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Sample records for pathogen load meeting

  1. Experimental Reservoirs of Human Pathogens: The Vibrio Cholerae Paradigm (7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Colwell, Rita

    2012-06-01

    Rita Colwell on "Experimental Reservoirs of Human Pathogens: The Vibrio cholerae paradigm" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  2. Experimental Reservoirs of Human Pathogens: The Vibrio Cholerae Paradigm (7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    Colwell, Rita [University of Maryland

    2016-07-12

    Rita Colwell on "Experimental Reservoirs of Human Pathogens: The Vibrio cholerae paradigm" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  3. Different associations of subscapular and triceps skinfold thicknesses with pathogen load: an ecogeographical analysis.

    PubMed

    Wells, Jonathan C K; Cortina-Borja, Mario

    2013-01-01

    The dominant evolutionary perspective on adipose tissue has considered it a relatively inert energy store. However, variability in adipose tissue distribution has recently been associated with age, parity, thermal environment and immune function. Genes regulating the innate immune system are more strongly expressed in deep-lying than peripheral adipose tissue. We hypothesized that central adiposity would correlate more strongly than peripheral adiposity with pathogen load across populations. Primary outcomes were subscapular and triceps skinfolds from 133 male and 106 female populations. National values for disability-adjusted life years lost, attributable to infectious diseases, were used to index pathogen load. Linear mixed-effects models were fitted, including a random effect term by country to investigate the association of each skinfold with pathogen load, adjusting for the other skinfold, mean annual temperature and clustering of the populations across countries. Adjusting for subscapular skinfold, triceps skinfold was not associated with pathogen load in either sex. Adjusting for triceps skinfold, subscapular skinfold was negatively associated with pathogen load in both sexes (P < 0.02). These associations were independent of variability in annual temperature. Adjusting for pathogen load and temperature, Oceanic populations had a different fat distribution compared to other populations. Across populations, higher pathogen load was associated with reduced central but not peripheral skinfolds, supporting the hypothesis that central adiposity is more closely associated with immune function. This scenario might explain why some populations increase disproportionately in central adiposity when the environment shifts from low-energy high-pathogen status to high-energy low-pathogen status. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Meeting report: Adaptation and communication of bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Aussel, Laurent; Beuzón, Carmen R; Cascales, Eric

    2016-05-18

    Bacteria usually live in complex environments, sharing niche and resources with other bacterial species, unicellular eukaryotic cells or complex organisms. Thus, they have evolved mechanisms to communicate, to compete and to adapt to changing environment as diverse as human tissues, animals or plants. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying these adaptation processes is therefore of primary importance for epidemiology and human health protection, and was the focus of a Current Trends in Biomedicine workshop organized by the International University of Andalucia in late October 2015 in Baeza (Spain). The topic was covered by complementary sessions: (i) interbacterial communication and competition that enable a better access to nutrients or a more efficient colonization of the ecological niche, (ii) adaptation of intracellular pathogens to their host, focusing on metabolic pathways, adaptive mechanisms and populational heterogeneity, and (iii) adaptation of animal and plant pathogens as well as plant-associated bacteria to a plant niche. This workshop emphasized the broad repertoire of mechanisms and factors bacteria have evolved to become efficient pathogens.

  5. Meeting report: Adaptation and communication of bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Aussel, Laurent; Beuzón, Carmen R.; Cascales, Eric

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteria usually live in complex environments, sharing niche and resources with other bacterial species, unicellular eukaryotic cells or complex organisms. Thus, they have evolved mechanisms to communicate, to compete and to adapt to changing environment as diverse as human tissues, animals or plants. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying these adaptation processes is therefore of primary importance for epidemiology and human health protection, and was the focus of a Current Trends in Biomedicine workshop organized by the International University of Andalucia in late October 2015 in Baeza (Spain). The topic was covered by complementary sessions: (i) interbacterial communication and competition that enable a better access to nutrients or a more efficient colonization of the ecological niche, (ii) adaptation of intracellular pathogens to their host, focusing on metabolic pathways, adaptive mechanisms and populational heterogeneity, and (iii) adaptation of animal and plant pathogens as well as plant-associated bacteria to a plant niche. This workshop emphasized the broad repertoire of mechanisms and factors bacteria have evolved to become efficient pathogens. PMID:26890494

  6. RapTOR: Automated sequencing library preparation and suppression for rapid pathogen characterization ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    Lane, Todd [SNL

    2016-07-12

    Todd Lane on "RapTOR: Automated sequencing library preparation and suppression for rapid pathogen characterization" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  7. RapTOR: Automated sequencing library preparation and suppression for rapid pathogen characterization ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, Todd

    2012-06-01

    Todd Lane on "RapTOR: Automated sequencing library preparation and suppression for rapid pathogen characterization" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  8. Meeting physical activity guidelines is associated with lower allostatic load and inflammation in Mexican Americans.

    PubMed

    Gay, Jennifer L; Salinas, Jennifer J; Buchner, David M; Mirza, Shaper; Kohl, Harold W; Fisher-Hoch, Susan P; McCormick, Joseph B

    2015-04-01

    Examine the relationship between physical activity (PA) and allostatic load in Mexican-Americans as well as variations by gender. Self-reported PA as well as cardiovascular, metabolic and inflammatory markers were assessed in 330 Mexican-American adults in the Cameron County Hispanic Cohort (Brownsville, TX, USA). Dependent variables included total allostatic load, blood pressure, metabolic, and inflammatory scores. PA participation was categorized as sedentary, low, moderate, high, and by whether activity was sufficient to meet public health guidelines. Logistic regression analyses were conducted using cross-sectional data, and tested interaction effects of gender and PA. High active participants had lower allostatic load and inflammatory risk than sedentary participants. These relationships held for meeting versus not meeting guidelines. Males meeting guidelines were less likely to have high inflammation than other groups. The data did not suggest a dose-response association. These findings indicate that PA may reduce accumulation of allostatic load, highlighting the importance of a physically active lifestyle across the life span.

  9. Grassland fires may favor native over introduced plants by reducing pathogen loads.

    PubMed

    Roy, Bitty A; Hudson, Kenneth; Visser, Matt; Johnson, Bart R

    2014-07-01

    Grasslands have been lost and degraded in the United States since Euro-American settlement due to agriculture, development, introduced invasive species, and changes in fire regimes. Fire is frequently used in prairie restoration to control invasion by trees and shrubs, but may have additional consequences. For example, fire might reduce damage by herbivore and pathogen enemies by eliminating litter, which harbors eggs and spores. Less obviously, fire might influence enemy loads differently for native and introduced plant hosts. We used a controlled burn in a Willamette Valley (Oregon) prairie to examine these questions. We expected that, without fire, introduced host plants should have less damage than native host plants because the introduced species are likely to have left many of their enemies behind when they were transported to their new range (the enemy release hypothesis, or ERH). If the ERH holds, then fire, which should temporarily reduce enemies on all species, should give an advantage to the natives because they should see greater total reduction in damage by enemies. Prior to the burn, we censused herbivore and pathogen attack on eight plant species (five of nonnative origin: Bromus hordaceous, Cynosuros echinatus, Galium divaricatum, Schedonorus arundinaceus (= Festuca arundinacea), and Sherardia arvensis; and three natives: Danthonia californica, Epilobium minutum, and Lomatium nudicale). The same plots were monitored for two years post-fire. Prior to the burn, native plants had more kinds of damage and more pathogen damage than introduced plants, consistent with the ERH. Fire reduced pathogen damage relative to the controls more for the native than the introduced species, but the effects on herbivory were negligible. Pathogen attack was correlated with plant reproductive fitness, whereas herbivory was not. These results suggest that fire may be useful for promoting some native plants in prairies due to its negative effects on their pathogens.

  10. Diet and Environment Shape Fecal Bacterial Microbiota Composition and Enteric Pathogen Load of Grizzly Bears

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Clarissa; Cristescu, Bogdan; Northrup, Joseph M.; Stenhouse, Gordon B.; Gänzle, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Background Diet and environment impact the composition of mammalian intestinal microbiota; dietary or health disturbances trigger alterations in intestinal microbiota composition and render the host susceptible to enteric pathogens. To date no long term monitoring data exist on the fecal microbiota and pathogen load of carnivores either in natural environments or in captivity. This study investigates fecal microbiota composition and the presence of pathogenic Escherichia coli and toxigenic clostridia in wild and captive grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) and relates these to food resources consumed by bears. Methodology/Principal Findings Feces were obtained from animals of two wild populations and from two captive animals during an active bear season. Wild animals consumed a diverse diet composed of plant material, animal prey and insects. Captive animals were fed a regular granulated diet with a supplement of fruits and vegetables. Bacterial populations were analyzed using quantitative PCR. Fecal microbiota composition fluctuated in wild and in captive animals. The abundance of Clostridium clusters I and XI, and of C. perfringens correlated to regular diet protein intake. Enteroaggregative E. coli were consistently present in all populations. The C. sordellii phospholipase C was identified in three samples of wild animals and for the first time in Ursids. Conclusion This is the first longitudinal study monitoring the fecal microbiota of wild carnivores and comparing it to that of captive individuals of the same species. Location and diet affected fecal bacterial populations as well as the presence of enteric pathogens. PMID:22194798

  11. Inactivation of bacterial pathogenic load in compost against vermicompost of organic solid waste aiming to achieve sanitation goals: A review.

    PubMed

    Soobhany, Nuhaa; Mohee, Romeela; Garg, Vinod Kumar

    2017-06-01

    Waste management strategies for organic residues, such as composting and vermicomposting, have been implemented in some developed and developing countries to solve the problem of organic solid waste (OSW). Yet, these biological treatment technologies do not always result in good quality compost or vermicompost with regards to sanitation capacity owing to the presence of bacterial pathogenic substances in objectionable concentrations. The presence of pathogens in soil conditioners poses a potential health hazard and their occurrence is of particular significance in composts and/or vermicomposts produced from organic materials. Past and present researches demonstrated a high-degree of agreement that various pathogens survive after the composting of certain OSW but whether similar changes in bacterial pathogenic loads arise during vermitechnology has not been thoroughly elucidated. This review garners information regarding the status of various pathogenic bacteria which survived or diffused after the composting process compared to the status of these pathogens after the vermicomposting of OSW with the aim of achieving sanitation goals. This work is also indispensable for the specification of compost quality guidelines concerning pathogen loads which would be specific to treatment technology. It was hypothesized that vermicomposting process for OSW can be efficacious in sustaining the existence of pathogenic organisms most specifically; human pathogens under safety levels. In summary, earthworms can be regarded as a way of obliterating pathogenic bacteria from OSW in a manner equivalent to earthworm gut transit mechanism which classifies vermicomposting as a promising sanitation technique in comparison to composting processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. 76 FR 2677 - Southern LNG Company, LLC; Notice of Public Scoping Meeting for the Proposed LNG Truck Loading...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-14

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Southern LNG Company, LLC; Notice of Public Scoping Meeting for the Proposed... will hold a public scoping meeting to obtain public input related to the environmental analysis of Southern LNG Company, LLC's (Southern) LNG Truck Loading Project. We scheduled this meeting to provide...

  13. Cefazolin loaded chitosan nanoparticles to cure multi drug resistant Gram-negative pathogens.

    PubMed

    Jamil, Bushra; Habib, Huma; Abbasi, Shahid; Nasir, Habib; Rahman, Abdur; Rehman, Asma; Bokhari, Habib; Imran, Muhammad

    2016-01-20

    Antibiotic resistance against Gram-negative microbes is considered as an alarming phenomenon that needs to be addressed urgently to develop better therapeutic solutions. The aim of the present research work was to investigate and develop cefazolin loaded chitosan nanoparticles (CSNPs) as a potential tool against multidrug resistant pathogens. Empty and drug loaded CSNPs were prepared by ionic gelation method. It was observed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based studies that CSNPs were less than 100 nm in size and displayed homogeneity both in shape and size. Encapsulation of cefazolin has not increased the size of nano systems. Zeta sizer results revealed that both systems have positive zeta potential of more or less +50 mV, thus contributing towards a stable formulation. Encapsulation efficiency was directly proportional to the increase in the concentration of antibiotic (28-62%). Furthermore, growth kinetics study had demonstrated excellent antimicrobial potential of cefazolin loaded CSNPs against multi drug resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeroginosa and Extended Spectrum Beta Lactamase (ESBL) positive Escherichia coli. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Prevalence and pathogen load estimates for the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis are impacted by ITS DNA copy number variation.

    PubMed

    Rebollar, Eria A; Woodhams, Douglas C; LaBumbard, Brandon; Kielgast, Jos; Harris, Reid N

    2017-03-21

    The ribosomal gene complex is a multi-copy region that is widely used for phylogenetic analyses of organisms from all 3 domains of life. In fungi, the copy number of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) is used to detect abundance of pathogens causing diseases such as chytridiomycosis in amphibians and white nose syndrome in bats. Chytridiomycosis is caused by the fungi Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) and B. salamandrivorans (Bsal), and is responsible for declines and extinctions of amphibians worldwide. Over a decade ago, a qPCR assay was developed to determine Bd prevalence and pathogen load. Here, we demonstrate the effect that ITS copy number variation in Bd strains can have on the estimation of prevalence and pathogen load. We used data sets from different amphibian species to simulate how ITS copy number affects prevalence and pathogen load. In addition, we tested 2 methods (gBlocks® synthetic standards and digital PCR) to determine ITS copy number in Bd strains. Our results show that assumptions about the ITS copy number can lead to under- or overestimation of Bd prevalence and pathogen load. The use of synthetic standards replicated previously published estimates of ITS copy number, whereas dPCR resulted in estimates that were consistently lower than previously published estimates. Standardizing methods will assist with comparison across studies and produce reliable estimates of prevalence and pathogen load in the wild, while using the same Bd strain for exposure experiments and zoospore standards in qPCR remains the best method for estimating parameters used in epidemiological studies.

  15. Inhibition of Bacterial Pathogens in Medium and on Spinach Leaf Surfaces using Plant-Derived Antimicrobials Loaded in Surfactant Micelles.

    PubMed

    Ruengvisesh, Songsirin; Loquercio, Andre; Castell-Perez, Elena; Taylor, T Matthew

    2015-11-01

    Encapsulation of hydrophobic plant essential oil components (EOC) into surfactant micelles can assist the decontamination of fresh produce surfaces from bacterial pathogens during postharvest washing. Loading of eugenol and carvacrol into surfactant micelles of polysorbate 20 (Tween 20), Surfynol® 485W, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and CytoGuard® LA 20 (CG20) was determined by identification of the EOC/surfactant-specific maximum additive concentration (MAC). Rheological behavior of dilute EOC-containing micelles was then tested to determine micelle tolerance to shearing. Antimicrobial efficacy of EOC micelles against Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serotype Saintpaul was first evaluated by the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC). Pathogen-inoculated spinach was treated with eugenol-containing micelles applied via spraying or immersion methods. SDS micelles produced the highest MACs for EOCs, while Tween 20 loaded the lowest amount of EOCs. Micelles demonstrated Newtonian behavior in response to shearing. SDS and CG20-derived micelles containing EOCs produced the lowest MICs and MBCs for pathogens. E. coli O157:H7 and S. Saintpaul were reduced on spinach surfaces by application of eugenol micelles, though no differences in numbers of surviving pathogens were observed when methods of antimicrobial micelle application (spraying, immersion) was compared (P ≥ 0.05). Data suggest eugenol in SDS and CG20 micelles may be useful for produce surface decontamination from bacterial pathogens during postharvest washing. Antimicrobial essential oil component (EOC)-containing micelles assist the delivery of natural food antimicrobials to food surfaces, including fresh produce, for decontamination of microbial foodborne pathogens. Antimicrobial EOC-loaded micelles were able to inhibit the enteric pathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Saintpaul in liquid medium and on spinach surfaces. However

  16. New Irradiation Method with Indocyanine Green-Loaded Nanospheres for Inactivating Periodontal Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Yasuyuki; Hayashi, Jun-ichiro; Fujimura, Takeki; Iwamura, Yuki; Yamamoto, Genta; Nishida, Eisaku; Ohno, Tasuku; Okada, Kosuke; Yamamoto, Hiromitsu; Kikuchi, Takeshi; Mitani, Akio; Fukuda, Mitsuo

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) has been proposed as an adjunctive strategy for periodontitis treatments. However, use of aPDT for periodontal treatment is complicated by the difficulty in accessing morphologically complex lesions such as furcation involvement, which the irradiation beam (which is targeted parallel to the tooth axis into the periodontal pocket) cannot access directly. The aim of this study was to validate a modified aPDT method that photosensitizes indocyanine green-loaded nanospheres through the gingivae from outside the pocket using a diode laser. To establish this trans-gingival irradiation method, we built an in vitro aPDT model using a substitution for gingivae. Irradiation conditions and the cooling method were optimized before the bactericidal effects on Porphyromonas gingivalis were investigated. The permeable energy through the gingival model at irradiation conditions of 2 W output power in a 50% duty cycle was comparable with the transmitted energy of conventional irradiation. Intermittent irradiation with air cooling limited the temperature increase in the gingival model to 2.75 °C. The aPDT group showed significant bactericidal effects, with reductions in colony-forming units of 99.99% after 5 min of irradiation. This effect of aPDT against a periodontal pathogen demonstrates the validity of trans-gingival irradiation for periodontal treatment. PMID:28098777

  17. Routine multidisciplinary cerebrovascular meetings do not reduce aneurysm clipping case load: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Davis, Brendan W; Stuart, Michael J; Jayapratap, Pravitha; Hall, Bruce I

    2016-07-01

    Structured multidisciplinary care is an increasingly popular tool in the management of many complex disease processes; however, there is little published data regarding the effects of such a process on management of intracranial aneurysms and neurosurgical case loads. There is some resistance in the neurosurgical community to routine involvement of interventional neuroradiologists in the care of patients with intracranial aneurysms due to concerns regarding maintenance of neurosurgical case loads and training capabilities. At our tertiary Australian hospital, we have implemented a weekly multidisciplinary cerebrovascular meeting (MDCVM) facilitating routine discussion of these cases between neurosurgeons and interventional neuroradiologists. This study identified management modalities for ruptured and unruptured cerebral aneurysms diagnosed at our centre for a 2-year period before and after the implementation of MDCVM culminating in a 4-year retrospective cohort study. The pre- and post-MDCVM cohorts were well matched for demographics with 162 and 224 patients, respectively. There is no significant difference in percentage or absolute numbers of endovascular or surgical cases in the pre-MDCVM (103; 73.0% versus 38; 27.0%, respectively) or post-MDCVM cohorts (105; 79.5% versus 27; 20.5%, respectively), reflecting a maintained surgical case load after the implementation of MDCVM (P = 0.21). There were no significant differences in any confounding variables including age, sex, aneurysm size/location, Fisher or World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies (WFNS) grade. Implementation of MDCVM did not impact on active management case loads with consistent numbers and percentages for both endovascular and microsurgical management. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  18. 76 FR 67439 - External Peer Review Meeting for Draft Microbial Risk Assessment Guideline: Pathogenic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-01

    ... Microorganisms With Focus on Food and Water AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice...: Pathogenic Microorganisms with Focus on Food and Water. EPA previously announced the release of the draft... Guideline: Pathogenic Microorganisms with Focus on Food and Water will be held on Monday, November 7,...

  19. Meeting current public health needs: optical biosensors for pathogen detection and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Minghui; Sapsford, Kim E.; Sergeev, Nikolay; Sun, Steven; Rasooly, Avraham

    2009-02-01

    Pathogen detection and analysis is critical for medicine, food safety, agriculture, public health and biosecurity. Many current microbial detection approaches are based on century-old culturing methods which, while reliable, are slow, provide relatively little information about the pathogens and are not adaptable to high throughput operations. Optical biodetection represents a potential alternative. Most ELISA and chromatography systems are based on optical methods that are also used for analysis of molecular interactions, such as DNA hybridization and protein-protein interactions (e.g. microarrays or SPR biosensors). Various optical biosensor platforms have been developed that have many of the characteristics essential for modern pathogen molecular analysis including sensitivity, speed of analysis, multi-channel capability, relative simplicity and low cost. Here we provide several examples of the use of optical biosensor technology for pathogen detection and analysis including high throughput DNA microarray analysis, SPR-based rapid direct detection of bacterial toxins, CCD-based fluorescent activity analysis of microbial toxins and a simple ECL-based CCD detection system. However, while effective for molecular analysis, most of these technologies are not as sensitive as traditional culturing methods for detecting microorganisms. There is a need to combine optical biosensors with traditional methods to speed culture-based detection and to provide more information regarding the pathogens.

  20. Factors Affecting Microbial Load and Profile of Potential Pathogens and Food Spoilage Bacteria from Household Kitchen Tables.

    PubMed

    Biranjia-Hurdoyal, Susheela; Latouche, Melissa Cathleen

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to study the bacterial load and isolate potential pathogens and food spoilage bacteria from kitchen tables, including preparation tables and dining tables. Methods. A total of 53 households gave their consent for participation. The samples were collected by swabbing over an area of 5 cm by 5 cm of the tables and processed for bacterial count which was read as colony forming units (CFU), followed by isolation and identification of potential pathogens and food spoilage bacteria. Result. Knowledge about hygiene was not always put into practice. Coliforms, Enterococcus spp., Pseudomonas spp., Proteus spp., and S. aureus were detected from both dining and preparation tables. The mean CFU and presence of potential pathogens were significantly affected by the hygienic practices of the main food handler of the house, materials of kitchen tables, use of plastic covers, time of sample collection, use of multipurpose sponges/towels for cleaning, and the use of preparation tables as chopping boards (p < 0.05). Conclusion. Kitchen tables could be very important source of potential pathogens and food spoilage bacteria causing foodborne diseases. Lack of hygiene was confirmed by presence of coliforms, S. aureus, and Enterococcus spp. The use of plastic covers, multipurpose sponges, and towels should be discouraged.

  1. Factors Affecting Microbial Load and Profile of Potential Pathogens and Food Spoilage Bacteria from Household Kitchen Tables

    PubMed Central

    Latouche, Melissa Cathleen

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to study the bacterial load and isolate potential pathogens and food spoilage bacteria from kitchen tables, including preparation tables and dining tables. Methods. A total of 53 households gave their consent for participation. The samples were collected by swabbing over an area of 5 cm by 5 cm of the tables and processed for bacterial count which was read as colony forming units (CFU), followed by isolation and identification of potential pathogens and food spoilage bacteria. Result. Knowledge about hygiene was not always put into practice. Coliforms, Enterococcus spp., Pseudomonas spp., Proteus spp., and S. aureus were detected from both dining and preparation tables. The mean CFU and presence of potential pathogens were significantly affected by the hygienic practices of the main food handler of the house, materials of kitchen tables, use of plastic covers, time of sample collection, use of multipurpose sponges/towels for cleaning, and the use of preparation tables as chopping boards (p < 0.05). Conclusion. Kitchen tables could be very important source of potential pathogens and food spoilage bacteria causing foodborne diseases. Lack of hygiene was confirmed by presence of coliforms, S. aureus, and Enterococcus spp. The use of plastic covers, multipurpose sponges, and towels should be discouraged. PMID:27446220

  2. Meeting the challenges of toxic microorganisms and pathogens: Implications for food safety and public health

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An interdisciplinary approach is needed to meet the longstanding and emerging challenges for protecting animals and humans from illnesses caused by feed- or food-borne microorganisms and their toxins. The reports in this special issue illustrate some components of a broad-based approach for charact...

  3. Mutation loads in different tissues from six pathogenic mtDNA point mutations.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, María M; Emperador, Sonia; Pineda, Mercè; López-Gallardo, Ester; Montero, Raquel; Yubero, Delia; Jou, Cristina; Jimenez-Mallebrera, Cecilia; Nascimento, Andrés; Ferrer, Isidre; García-Cazorla, Angels; Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo; Montoya, Julio; Artuch, Rafael

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we studied the mtDNA mutations m.3243A>G, m.3252A>G, m.15923A>G, m.13513G>A, m.8993T>G and m.9176T>C in the blood, urine and buccal mucosa of a cohort of 27 subjects. Urine cells had the highest mutation load for all of the mtDNA mutations studied. The mutation loads in the blood, urine and the buccal mucosa were significantly higher in the mitochondrial disorder group that manifested clinical signs than in the asymptomatic subjects. In conclusion, urine is a suitable biological sample for molecular diagnosis of mtDNA mutations and for the study of the attendant risk of recurrence in the offspring of asymptomatic mothers identified as non-carriers after mutation analysis in blood. Copyright © 2015 © Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Production of Organic Acids by Probiotic Lactobacilli Can Be Used to Reduce Pathogen Load in Poultry

    PubMed Central

    Neal-McKinney, Jason M.; Lu, Xiaonan; Duong, Tri; Larson, Charles L.; Call, Douglas R.; Shah, Devendra H.; Konkel, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    Probiotic Lactobacillus can be used to reduce the colonization of pathogenic bacteria in food animals, and therefore reduce the risk of foodborne illness to consumers. As a model system, we examined the mechanism of protection conferred by Lactobacillus species to inhibit C. jejuni growth in vitro and reduce colonization in broiler chickens. Possible mechanisms for the reduction of pathogens by lactobacilli include: 1) stimulation of adaptive immunity; 2) alteration of the cecal microbiome; and, 3) production of inhibitory metabolites, such as organic acids. The Lactobacillus species produced lactic acid at concentrations sufficient to kill C. jejuni in vitro. We determined that lactic acid produced by Lactobacillus disrupted the membrane of C. jejuni, as judged by biophotonics. The spectral features obtained using Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) and Raman spectroscopy techniques were used to accurately predict bacterial viability and differentiate C. jejuni samples according to lactic acid treatment. FT-IR spectral features of C. jejuni and Lactobacillus grown in co-culture revealed that the metabolism was dominated by Lactobacillus prior to the killing of C. jejuni. Based on our results, the development of future competitive exclusion strategies should include the evaluation of organic acid production. PMID:22962594

  5. Production of organic acids by probiotic lactobacilli can be used to reduce pathogen load in poultry.

    PubMed

    Neal-McKinney, Jason M; Lu, Xiaonan; Duong, Tri; Larson, Charles L; Call, Douglas R; Shah, Devendra H; Konkel, Michael E

    2012-01-01

    Probiotic Lactobacillus can be used to reduce the colonization of pathogenic bacteria in food animals, and therefore reduce the risk of foodborne illness to consumers. As a model system, we examined the mechanism of protection conferred by Lactobacillus species to inhibit C. jejuni growth in vitro and reduce colonization in broiler chickens. Possible mechanisms for the reduction of pathogens by lactobacilli include: 1) stimulation of adaptive immunity; 2) alteration of the cecal microbiome; and, 3) production of inhibitory metabolites, such as organic acids. The Lactobacillus species produced lactic acid at concentrations sufficient to kill C. jejuni in vitro. We determined that lactic acid produced by Lactobacillus disrupted the membrane of C. jejuni, as judged by biophotonics. The spectral features obtained using Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) and Raman spectroscopy techniques were used to accurately predict bacterial viability and differentiate C. jejuni samples according to lactic acid treatment. FT-IR spectral features of C. jejuni and Lactobacillus grown in co-culture revealed that the metabolism was dominated by Lactobacillus prior to the killing of C. jejuni. Based on our results, the development of future competitive exclusion strategies should include the evaluation of organic acid production.

  6. Direct effect of acaricides on pathogen loads and gene expression levels in honey bees Apis mellifera.

    PubMed

    Boncristiani, Humberto; Underwood, Robyn; Schwarz, Ryan; Evans, Jay D; Pettis, Jeffery; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis

    2012-05-01

    The effect of using acaricides to control varroa mites has long been a concern to the beekeeping industry due to unintended negative impacts on honey bee health. Irregular ontogenesis, suppression of immune defenses, and impairment of normal behavior have been linked to pesticide use. External stressors, including parasites and the pathogens they vector, can confound studies on the effects of pesticides on the metabolism of honey bees. This is the case of Varroa destructor, a mite that negatively affects honey bee health on many levels, from direct parasitism, which diminishes honey bee productivity, to vectoring and/or activating other pathogens, including many viruses. Here we present a gene expression profile comprising genes acting on diverse metabolic levels (detoxification, immunity, and development) in a honey bee population that lacks the influence of varroa mites. We present data for hives treated with five different acaricides; Apiguard (thymol), Apistan (tau-fluvalinate), Checkmite (coumaphos), Miteaway (formic acid) and ApiVar (amitraz). The results indicate that thymol, coumaphos and formic acid are able to alter some metabolic responses. These include detoxification gene expression pathways, components of the immune system responsible for cellular response and the c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway, and developmental genes. These could potentially interfere with the health of individual honey bees and entire colonies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Immediate/early loading of dental implants: a report from the Sociedad Española de Implantes World Congress consensus meeting in Barcelona, Spain, 2002.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Carlos; Rangert, Bo; Sennerby, Lars

    2003-01-01

    Immediate/early loading protocols are becoming frequently used in implant dentistry, but the prerequisites for achieving good results and the limitations of such protocols are not fully known. Moreover, the terminology used in immediate/early loading is still confusing. The purpose of this article is to present the outcome of a consensus meeting on immediate/early loading. A consensus meeting was organized during the Sociedad Española de Implantes World Congress in Barcelona on May 23, 2002, with the objective to present and discuss the experiences from immediate/early loading protocols in dental implant treatment. The purpose was also to discuss definitions of the terminology used in immediate/early loading. The consensus meeting agenda included presentations from invited experts, followed by a consensus discussion. A consensus statement was agreed on. Multiple independent investigators have demonstrated that immediate/early loading of implants is possible in many clinical situations; however, additional documentation is required.

  8. Egg white versus Salmonella Enteritidis! A harsh medium meets a resilient pathogen.

    PubMed

    Baron, Florence; Nau, Françoise; Guérin-Dubiard, Catherine; Bonnassie, Sylvie; Gautier, Michel; Andrews, Simon C; Jan, Sophie

    2016-02-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is the prevalent egg-product-related food-borne pathogen. The egg-contamination capacity of S. Enteritidis includes its exceptional survival capability within the harsh conditions provided by egg white. Egg white proteins, such as lysozyme and ovotransferrin, are well known to play important roles in defence against bacterial invaders. Indeed, several additional minor proteins and peptides have recently been found to play known or potential roles in protection against bacterial contamination. However, although such antibacterial proteins are well studied, little is known about their efficacy under the environmental conditions prevalent in egg white. Thus, the influence of factors such as temperature, alkalinity, nutrient restriction, viscosity and cooperative interactions on the activities of antibacterial proteins in egg white remains unclear. This review critically assesses the available evidence on the antimicrobial components of egg white. In addition, mechanisms employed by S. Enteritidis to resist egg white exposure are also considered along with various genetic studies that have shed light upon egg white resistance systems. We also consider how multiple, antibacterial proteins operate in association with specific environmental factors within egg white to generate a lethal protective cocktail that preserves sterility.

  9. Grazing management effects on sediment, phosphorus, and pathogen loading of streams in cool-season grass pastures.

    PubMed

    Schwarte, Kirk A; Russell, James R; Kovar, John L; Morrical, Daniel G; Ensley, Steven M; Yoon, Kyoung-Jin; Cornick, Nancy A; Cho, Yong Il

    2011-01-01

    Erosion and runoff from pastures may lead to degradation of surface water. A 2-yr grazing study was conducted to quantify the effects of grazing management on sediment, phosphorus (P), and pathogen loading of streams in cool-season grass pastures. Six adjoining 12.1-ha pastures bisected by a stream in central Iowa were divided into three treatments: continuous stocking with unrestricted stream access (CSU), continuous stocking with restricted stream access (CSR), and rotational stocking (RS). Rainfall simulations on stream banks resulted in greater ( < 0.10) proportions of applied precipitation and amounts of sediment and P transported in runoff from bare sites than from vegetated sites across grazing treatments. Similar differences were observed comparing vegetated sites in CSU and RS pastures with vegetated sites in CSR pastures. Bovine enterovirus was shed by an average of 24.3% of cows during the study period and was collected in the runoff of 8.3 and 16.7% of runoff simulations on bare sites in CSU pastures in June and October of 2008, respectively, and from 8.3% of runoff simulations on vegetated sites in CSU pastures in April 2009. Fecal pathogens (bovine coronavirus [BCV], bovine rotavirus group A, and O157:H7) shed or detected in runoff were almost nonexistent; only BCV was detected in feces of one cow in August of 2008. Erosion of cut-banks was the greatest contributor of sediment and P loading to the stream; contributions from surface runoff and grazing animals were considerably less and were minimized by grazing management practices that reduced congregation of cattle by pasture streams. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  10. Physical and antimicrobial properties of anise oil loaded nanoemulsions on the survival of foodborne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Topuz, Osman Kadir; Özvural, Emin Burçin; Zhao, Qin; Huang, Qingrong; Chikindas, Michael; Gölükçü, Muharrem

    2016-07-15

    The purpose of this research was to investigate antimicrobial effects of nano emulsions of anise oil (AO) on the survival of common food borne pathogens, Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli O157:H7. Series of emulsions containing different level of anise oil as potential antimicrobial delivery systems were prepared. Antimicrobial activities of bulk anise oil and its emulsions (coarse and nano) was tested by the minimum inhibitory concentration and time kill assay. Our results showed that bulk anise oil reduced the population of E. coli O157:H7 and L. monocytogenes by 1.48 and 0.47 log cfu/ml respectively after 6 h of contact time. However, under the same condition anise oil nanoemulsion (AO75) reduced E. coli O157:H7 and L. monocytogenes count by 2.51 and 1.64 log cfu/ml, respectively. Physicochemical and microbial analyses indicated that both nano and coarse emulsions of anise oil showed better and long-term physicochemical stability and antimicrobial activity compared to bulk anise oil. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Antibacterial Activity of Fructus forsythia Essential Oil and the Application of EO-Loaded Nanoparticles to Food-Borne Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Na; Gai, Qing-Yan; Jiao, Jiao; Wang, Wei; Zu, Yuan-Gang; Fu, Yu-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Fructus forsythia essential oil (FEO) with excellent antibacterial activity was rarely reported. The objective of the present study was to investigate the antibacterial activity and the antibacterial mechanism of FEO against two food-borne pathogenic bacteria, Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) in vitro. When treated FEO, the zones of inhibition (ZOI) of E. coli (20.5 ± 0.25 mm) and S. aureus (24.3 ± 0.21 mm) were much larger than control (p < 0.05). The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of FEO were 3.13 mg/mL and 1.56 mg/mL for E. coli and S. aureus, respectively. The antibacterial mechanism of FEO against E. coil was due to the changes in permeability and integrity of cell membrane leading to the leakage of nucleic acids and proteins. With the superior antibacterial activity of FEO, the nano-encapsulation method has been applied in FEO. When compared to FEO and blank chitosan nanoparticles, FEO-loaded nanoparticles (chitosan to FEO of 1:1) can effectively inhibit the growth of E. coil above 90% at room temperature. It is necessary to consider that FEO and FEO-loaded nanoparticles will become promising antibacterial additives for food preservative, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical applications. PMID:28231167

  12. 40 CFR 63.11088 - What requirements must I meet for gasoline loading racks if my facility is a bulk gasoline...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... gasoline loading racks if my facility is a bulk gasoline terminal, pipeline breakout station, or pipeline... CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Source Category: Gasoline... § 63.11088 What requirements must I meet for gasoline loading racks if my facility is a bulk gasoline...

  13. 40 CFR 63.11088 - What requirements must I meet for gasoline loading racks if my facility is a bulk gasoline...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... gasoline loading racks if my facility is a bulk gasoline terminal, pipeline breakout station, or pipeline... CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Source Category: Gasoline... § 63.11088 What requirements must I meet for gasoline loading racks if my facility is a bulk gasoline...

  14. 40 CFR 63.11088 - What requirements must I meet for gasoline loading racks if my facility is a bulk gasoline...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... gasoline loading racks if my facility is a bulk gasoline terminal, pipeline breakout station, or pipeline... CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Source Category: Gasoline... § 63.11088 What requirements must I meet for gasoline loading racks if my facility is a bulk gasoline...

  15. 40 CFR 63.11088 - What requirements must I meet for gasoline loading racks if my facility is a bulk gasoline...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... gasoline loading racks if my facility is a bulk gasoline terminal, pipeline breakout station, or pipeline... CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Source Category: Gasoline... § 63.11088 What requirements must I meet for gasoline loading racks if my facility is a bulk gasoline...

  16. Evaluation of the Control of Pathogen Load by an Anti-Salmonella Bacterium in a Herd of Cattle with Persistent Salmonella Infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Objective: To isolate an anti-Salmonella bacterium that may control pathogen load in persistently-infected cattle herds. Animals: 24 Holstein calves. Procedures: An Escherchia coli (designated as P8E5) that possesses anti-Salmonella activity was isolated from Salmonella negative bovine feces ob...

  17. Asymmetrical lower extremity loading after ACL reconstruction: more than meets the eye.

    PubMed

    Chmielewski, Terese L

    2011-06-01

    Sports fans know that movement patterns are important for athletic performance. Similarly, clinicians know that addressing abnormal movement patterns after an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is important for a successful return to sport. The kinematic (motion) component of movement patterns is more easily observed than the kinetic (forces) component, thus more commonly addressed in ACL reconstruction rehabilitation. Ignoring the kinetic component, though, could impede a successful return to sport. Asymmetrical lower extremity loading has been reported in a variety of activities following ACL reconstruction, and may contribute to both short- and long-term consequences. It is important that clinicians become aware of the potential for asymmetrical lower extremity loading to affect patient outcomes and for researchers to enlarge the body of knowledge.

  18. Simulating the Effect of Alternative Climate Change Scenarios on Pollutant Loading Reduction Requirements for Meeting Water Quality Standards Under USEPA's Total Maximum Daily Load Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gronewold, A. D.; Alameddine, I.; Anderson, R.; Wolpert, R.; Reckhow, K.

    2008-12-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) total maximum daily load (TMDL) program requires that individual states assess the condition of surface waters and identify those which fail to meet ambient water quality standards. Waters failing to meet those standards must have a TMDL assessment conducted to determine the maximum allowable pollutant load which can enter the water without violating water quality standards. While most of the nearly 30,000 TMDL assessments completed since 1995 use mechanistic or empirical water quality models to forecast water quality conditions under alternative pollutant loading reduction scenarios, few, if any, also simulate water quality conditions under alternative climate change scenarios. As a result, model-based loading reduction requirements (which serve as the cornerstone for implementing water resource management plans, and initiating environmental management infrastructure projects), believed to improve water quality in impaired waters and reinstate their designated use, may misrepresent the actual required reduction when future climate change scenarios are considered. For example, recent research indicates a potential long term future increase in both the number of days between, and the intensity of, individual precipitation events. In coastal terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, such climate conditions could lead to an increased accumulation of pollutants on the landscape between precipitation events, followed by a washoff event with a relatively high pollutant load. On the other hand, anticipated increases in average temperature and evaporation rate might not only reduce effective rainfall rates (resulting in less energy for transporting pollutants from the landscape) but also reduce the tidal exchange ratio in shallow estuaries (many of which are valuable recreational, commercial, and aesthetic natural resources). Here, we develop and apply a comprehensive watershed-scale model for simulating water quality in

  19. Concept for meeting the whole house heating load using a pulse combustion space heater

    SciTech Connect

    West, J.L.; Thrasher, W.H.; Brand, L.R.

    1985-08-01

    Documentation of a method to provide heat to an entire structure by means of an added pulse combustion space heating appliance installed in one room shows that a highly efficient space-heating appliance is an economically viable alternative. Case studies show the value of the approach and the problems associated with its use. Data show the fraction of the furnace load met by the space heater in the normal operating mode. Space heater effectiveness varies with room configurations. The study also found a higher degree of comfort with the combination of appliances than with the central furnace alone. 5 figures, 3 tables.

  20. Pathogen reduction co-benefits of nutrient best management practices

    PubMed Central

    Wainger, Lisa A.; Barber, Mary C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Many of the practices currently underway to reduce nitrogen, phosphorus, and sediment loads entering the Chesapeake Bay have also been observed to support reduction of disease-causing pathogen loadings. We quantify how implementation of these practices, proposed to meet the nutrient and sediment caps prescribed by the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL), could reduce pathogen loadings and provide public health co-benefits within the Chesapeake Bay system. Methods We used published data on the pathogen reduction potential of management practices and baseline fecal coliform loadings estimated as part of prior modeling to estimate the reduction in pathogen loadings to the mainstem Potomac River and Chesapeake Bay attributable to practices implemented as part of the TMDL. We then compare the estimates with the baseline loadings of fecal coliform loadings to estimate the total pathogen reduction potential of the TMDL. Results We estimate that the TMDL practices have the potential to decrease disease-causing pathogen loads from all point and non-point sources to the mainstem Potomac River and the entire Chesapeake Bay watershed by 19% and 27%, respectively. These numbers are likely to be underestimates due to data limitations that forced us to omit some practices from analysis. Discussion Based on known impairments and disease incidence rates, we conclude that efforts to reduce nutrients may create substantial health co-benefits by improving the safety of water-contact recreation and seafood consumption. PMID:27904807

  1. Pathogen reduction co-benefits of nutrient best management practices.

    PubMed

    Richkus, Jennifer; Wainger, Lisa A; Barber, Mary C

    2016-01-01

    Many of the practices currently underway to reduce nitrogen, phosphorus, and sediment loads entering the Chesapeake Bay have also been observed to support reduction of disease-causing pathogen loadings. We quantify how implementation of these practices, proposed to meet the nutrient and sediment caps prescribed by the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL), could reduce pathogen loadings and provide public health co-benefits within the Chesapeake Bay system. We used published data on the pathogen reduction potential of management practices and baseline fecal coliform loadings estimated as part of prior modeling to estimate the reduction in pathogen loadings to the mainstem Potomac River and Chesapeake Bay attributable to practices implemented as part of the TMDL. We then compare the estimates with the baseline loadings of fecal coliform loadings to estimate the total pathogen reduction potential of the TMDL. We estimate that the TMDL practices have the potential to decrease disease-causing pathogen loads from all point and non-point sources to the mainstem Potomac River and the entire Chesapeake Bay watershed by 19% and 27%, respectively. These numbers are likely to be underestimates due to data limitations that forced us to omit some practices from analysis. Based on known impairments and disease incidence rates, we conclude that efforts to reduce nutrients may create substantial health co-benefits by improving the safety of water-contact recreation and seafood consumption.

  2. Pathogen Loading From Canada Geese Faeces in Freshwater: Potential Risks to Human Health Through Recreational Water Exposure.

    PubMed

    Gorham, T J; Lee, J

    2016-05-01

    Canada geese (Branta canadensis) faeces have been shown to contain pathogenic protozoa and bacteria in numerous studies over the past 15 years. Further, increases in both the Canada geese populations and their ideal habitat requirements in the United States (US) translate to a greater presence of these human pathogens in public areas, such as recreational freshwater beaches. Combining these factors, the potential health risk posed by Canada geese faeces at freshwater beaches presents an emerging public health issue that warrants further study. Here, literature concerning human pathogens in Canada geese faeces is reviewed and the potential impacts these pathogens may have on human health are discussed. Pathogens of potential concern include Campylobacter jejuni, Salmonella Typhimurium, Listeria monocytogenes, Helicobacter canadensis, Arcobacter spp., Enterohemorragic Escherichia coli pathogenic strains, Chlamydia psitacci, Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia lamblia. Scenarios presenting potential exposure to pathogens eluted from faeces include bathers swimming in lakes, children playing with wet and dry sand impacted by geese droppings and other common recreational activities associated with public beaches. Recent recreational water-associated disease outbreaks in the US support the plausibility for some of these pathogens, including Cryptosporidium spp. and C. jejuni, to cause human illness in this setting. In view of these findings and the uncertainties associated with the real health risk posed by Canada geese faecal pathogens to users of freshwater lakes, it is recommended that beach managers use microbial source tracking and conduct a quantitative microbial risk assessment to analyse the local impact of Canada geese on microbial water quality during their decision-making process in beach and watershed management. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  3. Modulation of CD4+ T Cell-Dependent Specific Cytotoxic CD8+ T Cells Differentiation and Proliferation by the Timing of Increase in the Pathogen Load

    PubMed Central

    Tzelepis, Fanny; Persechini, Pedro M.; Rodrigues, Mauricio M.

    2007-01-01

    Background Following infection with viruses, bacteria or protozoan parasites, naïve antigen-specific CD8+ T cells undergo a process of differentiation and proliferation to generate effector cells. Recent evidences suggest that the timing of generation of specific effector CD8+ T cells varies widely according to different pathogens. We hypothesized that the timing of increase in the pathogen load could be a critical parameter governing this process. Methodology/Principal Findings Using increasing doses of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi to infect C57BL/6 mice, we observed a significant acceleration in the timing of parasitemia without an increase in mouse susceptibility. In contrast, in CD8 deficient mice, we observed an inverse relationship between the parasite inoculum and the timing of death. These results suggest that in normal mice CD8+ T cells became protective earlier, following the accelerated development of parasitemia. The evaluation of specific cytotoxic responses in vivo to three distinct epitopes revealed that increasing the parasite inoculum hastened the expansion of specific CD8+ cytotoxic T cells following infection. The differentiation and expansion of T. cruzi-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T cells is in fact dependent on parasite multiplication, as radiation-attenuated parasites were unable to activate these cells. We also observed that, in contrast to most pathogens, the activation process of T. cruzi-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T cells was dependent on MHC class II restricted CD4+ T cells. Conclusions/Significance Our results are compatible with our initial hypothesis that the timing of increase in the pathogen load can be a critical parameter governing the kinetics of CD4+ T cell-dependent expansion of pathogen-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T cells. PMID:17460760

  4. Modulation of CD4(+) T cell-dependent specific cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells differentiation and proliferation by the timing of increase in the pathogen load.

    PubMed

    Tzelepis, Fanny; Persechini, Pedro M; Rodrigues, Mauricio M

    2007-04-25

    Following infection with viruses, bacteria or protozoan parasites, naïve antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells undergo a process of differentiation and proliferation to generate effector cells. Recent evidences suggest that the timing of generation of specific effector CD8(+) T cells varies widely according to different pathogens. We hypothesized that the timing of increase in the pathogen load could be a critical parameter governing this process. Using increasing doses of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi to infect C57BL/6 mice, we observed a significant acceleration in the timing of parasitemia without an increase in mouse susceptibility. In contrast, in CD8 deficient mice, we observed an inverse relationship between the parasite inoculum and the timing of death. These results suggest that in normal mice CD8(+) T cells became protective earlier, following the accelerated development of parasitemia. The evaluation of specific cytotoxic responses in vivo to three distinct epitopes revealed that increasing the parasite inoculum hastened the expansion of specific CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells following infection. The differentiation and expansion of T. cruzi-specific CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells is in fact dependent on parasite multiplication, as radiation-attenuated parasites were unable to activate these cells. We also observed that, in contrast to most pathogens, the activation process of T. cruzi-specific CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells was dependent on MHC class II restricted CD4(+) T cells. Our results are compatible with our initial hypothesis that the timing of increase in the pathogen load can be a critical parameter governing the kinetics of CD4(+) T cell-dependent expansion of pathogen-specific CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells.

  5. The Red Death Meets the Abdominal Bristle: Polygenic Mutation for Susceptibility to a Bacterial Pathogen in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Etienne, Veronique; Andersen, Erik C.; Ponciano, José Miguel; Blanton, Dustin; Cadavid, Analucia; Joyner-Matos, Joanna; Matsuba, Chikako; Tabman, Brandon; Baer, Charles F.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the genetic basis of susceptibility to pathogens is an important goal of medicine and of evolutionary biology. A key first step toward understanding the genetics and evolution of any phenotypic trait is characterizing the role of mutation. However, the rate at which mutation introduces genetic variance for pathogen susceptibility in any organism is essentially unknown. Here we quantify the per-generation input of genetic variance by mutation (VM) for susceptibility of Caenorhabditis elegans to the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa (defined as the median time of death, LT50). VM for LT50 is slightly less than VM for a variety of life-history and morphological traits in this strain of C. elegans, but is well within the range of reported values in a variety of organisms. Mean LT50 did not change significantly over 250 generations of mutation accumulation. Comparison of VM to the standing genetic variance (VG) implies a strength of selection against new mutations of a few tenths of a percent. These results suggest that the substantial standing genetic variation for susceptibility of C. elegans to P. aeruginosa can be explained by polygenic mutation coupled with purifying selection. PMID:25495240

  6. Biofilm prevention of gram-negative bacterial pathogens involved in periprosthetic infection by antibiotic-loaded calcium sulfate beads in vitro.

    PubMed

    Howlin, Robert P; Winnard, Christopher; Frapwell, Connor J; Webb, Jeremy S; Cooper, John J; Aiken, Sean S; Stoodley, Paul

    2016-12-02

    Biofilm formation represents a key stage in the pathogenesis of prosthetic infections (PIs). More tolerant to antibiotics than their planktonic counterparts, biofilm bacteria are difficult to eradicate using conventional therapeutic regimes. A common approach in PI management is the adjunctive use of localised antibiotics in addition to systemic administration in an attempt to protect the implant from colonisation by infiltrating bacteria. This study evaluates the antibacterial and antibiofilm efficacy of antibiotic-loaded dissolvable calcium sulphate, previously shown to be effective against key gram-positive pathogens, against gram-negative species important in the establishment of chronic infection in PIs. Synthetic calcium sulfate beads loaded with tobramycin, vancomycin and both antibiotics in combination were assessed for their ability to eradicate planktonic Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae strains. The efficacy of the beads in preventing biofilm formation and eliminating established biofilms over multiple days was evaluated using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CSLM) imaging combined with image analysis and viable cell counts. Beads loaded with antibiotics demonstrated effective eluting concentrations for up to 37 d depending on the bacterial strain. In the presence of repeated bacterial challenges, antibiotic-loaded beads prevented bacterial colonisation and significantly reduce biofilm formation for the duration of the assay (7 d). Complete eradication of established biofilms was more difficult with evidence of biofilm regrowth after 1 week of contact with antibiotic-loaded beads, despite data suggesting a complete kill was achieved at earlier timepoints of 24 h and 72 h in the case of K. pneumoniae and P. aeruginosa. This study provides further evidence that calcium sulfate beads loaded with vancomycin and tobramycin may be a useful adjunctive component to the successful management of PIs.

  7. Monitoring to assess progress toward meeting the total maximum daily load for phosphorus in the Assabet River, Massachusetts: phosphorus loads, 2008 through 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zimmerman, Marc J.; Savoie, Jennifer G.

    2013-01-01

    Wastewater discharges to the Assabet River contribute substantial amounts of phosphorus, which support accumulations of nuisance aquatic plants that are most evident in the river’s impounded reaches during the growing season. To restore the Assabet River’s water quality and aesthetics, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency required the major wastewater-treatment plants in the drainage basin to reduce the amount of phosphorus discharged to the river by 2012. From October 2008 to December 2010, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection and in support of the requirements of the Total Maximum Daily Load for Phosphorus, collected weekly flow-proportional, composite samples for analysis of concentrations of total phosphorus and orthophosphorus upstream and downstream from each of the Assabet River’s two largest impoundments: Hudson and Ben Smith. The purpose of this monitoring effort was to evaluate conditions in the river before enhanced treatment-plant technologies had effected reductions in phosphorus loads, thereby defining baseline conditions for comparison with conditions following the mandated load reductions. The locations of sampling sites with respect to the impoundments enabled examination of the impoundments’ effects on phosphorus sequestration and on the transformation of phosphorus between particulate and dissolved forms. The study evaluated the differences between loads upstream and downstream from the impoundments throughout the sampling period and compared differences during two seasonal periods of relevance to aquatic plants: April 1 through October 31, the growing season, and November 1 through March 31, the nongrowing season, when existing permit limits allowed average monthly wastewater-treatment-plant-effluent concentrations of 0.75 milligram per liter (growing season) or 1.0 milligram per liter (nongrowing season) for total phosphorus. At the four sampling sites during the

  8. In vitro responses of chicken macrophage-like monocytes following exposure to pathogenic and non-pathogenic E. coli ghosts loaded with a rational design of conserved genetic materials of influenza and Newcastle disease viruses.

    PubMed

    Lagzian, Milad; Bassami, Mohammad Reza; Dehghani, Hesam

    2016-08-01

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) are two important viral diseases in the poultry industry. Therefore, new disease-fighting strategies, especially effective genetic vaccination, are in high demand. Bacterial Ghost (BG) is a promising platform for delivering genetic materials to macrophages, cells that are among the first to encounter these viruses. However, there is no investigation on the immune response of these macrophage-targeted treatments. Here, we investigated the effect of genetic materials of AIV and NDV on the gene expression profile of important pro-inflammatory cytokines, a chemokine, a transcription factor, major histocompatibility complexes, and the viability of the chicken macrophage-like monocyte cells (CMM). Our genetic construct contained the external domain of matrix protein 2 and nucleoprotein gene of AIV, and immunodominant epitopes of fusion and hemagglutinin-neuraminidase proteins of NDV (hereinafter referred to as pAIV-Vax), delivered via the pathogenic and non-pathogenic BGs (Escherichia coli O78K80 and E. coli TOP10 respectively). The results demonstrated that both types of BGs were able to efficiently deliver the construct to the CMM, although the pathogenic strain derived BG was a significantly better stimulant and delivery vehicle. Both BGs were safe regarding LPS toxicity and did not induce any cell death. Furthermore, the loaded BGs were more powerful in modulating the pro-inflammatory cytokines' responses and antigen presentation systems in comparison to the unloaded BGs. Nitric oxide production of the BG-stimulated cells was also comparable to those challenged by the live bacteria. According to the results, the combination of pAIV-Vax construct and E. coli O78K80 BG is promising in inducing a considerable innate and adaptive immune response against AIV-NDV and perhaps the pathogenic E. coli, provided that the current combination be a potential candidate for in vivo testing regarding the development of an

  9. Comparative proteomic analysis of two pathogenic Tritrichomonas foetus genotypes: there is more to the proteome than meets the eye.

    PubMed

    Stroud, Leah J; Šlapeta, Jan; Padula, Matthew P; Druery, Dylan; Tsiotsioras, George; Coorssen, Jens R; Stack, Colin M

    2017-03-01

    Certain clinical isolates of Tritrichomonas foetus infect the urogenital tract of cattle while others infect the gastrointestinal tract of cats. Previous studies have identified subtle genetic differences between these isolates with the term "genotype" adopted to reflect host origin. The aim of this work was to seek evidence of host-specific adaptation and to clarify the relationship between T. foetus genotypes. To do this we characterised the proteomes of both genotypes using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) coupled with LC-MS/MS. Our comparative analysis of the data revealed that both genotypes exhibited largely similar proteoform profiles; however differentiation was possible with 24 spots identified as having a four-fold or greater change. Deeper analysis using 2DE zymography and protease-specific fluorogenic substrates revealed marked differences in cysteine protease (CP) expression profiles between the two genotypes. These variances in CP activities could also account for the pathogenic and histopathological differences previously observed between T. foetus genotypes in cross-infection studies. Our findings highlight the importance of CPs as major determinants of parasite virulence and provide a foundation for future host-parasite interaction studies, with direct implications for the development of vaccines or drugs targeting T. foetus.

  10. Generation of functional HLA-DR*1101 tetramers receptive for loading with pathogen or tumour derived synthetic peptides

    PubMed Central

    Moro, Monica; Cecconi, Virginia; Martinoli, Chiara; Dallegno, Eliana; Giabbai, Barbara; Degano, Massimo; Glaichenhaus, Nicholas; Protti, Maria Pia; Dellabona, Paolo; Casorati, Giulia

    2005-01-01

    Background MHC class I-peptide tetramers are currently utilised to characterize CD8+ T cell responses at single cell level. The generation and use of MHC class II tetramers to study antigen-specific CD4+ T cells appears less straightforward. Most MHC class II tetramers are produced with a homogeneously built-in peptide, reducing greatly their flexibility of use. We attempted the generation of "empty" functional HLA-DR*1101 tetramers, receptive for loading with synthetic peptides by incubation. No such reagent is in fact available for this HLA-DR allele, one of the most frequent in the Caucasian population. Results We compared soluble MHC class II-immunoglobulin fusion proteins (HLA-DR*1101-Ig) with soluble MHC class II protein fused with an optimised Bir site for enzymatic biotynilation (HLA-DR*1101-Bir), both produced in insect cells. The molecules were multimerised by binding fluorochrome-protein A or fluorochrome-streptavidin, respectively. We find that HLA-DR*1101-Bir molecules are superior to the HLA-DR*1101-Ig ones both in biochemical and functional terms. HLA-DR*1101-Bir molecules can be pulsed with at least three different promiscuous peptide epitopes, derived from Tetanus Toxoid, influenza HA and the tumour associated antigen MAGE-3 respectively, to stain specific CD4+ T cells. Both staining temperature and activation state of CD4+ T cells are critical for the binding of peptide-pulsed HLA-DR*1101-Bir to the cognate TCR. Conclusion It is therefore possible to generate a soluble recombinant HLA-DR*1101 backbone that is receptive for loading with different peptides to stain specific CD4+ T cells. As shown for other HLA-DR alleles, we confirm that not all the strategies to produce soluble HLA-DR*1101 multimers are equivalent. PMID:16329759

  11. Novel approach of using a cocktail of designed bacteriophages against gut pathogenic E. coli for bacterial load biocontrol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study was conducted to explore new approaches of animal biocontrol via biological control feed. Method White rats were subjected to 140 highly lytic designed phages specific against E. coli. Phages were fed via drinking water, oral injection, and vegetable capsules. Phage feeding was applied by 24 h feeding with 11d monitoring and 20d phage feeding and monitoring. Group of rats received external pathogenic E. coli and another group did not, namely groups A and B. Results Phage feeding for 20d via vegetable capsules yielded the highest reduction of fecal E. coli, 3.02 and 4.62 log, in rats group A and B respectively. Second best, feeding for 20d via drinking water with alkali yielded 2.78 and 4.08 log in rats groups A and B respectively. The peak reduction in E. coli output was 5–10 d after phage feeding. Phage control declined after 10th day of feeding. Conclusions The use of cocktail of designed phages succeeded in suppressing flora or external E. coli. The phage feed biocontrol is efficient in controlling E. coli at the pre-harvest period, precisely at the 6th-8th day of phage feeding when the lowest E. coli output found. PMID:25062829

  12. Information technology and innovative drainage management practices for selenium load reduction from irrigated agriculture to provide stakeholder assurances and meet contaminant mass loading policy objectives

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, N.W.T.

    2009-10-15

    Many perceive the implementation of environmental regulatory policy, especially concerning non-point source pollution from irrigated agriculture, as being less efficient in the United States than in many other countries. This is partly a result of the stakeholder involvement process but is also a reflection of the inability to make effective use of Environmental Decision Support Systems (EDSS) to facilitate technical information exchange with stakeholders and to provide a forum for innovative ideas for controlling non-point source pollutant loading. This paper describes one of the success stories where a standardized Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) methodology was modified to better suit regulation of a trace element in agricultural subsurface drainage and information technology was developed to help guide stakeholders, provide assurances to the public and encourage innovation while improving compliance with State water quality objectives. The geographic focus of the paper is the western San Joaquin Valley where, in 1985, evapoconcentration of selenium in agricultural subsurface drainage water, diverted into large ponds within a federal wildlife refuge, caused teratogenecity in waterfowl embryos and in other sensitive wildlife species. The fallout from this environmental disaster was a concerted attempt by State and Federal water agencies to regulate non-point source loads of the trace element selenium. The complexity of selenium hydrogeochemistry, the difficulty and expense of selenium concentration monitoring and political discord between agricultural and environmental interests created challenges to the regulation process. Innovative policy and institutional constructs, supported by environmental monitoring and the web-based data management and dissemination systems, provided essential decision support, created opportunities for adaptive management and ultimately contributed to project success. The paper provides a retrospective on the contentious planning

  13. Evaluation of a Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay for Detecting Major Bacterial Enteric Pathogens in Fecal Specimens: Intestinal Inflammation and Bacterial Load Are Correlated in Campylobacter Infections

    PubMed Central

    Wohlwend, Nadia; Tiermann, Sacha; Risch, Lorenz; Risch, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A total of 1,056 native or Cary-Blair-preserved stool specimens were simultaneously tested by conventional stool culturing and by enteric bacterial panel (EBP) multiplex real-time PCR for Campylobacter jejuni, Campylobacter coli, Salmonella spp., and shigellosis disease-causing agents (Shigella spp. and enteroinvasive Escherichia coli [EIEC]). Overall, 143 (13.5%) specimens tested positive by PCR for the targets named above; 3 coinfections and 109 (10.4%) Campylobacter spp., 17 (1.6%) Salmonella spp., and 20 (1.9%) Shigella spp./EIEC infections were detected. The respective positive stool culture rates were 75 (7.1%), 14 (1.3%), and 7 (0.7%). The median threshold cycle (CT) values of culture-positive specimens were significantly lower than those of culture-negative ones (CT values, 24.3 versus 28.7; P < 0.001), indicating that the relative bacterial load per fecal specimen was significantly associated with the culture results. In Campylobacter infections, the respective median fecal calprotectin concentrations in PCR-negative/culture-negative (n = 40), PCR-positive/culture-negative (n = 14), and PCR-positive/culture-positive (n = 15) specimens were 134 mg/kg (interquartile range [IQR], 30 to 1,374 mg/kg), 1,913 mg/kg (IQR, 165 to 3,813 mg/kg), and 5,327 mg/kg (IQR, 1,836 to 18,213 mg/kg). Significant differences were observed among the three groups (P < 0.001), and a significant linear trend was identified (P < 0.001). Furthermore, the fecal calprotectin concentrations and CT values were found to be correlated (r = −0.658). Our results demonstrate that molecular screening of Campylobacter spp., Salmonella spp., and Shigella spp./EIEC using the BD Max EBP assay will result in timely diagnosis and improved sensitivity. The determination of inflammatory markers, such as calprotectin, in fecal specimens may aid in the interpretation of PCR results, particularly for enteric pathogens associated with mucosal damage and colonic inflammation. PMID:27307458

  14. Evaluation of a Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay for Detecting Major Bacterial Enteric Pathogens in Fecal Specimens: Intestinal Inflammation and Bacterial Load Are Correlated in Campylobacter Infections.

    PubMed

    Wohlwend, Nadia; Tiermann, Sacha; Risch, Lorenz; Risch, Martin; Bodmer, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    A total of 1,056 native or Cary-Blair-preserved stool specimens were simultaneously tested by conventional stool culturing and by enteric bacterial panel (EBP) multiplex real-time PCR for Campylobacter jejuni, Campylobacter coli, Salmonella spp., and shigellosis disease-causing agents (Shigella spp. and enteroinvasive Escherichia coli [EIEC]). Overall, 143 (13.5%) specimens tested positive by PCR for the targets named above; 3 coinfections and 109 (10.4%) Campylobacter spp., 17 (1.6%) Salmonella spp., and 20 (1.9%) Shigella spp./EIEC infections were detected. The respective positive stool culture rates were 75 (7.1%), 14 (1.3%), and 7 (0.7%). The median threshold cycle (CT) values of culture-positive specimens were significantly lower than those of culture-negative ones (CT values, 24.3 versus 28.7; P < 0.001), indicating that the relative bacterial load per fecal specimen was significantly associated with the culture results. In Campylobacter infections, the respective median fecal calprotectin concentrations in PCR-negative/culture-negative (n = 40), PCR-positive/culture-negative (n = 14), and PCR-positive/culture-positive (n = 15) specimens were 134 mg/kg (interquartile range [IQR], 30 to 1,374 mg/kg), 1,913 mg/kg (IQR, 165 to 3,813 mg/kg), and 5,327 mg/kg (IQR, 1,836 to 18,213 mg/kg). Significant differences were observed among the three groups (P < 0.001), and a significant linear trend was identified (P < 0.001). Furthermore, the fecal calprotectin concentrations and CT values were found to be correlated (r = -0.658). Our results demonstrate that molecular screening of Campylobacter spp., Salmonella spp., and Shigella spp./EIEC using the BD Max EBP assay will result in timely diagnosis and improved sensitivity. The determination of inflammatory markers, such as calprotectin, in fecal specimens may aid in the interpretation of PCR results, particularly for enteric pathogens associated with mucosal damage and colonic inflammation.

  15. The current state of knowledge on the interaction of Escherichia coli within vegetative filter strips as a sustainable best management practice to reduce fecal pathogen loading into surface waters.

    PubMed

    Olilo, Casianes Owino; Muia, Anastasia Wairimu; Moturi, Wilkister Nyaora; Onyando, Japhet Ogalo; Amber, Ford Roegner

    2016-08-01

    Agro-pastoral operations have the potential to threaten public health with loading of diverse pathogens into surface waters through overland flow; increasing awareness of the limitations of fecal indicators has led to development of a number of advancements in detection, source tracking and predictive modeling of public health risk. These tools and techniques are beginning to be integrated into management strategies. The objective of this review was to determine the status of current knowledge and challenges of the fate and transport of Escherichia coli in overland flow and their interaction within vegetative filter strip (VFS) as one of these implemented best management practices and to critically evaluate its use in that setting as an indicator organism. With few studies directly focusing on VFS removal of E. coli from overland flow, we critically evaluated the available data on movement of E. coil from fecal source loading to retention and decay or re-release for potential contamination of water ways and pointed out potential limitations in both pathogen-specific removal and its use as an indicator organisms within overland flow and VFS. Critical areas of focus for future studies to reduce gaps in knowledge were identified, and the integration of newer approaches in source tracking, alternative indicators and the use of non-pathogenic surrogates for field testing of existing VFS models was encouraged. With VFS as a growing field of interest as an economical conservation practice and as an avenue for conservation of resources for small-scale agro-pastoral operations, management strategies to reduce initial fecal load from either applied manure constituents or shedding from free-range animals will continue to test the limits in the applications of models to overland flow and VFS management strategies. Further studies at the microscale in understanding discrepancies between low and high pathogenicity strains of E. coil and between E. coil and other fecal pathogens

  16. The current state of knowledge on the interaction of Escherichia coli within vegetative filter strips as a sustainable best management practice to reduce fecal pathogen loading into surface waters

    PubMed Central

    Olilo, Casianes Owino; Muia, Anastasia Wairimu; Moturi, Wilkister Nyaora; Onyando, Japhet Ogalo; Amber, Ford Roegner

    2016-01-01

    Agro-pastoral operations have the potential to threaten public health with loading of diverse pathogens into surface waters through overland flow; increasing awareness of the limitations of fecal indicators has led to development of a number of advancements in detection, source tracking and predictive modeling of public health risk. These tools and techniques are beginning to be integrated into management strategies. The objective of this review was to determine the status of current knowledge and challenges of the fate and transport of Escherichia coli in overland flow and their interaction within vegetative filter strip (VFS) as one of these implemented best management practices and to critically evaluate its use in that setting as an indicator organism. With few studies directly focusing on VFS removal of E. coli from overland flow, we critically evaluated the available data on movement of E. coil from fecal source loading to retention and decay or re-release for potential contamination of water ways and pointed out potential limitations in both pathogen-specific removal and its use as an indicator organisms within overland flow and VFS. Critical areas of focus for future studies to reduce gaps in knowledge were identified, and the integration of newer approaches in source tracking, alternative indicators and the use of non-pathogenic surrogates for field testing of existing VFS models was encouraged. With VFS as a growing field of interest as an economical conservation practice and as an avenue for conservation of resources for small-scale agro-pastoral operations, management strategies to reduce initial fecal load from either applied manure constituents or shedding from free-range animals will continue to test the limits in the applications of models to overland flow and VFS management strategies. Further studies at the microscale in understanding discrepancies between low and high pathogenicity strains of E. coil and between E. coil and other fecal pathogens

  17. High load of multi-drug resistant nosocomial neonatal pathogens carried by cockroaches in a neonatal intensive care unit at Tikur Anbessa specialized hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cockroaches have been described as potential vectors for various pathogens for decades; although studies from neonatal intensive care units are scarce. This study assessed the vector potential of cockroaches (identified as Blatella germanica) in a neonatal intensive care unit setup in Tikur Anbessa Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Methods A total of 400 Blatella germanica roaches were aseptically collected for five consecutive months. Standard laboratory procedures were used to process the samples. Results From the external and gut homogenates, Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Citrobacter spp. Enterobacter cloacae, Citrobacter diversus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Providencia rettgeri, Klebsiella ozaenae, Enterobacter aeruginosa, Salmonella C1, Non Group A streptococcus, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter spp. and Shigella flexneri were isolated. Multi-drug resistance was seen in all organisms. Resistance to up to all the 12 antimicrobials tested was observed in different pathogens. Conclusion Cockroaches could play a vector role for nosocomial infections in a neonatal intensive care unit and environmental control measures of these vectors is required to reduce the risk of infection. A high level of drug resistance pattern of the isolated pathogens was demonstrated. PMID:22958880

  18. When green and red mycology meet: Impressions from an interdisciplinary forum on virulence mechanisms of phyto- and human-pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yidong; Hube, Bernhard; Kämper, Jörg; Meyer, Vera; Krappmann, Sven

    2017-07-19

    Fungal infections pose a constant threat to plants and humans, but detailed knowledge about pathogenesis, immunity, or virulence is rather scarce. Due to the fact that a certain overlap in the armoury of infection exists between plant- and human-pathogenic fungi, an interdisciplinary forum was held in October 2016 at the Institute for Clinical Microbiology, Immunology and Hygiene in Erlangen under the organisational umbrella from two special interest groups of German microbial societies. Scientific exchange and intense discussion of this timely topic was fostered by bringing together renowned experts in their respective fields to present their thoughts and recent findings in the course of a plenary lecture and six themed sessions, accompanied by oral and poster contributions of young researchers. By targeting the topic of fungal virulence mechanisms from various angles and in the context of plant and human hosts, some common grounds and exciting perspectives could be deduced during this vibrant scientific event.

  19. When Genome-Based Approach Meets the “Old but Good”: Revealing Genes Involved in the Antibacterial Activity of Pseudomonas sp. P482 against Soft Rot Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Krzyżanowska, Dorota M.; Ossowicki, Adam; Rajewska, Magdalena; Maciąg, Tomasz; Jabłońska, Magdalena; Obuchowski, Michał; Heeb, Stephan; Jafra, Sylwia

    2016-01-01

    Dickeya solani and Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. brasiliense are recently established species of bacterial plant pathogens causing black leg and soft rot of many vegetables and ornamental plants. Pseudomonas sp. strain P482 inhibits the growth of these pathogens, a desired trait considering the limited measures to combat these diseases. In this study, we determined the genetic background of the antibacterial activity of P482, and established the phylogenetic position of this strain. Pseudomonas sp. P482 was classified as Pseudomonas donghuensis. Genome mining revealed that the P482 genome does not contain genes determining the synthesis of known antimicrobials. However, the ClusterFinder algorithm, designed to detect atypical or novel classes of secondary metabolite gene clusters, predicted 18 such clusters in the genome. Screening of a Tn5 mutant library yielded an antimicrobial negative transposon mutant. The transposon insertion was located in a gene encoding an HpcH/HpaI aldolase/citrate lyase family protein. This gene is located in a hypothetical cluster predicted by the ClusterFinder, together with the downstream homologs of four nfs genes, that confer production of a non-fluorescent siderophore by P. donghuensis HYST. Site-directed inactivation of the HpcH/HpaI aldolase gene, the adjacent short chain dehydrogenase gene, as well as a homolog of an essential nfs cluster gene, all abolished the antimicrobial activity of the P482, suggesting their involvement in a common biosynthesis pathway. However, none of the mutants showed a decreased siderophore yield, neither was the antimicrobial activity of the wild type P482 compromised by high iron bioavailability. A genomic region comprising the nfs cluster and three upstream genes is involved in the antibacterial activity of P. donghuensis P482 against D. solani and P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliense. The genes studied are unique to the two known P. donghuensis strains. This study illustrates that mining of

  20. RESEARCH FOR MANAGING URBAN WATERSHED MICROBIAL CONTAMINATION (PROJECT 1: MANAGING URBAN WATERSHED PATHOGEN CONTAMINATION: 2. EFFECT OF LAND USE AND SEASON ON MICROORGANISM CONCENTRATION ON URBAN STORMWATER RUNOFF; 3. MICROORGANISM DIE-OFF RATES UNDER VARIOUS CONDITIONS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Water Supply and Water Resources Division (WSWRD) developed a document entitled Managing Urban Watershed Pathogen Contamination (EPA 600/R-03/111). This document provides information to support specific steps of the total maximum daily load (TMDL) process for meeting water q...

  1. RESEARCH FOR MANAGING URBAN WATERSHED MICROBIAL CONTAMINATION (PROJECT 1: MANAGING URBAN WATERSHED PATHOGEN CONTAMINATION: 2. EFFECT OF LAND USE AND SEASON ON MICROORGANISM CONCENTRATION ON URBAN STORMWATER RUNOFF; 3. MICROORGANISM DIE-OFF RATES UNDER VARIOUS CONDITIONS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Water Supply and Water Resources Division (WSWRD) developed a document entitled Managing Urban Watershed Pathogen Contamination (EPA 600/R-03/111). This document provides information to support specific steps of the total maximum daily load (TMDL) process for meeting water q...

  2. II. Pathogens

    Treesearch

    Ned B. Klopfenstein; Brian W. Geils

    2011-01-01

    Invasive fungal pathogens have caused immeasurably large ecological and economic damage to forests. It is well known that invasive fungal pathogens can cause devastating forest diseases (e.g., white pine blister rust, chestnut blight, Dutch elm disease, dogwood anthracnose, butternut canker, Scleroderris canker of pines, sudden oak death, pine pitch canker) (Maloy 1997...

  3. Utilization of legacy P in soils, a strategic approach meeting the 40% loading reduction goal while sustaining agricultural production in the Lake Erie basin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tiequan; Tan, Chin, S.; Wang, Yutao; Welacky, Tom

    2017-04-01

    Legacy phosphorus (P) in agricultural lands has been deemed the major source contributing to eutrophication of the Lake Erie. Canada and USA bilateral governments have set up a goal of 40% P loading reduction by 2025. Soil P draw-down (PDD) is a potential beneficial management practice for high P soils to overcome legacy P effect and mitigate soil P loss. A field experiment was conducted to assess the effects of PDD on crop yields, soil test P change, and soil P losses in both surface runoff and tile drainage under a corn-soybean rotation in a Brookston clay loam soil in a 9-year period from 2008 to 2016. Both yields of corn and soybean with PDD were highly identical to those with continuous P addition (CPA). Soil Olsen P with PDD declined with time at about 2.3 mg P kg-1 year-1, while with CPA it remained unchanged. Relative to CPA, PDD significantly decreased dissolved P and particular P losses, eventually the total P loss by 36%. In addition, farmers' production profitability increased by 15% through savings in investment for P fertilizer. The results indicate that utilization of soil legacy P can be an effective approach that enables us to reach the agri-P loading reduction goal, while improving production profitability and conserving world P resource.

  4. The Probiotic Combination of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis CECT 7210 and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BPL6 Reduces Pathogen Loads and Improves Gut Health of Weaned Piglets Orally Challenged with Salmonella Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Barba-Vidal, Emili; Castillejos, Lorena; Roll, Victor F. B.; Cifuentes-Orjuela, Gloria; Moreno Muñoz, José A.; Martín-Orúe, Susana M.

    2017-01-01

    -strain probiotic had a positive effect on reducing pathogen loads and alleviating animals in a Salmonella challenge. In addition, enhanced gut health and immunity was recorded in all animals receiving the probiotic, indicating an improvement in the post-weaning outcome. PMID:28861074

  5. Prevalence and pathogen load of Campylobacter spp., Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli O157/O145 serogroup in sheep faeces collected at sale yards and in abattoir effluent in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Yang, R; Abraham, S; Gardner, G E; Ryan, U; Jacobson, C

    2017-05-01

    Develop a multiplex quantitative PCR assay to investigate the prevalence and shedding of Escherichia coli O157/O145, Salmonella spp. and Campylobacter spp. in sheep at sale yards and abattoirs. A qPCR for E. coli O157/O145 was developed, validated and multiplexed with an existing qPCR for Campylobacter and Salmonella enterica. The absolute numbers of E. coli O157/O145, Campylobacter and Salmonella in control samples was determined using droplet digital PCR. These were then used as the controls in the multiplex qPCR on a total of 474 sheep faecal samples collected from two saleyards over a 4-month period (April-July 2014) and 96 effluent samples from an abattoir. The mutiplex qPCR was specific with a sensitivity of 5 organisms/μL faecal DNA extract for Campylobacter, S. enterica and E. coli O157/O145. The overall prevalence of Campylobacter, S. enterica and E. coli O157/O145 in faecal samples was 5.7%, 3.6% and 8.4% and in effluent samples was 18.8%, 6.3% and 5.2%, respectively. The pathogen loads of Campylobacter, S. enterica and E. coli O157/O145 in faecal and effluent samples was also determined via mutiplex qPCR. The overall prevalences of Campylobacter, S. enterica and E. coli O157/O145 were generally low (<6%), but point prevalences ranged considerably in healthy sheep (up to 26% for E. coli O157/O145). Further work to determine risk factors for shedding of bacterial organisms in meat sheep in the pre-slaughter period (on-farm, sale yards and lairage at abattoirs) could further reduce the risk of contamination of meat products. © 2017 Australian Veterinary Association.

  6. Monitoring to assess progress toward meeting the Assabet River, Massachusetts, phosphorus total maximum daily load - Aquatic macrophyte biomass and sediment-phosphorus flux

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zimmerman, Marc J.; Qian, Yu; Yong Q., Tian

    2011-01-01

    In 2004, the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) for Total Phosphorus in the Assabet River, Massachusetts, was approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The goal of the TMDL was to decrease the concentrations of the nutrient phosphorus to mitigate some of the instream ecological effects of eutrophication on the river; these effects were, for the most part, direct consequences of the excessive growth of aquatic macrophytes. The primary instrument effecting lower concentrations of phosphorus was to be strict control of phosphorus releases from four major wastewatertreatment plants in Westborough, Marlborough, Hudson, and Maynard, Massachusetts. The improvements to be achieved from implementing this control were lower concentrations of total and dissolved phosphorus in the river, a 50-percent reduction in aquatic-plant biomass, a 30-percent reduction in episodes of dissolved oxygen supersaturation, no low-flow dissolved oxygen concentrations less than 5.0 milligrams per liter, and a 90-percent reduction in sediment releases of phosphorus to the overlying water. In 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, initiated studies to evaluate conditions in the Assabet River prior to the upgrading of wastewater-treatment plants to remove more phosphorus from their effluents. The studies, completed in 2008, implemented a visual monitoring plan to evaluate the extent and biomass of the floating macrophyte Lemna minor (commonly known as lesser duckweed) in five impoundments and evaluated the potential for phosphorus flux from sediments in impounded and free-flowing reaches of the river. Hydrologically, the two study years 2007 and 2008 were quite different. In 2007, summer streamflows, although low, were higher than average, and in 2008, the flows were generally higher than in 2007. Visually, the effects of these streamflow differences on the distribution of Lemna were obvious. In 2007, large amounts of

  7. Load cell

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.

    2001-01-01

    A load cell combines the outputs of a plurality of strain gauges to measure components of an applied load. Combination of strain gauge outputs allows measurement of any of six load components without requiring complex machining or mechanical linkages to isolate load components. An example six axis load cell produces six independent analog outputs which can be combined to determine any one of the six general load components.

  8. Load cell

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.

    1998-01-01

    A load cell combines the outputs of a plurality of strain gauges to measure components of an applied load. Combination of strain gauge outputs allows measurement of any of six load components without requiring complex machining or mechanical linkages to isolate load components. An example six axis load cell produces six independent analog outputs, each directly proportional to one of the six general load components.

  9. Leading Meetings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindelow, John; Heynderickx, James

    Chapter 13 of a revised volume on school leadership, this chapter offers suggestions to help educators improve their performance in meetings, both as group leaders and as participants. Well-run meetings can rejuvenate an organization, leading to improved teamwork, communication, and morale. A poor meeting, on the other hand, can have a…

  10. Managing Meetings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hay, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Meetings are a means of giving people a chance to contribute. Meetings are also the nursery where the people's skills of listening, speaking, and building good working relationships are honed. They are where people practice being courteously challenging and confident, and they are where people are fascinated and fascinating. Meetings are where…

  11. De Novo Synthesis and Functional Analysis of Polyphosphate-Loaded Poly(Ethylene) Glycol Hydrogel Nanoparticles Targeting Pyocyanin and Pyoverdin Production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa as a Model Intestinal Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yushu; Papavasiliou, Georgia; Zaborina, Olga Y.; Alverdy, John C.; Teymour, Fouad

    2017-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract is the primary site of colonization of multidrug resistant pathogens and the major source of life-threatening complications in critically ill and immunocompromised patients. Eradication measures using antibiotics carry further risk of antibiotic resistance. Furthermore, antibiotic treatment can adversely shift the intestinal microbiome toward domination by resistant pathogens. Therefore, approaches directed to prevent replacement of health promoting microbiota with resistant pathogens should be developed. The use of non-microbicidal drugs to create microenvironmental conditions that suppress virulence of pathogens is an attractive strategy to minimize the negative consequences of intestinal microbiome disruption. We have previously shown that phosphate is depleted in the intestinal tract following surgical injury, that this depletion is a major “cue” that triggers bacterial virulence, and that the maintenance of phosphate abundance prevents virulence expression. However, the use of inorganic phosphate may not be a suitable agent to deliver to the site of the host-pathogen interaction since it is readily adsorbed in small intestine. Here we propose a novel drug delivery approach that exploits the use of nanoparticles that allow for prolonged release of phosphates. We have synthesized phosphate (Pi) and polyphosphate (PPi) crosslinked poly (ethylene) glycol (PEG) hydrogel nanoparticles (NP-Pi and NP-PPi, respectively) that result in sustained delivery of Pi and PPi. NP-PPi demonstrated more prolonged release of PPi as compared to the release of Pi from NP-Pi. In vitro studies indicate that free PPi as well NP-PPi are effective compounds for suppressing pyoverdin and pyocyanin production, two global virulence systems of virulence of P. aeruginosa. These studies suggest that sustained release of polyphosphate from NP-PPi can be exploited as a target for virulence suppression of lethal pathogenic phenotypes in the gastrointestinal

  12. De Novo Synthesis and Functional Analysis of Polyphosphate-Loaded Poly(Ethylene) Glycol Hydrogel Nanoparticles Targeting Pyocyanin and Pyoverdin Production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa as a Model Intestinal Pathogen.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yushu; Papavasiliou, Georgia; Zaborina, Olga Y; Alverdy, John C; Teymour, Fouad

    2017-04-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract is the primary site of colonization of multidrug resistant pathogens and the major source of life-threatening complications in critically ill and immunocompromised patients. Eradication measures using antibiotics carry further risk of antibiotic resistance. Furthermore, antibiotic treatment can adversely shift the intestinal microbiome toward domination by resistant pathogens. Therefore, approaches directed to prevent replacement of health promoting microbiota with resistant pathogens should be developed. The use of non-microbicidal drugs to create microenvironmental conditions that suppress virulence of pathogens is an attractive strategy to minimize the negative consequences of intestinal microbiome disruption. We have previously shown that phosphate is depleted in the intestinal tract following surgical injury, that this depletion is a major "cue" that triggers bacterial virulence, and that the maintenance of phosphate abundance prevents virulence expression. However, the use of inorganic phosphate may not be a suitable agent to deliver to the site of the host-pathogen interaction since it is readily adsorbed in small intestine. Here we propose a novel drug delivery approach that exploits the use of nanoparticles that allow for prolonged release of phosphates. We have synthesized phosphate (Pi) and polyphosphate (PPi) crosslinked poly (ethylene) glycol (PEG) hydrogel nanoparticles (NP-Pi and NP-PPi, respectively) that result in sustained delivery of Pi and PPi. NP-PPi demonstrated more prolonged release of PPi as compared to the release of Pi from NP-Pi. In vitro studies indicate that free PPi as well NP-PPi are effective compounds for suppressing pyoverdin and pyocyanin production, two global virulence systems of virulence of P. aeruginosa. These studies suggest that sustained release of polyphosphate from NP-PPi can be exploited as a target for virulence suppression of lethal pathogenic phenotypes in the gastrointestinal tract.

  13. Waterborne pathogens in urban watersheds.

    PubMed

    Arnone, Russell D; Walling, Joyce Perdek

    2007-03-01

    A serious concern for managers of water resources, pathogens in the urban environment easily enter waters through a number of pathways, including discharge of inadequately treated sewage, stormwater runoff, combined sewer overflows and sanitary sewer overflows. Pathogens in US ambient water bodies are regulated under the Clean Water Act (CWA), while pathogens in drinking water supplies are regulated under the Safe Drinking Water Act. Total maximum daily loads (TMDLs) are developed in accordance with CWA regulations for ambient water bodies with bacterial concentrations exceeding the water quality standard, which generally is a measure of a bacterial indicator organism. However, developing a TMDL for a supplementary indicator or pathogen is also required if a use impairment would still exist even after the water body is in compliance with the standard. This occurs because indicator organisms do not reflect the presence of pathogen contamination with complete certainty. The evaluation of pathogen indicators and summary of epidemiological studies presented are resources for those developing TMDLs to achieve water quality standards and restore water bodies to their intended uses.

  14. Local load shedding

    SciTech Connect

    Adibi, M.M.; Thorne, D.K. )

    1988-08-01

    Equipment overloads in an underground transmission network are caused by unscheduled outages. Repairs or replacements of damaged cables and/or transformers in urban areas are inherently difficult and time-consuming. Therefore, for overloads greatly in excess of short-time ratings, speed of load shedding is of paramount importance. Under such conditions, the system operator is faced with: recognizing the problem, determining the course of action and shedding the correct amount of load at the right locations. These tasks are difficult to perform, particularly under pressure of time. Reliance on pre-specified load shedding lists is not satisfactory since the load shedding lists do not necessarily match the amounts and locations of the required loads to be shed. Clearly, there has been a need for a local load shedding scheme, which in the first order of importance, would relieve the overloaded equipment within the time limits imposed by the equipment short-time ratings and in the second order of importance, would ''minimize'' the amount of load to be curtailed. This paper describes an approach which meets the dual objective, providing a practical solution to a difficult engineering/operating problem.

  15. Sediment and Fecal Indicator Bacteria Loading in a Mixed Land Use Watershed: Contributions from Suspended and Bed Load Transport

    EPA Science Inventory

    Water quality studies that quantify sediment and fecal bacteria loading commonly focus on suspended contaminants transported during high flows. Fecal contaminants in bed sediments are typically ignored and need to be considered because of their potential to increase pathogen load...

  16. Sediment and Fecal Indicator Bacteria Loading in a Mixed Land Use Watershed: Contributions from Suspended and Bed Load Transport

    EPA Science Inventory

    Water quality studies that quantify sediment and fecal bacteria loading commonly focus on suspended contaminants transported during high flows. Fecal contaminants in bed sediments are typically ignored and need to be considered because of their potential to increase pathogen load...

  17. Pathogene Mikroorganismen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Martin

    Infektionen, die vom Tier auf den Menschen übertragen werden, werden als Zoonosen bezeichnet. Pathogene Mikroorganismen können entweder durch Mensch-Mensch, Mensch-Tier-Kontakt oder durch Kontakt mit kontaminierten Vektoren übertragen werden [39]. Vektoren können einerseits belebt (z. B. blutsaugende Insekten), andererseits unbelebt sein. Kontaminierte Lebensmittel und Wasser gehören zu den wichtigsten unbelebten Vektoren. Neben Lebensmitteln können aber auch kontaminierte Gegenstände oder der Kontakt mit Kontaminationsquellen in der Umwelt Auslöser von Krankheitsfällen sein. Weltweit sind mehr als 1400 krankheitsverursachende biologische Agentien bekannt, von denen über 60 % ein zoonotisches Potenzial aufweisen. Als Ergebnis von Expertengesprächen wurde kürzlich berichtet, dass etwa 3 bis 4, meist virale, neu auftretende Infektionskrankheiten ("emerging diseases“) pro Jahr erwartet werden können [15]. Es handelt sich bei diesen Vorgängen aber nicht nur um das Auftauchen vollkommen neuer oder unbeschriebener Spezies, sondern auch um evolutionsbedingte Anpassungen von mikrobiellen Populationen an neue Bedingungen in ihrem Ökosystem [7]. Molekulare Analysen an Umweltchlamydien erbrachten Hinweise, dass die Evolution erste genetische Pathogenitätsmerkmale in dieser Spezies schon vor 700 Mio. Jahren entstehen ließ [14]. Viele Faktoren befeuern den Prozess der Anpassung, unter anderem auch alle Strategien, mit denen der Mensch seit Jahrtausenden versucht, Lebensmittel sicher und haltbar zu machen. Als die treibenden Kräfte des Auftretens neuer Krankheitserreger werden in der Gegenwart vor allem das sich ändernde Weltklima, die globalen Warenströme und die sich verändernden Konsumgewohnheiten genannt. Es steht auch außer Zweifel, dass viele dieser Erreger Tiere als ihr natürliches Reservoir haben werden, d. h. Zoonosen im klassischen Sinne sind [15].

  18. Truck loading rack blending

    SciTech Connect

    Boubenider, E.

    1995-12-01

    Blending, the combining of two or more components to make a single product, has become widely used in most loading rack applications. Blending should not be confused with additive injection, which is the injection of very small doses of enhancers, detergents and dyes into a product stream. Changes in the environmental protection laws in the early 90`s have put increasing demands on marketing terminals with regards to reformulated fuels and environmental protection concerns. As a result of these new mandates, terminals have turned to blending at the loading rack as an economical and convenient means in meeting these new requirements. This paper will discuss some of these mandates and how loading rack blending is used for different applications. Various types of blending will also be discussed along with considerations for each method.

  19. Endemicity of chytridiomycosis features pathogen overdispersion.

    PubMed

    Grogan, Laura F; Phillott, Andrea D; Scheele, Benjamin C; Berger, Lee; Cashins, Scott D; Bell, Sara C; Puschendorf, Robert; Skerratt, Lee F

    2016-05-01

    Pathogens can be critical drivers of the abundance and distribution of wild animal populations. The presence of an overdispersed pathogen load distribution between hosts (where few hosts harbour heavy parasite burdens and light infections are common) can have an important stabilizing effect on host-pathogen dynamics where infection intensity determines pathogenicity. This may potentially lead to endemicity of an introduced pathogen rather than extirpation of the host and/or pathogen. Overdispersed pathogen load distributions have rarely been considered in wild animal populations as an important component of the infection dynamics of microparasites such as bacteria, viruses, protozoa and fungi. Here we examined the abundance, distribution and transmission of the model fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd, cause of amphibian chytridiomycosis) between wild-caught Litoria rheocola (common mist frogs) to investigate the effects of an overdispersed pathogen load distribution on the host population in the wild. We quantified host survival, infection incidence and recovery probabilities relative to infectious burden, and compared the results of models where pathogen overdispersion either was or was not considered an important feature of host-pathogen dynamics. We found the distribution of Bd load between hosts to be highly overdispersed. We found that host survival was related to infection burden and that accounting for pathogen overdispersion allowed us to better understand infection dynamics and their implications for disease control. In addition, we found that the pattern of host infections and recoveries varied markedly with season whereby (i) infections established more in winter, consistent with temperature-dependent effects on fungal growth, and (ii) recoveries (loss of infection) occurred frequently in the field throughout the year but were less likely in winter. Our results suggest that pathogen overdispersion is an important feature of endemic

  20. Pathogen reduction requirements for direct potable reuse in Antarctica: evaluating human health risks in small communities.

    PubMed

    Barker, S Fiona; Packer, Michael; Scales, Peter J; Gray, Stephen; Snape, Ian; Hamilton, Andrew J

    2013-09-01

    Small, remote communities often have limited access to energy and water. Direct potable reuse of treated wastewater has recently gained attention as a potential solution for water-stressed regions, but requires further evaluation specific to small communities. The required pathogen reduction needed for safe implementation of direct potable reuse of treated sewage is an important consideration but these are typically quantified for larger communities and cities. A quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) was conducted, using norovirus, giardia and Campylobacter as reference pathogens, to determine the level of treatment required to meet the tolerable annual disease burden of 10(-6) DALYs per person per year, using Davis Station in Antarctica as an example of a small remote community. Two scenarios were compared: published municipal sewage pathogen loads and estimated pathogen loads during a gastroenteritis outbreak. For the municipal sewage scenario, estimated required log10 reductions were 6.9, 8.0 and 7.4 for norovirus, giardia and Campylobacter respectively, while for the outbreak scenario the values were 12.1, 10.4 and 12.3 (95th percentiles). Pathogen concentrations are higher under outbreak conditions as a function of the relatively greater degree of contact between community members in a small population, compared with interactions in a large city, resulting in a higher proportion of the population being at risk of infection and illness. While the estimates of outbreak conditions may overestimate sewage concentration to some degree, the results suggest that additional treatment barriers would be required to achieve regulatory compliance for safe drinking water in small communities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The PA and HA Gene-Mediated High Viral Load and Intense Innate Immune Response in the Brain Contribute to the High Pathogenicity of H5N1 Avian Influenza Virus in Mallard Ducks

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jiao; Hu, Zenglei; Mo, Yiqun; Wu, Qiwen; Cui, Zhu; Duan, Zhiqiang; Huang, Junqing; Chen, Hongzhi; Chen, Yuxin; Gu, Min; Wang, Xiaoquan; Hu, Shunlin; Liu, Huimou; Liu, Wenbo; Liu, Xiaowen

    2013-01-01

    Most highly pathogenic avian influenza A viruses cause only mild clinical signs in ducks, serving as an important natural reservoir of influenza A viruses. However, we isolated two H5N1 viruses that are genetically similar but differ greatly in virulence in ducks. A/Chicken/Jiangsu/k0402/2010 (CK10) is highly pathogenic, whereas A/Goose/Jiangsu/k0403/2010 (GS10) is low pathogenic. To determine the genetic basis for the high virulence of CK10 in ducks, we generated a series of single-gene reassortants between CK10 and GS10 and tested their virulence in ducks. Expression of the CK10 PA or hemagglutinin (HA) gene in the GS10 context resulted in increased virulence and virus replication. Conversely, inclusion of the GS10 PA or HA gene in the CK10 background attenuated the virulence and virus replication. Moreover, the PA gene had a greater contribution. We further determined that residues 101G and 237E in the PA gene contribute to the high virulence of CK10. Mutations at these two positions produced changes in virulence, virus replication, and polymerase activity of CK10 or GS10. Position 237 plays a greater role in determining these phenotypes. Moreover, the K237E mutation in the GS10 PA gene increased PA nuclear accumulation. Mutant GS10 viruses carrying the CK10 HA gene or the PA101G or PA237E mutation induced an enhanced innate immune response. A sustained innate response was detected in the brain rather than in the lung and spleen. Our results suggest that the PA and HA gene-mediated high virus replication and the intense innate immune response in the brain contribute to the high virulence of H5N1 virus in ducks. PMID:23926340

  2. Pathogen-tested, or certified planting material

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Certification programs have been developed to provide plant material that meets a predetermined level of plant health. The primary objective of these programs is to limit pathogen incidence in plant material in order to minimize losses by growers. For many fruit and nut crops plantings are expecte...

  3. Meeting Demand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daneman, Kathy

    1998-01-01

    Addresses how a school district can use temporary classroom space to meet increasing student enrollment while additional space is being built. Provides examples of using portable facilities to supplement educational sites, including how to protect students who are in portable classrooms when tornadoes appear. (GR)

  4. Pathology smorgasboard: Biocontrol, pathogen movement, and recent fumigation results.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Research on soilborne pathogens, disease control, and new forest diseases of interest were presented at the Western Forest and Conservation Nursery Association meeting in 2016. Research topics included reduced-rate soil fumigation, Pythium diversity and biocontrol, pathogen movement among nurseries,...

  5. Pathogen Webs in Collapsing Honey Bee Colonies

    PubMed Central

    Cornman, R. Scott; Tarpy, David R.; Chen, Yanping; Jeffreys, Lacey; Lopez, Dawn; Pettis, Jeffery S.; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Evans, Jay D.

    2012-01-01

    Recent losses in honey bee colonies are unusual in their severity, geographical distribution, and, in some cases, failure to present recognized characteristics of known disease. Domesticated honey bees face numerous pests and pathogens, tempting hypotheses that colony collapses arise from exposure to new or resurgent pathogens. Here we explore the incidence and abundance of currently known honey bee pathogens in colonies suffering from Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), otherwise weak colonies, and strong colonies from across the United States. Although pathogen identities differed between the eastern and western United States, there was a greater incidence and abundance of pathogens in CCD colonies. Pathogen loads were highly covariant in CCD but not control hives, suggesting that CCD colonies rapidly become susceptible to a diverse set of pathogens, or that co-infections can act synergistically to produce the rapid depletion of workers that characterizes the disorder. We also tested workers from a CCD-free apiary to confirm that significant positive correlations among pathogen loads can develop at the level of individual bees and not merely as a secondary effect of CCD. This observation and other recent data highlight pathogen interactions as important components of bee disease. Finally, we used deep RNA sequencing to further characterize microbial diversity in CCD and non-CCD hives. We identified novel strains of the recently described Lake Sinai viruses (LSV) and found evidence of a shift in gut bacterial composition that may be a biomarker of CCD. The results are discussed with respect to host-parasite interactions and other environmental stressors of honey bees. PMID:22927991

  6. Pathogen webs in collapsing honey bee colonies.

    PubMed

    Cornman, R Scott; Tarpy, David R; Chen, Yanping; Jeffreys, Lacey; Lopez, Dawn; Pettis, Jeffery S; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Evans, Jay D

    2012-01-01

    Recent losses in honey bee colonies are unusual in their severity, geographical distribution, and, in some cases, failure to present recognized characteristics of known disease. Domesticated honey bees face numerous pests and pathogens, tempting hypotheses that colony collapses arise from exposure to new or resurgent pathogens. Here we explore the incidence and abundance of currently known honey bee pathogens in colonies suffering from Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), otherwise weak colonies, and strong colonies from across the United States. Although pathogen identities differed between the eastern and western United States, there was a greater incidence and abundance of pathogens in CCD colonies. Pathogen loads were highly covariant in CCD but not control hives, suggesting that CCD colonies rapidly become susceptible to a diverse set of pathogens, or that co-infections can act synergistically to produce the rapid depletion of workers that characterizes the disorder. We also tested workers from a CCD-free apiary to confirm that significant positive correlations among pathogen loads can develop at the level of individual bees and not merely as a secondary effect of CCD. This observation and other recent data highlight pathogen interactions as important components of bee disease. Finally, we used deep RNA sequencing to further characterize microbial diversity in CCD and non-CCD hives. We identified novel strains of the recently described Lake Sinai viruses (LSV) and found evidence of a shift in gut bacterial composition that may be a biomarker of CCD. The results are discussed with respect to host-parasite interactions and other environmental stressors of honey bees.

  7. Staff meeting

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    I would like to invite all members of the CERN Personnel to a meeting on Wednesday 16 January 2008 at 3:00 p.m. Main Auditorium (bldg 500) to convey my best wishes for the new year, to review CERN’s activities during 2007 and to present the perspectives for 2008, the year of the LHC start-up. Closed-circuit transmission of the meeting will be available in the Council Chamber and in the AB Auditorium (Meyrin), the AB Auditorium (Prévessin), the IT Auditorium (Bldg. 31) and the AT Auditorium (Bldg. 30). Simultaneous translation into English will be available in the main Auditorium. Best wishes for the festive season! Robert AYMAR

  8. Meeting information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The 1986 Ocean Sciences Meeting of the American Geophysical Union and the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography (ASLO) will be held January 13-17, 1986, in New Orleans, La., at the Fairmont Hotel. Co-sponsoring societies are the Acoustical Society of America (ASA), the American Meteorological Society (AMS), the Marine Technology Society (MTS), and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Oceanic Engineering Society (OES).

  9. PATHOGENS: VIEWS OF EPA'S PATHOGEN EQUIVALENCY COMMITTEE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation reviews the pathogenic microorganisms that may be found in municipal sewage sludge and the commonly employed Class A and B processes for controlling pathogens. It notes how extensively they are used and discusses issues and concerns with their application. Pre...

  10. LOADING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Ohlinger, L.A.

    1958-10-01

    A device is presented for loading or charging bodies of fissionable material into a reactor. This device consists of a car, mounted on tracks, into which the fissionable materials may be placed at a remote area, transported to the reactor, and inserted without danger to the operating personnel. The car has mounted on it a heavily shielded magazine for holding a number of the radioactive bodies. The magazine is of a U-shaped configuration and is inclined to the horizontal plane, with a cap covering the elevated open end, and a remotely operated plunger at the lower, closed end. After the fissionable bodies are loaded in the magazine and transported to the reactor, the plunger inserts the body at the lower end of the magazine into the reactor, then is withdrawn, thereby allowing gravity to roll the remaining bodies into position for successive loading in a similar manner.

  11. SAM Pathogen Methods Query

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Laboratories measuring target pathogen analytes in environmental samples can use this online query tool to identify analytical methods in EPA's Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery for select pathogens.

  12. Modelling pathogen fate in stormwaters by a particle-pathogen interaction model using population balances.

    PubMed

    Vergeynst, L; Vallet, B; Vanrolleghem, P A

    2012-01-01

    Stormwater is polluted by various contaminants affecting the quality of receiving water bodies. Pathogens are one of these contaminants, which have a critical effect on water use in rivers. Increasing the retention time of water in stormwater basins can lead to reduced loads of pathogens released to the rivers. In this paper a model describing the behaviour of pathogens in stormwater basins is presented including different fate processes such as decay, adsorption/desorption, settling and solar disinfection. By considering the settling velocity distribution of particles and a layered approach, this model is able to create a light intensity, and particle and pathogen concentration profile along the water depth in the basin. A strong effect of solar disinfection is discerned. The model has been used to evaluate pathogen removal efficiencies in stormwater basins. It includes a population of particle classes characterized by a distribution of settling velocities in order to be able to reproduce stormwater quality and treatment in a realistic way.

  13. Pathogens affecting beef

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mankind has long recognized that animals harbor disease. Zoonotic pathogens are agents from animals that cause disease in humans. The pathogens may be broad spectrum and cause disease in animals and humans, or the animal may simply be an asymptomatic reservoir for a human pathogen. The human dise...

  14. Carbohydrate Loading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csernus, Marilyn

    Carbohydrate loading is a frequently used technique to improve performance by altering an athlete's diet. The objective is to increase glycogen stored in muscles for use in prolonged strenuous exercise. For two to three days, the athlete consumes a diet that is low in carbohydrates and high in fat and protein while continuing to exercise and…

  15. Carbohydrate Loading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csernus, Marilyn

    Carbohydrate loading is a frequently used technique to improve performance by altering an athlete's diet. The objective is to increase glycogen stored in muscles for use in prolonged strenuous exercise. For two to three days, the athlete consumes a diet that is low in carbohydrates and high in fat and protein while continuing to exercise and…

  16. Pathogen Phytosensing: Plants to Report Plant Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Mazarei, Mitra; Teplova, Irina; Hajimorad, M Reza; Stewart, C Neal

    2008-04-14

    Real-time systems that provide evidence of pathogen contamination in crops can be an important new line of early defense in agricultural centers. Plants possess defense mechanisms to protect against pathogen attack. Inducible plant defense is controlled by signal transduction pathways, inducible promoters and cis-regulatory elements corresponding to key genes involved in defense, and pathogen-specific responses. Identified inducible promoters and cis-acting elements could be utilized in plant sentinels, or 'phytosensors', by fusing these to reporter genes to produce plants with altered phenotypes in response to the presence of pathogens. Here, we have employed cis-acting elements from promoter regions of pathogen inducible genes as well as those responsive to the plant defense signal molecules salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, and ethylene. Synthetic promoters were constructed by combining various regulatory elements supplemented with the enhancer elements from the Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter to increase basal level of the GUS expression. The inducibility of each synthetic promoter was first assessed in transient expression assays using Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts and then examined for efficacy in stably transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants. Histochemical and fluorometric GUS expression analyses showed that both transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants responded to elicitor and phytohormone treatments with increased GUS expression when compared to untreated plants. Pathogen-inducible phytosensor studies were initiated by analyzing the sensitivity of the synthetic promoters against virus infection. Transgenic tobacco plants infected with Alfalfa mosaic virus showed an increase in GUS expression when compared to mock-inoculated control plants, whereas Tobacco mosaic virus infection caused no changes in GUS expression. Further research, using these transgenic plants against a range of different pathogens with the regulation of detectable

  17. Meeting Abstracts - Annual Meeting 2016.

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    The AMCP Abstracts program provides a forum through which authors can share their insights and outcomes of advanced managed care practice through publication in AMCP's Journal of Managed Care & Specialty Pharmacy (JMCP). Most of the reviewed and unreviewed abstracts are presented as posters so that interested AMCP meeting attendees can review findings and query authors. The Student/Resident/ Fellow poster presentation (unreviewed) is Wednesday, April 20, 2016, and the Professional poster presentation (reviewed) is Thursday, April 21. The Professional posters will also be displayed on Friday, April 22. The reviewed abstracts are published in the JMCP Meeting Abstracts supplement. The AMCP Managed Care & Specialty Pharmacy Annual Meeting 2016 in San Francisco, California, is expected to attract more than 3,500 managed care pharmacists and other health care professionals who manage and evaluate drug therapies, develop and manage networks, and work with medical managers and information specialists to improve the care of all individuals enrolled in managed care programs. Abstracts were submitted in the following categories: Research Report: describe completed original research on managed care pharmacy services or health care interventions. Examples include (but are not limited to) observational studies using administrative claims, reports of the impact of unique benefit design strategies, and analyses of the effects of innovative administrative or clinical programs. Economic Model: describe models that predict the effect of various benefit design or clinical decisions on a population. For example, an economic model could be used to predict the budget impact of a new pharmaceutical product on a health care system. Solving Problems in Managed Care: describe the specific steps taken to introduce a needed change, develop and implement a new system or program, plan and organize an administrative function, or solve other types of problems in managed care settings. These

  18. Meeting Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, Christiaan; Aspaas, Per Pippin

    2013-06-01

    On 2-3 June 2012, the University of Tromsoe hosted a conference about the cultural and scientific history of the transits of Venus. The conference took place in Tromsoe for two very specific reasons. First and foremost, the last transit of Venus of this century lent itself to be observed on the disc of the Midnight Sun in this part of Europe during the night of 5 to 6 June 2012. Second, several Venus transit expeditions in this region were central in the global enterprise of measuring the scale of the solar system in the eighteenth century. The site of the conference was the Nordnorsk Vitensenter (Science Centre of Northern Norway), which is located at the campus of the University of Tromsoe. After the conference, participants were invited to either stay in Tromsoe until the midnight of 5-6 June, or take part in a Venus transit voyage in Finnmark, during which the historical sites Vardoe, Hammerfest, and the North Cape were to be visited. The post-conference program culminated with the participants observing the transit of Venus in or near Tromsoe, Vardoe and even from a plane near Alta. These Proceedings contain a selection of the lectures delivered on 2-3 June 2012, and also a narrative description of the transit viewing from Tromsoe, Vardoe and Alta. The title of the book, Meeting Venus, refers the title of a play by the Hungarian film director, screenwriter and opera director Istvan Szabo (1938-). The autobiographical movie Meeting Venus (1991) directed by him is based on his experience directing Tannhauser at the Paris Opera in 1984. The movie brings the story of an imaginary international opera company that encounters a never ending series of difficulties and pitfalls that symbolise the challenges of any multicultural and international endeavour. As is evident from the many papers presented in this book, Meeting Venus not only contains the epic tales of the transits of the seventeenth, eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, it also covers the conference

  19. LOADED WAVEGUIDES

    DOEpatents

    Mullett, L.B.; Loach, B.G.; Adams, G.L.

    1958-06-24

    >Loaded waveguides are described for the propagation of electromagnetic waves with reduced phase velocities. A rectangular waveguide is dimensioned so as to cut-off the simple H/sub 01/ mode at the operating frequency. The waveguide is capacitance loaded, so as to reduce the phase velocity of the transmitted wave, by connecting an electrical conductor between directly opposite points in the major median plane on the narrower pair of waveguide walls. This conductor may take a corrugated shape or be an aperature member, the important factor being that the electrical length of the conductor is greater than one-half wavelength at the operating frequency. Prepared for the Second U.N. International ConferThe importance of nuclear standards is duscussed. A brief review of the international callaboration in this field is given. The proposal is made to let the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) coordinate the efforts from other groups. (W.D.M.)

  20. 29 CFR 1919.77 - Safe working load increase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safe working load increase. 1919.77 Section 1919.77 Labor... load increase. (a) In no case shall safe working loads be increased beyond the manufacturer's ratings or original design limitations unless such increase meets with the manufacturer's approval. Where the...

  1. 46 CFR 154.355 - Bow and stern loading piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Bow and stern loading piping. 154.355 Section 154.355 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... Arrangements § 154.355 Bow and stern loading piping. (a) Bow and stern loading piping must: (1) Meet § 154.310...

  2. 46 CFR 154.355 - Bow and stern loading piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Bow and stern loading piping. 154.355 Section 154.355 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... Arrangements § 154.355 Bow and stern loading piping. (a) Bow and stern loading piping must: (1) Meet § 154.310...

  3. Plant Pathogenic Fungi.

    PubMed

    Doehlemann, Gunther; Ökmen, Bilal; Zhu, Wenjun; Sharon, Amir

    2017-01-01

    Fungi are among the dominant causal agents of plant diseases. To colonize plants and cause disease, pathogenic fungi use diverse strategies. Some fungi kill their hosts and feed on dead material (necrotrophs), while others colonize the living tissue (biotrophs). For successful invasion of plant organs, pathogenic development is tightly regulated and specialized infection structures are formed. To further colonize hosts and establish disease, fungal pathogens deploy a plethora of virulence factors. Depending on the infection strategy, virulence factors perform different functions. While basically all pathogens interfere with primary plant defense, necrotrophs secrete toxins to kill plant tissue. In contrast, biotrophs utilize effector molecules to suppress plant cell death and manipulate plant metabolism in favor of the pathogen. This article provides an overview of plant pathogenic fungal species and the strategies they use to cause disease.

  4. Hot Meetings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Mary

    2002-01-01

    A colleague walked by my office one time as I was conducting a meeting. There were about five or six members of my team present. The colleague, a man who had been with our institution (The Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab, a.k.a. APL) for many years, could not help eavesdropping. He said later it sounded like we we re having a raucous argument, and he wondered whether he should stand by the door in case things got out of hand and someone threw a punch. Our Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) team was a hot group, to invoke the language that is fashionable today, although we never thought of ourselves in those terms. It was just our modus operandi. The tenor of the discussion got loud and volatile at times, but I prefer to think of it as animated, robust, or just plain collaborative. Mary Chiu and her "hot" team from the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory built the Advanced Composition Explorer spacecraft for NASA. Instruments on the spacecraft continue to collect data that inform us about what's happening on our most important star, the Sun.

  5. Load management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moir, Ian

    The development of the Electrical Load Management System (ELMS) for the Boeing 777 aircraft is reviewed. The discussion covers the overall design of the system, its principal components, and the functions it provides. Some of the additional system drivers, such as autoland electrical system partitioning and dispatch reliability, are outlined, and their effect on the system architecture is examined. The key technologies used in the development of the ELMS include smart high power contactors, ARING 629 data buses, the Motorola 68020 processor combined with Ada software, dedicated ASICs, and modular architecture for improved maintainability.

  6. Macrophage are the principal reservoir and sustain high virus loads in rhesus macaques after the depletion of CD4+ T cells by a highly pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus/HIV type 1 chimera (SHIV): Implications for HIV-1 infections of humans

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, Tatsuhiko; Brown, Charles R.; Endo, Yasuyuki; Buckler-White, Alicia; Plishka, Ronald; Bischofberger, Norbert; Hirsch, Vanessa; Martin, Malcolm A.

    2001-01-01

    The highly pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus/HIV type 1 (SHIV) chimeric virus SHIVDH12R induces a systemic depletion of CD4+ T lymphocytes in rhesus monkeys during the initial 3–4 weeks of infection. Nonetheless, high levels of viral RNA production continue unabated for an additional 2–5 months. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemical analyses revealed that tissue macrophage in the lymph nodes, spleen, gastrointestinal tract, liver, and kidney sustain high plasma virus loads in the absence of CD4+ T cells. Quantitative confocal immunofluorescence analysis indicated that greater than 95% of the virus-producing cells in these tissues are macrophage and less than 2% are T lymphocytes. Interestingly, the administration of a potent reverse transcriptase inhibitor blocked virus production during the early T cell phase but not during the later macrophage phase of the SHIVDH12R infection. When interpreted in the context of HIV-1 infections, these results implicate tissue macrophage as an important reservoir of virus in vivo. They become infected during the acute infection, gradually increase in number over time, and can be a major contributor to total body virus burden during the symptomatic phase of the human infection. PMID:11136236

  7. BACTERIAL WATERBORNE PATHOGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacterial pathogens are examples of classical etiological agents of waterborne disease. While these agents no longer serve as major threats to U.S. water supplies, they are still important pathogens in areas with substandard sanitation and poor water treatment facilities. In th...

  8. Emerging Escherichia Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Permpalung, Nitipong; Sentochnik, Deborah E.

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia hermannii was first identified as a new species in 1982. It has rarely been reported as a human pathogen. We report the first case of E. hermannii as the sole pathogen in a catheter-related bloodstream infection. PMID:23740732

  9. Plant pathogen resistance

    DOEpatents

    Greenberg, Jean T; Jung, Ho Won; Tschaplinski, Timothy

    2012-11-27

    Azelaic acid or its derivatives or analogs induce a robust and a speedier defense response against pathogens in plants. Azelaic acid treatment alone does not induce many of the known defense-related genes but activates a plant's defense signaling upon pathogen exposure.

  10. BACTERIAL WATERBORNE PATHOGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacterial pathogens are examples of classical etiological agents of waterborne disease. While these agents no longer serve as major threats to U.S. water supplies, they are still important pathogens in areas with substandard sanitation and poor water treatment facilities. In th...

  11. Plant pathogen resistance

    DOEpatents

    Greenberg, Jean T.; Jung, Ho Won; Tschaplinski, Timothy

    2015-10-20

    Azelaic acid or its derivatives or analogs induce a robust and a speedier defense response against pathogens in plants. Azelaic acid treatment alone does not induce many of the known defense-related genes but activates a plant's defense signaling upon pathogen exposure.

  12. Emerging foodborne pathogens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The emergence of new foodborne pathogens is due to a number of factors. An important factor is the globalization of the food supply with the possibility of the introduction of foodborne pathogens from other countries. Animal husbandry, food production, food processing, and food distribution system...

  13. 75 FR 80455 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-22

    ...; ] ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board (Access Board) plans to hold its regular committee and Board meetings...

  14. Residential equipment part load curves for use in DOE-2

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Hugh; Huang, Y.J.; Parker, D.

    1999-02-01

    DOE-2 (DOE2 90) includes several correlation curves that predict the energy use of systems underpart load conditions. DOE-2 simulates systems on an hour-by-hour basis, so the correlations are intended to predict part load energy use (and efficiency) as a function of the part load ratio (PLR) for each hour, where PLR = Hourly Load/Available Capacity. Generally residential and small commercial HVAC equipment meets the load at off-design conditions by cycling on and off. Therefore, the part load correlations must predict the degradation due to this on and off operation over an hourly interval.

  15. 1993 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1993-12-01

    The Loads and Resources Study is presented in three documents: (1) this summary of Federal system and Pacific Northwest region loads and resources; (2) a technical appendix detailing forecasted Pacific Northwest economic trends and loads, and (3) a technical appendix detailing the loads and resources for each major Pacific Northwest generating utility. In this loads and resources study, resource availability is compared with a range of forecasted electricity consumption. The forecasted future electricity demands -- firm loads -- are subtracted from the projected capability of existing and {open_quotes}contracted for{close_quotes} resources to determine whether Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the region will be surplus or deficit. If resources are greater than loads in any particular year or month, there is a surplus of energy and/or capacity, which BPA can sell to increase revenues. Conversely, if firm loads exceed available resources, there is a deficit of energy and/or capacity, and additional conservation, contract purchases, or generating resources will be needed to meet load growth. The Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study analyzes the Pacific Northwest`s projected loads and available generating resources in two parts: (1) the loads and resources of the Federal system, for which BPA is the marketing agency; and (2) the larger Pacific Northwest regional power system, which includes loads and resource in addition to the Federal system. The loads and resources analysis in this study simulates the operation of the power system under the Pacific Northwest Coordination Agreement (PNCA) produced by the Pacific Northwest Coordinating Group. This study presents the Federal system and regional analyses for five load forecasts: high, medium-high, medium, medium-low, and low. This analysis projects the yearly average energy consumption and resource availability for Operating Years (OY) 1994--95 through 2003--04.

  16. PREDICTING VIRUS LOADING TO STREAMS FROM GROUNDWATER: NONPOINT SOURCE APPLICATIONS FOR TMDL EVALUATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Density of septic systems in watersheds has been identified as a contributor to pathogen loading in streams. At present, little work has been done to provide simple models to assist in evaluating groundwater loading for pathogen TMDLs. A compartmental model is being developed for...

  17. PREDICTING VIRUS LOADING TO STREAMS FROM GROUNDWATER: NONPOINT SOURCE APPLICATIONS FOR TMDL EVALUATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Density of septic systems in watersheds has been identified as a contributor to pathogen loading in streams. At present, little work has been done to provide simple models to assist in evaluating groundwater loading for pathogen TMDLs. A compartmental model is being developed for...

  18. Call a Meeting!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonsalves, Bronte B.

    1988-01-01

    Outlines appropriate content for meetings between parents and teachers of young children. Argues that effective meetings foster parent education, communication and ongoing parent support. Identifies objectives for the initial meeting during the application and registration process, for parent education meetings, and for parent conferences.…

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF NITROGEN LOAD-REPONSE RELATIONSHIPS FOR ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A research program is currently underway to meet the United States Environmental Protection Agency's need to develop nutrient criteria for estuarine and coastal marine waters. This research is intended to develop nitrogen load-response relationships for submerged aquatic vegetati...

  20. An Evaluation of the HVAC Load Potential for Providing Load Balancing Service

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ning

    2012-09-30

    This paper investigates the potential of providing aggregated intra-hour load balancing services using heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. A direct-load control algorithm is presented. A temperature-priority-list method is used to dispatch the HVAC loads optimally to maintain consumer-desired indoor temperatures and load diversity. Realistic intra-hour load balancing signals were used to evaluate the operational characteristics of the HVAC load under different outdoor temperature profiles and different indoor temperature settings. The number of HVAC units needed is also investigated. Modeling results suggest that the number of HVACs needed to provide a {+-}1-MW load balancing service 24 hours a day varies significantly with baseline settings, high and low temperature settings, and the outdoor temperatures. The results demonstrate that the intra-hour load balancing service provided by HVAC loads meet the performance requirements and can become a major source of revenue for load-serving entities where the smart grid infrastructure enables direct load control over the HAVC loads.

  1. Development of a coupled pathogen-hydrologic catchment model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haydon, S.; Deletic, A.

    2006-09-01

    SummaryLarge numbers of pathogens can be mobilised from drinking water catchments during wet weather causing serious problems in management of water treatment plants. This paper presents an attempt to model pathogen discharges from large catchments. Two conceptual continuous pathogen models have been developed and evaluated using E. coli as a pathogen indicator. The first model, the EG model, describes surface and subsurface pathogen transport processes by means of wash-off and loss equations. It is coupled to an existing hydrologic model (SimHyd) that predicts flows. The second model, named ASP, takes into account only surface pathogen transport processes. It is coupled to a stormflow-baseflow separation model, and therefore is simpler than EG. The models have been tested against baseflow and storm event E. coli concentrations measured at three dissimilar catchments from southern Australia. The prediction of pathogen peak concentrations by the EG model was reasonably good; the coefficient of correlation between the measured and modelled pathogen peaks for all three catchments was r2 = 0.93. However, the ASP model was not able to model the peaks well ( r2 = 0.54). The prediction of pathogen loads was significantly better with r2 = 0.95 for the EG model and r2 = 0.89 for the ASP model. It was concluded that a slightly more complex EG model was performing better than the oversimplified ASP model.

  2. Low Plasma Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 2 Viral Load Is Independent of Proviral Load: Low Virus Production In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Popper, Stephen J.; Sarr, Abdoulaye Dieng; Guèye-Ndiaye, Aïssatou; Mboup, Souleymane; Essex, Myron E.; Kanki, Phyllis J.

    2000-01-01

    Levels of virus in the plasma are closely related to the pathogenicity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). HIV-2 is much less pathogenic than HIV-1, and infection with HIV-2 leads to significantly lower plasma viral load. To identify the source of this difference, we measured both viral RNA and proviral DNA in matched samples from 34 HIV-2-infected individuals. Nearly half had undetectable viral RNA loads (<100 copies/ml), but levels of proviral DNA were relatively high and confirmed that quantities of provirus in HIV-1 and HIV-2 infection were similar. Overall, HIV-2 proviral DNA load did not correlate with viral RNA load, and higher viral RNA load was associated with increased production of plasma virus from the proviral template. These results suggest that low viral load in HIV-2 infection is due to decreased rates of viral production, rather than differences in target cell infectivity. PMID:10627569

  3. Arginase activity in pathogenic and non-pathogenic species of Leishmania parasites

    PubMed Central

    Badirzadeh, Alireza; Taheri, Tahereh; Taslimi, Yasaman; Abdossamadi, Zahra; Heidari-Kharaji, Maryam; Gholami, Elham; Sedaghat, Baharehsadat; Niyyati, Maryam

    2017-01-01

    Proliferation of Leishmania (L.) parasites depends on polyamine availability, which can be generated by the L-arginine catabolism and the enzymatic activity of arginase (ARG) of the parasites and of the mammalian hosts. In the present study, we characterized and compared the arginase (arg) genes from pathogenic L. major and L. tropica and from non-pathogenic L. tarentolae. We quantified the level of the ARG activity in promastigotes and macrophages infected with pathogenic L. major and L. tropica and non-pathogenic L. tarentolae amastigotes. The ARG's amino acid sequences of the pathogenic and non-pathogenic Leishmania demonstrated virtually 98.6% and 88% identities with the reference L. major Friedlin ARG. Higher ARG activity was observed in all pathogenic promastigotes as compared to non-pathogenic L. tarentolae. In vitro infection of human macrophage cell line (THP1) with pathogenic and non-pathogenic Leishmania spp. resulted in increased ARG activities in the infected macrophages. The ARG activities present in vivo were assessed in susceptible BALB/c and resistant C57BL/6 mice infected with L. major, L. tropica and L. tarentolae. We demonstrated that during the development of the infection, ARG is induced in both strains of mice infected with pathogenic Leishmania. However, in L. major infected BALB/c mice, the induction of ARG and parasite load increased simultaneously according to the time course of infection, whereas in C57BL/6 mice, the enzyme is upregulated solely during the period of footpad swelling. In L. tropica infected mice, the footpads' swellings were slow to develop and demonstrated minimal cutaneous pathology and ARG activity. In contrast, ARG activity was undetectable in mice inoculated with the non-pathogenic L. tarentolae. Our data suggest that infection by Leishmania parasites can increase ARG activity of the host and provides essential polyamines for parasite salvage and its replication. Moreover, the ARG of Leishmania is vital for parasite

  4. Arginase activity in pathogenic and non-pathogenic species of Leishmania parasites.

    PubMed

    Badirzadeh, Alireza; Taheri, Tahereh; Taslimi, Yasaman; Abdossamadi, Zahra; Heidari-Kharaji, Maryam; Gholami, Elham; Sedaghat, Baharehsadat; Niyyati, Maryam; Rafati, Sima

    2017-07-01

    Proliferation of Leishmania (L.) parasites depends on polyamine availability, which can be generated by the L-arginine catabolism and the enzymatic activity of arginase (ARG) of the parasites and of the mammalian hosts. In the present study, we characterized and compared the arginase (arg) genes from pathogenic L. major and L. tropica and from non-pathogenic L. tarentolae. We quantified the level of the ARG activity in promastigotes and macrophages infected with pathogenic L. major and L. tropica and non-pathogenic L. tarentolae amastigotes. The ARG's amino acid sequences of the pathogenic and non-pathogenic Leishmania demonstrated virtually 98.6% and 88% identities with the reference L. major Friedlin ARG. Higher ARG activity was observed in all pathogenic promastigotes as compared to non-pathogenic L. tarentolae. In vitro infection of human macrophage cell line (THP1) with pathogenic and non-pathogenic Leishmania spp. resulted in increased ARG activities in the infected macrophages. The ARG activities present in vivo were assessed in susceptible BALB/c and resistant C57BL/6 mice infected with L. major, L. tropica and L. tarentolae. We demonstrated that during the development of the infection, ARG is induced in both strains of mice infected with pathogenic Leishmania. However, in L. major infected BALB/c mice, the induction of ARG and parasite load increased simultaneously according to the time course of infection, whereas in C57BL/6 mice, the enzyme is upregulated solely during the period of footpad swelling. In L. tropica infected mice, the footpads' swellings were slow to develop and demonstrated minimal cutaneous pathology and ARG activity. In contrast, ARG activity was undetectable in mice inoculated with the non-pathogenic L. tarentolae. Our data suggest that infection by Leishmania parasites can increase ARG activity of the host and provides essential polyamines for parasite salvage and its replication. Moreover, the ARG of Leishmania is vital for parasite

  5. Reproductive clonality of pathogens: a perspective on pathogenic viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasitic protozoa.

    PubMed

    Tibayrenc, Michel; Ayala, Francisco J

    2012-11-27

    We propose that clonal evolution in micropathogens be defined as restrained recombination on an evolutionary scale, with genetic exchange scarce enough to not break the prevalent pattern of clonal population structure, a definition already widely used for all kinds of pathogens, although not clearly formulated by many scientists and rejected by others. The two main manifestations of clonal evolution are strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) and widespread genetic clustering ("near-clading"). We hypothesize that this pattern is not mainly due to natural selection, but originates chiefly from in-built genetic properties of pathogens, which could be ancestral and could function as alternative allelic systems to recombination genes ("clonality/sexuality machinery") to escape recombinational load. The clonal framework of species of pathogens should be ascertained before any analysis of biomedical phenotypes (phylogenetic character mapping). In our opinion, this model provides a conceptual framework for the population genetics of any micropathogen.

  6. Comparison of Deterministic and Probabilistic Radial Distribution Systems Load Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Atma Ram; Kumar, Ashwani

    2017-08-01

    Distribution system network today is facing the challenge of meeting increased load demands from the industrial, commercial and residential sectors. The pattern of load is highly dependent on consumer behavior and temporal factors such as season of the year, day of the week or time of the day. For deterministic radial distribution load flow studies load is taken as constant. But, load varies continually with a high degree of uncertainty. So, there is a need to model probable realistic load. Monte-Carlo Simulation is used to model the probable realistic load by generating random values of active and reactive power load from the mean and standard deviation of the load and for solving a Deterministic Radial Load Flow with these values. The probabilistic solution is reconstructed from deterministic data obtained for each simulation. The main contribution of the work is: Finding impact of probable realistic ZIP load modeling on balanced radial distribution load flow. Finding impact of probable realistic ZIP load modeling on unbalanced radial distribution load flow. Compare the voltage profile and losses with probable realistic ZIP load modeling for balanced and unbalanced radial distribution load flow.

  7. Stomata and pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Gudesblat, Gustavo E; Torres, Pablo S

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria and fungi are capable of triggering stomatal closure through pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), which prevents penetration through these pores. Therefore, the stomata can be considered part of the plant innate immune response. Some pathogens have evolved mechanisms to evade stomatal defense. The bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc), which infects plants of the Brassicaceae family mainly through hydathodes, has also been reported to infect plants through stomata. A recent report shows that penetration of Xcc in Arabidopsis leaves through stomata depends on a secreted small molecule whose synthesis is under control of the rpf/diffusible signal factor (DSF) cell-to-cell signaling system, which also controls genes involved in biofilm formation and pathogenesis. The same reports shows that Arabidopsis ROS- and PAMP-activated MAP kinase 3 (MPK3) is essential for stomatal innate response. Other recent and past findings about modulation of stomatal behaviour by pathogens are also discussed. In all, these findings support the idea that PAMP-triggered stomatal closure might be a more effective and widespread barrier against phytopathogens than previously thought, which has in turn led to the evolution in pathogens of several mechanisms to evade stomatal defense. PMID:20514224

  8. Bioterrorism: pathogens as weapons.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Peter D; Bokor, Gyula

    2012-10-01

    Biowarfare has been used for centuries. The use of biological weapons in terrorism remains a threat. Biological weapons include infectious agents (pathogens) and toxins. The most devastating bioterrorism scenario would be the airborne dispersal of pathogens over a concentrated population area. Characteristics that make a specific pathogen a high-risk for bioterrorism include a low infective dose, ability to be aerosolized, high contagiousness, and survival in a variety of environmental conditions. The most dangerous potential bioterrorism agents include the microorganisms that produce anthrax, plague, tularemia, and smallpox. Other diseases of interest to bioterrorism include brucellosis, glanders, melioidosis, Q fever, and viral encephalitis. Food safety and water safety threats are another area of concern.

  9. Evolution of intracellular pathogens.

    PubMed

    Casadevall, Arturo

    2008-01-01

    The evolution of intracellular pathogens is considered in the context of ambiguities in basic definitions and the diversity of host-microbe interactions. Intracellular pathogenesis is a subset of a larger world of host-microbe interactions that includes amoeboid predation and endosymbiotic existence. Intracellular pathogens often reveal genome reduction. Despite the uniqueness of each host-microbe interaction, there are only a few general solutions to the problem of intracellular survival, especially in phagocytic cells. Similarities in intracellular pathogenic strategies between phylogenetically distant microbes suggest convergent evolution. For discerning such patterns, it is useful to consider whether the microbe is acquired from another host or directly from the environment. For environmentally acquired microbes, biotic pressures, such as amoeboid predators, may select for the capacity for virulence. Although often viewed as a specialized adaptation, the capacity for intracellular survival may be widespread among microbes, thus questioning whether the intracellular lifestyle warrants a category of special distinctiveness.

  10. Candida albicans pathogenicity mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, François L.; Wilson, Duncan; Hube, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    The polymorphic fungus Candida albicans is a member of the normal human microbiome. In most individuals, C. albicans resides as a lifelong, harmless commensal. Under certain circumstances, however, C. albicans can cause infections that range from superficial infections of the skin to life-threatening systemic infections. Several factors and activities have been identified which contribute to the pathogenic potential of this fungus. Among them are molecules which mediate adhesion to and invasion into host cells, the secretion of hydrolases, the yeast-to-hypha transition, contact sensing and thigmotropism, biofilm formation, phenotypic switching and a range of fitness attributes. Our understanding of when and how these mechanisms and factors contribute to infection has significantly increased during the last years. In addition, novel virulence mechanisms have recently been discovered. In this review we present an update on our current understanding of the pathogenicity mechanisms of this important human pathogen. PMID:23302789

  11. Bloodborne Pathogens Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blasdell, Sharon

    1993-01-01

    The final rule on the Occupational Exposure to Bloodborne Pathogens was published in the Federal Register on Dec. 6, 1991. This Standard, 29 CFR Part 1910.130, is expected to prevent 8,900 hepatitis B infections and nearly 200 deaths a year in healthcare workers in the U.S. The Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health Services at KSC has been planning to implement this standard for several years. Various aspects of this standard and its Bloodborne Pathogens Program at KSC are discussed.

  12. Waterborne Pathogens: The Protozoans.

    PubMed

    Moss, Joseph Anthony

    2016-09-01

    Waterborne diseases associated with polluted recreational and potable waters have been documented for more than a century. Key microbial protozoan parasites, such as Cryptosporidium and Giardia, are causative agents for gastrointestinal disease worldwide. Although not a first-line diagnostic approach for these diseases, medical imaging, such as radiography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasonography, and nuclear medicine technologies, can be used to evaluate patients with long-term effects. This article describes protozoan pathogens that affect human health, treatment of common waterborne pathogen-related diseases, and associated medical imaging.

  13. Concentrations of Pathogens and Indicators in Animal Feces in the Sydney Watershed

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Peter; Griffith, Merran; Angles, Mark; Deere, Daniel; Ferguson, Christobel

    2005-01-01

    A fecal analysis survey was undertaken to quantify animal inputs of pathogenic and indicator microorganisms in the temperate watersheds of Sydney, Australia. The feces from a range of domestic animals and wildlife were analyzed for the indicator bacteria fecal coliforms and Clostridium perfringens spores, the pathogenic protozoa Cryptosporidium and Giardia, and the enteric viruses adenovirus, enterovirus, and reovirus. Pathogen and fecal indicator concentrations were generally higher in domestic animal feces than in wildlife feces. Future studies to quantify potential pathogen risks in drinking-water watersheds should thus focus on quantifying pathogen loads from domestic animals and livestock rather than wildlife. PMID:16204506

  14. 46 CFR 112.15-5 - Final emergency loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... AND POWER SYSTEMS Emergency Loads § 112.15-5 Final emergency loads. On vessels required to have a final emergency power source by § 112.05-5(a) of this chapter, the following emergency lighting and... cargo oil and fuel oil system, if the emergency power source is the source of power to meet § 56.60(d...

  15. 46 CFR 112.15-5 - Final emergency loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... AND POWER SYSTEMS Emergency Loads § 112.15-5 Final emergency loads. On vessels required to have a final emergency power source by § 112.05-5(a) of this chapter, the following emergency lighting and... cargo oil and fuel oil system, if the emergency power source is the source of power to meet § 56.60(d...

  16. 46 CFR 112.15-5 - Final emergency loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... AND POWER SYSTEMS Emergency Loads § 112.15-5 Final emergency loads. On vessels required to have a final emergency power source by § 112.05-5(a) of this chapter, the following emergency lighting and... cargo oil and fuel oil system, if the emergency power source is the source of power to meet § 56.60(d...

  17. 46 CFR 112.15-5 - Final emergency loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... AND POWER SYSTEMS Emergency Loads § 112.15-5 Final emergency loads. On vessels required to have a final emergency power source by § 112.05-5(a) of this chapter, the following emergency lighting and... cargo oil and fuel oil system, if the emergency power source is the source of power to meet § 56.60(d...

  18. 46 CFR 112.15-5 - Final emergency loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... AND POWER SYSTEMS Emergency Loads § 112.15-5 Final emergency loads. On vessels required to have a final emergency power source by § 112.05-5(a) of this chapter, the following emergency lighting and... cargo oil and fuel oil system, if the emergency power source is the source of power to meet § 56.60(d...

  19. 14 CFR 23.371 - Gyroscopic and aerodynamic loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... engine mount and its supporting structure must meet the requirements of paragraph (a) of this section and... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Flight Loads § 23.371 Gyroscopic and aerodynamic loads. (a) Each engine mount and its...

  20. 14 CFR 23.371 - Gyroscopic and aerodynamic loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... engine mount and its supporting structure must meet the requirements of paragraph (a) of this section and... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Flight Loads § 23.371 Gyroscopic and aerodynamic loads. (a) Each engine mount and its...

  1. 14 CFR 23.371 - Gyroscopic and aerodynamic loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... engine mount and its supporting structure must meet the requirements of paragraph (a) of this section and... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Flight Loads § 23.371 Gyroscopic and aerodynamic loads. (a) Each engine mount and its...

  2. 14 CFR 23.371 - Gyroscopic and aerodynamic loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... engine mount and its supporting structure must meet the requirements of paragraph (a) of this section and... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Flight Loads § 23.371 Gyroscopic and aerodynamic loads. (a) Each engine mount and its...

  3. 14 CFR 23.371 - Gyroscopic and aerodynamic loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... engine mount and its supporting structure must meet the requirements of paragraph (a) of this section and... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Flight Loads § 23.371 Gyroscopic and aerodynamic loads. (a) Each engine mount and its...

  4. Structural evaluation of the 2736Z Building for seismic loads

    SciTech Connect

    Giller, R.A.

    1994-09-23

    The 2736Z building structure is evaluated for high-hazard loads. The 2736Z building is analyzed herein for normal and seismic loads and is found to successfully meet the guidelines of UCRL-15910 along with the related codes requirements.

  5. 46 CFR 154.355 - Bow and stern loading piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Arrangements § 154.355 Bow and stern loading piping. (a) Bow and stern loading piping must: (1) Meet § 154.310; (2) Be installed in an area away from the accommodation, service, or control space on type IG hulls; (3) Be clearly marked; (4) Be segregated from the cargo piping by a removable spool piece in the...

  6. 46 CFR 107.260 - Rated load test for cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Rated load test for cranes. 107.260 Section 107.260 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Inspection and Certification § 107.260 Rated load test for cranes. (a) To meet...

  7. 46 CFR 107.260 - Rated load test for cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Rated load test for cranes. 107.260 Section 107.260 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Inspection and Certification § 107.260 Rated load test for cranes. (a) To meet...

  8. 46 CFR 107.260 - Rated load test for cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Rated load test for cranes. 107.260 Section 107.260 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Inspection and Certification § 107.260 Rated load test for cranes. (a) To meet...

  9. 46 CFR 107.260 - Rated load test for cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rated load test for cranes. 107.260 Section 107.260 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Inspection and Certification § 107.260 Rated load test for cranes. (a) To meet...

  10. 46 CFR 107.260 - Rated load test for cranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Rated load test for cranes. 107.260 Section 107.260 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Inspection and Certification § 107.260 Rated load test for cranes. (a) To meet...

  11. 75 FR 39205 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance...

  12. 75 FR 13075 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance...

  13. 77 FR 74827 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance...

  14. 78 FR 76101 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. ] SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance...

  15. 78 FR 12715 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance...

  16. 77 FR 7126 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance...

  17. RAS Ordinary Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-08-01

    Here are summarized talks from the February and March RAS Ordinary Meetings. The February meeting also enjoyed the Eddington Lecture from Prof. Lisa Kewley (Australian National University) on galaxy evolution in 3D.

  18. 75 FR 66061 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers...

  19. 76 FR 68127 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-03

    ...] [FR Doc No: 2011-28540] ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board (Access Board) plans to hold its regular...

  20. 76 FR 21702 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers...

  1. 77 FR 51513 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers...

  2. 76 FR 10557 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers...

  3. 76 FR 78611 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers...

  4. 77 FR 36479 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers...

  5. DISINFECTION OF EMERGING PATHOGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is a growing awareness of the need to control waterborne microbial pathogens. This presentation will concentate on the role of chemical inactivation, using chlorine, chloramines and ozone as a means of controlling bacterial and protozoan species. Information will be present...

  6. Marine Viral Pathogens.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    toxin producing microalgae (Raphidophyceae). Although we have not definitively shown that the pathogen is viral, it has many characteristics that...Society America, Miami, FL, June 1994. 40.Hennes, K.P. and C.A. Suttle. 1994. The use of cyanine dyes for quantifying free viruses in natural water

  7. Pathogenicity and virulence

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Many pathogenic microorganisms are host-specific in that they parasitize only one or a few animal species. For example, the cause of equine strangles, Streptococcus equi subspecies equi, is essentially limited to infection of horses. Others—certain Salmonella serotypes, for example—have a broad host...

  8. Leafhopper viral pathogens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Four newly discovered viral pathogens in leafhopper vectors of Pierce’s disease of grapes, have been shown to replicate in sharpshooter leafhoppers; the glassy-winged sharpshooter, GWSS, Homalodisca vitripennis, and Oncometopia nigricans (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae). The viruses were classified as memb...

  9. DISINFECTION OF EMERGING PATHOGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is a growing awareness of the need to control waterborne microbial pathogens. This presentation will concentate on the role of chemical inactivation, using chlorine, chloramines and ozone as a means of controlling bacterial and protozoan species. Information will be present...

  10. PATHOGEN EQUIVALENCY COMMITTEE (PEC)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency created the PEC in 1985 to make recommendations to EPA and State managers on the equivalency of unproven sewage sludge disinfection technologies/processes to either a Process to Significantly Reduce Pathogens (PSRP) or a Process to Further...

  11. PATHOGEN EQUIVALENCY COMMITTEE (PEC)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency created the PEC in 1985 to make recommendations to EPA and State managers on the equivalency of unproven sewage sludge disinfection technologies/processes to either a Process to Significantly Reduce Pathogens (PSRP) or a Process to Further...

  12. Making Meetings Work Better.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Standke, Linda

    1978-01-01

    Focusing on the increased use by trainers of off-site facilities for employee training meetings, this article looks at some improvements and the expanding market in the meeting site industry. It also highlights emerging trends in the industry and covers the growth of meeting planning into a profession. (EM)

  13. Managing Magnificent Meetings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christianson, Becky

    2005-01-01

    Though trustees may communicate informally via telephone or e-mail, the board's formal meetings are the primary setting in which issues of great consequence are discussed and decided. That's why it is vital for those responsible for planning board meetings to be certain each meeting accomplishes the business at hand. Beyond common sense, planning…

  14. 75 FR 58350 - Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-24

    ... RESEARCH COMMISSION Meeting Notice is hereby given that the U.S. Arctic Research Commission will hold its... presentations concerning Arctic research activities. The focus of the meeting will be reports and updates on programs and research projects affecting the Arctic. If you plan to attend this meeting, please notify...

  15. Specialists Meeting on Helicopter Design Mission Load Spectra

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-08-01

    enrogistreur do bord h 5 piates. Au d6but do l’ktude, noue avions aong4 h enregistrer lea donndes aous forms magndtique et h faire du ddpouil- lement...limit6 h l’dpoquo h 6,4 t. L𔃾valua- tion a port6 our 5 machines dunr l’une dtait dffectde h une 4cole de pilotage et lea autree baades done 4...lament 5 % au voiainage do cotte dernibre (ontro 95 ot 100 %). A titre comparatif, noun avons4 i indiqu6 dona Is mime tableau ia rdpartition does masses

  16. Advances in rapid detection methods for foodborne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xihong; Lin, Chii-Wann; Wang, Jun; Oh, Deog Hwan

    2014-03-28

    Food safety is increasingly becoming an important public health issue, as foodborne diseases present a widespread and growing public health problem in both developed and developing countries. The rapid and precise monitoring and detection of foodborne pathogens are some of the most effective ways to control and prevent human foodborne infections. Traditional microbiological detection and identification methods for foodborne pathogens are well known to be time consuming and laborious as they are increasingly being perceived as insufficient to meet the demands of rapid food testing. Recently, various kinds of rapid detection, identification, and monitoring methods have been developed for foodborne pathogens, including nucleic-acid-based methods, immunological methods, and biosensor-based methods, etc. This article reviews the principles, characteristics, and applications of recent rapid detection methods for foodborne pathogens.

  17. Harrison chairs annual meetings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katzoff, Judith A.

    Fostering the development of interdisciplinary ideas at AGU meetings is the primary goal of AGU's new Meetings Chairman, Christopher G. A. Harrison. “The strength of AGU is the broadness of disciplines represented [within it],” Harrison explained.Harrison is a professor of geophysics at the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science at the University of Miami. The upcoming 1986 Spring Meeting is the first for which Harrison is serving as chairman, and his term will end after the 1988 Fall Meeting. He succeeds H. Frank Eden, who had been Meetings Chairman since late 1982.

  18. Hemipterans as plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Kaloshian, Isgouhi; Walling, Linda L

    2005-01-01

    Integration of the tools of genetics, genomics, and biochemistry has provided new approaches for identifying genes responding to herbivory. As a result, a picture of the complexity of plant-defense signaling to different herbivore feeding guilds is emerging. Plant responses to hemipteran insects have substantial overlap with responses mounted against microbial pathogens, as seen in changes in RNA profiles and emission of volatiles. Responses to known defense signals and characterization of the signaling pathways controlled by the first cloned insect R gene (Mi-1) indicate that perception and signal transduction leading to resistance may be similar to plant-pathogen interactions. Additionally, novel signaling pathways are emerging as important components of plant defense to insects. The availability of new tools and approaches will further enhance our understanding of the nature of defense in plant-hemipteran interactions.

  19. WATERBORNE PATHOGENS IN URBAN WATERSHEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pathogens are microorganisms that can cause sickness or even death. A serious concern for managers of water resources, pathogens in the urban environment easily enter waters through a number of pathways, including discharge of inadequately treated sewage, stormwater runoff, combi...

  20. WATERBORNE PATHOGENS IN URBAN WATERSHEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pathogens are microorganisms that can cause sickness or even death. A serious concern for managers of water resources, pathogens in the urban environment easily enter waters through a number of pathways, including discharge of inadequately treated sewage, stormwater runoff, combi...

  1. 39 CFR 6.1 - Regular meetings, annual meeting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Regular meetings, annual meeting. 6.1 Section 6.1 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE U.S. POSTAL SERVICE MEETINGS (ARTICLE VI) § 6.1 Regular meetings, annual meeting. The Board shall meet regularly on a schedule...

  2. 78 FR 6306 - Sunshine Act Meeting-Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ... COMMISSION Sunshine Act Meeting--Closed Meeting The following notice of a closed meeting is published... HOLDING THE MEETING: Commodity Futures Trading Commission. TIME AND DATE: February 4, 2013 at 12:00 p.m... meeting changes, an announcement of the change, along with the new time and place of the meeting will be...

  3. 78 FR 2961 - Sunshine Act Meeting-Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-15

    ... COMMISSION Sunshine Act Meeting--Closed Meeting The following notice of a closed meeting is published... HOLDING THE MEETING: Commodity Futures Trading Commission. TIME AND DATE: January 14, 2013 at 10:00 a.m... meeting changes, an announcement of the change, along with the new time and place of the meeting will be...

  4. Multiplex detection of agricultural pathogens

    DOEpatents

    Siezak, Thomas R.; Gardner, Shea; Torres, Clinton; Vitalis, Elizabeth; Lenhoff, Raymond J.

    2013-01-15

    Described are kits and methods useful for detection of agricultural pathogens in a sample. Genomic sequence information from agricultural pathogens was analyzed to identify signature sequences, e.g., polynucleotide sequences useful for confirming the presence or absence of a pathogen in a sample. Primer and probe sets were designed and optimized for use in a PCR based, multiplexed Luminex assay and/or an array assay to successfully identify the presence or absence of pathogens in a sample.

  5. Multiplex detection of agricultural pathogens

    DOEpatents

    McBride, Mary Teresa; Slezak, Thomas Richard; Messenger, Sharon Lee

    2010-09-14

    Described are kits and methods useful for detection of seven agricultural pathogens (BPSV; BHV; BVD; FMDV; BTV; SVD; and VESV) in a sample. Genomic sequence information from 7 agricultural pathogens was analyzed to identify signature sequences, e.g., polynucleotide sequences useful for confirming the presence or absence of a pathogen in a sample. Primer and probe sets were designed and optimized for use in a PCR based, multiplexed Luminex assay to successfully identify the presence or absence of pathogens in a sample.

  6. Fatigue failure load indicator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imig, L. A.; Davis, W. T.; Davis, D. C. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    An indicator for recording the load at which a fatigue specimen breaks during the last cycle of a fatigue test is described. A load cell is attached to the specimen which is alternately subjected to tension and compression loads. The output of the load cell which is proportional to the load on the specimen is applied to the input of a peak detector. Each time the specimen is subjected to a compression load, means are provided for applying a positive voltage to the rest of the peak detector to reset it. During the last cycle of the tension load the peak detector measures the maximum load on the specimen. Means are provided for disconnecting the load cell from the peak detector when there is a failure in the specimen.

  7. Meeting Regulatory Requirements

    EPA Science Inventory

    Domestic wastewater is made up of sanitary wastes from homes, commercial businesses and industry, and includes beneficial, commensal and pathogenic microorganisms. The extent to which a given strain of pathogen may be found within a waste treatment system is largely dependant up...

  8. Meeting Regulatory Requirements

    EPA Science Inventory

    Domestic wastewater is made up of sanitary wastes from homes, commercial businesses and industry, and includes beneficial, commensal and pathogenic microorganisms. The extent to which a given strain of pathogen may be found within a waste treatment system is largely dependant up...

  9. Pseudomonas 2007 Meeting Review

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pseudomonas is an important genus of bacteria. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the third most common nosocomial pathogen in our society, associated with chronic and eventually fatal lung disease in cystic fibrosis patients, while Pseudomonas syringae species are prominent plant pathogens. The fluorescen...

  10. Pathogenicity Islands in Bacterial Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Herbert; Hensel, Michael

    2004-01-01

    In this review, we focus on a group of mobile genetic elements designated pathogenicity islands (PAI). These elements play a pivotal role in the virulence of bacterial pathogens of humans and are also essential for virulence in pathogens of animals and plants. Characteristic molecular features of PAI of important human pathogens and their role in pathogenesis are described. The availability of a large number of genome sequences of pathogenic bacteria and their benign relatives currently offers a unique opportunity for the identification of novel pathogen-specific genomic islands. However, this knowledge has to be complemented by improved model systems for the analysis of virulence functions of bacterial pathogens. PAI apparently have been acquired during the speciation of pathogens from their nonpathogenic or environmental ancestors. The acquisition of PAI not only is an ancient evolutionary event that led to the appearance of bacterial pathogens on a timescale of millions of years but also may represent a mechanism that contributes to the appearance of new pathogens within a human life span. The acquisition of knowledge about PAI, their structure, their mobility, and the pathogenicity factors they encode not only is helpful in gaining a better understanding of bacterial evolution and interactions of pathogens with eukaryotic host cells but also may have important practical implications such as providing delivery systems for vaccination, tools for cell biology, and tools for the development of new strategies for therapy of bacterial infections. PMID:14726454

  11. How to Run a Meeting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jay, Antony

    1976-01-01

    Offers guidelines on how to correct things that go wrong in meetings. Discusses functions of a meeting, distinctions in size and type of meetings, the chairman's role, defining meeting objectives, making preparations, and conducting a meeting that will meet its objectives. (Author/JG)

  12. Strategies for effective meetings.

    PubMed

    Gerwick, Michele A

    2013-04-01

    This article provides basic strategies for conducting effective meetings and providing committee chairs and members with a sense of accomplishment. Health care professionals can become easily frustrated regarding the need to attend meetings. They may perceive that attending a meeting is a waste of their valuable time, that nothing is ever accomplished, and that their input is not valued. Committee leaders need to use effective strategies to enhance each committee member's sense of accomplishment. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Preferential Amplification of Pathogenic Sequences.

    PubMed

    Ge, Fang; Parker, Jayme; Chul Choi, Sang; Layer, Mark; Ross, Katherine; Jilly, Bernard; Chen, Jack

    2015-06-11

    The application of next generation sequencing (NGS) technology in the diagnosis of human pathogens is hindered by the fact that pathogenic sequences, especially viral, are often scarce in human clinical specimens. This known disproportion leads to the requirement of subsequent deep sequencing and extensive bioinformatics analysis. Here we report a method we called "Preferential Amplification of Pathogenic Sequences (PATHseq)" that can be used to greatly enrich pathogenic sequences. Using a computer program, we developed 8-, 9-, and 10-mer oligonucleotides called "non-human primers" that do not match the most abundant human transcripts, but instead selectively match transcripts of human pathogens. Instead of using random primers in the construction of cDNA libraries, the PATHseq method recruits these short non-human primers, which in turn, preferentially amplifies non-human, presumably pathogenic sequences. Using this method, we were able to enrich pathogenic sequences up to 200-fold in the final sequencing library. This method does not require prior knowledge of the pathogen or assumption of the infection; therefore, it provides a fast and sequence-independent approach for detection and identification of human viruses and other pathogens. The PATHseq method, coupled with NGS technology, can be broadly used in identification of known human pathogens and discovery of new pathogens.

  14. Ecology of Fungal Plant Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Termorshuizen, Aad J

    2016-12-01

    Fungal plant pathogens are ubiquitous and highly diverse. Key to their success is high host density, which notably is the case in agroecosystems. Several hypotheses related to the effects of plant pathogens on plant diversity (the Janzen-Connell hypothesis, the dilution effect hypothesis) and the phenomenon of higher biomass in plant mixtures (i.e., overyielding) can all be explained by the quantitative interplay between host and pathogen density. In many agroecosystems, fungal plant pathogens cause great losses, since in monocultures diseased plants cannot be replaced by healthy plants. On the other hand, in natural ecosystems fungal plant pathogens shape the succession of vegetation and enhance the biodiversity of forests and grasslands. When pathogens are introduced into areas outside their natural range, they may behave differently, causing severe damage. Once introduced, changes may occur such as hybridization with other closely related pathogens or host shifts, host jumps, or horizontal gene transfer. Such changes can be hazardous for both agricultural and natural ecosystems.

  15. Portable pathogen detection system

    DOEpatents

    Colston, Billy W.; Everett, Matthew; Milanovich, Fred P.; Brown, Steve B.; Vendateswaran, Kodumudi; Simon, Jonathan N.

    2005-06-14

    A portable pathogen detection system that accomplishes on-site multiplex detection of targets in biological samples. The system includes: microbead specific reagents, incubation/mixing chambers, a disposable microbead capture substrate, and an optical measurement and decoding arrangement. The basis of this system is a highly flexible Liquid Array that utilizes optically encoded microbeads as the templates for biological assays. Target biological samples are optically labeled and captured on the microbeads, which are in turn captured on an ordered array or disordered array disposable capture substrate and then optically read.

  16. Use of cationic polymers to reduce pathogen levels during dairy manure separation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zong; Carroll, Zachary S; Long, Sharon C; Gunasekaran, Sundaram; Runge, Troy

    2016-01-15

    Various separation technologies are used to deal with the enormous amounts of animal waste that large livestock operations generate. When the recycled waste stream is land applied, it is essential to lower the pathogen load to safeguard the health of livestock and humans. We investigated whether cationic polymers, used as a flocculent in the solid/liquid separation process, could reduce the pathogen indicator load in the animal waste stream. The effects of low charge density cationic polyacrylamide (CPAM) and high charge density cationic polydicyandiamide (PDCD) were investigated. Results demonstrated that CPAM was more effective than PDCD for manure coagulation and flocculation, while PDCD was more effective than CPAM in reducing the pathogen indicator loads. However, their combined use, CPAM followed by PDCD, resulted in both improved solids separation and pathogen indicator reduction.

  17. Load sensing system

    DOEpatents

    Sohns, Carl W.; Nodine, Robert N.; Wallace, Steven Allen

    1999-01-01

    A load sensing system inexpensively monitors the weight and temperature of stored nuclear material for long periods of time in widely variable environments. The system can include an electrostatic load cell that encodes weight and temperature into a digital signal which is sent to a remote monitor via a coaxial cable. The same cable is used to supply the load cell with power. When multiple load cells are used, vast

  18. Taking a Load Off.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenny, John

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the snow -load capacity of school roofs and how understanding this data aids in planning preventive measures and easing fear of roof collapse. Describes how to determine snow-load capacity, and explains the load-bearing behavior of flat versus sloped roofs. Collapse prevention measures are highlighted. (GR)

  19. EDITORIAL: Nano Meets Spectroscopy Nano Meets Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, David J. S.

    2012-08-01

    The multidisciplinary two-day Nano Meets Spectroscopy (NMS) event was held at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), Teddington, UK, in September 2011. The event was planned from the outset to be at the interface of several areas—in particular, spectroscopy and nanoscience, and to bring together topics and people with different approaches to achieving common goals in biomolecular science. Hence the meeting cut across traditional boundaries and brought together researchers using diverse techniques, particularly fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy. Despite engaging common problems, these techniques are frequently seen as mutually exclusive with the two communities rarely interacting at conferences. The meeting was widely seen to have lived up to its billing in good measure. It attracted the maximum capacity of ~120 participants, including 22 distinguished speakers (9 from outside the UK), over 50 posters and a vibrant corporate exhibition comprising 10 leading instrument companies and IOP Publishing. The organizers were Professor David Birch (Chair), Dr Karen Faulds and Professor Duncan Graham of the University of Strathclyde, Professor Cait MacPhee of the University of Edinburgh and Dr Alex Knight of NPL. The event was sponsored by the European Science Foundation, the Institute of Physics, the Royal Society of Chemistry, NPL and the Scottish Universities Physics Alliance. The full programme and abstracts are available at http://sensor.phys.strath.ac.uk/nms/program.php. The programme was quite ambitious in terms of the breadth and depth of scope. The interdisciplinary and synergistic concept of 'X meets Y' played well, cross-fertilization between different fields often being a source of inspiration and progress. Fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy provided the core, but the meeting had little repetition and also attracted contributions on more specialist techniques such as CARS, super-resolution, single molecule and chiral methods. In terms of application the

  20. Cryptosporidium Pathogenicity and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Bouzid, Maha; Chalmers, Rachel M.; Tyler, Kevin M.

    2013-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is a protozoan parasite of medical and veterinary importance that causes gastroenteritis in a variety of vertebrate hosts. Several studies have reported different degrees of pathogenicity and virulence among Cryptosporidium species and isolates of the same species as well as evidence of variation in host susceptibility to infection. The identification and validation of Cryptosporidium virulence factors have been hindered by the renowned difficulties pertaining to the in vitro culture and genetic manipulation of this parasite. Nevertheless, substantial progress has been made in identifying putative virulence factors for Cryptosporidium. This progress has been accelerated since the publication of the Cryptosporidium parvum and C. hominis genomes, with the characterization of over 25 putative virulence factors identified by using a variety of immunological and molecular techniques and which are proposed to be involved in aspects of host-pathogen interactions from adhesion and locomotion to invasion and proliferation. Progress has also been made in the contribution of host factors that are associated with variations in both the severity and risk of infection. Here we provide a review comprised of the current state of knowledge on Cryptosporidium infectivity, pathogenesis, and transmissibility in light of our contemporary understanding of microbial virulence. PMID:23297262

  1. Pathogen survival in chorizos: ecological factors.

    PubMed

    Hew, Carrie M; Hajmeer, Maha N; Farver, Thomas B; Riemann, Hans P; Glover, James M; Cliver, Dean O

    2006-05-01

    This study addressed health risks from ethnic sausages produced on a small scale, without inspection, in California and elsewhere. Mexican-style chorizo, a raw pork sausage that is not cured, fermented, or smoked, was contaminated experimentally in the batter with Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, or Salmonella serotypes and stuffed into natural casings. Formulations were based on a market survey in California. Physical parameters that were controlled were pH, water activity (a(w)), and storage temperature. The pH was adjusted with vinegar, stabilizing at 5.0 within 24 h. Initial a(w) levels adjusted with salt were 0.97, 0.95, 0.93, 0.90, and 0.85; levels declined with time because of evaporation. Pathogen numbers declined with storage up to 7 days, with few brief exceptions. Main effects and interactions of constant temperature and pH with declining a(w) on survival of the pathogens were determined. Maximum death rates occurred at higher a(w) for E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella than for L. monocytogenes. Salt used to adjust a(w) affected palatability. Spices (black pepper, chili pepper, chili powder, cumin, garlic, guajillo pepper, oregano, and paprika) comprised another, potentially significant aspect of the sausage formulation. Some (notably black pepper and cumin) carried an indigenous microflora that contributed significantly to the microbial load of the sausage batter. Only undiluted fresh and powdered garlic exhibited a significant antimicrobial effect on the pathogens. Although each of the tested formulations caused death of the inoculated pathogens, none of the death rates was sufficiently rapid to ensure safety within the probable shelf life of the product.

  2. Holding Effective Board Meetings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of School Administrators, Arlington, VA.

    Advice and tested methods for management of meetings from superintendents and board members are combined in this reference book on conducting effective school board meetings. Intended for a wide readership, it contains three chapters and an exhibit section comprising over one-third of the document. Following a brief introduction, chapter 1,…

  3. RAS Ordinary Meetings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-02-01

    At the October 2013 meeting the President presented the Gold Medal to Prof. Chris Chapman, the Eddington Medal to Prof. James Binney, and Winton Capital Award to Dr Katherine Joy. Prof. Bob White gave the Harold Jeffreys Lecture on "Building the dynamic crust of Iceland by rifting and volcanism". At the November meeting, Prof. Eline Tolstoy gave the George Darwin Lecture on "Galactic palaeontology".

  4. Meeting Making Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, G. Rogers

    Resources for planning adult education events are provided in this manual. Four major sections, with subdivisions, are presented: (1) Pre-meeting Preparation (the planning committee, goals and objectives, facilities and equipment, and leadership); (2) The Meeting (orientation and opening, working toward the objectives, people factors, and…

  5. 78 FR 38009 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-25

    ... ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Meetings AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Architectural and... on Frontier Issues 4:30-5:00--Ad Hoc Committee on Accessible Design in Education Wednesday, July 10...

  6. 78 FR 1216 - Office of the Director, National Institutes of Health; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    .... App.), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee. The meeting will... DNA Advisory Committee. Date: January 24, 2013. Time: 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Agenda: The NIH Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee (RAC) will discuss Biosafety measures for research with highly pathogenic...

  7. 78 FR 64964 - Center for Scientific Review; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Center for Scientific Review; Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the Host Interactions with Bacterial Pathogens...

  8. 78 FR 66027 - Center for Scientific Review; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Center for Scientific Review; Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the Pathogenic Eukaryotes Study Section, October...

  9. Tropism and Pathogenicity of Rickettsiae

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Tsuneo

    2012-01-01

    Rickettsiae are obligate intracellular parasitic bacteria that cause febrile exanthematous illnesses such as Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Mediterranean spotted fever, epidemic, and murine typhus, etc. Although the vector ranges of each Rickettsia species are rather restricted; i.e., ticks belonging to Arachnida and lice and fleas belonging to Insecta usually act as vectors for spotted fever group (SFG) and typhus group (TG) rickettsiae, respectively, it would be interesting to elucidate the mechanisms controlling the vector tropism of rickettsiae. This review discusses the factors determining the vector tropism of rickettsiae. In brief, the vector tropism of rickettsiae species is basically consistent with their tropism toward cultured tick and insect cells. The mechanisms responsible for rickettsiae pathogenicity are also described. Recently, genomic analyses of rickettsiae have revealed that they possess several genes that are homologous to those affecting the pathogenicity of other bacteria. Analyses comparing the genomes of pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains of rickettsiae have detected many factors that are related to rickettsial pathogenicity. It is also known that a reduction in the rickettsial genome has occurred during the course of its evolution. Interestingly, Rickettsia species with small genomes, such as Rickettsia prowazekii, are more pathogenic to humans than those with larger genomes. This review also examines the growth kinetics of pathogenic and non-pathogenic species of SFG rickettsiae (SFGR) in mammalian cells. The growth of non-pathogenic species is restricted in these cells, which is mediated, at least in part, by autophagy. The superinfection of non-pathogenic rickettsiae-infected cells with pathogenic rickettsiae results in an elevated yield of the non-pathogenic rickettsiae and the growth of the pathogenic rickettsiae. Autophagy is restricted in these cells. These results are discussed in this review. PMID:22737150

  10. 76 FR 59454 - Sunshine Act Meeting; Notice of Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-26

    ... Sunshine Act Meeting; Notice of Public Meeting Notice is hereby given that the Railroad Retirement Board will hold a meeting on October 6, 2011, 10 a.m. at the Board's meeting room on the 8th floor of its headquarters building, 844 North Rush Street, Chicago, Illinois, 60611. The agenda for this meeting follows...

  11. Load Induced Blindness

    PubMed Central

    Macdonald, James S. P.; Lavie, Nilli

    2008-01-01

    Although the perceptual load theory of attention has stimulated a great deal of research, evidence for the role of perceptual load in determining perception has typically relied on indirect measures that infer perception from distractor effects on reaction times or neural activity (see N. Lavie, 2005d`) was consistently reduced with high, compared to low, perceptual load but was unaffected by the level of working memory load. Because alternative accounts in terms of expectation, memory, response bias, and goal-neglect due to the more strenuous high load task were ruled out, these experiments clearly demonstrate that high perceptual load determines conscious perception, impairing the ability to merely detect the presence of a stimulus—a phenomenon of load induced blindness. PMID:18823196

  12. Load Model Data Tool

    SciTech Connect

    David Chassin, Pavel Etingov

    2013-04-30

    The LMDT software automates the process of the load composite model data preparation in the format supported by the major power system software vendors (GE and Siemens). Proper representation of the load composite model in power system dynamic analysis is very important. Software tools for power system simulation like GE PSLF and Siemens PSSE already include algorithms for the load composite modeling. However, these tools require that the input information on composite load to be provided in custom formats. Preparation of this data is time consuming and requires multiple manual operations. The LMDT software enables to automate this process. Software is designed to generate composite load model data. It uses the default load composition data, motor information, and bus information as an input. Software processes the input information and produces load composition model. Generated model can be stored in .dyd format supported by GE PSLF package or .dyr format supported by Siemens PSSE package.

  13. Meeting Report: Ordinary Meeting and Exhibition Meeting, 2006 June 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGee, H.; Mobberley, M.

    2007-06-01

    Prior to the Ordinary Meeting, the annual Exhibition was opened by Richard Miles, President, who said he was pleased to report that all but two of the Sections had display stands this year, and that most of the Directors had also been able to attend and were available for members who wished to discuss their work. Although we had almost a full day of talks to enjoy, members should not be shy of coming and going from the lecture theatre at will, and in particular must make sure they took sufficient time to do justice to the excellent Exhibition on offer.

  14. Respiratory Pathogens in Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Good, Robert C.; May, Bessie D.

    1971-01-01

    Respiratory disease in a dynamic colony of nonhuman primates during a 4-year period was due primarily to infections caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae, Diplococcus pneumoniae, Bordetella bronchiseptica, Pasteurella multocida, and Haemophilus influenzae. The principal secondary invaders were Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and streptococci. A high fatality rate was associated with infections caused by each of the primary pathogens, and females appeared to be more susceptible than males. Incidence of respiratory disease was greatest in the fall and early winter; however, at all times newly colonized monkeys had a higher infection rate than conditioned monkeys. Infections were occasionally confined only to the lungs and were sometimes present without grossly observable lung lesions. The information given on susceptibility of 10 species of nonhuman primates to respiratory infections provides a basis for developing disease models. PMID:16557951

  15. Flagella and bacterial pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Duan, Qiangde; Zhou, Mingxu; Zhu, Liqian; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2013-01-01

    As locomotive organelles, flagella allow bacteria to move toward favorable environments. A flagellum consists of three parts: the basal structure (rotary motor), the hook (universal joint), and the filament (helical propeller). For ages, flagella have been generally regarded as important virulence factors, mainly because of their motility property. However, flagella are getting recognized to play multiple roles with more functions besides motility and chemotaxis. Recent evidence has pinpointed that the bacterial flagella participate in many additional processes including adhesion, biofilm formation, virulence factor secretion, and modulation of the immune system of eukaryotic cells. This mini-review summarizes data from recent studies that elucidated how flagella, as a virulence factor, contribute to bacterial pathogenicity.

  16. [Pathogenic factors of mycoplasma].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasmas are smallest organisms capable of self-replication and cause various diseases in human. Especially, Mycoplasma pneumoniae is known as an etiological agent of pneumonia. From 2010 to 2012, epidemics of M. pneumoniae infections were reported worldwide (e.g., in France, Israel, and Japan). In the diseases caused by mycoplasmas, strong inflammatory responses induced by mycoplasmas have been thought to be important. However, mycoplasmas lack of cell wall and do not possess inflammation-inducing endotoxin such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We purified inflammation-inducing factors from pathogenic mycoplasmas and identified that they were lipoproteins. Lipoproteins derived from mycoplasmas induced inflammatory responses through Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2. In addition, we demonstrated that cytadherent property of M. pneumoniae played an important role in induction of inflammatory responses. Cytadherent property of M. pneumoniae induced inflammatory responses through TLR2 independent pathway. TLR4, inflammasomes, and autophagy were involved in this TLR2 independent induction of inflammatory responses.

  17. [Streptococcus pyogenes pathogenic factors].

    PubMed

    Bidet, Ph; Bonacorsi, S

    2014-11-01

    The pathogenicity of ß-hemolytic group A streptococcus (GAS) is particularly diverse, ranging from mild infections, such as pharyngitis or impetigo, to potentially debilitating poststreptococcal diseases, and up to severe invasive infections such as necrotizing fasciitis or the dreaded streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. This variety of clinical expressions, often radically different in individuals infected with the same strain, results from a complex interaction between the bacterial virulence factors, the mode of infection and the immune system of the host. Advances in comparative genomics have led to a better understanding of how, following this confrontation, GAS adapts to the immune system's pressure, either peacefully by reducing the expression of certain virulence factors to achieve an asymptomatic carriage, or on the contrary, by overexpressing them disproportionately, resulting in the most severe forms of invasive infection.

  18. Probiotics against Campylobacter Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Sorokulova; Kirik; Pinchuk

    1997-12-01

    Background: The subject matter of this study was to investigate, for the first time, the immediate-preventive effect of probiotics, composed of bacillus species, in a murine model of Campylobacter infection. Methods: An established model of Campylobacter infection in mice with a defined LD50 was utilized to assess the protective effect of probiotics. Results: The results obtained demonstrate that the level of animal protection, after a single administration of the new probiotics biosporin and subalin, reached 90-100% at LD50 and 80% at LD100. Conclusions: Such efficacy of probiotics is considered to be due to their high antagonistic activity against those pathogens registered in vitro. Antagonistic activity of other tested probiotics (bactisubtil and cereobiogen) to different cultures of Campylobacter was not manifested.

  19. Rapid Detection of Pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    David Perlin

    2005-08-14

    Pathogen identification is a crucial first defense against bioterrorism. A major emphasis of our national biodefense strategy is to establish fast, accurate and sensitive assays for diagnosis of infectious diseases agents. Such assays will ensure early and appropriate treatment of infected patients. Rapid diagnostics can also support infection control measures, which monitor and limit the spread of infectious diseases agents. Many select agents are highly transmissible in the early stages of disease, and it is critical to identify infected patients and limit the risk to the remainder of the population and to stem potential panic in the general population. Nucleic acid-based molecular approaches for identification overcome many of the deficiencies associated with conventional culture methods by exploiting both large- and small-scale genomic differences between organisms. PCR-based amplification of highly conserved ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, intergenic sequences, and specific toxin genes is currently the most reliable approach for bacterial, fungal and many viral pathogenic agents. When combined with fluorescence-based oligonucleotide detection systems, this approach provides real-time, quantitative, high fidelity analysis capable of single nucleotide allelic discrimination (4). These probe systems offer rapid turn around time (<2 h) and are suitable for high throughput, automated multiplex operations that are critical for clinical diagnostic laboratories. In this pilot program, we have used molecular beacon technology invented at the Public health Research Institute to develop a new generation of molecular probes to rapidly detect important agents of infectious diseases. We have also developed protocols to rapidly extract nucleic acids from a variety of clinical specimen including and blood and tissue to for detection in the molecular assays. This work represented a cooperative research development program between the Kramer-Tyagi/Perlin labs on probe development

  20. Finding all BRCA pathogenic mutation carriers: best practice models

    PubMed Central

    Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Jongmans, Marjolijn CJ

    2016-01-01

    Identifying germline BRCA pathogenic mutations in patients with ovarian or breast cancer is a crucial component in the medical management of affected patients. Furthermore, the relatives of affected patients can be offered genetic testing. Relatives who test positive for a germline BRCA pathogenic mutation can take appropriate action to prevent cancer or have cancer diagnosed as early as possible for better treatment options. The recent discovery that BRCA pathogenic mutation status can inform treatment decisions in patients with ovarian cancer has led to an increased demand for BRCA testing, with testing taking place earlier in the patient care pathway. New approaches to genetic counselling may be required to meet this greater demand for BRCA testing. This review discusses the need for best practices for genetic counselling and BRCA testing; it examines the challenges facing current practice and looks at adapted models of genetic counselling. PMID:27514840

  1. Finding all BRCA pathogenic mutation carriers: best practice models.

    PubMed

    Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Jongmans, Marjolijn Cj

    2016-09-01

    Identifying germline BRCA pathogenic mutations in patients with ovarian or breast cancer is a crucial component in the medical management of affected patients. Furthermore, the relatives of affected patients can be offered genetic testing. Relatives who test positive for a germline BRCA pathogenic mutation can take appropriate action to prevent cancer or have cancer diagnosed as early as possible for better treatment options. The recent discovery that BRCA pathogenic mutation status can inform treatment decisions in patients with ovarian cancer has led to an increased demand for BRCA testing, with testing taking place earlier in the patient care pathway. New approaches to genetic counselling may be required to meet this greater demand for BRCA testing. This review discusses the need for best practices for genetic counselling and BRCA testing; it examines the challenges facing current practice and looks at adapted models of genetic counselling.

  2. Managing Meetings...Remotely

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Hugh

    2005-01-01

    Remote meetings are best for updates and information sharing, but it is possible to effectively facilitate decisions with a little planning. Generally, the meeting leader needs to clearly state the proposed decision and then separately poll each participant for concurrence. Normally, there will be a range of responses, requiring the facilitator to restate the proposal and repeat the process. Several iterations may be required before a consensus is achieved. I usually confirm decisions by restating the conclusion as it will appear in the meeting notes and asking the participants to express any objections. Gaining commitment to follow-up actions is never easy, of course, but tends to be particularly tricky in remote meetings. The ideal solution is to use collaboration software with a whiteboard as a means of recording the follow-up actions and responsibilities. (A Word or Excel document viewed through NetMeeting works equally well.) But if the meeting is being conducted without collaboration software, the leader must review each follow-up action explicitly, even painstakingly. I generally note follow-up actions throughout the meeting and use the last few minutes to confirm and finalize. I read each action and name the person I think owns the responsibility. When the person accepts, I validate by asking for a completion date. All the normal rules for assigning follow-up actions apply, of course. One, and only one, person must be responsible for each action, and assigning an action to somebody not present is akin to assigning it to nobody.

  3. Paper microchip with a graphene-modified silver nano-composite electrode for electrical sensing of microbial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Safavieh, Mohammadali; Kaul, Vivasvat; Khetani, Sultan; Singh, Anupriya; Dhingra, Karan; Kanakasabapathy, Manoj Kumar; Draz, Mohamed Shehata; Memic, Adnan; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Shafiee, Hadi

    2017-02-02

    Rapid and sensitive point-of-care diagnostics are of paramount importance for early detection of infectious diseases and timely initiation of treatment. Here, we present cellulose paper and flexible plastic chips with printed graphene-modified silver electrodes as universal point-of-care diagnostic tools for the rapid and sensitive detection of microbial pathogens or nucleic acids through utilizing electrical sensing modality and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP). We evaluated the ability of the developed paper-based assay to detect (i) viruses on cellulose-based paper microchips without implementing amplification in samples with viral loads between 10(6) and 10(8) copies per ml, and (ii) amplified HIV-1 nucleic acids in samples with viral loads between 10 fg μl(-1) and 10(8) fg μl(-1). The target HIV-1 nucleic acid was amplified using the RT-LAMP technique and detected through the electrical sensing of LAMP amplicons for a broad range of RNA concentrations between 10 fg μl(-1) and 10(8) fg μl(-1) after 40 min of amplification time. Our assay may be used for antiretroviral therapy monitoring where it meets the sensitivity requirement of the World Health Organization guidelines. Such a paper microchip assay without the amplification step may also be considered as a simple and inexpensive approach for acute HIV detection where maximum viral replication occurs.

  4. Multiplex detection of respiratory pathogens

    DOEpatents

    McBride, Mary [Brentwood, CA; Slezak, Thomas [Livermore, CA; Birch, James M [Albany, CA

    2012-07-31

    Described are kits and methods useful for detection of respiratory pathogens (influenza A (including subtyping capability for H1, H3, H5 and H7 subtypes) influenza B, parainfluenza (type 2), respiratory syncytial virus, and adenovirus) in a sample. Genomic sequence information from the respiratory pathogens was analyzed to identify signature sequences, e.g., polynucleotide sequences useful for confirming the presence or absence of a pathogen in a sample. Primer and probe sets were designed and optimized for use in a PCR based, multiplexed Luminex assay to successfully identify the presence or absence of pathogens in a sample.

  5. Host Specificity of Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Bäumler, Andreas; Fang, Ferric C.

    2013-01-01

    Most pathogens are able to infect multiple hosts but some are highly adapted to a single-host species. A detailed understanding of the basis of host specificity can provide important insights into molecular pathogenesis, the evolution of pathogenic microbes, and the potential for pathogens to cross the species barrier to infect new hosts. Comparative genomics and the development of humanized mouse models have provided important new tools with which to explore the basis of generalism and specialism. This review will examine host specificity of bacterial pathogens with a focus on generalist and specialist serovars of Salmonella enterica. PMID:24296346

  6. Intervention strategies for control of foodborne pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juneja, Vijay K.

    2004-03-01

    The increasing numbers of illnesses associated with foodborne pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli O157:H7, has renewed concerns about food safety because of consumer preferences for minimally processed foods that offer convenience in availability and preparation. Accordingly, the need for better control of foodborne pathogens has been paramount in recent years. Mechanical removal of microorganisms from food can be accomplished by centrifugation, filtration, trimming and washing. Cleaning and sanitation strategies can be used for minimizing the access of microorganisms in foods from various sources. Other strategies for control of foodborne pathogens include established physical microbiocidal treatments such as ionizing radiation and heating. Research has continued to demonstrate that food irradiation is a suitable process to control and possibly eliminate foodborne pathogens, for example Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli O157:H7, from a number of raw and cooked meat and poultry products. Heat treatment is the most common method in use today for the inactivation of microorganisms. Microorganisms can also be destroyed by nonthermal treatments, such as application of high hydrostatic pressure, pulsed electric fields, oscillating magnetic fields or a combination of physical processes such as heat-irradiation, or heat-high hydrostatic pressure, etc. Each of the non-thermal technologies has specific applications in terms of the types of food that can be processed. Both conventional and newly developed physical treatments can be used in combination for controlling foodborne pathogens and enhancing the safety and shelf life of foods. Recent research has focused on combining traditional preservation factors with emerging intervention technologies. However, many key issues still need to be addressed for combination preservation factors or technologies to be useful in the food industry to meet public demands for foods with enhanced safety

  7. Cementitious Stabilization of Mixed Wastes with High Salt Loadings

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, R.D.; Burgess, M.W.; Fedorov, V.V.; Downing, D.J.

    1999-04-01

    Salt loadings approaching 50 wt % were tolerated in cementitious waste forms that still met leach and strength criteria, addressing a Technology Deficiency of low salt loadings previously identified by the Mixed Waste Focus Area. A statistical design quantified the effect of different stabilizing ingredients and salt loading on performance at lower loadings, allowing selection of the more effective ingredients for studying the higher salt loadings. In general, the final waste form needed to consist of 25 wt % of the dry stabilizing ingredients to meet the criteria used and 25 wt % water to form a workable paste, leaving 50 wt % for waste solids. The salt loading depends on the salt content of the waste solids but could be as high as 50 wt % if all the waste solids are salt.

  8. Pathogen dynamics during invasion and establishment of white-nose syndrome explain mechanisms of host persistence.

    PubMed

    Frick, Winifred F; Cheng, Tina L; Langwig, Kate E; Hoyt, Joseph R; Janicki, Amanda F; Parise, Katy L; Foster, Jeffrey T; Kilpatrick, A Marm

    2017-03-01

    Disease dynamics during pathogen invasion and establishment determine the impacts of disease on host populations and determine the mechanisms of host persistence. Temporal progression of prevalence and infection intensity illustrate whether tolerance, resistance, reduced transmission, or demographic compensation allow initially declining populations to persist. We measured infection dynamics of the fungal pathogen Pseudogymnoascus destructans that causes white-nose syndrome in bats by estimating pathogen prevalence and load in seven bat species at 167 hibernacula over a decade as the pathogen invaded, became established, and some host populations stabilized. Fungal loads increased rapidly and prevalence rose to nearly 100% at most sites within 2 yr of invasion in six of seven species. Prevalence and loads did not decline over time despite huge reductions in colony sizes, likely due to an extensive environmental reservoir. However, there was substantial variation in fungal load among sites with persisting colonies, suggesting that both tolerance and resistance developed at different sites in the same species. In contrast, one species disappeared from hibernacula within 3 yr of pathogen invasion. Variable host responses to pathogen invasion require different management strategies to prevent disease-induced extinction and to facilitate evolution of tolerance or resistance in persisting populations. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  9. Pathogenic agents in freshwater resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geldreich, Edwin E.

    1996-02-01

    Numerous pathogenic agents have been found in freshwaters used as sources for water supplies, recreational bathing and irrigation. These agents include bacterial pathogens, enteric viruses, several protozoans and parasitic worms more common to tropical waters. Although infected humans are a major source of pathogens, farm animals (cattle, sheep, pigs), animal pets (dogs, cats) and wildlife serve as significant reservoirs and should not be ignored. The range of infected individuals within a given warm-blooded animal group (humans included) may range from 1 to 25%. Survival times for pathogens in the water environment may range from a few days to as much as a year (Ascaris, Taenia eggs), with infective dose levels varying from one viable cell for several primary pathogenic agents to many thousands of cells for a given opportunistic pathogen.As pathogen detection in water is complex and not readily incorporated into routine monitoring, a surrogate is necessary. In general, indicators of faecal contamination provide a positive correlation with intestinal pathogen occurrences only when appropriate sample volumes are examined by sensitive methodology.Pathways by which pathogens reach susceptible water users include ingestion of contaminated water, body contact with polluted recreational waters and consumption of salad crops irrigated by polluted freshwaters. Major contributors to the spread of various water-borne pathogens are sewage, polluted surface waters and stormwater runoff. All of these contributions are intensified during periods of major floods. Several water-borne case histories are cited as examples of breakdowns in public health protection related to water supply, recreational waters and the consumption of contaminated salad crops. In the long term, water resource management must focus on pollution prevention from point sources of waste discharges and the spread of pathogens in watershed stormwater runoff.

  10. Phalange Tactile Load Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Griffith, Bryan Kristian (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A tactile load cell that has particular application for measuring the load on a phalange in a dexterous robot system. The load cell includes a flexible strain element having first and second end portions that can be used to mount the load cell to the phalange and a center portion that can be used to mount a suitable contact surface to the load cell. The strain element also includes a first S-shaped member including at least three sections connected to the first end portion and the center portion and a second S-shaped member including at least three sections coupled to the second end portion and the center portion. The load cell also includes eight strain gauge pairs where each strain gauge pair is mounted to opposing surfaces of one of the sections of the S-shaped members where the strain gauge pairs provide strain measurements in six-degrees of freedom.

  11. Professors and Industry Meet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheriff, Robert E.

    1974-01-01

    Describes backgrounds of geophysics graduates that are desired for employment by industry. Also listed are areas in which industry could help universities concerning the development of programs to meet the future manpower needs in industry. (BR)

  12. Pacific Northwest AGU Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engebretson, David C.; Beck, Myrl E., Jr.

    1984-04-01

    The 30th AGU Pacific Northwest Regional Meeting was held September 29 to October 1, 1983, on the campus of Western Washington University, Bellingham, Wash. Approximately 125 attended the meeting, and 36 papers were presented. The meeting included two fields trips, five special symposia, and a banquet where keynote speaker Don Swanson presented “Dome building on Mt. St. Helens.”The meeting highlights included a symposium on Tertiary sedimentary basins of Washington and Oregon which revealed the importance of sedimentological studies for deciphering the timing and nature of accretionary processes in tectonically active areas. Geological and geophysical studies on the recent tectonics of the Juan de Fuca plate and nearby continent were presented by workers from the United States and Canada as well as ongoing studies for the evolution and character of the crystalline North Cascades of Washington and British Columbia.

  13. Professors and Industry Meet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheriff, Robert E.

    1974-01-01

    Describes backgrounds of geophysics graduates that are desired for employment by industry. Also listed are areas in which industry could help universities concerning the development of programs to meet the future manpower needs in industry. (BR)

  14. Water System Partnerships Meeting

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Flyer, agenda and background document for January 31, 2017 meeting focused on incentives and drivers to support water system partnership development, funding and finance options for partnerships, and outreach and education.

  15. Pathogen prevalence, group bias, and collectivism in the standard cross-cultural sample.

    PubMed

    Cashdan, Elizabeth; Steele, Matthew

    2013-03-01

    It has been argued that people in areas with high pathogen loads will be more likely to avoid outsiders, to be biased in favor of in-groups, and to hold collectivist and conformist values. Cross-national studies have supported these predictions. In this paper we provide new pathogen codes for the 186 cultures of the Standard Cross-Cultural Sample and use them, together with existing pathogen and ethnographic data, to try to replicate these cross-national findings. In support of the theory, we found that cultures in high pathogen areas were more likely to socialize children toward collectivist values (obedience rather than self-reliance). There was some evidence that pathogens were associated with reduced adult dispersal. However, we found no evidence of an association between pathogens and our measures of group bias (in-group loyalty and xenophobia) or intergroup contact.

  16. Sedimentation-related meetings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The sedimentation committee would like to provide information on several meetings that took place in October 1983.The second annual meeting of the American Geomorphological Field Group was organized by S. Wells and T. Gardner and held in Chaco Canyon, N. Mex., October 7-10. Field excursions included visits to instrumented watersheds in badland areas, examination of the Quaternary history of Chaco Canyon, and investigation of fluvial problems associated with uranium mine tailings disposal and coal reclamation.

  17. Environmental Persistence Influences Infection Dynamics for a Butterfly Pathogen.

    PubMed

    Satterfield, Dara A; Altizer, Sonia; Williams, Mary-Kate; Hall, Richard J

    2017-01-01

    Many pathogens, including those infecting insects, are transmitted via dormant stages shed into the environment, where they must persist until encountering a susceptible host. Understanding how abiotic conditions influence environmental persistence and how these factors influence pathogen spread are crucial for predicting patterns of infection risk. Here, we explored the consequences of environmental transmission for infection dynamics of a debilitating protozoan parasite (Ophryocystis elektroscirrha) that infects monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus). We first conducted an experiment to observe the persistence of protozoan spores exposed to natural conditions. Experimental results showed that, contrary to our expectations, pathogen doses maintained high infectivity even after 16 days in the environment, although pathogens did yield infections with lower parasite loads after environmental exposure. Because pathogen longevity exceeded the time span of our experiment, we developed a mechanistic model to better explore environmental persistence for this host-pathogen system. Model analysis showed that, in general, longer spore persistence led to higher infection prevalence and slightly smaller monarch population sizes. The model indicated that typical parasite doses shed onto milkweed plants must remain viable for a minimum of 3 weeks for prevalence to increase during the summer-breeding season, and for 11 weeks or longer to match levels of infection commonly reported from the wild, assuming moderate values for parasite shedding rate. Our findings showed that transmission stages of this butterfly pathogen are long-lived and indicated that this is a necessary condition for the protozoan to persist in local monarch populations. This study provides a modeling framework for future work examining the dynamics of an ecologically important pathogen in an iconic insect.

  18. Environmental Persistence Influences Infection Dynamics for a Butterfly Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Altizer, Sonia; Williams, Mary-Kate; Hall, Richard J.

    2017-01-01

    Many pathogens, including those infecting insects, are transmitted via dormant stages shed into the environment, where they must persist until encountering a susceptible host. Understanding how abiotic conditions influence environmental persistence and how these factors influence pathogen spread are crucial for predicting patterns of infection risk. Here, we explored the consequences of environmental transmission for infection dynamics of a debilitating protozoan parasite (Ophryocystis elektroscirrha) that infects monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus). We first conducted an experiment to observe the persistence of protozoan spores exposed to natural conditions. Experimental results showed that, contrary to our expectations, pathogen doses maintained high infectivity even after 16 days in the environment, although pathogens did yield infections with lower parasite loads after environmental exposure. Because pathogen longevity exceeded the time span of our experiment, we developed a mechanistic model to better explore environmental persistence for this host-pathogen system. Model analysis showed that, in general, longer spore persistence led to higher infection prevalence and slightly smaller monarch population sizes. The model indicated that typical parasite doses shed onto milkweed plants must remain viable for a minimum of 3 weeks for prevalence to increase during the summer-breeding season, and for 11 weeks or longer to match levels of infection commonly reported from the wild, assuming moderate values for parasite shedding rate. Our findings showed that transmission stages of this butterfly pathogen are long-lived and indicated that this is a necessary condition for the protozoan to persist in local monarch populations. This study provides a modeling framework for future work examining the dynamics of an ecologically important pathogen in an iconic insect. PMID:28099501

  19. Load sensing system

    DOEpatents

    Sohns, C.W.; Nodine, R.N.; Wallace, S.A.

    1999-05-04

    A load sensing system inexpensively monitors the weight and temperature of stored nuclear material for long periods of time in widely variable environments. The system can include an electrostatic load cell that encodes weight and temperature into a digital signal which is sent to a remote monitor via a coaxial cable. The same cable is used to supply the load cell with power. When multiple load cells are used, vast inventories of stored nuclear material can be continuously monitored and inventoried of minimal cost. 4 figs.

  20. Dynamic localized load balancing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balandin, Sergey I.; Heiner, Andreas P.

    2003-08-01

    Traditionally dynamic load balancing is applied in resource-reserved connection-oriented networks with a large degree of managed control. Load balancing in connectionless networks is rather rudimentary and is either static or requires network-wide load information. This paper presents a fully automated, traffic driven dynamic load balancing mechanism that uses local load information. The proposed mechanism is easily deployed in a multi-vendor environment in which only a subset of routers supports the function. The Dynamic Localized Load Balancing (DLLB) mechanism distributes traffic based on two sets of weights. The first set is fixed and is inverse proportional to the path cost, typically the sum of reciprocal bandwidths along the path. The second weight reflects the utilization of the link to the first next hop along the path, and is therefore variable. The ratio of static weights defines the ideal load distribution, the ratio of variable weights the node-local load distribution estimate. By minimizing the difference between variable and fixed ratios the traffic distribution, with the available node-local knowledge, is optimal. The above mechanism significantly increases throughput and decreases delay from a network-wide perspective. Optionally the variable weight can include load information of nodes downstream to prevent congestion on those nodes. The latter function further improves network performance, and is easily implemented on top of the standard OSPF signaling. The mechanism does not require many node resources and can be implemented on existing router platforms.

  1. Load regulating expansion fixture

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, L.M.; Strum, M.J.

    1998-12-15

    A free standing self contained device for bonding ultra thin metallic films, such as 0.001 inch beryllium foils is disclosed. The device will regulate to a predetermined load for solid state bonding when heated to a bonding temperature. The device includes a load regulating feature, whereby the expansion stresses generated for bonding are regulated and self adjusting. The load regulator comprises a pair of friction isolators with a plurality of annealed copper members located therebetween. The device, with the load regulator, will adjust to and maintain a stress level needed to successfully and economically complete a leak tight bond without damaging thin foils or other delicate components. 1 fig.

  2. Load regulating expansion fixture

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, Lawrence M.; Strum, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    A free standing self contained device for bonding ultra thin metallic films, such as 0.001 inch beryllium foils. The device will regulate to a predetermined load for solid state bonding when heated to a bonding temperature. The device includes a load regulating feature, whereby the expansion stresses generated for bonding are regulated and self adjusting. The load regulator comprises a pair of friction isolators with a plurality of annealed copper members located therebetween. The device, with the load regulator, will adjust to and maintain a stress level needed to successfully and economically complete a leak tight bond without damaging thin foils or other delicate components.

  3. IAVCEI meets at IUGG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiken, Grant

    Although distant from erupting volcanos, the Vienna meeting of the International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth's Interior attracted about 100 volcanologists with promise of technical exchange, music, and good food. In all fairness, turnout was small due to the highly successful IAVCEI meetings held in the last 2 years at Santa Fe, N.Mex., and Mainz, Germany, and the excellent meeting held the following week in Naples, Italy, in honor of the 150th anniversary of the Vesuvius Observatory. IAVCEI met during the 20th General Assembly of the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics held in August. For IAVCEI, the most important discussions held during the Vienna meeting concerned the association's future with the IUGG. Over the last 10 years, there has been great excitement and a burgeoning attendance at IAVCEI meetings but poor attendance at IUGG general assemblies. Many volcanologists perceive IUGG as an indifferent bureaucracy with little concern for IAVCEI. On this basis, members of IAVCEI proposed that their association become independent. However, the decision has been made to stay with IUGG because of the potential for interdisciplinary meetings with other associations.

  4. Proteomics of Foodborne Bacterial Pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagerquist, Clifton K.

    This chapter is intended to be a relatively brief overview of proteomic techniques currently in use for the identification and analysis of microorganisms with a special emphasis on foodborne pathogens. The chapter is organized as follows. First, proteomic techniques are introduced and discussed. Second, proteomic applications are presented specifically as they relate to the identification and qualitative/quantitative analysis of foodborne pathogens.

  5. USEPA PATHOGEN EQUIVALENCY COMMITTEE RETREAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pathogen Equivalency Committee held its retreat from September 20-21, 2005 at Hueston Woods State Park in College Corner, Ohio. This presentation will update the PEC’s membership on emerging pathogens, analytical methods, disinfection techniques, risk analysis, preparat...

  6. USEPA PATHOGEN EQUIVALENCY COMMITTEE RETREAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pathogen Equivalency Committee held its retreat from September 20-21, 2005 at Hueston Woods State Park in College Corner, Ohio. This presentation will update the PEC’s membership on emerging pathogens, analytical methods, disinfection techniques, risk analysis, preparat...

  7. SWEET sugar transporters for phloem transport and pathogen nutrition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Qing

    2014-03-01

    Many intercellular solute transport processes require an apoplasmic step, that is, efflux from one cell and subsequent uptake by an adjacent cell. Cellular uptake transporters have been identified for many solutes, including sucrose; however, efflux transporters have remained elusive for a long time. Cellular efflux of sugars plays essential roles in many processes, such as sugar efflux as the first step in phloem loading, sugar efflux for nectar secretion, and sugar efflux for supplying symbionts such as mycorrhiza, and maternal efflux for filial tissue development. Furthermore, sugar efflux systems can be hijacked by pathogens for access to nutrition from hosts. Mutations that block recruitment of the efflux mechanism by the pathogen thus cause pathogen resistance. Until recently, little was known regarding the underlying mechanism of sugar efflux. The identification of sugar efflux carriers, SWEETs (Sugars Will Eventually be Exported Transporters), has shed light on cellular sugar efflux. SWEETs appear to function as uniporters, facilitating diffusion of sugars across cell membranes. Indeed, SWEETs probably mediate sucrose efflux from putative phloem parenchyma into the phloem apoplasm, a key step proceeding phloem loading. Engineering of SWEET mutants using transcriptional activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-based genomic editing allowed the engineering of pathogen resistance. The widespread expression of the SWEET family promises to provide insights into many other cellular efflux mechanisms.

  8. Physical constraints for pathogen movement.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Ulrich S

    2015-10-01

    In this pedagogical review, we discuss the physical constraints that pathogens experience when they move in their host environment. Due to their small size, pathogens are living in a low Reynolds number world dominated by viscosity. For swimming pathogens, the so-called scallop theorem determines which kinds of shape changes can lead to productive motility. For crawling or gliding cells, the main resistance to movement comes from protein friction at the cell-environment interface. Viruses and pathogenic bacteria can also exploit intracellular host processes such as actin polymerization and motor-based transport, if they present the appropriate factors on their surfaces. Similar to cancer cells that also tend to cross various barriers, pathogens often combine several of these strategies in order to increase their motility and therefore their chances to replicate and spread. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Molecular pathogenicity of Streptococcus anginosus.

    PubMed

    Asam, D; Spellerberg, B

    2014-08-01

    Streptococcus anginosus and the closely related species Streptococcus constellatus and Streptococcus intermedius, are primarily commensals of the mucosa. The true pathogenic potential of this group has been under-recognized for a long time because of difficulties in correct species identification as well as the commensal nature of these species. In recent years, streptococci of the S. anginosus group have been increasingly found as relevant microbial pathogens in abscesses and blood cultures and they play a pathogenic role in cystic fibrosis. Several international studies have shown a surprisingly high frequency of infections caused by the S. anginosus group. Recent studies and a genome-wide comparative analysis suggested the presence of multiple putative virulence factors that are well-known from other streptococcal species. However, very little is known about the molecular basis of pathogenicity in these bacteria. This review summarizes our current knowledge of pathogenicity factors and their regulation in S. anginosus.

  10. Genomics of clostridial pathogens: implication of extrachromosomal elements in pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Brüggemann, Holger

    2005-10-01

    The recently decoded genomes of the major clostridial toxin-producing pathogens Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium tetani, Clostridium botulinum and Clostridium difficile have provided a huge amount of new sequence data. Recent studies have focused on the identification and investigation of pathogenic determinants and the regulatory events governing their expression. The sequence data revealed also the genomic background of virulence genes, as well as the contribution of extrachromosomal elements to a pathogenic phenotype. This has generated new insights in clostridial pathogenesis - and will continue to do so in the future - and has deepened our understanding of the anaerobic lifestyle of clostridial species.

  11. 77 FR 59979 - Meeting of the Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ... ENROLLMENT OF ACTUARIES Meeting of the Advisory Committee; Meeting AGENCY: Joint Board for the Enrollment of Actuaries. ACTION: Notice of Federal Advisory Committee meeting. SUMMARY: The Executive Director of the Joint Board for the Enrollment of Actuaries gives notice of a closed meeting of the Advisory...

  12. 75 FR 28062 - Meeting of the Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-19

    ... ENROLLMENT OF ACTUARIES Meeting of the Advisory Committee; Meeting AGENCY: Joint Board for the Enrollment of Actuaries. ACTION: Notice of Federal Advisory Committee meeting. SUMMARY: The Executive Director of the Joint Board for the Enrollment of Actuaries gives notice of a meeting of the Advisory Committee...

  13. 76 FR 17967 - Meeting of the Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-31

    ... ENROLLMENT OF ACTUARIES Meeting of the Advisory Committee; Meeting AGENCY: Joint Board for the Enrollment of Actuaries. ACTION: Notice of Federal Advisory Committee meeting. SUMMARY: The Executive Director of the Joint Board for the Enrollment of Actuaries gives notice of a closed meeting of the Advisory...

  14. 75 FR 59292 - Meeting of the Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-27

    ... ENROLLMENT OF ACTUARIES Meeting of the Advisory Committee; Meeting AGENCY: Joint Board for the Enrollment of Actuaries. ACTION: Notice of Federal Advisory Committee meeting. SUMMARY: The Executive Director of the Joint Board for the Enrollment of Actuaries gives notice of a closed meeting of the Advisory...

  15. 76 FR 70709 - Sunshine Act Meeting; Emergency Meeting Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION Sunshine Act Meeting; Emergency Meeting Notice This notice that an emergency meeting was held is.... AGENCY HOLDING THE MEETING: Commodity Futures Trading Commission. TIME AND DATE: The Commission held an...

  16. 76 FR 57068 - Board Meeting; Sunshine Act Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-15

    ... Board Meeting; Sunshine Act Meetings TIME AND DATE: September 26, 2011, 9 a.m.-1:30 p.m. PLACE: 901 N...: Approval of the Minutes of the June 6, 2011, Meeting of the Board of Directors Strategic Planning President and Management Report Communications Strategy Advisory Council Next Meetings PORTIONS TO BE OPEN TO...

  17. 78 FR 34135 - Sunshine Act Meetings; Notice of Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD Sunshine Act Meetings; Notice of Public Meeting Notice is hereby given that the Railroad Retirement Board will hold a meeting on June 19, 2013, 2:00 p.m. at the Board's meeting room on the 8th floor of...

  18. 78 FR 34135 - Sunshine Act Meetings; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD Sunshine Act Meetings; Notice of Closed Meeting Notice is hereby given that the Railroad Retirement Board will hold a closed meeting on June 20, 2013, beginning at 9:00 a.m. at the Board's meeting room on...

  19. Electronic Load Bank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huston, Steven W.

    1992-01-01

    Electronic load-bank circuit provides pulsed or continuous low-resistance load to imitate effect of short circuit on Ni/H2 or other electrochemical power cells. Includes safety/warning feature and taps for measurement of cell-output voltage and current.

  20. Microbial load monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caplin, R. S.; Royer, E. R.

    1977-01-01

    Design analysis of a microbial load monitor system flight engineering model was presented. Checkout of the card taper and media pump system was fabricated as well as the final two incubating reading heads, the sample receiving and card loading device assembly, related sterility testing, and software. Progress in these areas was summarized.

  1. Strip and load data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    The method of taking batch data files and loading these files into the ADABAS data base management system (DBMS) is examined. This strip and load process allows the user to quickly become productive. Techniques for data fields and files definition are also included.

  2. CRITICAL LOADS METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    I summarize the results of an interagency project that 1) defines a generic approach to quantifying and reporting critical loads, and 2) exercises that generic approach by examining a data rich system -- the critical loads of sulfur deposition and it's effect on the chronic acidi...

  3. Combining ascent loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houbolt, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    Criteria and guidelines are presented for combining loads that develop during the ascent phase of a space flight. The primary load-caring structure is discussed including the basic tank and interconnecting members, engine support mounts and connections to tank structure, transition structures between stages, payload shrouds, and the basic support points at separation planes.

  4. Load induced blindness.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, James S P; Lavie, Nilli

    2008-10-01

    Although the perceptual load theory of attention has stimulated a great deal of research, evidence for the role of perceptual load in determining perception has typically relied on indirect measures that infer perception from distractor effects on reaction times or neural activity (see N. Lavie, 2005, for a review). Here we varied the level of perceptual load in a letter-search task and assessed its effect on the conscious perception of a search-irrelevant shape stimulus appearing in the periphery, using a direct measure of awareness (present/absent reports). Detection sensitivity (d') was consistently reduced with high, compared to low, perceptual load but was unaffected by the level of working memory load. Because alternative accounts in terms of expectation, memory, response bias, and goal-neglect due to the more strenuous high load task were ruled out, these experiments clearly demonstrate that high perceptual load determines conscious perception, impairing the ability to merely detect the presence of a stimulus--a phenomenon of load induced blindness.

  5. Load Induced Blindness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macdonald, James S. P.; Lavie, Nilli

    2008-01-01

    Although the perceptual load theory of attention has stimulated a great deal of research, evidence for the role of perceptual load in determining perception has typically relied on indirect measures that infer perception from distractor effects on reaction times or neural activity (see N. Lavie, 2005, for a review). Here we varied the level of…

  6. Waterborne protozoan pathogens.

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, M M; Naumovitz, D; Ortega, Y; Sterling, C R

    1997-01-01

    Protozoan parasites were the most frequently identified etiologic agents in waterborne disease outbreak from 1991 to 1994. The waterborne parasites Giardia lamblia, Naegleria fowleri, Acanthamoeba spp., Entamoeba histolytica, Cryptosporidium parvum, Cyclospora cayetanesis, Isospora belli, and the microsporidia are reviewed. For each parasite, the review includes history, life cycle, incidence, symptoms, and therapy. Clinical detection methods are compared, and emerging technologies are discussed. Information on the association of these parasites with waterborne outbreaks is reviewed. Current information on protozoan parasites identified as etiological agents in waterborne outbreaks is discussed. Water industry issues related to recent disease outbreaks are examined in the context of water quality testing regulations for G. lamblia and those proposed for C. parvum. The review identifies the limitations of the American Society of Testing and Materials water-testing method for these parasites. An overview of federal regulations affecting the water industry and laboratories that test for water quality is also provided. The article highlights the importance of the clinical laboratory as a frontline defense for the detection of infectious organisms. The review points to the need for clinical laboratories, physicians, and public health personnel to cooperatively plan and assess the challenge of meeting this potential public health threat. PMID:8993859

  7. Transportation and handling loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostrem, F. E.

    1971-01-01

    Criteria and recommended practices are presented for the prediction and verification of transportation and handling loads for the space vehicle structure and for monitoring these loads during transportation and handling of the vehicle or major vehicle segments. Elements of the transportation and handling systems, and the forcing functions and associated loads are described. The forcing functions for common carriers and typical handling devices are assessed, and emphasis is given to the assessment of loads at the points where the space vehicle is supported during transportation and handling. Factors which must be considered when predicting the loads include the transportation and handling medium; type of handling fixture; transport vehicle speed; types of terrain; weather (changes in pressure of temperature, wind, etc.); and dynamics of the transportation modes or handling devices (acceleration, deceleration, and rotations of the transporter or handling device).

  8. Booster Interface Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentz, Steve; Wood, Bill; Nettles, Mindy

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between shock waves and the wake shed from the forward booster/core attach hardware results in unsteady pressure fluctuations, which can lead to large buffeting loads on the vehicle. This task investigates whether computational tools can adequately predict these flows, and whether alternative booster nose shapes can reduce these loads. Results from wind tunnel tests will be used to validate the computations and provide design information for future Space Launch System (SLS) configurations. The current work combines numerical simulations with wind tunnel testing to predict buffeting loads caused by the boosters. Variations in nosecone shape, similar to the Ariane 5 design (fig. 1), are being evaluated with regard to lowering the buffet loads. The task will provide design information for the mitigation of buffet loads for SLS, along with validated simulation tools to be used to assess future SLS designs.

  9. Lightening the Load

    PubMed Central

    Remington, Anna M.; Swettenham, John G.; Lavie, Nilli

    2012-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) research portrays a mixed picture of attentional abilities with demonstrations of enhancements (e.g., superior visual search) and deficits (e.g., higher distractibility). Here we test a potential resolution derived from the Load Theory of Attention (e.g., Lavie, 2005). In Load Theory, distractor processing depends on the perceptual load of the task and as such can only be eliminated under high load that engages full capacity. We hypothesize that ASD involves enhanced perceptual capacity, leading to the superior performance and increased distractor processing previously reported. Using a signal-detection paradigm, we test this directly and demonstrate that, under higher levels of load, perceptual sensitivity was reduced in typical adults but not in adults with ASD. These findings confirm our hypothesis and offer a promising solution to the previous discrepancies by suggesting that increased distractor processing in ASD results not from a filtering deficit but from enhanced perceptual capacity. PMID:22428792

  10. Host-Pathogen Interactions

    PubMed Central

    English, Patricia D.; Jurale, Joseph Byrne; Albersheim, Peter

    1971-01-01

    The effect of a number of physiological variables on the secretion of polysaccharide-degrading enzymes by culture-grown Colletotrichum lindemuthianum (Saccardo and Magnus) Scribner was determined. The number of spores used to inoculate cultures grown on isolated bean hypocotyl cell walls affects the time after inoculation at which enzyme secretion occurs, but has no significant effect on the maximal amount of enzyme ultimately secreted. Cell walls isolated from bean leaves, first internodes, or hypocotyls (susceptible to C. lindemuthianum infection), when used as carbon source for C. lindemuthianum growth, stimulate the fungus to secrete more α-galactosidase than do cell walls isolated from roots (resistant to infection). The concentration of carbon source used for fungal growth determines the final level of enzyme activity in the culture fluid. The level of enzyme secretion is not proportional to fungal growth; rather, enzyme secretion is induced. Maximal α-galactosidase activity in the culture medium is found when the concentration of cell walls used as carbon source is 1% or greater. A higher concentration of cell walls is necessary for maximal α-arabinosidase activity. Galactose, when used as the carbon source, stimulates α-galactosidase secretion but, at comparable concentrations, is less effective in doing so than are cell walls. Polysaccharide-degrading enzymes are secreted by C. lindemuthianum at different times during growth of the pathogen on isolated cell walls. Pectinase and α-arabinosidase are secreted first, followed by β-xylosidase and cellulase, then β-glucosidase, and, finally, α-galactosidase. PMID:16657562

  11. Hydrogen Contractors Meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzsimmons, Tim

    2006-05-16

    This volume highlights the scientific content of the 2006 Hydrogen Contractors Meeting sponsored by the Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering (DMS&E) on behalf of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). Hydrogen Contractors Meeting held from May 16-19, 2006 at the Crystal Gateway Marriott Hotel Arlington, Virginia. This meeting is the second in a series of research theme-based Contractors Meetings sponsored by DMS&E held in conjunction with our counterparts in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) and the first with the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program. The focus of this year’s meeting is BES funded fundamental research underpinning advancement of hydrogen storage. The major goals of these research efforts are the development of a fundamental scientific base in terms of new concepts, theories and computational tools; new characterization capabilities; and new materials that could be used or mimicked in advancing capabilities for hydrogen storage.

  12. Transient virulence of emerging pathogens.

    PubMed

    Bolker, Benjamin M; Nanda, Arjun; Shah, Dharmini

    2010-05-06

    Should emerging pathogens be unusually virulent? If so, why? Existing theories of virulence evolution based on a tradeoff between high transmission rates and long infectious periods imply that epidemic growth conditions will select for higher virulence, possibly leading to a transient peak in virulence near the beginning of an epidemic. This transient selection could lead to high virulence in emerging pathogens. Using a simple model of the epidemiological and evolutionary dynamics of emerging pathogens, along with rough estimates of parameters for pathogens such as severe acute respiratory syndrome, West Nile virus and myxomatosis, we estimated the potential magnitude and timing of such transient virulence peaks. Pathogens that are moderately evolvable, highly transmissible, and highly virulent at equilibrium could briefly double their virulence during an epidemic; thus, epidemic-phase selection could contribute significantly to the virulence of emerging pathogens. In order to further assess the potential significance of this mechanism, we bring together data from the literature for the shapes of tradeoff curves for several pathogens (myxomatosis, HIV, and a parasite of Daphnia) and the level of genetic variation for virulence for one (myxomatosis). We discuss the need for better data on tradeoff curves and genetic variance in order to evaluate the plausibility of various scenarios of virulence evolution.

  13. Transient virulence of emerging pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Bolker, Benjamin M.; Nanda, Arjun; Shah, Dharmini

    2010-01-01

    Should emerging pathogens be unusually virulent? If so, why? Existing theories of virulence evolution based on a tradeoff between high transmission rates and long infectious periods imply that epidemic growth conditions will select for higher virulence, possibly leading to a transient peak in virulence near the beginning of an epidemic. This transient selection could lead to high virulence in emerging pathogens. Using a simple model of the epidemiological and evolutionary dynamics of emerging pathogens, along with rough estimates of parameters for pathogens such as severe acute respiratory syndrome, West Nile virus and myxomatosis, we estimated the potential magnitude and timing of such transient virulence peaks. Pathogens that are moderately evolvable, highly transmissible, and highly virulent at equilibrium could briefly double their virulence during an epidemic; thus, epidemic-phase selection could contribute significantly to the virulence of emerging pathogens. In order to further assess the potential significance of this mechanism, we bring together data from the literature for the shapes of tradeoff curves for several pathogens (myxomatosis, HIV, and a parasite of Daphnia) and the level of genetic variation for virulence for one (myxomatosis). We discuss the need for better data on tradeoff curves and genetic variance in order to evaluate the plausibility of various scenarios of virulence evolution. PMID:19864267

  14. Opportunistic Premise Plumbing Pathogens: Increasingly Important Pathogens in Drinking Water

    PubMed Central

    Falkinham, Joseph O.; Pruden, Amy; Edwards, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Opportunistic premise plumbing pathogens are responsible for a significant number of infections whose origin has been traced to drinking water. These opportunistic pathogens represent an emerging water borne disease problem with a major economic cost of at least $1 billion annually. The common features of this group of waterborne pathogens include: disinfectant-resistance, pipe surface adherence and biofilm formation, growth in amoebae, growth on low organic concentrations, and growth at low oxygen levels. Their emergence is due to the fact that conditions resulting from drinking water treatment select for them. As such, there is a need for novel approaches to reduce exposure to these pathogens. In addition to much-needed research, controls to reduce numbers and human exposure can be instituted independently by utilities and homeowners and hospital- and building-operators. PMID:26066311

  15. August 2015 Proposed Total Maximum Daily Load Document and Appendices for Vermont Segments of Lake Champlain

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These documents provide allocations of phosphorus loads to Lake Champlain to meet water quality criteria, describe basis for allocation for future growth, & describe how implementation measures were simulated to determine that allocations can be achieved

  16. 77 FR 70484 - Preoperational Testing of Onsite Electric Power Systems To Verify Proper Load Group Assignments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-26

    ... encompass preoperational testing of electrical power systems used to meet current Station Blackout... COMMISSION Preoperational Testing of Onsite Electric Power Systems To Verify Proper Load Group Assignments, Electrical Separation, and Redundancy AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Draft regulatory...

  17. Host pathogen relations: exploring animal models for fungal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Harwood, Catherine G; Rao, Reeta P

    2014-06-30

    Pathogenic fungi cause superficial infections but pose a significant public health risk when infections spread to deeper tissues, such as the lung. Within the last three decades, fungi have been identified as the leading cause of nosocomial infections making them the focus of research. This review outlines the model systems such as the mouse, zebrafish larvae, flies, and nematodes, as well as ex vivo and in vitro systems available to study common fungal pathogens.

  18. Host Pathogen Relations: Exploring Animal Models for Fungal Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Harwood, Catherine G.; Rao, Reeta P.

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic fungi cause superficial infections but pose a significant public health risk when infections spread to deeper tissues, such as the lung. Within the last three decades, fungi have been identified as the leading cause of nosocomial infections making them the focus of research. This review outlines the model systems such as the mouse, zebrafish larvae, flies, and nematodes, as well as ex vivo and in vitro systems available to study common fungal pathogens. PMID:25438011

  19. Functional genomics of pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Moxon, E R; Hood, D W; Saunders, N J; Schweda, E K H; Richards, J C

    2002-01-01

    Microbial diseases remain the commonest cause of global mortality and morbidity. Automated-DNA sequencing has revolutionized the investigation of pathogenic microbes by making the immense fund of information contained in their genomes available at reasonable cost. The challenge is how this information can be used to increase current understanding of the biology of commensal and virulence behaviour of pathogens with particular emphasis on in vivo function and novel approaches to prevention. One example of the application of whole-genome-sequence information is afforded by investigations of the pathogenic role of Haemophilus influenzae lipopolysaccharide and its candidacy as a vaccine. PMID:11839188

  20. Governing Board Meeting Management Checklist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halverson, Don E.

    This checklist is intended to give school governing board members a means of assessing their meeting practices. The checklist contains five categories, with a total of 80 questions, pertaining to meeting-management variables common to all governing boards. The categories include: (1) preparation for the meetings; (2) operation of the meetings; (3)…

  1. 75 FR 56608 - Agency Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-16

    ... COMMISSION Agency Meeting Federal Register Citation of Previous Announcement: [To be published] Status: Open Meeting. Place: 100 F. Street, NE., Washington, DC. Date and Time of Previously Announced Meeting: September 15, 2010. Change In the Meeting: Room Change. The Joint Public Roundtable on Swap Execution...

  2. Council Meeting Highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Council held a very productive meeting on 17 June using telephone conferencing and a Web-based system for sharing documents. Although the Executive Committee and many other committees have long conducted their business telephonically, this was a first for Council. The early date of the Joint Assembly in Nice, which incorporated AGU's 2003 Spring Meeting, meant that the critical item for Council, approval of the slate of candidates for the next election, would not be ready for action at that time. Thus, the meeting was scheduled for June in conjunction with the Planning Committee. The slate of nominees for the 2004-2006 term was approved as presented by the Union and Section nominating committees. The accompanying story provides the names and the process for petition nominations from the membership.

  3. EASD Diabetes Technology Meeting

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The first diabetes technology meeting organized by the European Diabetes Association covers the range from regulatory aspects, patient safety, about registries to clinical studies. After an intensive discussion about the evidence required for registration and reimbursement on new medical devices and in vitro diagnostics it becomes clear that more and better clinical trials will be required in the future. This was also highlighted by representatives of the American Diabetes Association. The 2 associations will be active in this field of research by a joint committee. This meeting is intended not to become a large-scale meeting focused on education but to provide a platform for an open discussion of experts involved in all areas that are relevant to achieve a meaningful usage of diabetes technology. PMID:24876444

  4. Urbanization Increases Pathogen Pressure on Feral and Managed Honey Bees

    PubMed Central

    López-Uribe, Margarita M.; Tarpy, David R.; Frank, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    Given the role of infectious disease in global pollinator decline, there is a need to understand factors that shape pathogen susceptibility and transmission in bees. Here we ask how urbanization affects the immune response and pathogen load of feral and managed colonies of honey bees (Apis mellifera Linnaeus), the predominant economically important pollinator worldwide. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we measured expression of 4 immune genes and relative abundance of 10 honey bee pathogens. We also measured worker survival in a laboratory bioassay. We found that pathogen pressure on honey bees increased with urbanization and management, and the probability of worker survival declined 3-fold along our urbanization gradient. The effect of management on pathogens appears to be mediated by immunity, with feral bees expressing immune genes at nearly twice the levels of managed bees following an immune challenge. The effect of urbanization, however, was not linked with immunity; instead, urbanization may favor viability and transmission of some disease agents. Feral colonies, with lower disease burdens and stronger immune responses, may illuminate ways to improve honey bee management. The previously unexamined effects of urbanization on honey-bee disease are concerning, suggesting that urban areas may favor problematic diseases of pollinators. PMID:26536606

  5. Urbanization Increases Pathogen Pressure on Feral and Managed Honey Bees.

    PubMed

    Youngsteadt, Elsa; Appler, R Holden; López-Uribe, Margarita M; Tarpy, David R; Frank, Steven D

    2015-01-01

    Given the role of infectious disease in global pollinator decline, there is a need to understand factors that shape pathogen susceptibility and transmission in bees. Here we ask how urbanization affects the immune response and pathogen load of feral and managed colonies of honey bees (Apis mellifera Linnaeus), the predominant economically important pollinator worldwide. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we measured expression of 4 immune genes and relative abundance of 10 honey bee pathogens. We also measured worker survival in a laboratory bioassay. We found that pathogen pressure on honey bees increased with urbanization and management, and the probability of worker survival declined 3-fold along our urbanization gradient. The effect of management on pathogens appears to be mediated by immunity, with feral bees expressing immune genes at nearly twice the levels of managed bees following an immune challenge. The effect of urbanization, however, was not linked with immunity; instead, urbanization may favor viability and transmission of some disease agents. Feral colonies, with lower disease burdens and stronger immune responses, may illuminate ways to improve honey bee management. The previously unexamined effects of urbanization on honey-bee disease are concerning, suggesting that urban areas may favor problematic diseases of pollinators.

  6. 1.5 MW RF Load for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, Robert Lawrence; Marsden, David; Collins, George; Karimov, Rasul; Mizuhara, Max; Neilson, Jeffrey

    2016-09-01

    Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. developed a 1.5 MW RF load for the ITER fusion research facility currently under construction in France. This program leveraged technology developed in two previous SBIR programs that successfully developed high power RF loads for fusion research applications. This program specifically focused on modifications required by revised technical performance, materials, and assembly specification for ITER. This program implemented an innovative approach to actively distribute the RF power inside the load to avoid excessive heating or arcing associated with constructive interference. The new design implemented materials and assembly changes required to meet specifications. Critical components were built and successfully tested during the program.

  7. Future research needs involving pathogens in groundwater

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Contamination of groundwater by enteric pathogens has commonly been associated with disease outbreaks. Proper management and treatment of pathogen sources are important barriers to preventing groundwater contamination. However, non-point sources of pathogen contamination are frequently difficult to ...

  8. Leopold Fellows meet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Dennis L.

    Communicating the results of environmental science research to nonscientists was the focus of a week-long meeting of fellows of the Aldo Leopold Leadership Program (ALLP) in June. Participating were 20 mid-career university facultymembers, the first group of ALLP fellows to be selected.Discussions were held on the role of scientists in society, techniques for effective leadership, improving communications skills, and working productively with news media. The training program considers both print and broadcast media as well as other outreach vehicles. The meeting was held at Kah Nee Ta Resort on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation, Warm Springs, Oregon, June 15-21, 1999.

  9. Load Balancing Scientific Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pearce, Olga Tkachyshyn

    2014-12-01

    The largest supercomputers have millions of independent processors, and concurrency levels are rapidly increasing. For ideal efficiency, developers of the simulations that run on these machines must ensure that computational work is evenly balanced among processors. Assigning work evenly is challenging because many large modern parallel codes simulate behavior of physical systems that evolve over time, and their workloads change over time. Furthermore, the cost of imbalanced load increases with scale because most large-scale scientific simulations today use a Single Program Multiple Data (SPMD) parallel programming model, and an increasing number of processors will wait for the slowest one at the synchronization points. To address load imbalance, many large-scale parallel applications use dynamic load balance algorithms to redistribute work evenly. The research objective of this dissertation is to develop methods to decide when and how to load balance the application, and to balance it effectively and affordably. We measure and evaluate the computational load of the application, and develop strategies to decide when and how to correct the imbalance. Depending on the simulation, a fast, local load balance algorithm may be suitable, or a more sophisticated and expensive algorithm may be required. We developed a model for comparison of load balance algorithms for a specific state of the simulation that enables the selection of a balancing algorithm that will minimize overall runtime.

  10. Cable load sensing device

    DOEpatents

    Beus, Michael J.; McCoy, William G.

    1998-01-01

    Apparatus for sensing the magnitude of a load on a cable as the cable is employed to support the load includes a beam structure clamped to the cable so that a length of the cable lies along the beam structure. A spacer associated with the beam structure forces a slight curvature in a portion of the length of cable under a cable "no-load" condition so that the portion of the length of cable is spaced from the beam structure to define a cable curved portion. A strain gauge circuit including strain gauges is secured to the beam structure by welding. As the cable is employed to support a load the load causes the cable curved portion to exert a force normal to the cable through the spacer and on the beam structure to deform the beam structure as the cable curved portion attempts to straighten under the load. As this deformation takes place, the resistance of the strain gauges is set to a value proportional to the magnitude of the normal strain on the beam structure during such deformation. The magnitude of the normal strain is manipulated in a control device to generate a value equal to the magnitude or weight of the load supported by the cable.

  11. Pathogens in Dairy Farming: Source Characterization and Groundwater Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwill, E. R.; Watanabe, N.; Li, X.; Hou, L.; Harter, T.; Bergamaschi, B.

    2007-12-01

    Intense animal husbandry is of growing concern as a potential contamination source of enteric pathogens as well as antibiotics. To assess the public health risk from pathogens and their hydrologic pathways, we hypothesize that the animal farm is not a homogeneous diffuse source, but that pathogen loading to the soil and, therefore, to groundwater varies significantly between the various management units of a farm. A dairy farm, for example, may include an area with calf hutches, corrals for heifers of various ages, freestalls and exercise yards for milking cows, separate freestalls for dry cows, a hospital barn, a yard for collection of solid manure, a liquid manure storage lagoon, and fields receiving various amounts of liquid and solid manure. Pathogen shedding and, hence, therapeutic and preventive pharmaceutical treatments vary between these management units. We are implementing a field reconnaissance program to determine the occurrence of three different pathogens ( E. coli, Salmonella, Campylobacter) and one indicator organism ( Enterococcus) at the ground-surface and in shallow groundwater of seven different management units on each of two farms, and in each of four seasons (spring/dry season, summer/irrigation season, fall/dry season, winter/rainy season). Initial results indicate that significant differences exist in the occurrence of these pathogens between management units and between organisms. These differences are weakly reflected in their occurrence in groundwater, despite the similarity of the shallow geologic environment across these sites. Our results indicate the importance of differentiating sources within a dairy farm and the importance of understanding subsurface transport processes for these pathogens.

  12. A loaded thermoacoustic engine

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, J.R.; Swift, G.W.

    1995-11-01

    Measurements and analysis of the performance of a thermoacoustic engine driving a dissipative load are presented. The effect of the load can be explained qualitatively using a simple low-amplitude approximation and quantitatively by invoking a more accurate low-amplitude numerical solution. The heater power {ital @};DQ and hot-end temperature {ital T}{sub {ital H}} are found to be simple functions of the load impedance and the unloaded values of {ital @};DQ and {ital T}{sub {ital H}}. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital Acoustical} {ital Society} {ital of} {ital America}.

  13. Dynamic load simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joncas, K. P.

    1972-01-01

    Concepts and techniques for identifying and simulating both the steady state and dynamic characteristics of electrical loads for use during integrated system test and evaluation are discussed. The investigations showed that it is feasible to design and develop interrogation and simulation equipment to perform the desired functions. During the evaluation, actual spacecraft loads were interrogated by stimulating the loads with their normal input voltage and measuring the resultant voltage and current time histories. Elements of the circuits were optimized by an iterative process of selecting element values and comparing the time-domain response of the model with those obtained from the real equipment during interrogation.

  14. Pathogen detection using engineered bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Smartt, Abby E; Xu, Tingting; Jegier, Patricia; Carswell, Jessica J; Blount, Samuel A; Sayler, Gary S; Ripp, Steven

    2012-04-01

    Bacteriophages, or phages, are bacterial viruses that can infect a broad or narrow range of host organisms. Knowing the host range of a phage allows it to be exploited in targeting various pathogens. Applying phages for the identification of microorganisms related to food and waterborne pathogens and pathogens of clinical significance to humans and animals has a long history, and there has to some extent been a recent revival in these applications as phages have become more extensively integrated into novel detection, identification, and monitoring technologies. Biotechnological and genetic engineering strategies applied to phages are responsible for some of these new methods, but even natural unmodified phages are widely applicable when paired with appropriate innovative detector platforms. This review highlights the use of phages as pathogen detector interfaces to provide the reader with an up-to-date inventory of phage-based biodetection strategies.

  15. Evolution of Immunity and Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Jack, Robert S

    2015-01-01

    Host and pathogen engage in a constant evolutionary struggle known as a "Red Queen Paradigm". In this struggle, natural selection favours the pathogen which evolves effective virulence mechanisms and the host which is able to field adequate resistance strategies. A number of factors limit what each side can do. These include the fact that the elaboration of virulence or resistance mechanisms results in costs in genetic fitness and requires the use of ever more of the limited number of genes available in the genome. In addition, since the pathogen usually has a very much shorter generation time than the host, it can fix new virulence mutations much more quickly than the host can evolve matching resistance mechanisms. Finally, the host must ensure that its defence system does not result in unacceptable levels of collateral damage to its own tissues. This chapter briefly outlines how these considerations shape host-pathogen interactions.

  16. Palmitoylation, pathogens and their host.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Mathieu; Blaskovic, Sanja; van der Goot, F Gisou

    2013-02-01

    S-Palmitoylation, the only reversible post-translational lipid modification, confers unique biochemical and functional properties to proteins. Although it has long been known that viral proteins are palmitoylated, recent studies reveal that this modification plays a critical role for pathogens of all kinds and at multiple steps of their life cycle. The present review examines the involvement of S-palmitoylation in infection by viruses, bacteria and parasites and illustrates how pathogens have evolved to manipulate the host palmitoylation machinery.

  17. Foodborne pathogens and their toxins.

    PubMed

    Martinović, Tamara; Andjelković, Uroš; Gajdošik, Martina Šrajer; Rešetar, Dina; Josić, Djuro

    2016-09-16

    Foodborne pathogens, mostly bacteria and fungi, but also some viruses, prions and protozoa, contaminate food during production and processing, but also during storage and transport before consuming. During their growth these microorganisms can secrete different components, including toxins, into the extracellular environment. Other harmful substances can be also liberated and can contaminate food after disintegration of food pathogens. Some bacterial and fungal toxins can be resistant to inactivation, and can survive harsh treatment during food processing. Many of these molecules are involved in cellular processes and can indicate different mechanisms of pathogenesis of foodborne organisms. More knowledge about food contaminants can also help understand their inactivation. In the present review the use of proteomics, peptidomics and metabolomics, in addition to other foodomic methods for the detection of foodborne pathogenic fungi and bacteria, is overviewed. Furthermore, it is discussed how these techniques can be used for discovering biomarkers for pathogenicity of foodborne pathogens, determining the mechanisms by which they act, and studying their resistance upon inactivation in food of animal and plant origin. Comprehensive and comparative view into the genome and proteome of foodborne pathogens of bacterial or fungal origin and foodomic, mostly proteomic, peptidomic and metabolomic investigation of their toxin production and their mechanism of action is necessary in order to get further information about their virulence, pathogenicity and survival under stress conditions. Furthermore, these data pave the way for identification of biomarkers to trace sources of contamination with food-borne microorganisms and their endo- and exotoxins in order to ensure food safety and prevent the outbreak of food-borne diseases. Therefore, detection of pathogens and their toxins during production, transport and before consume of food produce, as well as protection against

  18. 1999 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1999-12-01

    and/or capacity, which BPA may use or market to increase revenues. Conversely, if Federal system firm loads exceed available resources, there is a deficit of energy and/or capacity and BPA would add conservation or contract purchases as needed to meet its firm loads. The load forecast is derived by using econometric models and analysis to predict the loads that will be placed on electric utilities in the region. This study incorporates information on contract obligations and contract resources, combined with the resource capabilities obtained from public utility and investor-owned utility (IOU) customers through their annual data submittals to the PNUCC, from BPA's Firm Resource Exhibit (FRE Exhibit I) submittals, and through analysis of the Federal hydroelectric power system. The loads and resources analysis in this study simulates the operation of the power system under the Pacific Northwest Coordination Agreement (PNCA) produced by the Pacific Northwest Coordinating Group. The PNCA defines the planning and operation of the regional hydrosystem. The 1999 White Book is presented in two documents: (1) this summary of Federal system and Pacific Northwest region loads and resources; and (2) a technical appendix (available electronically only) detailing the loads and resources for each major Pacific Northwest generating utility. This analysis updates the December 1998 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study. This analysis projects the yearly average energy consumption and resource availability for Operating Years (OY) 2000-01 through 2009-10. The study shows the Federal system's and the region's monthly estimated maximum electricity demand, monthly energy demand, monthly energy generation, and monthly maximum generating capability--capacity--for OY 2000-01, 2004-05, and 2009-10. The Federal system and regional monthly capacity surplus/deficit projections are summarized for 10 operating years. This document analyzes the Pacific Northwest's projected loads and

  19. Meet the Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirker, Sara Schmickle

    2008-01-01

    This article describes how to create the life-size teacher portraits that are displayed during an annual "Meet the Teacher" event held to introduce students and families to the facility and staff of the Apple Glen Elementary School in Bentonville, Arkansas. Several months prior to this event, students are asked to closely observe their…

  20. The Electronic Board Meeting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gragg, Bob

    2000-01-01

    The Southern Oklahoma Technology Center, a vocational and technical school district, recently spearheaded an initiative to allow members to use laptops at home and during meetings to process board agenda items, receive video and multimedia presentations, and access the school's local-area network and the Internet. (MLH)

  1. Meet the Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirker, Sara Schmickle

    2008-01-01

    This article describes how to create the life-size teacher portraits that are displayed during an annual "Meet the Teacher" event held to introduce students and families to the facility and staff of the Apple Glen Elementary School in Bentonville, Arkansas. Several months prior to this event, students are asked to closely observe their…

  2. Reviving the Town Meeting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grove, Tim

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the use of the National Issues Forum's (NIF's) town meetings in efforts to increase citizen participation in democratic processes. Describes the Catholic adaptation of the NIF approach, providing examples of its use at the high school, college, and community level. (MAB)

  3. Reviving the Town Meeting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grove, Tim

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the use of the National Issues Forum's (NIF's) town meetings in efforts to increase citizen participation in democratic processes. Describes the Catholic adaptation of the NIF approach, providing examples of its use at the high school, college, and community level. (MAB)

  4. 75 FR 22100 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-27

    ... 9-Noon Public Hearing on Information and Communication Technology Standards and Guidelines. 1:30-3 p... on its refresh of accessibility criteria for information and communications technologies covered by... Updates. All meetings are accessible to persons with disabilities. An assistive listening system, computer...

  5. SMA Directors Meeting

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-07-28

    The Safety and Mission Assurance Directors from all NASA centers came together July 26-28, 2016 at Goddard Space Flight Center for their quarterly meeting. As part of the event, the attendees received a tour of the facilities and a briefing from the Goddard's Solar System Exploration Division Director Dr. Paul Mahaffy.

  6. Meeting RoboSimian

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-06-09

    This image was taken on June 6, 2015 at the DARPA Robotics Challenge in Pomona, California. Following each competition run, spectators at the event were able to get a close-up look at the robot competitors and meet the teams who built them. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19327

  7. 76 FR 54536 - Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-01

    ... PEACE Meeting AGENCY: United States Institute of Peace. Date/Time: Thursday, September 22, 2011 (9 a.m... provided in subsection 1706(h)(3) of the United States Institute of Peace Act, Public Law 98-525. Agenda... for Management and CFO, United States Institute of Peace. BILLING CODE 6820-AR-M ...

  8. 1981 Spring Meeting Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Approximately 2150 participants registered for the 1981 Spring Meeting. More than 1500 papers were presented.The spaciousness of the Baltimore Convention Center provided ample opportunity for attendees to exchange ideas and interact with their colleagues. Here are some candid shots.

  9. 75 FR 1780 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FARM CREDIT SYSTEM INSURANCE...). DATE AND TIME: The meeting of the Board will be held at the offices of the Farm Credit Administration in McLean, Virginia, on January 21, 2010, from 9 a.m. until such time as the Board concludes its...

  10. 1991 Fall Meeting Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, David S.

    The AGU 1991 Fall Meeting, held in San Francisco December 9-13, was the largest national AGU meeting ever held. Meeting participation continued the steady growth trend set throughout the previous decade. A total of 4,037 papers and posters were presented, and by Friday noon of the meeting over 5,500 members had registered.Several special events were scheduled to inform and engage members on societal and programmatic aspects of our science. AGU's Committee on Education and Human Resources sponsored an open forum that addressed opportunities and problems associated with dual-career couples. A discussion of NASA's strategic plan by Berrien Moore and Joseph Alexander drew a large audience, and a special session on societal aspects of the Mt. Pinatubo eruption drew an overflow crowd. Two special lectures— “Plumes, Plates, and Deep Earth Structure” by Don L. Anderson and “New Frontiers in Aeronomy: Effects of Global Atmospheric Change” by P. M. Banks-also drew overflow crowds.

  11. 76 FR 37062 - Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... (guest speaker: Paul Lloyd, Department of Agriculture, TARGET Center). 10:45-Noon--Ad Hoc Committee Meetings (Closed to Public). 1:30-2:45 p.m.--Presentation on Research Collaboration (guest speakers: Sue...). 10:45-Noon--Presentation on Accessible Taxis (guest speakers: Mathew McCollough; Kelly...

  12. Load research manual. Volume 3. Load research for advanced technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenburg, L.; Clarkson, G.; Grund, Jr., C.; Leo, J.; Asbury, J.; Brandon-Brown, F.; Derderian, H.; Mueller, R.; Swaroop, R.

    1980-11-01

    This three-volume manual presents technical guidelines for electric utility load research. Special attention is given to issues raised by the load data reporting requirements of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 and to problems faced by smaller utilities that are initiating load research programs. The manual includes guides to load research literature and glossaries of load research and statistical terms. In Volume 3, special load research procedures are presented for solar, wind, and cogeneration technologies.

  13. Sediment and Fecal Indicator Bacterial Loading in a Mixed Land Use Watershed: Contributions from Suspended and Bed Load Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, J. K.; Molina, M.; Sullivan, K.; Sidle, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    Water quality studies that quantify sediment and fecal bacteria loading commonly focus on suspended contaminants transported during high flows. Fecal contaminants in bed sediments are typically ignored and need to be considered because of their potential to increase pathogen loadings during high flows that produce bed load transport. Water (containing suspended sediment) and bed load samples (n = 145 & n = 28, respectively) were collected in a 122 km2 watershed located in N.E. Georgia, USA during the 2013 water year. Continuous discharge was calculated from level data using USGS rating curves. This study quantifies total sediment and fecal indicator bacteria loads (FIB) in an alluvial stream in a mixed land use watershed and provides valuable data for parameterization of watershed models that simulate sediment and bacteria transport. Annual loads for sediment and FIB were determined using linear relationships between the following: turbidity and total suspended solids (R2 = 0.96); turbidity and suspended Escherichia coli and enterococci (R2 = 0.54 and 0.67, respectively); discharge and bed load (R2 = 0.60), and discharge and sediment associated E. coli and enterococci (R2 = 0.55 and 0.50, respectively). The annual sediment load was 3660 t with approximately 95% attributed to suspended sediment load and 5% attributed to bed load. The annual E. coli load was 3.7 x 1014 colonies with approximately 99.5% attributed to suspended transport and 0.50% attributed to bed load sediment-associated transport. The annual enterococci load was 1.1 x 1015 colonies with approximately 100% attributed to suspended transport. Bed load sediment transport ranged from 2% to 8% of the total storm sediment load in several high flow events (Q = 5 to 40 m3 s-1). Bed sediment-associated E. coli load was 0.4% to 0.5% of the total storm E. coli load. Suspended transport is the predominant mechanism describing contaminant loading in this stream and load estimates can be determined using simple

  14. Statistical load data processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandijk, G. M.

    1972-01-01

    A recorder system has been installed on two operational fighter aircrafts. Signal values from a c.g.-acceleration transducer and a strain-gage installation at the wing root were sampled and recorded in digital format on the recorder system. To analyse such load-time histories for fatigue evaluation purposes, a number of counting methods are available in which level crossings, peaks, or ranges are counted. Ten different existing counting principles are defined. The load-time histories are analysed to evaluate these counting methods. For some of the described counting methods, the counting results might be affected by arbitrarily chosen parameters such as the magnitude of load ranges that will be neglected and other secondary counting restrictions. Such influences might invalidate the final counting results entirely. The evaluation shows that for the type of load-time histories associated with most counting methods, a sensible value of the parameters involved can be found.

  15. IT and Building Loads

    SciTech Connect

    Hastbacka, Mildred; Rutberg, Michael; Bouza, Antonio

    2013-09-30

    The article discusses available technologies for reducing IT energy consumption and the commensurate cooling load in commercial buildings. This article addresses the energy savings and market potential of these strategies as well.

  16. Lumbriculus variegatus loading study

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Results from sediment bioaccumulation tests with Lumbriculus variegatus with evaluating the effects of organism loading densityThis dataset is associated with the following publication:Burkhard , L., D. Hubin-Barrows, N. Billa, T. Highland , R. Hockett , D. Mount , and T. Norberg-King. Sediment Bioaccumulation Test with Lumbriculus variegatus: Effects of Organism Loading. ARCHIVES OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINATION AND TOXICOLOGY. Springer, New York, NY, USA, 71(7): 70-77, (2016).

  17. LOADING MACHINE FOR REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Simon, S.L.

    1959-07-01

    An apparatus is described for loading or charging slugs of fissionable material into a nuclear reactor. The apparatus of the invention is a "muzzle loading" type comprising a delivery tube or muzzle designed to be brought into alignment with any one of a plurality of fuel channels. The delivery tube is located within the pressure shell and it is also disposed within shielding barriers while the fuel cantridges or slugs are forced through the delivery tube by an externally driven flexible ram.

  18. Lumbosacral loads in bedmaking.

    PubMed

    Milburn, P D; Barrett, R S

    1999-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the introduction of larger and heavier beds which were lower to the floor increased the physical stress on employees responsible for room cleaning and bedmaking in the hospitality industry. More specifically, this study assessed the effect of bed size (single, double and king) and bed height (460 and 560 mm) on dynamic and static estimates of L5/S1 compression force and static L5/S1 shear force for six simulated components of the overall bedmaking task. Results confirmed the view that static models severely underestimate the loads on the lumbar spine under inertial lifting conditions, and also indicated that: (i) tasks with the greatest hand loads were not necessarily associated with the greatest spinal loads due to differences in the way each task was performed; (ii) L5/S1 loads produced during bedmaking may exceed recommended safe lifting limits for certain task-size height combinations; and (iii) the use of larger and heavier beds in the hospitality industry imposes increased loads on the lumbar spine. The investigation of alternative work practices designed to minimise loads on the lumbar spine is recommended.

  19. Composite Load Model Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ning; Qiao, Hong

    2007-09-30

    The WECC load modeling task force has dedicated its effort in the past few years to develop a composite load model that can represent behaviors of different end-user components. The modeling structure of the composite load model is recommended by the WECC load modeling task force. GE Energy has implemented this composite load model with a new function CMPLDW in its power system simulation software package, PSLF. For the last several years, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has taken the lead and collaborated with GE Energy to develop the new composite load model. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and BPA joint force and conducted the evaluation of the CMPLDW and test its parameter settings to make sure that: • the model initializes properly, • all the parameter settings are functioning, and • the simulation results are as expected. The PNNL effort focused on testing the CMPLDW in a 4-bus system. An exhaustive testing on each parameter setting has been performed to guarantee each setting works. This report is a summary of the PNNL testing results and conclusions.

  20. Gender-Specific Effects of Cognitive Load on Social Discounting

    PubMed Central

    Strombach, Tina; Margittai, Zsofia; Gorczyca, Barbara; Kalenscher, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    We live busy, social lives, and meeting the challenges of our complex environments puts strain on our cognitive systems. However, cognitive resources are limited. It is unclear how cognitive load affects social decision making. Previous findings on the effects of cognitive load on other-regarding preferences have been ambiguous, allowing no coherent opinion whether cognitive load increases, decreases or does not affect prosocial considerations. Here, we suggest that social distance between individuals modulates whether generosity towards a recipient increases or decreases under cognitive load conditions. Participants played a financial social discounting task with several recipients at variable social distance levels. In this task, they could choose between generous alternatives, yielding medium financial rewards for the participant and recipient at variable social distances, or between a selfish alternative, yielding larger rewards for the participant alone. We show that the social discount function of male participants was significantly flattened under high cognitive load conditions, suggesting they distinguished less between socially close and socially distant recipients. Unexpectedly, the cognitive-load effect on social discounting was gender-specific: while social discounting was strongly dependent on cognitive load in men, women were nearly unaffected by cognitive load manipulations. We suggest that cognitive load leads men, but not women to simplify the decision problem by neglecting the social distance information. We consider our study a good starting point for further experiments exploring the role of gender in prosocial choice. PMID:27788192

  1. Gender-Specific Effects of Cognitive Load on Social Discounting.

    PubMed

    Strombach, Tina; Margittai, Zsofia; Gorczyca, Barbara; Kalenscher, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    We live busy, social lives, and meeting the challenges of our complex environments puts strain on our cognitive systems. However, cognitive resources are limited. It is unclear how cognitive load affects social decision making. Previous findings on the effects of cognitive load on other-regarding preferences have been ambiguous, allowing no coherent opinion whether cognitive load increases, decreases or does not affect prosocial considerations. Here, we suggest that social distance between individuals modulates whether generosity towards a recipient increases or decreases under cognitive load conditions. Participants played a financial social discounting task with several recipients at variable social distance levels. In this task, they could choose between generous alternatives, yielding medium financial rewards for the participant and recipient at variable social distances, or between a selfish alternative, yielding larger rewards for the participant alone. We show that the social discount function of male participants was significantly flattened under high cognitive load conditions, suggesting they distinguished less between socially close and socially distant recipients. Unexpectedly, the cognitive-load effect on social discounting was gender-specific: while social discounting was strongly dependent on cognitive load in men, women were nearly unaffected by cognitive load manipulations. We suggest that cognitive load leads men, but not women to simplify the decision problem by neglecting the social distance information. We consider our study a good starting point for further experiments exploring the role of gender in prosocial choice.

  2. Spacecraft load, design and test philosophies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, B. K.

    1986-01-01

    The development of spacecraft loads, design and test philosophies at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) during the past 25 years is presented. Examples from the JPL's Viking, Voyager and Galileo spacecraft are used to explain the changes in philosophy necessary to meet the program requirements with a reduction in cost and schedule. Approaches to validate mathematical models of large structures which can't be ground tested as an overall system because of size and/or adverse effects of terrestrial conditions such as gravity are presented.

  3. Spacecraft load, design and test philosophies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, B. K.

    1986-01-01

    The development of spacecraft loads, design and test philosophies at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) during the past 25 years is presented. Examples from the JPL's Viking, Voyager and Galileo spacecraft are used to explain the changes in philosophy necessary to meet the program requirements with a reduction in cost and schedule. Approaches to validate mathematical models of large structures which can't be ground tested as an overall system because of size and/or adverse effects of terrestrial conditions such as gravity are presented.

  4. Evidence of trade-offs shaping virulence evolution in an emerging wildlife pathogen.

    PubMed

    Williams, P D; Dobson, A P; Dhondt, K V; Hawley, D M; Dhondt, A A

    2014-06-01

    In the mid-1990s, the common poultry pathogen Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) made a successful species jump to the eastern North American house finch Haemorhous mexicanus (HM). Subsequent strain diversification allows us to directly quantify, in an experimental setting, the transmission dynamics of three sequentially emergent geographic isolates of MG, which differ in the levels of pathogen load they induce. We find significant among-strain variation in rates of transmission as well as recovery. Pathogen strains also differ in their induction of host morbidity, measured as the severity of eye lesions due to infection. Relationships between pathogen traits are also investigated, with transmission and recovery rates being significantly negatively correlated, whereas transmission and virulence, measured as average eye lesion score over the course of infection, are positively correlated. By quantifying these disease-relevant parameters and their relationships, we provide the first analysis of the trade-offs that shape the evolution of this important emerging pathogen.

  5. Simultaneous identification of host, ectoparasite and pathogen DNA via in-solution capture.

    PubMed

    Campana, Michael G; Hawkins, Melissa T R; Henson, Lauren H; Stewardson, Kristin; Young, Hillary S; Card, Leah R; Lock, Justin; Agwanda, Bernard; Brinkerhoff, Jory; Gaff, Holly D; Helgen, Kristofer M; Maldonado, Jesús E; McShea, William J; Fleischer, Robert C

    2016-09-01

    Ectoparasites frequently vector pathogens from often unknown pathogen reservoirs to both human and animal populations. Simultaneous identification of the ectoparasite species, the wildlife host that provided their most recent blood meal(s), and their pathogen load would greatly facilitate the understanding of the complex transmission dynamics of vector-borne diseases. Currently, these identifications are principally performed using multiple polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. We developed an assay (EctoBaits) based on in-solution capture paired with high-throughput sequencing to simultaneously identify ectoparasites, host blood meals and pathogens. We validated our in-solution capture results using double-blind PCR assays, morphology and collection data. The EctoBaits assay effectively and efficiently identifies ectoparasites, blood meals, and pathogens in a single capture experiment, allowing for high-resolution taxonomic identification while preserving the DNA sample for future analyses.

  6. Arranging the bouquet of disease: floral traits and the transmission of plant and animal pathogens.

    PubMed

    McArt, Scott H; Koch, Hauke; Irwin, Rebecca E; Adler, Lynn S

    2014-05-01

    Several floral microbes are known to be pathogenic to plants or floral visitors such as pollinators. Despite the ecological and economic importance of pathogens deposited in flowers, we often lack a basic understanding of how floral traits influence disease transmission. Here, we provide the first systematic review regarding how floral traits attract vectors (for plant pathogens) or hosts (for animal pathogens), mediate disease establishment and evolve under complex interactions with plant mutualists that can be vectors for microbial antagonists. Attraction of floral visitors is influenced by numerous phenological, morphological and chemical traits, and several plant pathogens manipulate floral traits to attract vectors. There is rapidly growing interest in how floral secondary compounds and antimicrobial enzymes influence disease establishment in plant hosts. Similarly, new research suggests that consumption of floral secondary compounds can reduce pathogen loads in animal pollinators. Given recent concerns about pollinator declines caused in part by pathogens, the role of floral traits in mediating pathogen transmission is a key area for further research. We conclude by discussing important implications of floral transmission of pathogens for agriculture, conservation and human health, suggesting promising avenues for future research in both basic and applied biology. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  7. EDITORIAL: Microflow meets metrology Microflow meets metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Henning

    2010-07-01

    This special feature is dedicated to methods and applications of high-precision flow rate measurements at flow rates in the range of µl/min and below. It comprises papers from authors who gave lectures at the 250th PTB Seminar 'European Meeting on Microflow Metrology', held at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany, on 24-25 June 2009 and sponsored by the Helmholtz Funds e.V., Germany. More than 40 experts from national metrology institutes, universities and manufactures of flowmeters, and from seven European countries, attended the seminar. The main goal of the seminar was to discuss the measurement of very small flow rates on a metrological basis. The lectures covered measurements of flow rates of liquids as well as of gases. Manufacturers discussed their developments of commercial flowmeters for low flow rates, and first approaches towards a measurement traceable to the SI were introduced by the national metrology institutes. Thus, many interesting discussions were stimulated between various groups, in particular between those working in metrology and on applications. The measurement of very low flow rates traceable to the SI is just beginning. So many approaches have not yet been finished or are at the moment only at the status of a proof of principle. The papers in this special feature give an insight into these different approaches and mark the beginning of an exciting way towards the measurement of small and ultrasmall flow rates.

  8. Biosensors for plant pathogen detection.

    PubMed

    Khater, Mohga; de la Escosura-Muñiz, Alfredo; Merkoçi, Arben

    2017-07-15

    Infectious plant diseases are caused by pathogenic microorganisms such as fungi, bacteria, viruses, viroids, phytoplasma and nematodes. Worldwide, plant pathogen infections are among main factors limiting crop productivity and increasing economic losses. Plant pathogen detection is important as first step to manage a plant disease in greenhouses, field conditions and at the country boarders. Current immunological techniques used to detect pathogens in plant include enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and direct tissue blot immunoassays (DTBIA). DNA-based techniques such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR), real time PCR (RT-PCR) and dot blot hybridization have also been proposed for pathogen identification and detection. However these methodologies are time-consuming and require complex instruments, being not suitable for in-situ analysis. Consequently, there is strong interest for developing new biosensing systems for early detection of plant diseases with high sensitivity and specificity at the point-of-care. In this context, we revise here the recent advancement in the development of advantageous biosensing systems for plant pathogen detection based on both antibody and DNA receptors. The use of different nanomaterials such as nanochannels and metallic nanoparticles for the development of innovative and sensitive biosensing systems for the detection of pathogens (i.e. bacteria and viruses) at the point-of-care is also shown. Plastic and paper-based platforms have been used for this purpose, offering cheap and easy-to-use really integrated sensing systems for rapid on-site detection. Beside devices developed at research and development level a brief revision of commercially available kits is also included in this review. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. JANNAF 19th Propulsion Systems Hazards Subcommittee Meeting. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cocchiaro, James E. (Editor); Kuckels, Melanie C. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    This volume, the first of two volumes is a compilation of 25 unclassified/unlimited-distribution technical papers presented at the Joint Army-Navy-NASA-Air Force (JANNAF) 19th Propulsion Systems Hazards Subcommittee (PSHS) meeting held jointly with the 37th Combustion Subcommittee (CS) and 25th Airbreathing Propulsion Subcommittee (APS), and 1st Modeling and Simulation Subcommittee (MSS) meetings. The meeting was held 13-17 November 2000 at the Naval Postgraduate School and Hyatt Regency Hotel, Monterey, California. Topics covered at the PSHS meeting include: impact and thermal vulnerability of gun propellants; thermal decomposition and cookoff behavior of energetic materials; violent reaction and detonation phenomena of solid energetic materials subjected to shock and impact loading; and hazard classification, and insensitive munitions testing of propellants and propulsion systems.

  10. Meeting record for FFA working meeting of November 15, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Stejskal, G.F.

    1992-01-03

    This document provides a meeting record of the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) working meeting to discuss progress on old issues and further required actions regarding environmental impacts of the Savannah River Facility. (FI)

  11. Load Carriage: An Integrated Risk Management Approach.

    PubMed

    Orr, Robin M; Pope, Rodney R

    2015-11-01

    Military load carriage (LC) gives rise to substantial risks to soldier health, tactical performance, and mission success. The aim of this article was to extract and synthesize the key findings of a series of LC research reports previously published by the authors. Five reviews and 6 studies were included, with key findings extracted and synthesized in tabulated and critical narrative form. The weight of a soldier's load is a source of risk for soldier's injuries and tactical task performance. The resulting level of risk is influenced by risk modifiers (like speed of march, terrain grade, and task type and duration) and risk controls (like administrative controls and physical conditioning). In the Australian context, these risk controls were limited, with soldiers carrying heavier loads than those mandated by doctrine and policy, and LC conditioning not meeting best practice. The diversity of LC contexts, combined with the influence of risk modifiers and risk controls, means that levels of risk associated with LC are not consistent and must be assessed on a case-by-case basis. Load weight and marching routes (terrains, gradients), distances, speed, and duration are all potentially treatable sources of LC-related risk. Potential risk treatments include not only commanders directly addressing these specific sources of risk to the extent feasible, on a case-by-case basis, when planning or conducting LC tasks but also improving administration controls (i.e., doctrine and policies) and personal protection (i.e., the physical conditioning of the soldier) as part of the hierarchy of controls. Practical application would involve commanders developing and implementing dedicated LC doctrine and policies and implementing and enforcing LC conditioning programs that meets best practice.

  12. Appliance Commitment for Household Load Scheduling

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Pengwei; Lu, Ning

    2011-06-30

    This paper presents a novel appliance commitment algorithm that schedules thermostatically-controlled household loads based on price and consumption forecasts considering users comfort settings to meet an optimization objective such as minimum payment or maximum comfort. The formulation of an appliance commitment problem was described in the paper using an electrical water heater load as an example. The thermal dynamics of heating and coasting of the water heater load was modeled by physical models; random hot water consumption was modeled with statistical methods. The models were used to predict the appliance operation over the scheduling time horizon. User comfort was transformed to a set of linear constraints. Then, a novel linear, sequential, optimization process was used to solve the appliance commitment problem. The simulation results demonstrate that the algorithm is fast, robust, and flexible. The algorithm can be used in home/building energy-management systems to help household owners or building managers to automatically create optimal load operation schedules based on different cost and comfort settings and compare cost/benefits among schedules.

  13. Fecundity compensation and tolerance to a sterilizing pathogen in Daphnia.

    PubMed

    Vale, P F; Little, T J

    2012-09-01

    Hosts are armed with several lines of defence in the battle against parasites: they may prevent the establishment of infection, reduce parasite growth once infected or persevere through mechanisms that reduce the damage caused by infection, called tolerance. Studies on tolerance in animals have focused on mortality, and sterility tolerance has not been investigated experimentally. Here, we tested for genetic variation in the multiple steps of defence when the invertebrate Daphnia magna is infected with the sterilizing bacterial pathogen Pasteuria ramosa: anti-infection resistance, anti-growth resistance and the ability to tolerate sterilization once infected. When exposed to nine doses of a genetically diverse pathogen inoculum, six host genotypes varied in their average susceptibility to infection and in their parasite loads once infected. How host fecundity changed with increasing parasite loads did not vary between genotypes, indicating that there was no genetic variation for this measure of fecundity tolerance. However, genotypes differed in their level of fecundity compensation under infection, and we discuss how, by increasing host fitness without targeting parasite densities, fecundity compensation is consistent with the functional definition of tolerance. Such infection-induced life-history shifts are not traditionally considered to be part of the immune response, but may crucially reduce harm (in terms of fitness loss) caused by disease, and are a distinct source of selection on pathogens.

  14. Fecundity compensation and tolerance to a sterilizing pathogen in Daphnia

    PubMed Central

    Vale, P F; Little, T J

    2012-01-01

    Hosts are armed with several lines of defence in the battle against parasites: they may prevent the establishment of infection, reduce parasite growth once infected or persevere through mechanisms that reduce the damage caused by infection, called tolerance. Studies on tolerance in animals have focused on mortality, and sterility tolerance has not been investigated experimentally. Here, we tested for genetic variation in the multiple steps of defence when the invertebrate Daphnia magna is infected with the sterilizing bacterial pathogen Pasteuria ramosa: anti-infection resistance, anti-growth resistance and the ability to tolerate sterilization once infected. When exposed to nine doses of a genetically diverse pathogen inoculum, six host genotypes varied in their average susceptibility to infection and in their parasite loads once infected. How host fecundity changed with increasing parasite loads did not vary between genotypes, indicating that there was no genetic variation for this measure of fecundity tolerance. However, genotypes differed in their level of fecundity compensation under infection, and we discuss how, by increasing host fitness without targeting parasite densities, fecundity compensation is consistent with the functional definition of tolerance. Such infection-induced life-history shifts are not traditionally considered to be part of the immune response, but may crucially reduce harm (in terms of fitness loss) caused by disease, and are a distinct source of selection on pathogens. PMID:22856460

  15. Food pathogen detection using Ag nanorod-based surface plasmon resonance sensor

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Food safety is world-wide issue for protecting public health. Many researchers have been working on development of biosensors for pathogenic bacteria detection. However, current biosensing methods and techniques do not meet the requirement of demanding as a biosensor in terms of sensitivity, speci...

  16. Characterization of Pathogenicity, Virulence and Host-Pathogen Interractions

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, A; Folta, P

    2006-07-27

    The threats of bio-terrorism and newly emerging infectious diseases pose serious challenges to the national security infrastructure. Rapid detection and diagnosis of infectious disease in human populations, as well as characterizing pathogen biology, are critical for reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with such threats. One of the key challenges in managing an infectious disease outbreak, whether through natural causes or acts of overt terrorism, is detection early enough to initiate effective countermeasures. Much recent attention has been directed towards the utility of biomarkers or molecular signatures that result from the interaction of the pathogen with the host for improving our ability to diagnose and mitigate the impact of a developing infection during the time window when effective countermeasures can be instituted. Host responses may provide early signals in blood even from localized infections. Multiple innate and adaptive immune molecules, in combination with other biochemical markers, may provide disease-specific information and new targets for countermeasures. The presence of pathogen specific markers and an understanding of the molecular capabilities and adaptations of the pathogen when it interacts with its host may likewise assist in early detection and provide opportunities for targeting countermeasures. An important question that needs to be addressed is whether these molecular-based approaches will prove useful for early diagnosis, complement current methods of direct agent detection, and aid development and use of countermeasures. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will host a workshop to explore the utility of host- and pathogen-based molecular diagnostics, prioritize key research issues, and determine the critical steps needed to transition host-pathogen research to tools that can be applied towards a more effective national bio-defense strategy. The workshop will bring together leading researchers/scientists in the

  17. 77 FR 19034 - Meeting of the Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-29

    ... No: 2012-7500] JOINT BOARD FOR THE ENROLLMENT OF ACTUARIES Meeting of the Advisory Committee; Meeting AGENCY: Joint Board for the Enrollment of Actuaries. ACTION: Notice of Federal Advisory Committee meeting. SUMMARY: The Executive Director of the Joint Board for the Enrollment of Actuaries gives notice of...

  18. 77 FR 34408 - Meeting of the Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office JOINT BOARD FOR THE ENROLLMENT OF ACTUARIES Meeting of the Advisory Committee; Meeting AGENCY: Joint Board for the Enrollment of... Joint Board for the Enrollment of Actuaries gives notice of a meeting of the Advisory Committee...

  19. 75 FR 76486 - Meeting of the Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office JOINT BOARD FOR THE ENROLLMENT OF ACTUARIES Meeting of the Advisory Committee; Meeting AGENCY: Joint Board for the Enrollment of... Joint Board for the Enrollment of Actuaries gives notice of a meeting of the Advisory Committee...

  20. 78 FR 36575 - Meeting of the Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office JOINT BOARD FOR THE ENROLLMENT OF ACTUARIES Meeting of the Advisory Committee; Meeting AGENCY: Joint Board for the Enrollment of... Joint Board for the Enrollment of Actuaries gives notice of a meeting of the Advisory Committee...

  1. Meetings in Academe: It's Time for an "EXTREME MEETING MAKEOVER!"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berk, Ronald A.

    2012-01-01

    Meetings have a bad reputation with faculty. Rarely does one hear a positive word uttered about an upcoming or past meeting. That reputation has metastasized throughout higher education. The primary reason is because meetings can be major time wasters, accomplishing very little, often deteriorating into just another social event, or they may be…

  2. Meetings in Academe: It's Time for an "EXTREME MEETING MAKEOVER!"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berk, Ronald A.

    2012-01-01

    Meetings have a bad reputation with faculty. Rarely does one hear a positive word uttered about an upcoming or past meeting. That reputation has metastasized throughout higher education. The primary reason is because meetings can be major time wasters, accomplishing very little, often deteriorating into just another social event, or they may be…

  3. 78 FR 19008 - Meeting of the Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office JOINT BOARD FOR THE ENROLLMENT OF ACTUARIES Meeting of the Advisory Committee; Meeting AGENCY: Joint Board for the Enrollment of... Joint Board for the Enrollment of Actuaries gives notice of a closed meeting of the Advisory Committee...

  4. 75 FR 16510 - Meeting of the Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office JOINT BOARD FOR THE ENROLLMENT OF ACTUARIES Meeting of the Advisory Committee; Meeting AGENCY: Joint Board for the Enrollment of... Joint Board for the Enrollment of Actuaries gives notice of a closed meeting of the Advisory Committee...

  5. The Morning Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tibbitts, Scott

    2004-01-01

    It was fourteen years ago and I remember it well. It seemed that the right hand didn't know what the left was doing. It was crazy. Starsys was only eight people and deadlines were being missed because someone didn't know what someone else needed. How could a handful of people be this disconnected? Maybe a daily meeting would help. Little did I know that we were initiating a process that would last for two decades. The idea was simple: a short, all-hands meeting once a day to maintain the week's actions item list. Not too tough a challenge with eight folks, but quite a challenge as we grew to a 140-person company.

  6. ISKAF2010 Science Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, Joeri

    Radio astronomy - in its broadest sense from metre to sub-millimetre wavelengths - is making a major leap forward. Triggered by the efforts being made towards realising the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), a number of new facilities, or major upgrades of existing facilities, are coming on-line, bringing new excitement among radio astronomers and revitalising the interest of the astronomical community in general. The fantastic capabilities of these new facilities will revolutionise the way we do radio astronomy. The use of innovative technology solutions (including new software approaches and calibration algorithms) is expected to significantly enhance the performance of this new generation of radio telescopes. The associated advances in sensitivity, field-of-view, frequency range and spectral resolution guarantees that new and exciting science will be conducted. We are now truly entering a new golden age for radio astronomy. And this is only the beginning! The meeting takes its inspiration from the opening of the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) but there are many other telescopes or upgrades that are now coming online. These include the E-VLA, e-MERLIN, e-VLBI, MWA, PAPER, ATA, eSMA, EMBRACE, SCUBA-2, APEX, IRAM, Yebes and ATCA (CABB). Some of these facilities are now beginning to produce their first results. This meeting aims to provide an overview of these first successes and indeed struggles(!), and highlight the future perspective and longer term goals of our community. These initial results will give a first taste of the science (and the challenges) that we will enjoy with the SKA. Several major elements of new telescopes like MEERKAT, ALMA, ASKAP, APERTIF, LWA, SRT and FAST are also expected to be producing some initial technical results around this time - these will also be covered in the programme of the meeting. In summary, we encourage presentations on results that use new or recently upgraded telescopes, or results that use new challenging techniques or address

  7. Plant-pathogen interactions: disease resistance in modern agriculture.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Lesley A; Ridout, Christopher; O'Sullivan, Donal M; Leach, Jan E; Leung, Hei

    2013-04-01

    The growing human population will require a significant increase in agricultural production. This challenge is made more difficult by the fact that changes in the climatic and environmental conditions under which crops are grown have resulted in the appearance of new diseases, whereas genetic changes within the pathogen have resulted in the loss of previously effective sources of resistance. To help meet this challenge, advanced genetic and statistical methods of analysis have been used to identify new resistance genes through global screens, and studies of plant-pathogen interactions have been undertaken to uncover the mechanisms by which disease resistance is achieved. The informed deployment of major, race-specific and partial, race-nonspecific resistance, either by conventional breeding or transgenic approaches, will enable the production of crop varieties with effective resistance without impacting on other agronomically important crop traits. Here, we review these recent advances and progress towards the ultimate goal of developing disease-resistant crops.

  8. Streak camera meeting summary

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, Daniel H.; Bliss, David E.

    2014-09-01

    Streak cameras are important for high-speed data acquisition in single event experiments, where the total recorded information (I) is shared between the number of measurements (M) and the number of samples (S). Topics of this meeting included: streak camera use at the national laboratories; current streak camera production; new tube developments and alternative technologies; and future planning. Each topic is summarized in the following sections.

  9. National Space Council Meeting

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-10-05

    Space shuttle Discovery is seen behind Vice President Mike Pence as he delivers opening remarks during the National Space Council's first meeting, Thursday, Oct. 5, 2017 at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum's Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Va. The National Space Council, chaired by Vice President Mike Pence heard testimony from representatives from civil space, commercial space, and national security space industry representatives. Photo Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky)

  10. Tether Technology Interchange Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, James K. (Compiler)

    1998-01-01

    This is a compilation of 25 papers presented at a tether technical interchange meeting in Huntsville, AL, on September 9-10, 1997. After each presentation, a technical discussion was held to clarify and expand the salient points. A wide range of subjects was covered including tether dynamics, electrodynamics, space power generation, plasma physics, ionospheric physics, towing tethers, tethered reentry schemes, and future tether missions.

  11. Highlights: Spring Council Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Council members present at the May 24, 1981, meeting were Keiiti Aki, Steven Burges (for Jim Wallis), Peter S. Eagleson, E. R. Engdahl, Charles E. Helsley, James R. Heirtzler, Carl Kisslinger, Leslie H. Meredith, Chris N. K. Mooers, Norman F. Ness, Marcia M. Neugebauer, James J. O'Brien, Richard Rapp, Carl Sagan, James C. Savage, Joseph V. Smith, Fred Spilhaus, Donald L. Turcotte, James A. Van Allen, J. Tuzo Wilson, and Jay Winston (for Elmar R. Reiter until his arrival at 6:50 P.M.). David Strangway, representing the Canadian Geophysical Union, and Peter Steinhauser, representing the European Geophysical Society, were special observers at the meeting. Council meetings are open, and a number of section secretaries, committee chairmen, journal editors, and other members attended. The following major actions were adopted by the Council:The experiment of publishing oceanography and lower-atmosphere papers in JGR Green issues alternate to those containing upper-atmosphere papers will be continued through 1982. From preliminary indications the experiment seems to be working, but a full year of data, including a renewal cycle, is needed to assess the success of the experiment. Final decision will be made prior to the 1983 dues notices.

  12. "1999 Bioastronomy Meeting"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meech, Karen J. (Editor); Owen, Tobias C.

    2000-01-01

    The 6th Bioastronomy Conference, Bioastronomy '99: A New Era in Bioastronomy, was held at the Hapuna Prince Beach hotel on the Big Island of Hawaii from August 2-6, 1999. The series of previous Bioastronomy meetings have played an important role in integrating the broader interests and techniques of both astronomy and biology to understand the origin and evolution of living systems in the universe, and to generating a context for exploration in our solar system and in extrasolar planetary systems. The scope of these interdisciplinary fields is captured in the topics discussed at the meeting: organic molecules in interstellar and interplanetary space; origin and evolution of planetary systems; comets, asteroids, and other small bodies and their role in the origin and evolution of life; Earth as a living planet; extreme environments on Earth; origin of life; transport of life between planets; evolution of life and intelligence; detection and characterization of extrasolar planets; search for extraterrestrial technology and life; future missions; and public acceptance and support of scientific studies of life in the universe. This paper gives an overview summary of the conference and briefly highlights some of the themes discussed at the meeting.

  13. Organizing Scientific Meetings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epple, August

    1997-03-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction: What can go wrong?; 2. The decision: To run or not to run; 3. Scientific and related events: variety delights; 4. Social events: something for every taste and budget; 5. The program: how to accommodate pigs in a poke; 6. Selection of the meeting site: a touch of Russian roulette; 7. The dates of the meeting: you can't win; 8. Publications: cruel and unusual punishment; 9. Selection of participants: how to lose old friends and make new enemies; 10. Committees: you have to live with them; 11. Accompanists: you better love'm; 12. Office and staff: don't take chances; 13. The budget: a jungle with pitfalls; 14. Fund raising: some would rather see their dentist; 15. Allocation of travel support: not much fun either; 16. Schedule of preparations: from dream to reality; 17. Announcements and other information: clarity pays; 18. Design of forms, name tags, tickets, signs and stickers: how about using some common sense?; 19. Satellite meetings: think twice; 20. Checklist of important no-nos; List of appendixes; Appendixes A-R; Index.

  14. E-2C Loads Calibration in DFRC Flight Loads Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, Lawrence S.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: a) Safely and efficiently perform structural load tests on NAVAIR E-2C aircraft to calibrate strain gage instrumentation installed by NAVAIR; b) Collect load test data and derive loads equations for use in NAVAIR flight tests; and c) Assist flight test team with use of loads equations measurements at PAX River.

  15. Pathogen reduction of whole blood: utility and feasibility.

    PubMed

    Allain, J-P; Goodrich, R

    2017-09-05

    To collect information on pathogen reduction applied to whole blood. Pathogen reduction (PR) of blood components has been developed over the past two decades, and pathogen-reduced fresh-frozen plasma and platelet concentrates are currently in clinical use. High cost and incomplete coverage of components make PR out of reach for low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). However, should PR become applicable to whole blood (WB), the main product transfused in sub-Saharan Africa, and be compatible with the preparation of clinically suitable components, cost would be minimised, and a range of safety measures in place at high cost in developed areas would become redundant. All articles called with "pathogen reduction", "pathogen inactivation" and "whole blood" were retrieved from Medline. References in articles were utilised. One such PR technology (PRT) applied to WB has been developed and has shown efficacious against viruses, bacteria and parasites in vitro; and has been able to inactivate nucleated blood cells whilst retaining the ability to prepare components with acceptable characteristics. The efficacy of this WB PRT has been demonstrated in vivo using the inactivation of Plasmodium falciparum as a model and showing a high degree of correlation between in vitro and in vivo data. Obtaining further evidence of efficacy on other suitable targets is warranted. Shortening of the process, which is currently around 50 min, or increasing the number of units simultaneously processed would be necessary to make PRT WB conducive to LMIC blood services' needs. Even if not 100% effective against agents that are present in high pathogen load titres, WB PRT could massively impact blood safety in LMIC by providing safer products at an affordable cost. © 2017 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  16. 2014 RAD Spring Partner Meeting

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The RAD program held an in-person Partner Meeting on April 29, 2014. As in prior years, the meeting was structured as a facilitated roundtable dialogue for partners to share recycling program experiences, opportunities and challenges.

  17. Pathogen evolution and the immunological niche.

    PubMed

    Cobey, Sarah

    2014-07-01

    Host immunity is a major driver of pathogen evolution and thus a major determinant of pathogen diversity. Explanations for pathogen diversity traditionally assume simple interactions between pathogens and the immune system, a view encapsulated by the susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) model. However, there is growing evidence that the complexity of many host-pathogen interactions is dynamically important. This revised perspective requires broadening the definition of a pathogen's immunological phenotype, or what can be thought of as its immunological niche. After reviewing evidence that interactions between pathogens and host immunity drive much of pathogen evolution, I introduce the concept of a pathogen's immunological phenotype. Models that depart from the SIR paradigm demonstrate the utility of this perspective and show that it is particularly useful in understanding vaccine-induced evolution. This paper highlights questions in immunology, evolution, and ecology that must be answered to advance theories of pathogen diversity.

  18. Compositions and methods for pathogen transport

    DOEpatents

    El-Etr, Sahar; Farquar, George R.

    2016-01-26

    This disclosure provides a method for transporting a pathogen under ambient conditions, by culturing the pathogen with an amoeba under conditions that favor the incorporation of the pathogen into a trophozoite, starving the amoeba until it encysts, then culturing under conditions that favor conversion of the amoeba back to a trophozoite. In one aspect, the conditions that favor incorporation of the pathogen into the cyst of the amoeba comprises contacting the pathogen with the amoeba in an iron rich environment. Virus and/or bacteria are pathogens that can be transported by the disclosed method. Amoeba that are useful in the disclosed methods include, without limitation Acanthamoeba castellanii, Hartmannella vermiformis and Naegleria gruberi. The disclosed methods have utility in: transporting pathogens from military field hospitals and clinics to the laboratory; transporting pathogens from global satellite laboratories to clinical laboratories; long term storage of pathogens; enriching contaminated patient samples for pathogens of interest; biosurveillance and detection efforts.

  19. Pathogen evolution and the immunological niche

    PubMed Central

    Cobey, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Host immunity is a major driver of pathogen evolution and thus a major determinant of pathogen diversity. Explanations for pathogen diversity traditionally assume simple interactions between pathogens and the immune system, a view encapsulated by the susceptible–infected–recovered (SIR) model. However, there is growing evidence that the complexity of many host–pathogen interactions is dynamically important. This revised perspective requires broadening the definition of a pathogen's immunological phenotype, or what can be thought of as its immunological niche. After reviewing evidence that interactions between pathogens and host immunity drive much of pathogen evolution, I introduce the concept of a pathogen's immunological phenotype. Models that depart from the SIR paradigm demonstrate the utility of this perspective and show that it is particularly useful in understanding vaccine-induced evolution. This paper highlights questions in immunology, evolution, and ecology that must be answered to advance theories of pathogen diversity. PMID:25040161

  20. The Main Aeromonas Pathogenic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Tomás, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    The members of the Aeromonas genus are ubiquitous, water-borne bacteria. They have been isolated from marine waters, rivers, lakes, swamps, sediments, chlorine water, water distribution systems, drinking water and residual waters; different types of food, such as meat, fish, seafood, vegetables, and processed foods. Aeromonas strains are predominantly pathogenic to poikilothermic animals, and the mesophilic strains are emerging as important pathogens in humans, causing a variety of extraintestinal and systemic infections as well as gastrointestinal infections. The most commonly described disease caused by Aeromonas is the gastroenteritis; however, no adequate animal model is available to reproduce this illness caused by Aeromonas. The main pathogenic factors associated with Aeromonas are: surface polysaccharides (capsule, lipopolysaccharide, and glucan), S-layers, iron-binding systems, exotoxins and extracellular enzymes, secretion systems, fimbriae and other nonfilamentous adhesins, motility and flagella. PMID:23724321

  1. Acinetobacter: an underrated foodborne pathogen?

    PubMed

    Amorim, Angelo Maximo Batista de; Nascimento, Janaína Dos Santos

    2017-02-28

    The increasing prevalence of foodborne diseases observed in developing countries has been linked to a rise in the consumption of raw foods. However, unlike the classical pathogens that are commonly implicated in foodborne illnesses, members of the genus Acinetobacter are rarely associated with diarrheal disease, probably because of the difficulty in isolating these Gram-negative bacteria from food sources. Nevertheless, several species of Acinetobacter, especially A. baumannii, possess many of the characteristics associated with successful pathogens and exhibit a prodigious ability to acquire the multiple-drug resistance (MDR) phenotype. In this mini-review, we summarize the epidemiological data relating to MDR Acinetobacter and consider evidence suggesting that contaminated dairy products, along with raw fruit and vegetables, constitute extra-hospital reservoirs of this underrated pathogen, and may represent an increased risk to immunocompromised individuals and young children in healthcare settings.

  2. [Population genetics of plant pathogens].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wen; Zhan, Jia-Sui

    2012-02-01

    Comparing to natural ecosystems, the evolution of plant pathogens in agricultural ecosystems is generally faster due to high-density monocultures, large-scale application of agrochemicals, and international trade in agricultural products. Knowledge of the population genetics and evolutionary biology of plant pathogens is necessary to understand disease epidemiology, effectively breed and use resistant cultivars, and control plant diseases. In this article, we outlined the aims of population genetic studies in plant pathogens, discuss contributions of five evolutionary forces (i.e., mutation, gene flow, recombination, random genetic drift, and natural selection) to origin, maintenance, and distribution of genetic variation in time and space, and gave an overview of current research status in this field.

  3. Metabolic traits of pathogenic streptococci.

    PubMed

    Willenborg, Jörg; Goethe, Ralph

    2016-11-01

    Invasive and noninvasive diseases caused by facultative pathogenic streptococci depend on their equipment with virulence factors and on their ability to sense and adapt to changing nutrients in different host environments. The knowledge of the principal metabolic mechanisms which allow these bacteria to recognize and utilize nutrients in host habitats is a prerequisite for our understanding of streptococcal pathogenicity and the development of novel control strategies. This review aims to summarize and compare the central carbohydrate metabolic and amino acid biosynthetic pathways of a selected group of streptococcal species, all belonging to the naso-oropharyngeal microbiome in humans and/or animals. We also discuss the urgent need of comprehensive metabolomics approaches for a better understanding of the streptococcal metabolism during host-pathogen interaction. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  4. Infectious pathogens and bronchiolitis outcomes.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Kohei; Mansbach, Jonathan M; Camargo, Carlos A

    2014-07-01

    Bronchiolitis is a common early childhood illness and an important cause of morbidity, it is the number one cause of hospitalization among US infants. Bronchiolitis is also an active area of research, and recent studies have advanced our understanding of this illness. Although it has long been the conventional wisdom that the infectious etiology of bronchiolitis does not affect outcomes, a growing number of studies have linked specific pathogens of bronchiolitis (e.g., rhinovirus) to short- and long-term outcomes, such as future risk of developing asthma. The authors review the advent of molecular diagnostic techniques that have demonstrated diverse pathogens in bronchiolitis, and they review recent studies on the complex link between infectious pathogens of bronchiolitis and the development of childhood asthma.

  5. Pathogens and the placental fortress.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Jennifer R; Bakardjiev, Anna I

    2012-02-01

    Placental infections are major causes of maternal and fetal disease. This review introduces a new paradigm for placental infections based on current knowledge of placental defenses and how this barrier can be breached. Transmission of pathogens from mother to fetus can occur at two sites of direct contact between maternal cells and specialized fetal cells (trophoblasts) in the human placenta: firstly, maternal immune and endothelial cells juxtaposed to extravillous trophoblasts in the uterine implantation site and secondly, maternal blood surrounding the syncytiotrophoblast (SYN). Recent findings suggest that the primary vulnerability is in the implantation site. We explore evidence that the placental SYN evolved as a defense against pathogens, and that inflammation-mediated spontaneous abortion may benefit mother and pathogen. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Pathogens and the Placental Fortress

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Jennifer R.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Placental infections are major causes of maternal and fetal disease. This review introduces a new paradigm for placental infections based on current knowledge of placental defenses and how this barrier can be breached. Transmission of pathogens from mother to fetus can occur at two sites of direct contact between maternal cells and specialized fetal cells (trophoblasts) in the human placenta: (i) maternal immune and endothelial cells juxtaposed to extravillous trophoblasts in the uterine implantation site and (ii) maternal blood surrounding the syncytiotrophoblast. Recent findings suggest that the primary vulnerability is in the implantation site. We explore evidence that the placental syncytiotrophoblast evolved as a defense against pathogens, and that inflammation-mediated spontaneous abortion may benefit mother and pathogen. PMID:22169833

  7. Proteomics of Plant Pathogenic Fungi

    PubMed Central

    González-Fernández, Raquel; Prats, Elena; Jorrín-Novo, Jesús V.

    2010-01-01

    Plant pathogenic fungi cause important yield losses in crops. In order to develop efficient and environmental friendly crop protection strategies, molecular studies of the fungal biological cycle, virulence factors, and interaction with its host are necessary. For that reason, several approaches have been performed using both classical genetic, cell biology, and biochemistry and the modern, holistic, and high-throughput, omic techniques. This work briefly overviews the tools available for studying Plant Pathogenic Fungi and is amply focused on MS-based Proteomics analysis, based on original papers published up to December 2009. At a methodological level, different steps in a proteomic workflow experiment are discussed. Separate sections are devoted to fungal descriptive (intracellular, subcellular, extracellular) and differential expression proteomics and interactomics. From the work published we can conclude that Proteomics, in combination with other techniques, constitutes a powerful tool for providing important information about pathogenicity and virulence factors, thus opening up new possibilities for crop disease diagnosis and crop protection. PMID:20589070

  8. Picturing pathogen infection in plants.

    PubMed

    Barón, Matilde; Pineda, Mónica; Pérez-Bueno, María Luisa

    2016-09-01

    Several imaging techniques have provided valuable tools to evaluate the impact of biotic stress on host plants. The use of these techniques enables the study of plant-pathogen interactions by analysing the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of foliar metabolism during pathogenesis. In this work we review the use of imaging techniques based on chlorophyll fluorescence, multicolour fluorescence and thermography for the study of virus, bacteria and fungi-infected plants. These studies have revealed the impact of pathogen challenge on photosynthetic performance, secondary metabolism, as well as leaf transpiration as a promising tool for field and greenhouse management of diseases. Images of standard chlorophyll fluorescence (Chl-F) parameters obtained during Chl-F induction kinetics related to photochemical processes and those involved in energy dissipation, could be good stress indicators to monitor pathogenesis. Changes on UV-induced blue (F440) and green fluorescence (F520) measured by multicolour fluorescence imaging in pathogen-challenged plants seem to be related with the up-regulation of the plant secondary metabolism and with an increase in phenolic compounds involved in plant defence, such as scopoletin, chlorogenic or ferulic acids. Thermal imaging visualizes the leaf transpiration map during pathogenesis and emphasizes the key role of stomata on innate plant immunity. Using several imaging techniques in parallel could allow obtaining disease signatures for a specific pathogen. These techniques have also turned out to be very useful for presymptomatic pathogen detection, and powerful non-destructive tools for precision agriculture. Their applicability at lab-scale, in the field by remote sensing, and in high-throughput plant phenotyping, makes them particularly useful. Thermal sensors are widely used in crop fields to detect early changes in leaf transpiration induced by both air-borne and soil-borne pathogens. The limitations of measuring photosynthesis by

  9. Microbial load monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caplin, R. S.; Royer, E. R.

    1978-01-01

    Attempts are made to provide a total design of a Microbial Load Monitor (MLM) system flight engineering model. Activities include assembly and testing of Sample Receiving and Card Loading Devices (SRCLDs), operator related software, and testing of biological samples in the MLM. Progress was made in assembling SRCLDs with minimal leaks and which operate reliably in the Sample Loading System. Seven operator commands are used to control various aspects of the MLM such as calibrating and reading the incubating reading head, setting the clock and reading time, and status of Card. Testing of the instrument, both in hardware and biologically, was performed. Hardware testing concentrated on SRCLDs. Biological testing covered 66 clinical and seeded samples. Tentative thresholds were set and media performance listed.

  10. Shuttle car loading system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, E. R., Jr. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A system is described for loading newly mined material such as coal, into a shuttle car, at a location near the mine face where there is only a limited height available for a loading system. The system includes a storage bin having several telescoping bin sections and a shuttle car having a bottom wall that can move under the bin. With the bin in an extended position and filled with coal the bin sections can be telescoped to allow the coal to drop out of the bin sections and into the shuttle car, to quickly load the car. The bin sections can then be extended, so they can be slowly filled with more while waiting another shuttle car.

  11. Elastomeric load sharing device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isabelle, Charles J. (Inventor); Kish, Jules G. (Inventor); Stone, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An elastomeric load sharing device, interposed in combination between a driven gear and a central drive shaft to facilitate balanced torque distribution in split power transmission systems, includes a cylindrical elastomeric bearing and a plurality of elastomeric bearing pads. The elastomeric bearing and bearing pads comprise one or more layers, each layer including an elastomer having a metal backing strip secured thereto. The elastomeric bearing is configured to have a high radial stiffness and a low torsional stiffness and is operative to radially center the driven gear and to minimize torque transfer through the elastomeric bearing. The bearing pads are configured to have a low radial and torsional stiffness and a high axial stiffness and are operative to compressively transmit torque from the driven gear to the drive shaft. The elastomeric load sharing device has spring rates that compensate for mechanical deviations in the gear train assembly to provide balanced torque distribution between complementary load paths of split power transmission systems.

  12. From multiple pathogenicity islands to a unique organized pathogenicity archipelago

    PubMed Central

    Bouyioukos, Costas; Reverchon, Sylvie; Képès, François

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenicity islands are sets of successive genes in a genome that determine the virulence of a bacterium. In a growing number of studies, bacterial virulence appears to be determined by multiple islands scattered along the genome. This is the case in a family of seven plant pathogens and a human pathogen that, under KdgR regulation, massively secrete enzymes such as pectinases that degrade plant cell wall. Here we show that their multiple pathogenicity islands form together a coherently organized, single “archipelago” at the genome scale. Furthermore, in half of the species, most genes encoding secreted pectinases are expressed from the same DNA strand (transcriptional co-orientation). This genome architecture favors DNA conformations that are conducive to genes spatial co-localization, sometimes complemented by co-orientation. As proteins tend to be synthetized close to their encoding genes in bacteria, we propose that this architecture would favor the efficient funneling of pectinases at convergent points within the cell. The underlying functional hypothesis is that this convergent funneling of the full blend of pectinases constitutes a crucial strategy for successful degradation of the plant cell wall. Altogether, our work provides a new approach to describe and predict, at the genome scale, the full virulence complement. PMID:27302835

  13. June 1992 Hall B collaboration meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, Lawrence

    1992-06-01

    The Hall B collaboration meeting at the CEBAF 1992 Summer Workshop consisted of technical and physics working group meetings, a special beam line devices working group meeting the first meeting of the membership committee, a technical representatives meeting and a full collaboration meeting. Highlights of these meetings are presented in this report.

  14. Pathogenic rickettsiae as bioterrorism agents.

    PubMed

    Azad, Abdu F

    2007-07-15

    Because of their unique biological characteristics, such as environmental stability, small size, aerosol transmission, persistence in infected hosts, low infectious dose, and high associated morbidity and mortality, Rickettsia prowazekii and Coxiella burnetii have been weaponized. These biological attributes would make the pathogenic rickettsiae desirable bioterrorism agents. However, production of highly purified, virulent, weapon-quality rickettsiae is a daunting task that requires expertise and elaborate, state-of-the art laboratory procedures to retain rickettsial survival and virulence. Another drawback to developing rickettsial pathogens as biological weapons is their lack of direct transmission from host to host and the availability of very effective therapeutic countermeasures against these obligate intracellular bacteria.

  15. New trends in emerging pathogens.

    PubMed

    Skovgaard, Niels

    2007-12-15

    The emergence of pathogens is the result of a number of impact in all parts of the food chain. The emerging technologies in food production explain how new pathogens can establish themselves in the food chain and compromise food safety. The impact of the food technology is analysed for several bacteria, such as Yersinia, Campylobacter, Arcobacter, Helicobacter pullorum, Enterobacter sakazakii, Mycobacterium avium spp. paratuberculosis, prions related to vCJD and others. The importance of the ability of many microbes to form VBNC forms is elaborated on. Research on culture independent methods may address this outstanding issue to the better understanding of emerging pathogens. The "demerging" of pathogens also occur, and examples of this are explained. The reaction of bacteria to stresses and sublethal treatments, and how exposure to one stress factor can confer resistance to other stresses, literally speaking causing contagious resistance, are explained. The implication of this e.g. in modern approaches of food preservation, such as Minimally processed Foods, is considerable. Intestinal colonization of EHEC may be regulated by Quorum sensing, and this ability of microbes plays an important role in the colonization of microbes in food and on food processing equipment, an important factor in the emergence of pathogens. The emergence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as an opportunistic human pathogen, used for centuries for food and production of alcoholic beverages, calls for research in molecular tools to distinguish between probiotic and clinical strains. Cyclospora cayetanensis and Norovirus outbreaks can no longer be designated as emerging pathogens, they share however one characteristic in the epidemiology of emerging nature, the importance of the hygiene in the primary production stage, including supply of potable water, and the application of GMP and the HACCP principles in the beginning of the food chain. Hepatitis E virus is a potential emerging food borne

  16. 78 FR 4847 - Board Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-23

    ... CORPORATION Board Meeting AGENCY: Farm Credit System Insurance Corporation. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given of the regular meeting of the Farm Credit System Insurance Corporation Board (Board). DATE AND TIME: The meeting of the Board will be held at the offices of the Farm Credit Administration in McLean, Virginia, on...

  17. 75 FR 79334 - Meeting Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ARCTIC RESEARCH COMMISSION Meeting Notice Notice is hereby given that the U.S. Arctic Research Commission will hold its 95th meeting... concerning Arctic research activities. The focus of the meeting will be reports and updates on programs and...

  18. 75 FR 76006 - Regular Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-07

    ... Board (Board). Date and Time: The meeting of the Board will be held at the offices of the Farm Credit Administration in McLean, Virginia, on December 9, 2010, from 12:30 p.m. until such time as the Board concludes... CORPORATION Regular Meeting AGENCY: Farm Credit System Insurance Corporation Board. ACTION: Regular meeting...

  19. A Classroom Meeting of Minds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Marvin D.

    Steve Allen's "Meeting of Minds" television series (in which historical figures from different periods meet) and Hendrik Willem van Loon's "Van Loon's Lives" (which details a imagined dinner where guests meet) both present a concept which is readily adaptable to high school communication classes because it incorporates numerous…

  20. 78 FR 52601 - Commission Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-23

    ... COMMISSION Commission Meeting AGENCY: Susquehanna River Basin Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Susquehanna River Basin Commission will hold its regular business meeting on September 19, 2013, in Binghamton, New York. Details concerning the matters to be addressed at the business meeting are contained in the...

  1. Town Meeting and Community Engagement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uline, Cynthia L.

    1998-01-01

    Draws upon the history of the American town meeting as a vehicle for understanding this institution. Considers how a New England public school district has used town meetings effectively as a reform vehicle. Town meetings should be considered an honorable, truly democratic forum, not a symbolic gesture to improve public relations. (24 references)…

  2. Proteomics and integrative omic approaches for understanding host-pathogen interactions and infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Jean Beltran, Pierre M; Federspiel, Joel D; Sheng, Xinlei; Cristea, Ileana M

    2017-03-27

    Organisms are constantly exposed to microbial pathogens in their environments. When a pathogen meets its host, a series of intricate intracellular interactions shape the outcome of the infection. The understanding of these host-pathogen interactions is crucial for the development of treatments and preventive measures against infectious diseases. Over the past decade, proteomic approaches have become prime contributors to the discovery and understanding of host-pathogen interactions that represent anti- and pro-pathogenic cellular responses. Here, we review these proteomic methods and their application to studying viral and bacterial intracellular pathogens. We examine approaches for defining spatial and temporal host-pathogen protein interactions upon infection of a host cell. Further expanding the understanding of proteome organization during an infection, we discuss methods that characterize the regulation of host and pathogen proteomes through alterations in protein abundance, localization, and post-translational modifications. Finally, we highlight bioinformatic tools available for analyzing such proteomic datasets, as well as novel strategies for integrating proteomics with other omic tools, such as genomics, transcriptomics, and metabolomics, to obtain a systems-level understanding of infectious diseases.

  3. Estimating turbine limit load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, Arthur J.

    1993-01-01

    A method for estimating turbine limit-load pressure ratio from turbine map information is presented and demonstrated. It is based on a mean line analysis at the last-rotor exit. The required map information includes choke flow rate at all speeds as well as pressure ratio and efficiency at the onset of choke at design speed. One- and two-stage turbines are analyzed to compare the results with those from a more rigorous off-design flow analysis and to show the sensitivities of the computed limit-load pressure ratios to changes in the key assumptions.

  4. Ocean Tide Loading Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agnew, Duncan Carr

    2005-01-01

    September 15,2003 through May 15,2005 This grant funds the maintenance, updating, and distribution of programs for computing ocean tide loading, to enable the corrections for such loading to be more widely applied in space- geodetic and gravity measurements. These programs, developed under funding from the CDP and DOSE programs, incorporate the most recent global tidal models developed from Topex/Poscidon data, and also local tide models for regions around North America; the design of the algorithm and software makes it straightforward to combine local and global models.

  5. Investigation of Optimal Control Allocation for Gust Load Alleviation in Flight Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Susan A.; Taylor, Brian R.; Bodson, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Advances in sensors and avionics computation power suggest real-time structural load measurements could be used in flight control systems for improved safety and performance. A conventional transport flight control system determines the moments necessary to meet the pilot's command, while rejecting disturbances and maintaining stability of the aircraft. Control allocation is the problem of converting these desired moments into control effector commands. In this paper, a framework is proposed to incorporate real-time structural load feedback and structural load constraints in the control allocator. Constrained optimal control allocation can be used to achieve desired moments without exceeding specified limits on monitored load points. Minimization of structural loads by the control allocator is used to alleviate gust loads. The framework to incorporate structural loads in the flight control system and an optimal control allocation algorithm will be described and then demonstrated on a nonlinear simulation of a generic transport aircraft with flight dynamics and static structural loads.

  6. Iron loading: a risk factor for Whipple's disease?

    PubMed

    Weinberg, E D

    2001-07-01

    Because of impairment of microbial iron acquisition ability, some potential pathogens can cause disease only in iron loaded hosts. Tropheryma whippelii, the etiologic agent of Whipple's disease, is a possible example. Whipple's disease is non-contagious, occurs mainly in middle-aged white males, and displays many, but not all, of the complications of hereditary haemochromatosis. Tropheryma whippelii is a gastrointestinal commensal that causes disease in persons who have a Th1-Th2 imbalance. Host susceptibility may be exacerbated by iron loading. Consideration should be given to have patients evaluated for levels of interferon-gamma and interleukin-4 as well as for serum ferritin and transferrin iron saturation.

  7. Transfer Mechanisms for Heavy Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassisi, V.

    1986-01-01

    Soft hydraulic system gently maneuvers loads. Upper and lower load-transfer mechanisms attach through mounting holes in vertical beam adjustable or gross positioning. Fine positioning of load accomplished by hydraulic cylinders that move trunnion support and trunnion clamp through short distances. Useful in transferring large loads in railroads, agriculture, shipping, manufacturing, and even precision assembly of large items.

  8. Virulence and Pathogen Multiplication: A Serial Passage Experiment in the Hypervirulent Bacterial Insect-Pathogen Xenorhabdus nematophila

    PubMed Central

    Chapuis, Élodie; Pagès, Sylvie; Emelianoff, Vanya; Givaudan, Alain; Ferdy, Jean-Baptiste

    2011-01-01

    The trade-off hypothesis proposes that the evolution of pathogens' virulence is shaped by a link between virulence and contagiousness. This link is often assumed to come from the fact that pathogens are contagious only if they can reach high parasitic load in the infected host. In this paper we present an experimental test of the hypothesis that selection on fast replication can affect virulence. In a serial passage experiment, we selected 80 lines of the bacterial insect-pathogen Xenorhabdus nematophila to multiply fast in an artificial culture medium. This selection resulted in shortened lag phase in our selected bacteria. We then injected these bacteria into insects and observed an increase in virulence. This could be taken as a sign that virulence in Xenorhabdus is linked to fast multiplication. But we found, among the selected lineages, either no link or a positive correlation between lag duration and virulence: the most virulent bacteria were the last to start multiplying. We then surveyed phenotypes that are under the control of the flhDC super regulon, which has been shown to be involved in Xenorhabdus virulence. We found that, in one treatment, the flhDC regulon has evolved rapidly, but that the changes we observed were not connected to virulence. All together, these results indicate that virulence is, in Xenorhabdus as in many other pathogens, a multifactorial trait. Being able to grow fast is one way to be virulent. But other ways exist which renders the evolution of virulence hard to predict. PMID:21305003

  9. LOADING AND UNLOADING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1960-08-16

    A device for loading and unloading fuel rods into and from a reactor tank through an access hole includes parallel links carrying a gripper. These links enable the gripper to go through the access hole and then to be moved laterally from the axis of the access hole to the various locations of the fuel rods in the reactor tank.

  10. Fuel Load (FL)

    Treesearch

    Duncan C. Lutes; Robert E. Keane

    2006-01-01

    The Fuel Load method (FL) is used to sample dead and down woody debris, determine depth of the duff/ litter profile, estimate the proportion of litter in the profile, and estimate total vegetative cover and dead vegetative cover. Down woody debris (DWD) is sampled using the planar intercept technique based on the methodology developed by Brown (1974). Pieces of dead...

  11. Multidimensional spectral load balancing

    DOEpatents

    Hendrickson, Bruce A.; Leland, Robert W.

    1996-12-24

    A method of and apparatus for graph partitioning involving the use of a plurality of eigenvectors of the Laplacian matrix of the graph of the problem for which load balancing is desired. The invention is particularly useful for optimizing parallel computer processing of a problem and for minimizing total pathway lengths of integrated circuits in the design stage.

  12. Pathogen pollution and the emergence of a deadly amphibian pathogen.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Valerie J; Peterson, Anna C

    2012-11-01

    Imagine a single pathogen that is responsible for mass mortality of over a third of an entire vertebrate class. For example, if a single pathogen were causing the death, decline and extinction of 30% of mammal species (including humans), the entire world would be paying attention. This is what has been happening to the world's amphibians - the frogs, toads and salamanders that are affected by the chytrid fungal pathogen, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (referred to as Bd), which are consequently declining at an alarming rate. It has aptly been described as the worst pathogen in history in terms of its effects on biodiversity (Kilpatrick et al. 2010). The pathogen was only formally described about 13 years ago (Longcore et al. 1999), and scientists are still in the process of determining where it came from and investigating the question: why now? Healthy debate has ensued as to whether Bd is a globally endemic organism that only recently started causing high mortality due to shifting host responses and/or environmental change (e.g. Pounds et al. 2006) or whether a virulent strain of the pathogen has rapidly disseminated around the world in recent decades, affecting new regions with a vengeance (e.g. Morehouse et al. 2003; Weldon et al. 2004; Lips et al. 2008). We are finally beginning to shed more light on this question, due to significant discoveries that have emerged as a result of intensive DNA-sequencing methods comparing Bd isolates from different amphibian species across the globe. Evidence is mounting that there is indeed a global panzootic lineage of Bd (BdGPL) in addition to what appear to be more localized endemic strains (Fisher et al. 2009; James et al. 2009; Farrer et al. 2011). Additionally, BdGPL appears to be a hypervirulent strain that has resulted from the hybridization of different Bd strains that came into contact in recent decades, and is now potentially replacing the less-virulent endemic strains of the pathogen (Farrer et al. 2011

  13. Bloodborne Pathogens Exposure Control Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Child Care Association, Atlanta, GA.

    This sample exposure control plan is a guide to assist child care providers in complying with the blood-borne pathogens standard issued by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). The standard requires employers to establish a written exposure control plan by May 5, 1992 (for exposure to microorganisms in human blood that cause…

  14. MANAGING URBAN WATERSHED PATHOGEN CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation is a summary of the EPA National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL) publication entitled Managing Urban Watershed Pathogen Contamination, EPA/600/R-03/111 (September 2003). It is available on the internet at http://www.epa.gov/ednnrmrl/repository/water...

  15. USEPA PERSPECTIVE ON CONTROLLING PATHOGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA minimizes the risk of infectious diseases from the beneficial use of sludge by requiring its treatment to reduce pathogen levels below the detection limit. How new treatment processes can be shown equivalent to ones specified in 40CFR503 will be discussed together with ways t...

  16. Microbial Forensics and Plant Pathogens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    New awareness of the vulnerability of a nation's agricultural infrastructure to the intentional introduction of pathogens or pests has led to the enhancement of programs for prevention and preparedness. A necessary component of a balanced bio-security plan is the capability to determine whether an ...

  17. MANAGING URBAN WATERSHED PATHOGEN CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is written as a resource for state and local watershed managers who have the responsibility of managing pathogen contamination in urban watersheds. In addition it can be an information source for members of the public interested in watershed mitigation efforts aime...

  18. MANAGING URBAN WATERSHED PATHOGEN CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation is a summary of the EPA National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL) publication entitled Managing Urban Watershed Pathogen Contamination, EPA/600/R-03/111 (September 2003). It is available on the internet at http://www.epa.gov/ednnrmrl/repository/water...

  19. USEPA PERSPECTIVE ON CONTROLLING PATHOGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA minimizes the risk of infectious diseases from the beneficial use of sludge by requiring its treatment to reduce pathogen levels below the detection limit. How new treatment processes can be shown equivalent to ones specified in 40CFR503 will be discussed together with ways t...

  20. The Evolution of Foodborne Pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Ali, Galeb S.; Manning, Shannon D.

    Despite continuous advances in food safety and disease surveillance, control, and prevention, foodborne bacterial infections remain a major public health concern. Because foodborne pathogens are commonly exposed to multiple environmental stressors, such as low pH and antibiotics, most have evolved specific mechanisms to facilitate survival in adverse environments.

  1. MANAGING URBAN WATERSHED PATHOGEN CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is written as a resource for state and local watershed managers who have the responsibility of managing pathogen contamination in urban watersheds. In addition it can be an information source for members of the public interested in watershed mitigation efforts aime...

  2. Pathogenicity of Shigella in chickens.

    PubMed

    Shi, Run; Yang, Xia; Chen, Lu; Chang, Hong-tao; Liu, Hong-ying; Zhao, Jun; Wang, Xin-wei; Wang, Chuan-qing

    2014-01-01

    Shigellosis in chickens was first reported in 2004. This study aimed to determine the pathogenicity of Shigella in chickens and the possibility of cross-infection between humans and chickens. The pathogenicity of Shigella in chickens was examined via infection of three-day-old SPF chickens with Shigella strain ZD02 isolated from a human patient. The virulence and invasiveness were examined by infection of the chicken intestines and primary chicken intestinal epithelial cells. The results showed Shigella can cause death via intraperitoneal injection in SPF chickens, but only induce depression via crop injection. Immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy revealed the Shigella can invade the intestinal epithelia. Immunohistochemistry of the primary chicken intestinal epithelial cells infected with Shigella showed the bacteria were internalized into the epithelial cells. Electron microscopy also confirmed that Shigella invaded primary chicken intestinal epithelia and was encapsulated by phagosome-like membranes. Our data demonstrate that Shigella can invade primary chicken intestinal epithelial cells in vitro and chicken intestinal mucosa in vivo, resulting in pathogenicity and even death. The findings suggest Shigella isolated from human or chicken share similar pathogenicity as well as the possibility of human-poultry cross-infection, which is of public health significance.

  3. Biosignatures of Pathogen and Host

    SciTech Connect

    Fitch, J P; Chromy, B A; Forde, C E; Garcia, E; Gardner, S N; Gu, P P; Kuczmarksi, T A; Melius, C F; McCutchen-Maloney, S L; Milanovich, F P; Motin, V L; Ott, L L; Quong, A A; Quong, J N; Rocco, J M; Slezak, T R; Sokhansanj, B A; Vitalis, E A; Zemla, A T; McCready, P M

    2002-08-27

    In information theory, a signature is characterized by the information content as well as noise statistics of the communication channel. Biosignatures have analogous properties. A biosignature can be associated with a particular attribute of a pathogen or a host. However, the signature may be lost in backgrounds of similar or even identical signals from other sources. In this paper, we highlight statistical and signal processing challenges associated with identifying good biosignatures for pathogens in host and other environments. In some cases it may be possible to identify useful signatures of pathogens through indirect but amplified signals from the host. Discovery of these signatures requires new approaches to modeling and data interpretation. For environmental biosignal collections, it is possible to use signal processing techniques from other applications (e.g., synthetic aperture radar) to track the natural progression of microbes over large areas. We also present a computer-assisted approach to identify unique nucleic-acid based microbial signatures. Finally, an understanding of host-pathogen interactions will result in better detectors as well as opportunities in vaccines and therapeutics.

  4. Bloodborne Pathogens Exposure Control Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Child Care Association, Atlanta, GA.

    This sample exposure control plan is a guide to assist child care providers in complying with the blood-borne pathogens standard issued by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). The standard requires employers to establish a written exposure control plan by May 5, 1992 (for exposure to microorganisms in human blood that cause…

  5. Pathogenicity of Shigella in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lu; Chang, Hong-tao; Liu, Hong-ying; Zhao, Jun; Wang, Xin-wei; Wang, Chuan-qing

    2014-01-01

    Shigellosis in chickens was first reported in 2004. This study aimed to determine the pathogenicity of Shigella in chickens and the possibility of cross-infection between humans and chickens. The pathogenicity of Shigella in chickens was examined via infection of three-day-old SPF chickens with Shigella strain ZD02 isolated from a human patient. The virulence and invasiveness were examined by infection of the chicken intestines and primary chicken intestinal epithelial cells. The results showed Shigella can cause death via intraperitoneal injection in SPF chickens, but only induce depression via crop injection. Immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy revealed the Shigella can invade the intestinal epithelia. Immunohistochemistry of the primary chicken intestinal epithelial cells infected with Shigella showed the bacteria were internalized into the epithelial cells. Electron microscopy also confirmed that Shigella invaded primary chicken intestinal epithelia and was encapsulated by phagosome-like membranes. Our data demonstrate that Shigella can invade primary chicken intestinal epithelial cells in vitro and chicken intestinal mucosa in vivo, resulting in pathogenicity and even death. The findings suggest Shigella isolated from human or chicken share similar pathogenicity as well as the possibility of human-poultry cross-infection, which is of public health significance. PMID:24949637

  6. Pathogenicity of Aseptic Bursaphelenchus xylophilus

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Li-hua; Ye, Jianren; Negi, Sapna; Xu, Xu-ling; Wang, Zhang-li; Ji, Jin-yi

    2012-01-01

    Pine wilt is a disease of pine (Pinus spp.) caused by the pine wood nematode (PWN), Bursaphelenchus xylophilus. However, the pathogenic mechanism of pine wilt disease (PWD) remains unclear. Although the PWN was thought to be the only pathogenic agent associated with this disease, a potential role for bacterial symbionts in the disease process was recently proposed. Studies have indicated that aseptic PWNs do not cause PWD in aseptic pine trees, while PWNs associated with bacteria cause wilting symptoms. To investigate the pathogenicity of the PWN and its associated bacteria, 3-month-old microcuttings derived from certain clones of Pinus densiflora Siebold & Zucc. produced in vitro were inoculated under aseptic conditions with aseptic PWNs, non-aseptic PWNs and bacteria isolated from the nematodes. Six-month-old aseptic P. densiflora microcuttings and 7-month-old P. massoniana seedlings were also inoculated under aseptic conditions with aseptic PWNs and non-aseptic PWNs. The results showed that the aseptic microcuttings and seedlings inoculated with aseptic PWNs or non-aseptic PWNs wilted, while those inoculated with bacterial isolates did not wilt. Nematodes were recovered from wilted microcuttings and seedlings inoculated with aseptic PWNs and non-aseptic PWNs, and the asepsis of nematodes recovered from aseptic PWN-inoculated microcuttings and seedlings was reconfirmed by culturing them in NB liquid medium at 30°C for more than 7 days. Taken together, the results indicate that the asepsis of PWN did not cause the loss of pathogenicity. PMID:22662271

  7. Lectins in human pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Gallegos, Belém; Martínez, Ruth; Pérez, Laura; Del Socorro Pina, María; Perez, Eduardo; Hernández, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins widely distributed in nature. They constitute a highly diverse group of proteins consisting of many different protein families that are, in general, structurally unrelated. In the last few years, mushroom and other fungal lectins have attracted wide attention due to their antitumour, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. The present mini-review provides concise information about recent developments in understanding lectins from human pathogenic fungi. A bibliographic search was performed in the Science Direct and PubMed databases, using the following keywords "lectin", "fungi", "human" and "pathogenic". Lectins present in fungi have been classified; however, the role played by lectins derived from human pathogenic fungi in infectious processes remains uncertain; thus, this is a scientific field requiring more research. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012). Copyright © 2013 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Kicking Out Pathogens in Exosomes.

    PubMed

    Sergeeva, Oksana A; van der Goot, F Gisou

    2015-06-04

    Host-pathogen interactions involve a series of attacks and counter-attacks. Miao et al. show that, although some invading bacteria can take shelter in lysosomes by neutralizing their pH, this respite is temporary, as host cells can expel them in exosomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Sources of microbial pathogens in municipal solid waste landfills in the United States of America.

    PubMed

    Gerba, Charles P; Tamimi, Akrum H; Pettigrew, Charles; Weisbrod, Anne V; Rajagopalan, Vijay

    2011-08-01

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) categories, as specified by United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA), were evaluated for their relative contribution of pathogenic viruses, bacteria, and protozoan parasites into MSW landfills from 1960 to 2007. The purpose of this study was to identify trends and quantify the potential contribution of pathogens in MSW as an aid to the assessment of potential public health risks. A review of the literature was conducted to estimate values for the concentrations of faecal indicator bacteria and pathogens in the major categories of MSW. The major sources of MSW contributing enteric pathogens were food waste, pet faeces, absorbent products, and biosolids. During the last 47 years, recycling of glass, metals, plastic, paper and some organic wastes in MSW has increased, resulting in a decreased proportion of these materials in the total landfilled MSW. The relative proportion of remaining waste materials has increased; several of these waste categories contain pathogens. For all potential sources, food waste contributes the greatest number of faecal coliforms (80.62%). The largest contribution of salmonellae (97.27%), human enteroviruses (94.88%) and protozoan parasites (97%) are expected to come from pet faeces. Biosolids from wastewater treatment sludge contribute the greatest number of human noroviruses (99.94%). By comparison, absorbent hygiene products do not appear to contribute significantly to overall pathogen loading for any group of pathogens. This is largely due to the relatively low volume of these pathogen sources in MSW, compared, for example, with food waste at almost 40% of total MSW.

  10. Publication committee meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Publications Committee has oversight responsibility for the entire AGU publications program. It is supported in this activity by the Journals Board, the Books Board, and the Translations Board. The 1982-1984 committee is chaired by Thomas Graedel. Serving with him are David Atlas, Grant Gross, Jurate Landwehr, Peter Molnar, George Reid, and Rob Van der Voo.At its November 3-4 meeting the new committee spent much of its time acquainting its elf with the scope of the program, the current problems, and the potential opportunities. In addition to setting the background against which the work of the next two years would take place, the committee

  11. LLW Forum meeting report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    This report summarizes the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) meeting on May 29 through May 31, 1996.The LLW Forum is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties.

  12. LLW Forum meeting report

    SciTech Connect

    1991-12-31

    This document reports the details of the Quarterly Meeting of the Low- Level Radioactive Waste Forum held in San Diego, California during January 23-25, 1991. Topics discussed include: State and Compact Progress Reports; Legal Updates; Update on Technical Assistance; Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking Regarding Surcharge Rebates; Update on TCC Activities; NRC Update; Disposal of Commercial Mixed Waste; Update on EPA Activities; ACNW Working Group on Mixed Waste; National Profile on Mixed Waste; Commercial Perspective on Mixed Waste; Update on DOT Activities; Source Terms; Materials and Waste; Storage: and Waste Acceptance Criteria and Packaging.

  13. Load research manual. Volume 1. Load research procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenburg, L.; Clarkson, G.; Grund, Jr., C.; Leo, J.; Asbury, J.; Brandon-Brown, F.; Derderian, H.; Mueller, R.; Swaroop, R.

    1980-11-01

    This three-volume manual presents technical guidelines for electric utility load research. Special attention is given to issues raised by the load data reporting requirements of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 and to problems faced by smaller utilities that are initiating load research programs. In Volumes 1 and 2, procedures are suggested for determining data requirements for load research, establishing the size and customer composition of a load survey sample, selecting and using equipment to record customer electricity usage, processing data tapes from the recording equipment, and analyzing the data. Statistical techniques used in customer sampling are discussed in detail. The costs of load research also are estimated, and ongoing load research programs at three utilities are described. The manual includes guides to load research literature and glossaries of load research and statistical terms.

  14. Parallel Patterns of Increased Virulence in a Recently Emerged Wildlife Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Hawley, Dana M.; Osnas, Erik E.; Dobson, Andrew P.; Hochachka, Wesley M.; Ley, David H.; Dhondt, André A.

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of higher virulence during disease emergence has been predicted by theoretical models, but empirical studies of short-term virulence evolution following pathogen emergence remain rare. Here we examine patterns of short-term virulence evolution using archived isolates of the bacterium Mycoplasma gallisepticum collected during sequential emergence events in two geographically distinct populations of the host, the North American house finch (Haemorhous [formerly Carpodacus] mexicanus). We present results from two complementary experiments, one that examines the trend in pathogen virulence in eastern North American isolates over the course of the eastern epidemic (1994–2008), and the other a parallel experiment on Pacific coast isolates of the pathogen collected after M. gallisepticum established itself in western North American house finch populations (2006–2010). Consistent with theoretical expectations regarding short-term or dynamic evolution of virulence, we show rapid increases in pathogen virulence on both coasts following the pathogen's establishment in each host population. We also find evidence for positive genetic covariation between virulence and pathogen load, a proxy for transmission potential, among isolates of M. gallisepticum. As predicted by theory, indirect selection for increased transmission likely drove the evolutionary increase in virulence in both geographic locations. Our results provide one of the first empirical examples of rapid changes in virulence following pathogen emergence, and both the detected pattern and mechanism of positive genetic covariation between virulence and pathogen load are consistent with theoretical expectations. Our study provides unique empirical insight into the dynamics of short-term virulence evolution that are likely to operate in other emerging pathogens of wildlife and humans. PMID:23723736

  15. Measuring alignment of loading fixture

    DOEpatents

    Scavone, Donald W.

    1989-01-01

    An apparatus and method for measuring the alignment of a clevis and pin type loading fixture for compact tension specimens include a pair of substantially identical flat loading ligaments. Each loading ligament has two apertures for the reception of a respective pin of the loading fixture and a thickness less than one-half of a width of the clevis opening. The pair of loading ligaments are mounted in the clevis openings at respective sides thereof. The loading ligaments are then loaded by the pins of the loading fixture and the strain in each loading ligament is measured. By comparing the relative strain of each loading ligament, the alignment of the loading fixture is determined. Preferably, a suitable strain gage device is located at each longitudinal edge of a respective loading ligament equidistant from the two apertures in order to determine the strain thereat and hence the strain of each ligament. The loading ligaments are made substantially identical by jig grinding the loading ligaments as a matched set. Each loading ligament can also be individually calibrated prior to the measurement.

  16. Pathogenicity, morphology, and differentiation of Acanthamoeba.

    PubMed

    Khan, N A

    2001-12-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis is sight threatening corneal infection caused by pathogenic Acanthamoeba. Previous studies have shown the genotypic differences between pathogenic and non-pathogenic species/strains of Acanthamoeba. In this study, we examined the morphological differences between pathogenic and non-pathogenic species/strains using scanning electron microscopy. Pathogenic Acanthamoeba exhibited higher number of acanthopodia (structures associated with the binding of amoeba to the target cells) as compared to non-pathogens. In addition, interactions of amoeba with the corneal epithelial cells were studied. Only pathogenic amoeba exhibited adhesion to epithelial cells. Further results indicated that phagocytosis occurs in the pathogenic amoeba by the formation of amoebastome (characteristic of amoeba phagocyte). This study showed that Acanthamoeba phagocytosis may be both an efficient means of obtaining nutrients for the amoeba and a significant factor in the pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba infections.

  17. Power system very short-term load prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Trudnowski, D.J.; Johnson, J.M.; Whitney, P.

    1997-02-01

    A fundamental objective of a power-system operating and control scheme is to maintain a match between the system`s overall real-power load and generation. To accurately maintain this match, modern energy management systems require estimates of the future total system load. Several strategies and tools are available for estimating system load. Nearly all of these estimate the future load in 1-hour steps over several hours (or time frames very close to this). While hourly load estimates are very useful for many operation and control decisions, more accurate estimates at closer intervals would also be valuable. This is especially true for emerging Area Generation Control (AGC) strategies such as look-ahead AGC. For these short-term estimation applications, future load estimates out to several minutes at intervals of 1 to 5 minutes are required. The currently emerging operation and control strategies being developed by the BPA are dependent on accurate very short-term load estimates. To meet this need, the BPA commissioned the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Montana Tech (an affiliate of the University of Montana) to develop an accurate load prediction algorithm and computer codes that automatically update and can reliably perform in a closed-loop controller for the BPA system. The requirements include accurate load estimation in 5-minute steps out to 2 hours. This report presents the results of this effort and includes: a methodology and algorithms for short-term load prediction that incorporates information from a general hourly forecaster; specific algorithm parameters for implementing the predictor in the BPA system; performance and sensitivity studies of the algorithms on BPA-supplied data; an algorithm for filtering power system load samples as a precursor to inputting into the predictor; and FORTRAN 77 subroutines for implementing the algorithms.

  18. Pyroflow CFB boiler meets the dynamic challenges of utility operation

    SciTech Connect

    Chelian, P.K.; Hickey, M.; Utt, J.

    1995-12-31

    Large size CFB units supplied to utilities are required to respond rapidly and accurately to the system load demand signals. These units are designed to receive demand signals from load demand computers (economic dispatch systems), and by various types of feed forward controls to achieve the desired level of generation in a minimum amount of time, with minimum upset to the steam conditions. Pyropower Corporation supplied a 165 MWe net capacity CFB boiler to the Nova Scotia Power Inc., Point Aconi Station. This boiler was subjected to a number of tests to demonstrate the dynamic response of the boiler. The tests included minor and major load rejections as well as rapid increase and decrease of load. One of the tests was to demonstrate the ability to reject from full load to the house load and operate for eight hours. This report summarizes the experience of these tests, which leads to the conclusion that CFB boilers, when properly designed and tuned, are capable of meeting the present day challenges of dynamic response in dispatch mode of operation. This paper also draws references from other large size Pyroflow CFB units that are operating in cycling modes to address the capabilities of the CFB boilers related to rapid load variation.

  19. NEWS: AAPT Summer Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellema, Steve

    2000-11-01

    The 2000 Summer Meeting of the American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT) was held from 28~July-2~August at the University of Guelph in Ontario, Canada. Despite somewhat rainy weather throughout the week, the annual gathering was an enjoyable one, filled with interesting talks on the state of physics education in North America. Using a new scheduling format for the summer meeting, all of the paid workshops and tutorials were held on Saturday and Sunday 29-30 July. The invited and contributed papers for the main AAPT meeting were then presented on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday. As had been done in 1999 in San Antonio, a two-day tandem meeting dedicated to Physics Education Research (PER) was held on Wednesday and Thursday 2-3 August, immediately after the main AAPT meeting. Over the three days of the main meeting, 60 sessions were held under the sponsorship of various AAPT committees. These included sessions (numbers in parentheses) organized by the committees on Apparatus (1), Astronomy Education (3), Awards (2), Computers (5), Graduate Education (2), High Schools (1), History and Philosophy (1), Instructional Media (3), International Education (1), Laboratories (2), Pre-High School Education (2), Programs (4), Professional Concerns (6), Research in Physics Education (8), Science Education for the Public (2), Two-Year Colleges (5), Undergraduate Education (7) and Women in Physics (4). Figure 1. Guelph Church of Our Lady. The main meeting opened on Sunday evening with an invited lecture by Dr John J Simpson from the host institution, the University of Guelph, describing the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. At the ceremonial session that began the activities on Monday morning, recognition was given to Clifford Swartz for his almost 30 years of service as Editor of the AAPT journal, The Physics Teacher. This was followed by an invited talk by Jim Nelson from Seminole County Public School in Florida, who received the Excellence in Pre-College Teaching Award. The

  20. Virtual anthropology meets biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Weber, Gerhard W; Bookstein, Fred L; Strait, David S

    2011-05-17

    A meeting in Vienna in October 2010 brought together researchers using Virtual Anthropology (VA) and Finite Element Analysis (FEA) in order to explore the benefits and problems facing a collaboration between the two fields. FEA is used to test mechanical hypotheses in functional anatomy and VA complements and augments this process by virtue of its tools for acquiring data, for segmenting and preparing virtual specimens, and for generating reconstructions and artificial forms. This represents a critical methodological advance because geometry is one of the crucial inputs of FEA and is often the variable of interest in functional anatomy. However, we currently lack tools that quantitatively relate differences in geometry to differences in stress and strain, or that evaluate the impact on FEA of variation within and between biological samples. Thus, when comparing models of different geometry, we do not currently obtain sufficiently informative answers to questions such as "How different are these models, and in what manner are they different? Are they different in some anatomical regions but not others?" New methodologies must be developed in order to maximize the potential of FEA to address questions in comparative and evolutionary biology. In this paper we review these and other important issues that were raised during our Vienna meeting. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. 1999 Bioastronomy Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meech, Karen J.; Caroff, Lawrence J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The 6th Bioastronomy Conference, Bioastronomy '99: A New Era in Bioastronomy, was held at the Hapuna Prince Beach hotel on the Big Island of Hawaii from August 2-6, 1999. The series of previous Bioastronomy meetings have played an important role in integrating the broader interests and techniques of both astronomy and biology to understand the origin and evolution of living systems in the universe, and to generating a context for exploration in our solar system and in extrasolar planetary systems. The scope of these interdisciplinary fields is captured in the topics discussed at the meeting: organic molecules in interstellar and interplanetary space; origin and evolution of planetary systems; comets, asteroids, and other small bodies and their role in the origin and evolution of life; Earth as a living planet; extreme environments on Earth; origin of life; transport of life between planets; evolution of life and intelligence; detection and characterization of extrasolar planets; search for extraterrestrial technology and life; future missions; and public acceptance and support of scientific studies of life in the universe.

  2. Discovery of the Plague Pathogen: Lessons Learned.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ruifu; Butler, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Plague resulted in three pandemics in history; however, its causative pathogen was isolated until the third pandemic in Hong Kong in 1894. At that time, two famous researchers, Dr. Alexandre Yersin and Dr. Shibasaburo Kitasato, went to HK, in order to identify the pathogen. The two great researchers had done a lot of work to isolate and identify the causative pathogen. However, Dr. Alexandre Yersin reported the real pathogen for plague, and we now acknowledge his work by nominating the pathogen's genus as Yersinia. In this chapter, we discussed the lessons learned from the two researchers' experience on isolation and identification of plague pathogen.

  3. Sudden oak death-caused changes to surface fuel loading and potential fire behavior in Douglas-fir-tanoak forests

    Treesearch

    Y.S. Valachovic; C.A. Lee; H. Scanlon; J.M. Varner; R. Glebocki; B.D. Graham; D.M. Rizzo

    2011-01-01

    We compared stand structure and fuel loading in northwestern California forests invaded by Phytophthora ramorum, the cause of sudden oak death, to assess whether the continued presence of this pathogen alters surface fuel loading and potential fire behavior in ways that may encumber future firefighting response. To attempt to account for these...

  4. Load measurement system with load cell lock-out mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Thang; Carroll, Monty; Liu, Jonathan

    1995-01-01

    In the frame work of the project Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment (SPIFEX), a Load Measurement System was developed and fabricated to measure the impingement force of Shuttle Reaction Control System (RCS) jets. The Load Measurement System is a force sensing system that measures any combination of normal and shear forces up to 40 N (9 lbf) in the normal direction and 22 N (5 lbf) in the shear direction with an accuracy of +/- 0.04 N (+/- 0.01 lbf) Since high resolution is required for the force measurement, the Load Measurement System is built with highly sensitive load cells. To protect these fragile load cells in the non-operational mode from being damaged due to flight loads such as launch and landing loads of the Shuttle vehicle, a motor driven device known as the Load Cell Lock-Out Mechanism was built. This Lock-Out Mechanism isolates the load cells from flight loads and re-engages the load cells for the force measurement experiment once in space. With this highly effective protection system, the SPIFEX load measurement experiment was successfully conducted on STS-44 in September 1994 with all load cells operating properly and reading impingement forces as expected.

  5. Load theory behind the wheel; perceptual and cognitive load effects.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Gillian; Greene, Ciara M

    2017-09-01

    Perceptual Load Theory has been proposed as a resolution to the longstanding early versus late selection debate in cognitive psychology. There is much evidence in support of Load Theory but very few applied studies, despite the potential for the model to shed light on everyday attention and distraction. Using a driving simulator, the effect of perceptual and cognitive load on drivers' visual search was assessed. The findings were largely in line with Load Theory, with reduced distractor processing under high perceptual load, but increased distractor processing under high cognitive load. The effect of load on driving behaviour was also analysed, with significant differences in driving behaviour under perceptual and cognitive load. In addition, the effect of perceptual load on drivers' levels of awareness was investigated. High perceptual load significantly increased inattentional blindness and deafness, for stimuli that were both relevant and irrelevant to driving. High perceptual load also increased RTs to hazards. The current study helps to advance Load Theory by illustrating its usefulness outside of traditional paradigms. There are also applied implications for driver safety and roadway design, as the current study suggests that perceptual and cognitive load are important factors in driver attention. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Loads as a Resource: Frequency Responsive Demand

    SciTech Connect

    Kalsi, Karanjit; Williams, Tess L.; Marinovici, Laurentiu D.; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Lian, Jianming

    2015-11-30

    Demand-side frequency control can complement traditional generator controls to maintain the stability of large electric systems in the face of rising uncertainty and variability associated with renewable energy resources. This report presents a hierarchical frequency-based load control strategy that uses a supervisor to flexibly adjust control gains that a population of end-use loads respond to in a decentralized manner to help meet the NERC BAL-003-1 frequency response standard at both the area level and interconnection level. The load model is calibrated and used to model populations of frequency-responsive water heaters in a PowerWorld simulation of the U.S. Western Interconnection (WECC). The proposed design is implemented and demonstrated on physical water heaters in a laboratory setting. A significant fraction of the required frequency response in the WECC could be supplied by electric water heaters alone at penetration levels of less than 15%, while contributing to NERC requirements at the interconnection and area levels.

  7. Impartial institutions, pathogen stress and the expanding social network.

    PubMed

    Hruschka, Daniel; Efferson, Charles; Jiang, Ting; Falletta-Cowden, Ashlan; Sigurdsson, Sveinn; McNamara, Rita; Sands, Madeline; Munira, Shirajum; Slingerland, Edward; Henrich, Joseph

    2014-12-01

    Anthropologists have documented substantial cross-society variation in people's willingness to treat strangers with impartial, universal norms versus favoring members of their local community. Researchers have proposed several adaptive accounts for these differences. One variant of the pathogen stress hypothesis predicts that people will be more likely to favor local in-group members when they are under greater infectious disease threat. The material security hypothesis instead proposes that institutions that permit people to meet their basic needs through impartial interactions with strangers reinforce a tendency toward impartiality, whereas people lacking such institutions must rely on local community members to meet their basic needs. Some studies have examined these hypotheses using self-reported preferences, but not with behavioral measures. We conducted behavioral experiments in eight diverse societies that measure individuals' willingness to favor in-group members by ignoring an impartial rule. Consistent with the material security hypothesis, members of societies enjoying better-quality government services and food security show a stronger preference for following an impartial rule over investing in their local in-group. Our data show no support for the pathogen stress hypothesis as applied to favoring in-groups and instead suggest that favoring in-group members more closely reflects a general adaptive fit with social institutions that have arisen in each society.

  8. Plutonium Immobilization Canister Loading

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, E.L.

    1999-01-26

    This disposition of excess plutonium is determined by the Surplus Plutonium Disposition Environmental Impact Statement (SPD-EIS) being prepared by the Department of Energy. The disposition method (Known as ''can in canister'') combines cans of immobilized plutonium-ceramic disks (pucks) with vitrified high-level waste produced at the SRS Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). This is intended to deter proliferation by making the plutonium unattractive for recovery or theft. The envisioned process remotely installs cans containing plutonium-ceramic pucks into storage magazines. Magazines are then remotely loaded into the DWPF canister through the canister neck with a robotic arm and locked into a storage rack inside the canister, which holds seven magazines. Finally, the canister is processed through DWPF and filled with high-level waste glass, thereby surrounding the product cans. This paper covers magazine and rack development and canister loading concepts.

  9. Electrical Load Modeling and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Chassin, David P.

    2013-01-01

    Electricity consumer demand response and load control are playing an increasingly important role in the development of a smart grid. Smart grid load management technologies such as Grid FriendlyTM controls and real-time pricing are making their way into the conventional model of grid planning and operations. However, the behavior of load both affects, and is affected by load control strategies that are designed to support electric grid planning and operations. This chapter discussed the natural behavior of electric loads, how it interacts with various load control and demand response strategies, what the consequences are for new grid operation concepts and the computing issues these new technologies raise.

  10. HR Public meeting

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Cher(e)s collègues, En collaboration avec le Département HR, le Directeur général a le plaisir de vous convier à une réunion publique qui se tiendra le vendredi 25 juin 2010 à 9h30 dans l’Amphithéâtre principal (Bâtiment 500)*. Un café d’accueil y sera servi à partir de 9h. Cette réunion abordera les thèmes suivants : • Valeurs de l’Organisation (Directeur général) • Code de Conduite (Directeur général / Anne-Sylvie Catherin) • Création du nouveau rôle d’Ombudsperson (Vincent Vuillemin) Ces présentations seront suivies d’une séance de questions-réponses. Nous espérons vous retrouver nombreux le 25 juin ! Meilleures salutations, Anne-Sylvie Catherin Chef du Département des Ressources humaines *Cette réunion sera retransmise simultanément dans l’Amphithéâtre BE de Prévessin (Bâtiment 864) et également disponible à l’adresse suivante : http://webcast.cern.ch -------------------------------------------------------- Dear colleagues, In collaboration with HR Department, the Director-General would like to invite you to an information meeting which will be held on Friday 25 June 2010 at 9:30 am in the Main Auditorium (Building 500)*. A welcome coffee will be available from 9:00 am. During this meeting, information will be given about: • Organization’s values (Director-General) • Code of Conduct (Director-General / Anne-Sylvie Catherin) • New Ombudsperson role (Vincent Vuillemin) These presentations will be followed by a questions & answers session. We look forward to seeing you all on 25 June! Best regards, Anne-Sylvie Catherin Head, Human Resources Department *This meeting will be simultaneously retransmitted in BE Auditorium (Building 864) and available at the following address: http://webcast.cern.ch.

  11. HR Public meeting

    SciTech Connect

    2010-10-12

    Cher(e)s collègues, En collaboration avec le Département HR, le Directeur général a le plaisir de vous convier à une réunion publique qui se tiendra le vendredi 25 juin 2010 à 9h30 dans l’Amphithéâtre principal (Bâtiment 500)*. Un café d’accueil y sera servi à partir de 9h. Cette réunion abordera les thèmes suivants : • Valeurs de l’Organisation (Directeur général) • Code de Conduite (Directeur général / Anne-Sylvie Catherin) • Création du nouveau rôle d’Ombudsperson (Vincent Vuillemin) Ces présentations seront suivies d’une séance de questions-réponses. Nous espérons vous retrouver nombreux le 25 juin ! Meilleures salutations, Anne-Sylvie Catherin Chef du Département des Ressources humaines *Cette réunion sera retransmise simultanément dans l’Amphithéâtre BE de Prévessin (Bâtiment 864) et également disponible à l’adresse suivante : http://webcast.cern.ch -------------------------------------------------------- Dear colleagues, In collaboration with HR Department, the Director-General would like to invite you to an information meeting which will be held on Friday 25 June 2010 at 9:30 am in the Main Auditorium (Building 500)*. A welcome coffee will be available from 9:00 am. During this meeting, information will be given about: • Organization’s values (Director-General) • Code of Conduct (Director-General / Anne-Sylvie Catherin) • New Ombudsperson role (Vincent Vuillemin) These presentations will be followed by a questions & answers session. We look forward to seeing you all on 25 June! Best regards, Anne-Sylvie Catherin Head, Human Resources Department *This meeting will be simultaneously retransmitted in BE Auditorium (Building 864) and available at the following address: http://webcast.cern.ch.

  12. HR Public meeting

    SciTech Connect

    2010-06-25

    Cher(e)s collègues, En collaboration avec le Département HR, le Directeur général a le plaisir de vous convier à une réunion publique qui se tiendra le vendredi 25 juin 2010 à 9h30 dans l’Amphithéâtre principal (Bâtiment 500)*. Un café d’accueil y sera servi à partir de 9h. Cette réunion abordera les thèmes suivants : • Valeurs de l’Organisation (Directeur général) • Code de Conduite (Directeur général / Anne-Sylvie Catherin) • Création du nouveau rôle d’Ombudsperson (Vincent Vuillemin) Ces présentations seront suivies d’une séance de questions-réponses. Nous espérons vous retrouver nombreux le 25 juin ! Meilleures salutations, Anne-Sylvie Catherin Chef du Département des Ressources humaines *Cette réunion sera retransmise simultanément dans l’Amphithéâtre BE de Prévessin (Bâtiment 864) et également disponible à l’adresse suivante : http://webcast.cern.ch -------------------------------------------------------- Dear colleagues, In collaboration with HR Department, the Director-General would like to invite you to an information meeting which will be held on Friday 25 June 2010 at 9:30 am in the Main Auditorium (Building 500)*. A welcome coffee will be available from 9:00 am. During this meeting, information will be given about: • Organization’s values (Director-General) • Code of Conduct (Director-General / Anne-Sylvie Catherin) • New Ombudsperson role (Vincent Vuillemin) These presentations will be followed by a questions & answers session. We look forward to seeing you all on 25 June! Best regards, Anne-Sylvie Catherin Head, Human Resources Department *This meeting will be simultaneously retransmitted in BE Auditorium (Building 864) and available at the following address: http://webcast.cern.ch.

  13. 69. BUILDING NO. 542A, LOADING & UNLOADING DECKS, LOADING AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    69. BUILDING NO. 542-A, LOADING & UNLOADING DECKS, LOADING AND UNLOADING RAMP LOOKING NORTHEAST. BUILDING NO. 550, GENERAL STOREHOUSE, IN BACKGROUND LEFT. - Picatinny Arsenal, 500 Area, Powder Factory & Power House, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  14. 32. VAL, DETAIL SHOWING LOADING PLATFORM, PROJECTILE LOADING CAR, LAUNCHER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. VAL, DETAIL SHOWING LOADING PLATFORM, PROJECTILE LOADING CAR, LAUNCHER SLAB AND UNDERSIDE OF LAUNCHER BRIDGE LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  15. Load regulating latch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleberry, W. T. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A load regulating mechanical latch is described that has a pivotally mounted latch element having a hook-shaped end with a strike roller-engaging laterally open hook for engaging a stationary strike roller. The latch element or hook is pivotally mounted in a clevis end of an elongated latch stem that is adapted for axial movement through an opening in a support plate or bracket mounted to a structural member. A coil spring is disposed over and around the extending latch stem and the lower end of the coil spring engages the support bracket. A thrust washer is removably attached to the other end of the latch stem and engages the other end of the coil spring and compresses the coil spring thereby preloading the spring and the latch element carried by the latch stem. The hook-shaped latch element has a limited degree of axial travel for loading caused by structural distortion which may change the relative positions of the latch element hook and the strike roller. Means are also provided to permit limited tilt of the latch element due to loading of the hook.

  16. Load responsive hydrodynamic bearing

    DOEpatents

    Kalsi, Manmohan S.; Somogyi, Dezso; Dietle, Lannie L.

    2002-01-01

    A load responsive hydrodynamic bearing is provided in the form of a thrust bearing or journal bearing for supporting, guiding and lubricating a relatively rotatable member to minimize wear thereof responsive to relative rotation under severe load. In the space between spaced relatively rotatable members and in the presence of a liquid or grease lubricant, one or more continuous ring shaped integral generally circular bearing bodies each define at least one dynamic surface and a plurality of support regions. Each of the support regions defines a static surface which is oriented in generally opposed relation with the dynamic surface for contact with one of the relatively rotatable members. A plurality of flexing regions are defined by the generally circular body of the bearing and are integral with and located between adjacent support regions. Each of the flexing regions has a first beam-like element being connected by an integral flexible hinge with one of the support regions and a second beam-like element having an integral flexible hinge connection with an adjacent support region. A least one local weakening geometry of the flexing region is located intermediate the first and second beam-like elements. In response to application of load from one of the relatively rotatable elements to the bearing, the beam-like elements and the local weakening geometry become flexed, causing the dynamic surface to deform and establish a hydrodynamic geometry for wedging lubricant into the dynamic interface.

  17. Buffet Load Alleviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryall, T. G.; Moses, R. W.; Hopkins, M. A.; Henderson, D.; Zimcik, D. G.; Nitzsche, F.

    2004-01-01

    High performance aircraft are, by their very nature, often required to undergo maneuvers involving high angles of attack. Under these conditions unsteady vortices emanating from the wing and the fuselage will impinge on the twin fins (required for directional stability) causing excessive buffet loads, in some circumstances, to be applied to the aircraft. These loads result in oscillatory stresses, which may cause significant amounts of fatigue damage. Active control is a possible solution to this important problem. A full-scale test was carried out on an F/A-18 fuselage and fins using piezoceramic actuators to control the vibrations. Buffet loads were simulated using very powerful electromagnetic shakers. The first phase of this test was concerned with the open loop system identification whereas the second stage involved implementing linear time invariant control laws. This paper looks at some of the problems encountered as well as the corresponding solutions and some results. It is expected that flight trials of a similar control system to alleviate buffet will occur as early as 2001.

  18. Shot loading trainer analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, T.K.

    1995-02-15

    This document presents the results from the analysis of the shot loading trainer (SLT). This device will be used to test the procedure for installing shot into the annulus of the Project W-320 shipping container. To ensure that the shot is installed uniformly around the container, vibrators will be used to settle the shot. The SLT was analyzed to ensure that it would not jeopardize worker safety during operation. The results from the static analysis of the SLT under deadweight and vibrator operating loads show that the stresses in the SLT are below code allowables. The results from the modal analysis show that the natural frequencies of the SLT are far below the operating frequencies of the vibrators, provided the SLT is mounted on pneumatic tires. The SLT was also analyzed for wind, seismic, deadweight, and moving/transporting loads. Analysis of the SLT is in accordance with SDC-4.1 for safety class 3 structures (DOE-RL 1993) and the American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC) Manual of Steel Construction (AISC 1989).

  19. 5 CFR 1206.11 - Meeting place.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Meeting place. 1206.11 Section 1206.11 Administrative Personnel MERIT SYSTEMS PROTECTION BOARD ORGANIZATION AND PROCEDURES OPEN MEETINGS Conduct of Meetings § 1206.11 Meeting place. The Board will hold open meetings in meeting rooms designated in the...

  20. Lagenidium giganteum pathogenicity in mammals.

    PubMed

    Vilela, Raquel; Taylor, John W; Walker, Edward D; Mendoza, Leonel

    2015-02-01

    Infections of mammals by species in the phylum Oomycota taxonomically and molecularly similar to known Lagenidium giganteum strains have increased. During 2013-2014, we conducted a phylogenetic study of 21 mammalian Lagenidium isolates; we found that 11 cannot be differentiated from L. giganteum strains that the US Environmental Protection Agency approved for biological control of mosquitoes; these strains were later unregistered and are no longer available. L. giganteum strains pathogenic to mammals formed a strongly supported clade with the biological control isolates, and both types experimentally infected mosquito larvae. However, the strains from mammals grew well at 25°C and 37°C, whereas the biological control strains developed normally at 25°C but poorly at higher temperatures. The emergence of heat-tolerant strains of L. giganteum pathogenic to lower animals and humans is of environmental and public health concern.

  1. Antimicrobial resistance of mastitis pathogens.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Stephen P; Murinda, Shelton E

    2012-07-01

    Antibiotics are used extensively in the dairy industry to combat disease and to improve animal performance. Antibiotics such as penicillin, cephalosporin, streptomycin, and tetracycline are used for the treatment and prevention of diseases affecting dairy cows caused by a variety of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Antibiotics are often administrated routinely to entire herds to prevent mastitis during the dry period. An increase in the incidence of disease in a herd generally results in increased use of antimicrobials, which in turn increases the potential for antibiotic residues in milk and the potential for increased bacterial resistance to antimicrobials. Continued use of antibiotics in the treatment and prevention of diseases of dairy cows will continue to be scrutinized. It is clear that strategies employing the prudent use of antimicrobials are needed. This clearly illustrates the importance of effective herd disease prevention and control programs. Based on studies published to date, scientific evidence does not support widespread, emerging resistance among mastitis pathogens to antibacterial drugs even though many of these antibiotics have been used in the dairy industry for treatment and prevention of disease for several decades. However, it is clear that use of antibiotics in dairy cows can contribute to increased antimicrobial resistance. While antimicrobial resistance does occur, we are of the opinion that the advantages of using antibiotics for the treatment of mastitis far outweigh the disadvantages. The clinical consequences of antimicrobial resistance of dairy pathogens affecting humans appear small. Antimicrobial resistance among dairy pathogens, particularly those found in milk, is likely not a human health concern as long as the milk is pasteurized. However, there are an increasing number of people who choose to consume raw milk. Transmission of an antimicrobial-resistant mastitis pathogen and/or foodborne pathogen to humans could occur

  2. Bacteriophage biocontrol of foodborne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Mustafa; Annapure, Uday S

    2016-03-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that only infect bacterial cells. Phages are categorized based on the type of their life cycle, the lytic cycle cause lysis of the bacterium with the release of multiple phage particles where as in lysogenic phase the phage DNA is incorporated into the bacterial genome. Lysogeny does not result in lysis of the host. Lytic phages have several potential applications in the food industry as biocontrol agents, biopreservatives and as tools for detecting pathogens. They have also been proposed as alternatives to antibiotics in animal health. Two unique features of phage relevant for food safety are that they are harmless to mammalian cells and high host specificity, keeping the natural microbiota undisturbed. However, the recent approval of bacteriophages as food additives has opened the discussion about 'edible viruses'. This article reviews in detail the application of phages for the control of foodborne pathogens in a process known as "biocontrol".

  3. Lagenidium giganteum Pathogenicity in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Vilela, Raquel; Taylor, John W.; Walker, Edward D.

    2015-01-01

    Infections of mammals by species in the phylum Oomycota taxonomically and molecularly similar to known Lagenidium giganteum strains have increased. During 2013–2014, we conducted a phylogenetic study of 21 mammalian Lagenidium isolates; we found that 11 cannot be differentiated from L. giganteum strains that the US Environmental Protection Agency approved for biological control of mosquitoes; these strains were later unregistered and are no longer available. L. giganteum strains pathogenic to mammals formed a strongly supported clade with the biological control isolates, and both types experimentally infected mosquito larvae. However, the strains from mammals grew well at 25°C and 37°C, whereas the biological control strains developed normally at 25°C but poorly at higher temperatures. The emergence of heat-tolerant strains of L. giganteum pathogenic to lower animals and humans is of environmental and public health concern. PMID:25625190

  4. APDS: Autonomous Pathogen Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Langlois, R G; Brown, S; Burris, L; Colston, B; Jones, L; Makarewicz, T; Mariella, R; Masquelier, D; McBride, M; Milanovich, F; Masarabadi, S; Venkateswaran, K; Marshall, G; Olson, D; Wolcott, D

    2002-02-14

    An early warning system to counter bioterrorism, the Autonomous Pathogen Detection System (APDS) continuously monitors the environment for the presence of biological pathogens (e.g., anthrax) and once detected, it sounds an alarm much like a smoke detector warns of a fire. Long before September 11, 2001, this system was being developed to protect domestic venues and events including performing arts centers, mass transit systems, major sporting and entertainment events, and other high profile situations in which the public is at risk of becoming a target of bioterrorist attacks. Customizing off-the-shelf components and developing new components, a multidisciplinary team developed APDS, a stand-alone system for rapid, continuous monitoring of multiple airborne biological threat agents in the environment. The completely automated APDS samples the air, prepares fluid samples in-line, and performs two orthogonal tests: immunoassay and nucleic acid detection. When compared to competing technologies, APDS is unprecedented in terms of flexibility and system performance.

  5. The capacity of Porphyromonas gingivalis to multiply under iron-limiting conditions correlates with its pathogenicity in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Grenier, D; Goulet, V; Mayrand, D

    2001-07-01

    Isolates of Porphyromonas gingivalis have various abilities to induce infections in an animal model. The hypothesis of this study was that pathogenic strains of P. gingivalis could multiply under iron-limiting conditions, while non-pathogenic strains could not. Three pathogenic strains (W50, W83, and ATCC 49417) grew to a final optical density (660 nm) > 2 in horse serum, while the growth of the 3 non-pathogenic strains (ATCC 33277, LB13D-2, and HW24D-1) was negligible. When an excess of hemin or ferric chloride was added to the serum, significant growth of the non-pathogenic strains occurred. Under iron-limiting conditions, the pathogenic strains of P. gingivalis had a much lower requirement for human iron-loaded transferrin and hemin than the non-pathogenic strains. Proteolytic degradation of transferrin, which may be associated with the release of iron, was not markedly different for pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains. In addition, no relationship could be established between the level of 55Fe uptake from 55Fe-transferrin and the pathogenicity of strains. Our study provided evidence that the ability of P. gingivalis to multiply in vitro under iron-limiting conditions may be correlated with its ability to induce infections in an animal model. Isolates of P. gingivalis possessing a low requirement for iron are likely to have a higher potential for initiating periodontal infections.

  6. CELSS Program Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tremor, John W.; Macelroy, Robert D.

    1987-01-01

    A meeting on the potential contributions of plant science to the goals of Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) research produced discussions that helped to focus on a variety of topics. In the area of volatiles and soluble organics, microbial activity, disease, and productivity, participants emphasized the need to know more about the consequences of closure for the growth of plants. Under nutrient delivery systems, the problems focus on the need to maintain a stable, optimum nutrient system. Lighting systems discussions emphasized unique methods of direct lighting and development of improved irradiation sources. Flight experiment opportunities were outlined by one speaker. Documentation of the Plant Growth Module was discussed. The last day's discussion focused on the organization of the research group to be involved in the development and use of a two to three cubic meter sealed chamber and ancillary equipment.

  7. Rock Deformation Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Harry

    The Third Rock Deformation Colloquium was held December 4, 1989, at the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco. Steve Kirby of the U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, Calif., reported on actions taken by the rock deformation steering committee. Brian Wernicke of Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass., talked on the structural geology of the Great Basin.The steering committee voted for “Committee on Deformation of Earth Materials” as the name for the AGU technical committee on rock deformation, Kirby said. Considerable discussion has occurred in the steering committee over our relationship to the AGU Mineral Physics Committee. Indeed, Kirby will become chairman of that committee in 1990, underlining the overlap of the two groups. It was agreed that we will pursue closer association with Mineral Physics.

  8. The fifth BIOMOVS meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    The fifth workshop and Coordinating Group meeting were held in Grand Canyon, US, November 30 to December 4, 1987 with the US Department of Energy and National Council of Radiation Protection and Measurement acting as host. The workshop focused on discussions of results of Approach A and B scenarios as well as on proposals for new scenarios. The following scenarios under Approach A were discussed: release of mercury into a river; I-131 in milk after the Chernobyl accident; Cs-137 in milk, beef and barley after the Chernobyl accident and dynamics within a lake ecosystem. The following scenarios under Approach B were discussed: atmospheric deposition; irrigation with contaminated ground water; release into a lake from a river; aging of a lake; transport of contaminated groundwater to soil; and transport of contaminated ground water to a river. Reports on data quality and uncertainty analysis were also given.

  9. 1983 AGU Fall Meeting Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    In only 5 days the AGU 1983 Fall Meeting in San Francisco accommodated more than 3100 attendees and more than 2100 papers. Each of the special, all-Union sessions attracted crowds of close to 1100 persons. Except for the 1982 Fall Meeting, which covered 8 days and included the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography (ASLO) Winter Meeting, 1983's was the largest AGU Fall Meeting ever.The large number of presentaions at the 1983 meeting was handled efficiently by assigning more than 30% of the papers to poster sessions, which were to many participants the highlight of the meeting. Poster presentations are becoming extremely good, and some of the more spirited sessions make many oral presentations seem pale in comparison. The sight of some of the world's leading geophysicists chatting over a poster paper with a student attested to one of the advantages of this type of presentation.

  10. Resistant Pathogens, Fungi, and Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Guidry, Christopher A.; Mansfield, Sara A.; Sawyer, Robert G.; Cook, Charles H.

    2014-01-01

    The first reports of antibiotic pathogens occurred a few short years after the introduction of these powerful new agents, heralding a new kind of war between medicine and pathogens. Although originally described in Staphylococcus aureus, resistance among bacteria has now become a grim race to determine which classes of bacteria will become more resistant, pitting the Gram positive staphylococci, enterococci, and streptococci against the increasingly resistant Gram negative pathogens, e. g., carbapenemase-resistant enterobacteriaceae. In addition, the availability of antibacterial agents has allowed the development of whole new kinds of diseases caused by non-bacterial pathogens, related largely to fungi that are inherently resistant to antibacterials. All of these organisms are becoming more prevalent and, ultimately, more clinically relevant for surgeons. It is ironic that despite their ubiquity in our communities, there is seldom a second thought given to viral infections in patients with surgical illness. The extent of most surgeon’s interest in viral infections ends with hepatitis and HIV, no doubt related to transmissibility as well as the implications that these viruses might have in a patient’s hepatic or immune functions. There are chapters and even textbooks written about these viruses so these will not be considered here. Instead, we will present the growing body of knowledge of the herpes family viruses and their occurrence and consequences in patients with concomitant surgical disease or critical illness. We have also chosen to focus this chapter on previously immune competent patients, as the impact of herpes family viruses in immunosuppressed patients such as transplant or AIDS patients has received thorough treatment elsewhere. PMID:25440119

  11. Host-Pathogen Coupled Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-04

    number of Yersinia outer proteins ( Yops ) via a type 3 secretion system, and one of these (YopJ) accumulates in the cytosol of macrophages where it...pathogen behavior during the initial course of infection. Progress: Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) and Nuclear Factor-kappa B (NF-kB...macrophage death. The macrophage MAPK pathway signaling produces genomic transcription and cytokine expressed protein products that are emitted from

  12. Settling and survival profile of enteric pathogens in the swine effluent for water reuse purpose.

    PubMed

    Fongaro, G; Kunz, A; Magri, M E; Schissi, C D; Viancelli, A; Philippi, L S; Barardi, C R M

    2016-11-01

    The present study evaluated the pathogens persistence and settling profile in swine effluent. We determined the enteric pathogens settling characteristics, their survival and inactivation profile in swine effluent (for water reuse purpose) and in sludge (generated after aerobic treatment - during secondary settling process). The study was performed in laboratorial-scale and in full-scale (manure treatment plant). Enteric viruses and enteric bacteria were used as biomarkers. Results showed that these enteric pathogens were significantly reduced from swine effluent during secondary settling process, and enteric viruses removal was correlated with the suspended solids decantation. The design of secondary settlers can be adapted to improve pathogens removal, by diminishing the solids loading rate per area and time, ending in higher hydraulic retention times.

  13. Disentangling the interaction among host resources, the immune system and pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Cressler, Clayton E; Nelson, William A; Day, Troy; McCauley, Edward; Bonsall, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between the immune system and pathogens is often characterised as a predator–prey interaction. This characterisation ignores the fact that both require host resources to reproduce. Here, we propose novel theory that considers how these resource requirements can modify the interaction between the immune system and pathogens. We derive a series of models to describe the energetic interaction between the immune system and pathogens, from fully independent resources to direct competition for the same resource. We show that increasing within-host resource supply has qualitatively distinct effects under these different scenarios. In particular, we show the conditions for which pathogen load is expected to increase, decrease or even peak at intermediate resource supply. We survey the empirical literature and find evidence for all three patterns. These patterns are not explained by previous theory, suggesting that competition for host resources can have a strong influence on the outcome of disease. PMID:24350974

  14. Molecular Mechanisms of Bacterial Pathogenicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Thilo Martin

    Cautious optimism has arisen over recent decades with respect to the long struggle against bacteria, viruses, and parasites. This has been offset, however, by a fatal complacency stemming from previous successes such as the development of antimicrobial drugs, the eradication of smallpox, and global immunization programs. Infectious diseases nevertheless remain the world's leading cause of death, killing at least 17 million persons annually [61]. Diarrheal diseases caused by Vibrio cholerae or Shigella dysenteriae kill about 3 million persons every year, most of them young children: Another 4 million die of tuberculosis or tetanus. Outbreaks of diphtheria in Eastern Europe threatens the population with a disease that had previously seemed to be overcome. Efforts to control infectious diseases more comprehensively are undermined not only by socioeconomic conditions but also by the nature of the pathogenic organisms itself; some isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and Enterobacter have become so resistant to drugs by horizontal gene transfer that they are almost untreatable. In addition, the mechanism of genetic variability helps pathogens to evade the human immune system, thus compromising the development of powerful vaccines. Therefore detailed knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of microbial pathogenicity is absolutely necessary to develop new strategies against infectious diseases and thus to lower their impact on human health and social development.

  15. Taxonomy of bacterial fish pathogens.

    PubMed

    Austin, Brian

    2011-02-02

    Bacterial taxonomy has progressed from reliance on highly artificial culture-dependent techniques involving the study of phenotype (including morphological, biochemical and physiological data) to the modern applications of molecular biology, most recently 16S rRNA gene sequencing, which gives an insight into evolutionary pathways (= phylogenetics). The latter is applicable to culture-independent approaches, and has led directly to the recognition of new uncultured bacterial groups, i.e. "Candidatus", which have been associated as the cause of some fish diseases, including rainbow trout summer enteritic syndrome. One immediate benefit is that 16S rRNA gene sequencing has led to increased confidence in the accuracy of names allocated to bacterial pathogens. This is in marked contrast to the previous dominance of phenotyping, and identifications, which have been subsequently challenged in the light of 16S rRNA gene sequencing. To date, there has been some fluidity over the names of bacterial fish pathogens, with some, for example Vibrio anguillarum, being divided into two separate entities (V. anguillarum and V. ordalii). Others have been combined, for example V. carchariae, V. harveyi and V. trachuri as V. harveyi. Confusion may result with some organisms recognized by more than one name; V. anguillarum was reclassified as Beneckea and Listonella, with Vibrio and Listonella persisting in the scientific literature. Notwithstanding, modern methods have permitted real progress in the understanding of the taxonomic relationships of many bacterial fish pathogens.

  16. Mapping population and pathogen movements

    PubMed Central

    Tatem, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    For most of human history, populations have been relatively isolated from each other, and only recently has there been extensive contact between peoples, flora and fauna from both old and new worlds. The reach, volume and speed of modern travel are unprecedented, with human mobility increasing in high income countries by over 1000-fold since 1800. This growth is putting people at risk from the emergence of new strains of familiar diseases, and from completely new diseases, while ever more cases of the movement of both disease vectors and the diseases they carry are being seen. Pathogens and their vectors can now move further, faster and in greater numbers than ever before. Equally however, we now have access to the most detailed and comprehensive datasets on human mobility and pathogen distributions ever assembled, in order to combat these threats. This short review paper provides an overview of these datasets, with a particular focus on low income regions, and covers briefly approaches used to combine them to help us understand and control some of the negative effects of population and pathogen movements. PMID:24480992

  17. Taxonomy of bacterial fish pathogens

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial taxonomy has progressed from reliance on highly artificial culture-dependent techniques involving the study of phenotype (including morphological, biochemical and physiological data) to the modern applications of molecular biology, most recently 16S rRNA gene sequencing, which gives an insight into evolutionary pathways (= phylogenetics). The latter is applicable to culture-independent approaches, and has led directly to the recognition of new uncultured bacterial groups, i.e. "Candidatus", which have been associated as the cause of some fish diseases, including rainbow trout summer enteritic syndrome. One immediate benefit is that 16S rRNA gene sequencing has led to increased confidence in the accuracy of names allocated to bacterial pathogens. This is in marked contrast to the previous dominance of phenotyping, and identifications, which have been subsequently challenged in the light of 16S rRNA gene sequencing. To date, there has been some fluidity over the names of bacterial fish pathogens, with some, for example Vibrio anguillarum, being divided into two separate entities (V. anguillarum and V. ordalii). Others have been combined, for example V. carchariae, V. harveyi and V. trachuri as V. harveyi. Confusion may result with some organisms recognized by more than one name; V. anguillarum was reclassified as Beneckea and Listonella, with Vibrio and Listonella persisting in the scientific literature. Notwithstanding, modern methods have permitted real progress in the understanding of the taxonomic relationships of many bacterial fish pathogens. PMID:21314902

  18. National Hydrogen Vision Meeting Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    2001-11-01

    This document provides presentations and summaries of the notes from the National Hydrogen Vision Meeting''s facilitated breakout sessions. The Vision Meeting, which took place November 15-16, 2001, kicked off the public-private partnership that will pave the way to a more secure and cleaner energy future for America. These proceedings were compiled into a formal report, A National Vision of America''s Transition to a Hydrogen Economy - To 2030 and Beyond, which is also available online.

  19. Fifteenth LAMPF users group meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, D.R.F.

    1982-03-01

    The Fifteenth LAMPF Users Group Meeting was held November 2-3, 1981 at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physical Facility. The program of papers scheduled to be presented was amended to include a Report from Washington by Clarence R. Richardson, US Department of Energy. The general meeting ended with a round-table working group discussion concerning the Planning for a Kaon Factory. Individual items from the meeting were prepared separately for the data base.

  20. Enhance the Team Status Meeting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    Driven Meeting After coming to understand the shortcomings of the traditional approach to agendas, the PRT process improvement coaches began to make a...and review- ing the team data would make the team status meetings more effective and less time consuming. The changes worked, but what the coaches ...status meetings of those teams coached by the NAVAIR PRT have evolved into more relevant, easier to understand, and more visually interesting formats

  1. Plant innate immunity against human bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Melotto, Maeli; Panchal, Shweta; Roy, Debanjana

    2014-01-01

    Certain human bacterial pathogens such as the enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica are not proven to be plant pathogens yet. Nonetheless, under certain conditions they can survive on, penetrate into, and colonize internal plant tissues causing serious food borne disease outbreaks. In this review, we highlight current understanding on the molecular mechanisms of plant responses against human bacterial pathogens and discuss salient common and contrasting themes of plant interactions with phytopathogens or human pathogens. PMID:25157245

  2. Subwog 12-D tritium technology meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, M.J.; Addis, R.P.

    1991-01-01

    The first Subwog 12-D Tritium Technology Meeting was held at the Westinghouse Savannah River Site during the week of May 21, 1990. Subwog 12-D was created as a subwog of JOWOG 12 to address the need to understand tritium applications throughout the entire weapons complex. This includes weapons related concerns, but is primarily intended to cover tritium production and handling, environmental, safety and health issues, compatibility with materials in general; and facility design, commissioning and decommissioning activities. Tritium technology issues discussed included the physical and chemical properties, kinetics, storage, reservoir loading techniques, isotope exchange, radiolysis/aging, process and handling technology, compatibility, purification and filtering, analysis, monitoring methods, function testing, packaging and shipping, environmental and operational safety, facility design and safety, glovebox atmosphere clean-up systems, glovebox/facility decommissioning, tritium production target materials, and tritium recovery. This document provides a collection of most of the unclassified extended abstracts and abstracts presented at Subwog 12-D.

  3. Subwog 12-D tritium technology meeting. Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, M.J.; Addis, R.P.

    1991-12-31

    The first Subwog 12-D Tritium Technology Meeting was held at the Westinghouse Savannah River Site during the week of May 21, 1990. Subwog 12-D was created as a subwog of JOWOG 12 to address the need to understand tritium applications throughout the entire weapons complex. This includes weapons related concerns, but is primarily intended to cover tritium production and handling, environmental, safety and health issues, compatibility with materials in general; and facility design, commissioning and decommissioning activities. Tritium technology issues discussed included the physical and chemical properties, kinetics, storage, reservoir loading techniques, isotope exchange, radiolysis/aging, process and handling technology, compatibility, purification and filtering, analysis, monitoring methods, function testing, packaging and shipping, environmental and operational safety, facility design and safety, glovebox atmosphere clean-up systems, glovebox/facility decommissioning, tritium production target materials, and tritium recovery. This document provides a collection of most of the unclassified extended abstracts and abstracts presented at Subwog 12-D.

  4. Viruses of fish: an overview of significant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Crane, Mark; Hyatt, Alex

    2011-11-01

    The growing global demand for seafood together with the limited capacity of the wild-capture sector to meet this demand has seen the aquaculture industry continue to grow around the world. A vast array of aquatic animal species is farmed in high density in freshwater, brackish and marine systems where they are exposed to new environments and potentially new diseases. On-farm stresses may compromise their ability to combat infection, and farming practices facilitate rapid transmission of disease. Viral pathogens, whether they have been established for decades or whether they are newly emerging as disease threats, are particularly challenging since there are few, if any, efficacious treatments, and the development of effective viral vaccines for delivery in aquatic systems remains elusive. Here, we review a few of the more significant viral pathogens of finfish, including aquabirnaviruses and infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus which have been known since the first half of the 20th century, and more recent viral pathogens, for example betanodaviruses, that have emerged as aquaculture has undergone a dramatic expansion in the past few decades.

  5. Viruses of Fish: An Overview of Significant Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Mark; Hyatt, Alex

    2011-01-01

    The growing global demand for seafood together with the limited capacity of the wild-capture sector to meet this demand has seen the aquaculture industry continue to grow around the world. A vast array of aquatic animal species is farmed in high density in freshwater, brackish and marine systems where they are exposed to new environments and potentially new diseases. On-farm stresses may compromise their ability to combat infection, and farming practices facilitate rapid transmission of disease. Viral pathogens, whether they have been established for decades or whether they are newly emerging as disease threats, are particularly challenging since there are few, if any, efficacious treatments, and the development of effective viral vaccines for delivery in aquatic systems remains elusive. Here, we review a few of the more significant viral pathogens of finfish, including aquabirnaviruses and infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus which have been known since the first half of the 20th century, and more recent viral pathogens, for example betanodaviruses, that have emerged as aquaculture has undergone a dramatic expansion in the past few decades. PMID:22163333

  6. American Society for Microbiology. Microbes display their versatility at ASM meeting.

    PubMed

    Strauss, E

    2000-06-16

    About 12,000 scientists gathered here from 21 to 25 May for the 100th annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology. This year's lineup boasted presentations on a wide array of topics--everything from the body's defenses against microbial pathogens to bacterial involvement in geological processes.

  7. The enemy within: phloem-limited pathogens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The growing impact of phloem-limited pathogens on high-value crops has led to a renewed interest in understanding how they cause disease. Although these pathogens cause substantial crop losses, many are poorly characterized. In this review, we present examples of phloem-limited pathogens that includ...

  8. Response of soybean pathogens to glyceollin

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The ability to recognize pathogens and respond biochemically to prevent or inhibit pathogen invasion and colonization in plant cells is an active disease resistance response in plants. The involvement of soybean phytoalexin glyceollin in defense responses to the soybean pathogens Diaporthe phaseolor...

  9. 78 FR 14365 - Sunshine Act Meetings; Board of Directors Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office OVERSEAS PRIVATE INVESTMENT CORPORATION Sunshine Act Meetings; Board of Directors Meeting TIME AND DATE: Thursday, March 21, 2013, 10 a.m... may be obtained from Connie M. Downs at (202) 336-8438. Dated: March 1, 2013. Connie M. Downs...

  10. 75 FR 47312 - Board Meeting; Sunshine Act Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTER-AMERICAN FOUNDATION Board Meeting; Sunshine Act Meetings Time and Date: August 9, 2010, 8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.. Place: 101 Constitution Avenue, Washington, DC 20001. Status: Closed session as provided in 22 CFR 1004.4(f). Matters to...

  11. Nitrogen metabolism meets phytopathology.

    PubMed

    Fagard, Mathilde; Launay, Alban; Clément, Gilles; Courtial, Julia; Dellagi, Alia; Farjad, Mahsa; Krapp, Anne; Soulié, Marie-Christine; Masclaux-Daubresse, Céline

    2014-10-01

    Nitrogen (N) is essential for life and is a major limiting factor of plant growth. Because soils frequently lack sufficient N, large quantities of inorganic N fertilizers are added to soils for crop production. However, nitrate, urea, and ammonium are a major source of global pollution, because much of the N that is not taken up by plants enters streams, groundwater, and lakes, where it affects algal production and causes an imbalance in aquatic food webs. Many agronomical data indicate that the higher use of N fertilizers during the green revolution had an impact on the incidence of crop diseases. In contrast, examples in which a decrease in N fertilization increases disease severity are also reported, indicating that there is a complex relationship linking N uptake and metabolism and the disease infection processes. Thus, although it is clear that N availability affects disease, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. The aim of this review is to describe current knowledge of the mechanisms that link plant N status to the plant's response to pathogen infection and to the virulence and nutritional status of phytopathogens. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Solar-Enhanced Advanced Oxidation Processes for Water Treatment: Simultaneous Removal of Pathogens and Chemical Pollutants

    PubMed Central

    Tsydenova, Oyuna; Batoev, Valeriy; Batoeva, Agniya

    2015-01-01

    The review explores the feasibility of simultaneous removal of pathogens and chemical pollutants by solar-enhanced advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). The AOPs are based on in-situ generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), most notably hydroxyl radicals •OH, that are capable of destroying both pollutant molecules and pathogen cells. The review presents evidence of simultaneous removal of pathogens and chemical pollutants by photocatalytic processes, namely TiO2 photocatalysis and photo-Fenton. Complex water matrices with high loads of pathogens and chemical pollutants negatively affect the efficiency of disinfection and pollutant removal. This is due to competition between chemical substances and pathogens for generated ROS. Other possible negative effects include light screening, competitive photon absorption, adsorption on the catalyst surface (thereby inhibiting its photocatalytic activity), etc. Besides, some matrix components may serve as nutrients for pathogens, thus hindering the disinfection process. Each type of water/wastewater would require a tailor-made approach and the variables that were shown to influence the processes—catalyst/oxidant concentrations, incident radiation flux, and pH—need to be adjusted in order to achieve the required degree of pollutant and pathogen removal. Overall, the solar-enhanced AOPs hold promise as an environmentally-friendly way to substitute or supplement conventional water/wastewater treatment, particularly in areas without access to centralized drinking water or sewage/wastewater treatment facilities. PMID:26287222

  13. Solar-Enhanced Advanced Oxidation Processes for Water Treatment: Simultaneous Removal of Pathogens and Chemical Pollutants.

    PubMed

    Tsydenova, Oyuna; Batoev, Valeriy; Batoeva, Agniya

    2015-08-14

    The review explores the feasibility of simultaneous removal of pathogens and chemical pollutants by solar-enhanced advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). The AOPs are based on in-situ generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), most notably hydroxyl radicals •OH, that are capable of destroying both pollutant molecules and pathogen cells. The review presents evidence of simultaneous removal of pathogens and chemical pollutants by photocatalytic processes, namely TiO2 photocatalysis and photo-Fenton. Complex water matrices with high loads of pathogens and chemical pollutants negatively affect the efficiency of disinfection and pollutant removal. This is due to competition between chemical substances and pathogens for generated ROS. Other possible negative effects include light screening, competitive photon absorption, adsorption on the catalyst surface (thereby inhibiting its photocatalytic activity), etc. Besides, some matrix components may serve as nutrients for pathogens, thus hindering the disinfection process. Each type of water/wastewater would require a tailor-made approach and the variables that were shown to influence the processes-catalyst/oxidant concentrations, incident radiation flux, and pH-need to be adjusted in order to achieve the required degree of pollutant and pathogen removal. Overall, the solar-enhanced AOPs hold promise as an environmentally-friendly way to substitute or supplement conventional water/wastewater treatment, particularly in areas without access to centralized drinking water or sewage/wastewater treatment facilities.

  14. Multidimensional spectral load balancing

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, B.; Leland, R.

    1993-01-01

    We describe an algorithm for the static load balancing of scientific computations that generalizes and improves upon spectral bisection. Through a novel use of multiple eigenvectors, our new spectral algorithm can divide a computation into 4 or 8 pieces at once. These multidimensional spectral partitioning algorithms generate balanced partitions that have lower communication overhead and are less expensive to compute than those produced by spectral bisection. In addition, they automatically work to minimize message contention on a hypercube or mesh architecture. These spectral partitions are further improved by a multidimensional generalization of the Kernighan-Lin graph partitioning algorithm. Results on several computational grids are given and compared with other popular methods.

  15. Microbial Load Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, S. F.; Royer, E. R.

    1979-01-01

    The Microbial Load Monitor (MLM) is an automated and computerized system for detection and identification of microorganisms. Additionally, the system is designed to enumerate and provide antimicrobic susceptibility profiles for medically significant bacteria. The system is designed to accomplish these tasks in a time of 13 hours or less versus the traditional time of 24 hours for negatives and 72 hours or more for positives usually required for standard microbiological analysis. The MLM concept differs from other methods of microbial detection in that the system is designed to accept raw untreated clinical samples and to selectively identify each group or species that may be present in a polymicrobic sample.

  16. Variable loading roller

    DOEpatents

    Williams, D.M.

    1988-01-21

    An automatic loading roller for transmitting torque in traction drive devices in manipulator arm joints includes a two-part camming device having a first cam portion rotatable in place on a shaft by an input torque and a second cam portion coaxially rotatable and translatable having a rotating drive surface thereon for engaging the driven surface of an output roller with a resultant force proportional to the torque transmitted. Complementary helical grooves in the respective cam portions interconnected through ball bearings interacting with those grooves effect the rotation and translation of the second cam portion in response to rotation of the first. 14 figs.

  17. Variable loading roller

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Daniel M.

    1989-01-01

    An automatic loading roller for transmitting torque in traction drive devices in manipulator arm joints includes a two-part camming device having a first cam portion rotatable in place on a shaft by an input torque and a second cam portion coaxially rotatable and translatable having a rotating drive surface thereon for engaging the driven surface of an output roller with a resultant force proportional to the torque transmitted. Complementary helical grooves on the respective cam portions interconnected through ball bearings interacting with those grooves effect the rotation and translation of the second cam portion in response to rotation of the first.

  18. Plug Loads Conservation Measures

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Metzger, Jesse Dean

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple plug loads inventory information and calculates the energy and cost benefits of various retrofit opportunities. This tool includes energy conservation measures for: Vending Machine Misers, Delamp Vending Machine, Desktop to Laptop retrofit, CRT to LCD monitors retrofit, Computer Power Management Settings, and Energy Star Refrigerator retrofit. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, building life cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.

  19. Evasion of inflammasome activation by microbial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Ulland, Tyler K.; Ferguson, Polly J.; Sutterwala, Fayyaz S.

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the inflammasome occurs in response to infection with a wide array of pathogenic microbes. The inflammasome serves as a platform to activate caspase-1, which results in the subsequent processing and secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 and the initiation of an inflammatory cell death pathway termed pyroptosis. Effective inflammasome activation is essential in controlling pathogen replication as well as initiating adaptive immune responses against the offending pathogens. However, a number of pathogens have developed strategies to evade inflammasome activation. In this Review, we discuss these pathogen evasion strategies as well as the potential infectious complications of therapeutic blockade of IL-1 pathways. PMID:25642707

  20. Epigenetic control of effectors in plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Gijzen, Mark; Ishmael, Chelsea; Shrestha, Sirjana D

    2014-01-01

    Plant pathogens display impressive versatility in adapting to host immune systems. Pathogen effector proteins facilitate disease but can become avirulence (Avr) factors when the host acquires discrete recognition capabilities that trigger immunity. The mechanisms that lead to changes to pathogen Avr factors that enable escape from host immunity are diverse, and include epigenetic switches that allow for reuse or recycling of effectors. This perspective outlines possibilities of how epigenetic control of Avr effector gene expression may have arisen and persisted in filamentous plant pathogens, and how it presents special problems for diagnosis and detection of specific pathogen strains or pathotypes.

  1. Development of a process-based model to predict pathogen budgets for the Sydney drinking water catchment.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Christobel M; Croke, Barry F W; Beatson, Peter J; Ashbolt, Nicholas J; Deere, Daniel A

    2007-06-01

    In drinking water catchments, reduction of pathogen loads delivered to reservoirs is an important priority for the management of raw source water quality. To assist with the evaluation of management options, a process-based mathematical model (pathogen catchment budgets - PCB) is developed to predict Cryptosporidium, Giardia and E. coli loads generated within and exported from drinking water catchments. The model quantifies the key processes affecting the generation and transport of microorganisms from humans and animals using land use and flow data, and catchment specific information including point sources such as sewage treatment plants and on-site systems. The resultant pathogen catchment budgets (PCB) can be used to prioritize the implementation of control measures for the reduction of pathogen risks to drinking water. The model is applied in the Wingecarribee catchment and used to rank those sub-catchments that would contribute the highest pathogen loads in dry weather, and in intermediate and large wet weather events. A sensitivity analysis of the model identifies that pathogen excretion rates from animals and humans, and manure mobilization rates are significant factors determining the output of the model and thus warrant further investigation.

  2. 78 FR 12412 - Commission Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN COMMISSION Commission Meeting AGENCY: Susquehanna River Basin Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Susquehanna River Basin Commission will hold its regular business meeting on March 21, 2013, in Harrisburg...

  3. 77 FR 28420 - Commission Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN COMMISSION Commission Meeting AGENCY: Susquehanna River Basin Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Susquehanna River Basin Commission will hold its regular business meeting on June 7, 2012, in Binghamton, New...

  4. 77 FR 70204 - Commission Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN COMMISSION Commission Meeting AGENCY: Susquehanna River Basin Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Susquehanna River Basin Commission will hold its regular business meeting on December 14, 2012, in Annapolis...

  5. Business Meetings That Make Business.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobingier, John, Jr.

    This book defines initial objectives, gives post-meeting critiques, and points out steps and decisions necessary to make a success of every type of meeting ranging from small committees to large extravaganzas. It instructs on how to plan programs, incorporate audiovisual aids, deal with hotels, and make schedules work. Include d are the five basic…

  6. 63 FR 17209 - Meeting Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1998-04-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management--Interior Meeting Notice SUMMARY: The Lower Snake River District Resource Advisory Council will meet in Boise to discuss wildland fuel management and plans to complete the...

  7. 78 FR 5184 - Subcommittee Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-24

    ... locations: HSVR and HSQR Hyatt Regency Hotel Bethesda, One Metro Center, Bethesda, MD 20814 HCRT and HITR Hilton Washington DC/Rockville Hotel & Executive Meeting Center, 1750 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852... for dates of meetings: 1. Health System and Value Research (HSVR) Date: February 13, 2013 (Open from...

  8. A Branch Meeting in Avon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Kathryn; Coles, Alf

    2011-01-01

    The Association of Teachers of Mathematics (ATM) exists for, and is run by, its members. Branch meetings are so much more than the "grass roots" of the association--it can be a powerhouse of inspiration and creativity. In this article, the authors provide commentaries on a recent branch meeting.

  9. Time Spent in Committee Meetings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuker, H. E.; And Others

    In recent years, as students and faculty have become more involved in decisionmaking, the number of meetings of committees and subcommittees on college campuses has grown by leaps and bounds. This has led many people to believe that the amount of time and energy devoted to committee meetings is far greater than is justified in terms of…

  10. 76 FR 3629 - Regular Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FARM CREDIT SYSTEM INSURANCE CORPORATION Farm Credit System Insurance Corporation Board Regular Meeting SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given of the regular meeting of the Farm Credit System Insurance Corporation Board (Board). Date and Time: The...

  11. 76 FR 9636 - Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-18

    ... United States Mint Public Meeting ACTION: Notification of Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee March 1... United States Mint announces the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee (CCAC) public meeting scheduled for... Mint, 801 9th Street, NW., Washington, DC 20220. Subject: Review and consideration of candidate...

  12. Faculty Meetings: Hidden Conversational Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Richard F.

    2015-01-01

    In the everydayness of faculty meetings, collegial conversations mirror distinctive dynamics and practices, which either enhance or undercut organizational effectiveness. A cluster of conversational practices affect how colleagues connect, engage, interact, and influence others during faculty meetings in diverse educational settings. The…

  13. A Branch Meeting in Avon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Kathryn; Coles, Alf

    2011-01-01

    The Association of Teachers of Mathematics (ATM) exists for, and is run by, its members. Branch meetings are so much more than the "grass roots" of the association--it can be a powerhouse of inspiration and creativity. In this article, the authors provide commentaries on a recent branch meeting.

  14. 75 FR 53966 - Regular Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-02

    ... TIME: The meeting of the Board will be held at the offices of the Farm Credit Administration in McLean... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FARM CREDIT SYSTEM INSURANCE... Farm Credit Drive, McLean, Virginia 22102. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Parts of this meeting of the...

  15. Faculty Meetings: Hidden Conversational Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Richard F.

    2015-01-01

    In the everydayness of faculty meetings, collegial conversations mirror distinctive dynamics and practices, which either enhance or undercut organizational effectiveness. A cluster of conversational practices affect how colleagues connect, engage, interact, and influence others during faculty meetings in diverse educational settings. The…

  16. Multistrain Infections with Lyme Borreliosis Pathogens in the Tick Vector.

    PubMed

    Durand, Jonas; Herrmann, Coralie; Genné, Dolores; Sarr, Anouk; Gern, Lise; Voordouw, Maarten J

    2017-02-01

    Mixed or multiple-strain infections are common in vector-borne diseases and have important implications for the epidemiology of these pathogens. Previous studies have mainly focused on interactions between pathogen strains in the vertebrate host, but little is known about what happens in the arthropod vector. Borrelia afzelii and Borrelia garinii are two species of spirochete bacteria that cause Lyme borreliosis in Europe and that share a tick vector, Ixodes ricinus Each of these two tick-borne pathogens consists of multiple strains that are often differentiated using the highly polymorphic ospC gene. For each Borrelia species, we studied the frequencies and abundances of the ospC strains in a wild population of I. ricinus ticks that had been sampled from the same field site over a period of 3 years. We used quantitative PCR (qPCR) and 454 sequencing to estimate the spirochete load and the strain diversity within each tick. For B. afzelii, there was a negative relationship between the two most common ospC strains, suggesting the presence of competitive interactions in the vertebrate host and possibly the tick vector. The flat relationship between total spirochete abundance and strain richness in the nymphal tick indicates that the mean abundance per strain decreases as the number of strains in the tick increases. Strains with the highest spirochete load in the nymphal tick were the most common strains in the tick population. The spirochete abundance in the nymphal tick appears to be an important life history trait that explains why some strains are more common than others in nature.

  17. Bacterial Pathogen Indicator Transport from Livestock Mortality Biopiles.

    PubMed

    Michitsch, Robert; Jamieson, Rob; Gordon, Robert; Stratton, Glenn; Lake, Craig

    2015-09-01

    Biopiles can be used to dispose of slaughterhouse residuals (SLRs); however, the fate of pathogenic bacteria (e.g., pathogenic strains of , ) in these systems is not well understood. The transport of these bacteria in water leaching from the biopile could represent a significant contamination source. This research examined the transport of Enterobacteriaceae and Enterococcaceae indicator bacteria from SLR biopiles. Three biopiles (2.6 m wide by 4.6 m long by 1.8 m high) were formed on soil layers in concrete cells that allowed for real-time monitoring of environmental parameters, hydrologic flux, and indicator bacteria levels in effluent leaching from the piles. In biopile effluent, indicator bacteria populations decreased exponentially following biopile formation. Indicator bacteria loads in effluent constituted <0.01% of the initial indicator bacteria levels in the biopiles, which was attributed to retention, inactivation, and death. Nearly 90% of the total indicator bacteria loads coincided with large precipitation events (>15 mm d). Movement of the indicator bacteria through the biopiles and underlying soil appeared to be consistent with preferential flow phenomena. The populations of the Enterobacteriaceae indicators remained low in conditions of higher soil water content and lower biopile temperatures, whereas the Enterococcaceae indicator appeared to regrow in these conditions. This indicated that bacterial pathogen transport from a biopile could be a concern after the disappearance of conventional bacterial indicators, such as . Management considerations should attempt to divert excess water from entering a biopile, such as locating a biopile under a roof. Unsaturated biopile and soil conditions should be maintained to impede water flow through preferential pathways in the soil underneath a biopile.

  18. Meetings with the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusin, V.; Svoren, J.; Husarik, M.

    2009-05-01

    One of the most characteristic traits of the current astronomical research is a huge amount of professional information and an ever-increasing flow of observational data, a substantial fraction of which comes in pictures so appealing to the general public. In 2007, a group of research scientists of the Astronomical Institute of Slovak Academy of Sciences (Slovakia) got approved a project aimed at a specific transfer of astronomical data and knowledge to the general public -- a task of crucial importance especially this year, the IYA2009. The aim of the project is to popularise the field of astronomy to the wide public community and to increase the rudimentary astronomical knowledge of pupils and students of basic and secondary schools. One of the project's tasks is also to deepen such knowledge of teachers of physics, geography and natural sciences by organizing astronomy-focused meetings at a national level. It is important that the students and the wide public acquire information about practical applications of both astronomical and space research and see explicitly where a non-negligible part of the state budget from tax payers goes. This contribution highlights our experience being engaged in such activities and gives some tips for future developments this important professional-public relations.

  19. Future research needs involving pathogens in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradford, Scott A.; Harvey, Ronald W.

    2016-12-01

    Contamination of groundwater by enteric pathogens has commonly been associated with disease outbreaks. Proper management and treatment of pathogen sources are important prerequisites for preventing groundwater contamination. However, non-point sources of pathogen contamination are frequently difficult to identify, and existing approaches for pathogen detection are costly and only provide semi-quantitative information. Microbial indicators that are readily quantified often do not correlate with the presence of pathogens. Pathogens of emerging concern and increasing detections of antibiotic resistance among bacterial pathogens in groundwater are topics of growing concern. Adequate removal of pathogens during soil passage is therefore critical for safe groundwater extraction. Processes that enhance pathogen transport (e.g., high velocity zones and preferential flow) and diminish pathogen removal (e.g., reversible retention and enhanced survival) are of special concern because they increase the risk of groundwater contamination, but are still incompletely understood. Improved theory and modeling tools are needed to analyze experimental data, test hypotheses, understand coupled processes and controlling mechanisms, predict spatial and/or temporal variability in model parameters and uncertainty in pathogen concentrations, assess risk, and develop mitigation and best management approaches to protect groundwater.

  20. Future research needs involving pathogens in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradford, Scott A.; Harvey, Ronald W.

    2017-06-01

    Contamination of groundwater by enteric pathogens has commonly been associated with disease outbreaks. Proper management and treatment of pathogen sources are important prerequisites for preventing groundwater contamination. However, non-point sources of pathogen contamination are frequently difficult to identify, and existing approaches for pathogen detection are costly and only provide semi-quantitative information. Microbial indicators that are readily quantified often do not correlate with the presence of pathogens. Pathogens of emerging concern and increasing detections of antibiotic resistance among bacterial pathogens in groundwater are topics of growing concern. Adequate removal of pathogens during soil passage is therefore critical for safe groundwater extraction. Processes that enhance pathogen transport (e.g., high velocity zones and preferential flow) and diminish pathogen removal (e.g., reversible retention and enhanced survival) are of special concern because they increase the risk of groundwater contamination, but are still incompletely understood. Improved theory and modeling tools are needed to analyze experimental data, test hypotheses, understand coupled processes and controlling mechanisms, predict spatial and/or temporal variability in model parameters and uncertainty in pathogen concentrations, assess risk, and develop mitigation and best management approaches to protect groundwater.