Science.gov

Sample records for pathways interaction effects

  1. Pathway Interaction Database (PID) —

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) in collaboration with Nature Publishing Group has established the Pathway Interaction Database (PID) in order to provide a highly structured, curated collection of information about known biomolecular interactions and key cellular processes assembled into signaling pathways.

  2. Pathway Analysis Incorporating Protein-Protein Interaction Networks Identified Candidate Pathways for the Seven Common Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Peng-Lin; Yu, Ya-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Pathway analysis has become popular as a secondary analysis strategy for genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Most of the current pathway analysis methods aggregate signals from the main effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes within a pathway without considering the effects of gene-gene interactions. However, gene-gene interactions can also have critical effects on complex diseases. Protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks have been used to define gene pairs for the gene-gene interaction tests. Incorporating the PPI information to define gene pairs for interaction tests within pathways can increase the power for pathway-based association tests. We propose a pathway association test, which aggregates the interaction signals in PPI networks within a pathway, for GWAS with case-control samples. Gene size is properly considered in the test so that genes do not contribute more to the test statistic simply due to their size. Simulation studies were performed to verify that the method is a valid test and can have more power than other pathway association tests in the presence of gene-gene interactions within a pathway under different scenarios. We applied the test to the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium GWAS datasets for seven common diseases. The most significant pathway is the chaperones modulate interferon signaling pathway for Crohn’s disease (p-value = 0.0003). The pathway modulates interferon gamma, which induces the JAK/STAT pathway that is involved in Crohn’s disease. Several other pathways that have functional implications for the seven diseases were also identified. The proposed test based on gene-gene interaction signals in PPI networks can be used as a complementary tool to the current existing pathway analysis methods focusing on main effects of genes. An efficient software implementing the method is freely available at http://puppi.sourceforge.net. PMID:27622767

  3. Pathway Analysis Incorporating Protein-Protein Interaction Networks Identified Candidate Pathways for the Seven Common Diseases.

    PubMed

    Lin, Peng-Lin; Yu, Ya-Wen; Chung, Ren-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Pathway analysis has become popular as a secondary analysis strategy for genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Most of the current pathway analysis methods aggregate signals from the main effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes within a pathway without considering the effects of gene-gene interactions. However, gene-gene interactions can also have critical effects on complex diseases. Protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks have been used to define gene pairs for the gene-gene interaction tests. Incorporating the PPI information to define gene pairs for interaction tests within pathways can increase the power for pathway-based association tests. We propose a pathway association test, which aggregates the interaction signals in PPI networks within a pathway, for GWAS with case-control samples. Gene size is properly considered in the test so that genes do not contribute more to the test statistic simply due to their size. Simulation studies were performed to verify that the method is a valid test and can have more power than other pathway association tests in the presence of gene-gene interactions within a pathway under different scenarios. We applied the test to the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium GWAS datasets for seven common diseases. The most significant pathway is the chaperones modulate interferon signaling pathway for Crohn's disease (p-value = 0.0003). The pathway modulates interferon gamma, which induces the JAK/STAT pathway that is involved in Crohn's disease. Several other pathways that have functional implications for the seven diseases were also identified. The proposed test based on gene-gene interaction signals in PPI networks can be used as a complementary tool to the current existing pathway analysis methods focusing on main effects of genes. An efficient software implementing the method is freely available at http://puppi.sourceforge.net. PMID:27622767

  4. Minimal metabolic pathway structure is consistent with associated biomolecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Bordbar, Aarash; Nagarajan, Harish; Lewis, Nathan E; Latif, Haythem; Ebrahim, Ali; Federowicz, Stephen; Schellenberger, Jan; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2014-01-01

    Pathways are a universal paradigm for functionally describing cellular processes. Even though advances in high-throughput data generation have transformed biology, the core of our biological understanding, and hence data interpretation, is still predicated on human-defined pathways. Here, we introduce an unbiased, pathway structure for genome-scale metabolic networks defined based on principles of parsimony that do not mimic canonical human-defined textbook pathways. Instead, these minimal pathways better describe multiple independent pathway-associated biomolecular interaction datasets suggesting a functional organization for metabolism based on parsimonious use of cellular components. We use the inherent predictive capability of these pathways to experimentally discover novel transcriptional regulatory interactions in Escherichia coli metabolism for three transcription factors, effectively doubling the known regulatory roles for Nac and MntR. This study suggests an underlying and fundamental principle in the evolutionary selection of pathway structures; namely, that pathways may be minimal, independent, and segregated. PMID:24987116

  5. Minimal metabolic pathway structure is consistent with associated biomolecular interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bordbar, Aarash; Nagarajan, Harish; Lewis, Nathan E; Latif, Haythem; Ebrahim, Ali; Federowicz, Stephen; Schellenberger, Jan; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2014-01-01

    Pathways are a universal paradigm for functionally describing cellular processes. Even though advances in high-throughput data generation have transformed biology, the core of our biological understanding, and hence data interpretation, is still predicated on human-defined pathways. Here, we introduce an unbiased, pathway structure for genome-scale metabolic networks defined based on principles of parsimony that do not mimic canonical human-defined textbook pathways. Instead, these minimal pathways better describe multiple independent pathway-associated biomolecular interaction datasets suggesting a functional organization for metabolism based on parsimonious use of cellular components. We use the inherent predictive capability of these pathways to experimentally discover novel transcriptional regulatory interactions in Escherichia coli metabolism for three transcription factors, effectively doubling the known regulatory roles for Nac and MntR. This study suggests an underlying and fundamental principle in the evolutionary selection of pathway structures; namely, that pathways may be minimal, independent, and segregated. PMID:24987116

  6. Effects of Rivaroxaban on Platelet Activation and Platelet–Coagulation Pathway Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Heitmeier, Stefan; Laux, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Activation of coagulation and platelets is closely linked, and arterial thrombosis involves coagulation activation as well as platelet activation and aggregation. In these studies, we investigated the possible synergistic effects of rivaroxaban in combination with antiplatelet agents on thrombin generation and platelet aggregation in vitro and on arterial thrombosis and hemostasis in rat models. Materials and Methods: Thrombin generation was measured by the Calibrated Automated Thrombogram method (0.5 pmol/L tissue factor) using human platelet-rich plasma (PRP) spiked with rivaroxaban (15, 30, or 60 ng/mL), ticagrelor (1.0 µg/mL), and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA; 100 µg/mL). Tissue factor-induced platelet aggregation was measured in PRP spiked with rivaroxaban (15 or 30 ng/mL), ticagrelor (1 or 3 µg/mL), or a combination of these. An arteriovenous (AV) shunt model in rats was used to determine the effects of rivaroxaban (0.01, 0.03, or 0.1 mg/kg), clopidogrel (1 mg/kg), ASA (3 mg/kg), and combinations on arterial thrombosis. Results: Rivaroxaban inhibited thrombin generation in a concentration-dependent manner and the effect was enhanced with ticagrelor and ticagrelor plus ASA. Rivaroxaban and ticagrelor also concentration-dependently inhibited tissue factor-induced platelet aggregation, and their combination increased the inhibition synergistically. In the AV shunt model, rivaroxaban dose-dependently reduced thrombus formation. Combining subefficacious or weakly efficacious doses of rivaroxaban with ASA or ASA plus clopidogrel increased the antithrombotic effect. Conclusion: These data indicate that the combination of rivaroxaban with single or dual antiplatelet agents works synergistically to reduce platelet activation, which may in turn lead to the delayed/reduced formation of coagulation complexes and vice versa, thereby enhancing antithrombotic potency. PMID:25848131

  7. Discerning mechanistically rewired biological pathways by cumulative interaction heterogeneity statistics.

    PubMed

    Cotton, Travis B; Nguyen, Hien H; Said, Joseph I; Ouyang, Zhengyu; Zhang, Jinfa; Song, Mingzhou

    2015-01-01

    Changes in response of a biological pathway could be a consequence of either pathway rewiring, changed input, or a combination of both. Most pathway analysis methods are not designed for mechanistic rewiring such as regulatory element variations. This limits our understanding of biological pathway evolution. Here we present a Q-method to discern whether changed pathway response is caused by mechanistic rewiring of pathways due to evolution. The main innovation is a cumulative pathway interaction heterogeneity statistic accounting for rewiring-specific effects on the rate of change of each molecular variable across conditions. The Q-method remarkably outperformed differential-correlation based approaches on data from diverse biological processes. Strikingly, it also worked well in differentiating rewired chaotic systems, whose dynamics are notoriously difficult to predict. Applying the Q-method on transcriptome data of four yeasts, we show that pathway interaction heterogeneity for known metabolic and signaling pathways is indeed a predictor of interspecies genetic rewiring due to unbalanced TATA box-containing genes among the yeasts. The demonstrated effectiveness of the Q-method paves the way to understanding network evolution at the resolution of functional biological pathways. PMID:25921728

  8. Small-world networks of residue interactions in the Abl kinase complexes with cancer drugs: topology of allosteric communication pathways can determine drug resistance effects.

    PubMed

    Tse, A; Verkhivker, G M

    2015-07-01

    The human protein kinases play a fundamental regulatory role in orchestrating functional processes in complex cellular networks. Understanding how conformational equilibrium between functional kinase states can be modulated by ligand binding or mutations is critical for quantifying molecular basis of allosteric regulation and drug resistance. In this work, molecular dynamics simulations of the Abl kinase complexes with cancer drugs (Imatinib and Dasatinib) were combined with structure-based network modeling to characterize dynamics of the residue interaction networks in these systems. The results have demonstrated that structural architecture of kinase complexes can produce a small-world topology of the interaction networks. Our data have indicated that specific Imatinib binding to a small number of highly connected residues could lead to network-bridging effects and allow for efficient allosteric communication, which is mediated by a dominant pathway sensitive to the unphosphorylated Abl state. In contrast, Dasatinib binding to the active kinase form may activate a broader ensemble of allosteric pathways that are less dependent on the phosphorylation status of Abl and provide a better balance between the efficiency and resilience of signaling routes. Our results have unveiled how differences in the residue interaction networks and allosteric communications of the Abl kinase complexes can be directly related to drug resistance effects. This study offers a plausible perspective on how efficiency and robustness of the residue interaction networks and allosteric pathways in kinase structures may be associated with protein responses to drug binding.

  9. Alcohol Effects on Stress Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Blaine, Sara K.; Milivojevic, Verica; Fox, Helen

    2016-01-01

    A significant amount of neurobiological research regarding the development of alcohol use disorders (AUDs) has focused on alcohol-related activation and long-term alterations in the mesocortical dopaminergic reward pathways. However, alcohol does not only interact with brain reward systems. Many of its acute and chronic effects may be related to allostatic adaptations in hypothalamic and extrahypothalamic stress regulation pathways. For example, acute binge intoxication is associated with hypothalamically driven increases in blood cortisol, norepinephrine, and sex steroid metabolite levels. This may contribute to the development of mesocortical sensitization to alcohol. Furthermore, chronic alcohol exposure is associated with systemic dysregulation of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis, sympathetic adrenal medullary system, and sex steroid systems. This dysregulation appears to manifest as neuroendocrine tolerance. In this review, we first summarize the literature suggesting that alcohol-induced alterations in these hypothalamic systems influence craving and contribute to the development of AUDs. We note that for women, the effects of alcohol on these neuroendocrine stress regulation systems may be influenced by the rhythmic variations of hormones and steroids across the menstrual cycle. Second, we discuss how changes in these systems may indicate progression of AUDs and increased risk of relapse in both sexes. Specifically, neuroendocrine tolerance may contribute to mesocortical sensitization, which in turn may lead to decreased prefrontal inhibitory control of the dopaminergic reward and hypothalamic stress systems. Thus, pharmacological strategies that counteract alcohol-associated changes in hypothalamic and extrahypothalamic stress regulation pathways may slow the development and progression of AUDs. PMID:27254089

  10. Arbovirus-mosquito interactions: RNAi pathway.

    PubMed

    Olson, Ken E; Blair, Carol D

    2015-12-01

    Arthropod-borne (arbo) viruses infect hematophagous arthropods (vectors) to maintain virus transmission between vertebrate hosts. The mosquito vector actively controls arbovirus infection to minimize its fitness costs. The RNA interference (RNAi) pathway is the major antiviral response vectors use to restrict arbovirus infections. We know this because depleting RNAi gene products profoundly impacts arbovirus replication, the antiviral RNAi pathway genes undergo positive, diversifying selection and arboviruses have evolved strategies to evade the vector's RNAi responses. The vector's RNAi defense and arbovirus countermeasures lead to an arms race that prevents potential virus-induced fitness costs yet maintains arbovirus infections needed for transmission. This review will discuss the latest findings in RNAi-arbovirus interactions in the model insect (Drosophila melanogaster) and in specific mosquito vectors.

  11. Hsa-miR-590-5p Interaction with SMAD3 Transcript Supports Its Regulatory Effect on The TGFβ Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jafarzadeh, Meisam; Soltani, Bahram M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective SMAD proteins are the core players of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGFβ) signaling pathway, a pathway which is involved in cell proliferation, differentiation and migration. On the other hand, hsa-miRNA-590-5p (miR-590-5p) is known to have a negative regulatory effect on TGFβ signaling pathway receptors. Since, RNAhybrid analy- sis suggested SMAD3 as a bona fide target gene for miR-590, we intended to investigate the effect of miR-590-5p on SMAD3 transcription. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, miR-590-5p was overexpressed in different cell lines and its increased expression was detected through quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Western blot analysis was then used to investigate the effect of miR-590-5p overexpression on SMAD3 protein level. Next, the direct interaction of miR-590-5p with the 3´-UTR sequence of SMAD3 transcript was investigated using the dual luciferase assay. Finally, flow cytometery was used to inves- tigate the effect of miR-590-5p overexpression on cell cycle progression in HeLa and SW480 cell lines. Results miR-590-5p was overexpressed in the SW480 cell line and its overexpression resulted in significant reduction of the SMAD3 protein level. Consistently, direct interaction of miR-590-5p with 3´-UTR sequence of SMAD3 was detected. Finally, miR-590-5p over- expression did not show a significant effect on cell cycle progression of Hela and SW480 cell lines. Conclusion Consistent with previous reports about the negative regulatory effect of miR-590 on TGFβ receptors, our data suggest that miR-590-5p also attenuates the TGFβ signaling pathway through down-regulation of SMAD3. PMID:27054113

  12. An integrated pathway interaction network for the combination of four effective compounds from ShengMai preparations in the treatment of cardio-cerebral ischemic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fang; Lv, Yan-ni; Tan, Yi-sha; Shen, Kai; Zhai, Ke-feng; Chen, Hong-lin; Kou, Jun-ping; Yu, Bo-yang

    2015-01-01

    Aim: SMXZF (a combination of ginsenoside Rb1, ginsenoside Rg1, schizandrin and DT-13) derived from Chinese traditional medicine formula ShengMai preparations) is capable of alleviating cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in mice. In this study we used network pharmacology approach to explore the mechanisms of SMXZF in the treatment of cardio-cerebral ischemic diseases. Methods: Based upon the chemical predictors, such as chemical structure, pharmacological information and systems biology functional data analysis, a target-pathway interaction network was constructed to identify potential pathways and targets of SMXZF in the treatment of cardio-cerebral ischemia. Furthermore, the most related pathways were verified in TNF-α-treated human vascular endothelial EA.hy926 cells and H2O2-treated rat PC12 cells. Results: Three signaling pathways including the NF-κB pathway, oxidative stress pathway and cytokine network pathway were demonstrated to be the main signaling pathways. The results from the gene ontology analysis were in accordance with these signaling pathways. The target proteins were found to be associated with other diseases such as vision, renal and metabolic diseases, although they exerted therapeutic actions on cardio-cerebral ischemic diseases. Furthermore, SMXZF not only dose-dependently inhibited the phosphorylation of NF-κB, p50, p65 and IKKα/β in TNF-α-treated EA.hy926 cells, but also regulated the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway in H2O2-treated PC12 cells. Conclusion: NF-κB signaling pathway, oxidative stress pathway and cytokine network pathway are mainly responsible for the therapeutic actions of SMXZF against cardio-cerebral ischemic diseases. PMID:26456587

  13. Detecting genetic interactions in pathway-based genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Huang, Anhui; Martin, Eden R; Vance, Jeffery M; Cai, Xiaodong

    2014-05-01

    Pathway-based genome-wide association studies (GWAS) can exploit collective effects of causal variants in a pathway to increase power of detection. However, current methods for pathway-based GWAS do not consider epistatic effects of genetic variants, although interactions between genetic variants may play an important role in influencing complex traits. In this paper, we employed a Bayesian Lasso logistic regression model for pathway-based GWAS to include all possible main effects and a large number of pairwise interactions of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a pathway, and then inferred the model with an efficient group empirical Bayesian Lasso (EBLasso) method. Using the inferred model, the statistical significance of a pathway was tested with the Wald statistics. Reliable effects in a significant pathway were selected using the stability selection technique. Extensive computer simulations demonstrated that our group EBlasso method significantly outperformed two competitive methods in most simulation setups and offered similar performance in other simulation setups. When applying to a GWAS dataset for Parkinson disease, EBLasso identified three significant pathways including the primary bile acid biosynthesis pathway, the neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction, and the MAPK signaling pathway. All effects identified in the primary bile acid biosynthesis pathway and many of effects in the other two pathways were epistatic effects. The group EBLasso method provides a valuable tool for pathway-based GWAS to identify main and epistatic effects of genetic variants.

  14. Estrogen Stimulation of Cell Migration Involves Multiple Signaling Pathway Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Wang, Ji-Ping; Santen, Richard J.; Kim, Tae-Hyun; Park, Hoyong; Fan, Ping; Yue, Wei

    2010-01-01

    Hormone-dependent breast cancers respond to inhibitors of estrogen synthesis or action with tumor regression and with a reduction of new metastases. The mechanisms underlying the effects of estrogen on metastasis likely differ from those on tumor regression. Cell migration is a key first step in the metastatic process. Based on our prior work and other published data, we designed and tested a working model that suggested that estrogen receptor α, epidermal growth factor receptor, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), paxillin, phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase, p60 Src tyrosine kinase (c-Src), c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and MAPK interact to facilitate estradiol (E2)-induced cell migration. Accordingly, we examined the effect of E2 on activation of these pathways and demonstrated mechanistic effects by blocking each component and assessing cell migration as a biologic endpoint. Initial studies validated a robust cell migration assay characterized by highly reproducible, dose-dependent responses to E2. Examining various mechanisms involved in migration, we showed that E2 induced activation of c-Src, FAK, and paxillin with early peaks within 5–30 min and later peaks at 24 h. ERK and protein kinase B phosphorylation exhibited only early peaks. Blockade of various steps in these signaling pathways with use of small interfering RNA or specific inhibitors demonstrated mechanistic effects of these signaling molecules on cell migration. Our results suggest that the effects of E2 on cell migration involve multiple, interacting signaling pathways. Important effects are mediated by the MAPK, phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathways and use FAK, paxillin, and c-Src for activation. Each pathway represents a potential target for blocking cell migration and metastasis of breast cancer cells. PMID:20861240

  15. Modelling the interactions between TLR4 and IFNβ pathways.

    PubMed

    Günel, Aylin

    2012-08-21

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) association with their connate receptor TLR4 triggers Type I interferon signaling cascade through its MyD88 independent downstream. Compared to plethora of reported empirical data on both TLR4 and Type I interferon pathways, there is no known model to decipher crosstalk mechanisms between these two crucial innate immune pathogen activated pathways regulating vital transcriptional factors such as nuclear factor-κB (NFκB), IFNβ, the interferon-stimulated gene factor-3 (ISGF3) and an important cancer drug target protein kinase-R (PKR). Innate immune system is based on a sensitive balance of intricate interactions. In elucidating these interactions, in silico integration of pathways has great potential. Attempts confined to single pathway may not be effective in truly addressing source of real systems behavior. This is the first report combining toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) and interferon beta (IFNβ) pathways in a single in silico model, analyzing their interactions, pinpointing the source of delay in PKR late phase activity and limiting the transcription of IFN and PKR by using a method including an statistical physics technique in reaction equations. The model quite successfully recapitulates published interferon regulatory factor-3 (IRF3) and IFNβ data from mouse macrophages and PKR data from mouse embryonic fibroblast cell lines. The simulations end up with an estimate of IRF3, IFNβ, ISGF3 dose dependent profiles mimicking nonlinear dose response characteristic of the system. Involvement of concomitant PKR downstream can unravel elusive mechanisms in specific profiles like NFκB regulation.

  16. Groundwater interactions with surface waters: consequences on diffuse pollution pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzellino, Arianna; Salvetti, Roberta; Gorla, Elena; Parati, Paolo; Malagò, Anna; Ragusa, Francesca; Vismara, Renato

    2010-05-01

    The interactions between groundwater and surface water are complex. Surface-waters and groundwaters are, in fact, linked components of a hydrologic continuum. In general, diffuse pollution in surface waters is difficult to quantify since it follows a multitude of pathways and acts on different time scales. During rainfall events most of the diffuse pollutant load follows the surface runoff pathways and, reaches the surface acquifers however, a fraction of this load will follows the sub-surface runoff pathways and it will possibly reach the surface acquifers after a certain time lag. The time scale of the sub-surface runoff pathways is very different from the surface runoff time scale and rarely a subsurface diffuse pollution event can be directly correlated to a specific rainfall event. This is the reason why even though there are models that enable to simulate the groundwater-surface water system (GW-SW), yet the effect of these interactions in terms of diffuse pollution pathways and their correspondent effect on the quality of surface waters to date are largely unknown. To upgrade the conceptual modeling of the "groundwater-surface water" system, a broader perspective of such interactions across and between surfacewater bodies is needed. Multidimensional analyses may help in understanding the effect of such interactions, as the characterization of the hydraulic interface and its spatial variability. To fully understand these interactions, modeling studies need to be coupled to sound and robust monitoring of surface- and ground- water quality data. Modeling can be combined with multivariate statistical techniques (e.g. factor analysis) to improve our capability to "detect" the effect of the sub-surface runoff on the water quality of specific water courses. Aim of this study was to analyse the groundwater contribution to the total nutrient river load of different watersheds that share a very intensive agriculture and landfarming system. The studied watersheds all

  17. Interactions of pathogen-containing compartments with the secretory pathway.

    PubMed

    Canton, Johnathan; Kima, Peter E

    2012-11-01

    A subgroup of intracellular pathogens reside and replicate within membrane-bound compartments often termed pathogen-containing compartments (PCC). PCCs navigate around a wide range of host cell vesicles and organelles. In light of the perils of engaging with vesicles of the endocytic pathway, most PCCs modulate their interactions with endocytic vesicles while a few avoid those interactions. The secretory pathway constitutes another important grouping of vesicles and organelles in host cells. Although the negative consequences of engaging with the secretory pathway are not known, there is evidence that PCCs interact differentially with vesicles and organelles in this pathway as well. In this review, we consider three prokaryote pathogens and two protozoan parasites for which there is information on the interactions of their PCCs with the secretory pathway. Current understandings of the molecular interactions as well as the metabolic benefits that accompany those interactions are discussed. Not unexpectedly, our understanding of the extent of these interactions is variable. An underlying theme that is brought to the fore is that PCCs establish preferential interactions with distinct compartments of the secretory pathway.

  18. Actionable pathways: interactive discovery of therapeutic targets using signaling pathway models

    PubMed Central

    Salavert, Francisco; Hidago, Marta R.; Amadoz, Alicia; Çubuk, Cankut; Medina, Ignacio; Crespo, Daniel; Carbonell-Caballero, Jose; Dopazo, Joaquín

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of actionable targets is crucial for targeted therapies and is also a constituent part of the drug discovery process. The success of an intervention over a target depends critically on its contribution, within the complex network of gene interactions, to the cellular processes responsible for disease progression or therapeutic response. Here we present PathAct, a web server that predicts the effect that interventions over genes (inhibitions or activations that simulate knock-outs, drug treatments or over-expressions) can have over signal transmission within signaling pathways and, ultimately, over the cell functionalities triggered by them. PathAct implements an advanced graphical interface that provides a unique interactive working environment in which the suitability of potentially actionable genes, that could eventually become drug targets for personalized or individualized therapies, can be easily tested. The PathAct tool can be found at: http://pathact.babelomics.org. PMID:27137885

  19. Pathways in Interactive Media Practices among Youths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Beemt, Antoine; Akkerman, Sanne; Simons, P. Robert-Jan

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study examines how 11 Dutch students aged 14-15 develop an interest in specific types of interactive media practices and how they perceive these practices in relation to others. The methods included semi-structured interviewing, autodriving visual elicitation and photo elicitation using moodboards. Our results show the importance…

  20. Computational Reconstruction of NFκB Pathway Interaction Mechanisms during Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Börnigen, Daniela; Tyekucheva, Svitlana; Wang, Xiaodong; Rider, Jennifer R.; Lee, Gwo-Shu; Mucci, Lorelei A.; Sweeney, Christopher; Huttenhower, Curtis

    2016-01-01

    Molecular research in cancer is one of the largest areas of bioinformatic investigation, but it remains a challenge to understand biomolecular mechanisms in cancer-related pathways from high-throughput genomic data. This includes the Nuclear-factor-kappa-B (NFκB) pathway, which is central to the inflammatory response and cell proliferation in prostate cancer development and progression. Despite close scrutiny and a deep understanding of many of its members’ biomolecular activities, the current list of pathway members and a systems-level understanding of their interactions remains incomplete. Here, we provide the first steps toward computational reconstruction of interaction mechanisms of the NFκB pathway in prostate cancer. We identified novel roles for ATF3, CXCL2, DUSP5, JUNB, NEDD9, SELE, TRIB1, and ZFP36 in this pathway, in addition to new mechanistic interactions between these genes and 10 known NFκB pathway members. A newly predicted interaction between NEDD9 and ZFP36 in particular was validated by co-immunoprecipitation, as was NEDD9's potential biological role in prostate cancer cell growth regulation. We combined 651 gene expression datasets with 1.4M gene product interactions to predict the inclusion of 40 additional genes in the pathway. Molecular mechanisms of interaction among pathway members were inferred using recent advances in Bayesian data integration to simultaneously provide information specific to biological contexts and individual biomolecular activities, resulting in a total of 112 interactions in the fully reconstructed NFκB pathway: 13 (11%) previously known, 29 (26%) supported by existing literature, and 70 (63%) novel. This method is generalizable to other tissue types, cancers, and organisms, and this new information about the NFκB pathway will allow us to further understand prostate cancer and to develop more effective prevention and treatment strategies. PMID:27078000

  1. Integrated Interactive Chart as a Tool for Teaching Metabolic Pathways

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalogiannis, Stavros; Pagkalos, Ioannis; Koufoudakis, Panagiotis; Dashi, Ino; Pontikeri, Kyriaki; Christodoulou, Constantina

    2014-01-01

    An interactive chart of energy metabolism with didactic function, complementary to the already existing metabolic maps, located at the URL www.metpath.teithe.gr is being presented. The chart illustrates the major catabolic and biosynthetic pathways of glucose, fatty acids, and aminoacids, individually as well as in an integrated view. For every…

  2. Cyclone-cyclone Interactions through the Ocean Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Balaguru, Karthik; Taraphdar, Sourav; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Foltz, Gregory R.; Knaff, John A.

    2014-10-16

    The intense SST (Sea Surface Temperature) cooling caused by hurricane-induced mixing is restored at timescales on the order of weeks(1) and thus may persist long enough to influence a later hurricane passing over it. Though many studies have evaluated the effects of SST cool-ing induced by a hurricane on its own intensification(2, 3), none has looked at its effect on later storms. Using an analysis of observations and numerical model simulations, we demonstrate that hurricanes may influence the intensity of later hurricanes that pass over their linger-ing wakes. On average, when hurricanes encounter cold wakes, they experience SSTs that are ~0.4oC lower than when they do not encounter wakes and consequently decay(intensify) at a rate that is nearly three times faster(slower). In the region of warm SSTs (* 26.5oC) where the most intense and damaging hurricanes tend to occur, the percentage of hurricanes that encounter lingering cold wakes increases with hurricane frequency and was found to be as high as 40%. Furthermore, we estimate that the cumulative power dissipated(4) by the most energetic hurricanes has been reduced by as much as ~7% in a season through this effect. As the debate on changes in Atlantic hurricane activity associated with global warming(5) continues, the negative feedback between hurricane frequency and intensity resulting from hurricane-hurricane interactions through the ocean pathway deserves attention.

  3. The interaction of pathways to fear in childhood anxiety: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Field, Andy P; Storksen-Coulson, Hannah

    2007-12-01

    Recent research has shown that the verbal information pathway to fear creates long-term fear cognitions and can create cognitive biases and avoidance in children. However, the interaction between the verbal information pathway to fear and other pathways is untested. This experiment exposed children (aged 6-8) to threat information about a novel animal to see the impact on a measure of avoidance after a subsequent simulated direct negative encounter with that animal. Results showed that a direct negative experience (without prior information) or threat information (without a subsequent negative experience) produced similar effects, but in combination (verbal threat information followed by a direct negative experience) the effect was significantly magnified. These results support theories of fear acquisition that suppose that verbal information impacts on the strength of associations formed in subsequent conditioning episodes, and suggest that pathways to fear have interactive effects. PMID:17935694

  4. Dynamic multibody protein interactions suggest versatile pathways for copper trafficking.

    PubMed

    Keller, Aaron M; Benítez, Jaime J; Klarin, Derek; Zhong, Linghao; Goldfogel, Matthew; Yang, Feng; Chen, Tai-Yen; Chen, Peng

    2012-05-30

    As part of intracellular copper trafficking pathways, the human copper chaperone Hah1 delivers Cu(+) to the Wilson's Disease Protein (WDP) via weak and dynamic protein-protein interactions. WDP contains six homologous metal binding domains (MBDs) connected by flexible linkers, and these MBDs all can receive Cu(+) from Hah1. The functional roles of the MBD multiplicity in Cu(+) trafficking are not well understood. Building on our previous study of the dynamic interactions between Hah1 and the isolated fourth MBD of WDP, here we study how Hah1 interacts with MBD34, a double-domain WDP construct, using single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) combined with vesicle trapping. By alternating the positions of the smFRET donor and acceptor, we systematically probed Hah1-MBD3, Hah1-MBD4, and MBD3-MBD4 interaction dynamics within the multidomain system. We found that the two interconverting interaction geometries were conserved in both intermolecular Hah1-MBD and intramolecular MBD-MBD interactions. The Hah1-MBD interactions within MBD34 are stabilized by an order of magnitude relative to the isolated single-MBDs, and thermodynamic and kinetic evidence suggest that Hah1 can interact with both MBDs simultaneously. The enhanced interaction stability of Hah1 with the multi-MBD system, the dynamic intramolecular MBD-MBD interactions, and the ability of Hah1 to interact with multiple MBDs simultaneously suggest an efficient and versatile mechanism for the Hah1-to-WDP pathway to transport Cu(+).

  5. Interactions of Bacterial Proteins with Host Eukaryotic Ubiquitin Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Perrett, Charlotte Averil; Lin, David Yin-Wei; Zhou, Daoguo

    2011-01-01

    Ubiquitination is a post-translational modification in which one or more 76 amino acid polypeptide ubiquitin molecules are covalently linked to the lysine residues of target proteins. Ubiquitination is the main pathway for protein degradation that governs a variety of eukaryotic cellular processes, including the cell-cycle, vesicle trafficking, antigen presentation, and signal transduction. Not surprisingly, aberrations in the system have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many diseases including inflammatory and neurodegenerative disorders. Recent studies have revealed that viruses and bacterial pathogens exploit the host ubiquitination pathways to gain entry and to aid their survival/replication inside host cells. This review will summarize recent developments in understanding the biochemical and structural mechanisms utilized by bacterial pathogens to interact with the host ubiquitination pathways. PMID:21772834

  6. An Interactive, Integrated, Instructional Pathway to the LEAD Science Gateway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalda, S.; Clark, R.; Davis, L.; Wiziecki, E. N.

    2008-12-01

    of learning materials, as well as new tools and features, to enhance the appearance and use of the LEAD portal gateway and its underlying cyberinfrastructure in an educational setting. The development of educational materials has centered on promoting the accessibility and use of meteorological data and analysis tools through the LEAD portal by providing instructional materials, additional custom designed tools that build off of Unidata's Integrated Data Viewer (IDV) (e.g. IDV Basic and NCDestroyer), and an interactive component that takes the user through specific tasks utilizing multiple tools. In fact, select improvements to parameter lists and domain subsetting have inspired IDV developers to incorporate changes in IDV revisions that are now available to the entire community. This collection of materials, demonstrations, interactive guides, student exercises, and customized tools, which are now available to the educator and student through the LEAD portal gateway, can serve as an instructional pathway for a set of guided, phenomenon-based exercises (e.g. fronts, lake-effect snows, etc.). This paper will provide an overview of the LEAD education and outreach efforts with a focus on the design of Web-based educational materials and instructional approaches for user interaction with the LEAD portal gateway and the underlying cyberinfrastructure, and will encourage educators, especially those involved in undergraduate meteorology education, to begin incorporating these capabilities into their course materials.

  7. Extended LineSets: a visualization technique for the interactive inspection of biological pathways

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Biologists make use of pathway visualization tools for a range of tasks, including investigating inter-pathway connectivity and retrieving details about biological entities and interactions. Some of these tasks require an understanding of the hierarchical nature of elements within the pathway or the ability to make comparisons between multiple pathways. We introduce a technique inspired by LineSets that enables biologists to fulfill these tasks more effectively. Results We introduce a novel technique, Extended LineSets, to facilitate new explorations of biological pathways. Our technique incorporates intuitive graphical representations of different levels of information and includes a well-designed set of user interactions for selecting, filtering, and organizing biological pathway data gathered from multiple databases. Conclusions Based on interviews with domain experts and an analysis of two use cases, we show that our technique provides functionality not currently enabled by current techniques, and moreover that it helps biologists to better understand both inter-pathway connectivity and the hierarchical structure of biological elements within the pathways. PMID:26361500

  8. Differential genetic interactions of yeast stress response MAPK pathways

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Humberto; Shales, Michael; Fernandez-Piñar, Pablo; Wei, Ping; Molina, Maria; Fiedler, Dorothea; Shokat, Kevan M; Beltrao, Pedro; Lim, Wendell; Krogan, Nevan J

    2015-01-01

    Genetic interaction screens have been applied with great success in several organisms to study gene function and the genetic architecture of the cell. However, most studies have been performed under optimal growth conditions even though many functional interactions are known to occur under specific cellular conditions. In this study, we have performed a large-scale genetic interaction analysis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae involving approximately 49 × 1,200 double mutants in the presence of five different stress conditions, including osmotic, oxidative and cell wall-altering stresses. This resulted in the generation of a differential E-MAP (or dE-MAP) comprising over 250,000 measurements of conditional interactions. We found an extensive number of conditional genetic interactions that recapitulate known stress-specific functional associations. Furthermore, we have also uncovered previously unrecognized roles involving the phosphatase regulator Bud14, the histone methylation complex COMPASS and membrane trafficking complexes in modulating the cell wall integrity pathway. Finally, the osmotic stress differential genetic interactions showed enrichment for genes coding for proteins with conditional changes in phosphorylation but not for genes with conditional changes in gene expression. This suggests that conditional genetic interactions are a powerful tool to dissect the functional importance of the different response mechanisms of the cell. PMID:25888283

  9. iPath2.0: interactive pathway explorer.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takuji; Letunic, Ivica; Okuda, Shujiro; Kanehisa, Minoru; Bork, Peer

    2011-07-01

    iPath2.0 is a web-based tool (http://pathways.embl.de) for the visualization and analysis of cellular pathways. Its primary map summarizes the metabolism in biological systems as annotated to date. Nodes in the map correspond to various chemical compounds and edges represent series of enzymatic reactions. In two other maps, iPath2.0 provides an overview of secondary metabolite biosynthesis and a hand-picked selection of important regulatory pathways and other functional modules, allowing a more general overview of protein functions in a genome or metagenome. iPath2.0's main interface is an interactive Flash-based viewer, which allows users to easily navigate and explore the complex pathway maps. In addition to the default pre-computed overview maps, iPath offers several data mapping tools. Users can upload various types of data and completely customize all nodes and edges of iPath2.0's maps. These customized maps give users an intuitive overview of their own data, guiding the analysis of various genomics and metagenomics projects.

  10. Effects of PDT on the endocytic pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessel, David

    2010-02-01

    Two lines of evidence point to an early effect of photodamage on membrane trafficking. [1] Internalization of a fluorescent probe for hydrophobic membrane loci was impaired by prior photodamage. [2] Interference with the endocytic pathway by the PI-3 kinase antagonist wortmannin led to accumulation of cytoplasmic vacuoles suggesting a block in the recycling of plasma membrane components. Prior photodamage blocked this pathway so that no vacuoles were formed upon exposure of cells to wortmannin. In a murine hepatoma line, the endocytic pathway was preferentially sensitive to lysosomal photodamage. The role of photodamage to the endocytic pathway as a factor in PDT efficacy remains to be assessed.

  11. The UCSC Interaction Browser: multidimensional data views in pathway context.

    PubMed

    Wong, Christopher K; Vaske, Charles J; Ng, Sam; Sanborn, J Zachary; Benz, Stephen C; Haussler, David; Stuart, Joshua M

    2013-07-01

    High-throughput data sets such as genome-wide protein-protein interactions, protein-DNA interactions and gene expression data have been published for several model systems, especially for human cancer samples. The University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) Interaction Browser (http://sysbio.soe.ucsc.edu/nets) is an online tool for biologists to view high-throughput data sets simultaneously for the analysis of functional relationships between biological entities. Users can access several public interaction networks and functional genomics data sets through the portal as well as upload their own networks and data sets for analysis. Users can navigate through correlative relationships for focused sets of genes belonging to biological pathways using a standard web browser. Using a new visual modality called the CircleMap, multiple 'omics' data sets can be viewed simultaneously within the context of curated, predicted, directed and undirected regulatory interactions. The Interaction Browser provides an integrative viewing of biological networks based on the consensus of many observations about genes and their products, which may provide new insights about normal and disease processes not obvious from any isolated data set.

  12. Machine Learning of Protein Interactions in Fungal Secretory Pathways.

    PubMed

    Kludas, Jana; Arvas, Mikko; Castillo, Sandra; Pakula, Tiina; Oja, Merja; Brouard, Céline; Jäntti, Jussi; Penttilä, Merja; Rousu, Juho

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we apply machine learning methods for predicting protein interactions in fungal secretion pathways. We assume an inter-species transfer setting, where training data is obtained from a single species and the objective is to predict protein interactions in other, related species. In our methodology, we combine several state of the art machine learning approaches, namely, multiple kernel learning (MKL), pairwise kernels and kernelized structured output prediction in the supervised graph inference framework. For MKL, we apply recently proposed centered kernel alignment and p-norm path following approaches to integrate several feature sets describing the proteins, demonstrating improved performance. For graph inference, we apply input-output kernel regression (IOKR) in supervised and semi-supervised modes as well as output kernel trees (OK3). In our experiments simulating increasing genetic distance, Input-Output Kernel Regression proved to be the most robust prediction approach. We also show that the MKL approaches improve the predictions compared to uniform combination of the kernels. We evaluate the methods on the task of predicting protein-protein-interactions in the secretion pathways in fungi, S.cerevisiae, baker's yeast, being the source, T. reesei being the target of the inter-species transfer learning. We identify completely novel candidate secretion proteins conserved in filamentous fungi. These proteins could contribute to their unique secretion capabilities. PMID:27441920

  13. Machine Learning of Protein Interactions in Fungal Secretory Pathways.

    PubMed

    Kludas, Jana; Arvas, Mikko; Castillo, Sandra; Pakula, Tiina; Oja, Merja; Brouard, Céline; Jäntti, Jussi; Penttilä, Merja; Rousu, Juho

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we apply machine learning methods for predicting protein interactions in fungal secretion pathways. We assume an inter-species transfer setting, where training data is obtained from a single species and the objective is to predict protein interactions in other, related species. In our methodology, we combine several state of the art machine learning approaches, namely, multiple kernel learning (MKL), pairwise kernels and kernelized structured output prediction in the supervised graph inference framework. For MKL, we apply recently proposed centered kernel alignment and p-norm path following approaches to integrate several feature sets describing the proteins, demonstrating improved performance. For graph inference, we apply input-output kernel regression (IOKR) in supervised and semi-supervised modes as well as output kernel trees (OK3). In our experiments simulating increasing genetic distance, Input-Output Kernel Regression proved to be the most robust prediction approach. We also show that the MKL approaches improve the predictions compared to uniform combination of the kernels. We evaluate the methods on the task of predicting protein-protein-interactions in the secretion pathways in fungi, S.cerevisiae, baker's yeast, being the source, T. reesei being the target of the inter-species transfer learning. We identify completely novel candidate secretion proteins conserved in filamentous fungi. These proteins could contribute to their unique secretion capabilities.

  14. Machine Learning of Protein Interactions in Fungal Secretory Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kludas, Jana; Arvas, Mikko; Castillo, Sandra; Pakula, Tiina; Oja, Merja; Brouard, Céline; Jäntti, Jussi; Penttilä, Merja

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we apply machine learning methods for predicting protein interactions in fungal secretion pathways. We assume an inter-species transfer setting, where training data is obtained from a single species and the objective is to predict protein interactions in other, related species. In our methodology, we combine several state of the art machine learning approaches, namely, multiple kernel learning (MKL), pairwise kernels and kernelized structured output prediction in the supervised graph inference framework. For MKL, we apply recently proposed centered kernel alignment and p-norm path following approaches to integrate several feature sets describing the proteins, demonstrating improved performance. For graph inference, we apply input-output kernel regression (IOKR) in supervised and semi-supervised modes as well as output kernel trees (OK3). In our experiments simulating increasing genetic distance, Input-Output Kernel Regression proved to be the most robust prediction approach. We also show that the MKL approaches improve the predictions compared to uniform combination of the kernels. We evaluate the methods on the task of predicting protein-protein-interactions in the secretion pathways in fungi, S.cerevisiae, baker’s yeast, being the source, T. reesei being the target of the inter-species transfer learning. We identify completely novel candidate secretion proteins conserved in filamentous fungi. These proteins could contribute to their unique secretion capabilities. PMID:27441920

  15. CINPER: an interactive web system for pathway prediction for prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xizeng; Chen, Xin; Zhang, Yu; Pangle, Spencer; Xu, Ying

    2012-01-01

    We present a web-based network-construction system, CINPER (CSBL INteractive Pathway BuildER), to assist a user to build a user-specified gene network for a prokaryotic organism in an intuitive manner. CINPER builds a network model based on different types of information provided by the user and stored in the system. CINPER's prediction process has four steps: (i) collection of template networks based on (partially) known pathways of related organism(s) from the SEED or BioCyc database and the published literature; (ii) construction of an initial network model based on the template networks using the P-Map program; (iii) expansion of the initial model, based on the association information derived from operons, protein-protein interactions, co-expression modules and phylogenetic profiles; and (iv) computational validation of the predicted models based on gene expression data. To facilitate easy applications, CINPER provides an interactive visualization environment for a user to enter, search and edit relevant data and for the system to display (partial) results and prompt for additional data. Evaluation of CINPER on 17 well-studied pathways in the MetaCyc database shows that the program achieves an average recall rate of 76% and an average precision rate of 90% on the initial models; and a higher average recall rate at 87% and an average precision rate at 28% on the final models. The reduced precision rate in the final models versus the initial models reflects the reality that the final models have large numbers of novel genes that have no experimental evidences and hence are not yet collected in the MetaCyc database. To demonstrate the usefulness of this server, we have predicted an iron homeostasis gene network of Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 using the server. The predicted models along with the server can be accessed at http://csbl.bmb.uga.edu/cinper/.

  16. Protecting the hedgerow: p53 and hedgehog pathway interactions.

    PubMed

    Ho, Louisa; Alman, Benjamin

    2010-02-01

    A common environment for the Hedgehog (Subfamily: erinaceinae) is a row of shrubs and trees often used on farms for enclosing or separating fields, called a hedgerow. Maintenance of a continuous shrub border is important for shielding crops from weather damage, but also provides an ideal protective habitat for the hedgehog. Similar to its mammalian counterpart, the Hedgehog (Hh) signalling pathway requires a controlled environment to regulate proper functioning of the cell. When allowed to run wild, constitutive activation of the Hh pathway results in tumorigenesis in different tissues types, including brain, skin and cartilage. With an additional loss of p53 tumor suppressor activity, an increase in tumor incidence, size and metastasis have been observed. p53 has a number of functions that can suppress tumor formation and growth in most, if not all Hh-related cancers, such as the inhibition of cell cycle progression and cell survival. Furthermore, increasing evidence of an interaction between p53 and Hedgehog signalling pathways suggests a critical role for the tumor suppressor activity of p53 in "protecting the hedgerow".

  17. Integrated interactive chart as a tool for teaching metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Kalogiannis, Stavros; Pagkalos, Ioannis; Koufoudakis, Panagiotis; Dashi, Ino; Pontikeri, Kyriaki; Christodoulou, Constantina

    2014-01-01

    An interactive chart of energy metabolism with didactic function, complementary to the already existing metabolic maps, located at the URL www.metpath.teithe.gr is being presented. The chart illustrates the major catabolic and biosynthetic pathways of glucose, fatty acids, and aminoacids, individually as well as in an integrated view. For every metabolite and reaction an information sheet may be presented at the side of the map as fancybox, containing chemical structural formulae, an external link to the KEGG database and links that lead to the reactions at which the produced metabolites may participate as reactants. The latter allows the user to navigate through metabolic reactions following a route similar to the metabolic flow of substances, while keeping track of the occurring chemical transformations. Simultaneously, users may observe how they move across the metabolic map, possibly along different pathways, thus enhancing the user's integrated perception of metabolism. The site has already been introduced in biochemistry lectures and the students evaluated it. Most students were helped a lot or more to understand individual pathways as well as their interconnections and they also found it pleasant and easy to navigate. The vast majority of the students considered its use in the classroom desired. The chart currently may be displayed in English and in Greek while more languages can be integrated in the future. The authors' view, in accordance to the users' perception, is that the presented site may offer biochemistry tutors and students a useful teaching aid.

  18. Integrating pathways of Parkinson's disease in a molecular interaction map.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kazuhiro A; Ostaszewski, Marek; Matsuoka, Yukiko; Ghosh, Samik; Glaab, Enrico; Trefois, Christophe; Crespo, Isaac; Perumal, Thanneer M; Jurkowski, Wiktor; Antony, Paul M A; Diederich, Nico; Buttini, Manuel; Kodama, Akihiko; Satagopam, Venkata P; Eifes, Serge; Del Sol, Antonio; Schneider, Reinhard; Kitano, Hiroaki; Balling, Rudi

    2014-02-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a major neurodegenerative chronic disease, most likely caused by a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors. Information on various aspects of PD pathogenesis is rapidly increasing and needs to be efficiently organized, so that the resulting data is available for exploration and analysis. Here we introduce a computationally tractable, comprehensive molecular interaction map of PD. This map integrates pathways implicated in PD pathogenesis such as synaptic and mitochondrial dysfunction, impaired protein degradation, alpha-synuclein pathobiology and neuroinflammation. We also present bioinformatics tools for the analysis, enrichment and annotation of the map, allowing the research community to open new avenues in PD research. The PD map is accessible at http://minerva.uni.lu/pd_map .

  19. Critical pathways: effectiveness in achieving patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ireson, C L

    1997-06-01

    Refining the clinical care process to produce high-quality patient outcomes is becoming increasingly important as health care administrators strive for success in a mature managed care environment. This study examines the effect of structuring interventions and the evaluation of patient response, inherent in the critical pathway process, on clinical, length-of-hospital-stay, and financial patient outcomes. This study differs from previous critical pathway trials in that an objective measure of quality was used and the critical pathways were not introduced concurrently with a case management delivery model. The results show that critical pathways may be a significant determinant of improved quality in a managed care environment. The findings also suggest ways to improve nursing practice, nursing education, and nursing informatics.

  20. Joint inhibition of TOR and JNK pathways interacts to extend the lifespan of Brachionus manjavacas (Rotifera).

    PubMed

    Snell, Terry W; Johnston, Rachel K; Rabeneck, Brett; Zipperer, Cody; Teat, Stephanie

    2014-04-01

    The TOR kinase pathway is central in modulating aging in a variety of animal models. The target of rapamycin (TOR) integrates a complex network of signals from growth conditions, nutrient availability, energy status, and physiological stresses and matches an organism's growth rate to the resource environment. Important remaining problems are the identification of the pathways that interact with TOR and their characterization as additive or synergistic. One of the most versatile stress sensors in metazoans is the Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway. JNK is an evolutionarily conserved stress-activated protein kinase that is induced by a range of stressors, including UV irradiation, reactive oxygen species, DNA damage, heat, and bacterial antigens. JNK is thought to interact with the TOR pathway, but its effects on TOR are poorly understood. We used the rotifer Brachionus manjavacas as a model animal to probe the regulation of TOR and JNK pathways and explore their interaction. The effect of various chemical inhibitors was examined in life table and stressor challenge experiments. A survey of 12 inhibitors revealed two, rapamycin and JNK inhibitor, that significantly extended lifespan of B. manjavacas. At 1 μM concentration, exposure to rapamycin or JNK inhibitor extended mean rotifer lifespan by 35% and maximum lifespan by 37%. Exposure to both rapamycin and JNK inhibitor simultaneously extended mean rotifer lifespan by 65% more than either alone. Exposure to a combination of rapamycin and JNK inhibitors conveyed greater protection to starvation, UV and osmotic stress than either inhibitor alone. RNAi knockdown of TOR and JNK gene expression was investigated for its ability to extend rotifer lifespan. RNAi knockdown of the TOR gene resulted in 29% extension of the mean lifespan compared to control and knockdown of the JNK gene resulted in 51% mean lifespan extension. In addition to the lifespan, we quantified mitochondria activity using the fluorescent

  1. Interactions between Trypanosoma cruzi Secreted Proteins and Host Cell Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe Costa, Renata; da Silveira, Jose F.; Bahia, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is one of the prevalent neglected tropical diseases, affecting at least 6–7 million individuals in Latin America. It is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which is transmitted to vertebrate hosts by blood-sucking insects. After infection, the parasite invades and multiplies in the myocardium, leading to acute myocarditis that kills around 5% of untreated individuals. T. cruzi secretes proteins that manipulate multiple host cell signaling pathways to promote host cell invasion. The primary secreted lysosomal peptidase in T. cruzi is cruzipain, which has been shown to modulate the host immune response. Cruzipain hinders macrophage activation during the early stages of infection by interrupting the NF-kB P65 mediated signaling pathway. This allows the parasite to survive and replicate, and may contribute to the spread of infection in acute Chagas disease. Another secreted protein P21, which is expressed in all of the developmental stages of T. cruzi, has been shown to modulate host phagocytosis signaling pathways. The parasite also secretes soluble factors that exert effects on host extracellular matrix, such as proteolytic degradation of collagens. Finally, secreted phospholipase A from T. cruzi contributes to lipid modifications on host cells and concomitantly activates the PKC signaling pathway. Here, we present a brief review of the interaction between secreted proteins from T. cruzi and the host cells, emphasizing the manipulation of host signaling pathways during invasion. PMID:27065960

  2. Pathway Based Analysis of Genes and Interactions Influencing Porcine Testis Samples from Boars with Divergent Androstenone Content in Back Fat

    PubMed Central

    Sahadevan, Sudeep; Gunawan, Asep; Tholen, Ernst; Große-Brinkhaus, Christine; Tesfaye, Dawit; Schellander, Karl; Hofmann-Apitius, Martin; Cinar, Mehmet Ulas; Uddin, Muhammad Jasim

    2014-01-01

    One of the primary factors contributing to boar taint is the level of androstenone in porcine adipose tissues. A majority of the studies performed to identify candidate biomarkers for the synthesis of androstenone in testis tissues follow a reductionist approach, identifying and studying the effect of biomarkers individually. Although these studies provide detailed information on individual biomarkers, a global picture of changes in metabolic pathways that lead to the difference in androstenone synthesis is still missing. The aim of this work was to identify major pathways and interactions influencing steroid hormone synthesis and androstenone biosynthesis using an integrative approach to provide a bird’s eye view of the factors causing difference in steroidogenesis and androstenone biosynthesis. For this purpose, we followed an analysis procedure merging together gene expression data from boars with divergent levels of androstenone and pathway mapping and interaction network retrieved from KEGG database. The interaction networks were weighted with Pearson correlation coefficients calculated from gene expression data and significant interactions and enriched pathways were identified based on these networks. The results show that 1,023 interactions were significant for high and low androstenone animals and that a total of 92 pathways were enriched for significant interactions. Although published articles show that a number of these enriched pathways were activated as a result of downstream signaling of steroid hormones, we speculate that the significant interactions in pathways such as glutathione metabolism, sphingolipid metabolism, fatty acid metabolism and significant interactions in cAMP-PKA/PKC signaling might be the key factors determining the difference in steroidogenesis and androstenone biosynthesis between boars with divergent androstenone levels in our study. The results and assumptions presented in this study are from an in-silico analysis done at the

  3. Pathway based analysis of genes and interactions influencing porcine testis samples from boars with divergent androstenone content in back fat.

    PubMed

    Sahadevan, Sudeep; Gunawan, Asep; Tholen, Ernst; Große-Brinkhaus, Christine; Tesfaye, Dawit; Schellander, Karl; Hofmann-Apitius, Martin; Cinar, Mehmet Ulas; Uddin, Muhammad Jasim

    2014-01-01

    One of the primary factors contributing to boar taint is the level of androstenone in porcine adipose tissues. A majority of the studies performed to identify candidate biomarkers for the synthesis of androstenone in testis tissues follow a reductionist approach, identifying and studying the effect of biomarkers individually. Although these studies provide detailed information on individual biomarkers, a global picture of changes in metabolic pathways that lead to the difference in androstenone synthesis is still missing. The aim of this work was to identify major pathways and interactions influencing steroid hormone synthesis and androstenone biosynthesis using an integrative approach to provide a bird's eye view of the factors causing difference in steroidogenesis and androstenone biosynthesis. For this purpose, we followed an analysis procedure merging together gene expression data from boars with divergent levels of androstenone and pathway mapping and interaction network retrieved from KEGG database. The interaction networks were weighted with Pearson correlation coefficients calculated from gene expression data and significant interactions and enriched pathways were identified based on these networks. The results show that 1,023 interactions were significant for high and low androstenone animals and that a total of 92 pathways were enriched for significant interactions. Although published articles show that a number of these enriched pathways were activated as a result of downstream signaling of steroid hormones, we speculate that the significant interactions in pathways such as glutathione metabolism, sphingolipid metabolism, fatty acid metabolism and significant interactions in cAMP-PKA/PKC signaling might be the key factors determining the difference in steroidogenesis and androstenone biosynthesis between boars with divergent androstenone levels in our study. The results and assumptions presented in this study are from an in-silico analysis done at the

  4. Integrated modeling of flow and residence times at the catchment scale with multiple interacting pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, J.; Beven, K.; Rodhe, A.; Nyberg, L.; Bishop, K.

    2013-08-01

    There is still a need for catchment hydrological and transport models that properly integrate the effects of preferential flows while accounting for differences in velocities and celerities. A modeling methodology is presented here which uses particle tracking methods to simulate both flow and transport in multiple pathways in a single consistent solution. Water fluxes and storages are determined by the volume and density of particles and transport is attained by labeling the particles with information that may be tracked throughout the lifetime of that particle in the catchment. The methodology allows representation of preferential flows through the use of particle velocity distributions, and mixing between pathways can be achieved with pathway transition probabilities. A transferable 3-D modeling methodology is presented for the first time and applied to a unique step-shift isotope experiment that was carried out at the 0.63 ha G1 catchment in Gårdsjön, Sweden. This application highlights the importance of combining flow and transport in hydrological representations, and the importance of pathway velocity distributions and interactions in obtaining a satisfactory representation of the observations.

  5. Interaction of key pathways in sorafenib-treated hepatocellular carcinoma based on a PCR-array

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Wang, Ping; Li, Shijie; Yin, Linan; Shen, Haiyang; Liu, Ruibao

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the key pathways and to explore the mechanism of sorafenib in inhibiting hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The gene expression profile of GSE33621, including 6 sorafenib treated group and 6 control samples, was downloaded from the GEO (Gene Expression Omnibus) database. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in HCC samples were screened using the ΔΔCt method with the homogenized internal GAPDH. Also, the functions and pathways of DEGs were analyzed using the DAVID. Moreover, the significant pathways of DEGs that involved in HCC were analyzed based on the Latent pathway identification analysis (LPIA). A total of 44 down-regulated DEGs were selected in HCC samples. Also, there were 84 biological pathways that these 44 DEGs involved in. Also, LPIA showed that Osteoclast differentiation and hsa04664-Fc epsilon RI signaling pathway was the most significant interaction pathways. Moreover, Apoptosis, Toll-like receptor signaling pathway, Chagas disease, and T cell receptor signaling pathway were the significant pathways that interacted with hsa04664. In addition, DEGs such as AKT1 (v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1), TNF (tumor necrosis factor), SYK (spleen tyrosine kinase), and PIK3R1 (phosphoinositide-3-kinase, regulatory subunit 1 (alpha)) were the common genes that involved in the significant pathways. Several pathway interaction pairs that caused by several downregulated genes such as SYK, PI3K, AKT1, and TNF, were identified play curial role in sorafenib treated HCC. Sorafenib played important inhibition roles in HCC by affecting a complicate pathway interaction network. PMID:26045814

  6. BDNF-estrogen interactions in hippocampal mossy fiber pathway: implications for normal brain function and disease

    PubMed Central

    Harte-Hargrove, Lauren; MacLusky, Neil J.; Scharfman, Helen E.

    2013-01-01

    The neurotrophin BDNF and the steroid hormone estrogen exhibit potent effects on hippocampal neurons during development and in adulthood. BDNF and estrogen have also been implicated in the etiology of diverse types of neurological disorders or psychiatric illnesses, or have been discussed as potentially important in treatment. Although both are typically studied independently, it has been suggested that BDNF mediates several of the effects of estrogen in hippocampus, and that these interactions play a role in the normal brain as well as disease. Here we focus on the mossy fiber (MF) pathway of the hippocampus, a critical pathway in normal hippocampal function, and a prime example of a location where numerous studies support an interaction between BDNF and estrogen in the rodent brain. We first review the temporal and spatially-regulated expression of BDNF and estrogen in the MFs, as well as their receptors. Then we consider the results of studies that suggest that 17β-estradiol alters hippocampal function by its influence on BDNF expression in the MF pathway. We also address the hypothesis that estrogen influences hippocampus by mechanisms related not only to the mature form of BDNF, acting at trkB receptors, but also by regulating the precursor, proBDNF, acting at p75NTR. We suggest that the interactions between BDNF and 17β-estradiol in the MFs are potentially important in the normal function of the hippocampus, and have implications for sex differences in functions that depend on the MFs and in diseases where MF plasticity has been suggested to play an important role, Alzheimer’s disease, epilepsy and addiction. PMID:23276673

  7. The Arginine Decarboxylase Pathways of Host and Pathogen Interact to Impact Inflammatory Pathways in the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Dalluge, Joseph J.; Welchlin, Cole W.; Hughes, John; Han, Wei; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Laguna, Theresa A.; Williams, Bryan J.

    2014-01-01

    The arginine decarboxylase pathway, which converts arginine to agmatine, is present in both humans and most bacterial pathogens. In humans agmatine is a neurotransmitter with affinities towards α2-adrenoreceptors, serotonin receptors, and may inhibit nitric oxide synthase. In bacteria agmatine serves as a precursor to polyamine synthesis and was recently shown to enhance biofilm development in some strains of the respiratory pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We determined agmatine is at the center of a competing metabolism in the human lung during airways infections and is influenced by the metabolic phenotypes of the infecting pathogens. Ultra performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry detection was used to measure agmatine in human sputum samples from patients with cystic fibrosis, spent supernatant from clinical sputum isolates, and from bronchoalvelolar lavage fluid from mice infected with P. aeruginosa agmatine mutants. Agmatine in human sputum peaks during illness, decreased with treatment and is positively correlated with inflammatory cytokines. Analysis of the agmatine metabolic phenotype in clinical sputum isolates revealed most deplete agmatine when grown in its presence; however a minority appeared to generate large amounts of agmatine presumably driving sputum agmatine to high levels. Agmatine exposure to inflammatory cells and in mice demonstrated its role as a direct immune activator with effects on TNF-α production, likely through NF-κB activation. P. aeruginosa mutants for agmatine detection and metabolism were constructed and show the real-time evolution of host-derived agmatine in the airways during acute lung infection. These experiments also demonstrated pathogen agmatine production can upregulate the inflammatory response. As some clinical isolates have adapted to hypersecrete agmatine, these combined data would suggest agmatine is a novel target for immune modulation in the host-pathogen dynamic. PMID:25350753

  8. MAP3K1 functionally interacts with Axin1 in the canonical Wnt signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Sue Ng, Ser; Mahmoudi, Tokameh; Li, Vivian S W; Hatzis, Pantelis; Boersema, Paul J; Mohammed, Shabaz; Heck, Albert J; Clevers, Hans

    2010-01-01

    A central point of regulation in the Wnt/beta-catenin signalling pathway is the formation of the beta-catenin destruction complex. Axin1, an essential negative regulator of Wnt signalling, serves as a scaffold within this complex and is critical for rapid turnover of beta-catenin. To examine the mechanism by which Wnt signalling disables the destruction complex, we used an immunoprecipitation-coupled proteomics approach to identify novel endogenous binding partners of Axin1. We found mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 1 (MAP3K1) as an Axin1 interactor in Ls174T colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. Importantly, confirmation of this interaction in HEK293T cells indicated that the Axin1-MAP3K1 interaction is induced and modulated by Wnt stimulation. siRNA depletion of MAP3K1 specifically abrogated TCF/LEF-driven transcription and Wnt3A-driven endogenous gene expression in both HEK293T as well as DLD-1 CRC. Expression of ubiquitin ligase mutants of MAP3K1 abrogated TCF/LEF transcription, whereas kinase mutants had no effect in TCF-driven activity, highlighting the essential role of the MAP3K1 E3 ubiquitin ligase activity in regulation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway. These results suggest that MAP3K1, previously reported as an Axin1 inter-actor in c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase pathway, is also involved in the canonical Wnt signalling pathway and positively regulates expression of Wnt target genes. PMID:20128690

  9. Interaction between ICOS-B7RP1 and B7-CD28 costimulatory pathways in alloimmune responses in vivo.

    PubMed

    Salama, Alan D; Yuan, Xueli; Nayer, Ali; Chandraker, Anil; Inobe, Manabu; Uede, Toshimutsu; Sayegh, Mohamed H

    2003-04-01

    The B7-CD28 pathway is one of the foremost costimulatory pathways involved in T-cell activation. Recently, a number of additional costimulatory pathways have been described and preliminary data suggest that they play important roles in alloimmunity. However, the interactions between these different pathways are not well understood. We studied the effect of targeting ICOS ligand, B7RP1, in a rat cardiac transplant model, with and without concomitant blockade of the B7 pathway using CTLA4Ig. In a fully mismatched WF to LEW vascularized cardiac allograft model, without therapy, grafts were acutely rejected (MST 10.8 +/- 1.6 days). Early (day of transplant) B7RP1 blockade with ICOSIg alone had little effect on graft survival and rather than being additive with B7 blockade, ICOSIg abrogated the prolonged graft survival induced by CTLA4Ig treatment. By contrast, delayed (day 2 post-transplant) blockade of B7RP1 did not have such an effect. These findings were not related to cytokine deviation but may be in part related to the pattern of down-regulation of B7.2 expression following early B7RP1 blockade. This is the first report describing the complex interactions between ICOS-B7RP1 and B7-CD28 costimulatory pathways in alloimmunity in vivo. PMID:12694060

  10. Protein/Protein Interactions in the Mammalian Heme Degradation Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Andrea L. M.; Bagai, Ireena; Becker, Donald F.; Zuiderweg, Erik R. P.; Ragsdale, Stephen W.

    2014-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the O2-dependent degradation of heme to biliverdin, CO, and iron with electrons delivered from NADPH via cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR). Biliverdin reductase (BVR) then catalyzes conversion of biliverdin to bilirubin. We describe mutagenesis combined with kinetic, spectroscopic (fluorescence and NMR), surface plasmon resonance, cross-linking, gel filtration, and analytical ultracentrifugation studies aimed at evaluating interactions of HO-2 with CPR and BVR. Based on these results, we propose a model in which HO-2 and CPR form a dynamic ensemble of complex(es) that precede formation of the productive electron transfer complex. The 1H-15N TROSY NMR spectrum of HO-2 reveals specific residues, including Leu-201, near the heme face of HO-2 that are affected by the addition of CPR, implicating these residues at the HO/CPR interface. Alanine substitutions at HO-2 residues Leu-201 and Lys-169 cause a respective 3- and 22-fold increase in Km values for CPR, consistent with a role for these residues in CPR binding. Sedimentation velocity experiments confirm the transient nature of the HO-2·CPR complex (Kd = 15.1 μm). Our results also indicate that HO-2 and BVR form a very weak complex that is only captured by cross-linking. For example, under conditions where CPR affects the 1H-15N TROSY NMR spectrum of HO-2, BVR has no effect. Fluorescence quenching experiments also suggest that BVR binds HO-2 weakly, if at all, and that the previously reported high affinity of BVR for HO is artifactual, resulting from the effects of free heme (dissociated from HO) on BVR fluorescence. PMID:25196843

  11. Detecting differential patterns of interaction in molecular pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yajima, Masanao; Telesca, Donatello; Ji, Yuan; Müller, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We consider statistical inference for potentially heterogeneous patterns of association characterizing the expression of bio-molecular pathways across different biologic conditions. We discuss a modeling approach based on Gaussian-directed acyclic graphs and provide computational and methodological details needed for posterior inference. Our application finds motivation in reverse phase protein array data from a study on acute myeloid leukemia, where interest centers on contrasting refractory versus relapsed patients. We illustrate the proposed method through both synthetic and case study data. PMID:25519431

  12. From pathways to networks: connecting dots by establishing protein-protein interaction networks in signaling pathways using affinity purification and mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xu; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Junjie

    2015-01-01

    Signal transductions are the basis of biological activities in all living organisms. Studying the signaling pathways, especially under physiological conditions, has become one of the most important facets of modern biological research. During the last decade, mass spectrometry has been used extensively in biological research and is proven to be effective in addressing important biological questions. Here, we review the current progress in the understanding of signaling networks using mass spectrometry approaches. We will focus on studies of protein-protein interactions that use affinity purification followed by mass spectrometry approach. We discuss obstacles to affinity purification, data processing, functional validation, and identification of transient interactions and provide potential solutions for pathway-specific proteomics analysis, which we hope one day will lead to a comprehensive understanding of signaling networks in humans. PMID:25137225

  13. From pathways to networks: connecting dots by establishing protein-protein interaction networks in signaling pathways using affinity purification and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Junjie

    2015-01-01

    Signal transductions are the basis of biological activities in all living organisms. Studying the signaling pathways, especially under physiological conditions, has become one of the most important facets of modern biological research. During the last decade, MS has been used extensively in biological research and is proven to be effective in addressing important biological questions. Here, we review the current progress in the understanding of signaling networks using MS approaches. We will focus on studies of protein-protein interactions that use affinity purification followed by MS approach. We discuss obstacles to affinity purification, data processing, functional validation, and identification of transient interactions and provide potential solutions for pathway-specific proteomics analysis, which we hope one day will lead to a comprehensive understanding of signaling networks in humans. PMID:25137225

  14. Linear effects models of signaling pathways from combinatorial perturbation data

    PubMed Central

    Szczurek, Ewa; Beerenwinkel, Niko

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Perturbations constitute the central means to study signaling pathways. Interrupting components of the pathway and analyzing observed effects of those interruptions can give insight into unknown connections within the signaling pathway itself, as well as the link from the pathway to the effects. Different pathway components may have different individual contributions to the measured perturbation effects, such as gene expression changes. Those effects will be observed in combination when the pathway components are perturbed. Extant approaches focus either on the reconstruction of pathway structure or on resolving how the pathway components control the downstream effects. Results: Here, we propose a linear effects model, which can be applied to solve both these problems from combinatorial perturbation data. We use simulated data to demonstrate the accuracy of learning the pathway structure as well as estimation of the individual contributions of pathway components to the perturbation effects. The practical utility of our approach is illustrated by an application to perturbations of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Availability and Implementation: lem is available as a R package at http://www.mimuw.edu.pl/∼szczurek/lem. Contact: szczurek@mimuw.edu.pl; niko.beerenwinkel@bsse.ethz.ch Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27307630

  15. Modelling molecular interaction pathways using a two-stage identification algorithm.

    PubMed

    Gormley, Padhraig; Li, Kang; Irwin, George W

    2007-08-01

    In systems biology, molecular interactions are typically modelled using white-box methods, usually based on mass action kinetics. Unfortunately, problems with dimensionality can arise when the number of molecular species in the system is very large, which makes the system modelling and behavior simulation extremely difficult or computationally too expensive. As an alternative, this paper investigates the identification of two molecular interaction pathways using a black-box approach. This type of method creates a simple linear-in-the-parameters model using regression of data, where the output of the model at any time is a function of previous system states of interest. One of the main objectives in building black-box models is to produce an optimal sparse nonlinear one to effectively represent the system behavior. In this paper, it is achieved by applying an efficient iterative approach, where the terms in the regression model are selected and refined using a forward and backward subset selection algorithm. The method is applied to model identification for the MAPK signal transduction pathway and the Brusselator using noisy data of different sizes. Simulation results confirm the efficacy of the black-box modelling method which offers an alternative to the computationally expensive conventional approach. PMID:19003449

  16. Hodgkin Lymphoma Risk: Role of Genetic Polymorphisms and Gene-Gene Interactions in DNA repair pathways

    PubMed Central

    Monroy, Claudia M.; Cortes, Andrea C.; Lopez, Mirtha; Rourke, Elizabeth; Etzel, Carol J.; Younes, Anas; Strom, Sara S.; El-Zein, Randa

    2011-01-01

    DNA repair variants may play a potentially important role in an individual’s susceptibility to developing cancer. Numerous studies have reported the association between genetic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in DNA repair genes and different types of hematologic cancers. However, to date, the effects of such SNPs on modulating Hodgkin Lymphoma (HL) risk have not yet been investigated. We hypothesized that gene-gene interaction between candidate genes in Direct Reversal, Nucleotide excision repair (NER), Base excision repair (BER) and Double strand break (DSB) pathways may contribute to susceptibility to HL. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a study on 200 HL cases and 220 controls to assess associations between HL risk and 21 functional SNPs in DNA repair genes. We evaluated potential gene-gene interactions and the association of multiple polymorphisms in a chromosome region using a multi-analytic strategy combining logistic regression, multi-factor dimensionality reduction and classification and regression tree approaches. We observed that, in combination, allelic variants in the XPC Ala499Val, NBN Glu185Gln, XRCC3 Thr241Me, XRCC1 Arg194Trp and XRCC1 399Gln polymorphisms modify the risk for developing HL. Moreover, the cumulative genetic risk score revealed a significant trend where the risk for developing HL increases as the number of adverse alleles in BER and DSB genes increase. These findings suggest that DNA repair variants in BER and DSB pathways may play an important role in the development of HL. PMID:21374732

  17. Modelling molecular interaction pathways using a two-stage identification algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kang; Irwin, George W.

    2008-01-01

    In systems biology, molecular interactions are typically modelled using white-box methods, usually based on mass action kinetics. Unfortunately, problems with dimensionality can arise when the number of molecular species in the system is very large, which makes the system modelling and behavior simulation extremely difficult or computationally too expensive. As an alternative, this paper investigates the identification of two molecular interaction pathways using a black-box approach. This type of method creates a simple linear-in-the-parameters model using regression of data, where the output of the model at any time is a function of previous system states of interest. One of the main objectives in building black-box models is to produce an optimal sparse nonlinear one to effectively represent the system behavior. In this paper, it is achieved by applying an efficient iterative approach, where the terms in the regression model are selected and refined using a forward and backward subset selection algorithm. The method is applied to model identification for the MAPK signal transduction pathway and the Brusselator using noisy data of different sizes. Simulation results confirm the efficacy of the black-box modelling method which offers an alternative to the computationally expensive conventional approach. PMID:19003449

  18. ReactionFlow: an interactive visualization tool for causality analysis in biological pathways

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Molecular and systems biologists are tasked with the comprehension and analysis of incredibly complex networks of biochemical interactions, called pathways, that occur within a cell. Through interviews with domain experts, we identified four common tasks that require an understanding of the causality within pathways, that is, the downstream and upstream relationships between proteins and biochemical reactions, including: visualizing downstream consequences of perturbing a protein; finding the shortest path between two proteins; detecting feedback loops within the pathway; and identifying common downstream elements from two or more proteins. Results We introduce ReactionFlow, a visual analytics application for pathway analysis that emphasizes the structural and causal relationships amongst proteins, complexes, and biochemical reactions within a given pathway. To support the identified causality analysis tasks, user interactions allow an analyst to filter, cluster, and select pathway components across linked views. Animation is used to highlight the flow of activity through a pathway. Conclusions We evaluated ReactionFlow by providing our application to two domain experts who have significant experience with biomolecular pathways, after which we conducted a series of in-depth interviews focused on each of the four causality analysis tasks. Their feedback leads us to believe that our techniques could be useful to researchers who must be able to understand and analyze the complex nature of biological pathways. ReactionFlow is available at https://github.com/CreativeCodingLab/ReactionFlow. PMID:26361502

  19. Predicting metabolic pathways of small molecules and enzymes based on interaction information of chemicals and proteins.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yu-Fei; Chen, Lei; Cai, Yu-Dong; Feng, Kai-Yan; Huang, Tao; Jiang, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic pathway analysis, one of the most important fields in biochemistry, is pivotal to understanding the maintenance and modulation of the functions of an organism. Good comprehension of metabolic pathways is critical to understanding the mechanisms of some fundamental biological processes. Given a small molecule or an enzyme, how may one identify the metabolic pathways in which it may participate? Answering such a question is a first important step in understanding a metabolic pathway system. By utilizing the information provided by chemical-chemical interactions, chemical-protein interactions, and protein-protein interactions, a novel method was proposed by which to allocate small molecules and enzymes to 11 major classes of metabolic pathways. A benchmark dataset consisting of 3,348 small molecules and 654 enzymes of yeast was constructed to test the method. It was observed that the first order prediction accuracy evaluated by the jackknife test was 79.56% in identifying the small molecules and enzymes in a benchmark dataset. Our method may become a useful vehicle in predicting the metabolic pathways of small molecules and enzymes, providing a basis for some further analysis of the pathway systems.

  20. Direct interaction of Ste11 and Mkk1/2 through Nst1 integrates high-osmolarity glycerol and pheromone pathways to the cell wall integrity MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Leng, Gang; Song, Kiwon

    2016-01-01

    Coordination and cross talks of MAPK pathways are critical for signaling efficiency, but their mechanisms are not well understood. Slt2, the MAP kinase of cell wall integrity pathway (CWI), is activated by heat stress even in the absence of upstream components of this pathway, suggesting a supplementary input for Slt2 activation. Here, we identify a new interaction of Ste11 and Mkk1, mediated by Nst1 that connects the high-osmolarity glycerol and pheromone pathways directly to CWI pathway in response to heat and pheromone. We suggest that Ser(407) and Thr(411) are novel residues of Mkk1 activated by these MAPK pathways.

  1. Peptides interfering with protein-protein interactions in the ethylene signaling pathway delay tomato fruit ripening

    PubMed Central

    Bisson, Melanie M. A.; Kessenbrock, Mareike; Müller, Lena; Hofmann, Alexander; Schmitz, Florian; Cristescu, Simona M.; Groth, Georg

    2016-01-01

    The plant hormone ethylene is involved in the regulation of several processes with high importance for agricultural applications, e.g. ripening, aging and senescence. Previous work in our group has identified a small peptide (NOP-1) derived from the nuclear localization signal of the Arabidopsis ethylene regulator ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE-2 (EIN2) C-terminal part as efficient inhibitor of ethylene responses. Here, we show that NOP-1 is also able to efficiently disrupt EIN2-ETR1 complex formation in tomato, indicating that the NOP-1 inhibition mode is conserved across plant species. Surface application of NOP-1 on green tomato fruits delays ripening similar to known inhibitors of ethylene perception (MCP) and ethylene biosynthesis (AVG). Fruits treated with NOP-1 showed similar ethylene production as untreated controls underlining that NOP-1 blocks ethylene signaling by targeting an essential interaction in this pathway, while having no effect on ethylene biosynthesis. PMID:27477591

  2. Localization and interactions between Arabidopsis auxin biosynthetic enzymes in the TAA/YUC-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; Botchway, Stanley W; Hawes, Chris

    2016-07-01

    The growth regulator auxin is involved in all key developmental processes in plants. A complex network of a multiplicity of potential biosynthetic pathways as well as transport, signalling plus conjugation and deconjugation lead to a complex and multifaceted system system for auxin function. This raises the question how such a system can be effectively organized and controlled. Here we report that a subset of auxin biosynthetic enzymes in the TAA/YUC route of auxin biosynthesis is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). ER microsomal fractions also contain a significant percentage of auxin biosynthetic activity. This could point toward a model of auxin function using ER membrane location and subcellular compartmentation for supplementary layers of regulation. Additionally we show specific protein-protein interactions between some of the enzymes in the TAA/YUC route of auxin biosynthesis. PMID:27208541

  3. Peptides interfering with protein-protein interactions in the ethylene signaling pathway delay tomato fruit ripening.

    PubMed

    Bisson, Melanie M A; Kessenbrock, Mareike; Müller, Lena; Hofmann, Alexander; Schmitz, Florian; Cristescu, Simona M; Groth, Georg

    2016-01-01

    The plant hormone ethylene is involved in the regulation of several processes with high importance for agricultural applications, e.g. ripening, aging and senescence. Previous work in our group has identified a small peptide (NOP-1) derived from the nuclear localization signal of the Arabidopsis ethylene regulator ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE-2 (EIN2) C-terminal part as efficient inhibitor of ethylene responses. Here, we show that NOP-1 is also able to efficiently disrupt EIN2-ETR1 complex formation in tomato, indicating that the NOP-1 inhibition mode is conserved across plant species. Surface application of NOP-1 on green tomato fruits delays ripening similar to known inhibitors of ethylene perception (MCP) and ethylene biosynthesis (AVG). Fruits treated with NOP-1 showed similar ethylene production as untreated controls underlining that NOP-1 blocks ethylene signaling by targeting an essential interaction in this pathway, while having no effect on ethylene biosynthesis. PMID:27477591

  4. A novel genetic score approach using instruments to investigate interactions between pathways and environment: application to air pollution.

    PubMed

    Bind, Marie-Abele; Coull, Brent; Suh, Helen; Wright, Robert; Baccarelli, Andrea; Vokonas, Pantel; Schwartz, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Air pollution has been associated with increased systemic inflammation markers. We developed a new pathway analysis approach to investigate whether gene variants within relevant pathways (oxidative stress, endothelial function, and metal processing) modified the association between particulate air pollution and fibrinogen, C-reactive protein (CRP), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Our study population consisted of 822 elderly participants of the Normative Aging Study (1999-2011). To investigate the role of biological mechanisms and to reduce the number of comparisons in the analysis, we created pathway-specific scores using gene variants related to each pathway. To select the most appropriate gene variants, we used the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (Lasso) to relate independent outcomes representative of each pathway (8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine for oxidative stress, augmentation index for endothelial function, and patella lead for metal processing) to gene variants. A high genetic score corresponds to a higher allelic risk profile. We fit mixed-effects models to examine modification by the genetic score of the weekly air pollution association with the outcome. Among participants with higher genetic scores within the oxidative stress pathway, we observed significant associations between particle number and fibrinogen, while we did not find any association among participants with lower scores (p(interaction) = 0.04). Compared to individuals with low genetic scores of metal processing gene variants, participants with higher scores had greater effects of particle number on fibrinogen (p(interaction) = 0.12), CRP (p(interaction) = 0.02), and ICAM-1 (pinteraction = 0.08). This two-stage penalization method is easy to implement and can be used for large-scale genetic applications.

  5. [Interaction of the Embden-Meyerhof pathway and hexose monophosphate shunt in erythrocytes].

    PubMed

    Ataullakhanov, F I; Buravtsev, V N; Zhabotinskiĩ, A M; Norina, S B; Pichugin, A V

    1981-04-01

    A mathematical model of glycolysis in human erythrocytes for the interaction between the Embden-Meyerhof and the pentose phosphate pathways has been developed. The characteristic surfaces, i. e. interdependencies between the rates of metabolite flows in both pathways and ATP and NADPH concentrations have been calculated. The model obtained is well correlated with the experimental data on glycolysis characteristic at low rates of the pentose phosphate pathway reactions. The model suggests that NADPH and GSH concentrations should be stabilized. At ATP and NADPH concentrations close to the physiological ones the Embden-Meyerhof and pentose phosphate pathways function practically independently. When the NADPH concentration is decreased below 80% of the physiological value, the system ceases to stabilize the ATP concentration. In its turn, a decrease of ATP concentration results in a corresponding decrease of the maximal rate of the pentose phosphate pathway.

  6. [Cell signaling pathways interaction in cellular proliferation: Potential target for therapeutic interventionism].

    PubMed

    Valdespino-Gómez, Víctor Manuel; Valdespino-Castillo, Patricia Margarita; Valdespino-Castillo, Víctor Edmundo

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, cellular physiology is best understood by analysing their interacting molecular components. Proteins are the major components of the cells. Different proteins are organised in the form of functional clusters, pathways or networks. These molecules are ordered in clusters of receptor molecules of extracellular signals, transducers, sensors and biological response effectors. The identification of these intracellular signaling pathways in different cellular types has required a long journey of experimental work. More than 300 intracellular signaling pathways have been identified in human cells. They participate in cell homeostasis processes for structural and functional maintenance. Some of them participate simultaneously or in a nearly-consecutive progression to generate a cellular phenotypic change. In this review, an analysis is performed on the main intracellular signaling pathways that take part in the cellular proliferation process, and the potential use of some components of these pathways as target for therapeutic interventionism are also underlined. PMID:25986976

  7. Bioinformatics Annotation of Human Y Chromosome-Encoded Protein Pathways and Interactions.

    PubMed

    Rengaraj, Deivendran; Kwon, Woo-Sung; Pang, Myung-Geol

    2015-09-01

    We performed a comprehensive analysis of human Y chromosome-encoded proteins, their pathways, and their interactions using bioinformatics tools. From the NCBI annotation release 107 of human genome, we retrieved a total of 66 proteins encoded on Y chromosome. Most of the retrieved proteins were also matched with the proteins listed in the core databases of the Human Proteome Project including neXtProt, PeptideAtlas, and the Human Protein Atlas. When we examined the pathways of human Y-encoded proteins through KEGG database and Pathway Studio software, many of proteins fall into the categories related to cell signaling pathways. Using the STRING program, we found a total of 49 human Y-encoded proteins showing strong/medium interaction with each other. While using the Pathway studio software, we found that a total of 16 proteins interact with other chromosome-encoded proteins. In particular, the SRY protein interacted with 17 proteins encoded on other chromosomes. Additionally, we aligned the sequences of human Y-encoded proteins with the sequences of chimpanzee and mouse Y-encoded proteins using the NCBI BLAST program. This analysis resulted in a significant number of orthologous proteins between human, chimpanzee, and mouse. Collectively, our findings provide the scientific community with additional information on the human Y chromosome-encoded proteins.

  8. Uniform and Complementary Social Interaction: Distinct Pathways to Solidarity

    PubMed Central

    Koudenburg, Namkje; Postmes, Tom; Gordijn, Ernestine H.; van Mourik Broekman, Aafke

    2015-01-01

    We examine how different forms of co-action give rise to feelings of solidarity. We propose that (a) coordinated action elicits a sense of solidarity, and (b) the process through which such solidarity emerges differs for different forms of co-action. We suggest that whether solidarity within groups emerges from uniform action (e.g. synchronizing, as when people speak in unison) or from more complementary forms of action (e.g. alternating, when speaking in turns) has important consequences for the emergent position of individuals within the group. Uniform action relies on commonality, leaving little scope for individuality. In complementary action each individual makes a distinctive contribution to the group, thereby increasing a sense of personal value to the group, which should contribute to the emergence of solidarity. The predictions receive support from five studies, in which we study groups in laboratory and field settings. Results show that both complementary and uniform co-action increase a sense of solidarity compared to control conditions. However, in the complementary action condition, but not in the uniform action (or synchrony) condition, the effect on feelings of solidarity is mediated by a sense of personal value to the group. PMID:26047131

  9. Uniform and Complementary Social Interaction: Distinct Pathways to Solidarity.

    PubMed

    Koudenburg, Namkje; Postmes, Tom; Gordijn, Ernestine H; van Mourik Broekman, Aafke

    2015-01-01

    We examine how different forms of co-action give rise to feelings of solidarity. We propose that (a) coordinated action elicits a sense of solidarity, and (b) the process through which such solidarity emerges differs for different forms of co-action. We suggest that whether solidarity within groups emerges from uniform action (e.g. synchronizing, as when people speak in unison) or from more complementary forms of action (e.g. alternating, when speaking in turns) has important consequences for the emergent position of individuals within the group. Uniform action relies on commonality, leaving little scope for individuality. In complementary action each individual makes a distinctive contribution to the group, thereby increasing a sense of personal value to the group, which should contribute to the emergence of solidarity. The predictions receive support from five studies, in which we study groups in laboratory and field settings. Results show that both complementary and uniform co-action increase a sense of solidarity compared to control conditions. However, in the complementary action condition, but not in the uniform action (or synchrony) condition, the effect on feelings of solidarity is mediated by a sense of personal value to the group. PMID:26047131

  10. Mef2 Interacts with the Notch Pathway during Adult Muscle Development in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Caine, Charlotte; Kasherov, Petar; Silber, Joël; Lalouette, Alexis

    2014-01-01

    Myogenesis of indirect flight muscles (IFMs) in Drosophila melanogaster follows a well-defined cellular developmental scheme. During embryogenesis, a set of cells, the Adult Muscle Precursors (AMPs), are specified. These cells will become proliferating myoblasts during the larval stages which will then give rise to the adult IFMs. Although the cellular aspect of this developmental process is well studied, the molecular biology behind the different stages is still under investigation. In particular, the interactions required during the transition from proliferating myoblasts to differentiated myoblasts ready to fuse to the muscle fiber. It has been previously shown that the Notch pathway is active in proliferating myoblasts, and that this pathway is inhibited in developing muscle fibers. Furthermore, the Myocyte Enhancing Factor 2 (Mef2), Vestigial (Vg) and Scalloped (Sd) transcription factors are necessary for IFM development and that Vg is required for Notch pathway repression in differentiating fibers. Here we examine the interactions between Notch and Mef2 and mechanisms by which the Notch pathway is inhibited during differentiation. We show that Mef2 is capable of inhibiting the Notch pathway in non myogenic cells. A previous screen for Mef2 potential targets identified Delta a component of the Notch pathway. Dl is expressed in Mef2 and Sd-positive developing fibers. Our results show that Mef2 and possibly Sd regulate a Dl enhancer specifically expressed in the developing IFMs and that Mef2 is required for Dl expression in developing IFMs. PMID:25247309

  11. Pedigree-based random effect tests to screen gene pathways.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Marcio; Peralta, Juan M; Farook, Vidya; Puppala, Sobha; Kent, John W; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Blangero, John

    2014-01-01

    The new generation of sequencing platforms opens new horizons in the genetics field. It is possible to exhaustively assay all genetic variants in an individual and search for phenotypic associations. The whole genome sequencing approach, when applied to a large human sample like the San Antonio Family Study, detects a very large number (>25 million) of single nucleotide variants along with other more complex variants. The analytical challenges imposed by this number of variants are formidable, suggesting that methods are needed to reduce the overall number of statistical tests. In this study, we develop a single degree-of-freedom test of variants in a gene pathway employing a random effect model that uses an empirical pathway-specific genetic relationship matrix as the focal covariance kernel. The empirical pathway-specific genetic relationship uses all variants (or a chosen subset) from gene members of a given biological pathway. Using SOLAR's pedigree-based variance components modeling, which also allows for arbitrary fixed effects, such as principal components, to deal with latent population structure, we employ a likelihood ratio test of the pathway-specific genetic relationship matrix model. We examine all gene pathways in KEGG database gene pathways using our method in the first replicate of the Genetic Analysis Workshop 18 simulation of systolic blood pressure. Our random effect approach was able to detect true association signals in causal gene pathways. Those pathways could be easily be further dissected by the independent analysis of all markers. PMID:25519354

  12. A novel interaction linking the FAS-II and phthiocerol dimycocerosate (PDIM) biosynthetic pathways.

    PubMed

    Kruh, Nicole A; Borgaro, Janine G; Ruzsicska, Béla P; Xu, Hua; Tonge, Peter J

    2008-11-14

    The fatty acid biosynthesis (FAS-II) pathway in Mycobacterium tuberculosis generates long chain fatty acids that serve as the precursors to mycolic acids, essential components of the mycobacterial cell wall. Enzymes in the FAS-II pathway are thought to form one or more noncovalent multi-enzyme complexes within the cell, and a bacterial two-hybrid screen was used to search for missing components of the pathway and to furnish additional data on interactions involving these enzymes in vivo. Using the FAS-II beta-ketoacyl synthase, KasA, as bait, an extensive bacterial two-hybrid screen of a M. tuberculosis genome fragment library unexpectedly revealed a novel interaction between KasA and PpsB as well as PpsD, two polyketide modules involved in the biosynthesis of the virulence lipid phthiocerol dimycocerosate (PDIM). Sequence analysis revealed that KasA interacts with PpsB and PpsD in the region of the acyl carrier domain of each protein, raising the possibility that lipids could be transferred between the FAS-II and PDIM biosynthetic pathways. Subsequent studies utilizing purified proteins and radiolabeled lipids revealed that fatty acids loaded onto PpsB were transferred to KasA and also incorporated into long chain fatty acids synthesized using a Mycobacterium smegmatis lysate. These data suggest that in addition to producing PDIMs, the growing phthiocerol product can also be shuttled into the FAS-II pathway via KasA as an entry point for further elongation. Interactions between these biosynthetic pathways may exist as a simple means to increase mycobacterial lipid diversity, enhancing functionality and the overall complexity of the cell wall. PMID:18703500

  13. The PDZ Protein Canoe/AF-6 Links Ras-MAPK, Notch and Wingless/Wnt Signaling Pathways by Directly Interacting with Ras, Notch and Dishevelled

    PubMed Central

    Carmena, Ana; Speicher, Stephan; Baylies, Mary

    2006-01-01

    Over the past few years, it has become increasingly apparent that signal transduction pathways are not merely linear cascades; they are organized into complex signaling networks that require high levels of regulation to generate precise and unique cell responses. However, the underlying regulatory mechanisms by which signaling pathways cross-communicate remain poorly understood. Here we show that the Ras-binding protein Canoe (Cno)/AF-6, a PDZ protein normally associated with cellular junctions, is a key modulator of Wingless (Wg)/Wnt, Ras-Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) and Notch (N) signaling pathways cross-communication. Our data show a repressive effect of Cno/AF-6 on these three signaling pathways through physical interactions with Ras, N and the cytoplasmic protein Dishevelled (Dsh), a key Wg effector. We propose a model in which Cno, through those interactions, actively coordinates, at the membrane level, Ras-MAPK, N and Wg signaling pathways during progenitor specification. PMID:17183697

  14. Unified theory of effective interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayanagi, Kazuo

    2016-09-01

    We present a unified description of effective interaction theories in both algebraic and graphic representations. In our previous work, we have presented the Rayleigh-Schrödinger and Bloch perturbation theories in a unified fashion by introducing the main frame expansion of the effective interaction. In this work, we start also from the main frame expansion, and present various nonperturbative theories in a coherent manner, which include generalizations of the Brandow, Brillouin-Wigner, and Bloch-Horowitz theories on the formal side, and the extended Krenciglowa-Kuo and the extended Lee-Suzuki methods on the practical side. We thus establish a coherent and comprehensive description of both perturbative and nonperturbative theories on the basis of the main frame expansion.

  15. Effective interactions between fluid membranes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bing-Sui; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2015-08-01

    A self-consistent theory is proposed for the general problem of interacting undulating fluid membranes subject to the constraint that they do not interpenetrate. We implement the steric constraint via an exact functional integral representation and, through the use of a saddle-point approximation, transform it into a novel effective steric potential. The steric potential is found to consist of two contributions: one generated by zero-mode fluctuations of the membranes and the other by thermal bending fluctuations. For membranes of cross-sectional area S, we find that the bending fluctuation part scales with the intermembrane separation d as d-2 for d≪√S but crosses over to d-4 scaling for d≫√S, whereas the zero-mode part of the steric potential always scales as d-2. For membranes interacting exclusively via the steric potential, we obtain closed-form expressions for the effective interaction potential and for the rms undulation amplitude σ, which becomes small at low temperatures T and/or large bending stiffnesses κ. Moreover, σ scales as d for d≪√S but saturates at √kBTS/κ for d≫√S. In addition, using variational Gaussian theory, we apply our self-consistent treatment to study intermembrane interactions subject to different types of potentials: (i) the Moreira-Netz potential for a pair of strongly charged membranes with an intervening solution of multivalent counterions, (ii) an attractive square well, (iii) the Morse potential, and (iv) a combination of hydration and van der Waals interactions. PMID:26382349

  16. Effective interactions between fluid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bing-Sui; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2015-08-01

    A self-consistent theory is proposed for the general problem of interacting undulating fluid membranes subject to the constraint that they do not interpenetrate. We implement the steric constraint via an exact functional integral representation and, through the use of a saddle-point approximation, transform it into a novel effective steric potential. The steric potential is found to consist of two contributions: one generated by zero-mode fluctuations of the membranes and the other by thermal bending fluctuations. For membranes of cross-sectional area S , we find that the bending fluctuation part scales with the intermembrane separation d as d-2 for d ≪√{S } but crosses over to d-4 scaling for d ≫√{S } , whereas the zero-mode part of the steric potential always scales as d-2. For membranes interacting exclusively via the steric potential, we obtain closed-form expressions for the effective interaction potential and for the rms undulation amplitude σ , which becomes small at low temperatures T and/or large bending stiffnesses κ . Moreover, σ scales as d for d ≪√{S } but saturates at √{kBT S /κ } for d ≫√{S } . In addition, using variational Gaussian theory, we apply our self-consistent treatment to study intermembrane interactions subject to different types of potentials: (i) the Moreira-Netz potential for a pair of strongly charged membranes with an intervening solution of multivalent counterions, (ii) an attractive square well, (iii) the Morse potential, and (iv) a combination of hydration and van der Waals interactions.

  17. The cardiopulmonary effects of ambient air pollution and mechanistic pathways: a comparative hierarchical pathway analysis.

    PubMed

    Roy, Ananya; Gong, Jicheng; Thomas, Duncan C; Zhang, Junfeng; Kipen, Howard M; Rich, David Q; Zhu, Tong; Huang, Wei; Hu, Min; Wang, Guangfa; Wang, Yuedan; Zhu, Ping; Lu, Shou-En; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; Diehl, Scott R; Eckel, Sandrah P

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have investigated the associations between exposure to ambient air pollution and biomarkers of physiological pathways, yet little has been done on the comparison across biomarkers of different pathways to establish the temporal pattern of biological response. In the current study, we aim to compare the relative temporal patterns in responses of candidate pathways to different pollutants. Four biomarkers of pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress, five biomarkers of systemic inflammation and oxidative stress, ten parameters of autonomic function, and three biomarkers of hemostasis were repeatedly measured in 125 young adults, along with daily concentrations of ambient CO, PM2.5, NO2, SO2, EC, OC, and sulfate, before, during, and after the Beijing Olympics. We used a two-stage modeling approach, including Stage I models to estimate the association between each biomarker and pollutant over each of 7 lags, and Stage II mixed-effect models to describe temporal patterns in the associations when grouping the biomarkers into the four physiological pathways. Our results show that candidate pathway groupings of biomarkers explained a significant amount of variation in the associations for each pollutant, and the temporal patterns of the biomarker-pollutant-lag associations varied across candidate pathways (p<0.0001) and were not linear (from lag 0 to lag 3: p = 0.0629, from lag 3 to lag 6: p = 0.0005). These findings suggest that, among this healthy young adult population, the pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress pathway is the first to respond to ambient air pollution exposure (within 24 hours) and the hemostasis pathway responds gradually over a 2-3 day period. The initial pulmonary response may contribute to the more gradual systemic changes that likely ultimately involve the cardiovascular system.

  18. The Cardiopulmonary Effects of Ambient Air Pollution and Mechanistic Pathways: A Comparative Hierarchical Pathway Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Duncan C.; Zhang, Junfeng; Kipen, Howard M.; Rich, David Q.; Zhu, Tong; Huang, Wei; Hu, Min; Wang, Guangfa; Wang, Yuedan; Zhu, Ping; Lu, Shou-En; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; Diehl, Scott R.; Eckel, Sandrah P.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have investigated the associations between exposure to ambient air pollution and biomarkers of physiological pathways, yet little has been done on the comparison across biomarkers of different pathways to establish the temporal pattern of biological response. In the current study, we aim to compare the relative temporal patterns in responses of candidate pathways to different pollutants. Four biomarkers of pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress, five biomarkers of systemic inflammation and oxidative stress, ten parameters of autonomic function, and three biomarkers of hemostasis were repeatedly measured in 125 young adults, along with daily concentrations of ambient CO, PM2.5, NO2, SO2, EC, OC, and sulfate, before, during, and after the Beijing Olympics. We used a two-stage modeling approach, including Stage I models to estimate the association between each biomarker and pollutant over each of 7 lags, and Stage II mixed-effect models to describe temporal patterns in the associations when grouping the biomarkers into the four physiological pathways. Our results show that candidate pathway groupings of biomarkers explained a significant amount of variation in the associations for each pollutant, and the temporal patterns of the biomarker-pollutant-lag associations varied across candidate pathways (p<0.0001) and were not linear (from lag 0 to lag 3: p = 0.0629, from lag 3 to lag 6: p = 0.0005). These findings suggest that, among this healthy young adult population, the pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress pathway is the first to respond to ambient air pollution exposure (within 24 hours) and the hemostasis pathway responds gradually over a 2–3 day period. The initial pulmonary response may contribute to the more gradual systemic changes that likely ultimately involve the cardiovascular system. PMID:25502951

  19. Molecular mechanism for the interaction between gibberellin and brassinosteroid signaling pathways in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Gallego-Bartolomé, Javier; Minguet, Eugenio G; Grau-Enguix, Federico; Abbas, Mohamad; Locascio, Antonella; Thomas, Stephen G; Alabadí, David; Blázquez, Miguel A

    2012-08-14

    Plant development is modulated by the convergence of multiple environmental and endogenous signals, and the mechanisms that allow the integration of different signaling pathways is currently being unveiled. A paradigmatic case is the concurrence of brassinosteroid (BR) and gibberellin (GA) signaling in the control of cell expansion during photomorphogenesis, which is supported by physiological observations in several plants but for which no molecular mechanism has been proposed. In this work, we show that the integration of these two signaling pathways occurs through the physical interaction between the DELLA protein GAI, which is a major negative regulator of the GA pathway, and BRASSINAZOLE RESISTANT1 (BZR1), a transcription factor that broadly regulates gene expression in response to BRs. We provide biochemical evidence, both in vitro and in vivo, indicating that GAI inactivates the transcriptional regulatory activity of BZR1 upon their interaction by inhibiting the ability of BZR1 to bind to target promoters. The physiological relevance of this interaction was confirmed by the observation that the dominant gai-1 allele interferes with BR-regulated gene expression, whereas the bzr1-1D allele displays enhanced resistance to DELLA accumulation during hypocotyl elongation. Because DELLA proteins mediate the response to multiple environmental signals, our results provide an initial molecular framework for the integration with BRs of additional pathways that control plant development.

  20. Protein-Protein Interactions in the β-Oxidation Part of the Phenylacetate Utilization Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Grishin, Andrey M.; Ajamian, Eunice; Zhang, Linhua; Rouiller, Isabelle; Bostina, Mihnea; Cygler, Miroslaw

    2012-01-01

    Microbial anaerobic and so-called hybrid pathways for degradation of aromatic compounds contain β-oxidation-like steps. These reactions convert the product of the opening of the aromatic ring to common metabolites. The hybrid phenylacetate degradation pathway is encoded in Escherichia coli by the paa operon containing genes for 10 enzymes. Previously, we have analyzed protein-protein interactions among the enzymes catalyzing the initial oxidation steps in the paa pathway (Grishin, A. M., Ajamian, E., Tao, L., Zhang, L., Menard, R., and Cygler, M. (2011) J. Biol. Chem. 286, 10735–10743). Here we report characterization of interactions between the remaining enzymes of this pathway and show another stable complex, PaaFG, an enoyl-CoA hydratase and enoyl-Coa isomerase, both belonging to the crotonase superfamily. These steps are biochemically similar to the well studied fatty acid β-oxidation, which can be catalyzed by individual monofunctional enzymes, multifunctional enzymes comprising several domains, or enzymatic complexes such as the bacterial fatty acid β-oxidation complex. We have determined the structure of the PaaFG complex and determined that although individually PaaF and PaaG are similar to enzymes from the fatty acid β-oxidation pathway, the structure of the complex is dissimilar from bacterial fatty acid β-oxidation complexes. The PaaFG complex has a four-layered structure composed of homotrimeric discs of PaaF and PaaG. The active sites of PaaF and PaaG are adapted to accept the intermediary components of the Paa pathway, different from those of the fatty acid β-oxidation. The association of PaaF and PaaG into a stable complex might serve to speed up the steps of the pathway following the conversion of phenylacetyl-CoA to a toxic and unstable epoxide-CoA by PaaABCE monooxygenase. PMID:22961985

  1. The role of hydrogen-bonding interactions in acidic sugar reaction pathways.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xianghong; Johnson, David K; Himmel, Michael E; Nimlos, Mark R

    2010-09-01

    Previously, theoretical multiple sugar (beta-d-xylose and beta-d-glucose) reaction pathways were discovered that depended on the initial protonation site on the sugar molecules using Car-Parrinello-based molecular dynamics (CPMD) simulations [Qian, X. H.; Nimlos, M. R.; Davis, M.; Johnson, D. K.; Himmel, M. E. Carbohydr. Res.2005, 340, 2319-2327]. In addition, simulation results showed that water molecules could participate in the sugar reactions, thus altering the reaction pathways. In the present study, the temperature and water density effects on the sugar degradation pathways were investigated with CPMD. We found that changes in both temperature and water density could profoundly affect the mechanisms and pathways. We attributed these effects to both the strength of hydrogen bonding and proton affinity of water. PMID:20667524

  2. Signalling pathways mediating specific synergistic interactions between GDF9 and BMP15.

    PubMed

    Mottershead, David G; Ritter, Lesley J; Gilchrist, Robert B

    2012-03-01

    Growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9) and bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15) are two proteins selectively expressed in the oocyte which are essential for normal fertility. Both of these proteins are members of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) superfamily and as such are produced as pre-proproteins, existing after proteolytic processing as a complex of the respective pro and mature regions. Previous work has shown that these two proteins interact both at the genetic and cellular signalling levels. In this study, our aim was to determine if the purified mature regions of GDF9 and BMP15 exhibit synergistic interactions on granulosa cells and to determine if such interactions are specific to these two proteins. We have used primary cultures of murine granulosa cells and [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation or transcriptional reporter assays as our readouts. We observed clear synergistic interactions between the mature regions of GDF9 and BMP15 when either DNA synthesis or SMAD3 signalling were examined. GDF9/BMP15 synergistic interactions were specific such that neither factor could be replaced by an analogous TGF-β superfamily member. The GDF9/BMP15 synergistic signalling response was inhibited by the SMAD2/3 phosphorylation inhibitor SB431542, as well as inhibition of the mitogen-activated protein kinase or rous sarcoma oncogene (SRC) signalling pathways, but not the nuclear factor kappa B pathway. In this study, we show that purified mature regions of GDF9 and BMP15 synergistically interact in a specific manner which is not dependent on the presence of a pro-region. This synergistic interaction is targeted at the SMAD3 pathway, and is dependent on ERK1/2 and SRC kinase signalling.

  3. Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide modulates trophoblast-derived cell line function and interaction with phagocytic cells through autocrine pathways

    PubMed Central

    Vota, Daiana; Paparini, Daniel; Hauk, Vanesa; Toro, Ayelén; Merech, Fatima; Varone, Cecilia; Ramhorst, Rosanna; Pérez Leirós, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Trophoblast cells migrate and invade the decidual stroma in a tightly regulated process to maintain immune homeostasis at the maternal-placental interface during the first weeks of pregnancy. Locally synthesized factors modulate trophoblast cell function and their interaction with maternal leukocytes to promote the silent clearance of apoptotic cells. The vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a pleiotropic polypeptide with trophic and anti-inflammatory effects in murine pregnancy models. We explored the effect of VIP on two human first trimester trophoblast cell lines, particularly on their migration, invasiveness and interaction with phagocytic cells, and the signalling and regulatory pathways involved. We found that VIP enhanced trophoblast cell migration and invasion through the activation of high affinity VPAC receptors and PKA-CRE signalling pathways. VIP knocked-down trophoblast cells showed reduced migration in basal and leukemic inhibitor factor (LIF)-elicited conditions. In parallel, VIP-silenced trophoblast cells failed to induce the phagocytosis of apoptotic bodies and the expression of immunosuppressant markers by human monocytes. Our results suggest that VIP-mediated autocrine pathways regulate trophoblast cell function and contribute to immune homeostasis maintenance at placentation and may provide new clues for therapeutic intervention in pregnancies complicated by defective deep placentation. PMID:27212399

  4. Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide modulates trophoblast-derived cell line function and interaction with phagocytic cells through autocrine pathways.

    PubMed

    Vota, Daiana; Paparini, Daniel; Hauk, Vanesa; Toro, Ayelén; Merech, Fatima; Varone, Cecilia; Ramhorst, Rosanna; Pérez Leirós, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Trophoblast cells migrate and invade the decidual stroma in a tightly regulated process to maintain immune homeostasis at the maternal-placental interface during the first weeks of pregnancy. Locally synthesized factors modulate trophoblast cell function and their interaction with maternal leukocytes to promote the silent clearance of apoptotic cells. The vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a pleiotropic polypeptide with trophic and anti-inflammatory effects in murine pregnancy models. We explored the effect of VIP on two human first trimester trophoblast cell lines, particularly on their migration, invasiveness and interaction with phagocytic cells, and the signalling and regulatory pathways involved. We found that VIP enhanced trophoblast cell migration and invasion through the activation of high affinity VPAC receptors and PKA-CRE signalling pathways. VIP knocked-down trophoblast cells showed reduced migration in basal and leukemic inhibitor factor (LIF)-elicited conditions. In parallel, VIP-silenced trophoblast cells failed to induce the phagocytosis of apoptotic bodies and the expression of immunosuppressant markers by human monocytes. Our results suggest that VIP-mediated autocrine pathways regulate trophoblast cell function and contribute to immune homeostasis maintenance at placentation and may provide new clues for therapeutic intervention in pregnancies complicated by defective deep placentation. PMID:27212399

  5. Methods for Investigating Gene-Environment Interactions in Candidate Pathway and Genome-Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Duncan

    2010-01-01

    Despite the considerable enthusiasm about the yield of novel and replicated discoveries of genetic associations from the new generation of genome-wide association studies (GWAS), the proportion of the heritability of most complex diseases that have been studied to date remains small. Some of this “dark matter” could be due to gene-environment (G×E) interactions or more complex pathways involving multiple genes and exposures. We review the basic epidemiologic study design and statistical analysis approaches to studying G×E interactions individually and then consider more comprehensive approaches to studying entire pathways or GWAS data. In addition to the usual issues in genetic association studies, particular care is needed in exposure assessment and very large sample sizes are required. Although hypothesis-driven pathway-based and “agnostic” GWAS approaches are generally viewed as opposite poles, we suggest that the two can be usefully married using hierarchical modeling strategies that exploit external pathway knowledge in mining genome-wide data. PMID:20070199

  6. Functional features, biological pathways, and protein interaction networks of addiction-related genes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingchun; Zhao, Zhongming

    2010-05-01

    Addictions are chronic and common brain disorders affected by many genetic, environmental, and behavioral factors. Recent genome-wide linkage and association studies have revealed several promising genomic regions and multiple genes relating to addictions. To explore the underlying biological processes in the development of addictions, we used 62 genes recently reviewed by Li and Burmeister (2009) as representative addiction-related genes, and then we investigated their features in gene function, pathways, and protein interaction networks. We performed enrichment tests of their Gene Ontology (GO) annotations and of their pathways in the Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) system. The tests revealed that these addiction-related genes were highly enriched in neurodevelopment-related processes. Interestingly, we found circadian rhythm signaling in one of the enriched pathways. Moreover, these addiction-related genes tended to have higher connectivity and shorter characteristic shortest-path distances compared to control genes in the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network. This investigation is the first of such kind in addiction studies, and it is useful for further addiction candidate-gene prioritization and verification, thus helping us to better understand molecular mechanisms of addictions.

  7. O/S-1/ interactions - The product channels. [collisional electron quenching and chemical reaction pathway frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slanger, T. G.; Black, G.

    1978-01-01

    The first measurements are reported of the reaction pathways for the interaction between oxygen atoms in the 4.19 eV S-1 state, and four molecules, N2O, CO2, H2O, and NO. Distinction is made between three possible paths - quenching to O(D-1), quenching to O(P-3), and chemical reaction. With N2O, the most reasonable interpretation of the data indicates that there no reaction, in sharp contrast with the interaction between O(D-1) and N2O, which proceeds entirely by reaction. Similarly, there is no reaction with CO2. With H2O, the reactive pathway is the dominant one, although electronic quenching is not negligible. With NO, O(D-1) is the preferred product.

  8. The interaction between human enteroviruses and type I IFN signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Yi, Lina; Ke, Changwen; Zhang, Yonghui; Liu, Ren; Chen, Jinfei; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; He, Ming-Liang

    2015-06-01

    Human enteroviruses (HEV), very common and important human pathogens, cause infections in diverse ways. Recently, the large epidemic of HFMD caused by HEV infection became a growing threat to public health in China. As the first line of immune response, the type I interferon (IFN-α/β) pathway plays an essential role in antiviral infection, particularly in limiting both the early and late stages of infection. Because of co-evolution with the host, the viruses have evolved multiple strategies to evade or subvert the host immunity to ensure their survival. In this paper, we systematically reviewed and summarized the interaction between HEV infections and host type I IFN responses. We firstly described the recent findings of HEV recognition and IFN induction, specifically on host pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) in HEV infection. Then we discussed the antiviral effect of IFN in HEV infection. Finally, we timely summarized the mechanisms of HEV to circumvent the IFN responses. Clarification of the complexity in this battle may provide us new strategies for prevention and antiviral treatment.

  9. Interaction between glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and L-leucine catabolic enzymes: intersecting metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Hutson, Susan M; Islam, Mohammad Mainul; Zaganas, Ioannis

    2011-09-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) catabolism follows sequential reactions and their metabolites intersect with other metabolic pathways. The initial enzymes in BCAA metabolism, the mitochondrial branched-chain aminotransferase (BCATm), which deaminates the BCAAs to branched-chain α-keto acids (BCKAs); and the branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase enzyme complex (BCKDC), which oxidatively decarboxylates the BCKAs, are organized in a supramolecular complex termed metabolon. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH1) is found in the metabolon in rat tissues. Bovine GDH1 binds to the pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate (PMP)-form of human BCATm (PMP-BCATm) but not to pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-BCATm in vitro. This protein interaction facilitates reamination of the α-ketoglutarate (αKG) product of the GDH1 oxidative deamination reaction. Human GDH1 appears to act like bovine GDH1 but human GDH2 does not show the same enhancement of BCKDC enzyme activities. Another metabolic enzyme is also found in the metabolon is pyruvate carboxylase (PC). Kinetic results suggest that PC binds to the E1 decarboxylase of BCKDC but does not effect BCAA catabolism. The protein interaction of BCATm and GDH1 promotes regeneration of PLP-BCATm which then binds to BCKDC resulting in channeling of the BCKA products from BCATm first half reaction to E1 and promoting BCAA oxidation and net nitrogen transfer from BCAAs. The cycling of nitrogen through glutamate via the actions of BCATm and GDH1 releases free ammonia. Formation of ammonia may be important for astrocyte glutamine synthesis in the central nervous system. In peripheral tissue association of BCATm and GDH1 would promote BCAA oxidation at physiologically relevant BCAA concentrations. PMID:21621574

  10. Graph-theoretical identification of dissociation pathways on free energy landscapes of biomolecular interaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Stumm, Boris; Helms, Volkhard

    2010-03-01

    Biomolecular association and dissociation reactions take place on complicated interaction free energy landscapes that are still very hard to characterize computationally. For large enough distances, though, it often suffices to consider the six relative translational and rotational degrees of freedom of the two particles treated as rigid bodies. Here, we computed the six-dimensional free energy surface of a dimer of water-soluble alpha-helices by scanning these six degrees of freedom in about one million grid points. In each point, the relative free energy difference was computed as the sum of the polar and nonpolar solvation free energies of the helix dimer and of the intermolecular coulombic interaction energy. The Dijkstra graph algorithm was then applied to search for the lowest cost dissociation pathways based on a weighted, directed graph, where the vertices represent the grid points, the edges connect the grid points and their neighbors, and the weights are the reaction costs between adjacent pairs of grid points. As an example, the configuration of the bound state was chosen as the source node, and the eight corners of the translational cube were chosen as the destination nodes. With the strong electrostatic interaction of the two helices giving rise to a clearly funnel-shaped energy landscape, the eight lowest-energy cost pathways coming from different orientations converge into a well-defined pathway for association. We believe that the methodology presented here will prove useful for identifying low-energy association and dissociation pathways in future studies of complicated free energy landscapes for biomolecular interaction. PMID:19603501

  11. Glutamate, Ornithine, Arginine, Proline, and Polyamine Metabolic Interactions: The Pathway Is Regulated at the Post-Transcriptional Level

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Rajtilak; Barchi, Boubker; Turlapati, Swathi A.; Gagne, Maegan; Minocha, Rakesh; Long, Stephanie; Minocha, Subhash C.

    2016-01-01

    The metabolism of glutamate into ornithine, arginine, proline, and polyamines is a major network of nitrogen-metabolizing pathways in plants, which also produces intermediates like nitric oxide, and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) that play critical roles in plant development and stress. While the accumulations of intermediates and the products of this network depend primarily on nitrogen assimilation, the overall regulation of the interacting sub-pathways is not well understood. We tested the hypothesis that diversion of ornithine into polyamine biosynthesis (by transgenic approach) not only plays a role in regulating its own biosynthesis from glutamate but also affects arginine and proline biosynthesis. Using two high putrescine producing lines of Arabidopsis thaliana (containing a transgenic mouse ornithine decarboxylase gene), we studied the: (1) effects of exogenous supply of carbon and nitrogen on polyamines and pools of soluble amino acids; and, (2) expression of genes encoding key enzymes in the interactive pathways of arginine, proline and GABA biosynthesis as well as the catabolism of polyamines. Our findings suggest that: (1) the overall conversion of glutamate to arginine and polyamines is enhanced by increased utilization of ornithine for polyamine biosynthesis by the transgene product; (2) proline and arginine biosynthesis are regulated independently of polyamines and GABA biosynthesis; (3) the expression of most genes (28 that were studied) that encode enzymes of the interacting sub-pathways of arginine and GABA biosynthesis does not change even though overall biosynthesis of Orn from glutamate is increased several fold; and (4) increased polyamine biosynthesis results in increased assimilation of both nitrogen and carbon by the cells. PMID:26909083

  12. Extracellular matrix proteins interact with cell-signaling pathways in modifying risk of achilles tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Colleen J; van der Merwe, Lize; Cook, Jill; Handley, Christopher J; Collins, Malcolm; September, Alison V

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate interactions between variants within genes encoding components of the collagen fibril and components of cell-signaling pathways within the extracellular matrix, and determine the relative contribution of these variants to Achilles tendinopathy risk in a polygenic model. A total of 339 asymptomatic control participants and 179 participants clinically diagnosed with Achilles tendinopathy were genotyped for variants within six genes encoding components of the collagen fibril and three genes encoding components of cell-signaling pathways. Logistic regression, stepwise selection, and receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis was used to select and evaluate genetic interactions and determine the relative contribution of these variants to overall genetic risk. The strongest, best fit polygenic risk model included the variables sex, three COL27A1 variants (rs4143245; rs1249744; rs946053), COL5A1 rs12722, CASP8 rs1045485, and CASP8 rs2824129 with an area under the ROC curve of 0.737 and the maximum sum of sensitivity and specificity indicators equal to 134%. Significant interactions between genes encoding components of the collagen fibril and genes encoding components of the cell-signaling pathways modify risk of Achilles tendinopathy.

  13. Partial Activation of SA- and JA-Defensive Pathways in Strawberry upon Colletotrichum acutatum Interaction.

    PubMed

    Amil-Ruiz, Francisco; Garrido-Gala, José; Gadea, José; Blanco-Portales, Rosario; Muñoz-Mérida, Antonio; Trelles, Oswaldo; de Los Santos, Berta; Arroyo, Francisco T; Aguado-Puig, Ana; Romero, Fernando; Mercado, José-Ángel; Pliego-Alfaro, Fernando; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Caballero, José L

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the nature of pathogen host interaction may help improve strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) cultivars. Plant resistance to pathogenic agents usually operates through a complex network of defense mechanisms mediated by a diverse array of signaling molecules. In strawberry, resistance to a variety of pathogens has been reported to be mostly polygenic and quantitatively inherited, making it difficult to associate molecular markers with disease resistance genes. Colletotrichum acutatum spp. is a major strawberry pathogen, and completely resistant cultivars have not been reported. Moreover, strawberry defense network components and mechanisms remain largely unknown and poorly understood. Assessment of the strawberry response to C. acutatum included a global transcript analysis, and acidic hormones SA and JA measurements were analyzed after challenge with the pathogen. Induction of transcripts corresponding to the SA and JA signaling pathways and key genes controlling major steps within these defense pathways was detected. Accordingly, SA and JA accumulated in strawberry after infection. Contrastingly, induction of several important SA, JA, and oxidative stress-responsive defense genes, including FaPR1-1, FaLOX2, FaJAR1, FaPDF1, and FaGST1, was not detected, which suggests that specific branches in these defense pathways (those leading to FaPR1-2, FaPR2-1, FaPR2-2, FaAOS, FaPR5, and FaPR10) were activated. Our results reveal that specific aspects in SA and JA dependent signaling pathways are activated in strawberry upon interaction with C. acutatum. Certain described defense-associated transcripts related to these two known signaling pathways do not increase in abundance following infection. This finding suggests new insight into a specific putative molecular strategy for defense against this pathogen. PMID:27471515

  14. Partial Activation of SA- and JA-Defensive Pathways in Strawberry upon Colletotrichum acutatum Interaction.

    PubMed

    Amil-Ruiz, Francisco; Garrido-Gala, José; Gadea, José; Blanco-Portales, Rosario; Muñoz-Mérida, Antonio; Trelles, Oswaldo; de Los Santos, Berta; Arroyo, Francisco T; Aguado-Puig, Ana; Romero, Fernando; Mercado, José-Ángel; Pliego-Alfaro, Fernando; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Caballero, José L

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the nature of pathogen host interaction may help improve strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) cultivars. Plant resistance to pathogenic agents usually operates through a complex network of defense mechanisms mediated by a diverse array of signaling molecules. In strawberry, resistance to a variety of pathogens has been reported to be mostly polygenic and quantitatively inherited, making it difficult to associate molecular markers with disease resistance genes. Colletotrichum acutatum spp. is a major strawberry pathogen, and completely resistant cultivars have not been reported. Moreover, strawberry defense network components and mechanisms remain largely unknown and poorly understood. Assessment of the strawberry response to C. acutatum included a global transcript analysis, and acidic hormones SA and JA measurements were analyzed after challenge with the pathogen. Induction of transcripts corresponding to the SA and JA signaling pathways and key genes controlling major steps within these defense pathways was detected. Accordingly, SA and JA accumulated in strawberry after infection. Contrastingly, induction of several important SA, JA, and oxidative stress-responsive defense genes, including FaPR1-1, FaLOX2, FaJAR1, FaPDF1, and FaGST1, was not detected, which suggests that specific branches in these defense pathways (those leading to FaPR1-2, FaPR2-1, FaPR2-2, FaAOS, FaPR5, and FaPR10) were activated. Our results reveal that specific aspects in SA and JA dependent signaling pathways are activated in strawberry upon interaction with C. acutatum. Certain described defense-associated transcripts related to these two known signaling pathways do not increase in abundance following infection. This finding suggests new insight into a specific putative molecular strategy for defense against this pathogen.

  15. Partial Activation of SA- and JA-Defensive Pathways in Strawberry upon Colletotrichum acutatum Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Amil-Ruiz, Francisco; Garrido-Gala, José; Gadea, José; Blanco-Portales, Rosario; Muñoz-Mérida, Antonio; Trelles, Oswaldo; de los Santos, Berta; Arroyo, Francisco T.; Aguado-Puig, Ana; Romero, Fernando; Mercado, José-Ángel; Pliego-Alfaro, Fernando; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Caballero, José L.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the nature of pathogen host interaction may help improve strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) cultivars. Plant resistance to pathogenic agents usually operates through a complex network of defense mechanisms mediated by a diverse array of signaling molecules. In strawberry, resistance to a variety of pathogens has been reported to be mostly polygenic and quantitatively inherited, making it difficult to associate molecular markers with disease resistance genes. Colletotrichum acutatum spp. is a major strawberry pathogen, and completely resistant cultivars have not been reported. Moreover, strawberry defense network components and mechanisms remain largely unknown and poorly understood. Assessment of the strawberry response to C. acutatum included a global transcript analysis, and acidic hormones SA and JA measurements were analyzed after challenge with the pathogen. Induction of transcripts corresponding to the SA and JA signaling pathways and key genes controlling major steps within these defense pathways was detected. Accordingly, SA and JA accumulated in strawberry after infection. Contrastingly, induction of several important SA, JA, and oxidative stress-responsive defense genes, including FaPR1-1, FaLOX2, FaJAR1, FaPDF1, and FaGST1, was not detected, which suggests that specific branches in these defense pathways (those leading to FaPR1-2, FaPR2-1, FaPR2-2, FaAOS, FaPR5, and FaPR10) were activated. Our results reveal that specific aspects in SA and JA dependent signaling pathways are activated in strawberry upon interaction with C. acutatum. Certain described defense-associated transcripts related to these two known signaling pathways do not increase in abundance following infection. This finding suggests new insight into a specific putative molecular strategy for defense against this pathogen. PMID:27471515

  16. A systems biology approach using metabolomic data reveals genes and pathways interacting to modulate divergent growth in cattle

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Systems biology enables the identification of gene networks that modulate complex traits. Comprehensive metabolomic analyses provide innovative phenotypes that are intermediate between the initiator of genetic variability, the genome, and raw phenotypes that are influenced by a large number of environmental effects. The present study combines two concepts, systems biology and metabolic analyses, in an approach without prior functional hypothesis in order to dissect genes and molecular pathways that modulate differential growth at the onset of puberty in male cattle. Furthermore, this integrative strategy was applied to specifically explore distinctive gene interactions of non-SMC condensin I complex, subunit G (NCAPG) and myostatin (GDF8), known modulators of pre- and postnatal growth that are only partially understood for their molecular pathways affecting differential body weight. Results Our study successfully established gene networks and interacting partners affecting growth at the onset of puberty in cattle. We demonstrated the biological relevance of the created networks by comparison to randomly created networks. Our data showed that GnRH (Gonadotropin-releasing hormone) signaling is associated with divergent growth at the onset of puberty and revealed two highly connected hubs, BTC and DGKH, within the network. Both genes are known to directly interact with the GnRH signaling pathway. Furthermore, a gene interaction network for NCAPG containing 14 densely connected genes revealed novel information concerning the functional role of NCAPG in divergent growth. Conclusions Merging both concepts, systems biology and metabolomic analyses, successfully yielded new insights into gene networks and interacting partners affecting growth at the onset of puberty in cattle. Genetic modulation in GnRH signaling was identified as key modifier of differential cattle growth at the onset of puberty. In addition, the benefit of our innovative concept without prior

  17. The archaic chaperone-usher pathways may depend on donor strand exchange for intersubunit interactions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Miaomiao; Xu, Shihui; Zhu, Wei; Mao, Xiaohua

    2014-10-01

    Subunit-subunit interactions of the classical and alternate chaperone-usher (CU) systems have been shown to proceed through a donor strand exchange (DSE) mechanism. However, it is not known whether DSE is required for intersubunit interactions in the archaic CU system. We have previously shown that the Myxococcus xanthus Mcu system, a member of the archaic CU family that functions in spore coat formation, is likely to use the principle of donor strand complementation to medicate chaperone-subunit interactions analogous to the classical CU pathway. Here we describe the results of studies on Mcu subunit-subunit interactions. We constructed a series of N-terminal-deleted, single amino acid-mutated and donor strand-complemented Mcu subunits, and characterized their abilities to participate in subunit-subunit interactions. It appears that certain residues in both the N and C termini of McuA, a subunit of the Mcu system, play a critical role in intersubunit interactions and these interactions may involve the general principle of DSE of the classical and alternate CU systems. In addition, the specificity of the M. xanthus CU system for Mcu subunits over other spore coat proteins is demonstrated.

  18. Final State Interactions Effects in Neutrino-Nucleus Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Golan, Tomasz; Juszczak, Cezary; Sobczyk, Jan T.

    2012-07-01

    Final State Interactions effects are discussed in the context of Monte Carlo simulations of neutrino-nucleus interactions. A role of Formation Time is explained and several models describing this effect are compared. Various observables which are sensitive to FSI effects are reviewed including pion-nucleus interaction and hadron yields in backward hemisphere. NuWro Monte Carlo neutrino event generator is described and its ability to understand neutral current $\\pi^0$ production data in $\\sim 1$ GeV neutrino flux experiments is demonstrated.

  19. [Cognition-Emotion Interactions and Psychopathic Personality: Distinct Pathways to Antisocial and Violent Behavior].

    PubMed

    Verona, Edelyn

    2016-01-01

    Researchers have long acknowledged heterogeneity among persons who exhibit antisocial and violent behaviours. The study of psychopathic personality or psychopathy can help elucidate this heterogeneity through examination of the different facets that constitute this disorder. In particular, the distinct correlates of the interpersonal-affective traits (Factor 1) and the impulsive-antisocial traits (Factor 2) of psychopathy suggest at least two possible pathways to antisocial behaviours. Building on basic studies in cognitive and affective neuroscience, we provide a focused, non-comprehensive review of work identifying the biopsychological mechanisms involved in these two pathways, with special attention to studies using event-related potential (ERP) methods. In specific, a series of studies are discussed which examined affective and cognitive processes that may distinguish offenders high on psychopathic traits from other offenders, with emphasis on alterations in emotion-cognition interactions related to each factor of psychopathy. The set of findings reviewed highlight a central conclusion: Factor 1 represents a pathway involving reduced emotional responding, exacerbated by attentional abnormalities, that make for a more deliberate and emotionally insensitive offender profile. In contrast, Factor 2 characterizes a pathway marked by emotional and behavioural dysregulation and cognitive control dysfunctions, particularly in emotional contexts. Implications for identifying etiological processes and the further understanding of antisocial and violent behaviours are discussed. PMID:27570952

  20. Revealing complex function, process and pathway interactions with high-throughput expression and biological annotation data.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nitesh Kumar; Ernst, Mathias; Liebscher, Volkmar; Fuellen, Georg; Taher, Leila

    2016-10-20

    The biological relationships both between and within the functions, processes and pathways that operate within complex biological systems are only poorly characterized, making the interpretation of large scale gene expression datasets extremely challenging. Here, we present an approach that integrates gene expression and biological annotation data to identify and describe the interactions between biological functions, processes and pathways that govern a phenotype of interest. The product is a global, interconnected network, not of genes but of functions, processes and pathways, that represents the biological relationships within the system. We validated our approach on two high-throughput expression datasets describing organismal and organ development. Our findings are well supported by the available literature, confirming that developmental processes and apoptosis play key roles in cell differentiation. Furthermore, our results suggest that processes related to pluripotency and lineage commitment, which are known to be critical for development, interact mainly indirectly, through genes implicated in more general biological processes. Moreover, we provide evidence that supports the relevance of cell spatial organization in the developing liver for proper liver function. Our strategy can be viewed as an abstraction that is useful to interpret high-throughput data and devise further experiments.

  1. SNP-SNP interaction analysis of NF-κB signaling pathway on breast cancer survival

    PubMed Central

    Jamshidi, Maral; Fagerholm, Rainer; Khan, Sofia; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Andrulis, Irene L.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Devilee, Peter; Fasching, Peter A.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Guo, Qi; Rhenius, Valerie; Cornelissen, Sten; Rudolph, Anja; Knight, Julia A.; Loehberg, Christian R.; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Flyger, Henrik; Brenner, Hermann; Holleczek, Bernd; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Dyck, Laurien Van; Nevelsteen, Ines; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Giles, Graham G.; McLean, Catriona; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Tollenaar, Rob A.E.M.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Hooning, Maartje J.; Martens, John W.M.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Simard, Jacques; Dunning, Alison M.; Easton, Douglas F.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Hall, Per; Blomqvist, Carl; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Nevanlinna, Heli

    2015-01-01

    In breast cancer, constitutive activation of NF-κB has been reported, however, the impact of genetic variation of the pathway on patient prognosis has been little studied. Furthermore, a combination of genetic variants, rather than single polymorphisms, may affect disease prognosis. Here, in an extensive dataset (n = 30,431) from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium, we investigated the association of 917 SNPs in 75 genes in the NF-κB pathway with breast cancer prognosis. We explored SNP-SNP interactions on survival using the likelihood-ratio test comparing multivariate Cox’ regression models of SNP pairs without and with an interaction term. We found two interacting pairs associating with prognosis: patients simultaneously homozygous for the rare alleles of rs5996080 and rs7973914 had worse survival (HRinteraction 6.98, 95% CI=3.3-14.4, P = 1.42E-07), and patients carrying at least one rare allele for rs17243893 and rs57890595 had better survival (HRinteraction 0.51, 95% CI=0.3-0.6, P = 2.19E-05). Based on in silico functional analyses and literature, we speculate that the rs5996080 and rs7973914 loci may affect the BAFFR and TNFR1/TNFR3 receptors and breast cancer survival, possibly by disturbing both the canonical and non-canonical NF-κB pathways or their dynamics, whereas, rs17243893-rs57890595 interaction on survival may be mediated through TRAF2-TRAIL-R4 interplay. These results warrant further validation and functional analyses. PMID:26317411

  2. Consortium analysis of gene and gene-folate interactions in purine and pyrimidine metabolism pathways with ovarian carcinoma risk

    PubMed Central

    Kelemen, Linda E.; Terry, Kathryn L.; Goodman, Marc T.; Webb, Penelope M.; Bandera, Elisa V.; McGuire, Valerie; Rossing, Mary Anne; Wang, Qinggang; Dicks, Ed; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Song, Honglin; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Plisiecka-Halasa, Joanna; Timorek, Agnieszka; Menon, Usha; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Gayther, Simon A.; Ramus, Susan J.; Narod, Steven A.; Risch, Harvey A.; McLaughlin, John R.; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Glasspool, Rosalind; Paul, James; Carty, Karen; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubiński, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Cybulski, Cezary; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Massuger, Leon F. A. G.; van Altena, Anne M.; Aben, Katja K. H.; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Cramer, Daniel W.; Levine, Douglas A.; Bisogna, Maria; Giles, Graham G.; Southey, Melissa C.; Bruinsma, Fiona; Kjær, Susanne Krüger; Høgdall, Estrid; Jensen, Allan; Høgdall, Claus K.; Lundvall, Lene; Engelholm, Svend-Aage; Heitz, Florian; du Bois, Andreas; Harter, Philipp; Schwaab, Ira; Butzow, Ralf; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Leminen, Arto; Thompson, Pamela J.; Lurie, Galina; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Lambrechts, Diether; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Vergote, Ignace; Beesley, Jonathan; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B.; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Wu, Anna H.; Pearce, Celeste L.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Stram, Daniel; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Dörk, Thilo; Dürst, Matthias; Hillemanns, Peter; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Antonenkova, Natalia; Odunsi, Kunle; Edwards, Robert P.; Kelley, Joseph L.; Modugno, Francesmary; Ness, Roberta B.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Fridley, Brooke L.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Wu, Xifeng; Lu, Karen; Liang, Dong; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Iversen, Edwin S.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Krakstad, Camilla; Bjorge, Line; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Pejovic, Tanja; Bean, Yukie; Kellar, Melissa; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise A.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Campbell, Ian G.; Eccles, Diana; Whittemore, Alice S.; Sieh, Weiva; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Phelan, Catherine M.; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Goode, Ellen L.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Berchuck, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Cook, Linda S.; Le, Nhu D.

    2014-01-01

    Scope We re-evaluated previously reported associations between variants in pathways of one-carbon (folate) transfer genes and ovarian carcinoma (OC) risk, and in related pathways of purine and pyrimidine metabolism, and assessed interactions with folate intake. Methods and Results Odds ratios (OR) for 446 genetic variants were estimated among 13,410 OC cases and 22,635 controls and among 2,281 cases and 3,444 controls with folate information. Following multiple testing correction, the most significant main effect associations were for DPYD variants rs11587873 (OR=0.92, P=6x10−5) and rs828054 (OR=1.06, P=1x10−4). Thirteen variants in the pyrimidine metabolism genes, DPYD, DPYS, PPAT and TYMS, also interacted significantly with folate in a multi-variant analysis (corrected P=9.9x10−6) but collectively explained only 0.2% of OC risk. Although no other associations were significant after multiple testing correction, variants in SHMT1 in one-carbon transfer, previously reported with OC, suggested lower risk at higher folate (Pinteraction=0.03-0.006). Conclusions Variation in pyrimidine metabolism genes, particularly DPYD, which was previously reported to be associated with OC, may influence risk; however, stratification by folate intake is unlikely to modify disease risk appreciably in these women. SHMT1 SNP-byfolate interactions are plausible but require further validation. Polymorphisms in selected genes in purine metabolism were not associated with OC. PMID:25066213

  3. Modeling of the dorsal gradient across species reveals interaction between embryo morphology and Toll signaling pathway during evolution.

    PubMed

    Ambrosi, Priscilla; Chahda, Juan Sebastian; Koslen, Hannah R; Chiel, Hillel J; Mizutani, Claudia Mieko

    2014-08-01

    Morphogenetic gradients are essential to allocate cell fates in embryos of varying sizes within and across closely related species. We previously showed that the maternal NF-κB/Dorsal (Dl) gradient has acquired different shapes in Drosophila species, which result in unequally scaled germ layers along the dorso-ventral axis and the repositioning of the neuroectodermal borders. Here we combined experimentation and mathematical modeling to investigate which factors might have contributed to the fast evolutionary changes of this gradient. To this end, we modified a previously developed model that employs differential equations of the main biochemical interactions of the Toll (Tl) signaling pathway, which regulates Dl nuclear transport. The original model simulations fit well the D. melanogaster wild type, but not mutant conditions. To broaden the applicability of this model and probe evolutionary changes in gradient distributions, we adjusted a set of 19 independent parameters to reproduce three quantified experimental conditions (i.e. Dl levels lowered, nuclear size and density increased or decreased). We next searched for the most relevant parameters that reproduce the species-specific Dl gradients. We show that adjusting parameters relative to morphological traits (i.e. embryo diameter, nuclear size and density) alone is not sufficient to reproduce the species Dl gradients. Since components of the Tl pathway simulated by the model are fast-evolving, we next asked which parameters related to Tl would most effectively reproduce these gradients and identified a particular subset. A sensitivity analysis reveals the existence of nonlinear interactions between the two fast-evolving traits tested above, namely the embryonic morphological changes and Tl pathway components. Our modeling further suggests that distinct Dl gradient shapes observed in closely related melanogaster sub-group lineages may be caused by similar sequence modifications in Tl pathway components, which

  4. Modeling of the Dorsal Gradient across Species Reveals Interaction between Embryo Morphology and Toll Signaling Pathway during Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Koslen, Hannah R.; Chiel, Hillel J.; Mizutani, Claudia Mieko

    2014-01-01

    Morphogenetic gradients are essential to allocate cell fates in embryos of varying sizes within and across closely related species. We previously showed that the maternal NF-κB/Dorsal (Dl) gradient has acquired different shapes in Drosophila species, which result in unequally scaled germ layers along the dorso-ventral axis and the repositioning of the neuroectodermal borders. Here we combined experimentation and mathematical modeling to investigate which factors might have contributed to the fast evolutionary changes of this gradient. To this end, we modified a previously developed model that employs differential equations of the main biochemical interactions of the Toll (Tl) signaling pathway, which regulates Dl nuclear transport. The original model simulations fit well the D. melanogaster wild type, but not mutant conditions. To broaden the applicability of this model and probe evolutionary changes in gradient distributions, we adjusted a set of 19 independent parameters to reproduce three quantified experimental conditions (i.e. Dl levels lowered, nuclear size and density increased or decreased). We next searched for the most relevant parameters that reproduce the species-specific Dl gradients. We show that adjusting parameters relative to morphological traits (i.e. embryo diameter, nuclear size and density) alone is not sufficient to reproduce the species Dl gradients. Since components of the Tl pathway simulated by the model are fast-evolving, we next asked which parameters related to Tl would most effectively reproduce these gradients and identified a particular subset. A sensitivity analysis reveals the existence of nonlinear interactions between the two fast-evolving traits tested above, namely the embryonic morphological changes and Tl pathway components. Our modeling further suggests that distinct Dl gradient shapes observed in closely related melanogaster sub-group lineages may be caused by similar sequence modifications in Tl pathway components, which

  5. Structural and Functional Characterization of a Caenorhabditis elegans Genetic Interaction Network within Pathways.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Benjamin; Lee, Anna Y; Hallett, Michael; Jenna, Sarah

    2016-02-01

    A genetic interaction (GI) is defined when the mutation of one gene modifies the phenotypic expression associated with the mutation of a second gene. Genome-wide efforts to map GIs in yeast revealed structural and functional properties of a GI network. This provided insights into the mechanisms underlying the robustness of yeast to genetic and environmental insults, and also into the link existing between genotype and phenotype. While a significant conservation of GIs and GI network structure has been reported between distant yeast species, such a conservation is not clear between unicellular and multicellular organisms. Structural and functional characterization of a GI network in these latter organisms is consequently of high interest. In this study, we present an in-depth characterization of ~1.5K GIs in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We identify and characterize six distinct classes of GIs by examining a wide-range of structural and functional properties of genes and network, including co-expression, phenotypical manifestations, relationship with protein-protein interaction dense subnetworks (PDS) and pathways, molecular and biological functions, gene essentiality and pleiotropy. Our study shows that GI classes link genes within pathways and display distinctive properties, specifically towards PDS. It suggests a model in which pathways are composed of PDS-centric and PDS-independent GIs coordinating molecular machines through two specific classes of GIs involving pleiotropic and non-pleiotropic connectors. Our study provides the first in-depth characterization of a GI network within pathways of a multicellular organism. It also suggests a model to understand better how GIs control system robustness and evolution. PMID:26871911

  6. Structural and Functional Characterization of a Caenorhabditis elegans Genetic Interaction Network within Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Benjamin; Lee, Anna Y.; Hallett, Michael; Jenna, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    A genetic interaction (GI) is defined when the mutation of one gene modifies the phenotypic expression associated with the mutation of a second gene. Genome-wide efforts to map GIs in yeast revealed structural and functional properties of a GI network. This provided insights into the mechanisms underlying the robustness of yeast to genetic and environmental insults, and also into the link existing between genotype and phenotype. While a significant conservation of GIs and GI network structure has been reported between distant yeast species, such a conservation is not clear between unicellular and multicellular organisms. Structural and functional characterization of a GI network in these latter organisms is consequently of high interest. In this study, we present an in-depth characterization of ~1.5K GIs in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We identify and characterize six distinct classes of GIs by examining a wide-range of structural and functional properties of genes and network, including co-expression, phenotypical manifestations, relationship with protein-protein interaction dense subnetworks (PDS) and pathways, molecular and biological functions, gene essentiality and pleiotropy. Our study shows that GI classes link genes within pathways and display distinctive properties, specifically towards PDS. It suggests a model in which pathways are composed of PDS-centric and PDS-independent GIs coordinating molecular machines through two specific classes of GIs involving pleiotropic and non-pleiotropic connectors. Our study provides the first in-depth characterization of a GI network within pathways of a multicellular organism. It also suggests a model to understand better how GIs control system robustness and evolution. PMID:26871911

  7. Forest disturbance interactions and successional pathways in the Southern Rocky Mountains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu Liang,; Hawbaker, Todd J.; Zhu, Zhiliang; Xuecao Li,; Peng Gong,

    2016-01-01

    The pine forests in the southern portion of the Rocky Mountains are a heterogeneous mosaic of disturbance and recovery. The most extensive and intensive stress and mortality are received from human activity, fire, and mountain pine beetles (MPB;Dendroctonus ponderosae). Understanding disturbance interactions and disturbance-succession pathways are crucial for adapting management strategies to mitigate their impacts and anticipate future ecosystem change. Driven by this goal, we assessed the forest disturbance and recovery history in the Southern Rocky Mountains Ecoregion using a 13-year time series of Landsat image stacks. An automated classification workflow that integrates temporal segmentation techniques and a random forest classifier was used to examine disturbance patterns. To enhance efficiency in selecting representative samples at the ecoregion scale, a new sampling strategy that takes advantage of the scene-overlap among adjacent Landsat images was designed. The segment-based assessment revealed that the overall accuracy for all 14 scenes varied from 73.6% to 92.5%, with a mean of 83.1%. A design-based inference indicated the average producer’s and user’s accuracies for MPB mortality were 85.4% and 82.5% respectively. We found that burn severity was largely unrelated to the severity of pre-fire beetle outbreaks in this region, where the severity of post-fire beetle outbreaks generally decreased in relation to burn severity. Approximately half the clear-cut and burned areas were in various stages of recovery, but the regeneration rate was much slower for MPB-disturbed sites. Pre-fire beetle outbreaks and subsequent fire produced positive compound effects on seedling reestablishment in this ecoregion. Taken together, these results emphasize that although multiple disturbances do play a role in the resilience mechanism of the serotinous lodgepole pine, the overall recovery could be slow due to the vast area of beetle mortality.

  8. Extracting Between-Pathway Models from E-MAP Interactions Using Expected Graph Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, David R.; Kingsford, Carl

    Genetic interactions (such as synthetic lethal interactions) have become quantifiable on a large-scale using the epistatic miniarray profile (E-MAP) method. An E-MAP allows the construction of a large, weighted network of both aggravating and alleviating genetic interactions between genes. By clustering genes into modules and establishing relationships between those modules, we can discover compensatory pathways. We introduce a general framework for applying greedy clustering heuristics to probabilistic graphs. We use this framework to apply a graph clustering method called graph summarization to an E-MAP that targets yeast chromosome biology. This results in a new method for clustering E-MAP data that we call Expected Graph Compression (EGC). We validate modules and compensatory pathways using enriched Gene Ontology annotations and a novel method based on correlated gene expression. EGC finds a number of modules that are not found by any previous methods to cluster E-MAP data. EGC also uncovers core submodules contained within several previously found modules, suggesting that EGC can reveal the finer structure of E-MAP networks.

  9. Zebrafish Mutants calamity and catastrophe Define Critical Pathways of Gene–Nutrient Interactions in Developmental Copper Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Erik C.; Gitlin, Jonathan D.

    2008-01-01

    Nutrient availability is an important environmental variable during development that has significant effects on the metabolism, health, and viability of an organism. To understand these interactions for the nutrient copper, we used a chemical genetic screen for zebrafish mutants sensitive to developmental copper deficiency. In this screen, we isolated two mutants that define subtleties of copper metabolism. The first contains a viable hypomorphic allele of atp7a and results in a loss of pigmentation when exposed to mild nutritional copper deficiency. This mutant displays incompletely penetrant skeletal defects affected by developmental copper availability. The second carries an inactivating mutation in the vacuolar ATPase that causes punctate melanocytes and embryonic lethality. This mutant, catastrophe, is sensitive to copper deprivation revealing overlap between ion metabolic pathways. Together, the two mutants illustrate the utility of chemical genetic screens in zebrafish to elucidate the interaction of nutrient availability and genetic polymorphisms in cellular metabolism. PMID:19008952

  10. Special issue: redox active natural products and their interaction with cellular signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Claus

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade, research into natural products has experienced a certain renaissance. The urgent need for more and more effective antibiotics in medicine, the demand for ecologically friendly plant protectants in agriculture, "natural" cosmetics and the issue of a sustainable and healthy nutrition in an ageing society have fuelled research into Nature's treasure chest of "green gold". Here, redox active secondary metabolites from plants, fungi, bacteria and other (micro-)organisms often have been at the forefront of the most interesting developments. These agents provide powerful means to interfere with many, probably most cellular signaling pathways in humans, animals and lower organisms, and therefore can be used to protect, i.e., in form of antioxidants, and to frighten off or even kill, i.e., in form of repellants, antibiotics, fungicides and selective, often catalytic "sensor/effector" anticancer agents. Interestingly, whilst natural product research dates back many decades, in some cases even centuries, and compounds such as allicin and various flavonoids have been investigated thoroughly in the past, it has only recently become possible to investigate their precise interactions and mode(s) of action inside living cells. Here, fluorescent staining and labelling on the one side, and appropriate detection, either qualitatively under the microscope or quantitatively in flow cytometers and plate readers, on the other, enable researchers to obtain the various pieces of information necessary to construct a fairly complete puzzle of how such compounds act and interact in living cells. Complemented by the more traditional activity assays and Western Blots, and increasingly joined by techniques such as proteomics, chemogenetic screening and mRNA profiling, these cell based bioanalytical techniques form a powerful platform for "intracellular diagnostics". In the case of redox active compounds, especially of Reactive Sulfur Species (RSS), such techniques have

  11. Cost-Effectiveness of Interactive Courseware.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, J. D.

    What is known about the cost effectiveness of interactive courseware (ICW) is reviewed, and issues that remain are summarized. Effect size is used for reporting the effectiveness of ICW programs. Two ICW media are considered: computer-based instruction and interactive videodisc instruction. Effect sizes for computer-based instruction have been…

  12. The cannabinoid CB1 receptor and mTORC1 signalling pathways interact to modulate glucose homeostasis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Bermudez-Silva, Francisco J.; Romero-Zerbo, Silvana Y.; Haissaguerre, Magalie; Ruz-Maldonado, Inmaculada; Lhamyani, Said; El Bekay, Rajaa; Tabarin, Antoine; Marsicano, Giovanni; Cota, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is an intercellular signalling mechanism that is present in the islets of Langerhans and plays a role in the modulation of insulin secretion and expansion of the β-cell mass. The downstream signalling pathways mediating these effects are poorly understood. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signalling is a key intracellular pathway involved in energy homeostasis and is known to importantly affect the physiology of pancreatic islets. We investigated the possible relationship between cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor signalling and the mTORC1 pathway in the endocrine pancreas of mice by using pharmacological analysis as well as mice genetically lacking the CB1 receptor or the downstream target of mTORC1, the kinase p70S6K1. In vitro static secretion experiments on islets, western blotting, and in vivo glucose and insulin tolerance tests were performed. The CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant decreased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) at 0.1 µM while increasing phosphorylation of p70S6K1 and ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) within the islets. Specific pharmacological blockade of mTORC1 by 3 nM rapamycin, as well as genetic deletion of p70S6K1, impaired the CB1-antagonist-mediated decrease in GSIS. In vivo experiments showed that 3 mg/kg body weight rimonabant decreased insulin levels and induced glucose intolerance in lean mice without altering peripheral insulin sensitivity; this effect was prevented by peripheral administration of low doses of rapamycin (0.1 mg/kg body weight), which increased insulin sensitivity. These findings suggest a functional interaction between the ECS and the mTORC1 pathway within the endocrine pancreas and at the whole-organism level, which could have implications for the development of new therapeutic approaches for pancreatic β-cell diseases. PMID:26563389

  13. The cannabinoid CB1 receptor and mTORC1 signalling pathways interact to modulate glucose homeostasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Bermudez-Silva, Francisco J; Romero-Zerbo, Silvana Y; Haissaguerre, Magalie; Ruz-Maldonado, Inmaculada; Lhamyani, Said; El Bekay, Rajaa; Tabarin, Antoine; Marsicano, Giovanni; Cota, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is an intercellular signalling mechanism that is present in the islets of Langerhans and plays a role in the modulation of insulin secretion and expansion of the β-cell mass. The downstream signalling pathways mediating these effects are poorly understood. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signalling is a key intracellular pathway involved in energy homeostasis and is known to importantly affect the physiology of pancreatic islets. We investigated the possible relationship between cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor signalling and the mTORC1 pathway in the endocrine pancreas of mice by using pharmacological analysis as well as mice genetically lacking the CB1 receptor or the downstream target of mTORC1, the kinase p70S6K1. In vitro static secretion experiments on islets, western blotting, and in vivo glucose and insulin tolerance tests were performed. The CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant decreased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) at 0.1 µM while increasing phosphorylation of p70S6K1 and ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) within the islets. Specific pharmacological blockade of mTORC1 by 3 nM rapamycin, as well as genetic deletion of p70S6K1, impaired the CB1-antagonist-mediated decrease in GSIS. In vivo experiments showed that 3 mg/kg body weight rimonabant decreased insulin levels and induced glucose intolerance in lean mice without altering peripheral insulin sensitivity; this effect was prevented by peripheral administration of low doses of rapamycin (0.1 mg/kg body weight), which increased insulin sensitivity. These findings suggest a functional interaction between the ECS and the mTORC1 pathway within the endocrine pancreas and at the whole-organism level, which could have implications for the development of new therapeutic approaches for pancreatic β-cell diseases.

  14. Conditional Epistatic Interaction Maps Reveal Global Functional Rewiring of Genome Integrity Pathways in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashwani; Beloglazova, Natalia; Bundalovic-Torma, Cedoljub; Phanse, Sadhna; Deineko, Viktor; Gagarinova, Alla; Musso, Gabriel; Vlasblom, James; Lemak, Sofia; Hooshyar, Mohsen; Minic, Zoran; Wagih, Omar; Mosca, Roberto; Aloy, Patrick; Golshani, Ashkan; Parkinson, John; Emili, Andrew; Yakunin, Alexander F; Babu, Mohan

    2016-01-26

    As antibiotic resistance is increasingly becoming a public health concern, an improved understanding of the bacterial DNA damage response (DDR), which is commonly targeted by antibiotics, could be of tremendous therapeutic value. Although the genetic components of the bacterial DDR have been studied extensively in isolation, how the underlying biological pathways interact functionally remains unclear. Here, we address this by performing systematic, unbiased, quantitative synthetic genetic interaction (GI) screens and uncover widespread changes in the GI network of the entire genomic integrity apparatus of Escherichia coli under standard and DNA-damaging growth conditions. The GI patterns of untreated cultures implicated two previously uncharacterized proteins (YhbQ and YqgF) as nucleases, whereas reorganization of the GI network after DNA damage revealed DDR roles for both annotated and uncharacterized genes. Analyses of pan-bacterial conservation patterns suggest that DDR mechanisms and functional relationships are near universal, highlighting a modular and highly adaptive genomic stress response.

  15. Sharing, liking, commenting, and distressed? The pathway between Facebook interaction and psychological distress.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenhong; Lee, Kye-Hyoung

    2013-10-01

    Studies on the mental health implications of social media have generated mixed results. Drawing on a survey of college students (N=513), this research uses structural equation modeling to assess the relationship between Facebook interaction and psychological distress and two underlying mechanisms: communication overload and self-esteem. It is the first study, to our knowledge, that examines how communication overload mediates the mental health implications of social media. Frequent Facebook interaction is associated with greater distress directly and indirectly via a two-step pathway that increases communication overload and reduces self-esteem. The research sheds light on new directions for understanding psychological well-being in an increasingly mediated social world as users share, like, and comment more and more. PMID:23745614

  16. Modeling of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug Effect within Signaling Pathways and miRNA-Regulation Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian; Mansmann, Ulrich R.

    2013-01-01

    To date, it is widely recognized that Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) can exert considerable anti-tumor effects regarding many types of cancers. The prolonged use of NSAIDs is highly associated with diverse side effects. Therefore, tailoring down the NSAID application onto individual patients has become a necessary and relevant step towards personalized medicine. This study conducts the systemsbiological approach to construct a molecular model (NSAID model) containing a cyclooxygenase (COX)-pathway and its related signaling pathways. Four cancer hallmarks are integrated into the model to reflect different developmental aspects of tumorigenesis. In addition, a Flux-Comparative-Analysis (FCA) based on Petri net is developed to transfer the dynamic properties (including drug responsiveness) of individual cellular system into the model. The gene expression profiles of different tumor-types with available drug-response information are applied to validate the predictive ability of the NSAID model. Moreover, two therapeutic developmental strategies, synthetic lethality and microRNA (miRNA) biomarker discovery, are investigated based on the COX-pathway. In conclusion, the result of this study demonstrates that the NSAID model involving gene expression, gene regulation, signal transduction, protein interaction and other cellular processes, is able to predict the individual cellular responses for different therapeutic interventions (such as NS-398 and COX-2 specific siRNA inhibition). This strongly indicates that this type of model is able to reflect the physiological, developmental and pathological processes of an individual. The approach of miRNA biomarker discovery is demonstrated for identifying miRNAs with oncogenic and tumor suppressive functions for individual cell lines of breast-, colon- and lung-tumor. The achieved results are in line with different independent studies that investigated miRNA biomarker related to diagnostics of cancer treatments

  17. Interaction of PACAP with Sonic hedgehog reveals complex regulation of the hedgehog pathway by PKA.

    PubMed

    Niewiadomski, Pawel; Zhujiang, Annie; Youssef, Mary; Waschek, James A

    2013-11-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling is essential for proliferation of cerebellar granule cell progenitors (cGCPs) and its aberrant activation causes a cerebellar cancer medulloblastoma. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) inhibits Shh-driven proliferation of cGCPs and acts as tumor suppressor in murine medulloblastoma. We show that PACAP blocks canonical Shh signaling by a mechanism that involves activation of protein kinase A (PKA) and inhibition of the translocation of the Shh-dependent transcription factor Gli2 into the primary cilium. PKA is shown to play an essential role in inhibiting gene transcription in the absence of Shh, but global PKA activity levels are found to be a poor predictor of the degree of Shh pathway activation. We propose that the core Shh pathway regulates a small compartmentalized pool of PKA in the vicinity of primary cilia. GPCRs that affect global PKA activity levels, such as the PACAP receptor, cooperate with the canonical Shh signal to regulate Gli protein phosphorylation by PKA. This interaction serves to fine-tune the transcriptional and physiological function of the Shh pathway. PMID:23872071

  18. Deciphering the biological effects of acupuncture treatment modulating multiple metabolism pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Aihua; Yan, Guangli; Sun, Hui; Cheng, Weiping; Meng, Xiangcai; Liu, Li; Xie, Ning; Wang, Xijun

    2016-01-01

    Acupuncture is an alternative therapy that is widely used to treat various diseases. However, detailed biological interpretation of the acupuncture stimulations is limited. We here used metabolomics and proteomics technology, thereby identifying the serum small molecular metabolites into the effect and mechanism pathways of standardized acupuncture treatments at ‘Zusanli’ acupoint which was the most often used acupoint in previous reports. Comprehensive overview of serum metabolic profiles during acupuncture stimulation was investigated. Thirty-four differential metabolites were identified in serum metabolome and associated with ten metabolism pathways. Importantly, we have found that high impact glycerophospholipid metabolism, fatty acid metabolism, ether lipid metabolism were acutely perturbed by acupuncture stimulation. As such, these alterations may be useful to clarify the biological mechanism of acupuncture stimulation. A series of differentially expressed proteins were identified and such effects of acupuncture stimulation were found to play a role in transport, enzymatic activity, signaling pathway or receptor interaction. Pathway analysis further revealed that most of these proteins were found to play a pivotal role in the regulation of multiple metabolism pathways. It demonstrated that the metabolomics coupled with proteomics as a powerful approach for potential applications in understanding the biological effects of acupuncture stimulation. PMID:26879284

  19. A highway for war and peace: the secretory pathway in plant-microbe interactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Dong, Xinnian

    2011-07-01

    Secretion of proteins and other molecules is the primary means by which a cell interacts with its surroundings. The overall organization of the secretory system is remarkably conserved among eukaryotes, and many of the components have been investigated in detail in animal models. Plant cells, because of their sessile lifestyle, are uniquely reliant on the secretory pathway to respond to changes in their environments, either abiotic, such as the absence of nutrients, or biotic, such as the presence of predators or pathogens. In particular, most plant pathogens are extracellular, which demands a robust and efficient host secretory system directed at the site of attack. Here, we present a summary of recent advances in our understanding of the molecular details of the secretory pathway during plant-microbe interactions. Secretion is required not only for the delivery of antimicrobial molecules, but also for the biogenesis of cell surface sensors to detect microbes. The deposition of extracellular material is important in the defense against classical bacterial pathogens as well as in the so-called 'non-host' resistance. Finally, boosting the protein secretion capacity is vital for avoiding infection as well as for achieving symbiosis, even though in the latter case, the microbes are engulfed in intracellular compartments. The emerging evidence indicates that secretion provides an essential interface between plant hosts and their associated microbial partners.

  20. Triple SILAC to Determine Stimulus Specific Interactions in the Wnt Pathway

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Many important regulatory functions are performed by dynamic multiprotein complexes that adapt their composition and activity in response to different stimuli. Here we employ quantitative affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry to efficiently separate background from specific interactors but add an additional quantitative dimension to explicitly characterize stimulus-dependent interactions. This is accomplished by SILAC in a triple-labeling format, in which pull-downs with bait, with bait and stimulus, and without bait are quantified against each other. As baits, we use full-length proteins fused to the green fluorescent protein and expressed under endogenous control. We applied this technology to Wnt signaling, which is important in development, tissue homeostasis, and cancer, and investigated interactions of the key components APC, Axin-1, DVL2, and CtBP2 with differential pathway activation. Our screens identify many known Wnt signaling complex components and link novel candidates to Wnt signaling, including FAM83B and Girdin, which we found as interactors to multiple Wnt pathway players. Girdin binds to DVL2 independent of stimulation with the ligand Wnt3a but to Axin-1 and APC in a stimulus-dependent manner. The core destruction complex itself, which regulates beta-catenin stability as the key step in canonical Wnt signaling, remained essentially unchanged. PMID:22011079

  1. Cdc42p-Interacting Protein Bem4p Regulates the Filamentous-Growth Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pitoniak, Andrew; Chavel, Colin A.; Chow, Jacky; Smith, Jeremy; Camara, Diawoye; Karunanithi, Sheelarani; Li, Boyang; Wolfe, Kennith H.

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitous Rho (Ras homology) GTPase Cdc42p can function in different settings to regulate cell polarity and cellular signaling. How Cdc42p and other proteins are directed to function in a particular context remains unclear. We show that the Cdc42p-interacting protein Bem4p regulates the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway that controls filamentous growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Bem4p controlled the filamentous-growth pathway but not other MAPK pathways (mating or high-osmolarity glycerol response [HOG]) that also require Cdc42p and other shared components. Bem4p associated with the plasma membrane (PM) protein, Sho1p, to regulate MAPK activity and cell polarization under nutrient-limiting conditions that favor filamentous growth. Bem4p also interacted with the major activator of Cdc42p, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Cdc24p, which we show also regulates the filamentous-growth pathway. Bem4p interacted with the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of Cdc24p, which functions in an autoinhibitory capacity, and was required, along with other pathway regulators, to maintain Cdc24p at polarized sites during filamentous growth. Bem4p also interacted with the MAPK kinase kinase (MAPKKK) Ste11p. Thus, Bem4p is a new regulator of the filamentous-growth MAPK pathway and binds to general proteins, like Cdc42p and Ste11p, to promote a pathway-specific response. PMID:25384973

  2. Interaction of Prenatal Exposure to Cigarettes and MAOA Genotype in Pathways to Youth Antisocial Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Wakschlag, Lauren S.; Kistner, Emily O.; Pine, Daniel S.; Biesecker, Gretchen; Pickett, Kate E.; Skol, Andrew; Dukic, Vanja; Blair, R. James; Leventhal, Bennett L.; Cox, Nancy; Burns, James; Kasza, Kristen E.; Wright, Rosalind J.; Cook, Edwin H.

    2009-01-01

    Genetic susceptibility to antisocial behavior may increase fetal sensitivity to prenatal exposure to cigarette smoke. Testing putative Gene × Exposure mechanisms requires precise measurement of exposure and outcomes. We tested whether a functional polymorphism in the gene encoding the enzyme monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) interacts with exposure to predict pathways to adolescent antisocial behavior. We assessed both clinical and information-processing outcomes. 176 adolescents and their mothers participated in a follow-up of a pregnancy cohort with well-characterized exposure. A sex-specific pattern of gene × exposure interaction was detected. Exposed boys with the low activity MAOA 5’ untranslated region variable number of tandem repeats (uVNTR) genotype were at increased risk for Conduct Disorder (CD) symptoms. In contrast, exposed girls with the high activity MAOA uVNTR genotype were at increased risk for both CD symptoms and hostile attribution bias on a face-processing task. There was no evidence of a gene-environment correlation (rGE). Findings suggest that the MAOA uVNTR genotype, prenatal exposure to cigarettes, and sex interact to predict antisocial behavior and related information-processing patterns. Future research to replicate and extend these findings may focus on elucidating how gene × exposure interactions may shape behavior via associated changes in brain function. PMID:19255579

  3. The Clickable Guard Cell, Version II: Interactive Model of Guard Cell Signal Transduction Mechanisms and Pathways.

    PubMed

    Kwak, June M; Mäser, Pascal; Schroeder, Julian I

    2008-01-01

    Guard cells are located in the leaf epidermis and pairs of guard cells surround and form stomatal pores, which regulate CO(2) influx from the atmosphere into leaves for photosynthetic carbon fixation. Stomatal guard cells also regulate water loss of plants via transpiration to the atmosphere. Signal transduction mechanisms in guard cells integrate a multitude of different stimuli to modulate stomatal apertures. Stomata open in response to light. Stomata close in response to drought stress, elevated CO(2), ozone and low humidity. In response to drought, plants synthesize the hormone abscisic acid (ABA) that triggers closing of stomatal pores. Guard cells have become a highly developed model system for dissecting signal transduction mechanisms in plants and for elucidating how individual signaling mechanisms can interact within a network in a single cell. Many new findings have been made in the last few years. This chapter is an update of an electronic interactive chapter in the previous edition of The Arabidopsis Book (Mäser et al. 2003). Here we focus on mechanisms for which genes and mutations have been characterized, including signaling components for which there is substantial signaling, biochemical and genetic evidence. Ion channels have been shown to represent targets of early signal transduction mechanisms and provide functional signaling and quantitative analysis points to determine where and how mutations affect branches within the guard cell signaling network. Although a substantial number of genes and proteins that function in guard cell signaling have been identified in recent years, there are many more left to be identified and the protein-protein interactions within this network will be an important subject of future research. A fully interactive clickable electronic version of this publication can be accessed at the following web site: http://www-biology.ucsd.edu/labs/schroeder/clickablegc2/. The interactive clickable version includes the following

  4. Human wild-type tau interacts with wingless pathway components and produces neurofibrillary pathology in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Jackson, George R; Wiedau-Pazos, Martina; Sang, Tzu-Kang; Wagle, Naveed; Brown, Carlos A; Massachi, Sasan; Geschwind, Daniel H

    2002-05-16

    Pathologic alterations in the microtubule-associated protein tau have been implicated in a number of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Here, we show that tau overexpression, in combination with phosphorylation by the Drosophila glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) homolog and wingless pathway component (Shaggy), exacerbated neurodegeneration induced by tau overexpression alone, leading to neurofibrillary pathology in the fly. Furthermore, manipulation of other wingless signaling molecules downstream from shaggy demonstrated that components of the Wnt signaling pathway modulate neurodegeneration induced by tau pathology in vivo but suggested that tau phosphorylation by GSK-3beta differs from canonical Wnt effects on beta-catenin stability and TCF activity. The genetic system we have established provides a powerful reagent for identification of novel modifiers of tau-induced neurodegeneration that may serve as future therapeutic targets. PMID:12062036

  5. Gene-environment interactions in male reproductive health: special reference to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Brokken, Leon J S; Giwercman, Yvonne Lundberg

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few decades, there have been numerous reports of adverse effects on the reproductive health of wildlife and laboratory animals caused by exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). The increasing trends in human male reproductive disorders and the mounting evidence for causative environmental factors have therefore sparked growing interest in the health threat posed to humans by EDCs, which are substances in our food, environment and consumer items that interfere with hormone action, biosynthesis or metabolism, resulting in disrupted tissue homeostasis or reproductive function. The mechanisms of EDCs involve a wide array of actions and pathways. Examples include the estrogenic, androgenic, thyroid and retinoid pathways, in which the EDCs may act directly as agonists or antagonists, or indirectly via other nuclear receptors. Dioxins and dioxin-like EDCs exert their biological and toxicological actions through activation of the aryl hydrocarbon-receptor, which besides inducing transcription of detoxifying enzymes also regulates transcriptional activity of other nuclear receptors. There is increasing evidence that genetic predispositions may modify the susceptibility to adverse effects of toxic chemicals. In this review, potential consequences of hereditary predisposition and EDCs are discussed, with a special focus on the currently available publications on interactions between dioxin and androgen signaling.

  6. Gene-environment interactions in male reproductive health: special reference to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Brokken, Leon J S; Giwercman, Yvonne Lundberg

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few decades, there have been numerous reports of adverse effects on the reproductive health of wildlife and laboratory animals caused by exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). The increasing trends in human male reproductive disorders and the mounting evidence for causative environmental factors have therefore sparked growing interest in the health threat posed to humans by EDCs, which are substances in our food, environment and consumer items that interfere with hormone action, biosynthesis or metabolism, resulting in disrupted tissue homeostasis or reproductive function. The mechanisms of EDCs involve a wide array of actions and pathways. Examples include the estrogenic, androgenic, thyroid and retinoid pathways, in which the EDCs may act directly as agonists or antagonists, or indirectly via other nuclear receptors. Dioxins and dioxin-like EDCs exert their biological and toxicological actions through activation of the aryl hydrocarbon-receptor, which besides inducing transcription of detoxifying enzymes also regulates transcriptional activity of other nuclear receptors. There is increasing evidence that genetic predispositions may modify the susceptibility to adverse effects of toxic chemicals. In this review, potential consequences of hereditary predisposition and EDCs are discussed, with a special focus on the currently available publications on interactions between dioxin and androgen signaling. PMID:24369137

  7. gigantea suppresses immutans variegation by interactions with cytokinin and gibberellin signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Putarjunan, Aarthi; Rodermel, Steve

    2014-12-01

    The immutans (im) variegation mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is an ideal model to gain insight into factors that control chloroplast biogenesis. im defines the gene for PTOX, a plastoquinol terminal oxidase that participates in the control of thylakoid redox. Here, we report that the im defect can be suppressed during the late stages of plant development by gigantea (gi2), which defines the gene for GI, a central component of the circadian clock that plays a poorly understood role in diverse plant developmental processes. imgi2 mutants are late flowering and display other well-known phenotypes associated with gi2, such as starch accumulation and resistance to oxidative stress. We show that the restoration of chloroplast biogenesis in imgi2 is caused by a development-specific derepression of cytokinin signaling that involves cross talk with signaling pathways mediated by gibberellin (GA) and SPINDLY (SPY), a GA response inhibitor. Suppression of the plastid defect in imgi2 is likely caused by a relaxation of excitation pressures in developing plastids by factors contributed by gi2, including enhanced rates of photosynthesis and increased resistance to oxidative stress. Interestingly, the suppression phenotype of imgi can be mimicked by crossing im with the starch accumulation mutant, starch excess1 (sex1), perhaps because sex1 utilizes pathways similar to gi. We conclude that our studies provide a direct genetic linkage between GI and chloroplast biogenesis, and we construct a model of interactions between signaling pathways mediated by gi, GA, SPY, cytokinins, and sex1 that are required for chloroplast biogenesis. PMID:25349324

  8. Improved Protein Arrays for Quantitative Systems Analysis of the Dynamics of Signaling Pathway Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    YANG, CHIN-RANG

    2013-12-11

    Astronauts and workers in nuclear plants who repeatedly exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation (IR, <10 cGy) are likely to incur specific changes in signal transduction and gene expression in various tissues of their body. Remarkable advances in high throughput genomics and proteomics technologies enable researchers to broaden their focus from examining single gene/protein kinetics to better understanding global gene/protein expression profiling and biological pathway analyses, namely Systems Biology. An ultimate goal of systems biology is to develop dynamic mathematical models of interacting biological systems capable of simulating living systems in a computer. This Glue Grant is to complement Dr. Boothman’s existing DOE grant (No. DE-FG02-06ER64186) entitled “The IGF1/IGF-1R-MAPK-Secretory Clusterin (sCLU) Pathway: Mediator of a Low Dose IR-Inducible Bystander Effect” to develop sensitive and quantitative proteomic technology that suitable for low dose radiobiology researches. An improved version of quantitative protein array platform utilizing linear Quantum dot signaling for systematically measuring protein levels and phosphorylation states for systems biology modeling is presented. The signals are amplified by a confocal laser Quantum dot scanner resulting in ~1000-fold more sensitivity than traditional Western blots and show the good linearity that is impossible for the signals of HRP-amplification. Therefore this improved protein array technology is suitable to detect weak responses of low dose radiation. Software is developed to facilitate the quantitative readout of signaling network activities. Kinetics of EGFRvIII mutant signaling was analyzed to quantify cross-talks between EGFR and other signaling pathways.

  9. gigantea Suppresses immutans Variegation by Interactions with Cytokinin and Gibberellin Signaling Pathways1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Putarjunan, Aarthi; Rodermel, Steve

    2014-01-01

    The immutans (im) variegation mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is an ideal model to gain insight into factors that control chloroplast biogenesis. im defines the gene for PTOX, a plastoquinol terminal oxidase that participates in the control of thylakoid redox. Here, we report that the im defect can be suppressed during the late stages of plant development by gigantea (gi2), which defines the gene for GI, a central component of the circadian clock that plays a poorly understood role in diverse plant developmental processes. imgi2 mutants are late flowering and display other well-known phenotypes associated with gi2, such as starch accumulation and resistance to oxidative stress. We show that the restoration of chloroplast biogenesis in imgi2 is caused by a development-specific derepression of cytokinin signaling that involves cross talk with signaling pathways mediated by gibberellin (GA) and SPINDLY (SPY), a GA response inhibitor. Suppression of the plastid defect in imgi2 is likely caused by a relaxation of excitation pressures in developing plastids by factors contributed by gi2, including enhanced rates of photosynthesis and increased resistance to oxidative stress. Interestingly, the suppression phenotype of imgi can be mimicked by crossing im with the starch accumulation mutant, starch excess1 (sex1), perhaps because sex1 utilizes pathways similar to gi. We conclude that our studies provide a direct genetic linkage between GI and chloroplast biogenesis, and we construct a model of interactions between signaling pathways mediated by gi, GA, SPY, cytokinins, and sex1 that are required for chloroplast biogenesis. PMID:25349324

  10. Applied neuroanatomy elective to reinforce and promote engagement with neurosensory pathways using interactive and artistic activities.

    PubMed

    Dao, Vinh; Yeh, Pon-Hsiu; Vogel, Kristine S; Moore, Charleen M

    2015-01-01

    One in six Americans is currently affected by neurologic disease. As the United States population ages, the number of neurologic complaints is expected to increase. Thus, there is a pressing need for more neurologists as well as more neurology training in other specialties. Often interest in neurology begins during medical school, so improving education in medical neural courses is a critical step toward producing more neurologists and better neurology training in other specialists. To this end, a novel applied neuroanatomy elective was designed at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UTHSCSA) to complement the traditional first-year medical neuroscience course and promote engagement and deep learning of the material with a focus on neurosensory pathways. The elective covered four neurosensory modalities (proprioception/balance, vision, auditory, and taste/olfaction) over four sessions, each with a short classroom component and a much longer activity component. At each session, students reviewed the neurosensory pathways through structured presentations and then applied them to preplanned interactive activities, many of which allowed students to utilize their artistic talents. Students were required to complete subjective pre-course and post-course surveys and reflections. The survey results and positive student comments suggest that the elective was a valuable tool when used in parallel with the traditional medical neuroscience course in promoting engagement and reinforcement of the neurosensory material.

  11. Applied neuroanatomy elective to reinforce and promote engagement with neurosensory pathways using interactive and artistic activities.

    PubMed

    Dao, Vinh; Yeh, Pon-Hsiu; Vogel, Kristine S; Moore, Charleen M

    2015-01-01

    One in six Americans is currently affected by neurologic disease. As the United States population ages, the number of neurologic complaints is expected to increase. Thus, there is a pressing need for more neurologists as well as more neurology training in other specialties. Often interest in neurology begins during medical school, so improving education in medical neural courses is a critical step toward producing more neurologists and better neurology training in other specialists. To this end, a novel applied neuroanatomy elective was designed at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UTHSCSA) to complement the traditional first-year medical neuroscience course and promote engagement and deep learning of the material with a focus on neurosensory pathways. The elective covered four neurosensory modalities (proprioception/balance, vision, auditory, and taste/olfaction) over four sessions, each with a short classroom component and a much longer activity component. At each session, students reviewed the neurosensory pathways through structured presentations and then applied them to preplanned interactive activities, many of which allowed students to utilize their artistic talents. Students were required to complete subjective pre-course and post-course surveys and reflections. The survey results and positive student comments suggest that the elective was a valuable tool when used in parallel with the traditional medical neuroscience course in promoting engagement and reinforcement of the neurosensory material. PMID:24920370

  12. Genetic Interaction Maps in Escherichia coli Reveal Functional Crosstalk among Cell Envelope Biogenesis Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Vlasblom, James; Gagarinova, Alla; Phanse, Sadhna; Graham, Chris; Yousif, Fouad; Ding, Huiming; Xiong, Xuejian; Nazarians-Armavil, Anaies; Alamgir, Md; Ali, Mehrab; Pogoutse, Oxana; Pe'er, Asaf; Arnold, Roland; Michaut, Magali; Parkinson, John; Golshani, Ashkan; Whitfield, Chris; Wodak, Shoshana J.; Moreno-Hagelsieb, Gabriel; Greenblatt, Jack F.; Emili, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    As the interface between a microbe and its environment, the bacterial cell envelope has broad biological and clinical significance. While numerous biosynthesis genes and pathways have been identified and studied in isolation, how these intersect functionally to ensure envelope integrity during adaptive responses to environmental challenge remains unclear. To this end, we performed high-density synthetic genetic screens to generate quantitative functional association maps encompassing virtually the entire cell envelope biosynthetic machinery of Escherichia coli under both auxotrophic (rich medium) and prototrophic (minimal medium) culture conditions. The differential patterns of genetic interactions detected among >235,000 digenic mutant combinations tested reveal unexpected condition-specific functional crosstalk and genetic backup mechanisms that ensure stress-resistant envelope assembly and maintenance. These networks also provide insights into the global systems connectivity and dynamic functional reorganization of a universal bacterial structure that is both broadly conserved among eubacteria (including pathogens) and an important target. PMID:22125496

  13. Cellular and molecular pathways of extremely-low-frequency electromagnetic field interactions with living systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1992-06-01

    There is growing evidence that environmental electric and magnetic fields in the extremely-low-frequency (ELF) band below 300 Hz can influence biological functions by mechanisms that are only poorly understood at the present time. The primary objectives of this paper are to review the physical properties of ELF fields, their interactions with living systems at the tissue, cellular, and subcellular levels, and the key role of cell membranes ;in the transduction of signals from imposed ELF fields. Topics of discussion include signal-to-noise ratios for single cells and cell aggregates, resonance phenomena involving a combination of static and ELF magnetic fields, and the possible influence of ELF fields on molecular signaling pathways that involve membrane receptors and cytoplasmic second messengers.

  14. Cancer predisposition in mutant mice defective in multiple genetic pathways: uncovering important genetic interactions.

    PubMed

    Meira, L B; Reis, A M; Cheo, D L; Nahari, D; Burns, D K; Friedberg, E C

    2001-06-01

    Mouse models that mimic the human skin cancer-prone disease xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) provide an useful experimental system with which to study the relationship between the DNA repair process of nucleotide excision repair (NER) and ultraviolet- (UV) induced skin carcinogenesis. We have generated Xpc mutant mice and documented their deficiency in the process of NER of UV-induced DNA damage. Xpc mutant mice are highly predisposed to UV-B radiation-induced skin cancer, both in the homozygous and the heterozygous state. The combination of Xpc and Trp53 mutations enhances this predisposition and alters the tumor spectrum observed in single mutant mice. These results suggest a synergism between NER and the function of Trp53 in suppression of cancer. We have examined the mutational spectrum in the Trp53 gene from skin cancers in Trp53+/+ and Trp53+/- mice of all three Xpc genotypes and have found evidence for signature mutations associated with defective NER. In addition, we have demonstrated that Xpc mutant mice are highly predisposed to the induction of lung and liver cancers by treatment with 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF) and N-OH-2-AAF. By combining the Xpc mutation with other mutations in genes involved in repair of DNA damage we have identified additional genetic interactions important in carcinogenesis. The mouse Apex gene is a critical component of the base excision repair (BER) pathway as well as the redox regulation of transcription factors important in growth control and the cellular response to DNA damage. By combining mutations in Xpc, Trp53 and Apex we have obtained genetic evidence for a functional interaction between Apex and Trp53 which probably involves the activation of the Trp53 protein by Apex. Mutations in the mismatch repair (MMR) gene Msh2 also influence the carcinogenesis observed in Xpc Trp53 mutant mice. Our results demonstrate that multiple repair pathways operate in prevention of tumor formation. PMID:11376686

  15. Notch1 Regulates Hippocampal Plasticity Through Interaction with the Reelin Pathway, Glutamatergic Transmission and CREB Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Brai, Emanuele; Marathe, Swananda; Astori, Simone; Fredj, Naila Ben; Perry, Elisabeth; Lamy, Christophe; Scotti, Alessandra; Alberi, Lavinia

    2015-01-01

    Notch signaling plays a crucial role in adult brain function such as synaptic plasticity, memory and olfaction. Several reports suggest an involvement of this pathway in neurodegenerative dementia. Yet, to date, the mechanism underlying Notch activity in mature neurons remains unresolved. In this work, we investigate how Notch regulates synaptic potentiation and contributes to the establishment of memory in mice. We observe that Notch1 is a postsynaptic receptor with functional interactions with the Reelin receptor, apolipoprotein E receptor 2 (ApoER2) and the ionotropic receptor, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). Targeted loss of Notch1 in the hippocampal CA fields affects Reelin signaling by influencing Dab1 expression and impairs the synaptic potentiation achieved through Reelin stimulation. Further analysis indicates that loss of Notch1 affects the expression and composition of the NMDAR but not AMPAR. Glutamatergic signaling is further compromised through downregulation of CamKII and its secondary and tertiary messengers resulting in reduced cAMP response element-binding (CREB) signaling. Our results identify Notch1 as an important regulator of mechanisms involved in synaptic plasticity and memory formation. These findings emphasize the possible involvement of this signaling receptor in dementia. Highlights In this paper, we propose a mechanism for Notch1-dependent plasticity that likely underlies the function of Notch1 in memory formation: Notch1 interacts with another important developmental pathway, the Reelin cascade. Notch1 regulates both NMDAR expression and composition. Notch1 influences a cascade of cellular events culminating in CREB activation. PMID:26635527

  16. Partitioning the effects of an ecosystem engineer: kangaroo rats control community structure via multiple pathways.

    PubMed

    Prugh, Laura R; Brashares, Justin S

    2012-05-01

    1. Ecosystem engineers impact communities by altering habitat conditions, but they can also have strong effects through consumptive, competitive and other non-engineering pathways. 2. Engineering effects can lead to fundamentally different community dynamics than non-engineering effects, but the relative strengths of these interactions are seldom quantified. 3. We combined structural equation modelling and exclosure experiments to partition the effects of a keystone engineer, the giant kangaroo rat (Dipodomys ingens), on plants, invertebrates and vertebrates in a semi-arid California grassland. 4. We separated the effects of burrow creation from kangaroo rat density and found that kangaroo rats increased the diversity and abundance of other species via both engineering and non-engineering pathways. 5. Engineering was the primary factor structuring plant and small mammal communities, whereas non-engineering effects structured invertebrate communities and increased lizard abundance. 6. These results highlight the importance of the non-engineering effects of ecosystem engineers and shed new light on the multiple pathways by which strong-interactors shape communities.

  17. Pathway-Dependent Effectiveness of Network Algorithms for Gene Prioritization

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Jung Eun; Hwang, Sohyun; Lee, Insuk

    2015-01-01

    A network-based approach has proven useful for the identification of novel genes associated with complex phenotypes, including human diseases. Because network-based gene prioritization algorithms are based on propagating information of known phenotype-associated genes through networks, the pathway structure of each phenotype might significantly affect the effectiveness of algorithms. We systematically compared two popular network algorithms with distinct mechanisms – direct neighborhood which propagates information to only direct network neighbors, and network diffusion which diffuses information throughout the entire network – in prioritization of genes for worm and human phenotypes. Previous studies reported that network diffusion generally outperforms direct neighborhood for human diseases. Although prioritization power is generally measured for all ranked genes, only the top candidates are significant for subsequent functional analysis. We found that high prioritizing power of a network algorithm for all genes cannot guarantee successful prioritization of top ranked candidates for a given phenotype. Indeed, the majority of the phenotypes that were more efficiently prioritized by network diffusion showed higher prioritizing power for top candidates by direct neighborhood. We also found that connectivity among pathway genes for each phenotype largely determines which network algorithm is more effective, suggesting that the network algorithm used for each phenotype should be chosen with consideration of pathway gene connectivity. PMID:26091506

  18. Algorithms for effective querying of compound graph-based pathway databases

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Graph-based pathway ontologies and databases are widely used to represent data about cellular processes. This representation makes it possible to programmatically integrate cellular networks and to investigate them using the well-understood concepts of graph theory in order to predict their structural and dynamic properties. An extension of this graph representation, namely hierarchically structured or compound graphs, in which a member of a biological network may recursively contain a sub-network of a somehow logically similar group of biological objects, provides many additional benefits for analysis of biological pathways, including reduction of complexity by decomposition into distinct components or modules. In this regard, it is essential to effectively query such integrated large compound networks to extract the sub-networks of interest with the help of efficient algorithms and software tools. Results Towards this goal, we developed a querying framework, along with a number of graph-theoretic algorithms from simple neighborhood queries to shortest paths to feedback loops, that is applicable to all sorts of graph-based pathway databases, from PPIs (protein-protein interactions) to metabolic and signaling pathways. The framework is unique in that it can account for compound or nested structures and ubiquitous entities present in the pathway data. In addition, the queries may be related to each other through "AND" and "OR" operators, and can be recursively organized into a tree, in which the result of one query might be a source and/or target for another, to form more complex queries. The algorithms were implemented within the querying component of a new version of the software tool PATIKAweb (Pathway Analysis Tool for Integration and Knowledge Acquisition) and have proven useful for answering a number of biologically significant questions for large graph-based pathway databases. Conclusion The PATIKA Project Web site is http

  19. Effects of Prostaglandin Analogues on Aqueous Humor Outflow Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Nelson S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is the most prevalent risk factor for glaucoma. All treatments, whether surgical or pharmaceutical, are aimed at lowering IOP. Prostaglandin analogues are a first line therapy for glaucoma due to their ability to reduce IOP, once-daily dosing, efficacy, and minimal side-effect profile. Whereas prostaglandin analogues have been known to alter aqueous humor outflow through the unconventional (uveoscleral) pathway, more recent evidence suggests their action also occurs through the conventional (trabecular) pathway. Understanding how prostaglandin analogues successfully lower IOP is important, as this information may lead to the discovery of new molecular targets for future therapeutic intervention. This review explores the current understanding of prostaglandin analogue biology as it pertains to IOP reduction and improved aqueous humor outflow facility. PMID:24359106

  20. Insights into the TOR-S6K signaling pathway in maize (Zea mays L.). pathway activation by effector-receptor interaction.

    PubMed

    Garrocho-Villegas, Verónica; Aguilar C, Raúl; Sánchez de Jiménez, Estela

    2013-12-23

    The primordial TOR pathway, known to control growth and cell proliferation, has still not been fully described for plants. Nevertheless, in maize, an insulin-like growth factor (ZmIGF) peptide has been reported to stimulate this pathway. This research provides further insight into the TOR pathway in maize, using a biochemical approach in cultures of fast-growing (FG) and slow-growing (SG) calli, as a model system. Our results revealed that addition of either ZmIGF or insulin to SG calli stimulated DNA synthesis and increased the growth rate through cell proliferation and increased the rate of ribosomal protein (RP) synthesis by the selective mobilization of RP mRNAs into polysomes. Furthermore, analysis of the phosphorylation status of the main TOR and S6K kinases from the TOR pathway revealed stimulation by ZmIGF or insulin, whereas rapamycin inhibited its activation. Remarkably, a putative maize insulin-like receptor was recognized by a human insulin receptor antibody, as demonstrated by immunoprecipitation from membrane protein extracts of maize callus. Furthermore, competition experiments between ZmIGF and insulin for the receptor site on maize protoplasts suggested structural recognition of the putative receptor by either effector. These data were confirmed by confocal immunolocalization within the cell membrane of callus cells. Taken together, these data indicate that cell growth and cell proliferation in maize depend on the activation of the TOR-S6K pathway through the interaction of an insulin-like growth factor and its receptor. This evidence suggests that higher plants as well as metazoans have conserved this biochemical pathway to regulate their growth, supporting the conclusion that it is a highly evolved conserved pathway.

  1. Effects of economic interactions on credit risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatchett, J. P. L.; Kühn, R.

    2006-03-01

    We study a credit-risk model which captures effects of economic interactions on a firm's default probability. Economic interactions are represented as a functionally defined graph, and the existence of both cooperative and competitive business relations is taken into account. We provide an analytic solution of the model in a limit where the number of business relations of each company is large, but the overall fraction of the economy with which a given company interacts may be small. While the effects of economic interactions are relatively weak in typical (most probable) scenarios, they are pronounced in situations of economic stress, and thus lead to a substantial fattening of the tails of loss distributions in large loan portfolios. This manifests itself in a pronounced enhancement of the value at risk computed for interacting economies in comparison with their non-interacting counterparts.

  2. Combination of cyclopamine and tamoxifen promotes survival and migration of mcf-7 breast cancer cells--interaction of hedgehog-gli and estrogen receptor signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Sabol, Maja; Trnski, Diana; Uzarevic, Zvonimir; Ozretic, Petar; Musani, Vesna; Rafaj, Maja; Cindric, Mario; Levanat, Sonja

    2014-01-01

    Hedgehog-Gli (Hh-Gli) signaling pathway is one of the new molecular targets found upregulated in breast tumors. Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) signaling has a key role in the development of hormone-dependent breast cancer. We aimed to investigate the effects of inhibiting both pathways simultaneously on breast cancer cell survival and the potential interactions between these two signaling pathways. ER-positive MCF-7 cells show decreased viability after treatment with cyclopamine, a Hh-Gli pathway inhibitor, as well as after tamoxifen (an ERα inhibitor) treatment. Simultaneous treatment with cyclopamine and tamoxifen on the other hand, causes short-term survival of cells, and increased migration. We found upregulated Hh-Gli signaling under these conditions and protein profiling revealed increased expression of proteins involved in cell proliferation and migration. Therefore, even though Hh-Gli signaling seems to be a good potential target for breast cancer therapy, caution must be advised, especially when combining therapies. In addition, we also show a potential direct interaction between the Shh protein and ERα in MCF-7 cells. Our data suggest that the Shh protein is able to activate ERα independently of the canonical Hh-Gli signaling pathway. Therefore, this may present an additional boost for ER-positive cells that express Shh, even in the absence of estrogen.

  3. Combination of Cyclopamine and Tamoxifen Promotes Survival and Migration of MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells – Interaction of Hedgehog-Gli and Estrogen Receptor Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Uzarevic, Zvonimir; Ozretic, Petar; Musani, Vesna; Rafaj, Maja; Cindric, Mario; Levanat, Sonja

    2014-01-01

    Hedgehog-Gli (Hh-Gli) signaling pathway is one of the new molecular targets found upregulated in breast tumors. Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) signaling has a key role in the development of hormone-dependent breast cancer. We aimed to investigate the effects of inhibiting both pathways simultaneously on breast cancer cell survival and the potential interactions between these two signaling pathways. ER-positive MCF-7 cells show decreased viability after treatment with cyclopamine, a Hh-Gli pathway inhibitor, as well as after tamoxifen (an ERα inhibitor) treatment. Simultaneous treatment with cyclopamine and tamoxifen on the other hand, causes short-term survival of cells, and increased migration. We found upregulated Hh-Gli signaling under these conditions and protein profiling revealed increased expression of proteins involved in cell proliferation and migration. Therefore, even though Hh-Gli signaling seems to be a good potential target for breast cancer therapy, caution must be advised, especially when combining therapies. In addition, we also show a potential direct interaction between the Shh protein and ERα in MCF-7 cells. Our data suggest that the Shh protein is able to activate ERα independently of the canonical Hh-Gli signaling pathway. Therefore, this may present an additional boost for ER-positive cells that express Shh, even in the absence of estrogen. PMID:25503972

  4. Interactive Big Data Resource to Elucidate Human Immune Pathways and Diseases.

    PubMed

    Gorenshteyn, Dmitriy; Zaslavsky, Elena; Fribourg, Miguel; Park, Christopher Y; Wong, Aaron K; Tadych, Alicja; Hartmann, Boris M; Albrecht, Randy A; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Kleinstein, Steven H; Troyanskaya, Olga G; Sealfon, Stuart C

    2015-09-15

    Many functionally important interactions between genes and proteins involved in immunological diseases and processes are unknown. The exponential growth in public high-throughput data offers an opportunity to expand this knowledge. To unlock human-immunology-relevant insight contained in the global biomedical research effort, including all public high-throughput datasets, we performed immunological-pathway-focused Bayesian integration of a comprehensive, heterogeneous compendium comprising 38,088 genome-scale experiments. The distillation of this knowledge into immunological networks of functional relationships between molecular entities (ImmuNet), and tools to mine this resource, are accessible to the public at http://immunet.princeton.edu. The predictive capacity of ImmuNet, established by rigorous statistical validation, is easily accessed by experimentalists to generate data-driven hypotheses. We demonstrate the power of this approach through the identification of unique host-virus interaction responses, and we show how ImmuNet complements genetic studies by predicting disease-associated genes. ImmuNet should be widely beneficial for investigating the mechanisms of the human immune system and immunological diseases. PMID:26362267

  5. The Vac14-interaction network is linked to regulators of the endolysosomal and autophagic pathway.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Ulf; Vollenbröker, Beate; Braun, Daniela A; Van Le, Truc; Granado, Daniel; Kremerskothen, Joachim; Fränzel, Benjamin; Klosowski, Rafael; Barth, Johannes; Fufezan, Christian; Wolters, Dirk A; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Weide, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    The scaffold protein Vac14 acts in a complex with the lipid kinase PIKfyve and its counteracting phosphatase FIG4, regulating the interconversion of phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate to phosphatidylinositol-3,5-bisphosphate. Dysfunctional Vac14 mutants, a deficiency of one of the Vac14 complex components, or inhibition of PIKfyve enzymatic activity results in the formation of large vacuoles in cells. How these vacuoles are generated and which processes are involved are only poorly understood. Here we show that ectopic overexpression of wild-type Vac14 as well as of the PIKfyve-binding deficient Vac14 L156R mutant causes vacuoles. Vac14-dependent vacuoles and PIKfyve inhibitor-dependent vacuoles resulted in elevated levels of late endosomal, lysosomal, and autophagy-associated proteins. However, only late endosomal marker proteins were bound to the membranes of these enlarged vacuoles. In order to decipher the linkage between the Vac14 complex and regulators of the endolysosomal pathway, a protein affinity approach combined with multidimensional protein identification technology was conducted, and novel molecular links were unraveled. We found and verified the interaction of Rab9 and the Rab7 GAP TBC1D15 with Vac14. The identified Rab-related interaction partners support the theory that the regulation of vesicular transport processes and phosphatidylinositol-modifying enzymes are tightly interconnected.

  6. Targeting Plant Ethylene Responses by Controlling Essential Protein-Protein Interactions in the Ethylene Pathway.

    PubMed

    Bisson, Melanie M A; Groth, Georg

    2015-08-01

    The gaseous plant hormone ethylene regulates many processes of high agronomic relevance throughout the life span of plants. A central element in ethylene signaling is the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized membrane protein ethylene insensitive2 (EIN2). Recent studies indicate that in response to ethylene, the extra-membranous C-terminal end of EIN2 is proteolytically processed and translocated from the ER to the nucleus. Here, we report that the conserved nuclear localization signal (NLS) mediating nuclear import of the EIN2 C-terminus provides an important domain for complex formation with ethylene receptor ethylene response1 (ETR1). EIN2 lacking the NLS domain shows strongly reduced affinity for the receptor. Interaction of EIN2 and ETR1 is also blocked by a synthetic peptide of the NLS motif. The corresponding peptide substantially reduces ethylene responses in planta. Our results uncover a novel mechanism and type of inhibitor interfering with ethylene signal transduction and ethylene responses in plants. Disruption of essential protein-protein interactions in the ethylene signaling pathway as shown in our study for the EIN2-ETR1 complex has the potential to guide the development of innovative ethylene antagonists for modern agriculture and horticulture.

  7. The Integration of Epistasis Network and Functional Interactions in a GWAS Implicates RXR Pathway Genes in the Immune Response to Smallpox Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    McKinney, Brett A.; Lareau, Caleb; Oberg, Ann L.; Kennedy, Richard B.; Ovsyannikova, Inna G.; Poland, Gregory A.

    2016-01-01

    Although many diseases and traits show large heritability, few genetic variants have been found to strongly separate phenotype groups by genotype. Complex regulatory networks of variants and expression of multiple genes lead to small individual-variant effects and difficulty replicating the effect of any single variant in an affected pathway. Interaction network modeling of GWAS identifies effects ignored by univariate models, but population differences may still cause specific genes to not replicate. Integrative network models may help detect indirect effects of variants in the underlying biological pathway. In this study, we used gene-level functional interaction information from the Integrative Multi-species Prediction (IMP) tool to reveal important genes associated with a complex phenotype through evidence from epistasis networks and pathway enrichment. We test this method for augmenting variant-based network analyses with functional interactions by applying it to a smallpox vaccine immune response GWAS. The integrative analysis spotlights the role of genes related to retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRA), which has been implicated in a previous epistasis network analysis of smallpox vaccine. PMID:27513748

  8. The Integration of Epistasis Network and Functional Interactions in a GWAS Implicates RXR Pathway Genes in the Immune Response to Smallpox Vaccine.

    PubMed

    McKinney, Brett A; Lareau, Caleb; Oberg, Ann L; Kennedy, Richard B; Ovsyannikova, Inna G; Poland, Gregory A

    2016-01-01

    Although many diseases and traits show large heritability, few genetic variants have been found to strongly separate phenotype groups by genotype. Complex regulatory networks of variants and expression of multiple genes lead to small individual-variant effects and difficulty replicating the effect of any single variant in an affected pathway. Interaction network modeling of GWAS identifies effects ignored by univariate models, but population differences may still cause specific genes to not replicate. Integrative network models may help detect indirect effects of variants in the underlying biological pathway. In this study, we used gene-level functional interaction information from the Integrative Multi-species Prediction (IMP) tool to reveal important genes associated with a complex phenotype through evidence from epistasis networks and pathway enrichment. We test this method for augmenting variant-based network analyses with functional interactions by applying it to a smallpox vaccine immune response GWAS. The integrative analysis spotlights the role of genes related to retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRA), which has been implicated in a previous epistasis network analysis of smallpox vaccine. PMID:27513748

  9. Interaction between the carbon monoxide and nitric oxide pathways in the locus coeruleus during fever.

    PubMed

    Soriano, R N; Kwiatkoski, M; Batalhao, M E; Branco, L G; Carnio, E C

    2012-03-29

    We have documented that the locus coeruleus (LC), the main noradrenergic nucleus in the brain, is part of a thermoeffector neuronal pathway in fever induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Following this pioneering study, we have investigated the role of the LC carbon monoxide (CO) and nitric oxide (NO) pathways in fever. Interestingly, despite both CO and NO are capable of activating the same intracellular target, soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), our data have shown that LC CO is an antipyretic molecule, whereas LC NO is propyretic. Thus, aiming at further exploring the mechanisms underlying their anti- and propyretic properties, we investigated the putative interplay between the LC CO and NO pathways. Male Wistar rats were implanted with a guide cannula in the fourth ventricle (4V) and a temperature datalogger capsule in the peritoneal cavity. The animals were microinjected into the 4V with an inhibitor of heme oxygenase (HO) (ZnDPBG [zinc(II)deuteroporphyrin IX 2,4 bis ethylene glycol]), or a CO donor (CORM-2 [tricarbonyldichlororuthenium-(II)-dimer]), or an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) (l-NMMA [N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine acetate]), or an NO donor (NOC12 [3-ethyl-3-(ethylaminoethyl)-1-hydroxy-2-oxo-1-triazene]), and injected with LPS (100 μg/kg i.p.). Two hours later, the rats were decapitated, and the brains were frozen and cut in a cryostat. LC punches were processed to assess LC bilirubin and nitrite/nitrate (NOx) levels. Microinjection of ZnDPBG reduced LC bilirubin and increased LC NOx, whereas l-NMMA diminished LC NOx and reduced LC bilirubin. Furthermore, NOC12 caused an increase in LC bilirubin, whereas CORM-2 caused a reduction in LC NOx. These findings are consistent with the notion that in the LC during LPS fever the CO pathway downmodulates NOS activity and the NO pathway upmodulates HO activity, and, together with previous data, allow us to conjecture that LC CO blunts fever by downmodulating NOS (antipyretic property), LC NO upmodulates

  10. Broccoli Consumption Interacts with GSTM1 to Perturb Oncogenic Signalling Pathways in the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Traka, Maria; Gasper, Amy V.; Melchini, Antonietta; Bacon, James R.; Needs, Paul W.; Frost, Victoria; Chantry, Andrew; Jones, Alexandra M. E.; Ortori, Catharine A.; Barrett, David A.; Ball, Richard Y.; Mills, Robert D.; Mithen, Richard F.

    2008-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies suggest that people who consume more than one portion of cruciferous vegetables per week are at lower risk of both the incidence of prostate cancer and of developing aggressive prostate cancer but there is little understanding of the underlying mechanisms. In this study, we quantify and interpret changes in global gene expression patterns in the human prostate gland before, during and after a 12 month broccoli-rich diet. Methods and Findings Volunteers were randomly assigned to either a broccoli-rich or a pea-rich diet. After six months there were no differences in gene expression between glutathione S-transferase mu 1 (GSTM1) positive and null individuals on the pea-rich diet but significant differences between GSTM1 genotypes on the broccoli-rich diet, associated with transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFβ1) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) signalling pathways. Comparison of biopsies obtained pre and post intervention revealed more changes in gene expression occurred in individuals on a broccoli-rich diet than in those on a pea-rich diet. While there were changes in androgen signalling, regardless of diet, men on the broccoli diet had additional changes to mRNA processing, and TGFβ1, EGF and insulin signalling. We also provide evidence that sulforaphane (the isothiocyanate derived from 4-methylsuphinylbutyl glucosinolate that accumulates in broccoli) chemically interacts with TGFβ1, EGF and insulin peptides to form thioureas, and enhances TGFβ1/Smad-mediated transcription. Conclusions These findings suggest that consuming broccoli interacts with GSTM1 genotype to result in complex changes to signalling pathways associated with inflammation and carcinogenesis in the prostate. We propose that these changes may be mediated through the chemical interaction of isothiocyanates with signalling peptides in the plasma. This study provides, for the first time, experimental evidence obtained in humans to support observational studies

  11. Learning Communities: Pathways for Educational Success and Social Transformation through Interactive Groups in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    García-Carrión, Rocío; Díez-Palomar, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Schools as learning communities have been recommended by the European Commission as an effective model to support school quality and development. Aiming at studying how these schools are achieving such positive results, this article focuses on the analysis of a particular classroom intervention called "interactive groups". A five-year…

  12. Interaction between the pentose phosphate pathway and gluconeogenesis from glycerol in the liver.

    PubMed

    Jin, Eunsook S; Sherry, A Dean; Malloy, Craig R

    2014-11-21

    After exposure to [U-(13)C3]glycerol, the liver produces primarily [1,2,3-(13)C3]- and [4,5,6-(13)C3]glucose in equal proportions through gluconeogenesis from the level of trioses. Other (13)C-labeling patterns occur as a consequence of alternative pathways for glucose production. The pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), metabolism in the citric acid cycle, incomplete equilibration by triose phosphate isomerase, or the transaldolase reaction all interact to produce complex (13)C-labeling patterns in exported glucose. Here, we investigated (13)C labeling in plasma glucose in rats given [U-(13)C3]glycerol under various nutritional conditions. Blood was drawn at multiple time points to extract glucose for NMR analysis. Because the transaldolase reaction and incomplete equilibrium by triose phosphate isomerase cannot break a (13)C-(13)C bond within the trioses contributing to glucose, the appearance of [1,2-(13)C2]-, [2,3-(13)C2]-, [5,6-(13)C2]-, and [4,5-(13)C2]glucose provides direct evidence for metabolism of glycerol in the citric acid cycle or the PPP but not an influence of either triose phosphate isomerase or the transaldolase reaction. In all animals, [1,2-(13)C2]glucose/[2,3-(13)C2]glucose was significantly greater than [5,6-(13)C2]glucose/[4,5-(13)C2]glucose, a relationship that can only arise from gluconeogenesis followed by passage of substrates through the PPP. In summary, the hepatic PPP in vivo can be detected by (13)C distribution in blood glucose after [U-(13)C3]glycerol administration.

  13. Selective effects of insecticides on nigrostriatal dopaminergic nerve pathways.

    PubMed

    Bloomquist, Jeffrey R; Barlow, Rebecca L; Gillette, Jeffrey S; Li, Wen; Kirby, Michael L

    2002-10-01

    A degeneration of the nigrostriatal pathway is a primary component of Parkinson's disease (PD), and we have investigated the actions of insecticides on this pathway. For in vivo exposures, C57BL/6 mice were treated three times over a 2-week period with heptachlor, the pyrethroids deltamethrin and permethrin, or chlorpyrifos. One day after the last treatment, we observed that heptachlor and the pyrethroids increased maximal [3H]dopamine uptake in striatal synaptosomes from treated mice, with dose-dependent changes in Vmax displaying a bell-shaped curve. Western blot analysis confirmed increased levels of dopamine transporter (DAT) protein in the striatum of mice treated with heptachlor and permethrin. In contrast, we observed a small, but statistically significant decrease in dopamine uptake by 100 mg/kg chlorpyrifos. For heptachlor, doses that upregulated DAT expression had little or no effect on serotonin transport. Permethrin did cause an upregulation of serotonin transport, but required a 30-fold greater dose than that effective on dopamine uptake. Other evidence of specificity was found in transmitter release assays, where heptachlor and deltamethrin released dopamine from striatal terminals with greater potency than other transmitter types. These findings confirm that insecticides possess specificity for effects on striatal dopaminergic neurotransmission.

  14. Plasma interactions and surface/material effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandel, M.; Chutjian, A.; Hall, W.; Leung, P.; Robinson, P.; Stevens, N. J.

    1986-01-01

    A discussion on plasma interactions and surface/material effects is summarized. The key issues in this area were: (1) the lack of data on the material properties of common spacecraft surface materials; (2) lack of understanding of the contamination and decontamination processes; and (3) insufficient analytical tools to model synergistic phenomena related to plasma interactions. Without an adequate database of material properties, accurate system performance predictions cannot be made. The interdisciplinary nature of the surface-plasma interactions area makes it difficult to plan and maintain a coherent theoretical and experimental program. The shuttle glow phenomenon is an excellent example of an unanticipated, complex interaction involving synergism between surface and plasma effects. Building an adequate technology base for understanding and predicting surface-plasma interactions will require the coordinated efforts of engineers, chemists, and physicists. An interdisciplinary R and D program should be organized to deal with similar problems that the space systems of the 21st century may encounter.

  15. Plasma interactions and surface/material effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandel, M.; Chutjian, A.; Hall, W.; Leung, P.; Robinson, P.; Stevens, N. J.

    1986-10-01

    A discussion on plasma interactions and surface/material effects is summarized. The key issues in this area were: (1) the lack of data on the material properties of common spacecraft surface materials; (2) lack of understanding of the contamination and decontamination processes; and (3) insufficient analytical tools to model synergistic phenomena related to plasma interactions. Without an adequate database of material properties, accurate system performance predictions cannot be made. The interdisciplinary nature of the surface-plasma interactions area makes it difficult to plan and maintain a coherent theoretical and experimental program. The shuttle glow phenomenon is an excellent example of an unanticipated, complex interaction involving synergism between surface and plasma effects. Building an adequate technology base for understanding and predicting surface-plasma interactions will require the coordinated efforts of engineers, chemists, and physicists. An interdisciplinary R and D program should be organized to deal with similar problems that the space systems of the 21st century may encounter.

  16. Effects of an invasive plant transcend ecosystem boundaries through a dragonfly-mediated trophic pathway.

    PubMed

    Burkle, Laura A; Mihaljevic, Joseph R; Smith, Kevin G

    2012-12-01

    Trophic interactions can strongly influence the structure and function of terrestrial and aquatic communities through top-down and bottom-up processes. Species with life stages in both terrestrial and aquatic systems may be particularly likely to link the effects of trophic interactions across ecosystem boundaries. Using experimental wetlands planted with purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria), we tested the degree to which the bottom-up effects of floral density of this invasive plant could trigger a chain of interactions, changing the behavior of terrestrial flying insect prey and predators and ultimately cascading through top-down interactions to alter lower trophic levels in the aquatic community. The results of our experiment support the linkage of terrestrial and aquatic food webs through this hypothesized pathway, with high loosestrife floral density treatments attracting high levels of visiting insect pollinators and predatory adult dragonflies. High floral densities were also associated with increased adult dragonfly oviposition and subsequently high larval dragonfly abundance in the aquatic community. Finally, high-flower treatments were coupled with changes in zooplankton species richness and shifts in the composition of zooplankton communities. Through changes in animal behavior and trophic interactions in terrestrial and aquatic systems, this work illustrates the broad and potentially cryptic effects of invasive species, and provides additional compelling motivation for ecologists to conduct investigations that cross traditional ecosystem boundaries.

  17. Heterogeneous Effects of Direct Hypoxia Pathway Activation in Kidney Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Rafik; Masson, Norma; Simpson, Peter; Sciesielski, Lina Katrin; Sun, Min; Tian, Ya-Min; Ratcliffe, Peter John; Mole, David Robert

    2015-01-01

    General activation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathways is classically associated with adverse prognosis in cancer and has been proposed to contribute to oncogenic drive. In clear cell renal carcinoma (CCRC) HIF pathways are upregulated by inactivation of the von-Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor. However HIF-1α and HIF-2α have contrasting effects on experimental tumor progression. To better understand this paradox we examined pan-genomic patterns of HIF DNA binding and associated gene expression in response to manipulation of HIF-1α and HIF-2α and related the findings to CCRC prognosis. Our findings reveal distinct pan-genomic organization of canonical and non-canonical HIF isoform-specific DNA binding at thousands of sites. Overall associations were observed between HIF-1α-specific binding, and genes associated with favorable prognosis and between HIF-2α-specific binding and adverse prognosis. However within each isoform-specific set, individual gene associations were heterogeneous in sign and magnitude, suggesting that activation of each HIF-α isoform contributes a highly complex mix of pro- and anti-tumorigenic effects. PMID:26262842

  18. Wnt/β-Catenin and Sonic Hedgehog Pathways Interact in the Regulation of the Development of the Dorsal Mesenchymal Protrusion

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, Laura E.; Burns, Tara A.; Lockhart, Marie M.; Phelps, Aimee L.; Van den Hoff, Maurice J.B.; Wessels, Andy

    2016-01-01

    Background The dorsal mesenchymal protrusion (DMP) is a second heart field (SHF) derived tissue involved in cardiac septation. Molecular mechanisms controlling SHF/DMP development include the Bone Morphogenetic Protein and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways. Reduced expression of components in these pathways leads to inhibition of proliferation of the SHF/DMP precursor population and failure of the DMP to develop. While the Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) pathway has also been demonstrated to be critically important for SHF/DMP development and atrioventricular septation, its role in the regulation of SHF proliferation is contentious. Results Tissue-specific deletion of the Shh receptor Smoothened from the SHF resulted in compromised DMP formation and atrioventricular septal defects (AVSDs). Immunohistochemical analysis at critical stages of DMP development showed significant proliferation defect as well as reduction in levels of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway-intermediates β-catenin, Lef1, and Axin2. To determine whether the defects seen in the conditional Smoothened knock-out mouse could be attributed to reduced Wnt/β-catenin signaling, LiCl, a pharmacological activator of this Wnt/β-catenin pathway, was administered. This resulted in restoration of proliferation and partial rescue of the AVSD phenotype. Conclusions The data presented suggest that the Wnt/β-catenin pathway interact with the Shh pathway in the regulation of SHF/DMP-precursor proliferation and, hence, the development of the DMP. PMID:26297872

  19. Coordinated transcriptional regulation of isopentenyl diphosphate biosynthetic pathway enzymes in plastids by phytochrome-interacting factor 5.

    PubMed

    Mannen, Kazuto; Matsumoto, Takuro; Takahashi, Seiji; Yamaguchi, Yuta; Tsukagoshi, Masanori; Sano, Ryosuke; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Sakurai, Nozomu; Shibata, Daisuke; Koyama, Tanetoshi; Nakayama, Toru

    2014-01-10

    All isoprenoids are derived from a common C5 unit, isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP). In plants, IPP is synthesized via two distinct pathways; the cytosolic mevalonate pathway and the plastidial non-mevalonate (MEP) pathway. In this study, we used a co-expression analysis to identify transcription factors that coordinately regulate the expression of multiple genes encoding enzymes in the IPP biosynthetic pathway. Some candidates showed especially strong correlations with multiple genes encoding MEP-pathway enzymes. We report here that phytochrome-interacting factor 5 (PIF5), a basic-helix-loop-helix type transcription factor, functions as a positive regulator of the MEP pathway. Its overexpression in T87 suspension cultured cells resulted in increased accumulation of chlorophylls and carotenoids. Detailed analyses of carotenoids by HPLC indicated that some carotenoid biosynthetic pathways were concomitantly up-regulated, possibly as a result of enhanced IPP metabolic flow. Our results also revealed other PIF family proteins that play different roles from that of PIF5 in IPP metabolism.

  20. From a Subtractive to Multiplicative Approach: A Concept-Driven Interactive Pathway on the Selective Absorption of Light

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viennot, Laurence; de Hosson, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    This research documents the aims and the impact of a teaching experiment on how the absorption of light depends on the thickness of the absorbing medium. This teaching experiment is more specifically characterized as bringing to bear a "concept-driven interactive pathway". It is designed to make students analyse the absorption of light…

  1. FOXP2 drives neuronal differentiation by interacting with retinoic acid signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Devanna, Paolo; Middelbeek, Jeroen; Vernes, Sonja C.

    2014-01-01

    FOXP2 was the first gene shown to cause a Mendelian form of speech and language disorder. Although developmentally expressed in many organs, loss of a single copy of FOXP2 leads to a phenotype that is largely restricted to orofacial impairment during articulation and linguistic processing deficits. Why perturbed FOXP2 function affects specific aspects of the developing brain remains elusive. We investigated the role of FOXP2 in neuronal differentiation and found that FOXP2 drives molecular changes consistent with neuronal differentiation in a human model system. We identified a network of FOXP2 regulated genes related to retinoic acid signaling and neuronal differentiation. FOXP2 also produced phenotypic changes associated with neuronal differentiation including increased neurite outgrowth and reduced migration. Crucially, cells expressing FOXP2 displayed increased sensitivity to retinoic acid exposure. This suggests a mechanism by which FOXP2 may be able to increase the cellular differentiation response to environmental retinoic acid cues for specific subsets of neurons in the brain. These data demonstrate that FOXP2 promotes neuronal differentiation by interacting with the retinoic acid signaling pathway and regulates key processes required for normal circuit formation such as neuronal migration and neurite outgrowth. In this way, FOXP2, which is found only in specific subpopulations of neurons in the brain, may drive precise neuronal differentiation patterns and/or control localization and connectivity of these FOXP2 positive cells. PMID:25309332

  2. Trypanosoma cruzi calreticulin inhibits the complement lectin pathway activation by direct interaction with L-Ficolin.

    PubMed

    Sosoniuk, Eduardo; Vallejos, Gerardo; Kenawy, Hany; Gaboriaud, Christine; Thielens, Nicole; Fujita, Teizo; Schwaeble, Wilhelm; Ferreira, Arturo; Valck, Carolina

    2014-07-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas' disease, the sixth neglected tropical disease worldwide, infects 10-12 million people in Latin America. Differently from T. cruzi epimastigotes, trypomastigotes are complement-resistant and infective. CRPs, T-DAF, sialic acid and lipases explain at least part of this resistance. In vitro, T. cruzi calreticulin (TcCRT), a chaperone molecule that translocates from the ER to the parasite surface: (a) Inhibits the human classical complement activation, by interacting with C1, (b) As a consequence, an increase in infectivity is evident and, (c) It inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth. We report here that TcCRT also binds to the L-Ficolin collagenous portion, thus inhibiting approximately between 35 and 64% of the human complement lectin pathway activation, initiated by L-Ficolin, a property not shared by H-Ficolin. While L-Ficolin binds to 60% of trypomastigotes and to 24% of epimastigotes, 50% of the former and 4% of the latter display TcCRT on their surfaces. Altogether, these data indicate that TcCRT is a parasite inhibitory receptor for Ficolins. The resulting evasive activities, together with the TcCRT capacity to inhibit C1, with a concomitant increase in infectivity, may represent T. cruzi strategies to inhibit important arms of the innate immune response.

  3. How does the Royal Family of Tudor rule the PIWI-interacting RNA pathway?

    PubMed Central

    Siomi, Mikiko C.; Mannen, Taro; Siomi, Haruhiko

    2010-01-01

    PIWI (P-element-induced wimpy testis) proteins are a subset of the Argonaute proteins and are expressed predominantly in the germlines of a variety of organisms, including Drosophila and mammals. PIWI proteins associate specifically with PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs), small RNAs that are also expressed predominantly in germlines, and silence transposable DNA elements and other genes showing complementarities to the sequences of associated piRNAs. This mechanism helps to maintain the integrity of the genome and the development of gametes. PIWI proteins have been shown recently to contain symmetrical dimethyl arginines (sDMAs), and this modification is mediated by the methyltransferase PRMT5 (also known as Dart5 or Capsuleen). It was then demonstrated that multiple members of the Tudor (Tud) family of proteins, which are necessary for gametogenesis in both flies and mice, associate with PIWI proteins specifically through sDMAs in various but particular combinations. Although Tud domains in Tud family members are known to be sDMA-binding modules, involvement of the Tudor family at the molecular level in the piRNA pathway has only recently come into focus. PMID:20360382

  4. FOXP2 drives neuronal differentiation by interacting with retinoic acid signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Devanna, Paolo; Middelbeek, Jeroen; Vernes, Sonja C

    2014-01-01

    FOXP2 was the first gene shown to cause a Mendelian form of speech and language disorder. Although developmentally expressed in many organs, loss of a single copy of FOXP2 leads to a phenotype that is largely restricted to orofacial impairment during articulation and linguistic processing deficits. Why perturbed FOXP2 function affects specific aspects of the developing brain remains elusive. We investigated the role of FOXP2 in neuronal differentiation and found that FOXP2 drives molecular changes consistent with neuronal differentiation in a human model system. We identified a network of FOXP2 regulated genes related to retinoic acid signaling and neuronal differentiation. FOXP2 also produced phenotypic changes associated with neuronal differentiation including increased neurite outgrowth and reduced migration. Crucially, cells expressing FOXP2 displayed increased sensitivity to retinoic acid exposure. This suggests a mechanism by which FOXP2 may be able to increase the cellular differentiation response to environmental retinoic acid cues for specific subsets of neurons in the brain. These data demonstrate that FOXP2 promotes neuronal differentiation by interacting with the retinoic acid signaling pathway and regulates key processes required for normal circuit formation such as neuronal migration and neurite outgrowth. In this way, FOXP2, which is found only in specific subpopulations of neurons in the brain, may drive precise neuronal differentiation patterns and/or control localization and connectivity of these FOXP2 positive cells.

  5. Two Pathways for Water Interaction with Oxygen Adatoms on TiO2(110) Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lyubinetsky, Igor; Du, Yingge; Deskins, N. Aaron; Zhang, Zhenrong; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Dupuis, Michel

    2010-08-04

    Atomic-level investigation of the interaction of H2O with a partially re-oxidized TiO2(110) has been performed at 300 K by combining scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory. In particular, we demonstrate that oxygen adatoms (Oa), produced during O2 exposure of reduced TiO2(110) surfaces, alter water dissociation/ recombination chemistry through two different pathways. When H2O diffuses to Oa on the same Ti row, it becomes trapped near the Oa, exchanges a proton easily to dissociate and form a pair of terminal hydroxyls (OHt) along the row, which can then readily recombine and re-dissociate many times or overcome the barrier to move away. When H2O passes along the Oa on an adjacent row, an across-row proton transfer facilitated by the bridging O atom results in spontaneous dissociation of H2O on a Ti trough leading to the formation of a stable across-row OHt pair, which after awhile can recombine and H2O diffuses away. The across-row process has not been reported previously, and it starts from a ‘‘pseudo-dissociated’’ state of water. We also show how the H2O dissociation and OHt pair statistical reformation induce an apparent along- or across-row shift of Oa as a result of the oxygen scrambling process between H2O and Oa.

  6. Synergistic Neuroprotective Effects of Two Herbal Ingredients via CREB-Dependent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xu; Wang, Dongxiao; Zhao, Runqing; Dong, Xianzhe; Hu, Yuan; Liu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    As two natural oligosaccharide esters, 3,6’-Disinapoyl sucrose (DISS) and tenuifolisideA (TFSA) are originating from the root of Polygala tenuifolia Willd, a traditional Chinese medicine used in treatment of mental disorders. Previous reports have shown that both of them possess in vitro neuroprotective effects by stimulating different upstream pathways related with cyclic AMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB). In the present study, we investigated the additive neuroprotective effects of DISS and TFSA on Glu-induced damage of SY5Y cells and purposed the possible underlying mechanism. The interaction between DISS and TFSA showed a clear-cut synergistic effect as evidenced by combination index (CI). Additional evidence from biochemical (NOS activity) assays confirmed their additive inhibition on the Glu-induced NOS hyperactivation. Moreover, we showed that co-treatment of DISS and TFSA resulted in an additively up-regulated phosphorylation of CREB as well as increased expressions of CRTC1 and BDNF. Neuroprotective effects of DISS and TFSA on Glu-induced decrease in cell viability were blocked by MAPK/ERK1/2 inhibitor (U0126) and PI3-K inhibitor (LY290042). Nevertheless, the CRTC1 or BDNF expression induced by these two compounds was significantly reduced in the presence of either ERK or PI3-K inhibitor, indicating that the two oligosaccharide esters shared some common pathways in the regulation of CREB-BDNF pathway. Taken together, we, for the first time, showed that DISS and TFSA exerted the additive neuroprotective effects on CREB-BDNF signaling pathway through complementary mechanisms. PMID:27729863

  7. A study of prostaglandin pathway genes and interactions with current nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use in colorectal adenoma.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Todd L; Shrubsole, Martha J; Cai, Qiuyin; Li, Guoliang; Dai, Qi; Rex, Douglas K; Ulbright, Thomas M; Fu, Zhenming; Murff, Harvey J; Smalley, Walter; Ness, Reid; Zheng, Wei

    2012-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death and usually arises from colorectal polyps. Screening and removal of polyps reduce mortality from CRC. Colorectal polyps are known to aggregate in families; however the genetic determinants for risk of polyps are unknown. In addition, it has been shown that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use decreases the risk of CRC and the incidence and size of polyps. In this study, we used data from the Tennessee Colorectal Polyp Study and the Tennessee-Indiana Adenoma Recurrence Study to evaluate selected genes from the prostaglandin (PG) metabolism and signaling pathways for association with risk of polyps and for interactions with NSAIDs. Our design consisted of discovery and replication phases for a total of 2,551 Caucasian polyp cases and 3,285 Caucasian controls. We carried out multivariable logistic regression to test for association in both the discovery and replication phase and further examined the results with meta-analysis. We detected association signals in the genes PGE receptor 3 (PTGER3) and 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (HPGD), both strong biologic candidates for influence on polyp risk. We did not observe the previously reported effects and effect modification in PG-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2), PGE receptor 2 (PTGER2), or PGE receptor 4 (PTGER4), although we did observe a single nucleotide polymorphism in PTGER2 associated with risk of multiple adenomas. We also observed effect modification of the HPGD signal by NSAID exposure. PMID:22551900

  8. Adhesion effects in contact interaction of solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goryacheva, Irina; Makhovskaya, Yulya

    2008-01-01

    An approach to solving problems of the interaction of axisymmetric elastic bodies in the presence of adhesion is developed. The different natures of adhesion, i.e. capillary adhesion, or molecular adhesion described by the Lennard-Jones potential are examined. The effect of additional loading of the interacting bodies outside the contact zone is also investigated. The approach is based on the representation of the pressure outside the contact zone arising from adhesion by a step function. The analytical solution is obtained and is used to analyze the influence of the form of the adhesion interaction potential, of the surface energy of interacting bodies or the films covering the bodies, their shapes (parabolic, higher power exponential function), volume of liquid in the meniscus, density of contact spots, of elastic modulus and the Poisson ratio on the characteristics of the interaction of the bodies in the presence of adhesion. To cite this article: I. Goryacheva, Y. Makhovskaya, C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  9. Electrostatic interactions in the binding pathway of a transient protein complex studied by NMR and isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Meneses, Erick; Mittermaier, Anthony

    2014-10-01

    Much of our knowledge of protein binding pathways is derived from extremely stable complexes that interact very tightly, with lifetimes of hours to days. Much less is known about weaker interactions and transient complexes because these are challenging to characterize experimentally. Nevertheless, these types of interactions are ubiquitous in living systems. The combination of NMR relaxation dispersion Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) experiments and isothermal titration calorimetry allows the quantification of rapid binding kinetics for complexes with submillisecond lifetimes that are difficult to study using conventional techniques. We have used this approach to investigate the binding pathway of the Src homology 3 (SH3) domain from the Fyn tyrosine kinase, which forms complexes with peptide targets whose lifetimes are on the order of about a millisecond. Long range electrostatic interactions have been shown to play a critical role in the binding pathways of tightly binding complexes. The role of electrostatics in the binding pathways of transient complexes is less well understood. Similarly to previously studied tight complexes, we find that SH3 domain association rates are enhanced by long range electrostatics, whereas short range interactions are formed late in the docking process. However, the extent of electrostatic association rate enhancement is several orders of magnitudes less, whereas the electrostatic-free basal association rate is significantly greater. Thus, the SH3 domain is far less reliant on electrostatic enhancement to achieve rapid association kinetics than are previously studied systems. This suggests that there may be overall differences in the role played by electrostatics in the binding pathways of extremely stable versus transient complexes.

  10. Autophagy-related Protein 8 (Atg8) Family Interacting Motif in Atg3 Mediates the Atg3-Atg8 Interaction and Is Crucial for the Cytoplasm-to-Vacuole Targeting Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Masaya; Noda, Nobuo N.; Nakatogawa, Hitoshi; Kumeta, Hiroyuki; Ohsumi, Yoshinori; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko

    2010-01-01

    The autophagy-related protein 8 (Atg8) conjugation system is essential for the formation of double-membrane vesicles called autophagosomes during autophagy, a bulk degradation process conserved among most eukaryotes. It is also important in yeast for recognizing target vacuolar enzymes through the receptor protein Atg19 during the cytoplasm-to-vacuole targeting (Cvt) pathway, a selective type of autophagy. Atg3 is an E2-like enzyme that conjugates Atg8 with phosphatidylethanolamine. Here, we show that Atg3 directly interacts with Atg8 through the WEDL sequence, which is distinct from canonical interaction between E2 and ubiquitin-like modifiers. Moreover, NMR experiments suggest that the mode of interaction between Atg8 and Atg3 is quite similar to that between Atg8/LC3 and the Atg8 family interacting motif (AIM) conserved in autophagic receptors, such as Atg19 and p62. Thus, the WEDL sequence in Atg3 is a canonical AIM. In vitro analyses showed that Atg3 AIM is crucial for the transfer of Atg8 from the Atg8∼Atg3 thioester intermediate to phosphatidylethanolamine but not for the formation of the intermediate. Intriguingly, in vivo experiments showed that it is necessary for the Cvt pathway but not for starvation-induced autophagy. Atg3 AIM attenuated the inhibitory effect of Atg19 on Atg8 lipidation in vitro, suggesting that Atg3 AIM may be important for the lipidation of Atg19-bound Atg8 during the Cvt pathway. PMID:20615880

  11. Autophagy-related protein 8 (Atg8) family interacting motif in Atg3 mediates the Atg3-Atg8 interaction and is crucial for the cytoplasm-to-vacuole targeting pathway.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Masaya; Noda, Nobuo N; Nakatogawa, Hitoshi; Kumeta, Hiroyuki; Ohsumi, Yoshinori; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko

    2010-09-17

    The autophagy-related protein 8 (Atg8) conjugation system is essential for the formation of double-membrane vesicles called autophagosomes during autophagy, a bulk degradation process conserved among most eukaryotes. It is also important in yeast for recognizing target vacuolar enzymes through the receptor protein Atg19 during the cytoplasm-to-vacuole targeting (Cvt) pathway, a selective type of autophagy. Atg3 is an E2-like enzyme that conjugates Atg8 with phosphatidylethanolamine. Here, we show that Atg3 directly interacts with Atg8 through the WEDL sequence, which is distinct from canonical interaction between E2 and ubiquitin-like modifiers. Moreover, NMR experiments suggest that the mode of interaction between Atg8 and Atg3 is quite similar to that between Atg8/LC3 and the Atg8 family interacting motif (AIM) conserved in autophagic receptors, such as Atg19 and p62. Thus, the WEDL sequence in Atg3 is a canonical AIM. In vitro analyses showed that Atg3 AIM is crucial for the transfer of Atg8 from the Atg8∼Atg3 thioester intermediate to phosphatidylethanolamine but not for the formation of the intermediate. Intriguingly, in vivo experiments showed that it is necessary for the Cvt pathway but not for starvation-induced autophagy. Atg3 AIM attenuated the inhibitory effect of Atg19 on Atg8 lipidation in vitro, suggesting that Atg3 AIM may be important for the lipidation of Atg19-bound Atg8 during the Cvt pathway.

  12. Infant pathways to externalizing behavior: evidence of Genotype x Environment interaction.

    PubMed

    Leve, Leslie D; Kerr, David C R; Shaw, Daniel; Ge, Xiaojia; Neiderhiser, Jenae M; Scaramella, Laura V; Reid, John B; Conger, Rand; Reiss, David

    2010-01-01

    To further the understanding of the effects of early experiences, 9-month-old infants were observed during a frustration task. The analytical sample was composed of 348 linked triads of participants (adoptive parents, adopted child, and birth parent[s]) from a prospective adoption study. It was hypothesized that genetic risk for externalizing problems and affect dysregulation in the adoptive parents would independently and interactively predict a known precursor to externalizing problems: heightened infant attention to frustrating events. Results supported the moderation hypotheses involving adoptive mother affect dysregulation: Infants at genetic risk showed heightened attention to frustrating events only when the adoptive mother had higher levels of anxious and depressive symptoms. The Genotype x Environment interaction pattern held when substance use during pregnancy was considered.

  13. Drosophila Lipin interacts with insulin and TOR signaling pathways in the control of growth and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Sandra; Ugrankar, Rupali; Greene, Stephanie E; Prajapati, Meenakshi; Lehmann, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Lipin proteins have key functions in lipid metabolism, acting as both phosphatidate phosphatases (PAPs) and nuclear regulators of gene expression. We show that the insulin and TORC1 pathways independently control functions of Drosophila Lipin (dLipin). Reduced signaling through the insulin receptor strongly enhanced defects caused by dLipin deficiency in fat body development, whereas reduced signaling through TORC1 led to translocation of dLipin into the nucleus. Reduced expression of dLipin resulted in decreased signaling through the insulin-receptor-controlled PI3K-Akt pathway and increased hemolymph sugar levels. Consistent with this, downregulation of dLipin in fat body cell clones caused a strong growth defect. The PAP but not the nuclear activity of dLipin was required for normal insulin pathway activity. Reduction of other enzymes of the glycerol-3 phosphate pathway affected insulin pathway activity in a similar manner, suggesting an effect that is mediated by one or more metabolites associated with the pathway. Taken together, our data show that dLipin is subject to intricate control by the insulin and TORC1 pathways, and that the cellular status of dLipin impacts how fat body cells respond to signals relayed through the PI3K-Akt pathway.

  14. Particles inside electrolytes with ion-specific interactions, their effective charge distributions, and effective interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Mingnan; Liang, Yihao; Xing, Xiangjun

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we explore the statistical physics of colloidal particles that interact with electrolytes via ion-specific interactions. Firstly we study particles interacting weakly with electrolyte using linear response theory. We find that the mean potential around a particle is linearly determined by the effective charge distribution of the particle, which depends both on the bare charge distribution and on ion-specific interactions. We also discuss the effective interaction between two such particles and show that, in the far field regime, it is bilinear in the effective charge distributions of two particles. We subsequently generalize the above results to the more complicated case where particles interact strongly with the electrolyte. Our results indicate that in order to understand the statistical physics of non-dilute electrolytes, both ion-specific interactions and ionic correlations have to be addressed in a single unified and consistent framework. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11174196 and 91130012).

  15. Set-Based Joint Test of Interaction Between SNPs in the VEGF Pathway and Exogenous Estrogen Finds Association With Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Courtenay, Monique D.; Cade, William H.; Schwartz, Stephen G.; Kovach, Jaclyn L.; Agarwal, Anita; Wang, Gaofeng; Haines, Jonathan L.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Scott, William K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of irreversible visual loss in developed countries. Its etiology includes genetic and environmental factors. Although VEGFA variants are associated with AMD, the joint action of variants within the VEGF pathway and their interaction with nongenetic factors have not been investigated. Methods. Affymetrix 6.0 chipsets were used to genotype 668,238 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 1207 AMD cases and 686 controls. Environmental exposures were collected by questionnaire. A set-based test was conducted using the χ2 statistic at each SNP derived from Kraft's two degree of freedom (2df) joint test. Pathway- and gene-based test statistics were calculated as the mean of all independent SNP statistics. Phenotype labels were permuted 10,000 times to generate an empirical P value. Results. While a main effect of the VEGF pathway was not identified, the pathway was associated with neovascular AMD in women when accounting for birth control pill (BCP) use (P = 0.017). Analysis of VEGF's subpathways showed that SNPs in the proliferation subpathway were associated with neovascular AMD (P = 0.029) when accounting for BCP use. Nominally significant genes within this subpathway were also observed. Stratification by BCP use revealed novel significant genetic effects in women who had taken BCPs. Conclusions. These results illustrate that some AMD genetic risk factors may be revealed only when complex relationships among risk factors are considered. This shows the utility of exploring pathways of previously associated genes to find novel effects. It also demonstrates the importance of incorporating environmental exposures in tests of genetic association at the SNP, gene, or pathway level. PMID:25015356

  16. Alcohol Effects on Stress Pathways: Impact on Craving and Relapse Risk.

    PubMed

    Blaine, Sara K; Milivojevic, Verica; Fox, Helen; Sinha, Rajita

    2016-03-01

    A significant amount of neurobiological research regarding the development of alcohol use disorders (AUDs) has focused on alcohol-related activation and long-term alterations in the mesocortical dopaminergic reward pathways. However, alcohol does not only interact with brain reward systems. Many of its acute and chronic effects may be related to allostatic adaptations in hypothalamic and extrahypothalamic stress regulation pathways. For example, acute binge intoxication is associated with hypothalamically driven increases in blood cortisol, norepinephrine, and sex steroid metabolite levels. This may contribute to the development of mesocortical sensitization to alcohol. Furthermore, chronic alcohol exposure is associated with systemic dysregulation of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis, sympathetic adrenal medullary system, and sex steroid systems. This dysregulation appears to manifest as neuroendocrine tolerance. In this review, we first summarize the literature suggesting that alcohol-induced alterations in these hypothalamic systems influence craving and contribute to the development of AUDs. We note that for women, the effects of alcohol on these neuroendocrine stress regulation systems may be influenced by the rhythmic variations of hormones and steroids across the menstrual cycle. Second, we discuss how changes in these systems may indicate progression of AUDs and increased risk of relapse in both sexes. Specifically, neuroendocrine tolerance may contribute to mesocortical sensitization, which in turn may lead to decreased prefrontal inhibitory control of the dopaminergic reward and hypothalamic stress systems. Thus, pharmacological strategies that counteract alcohol-associated changes in hypothalamic and extrahypothalamic stress regulation pathways may slow the development and progression of AUDs. PMID:27254089

  17. Alcohol Effects on Stress Pathways: Impact on Craving and Relapse Risk.

    PubMed

    Blaine, Sara K; Milivojevic, Verica; Fox, Helen; Sinha, Rajita

    2016-03-01

    A significant amount of neurobiological research regarding the development of alcohol use disorders (AUDs) has focused on alcohol-related activation and long-term alterations in the mesocortical dopaminergic reward pathways. However, alcohol does not only interact with brain reward systems. Many of its acute and chronic effects may be related to allostatic adaptations in hypothalamic and extrahypothalamic stress regulation pathways. For example, acute binge intoxication is associated with hypothalamically driven increases in blood cortisol, norepinephrine, and sex steroid metabolite levels. This may contribute to the development of mesocortical sensitization to alcohol. Furthermore, chronic alcohol exposure is associated with systemic dysregulation of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis, sympathetic adrenal medullary system, and sex steroid systems. This dysregulation appears to manifest as neuroendocrine tolerance. In this review, we first summarize the literature suggesting that alcohol-induced alterations in these hypothalamic systems influence craving and contribute to the development of AUDs. We note that for women, the effects of alcohol on these neuroendocrine stress regulation systems may be influenced by the rhythmic variations of hormones and steroids across the menstrual cycle. Second, we discuss how changes in these systems may indicate progression of AUDs and increased risk of relapse in both sexes. Specifically, neuroendocrine tolerance may contribute to mesocortical sensitization, which in turn may lead to decreased prefrontal inhibitory control of the dopaminergic reward and hypothalamic stress systems. Thus, pharmacological strategies that counteract alcohol-associated changes in hypothalamic and extrahypothalamic stress regulation pathways may slow the development and progression of AUDs.

  18. Molecular pathways: gene-environment interactions regulating dietary fiber induction of proliferation and apoptosis via butyrate for cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Bultman, Scott J

    2014-02-15

    Gene-environment interactions are so numerous and biologically complicated that it can be challenging to understand their role in cancer. However, dietary fiber and colorectal cancer prevention may represent a tractable model system. Fiber is fermented by colonic bacteria into short-chain fatty acids such as butyrate. One molecular pathway that has emerged involves butyrate having differential effects depending on its concentration and the metabolic state of the cell. Low-moderate concentrations, which are present near the base of colonic crypts, are readily metabolized in the mitochondria to stimulate cell proliferation via energetics. Higher concentrations, which are present near the lumen, exceed the metabolic capacity of the colonocyte. Unmetabolized butyrate enters the nucleus and functions as a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor that epigenetically regulates gene expression to inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis as the colonocytes exfoliate into the lumen. Butyrate may therefore play a role in normal homeostasis by promoting turnover of the colonic epithelium. Because cancerous colonocytes undergo the Warburg effect, their preferred energy source is glucose instead of butyrate. Consequently, even moderate concentrations of butyrate accumulate in cancerous colonocytes and function as HDAC inhibitors to inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis. These findings implicate a bacterial metabolite with metaboloepigenetic properties in tumor suppression.

  19. Deduction and Analysis of the Interacting Stress Response Pathways of Metal/Radionuclide-reducing Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jizhong; He, Zhili

    2010-02-28

    Project Title: Deduction and Analysis of the Interacting Stress Response Pathways of Metal/Radionuclide-reducing Bacteria DOE Grant Number: DE-FG02-06ER64205 Principal Investigator: Jizhong (Joe) Zhou (University of Oklahoma) Key members: Zhili He, Aifen Zhou, Christopher Hemme, Joy Van Nostrand, Ye Deng, and Qichao Tu Collaborators: Terry Hazen, Judy Wall, Adam Arkin, Matthew Fields, Aindrila Mukhopadhyay, and David Stahl Summary Three major objectives have been conducted in the Zhou group at the University of Oklahoma (OU): (i) understanding of gene function, regulation, network and evolution of Desulfovibrio vugaris Hildenborough in response to environmental stresses, (ii) development of metagenomics technologies for microbial community analysis, and (iii) functional characterization of microbial communities with metagenomic approaches. In the past a few years, we characterized four CRP/FNR regulators, sequenced ancestor and evolved D. vulgaris strains, and functionally analyzed those mutated genes identified in salt-adapted strains. Also, a new version of GeoChip 4.0 has been developed, which also includes stress response genes (StressChip), and a random matrix theory-based conceptual framework for identifying functional molecular ecological networks has been developed with the high throughput functional gene array hybridization data as well as pyrosequencing data from 16S rRNA genes. In addition, GeoChip and sequencing technologies as well as network analysis approaches have been used to analyze microbial communities from different habitats. Those studies provide a comprehensive understanding of gene function, regulation, network, and evolution in D. vulgaris, and microbial community diversity, composition and structure as well as their linkages with environmental factors and ecosystem functioning, which has resulted in more than 60 publications.

  20. Investigation of cyclooxygenase and signaling pathways involved in human platelet aggregation mediated by synergistic interaction of various agonists

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Nadia; Farooq, Ahsana Dar; Sadek, Bassem

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the mechanism(s) of synergistic interaction of various platelet mediators such as arachidonic acid (AA) when combined with 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) or adenosine diphosphate (ADP) on human platelet aggregation were examined. The results demonstrated that 5-HT had no or negligible effect on aggregation but it did potentiate the aggregation response of AA. Similarly, the combination of subeffective concentrations of ADP and AA exhibited noticeable rise in platelet aggregation. Moreover, the observed synergistic effect of AA with 5-HT on platelets was inhibited by different cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors, namely ibuprofen and celecoxib, with half maximal inhibitory effect (IC50) values of 18.0±1.8 and 15.6±3.4 μmol/L, respectively. Interestingly, the synergistic effect observed for AA with 5-HT was, also, blocked by the 5-HT receptor blockers cyproheptadine (IC50=22.0±7 μmol/L), ketanserin (IC50=152±23 μmol/L), phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor (U73122; IC50=6.1±0.8 μmol/L), and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor (PD98059; IC50=3.8±0.5 μmol/L). Likewise, the synergism of AA and ADP was, also, attenuated by COX inhibitors (ibuprofen; IC50=20±4 μmol/L and celecoxib; IC50=24±7 μmol/L), PLC inhibitor (U73122; IC50=3.7±0.3 μmol/L), and MAPK inhibitor (PD98059; IC50=2.8±1.1 μmol/L). Our observed data demonstrate that the combination of subthreshold concentrations of agonists amplifies platelet aggregation and that these synergistic effects largely depend on activation of COX/thromboxane A2, receptor-operated Ca2+ channels, Gq/PLC, and MAPK signaling pathways. Moreover, our data revealed that inhibition of COX pathways by using both selective and/or non-selective COX inhibitors blocks not only AA metabolism and thromboxane A2 formation, but also its binding to Gq receptors and activation of receptor-operated Ca2+ channels in platelets. Overall, our results show that PLC and MAPK inhibitors proved to inhibit the

  1. Planning for effective interaction with FDA.

    PubMed

    Spurgin, Elizabeth A

    2004-12-01

    Manufacturers of diabetes devices can facilitate the formal regulatory approval process through early interaction with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Effective planning can help manage commonly perceived risks of interaction with the Agency, introduce new technologies to regulatory reviewers, and inform the manufacturer's product development strategy. This article reviews key aspects of the FDA evaluation process and suggests strategies that may facilitate effective communication with the Agency. Integrating early communication with FDA into broader product commercialization planning can streamline regulatory review and lead to early product launch into reimbursed markets.

  2. A melanin-independent interaction between Mc1r and Met signaling pathways is required for HGF-dependent melanoma.

    PubMed

    Wolnicka-Glubisz, Agnieszka; Strickland, Faith M; Wielgus, Albert; Anver, Miriam; Merlino, Glenn; De Fabo, Edward C; Noonan, Frances P

    2015-02-15

    Melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) signaling stimulates black eumelanin production through a cAMP-dependent pathway. MC1R polymorphisms can impair this process, resulting in a predominance of red phaeomelanin. The red hair, fair skin and UV sensitive phenotype is a well-described melanoma risk factor. MC1R polymorphisms also confer melanoma risk independent of pigment. We investigated the effect of Mc1r deficiency in a mouse model of UV-induced melanoma. C57BL/6-Mc1r+/+-HGF transgenic mice have a characteristic hyperpigmented black phenotype with extra-follicular dermal melanocytes located at the dermal/epidermal junction. UVB induces melanoma, independent of melanin pigmentation, but UVA-induced and spontaneous melanomas are dependent on black eumelanin. We crossed these mice with yellow C57BL/6-Mc1re/e animals which have a non-functional Mc1r and produce predominantly yellow phaeomelanin. Yellow C57BL/6-Mc1re/e-HGF mice produced no melanoma in response to UVR or spontaneously even though the HGF transgene and its receptor Met were expressed. Total melanin was less than in C57BL/6-Mc1r+/+-HGF mice, hyperpigmentation was not observed and there were few extra-follicular melanocytes. Thus, functional Mc1r was required for expression of the transgenic HGF phenotype. Heterozygous C57BL/6-Mc1re/+-HGF mice were black and hyperpigmented and, although extra-follicular melanocytes and skin melanin content were similar to C57BL/6-Mc1r+/+-HGF animals, they developed UV-induced and spontaneous melanomas with significantly less efficiency by all criteria. Thus, heterozygosity for Mc1r was sufficient to restore the transgenic HGF phenotype but insufficient to fully restore melanoma. We conclude that a previously unsuspected melanin-independent interaction between Mc1r and Met signaling pathways is required for HGF-dependent melanoma and postulate that this pathway is involved in human melanoma.

  3. Allosteric pathway identification through network analysis: from molecular dynamics simulations to interactive 2D and 3D graphs.

    PubMed

    Allain, Ariane; Chauvot de Beauchêne, Isaure; Langenfeld, Florent; Guarracino, Yann; Laine, Elodie; Tchertanov, Luba

    2014-01-01

    Allostery is a universal phenomenon that couples the information induced by a local perturbation (effector) in a protein to spatially distant regulated sites. Such an event can be described in terms of a large scale transmission of information (communication) through a dynamic coupling between structurally rigid (minimally frustrated) and plastic (locally frustrated) clusters of residues. To elaborate a rational description of allosteric coupling, we propose an original approach - MOdular NETwork Analysis (MONETA) - based on the analysis of inter-residue dynamical correlations to localize the propagation of both structural and dynamical effects of a perturbation throughout a protein structure. MONETA uses inter-residue cross-correlations and commute times computed from molecular dynamics simulations and a topological description of a protein to build a modular network representation composed of clusters of residues (dynamic segments) linked together by chains of residues (communication pathways). MONETA provides a brand new direct and simple visualization of protein allosteric communication. A GEPHI module implemented in the MONETA package allows the generation of 2D graphs of the communication network. An interactive PyMOL plugin permits drawing of the communication pathways between chosen protein fragments or residues on a 3D representation. MONETA is a powerful tool for on-the-fly display of communication networks in proteins. We applied MONETA for the analysis of communication pathways (i) between the main regulatory fragments of receptors tyrosine kinases (RTKs), KIT and CSF-1R, in the native and mutated states and (ii) in proteins STAT5 (STAT5a and STAT5b) in the phosphorylated and the unphosphorylated forms. The description of the physical support for allosteric coupling by MONETA allowed a comparison of the mechanisms of (a) constitutive activation induced by equivalent mutations in two RTKs and (b) allosteric regulation in the activated and non

  4. Effects of hydrodynamic interactions in bacterial swimming.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Suddhashil; Lun Wu, Xiao

    2008-03-01

    The lack of precise experimental data has prevented the investigation of the effects of long range hydrodynamic interactions in bacterial swimming. We perform measurements on various strains of bacteria with the aid of optical tweezers to shed light on this aspect of bacterial motility. Geometrical parameters recorded by fluorescence microscopy are used with theories which model flagella propulsion (Resistive force theory & Lighthill's formulation which includes long range interactions). Comparison of the predictions of these theories with experimental data, observed directly from swimming bacterium, led to the conclusion that while long range inetractions were important for single polar flagellated strains (Vibrio Alginolyticus & Caulobacter Crescentus), local force theory was adequate to describe the swimming of multi-flagellated Esherichia Coli. We performed additional measurements on E. Coli minicells (miniature cells with single polar flagellum) to try and determine the cause of this apparent effect of shielding of long range interactions in multiple flagellated bacteria.

  5. Interactions between auditory 'what' and 'where' pathways revealed by enhanced near-threshold discrimination of frequency and position.

    PubMed

    Tardif, Eric; Spierer, Lucas; Clarke, Stephanie; Murray, Micah M

    2008-03-01

    Partially segregated neuronal pathways ("what" and "where" pathways, respectively) are thought to mediate sound recognition and localization. Less studied are interactions between these pathways. In two experiments, we investigated whether near-threshold pitch discrimination sensitivity (d') is altered by supra-threshold task-irrelevant position differences and likewise whether near-threshold position discrimination sensitivity is altered by supra-threshold task-irrelevant pitch differences. Each experiment followed a 2 x 2 within-subjects design regarding changes/no change in the task-relevant and task-irrelevant stimulus dimensions. In Experiment 1, subjects discriminated between 750 Hz and 752 Hz pure tones, and d' for this near-threshold pitch change significantly increased by a factor of 1.09 when accompanied by a task-irrelevant position change of 65 micros interaural time difference (ITD). No response bias was induced by the task-irrelevant position change. In Experiment 2, subjects discriminated between 385 micros and 431 micros ITDs, and d' for this near-threshold position change significantly increased by a factor of 0.73 when accompanied by task-irrelevant pitch changes (6 Hz). In contrast to Experiment 1, task-irrelevant pitch changes induced a response criterion bias toward responding that the two stimuli differed. The collective results are indicative of facilitative interactions between "what" and "where" pathways. By demonstrating how these pathways may cooperate under impoverished listening conditions, our results bear implications for possible neuro-rehabilitation strategies. We discuss our results in terms of the dual-pathway model of auditory processing. PMID:18191423

  6. [Studies of interaction of intracellular signalling and metabolic pathways under inhibition of mitochondrial aconitase with fluoroacetate].

    PubMed

    Zinchenko, V P; Goncharov, N V; Teplova, V V; Kasymov, V A; Petrova, O I; Berezhnov, A V; Senchenkov, E V; Mindukshev, I V; Jenkins, R O; Radilov, A S

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondrial aconitase has been shown to be inactivated by a spectrum of substances or critical states. Fluoroacetate (FA) is the most known toxic agent inhibiting aconitase. The biochemistry of toxic action of FA is rather well understood, though no effective therapy has been proposed for the past six decades. In order to reveal novel approaches for possible antidotes to be developed, experiments were performed with rat liver mitochondria, Ehrlich ascite tumor cells and cardiomyocytes, exposed to FA or fluorocitrate in vitro. The effect of FA developed at much higher concentrations in comparison with fluorocitrate and was dependent upon respiratory substrates in experiments with mitochondria: with pyruvate, FA induced a slow oxidation and/or leak of pyridine nucleotides and inhibition of respiration. Oxidation of pyridine nucleotides was prevented by incubation of mitochondria with cyclosporin A. Studies of the pyridine nucleotides level and calcium response generated in Ehrlich ascite tumor cells under activation with ATP also revealed a loss of pyridine nucleotides from mitochondria resulting in a shift in the balance of mitochondrial and cytosolic NAD(P)H under exposure to FA. An increase of cytosolic [Ca2+] was observed in the cell lines exposed to FA and is explained by activation of plasma membrane calcium channels; this mechanism, could have an impact on amplitude and rate of Ca2+ waves in cardiomyocytes. Highlighting the reciprocal relationship between intracellular pyridine nucleotides and calcium balance, we discuss metabolic pathway modulation in the context of probable development of an effective therapy for FA poisoning and other inhibitors of aconitase. PMID:18318221

  7. Synergy and interactions among biological pathways leading to preterm premature rupture of membranes.

    PubMed

    Lannon, Sophia M R; Vanderhoeven, Jeroen P; Eschenbach, David A; Gravett, Michael G; Adams Waldorf, Kristina M

    2014-10-01

    Preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM) occurs in 1% to 2% of births. Impact of PPROM is greatest in low- and middle-income countries where prematurity-related deaths are most common. Recent investigations identify cytokine and matrix metalloproteinase activation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis as primary pathways to PPROM. These biological processes are initiated by heterogeneous etiologies including infection/inflammation, placental bleeding, uterine overdistention, and genetic polymorphisms. We hypothesize that pathways to PPROM overlap and act synergistically to weaken membranes. We focus our discussion on membrane composition and strength, pathways linking risk factors to membrane weakening, and future research directions to reduce the global burden of PPROM.

  8. Influence of gold(I) complexes involving adenine derivatives on major drug-drug interaction pathway.

    PubMed

    Dvořák, Zdeněk; Novotná, Aneta; Vančo, Ján; Trávníček, Zdeněk

    2013-12-01

    A series of considerably anti-inflammatory active gold(I) mixed-ligand complexes, involving the benzyl-substituted derivatives of N6-benzyladenine (HLn) and triphenylphosphine (PPh3) as ligands and having the general formula [Au(Ln)(PPh3)]·xH2O (1-4; n=1-4 and x=0-1), was evaluated for the ability to influence the expression of CYP1A1/2 and CYP3A4 and transcriptional activity of glucocorticoid (GR) and aryl hydrocarbon (AhR) receptors in primary human hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. In both tests, evaluating the ability of the complexes to modulate the expression of CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 in primary human hepatocytes and influence the transcriptional activity of AhR and GR in the reporter cell lines, no negative influence on the major drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450 isoenzymes and their signaling pathway (through GR and AhR receptors) was observed. These positive findings revealed another substantial evidence that could lead to utilization of the complexes as effective and relatively safe drugs for the treatment of hard-to-treat inflammation-related diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, comparable or even better than clinically used gold-containing drug Auranofin. PMID:24157406

  9. Conservation and expression of PIWI-interacting RNA pathway genes in male and female adult gonad of amniotes.

    PubMed

    Lim, Shu Ly; Tsend-Ayush, Enkhjargal; Kortschak, R Daniel; Jacob, Reuben; Ricciardelli, Carmela; Oehler, Martin K; Grützner, Frank

    2013-12-01

    The PIWI-interacting RNA (piRNA) pathway is essential for germline development and transposable element repression. Key elements of this pathway are members of the piRNA-binding PIWI/Argonaute protein family and associated factors (e.g., VASA, MAELSTROM, and TUDOR domain proteins). PIWI-interacting RNAs have been identified in mouse testis and oocytes, but information about the expression of the different piRNA pathway genes, in particular in the mammalian ovary, remains incomplete. We investigated the evolution and expression of piRNA pathway genes in gonads of amniote species (chicken, platypus, and mouse). Database searches confirm a high level of conservation and revealed lineage-specific gain and loss of Piwi genes in vertebrates. Expression analysis in mammals shows that orthologs of Piwi-like (Piwil) genes, Mael (Maelstrom), Mvh (mouse vasa homolog), and Tdrd1 (Tudor domain-containing protein 1) are expressed in platypus adult testis. In contrast to mouse, Piwil4 is expressed in platypus and human adult testis. We found evidence for Mael and Piwil2 expression in mouse Sertoli cells. Importantly, we show mRNA expression of Piwil2, Piwil4, and Mael in oocytes and supporting cells of human, mouse, and platypus ovary. We found no Piwil1 expression in mouse and chicken ovary. The conservation of gene expression in somatic parts of the gonad and germ cells of species that diverged over 800 million yr ago indicates an important role in adult male and female gonad. PMID:24108303

  10. Alcohol Interacts with Genetic Alteration of the Hippo Tumor Suppressor Pathway to Modulate Tissue Growth in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ilanges, Anoj; Jahanshahi, Maryam; Balobin, Denis M.; Pfleger, Cathie M.

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol-mediated cancers represent more than 3.5% of cancer-related deaths, yet how alcohol promotes cancer is a major open question. Using Drosophila, we identified novel interactions between dietary ethanol and loss of tumor suppressor components of the Hippo Pathway. The Hippo Pathway suppresses tumors in flies and mammals by inactivating transcriptional co-activator Yorkie, and the spectrum of cancers associated with impaired Hippo signaling overlaps strikingly with those associated with alcohol. Therefore, our findings may implicate loss of Hippo Pathway tumor suppression in alcohol-mediated cancers. Ethanol enhanced overgrowth from loss of the expanded, hippo, or warts tumor suppressors but, surprisingly, not from over-expressing the yorkie oncogene. We propose that in parallel to Yorkie-dependent overgrowth, impairing Hippo signaling in the presence of alcohol may promote overgrowth via additional alcohol-relevant targets. We also identified interactions between alcohol and Hippo Pathway over-activation. We propose that exceeding certain thresholds of alcohol exposure activates Hippo signaling to maintain proper growth control and prevent alcohol-mediated mis-patterning and tissue overgrowth. PMID:24205337

  11. Quercetin, a Natural Flavonoid Interacts with DNA, Arrests Cell Cycle and Causes Tumor Regression by Activating Mitochondrial Pathway of Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Shikha; Somasagara, Ranganatha R.; Hegde, Mahesh; Nishana, Mayilaadumveettil; Tadi, Satish Kumar; Srivastava, Mrinal; Choudhary, Bibha; Raghavan, Sathees C.

    2016-01-01

    Naturally occurring compounds are considered as attractive candidates for cancer treatment and prevention. Quercetin and ellagic acid are naturally occurring flavonoids abundantly seen in several fruits and vegetables. In the present study, we evaluate and compare antitumor efficacies of quercetin and ellagic acid in animal models and cancer cell lines in a comprehensive manner. We found that quercetin induced cytotoxicity in leukemic cells in a dose-dependent manner, while ellagic acid showed only limited toxicity. Besides leukemic cells, quercetin also induced cytotoxicity in breast cancer cells, however, its effect on normal cells was limited or none. Further, quercetin caused S phase arrest during cell cycle progression in tested cancer cells. Quercetin induced tumor regression in mice at a concentration 3-fold lower than ellagic acid. Importantly, administration of quercetin lead to ~5 fold increase in the life span in tumor bearing mice compared to that of untreated controls. Further, we found that quercetin interacts with DNA directly, and could be one of the mechanisms for inducing apoptosis in both, cancer cell lines and tumor tissues by activating the intrinsic pathway. Thus, our data suggests that quercetin can be further explored for its potential to be used in cancer therapeutics and combination therapy. PMID:27068577

  12. Quercetin, a Natural Flavonoid Interacts with DNA, Arrests Cell Cycle and Causes Tumor Regression by Activating Mitochondrial Pathway of Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Shikha; Somasagara, Ranganatha R; Hegde, Mahesh; Nishana, Mayilaadumveettil; Tadi, Satish Kumar; Srivastava, Mrinal; Choudhary, Bibha; Raghavan, Sathees C

    2016-01-01

    Naturally occurring compounds are considered as attractive candidates for cancer treatment and prevention. Quercetin and ellagic acid are naturally occurring flavonoids abundantly seen in several fruits and vegetables. In the present study, we evaluate and compare antitumor efficacies of quercetin and ellagic acid in animal models and cancer cell lines in a comprehensive manner. We found that quercetin induced cytotoxicity in leukemic cells in a dose-dependent manner, while ellagic acid showed only limited toxicity. Besides leukemic cells, quercetin also induced cytotoxicity in breast cancer cells, however, its effect on normal cells was limited or none. Further, quercetin caused S phase arrest during cell cycle progression in tested cancer cells. Quercetin induced tumor regression in mice at a concentration 3-fold lower than ellagic acid. Importantly, administration of quercetin lead to ~5 fold increase in the life span in tumor bearing mice compared to that of untreated controls. Further, we found that quercetin interacts with DNA directly, and could be one of the mechanisms for inducing apoptosis in both, cancer cell lines and tumor tissues by activating the intrinsic pathway. Thus, our data suggests that quercetin can be further explored for its potential to be used in cancer therapeutics and combination therapy. PMID:27068577

  13. Controlling a spillover pathway with the molecular cork effect.

    PubMed

    Marcinkowski, Matthew D; Jewell, April D; Stamatakis, Michail; Boucher, Matthew B; Lewis, Emily A; Murphy, Colin J; Kyriakou, Georgios; Sykes, E Charles H

    2013-06-01

    Spillover of reactants from one active site to another is important in heterogeneous catalysis and has recently been shown to enhance hydrogen storage in a variety of materials. The spillover of hydrogen is notoriously hard to detect or control. We report herein that the hydrogen spillover pathway on a Pd/Cu alloy can be controlled by reversible adsorption of a spectator molecule. Pd atoms in the Cu surface serve as hydrogen dissociation sites from which H atoms can spillover onto surrounding Cu regions. Selective adsorption of CO at these atomic Pd sites is shown to either prevent the uptake of hydrogen on, or inhibit its desorption from, the surface. In this way, the hydrogen coverage on the whole surface can be controlled by molecular adsorption at a minority site, which we term a 'molecular cork' effect. We show that the molecular cork effect is present during a surface catalysed hydrogenation reaction and illustrate how it can be used as a method for controlling uptake and release of hydrogen in a model storage system.

  14. Intergenerational Continuity in Parenting Behavior: Mediating Pathways and Child Effects

    PubMed Central

    Neppl, Tricia K.; Conger, Rand D.; Scaramella, Laura V.; Ontai, Lenna L.

    2009-01-01

    This prospective, longitudinal investigation examined mechanisms proposed to explain continuities in parenting behavior across two generations (G1, G2). Data came from 187 G2 adults, their mothers (G1), and their children (G3). Prospective information regarding G2 was collected both during adolescence and early adulthood. G1 data were collected during G2’s adolescence and G3 data were generated during the preschool years. Assessments included both observational and self-report measures. The results indicated a direct relationship between G1 and G2 harsh parenting and between G1 and G2 positive parenting. As predicted, specific mediators accounted for intergenerational continuity in particular types of parenting behavior. G2 externalizing behavior mediated the relationship between G1 and G2 harsh parenting, while G2 academic attainment mediated the relationship between G1 and G2 positive parenting. In addition, the hypothesized mediating pathways remained statistically significant after taking into account possible G2 effects on G1 parenting and G3 effects on G2 parenting. PMID:19702389

  15. Pathway design effects on synthetic vision head-up displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Lynda J.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Arthur, Jarvis J., III; Bailey, Randall E.

    2004-08-01

    NASA's Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) project is developing technologies with practical applications that will eliminate low visibility conditions as a causal factor to civil aircraft accidents while replicating the operational benefits of clear day flight operations, regardless of the actual outside visibility condition. A major thrust of the SVS project involves the development/demonstration of affordable, certifiable display configurations that provide intuitive out-the-window terrain and obstacle information with advanced pathway guidance for transport aircraft. This experiment evaluated the influence of different tunnel and guidance concepts upon pilot situation awareness (SA), mental workload, and flight path tracking performance for Synthetic Vision display concepts using a Head-Up Display (HUD). Two tunnel formats (dynamic, minimal) were evaluated against a baseline condition (no tunnel) during simulated IMC approaches to Reno-Tahoe International airport. Two guidance cues (tadpole, follow-me aircraft) were also evaluated to assess their influence on the tunnel formats. Results indicated that the presence of a tunnel on an SVS HUD had no effect on flight path performance but that it did have significant effects on pilot SA and mental workload. The dynamic tunnel concept with the follow-me aircraft guidance symbol produced the lowest workload and provided the highest SA among the tunnel concepts evaluated.

  16. Pathway Design Effects on Synthetic Vision Head-Up Displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, Lynda J.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Arthur, Jarvis J., III; Bailey, Randall E.

    2004-01-01

    NASA s Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) project is developing technologies with practical applications that will eliminate low visibility conditions as a causal factor to civil aircraft accidents while replicating the operational benefits of clear day flight operations, regardless of the actual outside visibility condition. A major thrust of the SVS project involves the development/demonstration of affordable, certifiable display configurations that provide intuitive out-the-window terrain and obstacle information with advanced pathway guidance for transport aircraft. This experiment evaluated the influence of different tunnel and guidance concepts upon pilot situation awareness (SA), mental workload, and flight path tracking performance for Synthetic Vision display concepts using a Head-Up Display (HUD). Two tunnel formats (dynamic, minimal) were evaluated against a baseline condition (no tunnel) during simulated IMC approaches to Reno-Tahoe International airport. Two guidance cues (tadpole, follow-me aircraft) were also evaluated to assess their influence on the tunnel formats. Results indicated that the presence of a tunnel on an SVS HUD had no effect on flight path performance but that it did have significant effects on pilot SA and mental workload. The dynamic tunnel concept with the follow-me aircraft guidance symbol produced the lowest workload and provided the highest SA among the tunnel concepts evaluated.

  17. Controlling a spillover pathway with the molecular cork effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcinkowski, Matthew D.; Jewell, April D.; Stamatakis, Michail; Boucher, Matthew B.; Lewis, Emily A.; Murphy, Colin J.; Kyriakou, Georgios; Sykes, E. Charles H.

    2013-06-01

    Spillover of reactants from one active site to another is important in heterogeneous catalysis and has recently been shown to enhance hydrogen storage in a variety of materials. The spillover of hydrogen is notoriously hard to detect or control. We report herein that the hydrogen spillover pathway on a Pd/Cu alloy can be controlled by reversible adsorption of a spectator molecule. Pd atoms in the Cu surface serve as hydrogen dissociation sites from which H atoms can spillover onto surrounding Cu regions. Selective adsorption of CO at these atomic Pd sites is shown to either prevent the uptake of hydrogen on, or inhibit its desorption from, the surface. In this way, the hydrogen coverage on the whole surface can be controlled by molecular adsorption at a minority site, which we term a ‘molecular cork’ effect. We show that the molecular cork effect is present during a surface catalysed hydrogenation reaction and illustrate how it can be used as a method for controlling uptake and release of hydrogen in a model storage system.

  18. Signal Propagation in the Human Visual Pathways: An Effective Connectivity Analysis.

    PubMed

    Youssofzadeh, Vahab; Prasad, Girijesh; Fagan, Andrew J; Reilly, Richard B; Martens, Sven; Meaney, James F; Wong-Lin, KongFatt

    2015-09-30

    Although the visual system has been extensively investigated, an integrated account of the spatiotemporal dynamics of long-range signal propagation along the human visual pathways is not completely known or validated. In this work, we used dynamic causal modeling approach to provide insights into the underlying neural circuit dynamics of pattern reversal visual-evoked potentials extracted from concurrent EEG-fMRI data. A recurrent forward-backward connectivity model, consisting of multiple interacting brain regions identified by EEG source localization aided by fMRI spatial priors, best accounted for the data dynamics. Sources were first identified in the thalamic area, primary visual cortex, as well as higher cortical areas along the ventral and dorsal visual processing streams. Consistent with hierarchical early visual processing, the model disclosed and quantified the neural temporal dynamics across the identified activity sources. This signal propagation is dominated by a feedforward process, but we also found weaker effective feedback connectivity. Using effective connectivity analysis, the optimal dynamic causal modeling revealed enhanced connectivity along the dorsal pathway but slightly suppressed connectivity along the ventral pathway. A bias was also found in favor of the right hemisphere consistent with functional attentional asymmetry. This study validates, for the first time, the long-range signal propagation timing in the human visual pathways. A similar modeling approach can potentially be used to understand other cognitive processes and dysfunctions in signal propagation in neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. Significance statement: An integrated account of long-range visual signal propagation in the human brain is currently incomplete. Using computational neural modeling on our acquired concurrent EEG-fMRI data under a visual evoked task, we found not only a substantial forward propagation toward "higher-order" brain regions but also a

  19. Differential interaction with endocytic and exocytic pathways distinguish parasitophorous vacuoles of Coxiella burnetii and Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed

    Heinzen, R A; Scidmore, M A; Rockey, D D; Hackstadt, T

    1996-03-01

    Coxiella burnetii and Chlamydia trachomatis are bacterial obligate intracellular parasites that occupy distinct vacuolar niches within eucaryotic host cells. We have employed immunofluorescence, cytochemistry, fluorescent vital stains, and fluid-phase markers in conjunction with electron, confocal, and conventional microscopy to characterize the vacuolar environments of these pathogens. The acidic nature of the C. burnetii-containing vacuole was confirmed by its acquisition of the acidotropic base acridine orange (AO). The presence of the vacuolar-type (H+) ATPase (V-ATPase) within the Coxiella vacuolar membrane was demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescence, and growth of C. burnetii was inhibited by bafilomycin A1 (Baf A), a specific inhibitor of the V-ATPase. In contrast, AO did not accumulate in C. trachomatis inclusions nor was the V-ATPase found in the inclusion membrane. Moreover, chlamydial growth was not inhibited by Baf A or the lysosomotropic amines methylamine, ammonium chloride, and chloroquine. Vacuoles harboring C. burnetii incorporated the fluorescent fluid- phase markers, fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (FITC-dex) and Lucifer yellow (LY), indicating trafficking between that vacuole and the endocytic pathway. Neither FITC-dex nor LY was sequestered by chlamydial inclusions. The late endosomal-prelysosomal marker cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor was not detectable in the vacuolar membranes encompassing either parasite. However, the lysosomal enzymes acid phosphatase and cathepsin D and the lysosomal glycoproteins LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 localized to the C. burnetii vacuole but not the chlamydial vacuole. Interaction of C. trachomatis inclusions with the Golgi-derived vesicles was demonstrated by the transport of sphingomyelin, endogenously synthesized from C6-NBD-ceramide, to the chlamydial inclusion and incorporation into the bacterial cell wall. Similar trafficking of C-NBD-ceramide was not evident in C. burnetii-infected cells

  20. Differential interaction with endocytic and exocytic pathways distinguish parasitophorous vacuoles of Coxiella burnetii and Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed Central

    Heinzen, R A; Scidmore, M A; Rockey, D D; Hackstadt, T

    1996-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii and Chlamydia trachomatis are bacterial obligate intracellular parasites that occupy distinct vacuolar niches within eucaryotic host cells. We have employed immunofluorescence, cytochemistry, fluorescent vital stains, and fluid-phase markers in conjunction with electron, confocal, and conventional microscopy to characterize the vacuolar environments of these pathogens. The acidic nature of the C. burnetii-containing vacuole was confirmed by its acquisition of the acidotropic base acridine orange (AO). The presence of the vacuolar-type (H+) ATPase (V-ATPase) within the Coxiella vacuolar membrane was demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescence, and growth of C. burnetii was inhibited by bafilomycin A1 (Baf A), a specific inhibitor of the V-ATPase. In contrast, AO did not accumulate in C. trachomatis inclusions nor was the V-ATPase found in the inclusion membrane. Moreover, chlamydial growth was not inhibited by Baf A or the lysosomotropic amines methylamine, ammonium chloride, and chloroquine. Vacuoles harboring C. burnetii incorporated the fluorescent fluid- phase markers, fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (FITC-dex) and Lucifer yellow (LY), indicating trafficking between that vacuole and the endocytic pathway. Neither FITC-dex nor LY was sequestered by chlamydial inclusions. The late endosomal-prelysosomal marker cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor was not detectable in the vacuolar membranes encompassing either parasite. However, the lysosomal enzymes acid phosphatase and cathepsin D and the lysosomal glycoproteins LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 localized to the C. burnetii vacuole but not the chlamydial vacuole. Interaction of C. trachomatis inclusions with the Golgi-derived vesicles was demonstrated by the transport of sphingomyelin, endogenously synthesized from C6-NBD-ceramide, to the chlamydial inclusion and incorporation into the bacterial cell wall. Similar trafficking of C-NBD-ceramide was not evident in C. burnetii-infected cells

  1. Negative Regulation of Grb10 Interacting GYF Protein 2 on Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Receptor Signaling Pathway Caused Diabetic Mice Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jing; Wei, Qianping; Deng, Huacong; Li, Gang; Ma, Lingli; Zeng, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Heterozygous Gigyf2+/− mice exhibits histopathological evidence of neurodegeneration such as motor dysfunction. Several lines of evidence have demonstrated the important role of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) signaling pathway in the neuropathogenic process of cognitive impairment, while decreased Grb10-Interacting GYF Protein 2 (GIGYF2) expression can alter IGF1R trafficking and its downstream signaling pathways. Growth factor receptor-bound protein 10 (Grb10), a suppressor of IGF1R pathway, has been shown to play a critical role in regulating diabetes-associated cognitive impairment. It remains unknown whether endogenous GIGYF2 expression contributes to the development of diabetes-associated cognitive impairment. Using streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice model, we first demonstrated that a significantly increased level of GIGYF2 expression was correlated with a significant decrease in the expression of phosphorylated IGF1R as well as the phosphorylation of AKT and ERK1/2, two signaling pathways downstream of IGF1R, in the hippocampus of diabetic mice. On the contrary, in situ knockdown of GIGYF2 expression in hippocampus resulted in increased expression of phosphorylated IGF1R expression and correspondingly reversed the down-regulation of ERK1/2 phsophorylation but had no obvious effect on Grb10 expression. Functionally, knockdown of GIGYF2 expression markedly ameliorated diabetes-associated cognitive dysfunction as well as the ultrastructural pathology and abnormal neurobehavioral changes. These results suggest that increased expression of GIGYF2 might contribute to the development of diabetes-associated cognitive disorder via negatively regulating IGF1R signaling pathway. Therefore, down-regulation of GIGYF2 expression may provide a potential novel approach to treat diabetes-associated cognitive impairment caused by aberrant IGF1R signaling pathway. PMID:25268761

  2. Cascading life-history interactions: alternative density-dependent pathways drive recruitment dynamics in a freshwater fish.

    PubMed

    Vandenbos, Rena E; Tonn, William M; Boss, Shelly M

    2006-07-01

    Although density-dependent mechanisms in early life-history are important regulators of recruitment in many taxa, consequences of such mechanisms on other life-history stages are poorly understood. To examine interacting and cascading effects of mechanisms acting on different life-history stages, we stocked experimental ponds with fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) at two different densities. We quantified growth and survival of the stocked fish, the eggs they produced, and the resulting offspring during their first season of life. Per-capita production and survival of eggs were inversely related to density of stocked fish; significant egg cannibalism by stocked minnows resulted in initial young-of-the-year (YOY) densities that were inversely related to adult densities. Subsequent growth and survival of YOY were then inversely related to these initial YOY densities, and survival of YOY was selective for larger fish. Because of these compensatory processes in the egg and YOY stages, treatments did not differ in YOY abundance and mean size at the end of the growing season. Because of differences in the intensity of size-selective mortality, however, variation in end-of season sizes of YOY was strongly (and inversely) related to densities of stocked fish. When mortality was severe in the egg stage (high densities of stocked fish), final YOY size distributions were more variable than when the dominant mortality was size-selective in the YOY stage (low stocked fish densities). These differences in size variation could have subsequent recruitment consequences, as overwinter survival is typically selective for YOY fish larger than a critical threshold size. Density-dependent effects on a given life stage are not independent, but will be influenced by earlier stages; alternative recruitment pathways can result when processes at earlier stages differ in magnitude or selectivity. Appreciation of these cascading effects should enhance our overall understanding of the

  3. Effective Interactions from No Core Shell Model

    SciTech Connect

    Dikmen, E.; Lisetskiy, A. F.; Barrett, B. R.; Navratil, P.; Vary, J. P.

    2008-11-11

    We construct the many-body effective Hamiltonian for pf-shell by carrying out 2({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){omega}. NCSM calculations at the 2-body cluster level. We demonstrate how the effective Hamiltonian derived from realistic nucleon-nucleon (NN) potentials for the 2({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){omega} NCSM space should be modified to properly account for the many-body correlations produced by truncating to the major pf-shell. We obtain two-body effective interactions for the pf-shell by using direct projection and use them to reproduce the results of large scale NCSM for other light Ca isotopes.

  4. p53 amplifies Toll-like receptor 5 response in human primary and cancer cells through interaction with multiple signal transduction pathways

    PubMed Central

    Shatz, Maria; Shats, Igor; Menendez, Daniel; Resnick, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor regulates transcription of genes associated with diverse cellular functions including apoptosis, growth arrest, DNA repair and differentiation. Recently, we established that p53 can modulate expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR) innate immunity genes but the degree of cross-talk between p53 and TLR pathways remained unclear. Here, using gene expression profiling we characterize the global effect of p53 on the TLR5-mediated transcription in MCF7 cells. We found that combined activation of p53 and TLR5 pathways synergistically increases expression of over 200 genes, mostly associated with immunity and inflammation. The synergy was observed in several human cancer cells and primary lymphocytes. The p53-dependent amplification of transcriptional response to TLR5 activation required expression of NFκB subunit p65 and was mediated by several molecular mechanisms including increased phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase, PI3K and STAT3 signaling. Additionally, p53 induction increased cytokine expression in response to TNFα, another activator of NFκB and MAP kinase pathways, suggesting a broad interaction between p53 and these signaling pathways. The expression of many synergistically induced genes is elevated in breast cancer patients responsive to chemotherapy. We suggest that p53's capacity to enhance immune response could be exploited to increase antitumor immunity and to improve cancer treatment. PMID:26220208

  5. Effectiveness and pathways of electrochemical degradation of pretilachlor herbicides.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jinzhi; Feng, Yujie; Sun, Xiaojun; Liu, Junfeng; Zhu, Limin

    2011-05-15

    Pretilachlor used as one kind of acetanilide herbicides is potentially dangerous and biorefractory. In this work, electrochemical degradation of lab-synthetic pretilachlor wastewater was carried out with Sb doped Ti/SnO(2) electrode as anode and stainless steel as cathode. The effect of current density on pretilachlor degradation was investigated, and the degradation pathway of pretilachlor was inferred by analyzing its main degradation intermediates. The results showed that the removal of pretilachlor and TOC in treatment time of 60 min were 98.8% and 43.1% under the conditions of current density of 20 mA cm(-2), initial concentration of pretilachlor of 60 mg L(-1), Na(2)SO(4) dosage of 0.1 mol L(-1), pH of 7.2, respectively, while the energy consumption was 15.8 kWhm(-3). The main reactions for electrochemical degradation of pretilachlor included hydroxylation, oxidation, dechlorination, C-O bond and C-N bond cleavage, resulting in the formation of nine main intermediates. PMID:21382661

  6. STAT3 interacts with Skp2/p27/p21 pathway to regulate the motility and invasion of gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zheng; Jiang, Xian; Qiao, Haiquan; Zhai, Bo; Zhang, Lianfeng; Zhang, Qiang; Wu, Yuanhong; Jiang, Hongchi; Sun, Xueying

    2013-04-01

    The interleukin-6 (IL-6)/Janus kinase 2 (JAK2)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) pathway mediates cell proliferation and migration. S-phase kinase-associated protein-2 (Skp2) catalyzes the ubiquitylation of p27 and p21. Here we investigated that the cross-talk of the two pathways regulates motility and invasion of gastric cancer SGC7901 and MGC803 cells. Both cell lines endogenously secret IL-6, and blockage of IL-6 or JAK2 inhibited the activation of JAK2 and STAT3. Depletion of STAT3 downregulated Skp2 expression, and thereby increased the expression of p27 and p21. The depletion of STAT3 inhibited the ability of cells to migrate and invade, and impaired the cellular cytoskeleton mainly microtubules; while the depletion of p27 partially restored the impaired ability to migrate, and reversed the impaired microfilaments, further inhibited the ability to invade, but had little effect on microtubules and cellular adhering ability of STAT3-depleted cells. STAT3 depletion inhibited the activity of RhoA and the interaction with stathmin, downregulated the expression of pFAK (phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase), acetylated-tubulin, RECK (reversion-inducing-cysteine-rich protein with kazal motifs) and Sp1, upregulated E-cadherin, and reduced the activities of MMP (matrix metalloproteinase)-2 and -9. The depletion of p27 increased RhoA (Ras homolog family member A) activity, upregulated RECK, and downregulated E-cadherin and Sp1 in STAT3-depleted cells. The results indicate that the interaction between STAT3 and Skp2/p27/p21 pathway plays an important role in mediating the motility, migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells, and inhibition of STAT3 may be a useful therapeutic approach for metastasis of gastric cancer, but caution needs to be taken for its effects on Skp2/p27/p21 pathway. PMID:23333463

  7. AtVPS41-mediated endocytic pathway is essential for pollen tube–stigma interaction in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Lihong; Liu, Jingjing; Zhong, Sheng; Gu, Hongya; Qu, Li-Jia

    2016-01-01

    In flowering plants, extensive male–female interactions are required for successful fertilization in which various signaling cascades are involved. Prevacuolar compartments (PVC) and vacuoles are two types of subcellular compartments that terminate signal transduction by sequestrating signaling molecules in yeast and mammalian cells; however, the manner in which they might be involved in male–female interactions in plants is unknown. In this study, we identified Arabidopsis thaliana vacuolar protein sorting 41 (AtVPS41), encoded by a single-copy gene with sequence similarity to yeast Vps41p, as a new factor controlling pollen tube–stigma interaction. Loss of AtVPS41 function disrupted penetration of pollen tubes into the transmitting tissue and thus led to failed male transmission. In the pollen tubes, AtVPS41 protein is associated with PVCs and the tonoplast. We demonstrate that AtVPS41 is required for the late stage of the endocytic pathway (i.e., endomembrane trafficking from PVCs to vacuoles) because internalization of cell-surface molecules was normal in the vps41-deficient pollen tubes, whereas PVC-to-vacuole trafficking was impaired. We further show that the CHCR domain is required for subcellular localization and biological functioning of AtVPS41. These results indicate that the AtVPS41-mediated late stage of the endocytic pathway is essential for pollen tube–stigma interaction in Arabidopsis. PMID:27185920

  8. A high throughput screening strategy to identify protein-protein interaction inhibitors that block the Fanconi anemia DNA repair pathway

    PubMed Central

    Voter, Andrew F.; Manthei, Kelly A.

    2016-01-01

    Induction of the Fanconi anemia (FA) DNA repair pathway is a common mechanism by which tumors evolve resistance to DNA crosslinking chemotherapies. Proper execution of the FA pathway requires interaction between the FA complementation group M protein (FANCM) and the RecQ-mediated genome instability protein (RMI) complex, and mutations that disrupt FANCM/RMI interactions sensitize cells to DNA crosslinking agents. Inhibitors that block FANCM/RMI complex formation could be useful therapeutics for re-sensitizing tumors that have acquired chemotherapeutic resistance. To identify such inhibitors, we have developed and validated high-throughput fluorescence polarization and proximity assays that are sensitive to inhibitors that disrupt interactions between the RMI complex and its binding site on FANCM (a peptide referred to as MM2). A pilot screen of 74,807 small molecules was performed using the fluorescence polarization assay. Hits from the primary screen were further tested using the proximity assay and an orthogonal proximity assay was used to assess inhibitor selectivity. Direct physical interaction between the RMI complex and the most selective inhibitor identified through the screening process was measured by surface plasmon resonance and isothermal titration calorimetry. Observation of direct binding by this small molecule validates the screening protocol. PMID:26962873

  9. Omega-3 fatty acids and cardiovascular disease: effects on risk factors, molecular pathways, and clinical events.

    PubMed

    Mozaffarian, Dariush; Wu, Jason H Y

    2011-11-01

    We reviewed available evidence for cardiovascular effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) consumption, focusing on long chain (seafood) n-3 PUFA, including their principal dietary sources, effects on physiological risk factors, potential molecular pathways and bioactive metabolites, effects on specific clinical endpoints, and existing dietary guidelines. Major dietary sources include fatty fish and other seafood. n-3 PUFA consumption lowers plasma triglycerides, resting heart rate, and blood pressure and might also improve myocardial filling and efficiency, lower inflammation, and improve vascular function. Experimental studies demonstrate direct anti-arrhythmic effects, which have been challenging to document in humans. n-3 PUFA affect a myriad of molecular pathways, including alteration of physical and chemical properties of cellular membranes, direct interaction with and modulation of membrane channels and proteins, regulation of gene expression via nuclear receptors and transcription factors, changes in eicosanoid profiles, and conversion of n-3 PUFA to bioactive metabolites. In prospective observational studies and adequately powered randomized clinical trials, benefits of n-3 PUFA seem most consistent for coronary heart disease mortality and sudden cardiac death. Potential effects on other cardiovascular outcomes are less-well-established, including conflicting evidence from observational studies and/or randomized trials for effects on nonfatal myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, atrial fibrillation, recurrent ventricular arrhythmias, and heart failure. Research gaps include the relative importance of different physiological and molecular mechanisms, precise dose-responses of physiological and clinical effects, whether fish oil provides all the benefits of fish consumption, and clinical effects of plant-derived n-3 PUFA. Overall, current data provide strong concordant evidence that n-3 PUFA are bioactive compounds that reduce risk of cardiac

  10. An ERP study of the interaction between verbal information and conditioning pathways to fear.

    PubMed

    Ugland, Carina C O; Dyson, Benjamin J; Field, Andy P

    2013-01-01

    Two experiments are described that explore the effects of verbal information and direct conditioning in the acquisition and extinction of fear responses. Participants were given verbal threat information about novel animals before conditioning trials in which the animals were presented alongside an aversive outcome (Experiment 1), or positive information about the animals before extinction trials (Experiment 2). Fear was measured using self-reported fear beliefs, expectancy of the unconditioned stimulus (US) and event-related brain potential (ERP). The results showed a direct effect of verbal information on acquisition (Experiment 1) and extinction (Experiment 2). There was a P2 peak latency shift at acquisition (Experiment 1) and P1 mean amplitude response at extinction (Experiment 2) based on the interaction between verbal information and US-contingency. However, the P2 response showed little evidence for an enhanced conditioned response (CR) when verbal threat information and direct conditioning combined: earlier P2 responses were found for all animals that had been associated with either threat information or the aversive US. Additionally, increase in P1 mean amplitude response (Experiment 2) seemed to stem from the conflict between verbal information and contingency information, rather than the predicted decrease in response where positive information and extinction training were combined. Future studies are suggested that might explore whether attention/arousal modulate the P1 response as a result of such expectation violations. PMID:22366224

  11. A role for Drosophila Cyclin J in oogenesis revealed by genetic interactions with the piRNA pathway

    PubMed Central

    Atikukke, Govindaraja; Albosta, Paul; Zhang, Huamei; Finley, Russell L.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclin J (CycJ) is a poorly characterized member of the Cyclin superfamily of cyclin-dependent kinase regulators, many of which regulate the cell cycle or transcription. Although CycJ is conserved in metazoans its cellular function has not been identified and no mutant defects have been described. In Drosophila, CycJ transcript is present primarily in ovaries and very early embryos, suggesting a role in one or both of these tissues. The CycJ gene (CycJ) lies immediately downstream of armitage (armi), a gene involved in the Piwi-associated RNA (piRNA) pathways that are required for silencing transposons in the germline and adjacent somatic cells. Mutations in armi result in oogenesis defects but a role for CycJ in oogenesis has not been defined. Here we assessed oogenesis in CycJ mutants in the presence or absence of mutations in armi or other piRNA pathway genes. CycJ null ovaries appeared normal, indicating that CycJ is not essential for oogenesis under normal conditions. In contrast, armi null ovaries produced only two egg chambers per ovariole and the eggs had severe axis specification defects, as observed previously for armi and other piRNA pathway mutants. Surprisingly, the CycJ armi double mutant failed to produce any mature eggs. The double null ovaries generally had only one egg chamber per ovariole and the egg chambers frequently contained an overabundance of differentiated germline cells. Production of these compound egg chambers could be suppressed with CycJ transgenes but not with mutations in the checkpoint gene mnk, which suppress oogenesis defects in armi mutants. The CycJ null showed similar genetic interactions with the germline and somatic piRNA pathway gene piwi, and to a lesser extent with aubergine (aub), a member of the germline-specific piRNA pathway. The strong genetic interactions between CycJ and piRNA pathway genes reveal a role for CycJ in early oogenesis. Our results suggest that CycJ is required to regulate egg chamber production or

  12. Alcohol effects on drug-nutrient interactions.

    PubMed

    Seitz, H K

    1985-01-01

    The interaction of ethanol with drugs and xenobiotics is complex because ethanol can affect any of the following steps; absorption, plasma protein binding, hepatic blood flow, distribution, hepatic uptake of drugs, and phase I and II hepatic metabolism. The ingestion of ethanol can lead to malabsorption of a variety of nutrients and can modify the absorption of various drugs. High concentrations of ethanol in conjunction with aspirin causes gastric mucosal damage. The principal effect of acute ethanol ingestion on drug metabolism is inhibition of microsomal drug metabolism. The synergistic effects of ethanol on central nervous system depressants can be explained by this mechanism. In contrast, chronic ethanol consumption increases mixed function oxidation and drug metabolism. The cross tolerance between ethanol and sedatives in chronic alcoholics may be due to this effect of alcohol. In addition, enhanced production of hepatotoxic products from certain drugs and xenobiotics and an increased activation of procarcinogens to carcinogens can result from this microsomal induction. The increased susceptibility to hepatotoxins and the enhanced carcinogenesis in the alcoholic may be explained by this fact. Other effects of the interaction between drugs and ethanol are the result of changes in organ susceptibility, best demonstrated for the central nervous system. Subsequently, the presence of liver disease has a great effect on drug metabolism in alcoholics.

  13. Effects of chlorobenzoate transformation on the Pseudomonas testosteroni biphenyl and chlorobiphenyl degradation pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Sondossi, M; Sylvestre, M; Ahmad, D

    1992-01-01

    Bacterial conversion of biphenyl (BP) and chlorobiphenyls (CBPs) to benzoates and chlorobenzoates (CBAs) proceeds by introduction of molecular oxygen at the 2,3 position, followed by a 1,2-meta cleavage of the molecule. Complete mineralization of CBPs requires the presence of two sets of genes, one for the transformation fo CBPs into CBAs and a second for the degradation of CBAs. It has been shown previously that removal of the CBAs produced from the degradation of CBPs is essential for efficient degradation of CBPs. In this study we confirmed that CBAs inhibit BP and CBP transformation in Pseudomonas testosteroni B-356. Among the three monochlorobenzoates tested, 3-chlorobenzoate was the most effective inhibitor. Furthermore, we found that in strain B-356, CBA transformation is controlled by BP-induced oxygenases that are not present in benzoate-grown cells. We found that this BP-linked CBA transformation pathway transformed CBAs produced from CBPs into several metabolites, including chlorocatechols and corresponding muconic semialdehydes. These metabolites inhibited the 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl 1,2-dioxygenase, while CBAs by themselves had no effect on this enzyme. Therefore, on the basis of this and other observations, it appears that when CBAs produced from CBPs accumulate in the growth medium, they are converted into unproductive metabolites that reduce the flux of the BP and CBP degradation pathway. The practical implications of these interactions on the microbial degradation of polychlorinated BPs are also discussed. PMID:1610172

  14. Stress Effects on Multiple Memory System Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Ness, Deborah; Calabrese, Pasquale

    2016-01-01

    Extensive behavioural, pharmacological, and neurological research reports stress effects on mammalian memory processes. While stress effects on memory quantity have been known for decades, the influence of stress on multiple memory systems and their distinct contributions to the learning process have only recently been described. In this paper, after summarizing the fundamental biological aspects of stress/emotional arousal and recapitulating functionally and anatomically distinct memory systems, we review recent animal and human studies exploring the effects of stress on multiple memory systems. Apart from discussing the interaction between distinct memory systems in stressful situations, we will also outline the fundamental role of the amygdala in mediating such stress effects. Additionally, based on the methods applied in the herein discussed studies, we will discuss how memory translates into behaviour. PMID:27034845

  15. Contamination Effects Due to Space Environmental Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Philip T.; Paquin, Krista C. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Molecular and particulate contaminants are commonly generated from the orbital spacecraft operations that are under the influence of the space environment. Once generated, these contaminants may attach to the surfaces of the spacecraft or may remain in the vicinity of the spacecraft. In the event these contaminants come to rest on the surfaces of the spacecraft or situated in the line-of-sight of the observation path, they will create various degrees of contamination effect which may cause undesirable effects for normal spacecraft operations, There will be circumstances in which the spacecraft may be subjected to special space environment due to operational conditions. Interactions between contaminants and special space environment may alter or greatly increase the contamination effect due to the synergistic effect. This paper will address the various types of contamination generation on orbit, the general effects of the contamination on spacecraft systems, and the typical impacts on the spacecraft operations due to the contamination effect. In addition, this paper will explain the contamination effect induced by the space environment and will discuss the intensified contamination effect resulting from the synergistic effect with the special space environment.

  16. Pathway detection from protein interaction networks and gene expression data using color-coding methods and A∗ search algorithms.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Cheng-Yu; Yeh, Hsiang-Yuan; Arias, Carlos Roberto; Soo, Von-Wun

    2012-01-01

    With the large availability of protein interaction networks and microarray data supported, to identify the linear paths that have biological significance in search of a potential pathway is a challenge issue. We proposed a color-coding method based on the characteristics of biological network topology and applied heuristic search to speed up color-coding method. In the experiments, we tested our methods by applying to two datasets: yeast and human prostate cancer networks and gene expression data set. The comparisons of our method with other existing methods on known yeast MAPK pathways in terms of precision and recall show that we can find maximum number of the proteins and perform comparably well. On the other hand, our method is more efficient than previous ones and detects the paths of length 10 within 40 seconds using CPU Intel 1.73 GHz and 1 GB main memory running under windows operating system. PMID:22577352

  17. Nitrate enrichment alters a Daphnia-microparasite interaction through multiple pathways.

    PubMed

    Dallas, Tad; Drake, John M

    2014-02-01

    Nutrient pollution has the potential to alter many ecological interactions, including host-parasite relationships. One of the largest sources of nutrient pollution comes from anthropogenic alteration of the nitrogen (N) cycle, specifically the increased rate of nitrate (NO3-N) deposition to aquatic environments, potentially altering host-parasite relationships. This study aimed to assess the mechanisms through which nitrate may impact host-pathogen relationships using a fungal pathogen (Metschnikowia bicuspidata) parasitic to crustacean zooplankton (Daphnia dentifera) as a tractable model system. First, the influence of nitrate on host population dynamics was assessed along a gradient of nitrate concentrations. Nitrate decreased host population size and increased infection prevalence. Second, the influence of nitrate on host reproduction, mortality, and infection intensity was assessed at the individual host level by examining the relationship between pathogen dose and infection prevalence at ambient (0.4 mg NO3-N*L(-1)) and intermediate (12 mg NO3-N*L(-1)) levels of nitrate. Host fecundity and infection intensity both decreased with increasing pathogen dose, but increased nitrate levels corresponded to greater infection intensities. Nitrate had no effect on host growth rate, suggesting that hosts do not alter feeding behavior in nitrate-treated media compared with ambient conditions. This study suggests that nutrient enrichment may enhance disease through increased transmission and infection intensity, but that high levels of nitrate may result in smaller epidemics through reduced transmission caused by smaller population sizes and increased pathogen mortality.

  18. Identification of Links Between Cellular Pathways by Genetic Interaction Mapping (GIM).

    PubMed

    Malabat, Christophe; Saveanu, Cosmin

    2016-01-01

    The yeast systematic deletion collection offered the basis for a number of different strategies that establish functional links between genes by analyzing the phenotype of cells that combine two different deletions or mutations. A distinguishing feature of the collection is the presence of molecular barcodes at each deleted locus, which can be used to quantify the presence and abundance of cells bearing a given allele in a complex mix. As a result, a large number of mutants can be tested in batch cultures, replacing tedious manipulation of thousands of individual strains with a barcode microarray readout. Barcode-based genetic screens like Genetic Interaction Mapping (GIM) thus require little investment in terms of specific equipment, are fast to perform, and allow precise measurements of double mutant growth rates for both aggravating (synthetic sick) and alleviating (epistatic) effects. We describe here protocols for preparing the pools of haploid double mutant S. cerevisiae cells, testing their composition with barcode microarrays, and analyzing the results to extract useful functional information.

  19. Interactions of polybrominated diphenyl ethers with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor pathway.

    PubMed

    Peters, A K; Nijmeijer, S; Gradin, K; Backlund, M; Bergman, A; Poellinger, L; Denison, M S; Van den Berg, M

    2006-07-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are brominated flame retardants that have been in use as additives in various consumer products. Structural similarities of PBDEs with other polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons that show affinity for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), such as some polychlorinated biphenyls, raised concerns about their possible dioxin-like properties. We studied the ability of environmentally relevant PBDEs (BDE-47, -99, -100, -153, -154, and -183) and the "planar" congener BDE-77 to bind and/or activate the AhR in stably transfected rodent hepatoma cell lines with an AhR-responsive enhanced green fluorescent protein (AhR-EGFP) reporter gene (H1G1.1c3 mouse and H4G1.1c2 rat hepatoma). 7-Ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylation (EROD) was used as a marker for CYP1A1 activity. Dose- and bromination-specific inhibition of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-induced responses was measured by their ability to inhibit the induction of AhR-EGFP expression and EROD activity. Individual exposure to these PBDEs did not result in any increase in induction of AhR-EGFP or CYP1A1 activity. The lower brominated PBDEs showed the strongest inhibitory effect on TCDD-induced activities in both cell lines. While the highest brominated PBDE tested, BDE-183, inhibited EROD activity, it did not affect the induction of AhR-EGFP expression. Similar findings were observed after exposing stably transfected human hepatoma (xenobiotic response element [XRE]-HepG2) cells to these PBDEs, resulting in a small but statically significant agonistic effect on XRE-driven luciferase activity. Co-exposure with TCDD resulted again in antagonistic effects, confirming that the inhibitory effect of these PBDEs on TCDD-induced responses was not only due to direct interaction at receptor level but also at DNA-binding level. This antagonism was confirmed for BDE-99 in HepG2 cells transiently transfected with a Gal4-AhR construct and the corresponding Gal4-Luc reporter gene. In addition, a

  20. Interactions of polybrominated diphenyl ethers with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor pathway.

    PubMed

    Peters, A K; Nijmeijer, S; Gradin, K; Backlund, M; Bergman, A; Poellinger, L; Denison, M S; Van den Berg, M

    2006-07-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are brominated flame retardants that have been in use as additives in various consumer products. Structural similarities of PBDEs with other polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons that show affinity for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), such as some polychlorinated biphenyls, raised concerns about their possible dioxin-like properties. We studied the ability of environmentally relevant PBDEs (BDE-47, -99, -100, -153, -154, and -183) and the "planar" congener BDE-77 to bind and/or activate the AhR in stably transfected rodent hepatoma cell lines with an AhR-responsive enhanced green fluorescent protein (AhR-EGFP) reporter gene (H1G1.1c3 mouse and H4G1.1c2 rat hepatoma). 7-Ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylation (EROD) was used as a marker for CYP1A1 activity. Dose- and bromination-specific inhibition of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-induced responses was measured by their ability to inhibit the induction of AhR-EGFP expression and EROD activity. Individual exposure to these PBDEs did not result in any increase in induction of AhR-EGFP or CYP1A1 activity. The lower brominated PBDEs showed the strongest inhibitory effect on TCDD-induced activities in both cell lines. While the highest brominated PBDE tested, BDE-183, inhibited EROD activity, it did not affect the induction of AhR-EGFP expression. Similar findings were observed after exposing stably transfected human hepatoma (xenobiotic response element [XRE]-HepG2) cells to these PBDEs, resulting in a small but statically significant agonistic effect on XRE-driven luciferase activity. Co-exposure with TCDD resulted again in antagonistic effects, confirming that the inhibitory effect of these PBDEs on TCDD-induced responses was not only due to direct interaction at receptor level but also at DNA-binding level. This antagonism was confirmed for BDE-99 in HepG2 cells transiently transfected with a Gal4-AhR construct and the corresponding Gal4-Luc reporter gene. In addition, a

  1. Ecosystem services capacity across heterogeneous forest types: understanding the interactions and suggesting pathways for sustaining multiple ecosystem services.

    PubMed

    Alamgir, Mohammed; Turton, Stephen M; Macgregor, Colin J; Pert, Petina L

    2016-10-01

    As ecosystem services supply from tropical forests is declining due to deforestation and forest degradation, much effort is essential to sustain ecosystem services supply from tropical forested landscapes, because tropical forests provide the largest flow of multiple ecosystem services among the terrestrial ecosystems. In order to sustain multiple ecosystem services, understanding ecosystem services capacity across heterogeneous forest types and identifying certain ecosystem services that could be managed to leverage positive effects across the wider bundle of ecosystem services are required. We sampled three forest types, tropical rainforests, sclerophyll forests, and rehabilitated plantation forests, over an area of 32,000m(2) from Wet Tropics bioregion, Australia, aiming to compare supply and evaluate interactions and patterns of eight ecosystem services (global climate regulation, air quality regulation, erosion regulation, nutrient regulation, cyclone protection, habitat provision, energy provision, and timber provision). On average, multiple ecosystem services were highest in the rainforests, lowest in sclerophyll forests, and intermediate in rehabilitated plantation forests. However, a wide variation was apparent among the plots across the three forest types. Global climate regulation service had a synergistic impact on the supply of multiple ecosystem services, while nutrient regulation service was found to have a trade-off impact. Considering multiple ecosystem services, most of the rehabilitated plantation forest plots shared the same ordination space with rainforest plots in the ordination analysis, indicating that rehabilitated plantation forests may supply certain ecosystem services nearly equivalent to rainforests. Two synergy groups and one trade-off group were identified. Apart from conserving rainforests and sclerophyll forests, our findings suggest two additional integrated pathways to sustain the supply of multiple ecosystem services from a

  2. Ecosystem services capacity across heterogeneous forest types: understanding the interactions and suggesting pathways for sustaining multiple ecosystem services.

    PubMed

    Alamgir, Mohammed; Turton, Stephen M; Macgregor, Colin J; Pert, Petina L

    2016-10-01

    As ecosystem services supply from tropical forests is declining due to deforestation and forest degradation, much effort is essential to sustain ecosystem services supply from tropical forested landscapes, because tropical forests provide the largest flow of multiple ecosystem services among the terrestrial ecosystems. In order to sustain multiple ecosystem services, understanding ecosystem services capacity across heterogeneous forest types and identifying certain ecosystem services that could be managed to leverage positive effects across the wider bundle of ecosystem services are required. We sampled three forest types, tropical rainforests, sclerophyll forests, and rehabilitated plantation forests, over an area of 32,000m(2) from Wet Tropics bioregion, Australia, aiming to compare supply and evaluate interactions and patterns of eight ecosystem services (global climate regulation, air quality regulation, erosion regulation, nutrient regulation, cyclone protection, habitat provision, energy provision, and timber provision). On average, multiple ecosystem services were highest in the rainforests, lowest in sclerophyll forests, and intermediate in rehabilitated plantation forests. However, a wide variation was apparent among the plots across the three forest types. Global climate regulation service had a synergistic impact on the supply of multiple ecosystem services, while nutrient regulation service was found to have a trade-off impact. Considering multiple ecosystem services, most of the rehabilitated plantation forest plots shared the same ordination space with rainforest plots in the ordination analysis, indicating that rehabilitated plantation forests may supply certain ecosystem services nearly equivalent to rainforests. Two synergy groups and one trade-off group were identified. Apart from conserving rainforests and sclerophyll forests, our findings suggest two additional integrated pathways to sustain the supply of multiple ecosystem services from a

  3. Polymorphisms in maternal folate pathway genes interact with arsenic in drinking water to influence risk of myelomeningocele

    PubMed Central

    Mazumdar, Maitreyi; Valeri, Linda; Rodrigues, Ema G.; Hasan, Md Omar Sharif Ibne; Hamid, Rezina; Paul, Ligi; Selhub, Jacob; Silva, Fareesa; Mostofa, MdGolam; Quamruzzaman, Quazi; Rahman, Mahmuder; Christiani, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Arsenic induces neural tube defects in many animal models. Additionally, studies have shown that mice with specific genetic defects in folate metabolism and transport are more susceptible to arsenic-induced neural tube defects. We sought to determine whether 14 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in genes involved in folate metabolism modified the effect of exposure to drinking water contaminated with inorganic arsenic and posterior neural tube defect (myelomeningocele) risk. Methods Fifty-four mothers of children with myelomeningocele and 55 controls were enrolled through clinical sites in rural Bangladesh in a case-control study of the association between environmental arsenic exposure and risk of myelomeningocele. We assessed participants for level of myelomeningocele, administered questionnaires, conducted biological and environmental sample collection, and performed genotyping. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used to measure inorganic arsenic concentration in drinking water. Candidate single-nucleotide polymorphisms were identified through review of the literature. Results Drinking water inorganic arsenic concentration was associated with increased risk of myelomeningocele for participants with 4 of the 14 studied single-nucleotide polymorphisms in genes involved in folate metabolism: the AA/AG genotype of rs2236225 (MTHFD1), the GG genotype of rs1051266 (SLC19A1), the TT genotype of rs7560488 (DNMT3A), and the GG genotype of rs3740393 (AS3MT) with adjusted OR of 1.13, 1.31, 1.20, and 1.25 for rs2236225, rs1051266, rs7560488, and rs3740393, respectively. Conclusions Our results support the hypothesis that environmental arsenic exposure increases the risk of myelomeningocele via interaction with folate metabolic pathways. PMID:26250961

  4. Ethanol Metabolism and Effects: Nitric Oxide and its Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xin-sheng; Deitrich, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    Ethanol (EtOH) in alcoholic beverages is consumed by a large number of individuals and its elimination is primarily by oxidation. The role of nitric oxide (NO) in ethanol’s effects is important since NO is one of the most prominent biological factors in mammals. NO is constantly formed endogenously from L-arginine. Dose and length of EtOH exposure, and cell type are the main factors affecting EtOH effects on NO production. Either acute or chronic EtOH ingestion affects inducible NO synthase (iNOS) activity. However it seems that EtOH suppresses induced-NO production by inhibition of iNOS in different cells. On the other hand, it is clear that acute low doses of EtOH increase both the release of NO and endothelial NOS (eNOS) expression, and augment endothelium-mediated vasodilatation, whereas higher doses impair endothelial functions. EtOH selectively affects neuronal NOS (nNOS) activity in different brain cells, which may relate to various behavioral interactions. Therefore, there is an excellent chance for EtOH and NO to react with each other. Effects of EtOH on NO production and NOS activity may be important to ethanol modification of cell or organ function. Nitrosated compounds (alkyl nitrites) are often found as the interaction products, which might be one of the minor pathways of EtOH metabolism. NO also inhibits EtOH metabolizing enzymes. Furthermore, NO is involved in EtOH induced liver damage and has a role in fetal development during ethanol exposure in pregnancy. The mechanisms underlying these effects are only partially understood. Hence, the current discussion of the interaction of ethanol and NO is presented. PMID:18690862

  5. Effective connectivity of neural pathways underlying disgust by multivariate Granger causality analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hao; Wang, Yonghui; Tian, Jie; Liu, Yijun

    2011-03-01

    The disgust system arises phylogenetically in response to dangers to the internal milieu from pathogens and their toxic products. Functional imaging studies have demonstrated that a much wider range of neural structures was involved in triggering disgust reactions. However, less is known regarding how and what neural pathways these neural structures interact. To address this issue, we adopted an effective connectivity based analysis, namely the multivariate Granger causality approach, to explore the causal interactions within these brain networks. Results presented that disgust can induce a wide range of brain activities, such as the insula, the anterior cingulate cortex, the parahippocampus lobe, the dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex, the superior occipital gyrus, and the supplementary motor cortex. These brain areas constitute as a whole, with much denser connectivity following disgust stimuli, in comparison with that of the neutral condition. Moreover, the anterior insula, showing multiple casual interactions with limbic and subcortical areas, was implicated as a central hub in organizing multiple information processing in the disgust system.

  6. Effects of modulation of pentose-phosphate pathway on biosynthesis of ansamitocins in Actinosynnema pretiosum.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yuxiang; Hu, Fengxian; Wei, Liujing; Bai, Linquan; Hua, Qiang

    2016-07-20

    Ansamitocins, produced by Actinosynnema pretiosum, are a group of maytansinoid antibiotics that block the assembly of tubulin into functional microtubules. The precursors of ansamitocin biosynthesis are generally derived from the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas (EMP) pathway and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. In this study, central carbon flux distributions were analyzed by (13)C-based flux analysis to reveal the contribution of individual central carbon metabolism pathways. To direct more carbon flux into ansamitocin biosynthesis, pentose phosphate (PP) pathway only and the combination of PP pathway and Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway were weakened, respectively. Ansamitocin P-3 (AP-3) productions by both kinds of pathways weakened mutant strains were significantly enhanced in chemically defined medium. In order to draw metabolic flux to the biosynthesis of ansamitocins more efficiently, heterologous phosphoglucomutase was subsequently overexpressed based on a mutant strain with combinational regulation of PP pathway and ED pathway. More fluxes were successfully directed into the UDP-glucose synthetic pathway and the AP-3 production was further improved in this case, reaching approximately 185mg/L in fermentation medium. It was demonstrated that eliminating the bypass pathways and favoring the precursor synthetic pathway could effectively improve ansamitocin production by A. pretiosum, suggesting a promising role of metabolic strategy in improving secondary metabolite production.

  7. Effects of modulation of pentose-phosphate pathway on biosynthesis of ansamitocins in Actinosynnema pretiosum.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yuxiang; Hu, Fengxian; Wei, Liujing; Bai, Linquan; Hua, Qiang

    2016-07-20

    Ansamitocins, produced by Actinosynnema pretiosum, are a group of maytansinoid antibiotics that block the assembly of tubulin into functional microtubules. The precursors of ansamitocin biosynthesis are generally derived from the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas (EMP) pathway and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. In this study, central carbon flux distributions were analyzed by (13)C-based flux analysis to reveal the contribution of individual central carbon metabolism pathways. To direct more carbon flux into ansamitocin biosynthesis, pentose phosphate (PP) pathway only and the combination of PP pathway and Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway were weakened, respectively. Ansamitocin P-3 (AP-3) productions by both kinds of pathways weakened mutant strains were significantly enhanced in chemically defined medium. In order to draw metabolic flux to the biosynthesis of ansamitocins more efficiently, heterologous phosphoglucomutase was subsequently overexpressed based on a mutant strain with combinational regulation of PP pathway and ED pathway. More fluxes were successfully directed into the UDP-glucose synthetic pathway and the AP-3 production was further improved in this case, reaching approximately 185mg/L in fermentation medium. It was demonstrated that eliminating the bypass pathways and favoring the precursor synthetic pathway could effectively improve ansamitocin production by A. pretiosum, suggesting a promising role of metabolic strategy in improving secondary metabolite production. PMID:27173582

  8. Effective Interactions for Nuclear Structure Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Signoracci, Angelo

    Experimental interest in nuclei far from stability, especially due to proposed advancements in rare isotope facilities, has stimulated improvements in theoretical predictions of exotic isotopes. However, standard techniques developed for nuclear structure calculations, Configuration Interaction theory and Energy Density Functional methods, lack either the generality or the accuracy necessary for reliable calculations away from stability. Hybrid methods, which combine Configuration Interaction theory and Energy Density Functional methods in order to exploit their beneficial properties, are currently under investigation for improved theoretical capabilities. A new technique to produce nuclear Hamiltonians has been developed, implementing renormalization group methods, many-body perturbative techniques, and Energy Density Functional methods. Connection to the underlying physics is a primary focus, limiting the number of free parameters necessary in the procedure. The main benefit of this approach is the improvement in the quality of effective interactions outside of standard model spaces. In the Hybrid Renormalization Procedure developed in this dissertation, Skyrme energy density functionals provide a realistic single particle basis that accounts for the long tail of loosely bound orbits, especially significant for valence orbits of exotic isotopes. A microscopic nucleon-nucleon potential is softened with renormalization group techniques to eliminate the hard core of the nuclear interaction. Many-body perturbative techniques, in the form of Rayleigh-Schrodinger theory, implement the realistic basis to convert the low-momentum interaction into a model space of interest. The basis is an important ingredient in the renormalization and greatly affects the results obtained with the Hybrid Renormalization Procedure, specifically through the single particle energies derived from Skyrme functionals. A comparison of the standard harmonic oscillator basis and the realistic

  9. Two Pathways for Water Interaction with Oxygen Adatoms on TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yingge; Deskins, N. Aaron; Zhang, Zhenrong; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Dupuis, Michel; Lyubinetsky, Igor

    2009-03-06

    Scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory studies show that oxygen adatoms (Oa), produced during O2 exposure of reduced TiO2(110) surfaces, alter the water dissociation/recombination chemistry through two distinctive pathways. Depending on whether H2O and Oa are on the same or adjacent Ti4+ rows, Oa facilitates H2O dissociation and proton transfer to form a terminal hydroxyl pair, positioned along- or across-Ti row, respectively. The latter process has not been reported previously, and it starts from “pseudo-dissociated” state of water. In both pathways, the subsequent reverse proton transfer results in H2O recombination and statistical oxygen atom scrambling, as manifested by an apparent along- or across-row motion of Oa’s.

  10. Phytohormone signaling pathway analysis method for comparing hormone responses in plant-pest interactions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Phytohormones mediate plant defense responses to pests and pathogens. In particular, the hormones jasmonic acid, ethylene, salicylic acid, and abscisic acid have been shown to dictate and fine-tune defense responses, and identification of the phytohormone components of a particular defense response is commonly used to characterize it. Identification of phytohormone regulation is particularly important in transcriptome analyses. Currently there is no computational tool to determine the relative activity of these hormones that can be applied to transcriptome analyses in soybean. Findings We developed a pathway analysis method that provides a broad measure of the activation or suppression of individual phytohormone pathways based on changes in transcript expression of pathway-related genes. The magnitude and significance of these changes are used to determine a pathway score for a phytohormone for a given comparison in a microarray experiment. Scores for individual hormones can then be compared to determine the dominant phytohormone in a given defense response. To validate this method, it was applied to publicly available data from previous microarray experiments that studied the response of soybean plants to Asian soybean rust and soybean cyst nematode. The results of the analyses for these experiments agreed with our current understanding of the role of phytohormones in these defense responses. Conclusions This method is useful in providing a broad measure of the relative induction and suppression of soybean phytohormones during a defense response. This method could be used as part of microarray studies that include individual transcript analysis, gene set analysis, and other methods for a comprehensive defense response characterization. PMID:22846705

  11. Does a Common Pathway Transduce Symbiotic Signals in Plant–Microbe Interactions?

    PubMed Central

    Genre, Andrea; Russo, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed major advances in our knowledge of plant mutualistic symbioses such as the rhizobium-legume symbiosis (RLS) and arbuscular mycorrhizas (AM). Some of these findings caused the revision of longstanding hypotheses, but one of the most solid theories is that a conserved set of plant proteins rules the transduction of symbiotic signals from beneficial glomeromycetes and rhizobia in a so-called common symbiotic pathway (CSP). Nevertheless, the picture still misses several elements, and a few crucial points remain unclear. How does one common pathway discriminate between – at least – two symbionts? Can we exclude that microbes other than AM fungi and rhizobia also use this pathway to communicate with their host plants? We here discuss the possibility that our current view is biased by a long-lasting focus on legumes, whose ability to develop both AM and RLS is an exception among plants and a recent innovation in their evolution; investigations in non-legumes are starting to place legume symbiotic signaling in a broader perspective. Furthermore, recent studies suggest that CSP proteins act in a wider scenario of symbiotic and non-symbiotic signaling. Overall, evidence is accumulating in favor of distinct activities for CSP proteins in AM and RLS, depending on the molecular and cellular context where they act. PMID:26909085

  12. Does a Common Pathway Transduce Symbiotic Signals in Plant-Microbe Interactions?

    PubMed

    Genre, Andrea; Russo, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed major advances in our knowledge of plant mutualistic symbioses such as the rhizobium-legume symbiosis (RLS) and arbuscular mycorrhizas (AM). Some of these findings caused the revision of longstanding hypotheses, but one of the most solid theories is that a conserved set of plant proteins rules the transduction of symbiotic signals from beneficial glomeromycetes and rhizobia in a so-called common symbiotic pathway (CSP). Nevertheless, the picture still misses several elements, and a few crucial points remain unclear. How does one common pathway discriminate between - at least - two symbionts? Can we exclude that microbes other than AM fungi and rhizobia also use this pathway to communicate with their host plants? We here discuss the possibility that our current view is biased by a long-lasting focus on legumes, whose ability to develop both AM and RLS is an exception among plants and a recent innovation in their evolution; investigations in non-legumes are starting to place legume symbiotic signaling in a broader perspective. Furthermore, recent studies suggest that CSP proteins act in a wider scenario of symbiotic and non-symbiotic signaling. Overall, evidence is accumulating in favor of distinct activities for CSP proteins in AM and RLS, depending on the molecular and cellular context where they act.

  13. TFPI inhibits lectin pathway of complement activation by direct interaction with MASP-2.

    PubMed

    Keizer, Mischa P; Pouw, Richard B; Kamp, Angela M; Patiwael, Sanne; Marsman, Gerben; Hart, Margreet H; Zeerleder, Sacha; Kuijpers, Taco W; Wouters, Diana

    2015-02-01

    The lectin pathway (LP) of complement has a protective function against invading pathogens. Recent studies have also shown that the LP plays an important role in ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-injury. MBL-associated serine protease (MASP)-2 appears to be crucial in this process. The serpin C1-inhibitor is the major inhibitor of MASP-2. In addition, aprotinin, a Kunitz-type inhibitor, was shown to inhibit MASP-2 activity in vitro. In this study we investigated whether the Kunitz-type inhibitor tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) is also able to inhibit MASP-2. Ex vivo LP was induced and detected by C4-deposition on mannan-coated plates. The MASP-2 activity was measured in a fluid-phase chromogenic assay. rTFPI in the absence or presence of specific monoclonal antibodies was used to investigate which TFPI-domains contribute to MASP-2 inhibition. Here, we identify TFPI as a novel selective inhibitor of MASP-2, without affecting MASP-1 or the classical pathway proteases C1s and C1r. Kunitz-2 domain of TFPI is required for the inhibition of MASP-2. Considering the role of MASP-2 in complement-mediated I/R-injury, the inhibition of this protease by TFPI could be an interesting therapeutic approach to limit the tissue damage in conditions such as cerebral stroke, myocardial infarction or solid organ transplantation.

  14. Interactions between nutritional and opioidergic pathways in the control of LH secretion in male sheep.

    PubMed

    Celi, Pietro; Miller, David W; Blache, Dominique; Martin, Graeme B

    2010-01-01

    naloxone, suggesting that an opioidergic mechanism is not involved in the suppressive effect of restricted nutrition on the gonadotrophic axis. Rather, because testosterone secretion was increased on the high plane of nutrition, the LH responses to naloxone are better explained by the effects of testosterone on opioidergic mechanisms. Finally, we failed to observe any interaction between opioids and calcium in the control of LH secretion.

  15. Psychophysiological effects of human-animal interaction: theoretical issues and long-term interaction effects.

    PubMed

    Virués-Ortega, Javier; Buela-Casal, Gualberto

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews literature published on the psychophysiological effects of long-term human-animal interaction (i.e., pet ownership, pet adoption). A literature search was conducted using PsycInfo and Medline databases. Although the available evidence is far from being consistent, it can be concluded that, in some cases, long-term relationships with animals may moderate baseline physiological variables, particularly blood pressure. Results proved more coherent in studies where animals were adopted by owners as part of the procedure. This paper examines existing hypotheses seeking to account for these effects and the supporting evidence. Two major hypotheses have been suggested to explain the psychophysiological effects of long-term interaction, namely (1) stress-buffering effects of noncritical social support provided by pets; and (2) classical conditioning of relaxation. These mechanisms may partially account for the long-term health outcomes observed in a number of human-animal interaction studies. PMID:16462556

  16. A nuclear-receptor-dependent phosphatidylcholine pathway with antidiabetic effects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nuclear hormone receptors regulate diverse metabolic pathways and the orphan nuclear receptor LRH-1 (also known as NR5A2) regulates bile acid biosynthesis. Structural studies have identified phospholipids as potential LRH-1 ligands, but their functional relevance is unclear. Here we show that an unu...

  17. Time-resolved multiphoton imaging of the interaction between the PKC and the NFκB signalling pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Penny E.; Ng, Tony; Roberts, Sarah A.; Vojnovic, Borivoj; Ameer-Beg, Simon M.

    2003-10-01

    Using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measured by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) we have explored the protein-protein interactions between fluorescent protein tagged fusion proteins of the activation pathways of PKC and NFkB. We observe FRET between CFP-IκB and YFP-p65 in unstimulated cells and when treated with TNFα. We also observed a reduction of the fluorescent lifetime of CFP-IκB in the absence of YFP-p65 when TNFα is present.

  18. Solar electric propulsion thrust beam interactive effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellen, J. M., Jr.; Fitzgerald, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    Interactive effects between ion engine thrust beams and an SEP spacecraft and its science payload have been examined. AC electric contamination from thrust beam potential fluctuations of both 'common mode' and 'point-to-point' forms has been evaluated. Quenching of point-to-point E-fields by both thrust ion and charge exchange ion plasmas is expected. Reduction methods for AC electric contamination from common mode thrust beam potential fluctuations have been developed. Charged particle contamination of ambient space and plasma wave contamination may result from density magnitude and spatial extent of charge exchange plasma plumes. Reduction methods for cone of directions of high angle charge exchange ions have been examined.

  19. Simple effective interaction for dimensional crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin, Lucian A.

    2016-03-01

    We show that the effective electron-electron interaction veff[n ] (r ,r') =erf [|r - r'|b (n ) ]/|r -r'| , with n being the electronic density and b (n ) fixed from the compressibility sum rule, is remarkably accurate in both three and two dimensions, competing with the actual state-of-the-art exchange-correlation static kernels. Using this result, we propose a simple isotropic approximation for the quasi-two-dimensional regime, which gives a realistic wave vector analysis of the correlation energy, in the context of the linear response time-dependent density functional theory.

  20. Effects of photorespiration, the cytochrome pathway, and the alternative pathway on the triple isotopic composition of atmospheric O2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angert, Alon; Rachmilevitch, Shimon; Barkan, Eugeni; Luz, Boaz

    2003-03-01

    The triple isotopic composition of atmospheric O2 is a new tracer used to estimate changes in global productivity. To estimate such changes, knowledge of the relationship between the discrimination against 17O and the discrimination against 18O is needed. This relationship is presented as θ = ln(17α)/ln(18α). Here, the value of theta was evaluated for the most important processes that affect the isotopic composition of oxygen. Similar values were found for dark respiration through the cytochrome pathway (0.516 ± 0.001) and the alternative pathway (0.514 ± 0.001), and slightly higher value was found for diffusion in air (0.521 ± 0.001). The combined effect of diffusion and respiration on the atmosphere was shown to be close to that of dark respiration. The value we found for photorespiration (0.506 ± 0.005) is considerably lower than that of dark respiration. Our results clearly show that the triple isotopic composition of the atmosphere is affected by the relative rates of photorespiration and dark respiration. Also, we show that closing the current global isotopic balance will enable the estimation of the current global rate of photorespiration. Using the Last Glacial Maximum as a case study, we show that variations in global rate of photorespiration affected the triple isotopic composition in the past. Strong fractionations measured in illuminated plants indicated that the alternative pathway is activated in the same conditions that favor high rate of photorespiration. This activation suggests that the global rate of the alternative pathway is higher than believed thus far, and may help to close the gap between the calculated and measured Dole Effect.

  1. MANORAA (Mapping Analogous Nuclei Onto Residue And Affinity) for identifying protein–ligand fragment interaction, pathways and SNPs

    PubMed Central

    Tanramluk, Duangrudee; Narupiyakul, Lalita; Akavipat, Ruj; Gong, Sungsam; Charoensawan, Varodom

    2016-01-01

    Protein–ligand interaction analysis is an important step of drug design and protein engineering in order to predict the binding affinity and selectivity between ligands to the target proteins. To date, there are more than 100 000 structures available in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), of which ∼30% are protein–ligand (MW below 1000 Da) complexes. We have developed the integrative web server MANORAA (Mapping Analogous Nuclei Onto Residue And Affinity) with the aim of providing a user-friendly web interface to assist structural study and design of protein–ligand interactions. In brief, the server allows the users to input the chemical fragments and present all the unique molecular interactions to the target proteins with available three-dimensional structures in the PDB. The users can also link the ligands of interest to assess possible off-target proteins, human variants and pathway information using our all-in-one integrated tools. Taken together, we envisage that the server will facilitate and improve the study of protein–ligand interactions by allowing observation and comparison of ligand interactions with multiple proteins at the same time. (http://manoraa.org). PMID:27131358

  2. The Interaction of ApoA-I and ABCA1 Triggers Signal Transduction Pathways to Mediate Efflux of Cellular Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guo-Jun; Yin, Kai; Fu, Yu-chang; Tang, Chao-Ke

    2012-01-01

    Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) has been characterized as a crucial step for antiatherosclerosis, which is initiated by ATP-binding cassette A1 (ABCA1) to mediate the efflux of cellular phospholipids and cholesterol to lipid-free apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I). However, the mechanisms underlying apoA-I/ABCA1 interaction to lead to the lipidation of apoA-I are poorly understood. There are several models proposed for the interaction of apoA-I with ABCA1 as well as the lipidation of apoA-I mediated by ABCA1. ApoA-I increases the levels of ABCA1 protein markedly. In turn, ABCA1 can stabilize apoA-I. The interaction of apoA-I with ABCA1 could activate signaling molecules that modulate posttranslational ABCA1 activity or lipid transport activity. The key signaling molecules in these processes include protein kinase A (PKA), protein kinase C (PKC), Janus kinase 2 (JAK2), Rho GTPases and Ca2+, and many factors also could influence the interaction of apoA-I with ABCA1. This review will summarize these mechanisms for the apoA-I interaction with ABCA1 as well as the signal transduction pathways involved in these processes. PMID:22064972

  3. Therapeutic effect of CNP on renal osteodystrophy by antagonizing the FGF-23/MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Hu, Peng; Huang, Bao Yu; Xia, Xun; Xuan, Qiang; Hu, Bo; Qin, Yuan Han

    2016-01-01

    Renal osteodystrophy (ROD) is highly prevalent in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Because most patients with ROD are asymptomatic in the early stage and bone biopsy remains not a routine procedure in many clinical settings; therefore, several biochemical parameters may help to identify the existence of ROD. C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) is considered as a positive regulator of bone formation. Both urinary excretion and renal expression of CNP are markedly up-regulated in the early stages of CKD, whereas they are still progressively declined accompanied by CKD progression, which invites speculation that the progressive decline of CNP may contribute, in part, to the pathogenesis of ROD. In addition, fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-23 is a bone-derived endocrine regulator of phosphate homeostasis. The elevation of serum FGF-23 has been recognized as a common feature in CKD to maintain normophosphatemia at the expense of declining 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D values. Since the effects of CNP and FGF-23 on bone formation appear to oppose each other, it is reasonable to propose a direct interaction of their signaling pathways during the progression of ROD. CNP and FGF-23 act through a close or reciprocal pathway and are in agreement with recent studies demonstrating a down-regulatory role of the mitogen-activated protein kinase activity by CNP. The specific node may act at the level of RAF-1 through the activation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinases II. PMID:26459742

  4. Assessing Spurious Interaction Effects in Structural Equation Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harring, Jeffrey R.; Weiss, Brandi A.; Li, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have stressed the importance of simultaneously estimating interaction and quadratic effects in multiple regression analyses, even if theory only suggests an interaction effect should be present. Specifically, past studies suggested that failing to simultaneously include quadratic effects when testing for interaction effects could…

  5. The effect of chronic seaweed subsidies on herbivory: plant-mediated fertilization pathway overshadows lizard-mediated predator pathways.

    PubMed

    Piovia-Scott, Jonah; Spiller, David A; Takimoto, Gaku; Yang, Louie H; Wright, Amber N; Schoener, Thomas W

    2013-08-01

    Flows of energy and materials link ecosystems worldwide and have important consequences for the structure of ecological communities. While these resource subsidies typically enter recipient food webs through multiple channels, most previous studies focussed on a single pathway of resource input. We used path analysis to evaluate multiple pathways connecting chronic marine resource inputs (in the form of seaweed deposits) and herbivory in a shoreline terrestrial ecosystem. We found statistical support for a fertilization effect (seaweed increased foliar nitrogen content, leading to greater herbivory) and a lizard numerical response effect (seaweed increased lizard densities, leading to reduced herbivory), but not for a lizard diet-shift effect (seaweed increased the proportion of marine-derived prey in lizard diets, but lizard diet was not strongly associated with herbivory). Greater seaweed abundance was associated with greater herbivory, and the fertilization effect was larger than the combined lizard effects. Thus, the bottom-up, plant-mediated effect of fertilization on herbivory overshadowed the top-down effects of lizard predators. These results, from unmanipulated shoreline plots with persistent differences in chronic seaweed deposition, differ from those of a previous experimental study of the short-term effects of a pulse of seaweed deposition: while the increase in herbivory in response to chronic seaweed deposition was due to the fertilization effect, the short-term increase in herbivory in response to a pulse of seaweed deposition was due to the lizard diet-shift effect. This contrast highlights the importance of the temporal pattern of resource inputs in determining the mechanism of community response to resource subsidies.

  6. Transverse effects of microbunch radiative interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Derbenev, Ya.S.; Shiltsev, V.D.

    1996-06-03

    In this article the authors study effects of microbunch cooperative electromagnetic radiation in a bend on transverse beam dynamics. An overtaking radiative interaction between different parts of the bunch results in three major forces variable along the bunch. Longitudinal force leads to energy loss and causes the bunch emittance growth in the bend due to the dispersion effect. Radial force consists of logarithmically large ``Talman`` centrifugal force and smaller centripetal force. Due to general radius-energy dependence in the bend, the ``Talman`` force does not affect beam dynamics while the centripetal force leads to projected emittance growth. Finally, radial and vertical focusing forces lead to trajectory distortions which vary along the bunch. These cooperative forces significantly affect the dynamics of short high-populated bunch in bends.

  7. Interactions between the kinetochore complex and the protein kinase A pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lina; Ho, Krystina; Piggott, Nina; Luo, Zongli; Measday, Vivien

    2012-07-01

    The kinetochore is a large structure composed of multiple protein subcomplexes that connect chromosomes to spindle microtubules to enable accurate chromosome segregation. Significant advances have been made in the identification of kinetochore proteins and elucidation of kinetochore structure; however, comparatively little is known about how cellular signals integrate with kinetochore function. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the cyclic AMP protein kinase A signaling pathway promotes cellular growth in response to glucose. In this study, we find that decreasing protein kinase A activity, either by overexpressing negative regulators of the pathway or deleting the upstream effector Ras2, improves the viability of ipl1 and spc24 kinetochore mutants. Ipl1/Aurora B is a highly conserved kinase that corrects attachment of sister kinetochores that have attached to the same spindle pole, whereas Spc24 is a component of the conserved Ndc80 kinetochore complex that attaches directly to microtubules. Unexpectedly, we find that kinetochore mutants have increased phosphorylation levels of protein kinase A substrates, suggesting that the cyclic AMP protein kinase A signaling pathway is stimulated. The increase in protein kinase A activity in kinetochore mutants is not induced by activation of the spindle checkpoint or a metaphase delay because protein kinase A activity remains constant during an unperturbed cell cycle. Finally, we show that lowering protein kinase A activity can rescue the chromosome loss defect of the inner kinetochore ndc10 mutant. Overall, our data suggest that the increased protein kinase A activity in kinetochore mutants is detrimental to cellular growth and chromosome transmission fidelity.

  8. Targeting Ras-RAF-ERK and its Interactive Pathways as a Novel Therapy for Malignant Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Lo, H.-W.

    2013-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common and the deadliest brain malignancies in adults. Despite the lack of a complete understanding of the biology of these tumors, significant advances have been made in the past decades. One of the key discoveries made in the area of malignant gliomas is that these tumors can be induced and maintained by aberrant signaling networks. In this context, the Ras pathway has been extensively exploited, from both basic and translational perspectives. Although somatic oncogenic mutations of Ras genes are frequent in several cancer types, early investigations on gliomas revealed disappointing facts that the Ras mutations are nearly absent in malignant gliomas and that the BRAF mutations are present in a very small percentage of gliomas. Therefore, the observed deregulation of the Ras-RAF-ERK signaling pathway in gliomas is attributed to its upstream positive regulators, including, EGFR and PDGFR known to be highly active in the majority of malignant gliomas. In contrast to the initial negative results on the somatic mutations of H-Ras, K-Ras and BRAF, recent breakthrough studies on pediatric low-grade astrocytomas uncovered genetic alterations of the BRAF gene involving copy number gains and rearrangements. The 7q34 rearrangements result in a novel in-frame KIAA1549:BRAF fusion gene that possesses constitutive BRAF kinase activity resembling oncogenic BRAF (V600E). In light of the earlier findings and recent breakthroughs, this review summarizes our current understanding of the Ras-RAF-ERK signaling pathway in gliomas and the outcome of preclinical and clinical studies that evaluated the efficacy of Ras-targeted therapy in malignant gliomas. PMID:20718706

  9. GAIP Interacting Protein C-Terminus Regulates Autophagy and Exosome Biogenesis of Pancreatic Cancer through Metabolic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Santanu; Pal, Krishnendu; Sharma, Anil K.; Dutta, Shamit K.; Lau, Julie S.; Yan, Irene K.; Wang, Enfeng; Elkhanany, Ahmed; Alkharfy, Khalid M.; Sanyal, Arunik; Patel, Tushar C.; Chari, Suresh T.; Spaller, Mark R.; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2014-01-01

    GAIP interacting protein C terminus (GIPC) is known to play an important role in a variety of physiological and disease states. In the present study, we have identified a novel role for GIPC as a master regulator of autophagy and the exocytotic pathways in cancer. We show that depletion of GIPC-induced autophagy in pancreatic cancer cells, as evident from the upregulation of the autophagy marker LC3II. We further report that GIPC regulates cellular trafficking pathways by modulating the secretion, biogenesis, and molecular composition of exosomes. We also identified the involvement of GIPC on metabolic stress pathways regulating autophagy and microvesicular shedding, and observed that GIPC status determines the loading of cellular cargo in the exosome. Furthermore, we have shown the overexpression of the drug resistance gene ABCG2 in exosomes from GIPC-depleted pancreatic cancer cells. We also demonstrated that depletion of GIPC from cancer cells sensitized them to gemcitabine treatment, an avenue that can be explored as a potential therapeutic strategy to overcome drug resistance in cancer. PMID:25469510

  10. GAIP interacting protein C-terminus regulates autophagy and exosome biogenesis of pancreatic cancer through metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Santanu; Pal, Krishnendu; Sharma, Anil K; Dutta, Shamit K; Lau, Julie S; Yan, Irene K; Wang, Enfeng; Elkhanany, Ahmed; Alkharfy, Khalid M; Sanyal, Arunik; Patel, Tushar C; Chari, Suresh T; Spaller, Mark R; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2014-01-01

    GAIP interacting protein C terminus (GIPC) is known to play an important role in a variety of physiological and disease states. In the present study, we have identified a novel role for GIPC as a master regulator of autophagy and the exocytotic pathways in cancer. We show that depletion of GIPC-induced autophagy in pancreatic cancer cells, as evident from the upregulation of the autophagy marker LC3II. We further report that GIPC regulates cellular trafficking pathways by modulating the secretion, biogenesis, and molecular composition of exosomes. We also identified the involvement of GIPC on metabolic stress pathways regulating autophagy and microvesicular shedding, and observed that GIPC status determines the loading of cellular cargo in the exosome. Furthermore, we have shown the overexpression of the drug resistance gene ABCG2 in exosomes from GIPC-depleted pancreatic cancer cells. We also demonstrated that depletion of GIPC from cancer cells sensitized them to gemcitabine treatment, an avenue that can be explored as a potential therapeutic strategy to overcome drug resistance in cancer.

  11. The Many Faces of Fear: Comparing the Pathways and Impacts of Nonconsumptive Predator Effects on Prey Populations

    PubMed Central

    Preisser, Evan L.; Bolnick, Daniel I.

    2008-01-01

    Background Most ecological models assume that predator and prey populations interact solely through consumption: predators reduce prey densities by killing and consuming individual prey. However, predators can also reduce prey densities by forcing prey to adopt costly defensive strategies. Methodology/Principal Findings We build on a simple Lotka-Volterra predator-prey model to provide a heuristic tool for distinguishing between the demographic effects of consumption (consumptive effects) and of anti-predator defenses (nonconsumptive effects), and for distinguishing among the multiple mechanisms by which anti-predator defenses might reduce prey population growth rates. We illustrate these alternative pathways for nonconsumptive effects with selected empirical examples, and use a meta-analysis of published literature to estimate the mean effect size of each pathway. Overall, predation risk tends to have a much larger impact on prey foraging behavior than measures of growth, survivorship, or fecundity. Conclusions/Significance While our model provides a concise framework for understanding the many potential NCE pathways and their relationships to each other, our results confirm empirical research showing that prey are able to partially compensate for changes in energy income, mitigating the fitness effects of defensive changes in time budgets. Distinguishing the many facets of nonconsumptive effects raises some novel questions, and will help guide both empirical and theoretical studies of how predation risk affects prey dynamics. PMID:18560575

  12. Local and distal effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization on direct pathway Pi uptake and root growth in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Watts-Williams, Stephanie J; Jakobsen, Iver; Cavagnaro, Timothy R; Grønlund, Mette

    2015-07-01

    Two pathways exist for plant Pi uptake from soil: via root epidermal cells (direct pathway) or via associations with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, and the two pathways interact in a complex manner. This study investigated distal and local effects of AM colonization on direct root Pi uptake and root growth, at different soil P levels. Medicago truncatula was grown at three soil P levels in split-pots with or without AM fungal inoculation and where one root half grew into soil labelled with (33)P. Plant genotypes included the A17 wild type and the mtpt4 mutant. The mtpt4 mutant, colonized by AM fungi, but with no functional mycorrhizal pathway for Pi uptake, was included to better understand effects of AM colonization per se. Colonization by AM fungi decreased expression of direct Pi transporter genes locally, but not distally in the wild type. In mtpt4 mutant plants, direct Pi transporter genes and the Pi starvation-induced gene Mt4 were more highly expressed than in wild-type roots. In wild-type plants, less Pi was taken up via the direct pathway by non-colonized roots when the other root half was colonized by AM fungi, compared with non-mycorrhizal plants. Colonization by AM fungi strongly influenced root growth locally and distally, and direct root Pi uptake activity locally, but had only a weak influence on distal direct pathway activity. The responses to AM colonization in the mtpt4 mutant suggested that in the wild type, the increased P concentration of colonized roots was a major factor driving the effects of AM colonization on direct root Pi uptake. PMID:25944927

  13. Local and distal effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization on direct pathway Pi uptake and root growth in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Watts-Williams, Stephanie J; Jakobsen, Iver; Cavagnaro, Timothy R; Grønlund, Mette

    2015-07-01

    Two pathways exist for plant Pi uptake from soil: via root epidermal cells (direct pathway) or via associations with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, and the two pathways interact in a complex manner. This study investigated distal and local effects of AM colonization on direct root Pi uptake and root growth, at different soil P levels. Medicago truncatula was grown at three soil P levels in split-pots with or without AM fungal inoculation and where one root half grew into soil labelled with (33)P. Plant genotypes included the A17 wild type and the mtpt4 mutant. The mtpt4 mutant, colonized by AM fungi, but with no functional mycorrhizal pathway for Pi uptake, was included to better understand effects of AM colonization per se. Colonization by AM fungi decreased expression of direct Pi transporter genes locally, but not distally in the wild type. In mtpt4 mutant plants, direct Pi transporter genes and the Pi starvation-induced gene Mt4 were more highly expressed than in wild-type roots. In wild-type plants, less Pi was taken up via the direct pathway by non-colonized roots when the other root half was colonized by AM fungi, compared with non-mycorrhizal plants. Colonization by AM fungi strongly influenced root growth locally and distally, and direct root Pi uptake activity locally, but had only a weak influence on distal direct pathway activity. The responses to AM colonization in the mtpt4 mutant suggested that in the wild type, the increased P concentration of colonized roots was a major factor driving the effects of AM colonization on direct root Pi uptake.

  14. Local and distal effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization on direct pathway Pi uptake and root growth in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Watts-Williams, Stephanie J.; Jakobsen, Iver; Cavagnaro, Timothy R.; Grønlund, Mette

    2015-01-01

    Two pathways exist for plant Pi uptake from soil: via root epidermal cells (direct pathway) or via associations with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, and the two pathways interact in a complex manner. This study investigated distal and local effects of AM colonization on direct root Pi uptake and root growth, at different soil P levels. Medicago truncatula was grown at three soil P levels in split-pots with or without AM fungal inoculation and where one root half grew into soil labelled with 33P. Plant genotypes included the A17 wild type and the mtpt4 mutant. The mtpt4 mutant, colonized by AM fungi, but with no functional mycorrhizal pathway for Pi uptake, was included to better understand effects of AM colonization per se. Colonization by AM fungi decreased expression of direct Pi transporter genes locally, but not distally in the wild type. In mtpt4 mutant plants, direct Pi transporter genes and the Pi starvation-induced gene Mt4 were more highly expressed than in wild-type roots. In wild-type plants, less Pi was taken up via the direct pathway by non-colonized roots when the other root half was colonized by AM fungi, compared with non-mycorrhizal plants. Colonization by AM fungi strongly influenced root growth locally and distally, and direct root Pi uptake activity locally, but had only a weak influence on distal direct pathway activity. The responses to AM colonization in the mtpt4 mutant suggested that in the wild type, the increased P concentration of colonized roots was a major factor driving the effects of AM colonization on direct root Pi uptake. PMID:25944927

  15. Effects of bursty protein production on the noisy oscillatory properties of downstream pathways

    PubMed Central

    Toner, D. L. K.; Grima, R.

    2013-01-01

    Experiments show that proteins are translated in sharp bursts; similar bursty phenomena have been observed for protein import into compartments. Here we investigate the effect of burstiness in protein expression and import on the stochastic properties of downstream pathways. We consider two identical pathways with equal mean input rates, except in one pathway proteins are input one at a time and in the other proteins are input in bursts. Deterministically the dynamics of these two pathways are indistinguishable. However the stochastic behavior falls in three categories: (i) both pathways display or do not display noise-induced oscillations; (ii) the non-bursty input pathway displays noise-induced oscillations whereas the bursty one does not; (iii) the reverse of (ii). We derive necessary conditions for these three cases to classify systems involving autocatalysis, trimerization and genetic feedback loops. Our results suggest that single cell rhythms can be controlled by regulation of burstiness in protein production. PMID:23942456

  16. Negative functional interaction between cell integrity MAPK pathway and Rho1 GTPase in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Viana, Raul A; Pinar, Mario; Soto, Teresa; Coll, Pedro M; Cansado, Jose; Pérez, Pilar

    2013-10-01

    Rho1 GTPase is the main activator of cell wall glucan biosynthesis and regulates actin cytoskeleton in fungi, including Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We have obtained a fission yeast thermosensitive mutant strain carrying the rho1-596 allele, which displays reduced Rho1 GTPase activity. This strain has severe cell wall defects and a thermosensitive growth, which is partially suppressed by osmotic stabilization. In a global screening for rho1-596 multicopy suppresors the pmp1+ gene was identified. Pmp1 is a dual specificity phosphatase that negatively regulates the Pmk1 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cell integrity pathway. Accordingly, elimination of Pmk1 MAPK partially rescued rho1-596 thermosensitivity, corroborating the unexpected antagonistic functional relationship of these genes. We found that rho1-596 cells displayed increased basal activation of the cell integrity MAPK pathway and therefore were hypersensitive to MgCl2 and FK506. Moreover, the absence of calcineurin was lethal for rho1-596. We found a higher level of calcineurin activity in rho1-596 than in wild-type cells, and overexpression of constitutively active calcineurin partially rescued rho1-596 thermosensitivity. All together our results suggest that loss of Rho1 function causes an increase in the cell integrity MAPK activity, which is detrimental to the cells and turns calcineurin activity essential.

  17. The Sestrins interact with GATOR2 to negatively regulate the amino acid sensing pathway upstream of mTORC1

    PubMed Central

    Chantranupong, Lynne; Wolfson, Rachel L.; Orozco, Jose M.; Saxton, Robert A.; Scaria, Sonia M.; Bar-Peled, Liron; Spooner, Eric; Isasa, Marta; Gygi, Steven P.; Sabatini, David M.

    2014-01-01

    The mTORC1 kinase is a major regulator of cell growth that responds to numerous environmental cues. A key input is amino acids, which act through the heterodimeric Rag GTPases (RagA/B bound to RagC/D) to promote the translocation of mTORC1 to the lysosomal surface, its site of activation. GATOR2 is a complex of unknown function that positively regulates mTORC1 signaling by acting upstream of or in parallel to GATOR1, which is a GTPase activating protein (GAP) for RagA/B and an inhibitor of the amino acid sensing pathway. Here, we find that the Sestrins, a family of poorly understood growth regulators (Sestrin1-3), interact with GATOR2 in an amino acid-sensitive fashion. Sestrin2-mediated inhibition of mTORC1 signaling requires GATOR1 and the Rag GTPases, and the Sestrins regulate the localization of mTORC1 in response to amino acids. Thus, we identify the Sestrins as GATOR2-interacting proteins that regulate the amino acid sensing branch of the mTORC1 pathway. PMID:25263562

  18. Non-Smc element 5 (Nse5) of the Smc5/6 complex interacts with SUMO pathway components.

    PubMed

    Bustard, Denise E; Ball, Lindsay G; Cobb, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    The Smc5/6 complex in Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains six essential non-Smc elements, Nse1-6. With the exception of Nse2 (also known as Mms21), which is an E3 small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) ligase, very little is understood about the role of these components or their contribution to Smc5/6 functionality. Our characterization of Nse5 establishes a previously unidentified relationship between the Smc5/6 complex and factors of the SUMO pathway. Nse5 physically associates with the E2 conjugating enzyme, Ubc9, where contacts are stabilized by non-covalent interactions with SUMO. SUMO also mediates the interactions between Nse5 and the two PIAS family E3 SUMO ligases, Siz1 and Siz2. Cells carrying the nse5-ts1 allele or lacking either SIZ1 or SIZ2 exhibit a reduction in Smc5 sumoylation upon MMS treatment and demonstrate functional redundancy for SUMO mediated events in the presence of DNA damage. Overall, given the extensive connection between Nse5 and components of the SUMO pathway, we speculate that one function of the Smc5/6 complex might be as a scaffold center to enable sumoylation events in budding yeast. PMID:27215325

  19. Non-Smc element 5 (Nse5) of the Smc5/6 complex interacts with SUMO pathway components

    PubMed Central

    Bustard, Denise E.; Ball, Lindsay G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Smc5/6 complex in Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains six essential non-Smc elements, Nse1-6. With the exception of Nse2 (also known as Mms21), which is an E3 small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) ligase, very little is understood about the role of these components or their contribution to Smc5/6 functionality. Our characterization of Nse5 establishes a previously unidentified relationship between the Smc5/6 complex and factors of the SUMO pathway. Nse5 physically associates with the E2 conjugating enzyme, Ubc9, where contacts are stabilized by non-covalent interactions with SUMO. SUMO also mediates the interactions between Nse5 and the two PIAS family E3 SUMO ligases, Siz1 and Siz2. Cells carrying the nse5-ts1 allele or lacking either SIZ1 or SIZ2 exhibit a reduction in Smc5 sumoylation upon MMS treatment and demonstrate functional redundancy for SUMO mediated events in the presence of DNA damage. Overall, given the extensive connection between Nse5 and components of the SUMO pathway, we speculate that one function of the Smc5/6 complex might be as a scaffold center to enable sumoylation events in budding yeast. PMID:27215325

  20. Non-Smc element 5 (Nse5) of the Smc5/6 complex interacts with SUMO pathway components.

    PubMed

    Bustard, Denise E; Ball, Lindsay G; Cobb, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    The Smc5/6 complex in Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains six essential non-Smc elements, Nse1-6. With the exception of Nse2 (also known as Mms21), which is an E3 small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) ligase, very little is understood about the role of these components or their contribution to Smc5/6 functionality. Our characterization of Nse5 establishes a previously unidentified relationship between the Smc5/6 complex and factors of the SUMO pathway. Nse5 physically associates with the E2 conjugating enzyme, Ubc9, where contacts are stabilized by non-covalent interactions with SUMO. SUMO also mediates the interactions between Nse5 and the two PIAS family E3 SUMO ligases, Siz1 and Siz2. Cells carrying the nse5-ts1 allele or lacking either SIZ1 or SIZ2 exhibit a reduction in Smc5 sumoylation upon MMS treatment and demonstrate functional redundancy for SUMO mediated events in the presence of DNA damage. Overall, given the extensive connection between Nse5 and components of the SUMO pathway, we speculate that one function of the Smc5/6 complex might be as a scaffold center to enable sumoylation events in budding yeast.

  1. Thioredoxin interacting protein (TXNIP) regulates tubular autophagy and mitophagy in diabetic nephropathy through the mTOR signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chunling; Zhang, Yuan; Kelly, Darren J.; Tan, Christina Y. R.; Gill, Anthony; Cheng, Delfine; Braet, Filip; Park, Jin-Sung; Sue, Carolyn M.; Pollock, Carol A.; Chen, Xin-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Hyperglycemia upregulates thioredoxin interacting protein (TXNIP) expression, which in turn induces ROS production, inflammatory and fibrotic responses in the diabetic kidney. Dysregulation of autophagy contributes to the development of diabetic nephropathy. However, the interaction of TXNIP with autophagy/mitophagy in diabetic nephropathy is unknown. In this study, streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were given TXNIP DNAzyme or scrambled DNAzyme for 12 weeks respectively. Fibrotic markers, mitochondrial function and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) were assessed in kidneys. Tubular autophagy and mitophagy were determined in kidneys from both human and rats with diabetic nephropathy. TXNIP and autophagic signaling molecules were examined. TXNIP DNAzyme dramatically attenuated extracellular matrix deposition in the diabetic kidneys compared to the control DNAzyme. Accumulation of autophagosomes and reduced autophagic clearance were shown in tubular cells of human diabetic compared to non-diabetic kidneys, which was reversed by TXNIP DNAzyme. High glucose induced mitochondrial dysfunction and mtROS production, and inhibited mitophagy in proximal tubular cells, which was reversed by TXNIP siRNA. TXNIP inhibition suppressed diabetes-induced BNIP3 expression and activation of the mTOR signaling pathway. Collectively, hyperglycemia-induced TXNIP contributes to the dysregulation of tubular autophagy and mitophagy in diabetic nephropathy through activation of the mTOR signaling pathway. PMID:27381856

  2. Temperature Induced Syllable Breaking Unveils Nonlinearly Interacting Timescales in Birdsong Motor Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Goldin, Matías A.; Alonso, Leandro M.; Alliende, Jorge A.; Goller, Franz; Mindlin, Gabriel B.

    2013-01-01

    The nature of telencephalic control over premotor and motor circuits is debated. Hypotheses range from complete usurping of downstream circuitry to highly interactive mechanisms of control. We show theoretically and experimentally, that telencephalic song motor control in canaries is consistent with a highly interactive strategy. As predicted from a theoretical model of respiratory control, mild cooling of a forebrain nucleus (HVC) led to song stretching, but further cooling caused progressive restructuring of song, consistent with the hypothesis that respiratory gestures are subharmonic responses to a timescale present in the output of HVC. This interaction between a life-sustaining motor function (respiration) and telencephalic song motor control suggests a more general mechanism of how nonlinear integration of evolutionarily new brain structures into existing circuitry gives rise to diverse, new behavior. PMID:23818988

  3. PKM2 enhances chemosensitivity to cisplatin through interaction with the mTOR pathway in cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Haiyan; Wu, Jun; Zhang, Wenwen; Luo, Hui; Shen, Zhaojun; Cheng, Huihui; Zhu, Xueqiong

    2016-01-01

    Pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) is a key driver of aerobic glycolysis in cancer cells and has been shown to be up-regulated by mTOR in vitro. Our previous proteomic profiling studies showed that PKM2 was significantly upregulated in cervical cancer tissues after treatment with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT). Whether PKM2 expression predicts cisplatin-based NACT sensitivity and is mTOR dependent in cervical cancer patients remains unclear. Using paired tumor samples (pre- and post-chemotherapy) from 36 cervical cancer patients, we examined mTOR, HIF-1α, c-Myc, and PKM2 expression in cervical cancer samples and investigated the response to cisplatin-based NACT. In addition, we established PKM2 suppressed cervical cancer cell lines and evaluated their sensitivity to cisplatin in vitro. We found that the mTOR/HIF-1α/c-Myc/PKM2 signaling pathway was significantly downregulated in post-chemotherapy cervical cancer tissues. High levels of mTOR, HIF-1α, c-Myc, and PKM2 were associated with a positive chemotherapy response in cervical cancer patients treated with cisplatin-based NACT. In vitro, PKM2 knockdown desensitized cervical cancer cells to cisplatin. Moreover, PKM2 had complex interactions with mTOR pathways. mTOR, HIF1α, c-Myc, and PKM2 expression in cervical cancer may serve as predictive biomarkers to cisplatin-based chemotherapy. PKM2 enhances chemosensitivity to cisplatin through interaction with the mTOR pathway in cervical cancer. PMID:27492148

  4. Interaction between Tbx1 and Hoxd10 and connection with TGFβ-BMP signal pathway during kidney development.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yu; Li, Fei; Zhao, Diana Yue; Zhang, Jing-Shu; Lv, Yuan; Li-Ling, Jesse

    2014-02-15

    Renal malformations are commonly found among patients carrying a 22q11 deletion which renders loss of Tbx1 gene, an important transcriptional factor implicated in a number of developmental processes. Smad1 is known to interact with Tbx1, but the exact mechanism remains unknown. In this study, we have measured the expression of Tbx1 in both murine and human tissues using RT-PCR, and analyzed its protein product and protein-protein interactions with Western blotting and immunoprecipitation assays. Precipitated proteins were verified with mass spectrometry. As discovered, Tbx1 binds with Hoxd10. Tbx1 and Hoxd10 genes also have similar expression profiles during murine kidney development. Based on homology between mouse and human, we hypothesized that such interaction also exists in human. Through a RNA interference experiment using a human embryonic kidney HEK293 cell line, we demonstrated that TBX1 can alter TGF-β/BMP, an important signaling pathway, through interacting with HOXD10. Above findings may shed light on the mechanism of TBX1 mutations leading to renal malformations found in patients carrying a 22q11 deletion. PMID:22842189

  5. The Stability of Ribosome Biogenesis Factor WBSCR22 Is Regulated by Interaction with TRMT112 via Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Õunap, Kadri; Leetsi, Lilian; Matsoo, Maarja; Kurg, Reet

    2015-01-01

    The human WBSCR22 protein is a 18S rRNA methyltransferase involved in pre-rRNA processing and ribosome 40S subunit biogenesis. Recent studies have shown that the protein function in ribosome synthesis is independent of its enzymatic activity. In this work, we have studied the WBSCR22 protein interaction partners by SILAC-coupled co-immunoprecipitation assay and identified TRMT112 as the interaction partner of WBSCR22. Knock-down of TRMT112 expression decreased the WBSCR22 protein level in mammalian cells, suggesting that the stability of WBSCR22 is regulated through the interaction with TRMT112. The localization of the TRMT112 protein is determined by WBSCR22, and the WBSCR22-TRMT112 complex is localized in the cell nucleus. We provide evidence that the interaction between WBSCR22/Bud23 and TRMT112/Trm112 is conserved between mammals and yeast, suggesting that the function of TRMT112 as a co-activator of methyltransferases is evolutionarily conserved. Finally, we show that the transiently expressed WBSCR22 protein is ubiquitinated and degraded through the proteasome pathway, revealing the tight control of the WBSCR22 protein level in the cells. PMID:26214185

  6. Identification of a genetic interaction between the tumor suppressor EAF2 and the retinoblastoma protein (Rb) signaling pathway in C. elegans and prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Liquan; Wang, Dan; Fisher, Alfred L.; Wang, Zhou

    2014-05-02

    Highlights: • RNAi screen identified genetic enhancers for the C. elegans homolog of EAF2. • EAF2 and RBBP4 proteins physically bind to each other and alter transcription. • Overexpression of EAF2 and RBBP4 induces the cell death in prostate cancer cells. - Abstract: The tumor suppressor EAF2 is regulated by androgen signaling and associated with prostate cancer. While EAF2 and its partner ELL have been shown to be members of protein complexes involved in RNA polymerase II transcriptional elongation, the biologic roles for EAF2 especially with regards to the development of cancer remains poorly understood. We have previously identified the eaf-1 gene in Caenorhabditiselegans as the ortholog of EAF2, and shown that eaf-1 interacts with the ELL ortholog ell-1 to control development and fertility in worms. To identify genetic pathways that interact with eaf-1, we screened RNAi libraries consisting of transcription factors, phosphatases, and chromatin-modifying factors to identify genes which enhance the effects of eaf-1(tm3976) on fertility. From this screen, we identified lin-53, hmg-1.2, pha-4, ruvb-2 and set-6 as hits. LIN-53 is the C. elegans ortholog of human retinoblastoma binding protein 4/7 (RBBP 4/7), which binds to the retinoblastoma protein and inhibits the Ras signaling pathway. We find that lin-53 showed a synthetic interaction with eaf-1(tm3976) where knockdown of lin-53 in an eaf-1(tm3976) mutant resulted in sterile worms. This phenotype may be due to cell death as the treated worms contain degenerated embryos with increased expression of the ced-1:GFP cell death marker. Further we find that the interaction between eaf-1 and lin-53/RBBP4/7 also exists in vertebrates, which is reflected by the formation of a protein complex between EAF2 and RBBP4/7. Finally, overexpression of either human EAF2 or RBBP4 in LNCaP cells induced the cell death while knockdown of EAF2 in LNCaP enhanced cell proliferation, indicating an important role of EAF2 in

  7. Effects of nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas on the heterotrophic pathways of bacteria and on their cell morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laroussi, Mounir; Richardson, J. Paul; Dobbs, Fred C.

    2002-07-01

    To date, most research on the interaction of nonequilibrium, atmospheric pressure plasma discharges with bacteria has concentrated on the germicidal effects. Therefore, published results deal mainly with killing efficacy and little attention is given to physical mechanisms and biochemical pathways and their potential alterations when cells of microorganisms are exposed to the plasma. In this letter, an attempt to investigate the effects of plasma exposure on the biochemical pathways of bacteria is presented. In addition, using electron microscopy, we investigate if any gross morphological changes take place when cells are exposed to a lethal dose of plasma. We are testing the hypothesis that disruption of the cell membrane, sometimes to the point of cell lysis, is the mechanism whereby plasma kills cells.

  8. Pluto's solar wind interaction: Collisional effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cravens, T. E.; Strobel, D. F.

    2015-01-01

    Exospheric neutral atoms and molecules (primarily N2, with trace amounts of CH4 and CO according to our current understanding of Pluto's atmosphere) escape from Pluto and travel into interplanetary space for millions of kilometers. Eventually, the neutrals are ionized by solar EUV photons and/or by collisions with solar wind electrons. The mass-loading associated with this ion pick-up is thought to produce a comet-like interaction of the solar wind with Pluto. Within a few thousand kilometers of Pluto the solar wind interaction should lead to a magnetic field pile-up and draping, as it does around other "non-magnetic" bodies such as Venus and comets. The structure of plasma regions and boundaries will be greatly affected by large gyroradii effects and the extensive exosphere. Energetic plasma should disappear from the flow within radial distances of a few thousand kilometers due to charge exchange collisions. An ionosphere should be present close to Pluto with a composition that is determined both by the primary ion production and ion-neutral chemistry. One question discussed in the paper is whether or not the ionosphere has a Venus-like sharply defined ionopause boundary or a diamagnetic cavity such as that found around comet Halley. Simple physical estimates of plasma processes and structures in the collision-dominated region are made in this paper and predictions are made for the New Horizons mission.

  9. Regeneration of sensory hair cells requires localized interactions between the Notch and Wnt pathways

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Carvajal, Andrés; Acedo, Joaquín Navajas; Jiang, Linjia; Kozlovskaja-Gumbrienė, Agnė; Alexander, Richard; Li, Hua; Piotrowski, Tatjana

    2015-01-01

    Summary In vertebrates, mechano-electrical transduction of sound is accomplished by sensory hair cells. While mammalian hair cells are not replaced when lost, in fish they constantly renew and regenerate after injury. In vivo tracking and cell fate analyses of all dividing cells during lateral line hair cell regeneration revealed that support and hair cell progenitors localize to distinct tissue compartments. Importantly, we find that the balance between self-renewal and differentiation in these compartments is controlled by spatially restricted Notch signaling and its inhibition of Wnt-induced proliferation. The ability to simultaneously study and manipulate individual cell behaviors and multiple pathways in vivo, transforms the lateral line into a powerful paradigm to mechanistically dissect sensory organ regeneration. The striking similarities to other vertebrate stem cell compartments uniquely place zebrafish to help elucidate why mammals possess such low capacity to regenerate hair cells. PMID:26190147

  10. Interactions between Polyamines and Abiotic Stress Pathway Responses Unraveled by Transcriptome Analysis of Polyamine Overproducers

    PubMed Central

    Marco, Francisco; Alcázar, Rubén; Carrasco, Pedro

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Plant development and productivity are negatively regulated by adverse environmental conditions. The identification of stress-regulatory genes, networks, and signaling molecules should allow the development of novel strategies to obtain tolerant plants. Polyamines (PAs) are polycationic compounds with a recognized role in plant growth and development, as well as in abiotic and biotic stress responses. During the last years, knowledge on PA functions has been achieved using genetically modified plants with altered PA levels. In this review, we combine the information obtained from global transcriptome analyses in transgenic Arabidopsis plants with altered putrescine or spermine levels. Comparison of common and specific gene networks affected by elevation of endogenous PAs, support the view that these compounds actively participate in stress signaling through intricate crosstalks with abscisic acid (ABA), Ca2+ signaling and other hormonal pathways in plant defense and development. PMID:22011340

  11. Quasiconfigurations and the theory of effective interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poves, A.; Zuker, A.

    1981-05-01

    Perturbation theory is reformulated. Schrödinger's equation is recast as a non linear integral equation which yields by Neumann expansion a linked cluster series for the degenerate, quasi degenerate or non degenerate problem. An effective interaction theory emerges that can be formulated in a biorthogonal basis leading to a non Hermitian secular problem. Hermiticity can be recovered in a clear and rigorous way. As the mathematical form of the theory is dictated by the request of physical clarity the latter is obtained naturally. When written in diagrammatic many body language, the integral equation produces a set of linked coupled equations for the degenerate case. The classic summations (Brueckner, Bethe-Faddeev and RPA) emerge naturally. Possible extensions of nuclear matter theory are suggested.

  12. Imd pathway is involved in the interaction of Drosophila melanogaster with the entomopathogenic bacteria, Xenorhabdus nematophila and Photorhabdus luminescens.

    PubMed

    Aymeric, Jean-Luc; Givaudan, Alain; Duvic, Bernard

    2010-08-01

    Xenorhabdus nematophila/Steinernema carpocapsae and Photorhabdus luminescens/Heterorhabditis bacteriophora are nemato-bacterial complexes highly pathogenic for insects. Using a syringe as artificial vector, we have analyzed the effects of the two bacteria, X. nematophila and P. luminescens on the genetic tool insect, Drosophila melanogaster. Both bacteria were found to kill adult flies in a dose dependent manner with X. nematophila being the fastest. On the other hand, when an injection of non-pathogenic bacteria, Escherichia coli, is performed 1 day before challenge with the entomopathogenic bacteria, then the survival of Drosophila flies was prolonged by at least 20h. After injection of entomopathogenic bacteria, Drosophila mutant Dif(1), affected on the Toll pathway, showed a similar phenotype than wild-type flies whereas Drosophila mutant Dredd(D55), affected on the imd pathway, was not protected by a prior injection of E. coli. This suggested that members of the imd pathway might be targets of these entomopathogenic bacteria albeit synthesis of antimicrobial peptides through this signaling pathway was induced by X. nematophila as well as P. luminescens. Finally, P. luminescens phoP mutant, an avirulent mutant in the Lepidopteran insect, Spodoptera littoralis, was found poorly virulent for D. melanogaster. phoP mutant partially protected D. melanogaster flies if injected 1 day before the injection of P. luminescens wild-type TT01 to the same extent than the E. coli-induced protection. However, phoP recovered a level of pathogenicity comparable to P. luminescens wild-type TT01 when injected to Drosophila flies affected on the imd pathway. PMID:20627393

  13. Neuregulin 1-activated ERBB4 interacts with YAP to induce Hippo pathway targetgenes and promote cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Haskins, Jonathan W.; Nguyen, Don X.; Stern, David F.

    2015-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase ERBB4, a member of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family, is unusual in that when phosphorylated, ERBB4 can undergo intramembrane proteolysis, releasing a soluble intracellular domain (ICD) that activates transcription in the nucleus. We found that ERBB4 activated the transcriptional coactivator YAP, which promotes organ and tissue growth and is inhibited by the tumor-suppressor Hippo pathway. Overexpressing ERBB4 in cultured mammary epithelial cells or adding the ERBB4 ligand neuregulin 1 (NRG1) to breast cancer cell cultures promoted the expression of genes regulated by YAP, such as CTGF. Knocking down YAP or ERBB4 prevented the induction of CTGF expression by NRG1, as did preventing ERBB4 cleavage by treating cells with the pan-EGFR inhibitors lapatinib or erlotinib. A PPxY motif in the ERBB4 ICD enabled its interaction with WW domains in YAP, similar to the mode of interaction between YAP and the kinase LATS1, which inhibits the transcriptional activity of YAP. The ERBB4 ICD coimmunoprecipitated with YAP and TEAD1, a YAP coactivator, suggesting that the ERBB4 ICD may functionally interact with YAP and TEAD to promote transcriptional activity. NRG1 stimulated YAP activity to an extent comparable to that of EGF or LPA (lysophosphatidic acid), known activators of YAP. NRG1 stimulated YAP-dependent cell migration in breast cancer cell lines. These observations connect the unusual nuclear function of a growth factor receptor with a mechanosensory pathway and suggest that NRG1-ERBB4-YAP signaling may underlie the aggressive behavior of tumor cells. PMID:25492965

  14. The Pathway Active Learning Environment: An interactive web-based tool for physics education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Christopher Matthew

    The work described here represents an effort to design, construct, and test an interactive online multimedia learning environment that can provide physics instruction to students in their homes. The system was designed with one-on-one human tutoring in mind as the mode of instruction. The system uses an original combination of a video-based tutor that incorporates natural language processing video-centered lessons and additional illustrative multimedia. Our Synthetic Interview (SI) tutor provides pre-recorded video answers from expert physics instructors in response to students' typed natural language questions. Our lessons cover Newton's laws and provide a context for the tutoring interaction to occur, connect physics ideas to real-world behavior of mechanical systems, and allow for quantitative testing of physics. Additional multimedia can be used to supplement the SI tutors' explanations and illustrate the physics of interest. The system is targeted at students of algebra-based and concept-based physics at the college and high school level. The system logs queries to the SI tutor, responses to lesson questions and several other interactions with the system, tagging those interactions with a username and timestamp. We have provided several groups of students with access to our system under several different conditions ranging from the controlled conditions of our interview facility to the naturalistic conditions of use at home. In total nearly two-hundred students have accessed the system. To gain insight into the ways students might use the system and understand the utility of its various components we analyzed qualitative interview data collected with 22 algebra-based physics students who worked with our system in our interview facility. We also performed a descriptive analysis of data from the system's log of user interactions. Finally we explored the use of machine learning to explore the possibility of using automated assessment to augment the interactive

  15. Defining Adverse Outcome Pathways for Effects of the Fungicide Propiconazole of Fish Reproduction

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) are used to describe the linkage of chemical interactions in terms of molecular initiating events to whole organism responses suitable for risk assessment. This study was conducted to develop AOPs for the model fungicide propiconazole relative to r...

  16. Interaction of MDM33 with mitochondrial inner membrane homeostasis pathways in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Klecker, Till; Wemmer, Megan; Haag, Mathias; Weig, Alfons; Böckler, Stefan; Langer, Thomas; Nunnari, Jodi; Westermann, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    Membrane homeostasis affects mitochondrial dynamics, morphology, and function. Here we report genetic and proteomic data that reveal multiple interactions of Mdm33, a protein essential for normal mitochondrial structure, with components of phospholipid metabolism and mitochondrial inner membrane homeostasis. We screened for suppressors of MDM33 overexpression-induced growth arrest and isolated binding partners by immunoprecipitation of cross-linked cell extracts. These approaches revealed genetic and proteomic interactions of Mdm33 with prohibitins, Phb1 and Phb2, which are key components of mitochondrial inner membrane homeostasis. Lipid profiling by mass spectrometry of mitochondria isolated from Mdm33-overexpressing cells revealed that high levels of Mdm33 affect the levels of phosphatidylethanolamine and cardiolipin, the two key inner membrane phospholipids. Furthermore, we show that cells lacking Mdm33 show strongly decreased mitochondrial fission activity indicating that Mdm33 is critical for mitochondrial membrane dynamics. Our data suggest that MDM33 functionally interacts with components important for inner membrane homeostasis and thereby supports mitochondrial division. PMID:26669658

  17. iNOS signaling interacts with COX-2 pathway in colonic fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingting; Zhu, Min; Lance, Peter

    2012-10-01

    COX-2 and iNOS are two major inflammatory mediators implicated in colorectal inflammation and cancer. Previously, the role of colorectal fibroblasts involved in regulation of COX-2 and iNOS expression was largely ignored. In addition, the combined interaction of COX-2 and iNOS signalings and their significance in the progression of colorectal inflammation and cancer within the fibroblasts have received little investigation. To address those issues, we investigated the role of colonic fibroblasts in the regulation of COX-2 and iNOS gene expression, and explored possible mechanisms of interaction between COX-2 and iNOS signalings using a colonic CCD-18Co fibroblast line and LPS, a potential stimulator of COX-2 and iNOS. Our results clearly demonstrated that LPS activated COX-2 gene expression and enhanced PGE(2) production, stimulated iNOS gene expression and promoted NO production in the fibroblasts. Interestingly, activation of COX-2 signaling by LPS was not involved in activation of iNOS signaling, while activation of iNOS signaling by LPS contributed in part to activation of COX-2 signaling. Further analysis indicated that PKC plays a major role in the activation and interaction of COX-2 and iNOS signalings induced by LPS in the fibroblasts. PMID:22683859

  18. Pathways of Understanding: the Interactions of Humanity and Global Environmental Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Harold K.; Katzenberger, John; Lousma, Jack; Mooney, Harold A.; Moss, Richard H.; Kuhn, William; Luterbacher, Urs; Wiegandt, Ellen

    1992-01-01

    How humans, interacting within social systems, affect and are affected by global change is explored. Recognizing the impact human activities have on the environment and responding to the need to document the interactions among human activities, the Consortium for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN) commissioned a group of 12 scientists to develop a framework illustrating the key human systems that contribute to global change. This framework, called the Social Process Diagram, will help natural and social scientists, educators, resource managers and policy makers envision and analyze how human systems interact among themselves and with the natural system. The Social Process Diagram consists of the following blocks that constitute the Diagram's structural framework: (1) fund of knowledge and experience; (2) preferences and expectations; (3) factors of production and technology; (4) population and social structure; (5) economic systems; (6) political systems and institutions; and (7) global scale environmental processes. To demonstrate potential ways the Diagram can be used, this document includes 3 hypothetical scenarios of global change issues: global warming and sea level rise; the environmental impact of human population migration; and energy and the environment. These scenarios demonstrate the Diagram's usefulness for visualizing specific processes that might be studied to evaluate a particular global change issues. The scenario also shows that interesting and unanticipated questions may emerge as links are explored between categories on the Diagram.

  19. Effective Social Interaction Strategies for Inclusive Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terpstra, Judith E.; Tamura, Ronald

    2008-01-01

    Many strategies and interventions exist in the education of young children with disabilities. One area of intervention is that of social interaction, including social skills instruction, peer interaction strategies, and play skills. Interaction and social skill strategies for use with children with and without disabilities for the purpose of…

  20. Modeling Effects of RNA on Capsid Assembly Pathways via Coarse-Grained Stochastic Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Gregory R.; Xie, Lu; Schwartz, Russell

    2016-01-01

    The environment of a living cell is vastly different from that of an in vitro reaction system, an issue that presents great challenges to the use of in vitro models, or computer simulations based on them, for understanding biochemistry in vivo. Virus capsids make an excellent model system for such questions because they typically have few distinct components, making them amenable to in vitro and modeling studies, yet their assembly can involve complex networks of possible reactions that cannot be resolved in detail by any current experimental technology. We previously fit kinetic simulation parameters to bulk in vitro assembly data to yield a close match between simulated and real data, and then used the simulations to study features of assembly that cannot be monitored experimentally. The present work seeks to project how assembly in these simulations fit to in vitro data would be altered by computationally adding features of the cellular environment to the system, specifically the presence of nucleic acid about which many capsids assemble. The major challenge of such work is computational: simulating fine-scale assembly pathways on the scale and in the parameter domains of real viruses is far too computationally costly to allow for explicit models of nucleic acid interaction. We bypass that limitation by applying analytical models of nucleic acid effects to adjust kinetic rate parameters learned from in vitro data to see how these adjustments, singly or in combination, might affect fine-scale assembly progress. The resulting simulations exhibit surprising behavioral complexity, with distinct effects often acting synergistically to drive efficient assembly and alter pathways relative to the in vitro model. The work demonstrates how computer simulations can help us understand how assembly might differ between the in vitro and in vivo environments and what features of the cellular environment account for these differences. PMID:27244559

  1. Interactions between pathways controlling posture and gait at the level of spinal interneurones in the cat.

    PubMed

    Jankowska, E; Edgley, S

    1993-01-01

    The properties of three interneuronal populations controlling posture and locomotion are briefly reviewed. These are interneurones mediating reciprocal inhibition of antagonistic muscles and interneurones in pathways from secondary muscle spindle afferents to ipsilateral and contralateral motoneurones, respectively. It will be shown that these interneurones subserve a variety of movements, with functionally specialized subpopulations being selected under different conditions. Mechanisms for gating the activity of these neurones appear to be specific for each of them but to act in concert. Interneurones which are active during locomotion and postural reactions are distributed over many segments of the spinal cord and over several of Rexed's laminae, both in the intermediate zone and in the ventral horn (Berkinblit et al., 1978; Bayev et al., 1979; Schor et al., 1986; Yates et al., 1989). The location of neurones discharging during neck and labyrinthine reflexes is illustrated in Fig. 1A and B but indications that neurones with an even wider distribution contribute to locomotion, scratching and the related postural reactions have been provided by neuronal markers which preferentially label active neurones (WGA-HRP; see Noga et al., 1987) or neurones with active genetic transcription (c-fos; I. Barajon, personal communication; Dai et al., 1991). Such a wide distribution indicates a high degree of non-homogeneity, since neurones of different functional types are usually located in different laminae. It has been demonstrated that some of these neurones may be particularly important for setting up the rhythm of muscle contractions specific for different gaits or scratching, as part of their "pattern generators" (see, e.g., Grillner, 1981). Other neurones may be primarily involved in initiation of these movements or in postural adjustments combined with them. A considerable proportion of neurones mediating these movements are nevertheless likely to be used not in one

  2. Interaction of the Human Papillomavirus E6 Oncoprotein with Sorting Nexin 27 Modulates Endocytic Cargo Transport Pathways.

    PubMed

    Ganti, Ketaki; Massimi, Paola; Manzo-Merino, Joaquin; Tomaić, Vjekoslav; Pim, David; Playford, Martin P; Lizano, Marcela; Roberts, Sally; Kranjec, Christian; Doorbar, John; Banks, Lawrence

    2016-09-01

    A subset of high-risk Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs) are the causative agents of a large number of human cancers, of which cervical is the most common. Two viral oncoproteins, E6 and E7, contribute directly towards the development and maintenance of malignancy. A characteristic feature of the E6 oncoproteins from cancer-causing HPV types is the presence of a PDZ binding motif (PBM) at its C-terminus, which confers interaction with cellular proteins harbouring PDZ domains. Here we show that this motif allows E6 interaction with Sorting Nexin 27 (SNX27), an essential component of endosomal recycling pathways. This interaction is highly conserved across E6 proteins from multiple high-risk HPV types and is mediated by a classical PBM-PDZ interaction but unlike many E6 targets, SNX27 is not targeted for degradation by E6. Rather, in HPV-18 positive cell lines the association of SNX27 with components of the retromer complex and the endocytic transport machinery is altered in an E6 PBM-dependent manner. Analysis of a SNX27 cargo, the glucose transporter GLUT1, reveals an E6-dependent maintenance of GLUT1 expression and alteration in its association with components of the endocytic transport machinery. Furthermore, knockdown of E6 in HPV-18 positive cervical cancer cells phenocopies the loss of SNX27, both in terms of GLUT1 expression levels and its vesicular localization, with a concomitant marked reduction in glucose uptake, whilst loss of SNX27 results in slower cell proliferation in low nutrient conditions. These results demonstrate that E6 interaction with SNX27 can alter the recycling of cargo molecules, one consequence of which is modulation of nutrient availability in HPV transformed tumour cells. PMID:27649450

  3. Interaction of the Human Papillomavirus E6 Oncoprotein with Sorting Nexin 27 Modulates Endocytic Cargo Transport Pathways.

    PubMed

    Ganti, Ketaki; Massimi, Paola; Manzo-Merino, Joaquin; Tomaić, Vjekoslav; Pim, David; Playford, Martin P; Lizano, Marcela; Roberts, Sally; Kranjec, Christian; Doorbar, John; Banks, Lawrence

    2016-09-01

    A subset of high-risk Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs) are the causative agents of a large number of human cancers, of which cervical is the most common. Two viral oncoproteins, E6 and E7, contribute directly towards the development and maintenance of malignancy. A characteristic feature of the E6 oncoproteins from cancer-causing HPV types is the presence of a PDZ binding motif (PBM) at its C-terminus, which confers interaction with cellular proteins harbouring PDZ domains. Here we show that this motif allows E6 interaction with Sorting Nexin 27 (SNX27), an essential component of endosomal recycling pathways. This interaction is highly conserved across E6 proteins from multiple high-risk HPV types and is mediated by a classical PBM-PDZ interaction but unlike many E6 targets, SNX27 is not targeted for degradation by E6. Rather, in HPV-18 positive cell lines the association of SNX27 with components of the retromer complex and the endocytic transport machinery is altered in an E6 PBM-dependent manner. Analysis of a SNX27 cargo, the glucose transporter GLUT1, reveals an E6-dependent maintenance of GLUT1 expression and alteration in its association with components of the endocytic transport machinery. Furthermore, knockdown of E6 in HPV-18 positive cervical cancer cells phenocopies the loss of SNX27, both in terms of GLUT1 expression levels and its vesicular localization, with a concomitant marked reduction in glucose uptake, whilst loss of SNX27 results in slower cell proliferation in low nutrient conditions. These results demonstrate that E6 interaction with SNX27 can alter the recycling of cargo molecules, one consequence of which is modulation of nutrient availability in HPV transformed tumour cells.

  4. Destruction Complex Function in the Wnt Signaling Pathway of Drosophila Requires Multiple Interactions Between Adenomatous Polyposis Coli 2 and Armadillo

    PubMed Central

    Kunttas-Tatli, Ezgi; Zhou, Meng-Ning; Zimmerman, Sandra; Molinar, Olivia; Zhouzheng, Fangyuan; Carter, Krista; Kapur, Megha; Cheatle, Alys; Decal, Richard; McCartney, Brooke M.

    2012-01-01

    The tumor suppressor Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) negatively regulates Wnt signaling through its activity in the destruction complex. APC binds directly to the main effector of the pathway, β-catenin (βcat, Drosophila Armadillo), and helps to target it for degradation. In vitro studies demonstrated that a nonphosphorylated 20-amino-acid repeat (20R) of APC binds to βcat through the N-terminal extended region of a 20R. When phosphorylated, the phospho-region of an APC 20R also binds βcat and the affinity is significantly increased. These distinct APC–βcat interactions suggest different models for the sequential steps of destruction complex activity. However, the in vivo role of 20R phosphorylation and extended region interactions has not been rigorously tested. Here we investigated the functional role of these molecular interactions by making targeted mutations in Drosophila melanogaster APC2 that disrupt phosphorylation and extended region interactions and deletion mutants missing the Armadillo binding repeats. We tested the ability of these mutants to regulate Wnt signaling in APC2 null and in APC2 APC1 double-null embryos. Overall, our in vivo data support the role of phosphorylation and extended region interactions in APC2’s destruction complex function, but suggest that the extended region plays a more significant functional role. Furthermore, we show that the Drosophila 20Rs with homology to the vertebrate APC repeats that have the highest affinity for βcat are functionally dispensable, contrary to biochemical predictions. Finally, for some mutants, destruction complex function was dependent on APC1, suggesting that APC2 and APC1 may act cooperatively in the destruction complex. PMID:22174073

  5. Interaction of the Human Papillomavirus E6 Oncoprotein with Sorting Nexin 27 Modulates Endocytic Cargo Transport Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ganti, Ketaki; Massimi, Paola; Manzo-Merino, Joaquin; Tomaić, Vjekoslav; Pim, David; Playford, Martin P.; Lizano, Marcela; Roberts, Sally; Kranjec, Christian; Doorbar, John; Banks, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    A subset of high-risk Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs) are the causative agents of a large number of human cancers, of which cervical is the most common. Two viral oncoproteins, E6 and E7, contribute directly towards the development and maintenance of malignancy. A characteristic feature of the E6 oncoproteins from cancer-causing HPV types is the presence of a PDZ binding motif (PBM) at its C-terminus, which confers interaction with cellular proteins harbouring PDZ domains. Here we show that this motif allows E6 interaction with Sorting Nexin 27 (SNX27), an essential component of endosomal recycling pathways. This interaction is highly conserved across E6 proteins from multiple high-risk HPV types and is mediated by a classical PBM-PDZ interaction but unlike many E6 targets, SNX27 is not targeted for degradation by E6. Rather, in HPV-18 positive cell lines the association of SNX27 with components of the retromer complex and the endocytic transport machinery is altered in an E6 PBM-dependent manner. Analysis of a SNX27 cargo, the glucose transporter GLUT1, reveals an E6-dependent maintenance of GLUT1 expression and alteration in its association with components of the endocytic transport machinery. Furthermore, knockdown of E6 in HPV-18 positive cervical cancer cells phenocopies the loss of SNX27, both in terms of GLUT1 expression levels and its vesicular localization, with a concomitant marked reduction in glucose uptake, whilst loss of SNX27 results in slower cell proliferation in low nutrient conditions. These results demonstrate that E6 interaction with SNX27 can alter the recycling of cargo molecules, one consequence of which is modulation of nutrient availability in HPV transformed tumour cells. PMID:27649450

  6. TROL-FNR interaction reveals alternative pathways of electron partitioning in photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Vojta, Lea; Carić, Dejana; Cesar, Vera; Antunović Dunić, Jasenka; Lepeduš, Hrvoje; Kveder, Marina; Fulgosi, Hrvoje

    2015-01-01

    In photosynthesis, final electron transfer from ferredoxin to NADP+ is accomplished by the flavo enzyme ferredoxin:NADP+ oxidoreductase (FNR). FNR is recruited to thylakoid membranes via integral membrane thylakoid rhodanase-like protein TROL. We address the fate of electrons downstream of photosystem I when TROL is absent. We have employed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to study free radical formation and electron partitioning in TROL-depleted chloroplasts. DMPO was used to detect superoxide anion (O2.−) formation, while the generation of other free radicals was monitored by Tiron. Chloroplasts from trol plants pre-acclimated to different light conditions consistently exhibited diminished O2.− accumulation. Generation of other radical forms was elevated in trol chloroplasts in all tested conditions, except for the plants pre-acclimated to high-light. Remarkably, dark- and growth light-acclimated trol chloroplasts were resilient to O2.− generation induced by methyl-viologen. We propose that the dynamic binding and release of FNR from TROL can control the flow of photosynthetic electrons prior to activation of the pseudo-cyclic electron transfer pathway. PMID:26041075

  7. Conformational selection in a protein-protein interaction revealed by dynamic pathway analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, Kalyan S.; Agafonov, Roman V.; Pontiggia, Francesco; Otten, Renee; Higgins, Matthew K.; Schertler, Gebhard F. X.; Oprian, Daniel D.; Kern, Dorothee

    2015-12-24

    Molecular recognition plays a central role in biology, and protein dynamics has been acknowledged to be important in this process. However, it is highly debated whether conformational changes happen before ligand binding to produce a binding-competent state (conformational selection) or are caused in response to ligand binding (induced fit). Proposals for both mechanisms in protein/protein recognition have been primarily based on structural arguments. However, the distinction between them is a question of the probabilities of going via these two opposing pathways. Here we present a direct demonstration of exclusive conformational selection in protein/protein recognition by measuring the flux for rhodopsin kinase binding to its regulator recoverin, an important molecular recognition in the vision system. Using NMR spectroscopy, stopped-flow kinetics and isothermal titration calorimetry we show that recoverin populates a minor conformation in solution that exposes a hydrophobic binding pocket responsible for binding rhodopsin kinase. Lastly, protein dynamics in free recoverin limits the overall rate of binding.

  8. Conformational selection in a protein-protein interaction revealed by dynamic pathway analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Chakrabarti, Kalyan S.; Agafonov, Roman V.; Pontiggia, Francesco; Otten, Renee; Higgins, Matthew K.; Schertler, Gebhard F. X.; Oprian, Daniel D.; Kern, Dorothee

    2015-12-24

    Molecular recognition plays a central role in biology, and protein dynamics has been acknowledged to be important in this process. However, it is highly debated whether conformational changes happen before ligand binding to produce a binding-competent state (conformational selection) or are caused in response to ligand binding (induced fit). Proposals for both mechanisms in protein/protein recognition have been primarily based on structural arguments. However, the distinction between them is a question of the probabilities of going via these two opposing pathways. Here we present a direct demonstration of exclusive conformational selection in protein/protein recognition by measuring the flux for rhodopsinmore » kinase binding to its regulator recoverin, an important molecular recognition in the vision system. Using NMR spectroscopy, stopped-flow kinetics and isothermal titration calorimetry we show that recoverin populates a minor conformation in solution that exposes a hydrophobic binding pocket responsible for binding rhodopsin kinase. Lastly, protein dynamics in free recoverin limits the overall rate of binding.« less

  9. Respiratory responses to cold water immersion: neural pathways, interactions, and clinical consequences awake and asleep.

    PubMed

    Datta, Avijit; Tipton, Michael

    2006-06-01

    The ventilatory responses to immersion and changes in temperature are reviewed. A fall in skin temperature elicits a powerful cardiorespiratory response, termed "cold shock," comprising an initial gasp, hypertension, and hyperventilation despite a profound hypocapnia. The physiology and neural pathways of this are examined with data from original studies. The respiratory responses to skin cooling override both conscious and other autonomic respiratory controls and may act as a precursor to drowning. There is emerging evidence that the combination of the reestablishment of respiratory rhythm following apnea, hypoxemia, and coincident sympathetic nervous and cyclic vagal stimulation appears to be an arrhythmogenic trigger. The potential clinical implications of this during wakefulness and sleep are discussed in relation to sudden death during immersion, underwater birth, and sleep apnea. A drop in deep body temperature leads to a slowing of respiration, which is more profound than the reduced metabolic demand seen with hypothermia, leading to hypercapnia and hypoxia. The control of respiration is abnormal during hypothermia, and correction of the hypoxia by inhalation of oxygen may lead to a further depression of ventilation and even respiratory arrest. The immediate care of patients with hypothermia needs to take these factors into account to maximize the chances of a favorable outcome for the rescued casualty. PMID:16714416

  10. The Tat pathway in Streptomyces lividans: interaction of Tat subunits and their role in translocation.

    PubMed

    De Keersmaeker, Sophie; Vrancken, Kristof; Van Mellaert, Lieve; Anné, Jozef; Geukens, Nick

    2007-04-01

    The twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathway transports folded proteins across bacterial cytoplasmic membranes. The Tat system of Streptomyces lividans consists of TatA, TatB and TatC, unlike most Gram-positive bacteria, which only have TatA and TatC subunits. Interestingly, in S. lividans TatA and TatB are localized in both the cytoplasm and the membrane. In the cytoplasm soluble TatA and TatB were found as monomers or as part of a hetero-oligomeric complex. Further analysis showed that specific information for recognition of the precursor by the soluble Tat components is mainly present in the twin-arginine signal peptide. Study of the role of the Tat subunits in complex assembly and stability in the membrane and cytoplasm showed that TatB stabilizes TatC whereas a key role in driving Tat complex assembly is suggested for TatC. Finally, by analysis of the oligomeric properties of TatA in the membrane of S. lividans and study of the affinity of membrane-embedded TatA for Tat/Sec precursors, a role for TatA as a translocator is postulated.

  11. Conformational Selection in a Protein-Protein Interaction revealed by Dynamic Pathway Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Kalyan S.; Agafonov, Roman V.; Pontiggia, Francesco; Otten, Renee; Higgins, Matthew K.; Schertler, Gebhard F. X.; Oprian, Daniel D.; Kern, Dorothee

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Molecular recognition plays a central role in biology, and protein dynamics has been acknowledged to be important in this process. However, it is highly debated whether conformational changes happen before ligand binding to produce a binding-competent state (conformational selection) or are caused in response to ligand binding (induced fit). Proposals for both mechanisms in protein/protein recognition have been primarily based on structural arguments. However, the distinction between them is a question of the probabilities of going via these two opposing pathways. Here we present a direct demonstration of exclusive conformational selection in protein/protein recognition by measuring the flux for rhodopsin kinase binding to its regulator recoverin, an important molecular recognition in the vision system. Using NMR spectroscopy, stopped-flow kinetics and isothermal titration calorimetry we show that recoverin populates a minor conformation in solution that exposes a hydrophobic binding pocket responsible for binding rhodopsin kinase. Protein dynamics in free recoverin limits the overall rate of binding. PMID:26725117

  12. Prioritizing disease-linked variants, genes, and pathways with an interactive whole-genome analysis pipeline.

    PubMed

    Lee, In-Hee; Lee, Kyungjoon; Hsing, Michael; Choe, Yongjoon; Park, Jin-Ho; Kim, Shu Hee; Bohn, Justin M; Neu, Matthew B; Hwang, Kyu-Baek; Green, Robert C; Kohane, Isaac S; Kong, Sek Won

    2014-05-01

    Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) studies are uncovering disease-associated variants in both rare and nonrare diseases. Utilizing the next-generation sequencing for WGS requires a series of computational methods for alignment, variant detection, and annotation, and the accuracy and reproducibility of annotation results are essential for clinical implementation. However, annotating WGS with up to date genomic information is still challenging for biomedical researchers. Here, we present one of the fastest and highly scalable annotation, filtering, and analysis pipeline-gNOME-to prioritize phenotype-associated variants while minimizing false-positive findings. Intuitive graphical user interface of gNOME facilitates the selection of phenotype-associated variants, and the result summaries are provided at variant, gene, and genome levels. Moreover, the enrichment results of specific variants, genes, and gene sets between two groups or compared with population scale WGS datasets that is already integrated in the pipeline can help the interpretation. We found a small number of discordant results between annotation software tools in part due to different reporting strategies for the variants with complex impacts. Using two published whole-exome datasets of uveal melanoma and bladder cancer, we demonstrated gNOME's accuracy of variant annotation and the enrichment of loss-of-function variants in known cancer pathways. gNOME Web server and source codes are freely available to the academic community (http://gnome.tchlab.org).

  13. Metabolic profiling of chickpea-Fusarium interaction identifies differential modulation of disease resistance pathways.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Yashwant; Dholakia, Bhushan B; Panigrahi, Priyabrata; Kadoo, Narendra Y; Giri, Ashok P; Gupta, Vidya S

    2015-08-01

    Chickpea is the third most widely grown legume in the world and mainly used as a vegetarian source of human dietary protein. Fusarium wilt, caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceri (Foc), is one of the major threats to global chickpea production. Host resistance is the best way to protect crops from diseases; however, in spite of using various approaches, the mechanism of Foc resistance in chickpea remains largely obscure. In the present study, non-targeted metabolic profiling at several time points of resistant and susceptible chickpea cultivars using high-resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was applied to better understand the mechanistic basis of wilt resistance or susceptibility. Multivariate analysis of the data (OPLS-DA) revealed discriminating metabolites in chickpea root tissue after Foc inoculation such as flavonoids, isoflavonoids, alkaloids, amino acids and sugars. Foc inoculated resistant plants had more flavonoids and isoflavonoids along with their malonyl conjugates. Many antifungal metabolites that were induced after Foc infection viz., aurantion-obstine β-glucosides and querecitin were elevated in resistant cultivar. Overall, diverse genetic and biochemical mechanisms were operational in the resistant cultivar for Foc defense as compared to the susceptible plant. The resistant chickpea plants employed the above-mentioned metabolic pathways as potential defense strategy against Foc.

  14. Pentamidine blocks the interaction between mutant S100A5 and RAGE V domain and inhibits the RAGE signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Cho, Ching Chang; Chou, Ruey Hwang; Yu, Chin

    2016-08-19

    The human S100 protein family contains small, dimeric and acidic proteins that contain two EF-hand motifs and bind calcium. When S100A5 binds calcium, its conformation changes and promotes interaction with the target protein. The extracellular domain of RAGE (Receptor of Advanced Glycation End products) contain three domains: C1, C2 and V. The RAGE V domain is the target protein of S100A5 that promotes cell survival, growth and differentiation by activating several signaling pathways. Pentamidine is an apoptotic and antiparasitic drug that is used to treat or prevent pneumonia. Here, we found that pentamidine interacts with S100A5 using HSQC titration. We elucidated the interactions of S100A5 with RAGE V domain and pentamidine using fluorescence and NMR spectroscopy. We generated two binary models-the S100A5-RAGE V domain and S100A5-Pentamidine complex-and then observed that the pentamidine and RAGE V domain share a similar binding region in mS100A5. We also used the WST-1 assay to investigate the bioactivity of S100A5, RAGE V domain and pentamidine. These results indicated that pentamidine blocks the binding between S100A5 and RAGE V domain. This finding is useful for the development of new anti-proliferation drugs.

  15. Pentamidine blocks the interaction between mutant S100A5 and RAGE V domain and inhibits the RAGE signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Cho, Ching Chang; Chou, Ruey Hwang; Yu, Chin

    2016-08-19

    The human S100 protein family contains small, dimeric and acidic proteins that contain two EF-hand motifs and bind calcium. When S100A5 binds calcium, its conformation changes and promotes interaction with the target protein. The extracellular domain of RAGE (Receptor of Advanced Glycation End products) contain three domains: C1, C2 and V. The RAGE V domain is the target protein of S100A5 that promotes cell survival, growth and differentiation by activating several signaling pathways. Pentamidine is an apoptotic and antiparasitic drug that is used to treat or prevent pneumonia. Here, we found that pentamidine interacts with S100A5 using HSQC titration. We elucidated the interactions of S100A5 with RAGE V domain and pentamidine using fluorescence and NMR spectroscopy. We generated two binary models-the S100A5-RAGE V domain and S100A5-Pentamidine complex-and then observed that the pentamidine and RAGE V domain share a similar binding region in mS100A5. We also used the WST-1 assay to investigate the bioactivity of S100A5, RAGE V domain and pentamidine. These results indicated that pentamidine blocks the binding between S100A5 and RAGE V domain. This finding is useful for the development of new anti-proliferation drugs. PMID:27297108

  16. Traf2 interacts with Smad4 and regulates BMP signaling pathway in MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, Koichi; Ikeda, Kyoko; Ito, Koichi

    2009-12-18

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) play important roles in osteoblast differentiation and maturation. In mammals, the BMP-induced receptor-regulated Smads form complexes with Smad4. These complexes translocate and accumulate in the nucleus, where they regulate the transcription of various target genes. However, the function of Smad4 remains unclear. We performed a yeast two-hybrid screen using Smad4 as bait and a cDNA library derived from bone marrow, to indentify the proteins interacting with Smad4. cDNA clones for Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated factor 2 (Traf2) were identified, and the interaction between the endogenous proteins was confirmed in the mouse osteoblast cell line MC3T3-E1. To investigate the function of Traf2, we silenced it with siRNA. The level of BMP-2 protein in the medium, the expression levels of the Bmp2 gene and BMP-induced transcription factor genes, including Runx2, Dlx5, Msx2, and Sp7, and the phosphorylated-Smad1 protein level were increased in cells transfected with Traf2 siRNA. The nuclear accumulation of Smad1 increased with TNF-{alpha} stimulation for 30 min at Traf2 silencing. These results suggest that the TNF-{alpha}-stimulated nuclear accumulation of Smad1 may be dependent on Traf2. Thus, the interaction between Traf2 and Smad4 may play a role in the cross-talk between TNF-{alpha} and BMP signaling pathways.

  17. Mammalian Golgi-associated Bicaudal-D2 functions in the dynein-dynactin pathway by interacting with these complexes.

    PubMed

    Hoogenraad, C C; Akhmanova, A; Howell, S A; Dortland, B R; De Zeeuw, C I; Willemsen, R; Visser, P; Grosveld, F; Galjart, N

    2001-08-01

    Genetic analysis in Drosophila suggests that Bicaudal-D functions in an essential microtubule-based transport pathway, together with cytoplasmic dynein and dynactin. However, the molecular mechanism underlying interactions of these proteins has remained elusive. We show here that a mammalian homologue of Bicaudal-D, BICD2, binds to the dynamitin subunit of dynactin. This interaction is confirmed by mass spectrometry, immunoprecipitation studies and in vitro binding assays. In interphase cells, BICD2 mainly localizes to the Golgi complex and has properties of a peripheral coat protein, yet it also co-localizes with dynactin at microtubule plus ends. Overexpression studies using green fluorescent protein-tagged forms of BICD2 verify its intracellular distribution and co-localization with dynactin, and indicate that the C-terminus of BICD2 is responsible for Golgi targeting. Overexpression of the N-terminal domain of BICD2 disrupts minus-end-directed organelle distribution and this portion of BICD2 co-precipitates with cytoplasmic dynein. Nocodazole treatment of cells results in an extensive BICD2-dynactin-dynein co-localization. Taken together, these data suggest that mammalian BICD2 plays a role in the dynein- dynactin interaction on the surface of membranous organelles, by associating with these complexes. PMID:11483508

  18. A quantitative chaperone interaction network reveals the architecture of cellular protein homeostasis pathways

    PubMed Central

    Taipale, Mikko; Tucker, George; Peng, Jian; Krykbaeva, Irina; Lin, Zhen-Yuan; Larsen, Brett; Choi, Hyungwon; Berger, Bonnie; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Lindquist, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Chaperones are abundant cellular proteins that promote the folding and function of their substrate proteins (clients). In vivo, chaperones also associate with a large and diverse set of co-factors (co-chaperones) that regulate their specificity and function. However, how these co-chaperones regulate protein folding and whether they have chaperone-independent biological functions is largely unknown. We have combined mass spectrometry and quantitative high-throughput LUMIER assays to systematically characterize the chaperone/co-chaperone/client interaction network in human cells. We uncover hundreds of novel chaperone clients, delineate their participation in specific co-chaperone complexes, and establish a surprisingly distinct network of protein/protein interactions for co-chaperones. As a salient example of the power of such analysis, we establish that NUDC family co-chaperones specifically associate with structurally related but evolutionarily distinct β-propeller folds. We provide a framework for deciphering the proteostasis network, its regulation in development and disease, and expand the use of chaperones as sensors for drug/target engagement. PMID:25036637

  19. Anillin interacts with microtubules and is part of the astral pathway that defines cortical domains.

    PubMed

    van Oostende Triplet, Chloe; Jaramillo Garcia, Melina; Haji Bik, Husni; Beaudet, Daniel; Piekny, Alisa

    2014-09-01

    Cytokinesis occurs by the ingression of an actomyosin ring that separates the cell into two daughter cells. The mitotic spindle, comprising astral and central spindle microtubules, couples contractile ring ingression with DNA segregation. Cues from the central spindle activate RhoA, the upstream regulator of the contractile ring. However, additional cues from the astral microtubules also reinforce the localization of active RhoA. Using human cells, we show that astral and central spindle microtubules independently control the localization of contractile proteins during cytokinesis. Astral microtubules restrict the accumulation and localization of contractile proteins during mitosis, whereas the central spindle forms a discrete ring by directing RhoA activation in the equatorial plane. Anillin stabilizes the contractile ring during cytokinesis. We show that human anillin interacts with astral microtubules and that this interaction is competed by the cortical recruitment of anillin by active RhoA. Anillin restricts the localization of myosin to the equatorial cortex and that of NuMA (part of the microtubule-tethering complex that regulates spindle position) to the polar cortex. The sequestration of anillin by astral microtubules might alter the organization of cortical proteins to polarize cells for cytokinesis. PMID:24994938

  20. Oxazoloisoindolinones with in vitro antitumor activity selectively activate a p53-pathway through potential inhibition of the p53-MDM2 interaction.

    PubMed

    Soares, Joana; Pereira, Nuno A L; Monteiro, Ângelo; Leão, Mariana; Bessa, Cláudia; Dos Santos, Daniel J V A; Raimundo, Liliana; Queiroz, Glória; Bisio, Alessandra; Inga, Alberto; Pereira, Clara; Santos, Maria M M; Saraiva, Lucília

    2015-01-23

    One of the most appealing targets for anticancer treatment is the p53 tumor suppressor protein. In half of human cancers, this protein is inactivated due to endogenous negative regulators such as MDM2. Actually, restoring the p53 activity, particularly through the inhibition of its interaction with MDM2, is considered a valuable therapeutic strategy against cancers with a wild-type p53 status. In this work, we report the synthesis of nine enantiopure phenylalaninol-derived oxazolopyrrolidone lactams and the evaluation of their biological effects as p53-MDM2 interaction inhibitors. Using a yeast-based screening assay, two oxazoloisoindolinones, compounds 1b and 3a, were identified as potential p53-MDM2 interaction inhibitors. The molecular mechanism of oxazoloisoindolinone 3a was further validated in human colon adenocarcinoma HCT116 cells with wild-type p53 (HCT116 p53(+/+)) and in its isogenic derivative without p53 (HCT116 p53(-/-)). Indeed, using these cells, we demonstrated that oxazoloisoindolinone 3a exhibited a p53-dependent in vitro antitumor activity through induction of G0/G1-phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The selective activation of a p53-apoptotic pathway by oxazoloisoindolinone 3a was further supported by the occurrence of PARP cleavage only in p53-expressing HCT116 cells. Moreover, oxazoloisoindolinone 3a led to p53 protein stabilization and to the up-regulation of p53 transcriptional activity with increased expression levels of several p53 target genes, as p21(WAF1/CIP1), MDM2, BAX and PUMA, in p53(+/+) but not in p53(-/-) HCT116 cells. Additionally, the ability of oxazoloisoindolinone 3a to block the p53-MDM2 interaction in HCT116 p53(+/+) cells was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. Finally, the molecular docking analysis of the interactions between the synthesized compounds and MDM2 revealed that oxazoloisoindolinone 3a binds to MDM2. Altogether, this work adds, for the first time, the oxazoloisoindolinone scaffold to the list of

  1. Oxazoloisoindolinones with in vitro antitumor activity selectively activate a p53-pathway through potential inhibition of the p53-MDM2 interaction.

    PubMed

    Soares, Joana; Pereira, Nuno A L; Monteiro, Ângelo; Leão, Mariana; Bessa, Cláudia; Dos Santos, Daniel J V A; Raimundo, Liliana; Queiroz, Glória; Bisio, Alessandra; Inga, Alberto; Pereira, Clara; Santos, Maria M M; Saraiva, Lucília

    2015-01-23

    One of the most appealing targets for anticancer treatment is the p53 tumor suppressor protein. In half of human cancers, this protein is inactivated due to endogenous negative regulators such as MDM2. Actually, restoring the p53 activity, particularly through the inhibition of its interaction with MDM2, is considered a valuable therapeutic strategy against cancers with a wild-type p53 status. In this work, we report the synthesis of nine enantiopure phenylalaninol-derived oxazolopyrrolidone lactams and the evaluation of their biological effects as p53-MDM2 interaction inhibitors. Using a yeast-based screening assay, two oxazoloisoindolinones, compounds 1b and 3a, were identified as potential p53-MDM2 interaction inhibitors. The molecular mechanism of oxazoloisoindolinone 3a was further validated in human colon adenocarcinoma HCT116 cells with wild-type p53 (HCT116 p53(+/+)) and in its isogenic derivative without p53 (HCT116 p53(-/-)). Indeed, using these cells, we demonstrated that oxazoloisoindolinone 3a exhibited a p53-dependent in vitro antitumor activity through induction of G0/G1-phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The selective activation of a p53-apoptotic pathway by oxazoloisoindolinone 3a was further supported by the occurrence of PARP cleavage only in p53-expressing HCT116 cells. Moreover, oxazoloisoindolinone 3a led to p53 protein stabilization and to the up-regulation of p53 transcriptional activity with increased expression levels of several p53 target genes, as p21(WAF1/CIP1), MDM2, BAX and PUMA, in p53(+/+) but not in p53(-/-) HCT116 cells. Additionally, the ability of oxazoloisoindolinone 3a to block the p53-MDM2 interaction in HCT116 p53(+/+) cells was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. Finally, the molecular docking analysis of the interactions between the synthesized compounds and MDM2 revealed that oxazoloisoindolinone 3a binds to MDM2. Altogether, this work adds, for the first time, the oxazoloisoindolinone scaffold to the list of

  2. Receptor-Drug Interaction: Europium Employment for Studying the Biochemical Pathway of G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Antonio, Colabufo Nicola; Grazia, Perrone Maria; Marialessandra, Contino; Francesco, Berardi; Roberto, Perrone

    2007-01-01

    In medicinal chemistry field, the biochemical pathways, involved in 7-transmembrane domains G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) activation, are commonly studied to establish the activity of ligands towards GPCRs. The most studied steps are the measurement of activated GTP-α subunit and stimulated intracellular cAMP. At the present, many researchers defined agonist or antagonist activity of potential GPCRs drugs employing [35S]GTPγS or [3H]cAMP as probes. Recently, the corresponding lanthanide labels Eu-GTP and Eu-cAMP as alternative to radiochemicals have been developed because they are highly sensitive, easy to automate, easily synthesized, they display a much longer shelf-life and they can be used in multilabel experiments. In the present review, the receptor-drug interaction by europium employment for studying the biochemical pathway of GPCR activation has been focused. Moreover, comparative studies between lanthanide label probes and the corresponding radiolabeled compounds have been carried out. PMID:18350113

  3. The Roles of Hyaluronan/RHAMM/CD44 and Their Respective Interactions along the Insidious Pathways of Fibrosarcoma Progression

    PubMed Central

    Nikitovic, Dragana; Kouvidi, Katerina; Karamanos, Nikos K.; Tzanakakis, George N.

    2013-01-01

    Fibrosarcomas are rare malignant mesenchymal tumors originating from fibroblasts. Importantly, fibrosarcoma cells were shown to have a high content and turnover of extracellular matrix (ECM) components including hyaluronan (HA), proteoglycans, collagens, fibronectin, and laminin. ECMs are complicated structures that surround and support cells within tissues. During cancer progression, significant changes can be observed in the structural and mechanical properties of the ECM components. Importantly, hyaluronan deposition is usually higher in malignant tumors as compared to benign tissues, predicting tumor progression in some tumor types. Furthermore, activated stromal cells are able to produce tissue structure rich in hyaluronan in order to promote tumor growth. Key biological roles of HA result from its interactions with its specific CD44 and RHAMM (receptor for HA-mediated motility) cell-surface receptors. HA-receptor downstream signaling pathways regulate in turn cellular processes implicated in tumorigenesis. Growth factors, including PDGF-BB, TGFβ2, and FGF-2, enhanced hyaluronan deposition to ECM and modulated HA-receptor expression in fibrosarcoma cells. Indeed, FGF-2 through upregulation of specific HAS isoforms and hyaluronan synthesis regulated secretion and net hyaluronan deposition to the fibrosarcoma pericellular matrix modulating these cells' migration capability. In this paper we discuss the involvement of hyaluronan/RHAMM/CD44 mediated signaling in the insidious pathways of fibrosarcoma progression. PMID:24083250

  4. Neuron-astrocyte interactions, pyruvate carboxylation and the pentose phosphate pathway in the neonatal rat brain.

    PubMed

    Morken, Tora Sund; Brekke, Eva; Håberg, Asta; Widerøe, Marius; Brubakk, Ann-Mari; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Glucose and acetate metabolism and the synthesis of amino acid neurotransmitters, anaplerosis, glutamate-glutamine cycling and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) have been extensively investigated in the adult, but not the neonatal rat brain. To do this, 7 day postnatal (P7) rats were injected with [1-(13)C]glucose and [1,2-(13)C]acetate and sacrificed 5, 10, 15, 30 and 45 min later. Adult rats were injected and sacrificed after 15 min. To analyse pyruvate carboxylation and PPP activity during development, P7 rats received [1,2-(13)C]glucose and were sacrificed 30 min later. Brain extracts were analysed using (1)H- and (13)C-NMR spectroscopy. Numerous differences in metabolism were found between the neonatal and adult brain. The neonatal brain contained lower levels of glutamate, aspartate and N-acetylaspartate but similar levels of GABA and glutamine per mg tissue. Metabolism of [1-(13)C]glucose at the acetyl CoA stage was reduced much more than that of [1,2-(13)C]acetate. The transfer of glutamate from neurons to astrocytes was much lower while transfer of glutamine from astrocytes to glutamatergic neurons was relatively higher. However, transport of glutamine from astrocytes to GABAergic neurons was lower. Using [1,2-(13)C]glucose it could be shown that despite much lower pyruvate carboxylation, relatively more pyruvate from glycolysis was directed towards anaplerosis than pyruvate dehydrogenation in astrocytes. Moreover, the ratio of PPP/glucose-metabolism was higher. These findings indicate that only the part of the glutamate-glutamine cycle that transfers glutamine from astrocytes to neurons is operating in the neonatal brain and that compared to adults, relatively more glucose is prioritised to PPP and pyruvate carboxylation. Our results may have implications for the capacity to protect the neonatal brain against excitotoxicity and oxidative stress.

  5. Optimal Scaling of Interaction Effects in Generalized Linear Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Rosmalen, Joost; Koning, Alex J.; Groenen, Patrick J. F.

    2009-01-01

    Multiplicative interaction models, such as Goodman's (1981) RC(M) association models, can be a useful tool for analyzing the content of interaction effects. However, most models for interaction effects are suitable only for data sets with two or three predictor variables. Here, we discuss an optimal scaling model for analyzing the content of…

  6. Neuron-glia interactions through the Heartless FGF receptor signaling pathway mediate morphogenesis of Drosophila astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Stork, Tobias; Sheehan, Amy; Tasdemir-Yilmaz, Ozge E; Freeman, Marc R

    2014-07-16

    Astrocytes are critically important for neuronal circuit assembly and function. Mammalian protoplasmic astrocytes develop a dense ramified meshwork of cellular processes to form intimate contacts with neuronal cell bodies, neurites, and synapses. This close neuron-glia morphological relationship is essential for astrocyte function, but it remains unclear how astrocytes establish their intricate morphology, organize spatial domains, and associate with neurons and synapses in vivo. Here we characterize a Drosophila glial subtype that shows striking morphological and functional similarities to mammalian astrocytes. We demonstrate that the Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor Heartless autonomously controls astrocyte membrane growth, and the FGFs Pyramus and Thisbe direct astrocyte processes to ramify specifically in CNS synaptic regions. We further show that the shape and size of individual astrocytes are dynamically sculpted through inhibitory or competitive astrocyte-astrocyte interactions and Heartless FGF signaling. Our data identify FGF signaling through Heartless as a key regulator of astrocyte morphological elaboration in vivo.

  7. Designing Interactions for Learning: Physicality, Interactivity, and Interface Effects in Digital Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to better understand the role of physicality, interactivity, and interface effects in learning with digital content. Drawing on work in cognitive science, human-computer interaction, and multimedia learning, the study argues that interfaces that promote physical interaction can provide "conceptual leverage"…

  8. Development of a pluripotent stem cell derived neuronal model to identify chemically induced pathway perturbations in relation to neurotoxicity: Effects of CREB pathway inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Pistollato, Francesca; Louisse, Jochem; Scelfo, Bibiana; Mennecozzi, Milena; Accordi, Benedetta; Basso, Giuseppe; Gaspar, John Antonydas; Zagoura, Dimitra; Barilari, Manuela; Palosaari, Taina; Sachinidis, Agapios; Bremer-Hoffmann, Susanne

    2014-10-15

    According to the advocated paradigm shift in toxicology, acquisition of knowledge on the mechanisms underlying the toxicity of chemicals, such as perturbations of biological pathways, is of primary interest. Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), such as human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), offer a unique opportunity to derive physiologically relevant human cell types to measure molecular and cellular effects of such pathway modulations. Here we compared the neuronal differentiation propensity of hESCs and hiPSCs with the aim to develop novel hiPSC-based tools for measuring pathway perturbation in relation to molecular and cellular effects in vitro. Among other fundamental pathways, also, the cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB) pathway was activated in our neuronal models and gave us the opportunity to study time-dependent effects elicited by chemical perturbations of the CREB pathway in relation to cellular effects. We show that the inhibition of the CREB pathway, using 2-naphthol-AS-E-phosphate (KG-501), induced an inhibition of neurite outgrowth and synaptogenesis, as well as a decrease of MAP2{sup +} neuronal cells. These data indicate that a CREB pathway inhibition can be related to molecular and cellular effects that may be relevant for neurotoxicity testing, and, thus, qualify the use of our hiPSC-derived neuronal model for studying chemical-induced neurotoxicity resulting from pathway perturbations. - Highlights: • HESCs derived neuronal cells serve as benchmark for iPSC based neuronal toxicity test development. • Comparisons between hESCs and hiPSCs demonstrated variability of the epigenetic state • CREB pathway modulation have been explored in relation to the neurotoxicant exposure KG-501 • hiPSC might be promising tools to translate theoretical AoPs into toxicological in vitro tests.

  9. Molecular interaction of the first 3 enzymes of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway of Trypanosoma cruzi

    SciTech Connect

    Nara, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Muneaki; Hirawake, Hiroko; Liao, Chien-Wei; Fukai, Yoshihisa; Suzuki, Shigeo; Tsubouchi, Akiko; Morales, Jorge; Takamiya, Shinzaburo; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Taka, Hikari; Mineki, Reiko; Fan, Chia-Kwung; Inaoka, Daniel Ken; Inoue, Masayuki; Tanaka, Akiko; Harada, Shigeharu; Kita, Kiyoshi; and others

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An Escherichia coli strain co-expressing CPSII, ATC, and DHO of Trypanosoma cruzi was constructed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Molecular interactions between CPSII, ATC, and DHO of T. cruzi were demonstrated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CPSII bound with both ATC and DHO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATC bound with both CPSII and DHO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A functional tri-enzyme complex might precede the establishment of the fused enzyme. -- Abstract: The first 3 reaction steps of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway are catalyzed by carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase II (CPSII), aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATC), and dihydroorotase (DHO), respectively. In eukaryotes, these enzymes are structurally classified into 2 types: (1) a CPSII-DHO-ATC fusion enzyme (CAD) found in animals, fungi, and amoebozoa, and (2) stand-alone enzymes found in plants and the protist groups. In the present study, we demonstrate direct intermolecular interactions between CPSII, ATC, and DHO of the parasitic protist Trypanosoma cruzi, which is the causative agent of Chagas disease. The 3 enzymes were expressed in a bacterial expression system and their interactions were examined. Immunoprecipitation using an antibody specific for each enzyme coupled with Western blotting-based detection using antibodies for the counterpart enzymes showed co-precipitation of all 3 enzymes. From an evolutionary viewpoint, the formation of a functional tri-enzyme complex may have preceded-and led to-gene fusion to produce the CAD protein. This is the first report to demonstrate the structural basis of these 3 enzymes as a model of CAD. Moreover, in conjunction with the essentiality of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis in the parasite, our findings provide a rationale for new strategies for developing drugs for Chagas disease, which target the intermolecular interactions of these 3 enzymes.

  10. Adverse Outcome Pathways and Ecological Risk Assessment: Bridging to Population-Level Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, Vincent J.; Etterson, Matthew A.; Hecker, Markus; Murphy, Cheryl A.; Roesijadi, Guritno; Spade, Daniel J.; Spromberg, Julann A.; Wang, Magnus; Ankley, Gerald T.

    2010-11-24

    The viability of populations of plants and animals is a key focus for environmental regulation. Population-level responses integrate the cumulative effects of chemical stressors on individuals as those individuals interact with and are affected by their con-specifics, competitors, predators, prey, habitat and other biotic and abiotic factors. Models of population-level effects of contaminants can integrate information from lower levels of biological organization and feed that information into higher-level community and ecosystem models. As individual-level endpoints are utilized to predict population responses, this requires that biological responses at lower levels of organization be translated into a form that is useable by the population modeler. In this paper we describe how mechanistic data, as captured in adverse outcome pathways, can be translated into modeling focused on population-level risk assessments. First, we present a succinct overview of different approaches to population modeling, and discuss the types of data needed for these models. Then we discuss how toxicity data are used currently for population modeling, and provide recommendations as to how testing might be modified to better generate information to support modeling. From this we describe how different key processes measured at the level of the individual serve as the bridge between mechanistic toxicology data and predictions of population status, and provide case examples of how this linkage has been/can be achieved.

  11. MORN5 Expression during Craniofacial Development and Its Interaction with the BMP and TGFβ Pathways.

    PubMed

    Cela, Petra; Hampl, Marek; Fu, Katherine K; Kunova Bosakova, Michaela; Krejci, Pavel; Richman, Joy M; Buchtova, Marcela

    2016-01-01

    MORN5 (MORN repeat containing 5) is encoded by a locus positioned on chromosome 17 in the chicken genome. The MORN motif is found in multiple copies in several proteins including junctophilins or phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinase family and the MORN proteins themselves are found across the animal and plant kingdoms. MORN5 protein has a characteristic punctate pattern in the cytoplasm in immunofluorescence imaging. Previously, MORN5 was found among differentially expressed genes in a microarray profiling experiment of the chicken embryo head. Here, we provided in situ hybridization to analyse, in detail, the MORN5 expression in chick craniofacial structures. The expression of MORN5 was first observed at stage HH17-18 (E2.5). MORN5 expression gradually appeared on either side of the primitive oral cavity, within the maxillary region. At stage HH20 (E3), prominent expression was localized in the mandibular prominences lateral to the midline. From stage HH20 up to HH29 (E6), there was strong expression in restricted regions of the maxillary and mandibular prominences. The frontonasal mass (in the midline of the face) expressed MORN5, starting at HH27 (E5). The expression was concentrated in the corners or globular processes, which will ultimately fuse with the cranial edges of the maxillary prominences. MORN5 expression was maintained in the fusion zone up to stage HH29. In sections MORN5 expression was localized preferentially in the mesenchyme. Previously, we examined signals that regulate MORN5 expression in the face based on a previous microarray study. Here, we validated the array results with in situ hybridization and QPCR. MORN5 was downregulated 24 h after Noggin and/or RA treatment. We also determined that BMP pathway genes are downstream of MORN5 following siRNA knockdown. Based on these results, we conclude that MORN5 is both regulated by and required for BMP signaling. The restricted expression of MORN5 in the lip fusion zone shown here supports the

  12. GSK-3β: a signaling pathway node modulating neural stem cell and endothelial cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Michaud, Michael; Canosa, Sandra; Kuo, Andrew; Madri, Joseph A

    2011-05-01

    behaviors could be brought to CD1 levels, consistent with the concept of GSK-3β functioning as a multifunctional signaling pathway node, modulating several behaviors in these cells. Lastly, the therapeutic potential of targeting GSK-3β is discussed.

  13. MORN5 Expression during Craniofacial Development and Its Interaction with the BMP and TGFβ Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Cela, Petra; Hampl, Marek; Fu, Katherine K.; Kunova Bosakova, Michaela; Krejci, Pavel; Richman, Joy M.; Buchtova, Marcela

    2016-01-01

    MORN5 (MORN repeat containing 5) is encoded by a locus positioned on chromosome 17 in the chicken genome. The MORN motif is found in multiple copies in several proteins including junctophilins or phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinase family and the MORN proteins themselves are found across the animal and plant kingdoms. MORN5 protein has a characteristic punctate pattern in the cytoplasm in immunofluorescence imaging. Previously, MORN5 was found among differentially expressed genes in a microarray profiling experiment of the chicken embryo head. Here, we provided in situ hybridization to analyse, in detail, the MORN5 expression in chick craniofacial structures. The expression of MORN5 was first observed at stage HH17-18 (E2.5). MORN5 expression gradually appeared on either side of the primitive oral cavity, within the maxillary region. At stage HH20 (E3), prominent expression was localized in the mandibular prominences lateral to the midline. From stage HH20 up to HH29 (E6), there was strong expression in restricted regions of the maxillary and mandibular prominences. The frontonasal mass (in the midline of the face) expressed MORN5, starting at HH27 (E5). The expression was concentrated in the corners or globular processes, which will ultimately fuse with the cranial edges of the maxillary prominences. MORN5 expression was maintained in the fusion zone up to stage HH29. In sections MORN5 expression was localized preferentially in the mesenchyme. Previously, we examined signals that regulate MORN5 expression in the face based on a previous microarray study. Here, we validated the array results with in situ hybridization and QPCR. MORN5 was downregulated 24 h after Noggin and/or RA treatment. We also determined that BMP pathway genes are downstream of MORN5 following siRNA knockdown. Based on these results, we conclude that MORN5 is both regulated by and required for BMP signaling. The restricted expression of MORN5 in the lip fusion zone shown here supports the

  14. MORN5 Expression during Craniofacial Development and Its Interaction with the BMP and TGFβ Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Cela, Petra; Hampl, Marek; Fu, Katherine K.; Kunova Bosakova, Michaela; Krejci, Pavel; Richman, Joy M.; Buchtova, Marcela

    2016-01-01

    MORN5 (MORN repeat containing 5) is encoded by a locus positioned on chromosome 17 in the chicken genome. The MORN motif is found in multiple copies in several proteins including junctophilins or phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinase family and the MORN proteins themselves are found across the animal and plant kingdoms. MORN5 protein has a characteristic punctate pattern in the cytoplasm in immunofluorescence imaging. Previously, MORN5 was found among differentially expressed genes in a microarray profiling experiment of the chicken embryo head. Here, we provided in situ hybridization to analyse, in detail, the MORN5 expression in chick craniofacial structures. The expression of MORN5 was first observed at stage HH17-18 (E2.5). MORN5 expression gradually appeared on either side of the primitive oral cavity, within the maxillary region. At stage HH20 (E3), prominent expression was localized in the mandibular prominences lateral to the midline. From stage HH20 up to HH29 (E6), there was strong expression in restricted regions of the maxillary and mandibular prominences. The frontonasal mass (in the midline of the face) expressed MORN5, starting at HH27 (E5). The expression was concentrated in the corners or globular processes, which will ultimately fuse with the cranial edges of the maxillary prominences. MORN5 expression was maintained in the fusion zone up to stage HH29. In sections MORN5 expression was localized preferentially in the mesenchyme. Previously, we examined signals that regulate MORN5 expression in the face based on a previous microarray study. Here, we validated the array results with in situ hybridization and QPCR. MORN5 was downregulated 24 h after Noggin and/or RA treatment. We also determined that BMP pathway genes are downstream of MORN5 following siRNA knockdown. Based on these results, we conclude that MORN5 is both regulated by and required for BMP signaling. The restricted expression of MORN5 in the lip fusion zone shown here supports the

  15. Interactive effects of fire and large herbivores on web-building spiders.

    PubMed

    Foster, C N; Barton, P S; Wood, J T; Lindenmayer, D B

    2015-09-01

    Altered disturbance regimes are a major driver of biodiversity loss worldwide. Maintaining or re-creating natural disturbance regimes is therefore the focus of many conservation programmes. A key challenge, however, is to understand how co-occurring disturbances interact to affect biodiversity. We experimentally tested for the interactive effects of prescribed fire and large macropod herbivores on the web-building spider assemblage of a eucalypt forest understorey and investigated the role of vegetation in mediating these effects using path analysis. Fire had strong negative effects on the density of web-building spiders, which were partly mediated by effects on vegetation structure, while negative effects of large herbivores on web density were not related to changes in vegetation. Fire amplified the effects of large herbivores on spiders, both via vegetation-mediated pathways and by increasing herbivore activity. The importance of vegetation-mediated pathways and fire-herbivore interactions differed for web density and richness and also differed between web types. Our results demonstrate that for some groups of web-building spiders, the effects of co-occurring disturbance drivers may be mostly additive, whereas for other groups, interactions between drivers can amplify disturbance effects. In our study system, the use of prescribed fire in the presence of high densities of herbivores could lead to reduced densities and altered composition of web-building spiders, with potential cascading effects through the arthropod food web. Our study highlights the importance of considering both the independent and interactive effects of disturbances, as well as the mechanisms driving their effects, in the management of disturbance regimes.

  16. Macrophage/cancer cell interactions mediate hormone resistance by a nuclear receptor derepression pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ping; Baek, Sung Hee; Bourk, Eliot M; Ohgi, Kenneth A; Garcia-Bassets, Ivan; Sanjo, Hideki; Akira, Shizuo; Kotol, Paul F; Glass, Christopher K; Rosenfeld, Michael G; Rose, David W

    2006-02-10

    Defining the precise molecular strategies that coordinate patterns of transcriptional responses to specific signals is central for understanding normal development and homeostasis as well as the pathogenesis of hormone-dependent cancers. Here we report specific prostate cancer cell/macrophage interactions that mediate a switch in function of selective androgen receptor antagonists/modulators (SARMs) from repression to activation in vivo. This is based on an evolutionarily conserved receptor N-terminal L/HX7LL motif, selectively present in sex steroid receptors, that causes recruitment of TAB2 as a component of an N-CoR corepressor complex. TAB2 acts as a sensor for inflammatory signals by serving as a molecular beacon for recruitment of MEKK1, which in turn mediates dismissal of the N-CoR/HDAC complex and permits derepression of androgen and estrogen receptor target genes. Surprisingly, this conserved sensor strategy may have arisen to mediate reversal of sex steroid-dependent repression of a limited cohort of target genes in response to inflammatory signals, linking inflammatory and nuclear receptor ligand responses to essential reproductive functions.

  17. Interaction of pollinators and herbivores on plant fitness suggests a pathway for correlated evolution of mutualism- and antagonism-related traits

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Carlos M.; Medrano, Mónica; Rey, Pedro J.; Sánchez-Lafuente, Alfonso M.; García, María B.; Guitián, Javier; Manzaneda, Antonio J.

    2002-01-01

    Different kinds of plant–animal interactions are ordinarily studied in isolation, yet considering the combined fitness effects of mutualistic and antagonistic interactions is essential to understanding plant character evolution. Functional, structural, or phylogenetic associations between attractive and defensive traits may be nonadaptive or result from correlational selection on sets of herbivory- and pollination-linked traits. Nonadditivity of fitness effects of mutualists and antagonists, a requisite for correlational selection, was experimentally tested in the field. We created experimental populations of the insect-pollinated perennial herb, Helleborus foetidus, at 16 different locations distributed among three regions in the Iberian Peninsula. Plants experienced one of four possible selective regimes generated by independently weakening the effects of pollinators and herbivores (flower and fruit predators) according to a two-way fully factorial design. Effects were assessed in terms of number of next-generation offspring recruited per mother plant under natural field conditions. Differences among H. foetidus plants in the strength of their interactions with pollinators and herbivores translated into differential fitness, as measured in terms of recruited offspring, and subsequent changes in plant population densities. A strong, geographically consistent nonadditivity in the fitness consequences of pollinators and herbivores was found also. Plants possessing the particular combination of “traits” simultaneously enhancing pollination and escape from herbivores enjoyed a disproportionate fitness advantage over plants possessing any of the other three possible “trait” combinations. Results suggest a simple, possibly widespread ecological pathway favoring the adaptive correlated evolution of mutualism- and antagonism-related plant traits in pollinator-dependent plants suffering intense flower and fruit herbivory. PMID:12482948

  18. Radium in the environment: exposure pathways and health effects.

    PubMed

    Brugge, Doug; Buchner, Virginia

    2012-01-01

    Radium is a naturally occurring radioactive element in the environment that can exist as several isotopes. Little information is available on the acute (short-term) non-cancer effects in humans. Radium exposure has resulted in acute leukopenia, anemia, necrosis of the jaw, and other effects. Cancer is the major effect of concern. Radium, via oral exposure, is known to cause bone, head, and nasal passage tumors in humans. The US Environmental Protection Agency has not classified radium for carcinogenicity.

  19. Infant Pathways to Externalizing Behavior: Evidence of Genotype x Environment Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leve, Leslie D.; Kerr, David C. R.; Shaw, Daniel; Ge, Xiaojia; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.; Scaramella, Laura V.; Reid, John B.; Conger, Rand; Reiss, David

    2010-01-01

    To further the understanding of the effects of early experiences, 9-month-old infants were observed during a frustration task. The analytical sample was composed of 348 linked triads of participants (adoptive parents, adopted child, and birth parent[s]) from a prospective adoption study. It was hypothesized that genetic risk for externalizing…

  20. Targeting Hippo pathway by specific interruption of YAP-TEAD interaction using cyclic YAP-like peptides.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zheng; Hu, Taishan; Xu, Zhiheng; Lin, Zhaohu; Zhang, Zhisen; Feng, Teng; Zhu, Liangcheng; Rong, Yiping; Shen, Hong; Luk, John M; Zhang, Xiongwen; Qin, Ning

    2015-02-01

    Hippo signaling pathway is emerging as a novel target for anticancer therapy because it plays key roles in organ size control and tumorigenesis. As the downstream effectors, Yes-associated protein (YAP)-transcriptional enhancer activation domain family member (TEAD) association is essential for YAP-driven oncogenic activity, while TEAD is largely dispensable for normal tissue growth. We present the design of YAP-like peptides (17mer) to occupy the interface 3 on TEAD. Introducing cysteines at YAP sites 87 and 96 can induce disulfide formation, as confirmed by crystallography. The engineered peptide significantly improves the potency in disrupting YAP-TEAD interaction in vitro. To confirm that blocking YAP-TEAD complex formation by directly targeting on TEAD is a valid approach, we report a significant reduction in tumor growth rate in a hepatocellular carcinoma xenograft model after introducing the dominant-negative mutation (Y406H) of TEAD1 to abolish YAP-TEAD interaction. Our results suggest that targeting TEAD is a promising strategy against YAP-induced oncogenesis.

  1. Optimization of photosynthesis by multiple metabolic pathways involving interorganelle interactions: resource sharing and ROS maintenance as the bases.

    PubMed

    Sunil, Bobba; Talla, Sai K; Aswani, Vetcha; Raghavendra, Agepati S

    2013-11-01

    The bioenergetic processes of photosynthesis and respiration are mutually beneficial. Their interaction extends to photorespiration, which is linked to optimize photosynthesis. The interplay of these three pathways is facilitated by two major phenomena: sharing of energy/metabolite resources and maintenance of optimal levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The resource sharing among different compartments of plant cells is based on the production/utilization of reducing equivalents (NADPH, NADH) and ATP as well as on the metabolite exchange. The responsibility of generating the cellular requirements of ATP and NAD(P)H is mostly by the chloroplasts and mitochondria. In turn, besides the chloroplasts, the mitochondria, cytosol and peroxisomes are common sinks for reduced equivalents. Transporters located in membranes ensure the coordinated movement of metabolites across the cellular compartments. The present review emphasizes the beneficial interactions among photosynthesis, dark respiration and photorespiration, in relation to metabolism of C, N and S. Since the bioenergetic reactions tend to generate ROS, the cells modulate chloroplast and mitochondrial reactions, so as to ensure that the ROS levels do not rise to toxic levels. The patterns of minimization of ROS production and scavenging of excess ROS in intracellular compartments are highlighted. Some of the emerging developments are pointed out, such as model plants, orientation/movement of organelles and metabolomics.

  2. Effects of Trophic Status on Mercury Methylation Pathways in Peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hines, M. E.; Zhang, L.; Sampath, S.; Hu, R.; Barkay, T.

    2014-12-01

    Methyl mercury (MeHg) is a bioaccumulative toxicant. It was believed to be produced by sulfate (SO4)- and iron- reducing bacteria (SRB and FeRB), but recent studies suggest that organisms that possess the gene cluster (hgcAB) can methylate Hg, which includes other microbial groups besides SRB and FeRB. Many areas known to accumulate high levels of MeHg are freshwater wetlands that lack sufficient electron acceptors to support the production of MeHg. To test the hypothesis that oligotrophic wetlands are able to methylate Hg by pathways that are not respiratory, peat was collected from three wetland sites in Alaska and three in Massachusetts that represented a trophic gradient. We determined rates of gas (CH4, CO2, H2) and LMW organic acid (formate, acetate, propionate, butyrate) formation, and rates of Hg methylation using the short-lived radioisotope 197Hg (half life 2.67 days). Two temperate sites exhibited strong terminal respiration (methanogenesis) and syntrophy, while the Alaskan sites and an oligotrophic temperate site exhibited low rates of both. Primary fermentation was an important process in the latter sites. Hg methylation was most active at the minerotrophic sites that exhibited active syntrophy and methanogenesis. Methylation decreased greatly in the presence of a methanogenic inhibitor and was stimulated by H2 indicating that methanogens and perhaps syntrophs were primary methylators. In the oligotrophic sites, the addition of SO4 stimulated methylation while a SO4 reduction inhibitor decreased methylation. There was no evidence of SO4 reduction in these samples suggesting that methylation was conducted by SRB that were metabolizing via fermentation and not SO4 reduction. While further studies are required to decipher the role of syntrophs including SRB varieties such as Syntrophobacter sp., these results indicate that fermentative bacteria may be able to significantly methylate Hg in wetlands that do not support anaerobic respiration.

  3. Cerebellar ataxias: β-III spectrin's interactions suggest common pathogenic pathways.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Emma; Suminaite, Daumante; Jackson, Mandy

    2016-08-15

    Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders all characterised by postural abnormalities, motor deficits and cerebellar degeneration. Animal and in vitro models have revealed β-III spectrin, a cytoskeletal protein present throughout the soma and dendritic tree of cerebellar Purkinje cells, to be required for the maintenance of dendritic architecture and for the trafficking and/or stabilisation of several membrane proteins: ankyrin-R, cell adhesion molecules, metabotropic glutamate receptor-1 (mGluR1), voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav ) and glutamate transporters. This scaffold of interactions connects β-III spectrin to a wide variety of proteins implicated in the pathology of many SCAs. Heterozygous mutations in the gene encoding β-III spectrin (SPTBN2) underlie SCA type-5 whereas homozygous mutations cause spectrin associated autosomal recessive ataxia type-1 (SPARCA1), an infantile form of ataxia with cognitive impairment. Loss-of β-III spectrin function appears to underpin cerebellar dysfunction and degeneration in both diseases resulting in thinner dendrites, excessive dendritic protrusion with loss of planarity, reduced resurgent sodium currents and abnormal glutamatergic neurotransmission. The initial physiological consequences are a decrease in spontaneous activity and excessive excitation, likely to be offsetting each other, but eventually hyperexcitability gives rise to dark cell degeneration and reduced cerebellar output. Similar molecular mechanisms have been implicated for SCA1, 2, 3, 7, 13, 14, 19, 22, 27 and 28, highlighting alterations to intrinsic Purkinje cell activity, dendritic architecture and glutamatergic transmission as possible common mechanisms downstream of various loss-of-function primary genetic defects. A key question for future research is whether similar mechanisms underlie progressive cerebellar decline in normal ageing. PMID:26821241

  4. Interaction between p53 and estradiol pathways in transcriptional responses to chemotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Lion, Mattia; Bisio, Alessandra; Tebaldi, Toma; De Sanctis, Veronica; Menendez, Daniel; Resnick, Michael A.; Ciribilli, Yari; Inga, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen receptors (ERs) and p53 can interact via cis-elements to regulate the angiogenesis-related VEGFR-1 (FLT1) gene, as we reported previously. Here, we address cooperation between these transcription factors on a global scale. Human breast adenocarcinoma MCF7 cells were exposed to single or combinatorial treatments with the chemotherapeutic agent doxorubicin and the ER ligand 17β-estradiol (E2). Whole-genome transcriptome changes were measured by expression microarrays. Nearly 200 differentially expressed genes were identified that showed limited responsiveness to either doxorubicin treatment or ER ligand alone but were upregulated in a greater than additive manner following combined treatment. Based on exposure to 5-fuorouracil and nutlin-3a, the combined responses were treatment-specific. Among 16 genes chosen for validation using quantitative real-time PCR, seven (INPP5D, TLR5, KRT15, EPHA2, GDNF, NOTCH1, SOX9) were confirmed to be novel direct targets of p53, based on responses in MCF7 cells silenced for p53 or cooperative targets of p53 and ER. Promoter pattern searches and chromatin IP experiments for the INPP5D, TLR5, KRT15 genes supported direct, cis-mediated p53 and/or ER regulation through canonical and noncanonical p53 and ER response elements. Collectively, we establish that combinatorial activation of p53 and ER can induce novel gene expression programs that have implications for cell-cell communications, adhesion, cell differentiation, development and inflammatory responses as well as cancer treatments. PMID:23518503

  5. Cerebellar ataxias: β‐III spectrin's interactions suggest common pathogenic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Emma; Suminaite, Daumante

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders all characterised by postural abnormalities, motor deficits and cerebellar degeneration. Animal and in vitro models have revealed β‐III spectrin, a cytoskeletal protein present throughout the soma and dendritic tree of cerebellar Purkinje cells, to be required for the maintenance of dendritic architecture and for the trafficking and/or stabilisation of several membrane proteins: ankyrin‐R, cell adhesion molecules, metabotropic glutamate receptor‐1 (mGluR1), voltage‐gated sodium channels (Nav) and glutamate transporters. This scaffold of interactions connects β‐III spectrin to a wide variety of proteins implicated in the pathology of many SCAs. Heterozygous mutations in the gene encoding β‐III spectrin (SPTBN2) underlie SCA type‐5 whereas homozygous mutations cause spectrin associated autosomal recessive ataxia type‐1 (SPARCA1), an infantile form of ataxia with cognitive impairment. Loss‐of β‐III spectrin function appears to underpin cerebellar dysfunction and degeneration in both diseases resulting in thinner dendrites, excessive dendritic protrusion with loss of planarity, reduced resurgent sodium currents and abnormal glutamatergic neurotransmission. The initial physiological consequences are a decrease in spontaneous activity and excessive excitation, likely to be offsetting each other, but eventually hyperexcitability gives rise to dark cell degeneration and reduced cerebellar output. Similar molecular mechanisms have been implicated for SCA1, 2, 3, 7, 13, 14, 19, 22, 27 and 28, highlighting alterations to intrinsic Purkinje cell activity, dendritic architecture and glutamatergic transmission as possible common mechanisms downstream of various loss‐of‐function primary genetic defects. A key question for future research is whether similar mechanisms underlie progressive cerebellar decline in normal ageing. PMID:26821241

  6. Effective Theories Of The Strong Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ubirajara van Kolck

    2004-07-31

    This is the final report corresponding to the full funding period (08/01-07/04) in the Department of Energy Outstanding Junior Investigator Grant DE-FG03-01ER41196. The development of an understanding of the interplay between perturbative and non-perturbative effects in strong-interacting systems forms the broad context of this research. The main thrust is the application of effective theories to QCD. Topics included a new power counting in the pionful effective theory, low-energy Compton scattering, charge-symmetry breaking in pion production and in the two-nucleon potential, parity violation, coupled-channel scattering, shallow resonances and halo nuclei, chiral symmetry in the baryon spectrum, existence of a tetraquark state, and molecular meson states. DOE grant DE-FG03-01ER41196 was used to partially support in the period 08/01-07/04 the research activities of the Principal Investigator, Dr. Ubirajara van Kolck, one post-doctoral research associate, Dr. Boris A. Gelman, and one graduate student, Mr. Will Hockings. During the grant period the PI was first Assistant then Associate Professor of Physics at the University of Arizona (UA), and a RHIC Physics Fellow at the RIKEN-BNL Research Center (RBRC). The association with RBRC ended in the Summer of 2004. Since September of 2002 the PI has also been partially supported by a Sloan Research Fellowship. Dr. Boris Gelman was supported by the grant from September 2002 to May 2004. He joined the UA after receiving a Ph.D. from the University of Maryland in the Summer of 2002. He left to take a research associate position in the nuclear theory group of the State University of New York at Stony Brook. The support of a post-doctoral researcher on this grant for two years was only possible by carrying over first- and second-year funds to later years. In addition, Mr. William Hockings started doing research under the PI's guidance. Mr. Hockings took Independent Study courses with the PI, while working as a teaching

  7. Artificial neural network-based exploration of gene-nutrient interactions in folate and xenobiotic metabolic pathways that modulate susceptibility to breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Naushad, Shaik Mohammad; Ramaiah, M Janaki; Pavithrakumari, Manickam; Jayapriya, Jaganathan; Hussain, Tajamul; Alrokayan, Salman A; Gottumukkala, Suryanarayana Raju; Digumarti, Raghunadharao; Kutala, Vijay Kumar

    2016-04-15

    In the current study, an artificial neural network (ANN)-based breast cancer prediction model was developed from the data of folate and xenobiotic pathway genetic polymorphisms along with the nutritional and demographic variables to investigate how micronutrients modulate susceptibility to breast cancer. The developed ANN model explained 94.2% variability in breast cancer prediction. Fixed effect models of folate (400 μg/day) and B12 (6 μg/day) showed 33.3% and 11.3% risk reduction, respectively. Multifactor dimensionality reduction analysis showed the following interactions in responders to folate: RFC1 G80A × MTHFR C677T (primary), COMT H108L × CYP1A1 m2 (secondary), MTR A2756G (tertiary). The interactions among responders to B12 were RFC1G80A × cSHMT C1420T and CYP1A1 m2 × CYP1A1 m4. ANN simulations revealed that increased folate might restore ER and PR expression and reduce the promoter CpG island methylation of extra cellular superoxide dismutase and BRCA1. Dietary intake of folate appears to confer protection against breast cancer through its modulating effects on ER and PR expression and methylation of EC-SOD and BRCA1. PMID:26784656

  8. Artificial neural network-based exploration of gene-nutrient interactions in folate and xenobiotic metabolic pathways that modulate susceptibility to breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Naushad, Shaik Mohammad; Ramaiah, M Janaki; Pavithrakumari, Manickam; Jayapriya, Jaganathan; Hussain, Tajamul; Alrokayan, Salman A; Gottumukkala, Suryanarayana Raju; Digumarti, Raghunadharao; Kutala, Vijay Kumar

    2016-04-15

    In the current study, an artificial neural network (ANN)-based breast cancer prediction model was developed from the data of folate and xenobiotic pathway genetic polymorphisms along with the nutritional and demographic variables to investigate how micronutrients modulate susceptibility to breast cancer. The developed ANN model explained 94.2% variability in breast cancer prediction. Fixed effect models of folate (400 μg/day) and B12 (6 μg/day) showed 33.3% and 11.3% risk reduction, respectively. Multifactor dimensionality reduction analysis showed the following interactions in responders to folate: RFC1 G80A × MTHFR C677T (primary), COMT H108L × CYP1A1 m2 (secondary), MTR A2756G (tertiary). The interactions among responders to B12 were RFC1G80A × cSHMT C1420T and CYP1A1 m2 × CYP1A1 m4. ANN simulations revealed that increased folate might restore ER and PR expression and reduce the promoter CpG island methylation of extra cellular superoxide dismutase and BRCA1. Dietary intake of folate appears to confer protection against breast cancer through its modulating effects on ER and PR expression and methylation of EC-SOD and BRCA1.

  9. Damaging effects of hyperglycemia on cardiovascular function: spotlight on glucose metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Mapanga, Rudo F; Essop, M Faadiel

    2016-01-15

    The incidence of cardiovascular complications associated with hyperglycemia is a growing global health problem. This review discusses the link between hyperglycemia and cardiovascular diseases onset, focusing on the role of recently emerging downstream mediators, namely, oxidative stress and glucose metabolic pathway perturbations. The role of hyperglycemia-mediated activation of nonoxidative glucose pathways (NOGPs) [i.e., the polyol pathway, hexosamine biosynthetic pathway, advanced glycation end products (AGEs), and protein kinase C] in this process is extensively reviewed. The proposal is made that there is a unique interplay between NOGPs and a downstream convergence of detrimental effects that especially affect cardiac endothelial cells, thereby contributing to contractile dysfunction. In this process the AGE pathway emerges as a crucial mediator of hyperglycemia-mediated detrimental effects. In addition, a vicious metabolic cycle is established whereby hyperglycemia-induced NOGPs further fuel their own activation by generating even more oxidative stress, thereby exacerbating damaging effects on cardiac function. Thus NOGP inhibition, and particularly that of the AGE pathway, emerges as a novel therapeutic intervention for the treatment of cardiovascular complications such as acute myocardial infarction in the presence hyperglycemia.

  10. Global effects of interactions on galaxy evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennicutt, Robert C., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Recent observations of the evolutionary properties of paired and interacting galaxies are reviewed, with special emphasis on their global emission properties and star formation rates. Data at several wavelengths provide strong confirmation of the hypothesis, proposed originally by Larson and Tinsley, that interactions trigger global bursts of star formation in galaxies. The nature and properties of the starbursts, and their overall role in galactic evolution are also discussed.

  11. Crystal Structure of UBA2ufd-Ubc9: Insights into E1-E2 Interactions in Sumo Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Harold W.; Seyedin, Steven N.; Miller, David W.; Miller, Darcie J.; Huang, Danny T.; Schulman, Brenda A.

    2010-01-01

    Canonical ubiquitin-like proteins (UBLs) such as ubiquitin, Sumo, NEDD8, and ISG15 are ligated to targets by E1-E2-E3 multienzyme cascades. The Sumo cascade, conserved among all eukaryotes, regulates numerous biological processes including protein localization, transcription, DNA replication, and mitosis. Sumo conjugation is initiated by the heterodimeric Aos1-Uba2 E1 enzyme (in humans called Sae1-Uba2), which activates Sumo's C-terminus, binds the dedicated E2 enzyme Ubc9, and promotes Sumo C-terminal transfer between the Uba2 and Ubc9 catalytic cysteines. To gain insights into details of E1-E2 interactions in the Sumo pathway, we determined crystal structures of the C-terminal ubiquitin fold domain (ufd) from yeast Uba2 (Uba2ufd), alone and in complex with Ubc9. The overall structures of both yeast Uba2ufd and Ubc9 superimpose well on their individual human counterparts, suggesting conservation of fundamental features of Sumo conjugation. Docking the Uba2ufd-Ubc9 and prior full-length human Uba2 structures allows generation of models for steps in Sumo transfer from Uba2 to Ubc9, and supports the notion that Uba2 undergoes remarkable conformational changes during the reaction. Comparisons to previous structures from the NEDD8 cascade demonstrate that UBL cascades generally utilize some parallel E1-E2 interaction surfaces. In addition, the structure of the Uba2ufd-Ubc9 complex reveals interactions unique to Sumo E1 and E2. Comparison with a previous Ubc9-E3 complex structure demonstrates overlap between Uba2 and E3 binding sites on Ubc9, indicating that loading with Sumo and E3-catalyzed transfer to substrates are strictly separate steps. The results suggest mechanisms establishing specificity and order in Sumo conjugation cascades. PMID:21209884

  12. Crystal Structure of UBA2[superscript ufd]-Ubc9: Insights into E1-E2 Interactions in Sumo Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing; Taherbhoy, Asad M.; Hunt, Harold W.; Seyedin, Steven N.; Miller, David W.; Miller, Darcie J.; Huang, Danny T.; Schulman, Brenda A.

    2012-04-30

    Canonical ubiquitin-like proteins (UBLs) such as ubiquitin, Sumo, NEDD8, and ISG15 are ligated to targets by E1-E2-E3 multienzyme cascades. The Sumo cascade, conserved among all eukaryotes, regulates numerous biological processes including protein localization, transcription, DNA replication, and mitosis. Sumo conjugation is initiated by the heterodimeric Aos1-Uba2 E1 enzyme (in humans called Sae1-Uba2), which activates Sumo's C-terminus, binds the dedicated E2 enzyme Ubc9, and promotes Sumo C-terminal transfer between the Uba2 and Ubc9 catalytic cysteines. To gain insights into details of E1-E2 interactions in the Sumo pathway, we determined crystal structures of the C-terminal ubiquitin fold domain (ufd) from yeast Uba2 (Uba2{sup ufd}), alone and in complex with Ubc9. The overall structures of both yeast Uba2{sup ufd} and Ubc9 superimpose well on their individual human counterparts, suggesting conservation of fundamental features of Sumo conjugation. Docking the Uba2{sup ufd}-Ubc9 and prior full-length human Uba2 structures allows generation of models for steps in Sumo transfer from Uba2 to Ubc9, and supports the notion that Uba2 undergoes remarkable conformational changes during the reaction. Comparisons to previous structures from the NEDD8 cascade demonstrate that UBL cascades generally utilize some parallel E1-E2 interaction surfaces. In addition, the structure of the Uba2{sup ufd}-Ubc9 complex reveals interactions unique to Sumo E1 and E2. Comparison with a previous Ubc9-E3 complex structure demonstrates overlap between Uba2 and E3 binding sites on Ubc9, indicating that loading with Sumo and E3-catalyzed transfer to substrates are strictly separate steps. The results suggest mechanisms establishing specificity and order in Sumo conjugation cascades.

  13. Impact of global climate change on ecosystem-level interactions among sympatric plants from all three photosynthetic pathways. Terminal report

    SciTech Connect

    Nobel, P.S.

    1997-12-17

    The proposed research will determine biochemical and physiological responses to variations in environmental factors for plants of all three photosynthetic pathways under competitive situations in the field. These responses will be used to predict the effects of global climatic change on an ecosystem in the northwestern Sonoran Desert where the C{sub 3} subshrub Encelia farinosa, the C{sub 4} bunchgrass Hilaria rigida, and the CAM succulent Agave deserti are co-dominants. These perennials are relatively short with overlapping shallow roots facilitating the experimental measurements as well as leading to competition for soil water. Net CO{sub 2} uptake over 24-h periods measured in the laboratory will be analyzed using an environmental productivity index (EPI) that can incorporate simultaneous effects of soil water, air temperature, and light. Based on EPI, net CO{sub 2} uptake and hence plant productivity will be predicted for the three species in the field under various treatments. Activity of the two CO{sub 2} fixation enzymes, Rubisco and PEPCase, will be determined for these various environmental conditions; also, partitioning of carbon to various organs will be measured based on {sup 14}CO{sub 2} labeling and dry weight analysis. Thus, enzymatic and partitioning controls on competition among sympatric model plants representing all three photosynthetic pathways will be investigated.

  14. The Effects of Ecological Variables on Parent-Infant Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, Michael E.

    This paper summarizes the findings of a series of studies on the effects of "ecological variables" on mother-father-sibling-infant interactions. Under consideration were: (1) the effects of stress on the parental preferences of young infants; (2) the effects of the presence of one parent on the interactions within the other parent-infant dyad; (3)…

  15. The effects of chelidonine on tubulin polymerisation, cell cycle progression and selected signal transmission pathways.

    PubMed

    Panzer, A; Joubert, A M; Bianchi, P C; Hamel, E; Seegers, J C

    2001-01-01

    Chelidonine is a tertiary benzophenanthridine alkaloid known to cause mitotic arrest and to interact weakly with tubulin. Our interest in chelidonine began when we found it to be a major contaminant of Ukrain, which is a compound reported to be selectively toxic to malignant cells. The effects of chelidonine in two normal (monkey kidney and Hs27), two transformed (Vero and Graham 293) and two malignant (WHCO5 and HeLa) cell lines, were examined. Chelidonine proved to be a weak inhibitor of cell growth, but no evidence for selective cytotoxicity was found in this study. It was confirmed that chelidonine inhibits tubulin polymerisation (IC50 = 24 microM), explaining its ability to disrupt microtubular structure in cells. A G2/M arrest results, which is characterised by abnormal metaphase morphology, increased levels of cyclin B1 and enhanced cdc2 kinase activity. Exposure of all cell lines examined to chelidonine leads to activation of the stress-activated protein kinase/jun kinase pathway (SAPK/JNK).

  16. Low dose radiation interactions with the transformation growth factor (TFG)-beta pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslowski, Amy Jesse

    A major limiting factor for long-term, deep-space missions is the radiation dose to astronauts. Because the dose to the astronauts is a mixed field of low- and high-LET radiation, there is a need to understand the effects of both radiation types on whole tissue; however, there are limited published data on the effects of high-LET (linear-energy-transfer) radiation on tissue. Thus, we designed a perfusion chamber system for rat trachea in order to mimic in vivo respiratory tissue. We successfully maintained the perfused tracheal tissue ex vivo in a healthy and viable condition for up to three days. In addition, this project studied the effects of high-LET Fe particles on the overall transformation growth factor (TGF)-beta response after TGF-beta inactivation and compared the results to the TGF-beta response post x-ray irradiation. It was found that a TGF-beta response could be measured in the perfused tracheal tissue, for x-ray and Fe particle irradiations, despite the high autofluorescent background intrinsic to tissue. However, after comparing the TGF-beta response of x-ray irradiation to High-Z-High-energy (HZE) irradiation, there was not a significant difference in radiation types. The TGF-beta response in x-ray and HZE irradiated perfusion chambers was also measured over time post irradiation. It was found that for 6 hour and 8 hour post irradiation, the TGF-beta response was higher for lower doses of radiation than for higher doses. This is in contrast to the 0 hour fixation which found the TGF-beta response to increase with increased dose. The inverse relationship found for 6 hour and 8 hour fixation times may indicate a threshold response for TGF-beta response; i.e., for low doses, a threshold of dose must be reached for an immediate TGF-beta response, otherwise the tissue responds more slowly to the irradiation damage. This result was unexpected and will require further investigation to determine if the threshold can be determined for the 250 kVp x-rays and

  17. Linkage of cold acclimation and disease resistance through plant-pathogen interaction pathway in Vitis amurensis grapevine.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiao; Zhang, Yali; Yin, Ling; Qu, Junjie; Lu, Jiang

    2014-12-01

    Low temperatures cause severe damage to none cold hardy grapevines. A preliminary survey with Solexa sequencing technology was used to analyze gene expression profiles of cold hardy Vitis amurensis 'Zuoshan-1' after cold acclimation at 4 °C for 48 h. A total of 16,750 and 18,068 putative genes were annotated for 4 °C-treated and control library, respectively. Among them, 393 genes were upregulated for at least 20-fold, while 69 genes were downregulated for at least 20-fold under the 4 °C treatment for 48 h. A subset of 101 genes from this survey was investigated further using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Genes associated with signaling events in pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity (PTI), including generation of calcium signals (CNGC, CMLs), jasmonic acid signal (JAZ1), oxidative burst (Rboh), and phosphorylation (FLS2, BAK, MEKK1, MKKs) cascades, were upregulated after cold acclimation. Disease resistance genes (RPM1, RPS5, RIN4, PBS1) in the process of effector-triggered immunity (ETI) were also upregulated in the current condition. Defense-related genes (WRKYs, PR1, MIN7) involved in both PTI and ETI processes were abundantly expressed after cold acclimation. Our results indicated that plant-pathogen interaction pathways were linked to the cold acclimation in V. amurensis grapevine. Other biotic- and abiotic-related genes, such as defense (protein phosphatase 2C, U-box domain proteins, NCED1, stilbene synthase), transcription (DREBs, MYBs, ERFs, ZFPs), signal transduction (kinase, calcium, and auxin signaling), transport (ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, auxin:hydrogen symporter), and various metabolism, were also abundantly expressed in the cold acclimation of V. Amurensis 'Zuoshan-1' grapevine. This study revealed a series of critical genes and pathways to delineate important biological processes affected by low temperature in 'Zuoshan-1'.

  18. TIMP-2 Interaction with MT1-MMP Activates the AKT Pathway and Protects Tumor Cells from Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Valacca, Cristina; Tassone, Evelyne; Mignatti, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP), a transmembrane proteinase with an extracellular catalytic domain and a short cytoplasmic tail, degrades a variety of extracellular matrix (ECM) components. In addition, MT1-MMP activates intracellular signaling through proteolysis-dependent and independent mechanisms. We have previously shown that binding of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2 (TIMP-2) to MT1-MMP controls cell proliferation and migration, as well as tumor growth in vivo by activating the Ras—extracellular signal regulated kinase-1 and -2 (ERK1/2) pathway through a mechanism that requires the cytoplasmic but not the proteolytic domain of MT1-MMP. Here we show that in MT1-MMP expressing cells TIMP-2 also induces rapid and sustained activation of AKT in a dose- and time-dependent manner and by a mechanism independent of the proteolytic activity of MT1-MMP. Fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 mediates TIMP-2 induction of ERK1/2 but not of AKT activation; however, Ras activation is necessary to transduce the TIMP-2-activated signal to both the ERK1/2 and AKT pathways. ERK1/2 and AKT activation by TIMP-2 binding to MT1-MMP protects tumor cells from apoptosis induced by serum starvation. Conversely, TIMP-2 upregulates apoptosis induced by three-dimensional type I collagen in epithelial cancer cells. Thus, TIMP-2 interaction with MT1-MMP provides tumor cells with either pro- or anti-apoptotic signaling depending on the extracellular environment and apoptotic stimulus. PMID:26331622

  19. Human type II Fcgamma receptors inhibit B cell activation by interacting with the p21(ras)-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Sármay, G; Koncz, G; Gergely, J

    1996-11-29

    Co-ligation of antigen receptors and type II Fcgamma receptors (FcgammaRIIb) on B cells interrupts signal transduction and ultimately inhibits antibody production. We have identified p52 Shc in the FcgammaRIIb1-specific immunoprecipitates isolated from the membrane fraction of BL41 Burkitt lymphoma cells following B cell receptor-FcgammaRIIb1 co-ligation. The insolubilized synthetic peptide representing the phosphorylated form of the tyrosine-based inhibitory motif of FcgammaRIIb also binds Shc from the lysates of activated but not from resting BL41 cells. This suggests that the binding does not depend on the interaction of FcgammaRIIb1-phosphotyrosine with the SH2 domain of Shc. Tyr phosphorylation of FcgammaRIIb1-associated Shc is low, indicating an impaired function. Shc is implicated in regulating p21(ras) activation; thus, we have compared p21(ras) activities in BL41 cells treated in different ways. p21(ras) activity is reduced when B cell receptor and FcgammaRIIb1 are co-ligated. p21(ras) couples protein-tyrosine kinase-dependent events to the Ser/Thr kinase-mediated signaling pathway leading to the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). Our results show that B cell receptor-FcgammaRIIb1 co-cross-linking partially inhibits mitogen-activated protein kinase activity. We conclude that FcgammaRIIb1-dependent inhibition of human B cell activation may be based on interrupting signal transduction between protein-tyrosine kinases and the p21(ras)/mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent activation pathway.

  20. Design of pathway preferential estrogens that provide beneficial metabolic and vascular effects without stimulating reproductive tissues.

    PubMed

    Madak-Erdogan, Zeynep; Kim, Sung Hoon; Gong, Ping; Zhao, Yiru C; Zhang, Hui; Chambliss, Ken L; Carlson, Kathryn E; Mayne, Christopher G; Shaul, Philip W; Korach, Kenneth S; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S

    2016-01-01

    There is great medical need for estrogens with favorable pharmacological profiles that support desirable activities for menopausal women, such as metabolic and vascular protection, but that lack stimulatory activities on the breast and uterus. We report the development of structurally novel estrogens that preferentially activate a subset of estrogen receptor (ER) signaling pathways and result in favorable target tissue-selective activity. Through a process of structural alteration of estrogenic ligands that was designed to preserve their essential chemical and physical features but greatly reduced their binding affinity for ERs, we obtained "pathway preferential estrogens" (PaPEs), which interacted with ERs to activate the extranuclear-initiated signaling pathway preferentially over the nuclear-initiated pathway. PaPEs elicited a pattern of gene regulation and cellular and biological processes that did not stimulate reproductive and mammary tissues or breast cancer cells. However, in ovariectomized mice, PaPEs triggered beneficial responses both in metabolic tissues (adipose tissue and liver) that reduced body weight gain and fat accumulation and in the vasculature that accelerated repair of endothelial damage. This process of designed ligand structure alteration represents a novel approach to develop ligands that shift the balance in ER-mediated extranuclear and nuclear pathways to obtain tissue-selective, non-nuclear PaPEs, which may be beneficial for postmenopausal hormone replacement. The approach may also have broad applicability for other members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. PMID:27221711

  1. Reactions of diborane with ammonia and ammonia borane: catalytic effects for multiple pathways for hydrogen release.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Vinh Son; Matus, Myrna H; Nguyen, Minh Tho; Dixon, David A

    2008-10-01

    High-level electronic structure calculations have been used to construct portions of the potential energy surfaces related to the reaction of diborane with ammonia and ammonia borane (B2H6 + NH3 and B2H6 + BH3NH3)to probe the molecular mechanism of H2 release. Geometries of stationary points were optimized at the MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ level. Total energies were computed at the coupled-cluster CCSD(T) theory level with the correlation-consistent basis sets. The results show a wide range of reaction pathways for H2 elimination. The initial interaction of B2H6 + NH3 leads to a weak preassociation complex, from which a B-H-B bridge bond is broken giving rise to a more stable H3BHBH2NH3 adduct. This intermediate, which is also formed from BH3NH3 + BH3, is connected with at least six transition states for H2 release with energies 18-93 kal/mol above the separated reactants. The lowest-lying transition state is a six-member cycle, in which BH3exerts a bifunctional catalytic effect accelerating H2 generation within a B-H-H-N framework. Diborane also induces a catalytic effect for H2 elimination from BH3NH3 via a three-step pathway with cyclic transition states. Following conformational changes, the rate-determining transition state for H2 release is approximately 27 kcal/mol above the B2H6 + BH3NH3 reactants, as compared with an energy barrier of approximately 37 kcal/mol for H2 release from BH3NH3. The behavior of two separated BH3 molecules is more complex and involves multiple reaction pathways. Channels from diborane or borane initially converge to a complex comprising the H3BHBH2NH3adduct plus BH3. The interaction of free BH3 with the BH3 moiety of BH3NH3 via a six-member transition state with diborane type of bonding leads to a lower-energy transition state. The corresponding energy barrier is approximately 8 kcal/mol, relative to the reference point H3BHBH2NH3 adduct + BH3. These transition states are 27-36 kcal/mol above BH3NH3 + B2H6, but 1-9 kcal/mol below the

  2. Pathway-Specific Effect of Caffeine on Protection against UV Irradiation–Induced Apoptosis in Corneal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling; Lu, Luo

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To define the role of molecular interaction between the UV-induced JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase) cascade and corneal epithelial cell apoptosis and protection against apoptosis by caffeine. Methods Rabbit and human corneal epithelial cells were cultured in DMEM/F12 medium containing 10% FBS and 5 μg/mL insulin at 37°C in 5% CO2. DNA fragmentation and ethidium bromide/acridine orange (EB/AO) nuclear staining were performed to detect cell death. Western blot, immunoprecipitation, and kinase assays were used to measure UV-induced mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activity. Results UV irradiation–induced apoptosis through apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) and MAKK4 (SEK1) upstream from JNK was caffeine sensitive. Caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine), an agent that is one of the most popular additions to food consumed in the world and a potential enhancer of chemotherapy, effectively protected corneal epithelial cells against apoptosis by its specific effect on the JNK cascade. Theophylline (1,3-dimethylxanthine) exhibited an effect similar to that of caffeine on prevention of UV irradiation–induced apoptosis. However, alterations of either intracellular cAMP or Ca2+ levels did not alter the effect of caffeine on the JNK signaling pathway. In addition, the blockade of PI3K-like kinases by wortmannin had no impact on the protective effect of caffeine against UV irradiation–induced apoptosis, suggesting that the protective effect of caffeine acts through a specific mechanism involving UV irradiation–induced activation of ASK1 and SEK1. In contrast, caffeine had no effects on melphalan-, hyperosmotic stress–, or IL-1 β-induced activation of the JNK signaling pathway in these cells. Conclusions UV irradiation stress–induced activation of the ASK1-SEK1-JNK signaling pathway leading to apoptosis is a caffeine-sensitive process, and caffeine, as a multifunctional agent in cells, can specifically interact with the pathway to protect against

  3. Neighborhood Disadvantage: Pathways of Effects for Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohen, Dafna E.; Leventhal, Tama; Dahinten, V. Susan; McIntosh, Cameron N.

    2008-01-01

    The present study used Canadian National Longitudinal data to examine a model of the mechanisms through which the effects of neighborhood socioeconomic conditions impact young children's verbal and behavioral outcomes (N = 3,528; M age = 5.05 years, SD= 0.86). Integrating elements of social disorganization theory and family stress models, and…

  4. In silico study of interaction between rice proteins enhanced disease susceptibility 1 and phytoalexin deficient 4, the regulators of salicylic acid signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Singh, Indra; Shah, Kavita

    2012-07-01

    Enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1), a plant-specific protein has homology with the eukaryotic lipase in their N-terminal halves and a unique domain at its C-termini. EDS1 is known to be an important regulator of biotic stress and an essential component of basal immunity. EDS1 interacts with its positive co-regulator phytoalexin deficient 4 (PAD4), resulting in mobilization of the salicylic acid defence pathway. Limited information regarding this interaction in rice is available. To study this interaction, a model of EDS1 and PAD4 proteins from rice was generated and validated with Accelrys DS software version 3.1 using bioinformatics interface. The in silico docking between the two proteins showed a significant protein-protein interaction between rice EDS1 and PAD4, suggesting that they form a dimeric protein complex, which, similar to that in Arabidopsis, is perhaps also important for triggering the salicylic acid signalling pathway in plants.

  5. Reputation Effects in Public and Private Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Ohtsuki, Hisashi; Iwasa, Yoh; Nowak, Martin A.

    2015-01-01

    We study the evolution of cooperation in a model of indirect reciprocity where people interact in public and private situations. Public interactions have a high chance to be observed by others and always affect reputation. Private interactions have a lower chance to be observed and only occasionally affect reputation. We explore all second order social norms and study conditions for evolutionary stability of action rules. We observe the competition between “honest” and “hypocritical” strategies. The former cooperate both in public and in private. The later cooperate in public, where many others are watching, but try to get away with defection in private situations. The hypocritical idea is that in private situations it does not pay-off to cooperate, because there is a good chance that nobody will notice it. We find simple and intuitive conditions for the evolution of honest strategies. PMID:26606239

  6. Reputation Effects in Public and Private Interactions.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuki, Hisashi; Iwasa, Yoh; Nowak, Martin A

    2015-11-01

    We study the evolution of cooperation in a model of indirect reciprocity where people interact in public and private situations. Public interactions have a high chance to be observed by others and always affect reputation. Private interactions have a lower chance to be observed and only occasionally affect reputation. We explore all second order social norms and study conditions for evolutionary stability of action rules. We observe the competition between "honest" and "hypocritical" strategies. The former cooperate both in public and in private. The later cooperate in public, where many others are watching, but try to get away with defection in private situations. The hypocritical idea is that in private situations it does not pay-off to cooperate, because there is a good chance that nobody will notice it. We find simple and intuitive conditions for the evolution of honest strategies.

  7. Error framing effects on performance: cognitive, motivational, and affective pathways.

    PubMed

    Steele-Johnson, Debra; Kalinoski, Zachary T

    2014-01-01

    Our purpose was to examine whether positive error framing, that is, making errors salient and cuing individuals to see errors as useful, can benefit learning when task exploration is constrained. Recent research has demonstrated the benefits of a newer approach to training, that is, error management training, that includes the opportunity to actively explore the task and framing errors as beneficial to learning complex tasks (Keith & Frese, 2008). Other research has highlighted the important role of errors in on-the-job learning in complex domains (Hutchins, 1995). Participants (N = 168) from a large undergraduate university performed a class scheduling task. Results provided support for a hypothesized path model in which error framing influenced cognitive, motivational, and affective factors which in turn differentially affected performance quantity and quality. Within this model, error framing had significant direct effects on metacognition and self-efficacy. Our results suggest that positive error framing can have beneficial effects even when tasks cannot be structured to support extensive exploration. Whereas future research can expand our understanding of error framing effects on outcomes, results from the current study suggest that positive error framing can facilitate learning from errors in real-time performance of tasks. PMID:24617273

  8. Benzo[a]pyrene and glycine N-methyltransferse Interactions: Gene expression profiles of the liver detoxification pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.-M.; Chen, S.-Y.; Lee, Y.-C.G.; Huang, C.-Y.F.; Chen, Y.-M. Arthur . E-mail: arthur@ym.edu.tw

    2006-07-15

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is one of many polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons that have been identified as major risk factors for developing various cancers. We previously demonstrated that the liver cancer susceptibility gene glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT) is capable of binding with BaP and protecting cells from BaP-7,8-diol 9,10-epoxide-DNA adduct formation. In this study, we used a cytotoxicity assay to demonstrate that the higher expression level of GNMT, the lower cytotoxicity occurred in the cells treated with BaP. In addition, a cDNA microarray containing 7,597 human genes was used to examine gene expression patterns in BaP-treated HepG2 (a liver cancer cell line that expresses very low levels of GNMT) and SCG2-1-1 (a stable HepG2 clone that expresses high levels of GNMT) cells. The results showed that among 6,018 readable HepG2 genes, 359 (6.0%) were up-regulated more than 1.5-fold and 768 (12.8%) were down-regulated. Overexpression of GNMT in SCG2-1-1 cells resulted in the down-regulation of genes related to the detoxification, kinase/phosphatase pathways, and oncogenes. Furthermore, real-time PCR was used to validate microarray data from 21 genes belonging to the detoxification pathway. Combining both microarray and real-time PCR data, the results showed that among 89 detoxification pathway genes analyzed, 22 (24.7%) were up-regulated and 6 (6.7%) were down-regulated in BaP-treated HepG2 cells, while in the BaP-treated SCG2-1-1 cells, 12 (13.5%) were up-regulated and 26 (29.2%) were down-regulated (P < 0.001). Therefore, GNMT sequesters BaP, diminishes BaP's effects to the liver detoxification pathway and prevents subsequent cytotoxicity.

  9. A metabolomics strategy to explore urinary biomarkers and metabolic pathways for assessment of interaction between Danhong injection and low-dose aspirin during their synergistic treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianping; Guo, Jianming; Shang, Erxin; Zhu, Zhenhua; Zhu, Kevin Yue; Li, Shujiao; Zhao, Buchang; Jia, Lifu; Zhao, Jing; Tang, Zhishu; Duan, Jinao

    2016-07-15

    The drug combination of Danhong injection (DHI) and low-dose aspirin (ASA) was frequently applied for the treatment of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. Due to the drug interactions, a lot of potential benefits and risks might exist side by side in the course of combination therapy. However, there had been no studies of interaction between DHI and ASA. Metabolomics was a powerful tool to explore endogenous biomarkers and metabolic pathways. In present study, metabolic profiling with ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QTOF/MS) coupled with multivariate statistical analysis was performed to provide insight into understanding the interaction between DHI and low-dose ASA. Eleven potential biomarkers of three types were identified and seven metabolic pathways were constructed. The results showed that the interaction between DHI and low-dose ASA during synergistic treatment indeed affected some key endogenous biomarkers and metabolic pathways, which could not happen when DHI or low-dose ASA was used alone. The quality and quantity of endogenous metabolite were both influenced by interaction between DHI and low-dose ASA. In details, the amount of flavin mononucleotide, L-2, 4-diaminobutyric acid (DABA) and 4-aminohippuric acid were significantly increased. On the contrary, the amount of 3-methyluridine, 4, 6-dihydroxyquinoline, cortolone-3-glucuronide, and serotonin were significantly decreased. Furthermore, O-phosphotyrosine, 3-methyl-2-butenal, indoxyl sulfate and dolichyl diphosphate were disappeared in urine. As to metabolic pathways, riboflavin metabolism, pentose and glucuronate interconversions, and tryptophan metabolism were all significantly influenced. The emerging alterations of biomarkers and metabolic pathways were associated with a lot of drugs and diseases based on literature researches, which might influence the co-administration of other drugs or the treatments of relevant

  10. A metabolomics strategy to explore urinary biomarkers and metabolic pathways for assessment of interaction between Danhong injection and low-dose aspirin during their synergistic treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianping; Guo, Jianming; Shang, Erxin; Zhu, Zhenhua; Zhu, Kevin Yue; Li, Shujiao; Zhao, Buchang; Jia, Lifu; Zhao, Jing; Tang, Zhishu; Duan, Jinao

    2016-07-15

    The drug combination of Danhong injection (DHI) and low-dose aspirin (ASA) was frequently applied for the treatment of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. Due to the drug interactions, a lot of potential benefits and risks might exist side by side in the course of combination therapy. However, there had been no studies of interaction between DHI and ASA. Metabolomics was a powerful tool to explore endogenous biomarkers and metabolic pathways. In present study, metabolic profiling with ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QTOF/MS) coupled with multivariate statistical analysis was performed to provide insight into understanding the interaction between DHI and low-dose ASA. Eleven potential biomarkers of three types were identified and seven metabolic pathways were constructed. The results showed that the interaction between DHI and low-dose ASA during synergistic treatment indeed affected some key endogenous biomarkers and metabolic pathways, which could not happen when DHI or low-dose ASA was used alone. The quality and quantity of endogenous metabolite were both influenced by interaction between DHI and low-dose ASA. In details, the amount of flavin mononucleotide, L-2, 4-diaminobutyric acid (DABA) and 4-aminohippuric acid were significantly increased. On the contrary, the amount of 3-methyluridine, 4, 6-dihydroxyquinoline, cortolone-3-glucuronide, and serotonin were significantly decreased. Furthermore, O-phosphotyrosine, 3-methyl-2-butenal, indoxyl sulfate and dolichyl diphosphate were disappeared in urine. As to metabolic pathways, riboflavin metabolism, pentose and glucuronate interconversions, and tryptophan metabolism were all significantly influenced. The emerging alterations of biomarkers and metabolic pathways were associated with a lot of drugs and diseases based on literature researches, which might influence the co-administration of other drugs or the treatments of relevant

  11. Antitumor effects of traditional Chinese medicine targeting the cellular apoptotic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huanli; Zhao, Xin; Liu, Xiaohui; Xu, Pingxiang; Zhang, Keming; Lin, Xiukun

    2015-01-01

    Defects in apoptosis are common phenomena in many types of cancer and are also a critical step in tumorigenesis. Targeting the apoptotic pathway has been considered an intriguing strategy for cancer therapy. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been used in the People’s Republic of China for thousands of years, and many of the medicines have been confirmed to be effective in the treatment of a number of tumors. With increasing cancer rates worldwide, the antitumor effects of TCMs have attracted more and more attention globally. Many of the TCMs have been shown to have antitumor activity through multiple targets, and apoptosis pathway-related targets have been extensively studied and defined to be promising. This review focuses on several antitumor TCMs, especially those with clinical efficacy, based on their effects on the apoptotic signaling pathway. The problems with and prospects of development of TCMs as anticancer agents are also presented. PMID:26056434

  12. The Interactivity Effect in Multimedia Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Chris; Gibbons, Nicola J.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the addition of interactivity to a computer-based learning package enhances the learning process. A sample of 33 (22 male and 11 female) undergraduates on a Business and Management degree used a multimedia system to learn about the operation of a bicycle pump. The system consisted of a labelled…

  13. Effects of Intergenerational Interaction on Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Carmen Requena; Gonzalez, Marta Zubiaur

    2008-01-01

    The world population pyramid has changed shape. However, this does not mean that societies have changed their negative concept of old age. Our study proposes an intergenerational service-learning program with 179 university students and 101 slightly depressed elderly people. The results show that the elderly people who interacted improved in…

  14. Enhancing Interactive Tutorial Effectiveness through Visual Cueing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jamet, Eric; Fernandez, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated whether learning how to use a web service with an interactive tutorial can be enhanced by cueing. We expected the attentional guidance provided by visual cues to facilitate the selection of information in static screen displays that corresponded to spoken explanations. Unlike most previous studies in this area, we…

  15. Effect of interactions on the conductance of graphene nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Bazzanella, M.; Faccioli, P.; Lipparini, E.

    2010-11-15

    We study the effects of the interaction between electrons and holes on the conductance G of quasi-one-dimensional graphene systems. We first consider as a benchmark the limit in which all interactions are negligible, recovering the predictions of the tight-binding approximation for the spectrum of the system, and the well-known result G=4e{sup 2}/h for the lowest conductance quantum. Then we consider an exactly solvable field theoretical model in which the electromagnetic interactions are effectively local. Finally, we use the effective-field theory formalism to develop an exactly solvable model in which we also include the effect of nonlocal interactions. We find that such interactions turn the nominally metallic armchair graphene nanoribbon into a semiconductor while the short-range interactions lead to a correction to the G=4e{sup 2}/h formula.

  16. TRC8, A KIDNEY CANCER-ASSOCIATED UBIQUITIN LIGASE, IS STEROL-REGULATED AND INTERACTS WITH LIPID AND PROTEIN BIOSYNTHETIC PATHWAYS

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jason P.; Brauweiler, Anne; Rudolph, Michael; Hooper, Joan E.; Drabkin, Harry A.; Gemmill, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    TRC8/RNF139 encodes an ER-resident E3-ubiquitin ligase that inhibits growth in a RING- and ubiquitylation-dependent manner. TRC8 also contains a predicted sterol-sensing domain. Here we report that TRC8 protein levels are sterol-responsive, and that it binds and stimulates ubiquitylation of the ER-anchor protein, INSIG. Induction of TRC8 destabilized the precursor forms of the transcription factors, SREBP-1 and SREBP-2. Loss of SREBP precursors was proteasome-dependent, required a functional RING domain, occurred without generating processed nuclear forms and suppressed SREBP target genes. TRC8 knockdown had opposite effects in sterol-deprived cells. In Drosophila, growth inhibition by DTrc8 was genetically suppressed by loss of specific MPN domain-containing proteins found in the COP9 signalosome and eIF3. DTrc8 genetically and physicially interacted with two eIF3 subunits, eIF3f and eIF3h. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed these interactions in mammalian cells and TRC8 over-expression suppressed polysome profiles. Moreover, high molecular weight ubiquitylated proteins were observed in eIF3 immunoprecipitations from TRC8 over-expressing cells. Thus, TRC8 function may provide a regulatory link between the lipid and protein biosynthetic pathways. PMID:20068067

  17. Tetramethylpyrazine Produces Antidepressant-Like Effects in Mice Through Promotion of BDNF Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Bo; Huang, Chao; Chen, Xiang-Fan; Tong, Li-Juan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Current antidepressants are clinically effective only after several weeks of administration. Tetramethylpyrazine (TMP) is an identified component of Ligusticum wallichii with neuroprotective effects. Here, we investigated the antidepressant effects of TMP in mice models of depression. Methods: Antidepressant effects of TMP were first detected in the forced swim test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST), and further assessed in the chronic social defeat stress (CSDS) model. Changes in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling pathway and in hippocampal neurogenesis after CSDS and TMP treatment were then investigated. A tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor and BDNF signaling inhibitors were also used to determine the mechanisms of TMP. Results: TMP exhibited potent antidepressant effects in the FST and TST without affecting locomotor activity. TMP also prevented the CSDS-induced symptoms. Moreover, TMP completely restored the CSDS-induced decrease of BDNF signaling pathway and hippocampal neurogenesis. Furthermore, a blockade of the BDNF signaling pathway prevented the antidepressant effects of TMP, while TMP produced no influence on the monoaminergic system. Conclusions: In conclusion, these data provide the first evidence that TMP has antidepressant effects, and this was mediated by promoting the BDNF signaling pathway. PMID:25618406

  18. Metformin exerts anticancer effects through the inhibition of the Sonic hedgehog signaling pathway in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    FAN, CONG; WANG, YUNSHAN; LIU, ZIMING; SUN, YING; WANG, XIUWEN; WEI, GUANGWEI; WEI, JUNMIN

    2015-01-01

    Metformin, a widely prescribed antidiabetic drug, has previously been shown to lower the risk of certain types of cancer, including that of breast cancer, and to improve prognosis. Its anticancer effects, which are mediated by the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), have become notable. The Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway is involved in changes in mammary ducts and malignant transformation. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the role of the Shh pathway in mediating the anticancer effects of metformin and the correlation between AMPK and the Shh pathway. We investigated the effectiveness of metformin in inhibiting the proliferation, migration, invasion and stemness of breast cancer cells in vitro using RNA extraction and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), western blot analysis, cell proliferation assay, scratch-wound assay (cell migration assay), cell invasion assay, mammosphere culture and flow cytometry. In in vivo experiments, a tumor xenograft model was used to detect the effects of metformin on cancer cell proliferation. The results revealed that the treatment of breast cancer cells with metformin led to the inhibition of the Shh signaling pathway. Importantly, metformin inhibited recombinant human Shh (rhShh)-induced cell migration, invasion, and stemness, and impaired cell proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated downregulation of AMPK reversed the inhibitory effects of metformin on rhShh-induced Gli-1 expression and stemness. Our findings identified a role of the Shh signaling pathway in the anticancer effects of metformin in breast cancer. Furthermore, we revealed that the metformin-mediated inhibition of the Shh signaling pathway may be dependent on AMPK. PMID:25999130

  19. Metformin exerts anticancer effects through the inhibition of the Sonic hedgehog signaling pathway in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Fan, Cong; Wang, Yunshan; Liu, Ziming; Sun, Ying; Wang, Xiuwen; Wei, Guangwei; Wei, Junmin

    2015-07-01

    Metformin, a widely prescribed antidiabetic drug, has previously been shown to lower the risk of certain types of cancer, including that of breast cancer, and to improve prognosis. Its anticancer effects, which are mediated by the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), have become notable. The Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway is involved in changes in mammary ducts and malignant transformation. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the role of the Shh pathway in mediating the anticancer effects of metformin and the correlation between AMPK and the Shh pathway. We investigated the effectiveness of metformin in inhibiting the proliferation, migration, invasion and stemness of breast cancer cells in vitro using RNA extraction and reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), western blot analysis, cell proliferation assay, scratch-wound assay (cell migration assay), cell invasion assay, mammosphere culture and flow cytometry. In in vivo experiments, a tumor xenograft model was used to detect the effects of metformin on cancer cell proliferation. The results revealed that the treatment of breast cancer cells with metformin led to the inhibition of the Shh signaling pathway. Importantly, metformin inhibited recombinant human Shh (rhShh)‑induced cell migration, invasion, and stemness, and impaired cell proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the small interfering RNA (siRNA)‑mediated downregulation of AMPK reversed the inhibitory effects of metformin on rhShh‑induced Gli-1 expression and stemness. Our findings identified a role of the Shh signaling pathway in the anticancer effects of metformin in breast cancer. Furthermore, we revealed that the metformin-mediated inhibition of the Shh signaling pathway may be dependent on AMPK. PMID:25999130

  20. Mercury as a Global Pollutant: Sources, Pathways, and Effects

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a global pollutant that affects human and ecosystem health. We synthesize understanding of sources, atmosphere-land-ocean Hg dynamics and health effects, and consider the implications of Hg-control policies. Primary anthropogenic Hg emissions greatly exceed natural geogenic sources, resulting in increases in Hg reservoirs and subsequent secondary Hg emissions that facilitate its global distribution. The ultimate fate of emitted Hg is primarily recalcitrant soil pools and deep ocean waters and sediments. Transfers of Hg emissions to largely unavailable reservoirs occur over the time scale of centuries, and are primarily mediated through atmospheric exchanges of wet/dry deposition and evasion from vegetation, soil organic matter and ocean surfaces. A key link between inorganic Hg inputs and exposure of humans and wildlife is the net production of methylmercury, which occurs mainly in reducing zones in freshwater, terrestrial, and coastal environments, and the subsurface ocean. Elevated human exposure to methylmercury primarily results from consumption of estuarine and marine fish. Developing fetuses are most at risk from this neurotoxin but health effects of highly exposed populations and wildlife are also a concern. Integration of Hg science with national and international policy efforts is needed to target efforts and evaluate efficacy. PMID:23590191

  1. Mercury as a global pollutant: sources, pathways, and effects.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Charles T; Mason, Robert P; Chan, Hing Man; Jacob, Daniel J; Pirrone, Nicola

    2013-05-21

    Mercury (Hg) is a global pollutant that affects human and ecosystem health. We synthesize understanding of sources, atmosphere-land-ocean Hg dynamics and health effects, and consider the implications of Hg-control policies. Primary anthropogenic Hg emissions greatly exceed natural geogenic sources, resulting in increases in Hg reservoirs and subsequent secondary Hg emissions that facilitate its global distribution. The ultimate fate of emitted Hg is primarily recalcitrant soil pools and deep ocean waters and sediments. Transfers of Hg emissions to largely unavailable reservoirs occur over the time scale of centuries, and are primarily mediated through atmospheric exchanges of wet/dry deposition and evasion from vegetation, soil organic matter and ocean surfaces. A key link between inorganic Hg inputs and exposure of humans and wildlife is the net production of methylmercury, which occurs mainly in reducing zones in freshwater, terrestrial, and coastal environments, and the subsurface ocean. Elevated human exposure to methylmercury primarily results from consumption of estuarine and marine fish. Developing fetuses are most at risk from this neurotoxin but health effects of highly exposed populations and wildlife are also a concern. Integration of Hg science with national and international policy efforts is needed to target efforts and evaluate efficacy.

  2. Molecular convergence of clock and photosensory pathways through PIF3-TOC1 interaction and co-occupancy of target promoters.

    PubMed

    Soy, Judit; Leivar, Pablo; González-Schain, Nahuel; Martín, Guiomar; Diaz, Céline; Sentandreu, Maria; Al-Sady, Bassem; Quail, Peter H; Monte, Elena

    2016-04-26

    A mechanism for integrating light perception and the endogenous circadian clock is central to a plant's capacity to coordinate its growth and development with the prevailing daily light/dark cycles. Under short-day (SD) photocycles, hypocotyl elongation is maximal at dawn, being promoted by the collective activity of a quartet of transcription factors, called PIF1, PIF3, PIF4, and PIF5 (phytochrome-interacting factors). PIF protein abundance in SDs oscillates as a balance between synthesis and photoactivated-phytochrome-imposed degradation, with maximum levels accumulating at the end of the long night. Previous evidence shows that elongation under diurnal conditions (as well as in shade) is also subjected to circadian gating. However, the mechanism underlying these phenomena is incompletely understood. Here we show that the PIFs and the core clock component Timing of CAB expression 1 (TOC1) display coincident cobinding to the promoters of predawn-phased, growth-related genes under SD conditions. TOC1 interacts with the PIFs and represses their transcriptional activation activity, antagonizing PIF-induced growth. Given the dynamics of TOC1 abundance (displaying high postdusk levels that progressively decline during the long night), our data suggest that TOC1 functions to provide a direct output from the core clock that transiently constrains the growth-promoting activity of the accumulating PIFs early postdusk, thereby gating growth to predawn, when conditions for cell elongation are optimal. These findings unveil a previously unrecognized mechanism whereby a core circadian clock output signal converges immediately with the phytochrome photosensory pathway to coregulate directly the activity of the PIF transcription factors positioned at the apex of a transcriptional network that regulates a diversity of downstream morphogenic responses. PMID:27071129

  3. Amino acid residues in the laminin G domains of protein S involved in tissue factor pathway inhibitor interaction.

    PubMed

    Somajo, Sofia; Ahnström, Josefin; Fernandez-Recio, Juan; Gierula, Magdalena; Villoutreix, Bruno O; Dahlbäck, Björn

    2015-05-01

    Protein S functions as a cofactor for tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) and activated protein C (APC). The sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG)-like region of protein S, consisting of two laminin G-like domains (LG1 and LG2), contains the binding site for C4b-binding protein (C4BP) and TFPI. Furthermore, the LG-domains are essential for the TFPI-cofactor function and for expression of full APC-cofactor function. The aim of the current study was to localise functionally important interaction sites in the protein S LG-domains using amino acid substitutions. Four protein S variants were created in which clusters of surface-exposed amino acid residues within the LG-domains were substituted. All variants bound normally to C4BP and were fully functional as cofactors for APC in plasma and in pure component assays. Two variants, SHBG2 (E612A, I614A, F265A, V393A, H453A), involving residues from both LG-domains, and SHBG3 (K317A, I330A, V336A, D365A) where residues in LG1 were substituted, showed 50-60 % reduction in enhancement of TFPI in FXa inhibition assays. For SHBG3 the decreased TFPI cofactor function was confirmed in plasma based thrombin generation assays. Both SHBG variants bound to TFPI with decreased affinity in surface plasmon resonance experiments. The TFPI Kunitz 3 domain is known to contain the interaction site for protein S. Using in silico analysis and protein docking exercises, preliminary models of the protein S SHBG/TFPI Kunitz domain 3 complex were created. Based on a combination of experimental and in silico data we propose a binding site for TFPI on protein S, involving both LG-domains.

  4. Electrical dipole-dipole interaction effects on magnetocurrent in organic phosphorescent materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Ming; Dai, Yanfeng; Ma, Dongge; Hu, Bin

    2011-08-01

    This letter reports the experimental studies on electrical dipole-dipole interaction effects on magnetocurrent (MC) and magneto-electroluminescence (MFEEL) based on two phosphorescent dyes: heavy-metal complex Ir(ppy)3 and Ir(ppy)2(acac) with strong spin-orbital coupling but different electrical dipole moments. We find that the Ir(ppy)3 with strong electrical dipole moment shows negligible MC and MFEEL. However, the Ir(ppy)2(acac) with weak dipole moment exhibits appreciable MC and MFEEL. The experimental results suggest that the electrical dipole-dipole interaction can change the MC and MFEEL from capture-based regime, where charge carriers are captured through spin-dependent process at short distance, to intersystem crossing-based regime, where charge carriers are captured through spin random process at long distance. As a result, changing electrical dipole-dipole interaction presents a new pathway to tune magnetic field effects in organic semiconductors.

  5. Modelization of nanospace interaction involving a ferromagnetic atom: a spin polarization effect study by thermogravimetric analysis.

    PubMed

    Santhanam, K S V; Chen, Xu; Gupta, S

    2014-04-01

    Ab initio studies of ferromagnetic atom interacting with carbon nanotubes have been reported in the literature that predict when the interaction is strong, a higher hybridization with confinement effect will result in spin polarization in the ferromagnetic atom. The spin polarization effect on the thermal oxidation to form its oxide is modeled here for the ferromagnetic atom and its alloy, as the above studies predict the 4s electrons are polarized in the atom. The four models developed here provide a pathway for distinguishing the type of interaction that exists in the real system. The extent of spin polarization in the ferromagnetic atom has been examined by varying the amount of carbon nanotubes in the composites in the thermogravimetric experiments. In this study we report the experimental results on the CoNi alloy which appears to show selective spin polarization. The products of the thermal oxidation has been analyzed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. PMID:24734699

  6. Parent suicide: pathways of effects into the third generation.

    PubMed

    Cain, Albert C

    2006-01-01

    There is a slim, slowly emerging literature addressing the impact of parent suicide upon children. By contrast with some other potentially pathogenic contexts for children (e.g., physical abuse), there has been virtually no exploration of the effect of a parent's suicide upon his or her children's parenting, that is, the transmission into a third generation of the sequelae of the original parent suicide. Based primarily on clinical and preventive work with adult "children of suicide" and their families, this paper begins to map some of the paths, direct and transparent or subterranean and disguised, that such experiences take into further generations. Patterns described include massive indulgence, communication of dire expectations, vicissitudes of family secrets, life-blanching living down the shame, defensive barriers against depressive affects, as well as dread-filled avoidance of producing a third generation.

  7. Interaction between cAMP-dependent and insulin-dependent signal pathways in tyrosine phosphorylation in primary cultures of rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Y; Uchijima, Y; Ariga, M; Seki, T; Takenaka, A; Hakuno, F; Takahashi, S I; Ariga, T; Noguchi, T

    1997-01-01

    The present studies were undertaken to determine whether the interaction between cAMP-dependent and insulin-dependent pathways in primary cultures of rat hepatocytes affects biological functions and tyrosine phosphorylation. Quiescent hepatocytes were pretreated with dibutyryl cAMP or cAMP-generating agents such as glucagon, and then treated or not with insulin. Preincubation for 6 h with dibutyryl cAMP or glucagon enhanced the effect of insulin on DNA synthesis, but not the effect of insulin on amino acid transport or glycogen and protein synthesis. Tyrosine phosphorylation of intracellular proteins was determined by immunoblot analysis using an anti-phosphotyrosine antibody. Maximum tyrosine phosphorylation of a 195 kDa protein, which may be a substrate of insulin receptor kinase, of 175-180 kDa proteins, including insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1, and of 90-95 kDa proteins, including the insulin receptor beta-subunit, was reached within 30 s of incubation with insulin. Pretreatment for about 3 h with dibutyryl cAMP or cAMP-generating agents clearly increased insulin-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of the 195 kDa protein, but not IRS-1, IRS-2 or the insulin receptor beta-subunit. Because dibutyryl cAMP and cAMP-generating agents did not increase insulin receptor number or its kinase activity, the effect of cAMP on this potentiation of tyrosine phosphorylation is assumed to be exerted at a step distal to insulin receptor kinase activation. The potentiation by cAMP pretreatment of insulin-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation may in part be secondary to inhibition of phosphotyrosine phosphatase activity, because cAMP pretreatment blunted the effect of Na3VO4 on the net tyrosine phosphorylation of the 195 kDa protein as compared with cells pretreated with no additive. In summary, the interactions between cAMP-dependent and insulin-dependent pathways that lead to augmentation of DNA synthesis appear to parallel the changes in tyrosine phosphorylation. Further

  8. Effects of homocysteine on metabolic pathways in cultured astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ying; Brennan, Lorraine

    2008-06-01

    Homocysteine is an amino acid that is an important risk factor for several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. Increased homocysteine levels induce neuronal cell death in a variety of neuronal types. However, very few studies have probed the effects of homocysteine in astrocytes. The present study investigated the effects of homocysteine on primary cultures of astrocytes by exposing astrocytes to 400 microM homocysteine for 20 h. Metabolic extracts of cells were prepared following a 4-h incubation in minimum medium with 5.5 mM [U-(13)C]glucose in the presence or absence of homocysteine and analysed using (13)C NMR. The expression level of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoform 2 (PDK-2), NAD(P)H levels and mitochondrial membrane potential responses were investigated following culture with homocysteine. Metabolomic analysis was performed using (1)H NMR spectroscopy and pattern recognition analysis. Following incubation with homocysteine there was a significant decrease (48%) in the ratio of flux through pyruvate carboxylase (PC) and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) which was due to an increased flux through PDH. In addition, homocysteine culture resulted in a significant reduction in PDK-2 protein expression. Following stimulation with glucose there was a significant increase in NAD(P)H levels and an impaired hyperpolarisation of the mitochondrial membrane in homocysteine-treated cells. Metabolomic analysis showed that the most discriminating metabolites following homocysteine treatment were choline and hypotaurine. In summary, the results demonstrated that sub-lethal concentrations of homocysteine caused significant metabolic changes and altered mitochondrial function in primary cultures of astrocytes. PMID:18417255

  9. Competition between members of the tribbles pseudokinase protein family shapes their interactions with mitogen activated protein kinase pathways.

    PubMed

    Guan, Hongtao; Shuaib, Aban; Leon, David Davila De; Angyal, Adrienn; Salazar, Maria; Velasco, Guillermo; Holcombe, Mike; Dower, Steven K; Kiss-Toth, Endre

    2016-01-01

    Spatio-temporal regulation of intracellular signalling networks is key to normal cellular physiology; dysregulation of which leads to disease. The family of three mammalian tribbles proteins has emerged as an important controller of signalling via regulating the activity of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK), the PI3-kinase induced signalling network and E3 ubiquitin ligases. However, the importance of potential redundancy in the action of tribbles and how the differences in affinities for the various binding partners may influence signalling control is currently unclear. We report that tribbles proteins can bind to an overlapping set of MAPK-kinases (MAPKK) in live cells and dictate the localisation of the complexes. Binding studies in transfected cells reveal common regulatory mechanisms and suggest that tribbles and MAPKs may interact with MAPKKs in a competitive manner. Computational modelling of the impact of tribbles on MAPK activation suggests a high sensitivity of this system to changes in tribbles levels, highlighting that these proteins are ideally placed to control the dynamics and balance of activation of concurrent signalling pathways. PMID:27600771

  10. Competition between members of the tribbles pseudokinase protein family shapes their interactions with mitogen activated protein kinase pathways

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Hongtao; Shuaib, Aban; Leon, David Davila De; Angyal, Adrienn; Salazar, Maria; Velasco, Guillermo; Holcombe, Mike; Dower, Steven K.; Kiss-Toth, Endre

    2016-01-01

    Spatio-temporal regulation of intracellular signalling networks is key to normal cellular physiology; dysregulation of which leads to disease. The family of three mammalian tribbles proteins has emerged as an important controller of signalling via regulating the activity of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK), the PI3-kinase induced signalling network and E3 ubiquitin ligases. However, the importance of potential redundancy in the action of tribbles and how the differences in affinities for the various binding partners may influence signalling control is currently unclear. We report that tribbles proteins can bind to an overlapping set of MAPK-kinases (MAPKK) in live cells and dictate the localisation of the complexes. Binding studies in transfected cells reveal common regulatory mechanisms and suggest that tribbles and MAPKs may interact with MAPKKs in a competitive manner. Computational modelling of the impact of tribbles on MAPK activation suggests a high sensitivity of this system to changes in tribbles levels, highlighting that these proteins are ideally placed to control the dynamics and balance of activation of concurrent signalling pathways. PMID:27600771

  11. CFTR interacts with ZO-1 to regulate tight junction assembly and epithelial differentiation through the ZONAB pathway.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Ye Chun; Wang, Yan; Da Silva, Nicolas; Kim, Bongki; Diao, Rui Ying; Hill, Eric; Brown, Dennis; Chan, Hsiao Chang; Breton, Sylvie

    2014-10-15

    Mutations in CFTR lead to dysfunction of tubular organs, which is currently attributed to impairment of its conductive properties. We now show that CFTR regulates tight junction assembly and epithelial cell differentiation through modulation of the ZO-1-ZONAB pathway. CFTR colocalizes with ZO-1 at the tight junctions of trachea and epididymis, and is expressed before ZO-1 in Wolffian ducts. CFTR interacts with ZO-1 through the CTFR PDZ-binding domain. In a three-dimensional (3D) epithelial cell culture model, CFTR regulates tight junction assembly and is required for tubulogenesis. CFTR inhibition or knockdown reduces ZO-1 expression and induces the translocation of the transcription factor ZONAB (also known as YBX3) from tight junctions to the nucleus, followed by upregulation of the transcription of CCND1 and downregulation of ErbB2 transcription. The epididymal tubules of cftr(-/-) and cftr(ΔF508) mice have reduced ZO-1 levels, increased ZONAB nuclear expression, and decreased epithelial cell differentiation, illustrated by the reduced expression of apical AQP9 and V-ATPase. This study provides a new paradigm for the etiology of diseases associated with CFTR mutations, including cystic fibrosis.

  12. APC/C and retinoblastoma interaction: cross-talk of retinoblastoma protein with the ubiquitin proteasome pathway.

    PubMed

    Ramanujan, Ajeena; Tiwari, Swati

    2016-10-01

    The ubiquitin (Ub) ligase anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) and the tumour suppressor retinoblastoma protein (pRB) play key roles in cell cycle regulation. APC/C is a critical regulator of mitosis and G1-phase of the cell cycle whereas pRB keeps a check on proliferation by inhibiting transition to the S-phase. APC/C and pRB interact with each other via the co-activator of APC/C, FZR1, providing an alternative pathway of regulation of G1 to S transition by pRB using a post-translational mechanism. Both pRB and FZR1 have complex roles and are implicated not only in regulation of cell proliferation but also in differentiation, quiescence, apoptosis, maintenance of chromosomal integrity and metabolism. Both are also targeted by transforming viruses. We discuss recent advances in our understanding of the involvement of APC/C and pRB in cell cycle based decisions and how these insights will be useful for development of anti-cancer and anti-viral drugs.

  13. APC/C and retinoblastoma interaction: cross-talk of retinoblastoma protein with the ubiquitin proteasome pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ramanujan, Ajeena; Tiwari, Swati

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin (Ub) ligase anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) and the tumour suppressor retinoblastoma protein (pRB) play key roles in cell cycle regulation. APC/C is a critical regulator of mitosis and G1-phase of the cell cycle whereas pRB keeps a check on proliferation by inhibiting transition to the S-phase. APC/C and pRB interact with each other via the co-activator of APC/C, FZR1, providing an alternative pathway of regulation of G1 to S transition by pRB using a post-translational mechanism. Both pRB and FZR1 have complex roles and are implicated not only in regulation of cell proliferation but also in differentiation, quiescence, apoptosis, maintenance of chromosomal integrity and metabolism. Both are also targeted by transforming viruses. We discuss recent advances in our understanding of the involvement of APC/C and pRB in cell cycle based decisions and how these insights will be useful for development of anti-cancer and anti-viral drugs. PMID:27402801

  14. A Course on Effective Teacher-Child Interactions. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamre, Bridget K.; Pianta, Robert C.; Burchinal, Margaret; Field, Samuel; LoCasale-Crouch, Jennifer; Downer, Jason T.; Howes, Carollee; LaParo, Karen; Scott-Little, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    This study found that teachers who were randomly assigned to take a 14-week course on effective teacher-child interactions demonstrated significant changes in beliefs and knowledge about effective practices and provided more stimulating and engaging interactions in the classroom. [This research brief is based on: Hamre, B. K., Pianta, R. C.,…

  15. 40 CFR 610.23 - Operator interaction effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Operator interaction effects. 610.23 Section 610.23 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL... Analysis § 610.23 Operator interaction effects. The device will also be evaluated with respect to: (a)...

  16. Experienced Elementary Music Teachers' Perceptions of Effective Classroom Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Beth Ellen

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how experienced elementary general music teachers perceived the effectiveness of their instructional interactions with students in the music classroom. The following questions were addressed in this study: What types of interactions do experienced teachers use most frequently and perceive as effective in…

  17. Identifying drug effects via pathway alterations using an integer linear programming optimization formulation on phosphoproteomic data.

    PubMed

    Mitsos, Alexander; Melas, Ioannis N; Siminelakis, Paraskeuas; Chairakaki, Aikaterini D; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Alexopoulos, Leonidas G

    2009-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of cell function and drug action is a major endeavor in the pharmaceutical industry. Drug effects are governed by the intrinsic properties of the drug (i.e., selectivity and potency) and the specific signaling transduction network of the host (i.e., normal vs. diseased cells). Here, we describe an unbiased, phosphoproteomic-based approach to identify drug effects by monitoring drug-induced topology alterations. With our proposed method, drug effects are investigated under diverse stimulations of the signaling network. Starting with a generic pathway made of logical gates, we build a cell-type specific map by constraining it to fit 13 key phopshoprotein signals under 55 experimental conditions. Fitting is performed via an Integer Linear Program (ILP) formulation and solution by standard ILP solvers; a procedure that drastically outperforms previous fitting schemes. Then, knowing the cell's topology, we monitor the same key phosphoprotein signals under the presence of drug and we re-optimize the specific map to reveal drug-induced topology alterations. To prove our case, we make a topology for the hepatocytic cell-line HepG2 and we evaluate the effects of 4 drugs: 3 selective inhibitors for the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) and a non-selective drug. We confirm effects easily predictable from the drugs' main target (i.e., EGFR inhibitors blocks the EGFR pathway) but we also uncover unanticipated effects due to either drug promiscuity or the cell's specific topology. An interesting finding is that the selective EGFR inhibitor Gefitinib inhibits signaling downstream the Interleukin-1alpha (IL1alpha) pathway; an effect that cannot be extracted from binding affinity-based approaches. Our method represents an unbiased approach to identify drug effects on small to medium size pathways which is scalable to larger topologies with any type of signaling interventions (small molecules, RNAi, etc). The method can reveal drug effects on

  18. Evidence for multiple stressor interactions and effects on coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Ban, Stephen S; Graham, Nicholas A J; Connolly, Sean R

    2014-03-01

    Concern is growing about the potential effects of interacting multiple stressors, especially as the global climate changes. We provide a comprehensive review of multiple stressor interactions in coral reef ecosystems, which are widely considered to be one of the most sensitive ecosystems to global change. First, we synthesized coral reef studies that examined interactions of two or more stressors, highlighting stressor interactions (where one stressor directly influences another) and potentially synergistic effects on response variables (where two stressors interact to produce an effect that is greater than purely additive). For stressor-stressor interactions, we found 176 studies that examined at least 2 of the 13 stressors of interest. Applying network analysis to analyze relationships between stressors, we found that pathogens were exacerbated by more costressors than any other stressor, with ca. 78% of studies reporting an enhancing effect by another stressor. Sedimentation, storms, and water temperature directly affected the largest number of other stressors. Pathogens, nutrients, and crown-of-thorns starfish were the most-influenced stressors. We found 187 studies that examined the effects of two or more stressors on a third dependent variable. The interaction of irradiance and temperature on corals has been the subject of more research (62 studies, 33% of the total) than any other combination of stressors, with many studies reporting a synergistic effect on coral symbiont photosynthetic performance (n = 19). Second, we performed a quantitative meta-analysis of existing literature on this most-studied interaction (irradiance and temperature). We found that the mean effect size of combined treatments was statistically indistinguishable from a purely additive interaction, although it should be noted that the sample size was relatively small (n = 26). Overall, although in aggregate a large body of literature examines stressor effects on coral reefs and coral

  19. Evidence for multiple stressor interactions and effects on coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Ban, Stephen S; Graham, Nicholas A J; Connolly, Sean R

    2014-03-01

    Concern is growing about the potential effects of interacting multiple stressors, especially as the global climate changes. We provide a comprehensive review of multiple stressor interactions in coral reef ecosystems, which are widely considered to be one of the most sensitive ecosystems to global change. First, we synthesized coral reef studies that examined interactions of two or more stressors, highlighting stressor interactions (where one stressor directly influences another) and potentially synergistic effects on response variables (where two stressors interact to produce an effect that is greater than purely additive). For stressor-stressor interactions, we found 176 studies that examined at least 2 of the 13 stressors of interest. Applying network analysis to analyze relationships between stressors, we found that pathogens were exacerbated by more costressors than any other stressor, with ca. 78% of studies reporting an enhancing effect by another stressor. Sedimentation, storms, and water temperature directly affected the largest number of other stressors. Pathogens, nutrients, and crown-of-thorns starfish were the most-influenced stressors. We found 187 studies that examined the effects of two or more stressors on a third dependent variable. The interaction of irradiance and temperature on corals has been the subject of more research (62 studies, 33% of the total) than any other combination of stressors, with many studies reporting a synergistic effect on coral symbiont photosynthetic performance (n = 19). Second, we performed a quantitative meta-analysis of existing literature on this most-studied interaction (irradiance and temperature). We found that the mean effect size of combined treatments was statistically indistinguishable from a purely additive interaction, although it should be noted that the sample size was relatively small (n = 26). Overall, although in aggregate a large body of literature examines stressor effects on coral reefs and coral

  20. Spin effects in the weak interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, S.J. Chicago Univ., IL . Dept. of Physics Chicago Univ., IL . Enrico Fermi Inst.)

    1990-01-01

    Modern experiments investigating the beta decay of the neutron and light nuclei are still providing important constraints on the theory of the weak interaction. Beta decay experiments are yielding more precise values for allowed and induced weak coupling constants and putting constraints on possible extensions to the standard electroweak model. Here we emphasize the implications of recent experiments to pin down the strengths of the weak vector and axial vector couplings of the nucleon.

  1. Climate targets and cost-effective climate stabilization pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Held, H.

    2015-08-01

    Climate economics has developed two main tools to derive an economically adequate response to the climate problem. Cost benefit analysis weighs in any available information on mitigation costs and benefits and thereby derives an "optimal" global mean temperature. Quite the contrary, cost effectiveness analysis allows deriving costs of potential policy targets and the corresponding cost- minimizing investment paths. The article highlights pros and cons of both approaches and then focusses on the implications of a policy that strives at limiting global warming to 2 °C compared to pre-industrial values. The related mitigation costs and changes in the energy sector are summarized according to the IPCC report of 2014. The article then points to conceptual difficulties when internalizing uncertainty in these types of analyses and suggests pragmatic solutions. Key statements on mitigation economics remain valid under uncertainty when being given the adequate interpretation. Furthermore, the expected economic value of perfect climate information is found to be on the order of hundreds of billions of Euro per year if a 2°-policy were requested. Finally, the prospects of climate policy are sketched.

  2. Curcumin protects against ischemic spinal cord injury: The pathway effect

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinhua; Wei, Hao; Lin, Meimei; Chen, Chunmei; Wang, Chunhua; Liu, Maobai

    2013-01-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors have been shown to participate in nerve cell injury during spinal cord ischemia. This study observed a protective effect of curcumin on ischemic spinal cord injury. Models of spinal cord ischemia were established by ligating the lumbar artery from the left renal artery to the bifurcation of the abdominal aorta. At 24 hours after model establishment, the rats were intraperitoneally injected with curcumin. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical results demonstrated that after spinal cord ischemia, inducible nitric oxide synthase and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor mRNA and protein expression significantly increased. However, curcumin significantly decreased inducible nitric oxide synthase and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor mRNA and protein expression in the ischemic spinal cord. Tarlov scale results showed that curcumin significantly improved motor function of the rat hind limb after spinal cord ischemia. The results demonstrate that curcumin exerts a neuroprotective fect against ischemic spinal cord injury by decreasing inducible nitric oxide synthase and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor expression. PMID:25206661

  3. Interaction and the Online Distance Classroom: Do Instructional Methods Effect the Quality of Interaction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanuka, Heather

    2011-01-01

    In this special issue, I bring together two studies to provide a comprehensive overview on diverse and interactive instructional methods aimed to facilitate higher levels of learning. One study explored the effects of group interaction using different instructional strategies focusing on the learning "process" using the Community of Inquiry…

  4. Compound K, a Ginsenoside Metabolite, Inhibits Colon Cancer Growth via Multiple Pathways Including p53-p21 Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiyu; Du, Guang-Jian; Wang, Chong-Zhi; Wen, Xiao-Dong; Calway, Tyler; Li, Zejuan; He, Tong-Chuan; Du, Wei; Bissonnette, Marc; Musch, Mark W.; Chang, Eugene B.; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2013-01-01

    Compound K (20-O-beta-d-glucopyranosyl-20(S)-protopanaxadiol, CK), an intestinal bacterial metabolite of ginseng protopanaxadiol saponins, has been shown to inhibit cell growth in a variety of cancers. However, the mechanisms are not completely understood, especially in colorectal cancer (CRC). A xenograft tumor model was used first to examine the anti-CRC effect of CK in vivo. Then, multiple in vitro assays were applied to investigate the anticancer effects of CK including antiproliferation, apoptosis and cell cycle distribution. In addition, a qPCR array and western blot analysis were executed to screen and validate the molecules and pathways involved. We observed that CK significantly inhibited the growth of HCT-116 tumors in an athymic nude mouse xenograft model. CK significantly inhibited the proliferation of human CRC cell lines HCT-116, SW-480, and HT-29 in a dose- and time-dependent manner. We also observed that CK induced cell apoptosis and arrested the cell cycle in the G1 phase in HCT-116 cells. The processes were related to the upregulation of p53/p21, FoxO3a-p27/p15 and Smad3, and downregulation of cdc25A, CDK4/6 and cyclin D1/3. The major regulated targets of CK were cyclin dependent inhibitors, including p21, p27, and p15. These results indicate that CK inhibits transcriptional activation of multiple tumor-promoting pathways in CRC, suggesting that CK could be an active compound in the prevention or treatment of CRC. PMID:23434653

  5. Exposure pathway-dependent effects of the fungicide epoxiconazole on a decomposer-detritivore system.

    PubMed

    Feckler, Alexander; Goedkoop, Willem; Zubrod, Jochen P; Schulz, Ralf; Bundschuh, Mirco

    2016-11-15

    Shredders play a central role in the breakdown of leaf material in aquatic systems. These organisms and the ecological function they provide may, however, be affected by chemical stressors either as a consequence of direct waterborne exposure or through alterations in food-quality (indirect pathway). To unravel the biological relevance of these effect pathways, we applied a 2×2-factorial test design. Leaf material was microbially colonized for 10days in absence or presence of the fungicide epoxiconazole (15μg/L) and subsequently fed to the shredder Asellus aquaticus under exposure to epoxiconazole (15μg/L) or in fungicide-free medium over a 28-day period (n=40). Both effect pathways caused alterations in asselids' food processing, physiological fitness, and growth, although not always statistically significantly: assimilation either increased or remained at a similar level relative to the control suggesting compensatory behavior of A. aquaticus to cope with the enhanced energy demand for detoxification processes and decreased nutritional quality of the food. The latter was driven by lowered microbial biomasses and the altered composition of fatty acids associated with the leaf material. Even with increased assimilation, direct and indirect effects caused decreases in the growth and lipid (fatty acid) content of A. aquaticus with relative effect sizes between 10 and 40%. Moreover, the concentrations of two essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (i.e., arachidonic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid) were non-significantly reduced (up to ~15%) in asselids. This effect was, however, independent of the exposure pathway. Although waterborne effects were generally stronger than the diet-related effects, results suggest impaired functioning of A. aquaticus via both effect pathways. PMID:27450951

  6. Effects of aerosol emission pathways on future warming and human health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partanen, Antti-Ilari; Matthews, Damon

    2016-04-01

    The peak global temperature is largely determined by cumulative emissions of long-lived greenhouse gases. However, anthropogenic emissions include also so-called short-lived climate forcers (SLCFs), which include aerosol particles and methane. Previous studies with simple models indicate that the timing of SLCF emission reductions has only a small effect on the rate of global warming and even less of an effect on global peak temperatures. However, these simple model analyses do not capture the spatial dynamics of aerosol-climate interactions, nor do they consider the additional effects of aerosol emissions on human health. There is therefore merit in assessing how the timing of aerosol emission reductions affects global temperature and premature mortality caused by elevated aerosol concentrations, using more comprehensive climate models. Here, we used an aerosol-climate model ECHAM-HAMMOZ to simulate the direct and indirect radiative forcing resulting from aerosol emissions. We simulated Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios, and we also designed idealized low and high aerosol emission pathways based on RCP4.5 scenario (LOW and HIGH, respectively). From these simulations, we calculated the Effective Radiative Forcing (ERF) from aerosol emissions between 1850 and 2100, as well as aerosol concentrations used to estimate the premature mortality caused by particulate pollution. We then use the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model to simulate the spatial and temporal pattern of climate response to these aerosol-forcing scenarios, in combination with prescribed emissions of both short and long-lived greenhouse gases according to the RCP4.5 scenario. In the RCP scenarios, global mean ERF declined during the 21st century from -1.3 W m-2 to -0.4 W m-2 (RCP8.5) and -0.2 W m-2 (RCP2.6). In the sensitivity scenarios, the forcing at the end of the 21st century was -1.6 W m-2 (HIGH) and practically zero (LOW). The difference in global mean temperature

  7. Interparticle interactions and polarization effects in colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Hayter, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    The physics of simple colloidal systems is usually dominated by three independent length scales: the particle size, the average interparticle distance, and the range of the interparticle potential. The dispersed particles typically have characteristic dimensions in the range 5 to 100 nm, often with spherical or cylindrical symmetry. Dispersion densities vary over volume fractions ranging from 0.5 to 10/sup -4/, with the corresponding mean interparticle distances ranging from about 1 to 10 diameters (in spherical systems). The interaction potential may be very short ranged (hard sphere), very long ranged (Coulomb or dipolar), or anywhere in between (screened Coulomb), and the correlations exhibited in the dispersion may be gas-like, liquid-like or crystalline, depending on the range of the potential relative to the interparticle distance. This rich phase behavior is responsible for the remarkable importance of colloidal studies in many areas of condensed matter physics and biophysics, but it poses often intractable problems in developing the statistical mechanical descriptions necessary for an understanding of scattering data from colloids. This paper will review the considerable recent progress in this field, in the context of SANS experiments on colloids in which the potentials are dominated by either screened Coulomb or magnetic dipolar interactions; in the case of magnetic colloids (ferrofluids), the use of polarization analysis will also be discussed. 32 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Friction Effects in Atom-Surface Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jentschura, Ulrich D.

    2016-05-01

    Atom-surface interactions both have a conservative as well as a dissipative component. A treatment of the dissipative terms requires the use of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, and the calculation of the imaginary part of the polarizability of an atom is required. The paper will review the recent resolution of a long-standing question regarding the low-frequency asymptotics of the imaginary part, as summarized in and, together with K. Pachucki, G. Lach and M. De Kieviet. The surprising conclusion is that the precise form of the imaginary part for low driving frequency is dominated by a so-called quantum electrodynamic loop correction, where ``correction'' here is not to be taken literally. The one-loop QED term dominates over the tree-level contribution! The findings drastically alter theoretical predictions for non-contact friction, and blackbody friction (due to the atom's interaction with a bath of thermal photons). The basic principle behind the calculation and the methods of nonrelativistic quantum electrodynamics will be discussed. Supported by the NSF (Grant PHY-1403973).

  9. Effect of the short-range interaction on critical phenomena in elastic interaction systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishino, Masamichi; Miyashita, Seiji

    2013-07-01

    The elastic interaction, induced by the lattice distortion due to the difference of the molecular size, causes an effective long-range interaction. In spin-crossover (SC) compounds, local bistable states, i.e., high-spin and low-spin states, have different molecular sizes, and the elastic interaction is important. In bipartite lattices, e.g., the square lattice, the ground state can be two types of phases: ferromagneticlike and antiferromagneticlike phases. In systems like SC compounds, the former phase consists of all small or large molecules, and the latter phase has the configuration of alternating small and large molecules. In fact, both cases are observed in SC systems. In this paper we have studied the effect of the short-range interaction in the elastic system on the properties of those order-disorder phase transitions. We have obtained a phase diagram in the coordinates of the temperature and the strength of the short-range interaction, including the metastable structures. We show that effects of the short-range interaction are essentially different for ferromagneticlike and antiferromagneticlike phase transitions. In the ferromagneticlike transition, the long-range interaction of elasticity is relevant, and the system exhibits a phase transition in the mean-filed universality class. In this case, the long-range interaction strongly enhances the ferromagneticlike order, and it works cooperatively with the short-range interaction. In contrast, in the antiferromagneticlike transition, the elastic interaction slightly enhances the antiferromagneticlike order, but essentially it does not contribute to the ordering, and the system shows a transition in the Ising universality class. We have found that in the border region between ferromagneticlike and antiferromagneticlike phases, the antiferromagneticlike phase has an advantage at finite temperatures. We discuss the critical properties of two-step SC transitions with comparison between the elastic interaction

  10. Nonstandard interaction effects on astrophysical neutrino fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Blennow, Mattias; Meloni, Davide

    2009-09-15

    We investigate new physics effects in the production and detection of high-energy neutrinos at neutrino telescopes. Analyzing the flavor ratios {phi}{sub {mu}}/{phi}{sub {tau}} and {phi}{sub {mu}}/({phi}{sub {tau}}+{phi}{sub e}), we find that the standard model predictions for them can be sensibly altered by new physics effects in the case of pion sources. However, the experimental precision required to see the effects would be very difficult to obtain.

  11. Stress-Immune-Growth Interactions: Cortisol Modulates Suppressors of Cytokine Signaling and JAK/STAT Pathway in Rainbow Trout Liver.

    PubMed

    Philip, Anju M; Vijayan, Mathilakath M

    2015-01-01

    Chronic stress is a major factor in the poor growth and immune performance of salmonids in aquaculture. However, the molecular mechanisms linking stress effects to growth and immune dysfunction is poorly understood. The suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS), a family of genes involved in the inhibition of JAK/STAT pathway, negatively regulates growth hormone and cytokine signaling, but their role in fish is unclear. Here we tested the hypothesis that cortisol modulation of SOCS gene expression is a key molecular mechanism leading to growth and immune suppression in response to stress in fish. Exposure of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) liver slices to cortisol, mimicking stress level, upregulated SOCS-1 and SOCS-2 mRNA abundance and this response was abolished by the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist mifepristone. Bioinformatics analysis confirmed the presence of putative glucocorticoid response elements in rainbow trout SOCS-1 and SOCS-2 promoters. Prior cortisol treatment suppressed acute growth hormone (GH)-stimulated IGF-1 mRNA abundance in trout liver and this involved a reduction in STAT5 phosphorylation and lower total JAK2 protein expression. Prior cortisol treatment also suppressed lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced IL-6 but not IL-8 transcript levels; the former but not the latter cytokine expression is via JAK/STAT phosphorylation. LPS treatment reduced GH signaling, but this was associated with the downregulation of GH receptors and not due to the upregulation of SOCS transcript levels by this endotoxin. Collectively, our results suggest that upregulation of SOCS-1 and SOCS-2 transcript levels by cortisol, and the associated reduction in JAK/STAT signaling pathway, may be a novel mechanism leading to growth reduction and immune suppression during stress in trout.

  12. PfIRR Interacts with HrIGF-I and Activates the MAP-kinase and PI3-kinase Signaling Pathways to Regulate Glycogen Metabolism in Pinctada fucata

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yu; He, Mao-xian

    2016-01-01

    The insulin-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways are major intracellular signaling modules and conserved among eukaryotes that are known to regulate diverse cellular processes. However, they have not been investigated in the mollusk species Pinctada fucata. Here, we demonstrate that insulin-related peptide receptor of P. fucata (pfIRR) interacts with human recombinant insulin-like growth factor I (hrIGF-I), and stimulates the MAPK and PI3K signaling pathways in P. fucata oocytes. We also show that inhibition of pfIRR by the inhibitor PQ401 significantly attenuates the basal and hrIGF-I-induced phosphorylation of MAPK and PI3K/Akt at amino acid residues threonine 308 and serine 473. Furthermore, our experiments show that there is cross-talk between the MAPK and PI3K/Akt pathways, in which MAPK kinase positively regulates the PI3K pathway, and PI3K positively regulates the MAPK cascade. Intramuscular injection of hrIGF-I stimulates the PI3K and MAPK pathways to increase the expression of pfirr, protein phosphatase 1, glucokinase, and the phosphorylation of glycogen synthase, decreases the mRNA expression of glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta, decreases glucose levels in hemocytes, and increases glycogen levels in digestive glands. These results suggest that the MAPK and PI3K pathways in P. fucata transmit the hrIGF-I signal to regulate glycogen metabolism. PMID:26911653

  13. PfIRR Interacts with HrIGF-I and Activates the MAP-kinase and PI3-kinase Signaling Pathways to Regulate Glycogen Metabolism in Pinctada fucata.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yu; He, Mao-xian

    2016-01-01

    The insulin-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways are major intracellular signaling modules and conserved among eukaryotes that are known to regulate diverse cellular processes. However, they have not been investigated in the mollusk species Pinctada fucata. Here, we demonstrate that insulin-related peptide receptor of P. fucata (pfIRR) interacts with human recombinant insulin-like growth factor I (hrIGF-I), and stimulates the MAPK and PI3K signaling pathways in P. fucata oocytes. We also show that inhibition of pfIRR by the inhibitor PQ401 significantly attenuates the basal and hrIGF-I-induced phosphorylation of MAPK and PI3K/Akt at amino acid residues threonine 308 and serine 473. Furthermore, our experiments show that there is cross-talk between the MAPK and PI3K/Akt pathways, in which MAPK kinase positively regulates the PI3K pathway, and PI3K positively regulates the MAPK cascade. Intramuscular injection of hrIGF-I stimulates the PI3K and MAPK pathways to increase the expression of pfirr, protein phosphatase 1, glucokinase, and the phosphorylation of glycogen synthase, decreases the mRNA expression of glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta, decreases glucose levels in hemocytes, and increases glycogen levels in digestive glands. These results suggest that the MAPK and PI3K pathways in P. fucata transmit the hrIGF-I signal to regulate glycogen metabolism.

  14. Effect Modification and Interaction Terms: It Takes Two to Tango.

    PubMed

    Jupiter, Daniel C

    2016-01-01

    In this Investigators' Corner I look more deeply into the previously discussed phenomenon of effect modification. I revisit an explanation and examples of the phenomenon and then examine how to account for it statistically. Specifically, I show, in detail, how to write a regression equation that includes interaction terms that account for the effect modification. Finally, I look at interpretation of regression coefficients both with and without the presence of effect modification, and the associated interaction terms.

  15. X(1576) and the final state interaction effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiang; Zhang, Bo; Shen, Lei-Lei; Zhu, Shi-Lin

    2007-04-01

    We study whether the broad peak X(1576) observed by BES Collaboration arises from the final state interaction effect of ρ(14501700) decays. The interference effect could produce an enhancement around 1540 MeV in the K+K- spectrum with typical interference phases. However, the branching ratio B[J/ψ→π0ρ(14501700)]·B[ρ(14501700)→K+K-] from the final state interaction effect is far less than the experimental data.

  16. Effect Modification and Interaction Terms: It Takes Two to Tango.

    PubMed

    Jupiter, Daniel C

    2016-01-01

    In this Investigators' Corner I look more deeply into the previously discussed phenomenon of effect modification. I revisit an explanation and examples of the phenomenon and then examine how to account for it statistically. Specifically, I show, in detail, how to write a regression equation that includes interaction terms that account for the effect modification. Finally, I look at interpretation of regression coefficients both with and without the presence of effect modification, and the associated interaction terms. PMID:27320193

  17. Communication: Dimensionality of the ionic conduction pathways in glass and the mixed-alkali effect.

    PubMed

    Novy, Melissa; Avila-Paredes, Hugo; Kim, Sangtae; Sen, Sabyasachi

    2015-12-28

    A revised empirical relationship between the power law exponent of ac conductivity dispersion and the dimensionality of the ionic conduction pathway is established on the basis of electrical impedance spectroscopic (EIS) measurements on crystalline ionic conductors. These results imply that the "universal" ac conductivity dispersion observed in glassy solids is associated with ionic transport along fractal pathways. EIS measurements on single-alkali glasses indicate that the dimensionality of this pathway D is ∼2.5, while in mixed-alkali glasses, D is lower and goes through a minimum value of ∼2.2 when the concentrations of the two alkalis become equal. D and σ display similar variation with alkali composition, thus suggesting a topological origin of the mixed-alkali effect.

  18. Communication: Dimensionality of the ionic conduction pathways in glass and the mixed-alkali effect.

    PubMed

    Novy, Melissa; Avila-Paredes, Hugo; Kim, Sangtae; Sen, Sabyasachi

    2015-12-28

    A revised empirical relationship between the power law exponent of ac conductivity dispersion and the dimensionality of the ionic conduction pathway is established on the basis of electrical impedance spectroscopic (EIS) measurements on crystalline ionic conductors. These results imply that the "universal" ac conductivity dispersion observed in glassy solids is associated with ionic transport along fractal pathways. EIS measurements on single-alkali glasses indicate that the dimensionality of this pathway D is ∼2.5, while in mixed-alkali glasses, D is lower and goes through a minimum value of ∼2.2 when the concentrations of the two alkalis become equal. D and σ display similar variation with alkali composition, thus suggesting a topological origin of the mixed-alkali effect. PMID:26723583

  19. Genetic effects in the leukotriene biosynthesis pathway and association with atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Crosslin, David R.; Shah, Svati H.; Nelson, Sarah C.; Haynes, Carol S.; Connelly, Jessica J.; Gadson, Shera; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Pascal J.; Vance, Jeffery M.; Rose, Jason; Granger, Chris B.; Seo, David; Gregory, Simon G.; Kraus, William E.

    2009-01-01

    Leukotrienes are arachidonic acid derivatives long known for their inflammatory properties and their involvement with a number of human diseases, most particularly asthma. Recently, leukotriene-based inflammation has also been shown to play an important role in atherosclerosis: ALOX5AP and LTA4H, both genes in the leukotriene biosynthesis pathway, have individually been shown to be associated with various cardiovascular disease (CVD) phenotypes. To assess the role of the leukotriene pathway in CVD pathogenesis, we performed genetic association studies of ALOX5AP and LTA4H in a family based study of early onset coronary artery disease (EOCAD) (GENECARD, 1,101 families) and in a non-familial dataset of EOCAD (CATHGEN, 656 cases and 405 controls). We found weak to moderate association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ALOX5AP and LTA4H with EOCAD. The previously reported four-SNP haplotype (HapA) in ALOX5AP showed association with EOCAD in CATHGEN (P = 0.02), while controlling for age, race and CVD risk factors. HapK, the previously reported ten-SNP haplotype in LTA4H was associated with EOCAD in CATHGEN (P = 0.04). Another previously reported four-SNP haplotype in ALOX5AP (HapB) was not significant in our sample (P = 0.39). The overall lack of (or weak) association of single SNPs as compared with the haplotype results demonstrates the need for analyzing multiple SNPs within each gene in such studies. Interestingly, we detected an association of SNPs in ALOX5 (P < 0.05), the target of ALOX5AP, with CVD. Using a pathway-based approach, we also detected statistical evidence for interactions among ALOX5, ALOX5AP and LTA4H using RNA expression data from a collection of freshly harvested human aortas with varying degrees of atherosclerosis. The GENECARD families did not demonstrate evidence for linkage or association with ALOX5, ALOX5AP or LTA4H. Our results support a modest role for the leukotriene pathway in atherosclerosis pathogenesis, reveal important

  20. Novel QCD Effects from Initial and Final State Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2007-09-12

    Initial-state and final-state interactions which are conventionally neglected in the parton model, have a profound effect in QCD hard-scattering reactions. The effects, which arise from gluon exchange between the active and spectator quarks, cause leading-twist single-spin asymmetries, diffractive deep inelastic scattering, diffractive hard hadronic reactions, and the breakdown of the Lam-Tung relation in Drell-Yan reactions. Diffractive deep inelastic scattering also leads to nuclear shadowing and non-universal antishadowing of nuclear structure functions through multiple scattering reactions in the nuclear target. Factorization-breaking effects are particularly important for hard hadron interactions since both initial-state and final-state interactions appear. Related factorization breaking effects can also appear in exclusive electroproduction reactions and in deeply virtual Compton scattering. None of the effects of initial-state and final-state interactions are incorporated in the light-front wavefunctions of the target hadron computed in isolation.

  1. Potential pathway of anti-inflammatory effect by New Zealand honeys

    PubMed Central

    Tomblin, Victoria; Ferguson, Lynnette R; Han, Dug Yeo; Murray, Pamela; Schlothauer, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    The role of honey in wound healing continues to attract worldwide attention. This study examines the anti-inflammatory effect of four honeys on wound healing, to gauge its efficacy as a treatment option. Isolated phenolics and crude extracts from manuka (Leptospermum scoparium), kanuka (Kunzea ericoides), clover (Trifolium spp.), and a manuka/kanuka blend of honeys were examined. Anti-inflammatory assays were conducted in HEK-Blue™-2, HEK-Blue™-4, and nucleotide oligomerization domain (NOD)2-Wild Type (NOD2-WT) cell lines, to assess the extent to which honey treatment impacts on the inflammatory response and whether the effect was pathway-specific. Kanuka honey, and to a lesser extent manuka honey, produced a powerful anti-inflammatory effect related to their phenolic content. The effect was observed in HEK-Blue™-2 cells using the synthetic tripalmitoylated lipopeptide Pam3CysSerLys4 (Pam3CSK4) ligand, suggesting that honey acts specifically through the toll-like receptor (TLR)1/TLR2 signaling pathway. The manuka/kanuka blend and clover honeys had no significant anti-inflammatory effect in any cell line. The research found that kanuka and manuka honeys have an important role in modulating the inflammatory response associated with wound healing, through a pathway-specific effect. The phenolic content of honey correlates with its effectiveness, although the specific compounds involved remain to be determined. PMID:24623989

  2. Effect of situation on mother-infant interaction.

    PubMed

    Maas, A Janneke B M; Vreeswijk, Charlotte M J M; van Bakel, Hedwig J A

    2013-02-01

    Research has shown that the early parent-infant relationship is of critical importance for children's developmental outcomes. While the effect of different settings on mother-infant interactive behavior is well studied, only few researchers systematically examined the effect of situational variables on mother-infant interaction. In the present study the effect of situational variables within the home setting on the quality of mother-infant interaction at 6 months was examined as well as the consistency in the quality of behaviors of mother and infant across these situations. During a home visit 292 mother-infant dyads were videotaped in three different situations (i.e., free play, face-to-face play, and diaper change). Interactive behaviors of mother and infant were assessed with the NICHD global ratings scales. Results showed substantial effects of situation on the interactive behavior of the mother-infant dyad. Despite the observed situational effects maternal sensitivity to non-distress, intrusiveness, stimulation of development, and positive regard and all five infant behavioral scales remained stable across the different situations. Insight into situational effects within the home setting on the quality of mother-infant interactive behavior may assist researchers to make well-informed decisions about measuring the parent-infant interaction in one or more specific situations. PMID:23261788

  3. Effects of CO2 and Temperature on Tritrophic Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Dyer, Lee A.; Richards, Lora A.; Short, Stephanie A.; Dodson, Craig D.

    2013-01-01

    There has been a significant increase in studies of how global change parameters affect interacting species or entire communities, yet the combined or interactive effects of increased atmospheric CO2 and associated increases in global mean temperatures on chemically mediated trophic interactions are mostly unknown. Thus, predictions of climate-induced changes on plant-insect interactions are still based primarily on studies of individual species, individual global change parameters, pairwise interactions, or parameters that summarize communities. A clear understanding of community response to global change will only emerge from studies that examine effects of multiple variables on biotic interactions. We examined the effects of increased CO2 and temperature on simple laboratory communities of interacting alfalfa, chemical defense, armyworm caterpillars, and parasitoid wasps. Higher temperatures and CO2 caused decreased plant quality, decreased caterpillar development times, developmental asynchrony between caterpillars and wasps, and complete wasp mortality. The effects measured here, along with other effects of global change on natural enemies suggest that biological control and other top-down effects of insect predators will decline over the coming decades. PMID:23638105

  4. Effects of hyperthermia on DNA repair pathways: one treatment to inhibit them all.

    PubMed

    Oei, Arlene L; Vriend, Lianne E M; Crezee, Johannes; Franken, Nicolaas A P; Krawczyk, Przemek M

    2015-01-01

    The currently available arsenal of anticancer modalities includes many DNA damaging agents that can kill malignant cells. However, efficient DNA repair mechanisms protect both healthy and cancer cells against the effects of treatment and contribute to the development of drug resistance. Therefore, anti-cancer treatments based on inflicting DNA damage can benefit from inhibition of DNA repair. Hyperthermia - treatment at elevated temperature - considerably affects DNA repair, among other cellular processes, and can thus sensitize (cancer) cells to DNA damaging agents. This effect has been known and clinically applied for many decades, but how heat inhibits DNA repair and which pathways are targeted has not been fully elucidated. In this review we attempt to summarize the known effects of hyperthermia on DNA repair pathways relevant in clinical treatment of cancer. Furthermore, we outline the relationships between the effects of heat on DNA repair and sensitization of cells to various DNA damaging agents. PMID:26245485

  5. Multilocus analyses of seven candidate genes suggest interacting pathways for obesity-related traits in Brazilian populations.

    PubMed

    Angeli, Cláudia B; Kimura, Lilian; Auricchio, Maria T; Vicente, João P; Mattevi, Vanessa S; Zembrzuski, Verônica M; Hutz, Mara H; Pereira, Alexandre C; Pereira, Tiago V; Mingroni-Netto, Regina C

    2011-06-01

    We investigated whether variants in major candidate genes for food intake and body weight regulation contribute to obesity-related traits under a multilocus perspective. We studied 375 Brazilian subjects from partially isolated African-derived populations (quilombos). Seven variants displaying conflicting results in previous reports and supposedly implicated in the susceptibility of obesity-related phenotypes were investigated: β2-adrenergic receptor (ADRB2) (Arg16Gly), insulin induced gene 2 (INSIG2) (rs7566605), leptin (LEP) (A19G), LEP receptor (LEPR) (Gln223Arg), perilipin (PLIN) (6209T > C), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARG) (Pro12Ala), and resistin (RETN) (-420 C > G). Regression models as well as generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction (GMDR) were employed to test the contribution of individual effects and higher-order interactions to BMI and waist-hip ratio (WHR) variation and risk of overweight/obesity. The best multilocus association signal identified in the quilombos was further examined in an independent sample of 334 Brazilian subjects of European ancestry. In quilombos, only the PPARG polymorphism displayed significant individual effects (WHR variation, P = 0.028). No association was observed either with the risk of overweight/obesity (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2), risk of obesity alone (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2) or BMI variation. However, GMDR analyses revealed an interaction between the LEPR and ADRB2 polymorphisms (P = 0.009) as well as a third-order effect involving the latter two variants plus INSIG2 (P = 0.034) with overweight/obesity. Assessment of the LEPR-ADRB2 interaction in the second sample indicated a marginally significant association (P = 0.0724), which was further verified to be limited to men (P = 0.0118). Together, our findings suggest evidence for a two-locus interaction between the LEPR Gln223Arg and ADRB2 Arg16Gly variants in the risk of overweight/obesity, and highlight further the importance of multilocus effects in

  6. Investigation of adverse effects of interactions between herbal drugs and natural blood clotting mechanism.

    PubMed

    Adhyapak, M S; Kachole, M S

    2016-05-01

    Throughout the world, herbal medicines are consumed by most of the patients without considering their adverse effects. Many herbal medicines/plant extracts have been reported to interact with the natural blood clotting system. In continuation to this effort, thirty medicinal plant extracts were allowed to interact with citrated human blood and the clotting time was measured after re-calcification in vitro using Lee and White method. The aq. leaf ext. of Syzygium cumini and Camellia sinensis significantly prolonged the clotting time. In response to the prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time tests, the ext. of C. sinensis showed normal APTT and marginally prolonged the PT to 16.7 s (control-15.2 s) while S. cumini showed normal PT but significantly prolonged the APTT to 66.9 s (control-20.7 s). This suggests that, C. sinensis acts on the extrinsic pathway while S. cumini on the intrinsic pathway. There are some common herbal formulations that are frequently used by the patients which contain above plant materials, like, Syzygium cumin in anti-diabetic formulations, while the ext. of C. sinensis is consumed frequently as beverage in many part of the world. Hence, patients having known bleeding tendency or haemophilia disease should take into account the interaction potential of these plants with the natural blood clotting system while taking herbal formulations containing above plants; specially, the patients suffering from intrinsic pathway factor deficiency should keep a limit on the consumption of S. cumini while extrinsic pathway factor deficiency patients should limit C. sinensis. Also, the medical practitioners should consider the patient's food consumption history before doing any major surgical procedures. PMID:26340850

  7. Learner Interaction Using Email: The Effects of Task Modification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Paul

    2005-01-01

    This paper outlines the findings of a research project studying the effects of task modification on learner interaction when using email. Taking as its starting point interactionalist theories of SLA, it argues that if those interactional features characteristic of negotiation of meaning which have been identified as promoting SLA are to be…

  8. Dietary glycine and threonine interactive effects in broilers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is little information regarding the interaction of dietary threonine and glycine on potential metabolic sparing effects, live production, or breast meat yield of broilers. To test these potential interactions, 432 one-day-old Ross 308 male broilers were fed a common diet up to 21 days of age a...

  9. Effectiveness of Interactive Video to Teach CPR Theory and Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyness, Ann L.

    This study investigated whether an interactive video system of instruction taught cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) as effectively as traditional instruction. Using standards of the American Heart Association, the study was designed with two randomized groups to be taught either by live instruction or by interactive video. Subjects were 100…

  10. Batch Effects and Pathway Analysis: Two Potential Perils in Cancer Studies Involving DNA Methylation Array Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Kristin N.; Peters, Brandilyn A.; Gamble, Mary V.

    2013-01-01

    Background DNA methylation microarrays have become an increasingly popular means of studying the role of epigenetics in cancer, though the methods used to analyze these arrays are still being developed and existing methods are not always widely disseminated among microarray users. Methods We investigated two problems likely to confront DNA methylation microarray users: 1) batch effects; and 2) the use of widely available pathway analysis software to analyze results. First, DNA taken from individuals exposed to low and high levels of drinking water arsenic were plated twice on Illumina’s Infinium 450K humanmethylation array, once in order of exposure and again following randomization. Second, we performed simulations in which random CpG sites were drawn from the 450K array and subjected to pathway analysis using Ingenuity’s IPA software. Results The majority of differentially methylated CpG sites identified in Run One were due to batch effects; few sites were also identified in Run Two. In addition, the pathway analysis software reported many significant associations between our data, randomly drawn from the 450K array, and various diseases and biological functions. Conclusions Data from our own laboratory illustrate the pitfalls of not properly controlling for chip-specific batch effects as well as using pathway analysis software created for gene expression arrays to analyze DNA methylation array data. Impact We present evidence that 1) chip-specific effects can simulate plausible differential methylation results; and 2) popular pathway analysis software developed for expression arrays can yield spurious results when used in tandem with methylation microarrays. PMID:23629520

  11. The Fanconi Anemia DNA Repair Pathway Is Regulated by an Interaction between Ubiquitin and the E2-like Fold Domain of FANCL.

    PubMed

    Miles, Jennifer A; Frost, Mark G; Carroll, Eilis; Rowe, Michelle L; Howard, Mark J; Sidhu, Ateesh; Chaugule, Viduth K; Alpi, Arno F; Walden, Helen

    2015-08-21

    The Fanconi Anemia (FA) DNA repair pathway is essential for the recognition and repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICL). Inefficient repair of these ICL can lead to leukemia and bone marrow failure. A critical step in the pathway is the monoubiquitination of FANCD2 by the RING E3 ligase FANCL. FANCL comprises 3 domains, a RING domain that interacts with E2 conjugating enzymes, a central domain required for substrate interaction, and an N-terminal E2-like fold (ELF) domain. The ELF domain is found in all FANCL homologues, yet the function of the domain remains unknown. We report here that the ELF domain of FANCL is required to mediate a non-covalent interaction between FANCL and ubiquitin. The interaction involves the canonical Ile44 patch on ubiquitin, and a functionally conserved patch on FANCL. We show that the interaction is not necessary for the recognition of the core complex, it does not enhance the interaction between FANCL and Ube2T, and is not required for FANCD2 monoubiquitination in vitro. However, we demonstrate that the ELF domain is required to promote efficient DNA damage-induced FANCD2 monoubiquitination in vertebrate cells, suggesting an important function of ubiquitin binding by FANCL in vivo. PMID:26149689

  12. Effect of Coulomb interaction on multi-electronwave packet dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Shiokawa, T.; Takada, Y.; Konabe, S.; Hatsugai, Y.; Muraguchi, M.; Endoh, T.; Shiraishi, K.

    2013-12-04

    We have investigated the effect of Coulomb interaction on electron transport in a one-dimensional nanoscale structure using a multi-electron wave packet approach. To study the time evolution, we numerically solve the time-dependent Hartree-Fock equation, finding that the electron wave packet dynamics strongly depends on the Coulomb interaction strength. When the Coulomb interaction is large, each electron wave packet moves separately in the presence of an electric field. With weak Coulomb interaction, however, the electron wave packets overlap, forming and moving as one collective wave packet.

  13. Effect of particle interactions on thermoremanent magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newell, A. J.; Niemerg, M.; Bates, D.

    2013-12-01

    Paleomagnetism has a dizzying array of protocols for determining the strength of the Earth's magnetic field in the past from measurements of the magnetic memory in rocks. Some, such as variants of the Thellier-Thellier method, try to isolate the signal from an "ideal" fraction of magnetic minerals, discarding the contribution of "non-ideal" minerals; others, like the multi-specimen method, try to glean useful information from all of the minerals. The "ideal" remanence carriers behave like single-domain (SD) magnets with uniaxial anisotropy, and their behavior is predicted by Louis Néel's theory of thermoremanent magnetization (TRM). Non-ideal carriers are not at all well understood, but every paleointensity method relies on assumptions about their nature to either remove their signal or make use of it. One way to explore the boundary between ideal and non-ideal is to look at the behavior of SD magnets as they are brought increasingly close together, thus increasing the strength of the magnetostatic coupling between them. Magnetostatic coupling greatly increases the complexity of such a system. Instead of just two stable states, many must be found. Instead of one energy barrier, there is a network of connections between stable states over energy barriers. Instead of one rate for the relaxation of a system towards equilibrium, there are several. It is particularly difficult to find the transition states at the top of the energy barriers. We have developed software that does all of the above. A method from algebraic geometry called homotopy continuation is used to find all stable states and transition states. The software can track changes in these states with magnetic field, temperature, or other external variables. We use it to model TRM acquisition in small systems of interacting particles, and examine its behavior under various paleointensity tests.

  14. Mutational analysis of the BPTI folding pathway: I. Effects of aromatic-->leucine substitutions on the distribution of folding intermediates.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, J. X.; Goldenberg, D. P.

    1997-01-01

    The roles of aromatic residues in determining the folding pathway of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) were analyzed mutationally by examining the distribution of disulfide-bonded intermediates that accumulated during the refolding of protein variants in which tyrosine or phenylalanine residues were individually replaced with leucine. The eight substitutions examined all caused significant changes in the intermediate distribution. In some cases, the major effect was to decrease the accumulation of intermediates containing two of the three disulfides found in the native protein, without affecting the distribution of earlier intermediates. Other substitutions, however, led to much more random distributions of the intermediates containing only one disulfide. These results indicate that the individual residues making up the hydrophobic core of the native protein make clearly distinguishable contributions to conformation and stability early in folding: The early distribution of intermediates does not appear to be determined by a general hydrophobic collapse. The effects of the substitutions were generally consistent with the structures of the major intermediates determined by NMR studies of analogs, confirming that the distribution of disulfide-bonded species is determined by stabilizing interactions within the ordered regions of the intermediates. The plasticity of the BPTI folding pathway implied by these results can be described using conformational funnels to illustrate the degree to which conformational entropy is lost at different stages in the folding of the wild-type and mutant proteins. PMID:9232656

  15. Effective Interaction: Communicating with and about People with Disabilities

    MedlinePlus

    ... with Disabilities in the Workplace ODEP - Office of Disability Employment Policy Disability Employment Policy Resources by Topic Choose a Disability ... Effective Interaction: Communicating With and About People with Disabilities in the Workplace As children, we are curious — ...

  16. Chiral susceptibility in an effective interaction model

    SciTech Connect

    Min He; Yu Jiang; Sun Weimin; Zong Hongshi

    2008-04-01

    A closed integral expression for the chiral susceptibility at finite temperature is derived. The corresponding disconnected part, which proves to be of major physical relevance and free from the additive quadratic ultraviolet divergence, is identified. Then a calculation based on an effective model gluon propagator is conducted within the framework of the Dyson-Schwinger equations for two flavors in the chiral limit. A narrow, divergent peak is observed as temperature varies, and its implications are discussed.

  17. Aerosol-cloud interactions: effect on precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takle, Jasmine; Maheskumar, R.

    2016-05-01

    Aerosols are tiny suspended particle in the atmosphere with high variability in time and space, play a major role in modulating the cloud properties and thereby precipitation. To understand the aerosol induced Invigoration effect predictors like aerosol optical depth, cloud optical depth, cloud top temperature, cloud effective radii, ice water path, retrieved from the Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) level-3 aqua satellite data were analysed for pre monsoon April-May and post monsoon October-November months over the Indian subcontinent 8 ° N to 33° N, 65 °E to 100 °E during the period 2003-2013. Apart from the above data, mesoscale dynamical parameters such as vertical wind shear of horizontal wind, relative humidity, were also considered to understand their role in invigoration. Case studies have been carried out for the regions having heavy rainfall events & minimal rainfall events during high Aerosol optical depths occasions respectively. Analysis revealed that the heavy rainfall which occurred in this region with higher optical depths might be due to invigoration effect of aerosols wherein the dynamical as well as thermodynamical parameters were also found favourable. Minimal rainfall events were also observed most probably due to the suppression of rain formation/delay in precipitation due to high amount of aerosol concentration in these regions. Prominent 36 such cases were studied all over India during Pre & Post monsoon months.

  18. Effects of Website Interactivity on Online Retail Shopping Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Hafizul

    Motivations to engage in retail online shopping can include both utilitarian and hedonic shopping dimensions. To cater to these consumers, online retailers can create a cognitively and esthetically rich shopping environment, through sophisticated levels of interactive web utilities and features, offering not only utilitarian benefits and attributes but also providing hedonic benefits of enjoyment. Since the effect of interactive websites has proven to stimulate online consumer’s perceptions, this study presumes that websites with multimedia rich interactive utilities and features can influence online consumers’ shopping motivations and entice them to modify or even transform their original shopping predispositions by providing them with attractive and enhanced interactive features and controls, thus generating a positive attitude towards products and services offered by the retailer. This study seeks to explore the effects of Web interactivity on online consumer behavior through an attitudinal model of technology acceptance.

  19. Effects of anticancer drugs on transcription factor-DNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Gniazdowski, Marek; Denny, William A; Nelson, Stephanie M; Czyz, Malgorzata

    2005-06-01

    DNA-interacting anticancer drugs are able to affect the propensity of DNA to interact with proteins through either reversible binding or covalent bond formation. The effect of the drugs on transcription factor interactions with DNA is reviewed. These effects can be classified as (i) competition between a drug and regulatory protein for target sequences; (ii) weakening of this interaction; (iii) enhancement of this interaction by chemical modification of the DNA and the creation of non-natural binding sites; and (iv) a 'suicide' mechanism, which is observed when a transcription factor induces changes in DNA structure, allowing a drug to bind to a target sequence. Several new strategies -- the antigene approach with oligonucleotides, peptide nucleic acids or locked nucleic acids, and sequence-specific polyamides -- are also reviewed. PMID:15948668

  20. Effect of surfactant hydrophobicity on the pathway for unfolding of ubiquitin.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Bryan F; Schneider, Grégory F; Whitesides, George M

    2012-11-14

    This paper describes the interaction between ubiquitin (UBI) and three sodium n-alkyl sulfates (SC(n)S) that have the same charge (Z = -1) but different hydrophobicity (n = 10, 12, or 14). Increasing the hydrophobicity of the n-alkyl sulfate resulted in (i) an increase in the number of distinct intermediates (that is, complexes of UBI and surfactant) that form along the pathway of unfolding, (ii) a decrease in the minimum concentrations of surfactant at which intermediates begin to form (i.e., a more negative ΔG(binding) of surfactant for UBI), and (iii) an increase in the number of surfactant molecules bound to UBI in each intermediate or complex. These results demonstrate that small changes in the hydrophobicity of a surfactant can significantly alter the binding interactions with a folded or unfolded cytosolic protein.

  1. Crystal Structure of Vancosaminyltransferase GtfD from the Vancomycin Biosynthetic Pathway: Interactions with Acceptor and Nucleotide Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Mulichak, A.M.; Lu, W.; Losey, H.C.; Walsh, C.T.; Garavito, R.M.

    2010-03-08

    The TDP-vancosaminyltransferase GtfD catalyzes the attachment of L-vancosamine to a monoglucosylated heptapeptide intermediate during the final stage of vancomycin biosynthesis. Glycosyltransferases from this and similar antibiotic pathways are potential tools for the design of new compounds that are effective against vancomycin resistant bacterial strains. We have determined the X-ray crystal structure of GtfD as a complex with TDP and the natural glycopeptide substrate at 2.0 {angstrom} resolution. GtfD, a member of the bidomain GT-B glycosyltransferase superfamily, binds TDP in the interdomain cleft, while the aglycone acceptor binds in a deep crevice in the N-terminal domain. However, the two domains are more interdependent in terms of substrate binding and overall structure than was evident in the structures of closely related glycosyltransferases GtfA and GtfB. Structural and kinetic analyses support the identification of Asp13 as a catalytic general base, with a possible secondary role for Thr10. Several residues have also been identified as being involved in donor sugar binding and recognition.

  2. Role of hippocampal and prefrontal cortical signaling pathways in dextromethorphan effect on morphine-induced memory impairment in rats.

    PubMed

    Ghasemzadeh, Zahra; Rezayof, Ameneh

    2016-02-01

    Evidence suggests that dextromethorphan (DM), an NMDA receptor antagonist, induces memory impairment. Considering that DM is widely used in cough-treating medications, and the co-abuse of DM with morphine has recently been reported, the aims of the present study was (1) to investigate whether there is a functional interaction between morphine and DM in passive avoidance learning and (2) to assess the possible role of the hippocampal and prefrontal cortical (PFC) signaling pathways in the effects of the drugs on memory formation. Our findings indicated that post-training or pre-test administration of morphine (2 and 6 mg/kg) or DM (10-30 mg/kg) impaired memory consolidation and retrieval which was associated with the attenuation of the levels of phosphorylated Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (p-CAMKII) and cAMP responsive element-binding protein (p-CREB) in the targeted sites. Moreover, the memory impairment induced by post-training administration of morphine was reversed by pre-test administration of the same dose of morphine or DM (30 mg/kg), indicating state-dependent learning (SDL) and a cross-SDL between the drugs. It is important to note that the levels of p-CAMKII/CAMKII and p-CREB/CREB in the hippocampus and the PFC increased in drugs-induced SDL. In addition, DM administration potentiated morphine-induced SDL which was related to the enhanced levels of hippocampal and PFC CAMKII-CREB signaling pathways. It can be concluded that there is a relationship between the hippocampus and the PFC in the effect of DM and/or morphine on memory retrieval. Moreover, a cross SDL can be induced between the co-administration of DM and morphine. Interestingly, CAMKII-CREB signaling pathways also mediate the drugs-induced SDL.

  3. Interactive effects of nutrient additions and predation on infaunal communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Posey, M.H.; Alphin, T.D.; Cahoon, L.; Lindquist, D.; Becker, M.E.

    1999-01-01

    Nutrient additions represent an important anthropogenic stress on coastal ecosystems. At moderate levels, increased nutrients may lead to increased primary production and, possibly, to increased biomass of consumers although complex trophic interactions may modify or mask these effects. We examined the influence of nutrient additions and interactive effects of trophic interactions (predation) on benthic infaunal composition and abundances through small-scale field experiments in 2 estuaries that differed in ambient nutrient conditions. A blocked experimental design was used that allowed an assessment of direct nutrient effects in the presence and absence of predation by epibenthic predators as well as an assessment of the independent effects of predation. Benthic microalgal production increased with experimental nutrient additions and was greater when infaunal abundances were lower, but there were no significant interactions between these factors. Increased abundances of one infaunal taxa, Laeonereis culveri, as well as the grazer feeding guild were observed with nutrient additions and a number of taxa exhibited higher abundances with predator exclusion. In contrast to results from freshwater systems there were no significant interactive effects between nutrient additions and predator exclusion as was predicted. The infaunal responses observed here emphasize the importance of both bottom-up (nutrient addition and primary producer driven) and top-down (predation) controls in structuring benthic communities. These processes may work at different spatial and temporal scales, and affect different taxa, making observation of potential interactive effects difficult.

  4. Mimicking human neuronal pathways in silico: an emergent model on the effective connectivity.

    PubMed

    Gürcan, Önder; Türker, Kemal S; Mano, Jean-Pierre; Bernon, Carole; Dikenelli, Oğuz; Glize, Pierre

    2014-04-01

    We present a novel computational model that detects temporal configurations of a given human neuronal pathway and constructs its artificial replication. This poses a great challenge since direct recordings from individual neurons are impossible in the human central nervous system and therefore the underlying neuronal pathway has to be considered as a black box. For tackling this challenge, we used a branch of complex systems modeling called artificial self-organization in which large sets of software entities interacting locally give rise to bottom-up collective behaviors. The result is an emergent model where each software entity represents an integrate-and-fire neuron. We then applied the model to the reflex responses of single motor units obtained from conscious human subjects. Experimental results show that the model recovers functionality of real human neuronal pathways by comparing it to appropriate surrogate data. What makes the model promising is the fact that, to the best of our knowledge, it is the first realistic model to self-wire an artificial neuronal network by efficiently combining neuroscience with artificial self-organization. Although there is no evidence yet of the model's connectivity mapping onto the human connectivity, we anticipate this model will help neuroscientists to learn much more about human neuronal networks, and could also be used for predicting hypotheses to lead future experiments.

  5. Evolution of high-level ethambutol-resistant tuberculosis through interacting mutations in decaprenylphosphoryl-β-D-arabinose biosynthetic and utilization pathway genes.

    PubMed

    Safi, Hassan; Lingaraju, Subramanya; Amin, Anita; Kim, Soyeon; Jones, Marcus; Holmes, Michael; McNeil, Michael; Peterson, Scott N; Chatterjee, Delphi; Fleischmann, Robert; Alland, David

    2013-10-01

    To study the evolution of drug resistance, we genetically and biochemically characterized Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains selected in vitro for ethambutol resistance. Mutations in decaprenylphosphoryl-β-D-arabinose (DPA) biosynthetic and utilization pathway genes Rv3806c, Rv3792, embB and embC accumulated to produce a wide range of ethambutol minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) that depended on mutation type and number. Rv3806c mutations increased DPA synthesis, causing MICs to double from 2 to 4 μg/ml in a wild-type background and to increase from 16 to 32 μg/ml in an embB codon 306 mutant background. Synonymous mutations in Rv3792 increased the expression of downstream embC, an ethambutol target, resulting in MICs of 8 μg/ml. Multistep selection was required for high-level resistance. Mutations in embC or very high embC expression were observed at the highest resistance level. In clinical isolates, Rv3806c mutations were associated with high-level resistance and had multiplicative effects with embB mutations on MICs. Ethambutol resistance is acquired through the acquisition of mutations that interact in complex ways to produce a range of MICs, from those falling below breakpoint values to ones representing high-level resistance.

  6. Optimal interaction of respiratory and thermal regulation at rest and during exercise: role of a serotonin-gated spinoparabrachial thermoafferent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Chi-Sang

    2009-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that the lateral parabrachial nucleus (LPBN) in dorsolateral pons is pivotal in mediating the feedback control of inspiratory drive by central chemoreceptor input and feedforward control of body temperature by cutaneous thermoreceptor input. The latter is subject to descending serotonergic inhibition which gates the transmission of ascending thermoafferent information from spinal dorsal horn to the LPBN. Here, a model is proposed which suggests that the LPBN may be important in balancing respiratory and thermal homeostasis, two conflicting goals that are heightened by environmental heat/cold stress or exercise where the effects of respiratory thermolysis become prominent. This optimization model of respiratory-thermoregulatory interaction is supported by a host of recent studies which demonstrate that animals with serotonin (5-HT) dysfunction at the spinal dorsal horn—due to 5-HT antagonism, genetic 5-HT defects or spinal cord injury—all display similar respiratory abnormalities that are consistent with hyperactivity of the spinoparabrachial thermoafferent (and pain) pathway. PMID:19770073

  7. Load interaction effects on fatigue crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoychev, Stoyan Ivanov

    The fatigue crack propagation rate can be either increased or decreased by the previous load history (overload, block loading, different load ratio, etc.). Currently, these load sequence effects can be explained either by using crack closure or internal stress concepts. They are studied in Part I and II of the dissertation accordingly. In Part I, the last 35 years of research in the crack closure area were carefully reviewed. A new Quadrature (Q) method for crack closure estimation, based on integration rather than differentiation of the load-displacement data, was developed and compared to the 'best' methods from the literature. The new method was able to reduce the scatter in the opening load estimations to a negligible level, but does not collapse the results for different load ratios (0.1 and 0.9). In Part II a general relationship between fatigue crack growth rate (da/dN) and the two-parameter (DeltaKtip and tipKmax) crack driving force was derived using fundamental fatigue (ε-N curve) properties. Based on this analysis, a new way of representing the da/dN data by means of the crack propagation (CP) table was proposed. In order to make the CP table sensitive to the load history effects, it was scaled using the applied and internal stresses and the corresponding stress intensity factors, characteristic for the crack tip. Two methods for calculating the internal stress intensity factors were developed, adopting the weight function and the new clamping force concepts accordingly. Finally, the CP table at the crack tip was successfully used together with the two-parameter crack driving force equation to predict da/dN for different load ratios, block loading and a single overload. Calculation of the crack closure was not needed in order to predict the experimental data accurately.

  8. Kinetic Differences and Synergistic Antiviral Effects Between Type I and Type III Interferon Signaling Indicate Pathway Independence

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Emily A.

    2015-01-01

    The spread of acute respiratory viral infections is controlled by type I and III interferon (IFN) signaling. While the mechanisms of type I IFN signaling have been studied in detail, features that distinguish type III IFN signaling remain poorly understood. Type III IFNs play an essential role in limiting infections of intestinal and respiratory epithelial surfaces; however, type III IFNs have been shown to activate similar genes to type I IFNs, raising the question of how these IFNs differ and their signals interact. We measured the kinetics of type I and III IFN activation, functional stability, and downstream antiviral responses on A549 human lung epithelial cells. Similar kinetics were found for transcriptional upregulation and secretion of type I and III IFNs in response to infection by an RNA virus, peaking at 12 h postinfection, and both protein types had similar stabilities with functional half-lives extending beyond 2 days. Both IFNs activated potent cellular antiviral responses; however, responses to type III IFNs were delayed by 2–6 h relative to type I IFN responses. Combined treatments with type I and III IFNs produced enhanced antiviral effects, and quantitative analysis of these data with a Bliss interaction model provides evidence for independence of type I and III IFN downstream signaling pathways. This novel synergistic interaction has therapeutic implications for treatment of respiratory virus infections. PMID:25938799

  9. Relativistic AC gyromagnetic effects in ultraintense laser-matter interaction.

    PubMed

    Geindre, J P; Audebert, P; Marjoribanks, R S

    2006-08-25

    We demonstrate that in ultraintense ultrafast laser-matter interaction, the interplay of laser-induced oscillating space-charge fields with laser E and B fields can strongly affect whether the interaction is relativistic or not: stronger laser fields may not in fact produce more relativistic plasma interactions. We show that there exists a regime of interaction, in the relation of laser intensity and incident angle, for which the Brunel effect of electron acceleration is strongly suppressed by AC gyromagnetic fields, at a frequency different from the laser field. Analytically and with 1.5D particle-in-cell modeling, we show that from gyromagnetic effects, even in the absence of usual J x B second-harmonic contributions, there are strong effects on the harmonic emission and on the generation of attosecond pulses. PMID:17026310

  10. Veterinary team interactions, part 2: the personal effect.

    PubMed

    Kinnison, T; Guile, D; May, S A

    2015-11-28

    Modern veterinary practices consist of multiple professions/occupations, often spread over multiple branches. Within these teams are identifiable 'key people' who are central to information and resource flow. Key people are frequently the appointed leaders, such as practice managers, but also include emergent leaders. Veterinary surgeons are commonly involved in the flow of higher order interactions such as problem solving, while administrators are often involved in information interactions. These key people are repeatedly boundary spanners, sharing resources across physical boundaries such as branches. Their marginal status (belonging to multiple groups) also allows them to interact across professional boundaries. Lower order interactions including asking for information and advice are often interprofessional; however, higher order interactions tend to be intraprofessional. Analysis of interaction reciprocity between professions demonstrated the prevalence of a profession based hierarchy, with veterinary surgeons at the top. Being social outside of work with a colleague is also linked to work based interactions. The results of this paper demonstrate the need for practices to consider key people and support them appropriately. Further to this, they suggest that, to promote an effective team, interactions should be based on experience as much as professional status, and that social interactions should be encouraged. PMID:26489995

  11. Coevolution and the Effects of Climate Change on Interacting Species

    PubMed Central

    Northfield, Tobin D.; Ives, Anthony R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent studies suggest that environmental changes may tip the balance between interacting species, leading to the extinction of one or more species. While it is recognized that evolution will play a role in determining how environmental changes directly affect species, the interactions among species force us to consider the coevolutionary responses of species to environmental changes. Methodology/Principle Findings We use simple models of competition, predation, and mutualism to organize and synthesize the ways coevolution modifies species interactions when climatic changes favor one species over another. In cases where species have conflicting interests (i.e., selection for increased interspecific interaction strength on one species is detrimental to the other), we show that coevolution reduces the effects of climate change, leading to smaller changes in abundances and reduced chances of extinction. Conversely, when species have nonconflicting interests (i.e., selection for increased interspecific interaction strength on one species benefits the other), coevolution increases the effects of climate change. Conclusions/Significance Coevolution sets up feedback loops that either dampen or amplify the effect of environmental change on species abundances depending on whether coevolution has conflicting or nonconflicting effects on species interactions. Thus, gaining a better understanding of the coevolutionary processes between interacting species is critical for understanding how communities respond to a changing climate. We suggest experimental methods to determine which types of coevolution (conflicting or nonconflicting) drive species interactions, which should lead to better understanding of the effects of coevolution on species adaptation. Conducting these experiments across environmental gradients will test our predictions of the effects of environmental change and coevolution on ecological communities. PMID:24167443

  12. Identification of BZR1-interacting Proteins as Potential Components of the Brassinosteroid Signaling Pathway in Arabidopsis Through Tandem Affinity Purification*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunming; Shang, Jian-Xiu; Chen, Qi-Xiu; Oses-Prieto, Juan A.; Bai, Ming-Yi; Yang, Yihong; Yuan, Min; Zhang, Yu-Lan; Mu, Cong-Cong; Deng, Zhiping; Wei, Chuang-Qi; Burlingame, Alma L.; Wang, Zhi-Yong; Sun, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are essential phytohormones for plant growth and development. BRs are perceived by the cell surface receptor kinase BRI1, and downstream signal transduction through multiple components leads to activation of the transcription factors BZR1 and BZR2/BES1. BZR1 activity is highly controlled by BR through reversible phosphorylation, protein degradation, and nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. To further understand the molecular function of BZR1, we performed tandem affinity purification of the BZR1 complex and identified BZR1-associated proteins using mass spectrometry. These BZR1-associated proteins included several known BR signaling components, such as BIN2, BSK1, 14–3-3λ, and PP2A, as well as a large number of proteins with previously unknown functions in BR signal transduction, including the kinases MKK5 and MAPK4, histone deacetylase 19, cysteine proteinase inhibitor 6, a DEAD-box RNA helicase, cysteine endopeptidases RD21A and RD21B, calmodulin-binding transcription activator 5, ubiquitin protease 12, cyclophilin 59, and phospholipid-binding protein synaptotagmin A. Their interactions with BZR1 were confirmed by in vivo and in vitro assays. Furthermore, MKK5 was found to phosphorylate BZR1 in vitro. This study demonstrates an effective method for purifying proteins associated with low-abundance transcription factors, and identifies new BZR1-interacting proteins with potentially important roles in BR response. PMID:24019147

  13. Identification of BZR1-interacting proteins as potential components of the brassinosteroid signaling pathway in Arabidopsis through tandem affinity purification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunming; Shang, Jian-Xiu; Chen, Qi-Xiu; Oses-Prieto, Juan A; Bai, Ming-Yi; Yang, Yihong; Yuan, Min; Zhang, Yu-Lan; Mu, Cong-Cong; Deng, Zhiping; Wei, Chuang-Qi; Burlingame, Alma L; Wang, Zhi-Yong; Sun, Ying

    2013-12-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are essential phytohormones for plant growth and development. BRs are perceived by the cell surface receptor kinase BRI1, and downstream signal transduction through multiple components leads to activation of the transcription factors BZR1 and BZR2/BES1. BZR1 activity is highly controlled by BR through reversible phosphorylation, protein degradation, and nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. To further understand the molecular function of BZR1, we performed tandem affinity purification of the BZR1 complex and identified BZR1-associated proteins using mass spectrometry. These BZR1-associated proteins included several known BR signaling components, such as BIN2, BSK1, 14-3-3λ, and PP2A, as well as a large number of proteins with previously unknown functions in BR signal transduction, including the kinases MKK5 and MAPK4, histone deacetylase 19, cysteine proteinase inhibitor 6, a DEAD-box RNA helicase, cysteine endopeptidases RD21A and RD21B, calmodulin-binding transcription activator 5, ubiquitin protease 12, cyclophilin 59, and phospholipid-binding protein synaptotagmin A. Their interactions with BZR1 were confirmed by in vivo and in vitro assays. Furthermore, MKK5 was found to phosphorylate BZR1 in vitro. This study demonstrates an effective method for purifying proteins associated with low-abundance transcription factors, and identifies new BZR1-interacting proteins with potentially important roles in BR response. PMID:24019147

  14. Effect of divalent anions on photodegradation kinetics and pathways of riboflavin in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Iqbal; Ahmed, Sofia; Sheraz, Muhammad Ali; Vaid, Faiyaz H M; Ansari, Izhar A

    2010-05-10

    The present investigation is based on a study of the effect of buffer and non-buffer divalent anions (phosphate, sulphate, tartrate, succinate, malonate) on the kinetics, product distribution and photodegradation pathways of riboflavin (RF) at pH 6.0-8.0. RF solutions (5x10(-5)M) were photodegraded in the presence of divalent anions (0.2-1.0M) using a visible light source and the photoproducts, cyclodehydroriboflavin (CDRF), formylmethylflavin (FMF), lumichrome (LC) and lumiflavin (LF) were assayed by a specific multicomponent spectrophotometric method. RF degradation in the presence of divalent anions follows parallel first-order kinetics to give CDRF and LC as the final products through photoaddition and photoreduction reactions, respectively. The divalent anion-catalysed CDRF formation is affected in the order: phosphate>sulphate>tartrate>succinate>malonate, showing maximum activity of the anions around pH 7. The divalent anions cause deviation of the photoreduction pathway in favour of the photoaddition pathway to form CDRF. The first- and second-order rate constants for the reactions involved in the photodegradation of RF have been determined and the rate-pH profiles and pathway relationships discussed. The catalytic activity of the divalent anions appears to be a function of the relative strength and chemical reactivity of the RF-divalent anion complex acting as a mediator in the photoaddition reaction.

  15. Characterization of ovalbumin absorption pathways in the rat intestine, including the effects of aspirin.

    PubMed

    Yokooji, Tomoharu; Nouma, Hitomi; Matsuo, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    Ingested proteins are absorbed from the intestinal lumen via the paracellular and/or transcellular pathways, depending on their physicochemical properties. In this study, we investigated the absorption pathway(s) of ovalbumin (OVA), an egg white-allergen, as well as the mechanisms of aspirin-facilitated OVA absorption in rats. In situ intestinal re-circulating perfusion experiments showed that the absorption rate of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled OVA in the distal intestine was higher than that for a marker of non-specific absorption, FITC-dextran (FD-40), and that colchicine, a general endocytosis inhibitor, suppressed OVA absorption. In the distal intestine, bafiromycin A1 and phenylarsine oxide inhibited the OVA absorption rate, whereas mehyl-β-cyclodextrin exerted no significant effects. Thus, OVA is preferentially absorbed from the distal intestine via the paracellular and receptor- and clathrin-mediated endocytic pathways. Furthermore, aspirin increased OVA absorption in the presence or absence of colchicine, indicating that aspirin facilitated OVA absorption by inducing intestinal barrier disruption and paracellular permeability.

  16. Systems Biology Model of Interactions Between Tissue Growth Factors and DNA Damage Pathways: Low Dose Response and Cross-Talk in TGFbeta and ATM Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neill, Peter; Anderson, Jennifer

    2014-10-02

    The etiology of radiation carcinogenesis has been described in terms of aberrant changes that span several levels of biological organization. Growth factors regulate many important cellular and tissue functions including apoptosis, differentiation and proliferation. A variety of genetic and epigenetic changes of growth factors have been shown to contribute to cancer initiation and progression. It is known that cellular and tissue damage to ionizing radiation is in part initiated by the production of reactive oxygen species, which can activate cytokine signaling, and the DNA damage response pathways, most notably the ATM signaling pathway. Recently the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) pathway has been shown to regulate or directly interact with the ATM pathway in the response to radiation. The relevance of this interaction with the ATM pathway is not known although p53 becomes phosphorylated and DNA damage responses are involved. However, growth factor interactions with DNA damage responses have not been elucidated particularly at low doses and further characterization of their relationship to cancer processes is warranted. Our goal will be to use a systems biology approach to mathematically and experimentally describe the low dose responses and cross-talk between the ATM and TGFβ pathways initiated by low and high LET radiation. We will characterize ATM and TGFβ signaling in epithelial and fibroblast cells using 2D models and ultimately extending to 3D organotypic cell culture models to begin to elucidate possible differences that may occur for different cell types and/or inter-cellular communication. We will investigate the roles of the Smad and Activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) proteins as the potential major contributors to cross- talk between the TGFβ and ATM pathways, and links to cell cycle control and/or the DNA damage response, and potential differences in their responses at low and high doses. We have developed various experimental

  17. Effect of Interactive Computer Simulations on Elementary Education Teachers' Understanding of Light Matter Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbewe, Simeon; Mumba, Frackson; Wright, Mary; Henson, Harvey; Chabalengula, Vivien

    2009-10-01

    This study assessed the effect of interactive computer simulations on elementary education in-service teachers' understanding of light matter interactions. A sample comprised 27 elementary education in-service teachers who were in a Master of Science in Mathematics and Science Education degree program at a mid-sized university in Midwest of the USA. Data was collected through pre and posttests. A t-test showed a significant difference between pre and post-tests. The analysis of pretest responses showed that teachers were not able to define or explain photons and electromagnetic spectrum. However, posttest responses showed that most teachers provided correct descriptions of these concepts and provided examples to explicate their responses. Based on our results, the interactive computer simulations had positive and significant impact on teachers' understanding of light matter interactions. Detailed results, implications for teacher education and science teaching and learning will be stated and discussed

  18. [Effect of aggregating agents on the pentosephosphate pathway of carbohydrate metabolism in human blood platelet extracts].

    PubMed

    Makarov, S A; Kudriavtseva, G V; Kolotilova, A I

    1983-01-01

    Thrombin inhibits the rate of glucose-6-phosphate and 6-phosphogluconate oxidation. ADP decreases the incorporation of ribose-5-phosphate into metabolism. The effect of adrenaline on the pentose phosphate pathway reactions was not demonstrated. Cell destruction by means of freezing, thawing and treatment with Triton X-100 decreases the rate of the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase reaction to a greater degree as compared with osmotic shock.

  19. Effective field theory analysis of the self-interacting chameleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanctuary, Hillary; Sturani, Riccardo

    2010-08-01

    We analyse the phenomenology of a self-interacting scalar field in the context of the chameleon scenario originally proposed by Khoury and Weltman. In the absence of self-interactions, this type of scalar field can mediate long range interactions and simultaneously evade constraints from violation of the weak equivalence principle. By applying to such a scalar field the effective field theory method proposed for Einstein gravity by Goldberger and Rothstein, we give a thorough perturbative evaluation of the importance of non-derivative self-interactions in determining the strength of the chameleon mediated force in the case of orbital motion. The self-interactions are potentially dangerous as they can change the long range behaviour of the field. Nevertheless, we show that they do not lead to any dramatic phenomenological consequence with respect to the linear case and solar system constraints are fulfilled.

  20. Interaction mechanisms and biological effects of static magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1994-06-01

    Mechanisms through which static magnetic fields interact with living systems are described and illustrated by selected experimental observations. These mechanisms include electrodynamic interactions with moving, ionic charges (blood flow and nerve impulse conduction), magnetomechanical interactions (orientation and translation of molecules structures and magnetic particles), and interactions with electronic spin states in charge transfer reactions (photo-induced electron transfer in photosynthesis). A general summary is also presented of the biological effects of static magnetic fields. There is convincing experimental evidence for magnetoreception mechanisms in several classes of lower organisms, including bacteria and marine organisms. However, in more highly evolved species of animals, there is no evidence that the interactions of static magnetic fields with flux densities up to 2 Tesla (1 Tesla [T] = 10{sup 4} Gauss) produce either behavioral or physiolocical alterations. These results, based on controlled studies with laboratory animals, are consistent with the outcome of recent epidemiological surveys on human populations exposed occupationally to static magnetic fields.

  1. Land cover effects on infiltration and preferential flow pathways in the high rainfall zone of Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwartendijk, Bob; van Meerveld, Ilja; Ravelona, Maafaka; Razakamanarivo, Herintsitohaina; Ghimire, Chandra; Bruijnzeel, Sampurno; Jones, Julia

    2015-04-01

    Shortened slash-and-burn cycles exhaust agricultural land and have resulted in extensive tracts of highly degraded land across the tropics. Land degradation typically results in decreased rainfall infiltration due to a reduced field-saturated hydraulic conductivity of the topsoil because of a progressive decline in soil organic matter, exposure to raindrop impact, surface sealing and compaction. This results, in turn, in enhanced surface runoff and erosion, and consequently less subsurface flow and groundwater recharge. On the other hand, natural vegetation regrowth or active reforestation can lead to a renewed accumulation of soil organic matter, macropore development and increased infiltration rates. As part of the P4GES project (Can Paying 4 Global Ecosystem Services values reduce poverty?; www.p4ges.org), we study the effects of land use change and reforestation on water resources in the Corridor Ankeniheny-Zahamena (CAZ) in eastern Madagascar. In this poster, we present the results of infiltration and preferential flow measurements in four different land uses in the southern part of the CAZ: (i) closed canopy forest, (ii) 3-14 year-old regrowth on fallow land (savokas), (iii) exhausted and severely degraded land (tany maty), and (iv) recently reforested sites (6-8 years old). The results show that infiltrability increases significantly after several years of forest regrowth after land abandonment, but it remains unclear whether active replanting decreases the time required for restoration of soil hydrological functioning. Preferential flow pathways differed strikingly between the respective land cover types: infiltration in mature forests was predominantly characterized by macropore flow (preferential flow pathways), whereas infiltration in exhausted agricultural land was dominated by matrix flow (few preferential flow pathways). Occurrence of preferential flow pathways in reforestation and fallow sites varied considerably. These results suggest that land

  2. SU(2) Higher-order effective quark interactions from polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braghin, Fábio L.

    2016-10-01

    Higher order quark effective interactions are found for SU(2) flavor by departing from a non-local quark-quark interaction. By integrating out a component of the quark field, the determinant is expanded in chirally symmetric and symmetry breaking effective interactions up to the fifth order in the quark bilinears. The resulting coupling constants are resolved in the leading order of the longwavelength limit and exact numerical ratios between several of these coupling constants are obtained in the large quark mass limit. In this level, chiral invariant interactions only show up in even powers of the quark bilinears, i.e. O(ψ bar ψ) 2 n (n = 1 , 2 , 3 , . .), whereas (explicit) chiral symmetry breaking terms emerge as O(ψ bar ψ) n being always proportional to some power of the Lagrangian quark mass.

  3. X(1576) and the final state interaction effect

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Xiang; Zhang Bo; Shen Leilei; Zhu Shilin

    2007-04-01

    We study whether the broad peak X(1576) observed by BES Collaboration arises from the final state interaction effect of {rho}(1450 1700) decays. The interference effect could produce an enhancement around 1540 MeV in the K{sup +}K{sup -} spectrum with typical interference phases. However, the branching ratio B[J/{psi}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{rho}(1450 1700)]{center_dot}B[{rho}(1450 1700){yields}K{sup +}K{sup -}] from the final state interaction effect is far less than the experimental data.

  4. Spacecraft environments interactions: Protecting against the effects of spacecraft charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herr, J. L.; Mccollum, M. B.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of the natural space environments on spacecraft design, development, and operation are the topic of a series of NASA Reference Publications currently being developed by the Electromagnetics and Environments Branch, Systems Analysis and Integration Laboratory, Marshall Space Flight Center. This primer, second in the series, describes the interactions between a spacecraft and the natural space plasma. Under certain environmental/spacecraft conditions, these interactions result in the phenomenon known as spacecraft charging. It is the focus of this publication to describe the phenomenon of spacecraft charging and its possible adverse effects on spacecraft and to present the key elements of a Spacecraft Charging Effects Protection Plan.

  5. Nuclear Effects in Neutrino Interactions at Low Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Miltenberger, Ethan Ryan

    2015-05-01

    This is a study to identify predicted effects of the carbon nucleus environment on neutrino - nucleus interactions with low momentum transfer. A large sample of neutrino interaction data collected by the MINERvA experiment is analyzed to show the distribution of charged hadron energy in a region with low momentum transfer. These distributions reveal a major discrepancy between the data and a popular interaction model with only the simplest Fermi gas nuclear effects. Detailed analysis of systematic uncertainties due to energy scale and resolution can account for only a little of the discrepancy. Two additional nuclear model effects, a suppression/screening effect (RPA), and the addition of a meson exchange current process (MEC), are shown to improve the description of the data.

  6. Evaluating Differential Effects Using Regression Interactions and Regression Mixture Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Horn, M. Lee; Jaki, Thomas; Masyn, Katherine; Howe, George; Feaster, Daniel J.; Lamont, Andrea E.; George, Melissa R. W.; Kim, Minjung

    2015-01-01

    Research increasingly emphasizes understanding differential effects. This article focuses on understanding regression mixture models, which are relatively new statistical methods for assessing differential effects by comparing results to using an interactive term in linear regression. The research questions which each model answers, their…

  7. STUDENT-TEACHER INTERACTION AS A DETERMINER OF EFFECTIVE TEACHING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LEWIS, EDWIN C.

    THIS STUDY TESTED THE HYPOTHESIS THAT THE EFFECTIVENESS OF A GIVEN TEACHER VARIES FROM ONE STUDENT TO ANOTHER AND THAT THIS DIFFERENCE IN EFFECTIVENESS IS A RESULT OF THE INTERACTION OF THE PERSONALITY PATTERNS OF THE STUDENT AND TEACHER. STUDENTS MAJORING IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING, ANIMAL HUSBANDRY, AND HOME ECONOMICS WERE THE SUBJECTS. PERSONS…

  8. Aerodynamic Interaction Effects of a Helicopter Rotor and Fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, David D., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    A three year Cooperative Research Agreements made in each of the three years between the Subsonic Aerodynamics Branch of the NASA Langley Research Center and the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Va. Tech) has been completed. This document presents results from this three year endeavor. The goal of creating an efficient method to compute unsteady interactional effects between a helicopter rotor and fuselage has been accomplished. This paper also includes appendices to support these findings. The topics are: 1) Rotor-Fuselage Interactions Aerodynamics: An Unsteady Rotor Model; and 2) Rotor/Fuselage Unsteady Interactional Aerodynamics: A New Computational Model.

  9. Effects of MAPK and PI3K Pathways on PD-L1 Expression in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Atefi, Mohammad; Avramis, Earl; Lassen, Amanda; Wong, Deborah; Robert, Lidia; Foulad, David; Cerniglia, Michael; Titz, Bjoern; Chodon, Thinle; Graeber, Thomas G.; Comin-Anduix, Begonya; Ribas, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Purpose PD-L1 is the main ligand for the immune inhibitory receptor PD-1. This ligand is frequently expressed by melanoma cells. In this study we investigated whether PD-L1 expression is controlled by melanoma driver mutations and modified by oncogenic signaling inhibition. Experimental Design Expression of PD-L1 was investigated in a panel of 51 melanoma cell lines containing different oncogenic mutations, including cell lines with innate and acquired resistance to BRAF inhibitors. The effects of targeted therapy drugs on expression of PD-L1 by melanoma cells were investigated. Results No association was found between the level of PD-L1 expression and mutations in BRAF, NRAS, PTEN or amplification of AKT. Resistance to vemurafenib due to the activation of alternative signaling pathways was accompanied with the induction of PD-L1 expression, while the resistance due to the reactivation of the MAPK pathway had no effect on PD-L1 expression. In melanoma cell lines the effects of BRAF, MEK and PI3K inhibitors on expression of PD-L1 were variable from reduction to induction, particularly in the presence of INFγ. In PD-L1-exposed lymphocytes, vemurafenib paradoxically restored activity of the MAPK pathway and increased the secretion of cytokines. Conclusions In melanoma cell lines, including BRAF inhibitor-resistant cells, PD-L1 expression is variably regulated by oncogenic signaling pathways. PD-L1-exposed lymphocytes decrease MAPK signaling, which is corrected by exposure to vemurafenib, providing potential benefits of combining this drug with immunotherapies. PMID:24812408

  10. Coulomb interaction effects on the Majorana states in quantum wires.

    PubMed

    Manolescu, A; Marinescu, D C; Stanescu, T D

    2014-04-30

    The stability of the Majorana modes in the presence of a repulsive interaction is studied in the standard semiconductor wire-metallic superconductor configuration. The effects of short-range Coulomb interaction, which is incorporated using a purely repulsive δ-function to model the strong screening effect due to the presence of the superconductor, are determined within a Hartree-Fock approximation of the effective Bogoliubov-De Gennes Hamiltonian that describes the low-energy physics of the wire. Through a numerical diagonalization procedure we obtain interaction corrections to the single particle eigenstates and calculate the extended topological phase diagram in terms of the chemical potential and the Zeeman energy. We find that, for a fixed Zeeman energy, the interaction shifts the phase boundaries to a higher chemical potential, whereas for a fixed chemical potential this shift can occur either at lower or higher Zeeman energies. These effects can be interpreted as a renormalization of the g-factor due to the interaction. The minimum Zeeman energy needed to realize Majorana fermions decreases with the increasing strength of the Coulomb repulsion. Furthermore, we find that in wires with multi-band occupancy this effect can be enhanced by increasing the chemical potential, i.e. by occupying higher energy bands. PMID:24722427

  11. A High-Throughput Screening Strategy to Identify Protein-Protein Interaction Inhibitors That Block the Fanconi Anemia DNA Repair Pathway.

    PubMed

    Voter, Andrew F; Manthei, Kelly A; Keck, James L

    2016-07-01

    Induction of the Fanconi anemia (FA) DNA repair pathway is a common mechanism by which tumors evolve resistance to DNA crosslinking chemotherapies. Proper execution of the FA pathway requires interaction between the FA complementation group M protein (FANCM) and the RecQ-mediated genome instability protein (RMI) complex, and mutations that disrupt FANCM/RMI interactions sensitize cells to DNA crosslinking agents. Inhibitors that block FANCM/RMI complex formation could be useful therapeutics for resensitizing tumors that have acquired chemotherapeutic resistance. To identify such inhibitors, we have developed and validated high-throughput fluorescence polarization and proximity assays that are sensitive to inhibitors that disrupt interactions between the RMI complex and its binding site on FANCM (a peptide referred to as MM2). A pilot screen of 74,807 small molecules was performed using the fluorescence polarization assay. Hits from the primary screen were further tested using the proximity assay, and an orthogonal proximity assay was used to assess inhibitor selectivity. Direct physical interaction between the RMI complex and the most selective inhibitor identified through the screening process was measured by surface plasmon resonance and isothermal titration calorimetry. Observation of direct binding by this small molecule validates the screening protocol.

  12. Interaction between Major Nitrogen Regulatory Protein NIT2 and Pathway-Specific Regulatory Factor NIT4 Is Required for Their Synergistic Activation of Gene Expression in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Bo; Marzluf, George A.

    1998-01-01

    In Neurospora crassa, the major nitrogen regulatory protein, NIT2, a member of the GATA family of transcription factors, controls positively the expression of numerous genes which specify nitrogen catabolic enzymes. Expression of the highly regulated structural gene nit-3, which encodes nitrate reductase, is dependent upon a synergistic interaction of NIT2 with a pathway-specific control protein, NIT4, a member of the GAL4 family of fungal regulatory factors. The NIT2 and NIT4 proteins both bind at specific recognition elements in the nit-3 promoter, but, in addition, we show that a direct protein-protein interaction between NIT2 and NIT4 is essential for optimal expression of the nit-3 structural gene. Neurospora possesses at least five different GATA factors which control different areas of cellular function, but which have a similar DNA binding specificity. Significantly, only NIT2, of the several Neurospora GATA factors examined, interacts with NIT4. We propose that protein-protein interactions of the individual GATA factors with additional pathway-specific regulatory factors determine each of their specific regulatory functions. PMID:9632783

  13. Sibling interaction: evidence of a generational effect in maltreating infants.

    PubMed

    Crittenden, P M

    1984-01-01

    Theorists have long assumed that an individual's style of child-rearing was based, in large part, on his or her parents' style of parenting. The strongest evidence of such a generational effect comes from retrospective studies of disturbed adults. The present study is an attempt to provide some prospective evidence. Infants, aged 6 to 11 months, were videotaped interacting with their mother, with a sibling, and with a second adult. At each sibling age (from 2 to 10 years) one abused, one neglected, one problematic, and one normally reared infant was seen. The adult/sibling patterns of interaction were coded as abusive, neglecting, inept, or sensitive. Infant patterns were difficult, passive, and cooperative. Siblings were found to interact with the infant in a manner similar to that of their mothers suggesting that they had learned their style of interaction from their mothers. Although adequately reared siblings increased in sensitivity with age, maltreated siblings did not. The possibility that infant temperament had influenced both the mothers' and the siblings' style of interaction (and, therefore, accounted for their similarity) was tested using a second adult interactant. Adults were found to influence infants more than the reverse. These data provide evidence of a generational effect in the learning of parenting styles appearing as early as the third year of life. Moreover, they suggest that the effect is not attributable to infant temperament.

  14. Pubertal Effects on Adjustment in Girls: Moving from Demonstrating Effects to Identifying Pathways

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graber, Julia A.; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; Warren, Michelle P.

    2006-01-01

    The present investigation examines mediated pathways from pubertal development to changes in depressive affect and aggression. Participants were 100 white girls who were between the ages of 10 and 14 (M=12.13, SD=0.80); girls were from well-educated, middle-to upper-middle class families, and attended private schools in a major northeastern urban…

  15. Effective long-distance interaction from short-distance interaction in a periodically driven one-dimensional classical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lingzhen; Liu, Modan; Marthaler, Michael

    2016-05-01

    We study the classical dynamics of many interacting particles in a periodically driven one-dimensional (1D) system. We show that under the rotating wave approximation (RWA), a short-distance 1D interaction (δ function or hard-core interaction) becomes a long-distance two-dimensional (2D) interaction which only depends on the distance in the phase space of the rotating frame. The RWA interaction describes the effect of the interaction on the slowly changing amplitude and phase of the oscillating particles, while the fast oscillations take on the role of a force carrier, which allows for interaction over much larger effective distances.

  16. Organophosphate pesticides exposure among farmworkers: pathways and risk of adverse health effects.

    PubMed

    Suratman, Suratman; Edwards, John William; Babina, Kateryna

    2015-01-01

    Organophosphate (OP) compounds are the most widely used pesticides with more than 100 OP compounds in use around the world. The high-intensity use of OP pesticides contributes to morbidity and mortality in farmworkers and their families through acute or chronic pesticides-related illnesses. Many factors contributing to adverse health effects have been investigated by researchers to determine pathways of OP-pesticide exposure among farmers in developed and developing countries. Factors like wind/agricultural pesticide drift, mixing and spraying pesticides, use of personal protective equipment (PPE), knowledge, perceptions, washing hands, taking a shower, wearing contaminated clothes, eating, drinking, smoking, and hot weather are common in both groups of countries. Factors including low socioeconomic status areas, workplace conditions, duration of exposure, pesticide safety training, frequency of applying pesticides, spraying against the wind, and reuse of pesticide containers for storage are specific contributors in developing countries, whereas housing conditions, social contextual factors, and mechanical equipment were specific pathways in developed countries. This paper compares existing research in environmental and behavioural exposure modifying factors and biological monitoring between developing and developed countries. The main objective of this review is to explore the current depth of understanding of exposure pathways and factors increasing the risk of exposure potentially leading to adverse health effects specific to each group of countries.

  17. The effects of hispidulin on bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity: role of AMPK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xinhuan; Chen, Jie; Wang, Ping; Zhou, Hui; Li, Song; Zhang, Mengyuan

    2014-09-01

    Bupivacaine is a sodium channel blocker, which is widely used for local infiltration nerve block, epidural and intrathecal anesthesia. However, bupivacaine could cause nerve damage. Hispidulin was shown to be able to penetrate the blood-brain barrier and possess antiepileptic activity. In this study, we investigate whether hispidulin administration could attenuate bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity. Bupivacaine-challenged mouse neuroblastoma N2a cells were treated with hispidulin. The neuron injury was assessed by examination of cell viability and apoptosis. The levels of activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathway were examined along with the effect of blocking AMPK signaling on cell viability in the presence of hispidulin and bupivacaine. Our results showed that Bupivacaine treatment significantly decreased cell viability and induced apoptosis. Treatment with hispidulin significantly attenuated bupivacaine-induced cell injury. In addition, hispidulin treatment increased the levels of phospho-AMPK and phospho-GSK3β and attenuated bupivacaine-induced loss in mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, we found that blocking AMPK signaling pathway significantly abolished the cytoprotective effect of hispidulin against bupivacaine-induced cell injury. Our findings suggest that treatment of neuroblastoma cells with hispidulin-protected neural cells from Bupivacaine-induced injury via the activation of the AMPK/GSK3β signaling pathway.

  18. Mediators, Receptors, and Signalling Pathways in the Anti-Inflammatory and Antihyperalgesic Effects of Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, John L.; Cripps, Allan W.; Smith, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    Acupuncture has been used for millennia to treat allergic diseases including both intermittent rhinitis and persistent rhinitis. Besides the research on the efficacy and safety of acupuncture treatment for allergic rhinitis, research has also investigated how acupuncture might modulate immune function to exert anti-inflammatory effects. A proposed model has previously hypothesized that acupuncture might downregulate proinflammatory neuropeptides, proinflammatory cytokines, and neurotrophins, modulating transient receptor potential vallinoid (TRPV1), a G-protein coupled receptor which plays a central role in allergic rhinitis. Recent research has been largely supportive of this model. New advances in research include the discovery of a novel cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway activated by acupuncture. A chemokine-mediated proliferation of opioid-containing macrophages in inflamed tissues, in response to acupuncture, has also been demonstrated for the first time. Further research on the complex cross talk between receptors during inflammation is also helping to elucidate the mediators and signalling pathways activated by acupuncture. PMID:26339274

  19. The effect of aquaporin 5 overexpression on the Ras signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Janghee; Lee, Juna; Kim, Myoung Sook; Jang, Se Jin; Sidransky, David; Moon, Chulso

    2008-03-07

    Human aquaporin 5 (AQP5) has been shown to be overexpressed in multiple cancers, such as pancreatic cancer and colon cancer. Furthermore, it has been reported that ectopic expression of AQP5 leads to many phenotypic changes characteristic of transformation. However, the biochemical mechanism leading to transformation in AQP5-overexpressing cells has not been clearly elucidated. In this report, the overexpression of AQP5 in NIH3T3 cells demonstrated a significant effect on Ras activity and, thus, cell proliferation. Furthermore, this influence was shown to be mediated by phosphorylation of the PKA consensus site of AQP5. This is the first evidence demonstrating an association between AQP5 and a signaling pathway, namely the Ras signal transduction pathway, which may be the basis of the oncogenic properties seen in AQP-overexpressing cells.

  20. Behavioral effects of clozapine: Involvement of trace amine pathways in C. elegans and M. musculus

    PubMed Central

    Karmacharya, Rakesh; Lynn, Spencer K.; Demarco, Sarah; Ortiz, Angelica; Wang, Xin; Lundy, Miriam Y.; Xie, Zhihua; Cohen, Bruce M.; Miller, Gregory M.; Buttner, Edgar A.

    2011-01-01

    Clozapine is an antipsychotic medication with superior efficacy in treatment-refractory schizophrenia. The molecular basis of clozapine’s therapeutic profile is not well understood. We studied behavioral effects of clozapine in Caenorhabditis elegans to identify novel pathways that modulate clozapine’s biological effects. Clozapine stimulated egg laying in C. elegans in a dose-dependent manner. This effect was clozapine-specific, as it was not observed with exposure to a typical antipsychotic, haloperidol or an atypical antipsychotic, olanzapine. A candidate gene screen of biogenic amine neurotransmitter systems identified signaling pathways that mediate this clozapine-specific effect on egg laying. Specifically, we found that clozapine-induced increase in egg laying requires tyramine biosynthesis. To test the implications of this finding across species, we explored whether trace amine systems modulate clozapine’s behavioral effects in mammals by studying trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1) knockout mice. Clozapine increased pre-pulse inhibition (PPI) in wild-type mice. This increase in PPI was abrogated in TAAR1 knockout mice, implicating TAAR1 in clozapine-induced PPI enhancement. In transfected mammalian cell lines, we found no TAAR activation by antipsychotics, suggesting that modulation of trace amine signaling in mice does not occur directly at the receptor itself. In summary, we report a heretofore-unknown role for trace amine systems in clozapine-mediated effects across two species: C. elegans and mice. PMID:21529784

  1. An Association Map on the Effect of Flavonoids on the Signaling Pathways in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Koosha, Sanaz; Alshawsh, Mohammed A; Looi, Chung Yeng; Seyedan, Atefehalsadat; Mohamed, Zahurin

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common type of cancer in the world, causing thousands of deaths annually. Although chemotherapy is known to be an effective treatment to combat colon cancer, it produces severe side effects. Natural products, on the other hand, appear to generate fewer side effects than do chemotherapeutic drugs. Flavonoids are polyphenolic compounds found in various fruits and vegetables known to possess antioxidant activities, and the literature shows that several of these flavonoids have anti-CRC propertiesFlavonoids are classified into five main subclasses: flavonols, flavanones, flavones, flavan-3-ols, and flavanonols. Of these subclasses, the flavanonols have a minimum effect against CRC, whereas the flavones play an important role. The main targets for the inhibitory effect of flavonoids on CRC signaling pathways are caspase; nuclear factor kappa B; mitogen-activated protein kinase/p38; matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-7, and MMP-9; p53; β-catenin; cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)2 and CDK4; and cyclins A, B, D, and E. In this review article, we summarize the in vitro and in vivo studies that have been performed since 2000 on the anti-CRC properties of flavonoids. We also describe the signaling pathways affected by flavonoids that have been found to be involved in CRC. Some flavonoids have the potential to be an effective alternative to chemotherapeutic drugs in the treatment of colon cancer; well-controlled clinical studies should, however, be conducted to support this proposal.

  2. An Association Map on the Effect of Flavonoids on the Signaling Pathways in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Koosha, Sanaz; Alshawsh, Mohammed A; Looi, Chung Yeng; Seyedan, Atefehalsadat; Mohamed, Zahurin

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common type of cancer in the world, causing thousands of deaths annually. Although chemotherapy is known to be an effective treatment to combat colon cancer, it produces severe side effects. Natural products, on the other hand, appear to generate fewer side effects than do chemotherapeutic drugs. Flavonoids are polyphenolic compounds found in various fruits and vegetables known to possess antioxidant activities, and the literature shows that several of these flavonoids have anti-CRC propertiesFlavonoids are classified into five main subclasses: flavonols, flavanones, flavones, flavan-3-ols, and flavanonols. Of these subclasses, the flavanonols have a minimum effect against CRC, whereas the flavones play an important role. The main targets for the inhibitory effect of flavonoids on CRC signaling pathways are caspase; nuclear factor kappa B; mitogen-activated protein kinase/p38; matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-7, and MMP-9; p53; β-catenin; cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)2 and CDK4; and cyclins A, B, D, and E. In this review article, we summarize the in vitro and in vivo studies that have been performed since 2000 on the anti-CRC properties of flavonoids. We also describe the signaling pathways affected by flavonoids that have been found to be involved in CRC. Some flavonoids have the potential to be an effective alternative to chemotherapeutic drugs in the treatment of colon cancer; well-controlled clinical studies should, however, be conducted to support this proposal. PMID:27226778

  3. An Association Map on the Effect of Flavonoids on the Signaling Pathways in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koosha, Sanaz; Alshawsh, Mohammed A.; Looi, Chung Yeng; Seyedan, Atefehalsadat; Mohamed, Zahurin

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common type of cancer in the world, causing thousands of deaths annually. Although chemotherapy is known to be an effective treatment to combat colon cancer, it produces severe side effects. Natural products, on the other hand, appear to generate fewer side effects than do chemotherapeutic drugs. Flavonoids are polyphenolic compounds found in various fruits and vegetables known to possess antioxidant activities, and the literature shows that several of these flavonoids have anti-CRC propertiesFlavonoids are classified into five main subclasses: flavonols, flavanones, flavones, flavan-3-ols, and flavanonols. Of these subclasses, the flavanonols have a minimum effect against CRC, whereas the flavones play an important role. The main targets for the inhibitory effect of flavonoids on CRC signaling pathways are caspase; nuclear factor kappa B; mitogen-activated protein kinase/p38; matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-7, and MMP-9; p53; β-catenin; cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)2 and CDK4; and cyclins A, B, D, and E. In this review article, we summarize the in vitro and in vivo studies that have been performed since 2000 on the anti-CRC properties of flavonoids. We also describe the signaling pathways affected by flavonoids that have been found to be involved in CRC. Some flavonoids have the potential to be an effective alternative to chemotherapeutic drugs in the treatment of colon cancer; well-controlled clinical studies should, however, be conducted to support this proposal. PMID:27226778

  4. The Group B Streptococcus–Secreted Protein CIP Interacts with C4, Preventing C3b Deposition via the Lectin and Classical Complement Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Pietrocola, Giampiero; Rindi, Simonetta; Rosini, Roberto; Buccato, Scilla

    2016-01-01

    The group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a leading cause of neonatal invasive disease. GBS bacteria are surrounded by a thick capsular polysaccharide that is a potent inhibitor of complement deposition via the alternative pathway. Several of its surface molecules can however activate the classical and lectin complement pathways, rendering this species still vulnerable to phagocytic killing. In this study we have identified a novel secreted protein named complement interfering protein (CIP) that downregulates complement activation via the classical and lectin pathways, but not the alternative pathway. The CIP protein showed high affinity toward C4b and inhibited its interaction with C2, presumably preventing the formation of the C4bC2a convertase. Addition of recombinant CIP to GBS cip-negative bacteria resulted in decreased deposition of C3b on their surface and in diminished phagocytic killing in a whole-blood assay. Our data reveal a novel strategy exploited by GBS to counteract innate immunity and could be valuable for the development of anti-infective agents against this important pathogen. PMID:26608922

  5. β-Arrestin interacts with the beta/gamma subunits of trimeric G-proteins and dishevelled in the Wnt/Ca(2+) pathway in xenopus gastrulation.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Katharina; Dürsch, Verena; Harnoš, Jakub; Bryja, Vitezslav; Gentzel, Marc; Schambony, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    β-Catenin independent, non-canonical Wnt signaling pathways play a major role in the regulation of morphogenetic movements in vertebrates. The term non-canonical Wnt signaling comprises multiple, intracellularly divergent, Wnt-activated and β-Catenin independent signaling cascades including the Wnt/Planar Cell Polarity and the Wnt/Ca(2+) cascades. Wnt/Planar Cell Polarity and Wnt/Ca(2+) pathways share common effector proteins, including the Wnt ligand, Frizzled receptors and Dishevelled, with each other and with additional branches of Wnt signaling. Along with the aforementioned proteins, β-Arrestin has been identified as an essential effector protein in the Wnt/