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Sample records for pathway direct afm

  1. Mapping individual cosmid DNAs by direct AFM imaging.

    PubMed

    Allison, D P; Kerper, P S; Doktycz, M J; Thundat, T; Modrich, P; Larimer, F W; Johnson, D K; Hoyt, P R; Mucenski, M L; Warmack, R J

    1997-05-01

    Individual cosmid clones have been restriction mapped by directly imaging, with the atomic force microscope (AFM), a mutant EcoRI endonuclease site-specifically bound to DNA. Images and data are presented that locate six restriction sites, predicted from gel electrophoresis, on a 35-kb cosmid isolated from mouse chromosome 7. Measured distances between endonuclease molecules bound to lambda DNA, when compared to known values, demonstrate the accuracy of AFM mapping to better than 1%. These results may be extended to identify other important site-specific protein-DNA interactions, such as transcription factor and mismatch repair enzyme binding, difficult to resolve by current techniques.

  2. In situ AFM imaging of apolipoprotein A-I directly derived from plasma HDL.

    PubMed

    Gan, Chaoye; Wang, Zhexuan; Chen, Yong

    2017-04-01

    The major apolipoproteins of plasma lipoproteins play vital roles in the structural integrity and physiological functions of lipoproteins. More than ten structural models of apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I), the major apolipoprotein of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), have been developed successively. In these models, apoA-I was supposed to organize in a ring-shaped form. To date, however, there is no direct evidence under physiological condition. Here, atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to in situ visualize the organization of apoA-I, which was exposed via depletion of the lipid component of plasma HDL pre-immobilized on functionalized mica sheets. For the first time, the ring-shaped coarse structure and three detailed structures (crescent-shaped, gapped "O"-shaped, and parentheses-shaped structures, respectively) of apoA-I in plasma HDL, which have the ability of binding scavenger receptors, were directly observed and quantitatively measured by AFM. The three detailed structures probably represent the different extents to which the lipid component of HDL was depleted. Data on lipid depletion of HDL may provide clues to understand lipid insertion of HDL. These data provide important information for the understanding of the structure/maturation of plasma HDL. Moreover, they suggest a powerful method for directly visualizing the major apolipoproteins of plasma lipoproteins or the protein component of lipoprotein-like lipid-protein complexes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Direct measurement of optical force induced by near-field plasmonic cavity using dynamic mode AFM

    DOE PAGES

    Guan, Dongshi; Hang, Zhi Hong; Marset, Zsolt; ...

    2015-11-20

    Plasmonic nanostructures have attracted much attention in recent years because of their potential applications in optical manipulation through near-field enhancement. Continuing experimental efforts have been made to develop accurate techniques to directly measure the near-field optical force induced by the plasmonic nanostructures in the visible frequency range. In this work, we report a new application of dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (DM-AFM) in the measurement of the enhanced optical force acting on a nano-structured plasmonic resonant cavity. The plasmonic cavity is made of an upper gold-coated glass sphere and a lower quartz substrate patterned with an array of subwavelength goldmore » disks. In the near-field when the sphere is positioned close to the disk array, plasmonic resonance is excited in the cavity and the induced force by a 1550 nm infrared laser is found to be increased by an order of magnitude compared with the photon pressure generated by the same laser light. Lastly, the experiment demonstrates that DM-AFM is a powerful tool for the study of light induced forces and their enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures.« less

  4. Direct measurement of optical force induced by near-field plasmonic cavity using dynamic mode AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Dongshi; Hang, Zhi Hong; Marset, Zsolt; Liu, Hui; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Chan, Ho Bun; Chan, C. T.; Tong, Penger

    2015-11-20

    Plasmonic nanostructures have attracted much attention in recent years because of their potential applications in optical manipulation through near-field enhancement. Continuing experimental efforts have been made to develop accurate techniques to directly measure the near-field optical force induced by the plasmonic nanostructures in the visible frequency range. In this work, we report a new application of dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (DM-AFM) in the measurement of the enhanced optical force acting on a nano-structured plasmonic resonant cavity. The plasmonic cavity is made of an upper gold-coated glass sphere and a lower quartz substrate patterned with an array of subwavelength gold disks. In the near-field when the sphere is positioned close to the disk array, plasmonic resonance is excited in the cavity and the induced force by a 1550 nm infrared laser is found to be increased by an order of magnitude compared with the photon pressure generated by the same laser light. Lastly, the experiment demonstrates that DM-AFM is a powerful tool for the study of light induced forces and their enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures.

  5. Direct Measurement of Optical Force Induced by Near-Field Plasmonic Cavity Using Dynamic Mode AFM

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Dongshi; Hang, Zhi Hong; Marcet, Zsolt; Liu, Hui; Kravchenko, I. I.; Chan, C. T.; Chan, H. B.; Tong, Penger

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures have attracted much attention in recent years because of their potential applications in optical manipulation through near-field enhancement. Continuing experimental efforts have been made to develop accurate techniques to directly measure the near-field optical force induced by the plasmonic nanostructures in the visible frequency range. In this work, we report a new application of dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (DM-AFM) in the measurement of the enhanced optical force acting on a nano-structured plasmonic resonant cavity. The plasmonic cavity is made of an upper gold-coated glass sphere and a lower quartz substrate patterned with an array of subwavelength gold disks. In the near-field when the sphere is positioned close to the disk array, plasmonic resonance is excited in the cavity and the induced force by a 1550 nm infrared laser is found to be increased by an order of magnitude compared with the photon pressure generated by the same laser light. The experiment demonstrates that DM-AFM is a powerful tool for the study of light induced forces and their enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures. PMID:26586455

  6. Direct electrochemical and AFM detection of amyloid-β peptide aggregation on basal plane HOPG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Paula; Xu, Meng; Zhang, Min; Zhou, Ting; Yang, Yanlian; Wang, Chen; Ferapontova, Elena E.

    2014-06-01

    Amyloidogenesis is associated with more than 30 human diseases, including Alzheimer's which is related to aggregation of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ). Here, consecutive stages of Aβ42 aggregation and amyloid fibril formation were followed electrochemically via oxidation of tyrosines in Aβ42 adsorbed on the basal plane graphite electrode and directly correlated with Aβ42 morphological changes observed by atomic force microscopy of the same substrate. The results offer new tools for analysis of mechanisms of Aβ aggregation.Amyloidogenesis is associated with more than 30 human diseases, including Alzheimer's which is related to aggregation of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ). Here, consecutive stages of Aβ42 aggregation and amyloid fibril formation were followed electrochemically via oxidation of tyrosines in Aβ42 adsorbed on the basal plane graphite electrode and directly correlated with Aβ42 morphological changes observed by atomic force microscopy of the same substrate. The results offer new tools for analysis of mechanisms of Aβ aggregation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details: procedures for Aβ42 aggregation and electrode modification, DPV/AFM measurements and analysis. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr02413c

  7. Non-reciprocal directional dichroism in the AFM phase of BiFeO3 at THz frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, Urmas; Rõõm, T.; Farkas, D.; Szaller, D.; Bordács, S.; Kézsmárki, I.; Engelkamp, H.; Ozaki, Y.; Tomiaki, Y.; Ito, T.; Fishman, Randy S.

    We did THz absorption spectroscopy of BiFeO3 single crystals in the AFM phase, where the spin cycloid is destroyed in magnetic fields between 18 T and 32 T in Voigt geometry at 1.6 K. If B0 ∥ [ 1 1 0 ] , we see strong directional dichroism (DD) of absorption of the magnon mode with light propagating along the direction of the ferroelectric polarization k ∥ P ∥ [ 111 ] and eω ∥ [ 1 1 0 ] , bω ∥ [ 1 1 2 ] . The sign of DD can be reversed (i) by reversing the direction of B0 or (ii) by flipping the sample, thus reversing the propagation direction of light. The observed effect is caused by the strong magneto-electric coupling in the collinear AFM phase. Research sponsored by the Estonian Ministry of Education and Research (IUT23-3).

  8. Direct visualization of the trimeric structure of the ASIC1a channel, using AFM imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Carnally, Stewart M.; Dev, Harveer S.; Stewart, Andrew P.; Barrera, Nelson P.; Van Bemmelen, Miguel X.; Schild, Laurent; Henderson, Robert M.; Edwardson, J.Michael

    2008-08-08

    There has been confusion about the subunit stoichiometry of the degenerin family of ion channels. Recently, a crystal structure of acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) 1a revealed that it assembles as a trimer. Here, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to image unprocessed ASIC1a bound to mica. We detected a mixture of subunit monomers, dimers and trimers. In some cases, triple-subunit clusters were clearly visible, confirming the trimeric structure of the channel, and indicating that the trimer sometimes disaggregated after adhesion to the mica surface. This AFM-based technique will now enable us to determine the subunit arrangement within heteromeric ASICs.

  9. Pathways of Lipid Vesicle Deposition on Solid Surfaces: A Combined QCM-D and AFM Study

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Ralf; Mukhopadhyay, Anneke; Brisson, Alain

    2003-01-01

    Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) are popular models of cell membranes with potential biotechnological applications, yet the mechanism of SLB formation is only partially understood. In this study, the adsorption and subsequent conformational changes of sonicated unilamellar vesicles on silica supports were investigated by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring and atomic force microscopy, using mixtures of zwitterionic, negatively charged, and positively charged lipids, both in the presence and in the absence of Ca2+ ions. Four different pathways of vesicle deposition could be distinguished. Depending on their charge, vesicles i), did not adsorb; ii), formed a stable vesicular layer; or iii), decomposed into an SLB after adsorption at high critical coverage or iv), at low coverage. Calcium was shown to enhance the tendency of SLB formation for negatively charged and zwitterionic vesicles. The role of vesicle-support, interbilayer, and intrabilayer interactions in the formation of SLBs is discussed. PMID:14581204

  10. Direct and quantitative AFM measurements of the concentration and temperature dependence of the hydrophobic force law at nanoscopic contacts.

    PubMed

    Stock, Philipp; Utzig, Thomas; Valtiner, Markus

    2015-05-15

    By virtue of its importance for self-organization of biological matter the hydrophobic force law and the range of hydrophobic interactions (HI) have been debated extensively over the last 40 years. Here, we directly measure and quantify the hydrophobic force-distance law over large temperature and concentration ranges. In particular, we study the HI between molecularly smooth hydrophobic self-assembled monolayers, and similarly modified gold-coated AFM tips (radii∼8-50 nm). We present quantitative and direct evidence that the hydrophobic force is both long-ranged and exponential down to distances of about 1-2 nm. Therefore, we introduce a self-consistent radius-normalization for atomic force microscopy data. This approach allows quantitative data fitting of AFM-based experimental data to the recently proposed Hydra-model. With a statistical significance of r(2)⩾0.96 our fitting and data directly reveal an exponential HI decay length of 7.2±1.2 Å that is independent of the salt concentration up to 750 mM. As such, electrostatic screening does not have a significant influence on the HI in electrolyte concentrations ranging from 1 mM to 750 mM. In 1 M solutions the observed instability during approach shifts to longer distances, indicating ion correlation/adsorption effects at high salt concentrations. With increasing temperature the magnitude of HI decreases monotonically, while the range increases slightly. We compare our results to the large body of available literature, and shed new light into range and magnitude of hydrophobic interactions at very close distances and over wide temperature and concentration regimes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Whole-Cell Electrical Activity Under Direct Mechanical Stimulus by AFM Cantilever Using Planar Patch Clamp Chip Approach

    PubMed Central

    Upadhye, Kalpesh V.; Candiello, Joseph E.; Davidson, Lance A.; Lin, Hai

    2011-01-01

    Patch clamp is a powerful tool for studying the properties of ion-channels and cellular membrane. In recent years, planar patch clamp chips have been fabricated from various materials including glass, quartz, silicon, silicon nitride, polydimethyl-siloxane (PDMS), and silicon dioxide. Planar patch clamps have made automation of patch clamp recordings possible. However, most planar patch clamp chips have limitations when used in combination with other techniques. Furthermore, the fabrication methods used are often expensive and require specialized equipments. An improved design as well as fabrication and characterization of a silicon-based planar patch clamp chip are described in this report. Fabrication involves true batch fabrication processes that can be performed in most common microfabrication facilities using well established MEMS techniques. Our planar patch clamp chips can form giga-ohm seals with the cell plasma membrane with success rate comparable to existing patch clamp techniques. The chip permits whole-cell voltage clamp recordings on variety of cell types including Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells and pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells, for times longer than most available patch clamp chips. When combined with a custom microfluidics chamber, we demonstrate that it is possible to perfuse the extra-cellular as well as intra-cellular buffers. The chamber design allows integration of planar patch clamp with atomic force microscope (AFM). Using our planar patch clamp chip and microfluidics chamber, we have recorded whole-cell mechanosensitive (MS) currents produced by directly stimulating human keratinocyte (HaCaT) cells using an AFM cantilever. Our results reveal the spatial distribution of MS ion channels and temporal details of the responses from MS channels. The results show that planar patch clamp chips have great potential for multi-parametric high throughput studies of ion channel proteins. PMID:22174731

  12. Accuracy of AFM force distance curves via direct solution of the Euler-Bernoulli equation

    SciTech Connect

    Eppell, Steven J. Liu, Yehe; Zypman, Fredy R.

    2016-03-15

    In an effort to improve the accuracy of force-separation curves obtained from atomic force microscope data, we compare force-separation curves computed using two methods to solve the Euler-Bernoulli equation. A recently introduced method using a direct sequential forward solution, Causal Time-Domain Analysis, is compared against a previously introduced Tikhonov Regularization method. Using the direct solution as a benchmark, it is found that the regularization technique is unable to reproduce accurate curve shapes. Using L-curve analysis and adjusting the regularization parameter, λ, to match either the depth or the full width at half maximum of the force curves, the two techniques are contrasted. Matched depths result in full width at half maxima that are off by an average of 27% and matched full width at half maxima produce depths that are off by an average of 109%.

  13. Direct AFM observation of individual micelles, tile decorations and tiling rules of a dodecagonal liquid quasicrystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ruibin; Zeng, Xiangbing; Ungar, Goran

    2017-10-01

    We performed an atomic force microscopy study of the dendron-based dodecagonal quasicrystal, the material that had been reported in 2004 as the first soft quasicrystal. We succeeded in orienting the 12-fold axis perpendicular to the substrate, which allowed the imaging of the quasiperiodic xy plane. Thus for the first time we have been able to obtain direct real-space information not only on the arrangement of the tiles, but also on their ‘decorations’ by the individual spherical micelles or ‘nanoatoms’. The high-resolution patterns recorded confirm the square-triangle tiling, but the abundance of different nodes corresponds closely to random tiling rather than to any inflation rule. The previously proposed model of three types of decorated tiles, two triangular and one square, has been confirmed; the basic Frank–Kasper mode of alternating dense-sparse-dense-sparse layer stacking along z is confirmed too, each of the four sublayers being 2 nm thick. The consecutive dense layers are seen to be rotated by 90°, as expected. The 2 nm steps on the surface correspond to one layer of spheres, nonetheless with a dense layer always remaining on top, which implies a layer slip underneath and possibly the existence of screw dislocations.

  14. Useful oriented immobilization of antibodies on chimeric magnetic particles: direct correlation of biomacromolecule orientation with biological activity by AFM studies.

    PubMed

    Marciello, Marzia; Filice, Marco; Olea, David; Velez, Marisela; Guisan, José M; Mateo, Cesar

    2014-12-16

    The preparation and performance of a suitable chimeric biosensor based on antibodies (Abs) immobilized on lipase-coated magnetic particles by means of a standing orienting strategy are presented. This novel system is based on hydrophobic magnetic particles coated with modified lipase molecules able to orient and further immobilize different Abs in a covalent way without any previous site-selective chemical modification of biomacromolecules. Different key parameters attending the process were studied and optimized. The optimal preparation was performed using a controlled loading (1 nmol Ab g(-1) chimeric support) at pH 9 and a short reaction time to recover a biological activity of about 80%. AFM microscopy was used to study and confirm the Abs-oriented immobilization on lipase-coated magnetic particles and the final achievement of a highly active and recyclable chimeric immune sensor. This direct technique was demonstrated to be a powerful alternative to the indirect immunoactivity assay methods for the study of biomacromolecule-oriented immobilizations.

  15. Germ direct observation by AFM under crystallization of self-organized assemblies of mono-protonated meso-tetraphenylporphine dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udal'tsov, Alexander V.

    2016-08-01

    Assemblies consisting of mono-protonated meso-tetraphenylporphine dimers and water have been investigated by UV-vis spectroscopy in solution and atomic force microscopy (AFM) in thin layers. These assemblies self-organized into domains produce microcrystals in thin layer. Morphology of the microcrystals and characteristic features of crystallization germ on the top found by contact AFM indicate that surface tension of an aqueous layer on the domain generates the crystallization process. Estimations of the pressure producing the germ and bulk modulus (Bm) of microcrystals give 26.3±2.6 MPa and 3.72 GPa and Bm=12.7 GPa obtained for dried thin films. The former modulus is comparable with bulk modulus of water (2.174 GPa) that implies liquid crystals formation. Absorptions of longitudinal optical (LO) phonons with ћωLO=0.3761 and 0.3577 eV, which are arisen because of hole polaron moving through water, are found in the electronic spectra of the assemblies. The crystallization is suggested to occur due to Zundel cation (H5O2+) operation like the water-porphyrin matrix self-organization found earlier.

  16. Diversifying Carotenoid Biosynthetic Pathways by Directed Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Umeno, Daisuke; Tobias, Alexander V.; Arnold, Frances H.

    2005-01-01

    Microorganisms and plants synthesize a diverse array of natural products, many of which have proven indispensable to human health and well-being. Although many thousands of these have been characterized, the space of possible natural products—those that could be made biosynthetically—remains largely unexplored. For decades, this space has largely been the domain of chemists, who have synthesized scores of natural product analogs and have found many with improved or novel functions. New natural products have also been made in recombinant organisms, via engineered biosynthetic pathways. Recently, methods inspired by natural evolution have begun to be applied to the search for new natural products. These methods force pathways to evolve in convenient laboratory organisms, where the products of new pathways can be identified and characterized in high-throughput screening programs. Carotenoid biosynthetic pathways have served as a convenient experimental system with which to demonstrate these ideas. Researchers have mixed, matched, and mutated carotenoid biosynthetic enzymes and screened libraries of these “evolved” pathways for the emergence of new carotenoid products. This has led to dozens of new pathway products not previously known to be made by the assembled enzymes. These new products include whole families of carotenoids built from backbones not found in nature. This review details the strategies and specific methods that have been employed to generate new carotenoid biosynthetic pathways in the laboratory. The potential application of laboratory evolution to other biosynthetic pathways is also discussed. PMID:15755953

  17. PathwaysWeb: a gene pathways API with directional interactions, expanded gene ontology, and versioning.

    PubMed

    Melott, James M; Weinstein, John N; Broom, Bradley M

    2016-01-15

    PathwaysWeb is a resource-based, well-documented web system that provides publicly available information on genes, biological pathways, Gene Ontology (GO) terms, gene-gene interaction networks (importantly, with the directionality of interactions) and links to key-related PubMed documents. The PathwaysWeb API simplifies the construction of applications that need to retrieve and interrelate information across multiple, pathway-related data types from a variety of original data sources. PathwaysBrowser is a companion website that enables users to explore the same integrated pathway data. The PathwaysWeb system facilitates reproducible analyses by providing access to all versions of the integrated datasets. Although its GO subsystem includes data for mouse, PathwaysWeb currently focuses on human data. However, pathways for mouse and many other species can be inferred with a high success rate from human pathways. PathwaysWeb can be accessed via the Internet at http://bioinformatics.mdanderson.org/main/PathwaysWeb:Overview. jmmelott@mdanderson.org Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Qplus AFM driven nanostencil.

    PubMed

    Grévin, B; Fakir, M; Hayton, J; Brun, M; Demadrille, R; Faure-Vincent, J

    2011-06-01

    We describe the development of a novel setup, in which large stencils with suspended silicon nitride membranes are combined with atomic force microscopy (AFM) regulation by using tuning forks. This system offers the possibility to perform separate AFM and nanostencil operations, as well as combined modes when using stencil chips with integrated tips. The flexibility and performances are demonstrated through a series of examples, including wide AFM scans in closed loop mode, probe positioning repeatability of a few tens of nanometer, simultaneous evaporation of large (several hundred of micron square) and nanoscopic metals and fullerene patterns in static, multistep, and dynamic modes. This approach paves the way for further developments, as it fully combines the advantages of conventional stenciling with the ones of an AFM driven shadow mask. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  19. The planar cell polarity pathway directs parietal endoderm migration.

    PubMed

    LaMonica, Kristi; Bass, Maya; Grabel, Laura

    2009-06-01

    Parietal endoderm (PE) contributes to the yolk sac and is the first migratory cell type in the mammalian embryo. We can visualize PE migration in vitro using the F9 teratocarcinoma derived embryoid body outgrowth system and, show here that PE migration is directed by the non-canonical Wnt planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway via Rho/ROCK. Based on golgi apparatus localization and microtubule orientation, 68.6% of cells in control outgrowths are oriented in the direction of migration. Perturbation of Wnt signaling via sFRP treatment results in a loss of orientation coupled with an increase in cell migration. Inhibition of the PCP pathway at the level of Daam1 also results in a loss of cell orientation along with an increase in cell migration, as seen with sFRP treatment. Constitutively active Daam can inhibit the loss of orientation that occurs with sFRP treatment. We previously demonstrated that ROCK inhibition leads to an increase in cell migration, and we now show that these cells also lack oriented migration. Canonical Wnt signaling or the Rac arm of the PCP pathway does not appear to play a role in PE oriented migration. These data suggest the PCP pathway via Rho/ROCK modulates migration of PE.

  20. Direct and indirect dorsolateral striatum pathways reinforce different action strategies.

    PubMed

    Vicente, Ana M; Galvão-Ferreira, Pedro; Tecuapetla, Fatuel; Costa, Rui M

    2016-04-04

    The basal ganglia, and the striatum in particular, are critical for action reinforcement [1,2]. The dorsal striatum, which can be further subdivided into dorsomedial (DMS) and dorsolateral (DLS) striatum, is mainly composed of two subpopulations of striatal medium spiny projection neurons (MSNs): dopamine D1 receptor-expressing MSNs that constitute the striatonigral or direct pathway (dMSNs); and dopamine D2 receptor-expressing MSNs that constitute the striatopallidal or indirect pathway (iMSNs) [3]. It has been suggested that each pathway has opposing roles in reinforcement, with dMSNs being important to learn positive reinforcement and iMSNs to learn to avoid undesired actions (Go/No-Go) [1]. Furthermore, optogenetic self-stimulation of dMSNs in DMS leads to reinforcement of actions, while self-stimulation of iMSNs leads to avoidance of actions [2]. However, in DLS, which has been implicated in the consolidation of well-trained actions and habits in mice [4,5], both pathways are active during lever-pressing for reward [6]. Furthermore, extensive skill training leads to long-lasting potentiation of glutamatergic inputs into both dMSNs and iMSNs [4]. We report here that, in DLS, both dMSNs and iMSNs are involved in positive reinforcement, but support different action strategies.

  1. Chemical Shifts to Metabolic Pathways: Identifying Metabolic Pathways Directly from a Single 2D NMR Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Abhinav; Rangarajan, Annapoorni; Pal, Debnath; Atreya, Hanudatta S

    2015-12-15

    Identifying cellular processes in terms of metabolic pathways is one of the avowed goals of metabolomics studies. Currently, this is done after relevant metabolites are identified to allow their mapping onto specific pathways. This task is daunting due to the complex nature of cellular processes and the difficulty in establishing the identity of individual metabolites. We propose here a new method: ChemSMP (Chemical Shifts to Metabolic Pathways), which facilitates rapid analysis by identifying the active metabolic pathways directly from chemical shifts obtained from a single two-dimensional (2D) [(13)C-(1)H] correlation NMR spectrum without the need for identification and assignment of individual metabolites. ChemSMP uses a novel indexing and scoring system comprised of a "uniqueness score" and a "coverage score". Our method is demonstrated on metabolic pathways data from the Small Molecule Pathway Database (SMPDB) and chemical shifts from the Human Metabolome Database (HMDB). Benchmarks show that ChemSMP has a positive prediction rate of >90% in the presence of decluttered data and can sustain the same at 60-70% even in the presence of noise, such as deletions of peaks and chemical shift deviations. The method tested on NMR data acquired for a mixture of 20 amino acids shows a success rate of 93% in correct recovery of pathways. When used on data obtained from the cell lysate of an unexplored oncogenic cell line, it revealed active metabolic pathways responsible for regulating energy homeostasis of cancer cells. Our unique tool is thus expected to significantly enhance analysis of NMR-based metabolomics data by reducing existing impediments.

  2. Aromatase pathway mediates sex change in each direction

    PubMed Central

    Kroon, Frederieke J; Munday, Philip L; Westcott, David A; Hobbs, Jean-Paul A; Liley, N. Robin

    2005-01-01

    The enzyme aromatase controls the androgen/oestrogen ratio by catalysing the irreversible conversion of testosterone into oestradiol (E2). Therefore, the regulation of E2 synthesis by aromatase is thought to be critical in sexual development and differentiation. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that experimental manipulation of E2 levels via the aromatase pathway induces adult sex change in each direction in a hermaphroditic fish that naturally exhibits bidirectional sex change. Our results demonstrate that a single enzymatic pathway can regulate both female and male sexual differentiation, and that aromatase may be the key enzyme that transduces environmental, including social, cues to functional sex differentiation in species with environmental sex determination. PMID:16006326

  3. Striatal direct and indirect pathways control decision-making behavior.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, Tom; Morita, Makiko; Hikida, Takatoshi

    2014-01-01

    Despite our ever-changing environment, animals are remarkably adept at selecting courses of action that are predictive of optimal outcomes. While requiring the contribution of a number of brain regions, a vast body of evidence implicates striatal mechanisms of associative learning and action selection to be critical to this ability. While numerous models of striatal-based decision-making have been developed, it is only recently that we have begun to understand the precise contributions of specific subpopulations of striatal neurons. Studies utilizing contemporary cell-type-specific technologies indicate that striatal output pathways play distinct roles in controlling goal-directed and social behaviors. Here we review current models of striatal-based decision-making, discuss recent developments in defining the functional roles of striatal output pathways, and assess how striatal dysfunction may contribute to the etiology of various neuropathologies.

  4. Nanoscale Nucleosome Dynamics Assessed with Time-lapse AFM

    PubMed Central

    Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental challenge associated with chromosomal gene regulation is accessibility of DNA within nucleosomes. Recent studies performed by various techniques, including single-molecule approaches, led to the realization that nucleosomes are dynamic structures rather than static systems, as it was once believed. Direct data is required in order to understand the dynamics of nucleosomes more clearly and answer fundamental questions, including: What is the range of nucleosome dynamics? Does a non-ATP dependent unwrapping process of nucleosomes exist? What are the factors facilitating the large scale opening and unwrapping of nucleosomes? This review summarizes the results of nucleosome dynamics obtained with time-lapse AFM, including a high-speed version (HS-AFM) capable of visualizing molecular dynamics on the millisecond time scale. With HS-AFM, the dynamics of nucleosomes at a sub-second time scale was observed allowing one to visualize various pathways of nucleosome dynamics, such as sliding and unwrapping, including complete dissociation. Overall, these findings reveal new insights into the dynamics of nucleosomes and the novel mechanisms controlling spontaneous chromatin dynamics. PMID:24839467

  5. Molecular pathways for defect annihilation in directed self-assembly.

    DOE PAGES

    Hur, Su-Mi; Thapar, Vikram; Ramirez-Hernandez, Abelardo; ...

    2015-11-17

    Over the last few years, the directed self-assembly of block copolymers by surface patterns has transitioned from academic curiosity to viable contender for commercial fabrication of next-generation nanocircuits by lithography. Recently, it has become apparent that kinetics, and not only thermodynamics, plays a key role for the ability of a polymeric material to self-assemble into a perfect, defect-free ordered state. Perfection, in this context, implies not more than one defect, with characteristic dimensions on the order of 5 nm, over a sample area as large as 100 cm2. In this work, we identify the key pathways and the corresponding free-energymore » barriers for eliminating defects, and we demonstrate that an extraordinarily large thermodynamic driving force is not necessarily sufficient for their removal. By adopting a concerted computational and experimental approach, we explain the molecular origins of these barriers, how they depend on material characteristics, and we propose strategies designed to over-come them. The validity of our conclusions for industrially-relevant patterning processes is established by relying on instruments and assembly lines that are only available at state-of-the-art fabrication facilities and, through this confluence of fundamental and applied research, we are able to discern the evolution of morphology at the smallest relevant length scales - a handful of nanometers -, and present a view of defect annihilation in directed self-assembly at an unprecedented level of detail.« less

  6. Molecular pathways for defect annihilation in directed self-assembly.

    SciTech Connect

    Hur, Su-Mi; Thapar, Vikram; Ramirez-Hernandez, Abelardo; Khaira, Gurdaman S.; Segal-Peretz, Tamar; Rincon-Delgadillo, Paulina A.; Li, Weihua; Muller, Marcus; Nealey, Paul F.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-11-17

    Over the last few years, the directed self-assembly of block copolymers by surface patterns has transitioned from academic curiosity to viable contender for commercial fabrication of next-generation nanocircuits by lithography. Recently, it has become apparent that kinetics, and not only thermodynamics, plays a key role for the ability of a polymeric material to self-assemble into a perfect, defect-free ordered state. Perfection, in this context, implies not more than one defect, with characteristic dimensions on the order of 5 nm, over a sample area as large as 100 cm2. In this work, we identify the key pathways and the corresponding free-energy barriers for eliminating defects, and we demonstrate that an extraordinarily large thermodynamic driving force is not necessarily sufficient for their removal. By adopting a concerted computational and experimental approach, we explain the molecular origins of these barriers, how they depend on material characteristics, and we propose strategies designed to over-come them. The validity of our conclusions for industrially-relevant patterning processes is established by relying on instruments and assembly lines that are only available at state-of-the-art fabrication facilities and, through this confluence of fundamental and applied research, we are able to discern the evolution of morphology at the smallest relevant length scales - a handful of nanometers -, and present a view of defect annihilation in directed self-assembly at an unprecedented level of detail.

  7. Molecular pathways for defect annihilation in directed self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Su-Mi; Thapar, Vikram; Ramírez-Hernández, Abelardo; Khaira, Gurdaman; Segal-Peretz, Tamar; Rincon-Delgadillo, Paulina A.; Li, Weihua; Müller, Marcus; Nealey, Paul F.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last few years, the directed self-assembly of block copolymers by surface patterns has transitioned from academic curiosity to viable contender for commercial fabrication of next-generation nanocircuits by lithography. Recently, it has become apparent that kinetics, and not only thermodynamics, plays a key role for the ability of a polymeric material to self-assemble into a perfect, defect-free ordered state. Perfection, in this context, implies not more than one defect, with characteristic dimensions on the order of 5 nm, over a sample area as large as 100 cm2. In this work, we identify the key pathways and the corresponding free energy barriers for eliminating defects, and we demonstrate that an extraordinarily large thermodynamic driving force is not necessarily sufficient for their removal. By adopting a concerted computational and experimental approach, we explain the molecular origins of these barriers and how they depend on material characteristics, and we propose strategies designed to overcome them. The validity of our conclusions for industrially relevant patterning processes is established by relying on instruments and assembly lines that are only available at state-of-the-art fabrication facilities, and, through this confluence of fundamental and applied research, we are able to discern the evolution of morphology at the smallest relevant length scales—a handful of nanometers—and present a view of defect annihilation in directed self-assembly at an unprecedented level of detail. PMID:26515095

  8. Molecular pathways for defect annihilation in directed self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Hur, Su-Mi; Thapar, Vikram; Ramírez-Hernández, Abelardo; Khaira, Gurdaman; Segal-Peretz, Tamar; Rincon-Delgadillo, Paulina A; Li, Weihua; Müller, Marcus; Nealey, Paul F; de Pablo, Juan J

    2015-11-17

    Over the last few years, the directed self-assembly of block copolymers by surface patterns has transitioned from academic curiosity to viable contender for commercial fabrication of next-generation nanocircuits by lithography. Recently, it has become apparent that kinetics, and not only thermodynamics, plays a key role for the ability of a polymeric material to self-assemble into a perfect, defect-free ordered state. Perfection, in this context, implies not more than one defect, with characteristic dimensions on the order of 5 nm, over a sample area as large as 100 cm(2). In this work, we identify the key pathways and the corresponding free energy barriers for eliminating defects, and we demonstrate that an extraordinarily large thermodynamic driving force is not necessarily sufficient for their removal. By adopting a concerted computational and experimental approach, we explain the molecular origins of these barriers and how they depend on material characteristics, and we propose strategies designed to overcome them. The validity of our conclusions for industrially relevant patterning processes is established by relying on instruments and assembly lines that are only available at state-of-the-art fabrication facilities, and, through this confluence of fundamental and applied research, we are able to discern the evolution of morphology at the smallest relevant length scales-a handful of nanometers-and present a view of defect annihilation in directed self-assembly at an unprecedented level of detail.

  9. Determination of the aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) from milk by direct analysis in real time - mass spectrometry (DART-MS)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Certain fungi that grow on crops can produce aflatoxins, which are highly carcinogenic. One of these, aflatoxin B1 can be metabolized by mammals to aflatoxin M1, a form that retains potent carcinogenicity and which can be excreted into milk. Direct analysis in real time (DART) ionization coupled to ...

  10. Optically active, amphiphilic poly(meta-phenylene ethynylene)s: synthesis, hydrogen-bonding enforced helix stability, and direct AFM observation of their helical structures.

    PubMed

    Banno, Motonori; Yamaguchi, Tomoko; Nagai, Kanji; Kaiser, Christian; Hecht, Stefan; Yashima, Eiji

    2012-05-23

    Optically active, amphiphilic poly(meta-phenylene ethynylene)s (PPEa) bearing L- or D-alanine-derived oligo(ethylene glycol) side chains connected to the backbone via amide linkages were prepared by microwave-assisted polycondensation. PPEa's exhibited an intense Cotton effect in the π-conjugated main-chain chromophore regions in various polar and nonpolar organic solvents due to a predominantly one-handed helical conformation stabilized by an intramolecular hydrogen-bonding network between the amide groups of the pendants. The stable helical structure was retained in the bulk and led to supramolecular column formation from stacked helices in oriented polymer films as evidenced by X-ray diffraction. Atomic force microscopy was used to directly visualize the helical structures of the polymers in two-dimensional crystalline layers with molecular resolution, and, for the first time, their absolute helical senses could unambiguously be determined.

  11. Combinatorial pathway optimization in Escherichia coli by directed co-evolution of rate-limiting enzymes and modular pathway engineering.

    PubMed

    Lv, Xiaomei; Gu, Jiali; Wang, Fan; Xie, Wenping; Liu, Min; Ye, Lidan; Yu, Hongwei

    2016-12-01

    Metabolic engineering of microorganisms for heterologous biosynthesis is a promising route to sustainable chemical production which attracts increasing research and industrial interest. However, the efficiency of microbial biosynthesis is often restricted by insufficient activity of pathway enzymes and unbalanced utilization of metabolic intermediates. This work presents a combinatorial strategy integrating modification of multiple rate-limiting enzymes and modular pathway engineering to simultaneously improve intra- and inter-pathway balance, which might be applicable for a range of products, using isoprene as an example product. For intra-module engineering within the methylerythritol-phosphate (MEP) pathway, directed co-evolution of DXS/DXR/IDI was performed adopting a lycopene-indicated high-throughput screening method developed herein, leading to 60% improvement of isoprene production. In addition, inter-module engineering between the upstream MEP pathway and the downstream isoprene-forming pathway was conducted via promoter manipulation, which further increased isoprene production by 2.94-fold compared to the recombinant strain with solely protein engineering and 4.7-fold compared to the control strain containing wild-type enzymes. These results demonstrated the potential of pathway optimization in isoprene overproduction as well as the effectiveness of combining metabolic regulation and protein engineering in improvement of microbial biosynthesis. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2661-2669. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Contributions of Rod and Cone Pathways to Retinal Direction Selectivity Through Development

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Juliana M.; Morrie, Ryan D.; Baertsch, Hans C.

    2016-01-01

    Direction selectivity is a robust computation across a broad stimulus space that is mediated by activity of both rod and cone photoreceptors through the ON and OFF pathways. However, rods, S-cones, and M-cones activate the ON and OFF circuits via distinct pathways and the relative contribution of each to direction selectivity is unknown. Using a variety of stimulation paradigms, pharmacological agents, and knockout mice that lack rod transduction, we found that inputs from the ON pathway were critical for strong direction-selective (DS) tuning in the OFF pathway. For UV light stimulation, the ON pathway inputs to the OFF pathway originated with rod signaling, whereas for visible stimulation, the ON pathway inputs to the OFF pathway originated with both rod and M-cone signaling. Whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings revealed that blocking the ON pathway reduced directional tuning in the OFF pathway via a reduction in null-side inhibition, which is provided by OFF starburst amacrine cells (SACs). Consistent with this, our recordings from OFF SACs confirmed that signals originating in the ON pathway contribute to their excitation. Finally, we observed that, for UV stimulation, ON contributions to OFF DS tuning matured earlier than direct signaling via the OFF pathway. These data indicate that the retina uses multiple strategies for computing DS responses across different colors and stages of development. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The retina uses parallel pathways to encode different features of the visual scene. In some cases, these distinct pathways converge on circuits that mediate a distinct computation. For example, rod and cone pathways enable direction-selective (DS) ganglion cells to encode motion over a wide range of light intensities. Here, we show that although direction selectivity is robust across light intensities, motion discrimination for OFF signals is dependent upon ON signaling. At eye opening, ON directional tuning is mature, whereas OFF DS tuning is

  13. Contributions of Rod and Cone Pathways to Retinal Direction Selectivity Through Development.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Juliana M; Morrie, Ryan D; Baertsch, Hans C; Feller, Marla B

    2016-09-14

    Direction selectivity is a robust computation across a broad stimulus space that is mediated by activity of both rod and cone photoreceptors through the ON and OFF pathways. However, rods, S-cones, and M-cones activate the ON and OFF circuits via distinct pathways and the relative contribution of each to direction selectivity is unknown. Using a variety of stimulation paradigms, pharmacological agents, and knockout mice that lack rod transduction, we found that inputs from the ON pathway were critical for strong direction-selective (DS) tuning in the OFF pathway. For UV light stimulation, the ON pathway inputs to the OFF pathway originated with rod signaling, whereas for visible stimulation, the ON pathway inputs to the OFF pathway originated with both rod and M-cone signaling. Whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings revealed that blocking the ON pathway reduced directional tuning in the OFF pathway via a reduction in null-side inhibition, which is provided by OFF starburst amacrine cells (SACs). Consistent with this, our recordings from OFF SACs confirmed that signals originating in the ON pathway contribute to their excitation. Finally, we observed that, for UV stimulation, ON contributions to OFF DS tuning matured earlier than direct signaling via the OFF pathway. These data indicate that the retina uses multiple strategies for computing DS responses across different colors and stages of development. The retina uses parallel pathways to encode different features of the visual scene. In some cases, these distinct pathways converge on circuits that mediate a distinct computation. For example, rod and cone pathways enable direction-selective (DS) ganglion cells to encode motion over a wide range of light intensities. Here, we show that although direction selectivity is robust across light intensities, motion discrimination for OFF signals is dependent upon ON signaling. At eye opening, ON directional tuning is mature, whereas OFF DS tuning is significantly reduced due

  14. Control of basal ganglia output by direct and indirect pathway projection neurons.

    PubMed

    Freeze, Benjamin S; Kravitz, Alexxai V; Hammack, Nora; Berke, Joshua D; Kreitzer, Anatol C

    2013-11-20

    The direct and indirect efferent pathways from striatum ultimately reconverge to influence basal ganglia output nuclei, which in turn regulate behavior via thalamocortical and brainstem motor circuits. However, the distinct contributions of these two efferent pathways in shaping basal ganglia output are not well understood. We investigated these processes using selective optogenetic control of the direct and indirect pathways, in combination with single-unit recording in the basal ganglia output nucleus substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) in mice. Optogenetic activation of striatal direct and indirect pathway projection neurons produced diverse cellular responses in SNr neurons, with stimulation of each pathway eliciting both excitations and inhibitions. Despite this response heterogeneity, the effectiveness of direct pathway stimulation in producing movement initiation correlated selectively with the subpopulation of inhibited SNr neurons. In contrast, effective indirect pathway-mediated motor suppression was most strongly influenced by excited SNr neurons. Our results support the theory that key basal ganglia output neurons serve as an inhibitory gate over motor output that can be opened or closed by striatal direct and indirect pathways, respectively.

  15. Control of Basal Ganglia Output by Direct and Indirect Pathway Projection Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Freeze, Benjamin S.; Kravitz, Alexxai V.; Hammack, Nora; Berke, Joshua D.

    2013-01-01

    The direct and indirect efferent pathways from striatum ultimately reconverge to influence basal ganglia output nuclei, which in turn regulate behavior via thalamocortical and brainstem motor circuits. However, the distinct contributions of these two efferent pathways in shaping basal ganglia output are not well understood. We investigated these processes using selective optogenetic control of the direct and indirect pathways, in combination with single-unit recording in the basal ganglia output nucleus substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) in mice. Optogenetic activation of striatal direct and indirect pathway projection neurons produced diverse cellular responses in SNr neurons, with stimulation of each pathway eliciting both excitations and inhibitions. Despite this response heterogeneity, the effectiveness of direct pathway stimulation in producing movement initiation correlated selectively with the subpopulation of inhibited SNr neurons. In contrast, effective indirect pathway-mediated motor suppression was most strongly influenced by excited SNr neurons. Our results support the theory that key basal ganglia output neurons serve as an inhibitory gate over motor output that can be opened or closed by striatal direct and indirect pathways, respectively. PMID:24259575

  16. Direct evidence for a xylose metabolic pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Batt, C.A.; Carvallo, S.; Easson, D.D.; Akedo, M.; Sinskey, A.J.

    1986-04-01

    Xylose transport, xylose reductase, and xylitol dehydrogenase activities are demonstrated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The enzymes in the xylose catabolic pathway necessary for the conversion of xylose xylulose are present, although S. cerevisiae cannot grow on xylose as a sole carbon source. Xylose transport is less efficient than glucose transport, and its rate is dependent upon aeration. Xylose reductase appears to be a xylose inducible enzyme and xylitol dehydrogenase activity is constitutive, although both are repressed by glucose. Both xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase activities are five- to tenfold lower in S. cerevisie as compared to Candida utilis. In vivo conversion of /sup 14/C-xylose in S. cerevisiage is demonstrated and xylitol is detected, although no significant levels of any other /sup 14/C-labeled metabolites (e.g., ethanol) are observed. 22 references.

  17. PREFACE: Non-contact AFM Non-contact AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giessibl, Franz J.; Morita, Seizo

    2012-02-01

    This special issue is focussed on high resolution non-contact atomic force microscopy (AFM). Non-contact atomic force microscopy was established approximately 15 years ago as a tool to image conducting and insulating surfaces with atomic resolution. Since 1998, an annual international conference has taken place, and although the proceedings of these conferences are a useful source of information, several key developments warrant devoting a special issue to this subject. In the theoretic field, the possibility of supplementing established techniques such as scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and Kelvin probe microscopy with atomically resolved force micrsoscopy poses many challenges in the calculation of contrast and contrast reversal. The surface science of insulators, self-assembled monolayers and adsorbates on insulators is a fruitful field for the application of non-contact AFM: several articles in this issue are devoted to these subjects. Atomic imaging and manipulation have been pioneered using STM, but because AFM allows the measurement of forces, AFM has had a profound impact in this field as well. Three-dimensional force spectroscopy has allowed many important insights into surface science. In this issue a combined 3D tunneling and force microscopy is introduced. Non-contact AFM typically uses frequency modulation to measure force gradients and was initially used mainly in a vacuum. As can be seen in this issue, frequency modulation is now also used in ambient conditions, allowing better spatial and force resolution. We thank all of the contributors for their time and efforts in making this special issue possible. We are also very grateful to the staff of IOP Publishing for handling the administrative aspects and for steering the refereeing process. Non-contact AFM contents Relation between the chemical force and the tunnelling current in atomic point contacts: a simple model Pavel Jelínek, Martin Ondrácek and Fernando Flores Theoretical simulation of

  18. Bidirectional Plasticity in Striatonigral Synapses: A Switch to Balance Direct and Indirect Basal Ganglia Pathways

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aceves, Jose J.; Rueda-Orozco, Pavel E.; Hernandez-Martinez, Ricardo; Galarraga, Elvira; Bargas, Jose

    2011-01-01

    There is no hypothesis to explain how direct and indirect basal ganglia (BG) pathways interact to reach a balance during the learning of motor procedures. Both pathways converge in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) carrying the result of striatal processing. Unfortunately, the mechanisms that regulate synaptic plasticity in striatonigral…

  19. Bidirectional Plasticity in Striatonigral Synapses: A Switch to Balance Direct and Indirect Basal Ganglia Pathways

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aceves, Jose J.; Rueda-Orozco, Pavel E.; Hernandez-Martinez, Ricardo; Galarraga, Elvira; Bargas, Jose

    2011-01-01

    There is no hypothesis to explain how direct and indirect basal ganglia (BG) pathways interact to reach a balance during the learning of motor procedures. Both pathways converge in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) carrying the result of striatal processing. Unfortunately, the mechanisms that regulate synaptic plasticity in striatonigral…

  20. An information-flow-based model with dissipation, saturation and direction for active pathway inference.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xianwen; Zhou, Xiaobo; Wu, Ling-Yun; Zhang, Xiang-Sun

    2010-05-27

    Biological systems process the genetic information and environmental signals through pathways. How to map the pathways systematically and efficiently from high-throughput genomic and proteomic data is a challenging open problem. Previous methods design different heuristics but do not describe explicitly the behaviours of the information flow. In this study, we propose new concepts of dissipation, saturation and direction to decipher the information flow behaviours in the pathways and thereby infer the biological pathways from a given source to its target. This model takes into account explicitly the common features of the information transmission and provides a general framework to model the biological pathways. It can incorporate different types of bio-molecular interactions to infer the signal transduction pathways and interpret the expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) associations. The model is formulated as a linear programming problem and thus is solved efficiently. Experiments on the real data of yeast indicate that the reproduced pathways are highly consistent with the current knowledge. Our model explicitly treats the biological pathways as information flows with dissipation, saturation and direction. The effective applications suggest that the three new concepts may be valid to describe the organization rules of biological pathways. The deduced linear programming should be a promising tool to infer the various biological pathways from the high-throughput data.

  1. An information-flow-based model with dissipation, saturation and direction for active pathway inference

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Biological systems process the genetic information and environmental signals through pathways. How to map the pathways systematically and efficiently from high-throughput genomic and proteomic data is a challenging open problem. Previous methods design different heuristics but do not describe explicitly the behaviours of the information flow. Results In this study, we propose new concepts of dissipation, saturation and direction to decipher the information flow behaviours in the pathways and thereby infer the biological pathways from a given source to its target. This model takes into account explicitly the common features of the information transmission and provides a general framework to model the biological pathways. It can incorporate different types of bio-molecular interactions to infer the signal transduction pathways and interpret the expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) associations. The model is formulated as a linear programming problem and thus is solved efficiently. Experiments on the real data of yeast indicate that the reproduced pathways are highly consistent with the current knowledge. Conclusions Our model explicitly treats the biological pathways as information flows with dissipation, saturation and direction. The effective applications suggest that the three new concepts may be valid to describe the organization rules of biological pathways. The deduced linear programming should be a promising tool to infer the various biological pathways from the high-throughput data. PMID:20504374

  2. Concurrent Activation of Striatal Direct and Indirect Pathways During Action Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Guohong; Jun, Sang Beom; Jin, Xin; Pham, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The basal ganglia are subcortical nuclei that control voluntary actions, and are affected by a number of debilitating neurological disorders1–4. The prevailing model of basal ganglia function proposes that two orthogonal projection circuits originating from distinct populations of spiny projection neurons (SPNs) in the striatum5,6 - the so-called direct and indirect pathways - have opposing effects on movement: while activity of direct-pathway SPNs purportedly facilitates movement, activity of indirect-pathway SPNs inhibits movement1,2. This model has been difficult to test due to the lack of methods to selectively measure the activity of direct- and indirect-pathway SPNs in freely moving animals. We developed a novel in-vivo method that allowed us to specifically measure direct- and indirect-pathway SPN activity using Cre-dependent viral expression of the genetically encoded calcium indicator (GECI) GCAMP3 in the dorsal striatum of D1-Cre (direct-pathway specific6,7) and A2A-Cre (indirect-pathway specific8,9) mice10. Using fiber optics and time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) in mice performing an operant task, we observed transient increases in neural activity in both direct- and indirect-pathway SPNs when animals initiated actions, but not when they were inactive. Concurrent activation of SPNs from both pathways in one hemisphere preceded the initiation of contraversive movements, and predicted the occurrence of specific movements within 500 ms. These observations challenge the classical view of basal ganglia function, and may have implications for understanding the origin of motor symptoms in basal ganglia disorders. PMID:23354054

  3. Directed evolution of a cellobiose utilization pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by simultaneously engineering multiple proteins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The optimization of metabolic pathways is critical for efficient and economical production of biofuels and specialty chemicals. One such significant pathway is the cellobiose utilization pathway, identified as a promising route in biomass utilization. Here we describe the optimization of cellobiose consumption and ethanol productivity by simultaneously engineering both proteins of the pathway, the β-glucosidase (gh1-1) and the cellodextrin transporter (cdt-1), in an example of pathway engineering through directed evolution. Results The improved pathway was assessed based on the strain specific growth rate on cellobiose, with the final mutant exhibiting a 47% increase over the wild-type pathway. Metabolite analysis of the engineered pathway identified a 49% increase in cellobiose consumption (1.78 to 2.65 g cellobiose/(L · h)) and a 64% increase in ethanol productivity (0.611 to 1.00 g ethanol/(L · h)). Conclusions By simultaneously engineering multiple proteins in the pathway, cellobiose utilization in S. cerevisiae was improved. This optimization can be generally applied to other metabolic pathways, provided a selection/screening method is available for the desired phenotype. The improved in vivo cellobiose utilization demonstrated here could help to decrease the in vitro enzyme load in biomass pretreatment, ultimately contributing to a reduction in the high cost of biofuel production. PMID:23802545

  4. AFM Structural Characterization of Drinking Water Biofilm ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Due to the complexity of mixed culture drinking water biofilm, direct visual observation under in situ conditions has been challenging. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed the three dimensional morphology and arrangement of drinking water relevant biofilm in air and aqueous solution. Operating parameters were optimized to improve imaging of structural details for a mature biofilm in liquid. By using a soft cantilever (0.03 N/m) and slow scan rate (0.5 Hz), biofilm and individual bacterial cell’s structural topography were resolved and continuously imaged in liquid without loss of spatial resolution or sample damage. The developed methodology will allow future in situ investigations to temporally monitor mixed culture drinking water biofilm structural changes during disinfection treatments. Due to the complexity of mixed culture drinking water biofilm, direct visual observation under in situ conditions has been challenging. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed the three dimensional morphology and arrangement of drinking water relevant biofilm in air and aqueous solution. Operating parameters were optimized to improve imaging of structural details for a mature biofilm in liquid. By using a soft cantilever (0.03 N/m) and slow scan rate (0.5 Hz), biofilm and individual bacterial cell’s structural topography were resolved and continuously imaged in liquid without loss of spatial resolution or sample damage. The developed methodo

  5. AFM Structural Characterization of Drinking Water Biofilm ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Due to the complexity of mixed culture drinking water biofilm, direct visual observation under in situ conditions has been challenging. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed the three dimensional morphology and arrangement of drinking water relevant biofilm in air and aqueous solution. Operating parameters were optimized to improve imaging of structural details for a mature biofilm in liquid. By using a soft cantilever (0.03 N/m) and slow scan rate (0.5 Hz), biofilm and individual bacterial cell’s structural topography were resolved and continuously imaged in liquid without loss of spatial resolution or sample damage. The developed methodology will allow future in situ investigations to temporally monitor mixed culture drinking water biofilm structural changes during disinfection treatments. Due to the complexity of mixed culture drinking water biofilm, direct visual observation under in situ conditions has been challenging. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed the three dimensional morphology and arrangement of drinking water relevant biofilm in air and aqueous solution. Operating parameters were optimized to improve imaging of structural details for a mature biofilm in liquid. By using a soft cantilever (0.03 N/m) and slow scan rate (0.5 Hz), biofilm and individual bacterial cell’s structural topography were resolved and continuously imaged in liquid without loss of spatial resolution or sample damage. The developed methodo

  6. Direct sampling of multiple single-molecular rupture dominant pathways involving a multistep transition.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Huijun; Ding, Huai; Hou, Zhonghuai

    2014-12-14

    We report a novel single-molecular rupture mechanism revealed by direct sampling of the dominant pathway using a self-optimized path sampling method. Multiple dominant pathways involving multistep transitions are identified. The rupture may take place via a direct unfolding from the native state to the unfolding state, or through a two-step pathway bypassing a distinct intermediate metastable state (IMS). This scenario facilitates us to propose a three-state kinetic model, which can produce a nonlinear dependence of the rupture time on pulling forces similar to the ones reported in the literature. In particular, molecule conformations in the IMS maintain an elongation of the tail at one terminal, by which external pulling will enhance the relative stability of IMS. Consequently, even though the overall transition rate of the multistep pathway is relatively small, the molecule still has to be ruptured via the multistep pathway rather than the direct pathway. Thus, our work demonstrates an IMS trapping effect induced rupture mechanism involving an abnormal switching from a fast dominant pathway to a slow one.

  7. Direct Observation of Parallel Folding Pathways Revealed Using a Symmetric Repeat Protein System

    PubMed Central

    Aksel, Tural; Barrick, Doug

    2014-01-01

    Although progress has been made to determine the native fold of a polypeptide from its primary structure, the diversity of pathways that connect the unfolded and folded states has not been adequately explored. Theoretical and computational studies predict that proteins fold through parallel pathways on funneled energy landscapes, although experimental detection of pathway diversity has been challenging. Here, we exploit the high translational symmetry and the direct length variation afforded by linear repeat proteins to directly detect folding through parallel pathways. By comparing folding rates of consensus ankyrin repeat proteins (CARPs), we find a clear increase in folding rates with increasing size and repeat number, although the size of the transition states (estimated from denaturant sensitivity) remains unchanged. The increase in folding rate with chain length, as opposed to a decrease expected from typical models for globular proteins, is a clear demonstration of parallel pathways. This conclusion is not dependent on extensive curve-fitting or structural perturbation of protein structure. By globally fitting a simple parallel-Ising pathway model, we have directly measured nucleation and propagation rates in protein folding, and have quantified the fluxes along each path, providing a detailed energy landscape for folding. This finding of parallel pathways differs from results from kinetic studies of repeat-proteins composed of sequence-variable repeats, where modest repeat-to-repeat energy variation coalesces folding into a single, dominant channel. Thus, for globular proteins, which have much higher variation in local structure and topology, parallel pathways are expected to be the exception rather than the rule. PMID:24988356

  8. GPIM AF-M315E Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spores, Ronald A.; Masse, Robert; Kimbrel, Scott; McLean, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Space Technology mission Directorate's (STMD) Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM) will demonstrate an operational AF-M315E green propellant propulsion system. Aerojet-Rocketdyne is responsible for the development of the propulsion system payload. This paper statuses the propulsion system module development, including thruster design and system design; Initial test results for the 1N engineering model thruster are presented. The culmination of this program will be high-performance, green AF-M315E propulsion system technology at TRL 7+, with components demonstrated to TRL 9, ready for direct infusion to a wide range of applications for the space user community.

  9. AFM Structural Characterization of Drinking Water Biofilm under Physiological Conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to the complexity of mixed culture drinking water biofilm, direct visual observation under in situ conditions has been challenging. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed the three dimensional morphology and arrangement of drinking water relevant biofilm in air...

  10. AFM Structural Characterization of Drinking Water Biofilm under Physiological Conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to the complexity of mixed culture drinking water biofilm, direct visual observation under in situ conditions has been challenging. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed the three dimensional morphology and arrangement of drinking water relevant biofilm in air...

  11. Different Roles of Direct and Indirect Frontoparietal Pathways for Individual Working Memory Capacity.

    PubMed

    Ekman, Matthias; Fiebach, Christian J; Melzer, Corina; Tittgemeyer, Marc; Derrfuss, Jan

    2016-03-09

    The ability to temporarily store and manipulate information in working memory is a hallmark of human intelligence and differs considerably across individuals, but the structural brain correlates underlying these differences in working memory capacity (WMC) are only poorly understood. In two separate studies, diffusion MRI data and WMC scores were collected for 70 and 109 healthy individuals. Using a combination of probabilistic tractography and network analysis of the white matter tracts, we examined whether structural brain network properties were predictive of individual WMC. Converging evidence from both studies showed that lateral prefrontal cortex and posterior parietal cortex of high-capacity individuals are more densely connected compared with low-capacity individuals. Importantly, our network approach was further able to dissociate putative functional roles associated with two different pathways connecting frontal and parietal regions: a corticocortical pathway and a subcortical pathway. In Study 1, where participants were required to maintain and update working memory items, the connectivity of the direct and indirect pathway was predictive of WMC. In contrast, in Study 2, where participants were required to maintain working memory items without updating, only the connectivity of the direct pathway was predictive of individual WMC. Our results suggest an important dissociation in the circuitry connecting frontal and parietal regions, where direct frontoparietal connections might support storage and maintenance, whereas subcortically mediated connections support the flexible updating of working memory content. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/362894-10$15.00/0.

  12. Direct and Indirect Pathways between Parental Constructive Behavior and Adolescent Affiliation with Achievement-Oriented Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Zeng-yin; Dornbusch, Sanford M.; Liu, Ruth X.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the direct and indirect pathways through which parental constructive behavior may influence the adolescent's affiliation with achievement-oriented peers. Using a longitudinal survey data set from nine California and Wisconsin high schools (from 9th through 12th grades, with an approximate age range from 14 through 18) structural…

  13. BOREAS AFM-06 Mean Wind Profile Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) tower from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994. The data set provides wind profiles at 38 heights, containing the variables of wind speed; wind direction; and the u-, v-, and w-components of the total wind. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The mean wind profile data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  14. Identification of a Specific Maleate Hydratase in the Direct Hydrolysis Route of the Gentisate Pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kun; Xu, Ying; Zhou, Ning-Yi

    2015-09-01

    In contrast to the well-characterized and more common maleylpyruvate isomerization route of the gentisate pathway, the direct hydrolysis route occurs rarely and remains unsolved. In Pseudomonas alcaligenes NCIMB 9867, two gene clusters, xln and hbz, were previously proposed to be involved in gentisate catabolism, and HbzF was characterized as a maleylpyruvate hydrolase converting maleylpyruvate to maleate and pyruvate. However, the complete degradation pathway of gentisate through direct hydrolysis has not been characterized. In this study, we obtained from the NCIMB culture collection a Pseudomonas alcaligenes spontaneous mutant strain that lacked the xln cluster and designated the mutant strain SponMu. The hbz cluster in strain SponMu was resequenced, revealing the correct location of the stop codon for hbzI and identifying a new gene, hbzG. HbzIJ was demonstrated to be a maleate hydratase consisting of large and small subunits, stoichiometrically converting maleate to enantiomerically pure d-malate. HbzG is a glutathione-dependent maleylpyruvate isomerase, indicating the possible presence of two alternative pathways of maleylpyruvate catabolism. However, the hbzF-disrupted mutant could still grow on gentisate, while disruption of hbzG prevented this ability, indicating that the direct hydrolysis route was not a complete pathway in strain SponMu. Subsequently, a d-malate dehydrogenase gene was introduced into the hbzG-disrupted mutant, and the engineered strain was able to grow on gentisate via the direct hydrolysis route. This fills a gap in our understanding of the direct hydrolysis route of the gentisate pathway and provides an explanation for the high yield of d-malate from maleate by this d-malate dehydrogenase-deficient natural mutant. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Identification of a Specific Maleate Hydratase in the Direct Hydrolysis Route of the Gentisate Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kun; Xu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to the well-characterized and more common maleylpyruvate isomerization route of the gentisate pathway, the direct hydrolysis route occurs rarely and remains unsolved. In Pseudomonas alcaligenes NCIMB 9867, two gene clusters, xln and hbz, were previously proposed to be involved in gentisate catabolism, and HbzF was characterized as a maleylpyruvate hydrolase converting maleylpyruvate to maleate and pyruvate. However, the complete degradation pathway of gentisate through direct hydrolysis has not been characterized. In this study, we obtained from the NCIMB culture collection a Pseudomonas alcaligenes spontaneous mutant strain that lacked the xln cluster and designated the mutant strain SponMu. The hbz cluster in strain SponMu was resequenced, revealing the correct location of the stop codon for hbzI and identifying a new gene, hbzG. HbzIJ was demonstrated to be a maleate hydratase consisting of large and small subunits, stoichiometrically converting maleate to enantiomerically pure d-malate. HbzG is a glutathione-dependent maleylpyruvate isomerase, indicating the possible presence of two alternative pathways of maleylpyruvate catabolism. However, the hbzF-disrupted mutant could still grow on gentisate, while disruption of hbzG prevented this ability, indicating that the direct hydrolysis route was not a complete pathway in strain SponMu. Subsequently, a d-malate dehydrogenase gene was introduced into the hbzG-disrupted mutant, and the engineered strain was able to grow on gentisate via the direct hydrolysis route. This fills a gap in our understanding of the direct hydrolysis route of the gentisate pathway and provides an explanation for the high yield of d-malate from maleate by this d-malate dehydrogenase-deficient natural mutant. PMID:26070679

  16. Formation of sensor array on the AFM chip surface by magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumov, I. D.; Kanashenko, S. L.; Ziborov, V. S.; Ivanov, Yu D.; Archakov, A. I.; Pleshakova, T. O.

    2017-01-01

    Development of atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanotechnological approaches to highly sensitive detection of proteins is a perspective direction in biomedical research. These approaches use AFM chips to concentrate the target proteins from the test solution volume (buffer solution, diluted biological fluid) onto the chip surface for their subsequent registration on the chip surface by AFM. Atomic force microscope is a molecular detector that enables protein detection at ultra-low (subfemtomolar) concentrations in single-molecule counting mode. Due to extremely high sensitivity of AFM, its application for multiplexed protein detection is of great interest for use in proteomics and diagnostic applications. In this study, AFM chips containing an array of sensor areas have been fabricated. Magnetron sputtering of chromium and tungsten nanolayers has been used to form optically visible metallic marks on the AFM chip surface to provide necessary precision of AFM probe positioning against each sensor area for scanning. It has been demonstrated that the marks formed by magnetron sputtering of Cr and W are stable on the surface of the AFM chips during the following activation and intensive washing of this surface. The results obtained in our present study allow application of the developed chips for multiplexed protein analysis by AFM.

  17. Critical Roles of the Direct GABAergic Pallido-cortical Pathway in Controlling Absence Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min; Ma, Tao; Wu, Shengdun; Ma, Jingling; Cui, Yan; Xia, Yang; Xu, Peng; Yao, Dezhong

    2015-01-01

    The basal ganglia (BG), serving as an intermediate bridge between the cerebral cortex and thalamus, are believed to play crucial roles in controlling absence seizure activities generated by the pathological corticothalamic system. Inspired by recent experiments, here we systematically investigate the contribution of a novel identified GABAergic pallido-cortical pathway, projecting from the globus pallidus externa (GPe) in the BG to the cerebral cortex, to the control of absence seizures. By computational modelling, we find that both increasing the activation of GPe neurons and enhancing the coupling strength of the inhibitory pallido-cortical pathway can suppress the bilaterally synchronous 2–4 Hz spike and wave discharges (SWDs) during absence seizures. Appropriate tuning of several GPe-related pathways may also trigger the SWD suppression, through modulating the activation level of GPe neurons. Furthermore, we show that the previously discovered bidirectional control of absence seizures due to the competition between other two BG output pathways also exists in our established model. Importantly, such bidirectional control is shaped by the coupling strength of this direct GABAergic pallido-cortical pathway. Our work suggests that the novel identified pallido-cortical pathway has a functional role in controlling absence seizures and the presented results might provide testable hypotheses for future experimental studies. PMID:26496656

  18. Developmental pathways to conduct disorder: implications for future directions in research, assessment, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Frick, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    Research has indicated that there are several common pathways through which children and adolescents develop conduct disorder, each with different risk factors and each with different underlying developmental mechanisms leading to the child's aggressive and antisocial behavior. The current article briefly summarizes research on these pathways, including one that onsets in adolescence and seems to be an exaggeration of normal adolescent rebellion against authority. The other two pathways typically involve conduct problems that onset early in childhood but differ on whether the child shows significant levels of callous-unemotional traits or whether the child shows significant problems in emotional and behavioral regulation. Important directions for future research on these pathways are highlighted, as well as implications of these pathways for assessing and diagnosing children and adolescents with conduct disorder. In particular, diagnostic criteria should recognize the importance of callous-unemotional traits for distinguishing a distinct subgroup of youths with the disorder. Finally, implications for the prevention and treatment of conduct disorder are discussed, especially the need for interventions that are comprehensive and individualized to the characteristics of children and adolescents in the various developmental pathways.

  19. Turning over renal osteodystrophy dogma: direct actions of FGF23 on osteoblast β-catenin pathway.

    PubMed

    Schiavi, Susan C; Moysés, Rosa M A

    2016-07-01

    Although recognized as a major complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD), the pathophysiology of the CKD-related mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) is not completely understood. Recently, the inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin pathway in osteocytes by sclerostin has been shown to play a role in CKD-MBD. The study by Carrilo-Lopez et al. confirms this inhibition in an experimental model of CKD. Moreover, they describe direct actions of FGF23-Klotho on osteoblasts, increasing the expression of DKK1, another Wnt/β-catenin pathway inhibitor. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Prenatal alcohol and other early childhood adverse exposures: Direct and indirect pathways to adolescent drinking

    PubMed Central

    Cornelius, Marie D.; De Genna, Natacha M.; Goldschmidt, Lidush; Larkby, Cynthia; Day, Nancy L.

    2016-01-01

    We examined direct and indirect pathways between adverse environmental exposures during gestation and childhood and drinking in mid-adolescence. Mothers and their offspring (n = 917 mother/child dyads) were followed prospectively from second trimester to a 16-year follow-up assessment. Interim assessments occurred at delivery, 6, 10, and 14 years. Adverse environmental factors included gestational exposures to alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana, exposures to childhood maltreatment and violence, maternal psychological symptoms, parenting practices, economic and home environments, and demographic characteristics of the mother and child. Indirect effects of early child behavioral characteristics including externalizing, internalizing activity, attention, and impulsivity were also examined. Polytomous logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate direct effects of adverse environmental exposures with level of adolescent drinking. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was applied to simultaneously estimate the relation between early adversity variables, childhood characteristics, and drinking level at age 16 while controlling for significant covariates. Level of drinking among the adolescent offspring was directly predicted by prenatal exposure to alcohol, less parental strictness, and exposures to maltreatment and violence during childhood. Whites and offspring with older mothers were more likely to drink at higher levels. There was a significant indirect effect between childhood exposure to violence and adolescent drinking via childhood externalizing behavior problems. All other hypothesized indirect pathways were not significant. Thus most of the early adversity measures directly predicted adolescent drinking and did not operate via childhood behavioral dysregulation characteristics. These results highlight the importance of adverse environmental exposures on pathways to adolescent drinking. PMID:26994529

  1. Modulation of transcytotic and direct targeting pathways in a polarized thyroid cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Zurzolo, C; Le Bivic, A; Quaroni, A; Nitsch, L; Rodriguez-Boulan, E

    1992-01-01

    Two biosynthetic pathways exist for delivery of membrane proteins to the apical surface of epithelial cells, direct transport from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and transcytosis from the basolateral membrane. Different epithelial cells vary in the expression of these mechanisms. Two extremes are MDCK cells, that use predominantly the direct route and hepatocytes, which deliver all apical proteins via the basolateral membrane. To determine how epithelial cells establish a particular targeting phenotype, we studied the apical delivery of endogenous dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV) at early and late stages in the development of monolayers of a highly polarized epithelial cell line derived from Fischer rat thyroid (FRT). In 1 day old monolayers, surface delivery of DPPIV from the TGN was unpolarized (50%/50%) but a large basal to apical transcytotic component resulted in a polarized apical distribution. In contrast, after 7 days of culture, delivery of DPPIV was mainly direct (85%) with no transcytosis of the missorted component. A basolateral marker, Ag 35/40 kD, on the other hand, was directly targeted (90-98%) at all times. These results indicate that the sorting machinery for apical proteins develops independently from the sorting machinery for basolateral proteins and that the sorting site relocates progressively from the basal membrane to the TGN during development of the epithelium. The transient expression of the transcytotic pathway may serve as a salvage pathway for missorted apical proteins when the polarized phenotype is being established. Images PMID:1350978

  2. Bcl-6 directly represses the gene program of the glycolysis pathway

    PubMed Central

    Oestreich, Kenneth J.; Read, Kaitlin A.; Gilbertson, Sarah E.; Hough, Kenneth P.; McDonald, Paul W.; Krishnamoorthy, Veena; Weinmann, Amy S.

    2014-01-01

    Despite our increasing knowledge of the molecular events that induce the glycolysis pathway in effector T cells, very little is known about the transcriptional mechanisms that dampen the glycolysis program in quiescent cell populations such as memory T cells. Here, we show that the transcription factor Bcl-6 directly repressed genes involved in the glycolysis pathway, including Slc2a1, Slc2a3, Pkm2 and Hk2, in TH1 cells exposed to low amounts of interleukin 2 (IL-2). Thus, Bcl-6 plays an opposing role to the IL-2-sensitive glycolytic transcriptional program that c-Myc and HIF-1α promote in effector T cells. Additionally, the Th1-lineage-specifying factor T-bet functionally antagonized the Bcl-6-dependent repression of genes in the glycolysis pathway, implicating the molecular balance between these two factors in metabolic gene program regulation. PMID:25194422

  3. New developments at PTB in 3D-AFM with tapping and torsion AFM mode and vector approach probing strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, G.; Hässler-Grohne, W.; Hüser, D.; Wolff, H.; Fluegge, J.; Bosse, H.

    2011-06-01

    A new 3D-AFM for true 3D measurements of nano structures has been developed at Physikalisch Technische-Bundesanstalt, the national metrology institute of Germany. In its configuration, two piezo actuators are applied to drive the AFM cantilever near its vertical and torsional resonant frequencies. In such a way, the AFM tip can probe the surface with a vertical and/or a lateral oscillation, offering high 3D probing sensitivity. For enhancing measurement flexibility as well as reducing tip wear, a so called "vector approach probing" (VAP) method has been applied. The sample is measured point by point using this method. At each probing point, the tip is approached towards the surface in its normal direction until the desired tip-sample interaction is detected and then immediately withdrawn from the surface. Preliminary experimental results show promising performance of the developed system. The measurement of a line structure of 800 nm height employing a super sharp AFM tip is performed, showing a repeatability of its 3D profiles of better than 1 nm (p-v). A single crystal critical dimension reference material (SCCDRM) having features with almost vertical sidewall is measured using a flared AFM tip. Results show that the feature has averaged left and right sidewall angles of 88.64° and 88.67deg;, respectively. However, the feature width non-uniformity may reach 10 nm within the measurement range of 1 μm. The standard deviation of the averaged middle CD values of 7 repeated measurements reaches 0.35 nm. In addition, an investigation of long term measurement stability is performed on a PTB photomask. The results shows that the 3D-AFM has a drift rate of about 0.00033 nm per line, which confirms the high measurement stability and the very low tip wear.

  4. Nano-Wilhelmy investigation of dynamic wetting properties of AFM tips through tip-nanobubble interaction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuliang; Wang, Huimin; Bi, Shusheng; Guo, Bin

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic wetting properties of atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips are of much concern in many AFM-related measurement, fabrication, and manipulation applications. In this study, the wetting properties of silicon and silicon nitride AFM tips are investigated through dynamic contact angle measurement using a nano-Wilhelmy balance based method. This is done by capillary force measurement during extension and retraction motion of AFM tips relative to interfacial nanobubbles. The working principle of the proposed method and mathematic models for dynamic contact angle measurement are presented. Geometric models of AFM tips were constructed using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) images taken from different view directions. The detailed process of tip-nanobubble interaction was investigated using force-distance curves of AFM on nanobubbles. Several parameters including nanobubble height, adhesion and capillary force between tip and nanobubbles are extracted. The variation of these parameters was studied over nanobubble surfaces. The dynamic contact angles of the AFM tips were calculated from the capillary force measurements. The proposed method provides direct measurement of dynamic contact angles for AFM tips and can also be taken as a general approach for nanoscale dynamic wetting property investigation. PMID:27452115

  5. Nano-Wilhelmy investigation of dynamic wetting properties of AFM tips through tip-nanobubble interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuliang; Wang, Huimin; Bi, Shusheng; Guo, Bin

    2016-07-01

    The dynamic wetting properties of atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips are of much concern in many AFM-related measurement, fabrication, and manipulation applications. In this study, the wetting properties of silicon and silicon nitride AFM tips are investigated through dynamic contact angle measurement using a nano-Wilhelmy balance based method. This is done by capillary force measurement during extension and retraction motion of AFM tips relative to interfacial nanobubbles. The working principle of the proposed method and mathematic models for dynamic contact angle measurement are presented. Geometric models of AFM tips were constructed using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) images taken from different view directions. The detailed process of tip-nanobubble interaction was investigated using force-distance curves of AFM on nanobubbles. Several parameters including nanobubble height, adhesion and capillary force between tip and nanobubbles are extracted. The variation of these parameters was studied over nanobubble surfaces. The dynamic contact angles of the AFM tips were calculated from the capillary force measurements. The proposed method provides direct measurement of dynamic contact angles for AFM tips and can also be taken as a general approach for nanoscale dynamic wetting property investigation.

  6. Nano-Wilhelmy investigation of dynamic wetting properties of AFM tips through tip-nanobubble interaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuliang; Wang, Huimin; Bi, Shusheng; Guo, Bin

    2016-07-25

    The dynamic wetting properties of atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips are of much concern in many AFM-related measurement, fabrication, and manipulation applications. In this study, the wetting properties of silicon and silicon nitride AFM tips are investigated through dynamic contact angle measurement using a nano-Wilhelmy balance based method. This is done by capillary force measurement during extension and retraction motion of AFM tips relative to interfacial nanobubbles. The working principle of the proposed method and mathematic models for dynamic contact angle measurement are presented. Geometric models of AFM tips were constructed using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) images taken from different view directions. The detailed process of tip-nanobubble interaction was investigated using force-distance curves of AFM on nanobubbles. Several parameters including nanobubble height, adhesion and capillary force between tip and nanobubbles are extracted. The variation of these parameters was studied over nanobubble surfaces. The dynamic contact angles of the AFM tips were calculated from the capillary force measurements. The proposed method provides direct measurement of dynamic contact angles for AFM tips and can also be taken as a general approach for nanoscale dynamic wetting property investigation.

  7. On the mechanism of the direct pathway for formic acid oxidation at a Pt(111) electrode.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jie; Yuan, Daofu; Yang, Fan; Mei, Dong; Zhang, Zunbiao; Chen, Yan-Xia

    2013-03-28

    In order determine whether formate is a reaction intermediate of the direct pathway for formic acid oxidation at a Pt electrode, formic acid (HCOOH) oxidation at a Pt(111) electrode has been studied by normal and fast scan voltammetry in 0.1 M HClO4 solutions with different HCOOH concentrations. The relationship between the HCOOH oxidation current density (j(ox)) and formate coverage (θ(formate)) is quantitatively analyzed. The kinetic simulation reveals that the previously proposed formate pathway, with decomposition of the bridge-bonded formate (HCOO(B)) as a rate determining step (rds), cannot be the main pathway responsible for the majority of the current for HCOOH oxidation. Instead, a kinetic model based on a mechanism with formic acid adsorption [structure: see text], along with simultaneous C-H bond activation as the rds for the direct pathway, explains the measured data well. It was found for the relatively slow rate of formic acid oxidation, that adsorption-desorption of the formate is faster, which competes for the surface sites for formic acid oxidation.

  8. Direct observation of multiple misfolding pathways in a single prion protein molecule.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hao; Liu, Xia; Neupane, Krishna; Gupta, Amar Nath; Brigley, Angela M; Solanki, Allison; Sosova, Iveta; Woodside, Michael T

    2012-04-03

    Protein misfolding is a ubiquitous phenomenon associated with a wide range of diseases. Single-molecule approaches offer a powerful tool for deciphering the mechanisms of misfolding by measuring the conformational fluctuations of a protein with high sensitivity. We applied single-molecule force spectroscopy to observe directly the misfolding of the prion protein PrP, a protein notable for having an infectious misfolded state that is able to propagate by recruiting natively folded PrP. By measuring folding trajectories of single PrP molecules held under tension in a high-resolution optical trap, we found that the native folding pathway involves only two states, without evidence for partially folded intermediates that have been proposed to mediate misfolding. Instead, frequent but fleeting transitions were observed into off-pathway intermediates. Three different misfolding pathways were detected, all starting from the unfolded state. Remarkably, the misfolding rate was even higher than the rate for native folding. A mutant PrP with higher aggregation propensity showed increased occupancy of some of the misfolded states, suggesting these states may act as intermediates during aggregation. These measurements of individual misfolding trajectories demonstrate the power of single-molecule approaches for characterizing misfolding directly by mapping out nonnative folding pathways.

  9. Direct biosynthesis of adipic acid from a synthetic pathway in recombinant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jia-Le; Xia, Xiao-Xia; Zhong, Jian-Jiang; Qian, Zhi-Gang

    2014-12-01

    The C6 dicarboxylic acid, adipic acid, is an important platform chemical in industry. Biobased production of adipic acid is a promising alternative to the current petrochemical route. Here, we report biosynthesis of adipic acid using an artificial pathway inspired by the reversal of beta-oxidation of dicarboxylic acids. The biosynthetic pathway comprises condensation of acetyl-CoA and succinyl-CoA to form the C6 backbone and subsequent reduction, dehydration, hydrogenation, and release of adipic acid from its thioester. The pathway was first tested in vitro with reconstituted pathway enzymes and then functionally introduced into Escherichia coli for the biosynthesis and excretion of adipic acid into the culture medium. The production titer was increased by approximately 20-fold through the combination of recruiting enzymes that were more suitable to catalyze the synthetic reactions and increasing availability of the condensation substrates. This work demonstrates direct biosynthesis of adipic acid via non-natural synthetic pathway, which may enable its renewable production.

  10. Measuring bacterial cells size with AFM

    PubMed Central

    Osiro, Denise; Filho, Rubens Bernardes; Assis, Odilio Benedito Garrido; Jorge, Lúcio André de Castro; Colnago, Luiz Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) can be used to obtain high-resolution topographical images of bacteria revealing surface details and cell integrity. During scanning however, the interactions between the AFM probe and the membrane results in distortion of the images. Such distortions or artifacts are the result of geometrical effects related to bacterial cell height, specimen curvature and the AFM probe geometry. The most common artifact in imaging is surface broadening, what can lead to errors in bacterial sizing. Several methods of correction have been proposed to compensate for these artifacts and in this study we describe a simple geometric model for the interaction between the tip (a pyramidal shaped AFM probe) and the bacterium (Escherichia coli JM-109 strain) to minimize the enlarging effect. Approaches to bacteria immobilization and examples of AFM images analysis are also described. PMID:24031837

  11. [Direct cryothermal ablation eliminates conduction of the slow pathway without inducing ectopic rhythms].

    PubMed

    Márquez, Manlio F; Colín, Luis; Iturralde, Pedro; Nava, Santiago; González, Eric; Rodríguez, Gerardo; Gómez, Jorge; Salica, Gabriel; Cossío, Jorge; Hermosillo, Antonio G; Cárdenas, Manuel

    2005-01-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation of atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia is based on the elimination of conduction of slow or fast intranodal pathway. To avoid potential atrioventricular (AV) block, a new technology has been developed, cryothermal ablation. We report a case of AV nodal reentrant tachycardia in whom direct cryoablation, without previous ice mapping, was successfully performed. Interestingly and as previously described, cryotherapy did not induce ectopic rhythms, the conventional surrogate during radiofrequency ablation.

  12. Direct vs. indirect pathway of hepatic glycogen synthesis as a function of glucose infusion rate

    SciTech Connect

    Bagby, G.J.; Lang, C.H.; Johnson, J.L.; Blakesly, H.L.; Spitzer, J.J.

    1986-03-05

    This study was initiated to determine the influence of the rate of exogenous glucose administration on liver glycogen synthesis by the direct (glucose uptake and incorporation into glycogen) vs the indirect pathway (glucose degradation to 3-carbon intermediates, e.g., lactate, prior to incorporation into glycogen). Catheterized rats were fasted 2 days prior to receiving a 3 hr infusion of glucose at rates of 0 to 230 ..mu..mol/min/kg containing tracer (6-/sup 3/H)- and (U-/sup 14/C)-glucose. Plasma glucose (r = 0.80), insulin (r = 0.90) and lactate (r = 0.84) were correlated with glucose infusion rate. The rate of liver glycogen deposition (0.46 +/- 0.03 ..mu..mol/min/g) did not differ between a glucose infusion rate of 20 and 230 ..mu..mol/min/kg. At the lowest and highest glucose infusion rates hepatic glycogenesis accounted for 87 +/- 6 and 9 +/- 1% of the total glucose load, respectively. The percent contribution of the direct pathways to glycogen deposition ((/sup 3/H) specific activity in hepatic glycogen/(/sup 3/H) specific activity in plasma glucose) increased from 16 +/- 3 to 83 +/- 5% from lowest to highest glucose infusion rates (prevailing plasma glucose concentrations: 9 +/- 1 and 21 +/- 2 mM, respectively). The results indicate that the relative contribution of the direct and indirect pathways of glucogen synthesis are dependent upon the glucose load or plasma glucose concentration.

  13. Differential and directional estrogenic signaling pathways induced by enterolignans and their precursors

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yun; Kawaguchi, Kayoko; Kiyama, Ryoiti

    2017-01-01

    Mammalian lignans or enterolignans are metabolites of plant lignans, an important category of phytochemicals. Although they are known to be associated with estrogenic activity, cell signaling pathways leading to specific cell functions, and especially the differences among lignans, have not been explored. We examined the estrogenic activity of enterolignans and their precursor plant lignans and cell signaling pathways for some cell functions, cell cycle and chemokine secretion. We used DNA microarray-based gene expression profiling in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells to examine the similarities, as well as the differences, among enterolignans, enterolactone and enterodiol, and their precursors, matairesinol, pinoresinol and sesamin. The profiles showed moderate to high levels of correlation (R values: 0.44 to 0.81) with that of estrogen (17β-estradiol or E2). Significant correlations were observed among lignans (R values: 0.77 to 0.97), and the correlations were higher for cell functions related to enzymes, signaling, proliferation and transport. All the enterolignans/precursors examined showed activation of the Erk1/2 and PI3K/Akt pathways, indicating the involvement of rapid signaling through the non-genomic estrogen signaling pathway. However, when their effects on specific cell functions, cell cycle progression and chemokine (MCP-1) secretion were examined, positive effects were observed only for enterolactone, suggesting that signals are given in certain directions at a position closer to cell functions. We hypothesized that, while estrogen signaling is initiated by the enterolignans/precursors examined, their signals are differentially and directionally modulated later in the pathways, resulting in the differences at the cell function level. PMID:28152041

  14. Exploration of molecular pathways mediating electric field-directed Schwann cell migration by RNA-Seq

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Li; Li, Yongchao; Knapp, Jennifer; Smith, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In peripheral nervous systems, Schwann cells wrap around axons of motor and sensory neurons to form the myelin sheath. Following spinal cord injury, Schwann cells regenerate and migrate to the lesion and are involved in the spinal cord regeneration process. Transplantation of Schwann cells into injured neural tissue results in enhanced spinal axonal regeneration. Effective directional migration of Schwann cells is critical in the neural regeneration process. In this study, we report that Schwann cells migrate anodally in an applied electric field (EF). The directedness and displacement of anodal migration increased significantly when the strength of the EF increased from 50 mV/mm to 200 mV/mm. The EF did not significantly affect the cell migration speed. To explore the genes and signaling pathways that regulate cell migration in EFs, we performed a comparative analysis of differential gene expression between cells stimulated with an EF (100 mV/mm) and those without using next-generation RNA sequencing, verified by RT-qPCR. Based on the cut-off criteria (FC > 1.2, q < 0.05), we identified 1,045 up-regulated and 1,636 down-regulated genes in control cells versus EF-stimulated cells. A Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis found that compared to the control group, 21 pathways are down-regulated, while 10 pathways are up-regulated. Differentially expressed genes participate in multiple cellular signaling pathways involved in the regulation of cell migration, including pathways of regulation of actin cytoskeleton, focal adhesion, and PI3K-Akt. PMID:25557037

  15. RNA-Directed DNA Methylation: The Evolution of a Complex Epigenetic Pathway in Flowering Plants.

    PubMed

    Matzke, Marjori A; Kanno, Tatsuo; Matzke, Antonius J M

    2015-01-01

    RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) is an epigenetic process in plants that involves both short and long noncoding RNAs. The generation of these RNAs and the induction of RdDM rely on complex transcriptional machineries comprising two plant-specific, RNA polymerase II (Pol II)-related RNA polymerases known as Pol IV and Pol V, as well as a host of auxiliary factors that include both novel and refashioned proteins. We present current views on the mechanism of RdDM with a focus on evolutionary innovations that occurred during the transition from a Pol II transcriptional pathway, which produces mRNA precursors and numerous noncoding RNAs, to the Pol IV and Pol V pathways, which are specialized for RdDM and gene silencing. We describe recently recognized deviations from the canonical RdDM pathway, discuss unresolved issues, and speculate on the biological significance of RdDM for flowering plants, which have a highly developed Pol V pathway.

  16. Application of Contact Mode AFM to Manufacturing Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, Michael A.; Schmid, Steven R.

    A review of the application of contact mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) to manufacturing processes is presented. A brief introduction to common experimental techniques including hardness, scratch, and wear testing is presented, with a discussion of challenges in the extension of manufacturing scale investigations to the AFM. Differences between the macro- and nanoscales tests are discussed, including indentation size effects and their importance in the simulation of processes such as grinding. The basics of lubrication theory are presented and friction force microscopy is introduced as a method of investigating metal forming lubrication on the nano- and microscales that directly simulates tooling/workpiece asperity interactions. These concepts are followed by a discussion of their application to macroscale industrial manufacturing processes and direct correlations are made.

  17. Exploring the transfer of recent plant photosynthates to soil microbes: mycorrhizal pathway vs direct root exudation

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Christina; Kilburn, Matt R; Clode, Peta L; Fuchslueger, Lucia; Koranda, Marianne; Cliff, John B; Solaiman, Zakaria M; Murphy, Daniel V

    2015-01-01

    Plants rapidly release photoassimilated carbon (C) to the soil via direct root exudation and associated mycorrhizal fungi, with both pathways promoting plant nutrient availability. This study aimed to explore these pathways from the root's vascular bundle to soil microbial communities. Using nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) imaging and 13C-phospho- and neutral lipid fatty acids, we traced in-situ flows of recently photoassimilated C of 13CO2-exposed wheat (Triticum aestivum) through arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) into root- and hyphae-associated soil microbial communities. Intraradical hyphae of AM fungi were significantly 13C-enriched compared to other root-cortex areas after 8 h of labelling. Immature fine root areas close to the root tip, where AM features were absent, showed signs of passive C loss and co-location of photoassimilates with nitrogen taken up from the soil solution. A significant and exclusively fresh proportion of 13C-photosynthates was delivered through the AM pathway and was utilised by different microbial groups compared to C directly released by roots. Our results indicate that a major release of recent photosynthates into soil leave plant roots via AM intraradical hyphae already upstream of passive root exudations. AM fungi may act as a rapid hub for translocating fresh plant C to soil microbes. PMID:25382456

  18. Exploring the transfer of recent plant photosynthates to soil microbes: mycorrhizal pathway vs direct root exudation.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Christina; Kilburn, Matt R; Clode, Peta L; Fuchslueger, Lucia; Koranda, Marianne; Cliff, John B; Solaiman, Zakaria M; Murphy, Daniel V

    2015-03-01

    Plants rapidly release photoassimilated carbon (C) to the soil via direct root exudation and associated mycorrhizal fungi, with both pathways promoting plant nutrient availability. This study aimed to explore these pathways from the root's vascular bundle to soil microbial communities. Using nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) imaging and (13) C-phospho- and neutral lipid fatty acids, we traced in-situ flows of recently photoassimilated C of (13) CO2 -exposed wheat (Triticum aestivum) through arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) into root- and hyphae-associated soil microbial communities. Intraradical hyphae of AM fungi were significantly (13) C-enriched compared to other root-cortex areas after 8 h of labelling. Immature fine root areas close to the root tip, where AM features were absent, showed signs of passive C loss and co-location of photoassimilates with nitrogen taken up from the soil solution. A significant and exclusively fresh proportion of (13) C-photosynthates was delivered through the AM pathway and was utilised by different microbial groups compared to C directly released by roots. Our results indicate that a major release of recent photosynthates into soil leave plant roots via AM intraradical hyphae already upstream of passive root exudations. AM fungi may act as a rapid hub for translocating fresh plant C to soil microbes. © 2014 The Authors New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  19. Direct Hospital Cost of Outcome Pathways in Implant-Based Reconstruction with Acellular Dermal Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Ali A.; Broderick, Kristen; Funk, Susan; Reaven, Nancy; Tenenbaum, Marissa M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Current cost data on tissue expansion followed by exchange for permanent implant (TE/I) reconstruction lack a necessary assessment of the experience of a heterogenous breast cancer patient population and their multiple outcome pathways. We extend our previous analysis to that of direct hospital cost as bundling of payments is likely to follow the changing centralization of cancer care at the hospital level. Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis (2003–2009) of TE/I reconstructions with or without an acellular dermal matrix (ADM), namely Alloderm RTM. Postreconstructive events were analyzed and organized into outcome pathways as previously described. Aggregated and normalized inpatient and outpatient hospital direct costs and physician reimbursement were generated for each outcome pathway with or without ADM. Results: Three hundred sixty-seven patients were analyzed. The average 2-year hospital direct cost per TE/I breast reconstruction patient was $11,862 in the +ADM and $12,319 in the −ADM groups (P > 0.05). Initial reconstructions were costlier in the +ADM ($6,868) than in the −ADM ($5,615) group, but the average cost of subsequent postreconstructive events within 2 years was significantly lower in +ADM ($5,176) than −ADM ($6,704) patients (P < 0.05). When a complication occurred, but reconstruction was still completed within 2 years, greater costs were incurred in the −ADM than in the +ADM group for most scenarios, leading to a net equalization of cost between study groups. Conclusion: Although direct hospital cost is an important factor for resource and fund allocation, it should not remain the sole factor when deciding to use ADM in TE/I reconstruction. PMID:27622099

  20. Prenatal alcohol and other early childhood adverse exposures: Direct and indirect pathways to adolescent drinking.

    PubMed

    Cornelius, Marie D; De Genna, Natacha M; Goldschmidt, Lidush; Larkby, Cynthia; Day, Nancy L

    2016-01-01

    We examined direct and indirect pathways between adverse environmental exposures during gestation and childhood and drinking in mid-adolescence. Mothers and their offspring (n=917 mother/child dyads) were followed prospectively from second trimester to a 16-year follow-up assessment. Interim assessments occurred at delivery, 6, 10, and 14years. Adverse environmental factors included gestational exposures to alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana, exposures to childhood maltreatment and violence, maternal psychological symptoms, parenting practices, economic and home environments, and demographic characteristics of the mother and child. Indirect effects of early child behavioral characteristics including externalizing, internalizing activity, attention, and impulsivity were also examined. Polytomous logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate direct effects of adverse environmental exposures with level of adolescent drinking. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was applied to simultaneously estimate the relation between early adversity variables, childhood characteristics, and drinking level at age 16 while controlling for significant covariates. Level of drinking among the adolescent offspring was directly predicted by prenatal exposure to alcohol, less parental strictness, and exposures to maltreatment and violence during childhood. Whites and offspring with older mothers were more likely to drink at higher levels. There was a significant indirect effect between childhood exposure to violence and adolescent drinking via childhood externalizing behavior problems. All other hypothesized indirect pathways were not significant. Thus most of the early adversity measures directly predicted adolescent drinking and did not operate via childhood behavioral dysregulation characteristics. These results highlight the importance of adverse environmental exposures on pathways to adolescent drinking. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Keratocyte fragments and cells utilize competing pathways to move in opposite directions in an electric field.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yaohui; Do, Hao; Gao, Jing; Zhao, Ren; Zhao, Min; Mogilner, Alex

    2013-04-08

    Sensing of an electric field (EF) by cells-galvanotaxis-is important in wound healing [1], development [2], cell division, nerve growth, and angiogenesis [3]. Different cell types migrate in opposite directions in EFs [4], and the same cell can switch the directionality depending on conditions [5]. A tug-of-war mechanism between multiple signaling pathways [6] can direct Dictyostelium cells to either cathode or anode. Mechanics of motility is simplest in fish keratocytes, so we turned to keratocytes to investigate their migration in EFs. Keratocytes sense electric fields and migrate to the cathode [7, 8]. Keratocyte fragments [9, 10] are the simplest motile units. Cell fragments from leukocytes are able to respond to chemotactic signals [11], but whether cell fragments are galvanotactic was unknown. We found that keratocyte fragments are the smallest motile electric field-sensing unit: they migrate to the anode, in the opposite direction of whole cells. Myosin II was essential for the direction sensing of fragments but not for parental cells, while PI3 kinase was essential for the direction sensing of whole cells but not for fragments. Thus, two signal transduction pathways, one depending on PI3K, another on myosin, compete to orient motile cells in the electric field. Galvanotaxis is not due to EF force and does not depend on cell or fragment size. We propose a "compass" model according to which protrusive and contractile actomyosin networks self-polarize to the front and rear of the motile cell, respectively, and the electric signal orients both networks toward cathode with different strengths.

  2. A Direct Cortico-Nigral Pathway as Revealed by Constrained Spherical Deconvolution Tractography in Humans.

    PubMed

    Cacciola, Alberto; Milardi, Demetrio; Anastasi, Giuseppe P; Basile, Gianpaolo A; Ciolli, Pietro; Irrera, Mariangela; Cutroneo, Giuseppina; Bruschetta, Daniele; Rizzo, Giuseppina; Mondello, Stefania; Bramanti, Placido; Quartarone, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Substantia nigra is an important neuronal structure, located in the ventral midbrain, that exerts a regulatory function within the basal ganglia circuitry through the nigro-striatal pathway. Although its subcortical connections are relatively well-known in human brain, little is known about its cortical connections. The existence of a direct cortico-nigral pathway has been demonstrated in rodents and primates but only hypothesized in humans. In this study, we aimed at evaluating cortical connections of substantia nigra in vivo in human brain by using probabilistic constrained spherical deconvolution (CSD) tractography on magnetic resonance diffusion weighted imaging data. We found that substantia nigra is connected with cerebral cortex as a whole, with the most representative connections involving prefrontal cortex, precentral and postcentral gyri and superior parietal lobule. These results may be relevant for the comprehension of the pathophysiology of several neurological disorders involving substantia nigra, such as parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, and pathological addictions.

  3. A Direct Cortico-Nigral Pathway as Revealed by Constrained Spherical Deconvolution Tractography in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Cacciola, Alberto; Milardi, Demetrio; Anastasi, Giuseppe P.; Basile, Gianpaolo A.; Ciolli, Pietro; Irrera, Mariangela; Cutroneo, Giuseppina; Bruschetta, Daniele; Rizzo, Giuseppina; Mondello, Stefania; Bramanti, Placido; Quartarone, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Substantia nigra is an important neuronal structure, located in the ventral midbrain, that exerts a regulatory function within the basal ganglia circuitry through the nigro-striatal pathway. Although its subcortical connections are relatively well-known in human brain, little is known about its cortical connections. The existence of a direct cortico-nigral pathway has been demonstrated in rodents and primates but only hypothesized in humans. In this study, we aimed at evaluating cortical connections of substantia nigra in vivo in human brain by using probabilistic constrained spherical deconvolution (CSD) tractography on magnetic resonance diffusion weighted imaging data. We found that substantia nigra is connected with cerebral cortex as a whole, with the most representative connections involving prefrontal cortex, precentral and postcentral gyri and superior parietal lobule. These results may be relevant for the comprehension of the pathophysiology of several neurological disorders involving substantia nigra, such as parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, and pathological addictions. PMID:27507940

  4. Classical dendritic cells mediate fibrosis directly via the retinoic acid pathway in severe eye allergy

    PubMed Central

    Ahadome, Sarah D.; Mathew, Rose; Reyes, Nancy J.; Mettu, Priyatham S.; Cousins, Scott W.; Calder, Virginia L.; Saban, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    Fibrosis is a shared end-stage pathway to lung, liver, and heart failure. In the ocular mucosa (conjunctiva), fibrosis leads to blindness in trachoma, pemphigoid, and allergy. The indirect fibrogenic role of DCs via T cell activation and inflammatory cell recruitment is well documented. However, here we demonstrate that DCs can directly induce fibrosis. In the mouse model of allergic eye disease (AED), classical CD11b+ DCs in the ocular mucosa showed increased activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), the enzyme required for retinoic acid synthesis. In vitro, CD11b+ DC–derived ALDH was associated with 9-cis-retinoic acid ligation to retinoid x receptor (RXR), which induced conjunctival fibroblast activation. In vivo, stimulating RXR led to rapid onset of ocular mucosal fibrosis, whereas inhibiting ALDH activity in DCs or selectively depleting DCs markedly reduced fibrosis. Collectively, these data reveal a profibrotic ALDH-dependent pathway by DCs and uncover a role for DC retinoid metabolism. PMID:27595139

  5. The BMP pathway acts to directly regulate Tbx20 in the developing heart

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, Elizabeth M.; Kaltenbrun, Erin; Callis, Thomas E.; Zeng, Xin-Xin I.; Marques, Sara R.; Yelon, Deborah; Wang, Da-Zhi; Conlon, Frank L.

    2010-01-01

    TBX20 has been shown to be essential for vertebrate heart development. Mutations within the TBX20 coding region are associated with human congenital heart disease, and the loss of Tbx20 in a wide variety of model systems leads to cardiac defects and eventually heart failure. Despite the crucial role of TBX20 in a range of cardiac cellular processes, the signal transduction pathways that act upstream of Tbx20 remain unknown. Here, we have identified and characterized a conserved 334 bp Tbx20 cardiac regulatory element that is directly activated by the BMP/SMAD1 signaling pathway. We demonstrate that this element is both necessary and sufficient to drive cardiac-specific expression of Tbx20 in Xenopus, and that blocking SMAD1 signaling in vivo specifically abolishes transcription of Tbx20, but not that of other cardiac factors, such as Tbx5 and MHC, in the developing heart. We further demonstrate that activation of Tbx20 by SMAD1 is mediated by a set of novel, non-canonical, high-affinity SMAD-binding sites located within this regulatory element and that phospho-SMAD1 directly binds a non-canonical SMAD1 site in vivo. Finally, we show that these non-canonical sites are necessary and sufficient for Tbx20 expression in Xenopus, and that reporter constructs containing these sites are expressed in a cardiac-specific manner in zebrafish and mouse. Collectively, our findings define Tbx20 as a direct transcriptional target of the BMP/SMAD1 signaling pathway during cardiac maturation. PMID:20460370

  6. AFM force measurement on nano scale Polystyrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guoyu; Zahra Fakhraai Team

    2014-03-01

    Large surface/volume ratio can significantly change the mechanical properties of polymer film with nanometer thickness. Intuitively, the average response contains a larger component of the liquid like layer on the surface compared with the bulk, which should lead to reduced elastic constant. But the ultra small length scale makes it challenging to directly measure the viscoelastic response of nanostructured polymers. When the film thickness is decreased, some measurement supports that the elastic moduli of amorphous polymer films also decreases , while others show the rubbery modulus stiffens. Though the indentation on millimeter and micrometer scale has become common, not much research has investigated the yield stress and strain on nano scale indentation, which contains much larger percentage and effect from the free surface layer. In this study, we use regular AFM tip to indent onto the surface of polystyrene nanodroplets, under various loading speeds to study relaxation times and mechanical response in these systems. . Thanks to the support from NBIC and NCF in U Penn.

  7. Decreasing Striatopallidal Pathway Function Enhances Motivation by Energizing the Initiation of Goal-Directed Action.

    PubMed

    Carvalho Poyraz, Fernanda; Holzner, Eva; Bailey, Matthew R; Meszaros, Jozsef; Kenney, Lindsay; Kheirbek, Mazen A; Balsam, Peter D; Kellendonk, Christoph

    2016-06-01

    Altered dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) binding in the striatum has been associated with abnormal motivation in neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. Here, we tested whether motivational deficits observed in mice with upregulated D2Rs (D2R-OEdev mice) are reversed by decreasing function of the striatopallidal "no-go" pathway. To this end, we expressed the Gαi-coupled designer receptor hM4D in adult striatopallidal neurons and activated the receptor with clozapine-N-oxide (CNO). Using a head-mounted miniature microscope we confirmed with calcium imaging in awake mice that hM4D activation by CNO inhibits striatopallidal function measured as disinhibited downstream activity in the globus pallidus. Mice were then tested in three operant tasks that address motivated behavior, the progressive ratio task, the progressive hold-down task, and outcome devaluation. Decreasing striatopallidal function in the dorsomedial striatum or nucleus accumbens core enhanced motivation in D2R-OEdev mice and control littermates. This effect was due to increased response initiation but came at the cost of goal-directed efficiency. Moreover, response vigor and the sensitivity to changes in reward value were not altered. Chronic activation of hM4D by administering CNO for 2 weeks in drinking water did not affect motivation due to a tolerance effect. However, the acute effect of CNO on motivation was reinstated after discontinuing chronic treatment for 48 h. Used as a therapeutic approach, striatopallidal inhibition should consider the risk of impairing goal-directed efficiency and behavioral desensitization. Motivation involves a directional component that allows subjects to efficiently select the behavior that will lead to an optimal outcome and an activational component that initiates and maintains the vigor and persistence of actions. Striatal output pathways modulate motivated behavior, but it remains unknown how these pathways regulate specific components of motivation. Here

  8. Decreasing Striatopallidal Pathway Function Enhances Motivation by Energizing the Initiation of Goal-Directed Action

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho Poyraz, Fernanda; Holzner, Eva; Bailey, Matthew R.; Meszaros, Jozsef; Kenney, Lindsay; Kheirbek, Mazen A.

    2016-01-01

    Altered dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) binding in the striatum has been associated with abnormal motivation in neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. Here, we tested whether motivational deficits observed in mice with upregulated D2Rs (D2R-OEdev mice) are reversed by decreasing function of the striatopallidal “no-go” pathway. To this end, we expressed the Gαi-coupled designer receptor hM4D in adult striatopallidal neurons and activated the receptor with clozapine-N-oxide (CNO). Using a head-mounted miniature microscope we confirmed with calcium imaging in awake mice that hM4D activation by CNO inhibits striatopallidal function measured as disinhibited downstream activity in the globus pallidus. Mice were then tested in three operant tasks that address motivated behavior, the progressive ratio task, the progressive hold-down task, and outcome devaluation. Decreasing striatopallidal function in the dorsomedial striatum or nucleus accumbens core enhanced motivation in D2R-OEdev mice and control littermates. This effect was due to increased response initiation but came at the cost of goal-directed efficiency. Moreover, response vigor and the sensitivity to changes in reward value were not altered. Chronic activation of hM4D by administering CNO for 2 weeks in drinking water did not affect motivation due to a tolerance effect. However, the acute effect of CNO on motivation was reinstated after discontinuing chronic treatment for 48 h. Used as a therapeutic approach, striatopallidal inhibition should consider the risk of impairing goal-directed efficiency and behavioral desensitization. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Motivation involves a directional component that allows subjects to efficiently select the behavior that will lead to an optimal outcome and an activational component that initiates and maintains the vigor and persistence of actions. Striatal output pathways modulate motivated behavior, but it remains unknown how these pathways regulate specific

  9. Accelerating the discovery of antibacterial compounds using pathway-directed whole cell screening.

    PubMed

    Matano, Leigh M; Morris, Heidi G; Wood, B McKay; Meredith, Timothy C; Walker, Suzanne

    2016-12-15

    Since the introduction of penicillin into the clinic in 1942, antibiotics have saved the lives of millions of people around the world. While penicillin and other traditional broad spectrum antibiotics were effective as monotherapies, the inexorable spread of antibiotic resistance has made alternative therapeutic approaches necessary. Compound combinations are increasingly seen as attractive options. Such combinations may include: lethal compounds; synthetically lethal compounds; or administering a lethal compound with a nonlethal compound that targets a virulence factor or a resistance factor. Regardless of the therapeutic strategy, high throughput screening is a key approach to discover potential leads. Unfortunately, the discovery of biologically active compounds that inhibit a desired pathway can be a very slow process, and an inordinate amount of time is often spent following up on compounds that do not have the desired biological activity. Here we describe a pathway-directed high throughput screening paradigm that combines the advantages of target-based and whole cell screens while minimizing the disadvantages. By exploiting this paradigm, it is possible to rapidly identify biologically active compounds that inhibit a pathway of interest. We describe some previous successful applications of this paradigm and report the discovery of a new class of d-alanylation inhibitors that may be useful as components of compound combinations to treat methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Visible light may directly induce nuclear DNA damage triggering the death pathway in RGC-5 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Guang-Yu; Fan, Bin; Ma, Tong-Hui

    2011-01-01

    Visible light has been previously demonstrated to induce retinal ganglion cell (RGC)-5 cell death through the mitochondrial pathway. The present study was designed to determine whether visible light might also directly trigger the death pathway by damaging nuclear DNA. RGC-5 cells were exposed to various intensities and durations of visible light exposure. Cell viability and death were monitored with the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and propidium iodide staining. Nuclear DNA damage caused by light was determined with the plasmid assay, genome DNA assay, and in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling. The subsequent activation of nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) was measured with western blot, and PARP-1's role in the death pathway was assessed by using specific inhibitors. Poly (ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) inhibitors were used to show their influence on light-induced cell death. Calcium influx was examined with the fura-2 assay and calcium channel blocker. We found that visible light induced RGC-5 cell death in a time- and intensity-dependent manner. After the light intensity was increased to 2,600 lx, activation of the death pathway in RGC-5 cells was clearly observed by detecting double-strand DNA breaks and nuclear DNA damage in vitro. Nuclear enzyme PARP-1 was promptly activated after exposure to 2,600 lx of light for 2 days, and specific inhibitors of PARP-1 had significant neuroprotective effects. The poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase inhibitor tannic acid and AIF inhibitor N-phenylmaleimide partially protected RGC-5 cells from light injury. A massive calcium influx was detected after 2 days of light exposure, and a calcium channel blocker partially protected cells against light injury. These results suggest that visible light exposure may directly cause nuclear DNA damage, which consequently activates PARP-1. In addition, RGC-5 cells damaged

  11. Visible light may directly induce nuclear DNA damage triggering the death pathway in RGC-5 cells

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Bin; Ma, Tong-Hui

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Visible light has been previously demonstrated to induce retinal ganglion cell (RGC)-5 cell death through the mitochondrial pathway. The present study was designed to determine whether visible light might also directly trigger the death pathway by damaging nuclear DNA. Methods RGC-5 cells were exposed to various intensities and durations of visible light exposure. Cell viability and death were monitored with the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and propidium iodide staining. Nuclear DNA damage caused by light was determined with the plasmid assay, genome DNA assay, and in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling. The subsequent activation of nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) was measured with western blot, and PARP-1’s role in the death pathway was assessed by using specific inhibitors. Poly (ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) inhibitors were used to show their influence on light-induced cell death. Calcium influx was examined with the fura-2 assay and calcium channel blocker. Results We found that visible light induced RGC-5 cell death in a time- and intensity-dependent manner. After the light intensity was increased to 2,600 lx, activation of the death pathway in RGC-5 cells was clearly observed by detecting double-strand DNA breaks and nuclear DNA damage in vitro. Nuclear enzyme PARP-1 was promptly activated after exposure to 2,600 lx of light for 2 days, and specific inhibitors of PARP-1 had significant neuroprotective effects. The poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase inhibitor tannic acid and AIF inhibitor N-phenylmaleimide partially protected RGC-5 cells from light injury. A massive calcium influx was detected after 2 days of light exposure, and a calcium channel blocker partially protected cells against light injury. Conclusions These results suggest that visible light exposure may directly cause nuclear DNA damage, which consequently activates

  12. Loss of Homeostasis in the Direct Pathway in a Mouse Model of Asymptomatic Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Escande, Mariela V; Taravini, Irene R E; Zold, Camila L; Belforte, Juan E; Murer, M Gustavo

    2016-05-25

    The characteristic slowness of movement in Parkinson's disease relates to an imbalance in the activity of striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of the direct (dMSNs) and indirect (iMSNs) pathways. However, it is still unclear whether this imbalance emerges during the asymptomatic phase of the disease or if it correlates with symptom severity. Here, we have used in vivo juxtacellular recordings and transgenic mice showing MSN-type-specific expression of fluorescent proteins to examine striatal imbalance after lesioning dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra. Multivariate clustering analysis of behavioral data discriminated 2 groups of dopamine-lesioned mice: asymptomatic (42 ± 7% dopaminergic neuron loss) and symptomatic (85 ± 5% cell loss). Contrary to the view that both pathways have similar gain in control conditions, dMSNs respond more intensely than iMSNs to cortical inputs in control animals. Importantly, asymptomatic mice show significant functional disconnection of dMSNs from motor cortex without changes in iMSN connectivity. Moreover, not only the gain but also the timing of the pathways is altered in symptomatic parkinsonism, where iMSNs fire significantly more and earlier than dMSNs. Therefore, cortical drive to dMSNs decreases after partial nigrostriatal lesions producing no behavioral impairment, but additional alterations in the gain and timing of iMSNs characterize symptomatic rodent parkinsonism. Prevailing models of Parkinson's disease state that motor symptoms arise from an imbalance in the activity of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) from the direct (dMSNs) and indirect (iMSNs) pathways. Therefore, it is hypothesized that symptom severity and the magnitude of this imbalanced activity are correlated. Using a mouse model of Parkinson's disease, we found that behaviorally undetectable nigrostriatal lesions induced a significant disconnection of dMSNs from the motor cortex. In contrast, iMSNs show an increased connectivity with the motor cortex, but

  13. Cyanobacterial production of 1,3-propanediol directly from carbon dioxide using a synthetic metabolic pathway.

    PubMed

    Hirokawa, Yasutaka; Maki, Yuki; Tatsuke, Tsuneyuki; Hanai, Taizo

    2016-03-01

    Production of chemicals directly from carbon dioxide using light energy is an attractive option for a sustainable future. The 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PDO) production directly from carbon dioxide was achieved by engineered Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 with a synthetic metabolic pathway. Glycerol dehydratase catalyzing the conversion of glycerol to 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde in a coenzyme B12-dependent manner worked in S. elongatus PCC 7942 without addition of vitamin B12, suggesting that the intrinsic pseudovitamin B12 served as a substitute of coenzyme B12. The highest titers of 1,3-PDO (3.79±0.23 mM; 288±17.7 mg/L) and glycerol (12.62±1.55 mM; 1.16±0.14 g/L), precursor of 1,3-PDO, were reached after 14 days of culture under optimized conditions in this study.

  14. Insights into Epoxy Network Nanostructural Heterogeneity Using AFM-IR.

    PubMed

    Morsch, Suzanne; Liu, Yanwen; Lyon, Stuart B; Gibbon, Simon R

    2016-01-13

    The first direct observation of a chemically heterogeneous nanostructure within an epoxy resin is reported. Epoxy resins comprise the matrix component of many high performance composites, coatings and adhesives, yet the molecular network structure that underpins the performance of these industrially essential materials is not well understood. Internal nodular morphologies have repeatedly been reported for epoxy resins analyzed using SEM or AFM, yet the origin of these features remains a contentious subject, and epoxies are still commonly assumed to be chemically homogeneous. Uniquely, in this contribution we use the recently developed AFM-IR technique to eliminate previous differences in interpretation, and establish that nodule features correspond to heterogeneous network connectivity within an epoxy phenolic formulation.

  15. Nano Mechanical Machining Using AFM Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostofa, Md. Golam

    Complex miniaturized components with high form accuracy will play key roles in the future development of many products, as they provide portability, disposability, lower material consumption in production, low power consumption during operation, lower sample requirements for testing, and higher heat transfer due to their very high surface-to-volume ratio. Given the high market demand for such micro and nano featured components, different manufacturing methods have been developed for their fabrication. Some of the common technologies in micro/nano fabrication are photolithography, electron beam lithography, X-ray lithography and other semiconductor processing techniques. Although these methods are capable of fabricating micro/nano structures with a resolution of less than a few nanometers, some of the shortcomings associated with these methods, such as high production costs for customized products, limited material choices, necessitate the development of other fabricating techniques. Micro/nano mechanical machining, such an atomic force microscope (AFM) probe based nano fabrication, has, therefore, been used to overcome some the major restrictions of the traditional processes. This technique removes material from the workpiece by engaging micro/nano size cutting tool (i.e. AFM probe) and is applicable on a wider range of materials compared to the photolithographic process. In spite of the unique benefits of nano mechanical machining, there are also some challenges with this technique, since the scale is reduced, such as size effects, burr formations, chip adhesions, fragility of tools and tool wear. Moreover, AFM based machining does not have any rotational movement, which makes fabrication of 3D features more difficult. Thus, vibration-assisted machining is introduced into AFM probe based nano mechanical machining to overcome the limitations associated with the conventional AFM probe based scratching method. Vibration-assisted machining reduced the cutting forces

  16. Rotenone Directly Induces BV2 Cell Activation via the p38 MAPK Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Feng; Chen, Dong; Hu, Qingsong; Wang, Guanghui

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease. Although its pathogenesis is still unclear, increasing evidence suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction induced by environmental toxins, such as mitochondrial complex I inhibitors, plays a significant role in the disease process. The microglia in PD brains are highly activated, and inflammation is also an essential element in PD pathogenesis. However, the means by which these toxins activate microglia is still unclear. In the present study, we found that rotenone, a mitochondrial complex I inhibitor, could directly activate microglia via the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signaling pathway, thereby inducing significantly increased expression of inflammatory cytokines. We further observed that rotenone induced caspase-1 activation and mature IL-1β release, both of which are strictly dependent on p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). The activation of p38 is associated with the presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by rotenone. Removal of these ROS abrogated the activation of the microglia. Therefore, our data suggest that the environmental toxin rotenone can directly activate microglia through the p38 MAPK pathway. PMID:23977201

  17. In the light of directed evolution: Pathways of adaptive protein evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Jesse D.; Arnold, Frances H.

    2009-01-01

    Directed evolution is a widely-used engineering strategy for improving the stabilities or biochemical functions of proteins by repeated rounds of mutation and selection. These experiments offer empirical lessons about how proteins evolve in the face of clearly-defined laboratory selection pressures. Directed evolution has revealed that single amino acid mutations can enhance properties such as catalytic activity or stability and that adaptation can often occur through pathways consisting of sequential beneficial mutations. When there are no single mutations that improve a particular protein property experiments always find a wealth of mutations that are neutral with respect to the laboratory-defined measure of fitness. These neutral mutations can open new adaptive pathways by at least 2 different mechanisms. Functionally-neutral mutations can enhance a protein's stability, thereby increasing its tolerance for subsequent functionally beneficial but destabilizing mutations. They can also lead to changes in “promiscuous” functions that are not currently under selective pressure, but can subsequently become the starting points for the adaptive evolution of new functions. These lessons about the coupling between adaptive and neutral protein evolution in the laboratory offer insight into the evolution of proteins in nature. PMID:19528653

  18. Direct pathway for hepatic glycogenesis predominates in meal-fed rats

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, M.T.; Veech, R.L.

    1987-05-01

    The pathway for hepatic glycogen synthesis in the postprandial state was studied in meal-fed rats chronically cannulated in the portal vein. The rate of glycogen synthesis in livers of rats meal-fed for seven days was found to be about 1 umol/g/min. Plasma glucose concentration in the portal vein was generally below 8 mM before meal-feeding and could reach up to 12 mM at the end of the meal-feeding. Studies on the hepatic-portal (H-P) difference of plasma glucose showed that liver released glucose in the fasted state and could either extract or release glucose after feeding, depending on plasma glucose concentration in the portal vein. The cross-over concentration for the transition was found to be 8 mM. The relative importance of the direct vs indirect pathway for the replenishment of hepatic glycogen was determined by injecting (3-/sup 3/H,U-/sup 14/C)-glucose into the portal vein at the end of meal-feeding. Six minutes after the injection, the ratio of /sup 3/H//sup 14/C in glycogen-glucose was found to be 83-92% of the ratio in liver free glucose. The H-P differences of glucose, lactate, pyruvate, and alanine during feeding were determined. It was found that the H-P difference of (glc) was about 9 times greater than the combined total of ..delta.. (lac), ..delta.. (pyr), and ..delta.. (ala) as early as 10 minutes after the onset of feeding. It is concluded that the direct pathway for the replenishment of hepatic glycogen is predominant and can account for more than 80% of the total glycogen synthesized in vivo in the postprandial state, in contrast to the result of < 30% reported previously by Newgard et al in acute traumatized rats.

  19. Combination STM/AFM and AFM Images of Magnetic Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, L.; Gallagher, M.; Howells, S.; Chen, T.; Sarid, D.

    1991-12-01

    By employing a cantilevered tip in a scanning tunneling microscope, one obtains images that show an enhancement of features associated with forces whose derivatives vary along the direction of scanning. The theory of this process is described together with experimental results showing magnetic domains on a gold coated floppy disk. Also shown are atomic force microscopy images of a ferrofluid-developed magnetic tape.

  20. BPA Directly Decreases GnRH Neuronal Activity via Noncanonical Pathway.

    PubMed

    Klenke, Ulrike; Constantin, Stephanie; Wray, Susan

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral feedback of gonadal estrogen to the hypothalamus is critical for reproduction. Bisphenol A (BPA), an environmental pollutant with estrogenic actions, can disrupt this feedback and lead to infertility in both humans and animals. GnRH neurons are essential for reproduction, serving as an important link between brain, pituitary, and gonads. Because GnRH neurons express several receptors that bind estrogen, they are potential targets for endocrine disruptors. However, to date, direct effects of BPA on GnRH neurons have not been shown. This study investigated the effects of BPA on GnRH neuronal activity using an explant model in which large numbers of primary GnRH neurons are maintained and express many of the receptors found in vivo. Because oscillations in intracellular calcium have been shown to correlate with electrical activity in GnRH neurons, calcium imaging was used to assay the effects of BPA. Exposure to 50μM BPA significantly decreased GnRH calcium activity. Blockage of γ-aminobutyric acid ergic and glutamatergic input did not abrogate the inhibitory BPA effect, suggesting direct regulation of GnRH neurons by BPA. In addition to estrogen receptor-β, single-cell RT-PCR analysis confirmed that GnRH neurons express G protein-coupled receptor 30 (G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1) and estrogen-related receptor-γ, all potential targets for BPA. Perturbation studies of the signaling pathway revealed that the BPA-mediated inhibition of GnRH neuronal activity occurred independent of estrogen receptors, GPER, or estrogen-related receptor-γ, via a noncanonical pathway. These results provide the first evidence of a direct effect of BPA on GnRH neurons.

  1. Anomalies in nanostructure size measurements by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mechler, Ádám; Kopniczky, Judit; Kokavecz, János; Hoel, Anders; Granqvist, Claes-Göran; Heszler, Peter

    2005-09-01

    Anomalies in atomic force microscopy (AFM) based size determination of nanoparticles were studied via comparative analysis of experiments and numerical calculations. Single tungsten oxide nanoparticles with a mean diameter of 3nm were deposited on mica and graphite substrates and were characterised by AFM. The size (height) of the nanoparticles, measured by tapping mode AFM, was found to be sensitive to the free amplitude of the oscillating tip, thus indicating that the images were not purely topographical. By comparing the experimental results to model calculations, we demonstrate that the dependence of the nanoparticle size on the oscillation amplitude of the tip is an inherent characteristic of the tapping mode AFM; it is also a function of physical properties such as elasticity and surface energy of the nanoparticle and the sample surface, and it depends on the radius of curvature of the tip. We show that good approximation of the real size can easily be obtained from plots of particle height vs free amplitude of the oscillating tip, although errors might persist for individual experiments. The results are valid for size (height) determination of any nanometer-sized objects imaged by tapping mode AFM.

  2. Amyloid and membrane complexity: The toxic interplay revealed by AFM.

    PubMed

    Canale, Claudio; Oropesa-Nuñez, Reinier; Diaspro, Alberto; Dante, Silvia

    2017-08-30

    Lipid membranes play a fundamental role in the pathological development of protein misfolding diseases. Several pieces of evidence suggest that the lipid membrane could act as a catalytic surface for protein aggregation. Furthermore, a leading theory indicates the interaction between the cell membrane and misfolded oligomer species as the responsible for cytotoxicity, hence, for neurodegeneration in disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. The definition of the mechanisms that drive the interaction between pathological protein aggregates and plasma membrane is fundamental for the development of effective therapies for a large class of diseases. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been employed to study how amyloid aggregates affect the cell physiological properties. Considerable efforts were spent to characterize the interaction with model systems, i.e., planar supported lipid bilayers, but some works also addressed the problem directly on living cells. Here, an overview of the main works involving the use of the AFM on both model system and living cells will be provided. Different kind of approaches will be presented, as well as the main results derived from the AFM analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Interlaboratory round robin on cantilever calibration for AFM force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    te Riet, Joost; Katan, Allard J; Rankl, Christian; Stahl, Stefan W; van Buul, Arend M; Phang, In Yee; Gomez-Casado, Alberto; Schön, Peter; Gerritsen, Jan W; Cambi, Alessandra; Rowan, Alan E; Vancso, G Julius; Jonkheijm, Pascal; Huskens, Jurriaan; Oosterkamp, Tjerk H; Gaub, Hermann; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Figdor, Carl G; Speller, Sylvia

    2011-12-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy studies performed by Atomic Force Microscopes (AFMs) strongly rely on accurately determined cantilever spring constants. Hence, to calibrate cantilevers, a reliable calibration protocol is essential. Although the thermal noise method and the direct Sader method are frequently used for cantilever calibration, there is no consensus on the optimal calibration of soft and V-shaped cantilevers, especially those used in force spectroscopy. Therefore, in this study we aimed at establishing a commonly accepted approach to accurately calibrate compliant and V-shaped cantilevers. In a round robin experiment involving eight different laboratories we compared the thermal noise and the Sader method on ten commercial and custom-built AFMs. We found that spring constants of both rectangular and V-shaped cantilevers can accurately be determined with both methods, although the Sader method proved to be superior. Furthermore, we observed that simultaneous application of both methods on an AFM proved an accurate consistency check of the instrument and thus provides optimal and highly reproducible calibration. To illustrate the importance of optimal calibration, we show that for biological force spectroscopy studies, an erroneously calibrated cantilever can significantly affect the derived (bio)physical parameters. Taken together, our findings demonstrated that with the pre-established protocol described reliable spring constants can be obtained for different types of cantilevers. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Direct photolysis rates and transformation pathways of the lampricides TFM and niclosamide in simulated sunlight

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McConville, Megan B.; Hubert, Terrance D.; Remucal, Christina K.

    2016-01-01

    The lampricides 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM) and 2′,5-dichloro-4′-nitrosalicylanilide (niclosamide) are directly added to many tributaries of the Great Lakes that harbor the invasive parasitic sea lamprey. Despite their long history of use, the fate of lampricides is not well understood. This study evaluates the rate and pathway of direct photodegradation of both lampricides under simulated sunlight. The estimated half-lives of TFM range from 16.6 ± 0.2 h (pH 9) to 32.9 ± 1.0 h (pH 6), while the half-lives of niclosamide range from 8.88 ± 0.52 days (pH 6) to 382 ± 83 days (pH 9) assuming continuous irradiation over a water depth of 55 cm. Both compounds degrade to form a series of aromatic intermediates, simple organic acids, ring cleavage products, and inorganic ions. Experimental data were used to construct a kinetic model which demonstrates that the aromatic products of TFM undergo rapid photolysis and emphasizes that niclosamide degradation is the rate-limiting step to dehalogenation and mineralization of the lampricide. This study demonstrates that TFM photodegradation is likely to occur on the time scale of lampricide applications (2–5 days), while niclosamide, the less selective lampricide, will undergo minimal direct photodegradation during its passage to the Great Lakes.

  5. DNA damage response pathway and replication fork stress during oligonucleotide directed gene editing.

    PubMed

    Bonner, Melissa; Strouse, Bryan; Applegate, Mindy; Livingston, Paula; Kmiec, Eric B

    2012-04-03

    Single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ODNs) can be used to direct the exchange of nucleotides in the genome of mammalian cells in a process known as gene editing. Once refined, gene editing should become a viable option for gene therapy and molecular medicine. Gene editing is regulated by a number of DNA recombination and repair pathways whose natural activities often lead to single- and double-stranded DNA breaks. It has been previously shown that introduction of a phosphorotioated ODN, designed to direct a gene-editing event, into cells results in the activation of γH2AX, a well-recognized protein biomarker for double-stranded DNA breakage. Using a single copy, integrated mutant enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) gene as our target, we now demonstrate that several types of ODNs, capable of directing gene editing, also activate the DNA damage response and the post-translational modification of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a signature modification of replication stress. We find that the gene editing reaction itself leads to transient DNA breakage, perhaps through replication fork collapse. Unmodified specific ODNs elicit a lesser degree of replication stress than their chemically modified counterparts, but are also less active in gene editing. Modified phosphothioate oligonucleotides (PTOs) are detrimental irrespective of the DNA sequence. Such collateral damage may prove problematic for proliferation of human cells genetically modified by gene editing.

  6. Hydration states of AFm cement phases

    SciTech Connect

    Baquerizo, Luis G.; Matschei, Thomas; Scrivener, Karen L.; Saeidpour, Mahsa; Wadsö, Lars

    2015-07-15

    The AFm phase, one of the main products formed during the hydration of Portland and calcium aluminate cement based systems, belongs to the layered double hydrate (LDH) family having positively charged layers and water plus charge-balancing anions in the interlayer. It is known that these phases present different hydration states (i.e. varying water content) depending on the relative humidity (RH), temperature and anion type, which might be linked to volume changes (swelling and shrinkage). Unfortunately the stability conditions of these phases are insufficiently reported. This paper presents novel experimental results on the different hydration states of the most important AFm phases: monocarboaluminate, hemicarboaluminate, strätlingite, hydroxy-AFm and monosulfoaluminate, and the thermodynamic properties associated with changes in their water content during absorption/desorption. This data opens the possibility to model the response of cementitious systems during drying and wetting and to engineer systems more resistant to harsh external conditions.

  7. Multifrequency AFM: from origins to convergence.

    PubMed

    Santos, Sergio; Lai, Chia-Yun; Olukan, Tuza; Chiesa, Matteo

    2017-04-20

    Since the inception of the atomic force microscope (AFM) in 1986, influential papers have been presented by the community and tremendous advances have been reported. Being able to routinely image conductive and non-conductive surfaces in air, liquid and vacuum environments with nanoscale, and sometimes atomic, resolution, the AFM has long been perceived by many as the instrument to unlock the nanoscale. From exploiting a basic form of Hooke's law to interpret AFM data to interpreting a seeming zoo of maps in the more advanced multifrequency methods however, an inflection point has been reached. Here, we discuss this evolution, from the fundamental dilemmas that arose in the beginning, to the exploitation of computer sciences, from machine learning to big data, hoping to guide the newcomer and inspire the experimenter.

  8. LET spectrum measurements in Cr-39 PNTD with AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Carl Edward; De Witt, Joel M; Benton, Eric R; Yasuda, Nakahiro; Benton, Eugene V

    2010-01-01

    Energetic protons, neutrons, and heavy ions undergoing collisions with target nuclei of varying Z can produce residual heavy recoil fragments via intra-nuclear cascade/evaporation reactions. The particles produced in these non-elastic collisions generally have such extremely short range ({approx}< 10 {mu}m) that they cannot be directly observed by conventional detection methods including CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) that has been chemically etched for analysis by standard visible light microscopy. However, high-LET recoil fragments having range on the order of several cell diameters can be produced in tissue during radiotherapy using proton and carbon beams. We have developed a method to analyze short-range, high-LET tracks in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) using short duration chemical etching ({approx}< 1 {mu}m) followed by automated atomic force microscope (AFM) scanning. The post-scan data processing used in this work was based on semi-automated matrix analysis opposed to traditional grey-scale image analysis. This method takes advantage of the 3-D data obtained via AFM to achieve robust discrimination of nuclear tracks from other features. Through automation of AFM scanning, sufficient AFM scan frames were obtained to attain an LET spectrum spanning the LET range from 200-1500 keV/{mu}m. In addition to our experiments, simulations were carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. To demonstrate this method, CR-39 PNTD was exposed to the proton therapy beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) at 60 and 230 MeV. Additionally, detectors were exposed to I GeV protons at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). For these exposures CR-39 PNTD, Al and Cu target foils were used between detector layers.

  9. LET Spectrum Measurements In CR-39 PNTD With AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C. E.; DeWitt, J. M.; Benton, E. R.; Yasuda, N.; Benton, E. V.

    2011-06-01

    Energetic protons, neutrons, and heavy ions undergoing collisions with target nuclei of varying Z can produce residual heavy recoil fragments via intra-nuclear cascade/evaporation reactions. The particles produced in these non-elastic collisions generally have such extremely short range ({approx}<10 {mu}m) that they cannot be directly observed by conventional detection methods including CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) that has been chemically etched for analysis by standard visible light microscopy. However, high-LET recoil fragments having range on the order of several cell diameters can be produced in tissue during radiotherapy using proton and carbon beams. We have developed a method to analyze short-range, high-LET tracks in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) using short duration chemical etching ({approx}<1 {mu}m) following by automated atomic force microscope (AFM) scanning. The post-scan data processing used in this work was based on semi-automated matrix analysis opposed to traditional grey-scale image analysis. This method takes advantage of the 3-D data obtained via AFM to achieve robust discrimination of nuclear tracks from other features inherently present in the post-etch detector surface. Through automation of AFM scanning, sufficient AFM scan frames were obtained to attain an LET spectrum spanning the LET range from 200-1500 keV/{mu}m. In addition to our experiments, simulations were carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. To demonstrate this method, CR-39 PNTD was exposed to the proton therapy beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) at 60 and 230 MeV. Additionally, detectors were exposed to 1 GeV protons at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). For these exposures CR-39 PNTD, Al and Cu target foils were used between detector layers.

  10. LET Spectrum Measurements In CR-39 PNTD With AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. E.; DeWitt, J. M.; Benton, E. R.; Yasuda, N.; Benton, E. V.

    2011-06-01

    Energetic protons, neutrons, and heavy ions undergoing collisions with target nuclei of varying Z can produce residual heavy recoil fragments via intra-nuclear cascade/evaporation reactions. The particles produced in these non-elastic collisions generally have such extremely short range (˜<10 μm) that they cannot be directly observed by conventional detection methods including CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) that has been chemically etched for analysis by standard visible light microscopy. However, high-LET recoil fragments having range on the order of several cell diameters can be produced in tissue during radiotherapy using proton and carbon beams. We have developed a method to analyze short-range, high-LET tracks in CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) using short duration chemical etching (˜<1 μm) following by automated atomic force microscope (AFM) scanning. The post-scan data processing used in this work was based on semi-automated matrix analysis opposed to traditional grey-scale image analysis. This method takes advantage of the 3-D data obtained via AFM to achieve robust discrimination of nuclear tracks from other features inherently present in the post-etch detector surface. Through automation of AFM scanning, sufficient AFM scan frames were obtained to attain an LET spectrum spanning the LET range from 200-1500 keV/μm. In addition to our experiments, simulations were carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. To demonstrate this method, CR-39 PNTD was exposed to the proton therapy beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) at 60 and 230 MeV. Additionally, detectors were exposed to 1 GeV protons at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). For these exposures CR-39 PNTD, Al and Cu target foils were used between detector layers.

  11. Direct molecular interactions between Beclin 1 and the canonical NFκB activation pathway.

    PubMed

    Niso-Santano, Mireia; Criollo, Alfredo; Malik, Shoaib Ahmad; Michaud, Michael; Morselli, Eugenia; Mariño, Guillermo; Lachkar, Sylvie; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Maiuri, Maria Chaira; Kroemer, Guido

    2012-02-01

    General (macro)autophagy and the activation of NFκB constitute prominent responses to a large array of intracellular and extracellular stress conditions. The depletion of any of the three subunits of the inhibitor of NFκB (IκB) kinase (IKKα, IKKβ, IKKγ/NEMO), each of which is essential for the canonical NFκB activation pathway, limits autophagy induction by physiological or pharmacological triggers, while constitutive active IKK subunits suffice to stimulate autophagy. The activation of IKK usually relies on TGFβ-activated kinase 1 (TAK1), which is also necessary for the optimal induction of autophagy in multiple settings. TAK1 interacts with two structurally similar co-activators, TAK1-binding proteins 2 and 3 (TAB2 and TAB3). Importantly, in resting conditions both TAB2 and TAB3 bind the essential autophagic factor Beclin 1, but not TAK1. In response to pro-autophagic stimuli, TAB2 and TAB3 dissociate from Beclin 1 and engage in stimulatory interactions with TAK1. The inhibitory interaction between TABs and Beclin 1 is mediated by their coiled-coil domains (CCDs). Accordingly, the overexpression of either TAB2 or TAB3 CCD stimulates Beclin 1- and TAK1-dependent autophagy. These results point to the existence of a direct molecular crosstalk between the canonical NFκB activation pathway and the autophagic core machinery that guarantees the coordinated induction of these processes in response to stress.

  12. Directing folding pathways for multi-component DNA origami nanostructures with complex topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marras, A. E.; Zhou, L.; Kolliopoulos, V.; Su, H.-J.; Castro, C. E.

    2016-05-01

    Molecular self-assembly has become a well-established technique to design complex nanostructures and hierarchical mesoscale assemblies. The typical approach is to design binding complementarity into nucleotide or amino acid sequences to achieve the desired final geometry. However, with an increasing interest in dynamic nanodevices, the need to design structures with motion has necessitated the development of multi-component structures. While this has been achieved through hierarchical assembly of similar structural units, here we focus on the assembly of topologically complex structures, specifically with concentric components, where post-folding assembly is not feasible. We exploit the ability to direct folding pathways to program the sequence of assembly and present a novel approach of designing the strand topology of intermediate folding states to program the topology of the final structure, in this case a DNA origami slider structure that functions much like a piston-cylinder assembly in an engine. The ability to program the sequence and control orientation and topology of multi-component DNA origami nanostructures provides a foundation for a new class of structures with internal and external moving parts and complex scaffold topology. Furthermore, this work provides critical insight to guide the design of intermediate states along a DNA origami folding pathway and to further understand the details of DNA origami self-assembly to more broadly control folding states and landscapes.

  13. A direct anterior cingulate pathway to the primate primary olfactory cortex may control attention to olfaction

    PubMed Central

    García-Cabezas, Miguel Á.; Barbas, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral and functional studies in humans suggest that attention plays a key role in activating the primary olfactory cortex through an unknown circuit mechanism. We report that a novel pathway from the anterior cingulate cortex, an area which has a key role in attention, projects directly to the primary olfactory cortex in rhesus monkeys, innervating mostly the anterior olfactory nucleus. Axons from the anterior cingulate cortex formed synapses mostly with spines of putative excitatory pyramidal neurons and with a small proportion of a neurochemical class of inhibitory neurons that are thought to have disinhibitory effect on excitatory neurons. This novel pathway from the anterior cingulate is poised to exert a powerful excitatory effect on the anterior olfactory nucleus, which is a critical hub for odorant processing via extensive bilateral connections with primary olfactory cortices and the olfactory bulb. Acting on the anterior olfactory nucleus, the anterior cingulate may activate the entire primary olfactory cortex to mediate the process of rapid attention to olfactory stimuli. PMID:23797208

  14. A direct view of the complex multi-pathway folding of telomeric G-quadruplexes

    PubMed Central

    Aznauryan, Mikayel; Søndergaard, Siri; Noer, Sofie L.; Schiøtt, Birgit; Birkedal, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    G-quadruplexes (G4s) are DNA secondary structures that are capable of forming and function in vivo. The propensity of G4s to exhibit extreme polymorphism and complex dynamics is likely to influence their cellular function, yet a clear microscopic picture of their folding process is lacking. Here we employed single-molecule FRET microscopy to obtain a direct view of the folding and underlying conformational dynamics of G4s formed by the human telomeric sequence in potassium containing solutions. Our experiments allowed detecting several folded states that are populated in the course of G4 folding and determining their folding energetics and timescales. Combining the single-molecule data with molecular dynamics simulations enabled obtaining a structural description of the experimentally observed folded states. Our work thus provides a comprehensive thermodynamic and kinetic description of the folding of G4s that proceeds through a complex multi-route pathway, involving several marginally stable conformational states. PMID:27799468

  15. Direct measurement of TRPV4 and PIEZO1 activity reveals multiple mechanotransduction pathways in chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rocio Servin-Vences, M; Moroni, Mirko; Lewin, Gary R; Poole, Kate

    2017-01-01

    The joints of mammals are lined with cartilage, comprised of individual chondrocytes embedded in a specialized extracellular matrix. Chondrocytes experience a complex mechanical environment and respond to changing mechanical loads in order to maintain cartilage homeostasis. It has been proposed that mechanically gated ion channels are of functional importance in chondrocyte mechanotransduction; however, direct evidence of mechanical current activation in these cells has been lacking. We have used high-speed pressure clamp and elastomeric pillar arrays to apply distinct mechanical stimuli to primary murine chondrocytes, stretch of the membrane and deflection of cell-substrate contacts points, respectively. Both TRPV4 and PIEZO1 channels contribute to currents activated by stimuli applied at cell-substrate contacts but only PIEZO1 mediates stretch-activated currents. These data demonstrate that there are separate, but overlapping, mechanoelectrical transduction pathways in chondrocytes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21074.001 PMID:28135189

  16. Heading in the right direction: thermodynamics-based network analysis and pathway engineering.

    PubMed

    Ataman, Meric; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily

    2015-12-01

    Thermodynamics-based network analysis through the introduction of thermodynamic constraints in metabolic models allows a deeper analysis of metabolism and guides pathway engineering. The number and the areas of applications of thermodynamics-based network analysis methods have been increasing in the last ten years. We review recent applications of these methods and we identify the areas that such analysis can contribute significantly, and the needs for future developments. We find that organisms with multiple compartments and extremophiles present challenges for modeling and thermodynamics-based flux analysis. The evolution of current and new methods must also address the issues of the multiple alternatives in flux directionalities and the uncertainties and partial information from analytical methods. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Degradation pathways of lamotrigine under advanced treatment by direct UV photolysis, hydroxyl radicals, and ozone.

    PubMed

    Keen, Olya S; Ferrer, Imma; Michael Thurman, E; Linden, Karl G

    2014-12-01

    Lamotrigine is recently recognized as a persistent pharmaceutical in the water environment and wastewater effluents. Its degradation was studied under UV and ozone advanced oxidation treatments with reaction kinetics of lamotrigine with ozone (≈4 M(-1)s(-1)), hydroxyl radical [(2.1 ± 0.3) × 10(9)M(-1)s(-1)] and by UV photolysis with low and medium pressure mercury vapor lamps [quantum yields ≈0 and (2.7 ± 0.4)× 10(-4) respectively] determined. All constants were measured at pH 6 and at temperature ≈20°C. The results indicate that lamotrigine is slow to respond to direct photolysis or oxidation by ozone and no attenuation of the contaminant is expected in UV or ozone disinfection applications. The compound reacts rapidly with hydroxyl radicals indicating that advanced oxidation processes would be effective for its treatment. Degradation products were identified under each treatment process using accurate mass time-of-flight spectrometry and pathways of decay were proposed. The main transformation pathways in each process were: dechlorination of the benzene ring during direct photolysis; hydroxyl group addition to the benzene ring during the reaction with hydroxyl radicals; and triazine ring opening after reaction with ozone. Different products that form in each process may be to a varying degree less environmentally stable than the parent lamotrigine. In addition, a novel method of ozone quenching without addition of salts is presented. The new quenching method would allow subsequent mass spectrometry analysis without a solid phase extraction clean-up step. The method involves raising the pH of the sample to approximately 10 for a few seconds and lowering it back and is therefore limited to applications for which temporary pH change is not expected to affect the outcome of the analysis.

  18. Modulation of direct pathway striatal projection neurons by muscarinic M₄-type receptors.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Flores, Teresa; Hernández-González, Omar; Pérez-Ramírez, María B; Lara-González, Esther; Arias-García, Mario A; Duhne, Mariana; Pérez-Burgos, Azucena; Prieto, G Aleph; Figueroa, Alejandra; Galarraga, Elvira; Bargas, José

    2015-02-01

    Models of basal ganglia (BG) function posit a dynamic balance between two classes of striatal projection neurons (SPNs): direct pathway neurons (dSPNs) that facilitate movements, and indirect pathway neurons (iSPNs) that repress movement execution. Two main modulatory transmitters regulate the output of these neurons: dopamine (DA) and acetylcholine (ACh). dSPNs express D1-type DA, M1-and M4-type ACh receptors, while iSPNs express D2-type DA and M1-type ACh receptors. Actions of M1-, D1-, and D2-receptors have been extensively reported, but we still ignore most actions of muscarinic M4-type receptors. Here, we used whole-cell recordings in acutely dissociated neurons, pharmacological tools such as mamba-toxins, and BAC D(1 or 2)-eGFP transgenic mice to show that activation of M4-type receptors with bath applied muscarine enhances Ca(2+)-currents through CaV1-channels in dSPNs and not in iSPNs. This action increases excitability of dSPNs after both direct current injection and synaptically driven stimulation. The increases in Ca(2+)-current and excitability were blocked specifically by mamba toxin-3, suggesting mediation via M4-type receptors. M4-receptor activation also increased network activity of dSPNs but not of iSPNs as seen with calcium-imaging techniques. Moreover, actions of D1-type and M4-type receptors may add to produce a larger enhancement of excitability of dSPNs or, paradoxically, oppose each other depending on the order of their activation. Possible implications of these findings are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Graphene MEMS: AFM probe performance improvement.

    PubMed

    Martin-Olmos, Cristina; Rasool, Haider Imad; Weiller, Bruce H; Gimzewski, James K

    2013-05-28

    We explore the feasibility of growing a continuous layer of graphene in prepatterned substrates, like an engineered silicon wafer, and we apply this as a mold for the fabrication of AFM probes. This fabrication method proves the fabrication of SU-8 devices coated with graphene in a full-wafer parallel technology and with high yield. It also demonstrates that graphene coating enhances the functionality of SU-8 probes, turning them conductive and more resistant to wear. Furthermore, it opens new experimental possibilities such as studying graphene-graphene interaction at the nanoscale with the precision of an AFM or the exploration of properties in nonplanar graphene layers.

  20. Quantitative Measurements of Elastic Properties with Ultrasonic-Based AFM and Conventional Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, D. C.

    A prime motivation for the original development of ultrasonic-based AFM methods was to enable measurements of elastic properties with nanoscale spatial resolution. In this chapter, we discuss the quantitative measurement of elastic modulus with ultrasonic-based AFM methods and compare it to measurement by more conventional or established techniques. First, we present the basic principles of modulus measurement with methods that involve contact resonance spectroscopy, such as atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM) and ultrasonic AFM (U-AFM). Fundamental concepts of modulus measurement with more established approaches, especially instrumented (nano-) indentation (NI) and surface acoustic wave spectroscopy (SAWS), are then discussed. We consider the relative strengths and limitations of various approaches, for example measurement accuracy, spatial resolution, and applicability to different materials. Example results for specific material systems are given with an emphasis on studies involving direct intercomparison of different techniques. Finally, current research in this area and opportunities for future work are described.

  1. Local and distal effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization on direct pathway Pi uptake and root growth in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Watts-Williams, Stephanie J; Jakobsen, Iver; Cavagnaro, Timothy R; Grønlund, Mette

    2015-07-01

    Two pathways exist for plant Pi uptake from soil: via root epidermal cells (direct pathway) or via associations with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, and the two pathways interact in a complex manner. This study investigated distal and local effects of AM colonization on direct root Pi uptake and root growth, at different soil P levels. Medicago truncatula was grown at three soil P levels in split-pots with or without AM fungal inoculation and where one root half grew into soil labelled with (33)P. Plant genotypes included the A17 wild type and the mtpt4 mutant. The mtpt4 mutant, colonized by AM fungi, but with no functional mycorrhizal pathway for Pi uptake, was included to better understand effects of AM colonization per se. Colonization by AM fungi decreased expression of direct Pi transporter genes locally, but not distally in the wild type. In mtpt4 mutant plants, direct Pi transporter genes and the Pi starvation-induced gene Mt4 were more highly expressed than in wild-type roots. In wild-type plants, less Pi was taken up via the direct pathway by non-colonized roots when the other root half was colonized by AM fungi, compared with non-mycorrhizal plants. Colonization by AM fungi strongly influenced root growth locally and distally, and direct root Pi uptake activity locally, but had only a weak influence on distal direct pathway activity. The responses to AM colonization in the mtpt4 mutant suggested that in the wild type, the increased P concentration of colonized roots was a major factor driving the effects of AM colonization on direct root Pi uptake.

  2. Local and distal effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization on direct pathway Pi uptake and root growth in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Watts-Williams, Stephanie J.; Jakobsen, Iver; Cavagnaro, Timothy R.; Grønlund, Mette

    2015-01-01

    Two pathways exist for plant Pi uptake from soil: via root epidermal cells (direct pathway) or via associations with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, and the two pathways interact in a complex manner. This study investigated distal and local effects of AM colonization on direct root Pi uptake and root growth, at different soil P levels. Medicago truncatula was grown at three soil P levels in split-pots with or without AM fungal inoculation and where one root half grew into soil labelled with 33P. Plant genotypes included the A17 wild type and the mtpt4 mutant. The mtpt4 mutant, colonized by AM fungi, but with no functional mycorrhizal pathway for Pi uptake, was included to better understand effects of AM colonization per se. Colonization by AM fungi decreased expression of direct Pi transporter genes locally, but not distally in the wild type. In mtpt4 mutant plants, direct Pi transporter genes and the Pi starvation-induced gene Mt4 were more highly expressed than in wild-type roots. In wild-type plants, less Pi was taken up via the direct pathway by non-colonized roots when the other root half was colonized by AM fungi, compared with non-mycorrhizal plants. Colonization by AM fungi strongly influenced root growth locally and distally, and direct root Pi uptake activity locally, but had only a weak influence on distal direct pathway activity. The responses to AM colonization in the mtpt4 mutant suggested that in the wild type, the increased P concentration of colonized roots was a major factor driving the effects of AM colonization on direct root Pi uptake. PMID:25944927

  3. Towards direct synthesis of alane: A predicted defect-mediated pathway confirmed experimentally

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lin -Lin; Herwadkar, Aditi; Reich, Jason M.; Johnson, Duane D.; House, Stephen D.; Pena-Martin, Pamela; Rockett, Angus A.; Robertson, Ian M.; Gupta, Shalabh; Pecharsky, Vitalij K.

    2016-08-18

    Here, alane (AlH3) is a unique energetic material that has not found a broad practical use for over 70 years because it is difficult to synthesize directly from its elements. Using density functional theory, we examine the defect-mediated formation of alane monomers on Al(111) in a two-step process: (1) dissociative adsorption of H2 and (2) alane formation, which are both endothermic on a clean surface. Only with Ti dopant to facilitate H2 dissociation and vacancies to provide Al adatoms, both processes become exothermic. In agreement, in situ scanning tunneling microscopy showed that during H2 exposure, alane monomers and clusters form primarily in the vicinity of Al vacancies and Ti atoms. Moreover, ball milling of the Al samples with Ti (providing necessary defects) showed a 10 % conversion of Al into AlH3 or closely related species at 344 bar H2, indicating that the predicted pathway may lead to the direct synthesis of alane from elements at pressures much lower than the 104 bar expected from bulk thermodynamics.

  4. Towards direct synthesis of alane: A predicted defect-mediated pathway confirmed experimentally

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Lin -Lin; Herwadkar, Aditi; Reich, Jason M.; ...

    2016-08-18

    Here, alane (AlH3) is a unique energetic material that has not found a broad practical use for over 70 years because it is difficult to synthesize directly from its elements. Using density functional theory, we examine the defect-mediated formation of alane monomers on Al(111) in a two-step process: (1) dissociative adsorption of H2 and (2) alane formation, which are both endothermic on a clean surface. Only with Ti dopant to facilitate H2 dissociation and vacancies to provide Al adatoms, both processes become exothermic. In agreement, in situ scanning tunneling microscopy showed that during H2 exposure, alane monomers and clusters formmore » primarily in the vicinity of Al vacancies and Ti atoms. Moreover, ball milling of the Al samples with Ti (providing necessary defects) showed a 10 % conversion of Al into AlH3 or closely related species at 344 bar H2, indicating that the predicted pathway may lead to the direct synthesis of alane from elements at pressures much lower than the 104 bar expected from bulk thermodynamics.« less

  5. Towards Direct Synthesis of Alane: A Predicted Defect-Mediated Pathway Confirmed Experimentally.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin-Lin; Herwadkar, Aditi; Reich, Jason M; Johnson, Duane D; House, Stephen D; Peña-Martin, Pamela; Rockett, Angus A; Robertson, Ian M; Gupta, Shalabh; Pecharsky, Vitalij K

    2016-09-08

    Alane (AlH3 ) is a unique energetic material that has not found a broad practical use for over 70 years because it is difficult to synthesize directly from its elements. Using density functional theory, we examine the defect-mediated formation of alane monomers on Al(111) in a two-step process: (1) dissociative adsorption of H2 and (2) alane formation, which are both endothermic on a clean surface. Only with Ti dopant to facilitate H2 dissociation and vacancies to provide Al adatoms, both processes become exothermic. In agreement, in situ scanning tunneling microscopy showed that during H2 exposure, alane monomers and clusters form primarily in the vicinity of Al vacancies and Ti atoms. Moreover, ball milling of the Al samples with Ti (providing necessary defects) showed a 10 % conversion of Al into AlH3 or closely related species at 344 bar H2 , indicating that the predicted pathway may lead to the direct synthesis of alane from elements at pressures much lower than the 10(4)  bar expected from bulk thermodynamics. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Carbamazepine directly inhibits adipocyte differentiation through activation of the ERK 1/2 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Turpin, E; Muscat, A; Vatier, C; Chetrite, G; Corruble, E; Moldes, M; Fève, B

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Carbamazepine (CBZ), known for its anti-epileptic, analgesic and mood-stabilizing properties, is also known to induce weight gain but the pathophysiology of this adverse effect is still largely unknown. We tested the hypothesis that CBZ could have a direct effect on adipocyte development and metabolism. Experimental Research We studied the effects of CBZ on morphological biochemical and molecular markers of adipogenesis, using several pre-adipocyte murine cell lines (3T3-L1, 3T3-F442A and T37i cells) and primary cultures of human pre-adipocytes. To delineate the mechanisms underlying the effect of CBZ, clonal expansion of pre-adipocytes, pro-adipogenic transcription factors, glucose uptake and lipolysis were also examined. Key Results CBZ strongly inhibited pre-adipocyte differentiation and triglyceride accumulation in a time- and dose-dependent manner in all models. Pleiotropic mechanisms were at the basis of the inhibitory effects of CBZ on adipogenesis and cell lipid accumulation. They included suppression of both clonal expansion and major adipogenic transcription factors such as PPAR-γ and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-α, activation of basal lipolysis and decrease in insulin-stimulated glucose transport. Conclusions and Implications The effect of CBZ on adipogenesis involves activation of the ERK1/2 pathway. Our results show that CBZ acts directly on pre-adipocytes and adipocytes to alter adipose tissue development and metabolism. PMID:22889231

  7. Towards direct synthesis of alane: A predicted defect-mediated pathway confirmed experimentally

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lin -Lin; Herwadkar, Aditi; Reich, Jason M.; Johnson, Duane D.; House, Stephen D.; Pena-Martin, Pamela; Rockett, Angus A.; Robertson, Ian M.; Gupta, Shalabh; Pecharsky, Vitalij K.

    2016-08-18

    Here, alane (AlH3) is a unique energetic material that has not found a broad practical use for over 70 years because it is difficult to synthesize directly from its elements. Using density functional theory, we examine the defect-mediated formation of alane monomers on Al(111) in a two-step process: (1) dissociative adsorption of H2 and (2) alane formation, which are both endothermic on a clean surface. Only with Ti dopant to facilitate H2 dissociation and vacancies to provide Al adatoms, both processes become exothermic. In agreement, in situ scanning tunneling microscopy showed that during H2 exposure, alane monomers and clusters form primarily in the vicinity of Al vacancies and Ti atoms. Moreover, ball milling of the Al samples with Ti (providing necessary defects) showed a 10 % conversion of Al into AlH3 or closely related species at 344 bar H2, indicating that the predicted pathway may lead to the direct synthesis of alane from elements at pressures much lower than the 104 bar expected from bulk thermodynamics.

  8. Conductance of AFM Deformed Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svizhenko, Alexei; Maiti, Amitesh; Anatram, M. P.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the electrical conductivity of carbon nanotubes upon deformation by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The density of states and conductance were computed using four orbital tight-binding method with various parameterizations. Different chiralities develop bandgap that varies with chirality.

  9. Contact nanomechanical measurements with the AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisse, Nicholas

    2013-03-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has found broad use in the biological sciences largely due to its ability to make measurements on unfixed and unstained samples under liquid. In addition to imaging at multiple spatial scales ranging from micro- to nanometer, AFMs are commonly used as nanomechanical probes. This is pertinent for cell biology, as it has been demonstrated that the geometrical and mechanical properties of the extracellular microenvironment are important in such processes as cancer, cardiovascular disease, muscular dystrophy, and even the control of cell life and death. Indeed, the ability to control and quantify these external geometrical and mechanical parameters arises as a key issue in the field. Because AFM can quantitatively measure the mechanical properties of various biological samples, novel insights to cell function and to cell-substrate interactions are now possible. As the application of AFM to these types of problems is widened, it is important to understand the performance envelope of the technique and its associated data analyses. This talk will discuss the important issues that must be considered when mechanical models are applied to real-world data. Examples of the effect of different model assumptions on our understanding of the measured material properties will be shown. Furthermore, specific examples of the importance of mechanical stimuli and the micromechanical environment to the structure and function of biological materials will be presented.

  10. Identification of Thiotetronic Acid Antibiotic Biosynthetic Pathways by Target-directed Genome Mining.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaoyu; Li, Jie; Millán-Aguiñaga, Natalie; Zhang, Jia Jia; O'Neill, Ellis C; Ugalde, Juan A; Jensen, Paul R; Mantovani, Simone M; Moore, Bradley S

    2015-12-18

    Recent genome sequencing efforts have led to the rapid accumulation of uncharacterized or "orphaned" secondary metabolic biosynthesis gene clusters (BGCs) in public databases. This increase in DNA-sequenced big data has given rise to significant challenges in the applied field of natural product genome mining, including (i) how to prioritize the characterization of orphan BGCs and (ii) how to rapidly connect genes to biosynthesized small molecules. Here, we show that by correlating putative antibiotic resistance genes that encode target-modified proteins with orphan BGCs, we predict the biological function of pathway specific small molecules before they have been revealed in a process we call target-directed genome mining. By querying the pan-genome of 86 Salinispora bacterial genomes for duplicated house-keeping genes colocalized with natural product BGCs, we prioritized an orphan polyketide synthase-nonribosomal peptide synthetase hybrid BGC (tlm) with a putative fatty acid synthase resistance gene. We employed a new synthetic double-stranded DNA-mediated cloning strategy based on transformation-associated recombination to efficiently capture tlm and the related ttm BGCs directly from genomic DNA and to heterologously express them in Streptomyces hosts. We show the production of a group of unusual thiotetronic acid natural products, including the well-known fatty acid synthase inhibitor thiolactomycin that was first described over 30 years ago, yet never at the genetic level in regards to biosynthesis and autoresistance. This finding not only validates the target-directed genome mining strategy for the discovery of antibiotic producing gene clusters without a priori knowledge of the molecule synthesized but also paves the way for the investigation of novel enzymology involved in thiotetronic acid natural product biosynthesis.

  11. Identification of Thiotetronic Acid Antibiotic Biosynthetic Pathways by Target-directed Genome Mining

    PubMed Central

    Millán-Aguiñaga, Natalie; Zhang, Jia Jia; O'Neill, Ellis C.; Ugalde, Juan A.; Jensen, Paul R.; Mantovani, Simone M.; Moore, Bradley S.

    2016-01-01

    Recent genome sequencing efforts have led to the rapid accumulation of uncharacterized or “orphaned” secondary metabolic biosynthesis gene clusters (BGCs) in public databases. This increase in DNA-sequenced big data has given rise to significant challenges in the applied field of natural product genome mining, including (i) how to prioritize the characterization of orphan BGCs, and (ii) how to rapidly connect genes to biosynthesized small molecules. Here we show that by correlating putative antibiotic resistance genes that encode target-modified proteins with orphan BGCs, we predict the biological function of pathway specific small molecules before they have been revealed in a process we call target-directed genome mining. By querying the pan-genome of 86 Salinispora bacterial genomes for duplicated house-keeping genes co-localized with natural product BGCs, we prioritized an orphan polyketide synthase-nonribosomal peptide synthetase hybrid BGC (tlm) with a putative fatty acid synthase resistance gene. We employed a new synthetic double-stranded DNA-mediated cloning strategy based on transformation-associated recombination to efficiently capture tlm and the related ttm BGCs directly from genomic DNA and to heterologously express them in Streptomyces hosts. We show the production of a group of unusual thiotetronic acid natural products, including the well-known fatty acid synthase inhibitor thiolactomycin that was first described over 30 years ago, yet never at the genetic level in regards to biosynthesis and auto-resistance. This finding not only validates the target-directed genome mining strategy for the discovery of antibiotic producing gene clusters without a priori knowledge of the molecule synthesized, but also paves the way for the investigation of novel enzymology involved in thiotetronic acid natural product biosynthesis. PMID:26458099

  12. A direct descending pathway informing locomotor networks about tactile sensor movement.

    PubMed

    Ache, Jan M; Haupt, S Shuichi; Dürr, Volker

    2015-03-04

    Much like visually impaired humans use a white-cane, nocturnal insects and mammals use antennae or whiskers for near-range orientation. Stick insects, for example, rely heavily on antennal tactile cues to find footholds and detect obstacles. Antennal contacts can even induce aimed reaching movements. Because tactile sensors are essentially one-dimensional, they must be moved to probe the surrounding space. Sensor movement is thus an essential cue for tactile sensing, which needs to be integrated by thoracic networks for generating appropriate adaptive leg movements. Based on single and double recordings, we describe a descending neural pathway comprising three identified ON- and OFF-type neurons that convey complementary, unambiguous, and short-latency information about antennal movement to thoracic networks in the stick insect. The neurons are sensitive to the velocity of antennal movements across the entire range covered by natural movements, regardless of movement direction and joint angle. Intriguingly, none of them originates from the brain. Instead, they descend from the gnathal ganglion and receive input from antennal mechanoreceptors in this lower region of the CNS. From there, they convey information about antennal movement to the thorax. One of the descending neurons, which is additionally sensitive to substrate vibration, feeds this information back to the brain via an ascending branch. We conclude that descending interneurons with complementary tuning characteristics, gains, input and output regions convey detailed information about antennal movement to thoracic networks. This pathway bypasses higher processing centers in the brain and thus constitutes a shortcut between tactile sensors on the head and the thorax. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/354081-11$15.00/0.

  13. Carcinogen-specific mutations in preferred Ras-Raf pathway oncogenes directed by strand bias.

    PubMed

    Keller, Ross R; Gestl, Shelley A; Lu, Amy Q; Hoke, Alicia; Feith, David J; Gunther, Edward J

    2016-08-01

    Carcinogen exposures inscribe mutation patterns on cancer genomes and sometimes bias the acquisition of driver mutations toward preferred oncogenes, potentially dictating sensitivity to targeted agents. Whether and how carcinogen-specific mutation patterns direct activation of preferred oncogenes remains poorly understood. Here, mouse models of breast cancer were exploited to uncover a mechanistic link between strand-biased mutagenesis and oncogene preference. When chemical carcinogens were employed during Wnt1-initiated mammary tumorigenesis, exposure to either 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) or N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) dramatically accelerated tumor onset. Mammary tumors that followed DMBA exposure nearly always activated the Ras pathway via somatic Hras(CAA61CTA) mutations. Surprisingly, mammary tumors that followed ENU exposure typically lacked Hras mutations, and instead activated the Ras pathway downstream via Braf(GTG636GAG) mutations. Hras(CAA61CTA) mutations involve an A-to-T change on the sense strand, whereas Braf(GTG636GAG) mutations involve an inverse T-to-A change, suggesting that strand-biased mutagenesis may determine oncogene preference. To examine this possibility further, we turned to an alternative Wnt-driven tumor model in which carcinogen exposures augment a latent mammary tumor predisposition in Apc(min) mice. DMBA and ENU each accelerated mammary tumor onset in Apc(min) mice by introducing somatic, "second-hit" Apc mutations. Consistent with our strand bias model, DMBA and ENU generated strikingly distinct Apc mutation patterns, including stringently strand-inverse mutation signatures at A:T sites. Crucially, these contrasting signatures precisely match those proposed to confer bias toward Hras(CAA61CTA) versus Braf(GTG636GAG) mutations in the original tumor sets. Our findings highlight a novel mechanism whereby exposure history acts through strand-biased mutagenesis to specify activation of preferred oncogenes. © The Author 2016

  14. Effect of transcranial direct current stimulation on neuroplasticity in corticomotor pathways of the tongue muscles.

    PubMed

    Kothari, M; Stubbs, P W; Figlewski, K; Pedersen, A R; Jensen, J; Baad-Hansen, L; Svensson, P; Nielsen, J F

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on neuroplasticity in corticomotor pathways related to tongue muscles evoked by a training task using the tongue drive system (TDS). Using a crossover design, 13 healthy participants completed two sessions of tDCS while performing 30 min of TDS training. Sessions were spaced at least 2 weeks apart and participants randomly received anodal and sham tDCS stimulation in the first session and the other condition in the second session. Single and paired pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to elicit motor evoked potentials (MEPs) of the tongue at three time-points: before, immediately after and 30 min after training. Participant-based reports of fun, pain, fatigue and motivation, level of difficulty and effort were evaluated on numerical rating scales. There was no consistent significant effect of anodal and sham stimulation on single or paired pulse stimulation MEP amplitude immediately or 30 min after TDS training. Irrespective of tDCS type, training with TDS induced cortical plasticity in terms of increased MEP amplitudes for higher stimulus intensities after 30 min compared with before and immediately after training. Participant-based reports revealed no significant difference between tDCS conditions for level of fun, fatigue, motivation, difficulty and level of effort but a significant increase in pain in the anodal condition, although pain level was low for both conditions. In conclusion, tongue MEP amplitudes appear to be sensitive to training with the tongue using TDS; however, anodal tDCS does not have an impact on training-evoked neuroplasticity of tongue corticomotor pathways. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Developmental Pathway of the MPER-Directed HIV-1-Neutralizing Antibody 10E8

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Baoshan; McKee, Krisha; Longo, Nancy S.; Yang, Yongping; Huang, Jinghe; Parks, Robert; Eudailey, Joshua; Lloyd, Krissey E.; Alam, S. Munir; Haynes, Barton F.; Mullikin, James C.; Connors, Mark; Mascola, John R.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Kwong, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Antibody 10E8 targets the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of HIV-1 gp41, neutralizes >97% of HIV-1 isolates, and lacks the auto-reactivity often associated with MPER-directed antibodies. The developmental pathway of 10E8 might therefore serve as a promising template for vaccine design, but samples from time-of-infection—often used to infer the B cell record—are unavailable. In this study, we used crystallography, next-generation sequencing (NGS), and functional assessments to infer the 10E8 developmental pathway from a single time point. Mutational analysis indicated somatic hypermutation of the 2nd-heavy chain-complementarity determining region (CDR H2) to be critical for neutralization, and structures of 10E8 variants with V-gene regions reverted to genomic origin for heavy-and-light chains or heavy chain-only showed structural differences >2 Å relative to mature 10E8 in the CDR H2 and H3. To understand these developmental changes, we used bioinformatic sieving, maximum likelihood, and parsimony analyses of immunoglobulin transcripts to identify 10E8-lineage members, to infer the 10E8-unmutated common ancestor (UCA), and to calculate 10E8-developmental intermediates. We were assisted in this analysis by the preservation of a critical D-gene segment, which was unmutated in most 10E8-lineage sequences. UCA and early intermediates weakly bound a 26-residue-MPER peptide, whereas HIV-1 neutralization and epitope recognition in liposomes were only observed with late intermediates. Antibody 10E8 thus develops from a UCA with weak MPER affinity and substantial differences in CDR H2 and H3 from the mature 10E8; only after extensive somatic hypermutation do 10E8-lineage members gain recognition in the context of membrane and HIV-1 neutralization. PMID:27299673

  16. Fsh and Lh direct conserved and specific pathways during flatfish semicystic spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chauvigné, François; Zapater, Cinta; Crespo, Diego; Planas, Josep V; Cerdà, Joan

    2014-10-01

    The current view of the control of spermatogenesis by Fsh and Lh in non-mammalian vertebrates is largely based on studies carried out in teleosts with cystic and cyclic spermatogenesis. Much less is known concerning the specific actions of gonadotropins during semicystic germ cell development, a type of spermatogenesis in which germ cells are released into the tubular lumen where they transform into spermatozoa. In this study, using homologous gonadotropins and a candidate gene approach, for which the genes' testicular cell-type-specific expression was established, we investigated the regulatory effects of Fsh and Lh on gene expression during spermatogenesis in Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis), a flatfish with asynchronous and semicystic germ cell development. During early spermatogenesis, Fsh and Lh upregulated steroidogenesis-related genes and nuclear steroid receptors, expressed in both somatic and germ cells, through steroid-dependent pathways, although Lh preferentially stimulated the expression of downstream genes involved in androgen and progestin syntheses. In addition, Lh specifically promoted the expression of spermatid-specific genes encoding spermatozoan flagellar proteins through direct interaction with the Lh receptor in these cells. Interestingly, at this spermatogenic stage, Fsh primarily regulated genes encoding Sertoli cell growth factors with potentially antagonistic effects on germ cell proliferation and differentiation through steroid mediation. During late spermatogenesis, fewer genes were regulated by Fsh or Lh, which was associated with a translational and posttranslational downregulation of the Fsh receptor in different testicular compartments. These results reveal that conserved and specialized gonadotropic pathways regulate semicystic spermatogenesis in flatfish, which may spatially adjust cell germ development to maintain a continuous reservoir of spermatids in the testis.

  17. Prolactin affects bovine oocytes through direct and cumulus-mediated pathways.

    PubMed

    Lebedeva, Irina Y; Singina, Galina N; Volkova, Natalia A; Vejlsted, Morten; Zinovieva, Natalia A; Schmidt, Mette

    2014-11-01

    yield both in system 2 (from 20.5%-40.9%, P < 0.01) and in system 3 (from 21.7%-33.9%, P < 0.05). The findings show for the first time the functioning of the direct pathway of PRL signaling into bovine oocytes, as confirmed by the expression of receptors of PRL and its direct meiosis-retarding effect involving activation of tyrosine kinases and NO synthase. Furthermore, this is the first demonstration that the beneficial effect of PRL on the oocyte developmental capacity is achieved via cumulus cells containing PRL receptors.

  18. Cortical and thalamic innervation of direct and indirect pathway medium-sized spiny neurons in mouse striatum.

    PubMed

    Doig, Natalie M; Moss, Jonathan; Bolam, J Paul

    2010-11-03

    The striatum receives major excitatory inputs from the cortex and thalamus that predominantly target the spines of medium-sized spiny neurons (MSNs). We aimed to determine whether there is any selectivity of these two excitatory afferents in their innervation of direct and indirect pathway MSNs. To address this, we used bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic mice, in which enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reports the presence of D(1) or D(2) dopamine receptor subtypes, markers of direct and indirect pathway MSNs, respectively. Excitatory afferents were identified by the selective expression of vesicular glutamate transporter type 1 (VGluT1) by corticostriatal afferents and vesicular glutamate transporter type 2 (VGluT2) by thalamostriatal afferents. A quantitative electron microscopic analysis was performed on striatal tissue from D(1) and D(2) mice that was double immunolabeled to reveal the EGFP and VGluT1 or VGluT2. We found that the proportion of synapses formed by terminals derived from the cortex and thalamus was similar for both direct and indirect pathway MSNs. Furthermore, qualitative analysis revealed that individual cortical or thalamic terminals form synapses with both direct and indirect pathway MSNs. Similarly, we observed a convergence of cortical and thalamic inputs onto individual MSNs of both direct and indirect pathway: individual EGFP-positive structures received input from both VGluT2-positive and VGluT2-negative terminals. These findings demonstrate that direct and indirect pathway MSNs are similarly innervated by cortical and thalamic afferents; both projections are thus likely to be critical in the control of MSNs and hence play fundamental roles in the expression of basal ganglia function.

  19. Probing ternary solvent effect in high Voc polymer solar cells using advanced AFM techniques

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Chao; Soleman, Mikhael; Lorenzo, Josie; ...

    2016-01-25

    This work describes a simple method to develop a high Voc low band gap PSCs. In addition, two new atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoscale characterization techniques to study the surface morphology and physical properties of the structured active layer are introduced. With the help of ternary solvent processing of the active layer and C60 buffer layer, a bulk heterojunction PSC with Voc more than 0.9 V and conversion efficiency 7.5% is developed. In order to understand the fundamental properties of the materials ruling the performance of the PSCs tested, AFM-based nanoscale characterization techniques including Pulsed-Force-Mode AFM (PFM-AFM) and Mode-Synthesizing AFMmore » (MSAFM) are introduced. Interestingly, MSAFM exhibits high sensitivity for direct visualization of the donor–acceptor phases in the active layer of the PSCs. Lastly, conductive-AFM (cAFM) studies reveal local variations in conductivity in the donor and acceptor phases as well as a significant increase in photocurrent in the PTB7:ICBA sample obtained with the ternary solvent processing.« less

  20. An approach towards 3D sensitive AFM cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koops, Richard; Fokkema, Vincent

    2014-04-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) tapping mode is a highly sensitive local probing technique that is very useful to study and measure surface properties down to the atomic scale. The tapping mode is mostly implemented using the resonance of the first bending mode of the cantilever and therefore provides sensitivity mainly along the direction of this oscillation. Driven by the semiconductor industry, there is an increasing need for accurate measurements of nanoscale structures for side wall characterization by AFM that requires additional sensitivity in the lateral direction. The conventional tapping mode has been augmented by various authors, for example by tilting the cantilever system (Cho et al 2011 Rev. Sci. Instrum. 82 023707) to access the sidewall or using a torsion mode (Dai et al 2011 Meas. Sci. Technol. 22 094009) of the cantilever to provide additional lateral sensitivity. These approaches however trade lateral sensitivity for vertical sensitivity or still lack sensitivity in the remaining lateral direction. We present an approach towards true 3D sensitivity for AFM cantilevers based on simultaneous excitation and optical detection of multiple cantilever resonance modes along three axes. Tuning the excitation of the cantilever to specific frequencies provides a mechanism to select only those cantilever modes that have the desired characteristics. Additionally, cantilever engineering has been used to design and create a substructure within the cantilever that has been optimized for specific resonance behavior around 4 MHz. In contrast to the conventional approach of using a piezo to actuate the cantilever modulation, we present results on photo-thermal excitation using an intensity modulated low-power laser source. By tightly focusing the excitation spot on the cantilever we were able to attain a deflection efficiency of 0.7 nm µW-1 for the first bending mode. The presented approach results in an efficient all optical excitation and deflection detection

  1. Melatonin directly scavenges hydrogen peroxide: a potentially new metabolic pathway of melatonin biotransformation.

    PubMed

    Tan, D X; Manchester, L C; Reiter, R J; Plummer, B F; Limson, J; Weintraub, S T; Qi, W

    2000-12-01

    A potential new metabolic pathway of melatonin biotransformation is described in this investigation. Melatonin was found to directly scavenge hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) to form N(1)-acetyl-N(2)-formyl-5-methoxykynuramine and, thereafter this compound could be enzymatically converted to N(1)-acetyl-5-methoxykynuramine by catalase. The structures of these kynuramines were identified using proton nuclear magnetic resonance, carbon nuclear magnetic resonance, and mass spectrometry. This is the first report to reveal a possible physiological association between melatonin, H(2)O(2), catalase, and kynuramines. Melatonin scavenges H(2)O(2) in a concentration-dependent manner. This reaction appears to exhibit two distinguishable phases. In the rapid reaction phase, the interaction between melatonin and H(2)O(2) reaches equilibrium rapidly (within 5 s). The rate constant for this phase was calculated to be 2.3 x 10(6) M(-1)s(-1). Thereafter, the relative equilibrium of melatonin and H(2)O(2) was sustained for roughly 1 h, at which time the content of H(2)O(2) decreased gradually over a several hour period, identified as the slow reaction phase. These observations suggest that melatonin, a ubiquitously distributed small nonenzymatic molecule, might serve to directly detoxify H(2)O(2) in living organisms. H(2)O(2) and melatonin are present in all subcellular compartments; thus, presumably, one important function of melatonin may be complementary in function to catalase and glutathione peroxidase in keeping intracellular H(2)O(2) concentrations at steady-state levels.

  2. The Interglomerular Circuit Potently Inhibits Olfactory Bulb Output Neurons by Both Direct and Indirect Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Puche, Adam C.; Shipley, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Sensory processing shapes our perception. In mammals, odor information is encoded by combinatorial activity patterns of olfactory bulb (OB) glomeruli. Glomeruli are richly interconnected by short axon cells (SACs), which form the interglomerular circuit (IGC). It is unclear how the IGC impacts OB output to downstream neural circuits. We combined in vitro and in vivo electrophysiology with optogenetics in mice and found the following: (1) the IGC potently and monosynaptically inhibits the OB output neurons mitral/tufted cells (MTCs) by GABA release from SACs: (2) gap junction-mediated electrical coupling is strong for the SAC→MTC synapse, but negligible for the SAC→ETC synapse; (3) brief IGC-mediated inhibition is temporally prolonged by the intrinsic properties of MTCs; and (4) sniff frequency IGC activation in vivo generates persistent MTC inhibition. These findings suggest that the temporal sequence of glomerular activation by sensory input determines which stimulus features are transmitted to downstream olfactory networks and those filtered by lateral inhibition. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Odor identity is encoded by combinatorial patterns of activated glomeruli, the initial signal transformation site of the olfactory system. Lateral circuit processing among activated glomeruli modulates olfactory signal transformation before transmission to higher brain centers. Using a combination of in vitro and in vivo optogenetics, this work demonstrates that interglomerular circuitry produces potent inhibition of olfactory bulb output neurons via direct chemical and electrical synapses as well as by indirect pathways. The direct inhibitory synaptic input engages mitral cell intrinsic membrane properties to generate inhibition that outlasts the initial synaptic action. PMID:27629712

  3. Modeling trans-spinal direct current stimulation for the modulation of the lumbar spinal motor pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuck, A.; Stegeman, D. F.; van Asseldonk, E. H. F.

    2017-10-01

    Objective. Trans-spinal direct current stimulation (tsDCS) is a potential new technique for the treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI). TsDCS aims to facilitate plastic changes in the neural pathways of the spinal cord with a positive effect on SCI recovery. To establish tsDCS as a possible treatment option for SCI, it is essential to gain a better understanding of its cause and effects. We seek to understand the acute effect of tsDCS, including the generated electric field (EF) and its polarization effect on the spinal circuits, to determine a cellular target. We further ask how these findings can be interpreted to explain published experimental results. Approach. We use a realistic full body finite element volume conductor model to calculate the EF of a 2.5 mA direct current for three different electrode configurations. We apply the calculated electric field to realistic motoneuron models to investigate static changes in membrane resting potential. The results are combined with existing knowledge about the theoretical effect on a neuronal level and implemented into an existing lumbar spinal network model to simulate the resulting changes on a network level. Main results. Across electrode configurations, the maximum EF inside the spinal cord ranged from 0.47 V m‑1 to 0.82 V m‑1. Axon terminal polarization was identified to be the dominant cellular target. Also, differences in electrode placement have a large influence on axon terminal polarization. Comparison between the simulated acute effects and the electrophysiological long-term changes observed in human tsDCS studies suggest an inverse relationship between the two. Significance. We provide methods and knowledge for better understanding the effects of tsDCS and serve as a basis for a more targeted and optimized application of tsDCS.

  4. Diffusion tensor imaging of dolphin brains reveals direct auditory pathway to temporal lobe

    PubMed Central

    Berns, Gregory S.; Cook, Peter F.; Foxley, Sean; Jbabdi, Saad; Miller, Karla L.; Marino, Lori

    2015-01-01

    The brains of odontocetes (toothed whales) look grossly different from their terrestrial relatives. Because of their adaptation to the aquatic environment and their reliance on echolocation, the odontocetes' auditory system is both unique and crucial to their survival. Yet, scant data exist about the functional organization of the cetacean auditory system. A predominant hypothesis is that the primary auditory cortex lies in the suprasylvian gyrus along the vertex of the hemispheres, with this position induced by expansion of ‘associative′ regions in lateral and caudal directions. However, the precise location of the auditory cortex and its connections are still unknown. Here, we used a novel diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) sequence in archival post-mortem brains of a common dolphin (Delphinus delphis) and a pantropical dolphin (Stenella attenuata) to map their sensory and motor systems. Using thalamic parcellation based on traditionally defined regions for the primary visual (V1) and auditory cortex (A1), we found distinct regions of the thalamus connected to V1 and A1. But in addition to suprasylvian-A1, we report here, for the first time, the auditory cortex also exists in the temporal lobe, in a region near cetacean-A2 and possibly analogous to the primary auditory cortex in related terrestrial mammals (Artiodactyla). Using probabilistic tract tracing, we found a direct pathway from the inferior colliculus to the medial geniculate nucleus to the temporal lobe near the sylvian fissure. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of post-mortem DTI in archival specimens to answer basic questions in comparative neurobiology in a way that has not previously been possible and shows a link between the cetacean auditory system and those of terrestrial mammals. Given that fresh cetacean specimens are relatively rare, the ability to measure connectivity in archival specimens opens up a plethora of possibilities for investigating neuroanatomy in cetaceans and other species

  5. Unraveling the microscopic pathway of homogeneous water crystallization at supercooled conditions from direct simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martelli, Fausto; Palmer, Jeremy; Singh, Rakesh; Debenedetti, Pablo; Car, Roberto

    By means of unbiased classical molecular dynamics simulations, we identify the microscopic pathways of spontaneous homogeneous crystallization in supercooled ST2 water. By introducing a new order parameter, we are able to monitor formation/disruption of locally ordered regions characterized by small ice clusters with intermediate range order. When two of these regions are close each other, they percolate and form a larger ordered region. The process is slow enough to allow for polymorphic selection in favor of cubic ice (Ic). The formation of an ice nucleus requires percolation of many small clusters so that the transformations at the interface of the nucleus do not involve its core, thus guaranteeing the stability of the nucleus. The growth of the crystalline nucleus is fast and involves direct transformation of interfacial liquid molecules as well as percolation of small Ic/Ih clusters. The growth is too fast to allow conversion of Ih into Ic sites, originating the formation of a stacking fault in the final crystal. We recognize Euclidean structures in the oxygen configuration of the second shell in Ic and Ih clusters. This new point of view allows us to explain the source of the ordered stacking fault geometry.

  6. Developmental pathway for potent V1V2-directed HIV-neutralizing antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; Schramm, Chaim A.; Gorman, Jason; Moore, Penny L.; Bhiman, Jinal N.; DeKosky, Brandon J.; Ernandes, Michael J.; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Kim, Helen J.; Pancera, Marie; Staupe, Ryan P.; Altae-Tran, Han R.; Bailer, Robert T.; Crooks, Ema T.; Cupo, Albert; Druz, Aliaksandr; Garrett, Nigel J.; Hoi, Kam H.; Kong, Rui; Louder, Mark K.; Longo, Nancy S.; McKee, Krisha; Nonyane, Molati; O’Dell, Sijy; Roark, Ryan S.; Rudicell, Rebecca S.; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Sheward, Daniel J.; Soto, Cinque; Wibmer, Constantinos Kurt; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Zhenhai; Mullikin, James C.; Binley, James M.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Wilson, Ian A.; Moore, John P.; Ward, Andrew B.; Georgiou, George; Williamson, Carolyn; Abdool Karim, Salim S.; Morris, Lynn; Kwong, Peter D.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Mascola, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Antibodies capable of neutralizing HIV-1 often target variable regions 1 and 2 (V1V2) of the HIV-1 envelope, but the mechanism of their elicitation has been unclear. Here we define the developmental pathway by which such antibodies are generated and acquire the requisite molecular characteristics for neutralization. Twelve somatically related neutralizing antibodies (CAP256-VRC26.01-12) were isolated from CAPRISA-donor CAP256; each antibody contained the protruding tyrosine-sulfated, anionic antigen-binding loop (CDR H3) characteristic of this category of antibodies. Their unmutated ancestor emerged between weeks 30–38 post-infection with a 35-residue CDR H3, and neutralized the virus that superinfected this individual 15 weeks after initial infection. Improved neutralization breadth occurred by week 59 with modest affinity maturation, and was preceded by extensive diversification of the virus population. HIV-1 V1V2-directed neutralizing antibodies can thus develop relatively rapidly through initial selection of B cells with a long CDR H3, and limited subsequent somatic hypermutation, an important vaccine insight. PMID:24590074

  7. Anticoagulation beyond direct thrombin and factor Xa inhibitors: indications for targeting the intrinsic pathway?

    PubMed

    van Montfoort, Maurits L; Meijers, Joost C M

    2013-08-01

    Antithrombotic drugs like vitamin K antagonists and heparin have been the gold standard for the treatment and prevention of thromboembolic disease for many years. Unfortunately, there are several disadvantages of these antithrombotic drugs: they are accompanied by serious bleeding problems, it is necessary to monitor the therapeutic window, and there are various interactions with food and other drugs. This has led to the development of new oral anticoagulants, specifically inhibiting either thrombin or factor Xa. In terms of effectiveness, these drugs are comparable to the currently available anticoagulants; however, they are still associated with issues such as bleeding, reversal of the drug and complicated laboratory monitoring. Vitamin K antagonists, heparin, direct thrombin and factor Xa inhibitors have in common that they target key proteins of the haemostatic system. In an attempt to overcome these difficulties we investigated whether the intrinsic coagulation factors (VIII, IX, XI, XII, prekallikrein and high-molecular-weight kininogen) are superior targets for anticoagulation. We analysed epidemiological data concerning thrombosis and bleeding in patients deficient in one of the intrinsic pathway proteins. Furthermore, we discuss several thrombotic models in intrinsic coagulation factor-deficient animals. The combined results suggest that intrinsic coagulation factors could be suitable targets for anticoagulant drugs.

  8. Direct regulation of the Nrarp gene promoter by the Notch signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Pirot, Pierre; van Grunsven, Leo A; Marine, Jean-Christophe; Huylebroeck, Danny; Bellefroid, Eric J

    2004-09-17

    Nrarp encodes for an evolutionarily conserved small ankyrin repeat-containing protein that functions as a negative regulator of Notch signaling. Interestingly, increased Nrarp transcription was observed following induction of Notch signaling, suggesting the existence of a negative feedback loop. We show here that both mouse and human promoter regions of Nrarp share two conserved regions located approximately 2 and approximately 3 kb upstream of the transcription start site each containing a perfect putative binding site for the Notch-dependent transcription factor Su(H). A 4.4 kb genomic fragment of the mouse Nrarp locus containing those conserved regions and fused to a luciferase reporter gene showed basal promoter activity in 293T cells and this activity was strongly increased by the intracellular domain of Notch, NICD. NICD-dependent stimulation was attenuated by a dominant negative mutant of Su(H), Su(H)DBM, and was not observed in Su(H)-deficient cells (OT-11). Promoter bashing and gel shift assays revealed that the most distal putative Su(H) binding site located within the -3 kb conserved element plays a crucial role in this induction. Collectively, these results provide definitive support for direct regulation of the Nrarp gene by the Notch pathway.

  9. Brg1 governs distinct pathways to direct multiple aspects of mammalian neural crest cell development.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Xiong, Yiqin; Shang, Ching; Twu, Karen Y; Hang, Calvin T; Yang, Jin; Han, Pei; Lin, Chieh-Yu; Lin, Chien-Jung; Tsai, Feng-Chiao; Stankunas, Kryn; Meyer, Tobias; Bernstein, Daniel; Pan, Minggui; Chang, Ching-Pin

    2013-01-29

    Development of the cerebral vessels, pharyngeal arch arteries (PAAs). and cardiac outflow tract (OFT) requires multipotent neural crest cells (NCCs) that migrate from the neural tube to target tissue destinations. Little is known about how mammalian NCC development is orchestrated by gene programming at the chromatin level, however. Here we show that Brahma-related gene 1 (Brg1), an ATPase subunit of the Brg1/Brahma-associated factor (BAF) chromatin-remodeling complex, is required in NCCs to direct cardiovascular development. Mouse embryos lacking Brg1 in NCCs display immature cerebral vessels, aberrant PAA patterning, and shortened OFT. Brg1 suppresses an apoptosis factor, Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (Ask1), and a cell cycle inhibitor, p21(cip1), to inhibit apoptosis and promote proliferation of NCCs, thereby maintaining a multipotent cell reservoir at the neural crest. Brg1 also supports Myosin heavy chain 11 (Myh11) expression to allow NCCs to develop into mature vascular smooth muscle cells of cerebral vessels. Within NCCs, Brg1 partners with chromatin remodeler Chromodomain-helicase-DNA-binding protein 7 (Chd7) on the PlexinA2 promoter to activate PlexinA2, which encodes a receptor for semaphorin to guide NCCs into the OFT. Our findings reveal an important role for Brg1 and its downstream pathways in the survival, differentiation, and migration of the multipotent NCCs critical for mammalian cardiovascular development.

  10. Developmental pathway for potent V1V2-directed HIV-neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Doria-Rose, Nicole A; Schramm, Chaim A; Gorman, Jason; Moore, Penny L; Bhiman, Jinal N; DeKosky, Brandon J; Ernandes, Michael J; Georgiev, Ivelin S; Kim, Helen J; Pancera, Marie; Staupe, Ryan P; Altae-Tran, Han R; Bailer, Robert T; Crooks, Ema T; Cupo, Albert; Druz, Aliaksandr; Garrett, Nigel J; Hoi, Kam H; Kong, Rui; Louder, Mark K; Longo, Nancy S; McKee, Krisha; Nonyane, Molati; O'Dell, Sijy; Roark, Ryan S; Rudicell, Rebecca S; Schmidt, Stephen D; Sheward, Daniel J; Soto, Cinque; Wibmer, Constantinos Kurt; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Zhenhai; Mullikin, James C; Binley, James M; Sanders, Rogier W; Wilson, Ian A; Moore, John P; Ward, Andrew B; Georgiou, George; Williamson, Carolyn; Abdool Karim, Salim S; Morris, Lynn; Kwong, Peter D; Shapiro, Lawrence; Mascola, John R

    2014-05-01

    Antibodies capable of neutralizing HIV-1 often target variable regions 1 and 2 (V1V2) of the HIV-1 envelope, but the mechanism of their elicitation has been unclear. Here we define the developmental pathway by which such antibodies are generated and acquire the requisite molecular characteristics for neutralization. Twelve somatically related neutralizing antibodies (CAP256-VRC26.01-12) were isolated from donor CAP256 (from the Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in South Africa (CAPRISA)); each antibody contained the protruding tyrosine-sulphated, anionic antigen-binding loop (complementarity-determining region (CDR) H3) characteristic of this category of antibodies. Their unmutated ancestor emerged between weeks 30-38 post-infection with a 35-residue CDR H3, and neutralized the virus that superinfected this individual 15 weeks after initial infection. Improved neutralization breadth and potency occurred by week 59 with modest affinity maturation, and was preceded by extensive diversification of the virus population. HIV-1 V1V2-directed neutralizing antibodies can thus develop relatively rapidly through initial selection of B cells with a long CDR H3, and limited subsequent somatic hypermutation. These data provide important insights relevant to HIV-1 vaccine development.

  11. Finite Element Method Simulation of the Field Distribution for AFM Tip-Enhanced Surface- Enhanced Raman Scanning Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Micic, Miodrag; Klymyshyn, Nicholas A.; Suh, Yung D.; Lu, H. Peter

    2003-02-20

    We simulate field enhancement distributions encountered in atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip-induced surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) experiments (AFM_SERS) by using the frequency-domain three-dimensional finite element method simulation (FEM) to solve Maxwell?s equations of electric field distributions. This paper reports on a numerical simulation of an electromagnetic field enhancement in the vicinity of a metallic atomic force microscopy 9AFM) tip positioned in a close proximity to metallic nanoparticles. We simulated the experimental configurations of involving an AFM metallic tip, one or two silver nanoparticles, and a laser beam of various incident angles under different geometric arrangements. Maximum electric field enhancement is discussed in terms of the relative position of the tip and nanoparticles, as well as the direction of excitation laser propagation. Our results suggest new approaches for using the AFM-SERS tip enhanced near-field imaging samples on surfaces.

  12. Detection of Pathogens Using AFM and SPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaseashta, Ashok

    2005-03-01

    A priori detection of pathogens in food and water has become a subject of paramount importance. Several recent incidents have resulted in the government passing stringent regulations for tolerable amounts of contamination of food products. Identification and/or monitoring of bacterial contamination in food are critical. The conventional methods of pathogen detection require time-consuming steps to arrive disembark at meaningful measurement in a timely manner as the detection time exceeds the time in which perishable food recycles through the food chain distribution. The aim of this presentation is to outline surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) as two methods for fast detect6ion of pathogens. Theoretical basis of SPR and experimental results of SPR and AFM on E. coli O157:H7 and prion are presented.

  13. AFM Nanotools for Surgery of Biological Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beard, J. D.; Gordeev, S. N.; Guy, R. H.

    2011-03-01

    Using a method of electron-beam induced deposition, we have been able to fabricate specialized AFM probes with application as "nanotools" for the manipulation of biological structures ("nanosurgery"). We describe several such tools, including a "nanoscalpel", "nanoneedles" for probing intracellular structures, and a "nanotome" which can separate surface layers from a biological structure. These applications are demonstrated by performing nanomanipulation on corneocyte cells from the outer layer of human skin.

  14. Characterizing Cell Mechanics with AFM and Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, N.; Micoulet, A.; Suresh, S.; Spatz, J. P.

    2007-03-01

    Cell mechanical properties and functionality are mainly determined by the cytoskeleton, besides the cell membrane, the nucleus and the cytosol, and depend on various parameters e.g. surface chemistry and rigidity, surface area and time available for cell spreading, nutrients and drugs provided in the culture medium. Human epithelial pancreatic and mammary cancer cells and their keratin intermediate filaments are the main focus of our work. We use Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to study cells adhering to substrates and Microfluidic Channels to probe cells in suspension, respectively. Local and global properties are extracted by varying AFM probe tip size and the available adhesion area for cells. Depth-sensing, instrumented indentation tests with AFM show a clear difference in contact stiffness for cells that are spread of controlled substrates and those that are loosely attached. Microfluidic Channels are utilized in parallel to evaluate cell deformation and ``flow resistance'', which are dependent on channel cross section, flow rate, cell nucleus size and the mechanical properties of cytoskeleton and membrane. The results from the study are used to provide some broad and quantitative assessments of the connections between cellular/subcellular mechanics and biochemical origins of disease states.

  15. Vibration signature analysis of AFM images

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, G.A.; Fu, J.; Pandit, S.M.

    1995-12-31

    Vibration signature analysis has been commonly used for the machine condition monitoring and the control of errors. However, it has been rarely employed for the analysis of the precision instruments such as an atomic force microscope (AFM). In this work, an AFM was used to collect vibration data from a sample positioning stage under different suspension and support conditions. Certain structural characteristics of the sample positioning stage show up as a result of the vibration signature analysis of the surface height images measured using an AFM. It is important to understand these vibration characteristics in order to reduce vibrational uncertainty, improve the damping and structural design, and to eliminate the imaging imperfections. The choice of method applied for vibration analysis may affect the results. Two methods, the data dependent systems (DDS) analysis and the Welch`s periodogram averaging method were investigated for application to this problem. Both techniques provide smooth spectrum plots from the data. Welch`s periodogram provides a coarse resolution as limited by the number of samples and requires a choice of window to be decided subjectively by the user. The DDS analysis provides sharper spectral peaks at a much higher resolution and a much lower noise floor. A decomposition of the signal variance in terms of the frequencies is provided as well. The technique is based on an objective model adequacy criterion.

  16. Nanomechanics of Yeast Surfaces Revealed by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dague, Etienne; Beaussart, Audrey; Alsteens, David

    Despite the large and well-documented characterization of the microbial cell wall in terms of chemical composition, the determination of the mechanical properties of surface molecules in relation to their function remains a key challenge in cell biology.The emergence of powerful tools allowing molecular manipulations has already revolutionized our understanding of the surface properties of fungal cells. At the frontier between nanophysics and molecular biology, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and more specifically single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS), has strongly contributed to our current knowledge of the cell wall organization and nanomechanical properties. However, due to the complexity of the technique, measurements on live cells are still at their infancy.In this chapter, we describe the cell wall composition and recapitulate the principles of AFM as well as the main current methodologies used to perform AFM measurements on live cells, including sample immobilization and tip functionalization.The current status of the progress in probing nanomechanics of the yeast surface is illustrated through three recent breakthrough studies. Determination of the cell wall nanostructure and elasticity is presented through two examples: the mechanical response of mannoproteins from brewing yeasts and elasticity measurements on lacking polysaccharide mutant strains. Additionally, an elegant study on force-induced unfolding and clustering of adhesion proteins located at the cell surface is also presented.

  17. Mounting of molded AFM probes by soldering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hantschel, Thomas; Pape, Uwe; Slesazeck, Stefan; Niedermann, Philippe; Vandervorst, Wilfried

    2000-08-01

    Electrical probes consisting of cantilever beams with integrated pyramidal metal or diamond tips have to be mounted to small holder chips before they can be used in electrical atomic force microscopy (AFM). Gluing procedures have been developed for this step but such a connection suffers mainly from low electrical conductivity and often also from low mechanical stability. Furthermore, it is not very suitable for massfabrication. Soldering is a well-established mounting method in microelectronics (e.g. surface mounted devices (SMD)) and could overcome these problems. Therefore, we have developed a soldering procedure for moulded AFM probes. This paper presents the optimized soldering procedure and demonstartes its use for probe mounting. Excellent results were obtained using a metallization system of Ti:W+Ni+Au and a SnBi58 solder paste in combination with a hotplate for the soldering step. The soldered probes are highly conductive and the mechanical connection between probe and holder chip is very rigid. They show clear resonance peaks in tapping mode AFM which we could not obtain with our glued probes before.

  18. HbzF catalyzes direct hydrolysis of maleylpyruvate in the gentisate pathway of Pseudomonas alcaligenes NCIMB 9867.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kun; Liu, Ting-Ting; Zhou, Ning-Yi

    2013-02-01

    HbzF from Pseudomonas alcaligenes NCIMB 9867 was purified to homogeneity as a His-tagged protein and likely a dimer by SDS-PAGE and gel filtration. This protein was demonstrated to be a novel maleylpyruvate hydrolase, catalyzing direct hydrolysis of maleylpyruvate to maleate and pyruvate, and belongs to the fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase superfamily. This study reveals the genetic determinate for the direct maleylpyruvate hydrolysis in the gentisate pathway, complementary to the well-studied maleylpyruvate isomerization route.

  19. Key Modulatory Role of Presynaptic Adenosine A2A Receptors in Cortical Neurotransmission to the Striatal Direct Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Quiroz, César; Luján, Rafael; Uchigashima, Motokazu; Simoes, Ana Patrícia; Lerner, Talia N.; Borycz, Janusz; Kachroo, Anil; Canas, Paula M.; Orru, Marco; Schwarzschild, Michael A.; Rosin, Diane L.; Kreitzer, Anatol C.; Cunha, Rodrigo A.; Watanabe, Masahiko; Ferré, Sergi

    2010-01-01

    Basal ganglia processing results from a balanced activation of direct and indirect striatal efferent pathways, which are controlled by dopamine D1 and D2 receptors, respectively. Adenosine A2A receptors are considered novel anti-parkinsonian targets, based on their selective postsynaptic localization in the indirect pathway, where they modulate D2 receptor function. The present study provides evidence for the existence of an additional functionally significant segregation of A2A receptors at the presynaptic level. Using integrated anatomical, electrophysiological and biochemical approaches, we demonstrate that presynaptic A2A receptors are preferentially localized in cortical glutamatergic terminals that contact striatal neurons of the direct pathway, where they exert a selective modulation of cortico-striatal neurotransmission. Presynaptic striatal A2A receptors could provide a new target for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:19936569

  20. Key modulatory role of presynaptic adenosine A2A receptors in cortical neurotransmission to the striatal direct pathway.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, César; Luján, Rafael; Uchigashima, Motokazu; Simoes, Ana Patrícia; Lerner, Talia N; Borycz, Janusz; Kachroo, Anil; Canas, Paula M; Orru, Marco; Schwarzschild, Michael A; Rosin, Diane L; Kreitzer, Anatol C; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Watanabe, Masahiko; Ferré, Sergi

    2009-11-18

    Basal ganglia processing results from a balanced activation of direct and indirect striatal efferent pathways, which are controlled by dopamine D1 and D2 receptors, respectively. Adenosine A2A receptors are considered novel antiparkinsonian targets, based on their selective postsynaptic localization in the indirect pathway, where they modulate D2 receptor function. The present study provides evidence for the existence of an additional, functionally significant, segregation of A2A receptors at the presynaptic level. Using integrated anatomical, electrophysiological, and biochemical approaches, we demonstrate that presynaptic A2A receptors are preferentially localized in cortical glutamatergic terminals that contact striatal neurons of the direct pathway, where they exert a selective modulation of corticostriatal neurotransmission. Presynaptic striatal A2A receptors could provide a new target for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  1. Nanoscale thermal AFM of polymers: transient heat flow effects.

    PubMed

    Duvigneau, Joost; Schönherr, Holger; Vancso, G Julius

    2010-11-23

    Thermal transport around the nanoscale contact area between the heated atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe tip and the specimen under investigation is a central issue in scanning thermal microscopy (SThM). Polarized light microscopy and AFM imaging of the temperature-induced crystallization of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) films in the region near the tip were used in this study to unveil the lateral heat transport. The radius of the observed lateral surface isotherm at 133 °C ranged from 2.2 ± 0.5 to 18.7 ± 0.5 μm for tip-polymer interface temperatures between 200 and 300 °C with contact times varying from 20 to 120 s, respectively. In addition, the heat transport into polymer films was assessed by measurements of the thermal expansion of poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) films with variable thickness on silicon supports. Our data showed that heat transport in the specimen normal (z) direction occurred to depths exceeding 1000 μm using representative non-steady-state SThM conditions (i.e., heating from 40 to 180 °C at a rate of 10 °C s(-1)). On the basis of the experimental results, a 1D steady-state model for heat transport was developed, which shows the temperature profile close to the tip-polymer contact. The model also indicates that ≤1% of the total power generated in the heater area, which is embedded in the cantilever end, is transported into the polymer through the tip-polymer contact interface. Our results complement recent efforts in the evaluation and improvement of existing theoretical models for thermal AFM, as well as advance further developments of SThM for nanoscale thermal materials characterization and/or manipulation via scanning thermal lithography (SThL).

  2. Developmental Pathways to Conduct Disorder: Implications for Future Directions in Research, Assessment, and Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frick, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    Research has indicated that there are several common pathways through which children and adolescents develop conduct disorder, each with different risk factors and each with different underlying developmental mechanisms leading to the child's aggressive and antisocial behavior. The current article briefly summarizes research on these pathways,…

  3. Work Stressors, Social Support, and Burnout in Junior Doctors: Exploring Direct and Indirect Pathways

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sochos, Antigonos; Bowers, Alexis; Kinman, Gail

    2012-01-01

    The study tested a pathway model linking different occupational stressors, different sources of social support, and burnout. A sample of 184 junior medical doctors was used. Pathway analysis suggested that doctors who experienced increased time demands, organizational constraints, and a lack of personal confidence perceived their consultants as…

  4. Work Stressors, Social Support, and Burnout in Junior Doctors: Exploring Direct and Indirect Pathways

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sochos, Antigonos; Bowers, Alexis; Kinman, Gail

    2012-01-01

    The study tested a pathway model linking different occupational stressors, different sources of social support, and burnout. A sample of 184 junior medical doctors was used. Pathway analysis suggested that doctors who experienced increased time demands, organizational constraints, and a lack of personal confidence perceived their consultants as…

  5. Education Direct: An Alternative Entry Pathway to Pre-Service Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilkington, Kevin; Lock, Graeme

    2012-01-01

    Universities in Australia are offering alternative entrance pathways to attract students from a range of backgrounds. These alternative pathways will undoubtedly be reviewed due to the recommendation in the Review of Australian Higher Education (Bradley, Noonan, Nugent & Scales, 2008) concerning increasing the diversity of university entrants.…

  6. Developmental Pathways to Conduct Disorder: Implications for Future Directions in Research, Assessment, and Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frick, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    Research has indicated that there are several common pathways through which children and adolescents develop conduct disorder, each with different risk factors and each with different underlying developmental mechanisms leading to the child's aggressive and antisocial behavior. The current article briefly summarizes research on these pathways,…

  7. Fluoxetine potentiation of methylphenidate-induced neuropeptide expression in the striatum occurs selectively in direct pathway (striatonigral) neurons

    PubMed Central

    Van Waes, Vincent; Carr, Betsy; Beverley, Joel A.; Steiner, Heinz

    2012-01-01

    Concomitant therapies combining psychostimulants such as methylphenidate and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are used to treat several mental disorders, including attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder/depression comorbidity. The neurobiological consequences of these drug combinations are poorly understood. Methylphenidate alone induces gene regulation that mimics partly effects of cocaine, consistent with some addiction liability. We previously showed that the SSRI fluoxetine potentiates methylphenidate-induced gene regulation in the striatum. The present study investigated which striatal output pathways are affected by the methylphenidate + fluoxetine combination, by assessing effects on pathway-specific neuropeptide markers. Results demonstrate that fluoxetine (5 mg/kg) potentiates methylphenidate (5 mg/kg)-induced expression of substance P and dynorphin, markers for direct pathway neurons. In contrast, no drug effects on the indirect pathway marker enkephalin were found. Because methylphenidate alone has minimal effects on dynorphin, the potentiation of dynorphin induction represents a more cocaine-like effect for the drug combination. On the other hand, the lack of an effect on enkephalin suggests a greater selectivity for the direct pathway compared with psychostimulants such as cocaine. Overall, the fluoxetine potentiation of gene regulation by methylphenidate occurs preferentially in sensorimotor striatal circuits, similar to other addictive psychostimulants. These results suggest that SSRIs may enhance the addiction liability of methylphenidate. PMID:22738672

  8. Homology-directed repair of DNA nicks via pathways distinct from canonical double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Davis, Luther; Maizels, Nancy

    2014-03-11

    DNA nicks are the most common form of DNA damage, and if unrepaired can give rise to genomic instability. In human cells, nicks are efficiently repaired via the single-strand break repair pathway, but relatively little is known about the fate of nicks not processed by that pathway. Here we show that homology-directed repair (HDR) at nicks occurs via a mechanism distinct from HDR at double-strand breaks (DSBs). HDR at nicks, but not DSBs, is associated with transcription and is eightfold more efficient at a nick on the transcribed strand than at a nick on the nontranscribed strand. HDR at nicks can proceed by a pathway dependent upon canonical HDR factors RAD51 and BRCA2; or by an efficient alternative pathway that uses either ssDNA or nicked dsDNA donors and that is strongly inhibited by RAD51 and BRCA2. Nicks generated by either I-AniI or the CRISPR/Cas9(D10A) nickase are repaired by the alternative HDR pathway with little accompanying mutagenic end-joining, so this pathway may be usefully applied to genome engineering. These results suggest that alternative HDR at nicks may be stimulated in physiological contexts in which canonical RAD51/BRCA2-dependent HDR is compromised or down-regulated, which occurs frequently in tumors.

  9. Homology-directed repair of DNA nicks via pathways distinct from canonical double-strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Luther; Maizels, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    DNA nicks are the most common form of DNA damage, and if unrepaired can give rise to genomic instability. In human cells, nicks are efficiently repaired via the single-strand break repair pathway, but relatively little is known about the fate of nicks not processed by that pathway. Here we show that homology-directed repair (HDR) at nicks occurs via a mechanism distinct from HDR at double-strand breaks (DSBs). HDR at nicks, but not DSBs, is associated with transcription and is eightfold more efficient at a nick on the transcribed strand than at a nick on the nontranscribed strand. HDR at nicks can proceed by a pathway dependent upon canonical HDR factors RAD51 and BRCA2; or by an efficient alternative pathway that uses either ssDNA or nicked dsDNA donors and that is strongly inhibited by RAD51 and BRCA2. Nicks generated by either I-AniI or the CRISPR/Cas9D10A nickase are repaired by the alternative HDR pathway with little accompanying mutagenic end-joining, so this pathway may be usefully applied to genome engineering. These results suggest that alternative HDR at nicks may be stimulated in physiological contexts in which canonical RAD51/BRCA2-dependent HDR is compromised or down-regulated, which occurs frequently in tumors. PMID:24556991

  10. A wide-range metrology AFM and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Haijun; Zhang, Dongxian

    2005-02-01

    In view of the fact that the application field of a dual tunneling-unit scanning tunneling microscope (DTU-STM) was strongly limited by sample conductivity, a dual imaging unit atomic force microscope (DIU-AFM) was developed for wide-range nano-metrology. A periodic grating is employed as a reference sample. The DIU-AFM simultaneously scans the grating and a test sample by using one single XY scanner. Their images thus have the same lateral size, and the length of the test sample image can be precisely measured by counting the number of periodic features of the reference grating. We further developed a new method of implementing wide-range nano-metrology. By alternatively moving the XY scanner in the X direction using a step motor, a series of pairs of images are obtained and can be spliced into two wide-range reference and test ones, respectively. Again, the two spliced images are of the same size, and the length of test image can be measured based on the reference grating features. In this way, wide-range metrology with nanometer order accuracy is successfully realized.

  11. Redesign, reconstruction, and directed extension of the Brevibacterium linens C40 carotenoid pathway in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se Hyeuk; Park, Yun Hee; Schmidt-Dannert, Claudia; Lee, Pyung Cheon

    2010-08-01

    In this study, the carotenoid biosynthetic pathways of Brevibacterium linens DSMZ 20426 were reconstructed, redesigned, and extended with additional carotenoid-modifying enzymes of other sources in a heterologous host Escherichia coli. The modular lycopene pathway synthesized an unexpected carotenoid structure, 3,4-didehydrolycopene, as well as lycopene. Extension of the novel 3,4-didehydrolycopene pathway with the mutant Pantoea lycopene cyclase CrtY(2) and the Rhodobacter spheroidene monooxygenase CrtA generated monocyclic torulene and acyclic oxocarotenoids, respectively. The reconstructed beta-carotene pathway synthesized an unexpected 7,8-dihydro-beta-carotene in addition to beta-carotene. Extension of the beta-carotene pathway with the B. linens beta-ring desaturase CrtU and Pantoea beta-carotene hydroxylase CrtZ generated asymmetric carotenoid agelaxanthin A, which had one aromatic ring at the one end of carotene backbone and one hydroxyl group at the other end, as well as aromatic carotenoid isorenieratene and dihydroxy carotenoid zeaxanthin. These results demonstrate that reconstruction of the biosynthetic pathways and extension with promiscuous enzymes in a heterologous host holds promise as a rational strategy for generating structurally diverse compounds that are hardly accessible in nature.

  12. BOREAS AFM-6 Surface Meteorological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminsitration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) collected surface meteorological data from 21 May to 20 Sep 1994 near the Southern Study Area-Old Jack Pine (SSA-OJP) tower site. The data are in tabular ASCII files. The surface meteorological data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  13. Direct AFM observations of impurity effects on a lysozyme crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakada, Toshitaka; Sazaki, Gen; Miyashita, Satoru; Durbin, Stephen D.; Komatsu, Hiroshi

    1999-01-01

    Impurity effects on the growth of tetragonal lysozyme crystals have been studied using in situ atomic force microscopy. Commercially available hen egg white lysozyme was characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with silver staining, and purified by re-crystallization and successive high pressure liquid chromatography. On the (1 1 0) crystal surface, there was no significant difference in morphology between crystals grown in commercial and in purified solutions. On the (1 0 1) surface, however, a large number of small particles were found when the crystal was grown in the commercial solution, while the surface grown in the purified solution was quite smooth. Among the typical residual impurities contained in commercial lysozyme, only covalently bound lysozyme dimer yielded such particles. From measurements of particle separation and an estimate of the critical nucleation size, we infer that the particles reduced the step velocity according to the mechanism described by Cabrera et al. [N. Cabrera, D.A. Vermilyea, in: R.H. Doremus et al. (Eds.), Growth and Perfection of Crystals, 1958, P. 393].

  14. Cryogen-free low temperature STM/AFM based on a closed cycle cryostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Byoung; Ulrich, Stefen; Murdick, Ryan; RHK Technology, Inc. Team

    2015-03-01

    Closed cycle cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope (CCC-STM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) will be presented. By using He heat exchange gas, thermally linked and mechanically decoupled CCC-STM/AFM enables atomically resolved microscopy and spectroscopy on various surfaces. We will present the noise measurement of the tunneling current and the thermal drift analysis. Temperature as low as 14K on the sample and the tip-sample distance fluctuation as low as 2 picometer have been achieved from 9K cryostat after 8h of cooling time. Low thermal drift in a lateral direction (<0.1nm/hr) enables to get a scanning tunneling spectroscopy grid with more than 64x64 pixels which typically takes over 10 hrs. We will also present the high stability and reproducibility of the CCC-STM/AFM with the atom resolved imaging of Si, Pt, Au and KBr surfaces in STM and AFM mode. These results demonstrate that the developed CCC-STM/AFM is a versatile instrument enabling experiments on a variety of materials and surfaces at picometer resolution without using any liquid cryogen.

  15. AFM1 in Milk: Physical, Biological, and Prophylactic Methods to Mitigate Contamination

    PubMed Central

    Giovati, Laura; Magliani, Walter; Ciociola, Tecla; Santinoli, Claudia; Conti, Stefania; Polonelli, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Aflatoxins (AFs) are toxic, carcinogenic, immunosuppressive secondary metabolites produced by some Aspergillus species which colonize crops, including many dietary staple foods and feed components. AFB1 is the prevalent and most toxic among AFs. In the liver, it is biotransformed into AFM1, which is then excreted into the milk of lactating mammals, including dairy animals. AFM1 has been shown to be cause of both acute and chronic toxicoses. The presence of AFM1 in milk and dairy products represents a worldwide concern since even small amounts of this metabolite may be of importance as long-term exposure is concerned. Contamination of milk may be mitigated either directly, decreasing the AFM1 content in contaminated milk, or indirectly, decreasing AFB1 contamination in the feed of dairy animals. Current strategies for AFM1 mitigation include good agricultural practices in pre-harvest and post-harvest management of feed crops (including storage) and physical or chemical decontamination of feed and milk. However, no single strategy offers a complete solution to the issue. PMID:26512694

  16. A Multidisciplinary Self-Directed Learning Module Improves Knowledge of a Quality Improvement Instrument: The HEART Pathway.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Nicholas D; Harper, Erin N; Leppert, Lauren M; Browning, Brittany M; Askew, Kim; Manthey, David E; Mahler, Simon A

    2016-07-20

    We created and tested an educational intervention to support implementation of an institution wide QI project (the HEART Pathway) designed to improve care for patients with acute chest pain. Although online learning modules have been shown effective in imparting knowledge regarding QI projects, it is unknown whether these modules are effective across specialties and healthcare professions. Participants, including nurses, advanced practice clinicians, house staff and attending physicians (N = 486), were enrolled into an online, self-directed learning course exploring the key concepts of the HEART Pathway. The module was completed by 97% of enrollees (469/486) and 90% passed on the first attempt (422/469). Out of 469 learners, 323 completed the pretest, learning module and posttest in the correct order. Mean test scores across learners improved significantly from 74% to 89% from the pretest to the posttest. Following the intervention, the HEART Pathway was used for 88% of patients presenting to our institution with acute chest pain. Our data demonstrate that this online, self-directed learning module can improve knowledge of the HEART Pathway across specialties-paving the way for more efficient and informed care for acute chest pain patients.

  17. Directed random walks and constraint programming reveal active pathways in hepatocyte growth factor signaling.

    PubMed

    Kittas, Aristotelis; Delobelle, Aurélien; Schmitt, Sabrina; Breuhahn, Kai; Guziolowski, Carito; Grabe, Niels

    2016-01-01

    An effective means to analyze mRNA expression data is to take advantage of established knowledge from pathway databases, using methods such as pathway-enrichment analyses. However, pathway databases are not case-specific and expression data could be used to infer gene-regulation patterns in the context of specific pathways. In addition, canonical pathways may not always describe the signaling mechanisms properly, because interactions can frequently occur between genes in different pathways. Relatively few methods have been proposed to date for generating and analyzing such networks, preserving the causality between gene interactions and reasoning over the qualitative logic of regulatory effects. We present an algorithm (MCWalk) integrated with a logic programming approach, to discover subgraphs in large-scale signaling networks by random walks in a fully automated pipeline. As an exemplary application, we uncover the signal transduction mechanisms in a gene interaction network describing hepatocyte growth factor-stimulated cell migration and proliferation from gene-expression measured with microarray and RT-qPCR using in-house perturbation experiments in a keratinocyte-fibroblast co-culture. The resulting subgraphs illustrate possible associations of hepatocyte growth factor receptor c-Met nodes, differentially expressed genes and cellular states. Using perturbation experiments and Answer Set programming, we are able to select those which are more consistent with the experimental data. We discover key regulator nodes by measuring the frequency with which they are traversed when connecting signaling between receptors and significantly regulated genes and predict their expression-shift consistently with the measured data. The Java implementation of MCWalk is publicly available under the MIT license at: https://bitbucket.org/akittas/biosubg. © 2015 FEBS.

  18. KynR, a Lrp/AsnC-Type Transcriptional Regulator, Directly Controls the Kynurenine Pathway in Pseudomonas aeruginosa▿

    PubMed Central

    Knoten, Claire A.; Hudson, L. Lynn; Coleman, James P.; Farrow, John M.; Pesci, Everett C.

    2011-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa can utilize a variety of carbon sources and produces many secondary metabolites to help survive harsh environments. P. aeruginosa is part of a small group of bacteria that use the kynurenine pathway to catabolize tryptophan. Through the kynurenine pathway, tryptophan is broken down into anthranilate, which is further degraded into tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates or utilized to make numerous aromatic compounds, including the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS). We have previously shown that the kynurenine pathway is a critical source of anthranilate for PQS synthesis and that the kynurenine pathway genes (kynA and kynBU) are upregulated in the presence of kynurenine. A putative Lrp/AsnC-type transcriptional regulator (gene PA2082, here called kynR), is divergently transcribed from the kynBU operon and is highly conserved in Gram-negative bacteria that harbor the kynurenine pathway. We show that a mutation in kynR renders P. aeruginosa unable to utilize l-tryptophan as a sole carbon source and decreases PQS production. In addition, we found that the increase of kynA and kynB transcriptional activity in response to kynurenine was completely abolished in a kynR mutant, further indicating that KynR mediates the kynurenine-dependent expression of the kynurenine pathway genes. Finally, we found that purified KynR specifically bound the kynA promoter in the presence of kynurenine and bound the kynB promoter in the absence or presence of kynurenine. Taken together, our data show that KynR directly regulates the kynurenine pathway genes. PMID:21965577

  19. KynR, a Lrp/AsnC-type transcriptional regulator, directly controls the kynurenine pathway in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Knoten, Claire A; Hudson, L Lynn; Coleman, James P; Farrow, John M; Pesci, Everett C

    2011-12-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa can utilize a variety of carbon sources and produces many secondary metabolites to help survive harsh environments. P. aeruginosa is part of a small group of bacteria that use the kynurenine pathway to catabolize tryptophan. Through the kynurenine pathway, tryptophan is broken down into anthranilate, which is further degraded into tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates or utilized to make numerous aromatic compounds, including the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS). We have previously shown that the kynurenine pathway is a critical source of anthranilate for PQS synthesis and that the kynurenine pathway genes (kynA and kynBU) are upregulated in the presence of kynurenine. A putative Lrp/AsnC-type transcriptional regulator (gene PA2082, here called kynR), is divergently transcribed from the kynBU operon and is highly conserved in gram-negative bacteria that harbor the kynurenine pathway. We show that a mutation in kynR renders P. aeruginosa unable to utilize L-tryptophan as a sole carbon source and decreases PQS production. In addition, we found that the increase of kynA and kynB transcriptional activity in response to kynurenine was completely abolished in a kynR mutant, further indicating that KynR mediates the kynurenine-dependent expression of the kynurenine pathway genes. Finally, we found that purified KynR specifically bound the kynA promoter in the presence of kynurenine and bound the kynB promoter in the absence or presence of kynurenine. Taken together, our data show that KynR directly regulates the kynurenine pathway genes.

  20. In situ nanomanipulators as a tool to separate individual tobermorite crystals for AFM studies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tianhe; Holzer, Lorenz; Kägi, Ralf; Winnefeld, Frank; Keller, Bruno

    2007-10-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies of cementitious materials are limited, mainly due to the lack of appropriate sample preparation techniques. In porous autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC), calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) is produced in its crystalline form, tobermorite. The crystals are lath-like with a length of several micrometers. In this work, we demonstrate the application of nanomanipulators to separate an individual tobermorite crystal from the bulk AAC for subsequent AFM investigations. The nanomanipulators are operated directly in an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM). We studied the interaction between moisture and the tobermorite surface under controlled relative humidity (RH). The results of topography and adhesion force measurements with AFM suggest that the surface of tobermorite is hydrophobic, which contrasts the macroscopic material properties (e.g. moisture transport in capillary pores).

  1. RDM16 and STA1 regulate differential usage of exon/intron in RNA directed DNA methylation pathway.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ravi Datta; Bogaerts, Bert; Goyal, Neha

    2017-04-20

    The splicing factors RDM16 and STA1 have been reported to play a role in the RNA directed DNA Methylation (RdDM) pathway. In this pathway, small interfering RNAs guide de-novo methylation of homologous DNA sequences. DNA methylation is epigenetic marks, which can suppress transposable elements, repeat sequences and genes. It also affects the chromatin structure. Upon deletion of RDM16 and STA1, previous studies based on gene level analysis were unable to find differentially spliced events implicated in RdDM pathway. In this study, RNA-seq data from RDM16 &STA1 mutants were analyzed. Differential expression analysis was performed at exon and intron level. This analysis revealed 3474 genes with potential differential expression events in the RDM16 mutant and 3058 in the STA1 mutant. We found 17 genes that have been reported to be involved in the RdDM pathway. These results suggest involvement of RDM16 and STA1 by influencing the expression of key gene components such as MORC6 in the RdDM pathway. Therefore, this study increases the understanding of the role of RDM16 and STA1 splicing factors in DNA methylation.

  2. Probing ternary solvent effect in high Voc polymer solar cells using advanced AFM techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chao; Soleman, Mikhael; Lorenzo, Josie; Dhasmana, Nitesh; Chantharasupawong, Panit; Ievlev, Anton; Gesquiere, Andre; Tetard, Laurene; Thomas, Jayan

    2016-01-25

    This work describes a simple method to develop a high Voc low band gap PSCs. In addition, two new atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoscale characterization techniques to study the surface morphology and physical properties of the structured active layer are introduced. With the help of ternary solvent processing of the active layer and C60 buffer layer, a bulk heterojunction PSC with Voc more than 0.9 V and conversion efficiency 7.5% is developed. In order to understand the fundamental properties of the materials ruling the performance of the PSCs tested, AFM-based nanoscale characterization techniques including Pulsed-Force-Mode AFM (PFM-AFM) and Mode-Synthesizing AFM (MSAFM) are introduced. Interestingly, MSAFM exhibits high sensitivity for direct visualization of the donor–acceptor phases in the active layer of the PSCs. Lastly, conductive-AFM (cAFM) studies reveal local variations in conductivity in the donor and acceptor phases as well as a significant increase in photocurrent in the PTB7:ICBA sample obtained with the ternary solvent processing.

  3. A direct pathway for the conversion of propionate into pyruvate in Moraxella lwoffi

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, B.; McGarry, J. D.

    1968-01-01

    ]propionate was chemically degraded. The C(1) of propionate was found only in C(1) of pyruvate. At least 86% of C(2) of pyruvate was derived from C(2) of propionate and at least 92% of C(3) of pyruvate from C(3) of propionate. 8. These results are incompatible with the operation of any of the previously described pathways for propionate metabolism except the direct one, perhaps via an activated acrylate. ImagesPLATE 2PLATE 1 PMID:4296055

  4. Diversity in Pathways to Parenthood: Patterns, Implications, and Emerging Research Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smock, Pamela J.; Greenland, Fiona Rose

    2010-01-01

    This review examines and synthesizes recent research on pathways to parenthood. We begin by providing basic information about patterns, differentials, and trends and discussing adoption and new reproductive technologies. We next turn to several areas of inquiry that became particularly prominent in the last decade: the continued "decoupling" of…

  5. Diversity in Pathways to Parenthood: Patterns, Implications, and Emerging Research Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smock, Pamela J.; Greenland, Fiona Rose

    2010-01-01

    This review examines and synthesizes recent research on pathways to parenthood. We begin by providing basic information about patterns, differentials, and trends and discussing adoption and new reproductive technologies. We next turn to several areas of inquiry that became particularly prominent in the last decade: the continued "decoupling" of…

  6. Starter unit specificity directs genome mining of polyketide synthase pathways in fungi

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Search of the protein database with the aflatoxin pathway polyketide synthase (PKS) revealed putative PKSs in the pathogenic fungi Coccidioides immitis and Coccidioides posadasii that could require partnerships with a pair of fatty acid synthase (FAS) subunits for the biosynthesis of fatty acid-poly...

  7. Directed evolution of a second xylitol catabolic pathway in Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Doten, R C; Mortlock, R P

    1984-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae PRL-R3 has inducible catabolic pathways for the degradation of ribitol and D-arabitol but cannot utilize xylitol as a growth substrate. A mutation in the rbtB regulatory gene of the ribitol operon permits the constitutive synthesis of the ribitol catabolic enzymes and allows growth on xylitol. The evolved xylitol catabolic pathway consists of an induced D-arabitol permease system that also transports xylitol, a constitutively synthesized ribitol dehydrogenase that oxidizes xylitol at the C-2 position to produce D-xylulose, and an induced D-xylulokinase from either the D-arabitol or D-xylose catabolic pathway. To investigate the potential of K. pneumoniae to evolve a different xylitol catabolic pathway, strains were constructed which were unable to synthesize ribitol dehydrogenase or either type of D-xylulokinase but constitutively synthesized the D-arabitol permease system. These strains had an inducible L-xylulokinase; therefore, the evolution of an enzyme which oxidized xylitol at the C-4 position to L-xylulose would establish a new xylitol catabolic pathway. Four independent xylitol-utilizing mutants were isolated, each of which had evolved a xylitol-4-dehydrogenase activity. The four dehydrogenases appeared to be identical because they comigrated during nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This novel xylitol dehydrogenase was constitutively synthesized, whereas L-xylulokinase remained inducible. Transductional analysis showed that the evolved dehydrogenase was not an altered ribitol or D-arabitol dehydrogenase and that the evolved dehydrogenase structural gene was not linked to the pentitol gene cluster. This evolved dehydrogenase had the highest activity with xylitol as a substrate, a Km for xylitol of 1.4 M, and a molecular weight of 43,000. Images PMID:6378891

  8. Direct demonstration of 25- and 50-microm arteriovenous pathways in healthy human and baboon lungs.

    PubMed

    Lovering, Andrew T; Stickland, Michael K; Kelso, Amy J; Eldridge, Marlowe W

    2007-04-01

    Postmortem microsphere studies in adult human lungs have demonstrated the existence of intrapulmonary arteriovenous pathways using nonphysiological conditions. The aim of the current study was to determine whether large diameter (>25 and 50 microm) intrapulmonary arteriovenous pathways are functional in human and baboon lungs under physiological perfusion and ventilation pressures. We used fresh healthy human donor lungs obtained for transplantation and fresh lungs from baboons (Papio c. anubis). Lungs were ventilated with room air by using a peak inflation pressure of 15 cm H(2)O and a positive end-expiratory pressure of 5 cm H(2)O. Lungs were perfused between 10 and 20 cm H(2)O by using a phosphate-buffered saline solution with 5% albumin. We infused a mixture of 25- and 50-microm microspheres (0.5 and 1 million total for baboons and human studies, respectively) into the pulmonary artery and collected the entire pulmonary venous outflow. Under these conditions, evidence of intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses was found in baboon (n = 3/4) and human (n = 4/6) lungs. In those lungs showing evidence of arteriovenous pathways, 50-microm microspheres were always able to traverse the pulmonary circulation, and the fraction of transpulmonary passage ranged from 0.0003 to 0.42%. These data show that intrapulmonary arteriovenous pathways >50 microm in diameter are functional under physiological ventilation and perfusion pressures in the isolated lung. These pathways provide an alternative conduit for pulmonary blood flow that likely bypasses the areas of gas exchange at the capillary-alveolar interface that could compromise both gas exchange and the ability of the lung to filter out microemboli.

  9. Device level 3D characterization using PeakForce AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timoney, Padraig; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Vaid, Alok; Hand, Sean; Osborne, Jason; Milligan, Eric; Feinstein, Adam

    2016-03-01

    Traditional metrology solutions face a range of challenges at the 1X node such as three dimensional (3D) measurement capabilities, shrinking overlay and critical dimension (CD) error budgets driven by multi-patterning and via in trench CD measurements. With advent of advanced technology nodes and 3D processing, an increasing need is emerging for in-die metrology including across-structure and structure-to-structure characterization. A myriad of work has emerged in the past few years intending to address these challenges from various aspects; in-die OCD with reduced spot size and tilt beam on traditional critical dimension scanning electron microscopy (CDSEM) for height measurements. This paper explores the latest capability offered by PeakForceTM Tapping Atomic Force Microscopy (PFT-AFM). The use of traditional harmonic tapping mode for scanning high aspect ratio, and complex "3D" wafer structures, results in limited depth probing capability as well as excessive tip wear. These limitations arise due to the large tip-sample interaction volume in such confined spaces. PeakForce Tapping eliminates these limitations through direct real time control of the tip-sample interaction contact force. The ability of PeakForce to measure, and respond directly to tip- sample interaction forces results in more detailed feature resolution, reduced tip wear, and improved depth capability. In this work, the PFT-AFM tool was applied for multiple applications, including the 14nm fin and replacement metal gate (RMG) applications outlined below. Results from DOE wafers, detailed measurement precision studies and correlation to reference metrology are presented for validation of this methodology. With the fin application, precision of 0.3nm is demonstrated by measuring 5 dies with 10 consecutive runs. Capability to resolve within-die and localized within-macro height variation is also demonstrated. Results obtained from the fin measurements support the increasing trend that measurements

  10. BOREAS AFM-04 Twin Otter Aircraft Sounding Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacPherson, J. Ian; Desjardins, Raymond L.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-4 team used the National Research Council, Canada (NRC) Twin Otter aircraft to make sounding measurements through the boundary layer. These measurements included concentrations of carbon dioxide and ozone, atmospheric pressure, dry bulb temperature, potential temperature, dewpoint temperature, calculated mixing ratio, and wind speed and direction. Aircraft position, heading, and altitude were also recorded. Data were collected at both the Northern Study Area (NSA) and the Southern Study Area (SSA) in 1994 and 1996. These data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The Twin Otter aircraft sounding data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files also are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  11. [AFM fishing of proteins under impulse electric field].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Yu D; Pleshakova, T O; Malsagova, K A; Kaysheva, A L; Kopylov, A T; Izotov, A A; Tatur, V Yu; Vesnin, S G; Ivanova, N D; Ziborov, V S; Archakov, A I

    2016-05-01

    A combination of (atomic force microscopy)-based fishing (AFM-fishing) and mass spectrometry allows to capture protein molecules from solutions, concentrate and visualize them on an atomically flat surface of the AFM chip and identify by subsequent mass spectrometric analysis. In order to increase the AFM-fishing efficiency we have applied pulsed voltage with the rise time of the front of about 1 ns to the AFM chip. The AFM-chip was made using a conductive material, highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The increased efficiency of AFM-fishing has been demonstrated using detection of cytochrome b5 protein. Selection of the stimulating pulse with a rise time of 1 ns, corresponding to the GHz frequency range, by the effect of intrinsic emission from water observed in this frequency range during water injection into the cell.

  12. The dual pathway inhibitor rigosertib is effective in direct-patient tumor xenografts of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Ryan T.; Keysar, Stephen B.; Bowles, Daniel W.; Glogowska, Magdalena J.; Astling, David P.; Morton, J. Jason; Le, Phuong; Umpierrez, Adrian; Eagles-Soukup, Justin; Gan, Gregory N.; Vogler, Brian W.; Sehrt, Daniel; Takimoto, Sarah M.; Aisner, Dara L.; Wilhelm, Francois; Frederick, Barbara A.; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Tan, Aik-Choon; Jimeno, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The dual pathway inhibitor rigosertib inhibits phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway activation as well as polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) activity across a broad spectrum of cancer cell lines. The importance of PIK3CA alterations in head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) has raised interest in exploring agents targeting PI3K, the product of PIK3CA. The genetic and molecular basis of rigosertib treatment response was investigated in a panel of 16 HNSCC cell lines, and direct patient tumor xenografts from 8 HNSCC patients (4 HPV16-positive). HNSCC cell lines and xenografts were characterized by pathway enrichment gene expression analysis, exon sequencing, gene copy number, western blotting, and IHC. Rigosertib had potent antiproliferative effects on 11 of the 16 HPV− HNSCC cell lines. Treatment sensitivity was confirmed in two cell lines using an orthotopic in vivo xenograft model. Growth reduction after rigosertib treatment was observed in 3/8 HNSCC direct patient tumor lines. The responsive tumor lines carried a combination of a PI3KCA activating event (amplification or mutation) and a p53 inactivating event (either HPV16-mediated or mutation-mediated TP53 inactivation). In this study, we evaluated the in vitro and in vivo efficacy of rigosertib in both HPV+ and HPV− HNSCCs focusing on inhibition of the PI3K pathway. Although consistent inhibition of the PI3K pathway was not evident in HNSCC, we identified a combination of PI3K/TP53 events necessary, but not sufficient for rigosertib-sensitivity. PMID:23873848

  13. Role of Direct vs. Indirect Pathways from the Motor Cortex to Spinal Motoneurons in the Control of Hand Dexterity

    PubMed Central

    Isa, Tadashi; Kinoshita, Masaharu; Nishimura, Yukio

    2013-01-01

    Evolutionally, development of the direct connection from the motor cortex to spinal motoneurons [corticomotoneuronal (CM) pathway] parallels the ability of hand dexterity. Damage to the corticofugal fibers in higher primates resulted in deficit of fractionated digit movements. Based on such observations, it was generally believed that the CM pathway plays a critical role in the control of hand dexterity. On the other hand, a number of “phylogenetically older” indirect pathways from the motor cortex to motoneurons still exist in primates. The indirect pathways are mediated by intercalated neurons such as segmental interneurons (sINs), propriospinal neurons (PNs) reticulospinal neurons (RSNs), or rubrospinal neurons (RuSNs). However, their contribution to hand dexterity remains elusive. Lesion of the brainstem pyramid sparing the transmission through the RuSNs and RSNs, resulted in permanent deficit of fractionated digit movements in macaque monkeys. On the other hand, in our recent study, after lesion of the dorsolateral funiculus (DLF) at the C5 segment, which removed the lateral corticospinal tract (l-CST) including the CM pathway and the transmission through sINs and RuSNs but spared the processing through the PNs and RSNs, fractionated digit movements recovered within several weeks. These results suggest that the PNs can be involved in the recovery of fractionated digit movements, but the RSNs and RuSNs have less capacity in this regard. However, on closer inspection, it was found that the activation pattern of hand and arm muscles considerably changed after the C5 lesion, suggesting limitation of PNs for the compensation of hand dexterity. Altogether, it is suggested that PNs, RSNs RuSNs, and the CM pathway (plus sINs) make a different contribution to the hand dexterity and appearance of motor deficit of the hand dexterity caused by damage to the corticofugal fibers and potential of recovery varies depending on the rostrocaudal level of the lesion. PMID

  14. A novel pathway of direct methane production and emission by eukaryotes including plants, animals and fungi: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiangong; Chen, Huai; Zhu, Qiuan; Shen, Yan; Wang, Xue; Wang, Meng; Peng, Changhui

    2015-08-01

    Methane (CH4) is a powerful greenhouse gas with a global warming potential 28 times that of carbon dioxide (CO2). CH4 is responsible for approximately 20% of the Earth's warming since pre-industrial times. Knowledge of the sources of CH4 is crucial due to the recent substantial interannual variability of growth rates and uncertainties regarding individual sources. The prevailing paradigm is that methanogenesis carried out by methanogenic archaea occurs primarily under strictly anaerobic conditions. However, in the past decade, studies have confirmed direct CH4 release from three important kingdoms of eukaryotes-Plantae, Animalia and Fungi-even in the presence of oxygen. This novel CH4 production pathway has been aptly termed "aerobic CH4 production" to distinguish it from the well-known anaerobic CH4 production pathway, which involves catalytic activity by methanogenic archaeal enzymes. In this review, we collated recent experimental evidence from the published literature and documented this novel pathway of direct CH4 production and emission by eukaryotes. The mechanisms involved in this pathway may be related to protective strategies of eukaryotes in response to changing environmental stresses, with CH4 a by-product or end-product during or at the end of the process(es) that originates from organic methyl-type compounds. Based on the existing, albeit uncertain estimates, plants seem to contribute less to the global CH4 budget (3-24%) compared to previous estimates (10-37%). We still lack estimates of CH4 emissions by animals and fungi. Overall, there is an urgent need to identify the precursors for this novel CH4 source and improve our understanding of the mechanisms of direct CH4 production and the impacts of environmental stresses. An estimate of this new CH4 source, which was not considered as a CH4 source by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) (2013), could be useful for better quantitation of the global CH4 budget.

  15. Identification of pathways directly regulated by SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE during vegetative and reproductive development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background MADS-domain transcription factors play important roles during plant development. The Arabidopsis MADS-box gene SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE (SVP) is a key regulator of two developmental phases. It functions as a repressor of the floral transition during the vegetative phase and later it contributes to the specification of floral meristems. How these distinct activities are conferred by a single transcription factor is unclear, but interactions with other MADS domain proteins which specify binding to different genomic regions is likely one mechanism. Results To compare the genome-wide DNA binding profile of SVP during vegetative and reproductive development we performed ChIP-seq analyses. These ChIP-seq data were combined with tiling array expression analysis, induction experiments and qRT-PCR to identify biologically relevant binding sites. In addition, we compared genome-wide target genes of SVP with those published for the MADS domain transcription factors FLC and AP1, which interact with SVP during the vegetative and reproductive phases, respectively. Conclusions Our analyses resulted in the identification of pathways that are regulated by SVP including those controlling meristem development during vegetative growth and flower development whereas floral transition pathways and hormonal signaling were regulated predominantly during the vegetative phase. Thus, SVP regulates many developmental pathways, some of which are common to both of its developmental roles whereas others are specific to only one of them. PMID:23759218

  16. BOREAS AFM-06 Mean Temperature Profile Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminsitration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) tower from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994. The data set provides temperature profiles at 15 heights, containing the variables of virtual temperature, vertical velocity, the speed of sound, and w-bar. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The mean temperature profile data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  17. BOREAS AFM-6 Boundary Layer Height Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminsitration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) site. This data set provides boundary layer height information over the site. The data were collected from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994 and are stored in tabular ASCII files. The boundary layer height data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  18. Cryogenic AFM-STM for mesoscopic physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Sueur, H.

    Electronic spectroscopy based on electron tunneling gives access to the electronic density of states (DOS) in conductive materials, and thus provides detailed information about their electronic properties. During this thesis work, we have developed a microscope in order to perform spatially resolved (10 nm) tunneling spectroscopy, with an unprecedented energy resolution (10 μeV), on individual nanocircuits. This machine combines an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM mode) together with a Scanning Tunneling Spectroscope (STS mode) and functions at very low temperatures (30 mK). In the AFM mode, the sample topography is recorded using a piezoelectric quartz tuning fork, which allows us to locate and image nanocircuits. Tunneling can then be performed on conductive areas of the circuit. With this microscope, we have measured the local DOS in a hybrid Superconductor-Normal metal-Superconductor (S-N-S) structure. In such circuit, the electronic properties of N and S are modified by the superconducting proximity effect. In particular, for short N wires, we have observed a minigap independent of position in the DOS of the N wire, as was previously predicted. Moreover, when varying the superconducting phase difference between the S electrodes, we have measured the modification of the minigap and its disappearance when the phase difference equals π. Our experimental results for the DOS, and its dependences (on phase, position, N length), are quantitatively accounted for by the quasiclassical theory of superconductivity. Some predictions of this theory are observed for the first time. La spectroscopie électronique basée sur l'effet tunnel donne accès à la densité d'états des électrons (DOS) dans les matériaux conducteurs, et renseigne ainsi en détail sur leurs propriétés électroniques. Au cours de cette thèse, nous avons développé un microscope permettant d'effectuer la spectroscopie tunnel résolue spatialement (10 nm) de nanocircuits individuels, avec une r

  19. Advances in the development of cancer therapeutics directed against the RAS-mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Sebolt-Leopold, Judith S

    2008-06-15

    Among mammalian mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascades, the extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) pathway has received the most attention in the oncology drug discovery arena. By virtue of its central role in promoting proliferation, survival, and metastasis, this pathway directly affects both the formation and progression of human tumors. The identification of non-ATP-competitive inhibitors of the MAPK kinase MAPK/ERK kinase (MEK) resulted in the first demonstration that the ERK pathway could be effectively shut down in a highly selective fashion. Subsequent discovery of the oncogenic nature of B-raf kinase led to the escalation of drug discovery efforts revolving around MEK and RAF. The emergence of multiple drug candidates targeting these downstream kinases provides us with the means for validating the importance of the RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK signaling cascade in human tumors. This article highlights the lessons learned in the clinical evaluation of MAPK pathway inhibitors as anticancer agents and the complexities surrounding optimization of their therapeutic potential in light of the challenges posed by genetic heterogeneity within patient populations.

  20. Direct accumulation pathway of radioactive cesium to fruit-bodies of edible mushroom from contaminated wood logs

    PubMed Central

    Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Aiba, Yukitoshi; Sakamoto, Fuminori; Kozai, Naofumi; Niizato, Tadafumi; Sasaki, Yoshito

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the accumulation process of radioactive Cs in edible mushrooms. We here first report the direct accumulation pathway of radioactive Cs from contaminated wood logs to the fruit-bodies of shiitake mushrooms through the basal portion of the stipe. In this pathway, radioactive Cs is not transported through the hyphae. This pathway results in a high accumulation of radioactive Cs in the fruit-body, more by the excess accumulation of radioactive Cs from the wood logs than that through the hyphae. We grew the fruit-bodies of Shiitake mushroom from radioactive-Cs-contaminated wood logs. The spatial distributions of radioactive Cs and Prussian blue as a tracer of interstitial water in the cross section of the wood log measured after the harvest of the fruit-body from the inoculated sawdust spawn area indicated that some fraction of the radioactive Cs and Prussian blue were transported directly to the basal portion of the stipe during the growth of the fruit-bodies. PMID:27430163

  1. Direct accumulation pathway of radioactive cesium to fruit-bodies of edible mushroom from contaminated wood logs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Aiba, Yukitoshi; Sakamoto, Fuminori; Kozai, Naofumi; Niizato, Tadafumi; Sasaki, Yoshito

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the accumulation process of radioactive Cs in edible mushrooms. We here first report the direct accumulation pathway of radioactive Cs from contaminated wood logs to the fruit-bodies of shiitake mushrooms through the basal portion of the stipe. In this pathway, radioactive Cs is not transported through the hyphae. This pathway results in a high accumulation of radioactive Cs in the fruit-body, more by the excess accumulation of radioactive Cs from the wood logs than that through the hyphae. We grew the fruit-bodies of Shiitake mushroom from radioactive-Cs-contaminated wood logs. The spatial distributions of radioactive Cs and Prussian blue as a tracer of interstitial water in the cross section of the wood log measured after the harvest of the fruit-body from the inoculated sawdust spawn area indicated that some fraction of the radioactive Cs and Prussian blue were transported directly to the basal portion of the stipe during the growth of the fruit-bodies.

  2. Morpholine degradation pathway of Mycobacterium aurum MO1: direct evidence of intermediates by in situ 1H nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Combourieu, B; Besse, P; Sancelme, M; Veschambre, H; Delort, A M; Poupin, P; Truffaut, N

    1998-01-01

    Resting Mycobacterium aurum MO1 cells were incubated with morpholine, a waste from the chemical industry. The kinetics of biodegradation was monitored by using in situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The incubation medium was directly analyzed by 1H NMR. This technique allowed the unambiguous identification of two intermediates of the metabolic pathway involved in the biodegradation process, glycolate and 2-(2-aminoethoxy)acetate. The latter compound, which was not commercially available, was synthesized, in three steps, from 2-(2-aminoethoxy)ethanol. Quantitative analysis of the kinetics of degradation of morpholine was performed by integrating the signals of the different metabolites in 1H-NMR spectra. Morpholine was degraded within 10 h. The intermediates increased during the first 10 h and finally disappeared after 20 h incubation. Assays of degradation were also carried out with glycolate and ethanolamine, hypothetical intermediates of the morpholine degradation pathway. They were degraded within 4 and 8 h, respectively. Until now, no tool for direct detection of intermediates or even morpholine has been available, consequently, only hypothetical pathways have been proposed. The approach described here gives both qualitative and quantitative information about the metabolic routes used in morpholine degradation by M. aurum MO1. It could be used to investigate many biodegradative processes.

  3. Morpholine Degradation Pathway of Mycobacterium aurum MO1: Direct Evidence of Intermediates by In Situ 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Combourieu, B.; Besse, P.; Sancelme, M.; Veschambre, H.; Delort, A. M.; Poupin, P.; Truffaut, N.

    1998-01-01

    Resting Mycobacterium aurum MO1 cells were incubated with morpholine, a waste from the chemical industry. The kinetics of biodegradation was monitored by using in situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The incubation medium was directly analyzed by 1H NMR. This technique allowed the unambiguous identification of two intermediates of the metabolic pathway involved in the biodegradation process, glycolate and 2-(2-aminoethoxy)acetate. The latter compound, which was not commercially available, was synthesized, in three steps, from 2-(2-aminoethoxy)ethanol. Quantitative analysis of the kinetics of degradation of morpholine was performed by integrating the signals of the different metabolites in 1H-NMR spectra. Morpholine was degraded within 10 h. The intermediates increased during the first 10 h and finally disappeared after 20 h incubation. Assays of degradation were also carried out with glycolate and ethanolamine, hypothetical intermediates of the morpholine degradation pathway. They were degraded within 4 and 8 h, respectively. Until now, no tool for direct detection of intermediates or even morpholine has been available, consequently, only hypothetical pathways have been proposed. The approach described here gives both qualitative and quantitative information about the metabolic routes used in morpholine degradation by M. aurum MO1. It could be used to investigate many biodegradative processes. PMID:9435073

  4. Cell death pathways in directly irradiated cells and cells exposed to medium from irradiated cells.

    PubMed

    Jella, Kishore Kumar; Garcia, Amaya; McClean, Brendan; Byrne, Hugh J; Lyng, Fiona M

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare levels of apoptosis, necrosis, mitotic cell death and senescence after treatment with both direct radiation and irradiated cell conditioned medium. Human keratinocytes (HaCaT cell line) were irradiated (0.005, 0.05 and 0.5 Gy) using a cobalt 60 teletherapy unit. For bystander experiments, the medium was harvested from donor HaCaT cells 1 hour after irradiation and transferred to recipient HaCaT cells. Clonogenic assay, apoptosis, necrosis, mitotic cell death, senescence and cell cycle analysis were measured in both directly irradiated cells and bystander cells A reduction in cell survival was observed for both directly irradiated cells and irradiated cell conditioned medium (ICCM)-treated cells. Early apoptosis and necrosis was observed predominantly after direct irradiation. An increase in the number of cells in G2/M phase was observed at 6 and 12 h which led to mitotic cell death after 72 h following direct irradiation and ICCM treatment. No senescence was observed in the HaCaT cell line following either direct irradiation or treatment with ICCM. This study has shown that directly irradiated cells undergo apoptosis, necrosis and mitotic cell death whereas ICCM-treated cells predominantly undergo mitotic cell death.

  5. Drug uptake pathways of multidrug transporter AcrB studied by molecular simulations and site-directed mutagenesis experiments.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xin-Qiu; Kimura, Nobuhiro; Murakami, Satoshi; Takada, Shoji

    2013-05-22

    Multidrug resistance has been a critical issue in current chemotherapy. In Escherichia coli , a major efflux pump responsible for the multidrug resistance contains a transporter AcrB. Crystallographic studies and mutational assays of AcrB provided much of structural and overall functional insights, which led to the functionally rotating mechanism. However, the drug uptake pathways are somewhat controversial because at least two possible pathways, the vestibule and the cleft paths, were suggested. Here, combining molecular simulations and site-directed mutagenesis experiments, we addressed the uptake mechanism finding that the drug uptake pathways can be significantly different depending on the properties of drugs. First, in the computational free energy analysis of drug movements along AcrB tunnels, we found a ligand-dependent drug uptake mechanism. With the same molecular sizes, drugs that are both strongly hydrophobic and lipophilic were preferentially taken in via the vestibule path, while other drugs favored the cleft path. Second, direct simulations realized totally about 3500 events of drug uptake by AcrB for a broad range of drug property. These simulations confirmed the ligand-dependent drug uptake and further suggested that a smaller drug favors the vestibule path, while a larger one is taken in via the cleft path. Moreover, the direct simulations identified an alternative uptake path which is not visible in the crystal structure. Third, site-directed mutagenesis of AcrB in E. coli verified that mutations of residues located along the newly identified path significantly reduced the efflux efficiency, supporting its relevance in in vivo function.

  6. AFM studies of semicrystalline polymer/inorganic nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strawhecker, Kenneth E.

    2002-01-01

    vapor transmission properties superior to that of the neat polymer and its conventionally filled composites. For example, for a 5wt.% MMT exfoliated composite, the softening temperature increases by 25°C, the Young's modulus triples with a decrease of only 20% in toughness, whereas there is also a 60% reduction in the water permeability. Furthermore, due to the nanoscale dispersion of filler, the nanocomposites retain their optical clarity. Finally, to better connect changes in morphology with property enhancements, AFM methods were devised which allow direct imaging of morphology as well as local properties.

  7. Resveratrol directly targets DDX5 resulting in suppression of the mTORC1 pathway in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, T; Iizumi, Y; Watanabe, M; Masuda, M; Morita, M; Aono, Y; Toriyama, S; Oishi, M; Goi, W; Sakai, T

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol has various attractive bioactivities, such as prevention of cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and obesity-related diseases. Therefore, identifying its direct binding proteins is expected to discover druggable targets. Sirtuin 1 and phosphodiesterases have so far been found as the direct molecular targets of resveratrol. We herein identified 11 novel resveratrol-binding proteins, including the DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp) box helicase 5 (DDX5, also known as p68), using resveratrol-immobilized beads. Treatment with resveratrol induced degradation of DDX5 in prostate cancer cells. Depletion of DDX5 caused apoptosis by inhibiting mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling. Moreover, knockdown of DDX5 attenuated the inhibitory activities of resveratrol against mTORC1 signaling and cancer cell growth. These data show that resveratrol directly targets DDX5 and induces cancer cell death by inhibiting the mTORC1 pathway. PMID:27148684

  8. Directing the Lithium–Sulfur Reaction Pathway via Sparingly Solvating Electrolytes for High Energy Density Batteries

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The lithium–sulfur battery has long been seen as a potential next generation battery chemistry for electric vehicles owing to the high theoretical specific energy and low cost of sulfur. However, even state-of-the-art lithium–sulfur batteries suffer from short lifetimes due to the migration of highly soluble polysulfide intermediates and exhibit less than desired energy density due to the required excess electrolyte. The use of sparingly solvating electrolytes in lithium–sulfur batteries is a promising approach to decouple electrolyte quantity from reaction mechanism, thus creating a pathway toward high energy density that deviates from the current catholyte approach. Herein, we demonstrate that sparingly solvating electrolytes based on compact, polar molecules with a 2:1 ratio of a functional group to lithium salt can fundamentally redirect the lithium–sulfur reaction pathway by inhibiting the traditional mechanism that is based on fully solvated intermediates. In contrast to the standard catholyte sulfur electrochemistry, sparingly solvating electrolytes promote intermediate- and short-chain polysulfide formation during the first third of discharge, before disproportionation results in crystalline lithium sulfide and a restricted fraction of soluble polysulfides which are further reduced during the remaining discharge. Moreover, operation at intermediate temperatures ca. 50 °C allows for minimal overpotentials and high utilization of sulfur at practical rates. This discovery opens the door to a new wave of scientific inquiry based on modifying the electrolyte local structure to tune and control the reaction pathway of many precipitation–dissolution chemistries, lithium–sulfur and beyond. PMID:28691072

  9. Directing the Lithium-Sulfur Reaction Pathway via Sparingly Solvating Electrolytes for High Energy Density Batteries.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Wook; Pang, Quan; Ha, Seungbum; Cheng, Lei; Han, Sang-Don; Zavadil, Kevin R; Gallagher, Kevin G; Nazar, Linda F; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam

    2017-06-28

    The lithium-sulfur battery has long been seen as a potential next generation battery chemistry for electric vehicles owing to the high theoretical specific energy and low cost of sulfur. However, even state-of-the-art lithium-sulfur batteries suffer from short lifetimes due to the migration of highly soluble polysulfide intermediates and exhibit less than desired energy density due to the required excess electrolyte. The use of sparingly solvating electrolytes in lithium-sulfur batteries is a promising approach to decouple electrolyte quantity from reaction mechanism, thus creating a pathway toward high energy density that deviates from the current catholyte approach. Herein, we demonstrate that sparingly solvating electrolytes based on compact, polar molecules with a 2:1 ratio of a functional group to lithium salt can fundamentally redirect the lithium-sulfur reaction pathway by inhibiting the traditional mechanism that is based on fully solvated intermediates. In contrast to the standard catholyte sulfur electrochemistry, sparingly solvating electrolytes promote intermediate- and short-chain polysulfide formation during the first third of discharge, before disproportionation results in crystalline lithium sulfide and a restricted fraction of soluble polysulfides which are further reduced during the remaining discharge. Moreover, operation at intermediate temperatures ca. 50 °C allows for minimal overpotentials and high utilization of sulfur at practical rates. This discovery opens the door to a new wave of scientific inquiry based on modifying the electrolyte local structure to tune and control the reaction pathway of many precipitation-dissolution chemistries, lithium-sulfur and beyond.

  10. Directing the lithium–sulfur reaction pathway via sparingly solvating electrolytes for high energy density batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Chang -Wook; Pang, Quan; Ha, Seungbum; ...

    2017-05-25

    The lithium–sulfur battery has long been seen as a potential next generation battery chemistry for electric vehicles owing to the high theoretical specific energy and low cost of sulfur. However, even state-of-the-art lithium–sulfur batteries suffer from short lifetimes due to the migration of highly soluble polysulfide intermediates and exhibit less than desired energy density due to the required excess electrolyte. The use of sparingly solvating electrolytes in lithium–sulfur batteries is a promising approach to decouple electrolyte quantity from reaction mechanism, thus creating a pathway toward high energy density that deviates from the current catholyte approach. Herein, we demonstrate that sparinglymore » solvating electrolytes based on compact, polar molecules with a 2:1 ratio of a functional group to lithium salt can fundamentally redirect the lithium–sulfur reaction pathway by inhibiting the traditional mechanism that is based on fully solvated intermediates. In contrast to the standard catholyte sulfur electrochemistry, sparingly solvating electrolytes promote intermediate- and short-chain polysulfide formation during the first third of discharge, before disproportionation results in crystalline lithium sulfide and a restricted fraction of soluble polysulfides which are further reduced during the remaining discharge. Moreover, operation at intermediate temperatures ca. 50 °C allows for minimal overpotentials and high utilization of sulfur at practical rates. Finally, this discovery opens the door to a new wave of scientific inquiry based on modifying the electrolyte local structure to tune and control the reaction pathway of many precipitation–dissolution chemistries, lithium–sulfur and beyond.« less

  11. Eukaryotic Chemotaxis: A Network of Signaling Pathways Controls Motility, Directional Sensing, and Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Swaney, Kristen F.; Huang, Chuan-Hsiang; Devreotes, Peter N.

    2015-01-01

    Chemotaxis, the directed migration of cells in chemical gradients, is a vital process in normal physiology and in the pathogenesis of many diseases. Chemotactic cells display motility, directional sensing, and polarity. Motility refers to the random extension of pseudopodia, which may be driven by spontaneous actin waves that propagate through the cytoskeleton. Directional sensing is mediated by a system that detects temporal and spatial stimuli and biases motility toward the gradient. Polarity gives cells morphologically and functionally distinct leading and lagging edges by relocating proteins or their activities selectively to the poles. By exploiting the genetic advantages of Dictyostelium, investigators are working out the complex network of interactions between the proteins that have been implicated in the chemotactic processes of motility, directional sensing, and polarity. PMID:20192768

  12. Eukaryotic chemotaxis: a network of signaling pathways controls motility, directional sensing, and polarity.

    PubMed

    Swaney, Kristen F; Huang, Chuan-Hsiang; Devreotes, Peter N

    2010-01-01

    Chemotaxis, the directed migration of cells in chemical gradients, is a vital process in normal physiology and in the pathogenesis of many diseases. Chemotactic cells display motility, directional sensing, and polarity. Motility refers to the random extension of pseudopodia, which may be driven by spontaneous actin waves that propagate through the cytoskeleton. Directional sensing is mediated by a system that detects temporal and spatial stimuli and biases motility toward the gradient. Polarity gives cells morphologically and functionally distinct leading and lagging edges by relocating proteins or their activities selectively to the poles. By exploiting the genetic advantages of Dictyostelium, investigators are working out the complex network of interactions between the proteins that have been implicated in the chemotactic processes of motility, directional sensing, and polarity.

  13. Direct, two-step synthetic pathway to novel dibenzo[a,c]phenanthridines.

    PubMed

    Churruca, Fátima; SanMartin, Raul; Carril, Mónica; Urtiaga, Miren Karmele; Solans, Xavier; Tellitu, Imanol; Domínguez, Esther

    2005-04-15

    Novel dibenzo[a,c]phenanthridines are prepared regioselectively by the application of a straightforward synthetic pathway, starting from new 3,4-diaryl- and 3,4-dihydro-3,4-diarylisoquinolines prepared via Ritter-type heterocyclization and the more classical two-step reductive amination/Bischler-Napieralski cyclization of triarylethanones, respectively. A comparative study of nonphenolic oxidative coupling methodologies provides a highly efficient procedure, based on the hypervalent iodine reagent phenyliodine(III) bis(trifluoroacetate) (PIFA), to accomplish the final coupling step.

  14. Direct and Indirect Pathways From Adverse Childhood Experiences to High School Dropout Among High-Risk Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Anne S; Villodas, Miguel T

    2017-07-24

    Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are associated with an increased risk for school dropout. This study examined pathways from childhood adversity to school dropout through academic, behavioral, emotional, and social pathways. Data were collected prospectively from 728 adolescents and their caregivers who participated in the Longitudinal Studies of Child Abuse and Neglect and from child protective services records. Path analyses revealed a direct association between ACEs and dropout, as well as indirect effects through poor reading achievement and elevated externalizing problems. ACEs were associated with elevated internalizing problems, which were negatively associated with dropout. However, ACEs were not associated with peer influences. Implications of the identified mechanisms in the ACEs and school dropout association for future preventive interventions are discussed. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Research on Adolescence © 2017 Society for Research on Adolescence.

  15. Microbial production of natural and non-natural flavonoids: Pathway engineering, directed evolution and systems/synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ramesh Prasad; Parajuli, Prakash; Koffas, Mattheos A G; Sohng, Jae Kyung

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we address recent advances made in pathway engineering, directed evolution, and systems/synthetic biology approaches employed in the production and modification of flavonoids from microbial cells. The review is divided into two major parts. In the first, various metabolic engineering and system/synthetic biology approaches used for production of flavonoids and derivatives are discussed broadly. All the manipulations/engineering accomplished on the microorganisms since 2000 are described in detail along with the biosynthetic pathway enzymes, their sources, structures of the compounds, and yield of each product. In the second part of the review, post-modifications of flavonoids by four major reactions, namely glycosylations, methylations, hydroxylations and prenylations using recombinant strains are described. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A method to monitor upper limb movement direction encoding in the corticomotor pathway.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Gwyn N; Vandal, Alain C; McNair, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal shoulder and elbow muscle coactivation patterns, or muscle synergies, are commonly present following stroke and may arise through dysfunctional descending neural control from the cortex. The authors evaluated a novel technique for examining corticomotor movement encoding of the upper limb in three dimensions. A 6-degree-of-freedom loadcell recorded arm twitch responses in healthy adults following stimulation over the cortex or over Erb's point in the periphery. Stimuli were delivered while the arm generated a 5 N preload in each of the 6 axial directions. The initial force twitch response to stimulation was used to construct twitch direction vectors for each preload direction. General linear mixed model analyses were used to determine the influence of stimulation location, preload direction, posture, and stimulation intensity on twitch direction. Cortical stimulation gave rise to arm twitch responses that were predictably modified by preload direction. Peripheral stimulation elicited stereotypical twitches that were not influenced by preload. Our stimulation, recording, and analysis techniques were able to capture movement encoding of the upper limb in three dimensions. Such techniques could be utilized in the stroke population to determine and monitor the presence of upper limb synergies during muscle activation.

  17. The Nrde Pathway Mediates Small-RNA-Directed Histone H3 Lysine 27 Trimethylation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Mao, Hui; Zhu, Chengming; Zong, Dandan; Weng, Chenchun; Yang, Xiangwei; Huang, Hui; Liu, Dun; Feng, Xuezhu; Guang, Shouhong

    2015-09-21

    Small-RNA-mediated chromatin modifications have been widely studied in plants and S. pombe. However, direct evidence of small-RNA-guided sequence-specific chromatin alterations is scarce in animals. In C. elegans, the nuclear RNAi defective (Nrde) pathway functions to transport siRNA from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, modulate transcription elongation, induce histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) trimethylation, and mediate transgenerational inheritance of RNAi. Here, we show that both exogenous RNAi and NRDE-bound endogenous 22G RNAs can direct sequence-specific histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27) trimethylation at targeted loci through the Nrde pathway. The resulting H3K27me3 status can be inherited by progeny for multiple generations. piRNAs and WAGO-1-associated siRNAs induce H3K27 methylation as well. Interestingly, CSR-1-associated endogenous siRNAs fail to trigger H3K27 methylation, whereas exogenous provision of dsRNAs can induce H3K27 methylation at the CSR-1-targeted loci via the Nrde pathway. We further observed distinct genetic requirements of H3K9 and H3K27 trimethylation. Whereas set-25 and met-2 are required for K9 methylation, mes-2 is required for K27 methylation. The depletion of mes-2 leads to a nuclear RNAi defective phenotype. These results indicate that dsRNA-triggered chromatin modification is a sequence-specific response that engages the Nrde pathway in C. elegans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. New Direction in Hydrogeochemical Transport Modeling: Incorporating Multiple Kinetic and Equilibrium Reaction Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Steefel, C.I.

    2000-02-02

    At least two distinct kinds of hydrogeochemical models have evolved historically for use in analyzing contaminant transport, but each has important limitations. One kind, focusing on organic contaminants, treats biodegradation reactions as parts of relatively simple kinetic reaction networks with no or limited coupling to aqueous and surface complexation and mineral dissolution/precipitation reactions. A second kind, evolving out of the speciation and reaction path codes, is capable of handling a comprehensive suite of multicomponent complexation (aqueous and surface) and mineral precipitation and dissolution reactions, but has not been able to treat reaction networks characterized by partial redox disequilibrium and multiple kinetic pathways. More recently, various investigators have begun to consider biodegradation reactions in the context of comprehensive equilibrium and kinetic reaction networks (e.g. Hunter et al. 1998, Mayer 1999). Here we explore two examples of multiple equilibrium and kinetic reaction pathways using the reactive transport code GIMRT98 (Steefel, in prep.): (1) a computational example involving the generation of acid mine drainage due to oxidation of pyrite, and (2) a computational/field example where the rates of chlorinated VOC degradation are linked to the rates of major redox processes occurring in organic-rich wetland sediments overlying a contaminated aerobic aquifer.

  19. Role of the direct and indirect pathways for glycogen synthesis in rat liver in the postprandial state

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, M.T.; Veech, R.L.

    1988-03-01

    The pathway for hepatic glycogen synthesis in the postprandial state was studied in meal-fed rats chronically cannulated in the portal vein. Plasma glucose concentration in the portal vein was found to be 4.50 +/- 1.01 mM (mean +/- SE; n = 3) before a meal and 11.54 +/- 0.70 mM (mean +/- SE; n = 4) after a meal in rats meal-fed a diet consisting of 100% commercial rat chow for 7 d. The hepatic-portal difference of plasma glucose concentration showed that liver released glucose in the fasted state and either extracted or released glucose after feeding depending on plasma glucose concentration in the portal vein. The concentration of portal vein glucose at which liver changes from glucose releasing to glucose uptake was 8 mM, the Km of glucokinase. The rate of glycogen synthesis in liver during meal-feeding was found to be approximately 1 mumol glucosyl U/g wet wt/min in rats meal-fed a 50% glucose supplemented chow diet. The relative importance of the direct vs. indirect pathway for the replenishment of hepatic glycogen was determined by the incorporation of (3-/sup 3/H,U-/sup 14/C)glucose into liver glycogen. Labeled glucose was injected into the portal vein at the end of meal-feeding. The ratio of /sup 3/H//sup 14/C in the glucosyl units of glycogen was found to be 83-92% of the ratio in liver free glucose six minutes after the injection, indicating that the majority of exogenous glucose incorporated into glycogen did not go through glycolysis. The percent contribution of the direct versus indirect pathway was quantitated from the difference in the relative specific activity (RSA) of (/sup 3/H) and (/sup 14/C)-glycogen in rats infused with (3-/sup 3/H,U-/sup 14/C)glucose. No significant difference was found between the RSA of (/sup 3/H)glycogen and (/sup 14/C)glycogen, indicating further that the pathway for glycogen synthesis in liver from exogenous glucose is from the direct pathway.

  20. Direct contact between dust and HBCD-treated fabrics is an important pathway of source-to-dust transfer.

    PubMed

    Rauert, Cassandra; Kuribara, Isamu; Kataoka, Toshiyuki; Wada, Takeharu; Kajiwara, Natsuko; Suzuki, Go; Takigami, Hidetaka; Harrad, Stuart

    2016-03-01

    Hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs) are a class of brominated flame retardant that have found extensive application in consumer products used widely in indoor environments. Although uncertainty remains about the human health impacts of HBCDs, ingestion of HBCD-contaminated indoor dust has been shown to be a particularly significant exposure pathway for young children. Despite this, understanding of the mechanisms via which HBCD transfer from products to indoor dust remains incomplete. In this study, an in-house test chamber was used to investigate transfer of HBCDs from a treated textile sample to indoor dust via direct textile:dust contact. Results were compared with previous data using the same test chamber to examine other pathways via which HBCDs transfer from products to dust, and highlighted HBCD transfer via direct source:dust contact as being particularly important. This novel finding was corroborated by complementary experiments that examined HBCD transfer via direct contact, from other treated textiles to three major components of indoor dust: artificial indoor dust, soil particles, and cotton linters.

  1. The effects of cervical transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation on motor pathways supplying the upper limb in humans

    PubMed Central

    D’Amico, Jessica M.; Butler, Jane E.; Taylor, Janet L.

    2017-01-01

    Non-invasive, weak direct current stimulation can induce changes in excitability of underlying neural tissue. Many studies have used transcranial direct current stimulation to induce changes in the brain, however more recently a number of studies have used transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation to induce changes in the spinal cord. This study further characterises the effects following cervical transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation on motor pathways supplying the upper limb. In Study 1, on two separate days, participants (n = 12, 5 F) received 20 minutes of either real or sham direct current stimulation at 3 mA through electrodes placed in an anterior-posterior configuration over the neck (anode anterior). Biceps brachii, flexor carpi radialis and first dorsal interosseous responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation (motor evoked potentials) and cervicomedullary stimulation (cervicomedullary motor evoked potentials) were measured before and after real or sham stimulation. In Study 2, on two separate days, participants (n = 12, 7 F) received either real or sham direct current stimulation in the same way as for Study 1. Before and after real or sham stimulation, median nerve stimulation elicited M waves and H reflexes in the flexor carpi radialis. H-reflex recruitment curves and homosynaptic depression of the H reflex were assessed. Results show that the effects of real and sham direct current stimulation did not differ for motor evoked potentials or cervicomedullary motor evoked potentials for any muscle, nor for H-reflex recruitment curve parameters or homosynaptic depression. Cervical transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation with the parameters described here does not modify motor responses to corticospinal stimulation nor does it modify H reflexes of the upper limb. These results are important for the emerging field of transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation. PMID:28225813

  2. Blood vessel endothelium-directed tumor cell streaming in breast tumors requires the HGF/C-Met signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Leung, E; Xue, A; Wang, Y; Rougerie, P; Sharma, V P; Eddy, R; Cox, D; Condeelis, J

    2016-11-28

    During metastasis to distant sites, tumor cells migrate to blood vessels. In vivo, breast tumor cells utilize a specialized mode of migration known as streaming, where a linear assembly of tumor cells migrate directionally towards blood vessels on fibronectin-collagen I-containing extracellular matrix (ECM) fibers in response to chemotactic signals. We have successfully reconstructed tumor cell streaming in vitro by co-plating tumors cells, macrophages and endothelial cells on 2.5 μm thick ECM-coated micro-patterned substrates. We found that tumor cells and macrophages, when plated together on the micro-patterned substrates, do not demonstrate sustained directional migration in only one direction (sustained directionality) but show random bi-directional walking. Sustained directionality of tumor cells as seen in vivo was established in vitro when beads coated with human umbilical vein endothelial cells were placed at one end of the micro-patterned 'ECM fibers' within the assay. We demonstrated that these endothelial cells supply the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) required for the chemotactic gradient responsible for sustained directionality. Using this in vitro reconstituted streaming system, we found that directional streaming is dependent on, and most effectively blocked, by inhibiting the HGF/C-Met signaling pathway between endothelial cells and tumor cells. Key observations made with the in vitro reconstituted system implicating C-Met signaling were confirmed in vivo in mammary tumors using the in vivo invasion assay and intravital multiphoton imaging of tumor cell streaming. These results establish HGF/C-Met as a central organizing signal in blood vessel-directed tumor cell migration in vivo and highlight a promising role for C-Met inhibitors in blocking tumor cell streaming and metastasis in vivo, and for use in human trials.Oncogene advance online publication, 28 November 2016; doi:10.1038/onc.2016.421.

  3. The effects of cervical transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation on motor pathways supplying the upper limb in humans.

    PubMed

    Dongés, Siobhan C; D'Amico, Jessica M; Butler, Jane E; Taylor, Janet L

    2017-01-01

    Non-invasive, weak direct current stimulation can induce changes in excitability of underlying neural tissue. Many studies have used transcranial direct current stimulation to induce changes in the brain, however more recently a number of studies have used transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation to induce changes in the spinal cord. This study further characterises the effects following cervical transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation on motor pathways supplying the upper limb. In Study 1, on two separate days, participants (n = 12, 5 F) received 20 minutes of either real or sham direct current stimulation at 3 mA through electrodes placed in an anterior-posterior configuration over the neck (anode anterior). Biceps brachii, flexor carpi radialis and first dorsal interosseous responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation (motor evoked potentials) and cervicomedullary stimulation (cervicomedullary motor evoked potentials) were measured before and after real or sham stimulation. In Study 2, on two separate days, participants (n = 12, 7 F) received either real or sham direct current stimulation in the same way as for Study 1. Before and after real or sham stimulation, median nerve stimulation elicited M waves and H reflexes in the flexor carpi radialis. H-reflex recruitment curves and homosynaptic depression of the H reflex were assessed. Results show that the effects of real and sham direct current stimulation did not differ for motor evoked potentials or cervicomedullary motor evoked potentials for any muscle, nor for H-reflex recruitment curve parameters or homosynaptic depression. Cervical transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation with the parameters described here does not modify motor responses to corticospinal stimulation nor does it modify H reflexes of the upper limb. These results are important for the emerging field of transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation.

  4. Bypassing primary sensory cortices--a direct thalamocortical pathway for transmitting salient sensory information.

    PubMed

    Liang, M; Mouraux, A; Iannetti, G D

    2013-01-01

    Detection and appropriate reaction to sudden and intense events happening in the sensory environment is crucial for survival. By combining Bayesian model selection with dynamic causal modeling of functional magnetic resonance imaging data, a novel analysis approach that allows inferring the causality between neural activities in different brain areas, we demonstrate that salient sensory information reaches the multimodal cortical areas responsible for its detection directly from the thalamus, without being first processed in primary and secondary sensory-specific areas. This direct thalamocortical transmission of multimodal salient information is parallel to the processing of finer stimulus attributes, which are transmitted in a modality-specific fashion from the thalamus to the relevant primary sensory areas. Such direct thalamocortical connections bypassing primary sensory cortices provide a fast and efficient way for transmitting information from subcortical structures to multimodal cortical areas, to allow the early detection of salient events and, thereby, trigger immediate and appropriate behavior.

  5. Solvent-Directed Helical Stereomutation Discloses Pathway Complexity on N-Heterotriangulene-Based Organogelators.

    PubMed

    Valera, Jorge S; Sánchez-Naya, Roberto; Ramírez, Francisco J; Zafra, José L; Gómez, Rafael; Casado, Juan; Sánchez, Luis

    2017-08-16

    The chiroptical features of supramolecular polymers formed from N-heterotriangulenes 1-3 have been investigated by circular dichroism (ECD) and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) techniques. In solution, the CD spectra demonstrate that the helicity of the aggregates depends on only the stereogenic centres located at the peripheral chains. In the gel state, the chiroptical features are conditioned by the point chirality of the stereogenic centres and by the achiral solvent utilised. Sonication of the gels formed in CCl4 reveals both kinetic and thermodynamic phases. These findings reveal the presence of pathway complexity in the gel state triggered by sonication. The described solvent-induced helical stereomutation demonstrates that the gel state can be utilised as an outstanding benchmark for investigating uncommon chiroptical effects and to explore the rules of chirality transmission. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Lack of a primary physicochemical determinant in the direct transport of drugs to the brain after nasal administration in rats: potential involvement of transporters in the pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyeong-Ryoon; Maeng, Han-Joo; Chae, Jung-Byung; Chong, Saeho; Kim, Dae-Duk; Shim, Chang-Koo; Chung, Suk-Jae

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the relative contribution of the direct pathway in overall brain transport for 17 model drugs with different physicochemical properties after nasal administrations and to identify factors that govern the fraction of the dose transported to the brain via the direct pathway (F(a, direct)). When the model drugs were nasally administered to rats, 5 of the 17 model drugs were delivered to a significant extent to the brain via the direct pathway. Multiple linear regression analyses showed that the correlation between various physicochemical properties and F(a, direct) was not statistically significant, indicative of a lack of primary physicochemical determinants in the direct transport pathway. Transporters such as rOAT3 and rOCT2 were expressed at significant levels in rat olfactory epithelia, and uptakes of standard substrates were significantly decreased in HEK293 cells expressing rOAT3 and rOCT2 in the presence of the five model drugs that were delivered to appreciable extents to the brain via the direct pathway. Therefore, these observations indicate that carrier-mediated transport may play a role in the brain delivery of drugs from the nose via the direct transport pathway.

  7. Pathways to Adult Sexual Revictimization: Direct and Indirect Behavioral Risk Factors across the Lifespan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fargo, Jamison D.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate direct and indirect social and behavioral risk factors for adult sexual revictimization. Participants include 147 adult, predominantly African American (88%) women, 59% of whom had a documented history of child sexual abuse. Participants are interviewed in adulthood about adolescent and adult sexual…

  8. Examining direct and indirect pathways to health behaviour: the influence of cognitive and affective probability beliefs.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Eva; van Osch, Liesbeth; de Vries, Hein; Lechner, Lilian

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to extricate the influence of rational (e.g., 'I think …') and intuitive (e.g., 'I feel …') probability beliefs in the behavioural decision-making process regarding skin cancer prevention practices. Structural equation modelling was used in two longitudinal surveys (sun protection during winter sports [N = 491]; sun protection during summer [N = 277]) to examine direct and indirect behavioural effects of affective and cognitive likelihood (i.e. unmediated or mediated by intention), controlled for attitude, social influence and self-efficacy. Affective likelihood was directly related to sun protection in both studies, whereas no direct effects were found for cognitive likelihood. After accounting for past sun protective behaviour, affective likelihood was only directly related to sun protection in Study 1. No support was found for the indirect effects of affective and cognitive likelihood through intention. The findings underscore the importance of feelings of (cancer) risk in the decision-making process and should be acknowledged by health behaviour theories and risk communication practices. Suggestions for future research are discussed.

  9. Pathways to Adult Sexual Revictimization: Direct and Indirect Behavioral Risk Factors across the Lifespan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fargo, Jamison D.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate direct and indirect social and behavioral risk factors for adult sexual revictimization. Participants include 147 adult, predominantly African American (88%) women, 59% of whom had a documented history of child sexual abuse. Participants are interviewed in adulthood about adolescent and adult sexual…

  10. Selective loss of bi-directional synaptic plasticity in the direct and indirect striatal output pathways accompanies generation of parkinsonism and l-DOPA induced dyskinesia in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Thiele, Sherri L; Chen, Betty; Lo, Charlotte; Gertler, Tracey S; Warre, Ruth; Surmeier, James D; Brotchie, Jonathan M; Nash, Joanne E

    2014-11-01

    Parkinsonian symptoms arise due to over-activity of the indirect striatal output pathway, and under-activity of the direct striatal output pathway. l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID) is caused when the opposite circuitry problems are established, with the indirect pathway becoming underactive, and the direct pathway becoming over-active. Here, we define synaptic plasticity abnormalities in these pathways associated with parkinsonism, symptomatic benefits of l-DOPA, and LID. We applied spike-timing dependent plasticity protocols to cortico-striatal synapses in slices from 6-OHDA-lesioned mouse models of parkinsonism and LID, generated in BAC transgenic mice with eGFP targeting the direct or indirect output pathways, with and without l-DOPA present. In naïve mice, bidirectional synaptic plasticity, i.e. LTP and LTD, was induced, resulting in an EPSP amplitude change of approximately 50% in each direction in both striatal output pathways, as shown previously. In parkinsonism and dyskinesia, both pathways exhibited unidirectional plasticity, irrespective of stimulation paradigm. In parkinsonian animals, the indirect pathway only exhibited LTP (LTP protocol: 143.5±14.6%; LTD protocol 177.7±22.3% of baseline), whereas the direct pathway only showed LTD (LTP protocol: 74.3±4.0% and LTD protocol: 63.3±8.7%). A symptomatic dose of l-DOPA restored bidirectional plasticity on both pathways to levels comparable to naïve animals (Indirect pathway: LTP protocol: 124.4±22.0% and LTD protocol: 52.1±18.5% of baseline. Direct pathway: LTP protocol: 140.7±7.3% and LTD protocol: 58.4±6.0% of baseline). In dyskinesia, in the presence of l-DOPA, the indirect pathway exhibited only LTD (LTP protocol: 68.9±21.3% and LTD protocol 52.0±14.2% of baseline), whereas in the direct pathway, only LTP could be induced (LTP protocol: 156.6±13.2% and LTD protocol 166.7±15.8% of baseline). We conclude that normal motor control requires bidirectional plasticity of both striatal outputs

  11. Preparation of DNA and nucleoprotein samples for AFM imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2010-01-01

    Sample preparation techniques allowing reliable and reproducible imaging of DNA with various structures, topologies and complexes with proteins are reviewed. The major emphasis is given to methods utilizing chemical functionalization of mica, enabling preparation of the surfaces with required characteristics. The methods are illustrated by examples of imaging of different DNA structures. Special attention is given to the possibility of AFM to image the dynamics of DNA at the nanoscale. The capabilities of time-lapse AFM in aqueous solutions are illustrated by imaging of dynamic processes as transitions of local alternative structures (transition of DNA between H and B forms). The application of AFM to studies of protein-DNA complexes is illustrated by a few examples of imaging site-specific complexes, as well as such systems as chromatin. The time-lapse AFM studies of protein-DNA complexes including very recent advances with the use of high-speed AFM are reviewed. PMID:20864349

  12. Constrained spherical deconvolution analysis of the limbic network in human, with emphasis on a direct cerebello-limbic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Arrigo, Alessandro; Mormina, Enricomaria; Anastasi, Giuseppe Pio; Gaeta, Michele; Calamuneri, Alessandro; Quartarone, Angelo; De Salvo, Simona; Bruschetta, Daniele; Rizzo, Giuseppina; Trimarchi, Fabio; Milardi, Demetrio

    2014-01-01

    The limbic system is part of an intricate network which is involved in several functions like memory and emotion. Traditionally the role of the cerebellum was considered mainly associated to motion control; however several evidences are raising about a role of the cerebellum in learning skills, emotions control, mnemonic and behavioral processes involving also connections with limbic system. In 15 normal subjects we studied limbic connections by probabilistic Constrained Spherical Deconvolution (CSD) tractography. The main result of our work was to prove for the first time in human brain the existence of a direct cerebello-limbic pathway which was previously hypothesized but never demonstrated. We also extended our analysis to the other limbic connections including cingulate fasciculus, inferior longitudinal fasciculus, uncinated fasciculus, anterior thalamic connections and fornix. Although these pathways have been already described in the tractographic literature we provided reconstruction, quantitative analysis and Fractional Anisotropy (FA) right-left symmetry comparison using probabilistic CSD tractography that is known to provide a potential improvement compared to previously used Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) techniques. The demonstration of the existence of cerebello-limbic pathway could constitute an important step in the knowledge of the anatomic substrate of non-motor cerebellar functions. Finally the CSD statistical data about limbic connections in healthy subjects could be potentially useful in the diagnosis of pathological disorders damaging this system. PMID:25538606

  13. BOREAS AFM-07 SRC Surface Meteorological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborne, Heather; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Young, Kim; Wittrock, Virginia; Shewchuck, Stan; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Saskatchewan Research Council (SRC) collected surface meteorological and radiation data from December 1993 until December 1996. The data set comprises Suite A (meteorological and energy balance measurements) and Suite B (diffuse solar and longwave measurements) components. Suite A measurements were taken at each of ten sites, and Suite B measurements were made at five of the Suite A sites. The data cover an approximate area of 500 km (North-South) by 1000 km (East-West) (a large portion of northern Manitoba and northern Saskatchewan). The measurement network was designed to provide researchers with a sufficient record of near-surface meteorological and radiation measurements. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files, and were collected by Aircraft Flux and Meteorology (AFM)-7. The surface meteorological and radiation data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  14. Manufacturing process of nanofluidics using afm probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karingula, Varun Kumar

    A new process for fabricating a nano fluidic device that can be used in medical application is developed and demonstrated. Nano channels are fabricated using a nano tip in indentation mode on AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy). The nano channels are integrated between the micro channels and act as a filter to separate biomolecules. Nano channels of 4 to7 m in length, 80nm in width, and at varying depths from 100nm to 850 nm allow the resulting device to separate selected groups of lysosomes and other viruses. Sharply developed vertical micro channels are produced from a deep reaction ion etching followed by deposition of different materials, such as gold and polymers, on the top surface, allowing the study of alternative ways of manufacturing a nanofluidic device. PDMS (Polydimethylsiloxane) bonding is performed to close the top surface of the device. An experimental setup is used to test and validate the device by pouring fluid through the channels. A detailed cost evaluation is conducted to compare the economical merits of the proposed process. It is shown that there is a 47:7% manufacturing time savings and a 60:6% manufacturing cost savings.

  15. Microrheology using a custom-made AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosgodagan Acharige, Sebastien; Benzaquen, Michael; Steinberger, Audrey

    In the past few years, a new method was developed to measure local properties of liquids (X. Xiong et al., Phys. Rev. E 80, 2009). This method consists of gluing a micron-sized glass fiber at the tip of an AFM cantilever and probing the liquid with it. In ENS Lyon, this method was perfected (C. Devailly et al., EPL, 106 5, 2014) with the help of an interferometer developped in the same laboratory (L. Bellon et al., Opt. Commun. 207 49, 2002 and P. Paolino et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 84, 2013), which background noise can reach 10-14 m /√{ Hz } . This method allows us to measure a wide range of viscosities (1 mPa . s to 500 mPa . s) of transparent and opaque fluids using a small sample volume ( 5 mL). In this presentation, I will briefly describe the interferometer developped in ENS Lyon, then explain precisely the microrheology measurements and then compare the experimental results to a model developped by M. Benzaquen. This work is supported financially by the ANR project NANOFLUIDYN (Grant Number ANR-13-BS10-0009).

  16. AFM studies of the crystallization and habit modification of an excipient material, adipic acid.

    PubMed

    Keel, T R; Thompson, C; Davies, M C; Tendler, S J B; Roberts, C J

    2004-08-06

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to investigate the (1 0 0) face of crystalline adipic acid, both in air and liquid environments. In air, surface reorganization occurred during scanning of the AFM probe, which has been investigated using single point force-distance analysis under a controlled relative humidity (RH) environment. We suggest such reorganization can be attributed to the influence of a network of water molecules bound to the hydrophilic (1 0 0) surface permitting local AFM tip-enhanced dissolution and reorganization of the solute. In situ imaging was also carried out on the crystals, revealing etch-pit formation during dissolution, and rapid growth at higher levels of supersaturation (sigma), both of which are direct consequences of the hydrophilic nature of the (1 0 0) face. Also presented here are nanoscale observations of the effect of octanoic acid, a structurally-related habit modifier, on crystalline adipic acid. Using AFM, we have been able to show that the presence of octanoic acid at low concentration has little observable affect on the development of the (1 0 0) face; however, as this concentration is increased, there are clear changes in step morphology and growth mode on the (1 0 0) face of the crystal. At a concentration of 1.26 mmol dm(-3) (a concentration corresponding to a molar ratio of approximately 1:175 octanoic acid:adipic acid), growth on the (1 0 0) face is inhibited, with in situ AFM imaging indicating this is a direct consequence of octanoic acid binding to the surface, and pinning the monomolecular growth steps.

  17. An AFM-based pit-measuring method for indirect measurements of cell-surface membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaojun; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Yong

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Air drying induced the transformation of cell-surface membrane vesicles into pits. • An AFM-based pit-measuring method was developed to measure cell-surface vesicles. • Our method detected at least two populations of cell-surface membrane vesicles. - Abstract: Circulating membrane vesicles, which are shed from many cell types, have multiple functions and have been correlated with many diseases. Although circulating membrane vesicles have been extensively characterized, the status of cell-surface membrane vesicles prior to their release is less understood due to the lack of effective measurement methods. Recently, as a powerful, micro- or nano-scale imaging tool, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been applied in measuring circulating membrane vesicles. However, it seems very difficult for AFM to directly image/identify and measure cell-bound membrane vesicles due to the similarity of surface morphology between membrane vesicles and cell surfaces. Therefore, until now no AFM studies on cell-surface membrane vesicles have been reported. In this study, we found that air drying can induce the transformation of most cell-surface membrane vesicles into pits that are more readily detectable by AFM. Based on this, we developed an AFM-based pit-measuring method and, for the first time, used AFM to indirectly measure cell-surface membrane vesicles on cultured endothelial cells. Using this approach, we observed and quantitatively measured at least two populations of cell-surface membrane vesicles, a nanoscale population (<500 nm in diameter peaking at ∼250 nm) and a microscale population (from 500 nm to ∼2 μm peaking at ∼0.8 μm), whereas confocal microscopy only detected the microscale population. The AFM-based pit-measuring method is potentially useful for studying cell-surface membrane vesicles and for investigating the mechanisms of membrane vesicle formation/release.

  18. Involvement of the Striatal Medium Spiny Neurons of the Direct Pathway in the Motor Stimulant Effects of Phencyclidine

    PubMed Central

    Bonito-Oliva, Alessandra; DuPont, Caitlin; Madjid, Nather; Ögren, Sven Ove

    2016-01-01

    Background: The psychotomimetic phencyclidine (PCP) produces behavioral symptoms similar to those observed in schizophrenia, accompanied by increased motor activity. The dopamine and adenosine 3’,5’-cyclic monophosphate-regulated phosphoprotein of 32kDa (DARPP-32) is enriched in the medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of the striatum and has been implicated in the actions of PCP. We examined the effects of deletion of DARPP-32 in distinct populations of striatal MSNs, on the ability of PCP to induce motor activation and memory deficit. Methods: The effects of PCP were examined in mice with conditional knockout of DARPP-32 in the MSNs of the direct, or indirect pathway. DARPP-32 phosphorylation was determined by Western blotting. The motor stimulant effects of PCP were determined by measuring locomotion following acute and chronic administration. Memory deficit was evaluated using the passive avoidance test. Results: Loss of DARPP-32 in direct MSNs prevents PCP-induced phosphorylation and abolishes the motor stimulation effects of PCP. In contrast, lack of DARPP-32 in indirect MSNs does not affect the ability of PCP to promote DARPP-32 phosphorylation and to increase motor activity. The impairment in passive avoidance induced by PCP is independent of the expression of DARPP-32 in direct or indirect MSNs. Conclusions: The increase in DARPP-32 phosphorylation induced by PCP occurs selectively in the MSNs of the direct pathway, which are also specifically involved in the motor stimulant effects of this drug. The memory deficit induced by PCP is not linked to the expression of DARPP-32 in striatal MSNs. PMID:26657176

  19. Electrocatalytic oxygen reduction reaction on perovskite oxides: series versus direct pathway.

    PubMed

    Poux, Tiphaine; Bonnefont, Antoine; Kéranguéven, Gwénaëlle; Tsirlina, Galina A; Savinova, Elena R

    2014-07-21

    The mechanism of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on LaCoO(3) and La(0.8)Sr(0.2)MnO(3) perovskite oxides is studied in 1 M NaOH by using the rotating ring disc electrode (RRDE) method. By combining experimental studies with kinetic modeling, it was demonstrated that on perovskite, as well as on perovskite/carbon electrodes, the ORR follows a series pathway through the intermediate formation of hydrogen peroxide. The escape of this intermediate from the electrode strongly depends on: 1) The loading of perovskite; high loadings lead to an overall 4 e(-) oxygen reduction due to efficient hydrogen peroxide re-adsorption on the active sites and its further reduction. 2) The addition of carbon to the catalytic layer, which affects both the utilization of the perovskite surface and the production of hydrogen peroxide. 3) The type of oxide; La(0.8)Sr(0.2)MnO(3) displays higher (compared to LaCoO(3)) activity in the reduction of oxygen to hydrogen peroxide and in the reduction/oxidation of the latter.

  20. Bim is a direct target of a neuronal E2F-dependent apoptotic pathway.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Subhas C; Liu, David X; Greene, Lloyd A

    2005-09-14

    The inappropriate expression/activation of cell-cycle-related molecules is associated with neuron death in many experimental paradigms and human neuropathologic conditions. However, the means whereby this links to the core apoptotic machinery in neurons have been unclear. Here, we show that the pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 homology 3 domain-only molecule Bcl-2 interacting mediator of cell death (Bim) is a target of a cell-cycle-related apoptotic pathway in neuronal cells. Induction of Bim in NGF-deprived cells requires expression and activity of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (cdk4) and consequent de-repression of E2 promoter binding factor (E2F)-regulated genes including members of the myb transcription factor family. The Bim promoter contains two myb binding sites, mutation of which abolishes induction of a Bim promoter-driven reporter by NGF deprivation or E2F-dependent gene de-repression. NGF deprivation significantly increases endogenous levels of C-myb and its occupancy of the endogenous Bim promoter. These findings support a model in which apoptotic stimuli lead to cdk4 activation, consequent de-repression of E2F-regulated mybs, and induction of pro-apoptotic Bim.

  1. Mineral phosphate solubilization by rhizosphere bacteria and scope for manipulation of the direct oxidation pathway involving glucose dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Sashidhar, B; Podile, A R

    2010-07-01

    Microbial biodiversity in the soil plays a significant role in metabolism of complex molecules, helps in plant nutrition and offers countless new genes, biochemical pathways, antibiotics and other metabolites, useful molecules for agronomic productivity. Phosphorus being the second most important macro-nutrient required by the plants, next to nitrogen, its availability in soluble form in the soils is of great importance in agriculture. Microbes present in the soil employ different strategies to make use of unavailable forms of phosphate and in turn also help plants making phosphate available for plant use. Azotobacter, a free-living nitrogen fixer, is known to increase the fertility of the soil and in turn the productivity of different crops. The glucose dehydrogenase gene, the first enzyme in the direct oxidation pathway, contributes significantly to mineral phosphate solubilization ability in several Gram-negative bacteria. It is possible to enhance further the biofertilizer potential of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria by introducing the genes involved mineral phosphate solubilization without affecting their ability to fix nitrogen or produce phytohormones for dual benefit to agricultural crops. Glucose dehydrogenases from Gram-negative bacteria can be engineered to improve their ability to use different substrates, function at higher temperatures and EDTA tolerance, etc., through site-directed mutagenesis. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. Targeted expression of μ-opioid receptors in a subset of striatal direct-pathway neurons restores opiate reward.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yijun; Ostlund, Sean B; James, Alex S; Park, Chang Sin; Ge, Weihong; Roberts, Kristofer W; Mittal, Nitish; Murphy, Niall P; Cepeda, Carlos; Kieffer, Brigitte L; Levine, Michael S; Jentsch, James David; Walwyn, Wendy M; Sun, Yi E; Evans, Christopher J; Maidment, Nigel T; Yang, X William

    2014-02-01

    μ-opioid receptors (MORs) are necessary for the analgesic and addictive effects of opioids such as morphine, but the MOR-expressing neuronal populations that mediate the distinct opiate effects remain elusive. Here we devised a new conditional bacterial artificial chromosome rescue strategy to show, in mice, that targeted MOR expression in a subpopulation of striatal direct-pathway neurons enriched in the striosome and nucleus accumbens, in an otherwise MOR-null background, restores opiate reward and opiate-induced striatal dopamine release and partially restores motivation to self administer an opiate. However, these mice lack opiate analgesia or withdrawal. We used Cre-mediated deletion of the rescued MOR transgene to establish that expression of the MOR transgene in the striatum, rather than in extrastriatal sites, is needed for the restoration of opiate reward. Our study demonstrates that a subpopulation of striatal direct-pathway neurons is sufficient to support opiate reward-driven behaviors and provides a new intersectional genetic approach to dissecting neurocircuit-specific gene function in vivo.

  3. Direct and indirect parieto-medial temporal pathways for spatial navigation in humans: evidence from resting-state functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Boccia, Maddalena; Sulpizio, Valentina; Nemmi, Federico; Guariglia, Cecilia; Galati, Gaspare

    2017-05-01

    Anatomical and functional findings in primates suggest the existence of a dedicated parieto-medial temporal pathway for spatial navigation, consisting of both direct and indirect projections from the caudal inferior parietal lobe (cIPL) to the hippocampus and the parahippocampal cortex, with indirect projections relaying through the posterior cingulate and retrosplenial cortex. This neural network is largely unexplored in humans. This study aimed at testing the existence of a parieto-medial temporal pathway for spatial navigation in humans. We explored the cortical connectivity patterns of the parahippocampal place area (PPA), the retrosplenial cortex (RSC), and the hippocampus (HC) using resting-state functional connectivity MRI. Our results demonstrate the existence of connections between the medial temporal lobe structures, i.e., PPA and HC, and the angular gyrus (AG), the human homologue of cIPL, as well as between RSC and AG. These connectivity patterns seem to reflect the direct and the indirect projections found in primates from cIPL to the medial temporal lobe. Such a result deserves feasible considerations to better understand the brain networks underpinning human spatial navigation.

  4. Mechanisms of direct inhibition of the respiratory sulfate-reduction pathway by (per)chlorate and nitrate.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Hans K; Kuehl, Jennifer V; Hazra, Amrita B; Justice, Nicholas B; Stoeva, Magdalena K; Sczesnak, Andrew; Mullan, Mark R; Iavarone, Anthony T; Engelbrektson, Anna; Price, Morgan N; Deutschbauer, Adam M; Arkin, Adam P; Coates, John D

    2015-06-01

    We investigated perchlorate (ClO(4)(-)) and chlorate (ClO(3)(-)) (collectively (per)chlorate) in comparison with nitrate as potential inhibitors of sulfide (H(2)S) production by mesophilic sulfate-reducing microorganisms (SRMs). We demonstrate the specificity and potency of (per)chlorate as direct SRM inhibitors in both pure cultures and undefined sulfidogenic communities. We demonstrate that (per)chlorate and nitrate are antagonistic inhibitors and resistance is cross-inducible implying that these compounds share at least one common mechanism of resistance. Using tagged-transposon pools we identified genes responsible for sensitivity and resistance in Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20. We found that mutants in Dde_2702 (Rex), a repressor of the central sulfate-reduction pathway were resistant to both (per)chlorate and nitrate. In general, Rex derepresses its regulon in response to increasing intracellular NADH:NAD(+) ratios. In cells in which respiratory sulfate reduction is inhibited, NADH:NAD(+) ratios should increase leading to derepression of the sulfate-reduction pathway. In support of this, in (per)chlorate or nitrate-stressed wild-type G20 we observed higher NADH:NAD(+) ratios, increased transcripts and increased peptide counts for genes in the core Rex regulon. We conclude that one mode of (per)chlorate and nitrate toxicity is as direct inhibitors of the central sulfate-reduction pathway. Our results demonstrate that (per)chlorate are more potent inhibitors than nitrate in both pure cultures and communities, implying that they represent an attractive alternative for controlling sulfidogenesis in industrial ecosystems. Of these, perchlorate offers better application logistics because of its inhibitory potency, solubility, relative chemical stability, low affinity for mineral cations and high mobility in environmental systems.

  5. Mechanisms of direct inhibition of the respiratory sulfate-reduction pathway by (per)chlorate and nitrate

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Hans K; Kuehl, Jennifer V; Hazra, Amrita B; Justice, Nicholas B; Stoeva, Magdalena K; Sczesnak, Andrew; Mullan, Mark R; Iavarone, Anthony T; Engelbrektson, Anna; Price, Morgan N; Deutschbauer, Adam M; Arkin, Adam P; Coates, John D

    2015-01-01

    We investigated perchlorate (ClO4−) and chlorate (ClO3−) (collectively (per)chlorate) in comparison with nitrate as potential inhibitors of sulfide (H2S) production by mesophilic sulfate-reducing microorganisms (SRMs). We demonstrate the specificity and potency of (per)chlorate as direct SRM inhibitors in both pure cultures and undefined sulfidogenic communities. We demonstrate that (per)chlorate and nitrate are antagonistic inhibitors and resistance is cross-inducible implying that these compounds share at least one common mechanism of resistance. Using tagged-transposon pools we identified genes responsible for sensitivity and resistance in Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20. We found that mutants in Dde_2702 (Rex), a repressor of the central sulfate-reduction pathway were resistant to both (per)chlorate and nitrate. In general, Rex derepresses its regulon in response to increasing intracellular NADH:NAD+ ratios. In cells in which respiratory sulfate reduction is inhibited, NADH:NAD+ ratios should increase leading to derepression of the sulfate-reduction pathway. In support of this, in (per)chlorate or nitrate-stressed wild-type G20 we observed higher NADH:NAD+ ratios, increased transcripts and increased peptide counts for genes in the core Rex regulon. We conclude that one mode of (per)chlorate and nitrate toxicity is as direct inhibitors of the central sulfate-reduction pathway. Our results demonstrate that (per)chlorate are more potent inhibitors than nitrate in both pure cultures and communities, implying that they represent an attractive alternative for controlling sulfidogenesis in industrial ecosystems. Of these, perchlorate offers better application logistics because of its inhibitory potency, solubility, relative chemical stability, low affinity for mineral cations and high mobility in environmental systems. PMID:25405978

  6. Non-collinear magnetism and exchange bias at the FM NiFe/AFM NiMn interface: local spin density FLAPW study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, K.; Freeman, A. J.; Wang, D.-S.; Zhong, L.; Fernandez-de-Castro, J.

    2001-03-01

    Magnetism at interfaces, such as the exchange bias between ferromagnetic (FM) and antiferromagnetic (AFM) materials, has attracted great attention because of technological applications. In order to investigate magnetic structures at the FM/AFM interface, we have implemented the FLAPW (E. Wimmer, H. Krakauer, M. Weinert and A.J. Freeman, PRB 24, 864(1981)) methodologies including non-collinear magnetism, in which the magnetic moment direction as well as the magnitude can vary continuously all over space. We first demonstrate this approach to determine the structure of a magnetic structure at an interface between FM NiFe and AFM NiMn. Although both bulk systems each show collinear FM and AFM structures, we found that a perpendicular magnetic orientation at their interface is energetically favorable, where the magnetic moments of the FM NiFe tend to lie perpendicular to those of AFM NiMn.

  7. Different Corticostriatal Integration in Spiny Projection Neurons from Direct and Indirect Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Barrera, Edén; Vizcarra-Chacón, Bianca J.; Tapia, Dagoberto; Bargas, José; Galarraga, Elvira

    2010-01-01

    The striatum is the principal input structure of the basal ganglia. Major glutamatergic afferents to the striatum come from the cerebral cortex and make monosynaptic contacts with medium spiny projection neurons (MSNs) and interneurons. Also: glutamatergic afferents to the striatum come from the thalamus. Despite differences in axonal projections, dopamine (DA) receptors expression and differences in excitability between MSNs from “direct” and “indirect” basal ganglia pathways, these neuronal classes have been thought as electrophysiologically very similar. Based on work with bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenic mice, here it is shown that corticostriatal responses in D1- and D2-receptor expressing MSNs (D1- and D2-MSNs) are radically different so as to establish an electrophysiological footprint that readily differentiates between them. Experiments in BAC mice allowed us to predict, with high probability (P > 0.9), in rats or non-BAC mice, whether a recorded neuron, from rat or mouse, was going to be substance P or enkephalin (ENK) immunoreactive. Responses are more prolonged and evoke more action potentials in D1-MSNs, while they are briefer and exhibit intrinsic autoregenerative responses in D2-MSNs. A main cause for these differences was the interaction of intrinsic properties with the inhibitory contribution in each response. Inhibition always depressed corticostriatal depolarization in D2-MSNs, while it helped in sustaining prolonged depolarizations in D1-MSNs, in spite of depressing early discharge. Corticostriatal responses changed dramatically after striatal DA depletion in 6-hydroxy-dopamine (6-OHDA) lesioned animals: a response reduction was seen in substance P (SP)+ MSNs whereas an enhanced response was seen in ENK+ MSNs. The end result was that differences in the responses were greatly diminished after DA depletion. PMID:20589098

  8. Tissue-Specific Whole Transcriptome Sequencing in Castor, Directed at Understanding Triacylglycerol Lipid Biosynthetic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Swarbreck, David; Febrer, Melanie; Larson, Tony R.; Graham, Ian A.; Caccamo, Mario; Slabas, Antoni R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Storage triacylglycerols in castor bean seeds are enriched in the hydroxylated fatty acid ricinoleate. Extensive tissue-specific RNA-Seq transcriptome and lipid analysis will help identify components important for its biosynthesis. Methodology/Findings Storage triacylglycerols (TAGs) in the endosperm of developing castor (Ricinus communis) seeds are highly enriched in ricinoleic acid (18:1-OH). We have analysed neutral lipid fractions from other castor tissues using TLC, GLC and mass spectrometry. Cotyledons, like the endosperm, contain high levels of 18:1-OH in TAG. Pollen and male developing flowers accumulate TAG but do not contain 18:1-OH and leaves do not contain TAG or 18:1-OH. Analysis of acyl-CoAs in developing endosperm shows that ricinoleoyl-CoA is not the dominant acyl-CoA, indicating that either metabolic channelling or enzyme substrate selectivity are important in the synthesis of tri-ricinolein in this tissue. RNA-Seq transcriptomic analysis, using Illumina sequencing by synthesis technology, has been performed on mRNA isolated from two stages of developing seeds, germinating seeds, leaf and pollen-producing male flowers in order to identify differences in lipid-metabolic pathways and enzyme isoforms which could be important in the biosynthesis of TAG enriched in 18:1-OH. This study gives comprehensive coverage of gene expression in a variety of different castor tissues. The potential role of differentially expressed genes is discussed against a background of proteins identified in the endoplasmic reticulum, which is the site of TAG biosynthesis, and transgenic studies aimed at increasing the ricinoleic acid content of TAG. Conclusions/Significance Several of the genes identified in this tissue-specific whole transcriptome study have been used in transgenic plant research aimed at increasing the level of ricinoleic acid in TAG. New candidate genes have been identified which might further improve the level of ricinoleic acid in transgenic

  9. Heterologous transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains direct functional chimeric influenza virus hemagglutinins into the endocytic pathway

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Chimeric genes were created by fusing DNA sequences encoding the ectodomain of the influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) to DNA coding for the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of either the G glycoprotein of vesicular stomatitis virus or the gC glycoprotein of Herpes simplex virus 1. CV-1 cells infected with SV40 vectors carrying the recombinant genes expressed large amounts of the chimeric proteins, HAG or HAgC on their surfaces. Although the ectodomains of HAG and HAgC differed in their immunological properties from that of HA, the chimeras displayed the biological functions characteristic of the wild-type protein. Both HAG and HAgC bound erythrocytes as efficiently as HA did and, after brief exposure to an acidic environment, induced the fusion of erythrocyte and CV-1 cell membranes. However, the behavior of HAG and HAgC at the cell surface differed from that of HA in several important respects. HAG and HAgC were observed to collect in coated pits whereas wild-type HA was excluded from those structures. In the presence of chloroquine, which inhibits the exit of receptors from endosomes, HAG and HAgC accumulated in intracellular vesicles. By contrast, chloroquine had no effect on the location of wild-type HA. HAG and HAgC labeled at the cell surface exhibited a temperature-dependent acquisition of resistance to extracellular protease at a rate similar to the rates of internalization observed for many cell surface receptors. HA acquired resistance to protease at a rate at least 20- fold slower. We conclude that HAG and HAgC are efficiently routed into the endocytic pathway and HA is not. However, like HA, HAG was degraded slowly, raising the possibility that HAG recycles to the plasma membrane. PMID:3007532

  10. Synthesis of Bulk BC8 Silicon Allotrope by Direct Transformation and Reduced-Pressure Chemical Pathways.

    PubMed

    Kurakevych, Oleksandr O; Le Godec, Yann; Crichton, Wilson A; Guignard, Jérémy; Strobel, Timothy A; Zhang, Haidong; Liu, Hanyu; Coelho Diogo, Cristina; Polian, Alain; Menguy, Nicolas; Juhl, Stephen J; Gervais, Christel

    2016-09-06

    Phase-pure samples of a metastable allotrope of silicon, Si-III or BC8, were synthesized by direct elemental transformation at 14 GPa and ∼900 K and also at significantly reduced pressure in the Na-Si system at 9.5 GPa by quenching from high temperatures ∼1000 K. Pure sintered polycrystalline ingots with dimensions ranging from 0.5 to 2 mm can be easily recovered at ambient conditions. The chemical route also allowed us to decrease the synthetic pressures to as low as 7 GPa, while pressures required for direct phase transition in elemental silicon are significantly higher. In situ control of the synthetic protocol, using synchrotron radiation, allowed us to observe the underlying mechanism of chemical interactions and phase transformations in the Na-Si system. Detailed characterization of Si-III using X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, (29)Si NMR spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy are discussed. These large-volume syntheses at significantly reduced pressures extend the range of possible future bulk characterization methods and applications.

  11. Intranasal administration of carbamazepine to mice: a direct delivery pathway for brain targeting.

    PubMed

    Serralheiro, Ana; Alves, Gilberto; Fortuna, Ana; Falcão, Amílcar

    2014-08-18

    The currently available antiepileptic drugs are typically administered via oral or intravenous (IV) routes which commonly exhibit high systemic distribution into non-targeted tissues, leading to peripheral adverse effects and limited brain uptake. In order to improve the efficacy and tolerability of the antiepileptic drug therapy, alternative administration strategies have been investigated. The purpose of the present study was to assess the pharmacokinetics of carbamazepine administered via intranasal (IN) and IV routes to mice, and to investigate whether a direct transport of the drug from nose to brain could be involved. The similar pharmacokinetic profiles obtained in all matrices following both administration routes indicate that, after IN delivery, carbamazepine reaches quickly and extensively the bloodstream, achieving the brain predominantly via systemic circulation. However, the uneven biodistribution of carbamazepine through the brain regions with higher concentrations in the olfactory bulb and frontal cortex following IN instillation, in comparison with the homogenous brain distribution pattern after IV injection, strongly suggests the involvement of a direct transport of carbamazepine from nose to brain. Therefore, it seems that IN delivery represents a suitable and promising alternative route to administer carbamazepine not only for the chronically use of the drug but also in emergency conditions.

  12. Direct neural pathways convey distinct visual information to Drosophila mushroom bodies

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Katrin; Aso, Yoshinori; Hige, Toshihide; Knapek, Stephan; Ichinose, Toshiharu; Friedrich, Anja B; Turner, Glenn C; Rubin, Gerald M; Tanimoto, Hiromu

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that visual and olfactory associative memories of Drosophila share mushroom body (MB) circuits (Vogt et al., 2014). Unlike for odor representation, the MB circuit for visual information has not been characterized. Here, we show that a small subset of MB Kenyon cells (KCs) selectively responds to visual but not olfactory stimulation. The dendrites of these atypical KCs form a ventral accessory calyx (vAC), distinct from the main calyx that receives olfactory input. We identified two types of visual projection neurons (VPNs) directly connecting the optic lobes and the vAC. Strikingly, these VPNs are differentially required for visual memories of color and brightness. The segregation of visual and olfactory domains in the MB allows independent processing of distinct sensory memories and may be a conserved form of sensory representations among insects. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14009.001 PMID:27083044

  13. Pathways to adult sexual revictimization: direct and indirect behavioral risk factors across the lifespan.

    PubMed

    Fargo, Jamison D

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate direct and indirect social and behavioral risk factors for adult sexual revictimization. Participants include 147 adult, predominantly African American (88%) women, 59% of whom had a documented history of child sexual abuse. Participants are interviewed in adulthood about adolescent and adult sexual victimization as well as other background and lifestyle characteristics. Structural equation modeling indicates that the relationship between child and adolescent sexual victimization is indirect, mediated by adolescent risk-taking behavior. The relationship between adolescent and adult sexual victimization is also indirect, mediated by risky sexual behavior. The residual effects of early childhood family environment and childhood physical abuse also indirectly predict sexual revictimization. Results provide empirical support for the general supposition that the relationship between child and adult sexual victimization is complex and that many intermediary factors differentially affect risk for a heightened vulnerability to sexual revictimization.

  14. Adiposity Has No Direct Effect on Carotid Intima-Media Thickness in Adolescents and Young Adults: Use of Structural Equation Modeling to Elucidate Indirect & Direct Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhiqian; Khoury, Philip R.; McCoy, Connie E.; Shah, Amy S.; Kimball, Thomas R.; Dolan, Lawrence M.; Urbina, Elaine M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) is associated with CV events in adults. Thicker cIMT is found in youth with CV risk factors including obesity. Which risk factors have the most effect upon cIMT in youth and whether obesity has direct or indirect effects is not known. We used structural equation modeling to elucidate direct and indirect pathways through which obesity and other risk factors were associated with cIMT. Methods We collected demographics, anthropometrics and laboratory data on 784 subjects age 10–24 years (mean 18.0 ± 3.3 years). Common, bulb and internal carotid cIMT were measured by ultrasound. Multivariable regression analysis was performed to assess independent determinants of cIMT. Analyses were repeated with structural equation modeling to determine direct and indirect effects. Results Multivariable regression models explained 11%–22% of variation of cIMT. Age, sex and systolic blood pressure (BP) z-score were significant determinants of all cIMT segments. Body mass index (BMI) z-score, race, presence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and non-HDL were significant for some segments (all p=0.05). The largest direct effect on cIMT was age (0.312) followed by BP (0.228), Blood glucose control (0.108) and non-HDL (0.134). BMI only had a significant indirect effect through blood glucose control, BP & non-HDL. High sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) had a small indirect effect through blood glucose control (all p=0.05). Conclusions Age and BP are the major factors with direct effect on cIMT. Glucose and non-HDL were also important in this cohort with a high prevalence of T2DM. BMI only has indirect effects, through other risk factors. Traditional CV risk factors have important direct effects on cIMT in the young, but adiposity exerts its influence only through other CV risk factors. PMID:26752690

  15. AFM imaging of fenestrated liver sinusoidal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Braet, F; Wisse, E

    2012-12-01

    Each microscope with its dedicated sample preparation technique provides the investigator with a specific set of data giving an instrument-determined (or restricted) insight into the structure and function of a tissue, a cell or parts thereof. Stepwise improvements in existing techniques, both instrumental and preparative, can sometimes cross barriers in resolution and image quality. Of course, investigators get really excited when completely new principles of microscopy and imaging are offered in promising new instruments, such as the AFM. The present paper summarizes a first phase of studies on the thin endothelial cells of the liver. It describes the preparation-dependent differences in AFM imaging of these cells after isolation. Special point of interest concerned the dynamics of the fenestrae, thought to filter lipid-carrying particles during their transport from the blood to the liver cells. It also describes the attempts to image the details of these cells when alive in cell cultures. It explains what physical conditions, mainly contributed to the scanning stylus, are thought to play a part in the limitations in imaging these cells. The AFM also offers promising specifications to those interested in cell surface details, such as membrane-associated structures, receptors, coated pits, cellular junctions and molecular aggregations or domains. The AFM also offers nano-manipulation possibilities, strengths and elasticity measurements, force interactions, affinity measurements, stiffness and other physical aspects of membranes and cytoskeleton. The potential for molecular approaches is there. New developments in cantilever construction and computer software promise to bring real time video imaging to the AFM. Home made accessories for the first generation of AFM are now commodities in commercial instruments and make the life of the AFM microscopist easier. Also, the combination of different microscopies, such as AFM and TEM, or AFM and SEM find their way to the

  16. [Application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) in ophthalmology].

    PubMed

    Milka, Michał; Mróz, Iwona; Jastrzebska, Maria; Wrzalik, Roman; Dobrowolski, Dariusz; Roszkowska, Anna M; Moćko, Lucyna; Wylegała, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows to examine surface of different biological objects in the nearly physiological conditions at the nanoscale. The purpose of this work is to present the history of introduction and the potential applications of the AFM in ophthalmology research and clinical practice. In 1986 Binnig built the AFM as a next generation of the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM). The functional principle of AFM is based on the measurement of the forces between atoms on the sample surface and the probe. As a result, the three-dimensional image of the surface with the resolution on the order of nanometres can be obtained. Yamamoto used as the first the AFM on a wide scale in ophthalmology. The first investigations used the AFM method to study structure of collagen fibres of the cornea and of the sclera. Our research involves the analysis of artificial intraocular lenses (IOLs). According to earlier investigations, e.g. Lombardo et al., the AFM was used to study only native IOLs. Contrary to the earlier investigations, we focused our measurements on lenses explanted from human eyes. The surface of such lenses is exposed to the influence of the intraocular aqueous environment, and to the related impacts of biochemical processes. We hereby present the preliminary results of our work in the form of AFM images depicting IOL surface at the nanoscale. The images allowed us to observe early stages of the dye deposit formation as well as local calcinosis. We believe that AFM is a very promising tool for studying the structure of IOL surface and that further observations will make it possible to explain the pathomechanism of artificial intraocular lens opacity formation.

  17. Iron in carbonate containing AFm phases

    SciTech Connect

    Dilnesa, B.Z.; Lothenbach, B.; Le Saout, G.; Renaudin, G.; Mesbah, A.; Filinchuk, Y.; Wichser, A.; Wieland, E.

    2011-03-15

    One of the AFm phases in hydrated Portland cement is Ca{sub 3}(Al{sub x}Fe{sub 2} {sub -} {sub x})O{sub 6}.CaCO{sub 3}.nH{sub 2}O. It is based on hexagonal and platey structural elements and the interlayer structure incorporates CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}. The solid phases were experimentally synthesized and characterized by different techniques including X-ray techniques (XRD and EXAFS) and vibrational spectroscopy techniques (IR, Raman). Fe-monocarbonate (Fe-Mc) and Al-monocarbonate (Al-Mc) were found to be stable up to 50 {sup o}C, while Fe-hemicarbonate (Fe-Hc) was unstable with respect to Fe-Mc in the presence of calcite. Fe-Mc has a rhombohedral R3-barc symmetry which is different from the triclinic of the Al analogue. Both XRD and thermodynamic modelling of the liquid compositions indicated that Al-Mc and the Fe-Mc phases do not form solid solution. The solubility products were calculated experimentally at 20 {sup o}C and 50 {sup o}C. Under standards condition the solubility products and other thermodynamic parameters were estimated using temperature-solubility product extrapolation and found to be logK{sub S0} (Fe-Mc) = -34.59 {+-} 0.50, logK{sub S0} (Fe-Hc) = -30.83 {+-} 0.50 and logK{sub S0}(Al-Mc) = -31.32 {+-} 0.50.

  18. Raman and AFM study of gamma irradiated plastic bottle sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Yasir; Kumar, Vijay; Sonkawade, R. G.; Dhaliwal, A. S.

    2013-02-01

    In this investigation, the effects of gamma irradiation on the structural properties of plastic bottle sheet are studied. The Plastic sheets were exposed with 1.25MeV 60Co gamma rays source at various dose levels within the range from 0-670 kGy. The induced modifications were followed by micro-Raman and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The Raman spectrum shows the decrease in Raman intensity and formation of unsaturated bonds with an increase in the gamma dose. AFM image displays rough surface morphology after irradiation. The detailed Raman analysis of plastic bottle sheets is presented here, and the results are correlated with the AFM observations.

  19. High-speed AFM of human chromosomes in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picco, L. M.; Dunton, P. G.; Ulcinas, A.; Engledew, D. J.; Hoshi, O.; Ushiki, T.; Miles, M. J.

    2008-09-01

    Further developments of the previously reported high-speed contact-mode AFM are described. The technique is applied to the imaging of human chromosomes at video rate both in air and in water. These are the largest structures to have been imaged with high-speed AFM and the first imaging in liquid to be reported. A possible mechanism that allows such high-speed contact-mode imaging without significant damage to the sample is discussed in the context of the velocity dependence of the measured lateral force on the AFM tip.

  20. Multiple Smaller Missions as a Direct Pathway to Mars Sample Return

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niles, P. B.; Draper, D. S.; Evans, C. A.; Gibson, E. K.; Graham, L. D.; Jones, J. H.; Lederer, S. M.; Ming, D.; Seaman, C. H.; Archer, P. D.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Recent discoveries by the Mars Exploration Rovers, Mars Express, Mars Odyssey, and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft include multiple, tantalizing astrobiological targets representing both past and present environments on Mars. The most desirable path to Mars Sample Return (MSR) would be to collect and return samples from that site which provides the clearest examples of the variety of rock types considered a high priority for sample return (pristine igneous, sedimentary, and hydrothermal). Here we propose an MSR architecture in which the next steps (potentially launched in 2018) would entail a series of smaller missions, including caching, to multiple landing sites to verify the presence of high priority sample return targets through in situ analyses. This alternative architecture to one flagship-class sample caching mission to a single site would preserve a direct path to MSR as stipulated by the Planetary Decadal Survey, while permitting investigation of diverse deposit types and providing comparison of the site of returned samples to other aqueous environments on early Mars

  1. Activation of Direct and Indirect Pathway Medium Spiny Neurons Drives Distinct Brain-wide Responses.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Joo; Weitz, Andrew J; Bernal-Casas, David; Duffy, Ben A; Choy, ManKin; Kravitz, Alexxai V; Kreitzer, Anatol C; Lee, Jin Hyung

    2016-07-20

    A central theory of basal ganglia function is that striatal neurons expressing the D1 and D2 dopamine receptors exert opposing brain-wide influences. However, the causal influence of each population has never been measured at the whole-brain scale. Here, we selectively stimulated D1 or D2 receptor-expressing neurons while visualizing whole-brain activity with fMRI. Excitation of either inhibitory population evoked robust positive BOLD signals within striatum, while downstream regions exhibited significantly different and generally opposing responses consistent with-though not easily predicted from-contemporary models of basal ganglia function. Importantly, positive and negative signals within the striatum, thalamus, GPi, and STN were all associated with increases and decreases in single-unit activity, respectively. These findings provide direct evidence for the opposing influence of D1 and D2 receptor-expressing striatal neurons on brain-wide circuitry and extend the interpretability of fMRI studies by defining cell-type-specific contributions to the BOLD signal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Direct Pathway to Molecular Photodissociation on Metal Surfaces Using Visible Light.

    PubMed

    Kazuma, Emiko; Jung, Jaehoon; Ueba, Hiromu; Trenary, Michael; Kim, Yousoo

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate molecular photodissociation on single-crystalline metal substrates, driven by visible-light irradiation. The visible-light-induced photodissociation on metal substrates has long been thought to never occur, either because visible-light energy is much smaller than the optical energy gap between the frontier electronic states of the molecule or because the molecular excited states have short lifetimes due to the strong hybridization between the adsorbate molecular orbitals (MOs) and metal substrate. The S-S bond in dimethyl disulfide adsorbed on both Cu(111) and Ag(111) surfaces was dissociated through direct electronic excitation from the HOMO-derived MO (the nonbonding lone-pair type orbitals on the S atoms (nS)) to the LUMO-derived MO (the antibonding orbital localized on the S-S bond (σ*SS)) by irradiation with visible light. A combination of scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory calculations revealed that visible-light-induced photodissociation becomes possible due to the interfacial electronic structures constructed by the hybridization between molecular orbitals and the metal substrate states. The molecule-metal hybridization decreases the gap between the HOMO- and LUMO-derived MOs into the visible-light energy region and forms LUMO-derived MOs that have less overlap with the metal substrate, which results in longer excited-state lifetimes.

  3. BRCA1 Directs the Repair Pathway to Homologous Recombination by Promoting 53BP1 Dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Isono, Mayu; Niimi, Atsuko; Oike, Takahiro; Hagiwara, Yoshihiko; Sato, Hiro; Sekine, Ryota; Yoshida, Yukari; Isobe, Shin-Ya; Obuse, Chikashi; Nishi, Ryotaro; Petricci, Elena; Nakada, Shinichiro; Nakano, Takashi; Shibata, Atsushi

    2017-01-10

    BRCA1 promotes homologous recombination (HR) by activating DNA-end resection. By contrast, 53BP1 forms a barrier that inhibits DNA-end resection. Here, we show that BRCA1 promotes DNA-end resection by relieving the 53BP1-dependent barrier. We show that 53BP1 is phosphorylated by ATM in S/G2 phase, promoting RIF1 recruitment, which inhibits resection. 53BP1 is promptly dephosphorylated and RIF1 released, despite remaining unrepaired DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). When resection is impaired by CtIP/MRE11 endonuclease inhibition, 53BP1 phosphorylation and RIF1 are sustained due to ongoing ATM signaling. BRCA1 depletion also sustains 53BP1 phosphorylation and RIF1 recruitment. We identify the phosphatase PP4C as having a major role in 53BP1 dephosphorylation and RIF1 release. BRCA1 or PP4C depletion impairs 53BP1 repositioning, EXO1 recruitment, and HR progression. 53BP1 or RIF1 depletion restores resection, RAD51 loading, and HR in PP4C-depleted cells. Our findings suggest that BRCA1 promotes PP4C-dependent 53BP1 dephosphorylation and RIF1 release, directing repair toward HR.

  4. The pathway of aerosol direct effects impact on air quality: a case study by using process analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiandong; Xing, Jia; Wang, Shuxiao; Hao, Jiming

    2017-04-01

    In addition to direct deteriorate air quality, aerosol reduces solar radiation through light scattering and absorption (aerosol direct effects, ADE), influences regional meteorology and further impacts on air quality indirectly. Previous study shows that these process may increase 2.2% to 3.2 % of PM2.5 concentration on north hemispheric. The contribution may reach 140 ug/m3 during heavily polluted period in Beijing. But the detailed pathway is still unclear. In this study, two-way coupled WRF-CMAQ with integrated process analysis was applied to explore how aerosol direct effect impacts on air quality through atmospheric dynamic process. Meteorology and air quality in January and July, 2013 is simulated to represent winter and summer case, respectively. Two scenarios, i.e., with and without aerosol radiation feedback are used and the difference between them is treated as contribution of aerosol direct effect. Diurnal average and vertical distribution of each process are analyzed. The results show that modeling performance is increased by considering aerosol direct effects. The modifications of vertical diffusion (VDIF), dry deposition (DDEP) and secondary reactions (AERO) are the most important ways. Maximum impacts on AERO and DDEP occurred at noon, while the maximum impacts on VDIF occurred in the morning and evening. ADE decreases PM2.5 concentration through AERO in winter and increases in summer. The relative contributions of these processes vary under different pollution condition and season. Fully understanding the influence of aerosol and meteorology interaction on atmospheric composite pollution will provide important guidance for the analysis of the causes of atmospheric composite pollution and the development of effective control strategies.

  5. Spatiotemporal trajectories of reactivation of somatosensory cortex by direct and secondary pathways after dorsal column lesions in squirrel monkeys.

    PubMed

    Qi, Hui-Xin; Wang, Feng; Liao, Chia-Chi; Friedman, Robert M; Tang, Chaohui; Kaas, Jon H; Avison, Malcolm J

    2016-11-15

    After lesions of the somatosensory dorsal column (DC) pathway, the cortical hand representation can become unresponsive to tactile stimuli, but considerable responsiveness returns over weeks of post-lesion recovery. The reactivation suggests that preserved subthreshold sensory inputs become potentiated and axon sprouting occurs over time to mediate recovery. Here, we studied the recovery process in 3 squirrel monkeys, using high-resolution cerebral blood volume-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (CBV-fMRI) mapping of contralateral somatosensory cortex responsiveness to stimulation of distal finger pads with low and high level electrocutaneous stimulation (ES) before and 2, 4, and 6weeks after a mid-cervical level contralateral DC lesion. Both low and high intensity ES of digits revealed the expected somatotopy of the area 3b hand representation in pre-lesion monkeys, while in areas 1 and 3a, high intensity stimulation was more effective in activating somatotopic patterns. Six weeks post-lesion, and irrespective of the severity of loss of direct DC inputs (98%, 79%, 40%), somatosensory cortical area 3b of all three animals showed near complete recovery in terms of somatotopy and responsiveness to low and high intensity ES. However there was significant variability in the patterns and amplitudes of reactivation of individual digit territories within and between animals, reflecting differences in the degree of permanent and/or transient silencing of primary DC and secondary inputs 2weeks post-lesion, and their spatio-temporal trajectories of recovery between 2 and 6weeks. Similar variations in the silencing and recovery of somatotopy and responsiveness to high intensity ES in areas 3a and 1 are consistent with individual differences in damage to and recovery of DC and spinocuneate pathways, and possibly the potentiation of spinothalamic pathways. Thus, cortical deactivation and subsequent reactivation depends not only on the degree of DC lesion, but also on

  6. Interleukin-18 directly protects cortical neurons by activating PI3K/AKT/NF-κB/CREB pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jia; Ping, Feng-feng; Lv, Wen-ting; Feng, Jun-yi; Shang, Jing

    2014-09-01

    Interleukin-18 (IL-18), a member of the IL-1 family of cytokines, was initially identified as an interferon (IFN)-γ-inducing factor. IL-18 is expressed in both immune and non-immune cells and participates in the adjustment of multitude cellular functions. Nonetheless, the effects of IL-18 on cortical neurons have not been explored. The present study was conducted to investigate the influence of IL-18 on rat primary cortical neurons and elucidate the underlying mechanisms. We proved that rrIL-18 increased the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in a time-dependent manner. Treatment with rrIL-18 (50 ng/ml) deactivated phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) by facilitating its phosphorylation, enhanced the expression of Phosphoinositide 3-OH kinase (PI3K) and p-Akt, standing for the activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway. As its pivotal downstream pathways, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB)/Bcl-2 and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) were examined in further steps. Our data revealed that rrIL-18 stimulated NF-κB activation, improved p-CREB and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 expression levels. But rrIL-18 had little or no effect on GSK-3β pathway. Besides, rrIL-18 increased levels of BDNF and Bcl-2/Bax ratio and decreased cleaved caspase-3 expression to protect cortical neurons from damage induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). These results in vitro showed the protection of IL-18 on cortical neurons. And this direct neuroprotective effect of IL-18 is crippled by PI3K inhibitor wortmannin.

  7. Understanding the direct radiative effect of dust aerosols on transport pathways using the NASA GEOS-5 AGCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowottnick, E. P.; Colarco, P. R.; Lau, W. K.; Kim, K.

    2012-12-01

    African dust aerosols are transported across the Atlantic Ocean to the Caribbean by the easterly trade winds.While in transport, dust aerosols interact with the Earth system in various ways, ranging from influencing the local radiation balance to serving as a nutrient for tropical ecosystems.However, our current understanding of these processes is incomplete and serves as a source of uncertainty in Earth system modeling.Here, we focus on understanding the direct radiative impacts of African dust aerosols on the atmosphere using the NASA GEOS-5 atmospheric general circulation model that simulates aerosols with an online version of the GOCART model. For this study, we compare a high resolution GEOS-5 climate simulation where aerosols have been radiatively coupled to the atmosphere to one where aerosols are treated as passive tracers for June - September, 2009. Utilizing streamfunction and velocity potentials of the simulated dust mass flux, we isolate differences in dust transport pathways caused by the direct radiative effect of dust by comparing the rotational and divergent components of the dust flow in the horizontal and vertical on various timescales.Additionally, we pay special attention to the influence of dust aerosols on African Easterly Jet (AEJ) position and strength, as well as temperature profiles, cloudiness, and precipitation to gain further insight into the direct radiative effect of dust aerosols on the atmosphere

  8. Direct entry by RNase E is a major pathway for the degradation and processing of RNA in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Justin E; Kime, Louise; Romero A, David; McDowall, Kenneth J

    2014-10-01

    Escherichia coli endoribonuclease E has a major influence on gene expression. It is essential for the maturation of ribosomal and transfer RNA as well as the rapid degradation of messenger RNA. The latter ensures that translation closely follows programming at the level of transcription. Recently, one of the hallmarks of RNase E, i.e. its ability to bind via a 5'-monophosphorylated end, was shown to be unnecessary for the initial cleavage of some polycistronic tRNA precursors. Here we show using RNA-seq analyses of ribonuclease-deficient strains in vivo and a 5'-sensor mutant of RNase E in vitro that, contrary to current models, 5'-monophosphate-independent, 'direct entry' cleavage is a major pathway for degrading and processing RNA. Moreover, we present further evidence that direct entry is facilitated by RNase E binding simultaneously to multiple unpaired regions. These simple requirements may maximize the rate of degradation and processing by permitting multiple sites to be surveyed directly without being constrained by 5'-end tethering. Cleavage was detected at a multitude of sites previously undescribed for RNase E, including ones that regulate the activity and specificity of ribosomes. A potentially broad role for RNase G, an RNase E paralogue, in the trimming of 5'-monophosphorylated ends was also revealed.

  9. Control of torque direction by spinal pathways at the cat ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Nichols, T R; Lawrence, J H; Bonasera, S J

    1993-01-01

    To study the biomechanics of the calcaneal tendon's complex insertion onto the calcaneus, we measured torque-time trajectories exerted by the triceps surae and tibialis anterior muscles in eight unanesthetized decerebrate cats using a multi-axis force-moment sensor placed at the ankle joint. The ankle was constrained to an angle of 110 degrees plantarflexion. Muscles were activated using crossed-extension (XER), flexion (FWR), and caudal cutaneous sural nerve (SNR) reflexes. Torque contributions of other muscles activated by these reflexes were eliminated by denervation or tenotomy. In two animals, miniature pressure transducers were implanted among tendon fibers from the lateral gastrocnemius (LG) muscle that insert straight into the calcaneus or among tendon fibers from the medial gastrocnemius (MG) that cross over and insert on the lateral aspect of calcaneus. Reflexively evoked torques had the following directions: FWR, dorsiflexion and adduction; SNR, plantarflexion and abduction; and XER, plantarflexion and modest abduction or adduction. The proportion of abduction torque to plantarflexion torque was always greater for SNR than XER; this difference was about 50% of the magnitude of abduction torque generated by tetanic stimulation of the peronei. During SNR, pressures were higher in regions of the calcaneal tendon originating from MG than regions originating from LG. Similarly, pressures within the MG portion of the calcaneal tendon were higher during SNR than during XER, although these two reflexes produced matched ankle plantarflexion forces. Selective tenotomies and electromyographic recordings further demonstrated that MG generated most of the torque in response to SNR, while soleus, LG, and MG all generated torques in response to XER.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Transcranial direct current stimulation modulates human color discrimination in a pathway-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Costa, Thiago L; Nagy, Balázs V; Barboni, Mirella T S; Boggio, Paulo S; Ventura, Dora F

    2012-01-01

    Previous research showed that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) can modulate visual cortex excitability. However, there is no experiment on the effects of tDCS on color perception to date. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of tDCS on color discrimination tasks. Fifteen healthy subjects (mean age of 25.6 ± 4.4 years) were tested with Cambridge Color Test 2.0 (Trivector and ellipses protocols) and a Forced-choice Spatial Color Contrast Sensitivity task (vertical red-green sinusoidal grating) while receiving tDCS. Anodal, cathodal, and sham tDCS were delivered at Oz for 22 min using two square electrodes (25 cm(2) with a current of 1.5 mA) in sessions separated by 7 days. Anodal tDCS significantly increased tritan sensitivity (p < 0.01) and had no significant effect on protan, deutan, or red-green grating discrimination. The effects on the tritan discrimination returned to baseline after 15 min (p < 0.01). Cathodal tDCS reduced the sensitivity in the deutan axis and increased sensitivity in the tritan axis (p < 0.05). The lack of anodal tDCS effects in the protan, deutan, and red-green grating sensitivities could be explained by a "ceiling effect" since adults in this age range tend to have optimal color discrimination performance for these hues. The differential effects of cathodal tDCS on tritan and deutan sensitivities and the absence of the proposed ceiling effects for the tritan axes might be explained by Parvocellular (P) and Koniocellular (K) systems with regard to their functional, physiological, and anatomical differences. The results also support the existence of a systematic segregation of P and K color-coding cells in V1. Future research and possible clinical implications are discussed.

  11. Molecular mechanism of direct proflavine-DNA intercalation: evidence for drug-induced minimum base-stacking penalty pathway.

    PubMed

    Sasikala, Wilbee D; Mukherjee, Arnab

    2012-10-11

    DNA intercalation, a biophysical process of enormous clinical significance, has surprisingly eluded molecular understanding for several decades. With appropriate configurational restraint (to prevent dissociation) in all-atom metadynamics simulations, we capture the free energy surface of direct intercalation from minor groove-bound state for the first time using an anticancer agent proflavine. Mechanism along the minimum free energy path reveals that intercalation happens through a minimum base stacking penalty pathway where nonstacking parameters (Twist→Slide/Shift) change first, followed by base stacking parameters (Buckle/Roll→Rise). This mechanism defies the natural fluctuation hypothesis and provides molecular evidence for the drug-induced cavity formation hypothesis. The thermodynamic origin of the barrier is found to be a combination of entropy and desolvation energy.

  12. The Notch Signaling Pathway Controls the Size of the Ocular Lens by Directly Suppressing p57Kip2 Expression▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Junling; Lin, Min; Zhang, Lingna; York, J. Philippe; Zhang, Pumin

    2007-01-01

    The size of an organ must be tightly controlled so that it fits within an organism. The mammalian lens is a relatively simple organ composed of terminally differentiated, amitotic lens fiber cells capped on the anterior surface by a layer of immature, mitotic epithelial cells. The proliferation of lens epithelial cells fuels the growth of the lens, thus controling the size of the lens. We report that the Notch signaling pathway defines the boundary between proliferation and differentiation in the developing lens. The loss of Notch signaling results in the loss of epithelial cells to differentiation and a much smaller lens. We found that the Notch effector Herp2 is expressed in lens epithelium and directly suppresses p57Kip2 expression, providing a molecular link between Notch signaling and the cell cycle control machinery during lens development. PMID:17709399

  13. A direct amygdala-motor pathway for emotional displays to influence action: A diffusion tensor imaging study.

    PubMed

    Grèzes, Julie; Valabrègue, Romain; Gholipour, Bahar; Chevallier, Coralie

    2014-12-01

    An important evolutionary function of emotions is to prime individuals for action. Although functional neuroimaging has provided evidence for such a relationship, little is known about the anatomical substrates allowing the limbic system to influence cortical motor-related areas. Using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and probabilistic tractography on a cohort of 40 participants, we provide evidence of a structural connection between the amygdala and motor-related areas (lateral and medial precentral, motor cingulate and primary motor cortices, and postcentral gyrus) in humans. We then compare this connection with the connections of the amygdala with emotion-related brain areas (superior temporal sulcus, fusiform gyrus, orbitofrontal cortex, and lateral inferior frontal gyrus) and determine which amygdala nuclei are at the origin of these projections. Beyond the well-known subcortical influences over automatic and stereotypical emotional behaviors, a direct amygdala-motor pathway might provide a mechanism by which the amygdala can influence more complex motor behaviors.

  14. Ability of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GAF01 to remove AFM1 in vitro and to counteract AFM1 immunotoxicity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Abbès, Samir; Salah-Abbès, Jalila Ben; Sharafi, Hakimeh; Jebali, Rania; Noghabi, Kambiz Akbari; Oueslati, Ridha

    2013-01-01

    Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) has been detected in many parts of the world both in raw milk and many dairy products, causing great economic losses and human disease. Unfortunately, there are few studies dealing with AFM1 immunotoxicity/interactions with lactic acid bacteria for potential application as a natural preventive agent. The aim of this study was to isolate (from dairy products) food-grade probiotic bacteria able to degrade/bind AFM1 in vitro and evaluate whether the same organism(s) could impart a protective role against AFM1-induced immunotoxicity in exposed Balb/c mice. Bacteria (Lactobacillus plantarum MON03 and L. rhamnosus GAF01) were isolated from Tunisian artisanal butter and then tested for abilities to eliminate AFM1 from phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and reconstituted milk (containing 0.05, 0.10, and 0.20 µg AFM1/ml) after 0, 6, and 24 h at 37°C. Results showed that the selected bacteria could 'remove' AFM1 both in PBS and skimmed milk. The binding abilities of AFM1 by L. plantarum MON03 and L. rhamnosus GAF01 strains (at 10(8) CFU/ml) in PBS and reconstituted milk ranged, respectively, from 16.1-78.6% and 15.3-95.1%; overall, L. rhamnosus showed a better potential for removal than L. plantarum. 'Removal' appeared to be by simple binding; the bacteria/AFM1 complex was stable and only a very small proportion of mycotoxin was released back into the solution. L. rhamnosus GAF01 had the highest binding capacity and was selected for use in the in vivo study. Those results indicated that use of the organism prevented AFM1-induced effects on total white and red blood cells, and lymphocyte subtypes, after 15 days of host treatment. These studies clearly indicated that L. rhamnosus GAF01 was able to bind AFM1 in vitro and-by mechanisms that might also be related to a binding effect-counteract AFM1-induced immunotoxicity. Moreover, by itself, this bacterium was not toxic and could potentially be used as an additive in dairy products and in biotechnology for

  15. AFM studies of homogeneous and mixed lipid mono- and bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runyan, Lindsay; Pantea, Mircea; Hoffmann, Peter

    2007-03-01

    Phospholipid mono- and bilayers have potential research applications in various areas of biology and medicine, where they serve as substitutes for cell membranes. The use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) to characterize such materials allows for the measurement of the topographic features of the material on a subnanometric scale and of the forces arising due to the interaction between the AFM tip and the phospholipid surface; the addition of biological molecules commonly found in cells to the AFM tip, such as proteins, allows the interaction between these molecules and a cell membrane to be studied. For this study, mixed phospholipid monolayers consisting of 1,2-Distearoyl-sn-Glycero-3-Phosphoethanolamine (DSPE) and 1,2-Dioleoyl-sn-Glycero-3-Phosphoethanolamine (DOPE) as well as bilayers consisting of 1,2-Dipalmitoyl-sn-Glycero-3-Phosphocholine (DPPC) were synthesized and studied using AFM imaging and force measurements.

  16. Introduction to atomic force microscopy (AFM) in biology.

    PubMed

    Goldsbury, Claire S; Scheuring, Simon; Kreplak, Laurent

    2009-11-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has the unique capability of imaging biological samples with molecular resolution in buffer solution. In addition to providing topographical images of surfaces with nanometer- to angstrom-scale resolution, forces between single molecules and mechanical properties of biological samples can be investigated from the nanoscale to the microscale. Importantly, the measurements are made in buffer solutions, allowing biological samples to "stay alive" within a physiological-like environment while temporal changes in structure are measured-e.g., before and after addition of chemical reagents. These qualities distinguish AFM from conventional imaging techniques of comparable resolution, e.g., electron microscopy (EM). This unit provides an introduction to AFM on biological systems and describes specific examples of AFM on proteins, cells, and tissues. The physical principles of the technique and methodological aspects of its practical use and applications are also described.

  17. AFM-based quantification of conformational changes in DNA caused by reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Berg, Florian; Wilken, Janine; Helm, Christiane A; Block, Stephan

    2015-01-08

    Radical induced modification of DNA plays an important role in many pathological pathways like cancer development, aging, etc. In this work, we quantify radical-induced DNA damage that causes transitions from double to single stranded DNA using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The plasmid pBR322 is attacked by free hydroxyl radicals that are produced by Fenton's reaction; the strength of the radical attack is controlled via the ratio of hydroxyl radical molecules to DNA base pairs. The extent of DNA modification is assessed by AFM tapping mode (TM) imaging of the plasmids (after adsorption onto PAH-functionalized mica) in air. As single stranded DNA chains (height ∼2 Å) are much smaller than intact DNA strands (∼5 Å), their fraction can be quantified based on the height distribution, which allows a simplified data analysis in comparison to similar AFM-based approaches. It is found that the amount of damaged DNA strands increases with increasing strength of radical attack, and decreases if ROS scavengers like sodium acetate are added. Competition curves are calculated for the interaction of hydroxyl radicals with DNA and sodium acetate, which finally allows calculation of relative rate constants for the respective reactions.

  18. Nanoscale structural features determined by AFM for single virus particles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu-wen W; Odorico, Michael; Meillan, Matthieu; Vellutini, Luc; Teulon, Jean-Marie; Parot, Pierre; Bennetau, Bernard; Pellequer, Jean-Luc

    2013-11-21

    In this work, we propose "single-image analysis", as opposed to multi-image averaging, for extracting valuable information from AFM images of single bio-particles. This approach allows us to study molecular systems imaged by AFM under general circumstances without restrictions on their structural forms. As feature exhibition is a resolution correlation, we have performed AFM imaging on surfaces of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) to demonstrate variations of structural patterns with probing resolution. Two AFM images were acquired with the same tip at different probing resolutions in terms of pixel width, i.e., 1.95 and 0.49 nm per pixel. For assessment, we have constructed an in silico topograph based on the three-dimensional crystal structure of TMV as a reference. The prominent artifacts observed in the AFM-determined shape of TMV were attributed to tip convolutions. The width of TMV rod was systematically overestimated by ~10 nm at both probing resolutions of AFM. Nevertheless, the effects of tip convolution were less severe in vertical orientation so that the estimated height of TMV by AFM imaging was in close agreement with the in silico X-ray topograph. Using dedicated image processing algorithms, we found that at low resolution (i.e., 1.95 nm per pixel), the extracted surface features of TMV can be interpreted as a partial or full helical repeat (three complete turns with ~7.0 nm in length), while individual protein subunits (~2.5 nm) were perceivable only at high resolution. The present study shows that the scales of revealed structural features in AFM images are subject to both probing resolution and processing algorithms for image analysis.

  19. Nanoscale structural features determined by AFM for single virus particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shu-Wen W.; Odorico, Michael; Meillan, Matthieu; Vellutini, Luc; Teulon, Jean-Marie; Parot, Pierre; Bennetau, Bernard; Pellequer, Jean-Luc

    2013-10-01

    In this work, we propose ``single-image analysis'', as opposed to multi-image averaging, for extracting valuable information from AFM images of single bio-particles. This approach allows us to study molecular systems imaged by AFM under general circumstances without restrictions on their structural forms. As feature exhibition is a resolution correlation, we have performed AFM imaging on surfaces of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) to demonstrate variations of structural patterns with probing resolution. Two AFM images were acquired with the same tip at different probing resolutions in terms of pixel width, i.e., 1.95 and 0.49 nm per pixel. For assessment, we have constructed an in silico topograph based on the three-dimensional crystal structure of TMV as a reference. The prominent artifacts observed in the AFM-determined shape of TMV were attributed to tip convolutions. The width of TMV rod was systematically overestimated by ~10 nm at both probing resolutions of AFM. Nevertheless, the effects of tip convolution were less severe in vertical orientation so that the estimated height of TMV by AFM imaging was in close agreement with the in silico X-ray topograph. Using dedicated image processing algorithms, we found that at low resolution (i.e., 1.95 nm per pixel), the extracted surface features of TMV can be interpreted as a partial or full helical repeat (three complete turns with ~7.0 nm in length), while individual protein subunits (~2.5 nm) were perceivable only at high resolution. The present study shows that the scales of revealed structural features in AFM images are subject to both probing resolution and processing algorithms for image analysis.

  20. BOREAS AFM-03-NCAR Electra 1994 Aircraft Sounding Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenschow, Donald H.; Oncley, Steven P.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-3 team used the National Center for Atmospheric Research's (NCAR) Electra aircraft to make sounding measurements to study the planetary boundary layer using in situ and remote-sensing measurements. Measurements were made of wind speed and direction, air pressure and temperature, potential temperature, dewpoint, mixing ratio of H, O, CO, concentration, and ozone concentration. Twenty-five research missions were flown over the Northern Study Area (NSA), Southern Study Area (SSA), and the transect during BOREAS Intensive Field Campaigns (IFCs) 1, 2, and 3 during 1994. All missions had from four to ten soundings through the top of the planetary boundary layer. This sounding data set contains all of the in situ vertical profiles through the boundary layer top that were made (with the exception of 'porpoise' maneuvers). Data were recorded in one-second time intervals. These data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The NCAR Electra 1994 aircraft sounding data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  1. BOREAS AFM-2 Wyoming King Air 1994 Aircraft Sounding Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Robert D.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS AFM-2 team used the University of Wyoming King Air aircraft during IFCs 1, 2, and 3 in 1994 to collected pass-by-pass fluxes (and many other statistics) for the large number of level (constant altitude), straight-line passes used in a variety of flight patterns over the SSA and NSA and areas along the transect between these study areas. The data described here form a second set, namely soundings that were incorporated into nearly every research flight by the King Air in 1994. These soundings generally went from near the surface to above the inversion layer. Most were flown immediately after takeoff or immediately after finishing the last flux pattern of that particular day's flights. The parameters that were measured include wind direction, wind speed, west wind component (u), south wind component (v), static pressure, air dry bulb temperature, potential temperature, dewpoint, temperature, water vapor mixing ratio, and CO2 concentration. Data on the aircraft's location, attitude, and altitude during data collection are also provided. These data are stored in tabular ASCH files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  2. Structure assisted compressed sensing reconstruction of undersampled AFM images.

    PubMed

    Oxvig, Christian Schou; Arildsen, Thomas; Larsen, Torben

    2017-01-01

    The use of compressed sensing in atomic force microscopy (AFM) can potentially speed-up image acquisition, lower probe-specimen interaction, or enable super resolution imaging. The idea in compressed sensing for AFM is to spatially undersample the specimen, i.e. only acquire a small fraction of the full image of it, and then use advanced computational techniques to reconstruct the remaining part of the image whenever this is possible. Our initial experiments have shown that it is possible to leverage inherent structure in acquired AFM images to improve image reconstruction. Thus, we have studied structure in the discrete cosine transform coefficients of typical AFM images. Based on this study, we propose a generic support structure model that may be used to improve the quality of the reconstructed AFM images. Furthermore, we propose a modification to the established iterative thresholding reconstruction algorithms that enables the use of our proposed structure model in the reconstruction process. Through a large set of reconstructions, the general reconstruction capability improvement achievable using our structured model is shown both quantitatively and qualitatively. Specifically, our experiments show that our proposed algorithm improves over established iterative thresholding algorithms by being able to reconstruct AFM images to a comparable quality using fewer measurements or equivalently obtaining a more detailed reconstruction for a fixed number of measurements. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Robust strategies for automated AFM force curve analysis--I. Non-adhesive indentation of soft, inhomogeneous materials.

    PubMed

    Lin, David C; Dimitriadis, Emilios K; Horkay, Ferenc

    2007-06-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has found wide applicability as a nanoindentation tool to measure local elastic properties of soft materials. An automated approach to the processing of AFM indentation data, namely, the extraction of Young's modulus, is essential to realizing the high-throughput potential of the instrument as an elasticity probe for typical soft materials that exhibit inhomogeneity at microscopic scales. This paper focuses on Hertzian analysis techniques, which are applicable to linear elastic indentation. We compiled a series of synergistic strategies into an algorithm that overcomes many of the complications that have previously impeded efforts to automate the fitting of contact mechanics models to indentation data. AFM raster data sets containing up to 1024 individual force-displacement curves and macroscopic compression data were obtained from testing polyvinyl alcohol gels of known composition. Local elastic properties of tissue-engineered cartilage were also measured by the AFM. All AFM data sets were processed using customized software based on the algorithm, and the extracted values of Young's modulus were compared to those obtained by macroscopic testing. Accuracy of the technique was verified by the good agreement between values of Young's modulus obtained by AFM and by direct compression of the synthetic gels. Validation of robustness was achieved by successfully fitting the vastly different types of force curves generated from the indentation of tissue-engineered cartilage. For AFM indentation data that are amenable to Hertzian analysis, the method presented here minimizes subjectivity in preprocessing and allows for improved consistency and minimized user intervention. Automated, large-scale analysis of indentation data holds tremendous potential in bioengineering applications, such as high-resolution elasticity mapping of natural and artificial tissues.

  4. Foxo1 is a downstream effector of Isl1 in direct pathway striatal projection neuron development within the embryonic mouse telencephalon.

    PubMed

    Waclaw, R R; Ehrman, L A; Merchan-Sala, P; Kohli, V; Nardini, D; Campbell, K

    2017-04-01

    Recent studies have shown that the LIM-homeodomain transcription factor Isl1 is required for the survival and differentiation of direct pathway striatonigral neurons during embryonic development. The downstream effectors of Isl1 in these processes are presently unknown. We show here that Foxo1, a transcription factor that has been implicated in cell survival, is expressed in striatal projection neurons (SPNs) that derive from the Isl1 lineage (i.e. direct pathway SPNs). Moreover, Isl1 conditional knockouts (cKOs) show a severe loss of Foxo1 expression at E15.5 with a modest recovery by E18.5. Although Foxo1 is enriched in the direct pathway SPNs at embryonic stages, it is expressed in both direct and indirect pathway SPNs at postnatal time points as evidenced by co-localization with EGFP in both Drd1-EGFP and Drd2-EGFP BAC transgenic mice. Foxo1 was not detected in striatal interneurons as marked by the transcription factor Nkx2.1. Conditional knockout of Foxo1 using Dlx5/6-CIE mice results in reduced expression of the SPN marker Darpp-32, as well as in the direct pathway SPN markers Ebf1 and Zfp521 within the embryonic striatum at E15.5. However, this phenotype improves in the conditional mutants by E18.5. Interestingly, the Foxo family members, Foxo3 and Foxo6, remain expressed at late embryonic stages in the Foxo1 cKOs unlike the Isl1 cKOs where Foxo1/3/6 as well as the Foxo1/3 target Bach2 are all reduced. Taken together, these findings suggest that Foxo-regulated pathways are downstream of Isl1 in the survival and/or differentiation of direct pathway SPNs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Influence of Fluid Cell Design on the Frequency Response of AFM Microcantilevers in Liquid Media

    PubMed Central

    Motamedi, Ramin; Wood-Adams, Paula M.

    2008-01-01

    A study of the frequency response of AFM microcantilevers in liquid media contained in a commercial fluid cell is presented. Such systems exhibit complicated dynamics which are often not well described by available theories. Their dynamic behavior has a direct effect on the use of the AFM in dynamic mode while imaging in liquid or while extracting the rheological properties of the fluid. We explore the issues related to the design of the cantilever holder/fluid cell and propose an approach for evaluating, minimizing and recognizing the ultimate limitations of commercial cantilever holders. A technique for estimating the frequency response spectrum of the fluid cell itself from experimental data is presented. This spectrum can then be used to evaluate whether or not the fluid cell is suited for the desired purpose. PMID:27873849

  6. New insights into the mucoadhesion of pectins by AFM roughness parameters in combination with SPR.

    PubMed

    Joergensen, Lars; Klösgen, Beate; Simonsen, Adam Cohen; Borch, Jonas; Hagesaether, Ellen

    2011-06-15

    The object of this study was to assess the mucoadhesion of the three main commercially available types of pectin by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and surface Plasmon resonance (SPR). Polyacrylic acid and polyvinyl pyrrolidone were used as positive and negative control, respectively. Image analysis of the AFM scans revealed a significant change of roughness parameters when low-ester pectin was introduced to mica supported bovine submaxillarymucin, indicating a high mucoadhesion for this type of pectin. Only minor changes were observed with high-ester and amidated pectin. The same ranking order of adhesion affinity was confirmed by SPR. In conclusion, a high specific mucin interaction of pectin with a high charge density was demonstrated directly on a molecular scale without interference from the viscoelastic properties or the intra-molecular interactions between the polymer chains themselves, using two independent methods.

  7. AFM investigation and optical band gap study of chemically deposited PbS thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, S.; Mansoor, M.; Abubakar; Asim, M. M.

    2016-08-01

    The interest into deposition of nanocrystalline PbS thin films, the potential of designing and tailoring both the topographical features and the band gap energy (Eg) by controlling growth parameters, has significant technological importance. Nanocrystalline thin films of lead sulfide were grown onto glass substrates by chemical bath deposition (CBD) method. The experiments were carried out by varying deposition temperature. We report on the modification of structural and optical properties as a function of deposition temperature. The morphological changes of the films were analyzed by using SEM and AFM. AFM was also used to calculate average roughness of the films. XRD spectra indicated preferred growth of cubic phase of PbS films in (200) direction with increasing deposition time. Optical properties have been studied by UV-Spectrophotometer. From the diffused reflectance spectra we have calculated the optical Eg shift from 0.649-0.636 eV with increasing deposition time.

  8. Characterisation of tissue factor-bearing extracellular vesicles with AFM: comparison of air-tapping-mode AFM and liquid Peak Force AFM.

    PubMed

    Hardij, Julie; Cecchet, Francesca; Berquand, Alexandre; Gheldof, Damien; Chatelain, Christian; Mullier, François; Chatelain, Bernard; Dogné, Jean-Michel

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are shed from cells and carry markers of the parent cells. Vesicles derived from cancer cells reach the bloodstream and locally influence important physiological processes. It has been previously shown that procoagulant vesicles are circulating in patients' fluids. These EVs are therefore considered as promising biomarkers for the thrombotic risk. Because of their small size, classical methods such as flow cytometry suffer from limitation for their characterisation. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been proposed as a promising complementary method for the characterisation of EVs. THE OBJECTIVES OF THIS STUDY ARE: (a) to develop and validate AFM with specific antibodies (anti-TF) and (b) to compare air and liquid modes for EVs' size and number determination as potential biomarkers of the prothrombotic risk. AFM multimode nanoscope III was used for air tapping mode (TM). AFM catalyst was used for liquid Peak Force Tapping (PFT) mode. Vesicles are generated according to Davila et al.'s protocol. Substrates are coated with various concentrations of antibodies, thanks to ethanolamine and glutaraldehyde. Vesicles were immobilised on antibody-coated surfaces to select tissue factor (TF)-positive vesicles. The size range of vesicles observed in liquid PFT mode is 6-10 times higher than in air mode. This corresponds to the data found in the literature. We recommend liquid PFT mode to analyse vesicles on 5 µg/ml antibody-coated substrates.

  9. The cAMP Signaling Pathway and Direct Protein Kinase A Phosphorylation Regulate Polycystin-2 (TRPP2) Channel Function*

    PubMed Central

    Cantero, María del Rocío; Velázquez, Irina F.; Streets, Andrew J.; Ong, Albert C. M.; Cantiello, Horacio F.

    2015-01-01

    Polycystin-2 (PC2) is a TRP-type, Ca2+-permeable non-selective cation channel that plays an important role in Ca2+ signaling in renal and non-renal cells. The effect(s) of the cAMP pathway and kinase mediated phosphorylation of PC2 seem to be relevant to PC2 trafficking and its interaction with polycystin-1. However, the role of PC2 phosphorylation in channel function is still poorly defined. Here we reconstituted apical membranes of term human syncytiotrophoblast (hST), containing endogenous PC2 (PC2hst), and in vitro translated channel protein (PC2iv). Addition of the catalytic subunit of PKA increased by 566% the spontaneous PC2hst channel activity in the presence of ATP. Interestingly, 8-Br-cAMP also stimulated spontaneous PC2hst channel activity in the absence of the exogenous kinase. Either stimulation was inhibited by addition of alkaline phosphatase, which in turn, was reversed by the phosphatase inhibitor vanadate. Neither maneuver modified the single channel conductance but instead increased channel mean open time. PKA directly phosphorylated PC2, which increased the mean open time but not the single channel conductance of the channel. PKA phosphorylation did not modify either R742X truncated or S829A-mutant PC2iv channel function. The data indicate that the cAMP pathway regulates PC2-mediated cation transport in the hST. The relevant PKA site for PC2 channel regulation centers on a single residue serine 829, in the carboxyl terminus. PMID:26269590

  10. New AFM Techniques for Investigating Molecular Growth Mechanisms of Protein Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Huayu; Nadarajah, Arunan; Konnert, John H.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1998-01-01

    . Measuring these units was not attempted before and most studies have assumed that the growth unit consisted of individual protein molecules. The linescan mode of AFM instruments allows the crystal surface to be scanned along a single line. By scanning across a growth step an image showing the motion of the step is obtained. Normally such an image shows a straight line for continuous and constant step velocity. In this study by increasing the scan rate and by decreasing the step velocity (by decreasing the supersaturation), we were able to capture images of individual growth events, shown by jump discontinuities in the step line. By suitable integration of the image the growth unit dimension in the scanned direction can be obtained. Since multiple units can be involved in the growth process it is necessary to collect a statistically relevant sample before drawing conclusions about the growth mechanism. This technique was successfully employed to obtain the dimensions of growth units for the (110) face, showing that they consisted of various aggregates corresponding to the 43 helices in the crystal structure.

  11. Molecular dynamics study on the mechanism of AFM-based nanoscratching process with water-layer lubrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jiaqi; Zhao, Jinsheng; Dong, Zeguang; Liu, Pinkuan

    2015-08-01

    The atomic force microscopy (AFM) based direct nanoscratching has been thoroughly studied but the mechanism of nanoscratching with water-layer lubrication is yet to be well understood. In current study, three-dimensional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are conducted to evaluate the effects of the water-layer lubrication on the AFM-based nanoscratching process on monocrystalline copper. Comparisons of workpiece deformation, scratching forces, and friction coefficients are made between the water-lubricated and dry scratching under various thickness of water layer, scratching depth and scratching velocity. Simulation results reveal that the water layer has positive impact on the surface quality and significant influence on the scratching forces (normal forces and tangential forces). The friction coefficients of the tip in water-lubricated nanoscratching are significantly bigger than those in the dry process. Our simulation results shed lights on a promising AFM-based nanofabrication method, which can assist to get nanoscale surface morphologies with higher quality than traditional approaches.

  12. In situ AFM Study of Amelogenin Assembly and Disassembly Dynamics on Charged Surfaces Provides Insights on Matrix Protein Self-Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Long; Bromley, Keith M.

    2012-01-01

    Because self-assembly of matrix proteins is a key step in hard tissue mineralization, developing an understanding of the assembly pathways and underlying mechanisms is likely to be important for successful hard tissue engineering. While many studies of matrix protein assembly have been performed on bulk solutions, in vivo these proteins are likely to be in contact with charged biological surfaces composed of lipids, proteins, or minerals. Here we report the results of an in situ AFM study of self-assembly by amelogenin - the principal protein of the extracellular matrix in developing enamel - in contact with two different charged substrates: hydrophilic negatively charged bare mica and positively charged 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APS) silanized mica. First we demonstrate an AFM-based protocol for determining the size of both amelogenin monomers and oligomers. Using this protocol, we find that, although amelogenin exists primarily as ∼26 nm in diameter nanospheres in bulk solution at pH8.0 studied by DLS, it behaves dramatically differently upon interacting with charged substrates at the same pH, and exhibits complex substrate-dependent assembly pathways and dynamics. On positively charged APS-treated mica surfaces, amelogenin forms a relatively uniform population of decameric oligomers which then transforms into two main populations: higher-order assemblies of oligomers and amelogenin monomers, while on negatively charged bare mica surfaces, it forms a film of monomers that exhibits tip-induced desorption and patterning. The present study represents a successful attempt to identify the size of amelogenin oligomers and to directly monitor assembly and disassembly dynamics on surfaces. The findings have implications for amelogenin-controlled calcium phosphate mineralization in vitro and may offer new insights into in vivo self-assembly of matrix proteins, as well as their control over hard tissue formation. PMID:21916473

  13. AFM investigation of Martian soil simulants on micromachined Si substrates.

    PubMed

    Vijendran, S; Sykulska, H; Pike, W T

    2007-09-01

    The micro and nanostructures of Martian soil simulants with particles in the micrometre-size range have been studied using a combination of optical and atomic force microscopy (AFM) in preparation for the 2007 NASA Phoenix Mars Lander mission. The operation of an atomic force microscope on samples of micrometre-sized soil particles is a poorly investigated area where the unwanted interaction between the scanning tip and loose particles results in poor image quality and tip contamination by the sample. In order to mitigate these effects, etched silicon substrates with a variety of features have been used to facilitate the sorting and gripping of particles. From these experiments, a number of patterns were identified that were particularly good at isolating and immobilizing particles for AFM imaging. This data was used to guide the design of micromachined substrates for the Phoenix AFM. Both individual particles as well as aggregates were successfully imaged, and information on sizes, shapes and surface morphologies were obtained. This study highlights both the strengths and weaknesses of AFM for the potential in situ investigation of Martian soil and dust. Also presented are more general findings of the limiting operational constraints that exist when attempting the AFM of high aspect ratio particles with current technology. The performance of the final designs of the substrates incorporated on Phoenix will be described in a later paper.

  14. Low tip damage AFM technique development for nano structures characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Biao; Wang, Charles C.; Huang, Po-Fu; Uritsky, Yuri

    2010-06-01

    Ambient dynamic mode (tapping mode or intermittent-contact mode) AFM imaging has been used extensively for the characterization of the topography of nano structures. However, the results are beset with artifacts, because hard tapping of the AFM tip on sample surface usually causes premature tip damage. Through careful study of the cantilever amplitude and phase signals as functions of tip-to-sample distance, principle of non-contact AFM operation was discovered to enable high resolution and low tip damage AFM image acquisition [1, 2]. However, current study discovers that the conventional way of acquiring amplitude and phase versus distance curves gives erroneous non-contact operating range, because the tip gets damaged during the data acquisition process. A new technique is developed to reliably map the operating parameters of an intact tip that ensures the AFM be operated with the correct non-contact settings. Two examples are given to illustrate the successful applications of this new technique. The first example involves the size characterization of polystyrene latex (PSL) nano particles used for light scattering tool calibration. The second example is the development of robust recipes for the measurement of the depth of phase-shift mask trenches.

  15. Deconvolution of calcium fluorescent indicator signal from AFM cantilever reflection.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Ayon, G Monserratt; Oliver, David J; Grutter, Peter H; Komarova, Svetlana V

    2012-08-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can be combined with fluorescence microscopy to measure the changes in intracellular calcium levels (indicated by fluorescence of Ca²⁺ sensitive dye fluo-4) in response to mechanical stimulation performed by AFM. Mechanical stimulation using AFM is associated with cantilever movement, which may interfere with the fluorescence signal. The motion of the AFM cantilever with respect to the sample resulted in changes of the reflection of light back to the sample and a subsequent variation in the fluorescence intensity, which was not related to changes in intracellular Ca²⁺ levels. When global Ca²⁺ responses to a single stimulation were assessed, the interference of reflected light with the fluorescent signal was minimal. However, in experiments where local repetitive stimulations were performed, reflection artifacts, correlated with cantilever motion, represented a significant component of the fluorescent signal. We developed a protocol to correct the fluorescence traces for reflection artifacts, as well as photobleaching. An added benefit of our method is that the cantilever reflection in the fluorescence recordings can be used for precise temporal correlation of the AFM and fluorescence measurements.

  16. [Wnt/β-catenin signal pathway mediated Salidroside induced directional differentiation from mouse mesenchymal stem cells to nerve cells].

    PubMed

    Guo, Chao; Liu, Run; Zhao, Hong-Bin; Qin, Guan-Hua

    2015-03-01

    To explore the molecule mechanism of Salidroside inducing directional differentiation of mouse mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into neuronal cells. The mouse multipotent mesenchymal precursor cell line (D1) was taken as the objective. Cultured MSCs were divided into the negative control group (complete culture solution), the positive control group (containing 1 mmol/L β-mercaptoethanol), the Salidroside induced group (20 mg/L Salidroside), and the blocked group (20 ng/ ml DKK1, a special inhibitor of Wnt/β-catenin signal pathway). All cells were inoculated in a 6-well plate (1 x 10(4) cells/cm2) and grouped for 24 h. The expression of p-catenin was detected by fluorescence Immunochemistry in the negative control group, the positive control group, and the Salidroside induced group. The expression of neuron-specific enolase (NSE), beta 3 class III tubulin (β-tubulin III), nuclear receptor related factor 1 (Nurr1), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) mRNA, Wnt3a, β-catenin, low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein6 (LRP6), Axin mRNA were detected using reverse transcrip- tion PCR (RT-PCR). The expression of β-catenin and NSE protein were analyzed by Western blot in the negative control group, the positive control group, and the Salidroside induced group. Ca2+ chelating agents (EGTA), L-type Ca2+ channel blocker (Nifedpine), and IP3Ks special inhibitor (LY294002) were used to block Ca2+ signal pathway respectively. The expression of Wnt3a, LRP-6, Axin, glycogen syn- thase kinase (GSK-3), and β-catenin mRNA were detected by RT-PCR. The β-catenin protein expression was analyzed using Western blot. Compared with the positive control group, β-catenin protein was strong positively expressed; the expression of Wnt3a, β-catenin, LRP6, Axin, NSE, β-tubulin III, Nurr1 mRNA, and NSE protein were obviously up-regulated in the Salidroside induced group (P < 0.01). Compared with the positive control group and the Salidroside induced group, β-catenin, NSE, Nurr1

  17. Genome-wide analysis of N1ICD/RBPJ targets in vivo reveals direct transcriptional regulation of Wnt, SHH, and hippo pathway effectors by Notch1.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaochen; Hibbs, Matthew Aaron; Gard, Ashley Lauren; Shylo, Natalia Aliakseeuna; Yun, Kyuson

    2012-04-01

    The Notch pathway plays a pivotal role in regulating cell fate decisions in many stem cell systems. However, the full repertoire of Notch target genes in vivo and the mechanisms through which this pathway activity is integrated with other signaling pathways are largely unknown. Here, we report a transgenic mouse in which the activation of the Notch pathway massively expands the neural stem cell (NSC) pool in a cell context-dependent manner. Using this in vivo system, we identify direct targets of RBPJ/N1ICD in cortical NSCs at a genome-wide level through combined ChIP-Seq and transcriptome analyses. Through a highly conservative analysis of these datasets, we identified 98 genes that are directly regulated by N1ICD/RPBJ in vivo. These include many transcription factors that are known to be critical for NSC self-renewal (Sox2, Pax6, Tlx, and Id4) and the transcriptional effectors of the Wnt, SHH, and Hippo pathways, TCF4, Gli2, Gli3, Yap1, and Tead2. Since little is known about the function of the Hippo-Yap pathway in NSCs, we analyzed Yap1 expression and function in NSCs. We show that Yap1 expression is restricted to the stem cell compartment in the developing forebrain and that its expression is sufficient to rescue Notch pathway inhibition in NSC self-renewal assays. Together, results of this study reveal a previously underappreciated complexity and breadth of Notch1 targets in vivo and show direct interaction between Notch and Hippo-Yap pathways in NSCs.

  18. Msi2 Maintains Quiescent State of Hair Follicle Stem Cells by Directly Repressing the Hh Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xianghui; Tian, Yuhua; Song, Yongli; Shi, Jianyun; Xu, Jiuzhi; Xiong, Kai; Li, Jia; Xu, Wenjie; Zhao, Yiqiang; Shuai, Jianwei; Chen, Lei; Plikus, Maksim V; Lengner, Christopher J; Ren, Fazheng; Xue, Lixiang; Yu, Zhengquan

    2017-05-01

    Hair follicles (HFs) undergo precisely regulated cycles of active regeneration (anagen), involution (catagen), and relative quiescence (telogen). Hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) play important roles in regenerative cycling. Elucidating mechanisms that govern HFSC behavior can help uncover the underlying principles of hair development, hair growth disorders, and skin cancers. RNA-binding proteins of the Musashi (Msi) have been implicated in the biology of different stem cell types, yet they have not been studied in HFSCs. Here we utilized gain- and loss-of-function mouse models to demonstrate that forced MSI2 expression retards anagen entry and consequently delays hair growth, whereas loss of Msi2 enhances hair regrowth. Furthermore, our findings show that Msi2 maintains quiescent state of HFSCs in the process of the telogen-to-anagen transition. At the molecular level, our unbiased transcriptome profiling shows that Msi2 represses Hedgehog signaling activity and that Shh is its direct target in the hair follicle. Taken together, our findings reveal the importance of Msi2 in suppressing hair regeneration and maintaining HFSC quiescence. The previously unreported Msi2-Shh-Gli1 pathway adds to the growing understanding of the complex network governing cyclic hair growth. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. USP39, a direct target of microRNA-133a, promotes progression of pancreatic cancer via the AKT pathway.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jing; Liu, Tiande; Huang, Peng; Yan, Wei; Guo, Changkuo; Xiong, Le; Liu, Anwen

    2017-04-22

    Ubiquitin specific protease 39 (USP39) is one of the deubiquitinating enzymes without ubiquitin protease activity, which has been implicated in the progression of several cancers. However, the role of USP39 in pancreatic cancer (PC) is largely unknown. In present study, we found that USP39 expression was elevated in PC tissues than adjacent non-tumor tissues. Importantly, we demonstrated that overexpression of USP39 is closely correlated with tumor progression and poor survival in PC patients. Furthermore, high USP39 expression was observed in PC cell lines and ectopic expression of USP39 significantly enhanced in vitro cell proliferation and promoted in vivo tumor growth, whereas silencing USP39 suppressed growth of PC cells. Besides, our experimental data revealed that knockdown of USP39 induced cell apoptosis through inhibition of AKT signaling pathway in PC cells. Moreover, USP39 was a direct target of miR-133a, a microRNA that has been reported to be involved in progression of PC. Taken together, our data provide a novel PC regulatory axis that is miR-133a/USP39, the dysfunction of which drives diverse aspects of the progression of PC.

  20. Direct observation of kinetic traps associated with structural transformations leading to multiple pathways of S-layer assembly.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seong-Ho; Chung, Sungwook; Sanii, Babak; Comolli, Luis R; Bertozzi, Carolyn R; De Yoreo, James J

    2012-08-07

    The concept of a folding funnel with kinetic traps describes folding of individual proteins. Using in situ Atomic Force Microscopy to investigate S-layer assembly on mica, we show this concept is equally valid during self-assembly of proteins into extended matrices. We find the S-layer-on-mica system possesses a kinetic trap associated with conformational differences between a long-lived transient state and the final stable state. Both ordered tetrameric states emerge from clusters of the monomer phase, however, they then track along two different pathways. One leads directly to the final low-energy state and the other to the kinetic trap. Over time, the trapped state transforms into the stable state. By analyzing the time and temperature dependencies of formation and transformation we find that the energy barriers to formation of the two states differ by only 0.7 kT, but once the high-energy state forms, the barrier to transformation to the low-energy state is 25 kT. Thus the transient state exhibits the characteristics of a kinetic trap in a folding funnel.

  1. A low-cost AFM setup with an interferometer for undergraduates and secondary-school students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, Antje; Feigl, Daniela; Kuhn, David; Schaupp, Manuel; Quast, Günter; Busch, Kurt; Eichner, Ludwig; Schumacher, Jens

    2013-07-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is an important tool in nanotechnology. This method makes it possible to observe nanoscopic surfaces beyond the resolution of light microscopy. In order to provide undergraduate and secondary-school students with insights into this world, we have developed a very robust low-cost AFM setup with a Fabry-Perot interferometer as a detecting device. This setup is designed to be operated almost completely manually and its simplicity gives access to a profound understanding of the working principle. Our AFM is operated in a constant height mode, i.e. the topography of the sample surface is represented directly by the deflection of the cantilever. Thus, the measuring procedure can be understood even by secondary-school students; furthermore, it is the method with the lowest cost, totalling not more than 10-15 k Euros. Nevertheless, we are able to examine a large variety of sample topographies such as CD and DVD surfaces, IC structures, blood cells, butterfly wings or moth eyes. Furthermore, force-distance curves can be recorded and the tensile moduli of some materials can be evaluated. We present our setup in detail and describe its working principles. In addition, we show various experiments which have already been performed by students.

  2. Quantitative Analysis of Human Keratinocyte Cell Elasticity using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM)

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Carmen Kar Man; Yang, Ruiguo; Seiffert-Sinha, Kristina; Lai, King Wai Chiu; Sinha, Animesh A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) to visualize and quantify the dynamics of epithelial cell junction interactions under physiological and pathophysiological conditions at the nanoscale. Desmosomal junctions are specialized structures critical to cellular adhesion within epithelial tissues. Disassembly of these junctions is seen consequent to the development of autoantibodies directed at specific desmosomal proteins in blistering skin diseases such as Pemphigus. However, these structures are complex and mechanically inhomogeneous, making it difficult to study and the mechanisms of autoantibody mediated keratinocyte disassembly remain largely unknown. Here, we have used AFM system to image and measure the mechanical property of living skin epithelial cells in culture. We demonstrate that the force measurement data can possibly distinguish the cell with different antibody treatment. Our demonstration of the use of AFM for in situ imaging and elasticity measurement positioned us to begin to investigate disease mechanisms and monitor therapeutic strategies in blistering skin diseases in much greater detail, to meet the demands for understanding disease pathology at the local, or tissue level. PMID:21349797

  3. Optimization of phase contrast in bimodal amplitude modulation AFM

    PubMed Central

    Damircheli, Mehrnoosh; Payam, Amir F

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bimodal force microscopy has expanded the capabilities of atomic force microscopy (AFM) by providing high spatial resolution images, compositional contrast and quantitative mapping of material properties without compromising the data acquisition speed. In the first bimodal AFM configuration, an amplitude feedback loop keeps constant the amplitude of the first mode while the observables of the second mode have not feedback restrictions (bimodal AM). Here we study the conditions to enhance the compositional contrast in bimodal AM while imaging heterogeneous materials. The contrast has a maximum by decreasing the amplitude of the second mode. We demonstrate that the roles of the excited modes are asymmetric. The operational range of bimodal AM is maximized when the second mode is free to follow changes in the force. We also study the contrast in trimodal AFM by analyzing the kinetic energy ratios. The phase contrast improves by decreasing the energy of second mode relative to those of the first and third modes. PMID:26114079

  4. Mounting of Escherichia coli spheroplasts for AFM imaging.

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Claretta J; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Allison, David P; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2005-11-01

    The cytoplasmic membrane of Escherichia coli (E. coli) is the location of numerous, chemically specific transporters and recognition elements. Investigation of this membrane in vivo by atomic force microscopy (AFM) requires removal of the cell wall and stable immobilization of the spheroplast. AFM images demonstrate that spheroplasts can be secured with warm gelatin applied to the mica substrate just before the addition of a spheroplast suspension. The resulting preparation can be repeatedly imaged by AFM over the course of several hours. Confocal fluorescence imaging confirms the association of the spheroplasts with the gelatin layer. Gelatin molecules are known to reorder into a network after heating. Entrapment within this gelatin network is believed to be responsible for the immobilization of spheroplasts on mica.

  5. AFM of biological complexes: what can we learn?

    PubMed Central

    Gaczynska, Maria; Osmulski, Pawel A.

    2009-01-01

    The term “biological complexes” broadly encompasses particles as diverse as multisubunit enzymes, viral capsids, transport cages, molecular nets, ribosomes, nucleosomes, biological membrane components and amyloids. The complexes represent a broad range of stability and composition. Atomic force microscopy offers a wealth of structural and functional data about such assemblies. For this review, we choose to comment on the significance of AFM to study various aspects of biology of selected nonmembrane protein assemblies. Such particles are large enough to reveal many structural details under the AFM probe. Importantly, the specific advantages of the method allow for gathering dynamic information about their formation, stability or allosteric structural changes critical for their function. Some of them have already found their way to nanomedical or nanotechnological applications. Here we present examples of studies where the AFM provided pioneering information about the biology of complexes, and examples of studies where the simplicity of the method is used toward the development of potential diagnostic applications. PMID:19802337

  6. Fractal properties of macrophage membrane studied by AFM.

    PubMed

    Bitler, A; Dover, R; Shai, Y

    2012-12-01

    Complexity of cell membrane poses difficulties to quantify corresponding morphology changes during cell proliferation and damage. We suggest using fractal dimension of the cell membrane to quantify its complexity and track changes produced by various treatments. Glutaraldehyde fixed mouse RAW 264.7 macrophage membranes were chosen as model system and imaged in PeakForce QNM (quantitative nanomechanics) mode of AFM (atomic force microscope). The morphology of the membranes was characterized by fractal dimension. The parameter was calculated for set of AFM images by three different methods. The same calculations were done for the AFM images of macrophages treated with colchicine, an inhibitor of the microtubule polymerization, and microtubule stabilizing agent taxol. We conclude that fractal dimension can be additional and useful parameter to characterize the cell membrane complexity and track the morphology changes produced by different treatments.

  7. Sub-diffraction nano manipulation using STED AFM.

    PubMed

    Chacko, Jenu Varghese; Canale, Claudio; Harke, Benjamin; Diaspro, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    In the last two decades, nano manipulation has been recognized as a potential tool of scientific interest especially in nanotechnology and nano-robotics. Contemporary optical microscopy (super resolution) techniques have also reached the nanometer scale resolution to visualize this and hence a combination of super resolution aided nano manipulation ineluctably gives a new perspective to the scenario. Here we demonstrate how specificity and rapid determination of structures provided by stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscope can aid another microscopic tool with capability of mechanical manoeuvring, like an atomic force microscope (AFM) to get topological information or to target nano scaled materials. We also give proof of principle on how high-resolution real time visualization can improve nano manipulation capability within a dense sample, and how STED-AFM is an optimal combination for this job. With these evidences, this article points to future precise nano dissections and maybe even to a nano-snooker game with an AFM tip and fluorospheres.

  8. Determining surface properties with bimodal and multimodal AFM.

    PubMed

    Forchheimer, D; Borysov, Stanislav S; Platz, D; Haviland, David B

    2014-12-05

    Conventional dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) can be extended to bimodal and multimodal AFM in which the cantilever is simultaneously excited at two or more resonance frequencies. Such excitation schemes result in one additional amplitude and phase images for each driven resonance, and potentially convey more information about the surface under investigation. Here we present a theoretical basis for using this information to approximate the parameters of a tip-surface interaction model. The theory is verified by simulations with added noise corresponding to room-temperature measurements.

  9. BOREAS AFM-04 Twin Otter Aircraft Flux Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacPherson, J. Ian; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Desjardins, Raymond L.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS AFM-5 team collected and processed data from the numerous radiosonde flights during the project. The goals of the AFM-05 team were to provide large-scale definition of the atmosphere by supplementing the existing AES aerological network, both temporally and spatially. This data set includes basic upper-air parameters collected from the network of upper-air stations during the 1993, 1994, and 1996 field campaigns over the entire study region. The data are contained in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  10. Information seeking and anxiety among colonoscopy-naïve adults: Direct-to-colonoscopy vs traditional consult-first pathways

    PubMed Central

    Silvester, Jocelyn A; Kalkat, Harmandeep; Graff, Lesley A; Walker, John R; Singh, Harminder; Duerksen, Donald R

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effects of direct to colonoscopy pathways on information seeking behaviors and anxiety among colonoscopy-naïve patients. METHODS Colonoscopy-naïve patients at two tertiary care hospitals completed a survey immediately prior to their scheduled outpatient procedure and before receiving sedation. Survey items included clinical pathway (direct or consult), procedure indication (cancer screening or symptom investigation), telephone and written contact from the physician endoscopist office, information sources, and pre-procedure anxiety. Participants reported pre-procedure anxiety using a 10 point scale anchored by “very relaxed” (1) and “very nervous” (10). At least three months following the procedure, patient medical records were reviewed to determine sedative dose, procedure indications and any adverse events. The primary comparison was between the direct and consult pathways. Given the very different implications, a secondary analysis considering the patient-reported indication for the procedure (symptoms or screening). Effects of pathway (direct vs consult) were compared both within and between the screening and symptom subgroups. RESULTS Of 409 patients who completed the survey, 34% followed a direct pathway. Indications for colonoscopy were similar in each group. The majority of the participants were women (58%), married (61%), and internet users (81%). The most important information source was family physicians (Direct) and specialist physicians (Consult). Use of other information sources, including the internet (20% vs 18%) and Direct family and friends (64% vs 53%), was similar in the Direct and Consult groups, respectively. Only 31% of the 81% who were internet users accessed internet health information. Most sought fundamental information such as what a colonoscopy is or why it is done. Pre-procedure anxiety did not differ between care pathways. Those undergoing colonoscopy for symptoms reported greater anxiety [mean 5.3, 95

  11. Production of resident fish benefits from experimental salmon subsidies via direct and indirect pathways across stream-riparian boundaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collins, Scott F.; Baxter, Colden V.; Marcarelli, Amy M.; Wipfli, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Artificial additions of nutrients of differing forms such as salmon carcasses and analog pellets (i.e. pasteurized fishmeal) have been proposed as a means of stimulating aquatic productivity and enhancing populations of anadromous and resident fishes. Nutrient mitigation to enhance fish production in stream ecosystems assumes that the central pathway by which effects occur is bottom-up, through aquatic primary and secondary production, with little consideration of reciprocal aquatic-terrestrial pathways. The net outcome (i.e. bottom-up vs. top-down) of adding salmon-derived materials to streams depend on whether or not these subsidies indirectly intensify predation on in situ prey via increases in a shared predator or alleviate such predation pressure. We conducted a 3-year experiment across nine tributaries of the N. Fork Boise River, Idaho, USA, consisting of 500-m stream reaches treated with salmon carcasses (n = 3), salmon carcass analog (n = 3), and untreated control reaches (n = 3). We observed 2–8 fold increases in streambed biofilms in the 2–6 weeks following additions of both salmon subsidy treatments in years 1 and 2 and a 1.5-fold increase in standing crop biomass of aquatic invertebrates to carcass additions in the second year of our experiment. The consumption of benthic invertebrates by stream fishes increased 110–140% and 44–66% in carcass and analog streams in the same time frame, which may have masked invertebrate standing crop responses in years 3 and 4. Resident trout directly consumed 10.0–24.0 g·m−2·yr−1 of salmon carcass and <1–11.0 g·m−2·yr−1 of analog material, which resulted in 1.2–2.9 g·m−2·yr−1 and 0.03–1.4 g·m−2·yr−1 of tissue produced. In addition, a feedback flux of terrestrial maggots to streams contributed 0.0–2.0 g·m−2·yr−1 to trout production. Overall, treatments increased annual trout production by 2–3 fold, though density and biomass were unaffected. Our results

  12. Microcanonical molecular simulations of methane hydrate nucleation and growth: evidence that direct nucleation to sI hydrate is among the multiple nucleation pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengcai; Walsh, Matthew R; Guo, Guang-Jun

    2015-04-14

    The results of six high-precision constant energy molecular dynamics (MD) simulations initiated from methane-water systems equilibrated at 80 MPa and 250 K indicate that methane hydrates can nucleate via multiple pathways. Five trajectories nucleate to an amorphous solid. One trajectory nucleates to a structure-I hydrate template with long-range order which spans the simulation box across periodic boundaries despite the presence of several defects. While experimental and simulation data for hydrate nucleation with different time- and length-scales suggest that there may exist multiple pathways for nucleation, including metastable intermediates and the direct formation of the globally-stable phase, this work provides the most compelling evidence that direct formation to the globally stable crystalline phase is one of the multiple pathways available for hydrate nucleation.

  13. Dopamine D1 Receptor-Mediated Transmission Maintains Information Flow Through the Cortico-Striato-Entopeduncular Direct Pathway to Release Movements.

    PubMed

    Chiken, Satomi; Sato, Asako; Ohta, Chikara; Kurokawa, Makoto; Arai, Satoshi; Maeshima, Jun; Sunayama-Morita, Tomoko; Sasaoka, Toshikuni; Nambu, Atsushi

    2015-12-01

    In the basal ganglia (BG), dopamine plays a pivotal role in motor control, and dopamine deficiency results in severe motor dysfunctions as seen in Parkinson's disease. According to the well-accepted model of the BG, dopamine activates striatal direct pathway neurons that directly project to the output nuclei of the BG through D1 receptors (D1Rs), whereas dopamine inhibits striatal indirect pathway neurons that project to the external pallidum (GPe) through D2 receptors. To clarify the exact role of dopaminergic transmission via D1Rs in vivo, we developed novel D1R knockdown mice in which D1Rs can be conditionally and reversibly regulated. Suppression of D1R expression by doxycycline treatment decreased spontaneous motor activity and impaired motor ability in the mice. Neuronal activity in the entopeduncular nucleus (EPN), one of the output nuclei of the rodent BG, was recorded in awake conditions to examine the mechanism of motor deficits. Cortically evoked inhibition in the EPN mediated by the cortico-striato-EPN direct pathway was mostly lost during suppression of D1R expression, whereas spontaneous firing rates and patterns remained unchanged. On the other hand, GPe activity changed little. These results suggest that D1R-mediated dopaminergic transmission maintains the information flow through the direct pathway to appropriately release motor actions.

  14. Asymmetric direct α-alkylation of 2-oxindoles with Michler's hydrol catalyzed by bis-cinchona alkaloid-Brønsted acid via an SN1-type pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Qiao, Zhen; Wang, Yan; Zhong, Nengjun; Liu, Li; Wang, Dong; Chen, Yong-Jun

    2013-02-25

    An enantioselective direct α-alkylation of 2-oxindoles with Michler's hydrol via an S(N)1-type pathway in the non-covalent activation mode using the bis-cinchona alkaloid and Brønsted acid as a co-catalyst was developed and good to high yields and enantioselectivities were obtained.

  15. A theory about a role of the hyper direct pathway in pattern expression by the basal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Jourdan, Ivan; Barttfeld, Pablo; Zanutto, B Silvano

    2010-01-01

    The Basal Ganglia (BG) are a group of nuclei, in the brain of mammalians and other vertebrates, strongly connected with the cerebral cortex, thalamus and other brain areas. The BG are associated with several brain functions including learning and motor control. When there is cortical activation, there is a strong synchronization between BG and cortex, i.e. when a given task is being executed or in the case of Parkinson disease[1], [2]. If we consider the internal segment of the Globus Pallidus (GPi) there is synchronism between GPi-cortex at frequencies as low as 3Hz to as high as 85Hz [1], [3]. In the other hand, in a delta sleep or in an anesthetized case, a very low frequency correlation is observed (1-10 Hz), but no high frequency correlation between GPi-cortex [1], [2], [3]. It is unknown why this decorrelation happens. But It is agreement that when there is no pattern to select, like in delta sleep or with an anesthetized model, the BG network would maintain the GPi and cortex decorrelated at high frequencies. Many thalamus-BG and thalamus-BG-cortex loops are modulators of the BG activity. Particularly there exists an anatomic thalamus-BG loop, formed by GPi, intralaminar thalamic nuclei (IL) and Subthalamic Nucleus (STN) [4]. Using a computational model, based on an "Integrate and Fire" neural network, we analyzed the IL nucleus as a modulator of the so-called hyper direct pathway. Our results show that, in an anesthetic case, this thalamic path could be relevant to allow a high frequency decorrelated state between the GPi and cortex.

  16. AFM-IR: Technology and Applications in Nanoscale Infrared Spectroscopy and Chemical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Dazzi, Alexandre; Prater, Craig B

    2016-12-13

    Atomic force microscopy-based infrared spectroscopy (AFM-IR) is a rapidly emerging technique that provides chemical analysis and compositional mapping with spatial resolution far below conventional optical diffraction limits. AFM-IR works by using the tip of an AFM probe to locally detect thermal expansion in a sample resulting from absorption of infrared radiation. AFM-IR thus can provide the spatial resolution of AFM in combination with the chemical analysis and compositional imaging capabilities of infrared spectroscopy. This article briefly reviews the development and underlying technology of AFM-IR, including recent advances, and then surveys a wide range of applications and investigations using AFM-IR. AFM-IR applications that will be discussed include those in polymers, life sciences, photonics, solar cells, semiconductors, pharmaceuticals, and cultural heritage. In the Supporting Information , the authors provide a theoretical section that reviews the physics underlying the AFM-IR measurement and detection mechanisms.

  17. Cantilever's behavior in the AC mode of an AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Nunes, V.B.; Zanette, S.I.; Caride, A.O.; Prioli, R.; Rivas, A.M.F

    2003-03-15

    In this paper, a model with a small number of parameters is used to simulate the motion of a cantilever in the AC mode of an atomic force microscope (AFM). The results elucidate the transition dependence-from noncontact to tapping operating mode-on the height of the contamination layer and on the stiffness of the sample.

  18. Probing the Double Layer: Effect of Image Forces on AFM

    PubMed Central

    Sachs, Frederick

    2006-01-01

    Force probes such as AFM tips or laser trap latex beads have a dielectric constant much less than that of the water that they displace. Thus when a probe approaches a charged surface under water it will be repelled simply based upon the image forces, and these can be of nN magnitude. PMID:16714346

  19. 3D Color Digital Elevation Map of AFM Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This color image is a three dimensional (3D) view of a digital elevation map of a sample collected by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Atomic Force Microscope (AFM).

    The image shows four round pits, only 5 microns in depth, that were micromachined into the silicon substrate, which is the background plane shown in red. This image has been processed to reflect the levelness of the substrate.

    A Martian particle only one micrometer, or one millionth of a meter, across is held in the upper left pit.

    The rounded particle shown at the highest magnification ever seen from another world is a particle of the dust that cloaks Mars. Such dust particles color the Martian sky pink, feed storms that regularly envelop the planet and produce Mars' distinctive red soil.

    The particle was part of a sample informally called 'Sorceress' delivered to the AFM on the 38th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (July 2, 2008). The AFM is part of Phoenix's microscopic station called MECA, or the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer.

    The AFM was developed by a Swiss-led consortium, with Imperial College London producing the silicon substrate that holds sampled particles.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  20. Characterization and acoustic emission monitoring of AFM nanomachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, B. W.; Lee, S. H.

    2009-04-01

    This study aims to determine the machining characteristics during nano-scratching of silicon wafers using AFM and to monitor the machining states using acoustic emission (AE). Along with a specially designed AFM experimental setup, simplified geometric models are employed to estimate the friction coefficient and the minimum chip formation depth for nano-machining. In the nano-experiments, with the increase of the engaging depth of an AFM tip, two modes of plastic deformation—ploughing mode and cutting mode—are observed. With the aid of AFM and FE-SEM images, typical features of each mode, such as pile-up and chip formations, are illustrated and analyzed. Moreover, it is shown that pile-up formation is closely related to the deformation characteristics at the corresponding scratching depth, and the ratio of pile-ups to the groove depth can be used as an index to indicate the mode transition. As far as in-process monitoring is concerned, during the ploughing mode, related AE RMS values are relatively low. By contrast, the RMS values during the cutting mode are significantly higher than those during the ploughing mode, with apparent chip formation. In addition, AE count rates show appropriate sensitivity to detect the mode transition. Our results indicate that the proposed scheme can be used to characterize nano-scale machining and to monitor the mode transition.

  1. 3D Color Digital Elevation Map of AFM Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This color image is a three dimensional (3D) view of a digital elevation map of a sample collected by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Atomic Force Microscope (AFM).

    The image shows four round pits, only 5 microns in depth, that were micromachined into the silicon substrate, which is the background plane shown in red. This image has been processed to reflect the levelness of the substrate.

    A Martian particle only one micrometer, or one millionth of a meter, across is held in the upper left pit.

    The rounded particle shown at the highest magnification ever seen from another world is a particle of the dust that cloaks Mars. Such dust particles color the Martian sky pink, feed storms that regularly envelop the planet and produce Mars' distinctive red soil.

    The particle was part of a sample informally called 'Sorceress' delivered to the AFM on the 38th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (July 2, 2008). The AFM is part of Phoenix's microscopic station called MECA, or the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer.

    The AFM was developed by a Swiss-led consortium, with Imperial College London producing the silicon substrate that holds sampled particles.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  2. Structural investigations on native collagen type I fibrils using AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Strasser, Stefan; Zink, Albert; Janko, Marek; Heckl, Wolfgang M.; Thalhammer, Stefan . E-mail: stefan.thalhammer@gsf.de

    2007-03-02

    This study was carried out to determine the elastic properties of single collagen type I fibrils with the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Native collagen fibrils were formed by self-assembly in vitro characterized with the AFM. To confirm the inner assembly of the collagen fibrils, the AFM was used as a microdissection tool. Native collagen type I fibrils were dissected and the inner core uncovered. To determine the elastic properties of collagen fibrils the tip of the AFM was used as a nanoindentor by recording force-displacement curves. Measurements were done on the outer shell and in the core of the fibril. The structural investigations revealed the banding of the shell also in the core of native collagen fibrils. Nanoindentation experiments showed the same Young's modulus on the shell as well as in the core of the investigated native collagen fibrils. In addition, the measurements indicate a higher adhesion in the core of the collagen fibrils compared to the shell.

  3. Measurement of cationic and intracellular modulation of integrin binding affinity by AFM-based nanorobot.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Kevin C; Yang, Ruiguo; Zeng, Bixi; Song, Bo; Wang, Shouye; Xi, Ning; Basson, Marc D

    2013-07-02

    Integrins are dynamic transmembrane cation-dependent heterodimers that both anchor cells in position and transduce signals into and out of cells. We used an atomic force microscope (AFM)-based nanorobotic system to measure integrin-binding forces in intact human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells. The AFM-based nanorobot enables human-directed, high-accuracy probe positioning and site-specific investigations. Functionalizing the AFM probe with an arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD)-containing sequence (consensus binding sequence for integrins) allowed us to detect a series of peptide-cell membrane interactions with a median binding force of 115.1 ± 4.9 pN that were not detected in control interactions. Chelating divalent cations from the culture medium abolished these interactions, as did inhibiting intracellular focal adhesion kinase (FAK) using Y15. Adding 1 mM Mg(2+) to the medium caused a rightward shift in the force-binding curve. Adding 1 mM Ca(2+) virtually abolished the RGD-membrane specific interactions and blocked the Mg(2+) effects. Cell adhesion assays demonstrated parallel effects of divalent cations and the FAK inhibitor on cell adhesion. These results demonstrate direct modulation of integrin-binding affinity by both divalent cations and intracellular signal inhibition. Additionally, three binding states (nonspecific, specific inactivated, and specific activated) were delineated from affinity measurements. Although other research has assumed that this process of integrin conformational change causes altered ligand binding, in this work we directly measured these three states in individual integrins in a physiologically based study. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Measurement of Cationic and Intracellular Modulation of Integrin Binding Affinity by AFM-Based Nanorobot

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Kevin C.; Yang, Ruiguo; Zeng, Bixi; Song, Bo; Wang, Shouye; Xi, Ning; Basson, Marc D.

    2013-01-01

    Integrins are dynamic transmembrane cation-dependent heterodimers that both anchor cells in position and transduce signals into and out of cells. We used an atomic force microscope (AFM)-based nanorobotic system to measure integrin-binding forces in intact human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells. The AFM-based nanorobot enables human-directed, high-accuracy probe positioning and site-specific investigations. Functionalizing the AFM probe with an arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD)-containing sequence (consensus binding sequence for integrins) allowed us to detect a series of peptide-cell membrane interactions with a median binding force of 115.1 ± 4.9 pN that were not detected in control interactions. Chelating divalent cations from the culture medium abolished these interactions, as did inhibiting intracellular focal adhesion kinase (FAK) using Y15. Adding 1 mM Mg2+ to the medium caused a rightward shift in the force-binding curve. Adding 1 mM Ca2+ virtually abolished the RGD-membrane specific interactions and blocked the Mg2+ effects. Cell adhesion assays demonstrated parallel effects of divalent cations and the FAK inhibitor on cell adhesion. These results demonstrate direct modulation of integrin-binding affinity by both divalent cations and intracellular signal inhibition. Additionally, three binding states (nonspecific, specific inactivated, and specific activated) were delineated from affinity measurements. Although other research has assumed that this process of integrin conformational change causes altered ligand binding, in this work we directly measured these three states in individual integrins in a physiologically based study. PMID:23823222

  5. An AFM-SIMS Nano Tomography Acquisition System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinford, Richard William

    An instrument, adding the capability to measure 3D volumetric chemical composition, has been constructed by me as a member of the Sanchez Nano Laboratory. The laboratory's in situ atomic force microscope (AFM) and secondary ion mass spectrometry systems (SIMS) are functional and integrated as one instrument. The SIMS utilizes a Ga focused ion beam (FIB) combined with a quadrupole mass analyzer. The AFM is comprised of a 6-axis stage, three coarse axes and three fine. The coarse stage is used for placing the AFM tip anywhere inside a (13x13x5 mm3) (xyz) volume. Thus the tip can be moved in and out of the FIB processing region with ease. The planned range for the Z-axis piezo was 60 microm, but was reduced after it was damaged from arc events. The repaired Z-axis piezo is now operated at a smaller nominal range of 18 microm (16.7 microm after pre-loading), still quite respectable for an AFM. The noise floor of the AFM is approximately 0.4 nm Rq. The voxel size for the combined instrument is targeted at 50 nm or larger. Thus 0.4 nm of xyz uncertainty is acceptable. The instrument has been used for analyzing samples using FIB beam currents of 250 pA and 5.75 nA. Coarse tip approaches can take a long time so an abbreviated technique is employed. Because of the relatively long thro of the Z piezo, the tip can be disengaged by deactivating the servo PID. Once disengaged, it can be moved laterally out of the way of the FIB-SIMS using the coarse stage. This instrument has been used to acquire volumetric data on AlTiC using AFM tip diameters of 18.9 nm and 30.6 nm. Acquisition times are very long, requiring multiple days to acquire a 50-image stack. New features to be added include auto stigmation, auto beam shift, more software automation, etc. Longer term upgrades to include a new lower voltage Z-piezo with strain-gauge feedback and a new design to extend the life for the coarse XY nano-positioners. This AFM-SIMS instrument, as constructed, has proven to be a great proof

  6. Granzyme H induces cell death primarily via a Bcl-2-sensitive mitochondrial cell death pathway that does not require direct Bid activation.

    PubMed

    Ewen, Catherine L; Kane, Kevin P; Bleackley, R Chris

    2013-07-01

    Natural killer and T cell-mediated cytotoxicity is important for the elimination of viruses and transformed cells. The granule lytic pathway utilizes perforin and granzymes to induce cell death, while receptor-mediated lytic pathways rely on molecules such as FasL. Pro-apoptotic activities of Granzyme B (GrB) and Fas are well-established, and many of their cellular targets have been identified. However, humans express additional related granzymes - GrA, GrM, GrK, and GrH. Neither the cytotoxic potential of GrH, nor the mechanism by which GrH may induce target cell death is currently understood. We proposed that GrH would have pro-apoptotic activity that would be distinct from that of GrB and FasL, which could be relevant when Fas/FasL or GrB activity or death pathways were impaired. Our results, using a purified recombinant form of GrH, revealed that GrH induced cell death via a Bcl-2-sensitive mitochondrial pathway without direct processing of Bid. Additionally, neither the apoptosome nor caspase-3 was essential to the induction of GrH-mediated cell death. However, GrH did directly process DFF45, potentially leading to DNA damage. Our findings support the idea that multiple, non-redundant death pathways may be initiated by cytotoxic cells to counteract various immune evasion strategies.

  7. Scanning hall probe microscopy (SHPM) using quartz crystal AFM feedback.

    PubMed

    Dede, M; Urkmen, K; Girişen, O; Atabak, M; Oral, A; Farrer, I; Ritchie, D

    2008-02-01

    Scanning Hall Probe Microscopy (SHPM) is a quantitative and non-invasive technique for imaging localized surface magnetic field fluctuations such as ferromagnetic domains with high spatial and magnetic field resolution of approximately 50 nm and 7 mG/Hz(1/2) at room temperature. In the SHPM technique, scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or atomic force microscope (AFM) feedback is used to keep the Hall sensor in close proximity of the sample surface. However, STM tracking SHPM requires conductive samples; therefore the insulating substrates have to be coated with a thin layer of gold. This constraint can be eliminated with the AFM feedback using sophisticated Hall probes that are integrated with AFM cantilevers. However it is very difficult to micro fabricate these sensors. In this work, we have eliminated the difficulty in the cantilever-Hall probe integration process, just by gluing a Hall Probe chip to a quartz crystal tuning fork force sensor. The Hall sensor chip is simply glued at the end of a 32.768 kHz or 100 kHz Quartz crystal, which is used as force sensor. An LT-SHPM system is used to scan the samples. The sensor assembly is dithered at the resonance frequency using a digital Phase Locked Loop circuit and frequency shifts are used for AFM tracking. SHPM electronics is modified to detect AFM topography and the frequency shift, along with the magnetic field image. Magnetic domains and topography of an Iron Garnet thin film crystal, NdFeB demagnetised magnet and hard disk samples are presented at room temperature. The performance is found to be comparable with the SHPM using STM feedback.

  8. High-speed AFM images of thermal motion provide stiffness map of interfacial membrane protein moieties.

    PubMed

    Preiner, Johannes; Horner, Andreas; Karner, Andreas; Ollinger, Nicole; Siligan, Christine; Pohl, Peter; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2015-01-14

    The flexibilities of extracellular loops determine ligand binding and activation of membrane receptors. Arising from fluctuations in inter- and intraproteinaceous interactions, flexibility manifests in thermal motion. Here we demonstrate that quantitative flexibility values can be extracted from directly imaging the thermal motion of membrane protein moieties using high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM). Stiffness maps of the main periplasmic loops of single reconstituted water channels (AqpZ, GlpF) revealed the spatial and temporal organization of loop-stabilizing intraproteinaceous H-bonds and salt bridges.

  9. High-Speed AFM Images of Thermal Motion Provide Stiffness Map of Interfacial Membrane Protein Moieties

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The flexibilities of extracellular loops determine ligand binding and activation of membrane receptors. Arising from fluctuations in inter- and intraproteinaceous interactions, flexibility manifests in thermal motion. Here we demonstrate that quantitative flexibility values can be extracted from directly imaging the thermal motion of membrane protein moieties using high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM). Stiffness maps of the main periplasmic loops of single reconstituted water channels (AqpZ, GlpF) revealed the spatial and temporal organization of loop-stabilizing intraproteinaceous H-bonds and salt bridges. PMID:25516527

  10. Effector pathway-dependent relative efficacy at serotonin type 2A and 2C receptors: evidence for agonist-directed trafficking of receptor stimulus.

    PubMed

    Berg, K A; Maayani, S; Goldfarb, J; Scaramellini, C; Leff, P; Clarke, W P

    1998-07-01

    There are many examples of a single receptor coupling directly to more than one cellular signal transduction pathway. Although traditional receptor theory allows for activation of multiple cellular effectors by agonists, it predicts that the relative degree of activation of each effector pathway by an agonist (relative efficacy) must be the same. In the current experiments, we demonstrate that agonists at the human serotonin2A (5-HT2A) and 5-HT2C receptors activate differentially two signal transduction pathways independently coupled to the receptors [phospholipase C (PLC)-mediated inositol phosphate (IP) accumulation and phospholipase A2 (PLA2)-mediated arachidonic acid (AA) release]. The relative efficacies of agonists differed depending on which signal transduction pathway was measured. Moreover, relative to 5-HT, some 5-HT2C agonists (e.g., 3-trifluoromethylphenyl-piperazine) preferentially activated the PLC-IP pathway, whereas others (e.g., lysergic acid diethylamide) favored the PLA2-AA pathway. In contrast, when two dependent responses were measured (IP accumulation and calcium mobilization), agonist relative efficacies were not different. These data strongly support the hypothesis termed "agonist-directed trafficking of receptor stimulus" recently proposed by Kenakin [Trends Pharmacol Sci 16:232-238 (1995)]. Concentration-response curves to 5-HT2C agonists were fit well by a three-state model of receptor activation, suggesting that two active receptor states may be sufficient to explain pathway-dependent agonist efficacy. Rational drug design that optimizes preferential effector activity within a group of receptor-selective drugs holds the promise of increased selectivity in clinically useful agents.

  11. Possible enhancements of AFM spin-fluctuations in high-TC cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarlborg, Thomas

    2009-03-01

    Ab-initio band calculations for high-TC cuprates, together with modelling based of a free electron like band, show a strong interaction between anti-ferromagnetic (AFM) spin waves and periodic lattice distortions as for phonons, even though this type of spin-phonon coupling (SPC) is underestimated in calculations using the local density approximation. The SPC has a direct influence on the properties of the HTC cuprates and it can explain many observations. The strongest effects are seen for modulated waves in the CuO bond direction, and a band gap is formed near the X,Y points, but unusal band dispersion (like ``waterfalls'') might also be induced below the Fermi energy (EF) in the diagonal direction. The band results are used to propose different ways of increasing AFM spin-fluctuations locally, and to have a higher density-of-states (DOS) at EF. Static potential modulations, via periodic distribution of dopants or lattice distortions, can be tuned to increase the DOS. This opens for possibilities to enhance coupling for spin fluctuations (λsf) and superconductivity. The exchange enhancement is in general increased near a surface, which suggests a tendency towards static spin configurations. The sensivity of the band results to corrections of the local density potential are discussed.

  12. Evaluating legacy contaminants and emerging chemicals in marine environments using adverse outcome pathways and biological effects-directed analysis.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Thomas H; Lyons, Brett P; Thain, John E; Law, Robin J

    2013-09-30

    important scientific, economic and health challenges. In order to meet these challenges and pursue cost-effective scientific approaches that can provide evidence necessary to support policy needs (e.g. the European Marine Strategy Framework Directive), it is widely recognised that there is a need to (i) provide marine exposure assessments for priority contaminants using a range of validated models, passive samplers and biomarkers; (ii) integrate chemical monitoring data with biological effects data across spatial and temporal scales (including quality controls); and (iii) strengthen the evidence base to understand the relationship between exposure to complex chemical mixtures, biological and ecological impacts through integrated approaches and molecular data (e.g. genomics, proteomics and metabolomics). Additionally, we support the widely held view that (iv) that rather than increasing the analytical chemistry monitoring of large number of emerging contaminants, it will be important to target analytical chemistry towards key groups of chemicals of concern using effects-directed analysis. It is also important to evaluate to what extent existing biomarkers and bioassays can address various classes of emerging chemicals using the adverse outcome pathway (AOP) approach now being developed by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) with respect to human toxicology and ecotoxicology. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. High aspect ratio AFM Probe processing by helium-ion-beam induced deposition.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Keiko; Guo, Hongxuan; Nagano, Syoko; Fujita, Daisuke

    2014-11-01

    A Scanning Helium Ion Microscope (SHIM) is a high resolution surface observation instrument similar to a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) since both instruments employ finely focused particle beams of ions or electrons [1]. The apparent difference is that SHIMs can be used not only for a sub-nanometer scale resolution microscopic research, but also for the applications of very fine fabrication and direct lithography of surfaces at the nanoscale dimensions. On the other hand, atomic force microscope (AFM) is another type of high resolution microscopy which can measure a three-dimensional surface morphology by tracing a fine probe with a sharp tip apex on a specimen's surface.In order to measure highly uneven and concavo-convex surfaces by AFM, the probe of a high aspect ratio with a sharp tip is much more necessary than the probe of a general quadrangular pyramid shape. In this paper we report the manufacture of the probe tip of the high aspect ratio by ion-beam induced gas deposition using a nanoscale helium ion beam of SHIM.Gas of platinum organic compound was injected into the sample surface neighborhood in the vacuum chamber of SHIM. The decomposition of the gas and the precipitation of the involved metal brought up a platinum nano-object in a pillar shape on the normal commercial AFM probe tip. A SHIM system (Carl Zeiss, Orion Plus) equipped with the gas injection system (OmniProbe, OmniGIS) was used for the research. While the vacuum being kept to work, we injected platinum organic compound ((CH3)3(CH3C5H4)Pt) into the sample neighborhood and irradiated the helium ion beam with the shape of a point on the apex of the AFM probe tip. It is found that we can control the length of the Pt nano-pillar by irradiation time of the helium ion beam. The AFM probe which brought up a Pt nano-pillar is shown in Figure 1. It is revealed that a high-aspect-ratio Pt nano-pillar of ∼40nm diameter and up to ∼2000 nm length can be grown. In addition, for possible heating

  14. Understanding the TERS Effect with On-line Tunneling and Force Feedback Using Multiprobe AFM/NSOM with Raman Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Aaron; Dekhter, Rimma; Hamra, Patricia; Bar-David, Yossi; Taha, Hesham

    Tip enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) has evolved in several directions over the past years. The data from this variety of methodologies has now accumulated to the point that there is a reasonable possibility of evolving an understanding of the underlying cause of the resulting effects that could be the origin of the various TERS enhancement processes. The objective of this presentation is to use the results thus far with atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes with noble metal coating, etching, transparent gold nanoparticles with and without a second nanoparticle [Wang and Schultz, ANALYST 138, 3150 (2013)] and tunneling feedback probes [R. Zhang et. al., NATURE 4 9 8, 8 2 (2013)]. We attempt at understanding this complex of results with AFM/NSOM multiprobe techniques. Results indicate that TERS is dominated by complex quantum interactions. This produces a highly confined and broadband plasmon field with all k vectors for effective excitation. Normal force tuning fork feedback with exposed tip probes provides an excellent means to investigate these effects with TERS probes that we have shown can circumvent the vexing problem of jump to contact prevalent in conventional AFM methodology and permit on-line switching between tunneling and AFM feedback modes of operation.

  15. Dissimilar pH-dependent adsorption features of bovine serum albumin and alpha-chymotrypsin on mica probed by AFM.

    PubMed

    Demanèche, Sandrine; Chapel, Jean-Paul; Monrozier, Lucile Jocteur; Quiquampoix, Hervé

    2009-05-01

    We studied bovine serum albumin (BSA) and alpha-chymotrypsin adsorption onto mica surfaces over a large pH range by atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements in liquid. Data analyses (height, roughness and roughness factor) brought new insights on the conformation of proteins in soil environments, with mica as a model of soil phyllosilicates and non-hydrophobic surfaces. Validation of AFM approach was performed on BSA, whose behavior was previously described by nuclear magnetic resonance and infra-red spectroscopic methods. Maximum adsorption was observed near the isoelectric point (IEP). A stronger interaction and a lower amount of adsorbed proteins were observed below the IEP, which contrasted with the progressive decrease of adsorption above the IEP. We then studied the adsorption of alpha-chymotrypsin, a proteolytic enzyme commonly found in soils. AFM pictures demonstrated a complete coverage of the mica surface at the IEP in contrast to the BSA case. Comparison of the AFM data with other indirect methods broadened the understanding of alpha-chymotrypsin adsorption process through the direct display of the protein adsorption patterns as a function of pH.

  16. Direct comparison of 3-centre and 4-centre HBr elimination pathways in methyl-substituted vinyl bromides.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Shubhrangshu; Hornung, Balázs; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J

    2016-10-12

    Elimination of HBr from UV-photoexcited vinyl bromides can occur through both 3-centre and 4-centre transition states (TSs). The competition between these pathways is examined using velocity map imaging of HBr (v = 0-2, J) photofragments. The three vinyl bromides chosen for study have methyl substituents that block either the 3-centre or the 4-centre TS, or leave both pathways open. The kinetic energy distributions extracted from velocity map images of HBr from 193 nm photolysis of the three vinyl bromide compounds are approximately described by a statistical model of energy disposal among the degrees of freedom of the photoproducts, and are attributed to dissociation on the lowest electronic state of the molecule after internal conversion. Dissociation via the 4-centre TS gives greater average kinetic energy release than for the 3-centre TS pathway. The resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization (REMPI) schemes used to detect HBr restrict measurements to J ≤ 7 for v = 2 and J ≤ 15 for v = 0. Within this spectroscopic range, the HBr rotational temperature is colder for the 4-centre than for the 3-centre elimination pathway. Calculations of the intrinsic reaction coordinates and RRKM calculations of HBr elimination rate coefficients provide mechanistic insights into the competition between the pathways.

  17. An Interferon Regulated MicroRNA Provides Broad Cell-Intrinsic Antiviral Immunity through Multihit Host-Directed Targeting of the Sterol Pathway.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Kevin A; Hsieh, Wei Yuan; Forster, Thorsten; Blanc, Mathieu; Lu, Hongjin; Crick, Peter J; Yutuc, Eylan; Watterson, Steven; Martin, Kimberly; Griffiths, Samantha J; Enright, Anton J; Yamamoto, Mami; Pradeepa, Madapura M; Lennox, Kimberly A; Behlke, Mark A; Talbot, Simon; Haas, Jürgen; Dölken, Lars; Griffiths, William J; Wang, Yuqin; Angulo, Ana; Ghazal, Peter

    2016-03-01

    In invertebrates, small interfering RNAs are at the vanguard of cell-autonomous antiviral immunity. In contrast, antiviral mechanisms initiated by interferon (IFN) signaling predominate in mammals. Whilst mammalian IFN-induced miRNA are known to inhibit specific viruses, it is not known whether host-directed microRNAs, downstream of IFN-signaling, have a role in mediating broad antiviral resistance. By performing an integrative, systematic, global analysis of RNA turnover utilizing 4-thiouridine labeling of newly transcribed RNA and pri/pre-miRNA in IFN-activated macrophages, we identify a new post-transcriptional viral defense mechanism mediated by miR-342-5p. On the basis of ChIP and site-directed promoter mutagenesis experiments, we find the synthesis of miR-342-5p is coupled to the antiviral IFN response via the IFN-induced transcription factor, IRF1. Strikingly, we find miR-342-5p targets mevalonate-sterol biosynthesis using a multihit mechanism suppressing the pathway at different functional levels: transcriptionally via SREBF2, post-transcriptionally via miR-33, and enzymatically via IDI1 and SC4MOL. Mass spectrometry-based lipidomics and enzymatic assays demonstrate the targeting mechanisms reduce intermediate sterol pathway metabolites and total cholesterol in macrophages. These results reveal a previously unrecognized mechanism by which IFN regulates the sterol pathway. The sterol pathway is known to be an integral part of the macrophage IFN antiviral response, and we show that miR-342-5p exerts broad antiviral effects against multiple, unrelated pathogenic viruses such Cytomegalovirus and Influenza A (H1N1). Metabolic rescue experiments confirm the specificity of these effects and demonstrate that unrelated viruses have differential mevalonate and sterol pathway requirements for their replication. This study, therefore, advances the general concept of broad antiviral defense through multihit targeting of a single host pathway.

  18. Hydrodynamic effects of the tip movement on surface nanobubbles: a combined tapping mode, lift mode and force volume mode AFM study.

    PubMed

    Walczyk, Wiktoria; Hain, Nicole; Schönherr, Holger

    2014-08-28

    We report on an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) study of AFM tip-nanobubble interactions in experiments conducted on argon surface nanobubbles on HOPG (highly oriented pyrolytic graphite) in water in tapping mode, lift mode and Force Volume (FV) mode AFM. By subsequent data acquisition on the same nanobubbles in these three different AFM modes, we could directly compare the effect of different tip-sample interactions. The tip-bubble interaction strength was found to depend on the vertical and horizontal position of the tip on the bubble with respect to the bubble center. The interaction forces measured experimentally were in good agreement with the forces calculated using the dynamic interaction model. The strength of the hydrodynamic effect was also found to depend on the direction of the tip movement. It was more pronounced in the FV mode, in which the tip approaches the bubble from the top, than in the lift mode, in which the tip approaches the bubble from the side. This result suggests that the direction of tip movement influences the bubble deformation. The effect should be taken into account when nanobubbles are analysed by AFM in various scanning modes.

  19. BOREAS AFM-5 Level-1 Upper Air Network Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Alan; Hrynkiw, Charmaine; Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-5 team collected and processed data from the numerous radiosonde flights during the project. The goals of the AFM-05 team were to provide large-scale definition of the atmosphere by supplementing the existing Atmospheric Environment Service (AES) aerological network, both temporally and spatially. This data set includes basic upper-air parameters collected from the network of upper-air stations during the 1993, 1994, and 1996 field campaigns over the entire study region. The data are contained in tabular ASCII files. The level-1 upper-air network data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files also are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  20. AFM Manipulation of Viruses: Substrate Interactions and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falvo, M. R.; Superfine, R.; Washburn, S.; Finch, M.; Taylor, R. M.; Chi, V.; Brooks, F. P.; Ferrari, F.; Samulski, R.

    1996-03-01

    Using an AFM tip as a manipulation tool, we have translated, rotated, and dissected individual Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) and Adenovirus particles. We have implemented a teleoperation system which allows manual control of the relative tip-sample position while also allowing conventional AFM operation for imaging resulting structure. Using simple tip trajectories to bend the rod-shaped TMV, we observed a variety of resulting structures and mechanical failures. The distributed adhesive interaction between the virus and the sample surface, as well as the local tip-virus interaction affect the distortion in the shape of the virus. Experiments were performed in air as well as in liquid on graphite and Si substrates. The in-liquid experiments allow tuning of the environmental conditions, including osmolarity and pH, which are known to profoundly affect the virus structure. A continuum mechanical model relating mechanical properties to observations provides insight into the constraints for successful nondestructive manipulation.

  1. Automated assembly of holder chips to AFM probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhart, Gunther; Jacob, Dirk; Fouchier, Marc

    2001-10-01

    At the Belgian institute IMEC techniques for the production of electrically conductive atomic force microscope (AFM) probes are developed. To facilitate handling of the fragile probes, holder chips are required. The assembly of such holder chips, which can be split up into the application of solder paste, the positioning of the holder chip and the soldering of the chip, is a crucial manufacturing step, that, until now, was performed manually for economic reasons. With the help of a modular micro assembly tool, developed by the Institute for Machine Tools and Industrial Management (iwb) of the Technische Universitaet Muenchen, an economical automated assembly of the holder chips was developed. Thanks to our integrated sensor technology, even the automated assembly onto the extremely fragile membranes of moulded AFM probes was possible. In particular, the dispensing process of the solder paste onto the membranes was improved by the integration of a non-contact sensor for the needle clearance.

  2. Nano-Bio-Mechanics of Neuroblastoma Cells Using AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastatas, Lyndon; Matthews, James; Kang, Min; Park, Soyeun

    2011-10-01

    We have conducted an in vitro study to determine the elastic moduli of neurobalstoma cell lines using atomic force microscopy. Using a panel of cell lines established from neuroblastoma patients at different stages of disease progress and treatment, we have investigated the differences in elastic moduli during a course of cancer progression and chemotherapy. The cells were grown on the hard substrates that are chemically functionalized to enhance adhesion. We have performed the AFM indentation experiments with different applied forces from the AFM probe. For the purpose of the comparison between cell lines, the indentations were performed only on cell centers. The obtained force-distance curves were analyzed using the Hertz model in order to extract the elastic moduli. We have found that the elastic moduli of human neuroblastoma cells significantly varied during the disease progression. We postulate that the observed difference might be affected by the treatment and chemotherapy.

  3. Quantitative nano-mechanics of biological cells with AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Igor

    2013-03-01

    The importance of study of living cells is hard to overestimate. Cell mechanics is a relatively young, yet not a well-developed area. Besides just a fundamental interest, large practical need has emerged to measure cell mechanics quantitatively. Recent studies revealed a significant correlation between stiffness of biological cells and various human diseases, such as cancer, malaria, arthritis, and even aging. However, really quantitative studies of mechanics of biological cells are virtually absent. It is not even clear if the cell, being a complex and heterogeneous object, can be described by the elastic modulus at all. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a natural instrument to study properties of cells in their native environments. Here we will demonstrate that quantitative measurements of elastic modulus of cells with AFM are possible. Specifically, we will show that the ``cell body'' (cell without ``brush'' surface layer, a non-elastic layer surrounding cells) typically demonstrates the response of a homogeneous elastic medium up to the deformation of 10-20%, but if and only if a) the cellular brush layer is taken into account, b) rather dull AFM probes are used. This will be justified with the help of the strong condition of elastic behavior of material: the elastic modulus is shown to be independent on the indentation depth. We will also demonstrate that an attempt either to ignore the brush layer or to use sharp AFM probes will result in the violation of the strong condition, which implies impossibility to use the concept of the elastic modulus to describe cell mechanics in such experiments. Examples of quantitative measurements of the Young's modulus of the cell body and the cell brush parameters will be given for various cells. Address when submitting: Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY 13699

  4. Adiabatic Compression Sensitivity of AF-M315E

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    products of HAN (hydroxylammonium nitrate) based propellants such as AF-M315E are nitric acid and NOx gases. The presence of excess acids causes... Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) program. As the propulsion system developed by Aerojet- Rocketdyne for this propellant advances in maturity, studies...have been undertaken to address the knowledge gaps in the adiabatic compression sensitivity of the propellant as it relates to the system parameters for

  5. Investigation of biopolymer networks by means of AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keresztes, Z.; Rigó, T.; Telegdi, J.; Kálmán, E.

    Natural hydrogel alginate was investigated by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM) to gain microscale information on the morphological and rheological properties of the biopolymer network cross-linked by various cations. Local rheological properties of the gels measured by force spectroscopy gave correlation between increasing ion selectivity and increasing polymer elasticity. Adhesive forces acting between the surface of the gel and the probe, and also the intrinsic rheological properties of bulk polymers affect the microscopical image formation.

  6. On CD-AFM bias related to probe bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukraintsev, V. A.; Orji, N. G.; Vorburger, T. V.; Dixson, R. G.; Fu, J.; Silver, R. M.

    2012-03-01

    Critical Dimension AFM (CD-AFM) is a widely used reference metrology. To characterize modern semiconductor devices, very small and flexible probes, often 15 nm to 20 nm in diameter, are now frequently used. Several recent publications have reported on uncontrolled and significant probe-to-probe bias variation during linewidth and sidewall angle measurements [1,2]. Results obtained in this work suggest that probe bending can be on the order of several nanometers and thus potentially can explain much of the observed CD-AFM probe-to-probe bias variation. We have developed and experimentally tested one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) models to describe the bending of cylindrical probes. An earlier 1D bending model reported by Watanabe et al. [3] was refined. Contributions from several new phenomena were considered, including: probe misalignment, diameter variation near the carbon nanotube tip (CNT) apex, probe bending before snapping, distributed van der Waals-London force, etc. The methodology for extraction of the Hamaker probe-surface interaction energy from experimental probe bending data was developed. To overcome limitations of the 1D model, a new 2D distributed force (DF) model was developed. Comparison of the new model with the 1D single point force (SPF) model revealed about 27 % difference in probe bending bias between the two. A simple linear relation between biases predicted by the 1D SPF and 2D DF models was found. This finding simplifies use of the advanced 2D DF model of probe bending in various CD-AFM applications. New 2D and three-dimensional (3D) CDAFM data analysis software is needed to take full advantage of the new bias correction modeling capabilities.

  7. AFM and SThM Characterization of Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foy, Christopher; Sidorov, Anton; Chen, Xunchi; Ruan, Ming; Berger, Claire; de Heer, Walter; Jiang, Zhigang

    2012-03-01

    We report on detailed characterization of epitaxial grown graphene on SiC and chemical vapor deposition grown graphene on Cu foil using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning thermal microscopy (SThM). We focus on the electronic and thermal properties of graphene grain boundaries, and thus providing valuable feedback to materials growth. Specifically, we perform thermal conductivity contrast mapping and surface potential mapping of graphene, and compare with that obtained on the Au electrodes and the substrate.

  8. Biophysical properties of cardiomyocyte surface explored by multiparametric AFM.

    PubMed

    Smolyakov, Georges; Cauquil, Marie; Severac, Childerick; Lachaize, Véronique; Guilbeau-Frugier, Céline; Sénard, Jean-Michel; Galés, Céline; Dague, Etienne

    2017-03-02

    PeakForce Quantitative Nanomechanical Mapping (PeakForce QNM) multiparametric AFM mode was adapted to qualitative and quantitative study of the lateral membrane of cardiomyocytes (CMs), extending this powerful mode to the study of soft cells. On living CM, PeakForce QNM depicted the crests and hollows periodic alternation of cell surface architecture previously described using AFM Force Volume (FV) mode. PeakForce QNM analysis provided better resolution in terms of pixel number compared to FV mode and reduced acquisition time, thus limiting the consequences of spontaneous living adult CM dedifferentiation once isolated from the cardiac tissue. PeakForce QNM mode on fixed CMs clearly visualized subsarcolemmal mitochondria (SSM) and their loss following formamide treatment, concomitant with the interfibrillar mitochondria climbing up and forming heaps at the cell surface. Interestingly, formamide-promoted SSM loss allowed visualization of the sarcomeric apparatus ultrastructure below the plasma membrane. High PeakForce QNM resolution led to better contrasted mechanical maps than FV mode and provided correlation between adhesion, dissipation, mechanical and topographical maps. Modified hydrophobic AFM tip enhanced contrast on adhesion and dissipation maps and suggested that CM surface crests and hollows exhibit distinct chemical properties. Finally, two-dimensional Fast Fourier Transform to objectively quantify AFM maps allowed characterization of periodicity of both sarcomeric Z-line and M-band. Overall, this study validated PeakForce QNM as a valuable and innovative mode for the exploration of living and fixed CMs. In the future, it could be applied to depict cell membrane architectural, mechanical and chemical defects as well as sarcomeric abnormalities associated with cardiac diseases.

  9. A dileucine-like sorting signal directs transport into an AP-3-dependent, clathrin-independent pathway to the yeast vacuole.

    PubMed Central

    Vowels, J J; Payne, G S

    1998-01-01

    Transport of yeast alkaline phosphatase (ALP) to the vacuole depends on the clathrin adaptor-like complex AP-3, but does not depend on proteins necessary for transport through pre-vacuolar endosomes. We have identified ALP sequences that direct sorting into the AP-3-dependent pathway using chimeric proteins containing residues from the ALP cytoplasmic domain fused to sequences from a Golgi-localized membrane protein, guanosine diphosphatase (GDPase). The full-length ALP cytoplasmic domain, or ALP amino acids 1-16 separated from the transmembrane domain by a spacer, directed GDPase chimeric proteins from the Golgi complex to the vacuole via the AP-3 pathway. Mutation of residues Leu13 and Val14 within the ALP cytoplasmic domain prevented AP-3-dependent vacuolar transport of both chimeric proteins and full-length ALP. This Leucine-Valine (LV)-based sorting signal targeted chimeric proteins and native ALP to the vacuole in cells lacking clathrin function. These results identify an LV-based sorting signal in the ALP cytoplasmic domain that directs transport into a clathrin-independent, AP-3-dependent pathway to the vacuole. The similarity of the ALP sorting signal to mammalian dileucine sorting motifs, and the evolutionary conservation of AP-3 subunits, suggests that dileucine-like signals constitute a core element for AP-3-dependent transport to lysosomal compartments in all eukaryotic cells. PMID:9564031

  10. Near-Field Spectroscopy with Nanoparticles Deposited by AFM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2008-01-01

    An alternative approach to apertureless near-field optical spectroscopy involving an atomic-force microscope (AFM) entails less complexity of equipment than does a prior approach. The alternative approach has been demonstrated to be applicable to apertureless near-field optical spectroscopy of the type using an AFM and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), and is expected to be equally applicable in cases in which infrared or fluorescence spectroscopy is used. Apertureless near-field optical spectroscopy is a means of performing spatially resolved analyses of chemical compositions of surface regions of nanostructured materials. In apertureless near-field spectroscopy, it is common practice to utilize nanostructured probe tips or nanoparticles (usually of gold) having shapes and dimensions chosen to exploit plasmon resonances so as to increase spectroscopic-signal strengths. To implement the particular prior approach to which the present approach is an alternative, it is necessary to integrate a Raman spectrometer with an AFM and to utilize a special SERS-active probe tip. The resulting instrumentation system is complex, and the tasks of designing and constructing the system and using the system to acquire spectro-chemical information from nanometer-scale regions on a surface are correspondingly demanding.

  11. Nanoscale rippling on polymer surfaces induced by AFM manipulation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Nanoscale rippling induced by an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip can be observed after performing one or many scans over the same area on a range of materials, namely ionic salts, metals, and semiconductors. However, it is for the case of polymer films that this phenomenon has been widely explored and studied. Due to the possibility of varying and controlling various parameters, this phenomenon has recently gained a great interest for some technological applications. The advent of AFM cantilevers with integrated heaters has promoted further advances in the field. An alternative method to heating up the tip is based on solvent-assisted viscoplastic deformations, where the ripples develop upon the application of a relatively low force to a solvent-rich film. An ensemble of AFM-based procedures can thus produce nanoripples on polymeric surfaces quickly, efficiently, and with an unprecedented order and control. However, even if nanorippling has been observed in various distinct modes and many theoretical models have been since proposed, a full understanding of this phenomenon is still far from being achieved. This review aims at summarizing the current state of the art in the perspective of achieving control over the rippling process on polymers at a nanoscale level. PMID:26733086

  12. Tissue section AFM: In situ ultrastructural imaging of native biomolecules

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Helen K.; Hodson, Nigel W.; Hoyland, Judith A.; Millward-Sadler, Sarah J.; Garrod, David; Scothern, Anthea; Griffiths, Christopher E.M.; Watson, Rachel E.B.; Cox, Thomas R.; Erler, Janine T.; Trafford, Andrew W.; Sherratt, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Conventional approaches for ultrastructural high-resolution imaging of biological specimens induce profound changes in bio-molecular structures. By combining tissue cryo-sectioning with non-destructive atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging we have developed a methodology that may be applied by the non-specialist to both preserve and visualize bio-molecular structures (in particular extracellular matrix assemblies) in situ. This tissue section AFM technique is capable of: i) resolving nm–µm scale features of intra- and extracellular structures in tissue cryo-sections; ii) imaging the same tissue region before and after experimental interventions; iii) combining ultrastructural imaging with complimentary microscopical and micromechanical methods. Here, we employ this technique to: i) visualize the macro-molecular structures of unstained and unfixed fibrillar collagens (in skin, cartilage and intervertebral disc), elastic fibres (in aorta and lung), desmosomes (in nasal epithelium) and mitochondria (in heart); ii) quantify the ultrastructural effects of sequential collagenase digestion on a single elastic fibre; iii) correlate optical (auto fluorescent) with ultrastructural (AFM) images of aortic elastic lamellae. PMID:20144712

  13. Sub-Diffraction Nano Manipulation Using STED AFM

    PubMed Central

    Chacko, Jenu Varghese; Canale, Claudio; Harke, Benjamin; Diaspro, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    In the last two decades, nano manipulation has been recognized as a potential tool of scientific interest especially in nanotechnology and nano-robotics. Contemporary optical microscopy (super resolution) techniques have also reached the nanometer scale resolution to visualize this and hence a combination of super resolution aided nano manipulation ineluctably gives a new perspective to the scenario. Here we demonstrate how specificity and rapid determination of structures provided by stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscope can aid another microscopic tool with capability of mechanical manoeuvring, like an atomic force microscope (AFM) to get topological information or to target nano scaled materials. We also give proof of principle on how high-resolution real time visualization can improve nano manipulation capability within a dense sample, and how STED-AFM is an optimal combination for this job. With these evidences, this article points to future precise nano dissections and maybe even to a nano-snooker game with an AFM tip and fluorospheres. PMID:23799123

  14. Fabrication and characterization of mesoscale protein patterns using atomic force microscopy (AFM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Pei

    2011-07-01

    A versatile AFM local oxidation lithography was developed for fabricating clean protein patterns ranging from nanometer to sub-millimeter scale on octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) layer of Si (100) wafer. This protein patterning method can generate bio-active protein pattern with a clean background without the need of the anti-fouling the surface or repetitive rinsing. As a model system, lysozyme protein patterns were investigated through their binding reactions with antibodies and aptamers by AFM. Polyclonal anti-lysozyme antibodies and anti-lysozyme aptamer are found to preferentially bind to the lysozyme molecules on the edge of a protein pattern before their binding to the interior ones. It was also demonstrated that the topography of the immobilized protein pattern affects the antibody binding direction. We found that the anti-lysozyme antibodies binding to the edge lysozyme molecules on the half-buried pattern started from the top but the binding on the extruded pattern started from the side because of their different spatial accessibility. In addition, after incubating lysozyme pattern with anti-lysozyme aptamer in buffer solution for enough long time, some fractal-shaped aptamer fibers with 1-6nm high and up to tens of micrometers long were formed by the self-assembling of aptamer molecules on the surface. The aptamer fibers anchor specifically on the edge of protein patterns, which originates from the biospecific recognition between the aptamer and its target protein. Once these edge-bound fibers have formed, they can serve as scaffolds for further assembly processes. We used these aptamer fibers as templates to fabricate palladium and streptavidin nanowires, which anchored on the pattern edges and never cross over or collapse over each other. The aptamer fiber scaffold potentially can lead to an effective means to fabricate and interface nanowires to existing surface patterns. KEYWORDS: Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Protein Patterns, Lysozyme, Aptamer

  15. A rapid, membrane-dependent pathway directs furrow formation through RalA in the early Drosophila embryo

    PubMed Central

    Holly, Ryan M.; Mavor, Lauren M.; Zuo, Zhongyuan; Blankenship, J. Todd

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membrane furrow formation is crucial in cell division and cytokinesis. Furrow formation in early syncytial Drosophila embryos is exceptionally rapid, with furrows forming in as little as 3.75 min. Here, we use 4D imaging to identify furrow formation, stabilization, and regression periods, and identify a rapid, membrane-dependent pathway that is essential for plasma membrane furrow formation in vivo. Myosin II function is thought to provide the ingression force for cytokinetic furrows, but the role of membrane trafficking pathways in guiding furrow formation is less clear. We demonstrate that a membrane trafficking pathway centered on Ras-like protein A (RalA) is required for fast furrow ingression in the early fly embryo. RalA function is absolutely required for furrow formation and initiation. In the absence of RalA and furrow function, chromosomal segregation is aberrant and polyploid nuclei are observed. RalA localizes to syncytial furrows, and mediates the movement of exocytic vesicles to the plasma membrane. Sec5, which is an exocyst complex subunit and localizes to ingressing furrows in wild-type embryos, becomes punctate and loses its cortical association in the absence of RalA function. Rab8 also fails to traffic to the plasma membrane and accumulates aberrantly in the cytoplasm in RalA disrupted embryos. RalA localization precedes F-actin recruitment to the furrow tip, suggesting that membrane trafficking might function upstream of cytoskeletal remodeling. These studies identify a pathway, which stretches from Rab8 to RalA and the exocyst complex, that mediates rapid furrow formation in early Drosophila embryos. PMID:26092850

  16. Directing Dopaminergic Fiber Growth Along a Preformed Molecular Pathway From Embryonic Ventral Mesencephalon Transplants in the Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Y.; Zhang, C.; Ziemba, K.S.; Goldstein, G.A.; Sullivan, P.G.; Smith, G.M.

    2012-01-01

    To identify guidance molecules to promote long-distance growth of dopaminergic axons from transplanted embryonic ventral mesencephalon (VM) tissue, three pathways were created by expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP), glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), or a combination of GDNF/GDNF receptor α1 (GFRα1) along the corpus callosum. To generate the guidance pathway, adenovirus encoding these transcripts was injected at four positions along the corpus callosum. In all groups, GDNF adenovirus was also injected on the right side 2.5 mm from the midline at the desired transplant site. Four days later, a piece of VM tissue from embryonic day 14 rats was injected at the transplant site. All rats also received daily subcutaneous injections of N-acetyl-L-cysteinamide (NACA; 100 μg per rat) as well as chondroitinase ABC at transplant site (10 U/ml, 2 μl). Two weeks after transplantation, the rats were perfused and the brains dissected out. Coronal sections were cut and immunostained with antibody to tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) to identify and count dopaminergic fibers in the corpus callosum. In GFP-expressing pathways, TH+ fibers grew out of the transplants for a short distance in the corpus callosum. Very few TH+ fibers grew across the midline. However, pathways expressing GDNF supported more TH+ fiber growth across the midline into the contralateral hemisphere. Significantly greater numbers of TH+ fibers grew across the midline in animals expressing a combination of GDNF and GFRα1 in the corpus callosum. These data suggest that expression of GDNF or a combination of GDNF and GFRα1 can support the long-distance dopaminergic fiber growth from a VM transplant, with the combination having a superior effect. PMID:21337366

  17. New paradigm in ethylene signaling: EIN2, the central regulator of the signaling pathway, interacts directly with the upstream receptors.

    PubMed

    Bisson, Melanie M A; Groth, Georg

    2011-01-01

    The membrane protein ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE2 (EIN2), which is supposed to act between the soluble serine/threonine kinase CTR1 and the EIN3/EIL family of transcription factors, is a central and most critical element of the ethylene signaling pathway in Arabidopsis. In a recent study, we have identified that EIN2 interacts tightly with all members of the Arabidopsis ethylene receptor family - proteins that mark the starting point of the signaling pathway. Our studies show consistently that the kinase domain of the receptors is essential for the formation of the EIN2-receptor complex. Furthermore, mutational analysis demonstrates that phosphorylation is a key mechanism in controlling the interaction of EIN2 and the ethylene receptors. Interaction studies in the presence of the ethylene agonist cyanide revealed a causal link between hormone binding and complex formation. In the presence of the plant hormone agonist the auto-kinase activity of the receptors is inhibited and the non-phosphorylated kinase domain of the receptors binds tightly to the carboxyl-terminal domain of EIN2. In the absence of cyanide inhibition of the auto-kinase activity is relieved and complex formation with the phosphorylated kinase domain of the receptors is reduced. Our data suggest a novel model on the integration of EIN2 in the ethylene signaling pathway.

  18. A Direct Link between Abscisic Acid Sensing and the Chromatin-Remodeling ATPase BRAHMA via Core ABA Signaling Pathway Components.

    PubMed

    Peirats-Llobet, Marta; Han, Soon-Ki; Gonzalez-Guzman, Miguel; Jeong, Cheol Woong; Rodriguez, Lesia; Belda-Palazon, Borja; Wagner, Doris; Rodriguez, Pedro L

    2016-01-04

    Optimal response to drought is critical for plant survival and will affect biodiversity and crop performance during climate change. Mitotically heritable epigenetic or dynamic chromatin state changes have been implicated in the plant response to the drought stress hormone abscisic acid (ABA). The Arabidopsis SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling ATPase BRAHMA (BRM) modulates response to ABA by preventing premature activation of stress response pathways during germination. We show that core ABA signaling pathway components physically interact with BRM and post-translationally modify BRM by phosphorylation/dephosphorylation. Genetic evidence suggests that BRM acts downstream of SnRK2.2/2.3 kinases, and biochemical studies identified phosphorylation sites in the C-terminal region of BRM at SnRK2 target sites that are evolutionarily conserved. Finally, the phosphomimetic BRM(S1760D S1762D) mutant displays ABA hypersensitivity. Prior studies showed that BRM resides at target loci in the ABA pathway in the presence and absence of the stimulus, but is only active in the absence of ABA. Our data suggest that SnRK2-dependent phosphorylation of BRM leads to its inhibition, and PP2CA-mediated dephosphorylation of BRM restores the ability of BRM to repress ABA response. These findings point to the presence of a rapid phosphorylation-based switch to control BRM activity; this property could be potentially harnessed to improve drought tolerance in plants. Copyright © 2016 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. JAK/STAT pathway directed therapy of T-cell leukemia/lymphoma: Inspired by functional and structural genomics.

    PubMed

    Waldmann, Thomas A

    2017-08-15

    Abnormal activation of the γc cytokine JAK/STAT signaling pathway assessed by STAT3 or STAT5b phosphorylation was present in a proportion of many T-cell malignancies. Activating mutations of STAT3/STAT5b and JAK1/3 were present in some but not in all cases with constitutive signaling pathway activation. Using shRNA analysis pSTAT malignant T-cell lines were addicted to JAKs/STATs whether they were mutated or not. Activating JAK/STAT mutations were not sufficient to support leukemic cell proliferation but only augmented upstream pathway signals. Functional cytokine receptors were required for pSTAT expression. Combining a JAK1/2 inhibitor with a Bcl-xL inhibitor navitoclax provided additive/synergistic activity with IL-2 dependent ATLL cell lines and in a mouse model of human IL-2 dependent ATLL. The insight that disorders of the γc/JAK/STAT system are pervasive suggests approaches including those that target gamma cytokines, their receptors or that use JAK kinase inhibitors may be of value in multicomponent therapy for T-cell malignancies. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. A review of the application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) in food science and technology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shaoyang; Wang, Yifen

    2011-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a powerful nanoscale analysis technique used in food area. This versatile technique can be used to acquire high-resolution sample images and investigate local interactions in air or liquid surroundings. In this chapter, we explain the principles of AFM and review representative applications of AFM in gelatin, casein micelle, carrageenan, gellan gum, starch, and interface. We elucidate new knowledge revealed with AFM as well as ways to use AFM to obtain morphology and rheology information in different food fields. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Crystal structures of Boro-AFm and sBoro-AFt phases

    SciTech Connect

    Champenois, Jean-Baptiste; Cau Dit Coumes, Celine; Leroux, Fabrice; Mercier, Cyrille; Revel, Bertrand; Damidot, Denis

    2012-10-15

    Crystal structures of boron-containing AFm (B-AFm) and AFt (B-AFt) phases have been solved ab-initio and refined from X-ray powder diffraction. {sup 11}B NMR and Raman spectroscopies confirm the boron local environment in both compounds: three-fold coordinated in B-AFm corresponding to HBO{sub 3}{sup 2-} species, and four-fold coordinated in B-AFt corresponding to B (OH){sub 4}{sup -} species. B-AFm crystallizes in the rhombohedral R3{sup Macron }c space group and has the 3CaO{center_dot}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}CaHBO{sub 3}{center_dot}12H{sub 2}O (4CaO{center_dot}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}1/2B{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}12.5H{sub 2}O, C{sub 4}AB{sub 1/2}H{sub 12.5}) general formulae with planar trigonal HBO{sub 3}{sup 2-} anions weakly bonded at the centre of the interlayer region. One HBO{sub 3}{sup 2-} anion is statistically distributed with two weakly bonded water molecules on the same crystallographic site. B-AFt crystallizes in the trigonal P3cl space group and has the 3CaO{center_dot}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}Ca(OH){sub 2}{center_dot}2Ca(B (OH){sub 4}){sub 2}{center_dot}24H{sub 2}O (6CaO{center_dot}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}2B{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}33H{sub 2}O, C{sub 6}AB{sub 2}H{sub 33}) general formulae with tetrahedral B (OH){sub 4}{sup -} anions located in the channel region of the structure. All tetrahedral anions are oriented in a unique direction, leading to a hexagonal c lattice parameter about half that of ettringite.

  2. Immune Cell Regulatory Pathways Unexplored as Host-Directed Therapeutic Targets for Mycobacterium tuberculosis: An Opportunity to Apply Precision Medicine Innovations to Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mahon, Robert N.; Hafner, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The lack of novel antimicrobial drugs in development for tuberculosis treatment has provided an impetus for the discovery of adjunctive host-directed therapies (HDTs). Several promising HDT candidates are being evaluated, but major advancement of tuberculosis HDTs will require understanding of the master or “core” cell signaling pathways that control intersecting immunologic and metabolic regulatory mechanisms, collectively described as “immunometabolism.” Core regulatory pathways conserved in all eukaryotic cells include poly (ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs), sirtuins, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling. Critical interactions of these signaling pathways with each other and their roles as master regulators of immunometabolic functions will be addressed, as well as how Mycobacterium tuberculosis is already known to influence various other cell signaling pathways interacting with them. Knowledge of these essential mechanisms of cell function regulation has led to breakthrough targeted treatment advances for many diseases, most prominently in oncology. Leveraging these exciting advances in precision medicine for the development of innovative next-generation HDTs may lead to entirely new paradigms for treatment and prevention of tuberculosis and other infectious diseases. PMID:26409283

  3. Ab initio study of CO2 capture mechanisms in aqueous monoethanolamine: reaction pathways for the direct interconversion of carbamate and bicarbonate.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Yoichi; Yamada, Hidetaka; Chowdhury, Firoz A; Higashii, Takayuki; Onoda, Masami

    2013-09-26

    Ab initio molecular orbital calculations combined with the polarizable continuum model (PCM) formalism have been carried out for a comprehensive understanding of the mechanism of carbon dioxide (CO2) absorption by aqueous amine solutions. CO2 is captured by amines to generate carbamates and bicarbonate. We have examined the direct interconversion pathways of these two species (collectively represented by a reversible hydrolysis of carbamate) with the prototypical amine, monoethanolamine (MEA). We evaluate both a concerted and a stepwise mechanism for the neutral hydrolysis of MEA carbamate. Large activation energies (ca. 36 kcal/mol) and lack of increase in catalytic efficiency with the inclusion of additional water molecules are predicted in both the mechanisms. We also examined the mechanism of alkaline hydrolysis of MEA carbamate at high concentrations of amine (high pH). The addition of OH(-) ion to carbamate anion was theoretically not allowed due to the reduction in the nucleophilicity of the former as a result of microsolvation. We propose an alternative pathway for hydrolysis: a proton transfer from protonated MEA to carbamate to generate the carbamic acid that initially undergoes a nucleophilic addition of OH(-) and subsequent low-barrier reactions leading to the formation of bicarbonate and free MEA. On the basis of the calculated activation energies, this pathway would be the most efficient route for the direct interconversion of carbamate and bicarbonate without the intermediacy of the free CO2, while the actual contributions will be dependent on the concentrations of protonated MEA and OH(-) ions.

  4. Telmisartan inhibited angiotensin II-induced collagen metabolic imbalance without directly targeting TGF-β 1/Smad signaling pathway in cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Zhao, N A; Wang, J K; Zhu, S M; Zhu, H L; Liu, B; Cui, Q W; Guan, G C; Tian, G

    2015-12-01

    Cardiac fibrosis is an important pathological process of cardiac remodeling. A large number of studies have shown that telmisartan can attenuate cardiac fibrosis through acting on angiotensin II 1 receptor (AT1R), and TGF-β 1/Smad signaling molecule is an important pathway to achieve this effect. The aim of the study was to clarify whether, with excessive activation of RAAS system, telmisartan could also directly target TGF-β 1/Smad signaling pathway to have the function of anti-cardiac fibrosis. In this study, neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts were cultured and AngII or TGF-β 1 was administered for treatment or pre-incubation, and then telmisartan was used for 24 hours' incubation. Western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) tests were performed to detect protein expressions. The results showed that telmisartan could inhibit collagen synthesis and collagen metabolic imbalance under the effect of Ang II, but telmisartan could not have such function in TGF-β 1-induced cardiac fibroblasts. It was further confirmed by western blot method that telmisartan could inhibit TGF-β 1/Smad signaling molecule expression under the effect of Ang II, but telmisartan had no effect on TGF-β 1-induced Smad signaling molecule expression. According to the present study telmisartan played a role of anticardiac fibrosis without directly targeting TGF-β 1/Smad signaling pathway molecule.

  5. IL-2 augments the therapeutic efficacy of adoptively transferred B cells which directly kill tumor cells via the CXCR4/CXCL12 and perforin pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Xia, Leiming; Zhou, Li; Wang, Yi; Bao, Yangyi; Huang, Shiang; Ren, Xiubao; Lundy, Steven K.; Dai, Fu; Li, Qiao; Chang, Alfred E.

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that antitumor B cells directly kill tumor cells via the Fas/FasL pathway and are regulated by IL-10. In this study, we defined additional mechanisms involved in B cell antitumor immunity. Administration of IL-2 significantly augmented the therapeutic efficacy of adoptively transferred tumor-draining lymph node (TDLN) B cells which express IL- 2R. Culture supernatant of purified B splenocytes harvested from the mice that received adoptive transfer of 4T1 TDLN B cells plus IL-2 administration produced larger amounts of IgG which bound to 4T1, resulting in 4T1 lysis. Furthermore, we detected CXCR4 expression on 4T1 TDLN B cells, and 4T1 tumor cells produced its ligand CXCL12. Transwell experiments demonstrated the chemoattraction of CXCR4-expressing 4T1 TDLN B cells towards CXCL12- producing 4T1 cells. Blockade of CXCR4 using a CXCR4-specific inhibitor, AMD3100, significantly reduced the killing of 4T1 tumor cells by 4T1 TDLN B cells. Blockade of FasL and CXCR4 concurrently inhibited B cell-mediated direct killing of tumor cells in an additive manner, indicating that both Fas/FasL and CXCL12/CXCR4 pathways are involved in the direct killing of 4T1 cells by 4T1 TDLN B cells. TDLN B cells produced perforin. Additional transwell experiments showed that effector B cells could directly kill tumor cells in cell-cell contact via the Fas/FasL and CXCR4/CXCL12 pathways as well as perforin, while without cell contact, perforin secreted by B cells led to tumor cell cytotoxicity. These findings underscore the diversity of function by which B cells can play an important role in the host immune response to tumor. PMID:27528023

  6. IL-2 augments the therapeutic efficacy of adoptively transferred B cells which directly kill tumor cells via the CXCR4/CXCL12 and perforin pathways.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yang; Tao, Huimin; Hu, Yangyang; Chen, Quanning; Chen, Xin; Xia, Leiming; Zhou, Li; Wang, Yi; Bao, Yangyi; Huang, Shiang; Ren, Xiubao; Lundy, Steven K; Dai, Fu; Li, Qiao; Chang, Alfred E

    2016-09-13

    We previously reported that antitumor B cells directly kill tumor cells via the Fas/FasL pathway and are regulated by IL-10. In this study, we defined additional mechanisms involved in B cell antitumor immunity. Administration of IL-2 significantly augmented the therapeutic efficacy of adoptively transferred tumor-draining lymph node (TDLN) B cells which express IL- 2R. Culture supernatant of purified B splenocytes harvested from the mice that received adoptive transfer of 4T1 TDLN B cells plus IL-2 administration produced larger amounts of IgG which bound to 4T1, resulting in 4T1 lysis. Furthermore, we detected CXCR4 expression on 4T1 TDLN B cells, and 4T1 tumor cells produced its ligand CXCL12. Transwell experiments demonstrated the chemoattraction of CXCR4-expressing 4T1 TDLN B cells towards CXCL12- producing 4T1 cells. Blockade of CXCR4 using a CXCR4-specific inhibitor, AMD3100, significantly reduced the killing of 4T1 tumor cells by 4T1 TDLN B cells. Blockade of FasL and CXCR4 concurrently inhibited B cell-mediated direct killing of tumor cells in an additive manner, indicating that both Fas/FasL and CXCL12/CXCR4 pathways are involved in the direct killing of 4T1 cells by 4T1 TDLN B cells. TDLN B cells produced perforin. Additional transwell experiments showed that effector B cells could directly kill tumor cells in cell-cell contact via the Fas/FasL and CXCR4/CXCL12 pathways as well as perforin, while without cell contact, perforin secreted by B cells led to tumor cell cytotoxicity. These findings underscore the diversity of function by which B cells can play an important role in the host immune response to tumor.

  7. Spin Dynamics and Quantum Tunneling in Fe8 Nanomagnet and in AFM Rings by NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Ho-Baek, Seung

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis, our main interest has been to investigate the spin dynamics and quantum tunneling in single molecule magnets (SMMs), For this we have selected two different classes of SMMs: a ferrimagnetic total high spin S = 10 cluster Fe8 and antiferromagnetic (AFM) ring-type clusters. For Fe8, our efforts have been devoted to the investigation of the quantum tunneling of magnetization in the very low temperature region. The most remarkable experimental finding in Fe8 is that the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T{sub l}) at low temperatures takes place via strong collision mechanism, and thus it allows to measure directly the tunneling rate vs T and H for the first time. For AFM rings, we have shown that 1/T{sub l} probes the thermal fluctuations of the magnetization in the intermediate temperature range. We find that the fluctuations are dominated by a single characteristic frequency which has a power law T-dependence indicative of fluctuations due to electron-acoustic phonon interactions.

  8. Strategies for the AFM-based manipulation of silver nanowires on a flat surface.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-Zhi; Wu, Sen; Zhang, Jun-Ming; Bai, Hui-Tian; Jin, Fan; Pang, Hai; Hu, Xiao-Dong

    2017-09-08

    Silver nanowires (Ag NWs) are a promising material for building various sensors and devices at the nanoscale. However, the fast and precise placement of individual Ag NWs is still a challenge today. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been widely used to manipulate nanoparticles, yet this technology encounters many difficulties when being applied to the movement of Ag NWs as well as other soft one-dimensional (1D) materials, since the samples are easily distorted or even broken due to friction and adhesion on the substrate. In this paper, two novel manipulation strategies based on the parallel pushing method are presented. This method applies a group of short parallel pushing vectors (PPVs) to the Ag NW along its longitudinal direction. Identical and proportional vectors are respectively proposed to translate and rotate the Ag NWs with a straight-line configuration. The rotation strategy is also applied to straighten flexed Ag NWs. The finite element method simulation is introduced to analyse the behaviour of the Ag NWs as well as to optimize the parameter setting of the PPVs. Experiments are carried out to confirm the efficiency of the presented strategies. By comprehensive application of the new strategies, four Ag NWs are continuously assembled in a rectangular pattern. This study improves the controllability of the position and configuration of Ag NWs on a flat substrate. It also indicates the practicability of automatic nanofabrication using common AFMs.

  9. Structure of tetracene films on hydrogen-passivated Si(001) studied via STM, AFM, and NEXAFS

    SciTech Connect

    Tersigni, A.; Shi, J.; Jiang, D. T.; Qin, X. R.

    2006-11-15

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) have been used to study the structure of tetracene films on hydrogen-passivated Si(001). STM imaging of the films with nominal thickness of three monolayers (3 ML) exhibits the characteristic 'herringbone' molecular packing known from the bulk crystalline tetracene, showing standing molecules on the ab plane. The dimensions and orientation of the herringbone lattice indicate a commensurate structural relationship between the lattice and the crystalline substrate. The corresponding AFM images illustrate that at and above the third layer of the films, the islands are anisotropic, in contrast with the submonolayer fractals, with two preferred growth directions appearing orthogonal to each other. The polarization dependent NEXAFS measurements indicate that the average molecular tilting angle with respect to the surface first increases with the film thickness up to 3 ML, then stabilizes at a value close to the bulk tetracene case afterwards. The combined results indicate a distinct growth morphological change that occurs around a few monolayers of thickness.

  10. Strategies for the AFM-based manipulation of silver nanowires on a flat surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hong-Zhi; Wu, Sen; Zhang, Jun-Ming; Bai, Hui-Tian; Jin, Fan; Pang, Hai; Hu, Xiao-Dong

    2017-09-01

    Silver nanowires (Ag NWs) are a promising material for building various sensors and devices at the nanoscale. However, the fast and precise placement of individual Ag NWs is still a challenge today. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been widely used to manipulate nanoparticles, yet this technology encounters many difficulties when being applied to the movement of Ag NWs as well as other soft one-dimensional (1D) materials, since the samples are easily distorted or even broken due to friction and adhesion on the substrate. In this paper, two novel manipulation strategies based on the parallel pushing method are presented. This method applies a group of short parallel pushing vectors (PPVs) to the Ag NW along its longitudinal direction. Identical and proportional vectors are respectively proposed to translate and rotate the Ag NWs with a straight-line configuration. The rotation strategy is also applied to straighten flexed Ag NWs. The finite element method simulation is introduced to analyse the behaviour of the Ag NWs as well as to optimize the parameter setting of the PPVs. Experiments are carried out to confirm the efficiency of the presented strategies. By comprehensive application of the new strategies, four Ag NWs are continuously assembled in a rectangular pattern. This study improves the controllability of the position and configuration of Ag NWs on a flat substrate. It also indicates the practicability of automatic nanofabrication using common AFMs.

  11. Method for quantitative measurements of the elastic modulus of biological cells in AFM indentation experiments.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, Igor; Dokukin, Maxim E; Guz, Nataliia V

    2013-04-01

    Here we overview and further develop a quantitative method to measure mechanics of biological cells in indentation experiments, which is based on the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM). We demonstrate how the elastic modulus of the cell body should be measured when the cellular brush is taken into account. The brush is an essential inelastic part of the cell, which surrounds all eukaryotic (the brush is mostly microvilli and glycocalyx) and gram-negative prokaryotic cells (the brush is polysaccharides). The other main feature of the described method is the use of a relatively dull AFM probe to stay in the linear stress-strain regime. In particular, we show that the elastic modulus (aka the Young's modulus) of cells is independent of the indentation depth up to 10-20% deformation for the eukaryotic cells studied here. Besides the elastic modulus, the method presented allows obtaining the parameters of cellular brush, such as the effective length and grafting density of the brush. Although the method is demonstrated on eukaryotic cells, it is directly applicable for all types of cells, and even non-biological soft materials surrounded by either a brush or any field of long-range forces. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Characterization of Bitumen Micro-Mechanical Behaviors Using AFM, Phase Dynamics Theory and MD Simulation.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yue; Wang, Linbing; Wang, Dawei; Guo, Meng; Liu, Pengfei; Yu, Jianxin

    2017-02-21

    Fundamental understanding of micro-mechanical behaviors in bitumen, including phase separation, micro-friction, micro-abrasion, etc., can help the pavement engineers better understand the bitumen mechanical performances at macroscale. Recent researches show that the microstructure evolution in bitumen will directly affect its surface structure and micro-mechanical performance. In this study, the bitumen microstructure and micro-mechanical behaviors are studied using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) experiments, Phase Dynamics Theory and Molecular Dynamics (MD) Simulation. The AFM experiment results show that different phase-structure will occur at the surface of the bitumen samples under certain thermodynamic conditions at microscale. The phenomenon can be explained using the phase dynamics theory, where the effects of stability parameter and temperature on bitumen microstructure and micro-mechanical behavior are studied combined with MD Simulation. Simulation results show that the saturates phase, in contrast to the naphthene aromatics phase, plays a major role in bitumen micro-mechanical behavior. A high stress zone occurs at the interface between the saturates phase and the naphthene aromatics phase, which may form discontinuities that further affect the bitumen frictional performance.

  13. Characterization of Bitumen Micro-Mechanical Behaviors Using AFM, Phase Dynamics Theory and MD Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yue; Wang, Linbing; Wang, Dawei; Guo, Meng; Liu, Pengfei; Yu, Jianxin

    2017-01-01

    Fundamental understanding of micro-mechanical behaviors in bitumen, including phase separation, micro-friction, micro-abrasion, etc., can help the pavement engineers better understand the bitumen mechanical performances at macroscale. Recent researches show that the microstructure evolution in bitumen will directly affect its surface structure and micro-mechanical performance. In this study, the bitumen microstructure and micro-mechanical behaviors are studied using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) experiments, Phase Dynamics Theory and Molecular Dynamics (MD) Simulation. The AFM experiment results show that different phase-structure will occur at the surface of the bitumen samples under certain thermodynamic conditions at microscale. The phenomenon can be explained using the phase dynamics theory, where the effects of stability parameter and temperature on bitumen microstructure and micro-mechanical behavior are studied combined with MD Simulation. Simulation results show that the saturates phase, in contrast to the naphthene aromatics phase, plays a major role in bitumen micro-mechanical behavior. A high stress zone occurs at the interface between the saturates phase and the naphthene aromatics phase, which may form discontinuities that further affect the bitumen frictional performance. PMID:28772570

  14. Phosphodiesterase 4 inhibition affects both the direct and indirect pathway: an electrophysiological study examining the tri-phasic response in the substantia nigra pars reticulata.

    PubMed

    Heckman, P R A; Schweimer, J V; Sharp, T; Prickaerts, J; Blokland, A

    2017-09-18

    Fronto-striatal circuits constitute the neurobiological basis of many neuropsychiatric disorders. Part of the intracellular signaling within these circuits, including its dopaminergic modulation, is regulated by the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling cascade. Based on the overall expression in human fronto-striatal circuitry, we tested the effects of a cAMP selective phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitor on the tri-phasic response in the dorsomedial substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) upon stimulation of the infralimbic cortex in rats. Our results show for the first time that stimulation of the cognitive infralimbic cortex leads to a tri-phasic response in SNr neurons. In addition and in line with previous biochemical and behavioral studies, PDE4 inhibition by roflumilast affects the direct pathway as well as the indirect pathway of which the latter appears more sensitive than the former.

  15. Dopamine-dependent long-term depression is expressed in striatal spiny neurons of both direct and indirect pathways: implications for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bagetta, Vincenza; Picconi, Barbara; Marinucci, Silvia; Sgobio, Carmelo; Pendolino, Valentina; Ghiglieri, Veronica; Fusco, Francesca R; Giampà, Carmen; Calabresi, Paolo

    2011-08-31

    Striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) are divided into two subpopulations exerting distinct effects on motor behavior. Transgenic mice carrying bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) able to confer cell type-specific expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) for dopamine (DA) receptors have been developed to characterize differences between these subpopulations. Analysis of these mice, in contrast with original pioneering studies, showed that striatal long-term depression (LTD) was expressed in indirect but not in the direct pathway MSNs. To address this mismatch, we applied a new approach using combined BAC technology and receptor immunohistochemistry. We demonstrate that, in physiological conditions, DA-dependent LTD is expressed in both pathways showing that the lack of synaptic plasticity found in D(1) eGFP mice is associated to behavioral deficits. Our findings suggest caution in the use of this tool and indicate that the "striatal segregation" hypothesis might not explain all synaptic dysfunctions in Parkinson's disease.

  16. Solvent-mediated repair and patterning of surfaces by AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Elhadj, S; Chernov, A; De Yoreo, J

    2007-10-30

    A tip-based approach to shaping surfaces of soluble materials with nanometer-scale control is reported. The proposed method can be used, for example, to eliminate defects and inhomogeneities in surface shape, repair mechanical or laser-induced damage to surfaces, or perform 3D lithography on the length scale of an AFM tip. The phenomenon that enables smoothing and repair of surfaces is based on the transport of material from regions of high- to low-curvature within the solution meniscus formed in a solvent-containing atmosphere between the surface in question and an AFM tip scanned over the surface. Using in situ AFM measurements of the kinetics of surface remodeling on KDP (KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}) crystals in humid air, we show that redistribution of solute material during relaxation of grooves and mounds is driven by a reduction in surface free energy as described by the Gibbs-Thomson law. We find that the perturbation from a flat interface evolves according to the diffusion equation where the effective diffusivity is determined by the product of the surface stiffness and the step kinetic coefficient. We also show that, surprisingly, if the tip is instead scanned over or kept stationary above an atomically flat area of the surface, a convex structure is formed with a diameter that is controlled by the dimensions of the meniscus, indicating that the presence of the tip and meniscus reduces the substrate chemical potential beneath that of the free surface. This allows one to create nanometer-scale 3D structures of arbitrary shape without the removal of substrate material or the use of extrinsic masks or chemical compounds. Potential applications of these tip-based phenomena are discussed.

  17. Image Analysis and Length Estimation of Biomolecules Using AFM

    PubMed Central

    Sundstrom, Andrew; Cirrone, Silvio; Paxia, Salvatore; Hsueh, Carlin; Kjolby, Rachel; Gimzewski, James K.; Reed, Jason; Mishra, Bud

    2014-01-01

    There are many examples of problems in pattern analysis for which it is often possible to obtain systematic characterizations, if in addition a small number of useful features or parameters of the image are known a priori or can be estimated reasonably well. Often, the relevant features of a particular pattern analysis problem are easy to enumerate, as when statistical structures of the patterns are well understood from the knowledge of the domain. We study a problem from molecular image analysis, where such a domain-dependent understanding may be lacking to some degree and the features must be inferred via machine-learning techniques. In this paper, we propose a rigorous, fully automated technique for this problem. We are motivated by an application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) image processing needed to solve a central problem in molecular biology, aimed at obtaining the complete transcription profile of a single cell, a snapshot that shows which genes are being expressed and to what degree. Reed et al. (“Single molecule transcription profiling with AFM,” Nanotechnology, vol. 18, no. 4, 2007) showed that the transcription profiling problem reduces to making high-precision measurements of biomolecule backbone lengths, correct to within 20–25 bp (6–7.5 nm). Here, we present an image processing and length estimation pipeline using AFM that comes close to achieving these measurement tolerances. In particular, we develop a biased length estimator on trained coefficients of a simple linear regression model, biweighted by a Beaton–Tukey function, whose feature universe is constrained by James–Stein shrinkage to avoid overfitting. In terms of extensibility and addressing the model selection problem, this formulation subsumes the models we studied. PMID:22759526

  18. Applications of AFM for atomic manipulation and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custance, Oscar

    2009-03-01

    Since the first demonstration of atom-by-atom assembly [1], atomic manipulation with scanning tunneling microscopy has yielded stunning realizations in nanoscience. A new exciting panorama has been recently opened with the possibility of manipulating atoms at surfaces using atomic force microscopy (AFM) [2-5]. In this talk, we will present two different approaches that enable patterning structures at semiconductor surfaces by manipulating individual atoms with AFM and at room temperature [2, 3]. We will discuss the physics behind each protocol through the analysis of the measured forces associated with these manipulations [3-5]. Another challenging issue in scanning probe microscopy is the ability to disclose the local chemical composition of a multi-element system at atomic level. Here, we will introduce a single-atom chemical identification method, which is based on detecting the forces between the outermost atom of the AFM tip and the atoms at a surface [6]. We demonstrate this identification procedure on a particularly challenging system, where any discrimination attempt based solely on topographic measurements would be impossible to achieve. [4pt] References: [0pt] [1] D. M. Eigler and E. K. Schweizer, Nature 344, 524 (1990); [0pt] [2] Y. Sugimoto, M. Abe, S. Hirayama, N. Oyabu, O. Custance and S. Morita, Nature Materials 4, 156 (2005); [0pt] [3] Y. Sugimoto, P. Pou, O. Custance, P. Jelinek, M. Abe, R. Perez and S. Morita, Science 322, 413 (2008); [0pt] [4] Y. Sugimoto, P. Jelinek, P. Pou, M. Abe, S. Morita, R. Perez and O. Custance, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 106104 (2007); [0pt] [5] M. Ternes, C. P. Lutz, C. F. Hirjibehedin, F. J. Giessibl and A. J. Heinrich, Science 319, 1066 (2008); [0pt] [6] Y. Sugimoto, P. Pou, M. Abe, P. Jelinek, R. Perez, S. Morita, and O. Custance, Nature 446, 64 (2007)

  19. MicroRNA-140-5p inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma by directly targeting the unique isomerase Pin1 to block multiple cancer-driving pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xingxue; Zhu, Zhendong; Xu, Shenmin; Yang, Li-nan; Liao, Xin-Hua; Zheng, Min; Yang, Dayun; Wang, Jichuang; Chen, Dongmei; Wang, Long; Liu, Xiaolong; Liu, Jingfeng; Chen, Ruey-Hwa; Zhen Zhou, Xiao; Ping Lu, Kun; Liu, Hekun

    2017-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the second leading cause of cancer related-death. As a major common regulator of numerous cancer-driving pathways and a unique therapeutic target, the prolyl isomerase Pin1 is overexpressed in a majority of HCCs, whereas the mechanism underlying Pin1 overexpression remains elusive. Here we find that miR-140-5p inhibits HCC by directly targeting Pin1 to block multiple cancer-driving pathways. Bioinformatics analysis, miRNA binding and functional assays identify that miR-140-5p directly interacts with the 3′UTR of Pin1 and inhibits Pin1 translation. Furthermore, like stable Pin1 knockdown, moderate overexpression of miR-140-5p not only eliminates Pin1, but also inhibits cells growth and metastasis. Importantly, these effects of miR-140-5p are largely rescued by reconstitution of Pin1. Moreover, miR-140-5p inhibits multiple Pin1-dependent cancer pathways and suppresses tumor growth in mice. The clinical significance of these findings has been substantiated by the demonstrations that miR-140-5p is frequently down-regulated and inversely correlated with Pin1 overexpression in HCC tissues and cell lines. Given prevalent miR-140-5p downregulation in other cancers and major impact of Pin1 overexpression on activating numerous cancer-driving pathways including global miRNA downregulation, the miR-140-5p/Pin1 axis may play a major role in tumorigenesis and offer promising therapeutic targets for HCC and other cancers. PMID:28383568

  20. Angiosperms Are Unique among Land Plant Lineages in the Occurrence of Key Genes in the RNA-Directed DNA Methylation (RdDM) Pathway.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lu; Hatlen, Andrea; Kelly, Laura J; Becher, Hannes; Wang, Wencai; Kovarik, Ales; Leitch, Ilia J; Leitch, Andrew R

    2015-09-02

    The RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) pathway can be divided into three phases: 1) small interfering RNA biogenesis, 2) de novo methylation, and 3) chromatin modification. To determine the degree of conservation of this pathway we searched for key genes among land plants. We used OrthoMCL and the OrthoMCL Viridiplantae database to analyze proteomes of species in bryophytes, lycophytes, monilophytes, gymnosperms, and angiosperms. We also analyzed small RNA size categories and, in two gymnosperms, cytosine methylation in ribosomal DNA. Six proteins were restricted to angiosperms, these being NRPD4/NRPE4, RDM1, DMS3 (defective in meristem silencing 3), SHH1 (SAWADEE homeodomain homolog 1), KTF1, and SUVR2, although we failed to find the latter three proteins in Fritillaria persica, a species with a giant genome. Small RNAs of 24 nt in length were abundant only in angiosperms. Phylogenetic analyses of Dicer-like (DCL) proteins showed that DCL2 was restricted to seed plants, although it was absent in Gnetum gnemon and Welwitschia mirabilis. The data suggest that phases (1) and (2) of the RdDM pathway, described for model angiosperms, evolved with angiosperms. The absence of some features of RdDM in F. persica may be associated with its large genome. Phase (3) is probably the most conserved part of the pathway across land plants. DCL2, involved in virus defense and interaction with the canonical RdDM pathway to facilitate methylation of CHH, is absent outside seed plants. Its absence in G. gnemon, and W. mirabilis coupled with distinctive patterns of CHH methylation, suggest a secondary loss of DCL2 following the divergence of Gnetales.

  1. Direct Pathway from Early/Recycling Endosomes to the Golgi Apparatus Revealed through the Study of Shiga Toxin B-fragment Transport

    PubMed Central

    Mallard, Frédéric; Antony, Claude; Tenza, Danièle; Salamero, Jean; Goud, Bruno; Johannes, Ludger

    1998-01-01

    Shiga toxin and other toxins of this family can escape the endocytic pathway and reach the Golgi apparatus. To synchronize endosome to Golgi transport, Shiga toxin B-fragment was internalized into HeLa cells at low temperatures. Under these conditions, the protein partitioned away from markers destined for the late endocytic pathway and colocalized extensively with cointernalized transferrin. Upon subsequent incubation at 37°C, ultrastructural studies on cryosections failed to detect B-fragment–specific label in multivesicular or multilamellar late endosomes, suggesting that the protein bypassed the late endocytic pathway on its way to the Golgi apparatus. This hypothesis was further supported by the rapid kinetics of B-fragment transport, as determined by quantitative confocal microscopy on living cells and by B-fragment sulfation analysis, and by the observation that actin- depolymerizing and pH-neutralizing drugs that modulate vesicular transport in the late endocytic pathway had no effect on B-fragment accumulation in the Golgi apparatus. B-fragment sorting at the level of early/recycling endosomes seemed to involve vesicular coats, since brefeldin A treatment led to B-fragment accumulation in transferrin receptor–containing membrane tubules, and since B-fragment colocalized with adaptor protein type 1 clathrin coat components on early/recycling endosomes. Thus, we hypothesize that Shiga toxin B-fragment is transported directly from early/recycling endosomes to the Golgi apparatus. This pathway may also be used by cellular proteins, as deduced from our finding that TGN38 colocalized with the B-fragment on its transport from the plasma membrane to the TGN. PMID:9817755

  2. Direct pathway from early/recycling endosomes to the Golgi apparatus revealed through the study of shiga toxin B-fragment transport.

    PubMed

    Mallard, F; Antony, C; Tenza, D; Salamero, J; Goud, B; Johannes, L

    1998-11-16

    Shiga toxin and other toxins of this family can escape the endocytic pathway and reach the Golgi apparatus. To synchronize endosome to Golgi transport, Shiga toxin B-fragment was internalized into HeLa cells at low temperatures. Under these conditions, the protein partitioned away from markers destined for the late endocytic pathway and colocalized extensively with cointernalized transferrin. Upon subsequent incubation at 37 degreesC, ultrastructural studies on cryosections failed to detect B-fragment-specific label in multivesicular or multilamellar late endosomes, suggesting that the protein bypassed the late endocytic pathway on its way to the Golgi apparatus. This hypothesis was further supported by the rapid kinetics of B-fragment transport, as determined by quantitative confocal microscopy on living cells and by B-fragment sulfation analysis, and by the observation that actin- depolymerizing and pH-neutralizing drugs that modulate vesicular transport in the late endocytic pathway had no effect on B-fragment accumulation in the Golgi apparatus. B-fragment sorting at the level of early/recycling endosomes seemed to involve vesicular coats, since brefeldin A treatment led to B-fragment accumulation in transferrin receptor-containing membrane tubules, and since B-fragment colocalized with adaptor protein type 1 clathrin coat components on early/recycling endosomes. Thus, we hypothesize that Shiga toxin B-fragment is transported directly from early/recycling endosomes to the Golgi apparatus. This pathway may also be used by cellular proteins, as deduced from our finding that TGN38 colocalized with the B-fragment on its transport from the plasma membrane to the TGN.

  3. Angiosperms Are Unique among Land Plant Lineages in the Occurrence of Key Genes in the RNA-Directed DNA Methylation (RdDM) Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lu; Hatlen, Andrea; Kelly, Laura J.; Becher, Hannes; Wang, Wencai; Kovarik, Ales; Leitch, Ilia J.; Leitch, Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    The RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) pathway can be divided into three phases: 1) small interfering RNA biogenesis, 2) de novo methylation, and 3) chromatin modification. To determine the degree of conservation of this pathway we searched for key genes among land plants. We used OrthoMCL and the OrthoMCL Viridiplantae database to analyze proteomes of species in bryophytes, lycophytes, monilophytes, gymnosperms, and angiosperms. We also analyzed small RNA size categories and, in two gymnosperms, cytosine methylation in ribosomal DNA. Six proteins were restricted to angiosperms, these being NRPD4/NRPE4, RDM1, DMS3 (defective in meristem silencing 3), SHH1 (SAWADEE homeodomain homolog 1), KTF1, and SUVR2, although we failed to find the latter three proteins in Fritillaria persica, a species with a giant genome. Small RNAs of 24 nt in length were abundant only in angiosperms. Phylogenetic analyses of Dicer-like (DCL) proteins showed that DCL2 was restricted to seed plants, although it was absent in Gnetum gnemon and Welwitschia mirabilis. The data suggest that phases (1) and (2) of the RdDM pathway, described for model angiosperms, evolved with angiosperms. The absence of some features of RdDM in F. persica may be associated with its large genome. Phase (3) is probably the most conserved part of the pathway across land plants. DCL2, involved in virus defense and interaction with the canonical RdDM pathway to facilitate methylation of CHH, is absent outside seed plants. Its absence in G. gnemon, and W. mirabilis coupled with distinctive patterns of CHH methylation, suggest a secondary loss of DCL2 following the divergence of Gnetales. PMID:26338185

  4. Modulation of tumor cell stiffness and migration by type IV collagen through direct activation of integrin signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng-Yi; Lin, Jo-Shi; Yang, Bei-Chang

    2014-08-01

    Excessive collagen deposition plays a critical role in tumor progression and metastasis. To understand how type IV collagen affects mechanical stiffness and migration, low-collagen-IV-expressing transfectants of B16F10, U118MG, and Huh7 (denoted shCol cells) were established by the lentiviral-mediated delivery of small interfering RNA against type IV-α1 collagen (Col4A1). Although having similar growth rates, shCol cells showed a flatter morphology compared to that of the corresponding controls. Notably, knocking down the Col4A1 gene conferred the cells with higher levels of elasticity and lower motility. Exposure to blocking antibodies against human β1 integrin or α2β1 integrin or the pharmacological inhibition of Src and ERK activity by PP1 and U0126, respectively, effectively reduced cell motility and raised cell stiffness. Reduced Src and ERK activities in shCol cells indicate the involvement of a collagen IV/integrin signaling pathway. The forced expression of β1 integrin significantly stimulated Src and ERK phosphorylation, reduced cell stiffness, and accelerated cell motility. In an experimental metastasis assay using C57BL/6 mice, B16F10 shCol cells formed significantly fewer and smaller lung nodules, confirming the contribution of collagen to metastasis. In summary, the integrin signaling pathway activated in a tumor environment with collagen deposition is responsible for low cell elasticity and high metastatic ability.

  5. A pathway switch directs BAFF signaling to distinct NFκB transcription factors in maturing and proliferating B cells.

    PubMed

    Almaden, Jonathan V; Tsui, Rachel; Liu, Yi C; Birnbaum, Harry; Shokhirev, Maxim N; Ngo, Kim A; Davis-Turak, Jeremy C; Otero, Dennis; Basak, Soumen; Rickert, Robert C; Hoffmann, Alexander

    2014-12-24

    BAFF, an activator of the noncanonical NFκB pathway, provides critical survival signals during B cell maturation and contributes to B cell proliferation. We found that the NFκB family member RelB is required ex vivo for B cell maturation, but cRel is required for proliferation. Combined molecular network modeling and experimentation revealed Nfkb2 p100 as a pathway switch; at moderate p100 synthesis rates in maturing B cells, BAFF fully utilizes p100 to generate the RelB:p52 dimer, whereas at high synthesis rates, p100 assembles into multimeric IκBsome complexes, which BAFF neutralizes in order to potentiate cRel activity and B cell expansion. Indeed, moderation of p100 expression or disruption of IκBsome assembly circumvented the BAFF requirement for full B cell expansion. Our studies emphasize the importance of p100 in determining distinct NFκB network states during B cell biology, which causes BAFF to have context-dependent functional consequences.

  6. High-speed AFM probe with micromachined membrane tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byungki; Kwak, Byung Hyung; Jamil, Faize

    2008-08-01

    This paper presents a micromachined silicon membrane type AFM tip designed to move nearly 1µm by electrostatic force. Since the tip can be vibrated in small amplitude with AC voltage input and can be displaced up to 1μm by DC voltage input, an additional piezo actuator is not required for scanning of submicron features. The micromachined membrane tips are designed to have 100 kHz ~ 1 MHz resonant frequency. Displacement of the membrane tip is measured by an optical interferometer using a micromachined diffraction grating on a quartz wafer which is positioned behind the membrane tip.

  7. Theoretical modelling of AFM for bimetallic tip-substrate interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Ferrante, John

    1991-01-01

    Recently, a new technique for calculating the defect energetics of alloys based on Equivalent Crystal Theory was developed. This new technique successfully predicts the bulk properties for binary alloys as well as segregation energies in the dilute limit. The authors apply this limit for the calculation of energy and force as a function of separation of an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip and substrate. The study was done for different combinations of tip and sample materials. The validity of the universality discovered for the same metal interfaces is examined for the case of different metal interactions.

  8. The Advancing State of AF-M315E Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masse, Robert; Spores, Ronald A.; McLean, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The culmination of twenty years of applied research in hydroxyl ammonium nitrate (HAN)-based monopropellants, the NASA Space Technology mission Directorate's (STMD) Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) will achieve the first on-orbit demonstration of an operational AF-M315E green propellant propulsion system by the end of 2015. Following an contextual overview of the completed flight design of the GPIM propellant storage and feed system, results of first operation of a flight-representative heavyweight 20-N engineering model thruster (to be conducted in mid-2014) are presented with performance comparisons to prior lab model (heavyweight) test articles.

  9. Optical fiber fluorescence spectroscopy for detecting AFM1 in milk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignani, A. G.; Cucci, C.; Ciaccheri, L.; Dall'Asta, C.; Galaverna, G.; Dossena, A.; Marchelli, R.

    2008-04-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy carried out by means of optical fibers was used for the rapid screening of M1 aflatoxin in milk, enabling the detection of concentrations up to the legal limit, which is 50 ppt. A compact fluorometric device equipped with a LED source, a miniaturized spectrometer, and optical fibers for illumination/detection of the measuring micro-cell was tested for measuring threshold values of AFM1 in pre-treated milk samples. Multivariate processing of the spectral data made it possible to obtain a preliminary screening at the earlier stages of the industrial process, as well as to discard contaminated milk stocks before their inclusion in the production chain.

  10. Non-classical antigen processing pathways are required for MHC class II-restricted direct tumor recognition by NY-ESO-1-specific CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, Junko; Tsuji, Takemasa; Luescher, Immanuel; Old, Lloyd J.; Shrikant, Protul; Gnjatic, Sacha; Odunsi, Kunle

    2014-01-01

    Tumor antigen-specific CD4+ T cells that directly recognize cancer cells are important for orchestrating antitumor immune responses at the local tumor sites. However, the mechanisms of direct MHC class II (MHC-II) presentation of intracellular tumor antigen by cancer cells are poorly understood. We found that two functionally distinct subsets of CD4+ T cells were expanded after HLA-DPB1*04 (DP04)-binding NY-ESO-1157–170 peptide vaccination in ovarian cancer patients. While both subsets similarly recognized exogenous NY-ESO-1 protein pulsed on DP04+ target cells, only one type recognized target cells with intracellular expression of NY-ESO-1. The tumor-recognizing CD4+ T cells more efficiently recognized the short 8–9-mer peptides than the non-tumor-recognizing CD4+ T cells. In addition to endosomal/lysosomal proteases that are typically involved in MHC-II antigen presentation, several pathways in the MHC class I presentation pathways such as the proteasomal degradation and transporter-associated with antigen-processing (TAP)-mediated peptide transport were also involved in the presentation of intracellular NY-ESO-1 on MHC-II. The presentation was inhibited significantly by primaquine, a small molecule that inhibits endosomal recycling, consistent with findings that pharmacological inhibition of new protein synthesis enhances antigen presentation. Together, our data demonstrated that cancer cells selectively present peptides from intracellular tumor antigens on MHC-II by multiple non-classical antigen-processing pathways. Harnessing direct tumor-recognizing ability of CD4+ T cells could be a promising strategy to enhance antitumor immune responses in the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. PMID:24764581

  11. Nonclassical antigen-processing pathways are required for MHC class II-restricted direct tumor recognition by NY-ESO-1-specific CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Junko; Tsuji, Takemasa; Luescher, Immanuel; Old, Lloyd J; Shrikant, Protul; Gnjatic, Sacha; Odunsi, Kunle

    2014-04-01

    Tumor antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells that directly recognize cancer cells are important for orchestrating antitumor immune responses at the local tumor sites. However, the mechanisms of direct MHC class II (MHC-II) presentation of intracellular tumor antigen by cancer cells are poorly understood. We found that two functionally distinct subsets of CD4(+) T cells were expanded after HLA-DPB1*04 (DP04)-binding NY-ESO-1157-170 peptide vaccination in patients with ovarian cancer. Although both subsets recognized exogenous NY-ESO-1 protein pulsed on DP04(+) target cells, only one type recognized target cells with intracellular expression of NY-ESO-1. The tumor-recognizing CD4(+) T cells more efficiently recognized the short 8-9-mer peptides than the non-tumor-recognizing CD4(+) T cells. In addition to endosomal/lysosomal proteases that are typically involved in MHC-II antigen presentation, several pathways in the MHC class I presentation pathways, such as the proteasomal degradation and transporter-associated with antigen-processing-mediated peptide transport, were also involved in the presentation of intracellular NY-ESO-1 on MHC-II. The presentation was inhibited significantly by primaquine, a small molecule that inhibits endosomal recycling, consistent with findings that pharmacologic inhibition of new protein synthesis enhances antigen presentation. Together, our data demonstrate that cancer cells selectively present peptides from intracellular tumor antigens on MHC-II by multiple nonclassical antigen-processing pathways. Harnessing the direct tumor-recognizing ability of CD4(+) T cells could be a promising strategy to enhance antitumor immune responses in the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment.

  12. A care pathway analysis of tuberculosis patients in benin: Highlights on direct costs and critical stages for an evidence-based decision-making.

    PubMed

    Laokri, Samia; Amoussouhui, Arnaud; Ouendo, Edgard M; Hounnankan, Athanase Cossi; Anagonou, Séverin; Gninafon, Martin; Kassa, Ferdinand; Tawo, Léon; Dujardin, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Free tuberculosis control fail to protect patients from substantial medical and non-medical expenditure, thus a greater degree of disaggregation of patient cost is needed to fully capture their context and inform policymaking. A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted on a convenience sample of six health districts of Southern Benin. From August 2008 to February 2009, we recruited all smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients treated under the national strategy in the selected districts. Direct out-of-pocket costs associated with tuberculosis, time delays, and care-seeking pattern were collected from symptom onset to end of treatment. Population description and outcome data were reported for 245 patients of whom 153 completed their care pathway. For them, the median overall direct cost was USD 183 per patient. Payments to traditional healers, self-medication drugs, travel, and food expenditures contributed largely to this cost burden. Patient, provider, and treatment delays were also reported. Pre-diagnosis and intensive treatment stages were the most critical stages, with median expenditure of USD 43 per patient and accounting for 38% and 29% of the overall direct cost, respectively. However, financial barriers differed depending on whether the patient lived in urban or rural areas. This study delivers new evidence about bottlenecks encountered during the TB care pathway. Financial barriers to accessing the free-of-charge tuberculosis control strategy in Benin remain substantial for low-income households. Irregular time delays and hidden costs, often generated by multiple visits to various care providers, impair appropriate patient pathways. Particular attention should be paid to pre-diagnosis and intensive treatment. Cost assessment and combined targeted interventions embodied by a patient-centered approach on the specific critical stages would likely deliver better program outcomes.

  13. Evolution of the two-week rule pathway--direct access colonoscopy vs outpatient appointments: one year's experience and patient satisfaction survey.

    PubMed

    Maruthachalam, K; Stoker, E; Chaudhri, S; Noblett, S; Horgan, A F

    2005-09-01

    Abstract Objectives The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of Direct access colonoscopy (DAC) vs outpatient appointments for two-week rule colorectal cancer referrals and to evaluate the satisfaction of patients referred through these routes. Patients and methods Data were collected prospectively from January 2003 to December 2003 on patients who were referred for DAC or outpatient appointments at the discretion of the referring General practitioner via the Lower GI two-week rule pathway. A postal questionnaire was used to survey patient satisfaction. Results Six hundred and thirty-nine patients were referred via the two-week rule pathway; 188 patients underwent colonoscopy at their initial hospital visit and 19 (10.1%) colorectal cancers were diagnosed; 442 patients had an outpatient appointment and 32 (7.2%) colorectal cancers were identified. There were 7 (1%) inappropriate referrals and 2 patients refused investigations. All outcome parameters measured were reduced for patients referred directly for colonoscopy including time to definitive investigations (Median 9 vs 52 days P < 0.0001), time to histological diagnosis (Median 14 vs 42 days P < 0.0001) and time to treatment (Median 55 vs 75 days P < 0.0483). One hundred and seventy patients were surveyed by the postal questionnaire of whom 127 (75%) responded. Ninety-eight percent of patients were satisfied with the service provided. Four (6.6%) of 60 patients who had undergone direct access colonoscopy expressed a desire to be seen at the outpatient department initially. Conclusions Direct access colonoscopy results in significantly reduced times to histological diagnosis and definitive treatment in patients with colorectal cancer. Patients can be directly admitted for investigations bypassing the outpatient clinic without affecting patient satisfaction.

  14. Nanophotonic Atomic Force Microscope Transducers Enable Chemical Composition and Thermal Conductivity Measurements at the Nanoscale [Nanophotonic AFM Transducers Enable Chemical Composition and Thermal Conductivity Measurements at the Nanoscale

    DOE PAGES

    Chae, Jungseok; An, Sangmin; Ramer, Georg; ...

    2017-08-03

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) offers a rich observation window on the nanoscale, yet many dynamic phenomena are too fast and too weak for direct AFM detection. Integrated cavity-optomechanics is revolutionizing micromechanical sensing; however, it has not yet impacted AFM. Here, we make a groundbreaking advance by fabricating picogram-scale probes integrated with photonic resonators to realize functional AFM detection that achieve high temporal resolution (<10 ns) and picometer vertical displacement uncertainty simultaneously. The ability to capture fast events with high precision is leveraged to measure the thermal conductivity (η), for the first time, concurrently with chemical composition at the nanoscalemore » in photothermal induced resonance experiments. The intrinsic η of metal–organic-framework individual microcrystals, not measurable by macroscale techniques, is obtained with a small measurement uncertainty (8%). The improved sensitivity (50×) increases the measurement throughput 2500-fold and enables chemical composition measurement of molecular monolayer-thin samples. In conclusion, our paradigm-shifting photonic readout for small probes breaks the common trade-off between AFM measurement precision and ability to capture transient events, thus transforming the ability to observe nanoscale dynamics in materials.« less

  15. Direct and indirect pathways to lamina I in the medulla oblongata and spinal cord of the cat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holstege, Gert

    1988-01-01

    The pathways to lamina I in the medulla oblongata and spinal cord of the cat were traced using horse-radish-peroxidase (HRP) and autoradiographic techniques. The HRP results indicated that several neuronal cell groups in the brain stem and hypothalamus project to the spinal cord throughout its total length. The autoradiographic tracing results demonstrated that the strongest projections to lamina I are derived from the following four areas: the caudal nucleus raphe magnus (NRM), the ventral part of the caudal pontine and NRM, the contralaterally projecting lateral pontine or paralemniscal tegmentum, and the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. In addition, a limited, especially at lumbosacral levels, distinct projection to lamina I was found to originate in the most caudal part of the medullary tegmentum.

  16. Direct and indirect pathways to lamina I in the medulla oblongata and spinal cord of the cat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holstege, Gert

    1988-01-01

    The pathways to lamina I in the medulla oblongata and spinal cord of the cat were traced using horse-radish-peroxidase (HRP) and autoradiographic techniques. The HRP results indicated that several neuronal cell groups in the brain stem and hypothalamus project to the spinal cord throughout its total length. The autoradiographic tracing results demonstrated that the strongest projections to lamina I are derived from the following four areas: the caudal nucleus raphe magnus (NRM), the ventral part of the caudal pontine and NRM, the contralaterally projecting lateral pontine or paralemniscal tegmentum, and the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. In addition, a limited, especially at lumbosacral levels, distinct projection to lamina I was found to originate in the most caudal part of the medullary tegmentum.

  17. Pathway Targeted Immunotherapy: Rationale and Evidence of Durable Clinical Responses with a Novel, EGF-directed Agent for Advanced NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Rosell, Rafael; Neninger, Elia; Nicolson, Marianne; Huber, Rudolf M; Thongprasert, Sumitra; Parikh, Purvish M; D'Hondt, Erik

    2016-11-01

    Abnormalities in the epidermal growth factor (EGF) and EGFR pathway promote progression of NSCLC. Immunization with EGF vaccine induces specific, neutralizing anti-EGF antibodies that prevent binding of the ligand to its receptor. This concept of pathway targeted immunotherapy (PTI) was validated in vitro by dose-related suppression of EGFR, Akt, and Erk1/2 phosphorylation in cell lines with different mutations. A randomized phase II trial showed improved overall survival (OS) in subgroups with advanced NSCLC showing a clear immunologic response. By per-protocol analysis of the ensuing phase IIb trial, patients receiving EGF PTI survived 3 months longer than controls (12.43 versus 9.43 months; hazard ratio = 0.77 [95% confidence interval, 0.61-0.98]). These data were confirmed in a larger trial showing an OS benefit over control of >3 months. The variable most strongly correlated with efficacy was circulating EGF at enrolment. Patients with serum EGF levels >250 pg/mL benefited most from treatment with EGF PTI. Of 188 patients tested, 94 were above this biomarker threshold. The OS benefit from active versus control treatment was 6.7 months. More than 15% of patients had responses for >5 years. Long-term survivors are seen in all EGF PTI trials. Treatment is well-tolerated, induces high anti-EGF antibody titers, reduces levels of circulating serum EGF, achieves durable responses, and significantly prolongs OS. A threshold of 250 pg/mL has been set to enrich the study population in the ongoing pivotal trial. This biomarker-guided study in an enriched population of patients with both squamous and nonsquamous stage IV NSCLC aims to replicate the favorable efficacy/tolerability balance of earlier studies.

  18. Thaliporphine Preserves Cardiac Function of Endotoxemic Rabbits by Both Directly and Indirectly Attenuating NFκB Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lee, A. S.; Chen, W. P.; Lee, S. S.; Su, M. J.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac depression in sepsis is associated with the increased morbidity and mortality. Although myofilaments damage, autonomic dysfunction, and apoptosis play roles in sepsis-induced myocardial dysfunction, the underlying mechanism is not clear. All of these possible factors are related to NFκB signaling, which plays the main role in sepsis signaling. Thaliporphine was determined to possess anti-inflammatory and cardioprotective activity by suppressing NFκB signaling in rodents. The purpose of this study is to further prove this protective effect in larger septic animals, and try to find the underlying mechanisms. The systolic and diastolic functions were evaluated in vivo by pressure-volume analysis at different preloads. Both preload-dependent and -independent hemodynamic parameters were performed. Inflammatory factors of whole blood and serum samples were analyzed. Several sepsis-related signaling pathways were also determined at protein level. Changes detected by conductance catheter showed Thaliporphine could recover impaired left ventricular systolic function after 4 hours LPS injection. It could also reverse the LPS induced steeper EDPVR and gentler ESPVR, thus improve Ees, Ea, and PRSW. Thaliporphine may exert this protective effect by decreasing TNFα and caspase3 dependent cell apoptosis, which was consistent with the decreased serum cTnI and LDH concentration. Thaliporphine could protect sepsis-associated myocardial dysfunction in both preload-dependent and -independent ways. It may exert these protective effects by both increase of “good”-PI3K/Akt/mTOR and decrease of “bad”-p38/NFκB pathways, which followed by diminishing TNFα and caspase3 dependent cell apoptosis. PMID:22761733

  19. To Serve the Future Hour. An Anthology on New Directions for Nursing. Pathways to Practice, Vol. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reitt, Barbara B., Ed.

    Nurses today are faced with the problem of choosing from a proliferating array of alternatives, both when they decide what type of nursing education to pursue and when they must choose between the many occupational directions they face on graduation from nursing school. Recognizing these recent developments in both education and health, the…

  20. Exact Diagonalization studies of frustrated AFM Heisenberg polytopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousochatzakis, Ioannis; Laeuchli, Andreas; Mila, Frederic

    2007-03-01

    We explore the low energy physics of the AFM s=1/2 Heisenberg model on a number of frustrated magnetic molecule systems using exact diagonalization (ED). Particular emphasis is given to molecules with spins occupying the vertices of symmetric polyhedra. To this end, we have extended the standard ED technique in order to exploit the full point group (permutation) symmetry, thus including higher than one-dimensional irreducible representations. Apart from classifying the energy spectra according to both spin and permutation symmetries, our method provides the exact level degeneracies. In particular, for large frustrated polytopes, we find the existence of an accordingly large number of low-lying singlets below the first triplet, similarly to the case of frustrated 2D magnets. We also study the properties of the local spectral density functions, in view of interpreting recent neutron scattering experiments in Fe30, one of the biggest AFM frustrated molecule available (comprising 30 spins 5/2 mounted on the vertices of a icosidodecahedron).

  1. Iron oxide mineral-water interface reactions studied by AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Hawley, M.E.; Rogers, P.S.Z.

    1994-07-01

    Natural iron mineral surfaces have been examined in air by atomic force (AFM) and scanning tunneling (STM) microscopies. A number of different surface features were found to be characteristic of the native surface. Even surfaces freshly exposed by crushing larger crystals were found to have a pebbly surface texture caused by the presence of thin coatings of what might be surface precipitates. This finding is interpreted as evidence for previous exposure to water, probably through an extensive network of microfractures. Surface reactions on the goethite crystals were studied by AFM at size resolutions ranging from microns to atomic resolution before, during, and after reaction with distilled water and 0.lN HCl. Immediate and extensive surface reconfiguration occurred on contact with water. In one case, after equilibration with water for 3 days, surface reprecipitation, etching and pitting were observed. Atomic resolution images taken under water were found to be disordered. The result of surface reaction was generally to increase the surface area substantially through the extension of surface platelet arrays, present prior to reaction. This work is being done in support of the site characterization project at Yucca Mountain.

  2. AFM-assisted nanofabrication using self-assembled monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Chang-Hyun

    This study describes the covalent and the electrostatic attachment of molecules, nano-particles, and proteins to patterned self-assembled monolayers. A scanning probe nanografting technique was employed to produce patterns of various sizes, down to 10 nm. Thus, we are able to demonstrate a degree of surface patterning which is an order of magnitude smaller than that used in the semiconductor industry. One efficient strategy for creating chemically specific nanostructures is to use the extraordinary catalytic properties of enzymes. However, as the dimension of a catalyst patch is reduced down to nanometer scale, it is difficult to detect the very low concentration of product. This study resolves the problem by developing a new strategy: the surface trapping of a product generated by a nanometer-scale patch of surface-bound enzyme. An array of proteins finds use when the array contains a number of different proteins. Toward this end, a new and convenient method for immobilizing enzymes is developed, which will allow the preparation of thin films containing several different catalytically-active enzymes on the nanoscale. The disadvantage of scanning probe nanografting technique is that the AFM tip loses resolution through wear during the patterning procedure. This study examines the possibility of developing a new AFM lithographic method to avoid wear: the use of enzymes covalently attached to a tip as a site-specific catalyst.

  3. Extended-range AFM imaging for applications to reflectance modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Brian G.; Reyes, Pablo A.

    2016-09-01

    A technique employing a 3D morphological image-registration algorithm is demonstrated for stitching together high-resolution surface im- ages obtained with a commercial atomic-force microscope (AFM), producing 3D surface images up to 1mm long with lateral resolution 100nm: These images can be applied to reflectance modeling by extracting surface parameters to be used as inputs for reflectance models, for instance the previously-published Coherence Model [BG. Hoover and VL. Gamiz, J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 23, 314 (2006)], which utilizes the surface roughness and autocorrelation derivatives in the large-roughness approximation. Surface moments estimated from extended-range AFM images demonstrate lower uncertainty at all frequencies and substantial reduction of sampling artifacts at low frequencies, enabling improved estimates of surface parameters. The autocorrelation of a nearly monoscale diffuse-gold surface is measured out to 800μm separation, and the autocorrelation of a multiscale tin surface provides parameters that verify the Coherence Model …t to the measured quasimonostatic BRDF.

  4. AFM analysis of bleaching effects on dental enamel microtopography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedreira de Freitas, Ana Carolina; Espejo, Luciana Cardoso; Botta, Sergio Brossi; Teixeira, Fernanda de Sa; Luz, Maria Aparecida A. Cerqueira; Garone-Netto, Narciso; Matos, Adriana Bona; Salvadori, Maria Cecilia Barbosa da Silveira

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to test a new methodology to evaluate the effects of 35% hydrogen peroxide agent on the microtopography of sound enamel using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The buccal sound surfaces of three extracted human lower incisors were used, without polishing the surfaces to maintain them with natural morphology. These unpolished surfaces were subjected to bleaching procedure with 35% hydrogen peroxide that consisted of 4 applications of the bleaching agent on enamel surfaces for 10 min each application. Surface images were obtained in a 15 μm × 15 μm area using an AFM. The roughness (Ra and RMS) and the power spectral density (PSD) were obtained before and after the bleaching treatment. As results we could inquire that the PSD analyses were very suitable to identifying the morphological changes on the surfaces, while the Ra and RMS parameters were insufficient to represent the morphological alterations promoted by bleaching procedure on enamel. The morphological wavelength in the range of visible light spectrum (380-750 nm) was analyzed, showing a considerable increase of the PSD with the bleaching treatment.

  5. SU-8 hollow cantilevers for AFM cell adhesion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Vincent; Behr, Pascal; Drechsler, Ute; Polesel-Maris, Jérôme; Potthoff, Eva; Vörös, Janos; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2016-05-01

    A novel fabrication method was established to produce flexible, transparent, and robust tipless hollow atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers made entirely from SU-8. Channels of 3 μm thickness and several millimeters length were integrated into 12 μm thick and 40 μm wide cantilevers. Connected to a pressure controller, the devices showed high sealing performance with no leakage up to 6 bars. Changing the cantilever lengths from 100 μm to 500 μm among the same wafer allowed the targeting of various spring constants ranging from 0.5 to 80 N m-1 within a single fabrication run. These hollow polymeric AFM cantilevers were operated in the optical beam deflection configuration. To demonstrate the performance of the device, single-cell force spectroscopy experiments were performed with a single probe detaching in a serial protocol more than 100 Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells from plain glass and glass coated with polydopamine while measuring adhesion forces in the sub-nanoNewton range. SU-8 now offers a new alternative to conventional silicon-based hollow cantilevers with more flexibility in terms of complex geometric design and surface chemistry modification.

  6. Pathogen identification using peptide nanotube biosensors and impedance AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccuspie, Robert I.

    Pathogen identification at highly sensitive levels is crucial to meet urgent needs in fighting the spread of disease or detecting bioterrorism events. Toward that end, a new method for biosensing utilizing fluorescent antibody nanotubes is proposed. Fundamental studies on the self-assembly of these peptide nanotubes are performed, as are applications of aligning these nanotubes on surfaces. As biosensors, these nanotubes incorporate recognition units with antibodies at their ends and fluorescent signaling units at their sidewalls. When viral pathogens were mixed with these antibody nanotubes in solution, the nanotubes rapidly aggregated around the viruses. The size of the aggregates increased as the concentration of viruses increased, as detected by flow cytometry on the order of attomolar concentrations by changes in fluorescence and light scattering intensities. This enabled determination of the concentrations of viruses at trace levels (102 to 106 pfu/mL) within 30 minutes from the receipt of samples to the final quantitative data analysis, as demonstrated on Adenovirus, Herpes Simplex Virus, Influenza, and Vaccinia virus. As another separate approach, impedance AFM is used to study the electrical properties of individual viruses and nanoparticles used as model systems. The design, development, and implementation of the impedance AFM for an Asylum Research platform is described, as well as its application towards studying the impedance of individual nanoparticles as a model system for understanding the fundamental science of how the life cycle of a virus affects its electrical properties. In combination, these approaches fill a pressing need to quantify viruses both rapidly and sensitively.

  7. AFM-Based Single Molecule Techniques: Unraveling the Amyloid Pathogenic Species

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, Francesco Simone; Habchi, Johnny; Cerreta, Andrea; Dietler, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Background A wide class of human diseases and neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease, is due to the failure of a specific peptide or protein to keep its native functional conformational state and to undergo a conformational change into a misfolded state, triggering the formation of fibrillar cross-β sheet amyloid aggregates. During the fibrillization, several coexisting species are formed, giving rise to a highly heterogeneous mixture. Despite its fundamental role in biological function and malfunction, the mechanism of protein self-assembly and the fundamental origins of the connection between aggregation, cellular toxicity and the biochemistry of neurodegeneration remains challenging to elucidate in molecular detail. In particular, the nature of the specific state of proteins that is most prone to cause cytotoxicity is not established. Methods: In the present review, we present the latest advances obtained by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based techniques to unravel the biophysical properties of amyloid aggregates at the nanoscale. Unraveling amyloid single species biophysical properties still represents a formidable experimental challenge, mainly because of their nanoscale dimensions and heterogeneous nature. Bulk techniques, such as circular dichroism or infrared spectroscopy, are not able to characterize the heterogeneity and inner properties of amyloid aggregates at the single species level, preventing a profound investigation of the correlation between the biophysical properties and toxicity of the individual species. Conclusion: The information delivered by AFM based techniques could be central to study the aggregation pathway of proteins and to design molecules that could interfere with amyloid aggregation delaying the onset of misfolding diseases. PMID:27189600

  8. The histone H3 lysine 56 acetylation pathway is regulated by target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling and functions directly in ribosomal RNA biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongfeng; Fan, Meiyun; Pfeffer, Lawrence M; Laribee, R Nicholas

    2012-08-01

    Epigenetic changes in chromatin through histone post-translational modifications are essential for altering gene transcription in response to environmental cues. How histone modifications are regulated by environmental stimuli remains poorly understood yet this process is critical for delineating how epigenetic pathways are influenced by the cellular environment. We have used the target of rapamycin (TOR) pathway, which transmits environmental nutrient signals to control cell growth, as a model to delineate mechanisms underlying this phenomenon. A chemical genomics screen using the TOR inhibitor rapamycin against a histone H3/H4 mutant library identified histone H3 lysine 56 acetylation (H3K56ac) as a chromatin modification regulated by TOR signaling. We demonstrate this acetylation pathway functions in TOR-dependent cell growth in part by contributing directly to ribosomal RNA (rRNA) biogenesis. Specifically, H3K56ac creates a chromatin environment permissive to RNA polymerase I transcription and nascent rRNA processing by regulating binding of the high mobility group protein Hmo1 and the small ribosomal subunit (SSU) processome complex. Overall, these studies identify a novel chromatin regulatory role for TOR signaling and support a specific function for H3K56ac in ribosomal DNA (rDNA) gene transcription and nascent rRNA processing essential for cell growth.

  9. Quality Child Care Supports the Achievement of Low-Income Children: Direct and Indirect Pathways Through Caregiving and the Home Environment

    PubMed Central

    McCartney, Kathleen; Dearing, Eric; Taylor, Beck A.; Bub, Kristen L.

    2009-01-01

    Existing studies of child care have not been able to determine whether higher quality child care protects children from the effects of poverty, whether poverty and lower quality child care operate as dual risk factors, or whether both are true. The objective of the current study was to test two pathways through which child care may serve as a naturally occurring intervention for low-income children: a direct pathway through child care quality to child outcomes, and an indirect pathway through improvements in the home environment. Children were observed in their homes and child care settings at 6, 15, 24, and 36 months. An interaction between family income-to-needs ratio and child care quality predicted School Readiness, Receptive Language, and Expressive Language, as well as improvements in the home environment. Children from low-income families profited from observed learning supports in the form of sensitive care and stimulation of cognitive development, and their parents profited from unobserved informal and formal parent supports. Policy implications are discussed. PMID:19578561

  10. PbSe nanocrystal growth as nanocubes and nanorods on peptide nanotubes via different directed-assembly pathways.

    PubMed

    Shi, Menglu; Su, Wei; Matsui, Hiroshi

    2010-11-01

    Pb-binding TAR-1 peptides (Ile-Ser-Leu-Leu-His-Ser-Thr) were covalently conjugated on a bolaamphiphile peptide nanotube substrate and the precursors of PbSe were incubated at room temperature. This resulted in the growth of highly crystalline PbSe nanocubes on this biomimetic cylindrical substrate. The growth mechanism to generate nanocubes occurs via the directed self-assembly of nanoparticles and then nanoparticle fusion. The peptide conformation and the cylindrical peptide nanotube substrate play important roles in the mesoscopic crystallization of PbSe nanocubes. Changing the buffer for the peptide immobilization process from 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid to phosphate induces a transformation in the nanocrystal shape from nanocube to nanorods. The conformational change of the TAR-1 peptide on the nanotubes due to the change in the buffer seems to be responsible for aggregating intermediate nanoparticles in different directions for the directed fusion and mesoscopic crystallization of PbSe into the different shapes.

  11. Combination therapy targeting integrins reduces glioblastoma tumor growth through antiangiogenic and direct antitumor activity and leads to activation of the pro-proliferative prolactin pathway

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tumors may develop resistance to specific angiogenic inhibitors via activation of alternative pathways. Therefore, multiple angiogenic pathways should be targeted to achieve significant angiogenic blockade. In this study we investigated the effects of a combined application of the angiogenic inhibitors endostatin and tumstatin in a model of human glioblastoma multiforme. Results Inhibitors released by stably transfected porcine aortic endothelial cells (PAE) showed anti-angiogenic activity in proliferation and wound-healing assays with endothelial cells (EC). Interestingly, combination of endostatin and tumstatin (ES + Tum) also reduced proliferation of glioma cells and additionally induced morphological changes and apoptosis in vitro. Microencapsulated PAE-cells producing these inhibitors were applied for local therapy in a subcutaneous glioblastoma model. When endostatin or tumstatin were applied separately, in vivo tumor growth was inhibited by 58% and 50%, respectively. Combined application of ES + Tum, in comparison, resulted in a significantly more pronounced inhibition of tumor growth (83%). cDNA microarrays of tumors treated with ES + Tum revealed an up-regulation of prolactin receptor (PRLR). ES + Tum-induced up-regulation of PRLR in glioma cells was also found in in vitro. Moreover, exogenous PRLR overexpression in vitro led to up-regulation of its ligand prolactin and increased proliferation suggesting a functional autocrine growth loop in these cells. Conclusion Our data indicate that integrin-targeting factors endostatin and tumstatin act additively by inhibiting glioblastoma growth via reduction of vessel density but also directly by affecting proliferation and viability of tumor cells. Treatment with the ES + Tum-combination activates the PRLR pro-proliferative pathway in glioblastoma. Future work will show whether the prolactin signaling pathway represents an additional target to improve therapeutic strategies in this

  12. Epidermal Growth Factor-dependent Activation of the Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase Pathway by DJ-1 Protein through Its Direct Binding to c-Raf Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Kato-Ose, Izumi; Murata, Hiroaki; Maita, Hiroshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M. M.; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2015-01-01

    DJ-1 is an oncogene and also a causative gene for familial Parkinson disease. DJ-1 has various functions, and the oxidative status of cysteine at position 106 (Cys-106) is crucial for determination of the activation level of DJ-1. Although DJ-1 requires activated Ras for its oncogenic activity and although it activates the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway, a cell growth pathway downstream of Ras, the precise mechanism underlying activation of the ERK pathway by DJ-1 is still not known. In this study, we found that DJ-1 directly bound to the kinase domain of c-Raf but not to Ras and that Cys-106 mutant DJ-1 bound to c-Raf more weakly than did wild-type DJ-1. Co-localization of DJ-1 with c-Raf in the cytoplasm was enhanced in epidermal growth factor (EGF)-treated cells. Knockdown of DJ-1 expression attenuated the phosphorylation level of c-Raf in EGF-treated cells, resulting in reduced activation of MEK and ERK1/2. Although EGF-treated DJ-1 knock-out cells also showed attenuated c-Raf activation, reintroduction of wild-type DJ-1, but not C106S DJ-1, into DJ-1 knock-out cells restored c-Raf activation in a DJ-1 binding activity in a c-Raf-dependent manner. DJ-1 was not responsible for activation of c-Raf in phorbol myristate acetate-treated cells. Furthermore, DJ-1 stimulated self-phosphorylation activity of c-Raf in vitro, but DJ-1 was not a target for Raf kinase. Oxidation of Cys-106 in DJ-1 was not affected by EGF treatment. These findings showed that DJ-1 is a positive regulator of the EGF/Ras/ERK pathway through targeting c-Raf. PMID:26048984

  13. Epidermal Growth Factor-dependent Activation of the Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase Pathway by DJ-1 Protein through Its Direct Binding to c-Raf Protein.

    PubMed

    Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Kato-Ose, Izumi; Murata, Hiroaki; Maita, Hiroshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2015-07-17

    DJ-1 is an oncogene and also a causative gene for familial Parkinson disease. DJ-1 has various functions, and the oxidative status of cysteine at position 106 (Cys-106) is crucial for determination of the activation level of DJ-1. Although DJ-1 requires activated Ras for its oncogenic activity and although it activates the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway, a cell growth pathway downstream of Ras, the precise mechanism underlying activation of the ERK pathway by DJ-1 is still not known. In this study, we found that DJ-1 directly bound to the kinase domain of c-Raf but not to Ras and that Cys-106 mutant DJ-1 bound to c-Raf more weakly than did wild-type DJ-1. Co-localization of DJ-1 with c-Raf in the cytoplasm was enhanced in epidermal growth factor (EGF)-treated cells. Knockdown of DJ-1 expression attenuated the phosphorylation level of c-Raf in EGF-treated cells, resulting in reduced activation of MEK and ERK1/2. Although EGF-treated DJ-1 knock-out cells also showed attenuated c-Raf activation, reintroduction of wild-type DJ-1, but not C106S DJ-1, into DJ-1 knock-out cells restored c-Raf activation in a DJ-1 binding activity in a c-Raf-dependent manner. DJ-1 was not responsible for activation of c-Raf in phorbol myristate acetate-treated cells. Furthermore, DJ-1 stimulated self-phosphorylation activity of c-Raf in vitro, but DJ-1 was not a target for Raf kinase. Oxidation of Cys-106 in DJ-1 was not affected by EGF treatment. These findings showed that DJ-1 is a positive regulator of the EGF/Ras/ERK pathway through targeting c-Raf.

  14. PDE10A inhibitors stimulate or suppress motor behavior dependent on the relative activation state of the direct and indirect striatal output pathways

    PubMed Central

    Megens, Anton A H P; Hendrickx, Herman M R; Mahieu, Michel M A; Wellens, Annemie L Y; de Boer, Peter; Vanhoof, Greet

    2014-01-01

    The enzyme phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A) regulates the activity of striatal, medium spiny neurons (MSNs), which are divided into a behaviorally stimulating, Gs-coupled D1 receptor-expressing “direct” pathway and a behaviorally suppressant, Gi-coupled D2 receptor-expressing “indirect” pathway. Activating both pathways, PDE10A inhibitors (PDE10AIs) combine functional characteristics of D2 antagonists and D1 agonists. While the effects of PDE10AIs on spontaneous and stimulated behavior have been extensively reported, the present study investigates their effects on suppressed behavior under various conditions of reduced dopaminergic neurotransmission: blockade of D1 receptors with SCH-23390, blockade of D2 receptors with haloperidol, or depletion of dopamine with RO-4-1284 or reserpine. In rats, PDE10AIs displayed relatively low cataleptic activity per se. After blocking D1 receptors, however, they induced pronounced catalepsy at low doses close to those required for inhibition of apomorphine-induced behavior; slightly higher doses resulted in behavioral stimulant effects, counteracting the catalepsy. PDE10AIs also counteracted catalepsy and related behaviors induced by D2 receptor blockade or dopamine depletion; catalepsy was replaced by behavioral stimulant effects under the latter but not the former condition. Similar interactions were observed at the level of locomotion in mice. At doses close to those inhibiting d-amphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion, PDE10AIs reversed hypolocomotion induced by D1 receptor blockade or dopamine depletion but not hypolocomotion induced by D2 receptor blockade. It is concluded that PDE10AIs stimulate or inhibit motor behavior dependent on the relative activation state of the direct and indirect striatal output pathways. PMID:25505601

  15. The Brisbane Longitudinal Twin Study Pathways to Cannabis Use, Abuse and Dependence Project: Current status, preliminary results and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, NA; Henders, AK; Davenport, TA; Hermens, DF; Wright, MJ; Martin, NG; Hickie, IB

    2013-01-01

    We describe the data being collected from the Brisbane Longitudinal Twin Study (BLTS) in Australia as part of the US National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) funded project Pathways to Cannabis Use, Abuse and Dependence. The history, recruitment, assessment and retention of twin families in this project are described in detail along with preliminary findings and plans for future research. The goal of this NIDA project is to make a significant contribution to the discovery of quantitative trait loci (QTL) influencing cannabis use disorders. Although the focus is cannabis use, abuse and dependence in young adults, measures of comorbid illicit drug use disorders are also being collected. In addition, a variety of internalizing and externalizing disorders are being assessed, funded by support from the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council. Because these same twins have participated in numerous twin studies since 1992, future plans will include linking different phenotypes to investigate relationships between drug use, psychiatric disorders and psychological phenotypes within cross-sectional and longitudinal or developmental frameworks. PMID:23187020

  16. Epithelia-derived wingless regulates dendrite directional growth of drosophila ddaE neuron through the Fz-Fmi-Dsh-Rac1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoting; Wang, Yan; Wang, Huan; Liu, Tongtong; Guo, Jing; Yi, Wei; Li, Yan

    2016-04-29

    Proper dendrite patterning is critical for the receiving and processing of information in the nervous system. Cell-autonomous molecules have been extensively studied in dendrite morphogenesis; however, the regulatory mechanisms of environmental factors in dendrite growth remain to be elucidated. By evaluating the angle between two primary dendrites (PD-Angle), we found that the directional growth of the primary dendrites of a Drosophila periphery sensory neuron ddaE is regulated by the morphogen molecule Wingless (Wg). During the early stage of dendrite growth, Wg is expressed in a group of epithelial cells posteriorly adjacent to ddaE. When Wg expression is reduced or shifted anteriorly, the PD-Angle is markedly decreased. Furthermore, Wg receptor Frizzled functions together with Flamingo and Dishevelled in transducing the Wg signal into ddaE neuron, and the downstream signal is mediated by non-canonical Wnt pathway through Rac1. In conclusion, we reveal that epithelia-derived Wg plays a repulsive role in regulating the directional growth of dendrites through the non-canonical Wnt pathway. Thus, our findings provide strong in vivo evidence on how environmental signals serve as spatial cues for dendrite patterning.

  17. The importance of correcting for variable probe-sample interactions in AFM-IR spectroscopy: AFM-IR of dried bacteria on a polyurethane film.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Daniel E; Biffinger, Justin C; Cockrell-Zugell, Allison L; Lo, Michael; Kjoller, Kevin; Cook, Debra; Lee, Woo Kyung; Pehrsson, Pehr E; Crookes-Goodson, Wendy J; Hung, Chia-Suei; Nadeau, Lloyd J; Russell, John N

    2016-08-02

    AFM-IR is a combined atomic force microscopy-infrared spectroscopy method that shows promise for nanoscale chemical characterization of biological-materials interactions. In an effort to apply this method to quantitatively probe mechanisms of microbiologically induced polyurethane degradation, we have investigated monolayer clusters of ∼200 nm thick Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 bacteria (Pf) on a 300 nm thick polyether-polyurethane (PU) film. Here, the impact of the different biological and polymer mechanical properties on the thermomechanical AFM-IR detection mechanism was first assessed without the additional complication of polymer degradation. AFM-IR spectra of Pf and PU were compared with FTIR and showed good agreement. Local AFM-IR spectra of Pf on PU (Pf-PU) exhibited bands from both constituents, showing that AFM-IR is sensitive to chemical composition both at and below the surface. One distinct difference in local AFM-IR spectra on Pf-PU was an anomalous ∼4× increase in IR peak intensities for the probe in contact with Pf versus PU. This was attributed to differences in probe-sample interactions. In particular, significantly higher cantilever damping was observed for probe contact with PU, with a ∼10× smaller Q factor. AFM-IR chemical mapping at single wavelengths was also affected. We demonstrate ratioing of mapping data for chemical analysis as a simple method to cancel the extreme effects of the variable probe-sample interactions.

  18. Intrinsically High-Q Dynamic AFM Imaging in Liquid with a Significantly Extended Needle Tip

    PubMed Central

    Minary-Jolandan, Majid; Tajik, Arash; Wang, Ning; Yu, Min-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) probe with a long and rigid needle tip was fabricated and studied for high Q factor dynamic (tapping mode) AFM imaging of samples submersed in liquid. The extended needle tip over a regular commercially-available tapping mode AFM cantilever was sufficiently long to keep the AFM cantilever from submersed in liquid, which significantly minimized the hydrodynamic damping involved in dynamic AFM imaging of samples in liquid. Dynamic AFM imaging of samples in liquid at an intrinsic Q factor of over 100 and an operation frequency of over 200 kHz was demonstrated. The method has the potential to be extended to acquire viscoelastic materials properties and provide truly gentle imaging of soft biological samples in physiological environments. PMID:22595833

  19. An AFM study of calcite dissolution in concentrated electrolyte solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Agudo, E.; Putnis, C. V.; Putnis, A.; Rodriguez-Navarro, C.

    2009-04-01

    Calcite-solution interactions are of a paramount importance in a range of processes such as the removal of heavy metals, carbon dioxide sequestration, landscape modeling, weathering of building stone and biomineralization. Water in contact with minerals often carries significant amounts of solutes; additionally, their concentration may vary due to evaporation and condensation. It is well known that calcite dissolution is affected dramatically by the presence of such solutes. Here we present investigations on the dissolution of calcite in the presence of different electrolytes. Both bulk (batch reactors) experiments and nanoscale (in situ AFM) techniques are used to study the dissolution of calcite in a range of solutions containing alkaly cations balanced by halide anions. Previous works have indicated that the ionic strength has little influence in calcite dissolution rates measured from bulk experiments (Pokrovsky et al. 2005; Glendhill and Morse, 2004). Contrary to these results, our quantitative analyses of AFM observations show an enhancement of the calcite dissolution rate with increasing electrolyte concentration. Such an effect is concentration-dependent and it is most evident in concentrated solutions. AFM experiments have been carried out in a fluid cell using calcite cleavage surfaces in contact with solutions of simple salts of the alkaly metals and halides at different undersaturations with respect to calcite to try to specify the effect of the ionic strength on etch pit spreading rate and calcite dissolution rate. These results show that the presence of soluble salts may critically affect the weathering of carbonate rocks in nature as well as the decay of carbonate stone in built cultural heritage. References: Pokrosky, O.S.; Golubev, S.V.; Schott, J. Dissolution kinetics of calcite, dolomite and magnesite at 25°C and 0 to 50 atm pCO2. Chemical Geology, 2005, 217 (3-4) 239-255. Glendhill, D.K.; Morse, J.W. Dissolution kinetics of calcite in Na

  20. Dispersion and Fixation of Adeno-Associated Virus with Glutaraldehyde for Afm Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Wang, Xinyan; Yang, Haijun; Lü, Junhong

    Sample preparation is an important procedure for atomic force microscope (AFM) studies. However, flexible virus particles have a tendency to aggregate together and are easily compressed during sample preparation or by AFM tip that subsequently hamper studying of virus by AFM. Herein, low concentration chemical reagent of glutaraldehyde (2%, v/v) is pre-mixed in virus suspension that facilitates the dispersion and observation of recombinant serotype 2 adeno-associated virus particles deposited on mica surface with little deformation.

  1. Acquisition of a Modular, Multi-laser, Raman-AFM Instrument for Multdisciplinary Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-28

    vapor deposition on copper foils. The four lasers range from the blue to 785 nm and provides a unique handle to determine excitation dependence of...Acquisition of a Modular, Multi- laser , Raman- AFM Instrument for Multdisciplinary Research A four- laser , confocal Raman/Atomic Force Scanning... laser , Raman-AFM Instrument for Multdisciplinary Research Report Title A four- laser , confocal Raman/Atomic Force Scanning microscope (Raman-AFM

  2. Hybrid AFM for Nanoscale Physicochemical Characterization: Recent Development and Emerging Applications.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wanyi; Zhang, Wen

    2017-03-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has evolved to be one of the most powerful tools for the characterization of material surfaces especially at the nanoscale. Recent development of AFM has incorporated a suite of analytical techniques including surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) technique and infrared (IR) spectroscopy to further reveal chemical composition and map the chemical distribution. This incorporation not only elevates the functionality of AFM but also increases the resolution limitation of conventional IR and Raman spectroscopy. Despite the rapid development of such hybrid AFM techniques, many unique features, principles, applications, potential pitfalls or artifacts are not well known to the community. This review systematically summarizes the recent relevant literature on hybrid AFM principles and applications. It focuses specially on AFM-IR and AFM-Raman techniques. Various applications in different research fields are critically reviewed and discussed, highlighting the potentials of these hybrid AFM techniques. Here, the major drawbacks and limitations of these two hybrid AFM techniques are presented. The intentions of this article are to shed new light on the future research and achieve improvements in stability and reliability of the measurements.

  3. Visualization of internal structure of banana starch granule through AFM.

    PubMed

    Peroni-Okita, Fernanda H G; Gunning, A Patrick; Kirby, Andrew; Simão, Renata A; Soares, Claudinéia A; Cordenunsi, Beatriz R

    2015-09-05

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a high resolution technique for studying the external and internal structures of starch granules. For this purpose granules were isolated from bananas and embedded in a non-penetrating resin. To achieve image contrast of the ultrastructure, the face of the cut blocks were wetted in steam and force modulation mode imaging was used. Images of starch from green bananas showed large variation of height across the granule due to a locational specific absorption of water and swelling of amorphous regions; the data reveal that the center of the granules are structurally different and have different viscoelastic properties. Images of starches from ripe bananas showed an even greater different level of organization: absence of growth rings around the hilum; the central region of the granule is richer in amylose; very porous surface with round shaped dark structures; the size of blocklets are larger than the green fruits.

  4. Adhesion forces between AFM tips and superficial dentin surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pelin, I M; Piednoir, A; Machon, D; Farge, P; Pirat, C; Ramos, S M M

    2012-06-15

    In this work, we study the adhesion forces between atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips and superficial dentin etched with phosphoric acid. Initially, we quantitatively analyze the effect of acid etching on the surface heterogeneity and the surface roughness, two parameters that play a key role in the adhesion phenomenon. From a statistical study of the force-distance curves, we determine the average adhesion forces on the processed substrates. Our results show that the average adhesion forces, measured in water, increase linearly with the acid exposure time. The highest values of such forces are ascribed to the high density of collagen fibers on the etched surfaces. The individual contribution of exposed collagen fibrils to the adhesion force is highlighted. We also discuss in this paper the influence of the environmental medium (water/air) in the adhesion measurements. We show that the weak forces involved require working in the aqueous medium. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. AFM, SEM and TEM Studies on Porous Anodic Alumina

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Porous anodic alumina (PAA) has been intensively studied in past decade due to its applications for fabricating nanostructured materials. Since PAA’s pore diameter, thickness and shape vary too much, a systematical study on the methods of morphology characterization is meaningful and essential for its proper development and utilization. In this paper, we present detailed AFM, SEM and TEM studies on PAA and its evolvements with abundant microstructures, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each method. The sample preparation, testing skills and morphology analysis are discussed, especially on the differentiation during characterizing complex cross-sections and ultrasmall nanopores. The versatility of PAAs is also demonstrated by the diversity of PAAs’ microstructure. PMID:20672104

  6. Bubble colloidal AFM probes formed from ultrasonically generated bubbles.

    PubMed

    Vakarelski, Ivan U; Lee, Judy; Dagastine, Raymond R; Chan, Derek Y C; Stevens, Geoffrey W; Grieser, Franz

    2008-02-05

    Here we introduce a simple and effective experimental approach to measuring the interaction forces between two small bubbles (approximately 80-140 microm) in aqueous solution during controlled collisions on the scale of micrometers to nanometers. The colloidal probe technique using atomic force microscopy (AFM) was extended to measure interaction forces between a cantilever-attached bubble and surface-attached bubbles of various sizes. By using an ultrasonic source, we generated numerous small bubbles on a mildly hydrophobic surface of a glass slide. A single bubble picked up with a strongly hydrophobized V-shaped cantilever was used as the colloidal probe. Sample force measurements were used to evaluate the pure water bubble cleanliness and the general consistency of the measurements.

  7. Single molecule dynamics of polyproline by using AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamamushi, Hironori; Kawakami, Masaru; Furukawa, Hidemitsu

    2017-04-01

    Polyproline forms a unique structure, called polyproline helix. It takes polyproline II helix in water and Polyproline I helix in n-propanol. PP II is known to be a rigid molecule in spite of no hydrogen bonds between backbone atoms, and to play an important role in biological functions such as formation of collagen structure and in the cell-adhesion. In this study, we carried out single molecule force spectroscopy of polyproline with AFM(Atomic Force Microscope) and covalent immobilization of polyproline molecule on gold substrate to evaluate the rigidity of PP II at single molecule level. We found that the force-extension curve of polyproline shows a linear increase, which is unusual and not seen with others homo-polypeptide molecules. These results indicate that the high rigidity of polyproline II helix can be explained by "enthalpic", not "entropic" driven elasticity.

  8. SPR and AFM study of engineered biomolecule immobilisation techniques.

    PubMed

    Craig, Ian; McLaughlin, James A

    2006-01-01

    A comparative study into two novel and diverse schemes designed to improve immobilization of biomolecules for biosensing purposes is presented. In the first method a silicon rich matrix is created using PECVD. The second method involves creating nano-patterns on the sensor surface to create a large number of surface discontinuities to which the proteins will bind preferentially. The basic theory of SPR is provided to show the importance of the surface sensitive nature of this optical transduction technique. The present work suggests that both may prove both for SPR and other biosensing applications. Of the two schemes proposed, the results for nano-patterning seem to suggest that it is promoting better surface attachment of biomolecules. The results of SPR and AFM studies are presented that have shown that each of these schemes promotes improved binding of various proteins.

  9. Direct Visualization of RNA-DNA Primer Removal from Okazaki Fragments Provides Support for Flap Cleavage and Exonucleolytic Pathways in Eukaryotic Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bochao; Hu, Jiazhi; Wang, Jingna; Kong, Daochun

    2017-03-24

    During DNA replication in eukaryotic cells, short single-stranded DNA segments known as Okazaki fragments are first synthesized on the lagging strand. The Okazaki fragments originate from ∼35-nucleotide-long RNA-DNA primers. After Okazaki fragment synthesis, these primers must be removed to allow fragment joining into a continuous lagging strand. To date, the models of enzymatic machinery that removes the RNA-DNA primers have come almost exclusively from biochemical reconstitution studies and some genetic interaction assays, and there is little direct evidence to confirm these models. One obstacle to elucidating Okazaki fragment processing has been the lack of methods that can directly examine primer removal in vivo In this study, we developed an electron microscopy assay that can visualize nucleotide flap structures on DNA replication forks in fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe). With this assay, we first demonstrated the generation of flap structures during Okazaki fragment processing in vivo The mean and median lengths of the flaps in wild-type cells were ∼51 and ∼41 nucleotides, respectively. We also used yeast mutants to investigate the impact of deleting key DNA replication nucleases on these flap structures. Our results provided direct in vivo evidence for a previously proposed flap cleavage pathway and the critical function of Dna2 and Fen1 in cleaving these flaps. In addition, we found evidence for another previously proposed exonucleolytic pathway involving RNA-DNA primer digestion by exonucleases RNase H2 and Exo1. Taken together, our observations suggest a dual mechanism for Okazaki fragment maturation in lagging strand synthesis and establish a new strategy for interrogation of this fascinating process. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. An improved measurement of dsDNA elasticity using AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thi-Huong; Lee, Sang-Myung; Na, Kyounghwan; Yang, Sungwook; Kim, Jinseok; Yoon, Eui-Sung

    2010-02-01

    The mechanical properties of a small fragment (30 bp) of an individual double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (dsDNA) in water have been investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). We have stretched three systems including ssDNA, double-fixed dsDNA (one strand of the dsDNA molecules was biotinylated at the 3'-end and thiolated at the 5'-end, this was reversed for the other complementary strand) and single-fixed dsDNA (one strand of the dsDNA molecules was biotinylated at the 3'-end and thiolated at the 5'-end, whereas the other complementary strand was biotinylated at only the 5'-end). The achieved thiolation and biotinylation were to bind ds- or ssDNA to the gold surface and streptavidin-coated AFM tip, respectively. Analysis of the force versus displacement (F-D) curves from tip-DNA-substrate systems shows that the pull-off length (Lo) and stretch length (δ) from the double-fixed system were shorter than those observed in the ssDNA and the single-fixed system. The obtained stretch force (Fst) from the single-fixed dsDNA was much greater than that from the ssDNA even though it was about 10 pN greater than the one obtained in the double-fixed system. As a result, the Young's modulus of the double-fixed dsDNA was greater than that of the single-fixed dsDNA and the ssDNA. A more reliable stiffness of the dsDNA was observed via the double-fixed system, since there is no effect of the unpaired molecules during stretching, which always occurred in the single-fixed system. The unpaired molecules were also observed by comparing the stiffness of ssDNA and single-fixed dsDNA in which the end of one strand was left free.

  11. AFM tip effect on a thin liquid film.

    PubMed

    Ledesma-Alonso, R; Legendre, D; Tordjeman, Ph

    2013-06-25

    We study the interaction between an AFM probe and a liquid film deposited over a flat substrate. We investigate the effects of the physical and geometrical parameters, with a special focus on the film thickness E, the probe radius R, and the distance D between the probe and the free surface. Deformation profiles have been calculated from the numerical simulations of the Young-Laplace equation by taking into account the probe/liquid and the liquid/substrate interactions, characterized by the Hamaker constants, Hpl and Hls. We demonstrate that the deformation of a shallow film is determined by a particular characteristic length λF = (2πγE(4)/Hls)(1/2), resulting from the balance between the capillary force (γ is the surface tension) and the van der Waals liquid/substrate attraction. For the case of a bulk liquid, the extent of the interface deformation is simply controlled by the capillary length λC = (γ/Δρg)(1/2). These trends point out two asymptotic regimes, which in turn are bounded by two characteristic film thicknesses Eg = (Hls/2πΔρg)(1/4) and Eγ = (R(2)Hls/2πγ)(1/4). For E > Eg, the bulk behavior is recovered, and for E < Eγ, we show the existence of a particular shallow film regime in which a localized tip effect is observed. This tip effect is characterized by the small magnitude of the deformation and an important restriction of its radial extent λF localized below the probe. In addition, we have found that the film thickness has a significant effect on the threshold separation distance Dmin below which the irreversible jump-to-contact process occurs: Dmin is probe radius-dependent for the bulk whereas it is film-thickness-dependent for shallow films. These results have an important impact on the optimal AFM scanning conditions.

  12. Amyloid β peptide directly impairs pineal gland melatonin synthesis and melatonin receptor signaling through the ERK pathway.

    PubMed

    Cecon, Erika; Chen, Min; Marçola, Marina; Fernandes, Pedro A C; Jockers, Ralf; Markus, Regina P

    2015-06-01

    Melatonin is the hormone produced by the pineal gland known to regulate physiologic rhythms and to display immunomodulatory and neuroprotective properties. It has been reported that Alzheimer disease patients show impaired melatonin production and altered expression of the 2 G protein-coupled melatonin receptors (MTRs), MT₁ and MT₂, but the underlying mechanisms are not known. Here we evaluated whether this dysfunction of the melatonergic system is directly caused by amyloid β peptides (Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42)). Aβ treatment of rat pineal glands elicited an inflammatory response within the gland, evidenced by the up-regulation of 52 inflammatory genes, and decreased the production of melatonin up to 75% compared to vehicle-treated glands. Blocking NF-κB activity prevented this effect. Exposure of HEK293 cells stably expressing recombinant MT₁ or MT₂ receptors to Aβ lead to a 40% reduction in [(125)I]iodomelatonin binding to MT₁. ERK1/2 activation triggered by MTRs, but not by the β₂-adrenergic receptor, was markedly impaired by Aβ in HEK293 transfected cells, as well as in primary rat endothelial cells expressing endogenous MTRs. Our data reveal the melatonergic system as a new target of Aβ, opening new perspectives to Alzheimer disease diagnosis and therapeutic intervention.

  13. Salt-induced transcription factor MYB74 is regulated by the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Rui; Wang, Yuhan; Zheng, Hao; Lu, Wei; Wu, Changai; Huang, Jinguang; Yan, Kang; Yang, Guodong; Zheng, Chengchao

    2015-01-01

    Salt stress is one of the major abiotic stresses in agriculture worldwide that causes crop failure by interfering with the profile of gene expression and cell metabolism. Transcription factors and RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) play an important role in the regulation of gene activation under abiotic stress in plants. This work characterized AtMYB74, a member of the R2R3-MYB gene family, which is transcriptionally regulated mainly by RdDM as a response in salt stress in Arabidopsis. Bisulphite sequencing indicated that 24-nt siRNAs target a region approximately 500bp upstream of the transcription initiation site of AtMYB74, which is heavily methylated. Levels of DNA methylation in this region were significantly reduced in wild type plants under salt stress, whereas no changes were found in RdDM mutants. Northern blot and quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR analysis showed that the accumulation of 24-nt siRNAs was decreased in WT plants under salt stress. Further promoter deletion analysis revealed that the siRNA target region is essential for maintaining AtMYB74 expression patterns. In addition, transgenic plants overexpressing AtMYB74 displayed hypersensitivity to NaCl during seed germination. These results suggest that changes in the levels of the five 24-nt siRNAs regulate the AtMYB74 transcription factor via RdDM in response to salt stress. PMID:26139822

  14. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Thiol–Disulfide Exchange Covering Direct Substitution and Thiol Oxidation-Mediated Pathways

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Disulfides are important building blocks in the secondary and tertiary structures of proteins, serving as inter- and intra-subunit cross links. Disulfides are also the major products of thiol oxidation, a process that has primary roles in defense mechanisms against oxidative stress and in redox regulation of cell signaling. Although disulfides are relatively stable, their reduction, isomerisation, and interconversion as well as their production reactions are catalyzed by delicate enzyme machineries, providing a dynamic system in biology. Redox homeostasis, a thermodynamic parameter that determines which reactions can occur in cellular compartments, is also balanced by the thiol–disulfide pool. However, it is the kinetic properties of the reactions that best represent cell dynamics, because the partitioning of the possible reactions depends on kinetic parameters. Critical Issues: This review is focused on the kinetics and mechanisms of thiol–disulfide substitution and redox reactions. It summarizes the challenges and advances that are associated with kinetic investigations in small molecular and enzymatic systems from a rigorous chemical perspective using biological examples. The most important parameters that influence reaction rates are discussed in detail. Recent Advances and Future Directions: Kinetic studies of proteins are more challenging than small molecules, and quite often investigators are forced to sacrifice the rigor of the experimental approach to obtain the important kinetic and mechanistic information. However, recent technological advances allow a more comprehensive analysis of enzymatic systems via using the systematic kinetics apparatus that was developed for small molecule reactions, which is expected to provide further insight into the cell's machinery. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 1623–1641. PMID:23075118

  15. Measurement of a CD and sidewall angle artifact with two-dimensional CD AFM metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixson, Ronald G.; Sullivan, Neal T.; Schneir, Jason; McWaid, Thomas H.; Tsai, Vincent W.; Prochazka, Jerry; Young, Michael

    1996-05-01

    Despite the widespread acceptance of SEM metrology in semiconductor manufacturing, there is no SEM CD standard currently available. Producing such a standard is challenging because SEM CD measurements are not only a function of the linewidth, but also dependent on the line material, sidewall roughness, sidewall angle, line height, substrate material, and the proximity of other objects. As the presence of AFM metrology in semiconductor manufacturing increases, the history of SEM CD metrology raises a number of questions about the prospect of AFM CD artifacts. Is an AFM CD artifact possible? What role would it play in the manufacturing environment? Although AFM has some important advantages over SEM, such as relative insensitivity to material differences, the throughput and reliability of most AFM instruments is not yet at the level necessary to support in-line CD metrology requirements. What, then, is the most useful relationship between AFM and SEM metrology? As a means of addressing some of these questions, we have measured the CD and sidewall angle of 1.2 micrometer oxy-nitride line on Si using three different techniques: optical microscopy (with modeling), AFM, and cross sectional TEM. Systematic errors in the AFM angle measurements were reduced by using a rotational averaging technique that we describe. We found good agreement with uncertainties below 30 nm (2 sigma) for the CD measurement and 1.0 degrees (2 sigma) for the sidewall angles. Based upon these results we suggest a measurement procedure which will yield useful AFM CD artifacts. We consider the possibility that AFMs, especially when used with suitable CD artifacts, can effectively support SEM CD metrology. This synergistic relationship between the AFM and SEM represents an emerging paradigm that has also been suggested by a number of others.

  16. Communication: Direct evidence for sequential dissociation of gas-phase Fe(CO)5 via a singlet pathway upon excitation at 266 nm.

    PubMed

    Wernet, Ph; Leitner, T; Josefsson, I; Mazza, T; Miedema, P S; Schröder, H; Beye, M; Kunnus, K; Schreck, S; Radcliffe, P; Düsterer, S; Meyer, M; Odelius, M; Föhlisch, A

    2017-06-07

    We prove the hitherto hypothesized sequential dissociation of Fe(CO)5 in the gas phase upon photoexcitation at 266 nm via a singlet pathway with time-resolved valence and core-level photoelectron spectroscopy with an x-ray free-electron laser. Valence photoelectron spectra are used to identify free CO molecules and to determine the time constants of stepwise dissociation to Fe(CO)4 within the temporal resolution of the experiment and further to Fe(CO)3 within 3 ps. Fe 3p core-level photoelectron spectra directly reflect the singlet spin state of the Fe center in Fe(CO)5, Fe(CO)4, and Fe(CO)3 showing that the dissociation exclusively occurs along a singlet pathway without triplet-state contribution. Our results are important for assessing intra- and intermolecular relaxation processes in the photodissociation dynamics of the prototypical Fe(CO)5 complex in the gas phase and in solution, and they establish time-resolved core-level photoelectron spectroscopy as a powerful tool for determining the multiplicity of transition metals in photochemical reactions of coordination complexes.

  17. Communication: Direct evidence for sequential dissociation of gas-phase Fe(CO)5 via a singlet pathway upon excitation at 266 nm

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, T.; Mazza, T.; Schröder, H.; Kunnus, K.; Schreck, S.; Radcliffe, P.; Düsterer, S.; Meyer, M.; Föhlisch, A.

    2017-01-01

    We prove the hitherto hypothesized sequential dissociation of Fe(CO)5 in the gas phase upon photoexcitation at 266 nm via a singlet pathway with time-resolved valence and core-level photoelectron spectroscopy with an x-ray free-electron laser. Valence photoelectron spectra are used to identify free CO molecules and to determine the time constants of stepwise dissociation to Fe(CO)4 within the temporal resolution of the experiment and further to Fe(CO)3 within 3 ps. Fe 3p core-level photoelectron spectra directly reflect the singlet spin state of the Fe center in Fe(CO)5, Fe(CO)4, and Fe(CO)3 showing that the dissociation exclusively occurs along a singlet pathway without triplet-state contribution. Our results are important for assessing intra- and intermolecular relaxation processes in the photodissociation dynamics of the prototypical Fe(CO)5 complex in the gas phase and in solution, and they establish time-resolved core-level photoelectron spectroscopy as a powerful tool for determining the multiplicity of transition metals in photochemical reactions of coordination complexes. PMID:28595420

  18. Communication: Direct evidence for sequential dissociation of gas-phase Fe(CO)5 via a singlet pathway upon excitation at 266 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wernet, Ph.; Leitner, T.; Josefsson, I.; Mazza, T.; Miedema, P. S.; Schröder, H.; Beye, M.; Kunnus, K.; Schreck, S.; Radcliffe, P.; Düsterer, S.; Meyer, M.; Odelius, M.; Föhlisch, A.

    2017-06-01

    We prove the hitherto hypothesized sequential dissociation of Fe(CO)5 in the gas phase upon photoexcitation at 266 nm via a singlet pathway with time-resolved valence and core-level photoelectron spectroscopy with an x-ray free-electron laser. Valence photoelectron spectra are used to identify free CO molecules and to determine the time constants of stepwise dissociation to Fe(CO)4 within the temporal resolution of the experiment and further to Fe(CO)3 within 3 ps. Fe 3p core-level photoelectron spectra directly reflect the singlet spin state of the Fe center in Fe(CO)5, Fe(CO)4, and Fe(CO)3 showing that the dissociation exclusively occurs along a singlet pathway without triplet-state contribution. Our results are important for assessing intra- and intermolecular relaxation processes in the photodissociation dynamics of the prototypical Fe(CO)5 complex in the gas phase and in solution, and they establish time-resolved core-level photoelectron spectroscopy as a powerful tool for determining the multiplicity of transition metals in photochemical reactions of coordination complexes.

  19. Water oxidation with mononuclear ruthenium(II) polypyridine complexes involving a direct Ru(IV)═O pathway in neutral and alkaline media.

    PubMed

    Badiei, Yosra M; Polyansky, Dmitry E; Muckerman, James T; Szalda, David J; Haberdar, Rubabe; Zong, Ruifa; Thummel, Randolph P; Fujita, Etsuko

    2013-08-05

    The catalytic water oxidation mechanism proposed for many single-site ruthenium complexes proceeds via the nucleophilic attack of a water molecule on the Ru(V)═O species. In contrast, Ru(II) complexes containing 4-t-butyl-2,6-di-1',8'-(naphthyrid-2'-yl)-pyridine (and its bisbenzo-derivative), an equatorial water, and two axial 4-picolines follow the thermodynamically more favorable "direct pathway" via [Ru(IV)═O](2+), which avoids the higher oxidation state [Ru(V)═O](3+) in neutral and basic media. Our experimental and theoretical results that focus on the pH-dependent onset catalytic potentials indicative of a PCET driven low-energy pathway for the formation of products with an O-O bond (such as [Ru(III)-OOH](2+) and [Ru(IV)-OO](2+)) at an applied potential below the Ru(V)═O/Ru(IV)═O couple clearly support such a mechanism. However, in the cases of [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(OH2)](2+) and [Ru(tpy)(bpm)(OH2)](2+), the formation of the Ru(V)═O species appears to be required before O-O bond formation. The complexes under discussion provide a unique functional model for water oxidation that proceeds by four consecutive PCET steps in neutral and alkaline media.

  20. Novel pathways for injury from offshore oil spills: direct, sublethal and indirect effects of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on pelagic Sargassum communities.

    PubMed

    Powers, Sean P; Hernandez, Frank J; Condon, Robert H; Drymon, J Marcus; Free, Christopher M

    2013-01-01

    The pelagic brown alga Sargassum forms an oasis of biodiversity and productivity in an otherwise featureless ocean surface. The vast pool of oil resulting from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill came into contact with a large portion of the Gulf of Mexico's floating Sargassum mats. Aerial surveys performed during and after the oil spill show compelling evidence of loss and subsequent recovery of Sargassum. Expanding on the trends observed in the aerial surveys, we conducted a series of mesocosm experiments to test the effect of oil and dispersants on the vertical position and weight of the Sargassum complex (Sargassum natans and S. fluitans), as well as on the dissolved oxygen concentrations surrounding the algae. Dispersant and dispersed-oil had significant effects on the vertical position of both species of Sargassum over a period of 72 hours. Similarly, dissolved oxygen concentrations were lowest in dispersant and dispersed-oil treatments, respectively. Cumulatively, our findings suggest three pathways for oil-spill related injury: (1) Sargassum accumulated oil on the surface exposing animals to high concentrations of contaminants; (2) application of dispersant sank Sargassum, thus removing the habitat and potentially transporting oil and dispersant vertically; and (3) low oxygen surrounded the habitat potentially stressing animals that reside in the alga. These pathways represent direct, sublethal, and indirect effects of oil and dispersant release that minimize the ecosystem services provided by floating Sargassum - the latter two effects are rarely considered in assessing impacts of oil spills or response procedures.

  1. Novel Pathways for Injury from Offshore Oil Spills: Direct, Sublethal and Indirect Effects of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill on Pelagic Sargassum Communities

    PubMed Central

    Powers, Sean P.; Hernandez, Frank J.; Condon, Robert H.; Drymon, J. Marcus; Free, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    The pelagic brown alga Sargassum forms an oasis of biodiversity and productivity in an otherwise featureless ocean surface. The vast pool of oil resulting from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill came into contact with a large portion of the Gulf of Mexico’s floating Sargassum mats. Aerial surveys performed during and after the oil spill show compelling evidence of loss and subsequent recovery of Sargassum. Expanding on the trends observed in the aerial surveys, we conducted a series of mesocosm experiments to test the effect of oil and dispersants on the vertical position and weight of the Sargassum complex (Sargassum natans and S. fluitans), as well as on the dissolved oxygen concentrations surrounding the algae. Dispersant and dispersed-oil had significant effects on the vertical position of both species of Sargassum over a period of 72 hours. Similarly, dissolved oxygen concentrations were lowest in dispersant and dispersed-oil treatments, respectively. Cumulatively, our findings suggest three pathways for oil-spill related injury: (1) Sargassum accumulated oil on the surface exposing animals to high concentrations of contaminants; (2) application of dispersant sank Sargassum, thus removing the habitat and potentially transporting oil and dispersant vertically; and (3) low oxygen surrounded the habitat potentially stressing animals that reside in the alga. These pathways represent direct, sublethal, and indirect effects of oil and dispersant release that minimize the ecosystem services provided by floating Sargassum – the latter two effects are rarely considered in assessing impacts of oil spills or response procedures. PMID:24086378

  2. Two Components of the RNA-Directed DNA Methylation Pathway Associate with MORC6 and Silence Loci Targeted by MORC6 in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhang-Wei; Zhou, Jin-Xing; Huang, Huan-Wei; Li, Yong-Qiang; Shao, Chang-Rong; Li, Lin; Cai, Tao; Chen, She

    2016-01-01

    The SU(VAR)3-9 homolog SUVH9 and the double-stranded RNA-binding protein IDN2 were thought to be components of an RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) pathway in Arabidopsis. We previously found that SUVH9 interacts with MORC6 but how the interaction contributes to transcriptional silencing remains elusive. Here, our genetic analysis indicates that SUVH2 and SUVH9 can either act in the same pathway as MORC6 or act synergistically with MORC6 to mediate transcriptional silencing. Moreover, we demonstrate that IDN2 interacts with MORC6 and mediates the silencing of a subset of MORC6 target loci. Like SUVH2, SUVH9, and IDN2, other RdDM components including Pol IV, Pol V, RDR2, and DRM2 are also required for transcriptional silencing at a subset of MORC6 target loci. MORC6 was previously shown to mediate transcriptional silencing through heterochromatin condensation. We demonstrate that the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex components SWI3B, SWI3C, and SWI3D interact with MORC6 as well as with SUVH9 and then mediate transcriptional silencing. These results suggest that the RdDM components are involved not only in DNA methylation but also in MORC6-mediated heterochromatin condensation. This study illustrates how DNA methylation is linked to heterochromatin condensation and thereby enhances transcriptional silencing at methylated genomic regions. PMID:27171427

  3. Effect of the molecular weight on deformation states of the polystyrene film by AFM single scanning.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yang; Yan, Yongda; Liang, Yingchun; Hu, Zhenjiang; Zhao, Xuesen; Sun, Tao; Dong, Shen

    2013-01-01

    Nanobundles patterns can be formed on the surface of most thermoplastic polymers when the atomic force microscope (AFM)-based nanomechanical machining method is employed to scratch their surfaces. Such patterns are reviewed as three-dimensional sine-wave structures. In the present study, the single-line scratch test is used firstly to study different removal states of the polystyrene (PS) polymer with different molecular weights (MWs). Effects of the scratching direction and the scratching velocity on deformation of the PS film and the state of the removed materials are also investigated. Single-wear box test is then employed to study the possibility of forming bundle structures on PS films with different MWs. The experimental results show that the state between the tip and the sample plays a key role in the nano machining process. If the contact radius between the AFM tip and the polymer surface is larger than the chain end-to-end distance, it is designated as the "cutting" state that means the area of both side ridges is less than the area of the groove and materials are removed. If the contact radius is less than the chain end-to-end distance, it is designated as the "plowing" state that means the area of both side ridges is larger than the area of the groove and no materials are removed at all. For the perfect bundles formation on the PS film, the plowing state is ideal condition for the larger MW polymers because of the chains' entanglement. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Structure and Dynamics of Four-way DNA Junctions Dynamics Revealed by Single-Molecule AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubchenko, Yuri

    2004-03-01

    For-way DNA junctions (Holliday junctions) are critical intermediates for homologous, site-specific recombination, DNA repair and replication. A wealth of structural information is available for immobile four-way junctions. However, these data cannot give the answer on the mechanism of branch migration, the major property of the Holliday junction. Two models for the mechanism of branch migration were suggested. According to the early model of Alberts-Meselson-Sigal, exchanging DNA strands around the junction remain parallel during branch migration. Kinetic studies of branch migration suggest an alternative model in which the junction adopts an extended conformation. We tested these models using a Holliday junction undergoing branch migration. Note that it was the first time when the dynamics of the four-way DNA junction capable of branch migration had been analyzed. We applied time-lapse atomic force microscopy (single molecule dynamics AFM) to image directly loosely bound DNA at liquid-surface interface. These experiments show that mobile Holliday junctions adopt an unfolded conformation during branch migration. This conformation of the junction remains unchanged until strand separation. The data obtained support the model for branch migration having the extended conformation of the Holliday junction. The analysis of the Holliday junctions dynamics at conditions limiting branch migration revealed a broad movement of the arms suggesting that the range of mobility of these junctions is much wider than detected before. Further applications of the time-lapse AFM approach in attempt to resolve the subpopulations of the junctions conformers and the prospects for analyses of dynamics of complex biological systems will be discussed.

  5. Hematite/silver nanoparticle bilayers on mica--AFM, SEM and streaming potential studies.

    PubMed

    Morga, Maria; Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Oćwieja, Magdalena; Bielańska, Elżbieta

    2014-06-15

    Bilayers of hematite/silver nanoparticles were obtained in the self-assembly process and thoroughly characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and in situ streaming potential measurements. The hematite nanoparticles, forming a supporting layer, were 22 nm in diameter, exhibiting an isoelectric point at pH 8.9. The silver nanoparticles, used to obtain an external layer, were 29 nm in diameter, and remained negative within the pH range 3 to 11. In order to investigate the particle deposition, mica sheets were used as a model solid substrate. The coverage of the supporting layer was adjusted by changing the bulk concentration of the hematite suspension and the deposition time. Afterward, silver nanoparticle monolayers of controlled coverage were deposited under the diffusion-controlled transport. The coverage of bilayers was determined by a direct enumeration of deposited particles from SEM micrographs and AFM images. Additionally, the formation of the hematite/silver bilayers was investigated by streaming potential measurements carried out under in situ conditions. The effect of the mica substrate and the coverage of a supporting layer on the zeta potential of bilayers was systematically studied. It was established that for the coverage exceeding 0.20, the zeta potential of bilayers was independent on the substrate and the supporting layer coverage. This behavior was theoretically interpreted in terms of the 3D electrokinetic model. Beside significance for basic sciences, these measurements allowed to develop a robust method of preparing nanoparticle bilayers of controlled properties, having potential applications in catalytic processes.

  6. Cocaine-induced adaptations in D1 and D2 accumbens projection neurons (a dichotomy not necessarily synonymous with direct and indirect pathways).

    PubMed

    Smith, Rachel J; Lobo, Mary Kay; Spencer, Sade; Kalivas, Peter W

    2013-08-01

    Cocaine exposure causes enduring neuroadaptations in ventral striatum, or nucleus accumbens (NAc), an area critically involved in reward learning and relapse of drug seeking. Medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in striatum are dichotomous in their expression of either D1 or D2 dopamine receptors, along with other receptors and neuropeptides. In dorsal striatum, these two subpopulations show non-overlapping innervation of distinct terminal fields via the direct or indirect pathways. However, NAc D1-MSNs and D2-MSNs are not fully segregated in this manner, with both cell types innervating ventral pallidum. Recent studies show that D1-MSNs and D2-MSNs play opposing roles in cocaine-associated behaviors. Further, cocaine induces differential adaptations in these two subpopulations in NAc, including changes to synaptic plasticity, glutamatergic signaling, and spine morphology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The indirect and direct pathways between physical fitness and academic achievement on commencement in post-compulsory education in a historical cohort of Danish school youth.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Mikkel Porsborg; Starkopf, Liis; Sessa, Maurizio; Mortensen, Rikke Nørmark; Vardinghus-Nielsen, Henrik; Bøggild, Henrik; Lange, Theis; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2017-09-11

    Some studies have found positive associations between physical fitness and academic achievements. Pupils' academic achievements should indicate scholastic abilities to commence a post-compulsory education. However, the effect magnitude of physical fitness and academic achievements on commencement in post-compulsory education is unknown. We examined the pathways between physical fitness and academic achievement on pupils' commencement in post-compulsory education. This historical cohort study followed 530 girls and 554 boys from the Danish municipality of Aalborg in the period 2008-2014, 13 to 15 years old in 2010. Physical fitness was assessed through a watt-max cycle ergometer test represented as VO2max (mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)). Academic achievement, commencement status and information on covariates were obtained from Danish nationwide registers. Causal inference based mediation analysis was used to investigate the indirect and direct pathways by separating the total effect of physical fitness on post-compulsory education commencement. Adjusting for sex, age, ethnicity and socioeconomic status, the overall mediation analysis showed an odds ratio (OR) of 1.87 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.30; 2.73) for the total effect, corresponding to an increase in odds of post-compulsory education commencement when the physical fitness was increased by 10 units of VO2max. The separated total effect showed a natural direct OR of 1.36 (95% CI: 0.93; 1.98) and a natural indirect (i.e., through academic achievement) OR of 1.37 (95% CI: 1.20; 1.57). Thus, 51% (95% CI: 27%; 122%) of the effect of physical fitness on post-compulsory education commencement was mediated through academic achievement. Physical fitness had a positive effect on post-compulsory education commencement. A substantial part of this effect was mediated through academic achievement.

  8. Voluntary exercise during extinction of auditory fear conditioning reduces the relapse of fear associated with potentiated activity of striatal direct pathway neurons.

    PubMed

    Mika, Agnieszka; Bouchet, Courtney A; Bunker, Preston; Hellwinkel, Justin E; Spence, Katie G; Day, Heidi E W; Campeau, Serge; Fleshner, Monika; Greenwood, Benjamin N

    2015-11-01

    Relapse of previously extinguished fear presents a significant, pervasive obstacle to the successful long-term treatment of anxiety and trauma-related disorders. Thus, identification of a novel means to enhance fear extinction to stand the passage of time and generalize across contexts is of the utmost importance. Acute bouts of exercise can be used as inexpensive, noninvasive treatment strategies to reduce anxiety, and have been shown to enhance memory for extinction when performed in close temporal proximity to the extinction session. However, it is unclear whether acute exercise can be used to prevent relapse of fear, and the neural mechanisms underlying this potential effect are unknown. The current study therefore examined whether acute exercise during extinction of auditory fear can protect against the later relapse of fear. Male F344 rats lacking an extended history of wheel running were conditioned to fear a tone CS and subsequently extinguished within either a freely mobile running wheel, a locked wheel, or a control context lacking a wheel. Rats exposed to fear extinction within a freely mobile wheel ran during fear extinction, and demonstrated reduced fear as well as attenuated corticosterone levels during re-exposure to the extinguished CS during the relapse test in a novel context 1week later. Examination of cfos mRNA patterns elicited by re-exposure to the extinguished CS during the relapse test revealed that acute exercise during extinction decreased activation of brain circuits classically involved in driving fear expression and interestingly, increased activity within neurons of the direct striatal pathway involved in reward signaling. These data suggest that exercise during extinction reduces relapse through a mechanism involving the direct pathway of the striatum. It is suggested that a positive affective state could become associated with the CS during exercise during extinction, thus resulting in a relapse-resistant extinction memory.

  9. Voluntary exercise during extinction of auditory fear conditioning reduces the relapse of fear associated with potentiated activity of striatal direct pathway neurons

    PubMed Central

    Mika, Agnieszka; Bouchet, Courtney A.; Bunker, Preston; Hellwinkel, Justin E.; Spence, Katie G.; Day, Heidi E.W.; Campeau, Serge; Fleshner, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Relapse of previously extinguished fear presents a significant, pervasive obstacle to the successful long-term treatment of anxiety and trauma-related disorders. Thus, identification of a novel means to enhance fear extinction to stand the passage of time and generalize across contexts is of the utmost importance. Acute bouts of exercise can be used as inexpensive, noninvasive treatment strategies to reduce anxiety, and have been shown to enhance memory for extinction when performed in close temporal proximity to the extinction session. However, it is unclear whether acute exercise can be used to prevent relapse of fear, and the neural mechanisms underlying this potential effect are unknown. The current study therefore examined whether acute exercise during extinction of auditory fear can protect against the later relapse of fear. Male, F344 rats lacking an extended history of wheel running were conditioned to fear a tone CS and subsequently extinguished within either a freely mobile running wheel, a locked wheel, or a control context lacking a wheel. Rats exposed to fear extinction within a freely mobile wheel ran during fear extinction, and demonstrated reduced fear as well as attenuated corticosterone levels during re-exposure to the extinguished CS during the relapse test in a novel context 1 week later. Examination of cfos mRNA patterns elicited by re-exposure to the extinguished CS during the relapse test revealed that acute exercise during extinction decreased activation of brain circuits classically involved in driving fear expression and interestingly, increased activity within neurons of the direct striatal pathway involved in reward signaling. These data suggest that exercise during extinction reduces relapse through a mechanism involving the direct pathway of the striatum. It is suggested that a positive affective state could become associated with the CS during exercise during extinction, thus resulting in a relapse-resistant extinction memory. PMID

  10. Proceedings of the 2010 AFMS Medical Research Symposium. Volume 5. Nursing Track: Abstracts and Presentations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-15

    will include hematocrit, hemoglobin , mean corpuscle volume, iron , total iron binding capacity, Ferritin , and soluble transferring receptor. The...Iraq/Afghanistan ........ 2  Iron Status of Deployed Military Members...2010 AFMS Medical Research Symposium Volume 5 Nursing 8 Proceedings of the 2010 AFMS Medical Research Symposium Volume 5 Nursing 9 Iron

  11. Characterization study on machining PMMA thin-film using AFM tip-based dynamic plowing lithography.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yongda; He, Yang; Geng, Yanquan; Hu, Zhenjiang; Zhao, Xuesen

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a reliable nanolithography technique, namely dynamic plowing lithography (DPL) based on a commercial atomic force microscope (AFM). The poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) solution spinning on a silicon substrate is utilized to be scratched directly with an oscillating tip at its resonance frequency. The films with different thickness are obtained by adjusting the concentration of solution and post baked time. A new silicon tip is employed to conduct DPL on PMMA film surface. The geometry of nano-line structure scratched on the film with high adhesion force is shown with a transition process, including total protuberance, protuberance with groove and groove with pile-up. The scratching direction has less influence on the scratched depth of groove, while the shape of pile-up is varied with directions. The depth of groove on thin films is increasing with the drive amplitude until the value of the depth reaches to the threshold value. Moreover, owing to smaller elastic modulus, the film with relatively large thickness could be modified by the tip more easily using this DPL method. SCANNING 38:612-618, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. BOREAS AFM-12 1-km AVHRR Seasonal Land Cover Classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steyaert, Lou; Hall, Forrest G.; Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Loveland, Thomas R.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-12 team's efforts focused on regional scale Surface Vegetation and Atmosphere (SVAT) modeling to improve parameterization of the heterogeneous BOREAS landscape for use in larger scale Global Circulation Models (GCMs). This regional land cover data set was developed as part of a multitemporal one-kilometer Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) land cover analysis approach that was used as the basis for regional land cover mapping, fire disturbance-regeneration, and multiresolution land cover scaling studies in the boreal forest ecosystem of central Canada. This land cover classification was derived by using regional field observations from ground and low-level aircraft transits to analyze spectral-temporal clusters that were derived from an unsupervised cluster analysis of monthly Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) image composites (April-September 1992). This regional data set was developed for use by BOREAS investigators, especially those involved in simulation modeling, remote sensing algorithm development, and aircraft flux studies. Based on regional field data verification, this multitemporal one-kilometer AVHRR land cover mapping approach was effective in characterizing the biome-level land cover structure, embedded spatially heterogeneous landscape patterns, and other types of key land cover information of interest to BOREAS modelers.The land cover mosaics in this classification include: (1) wet conifer mosaic (low, medium, and high tree stand density), (2) mixed coniferous-deciduous forest (80% coniferous, codominant, and 80% deciduous), (3) recent visible bum, vegetation regeneration, or rock outcrops-bare ground-sparsely vegetated slow regeneration bum (four classes), (4) open water and grassland marshes, and (5) general agricultural land use/ grasslands (three classes). This land cover mapping approach did not detect small subpixel-scale landscape

  13. Mechanical Characterization of Photo-crosslinked, Thermoresponsive Hydrogel Thin Films via AFM Nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Thao; Aidala, Katherine; Hayward, Ryan

    2014-03-01

    Thin hydrogel films with patterned swelling are known to buckle into programmed three-dimensional shapes, offering approaches to fabricate reversibly self-folding micro-devices for actuators and drug delivery devices. To precisely control the shapes adopted, it is important to quantitatively understand the relationship between swelling and mechanical properties. Furthermore, to understand the buckling pathways and the mechanical responses of the swelled materials, it is also important to identify how the gels undergo stress relaxation. However, the low moduli, high water contents, and micrometer-scale thicknesses of these materials have so far made mechanical characterization difficult. In this study, we use an AFM nanoindentation technique to characterize the mechanical properties of photo-crosslinked, thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) hydrogel thin films. Simultaneously, we conduct stress relaxation experiments at microscopic indentation lengths to differentiate between the effects of viscoelastic and poroelastic response mechanisms. This research was funded by the Army Research Office through W911NF-11-1-0080 and the NSF Materials Research Science and Engineering Center at the University of Massachusetts through DMR-0820506.

  14. Insulin directly regulates NPY and AgRP gene expression via the MAPK MEK/ERK signal transduction pathway in mHypoE-46 hypothalamic neurons.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Christopher M; Belsham, Denise D

    2009-08-13

    Insulin plays a key role in the maintenance of nutrient homeostasis through central regulation of neuropeptides. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti-related peptide (AgRP) are vital orexigenic peptides that are regulated by insulin, although the processes utilized are unknown. Using a hypothalamic, clonal cell line, mHypoE-46, which endogenously expresses NPY, AgRP and the insulin receptor, we studied the mechanisms involved in the regulation of the NPY/AgRP neuron by insulin. We determined that insulin has direct actions on the neurons and acts to repress NPY/AgRP gene expression through a MAPK MEK/ERK-dependent pathway. Transient transfection analysis determined that human NPY and AgRP 5' flanking gene regions were not regulated by insulin in the mouse cell line, while sequence comparison analysis indicated only a 50% sequence similarity between human and mouse NPY and AgRP 5' flanking regions. These experiments indicate that insulin acts directly on specific hypothalamic neurons to regulate neuropeptide transcription.

  15. Ultrastructural evidence for a direct excitatory pathway from the nucleus retroambiguus to lateral longissimus and quadratus lumborum motoneurons in the female golden hamster.

    PubMed

    Gerrits, Peter O; Mouton, Leonora J; de Weerd, Henk; Georgiadis, Janniko R; Krukerink, Marco; Holstege, Gert

    2004-12-20

    During mating, the female golden hamster displays a stereotyped specific receptive posture, characterized by lordosis of the back, elevation of the tail, and extension of the legs. Muscles involved in this posture are thought to be iliopsoas, cutaneus trunci, lateral longissimus (LL), and quadratus lumborum (QL). Lesion studies in rats suggest that mating behavior is controlled by the mesencephalic periaqueductal gray (PAG). The PAG does not project directly to the motoneurons innervating the muscles involved in mating, but is thought to make use of the nucleus retroambiguus (NRA) as relay. The NRA is located ventrolaterally in the most caudal medulla, and projects directly to iliopsoas and cutaneus trunci motoneuronal cell groups. The question is whether this is also true for LL and QL muscles. Retrograde HRP tracing experiments revealed that LL and QL motoneurons are located medially in the ventral horn of the T12-L6 and T13-L4 segments, respectively. A subsequent ultrastructural study combined wheatgerm agglutinin-conjugated horseradish peroxidase injections in the NRA with cholera-toxin B-subunit injections in LL and QL muscles. The results revealed monosynaptic contacts between anterogradely labeled NRA-fiber terminals with retrogradely labeled dendrites of both LL and QL motoneurons. Almost all these terminals had asymmetrical synapses and contained spherical vesicles, suggesting an excitatory function of this NRA-motoneuronal pathway. These results correspond with the hypothesis that in hamster the PAG-NRA-motoneuronal projection not only involves motoneurons of iliopsoas and cutaneus trunci but also of LL and QL.

  16. Electronic structure of the surface unoccupied band of Ge(001)-c (4 ×2 ) : Direct imaging of surface electron relaxation pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanasaki, J.; Yamamoto, I.; Azuma, J.; Fukatsu, S.

    2017-09-01

    We have studied the electronic structure of the surface unoccupied band (SUB) of clean Ge(001)-c (4 ×2 ) , with high energy and momentum resolution, by means of time- and angle-resolved two-photon photoelectron spectroscopy. The time evolution of photoelectron intensity images, measured as functions of energy and emission angle after photoexcitation with laser pulses (1.5 eV, 200 fs), provides a momentum space view of the relaxation pathways of surface excited electrons toward the bottom of the SUB. Surface excited electrons relax in several picoseconds along the strongly dispersive directions (Γ ¯J'¯ and Γ ¯J2 '¯ ) and then accumulate near the band bottom. Taking into account the ultrafast change of surface potential, possibly due to the spatial redistribution of nonthermal carriers generated by photoexcitation, an energy width of 0.22 eV was determined as the surface band gap, as well as the surface dispersion properties along three high-symmetry directions.

  17. Nanoscale conformational ordering in polyanilines investigated by SAXS and AFM.

    PubMed

    Leite, Fabio L; Neto, Mario de Oliveira; Paterno, Leonardo G; Ballestero, Michel R M; Polikarpov, Igor; Mascarenhas, Yvonne P; Herrmann, Paulo S P; Mattoso, Luiz H C; Oliveira, Osvaldo N

    2007-12-15

    Understanding the adsorption mechanisms in nanostructured polymer films has become crucial for their use in technological applications, since film properties vary considerably with the experimental conditions utilized for film fabrication. In this paper, we employ small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to investigate solutions of polyanilines and correlate the chain conformations with morphological features of the nanostructured films obtained with atomic force microscopy (AFM). It is shown that aggregates formed already in solution affect the film morphology; in particular, at early stages of adsorption film morphology appears entirely governed by the chain conformation in solution and adsorption of aggregates. We also use SAXS data for modeling poly(o-ethoxyaniline) (POEA) particle shape through an ab initio procedure based on simulated annealing using the dummy atom model (DAM), which is then compared to the morphological features of POEA films fabricated with distinct pHs and doping acids. Interestingly, when the derivative POEA is doped with p-toluene sulfonic acid (TSA), the resulting films exhibit a fibrillar morphology-seen with atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy-that is consistent with the cylindrical shape inferred from the SAXS data. This is in contrast with the globular morphology observed for POEA films doped with other acids.

  18. AFM Investigation of Liquid-Filled Polymer Microcapsules Elasticity.

    PubMed

    Sarrazin, Baptiste; Tsapis, Nicolas; Mousnier, Ludivine; Taulier, Nicolas; Urbach, Wladimir; Guenoun, Patrick

    2016-05-10

    Elasticity of polymer microcapsules (MCs) filled with a liquid fluorinated core is studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Accurately characterized spherical tips are employed to obtain the Young's moduli of MCs having four different shell thicknesses. We show that those moduli are effective ones because the samples are composites. The strong decrease of the effective MC elasticity (from 3.0 to 0.1 GPa) as the shell thickness decreases (from 200 to 10 nm) is analyzed using a novel numerical approach. This model describes the evolution of the elasticity of a coated half-space according to the contact radius, the thickness of the film, and the elastic moduli of bulk materials. This numerical model is consistent with the experimental data and allows simulating the elastic behavior of MCs at high frequencies (5 MHz). While the quasi-static elasticity of the MCs is found to be very dependent on the shell thickness, the high frequency (5 MHz) elastic behavior of the core leads to a stable behavior of the MCs (from 2.5 to 3 GPa according to the shell thickness). Finally, the effect of thermal annealing on the MCs elasticity is investigated. The Young's modulus is found to decrease because of the reduction of the shell thickness due to the loss of the polymer.

  19. AFM imaging of ligand binding to platelet integrin alphaIIbbeta3 receptors reconstituted into planar lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Mohammad A; Agnihotri, Aashiish; Siedlecki, Christopher A

    2005-07-19

    The platelet integrin alphaIIbbeta3 plays a key role in platelet adhesion, activation, and aggregation at the subendothelium and at protein-coated synthetic biomaterials. In this study, interactions between alphaIIbbeta3 and both protein and peptide ligands for the receptor were imaged under physiological conditions by high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM). To directly image the ligand-receptor interactions, alphaIIbbeta3 receptors were reconstituted into a supported lipid bilayer formed on a mica surface in the AFM fluid cell assembly and subsequently activated with Mn2+. Fibrinogen, the natural protein ligand for the integrin, as well as a nanogold-labeled peptide ligand (an RGD-containing heptamer) were infused into the AFM fluid cell, incubated with the reconstituted and activated receptors, and imaged under buffer. Height images illustrating topographical features showed the integrin reconstituted in the bilayer. Fibrinogen molecules binding to the receptors were easily observed in the height images, with fibrinogen showing its characteristic trinodular structure and occasionally bridging integrin receptors. Fibrinogen was observed to bind to integrins at the D-domain consistent with the location of the gamma-chain dodecapeptide, while fibrinogen bridging integrins bound to receptors on opposite sides of the protein consistent with a 2-fold axis of symmetry. Peptide ligands were not visible in height images; however, phase images that map the mechanical properties detected the nanogold labels and demonstrated the presence of peptide ligands bound to the receptors. The results demonstrate the ability of this high-resolution microscopy technique to directly visualize single ligand/receptor interactions in a dynamic and physiologically relevant environment, and establish a framework for future fundamental studies of single protein/receptor interactions during normal pathological processes as well as biomaterial surface-induced thrombosis.

  20. Communication between thiamin cofactors in the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E1 component active centers: evidence for a "direct pathway" between the 4'-aminopyrimidine N1' atoms.

    PubMed

    Nemeria, Natalia S; Arjunan, Palaniappa; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Mossad, Madouna; Tittmann, Kai; Furey, William; Jordan, Frank

    2010-04-09

    Kinetic, spectroscopic, and structural analysis tested the hypothesis that a chain of residues connecting the 4'-aminopyrimidine N1' atoms of thiamin diphosphates (ThDPs) in the two active centers of the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E1 component provides a signal transduction pathway. Substitution of the three acidic residues (Glu(571), Glu(235), and Glu(237)) and Arg(606) resulted in impaired binding of the second ThDP, once the first active center was filled, suggesting a pathway for communication between the two ThDPs. 1) Steady-state kinetic and fluorescence quenching studies revealed that upon E571A, E235A, E237A, and R606A substitutions, ThDP binding in the second active center was affected. 2) Analysis of the kinetics of thiazolium C2 hydrogen/deuterium exchange of enzyme-bound ThDP suggests half-of-the-sites reactivity for the E1 component, with fast (activated site) and slow exchanging sites (dormant site). The E235A and E571A variants gave no evidence for the slow exchanging site, indicating that only one of two active sites is filled with ThDP. 3) Titration of the E235A and E237A variants with methyl acetylphosphonate monitored by circular dichroism suggested that only half of the active sites were filled with a covalent predecarboxylation intermediate analog. 4) Crystal structures of E235A and E571A in complex with ThDP revealed the structural basis for the spectroscopic and kinetic observations and showed that either substitution affects cofactor binding, despite the fact that Glu(235) makes no direct contact with the cofactor. The role of the conserved Glu(571) residue in both catalysis and cofactor orientation is revealed by the combined results for the first time.

  1. New insights into morphology of high performance BHJ photovoltaics revealed by high resolution AFM.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Liu, Feng; Yagihashi, Noritoshi; Nakaya, Masafumi; Ferdous, Sunzida; Liang, Xiaobin; Muramatsu, Atsushi; Nakajima, Ken; Russell, Thomas P

    2014-10-08

    Direct imaging of the bulk heterojunction (BHJ) thin film morphology in polymer-based solar cells is essential to understand device function and optimize efficiency. The morphology of the BHJ active layer consists of bicontinuous domains of the donor and acceptor materials, having characteristic length scales of several tens of nanometers, that reduces charge recombination, enhances charge separation, and enables electron and hole transport to their respective electrodes. Direct imaging of the morphology from the molecular to macroscopic level, though, is lacking. Though transmission electron tomography provides a 3D, real-space image of the morphology, quantifying the structure is not possible. Here we used high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) in the tapping and nanomechanical modes to investigate the BHJ active layer morphology that, when combined with Ar(+) etching, provided unique insights with unparalleled spatial resolution. PCBM was seen to form a network that interpenetrated into the fibrillar network of the hole-conducting polymer, both being imbedded in a mixture of the two components. The free surface was found to be enriched with polymer crystals having a "face-on" orientation and the morphology at the anode interface was markedly different.

  2. Atomic interactions between metallic tips and surfaces in NC-AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejat Pishkenari, Hossein

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, the atomic-scale interactions between metallic tips and samples in noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) are studied using molecular dynamics simulations. The effects of the tip and sample materials, the surface plane direction and the lateral position of the tip with respect to the sample, on the interaction force and the dissipated energy, are investigated. The simulations conducted demonstrate that, generally, we can classify the possible outcomes for the dynamics due to the tip-surface interactions into four major categories. The first category includes all cases in which there are no considerable instabilities in tip-surface interactions, leading to negligible energy loss (dissipated energy < 3 meV/cycle), while the other three categories consist of cases with reversible or irreversible reconstruction of the tip and the surface. For the second category, there is a hysteresis loop in the interaction force and in the displacement of the system atoms depending significantly on the surface plane direction, the surface density, the cohesive energy of the tip and the surface, the adhesive energy between tip apex atom and the surface, and the adhesive energy between a surface atom and the tip. The third and fourth categories include cases with irreversible changes in the tip or the surface. Based on the adhesive and cohesive energies of the tip and the surface, we have proposed a simple and rapid criterion capable of predicting the category to which each setup belongs.

  3. AFM nanoscale indentation in air of polymeric and hybrid materials with highly different stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suriano, Raffaella; Credi, Caterina; Levi, Marinella; Turri, Stefano

    2014-08-01

    In this study, nanomechanical properties of a variety of polymeric materials was investigated by means of AFM. In particular, selecting different AFM probes, poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) bulk samples, sol-gel hybrid thin films and hydrated hyaluronic acid hydrogels were indented in air to determine the elastic modulus. The force-distance curves and the indentation data were found to be greatly affected by the cantilever stiffness and by tip geometry. AFM indentation tests show that the choice of the cantilever spring constant and of tip shape is crucially influenced by elastic properties of samples. When adhesion-dominated interactions occur between the tip and the surface of samples, force-displacement curves reveal that a suitable functionalization of AFM probes allows the control of such interactions and the extraction of Young' modulus from AFM curves that would be otherwise unfeasible. By applying different mathematical models depending on AFM probes and materials under investigation, the values of Young's modulus were obtained and compared to those measured by rheological and dynamic mechanical analysis or to literature data. Our results show that a wide range of elastic moduli (10 kPa-10 GPa) can be determined by AFM in good agreement with those measured by conventional macroscopic measurements.

  4. Tip Characterization Method using Multi-feature Characterizer for CD-AFM

    PubMed Central

    Orji, Ndubuisi G.; Itoh, Hiroshi; Wang, Chumei; Dixson, Ronald G.; Walecki, Peter S.; Schmidt, Sebastian W.; Irmer, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    In atomic force microscopy (AFM) metrology, the tip is a key source of uncertainty. Images taken with an AFM show a change in feature width and shape that depends on tip geometry. This geometric dilation is more pronounced when measuring features with high aspect ratios, and makes it difficult to obtain absolute dimensions. In order to accurately measure nanoscale features using an AFM, the tip dimensions should be known with a high degree of precision. We evaluate a new AFM tip characterizer, and apply it to critical dimension AFM (CD-AFM) tips used for high aspect ratio features. The characterizer is made up of comb-shaped lines and spaces, and includes a series of gratings that could be used as an integrated nanoscale length reference. We also demonstrate a simulation method that could be used to specify what range of tip sizes and shapes the characterizer can measure. Our experiments show that for non re-entrant features, the results obtained with this characterizer are consistent to 1 nm with the results obtained by using widely accepted but slower methods that are common practice in CD-AFM metrology. A validation of the integrated length standard using displacement interferometry indicates a uniformity of better than 0.75%, suggesting that the sample could be used as highly accurate and SI traceable lateral scale for the whole evaluation process. PMID:26720439

  5. AF-M315E Propulsion System Advances and Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masse, Robert K.; Allen, May; Driscoll, Elizabeth; Spores, Ronald A.; Arrington, Lynn A.; Schneider, Steven J.; Vasek, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Even as for the GR-1 awaits its first on-orbit demonstration on the planned 2017 launch of NASA's Green Propulsion Infusion Mission (GPIM) program, ongoing efforts continue to advance the technical state-of-the-art through improvements in the performance, life capability, and affordability of both Aerojet Rocketdyne's 1-N-class GR-1 and 20-N-class GR-22 green monopropellant thrusters. Hot-fire testing of a design upgrade of the GR-22 thruster successfully demonstrated resolution of a life-limiting thermo-structural issue encountered during prototype testing on the GPIM program, yielding both an approximately 2x increase in demonstrating life capability, as well as fundamental insights relating to how ionic liquid thrusters operate, thruster scaling, and operational factors affecting catalyst bed life. Further, a number of producibility improvements, related to both materials and processes and promising up to 50% unit cost reduction, have been identified through a comprehensive Design for Manufacturing and Assembly (DFMA) assessment activity recently completed at Aerojet Rocketdyne. Focused specifically on the GR-1 but applicable to the common-core architecture of both thrusters, ongoing laboratory (heavyweight) thruster testing being conducted under a Space Act Agreement at NASA Glenn Research Center has already validated a number of these proposed manufacturability upgrades, additionally achieving a greater than 40% increase in thruster life. In parallel with technical advancements relevant to conventional large spacecraft, a joint effort between NASA and Aerojet Rocketdyne is underway to prepare 1-U CubeSat AF-M315E propulsion module for first flight demonstration in 2018.

  6. XPS and AFM Study of GaAs Surface Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Contreras-Guerrero, R.; Wallace, R. M.; Aguirre-Francisco, S.; Herrera-Gomez, A.; Lopez-Lopez, M.

    2008-11-13

    Obtaining smooth and atomically clean surfaces is an important step in the preparation of a surface for device manufacturing. In this work different processes are evaluated for cleaning a GaAs surface. A good surface cleaning treatment is that which provides a high level of uniformity and controllability of the surface. Different techniques are useful as cleaning treatments depending on the growth process to be used. The goal is to remove the oxygen and carbon contaminants and then form a thin oxide film to protect the surface, which is easy to remove later with thermal desorption mechanism like molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) with minimal impact to the surface. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) were used to characterize the structure of the surface, the composition, as well as detect oxygen and carbon contaminant on the GaAs surface. This study consists in two parts. The first part the surface was subjected to different chemical treatments. The chemical solutions were: (a)H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}:H{sub 2}O{sub 2}:H{sub 2}O(4:1:100), (b) HCl: H{sub 2}O(1:3), (c)NH{sub 4}OH 29%. The treatments (a) and (b) reduced the oxygen on the surface. Treatment (c) reduces carbon contamination. In the second part we made MOS devices on the surfaces treated. They were characterized by CV and IV electrical measurements. They show frequency dispersion.

  7. [Irreversible chemical AFM-fishing for the detection of low-copied proteins].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Iu D; Danichev, V V; Pleshakova, T O; Shumov, I D; Ziborov, V S; Krokhin, N V; Zagumennyĭ, M N; Ustinov, V S; Smirnov, L P; Shironin, A V; Archakov, A I

    2014-01-01

    The atomic-force microscopy-based method of irreversible chemical AFM-fishing (AFM-IF(Ch)) has been developed for the detection of proteins at ultra-low concentrations in solution. Using this method, a very low concentration of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) protein (10(-17) M) was detected in solution. A theoretical model that allows the description of obtained experimental data, is proposed. This model takes into consideration both the transport of the protein from the bulk solution onto the AFM-chip surface and its irreversible binding to the activated area.

  8. Novel Method of Measuring Cantilever Deflection during an AFM Force Measurement