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Sample records for pathway requires clathrin-mediated

  1. Ebola Virus Uses Clathrin Mediated Endocytosis as an Entry Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Suchita; Warfield, Kelly L.; Ruthel, Gordon; Bavari, Sina; Aman, M. Javad; Hope, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) infects several cell types and while viral entry is known to be pH dependent; the exact entry pathway(s) remains unknown. To gain insights into EBOV entry, the role of several inhibitors of clathrin-mediated endocytosis in blocking infection mediated by HIV pseudotyped with the EBOV envelope glycoprotein (EbGP) was examined. Wild type HIV and envelope-minus HIV pseudotyped with Vesicular Stomatitis Virus glycoprotein (VSVg) were used as controls to assess cell viability after inhibiting clathrin pathway. Inhibition of clathrin pathway using dominant-negative Eps15; siRNA-mediated knockdown of clathrin heavy chain; chlorpromazine and sucrose blocked EbGP pseudotyped HIV infection. Also, both chlorpromazine and Bafilomycin A1 inhibited entry of infectious EBOV. Sensitivity of EbGP pseudotyped HIV as well as infectious EBOV to inhibitors of clathrin suggests that EBOV uses clathrin-mediated endocytosis as an entry pathway. Furthermore, since chlorpromazine inhibits EBOV infection, novel therapeutic modalities could be designed based on this lead compound. PMID:20202662

  2. USP17 is required for clathrin mediated endocytosis of epidermal growth factor receptor

    PubMed Central

    Jaworski, Jakub; de la Vega, Michelle; Fletcher, Sarah J.; McFarlane, Cheryl; Greene, Michelle K.; Smyth, Andrew W.; Van Schaeybroeck, Sandra; Johnston, James A.; Scott, Christopher J.; Rappoport, Joshua Z.; Burrows, James F.

    2014-01-01

    Previously we have shown that expression of the deubiquitinating enzyme USP17 is required for cell proliferation and motility. More recently we reported that USP17 deubiquitinates RCE1 isoform 2 and thus regulates the processing of ‘CaaX’ motif proteins. Here we now show that USP17 expression is induced by epidermal growth factor and that USP17 expression is required for clathrin mediated endocytosis of epidermal growth factor receptor. In addition, we show that USP17 is required for the endocytosis of transferrin, an archetypal substrate for clathrin mediated endocytosis, and that USP17 depletion impedes plasma membrane recruitment of the machinery required for clathrin mediated endocytosis. Thus, our data reveal that USP17 is necessary for epidermal growth factor receptor and transferrin endocytosis via clathrin coated pits, indicate this is mediated via the regulation of the recruitment of the components of the endocytosis machinery and suggest USP17 may play a general role in receptor endocytosis. PMID:25026282

  3. Dynamics of clathrin-mediated endocytosis and its requirement for organelle biogenesis in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Macro, Laura; Jaiswal, Jyoti K; Simon, Sanford M

    2012-12-01

    The protein clathrin mediates one of the major pathways of endocytosis from the extracellular milieu and plasma membrane. In single-cell eukaryotes, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the gene encoding clathrin is not an essential gene, raising the question of whether clathrin conveys specific advantages for multicellularity. Furthermore, in contrast to mammalian cells, endocytosis in S. cerevisiae is not dependent on either clathrin or adaptor protein 2 (AP2), an endocytic adaptor molecule. In this study, we investigated the requirement for components of clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) in another unicellular organism, the amoeba Dictyostelium. We identified a heterotetrameric AP2 complex in Dictyostelium that is similar to that which is found in higher eukaryotes. By simultaneously imaging fluorescently tagged clathrin and AP2, we found that, similar to higher eukaryotes, these proteins colocalized to membrane puncta that move into the cell together. In addition, the contractile vacuole marker protein, dajumin-green fluorescent protein (GFP), is trafficked via the cell membrane and internalized by CME in a clathrin-dependent, AP2-independent mechanism. This pathway is distinct from other endocytic mechanisms in Dictyostelium. Our finding that CME is required for the internalization of contractile vacuole proteins from the cell membrane explains the contractile vacuole biogenesis defect in Dictyostelium cells lacking clathrin. Our results also suggest that the machinery for CME and its role in organelle maintenance appeared early during eukaryotic evolution. We hypothesize that dependence of endocytosis on specific components of the CME pathway evolved later, as demonstrated by internalization independent of AP2 function.

  4. Dynamics of clathrin-mediated endocytosis and its requirement for organelle biogenesis in Dictyostelium

    PubMed Central

    Macro, Laura; Jaiswal, Jyoti K.; Simon, Sanford M.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The protein clathrin mediates one of the major pathways of endocytosis from the extracellular milieu and plasma membrane. In single-cell eukaryotes, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the gene encoding clathrin is not an essential gene, raising the question of whether clathrin conveys specific advantages for multicellularity. Furthermore, in contrast to mammalian cells, endocytosis in S. cerevisiae is not dependent on either clathrin or adaptor protein 2 (AP2), an endocytic adaptor molecule. In this study, we investigated the requirement for components of clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) in another unicellular organism, the amoeba Dictyostelium. We identified a heterotetrameric AP2 complex in Dictyostelium that is similar to that which is found in higher eukaryotes. By simultaneously imaging fluorescently tagged clathrin and AP2, we found that, similar to higher eukaryotes, these proteins colocalized to membrane puncta that move into the cell together. In addition, the contractile vacuole marker protein, dajumin-green fluorescent protein (GFP), is trafficked via the cell membrane and internalized by CME in a clathrin-dependent, AP2-independent mechanism. This pathway is distinct from other endocytic mechanisms in Dictyostelium. Our finding that CME is required for the internalization of contractile vacuole proteins from the cell membrane explains the contractile vacuole biogenesis defect in Dictyostelium cells lacking clathrin. Our results also suggest that the machinery for CME and its role in organelle maintenance appeared early during eukaryotic evolution. We hypothesize that dependence of endocytosis on specific components of the CME pathway evolved later, as demonstrated by internalization independent of AP2 function. PMID:22992464

  5. Entry of Classical Swine Fever Virus into PK-15 Cells via a pH-, Dynamin-, and Cholesterol-Dependent, Clathrin-Mediated Endocytic Pathway That Requires Rab5 and Rab7

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Bao-Jun; Liu, Chun-Chun; Zhou, Jing; Wang, Shi-Qi; Gao, Zhi-Can; Zhang, Xiao-Min; Chen, Pu-Yan

    2016-01-01

    cells through the endocytic pathway, providing new insights into the life cycle of pestiviruses. IMPORTANCE Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), a single-stranded, positive-sense pestivirus within the family Flaviviridae, is internalized by clathrin-dependent receptor-mediated endocytosis. However, the detailed mechanism of cell entry is unknown for other pestiviruses, such as classical swine fever (CSF) virus (CSFV). CSFV is the etiological agent of CSF, a highly contagious disease of swine that causes numerous deaths in pigs and enormous economic losses in China. Understanding the entry pathway of CSFV will not only advance our knowledge of CSFV infection and pathogenesis but also provide novel drug targets for antiviral intervention. Based on this objective, we used systematic approaches to dissect the pathway of entry of CSFV into PK-15 cells. This is the first report to show that the entry of CSFV into PK-15 cells requires a low-pH environment and involves dynamin- and cholesterol-dependent, clathrin-mediated endocytosis that requires Rab5 and Rab7. PMID:27489278

  6. An unmet actin requirement explains the mitotic inhibition of clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Satdip; Fielding, Andrew B; Gassner, Gisela; Carter, Nicholas J; Royle, Stephen J

    2014-02-18

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) is the major internalisation route for many different receptor types in mammalian cells. CME is shut down during early mitosis, but the mechanism of this inhibition is unclear. In this study, we show that the mitotic shutdown is due to an unmet requirement for actin in CME. In mitotic cells, membrane tension is increased and this invokes a requirement for the actin cytoskeleton to assist the CME machinery to overcome the increased load. However, the actin cytoskeleton is engaged in the formation of a rigid cortex in mitotic cells and is therefore unavailable for deployment. We demonstrate that CME can be 'restarted' in mitotic cells despite high membrane tension, by allowing actin to engage in endocytosis. Mitotic phosphorylation of endocytic proteins is maintained in mitotic cells with restored CME, indicating that direct phosphorylation of the CME machinery does not account for shutdown. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00829.001.

  7. Ebola Virus Uses Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis as an Entry Pathway

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    clathrin-mediated endocytosis is not restricted to small spherical coated pits. Listeria has been shown to utilize clathrin- mediated endocytosis to...enter cells (Veiga and Cossart, 2005). The large size of the Listeria , which extends to 2 μm (Giardini and Theriot, 2001), suggests that clathrin coated... Listeria monocytogenes. Biophys. J. 81 (6), 3193–3203. Hanover, J.A., Willingham, M.C., Pastan, I., 1984. Kinetics of transit of transferrin and epidermal

  8. Endocytosis of Epithelial Apical Junctional Proteins by a Clathrin-mediated Pathway into a Unique Storage Compartment

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Andrei I.; Nusrat, Asma; Parkos, Charles A.

    2004-01-01

    The adherens junction (AJ) and tight junction (TJ) are key regulators of epithelial polarity and barrier function. Loss of epithelial phenotype is accompanied by endocytosis of AJs and TJs via unknown mechanisms. Using a model of calcium depletion, we defined the pathway of internalization of AJ and TJ proteins (E-cadherin, p120 and β-catenins, occludin, JAM-1, claudins 1 and 4, and ZO-1) in T84 epithelial cells. Proteinase protection assay and immunocytochemistry revealed orchestrated internalization of AJs and TJs into a subapical cytoplasmic compartment. Disruption of caveolae/lipid rafts did not prevent endocytosis, nor did caveolin-1 colocalize with internalized junctional proteins. Furthermore, AJ and TJ proteins did not colocalize with the macropinocytosis marker dextran. Inhibitors of clathrin-mediated endocytosis blocked internalization of AJs and TJs, and junctional proteins colocalized with clathrin and α-adaptin. AJ and TJ proteins were observed to enter early endosomes followed by movement to organelles that stained with syntaxin-4 but not with markers of late and recycling endosomes, lysosomes, or Golgi. These results indicate that endocytosis of junctional proteins is a clathrin-mediated process leading into a unique storage compartment. Such mechanisms may mediate the disruption of intercellular contacts during normal tissue remodeling and in pathology. PMID:14528017

  9. Orthobunyavirus Entry into Neurons and Other Mammalian Cells Occurs via Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis and Requires Trafficking into Early Endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Hollidge, Bradley S.; Nedelsky, Natalia B.; Salzano, Mary-Virginia; Fraser, Jonathan W.; González-Scarano, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    La Crosse virus (LACV) is a leading cause of pediatric encephalitis and aseptic meningitis in the midwestern and southern United States, where it is considered an emerging human pathogen. No specific therapies or vaccines are available for LACV or any other orthobunyaviruses. Inhibition of LACV entry into cells is a potential target for therapeutic intervention, but this approach is limited by our current knowledge of the entry process. Here, we determined that clathrin-mediated endocytosis is the primary mechanism of orthobunyavirus entry and identified key cellular factors in this process. First, we demonstrated that LACV colocalized with clathrin shortly after infection in HeLa cells; we then confirmed the functional requirement of dynamin- and clathrin-mediated endocytosis for orthobunyavirus entry using several independent assays and, importantly, extended these findings to primary neuronal cultures. We also determined that macropinocytosis and caveolar endocytosis, both established routes of virus entry, are not critical for cellular entry of LACV. Moreover, we demonstrated that LACV infection is dependent on Rab5, which plays an important regulatory role in early endosomes, but not on Rab7, which is associated with late endosomes. These findings provide the first description of bunyavirus entry into cells of the central nervous system, where infection can cause severe neurological disease, and will aid in the design and development of antivirals and therapeutics that may be useful in the treatment of LACV and, more broadly, arboviral infections of the central nervous system. PMID:22623766

  10. Polarised clathrin-mediated endocytosis of EGFR during chemotactic invasion.

    PubMed

    Mutch, Laura Jane; Howden, Jake Davey; Jenner, Emma Poppy Louise; Poulter, Natalie Sarah; Rappoport, Joshua Zachary

    2014-06-01

    Directed cell migration is critical for numerous physiological processes including development and wound healing. However chemotaxis is also exploited during cancer progression. Recent reports have suggested links between vesicle trafficking pathways and directed cell migration. Very little is known about the potential roles of endocytosis pathways during metastasis. Therefore we performed a series of studies employing a previously characterised model for chemotactic invasion of cancer cells to assess specific hypotheses potentially linking endocytosis to directed cell migration. Our results demonstrate that clathrin-mediated endocytosis is indispensable for epidermal growth factor (EGF) directed chemotactic invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells. Conversely, caveolar endocytosis is not required in this mode of migration. We further found that chemoattractant receptor (EGFR) trafficking occurs by clathrin-mediated endocytosis and is polarised towards the front of migrating cells. However, we found no role for clathrin-mediated endocytosis in focal adhesion disassembly in this migration model. Thus, this study has characterised the role of endocytosis during chemotactic invasion and has identified functions mechanistically linking clathrin-mediated endocytosis to directed cell motility.

  11. Polarised Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis of EGFR During Chemotactic Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Mutch, Laura Jane; Howden, Jake Davey; Jenner, Emma Poppy Louise; Poulter, Natalie Sarah; Rappoport, Joshua Zachary

    2014-01-01

    Directed cell migration is critical for numerous physiological processes including development and wound healing. However chemotaxis is also exploited during cancer progression. Recent reports have suggested links between vesicle trafficking pathways and directed cell migration. Very little is known about the potential roles of endocytosis pathways during metastasis. Therefore we performed a series of studies employing a previously characterised model for chemotactic invasion of cancer cells to assess specific hypotheses potentially linking endocytosis to directed cell migration. Our results demonstrate that clathrin-mediated endocytosis is indispensable for epidermal growth factor (EGF) directed chemotactic invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells. Conversely, caveolar endocytosis is not required in this mode of migration. We further found that chemoattractant receptor (EGFR) trafficking occurs by clathrin-mediated endocytosis and is polarised towards the front of migrating cells. However, we found no role for clathrin-mediated endocytosis in focal adhesion disassembly in this migration model. Thus, this study has characterised the role of endocytosis during chemotactic invasion and has identified functions mechanistically linking clathrin-mediated endocytosis to directed cell motility. PMID:24921075

  12. Srv2/CAP is required for polarized actin cable assembly and patch internalization during clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Toshima, Junko Y; Horikomi, Chika; Okada, Asuka; Hatori, Makiko N; Nagano, Makoto; Masuda, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Wataru; Siekhaus, Daria Elisabeth; Toshima, Jiro

    2016-01-15

    The dynamic assembly and disassembly of actin filaments is essential for the formation and transport of vesicles during endocytosis. In yeast, two types of actin structures, namely cortical patches and cytoplasmic cables, play a direct role in endocytosis, but how their interaction is regulated remains unclear. Here, we show that Srv2/CAP, an evolutionarily conserved actin regulator, is required for efficient endocytosis owing to its role in the formation of the actin patches that aid initial vesicle invagination and of the actin cables that these move along. Deletion of the SRV2 gene resulted in the appearance of aberrant fragmented actin cables that frequently moved past actin patches, the sites of endocytosis. We find that the C-terminal CARP domain of Srv2p is vitally important for the proper assembly of actin patches and cables; we also demonstrate that the N-terminal helical folded domain of Srv2 is required for its localization to actin patches, specifically to the ADP-actin rich region through an interaction with cofilin. These results demonstrate the in vivo roles of Srv2p in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton during clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

  13. Cell entry of bovine ephemeral fever virus requires activation of Src-JNK-AP1 and PI3K-Akt-NF-κB pathways as well as Cox-2-mediated PGE2 /EP receptor signalling to enhance clathrin-mediated virus endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ching-Yuan; Huang, Wei-Ru; Chi, Pei-I; Chiu, Hung-Chuan; Liu, Hung-Jen

    2015-07-01

    Although we have previously demonstrated that cell entry of bovine ephemeral fever virus (BEFV) follows a clathrin-mediated and dynamin 2-dependent endocytosis pathway, the cellular mechanism mediating virus entry remains unknown. Here, we report that BEFV triggers simultaneously Src-JNK-AP1 and PI3K-Akt-NF-κB signalling pathways in the stage of virus binding to induce clathrin and dynamin 2 expressions, while vesicular stomatitis virus only activates Src-JNK signalling to enhance its entry. Activation of these pathways by ultraviolet-inactivated BEFV suggests a role for virus binding but not viral internalization and gene expression. By blocking these signalling pathways with specific inhibitors, BEFV-induced expressions of clathrin and dynamin 2 were significantly diminished. By labelling BEFV with 3,3'-dilinoleyloxacarbocyanine perchlorate to track viral entry, we found that virus entry was hindered by both Src and Akt inhibitors, suggesting that these signalling pathways are crucial for efficient virus entry. In addition, BEFV also triggers Cox-2-catalysed prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis and induces expressions of G-protein-coupled E-prostanoid (EP) receptors 2 and 4, leading to amplify signal cascades of Src-JNK-AP1 and PI3K-Akt-NF-κB, which elevates both clathrin and dynamin 2 expressions. Furthermore, pretreatment of cells with adenylate cyclase (cAMP) inhibitor SQ22536 reduced BEFV-induced Src phosphorylation as well as clathrin and dynamin 2 expressions. Our findings reveal for the first time that BEFV activates the Cox-2-mediated PGE2/EP receptor signalling pathways, further enhancing Src-JNK-AP1 in a cAMP-dependent manner and PI3K-Akt-NF-κB in a cAMP-independent manner. Accordingly, BEFV stimulates PGE2/EP receptor signalling amplifying Src-JNK-AP1 and PI3K-Akt-NF-κB pathways in an autocrine or paracrine fashion to enhance virus entry. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Simian Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Cell Entry Is Dependent on CD163 and Uses a Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis-Like Pathway

    PubMed Central

    McCluskey, Adam; Robinson, Phillip J.; Haucke, Volker; Wahl-Jensen, Victoria; Bailey, Adam L.; Lauck, Michael; Friedrich, Thomas C.; Goldberg, Tony L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV) causes a severe and almost uniformly fatal viral hemorrhagic fever in Asian macaques but is thought to be nonpathogenic for humans. To date, the SHFV life cycle is almost completely uncharacterized on the molecular level. Here, we describe the first steps of the SHFV life cycle. Our experiments indicate that SHFV enters target cells by low-pH-dependent endocytosis. Dynamin inhibitors, chlorpromazine, methyl-β-cyclodextrin, chloroquine, and concanamycin A dramatically reduced SHFV entry efficiency, whereas the macropinocytosis inhibitors EIPA, blebbistatin, and wortmannin and the caveolin-mediated endocytosis inhibitors nystatin and filipin III had no effect. Furthermore, overexpression and knockout study and electron microscopy results indicate that SHFV entry occurs by a dynamin-dependent clathrin-mediated endocytosis-like pathway. Experiments utilizing latrunculin B, cytochalasin B, and cytochalasin D indicate that SHFV does not hijack the actin polymerization pathway. Treatment of target cells with proteases (proteinase K, papain, α-chymotrypsin, and trypsin) abrogated entry, indicating that the SHFV cell surface receptor is a protein. Phospholipases A2 and D had no effect on SHFV entry. Finally, treatment of cells with antibodies targeting CD163, a cell surface molecule identified as an entry factor for the SHFV-related porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, diminished SHFV replication, identifying CD163 as an important SHFV entry component. IMPORTANCE Simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV) causes highly lethal disease in Asian macaques resembling human illness caused by Ebola or Lassa virus. However, little is known about SHFV's ecology and molecular biology and the mechanism by which it causes disease. The results of this study shed light on how SHFV enters its target cells. Using electron microscopy and inhibitors for various cellular pathways, we demonstrate that SHFV invades cells by low

  15. Tannerella forsythia invasion in oral epithelial cells requires phosphoinositide 3-kinase activation and clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Mishima, Elina; Sharma, Ashu

    2011-08-01

    Tannerella forsythia, a Gram-negative anaerobe implicated in periodontitis, has been detected within human buccal epithelial cells and shown to invade oral epithelial cells in vitro. We have previously shown that this bacterium triggers host tyrosine kinase-dependent phosphorylation and actin-dependent cytoskeleton reorganization for invasion. On the bacterial side, the leucine-rich repeat cell-surface BspA protein is important for entry. The present study was undertaken to identify host signalling molecules during T. forsythia entry into human oral and cervical epithelial cells. Specifically, the roles of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), Rho-family GTPases, cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains and the endocytic protein clathrin were investigated. For this purpose, cell lines were pretreated with chemical inhibitors or small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that target PI3Ks, Rho GTPases, clathrin and cholesterol (a critical component of 'lipid rafts'), and the resulting effects on T. forsythia uptake were determined. Our studies revealed that T. forsythia entry is dependent on host PI3K signalling, and that purified BspA protein causes activation of this lipid kinase. Bacterial entry also requires the cooperation of host Rac1 GTPase. Finally, our findings indicate an important role for clathrin and cholesterol-rich lipid microdomains in the internalization process.

  16. Ikarugamycin: A Natural Product Inhibitor of Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Elkin, Sarah R.; Oswald, Nathaniel W.; Reed, Dana K.; Mettlen, Marcel; MacMillan, John B.; Schmid, Sandra L.

    2017-01-01

    Ikarugamycin (IKA) is a previously discovered antibiotic, which has been shown to inhibit the uptake of oxidized low-density lipoproteins in macrophages. Furthermore, several groups have previously used IKA to inhibit clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) in plant cell lines. However, detailed characterization of IKA has yet to be performed. Consequently, we performed biochemistry and microscopy experiments to further characterize the effects of IKA on CME. We show that IKA has an IC50 of 2.7 µm in H1299 cells and acutely inhibits CME, but not other endocytic pathways, in a panel of cell lines. Although long-term incubation with IKA has cytotoxic effects, the short-term inhibitory effects on CME are reversible. Thus, IKA can be a useful tool for probing routes of endocytic trafficking. PMID:27392092

  17. Mitotic inhibition of clathrin-mediated endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Fielding, Andrew B.; Royle, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Endocytosis and mitosis are fundamental processes in a cell’s life. Nearly fifty years of research suggest that these processes are linked and that endocytosis is shut down as cells undergo the early stages of mitosis. Precisely how this occurs at a molecular level is an open question. In this review, we summarize the early work characterizing the inhibition of clathrin-mediated endocytosis and discuss recent challenges to this established concept. We also set out four proposed mechanisms for the inhibition: mitotic phosphorylation of endocytic proteins, altered membrane tension, moonlighting of endocytic proteins and a mitotic spindle-dependent mechanism. Finally, we speculate the functional consequences of endocytic shutdown during mitosis and where an understanding of the mechanism of inhibition will lead us in the future. PMID:23307073

  18. Initiation of clathrin-mediated endocytosis: all you need is two?

    PubMed

    Swan, Laura E

    2013-05-01

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis is a major route for the retrieval of plasma-membrane cargoes, and defects of this process can cause catastrophic human dysfunctions. However, the processes governing how a clathrin-coated profile (ccp) is initiated are still murky. Despite an ever-growing cast of molecules proposed as triggers of ccp nucleation and increasingly sophisticated bioimaging techniques examining clathrin-mediated endocytosis, it is yet unknown if ccp formation is governed by a universal mechanism. A recent paper by Cocucci et al. has tracked single-molecule events to identify that stable accumulation of ccps requires the near-simultaneous arrival of two AP2 adaptors bridged by one clathrin triskelion. This commentary examines the role of AP2 in cargo-mediated endocytosis in the light of recent advances in biophotonics, chemical inhibitors and genetics, examines the claims of other molecules to be the initiators of ccp formation and proposes future directions in research into this topic. Editor's suggested further reading in BioEssays: The evolution of dynamin to regulate clathrin-mediated endocytosis Abstract Clathrin-mediated endocytosis: What works for small, also works for big Abstract.

  19. Otoferlin couples to clathrin-mediated endocytosis in mature cochlear inner hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Duncker, Susanne V.; Franz, Christoph; Kuhn, Stephanie; Schulte, Uwe; Campanelli, Dario; Brandt, Niels; Hirt, Bernhard; Fakler, Bernd; Blin, Nikolaus; Ruth, Peter; Engel, Jutta; Marcotti, Walter; Zimmermann, Ulrike; Knipper, Marlies

    2013-01-01

    The encoding of auditory information with indefatigable precision requires efficient re-supply of vesicles at inner hair cell (IHC) ribbon synapses. Otoferlin, a transmembrane protein responsible for deafness in DFNB9 families, has been postulated to act as a calcium sensor for exocytosis as well as to be involved in rapid vesicle replenishment of IHCs. However, the molecular basis of vesicle recycling in IHCs is largely unknown. In the present study, we used high-resolution liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry to co-purify otoferlin interaction partners in the mammalian cochlea. We identified multiple subunits of the adaptor protein complex AP-2 (CLAP), an essential component of clathrin-mediated endocytosis, as binding partners of otoferlin in rats and mice. The interaction between otoferlin and AP-2 was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. We also found that AP-2 interacts with myosin VI, another otoferlin binding partner important for clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The expression of AP-2 in IHCs was verified by RT-PCR. Confocal microscopy experiments revealed that the expression of AP-2 and its co-localization with otoferlin is confined to mature IHCs. When clathrin-mediated endocytosis was inhibited by blocking dynamin action, real-time changes in membrane capacitance showed impaired synaptic vesicle replenishment in mature but not immature IHCs. We suggest that an otoferlin–AP-2 interaction drives Ca2+- and stimulus-dependent compensating clathrin-mediated endocytosis in mature IHCs. PMID:23719817

  20. Imaging and Modeling the Dynamics of Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Mettlen, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) plays a central role in cellular homeostasis and is mediated by clathrin-coated pits (CCPs). Live-cell imaging has revealed a remarkable heterogeneity in CCP assembly kinetics, which can be used as an intrinsic source of mechanistic information on CCP regulation but also poses several major problems for unbiased analysis of CME dynamics. The backbone of unveiling the molecular control of CME is an imaging-based inventory of the full diversity of individual CCP behaviors, which requires detection and tracking of structural fiduciaries and regulatory proteins with an accuracy of >99.9%, despite very low signals. This level of confidence can only be achieved by combining appropriate imaging modalities with self-diagnostic computational algorithms for image analysis and data mining. PMID:25167858

  1. Internalization of the opioid growth factor, [Met5]-enkephalin, is dependent on clathrin-mediated endocytosis for downregulation of cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Fan; McLaughlin, Patricia J; Banks, William A; Zagon, Ian S

    2010-09-01

    The opioid growth factor (OGF; [Met(5)]-enkephalin), a constitutively expressed and tonically active inhibitory peptide, interacts with the OGF receptor (OGFr) to form an endogenous growth-regulating pathway in homeostasis. Amplification of OGF-OGFr interfacing in animal and clinical studies depresses development, neoplasia, angiogenesis, and immunity. Disruption of the OGF-OGFr axis accelerates cell proliferation and has been particularly important in wound repair. To investigate how OGF enters cells, OGF was labeled with 5,6-tetramethylrhodamine OGF (RhoOGF) to study its uptake in live cells. African green monkey kidney cells (COS-7) incubated with RhoOGF exhibited a temperature-dependent course of entry, being internalized at 37 degrees C but not at 4 degrees C. RhoOGF was detected in the cytoplasm 15 min after initial exposure, observed in both cytoplasm and nucleus within 30 min, and remained in the cells for as long as 5 h. A 100-fold excess of OGF or the opioid antagonist naltrexone, but not other opioid ligands (some selective for classic opioid receptors), markedly reduced entry of RhoOGF into cells. RhoOGF was functional because DNA synthesis in cells incubated with RhoOGF (10(-5) to 10(-8) M) was decreased 24-36%, and was comparable to cells treated with unlabeled OGF (reductions of 26-39%). OGF internalization was dependent on clathrin-mediated endocytosis, with addition of clathrin siRNA diminishing the uptake of RhoOGF and upregulating DNA synthesis. RhoOGF clathrin-mediated endocytosis was unrelated to endosomal or Golgi pathways. Taken together, these results suggest that OGF enters cells by active transport in a saturable manner that requires clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

  2. Actin growth profile in clathrin-mediated endocytosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tweten, D. J.; Bayly, P. V.; Carlsson, A. E.

    2017-05-01

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis in yeast is driven by a protein patch containing close to 100 different types of proteins. Among the proteins are 5000 -10 000 copies of polymerized actin, and successful endocytosis requires growth of the actin network. Since it is not known exactly how actin network growth drives endocytosis, we calculate the spatial distribution of actin growth required to generate the force that drives the process. First, we establish the force distribution that must be supplied by actin growth, by combining membrane-bending profiles obtained via electron microscopy with established theories of membrane mechanics. Next, we determine the profile of actin growth, using a continuum mechanics approach and an iterative procedure starting with an actin growth profile obtained from a linear analysis. The profile has fairly constant growth outside a central hole of radius 45-50 nm, but very little growth in this hole. This growth profile can reproduce the required forces if the actin shear modulus exceeds 80 kPa, and the growing filaments can exert very large polymerization forces. The growth profile prediction could be tested via electron-microscopy or super-resolution experiments in which the turgor pressure is suddenly turned off.

  3. Evolutionary Changes on the Way to Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis in Animals

    PubMed Central

    Dergai, Mykola; Iershov, Anton; Novokhatska, Olga; Pankivskyi, Serhii; Rynditch, Alla

    2016-01-01

    Endocytic pathways constitute an evolutionarily ancient system that significantly contributed to the eukaryotic cell architecture and to the diversity of cell type–specific functions and signaling cascades, in particular of metazoans. Here we used comparative proteomic studies to analyze the universal internalization route in eukaryotes, clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), to address the issues of how this system evolved and what are its specific features. Among 35 proteins crucially required for animal CME, we identified a subset of 22 proteins common to major eukaryotic branches and 13 gradually acquired during evolution. Based on exploration of structure–function relationship between conserved homologs in sister, distantly related and early diverged branches, we identified novel features acquired during evolution of endocytic proteins on the way to animals: Elaborated way of cargo recruitment by multiple sorting proteins, structural changes in the core endocytic complex AP2, the emergence of the Fer/Cip4 homology domain-only protein/epidermal growth factor receptor substrate 15/intersectin functional complex as an additional interaction hub and activator of AP2, as well as changes in late endocytic stages due to recruitment of dynamin/sorting nexin 9 complex and involvement of the actin polymerization machinery. The evolutionary reconstruction showed the basis of the CME process and its subsequent step-by-step development. Documented changes imply more precise regulation of the pathway, as well as CME specialization for the uptake of specific cargoes and cell type-specific functions. PMID:26872775

  4. Actin dynamics counteract membrane tension during clathrin-mediated endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Boulant, Steeve; Kural, Comert; Zeeh, Jean-Christophe; Ubelmann, Florent; Kirchhausen, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis is independent of actin dynamics in many circumstances but requires actin polymerization in others. We show that membrane tension determines the actin dependence of clathrin-coat assembly. As found previously, clathrin assembly supports formation of mature coated pits in the absence of actin polymerization on both dorsal and ventral surfaces of non-polarized mammalian cells, and also on basolateral surfaces of polarized cells. Actin engagement is necessary, however, to complete membrane deformation into a coated pit on apical surfaces of polarized cells and, more generally, on the surface of any cell in which the plasma membrane is under tension from osmotic swelling or mechanical stretching. We use these observations to alter actin dependence experimentally and show that resistance of the membrane to propagation of the clathrin lattice determines the distinction between "actin-dependent" and "actin-independent". We also find that light-chain bound Hip1R mediates actin engagement. These data thus provide a unifying explanation for the role of actin dynamics in coated-pit budding. PMID:21841790

  5. Synaptotagmin-11 inhibits clathrin-mediated and bulk endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changhe; Wang, Yeshi; Hu, Meiqin; Chai, Zuying; Wu, Qihui; Huang, Rong; Han, Weiping; Zhang, Claire Xi; Zhou, Zhuan

    2016-01-01

    Precise and efficient endocytosis is essential for vesicle recycling during a sustained neurotransmission. The regulation of endocytosis has been extensively studied, but inhibitors have rarely been found. Here, we show that synaptotagmin-11 (Syt11), a non-Ca(2+)-binding Syt implicated in schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease, inhibits clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) and bulk endocytosis in dorsal root ganglion neurons. The frequency of both types of endocytic event increases in Syt11 knockdown neurons, while the sizes of endocytosed vesicles and the kinetics of individual bulk endocytotic events remain unaffected. Specifically, clathrin-coated pits and bulk endocytosis-like structures increase on the plasma membrane in Syt11-knockdown neurons. Structural-functional analysis reveals distinct domain requirements for Syt11 function in CME and bulk endocytosis. Importantly, Syt11 also inhibits endocytosis in hippocampal neurons, implying a general role of Syt11 in neurons. Taken together, we propose that Syt11 functions to ensure precision in vesicle retrieval, mainly by limiting the sites of membrane invagination at the early stage of endocytosis.

  6. Protein aggregation can inhibit clathrin-mediated endocytosis by chaperone competition

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Anan; Shibata, Yoko; Shah, Bijal; Calamini, Barbara; Lo, Donald C.; Morimoto, Richard I.

    2014-01-01

    Protein conformational diseases exhibit complex pathologies linked to numerous molecular defects. Aggregation of a disease-associated protein causes the misfolding and aggregation of other proteins, but how this interferes with diverse cellular pathways is unclear. Here, we show that aggregation of neurodegenerative disease-related proteins (polyglutamine, huntingtin, ataxin-1, and superoxide dismutase-1) inhibits clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) in mammalian cells by aggregate-driven sequestration of the major molecular chaperone heat shock cognate protein 70 (HSC70), which is required to drive multiple steps of CME. CME suppression was also phenocopied by HSC70 RNAi depletion and could be restored by conditionally increasing HSC70 abundance. Aggregation caused dysregulated AMPA receptor internalization and also inhibited CME in primary neurons expressing mutant huntingtin, showing direct relevance of our findings to the pathology in neurodegenerative diseases. We propose that aggregate-associated chaperone competition leads to both gain-of-function and loss-of-function phenotypes as chaperones become functionally depleted from multiple clients, leading to the decline of multiple cellular processes. The inherent properties of chaperones place them at risk, contributing to the complex pathologies of protein conformational diseases. PMID:24706768

  7. Design principles for robust vesiculation in clathrin-mediated endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Hassinger, Julian E.; Oster, George; Drubin, David G.; Rangamani, Padmini

    2017-01-01

    A critical step in cellular-trafficking pathways is the budding of membranes by protein coats, which recent experiments have demonstrated can be inhibited by elevated membrane tension. The robustness of processes like clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) across a diverse range of organisms and mechanical environments suggests that the protein machinery in this process has evolved to take advantage of some set of physical design principles to ensure robust vesiculation against opposing forces like membrane tension. Using a theoretical model for membrane mechanics and membrane protein interaction, we have systematically investigated the influence of membrane rigidity, curvature induced by the protein coat, area covered by the protein coat, membrane tension, and force from actin polymerization on bud formation. Under low tension, the membrane smoothly evolves from a flat to budded morphology as the coat area or spontaneous curvature increases, whereas the membrane remains essentially flat at high tensions. At intermediate, physiologically relevant, tensions, the membrane undergoes a “snap-through instability” in which small changes in the coat area, spontaneous curvature or membrane tension cause the membrane to “snap” from an open, U-shape to a closed bud. This instability can be smoothed out by increasing the bending rigidity of the coat, allowing for successful budding at higher membrane tensions. Additionally, applied force from actin polymerization can bypass the instability by inducing a smooth transition from an open to a closed bud. Finally, a combination of increased coat rigidity and force from actin polymerization enables robust vesiculation even at high membrane tensions. PMID:28126722

  8. Visualizing clathrin-mediated IgE receptor internalization by electron and atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Burns, Alan R; Oliver, Janet M; Pfeiffer, Janet R; Wilson, Bridget S

    2008-01-01

    A significant step in the immunoglobulin E (IgE) receptor signaling pathway in mast cell membranes is receptor internalization by clathrin-coated vesicles. Visualization in native membrane sheets of the emerging clathrin lattice structures containing the IgE receptor and associated signaling partners has been accomplished with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). More recently, membrane sheets with labeled clathrin have also been characterized with atomic force microscopy (AFM) in combination with fluorescence imaging. We discuss here the procedure for creating fixed, native cell membrane sheets, labeling with immunogold or fluorescent labels, and utilization for TEM or AFM/fluorescence imaging of clathrin-mediated IgE internalization.

  9. α-Arrestins participate in cargo selection for both clathrin-independent and clathrin-mediated endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Prosser, Derek C.; Pannunzio, Anthony E.; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.; Thorner, Jeremy; Wendland, Beverly; O'Donnell, Allyson F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) is a well-studied mechanism to internalize plasma membrane proteins; however, to endocytose such cargo, most eukaryotic cells also use alternative clathrin-independent endocytic (CIE) pathways, which are less well characterized. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a widely used model for studying CME, was recently shown to have a CIE pathway that requires the GTPase Rho1, the formin Bni1, and their regulators. Nevertheless, in both yeast and mammalian cells, the mechanisms underlying cargo selection in CME and CIE are only beginning to be understood. For CME in yeast, particular α-arrestins contribute to recognition of specific cargos and promote their ubiquitylation by recruiting the E3 ubiquitin protein ligase Rsp5. Here, we show that the same α-arrestin–cargo pairs promote internalization through the CIE pathway by interacting with CIE components. Notably, neither expression of Rsp5 nor its binding to α-arrestins is required for CIE. Thus, α-arrestins are important for cargo selection in both the CME and CIE pathways, but function by distinct mechanisms in each pathway. PMID:26459639

  10. α-Arrestins participate in cargo selection for both clathrin-independent and clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Prosser, Derek C; Pannunzio, Anthony E; Brodsky, Jeffrey L; Thorner, Jeremy; Wendland, Beverly; O'Donnell, Allyson F

    2015-11-15

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) is a well-studied mechanism to internalize plasma membrane proteins; however, to endocytose such cargo, most eukaryotic cells also use alternative clathrin-independent endocytic (CIE) pathways, which are less well characterized. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a widely used model for studying CME, was recently shown to have a CIE pathway that requires the GTPase Rho1, the formin Bni1, and their regulators. Nevertheless, in both yeast and mammalian cells, the mechanisms underlying cargo selection in CME and CIE are only beginning to be understood. For CME in yeast, particular α-arrestins contribute to recognition of specific cargos and promote their ubiquitylation by recruiting the E3 ubiquitin protein ligase Rsp5. Here, we show that the same α-arrestin-cargo pairs promote internalization through the CIE pathway by interacting with CIE components. Notably, neither expression of Rsp5 nor its binding to α-arrestins is required for CIE. Thus, α-arrestins are important for cargo selection in both the CME and CIE pathways, but function by distinct mechanisms in each pathway. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. Computational Modeling and Simulations of Bioparticle Internalization Through Clathrin-mediated Endocytosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Hua; Dutta, Prashanta; Liu, Jin

    2016-11-01

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) is one of the most important endocytic pathways for the internalization of bioparticles at lipid membrane of cells, which plays crucial roles in fundamental understanding of viral infections and interacellular/transcelluar targeted drug delivery. During CME, highly dynamic clathrin-coated pit (CCP), formed by the growth of ordered clathrin lattices, is the key scaffolding component that drives the deformation of plasma membrane. Experimental studies have shown that CCP alone can provide sufficient membrane curvature for facilitating membrane invagination. However, currently there is no computational model that could couple cargo receptor binding with membrane invagination process, nor simulations of the dynamic growing process of CCP. We develop a stochastic computational model for the clathrin-mediated endocytosis based on Metropolis Monte Carlo simulations. In our model, the energetic costs of bending membrane and CCP are linked with antigen-antibody interactions. The assembly of clathrin lattices is a dynamic process that correlates with antigen-antibody bond formation. This model helps study the membrane deformation and the effects of CCP during functionalized bioparticles internalization through CME. This work is supported by NSF Grants: CBET-1250107 and CBET-1604211.

  12. A Nibbling Mechanism for Clathrin-mediated Retrieval of Secretory Granule Membrane after Exocytosis*

    PubMed Central

    Bittner, Mary A.; Aikman, Rachel L.; Holz, Ronald W.

    2013-01-01

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis is the major pathway for recycling of granule membrane components after strong stimulation and high exocytotic rates. It resembles “classical” receptor-mediated endocytosis but has a trigger that is unique to secretion, the sudden appearance of the secretory granule membrane in the plasma membrane. The spatial localization, the relationship to individual fusion events, the nature of the cargo, and the timing and nature of the nucleation events are unknown. Furthermore, a size mismatch between chromaffin granules (∼300-nm diameter) and typical clathrin-coated vesicles (∼90 nm) makes it unlikely that clathrin-mediated endocytosis internalizes as a unit the entire fused granule membrane. We have used a combination of total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy of transiently expressed proteins and time-resolved quantitative confocal imaging of endogenous proteins along with a fluid-phase marker to address these issues. We demonstrate that the fused granule membrane remains a distinct entity and serves as a nucleation site for clathrin- and dynamin-mediated endocytosis that internalizes granule membrane components in small increments. PMID:23386611

  13. Correlated fluorescence-atomic force microscopy studies of the clathrin mediated endocytosis in SKMEL cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hor, Amy; Luu, Anh; Kang, Lin; Scott, Brandon; Bailey, Elizabeth; Hoppe, Adam; Smith, Steve

    2017-02-01

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) is one of the central pathways for cargo transport into cells, and plays a major role in the maintenance of cellular functions, such as intercellular signaling, nutrient intake, and turnover of plasma membrane in cells. The clathrin-mediated endocytosis process involves invagination and formation of clathrin-coated vesicles. However, the biophysical mechanisms of vesicle formation are still debated. Currently, there are two models describing membrane bending during the formation of clathrin cages: the first involves the deposition of all clathrin molecules to the plasma membrane, forming a flat lattice prior to membrane bending, whereas in the second model, membrane bending happens simultaneously as the clathrin arrives to the site to form a clathrin-coated cage. We investigate clathrin vesicle formation mechanisms through the utilization of tapping-mode atomic force microscopy for high resolution topographical imaging in neutral buffer solution of unroofed cells exposing the inner membrane, combined with fluorescence imaging to definitively label intracellular constituents with specific fluorophores (actin filaments labeled with green phalloidin and clathrin coated vesicles with the fusion protein Tq2) in SKMEL (Human Melanoma) cells. An extensive statistical survey of many hundreds of CME events, at various stages of progression, are observed via this method, allowing inferences about the dominant mechanisms active in CME in SKMEL cells. Results indicate a mixed model incorporating aspects of both the aforementioned mechanisms for CME.

  14. Otoferlin couples to clathrin-mediated endocytosis in mature cochlear inner hair cells.

    PubMed

    Duncker, Susanne V; Franz, Christoph; Kuhn, Stephanie; Schulte, Uwe; Campanelli, Dario; Brandt, Niels; Hirt, Bernhard; Fakler, Bernd; Blin, Nikolaus; Ruth, Peter; Engel, Jutta; Marcotti, Walter; Zimmermann, Ulrike; Knipper, Marlies

    2013-05-29

    The encoding of auditory information with indefatigable precision requires efficient resupply of vesicles at inner hair cell (IHC) ribbon synapses. Otoferlin, a transmembrane protein responsible for deafness in DFNB9 families, has been postulated to act as a calcium sensor for exocytosis as well as to be involved in rapid vesicle replenishment of IHCs. However, the molecular basis of vesicle recycling in IHCs is largely unknown. In the present study, we used high-resolution liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry to copurify otoferlin interaction partners in the mammalian cochlea. We identified multiple subunits of the adaptor protein complex AP-2 (CLAP), an essential component of clathrin-mediated endocytosis, as binding partners of otoferlin in rats and mice. The interaction between otoferlin and AP-2 was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation. We also found that AP-2 interacts with myosin VI, another otoferlin binding partner important for clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME). The expression of AP-2 in IHCs was verified by reverse transcription PCR. Confocal microscopy experiments revealed that the expression of AP-2 and its colocalization with otoferlin is confined to mature IHCs. When CME was inhibited by blocking dynamin action, real-time changes in membrane capacitance showed impaired synaptic vesicle replenishment in mature but not immature IHCs. We suggest that an otoferlin-AP-2 interaction drives Ca(2+)- and stimulus-dependent compensating CME in mature IHCs.

  15. Cargo recognition during clathrin-mediated endocytosis: a team effort.

    PubMed

    Sorkin, Alexander

    2004-08-01

    Transmembrane proteins destined to endosomes are selectively accumulated in clathrin-coated pits at the plasma membrane and rapidly internalized in clathrin-coated vesicles. The recognition of specific sequence motifs in transmembrane cargo by coated-pit proteins confers specificity on the endocytic process. Interaction of membrane cargo with the clathrin adaptor protein complex AP-2 is the major mechanism of cargo sorting into coated pits in mammalian cells. Recent studies have revealed a variety of alternative mechanisms of cargo recruitment involving additional adaptor proteins. These alternative mechanisms appear to be particularly important during clathrin-mediated endocytosis of signaling receptors.

  16. Hepatitis C virus entry depends on clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Emmanuelle; Belouzard, Sandrine; Goueslain, Lucie; Wakita, Takaji; Dubuisson, Jean; Wychowski, Czeslaw; Rouillé, Yves

    2006-07-01

    Due to difficulties in cell culture propagation, the mechanisms of hepatitis C virus (HCV) entry are poorly understood. Here, postbinding cellular mechanisms of HCV entry were studied using both retroviral particles pseudotyped with HCV envelope glycoproteins (HCVpp) and the HCV clone JFH-1 propagated in cell culture (HCVcc). HCVpp entry was measured by quantitative real-time PCR after 3 h of contact with target cells, and HCVcc infection was quantified by immunoblot analysis and immunofluorescence detection of HCV proteins expressed in infected cells. The functional role of clathrin-mediated endocytosis in HCV entry was assessed by small interfering RNA-mediated clathrin heavy chain depletion and with chlorpromazine, an inhibitor of clathrin-coated pit formation at the plasma membrane. In both conditions, HCVpp entry and HCVcc infection were inhibited. HCVcc infection was also inhibited by pretreating target cells with bafilomycin A1 or chloroquine, two drugs known to interfere with endosome acidification. These data indicate that HCV enters target cells by clathrin-mediated endocytosis, followed by a fusion step from within an acidic endosomal compartment.

  17. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis of gold nanoparticles in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ng, Cheng Teng; Tang, Florence Mei Ai; Li, Jasmine Jia'en; Ong, Cynthia; Yung, Lanry Lin Yue; Bay, Boon Huat

    2015-02-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have potential biomedical and scientific applications. In this study, we evaluated the uptake and internalization of FBS-coated 20 nm AuNPs into lung fibroblasts and liver cells by different microscopy techniques. AuNP aggregates were observed inside MRC5 lung fibroblasts and Chang liver cells under light microscopy, especially after enhancement with automegallography. Clusters of AuNPs were observed to be adsorbed on the cell surface by scanning electron microscopy. Ultrathin sections showed that AuNPs were mainly enclosed within cytoplasmic vesicles when viewed under transmission electron microscopy. We also investigated the mechanism of uptake for AuNPs, using endocytosis inhibitors and quantification of Au with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Cells treated with concanavalin A and chlorpromazine showed significant decrease of Au uptake in MRC5 lung fibroblasts and Chang liver cells, respectively, implying that the uptake of AuNPs was facilitated by clathrin-mediated endocytosis. It would therefore appear that uptake of 20 nm AuNPs in both cell types with different tissues of origin, was dependent upon clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

  18. Signalling through phospholipase C interferes with clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Carvou, Nicolas; Norden, Anthony G W; Unwin, Robert J; Cockcroft, Shamshad

    2007-01-01

    We investigated if phosphatidylinositol(4,5)bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P2) hydrolysis by phospholipase C activation through cell surface receptors would interfere with clathrin-mediated endocytosis as recruitment of clathrin assembly proteins is PtdIns(4,5)P2-dependent. In the WKPT renal epithelial cell line, endocytosed insulin and beta2-glycoprotein I (beta2gpI) were observed in separate compartments, although endocytosis of both ligands was clathrin-dependent as demonstrated by expression of the clathrin-binding C-terminal domain of AP180 (AP180-C). The two uptake mechanisms were different as only insulin uptake was reduced when the mu2-subunit of the adaptor complex AP-2 was silenced by RNA interference. ATP receptors are expressed at the apical surface of renal cells and, thus, we examined the effect of extracellular ATP on insulin and beta2gpI uptake. ATP stimulated phospholipase C activity, and also suppressed uptake of insulin, but not beta2gpI. This effect was reversed by the PLC inhibitor U-73122. In polarized cell cultures, insulin uptake was apical, whereas beta2gpI uptake was through the basolateral membrane, thus providing an explanation for selective inhibition of insulin endocytosis by ATP. Taken together, these results demonstrate that stimulation of apical G-protein-coupled P2Y receptors, which are coupled to phospholipase C activation diminishes clathrin-mediated endocytosis without interfering with basolateral endocytic mechanisms.

  19. Mycoplasma pneumoniae CARDS Toxin Is Internalized via Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Manickam; Kannan, T. R.; Baseman, Joel B.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial toxins possess specific mechanisms of binding and uptake by mammalian cells. Mycoplasma pneumoniae CARDS (Community Acquired Respiratory Distress Syndrome) toxin is a 68 kDa protein, which demonstrates high binding affinity to human surfactant protein-A and exhibits specific biological activities including mono-ADP ribosylation and vacuolization. These properties lead to inflammatory processes in the airway and a range of cytopathologies including ciliostasis, loss of tissue integrity and injury, and cell death. However, the process by which CARDS toxin enters target cells is unknown. In this study, we show that CARDS toxin binds to mammalian cell surfaces and is internalized rapidly in a dose and time-dependent manner using a clathrin-mediated pathway, as indicated by inhibition of toxin internalization by monodansylcadaverine but not by methyl-β-cyclodextrin or filipin. Furthermore, the internalization of CARDS toxin was markedly inhibited in clathrin-depleted cells. PMID:23667510

  20. Mycoplasma pneumoniae CARDS toxin is internalized via clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Manickam; Kannan, T R; Baseman, Joel B

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial toxins possess specific mechanisms of binding and uptake by mammalian cells. Mycoplasma pneumoniae CARDS (Community Acquired Respiratory Distress Syndrome) toxin is a 68 kDa protein, which demonstrates high binding affinity to human surfactant protein-A and exhibits specific biological activities including mono-ADP ribosylation and vacuolization. These properties lead to inflammatory processes in the airway and a range of cytopathologies including ciliostasis, loss of tissue integrity and injury, and cell death. However, the process by which CARDS toxin enters target cells is unknown. In this study, we show that CARDS toxin binds to mammalian cell surfaces and is internalized rapidly in a dose and time-dependent manner using a clathrin-mediated pathway, as indicated by inhibition of toxin internalization by monodansylcadaverine but not by methyl-β-cyclodextrin or filipin. Furthermore, the internalization of CARDS toxin was markedly inhibited in clathrin-depleted cells.

  1. Phosphorylation Decreases Ubiquitylation of the Thiazide-sensitive Cotransporter NCC and Subsequent Clathrin-mediated Endocytosis*

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaek, Lena L.; Kortenoeven, Marleen L. A.; Aroankins, Takwa S.; Fenton, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    The thiazide-sensitive sodium chloride cotransporter, NCC, is the major NaCl transport protein in the distal convoluted tubule (DCT). The transport activity of NCC can be regulated by phosphorylation, but knowledge of modulation of NCC trafficking by phosphorylation is limited. In this study, we generated novel tetracycline-inducible Madin-Darby canine kidney type I (MDCKI) cell lines expressing NCC to examine the role of NCC phosphorylation and ubiquitylation on NCC endocytosis. In MDCKI-NCC cells, NCC was highly glycosylated at molecular weights consistent with NCC monomers and dimers. NCC constitutively cycles to the apical plasma membrane of MDCKI-NCC cells, with 20–30% of the membrane pool of NCC internalized within 30 min. The use of dynasore, PitStop2, methyl-β-cyclodextrin, nystatin, and filipin (specific inhibitors of either clathrin-dependent or -independent endocytosis) demonstrated that NCC is internalized via a clathrin-mediated pathway. Reduction of endocytosis resulted in greater levels of NCC in the plasma membrane. Immunogold electron microscopy confirmed the association of NCC with the clathrin-mediated internalization pathway in rat DCT cells. Compared with controls, inducing phosphorylation of NCC via low chloride treatment or mimicking phosphorylation by replacing Thr-53, Thr-58, and Ser-71 residues with Asp resulted in increased membrane abundance and reduced rates of NCC internalization. NCC ubiquitylation was lowest in the conditions with greatest NCC phosphorylation, thus providing a mechanism for the reduced endocytosis. In conclusion, our data support a model where NCC is constitutively cycled to the plasma membrane, and upon stimulation, it can be phosphorylated to both increase NCC activity and decrease NCC endocytosis, together increasing NaCl transport in the DCT. PMID:24668812

  2. Phosphorylation decreases ubiquitylation of the thiazide-sensitive cotransporter NCC and subsequent clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaek, Lena L; Kortenoeven, Marleen L A; Aroankins, Takwa S; Fenton, Robert A

    2014-05-09

    The thiazide-sensitive sodium chloride cotransporter, NCC, is the major NaCl transport protein in the distal convoluted tubule (DCT). The transport activity of NCC can be regulated by phosphorylation, but knowledge of modulation of NCC trafficking by phosphorylation is limited. In this study, we generated novel tetracycline-inducible Madin-Darby canine kidney type I (MDCKI) cell lines expressing NCC to examine the role of NCC phosphorylation and ubiquitylation on NCC endocytosis. In MDCKI-NCC cells, NCC was highly glycosylated at molecular weights consistent with NCC monomers and dimers. NCC constitutively cycles to the apical plasma membrane of MDCKI-NCC cells, with 20-30% of the membrane pool of NCC internalized within 30 min. The use of dynasore, PitStop2, methyl-β-cyclodextrin, nystatin, and filipin (specific inhibitors of either clathrin-dependent or -independent endocytosis) demonstrated that NCC is internalized via a clathrin-mediated pathway. Reduction of endocytosis resulted in greater levels of NCC in the plasma membrane. Immunogold electron microscopy confirmed the association of NCC with the clathrin-mediated internalization pathway in rat DCT cells. Compared with controls, inducing phosphorylation of NCC via low chloride treatment or mimicking phosphorylation by replacing Thr-53, Thr-58, and Ser-71 residues with Asp resulted in increased membrane abundance and reduced rates of NCC internalization. NCC ubiquitylation was lowest in the conditions with greatest NCC phosphorylation, thus providing a mechanism for the reduced endocytosis. In conclusion, our data support a model where NCC is constitutively cycled to the plasma membrane, and upon stimulation, it can be phosphorylated to both increase NCC activity and decrease NCC endocytosis, together increasing NaCl transport in the DCT.

  3. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis is the dominant mechanism of vesicle retrieval at hippocampal synapses.

    PubMed

    Granseth, Björn; Odermatt, Benjamin; Royle, Stephen J; Lagnado, Leon

    2006-09-21

    The maintenance of synaptic transmission requires that vesicles be recycled after releasing neurotransmitter. Several modes of retrieval have been proposed to operate at small synaptic terminals of central neurons, including a fast "kiss-and-run" mechanism that releases neurotransmitter through a fusion pore. Using an improved fluorescent reporter comprising pHluorin fused to synaptophysin, we find that only a slow mode of endocytosis (tau = 15 s) operates at hippocampal synapses when vesicle fusion is triggered by a single nerve impulse or short burst. This retrieval mechanism is blocked by overexpression of the C-terminal fragment of AP180 or by knockdown of clathrin using RNAi, and it is associated with the movement of clathrin and vesicle proteins out of the synapse. These results indicate that clathrin-mediated endocytosis is the major, if not exclusive, mechanism of vesicle retrieval after physiological stimuli.

  4. Constitutive expression of clathrin hub hinders elicitor-induced clathrin-mediated endocytosis and defense gene expression in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Adam, T; Bouhidel, K; Der, C; Robert, F; Najid, A; Simon-Plas, F; Leborgne-Castel, N

    2012-09-21

    Endocytosis has been recently implicated in the signaling network associated with the recognition of microbes by plants. In a previous study, we showed that the elicitor cryptogein was able to induce clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) in tobacco suspension cells. Herein, we investigate further the induced CME by means of a GFP-tagged clathrin light chain and a CME inhibitor, the hub domain of clathrin heavy chain. Hub constitutive expression does affect neither cell growth nor constitutive endocytosis but abolishes cryptogein-induced CME. Such an inhibition has no impact on early events in the cryptogein signaling pathway but reduces the expression of defense-associated genes.

  5. Selectivity of commonly used inhibitors of clathrin-mediated and caveolae-dependent endocytosis of G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shuohan; Zhang, Xiaohan; Zheng, Mei; Zhang, Xiaowei; Min, Chengchun; Wang, Zengtao; Cheon, Seung Hoon; Oak, Min-Ho; Nah, Seung-Yeol; Kim, Kyeong-Man

    2015-10-01

    Among the multiple G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) endocytic pathways, clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) and caveolar endocytosis are more extensively characterized than other endocytic pathways. A number of endocytic inhibitors have been used to block CME; however, systemic studies to determine the selectivity of these inhibitors are needed. Clathrin heavy chain or caveolin1-knockdown cells have been employed to determine the specificity of various chemical and molecular biological tools for CME and caveolar endocytosis. Sucrose, concanavalin A, and dominant negative mutants of dynamin blocked other endocytic pathways, in addition to CME. In particular, concanavalin A nonspecifically interfered with the signaling of several GPCRs tested in the study. Decreased pH, monodansylcadaverine, and dominant negative mutants of epsin were more specific for CME than other treatments were. A recently introduced CME inhibitor, Pitstop2™, showed only marginal selectivity for CME and interfered with receptor expression on the cell surface. Blockade of receptor endocytosis by epsin mutants and knockdown of the clathrin heavy chain enhanced the β2AR-mediated ERK activation. Overall, our studies show that previous experimental results should be interpreted with discretion if they included the use of endocytic inhibitors that were previously thought to be CME-selective. In addition, our study shows that endocytosis of β2 adrenoceptor through clathrin-mediated pathway has negative effects on ERK activation.

  6. Clathrin Mediates Infectious Hepatitis C Virus Particle Egress

    PubMed Central

    Benedicto, Ignacio; Gondar, Virgínia; Molina-Jiménez, Francisca; García-Buey, Luisa; López-Cabrera, Manuel; Gastaminza, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although it is well established that hepatitis C virus (HCV) entry into hepatocytes depends on clathrin-mediated endocytosis, the possible roles of clathrin in other steps of the viral cycle remain unexplored. Thus, we studied whether cell culture-derived HCV (HCVcc) exocytosis was altered after clathrin interference. Knockdown of clathrin or the clathrin adaptor AP-1 in HCVcc-infected human hepatoma cell cultures impaired viral secretion without altering intracellular HCVcc levels or apolipoprotein B (apoB) and apoE exocytosis. Similar reductions in HCVcc secretion were observed after treatment with specific clathrin and dynamin inhibitors. Furthermore, detergent-free immunoprecipitation assays, neutralization experiments, and immunofluorescence analyses suggested that whereas apoE associated with infectious intracellular HCV precursors in endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-related structures, AP-1 participated in HCVcc egress in a post-ER compartment. Finally, we observed that clathrin and AP-1 knockdown altered the endosomal distribution of HCV core, reducing and increasing its colocalization with early endosome and lysosome markers, respectively. Our data support a model in which nascent HCV particles associate with apoE in the ER and exit cells following a clathrin-dependent transendosomal secretory route. IMPORTANCE HCV entry into hepatocytes depends on clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Here we demonstrate for the first time that clathrin also participates in HCV exit from infected cells. Our data uncover important features of HCV egress, which may lead to the development of new therapeutic interventions. Interestingly, we show that secretion of the very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) components apoB and apoE is not impaired after clathrin interference. This is a significant finding, since, to date, it has been proposed that HCV and VLDL follow similar exocytic routes. Given that lipid metabolism recently emerged as a potential target for therapies against HCV

  7. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis is inhibited during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Fielding, Andrew B; Willox, Anna K; Okeke, Emmanuel; Royle, Stephen J

    2012-04-24

    A long-standing paradigm in cell biology is the shutdown of endocytosis during mitosis. There is consensus that transferrin uptake is inhibited after entry into prophase and that it resumes in telophase. A recent study proposed that endocytosis is continuous throughout the cell cycle and that the observed inhibition of transferrin uptake is due to a decrease in available transferrin receptor at the cell surface, and not to a shutdown of endocytosis. This challenge to the established view is gradually becoming accepted. Because of this controversy, we revisited the question of endocytic activity during mitosis. Using an antibody uptake assay and controlling for potential changes in surface receptor density, we demonstrate the strong inhibition of endocytosis in mitosis of CD8 chimeras containing any of the three major internalization motifs for clathrin-mediated endocytosis (YXXΦ, [DE]XXXL[LI], or FXNPXY) or a CD8 protein with the cytoplasmic tail of the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor. The shutdown is not gradual: We describe a binary switch from endocytosis being "on" in interphase to "off" in mitosis as cells traverse the G(2)/M checkpoint. In addition, we show that the inhibition of transferrin uptake in mitosis occurs despite abundant transferrin receptor at the surface of HeLa cells. Our study finds no support for the recent idea that endocytosis continues during mitosis, and we conclude that endocytosis is temporarily shutdown during early mitosis.

  8. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis is inhibited during mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Fielding, Andrew B.; Willox, Anna K.; Okeke, Emmanuel; Royle, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    A long-standing paradigm in cell biology is the shutdown of endocytosis during mitosis. There is consensus that transferrin uptake is inhibited after entry into prophase and that it resumes in telophase. A recent study proposed that endocytosis is continuous throughout the cell cycle and that the observed inhibition of transferrin uptake is due to a decrease in available transferrin receptor at the cell surface, and not to a shutdown of endocytosis. This challenge to the established view is gradually becoming accepted. Because of this controversy, we revisited the question of endocytic activity during mitosis. Using an antibody uptake assay and controlling for potential changes in surface receptor density, we demonstrate the strong inhibition of endocytosis in mitosis of CD8 chimeras containing any of the three major internalization motifs for clathrin-mediated endocytosis (YXXΦ, [DE]XXXL[LI], or FXNPXY) or a CD8 protein with the cytoplasmic tail of the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor. The shutdown is not gradual: We describe a binary switch from endocytosis being “on” in interphase to “off” in mitosis as cells traverse the G2/M checkpoint. In addition, we show that the inhibition of transferrin uptake in mitosis occurs despite abundant transferrin receptor at the surface of HeLa cells. Our study finds no support for the recent idea that endocytosis continues during mitosis, and we conclude that endocytosis is temporarily shutdown during early mitosis. PMID:22493256

  9. Differential requirements for clathrin endocytic pathway components in cellular entry by Ebola and Marburg glycoprotein pseudovirions.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Suchita; Hope, Thomas J; Young, John A T

    2011-10-10

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis was previously implicated as one of the cellular pathways involved in filoviral glycoprotein mediated viral entry into target cells. Here we have further dissected the requirements for different components of this pathway in Ebola versus Marburg virus glycoprotein (GP) mediated viral infection. Although a number of these components were involved in both cases; Ebola GP-dependent viral entry specifically required the cargo recognition proteins Eps15 and DAB2 as well as the clathrin adaptor protein AP-2. In contrast, Marburg GP-mediated infection was independent of these three proteins and instead required beta-arrestin 1 (ARRB1). These findings have revealed an unexpected difference between the clathrin pathway requirements for Ebola GP versus Marburg GP pseudovirion infection. Anthrax toxin also uses a clathrin-, and ARRB1-dependent pathway for cellular entry, indicating that the mechanism used by Marburg GP pseudovirions may be more generally important for pathogen entry.

  10. Eps15 membrane-binding and -bending activity acts redundantly with Fcho1 during clathrin-mediated endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Johnson, Adam; Hanna, Michael; Audhya, Anjon

    2016-01-01

    Clathrin coat assembly on membranes requires cytosolic adaptors and accessory proteins, which bridge triskeleons with the lipid bilayer and stabilize lattice architecture throughout the process of vesicle formation. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the prototypical AP-2 adaptor complex, which is activated by the accessory factor Fcho1 at the plasma membrane, is dispensable during embryogenesis, enabling us to define alternative mechanisms that facilitate clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Here we uncover a synthetic genetic interaction between C. elegans Fcho1 (FCHO-1) and Eps15 (EHS-1), suggesting that they function in a parallel and potentially redundant manner. Consistent with this idea, we find that the FCHO-1 EFC/F-BAR domain and the EHS-1 EH domains exhibit highly similar membrane-binding and -bending characteristics in vitro. Furthermore, we demonstrate a critical role for EHS-1 when FCHO-1 membrane-binding and -bending activity is specifically eliminated in vivo. Taken together, our data highlight Eps15 as an important membrane-remodeling factor, which acts in a partially redundant manner with Fcho proteins during the earliest stages of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. PMID:27385343

  11. Crosstalk between Akt/GSK3β signaling and dynamin-1 regulates clathrin-mediated endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Carlos R; Chen, Ping-Hung; Srinivasan, Saipraveen; Aguet, François; Mettlen, Marcel; Schmid, Sandra L

    2015-01-01

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) regulates signaling from the plasma membrane. Analysis of clathrin-coated pit (CCP) dynamics led us to propose the existence of a rate-limiting, regulatory step(s) that monitor the fidelity of early stages in CCP maturation. Here we show that nascent endocytic vesicles formed in mutant cells displaying rapid, dysregulated CME are defective in early endosomal trafficking, maturation and acidification, confirming the importance of this “checkpoint.” Dysregulated CME also alters EGF receptor signaling and leads to constitutive activation of the protein kinase Akt. Dynamin-1, which was thought to be neuron specific, is activated by the Akt/GSK3β signaling cascade in non-neuronal cells to trigger rapid, dysregulated CME. Acute activation of dynamin-1 in RPE cells by inhibition of GSK3β accelerates CME, alters CCP dynamics and, unexpectedly, increases the rate of CCP initiation. CRISPR-Cas9n-mediated knockout and reconstitution studies establish that dynamin-1 is activated by Akt/GSK3β signaling in H1299 non-small lung cancer cells. These findings provide direct evidence for an isoform-specific role for dynamin in regulating CME and reveal a feed-forward pathway that could link signaling from cell surface receptors to the regulation of CME. PMID:26139537

  12. Egg drop syndrome virus enters duck embryonic fibroblast cells via clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jingjing; Tan, Dan; Wang, Yang; Liu, Caihong; Xu, Jiamin; Wang, Jingyu

    2015-12-02

    Previous studies of egg drop syndrome virus (EDSV) is restricted to serological surveys, disease diagnostics, and complete viral genome analysis. Consequently, the infection characteristics and entry routes of EDSV are poorly understood. Therefore, we aimed to explore the entry pathway of EDSV into duck embryonic fibroblast (DEF) cells as well as the infection characteristics and proliferation of EDSV in primary DEF and primary chicken embryo liver (CEL) cells. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the virus triggered DEF cell membrane invagination as early as 10 min post-infection and that integrated endocytic vesicles formed at 20 min post-infection. The virus yield in EDSV-infected DEF cells treated with chlorpromazine (CPZ), sucrose, methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD), or NH4Cl was measured by quantitative real-time PCR. Compared with the mock treatment, CPZ and sucrose greatly inhibited the production of viral progeny in a dose-dependent manner, while MβCD treatment did not result in a significant difference. Furthermore, NH4Cl had a strong inhibitory effect on the production of EDSV progeny. In addition, indirect immunofluorescence demonstrated that virus particles clustered on the surface of DEF cells treated with CPZ or sucrose. These results indicate that EDSV enters DEF cells through clathrin-mediated endocytosis followed by a pH-dependent step, which is similar to the mechanism of entry of human adenovirus types 2 and 5. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Actin polymerization does not provide direct mechanical forces for vesicle fission during clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Yao, Li-Hua; Rao, Yan; Bang, Chi; Kurilova, Svetlana; Varga, Kelly; Wang, Chun-Yang; Weller, Brandon D; Cho, Wonhwa; Cheng, Jun; Gong, Liang-Wei

    2013-10-02

    Actin polymerization is important for vesicle fission during clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), and it has been proposed that actin polymerization may promote vesicle fission during CME by providing direct mechanical forces. However, there is no direct evidence in support of this hypothesis. In the present study, the role of actin polymerization in vesicle fission was tested by analyzing the kinetics of the endocytic tubular membrane neck (the fission-pore) with cell-attached capacitance measurements to detect CME of single vesicles in a millisecond time resolution in mouse chromaffin cells. Inhibition in dynamin GTPase activity increased the fission-pore conductance (Gp), supporting the mechanical role of dynamin GTPase in vesicle fission. However, disruptions in actin polymerization did not alter the fission-pore conductance Gp, thus arguing against the force-generating role of actin polymerization in vesicle fission during CME. Similar to disruptions of actin polymerization, cholesterol depletion results in an increase in the fission-pore duration, indicating a role for cholesterol-dependent membrane reorganization in vesicle fission. Further experiments suggested that actin polymerization and cholesterol might function in vesicle fission during CME in the same pathway. Our results thus support a model in which actin polymerization promotes vesicle fission during CME by inducing cholesterol-dependent membrane reorganization.

  14. Mitochondrial uncouplers inhibit clathrin-mediated endocytosis largely through cytoplasmic acidification

    PubMed Central

    Dejonghe, Wim; Kuenen, Sabine; Mylle, Evelien; Vasileva, Mina; Keech, Olivier; Viotti, Corrado; Swerts, Jef; Fendrych, Matyáš; Ortiz-Morea, Fausto Andres; Mishev, Kiril; Delang, Simon; Scholl, Stefan; Zarza, Xavier; Heilmann, Mareike; Kourelis, Jiorgos; Kasprowicz, Jaroslaw; Nguyen, Le Son Long; Drozdzecki, Andrzej; Van Houtte, Isabelle; Szatmári, Anna-Mária; Majda, Mateusz; Baisa, Gary; Bednarek, Sebastian York; Robert, Stéphanie; Audenaert, Dominique; Testerink, Christa; Munnik, Teun; Van Damme, Daniël; Heilmann, Ingo; Schumacher, Karin; Winne, Johan; Friml, Jiří; Verstreken, Patrik; Russinova, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    ATP production requires the establishment of an electrochemical proton gradient across the inner mitochondrial membrane. Mitochondrial uncouplers dissipate this proton gradient and disrupt numerous cellular processes, including vesicular trafficking, mainly through energy depletion. Here we show that Endosidin9 (ES9), a novel mitochondrial uncoupler, is a potent inhibitor of clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) in different systems and that ES9 induces inhibition of CME not because of its effect on cellular ATP, but rather due to its protonophore activity that leads to cytoplasm acidification. We show that the known tyrosine kinase inhibitor tyrphostinA23, which is routinely used to block CME, displays similar properties, thus questioning its use as a specific inhibitor of cargo recognition by the AP-2 adaptor complex via tyrosine motif-based endocytosis signals. Furthermore, we show that cytoplasm acidification dramatically affects the dynamics and recruitment of clathrin and associated adaptors, and leads to reduction of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate from the plasma membrane. PMID:27271794

  15. New Regulators of Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis Identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by Systematic Quantitative Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Kristen B.; Grossman, Caitlin; Di Pietro, Santiago M.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the importance of clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) for cell biology, it is unclear if all components of the machinery have been discovered and many regulatory aspects remain poorly understood. Here, using Saccharomyces cerevisiae and a fluorescence microscopy screening approach we identify previously unknown regulatory factors of the endocytic machinery. We further studied the top scoring protein identified in the screen, Ubx3, a member of the conserved ubiquitin regulatory X (UBX) protein family. In vivo and in vitro approaches demonstrate that Ubx3 is a new coat component. Ubx3-GFP has typical endocytic coat protein dynamics with a patch lifetime of 45 ± 3 sec. Ubx3 contains a W-box that mediates physical interaction with clathrin and Ubx3-GFP patch lifetime depends on clathrin. Deletion of the UBX3 gene caused defects in the uptake of Lucifer Yellow and the methionine transporter Mup1 demonstrating that Ubx3 is needed for efficient endocytosis. Further, the UBX domain is required both for localization and function of Ubx3 at endocytic sites. Mechanistically, Ubx3 regulates dynamics and patch lifetime of the early arriving protein Ede1 but not later arriving coat proteins or actin assembly. Conversely, Ede1 regulates the patch lifetime of Ubx3. Ubx3 likely regulates CME via the AAA-ATPase Cdc48, a ubiquitin-editing complex. Our results uncovered new components of the CME machinery that regulate this fundamental process. PMID:26362318

  16. A Novel Multiple Hypothesis Based Particle Tracking Method for Clathrin Mediated Endocytosis Analysis Using Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Liang; Shen, Hongying; De Camilli, Pietro; Duncan, James S.

    2015-01-01

    In order to quantitatively analyze biological images and study underlying mechanisms of the cellular and subcellular processes, it is often required to track a large number of particles involved in these processes. Manual tracking can be performed by the biologists, but the workload is very heavy. In this paper, we present an automatic particle tracking method for analyzing an essential subcellular process, namely clathrin mediated endocytosis. The framework of the tracking method is an extension of the classical multiple hypothesis tracking (MHT), and it is designed to manage trajectories, solve data association problems, and handle pseudo-splitting/merging events. In the extended MHT framework, particle tracking becomes evaluating two types of hypotheses. The first one is the trajectory-related hypothesis, to test whether a recovered trajectory is correct, and the second one is the observation-related hypothesis, to test whether an observation from an image belongs to a real particle. Here, an observation refers to a detected particle and its feature vector. To detect the particles in 2D fluorescence images taken using total internal reflection microscopy, the images are segmented into regions, and the features of the particles are obtained by fitting Gaussian mixture models into each of the image regions. Specific models are developed according to the properties of the particles. The proposed tracking method is demonstrated on synthetic data under different scenarios and applied to real data. PMID:24808351

  17. Agrobacterium delivers VirE2 protein into host cells via clathrin-mediated endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoyang; Pan, Shen Q.

    2017-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens can cause crown gall tumors on a wide range of host plants. As a natural genetic engineer, the bacterium can transfer both single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) [transferred DNA (T-DNA)] molecules and bacterial virulence proteins into various recipient cells. Among Agrobacterium-delivered proteins, VirE2 is an ssDNA binding protein that is involved in various steps of the transformation process. However, it is not clear how plant cells receive the T-DNA or protein molecules. Using a split–green fluorescent protein approach, we monitored the VirE2 delivery process inside plant cells in real time. We observed that A. tumefaciens delivered VirE2 from the bacterial lateral sides that were in close contact with plant membranes. VirE2 initially accumulated on plant cytoplasmic membranes at the entry points. VirE2-containing membranes were internalized through clathrin-mediated endocytosis to form endomembrane compartments. VirE2 colocalized with the early endosome marker SYP61 but not with the late endosome marker ARA6, suggesting that VirE2 escaped from early endosomes for subsequent trafficking inside the cells. Dual endocytic motifs at the carboxyl-terminal tail of VirE2 were involved in VirE2 internalization and could interact with the μ subunit of the plant clathrin-associated adaptor AP2 complex (AP2M). Both the VirE2 cargo motifs and AP2M were important for the transformation process. Because AP2-mediated endocytosis is well conserved, our data suggest that the A. tumefaciens pathogen hijacks conserved endocytic pathways to facilitate the delivery of virulence factors. This might be important for Agrobacterium to achieve both a wide host range and a high transformation efficiency. PMID:28345032

  18. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate Influences PIN Polarization by Controlling Clathrin-Mediated Membrane Trafficking in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Ischebeck, Till; Werner, Stephanie; Krishnamoorthy, Praveen; Lerche, Jennifer; Meijón, Mónica; Stenzel, Irene; Löfke, Christian; Wiessner, Theresa; Im, Yang Ju; Perera, Imara Y.; Iven, Tim; Feussner, Ivo; Busch, Wolfgang; Boss, Wendy F.; Teichmann, Thomas; Hause, Bettina; Persson, Staffan; Heilmann, Ingo

    2013-01-01

    The functions of the minor phospholipid phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P2] during vegetative plant growth remain obscure. Here, we targeted two related phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinases (PI4P 5-kinases) PIP5K1 and PIP5K2, which are expressed ubiquitously in Arabidopsis thaliana. A pip5k1 pip5k2 double mutant with reduced PtdIns(4,5)P2 levels showed dwarf stature and phenotypes suggesting defects in auxin distribution. The roots of the pip5k1 pip5k2 double mutant had normal auxin levels but reduced auxin transport and altered distribution. Fluorescence-tagged auxin efflux carriers PIN-FORMED (PIN1)–green fluorescent protein (GFP) and PIN2-GFP displayed abnormal, partially apolar distribution. Furthermore, fewer brefeldin A–induced endosomal bodies decorated by PIN1-GFP or PIN2-GFP formed in pip5k1 pip5k2 mutants. Inducible overexpressor lines for PIP5K1 or PIP5K2 also exhibited phenotypes indicating misregulation of auxin-dependent processes, and immunolocalization showed reduced membrane association of PIN1 and PIN2. PIN cycling and polarization require clathrin-mediated endocytosis and labeled clathrin light chain also displayed altered localization patterns in the pip5k1 pip5k2 double mutant, consistent with a role for PtdIns(4,5)P2 in the regulation of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Further biochemical tests on subcellular fractions enriched for clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs) indicated that pip5k1 and pip5k2 mutants have reduced CCV-associated PI4P 5-kinase activity. Together, the data indicate an important role for PtdIns(4,5)P2 in the control of clathrin dynamics and in auxin distribution in Arabidopsis. PMID:24326589

  19. Ultrasound Microbubble Treatment Enhances Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis and Fluid-Phase Uptake through Distinct Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Fekri, Farnaz; Delos Santos, Ralph Christian; Karshafian, Raffi

    2016-01-01

    Drug delivery to tumors is limited by several factors, including drug permeability of the target cell plasma membrane. Ultrasound in combination with microbubbles (USMB) is a promising strategy to overcome these limitations. USMB treatment elicits enhanced cellular uptake of materials such as drugs, in part as a result of sheer stress and formation of transient membrane pores. Pores formed upon USMB treatment are rapidly resealed, suggesting that other processes such as enhanced endocytosis may contribute to the enhanced material uptake by cells upon USMB treatment. How USMB regulates endocytic processes remains incompletely understood. Cells constitutively utilize several distinct mechanisms of endocytosis, including clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) for the internalization of receptor-bound macromolecules such as Transferrin Receptor (TfR), and distinct mechanism(s) that mediate the majority of fluid-phase endocytosis. Tracking the abundance of TfR on the cell surface and the internalization of its ligand transferrin revealed that USMB acutely enhances the rate of CME. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy experiments revealed that USMB treatment altered the assembly of clathrin-coated pits, the basic structural units of CME. In addition, the rate of fluid-phase endocytosis was enhanced, but with delayed onset upon USMB treatment relative to the enhancement of CME, suggesting that the two processes are distinctly regulated by USMB. Indeed, vacuolin-1 or desipramine treatment prevented the enhancement of CME but not of fluid phase endocytosis upon USMB, suggesting that lysosome exocytosis and acid sphingomyelinase, respectively, are required for the regulation of CME but not fluid phase endocytosis upon USMB treatment. These results indicate that USMB enhances both CME and fluid phase endocytosis through distinct signaling mechanisms, and suggest that strategies for potentiating the enhancement of endocytosis upon USMB treatment may improve targeted

  20. Moesin Controls Clathrin-Mediated S1PR1 Internalization in T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nomachi, Akira; Yoshinaga, Masanori; Liu, Jaron; Kanchanawong, Pakorn; Tohyama, Kiyoshi; Thumkeo, Dean; Watanabe, Takeshi; Narumiya, Shuh; Hirata, Takako

    2013-01-01

    The lipid mediator sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) regulates a wide range of cellular activities, including vascular maturation, angiogenesis, and immune-cell trafficking. Among the five known receptors for S1P (S1PR1-S1PR5), S1PR1 is a critical regulator of lymphocyte trafficking: its signaling is required for lymphocyte egress from lymphoid organs, while its down-modulation by agonist-induced internalization is a prerequisite for lymphocyte entry into lymphoid organs from the bloodstream. Despite the importance of S1PR1 down-regulation in determining lymphocyte behavior, the molecular mechanism of its internalization in lymphocytes has not been defined. Here we show that agonist-induced S1PR1 internalization in T cells occurs via clathrin-mediated endocytosis and is regulated by moesin, an ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) family member. In S1P-stimulated T cells, S1PR1 relocalized within clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs) and early endosomes, and S1PR1 internalization was blocked when clathrin was pharmacologically inhibited. Stimulating moesin-deficient T cells with S1P failed to induce S1PR1 internalization and CCV formation. Furthermore, treating moesin-deficient mice with FTY720, an S1P receptor agonist known to internalize S1PR1, caused delayed lymphopenia, and lymphocytes isolated from FTY720-treated moesin-deficient mice still responded to S1P ex vivo in chemotaxis assays. These results reveal a novel role for moesin in regulating clathrin-dependent S1PR1 internalization through CCV formation. PMID:24358210

  1. Calcyon, a novel partner of clathrin light chain, stimulates clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jiping; Dai, Rujuan; Negyessy, Laszlo; Bergson, Clare

    2006-06-02

    In the central nervous system, clathrin-mediated endocytosis is crucial for efficient synaptic transmission. Clathrin-coated vesicle assembly and disassembly is regulated by some 30 adaptor and accessory proteins, most of which interact with clathrin heavy chain. Using the calcyon cytosolic domain as bait, we isolated clathrin light chain in a yeast two-hybrid screen. The interaction domain was mapped to the heavy chain binding domain and C-terminal regions of light chain. Further, the addition of the calcyon C terminus stimulated clathrin self-assembly in a dose-dependent fashion. Calcyon, which is a single transmembrane protein predominantly expressed in brain, localized to vesicular compartments within pre- and postsynaptic structures. There was a high degree of overlap in the distribution of LC and calcyon in neuronal dendrites, spines, and cell bodies. Co-immunoprecipitation studies further suggested an association of calcyon with the clathrin-mediated endocytic machinery. Compared with controls, HEK293 cells overexpressing calcyon exhibited significantly enhanced transferrin uptake but equivalent levels of recycling. Conversely, transferrin uptake was largely abolished in neocortical neurons obtained from mice homozygous for a calcyon null allele, whereas recycling proceeded at wild type levels. Collectively, these data indicate a role for calcyon in clathrin-mediated endocytosis in brain.

  2. Dengue-3 Virus Entry into Vero Cells: Role of Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis in the Outcome of Infection.

    PubMed

    Piccini, Luana E; Castilla, Viviana; Damonte, Elsa B

    2015-01-01

    The endocytic uptake and intracellular trafficking for penetration of DENV-3 strain H-87 into Vero cells was analyzed by using several biochemical inhibitors and dominant negative mutants of cellular proteins. The results presented show that the infective entry of DENV-3 into Vero cells occurs through a non-classical endocytosis pathway dependent on low pH and dynamin, but non-mediated by clathrin. After uptake, DENV-3 transits through early endosomes to reach Rab 7-regulated late endosomes, and according with the half-time for ammonium chloride resistance viral nucleocapsid is released into the cytosol approximately at 12 min post-infection. Furthermore, the influence of the clathrin pathway in DENV-3 infective entry in other mammalian cell lines of human origin, such as A549, HepG2 and U937 cells, was evaluated demonstrating that variable entry pathways are employed depending on the host cell. Results show for the first time the simultaneous coexistence of infective and non -infective routes for DENV entry into the host cell, depending on the usage of clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

  3. Dengue-3 Virus Entry into Vero Cells: Role of Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis in the Outcome of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Piccini, Luana E.; Castilla, Viviana; Damonte, Elsa B.

    2015-01-01

    The endocytic uptake and intracellular trafficking for penetration of DENV-3 strain H-87 into Vero cells was analyzed by using several biochemical inhibitors and dominant negative mutants of cellular proteins. The results presented show that the infective entry of DENV-3 into Vero cells occurs through a non-classical endocytosis pathway dependent on low pH and dynamin, but non-mediated by clathrin. After uptake, DENV-3 transits through early endosomes to reach Rab 7-regulated late endosomes, and according with the half-time for ammonium chloride resistance viral nucleocapsid is released into the cytosol approximately at 12 min post-infection. Furthermore, the influence of the clathrin pathway in DENV-3 infective entry in other mammalian cell lines of human origin, such as A549, HepG2 and U937 cells, was evaluated demonstrating that variable entry pathways are employed depending on the host cell. Results show for the first time the simultaneous coexistence of infective and non -infective routes for DENV entry into the host cell, depending on the usage of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. PMID:26469784

  4. Cellular Uptake and Infection by Canine Parvovirus Involves Rapid Dynamin-Regulated Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis, Followed by Slower Intracellular Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Parker, John S. L.; Parrish, Colin R.

    2000-01-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) is a small, nonenveloped virus that is a host range variant of a virus which infected cats and changes in the capsid protein control the ability of the virus to infect canine cells. We used a variety of approaches to define the early stages of cell entry by CPV. Electron microscopy showed that virus particles concentrated within clathrin-coated pits and vesicles early in the uptake process and that the infecting particles were rapidly removed from the cell surface. Overexpression of a dominant interfering mutant of dynamin in the cells altered the trafficking of capsid-containing vesicles. There was a 40% decrease in the number of CPV-infected cells in mutant dynamin-expressing cells, as well as a ∼40% decrease in the number of cells in S phase of the cell cycle, which is required for virus replication. However, there was also up to 10-fold more binding of CPV to the surface of mutant dynamin-expressing cells than there was to uninduced cells, suggesting an increased receptor retention on the cell surface. In contrast, there was little difference in virus binding, virus infection rate, or cell cycle distribution between induced and uninduced cells expressing wild-type dynamin. CPV particles colocalized with transferrin in perinuclear endosomes but not with fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran, a marker for fluid-phase endocytosis. Cells treated with nanomolar concentrations of bafilomycin A1 were largely resistant to infection when the drug was added either 30 min before or 90 min after inoculation, suggesting that there was a lag between virus entering the cell by clathrin-mediated endocytosis and escape of the virus from the endosome. High concentrations of CPV particles did not permeabilize canine A72 or mink lung cells to α-sarcin, but canine adenovirus type 1 particles permeabilized both cell lines. These data suggest that the CPV entry and infection pathway is complex and involves multiple vesicular components. PMID:10644365

  5. A Feedback Loop between Dynamin and Actin Recruitment during Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Marcus J.; Lampe, Marko; Merrifield, Christien J.

    2012-01-01

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis proceeds by a sequential series of reactions catalyzed by discrete sets of protein machinery. The final reaction in clathrin-mediated endocytosis is membrane scission, which is mediated by the large guanosine triophosphate hydrolase (GTPase) dynamin and which may involve the actin-dependent recruitment of N-terminal containing BIN/Amphiphysin/RVS domain containing (N-BAR) proteins. Optical microscopy has revealed a detailed picture of when and where particular protein types are recruited in the ∼20–30 s preceding scission. Nevertheless, the regulatory mechanisms and functions that underpin protein recruitment are not well understood. Here we used an optical assay to investigate the coordination and interdependencies between the recruitment of dynamin, the actin cytoskeleton, and N-BAR proteins to individual clathrin-mediated endocytic scission events. These measurements revealed that a feedback loop exists between dynamin and actin at sites of membrane scission. The kinetics of dynamin, actin, and N-BAR protein recruitment were modulated by dynamin GTPase activity. Conversely, acute ablation of actin dynamics using latrunculin-B led to a ∼50% decrease in the incidence of scission, an ∼50% decrease in the amplitude of dynamin recruitment, and abolished actin and N-BAR recruitment to scission events. Collectively these data suggest that dynamin, actin, and N-BAR proteins work cooperatively to efficiently catalyze membrane scission. Dynamin controls its own recruitment to scission events by modulating the kinetics of actin and N-BAR recruitment to sites of scission. Conversely actin serves as a dynamic scaffold that concentrates dynamin and N-BAR proteins at sites of scission. PMID:22505844

  6. Visualization of clathrin-mediated endocytosis in live Drosophila egg chambers

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Anupma; Traub, Linton M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary In oviparous animals, clathrin-dependent endocytosis is often critical to stockpile a necessary supply of yolk within the maturing oocyte, which enables subsequent embryonic development. In the physically linked chains of maturing egg chambers within the Drosophila melanogaster ovary, a distinct, morphologically discernable, subset undergoes a massive burst clathrin-mediated endocytosis to accumulate yolk in a process termed vitellogenesis. Here, we describe how to prepare isolated ovaries to follow endocytosis, and detail approaches to follow live uptake of soluble reporters into vitellogenic Drosophila egg chambers. PMID:24947394

  7. Distinct CPT-induced deaths in lung cancer cells caused by clathrin-mediated internalization of CP micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu-Sheng; Cheng, Ru-You; Lo, Yu-Lun; Hsu, Chin; Chen, Su-Hwei; Chiu, Chien-Chih; Wang, Li-Fang

    2016-02-01

    We previously synthesized a chondroitin sulfate-graft-poly(ε-caprolactone) copolymer (H-CP) with a high content of poly(ε-caprolactone) (18.7 mol%), which self-assembled in water into a rod-like micelle to encapsulate hydrophobic camptothecin (CPT) in the core (micelle/CPT) for tumor-targeted drug delivery. As a result of the recognition of the micelle by CD44, the micelle/CPT entered CRL-5802 cells efficiently and released CPT efficaciously, resulting in higher tumor suppression than commercial CPT-11. In this study, H1299 cells were found to have a higher CD44 expression than CRL-5802 cells. However, the lower CD44-expressing CRL-5802 cells had a higher percentage of cell death and higher cellular uptake of the micelle/CPT than the higher CD44-expressing H1299 cells. Examination of the internalization pathway of the micelle/CPT in the presence of different endocytic chemical inhibitors showed that the CRL-5802 cells involved clathrin-mediated endocytosis, which was not found in the H1299 cells. Analysis of the cell cycle of the two cell lines exposed to the micelle/CPT revealed that the CRL-5802 cells arrested mainly in the S phase and the H1299 cells arrested mainly in the G2-M phase. A consistent result was also found in the evaluation of γ-H2AX expression, which was about three-fold higher in the CRL-5802 cells than in the H1299 cells. A near-infrared dye, IR780, was encapsulated into the micelle to observe the in vivo biodistribution of the micelle/IR780 in tumor-bearing mice. The CRL-5802 tumor showed a higher fluorescence intensity than the H1299 tumor at any tracing time after 1 h. Thus we tentatively concluded that CRL-5802 cells utilized the clathrin-mediated internalization pathway and arrested in the S phase on exposure to the micelle/CPT; all are possible reasons for the better therapeutic outcome in CRL-5802 cells than in H1299 cells.We previously synthesized a chondroitin sulfate-graft-poly(ε-caprolactone) copolymer (H-CP) with a high content of

  8. Entry of a Novel Marine DNA Virus, Singapore Grouper Iridovirus, into Host Cells Occurs via Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis and Macropinocytosis in a pH-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaowen; Huang, Xiaohong; Huang, Youhua; Hao, Xian; Xu, Haijiao; Cai, Mingjun

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Iridoviruses are nucleocytoplasmic DNA viruses which cause great economic losses in the aquaculture industry but also show significant threat to global biodiversity. However, a lack of host cells has resulted in poor progress in clarifying iridovirus behavior. We investigated the crucial events during virus entry using a combination of single-virus tracking and biochemical assays, based on the established virus-cell infection model for Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV). SGIV infection in host cells was strongly inhibited when cells were pretreated with drugs blocking clathrin-mediated endocytosis, including sucrose and chlorpromazine. Inhibition of key regulators of macropinocytosis, including Na+/H+ exchanger, Rac1 GTPase, p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1), protein kinase C (PKC), and myosin II, significantly reduced SGIV uptake. Cy5-labeled SGIV particles were observed to colocalize with clathrin and macropinosomes. In contrast, disruption of cellular cholesterol by methyl-β-cyclodextrin and nystatin had no effect on virus infection, suggesting that SGIV entered grouper cells via the clathrin-mediated endocytic pathway and macropinocytosis but not via caveola-dependent endocytosis. Furthermore, inhibitors of endosome acidification such as chloroquine and bafilomycin A1 blocked virus infection, indicating that SGIV entered cells in a pH-dependent manner. In addition, SGIV particles were observed to be transported along both microtubules and actin filaments, and intracellular SGIV motility was remarkably impaired by depolymerization of microtubules or actin filaments. The results of this study for the first time demonstrate that not only the clathrin-dependent pathway but also macropinocytosis are involved in fish DNA enveloped virus entry, thus providing a convenient tactic for exploring the life cycle of DNA viruses. IMPORTANCE Virus entry into host cells is critically important for initiating infections and is usually recognized as an ideal target for

  9. Osmotic Stress Modulates the Balance between Exocytosis and Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zwiewka, Marta; Nodzyński, Tomasz; Robert, Stéphanie; Vanneste, Steffen; Friml, Jiří

    2015-08-01

    The sessile life style of plants creates the need to deal with an often adverse environment, in which water availability can change on a daily basis, challenging the cellular physiology and integrity. Changes in osmotic conditions disrupt the equilibrium of the plasma membrane: hypoosmotic conditions increase and hyperosmotic environment decrease the cell volume. Here, we show that short-term extracellular osmotic treatments are closely followed by a shift in the balance between endocytosis and exocytosis in root meristem cells. Acute hyperosmotic treatments (ionic and nonionic) enhance clathrin-mediated endocytosis simultaneously attenuating exocytosis, whereas hypoosmotic treatments have the opposite effects. In addition to clathrin recruitment to the plasma membrane, components of early endocytic trafficking are essential during hyperosmotic stress responses. Consequently, growth of seedlings defective in elements of clathrin or early endocytic machinery is more sensitive to hyperosmotic treatments. We also found that the endocytotic response to a change of osmotic status in the environment is dominant over the presumably evolutionary more recent regulatory effect of plant hormones, such as auxin. These results imply that osmotic perturbation influences the balance between endocytosis and exocytosis acting through clathrin-mediated endocytosis. We propose that tension on the plasma membrane determines the addition or removal of membranes at the cell surface, thus preserving cell integrity.

  10. Deciphering dynamics of clathrin-mediated endocytosis in a living organism

    PubMed Central

    Heidotting, Spencer P.; Huber, Scott D.

    2016-01-01

    Current understanding of clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) dynamics is based on detection and tracking of fluorescently tagged clathrin coat components within cultured cells. Because of technical limitations inherent to detection and tracking of single fluorescent particles, CME dynamics is not characterized in vivo, so the effects of mechanical cues generated during development of multicellular organisms on formation and dissolution of clathrin-coated structures (CCSs) have not been directly observed. Here, we use growth rates of fluorescence signals obtained from short CCS intensity trace fragments to assess CME dynamics. This methodology does not rely on determining the complete lifespan of individual endocytic assemblies. Therefore, it allows for real-time monitoring of spatiotemporal changes in CME dynamics and is less prone to errors associated with particle detection and tracking. We validate the applicability of this approach to in vivo systems by demonstrating the reduction of CME dynamics during dorsal closure of Drosophila melanogaster embryos. PMID:27458134

  11. White spot syndrome virus enters crayfish hematopoietic tissue cells via clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiajun; Li, Fang; Wu, Junjun; Yang, Feng

    2015-12-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a major pathogen of aquacultured shrimp. However, the mechanism of its entry remains poorly understood. In this study, by analyzing the internalization of WSSV using crayfish hematopoietic tissue (HPT) cells, we showed that WSSV virions were engulfed by cell membrane invaginations sharing the features of clathrin-coated pits and then internalized into coated cytoplasmic vesicles. Further investigation indicated that WSSV internalization was significantly inhibited by chlorpromazine (CPZ) but not genistein. The internalized virions were colocalized with endogenous clathrin as well as transferrin which undergoes clathrin-dependent uptake. Preventing endosome acidification by ammonium chloride (NH4Cl) or chloroquine (CQ) dramatically reduced WSSV entry as well. Moreover, disturbance of dynamin activity or depletion of membrane cholesterol also blocked WSSV uptake. These data indicate that WSSV enters crayfish HPT cells via clathrin-mediated endocytosis in a pH-dependent manner, and membrane cholesterol as well as dynamin is critical for efficient viral entry.

  12. Protein Kinase C-dependent Ubiquitination and Clathrin-mediated Endocytosis of the Cationic Amino Acid Transporter CAT-1*

    PubMed Central

    Vina-Vilaseca, Arnau; Bender-Sigel, Julia; Sorkina, Tatiana; Closs, Ellen Ildicho; Sorkin, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Cationic amino acid transporter 1 (CAT-1) is responsible for the bulk of the uptake of cationic amino acids in most mammalian cells. Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) leads to down-regulation of the cell surface CAT-1. To examine the mechanisms of PKC-induced down-regulation of CAT-1, a functional mutant of CAT-1 (CAT-1-HA-GFP) was generated in which a hemagglutinin antigen (HA) epitope tag was introduced into the second extracellular loop and GFP was attached to the carboxyl terminus. CAT-1-HA-GFP was stably expressed in porcine aorthic endothelial and human epithelial kidney (HEK) 293 cells. Using the HA antibody internalization assay we have demonstrated that PKC-dependent endocytosis was strongly inhibited by siRNA depletion of clathrin heavy chain, indicating that CAT-1-HA-GFP internalization requires clathrin-coated pits. Internalized CAT-1-HA-GFP was accumulated in early, recycling, and late endosomes. PKC activation also resulted in ubiquitination of CAT-1. CAT-1 ubiquitination and endocytosis in phorbol ester-stimulated porcine aorthic endothelial and HEK293 cells were inhibited by siRNA knockdown of NEDD4-2 and NEDD4-1 E3 ubiquitin ligases, respectively. In contrast, ubiquitination and endocytosis of the dopamine transporter was dependent on NEDD4-2 in all cell types tested. Altogether, our data suggest that ubiquitination mediated by NEDD4-2 or NEDD4-1 leading to clathrin-mediated endocytosis is the common mode of regulation of various transporter proteins by PKC. PMID:21212261

  13. Light-regulated stapled peptides to inhibit protein-protein interactions involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Nevola, Laura; Martín-Quirós, Andrés; Eckelt, Kay; Camarero, Núria; Tosi, Sébastien; Llobet, Artur; Giralt, Ernest; Gorostiza, Pau

    2013-07-22

    Control of membrane traffic: Photoswitchable inhibitors of protein-protein interactions were applied to photoregulate clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) in living cells. Traffic light (TL) peptides acting as "stop" and "go" signals for membrane traffic can be used to dissect the role of CME in receptor internalization and in cell growth, division, and differentiation. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Protein Corona Modulates Uptake and Toxicity of Nanoceria via Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Mazzolini, Julie; Weber, Ralf J M; Chen, Hsueh-Shih; Khan, Abdullah; Guggenheim, Emily; Shaw, Robert K; Chipman, James K; Viant, Mark R; Rappoport, Joshua Z

    2016-08-01

    Particles present in diesel exhaust have been proposed as a significant contributor to the development of acute and chronic lung diseases, including respiratory infection and allergic asthma. Nanoceria (CeO2 nanoparticles) are used to increase fuel efficiency in internal combustion engines, are present in exhaust fumes, and could affect cells of the airway. Components from the environment such as biologically derived proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids can form a dynamic layer, commonly referred to as the "protein corona" which alters cellular nanoparticle interactions and internalization. Using confocal reflectance microscopy, we quantified nanoceria uptake by lung-derived cells in the presence and absence of a serum-derived protein corona. Employing mass spectrometry, we identified components of the protein corona, and demonstrated that the interaction between transferrin in the protein corona and the transferrin receptor is involved in mediating the cellular entry of nanoceria via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Furthermore, under these conditions nanoceria does not affect cell growth, viability, or metabolism, even at high concentration. Alternatively, despite the antioxidant capacity of nanoceria, in serum-free conditions these nanoparticles induce plasma membrane disruption and cause changes in cellular metabolism. Thus, our results identify a specific receptor-mediated mechanism for nanoceria entry, and provide significant insight into the potential for nanoparticle-dependent toxicity.

  15. Structural organization of the actin cytoskeleton at sites of clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Collins, Agnieszka; Warrington, Anthony; Taylor, Kenneth A; Svitkina, Tatyana

    2011-07-26

    The dynamic actin cytoskeleton plays an important role in clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME). However, its exact functions remain uncertain as a result of a lack of high-resolution structural information regarding actin architecture at endocytic sites. Using platinum replica electron microscopy in combination with electron tomography, we found that actin patches associated with clathrin-coated structures (CCSs) in cultured mouse cells consist of a densely branched actin network, in which actin filament barbed ends are oriented toward the CCS. The shape of the actin network varied from a small lateral patch at the periphery of shallow CCSs, to a collar-like arrangement around partly invaginated CCSs with actin filament barbed ends abutting the CCS neck, to a polarized comet tail in association with highly constricted or fully endocytosed CCSs. Our data suggest that the primary role of the actin cytoskeleton in CME is to constrict and elongate the bud neck and drive the endocytosed vesicles from the plasma membrane. Moreover, in these processes, barbed ends directly push onto the load, as in a conventional propulsion mechanism. Based on our findings, we propose a model for initiation, evolution, and function of the dendritic actin network at CCSs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Kinetics of cellular uptake of viruses and nanoparticles via clathrin-mediated endocytosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Anand; Berezhkovskii, Alexander; Nossal, Ralph

    2016-02-01

    Several viruses exploit clathrin-mediated endocytosis to gain entry into host cells. This process is also used extensively in biomedical applications to deliver nanoparticles (NPs) to diseased cells. The internalization of these nano-objects is controlled by the assembly of a clathrin-containing protein coat on the cytoplasmic side of the plasma membrane, which drives the invagination of the membrane and the formation of a cargo-containing endocytic vesicle. Current theoretical models of receptor-mediated endocytosis of viruses and NPs do not explicitly take coat assembly into consideration. In this paper we study cellular uptake of viruses and NPs with a focus on coat assembly. We characterize the internalization process by the mean time between the binding of a particle to the membrane and its entry into the cell. Using a coarse-grained model which maps the stochastic dynamics of coat formation onto a one-dimensional random walk, we derive an analytical formula for this quantity. A study of the dependence of the mean internalization time on NP size shows that there is an upper bound above which this time becomes extremely large, and an optimal size at which it attains a minimum. Our estimates of these sizes compare well with experimental data. We also study the sensitivity of the obtained results on coat parameters to identify factors which significantly affect the internalization kinetics.

  17. Phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate 4-kinase regulates early endosomal dynamics during clathrin-mediated endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Endocytic turnover is essential for the regulation of the protein composition and function of the plasma membrane, and thus affects the plasma membrane levels of many receptors. In Drosophila melanogaster photoreceptors, photon absorption by the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) rhodopsin 1 (Rh1; also known as NinaE) triggers its endocytosis through clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME). We find that CME of Rh1 is regulated by phosphatidylinositol 5 phosphate 4-kinase (PIP4K). Flies lacking PIP4K show mislocalization of Rh1 on expanded endomembranes within the cell body. This mislocalization of Rh1 was dependent on the formation of an expanded Rab5-positive compartment. The Rh1-trafficking defect in PIP4K-depleted cells could be suppressed by downregulating Rab5 function or by selectively reconstituting PIP4K in the PI3P-enriched early endosomal compartment of photoreceptors. We also found that loss of PIP4K was associated with increased CME and an enlarged Rab5-positive compartment in cultured Drosophila cells. Collectively, our findings define PIP4K as a novel regulator of early endosomal homeostasis during CME. PMID:28507272

  18. Phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate 4-kinase regulates early endosomal dynamics during clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Kamalesh, Kumari; Trivedi, Deepti; Toscano, Sarah; Sharma, Sanjeev; Kolay, Sourav; Raghu, Padinjat

    2017-07-01

    Endocytic turnover is essential for the regulation of the protein composition and function of the plasma membrane, and thus affects the plasma membrane levels of many receptors. In Drosophila melanogaster photoreceptors, photon absorption by the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) rhodopsin 1 (Rh1; also known as NinaE) triggers its endocytosis through clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME). We find that CME of Rh1 is regulated by phosphatidylinositol 5 phosphate 4-kinase (PIP4K). Flies lacking PIP4K show mislocalization of Rh1 on expanded endomembranes within the cell body. This mislocalization of Rh1 was dependent on the formation of an expanded Rab5-positive compartment. The Rh1-trafficking defect in PIP4K-depleted cells could be suppressed by downregulating Rab5 function or by selectively reconstituting PIP4K in the PI3P-enriched early endosomal compartment of photoreceptors. We also found that loss of PIP4K was associated with increased CME and an enlarged Rab5-positive compartment in cultured Drosophila cells. Collectively, our findings define PIP4K as a novel regulator of early endosomal homeostasis during CME. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Disruption of clathrin-mediated trafficking causes centrosome overduplication and senescence

    PubMed Central

    Olszewski, Maciej B.; Chandris, Panagiotis; Park, Bum-Chan; Eisenberg, Evan; Greene, Lois E.

    2013-01-01

    The Hsc70 cochaperone, G cyclin-associated kinase (GAK), has been shown to be essential for the chaperoning of clathrin by Hsc70 in the cell. In this study, we used conditional GAK knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) to determine the effect of completely inhibiting clathrin-dependent trafficking on the cell cycle. After GAK was knocked out, the cells developed the unusual phenotype of having multiple centrosomes, but at the same time failed to divide and ultimately became senescent. To explain this phenotype, we examined the signaling profile and found that mitogenic stimulation of the GAK KO cells and the control cells were similar except for increased phosphosylation of Akt. In addition, the disruption of intracellular trafficking caused by knocking out GAK destabilized the lysosomal membranes, resulting in DNA damage due to iron leakage. Knocking down clathrin heavy chain or inhibiting dynamin largely reproduced the GAK KO phenotype, but inhibiting only clathrin-mediated endocytosis by knocking down AP2 caused growth arrest and centrosome overduplication, but no DNA damage or senescence. We conclude that disruption of clathrin-dependent trafficking induces senescence accompanied by centrosome overduplication because of a combination of DNA damage and changes in mitogenic signaling that uncouples centrosomal duplication from DNA replication. PMID:24138026

  20. ENTH and ANTH domain proteins participate in AP2-independent clathrin-mediated endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Manna, Paul T.; Gadelha, Catarina; Puttick, Amy E.; Field, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) is a major route of entry into eukaryotic cells. A core of evolutionarily ancient genes encodes many components of this system but much of our mechanistic understanding of CME is derived from a phylogenetically narrow sampling of a few model organisms. In the parasite Trypanosoma brucei, which is distantly related to the better characterised animals and fungi, exceptionally fast endocytic turnover aids its evasion of the host immune system. Although clathrin is absolutely essential for this process, the adaptor protein complex 2 (AP2) has been secondarily lost, suggesting mechanistic divergence. Here, we characterise two phosphoinositide-binding monomeric clathrin adaptors, T. brucei (Tb)EpsinR and TbCALM, which in trypanosomes are represented by single genes, unlike the expansions present in animals and fungi. Depletion of these gene products reveals essential, but partially redundant, activities in CME. Ultrastructural analysis of TbCALM and TbEpsinR double-knockdown cells demonstrated severe defects to clathrin-coated pit formation and morphology associated with a dramatic inhibition of endocytosis. Depletion of TbCALM alone, however, produced a distinct lysosomal segregation phenotype, indicating an additional non-redundant role for this protein. Therefore, TbEpsinR and TbCALM represent ancient phosphoinositide-binding proteins with distinct and vital roles in AP2-independent endocytosis. PMID:25908855

  1. Cadherin-6B undergoes macropinocytosis and clathrin-mediated endocytosis during cranial neural crest cell EMT

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhan, Rangarajan; Taneyhill, Lisa A.

    2015-01-01

    The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is important for the formation of migratory neural crest cells during development and is co-opted in human diseases such as cancer metastasis. Chick premigratory cranial neural crest cells lose intercellular contacts, mediated in part by Cadherin-6B (Cad6B), migrate extensively, and later form a variety of adult derivatives. Importantly, modulation of Cad6B is crucial for proper neural crest cell EMT. Although Cad6B possesses a long half-life, it is rapidly lost from premigratory neural crest cell membranes, suggesting the existence of post-translational mechanisms during EMT. We have identified a motif in the Cad6B cytoplasmic tail that enhances Cad6B internalization and reduces the stability of Cad6B upon its mutation. Furthermore, we demonstrate for the first time that Cad6B is removed from premigratory neural crest cells through cell surface internalization events that include clathrin-mediated endocytosis and macropinocytosis. Both of these processes are dependent upon the function of dynamin, and inhibition of Cad6B internalization abrogates neural crest cell EMT and migration. Collectively, our findings reveal the significance of post-translational events in controlling cadherins during neural crest cell EMT and migration. PMID:25795298

  2. Pan1 regulates transitions between stages of clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Bradford, Mary Katherine; Whitworth, Karen; Wendland, Beverly

    2015-04-01

    Endocytosis is a well-conserved process by which cells invaginate small portions of the plasma membrane to create vesicles containing extracellular and transmembrane cargo proteins. Dozens of proteins and hundreds of specific binding interactions are needed to coordinate and regulate these events. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a powerful model system with which to study clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME). Pan1 is believed to be a scaffolding protein due to its interactions with numerous proteins that act throughout the endocytic process. Previous research characterized many Pan1 binding interactions, but due to Pan1's essential nature, the exact mechanisms of Pan1's function in endocytosis have been difficult to define. We created a novel Pan1-degron allele, Pan1-AID, in which Pan1 can be specifically and efficiently degraded in <1 h upon addition of the plant hormone auxin. The loss of Pan1 caused a delay in endocytic progression and weakened connections between the coat/actin machinery and the membrane, leading to arrest in CME. In addition, we determined a critical role for the central region of Pan1 in endocytosis and viability. The regions important for endocytosis and viability can be separated, suggesting that Pan1 may have a distinct role in the cell that is essential for viability.

  3. Membrane Tension Inhibits Deformation by Coat Proteins in Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassinger, Julian; Drubin, David; Oster, George; Rangamani, Padmini

    2016-02-01

    In clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), clathrin and various adaptor proteins coat a patch of the plasma membrane, which is reshaped to form a budded vesicle. Experimental studies have demonstrated that elevated membrane tension can inhibit bud formation by a clathrin coat. In this study, we investigate the impact of membrane tension on the mechanics of membrane budding by simulating clathrin coats that either grow in area or progressively induce greater curvature. At low membrane tension, progressively increasing the area of a curvature-generating coat causes the membrane to smoothly evolve from a flat to budded morphology, whereas the membrane remains essentially flat at high membrane tensions. Interestingly, at physiologically relevant, intermediate membrane tensions, the shape evolution of the membrane undergoes a snapthrough instability in which increasing coat area causes the membrane to "snap" from an open, U-shaped bud to a closed, $\\Omega$-shaped bud. This instability is accompanied by a large energy barrier, which could cause a developing endocytic pit to stall if the binding energy of additional coat is insufficient to overcome this barrier. Similar results were found for a coat of constant area in which the spontaneous curvature progressively increases. Additionally, a pulling force on the bud, simulating a force from actin polymerization, is sufficient to drive a transition from an open to closed bud, overcoming the energy barrier opposing this transition.

  4. A High Precision Survey of the Molecular Dynamics of Mammalian Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Marcus J.; Perrais, David; Merrifield, Christien J.

    2011-01-01

    Dual colour total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy is a powerful tool for decoding the molecular dynamics of clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME). Typically, the recruitment of a fluorescent protein–tagged endocytic protein was referenced to the disappearance of spot-like clathrin-coated structure (CCS), but the precision of spot-like CCS disappearance as a marker for canonical CME remained unknown. Here we have used an imaging assay based on total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to detect scission events with a resolution of ∼2 s. We found that scission events engulfed comparable amounts of transferrin receptor cargo at CCSs of different sizes and CCS did not always disappear following scission. We measured the recruitment dynamics of 34 types of endocytic protein to scission events: Abp1, ACK1, amphiphysin1, APPL1, Arp3, BIN1, CALM, CIP4, clathrin light chain (Clc), cofilin, coronin1B, cortactin, dynamin1/2, endophilin2, Eps15, Eps8, epsin2, FBP17, FCHo1/2, GAK, Hip1R, lifeAct, mu2 subunit of the AP2 complex, myosin1E, myosin6, NECAP, N-WASP, OCRL1, Rab5, SNX9, synaptojanin2β1, and syndapin2. For each protein we aligned ∼1,000 recruitment profiles to their respective scission events and constructed characteristic “recruitment signatures” that were grouped, as for yeast, to reveal the modular organization of mammalian CME. A detailed analysis revealed the unanticipated recruitment dynamics of SNX9, FBP17, and CIP4 and showed that the same set of proteins was recruited, in the same order, to scission events at CCSs of different sizes and lifetimes. Collectively these data reveal the fine-grained temporal structure of CME and suggest a simplified canonical model of mammalian CME in which the same core mechanism of CME, involving actin, operates at CCSs of diverse sizes and lifetimes. PMID:21445324

  5. The TWD40-2 protein and the AP2 complex cooperate in the clathrin-mediated endocytosis of cellulose synthase to regulate cellulose biosynthesis

    DOE PAGES

    Bashline, Logan; Li, Shundai; Zhu, Xiaoyu; ...

    2015-09-28

    Here, cellulose biosynthesis is performed exclusively by plasma membrane-localized cellulose synthases (CESAs). Therefore, the trafficking of CESAs to and from the plasma membrane is an important mechanism for regulating cellulose biosynthesis. CESAs were recently identified as cargo proteins of the classic adaptor protein 2 (AP2) complex of the clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) pathway. The AP2 complex of the CME pathway is conserved in yeast, animals, and plants, and has been well-characterized in many systems. In contrast, the recently discovered TPLATE complex (TPC), which is proposed to function as a CME adaptor complex, is only conserved in plants and a few othermore » eukaryotes. In this study, we discovered that the TWD40-2 protein, a putative member of the TPC, is also important for the endocytosis of CESAs. Genetic analysis between TWD40-2 and AP2M of the AP2 complex revealed that the roles of TWD40-2 in CME are both distinct from and cooperative with the AP2 complex. Loss of efficient CME in twd40-2-3 resulted in the unregulated overaccumulation of CESAs at the plasma membrane. In seedlings of twd40-2-3 and other CME-deficient mutants, a direct correlation was revealed between endocytic deficiency and cellulose content deficiency, highlighting the importance of controlled CESA endocytosis in regulating cellulose biosynthesis.« less

  6. The TWD40-2 protein and the AP2 complex cooperate in the clathrin-mediated endocytosis of cellulose synthase to regulate cellulose biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Bashline, Logan; Li, Shundai; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Gu, Ying

    2015-10-13

    Cellulose biosynthesis is performed exclusively by plasma membrane-localized cellulose synthases (CESAs). Therefore, the trafficking of CESAs to and from the plasma membrane is an important mechanism for regulating cellulose biosynthesis. CESAs were recently identified as cargo proteins of the classic adaptor protein 2 (AP2) complex of the clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) pathway. The AP2 complex of the CME pathway is conserved in yeast, animals, and plants, and has been well-characterized in many systems. In contrast, the recently discovered TPLATE complex (TPC), which is proposed to function as a CME adaptor complex, is only conserved in plants and a few other eukaryotes. In this study, we discovered that the TWD40-2 protein, a putative member of the TPC, is also important for the endocytosis of CESAs. Genetic analysis between TWD40-2 and AP2M of the AP2 complex revealed that the roles of TWD40-2 in CME are both distinct from and cooperative with the AP2 complex. Loss of efficient CME in twd40-2-3 resulted in the unregulated overaccumulation of CESAs at the plasma membrane. In seedlings of twd40-2-3 and other CME-deficient mutants, a direct correlation was revealed between endocytic deficiency and cellulose content deficiency, highlighting the importance of controlled CESA endocytosis in regulating cellulose biosynthesis.

  7. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis of FITC-albumin in alveolar type II epithelial cell line RLE-6TN.

    PubMed

    Yumoto, Ryoko; Nishikawa, Hiromi; Okamoto, Miho; Katayama, Hirokazu; Nagai, Junya; Takano, Mikihisa

    2006-05-01

    We examined mechanisms of FITC-albumin uptake by alveolar type II epithelial cells using cultured RLE-6TN cells. Alkaline phosphatase activity and the expression of cytokeratin 19 mRNA, which are characteristic features of alveolar type II epithelial cells, were detected in RLE-6TN cells. The uptake of FITC-albumin by the cells was time and temperature dependent and showed the saturation kinetics of high- and low-affinity transport systems. FITC-albumin uptake was inhibited by native albumin, by chemically modified albumin, and by metabolic inhibitors and bafilomycin A(1), an inhibitor of vacuolar H(+)-ATPase. Confocal laser scanning microscopic analysis after FITC-albumin uptake showed punctate localization of fluorescence in the cells, which was partly localized in lysosomes. FITC-albumin taken up by the cells gradually degraded over time, as shown by fluoroimage analyzer after SDS-PAGE. The uptake of FITC-albumin by RLE-6TN cells was not inhibited by nystatin, indomethacin, or methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (inhibitors of caveolae-mediated endocytosis) but was inhibited by phenylarsine oxide and chlorpromazine (inhibitors of clathrin-mediated endocytosis) in a concentration-dependent manner. Uptake was also inhibited by potassium depletion and hypertonicity, conditions known to inhibit clathrin-mediated endocytosis. These results indicate that the uptake of FITC-albumin in cultured alveolar type II epithelial cells, RLE-6TN, is mediated by clathrin-mediated but not by caveolae-mediated endocytosis, and intracellular FITC-albumin is gradually degraded in lysosomes. Possible receptors involved in this endocytic system are discussed.

  8. Connexin 31.1 degradation requires the Clathrin-mediated autophagy in NSCLC cell H1299.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xingli; Ruan, Zhenchao; Yang, Xiufang; Chu, Kaili; Wu, Hai; Li, Yao; Huang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Connexins have relative short half-lives. Connexin 31.1 (Cx31.1) was newly reported to be down-regulated in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines, and displayed tumour-suppressive properties. However, no reports describing how a cell regulates Cx31.1 level were found. In this study, Cx31.1 was suggested to be degraded through both ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy. Blockage of UPS with MG-132 increased Cx31.1 level, but could not inhibit the degradation of Cx31.1 completely. In H1299 cells stably expressing Cx31.1, Cx31.1 reduced when autophagy was induced through starvation or Brefeldin A treatment. Knockdown of autophagy-related protein ATG5 could increase the cellular level of Cx31.1 both under normal growth condition and starvation-induced autophagy. Colocalization of Cx31.1 and autophagy marker light chain 3 (LC3) was revealed by immunofluorescence analysis. Coimmunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence showed that Cx31.1 might interact with clathrin heavy chain which was newly reported to regulate autophagic lysosome reformation (ALR) and controls lysosome homoeostasis. When clathrin expression was knockdown by siRNA treatment, the level of Cx31.1 increased prominently both under normal growth condition and starvation-induced autophagy. Under starvation-induced autophagy, LC3-II levels were slightly accumulated with siCla. treatment compared to that of siNC, which could be ascribed to that clathrin knockdown impaired the late stage of autophagy, ALR. Taken together, we found autophagy contributed to Cx31.1 degradation, and clathrin might be involved in the autophagy of Cx31.1.

  9. Visualizing clathrin-mediated endocytosis of G protein-coupled receptors at single-event resolution via TIRF microscopy.

    PubMed

    Soohoo, Amanda L; Bowersox, Shanna L; Puthenveedu, Manojkumar A

    2014-10-20

    Many important signaling receptors are internalized through the well-studied process of clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME). Traditional cell biological assays, measuring global changes in endocytosis, have identified over 30 known components participating in CME, and biochemical studies have generated an interaction map of many of these components. It is becoming increasingly clear, however, that CME is a highly dynamic process whose regulation is complex and delicate. In this manuscript, we describe the use of Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy to directly visualize the dynamics of components of the clathrin-mediated endocytic machinery, in real time in living cells, at the level of individual events that mediate this process. This approach is essential to elucidate the subtle changes that can alter endocytosis without globally blocking it, as is seen with physiological regulation. We will focus on using this technique to analyze an area of emerging interest, the role of cargo composition in modulating the dynamics of distinct clathrin-coated pits (CCPs). This protocol is compatible with a variety of widely available fluorescence probes, and may be applied to visualizing the dynamics of many cargo molecules that are internalized from the cell surface.

  10. Integrin-beta3 clusters recruit clathrin-mediated endocytic machinery in the absence of traction force.

    PubMed

    Yu, Cheng-han; Rafiq, Nisha Bte Mohd; Cao, Fakun; Zhou, Yuhuan; Krishnasamy, Anitha; Biswas, Kabir Hassan; Ravasio, Andrea; Chen, Zhongwen; Wang, Yu-Hsiu; Kawauchi, Keiko; Jones, Gareth E; Sheetz, Michael P

    2015-10-28

    The turnover of integrin receptors is critical for cell migration and adhesion dynamics. Here we find that force development at integrins regulates adaptor protein recruitment and endocytosis. Using mobile RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) ligands on supported lipid membranes (RGD membranes) and rigid RGD ligands on glass (RGD-glass), we find that matrix force-dependent integrin signals block endocytosis. Dab2, an adaptor protein of clathrin-mediated endocytosis, is not recruited to activated integrin-beta3 clusters on RGD-glass; however, it is recruited to integrin-mediated adhesions on RGD membranes. Further, when force generation is inhibited on RGD-glass, Dab2 binds to integrin-beta3 clusters. Dab2 binding to integrin-beta3 excludes other adhesion-related adaptor proteins, such as talin. The clathrin-mediated endocytic machinery combines with Dab2 to facilitate the endocytosis of RGD-integrin-beta3 clusters. From these observations, we propose that loss of traction force on ligand-bound integrin-beta3 causes recruitment of Dab2/clathrin, resulting in endocytosis of integrins.

  11. Integrin-beta3 clusters recruit clathrin-mediated endocytic machinery in the absence of traction force

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Cheng-han; Rafiq, Nisha Bte Mohd; Cao, Fakun; Zhou, Yuhuan; Krishnasamy, Anitha; Biswas, Kabir Hassan; Ravasio, Andrea; Chen, Zhongwen; Wang, Yu-Hsiu; Kawauchi, Keiko; Jones, Gareth E.; Sheetz, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    The turnover of integrin receptors is critical for cell migration and adhesion dynamics. Here we find that force development at integrins regulates adaptor protein recruitment and endocytosis. Using mobile RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) ligands on supported lipid membranes (RGD membranes) and rigid RGD ligands on glass (RGD-glass), we find that matrix force-dependent integrin signals block endocytosis. Dab2, an adaptor protein of clathrin-mediated endocytosis, is not recruited to activated integrin-beta3 clusters on RGD-glass; however, it is recruited to integrin-mediated adhesions on RGD membranes. Further, when force generation is inhibited on RGD-glass, Dab2 binds to integrin-beta3 clusters. Dab2 binding to integrin-beta3 excludes other adhesion-related adaptor proteins, such as talin. The clathrin-mediated endocytic machinery combines with Dab2 to facilitate the endocytosis of RGD-integrin-beta3 clusters. From these observations, we propose that loss of traction force on ligand-bound integrin-beta3 causes recruitment of Dab2/clathrin, resulting in endocytosis of integrins. PMID:26507506

  12. Inhibiting clathrin-mediated endocytosis of the leucine-rich G protein-coupled Receptor-5 diminishes cell fitness.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Joshua C; Rochelle, Lauren K; Ray, Caroline; Pack, Thomas F; Bock, Cheryl B; Lubkov, Veronica; Lyerly, H Kim; Waggoner, Alan S; Barak, Larry S; Caron, Marc G

    2017-03-08

    The leucine-rich G protein-coupled receptor-5 (LGR5) is expressed in adult tissue stem cells of many epithelia and its overexpression is negatively correlated with cancer prognosis. LGR5 potentiates WNT/β-catenin signaling through its unique constitutive internalization property that clears negative regulators of the WNT-receptor complex from the membrane. However, both the mechanism and physiological relevance of LGR5 internalization is unclear. Therefore, a natural product library was screened to discover LGR5 internalization inhibitors and gain mechanistic insight into LGR5 internalization. The plant lignan justicidin B, blocked the constitutive internalization of LGR5. Justicidin B is structurally similar to more potent vacuolar-type H+-ATPase (vATPase) inhibitors, which all inhibited LGR5 internalization by blocking clathrin-mediated endocytosis. We then tested the physiological relevance of LGR5 internalization blockade in vivo. A LGR5-rainbow (LBOW) mouse line was engineered to express three different LGR5 isoforms along with unique fluorescent protein lineage reporters in the same mouse. In this manner, the effects of each isoform on cell fate can be simultaneously assessed through simple fluorescent imaging for each lineage reporter. LBOW mice express three different forms of LGR5, which includes a wild-type form that constitutively internalizes and two mutant forms whose internalization properties have been compromised by genetic perturbations within the carboxyl-terminal tail. LBOW was activated in the intestinal epithelium and a year-long lineage tracing course revealed that genetic blockade of LGR5 internalization diminished cell fitness. Together these data provide proof-of-concept genetic evidence that blocking the clathrin-mediated endocytosis of LGR5 could be used to pharmacologically control cell behavior.

  13. Doxorubicin-Nanocarriers Enhance Doxorubicin Uptake and Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis in Drug-Resistant Ovarian Cancer Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Mohammed

    We tested Fe3O4 TiO2 metal oxide core-shell nanocomposites as carriers for doxorubicin and investigated the distribution of "doxorubicin-nanocarriers" and free doxorubicin in doxorubicin-sensitive and -resistant ovarian cancer cell lines. We hypothesized that doxorubicin-nanocarriers (DOX-NCs) would increase doxorubicin uptake in a drug-resistant cell line. Our expectation was that doxorubicin would bind to the TiO2 surface either by a labile monodentate link or through adsorption and subsequent disassociation from the nanocomposite carriers upon acidification in cell endosomes. Released doxorubicin could then traverse the intracellular milieu to enter the cell nucleus, overcoming the p-glycoprotein mediated doxorubicin resistance. Using a combination of confocal fluorescent microscopy, flow cytometry, and X-ray fluorescence microscopy we were able to evaluate the uptake and distribution of doxorubicin-nanocarriers in cells. Moreover, we found that nanocomposite treatment modulates the simultaneous uptake and distribution of fluorescent transferrin in ovarian cancer cell lines. This increased transferrin uptake still occurred by clathrin-mediated endocytosis; it appears that the nanocomposites and DOX-NCs alike may interfere with trans-Golgi apparatus function.

  14. Sorting of Clathrin-Independent Cargo Proteins Depends on Rab35 Delivered by Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Dipannita; Donaldson, Julie G

    2015-09-01

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) and clathrin-independent endocytosis (CIE) co-exist in most cells but little is known about their communication and coordination. Here we show that when CME was inhibited, endocytosis by CIE continued but endosomal trafficking of CIE cargo proteins was altered. CIE cargo proteins that normally traffic directly into Arf6-associated tubules after internalization and avoid degradation (CD44, CD98 and CD147) now trafficked to lysosomes and were degraded. The endosomal tubules were also absent and Arf6-GTP levels were elevated. The altered trafficking, loss of the tubular endosomal network and elevated Arf6-GTP levels caused by inhibition of CME were rescued by expression of Rab35, a Rab associated with clathrin-coated vesicles, or its effector ACAPs, Arf6 GTPase activating proteins (GAP) that inactivate Arf6. Furthermore, siRNA knockdown of Rab35 recreated the phenotype of CME ablation on CIE cargo trafficking without altering endocytosis of transferrin. These observations suggest that Rab35 serves as a CME detector and that loss of CME, or Rab35 input, leads to elevated Arf6-GTP and shifts the sorting of CIE cargo proteins to lysosomes and degradation.

  15. The apoptotic engulfment protein Ced-6 participates in clathrin-mediated yolk uptake in Drosophila egg chambers

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Anupma; Watkins, Simon C.; Traub, Linton M.

    2012-01-01

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis and phagocytosis are both selective surface internalization processes but have little known mechanistic similarity or interdependence. Here we show that the phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain protein Ced-6, a well-established phagocytosis component that operates as a transducer of so-called “eat-me” signals during engulfment of apoptotic cells and microorganisms, is expressed in the female Drosophila germline and that Ced-6 expression correlates with ovarian follicle development. Ced-6 exhibits all the known biochemical properties of a clathrin-associated sorting protein, yet ced-6–null flies are semifertile despite massive accumulation of soluble yolk precursors in the hemolymph. This is because redundant sorting signals within the cytosolic domain of the Drosophila vitellogenin receptor Yolkless, a low density lipoprotein receptor superfamily member, occur; a functional atypical dileucine signal binds to the endocytic AP-2 clathrin adaptor directly. Nonetheless, the Ced-6 PTB domain specifically recognizes the noncanonical Yolkless FXNPXA sorting sequence and in HeLa cells promotes the rapid, clathrin-dependent uptake of a Yolkless chimera lacking the distal dileucine signal. Ced-6 thus operates in vivo as a clathrin adaptor. Because the human Ced-6 orthologue GULP similarly binds to clathrin machinery, localizes to cell surface clathrin-coated structures, and is enriched in placental clathrin-coated vesicles, new possibilities for Ced-6/Gulp operation during phagocytosis must be considered. PMID:22398720

  16. NECAP 1 regulates AP-2 interactions to control vesicle size, number, and cargo during clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Brigitte; Murphy, Sebastian; Dokainish, Hatem; Girard, Martine; Gudheti, Manasa V; Kozlov, Guennadi; Halin, Marilene; Philie, Jacynthe; Jorgensen, Erik M; Gehring, Kalle; McPherson, Peter S

    2013-10-01

    AP-2 is the core-organizing element in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. During the formation of clathrin-coated vesicles, clathrin and endocytic accessory proteins interact with AP-2 in a temporally and spatially controlled manner, yet it remains elusive as to how these interactions are regulated. Here, we demonstrate that the endocytic protein NECAP 1, which binds to the α-ear of AP-2 through a C-terminal WxxF motif, uses an N-terminal PH-like domain to compete with clathrin for access to the AP-2 β2-linker, revealing a means to allow AP-2-mediated coordination of accessory protein recruitment and clathrin polymerization at sites of vesicle formation. Knockdown and functional rescue studies demonstrate that through these interactions, NECAP 1 and AP-2 cooperate to increase the probability of clathrin-coated vesicle formation and to control the number, size, and cargo content of the vesicles. Together, our data demonstrate that NECAP 1 modulates the AP-2 interactome and reveal a new layer of organizational control within the endocytic machinery.

  17. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis is involved in Tomato yellow leaf curl virus transport across the midgut barrier of its whitefly vector.

    PubMed

    Pan, Li-Long; Chen, Qun-Fang; Zhao, Juan-Juan; Guo, Tao; Wang, Xiao-Wei; Hariton-Shalev, Aliza; Czosnek, Henryk; Liu, Shu-Sheng

    2017-02-01

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) is a begomovirus transmitted by the whitefly Bemisia tabaci. The circulative translocation of the virus in the insect is known in its broad line. However, transit of TYLCV from the digestive tract into the haemolymph is poorly understood. We studied the involvement of clathrin in this process by disrupting the clathrin-mediated endocytosis and the endosome network using inhibitor feeding, antibody blocking and dsRNA silencing. We monitored the quantities of TYLCV in the whitefly and virus transmission efficiency. Following endocytosis and endosome network disruption, the quantity of virus was higher in the midgut relative to that of the whole insect body, and the quantity of virus in the haemolymph was reduced. The transmission efficiency of TYLCV by the treated insects was also reduced. These findings indicate that clathrin-mediated endocytosis and endosomes play an important role in the transport of TYLCV across the whitefly midgut. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Hypothesis review: are clathrin-mediated endocytosis and clathrin-dependent membrane and protein trafficking core pathophysiological processes in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder?

    PubMed

    Schubert, K O; Föcking, M; Prehn, J H M; Cotter, D R

    2012-07-01

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) is the best-characterized mechanism governing cellular membrane and protein trafficking. In this hypothesis review, we integrate recent evidence implicating CME and related cellular trafficking mechanisms in the pathophysiology of psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. The evidence includes proteomic and genomic findings implicating proteins and genes of the clathrin interactome. Additionally, several important candidate genes for schizophrenia, such as dysbindin, are involved in processes closely linked to CME and membrane trafficking. We discuss that key aspects of psychosis neuropathology such as synaptic dysfunction, white matter changes and aberrant neurodevelopment are all influenced by clathrin-dependent processes, and that other cellular trafficking mechanisms previously linked to psychoses interact with the clathrin interactome in important ways. Furthermore, many antipsychotic drugs have been shown to affect clathrin-interacting proteins. We propose that the targeted pharmacological manipulation of the clathrin interactome may offer fruitful opportunities for novel treatments of schizophrenia.

  19. The Ebola virus glycoprotein mediates entry via a non-classical dynamin-dependent macropinocytic pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Mulherkar, Nirupama; Raaben, Matthijs; Torre, Juan Carlos de la; Whelan, Sean P.; Chandran, Kartik

    2011-10-25

    Ebola virus (EBOV) has been reported to enter cultured cell lines via a dynamin-2-independent macropinocytic pathway or clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The route(s) of productive EBOV internalization into physiologically relevant cell types remain unexplored, and viral-host requirements for this process are incompletely understood. Here, we use electron microscopy and complementary chemical and genetic approaches to demonstrate that the viral glycoprotein, GP, induces macropinocytic uptake of viral particles into cells. GP's highly-glycosylated mucin domain is dispensable for virus-induced macropinocytosis, arguing that interactions between other sequences in GP and the host cell surface are responsible. Unexpectedly, we also found a requirement for the large GTPase dynamin-2, which is proposed to be dispensable for several types of macropinocytosis. Our results provide evidence that EBOV uses an atypical dynamin-dependent macropinocytosis-like entry pathway to enter Vero cells, adherent human peripheral blood-derived monocytes, and a mouse dendritic cell line.

  20. A dilemma for viruses and giant viruses: which endocytic pathway to use to enter cells?

    PubMed

    Ghigo, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Viruses must enter host cells to deliver their genetic material and accessory proteins. Endocytosis offers to viruses the opportunity to enter host cells. However, endocytosis is a complex phenomenon that includes different mechanisms, clathrin-mediated endocytosis, caveolin-mediated endocytosis, macropinocytosis, and phagocytosis. Here, I describe the ways used by different viruses to exploit these endocytic pathways.

  1. C-terminal of human histamine H1 receptors regulates their agonist-induced clathrin-mediated internalization and G-protein signaling.

    PubMed

    Hishinuma, Shigeru; Nozawa, Hiroki; Akatsu, Chizuru; Shoji, Masaru

    2016-11-01

    It has been suggested that the agonist-induced internalization of G-protein-coupled receptors from the cell surface into intracellular compartments regulates cellular responsiveness. We previously reported that Gq/11 -protein-coupled human histamine H1 receptors internalized via clathrin-dependent mechanisms upon stimulation with histamine. However, the molecular determinants of H1 receptors responsible for agonist-induced internalization remain unclear. In this study, we evaluated the roles of the intracellular C-terminal of human histamine H1 receptors tagged with hemagglutinin (HA) at the N-terminal in histamine-induced internalization in Chinese hamster ovary cells. The histamine-induced internalization was evaluated by the receptor binding assay with [(3) H]mepyramine and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy with an anti-HA antibody. We found that histamine-induced internalization was inhibited under hypertonic conditions or by pitstop, a clathrin terminal domain inhibitor, but not by filipin or nystatin, disruptors of the caveolar structure and function. The histamine-induced internalization was also inhibited by truncation of a single amino acid, Ser487, located at the end of the intracellular C-terminal of H1 receptors, but not by its mutation to alanine. In contrast, the receptor-G-protein coupling, which was evaluated by histamine-induced accumulation of [(3) H]inositol phosphates, was potentiated by truncation of Ser487, but was lost by its mutation to alanine. These results suggest that the intracellular C-terminal of human H1 receptors, which only comprises 17 amino acids (Cys471-Ser487), plays crucial roles in both clathrin-dependent internalization of H1 receptors and G-protein signaling, in which truncation of Ser487 and its mutation to alanine are revealed to result in biased signaling toward activation of G-proteins and clathrin-mediated internalization, respectively.

  2. Clathrin light chains are required for the gyrating-clathrin recycling pathway and thereby promote cell migration.

    PubMed

    Majeed, Sophia R; Vasudevan, Lavanya; Chen, Chih-Ying; Luo, Yi; Torres, Jorge A; Evans, Timothy M; Sharkey, Andrew; Foraker, Amy B; Wong, Nicole M L; Esk, Christopher; Freeman, Theresa A; Moffett, Ashley; Keen, James H; Brodsky, Frances M

    2014-05-23

    The clathrin light chain (CLC) subunits participate in several membrane traffic pathways involving both clathrin and actin, through binding the actin-organizing huntingtin-interacting proteins (Hip). However, CLCs are dispensable for clathrin-mediated endocytosis of many cargoes. Here we observe that CLC depletion affects cell migration through Hip binding and reduces surface expression of β1-integrin by interference with recycling following normal endocytosis of inactive β1-integrin. CLC depletion and expression of a modified CLC also inhibit the appearance of gyrating (G)-clathrin structures, known mediators of rapid recycling of transferrin receptor from endosomes. Expression of the modified CLC reduces β1-integrin and transferrin receptor recycling, as well as cell migration, implicating G-clathrin in these processes. Supporting a physiological role for CLC in migration, the CLCb isoform of CLC is upregulated in migratory human trophoblast cells during uterine invasion. Together, these studies establish CLCs as mediating clathrin-actin interactions needed for recycling by G-clathrin during migration.

  3. Development of water requirement factors for biomass conversion pathway.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shikhar; Kumar, Amit

    2011-01-01

    Published data were used to develop an integrated spreadsheet-based model to estimate total water requirement for 12 biomass conversion pathways. The water requirement for crop production was attributed only to the grains in the estimates since agricultural residues are produced irrespective of their use for fuel or electricity. Corn stover- and wheat straw-based ethanol production pathways are water efficient, requiring only 0.3 l, whereas biopower production pathways (i.e. direct combustion and bio-oil production) require about 0.8-0.9 l of water per MJ. Wheat- and corn-based ethanol production pathways consume 77 and 108 l of water per MJ, respectively. Utilization of switchgrass for production of ethanol, biopower through the direct combustion, and pyrolysis consume 128, 187 and 229 l of water per MJ, respectively. Biodiesel production from canola seed consumes 124 l of water per MJ. Corn stover- and wheat straw-based conversion pathways are most water efficient.

  4. FYVE1/FREE1 Interacts with the PYL4 ABA Receptor and Mediates its Delivery to the Vacuolar Degradation Pathway.

    PubMed

    Belda-Palazon, Borja; Rodriguez, Lesia; Fernandez, Maria A; Castillo, Mari-Cruz; Anderson, Erin A; Gao, Caiji; González-Guzmán, Miguel; Peirats-Llobet, Marta; Zhao, Qiong; De Winne, Nancy; Gevaert, Kris; De Jaeger, Geert; Jiang, Liwen; Leon, Jose; Mullen, Robert T; Rodriguez, Pedro L

    2016-08-05

    Recently, we described the ubiquitylation of PYL4 and PYR1 by the RING E3 ubiquitin ligase RSL1 at the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis thaliana. This suggested that ubiquitylated ABA receptors might be targeted to the vacuolar degradation pathway because such ubiquitylation is usually an internalization signal for the endocytic route. Here, we show that FYVE1 (previously termed FREE1), a recently described component of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery, interacted with RSL1-receptor complexes and recruited PYL4 to endosomal compartments. Although the ESCRT pathway has been assumed to be reserved for integral membrane proteins, we show the involvement of this pathway in the degradation of ABA receptors, which can be associated with membranes but are not integral membrane proteins. Knock-down fyve1 alleles are hypersensitive to ABA, illustrating the biological relevance of the ESCRT pathway for the modulation of ABA signaling. In addition, fyve1 mutants are impaired in the targeting of ABA receptors for vacuolar degradation, leading to increased accumulation of PYL4 and an enhanced response to ABA. Pharmacological and genetic approaches revealed a dynamic turnover of ABA receptors from the plasma membrane to the endosomal/vacuolar degradation pathway, which was mediated by FYVE1 and was dependent on RSL1. This process involves clathrin-mediated endocytosis and trafficking of PYL4 through the ESCRT pathway, which helps to regulate the turnover of ABA receptors and attenuate ABA signaling. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  5. Level of PICALM, a key component of clathrin-mediated endocytosis, is correlated with levels of phosphotau and autophagy-related proteins and is associated with tau inclusions in AD, PSP and Pick disease.

    PubMed

    Ando, Kunie; Tomimura, Karen; Sazdovitch, Véronique; Suain, Valérie; Yilmaz, Zehra; Authelet, Michèle; Ndjim, Marième; Vergara, Cristina; Belkouch, Mounir; Potier, Marie-Claude; Duyckaerts, Charles; Brion, Jean-Pierre

    2016-10-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms in PICALM, a key component of clathrin-mediated endocytosis machinery, have been identified as genetic susceptibility loci for late onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD). We previously reported that PICALM protein levels were decreased in AD brains and that PICALM was co-localised with neurofibrillary tangles in LOAD, familial AD with PSEN1 mutations and Down syndrome. In the present study, we analysed PICALM expression, cell localisation and association with pathological cellular inclusions in other tauopathies and in non-tau related neurodegenerative diseases. We observed that PICALM was associated with neuronal tau pathology in Pick disease and in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and co-localised with both 3R and 4R tau positive inclusions unlike in corticobasal degeneration (CBD) or in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD)-MAPT P301L. PICALM immunoreactivities were not detected in tau-positive tufted astrocytes in PSP, astrocytic plaques in CBD, Lewy bodies in Lewy body disease, diffuse type (LBD) and in TDP-43-positive inclusions in FTLD. In the frontal cortex in tauopathies, the ratio of insoluble to soluble PICALM was increased while the level of soluble PICALM was decreased and was inversely correlated with the level of phosphotau. PICALM decrease was also significantly correlated with increased LC3-II and decreased Beclin-1 levels in tauopathies and in non-tau related neurodegenerative diseases. These results suggest that there is a close relationship between abnormal PICALM processing, tau pathology and impairment of autophagy in human neurodegenerative diseases.

  6. Drosophila Epsin mediates a select endocytic pathway that DSL ligands must enter to activate Notch.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weidong; Struhl, Gary

    2004-11-01

    Recent findings suggest that Delta/Serrate/Lag2 (DSL) signals activate Notch by an unprecedented mechanism that requires the ligands to be endocytosed in signal-sending cells to activate the receptor in signal-receiving cells. Here, we show that cells devoid of Epsin, a conserved adaptor protein for Clathrin-mediated endocytosis, behave normally except that they cannot send DSL signals. Surprisingly, we find that Epsin is not required for bulk endocytosis of DSL proteins. Instead, Epsin appears to be essential for targeting DSL proteins to a special endocytic pathway that they must enter to acquire signaling activity. We present evidence that DSL proteins must be mono-ubiquitinated to be targeted by Epsin to this pathway. Furthermore, we show that the requirements for both Epsin and mono-ubiquitination can be bypassed by introducing the internalization signal that mediates endocytosis and recycling of the Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) receptor. We propose that Epsin is essential for DSL signaling because it targets mono-ubiquitinated DSL proteins to an endocytic recycling compartment that they must enter to be converted into active ligands. Alternatively Epsin may be required to target mono-ubiquitinated DSL proteins to a particular subclass of coated pits that have special properties essential for Notch activation.

  7. SAMP8 mice have altered hippocampal gene expression in long term potentiation, phosphatidylinositol signaling, and endocytosis pathways.

    PubMed

    Armbrecht, Harvey J; Siddiqui, Akbar M; Green, Michael; Farr, Susan A; Kumar, Vijaya B; Banks, William A; Patrick, Ping; Shah, Gul N; Morley, John E

    2014-01-01

    The senescence-accelerated mouse (SAMP8) strain exhibits decreased learning and memory and increased amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide accumulation at 12 months. To detect differences in gene expression in SAMP8 mice, we used a control mouse that was a 50% cross between SAMP8 and CD-1 mice and which showed no memory deficits (50% SAMs). We then compared gene expression in the hippocampus of 4- and 12-month-old SAMP8 and control mice using Affymetrix gene arrays. At 12 months, but not at 4 months, pathway analysis revealed significant differences in the long term potentiation (6 genes), phosphatidylinositol signaling (6 genes), and endocytosis (10 genes) pathways. The changes in long term potentiation included mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling (N-ras, cAMP responsive element binding protein [CREB], protein phosphatase inhibitor 1) and Ca-dependent signaling (inositol triphosphate [ITP] receptors 1 and 2 and phospholipase C). Changes in phosphatidylinositol signaling genes suggested altered signaling through phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, and Western blotting revealed phosphorylation changes in serine/threonine protein kinase AKT and 70S6K. Changes in the endocytosis pathway involved genes related to clathrin-mediated endocytosis (dynamin and clathrin). Endocytosis is required for receptor recycling, is involved in Aβ metabolism, and is regulated by phosphatidylinositol signaling. In summary, these studies demonstrate altered gene expression in 3 SAMP8 hippocampal pathways associated with memory formation and consolidation. These pathways might provide new therapeutic targets in addition to targeting Aβ metabolism itself.

  8. Requirements for a conservative protein translocation pathway in chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Vojta, Lea; Soll, Jürgen; Bölter, Bettina

    2007-06-12

    The chloroplast inner envelope translocon subunit Tic110 is imported via a soluble stromal translocation intermediate. In this study an in-organellar import system is established which allows for an accumulation of this intermediate in order to analyze its requirements for reexport. All results demonstrate that the re-export of Tic110 from the soluble intermediate stage into the inner envelope requires ATP hydrolysis, which cannot be replaced by other NTPs. Furthermore, the molecular chaperone Hsp93 seems prominently involved in the reexport pathway of Tic110, because other stromal intermediates like that of the oxygen evolving complex subunit OE33 (iOE33) en route to the thylakoid lumen interacts preferentially with Hsp70.

  9. Efficient Endocytic Uptake and Maturation in Drosophila Oocytes Requires Dynamitin/p50

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guojun; Sanghavi, Paulomi; Bollinger, Kathryn E.; Perry, Libby; Marshall, Brendan; Roon, Penny; Tanaka, Tsubasa; Nakamura, Akira; Gonsalvez, Graydon B.

    2015-01-01

    Dynactin is a multi-subunit complex that functions as a regulator of the Dynein motor. A central component of this complex is Dynamitin/p50 (Dmn). Dmn is required for endosome motility in mammalian cell lines. However, the extent to which Dmn participates in the sorting of cargo via the endosomal system is unknown. In this study, we examined the endocytic role of Dmn using the Drosophila melanogaster oocyte as a model. Yolk proteins are internalized into the oocyte via clathrin-mediated endocytosis, trafficked through the endocytic pathway, and stored in condensed yolk granules. Oocytes that were depleted of Dmn contained fewer yolk granules than controls. In addition, these oocytes accumulated numerous endocytic intermediate structures. Particularly prominent were enlarged endosomes that were relatively devoid of Yolk proteins. Ultrastructural and genetic analyses indicate that the endocytic intermediates are produced downstream of Rab5. Similar phenotypes were observed upon depleting Dynein heavy chain (Dhc) or Lis1. Dhc is the motor subunit of the Dynein complex and Lis1 is a regulator of Dynein activity. We therefore propose that Dmn performs its function in endocytosis via the Dynein motor. Consistent with a role for Dynein in endocytosis, the motor colocalized with the endocytic machinery at the oocyte cortex in an endocytosis-dependent manner. Our results suggest a model whereby endocytic activity recruits Dynein to the oocyte cortex. The motor along with its regulators, Dynactin and Lis1, functions to ensure efficient endocytic uptake and maturation. PMID:26265702

  10. Delineation of the endocytic pathway of substance P and its seven-transmembrane domain NK1 receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Grady, E F; Garland, A M; Gamp, P D; Lovett, M; Payan, D G; Bunnett, N W

    1995-01-01

    Many of the actions of the neuropeptide substance P (SP) that are mediated by the neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1-R) desensitize and resensitize, which may be associated with NK1-R endocytosis and recycling. We delineated this endocytic pathway in transfected cells by confocal microscopy using cyanine 3-SP and NK1-R antibodies. SP and the NK1-R were internalized into the same clathrin immunoreactive vesicles, and then sorted into different compartments. The NK1-R was colocalized with a marker of early endosomes, but not with markers of late endosomes or lysosomes. We quantified the NK1-R at the cell surface by incubating cells with an antibody to an extracellular epitope. After exposure to SP, there was a loss and subsequent recovery of surface NK1-R. The loss was prevented by hypertonic sucrose and potassium depletion, inhibitors of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Recovery was independent of new protein synthesis because it was unaffected by cycloheximide. Recovery required endosomal acidification because it was prevented by an H(+)-ATPase inhibitor. The fate of internalized 125I-SP was examined by chromatography. SP was intact at the cell surface and in early endosomes, but slowly degraded in perinuclear vesicles. We conclude that SP induces clathrin-dependent internalization of the NK1-R. The SP/NK1-R complex dissociates in acidified endosomes. SP is degraded, whereas the NK1-R recycles to the cell surface. Images PMID:7545030

  11. Requirements for innate immune pathways in environmentally induced autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that environmental triggers in combination with genetic and stochastic factors play an important role in spontaneous autoimmune disease. Although the specific environmental agents and how they promote autoimmunity remain largely unknown, in part because of diverse etiologies, environmentally induced autoimmune models can provide insights into potential mechanisms. Studies of idiopathic and environmentally induced systemic autoimmunity show that they are mediated by common adaptive immune response genes. By contrast, although the innate immune system is indispensable for autoimmunity, there are clear differences in the molecular and cellular innate components that mediate specific systemic autoimmune diseases, suggesting distinct autoimmune-promoting pathways. Some of these differences may be related to the bifurcation of toll-like receptor signaling that distinguishes interferon regulatory factor 7-mediated type I interferon production from nuclear factor-κB-driven proinflammatory cytokine expression. Accordingly, idiopathic and pristane-induced systemic autoimmunity require both type I interferon and proinflammatory cytokines whereas the less aggressive mercury-induced autoimmunity, although dependent on nucleic acid-binding toll-like receptors, does not require type I interferon but needs proinflammatory cytokines. Scavenger receptors and the inflammasome may contribute to silica-induced autoimmunity. Greater understanding of the innate mechanisms responsible for idiopathic and environmentally induced autoimmunity should yield new information into the processes that instigate and drive systemic autoimmunity. PMID:23557436

  12. African Swine Fever Virus Gets Undressed: New Insights on the Entry Pathway.

    PubMed

    Andrés, Germán

    2017-02-15

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is a large, multienveloped DNA virus composed of a genome-containing core successively wrapped by an inner lipid envelope, an icosahedral protein capsid, and an outer lipid envelope. In keeping with this structural complexity, recent studies have revealed an intricate entry program. This Gem highlights how ASFV uses two alternative pathways, macropinocytosis and clathrin-mediated endocytosis, to enter into the host macrophage and how the endocytosed particles undergo a stepwise, low pH-driven disassembly leading to inner envelope fusion and core delivery in the cytoplasm. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  13. Murine Polyomavirus Cell Surface Receptors Activate Distinct Signaling Pathways Required for Infection

    PubMed Central

    O’Hara, Samantha D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Virus binding to the cell surface triggers an array of host responses, including activation of specific signaling pathways that facilitate steps in virus entry. Using mouse polyomavirus (MuPyV), we identified host signaling pathways activated upon virus binding to mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Pathways activated by MuPyV included the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), FAK/SRC, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. Gangliosides and α4-integrin are required receptors for MuPyV infection. MuPyV binding to both gangliosides and the α4-integrin receptors was required for activation of the PI3K pathway; however, either receptor interaction alone was sufficient for activation of the MAPK pathway. Using small-molecule inhibitors, we confirmed that the PI3K and FAK/SRC pathways were required for MuPyV infection, while the MAPK pathway was dispensable. Mechanistically, the PI3K pathway was required for MuPyV endocytosis, while the FAK/SRC pathway enabled trafficking of MuPyV along microtubules. Thus, MuPyV interactions with specific cell surface receptors facilitate activation of signaling pathways required for virus entry and trafficking. Understanding how different viruses manipulate cell signaling pathways through interactions with host receptors could lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets for viral infection. PMID:27803182

  14. Requirements for F-BAR proteins TOCA-1 and TOCA-2 in actin dynamics and membrane trafficking during Caenorhabditis elegans oocyte growth and embryonic epidermal morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Chiara; Troglio, Flavia; Bai, Zhiyong; Patel, Falshruti B; Zucconi, Adriana; Malabarba, Maria Grazia; Disanza, Andrea; Stradal, Theresia B; Cassata, Giuseppe; Confalonieri, Stefano; Hardin, Jeffrey D; Soto, Martha C; Grant, Barth D; Scita, Giorgio

    2009-10-01

    The TOCA family of F-BAR-containing proteins bind to and remodel lipid bilayers via their conserved F-BAR domains, and regulate actin dynamics via their N-Wasp binding SH3 domains. Thus, these proteins are predicted to play a pivotal role in coordinating membrane traffic with actin dynamics during cell migration and tissue morphogenesis. By combining genetic analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans with cellular biochemical experiments in mammalian cells, we showed that: i) loss of CeTOCA proteins reduced the efficiency of Clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) in oocytes. Genetic interference with CeTOCAs interacting proteins WSP-1 and WVE-1, and other components of the WVE-1 complex, produced a similar effect. Oocyte endocytosis defects correlated well with reduced egg production in these mutants. ii) CeTOCA proteins localize to cell-cell junctions and are required for proper embryonic morphogenesis, to position hypodermal cells and to organize junctional actin and the junction-associated protein AJM-1. iii) Double mutant analysis indicated that the toca genes act in the same pathway as the nematode homologue of N-WASP/WASP, wsp-1. Furthermore, mammalian TOCA-1 and C. elegans CeTOCAs physically associated with N-WASP and WSP-1 directly, or WAVE2 indirectly via ABI-1. Thus, we propose that TOCA proteins control tissues morphogenesis by coordinating Clathrin-dependent membrane trafficking with WAVE and N-WASP-dependent actin-dynamics.

  15. Requirements for F-BAR Proteins TOCA-1 and TOCA-2 in Actin Dynamics and Membrane Trafficking during Caenorhabditis elegans Oocyte Growth and Embryonic Epidermal Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Falshruti B.; Zucconi, Adriana; Malabarba, Maria Grazia; Disanza, Andrea; Stradal, Theresia B.; Cassata, Giuseppe; Confalonieri, Stefano; Hardin, Jeffrey D.; Soto, Martha C.; Grant, Barth D.; Scita, Giorgio

    2009-01-01

    The TOCA family of F-BAR–containing proteins bind to and remodel lipid bilayers via their conserved F-BAR domains, and regulate actin dynamics via their N-Wasp binding SH3 domains. Thus, these proteins are predicted to play a pivotal role in coordinating membrane traffic with actin dynamics during cell migration and tissue morphogenesis. By combining genetic analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans with cellular biochemical experiments in mammalian cells, we showed that: i) loss of CeTOCA proteins reduced the efficiency of Clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) in oocytes. Genetic interference with CeTOCAs interacting proteins WSP-1 and WVE-1, and other components of the WVE-1 complex, produced a similar effect. Oocyte endocytosis defects correlated well with reduced egg production in these mutants. ii) CeTOCA proteins localize to cell–cell junctions and are required for proper embryonic morphogenesis, to position hypodermal cells and to organize junctional actin and the junction-associated protein AJM-1. iii) Double mutant analysis indicated that the toca genes act in the same pathway as the nematode homologue of N-WASP/WASP, wsp-1. Furthermore, mammalian TOCA-1 and C. elegans CeTOCAs physically associated with N-WASP and WSP-1 directly, or WAVE2 indirectly via ABI-1. Thus, we propose that TOCA proteins control tissues morphogenesis by coordinating Clathrin-dependent membrane trafficking with WAVE and N-WASP–dependent actin-dynamics. PMID:19798448

  16. Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Entry into Host Cells Occurs through the Multivesicular Body and Requires ESCRT Regulators

    PubMed Central

    Shtanko, Olena; Nikitina, Raisa A.; Altuntas, Cengiz Z.; Chepurnov, Alexander A.; Davey, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a tick-borne bunyavirus causing outbreaks of severe disease in humans, with a fatality rate approaching 30%. There are no widely accepted therapeutics available to prevent or treat the disease. CCHFV enters host cells through clathrin-mediated endocytosis and is subsequently transported to an acidified compartment where the fusion of virus envelope with cellular membranes takes place. To better understand the uptake pathway, we sought to identify host factors controlling CCHFV transport through the cell. We demonstrate that after passing through early endosomes in a Rab5-dependent manner, CCHFV is delivered to multivesicular bodies (MVBs). Virus particles localized to MVBs approximately 1 hour after infection and affected the distribution of the organelle within cells. Interestingly, blocking Rab7 activity had no effect on association of the virus with MVBs. Productive virus infection depended on phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activity, which meditates the formation of functional MVBs. Silencing Tsg101, Vps24, Vps4B, or Alix/Aip1, components of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) pathway controlling MVB biogenesis, inhibited infection of wild-type virus as well as a novel pseudotyped vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) bearing CCHFV glycoprotein, supporting a role for the MVB pathway in CCHFV entry. We further demonstrate that blocking transport out of MVBs still allowed virus entry while preventing vesicular acidification, required for membrane fusion, trapped virions in the MVBs. These findings suggest that MVBs are necessary for infection and are the sites of virus-endosome membrane fusion. PMID:25233119

  17. A non-canonical ESCRT pathway, including histidine domain phosphotyrosine phosphatase (HD-PTP), is used for down-regulation of virally ubiquitinated MHC class I.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Michael D J; Piper, Siân C; Bright, Nicholas A; Evans, Jennifer L; Boname, Jessica M; Bowers, Katherine; Lehner, Paul J; Luzio, J Paul

    2015-10-01

    The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV) K3 viral gene product effectively down-regulates cell surface MHC class I. K3 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that promotes Lys(63)-linked polyubiquitination of MHC class I, providing the signal for clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Endocytosis is followed by sorting into the intralumenal vesicles (ILVs) of multivesicular bodies (MVBs) and eventual delivery to lysosomes. The sorting of MHC class I into MVBs requires many individual proteins of the four endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs). In HeLa cells expressing the KSHV K3 ubiquitin ligase, the effect of RNAi-mediated depletion of individual proteins of the ESCRT-0 and ESCRT-I complexes and three ESCRT-III proteins showed that these are required to down-regulate MHC class I. However, depletion of proteins of the ESCRT-II complex or of the ESCRT-III protein, VPS20 (vacuolar protein sorting 20)/CHMP6 (charged MVB protein 6), failed to prevent the loss of MHC class I from the cell surface. Depletion of histidine domain phosphotyrosine phosphatase (HD-PTP) resulted in an increase in the cell surface concentration of MHC class I in HeLa cells expressing the KSHV K3 ubiquitin ligase. Rescue experiments with wild-type (WT) and mutant HD-PTP supported the conclusion that HD-PTP acts as an alternative to ESCRT-II and VPS20/CHMP6 as a link between the ESCRT-I and those ESCRT-III protein(s) necessary for ILV formation. Thus, the down-regulation of cell surface MHC class I, polyubiquitinated by the KSHV K3 ubiquitin ligase, does not employ the canonical ESCRT pathway, but instead utilizes an alternative pathway in which HD-PTP replaces ESCRT-II and VPS20/CHMP6.

  18. Uptake of Helicobacter pylori Vesicles Is Facilitated by Clathrin-Dependent and Clathrin-Independent Endocytic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Olofsson, Annelie; Nygård Skalman, Lars; Obi, Ikenna; Lundmark, Richard

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteria shed a diverse set of outer membrane vesicles that function as transport vehicles to deliver effector molecules and virulence factors to host cells. Helicobacter pylori is a gastric pathogen that infects half of the world’s population, and in some individuals the infection progresses into peptic ulcer disease or gastric cancer. Here we report that intact vesicles from H. pylori are internalized by clathrin-dependent endocytosis and further dynamin-dependent processes, as well as in a cholesterol-sensitive manner. We analyzed the uptake of H. pylori vesicles by gastric epithelial cells using a method that we refer to as quantification of internalized substances (qIS). The qIS assay is based on a near-infrared dye with a cleavable linker that enables the specific quantification of internalized substances after exposure to reducing conditions. Both chemical inhibition and RNA interference in combination with the qIS assay showed that H. pylori vesicles enter gastric epithelial cells via both clathrin-mediated endocytosis and additional endocytic processes that are dependent on dynamin. Confocal microscopy revealed that H. pylori vesicles colocalized with clathrin and dynamin II and with markers of subsequent endosomal and lysosomal trafficking. Interestingly, however, knockdown of components required for caveolae had no significant effect on internalization and knockdown of components required for clathrin-independent carrier (CLIC) endocytosis increased internalization of H. pylori vesicles. Furthermore, uptake of vesicles by both clathrin-dependent and -independent pathways was sensitive to depletion, but not sequestering, of cholesterol in the host cell membrane suggesting that membrane fluidity influences the efficiency of H. pylori vesicle uptake. PMID:24846379

  19. The Drosophila rolled locus encodes a MAP kinase required in the sevenless signal transduction pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, W H; Zavitz, K H; Dickson, B; van der Straten, A; Brunner, D; Hafen, E; Zipursky, S L

    1994-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases have been proposed to play a critical role in receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)-mediated signal transduction pathways. Although genetic and biochemical studies of RTK pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster and mammals have revealed remarkable similarities, a genetic requirement for MAP kinases in RTK signaling has not been established. During retinal development in Drosophila, the sevenless (Sev) RTK is required for development of the R7 photoreceptor cell. Components of the signal transduction pathway activated by Sev in the R7 precursor include proteins encoded by the gap1, drk, Sos, ras1 and raf loci. In this report we present evidence that a Drosophila MAP kinase, ERK-A, is encoded by the rolled locus and is required downstream of raf in the Sev signal transduction pathway. Images PMID:8157002

  20. The Toll-Dorsal Pathway Is Required for Resistance to Viral Oral Infection in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Álvaro Gil; Naylor, Huw; Esteves, Sara Santana; Pais, Inês Silva; Martins, Nelson Eduardo; Teixeira, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Pathogen entry route can have a strong impact on the result of microbial infections in different hosts, including insects. Drosophila melanogaster has been a successful model system to study the immune response to systemic viral infection. Here we investigate the role of the Toll pathway in resistance to oral viral infection in D. melanogaster. We show that several Toll pathway components, including Spätzle, Toll, Pelle and the NF-kB-like transcription factor Dorsal, are required to resist oral infection with Drosophila C virus. Furthermore, in the fat body Dorsal is translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and a Toll pathway target gene reporter is upregulated in response to Drosophila C Virus infection. This pathway also mediates resistance to several other RNA viruses (Cricket paralysis virus, Flock House virus, and Nora virus). Compared with control, viral titres are highly increased in Toll pathway mutants. The role of the Toll pathway in resistance to viruses in D. melanogaster is restricted to oral infection since we do not observe a phenotype associated with systemic infection. We also show that Wolbachia and other Drosophila-associated microbiota do not interact with the Toll pathway-mediated resistance to oral infection. We therefore identify the Toll pathway as a new general inducible pathway that mediates strong resistance to viruses with a route-specific role. These results contribute to a better understanding of viral oral infection resistance in insects, which is particularly relevant in the context of transmission of arboviruses by insect vectors. PMID:25473839

  1. Iron-rich ferritin in the hypoxia-tolerant rodent Spalax ehrenbergi: a naturally-occurring biomarker confirms the internalization and pathways of intracellular macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Iancu, Theodore C; Arad, Talmon; Shams, Imad; Manov, Irena

    2014-09-01

    The discovery of pits/caveolae in the plasmalemma advanced the study of macromolecule internalization. "Transcytosis" describes the transport of macromolecular cargo from one front of a polarized cell to the other within membrane-bounded carrier(s), via endocytosis, intracellular trafficking and exocytosis. Clathrin-mediated transcytosis is used extensively by epithelial cells, while caveolae-mediated transcytosis mostly occurs in endothelial cells. The internalization pathways were monitored by various markers, including radioisotopes, nanoparticles, enzymes, immunostains, and fluorophores. We describe an internalization pathway identified using a naturally-occurring biomarker, in vivo assembled ferritin, containing electron-dense iron cores. Iron, an essential trace metal for most living species and iron homeostasis, is crucial for cellular life. Ferritin is a ubiquitous and highly conserved archeoprotein whose main function is to store a reserve iron supply inside the cytoplasm in a non-toxic form. Ferritin is present in all organisms which have a metabolic requirement for iron and in even in organisms whose taxonomic rank is very low. The newborns of the blind mole, Spalax ehrenbergi, are born and live in a hypoxic environment and have significant iron overload in their liver and heart, but their iron metabolism has not been previously studied. These newborns, which are evolutionarily adapted to fluctuations in the environmental oxygen, have a unique ability to sequester transplacental iron and store it in ferritin without any signs of iron toxicity. Using the ferrihydrite cores of ferritin, we were able to monitor the ferritin internalization from portals of its entry into the cytosol of hepatocytes and cardiomyocytes and into the lysosomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Humidity sensation requires both mechanosensory and thermosensory pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Joshua; Vidal-Gadea, Andrés G.; Makay, Alex; Lanam, Carolyn; Pierce-Shimomura, Jonathan T.

    2014-01-01

    All terrestrial animals must find a proper level of moisture to ensure their health and survival. The cellular-molecular basis for sensing humidity is unknown in most animals, however. We used the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to uncover a mechanism for sensing humidity. We found that whereas C. elegans showed no obvious preference for humidity levels under standard culture conditions, worms displayed a strong preference after pairing starvation with different humidity levels, orienting to gradients as shallow as 0.03% relative humidity per millimeter. Cell-specific ablation and rescue experiments demonstrate that orientation to humidity in C. elegans requires the obligatory combination of distinct mechanosensitive and thermosensitive pathways. The mechanosensitive pathway requires a conserved DEG/ENaC/ASIC mechanoreceptor complex in the FLP neuron pair. Because humidity levels influence the hydration of the worm’s cuticle, our results suggest that FLP may convey humidity information by reporting the degree that subcuticular dendritic sensory branches of FLP neurons are stretched by hydration. The thermosensitive pathway requires cGMP-gated channels in the AFD neuron pair. Because humidity levels affect evaporative cooling, AFD may convey humidity information by reporting thermal flux. Thus, humidity sensation arises as a metamodality in C. elegans that requires the integration of parallel mechanosensory and thermosensory pathways. This hygrosensation strategy, first proposed by Thunberg more than 100 y ago, may be conserved because the underlying pathways have cellular and molecular equivalents across a wide range of species, including insects and humans. PMID:24843133

  3. Humidity sensation requires both mechanosensory and thermosensory pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Russell, Joshua; Vidal-Gadea, Andrés G; Makay, Alex; Lanam, Carolyn; Pierce-Shimomura, Jonathan T

    2014-06-03

    All terrestrial animals must find a proper level of moisture to ensure their health and survival. The cellular-molecular basis for sensing humidity is unknown in most animals, however. We used the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to uncover a mechanism for sensing humidity. We found that whereas C. elegans showed no obvious preference for humidity levels under standard culture conditions, worms displayed a strong preference after pairing starvation with different humidity levels, orienting to gradients as shallow as 0.03% relative humidity per millimeter. Cell-specific ablation and rescue experiments demonstrate that orientation to humidity in C. elegans requires the obligatory combination of distinct mechanosensitive and thermosensitive pathways. The mechanosensitive pathway requires a conserved DEG/ENaC/ASIC mechanoreceptor complex in the FLP neuron pair. Because humidity levels influence the hydration of the worm's cuticle, our results suggest that FLP may convey humidity information by reporting the degree that subcuticular dendritic sensory branches of FLP neurons are stretched by hydration. The thermosensitive pathway requires cGMP-gated channels in the AFD neuron pair. Because humidity levels affect evaporative cooling, AFD may convey humidity information by reporting thermal flux. Thus, humidity sensation arises as a metamodality in C. elegans that requires the integration of parallel mechanosensory and thermosensory pathways. This hygrosensation strategy, first proposed by Thunberg more than 100 y ago, may be conserved because the underlying pathways have cellular and molecular equivalents across a wide range of species, including insects and humans.

  4. Dissection of the Influenza A Virus Endocytic Routes Reveals Macropinocytosis as an Alternative Entry Pathway

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Erik; Tscherne, Donna M.; Wienholts, Marleen J.; Cobos-Jiménez, Viviana; Scholte, Florine; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Rottier, Peter J. M.; de Haan, Cornelis A. M.

    2011-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) enters host cells upon binding of its hemagglutinin glycoprotein to sialylated host cell receptors. Whereas dynamin-dependent, clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) is generally considered as the IAV infection pathway, some observations suggest the occurrence of an as yet uncharacterized alternative entry route. By manipulating entry parameters we established experimental conditions that allow the separate analysis of dynamin-dependent and -independent entry of IAV. Whereas entry of IAV in phosphate-buffered saline could be completely inhibited by dynasore, a specific inhibitor of dynamin, a dynasore-insensitive entry pathway became functional in the presence of fetal calf serum. This finding was confirmed with the use of small interfering RNAs targeting dynamin-2. In the presence of serum, both IAV entry pathways were operational. Under these conditions entry could be fully blocked by combined treatment with dynasore and the amiloride derivative EIPA, the hallmark inhibitor of macropinocytosis, whereas either drug alone had no effect. The sensitivity of the dynamin-independent entry pathway to inhibitors or dominant-negative mutants affecting actomyosin dynamics as well as to a number of specific inhibitors of growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases and downstream effectors thereof all point to the involvement of macropinocytosis in IAV entry. Consistently, IAV particles and soluble FITC-dextran were shown to co-localize in cells in the same vesicles. Thus, in addition to the classical dynamin-dependent, clathrin-mediated endocytosis pathway, IAV enters host cells by a dynamin-independent route that has all the characteristics of macropinocytosis. PMID:21483486

  5. Rho/Rock signal transduction pathway is required for MSC tenogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Maharam, Edward; Yaport, Miguel; Villanueva, Nathaniel L; Akinyibi, Takintope; Laudier, Damien; He, Zhiyong; Leong, Daniel J; Sun, Hui B

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based treatments have shown promise for improving tendon healing and repair. MSCs have the potential to differentiate into multiple lineages in response to select chemical and physical stimuli, including into tenocytes. Cell elongation and cytoskeletal tension have been shown to be instrumental to the process of MSC differentiation. Previous studies have shown that inhibition of stress fiber formation leads MSCs to default toward an adipogenic lineage, which suggests that stress fibers are required for MSCs to sense the environmental factors that can induce differentiation into tenocytes. As the Rho/ROCK signal transduction pathway plays a critical role in both stress fiber formation and in cell sensation, we examined whether the activation of this pathway was required when inducing MSC tendon differentiation using rope-like silk scaffolds. To accomplish this, we employed a loss-of-function approach by knocking out ROCK, actin and myosin (two other components of the pathway) using the specific inhibitors Y-27632, Latrunculin A and blebbistatin, respectively. We demonstrated that independently disrupting the cytoskeleton and the Rho/ROCK pathway abolished the expression of tendon differentiation markers and led to a loss of spindle morphology. Together, these studies suggest that the tension that is generated by MSC elongation is essential for MSC teno-differentiation and that the Rho/ROCK pathway is a critical mediator of tendon differentiation on rope-like silk scaffolds.

  6. Heat-shock transcription factor (HSF)-1 pathway required for Caenorhabditis elegans immunity.

    PubMed

    Singh, Varsha; Aballay, Alejandro

    2006-08-29

    Innate immunity comprises physical barriers, pattern-recognition receptors, antimicrobial substances, phagocytosis, and fever. Here we report that increased temperature results in the activation of a conserved pathway involving the heat-shock (HS) transcription factor (HSF)-1 that enhances immunity in the invertebrate Caenorhabditis elegans. The HSF-1 defense response is independent of the p38 MAPK/PMK-1 pathway and requires a system of chaperones including small and 90-kDa inducible HS proteins. In addition, HSF-1 is needed for the effects of the DAF-2 insulin-like pathway in defense to pathogens, indicating that interacting pathways control stress response, aging, and immunity. The results also show that HSF-1 is required for C. elegans immunity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella enterica, Yersinia pestis, and Enterococcus faecalis, indicating that HSF-1 is part of a multipathogen defense pathway. Considering that several coinducers of HSF-1 are currently in clinical trials, this work opens the possibility that activation of HSF-1 could be used to boost immunity to treat infectious diseases and immunodeficiencies.

  7. The Toll pathway is required in the epidermis for muscle development in the Drosophila embryo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halfon, M. S.; Keshishian, H.

    1998-01-01

    The Toll signaling pathway functions in several Drosophila processes, including dorsal-ventral pattern formation and the immune response. Here, we demonstrate that this pathway is required in the epidermis for proper muscle development. Previously, we showed that the zygotic Toll protein is necessary for normal muscle development; in the absence of zygotic Toll, close to 50% of hemisegments have muscle patterning defects consisting of missing, duplicated and misinserted muscle fibers (Halfon, M.S., Hashimoto, C., and Keshishian, H., Dev. Biol. 169, 151-167, 1995). We have now also analyzed the requirements for easter, spatzle, tube, and pelle, all of which function in the Toll-mediated dorsal-ventral patterning pathway. We find that spatzle, tube, and pelle, but not easter, are necessary for muscle development. Mutations in these genes give a phenotype identical to that seen in Toll mutants, suggesting that elements of the same pathway used for Toll signaling in dorsal-ventral development are used during muscle development. By expressing the Toll cDNA under the control of distinct Toll enhancer elements in Toll mutant flies, we have examined the spatial requirements for Toll expression during muscle development. Expression of Toll in a subset of epidermal cells that includes the epidermal muscle attachment cells, but not Toll expression in the musculature, is necessary for proper muscle development. Our results suggest that signals received by the epidermis early during muscle development are an important part of the muscle patterning process.

  8. Tectonic, a novel regulator of the Hedgehog pathway required for both activation and inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Reiter, Jeremy F.; Skarnes, William C.

    2006-01-01

    We report the identification of a novel protein that participates in Hedgehog-mediated patterning of the neural tube. This protein, named Tectonic, is the founding member of a previously undescribed family of evolutionarily conserved secreted and transmembrane proteins. During neural tube development, mouse Tectonic is required for formation of the most ventral cell types and for full Hedgehog (Hh) pathway activation. Epistasis analyses reveal that Tectonic modulates Hh signal transduction downstream of Smoothened (Smo) and Rab23. Interestingly, characterization of Tectonic Shh and Tectonic Smo double mutants indicates that Tectonic plays an additional role in repressing Hh pathway activity. PMID:16357211

  9. Tectonic, a novel regulator of the Hedgehog pathway required for both activation and inhibition.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Jeremy F; Skarnes, William C

    2006-01-01

    We report the identification of a novel protein that participates in Hedgehog-mediated patterning of the neural tube. This protein, named Tectonic, is the founding member of a previously undescribed family of evolutionarily conserved secreted and transmembrane proteins. During neural tube development, mouse Tectonic is required for formation of the most ventral cell types and for full Hedgehog (Hh) pathway activation. Epistasis analyses reveal that Tectonic modulates Hh signal transduction downstream of Smoothened (Smo) and Rab23. Interestingly, characterization of Tectonic Shh and Tectonic Smo double mutants indicates that Tectonic plays an additional role in repressing Hh pathway activity.

  10. Palmitoylation of TEAD Transcription Factors Is Required for Their Stability and Function in Hippo Pathway Signaling.

    PubMed

    Noland, Cameron L; Gierke, Sarah; Schnier, Paul D; Murray, Jeremy; Sandoval, Wendy N; Sagolla, Meredith; Dey, Anwesha; Hannoush, Rami N; Fairbrother, Wayne J; Cunningham, Christian N

    2016-01-05

    The Hippo signaling pathway is responsible for regulating the function of TEAD family transcription factors in metazoans. TEADs, with their co-activators YAP/TAZ, are critical for controlling cell differentiation and organ size through their transcriptional activation of genes involved in cell growth and proliferation. Dysregulation of the Hippo pathway has been implicated in multiple forms of cancer. Here, we identify a novel form of regulation of TEAD family proteins. We show that human TEADs are palmitoylated at a universally conserved cysteine, and report the crystal structures of the human TEAD2 and TEAD3 YAP-binding domains in their palmitoylated forms. These structures show a palmitate bound within a highly conserved hydrophobic cavity at each protein's core. Our findings also demonstrate that this modification is required for proper TEAD folding and stability, indicating a potential new avenue for pharmacologically regulating the Hippo pathway through the modulation of TEAD palmitoylation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The Intracellular Trafficking Pathway of Transferrin

    PubMed Central

    Mayle, Kristine M.; Le, Alexander M.; Kamei, Daniel T.

    2011-01-01

    Background Transferrin (Tf) is an iron-binding protein that facilitates iron-uptake in cells. Iron-loaded Tf first binds to the Tf receptor (TfR) and enters the cell through clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Inside the cell, Tf is trafficked to early endosomes, delivers iron, and then is subsequently directed to recycling endosomes to be taken back to the cell surface. Scope of Review We aim to review the various methods and techniques that researchers have employed for elucidating the Tf trafficking pathway and the cell-machinery components involved. These experimental methods can be categorized as microscopy, radioactivity, and surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Major Conclusions Qualitative experiments, such as total internal reflectance fluorescence (TIRF), electron, laser-scanning confocal, and spinning-disk confocal microscopy, have been utilized to determine the roles of key components in the Tf trafficking pathway. These techniques allow temporal resolution and are useful for imaging Tf endocytosis and recycling, which occur on the order of seconds to minutes. Additionally, radiolabeling and SPR methods, when combined with mathematical modeling, have enabled researchers to estimate quantitative kinetic parameters and equilibrium constants associated with Tf binding and trafficking. General Significance Both qualitative and quantitative data can be used to analyze the Tf trafficking pathway. The valuable information that is obtained about the Tf trafficking pathway can then be combined with mathematical models to identify design criteria to improve the ability of Tf to deliver anticancer drugs. PMID:21968002

  12. The WRKY45-Dependent Signaling Pathway Is Required For Resistance against Striga hermonthica Parasitism.

    PubMed

    Mutuku, J Musembi; Yoshida, Satoko; Shimizu, Takafumi; Ichihashi, Yasunori; Wakatake, Takanori; Takahashi, Akira; Seo, Mitsunori; Shirasu, Ken

    2015-07-01

    The root hemiparasite witchweed (Striga spp.) is a devastating agricultural pest that causes losses of up to $1 billion US annually in sub-Saharan Africa. Development of resistant crops is one of the cost-effective ways to address this problem. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance are not well understood. To understand molecular events upon Striga spp. infection, we conducted genome-scale RNA sequencing expression analysis using Striga hermonthica-infected rice (Oryza sativa) roots. We found that transcripts grouped under the Gene Ontology term defense response were significantly enriched in up-regulated differentially expressed genes. In particular, we found that both jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) pathways were induced, but the induction of the JA pathway preceded that of the SA pathway. Foliar application of JA resulted in higher resistance. The hebiba mutant plants, which lack the JA biosynthesis gene allene oxide cyclase, exhibited severe S. hermonthica susceptibility. The resistant phenotype was recovered by application of JA. By contrast, the SA-deficient NahG rice plants were resistant against S. hermonthica, indicating that endogenous SA is not required for resistance. However, knocking down WRKY45, a regulator of the SA/benzothiadiazole pathway, resulted in enhanced susceptibility. Interestingly, NahG plants induced the JA pathway, which was down-regulated in WRKY45-knockdown plants, linking the resistant and susceptible phenotypes to the JA pathway. Consistently, the susceptibility phenotype in the WRKY45-knockdown plants was recovered by foliar JA application. These results point to a model in which WRKY45 modulates a cross talk in resistance against S. hermonthica by positively regulating both SA/benzothiadiazole and JA pathways.

  13. The WRKY45-Dependent Signaling Pathway Is Required For Resistance against Striga hermonthica Parasitism1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Satoko; Takahashi, Akira; Seo, Mitsunori

    2015-01-01

    The root hemiparasite witchweed (Striga spp.) is a devastating agricultural pest that causes losses of up to $1 billion US annually in sub-Saharan Africa. Development of resistant crops is one of the cost-effective ways to address this problem. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance are not well understood. To understand molecular events upon Striga spp. infection, we conducted genome-scale RNA sequencing expression analysis using Striga hermonthica-infected rice (Oryza sativa) roots. We found that transcripts grouped under the Gene Ontology term defense response were significantly enriched in up-regulated differentially expressed genes. In particular, we found that both jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) pathways were induced, but the induction of the JA pathway preceded that of the SA pathway. Foliar application of JA resulted in higher resistance. The hebiba mutant plants, which lack the JA biosynthesis gene ALLENE OXIDE CYCLASE, exhibited severe S. hermonthica susceptibility. The resistant phenotype was recovered by application of JA. By contrast, the SA-deficient NahG rice plants were resistant against S. hermonthica, indicating that endogenous SA is not required for resistance. However, knocking down WRKY45, a regulator of the SA/benzothiadiazole pathway, resulted in enhanced susceptibility. Interestingly, NahG plants induced the JA pathway, which was down-regulated in WRKY45-knockdown plants, linking the resistant and susceptible phenotypes to the JA pathway. Consistently, the susceptibility phenotype in the WRKY45-knockdown plants was recovered by foliar JA application. These results point to a model in which WRKY45 modulates a cross talk in resistance against S. hermonthica by positively regulating both SA/benzothiadiazole and JA pathways. PMID:26025049

  14. Activity-Dependent Degradation of Synaptic Vesicle Proteins Requires Rab35 and the ESCRT Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sheehan, Patricia; Zhu, Mei; Beskow, Anne; Vollmer, Cyndel

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic vesicle (SV) pools must maintain a functional repertoire of proteins to efficiently release neurotransmitter. The accumulation of old or damaged proteins on SV membranes is linked to synaptic dysfunction and neurodegeneration. However, despite the importance of SV protein turnover for neuronal health, the molecular mechanisms underlying this process are largely unknown. Here, we have used dissociated rat hippocampal neurons to investigate the pathway for SV protein degradation. We find that neuronal activity drives the degradation of a subset of SV proteins and that the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery and SV-associated GTPase Rab35 are key elements of this use-dependent degradative pathway. Specifically, neuronal activity induces Rab35 activation and binding to the ESCRT-0 protein Hrs, which we have identified as a novel Rab35 effector. These actions recruit the downstream ESCRT machinery to SV pools, thereby initiating SV protein degradation via the ESCRT pathway. Our findings show that the Rab35/ESCRT pathway facilitates the activity-dependent removal of specific proteins from SV pools, thereby maintaining presynaptic protein homeostasis. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Synaptic transmission is mediated by the release of chemical neurotransmitters from synaptic vesicles (SVs). This tightly regulated process requires a functional pool of SVs, necessitating cellular mechanisms for removing old or damaged proteins that could impair SV cycling. Here, we show that a subset of SV proteins is degraded in an activity-dependent manner and that key steps in this degradative pathway are the activation of the small GTPase Rab35 and the subsequent recruitment of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery to SV pools. Further, we demonstrate that ESCRT-0 component Hrs is an effector of Rab35, thus providing novel mechanistic insight into the coupling of neuronal activity with SV protein degradation and the

  15. Requirements of the cytosolic iron–sulfur cluster assembly pathway in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Delphine G.; Netz, Daili J. A.; Lagny, Thibaut J.; Pierik, Antonio J.; Balk, Janneke

    2013-01-01

    The assembly of iron–sulfur (Fe–S) clusters requires dedicated protein factors inside the living cell. Striking similarities between prokaryotic and eukaryotic assembly proteins suggest that plant cells inherited two different pathways through endosymbiosis: the ISC pathway in mitochondria and the SUF pathway in plastids. Fe–S proteins are also found in the cytosol and nucleus, but little is known about how they are assembled in plant cells. Here, we show that neither plastid assembly proteins nor the cytosolic cysteine desulfurase ABA3 are required for the activity of cytosolic aconitase, which depends on a [4Fe–4S] cluster. In contrast, cytosolic aconitase activity depended on the mitochondrial cysteine desulfurase NFS1 and the mitochondrial transporter ATM3. In addition, we were able to complement a yeast mutant in the cytosolic Fe–S cluster assembly pathway, dre2, with the Arabidopsis homologue AtDRE2, but only when expressed together with the diflavin reductase AtTAH18. Spectroscopic characterization showed that purified AtDRE2 could bind up to two Fe–S clusters. Purified AtTAH18 bound one flavin per molecule and was able to accept electrons from NAD(P)H. These results suggest that the proteins involved in cytosolic Fe–S cluster assembly are highly conserved, and that dependence on the mitochondria arose before the second endosymbiosis event leading to plastids. PMID:23754812

  16. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis persists during unperturbed mitosis.

    PubMed

    Tacheva-Grigorova, Silvia K; Santos, António J M; Boucrot, Emmanuel; Kirchhausen, Tom

    2013-08-29

    How does mitosis influence the critical process of endocytosis? Some experiments lead to the conclusion that endocytosis arrests completely during mitosis, whereas others indicate that endocytosis persists. We have resolved this apparent discrepancy by showing how conditions of the experiment influence its outcome. The dynamics of clathrin-coated pit formation and the uptake of transferrin are maintained in naturally dividing cells but are nearly absent in mitotic cells arrested chemically by treatment with nocodazole, S-Trityl-L-cysteine, or RO-3306. Moreover, sequentially incubating cells at 4°C and then shifting them to 37°C or to serum starvation artificially increases the amount of transferrin receptor at the surface of naturally dividing cells, leading to the incorrect conclusion that endocytosis has ceased during mitosis. Thus, our data show that endocytosis is unaffected during all stages of natural cell division. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Ubiquitin initiates sorting of Golgi and plasma membrane proteins into the vacuolar degradation pathway.

    PubMed

    Scheuring, David; Künzl, Fabian; Viotti, Corrado; Yan, Melody San Wan; Jiang, Liwen; Schellmann, Swen; Robinson, David G; Pimpl, Peter

    2012-09-12

    In yeast and mammals, many plasma membrane (PM) proteins destined for degradation are tagged with ubiquitin. These ubiquitinated proteins are internalized into clathrin-coated vesicles and are transported to early endosomal compartments. There, ubiquitinated proteins are sorted by the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery into the intraluminal vesicles of multivesicular endosomes. Degradation of these proteins occurs after endosomes fuse with lysosomes/lytic vacuoles to release their content into the lumen. In plants, some PM proteins, which cycle between the PM and endosomal compartments, have been found to be ubiquitinated, but it is unclear whether ubiquitin is sufficient to mediate internalization and thus acts as a primary sorting signal for the endocytic pathway. To test whether plants use ubiquitin as a signal for the degradation of membrane proteins, we have translationally fused ubiquitin to different fluorescent reporters for the plasma membrane and analyzed their transport. Ubiquitin-tagged PM reporters localized to endosomes and to the lumen of the lytic vacuole in tobacco mesophyll protoplasts and in tobacco epidermal cells. The internalization of these reporters was significantly reduced if clathrin-mediated endocytosis was inhibited by the coexpression of a mutant of the clathrin heavy chain, the clathrin hub. Surprisingly, a ubiquitin-tagged reporter for the Golgi was also transported into the lumen of the vacuole. Vacuolar delivery of the reporters was abolished upon inhibition of the ESCRT machinery, indicating that the vacuolar delivery of these reporters occurs via the endocytic transport route. Ubiquitin acts as a sorting signal at different compartments in the endomembrane system to target membrane proteins into the vacuolar degradation pathway: If displayed at the PM, ubiquitin triggers internalization of PM reporters into the endocytic transport route, but it also mediates vacuolar delivery if displayed at the

  18. Drosophila Nociceptive Sensitization Requires BMP Signaling via the Canonical SMAD Pathway.

    PubMed

    Follansbee, Taylor L; Gjelsvik, Kayla J; Brann, Courtney L; McParland, Aidan L; Longhurst, Colin A; Galko, Michael J; Ganter, Geoffrey K

    2017-08-30

    Nociceptive sensitization is a common feature in chronic pain, but its basic cellular mechanisms are only partially understood. The present study used the Drosophila melanogaster model system and a candidate gene approach to identify novel components required for modulation of an injury-induced nociceptive sensitization pathway presumably downstream of Hedgehog. This study demonstrates that RNAi silencing of a member of the Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) signaling pathway, Decapentaplegic (Dpp), specifically in the Class IV multidendritic nociceptive neuron, significantly attenuated ultraviolet injury-induced sensitization. Furthermore, overexpression of Dpp in Class IV neurons was sufficient to induce thermal hypersensitivity in the absence of injury. The requirement of various BMP receptors and members of the SMAD signal transduction pathway in nociceptive sensitization was also demonstrated. The effects of BMP signaling were shown to be largely specific to the sensitization pathway and not associated with changes in nociception in the absence of injury or with changes in dendritic morphology. Thus, the results demonstrate that Dpp and its pathway play a crucial and novel role in nociceptive sensitization. Because the BMP family is so strongly conserved between vertebrates and invertebrates, it seems likely that the components analyzed in this study represent potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of chronic pain in humans.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This report provides a genetic analysis of primary nociceptive neuron mechanisms that promote sensitization in response to injury. Drosophila melanogaster larvae whose primary nociceptive neurons were reduced in levels of specific components of the BMP signaling pathway, were injured and then tested for nocifensive responses to a normally subnoxious stimulus. Results suggest that nociceptive neurons use the BMP2/4 ligand, along with identified receptors and intracellular transducers to transition to a

  19. Identification of a calcineurin-independent pathway required for sodium ion stress response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Ganster, R W; McCartney, R R; Schmidt, M C

    1998-01-01

    The calcium-dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin plays an essential role in ion homeostasis in yeast. In this study, we identify a parallel ion stress response pathway that is independent of the calcineurin signaling pathway. Cells with null alleles in both STD1 and its homologue, MTH1, manifest numerous phenotypes observed in calcineurin mutants, including sodium, lithium, manganese, and hydroxyl ion sensitivity, as well as alpha factor toxicity. Furthermore, increased gene dosage of STD1 suppresses the ion stress phenotypes in calcineurin mutants and confers halotolerance in wild-type cells. However, Std1p functions in a calcineurin-independent ion stress response pathway, since a std1 mth1 mutant is FK506 sensitive under conditions of ion stress. Mutations in other genes known to regulate gene expression in response to changes in glucose concentration, including SNF3, RGT2, and SNF5, also affect cell growth under ion stress conditions. Gene expression studies indicate that the regulation of HAL1 and PMR2 expression is affected by STD1 gene dosage. Taken together, our data demonstrate that response to ion stress requires the participation of both calcineurin-dependent and -independent pathways. PMID:9725828

  20. Endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway required for immune homeostasis is neurally controlled by arrestin-1.

    PubMed

    Singh, Varsha; Aballay, Alejandro

    2012-09-28

    In response to pathogen infection, the host innate immune system activates microbial killing pathways and cellular stress pathways that need to be balanced because insufficient or excessive immune responses have deleterious consequences. Recent studies demonstrate that two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the nervous system of Caenorhabditis elegans control immune homeostasis. To investigate further how GPCR signaling controls immune homeostasis at the organismal level, we studied arrestin-1 (ARR-1), which is the only GPCR adaptor protein in C. elegans. The results indicate that ARR-1 is required for GPCR signaling in ASH, ASI, AQR, PQR, and URX neurons, which control the unfolded protein response and a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway required for innate immunity. ARR-1 activity also controlled immunity through ADF chemosensory and AFD thermosensory neurons that regulate longevity. Furthermore, we found that although ARR-1 played a key role in the control of immunity by AFD thermosensory neurons, it did not control longevity through these cells. However, ARR-1 partially controlled longevity through ADF neurons.

  1. The major cellular sterol regulatory pathway is required for Andes virus infection.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Josiah; Drake, Mary Jane; Bruce, Emily A; Riblett, Amber M; Didigu, Chukwuka A; Wilen, Craig B; Malani, Nirav; Male, Frances; Lee, Fang-Hua; Bushman, Frederic D; Cherry, Sara; Doms, Robert W; Bates, Paul; Briley, Kenneth

    2014-02-01

    The Bunyaviridae comprise a large family of RNA viruses with worldwide distribution and includes the pathogenic New World hantavirus, Andes virus (ANDV). Host factors needed for hantavirus entry remain largely enigmatic and therapeutics are unavailable. To identify cellular requirements for ANDV infection, we performed two parallel genetic screens. Analysis of a large library of insertionally mutagenized human haploid cells and a siRNA genomic screen converged on components (SREBP-2, SCAP, S1P and S2P) of the sterol regulatory pathway as critically important for infection by ANDV. The significance of this pathway was confirmed using functionally deficient cells, TALEN-mediated gene disruption, RNA interference and pharmacologic inhibition. Disruption of sterol regulatory complex function impaired ANDV internalization without affecting virus binding. Pharmacologic manipulation of cholesterol levels demonstrated that ANDV entry is sensitive to changes in cellular cholesterol and raises the possibility that clinically approved regulators of sterol synthesis may prove useful for combating ANDV infection.

  2. ErbB2-dependent chemotaxis requires microtubule capture and stabilization coordinated by distinct signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Benseddik, Khedidja; Sen Nkwe, Nadine; Daou, Pascale; Verdier-Pinard, Pascal; Badache, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Activation of the ErbB2 receptor tyrosine kinase stimulates breast cancer cell migration. Cell migration is a complex process that requires the synchronized reorganization of numerous subcellular structures including cell-to-matrix adhesions, the actin cytoskeleton and microtubules. How the multiple signaling pathways triggered by ErbB2 coordinate, in time and space, the various processes involved in cell motility, is poorly defined. We investigated the mechanism whereby ErbB2 controls microtubules and chemotaxis. We report that activation of ErbB2 increased both cell velocity and directed migration. Impairment of the Cdc42 and RhoA GTPases, but not of Rac1, prevented the chemotactic response. RhoA is a key component of the Memo/ACF7 pathway whereby ErbB2 controls microtubule capture at the leading edge. Upon Memo or ACF7 depletion, microtubules failed to reach the leading edge and cells lost their ability to follow the chemotactic gradient. Constitutive ACF7 targeting to the membrane in Memo-depleted cells reestablished directed migration. ErbB2-mediated activation of phospholipase C gamma (PLCγ) also contributed to cell guidance. We further showed that PLCγ signaling, via classical protein kinases C, and Memo signaling converged towards a single pathway controlling the microtubule capture complex. Finally, inhibiting the PI3K/Akt pathway did not affect microtubule capture, but disturbed microtubule stability, which also resulted in defective chemotaxis. PI3K/Akt-dependent stabilization of microtubules involved repression of GSK3 activity on the one hand and inhibition of the microtubule destabilizing protein, Stathmin, on the other hand. Thus, ErbB2 triggers distinct and complementary pathways that tightly coordinate microtubule capture and microtubule stability to control chemotaxis.

  3. A functional 4-hydroxybenzoate degradation pathway in the phytopathogen Xanthomonas campestris is required for full pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia-Yuan; Zhou, Lian; Chen, Bo; Sun, Shuang; Zhang, Wei; Li, Ming; Tang, Hongzhi; Jiang, Bo-Le; Tang, Ji-Liang; He, Ya-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Plants contain significant levels of natural phenolic compounds essential for reproduction and growth, as well as defense mechanisms against pathogens. Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) is the causal agent of crucifers black rot. Here we showed that genes required for the synthesis, utilization, transportation, and degradation of 4-hydroxybenzoate (4-HBA) are present in Xcc. Xcc rapidly degrades 4-HBA, but has no effect on 2-hydroxybenzoate and 3-hydroxybenzoate when grown in XOLN medium. The genes for 4-HBA degradation are organized in a superoperonic cluster. Bioinformatics, biochemical, and genetic data showed that 4-HBA is hydroxylated by 4-HBA 3-hydroxylase (PobA), which is encoded by Xcc0356, to yield PCA. The resulting PCA is further metabolized via the PCA branches of the β-ketoadipate pathway, including Xcc0364, Xcc0365, and PcaFHGBDCR. Xcc0364 and Xcc0365 encode a new form of β-ketoadipate succinyl-coenzyme A transferase that is required for 4-HBA degradation. pobA expression was induced by 4-HBA via the transcriptional activator, PobR. Radish and cabbage hydrolysates contain 2-HBA, 3-HBA, 4-HBA, and other phenolic compounds. Addition of radish and cabbage hydrolysates to Xcc culture significantly induced the expression of pobA via PobR. The 4-HBA degradation pathway is required for full pathogenicity of Xcc in radish. PMID:26672484

  4. A functional 4-hydroxybenzoate degradation pathway in the phytopathogen Xanthomonas campestris is required for full pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia-Yuan; Zhou, Lian; Chen, Bo; Sun, Shuang; Zhang, Wei; Li, Ming; Tang, Hongzhi; Jiang, Bo-Le; Tang, Ji-Liang; He, Ya-Wen

    2015-12-17

    Plants contain significant levels of natural phenolic compounds essential for reproduction and growth, as well as defense mechanisms against pathogens. Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) is the causal agent of crucifers black rot. Here we showed that genes required for the synthesis, utilization, transportation, and degradation of 4-hydroxybenzoate (4-HBA) are present in Xcc. Xcc rapidly degrades 4-HBA, but has no effect on 2-hydroxybenzoate and 3-hydroxybenzoate when grown in XOLN medium. The genes for 4-HBA degradation are organized in a superoperonic cluster. Bioinformatics, biochemical, and genetic data showed that 4-HBA is hydroxylated by 4-HBA 3-hydroxylase (PobA), which is encoded by Xcc0356, to yield PCA. The resulting PCA is further metabolized via the PCA branches of the β-ketoadipate pathway, including Xcc0364, Xcc0365, and PcaFHGBDCR. Xcc0364 and Xcc0365 encode a new form of β-ketoadipate succinyl-coenzyme A transferase that is required for 4-HBA degradation. pobA expression was induced by 4-HBA via the transcriptional activator, PobR. Radish and cabbage hydrolysates contain 2-HBA, 3-HBA, 4-HBA, and other phenolic compounds. Addition of radish and cabbage hydrolysates to Xcc culture significantly induced the expression of pobA via PobR. The 4-HBA degradation pathway is required for full pathogenicity of Xcc in radish.

  5. Rab6 Is Required for Multiple Apical Transport Pathways but Not the Basolateral Transport Pathway in Drosophila Photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Iwanami, Nozomi; Nakamura, Yuri; Satoh, Takunori; Liu, Ziguang; Satoh, Akiko K

    2016-02-01

    Polarized membrane trafficking is essential for the construction and maintenance of multiple plasma membrane domains of cells. Highly polarized Drosophila photoreceptors are an excellent model for studying polarized transport. A single cross-section of Drosophila retina contains many photoreceptors with 3 clearly differentiated plasma membrane domains: a rhabdomere, stalk, and basolateral membrane. Genome-wide high-throughput ethyl methanesulfonate screening followed by precise immunohistochemical analysis identified a mutant with a rare phenotype characterized by a loss of 2 apical transport pathways with normal basolateral transport. Rapid gene identification using whole-genome resequencing and single nucleotide polymorphism mapping identified a nonsense mutation of Rab6 responsible for the apical-specific transport deficiency. Detailed analysis of the trafficking of a major rhabdomere protein Rh1 using blue light-induced chromophore supply identified Rab6 as essential for Rh1 to exit the Golgi units. Rab6 is mostly distributed from the trans-Golgi network to a Golgi-associated Rab11-positive compartment that likely recycles endosomes or transport vesicles going to recycling endosomes. Furthermore, the Rab6 effector, Rich, is required for Rab6 recruitment in the trans-Golgi network. Moreover, a Rich null mutation phenocopies the Rab6 null mutant, indicating that Rich functions as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rab6. The results collectively indicate that Rab6 and Rich are essential for the trans-Golgi network-recycling endosome transport of cargoes destined for 2 apical domains. However, basolateral cargos are sorted and exported from the trans-Golgi network in a Rab6-independent manner.

  6. Ethylene signaling pathway and MAPK cascades are required for AAL toxin-induced programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Mase, Keisuke; Mizuno, Takahito; Ishihama, Nobuaki; Fujii, Takayuki; Mori, Hitoshi; Kodama, Motoichiro; Yoshioka, Hirofumi

    2012-08-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD), known as hypersensitive response cell death, has an important role in plant defense response. The signaling pathway of PCD remains unknown. We employed AAL toxin and Nicotiana umbratica to analysis plant PCD. AAL toxin is a pathogenicity factor of the necrotrophic pathogen Alternaria alternata f. sp. lycopersici. N. umbratica is sensitive to AAL toxin, susceptible to pathogens, and effective in Tobacco rattle virus-based virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). VIGS analyses indicated that AAL toxin-triggered cell death (ACD) is dependent upon the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase kinase MEK2, which is upstream of both salicylic acid-induced protein kinase (SIPK) and wound-induced protein kinase (WIPK) responsible for ethylene (ET) synthesis. ET treatment of MEK2-silenced N. umbratica re-established ACD. In SIPK- and WIPK-silenced N. umbratica, ACD was compromised and ET accumulation was not observed. However, in contrast to the case of MEK2-silenced plants, ET treatment did not induce cell death in SIPK- and WIPK-silenced plants. This work showed that ET-dependent pathway and MAP kinase cascades are required in ACD. Our results suggested that MEK2-SIPK/WIPK cascades have roles in ET biosynthesis; however, SIPK and WIPK have other roles in ET signaling or another pathway leading to cell death by AAL toxin.

  7. Effective use of a horizontally-transferred pathway for dichloromethane catabolism requires post–transfer refinement

    PubMed Central

    Michener, Joshua K; Camargo Neves, Aline A; Vuilleumier, Stéphane; Bringel, Françoise; Marx, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    When microbes acquire new abilities through horizontal gene transfer, the genes and pathways must function under conditions with which they did not coevolve. If newly-acquired genes burden the host, their utility will depend on further evolutionary refinement of the recombinant strain. We used laboratory evolution to recapitulate this process of transfer and refinement, demonstrating that effective use of an introduced dichloromethane degradation pathway required one of several mutations to the bacterial host that are predicted to increase chloride efflux. We then used this knowledge to identify parallel, beneficial mutations that independently evolved in two natural dichloromethane-degrading strains. Finally, we constructed a synthetic mobile genetic element carrying both the degradation pathway and a chloride exporter, which preempted the adaptive process and directly enabled effective dichloromethane degradation across diverse Methylobacterium environmental isolates. Our results demonstrate the importance of post–transfer refinement in horizontal gene transfer, with potential applications in bioremediation and synthetic biology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04279.001 PMID:25418043

  8. Dentate Gyrus Development Requires ERK Activity to Maintain Progenitor Population and MAPK Pathway Feedback Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Vithayathil, Joseph; Pucilowska, Joanna; Goodnough, L. Henry; Atit, Radhika P.

    2015-01-01

    The ERK/MAPK pathway is an important developmental signaling pathway. Mutations in upstream elements of this pathway result in neuro-cardio-facial cutaneous (NCFC) syndromes, which are typified by impaired neurocognitive abilities that are reliant upon hippocampal function. The role of ERK signaling during hippocampal development has not been examined and may provide critical insight into the cause of hippocampal dysfunction in NCFC syndromes. In this study, we have generated ERK1 and conditional ERK2 compound knock-out mice to determine the role of ERK signaling during development of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. We found that loss of both ERK1 and ERK2 resulted in 60% fewer granule cells and near complete absence of neural progenitor pools in the postnatal dentate gyrus. Loss of ERK1/2 impaired maintenance of neural progenitors as they migrate from the dentate ventricular zone to the dentate gyrus proper, resulting in premature depletion of neural progenitor cells beginning at E16.5, which prevented generation of granule cells later in development. Finally, loss of ERK2 alone does not impair development of the dentate gyrus as animals expressing only ERK1 developed a normal hippocampus. These findings establish that ERK signaling regulates maintenance of progenitor cells required for development of the dentate gyrus. PMID:25926459

  9. Wnt/β-catenin pathway in the prefrontal cortex is required for cocaine-induced neuroadaptations.

    PubMed

    Cuesta, Santiago; Severin, Maria J; Batuecas, Jorgelina; Rosso, Silvana B; Pacchioni, Alejandra M

    2016-02-22

    Behavioral sensitization is a progressive and enduring enhancement of the motor stimulant effects elicited by repeated administration of drugs of abuse. It can be divided into two distinct temporal and anatomical domains, termed initiation and expression, which are characterized by specific molecular and neurochemical changes. This study examines the role of the Wnt canonical pathway mediating the induction of cocaine sensitization. We found that β-catenin levels in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), amygdala (Amyg) and dorsal striatum (CPu) are decreased in animals that show sensitization. Accordingly, GSK3β activity levels are increased in the same areas. Moreover, β-catenin levels in nuclear fraction, mRNA expression of Axin2 and Wnt7b are decreased in the PFC of sensitized animals. Then, in order to demonstrate that changes in the PFC are crucial for initiation of sensitization, we either rescue β-catenin levels with a systemic treatment of a GSK3β inhibitor (Lithium Chloride) or inhibit Wnt/β-catenin pathway with an intracerebral infusion of Sulindac before each cocaine injection. As expected, rescuing β-catenin levels in the PFC as well as CPu and Amyg blocks cocaine-induced sensitization, while decreasing β-catenin levels exclusively in the PFC exacerbates it. Therefore, our results demonstrate a new role for the Wnt/β-catenin pathway as a required neuroadaptation in inducing behavioral sensitization.

  10. Cytolethal distending toxins require components of the ER-associated degradation pathway for host cell entry.

    PubMed

    Eshraghi, Aria; Dixon, Shandee D; Tamilselvam, Batcha; Kim, Emily Jin-Kyung; Gargi, Amandeep; Kulik, Julia C; Damoiseaux, Robert; Blanke, Steven R; Bradley, Kenneth A

    2014-07-01

    Intracellular acting protein exotoxins produced by bacteria and plants are important molecular determinants that drive numerous human diseases. A subset of these toxins, the cytolethal distending toxins (CDTs), are encoded by several Gram-negative pathogens and have been proposed to enhance virulence by allowing evasion of the immune system. CDTs are trafficked in a retrograde manner from the cell surface through the Golgi apparatus and into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) before ultimately reaching the host cell nucleus. However, the mechanism by which CDTs exit the ER is not known. Here we show that three central components of the host ER associated degradation (ERAD) machinery, Derlin-2 (Derl2), the E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase Hrd1, and the AAA ATPase p97, are required for intoxication by some CDTs. Complementation of Derl2-deficient cells with Derl2:Derl1 chimeras identified two previously uncharacterized functional domains in Derl2, the N-terminal 88 amino acids and the second ER-luminal loop, as required for intoxication by the CDT encoded by Haemophilus ducreyi (Hd-CDT). In contrast, two motifs required for Derlin-dependent retrotranslocation of ERAD substrates, a conserved WR motif and an SHP box that mediates interaction with the AAA ATPase p97, were found to be dispensable for Hd-CDT intoxication. Interestingly, this previously undescribed mechanism is shared with the plant toxin ricin. These data reveal a requirement for multiple components of the ERAD pathway for CDT intoxication and provide insight into a Derl2-dependent pathway exploited by retrograde trafficking toxins.

  11. Cellular entry via an actin and clathrin-dependent route is required for Lv2 restriction of HIV-2

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, I.P.; McKnight, A.

    2011-06-20

    Lv2 is a human factor that restricts infection of some HIV-2 viruses after entry into particular target cells. HIV-2 MCR is highly susceptible to Lv2 whereas HIV-2 MCN is not. The block is after reverse transcription but prior to nuclear entry. The viral determinants for this restriction have been mapped to the HIV-2 envelope and the capsid genes. Our model of Lv2 restriction suggests that the route taken into a cell is important in determining whether a productive infection occurs. Here we characterised the infectious routes used by MCN and MCR using chemical compounds and molecular techniques to distinguish between potential pathways. Our results suggest that susceptible MCR can enter restrictive HeLa{sup CD4} cells via two pathways; a clathrin/AP2 mediated endocytic route that is sensitive to Lv2 restriction and an alternative, non-clathrin mediated route, which results in more efficient infection.

  12. A CRISPR screen defines a signal peptide processing pathway required by flaviviruses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong; Miner, Jonathan J; Gorman, Matthew J; Rausch, Keiko; Ramage, Holly; White, James P; Zuiani, Adam; Zhang, Ping; Fernandez, Estefania; Zhang, Qiang; Dowd, Kimberly A; Pierson, Theodore C; Cherry, Sara; Diamond, Michael S

    2016-07-07

    Flaviviruses infect hundreds of millions of people annually, and no antiviral therapy is available. We performed a genome-wide CRISPR/Cas9-based screen to identify host genes that, when edited, resulted in reduced flavivirus infection. Here, we validated nine human genes required for flavivirus infectivity, and these were associated with endoplasmic reticulum functions including translocation, protein degradation, and N-linked glycosylation. In particular, a subset of endoplasmic reticulum-associated signal peptidase complex (SPCS) proteins was necessary for proper cleavage of the flavivirus structural proteins (prM and E) and secretion of viral particles. Loss of SPCS1 expression resulted in markedly reduced yield of all Flaviviridae family members tested (West Nile, Dengue, Zika, yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis, and hepatitis C viruses), but had little impact on alphavirus, bunyavirus, or rhabdovirus infection or the surface expression or secretion of diverse host proteins. We found that SPCS1 dependence could be bypassed by replacing the native prM protein leader sequences with a class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigen leader sequence. Thus, SPCS1, either directly or indirectly via its interactions with unknown host proteins, preferentially promotes the processing of specific protein cargo, and Flaviviridae have a unique dependence on this signal peptide processing pathway. SPCS1 and other signal processing pathway members could represent pharmacological targets for inhibiting infection by the expanding number of flaviviruses of medical concern.

  13. Rhizobium-legume symbiosis shares an exocytotic pathway required for arbuscule formation.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Sergey; Fedorova, Elena E; Limpens, Erik; De Mita, Stephane; Genre, Andrea; Bonfante, Paola; Bisseling, Ton

    2012-05-22

    Endosymbiotic interactions are characterized by the formation of specialized membrane compartments, by the host in which the microbes are hosted, in an intracellular manner. Two well-studied examples, which are of major agricultural and ecological importance, are the widespread arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis and the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis. In both symbioses, the specialized host membrane that surrounds the microbes forms a symbiotic interface, which facilitates the exchange of, for example, nutrients in a controlled manner and, therefore, forms the heart of endosymbiosis. Despite their key importance, the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the formation of these membrane interfaces are largely unknown. Recent studies strongly suggest that the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis coopted a signaling pathway, including receptor, from the more ancient arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis to form a symbiotic interface. Here, we show that two highly homologous exocytotic vesicle-associated membrane proteins (VAMPs) are required for formation of the symbiotic membrane interface in both interactions. Silencing of these Medicago VAMP72 genes has a minor effect on nonsymbiotic plant development and nodule formation. However, it blocks symbiosome as well as arbuscule formation, whereas root colonization by the microbes is not affected. Identification of these VAMP72s as common symbiotic regulators in exocytotic vesicle trafficking suggests that the ancient exocytotic pathway forming the periarbuscular membrane compartment has also been coopted in the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis.

  14. A CRISPR screen defines a signal peptide processing pathway required by flaviviruses

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rong; Miner, Jonathan J.; Gorman, Matthew J.; Rausch, Keiko; Ramage, Holly; White, James P.; Zuiani, Adam; Zhang, Ping; Fernandez, Estefania; Zhang, Qiang; Dowd, Kimberly A.; Pierson, Theodore C.; Cherry, Sara; Diamond, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Flaviviruses infect hundreds of millions of people annually, with no antiviral therapy available1,2. We performed a genome-wide CRISPR/Cas9-based screen to identify host genes that when edited resulted in reduced flavivirus infection. We validated nine human genes required for flavivirus infectivity, and these were associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) functions including translocation, protein degradation, and N-linked glycosylation. In particular, a subset of ER-associated signal peptidase complex (SPCS) proteins was necessary for the proper cleavage of the flavivirus structural proteins (prM and E) and secretion of viral particles. Loss of SPCS1 expression resulted in markedly reduced yield of all Flaviviridae family members tested (West Nile, Dengue, Zika, yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis, and hepatitis C viruses), yet had little impact on alphavirus, bunyavirus, or rhabdovirus infection or the surface expression or secretion of diverse host proteins. We found that SPCS1 dependence could be bypassed by replacing the native prM protein leader sequences with a class I MHC antigen leader sequence. Thus, SPCS1, either directly or indirectly via its interactions with unknown host proteins, preferentially promotes the processing of specific protein cargo, and Flaviviridae have a unique dependence on this signal peptide processing pathway. SPCS1 and other signal processing pathway members could represent pharmacological targets for inhibiting infection of the expanding number of flaviviruses of medical concern. PMID:27383988

  15. Identification of a novel cyclin required for the intrinsic apoptosis pathway in lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Roig, M B; Roset, R; Ortet, L; Balsiger, N A; Anfosso, A; Cabellos, L; Garrido, M; Alameda, F; Brady, H J M; Gil-Gómez, G

    2009-02-01

    We have identified an early step common to pathways activated by different forms of intrinsic apoptosis stimuli. It requires de novo synthesis of a novel cyclin, cyclin O, that forms active complexes primarily with Cdk2 upon apoptosis induction in lymphoid cells. Cyclin O expression precedes glucocorticoid and gamma-radiation-induced apoptosis in vivo in mouse thymus and spleen, and its overexpression induces caspase-dependent apoptosis in cultured cells. Knocking down the endogenous expression of cyclin O by shRNA leads to the inhibition of glucocorticoid and DNA damage-induced apoptosis due to a failure in the activation of apical caspases while leaving CD95 death receptor-mediated apoptosis intact. Our data demonstrate that apoptosis induction in lymphoid cells is one of the physiological roles of cyclin O and it does not act by perturbing a normal cellular process such as the cell cycle, the DNA damage checkpoints or transcriptional response to glucocorticoids.

  16. SCAP/SREBP pathway is required for the full steroidogenic response to cyclic AMP

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu-Albergine, Masami; Van Yserloo, Brian; Golkowski, Martin G.; Ong, Shao-En; Beavo, Joseph A.; Bornfeldt, Karin E.

    2016-01-01

    Luteinizing hormone (LH) stimulates steroidogenesis largely through a surge in cyclic AMP (cAMP). Steroidogenic rates are also critically dependent on the availability of cholesterol at mitochondrial sites of synthesis. This cholesterol is provided by cellular uptake of lipoproteins, mobilization of intracellular lipid, and de novo synthesis. Whether and how these pathways are coordinated by cAMP are poorly understood. Recent phosphoproteomic analyses of cAMP-dependent phosphorylation sites in MA10 Leydig cells suggested that cAMP regulates multiple steps in these processes, including activation of the SCAP/SREBP pathway. SCAP [sterol-regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) cleavage-activating protein] acts as a cholesterol sensor responsible for regulating intracellular cholesterol balance. Its role in cAMP-mediated control of steroidogenesis has not been explored. We used two CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat)-Cas9 (CRISPR associated protein 9) knockout approaches to test the role of SCAP in steroidogenesis. Our results demonstrate that SCAP is required for progesterone production induced by concurrent inhibition of the cAMP phosphodiesterases PDE4 and PDE8. These inhibitors increased SCAP phosphorylation, SREBP2 activation, and subsequent expression of cholesterol biosynthetic genes, whereas SCAP deficiency largely prevented these effects. Reexpression of SCAP in SCAP-deficient cells restored SREBP2 protein expression and partially restored steroidogenic responses, confirming the requirement of SCAP–SREBP2 in steroidogenesis. Inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A reductase and isoprenylation attenuated, whereas exogenously provided cholesterol augmented, PDE inhibitor-induced steroidogenesis, suggesting that the cholesterol substrate needed for steroidogenesis is provided by both de novo synthesis and isoprenylation-dependent mechanisms. Overall, these results demonstrate a novel role for LH/cAMP in SCAP

  17. The golgin GMAP-210 is required for efficient membrane trafficking in the early secretory pathway

    PubMed Central

    Roboti, Peristera; Sato, Keisuke; Lowe, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Golgins are coiled-coil proteins that participate in membrane-tethering events at the Golgi complex. Golgin-mediated tethering is thought to be important for vesicular trafficking and Golgi organization. However, the degree to which individual golgins contribute to these processes is poorly defined, and it has been proposed that golgins act in a largely redundant manner. Previous studies on the golgin GMAP-210 (also known as TRIP11), which is mutated in the rare skeletal disorder achondrogenesis type 1A, have yielded conflicting results regarding its involvement in trafficking. Here, we re-investigated the trafficking role of GMAP-210, and found that it is indeed required for efficient trafficking in the secretory pathway. GMAP-210 acts at both the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-to-Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC) and Golgi complex during anterograde trafficking, and is also required for retrograde trafficking to the ER. Using co-depletion experiments, we also found that GMAP-210 acts in a partially redundant manner with the golgin GM130 to ensure efficient anterograde cargo delivery to the cis-Golgi. In summary, our results indicate a role for GMAP-210 in several trafficking steps at the ER–Golgi interface, some of which are partially redundant with another golgin, namely GM130 (also known as GOLGA2). PMID:25717001

  18. The MRN-CtIP pathway is required for metaphase chromosome alignment

    PubMed Central

    Rozier, Lorene; Guo, Yige; Peterson, Shaun; Sato, Mai; Baer, Richard; Gautier, Jean; Mao, Yinghui

    2013-01-01

    Summary Faithful duplication of the genome in S phase followed by its accurate segregation in mitosis is essential to maintain genomic integrity. Recent studies have suggested that proteins involved in DNA transactions are also required for whole chromosome stability. Here we demonstrate that the MRN (Mre11, Rad50, and Nbs1) complex and CtIP are required for accurate chromosome segregation. Depletion of Mre11 or CtIP, antibody-mediated inhibition of Mre11, or small molecule inhibition of MRN using mirin results in metaphase chromosome alignment defects in Xenopus egg extracts. Similarly, loss of MRN function adversely affects spindle assembly around DNA-coated beads in egg extracts. Inhibition of MRN function in mammalian cells triggers a metaphase delay and disrupts the RCC1-dependent RanGTP gradient. Addition of the Mre11 inhibitor mirin to egg extracts and mammalian cells reduces RCC1 association with mitotic chromosomes. Thus, the MRN-CtIP pathway contributes to Ran-dependent mitotic spindle assembly by modulating RCC1 chromosome association. PMID:23434370

  19. Permissivity of the biphenyl-specific aerobic bacterial metabolic pathway towards analogues with various steric requirements.

    PubMed

    Overwin, Heike; Standfuß-Gabisch, Christine; González, Myriam; Méndez, Valentina; Seeger, Michael; Reichelt, Joachim; Wray, Victor; Hofer, Bernd

    2015-09-01

    It has repeatedly been shown that aryl-hydroxylating dioxygenases do not possess a very high substrate specificity. To gain more insight into this phenomenon, we examined two powerful biphenyl dioxygenases, the well-known wild-type enzyme from Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 (BphA-LB400) and a hybrid enzyme, based on a dioxygenase from Pseudomonas sp. B4-Magdeburg (BphA-B4h), for their abilities to dioxygenate a selection of eight biphenyl analogues in which the second aromatic ring was replaced by aliphatic as well as aliphatic/aromatic moieties, reflecting a variety of steric requirements. Interestingly, both enzymes were able to catalyse transformation of almost all of these compounds. While the products formed were identical, major differences were observed in transformation rates. In most cases, BphA-B4h proved to be a significantly more powerful catalyst than BphA-LB400. NMR characterization of the reaction products showed that the metabolite obtained from biphenylene underwent angular dioxygenation, whereas all other compounds were subject to lateral dioxygenation at ortho and meta carbons. Subsequent growth studies revealed that both dioxygenase source strains were able to utilize several of the biphenyl analogues as sole sources of carbon and energy. Therefore, prototype BphBCD enzymes of the biphenyl degradative pathway were examined for their ability to further catabolize the lateral dioxygenation products. All of the ortho- and meta-hydroxylated compounds were converted to acids, showing that this pathway is quite permissive, enabling catalysis of the turnover of a fairly wide variety of metabolites.

  20. Annexin II-dependent actin remodelling evoked by hydrogen peroxide requires the metalloproteinase/sphingolipid pathway.

    PubMed

    Cinq-Frais, Christel; Coatrieux, Christelle; Savary, Aude; D'Angelo, Romina; Bernis, Corinne; Salvayre, Robert; Nègre-Salvayre, Anne; Augé, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Actin remodeling is a dynamic process associated with cell shape modification occurring during cell cycle and proliferation. Oxidative stress plays a role in actin reorganization via various systems including p38MAPK. Beside, the mitogenic response evoked by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells (SMC) involves the metalloproteinase (MMPs)/sphingomyelinase 2 (nSMase2) signaling pathway. The aim of this work was to investigate whether this system plays a role in actin remodeling induced by H2O2. Low H2O2 dose (5µM) rapidly triggered a signaling cascade leading to nSMase2 activation, src and annexin 2 (AnxA2) phosphorylation, and actin remodeling, in fibroblasts and SMC. These events were blocked by pharmacological inhibitors of MMPs (Ro28-2653) and p38MAPK (SB203580), and were lacking in MMP2(-/-) and in nSMase2-mutant (fro) fibroblasts. Likewise, H2O2 was unable to induce actin remodeling in fro and MMP2(-/-) fibroblasts or in cells pretreated with p38MAPK, or MMP inhibitors. Finally we show that nSMase2 activation by H2O2, depends on MMP2 and p38MAPK, and is required for the src-dependent phosphorylation of AnxA2, and actin remodeling. Taken together, these findings indicate for the first time that AnxA2 phosphorylation and actin remodeling evoked by oxidative stress depend on the sphingolipid pathway, via MMP2 and p38MAPK.

  1. Annexin II-dependent actin remodelling evoked by hydrogen peroxide requires the metalloproteinase/sphingolipid pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cinq-Frais, Christel; Coatrieux, Christelle; Savary, Aude; D’Angelo, Romina; Bernis, Corinne; Salvayre, Robert; Nègre-Salvayre, Anne; Augé, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    Actin remodeling is a dynamic process associated with cell shape modification occurring during cell cycle and proliferation. Oxidative stress plays a role in actin reorganization via various systems including p38MAPK. Beside, the mitogenic response evoked by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells (SMC) involves the metalloproteinase (MMPs)/sphingomyelinase 2 (nSMase2) signaling pathway. The aim of this work was to investigate whether this system plays a role in actin remodeling induced by H2O2. Low H2O2 dose (5 µM) rapidly triggered a signaling cascade leading to nSMase2 activation, src and annexin 2 (AnxA2) phosphorylation, and actin remodeling, in fibroblasts and SMC. These events were blocked by pharmacological inhibitors of MMPs (Ro28-2653) and p38MAPK (SB203580), and were lacking in MMP2−/− and in nSMase2-mutant (fro) fibroblasts. Likewise, H2O2 was unable to induce actin remodeling in fro and MMP2−/− fibroblasts or in cells pretreated with p38MAPK, or MMP inhibitors. Finally we show that nSMase2 activation by H2O2, depends on MMP2 and p38MAPK, and is required for the src-dependent phosphorylation of AnxA2, and actin remodeling. Taken together, these findings indicate for the first time that AnxA2 phosphorylation and actin remodeling evoked by oxidative stress depend on the sphingolipid pathway, via MMP2 and p38MAPK. PMID:25574848

  2. Ten-m3 Is Required for the Development of Topography in the Ipsilateral Retinocollicular Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Dharmaratne, Nuwan; Glendining, Kelly A.; Young, Timothy R.; Tran, Heidi; Sawatari, Atomu; Leamey, Catherine A.

    2012-01-01

    Background The alignment of ipsilaterally and contralaterally projecting retinal axons that view the same part of visual space is fundamental to binocular vision. While much progress has been made regarding the mechanisms which regulate contralateral topography, very little is known of the mechanisms which regulate the mapping of ipsilateral axons such that they align with their contralateral counterparts. Results Using the advantageous model provided by the mouse retinocollicular pathway, we have performed anterograde tracing experiments which demonstrate that ipsilateral retinal axons begin to form terminal zones (TZs) in the superior colliculus (SC), within the first few postnatal days. These appear mature by postnatal day 11. Importantly, TZs formed by ipsilaterally-projecting retinal axons are spatially offset from those of contralaterally-projecting axons arising from the same retinotopic location from the outset. This pattern is consistent with that required for adult visuotopy. We further demonstrate that a member of the Ten-m/Odz/Teneurin family of homophilic transmembrane glycoproteins, Ten-m3, is an essential regulator of ipsilateral retinocollicular topography. Ten-m3 mRNA is expressed in a high-medial to low-lateral gradient in the developing SC. This corresponds topographically with its high-ventral to low-dorsal retinal gradient. In Ten-m3 knockout mice, contralateral ventrotemporal axons appropriately target rostromedial SC, whereas ipsilateral axons exhibit dramatic targeting errors along both the mediolateral and rostrocaudal axes of the SC, with a caudal shift of the primary TZ, as well as the formation of secondary, caudolaterally displaced TZs. In addition to these dramatic ipsilateral-specific mapping errors, both contralateral and ipsilateral retinocollicular TZs exhibit more subtle changes in morphology. Conclusions We conclude that important aspects of adult visuotopy are established via the differential sensitivity of ipsilateral and

  3. Comparison of Investment and Related Requirements for Selected Hydrogen Vehicle System Pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogart, S. Locke

    2002-12-01

    A model was developed for production, transmission, delivery, and consumption of hydrogen for large-scale systems ultimately providing shaft-work for hydrogen-based vehicles. (See Glossary, after References). Presently, the supply technologies are limited to solar photovoltaic, wind, nuclear, and nuclear thermochemical sources. Transmission technologies include electric power, hydrogen pipeline, and liquid hydrocarbon pipeline. Delivery technologies include both liquid and gaseous hydrogen and liquid hydrocarbon. Storage modes were selected as appropriate for the pathway transmission and delivery modes. Finally, consumption technologies are fuel-cell based, with and without a fuel processor (reformer). Overall, there were 39 separate pathways in this initial analysis. Subsystem efficiencies, capital costs, and capacity factors were derived from a literature search and supported by calculations where necessary. Overall systems efficiency, system peak power capital costs, and systems average power capital costs were calculated to indicate the potential capital investment requirements. The model was exercised to assess the capital cost (and related aspects) requirements to provide the equivalent automobile shaftwork of eleven million barrels of oil per day by the year 2040 (the Administration's objective). These costs range from 650 billion to 11.7 trillion and primarily depend on the selected energy source. The results reveal that nuclear thermochemical systems based on liquid hydrocarbon transmission and delivery lie at the low-cost end of the range, followed by nuclear or wind electric, then nuclear or wind hydrogen pipeline, and finally by solar electric and solar hydrogen pipeline. It is noted that thermochemical systems based on liquid hydrocarbons was the least-cost option for all of the energy sources. One vehicle storage technology, chemical hydride, was determined to be too costly to be included for later analysis. The results were compared against what

  4. Shh pathway activation is present and required within the vertebrate limb bud apical ectodermal ridge for normal autopod patterning.

    PubMed

    Bouldin, Cortney M; Gritli-Linde, Amel; Ahn, Sohyun; Harfe, Brian D

    2010-03-23

    Expression of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) in the posterior mesenchyme of the developing limb bud regulates patterning and growth of the developing limb by activation of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway. Through the analysis of Shh and Hh signaling target genes, it has been shown that activation in the limb bud mesoderm is required for normal limb development to occur. In contrast, it has been stated that Hh signaling in the limb bud ectoderm cannot occur because components of the Hh signaling pathway and Hh target genes have not been found in this tissue. However, recent array-based data identified both the components necessary to activate the Hh signaling pathway and targets of this pathway in the limb bud ectoderm. Using immunohistochemistry and various methods of detection for targets of Hh signaling, we found that SHH protein and targets of Hh signaling are present in the limb bud ectoderm including the apex of the bud. To directly test whether ectodermal Hh signaling was required for normal limb patterning, we removed Smo, an essential component of the Hh signaling pathway, from the apical ectodermal ridge (AER). Loss of functional Hh signaling in the AER resulted in disruption of the normal digit pattern and formation of additional postaxial cartilaginous condensations. These data indicate that contrary to previous accounts, the Hh signaling pathway is present and required in the developing limb AER for normal autopod development.

  5. General secretion pathway (eps) genes required for toxin secretion and outer membrane biogenesis in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Sandkvist, M; Michel, L O; Hough, L P; Morales, V M; Bagdasarian, M; Koomey, M; DiRita, V J; Bagdasarian, M

    1997-11-01

    The general secretion pathway (GSP) of Vibrio cholerae is required for secretion of proteins including chitinase, enterotoxin, and protease through the outer membrane. In this study, we report the cloning and sequencing of a DNA fragment from V. cholerae, containing 12 open reading frames, epsC to -N, which are similar to GSP genes of Aeromonas, Erwinia, Klebsiella, Pseudomonas, and Xanthomonas spp. In addition to the two previously described genes, epsE and epsM (M. Sandkvist, V. Morales, and M. Bagdasarian, Gene 123: 81-86, 1993; L. J. Overbye, M. Sandkvist, and M. Bagdasarian, Gene 132:101-106, 1993), it is shown here that epsC, epsF, epsG, and epsL also encode proteins essential for GSP function. Mutations in the eps genes result in aberrant outer membrane protein profiles, which indicates that the GSP, or at least some of its components, is required not only for secretion of soluble proteins but also for proper outer membrane assembly. Several of the Eps proteins have been identified by use of the T7 polymerase-promoter system in Escherichia coli. One of them, a pilin-like protein, EpsG, was analyzed also in V. cholerae and found to migrate as two bands on polyacrylamide gels, suggesting that in this organism it might be processed or otherwise modified by a prepilin peptidase. We believe that TcpJ prepilin peptidase, which processes the subunit of the toxin-coregulated pilus, TcpA, is not involved in this event. This is supported by the observations that apparent processing of EpsG occurs in a tcpJ mutant of V. cholerae and that, when coexpressed in E. coli, TcpJ cannot process EpsG although the PilD peptidase from Neisseria gonorrhoeae can.

  6. Characterization of a Pipecolic Acid Biosynthesis Pathway Required for Systemic Acquired Resistance.

    PubMed

    Ding, Pingtao; Rekhter, Dmitrij; Ding, Yuli; Feussner, Kirstin; Busta, Lucas; Haroth, Sven; Xu, Shaohua; Li, Xin; Jetter, Reinhard; Feussner, Ivo; Zhang, Yuelin

    2016-10-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is an immune response induced in the distal parts of plants following defense activation in local tissue. Pipecolic acid (Pip) accumulation orchestrates SAR and local resistance responses. Here, we report the identification and characterization of SAR-DEFICIENT4 (SARD4), which encodes a critical enzyme for Pip biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana Loss of function of SARD4 leads to reduced Pip levels and accumulation of a Pip precursor, Δ(1)-piperideine-2-carboxylic acid (P2C). In Escherichia coli, expression of the aminotransferase ALD1 leads to production of P2C and addition of SARD4 results in Pip production, suggesting that a Pip biosynthesis pathway can be reconstituted in bacteria by coexpression of ALD1 and SARD4. In vitro experiments showed that ALD1 can use l-lysine as a substrate to produce P2C and P2C is converted to Pip by SARD4. Analysis of sard4 mutant plants showed that SARD4 is required for SAR as well as enhanced pathogen resistance conditioned by overexpression of the SAR regulator FLAVIN-DEPENDENT MONOOXYGENASE1. Compared with the wild type, pathogen-induced Pip accumulation is only modestly reduced in the local tissue of sard4 mutant plants, but it is below detection in distal leaves, suggesting that Pip is synthesized in systemic tissue by SARD4-mediated reduction of P2C and biosynthesis of Pip in systemic tissue contributes to SAR establishment.

  7. Tomato susceptibility to root-knot nematodes requires an intact jasmonic acid signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, Kishor K; Xie, Qi-Guang; Mantelin, Sophie; Bishnoi, Usha; Girke, Thomas; Navarre, Duroy A; Kaloshian, Isgouhi

    2008-09-01

    Responses of resistant (Mi-1/Mi-1) and susceptible (mi-1/ mi-1) tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) to root-knot nematodes (RKNs; Meloidogyne spp.) infection were monitored using cDNA microarrays, and the roles of salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) defense signaling were evaluated in these interactions. Array analysis was used to compare transcript profiles in incompatible and compatible interactions of tomato roots 24 h after RKN infestation. The jai1 and def1 tomato mutant, altered in JA signaling, and tomato transgenic line NahG, altered in SA signaling, in the presence or absence of the RKN resistance gene Mi-1, were evaluated. The array analysis identified 1,497 and 750 genes differentially regulated in the incompatible and compatible interactions, respectively. Of the differentially regulated genes, 37% were specific to the incompatible interactions. NahG affected neither Mi-1 resistance nor basal defenses to RKNs. However, jai1 reduced tomato susceptibility to RKNs while not affecting Mi-1 resistance. In contrast, the def1 mutant did not affect RKN susceptibility. These results indicate that JA-dependent signaling does not play a role in Mi-1-mediated defense; however, an intact JA signaling pathway is required for tomato susceptibility to RKNs. In addition, low levels of SA might be sufficient for basal and Mi-1 resistance to RKNs.

  8. Vitamin D receptor pathway is required for probiotic protection in colitis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shaoping; Yoon, Sonia; Zhang, Yong-Guo; Lu, Rong; Xia, Yinglin; Wan, Jiandi; Petrof, Elaine O; Claud, Erika C; Chen, Di; Sun, Jun

    2015-09-01

    Low expression of vitamin D receptor (VDR) and dysfunction of vitamin D/VDR signaling are reported in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); therefore, restoration of VDR function to control inflammation in IBD is desirable. Probiotics have been used in the treatment of IBD. However, the role of probiotics in the modulation of VDR signaling to effectively reduce inflammation is unknown. We identified a novel role of probiotics in activating VDR activity, thus inhibiting inflammation, using cell models and VDR knockout mice. We found that the probiotics Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG (LGG) and Lactobacillus plantarum (LP) increased VDR protein expression in both mouse and human intestinal epithelial cells. Using the VDR luciferase reporter vector, we detected increased transcriptional activity of VDR after probiotic treatment. Probiotics increased the expression of the VDR target genes, such as antimicrobial peptide cathelicidin, at the transcriptional level. Furthermore, the role of probiotics in regulating VDR signaling was tested in vivo using a Salmonella-colitis model in VDR knockout mice. Probiotic treatment conferred physiological and histologic protection from Salmonella-induced colitis in VDR(+/+) mice, whereas probiotics had no effects in the VDR(-/-) mice. Probiotic treatment also enhanced numbers of Paneth cells, which secrete AMPs for host defense. These data indicate that the VDR pathway is required for probiotic protection in colitis. Understanding how probiotics enhance VDR signaling and inhibit inflammation will allow probiotics to be used effectively, resulting in innovative approaches to the prevention and treatment of chronic inflammation.

  9. Lhx9 gene expression during early limb development in mice requires the FGF signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yisheng; Wilson, Megan J

    2015-01-01

    Lhx9 is a member of the LIM-homeodomain gene family necessary for the correct development of many organs including gonads, limbs, heart and the nervous system. In the context of limb development, Lhx9 has been implicated as an integrator for Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signalling required for proximal-distal (PD) and anterior-posterior (AP) development of the limb. Three splice variants of the Lhx9 transcript are expressed during development, two of which are predicted to act in a dominant negative fashion, competing with the DNA binding version of Lhx9 for binding to cofactors via the LIM-domain. We examined the expression pattern for the three alternative splice forms of Lhx9; Lhx9α, Lhx9β and Lhx9c during early limb development. We have found that of the three Lhx9 isoforms, only Lhx9α and Lhx9c (intact homeodomain) are expressed during early limb development, each with their own distinct expression pattern. Additionally we determined that Lhx9 expression overlaps with FGF10 expression in the developing limb bud mesenchyme. Limb bud explant cultures, in the presence of signalling pathway inhibitors, also indicated that Lhx9 mRNA expression in the limb bud was dependent on FGF signalling.

  10. A type II protein secretory pathway required for levansucrase secretion by Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus.

    PubMed

    Arrieta, Juan G; Sotolongo, Mailin; Menéndez, Carmen; Alfonso, Dubiel; Trujillo, Luis E; Soto, Melvis; Ramírez, Ricardo; Hernández, Lázaro

    2004-08-01

    The endophytic diazotroph Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus secretes a constitutively expressed levansucrase (LsdA, EC 2.4.1.10) to utilize plant sucrose. LsdA, unlike other extracellular levansucrases from gram-negative bacteria, is transported to the periplasm by a signal-peptide-dependent pathway. We identified an unusually organized gene cluster encoding at least the components LsdG, -O, -E, -F, -H, -I, -J, -L, -M, -N, and -D of a type II secretory system required for LsdA translocation across the outer membrane. Another open reading frame, designated lsdX, is located between the operon promoter and lsdG, but it was not identified in BLASTX searches of the DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank databases. The lsdX, -G, and -O genes were isolated from a cosmid library of strain SRT4 by complementation of an ethyl methanesulfonate mutant unable to transport LsdA across the outer membrane. The downstream genes lsdE, -F, -H, -I, -J, -L, -M, -N, and -D were isolated through chromosomal walking. The high G+C content (64 to 74%) and the codon usage of the genes identified are consistent with the G+C content and codon usage of the standard G. diazotrophicus structural gene. Sequence analysis of the gene cluster indicated that a polycistronic transcript is synthesized. Targeted disruption of lsdG, lsdO, or lsdF blocked LsdA secretion, and the bacterium failed to grow on sucrose. Replacement of Cys(162) by Gly at the C terminus of the pseudopilin LsdG abolished the protein functionality, suggesting that there is a relationship with type IV pilins. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis revealed conservation of the type II secretion operon downstream of the levansucrase-levanase (lsdA-lsdB) locus in 14 G. diazotrophicus strains representing 11 genotypes recovered from four different host plants in diverse geographical regions. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a type II pathway for protein secretion in the Acetobacteraceae.

  11. The insulator protein BEAF-32 is required for Hippo pathway activity in the terminal differentiation of neuronal subtypes.

    PubMed

    Jukam, David; Viets, Kayla; Anderson, Caitlin; Zhou, Cyrus; DeFord, Peter; Yan, Jenny; Cao, Jinshuai; Johnston, Robert J

    2016-07-01

    The Hippo pathway is crucial for not only normal growth and apoptosis but also cell fate specification during development. What controls Hippo pathway activity during cell fate specification is incompletely understood. In this article, we identify the insulator protein BEAF-32 as a regulator of Hippo pathway activity in Drosophila photoreceptor differentiation. Though morphologically uniform, the fly eye is composed of two subtypes of R8 photoreceptor neurons defined by expression of light-detecting Rhodopsin proteins. In one R8 subtype, active Hippo signaling induces Rhodopsin 6 (Rh6) and represses Rhodopsin 5 (Rh5), whereas in the other subtype, inactive Hippo signaling induces Rh5 and represses Rh6. The activity state of the Hippo pathway in R8 cells is determined by the expression of warts, a core pathway kinase, which interacts with the growth regulator melted in a double-negative feedback loop. We show that BEAF-32 is required for expression of warts and repression of melted Furthermore, BEAF-32 plays a second role downstream of Warts to induce Rh6 and prevent Rh5 fate. BEAF-32 is dispensable for Warts feedback, indicating that BEAF-32 differentially regulates warts and Rhodopsins. Loss of BEAF-32 does not noticeably impair the functions of the Hippo pathway in eye growth regulation. Our study identifies a context-specific regulator of Hippo pathway activity in post-mitotic neuronal fate, and reveals a developmentally specific role for a broadly expressed insulator protein. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes required in the absence of the CIN8-encoded spindle motor act in functionally diverse mitotic pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Geiser, J R; Schott, E J; Kingsbury, T J; Cole, N B; Totis, L J; Bhattacharyya, G; He, L; Hoyt, M A

    1997-01-01

    Kinesin-related Cin8p is the most important spindle-pole-separating motor in Saccharomyces cerevisiae but is not essential for cell viability. We identified 20 genes whose products are specifically required by cell deficient for Cin8p. All are associated with mitotic roles and represent at least four different functional pathways. These include genes whose products act in two spindle motor pathways that overlap in function with Cin8p, the kinesin-related Kip1p pathway and the cytoplasmic dynein pathway. In addition, genes required for mitotic spindle checkpoint function and for normal microtubule stability were recovered. Mutant alleles of eight genes caused phenotypes similar to dyn1 (encodes the dynein heavy chain), including a spindle-positioning defect. We provide evidence that the products of these genes function in concept with dynein. Among the dynein pathway gene products, we found homologues of the cytoplasmic dynein intermediate chain, the p150Glued subunit of the dynactin complex, and human LIS-1, required for normal brain development. These findings illustrate the complex cellular interactions exhibited by Cin8p, a member of a conserved spindle motor family. Images PMID:9201714

  13. The 3-Hydroxy-2-Butanone Pathway Is Required for Pectobacterium carotovorum Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Marquez-Villavicencio, Maria del Pilar; Weber, Brooke; Witherell, R. Andrews; Willis, David K.; Charkowski, Amy O.

    2011-01-01

    Pectobacterium species are necrotrophic bacterial pathogens that cause soft rot diseases in potatoes and several other crops worldwide. Gene expression data identified Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum budB, which encodes the α-acetolactate synthase enzyme in the 2,3-butanediol pathway, as more highly expressed in potato tubers than potato stems. This pathway is of interest because volatiles produced by the 2,3-butanediol pathway have been shown to act as plant growth promoting molecules, insect attractants, and, in other bacterial species, affect virulence and fitness. Disruption of the 2,3-butanediol pathway reduced virulence of P. c. subsp. carotovorum WPP14 on potato tubers and impaired alkalinization of growth medium and potato tubers under anaerobic conditions. Alkalinization of the milieu via this pathway may aid in plant cell maceration since Pectobacterium pectate lyases are most active at alkaline pH. PMID:21876734

  14. Mechanical activation of mammalian target of rapamycin pathway is required for cartilage development

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Yingjie; Yang, Xu; Yang, Wentian; Charbonneau, Cherie; Chen, Qian

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical stress regulates development by modulating cell signaling and gene expression. However, the cytoplasmic components mediating mechanotransduction remain unclear. In this study, elimination of muscle contraction during chicken embryonic development resulted in a reduction in the activity of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in the cartilaginous growth plate. Inhibition of mTOR activity led to significant inhibition of chondrocyte proliferation, cartilage tissue growth, and expression of chondrogenic genes, including Indian hedgehog (Ihh), a critical mediator of mechanotransduction. Conversely, cyclic loading (1 Hz, 5% matrix deformation) of embryonic chicken growth plate chondrocytes in 3-dimensional (3D) collagen scaffolding induced sustained activation of mTOR. Mechanical activation of mTOR occurred in serum-free medium, indicating that it is independent of growth factor or nutrients. Treatment of chondrocytes with Rapa abolished mechanical activation of cell proliferation and Ihh gene expression. Cyclic loading of chondroprogenitor cells deficient in SH2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 2 (Shp2) further enhanced mechanical activation of mTOR, cell proliferation, and chondrogenic gene expression. This result suggests that Shp2 is an antagonist of mechanotransduction through inhibition of mTOR activity. Our data demonstrate that mechanical activation of mTOR is necessary for cell proliferation, chondrogenesis, and cartilage growth during bone development, and that mTOR is an essential mechanotransduction component modulated by Shp2 in the cytoplasm.—Guan, Y., Yang, X., Yang, W., Charbonneau, C., Chen, Q. Mechanical activation of mammalian target of rapamycin pathway is required for cartilage development. PMID:25002119

  15. NFAT5 regulates the canonical Wnt pathway and is required for cardiomyogenic differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Adachi, Atsuo; Takahashi, Tomosaburo; Ogata, Takehiro; Imoto-Tsubakimoto, Hiroko; Nakanishi, Naohiko; Ueyama, Tomomi; Matsubara, Hiroaki

    2012-09-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NFAT5 protein expression is downregulated during cardiomyogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of NFAT5 function suppresses canonical Wnt signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of NFAT5 function attenuates mesodermal induction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NFAT5 function is required for cardiomyogenesis. -- Abstract: While nuclear factor of activated T cells 5 (NFAT5), a transcription factor implicated in osmotic stress response, is suggested to be involved in other processes such as migration and proliferation, its role in cardiomyogenesis is largely unknown. Here, we examined the role of NFAT5 in cardiac differentiation of P19CL6 cells, and observed that it was abundantly expressed in undifferentiated P19CL6 cells, and its protein expression was significantly downregulated by enhanced proteasomal degradation during DMSO-induced cardiomyogenesis. Expression of a dominant negative mutant of NFAT5 markedly attenuated cardiomyogenesis, which was associated with the inhibition of mesodermal differentiation. TOPflash reporter assay revealed that the transcriptional activity of canonical Wnt signaling was activated prior to mesodermal differentiation, and this activation was markedly attenuated by NFAT5 inhibition. Pharmacological activation of canonical Wnt signaling by [2 Prime Z, 3 Prime E]-6-bromoindirubin-3 Prime -oxime (BIO) restored Brachyury expression in NFAT5DN-expressing cells. Inhibition of NFAT5 markedly attenuated Wnt3 and Wnt3a induction. Expression of Dkk1 and Cerberus1, which are secreted Wnt antagonists, was also inhibited by NFAT5 inhibition. Thus, endogenous NFAT5 regulates the coordinated expression of Wnt ligands and antagonists, which are essential for cardiomyogenesis through the canonical Wnt pathway. These results demonstrated a novel role of NFAT5 in cardiac differentiation of stem cells.

  16. Fungal morphogenetic pathways are required for the hallmark inflammatory response during Candida albicans vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Peters, Brian M; Palmer, Glen E; Nash, Andrea K; Lilly, Elizabeth A; Fidel, Paul L; Noverr, Mairi C

    2014-02-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis, caused primarily by Candida albicans, presents significant health issues for women of childbearing age. As a polymorphic fungus, the ability of C. albicans to switch between yeast and hyphal morphologies is considered its central virulence attribute. Armed with new criteria for defining vaginitis immunopathology, the purpose of this study was to determine whether the yeast-to-hypha transition is required for the hallmark inflammatory responses previously characterized during murine vaginitis. Kinetic analyses of vaginal infection with C. albicans in C57BL/6 mice demonstrated that fungal burdens remained constant throughout the observation period, while polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN), S100A8, and interleukin-1β levels obtained from vaginal lavage fluid increased by day 3 onward. Lactate dehydrogenase activity was also positively correlated with increased effectors of innate immunity. Additionally, immunodepletion of neutrophils in infected mice confirmed a nonprotective role for PMNs during vaginitis. Determination of the importance of fungal morphogenesis during vaginitis was addressed with a two-pronged approach. Intravaginal inoculation of mice with C. albicans strains deleted for key transcriptional regulators (bcr1Δ/Δ, efg1Δ/Δ, cph1Δ/Δ, and efg1Δ/Δ cph1Δ/Δ) controlling the yeast-to-hypha switch revealed a crucial role for morphogenetic signaling through the Efg1 and, to a lesser extent, the Bcr1 pathways in contributing to vaginitis immunopathology. Furthermore, overexpression of transcription factors NRG1 and UME6, to maintain yeast and hyphal morphologies, respectively, confirmed the importance of morphogenesis in generating innate immune responses in vivo. These results highlight the yeast-to-hypha switch and the associated morphogenetic response as important virulence components for the immunopathogenesis of Candida vaginitis, with implications for transition from benign colonization to symptomatic infection.

  17. Fungal Morphogenetic Pathways Are Required for the Hallmark Inflammatory Response during Candida albicans Vaginitis

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Glen E.; Nash, Andrea K.; Lilly, Elizabeth A.; Fidel, Paul L.; Noverr, Mairi C.

    2014-01-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis, caused primarily by Candida albicans, presents significant health issues for women of childbearing age. As a polymorphic fungus, the ability of C. albicans to switch between yeast and hyphal morphologies is considered its central virulence attribute. Armed with new criteria for defining vaginitis immunopathology, the purpose of this study was to determine whether the yeast-to-hypha transition is required for the hallmark inflammatory responses previously characterized during murine vaginitis. Kinetic analyses of vaginal infection with C. albicans in C57BL/6 mice demonstrated that fungal burdens remained constant throughout the observation period, while polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN), S100A8, and interleukin-1β levels obtained from vaginal lavage fluid increased by day 3 onward. Lactate dehydrogenase activity was also positively correlated with increased effectors of innate immunity. Additionally, immunodepletion of neutrophils in infected mice confirmed a nonprotective role for PMNs during vaginitis. Determination of the importance of fungal morphogenesis during vaginitis was addressed with a two-pronged approach. Intravaginal inoculation of mice with C. albicans strains deleted for key transcriptional regulators (bcr1Δ/Δ, efg1Δ/Δ, cph1Δ/Δ, and efg1Δ/Δ cph1Δ/Δ) controlling the yeast-to-hypha switch revealed a crucial role for morphogenetic signaling through the Efg1 and, to a lesser extent, the Bcr1 pathways in contributing to vaginitis immunopathology. Furthermore, overexpression of transcription factors NRG1 and UME6, to maintain yeast and hyphal morphologies, respectively, confirmed the importance of morphogenesis in generating innate immune responses in vivo. These results highlight the yeast-to-hypha switch and the associated morphogenetic response as important virulence components for the immunopathogenesis of Candida vaginitis, with implications for transition from benign colonization to symptomatic infection. PMID

  18. Coil-dependent signaling pathway is not required for Mi-1-mediated potato aphid resistance.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, Kishor K; Xie, Qi-Guang; Pourshalimi, Daniel; Younglove, Ted; Kaloshian, Isgouhi

    2007-03-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) has a unique resistance gene, Mi-1, that confers resistance to animals from distinct taxa, nematodes, and piercing and sucking insects. Mi-1 encodes a protein with a nucleotide-binding site and leucine-rich repeat motifs. Early in the potato aphid (Macrosiphum euphorbiae)--tomato interactions, aphid feeding induces the expression of the jasmonic acid (JA)-regulated proteinase inhibitor genes, Pin1 and Pin2. The jail-1 (jasmonic acid insensitive 1) tomato mutant, which is impaired in JA perception, was used to gain additional insight into the JA signaling pathway and its role in the Mi-1-mediated aphid resistance. The jail-1 mutant has a deletion in the Coil gene that encodes a putative F-box protein. In this study, aphid colonization, survival, and fecundity were compared on wild-type tomato and jail-1 mutant. In choice assays, the jail-1 mutant showed higher colonization by potato aphids compared with wild-type tomato. In contrast, no-choice assays showed no difference in potato aphid survival or fecundity between jail-1 and the wild-type parent. Plants homozygous for Mi-1 and for the jail mutation were not compromised in resistance to potato aphids, using either choice or no-choice assays. In addition, the accumulation of JA-regulated Pin1 transcripts after aphid feeding was Coil dependent. Taken together, these data indicate that, although potato aphids activate Coil-dependent defense response in tomato, this response is not required for Mi-1-mediated resistance to aphids.

  19. Requirement for the plastidial oxidative pentose phosphate pathway for nitrate assimilation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Bussell, John D; Keech, Olivier; Fenske, Ricarda; Smith, Steven M

    2013-08-01

    Sugar metabolism and the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (OPPP) are strongly implicated in N assimilation, although the relationship between them and the roles of the plastidial and cytosolic OPPP have not been established genetically. We studied a knock-down mutant of the plastid-localized OPPP enzyme 6-phosphogluconolactonase 3 (PGL3). pgl3-1 plants exhibited relatively greater resource allocation to roots but were smaller than the wild type. They had a lower content of amino acids and free NO3 - in leaves than the wild type, despite exhibiting comparable photosynthetic rates and efficiency, and normal levels of many other primary metabolites. When N-deprived plants were fed via the roots with 15NO3 -, pgl3-1 exhibited normal induction of OPPP and nitrate assimilation genes in roots, and amino acids in roots and shoots were labeled with (15) N at least as rapidly as in the wild type. However, when N-replete plants were fed via the roots with sucrose, expression of specific OPPP and N assimilation genes in roots increased in the wild type but not in pgl3-1. Thus, sugar-dependent expression of N assimilation genes requires OPPP activity and the specificity of the effect of the pgl3-1 mutation on N assimilation genes establishes that it is not the result of general energy deficiency or accumulation of toxic intermediates. We conclude that expression of specific nitrate assimilation genes in the nucleus of root cells is positively regulated by a signal emanating from OPPP activity in the plastid.

  20. Identification of Pathways Required for the Coordination of Late Mitotic Events in Animal Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    critical part of telomere maturation, as it prevents repair of telomeres through non- homologous end joining . Experiments described here have led to...become fused through the non-homologous end joining pathway. The identification of Rat1p was unexpected as this protein has been previously characterized...chromatin structures that protect chromosomes ends from the DNA repair pathways. Telomeres are re-formed after each round of DNA replication. The

  1. Notch pathway repression by vestigial is required to promote indirect flight muscle differentiation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Bernard, F; Dutriaux, A; Silber, J; Lalouette, A

    2006-07-01

    Drosophila dorsal longitudinal muscles develop during metamorphosis by fusion of myoblasts with larval templates. It has been shown that both vestigial and Notch are crucial for correct formation of these muscles. We investigated the relationship between vestigial and the Notch pathway during this process. Using Enhancer of Split Region Transcript m6 gene expression as a reporter of Notch pathway activity, we were able to demonstrate that this pathway is only active in myoblasts. Moreover, close examination of the cellular location of several of the main actors of the N pathway (Notch, Delta, neuralized, Serrate, Mind bomb1 and fringe) during dorsal longitudinal muscle development enabled us to find that Notch receptor can play multiple roles in adult myogenesis. We report that the locations of the two Notch ligands (Delta and Serrate) are different. Interestingly, we found that fringe, which encodes a glycosyltransferase that modifies the affinity of the Notch receptor for its ligands, is expressed in muscle fibers and in a subset of myoblasts. In addition, we demonstrate that fringe expression is essential for Notch pathway inhibition and muscle differentiation. Lastly, we report that, in vestigial mutants, fringe expression is lost, and when fringe is overexpressed, a significant rescue of indirect flight muscle degeneration is obtained. Altogether, our data show that a vestigial-differentiating function is achieved through the inhibition of the Notch pathway.

  2. Vacuolar Localization of Oligomeric α-Mannosidase Requires the Cytoplasm to Vacuole Targeting and Autophagy Pathway Components in Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    PubMed Central

    Hutchins, Maria U.; Klionsky, Daniel J.

    2009-01-01

    One challenge facing eukaryotic cells is the post-translational import of proteins into organelles. This problem is exacerbated when the proteins assemble into large complexes. Aminopeptidase I (API) is a resident hydrolase of the vacuole/lysosome in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The precursor form of API assembles into a dodecamer in the cytosol and maintains this oligomeric form during the import process. Vacuolar delivery of the precursor form of API requires a vesicular mechanism termed the cytoplasm to vacuole targeting (Cvt) pathway. Many components of the Cvt pathway are also used in the degradative autophagy pathway. α-Mannosidase (Ams1) is another resident hydrolase that enters the vacuole independent of the secretory pathway; however, its mechanism of vacuolar delivery has not been established. We show vacuolar localization of Ams1 is blocked in mutants that are defective in the Cvt and autophagy pathways. We have found that Ams1 forms an oligomer in the cytoplasm. The oligomeric form of Ams1 is also detected in subvacuolar vesicles in strains that are blocked in vesicle breakdown, indicating that it retains its oligomeric form during the import process. These results identify Ams1 as a second biosynthetic cargo protein of the Cvt and autophagy pathways. PMID:11264288

  3. The Suf Iron-Sulfur Cluster Synthesis Pathway Is Required for Apicoplast Maintenance in Malaria Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Gisselberg, Jolyn E.; Dellibovi-Ragheb, Teegan A.; Matthews, Krista A.; Bosch, Gundula; Prigge, Sean T.

    2013-01-01

    The apicoplast organelle of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum contains metabolic pathways critical for liver-stage and blood-stage development. During the blood stages, parasites lacking an apicoplast can grow in the presence of isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP), demonstrating that isoprenoids are the only metabolites produced in the apicoplast which are needed outside of the organelle. Two of the isoprenoid biosynthesis enzymes are predicted to rely on iron-sulfur (FeS) cluster cofactors, however, little is known about FeS cluster synthesis in the parasite or the roles that FeS cluster proteins play in parasite biology. We investigated two putative FeS cluster synthesis pathways (Isc and Suf) focusing on the initial step of sulfur acquisition. In other eukaryotes, these proteins can be located in multiple subcellular compartments, raising the possibility of cross-talk between the pathways or redundant functions. In P. falciparum, SufS and its partner SufE were found exclusively the apicoplast and SufS was shown to have cysteine desulfurase activity in a complementation assay. IscS and its effector Isd11 were solely mitochondrial, suggesting that the Isc pathway cannot contribute to apicoplast FeS cluster synthesis. The Suf pathway was disrupted with a dominant negative mutant resulting in parasites that were only viable when supplemented with IPP. These parasites lacked the apicoplast organelle and its organellar genome – a phenotype not observed when isoprenoid biosynthesis was specifically inhibited with fosmidomycin. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the Suf pathway is essential for parasite survival and has a fundamental role in maintaining the apicoplast organelle in addition to any role in isoprenoid biosynthesis. PMID:24086138

  4. A MAP Kinase pathway in Caenorhabditis elegans is required for defense against infection by opportunistic Proteus species.

    PubMed

    JebaMercy, Gnanasekaran; Vigneshwari, Loganathan; Balamurugan, Krishnaswamy

    2013-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans innate immunity requires a conserved mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway that regulates the basal and pathogen-induced expression of immune effectors. Being in the group of opportunistic pathogens, Proteus spp. cause large number of nosocomial infections. Since, Proteus spp. do not cause death in wild type C. elegans, to understand the role and contribution of MAP Kinase pathway, the mutants (sek-1 and pmk-1) of this pathway were employed. Physiological experiments revealed that the Proteus spp. were able to kill MAP Kinase pathway mutant's C. elegans significantly. To understand the involvement of innate immune pathways specific players at the mRNA level, the regulation of few candidate antimicrobial genes were kinetically investigated during Proteus spp. infections. Real-time PCR analysis indicated a regulation of few candidate immune regulatory genes (F08G5.6, lys-7, nlp-29, ATF-7 and daf-16) during the course of Proteus spp. infections. In addition, the lipopolysaccharides (LPS) isolated from Proteus mirabilis upon exposure to mutant C. elegans showed modifications at their functional regions suggesting that the pathogen modifies its internal machinery according to the specific host for effective pathogenesis.

  5. piRNA pathway is not required for antiviral defense in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Petit, Marine; Mongelli, Vanesa; Frangeul, Lionel; Blanc, Hervé; Jiggins, Francis; Saleh, Maria-Carla

    2016-07-19

    Since its discovery, RNA interference has been identified as involved in many different cellular processes, and as a natural antiviral response in plants, nematodes, and insects. In insects, the small interfering RNA (siRNA) pathway is the major antiviral response. In recent years, the Piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA) pathway also has been implicated in antiviral defense in mosquitoes infected with arboviruses. Using Drosophila melanogaster and an array of viruses that infect the fruit fly acutely or persistently or are vertically transmitted through the germ line, we investigated in detail the extent to which the piRNA pathway contributes to antiviral defense in adult flies. Following virus infection, the survival and viral titers of Piwi, Aubergine, Argonaute-3, and Zucchini mutant flies were similar to those of wild type flies. Using next-generation sequencing of small RNAs from wild type and siRNA mutant flies, we showed that no viral-derived piRNAs were produced in fruit flies during different types of viral infection. Our study provides the first evidence, to our knowledge, that the piRNA pathway does not play a major role in antiviral defense in adult Drosophila and demonstrates that viral-derived piRNA production depends on the biology of the host-virus combination rather than being part of a general antiviral process in insects.

  6. piRNA pathway is not required for antiviral defense in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Petit, Marine; Mongelli, Vanesa; Frangeul, Lionel; Blanc, Hervé; Jiggins, Francis; Saleh, Maria-Carla

    2016-01-01

    Since its discovery, RNA interference has been identified as involved in many different cellular processes, and as a natural antiviral response in plants, nematodes, and insects. In insects, the small interfering RNA (siRNA) pathway is the major antiviral response. In recent years, the Piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA) pathway also has been implicated in antiviral defense in mosquitoes infected with arboviruses. Using Drosophila melanogaster and an array of viruses that infect the fruit fly acutely or persistently or are vertically transmitted through the germ line, we investigated in detail the extent to which the piRNA pathway contributes to antiviral defense in adult flies. Following virus infection, the survival and viral titers of Piwi, Aubergine, Argonaute-3, and Zucchini mutant flies were similar to those of wild type flies. Using next-generation sequencing of small RNAs from wild type and siRNA mutant flies, we showed that no viral-derived piRNAs were produced in fruit flies during different types of viral infection. Our study provides the first evidence, to our knowledge, that the piRNA pathway does not play a major role in antiviral defense in adult Drosophila and demonstrates that viral-derived piRNA production depends on the biology of the host–virus combination rather than being part of a general antiviral process in insects. PMID:27357659

  7. Fluctuation of multiple metabolic pathways is required for Escherichia coli in response to chlortetracycline stress.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiangmin; Kang, Liqun; Li, Hui; Peng, Xuanxian

    2014-04-01

    Bacterial antibiotic resistance has become a worldwide challenge with the overuse and misuse of drugs. Several mechanisms for the resistance are revealed, but information regarding the bacterial global response to antibiotics is largely absent. In this study, we characterized the differential proteome of Escherichia coli K12 BW25113 in response to chlortetracycline stress using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation labeling quantitative proteomics technology. A total of 723 proteins including 10,763 peptides were identified with 184 decreasing and 147 increasing in abundance by liquid chromatography matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. Most interestingly, crucial metabolic pathways such as the tricarboxylic acid cycle, pyruvate metabolism and glycolysis/gluconeogenesis sharply fluctuated, while the ribosome protein complexes contributing to the translation process were generally elevated in chlortetracycline stress, which is known for a compensative tactic due to the action of chlortetracycline on the ribosome. Further antimicrobial susceptibility assays validated the role of differential proteins in metabolic pathways using genetically modified mutants of gene deletion of these differential proteins. Our study demonstrated that the down-regulation of metabolic pathways was a part of the global response and played an important role in the antibiotics resistance. These results indicate that reverting of these fluctuated pathways may become a novel strategy to combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

  8. The C5 convertase is not required for activation of the terminal complement pathway in murine experimental cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Theresa N; Darley, Meghan M; Weckbach, Sebastian; Stahel, Philip F; Tomlinson, Stephen; Barnum, Scott R

    2012-07-13

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is the most severe manifestation of clinical malaria syndromes and has a high fatality rate especially in the developing world. Recent studies demonstrated that C5(-/-) mice are resistant to experimental CM (ECM) and that protection was due to the inability to form the membrane attack complex. Unexpectedly, we observed that C4(-/-) and factor B(-/-) mice were fully susceptible to disease, indicating that activation of the classical or alternative pathways is not required for ECM. C3(-/-) mice were also susceptible to ECM, indicating that the canonical C5 convertases are not required for ECM development and progression. Abrogation of ECM by treatment with anti-C9 antibody and detection of C5a in serum of C3(-/-) mice confirmed that C5 activation occurs in ECM independent of C5 convertases. Our data indicate that activation of C5 in ECM likely occurs via coagulation enzymes of the extrinsic protease pathway.

  9. Search for age-related macular degeneration risk variants in Alzheimer disease genes and pathways.

    PubMed

    Logue, Mark W; Schu, Matthew; Vardarajan, Badri N; Farrell, John; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Jun, Gyungah; Baldwin, Clinton T; Deangelis, Margaret M; Farrer, Lindsay A

    2014-06-01

    Several lines of inquiry point to overlapping molecular mechanisms between late-onset Alzheimer disease (AD) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We evaluated summarized results from large genome-wide association studies for AD and AMD to test the hypothesis that AD susceptibility loci are also associated with AMD. We observed association of both disorders with genes in a region of chromosome 7, including PILRA and ZCWPW1 (peak AMD SNP rs7792525, minor allele frequency [MAF] = 19%, odds ratio [OR] = 1.14, p = 2.34 × 10(-6)), and with ABCA7 (peak AMD SNP rs3752228, MAF = 0.054, OR = 1.22, p = 0.00012). Next, we evaluated association of AMD with genes in AD-related pathways identified by canonical pathway analysis of AD-associated genes. Significant associations were observed with multiple previously identified AMD risk loci and 2 novel genes: HGS (peak SNP rs8070488, MAF = 0.23, OR = 0.91, p = 7.52 × 10(-5)), which plays a role in the clathrin-mediated endocytosis signaling pathway, and TNF (peak SNP rs2071590, MAF = 0.34, OR = 0.89, p = 1.17 × 10(-5)), which is a member of the atherosclerosis signaling and the LXR/RXR activation pathways. Our results suggest that AMD and AD share genetic mechanisms.

  10. Cellular uptake pathways of lipid-modified cationic polymers in gene delivery to primary cells.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Charlie Y M; Uludağ, Hasan

    2012-11-01

    Hydrophobic modifications have emerged as a promising approach to improve the efficiency of non-viral gene delivery vectors (GDV). Functional GDVs from non-toxic polymers have been created with this approach but the mechanism(s) behind lipid-mediated enhancement in transfection remains to be clarified. Using a linoleic acid-substituted 2 kDa polyethylenimine (PEI2LA), we aimed to define the cellular uptake pathways and intracellular trafficking of plasmid DNA in normal human foreskin fibroblast cells. Several pharmacological compounds were applied to selectively inhibit uptake by clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), caveolin-mediated endocytosis (CvME) and macropinocytosis. We found that PEI2LA complexes were taken up predominantly through CME, and to a lesser extent by CvME. In contrast, its precursor molecule, PEI2 complexes was internalized primarily by CvME and macropinocytosis. The commonly used 25 kDa PEI 25 complexes utilized all endocytic pathways, suggesting its efficiency is derived from a different set of transfection pathways than PEI2LA. We further applied several endosome disruptive agents and found that hypertonic media enhanced the transfection of PEI2LA by 6.5-fold. We infer that lipid substitution changes the normal uptake pathways significantly and transfection with hydrophobically modified GDVs may be further enhanced by incorporating endosome disruptive elements into vector design.

  11. ERK/MAPK Signaling Is Required for Pathway-Specific Striatal Motor Functions.

    PubMed

    Hutton, Scott R; Otis, James M; Kim, Erin M; Lamsal, Yashna; Stuber, Garret D; Snider, William D

    2017-08-23

    The ERK/MAPK intracellular signaling pathway is hypothesized to be a key regulator of striatal activity via modulation of synaptic plasticity and gene transcription. However, prior investigations into striatal ERK/MAPK functions have yielded conflicting results. Further, these studies have not delineated the cell-type-specific roles of ERK/MAPK signaling due to the reliance on globally administered pharmacological ERK/MAPK inhibitors and the use of genetic models that only partially reduce total ERK/MAPK activity. Here, we generated mouse models in which ERK/MAPK signaling was completely abolished in each of the two distinct classes of medium spiny neurons (MSNs). ERK/MAPK deletion in D1R-MSNs (direct pathway) resulted in decreased locomotor behavior, reduced weight gain, and early postnatal lethality. In contrast, loss of ERK/MAPK signaling in D2R-MSNs (indirect pathway) resulted in a profound hyperlocomotor phenotype. ERK/MAPK-deficient D2R-MSNs exhibited a significant reduction in dendritic spine density, markedly suppressed electrical excitability, and suppression of activity-associated gene expression even after pharmacological stimulation. Our results demonstrate the importance of ERK/MAPK signaling in governing the motor functions of the striatal direct and indirect pathways. Our data further show a critical role for ERK in maintaining the excitability and plasticity of D2R-MSNs.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Alterations in ERK/MAPK activity are associated with drug abuse, as well as neuropsychiatric and movement disorders. However, genetic evidence defining the functions of ERK/MAPK signaling in striatum-related neurophysiology and behavior is lacking. We show that loss of ERK/MAPK signaling leads to pathway-specific alterations in motor function, reduced neuronal excitability, and the inability of medium spiny neurons to regulate activity-induced gene expression. Our results underscore the potential importance of the ERK/MAPK pathway in human movement disorders

  12. Neurotransmitter signaling pathways required for normal development in Xenopus laevis embryos: a pharmacological survey screen

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Kelly G.; Levin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitters are not only involved in brain function but are also important signaling molecules for many diverse cell types. Neurotransmitters are widely conserved, from evolutionarily ancient organisms lacking nervous systems through man. Here, we report results from a loss- and gain-of-function survey, using pharmacologic modulators of several neurotransmitter pathways to examine possible roles in normal embryogenesis. Applying reagents targeting the glutamatergic, adrenergic, and dopaminergic pathways to embryos of Xenopus laevis from gastrulation to organogenesis stages, we observed and quantified numerous malformations including craniofacial defects, hyperpigmentation, muscle mispatterning, and miscoiling of the gut. These data implicate several key neurotransmitters in new embryonic patterning roles, reveal novel earlier stages for processes involved in eye development, suggest new targets for subsequent molecular-genetic investigation, and highlight the necessity for in-depth toxicology studies of psychoactive compounds to which human embryos might be exposed during pregnancy. PMID:27060969

  13. The RdDM pathway is required for basal heat tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Popova, Olga V; Dinh, Huy Q; Aufsatz, Werner; Jonak, Claudia

    2013-03-01

    Heat stress affects epigenetic gene silencing in Arabidopsis. To test for a mechanistic involvement of epigenetic regulation in heat-stress responses, we analyzed the heat tolerance of mutants defective in DNA methylation, histone modifications, chromatin-remodeling, or siRNA-based silencing pathways. Plants deficient in NRPD2, the common second-largest subunit of RNA polymerases IV and V, and in the Rpd3-type histone deacetylase HDA6 were hypersensitive to heat exposure. Microarray analysis demonstrated that NRPD2 and HDA6 have independent roles in transcriptional reprogramming in response to temperature stress. The misexpression of protein-coding genes in nrpd2 mutants recovering from heat correlated with defective epigenetic regulation of adjacent transposon remnants which involved the loss of control of heat-stress-induced read-through transcription. We provide evidence that the transcriptional response to temperature stress, at least partially, relies on the integrity of the RNA-dependent DNA methylation pathway.

  14. Anaerobic activation of the entire denitrification pathway in Pseudomonas aeruginosa requires Anr, an analog of Fnr.

    PubMed

    Ye, R W; Haas, D; Ka, J O; Krishnapillai, V; Zimmermann, A; Baird, C; Tiedje, J M

    1995-06-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa gene anr, which encodes a structural and functional analog of the anaerobic regulator Fnr in Escherichia coli, was mapped to the SpeI fragment R, which is at about 59 min on the genomic map of P. aeruginosa PAO1. Wild-type P. aeruginosa PAO1 grew under anaerobic conditions with nitrate, nitrite, and nitrous oxide as alternative electron acceptors. An anr deletion mutant, PAO6261, was constructed. It was unable to grow with these alternative electron acceptors; however, its ability to denitrify was restored upon the introduction of the wild-type anr gene. In addition, the activities of two enzymes in the denitrification pathway, nitrite reductase and nitric oxide reductase, were not detectable under oxygen-limiting conditions in strain PAO6261 but were restored when complemented with the anr+ gene. These results indicate that the anr gene product plays a key role in anaerobically activating the entire denitrification pathway.

  15. The small interfering RNA production pathway is required for shoot meristem initiation in rice

    PubMed Central

    Nagasaki, Hiroshi; Itoh, Jun-ichi; Hayashi, Katsunobu; Hibara, Ken-ichiro; Satoh-Nagasawa, Namiko; Nosaka, Misuzu; Mukouhata, Motohiro; Ashikari, Motoyuki; Kitano, Hidemi; Matsuoka, Makoto; Nagato, Yasuo; Sato, Yutaka

    2007-01-01

    The shoot apical meristem (SAM) is a group of stem cells that are responsible for plant development. Mutations in rice SHOOTLESS2 (SHL2), SHL4/SHOOT ORGANIZATION2 (SHO2), and SHO1 cause complete deletion or abnormal formation of the SAM. In this study we showed that defects in SAM formation in shl mutants are associated with the loss of expression of the homeodomain–leucine zipper (HD-ZIPIII) family genes. Rice SHL2, SHL4/SHO2, and SHO1 encoded orthologues of Arabidopsis RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 6, ARGONAUTE (AGO) 7, and DICER-like 4, respectively, whose mutations affect leaf development through the trans-acting siRNA (ta-siRNA) pathway. This suggested that the ta-siRNA pathway regulates the critical step of SAM formation during rice embryogenesis. The gain-of-function experiment by the ectopic expression of SHL4 resulted in reduced accumulation of an microRNA, miR166, and partial adaxialization of leaves, supporting a role for the ta-siRNA pathway in the maintenance of leaf polarity as previously reported in maize. Analysis of the spatiotemporal expression patterns of HD-ZIPIII and miR166 in wild-type and shl mutant embryos suggested that the loss of HD-ZIPIII expression in the SAM region of the developing embryo is the result of ectopic expression of miR166. Our analysis of shl mutants demonstrated that HD-ZIPIII expression regulated by miR166 is sensitive to the ta-siRNA pathway during SAM formation in rice embryogenesis. PMID:17804793

  16. Pathways and key intermediates required for obligate aerobic ammonia-dependent chemolithotrophy in bacteria and Thaumarchaeota

    PubMed Central

    Kozlowski, Jessica A; Stieglmeier, Michaela; Schleper, Christa; Klotz, Martin G; Stein, Lisa Y

    2016-01-01

    Chemolithotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and Thaumarchaeota are central players in the global nitrogen cycle. Obligate ammonia chemolithotrophy has been characterized for bacteria; however, large gaps remain in the Thaumarchaeotal pathway. Using batch growth experiments and instantaneous microrespirometry measurements of resting biomass, we show that the terrestrial Thaumarchaeon Nitrososphaera viennensis EN76T exhibits tight control over production and consumption of nitric oxide (NO) during ammonia catabolism, unlike the ammonia-oxidizing bacterium Nitrosospira multiformis ATCC 25196T. In particular, pulses of hydroxylamine into a microelectrode chamber as the sole substrate for N. viennensis resulted in iterative production and consumption of NO followed by conversion of hydroxylamine to nitrite. In support of these observations, oxidation of ammonia in growing cultures of N. viennensis, but not of N. multiformis, was inhibited by the NO-scavenger PTIO. When based on the marginal nitrous oxide (N2O) levels detected in cell-free media controls, the higher levels produced by N. multiformis were explained by enzyme activity, whereas N2O in N. viennensis cultures was attributed to abiotic reactions of released N-oxide intermediates with media components. Our results are conceptualized in a pathway for ammonia-dependent chemolithotrophy in Thaumarchaea, which identifies NO as an essential intermediate in the pathway and implements known biochemistry to be executed by a proposed but still elusive copper enzyme. Taken together, this work identifies differences in ammonia-dependent chemolithotrophy between bacteria and the Thaumarchaeota, advances a central catabolic role of NO only in the Thaumarchaeotal pathway and reveals stark differences in how the two microbial cohorts contribute to N2O emissions. PMID:26882267

  17. Role of specific endocytic pathways in electrotransfection of cells

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chun-Chi; Wu, Mina; Yuan, Fan

    2014-01-01

    Electrotransfection is a technique utilized for gene delivery in both preclinical and clinical studies. However, its mechanisms are not fully understood. The goal of this study was to investigate specific pathways of endocytosis involved in electrotransfection. In the study, three different human cell lines (HEK293, HCT116, and HT29) were either treated with ice cold medium postelectrotransfection or endocytic inhibitors prior to electrotransfection. The inhibitors were pharmacological agents (chlorpromazine, genistein, and amiloride) or different small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules that could knockdown expression of clathrin heavy chain (CLTC), caveolin-1, and Rab34, respectively. The reduction in gene expressions was confirmed with western blot analysis at 48-72h post-siRNA treatment. It was observed that treatments with either ice cold medium, chlorpromazine, or genistein resulted in significant reductions in electrotransfection efficiency (eTE) in all three cell lines, compared to the matched controls, but amiloride treatment had insignificant effects on eTE. For cells treated with siRNA, only CLTC knockdown resulted in eTE reduction for all three cell lines. Together, these data demonstrated that the clathrin-mediated endocytosis played an important role in electrotransfection. PMID:26052524

  18. The SUMO pathway is developmentally regulated and required for programmed DNA elimination in Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Atsushi; Forney, James D

    2006-05-01

    Extensive genome-wide remodeling occurs during the formation of the somatic macronuclei from the germ line micronuclei in ciliated protozoa. This process is limited to sexual reproduction and includes DNA amplification, chromosome fragmentation, and the elimination of internal segments of DNA. Our efforts to define the pathways regulating these events revealed a gene encoding a homologue of ubiquitin activating enzyme 2 (UBA2) that is upregulated at the onset of macronuclear development in Paramecium tetraurelia. Uba2 enzymes are known to activate the protein called small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) that is covalently attached to target proteins. Consistent with this relationship, Northern analysis showed increased abundance of SUMO transcripts during sexual reproduction in Paramecium. RNA interference (RNAi) against UBA2 or SUMO during vegetative growth had little effect on cell survival or fission rates. In contrast, RNAi of mating cells resulted in failure to form a functional macronucleus. Despite normal amplification of the genome, excision of internal eliminated sequences was completely blocked. Additional experiments showed that the homologous UBA2 and SUMO genes in Tetrahymena thermophila are also upregulated during conjugation. These results provide evidence for the developmental regulation of the SUMO pathway in ciliates and suggest a key role for the pathway in controlling genome remodeling.

  19. The SUMO Pathway Is Developmentally Regulated and Required for Programmed DNA Elimination in Paramecium tetraurelia† ‡

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Atsushi; Forney, James D.

    2006-01-01

    Extensive genome-wide remodeling occurs during the formation of the somatic macronuclei from the germ line micronuclei in ciliated protozoa. This process is limited to sexual reproduction and includes DNA amplification, chromosome fragmentation, and the elimination of internal segments of DNA. Our efforts to define the pathways regulating these events revealed a gene encoding a homologue of ubiquitin activating enzyme 2 (UBA2) that is upregulated at the onset of macronuclear development in Paramecium tetraurelia. Uba2 enzymes are known to activate the protein called small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) that is covalently attached to target proteins. Consistent with this relationship, Northern analysis showed increased abundance of SUMO transcripts during sexual reproduction in Paramecium. RNA interference (RNAi) against UBA2 or SUMO during vegetative growth had little effect on cell survival or fission rates. In contrast, RNAi of mating cells resulted in failure to form a functional macronucleus. Despite normal amplification of the genome, excision of internal eliminated sequences was completely blocked. Additional experiments showed that the homologous UBA2 and SUMO genes in Tetrahymena thermophila are also upregulated during conjugation. These results provide evidence for the developmental regulation of the SUMO pathway in ciliates and suggest a key role for the pathway in controlling genome remodeling. PMID:16682458

  20. THE 5-LIPOXYGENASE PATHWAY IS REQUIRED FOR ACUTE LUNG INJURY FOLLOWING HEMORRHAGIC SHOCK

    PubMed Central

    Eun, John C.; Moore, Ernest E.; Mauchley, David C.; Johnson, Chris A.; Meng, Xianzhong; Banerjee, Anirban; Wohlauer, Max V.; Zarini, Simona; Gijón, Miguel A.; Murphy, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    The cellular and biochemical mechanisms leading to acute lung injury and subsequent multiple organ failure are only partially understood. In order to study the potential role of eicosanoids, particularly leukotrienes, as possible mediators of acute lung injury, we used a murine experimental model of acute lung injury induced by hemorrhagic shock after blood removal via cardiac puncture. Neutrophil sequestration as shown by immunofluorescence, and protein leakage into the alveolar space, were measured as markers of injury. We used liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry to unequivocally identify several eicosanoids in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of experimental animals. MK886, a specific inhibitor of the 5-lipoxygenase pathway, as well as transgenic mice deficient in 5-lipoxygenase, were used to determine the role of this enzymatic pathway in this model. Leukotriene B4 and leukotriene C4 were consistently elevated in shock-treated mice compared to sham-treated mice. MK886 attenuated neutrophil infiltration and protein extravasation induced by hemorrhagic shock. 5-lipoxygenase-deficient mice showed reduced neutrophil infiltration and protein extravasation after shock treatment, indicating greatly reduced lung injury. These results support the hypothesis that 5-lipoxygenase, most likely through the generation of leukotrienes, plays an important role in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury induced by hemorrhagic shock in mice. This pathway could represent a new target for pharmacological intervention to reduce lung damage following severe primary injury. PMID:22392149

  1. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae v-SNARE Vti1p Is Required for Multiple Membrane Transport Pathways to the Vacuole

    PubMed Central

    von Mollard, Gabriele Fischer; Stevens, Tom H.

    1999-01-01

    The interaction between v-SNAREs on transport vesicles and t-SNAREs on target membranes is required for membrane traffic in eukaryotic cells. Here we identify Vti1p as the first v-SNARE protein found to be required for biosynthetic traffic into the yeast vacuole, the equivalent of the mammalian lysosome. Certain vti1-ts yeast mutants are defective in alkaline phosphatase transport from the Golgi to the vacuole and in targeting of aminopeptidase I from the cytosol to the vacuole. VTI1 interacts genetically with the vacuolar t-SNARE VAM3, which is required for transport of both alkaline phosphatase and aminopeptidase I to the vacuole. The v-SNARE Nyv1p forms a SNARE complex with Vam3p in homotypic vacuolar fusion; however, we find that Nyv1p is not required for any of the three biosynthetic pathways to the vacuole. v-SNAREs were thought to ensure specificity in membrane traffic. However, Vti1p also functions in two additional membrane traffic pathways: Vti1p interacts with the t-SNAREs Pep12p in traffic from the TGN to the prevacuolar compartment and with Sed5p in retrograde traffic to the cis-Golgi. The ability of Vti1p to mediate multiple fusion steps requires additional proteins to ensure specificity in membrane traffic. PMID:10359592

  2. Retinoic Acid Inducible Gene 1 Protein (RIG1)-Like Receptor Pathway Is Required for Efficient Nuclear Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Sayed, Nazish; Ospino, Frank; Himmati, Farhan; Lee, Jieun; Chanda, Palas; Mocarski, Edward S; Cooke, John P

    2017-05-01

    We have revealed a critical role for innate immune signaling in nuclear reprogramming to pluripotency, and in the nuclear reprogramming required for somatic cell transdifferentiation. Activation of innate immune signaling causes global changes in the expression and activity of epigenetic modifiers to promote epigenetic plasticity. In our previous articles, we focused on the role of toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) in this signaling pathway. Here, we define the role of another innate immunity pathway known to participate in response to viral RNA, the retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 receptor (RIG-1)-like receptor (RLR) pathway. This pathway is represented by the sensors of viral RNA, RIG-1, LGP2, and melanoma differentiation-associated protein 5 (MDA5). We first found that TLR3 deficiency only causes a partial inhibition of nuclear reprogramming to pluripotency in mouse tail-tip fibroblasts, which motivated us to determine the contribution of RLR. We found that knockdown of interferon beta promoter stimulator 1, the common adaptor protein for the RLR family, substantially reduced nuclear reprogramming induced by retroviral or by modified messenger RNA expression of Oct 4, Sox2, KLF4, and c-MYC (OSKM). Importantly, a double knockdown of both RLR and TLR3 pathway led to a further decrease in induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) colonies suggesting an additive effect of both these pathways on nuclear reprogramming. Furthermore, in murine embryonic fibroblasts expressing a doxycycline (dox)-inducible cassette of the genes encoding OSKM, an RLR agonist increased the yield of iPSCs. Similarly, the RLR agonist enhanced nuclear reprogramming by cell permeant peptides of the Yamanaka factors. Finally, in the dox-inducible system, RLR activation promotes activating histone marks in the promoter region of pluripotency genes. To conclude, innate immune signaling mediated by RLR plays a critical role in nuclear reprogramming. Manipulation of innate immune signaling may facilitate

  3. Zfrp8/PDCD2 is required in ovarian stem cells and interacts with the piRNA pathway machinery.

    PubMed

    Minakhina, Svetlana; Changela, Neha; Steward, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    The maintenance of stem cells is central to generating diverse cell populations in many tissues throughout the life of an animal. Elucidating the mechanisms involved in how stem cells are formed and maintained is crucial to understanding both normal developmental processes and the growth of many cancers. Previously, we showed that Zfrp8/PDCD2 is essential for the maintenance of Drosophila hematopoietic stem cells. Here, we show that Zfrp8/PDCD2 is also required in both germline and follicle stem cells in the Drosophila ovary. Expression of human PDCD2 fully rescues the Zfrp8 phenotype, underlining the functional conservation of Zfrp8/PDCD2. The piRNA pathway is essential in early oogenesis, and we find that nuclear localization of Zfrp8 in germline stem cells and their offspring is regulated by some piRNA pathway genes. We also show that Zfrp8 forms a complex with the piRNA pathway protein Maelstrom and controls the accumulation of Maelstrom in the nuage. Furthermore, Zfrp8 regulates the activity of specific transposable elements also controlled by Maelstrom and Piwi. Our results suggest that Zfrp8/PDCD2 is not an integral member of the piRNA pathway, but has an overlapping function, possibly competing with Maelstrom and Piwi.

  4. Zfrp8/PDCD2 is required in ovarian stem cells and interacts with the piRNA pathway machinery

    PubMed Central

    Minakhina, Svetlana; Changela, Neha; Steward, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    The maintenance of stem cells is central to generating diverse cell populations in many tissues throughout the life of an animal. Elucidating the mechanisms involved in how stem cells are formed and maintained is crucial to understanding both normal developmental processes and the growth of many cancers. Previously, we showed that Zfrp8/PDCD2 is essential for the maintenance of Drosophila hematopoietic stem cells. Here, we show that Zfrp8/PDCD2 is also required in both germline and follicle stem cells in the Drosophila ovary. Expression of human PDCD2 fully rescues the Zfrp8 phenotype, underlining the functional conservation of Zfrp8/PDCD2. The piRNA pathway is essential in early oogenesis, and we find that nuclear localization of Zfrp8 in germline stem cells and their offspring is regulated by some piRNA pathway genes. We also show that Zfrp8 forms a complex with the piRNA pathway protein Maelstrom and controls the accumulation of Maelstrom in the nuage. Furthermore, Zfrp8 regulates the activity of specific transposable elements also controlled by Maelstrom and Piwi. Our results suggest that Zfrp8/PDCD2 is not an integral member of the piRNA pathway, but has an overlapping function, possibly competing with Maelstrom and Piwi. PMID:24381196

  5. Pathways through High School: Translating the Effects of New Graduation Requirements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossman, Gretchen B.; And Others

    The first phase of a study of the effects of new high school graduation requirements in Maryland was conducted in 1986. Interviews were conducted with 182 administrators, teachers, and students about their perspectives on new requirements instituted in 1985. Transcript records were analyzed for 249 students from 5 high schools. Interview data did…

  6. Reciprocal requirements for Eda/Edar/NF-κB and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways in hair follicle induction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuhang; Tomann, Philip; Andl, Thomas; Gallant, Natalie M.; Huelsken, Joerg; Jerchow, Boris; Birchmeier, Walter; Paus, Ralf; Piccolo, Stefano; Mikkola, Marja L.; Morrisey, Edward E.; Overbeek, Paul A.; Scheidereit, Claus; Millar, Sarah E.; Schmidt-Ullrich, Ruth

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Wnt/β-catenin and NF-κB signaling mechanisms provide central controls in development and disease, but how these pathways intersect is unclear. Using hair follicle induction as a model system, we show that patterning of dermal Wnt/β-catenin signaling requires epithelial β-catenin activity. We find that Wnt/β-catenin signaling is absolutely required for NF-κB activation, and that Edar is a direct Wnt target gene. Wnt/β-catenin signaling is initially activated independently of Eda/Edar/NF-κB activity in primary hair follicle primordia. However, Eda/Edar/NF-κB signaling is required to refine the pattern of Wnt/β-catenin activity, and to maintain this activity at later stages of placode development. We show that maintenance of localized expression of Wnt10b and Wnt10a requires NF-κB signaling, providing a molecular explanation for the latter observation, and identify Wnt10b as a direct NF-κB target. These data reveal a complex interplay and inter-dependence of Wnt/β-catenin and Eda/Edar/NF-κB signaling pathways in initiation and maintenance of primary hair follicle placodes. PMID:19619491

  7. The Hedgehog processing pathway is required for NSCLC growth and survival

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Blanco, Jezabel; Schilling, Neal S.; Tokhunts, Robert; Giambelli, Camilla; Long, Jun; Liang Fei, Dennis; Singh, Samer; Black, Kendall E.; Wang, Zhiqiang; Galimberti, Fabrizio; Bejarano, Pablo A.; Elliot, Sharon; Glassberg, Marilyn K.; Nguyen, Dao M.; Lockwood, William W.; Lam, Wan L.; Dmitrovsky, Ethan; Capobianco, Anthony J.; Robbins, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Considerable interest has been generated from the results of recent clinical trials using SMOOTHENED (SMO) antagonists to inhibit the growth of HEDGEHOG (HH) signaling dependent tumors. This interest is tempered by the discovery of SMO mutations mediating resistance, underscoring the rationale for developing therapeutic strategies that interrupt HH signaling at levels distinct from those inhibiting SMO function. Here, we demonstrate that HH dependent non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) growth is sensitive to blockade of the HH pathway upstream of SMO, at the level of HH ligand processing. Individually, the use of different lentivirally delivered shRNA constructs targeting two functionally distinct HH-processing proteins, SKINNY HEDGEHOG (SKN) or DISPATCHED-1 (DISP-1), in NSCLC cell lines produced similar decreases in cell proliferation and increased cell death. Further, providing either an exogenous source of processed HH or a SMO agonist reverses these effects. The attenuation of HH processing, by knocking down either of these gene products, also abrogated tumor growth in mouse xenografts. Finally, we extended these findings to primary clinical specimens, showing that SKN is frequently over-expressed in NSCLC and that higher DISP-1 expression is associated with an unfavorable clinical outcome. Our results show a critical role for HH processing in HH-dependent tumors, identifies two potential druggable targets in the HH pathway, and suggest that similar therapeutic strategies could be explored to treat patients harboring HH ligand dependent cancers. PMID:22733134

  8. Process and utility water requirements for cellulosic ethanol production processes via fermentation pathway

    EPA Science Inventory

    The increasing need of additional water resources for energy production is a growing concern for future economic development. In technology development for ethanol production from cellulosic feedstocks, a detailed assessment of the quantity and quality of water required, and the ...

  9. Process and utility water requirements for cellulosic ethanol production processes via fermentation pathway

    EPA Science Inventory

    The increasing need of additional water resources for energy production is a growing concern for future economic development. In technology development for ethanol production from cellulosic feedstocks, a detailed assessment of the quantity and quality of water required, and the ...

  10. Rapid synthesis of auxin via a new tryptophan-dependent pathway is required for shade avoidance in plants.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yi; Ferrer, Jean-Luc; Ljung, Karin; Pojer, Florence; Hong, Fangxin; Long, Jeff A; Li, Lin; Moreno, Javier E; Bowman, Marianne E; Ivans, Lauren J; Cheng, Youfa; Lim, Jason; Zhao, Yunde; Ballaré, Carlos L; Sandberg, Göran; Noel, Joseph P; Chory, Joanne

    2008-04-04

    Plants grown at high densities perceive a decrease in the red to far-red (R:FR) ratio of incoming light, resulting from absorption of red light by canopy leaves and reflection of far-red light from neighboring plants. These changes in light quality trigger a series of responses known collectively as the shade avoidance syndrome. During shade avoidance, stems elongate at the expense of leaf and storage organ expansion, branching is inhibited, and flowering is accelerated. We identified several loci in Arabidopsis, mutations in which lead to plants defective in multiple shade avoidance responses. Here we describe TAA1, an aminotransferase, and show that TAA1 catalyzes the formation of indole-3-pyruvic acid (IPA) from L-tryptophan (L-Trp), the first step in a previously proposed, but uncharacterized, auxin biosynthetic pathway. This pathway is rapidly deployed to synthesize auxin at the high levels required to initiate the multiple changes in body plan associated with shade avoidance.

  11. Mesenchymal chemotaxis requires selective inactivation of myosin II at the leading edge via a noncanonical PLCγ/PKCα pathway.

    PubMed

    Asokan, Sreeja B; Johnson, Heath E; Rahman, Anisur; King, Samantha J; Rotty, Jeremy D; Lebedeva, Irina P; Haugh, Jason M; Bear, James E

    2014-12-22

    Chemotaxis, migration toward soluble chemical cues, is critical for processes such as wound healing and immune surveillance and is exhibited by various cell types, from rapidly migrating leukocytes to slow-moving mesenchymal cells. To study mesenchymal chemotaxis, we observed cell migration in microfluidic chambers that generate stable gradients of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). Surprisingly, we found that pathways implicated in amoeboid chemotaxis, such as PI3K and mammalian target of rapamycin signaling, are dispensable for PDGF chemotaxis. Instead, we find that local inactivation of Myosin IIA, through a noncanonical Ser1/2 phosphorylation of the regulatory light chain, is essential. This site is phosphorylated by PKCα, which is activated by an intracellular gradient of diacylglycerol generated by PLCγ. Using a combination of live imaging and gradients of activators/inhibitors in the microfluidic chambers, we demonstrate that this signaling pathway and subsequent inhibition of Myosin II activity at the leading edge are required for mesenchymal chemotaxis.

  12. RNase MRP is required for entry of 35S precursor rRNA into the canonical processing pathway.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Lasse; Bommankanti, Ananth; Li, Xing; Hayden, Lauren; Jones, Adrienne; Khan, Miriam; Oni, Tolulope; Zengel, Janice M

    2009-07-01

    RNase MRP is a nucleolar RNA-protein enzyme that participates in the processing of rRNA during ribosome biogenesis. Previous experiments suggested that RNase MRP makes a nonessential cleavage in the first internal transcribed spacer. Here we report experiments with new temperature-sensitive RNase MRP mutants in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that show that the abundance of all early intermediates in the processing pathway is severely reduced upon inactivation of RNase MRP. Transcription of rRNA continues unabated as determined by RNA polymerase run-on transcription, but the precursor rRNA transcript does not accumulate, and appears to be unstable. Taken together, these observations suggest that inactivation of RNase MRP blocks cleavage at sites A0, A1, A2, and A3, which in turn, prevents precursor rRNA from entering the canonical processing pathway (35S > 20S + 27S > 18S + 25S + 5.8S rRNA). Nevertheless, at least some cleavage at the processing site in the second internal transcribed spacer takes place to form an unusual 24S intermediate, suggesting that cleavage at C2 is not blocked. Furthermore, the long form of 5.8S rRNA is made in the absence of RNase MRP activity, but only in the presence of Xrn1p (exonuclease 1), an enzyme not required for the canonical pathway. We conclude that RNase MRP is a key enzyme for initiating the canonical processing of precursor rRNA transcripts, but alternative pathway(s) might provide a backup for production of small amounts of rRNA.

  13. RNase MRP is required for entry of 35S precursor rRNA into the canonical processing pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lindahl, Lasse; Bommankanti, Ananth; Li, Xing; Hayden, Lauren; Jones, Adrienne; Khan, Miriam; Oni, Tolulope; Zengel, Janice M.

    2009-01-01

    RNase MRP is a nucleolar RNA–protein enzyme that participates in the processing of rRNA during ribosome biogenesis. Previous experiments suggested that RNase MRP makes a nonessential cleavage in the first internal transcribed spacer. Here we report experiments with new temperature-sensitive RNase MRP mutants in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that show that the abundance of all early intermediates in the processing pathway is severely reduced upon inactivation of RNase MRP. Transcription of rRNA continues unabated as determined by RNA polymerase run-on transcription, but the precursor rRNA transcript does not accumulate, and appears to be unstable. Taken together, these observations suggest that inactivation of RNase MRP blocks cleavage at sites A0, A1, A2, and A3, which in turn, prevents precursor rRNA from entering the canonical processing pathway (35S > 20S + 27S > 18S + 25S + 5.8S rRNA). Nevertheless, at least some cleavage at the processing site in the second internal transcribed spacer takes place to form an unusual 24S intermediate, suggesting that cleavage at C2 is not blocked. Furthermore, the long form of 5.8S rRNA is made in the absence of RNase MRP activity, but only in the presence of Xrn1p (exonuclease 1), an enzyme not required for the canonical pathway. We conclude that RNase MRP is a key enzyme for initiating the canonical processing of precursor rRNA transcripts, but alternative pathway(s) might provide a backup for production of small amounts of rRNA. PMID:19465684

  14. VdNUC-2, the Key Regulator of Phosphate Responsive Signaling Pathway, Is Required for Verticillium dahliae Infection

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Sheng; Wang, Cai-yue; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Qing; Lin, Ling

    2015-01-01

    In fungal cells, a phosphate (Pi) responsive signaling and metabolism (PHO) pathway regulates Pi-homeostasis. NUC-2/PHO81 and its homologs are one of the most important components in the regulation pathway. In soil-borne phytopathogenic fungus Verticillium dahliae, we identified a Neurospora crassa nuc-2 homolog gene VdNUC-2. VdNUC-2 is composed of 1,018 amino acids, and is highly conserved in tested filamentous fungi. Under conditions of Pi-starvation, compared with the wild-type strain and ectopic complementation strains, the VdNUC-2 knocked out mutants exhibited reduced radial growth, decreased production of conidia and microsclerotia, and were more sensitive to hydrogen peroxide stress. The virulence of VdNUC-2 defective mutants was significantly compromised, and that was unable to be restored by exogenous application of extra Pi. Additionally, the deletion mutants of VdNUC-1, a key transcription factor gene positively controlled by VdNUC-2 in the PHO pathway, showed the similar cultural phenotypes as VdNUC-2 mutants when both of them grew in Pi-limited conditions. However, the virulence of VdNUC-1 mutants was comparable to the wild-type strain. These evidences indicated that the virulence reduction in VdNUC-2 mutants is not due to the interruptions in the PHO pathway or the disturbance of Pi-homeostasis in V. dahliae cytoplasm. VdNUC-2 is not only a crucial gene in the PHO pathway in V. dahliae, but also is required for the full virulence during host-infection. PMID:26670613

  15. DREF is required for cell and organismal growth in Drosophila and functions downstream of the nutrition/TOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Killip, L E; Grewal, S S

    2012-11-15

    Nutrient availability is a key determinant of animal growth. The conserved insulin/PI3 kinase and TOR kinase signaling pathways are two of the best characterized regulators of cell and tissue growth in response to nutritional conditions. Studies in Drosophila larvae show that one mechanism by which these pathways drive growth is by regulating the expression of metabolic genes, especially those genes required for protein synthesis. Here we examine a role for the transcription factor DREF in mediating some of these transcriptional and growth responses. We find that loss of DREF leads to a decrease in organismal growth. These effects are in part due to a requirement for DREF function in cell-autonomous growth. We also uncover a non-autonomous role for DREF activity in the larval fat body. Previous studies show that activation of TOR in the fat body couples nutrition to insulin release from the brain; we find that inhibition of DREF in the fat body can phenocopy effects of nutrient deprivation and fat-specific TOR inhibition, leading to a reduction in systemic insulin signaling, delayed larval growth and smaller final size. Using genetic epistasis, we find that DREF is required for growth downstream of TOR, but not insulin/PI3K signaling. Moreover, we show that TOR can control DREF mRNA levels, in part via the transcription factor dMyc. Finally we show that DREF is required for normal expression of many ribosome biogenesis genes, suggesting that one mechanism by which DREF is required for growth is through the control of protein synthetic capacity. Together these findings suggest DREF is an essential transcription factor in the nutritional control of cell and tissue growth during Drosophila development. Given that DREF is conserved, this role may also be important in the control of growth in other animals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Aurora A kinase is required for activation of the Fanconi anemia/BRCA pathway upon DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Chun, Min Jeong; Hwang, Soo Kyung; Kim, Hyoun Geun; Goh, Sung-Ho; Kim, Sunshin; Lee, Chang-Hun

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies have linked the DNA damage response to mitotic progression machinery. Mitotic kinases, such as Aurora A kinase and Polo-like kinase, are involved in the phosphorylation of cell cycle regulators in response to DNA damage. Here, we investigated the potential involvement of Aurora A kinase in the activation of the Fanconi anemia (FA)/BRCA pathway, which participates in cellular response to DNA interstrand cross-link lesions (ICL). Initially, we detected interactions between Aurora A kinase and FANCA protein, one of the components of the FA nuclear core complex. Silencing of Aurora A kinase led to inhibition of monoubiquitination of FANCD2 and formation of nuclear foci, the final consequences of FA/BRCA pathway activation upon ICL induction. An in vitro kinase assay revealed that Aurora A kinase phosphorylates S165 of FANCA. Moreover, this phosphorylation event was induced by the treatment with mitomycin C (MMC), an ICL-inducing agent. In cells overexpressing S165A mutant FANCA, monoubiquitination of FANCD2 and nuclear foci formation was impaired and cellular sensitivity to MMC was enhanced. These results suggest that S165 phosphorylation by Aurora A kinase is required for proper activation of the FA/BRCA pathway in response to DNA damage.

  17. Drosophila p53-related protein kinase is required for PI3K/TOR pathway-dependent growth.

    PubMed

    Ibar, Consuelo; Cataldo, Vicente F; Vásquez-Doorman, Constanza; Olguín, Patricio; Glavic, Alvaro

    2013-03-01

    Cell growth and proliferation are pivotal for final organ and body size definition. p53-related protein kinase (Bud32/PRPK) has been identified as a protein involved in proliferation through its effects on transcription in yeast and p53 stabilization in human cell culture. However, the physiological function of Bud32/PRPK in metazoans is not well understood. In this work, we have analyzed the role of PRPK in Drosophila development. Drosophila PRPK is expressed in every tissue analyzed and is required to support proliferation and cell growth. The Prpk knockdown animals show phenotypes similar to those found in mutants for positive regulators of the PI3K/TOR pathway. This pathway has been shown to be fundamental for animal growth, transducing the hormonal and nutritional status into the protein translation machinery. Functional interactions have established that Prpk operates as a transducer of the PI3K/TOR pathway, being essential for TOR kinase activation and for the regulation of its targets (S6K and 4E-BP, autophagy and bulk endocytosis). This suggests that Prpk is crucial for stimulating the basal protein biosynthetic machinery in response to insulin signaling and to changes in nutrient availability.

  18. Antigen Processing and Remodeling of the Endosomal Pathway: Requirements for Antigen Cross-Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Compeer, Ewoud Bernardus; Flinsenberg, Thijs Willem Hendrik; van der Grein, Susanna Geertje; Boes, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Cross-presentation of endocytosed antigen as peptide/class I major histocompatibility complex complexes plays a central role in the elicitation of CD8+ T cell clones that mediate anti-viral and anti-tumor immune responses. While it has been clear that there are specific subsets of professional antigen presenting cells capable of antigen cross-presentation, identification of mechanisms involved is still ongoing. Especially amongst dendritic cells (DC), there are specialized subsets that are highly proficient at antigen cross-presentation. We here present a focused survey on the cell biological processes in the endosomal pathway that support antigen cross-presentation. This review highlights DC-intrinsic mechanisms that facilitate the cross-presentation of endocytosed antigen, including receptor-mediated uptake, maturation-induced endosomal sorting of membrane proteins, dynamic remodeling of endosomal structures and cell surface-directed endosomal trafficking. We will conclude with the description of pathogen-induced deviation of endosomal processing, and discuss how immune evasion strategies pertaining endosomal trafficking may preclude antigen cross-presentation. PMID:22566920

  19. The oxygen reduction pathway and heat shock stress response are both required for Entamoeba histolytica pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Olivos-García, Alfonso; Saavedra, Emma; Nequiz, Mario; Santos, Fabiola; Luis-García, Erika Rubí; Gudiño, Marco; Pérez-Tamayo, Ruy

    2016-05-01

    Several species belonging to the genus Entamoeba can colonize the mouth or the human gut; however, only Entamoeba histolytica is pathogenic to the host, causing the disease amoebiasis. This illness is responsible for one hundred thousand human deaths per year worldwide, affecting mainly underdeveloped countries. Throughout its entire life cycle and invasion of human tissues, the parasite is constantly subjected to stress conditions. Under in vitro culture, this microaerophilic parasite can tolerate up to 5 % oxygen concentrations; however, during tissue invasion the parasite has to cope with the higher oxygen content found in well-perfused tissues (4-14 %) and with reactive oxygen and nitrogen species derived from both host and parasite. In this work, the role of the amoebic oxygen reduction pathway (ORP) and heat shock response (HSP) are analyzed in relation to E. histolytica pathogenicity. The data suggest that in contrast with non-pathogenic E. dispar, the higher level of ORP and HSPs displayed by E. histolytica enables its survival in tissues by diminishing and detoxifying intracellular oxidants and repairing damaged proteins to allow metabolic fluxes, replication and immune evasion.

  20. Drosophila DREF acting via the JNK pathway is required for thorax development.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Yasuhide; Nguyen, Trong Tue; Fujiwara, Shunsuke; Matsuda, Risa; Valadez-Graham, Viviana; Zurita, Mario; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu

    2012-08-01

    The Drosophila Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) gene basket (bsk) promoter contains a DNA replication-related element (DRE)-like sequence, raising the possibility of regulation by the DNA replication-related element-binding factor (DREF). Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays with anti-DREF IgG showed the bsk gene promoter region to be effectively amplified. Luciferase transient expression assays revealed the DRE-like sequence to be important for bsk gene promoter activity, and knockdown of DREF decreased the bsk mRNA level and the bsk gene promoter activity. Furthermore, knockdown of DREF in the notum compartment of wing discs by pannier-GAL4 and UAS-DREFIR resulted in a split thorax phenotype. Monitoring of JNK activity in the wing disc by LacZ expression in a puckered (puc)-LacZ enhancer trap line revealed the reduction in DREF knockdown clones. These findings indicate that DREF is involved in regulation of Drosophila thorax development via actions on the JNK pathway.

  1. Resistance of Fusarium poae in Arabidopsis leaves requires mainly functional JA and ET signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Dinolfo, María Inés; Castañares, Eliana; Stenglein, Sebastián A

    2017-10-01

    Fusarium poae has been considered as a minor species among those that cause the FHB disease but in recent years several researchers have documented a high frequency of occurrence in several crops. We evaluated the ability of F. poae to produce symptoms in A. thaliana leaves. Moreover, we analyzed the defense of A. thaliana against F. poae using SA, JA, and ET mutants and we monitored the expression level of genes involved in the main signaling pathways related to plant defense. Symptoms were observed in the inoculated leaves demonstrating the ability of F. poae to infect A. thaliana leaves. Moreover, the npr1-1 mutants presented low symptoms compared to Col-0, etr2-1, and coi1-1 and that the coi1-1 mutant was the most susceptible genotypes followed by etr2-1 genotypes. The RT-PCR revealed that PDF1.2, CHI/PR3, and ERF1, three important JA-ET responsive genes and NPR1 and PR1, which are regulated by SA signaling, were expressed upon F. poae inoculation. Our results suggest that JA and ET could play a key role in Arabidopsis leaves defense against F. poae representing the first evaluation of the response of the main A. thaliana phytohormones involved in plant defense in the presence of F. poae. Copyright © 2017 British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. CAP defines a second signalling pathway required for insulin-stimulated glucose transport.

    PubMed

    Baumann, C A; Ribon, V; Kanzaki, M; Thurmond, D C; Mora, S; Shigematsu, S; Bickel, P E; Pessin, J E; Saltiel, A R

    2000-09-14

    Insulin stimulates the transport of glucose into fat and muscle cells. Although the precise molecular mechanisms involved in this process remain uncertain, insulin initiates its actions by binding to its tyrosine kinase receptor, leading to the phosphorylation of intracellular substrates. One such substrate is the Cbl proto-oncogene product. Cbl is recruited to the insulin receptor by interaction with the adapter protein CAP, through one of three adjacent SH3 domains in the carboxy terminus of CAP. Upon phosphorylation of Cbl, the CAP-Cbl complex dissociates from the insulin receptor and moves to a caveolin-enriched, triton-insoluble membrane fraction. Here, to identify a molecular mechanism underlying this subcellular redistribution, we screened a yeast two-hybrid library using the amino-terminal region of CAP and identified the caveolar protein flotillin. Flotillin forms a ternary complex with CAP and Cbl, directing the localization of the CAP-Cbl complex to a lipid raft subdomain of the plasma membrane. Expression of the N-terminal domain of CAP in 3T3-L1 adipocytes blocks the stimulation of glucose transport by insulin, without affecting signalling events that depend on phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase. Thus, localization of the Cbl-CAP complex to lipid rafts generates a pathway that is crucial in the regulation of glucose uptake.

  3. Lifespan Extension Conferred by Endoplasmic Reticulum Secretory Pathway Deficiency Requires Induction of the Unfolded Protein Response

    PubMed Central

    Labunskyy, Vyacheslav M.; Gerashchenko, Maxim V.; Delaney, Joe R.; Kaya, Alaattin; Kennedy, Brian K.; Kaeberlein, Matt; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2014-01-01

    Cells respond to accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by activating the unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway. The UPR restores ER homeostasis by degrading misfolded proteins, inhibiting translation, and increasing expression of chaperones that enhance ER protein folding capacity. Although ER stress and protein aggregation have been implicated in aging, the role of UPR signaling in regulating lifespan remains unknown. Here we show that deletion of several UPR target genes significantly increases replicative lifespan in yeast. This extended lifespan depends on a functional ER stress sensor protein, Ire1p, and is associated with constitutive activation of upstream UPR signaling. We applied ribosome profiling coupled with next generation sequencing to quantitatively examine translational changes associated with increased UPR activity and identified a set of stress response factors up-regulated in the long-lived mutants. Besides known UPR targets, we uncovered up-regulation of components of the cell wall and genes involved in cell wall biogenesis that confer resistance to multiple stresses. These findings demonstrate that the UPR is an important determinant of lifespan that governs ER stress and identify a signaling network that couples stress resistance to longevity. PMID:24391512

  4. Yap1, transcription regulator in the Hippo signaling pathway, is required for Xenopus limb bud regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shinichi; Tamura, Koji; Yokoyama, Hitoshi

    2014-04-01

    The Hippo signaling pathway is conserved from insects to mammals and is important for multiple processes, including cell proliferation, apoptosis and tissue homeostasis. Hippo signaling is also crucial for regeneration, including intercalary regeneration, of the whole body in the flatworm and of the leg in the cricket. However, its role in vertebrate epimorphic regeneration is unknown. Therefore, to identify principles of regeneration that are conserved among bilaterians, we investigated the role of Hippo signaling in the limb bud regeneration of an anuran amphibian, Xenopus laevis. We found that a transcription factor, Yap1, an important downstream effector of Hippo signaling, is upregulated in the regenerating limb bud. To evaluate Yap1׳s function in limb bud regeneration, we made transgenic animals that expressed a dominant-negative form of Yap under a heat-shock promoter. Overexpression of a dominant-negative form of Yap in tadpoles reduced cell proliferation, induced ectopic apoptosis, perturbed the expression domains of limb-patterning genes including hoxa13, hoxa11, and shh in the regenerating limb bud. Transient expression of a dominant-negative Yap in transgenic tadpoles also caused limb bud regeneration defects, and reduced intercalary regeneration. These results indicate that Yap1 has a crucial role in controlling the limb regenerative capacity in Xenopus, and suggest that the involvement of Hippo signaling in regeneration is conserved between vertebrates and invertebrates. This finding provides molecular evidence that common principles underlie regeneration across phyla, and may contribute to the development of new therapies in regenerative medicine.

  5. Antigen processing and remodeling of the endosomal pathway: requirements for antigen cross-presentation.

    PubMed

    Compeer, Ewoud Bernardus; Flinsenberg, Thijs Willem Hendrik; van der Grein, Susanna Geertje; Boes, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Cross-presentation of endocytosed antigen as peptide/class I major histocompatibility complex complexes plays a central role in the elicitation of CD8(+) T cell clones that mediate anti-viral and anti-tumor immune responses. While it has been clear that there are specific subsets of professional antigen presenting cells capable of antigen cross-presentation, identification of mechanisms involved is still ongoing. Especially amongst dendritic cells (DC), there are specialized subsets that are highly proficient at antigen cross-presentation. We here present a focused survey on the cell biological processes in the endosomal pathway that support antigen cross-presentation. This review highlights DC-intrinsic mechanisms that facilitate the cross-presentation of endocytosed antigen, including receptor-mediated uptake, maturation-induced endosomal sorting of membrane proteins, dynamic remodeling of endosomal structures and cell surface-directed endosomal trafficking. We will conclude with the description of pathogen-induced deviation of endosomal processing, and discuss how immune evasion strategies pertaining endosomal trafficking may preclude antigen cross-presentation.

  6. Nuclear import of the yeast hexokinase 2 protein requires α/β-importin-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Peláez, Rafael; Fernández-García, Paula; Herrero, Pilar; Moreno, Fernando

    2012-01-27

    Hexokinase 2 (Hxk2) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was one of the first metabolic enzymes described as a multifunctional protein. Hxk2 has a double subcellular localization and role, it functions as a glycolytic enzyme in the cytoplasm and as a regulator of gene transcription of several Mig1-regulated genes in the nucleus. However, the mechanism by which Hxk2 enters in the nucleus was unknown until now. Here, we report that the Hxk2 protein is an import substrate of the carriers α-importin (Kap60 in yeast) and β-importin (Kap95 in yeast). We also show that the Hxk2 nuclear import and the binding of Hxk2 with Kap60 are glucose-dependent and involve one lysine-rich nuclear localization sequence (NLS), located between lysine 6 and lysine 12. Moreover, Kap95 facilitates the recognition of the Hxk2 NLS1 motif by Kap60 and both importins are essential for Hxk2 nuclear import. It is also demonstrated that Hxk2 nuclear import and its binding to Kap95 and Kap60 depend on the Gsp1-GTP/GDP protein levels. Thus, our study uncovers Hxk2 as a new cargo for the α/β-importin pathway of S. cerevisiae.

  7. CAP defines a second signalling pathway required for insulin-stimulated glucose transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Christian A.; Ribon, Vered; Kanzaki, Makoto; Thurmond, Debbie C.; Mora, Silvia; Shigematsu, Satoshi; Bickel, Perry E.; Pessin, Jeffrey E.; Saltiel, Alan R.

    2000-09-01

    Insulin stimulates the transport of glucose into fat and muscle cells. Although the precise molecular mechanisms involved in this process remain uncertain, insulin initiates its actions by binding to its tyrosine kinase receptor, leading to the phosphorylation of intracellular substrates. One such substrate is the Cbl protooncogene product. Cbl is recruited to the insulin receptor by interaction with the adapter protein CAP, through one of three adjacent SH3 domains in the carboxy terminus of CAP. Upon phosphorylation of Cbl, the CAP-Cbl complex dissociates from the insulin receptor and moves to a caveolin-enriched, triton-insoluble membrane fraction. Here, to identify a molecular mechanism underlying this subcellular redistribution, we screened a yeast two-hybrid library using the amino-terminal region of CAP and identified the caveolar protein flotillin. Flotillin forms a ternary complex with CAP and Cbl, directing the localization of the CAP-Cbl complex to a lipid raft subdomain of the plasma membrane. Expression of the N-terminal domain of CAP in 3T3-L1 adipocytes blocks the stimulation of glucose transport by insulin, without affecting signalling events that depend on phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase. Thus, localization of the Cbl-CAP complex to lipid rafts generates a pathway that is crucial in the regulation of glucose uptake.

  8. Inducible pathway is required for mutagenesis in Salmonella typhimurium LT2

    SciTech Connect

    Orrego, C.; Eisenstadt, E.

    1987-06-01

    UV mutability of Salmonella typhimurium LT2 was eliminated in the presence of a multicopy plasmid carrying the Escherichia coli lexA/sup +/ gene. This result suggests that inducible, SOS-like functions are required for UV mutagenesis in S. typhimurium. S. typhimurium strains carrying either point or deletion mutations in topA had previously been shown to lose their mutability by UV or methyl methanesulfonate. Mitomycin C induction of the Phi(mucB'-lacZ') fusion (a DNA damage-inducible locus carried on plasmid pSE205) in S. typhimurium topA was normal, suggesting that RecA is activated in topA mutants. These observations lead the authors deduce that S. typhimurium has at least one DNA damage-inducible locus in addition to recA that is required for UV mutability.

  9. The Hippo signaling pathway is required for salivary gland development and its dysregulation is associated with Sjogren's-like disease

    PubMed Central

    Enger, Tone Berge; Samad-Zadeh, Arman; Bouchie, Meghan; Skarstein, Kathrine; Galtung, Hilde Kanli; Mera, Toshiyuki; Walker, Janice; Menko, A. Sue; Varelas, Xaralabos; Faustman, Denise L.; Jensen, Janicke Liaaen; Kukuruzinska, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Sjogren's syndrome (SS) is a complex autoimmune disease that primarily affects salivary and lacrimal glands and is associated with high morbidity. Although the prevailing dogma is that immune system pathology drives SS, increasing evidence points to structural defects, including defective E-cadherin adhesion, to be involved in its etiology. We have shown that E-cadherin plays pivotal roles in the development of the mouse salivary submandibular gland (SMG) by organizing apical-basal polarity in acinar and ductal progenitors and by signaling survival for differentiating duct cells. Recently, E-cadherin junctions have been shown to interact with effectors of the Hippo signaling pathway, a core pathway regulating organ size, cell proliferation and differentiation. We now show that Hippo signaling is required for SMG branching morphogenesis and is involved in the pathophysiology of SS. During SMG development, a Hippo pathway effector, TAZ, becomes increasingly phosphorylated and associated with E-cadherin and α-catenin, consistent with the activation of Hippo signaling. Inhibition of Lats2, an upstream kinase that promotes TAZ phosphorylation, results in dysmorphogenesis of the SMG and impaired duct formation. SMGs from NOD mice, a mouse model for SS, phenocopy the Lats2-inhibited SMGs and exhibit a reduction in E-cadherin junctional components, including TAZ. Importantly, labial specimens from human SS patients display mislocalization of TAZ from junctional regions to the nucleus, coincident with accumulation of extracellular matrix components, fibronectin and CTGF, known downstream targets of TAZ. Our studies show that Hippo signaling plays a crucial role in SMG branching morphogenesis and provide evidence that defects in this pathway are associated with SS in humans. PMID:24080911

  10. The Hippo signaling pathway is required for salivary gland development and its dysregulation is associated with Sjogren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Enger, Tone B; Samad-Zadeh, Arman; Bouchie, Meghan P; Skarstein, Kathrine; Galtung, Hilde K; Mera, Toshiyuki; Walker, Janice; Menko, A Sue; Varelas, Xaralabos; Faustman, Denise L; Jensen, Janicke L; Kukuruzinska, Maria A

    2013-11-01

    Sjogren's syndrome (SS) is a complex autoimmune disease that primarily affects salivary and lacrimal glands and is associated with high morbidity. Although the prevailing dogma is that immune system pathology drives SS, increasing evidence points to structural defects, including defective E-cadherin adhesion, to be involved in its etiology. We have shown that E-cadherin has pivotal roles in the development of the mouse salivary submandibular gland (SMG) by organizing apical-basal polarity in acinar and ductal progenitors and by signaling survival for differentiating duct cells. Recently, E-cadherin junctions have been shown to interact with effectors of the Hippo signaling pathway, a core pathway regulating the organ size, cell proliferation, and differentiation. We now show that Hippo signaling is required for SMG-branching morphogenesis and is involved in the pathophysiology of SS. During SMG development, a Hippo pathway effector, TAZ, becomes increasingly phosphorylated and associated with E-cadherin and α-catenin, consistent with the activation of Hippo signaling. Inhibition of Lats2, an upstream kinase that promotes TAZ phosphorylation, results in dysmorphogenesis of the SMG and impaired duct formation. SMGs from non-obese diabetic mice, a mouse model for SS, phenocopy the Lats2-inhibited SMGs and exhibit a reduction in E-cadherin junctional components, including TAZ. Importantly, labial specimens from human SS patients display mislocalization of TAZ from junctional regions to the nucleus, coincident with accumulation of extracellular matrix components, fibronectin and connective tissue growth factor, known downstream targets of TAZ. Our studies show that Hippo signaling has a crucial role in SMG-branching morphogenesis and provide evidence that defects in this pathway are associated with SS in humans.

  11. Voltage-gated Nav channel targeting in the heart requires an ankyrin-G dependent cellular pathway.

    PubMed

    Lowe, John S; Palygin, Oleg; Bhasin, Naina; Hund, Thomas J; Boyden, Penelope A; Shibata, Erwin; Anderson, Mark E; Mohler, Peter J

    2008-01-14

    Voltage-gated Na(v) channels are required for normal electrical activity in neurons, skeletal muscle, and cardiomyocytes. In the heart, Na(v)1.5 is the predominant Na(v) channel, and Na(v)1.5-dependent activity regulates rapid upstroke of the cardiac action potential. Na(v)1.5 activity requires precise localization at specialized cardiomyocyte membrane domains. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying Na(v) channel trafficking in the heart are unknown. In this paper, we demonstrate that ankyrin-G is required for Na(v)1.5 targeting in the heart. Cardiomyocytes with reduced ankyrin-G display reduced Na(v)1.5 expression, abnormal Na(v)1.5 membrane targeting, and reduced Na(+) channel current density. We define the structural requirements on ankyrin-G for Na(v)1.5 interactions and demonstrate that loss of Na(v)1.5 targeting is caused by the loss of direct Na(v)1.5-ankyrin-G interaction. These data are the first report of a cellular pathway required for Na(v) channel trafficking in the heart and suggest that ankyrin-G is critical for cardiac depolarization and Na(v) channel organization in multiple excitable tissues.

  12. RNAi screening reveals requirement for host cell secretory pathway in infection by diverse families of negative-strand RNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Debasis; Das, Anshuman; Dinh, Phat X.; Subramaniam, Sakthivel; Nayak, Debasis; Barrows, Nicholas J.; Pearson, James L.; Thompson, Jesse; Kelly, David L.; Ladunga, Istvan; Pattnaik, Asit K.

    2011-01-01

    Negative-strand (NS) RNA viruses comprise many pathogens that cause serious diseases in humans and animals. Despite their clinical importance, little is known about the host factors required for their infection. Using vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), a prototypic NS RNA virus in the family Rhabdoviridae, we conducted a human genome-wide siRNA screen and identified 72 host genes required for viral infection. Many of these identified genes were also required for infection by two other NS RNA viruses, the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus of the Arenaviridae family and human parainfluenza virus type 3 of the Paramyxoviridae family. Genes affecting different stages of VSV infection, such as entry/uncoating, gene expression, and assembly/release, were identified. Depletion of the proteins of the coatomer complex I or its upstream effectors ARF1 or GBF1 led to detection of reduced levels of VSV RNA. Coatomer complex I was also required for infection of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus and human parainfluenza virus type 3. These results highlight the evolutionarily conserved requirements for gene expression of diverse families of NS RNA viruses and demonstrate the involvement of host cell secretory pathway in the process. PMID:22065774

  13. The Akt signaling pathway is required for tissue maintenance and regeneration in planarians.

    PubMed

    Peiris, T Harshani; Ramirez, Daniel; Barghouth, Paul G; Oviedo, Néstor J

    2016-04-11

    Akt (PKB) is a serine threonine protein kinase downstream of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway. In mammals, Akt is ubiquitously expressed and is associated with regulation of cellular proliferation, metabolism, cell growth and cell death. Akt has been widely studied for its central role in physiology and disease, in particular cancer where it has become an attractive pharmacological target. However, the mechanisms by which Akt signaling regulates stem cell behavior in the complexity of the whole body are poorly understood. Planarians are flatworms with large populations of stem cells capable of dividing to support adult tissue renewal and regeneration. The planarian ortholog Smed-Akt is molecularly conserved providing unique opportunities to analyze the function of Akt during cellular turnover and repair of adult tissues. Our findings abrogating Smed-Akt with RNA-interference in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea led to a gradual decrease in stem cell (neoblasts) numbers. The reduced neoblast numbers largely affected the maintenance of adult tissues including the nervous and excretory systems and ciliated structures in the ventral epithelia, which impaired planarian locomotion. Downregulation of Smed-Akt function also resulted in an increase of cell death throughout the animal. However, in response to amputation, levels of cell death were decreased and failed to localize near the injury site. Interestingly, the neoblast mitotic response was increased around the amputation area but the regenerative blastema failed to form. We demonstrate Akt signaling is essential for organismal physiology and in late stages of the Akt phenotype the reduction in neoblast numbers may impair regeneration in planarians. Functional disruption of Smed-Akt alters the balance between cell proliferation and cell death leading to systemic impairment of adult tissue renewal. Our results also reveal novel roles for Akt signaling during regeneration, specifically for the timely

  14. Toxic Accumulation of LPS Pathway Intermediates Underlies the Requirement of LpxH for Growth of Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC 19606

    PubMed Central

    Richie, Daryl L.; Takeoka, Kenneth T.; Bojkovic, Jade; Metzger, Louis E.; Rath, Christopher M.; Sawyer, William S.; Wei, Jun-Rong; Dean, Charles R.

    2016-01-01

    The lipid A moiety of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the main constituent of the outer leaflet of the Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane (OM) and is essential in many Gram-negative pathogens. An exception is Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC 19606, where mutants lacking enzymes occurring early in lipid A biosynthesis (LpxA, LpxC or LpxD), and correspondingly lacking LPS, can grow. In contrast, we show here that LpxH, an enzyme that occurs downstream of LpxD in the lipid A biosynthetic pathway, is essential for growth in this strain. Multiple attempts to disrupt lpxH on the genome were unsuccessful, and when LpxH expression was controlled by an isopropyl β-d-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) inducible promoter, cell growth under typical laboratory conditions required IPTG induction. Mass spectrometry analysis of cells shifted from LpxH-induced to uninduced (and whose growth was correspondingly slowing as LpxH was depleted) showed a large cellular accumulation of UDP-2,3-diacyl-GlcN (substrate of LpxH), a C14:0(3-OH) acyl variant of the LpxD substrate (UDP-3-O-[(R)-3-OH-C14]-GlcN), and disaccharide 1-monophosphate (DSMP). Furthermore, the viable cell counts of the LpxH depleted cultures dropped modestly, and electron microscopy revealed clear defects at the cell (inner) membrane, suggesting lipid A intermediate accumulation was toxic. Consistent with this, blocking the synthesis of these intermediates by inhibition of the upstream LpxC enzyme using CHIR-090 abrogated the requirement for IPTG induction of LpxH. Taken together, these data indicate that LpxH is essential for growth in A. baumannii ATCC19606, because, unlike earlier pathway steps like LpxA or LpxC, blockage of LpxH causes accumulation of detergent-like pathway intermediates that prevents cell growth. PMID:27526195

  15. Clinical evidence on the magnitude of change in growth pathway activity in relation to Tamoxifen resistance is required.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Sepideh; Farahmand, Leila; Teymourzadeh, Azin; Majidzadeh-A, Keivan

    2017-08-08

    Despite prolonged disease-free survival and overall survival rates in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive patients undergoing adjuvant treatment, Tamoxifen therapy tends to fail due to eventual acquisition of resistance. Although numerous studies have emphasized the role of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) in the development of Tamoxifen resistance, inadequate clinical evidence is available regarding the alteration of biomarker expression during acquired resistance, thus undermining the validity of the findings. Results of two meta-analyses investigating the effect of HER2 status on the prognosis of Tamoxifen-receiving patients have demonstrated that despite HER2-negative patients having longer disease-free survival; there is no difference in overhaul survival between the two groups. Furthermore, due to the intricate molecular interactions among estrogen receptors including ERα36, ERα66, and also RTKs, it is not surprising that RTK suppression does not restore Tamoxifen sensitivity. In considering such a complex network, we speculate that by the time HER2/EGFR is suppressed via targeted therapies, activation of ERα66 and ERα36 initiate molecular signaling pathways downstream of RTKs, thereby enhancing cell proliferation even in the presence of both Tamoxifen and RTK inhibitors. Although clinical findings regarding the molecular pathways downstream of RTKs have been thoroughly discussed in this review, further clinical studies are required in determining a consistency between preclinical and clinical findings. Discovering the best targets in preventing tumor progression requires thorough comprehension of estrogen-dependent and estrogen-independent pathways during Tamoxifen resistance development. Indeed, exploring additional clinically-proven targets would allow for better characterized treatments being available for breast cancer patients. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. The C5 Convertase Is Not Required for Activation of the Terminal Complement Pathway in Murine Experimental Cerebral Malaria*

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Theresa N.; Darley, Meghan M.; Weckbach, Sebastian; Stahel, Philip F.; Tomlinson, Stephen; Barnum, Scott R.

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is the most severe manifestation of clinical malaria syndromes and has a high fatality rate especially in the developing world. Recent studies demonstrated that C5−/− mice are resistant to experimental CM (ECM) and that protection was due to the inability to form the membrane attack complex. Unexpectedly, we observed that C4−/− and factor B−/− mice were fully susceptible to disease, indicating that activation of the classical or alternative pathways is not required for ECM. C3−/− mice were also susceptible to ECM, indicating that the canonical C5 convertases are not required for ECM development and progression. Abrogation of ECM by treatment with anti-C9 antibody and detection of C5a in serum of C3−/− mice confirmed that C5 activation occurs in ECM independent of C5 convertases. Our data indicate that activation of C5 in ECM likely occurs via coagulation enzymes of the extrinsic protease pathway. PMID:22689574

  17. Localization and functional requirement of yeast Na+/H+ exchanger, Nhx1p, in the endocytic and protein recycling pathway.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Ai; Toshima, Junko Y; Kanno, Chisa; Kawata, Chie; Toshima, Jiro

    2012-02-01

    Acidification of the lumen of intracellular organelles is important for post-transcriptional processing, endosomal maturation, receptor recycling, and vesicle trafficking, being regulated by an intricate balance between H+ influx through vacuolar-type H+-ATPase and efflux through ion channels and transporters, such as the Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE). The eukaryotic NHE family comprises two major subgroups, one residing in the plasma membrane and the other in intracellular organelles. While mammalian intracellular NHE isoforms are localized to various organelles, including the mid-trans-Golgi compartments, early and late endosomes, and recycling endosomes, Nhx1p, the sole NHE in yeast, has been reported to be localized predominantly to the late endosomal/prevacuolar compartment. Here, using live cell imaging, we demonstrated that Nhx1p is localized to the trans-Golgi network compartments, late endosomes, and recycling endosomes, similar to mammalian intracellular NHE isoforms. Loss of Nhx1p led to accumulation of components of the retromer and endosomal sorting complex required for transport complexes, but not trans-Golgi compartments, in aberrant prevacuolar compartments. Importantly, Nhx1p was also required for recycling of the plasma membrane vesicle SNAP receptor Snc1p. These observations suggest that Nhx1p plays an important role in regulation of the luminal pH of various intracellular organelles, and that this regulation is critical for the protein recycling pathway as well as the endocytic pathway. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The Syk–NFAT–IL-2 Pathway in Dendritic Cells Is Required for Optimal Sterile Immunity Elicited by Alum Adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Khameneh, Hanif Javanmard; Ho, Adrian W. S.; Spreafico, Roberto; Derks, Heidi; Quek, Hazel Q. Y.

    2017-01-01

    Despite a long history and extensive usage of insoluble aluminum salts (alum) as vaccine adjuvants, the molecular mechanisms underpinning Ag-specific immunity upon vaccination remain unclear. Dendritic cells (DCs) are crucial initiators of immune responses, but little is known about the molecular pathways used by DCs to sense alum and, in turn, activate T and B cells. In this article, we show that alum adjuvanticity requires IL-2 specifically released by DCs, even when T cell secretion of IL-2 is intact. We demonstrate that alum, as well as other sterile particulates, such as uric acid crystals, induces DCs to produce IL-2 following initiation of actin-mediated phagocytosis that leads to Src and Syk kinase activation, Ca2+ mobilization, and calcineurin-dependent activation of NFAT, the master transcription factor regulating IL-2 expression. Using chimeric mice, we show that DC-derived IL-2 is required for maximal Ag-specific proliferation of CD4+ T cells and optimal humoral responses following alum-adjuvanted immunization. These data identify DC-derived IL-2 as a key mediator of alum adjuvanticity in vivo and the Src–Syk pathway as a potential leverage point in the rational design of novel adjuvants. PMID:27895176

  19. Structural requirements and reaction pathways in dimethyl ether combustion catalyzed by supported Pt clusters.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Akio; Neurock, Matthew; Iglesia, Enrique

    2007-10-31

    The identity and reversibility of the elementary steps required for catalytic combustion of dimethyl ether (DME) on Pt clusters were determined by combining isotopic and kinetic analyses with density functional theory estimates of reaction energies and activation barriers to probe the lowest energy paths. Reaction rates are limited by C-H bond activation in DME molecules adsorbed on surfaces of Pt clusters containing chemisorbed oxygen atoms at near-saturation coverages. Reaction energies and activation barriers for C-H bond activation in DME to form methoxymethyl and hydroxyl surface intermediates show that this step is more favorable than the activation of C-O bonds to form two methoxides, consistent with measured rates and kinetic isotope effects. This kinetic preference is driven by the greater stability of the CH3OCH2* and OH* intermediates relative to chemisorbed methoxides. Experimental activation barriers on Pt clusters agree with density functional theory (DFT)-derived barriers on oxygen-covered Pt(111). Measured DME turnover rates increased with increasing DME pressure, but decreased as the O2 pressure increased, because vacancies (*) on Pt surfaces nearly saturated with chemisorbed oxygen are required for DME chemisorption. DFT calculations show that although these surface vacancies are required, higher oxygen coverages lead to lower C-H activation barriers, because the basicity of oxygen adatoms increases with coverage and they become more effective in hydrogen abstraction from DME. Water inhibits reaction rates via quasi-equilibrated adsorption on vacancy sites, consistent with DFT results indicating that water binds more strongly than DME on vacancies. These conclusions are consistent with the measured kinetic response of combustion rates to DME, O2, and H2O, with H/D kinetic isotope effects, and with the absence of isotopic scrambling in reactants containing isotopic mixtures of 18O2-16O2 or 12CH3O12CH3-13CH3O13CH3. Turnover rates increased with Pt

  20. Structural Requirements and Reaction Pathways in Dimethyl Ether Combustion Catalyzed by Supported Pt Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Akio; Neurock, Matthew; Iglesia, Enrique

    2007-10-31

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The identity and reversibility of the elementary steps required for catalytic combustion of dimethyl ether (DME) on Pt clusters were determined by combining isotopic and kinetic analyses with density functional theory estimates of reaction energies and activation barriers to probe the lowest energy paths. Reaction rates are limited by C-H bond activation in DME molecules adsorbed on surfaces of Pt clusters containing chemisorbed oxygen atoms at near-saturation coverages. Reaction energies and activation barriers for C-H bond activation in DME to form methoxymethyl and hydroxyl surface intermediates show that this step is more favorable than the activation of C-O bonds to form two methoxides, consistent with measured rates and kinetic isotope effects. This kinetic preference is driven by the greater stability of the CH3OCH2* and OH* intermediates relative to chemisorbed methoxides. Experimental activation barriers on Pt clusters agree with density functional theory (DFT)-derived barriers on oxygen-covered Pt(111). Measured DME turnover rates increased with increasing DME pressure, but decreased as the O2 pressure increased, because vacancies (*) on Pt surfaces nearly saturated with chemisorbed oxygen are required for DME chemisorption. DFT calculations show that although these surface vacancies are required, higher oxygen coverages lead to lower C-H activation barriers, because the basicity of oxygen adatoms increases with coverage and they become more effective in hydrogen abstraction from DME. Water inhibits reaction rates via quasi-equilibrated adsorption on vacancy sites, consistent with DFT results indicating that water binds more strongly than DME on vacancies. These

  1. Fluxes of Ca2+ and K+ are required for the listeriolysin O-dependent internalization pathway of Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Vadia, Stephen; Seveau, Stephanie

    2014-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is responsible for the life-threatening food-borne disease listeriosis. This disease mainly affects elderly and immunocompromised individuals, causing bacteremia and meningoencephalitis. In pregnant women, L. monocytogenes infection leads to abortion and severe infection of the fetus or newborn. The L. monocytogenes intracellular life cycle is critical for pathogenesis. Previous studies have established that the major virulence factor of L. monocytogenes, the pore-forming toxin listeriolysin O (LLO), is sufficient to induce L. monocytogenes internalization into human epithelial cell lines. This internalization pathway strictly requires the formation of LLO pores in the plasma membrane and can be stimulated by the heterologous pore-forming toxin pneumolysin, suggesting that LLO acts nonspecifically by forming transmembrane pores. The present work tested the hypothesis that Ca2+ and K+ fluxes subsequent to perforation by LLO control L. monocytogenes internalization. We report that L. monocytogenes perforates the host cell plasma membrane in an LLO-dependent fashion at the early stage of invasion. In response to perforation, host cells undergo Ca2+ -dependent but K+ -independent resealing of their plasma membrane. In contrast to the plasma membrane resealing process, LLO-induced L. monocytogenes internalization requires both Ca2+ and K+ fluxes. Further linking ion fluxes to bacterial internalization, treating cells with a combination of Ca2+ and K+ ionophores but not with individual ionophores is sufficient to induce efficient internalization of large cargoes, such as 1-μm polystyrene beads and bacteria. We propose that LLO-induced L. monocytogenes internalization requires a Ca2+ - and K+ -dependent internalization pathway that is mechanistically distinct from the process of plasma membrane resealing.

  2. Germ Cells Are Not Required to Establish the Female Pathway in Mouse Fetal Gonads

    PubMed Central

    Maatouk, Danielle M.; Mork, Lindsey; Hinson, Ashley; Kobayashi, Akio; McMahon, Andrew P.; Capel, Blanche

    2012-01-01

    The fetal gonad is composed of a mixture of somatic cell lineages and germ cells. The fate of the gonad, male or female, is determined by a population of somatic cells that differentiate into Sertoli or granulosa cells and direct testis or ovary development. It is well established that germ cells are not required for the establishment or maintenance of Sertoli cells or testis cords in the male gonad. However, in the agametic ovary, follicles do not form suggesting that germ cells may influence granulosa cell development. Prior investigations of ovaries in which pre-meiotic germ cells were ablated during fetal life reported no histological changes during stages prior to birth. However, whether granulosa cells underwent normal molecular differentiation was not investigated. In cases where germ cell loss occurred secondary to other mutations, transdifferentiation of granulosa cells towards a Sertoli cell fate was observed, raising questions about whether germ cells play an active role in establishing or maintaining the fate of granulosa cells. We developed a group of molecular markers associated with ovarian development, and show here that the loss of pre-meiotic germ cells does not disrupt the somatic ovarian differentiation program during fetal life, or cause transdifferentiation as defined by expression of Sertoli markers. Since we do not find defects in the ovarian somatic program, the subsequent failure to form follicles at perinatal stages is likely attributable to the absence of germ cells rather than to defects in the somatic cells. PMID:23091613

  3. A conserved mitochondrial surveillance pathway is required for defense against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Tjahjono, Elissa

    2017-01-01

    All living organisms exist in a precarious state of homeostasis that requires constant maintenance. A wide variety of stresses, including hypoxia, heat, and infection by pathogens perpetually threaten to imbalance this state. Organisms use a battery of defenses to mitigate damage and restore normal function. Previously, we described a Caenorhabditis elegans-Pseudomonas aeruginosa assay (Liquid Killing) in which toxicity to the host is dependent upon the secreted bacterial siderophore pyoverdine. Although pyoverdine is also indispensable for virulence in mammals, its cytological effects are unclear. We used genetics, transcriptomics, and a variety of pathogen and chemical exposure assays to study the interactions between P. aeruginosa and C. elegans. Although P. aeruginosa can kill C. elegans through at least 5 different mechanisms, the defense responses activated by Liquid Killing are specific and selective and have little in common with innate defense mechanisms against intestinal colonization. Intriguingly, the defense response utilizes the phylogenetically-conserved ESRE (Ethanol and Stress Response Element) network, which we and others have previously shown to mitigate damage from a variety of abiotic stresses. This is the first report of this networks involvement in innate immunity, and indicates that host innate immune responses overlap with responses to abiotic stresses. The upregulation of the ESRE network in C. elegans is mediated in part by a family of bZIP proteins (including ZIP-2, ZIP-4, CEBP-1, and CEBP-2) that have overlapping and unique functions. Our data convincingly show that, following exposure to P. aeruginosa, the ESRE defense network is activated by mitochondrial damage, and that mitochondrial damage also leads to ESRE activation in mammals. This establishes a role for ESRE in a phylogenetically-conserved mitochondrial surveillance system important for stress response and innate immunity. PMID:28662060

  4. TGF-β induction of FGF-2 expression in stromal cells requires integrated smad3 and MAPK pathways

    PubMed Central

    Strand, Douglas W; Liang, Yao-Yun; Yang, Feng; Barron, David A; Ressler, Steven J; Schauer, Isaiah G; Feng, Xin-Hua; Rowley, David R

    2014-01-01

    Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) regulates the reactive stroma microenvironment associated with most carcinomas and mediates expression of many stromal derived factors important for tumor progression, including FGF-2 and CTGF. TGF-β is over-expressed in most carcinomas, and FGF-2 action is important in tumor-induced angiogenesis. The signaling mechanisms of how TGF-β regulates FGF-2 expression in the reactive stroma microenvironment are not understood. Accordingly, we have assessed key signaling pathways that mediate TGF-β1-induced FGF-2 expression in prostate stromal fibroblasts and mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) null for Smad2 and Smad3. TGF-β1 induced phosphorylation of Smad2, Smad3, p38 and ERK1/2 proteins in both control MEFs and prostate fibroblasts. Of these, Smad3, but not Smad2 was found to be required for TGF-β1 induction of FGF-2 expression in stromal cells. ChIP analysis revealed a Smad3/Smad4 complex was associated with the -1.9 to -2.3 kb upstream proximal promoter of the FGF-2 gene, further suggesting a Smad3-specific regulation. In addition, chemical inhibition of p38 or ERK1/2 MAPK activity also blocked TGF-β1-induced FGF-2 expression in a Smad3-independent manner. Conversely, inhibition of JNK signaling enhanced FGF-2 expression. Together, these data indicate that expression of FGF-2 in fibroblasts in the tumor stromal cell microenvironment is coordinately dependent on both intact Smad3 and MAP kinase signaling pathways. These pathways and key downstream mediators of TGF-β action in the tumor reactive stroma microenvironment, may evolve as putative targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:25374926

  5. TGF-β induction of FGF-2 expression in stromal cells requires integrated smad3 and MAPK pathways.

    PubMed

    Strand, Douglas W; Liang, Yao-Yun; Yang, Feng; Barron, David A; Ressler, Steven J; Schauer, Isaiah G; Feng, Xin-Hua; Rowley, David R

    2014-01-01

    Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) regulates the reactive stroma microenvironment associated with most carcinomas and mediates expression of many stromal derived factors important for tumor progression, including FGF-2 and CTGF. TGF-β is over-expressed in most carcinomas, and FGF-2 action is important in tumor-induced angiogenesis. The signaling mechanisms of how TGF-β regulates FGF-2 expression in the reactive stroma microenvironment are not understood. Accordingly, we have assessed key signaling pathways that mediate TGF-β1-induced FGF-2 expression in prostate stromal fibroblasts and mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) null for Smad2 and Smad3. TGF-β1 induced phosphorylation of Smad2, Smad3, p38 and ERK1/2 proteins in both control MEFs and prostate fibroblasts. Of these, Smad3, but not Smad2 was found to be required for TGF-β1 induction of FGF-2 expression in stromal cells. ChIP analysis revealed a Smad3/Smad4 complex was associated with the -1.9 to -2.3 kb upstream proximal promoter of the FGF-2 gene, further suggesting a Smad3-specific regulation. In addition, chemical inhibition of p38 or ERK1/2 MAPK activity also blocked TGF-β1-induced FGF-2 expression in a Smad3-independent manner. Conversely, inhibition of JNK signaling enhanced FGF-2 expression. Together, these data indicate that expression of FGF-2 in fibroblasts in the tumor stromal cell microenvironment is coordinately dependent on both intact Smad3 and MAP kinase signaling pathways. These pathways and key downstream mediators of TGF-β action in the tumor reactive stroma microenvironment, may evolve as putative targets for therapeutic intervention.

  6. Genetic dissection of TrkB activated signalling pathways required for specific aspects of the taste system

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Neurotrophin-4 (NT-4) and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) bind to the same receptor, Ntrk2/TrkB, but play distinct roles in the development of the rodent gustatory system. However, the mechanisms underlying these processes are lacking. Results Here, we demonstrate, in vivo, that single or combined point mutations in major adaptor protein docking sites on TrkB receptor affect specific aspects of the mouse gustatory development, known to be dependent on BDNF or NT-4. In particular, mice with a mutation in the TrkB-SHC docking site had reduced gustatory neuron survival at both early and later stages of development, when survival is dependent on NT-4 and BDNF, respectively. In addition, lingual innervation and taste bud morphology, both BDNF-dependent functions, were altered in these mutants. In contrast, mutation of the TrkB-PLCγ docking site alone did not affect gustatory neuron survival. Moreover, innervation to the tongue was delayed in these mutants and taste receptor expression was altered. Conclusions We have genetically dissected pathways activated downstream of the TrkB receptor that are required for specific aspects of the taste system controlled by the two neurotrophins NT-4 and BDNF. In addition, our results indicate that TrkB also regulate the expression of specific taste receptors by distinct signalling pathways. These results advance our knowledge of the biology of the taste system, one of the fundamental sensory systems crucial for an organism to relate to the environment. PMID:25256039

  7. The anti-adipogenic effect of macrophage-conditioned medium requires the IKKβ/NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Yarmo, M N; Gagnon, A; Sorisky, A

    2010-11-01

    Macrophage-secreted factors inhibit adipogenesis, but the underlying mechanism is not well understood. Our objective was to determine if anti-adipogenic signaling pathways in human preadipocytes are activated by macrophage-conditioned medium (MacCM). Human abdominal subcutaneous stromal preadipocytes were treated with adipogenic inducers in either standard medium or medium conditioned by human THP-1 macrophages. THP-1-MacCM increased inhibitor of κB kinase β (IKKβ) phosphorylation, inhibitor of NF-κB α (IκBα) degradation, and NF-κB activity in human preadipocytes in a time-dependent manner. Concomitant treatment of human abdominal subcutaneous preadipocytes with sc-514, a selective inhibitor of IKKβ, prevented the inhibitory effect of THP-1-MacCM on lipid accumulation and expression of adipogenic markers. Our data indicate that activation of the preadipocyte IKKβ/NF-κB pathway is required for the anti-adipogenic effect of THP-1-MacCM on human adipogenesis.

  8. Neuronal Stress Pathway Mediating a Histone Methyl/Phospho Switch is Required for Herpes Simplex Virus Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Cliffe, Anna R.; Arbuckle, Jesse H.; L.Vogel, Jodi; Geden, Matthew J.; Rothbart, Scott B.; Cusack, Corey L.; Strahl, Brian D.; Kristie, Thomas M.; Deshmukh, Mohanish

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Herpes simplex virus (HSV) reactivation from latent neuronal infection requires stimulation of lytic gene expression from promoters associated with repressive heterochromatin. Various neuronal stresses trigger reactivation, but how these stimuli activate silenced promoters remains unknown. We show that a neuronal pathway involving activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), common to many stress responses, is essential for initial HSV gene expression during reactivation. This JNK activation in neurons is mediated by dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK) and JNK-interacting protein 3 (JIP3), which direct JNK towards stress responses instead of other cellular functions. Surprisingly, JNK-mediated viral gene induction occurs independently of histone demethylases that remove repressive lysine modifications. Rather, JNK signaling results in a histone methyl/phospho switch on HSV lytic promoters, a mechanism permitting gene expression in the presence of repressive lysine methylation. JNK is present on viral promoters during reactivation, thereby linking a neuronal-specific stress pathway and HSV reactivation from latency. PMID:26651941

  9. Rapid synthesis of auxin via a new tryptophan-dependent pathway is required for shade avoidance in plants

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Yi; Ferrer, Jean-Luc; Ljung, Karin; Pojer, Florence; Hong, Fangxin; Long, Jeff A.; Li, Lin; Moreno, Javier E.; Bowman, Marianne E.; Ivans, Lauren J.; Cheng, Youfa; Lim, Jason; Zhao, Yunde; Ballaré, Carlos L.; Sandberg, Göran; Noel, Joseph P.; Chory, Joanne

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Plants grown at high densities perceive a decrease in the red to far-red (R:FR) ratio of incoming light, resulting from absorption of red light by canopy leaves and reflection of far-red light from neighboring plants. These changes in light quality trigger a series of responses known collectively as the shade avoidance syndrome. During shade avoidance, stems elongate at the expense of leaf and storage organ expansion, branching is inhibited, and flowering is accelerated. We identified several loci in Arabidopsis, mutations in which lead to plants defective in multiple shade avoidance outputs. Here we describe SAV3, an aminotransferase, and show that SAV3 catalyzes the formation of indole-3-pyruvic acid (IPA) from L-tryptophan (L-Trp), the first step in a previously proposed, but uncharacterized, auxin biosynthetic pathway. This pathway is rapidly deployed to biosynthesize auxin at the high levels required to initiate the multiple changes in body plan associated with shade avoidance. PMID:18394996

  10. Tumour susceptibility gene 101 and the vacuolar protein sorting pathway are required for the release of hepatitis E virions.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Shigeo; Takahashi, Masaharu; Jirintai, Suljid; Tanaka, Toshinori; Nishizawa, Tsutomu; Yasuda, Jiro; Okamoto, Hiroaki

    2011-12-01

    We have previously demonstrated that an intact PSAP motif in the ORF3 protein is required for the formation and release of membrane-associated hepatitis E virus (HEV) particles with ORF3 proteins on their surface. In this study, we investigated the direct interaction between the ORF3 protein and tumour susceptibility gene 101 (Tsg101), a cellular factor involved in the budding of viruses containing the P(T/S)AP late-domain, in PLC/PRF/5 cells expressing the wild-type or PSAP-mutated ORF3 protein and Tsg101 by co-immunoprecipitation. Tsg101 bound to wild-type ORF3 protein, but not to the PSAP-inactive ORF3 protein. To examine whether HEV utilizes the multivesicular body (MVB) pathway to release the virus particles, we analysed the efficiency of virion release from cells upon introduction of small interfering RNA (siRNA) against Tsg101 or dominant-negative (DN) mutants of Vps4 (Vps4A and Vps4B). The relative levels of virus particles released from cells depleted of Tsg101 decreased to 6.4 % of those transfected with negative control siRNA. Similarly, virion egress was significantly reduced by the overexpression of DN forms (Vps4AEQ or Vps4BEQ). The relative levels of virus particles released from cells expressing Vps4AEQ and Vps4BEQ were 19.2 and 15.6 %, respectively, while the overexpression of wild-type Vps4A and Vps4B did not alter the levels of virus release. These results indicate that the ORF3 protein interacts with Tsg101 through the PSAP motifs in infected cells, and that Tsg101 and the enzymic activities of Vps4A and Vps4B are involved in HEV release, thus suggesting that HEV requires the MVB pathway for egress of virus particles.

  11. Aldosterone does not require angiotensin II to activate NCC through a WNK4-SPAK-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    van der Lubbe, Nils; Lim, Christina H; Meima, Marcel E; van Veghel, Richard; Rosenbaek, Lena Lindtoft; Mutig, Kerim; Danser, Alexander H J; Fenton, Robert A; Zietse, Robert; Hoorn, Ewout J

    2012-06-01

    We and others have recently shown that angiotensin II can activate the sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) through a WNK4-SPAK-dependent pathway. Because WNK4 was previously shown to be a negative regulator of NCC, it has been postulated that angiotensin II converts WNK4 to a positive regulator. Here, we ask whether aldosterone requires angiotensin II to activate NCC and if their effects are additive. To do so, we infused vehicle or aldosterone in adrenalectomized rats that also received the angiotensin receptor blocker losartan. In the presence of losartan, aldosterone was still capable of increasing total and phosphorylated NCC twofold to threefold. The kinases WNK4 and SPAK also increased with aldosterone and losartan. A dose-dependent relationship between aldosterone and NCC, SPAK, and WNK4 was identified, suggesting that these are aldosterone-sensitive proteins. As more functional evidence of increased NCC activity, we showed that rats receiving aldosterone and losartan had a significantly greater natriuretic response to hydrochlorothiazide than rats receiving losartan only. To study whether angiotensin II could have an additive effect, rats receiving aldosterone with losartan were compared with rats receiving aldosterone only. Rats receiving aldosterone only retained more sodium and had twofold to fourfold increase in phosphorylated NCC. Together, our results demonstrate that aldosterone does not require angiotensin II to activate NCC and that WNK4 appears to act as a positive regulator in this pathway. The additive effect of angiotensin II may favor electroneutral sodium reabsorption during hypovolemia and may contribute to hypertension in diseases with an activated renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system.

  12. Normal Function of the Yeast TOR Pathway Requires the Type 2C Protein Phosphatase Ptc1▿ †

    PubMed Central

    González, Asier; Ruiz, Amparo; Casamayor, Antonio; Ariño, Joaquín

    2009-01-01

    Yeast ptc1 mutants are rapamycin and caffeine sensitive, suggesting a functional connection between Ptc1 and the TOR pathway that is not shared by most members of the type 2C phosphatase family. Genome-wide profiling revealed that the ptc1 mutation largely attenuates the transcriptional response to rapamycin. The lack of Ptc1 significantly prevents the nuclear translocation of Gln3 and Msn2 transcription factors to the nucleus, as well as the dephosphorylation of the Npr1 kinase, in response to rapamycin. This could explain the observed decrease in both the basal and rapamycin-induced expression of several genes subjected to nitrogen catabolite repression (GAT1, MEP1, and GLN1) and stress response element (STRE)-driven promoters. Interestingly, this decrease is abolished in the absence of the Sit4 phosphatase. Epitasis analysis indicates that the mutation of SIT4 or TIP41, encoding a Tap42-interacting protein, abolishes the sensitivity of the ptc1 strain to rapamycin and caffeine. All of these results suggest that Ptc1 is required for normal TOR signaling, possibly by regulating a step upstream of Sit4 function. According to this hypothesis, we observe that the mutation of PTC1 drastically diminishes the rapamycin-induced interaction between Tap42 and Tip41, and this can be explained by lower-than-normal levels of Tip41 in ptc1 cells. Ptc1 is not necessary for the normal expression of the TIP41 gene; instead, its absence dramatically affects the stability of Tip41. The lack of Ptc1 partially abolishes the rapamycin-induced dephosphorylation of Tip41, which may further decrease Tap42 binding. Reduced Tip41 levels contribute to the ptc1 phenotypes, although additional Ptc1 targets must exist. All of these results provide the first evidence showing that a type 2C protein phosphatase is required for the normal functioning of the TOR pathway. PMID:19273591

  13. A melanin-independent interaction between Mc1r and Met signalling pathways is required for HGF-dependent melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Wolnicka-Glubisz, Agnieszka; Strickland, Faith M.; Wielgus, Albert; Anver, Miriam; Merlino, Glenn; De Fabo, Edward C.; Noonan, Frances P.

    2014-01-01

    Melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) signaling stimulates black eumelanin production through a cAMP dependent pathway. MC1R polymorphisms can impair this process, resulting in a predominance of red phaeomelanin. The red hair, fair skin and UV sensitive phenotype is a well-described melanoma risk factor. MC1R polymorphisms also confer melanoma risk independent of pigment. We investigated the effect of Mc1r deficiency in a mouse model of UV-induced melanoma. C57BL/6-Mc1r+/+-HGF transgenic mice have a characteristic hyperpigmented black phenotype with extra-follicular dermal melanocytes located at the dermal/epidermal junction. UVB induces melanoma, independent of melanin pigmentation, but UVA-induced and spontaneous melanomas are dependent on black eumelanin. We crossed these mice with yellow C57BL/6-Mc1re/e animals which have a non-functional Mc1r and produce predominantly yellow phaeomelanin. Yellow C57BL/6-Mc1re/e-HGF mice produced no melanoma in response to UVR or spontaneously even though the HGF transgene and its receptor Met were expressed. Total melanin was less than in C57BL/6-Mc1r+/+-HGF mice, hyperpigmentation was not observed and there were few extra-follicular melanocytes. Thus, functional Mc1r was required for expression of the transgenic HGF phenotype. Heterozygous C57BL/6-Mc1re/+-HGF mice were black and hyperpigmented and, although extra-follicular melanocytes and skin melanin content were similar to C57BL/6-Mc1r+/+-HGF animals, they developed UV-induced and spontaneous melanomas with significantly less efficiency by all criteria. Thus, heterozygosity for Mc1r was sufficient to restore the transgenic HGF phenotype but insufficient to fully restore melanoma. We conclude that a previously unsuspected melanin-independent interaction between Mc1r and Met signaling pathways is required for HGF-dependent melanoma and postulate that this pathway is involved in human melanoma. PMID:24975581

  14. A melanin-independent interaction between Mc1r and Met signaling pathways is required for HGF-dependent melanoma.

    PubMed

    Wolnicka-Glubisz, Agnieszka; Strickland, Faith M; Wielgus, Albert; Anver, Miriam; Merlino, Glenn; De Fabo, Edward C; Noonan, Frances P

    2015-02-15

    Melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) signaling stimulates black eumelanin production through a cAMP-dependent pathway. MC1R polymorphisms can impair this process, resulting in a predominance of red phaeomelanin. The red hair, fair skin and UV sensitive phenotype is a well-described melanoma risk factor. MC1R polymorphisms also confer melanoma risk independent of pigment. We investigated the effect of Mc1r deficiency in a mouse model of UV-induced melanoma. C57BL/6-Mc1r+/+-HGF transgenic mice have a characteristic hyperpigmented black phenotype with extra-follicular dermal melanocytes located at the dermal/epidermal junction. UVB induces melanoma, independent of melanin pigmentation, but UVA-induced and spontaneous melanomas are dependent on black eumelanin. We crossed these mice with yellow C57BL/6-Mc1re/e animals which have a non-functional Mc1r and produce predominantly yellow phaeomelanin. Yellow C57BL/6-Mc1re/e-HGF mice produced no melanoma in response to UVR or spontaneously even though the HGF transgene and its receptor Met were expressed. Total melanin was less than in C57BL/6-Mc1r+/+-HGF mice, hyperpigmentation was not observed and there were few extra-follicular melanocytes. Thus, functional Mc1r was required for expression of the transgenic HGF phenotype. Heterozygous C57BL/6-Mc1re/+-HGF mice were black and hyperpigmented and, although extra-follicular melanocytes and skin melanin content were similar to C57BL/6-Mc1r+/+-HGF animals, they developed UV-induced and spontaneous melanomas with significantly less efficiency by all criteria. Thus, heterozygosity for Mc1r was sufficient to restore the transgenic HGF phenotype but insufficient to fully restore melanoma. We conclude that a previously unsuspected melanin-independent interaction between Mc1r and Met signaling pathways is required for HGF-dependent melanoma and postulate that this pathway is involved in human melanoma.

  15. The AMPK-PPARGC1A pathway is required for antimicrobial host defense through activation of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chul-Su; Kim, Jwa-Jin; Lee, Hye-Mi; Jin, Hyo Sun; Lee, Sang-Hee; Park, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Soung Jung; Kim, Jin-Man; Han, Yong-Mahn; Lee, Myung-Shik; Kweon, Gi Ryang; Shong, Minho; Jo, Eun-Kyeong

    2014-05-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a crucial energy sensor and plays a key role in integration of cellular functions to maintain homeostasis. Despite this, it is largely unknown whether targeting the AMPK pathway can be used as a therapeutic strategy for infectious diseases. Herein, we show that AMPK activation robustly induces antibacterial autophagy, which contributes to antimicrobial defense against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). AMPK activation led to inhibition of Mtb-induced phosphorylation of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR) in macrophages. In addition, AMPK activation increased the genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation, mitochondrial ATP production, and biogenesis in Mtb-infected macrophages. Notably, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma, coactivator 1α (PPARGC1A) was required for AMPK-mediated antimicrobial activity, as well as enhancement of mitochondrial function and biogenesis, in macrophages. Further, the AMPK-PPARGC1A pathway was involved in the upregulation of multiple autophagy-related genes via CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP), β (CEBPB). PPARGC1A knockdown inhibited the AMPK-mediated induction of autophagy and impaired the fusion of phagosomes with MAP1LC3B (LC3B) autophagosomes in Mtb-infected macrophages. The link between autophagy, mitochondrial function, and antimicrobial activity was further demonstrated by studying LysMCre-mediated knockout of atg7, demonstrating mitochondrial ultrastructural defects and dysfunction, as well as blockade of antimicrobial activity against mycobacteria. Collectively, our results identify the AMPK-PPARGC1A axis as contributing to autophagy activation leading to an antimicrobial response, as a novel host defense mechanism.

  16. Beclin 1 Is Required for Neuron Viability and Regulates Endosome Pathways via the UVRAG-VPS34 Complex

    PubMed Central

    Wold, Mitchell S.; Gong, Shiaoching; Phillips, Greg R.; Dou, Zhixun; Zhao, Yanxiang; Heintz, Nathaniel; Zong, Wei-Xing; Yue, Zhenyu

    2014-01-01

    Deficiency of autophagy protein beclin 1 is implicated in tumorigenesis and neurodegenerative diseases, but the molecular mechanism remains elusive. Previous studies showed that Beclin 1 coordinates the assembly of multiple VPS34 complexes whose distinct phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase III (PI3K-III) lipid kinase activities regulate autophagy at different steps. Recent evidence suggests a function of beclin 1 in regulating multiple VPS34-mediated trafficking pathways beyond autophagy; however, the precise role of beclin 1 in autophagy-independent cellular functions remains poorly understood. Herein we report that beclin 1 regulates endocytosis, in addition to autophagy, and is required for neuron viability in vivo. We find that neuronal beclin 1 associates with endosomes and regulates EEA1/early endosome localization and late endosome formation. Beclin 1 maintains proper cellular phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI(3)P) distribution and total levels, and loss of beclin 1 causes a disruption of active Rab5 GTPase-associated endosome formation and impairment of endosome maturation, likely due to a failure of Rab5 to recruit VPS34. Furthermore, we find that Beclin 1 deficiency causes complete loss of the UVRAG-VPS34 complex and associated lipid kinase activity. Interestingly, beclin 1 deficiency impairs p40phox-linked endosome formation, which is rescued by overexpressed UVRAG or beclin 1, but not by a coiled-coil domain-truncated beclin 1 (a UVRAG-binding mutant), Atg14L or RUBICON. Thus, our study reveals the essential role for beclin 1 in neuron survival involving multiple membrane trafficking pathways including endocytosis and autophagy, and suggests that the UVRAG-beclin 1 interaction underlies beclin 1's function in endocytosis. PMID:25275521

  17. Beclin 1 is required for neuron viability and regulates endosome pathways via the UVRAG-VPS34 complex.

    PubMed

    McKnight, Nicole C; Zhong, Yun; Wold, Mitchell S; Gong, Shiaoching; Phillips, Greg R; Dou, Zhixun; Zhao, Yanxiang; Heintz, Nathaniel; Zong, Wei-Xing; Yue, Zhenyu

    2014-10-01

    Deficiency of autophagy protein beclin 1 is implicated in tumorigenesis and neurodegenerative diseases, but the molecular mechanism remains elusive. Previous studies showed that Beclin 1 coordinates the assembly of multiple VPS34 complexes whose distinct phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase III (PI3K-III) lipid kinase activities regulate autophagy at different steps. Recent evidence suggests a function of beclin 1 in regulating multiple VPS34-mediated trafficking pathways beyond autophagy; however, the precise role of beclin 1 in autophagy-independent cellular functions remains poorly understood. Herein we report that beclin 1 regulates endocytosis, in addition to autophagy, and is required for neuron viability in vivo. We find that neuronal beclin 1 associates with endosomes and regulates EEA1/early endosome localization and late endosome formation. Beclin 1 maintains proper cellular phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI(3)P) distribution and total levels, and loss of beclin 1 causes a disruption of active Rab5 GTPase-associated endosome formation and impairment of endosome maturation, likely due to a failure of Rab5 to recruit VPS34. Furthermore, we find that Beclin 1 deficiency causes complete loss of the UVRAG-VPS34 complex and associated lipid kinase activity. Interestingly, beclin 1 deficiency impairs p40phox-linked endosome formation, which is rescued by overexpressed UVRAG or beclin 1, but not by a coiled-coil domain-truncated beclin 1 (a UVRAG-binding mutant), Atg14L or RUBICON. Thus, our study reveals the essential role for beclin 1 in neuron survival involving multiple membrane trafficking pathways including endocytosis and autophagy, and suggests that the UVRAG-beclin 1 interaction underlies beclin 1's function in endocytosis.

  18. The AMPK-PPARGC1A pathway is required for antimicrobial host defense through activation of autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chul-Su; Kim, Jwa-Jin; Lee, Hye-Mi; Jin, Hyo Sun; Lee, Sang-Hee; Park, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Soung Jung; Kim, Jin-Man; Han, Yong-Mahn; Lee, Myung-Shik; Kweon, Gi Ryang; Shong, Minho; Jo, Eun-Kyeong

    2014-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a crucial energy sensor and plays a key role in integration of cellular functions to maintain homeostasis. Despite this, it is largely unknown whether targeting the AMPK pathway can be used as a therapeutic strategy for infectious diseases. Herein, we show that AMPK activation robustly induces antibacterial autophagy, which contributes to antimicrobial defense against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). AMPK activation led to inhibition of Mtb-induced phosphorylation of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR) in macrophages. In addition, AMPK activation increased the genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation, mitochondrial ATP production, and biogenesis in Mtb-infected macrophages. Notably, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma, coactivator 1α (PPARGC1A) was required for AMPK-mediated antimicrobial activity, as well as enhancement of mitochondrial function and biogenesis, in macrophages. Further, the AMPK-PPARGC1A pathway was involved in the upregulation of multiple autophagy-related genes via CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP), β (CEBPB). PPARGC1A knockdown inhibited the AMPK-mediated induction of autophagy and impaired the fusion of phagosomes with MAP1LC3B (LC3B) autophagosomes in Mtb-infected macrophages. The link between autophagy, mitochondrial function, and antimicrobial activity was further demonstrated by studying LysMCre-mediated knockout of atg7, demonstrating mitochondrial ultrastructural defects and dysfunction, as well as blockade of antimicrobial activity against mycobacteria. Collectively, our results identify the AMPK-PPARGC1A axis as contributing to autophagy activation leading to an antimicrobial response, as a novel host defense mechanism. PMID:24598403

  19. The TRIF-dependent signaling pathway is not required for acute cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, Fang; Wang, Jun; Sayeed, Iqbal; Ishrat, Tauheed; Atif, Fahim; Stein, Donald G.

    2009-12-18

    TIR domain-containing adaptor protein (TRIF) is an adaptor protein in Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathways. Activation of TRIF leads to the activation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B). While studies have shown that TLRs are implicated in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury and in neuroprotection against ischemia afforded by preconditioning, little is known about TRIF's role in the pathological process following cerebral I/R. The present study investigated the role that TRIF may play in acute cerebral I/R injury. In a mouse model of cerebral I/R induced by transient middle cerebral artery occlusion, we examined the activation of NF-{kappa}B and IRF3 signaling in ischemic cerebral tissue using ELISA and Western blots. Neurological function and cerebral infarct size were also evaluated 24 h after cerebral I/R. NF-{kappa}B activity and phosphorylation of the inhibitor of kappa B (I{kappa}B{alpha}) increased in ischemic brains, but IRF3, inhibitor of {kappa}B kinase complex-{epsilon} (IKK{epsilon}), and TANK-binding kinase1 (TBK1) were not activated after cerebral I/R in wild-type (WT) mice. Interestingly, TRIF deficit did not inhibit NF-{kappa}B activity or p-I{kappa}B{alpha} induced by cerebral I/R. Moreover, although cerebral I/R induced neurological and functional impairments and brain infarction in WT mice, the deficits were not improved and brain infarct size was not reduced in TRIF knockout mice compared to WT mice. Our results demonstrate that the TRIF-dependent signaling pathway is not required for the activation of NF-{kappa}B signaling and brain injury after acute cerebral I/R.

  20. Endocytic pathways of optimized resveratrol cubosomes capturing into human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Bar, Hend Mohamed; El Basset Sanad, Rania Abd

    2017-09-01

    Resveratrol (RSV) is a natural polyphenolic compound with high affinity to hepatocytes. It has numerous benefits as anticancer, antioxidant, immunomodulatory and cardioprotective actions. Nevertheless, RSV therapeutic applications are hindered by its low solubility, light sensitivity and extensive first-pass metabolism. Cubosomes are colloidally stable dispersed liquid crystalline nanoparticles. The incorporation of RSV into cubosomes could overcome some of its physicochemical limitations. A Design-Expert(®) software was applied to optimize cubosomes in terms of particle size and encapsulation efficiency (EE%). The used model proved its suitability in predicting optimum cubosomal size. The prepared cubosomes showed an enhanced HepG2 cytotoxicity except at particle size of ≈20nm. Different endocytic pathways mechanisms as macropinocytosis, clathrin-mediated endocytosis and caveolae-mediated endocytosis were identified in the cellular uptake of RSV cubosomes depending on particle size. Caveolae-mediated transport was shown to have a significant effect on RSV cubosomes internalization efficiency and cytotoxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Cellular uptake and intracellular pathways of PLL-g-PEG-DNA nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lühmann, Tessa; Rimann, Markus; Bittermann, Anne Greet; Hall, Heike

    2008-09-01

    Polycationic molecules form condensates with DNA and are used for gene therapy as an alternative to viral vectors. As clinical efficacy corresponds to cellular uptake, intracellular stability of the condensates, and bioavailability of the DNA, it is crucial to analyze uptake mechanisms and trafficking pathways. Here, a detailed study of uptake, stability, and localization of PLL-g-PEG-DNA nanoparticles within COS-7 cells is presented, using FACS analysis to assess the involvement of different uptake mechanisms, colocalization studies with markers indicative for different endocytotic pathways, and immunofluorescence staining to analyze colocalization with intracellular compartments. PLL-g-PEG-DNA nanoparticles were internalized in an energy-dependent manner after 2 h and accumulated in the perinuclear region after >6 h. The nanoparticles were found to be stable within the cytoplasm for at least 24 h and did not colocalize with the endosomal pathway. Nanoparticle uptake was approximately 50% inhibited by genistein, an inhibitor of the caveolae-mediated pathway. However, genistein did not inhibit gene expression, and PLL-g-PEG-DNA nanoparticles were not colocalized with caveolin-1 indicating that caveolae-mediated endocytosis is not decisive for DNA delivery. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis and macropinocytosis pathways were reduced by 17 and 24%, respectively, in the presence of the respective inhibitors. When cells were transfected in the presence of double and triple inhibitors, transfection efficiencies were increasingly reduced by 40 and 70%, respectively; however, no differences were found between the different uptake mechanisms. These findings suggest that PLL-g-PEG-DNA nanoparticles enter by several pathways and might therefore be an efficient and versatile tool to deliver therapeutic DNA.

  2. Tyrosine-based signal mediates LRP6 receptor endocytosis and desensitization of Wnt/β-catenin pathway signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chia-Chen; Kanekiyo, Takahisa; Roth, Barbara; Bu, Guojun

    2014-10-03

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling orchestrates a number of critical events including cell growth, differentiation, and cell survival during development. Misregulation of this pathway leads to various human diseases, specifically cancers. Endocytosis and phosphorylation of the LDL receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6), an essential co-receptor for Wnt/β-catenin signaling, play a vital role in mediating Wnt/β-catenin signal transduction. However, its regulatory mechanism is not fully understood. In this study, we define the mechanisms by which LRP6 endocytic trafficking regulates Wnt/β-catenin signaling activation. We show that LRP6 mutant with defective tyrosine-based signal in its cytoplasmic tail has an increased cell surface distribution and decreased endocytosis rate. These changes in LRP6 endocytosis coincide with an increased distribution to caveolae, increased phosphorylation, and enhanced Wnt/β-catenin signaling. We further demonstrate that treatment of Wnt3a ligands or blocking the clathrin-mediated endocytosis of LRP6 leads to a redistribution of wild-type receptor to lipid rafts. The LRP6 tyrosine mutant also exhibited an increase in signaling activation in response to Wnt3a stimulation when compared with wild-type LRP6, and this activation is suppressed when caveolae-mediated endocytosis is blocked. Our results reveal molecular mechanisms by which LRP6 endocytosis routes regulate its phosphorylation and the strength of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, and have implications on how this pathway can be modulated in human diseases.

  3. Replication-Independent Activation of Human Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells by the Paramyxovirus SV5 Requires TLR7 and Autophagy Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Manuse, Mary J.; Briggs, Caitlin M.; Parks, Griffith D.

    2010-01-01

    The paramyxovirus Simian Virus 5 (SV5) is a poor inducer of interferon (IFN) secretion in all cell types tested so far, including primary epithelial cells and primary human myeloid dendritic cells. SV5 is hypothesized to limit induction of antiviral responses through control of viral gene expression and production of the V protein antagonist. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are known to uniquely express toll-like receptor (TLR)-7 and are a main producer of IFN-alpha among peripheral blood mononuclear cells in response to many viruses. Here, we tested whether SV5 would remain a poor inducer of IFN in primary human pDCs. The efficiency of SV5 infection of pDCs could be increased by an increasing multiplicity of infection. pDCs infected by both live and UV-inactivated SV5 induced large amounts of IFN-alpha secretion and resulted in upregulation of maturation markers CD80 and CD86. However, IL-6 secretion was not induced by SV5 infection. When TLR7 signaling was inhibited, SV5 induced less IFN secretion and CD80 expression, and there was a corresponding increase in number of infected cells. Similar effects were seen with inhibitors of cellular autophagy pathways, suggesting that the SV5 activation of pDC requires access to the cytoplasm and autophagic sampling of cytoplasmic contents. These results have implications for control of SV5 infections in vivo and for development of SV5 as a vaccine vector. PMID:20605567

  4. The canonical Wingless signaling pathway is required but not sufficient for inflow tract formation in the Drosophila melanogaster heart.

    PubMed

    Trujillo, Gloriana V; Nodal, Dalea H; Lovato, Candice V; Hendren, Jill D; Helander, Lynda A; Lovato, TyAnna L; Bodmer, Rolf; Cripps, Richard M

    2016-05-01

    The inflow tracts of the embryonic Drosophila cardiac tube, termed ostia, arise in its posterior three segments from cardiac cells that co-express the homeotic transcription factor Abdominal-A (abdA), the orphan nuclear receptor Seven-up (Svp), and the signaling molecule Wingless (Wg). To define the roles of these factors in inflow tract development, we assessed their function in inflow tract formation. We demonstrate, using several criteria, that abdA, svp, and wg are each critical for normal inflow tract formation. We further show that Wg acts in an autocrine manner to impact ostia fate, and that it mediates this effect at least partially through the canonical Wg signaling pathway. By contrast, neither wg expression nor Wg signaling are sufficient for inflow tract formation when expressed in anterior Svp cells that do not normally form inflow tracts in the embryo. Instead, ectopic abd-A expression throughout the cardiac tube is required for the formation of ectopic inflow tracts, indicating that autocrine Wg signaling must be supplemented by additional Hox-dependent factors to effect inflow tract formation. Taken together, these studies define important cellular and molecular events that contribute to cardiac inflow tract development in Drosophila. Given the broad conservation of the cardiac regulatory network through evolution, our studies provide insight into mechanisms of cardiac development in higher animals.

  5. Delivery of endocytosed proteins to the cell-division plane requires change of pathway from recycling to secretion.

    PubMed

    Richter, Sandra; Kientz, Marika; Brumm, Sabine; Nielsen, Mads Eggert; Park, Misoon; Gavidia, Richard; Krause, Cornelia; Voss, Ute; Beckmann, Hauke; Mayer, Ulrike; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Jürgens, Gerd

    2014-04-08

    Membrane trafficking is essential to fundamental processes in eukaryotic life, including cell growth and division. In plant cytokinesis, post-Golgi trafficking mediates a massive flow of vesicles that form the partitioning membrane but its regulation remains poorly understood. Here, we identify functionally redundant Arabidopsis ARF guanine-nucleotide exchange factors (ARF-GEFs) BIG1-BIG4 as regulators of post-Golgi trafficking, mediating late secretion from the trans-Golgi network but not recycling of endocytosed proteins to the plasma membrane, although the TGN also functions as an early endosome in plants. In contrast, BIG1-4 are absolutely required for trafficking of both endocytosed and newly synthesized proteins to the cell-division plane during cytokinesis, counteracting recycling to the plasma membrane. This change from recycling to secretory trafficking pathway mediated by ARF-GEFs confers specificity of cargo delivery to the division plane and might thus ensure that the partitioning membrane is completed on time in the absence of a cytokinesis-interphase checkpoint. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02131.001.

  6. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α is required for hepatic outgrowth via the p53 pathway in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hao; Wen, Bin; Liu, Xiaohui; Gao, Ce; Yang, Ruimeng; Wang, Luxiang; Chen, Saijuan; Chen, Zhu; de The, Hugues; Zhou, Jun; Zhu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/ebpα) is a transcription factor that plays important roles in the regulation of hepatogenesis, adipogenesis and hematopoiesis. Disruption of the C/EBPα gene in mice leads to disturbed liver architecture and neonatal death due to hypoglycemia. However, the precise stages of liver development affected by C/ebpα loss are poorly studied. Using the zebrafish embryo as a model organism, we show that inactivation of the cebpa gene by TALENs results in a small liver phenotype. Further studies reveal that C/ebpα is distinctively required for hepatic outgrowth but not for hepatoblast specification. Lack of C/ebpα leads to enhanced hepatic cell proliferation and subsequent increased cell apoptosis. Additional loss of p53 can largely rescue the hepatic defect in cebpa mutants, suggesting that C/ebpα plays a role in liver growth regulation via the p53 pathway. Thus, our findings for the first time demonstrate a stage-specific role for C/ebpα during liver organogenesis. PMID:26511037

  7. Inhibition of potential uptake pathways for silver nanoparticles in the estuarine snail Peringia ulvae.

    PubMed

    Khan, Farhan R; Misra, Superb K; Bury, Nicolas R; Smith, Brian D; Rainbow, Philip S; Luoma, Samuel N; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia

    2015-05-01

    Mechanisms involved in the uptake of Ag NPs, and NPs in general, have been long debated within nano-ecotoxicology. In vitro studies provide evidence of the different available uptake pathways, but in vivo demonstrations are lacking. In this study, pharmacological inhibitors were employed to block specific uptake pathways that have been implicated in the transport of metal NPs and aqueous metal forms; phenamil (inhibits Na(+) channel), bafilomycin A1 (H(+) proton pump), amantadine (clathrin-mediated endocytosis), nystatin (caveolae-mediated endocytosis) and phenylarsine oxide (PAO, macropinocytosis). Peringia ulvae (snails) were exposed to 150 µg Ag L(-1) added as citrate capped Ag NPs or aqueous Ag (AgNO3) in combination with inhibitor treatment (determined by preliminary studies). Reductions in accumulated tissue burdens caused by the inhibitors were compared to control exposures (i.e. no inhibition) after 6 and 24 h. No inhibitor treatment completely eliminated the uptake of Ag in either aqueous or NP form, but all inhibitor treatments, except phenamil, significantly reduced the uptake of Ag presented as Ag NPs. Clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis appear to be mechanisms exploited by Ag NPs, with the latter pathway only active at 24 h. Inhibition of the H(+) proton pump showed that a portion of Ag NP uptake is achieved as aqueous Ag and is explained by the dissolution of the particles (∼25% in 24 h). This in vivo study demonstrates that uptake of Ag from Ag NPs is achieved by multiple pathways and that these pathways are simultaneously active.

  8. Size-dependent internalization of particles via the pathways of clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed Central

    Rejman, Joanna; Oberle, Volker; Zuhorn, Inge S; Hoekstra, Dick

    2004-01-01

    Non-phagocytic eukaryotic cells can internalize particles <1 microm in size, encompassing pathogens, liposomes for drug delivery or lipoplexes applied in gene delivery. In the present study, we have investigated the effect of particle size on the pathway of entry and subsequent intracellular fate in non-phagocytic B16 cells, using a range of fluorescent latex beads of defined sizes (50-1000 nm). Our data reveal that particles as large as 500 nm were internalized by cells via an energy-dependent process. With an increase in size (50-500 nm), cholesterol depletion increased the efficiency of inhibition of uptake. The processing of the smaller particles was significantly perturbed upon microtubule disruption, while displaying a negligible effect on that of the 500 nm beads. Inhibitor and co-localization studies revealed that the mechanism by which the beads were internalized, and their subsequent intracellular routing, was strongly dependent on particle size. Internalization of microspheres with a diameter <200 nm involved clathrin-coated pits. With increasing size, a shift to a mechanism that relied on caveolae-mediated internalization became apparent, which became the predominant pathway of entry for particles of 500 nm in size. At these conditions, delivery to the lysosomes was no longer apparent. The data indicate that the size itself of (ligand-devoid) particles can determine the pathway of entry. The clathrin-mediated pathway of endocytosis shows an upper size limit for internalization of approx. 200 nm, and kinetic parameters may determine the almost exclusive internalization of such particles along this pathway rather than via caveolae. PMID:14505488

  9. The EH and SH3 domain Ese proteins regulate endocytosis by linking to dynamin and Eps15.

    PubMed Central

    Sengar, A S; Wang, W; Bishay, J; Cohen, S; Egan, S E

    1999-01-01

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis is a multistep process which requires interaction between a number of conserved proteins. We have cloned two mammalian genes which code for a number of endocytic adaptor proteins. Two of these proteins, termed Ese1 and Ese2, contain two N-terminal EH domains, a central coiled-coil domain and five C-terminal SH3 domains. Ese1 is constitutively associated with Eps15 proteins to form a complex with at least 14 protein-protein interaction surfaces. Yeast two-hybrid assays have revealed that Ese1 EH and SH3 domains bind epsin family proteins and dynamin, respectively. Overexpression of Ese1 is sufficient to block clathrin-mediated endocytosis in cultured cells, presumably through disruption of higher order protein complexes, which are assembled on the endogenous Ese1-Eps15 scaffold. The Ese1-Eps15 scaffold therefore links dynamin, epsin and other endocytic pathway components. PMID:10064583

  10. Presynaptic UNC-31 (CAPS) is required to activate the G alpha(s) pathway of the Caenorhabditis elegans synaptic signaling network.

    PubMed

    Charlie, Nicole K; Schade, Michael A; Thomure, Angela M; Miller, Kenneth G

    2006-02-01

    C. elegans mutants lacking the dense-core vesicle priming protein UNC-31 (CAPS) share highly similar phenotypes with mutants lacking a neuronal G alpha(s) pathway, including strong paralysis despite exhibiting near normal levels of steady-state acetylcholine release as indicated by drug sensitivity assays. Our genetic analysis shows that UNC-31 and neuronal G alpha(s) are different parts of the same pathway and that the UNC-31/G alpha(s) pathway is functionally distinct from the presynaptic G alpha(q) pathway with which it interacts. UNC-31 acts upstream of G alpha(s) because mutations that activate the G alpha(s) pathway confer similar levels of strongly hyperactive, coordinated locomotion in both unc-31 null and (+) backgrounds. Using cell-specific promoters, we show that both UNC-31 and the G alpha(s) pathway function in cholinergic motor neurons to regulate locomotion rate. Using immunostaining we show that UNC-31 is often concentrated at or near active zones of cholinergic motor neuron synapses. Our data suggest that presynaptic UNC-31 activity, likely acting via dense-core vesicle exocytosis, is required to locally activate the neuronal G alpha(s) pathway near synaptic active zones.

  11. Lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of NF-{kappa}B non-canonical pathway requires BCL10 serine 138 and NIK phosphorylations

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, Sumit; Borthakur, Alip; Dudeja, Pradeep K.; Tobacman, Joanne K.

    2010-11-15

    Background and aims: B-cell lymphoma/leukemia (BCL)-10 and reactive oxygen species mediate two pathways of NF-{kappa}B (RelA) activation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in human colonic epithelial cells. The pathway for LPS activation of RelB by the non-canonical pathway (RelB) in non-myeloid cells was not yet reported, but important for understanding the range of potential microbial LPS-induced effects in inflammatory bowel disease. Methods: Experiments were performed in human colonic epithelial cells and in mouse embryonic fibroblasts deficient in components of the IkappaB kinase (IKK) signalosome, in order to detect mediators of the non-canonical pathway of NF-{kappa}B activation, including nuclear RelB and p52 and phospho- and total NF-{kappa}B inducing kinase (NIK). BCL10 was silenced by siRNA and effects of mutations of specific phosphorylation sites of BCL10 (Ser138Gly and Ser218Gly) were determined. Results: By the non-canonical pathway, LPS exposure increased nuclear RelB and p52, and phospho-NIK, with no change in total NIK. Phosphorylation of BCL10 serine 138 was required for NIK phosphorylation, since mutation of this residue eliminated the increases in phospho-NIK and nuclear RelB and p52. Mutations of either serine 138 or serine 218 reduced RelA, p50, and phospho-I{kappa}B{alpha} of the canonical pathway. Effects of LPS stimulation and BCL10 silencing on NIK phosphorylation were demonstrated in confocal images. Conclusions: LPS induces activation of both canonical and non-canonical pathways of NF-{kappa}B in human colonic epithelial cells, and the non-canonical pathway requires phosphorylations of BCL10 (serine 138) and NIK. These findings demonstrate the important role of BCL10 in mediating LPS-induced inflammation in human colonic epithelial cells and may open new avenues for therapeutic interventions.

  12. Blood vessel endothelium-directed tumor cell streaming in breast tumors requires the HGF/C-Met signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Leung, E; Xue, A; Wang, Y; Rougerie, P; Sharma, V P; Eddy, R; Cox, D; Condeelis, J

    2016-11-28

    During metastasis to distant sites, tumor cells migrate to blood vessels. In vivo, breast tumor cells utilize a specialized mode of migration known as streaming, where a linear assembly of tumor cells migrate directionally towards blood vessels on fibronectin-collagen I-containing extracellular matrix (ECM) fibers in response to chemotactic signals. We have successfully reconstructed tumor cell streaming in vitro by co-plating tumors cells, macrophages and endothelial cells on 2.5 μm thick ECM-coated micro-patterned substrates. We found that tumor cells and macrophages, when plated together on the micro-patterned substrates, do not demonstrate sustained directional migration in only one direction (sustained directionality) but show random bi-directional walking. Sustained directionality of tumor cells as seen in vivo was established in vitro when beads coated with human umbilical vein endothelial cells were placed at one end of the micro-patterned 'ECM fibers' within the assay. We demonstrated that these endothelial cells supply the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) required for the chemotactic gradient responsible for sustained directionality. Using this in vitro reconstituted streaming system, we found that directional streaming is dependent on, and most effectively blocked, by inhibiting the HGF/C-Met signaling pathway between endothelial cells and tumor cells. Key observations made with the in vitro reconstituted system implicating C-Met signaling were confirmed in vivo in mammary tumors using the in vivo invasion assay and intravital multiphoton imaging of tumor cell streaming. These results establish HGF/C-Met as a central organizing signal in blood vessel-directed tumor cell migration in vivo and highlight a promising role for C-Met inhibitors in blocking tumor cell streaming and metastasis in vivo, and for use in human trials.Oncogene advance online publication, 28 November 2016; doi:10.1038/onc.2016.421.

  13. Neurospora crassa Female Development Requires the PACC and Other Signal Transduction Pathways, Transcription Factors, Chromatin Remodeling, Cell-To-Cell Fusion, and Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Chinnici, Jennifer L.; Fu, Ci; Caccamise, Lauren M.; Arnold, Jason W.; Free, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Using a screening protocol we have identified 68 genes that are required for female development in the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. We find that we can divide these genes into five general groups: 1) Genes encoding components of the PACC signal transduction pathway, 2) Other signal transduction pathway genes, including genes from the three N. crassa MAP kinase pathways, 3) Transcriptional factor genes, 4) Autophagy genes, and 5) Other miscellaneous genes. Complementation and RIP studies verified that these genes are needed for the formation of the female mating structure, the protoperithecium, and for the maturation of a fertilized protoperithecium into a perithecium. Perithecia grafting experiments demonstrate that the autophagy genes and the cell-to-cell fusion genes (the MAK-1 and MAK-2 pathway genes) are needed for the mobilization and movement of nutrients from an established vegetative hyphal network into the developing protoperithecium. Deletion mutants for the PACC pathway genes palA, palB, palC, palF, palH, and pacC were found to be defective in two aspects of female development. First, they were unable to initiate female development on synthetic crossing medium. However, they could form protoperithecia when grown on cellophane, on corn meal agar, or in response to the presence of nearby perithecia. Second, fertilized perithecia from PACC pathway mutants were unable to produce asci and complete female development. Protein localization experiments with a GFP-tagged PALA construct showed that PALA was localized in a peripheral punctate pattern, consistent with a signaling center associated with the ESCRT complex. The N. crassa PACC signal transduction pathway appears to be similar to the PacC/Rim101 pathway previously characterized in Aspergillus nidulans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In N. crassa the pathway plays a key role in regulating female development. PMID:25333968

  14. Maximal adamantyl-substituted retinoid-related molecule-induced apoptosis requires NF-κB noncanonical and canonical pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Farhana, L; Dawson, M I; Murshed, F; Fontana, J A

    2011-01-01

    NF-κB transcription factors have a critical role in regulating cell survival and apoptosis. We have previously shown that 4-(3-Cl-(1-adamantyl)-4-hydroxyphenyl)-3-chlorocinnamic acid (3-Cl-AHPC), an adamantyl-substituted retinoid molecule, induced apoptosis and required NF-κB activation in prostate and breast carcinoma cells. Here, we show that 3-Cl-AHPC activated both IκB kinase (IKK)α and IKKβ with subsequent activation of the canonical and noncanonical NF-κB pathways in the human breast carcinoma and leukemia cell lines. 3-Cl-AHPC-mediated activation of the NF-κB canonical pathway occurred within 6 h, whereas maximal activation of the NF-κB noncanonical pathway required 48 h. Knockout of IKKα or IKKβ expression in mouse embryonic fibroblast cells and knockdown of IKKα or IKKβ in MDA-MB-468 cells resulted in the inhibition of 3-Cl-AHPC-mediated apoptosis, indicating that activation of canonical and noncanonical pathways are required for maximal 3-Cl-AHPC-mediated apoptosis. 3-Cl-AHPC activation of the noncanonical pathway was preceded by caspase-mediated decrease in the E3-ligase c-IAP1 with subsequent stabilization of NF-κB-inducing kinase (NIK) expression, increased binding of NIK by TRAF3, activation of IKKα, and the resultant increased levels of RelB and p52. Increased expression of c-IAP1 blocked 3-Cl-AHPC-mediated stabilization of NIK levels and 3-Cl-AHPC-mediated apoptosis. Cdc37 expression was required for activation of IKKα and IKKβ by 3-Cl-AHPC. These findings suggest that NF-κB pathways have an important role in 3-Cl-AHPC-mediated apoptosis.

  15. Hydrogen production in Chlamydomonas: photosystem II-dependent and -independent pathways differ in their requirement for starch metabolism.

    PubMed

    Chochois, Vincent; Dauvillée, David; Beyly, Audrey; Tolleter, Dimitri; Cuiné, Stéphan; Timpano, Hélène; Ball, Steven; Cournac, Laurent; Peltier, Gilles

    2009-10-01

    Under sulfur deprivation conditions, the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii produces hydrogen in the light in a sustainable manner thanks to the contribution of two pathways, direct and indirect. In the direct pathway, photosystem II (PSII) supplies electrons to hydrogenase through the photosynthetic electron transport chain, while in the indirect pathway, hydrogen is produced in the absence of PSII through a photosystem I-dependent process. Starch metabolism has been proposed to contribute to both pathways by feeding respiration and maintaining anoxia during the direct pathway and by supplying reductants to the plastoquinone pool during the indirect pathway. At variance with this scheme, we report that a mutant lacking starch (defective for sta6) produces similar hydrogen amounts as the parental strain in conditions of sulfur deprivation. However, when PSII is inhibited by 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea, conditions where hydrogen is produced by the indirect pathway, hydrogen production is strongly reduced in the starch-deficient mutant. We conclude that starch breakdown contributes to the indirect pathway by feeding electrons to the plastoquinone pool but is dispensable for operation of the direct pathway that prevails in the absence of DCMU. While hydrogenase induction was strongly impaired in the starch-deficient mutant under dark anaerobic conditions, wild-type-like induction was observed in the light. Because this light-driven hydrogenase induction is DCMU insensitive and strongly inhibited by carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone or 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropyl-p-benzoquinone, we conclude that this process is regulated by the proton gradient generated by cyclic electron flow around PSI.

  16. Sac2/INPP5F is an inositol 4-phosphatase that functions in the endocytic pathway.

    PubMed

    Nakatsu, Fubito; Messa, Mirko; Nández, Ramiro; Czapla, Heather; Zou, Yixiao; Strittmatter, Stephen M; De Camilli, Pietro

    2015-04-13

    The recruitment of inositol phosphatases to endocytic membranes mediates dephosphorylation of PI(4,5)P2, a phosphoinositide concentrated in the plasma membrane, and prevents its accumulation on endosomes. The importance of the conversion of PI(4,5)P2 to PtdIns during endocytosis is demonstrated by the presence of both a 5-phosphatase and a 4-phosphatase (Sac domain) module in the synaptojanins, endocytic PI(4,5)P2 phosphatases conserved from yeast to humans and the only PI(4,5)P2 phosphatases in yeast. OCRL, another 5-phosphatase that couples endocytosis to PI(4,5)P2 dephosphorylation, lacks a Sac domain. Here we show that Sac2/INPP5F is a PI4P phosphatase that colocalizes with OCRL on endocytic membranes, including vesicles formed by clathrin-mediated endocytosis, macropinosomes, and Rab5 endosomes. An OCRL-Sac2/INPP5F interaction could be demonstrated by coimmunoprecipitation and was potentiated by Rab5, whose activity is required to recruit Sac2/INPP5F to endosomes. Sac2/INPP5F and OCRL may cooperate in the sequential dephosphorylation of PI(4,5)P2 at the 5 and 4 position of inositol in a partnership that mimics that of the two phosphatase modules of synaptojanin.

  17. Vps15p regulates the distribution of cup-shaped organelles containing the major eisosome protein Pil1p to the extracellular fraction required for endocytosis of extracellular vesicles carrying metabolic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Stein, Kathryn; Winters, Chelsea; Chiang, Hui-Ling

    2017-05-01

    Exosomes are small vesicles secreted from virtually every cell from bacteria to humans. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a model system to study trafficking of small vesicles in response to changes in the environment. When yeast cells are grown in low glucose, vesicles carrying gluconeogenic enzymes are present as free vesicles and aggregated clusters in the cytoplasm. These vesicles are also secreted into the periplasm and account for more than 90% of total extracellular organelles, while less than 10% are larger 100-300 nm structures with unknown functions. When glucose is added to glucose-starved cells, secreted vesicles are endocytosed and then targeted to the vacuole. Recent secretomic studies indicated that more than 300 proteins involved in diverse biological functions are secreted during glucose starvation and endocytosed during glucose re-feeding. We hypothesised that extracellular vesicles are internalised using novel mechanisms independent of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Our results showed that vesicles carrying metabolic enzymes were endocytosed at a fast rate, whereas vesicles carrying the heat shock protein Ssa1p were endocytosed at a slow rate. The PI3K regulator Vps15p is critical for the fast internalisation of extracellular vesicles. VPS15 regulates the distribution of the 100-300 nm organelles that contain the major eisosome protein Pil1p to the extracellular fraction. These Pil1p-containing structures were purified and showed unique cup-shape with their centres deeper than the peripheries. In the absence of VPS15, PIL1 or when PIL1 was mutated, the 100-300 nm structures were not observed in the extracellular fraction and the rapid internalisation of vesicles was impaired. We conclude that VPS15 regulates the distribution of the 100-300 nm Pil1p-containing organelles to the extracellular fraction required for fast endocytosis of vesicles carrying metabolic enzymes. This work provides the first evidence showing that Pil1p displayed unique

  18. Genome-Wide RNAi Screen Identifies Novel Host Proteins Required for Alphavirus Entry

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Gwen M.; Kielian, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    The enveloped alphaviruses include important and emerging human pathogens such as Chikungunya virus and Eastern equine encephalitis virus. Alphaviruses enter cells by clathrin-mediated endocytosis, and exit by budding from the plasma membrane. While there has been considerable progress in defining the structure and function of the viral proteins, relatively little is known about the host factors involved in alphavirus infection. We used a genome-wide siRNA screen to identify host factors that promote or inhibit alphavirus infection in human cells. Fuzzy homologue (FUZ), a protein with reported roles in planar cell polarity and cilia biogenesis, was required for the clathrin-dependent internalization of both alphaviruses and the classical endocytic ligand transferrin. The tetraspanin membrane protein TSPAN9 was critical for the efficient fusion of low pH-triggered virus with the endosome membrane. FUZ and TSPAN9 were broadly required for infection by the alphaviruses Sindbis virus, Semliki Forest virus, and Chikungunya virus, but were not required by the structurally-related flavivirus Dengue virus. Our results highlight the unanticipated functions of FUZ and TSPAN9 in distinct steps of alphavirus entry and suggest novel host proteins that may serve as targets for antiviral therapy. PMID:24367265

  19. Requirement of MyD88 and Fas pathways for the efficacy of allergen-free immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, D M; Wowk, P F; Paula, M O; Gembre, A F; Baruffi, M D; Fermino, M L; Turato, W M; Campos, L W; Silva, C L; Ramos, S G; Horn, C; Marchal, G; Arruda, L K; Russo, M; Bonato, V L D

    2015-03-01

    We have shown that mycobacterial antigens and CpG oligodeoxynucleotides downmodulate airway allergic inflammation by mechanisms dependent on T-cell activation. Here, we investigated the participation of the innate response, particularly the role of MyD88 adaptor, and Fas molecules in the effectiveness of DNA-HSP65 or CpG/culture filtrated proteins (CFP) immunotherapy. Mice sensitized and challenged with Der p 1 allergen were treated with DNA-HSP65, CpG/CFP, or with adoptively transferred cells from immunized mice. The treatment efficacy was assessed by evaluating eosinophil recruitment, antibody, and cytokine production. In addition to downregulating the Th2 response, DNA-HSP65 and CpG/CFP promoted IL-10 and IFN-γ production. Adoptive transfer of cells from mice immunized with DNA-HSP65 or CpG/CFP to allergic recipients downmodulated the allergic response. Notably, transfer of cells from DNA-HSP65- or CpG/CFP-immunized MyD88(-/-) mice failed to reduce allergy. Additionally, for effective reduction of allergy by cells from CpG/CFP-immunized mice, Fas molecules were required. Although DNA-HSP65 or CpG/CFP immunization stimulated antigen-specific production of IFN-γ and IL-10, the effect of DNA-HSP65 was associated with IL-10 while CpG/CFP was associated with IFN-γ. Moreover, after stimulation with mycobacterial antigens plus Der p 1 allergen, cells from mite-allergic patients with asthma exhibited similar patterns of cytokine production as those found in the lung of treated mice. This study provides new insights on the mechanisms of allergen-free immunotherapy by showing that both DNA-HSP65 and CpG/CFP downregulated house dust mite-induced allergic airway inflammation via distinct pathways that involve not only induction of mycobacterial-specific adaptive responses but also signaling via MyD88 and Fas molecules. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Arabidopsis phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase1 of the phosphoserine pathway is essential for development and required for ammonium assimilation and tryptophan biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Benstein, Ruben Maximilian; Ludewig, Katja; Wulfert, Sabine; Wittek, Sebastian; Gigolashvili, Tamara; Frerigmann, Henning; Gierth, Markus; Flügge, Ulf-Ingo; Krueger, Stephan

    2013-12-01

    In plants, two independent serine biosynthetic pathways, the photorespiratory and glycolytic phosphoserine (PS) pathways, have been postulated. Although the photorespiratory pathway is well characterized, little information is available on the function of the PS pathway in plants. Here, we present a detailed characterization of phosphoglycerate dehydrogenases (PGDHs) as components of the PS pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana. All PGDHs localize to plastids and possess similar kinetic properties, but they differ with respect to their sensitivity to serine feedback inhibition. Furthermore, analysis of pgdh1 and phosphoserine phosphatase mutants revealed an embryo-lethal phenotype and PGDH1-silenced lines were inhibited in growth. Metabolic analyses of PGDH1-silenced lines grown under ambient and high CO2 conditions indicate a direct link between PS biosynthesis and ammonium assimilation. In addition, we obtained several lines of evidence for an interconnection between PS and tryptophan biosynthesis, because the expression of PGDH1 and phosphoserine aminotransferase1 is regulated by MYB51 and MYB34, two activators of tryptophan biosynthesis. Moreover, the concentration of tryptophan-derived glucosinolates and auxin were reduced in PGDH1-silenced plants. In essence, our results provide evidence for a vital function of PS biosynthesis for plant development and metabolism.

  1. Molecular Structure, Function, and Dynamics of Clathrin-Mediated Membrane Traffic

    PubMed Central

    Kirchhausen, Tom; Owen, David; Harrison, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    Clathrin is a molecular scaffold for vesicular uptake of cargo at the plasma membrane, where its assembly into cage-like lattices underlies the clathrin-coated pits of classical endocytosis. This review describes the structures of clathrin, major cargo adaptors, and other proteins that participate in forming a clathrin-coated pit, loading its contents, pinching off the membrane as a lattice-enclosed vesicle, and recycling the components. It integrates as much of the structural information as possible at the time of writing into a sketch of the principal steps in coated-pit and coated-vesicle formation. PMID:24789820

  2. Omega-3 fatty acid deficiency disrupts endocytosis, neuritogenesis, and mitochondrial protein pathways in the mouse hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    English, Jane A.; Harauma, Akiko; Föcking, Melanie; Wynne, Kieran; Scaife, Caitriona; Cagney, Gerard; Moriguchi, Toru; Cotter, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acid (n-3 FA) deficiency is an environmental risk factor for schizophrenia, yet characterization of the consequences of deficiency at the protein level in the brain is limited. We aimed to identify the protein pathways disrupted as a consequence of chronic n-3 deficiency in the hippocampus of mice. Fatty acid analysis of the hippocampus following chronic dietary deficiency revealed a 3-fold decrease (p < 0.001) in n-3 FA levels. Label free LC-MS/MS analysis identified and profiled 1008 proteins, of which 114 were observed to be differentially expressed between n-3 deficient and control groups (n = 8 per group). The cellular processes that were most implicated were neuritogenesis, endocytosis, and exocytosis, while specific protein pathways that were most significantly dysregulated were mitochondrial dysfunction and clathrin mediated endocytosis (CME). In order to characterize whether these processes and pathways are ones influenced by antipsychotic medication, we used LC-MS/MS to test the differential expression of these 114 proteins in the hippocampus of mice chronically treated with the antipsychotic agent haloperidol. We observed 23 of the 114 proteins to be differentially expressed, 17 of which were altered in the opposite direction to that observed following n-3 deficiency. Overall, our findings point to disturbed synaptic function, neuritogenesis, and mitochondrial function as a consequence of dietary deficiency in n-3 FA. This study greatly aids our understanding of the molecular mechanism by which n-3 deficiency impairs normal brain function, and provides clues as to how n-3 FA exert their therapeutic effect in early psychosis. PMID:24194745

  3. Convergence of multiple signaling pathways is required to coordinately up-regulate mtDNA and mitochondrial biogenesis during T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    D’Souza, Anthony D.; Parikh, Neal; Kaech, Susan M.; Shadel, Gerald S.

    2009-01-01

    The quantity and activity of mitochondria vary dramatically in tissues and are modulated in response to changing cellular energy demands and environmental factors. The amount of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), which encodes essential subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation complexes required for cellular ATP production, is also tightly regulated, but by largely unknown mechanisms. Using murine T cells as a model system, we have addressed how specific signaling pathways influence mitochondrial biogenesis and mtDNA levels. T cell receptor (TCR) activation results in a large increase in mitochondrial mass and membrane potential and a corresponding increase of mtDNA copy number, indicating the vital role for mitochondrial function for the growth and proliferation of these cells. Independent activation of protein kinase C (via PMA) or calcium-related pathways (via ionomycin) had differential and sub-maximal effects on these mitochondrial parameters, as did activation of naïve T cells with proliferative cytokines. Thus, the robust mitochondrial biogenesis response observed upon TCR activation requires synergy of multiple downstream signaling pathways. One such pathway involves AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which we show has an unprecedented role in negatively regulating mitochondrial biogenesis that is mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-dependent. That is, inhibition of AMPK after TCR signaling commences results in excessive, but uncoordinated mitochondrial proliferation. We propose that mitochondrial biogenesis is not under control of a master regulatory circuit, but rather requires the convergence of multiple signaling pathways with distinct downstream consequences on the organelle’s structure, composition, and function. PMID:17890163

  4. A SNX3-dependent Retromer pathway mediates retrograde transport of the Wnt sorting receptor Wntless and is required for Wnt secretion

    PubMed Central

    Harterink, Martin; Silhankova, Marie; Betist, Marco C.; van Weering, Jan R. T.; van Heesbeen, Roy G. H. P.; Middelkoop, Teije C.; Basler, Konrad; Cullen, Peter J.; Korswagen, Hendrik C.

    2014-01-01

    Wnt proteins are lipid modified glycoproteins that play a central role in development, adult tissue homeostasis and disease. Secretion of Wnt proteins is mediated by the Wnt-binding protein Wntless (Wls), which transports Wnt from the Golgi network to the cell surface for release. It has recently been shown that recycling of Wls through a retromer-dependent endosome-to-Golgi trafficking pathway is required for efficient Wnt secretion, but the mechanism of this retrograde transport pathway is poorly understood. Here, we report that Wls recycling is mediated through a novel retromer pathway that is independent of the retromer sorting nexins SNX1-SNX2 and SNX5-SNX6. We found that the unrelated sorting nexin, SNX3, has an evolutionarily conserved function in Wls recycling and Wnt secretion and show that SNX3 interacts directly with the cargo-selective sub-complex of the retromer to sort Wls into a morphologically distinct retrieval pathway. These results demonstrate that SNX3 is part of an alternative retromer pathway that functionally separates the retrograde transport of Wls from other retromer cargo. PMID:21725319

  5. Inhibition of a NF-κB/Diap1 Pathway by PGRP-LF Is Required for Proper Apoptosis during Drosophila Development

    PubMed Central

    Tavignot, Raphael; Chaduli, Delphine; Djitte, Fatoumata; Charroux, Bernard; Royet, Julien

    2017-01-01

    NF-κB pathways are key signaling cascades of the Drosophila innate immune response. One of them, the Immune Deficiency (IMD) pathway, is under a very tight negative control. Although molecular brakes exist at each step of this signaling module from ligand availability to transcriptional regulation, it remains unknown whether repressors act in the same cells or tissues and if not, what is rationale behind this spatial specificity. We show here that the negative regulator of IMD pathway PGRP-LF is epressed in ectodermal derivatives. We provide evidence that, in the absence of any immune elicitor, PGRP-LF loss-of-function mutants, display a constitutive NF-κB/IMD activation specifically in ectodermal tissues leading to genitalia and tergite malformations. In agreement with previous data showing that proper development of these structures requires induction of apoptosis, we show that ectopic activation of NF-κB/IMD signaling leads to apoptosis inhibition in both genitalia and tergite primordia. We demonstrate that NF-κB/IMD signaling antagonizes apoptosis by up-regulating expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Diap1. Altogether these results show that, in the complete absence of infection, the negative regulation of NF-κB/IMD pathway by PGRP-LF is crucial to ensure proper induction of apoptosis and consequently normal fly development. These results highlight that IMD pathway regulation is controlled independently in different tissues, probably reflecting the different roles of this signaling cascade in both developmental and immune processes. PMID:28085885

  6. Requirements and potential development pathways for fission energy supply infrastructures of the 21st century - a systems viewpoint.

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, D. C.

    1999-06-14

    Using an energy supply systems approach, we envision attributes and characteristic needs of a future global fission-based energy supply infrastructure, enumerate potential pathways for meeting those needs, and identify the underlying enabling science and technology developments for R and D efforts to meet the needs.

  7. BAG3 induction is required to mitigate proteotoxicity via selective autophagy following inhibition of constitutive protein degradation pathways.

    PubMed

    Rapino, F; Jung, M; Fulda, S

    2014-03-27

    Simultaneous inhibition of the two major constitutive protein quality control (PQC) pathways, that is, the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and the aggresome-autophagy system, has been suggested as a promising strategy to trigger cell death in cancer cells. However, we observed that one third of rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) cells survives parallel inhibition of the UPS by Bortezomib and the aggresome-autophagy pathway by the cytoplasmic histone deacetylase 6 inhibitor ST80, and is able to regrow upon drug removal, thus pointing to the induction of compensatory pathways. Here, we identify Bcl-2-associated athanogene 3 (BAG3) as a critical mediator of inducible resistance in surviving cells after concomitant blockage of constitutive PQC pathways by mitigating ST80/Bortezomib-triggered proteotoxicity via selective autophagy. ST80/Bortezomib cotreatment upregulates BAG3 mRNA and protein levels in surviving cells in addition to triggering the accumulation of insoluble protein aggregates. Intriguingly, knockdown of BAG3 by RNA interference severely impairs clearance of protein aggregates, significantly increases cell death and reduces long-term survival and clonogenic growth during recovery after ST80/Bortezomib cotreatment. Similarly, inhibition of autophagy by inducible autophagy-related protein 7 knockdown prevents removal of protein aggregates and cell regrowth during recovery after ST80/Bortezomib cotreatment. Also, the inhibition of lysosomal degradation using the V-ATPase pump inhibitor Bafilomycin A1 enhances accumulation of protein aggregates, and completely abolishes regrowth after Bortezomib/ST80-induced proteotoxic stress. By identifying BAG3 as a key mediator of inducible resistance by mitigating proteotoxicity via selective autophagy after inhibition of constitutive PQC systems, our study provides new insights into the regulation of PQC pathways in cancer cells and identifies new targets for therapeutic intervention.

  8. Adenosine is required for sustained inflammasome activation via the A2A receptor and the HIF-1α pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Xinshou; Ghani, Ayaz; Malik, Ahsan; Wilder, Tuere; Colegio, Oscar Rene; Flavell, Richard Anthony; Cronstein, Bruce Neil; Mehal, Wajahat Zafar

    2013-12-01

    Inflammasome pathways are important in chronic diseases; however, it is not known how the signalling is sustained after initiation. Inflammasome activation is dependent on stimuli such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and ATP that provide two distinct signals resulting in rapid production of interleukin (IL)-1β, with the lack of response to repeat stimulation. Here we report that adenosine is a key regulator of inflammasome activity, increasing the duration of the inflammatory response via the A2A receptor. Adenosine does not replace signals provided by stimuli such as LPS or ATP but sustains inflammasome activity via a cAMP/PKA/CREB/HIF-1α pathway. In the setting of the lack of IL-1β responses after previous exposure to LPS, adenosine can supersede this tolerogenic state and drive IL-1β production. These data reveal that inflammasome activity is sustained, after initial activation, by A2A receptor-mediated signalling.

  9. Differential requirements of MyD88 and TRIF pathways in TLR4-mediated immune responses in murine B cells.

    PubMed

    Yanagibashi, Tsutomu; Nagai, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Yasuharu; Ikutani, Masashi; Hirai, Yoshikatsu; Takatsu, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    LPS stimulates the TLR4/Myeloid differentiation protein-2 (MD-2) complex and promotes a variety of immune responses in B cells. TLR4 has two main signaling pathways, MyD88 and Toll/IL-1R (TIR)-domain-containing adaptor-inducing interferon-β (TRIF) pathways, but relatively few studies have examined these pathways in B cells. In this study, we investigated MyD88- or TRIF-dependent LPS responses in B cells by utilizing their knockout mice. Compared with wild-type (WT) B cells, MyD88(-/-) B cells were markedly impaired in up-regulation of CD86 and proliferation induced by lipid A moiety of LPS. TRIF(-/-) B cells were also impaired in these responses compared with WT B cells, but showed better responses than MyD88(-/-) B cells. Regarding class switch recombination (CSR) elicited by lipid A plus IL-4, MyD88(-/-) B cells showed similar patterns of CSR to WT B cells. However, TRIF(-/-) B cells showed the impaired in the CSR. Compared with WT and MyD88(-/-) B cells, TRIF(-/-) B cells exhibited reduced cell division, fewer IgG1(+) cells per division, and decreased activation-induced cytidine deaminase (Aicda) mRNA expression in response to lipid A plus IL-4. Finally, IgG1 production to trinitrophenyl (TNP)-LPS immunization was impaired in TRIF(-/-) mice, while MyD88(-/-) mice exhibited increased IgG1 production. Thus, MyD88 and TRIF pathways differently regulate TLR4-induced immune responses in B cells.

  10. Signal transduction pathway regulating prostaglandin EP3 receptor-induced neurite retraction: requirement for two different tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, J; Katoh, H; Yasui, H; Yamaguchi, Y; Nakamura, K; Hasegawa, H; Ichikawa, A; Negishi, M

    1999-01-01

    We reported previously that activation of the prostaglandin E receptor EP3 subtype triggered neurite retraction through the small GTPase Rho-, and its target, RhoA-binding kinase alpha (ROKalpha)-, dependent pathway in EP3 receptor-expressing PC12 cells. Here we examined the involvement of tyrosine kinases in this pathway in nerve growth factor-differentiated PC12 cells. Tyrphostin A25, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, blocked neurite retraction and cell rounding induced by activation of the EP3 receptor, however, it failed to block neurite retraction and cell rounding induced by microinjection of constitutively active RhoA, RhoAV14, indicating that a tyrphostin-sensitive tyrosine kinase was involved in the pathway from the EP3 receptor to Rho activation. On the other hand, genistein, another tyrosine kinase inhibitor, blocked neurite retraction and cell rounding induced by both activation of the EP3 receptor and microinjection of RhoAV14. However, genistein did not block neuronal morphological changes induced by microinjection of a constitutively active mutant of ROKalpha. These results indicate that two different tyrosine kinases, tyrphostin A25-sensitive and genistein-sensitive kinases, are involved in the EP3 receptor-mediated neurite retraction acting upstream and downstream of Rho, respectively. PMID:10333476

  11. MLV requires Tap/NXF1-dependent pathway to export its unspliced RNA to the cytoplasm and to express both spliced and unspliced RNAs.

    PubMed

    Pessel-Vivares, Lucie; Ferrer, Mireia; Lainé, Sébastien; Mougel, Marylène

    2014-03-05

    Eukaryotic cells have evolved stringent proofreading mechanisms to ensure that intron-containing mRNAs do not leave the nucleus. However, all retroviruses must bypass this checkpoint for replication. Indeed, their primary polycistronic transcript (Full-Length) must reach the cytoplasm to be either translated or packaged as genomic RNA in progeny viruses.Murine leukemia virus (MLV) is a prototype of simple retroviruses with only two well-regulated splicing events that directly influence viral leukemogenic properties in mice. Several cis-elements have been identified in the FL RNA that regulate its cytoplasmic accumulation. However, their connection with an export mechanism is yet unknown. Our goal was to identify the cellular pathway used by MLV to export its RNAs into the cytoplasm of the host cells. Since other retroviruses use the CRM1 and/or the Tap/NXF1 pathways to export their unspliced RNA from the nucleus, we investigated the role of these two pathways in MLV replication by using specific inhibitors. The effects of export inhibition on MLV protein synthesis, RNA levels and RNA localization were studied by Western blotting, RT-qPCR, fluorescence microscopy and ribonucleoprotein immunoprecipitation assays. Taken together, our results show for the first time that MLV requires the Tap/NXF1-mediated export pathway, and not the CRM1 pathway, for the expression of its spliced and unspliced RNAs and for FL RNA nuclear export. By contrast to HIV-1, MLV recruits the same pathway for the cytoplasmic expression of its spliced and unspliced RNAs. Thus, MLV RNA expression depends upon coordinated splicing/export processes. In addition, FL RNA translation relies on Tap/NXF1-dependent export, raising the critical question of whether the pool of FL RNA to be packaged is also exported by Tap/NXF1.

  12. Follicle-stimulating hormone-induced aromatase in immature rat Sertoli cells requires an active phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway and is inhibited via the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Claudia A; Millena, Ana C; Reddy, Sheila; Finlay, Sheila; Vizcarra, Jorge; Khan, Shafiq A; Davis, John S

    2006-03-01

    Postnatal development and function of testicular Sertoli cells are regulated primarily by FSH. During this early period of development, estrogens play a role in proliferation of somatic cells, which contributes significantly to testicular development. Growth factors like epidermal growth factor (EGF) are produced in the testis and play a role in regulation of estradiol production and male fertility. Although these divergent factors modulate gonadal function, little is known about their mechanism of action in Sertoli cells. The present study investigates the intracellular events that take place down-stream of FSH and EGF receptors in Sertoli cells isolated from immature (10-d-old) rats, and examines which intracellular signals may be involved in their effects on aromatase activity and estradiol production in immature rat Sertoli cells. Primary cultures of rat Sertoli cells were treated with FSH in combination with EGF and signaling pathway-specific inhibitors. Levels of estradiol production, aromatase mRNA (Cyp19a1), and aromatase protein (CYP19A1) were determined. Western blot analysis was performed to determine the effects of FSH and EGF on levels of activated (phosphorylated) AKT1 and p42 ERK2 and p44 ERK1, also named MAPK1 and MAPK3, respectively. The stimulatory actions of FSH on aromatase mRNA, aromatase protein, and estradiol production were blocked by inhibition of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT1 signaling pathway. In contrast, inhibition of ERK signaling augmented the stimulatory effects of FSH on estradiol production, aromatase mRNA, and protein levels. Furthermore, EGF inhibited the expression of aromatase mRNA and protein in response to FSH, and these inhibitory effects of EGF were critically dependent on the activation of the ERK signaling pathway. We conclude that an active phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase /AKT signaling pathway is required for the stimulatory actions of FSH, whereas an active ERK/MAPK pathway inhibits estradiol production and

  13. Molecular Signatures of Cardiac Defects in Down Syndrome Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines Suggest Altered Ciliome and Hedgehog Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ripoll, Clémentine; Rivals, Isabelle; Ait Yahya-Graison, Emilie; Dauphinot, Luce; Paly, Evelyne; Mircher, Clothilde; Ravel, Aimé; Grattau, Yann; Bléhaut, Henri; Mégarbane, André; Dembour, Guy; de Fréminville, Bénédicte; Touraine, Renaud; Créau, Nicole; Potier, Marie Claude; Delabar, Jean Maurice

    2012-01-01

    Forty percent of people with Down syndrome exhibit heart defects, most often an atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD) and less frequently a ventricular septal defect (VSD) or atrial septal defect (ASD). Lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) were established from lymphocytes of individuals with trisomy 21, the chromosomal abnormality causing Down syndrome. Gene expression profiles generated from DNA microarrays of LCLs from individuals without heart defects (CHD−; n = 22) were compared with those of LCLs from patients with cardiac malformations (CHD+; n = 21). After quantile normalization, principal component analysis revealed that AVSD carriers could be distinguished from a combined group of ASD or VSD (ASD+VSD) carriers. From 9,758 expressed genes, we identified 889 and 1,016 genes differentially expressed between CHD− and AVSD and CHD− and ASD+VSD, respectively, with only 119 genes in common. A specific chromosomal enrichment was found in each group of affected genes. Among the differentially expressed genes, more than 65% are expressed in human or mouse fetal heart tissues (GEO dataset). Additional LCLs from new groups of AVSD and ASD+VSD patients were analyzed by quantitative PCR; observed expression ratios were similar to microarray results. Analysis of GO categories revealed enrichment of genes from pathways regulating clathrin-mediated endocytosis in patients with AVSD and of genes involved in semaphorin-plexin-driven cardiogenesis and the formation of cytoplasmic microtubules in patients with ASD-VSD. A pathway-oriented search revealed enrichment in the ciliome for both groups and a specific enrichment in Hedgehog and Jak-stat pathways among ASD+VSD patients. These genes or related pathways are therefore potentially involved in normal cardiogenesis as well as in cardiac malformations observed in individuals with trisomy 21. PMID:22912673

  14. Huntingtin-interacting protein 1-related is required for accurate congression and segregation of chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Park, Sun Joo

    2010-12-01

    Huntingtin-interacting protein 1-related (HIP1r) is known to function in clathrin-mediated endocytosis and regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, which occurs continuously in non-dividing cells. This study reports a new function for HIP1r in mitosis. Green fluorescent protein-fused HIP1r localizes to the mitotic spindles. Depletion of HIP1r by RNA interference induces misalignment of chromosomes and prolonged mitosis, which is associated with decreased proliferation of HIP1r-deficeint cells. Chromosome misalignment leads to missegregation and ultimately production of multinucleated cells. Depletion of HIP1r causes persistent activation of the spindle checkpoint in misaligned chromosomes. These findings suggest that HIP1r plays an important role in regulating the attachment of spindle microtubules to chromosomes during mitosis, an event that is required for accurate congression and segregation of chromosomes. This finding may provide new insights that improve the understanding of various human diseases involving HIP1r as well as its fusion genes.

  15. Aminoacyl-tRNA Quality Control is Required for Efficient Activation of the TOR Pathway Regulator Gln3p.

    PubMed

    Mohler, Kyle; Mann, Rebecca; Kyle, Amanda; Reynolds, Noah; Ibba, Michael

    2017-09-14

    The aminoacylation status of the cellular tRNA pool regulates both general amino acid control (GAAC) and target of rapamycin (TOR) stress response pathways in yeast. Consequently, fidelity of translation at the level of aminoacyl-tRNA synthesis plays a central role in determining accuracy and sensitivity of stress responses. To investigate effects of translational quality control (QC) on cell physiology under stress conditions, phenotypic microarray analyses were used to identify changes in QC deficient cells. Nitrogen source growth assays showed QC deficient yeast grew differently compared to WT. The QC deficient strain was more tolerant to caffeine treatment than wild type through altered interactions with the TOR and GAAC pathways. Increased caffeine tolerance of the QC deficient strain was consistent with the observation that the activity of Gln3p, a transcription factor controlled by the TOR pathway, is decreased in the QC deficient strain compared to WT. GCN4 translation, which is typically repressed in the absence of nutritional stress, was enhanced in the QC deficient strain through TOR inhibition. QC did not impact cell cycle regulation; however, the chronological lifespan of QC deficient yeast strains decreased compared to wild type, likely due to translational errors and alteration of the TOR-associated regulon. These findings support the idea that changes in translational fidelity provide a mechanism of cellular adaptation by modulating TOR activity. This, in turn, supports a central role for aminoacyl-tRNA synthesis QC in the integrated stress response by maintaining the proper aa-tRNA pools necessary to coordinate the GAAC and TOR.

  16. Highly Efficient Differentiation of Endothelial Cells from Pluripotent Stem Cells Requires the MAPK and the PI3K Pathways.

    PubMed

    Harding, Aja; Cortez-Toledo, Elizabeth; Magner, Nataly L; Beegle, Julie R; Coleal-Bergum, Dane P; Hao, Dake; Wang, Aijun; Nolta, Jan A; Zhou, Ping

    2017-04-01

    Pluripotent stem cells are a promising source of endothelial cells (ECs) for the treatment of vascular diseases. We have developed a robust protocol to differentiate human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) and embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into ECs with high purities (94%-97% CD31(+) and 78%-83% VE-cadherin(+) ) in 8 days without cell sorting. Passaging of these cells yielded a nearly pure population of ECs (99% of CD31(+) and 96.8% VE-cadherin(+) ). These ECs also expressed other endothelial markers vWF, Tie2, NOS3, and exhibited functions of ECs such as uptake of Dil-acetylated low-density lipoprotein and formation of tubes in vitro or vessels in vivo on matrigel. We found that FGF2, VEGF, and BMP4 synergistically induced early vascular progenitors (VPs) from hiPSC-derived mesodermal cells. The MAPK and PI3K pathways are crucial not only for the initial commitment to vascular lineages but also for the differentiation of vascular progenitors to ECs, most likely through regulation of the ETS family transcription factors, ERG and FLI1. We revealed novel roles of the p38 and JNK MAPK pathways on EC differentiation. Furthermore, inhibition of the ERK pathway markedly promoted the differentiation of smooth muscle cells. Finally, we demonstrate that pluripotent stem cell-derived ECs are capable of forming patent blood vessels that were connected to the host vasculature in the ischemic limbs of immune deficient mice. Thus, we demonstrate that ECs can be efficiently derived from hiPSCs and hESCs, and have great potential for vascular therapy as well as for mechanistic studies of EC differentiation. Stem Cells 2017;35:909-919. © 2017 The Authors Stem Cells published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  17. Butyrate-induced proapoptotic and antiangiogenic pathways in EAT cells require activation of CAD and downregulation of VEGF

    SciTech Connect

    Belakavadi, Madesh . E-mail: belakama@umdnj.edu; Prabhakar, B.T.; Salimath, Bharathi P.

    2005-10-07

    Butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid produced in the colon, induces cell cycle arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis in transformed cell lines. In this report, we study the effects of butyrate (BuA) on the growth of Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) cells in vivo. BuA, when injected intraperitoneally (i.p) into mice, inhibited proliferation of EAT cells. Further, induction of apoptosis in EAT cells was monitored by nuclear condensation, annexin-V staining, DNA fragmentation, and translocation of caspase-activated DNase into nucleus upon BuA-treatment. Ac-DEVD-CHO, a caspase-3 inhibitor, completely inhibited BuA-induced apoptosis, indicating that activation of caspase-3 mediates the apoptotic pathway in EAT cells. The proapoptotic effect of BuA also reflects on the antiangiogenic pathway in EAT cells. The antiangiogenic effect of BuA in vivo was demonstrated by the downregulation of the secretion of VEGF in EAT cells. CD31 immunohistochemical staining of peritoneum sections clearly indicated a potential angioinhibitory effect of BuA in EAT cells. These results suggest that BuA, besides regulating other fundamental cellular processes, is able to modulate the expression/secretion of the key angiogenic growth factor VEGF in EAT cells.

  18. Structural Requirements for Sorting Pro-Vasopressin to the Regulated Secretory Pathway in a Neuronal Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Cool, David R.; Jackson, Steven B.; Waddell, Karen S.

    2009-01-01

    Vasopressin is a peptide hormone normally secreted via the regulated secretory pathway in neuro-endocrine cells. In an effort to determine which region of vasopressin contains sufficient information for sorting, we created five constructs with the cDNA for vasopressin or regions of vasopressin in frame with the gene for green fluorescent protein (GFP). Fluorescence microscopy of Neuro-2a cells expressing the constructs revealed full-length vasopressin-GFP (VP-GFP), neurophysin-GFP (NP-GFP) and arginine-vasopressin/neurophysin-GFP (AN-GFP), were localized to punctate granules in the neurites and accumulated at the tips of neurites, characteristic of regulated secretory granules. These fusion proteins were secreted in a regulated manner as determined by pulse-chase labeling experiments. Two other chimeric proteins, signalpeptide-GFP and AVP-GFP were localized to a perinuclear region, characteristic of the endoplasmic reticulum. Pulse/chase [35S]labeling followed by immunoprecipitation using anti-GFP antibody indicated that these two fusion proteins were constitutively secreted. We conclude that the neurophysin region of pro-vasopressin contains information that is both sufficient and necessary for sorting GFP into the regulated secretory pathway. PMID:19830265

  19. Increased survival and cell cycle progression pathways are required for EWS/FLI1-induced malignant transformation

    PubMed Central

    Javaheri, Tahereh; Kazemi, Zahra; Pencik, Jan; Pham, Ha TT; Kauer, Maximilian; Noorizadeh, Rahil; Sax, Barbara; Nivarthi, Harini; Schlederer, Michaela; Maurer, Barbara; Hofbauer, Maximillian; Aryee, Dave NT; Wiedner, Marc; Tomazou, Eleni M; Logan, Malcolm; Hartmann, Christine; Tuckermann, Jan P; Kenner, Lukas; Mikula, Mario; Dolznig, Helmut; Üren, Aykut; Richter, Günther H; Grebien, Florian; Kovar, Heinrich; Moriggl, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma (ES) is the second most frequent childhood bone cancer driven by the EWS/FLI1 (EF) fusion protein. Genetically defined ES models are needed to understand how EF expression changes bone precursor cell differentiation, how ES arises and through which mechanisms of inhibition it can be targeted. We used mesenchymal Prx1-directed conditional EF expression in mice to study bone development and to establish a reliable sarcoma model. EF expression arrested early chondrocyte and osteoblast differentiation due to changed signaling pathways such as hedgehog, WNT or growth factor signaling. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) expressing EF showed high self-renewal capacity and maintained an undifferentiated state despite high apoptosis. Blocking apoptosis through enforced BCL2 family member expression in MSCs promoted efficient and rapid sarcoma formation when transplanted to immunocompromised mice. Mechanistically, high BCL2 family member and CDK4, but low P53 and INK4A protein expression synergized in Ewing-like sarcoma development. Functionally, knockdown of Mcl1 or Cdk4 or their combined pharmacologic inhibition resulted in growth arrest and apoptosis in both established human ES cell lines and EF-transformed mouse MSCs. Combinatorial targeting of survival and cell cycle progression pathways could counteract this aggressive childhood cancer. PMID:27735950

  20. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and calcium-activated transcription pathways are required for VLDL-induced smooth muscle cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Lipskaia, Larissa; Pourci, Marie-Luce; Deloménie, Claudine; Combettes, Laurent; Goudounèche, Dominique; Paul, Jean-Louis; Capiod, Thierry; Lompré, Anne-Marie

    2003-05-30

    Little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms of atherogenicity of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins such as very low-density lipoproteins (VLDLs). We examined the effect of VLDL on proliferation of rat aortic smooth muscle cells, intracellular Ca2+ handling, and activity of cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) and nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) transcription factors. VLDL, isolated from human serum, dose- and time-dependently promoted proliferation. After 4 hours of exposure to VLDL (0.15 g/L proteins), the caffeine-induced Ca2+ release was inhibited and the IP3-sensitive Ca2+ release induced by ATP (10 micromol/L) was markedly prolonged. In quiescent cells, CREB was phosphorylated (pCREB) and NFAT was present in the cytosol, whereas in cells exposed to VLDL for 4 to 24 hours, pCREB disappeared and NFAT was translocated to the nucleus. VLDL-induced NFAT translocation and proliferation were blocked by cyclosporin A and LY294002 involving calcineurin and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways. Indeed, VLDLs rapidly phosphorylate protein kinase B and glycogen synthase kinase-3beta in a PI3K-dependent way. These results provide the first evidence that VLDLs induce smooth muscle cell proliferation by activating the PI3K pathway and nuclear NFAT translocation. Blockade of the Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release mechanism and dephosphorylation of pCREB contribute but were not sufficient to induce a proliferating phenotype.

  1. HSP70-1 is required for interleukin-5-induced angiogenic responses through eNOS pathway

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung Lyea; Chung, Tae-Wook; Kim, Sangtae; Hwang, Byungdoo; Kim, Jung Min; Lee, Hwan Myung; Cha, Hee-Jae; Seo, Yoonhee; Choe, Soo Young; Ha, Ki-Tae; Kim, Gonhyung; Yun, Seok-Joong; Park, Sung-Soo; Choi, Yung Hyun; Kim, Bo Kyung; Kim, Won-Tae; Cha, Eun-Jong; Patterson, Cam; Kim, Wun-Jae; Moon, Sung-Kwon

    2017-01-01

    We report a pivotal role for IL-5 as an angiogenic activator. IL-5 increased proliferation, migration and colony tube formation in HUVECs associated with the phosphorylation of ERK and AKT/eNOS, and promoted microvessel sprouting from an angiogenesis animal model. The angiogenic effects were confirmed in IL-5-deficient mice and addition of IL-5 antibody. HSP70-1 was identified via expression profiling following IL-5 stimulation. A siRNA knockdown of HSP70-1 suppressed angiogenic responses and eNOS phosphorylation induced by IL-5. HSP70-1 overexpression enhanced IL-5-induced angiogenic responses. In addition, IL-5-induced neo-vascular formation was verified in both HSP70-1 knockout and HSP70-1 transgenic mice. Furthermore, transcription factor AP-1 was a main factor in IL-5-induced HSP70-1 in response to ERK and AKT signaling pathway. Angiogenic responses induced by VEGF had no effect in either HSP70-1 siRNA in vitro or HSP70-1 knockout mice. IL-5-induced angiogenic responses depended on the binding of IL-5Rα. Our data demonstrate that binding of IL-5 to IL-5Rα receptors enhances angiogenic responses by stimulating the expression of HSP70-1 via the eNOS signaling pathway. PMID:28317868

  2. Dihydroartemisinin and its derivative induce apoptosis in acute myeloid leukemia through Noxa-mediated pathway requiring iron and endoperoxide moiety

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xuan; Zhong, Hang; Wang, Rui; Liu, Dan; Waxman, Samuel; Zhao, Linxiang; Jing, Yongkui

    2015-01-01

    Anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1 plays an important role in protecting cell from death in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The apoptosis blocking activity of Mcl-1 is inhibited by BH3-only protein Noxa. We found that dihydroartemisinin (DHA) and its derivative X-11 are potent apoptosis inducers in AML cells and act through a Noxa-mediate pathway; X-11 is four-fold more active than DHA. DHA and X-11-induced apoptosis is associated with induction of Noxa; apoptosis is blocked by silencing Noxa. DHA and X-11 induce Noxa expression by upregulating the transcription factor FOXO3a in a reactive oxygen species-mediated pathway. Interfering with the integrity of the endoperoxide moiety of DHA and X-11, as well as chelating intracellular iron with deferoxamine, diminish apoptosis and Noxa induction. AML cells expressing Bcl-xL, or with overexpression of Bcl-2, have decreased sensitivity to DHA and X-11-induced apoptosis which could be overcome by addition of Bcl-2/Bcl-xL inhibitor ABT-737. DHA and X-11 represent a new group of AML cells-apoptosis inducing compounds which work through Noxa up-regulation utilizing the specific endoperoxide moiety and intracellular iron. PMID:25714024

  3. TRIB3 Mediates Glucose-Induced Insulin Resistance via a Mechanism That Requires the Hexosamine Biosynthetic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Liu, Jiarong; Tian, Ling; Liu, Qinglan; Fu, Yuchang; Garvey, W. Timothy

    2013-01-01

    In the current study, we investigated the role of tribbles homolog 3 (TRIB3) in glucose-induced insulin resistance and whether the induction of TRIB3 by glucose is dependent on the nutrient-sensing hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP) known to mediate glucose toxicity in diabetes. In diabetic rats, TRIB3 expression in skeletal muscle was increased after 10 days of hyperglycemia, and glycemia and muscle TRIB3 were both restored toward normal by insulin therapy. In L6 myocytes, the induction of TRIB3 by high glucose or glucosamine was reversible upon removal of these substrates. To assess the role of HBP in the induction of TRIB3, we demonstrated that the ability of high glucose to augment TRIB3 expression was prevented by azaserine, an inhibitor of glutamine: fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase (GFAT), which is the rate-limiting enzyme in the HBP pathway. TRIB3 expression was also substantially stimulated by glucosamine, which bypasses GFAT, accompanied by a decrease in the insulin-stimulated glucose transport rate, and neither response was affected by azaserine. Further, knockdown of TRIB3 inhibited, and TRIB3 overexpression enhanced, the ability of both high glucose and glucosamine to induce insulin resistance. These data provide the mechanistic link between the HBP flux and insulin resistance and point to TRIB3 as a novel target for treatment of glucose-induced insulin resistance. PMID:23990361

  4. Regulation of Hxt3 and Hxt7 turnover converges on the Vid30 complex and requires inactivation of the Ras/cAMP/PKA pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Snowdon, Chris; van der Merwe, George

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells adjust their intracellular protein complement as a mechanism to adapt to changing environmental signals. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae the hexose transporters Hxt3 and Hxt7 are expressed and function on the plasma membrane in high and low glucose abundance, respectively. By contrast, Hxt3 is endocytosed and degraded in the vacuole when cells are starved of glucose and Hxt7 in response to rapamycin treatment or when nitrogen is limiting. Yeast uses several signaling pathways, including the TORC1 and Ras/cAMP/Protein Kinase A (PKA) pathways, to adapt to nutrient changes in the environment. The multi-protein Vid30 complex (Vid30c), an E3 ubiquitin ligase required for the degradation of FBPase, assists in this adaptation process in a mechanism that is poorly understood. Here we show the endocytosis and the subsequent degradation of both Hxt3 and Hxt7, in response to different nutrient signals, is dependent on components of the Vid30c. Additionally, we define the signaling events required for the turnover of Hxt3 and Hxt7 by showing that Hxt3 turnover requires Ras2 and PKA inactivation, whereas Hxt7 turnover requires TORC1 and Ras2 inactivation. Further investigation led us to identify Rim15, a kinase that is inhibited by both the TORC1 and Ras/cAMP/PKA pathways, as a key downstream effector in signaling both turnover events. Finally, we show that the turnover of both Hxt3 and Hxt7 is dependent on the essential E3 ubiquitin ligase, Rsp5, indicating that the role of the Vid30c might be indirect of Hxt ubiquitylation.

  5. rugose (rg), a Drosophila A kinase anchor protein, is required for retinal pattern formation and interacts genetically with multiple signaling pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Shamloula, Hoda K; Mbogho, Mkajuma P; Pimentel, Angel C; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zosia M A; Hyatt, Vanneta; Okano, Hideyuki; Venkatesh, Tadmiri R

    2002-01-01

    In the developing Drosophila eye, cell fate determination and pattern formation are directed by cell-cell interactions mediated by signal transduction cascades. Mutations at the rugose locus (rg) result in a rough eye phenotype due to a disorganized retina and aberrant cone cell differentiation, which leads to reduction or complete loss of cone cells. The cone cell phenotype is sensitive to the level of rugose gene function. Molecular analyses show that rugose encodes a Drosophila A kinase anchor protein (DAKAP 550). Genetic interaction studies show that rugose interacts with the components of the EGFR- and Notch-mediated signaling pathways. Our results suggest that rg is required for correct retinal pattern formation and may function in cell fate determination through its interactions with the EGFR and Notch signaling pathways. PMID:12072466

  6. Antiapoptotic effects of erythropoietin in differentiated neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells require activation of both the STAT5 and AKT signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Um, Moonkyoung; Lodish, Harvey F

    2006-03-03

    The hematopoietic cytokine erythropoietin (Epo) prevents neuronal death during ischemic events in the brain and in neurodegenerative diseases, presumably through its antiapoptotic effects. To explore the role of different signaling pathways in Epo-mediated antiapoptotic effects in differentiated human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, we employed a prolactin receptor (PrlR)/erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) chimera system, in which binding of prolactin (Prl) to the extracellular domain activates EpoR signaling in the cytosol. On induction of apoptosis by staurosporine, Prl supports survival of the SH-SY5Y cells expressing the wild-type PrlR/EpoR chimera. In these cells Prl treatment strongly activates the STAT5, AKT, and MAPK signaling pathways and induces weak activation of the p65 NF-kappaB factor. Selective mutation of the eight tyrosine residues of the EpoR cytoplasmic domain results in impaired or absent activation of either STAT5 (mutation of Tyr(343)) or AKT (mutation of Tyr(479)) or both (mutation of all eight tyrosine residues). Most interestingly, Prl treatment does not prevent apoptosis in cells expressing mutant PrlR/EpoR chimeras in which either the STAT5 or the AKT signaling pathways are not activated. In contrast, ERK 1/2 is fully activated by all mutant PrlR/EpoR chimeras, comparable with the level seen with the wild-type PrlR/EpoR chimera, implying that activation of the MAPK signaling pathway per se is not sufficient for antiapoptotic activity. Therefore, the antiapoptotic effects of Epo in neuronal cells require the combinatorial activation of multiple signaling pathways, including STAT5, AKT, and potentially MAPK as well, in a manner similar to that observed in hematopoietic cells.

  7. A new pathway for salvaging the coenzyme B12 precursor cobinamide in archaea requires cobinamide-phosphate synthase (CbiB) enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Woodson, Jesse D; Zayas, Carmen L; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C

    2003-12-01

    The ability of archaea to salvage cobinamide has been under question because archaeal genomes lack orthologs to the bacterial nucleoside triphosphate:5'-deoxycobinamide kinase enzyme (cobU in Salmonella enterica). The latter activity is required for cobinamide salvaging in bacteria. This paper reports evidence that archaea salvage cobinamide from the environment by using a pathway different from the one used by bacteria. These studies demanded the functional characterization of two genes whose putative function had been annotated based solely on their homology to the bacterial genes encoding adenosylcobyric acid and adenosylcobinamide-phosphate synthases (cbiP and cbiB, respectively) of S. enterica. A cbiP mutant strain of the archaeon Halobacterium sp. strain NRC-1 was auxotrophic for adenosylcobyric acid, a known intermediate of the de novo cobamide biosynthesis pathway, but efficiently salvaged cobinamide from the environment, suggesting the existence of a salvaging pathway in this archaeon. A cbiB mutant strain of Halobacterium was auxotrophic for adenosylcobinamide-GDP, a known de novo intermediate, and did not salvage cobinamide. The results of the nutritional analyses of the cbiP and cbiB mutants suggested that the entry point for cobinamide salvaging is adenosylcobyric acid. The data are consistent with a salvaging pathway for cobinamide in which an amidohydrolase enzyme cleaves off the aminopropanol moiety of adenosylcobinamide to yield adenosylcobyric acid, which is converted by the adenosylcobinamide-phosphate synthase enzyme to adenosylcobinamide-phosphate, a known intermediate of the de novo biosynthetic pathway. The existence of an adenosylcobinamide amidohydrolase enzyme would explain the lack of an adenosylcobinamide kinase in archaea.

  8. A New Pathway for Salvaging the Coenzyme B12 Precursor Cobinamide in Archaea Requires Cobinamide-Phosphate Synthase (CbiB) Enzyme Activity

    PubMed Central

    Woodson, Jesse D.; Zayas, Carmen L.; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C.

    2003-01-01

    The ability of archaea to salvage cobinamide has been under question because archaeal genomes lack orthologs to the bacterial nucleoside triphosphate:5′-deoxycobinamide kinase enzyme (cobU in Salmonella enterica). The latter activity is required for cobinamide salvaging in bacteria. This paper reports evidence that archaea salvage cobinamide from the environment by using a pathway different from the one used by bacteria. These studies demanded the functional characterization of two genes whose putative function had been annotated based solely on their homology to the bacterial genes encoding adenosylcobyric acid and adenosylcobinamide-phosphate synthases (cbiP and cbiB, respectively) of S. enterica. A cbiP mutant strain of the archaeon Halobacterium sp. strain NRC-1 was auxotrophic for adenosylcobyric acid, a known intermediate of the de novo cobamide biosynthesis pathway, but efficiently salvaged cobinamide from the environment, suggesting the existence of a salvaging pathway in this archaeon. A cbiB mutant strain of Halobacterium was auxotrophic for adenosylcobinamide-GDP, a known de novo intermediate, and did not salvage cobinamide. The results of the nutritional analyses of the cbiP and cbiB mutants suggested that the entry point for cobinamide salvaging is adenosylcobyric acid. The data are consistent with a salvaging pathway for cobinamide in which an amidohydrolase enzyme cleaves off the aminopropanol moiety of adenosylcobinamide to yield adenosylcobyric acid, which is converted by the adenosylcobinamide-phosphate synthase enzyme to adenosylcobinamide-phosphate, a known intermediate of the de novo biosynthetic pathway. The existence of an adenosylcobinamide amidohydrolase enzyme would explain the lack of an adenosylcobinamide kinase in archaea. PMID:14645280

  9. GDNF control of the glutamatergic cortico-striatal pathway requires tonic activation of adenosine A2A Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Catarina A.R.V.; Simões, Patrícia F.; Canas, Paula M.; Quiroz, César; Sebastião, Ana M.; Ferré, Sergi; Cunha, Rodrigo A.; Ribeiro, Joaquim A.

    2009-01-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) affords neuroprotection in Parkinson’s disease in accordance with its ability to bolster nigrostriatal innervation. We previously found that GDNF facilitates dopamine release in a manner dependent on adenosine A2A receptor activation. Since motor dysfunction also involves modifications of striatal glutamatergic innervation, we now tested if GDNF and its receptor system, Ret (rearranged during transfection) and GFRα1 (GDNF family receptor alpha 1) controlled the cortico-striatal glutamatergic pathway in an A2A receptor-dependent manner. GDNF (10 ng/ml) enhanced (by ≈13%) glutamate release from rat striatal nerve endings, an effect potentiated (up to ≈ 30%) by the A2A receptor agonist CGS 21680 (10 nM) and prevented by the A2A receptor antagonist, SCH 58261 (50 nM). Triple immunocytochemical studies revealed that Ret and GFRα1 were located in 50% of rat striatal glutamatergic terminals (immunopositive for vesicular glutamate transporters-1/2), where they were found to be co-located with A2A receptors. Activation of the glutamatergic system upon in vivo electrical stimulation of the rat cortico-striatal input induced striatal Ret phosphoprylation that was prevented by pre-treatment with the A2A receptor antagonist, MSX-3 (3 mg/kg). The results provide the first functional and morphological evidence that GDNF controls cortico-striatal glutamatergic pathways in a manner largely dependent on the co-activation of adenosine A2A receptors. PMID:19141075

  10. WNK3 bypasses the tonicity requirement for K-Cl cotransporter activation via a phosphatase-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    de Los Heros, Paola; Kahle, Kristopher T; Rinehart, Jesse; Bobadilla, Norma A; Vázquez, Norma; San Cristobal, Pedro; Mount, David B; Lifton, Richard P; Hebert, Steven C; Gamba, Gerardo

    2006-02-07

    SLC12A cation/Cl- cotransporters are mutated in human disease, are targets of diuretics, and are collectively involved in the regulation of cell volume, neuronal excitability, and blood pressure. This gene family has two major branches with different physiological functions and inverse regulation: K-Cl cotransporters (KCC1-KCC4) mediate cellular Cl- efflux, are inhibited by phosphorylation, and are activated by dephosphorylation; Na-(K)-Cl cotransporters (NCC and NKCC1/2) mediate cellular Cl- influx and are activated by phosphorylation. A single kinase/phosphatase pathway is thought to coordinate the activities of these cotransporters in a given cell; however, the mechanisms involved are as yet unknown. We previously demonstrated that WNK3, a paralog of serine-threonine kinases mutated in hereditary hypertension, is coexpressed with several cation/Cl- cotransporters and regulates their activity. Here, we show that WNK3 completely prevents the cell swelling-induced activation of KCC1-KCC4 in Xenopus oocytes. In contrast, catalytically inactive WNK3 abolishes the cell shrinkage-induced inhibition of KCC1-KCC4, resulting in a >100-fold stimulation of K-Cl cotransport during conditions in which transport is normally inactive. This activation is completely abolished by calyculin A and cyclosporine A, inhibitors of protein phosphatase 1 and 2B, respectively. Wild-type WNK3 activates Na-(K)-Cl cotransporters by increasing their phosphorylation, and catalytically inactive kinase inhibits Na-(K)-Cl cotransporters by decreasing their phosphorylation, such that our data suggest that WNK3 is a crucial component of the kinase/phosphatase signaling pathway that coordinately regulates the Cl- influx and efflux branches of the SLC12A cotransporter family.

  11. Erythropoietin activates two distinct signaling pathways required for the initiation and the elongation of c-myc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C.; Sytkowski, A. J.

    2001-01-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo) stimulation of erythroid cells results in the activation of several kinases and a rapid induction of c-myc expression. Protein kinase C is necessary for Epo up-regulation of c-myc by promoting elongation at the 3'-end of exon 1. PKCepsilon mediates this signal. We now show that Epo triggers two signaling pathways to c-myc. Epo rapidly up-regulated Myc protein in BaF3-EpoR cells. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002 blocked Myc up-regulation in a concentration-dependent manner but had no effect on the Epo-induced phosphorylation of ERK1 and ERK2. LY294002 also had no effect on Epo up-regulation of c-fos. MEK1 inhibitor PD98059 blocked both the c-myc and the c-fos responses to Epo. PD98059 and the PKC inhibitor H7 also blocked the phosphorylation of ERK1 and ERK2. PD98059 but not LY294002 inhibited Epo induction of ERK1 and ERK2 phosphorylation in normal erythroid cells. LY294002 blocked transcription of c-myc at exon 1. PD98059 had no effect on transcription from exon 1 but, rather, blocked Epo-induced c-myc elongation at the 3'-end of exon 1. These results identify two Epo signaling pathways to c-myc, one of which is PI3K-dependent operating on transcriptional initiation, whereas the other is mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent operating on elongation.

  12. Wnt/β-catenin pathway is required for epithelial to mesenchymal transition in CXCL12 over expressed breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shan, Shumei; Lv, Qiang; Zhao, Yiling; Liu, Chunfeng; Sun, Yingyan; Xi, Kemin; Xiao, Jiayi; Li, Caijuan

    2015-01-01

    CXCL12 is positively associated with the metastasis and prognosis of various human malignancies. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), the main cells secreting CXCL12, are capable of inducing epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of breast cancer cells. However, it has not been completely understood whether CXCL12 is involved in EMT of breast cancer cells and the underlying mechanisms. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of CXCL12 on the EMT and cancer stem cell (CSC)-like phenotypes formation by transfecting pEGFP-N1-CXCL12 plasmid into MCF-7 cells. Real time-PCR and Western blot analysis demonstrated the successful over expression of CXCL12 in MCF-7 cells. Cell counting kit-8 assay, wound healing assay and Transwell invasion analysis confirmed that over expression of CXCL12 significantly promoted the proliferation, migration and invasion in MCF-7 cells (P<0.05). In addition, ALDH activity was dramatically enhanced compared with parental (P<0.001), accompanied by the notably elevated mRNA and protein levels of OCT-4, Nanog, and SOX2 in CXCL12 overexpressed-MCF-7 cells (P<0.001). Furthermore, we observed the down regulation of E-cadherin and up regulation of vimentin, N-cadherin, and α-SMA in CXCL12 overexpressed-MCF-7 cells (P<0.01). Meanwhile, western blot and immunofluorescence assay showed that over expression of CXCL12 activated Wnt/β-catenin pathway to induce EMT of MCF-7 cells, as evidenced by the increased expression of E-cadherin after silencing β-catenin by siRNA interference (P<0.001). Collectively, our findings suggested that over expression of CXCL12 could trigger EMT by activating Wnt/β-catenin pathway and induce CSC-like phenotypes formation to promote the proliferation and metastasis in MCF-7. Hence, CXCL12 may become a promising candidate for breast cancer therapy.

  13. Erythropoietin activates two distinct signaling pathways required for the initiation and the elongation of c-myc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C.; Sytkowski, A. J.

    2001-01-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo) stimulation of erythroid cells results in the activation of several kinases and a rapid induction of c-myc expression. Protein kinase C is necessary for Epo up-regulation of c-myc by promoting elongation at the 3'-end of exon 1. PKCepsilon mediates this signal. We now show that Epo triggers two signaling pathways to c-myc. Epo rapidly up-regulated Myc protein in BaF3-EpoR cells. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002 blocked Myc up-regulation in a concentration-dependent manner but had no effect on the Epo-induced phosphorylation of ERK1 and ERK2. LY294002 also had no effect on Epo up-regulation of c-fos. MEK1 inhibitor PD98059 blocked both the c-myc and the c-fos responses to Epo. PD98059 and the PKC inhibitor H7 also blocked the phosphorylation of ERK1 and ERK2. PD98059 but not LY294002 inhibited Epo induction of ERK1 and ERK2 phosphorylation in normal erythroid cells. LY294002 blocked transcription of c-myc at exon 1. PD98059 had no effect on transcription from exon 1 but, rather, blocked Epo-induced c-myc elongation at the 3'-end of exon 1. These results identify two Epo signaling pathways to c-myc, one of which is PI3K-dependent operating on transcriptional initiation, whereas the other is mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent operating on elongation.

  14. Thymic medullary epithelium and thymocyte self tolerance require cooperation between CD28-CD80/86 and CD40-CD40L costimulatory pathways

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Joy A.; Zhang, Jingjing; Jeon, Hyein; Nitta, Takeshi; Ohigashi, Izumi; Klug, David; Kruhlak, Michael J.; Choudhury, Baishakhi; Sharrow, Susan O.; Granger, Larry; Adams, Anthony; Eckhaus, Michael A.; Jenkinson, S. Rhiannon; Richie, Ellen R.; Gress, Ronald E.; Takahama, Yousuke; Hodes, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    A critical process during thymic development of the T cell repertoire is the induction of self-tolerance. Tolerance in developing T cells is highly dependent on medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTEC) and mTEC development in turn requires signals from mature single positive (SP) thymocytes, a bidirectional relationship termed thymus crosstalk. We show that CD28-CD80/86 and CD40-CD40L costimulatory interactions, which mediate negative selection and self-tolerance, upregulate expression of LTα, LTβ and RANK in the thymus and are necessary for medullary development. Combined absence of CD28-CD80/86 and CD40-CD40L results in profound deficiency in mTEC development comparable to that observed in the absence of SP thymocytes. This requirement for costimulatory signaling is maintained even in a TCR transgenic model of high affinity TCR-ligand interactions. CD4 thymocytes maturing in the altered thymic epithelial environment of CD40/CD80/86 KO mice are highly autoreactive in vitro and are lethal in congenic adoptive transfer in vivo, demonstrating a critical role for these costimulatory pathways in self-tolerance as well as thymic epithelial development. These findings demonstrate that cooperativity between CD28-CD80/86 and CD40-CD40L pathways is required for normal medullary epithelium and for maintenance of self-tolerance in thymocyte development. PMID:24337745

  15. Wnt5a is required for endothelial differentiation of embryonic stem cells and vascularization via pathways involving both Wnt/beta-catenin and protein kinase Calpha.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dong-Hwa; Yoon, Ju-Young; Lee, Soung-Hoon; Bryja, Vitezslav; Andersson, Emma R; Arenas, Ernest; Kwon, Young-Guen; Choi, Kang-Yell

    2009-02-13

    In this study, we examined the signaling pathways activated by Wnt5a in endothelial differentiation of embryonic stem (ES) cells and the function of Wnt5a during vascular development. We first found that Wnt5a(-/-) mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells exhibited a defect in endothelial differentiation, which was rescued by addition of Wnt5a, suggesting that Wnt5a is required for endothelial differentiation of ES cells. Involvement of both beta-catenin and protein kinase (PK)Calpha pathways in endothelial differentiation of mES cells requiring Wnt5a was indicated by activation of both beta-catenin and PKCalpha in Wnt5a(+/-) but not in Wnt5a(-/-) mES cells. We also found that beta-catenin or PKCalpha knockdowns inhibited the Wnt5a-induced endothelial differentiation of ES cells. Moreover, the lack of endothelial differentiation of Wnt5a(-/-) mES cells was rescued only by transfection of both beta-catenin and PKCalpha, indicating that both genes are required for Wnt5a-mediated endothelial differentiation. Wnt5a was also found to be essential for the differentiation of mES cells into immature endothelial progenitor cells, which are known to play a role in repair of damaged endothelium. Furthermore, a defect in the vascularization of the neural tissue was detected at embryonic day 14.5 in Wnt5a(-/-) mice, implicating Wnt5a in vascular development in vivo. Thus, we conclude that Wnt5a is involved in the endothelial differentiation of ES cells via both Wnt/beta-catenin and PKC signaling pathways and regulates embryonic vascular development.

  16. Saccharomyces cerevisiae engineered for xylose metabolism requires gluconeogenesis and the oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway for aerobic xylose assimilation.

    PubMed

    Hector, Ronald E; Mertens, Jeffrey A; Bowman, Michael J; Nichols, Nancy N; Cotta, Michael A; Hughes, Stephen R

    2011-09-01

    Saccharomyces strains engineered to ferment xylose using Scheffersomyces stipitis xylose reductase (XR) and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) genes appear to be limited by metabolic imbalances, due to differing cofactor specificities of XR and XDH. The S. stipitis XR, which uses both NADH and NADPH, is hypothesized to reduce the cofactor imbalance, allowing xylose fermentation in this yeast. However, unadapted S. cerevisiae strains expressing this XR grow poorly on xylose, suggesting that metabolism is still imbalanced, even under aerobic conditions. In this study, we investigated the possible reasons for this imbalance by deleting genes required for NADPH production and gluconeogenesis in S. cerevisiae. S. cerevisiae cells expressing the XR-XDH, but not a xylose isomerase, pathway required the oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) and gluconeogenic production of glucose-6-P for xylose assimilation. The requirement for generating glucose-6-P from xylose was also shown for Kluyveromyces lactis. When grown in xylose medium, both K. lactis and S. stipitis showed increases in enzyme activity required for producing glucose-6-P. Thus, natural xylose-assimilating yeast respond to xylose, in part, by upregulating enzymes required for recycling xylose back to glucose-6-P for the production of NADPH via the oxidative branch of the PPP. Finally, we show that induction of these enzymes correlated with increased tolerance to the NADPH-depleting compound diamide and the fermentation inhibitors furfural and hydroxymethyl furfural; S. cerevisiae was not able to increase enzyme activity for glucose-6-P production when grown in xylose medium and was more sensitive to these inhibitors in xylose medium compared to glucose.

  17. Phorbol ester-induced apoptosis of C4-2 cells requires both a unique and a redundant protein kinase C signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yin, Lihong; Bennani-Baiti, Nabila; Powell, C Thomas

    2005-02-18

    Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) potently induces apoptosis of LNCaP human prostate cancer cells. Here, we show that C4-2 cells, androgen-hypersensitive derivatives of LNCaP cells, also are sensitive to PMA-induced apoptosis. Previous reports have implicated activation of protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes alpha and delta in PMA-induced LNCaP apoptosis using overexpression, pharmacological inhibitors, and dominant-negative constructs, but have left unresolved if other isozymes are involved, if there are separate requirements for individual PKC isozymes, or if there is redundancy. We have resolved these questions in C4-2 cells using stable expression of short hairpin RNAs to knock down expression of specific PKC isozymes individually and in pairs. Partial knockdown of PKCdelta inhibited PMA-induced C4-2 cell death almost completely, whereas near-complete knockdown of PKCalpha had no effect. Knockdown of PKCepsilon alone had no effect, but simultaneous knockdown of both PKCalpha and PKCepsilon in C4-2 cells that continued to express normal levels of PKCdelta inhibited PMA-induced apoptosis. Thus, our data indicate that there is an absolute requirement for PKCdelta in PMA-induced C4-2 apoptosis but that the functions of PKCalpha and PKCepsilon in apoptosis induction are redundant, such that either one (but not both) is required. Investigation of PMA-induced events required for LNCaP and C4-2 apoptosis revealed that p38 activation is dependent on PKCdelta, whereas induction of retinoblastoma protein hypophosphorylation requires both PKC signaling pathways and is downstream of p38 activation in the PKCdelta pathway.

  18. The adaptor-like protein ROG-1 is required for activation of the Ras-MAP kinase pathway and meiotic cell cycle progression in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Yosuke; Kawasaki, Ichiro; Urushiyama, Seiichi; Yasuda, Tomoharu; Shirakata, Masaki; Iino, Yuichi; Shibuya, Hiroshi; Yamanashi, Yuji

    2007-03-01

    The Ras-MAP kinase pathway regulates varieties of fundamental cellular events. In Caenorhabditis elegans, this pathway is required for oocyte development; however, the nature of its up-stream regulators has remained elusive. Here, we identified a C. elegans gene, rog-1, which encodes the only protein having the IRS-type phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain in the worms. ROG-1 has no obvious domain structure aside from the PTB domain, suggesting that it could serve as an adaptor down-stream of protein-tyrosine kinases (PTKs). RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated down-regulation of rog-1 mRNA significantly decreased brood size. rog-1(tm1031) truncation mutants showed a severe disruption in progression of developing oocytes from pachytene to diakinesis, as was seen in worms carrying a loss-of-function mutation in the let-60 Ras or mpk-1 MAP kinase gene. Furthermore, let-60 Ras-regulated activation of MPK-1 in the gonad is undetectable in rog-1(tm1031) mutants. Conversely, a gain-of-function mutation in the let-60 Ras gene rescues the brood size reduction and germ cell abnormality in rog-1(tm1031) worms. Consistently, rog-1 is preferentially expressed in the germ cells and its expression in the gonad is essential for oocyte development. Thus, ROG-1 is a key positive regulator of the Ras-MAP kinase pathway that permits germ cells to exit from pachytene.

  19. Expression of the RAE-1 Family of Stimulatory NK-Cell Ligands Requires Activation of the PI3K Pathway during Viral Infection and Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Tokuyama, Maria; Lorin, Clarisse; Delebecque, Frederic; Jung, Heiyoun; Raulet, David H.; Coscoy, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes that play a major role in the elimination of virally-infected cells and tumor cells. NK cells recognize and target abnormal cells through activation of stimulatory receptors such as NKG2D. NKG2D ligands are self-proteins, which are absent or expressed at low levels on healthy cells but are induced upon cellular stress, transformation, or viral infection. The exact molecular mechanisms driving expression of these ligands remain poorly understood. Here we show that murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection activates the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) pathway and that this activation is required for the induction of the RAE-1 family of mouse NKG2D ligands. Among the multiple PI3K catalytic subunits, inhibition of the p110α catalytic subunit blocks this induction. Similarly, inhibition of p110α PI3K reduces cell surface expression of RAE-1 on transformed cells. Many viruses manipulate the PI3K pathway, and tumors frequently mutate the p110α oncogene. Thus, our findings suggest that dysregulation of the PI3K pathway is an important signal to induce expression of RAE-1, and this may represent a commonality among various types of cellular stresses that result in the induction of NKG2D ligands. PMID:21966273

  20. FvBck1, a component of cell wall integrity MAP kinase pathway, is required for virulence and oxidative stress response in sugarcane Pokkah Boeng pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chengkang; Wang, Jianqiang; Tao, Hong; Dang, Xie; Wang, Yang; Chen, Miaoping; Zhai, Zhenzhen; Yu, Wenying; Xu, Liping; Shim, Won-Bo; Lu, Guodong; Wang, Zonghua

    2015-01-01

    Fusarium verticillioides (formerly F. moniliforme) is suggested as one of the causal agents of Pokkah Boeng, a serious disease of sugarcane worldwide. Currently, detailed molecular and physiological mechanism of pathogenesis is unknown. In this study, we focused on cell wall integrity MAPK pathway as one of the potential signaling mechanisms associated with Pokkah Boeng pathogenesis. We identified FvBCK1 gene that encodes a MAP kinase kinase kinase homolog and determined that it is not only required for growth, micro- and macro-conidia production, and cell wall integrity but also for response to osmotic and oxidative stresses. The deletion of FvBCK1 caused a significant reduction in virulence and FB1 production, a possibly carcinogenic mycotoxin produced by the fungus. Moreover, we found the expression levels of three genes, which are known to be involved in superoxide scavenging, were down regulated in the mutant. We hypothesized that the loss of superoxide scavenging capacity was one of the reasons for reduced virulence, but overexpression of catalase or peroxidase gene failed to restore the virulence defect in the deletion mutant. When we introduced Magnaporthe oryzae MCK1 into the FvBck1 deletion mutant, while certain phenotypes were restored, the complemented strain failed to gain full virulence. In summary, FvBck1 plays a diverse role in F. verticillioides, and detailed investigation of downstream signaling pathways will lead to a better understanding of how this MAPK pathway regulates Pokkah Boeng on sugarcane. PMID:26500635

  1. Signaling of chloroquine-induced stress in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires the Hog1 and Slt2 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways.

    PubMed

    Baranwal, Shivani; Azad, Gajendra Kumar; Singh, Vikash; Tomar, Raghuvir S

    2014-09-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) has been under clinical use for several decades, and yet little is known about CQ sensing and signaling mechanisms or about their impact on various biological pathways. We employed the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism to study the pathways targeted by CQ. Our screening with yeast mutants revealed that it targets histone proteins and histone deacetylases (HDACs). Here, we also describe the novel role of mitogen-activated protein kinases Hog1 and Slt2, which aid in survival in the presence of CQ. Cells deficient in Hog1 or Slt2 are found to be CQ hypersensitive, and both proteins were phosphorylated in response to CQ exposure. CQ-activated Hog1p is translocated to the nucleus and facilitates the expression of GPD1 (glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase), which is required for the synthesis of glycerol (one of the major osmolytes). Moreover, cells treated with CQ exhibited an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and the effects were rescued by addition of reduced glutathione to the medium. The deletion of SOD1, the superoxide dismutase in yeast, resulted in hypersensitivity to CQ. We have also observed P38 as well as P42/44 phosphorylation in HEK293T human cells upon exposure to CQ, indicating that the kinds of responses generated in yeast and human cells are similar. In summary, our findings define the multiple biological pathways targeted by CQ that might be useful for understanding the toxicity modulated by this pharmacologically important molecule.

  2. The GIPC1-Akt1 Pathway Is Required for the Specification of the Eye Field in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    La Torre, Anna; Hoshino, Akina; Cavanaugh, Christopher; Ware, Carol B; Reh, Thomas A

    2015-09-01

    During early patterning of the neural plate, a single region of the embryonic forebrain, the eye field, becomes competent for eye development. The hallmark of eye field specification is the expression of the eye field transcription factors (EFTFs). Experiments in fish, amphibians, birds, and mammals have demonstrated largely conserved roles for the EFTFs. Although some of the key signaling events that direct the synchronized expression of these factors to the eye field have been elucidated in fish and frogs, it has been more difficult to study these mechanisms in mammalian embryos. In this study, we have used two different methods for directed differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) to generate eye field cells and retina in vitro to test for a role of the PDZ domain-containing protein GIPC1 in the specification of the mammalian eye primordia. We find that the overexpression of a dominant-negative form of GIPC1 (dnGIPC1), as well as the downregulation of endogenous GIPC1, is sufficient to inhibit the development of eye field cells from mESCs. GIPC1 interacts directly with IGFR and participates in Akt1 activation, and pharmacological inhibition of Akt1 phosphorylation mimics the dnGIPC1 phenotype. Our data, together with previous studies in Xenopus, support the hypothesis that the GIPC1-PI3K-Akt1 pathway plays a key role in eye field specification in vertebrates.

  3. In Polytomella sp. mitochondria, biogenesis of the heterodimeric COX2 subunit of cytochrome c oxidase requires two different import pathways.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Suárez, Alejandra; Vázquez-Acevedo, Miriam; Rojas-Hernández, Andrés; Funes, Soledad; Uribe-Carvajal, Salvador; González-Halphen, Diego

    2012-05-01

    In the vast majority of eukaryotic organisms, the mitochondrial cox2 gene encodes subunit II of cytochrome c oxidase (COX2). However, in some lineages including legumes and chlorophycean algae, the cox2 gene migrated to the nucleus. Furthermore, in chlorophycean algae, this gene was split in two different units. Thereby the COX2 subunit is encoded by two independent nuclear genes, cox2a and cox2b, and mitochondria have to import the cytosol-synthesized COX2A and COX2B subunits and assemble them into the cytochrome c oxidase complex. In the chlorophycean algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Polytomella sp., the COX2A precursor exhibits a long (130-140 residues), cleavable mitochondrial targeting sequence (MTS). In contrast, COX2B lacks an MTS, suggesting that mitochondria use different mechanisms to import each subunit. Here, we explored the in vitro import processes of both, the Polytomella sp. COX2A precursor and the COX2B protein. We used isolated, import-competent mitochondria from this colorless alga. Our results suggest that COX2B is imported directly into the intermembrane space, while COX2A seems to follow an energy-dependent import pathway, through which it finally integrates into the inner mitochondrial membrane. In addition, the MTS of the COX2A precursor is eliminated. This is the first time that the in vitro import of split COX2 subunits into mitochondria has been achieved.

  4. Lordosis facilitation by leptin in ovariectomized, estrogen-primed rats requires simultaneous or sequential activation of several protein kinase pathways.

    PubMed

    García-Juárez, Marcos; Beyer, Carlos; Gómora-Arrati, Porfirio; Domínguez-Ordoñez, Raymundo; Lima-Hernández, Francisco J; Eguibar, José R; Galicia-Aguas, Yadira L; Etgen, Anne M; González-Flores, Oscar

    2013-09-01

    The present study tested the hypothesis that the Janus kinase 2, Src tyrosine kinases, and mitogen-activated protein kinase interact to regulate lordosis behavior induced by leptin in ovariectomized, estrogen-primed rats. The role of protein kinase A and protein kinase C in lordosis facilitation by leptin was also assessed. In experiment 1, the intracerebroventricular administration of leptin to ovariectomized, estradiol-primed rats significantly stimulated lordosis behavior at 1, 2 and 4 h post-injection tests. In experiment 2, the Janus kinase 2 inhibitor AG490, the Src tyrosine kinase inhibitor PP2 and the mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor PD98059 were administered into the right lateral ventricle before leptin. The lordosis quotient and the lordosis score induced by leptin were significantly decreased by each of these kinase inhibitors. In experiment 3, we examined the effects of RpcAMPS and bisindolylmaleimide, protein kinase A and protein kinase C inhibitors on the lordosis elicited by leptin administration. Lordosis behavior induced by leptin was significantly decreased by both the protein kinase A and protein kinase C inhibitors at 1 h post-leptin injection. The results confirm that multiple intracellular pathways participate in the expression of lordosis behavior in estrogen-primed rats elicited by leptin. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. 1–42 β-Amyloid peptide requires PDK1/nPKC/Rac 1 pathway to induce neuronal death

    PubMed Central

    Manterola, L; Hernando-Rodríguez, M; Ruiz, A; Apraiz, A; Arrizabalaga, O; Vellón, L; Alberdi, E; Cavaliere, F; Lacerda, H M; Jimenez, S; Parada, L A; Matute, C; Zugaza, J L

    2013-01-01

    1–42 β-Amyloid (Aβ1–42) peptide is a key molecule involved in the development of Alzheimer's disease. Some of its effects are manifested at the neuronal morphological level. These morphological changes involve loss of neurites due to cytoskeleton alterations. However, the mechanism of Aβ1–42 peptide activation of the neurodegenerative program is still poorly understood. Here, Aβ1–42 peptide-induced transduction of cellular death signals through the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/phosphoinositol-dependent kinase (PDK)/novel protein kinase C (nPKC)/Rac 1 axis is described. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of PDK1 and nPKC activities blocks Rac 1 activation and neuronal cell death. Our results provide insights into an unsuspected connection between PDK1, nPKCs and Rac 1 in the same signal-transduction pathway and points out nPKCs and Rac 1 as potential therapeutic targets to block the toxic effects of Aβ1–42 peptide in neurons. PMID:23340502

  6. GENETIC EVIDENCE FOR THE REQUIREMENT OF THE ENDOCYTIC PATHWAY IN THE UPTAKE OF COENZYME Q6 IN SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    PubMed Central

    Padilla-López, Sergio; Jiménez-Hidalgo, María; Martín-Montalvo, Alejandro; F. Clarke, Catherine; Navas, Plácido; Santos-Ocaña, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Coenzyme Q is an isoprenylated benzoquinone lipid that functions in respiratory electron transport and as a lipid antioxidant. Dietary supplementation with Q is increasingly used as a therapeutic for treatment of mitochondrial and neurodegenerative diseases, yet little is known regarding the mechanism of its uptake. As opposed to other yeast backgrounds, EG103 strains are unable to import exogenous Q6 to the mitochondria. Furthermore, the distribution of exogenous Q6 among endomembranes suggests an impairment of the membrane traffic at the level of the endocytic pathway. This fact was confirmed after the detection of defects in the incorporation of FM4-64 marker and CPY delivery to the vacuole. A similar effect was demonstrated in double mutant strains in Q6 synthesis and several steps of endocytic process; those cells are unable to uptake exogenous Q6 to the mitochondria and restore the growth on non-fermentable carbon sources. Additional data about the positive effect of peptone presence for exogenous Q6 uptake support the hypothesis that Q6 is transported to mitochondria through an endocytic-based system. PMID:19345667

  7. Diacylglycerol Is Required for the Formation of COPI Vesicles in the Golgi-to-ER Transport Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Ulibarri, Inés; Vilella, Montserrat; Lázaro-Diéguez, Francisco; Sarri, Elisabet; Martínez, Susana E.; Jiménez, Nuria; Claro, Enrique; Mérida, Isabel; Burger, Koert N.J.

    2007-01-01

    Diacylglycerol is necessary for trans-Golgi network (TGN) to cell surface transport, but its functional relevance in the early secretory pathway is unclear. Although depletion of diacylglycerol did not affect ER-to-Golgi transport, it led to a redistribution of the KDEL receptor to the Golgi, indicating that Golgi-to-ER transport was perturbed. Electron microscopy revealed an accumulation of COPI-coated membrane profiles close to the Golgi cisternae. Electron tomography showed that the majority of these membrane profiles originate from coated buds, indicating a block in membrane fission. Under these conditions the Golgi-associated pool of ARFGAP1 was reduced, but there was no effect on the binding of coatomer or the membrane fission protein CtBP3/BARS to the Golgi. The addition of 1,2-dioctanoyl-sn-glycerol or the diacylglycerol analogue phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate reversed the effects of endogenous diacylglycerol depletion. Our findings implicate diacylglycerol in the retrograde transport of proteins from Golgi to the ER and suggest that it plays a critical role at a late stage of COPI vesicle formation. PMID:17567948

  8. The GIPC1-Akt1 pathway is required for the specification of the eye field in mouse embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    La Torre, Anna; Hoshino, Akina; Cavanaugh, Christopher; Ware, Carol B.; Reh, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    During early patterning of the neural plate, a single region of the embryonic forebrain, the eye field, becomes competent for eye development. The hallmark of eye field specification is the expression of the eye field transcription factors (EFTFs). Experiments in fish, amphibians, birds and mammals have demonstrated largely conserved roles for the EFTFs. Although some of the key signaling events that direct the synchronized expression of these factors to the eye field have been elucidated in fish and frogs, it has been more difficult to study these mechanisms in mammalian embryos. In this study, we have used two different methods for directed differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) to generate eye field cells and retina in vitro to test for a role of the PDZ domain-containing protein GIPC1 in the specification of the mammalian eye primordia. We find that the overexpression of a dominant-negative form of GIPC1 (dnGIPC1), as well as the downregulation of endogenous GIPC1, is sufficient to inhibit the development of eye field cells from mESCs. GIPC1 interacts directly with IGFR and participates in Akt1 activation, and pharmacological inhibition of Akt1 phosphorylation mimics the dnGIPC1 phenotype. Our data, together with previous studies in Xenopus, support the hypothesis that the GIPC1-PI3K-Akt1 pathway plays a key role in eye field specification in vertebrates. PMID:26013465

  9. Gibberellic acid nitrite stimulates germination of two species of light-requiring seeds via the nitric oxide pathway.

    PubMed

    Jovanović, Vladan; Giba, Zlatko; Djoković, Dejan; Milosavljević, Slobodan; Grubisić, Dragoljub; Konjević, Radomir

    2005-06-01

    We used two species of light-requiring seeds, Paulownia tomentosa, which have absolute light requirement (no germination in darkness), and Stellaria media seeds, which germinate in darkness to a certain extent because of presence of preformed active phytochrome, to obtain results strongly suggesting that gibberellic acid nitrite stimulates seed germination via its capability as a functional NO donor. Exogenous application of gibberellic acid nitrite stimulates gibberellin-insensitive Stellaria media seed germination in darkness as do a wide variety of NO donors. Pure gibberellic acid could replace the light requirement of P. tomentosa seeds, thus enabling them to germinate in darkness. Gibberellic acid nitrite did not have this effect. A stimulative effect from gibberellic acid nitrite could be detected only after exposure of these seeds to short, 10 min, pulse of red light. Taken together, these results suggest that gibberellic activity of gibberellic acid nitrite is lost after nitrosation but, regarding to the presence of -O-NO moiety in the molecule, gibberellic acid nitrite shares stimulative properties in seed germination with other compounds with NO-releasing properties.

  10. The CLAVATA signaling pathway mediating stem cell fate in shoot meristems requires Ca(2+) as a secondary cytosolic messenger.

    PubMed

    Chou, Hsuan; Zhu, Yingfang; Ma, Yi; Berkowitz, Gerald A

    2016-02-01

    CLAVATA1 (CLV1) is a receptor protein expressed in the shoot apical meristem (SAM) that translates perception of a non-cell-autonomous CLAVATA3 (CLV3) peptide signal into altered stem cell fate. CLV3 reduces expression of WUSCHEL (WUS) and FANTASTIC FOUR 2 (FAF2) in the SAM. Expression of WUS and FAF2 leads to maintenance of undifferentiated stem cells in the SAM. CLV3 binding to CLV1 inhibits expression of these genes and controls stem cell fate in the SAM through an unidentified signaling pathway. Cytosolic Ca(2+) elevations, cyclic nucleotide (cGMP)-activated Ca(2+) channels, and cGMP have been linked to signaling downstream of receptors similar to CLV1. Hence, we hypothesized that cytosolic Ca(2+) elevation mediates the CLV3 ligand/CLV1 receptor signaling that controls meristem stem cell fate. CLV3 application to Arabidopsis seedlings results in elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) and cGMP. CLV3 control of WUS was prevented in a genotype lacking a functional cGMP-activated Ca(2+) channel. In wild-type plants, CLV3 inhibition of WUS and FAF2 expression was impaired by treatment with either a Ca(2+) channel blocker or a guanylyl cyclase inhibitor. When CLV3-dependent repression of WUS is blocked, altered control of stem cell fate leads to an increase in SAM size; we observed a larger SAM size in seedlings treated with the Ca(2+) channel blocker. These results suggest that the CLV3 ligand/CLV1 receptor system initiates a signaling cascade that elevates cytosolic Ca(2+), and that this cytosolic secondary messenger is involved in the signal transduction cascade linking CLV3/CLV1 to control of gene expression and stem cell fate in the SAM. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. NIK is required for NF-κB-mediated induction of BAG3 upon inhibition of constitutive protein degradation pathways.

    PubMed

    Rapino, F; Abhari, B A; Jung, M; Fulda, S

    2015-03-12

    Recently, we reported that induction of the co-chaperone Bcl-2-associated athanogene 3 (BAG3) is critical for recovery of rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) cells after proteotoxic stress upon inhibition of the two constitutive protein degradation pathways, that is, the ubiquitin-proteasome system by Bortezomib and the aggresome-autophagy system by histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) inhibitor ST80. In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms mediating BAG3 induction under these conditions. Here, we identify nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB)-inducing kinase (NIK) as a key mediator of ST80/Bortezomib-stimulated NF-κB activation and transcriptional upregulation of BAG3. ST80/Bortezomib cotreatment upregulates mRNA and protein expression of NIK, which is accompanied by an initial increase in histone H3 acetylation. Importantly, NIK silencing by siRNA abolishes NF-κB activation and BAG3 induction by ST80/Bortezomib. Furthermore, ST80/Bortezomib cotreatment stimulates NF-κB transcriptional activity and upregulates NF-κB target genes. Genetic inhibition of NF-κB by overexpression of dominant-negative IκBα superrepressor (IκBα-SR) or by knockdown of p65 blocks the ST80/Bortezomib-stimulated upregulation of BAG3 mRNA and protein expression. Interestingly, inhibition of lysosomal activity by Bafilomycin A1 inhibits ST80/Bortezomib-stimulated IκBα degradation, NF-κB activation and BAG3 upregulation, indicating that IκBα is degraded via the lysosome in the presence of Bortezomib. Thus, by demonstrating a critical role of NIK in mediating NF-κB activation and BAG3 induction upon ST80/Bortezomib cotreatment, our study provides novel insights into mechanisms of resistance to proteotoxic stress in RMS.

  12. FTO is required for myogenesis by positively regulating mTOR-PGC-1α pathway-mediated mitochondria biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaobo; Huang, Ning; Yang, Min; Wei, Dandan; Tai, Haoran; Han, Xiaojuan; Gong, Hui; Zhou, Jiao; Qin, Jianqiong; Wei, Xiawei; Chen, Honghan; Fang, Tingting; Xiao, Hengyi

    2017-03-23

    Global germ line loss of fat mass- and obesity-associated (FTO) gene results in both the reduction of fat mass and lean mass in mice. The role of FTO in adipogenesis has been proposed, however, that in myogenesis has not. Skeletal muscle is the main component of body lean mass, so its connection with FTO physiologic significance need to be clarified. Here, we assessed the impact of FTO on murine skeletal muscle differentiation by in vitro and in vivo experiments. We found that FTO expression increased during myoblasts differentiation, while the silence of FTO inhibited the differentiation; in addition, skeletal muscle development was impaired in skeletal muscle FTO-deficient mice. Significantly, FTO-promoted myogenic differentiation was dependent on its m6A demethylase activity. Mechanically, we found that FTO downregulation suppressed mitochondria biogenesis and energy production, showing as the decreased mitochondria mass and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content, the downregulated expression of mtDNA-encoding genes and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) gene, together with declined ATP level. Moreover, the involvement of mTOR-PGC-1α pathway in the connection between FTO and muscle differentiation is displayed, since the expression of FTO affected the activity of mTOR and rapamycin blocked FTO-induced PGC-1α transcription, along with the parallel alteration pattern of FTO expression and mTOR phosphorylation during myoblasts differentiation. Summarily, our findings provide the first evidence for the contribution of FTO for skeletal muscle differentiation and a new insight to study the physiologic significance of RNA methylation.

  13. Apg7p/Cvt2p Is Required for the Cytoplasm-to-Vacuole Targeting, Macroautophagy, and Peroxisome Degradation Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kim, John; Dalton, Valerie M.; Eggerton, Kimberly P.; Scott, Sidney V.; Klionsky, Daniel J.

    1999-01-01

    Proper functioning of organelles necessitates efficient protein targeting to the appropriate subcellular locations. For example, degradation in the fungal vacuole relies on an array of targeting mechanisms for both resident hydrolases and their substrates. The particular processes that are used vary depending on the available nutrients. Under starvation conditions, macroautophagy is the primary method by which bulk cytosol is sequestered into autophagic vesicles (autophagosomes) destined for this organelle. Molecular genetic, morphological, and biochemical evidence indicates that macroautophagy shares much of the same cellular machinery as a biosynthetic pathway for the delivery of the vacuolar hydrolase, aminopeptidase I, via the cytoplasm-to-vacuole targeting (Cvt) pathway. The machinery required in both pathways includes a novel protein modification system involving the conjugation of two autophagy proteins, Apg12p and Apg5p. The conjugation reaction was demonstrated to be dependent on Apg7p, which shares homology with the E1 family of ubiquitin-activating enzymes. In this study, we demonstrate that Apg7p functions at the sequestration step in the formation of Cvt vesicles and autophagosomes. The subcellular localization of Apg7p fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) indicates that a subpopulation of Apg7pGFP becomes membrane associated in an Apg12p-dependent manner. Subcellular fractionation experiments also indicate that a portion of the Apg7p pool is pelletable under starvation conditions. Finally, we demonstrate that the Pichia pastoris homologue Gsa7p that is required for peroxisome degradation is functionally similar to Apg7p, indicating that this novel conjugation system may represent a general nonclassical targeting mechanism that is conserved across species. PMID:10233148

  14. The inhibition of the apoptosis pathway by the Coxiella burnetii effector protein CaeA requires the EK repetition motif, but is independent of survivin.

    PubMed

    Bisle, Stephanie; Klingenbeck, Leonie; Borges, Vítor; Sobotta, Katharina; Schulze-Luehrmann, Jan; Menge, Christian; Heydel, Carsten; Gomes, João Paulo; Lührmann, Anja

    2016-05-18

    ABSRTACT Coxiella burnetii is an obligate intracellular bacterium that causes Query (Q) fever, a zoonotic disease. It requires a functional type IV secretion system (T4SS) which translocate bacterial effector proteins into the host cell cytoplasm and thereby facilitates bacterial replication. To date, more than 130 effector proteins have been identified, but their functions remain largely unknown. Recently, we demonstrated that one of these proteins, CaeA (CBU1524) localized to the host cell nucleus and inhibited intrinsic apoptosis of HEK293 or CHO cells. In the present study we addressed the question whether CaeA also affects the extrinsic apoptosis pathway. Ectopic expression of CaeA reduced extrinsic apoptosis and prevented the cleavage of the executioner caspase 7, but did not impair the activation of initiator caspase 9. CaeA expression resulted in an up-regulation of survivin (an inhibitor of activated caspases), which, however, was not causal for the anti-apoptotic effect of CaeA. Comparing the sequence of CaeA from 25 different C. burnetii isolates we identified an EK (glutamic acid/ lysine) repetition motif as a site of high genetic variability. The EK motif of CaeA was essential for the anti-apoptotic activity of CaeA. From these data, we conclude that the C. burnetii effector protein CaeA interferes with the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis pathway. The process requires the EK repetition motif of CaeA, but is independent of the upregulated expression of survivin.

  15. Chemical inhibition reveals differential requirements of signaling pathways in krasV12- and Myc-induced liver tumors in transgenic zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Chuan; Yang, Qiqi; Huo, Xiaojing; Li, Hankun; Zhou, Li; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2017-01-01

    Previously we have generated inducible liver tumor models by transgenic expression of an oncogene and robust tumorigenesis can be rapidly induced by activation of the oncogene in both juvenile and adult fish. In the present study, we aimed at chemical intervention of tumorigenesis for understanding molecular pathways of tumorigenesis and for potential development of a chemical screening tool for anti-cancer drug discovery. Thus, we evaluated the roles of several major signaling pathways in krasV12- or Myc-induced liver tumors by using several small molecule inhibitors: SU5402 and SU6668 for VEGF/FGF signaling; IWR1 and cardionogen 1 for Wnt signaling; and cyclopamine and Gant61 for Hedgehog signaling. Inhibition of VEGF/FGF signaling was found to deter both Myc- and krasV12-induced liver tumorigenesis while suppression of Wnt signaling relaxed only Myc- but not krasV12-induced liver tumorigenesis. Inhibiting Hedgehog signaling did not suppress either krasV12 or Myc-induced tumors. The suppression of liver tumorigenesis was accompanied with a decrease of cell proliferation, increase of apoptosis, distorted liver histology. Collectively, our observations suggested the requirement of VEGF/FGF signaling but not the hedgehog signaling in liver tumorigenesis in both transgenic fry. However, Wnt signaling appeared to be required for liver tumorigenesis only in Myc but not krasV12 transgenic zebrafish. PMID:28378824

  16. The Helicase Aquarius/EMB-4 Is Required to Overcome Intronic Barriers to Allow Nuclear RNAi Pathways to Heritably Silence Transcription.

    PubMed

    Akay, Alper; Di Domenico, Tomas; Suen, Kin M; Nabih, Amena; Parada, Guillermo E; Larance, Mark; Medhi, Ragini; Berkyurek, Ahmet C; Zhang, Xinlian; Wedeles, Christopher J; Rudolph, Konrad L M; Engelhardt, Jan; Hemberg, Martin; Ma, Ping; Lamond, Angus I; Claycomb, Julie M; Miska, Eric A

    2017-08-07

    Small RNAs play a crucial role in genome defense against transposable elements and guide Argonaute proteins to nascent RNA transcripts to induce co-transcriptional gene silencing. However, the molecular basis of this process remains unknown. Here, we identify the conserved RNA helicase Aquarius/EMB-4 as a direct and essential link between small RNA pathways and the transcriptional machinery in Caenorhabditis elegans. Aquarius physically interacts with the germline Argonaute HRDE-1. Aquarius is required to initiate small-RNA-induced heritable gene silencing. HRDE-1 and Aquarius silence overlapping sets of genes and transposable elements. Surprisingly, removal of introns from a target gene abolishes the requirement for Aquarius, but not HRDE-1, for small RNA-dependent gene silencing. We conclude that Aquarius allows small RNA pathways to compete for access to nascent transcripts undergoing co-transcriptional splicing in order to detect and silence transposable elements. Thus, Aquarius and HRDE-1 act as gatekeepers coordinating gene expression and genome defense. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Transport pathways of solid lipid nanoparticles across Madin-Darby canine kidney epithelial cell monolayer.

    PubMed

    Chai, Gui-Hong; Hu, Fu-Qiang; Sun, Jihong; Du, Yong-Zhong; You, Jian; Yuan, Hong

    2014-10-06

    An understanding of drug delivery system transport across epithelial cell monolayer is very important for improving the absorption and bioavailability of the drug payload. The mechanisms of epithelial cell monolayer transport for various nanocarriers may differ significantly due to their variable components, surface properties, or diameter. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs), conventionally formed by lipid materials, have gained increasing attention in recent years due to their excellent biocompatibility and high oral bioavailability. However, there have been few reports about the mechanisms of SLNs transport across epithelial cell monolayer. In this study, the molecular mechanisms utilized by SLNs of approximately 100 nm in diameter crossing intestinal epithelial monolayer were carefully studied using a simulative intestinal epithelial monolayer formed by Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial cells. The results demonstrated that SLNs transportation did not induce a significant change on tight junction structure. We found that the endocytosis of SLNs into the epithelial cells was energy-dependent and was significantly greater than nanoparticle exocytosis. The endocytosis of SLNs was found to be rarely mediated via macropinocytosis, as confirmed by the addition of 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl)amiloride (EIPA) as an inhibitory agent, and mainly depended on lipid raft/caveolae- and clathrin-mediated pathways. After SLNs was internalized into MDCK cells, lysosome was one of the main destinations for these nanoparticles. The exocytosis study indicated that the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi complex, and microtubules played important roles in the transport of SLNs out of MDCK cells. The transcytosis study indicated that only approximately 2.5% of the total SLNs was transported from the apical side to the basolateral side. For SLNs transportation in MDCK cell monolayer, greater transport (approximately 4-fold) was observed to the apical side than to the basolateral side. Our

  18. Salicylic Acid Regulates Pollen Tip Growth through an NPR3/NPR4-Independent Pathway.

    PubMed

    Rong, Duoyan; Luo, Nan; Mollet, Jean Claude; Liu, Xuanming; Yang, Zhenbiao

    2016-11-07

    Tip growth is a common strategy for the rapid elongation of cells to forage the environment and/or to target to long-distance destinations. In the model tip growth system of Arabidopsis pollen tubes, several small-molecule hormones regulate their elongation, but how these rapidly diffusing molecules control extremely localized growth remains mysterious. Here we show that the interconvertible salicylic acid (SA) and methylated SA (MeSA), well characterized for their roles in plant defense, oppositely regulate Arabidopsis pollen tip growth with SA being inhibitory and MeSA stimulatory. The effect of SA and MeSA was independent of known NPR3/NPR4 SA receptor-mediated signaling pathways. SA inhibited clathrin-mediated endocytosis in pollen tubes associated with an increased accumulation of less stretchable demethylated pectin in the apical wall, whereas MeSA did the opposite. Furthermore, SA and MeSA alter the apical activation of ROP1 GTPase, a key regulator of tip growth in pollen tubes, in an opposite manner. Interestingly, both MeSA methylesterase and SA methyltransferase, which catalyze the interconversion between SA and MeSA, are localized at the apical region of pollen tubes, indicating of the tip-localized production of SA and MeSA and consistent with their effects on the apical cellular activities. These findings suggest that local generation of a highly diffusible signal can regulate polarized cell growth, providing a novel mechanism of cell polarity control apart from the one involving protein and mRNA polarization.

  19. Rabies Internalizes into Primary Peripheral Neurons via Clathrin Coated Pits and Requires Fusion at the Cell Body

    PubMed Central

    Piccinotti, Silvia; Whelan, Sean P. J.

    2016-01-01

    The single glycoprotein (G) of rabies virus (RABV) dictates all viral entry steps from receptor engagement to membrane fusion. To study the uptake of RABV into primary neuronal cells in culture, we generated a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus in which the G protein was replaced with that of the neurotropic RABV CVS-11 strain (rVSV CVS G). Using microfluidic compartmentalized culture, we examined the uptake of single virions into the termini of primary neurons of the dorsal root ganglion and ventral spinal cord. By pharmacologically disrupting endocytosis at the distal neurites, we demonstrate that rVSV CVS G uptake and infection are dependent on dynamin. Imaging of single virion uptake with fluorescent endocytic markers further identifies endocytosis via clathrin-coated pits as the predominant internalization mechanism. Transmission electron micrographs also reveal the presence of viral particles in vesicular structures consistent with incompletely coated clathrin pits. This work extends our previous findings of clathrin-mediated uptake of RABV into epithelial cells to two neuronal subtypes involved in rabies infection in vivo. Chemical perturbation of endosomal acidification in the neurite or somal compartment further shows that establishment of infection requires pH-dependent fusion of virions at the cell body. These findings correlate infectivity to existing single particle evidence of long-range endosomal transport of RABV and clathrin dependent uptake at the plasma membrane. PMID:27463226

  20. Genetic requirements for the single-strand annealing pathway of double-strand break repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, E.L.; Sugawara, N.; Haber, J.E.

    1996-03-01

    HO endonuclease-induced double-strand breaks (DSBs) within a direct duplication of Escherichia coli lacZ genes are repaired either by gene conversion or by single-strand annealing (SSA), with >80% being SSA. Previously it was demonstrated that the RAD52 gene is required for DSB-induced SSA. In the present study, the effects of other genes belonging to the RAD52 epistasis group were analyzed. We show that RAD51, RAD54, RAD55, and RAD57 genes are not required for SSA irrespective of whether recombination occurred in plasmid or chromosomal DNA. In both plasmid and chromosomal constructs with homologous sequences in direct orientation, the proportion of SSA events over gene conversion was significantly elevated in the mutant strains. However, gene conversion was not affected when the two lacZ sequences were in inverted orientation. These results suggest that there is a competition between SSA and gene conversion processes that favors SSA in the absence of RAD51, RAD54, RAD55 and RAD57. Mutations in RAD50 and XRS2 genes do not prevent the completion, but markedly retard the kinetics, of DSB repair by both mechanisms in the lacZ direct repeat plasmid, a result resembling the effects of these genes during mating-type (MAT) switching. 43 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Genetic Requirements for the Single-Strand Annealing Pathway of Double-Strand Break Repair in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, E. L.; Sugawara, N.; Fishman-Lobell, J.; Haber, J. E.

    1996-01-01

    HO endonuclease-induced double-strand breaks (DSBs) within a direct duplication of Escherichia coli lacZ genes are repaired either by gene conversion or by single-strand annealing (SSA), with >80% being SSA. Previously it was demonstrated that the RAD52 gene is required for DSB-induced SSA. In the present study, the effects of other genes belonging to the RAD52 epistasis group were analyzed. We show that RAD51, RAD54, RAD55, and RAD57 genes are not required for SSA irrespective of whether recombination occurred in plasmid or chromosomal DNA. In both plasmid and chromosomal constructs with homologous sequences in direct orientation, the proportion of SSA events over gene conversion was significantly elevated in the mutant strains. However, gene conversion was not affected when the two lacZ sequences were in inverted orientation. These results suggest that there is a competition between SSA and gene conversion processes that favors SSA in the absence of RAD51, RAD54, RAD55 and RAD57. Mutations in RAD50 and XRS2 genes do not prevent the completion, but markedly retard the kinetics, of DSB repair by both mechanisms in the lacZ direct repeat plasmid, a result resembling the effects of these genes during mating-type (MAT) switching. PMID:8849880

  2. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase is required for integrin-stimulated AKT and Raf-1/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway activation.

    PubMed Central

    King, W G; Mattaliano, M D; Chan, T O; Tsichlis, P N; Brugge, J S

    1997-01-01

    Cell attachment to fibronectin stimulates the integrin-dependent interaction of p85-associated phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase with integrin-dependent focal adhesion kinase (FAK) as well as activation of the Ras/mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway. However, it is not known if this PI 3-kinase-FAK interaction increases the synthesis of the 3-phosphorylated phosphoinositides (3-PPIs) or what role, if any, is played by activated PI 3-kinase in integrin signaling. We demonstrate here the integrin-dependent accumulation of the PI 3-kinase products, PI 3,4-bisphosphate [PI(3,4)P2] and PI(3,4,5)P3, as well as activation of AKT kinase, a serine/threonine kinase that can be stimulated by binding of PI(3,4)P2. The PI 3-kinase inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002 significantly decreased the integrin-induced accumulation of the 3-PPIs and activation of AKT kinase, without having significant effects on the levels of PI(4,5)P2 or tyrosine phosphorylation of paxillin. These inhibitors also reduced cell adhesion/spreading onto fibronectin but had no effect on attachment to polylysine. Interestingly, integrin-mediated Erk-2, Mek-1, and Raf-1 activation, but not Ras-GTP loading, was inhibited at least 80% by wortmannin and LY294002. In support of the pharmacologic results, fibronectin activation of Erk-2 and AKT kinases was completely inhibited by overexpression of a dominant interfering p85 subunit of PI 3-kinase. We conclude that integrin-mediated adhesion to fibronectin results in the accumulation of the PI 3-kinase products PI(3,4)P2 and PI(3,4,5)P3 as well as the PI 3-kinase-dependent activation of the kinases Raf-1, Mek-1, Erk-2, and AKT and that PI 3-kinase may function upstream of Raf-1 but downstream of Ras in integrin activation of Erk-2 MAP and AKT kinases. PMID:9234699

  3. A dominant-negative clathrin mutant differentially affects trafficking of molecules with distinct sorting motifs in the class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, S H; Marks, M S; Brodsky, F M

    1998-03-09

    The role of clathrin in intracellular sorting was investigated by expression of a dominant-negative mutant form of clathrin, termed the hub fragment. Hub inhibition of clathrin-mediated membrane transport was established by demonstrating a block of transferrin internalization and an alteration in the intracellular distribution of the cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate receptor. Hubs had no effect on uptake of FITC-dextran, adaptor distribution, organelle integrity in the secretory pathway, or cell surface expression of constitutively secreted molecules. Hub expression blocked lysosomal delivery of chimeric molecules containing either the tyrosine-based sorting signal of H2M or the dileucine-based sorting signal of CD3gamma, confirming a role for clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs) in recognizing these signals and sorting them to the endocytic pathway. Hub expression was then used to probe the role of CCVs in targeting native molecules bearing these sorting signals in the context of HLA-DM and the invariant chain (I chain) complexed to HLA-DR. The distribution of these molecules was differentially affected. Accumulation of hubs before expression of the DM dimer blocked DM export from the TGN, whereas hubs had no effect on direct targeting of the DR-I chain complex from the TGN to the endocytic pathway. However, concurrent expression of hubs, such that hubs were building to inhibitory concentrations during DM or DR-I chain expression, caused cell surface accumulation of both complexes. These observations suggest that both DM and DR-I chain are directly transported to the endocytic pathway from the TGN, DM in CCVs, and DR-I chain independent of CCVs. Subsequently, both complexes can appear at the cell surface from where they are both internalized by CCVs. Differential packaging in CCVs in the TGN, mediated by tyrosine- and dileucine-based sorting signals, could be a mechanism for functional segregation of DM from DR-I chain until their intended rendezvous in late

  4. The Mxi-Spa Type III Secretory Pathway of Shigella flexneri Requires an Outer Membrane Lipoprotein, MxiM, for Invasin Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Schuch, Raymond; Maurelli, Anthony T.

    1999-01-01

    Invasion of epithelial cells by Shigella flexneri is mediated by a set of translocated bacterial invasins, the Ipa proteins, and its dedicated type III secretion system, called Mxi-Spa. We show here that mxiM, part of the mxi-spa locus in the S. flexneri virulence plasmid, encodes an indispensable type III secretion apparatus component, required for both Ipa translocation and tissue culture cell invasion. We demonstrated that mature MxiM, first identified as a putative lipoprotein, is lipidated in vivo. Consistent with features of known lipoproteins, MxiM (i) can be labeled with [3H]palmitate and [2-3H]glycerol, (ii) is associated with the cell envelope, (iii) is secreted independently of the type III pathway, and (iv) requires an intact lipoprotein modification and processing site for full activity. The lipidated form of MxiM was detected primarily in the outer membrane, where it establishes a peripheral association with the inner leaflet. Through analysis of subcellular Ipa distribution in a mxiM null mutant background, MxiM was found to be required for the assembly and/or function of outer, but not inner, membrane regions of Mxi-Spa. This function probably requires interactions with other Mxi-Spa subunits within the periplasmic space. We discuss implications of these findings with respect to the function of MxiM and the structure of Mxi-Spa as a whole. PMID:10085046

  5. Activation of p38 and JNK MAPK pathways abrogates requirement for new protein synthesis for phorbol ester mediated induction of select MMP and TIMP genes.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, Clara L; Nuttall, Robert K; Young, David A; Goldspink, Deborah; Clark, Ian M; Edwards, Dylan R

    2008-03-01

    The human matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) gene family includes 24 genes whose regulated expression, together with that of four tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs), is essential in tissue remodelling and cell signalling. Quantitative real-time-PCR (qPCR) analysis was used to evaluate the shared and unique patterns of control of these two gene families in human MRC-5 and WI-38 fibroblasts in response to the protein kinase C (PKC) activator phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA). The requirement for ongoing translation was analysed using three protein synthesis inhibitors, anisomycin, cycloheximide and emetine. PMA induced MMP1, 3, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 14 and TIMP1 and TIMP3 RNAs after 4-8 h, and induction of all except MMP9 and TIMP3 was blocked by all protein synthesis inhibitors. However, even though all inhibitors effectively blocked translation, PMA-induction of MMP9 and TIMP3 was blocked by emetine but was insensitive to cycloheximide and anisomycin. Anisomycin alone induced MMP9 and TIMP3, along with MMP25 and MMP19. The extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs)-1/2 were strongly activated by PMA, while anisomycin activated the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 pathways, and cycloheximide activated p38, but emetine had no effect on the stress-activated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. The involvement of the p38 and JNK pathways in the selective effects of anisomycin and cycloheximide on MMP/TIMP expression was supported by use of pharmacological inhibitors. These data confirm that most inducible MMPs and TIMP1 behave as "late" activated, protein synthesis-dependent genes in fibroblasts. However, the requirement of protein synthesis for PMA-induction of MMPs and TIMPs is not universal, since it is abrogated for MMP9 and TIMP3 by stimulation of the stress-activated MAPK pathways. The definition of clusters of co-regulated genes among the two gene families will aid in bioinformatic dissection of control mechanisms.

  6. Neurodegeneration in C. elegans models of ALS requires TIR-1/Sarm1 immune pathway activation in neurons.

    PubMed

    Vérièpe, Julie; Fossouo, Lucresse; Parker, J Alex

    2015-06-10

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease thought to employ cell non-autonomous mechanisms where neuronal injury engages immune responses to influence disease progression. Here we show that the expression of mutant proteins causative for ALS in Caenorhabditis elegans motor neurons induces an innate immune response via TIR-1/Sarm1. Loss of function mutations in tir-1, associated downstream kinases, and the transcription factor atf-7 all suppress motor neuron degeneration. The neurosecretory proteins UNC-13 and UNC-31 are required for induction of the immune response as well as the degeneration of motor neurons. The human orthologue of UNC-13, UNC13A, has been identified as a genetic modifier of survival in ALS, and we provide functional evidence of UNC-13/UNC13A in regulating motor neuron degeneration. We propose that the innate immune system reacts to the presence of mutant proteins as a contagion, recruiting a pathogen resistance response that is ultimately harmful and drives progressive neurodegeneration.

  7. Aspergillus fumigatus Stimulates the NLRP3 Inflammasome through a Pathway Requiring ROS Production and the Syk Tyrosine Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Saïd-Sadier, Najwane; Padilla, Eduardo; Langsley, Gordon; Ojcius, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Invasive aspergillosis (IA) is a life-threatening disease that occurs in immunodepressed patients when infected with Aspergillus fumigatus. This fungus is the second most-common causative agent of fungal disease after Candida albicans. Nevertheless, much remains to be learned about the mechanisms by which A. fulmigatus activates the innate immune system. We investigated the inflammatory response to conidia and hyphae of A. fumigatus and specifically, their capacity to trigger activation of an inflammasome. Our results show that in contrast to conidia, hyphal fragments induce NLRP3 inflammasome assembly, caspase-1 activation and IL-1β release from a human monocyte cell line. The ability of Aspergillus hyphae to activate the NLRP3 inflammasome in the monocytes requires K+ efflux and ROS production. In addition, our data show that NLRP3 inflammasome activation as well as pro-IL-1β expression relies on the Syk tyrosine kinase, which is downstream from the pathogen recognition receptor Dectin-1, reinforcing the importance of Dectin-1 in the innate immune response against fungal infection. Furthermore, we show that treatment of monocytes with corticosteroids inhibits transcription of the gene encoding IL-1β. Thus, our data demonstrate that the innate immune response against A. fumigatus infection involves a two step activation process, with a first signal promoting expression and synthesis of pro-IL-1β; and a second signal, involving Syk-induced activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and caspase-1, allowing processing and secretion of the mature cytokine. PMID:20368800

  8. Requirement of ERα and basal activities of EGFR and Src kinase in Cd-induced activation of MAPK/ERK pathway in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Xiulong Wei, Zhengxi; Shaikh, Zahir A.

    2015-08-15

    Cadmium (Cd) is a common environmental toxicant and an established carcinogen. Epidemiological studies implicate Cd with human breast cancer. Low micromolar concentrations of Cd promote proliferation of human breast cancer cells in vitro. The growth promotion of breast cancer cells is associated with the activation of MAPK/ERK pathway. This study explores the mechanism of Cd-induced activation of MAPK/ERK pathway. Specifically, the role of cell surface receptors ERα, EGFR, and Src kinase was evaluated in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells treated with 1–3 μM Cd. The activation of ERK was studied using a serum response element (SRE) luciferase reporter assay. Receptor phosphorylation was detected by Western blot analyses. Cd treatment increased both the SRE reporter activity and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in a concentration-dependent manner. Cd treatment had no effect on reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Also, blocking the entry of Cd into the cells with manganese did not diminish Cd-induced activation of MAPK/ERK. These results suggest that the effect of Cd was likely not caused by intracellular ROS generation, but through interaction with the membrane receptors. While Cd did not appear to activate either EGFR or Src kinase, their inhibition completely blocked the Cd-induced activation of ERK as well as cell proliferation. Similarly, silencing ERα with siRNA or use of ERα antagonist blocked the effects of Cd. Based on these results, it is concluded that not only ERα, but also basal activities of EGFR and Src kinase are essential for Cd-induced signal transduction and activation of MAPK/ERK pathway for breast cancer cell proliferation. - Highlights: • Low micromolar concentrations of Cd rapidly activate ERK1/2 in MCF-7 cells. • Signal transduction and resulting cell proliferation require EGFR, ERα, and Src. • These findings implicate Cd in promotion of breast cancer.

  9. Crosstalk between Ca2+ signaling and mitochondrial H2O2 is required for rotenone inhibition of mTOR signaling pathway leading to neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunxiao; Ye, Yangjing; Zhou, Qian; Zhang, Ruijie; Zhang, Hai; Liu, Wen; Xu, Chong; Liu, Lei; Huang, Shile; Chen, Long

    2016-02-16

    Rotenone, a neurotoxic pesticide, induces loss of dopaminergic neurons related to Parkinson's disease. Previous studies have shown that rotenone induces neuronal apoptosis partly by triggering hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-dependent suppression of mTOR pathway. However, the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. Here, we show that rotenone elevates intracellular free calcium ion ([Ca2+]i) level, and activates CaMKII, resulting in inhibition of mTOR signaling and induction of neuronal apoptosis. Chelating [Ca2+]i with BAPTA/AM, preventing extracellular Ca2+ influx using EGTA, inhibiting CaMKII with KN93, or silencing CaMKII significantly attenuated rotenone-induced H2O2 production, mTOR inhibition, and cell death. Interestingly, using TTFA, antimycin A, catalase or Mito-TEMPO, we found that rotenone-induced mitochondrial H2O2 also in turn elevated [Ca2+]i level, thereby stimulating CaMKII, leading to inhibition of mTOR pathway and induction of neuronal apoptosis. Expression of wild type mTOR or constitutively active S6K1, or silencing 4E-BP1 strengthened the inhibitory effects of catalase, Mito-TEMPO, BAPTA/AM or EGTA on rotenone-induced [Ca2+]i elevation, CaMKII phosphorylation and neuronal apoptosis. Together, the results indicate that the crosstalk between Ca2+ signaling and mitochondrial H2O2 is required for rotenone inhibition of mTOR-mediated S6K1 and 4E-BP1 pathways. Our findings suggest that how to control over-elevation of intracellular Ca2+ and overproduction of mitochondrial H2O2 may be a new approach to deal with the neurotoxicity of rotenone.

  10. Crosstalk between Ca2+ signaling and mitochondrial H2O2 is required for rotenone inhibition of mTOR signaling pathway leading to neuronal apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qian; Zhang, Ruijie; Zhang, Hai; Liu, Wen; Xu, Chong; Liu, Lei; Huang, Shile; Chen, Long

    2016-01-01

    Rotenone, a neurotoxic pesticide, induces loss of dopaminergic neurons related to Parkinson's disease. Previous studies have shown that rotenone induces neuronal apoptosis partly by triggering hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-dependent suppression of mTOR pathway. However, the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. Here, we show that rotenone elevates intracellular free calcium ion ([Ca2+]i) level, and activates CaMKII, resulting in inhibition of mTOR signaling and induction of neuronal apoptosis. Chelating [Ca2+]i with BAPTA/AM, preventing extracellular Ca2+ influx using EGTA, inhibiting CaMKII with KN93, or silencing CaMKII significantly attenuated rotenone-induced H2O2 production, mTOR inhibition, and cell death. Interestingly, using TTFA, antimycin A, catalase or Mito-TEMPO, we found that rotenone-induced mitochondrial H2O2 also in turn elevated [Ca2+]i level, thereby stimulating CaMKII, leading to inhibition of mTOR pathway and induction of neuronal apoptosis. Expression of wild type mTOR or constitutively active S6K1, or silencing 4E-BP1 strengthened the inhibitory effects of catalase, Mito-TEMPO, BAPTA/AM or EGTA on rotenone-induced [Ca2+]i elevation, CaMKII phosphorylation and neuronal apoptosis. Together, the results indicate that the crosstalk between Ca2+ signaling and mitochondrial H2O2 is required for rotenone inhibition of mTOR-mediated S6K1 and 4E-BP1 pathways. Our findings suggest that how to control over-elevation of intracellular Ca2+ and overproduction of mitochondrial H2O2 may be a new approach to deal with the neurotoxicity of rotenone. PMID:26859572

  11. Fungal communication requires the MAK-2 pathway elements STE-20 and RAS-2, the NRC-1 adapter STE-50 and the MAP kinase scaffold HAM-5.

    PubMed

    Dettmann, Anne; Heilig, Yvonne; Valerius, Oliver; Ludwig, Sarah; Seiler, Stephan

    2014-11-01

    Intercellular communication is critical for the survival of unicellular organisms as well as for the development and function of multicellular tissues. Cell-to-cell signaling is also required to develop the interconnected mycelial network characteristic of filamentous fungi and is a prerequisite for symbiotic and pathogenic host colonization achieved by molds. Somatic cell-cell communication and subsequent cell fusion is governed by the MAK-2 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade in the filamentous ascomycete model Neurospora crassa, yet the composition and mode of regulation of the MAK-2 pathway are currently unclear. In order to identify additional components involved in MAK-2 signaling we performed affinity purification experiments coupled to mass spectrometry with strains expressing functional GFP-fusion proteins of the MAPK cascade. This approach identified STE-50 as a regulatory subunit of the Ste11p homolog NRC-1 and HAM-5 as cell-communication-specific scaffold protein of the MAPK cascade. Moreover, we defined a network of proteins consisting of two Ste20-related kinases, the small GTPase RAS-2 and the adenylate cyclase capping protein CAP-1 that function upstream of the MAK-2 pathway and whose signals converge on the NRC-1/STE-50 MAP3K complex and the HAM-5 scaffold. Finally, our data suggest an involvement of the striatin interacting phosphatase and kinase (STRIPAK) complex, the casein kinase 2 heterodimer, the phospholipid flippase modulators YPK-1 and NRC-2 and motor protein-dependent vesicle trafficking in the regulation of MAK-2 pathway activity and function. Taken together, these data will have significant implications for our mechanistic understanding of MAPK signaling and for homotypic cell-cell communication in fungi and higher eukaryotes.

  12. Coronavirus cell entry occurs through the endo-/lysosomal pathway in a proteolysis-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Burkard, Christine; Verheije, Monique H; Wicht, Oliver; van Kasteren, Sander I; van Kuppeveld, Frank J; Haagmans, Bart L; Pelkmans, Lucas; Rottier, Peter J M; Bosch, Berend Jan; de Haan, Cornelis A M

    2014-11-01

    Enveloped viruses need to fuse with a host cell membrane in order to deliver their genome into the host cell. While some viruses fuse with the plasma membrane, many viruses are endocytosed prior to fusion. Specific cues in the endosomal microenvironment induce conformational changes in the viral fusion proteins leading to viral and host membrane fusion. In the present study we investigated the entry of coronaviruses (CoVs). Using siRNA gene silencing, we found that proteins known to be important for late endosomal maturation and endosome-lysosome fusion profoundly promote infection of cells with mouse hepatitis coronavirus (MHV). Using recombinant MHVs expressing reporter genes as well as a novel, replication-independent fusion assay we confirmed the importance of clathrin-mediated endocytosis and demonstrated that trafficking of MHV to lysosomes is required for fusion and productive entry to occur. Nevertheless, MHV was shown to be less sensitive to perturbation of endosomal pH than vesicular stomatitis virus and influenza A virus, which fuse in early and late endosomes, respectively. Our results indicate that entry of MHV depends on proteolytic processing of its fusion protein S by lysosomal proteases. Fusion of MHV was severely inhibited by a pan-lysosomal protease inhibitor, while trafficking of MHV to lysosomes and processing by lysosomal proteases was no longer required when a furin cleavage site was introduced in the S protein immediately upstream of the fusion peptide. Also entry of feline CoV was shown to depend on trafficking to lysosomes and processing by lysosomal proteases. In contrast, MERS-CoV, which contains a minimal furin cleavage site just upstream of the fusion peptide, was negatively affected by inhibition of furin, but not of lysosomal proteases. We conclude that a proteolytic cleavage site in the CoV S protein directly upstream of the fusion peptide is an essential determinant of the intracellular site of fusion.

  13. Coronavirus Cell Entry Occurs through the Endo-/Lysosomal Pathway in a Proteolysis-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Burkard, Christine; Verheije, Monique H.; Wicht, Oliver; van Kasteren, Sander I.; van Kuppeveld, Frank J.; Haagmans, Bart L.; Pelkmans, Lucas; Rottier, Peter J. M.; Bosch, Berend Jan; de Haan, Cornelis A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Enveloped viruses need to fuse with a host cell membrane in order to deliver their genome into the host cell. While some viruses fuse with the plasma membrane, many viruses are endocytosed prior to fusion. Specific cues in the endosomal microenvironment induce conformational changes in the viral fusion proteins leading to viral and host membrane fusion. In the present study we investigated the entry of coronaviruses (CoVs). Using siRNA gene silencing, we found that proteins known to be important for late endosomal maturation and endosome-lysosome fusion profoundly promote infection of cells with mouse hepatitis coronavirus (MHV). Using recombinant MHVs expressing reporter genes as well as a novel, replication-independent fusion assay we confirmed the importance of clathrin-mediated endocytosis and demonstrated that trafficking of MHV to lysosomes is required for fusion and productive entry to occur. Nevertheless, MHV was shown to be less sensitive to perturbation of endosomal pH than vesicular stomatitis virus and influenza A virus, which fuse in early and late endosomes, respectively. Our results indicate that entry of MHV depends on proteolytic processing of its fusion protein S by lysosomal proteases. Fusion of MHV was severely inhibited by a pan-lysosomal protease inhibitor, while trafficking of MHV to lysosomes and processing by lysosomal proteases was no longer required when a furin cleavage site was introduced in the S protein immediately upstream of the fusion peptide. Also entry of feline CoV was shown to depend on trafficking to lysosomes and processing by lysosomal proteases. In contrast, MERS-CoV, which contains a minimal furin cleavage site just upstream of the fusion peptide, was negatively affected by inhibition of furin, but not of lysosomal proteases. We conclude that a proteolytic cleavage site in the CoV S protein directly upstream of the fusion peptide is an essential determinant of the intracellular site of fusion. PMID:25375324

  14. Requirement of neuronal connexin36 in pathways mediating presynaptic inhibition of primary afferents in functionally mature mouse spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Bautista, Wendy; Nagy, James I; Dai, Yue; McCrea, David A

    2012-01-01

    Electrical synapses formed by gap junctions containing connexin36 (Cx36) promote synchronous activity of interneurones in many regions of mammalian brain; however, there is limited information on the role of electrical synapses in spinal neuronal networks. Here we show that Cx36 is widely distributed in the spinal cord and is involved in mechanisms that govern presynaptic inhibition of primary afferent terminals. Electrophysiological recordings were made in spinal cord preparations from 8- to 11-day-old wild-type and Cx36 knockout mice. Several features associated with presynaptic inhibition evoked by conditioning stimulation of low threshold hindlimb afferents were substantially compromised in Cx36 knockout mice. Dorsal root potentials (DRPs) evoked by low intensity stimulation of sensory afferents were reduced in amplitude by 79% and in duration by 67% in Cx36 knockouts. DRPs were similarly affected in wild-types by bath application of gap junction blockers. Consistent with presynaptic inhibition of group Ia muscle spindle afferent terminals on motoneurones described in adult cats, conditioning stimulation of an adjacent dorsal root evoked a long duration inhibition of monosynaptic reflexes recorded from the ventral root in wild-type mice, and this inhibition was antagonized by bicuculline. The same conditioning stimulation failed to inhibit monosynaptic reflexes in Cx36 knockout mice. Immunofluorescence labelling for Cx36 was found throughout the dorsal and ventral horns of the spinal cord of juvenile mice and persisted in mature animals. In deep dorsal horn laminae, where interneurones involved in presynaptic inhibition of large diameter muscle afferents are located, cells were extensively dye-coupled following intracellular neurobiotin injection. Coupled cells displayed Cx36-positive puncta along their processes. Our results indicate that gap junctions formed by Cx36 in spinal cord are required for maintenance of presynaptic inhibition, including the

  15. Molecular signalling pathways in the cerebral cortex are required for retrieval of one-trial avoidance learning in rats.

    PubMed

    Barros, D M; Izquierdo, L A; Mello e Souza, T; Ardenghi, P G; Pereira, P; Medina, J H; Izquierdo, I

    2000-09-01

    Rats were implanted bilaterally with cannulae in the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus, the entorhinal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, posterior parietal cortex, or the basolateral complex of the amygdala. The animals were trained in one-trial step-down inhibitory avoidance and tested 24 h later. Prior (10 min) to the retention test, through the cannulae, they received 0.5 microl infusions of a vehicle (2% dimethylsulfoxide in saline), or of the following drugs dissolved in the vehicle: the glutamate NMDA receptor blocker, aminophosphonopentanoic acid (AP5, 2.0 or 5.0 microg), the AMPA receptor blocker, 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3 (1H,4H)dione (DNQX, 0.4 or 1.0 microg), the metabotropic receptor antagonist, methylcarboxyphenylglycine (MCPG, 0.5 or 2.5 microg), the inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), Rp-cAMPs (0.1 or 0.5 microg), the PKA stimulant, Sp-cAMPs (0.5 microg), or the inhibitor of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), PD098059 (10 or 50 microM). All these drugs, at the same doses, had been previously found to alter long-term memory formation of this task. Here, retrieval test performance was blocked by DNQX, MCPG, Rp-cAMPs and PD098059 and enhanced by Sp-cAMPs infused into CA1 or the entorhinal cortex. The drugs had similar effects when infused into the parietal or anterior cingulate cortex, except that in these two areas AP5 also blocked retrieval, and in the cingulate cortex DNQX had no effect. Infusions into the basolateral amygdala were ineffective except for DNQX, which hindered retrieval. None of the treatments that affected retrieval had any influence on performance in an open field or in a plus maze; therefore, their effect on retention testing can not be attributed to an influence on locomotion, exploration or anxiety. The results indicate that the four cortical regions studied participate actively in, and are necessary for, retrieval of the one-trial avoidance task. They require metabotropic and/or NMDA glutamate

  16. Bud detachment in hydra requires activation of fibroblast growth factor receptor and a Rho–ROCK–myosin II signaling pathway to ensure formation of a basal constriction

    PubMed Central

    Holz, Oliver; Apel, David; Steinmetz, Patrick; Lange, Ellen; Hopfenmüller, Simon; Ohler, Kerstin; Sudhop, Stefanie

    2017-01-01

    Background: Hydra propagates asexually by exporting tissue into a bud, which detaches 4 days later as a fully differentiated young polyp. Prerequisite for detachment is activation of fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) signaling. The mechanism which enables constriction and tissue separation within the monolayered ecto‐ and endodermal epithelia is unknown. Results: Histological sections and staining of F‐actin by phalloidin revealed conspicuous cell shape changes at the bud detachment site indicating a localized generation of mechanical forces and the potential enhancement of secretory functions in ectodermal cells. By gene expression analysis and pharmacological inhibition, we identified a candidate signaling pathway through Rho, ROCK, and myosin II, which controls bud base constriction and rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton. Specific regional myosin phosphorylation suggests a crucial role of ectodermal cells at the detachment site. Inhibition of FGFR, Rho, ROCK, or myosin II kinase activity is permissive for budding, but represses myosin phosphorylation, rearrangement of F‐actin and constriction. The young polyp remains permanently connected to the parent by a broad tissue bridge. Conclusions: Our data suggest an essential role of FGFR and a Rho‐ROCK‐myosin II pathway in the control of cell shape changes required for bud detachment. Developmental Dynamics 246:502–516, 2017. © 2017 The Authors Developmental Dynamics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Anatomists PMID:28411398

  17. The fungal α-aminoadipate pathway for lysine biosynthesis requires two enzymes of the aconitase family for the isomerization of homocitrate to homoisocitrate

    PubMed Central

    Fazius, Felicitas; Shelest, Ekaterina; Gebhardt, Peter; Brock, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Fungi produce α-aminoadipate, a precursor for penicillin and lysine via the α-aminoadipate pathway. Despite the biotechnological importance of this pathway, the essential isomerization of homocitrate via homoaconitate to homoisocitrate has hardly been studied. Therefore, we analysed the role of homoaconitases and aconitases in this isomerization. Although we confirmed an essential contribution of homoaconitases from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aspergillus fumigatus, these enzymes only catalysed the interconversion between homoaconitate and homoisocitrate. In contrast, aconitases from fungi and the thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus converted homocitrate to homoaconitate. Additionally, a single aconitase appears essential for energy metabolism, glutamate and lysine biosynthesis in respirating filamentous fungi, but not in the fermenting yeast S. cerevisiae that possesses two contributing aconitases. While yeast Aco1p is essential for the citric acid cycle and, thus, for glutamate synthesis, Aco2p specifically and exclusively contributes to lysine biosynthesis. In contrast, Aco2p homologues present in filamentous fungi were transcribed, but enzymatically inactive, revealed no altered phenotype when deleted and did not complement yeast aconitase mutants. From these results we conclude that the essential requirement of filamentous fungi for respiration versus the preference of yeasts for fermentation may have directed the evolution of aconitases contributing to energy metabolism and lysine biosynthesis. PMID:23106124

  18. Cell wall integrity and high osmolarity glycerol pathways are required for adaptation of Alternaria brassicicola to cell wall stress caused by brassicaceous indolic phytoalexins.

    PubMed

    Joubert, Aymeric; Bataille-Simoneau, Nelly; Campion, Claire; Guillemette, Thomas; Hudhomme, Piétrick; Iacomi-Vasilescu, Béatrice; Leroy, Thibault; Pochon, Stéphanie; Poupard, Pascal; Simoneau, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Camalexin, the characteristic phytoalexin of Arabidopsis thaliana, inhibits growth of the fungal necrotroph Alternaria brassicicola. This plant metabolite probably exerts its antifungal toxicity by causing cell membrane damage. Here we observed that activation of a cellular response to this damage requires cell wall integrity (CWI) and the high osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathways. Camalexin was found to activate both AbHog1 and AbSlt2 MAP kinases, and activation of the latter was abrogated in a AbHog1 deficient strain. Mutant strains lacking functional MAP kinases showed hypersensitivity to camalexin and brassinin, a structurally related phytoalexin produced by several cultivated Brassica species. Enhanced susceptibility to the membrane permeabilization activity of camalexin was observed for MAP kinase deficient mutants. These results suggest that the two signalling pathways have a pivotal role in regulating a cellular compensatory response to preserve cell integrity during exposure to camalexin. AbHog1 and AbSlt2 deficient mutants had reduced virulence on host plants that may, at least for the latter mutants, partially result from their inability to cope with defence metabolites such as indolic phytoalexins. This constitutes the first evidence that a phytoalexin activates fungal MAP kinases and that outputs of activated cascades contribute to protecting the fungus against antimicrobial plant metabolites. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Anteroposterior patterning of Drosophila ocelli requires an anti-repressor mechanism within the hh pathway mediated by the Six3 gene Optix.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Cejudo, Maria A; Casares, Fernando

    2015-08-15

    In addition to compound eyes, most insects possess a set of three dorsal ocelli that develop at the vertices of a triangular cuticle patch, forming the ocellar complex. The wingless and hedgehog signaling pathways, together with the transcription factor encoded by orthodenticle, are known to play major roles in the specification and patterning of the ocellar complex. Specifically, hedgehog is responsible for the choice between ocellus and cuticle fates within the ocellar complex primordium. However, the interactions between signals and transcription factors known to date do not fully explain how this choice is controlled. We show that this binary choice depends on dynamic changes in the domains of hedgehog signaling. In this dynamics, the restricted expression of engrailed, a hedgehog signaling target, is key because it defines a domain within the complex where hedgehog transcription is maintained while the pathway activity is blocked. We further show that the Drosophila Six3, optix, is expressed in and required for the development of the anterior ocellus specifically, limiting the ocellar expression domain of en. This finding confirms previous genetic evidence that the spatial allocation of the primordia of anterior and posterior ocelli is differentially regulated, which may apply to the patterning of the insect head in general.

  20. P53 is required for Doxorubicin-induced apoptosis via the TGF-beta signaling pathway in osteosarcoma-derived cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yifu; Xia, Peng; Zhang, Haipeng; Liu, Biao; Shi, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common type of aggressive bone cancer. Current treatment strategies include surgical resection, radiation, and chemotherapy. Doxorubicin has been widely used as a chemotherapeutic drug to treat osteosarcoma. However, drug resistance has become a challenge to its use. In this study, p53-wild type U2OS and p53-null MG-63 osteosarcoma-derived cells were used to investigate the mechanism of doxorubicin-induced cytotoxicity. In cell viability assays, doxorubicin effectively induced apoptosis in U2OS cells via the p53 signaling pathway, evidenced by elevated PUMA and p21 protein levels and activated caspase 3 cleavage. In contrast, p53-null MG-63 cells were resistant to doxorubicin-induced apoptosis, while exogenous expression of p53 increased drug sensitivity in those cells. The role of TGF-β/Smad3 signaling was investigated by using TGF-β reporter luciferase assays. Doxorubicin was able to induce TGF-β signal transduction without increasing TGF-β production in the presence of p53. Knockdown of Smad3 expression by small hairpin RNA (shRNA) showed that Smad3 was required for p53-mediated TGF-β signaling in response to doxorubicin treatment in U2OS and MG-63 cells. Taken together, these data demonstrate that p53 and TGF-β/Smad3 signaling pathways are both essential for doxorubicin-induced cytotoxicity in osteosarcoma cells. PMID:27073729

  1. Caenorhabditis elegans mom-4 is required for the activation of the p38 MAPK signaling pathway in the response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ajing; Shi, Guojun; Liu, Feng; Ge, Baoxue

    2013-01-01

    The p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) plays an evolutionarily conserved role in the cellular response to microbial infection and environmental stress. Activation of p38 is mediated through phosphorylation by upstream MAPKK, which in turn is activated by MAPKKK. In the Caenorhabditis elegans, the p38 MAPK (also called PMK-1) signaling pathway has been shown to be required in its resistance to bacterial infection. However, how different upstream MAP2Ks and MAP3Ks specifically contribute to the activation of PMK-1 in response to bacterial infection still is not clearly understood. By using double-stranded RNA-mediated interference (RNAi) and genetic mutants of C. elegans, we demonstrate that C. elegans MOM-4, a mammalian TAK1 homolog, is required for the resistance of C. elegans to a P. aeruginosa infection. We have also found that the MKK-4 of C. elegans is required for P. aeruginosa resistance, but not through the regulation of DLK-1. In summary, our results indicate that different upstream MAPKKKs or MAPKKs regulate the activation of PMK-1 in response to P. Aeruginosa.

  2. The alternative end-joining pathway for repair of DNA double-strand breaks requires PARP1 but is not dependent upon microhomologies

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Wael Y.; Rhein, Tim

    2010-01-01

    Non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), the major repair pathway for DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in mammalian cells, employs a repertoire of core proteins, the recruitment of which to DSB-ends is Ku-dependent. Lack of either of the core components invariably leads to a repair deficiency. There has been evidence that an alternative end-joining operates in the absence of the core components. We used chromosomal reporter substrates to specifically monitor NHEJ of single I-SceI-induced-DSB for detailed comparison of classical and alternative end-joining. We show that rapid repair of both compatible and non-compatible ends require Ku-protein. In the absence of Ku, cells use a slow but efficient repair mode which experiences increasing sequence-loss with time after DSB induction. Chemical inhibition and PARP1-depletion demonstrated that the alternative end-joining in vivo is completely dependent upon functional PARP1. Furthermore, we show that the requirement for PARP1 depends on the absence of Ku but not on DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs). Extensive sequencing of repair junctions revealed that the alternative rejoining does not require long microhomologies. Together, we show that mammalian cells need Ku for rapid and conservative NHEJ. PARP1-dependent alternative route may partially rescue the deficient repair phenotype presumably at the expense of an enhanced mutation rate. PMID:20483915

  3. Transcriptional Gene Silencing Maintained by OTS1 SUMO Protease Requires a DNA-Dependent Polymerase V-Dependent Pathway1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lei; Yan, Xiaojing; Zhao, Yiqiang

    2017-01-01

    The expression of genes with aberrant structure is prevented at both the transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation levels. Aberrant gene silencing at the posttranscriptional level is well studied; however, it is not well understood how aberrant genes are silenced at the transcriptional level. In this study, through genetic screening a transgenic report line that harbors an aberrant gene (35S-LUC, lacking 3′-untranslated region [3′-UTR]) and lacks luciferase (LUC) activity, we identify that the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) protease OTS1 gene is required for maintaining the silence of the reporter 35S-LUC and an endogenous mutator-like element MULE-F19G14 at the transcriptional level, which requires DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (Pol) V and DDR complex, but not Pol IV. The increased transcripts in ots1 mutants are terminated by the 3′-UTRs of downstream genes. In addition to ots1 mutations, mutations in several known or putative SUMO proteases and two SUMO E3 ligases, SIZ1 and MMS21, have similar effects on this silencing regulation. Taken together, our results reveal that the enzymes involved in the SUMOylation process restrain aberrant gene transcription by using a downstream gene 3′-UTR, and this regulation requires a functional Pol V-dependent pathway in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). PMID:27852949

  4. The inhibition of the apoptosis pathway by the Coxiella burnetii effector protein CaeA requires the EK repetition motif, but is independent of survivin

    PubMed Central

    Bisle, Stephanie; Klingenbeck, Leonie; Borges, Vítor; Sobotta, Katharina; Schulze-Luehrmann, Jan; Menge, Christian; Heydel, Carsten; Gomes, João Paulo; Lührmann, Anja

    2016-01-01

    ABSRTACT Coxiella burnetii is an obligate intracellular bacterium that causes Query (Q) fever, a zoonotic disease. It requires a functional type IV secretion system (T4SS) which translocate bacterial effector proteins into the host cell cytoplasm and thereby facilitates bacterial replication. To date, more than 130 effector proteins have been identified, but their functions remain largely unknown. Recently, we demonstrated that one of these proteins, CaeA (CBU1524) localized to the host cell nucleus and inhibited intrinsic apoptosis of HEK293 or CHO cells. In the present study we addressed the question whether CaeA also affects the extrinsic apoptosis pathway. Ectopic expression of CaeA reduced extrinsic apoptosis and prevented the cleavage of the executioner caspase 7, but did not impair the activation of initiator caspase 9. CaeA expression resulted in an up-regulation of survivin (an inhibitor of activated caspases), which, however, was not causal for the anti-apoptotic effect of CaeA. Comparing the sequence of CaeA from 25 different C. burnetii isolates we identified an EK (glutamic acid/ lysine) repetition motif as a site of high genetic variability. The EK motif of CaeA was essential for the anti-apoptotic activity of CaeA. From these data, we conclude that the C. burnetii effector protein CaeA interferes with the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis pathway. The process requires the EK repetition motif of CaeA, but is independent of the upregulated expression of survivin. PMID:26760129

  5. The requirement for recombination factors differs considerably between different pathways of homologous double-strand break repair in somatic plant cells.

    PubMed

    Roth, Nadine; Klimesch, Jacqueline; Dukowic-Schulze, Stefanie; Pacher, Michael; Mannuss, Anja; Puchta, Holger

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, multiple factors involved in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair have been characterised in Arabidopsis thaliana. Using homologous sequences in somatic cells, DSBs are mainly repaired by two different pathways: synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA) and single-strand annealing (SSA). By applying recombination substrates in which recombination is initiated by the induction of a site-specific DSB by the homing endonuclease I-SceI, we were able to characterise the involvement of different factors in both pathways. The nucleases MRE11 and COM1, both involved in DSB end processing, were not required for either SDSA or SSA in our assay system. Both SDSA and SSA were even more efficient without MRE11, in accordance with the fact that a loss of MRE11 might negatively affect the efficiency of non-homologous end joining. Loss of the classical recombinase RAD51 or its two paralogues RAD51C and XRCC3, as well as the SWI2/SNF2 remodelling factor RAD54, resulted in a drastic deficiency in SDSA but had hardly any influence on SSA, confirming that a strand exchange reaction is only required for SDSA. The helicase FANCM, which is postulated to be involved in the stabilisation of recombination intermediates, is surprisingly not only needed for SDSA but to a lesser extent also for SSA. Both SSA and SDSA were affected only weakly when the SMC6B protein, implicated in sister chromatid recombination, was absent, indicating that SSA and SDSA are in most cases intrachromatid recombination reactions.

  6. The Erk MAP kinase pathway is activated at muscle spindles and is required for induction of the muscle spindle-specific gene Egr3 by neuregulin1.

    PubMed

    Herndon, Carter A; Ankenbruck, Nick; Fromm, Larry

    2014-02-01

    Muscle spindles are sensory receptors composed of specialized muscle fibers, known as intrafusal muscle fibers, along with the endings of sensory neuron axons that innervate these muscle fibers. Formation of muscle spindles requires neuregulin1 (NRG1), which is released by sensory axons, activating ErbB receptors in muscle cells that are contacted. The transcription factor Egr3 is transcriptionally induced by NRG1, which in turn activates various target genes involved in forming intrafusal fibers. We have previously shown that, in cultured muscle cells, NRG1 signaling activates the Egr3 gene through SRF and CREB, which bind to a composite regulatory element, and that NRG1 signaling targets SRF by stimulating nuclear translocation of SRF coactivators myocardin-related transcription factor (MRTF)-A and MRTF-B and targets CREB by phosphorylation. The current studies examined signaling relays that might function in the NRG1 pathway upstream of SRF and CREB. We found that transcriptional induction of Egr3 in response to NRG1 requires the MAP kinase Erk1/2, which acts upstream of CREB to induce its phosphorylation. MRTFs are targeted by the Rho-actin pathway, yet in the absence of Rho-actin signaling, even though MRTFs fail to be translocated to the nucleus, NRG1 induces Egr3 transcription. In mouse muscle in vivo, activation of Erk1/2 is enhanced selectively where muscle spindles are located. These results suggest that Erk1/2 acts in intrafusal fibers of muscle spindles to induce transcription of Egr3 and that Egr3 induction occurs independently of MRTFs and involves Erk1/2 acting on other transcriptional regulatory targets that interact with the SRF-CREB regulatory element. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Functional and Structural Characterization of Polysaccharide Co-polymerase Proteins Required for Polymer Export in ATP-binding Cassette Transporter-dependent Capsule Biosynthesis Pathways*

    PubMed Central

    Larue, Kane; Ford, Robert C.; Willis, Lisa M.; Whitfield, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B and Escherichia coli K1 bacteria produce a capsular polysaccharide (CPS) that is composed of α2,8-linked polysialic acid (PSA). Biosynthesis of PSA in these bacteria occurs via an ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporter-dependent pathway. In N. meningitidis, export of PSA to the surface of the bacterium requires two proteins that form an ABC transporter (CtrC and CtrD) and two additional proteins, CtrA and CtrB, that are proposed to form a cell envelope-spanning export complex. CtrA is a member of the outer membrane polysaccharide export (OPX) family of proteins, which are proposed to form a pore to mediate export of CPSs across the outer membrane. CtrB is an inner membrane protein belonging to the polysaccharide co-polymerase (PCP) family. PCP proteins involved in other bacterial polysaccharide assembly systems form structures that extend into the periplasm from the inner membrane. There is currently no structural information available for PCP or OPX proteins involved in an ABC transporter-dependent CPS biosynthesis pathway to support their proposed roles in polysaccharide export. Here, we report cryo-EM images of purified CtrB reconstituted into lipid bilayers. These images contained molecular top and side views of CtrB and showed that it formed a conical oligomer that extended ∼125 Å from the membrane. This structure is consistent with CtrB functioning as a component of an envelope-spanning complex. Cross-complementation of CtrA and CtrB in E. coli mutants with defects in genes encoding the corresponding PCP and OPX proteins show that PCP-OPX pairs require interactions with their cognate partners to export polysaccharide. These experiments add further support for the model of an ABC transporter-PCP-OPX multiprotein complex that functions to export CPS across the cell envelope. PMID:21454677

  8. Assembly of the archaeal box C/D sRNP can occur via alternative pathways and requires temperature-facilitated sRNA remodeling.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Keith T; Zhang, Xinxin; Agris, Paul F; Maxwell, E Stuart

    2006-10-06

    Archaeal dual-guide box C/D small nucleolar RNA-like RNAs (sRNAs) bind three core proteins in sequential order at both terminal box C/D and internal C'/D' motifs to assemble two ribonuclear protein (RNP) complexes active in guiding nucleotide methylation. Experiments have investigated the process of box C/D sRNP assembly and the resultant changes in sRNA structure or "remodeling" as a consequence of sRNP core protein binding. Hierarchical assembly of the Methanocaldococcus jannaschii sR8 box C/D sRNP is a temperature-dependent process with binding of L7 and Nop56/58 core proteins to the sRNA requiring elevated temperature to facilitate necessary RNA structural dynamics. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and RNA thermal denaturation revealed an increased order and stability of sRNA folded structure as a result of L7 binding. Subsequent binding of the Nop56/58 and fibrillarin core proteins to the L7-sRNA complex further remodeled sRNA structure. Assessment of sR8 guide region accessibility using complementary RNA oligonucleotide probes revealed significant changes in guide region structure during sRNP assembly. A second dual-guide box C/D sRNA from M. jannaschii, sR6, also exhibited RNA remodeling during temperature-dependent sRNP assembly, although core protein binding was affected by sR6's distinct folded structure. Interestingly, the sR6 sRNP followed an alternative assembly pathway, with both guide regions being continuously exposed during sRNP assembly. Further experiments using sR8 mutants possessing alternative guide regions demonstrated that sRNA folded structure induced by specific guide sequences impacted the sRNP assembly pathway. Nevertheless, assembled sRNPs were active for sRNA-guided methylation independent of the pathway followed. Thus, RNA remodeling appears to be a common and requisite feature of archaeal dual-guide box C/D sRNP assembly and formation of the mature sRNP can follow different assembly pathways in generating catalytically active

  9. WSC-1 and HAM-7 Are MAK-1 MAP Kinase Pathway Sensors Required for Cell Wall Integrity and Hyphal Fusion in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Ci; Seiler, Stephan; Free, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    A large number of cell wall proteins are encoded in the Neurospora crassa genome. Strains carrying gene deletions of 65 predicted cell wall proteins were characterized. Deletion mutations in two of these genes (wsc-1 and ham-7) have easily identified morphological and inhibitor-based defects. Their phenotypic characterization indicates that HAM-7 and WSC-1 function during cell-to-cell hyphal fusion and in cell wall integrity maintenance, respectively. wsc-1 encodes a transmembrane protein with extensive homology to the yeast Wsc family of sensor proteins. In N. crassa, WSC-1 (and its homolog WSC-2) activates the cell wall integrity MAK-1 MAP kinase pathway. The GPI-anchored cell wall protein HAM-7 is required for cell-to-cell fusion and the sexual stages of the N. crassa life cycle. Like WSC-1, HAM-7 is required for activating MAK-1. A Δwsc-1;Δham-7 double mutant fully phenocopies mutants lacking components of the MAK-1 MAP kinase cascade. The data identify WSC-1 and HAM-7 as the major cell wall sensors that regulate two distinct MAK-1-dependent cellular activities, cell wall integrity and hyphal anastomosis, respectively. PMID:22879952

  10. Identification of novel virulence genes and metabolic pathways required for full fitness of Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi in olive (Olea europaea) knots.

    PubMed

    Matas, Isabel M; Lambertsen, Lotte; Rodríguez-Moreno, Luis; Ramos, Cayo

    2012-12-01

    Comparative genomics and functional analysis of Pseudomonas syringae and related pathogens have mainly focused on diseases of herbaceous plants; however, there is a general lack of knowledge about the virulence and pathogenicity determinants required for infection of woody plants. Here, we applied signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) to Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi during colonization of olive (Olea europaea) knots, with the goal of identifying the range of genes linked to growth and symptom production in its plant host. A total of 58 different genes were identified, and most mutations resulted in hypovirulence in woody olive plants. Sequence analysis of STM mutations allowed us to identify metabolic pathways required for full fitness of P. savastanoi in olive and revealed novel mechanisms involved in the virulence of this pathogen, some of which are essential for full colonization of olive knots by the pathogen and for the lysis of host cells. This first application of STM to a P. syringae-like pathogen provides confirmation of functional capabilities long believed to play a role in the survival and virulence of this group of pathogens but not adequately tested before, and unravels novel factors not correlated previously with the virulence of other plant or animal bacterial pathogens. © 2012 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  11. Oligoadenylate synthetase/protein kinase R pathways and alphabeta TCR+ T cells are required for adenovirus vector: IFN-gamma inhibition of herpes simplex virus-1 in cornea.

    PubMed

    Austin, Bobbie Ann; Halford, William P; Williams, Bryan R G; Carr, Daniel J J

    2007-04-15

    An adenoviral (Ad) vector containing the murine IFN-gamma transgene (Ad:IFN-gamma) was evaluated for its capacity to inhibit HSV-1. To measure effectiveness, viral titers were analyzed in cornea and trigeminal ganglia (TG) during acute ocular HSV-1 infection. Ad:IFN-gamma potently suppressed HSV-1 replication in a dose-dependent fashion, requiring IFN-gamma receptor. Moreover, Ad:IFN-gamma was effective when delivered -72 and -24 h before infection as well as 24 h postinfection. Associated with antiviral opposition, TG from Ad:IFN-gamma-transduced mice harbored fewer T cells. Also related to T cell involvement, Ad:IFN-gamma was effective but attenuated in TG from alphabeta TCR-deficient mice. In corneas, alphabeta TCR(+) T cells were obligatory for protection against viral multiplication. Type I IFN involvement amid antiviral efficacy of Ad:IFN-gamma was further investigated because types I and II IFN pathways have synergistic anti-HSV-1 activity. Ad:IFN-gamma inhibited viral reproduction in corneas and TG from alphabeta IFNR-deficient (CD118(-/-)) mice, although viral titers were 2- to 3-fold higher in cornea and TG compared with wild-type mice. The absence of IFN-stimulated antiviral proteins, 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase/RNase L, and dsRNA-dependent protein kinase R completely eliminated the antiviral effectiveness of Ad:IFN-gamma. Collectively, the results demonstrate the following: 1) nonexistence of type I IFN receptor does not abolish defense of Ad:IFN-gamma against HSV-1; 2) antiviral pathways oligoadenylate synthetase-RNase L and protein kinase R are mandatory; and 3) alphabeta TCR(+) T cells are compulsory for Ad:IFN-gamma effectiveness against HSV-1 in cornea but not in TG.

  12. Epigallocatechin gallate, a green tea polyphenol, mediates NO-dependent vasodilation using signaling pathways in vascular endothelium requiring reactive oxygen species and Fyn.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-A; Formoso, Gloria; Li, Yunhua; Potenza, Maria A; Marasciulo, Flora L; Montagnani, Monica; Quon, Michael J

    2007-05-04

    Green tea consumption is associated with reduced cardiovascular mortality in some epidemiological studies. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a bioactive polyphenol in green tea, mimics metabolic actions of insulin to inhibit gluconeogenesis in hepatocytes. Because signaling pathways regulating metabolic and vasodilator actions of insulin are shared in common, we hypothesized that EGCG may also have vasodilator actions to stimulate production of nitric oxide (NO) from endothelial cells. Acute intra-arterial administration of EGCG to mesenteric vascular beds isolated ex vivo from WKY rats caused dose-dependent vasorelaxation. This was inhibitable by L-NAME (NO synthase inhibitor), wortmannin (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor), or PP2 (Src family kinase inhibitor). Treatment of bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) with EGCG (50 microm) acutely stimulated production of NO (assessed with NO-specific fluorescent dye DAF-2) that was inhibitable by l-NAME, wortmannin, or PP2. Stimulation of BAEC with EGCG also resulted in dose- and time-dependent phosphorylation of eNOS that was inhibitable by wortmannin or PP2 (but not by MEK inhibitor PD98059). Specific knockdown of Fyn (but not Src) with small interfering RNA inhibited both EGCG-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS as well as production of NO in BAEC. Treatment of BAEC with EGCG generated intracellular H(2)O(2) (assessed with H(2)O(2)-specific fluorescent dye CM-H(2)DCF-DA), whereas treatment with N-acetylcysteine inhibited EGCG-stimulated phosphorylation of Fyn, Akt, and eNOS. We conclude that EGCG has endothelial-dependent vasodilator actions mediated by intracellular signaling pathways requiring reactive oxygen species and Fyn that lead to activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, Akt, and eNOS. This mechanism may explain, in part, beneficial vascular and metabolic health effects of green tea consumption.

  13. OAS/PKR Pathways and α/β TCR+ T Cells are Required for Ad: IFN-γ Inhibition of HSV-1 in Cornea1

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Bobbie Ann; Halford, William P.; Williams, Bryan R. G.; Carr, Daniel J. J.

    2007-01-01

    An adenoviral vector containing the muIFN-γ transgene (Ad:IFN-γ) was evaluated for its capacity to inhibit HSV-1. To measure effectiveness, viral titers were analyzed in cornea and trigeminal ganglia (TG) during acute ocular HSV-1 infection. Ad: IFN-γ potently suppressed HSV-1 replication in a dose-dependent fashion, requiring IFN-γ R. Moreover, Ad:IFN-γ was effective when delivered -72 and -24 h prior to infection as well as 24 h post infection. Associated with anti-viral opposition, TG from Ad: IFN-γ transduced mice harbored fewer T cells. Also related to T cell involvement, Ad:IFN-γ was effective but attenuated in TG from α/β TCR deficient mice. In corneas, α/β TCR+ T cells were obligatory for protection against viral multiplication. Type I IFN involvement amid anti-viral efficacy of Ad: IFN-γ was further investigated because type I and II IFN pathways have synergistic anti-HSV-1 activity. Ad:IFN-γ inhibited viral reproduction in corneas and TG from IFN-α/β R deficient (CD118 −/−) mice, although viral titers were 2–3 fold higher in cornea and TG, compared to wild type. The absence of IFN-stimulated anti-viral proteins, 2’-5’ oligoadenylate synthetase/RNase L and ds RNA dependent protein kinase R, completely eliminated the anti-viral effectiveness of Ad:IFN-γ. Collectively, the results demonstrate: (1) nonexistence of type I IFN R does not abolish defense of Ad:IFN-γ against HSV-1; (2) anti-viral pathways, OAS/RNase L and PKR are mandatory; and (3) α/β TCR+ T cells are compulsory for Ad: IFN-γ effectiveness against HSV-1 in cornea but not in TG. PMID:17404299

  14. AKT/mTOR and c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling pathways are required for chrysotile asbestos-induced autophagy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ziying; Liu, Tie; Kamp, David W; Wang, Yahong; He, Huijuan; Zhou, Xu; Li, Donghong; Yang, Lawei; Zhao, Bin; Liu, Gang

    2014-07-01

    Chrysotile asbestos is closely associated with excess mortality from pulmonary diseases such as lung cancer, mesothelioma, and asbestosis. Although multiple mechanisms in which chrysotile asbestos fibers induce pulmonary disease have been identified, the role of autophagy in human lung epithelial cells has not been examined. In this study, we evaluated whether chrysotile asbestos induces autophagy in A549 human lung epithelial cells and then analyzed the possible underlying molecular mechanism. Chrysotile asbestos induced autophagy in A549 cells based on a series of biochemical and microscopic autophagy markers. We observed that asbestos increased expression of A549 cell microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3-II), an autophagy marker, in conjunction with dephosphorylation of phospho-AKT, phospho-mTOR, and phospho-p70S6K. Notably, AKT1/AKT2 double-knockout murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) had negligible asbestos-induced LC3-II expression, supporting a crucial role for AKT signaling. Chrysotile asbestos also led to the phosphorylation/activation of Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 MAPK. Pharmacologic inhibition of JNK, but not p38 MAPK, dramatically inhibited the protein expression of LC3-II. Moreover, JNK2(-/-) MEFs but not JNK1(-/-) MEFs blocked LC3-II levels induced by chrysotile asbestos. In addition, N-acetylcysteine, an antioxidant, attenuated chrysotile asbestos-induced dephosphorylation of P-AKT and completely abolished phosphorylation/activation of JNK. Finally, we demonstrated that chrysotile asbestos-induced apoptosis was not affected by the presence of the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine or autophagy-related gene 5 siRNA, indicating that the chrysotile asbestos-induced autophagy may be adaptive rather than prosurvival. Our findings demonstrate that AKT/mTOR and JNK2 signaling pathways are required for chrysotile asbestos-induced autophagy. These data provide a mechanistic basis for possible future clinical applications targeting

  15. The optimal corepressor function of nuclear receptor corepressor (NCoR) for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ requires G protein pathway suppressor 2.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chun; Li, Yali; Gow, Chien-Hung; Wong, Madeline; Zha, Jikun; Yan, Chunxia; Liu, Hongqi; Wang, Yongjun; Burris, Thomas P; Zhang, Jinsong

    2015-02-06

    Repression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ)-dependent transcription by the nuclear receptor corepressor (NCoR) is important for homeostatic expression of PPARγ target genes in vivo. The current model states that NCoR-mediated repression requires its direct interaction with PPARγ in the repressive conformation. Previous studies, however, have shown that DNA-bound PPARγ is incompatible with a direct, high-affinity association with NCoR because of the inherent ability of PPARγ to adopt the active conformation. Here we show that NCoR acquires the ability to repress active PPARγ-mediated transcription via G protein pathway suppressor 2 (GPS2), a component of the NCoR corepressor complex. Unlike NCoR, GPS2 can recognize and bind the active state of PPARγ. In GPS2-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblast cells, loss of GPS2 markedly reduces the corepressor function of NCoR for PPARγ, leading to constitutive activation of PPARγ target genes and spontaneous adipogenesis of the cells. GPS2, however, is dispensable for repression mediated by unliganded thyroid hormone receptor α or a PPARγ mutant unable to adopt the active conformation. This study shows that GPS2, although dispensable for the intrinsic repression function of NCoR, can mediate a novel corepressor repression pathway that allows NCoR to directly repress active PPARγ-mediated transcription, which is important for the optimal corepressor function of NCoR for PPARγ. Interestingly, GPS2-dependent repression specifically targets PPARγ but not PPARα or PPARδ. Therefore, GPS2 may serve as a unique target to manipulate PPARγ signaling in diseases. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Holo-APP and G-protein-mediated signaling are required for sAPPα-induced activation of the Akt survival pathway

    PubMed Central

    Milosch, N; Tanriöver, G; Kundu, A; Rami, A; François, J-C; Baumkötter, F; Weyer, S W; Samanta, A; Jäschke, A; Brod, F; Buchholz, C J; Kins, S; Behl, C; Müller, U C; Kögel, D

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that loss of physiologic amyloid precursor protein (APP) function leads to reduced neuronal plasticity, diminished synaptic signaling and enhanced susceptibility of neurons to cellular stress during brain aging. Here we investigated the neuroprotective function of the soluble APP ectodomain sAPPα (soluble APPα), which is generated by cleavage of APP by α-secretase along the non-amyloidogenic pathway. Recombinant sAPPα protected primary hippocampal neurons and SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells from cell death induced by trophic factor deprivation. We show that this protective effect is abrogated in neurons from APP-knockout animals and APP-depleted SH-SY5Y cells, but not in APP-like protein 1- and 2- (APLP1 and APLP2) depleted cells, indicating that expression of membrane-bound holo-APP is required for sAPPα-dependent neuroprotection. Trophic factor deprivation diminished the activity of the Akt survival pathway. Strikingly, both recombinant sAPPα and the APP-E1 domain were able to stimulate Akt activity in wild-type (wt) fibroblasts, SH-SY5Y cells and neurons, but failed to rescue in APP-deficient neurons or fibroblasts. The ADAM10 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain-containing protein 10) inhibitor GI254023X exacerbated neuron death in organotypic (hippocampal) slice cultures of wt mice subjected to trophic factor and glucose deprivation. This cell death-enhancing effect of GI254023X could be completely rescued by applying exogenous sAPPα. Interestingly, sAPPα-dependent Akt induction was unaffected in neurons of APP-ΔCT15 mice that lack the C-terminal YENPTY motif of the APP intracellular region. In contrast, sAPPα-dependent rescue of Akt activation was completely abolished in APP mutant cells lacking the G-protein interaction motif located in the APP C-terminus and by blocking G-protein-dependent signaling with pertussis toxin. Collectively, our data provide new mechanistic insights into the physiologic role of APP in

  17. Holo-APP and G-protein-mediated signaling are required for sAPPα-induced activation of the Akt survival pathway.

    PubMed

    Milosch, N; Tanriöver, G; Kundu, A; Rami, A; François, J-C; Baumkötter, F; Weyer, S W; Samanta, A; Jäschke, A; Brod, F; Buchholz, C J; Kins, S; Behl, C; Müller, U C; Kögel, D

    2014-08-28

    Accumulating evidence indicates that loss of physiologic amyloid precursor protein (APP) function leads to reduced neuronal plasticity, diminished synaptic signaling and enhanced susceptibility of neurons to cellular stress during brain aging. Here we investigated the neuroprotective function of the soluble APP ectodomain sAPPα (soluble APPα), which is generated by cleavage of APP by α-secretase along the non-amyloidogenic pathway. Recombinant sAPPα protected primary hippocampal neurons and SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells from cell death induced by trophic factor deprivation. We show that this protective effect is abrogated in neurons from APP-knockout animals and APP-depleted SH-SY5Y cells, but not in APP-like protein 1- and 2- (APLP1 and APLP2) depleted cells, indicating that expression of membrane-bound holo-APP is required for sAPPα-dependent neuroprotection. Trophic factor deprivation diminished the activity of the Akt survival pathway. Strikingly, both recombinant sAPPα and the APP-E1 domain were able to stimulate Akt activity in wild-type (wt) fibroblasts, SH-SY5Y cells and neurons, but failed to rescue in APP-deficient neurons or fibroblasts. The ADAM10 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain-containing protein 10) inhibitor GI254023X exacerbated neuron death in organotypic (hippocampal) slice cultures of wt mice subjected to trophic factor and glucose deprivation. This cell death-enhancing effect of GI254023X could be completely rescued by applying exogenous sAPPα. Interestingly, sAPPα-dependent Akt induction was unaffected in neurons of APP-ΔCT15 mice that lack the C-terminal YENPTY motif of the APP intracellular region. In contrast, sAPPα-dependent rescue of Akt activation was completely abolished in APP mutant cells lacking the G-protein interaction motif located in the APP C-terminus and by blocking G-protein-dependent signaling with pertussis toxin. Collectively, our data provide new mechanistic insights into the physiologic role of APP in

  18. TLR9 ligands induce S100A8 in macrophages via a STAT3-dependent pathway which requires IL-10 and PGE2.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Kenneth; Chung, Yuen Ming; Endoh, Yasumi; Geczy, Carolyn L

    2014-01-01

    S100A8 and S100A9 are highly-expressed calcium-binding proteins in neutrophils and monocytes, and in subsets of macrophages in inflammatory lesions. Unmethylated CpG motifs found in bacterial and viral DNA are potent activators of innate immunity via Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9). S100A8, but not S100A9, mRNA and protein was directly induced by CpG-DNA in murine and human macrophages. Induction in murine macrophages peaked at 16 h. CpG-DNA-induced S100A8 required de novo protein synthesis; IL-10 and Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synergistically enhanced expression and promoted earlier gene induction. Inhibitors of endogenous IL-10, PGE2, and the E prostanoid (EP) 4 receptor strongly suppressed S100A8 expression, particularly when combined. Thus, S100A8 induction by E. coli DNA required both IL-10 and PGE2/EP4 signaling. The MAPKs, PI3K and JAK pathways were essential, whereas ERK1/2 appeared to play a direct role. S100A8 induction by CpG-DNA was controlled at the transcriptional level. The promoter region responsible for activation, either directly, or indirectly via IL-10 and PGE2, was located within a -178 to -34-bp region and required STAT3 binding. Because of the robust links connecting IL-10 and PGE2 with an anti-inflammatory macrophage phenotype, the induction profile of S100A8 strongly indicates a role for this protein in resolution of inflammation.

  19. Stress-induced phosphorylation of STAT1 at Ser727 requires p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase whereas IFN-γ uses a different signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kovarik, Pavel; Stoiber, Dagmar; Eyers, Patrick A.; Menghini, Rossella; Neininger, Armin; Gaestel, Matthias; Cohen, Philip; Decker, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    STAT1 is an essential transcription factor for macrophage activation by IFN-γ and requires phosphorylation of the C-terminal Ser727 for transcriptional activity. In macrophages, Ser727 phosphorylation in response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), UV irradiation, or TNF-α occurred through a signaling path sensitive to the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) inhibitor SB203580 whereas IFN-γ-mediated Ser727 phosphorylation was not inhibited by the drug. Consistently, SB203580 did not affect IFN-γ-mediated, Stat1-dependent transcription but inhibited its enhancement by LPS. Furthermore, LPS, UV irradiation, and TNF-α caused activation of p38 MAPK whereas IFN-γ did not. An essential role for p38 MAPK activity in STAT1 Ser727 phosphorylation was confirmed by using cells expressing an SB203580-resistant p38 MAPK. In such cells, STAT1 Ser727 phosphorylation in response to UV irradiation was found to be SB203580 insensitive. Targeted disruption of the mapkap-k2 gene, encoding a kinase downstream of p38 MAPK with a key role in LPS-stimulated TNF-α production and stress-induced heat shock protein 25 phosphorylation, was without a significant effect on UV-mediated Ser727 phosphorylation. The recombinant Stat1 C terminus was phosphorylated in vitro by p38MAPKα and β but not by MAPK-activated protein kinase 2. Janus kinase 2 activity, previously reported to be required for IFN-γ-mediated Ser727 phosphorylation, was not needed for LPS-mediated Ser727 phosphorylation, and activation of Janus kinase 2 did not cause the appearance of STAT1 Ser727 kinase activity. Our data suggest that STAT1 is phosphorylated at Ser727 by a stress-activated signaling pathway either through p38 MAPK directly or through an unidentified kinase downstream of p38MAPK. PMID:10570180

  20. A p38(MAPK)/HIF-1 pathway initiated by UVB irradiation is required to induce Noxa and apoptosis of human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Nys, Kris; Van Laethem, An; Michiels, Carine; Rubio, Noemi; Piette, Jacques G; Garmyn, Maria; Agostinis, Patrizia

    2010-09-01

    The signal transduction pathways leading to apoptosis of human keratinocytes responding to UVB irradiation are complex and not completely understood. Previously, we reported that in UVB-irradiated keratinocytes, p38(MAPK) instigates Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) activation and mitochondrial apoptosis. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the pro-apoptotic function of p38(MAPK) remained unclear. Here, we show that in UVB-treated human primary keratinocytes the activation of p38(MAPK) is necessary to upregulate Noxa, a BH3-only pro-apoptotic dominantly induced by UVB and required for apoptosis. Whereas p53-silencing was marginally cytoprotective and poorly affected Noxa expression, p38(MAPK) inhibition in p53-silenced keratinocytes or in p53(-/-) cells could still efficiently prevent Noxa induction and intrinsic apoptosis after UVB, indicating that p38(MAPK) signals mainly through p53-independent mechanisms. Furthermore, p38(MAPK) was required for the induction and activation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) in response to UVB, and HIF-1 knockdown reduced Noxa expression and apoptosis. In UVB-irradiated keratinocytes, Noxa targeted the anti-apoptotic myeloid cell leukemia sequence 1 (Mcl-1) for degradation, and small-interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of Noxa or p38(MAPK) inhibition restored levels of Mcl-1 and abolished apoptosis. Thus, the pro-apoptotic mechanisms orchestrated by p38(MAPK) in human keratinocytes in response to UVB involve an HIF-1/Noxa axis, which prompts the downregulation of anti-apoptotic Mcl-1, thereby favoring Bax-mediated mitochondrial apoptosis of UVB-damaged keratinocytes.

  1. The Campylobacter jejuni CiaD effector protein activates MAP kinase signaling pathways and is required for the development of disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Enteric pathogens utilize a distinct set of proteins to modulate host cell signaling events that promote host cell invasion, induction of the inflammatory response, and intracellular survival. Human infection with Campylobacter jejuni, the causative agent of campylobacteriosis, is characterized by diarrhea containing blood and leukocytes. The clinical presentation of acute disease, which is consistent with cellular invasion, requires the delivery of the Campylobacter invasion antigens (Cia) to the cytosol of host cells via a flagellar Type III Secretion System (T3SS). We identified a novel T3SS effector protein, which we termed CiaD that is exported from the C. jejuni flagellum and delivered to the cytosol of host cells. Results We show that the host cell kinases p38 and Erk 1/2 are activated by CiaD, resulting in the secretion of interleukin-8 (IL-8) from host cells. Additional experiments revealed that CiaD-mediated activation of p38 and Erk 1/2 are required for maximal invasion of host cells by C. jejuni. CiaD contributes to disease, as evidenced by infection of IL-10 knockout mice. Noteworthy is that CiaD contains a Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase-docking site that is found within effector proteins produced by other enteric pathogens. These findings indicate that C. jejuni activates the MAP kinase signaling pathways Erk 1/2 and p38 to promote cellular invasion and the release of the IL-8 pro-inflammatory chemokine. Conclusions The identification of a novel T3SS effector protein from C. jejuni significantly expands the knowledge of virulence proteins associated with C. jejuni pathogenesis and provides greater insight into the mechanism utilized by C. jejuni to invade host cells. PMID:24144181

  2. Tip cell-specific requirement for an atypical Gpr124- and Reck-dependent Wnt/β-catenin pathway during brain angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Vanhollebeke, Benoit; Stone, Oliver A; Bostaille, Naguissa; Cho, Chris; Zhou, Yulian; Maquet, Emilie; Gauquier, Anne; Cabochette, Pauline; Fukuhara, Shigetomo; Mochizuki, Naoki; Nathans, Jeremy; Stainier, Didier Yr

    2015-06-08

    Despite the critical role of endothelial Wnt/β-catenin signaling during central nervous system (CNS) vascularization, how endothelial cells sense and respond to specific Wnt ligands and what aspects of the multistep process of intra-cerebral blood vessel morphogenesis are controlled by these angiogenic signals remain poorly understood. We addressed these questions at single-cell resolution in zebrafish embryos. We identify the GPI-anchored MMP inhibitor Reck and the adhesion GPCR Gpr124 as integral components of a Wnt7a/Wnt7b-specific signaling complex required for brain angiogenesis and dorsal root ganglia neurogenesis. We further show that this atypical Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway selectively controls endothelial tip cell function and hence, that mosaic restoration of single wild-type tip cells in Wnt/β-catenin-deficient perineural vessels is sufficient to initiate the formation of CNS vessels. Our results identify molecular determinants of ligand specificity of Wnt/β-catenin signaling and provide evidence for organ-specific control of vascular invasion through tight modulation of tip cell function.

  3. YvcK of Bacillus subtilis is required for a normal cell shape and for growth on Krebs cycle intermediates and substrates of the pentose phosphate pathway.

    PubMed

    Görke, Boris; Foulquier, Elodie; Galinier, Anne

    2005-11-01

    The HPr-like protein Crh has so far been detected only in the bacillus group of bacteria. In Bacillus subtilis, its gene is part of an operon composed of six ORFs, three of which exhibit strong similarity to genes of unknown function present in many bacteria. The promoter of the operon was determined and found to be constitutively active. A deletion analysis revealed that gene yvcK, encoded by this operon, is essential for growth on Krebs cycle intermediates and on carbon sources metabolized via the pentose phosphate pathway. In addition, cells lacking YvcK acquired media-dependent filamentous or L-shape-like aberrant morphologies. The presence of high magnesium concentrations restored normal growth and cell morphology. Furthermore, suppressor mutants cured from these growth defects appeared spontaneously with a high frequency. Such suppressing mutations were identified in a transposon mutagenesis screen and found to reside in seven different loci. Two of them mapped in genes of central carbon metabolism, including zwf, which encodes glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and cggR, the product of which regulates the synthesis of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. All these results suggest that YvcK has an important role in carbon metabolism, probably in gluconeogenesis required for the synthesis of cell wall precursor molecules. Interestingly, the Escherichia coli homologous protein, YbhK, can substitute for YvcK in B. subtilis, suggesting that the two proteins have been functionally conserved in these different bacteria.

  4. Apg16p is required for the function of the Apg12p-Apg5p conjugate in the yeast autophagy pathway.

    PubMed

    Mizushima, N; Noda, T; Ohsumi, Y

    1999-07-15

    Autophagy is an intracellular bulk degradation system that is ubiquitous for eukaryotic cells. In this process, cytoplasmic components are enclosed in autophagosomes and delivered to lysosomes/vacuoles. We recently found that a protein conjugation system, in which Apg12p is covalently attached to Apg5p, is indispensable for autophagy in yeast. Here, we describe a novel coiled-coil protein, Apg16p, essential for autophagy. Apg16p interacts with Apg12p-conjugated Apg5p and less preferentially with unconjugated Apg5p. Moreover, the coiled-coil domain of Apg16p mediates self-multimerization that leads to cross-linking of Apg5p molecules and formation of a stable protein complex. Apg16p is not essential for the Apg12p-Apg5p conjugation reaction. These results suggest that the Apg12p-Apg5p conjugate requires Apg16p to accomplish its role in the autophagy pathway, and Apg16p is a key molecule as a linker to form the Apg12p-Apg5p-Apg16p multimer.

  5. The folliculin-FNIP1 pathway deleted in human Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome is required for murine B-cell development

    PubMed Central

    Baba, Masaya; Keller, Jonathan R.; Sun, Hong-Wei; Resch, Wolfgang; Kuchen, Stefan; Suh, Hyung Chan; Hasumi, Hisashi; Hasumi, Yukiko; Kieffer-Kwon, Kyong-Rim; Gonzalez, Carme Gallego; Hughes, Robert M.; Klein, Mara E.; Oh, Hyoungbin F.; Bible, Paul; Southon, Eileen; Tessarollo, Lino; Schmidt, Laura S.

    2012-01-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by cutaneous fibrofolliculomas, pulmonary cysts, and kidney malignancies. Affected individuals carry germ line mutations in folliculin (FLCN), a tumor suppressor gene that becomes biallelically inactivated in kidney tumors by second-hit mutations. Similar to other factors implicated in kidney cancer, FLCN has been shown to modulate activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). However, its precise in vivo function is largely unknown because germ line deletion of Flcn results in early embryonic lethality in animal models. Here, we describe mice deficient in the newly characterized folliculin-interacting protein 1 (Fnip1). In contrast to Flcn, Fnip1−/− mice develop normally, are not susceptible to kidney neoplasia, but display a striking pro-B cell block that is entirely independent of mTOR activity. We show that this developmental arrest results from rapid caspase-induced pre-B cell death, and that a Bcl2 transgene reconstitutes mature B-cell populations, respectively. We also demonstrate that conditional deletion of Flcn recapitulates the pro-B cell arrest of Fnip1−/− mice. Our studies thus demonstrate that the FLCN-FNIP complex deregulated in BHD syndrome is absolutely required for B-cell differentiation, and that it functions through both mTOR-dependent and independent pathways. PMID:22709692

  6. Tip cell-specific requirement for an atypical Gpr124- and Reck-dependent Wnt/β-catenin pathway during brain angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vanhollebeke, Benoit; Stone, Oliver A; Bostaille, Naguissa; Cho, Chris; Zhou, Yulian; Maquet, Emilie; Gauquier, Anne; Cabochette, Pauline; Fukuhara, Shigetomo; Mochizuki, Naoki; Nathans, Jeremy; Stainier, Didier YR

    2015-01-01

    Despite the critical role of endothelial Wnt/β-catenin signaling during central nervous system (CNS) vascularization, how endothelial cells sense and respond to specific Wnt ligands and what aspects of the multistep process of intra-cerebral blood vessel morphogenesis are controlled by these angiogenic signals remain poorly understood. We addressed these questions at single-cell resolution in zebrafish embryos. We identify the GPI-anchored MMP inhibitor Reck and the adhesion GPCR Gpr124 as integral components of a Wnt7a/Wnt7b-specific signaling complex required for brain angiogenesis and dorsal root ganglia neurogenesis. We further show that this atypical Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway selectively controls endothelial tip cell function and hence, that mosaic restoration of single wild-type tip cells in Wnt/β-catenin-deficient perineural vessels is sufficient to initiate the formation of CNS vessels. Our results identify molecular determinants of ligand specificity of Wnt/β-catenin signaling and provide evidence for organ-specific control of vascular invasion through tight modulation of tip cell function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06489.001 PMID:26051822

  7. AKT/mTOR and C-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK) Signaling Pathways Are Required for Chrysotile Asbestos-Induced Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ziying; Liu, Tie; Kamp, David W; Wang, Yahong; He, Huijuan; Zhou, Xu; Li, Donghong; Yang, Lawei; Zhao, Bin; Liu, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Chrysotile asbestos is closely associated with excess mortality from pulmonary diseases such as lung cancer, mesothelioma, and asbestosis. Although multiple mechanisms in which chrysotile asbestos fibers induce pulmonary disease have been identified, the role of autophagy in human lung epithelial cells has not been examined. In the present study, we evaluated whether chrysotile asbestos induces autophagy in A549 human lung epithelial cells, and then analyzed the possible underlying molecular mechanism. Chrysotile asbestos-induced autophagy in A549 cells based on a series of biochemical and microscopic autophagy markers. We observed that asbestos increased A549 cell microtubule-associated protein 2 light chains 3 (LC3-II) expression, an autophagy marker, in conjunction with dephosphorylation of phospho-AKT, phospho-mTOR, and phospho-P70s6k. Notably, AKT1/AKT2 double knockout (AKT DKO) murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) had negligible asbestos-induced LC3-II expression supporting a crucial role for AKT signaling. Chrysotile asbestos also led to the phosphorylation/activation of Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 MAPK. Pharmacologic inhibition of JNK, but not p38 MAPK, dramatically inhibited the protein expression of LC3-II. Moreover, JNK2−/− MEFs but not JNK1−/− MEFs blocked LC3-II levels induced by chrysotile asbestos. In addition, NAC, an antioxidant, attenuated chrysotile asbestos-induced dephosphorylation of p-AKT and completely abolished phosphorylation/activation of JNK. Finally, we demonstrated that chrysotile asbestos-induced apoptosis was not affected by the presence of the autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine (3-MA) or ATG5 (autophagy-related gene 5) siRNA, indicating that chrysotile asbestos-induced autophagy may be adaptive rather than prosurvival. Our findings demonstrate that AKT/mTOR and JNK2 signaling pathways are required for chrysotile asbestos-induced autophagy. These data provide a mechanistic basis for possible future clinical

  8. Requirement of a Functional Flavin Mononucleotide Prenyltransferase for the Activity of a Bacterial Decarboxylase in a Heterologous Muconic Acid Pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Weber, Heike E; Gottardi, Manuela; Brückner, Christine; Oreb, Mislav; Boles, Eckhard; Tripp, Joanna

    2017-05-15

    Biotechnological production of cis,cis-muconic acid from renewable feedstocks is an environmentally sustainable alternative to conventional, petroleum-based methods. Even though a heterologous production pathway for cis,cis-muconic acid has already been established in the host organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the generation of industrially relevant amounts of cis,cis-muconic acid is hampered by the low activity of the bacterial protocatechuic acid (PCA) decarboxylase AroY isomeric subunit C(iso) (AroY-C(iso)), leading to secretion of large amounts of the intermediate PCA into the medium. In the present study, we show that the activity of AroY-C(iso) in S. cerevisiae strongly depends on the strain background. We could demonstrate that the strain dependency is caused by the presence or absence of an intact genomic copy of PAD1, which encodes a mitochondrial enzyme responsible for the biosynthesis of a prenylated form of the cofactor flavin mononucleotide (prFMN). The inactivity of AroY-C(iso) in strain CEN.PK2-1 could be overcome by plasmid-borne expression of Pad1 or its bacterial homologue AroY subunit B (AroY-B). Our data reveal that the two enzymes perform the same function in decarboxylation of PCA by AroY-C(iso), although coexpression of Pad1 led to higher decarboxylase activity. Conversely, AroY-B can replace Pad1 in its function in decarboxylation of phenylacrylic acids by ferulic acid decarboxylase Fdc1. Targeting of the majority of AroY-B to mitochondria by fusion to a heterologous mitochondrial targeting signal did not improve decarboxylase activity of AroY-C(iso), suggesting that mitochondrial localization has no major impact on cofactor biosynthesis.IMPORTANCE In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the decarboxylation of protocatechuic acid (PCA) to catechol is the bottleneck reaction in the heterologous biosynthetic pathway for production of cis,cis-muconic acid, a valuable precursor for the production of bulk chemicals. In our work, we demonstrate the

  9. Cooperative Functions of ZnT1, Metallothionein and ZnT4 in the Cytoplasm Are Required for Full Activation of TNAP in the Early Secretory Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Tokuji; Anan, Yasumi; Tsuji, Natsuko; Ogra, Yasumitsu; Kimura, Tomoki; Miyamae, Yusaku; Masuda, Seiji; Nagao, Masaya; Kambe, Taiho

    2013-01-01

    The activation process of secretory or membrane-bound zinc enzymes is thought to be a highly coordinated process involving zinc transport, trafficking, transfer and coordination. We have previously shown that secretory and membrane-bound zinc enzymes are activated in the early secretory pathway (ESP) via zinc-loading by the zinc transporter 5 (ZnT5)-ZnT6 hetero-complex and ZnT7 homo-complex (zinc transport complexes). However, how other proteins conducting zinc metabolism affect the activation of these enzymes remains unknown. Here, we investigated this issue by disruption and re-expression of genes known to be involved in cytoplasmic zinc metabolism, using a zinc enzyme, tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP), as a reporter. We found that TNAP activity was significantly reduced in cells deficient in ZnT1, Metallothionein (MT) and ZnT4 genes (ZnT1−/−MT−/−ZnT4−/− cells), in spite of increased cytosolic zinc levels. The reduced TNAP activity in ZnT1−/−MT−/−ZnT4−/− cells was not restored when cytosolic zinc levels were normalized to levels comparable with those of wild-type cells, but was reversely restored by extreme zinc supplementation via zinc-loading by the zinc transport complexes. Moreover, the reduced TNAP activity was adequately restored by re-expression of mammalian counterparts of ZnT1, MT and ZnT4, but not by zinc transport-incompetent mutants of ZnT1 and ZnT4. In ZnT1−/−MT−/−ZnT4−/− cells, the secretory pathway normally operates. These findings suggest that cooperative zinc handling of ZnT1, MT and ZnT4 in the cytoplasm is required for full activation of TNAP in the ESP, and present clear evidence that the activation process of zinc enzymes is elaborately controlled. PMID:24204829

  10. Human SCARB2-mediated entry and endocytosis of EV71.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Wen; Lin, Hsiang-Yin; Tsou, Yueh-Liang; Chitra, Ebenezer; Hsiao, Kuang-Nan; Shao, Hsiao-Yun; Liu, Chia-Chyi; Sia, Charles; Chong, Pele; Chow, Yen-Hung

    2012-01-01

    Enterovirus (EV) 71 infection is known to cause hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) and in severe cases, induces neurological disorders culminating in fatality. An outbreak of EV71 in South East Asia in 1997 affected over 120,000 people and caused neurological disorders in a few individuals. The control of EV71 infection through public health interventions remains minimal and treatments are only symptomatic. Recently, human scavenger receptor class B, member 2 (SCARB2) has been reported to be a cellular receptor of EV71. We expressed human SCARB2 gene in NIH3T3 cells (3T3-SCARB2) to study the mechanisms of EV71 entry and infection. We demonstrated that human SCARB2 serves as a cellular receptor for EV71 entry. Disruption of expression of SCARB2 using siRNAs can interfere EV71 infection and subsequent inhibit the expression of viral capsid proteins in RD and 3T3-SCARB2 but not Vero cells. SiRNAs specific to clathrin or dynamin or chemical inhibitor of clathrin-mediated endocytosis were all capable of interfering with the entry of EV71 into 3T3-SCARB2 cells. On the other hand, caveolin specific siRNA or inhibitors of caveolae-mediated endocytosis had no effect, confirming that only clathrin-mediated pathway was involved in EV71 infection. Endocytosis of EV71 was also found to be pH-dependent requiring endosomal acidification and also required intact membrane cholesterol. In summary, the mechanism of EV71 entry through SCARB2 as the receptor for attachment, and its cellular entry is through a clathrin-mediated and pH-dependent endocytic pathway. This study on the receptor and endocytic mechanisms of EV71 infection is useful for the development of effective medications and prophylactic treatment against the enterovirus.

  11. Lipid Requirements for the Enzymatic Activity of MraY Translocases and in Vitro Reconstitution of the Lipid II Synthesis Pathway.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Erik; Ma, Yi; Engels, Ina; Münch, Daniela; Otten, Christian; Schneider, Tanja; Henrichfreise, Beate; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Dötsch, Volker; Bernhard, Frank

    2016-01-29

    Screening of new compounds directed against key protein targets must continually keep pace with emerging antibiotic resistances. Although periplasmic enzymes of bacterial cell wall biosynthesis have been among the first drug targets, compounds directed against the membrane-integrated catalysts are hardly available. A promising future target is the integral membrane protein MraY catalyzing the first membrane associated step within the cytoplasmic pathway of bacterial peptidoglycan biosynthesis. However, the expression of most MraY homologues in cellular expression systems is challenging and limits biochemical analysis. We report the efficient production of MraY homologues from various human pathogens by synthetic cell-free expression approaches and their subsequent characterization. MraY homologues originating from Bordetella pertussis, Helicobacter pylori, Chlamydia pneumoniae, Borrelia burgdorferi, and Escherichia coli as well as Bacillus subtilis were co-translationally solubilized using either detergent micelles or preformed nanodiscs assembled with defined membranes. All MraY enzymes originating from Gram-negative bacteria were sensitive to detergents and required nanodiscs containing negatively charged lipids for obtaining a stable and functionally folded conformation. In contrast, the Gram-positive B. subtilis MraY not only tolerates detergent but is also less specific for its lipid environment. The MraY·nanodisc complexes were able to reconstitute a complete in vitro lipid I and lipid II forming pipeline in combination with the cell-free expressed soluble enzymes MurA-F and with the membrane-associated protein MurG. As a proof of principle for future screening platforms, we demonstrate the inhibition of the in vitro lipid II biosynthesis with the specific inhibitors fosfomycin, feglymycin, and tunicamycin. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Predictions of particle size and lattice diffusion pathway requirements for sodium-ion anodes using η-Cu6Sn5 thin films as a model system.

    PubMed

    Baggetto, Loïc; Jumas, Jean-Claude; Górka, Joanna; Bridges, Craig A; Veith, Gabriel M

    2013-07-14

    Geometrically well-defined Cu6Sn5 thin films were used as a model system to estimate the diffusion depth and diffusion pathway requirements of Na ions in alloy anodes. Cu6Sn5 anodes have an initial reversible capacity towards Li of 545 mA h g(-1) (Li3.96Sn or 19.8 Li/Cu6Sn5), close to the theoretical 586 mA h g(-1) (Li4.26Sn), and a very low initial irreversible capacity of 1.6 Li/Cu6Sn5 (Li0.32Sn). In contrast, the reaction with Na is limited with a reversible capacity of 160 mA h g(-1) compared to the expected 516 mA h g(-1) (Na3.75Sn). X-ray diffraction and (119)Sn-Mössbauer spectroscopy measurements show that this limited capacity likely results from the restricted diffusion of Na into the anode nanoparticles and not the formation of a low Na-content phase. Moreover, our results suggest that the η-Cu6Sn5 alloy should have optimized particle sizes of nearly 10 nm diameter to increase the Na capacity significantly. An alternative system consisting of a two-phase mixture of Cu6Sn5 and Sn of nominal composition 'Cu6Sn10' has been studied and is able to deliver a larger initial reversible storage capacity of up to 400 mA h g(-1). Finally, we have demonstrated that the presence of Cu in Cu6Sn5 and 'Cu6Sn10' suppresses the anomalous electrolyte decomposition normally observed for pure Sn.

  13. Lipid Requirements for the Enzymatic Activity of MraY Translocases and in Vitro Reconstitution of the Lipid II Synthesis Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Henrich, Erik; Ma, Yi; Engels, Ina; Münch, Daniela; Otten, Christian; Schneider, Tanja; Henrichfreise, Beate; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Dötsch, Volker; Bernhard, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Screening of new compounds directed against key protein targets must continually keep pace with emerging antibiotic resistances. Although periplasmic enzymes of bacterial cell wall biosynthesis have been among the first drug targets, compounds directed against the membrane-integrated catalysts are hardly available. A promising future target is the integral membrane protein MraY catalyzing the first membrane associated step within the cytoplasmic pathway of bacterial peptidoglycan biosynthesis. However, the expression of most MraY homologues in cellular expression systems is challenging and limits biochemical analysis. We report the efficient production of MraY homologues from various human pathogens by synthetic cell-free expression approaches and their subsequent characterization. MraY homologues originating from Bordetella pertussis, Helicobacter pylori, Chlamydia pneumoniae, Borrelia burgdorferi, and Escherichia coli as well as Bacillus subtilis were co-translationally solubilized using either detergent micelles or preformed nanodiscs assembled with defined membranes. All MraY enzymes originating from Gram-negative bacteria were sensitive to detergents and required nanodiscs containing negatively charged lipids for obtaining a stable and functionally folded conformation. In contrast, the Gram-positive B. subtilis MraY not only tolerates detergent but is also less specific for its lipid environment. The MraY·nanodisc complexes were able to reconstitute a complete in vitro lipid I and lipid II forming pipeline in combination with the cell-free expressed soluble enzymes MurA-F and with the membrane-associated protein MurG. As a proof of principle for future screening platforms, we demonstrate the inhibition of the in vitro lipid II biosynthesis with the specific inhibitors fosfomycin, feglymycin, and tunicamycin. PMID:26620564

  14. Pioglitazone, an anti-diabetic drug requires sustained MAPK activation for its anti-tumor activity in MCF7 breast cancer cells, independent of PPAR-γ pathway.

    PubMed

    Kole, Labanyamoy; Sarkar, Mrinmoy; Deb, Anwesha; Giri, Biplab

    2016-02-01

    The thiazolidinedione (TZD) class of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) ligands are known for their ability to induce adipocyte differentiation, to increase insulin sensitivity including anticancer properties. But, whether or not upstream events like MAPK activation or PPAR-γ signaling are involved or associated with this anticancer activity is not well understood in breast cancer cells. The role of MAPK and PPAR pathways during the pioglitazone (Pio) induced PPAR-γ independent anticancer activity in MCF7 cells has been focused here. The anticancer activity of Pio has been investigated in breast cancer cells in vitro. Anti-tumor effects were assessed by alamar blue assay, Western blot analysis, cell cycle analysis, and annexin V-FITC/PI binding assay by flow cytometry, Hoechst staining and luciferase assay. The anticancer activity of Pio is found to be correlating with the up regulation of CDKIs (p21/p27) and down regulation of CDK-4. This study demonstrates that the induction of CDKIs by Pio is due to the sustained activation of MAPK. The Pio-mediated activation of MAPK is transmitted to activate ELK-1 and the related anti-proliferation is blocked by MEK inhibitor (PD-184352). Pio suppresses the proliferation of MCF7 cells, at least partly by a PPAR-γ-independent mechanism involving the induction of p21 which in turn requires sustained activation of MAPK. These findings implicate the utility of Pio in the treatment of PPAR positive or negative human cancers and the development of a new class of compounds to enhance the effectiveness of Pio. Copyright © 2015 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  15. Paramutation in Drosophila Requires Both Nuclear and Cytoplasmic Actors of the piRNA Pathway and Induces Cis-spreading of piRNA Production

    PubMed Central

    Hermant, Catherine; Boivin, Antoine; Teysset, Laure; Delmarre, Valérie; Asif-Laidin, Amna; van den Beek, Marius; Antoniewski, Christophe; Ronsseray, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Transposable element activity is repressed in the germline in animals by PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs), a class of small RNAs produced by genomic loci mostly composed of TE sequences. The mechanism of induction of piRNA production by these loci is still enigmatic. We have shown that, in Drosophila melanogaster, a cluster of tandemly repeated P-lacZ-white transgenes can be activated for piRNA production by maternal inheritance of a cytoplasm containing homologous piRNAs. This activated state is stably transmitted over generations and allows trans-silencing of a homologous transgenic target in the female germline. Such an epigenetic conversion displays the functional characteristics of a paramutation, i.e., a heritable epigenetic modification of one allele by the other. We report here that piRNA production and trans-silencing capacities of the paramutated cluster depend on the function of the rhino, cutoff, and zucchini genes involved in primary piRNA biogenesis in the germline, as well as on that of the aubergine gene implicated in the ping-pong piRNA amplification step. The 21-nt RNAs, which are produced by the paramutated cluster, in addition to 23- to 28-nt piRNAs are not necessary for paramutation to occur. Production of these 21-nt RNAs requires Dicer-2 but also all the piRNA genes tested. Moreover, cytoplasmic transmission of piRNAs homologous to only a subregion of the transgenic locus can generate a strong paramutated locus that produces piRNAs along the whole length of the transgenes. Finally, we observed that maternally inherited transgenic small RNAs can also impact transgene expression in the soma. In conclusion, paramutation involves both nuclear (Rhino, Cutoff) and cytoplasmic (Aubergine, Zucchini) actors of the piRNA pathway. In addition, since it is observed between nonfully homologous loci located on different chromosomes, paramutation may play a crucial role in epigenome shaping in Drosophila natural populations. PMID:26482790

  16. Receptor-activated Ca2+ inflow in animal cells: a variety of pathways tailored to meet different intracellular Ca2+ signalling requirements.

    PubMed Central

    Barritt, G J

    1999-01-01

    Receptor-activated Ca2+ channels (RACCs) play a central role in regulation of the functions of animal cells. Together with voltage-operated Ca2+ channels (VOCCs) and ligand-gated non-selective cation channels, RACCs provide a variety of pathways by which Ca2+ can be delivered to the cytoplasmic space and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in order to initiate or maintain specific types of intracellular Ca2+ signal. Store-operated Ca2+ channels (SOCs), which are activated by a decrease in Ca2+ in the ER, are a major subfamily of RACCs. A careful analysis of the available data is required in order to discern the different types of RACCs (differentiated chiefly on the basis of ion selectivity and mechanism of activation) and to properly develop hypotheses for structures and mechanisms of activation. Despite much intensive research, the structures and mechanisms of activation of RACCs are only now beginning to be understood. In considering the physiological functions of the different RACCs, it is useful to consider the specificity for Ca2+ of each type of cation channel and the rate at which Ca2+ flows through a single open channel; the locations of the channels on the plasma membrane (in relation to the ER, cytoskeleton and other intracellular units of structure and function); the Ca2+-responsive enzymes and proteins; and the intracellular buffers and proteins that control the distribution of Ca2+ in the cytoplasmic space. RACCs which are non-selective cation channels can deliver Ca2+ directly to specific regions of the cytoplasmic space, and can also admit Na+, which induces depolarization of the plasma membrane, the opening of VOCCs and the subsequent inflow of Ca2+. SOCs appear to deliver Ca2+ specifically to the ER, thereby maintaining oscillating Ca2+ signals. PMID:9882611

  17. Lipid rafts are required for GLUT4 internalization in adipose cells

    PubMed Central

    Ros-Baró, Anna; López-Iglesias, Carmen; Peiró, Sandra; Bellido, David; Palacín, Manuel; Zorzano, Antonio; Camps, Marta

    2001-01-01

    It has been recently reported that insulin recruits a novel signaling machinery to lipid rafts required for insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation [Baumann, A., Ribon, V., Kanzaki, M., Thurmond, D. C., Mora, S., Shigematsu, S., Bickel, P. E., Pessin, J. E. & Saltiel, A. R. (2001) Nature 407, 202–207, 2000; Chiang, S. H., Baumann, C. A., Kanzaki, M., Thurmond, D. C., Watson, R. T., Neudauer, C. L., Macara, I. G., Pessin, J. E. & Saltiel, A. R. (2001) Nature 410, 944–948]. We have assessed the role of lipid rafts on GLUT4 traffic in adipose cells. High GLUT4 levels were detected in caveolae from adipocytes by two approaches, the mechanical isolation of purified caveolae from plasma membrane lawns and the immunogold analysis of plasma membrane lawns followed by freeze-drying. The role of lipid rafts in GLUT4 trafficking was studied by adding nystatin or filipin at concentrations that specifically disrupt caveolae morphology and inhibit caveolae function without altering clathrin-mediated endocytosis. These caveolae inhibitors did not affect the insulin-stimulated glucose transport. However, they blocked both the GLUT4 internalization and the down-regulation of glucose transport triggered by insulin removal in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Our data indicate that lipid rafts are crucial for GLUT4 internalization after insulin removal. Given that high levels of GLUT4 were detected in caveolae from insulin-treated adipose cells, this transporter may be internalized from caveolae or caveolae may operate as an obligatory transition station before internalization. PMID:11593015

  18. Emerging evidence of signalling roles for PI(3,4)P2 in Class I and II PI3K-regulated pathways.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Phillip T; Stephens, Len R

    2016-02-01

    There are eight members of the phosphoinositide family of phospholipids in eukaryotes; PI, PI3P, PI4P, PI5P, PI(4,5)P2, PI(3,4)P2, PI(3,5)P2 and PI(3,4,5)P3. Receptor activation of Class I PI3Ks stimulates the phosphorylation of PI(4,5)P2 to form PI(3,4,5)P3. PI(3,4,5)P3 is an important messenger molecule that is part of a complex signalling network controlling cell growth and division. PI(3,4,5)P3 can be dephosphorylated by both 3- and 5-phosphatases, producing PI(4,5)P2 and PI(3,4)P2, respectively. There is now strong evidence that PI(3,4)P2 generated by this route does not merely represent another pathway for removal of PI(3,4,5)P3, but can act as a signalling molecule in its own right, regulating macropinocytosis, fast endophilin-mediated endocytosis (FEME), membrane ruffling, lamellipodia and invadopodia. PI(3,4)P2 can also be synthesized directly from PI4P by Class II PI3Ks and this is important for the maturation of clathrin-coated pits [clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME)] and signalling in early endosomes. Thus PI(3,4)P2 is emerging as an important signalling molecule involved in the coordination of several specific membrane and cytoskeletal responses. Further, its inappropriate accumulation contributes to pathology caused by mutations in genes encoding enzymes responsible for its degradation, e.g. Inpp4B.

  19. Clathrin-Mediated Auxin Efflux and Maxima Regulate Hypocotyl Hook Formation and Light-Stimulated Hook Opening in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qinqin; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Juan; Yan, Xu; Wang, Chao; Xu, Jian; Pan, Jianwei

    2016-01-04

    The establishment of auxin maxima by PIN-FORMED 3 (PIN3)- and AUXIN RESISTANT 1/LIKE AUX1 (LAX) 3 (AUX1/LAX3)-mediated auxin transport is essential for hook formation in Arabidopsis hypocotyls. Until now, however, the underlying regulatory mechanism has remained poorly understood. Here, we show that loss of function of clathrin light chain CLC2 and CLC3 genes enhanced auxin maxima and thereby hook curvature, alleviated the inhibitory effect of auxin overproduction on auxin maxima and hook curvature, and delayed blue light-stimulated auxin maxima reduction and hook opening. Moreover, pharmacological experiments revealed that auxin maxima formation and hook curvature in clc2 clc3 were sensitive to auxin efflux inhibitors 1-naphthylphthalamic acid and 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid but not to the auxin influx inhibitor 1-naphthoxyacetic acid. Live-cell imaging analysis further uncovered that loss of CLC2 and CLC3 function impaired PIN3 endocytosis and promoted its lateralization in the cortical cells but did not affect AUX1 localization. Taken together, these results suggest that clathrin regulates auxin maxima and thereby hook formation through modulating PIN3 localization and auxin efflux, providing a novel mechanism that integrates developmental signals and environmental cues to regulate plant skotomorphogenesis and photomorphogenesis.

  20. Clathrin-mediated post-fusion membrane retrieval influences the exocytic mode of endothelial Weibel-Palade bodies

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Nicola L.; White, Ian J.; McCormack, Jessica J.; Robinson, Christopher; Nightingale, Thomas D.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Weibel-Palade bodies (WPBs), the storage organelles of endothelial cells, are essential to normal haemostatic and inflammatory responses. Their major constituent protein is von Willebrand factor (VWF) which, following stimulation with secretagogues, is released into the blood vessel lumen as large platelet-catching strings. This exocytosis changes the protein composition of the cell surface and also results in a net increase in the amount of plasma membrane. Compensatory endocytosis is thought to limit changes in cell size and retrieve fusion machinery and other misplaced integral membrane proteins following exocytosis; however, little is known about the extent, timing, mechanism and precise function of compensatory endocytosis in endothelial cells. Using biochemical assays, live-cell imaging and correlative spinning-disk microscopy and transmission electron microscopy assays we provide the first in-depth high-resolution characterisation of this process. We provide a model of compensatory endocytosis based on rapid clathrin- and dynamin-mediated retrieval. Inhibition of this process results in a change of exocytic mode: WPBs then fuse with previously fused WPBs rather than the plasma membrane, leading, in turn, to the formation of structurally impaired tangled VWF strings. This article has an associated First Person interview with the first authors of the paper. PMID:28674075

  1. CD4 Glycoprotein Degradation Induced by Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Vpu Protein Requires the Function of Proteasomes and the Ubiquitin-Conjugating Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Ulrich; Antón, Luis C.; Bačík, Igor; Cox, Josephine H.; Bour, Stéphane; Bennink, Jack R.; Orlowski, Marian; Strebel, Klaus; Yewdell, Jonathan W.

    1998-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vpu gene encodes a type I anchored integral membrane phosphoprotein with two independent functions. First, it regulates virus release from a post-endoplasmic reticulum (ER) compartment by an ion channel activity mediated by its transmembrane anchor. Second, it induces the selective down regulation of host cell receptor proteins (CD4 and major histocompatibility complex class I molecules) in a process involving its phosphorylated cytoplasmic tail. In the present work, we show that the Vpu-induced proteolysis of nascent CD4 can be completely blocked by peptide aldehydes that act as competitive inhibitors of proteasome function and also by lactacystin, which blocks proteasome activity by covalently binding to the catalytic β subunits of proteasomes. The sensitivity of Vpu-induced CD4 degradation to proteasome inhibitors paralleled the inhibition of proteasome degradation of a model ubiquitinated substrate. Characterization of CD4-associated oligosaccharides indicated that CD4 rescued from Vpu-induced degradation by proteasome inhibitors is exported from the ER to the Golgi complex. This finding suggests that retranslocation of CD4 from the ER to the cytosol may be coupled to its proteasomal degradation. CD4 degradation mediated by Vpu does not require the ER chaperone calnexin and is dependent on an intact ubiquitin-conjugating system. This was demonstrated by inhibition of CD4 degradation (i) in cells expressing a thermally inactivated form of the ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1 or (ii) following expression of a mutant form of ubiquitin (Lys48 mutated to Arg48) known to compromise ubiquitin targeting by interfering with the formation of polyubiquitin complexes. CD4 degradation was also prevented by altering the four Lys residues in its cytosolic domain to Arg, suggesting a role for ubiquitination of one or more of these residues in the process of degradation. The results clearly demonstrate a role for the cytosolic

  2. Arabidopsis Phosphoglycerate Dehydrogenase1 of the Phosphoserine Pathway Is Essential for Development and Required for Ammonium Assimilation and Tryptophan Biosynthesis[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Benstein, Ruben Maximilian; Ludewig, Katja; Wulfert, Sabine; Wittek, Sebastian; Gigolashvili, Tamara; Frerigmann, Henning; Gierth, Markus; Flügge, Ulf-Ingo; Krueger, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    In plants, two independent serine biosynthetic pathways, the photorespiratory and glycolytic phosphoserine (PS) pathways, have been postulated. Although the photorespiratory pathway is well characterized, little information is available on the function of the PS pathway in plants. Here, we present a detailed characterization of phosphoglycerate dehydrogenases (PGDHs) as components of the PS pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana. All PGDHs localize to plastids and possess similar kinetic properties, but they differ with respect to their sensitivity to serine feedback inhibition. Furthermore, analysis of pgdh1 and phosphoserine phosphatase mutants revealed an embryo-lethal phenotype and PGDH1-silenced lines were inhibited in growth. Metabolic analyses of PGDH1-silenced lines grown under ambient and high CO2 conditions indicate a direct link between PS biosynthesis and ammonium assimilation. In addition, we obtained several lines of evidence for an interconnection between PS and tryptophan biosynthesis, because the expression of PGDH1 and PHOSPHOSERINE AMINOTRANSFERASE1 is regulated by MYB51 and MYB34, two activators of tryptophan biosynthesis. Moreover, the concentration of tryptophan-derived glucosinolates and auxin were reduced in PGDH1-silenced plants. In essence, our results provide evidence for a vital function of PS biosynthesis for plant development and metabolism. PMID:24368794

  3. Granzyme H induces cell death primarily via a Bcl-2-sensitive mitochondrial cell death pathway that does not require direct Bid activation.

    PubMed

    Ewen, Catherine L; Kane, Kevin P; Bleackley, R Chris

    2013-07-01

    Natural killer and T cell-mediated cytotoxicity is important for the elimination of viruses and transformed cells. The granule lytic pathway utilizes perforin and granzymes to induce cell death, while receptor-mediated lytic pathways rely on molecules such as FasL. Pro-apoptotic activities of Granzyme B (GrB) and Fas are well-established, and many of their cellular targets have been identified. However, humans express additional related granzymes - GrA, GrM, GrK, and GrH. Neither the cytotoxic potential of GrH, nor the mechanism by which GrH may induce target cell death is currently understood. We proposed that GrH would have pro-apoptotic activity that would be distinct from that of GrB and FasL, which could be relevant when Fas/FasL or GrB activity or death pathways were impaired. Our results, using a purified recombinant form of GrH, revealed that GrH induced cell death via a Bcl-2-sensitive mitochondrial pathway without direct processing of Bid. Additionally, neither the apoptosome nor caspase-3 was essential to the induction of GrH-mediated cell death. However, GrH did directly process DFF45, potentially leading to DNA damage. Our findings support the idea that multiple, non-redundant death pathways may be initiated by cytotoxic cells to counteract various immune evasion strategies.

  4. Cellular VPS4 Is Required for Efficient Entry and Egress of Budded Virions of Autographa californica Multiple Nucleopolyhedrovirus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhaofei

    2012-01-01

    Membrane budding is essential for the egress of many enveloped viruses, and this process shares similarities with the biogenesis of multivesicular bodies (MVBs). In eukaryotic cells, the budding of intraluminal vesicles (IVLs) is mediated by the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery and some viruses require ESCRT machinery components or functions to bud from host cells. Baculoviruses, such as Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV), enter host cells by clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Viral DNA replication and nucleocapsid assembly occur within the nucleus. Some progeny nucleocapsids are subsequently trafficked to, and bud from, the plasma membrane, forming budded virions (BV). To determine whether the host ESCRT machinery is important or necessary for AcMNPV replication, we cloned a cDNA of Spodoptera frugiperda VPS4, a key regulator for disassembly and recycling of ESCRT III. We then examined viral infection and budding in the presence of wild-type (WT) or dominant negative (DN) forms of VPS4. First, we used a viral complementation system, in combination with fluorescent tags, to examine the effects of transiently expressed WT or DN VPS4 on viral entry. We found that dominant negative VPS4 substantially inhibited virus entry. Entering virus was observed within aberrant compartments containing the DN VPS4 protein. We next used recombinant bacmids expressing WT or DN VPS4 proteins to examine virus egress. We found that production of infectious AcMNPV BV was substantially reduced by expression of DN VPS4 but not by WT VPS4. Together, these results indicate that a functional VPS4 is necessary for efficient AcMNPV BV entry into, and egress from, insect cells. PMID:22072775

  5. P38 AND EGF RECEPTOR KINASE-MEDIATED ACTIVATION OF THE PHOSPHATIDYLINOSITOL 3-KINASE/AKT PATHWAY IS REQUIRED FOR ZN2+INDUCED CYCLOOXYGENASE-2 EXPRESSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) expression is induced by physiological and inflammatory stimuli. Regulation of COX-2 expression is stimulus- and cell type-specific. Exposure to Zn2+ has been associated with activation of multiple intracellular signaling pathways as well as the induction...

  6. P38 AND EGF RECEPTOR KINASE-MEDIATED ACTIVATION OF THE PHOSPHATIDYLINOSITOL 3-KINASE/AKT PATHWAY IS REQUIRED FOR ZN2+INDUCED CYCLOOXYGENASE-2 EXPRESSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) expression is induced by physiological and inflammatory stimuli. Regulation of COX-2 expression is stimulus- and cell type-specific. Exposure to Zn2+ has been associated with activation of multiple intracellular signaling pathways as well as the induction...

  7. De Novo Guanine Biosynthesis but Not the Riboswitch-Regulated Purine Salvage Pathway Is Required for Staphylococcus aureus Infection In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Donghong; Katakam, Anand K.; Reichelt, Mike; Lin, Baiwei; Kim, Janice; Park, Summer; Date, Shailesh V.; Monk, Ian R.; Xu, Min; Austin, Cary D.; Maurer, Till

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT De novo guanine biosynthesis is an evolutionarily conserved pathway that creates sufficient nucleotides to support DNA replication, transcription, and translation. Bacteria can also salvage nutrients from the environment to supplement the de novo pathway, but the relative importance of either pathway during Staphylococcus aureus infection is not known. In S. aureus, genes important for both de novo and salvage pathways are regulated by a guanine riboswitch. Bacterial riboswitches have attracted attention as a novel class of antibacterial drug targets because they have high affinity for small molecules, are absent in humans, and regulate the expression of multiple genes, including those essential for cell viability. Genetic and biophysical methods confirm the existence of a bona fide guanine riboswitch upstream of an operon encoding xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (xpt), xanthine permease (pbuX), inosine-5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (guaB), and GMP synthetase (guaA) that represses the expression of these genes in response to guanine. We found that S. aureus guaB and guaA are also transcribed independently of riboswitch control by alternative promoter elements. Deletion of xpt-pbuX-guaB-guaA genes resulted in guanine auxotrophy, failure to grow in human serum, profound abnormalities in cell morphology, and avirulence in mouse infection models, whereas deletion of the purine salvage genes xpt-pbuX had none of these effects. Disruption of guaB or guaA recapitulates the xpt-pbuX-guaB-guaA deletion in vivo. In total, the data demonstrate that targeting the guanine riboswitch alone is insufficient to treat S. aureus infections but that inhibition of guaA or guaB could have therapeutic utility. IMPORTANCE De novo guanine biosynthesis and purine salvage genes were reported to be regulated by a guanine riboswitch in Staphylococcus aureus. We demonstrate here that this is not true, because alternative promoter elements that uncouple the de novo pathway from

  8. The transcription factors ADR1 or CAT8 are required for RTG pathway activation and evasion from yeast acetic acid-induced programmed cell death in raffinose

    PubMed Central

    Laera, Luna; Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Ždralević, Maša; Marzulli, Domenico; Liu, Zhengchang; Giannattasio, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown on glucose undergoes programmed cell death (PCD) induced by acetic acid (AA-PCD), but evades PCD when grown in raffinose. This is due to concomitant relief of carbon catabolite repression (CCR) and activation of mitochondrial retrograde signaling, a mitochondria-to-nucleus communication pathway causing up-regulation of various nuclear target genes, such as CIT2, encoding peroxisomal citrate synthase, dependent on the positive regulator RTG2 in response to mitochondrial dysfunction. CCR down-regulates genes mainly involved in mitochondrial respiratory metabolism. In this work, we investigated the relationships between the RTG and CCR pathways in the modulation of AA-PCD sensitivity under glucose repression or de-repression conditions. Yeast single and double mutants lacking RTG2 and/or certain factors regulating carbon source utilization, including MIG1, HXK2, ADR1, CAT8, and HAP4, have been analyzed for their survival and CIT2 expression after acetic acid treatment. ADR1 and CAT8 were identified as positive regulators of RTG-dependent gene transcription. ADR1 and CAT8 interact with RTG2 and with each other in inducing cell resistance to AA-PCD in raffinose and controlling the nature of cell death. In the absence of ADR1 and CAT8, AA-PCD evasion is acquired through activation of an alternative factor/pathway repressed by RTG2, suggesting that RTG2 may play a function in promoting necrotic cell death in repressing conditions when RTG pathway is inactive. Moreover, our data show that simultaneous mitochondrial retrograde pathway activation and SNF1-dependent relief of CCR have a key role in central carbon metabolism reprogramming which modulates the yeast acetic acid-stress response. PMID:28357334

  9. The HOG MAP kinase pathway is required for the induction of methylglyoxal-responsive genes and determines methylglyoxal resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Jaime; Rodríguez-Vargas, Sonia; Prieto, Jose A

    2005-04-01

    A sudden overaccumulation of methylglyoxal (MG) induces, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the expression of MG-protective genes, including GPD1, GLO1 and GRE3. The response is partially dependent on the transcriptional factors Msn2p/Msn4p, but unrelated with the general stress response mechanism. Here, we show that the high-osmolarity glycerol (HOG)-pathway controls the genetic response to MG and determines the yeast growth capacity upon MG exposure. Strains lacking the MAPK Hog1p, the upstream component Ssk1p or the HOG-dependent nuclear factor Msn1p, showed a reduction in the mRNA accumulation of MG-responsive genes after MG addition. Moreover, hyperactivation of Hog1p by deletion of protein phosphatase PTP2 enhanced the response, while blocking the pathway by deletion of the MAPKK PBS2 had a negative effect. In addition, the activity of Hog1p affected the basal level of GPD1 mRNA under non-inducing conditions. These effects had a great influence on MG resistance, as hog1Delta and other HOG-pathway mutants with impaired MG-specific expression displayed MG sensitivity, whereas those with enhanced expression exhibited MG resistance as compared with the wild-type. However, MG does not trigger the overphosphorylation of Hog1p or its nuclear import in the parental strain. Moreover, dual phosphorylation of Hog1p appears to be dispensable in the triggering of the transcriptional response, although a phosphorylable form of Hog1p is fundamental for the transcriptional activity. Overall, our results suggest that the basal activity of the HOG-pathway serves to amplify the expression of MG-responsive genes under non-inducing and inducing conditions, ensuring cell protection against this toxic glycolytic by-product.

  10. PAK1 interacts with beta-catenin and is required for the regulation of the beta-catenin signalling pathway by gastrins.

    PubMed

    He, Hong; Shulkes, Arthur; Baldwin, Graham S

    2008-10-01

    Beta-catenin regulates cell-cell adhesion by binding to E-cadherin at the cell membrane and, when translocated into the nucleus, mediates signalling by activation of transcription factors such as TCF4. Mutations of the components of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway are found in many gastrointestinal cancers. Gastrins, including amidated (Gamide) and glycine-extended (Ggly) gastrin(17), stimulate the proliferation of gastrointestinal cancer cells. Gastrins also regulate beta-catenin signalling through multiple pathways which seem to converge on p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1). In this study, we have investigated the role of PAK1 in the regulation of beta-catenin signalling by gastrins. Here we report for the first time that PAK1 associated with beta-catenin. Both Gamide and Ggly stimulated the phosphorylation and activation of beta-catenin in a PAK1-dependent manner. A kinase-inactive mutant PAK1(K299A) blocked the gastrin-stimulated dissociation of beta-catenin from E-cadherin, translocation of beta-catenin from the cell membrane to the nucleus, and association of beta-catenin with the transcription factor TCF4. The PAK1(K299A) mutant also inhibited the stimulation of the expression of c-myc and cyclin D1, and of cell proliferation and migration, by gastrins. The results indicate that gastrins regulate beta-catenin signalling through a PAK1-dependent pathway. PAK1 seems to be the point of convergence of multiple signalling pathways activated by gastrins.

  11. Multiple cytosolic and transmembrane determinants are required for the trafficking of SCAMP1 via an ER-Golgi-TGN-PM pathway.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yi; Jia, Tianran; Lam, Sheung Kwan; Ding, Yu; Gao, Caiji; San, Melody Wan Yan; Pimpl, Peter; Jiang, Liwen

    2011-03-01

    How polytopic plasma membrane (PM) proteins reach their destination in plant cells remains elusive. Using transgenic tobacco BY-2 cells, we previously showed that the rice secretory carrier membrane protein 1 (SCAMP1), an integral membrane protein with four transmembrane domains (TMDs), is localized to the PM and trans-Golgi network (TGN). Here, we study the transport pathway and sorting signals of SCAMP1 by following its transient expression in tobacco BY-2 protoplasts and show that SCAMP1 reaches the PM via an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Golgi-TGN-PM pathway. Loss-of-function and gain-of-function analysis of various green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions with SCAMP1 mutations further demonstrates that: (i) the cytosolic N-terminus of SCAMP1 contains an ER export signal; (ii) the transmembrane domain 2 (TMD2) and TMD3 of SCAMP1 are essential for Golgi export; (iii) SCAMP1 TMD1 is essential for TGN-to-PM targeting; (iv) the predicted topology of SCAMP1 and its various mutants remain identical as demonstrated by protease protection assay. Therefore, both the cytosolic N-terminus and TMD sequences of SCAMP1 play integral roles in mediating its transport to the PM via an ER-Golgi-TGN pathway. © 2011 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Regulation of a DLK-1 and p38 MAP kinase pathway by the ubiquitin ligase RPM-1 is required for presynaptic development.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Katsunori; Abrams, Benjamin; Grill, Brock; Goncharov, Alexandr; Huang, Xun; Chisholm, Andrew D; Jin, Yishi

    2005-02-11

    Synapses display a stereotyped ultrastructural organization, commonly containing a single electron-dense presynaptic density surrounded by a cluster of synaptic vesicles. The mechanism controlling subsynaptic proportion is not understood. Loss of function in the C. elegans rpm-1 gene, a putative RING finger/E3 ubiquitin ligase, causes disorganized presynaptic cytoarchitecture. RPM-1 is localized to the presynaptic periactive zone. We report that RPM-1 negatively regulates a p38 MAP kinase pathway composed of the dual leucine zipper-bearing MAPKKK DLK-1, the MAPKK MKK-4, and the p38 MAP kinase PMK-3. Inactivation of this pathway suppresses rpm-1 loss of function phenotypes, whereas overexpression or constitutive activation of this pathway causes synaptic defects resembling rpm-1(lf) mutants. DLK-1, like RPM-1, is localized to the periactive zone. DLK-1 protein levels are elevated in rpm-1 mutants. The RPM-1 RING finger can stimulate ubiquitination of DLK-1. Our data reveal a presynaptic role of a previously unknown p38 MAP kinase cascade.

  13. Yeast MPH1 gene functions in an error-free DNA damage bypass pathway that requires genes from Homologous recombination, but not from postreplicative repair.

    PubMed Central

    Schürer, K Anke; Rudolph, Christian; Ulrich, Helle D; Kramer, Wilfried

    2004-01-01

    The MPH1 gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, encoding a member of the DEAH family of proteins, had been identified by virtue of the spontaneous mutator phenotype of respective deletion mutants. Genetic analysis suggested that MPH1 functions in a previously uncharacterized DNA repair pathway that protects the cells from damage-induced mutations. We have now analyzed genetic interactions of mph1 with a variety of mutants from different repair systems with respect to spontaneous mutation rates and sensitivities to different DNA-damaging agents. The dependence of the mph1 mutator phenotype on REV3 and REV1 and the synergy with mutations in base and nucleotide excision repair suggest an involvement of MPH1 in error-free bypass of lesions. However, although we observed an unexpected partial suppression of the mph1 mutator phenotype by rad5, genetic interactions with other mutations in postreplicative repair imply that MPH1 does not belong to this pathway. Instead, mutations from the homologous recombination pathway were found to be epistatic to mph1 with respect to both spontaneous mutation rates and damage sensitivities. Determination of spontaneous mitotic recombination rates demonstrated that mph1 mutants are not deficient in homologous recombination. On the contrary, in an sgs1 background we found a pronounced hyperrecombination phenotype. Thus, we propose that MPH1 is involved in a branch of homologous recombination that is specifically dedicated to error-free bypass. PMID:15126389

  14. Career Pathways in Indiana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaskey, Steve; Johnson, Tricia

    2010-01-01

    The revisions to the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006 require that career and technical education (CTE) programs provide students with a clear pathway from secondary to postsecondary education, and into high-wage, high-skill and high-demand careers. States nationwide are developing programs, called career pathways, to…

  15. Requirement for Ras/Raf/ERK pathway in naringin-induced G1-cell-cycle arrest via p21WAF1 expression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Il; Lee, Se-Jung; Lee, Soo-Bok; Park, Keerang; Kim, Wun-Jae; Moon, Sung-Kwon

    2008-09-01

    Naringin, an active flavonoid found in citrus fruit extracts, has pharmacological utility. The present study identified a novel mechanism of the anticancer effects of naringin in urinary bladder cancer cells. Naringin treatment resulted in significant dose-dependent growth inhibition together with G(1)-phase cell-cycle arrest at a dose of 100 microM (the half maximal inhibitory concentration) in 5637 cells. In addition, naringin treatment strongly induced p21WAF1 expression, independent of the p53 pathway, and downregulated expression of cyclins and cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs). Moreover, treatment with naringin induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase. Among the pathways examined, only PD98059, an ERK-specific inhibitor, blocked naringin-dependent p21WAF1 expression. Consistently, blockade of ERK function reversed naringin-mediated inhibition of cell proliferation and decreased cell-cycle proteins. Furthermore, naringin treatment increased both Ras and Raf activation. Transfection of cells with dominant-negative Ras (RasN17) and Raf (RafS621A) mutant genes suppressed naringin-induced ERK activity and p21WAF1 expression. Finally, the naringin-induced reduction in cell proliferation and cell-cycle proteins also was abolished in the presence of RasN17 and RafS621A mutant genes. These data demonstrate that the Ras/Raf/ERK pathway participates in p21WAF1 induction, subsequently leading to a decrease in the levels of cyclin D1/CDK4 and cyclin E-CDK2 complexes and naringin-dependent inhibition of cell growth. Overall, these unexpected findings concerning the molecular mechanisms of naringin in 5637 cancer cells provide a theoretical basis for the therapeutic use of flavonoids to treat malignancies.

  16. Non-classical antigen processing pathways are required for MHC class II-restricted direct tumor recognition by NY-ESO-1-specific CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, Junko; Tsuji, Takemasa; Luescher, Immanuel; Old, Lloyd J.; Shrikant, Protul; Gnjatic, Sacha; Odunsi, Kunle

    2014-01-01

    Tumor antigen-specific CD4+ T cells that directly recognize cancer cells are important for orchestrating antitumor immune responses at the local tumor sites. However, the mechanisms of direct MHC class II (MHC-II) presentation of intracellular tumor antigen by cancer cells are poorly understood. We found that two functionally distinct subsets of CD4+ T cells were expanded after HLA-DPB1*04 (DP04)-binding NY-ESO-1157–170 peptide vaccination in ovarian cancer patients. While both subsets similarly recognized exogenous NY-ESO-1 protein pulsed on DP04+ target cells, only one type recognized target cells with intracellular expression of NY-ESO-1. The tumor-recognizing CD4+ T cells more efficiently recognized the short 8–9-mer peptides than the non-tumor-recognizing CD4+ T cells. In addition to endosomal/lysosomal proteases that are typically involved in MHC-II antigen presentation, several pathways in the MHC class I presentation pathways such as the proteasomal degradation and transporter-associated with antigen-processing (TAP)-mediated peptide transport were also involved in the presentation of intracellular NY-ESO-1 on MHC-II. The presentation was inhibited significantly by primaquine, a small molecule that inhibits endosomal recycling, consistent with findings that pharmacological inhibition of new protein synthesis enhances antigen presentation. Together, our data demonstrated that cancer cells selectively present peptides from intracellular tumor antigens on MHC-II by multiple non-classical antigen-processing pathways. Harnessing direct tumor-recognizing ability of CD4+ T cells could be a promising strategy to enhance antitumor immune responses in the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. PMID:24764581

  17. Nonclassical antigen-processing pathways are required for MHC class II-restricted direct tumor recognition by NY-ESO-1-specific CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Junko; Tsuji, Takemasa; Luescher, Immanuel; Old, Lloyd J; Shrikant, Protul; Gnjatic, Sacha; Odunsi, Kunle

    2014-04-01

    Tumor antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells that directly recognize cancer cells are important for orchestrating antitumor immune responses at the local tumor sites. However, the mechanisms of direct MHC class II (MHC-II) presentation of intracellular tumor antigen by cancer cells are poorly understood. We found that two functionally distinct subsets of CD4(+) T cells were expanded after HLA-DPB1*04 (DP04)-binding NY-ESO-1157-170 peptide vaccination in patients with ovarian cancer. Although both subsets recognized exogenous NY-ESO-1 protein pulsed on DP04(+) target cells, only one type recognized target cells with intracellular expression of NY-ESO-1. The tumor-recognizing CD4(+) T cells more efficiently recognized the short 8-9-mer peptides than the non-tumor-recognizing CD4(+) T cells. In addition to endosomal/lysosomal proteases that are typically involved in MHC-II antigen presentation, several pathways in the MHC class I presentation pathways, such as the proteasomal degradation and transporter-associated with antigen-processing-mediated peptide transport, were also involved in the presentation of intracellular NY-ESO-1 on MHC-II. The presentation was inhibited significantly by primaquine, a small molecule that inhibits endosomal recycling, consistent with findings that pharmacologic inhibition of new protein synthesis enhances antigen presentation. Together, our data demonstrate that cancer cells selectively present peptides from intracellular tumor antigens on MHC-II by multiple nonclassical antigen-processing pathways. Harnessing the direct tumor-recognizing ability of CD4(+) T cells could be a promising strategy to enhance antitumor immune responses in the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment.

  18. Inhibition of prostate cancer growth by solanine requires the suppression of cell cycle proteins and the activation of ROS/P38 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Pan, Bin; Zhong, Weifeng; Deng, Zhihai; Lai, Caiyong; Chu, Jing; Jiao, Genlong; Liu, Junfeng; Zhou, Qizhao

    2016-11-01

    Solanine, a naturally steroidal glycoalkaloid in nightshade (Solanum nigrum Linn.), can inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of tumor cells. However, the mechanism of solanine-suppressing prostate cancer cell growth remains to be elucidated. This study investigates the inhibition mechanism of solanine on cancer development in vivo and in cultured human prostate cancer cell DU145 in vitro. Results show that solanine injection significantly suppresses the tumor cell growth in xenograft athymic nude mice. Solanine regulates the protein levels of cell cycle proteins, including Cyclin D1, Cyclin E1, CDK2, CDK4, CDK6, and P21 in vivo and in vitro. Also, in cultured DU145 cell, solanine significantly inhibits cell growth. Moreover, the administration of NAC, an active oxygen scavenger, markedly reduces solanine-induced cell death. Blockade of P38 MAPK kinase cannot suppress reactive oxygen species (ROS), but can suppress solanine-induced cell apoptosis. Also, inhibition of ROS by NAC inactivates P38 pathway. Taken together, the data suggest that inhibition of prostate cancer growth by solanine may be through blocking the expression of cell cycle proteins and inducing apoptosis via ROS and activation of P38 pathway. These findings indicate an attractive therapeutic potential of solanine for suppression of prostate cancer.

  19. A membrane microdomain-associated protein, Arabidopsis Flot1, is involved in a clathrin-independent endocytic pathway and is required for seedling development.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruili; Liu, Peng; Wan, Yinglang; Chen, Tong; Wang, Qinli; Mettbach, Ursula; Baluska, Frantisek; Samaj, Jozef; Fang, Xiaohong; Lucas, William J; Lin, Jinxing

    2012-05-01

    Endocytosis is essential for the maintenance of protein and lipid compositions in the plasma membrane and for the acquisition of materials from the extracellular space. Clathrin-dependent and -independent endocytic processes are well established in yeast and animals; however, endocytic pathways involved in cargo internalization and intracellular trafficking remain to be fully elucidated for plants. Here, we used transgenic green fluorescent protein-flotillin1 (GFP-Flot1) Arabidopsis thaliana plants in combination with confocal microscopy analysis and transmission electron microscopy immunogold labeling to study the spatial and dynamic aspects of GFP-Flot1-positive vesicle formation. Vesicle size, as outlined by the gold particles, was ∼100 nm, which is larger than the 30-nm size of clathrin-coated vesicles. GFP-Flot1 also did not colocalize with clathrin light chain-mOrange. Variable-angle total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy also revealed that the dynamic behavior of GFP-Flot1-positive puncta was different from that of clathrin light chain-mOrange puncta. Furthermore, disruption of membrane microdomains caused a significant alteration in the dynamics of Flot1-positive puncta. Analysis of artificial microRNA Flot1 transgenic Arabidopsis lines established that a reduction in Flot1 transcript levels gave rise to a reduction in shoot and root meristem size plus retardation in seedling growth. Taken together, these findings support the hypothesis that, in plant cells, Flot1 is involved in a clathrin-independent endocytic pathway and functions in seedling development.

  20. ERManI (Endoplasmic Reticulum Class I α-Mannosidase) Is Required for HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein Degradation via Endoplasmic Reticulum-associated Protein Degradation Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tao; Frabutt, Dylan A; Moremen, Kelley W; Zheng, Yong-Hui

    2015-09-04

    Previously, we reported that the mitochondrial translocator protein (TSPO) induces HIV-1 envelope (Env) degradation via the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated protein degradation (ERAD) pathway, but the mechanism was not clear. Here we investigated how the four ER-associated glycoside hydrolase family 47 (GH47) α-mannosidases, ERManI, and ER-degradation enhancing α-mannosidase-like (EDEM) proteins 1, 2, and 3, are involved in the Env degradation process. Ectopic expression of these four α-mannosidases uncovers that only ERManI inhibits HIV-1 Env expression in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, genetic knock-out of the ERManI gene MAN1B1 using CRISPR/Cas9 technology disrupts the TSPO-mediated Env degradation. Biochemical studies show that HIV-1 Env interacts with ERManI, and between the ERManI cytoplasmic, transmembrane, lumenal stem, and lumenal catalytic domains, the catalytic domain plays a critical role in the Env-ERManI interaction. In addition, functional studies show that inactivation of the catalytic sites by site-directed mutagenesis disrupts the ERManI activity. These studies identify ERManI as a critical GH47 α-mannosidase in the ER-associated protein degradation pathway that initiates the Env degradation and suggests that its catalytic domain and enzymatic activity play an important role in this process. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. The morphogenesis-related NDR kinase pathway of Colletotrichum orbiculare is required for translating plant surface signals into infection-related morphogenesis and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Sayo; Ishizuka, Junya; Miyashita, Ito; Ishii, Takaaki; Miyoshi, Hideto

    2017-01-01

    Plant infection by pathogenic fungi involves the differentiation of appressoria, specialized infection structures, initiated by fungal sensing and responding to plant surface signals. How plant fungal pathogens control infection-related morphogenesis in response to plant-derived signals has been unclear. Here we showed that the morphogenesis-related NDR kinase pathway (MOR) of the cucumber anthracnose fungus Colletotrichum orbiculare is crucial for appressorium development following perception of plant-derived signals. By screening of random insertional mutants, we identified that the MOR element CoPag1 (Perish-in-the-absence-of-GYP1) is a key component of the plant-derived signaling pathway involved in appressorium morphogenesis. Constitutive activation of the NDR kinase CoCbk1 (Cell-wall-biosynthesis-kinase-1) complemented copag1 defects. Furthermore, copag1 deletion impaired CoCbk1 phosphorylation, suggesting that CoPag1 functions via CoCbk1 activation. Searching for the plant signals that contribute to appressorium induction via MOR, we found that the cutin monomer n-octadecanal, degraded from the host cuticle by conidial esterases, functions as a signal molecule for appressorium development. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling during appressorium development revealed that MOR is responsible for the expression of a subset of the plant-signal-induced genes with potential roles in pathogenicity. Thus, MOR of C. orbiculare has crucial roles in regulating appressorium development and pathogenesis by communicating with plant-derived signals. PMID:28146587

  2. Neuronal JNK pathway activation by IL-1 is mediated through IL1RAPL1, a protein required for development of cognitive functions.

    PubMed

    Pavlowsky, Alice; Zanchi, Alice; Pallotto, Marta; Giustetto, Maurizio; Chelly, Jamel; Sala, Carlo; Billuart, Pierre

    2010-05-01

    Interleukin-1-Receptor Accessory Protein Like 1 (IL1RAPL1) gene mutations are associated to cognitive impairment ranging from non-syndromic X-linked mental retardation to autism. Functionally IL1RAPL1 belongs to a novel family of Toll/IL-1 Receptors, but its ligand is unknown. In a recent study, we have shown that IL1RAPL1 is present in dendritic spine where it interacts with PSD-95, a major scaffold protein of excitatory post-synaptic density. We demonstrated that IL1RAPL1 regulates the synaptic localization of PSD-95 by controlling JNK (c-Jun terminal Kinase) activity and PSD-95 phosphorylation. Loss of IL1RAPL1 in mouse not only led to a reduction of excitatory synapses but also to specific deficits in hippocampal long-term synaptic plasticity. Here we report that activation of JNK pathway in neurons by Interleukin-1 (IL-1) is mediated by IL1RAPL1. The interaction of IL1RAPL1 with PSD-95 discloses a novel pathophysiological mechanism underlying cognitive impairment associated with alterations of the JNK pathway in response to IL-1 and leading to the mislocalization of PSD-95, that subsequently result in abnormal synaptic organization and function.

  3. Androgen Receptor Requires JunD as a Co-activator to Switch on an Oxidative Stress Generation Pathway in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mehraein-Ghomi, Farideh; Basu, Hirak S.; Church, Dawn R.; Hoffmann, F. Michael; Wilding, George

    2010-01-01

    Relatively high oxidative stress levels in the prostate are postulated to be a major factor for prostate carcinogenesis and prostate cancer (CaP) progression. We focused on elucidating metabolic pathways of oxidative stress generation in CaP cells. Previously, we showed that transcription factor JunD is essential for androgen-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in androgen-dependent human prostate cancer cells. We also recently demonstrated that androgen induces the first and regulatory enzyme spermidine/spermine N1-acetyl transferase (SSAT) in a polyamine catabolic pathway that produces copious amounts of metabolic ROS. Here, we present co-immunoprecipitation and Gaussia luciferase reconstitution assay data that show JunD forms a complex with androgen-activated AR in situ. Our chromatin immunoprecipitation assay data demonstrate that JunD binds directly to a specific SSAT promoter sequence only in androgen-treated LNCaP cells. Using a vector containing a luciferase reporter gene connected to the SSAT promoter and a JunD-silenced LNCaP cell line, we show that JunD is essential for androgen-induced SSAT gene expression. The elucidation of JunD-AR complex inducing SSAT expression leading to polyamine oxidation establishes the mechanistic basis of androgen-induced ROS production in CaP cells and opens up a new prostate specific target for CaP chemopreventive/chemotherapeutic drug development. PMID:20460526

  4. Interleukin (IL)-1 Receptor–associated Kinase (IRAK) Requirement for Optimal Induction of Multiple IL-1 Signaling Pathways and IL-6 Production

    PubMed Central

    Kanakaraj, Palanisamy; Schafer, Peter H.; Cavender, Druie E.; Wu, Ying; Ngo, Karen; Grealish, Patrick F.; Wadsworth, Scott A.; Peterson, Per A.; Siekierka, John J.; Harris, Crafford A.; Fung-Leung, Wai-Ping

    1998-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-1 is a proinflammatory cytokine with pleiotropic effects in inflammation. IL-1 binding to its receptor triggers a cascade of signaling events, including activation of the stress-activated mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 MAP kinase, as well as transcription factor nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). IL-1 signaling results in cellular responses through induction of inflammatory gene products such as IL-6. One of the earliest events in IL-1 signaling is the rapid interaction of IL-1 receptor–associated kinases, IRAK and IRAK-2, with the receptor complex. The relative roles of IRAK and IRAK-2 in IL-1 signaling pathways and subsequent cellular responses have not been previously determined. To evaluate the importance of IRAK in IL-1 signaling, IRAK-deficient mouse fibroblast cells were prepared and studied. Here we report that IL-1–mediated activation of JNK, p38, and NF-κB were all reduced in embryonic fibroblasts deficient in IRAK expression. In addition, IL-6 production in response to IL-1 was also dramatically reduced in IRAK-deficient embryonic fibroblasts and in skin fibroblasts prepared from IRAK-deficient mice. Our results demonstrate that IRAK plays an essential proximal role in coordinating multiple IL-1 signaling pathways for optimal induction of cellular responses. PMID:9625767

  5. faint sausage encodes a novel extracellular protein of the immunoglobulin superfamily required for cell migration and the establishment of normal axonal pathways in the Drosophila nervous system.

    PubMed

    Lekven, A C; Tepass, U; Keshmeshian, M; Hartenstein, V

    1998-07-01

    We examined the structure of the nervous system in Drosophila embryos homozygous for a null mutation in the faint sausage (fas) gene. In the peripheral nervous system (PNS) of fas mutants, neurons fail to delaminate from the ectodermal epithelium; in the central nervous system (CNS), the positions of neuronal cell bodies and glial cells are abnormal and normal axonal pathways do not form. Sequence analysis of fas cDNAs revealed that the fas protein product has characteristics of an extracellular protein and that it is a novel member of the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily. In situ hybridization demonstrated that fas transcripts are expressed throughout the embryo but they are in relatively high concentrations in the lateral ectoderm, from which the peripheral nervous system delaminates and in the CNS. Antiserum directed against Fas protein was found to stain neurons but not glia in the CNS. We conclude that fas encodes a protein that, in the developing nervous system, is present on the surface of neurons and is essential for nerve cell migration and the establishment of axonal pathways.

  6. Melanocyte transformation requires complete loss of all pocket protein function via a mechanism that mitigates the need for MAPK pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Tonks, I D; Mukhopadhyay, P; Schroder, W A; Sorolla, A; Mould, A W; Handoko, H Y; Ferguson, B; Muller, H K; Keith, P; Hayward, N K; Walker, G J; Kay, G F

    2017-06-29

    Deregulation of p16INK4A is a critical event in melanoma susceptibility and progression. It is generally assumed that the major effect of loss of p16 function is mediated through the CDK-cyclin pathway via its influence on the pocket protein (PP) pRb. However, there are also two other PPs, p107 and p130, which, when phosphorylated by CDK-cyclin complexes, play a role in permitting cell progression. Cohorts of mice carrying melanocyte-specific knockouts (KOs) of various combinations of the three PPs were generated. Mice null for pRb, p107, p130 or any combination of double mutants did not develop melanoma. Surprisingly, melanocyte-specific loss of all three PPs facilitated melanoma development (median age of onset 308 days, penetrance 40% at 1 year). Tumorigenesis was exacerbated by Trp53 co-deletion (median age of onset 275 days, penetrance 82% at 1 year), with cell culture studies indicating that this difference may result from the apoptotic role of Trp53. Melanomas in PP;Trp53-deficient mice lacked either Ras or Braf mutations, and hence developed in the absence of constitutive MAPK pathway activation. The lag period between induction of total PP or PP/Trp53 KO and melanoma development indicates that additional genetic or epigenetic alterations may account for neoplastic progression. However, exome sequencing of PP;Trp53 KO melanomas failed to reveal any additional recurrent driver mutations. Analysis of the putative mutation signature of the PP;Trp53 KO melanomas suggests that melanocytes are primed for transformation via a mutagenic mechanism involving an excess of T>G substitutions, but not involving a preponderance of C>T substitutions at CpG sites, which is the case for most spontaneous cancers not driven by a specific carcinogen. In sum, deregulation of all three PPs appears central to neoplastic progression for melanoma, and the customary reference to the p16(INKA)/CDK4/pRB pathway may no longer be accurate; all PPs are potentially critical targets of CDK

  7. Optical manipulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells reveals that green light protection against UV irradiation is favored by low Ca2+ and requires intact UPR pathway.

    PubMed

    Farcasanu, Ileana C; Mitrica, Radu; Cristache, Ligia; Nicolau, Ioana; Ruta, Lavinia L; Paslaru, Liliana; Comorosan, Sorin

    2013-11-01

    Optical manipulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells with high density green photons conferred protection against the deleterious effects of UV radiation. Combining chemical screening with UV irradiation of yeast cells, it was noted that the high density green photons relied on the presence of intact unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway to exert their protective effect and that the low Ca(2+) conditions boosted the effect. UPR chemical inducers tunicamycin, dithiotreitol and calcium chelators augmented the green light effect in a synergic action against UV-induced damage. Photo-manipulation of cells was a critical factor since the maximum protection was achieved only when cells were pre-exposed to green light. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. CD66-mediated phagocytosis of Opa52 Neisseria gonorrhoeae requires a Src-like tyrosine kinase- and Rac1-dependent signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Hauck, C R; Meyer, T F; Lang, F; Gulbins, E

    1998-01-15

    The interaction of Neisseria gonorrhoeae with human phagocytes is a hallmark of gonococcal infections. Recently, CD66 molecules have been characterized as receptors for Opa52-expressing gonococci on human neutrophils. Here we show that Opa52-expressing gonococci or Escherichia coli or F(ab) fragments directed against CD66, respectively, activate a signalling cascade from CD66 via Src-like protein tyrosine kinases, Rac1 and PAK to Jun-N-terminal kinase. The induced signal is distinct from Fcgamma-receptor-mediated signalling and is specific for Opa52, since piliated Opa- gonococci, commensal Neisseria cinerea or E.coli do not stimulate this signalling pathway. Inhibition of Src-like kinases or Rac1 prevents the uptake of Opa52 bacteria, demonstrating the crucial role of this signalling cascade for the opsonin-independent, Opa52/CD66-mediated phagocytosis of pathogenic Neisseria.

  9. Fgfr4 is required for effective muscle regeneration in vivo. Delineation of a MyoD-Tead2-Fgfr4 transcriptional pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Po; Caretti, Giuseppina; Mitchell, Stephanie; McKeehan, Wallace L; Boskey, Adele L; Pachman, Lauren M; Sartorelli, Vittorio; Hoffman, Eric P

    2006-01-06

    Fgfr4 has been shown to be important for appropriate muscle development in chick limb buds; however, Fgfr4 null mice show no phenotype. Here, we show that staged induction of muscle regeneration in Fgfr4 null mice becomes highly abnormal at the time point when Fgfr4 is normally expressed. By 7 days of regeneration, differentiation of myotubes became poorly coordinated and delayed by both histology and embryonic myosin heavy chain staining. By 14 days much of the muscle was replaced by fat and calcifications. To begin to dissect the molecular pathways involving Fgfr4, we queried the promoter sequences for transcriptional factor binding sites and tested candidate regulators in a 27-time point regeneration series. The Fgfr4 promoter region contained a Tead protein binding site (M-CAT 5'-CATTCCT-3'), and Tead2 showed induction during regeneration commensurate with Fgfr4 regulation. Co-transfection of Tead2 and Fgfr4 promoter reporter constructs into C2C12 myotubes showed Tead2 to activate Fgfr4, and mutation of the M-CAT motif in the Fgfr4 promoter abolished these effects. Immunostaining for Tead2 showed timed expression in myotube nuclei consistent with the mRNA data. Query of the expression timing and genomic sequences of Tead2 suggested direct regulation by MyoD, and consistent with this, MyoD directly bound to two strong E-boxes in the first intron of Tead2 by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Moreover, co-transfection of MyoD and Tead2 intron reporter constructs into 10T1/2 cells activated reporter activity in a dose-dependent manner. This activation was greatly reduced when the two E-boxes were mutated. Our data suggest a novel MyoD-Tead2-Fgfr4 pathway important for effective muscle regeneration.

  10. Insulin is required for amino acid stimulation of dual pathways for translational control in skeletal muscle in the late-gestation ovine fetus.

    PubMed

    Brown, Laura D; Rozance, Paul J; Barry, James S; Friedman, Jacob E; Hay, William W

    2009-01-01

    During late gestation, amino acids and insulin promote skeletal muscle protein synthesis. However, the independent effects of amino acids and insulin on the regulation of mRNA translation initiation in the fetus are relatively unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine whether acute amino acid infusion in the late-gestation ovine fetus, with and without a simultaneous increase in fetal insulin concentration, activates translation initiation pathway(s) in skeletal muscle. Fetuses received saline (C), mixed amino acid infusion plus somatostatin infusion to suppress amino acid-stimulated fetal insulin secretion (AA+S), mixed amino acid infusion with concomitant physiological increase in fetal insulin (AA), or high-dose insulin infusion with euglycemia and euaminoacidemia (HI). After a 2-h infusion period, fetal skeletal muscle was harvested under in vivo steady-state conditions and frozen for quantification of proteins both upstream and downstream of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). In the AA group, we found a threefold increase in ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70(S6k)) and Erk1/2 phosphorylation; however, blocking the physiological rise in insulin with somatostatin in the AA+S group prevented this increase. In the HI group, Akt, Erk1/2, p70(S6k), and ribosomal protein S6 were highly phosphorylated and 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) associated with eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF)4E decreased by 30%. These data show that insulin is a significant regulator of intermediates involved in translation initiation in ovine fetal skeletal muscle. Furthermore, the effect of amino acids is dependent on a concomitant increase in fetal insulin concentrations, because amino acid infusion upregulates p70(S6k) and Erk only when amino acid-stimulated increase in insulin occurs.

  11. Spatiotemporal control of endocytosis by phosphatidylinositol-3,4-bisphosphate.

    PubMed

    Posor, York; Eichhorn-Gruenig, Marielle; Puchkov, Dmytro; Schöneberg, Johannes; Ullrich, Alexander; Lampe, André; Müller, Rainer; Zarbakhsh, Sirus; Gulluni, Federico; Hirsch, Emilio; Krauss, Michael; Schultz, Carsten; Schmoranzer, Jan; Noé, Frank; Haucke, Volker

    2013-07-11

    Phosphoinositides serve crucial roles in cell physiology, ranging from cell signalling to membrane traffic. Among the seven eukaryotic phosphoinositides the best studied species is phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2), which is concentrated at the plasma membrane where, among other functions, it is required for the nucleation of endocytic clathrin-coated pits. No phosphatidylinositol other than PI(4,5)P2 has been implicated in clathrin-mediated endocytosis, whereas the subsequent endosomal stages of the endocytic pathway are dominated by phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphates(PI(3)P). How phosphatidylinositol conversion from PI(4,5)P2-positive endocytic intermediates to PI(3)P-containing endosomes is achieved is unclear. Here we show that formation of phosphatidylinositol-3,4-bisphosphate (PI(3,4)P2) by class II phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase C2α (PI(3)K C2α) spatiotemporally controls clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Depletion of PI(3,4)P2 or PI(3)K C2α impairs the maturation of late-stage clathrin-coated pits before fission. Timed formation of PI(3,4)P2 by PI(3)K C2α is required for selective enrichment of the BAR domain protein SNX9 at late-stage endocytic intermediates. These findings provide a mechanistic framework for the role of PI(3,4)P2 in endocytosis and unravel a novel discrete function of PI(3,4)P2 in a central cell physiological process.

  12. Endocytosis of the anthrax toxin is mediated by clathrin, actin and unconventional adaptors.

    PubMed

    Abrami, Laurence; Bischofberger, Mirko; Kunz, Béatrice; Groux, Romain; van der Goot, F Gisou

    2010-03-05

    The anthrax toxin is a tripartite toxin, where the two enzymatic subunits require the third subunit, the protective antigen (PA), to interact with cells and be escorted to their cytoplasmic targets. PA binds to cells via one of two receptors, TEM8 and CMG2. Interestingly, the toxin times and triggers its own endocytosis, in particular through the heptamerization of PA. Here we show that PA triggers the ubiquitination of its receptors in a beta-arrestin-dependent manner and that this step is required for clathrin-mediated endocytosis. In addition, we find that endocytosis is dependent on the heterotetrameric adaptor AP-1 but not the more conventional AP-2. Finally, we show that endocytosis of PA is strongly dependent on actin. Unexpectedly, actin was also found to be essential for efficient heptamerization of PA, but only when bound to one of its 2 receptors, TEM8, due to the active organization of TEM8 into actin-dependent domains. Endocytic pathways are highly modular systems. Here we identify some of the key players that allow efficient heptamerization of PA and subsequent ubiquitin-dependent, clathrin-mediated endocytosis of the anthrax toxin.

  13. Analysis of FcγRIIA Cytoplasmic Tail Requirements in Signaling for Serotonin Secretion: Evidence for an ITAM-dependent, PI3K-dependent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Anthony B.; Worth, Randall G.; Dickstein, Rian J.; Dickstein, Joshua S.; Kim-Han, Tae-Hee; Kim, Moo-Kyung; Schreiber, Alan D.

    2010-01-01

    The human Fc receptor, FcγRIIA, is known to mediate phagocytosis and endocytosis, yet the greatest numbers of these receptors are expressed on the surface of non-phagocytic platelets, where they are involved in serotonin secretion. FcγRIIA harbors three tyrosine (Y) residues within its cytoplasmic domain. Y1 is upstream of both Y2 and Y3, which are contained within an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM), required for many signaling events. We have demonstrated that the two ITAM tyrosines are required for phagocytic signaling and that mutation of a single ITAM tyrosine decreases but does not abolish phagocytic signaling. Furthermore, we have identified that the YMTL motif is required for endocytosis. These observations suggest that FcγRIIA utilizes different sequences for various signaling events. Therefore, we investigated the sequence requirements for another important FcγRIIA-mediated signaling event, serotonin secretion, using Rat Basophilic Leukemia (RBL-2H3) cells transfected with wildtype (WT) FcγRIIA or mutant FcγRIIA. Stimulation of cells expressing WT FcγRIIA induced release of serotonin at a level 7-fold greater than that in nonstimulated WT FcγRIIA-transfected cells or nontransfected RBL cells. Mutation of either ITAM tyrosine (Y2 or Y3) to phenylalanine was sufficient to abolish serotonin secretion. Further, while inhibition of Syk with piceatannol blocked phagocytosis as expected, it did not inhibit serotonin secretion. Additionally, inhibition of phosphoinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) with wortmannin only had a partial effect on serotonin signaling, despite the fact that the concentrations used completely abolished phagocytic signaling. These data suggest that the requirements for serotonin secretion differ from those for phagocytosis mediated by FcγRIIA. PMID:20384866

  14. Interaction of Yna1 and Yna2 Is Required for Nuclear Accumulation and Transcriptional Activation of the Nitrate Assimilation Pathway in the Yeast Hansenula polymorpha

    PubMed Central

    Silvestrini, Lucia; Rossi, Beatrice; Gallmetzer, Andreas; Mathieu, Martine; Scazzocchio, Claudio; Berardi, Enrico; Strauss, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    A few yeasts, including Hansenula polymorpha are able to assimilate nitrate and use it as nitrogen source. The genes necessary for nitrate assimilation are organised in this organism as a cluster comprising those encoding nitrate reductase (YNR1), nitrite reductase (YNI1), a high affinity transporter (YNT1), as well as the two pathway specific Zn(II)2Cys2 transcriptional activators (YNA1, YNA2). Yna1p and Yna2p mediate induction of the system and here we show that their functions are interdependent. Yna1p activates YNA2 as well as its own (YNA1) transcription thus forming a nitrate-dependent autoactivation loop. Using a split-YFP approach we demonstrate here that Yna1p and Yna2p form a heterodimer independently of the inducer and despite both Yna1p and Yna2p can occupy the target promoter as mono- or homodimer individually, these proteins are transcriptionally incompetent. Subsequently, the transcription factors target genes containing a conserved DNA motif (termed nitrate-UAS) determined in this work by in vitro and in vivo protein-DNA interaction studies. These events lead to a rearrangement of the chromatin landscape on the target promoters and are associated with the onset of transcription of these target genes. In contrast to other fungi and plants, in which nuclear accumulation of the pathway-specific transcription factors only occur in the presence of nitrate, Yna1p and Yna2p are constitutively nuclear in H. polymorpha. Yna2p is needed for this nuclear accumulation and Yna1p is incapable of strictly positioning in the nucleus without Yna2p. In vivo DNA footprinting and ChIP analyses revealed that the permanently nuclear Yna1p/Yna2p heterodimer only binds to the nitrate-UAS when the inducer is present. The nitrate-dependent up-regulation of one partner protein in the heterodimeric complex is functionally similar to the nitrate-dependent activation of nuclear accumu