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Sample records for pathways interaction effects

  1. Effect of rod–cone interactions on mesopic visual performance mediated by chromatic and luminance pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zele, Andrew J.; Maynard, Michelle L.; Joyce, Daniel S.; Cao, Dingcai

    2014-01-01

    We studied the effect of rod–cone interactions on mesopic visual reaction time (RT). Rod and cone photoreceptor excitations were independently controlled using a four-primary photostimulator. It was observed that (1) lateral rod–cone interactions increase the cone-mediated RTs; (2) the rod–cone interactions are strongest when rod sensitivity is maximal in a dark surround, but weaker with increased rod activity in a light surround; and (3) the presence of a dark surround nonselectively increased the mean and variability of chromatic (+L−M, S-cone) and luminance (L + M + S) RTs independent of the level of rod activity. The results demonstrate that lateral rod–cone interactions must be considered when deriving mesopic luminous efficiency using RT. PMID:24695205

  2. Analysis of interaction of phenolic compounds with the cholecystokinin signaling pathway to explain effects on reducing food intake.

    PubMed

    Al Shukor, Nadin; Raes, Katleen; Van Camp, John; Smagghe, Guy

    2014-03-01

    Previous animal experiments demonstrated that phenolic compounds can reduce weight and food intake, but the exact mechanism(s) behind these effects remain unknown. For regulation of food intake, the cholecystokinin (CCK) hormone signaling pathway plays an important role as it induces satiety by binding on its specific receptor (CCK1R), hereby reducing food intake. In this study, we investigated the possible interactions of eight phenolic compounds of different classes (tannic acid, gallic acid, benzoic acid, hydroxybenzoic acid, protocatechuic acid, quercetin, kaempferol and resveratrol) with the CCK1R signaling pathway. As major results, the tested phenolic compounds could not activate the CCK1R in a specific cell-based bioassay. In contrast, we observed an anti-CCK1R activity. This antagonistic action might be explained by blocking of the functioning of the CCK1R receptor, although the exact mechanism of interaction remains unknown. For tannic acid, we also measured a sequestration activity of the CCK hormone in vitro. In conclusion, the reported activity of phenolic compounds against food intake and weight is not based on an activation of the CCK1R. Taking into account the complex regulation of food intake, further work is necessary to unravel other essential mechanisms involved to explain the reported effects of phenolic compounds against food intake.

  3. Pathway Analysis Incorporating Protein-Protein Interaction Networks Identified Candidate Pathways for the Seven Common Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Peng-Lin; Yu, Ya-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Pathway analysis has become popular as a secondary analysis strategy for genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Most of the current pathway analysis methods aggregate signals from the main effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes within a pathway without considering the effects of gene-gene interactions. However, gene-gene interactions can also have critical effects on complex diseases. Protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks have been used to define gene pairs for the gene-gene interaction tests. Incorporating the PPI information to define gene pairs for interaction tests within pathways can increase the power for pathway-based association tests. We propose a pathway association test, which aggregates the interaction signals in PPI networks within a pathway, for GWAS with case-control samples. Gene size is properly considered in the test so that genes do not contribute more to the test statistic simply due to their size. Simulation studies were performed to verify that the method is a valid test and can have more power than other pathway association tests in the presence of gene-gene interactions within a pathway under different scenarios. We applied the test to the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium GWAS datasets for seven common diseases. The most significant pathway is the chaperones modulate interferon signaling pathway for Crohn’s disease (p-value = 0.0003). The pathway modulates interferon gamma, which induces the JAK/STAT pathway that is involved in Crohn’s disease. Several other pathways that have functional implications for the seven diseases were also identified. The proposed test based on gene-gene interaction signals in PPI networks can be used as a complementary tool to the current existing pathway analysis methods focusing on main effects of genes. An efficient software implementing the method is freely available at http://puppi.sourceforge.net. PMID:27622767

  4. Effective connectivity of ascending and descending frontalthalamic pathways during sustained attention: Complex brain network interactions in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Jagtap, Pranav; Diwadkar, Vaibhav A

    2016-07-01

    Frontal-thalamic interactions are crucial for bottom-up gating and top-down control, yet have not been well studied from brain network perspectives. We applied network modeling of fMRI signals [dynamic causal modeling (DCM)] to investigate frontal-thalamic interactions during an attention task with parametrically varying levels of demand. fMRI was collected while subjects participated in a sustained continuous performance task with low and high attention demands. 162 competing model architectures were employed in DCM to evaluate hypotheses on bilateral frontal-thalamic connections and their modulation by attention demand, selected at a second level using Bayesian model selection. The model architecture evinced significant contextual modulation by attention of ascending (thalamus → dPFC) and descending (dPFC → thalamus) pathways. However, modulation of these pathways was asymmetric: while positive modulation of the ascending pathway was comparable across attention demand, modulation of the descending pathway was significantly greater when attention demands were increased. Increased modulation of the (dPFC → thalamus) pathway in response to increased attention demand constitutes novel evidence of attention-related gain in the connectivity of the descending attention pathway. By comparison demand-independent modulation of the ascending (thalamus → dPFC) pathway suggests unbiased thalamic inputs to the cortex in the context of the paradigm. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2557-2570, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Effects of Rivaroxaban on Platelet Activation and Platelet–Coagulation Pathway Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Heitmeier, Stefan; Laux, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Activation of coagulation and platelets is closely linked, and arterial thrombosis involves coagulation activation as well as platelet activation and aggregation. In these studies, we investigated the possible synergistic effects of rivaroxaban in combination with antiplatelet agents on thrombin generation and platelet aggregation in vitro and on arterial thrombosis and hemostasis in rat models. Materials and Methods: Thrombin generation was measured by the Calibrated Automated Thrombogram method (0.5 pmol/L tissue factor) using human platelet-rich plasma (PRP) spiked with rivaroxaban (15, 30, or 60 ng/mL), ticagrelor (1.0 µg/mL), and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA; 100 µg/mL). Tissue factor-induced platelet aggregation was measured in PRP spiked with rivaroxaban (15 or 30 ng/mL), ticagrelor (1 or 3 µg/mL), or a combination of these. An arteriovenous (AV) shunt model in rats was used to determine the effects of rivaroxaban (0.01, 0.03, or 0.1 mg/kg), clopidogrel (1 mg/kg), ASA (3 mg/kg), and combinations on arterial thrombosis. Results: Rivaroxaban inhibited thrombin generation in a concentration-dependent manner and the effect was enhanced with ticagrelor and ticagrelor plus ASA. Rivaroxaban and ticagrelor also concentration-dependently inhibited tissue factor-induced platelet aggregation, and their combination increased the inhibition synergistically. In the AV shunt model, rivaroxaban dose-dependently reduced thrombus formation. Combining subefficacious or weakly efficacious doses of rivaroxaban with ASA or ASA plus clopidogrel increased the antithrombotic effect. Conclusion: These data indicate that the combination of rivaroxaban with single or dual antiplatelet agents works synergistically to reduce platelet activation, which may in turn lead to the delayed/reduced formation of coagulation complexes and vice versa, thereby enhancing antithrombotic potency. PMID:25848131

  6. Integrated pathway and epistasis analysis reveals interactive effect of genetic variants at TERF1 and AFAP1L2 loci on melanoma risk

    PubMed Central

    Vaysse, Amaury; Wei, Qingyi; Chen, Wei V.; Mohamdi, Hamida; Maubec, Eve; Lavielle, Nolwenn; Galan, Pilar; Lathrop, Mark; Avril, Marie-Françoise; Lee, Jeffrey E.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have characterized 13 loci associated with melanoma, which only account for a small part of melanoma risk. To identify new genes with too small an effect to be detected individually but which collectively influence melanoma risk and/or show interactive effects, we used a two-step analysis strategy including pathway analysis of genome-wide SNP data, in a first step, and epistasis analysis within significant pathways, in a second step. Pathway analysis, using the gene-set enrichment analysis (GSEA) approach and the gene ontology (GO) database, was applied to the outcomes of MELARISK (3,976 subjects) and MDACC (2,827 subjects) GWASs. Cross-gene SNP-SNP interaction analysis within melanoma-associated GOs was performed using the INTERSNP software. Five GO categories were significantly enriched in genes associated with melanoma (FDR≤5% in both studies): response to light stimulus, regulation of mitotic cell cycle, induction of programmed cell death, cytokine activity and oxidative phosphorylation. Epistasis analysis, within each of the five significant GOs, showed significant evidence for interaction for one SNP pair at TERF1 and AFAP1L2 loci (pmeta-int =2.0×10−7, which met both the pathway and overall multiple-testing corrected thresholds that are equal to 9.8×10−7 and 2.0×10−7, respectively) and suggestive evidence for another pair involving correlated SNPs at the same loci (pmeta-int =3.6×10−6 ). This interaction has important biological relevance given the key role of TERF1 in telomere biology and the reported physical interaction between TERF1 and AFAP1L2 proteins. This finding brings a novel piece of evidence for the emerging role of telomere dysfunction into melanoma development. PMID:25892537

  7. Hsa-miR-590-5p Interaction with SMAD3 Transcript Supports Its Regulatory Effect on The TGFβ Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jafarzadeh, Meisam; Soltani, Bahram M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective SMAD proteins are the core players of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGFβ) signaling pathway, a pathway which is involved in cell proliferation, differentiation and migration. On the other hand, hsa-miRNA-590-5p (miR-590-5p) is known to have a negative regulatory effect on TGFβ signaling pathway receptors. Since, RNAhybrid analy- sis suggested SMAD3 as a bona fide target gene for miR-590, we intended to investigate the effect of miR-590-5p on SMAD3 transcription. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, miR-590-5p was overexpressed in different cell lines and its increased expression was detected through quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Western blot analysis was then used to investigate the effect of miR-590-5p overexpression on SMAD3 protein level. Next, the direct interaction of miR-590-5p with the 3´-UTR sequence of SMAD3 transcript was investigated using the dual luciferase assay. Finally, flow cytometery was used to inves- tigate the effect of miR-590-5p overexpression on cell cycle progression in HeLa and SW480 cell lines. Results miR-590-5p was overexpressed in the SW480 cell line and its overexpression resulted in significant reduction of the SMAD3 protein level. Consistently, direct interaction of miR-590-5p with 3´-UTR sequence of SMAD3 was detected. Finally, miR-590-5p over- expression did not show a significant effect on cell cycle progression of Hela and SW480 cell lines. Conclusion Consistent with previous reports about the negative regulatory effect of miR-590 on TGFβ receptors, our data suggest that miR-590-5p also attenuates the TGFβ signaling pathway through down-regulation of SMAD3. PMID:27054113

  8. Cardioprotection Effects of Sevoflurane by Regulating the Pathway of Neuroactive Ligand-Receptor Interaction in Patients Undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinquan; Cheng, Jian; Zhang, Chao

    2017-01-01

    This study was designed to identify attractor modules and further reveal the potential biological processes involving in sevoflurane-induced anesthesia in patients treated with coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Microarray profile data (ID: E-GEOD-4386) on atrial samples obtained from patients receiving anesthetic gas sevoflurane prior to and following CABG procedure were downloaded from EMBL-EBI database for further analysis. Protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks of baseline and sevoflurane groups were inferred and reweighted according to Spearman correlation coefficient (SCC), followed by systematic modules inference using clique-merging approach. Subsequently, attract method was utilized to explore attractor modules. Finally, pathway enrichment analyses for genes in the attractor modules were implemented to illuminate the biological processes in sevoflurane group. Using clique-merging approach, 27 and 36 modules were obtained from the PPI networks of baseline and sevoflurane-treated samples, respectively. By comparing with the baseline condition, 5 module pairs with the same gene composition were identified. Subsequently, 1 out of 5 modules was identified as an attractor based on attract method. Additionally, pathway analysis indicated that genes in the attractor module were associated with neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction. Accordingly, sevoflurane might exert important functions in cardioprotection in patients following CABG, partially through regulating the pathway of neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction. PMID:28348638

  9. Actionable pathways: interactive discovery of therapeutic targets using signaling pathway models

    PubMed Central

    Salavert, Francisco; Hidago, Marta R.; Amadoz, Alicia; Çubuk, Cankut; Medina, Ignacio; Crespo, Daniel; Carbonell-Caballero, Jose; Dopazo, Joaquín

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of actionable targets is crucial for targeted therapies and is also a constituent part of the drug discovery process. The success of an intervention over a target depends critically on its contribution, within the complex network of gene interactions, to the cellular processes responsible for disease progression or therapeutic response. Here we present PathAct, a web server that predicts the effect that interventions over genes (inhibitions or activations that simulate knock-outs, drug treatments or over-expressions) can have over signal transmission within signaling pathways and, ultimately, over the cell functionalities triggered by them. PathAct implements an advanced graphical interface that provides a unique interactive working environment in which the suitability of potentially actionable genes, that could eventually become drug targets for personalized or individualized therapies, can be easily tested. The PathAct tool can be found at: http://pathact.babelomics.org. PMID:27137885

  10. Interaction of vitamin D with membrane-based signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Larriba, María Jesús; González-Sancho, José Manuel; Bonilla, Félix; Muñoz, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Many studies in different biological systems have revealed that 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1α,25(OH)2D3) modulates signaling pathways triggered at the plasma membrane by agents such as Wnt, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, epidermal growth factor (EGF), and others. In addition, 1α,25(OH)2D3 may affect gene expression by paracrine mechanisms that involve the regulation of cytokine or growth factor secretion by neighboring cells. Moreover, post-transcriptional and post-translational effects of 1α,25(OH)2D3 add to or overlap with its classical modulation of gene transcription rate. Together, these findings show that vitamin D receptor (VDR) cannot be considered only as a nuclear-acting, ligand-modulated transcription factor that binds to and controls the transcription of target genes. Instead, available data support the view that much of the complex biological activity of 1α,25(OH)2D3 resides in its capacity to interact with membrane-based signaling pathways and to modulate the expression and secretion of paracrine factors. Therefore, we propose that future research in the vitamin D field should focus on the interplay between 1α,25(OH)2D3 and agents that act at the plasma membrane, and on the analysis of intercellular communication. Global analyses such as RNA-Seq, transcriptomic arrays, and genome-wide ChIP are expected to dissect the interactions at the gene and molecular levels. PMID:24600406

  11. [A novel biological pathway expansion method based on the knowledge of protein-protein interactions].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaolei; Zuo, Xiaoyu; Qin, Jiheng; Liang, Yan; Zhang, Naizun; Luan, Yizhao; Rao, Shaoqi

    2014-04-01

    Biological pathways have been widely used in gene function studies; however, the current knowledge for biological pathways is per se incomplete and has to be further expanded. Bioinformatics prediction provides us a cheap but effective way for pathway expansion. Here, we proposed a novel method for biological pathway prediction, by intergrating prior knowledge of protein?protein interactions and Gene Ontology (GO) database. First, the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways to which the interacting neighbors of a targe gene (at the level of protein?protein interaction) belong were chosen as the candidate pathways. Then, the pathways to which the target gene belong were determined by testing whether the genes in the candidate pathways were enriched in the GO terms to which the target gene were annotated. The protein?protein interaction data obtained from the Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) and Biological General Repository for Interaction Datasets (BioGRID) were respectively used to predict the pathway attribution(s) of the target gene. The results demanstrated that both the average accuracy (the ratio of the correctly predicted pathways to the totally pathways to which all the target genes were annotated) and the relative accuracy (of the genes with at least one annotated pathway being successful predicted, the percentage of the genes with all the annotated pathways being correctly predicted) for pathway predictions were increased with the number of the interacting neighbours. When the number of interacting neighbours reached 22, the average accuracy was 96.2% (HPRD) and 96.3% (BioGRID), respectively, and the relative accuracy was 93.3% (HPRD) and 84.1% (BioGRID), respectively. Further validation analysis of 89 genes whose pathway knowledge was updated in a new database release indicated that 50 genes were correctly predicted for at least one updated pathway, and 43 genes were accurately predicted for all the updated pathways, giving an

  12. Pathways in Interactive Media Practices among Youths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Beemt, Antoine; Akkerman, Sanne; Simons, P. Robert-Jan

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study examines how 11 Dutch students aged 14-15 develop an interest in specific types of interactive media practices and how they perceive these practices in relation to others. The methods included semi-structured interviewing, autodriving visual elicitation and photo elicitation using moodboards. Our results show the importance…

  13. The interactions of flavonoids within neuronal signalling pathways

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that dietary phytochemicals, in particular flavonoids, may exert beneficial effects in the central nervous system by protecting neurons against stress-induced injury, by suppressing neuroinflammation and by promoting neurocognitive performance, through changes in synaptic plasticity. It is likely that flavonoids exert such effects in neurons, through selective actions on different components within a number of protein kinase and lipid kinase signalling cascades, such as phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt, protein kinase C and mitogen-activated protein kinase. This review details the potential inhibitory or stimulatory actions of flavonoids within these pathways, and describes how such interactions are likely to affect cellular function through changes in the activation state of target molecules and/or by modulating gene expression. Although, precise sites of action are presently unknown, their abilities to: (1) bind to ATP binding sites on enzymes and receptors; (2) modulate the activity of kinases directly; (3) affect the function of important phosphatases; (4) preserve neuronal Ca2+ homeostasis; and (5) modulate signalling cascades lying downstream of kinases, are explored. Future research directions are outlined in relation to their precise site(s) of action within the signalling pathways and the sequence of events that allow them to regulate neuronal function in the central nervous system. PMID:18850181

  14. WW domain interactions regulate the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway

    PubMed Central

    Salah, Z; Aqeilan, R I

    2011-01-01

    The Hippo kinase pathway is emerging as a conserved signaling pathway that is essential for organ growth and tumorigenesis in Drosophila and mammalians. Although the signaling of the core kinases is relatively well understood, less is known about the upstream inputs, downstream outputs and regulation of the whole cascade. Enrichment of the Hippo pathway components with WW domains and their cognate proline-rich interacting motifs provides a versatile platform for further understanding the mechanisms that regulate organ growth and tumorigenesis. Here, we review recently discovered mechanisms of WW domain-mediated interactions that contribute to the regulation of the Hippo signaling pathway in tumorigenesis. We further discuss new insights and future directions on the emerging role of such regulation. PMID:21677687

  15. WW domain interactions regulate the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway.

    PubMed

    Salah, Z; Aqeilan, R I

    2011-06-16

    The Hippo kinase pathway is emerging as a conserved signaling pathway that is essential for organ growth and tumorigenesis in Drosophila and mammalians. Although the signaling of the core kinases is relatively well understood, less is known about the upstream inputs, downstream outputs and regulation of the whole cascade. Enrichment of the Hippo pathway components with WW domains and their cognate proline-rich interacting motifs provides a versatile platform for further understanding the mechanisms that regulate organ growth and tumorigenesis. Here, we review recently discovered mechanisms of WW domain-mediated interactions that contribute to the regulation of the Hippo signaling pathway in tumorigenesis. We further discuss new insights and future directions on the emerging role of such regulation.

  16. AN INTEGRATED NETWORK APPROACH TO IDENTIFYING BIOLOGICAL PATHWAYS AND ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURE INTERACTIONS IN COMPLEX DISEASES

    PubMed Central

    DARABOS, CHRISTIAN; QIU, JINGYA; MOORE, JASON H.

    2015-01-01

    Complex diseases are the result of intricate interactions between genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors. In previous studies, we used epidemiological and genetic data linking environmental exposure or genetic variants to phenotypic disease to construct Human Phenotype Networks and separately analyze the effects of both environment and genetic factors on disease interactions. To better capture the intricacies of the interactions between environmental exposure and the biological pathways in complex disorders, we integrate both aspects into a single “tripartite” network. Despite extensive research, the mechanisms by which chemical agents disrupt biological pathways are still poorly understood. In this study, we use our integrated network model to identify specific biological pathway candidates possibly disrupted by environmental agents. We conjecture that a higher number of co-occurrences between an environmental substance and biological pathway pair can be associated with a higher likelihood that the substance is involved in disrupting that pathway. We validate our model by demonstrating its ability to detect known arsenic and signal transduction pathway interactions and speculate on candidate cell-cell junction organization pathways disrupted by cadmium. The validation was supported by distinct publications of cell biology and genetic studies that associated environmental exposure to pathway disruption. The integrated network approach is a novel method for detecting the biological effects of environmental exposures. A better understanding of the molecular processes associated with specific environmental exposures will help in developing targeted molecular therapies for patients who have been exposed to the toxicity of environmental chemicals. PMID:26776169

  17. Computational Reconstruction of NFκB Pathway Interaction Mechanisms during Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Börnigen, Daniela; Tyekucheva, Svitlana; Wang, Xiaodong; Rider, Jennifer R; Lee, Gwo-Shu; Mucci, Lorelei A; Sweeney, Christopher; Huttenhower, Curtis

    2016-04-01

    Molecular research in cancer is one of the largest areas of bioinformatic investigation, but it remains a challenge to understand biomolecular mechanisms in cancer-related pathways from high-throughput genomic data. This includes the Nuclear-factor-kappa-B (NFκB) pathway, which is central to the inflammatory response and cell proliferation in prostate cancer development and progression. Despite close scrutiny and a deep understanding of many of its members' biomolecular activities, the current list of pathway members and a systems-level understanding of their interactions remains incomplete. Here, we provide the first steps toward computational reconstruction of interaction mechanisms of the NFκB pathway in prostate cancer. We identified novel roles for ATF3, CXCL2, DUSP5, JUNB, NEDD9, SELE, TRIB1, and ZFP36 in this pathway, in addition to new mechanistic interactions between these genes and 10 known NFκB pathway members. A newly predicted interaction between NEDD9 and ZFP36 in particular was validated by co-immunoprecipitation, as was NEDD9's potential biological role in prostate cancer cell growth regulation. We combined 651 gene expression datasets with 1.4M gene product interactions to predict the inclusion of 40 additional genes in the pathway. Molecular mechanisms of interaction among pathway members were inferred using recent advances in Bayesian data integration to simultaneously provide information specific to biological contexts and individual biomolecular activities, resulting in a total of 112 interactions in the fully reconstructed NFκB pathway: 13 (11%) previously known, 29 (26%) supported by existing literature, and 70 (63%) novel. This method is generalizable to other tissue types, cancers, and organisms, and this new information about the NFκB pathway will allow us to further understand prostate cancer and to develop more effective prevention and treatment strategies.

  18. Integrated Interactive Chart as a Tool for Teaching Metabolic Pathways

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalogiannis, Stavros; Pagkalos, Ioannis; Koufoudakis, Panagiotis; Dashi, Ino; Pontikeri, Kyriaki; Christodoulou, Constantina

    2014-01-01

    An interactive chart of energy metabolism with didactic function, complementary to the already existing metabolic maps, located at the URL www.metpath.teithe.gr is being presented. The chart illustrates the major catabolic and biosynthetic pathways of glucose, fatty acids, and aminoacids, individually as well as in an integrated view. For every…

  19. Cyclone-cyclone Interactions through the Ocean Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Balaguru, Karthik; Taraphdar, Sourav; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Foltz, Gregory R.; Knaff, John A.

    2014-10-16

    The intense SST (Sea Surface Temperature) cooling caused by hurricane-induced mixing is restored at timescales on the order of weeks(1) and thus may persist long enough to influence a later hurricane passing over it. Though many studies have evaluated the effects of SST cool-ing induced by a hurricane on its own intensification(2, 3), none has looked at its effect on later storms. Using an analysis of observations and numerical model simulations, we demonstrate that hurricanes may influence the intensity of later hurricanes that pass over their linger-ing wakes. On average, when hurricanes encounter cold wakes, they experience SSTs that are ~0.4oC lower than when they do not encounter wakes and consequently decay(intensify) at a rate that is nearly three times faster(slower). In the region of warm SSTs (* 26.5oC) where the most intense and damaging hurricanes tend to occur, the percentage of hurricanes that encounter lingering cold wakes increases with hurricane frequency and was found to be as high as 40%. Furthermore, we estimate that the cumulative power dissipated(4) by the most energetic hurricanes has been reduced by as much as ~7% in a season through this effect. As the debate on changes in Atlantic hurricane activity associated with global warming(5) continues, the negative feedback between hurricane frequency and intensity resulting from hurricane-hurricane interactions through the ocean pathway deserves attention.

  20. Interactions of Bacterial Proteins with Host Eukaryotic Ubiquitin Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Perrett, Charlotte Averil; Lin, David Yin-Wei; Zhou, Daoguo

    2011-01-01

    Ubiquitination is a post-translational modification in which one or more 76 amino acid polypeptide ubiquitin molecules are covalently linked to the lysine residues of target proteins. Ubiquitination is the main pathway for protein degradation that governs a variety of eukaryotic cellular processes, including the cell-cycle, vesicle trafficking, antigen presentation, and signal transduction. Not surprisingly, aberrations in the system have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many diseases including inflammatory and neurodegenerative disorders. Recent studies have revealed that viruses and bacterial pathogens exploit the host ubiquitination pathways to gain entry and to aid their survival/replication inside host cells. This review will summarize recent developments in understanding the biochemical and structural mechanisms utilized by bacterial pathogens to interact with the host ubiquitination pathways. PMID:21772834

  1. An Interactive, Integrated, Instructional Pathway to the LEAD Science Gateway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalda, S.; Clark, R.; Davis, L.; Wiziecki, E. N.

    2008-12-01

    of learning materials, as well as new tools and features, to enhance the appearance and use of the LEAD portal gateway and its underlying cyberinfrastructure in an educational setting. The development of educational materials has centered on promoting the accessibility and use of meteorological data and analysis tools through the LEAD portal by providing instructional materials, additional custom designed tools that build off of Unidata's Integrated Data Viewer (IDV) (e.g. IDV Basic and NCDestroyer), and an interactive component that takes the user through specific tasks utilizing multiple tools. In fact, select improvements to parameter lists and domain subsetting have inspired IDV developers to incorporate changes in IDV revisions that are now available to the entire community. This collection of materials, demonstrations, interactive guides, student exercises, and customized tools, which are now available to the educator and student through the LEAD portal gateway, can serve as an instructional pathway for a set of guided, phenomenon-based exercises (e.g. fronts, lake-effect snows, etc.). This paper will provide an overview of the LEAD education and outreach efforts with a focus on the design of Web-based educational materials and instructional approaches for user interaction with the LEAD portal gateway and the underlying cyberinfrastructure, and will encourage educators, especially those involved in undergraduate meteorology education, to begin incorporating these capabilities into their course materials.

  2. Differential genetic interactions of yeast stress response MAPK pathways.

    PubMed

    Martin, Humberto; Shales, Michael; Fernandez-Piñar, Pablo; Wei, Ping; Molina, Maria; Fiedler, Dorothea; Shokat, Kevan M; Beltrao, Pedro; Lim, Wendell; Krogan, Nevan J

    2015-04-17

    Genetic interaction screens have been applied with great success in several organisms to study gene function and the genetic architecture of the cell. However, most studies have been performed under optimal growth conditions even though many functional interactions are known to occur under specific cellular conditions. In this study, we have performed a large-scale genetic interaction analysis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae involving approximately 49 × 1,200 double mutants in the presence of five different stress conditions, including osmotic, oxidative and cell wall-altering stresses. This resulted in the generation of a differential E-MAP (or dE-MAP) comprising over 250,000 measurements of conditional interactions. We found an extensive number of conditional genetic interactions that recapitulate known stress-specific functional associations. Furthermore, we have also uncovered previously unrecognized roles involving the phosphatase regulator Bud14, the histone methylation complex COMPASS and membrane trafficking complexes in modulating the cell wall integrity pathway. Finally, the osmotic stress differential genetic interactions showed enrichment for genes coding for proteins with conditional changes in phosphorylation but not for genes with conditional changes in gene expression. This suggests that conditional genetic interactions are a powerful tool to dissect the functional importance of the different response mechanisms of the cell.

  3. Signaling pathways and tissue interactions in neural plate border formation.

    PubMed

    Schille, Carolin; Schambony, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    The neural crest is a transient cell population that gives rise to various cell types of multiple tissues and organs in the vertebrate embryo. Neural crest cells arise from the neural plate border, a region localized at the lateral borders of the prospective neural plate. Temporally and spatially coordinated interaction with the adjacent tissues, the non-neural ectoderm, the neural plate and the prospective dorsolateral mesoderm, is required for neural plate border specification. Signaling molecules, namely BMP, Wnt and FGF ligands and corresponding antagonists are derived from these tissues and interact to induce the expression of neural plate border specific genes. The present mini-review focuses on the current understanding of how the NPB territory is formed and accentuates the need for coordinated interaction of BMP and Wnt signaling pathways and precise tissue communication that are required for the definition of the prospective NC in the competent ectoderm.

  4. Fgf and Sdf-1 pathways interact during zebrafish fin regeneration.

    PubMed

    Bouzaffour, Mohamed; Dufourcq, Pascale; Lecaudey, Virginie; Haas, Petra; Vriz, Sophie

    2009-06-08

    The chemokine stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF1) was originally identified as a pre-B cell stimulatory factor but has been recently implicated in several other key steps in differentiation and morphogenesis. In addition, SDF1 as well as FGF signalling pathways have recently been shown to be involved in the control of epimorphic regeneration. In this report, we address the question of a possible interaction between the two signalling pathways during adult fin regeneration in zebrafish. Using a combination of pharmaceutical and genetic tools, we show that during epimorphic regeneration, expression of sdf1, as well as of its cognate receptors, cxcr4a, cxcr4b and cxcr7 are controlled by FGF signalling. We further show that, Sdf1a negatively regulates the expression of fgf20a. Together, these results lead us to propose that: 1) the function of Fgf in blastema formation is, at least in part, relayed by the chemokine Sdf1a, and that 2) Sdf1 exerts negative feedback on the Fgf pathway, which contributes to a transient expression of Fgf20a downstream genes at the beginning of regeneration. However this feedback control can be bypassed since the Sdf1 null mutants regenerate their fin, though slower. Very few mutants for the regeneration process were isolated so far, illustrating the difficulty in identifying genes that are indispensable for regeneration. This observation supports the idea that the regeneration process involves a delicate balance between multiple pathways.

  5. Automated identification of pathways from quantitative genetic interaction data

    PubMed Central

    Battle, Alexis; Jonikas, Martin C; Walter, Peter; Weissman, Jonathan S; Koller, Daphne

    2010-01-01

    High-throughput quantitative genetic interaction (GI) measurements provide detailed information regarding the structure of the underlying biological pathways by reporting on functional dependencies between genes. However, the analytical tools for fully exploiting such information lag behind the ability to collect these data. We present a novel Bayesian learning method that uses quantitative phenotypes of double knockout organisms to automatically reconstruct detailed pathway structures. We applied our method to a recent data set that measures GIs for endoplasmic reticulum (ER) genes, using the unfolded protein response as a quantitative phenotype. The results provided reconstructions of known functional pathways including N-linked glycosylation and ER-associated protein degradation. It also contained novel relationships, such as the placement of SGT2 in the tail-anchored biogenesis pathway, a finding that we experimentally validated. Our approach should be readily applicable to the next generation of quantitative GI data sets, as assays become available for additional phenotypes and eventually higher-level organisms. PMID:20531408

  6. Machine Learning of Protein Interactions in Fungal Secretory Pathways.

    PubMed

    Kludas, Jana; Arvas, Mikko; Castillo, Sandra; Pakula, Tiina; Oja, Merja; Brouard, Céline; Jäntti, Jussi; Penttilä, Merja; Rousu, Juho

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we apply machine learning methods for predicting protein interactions in fungal secretion pathways. We assume an inter-species transfer setting, where training data is obtained from a single species and the objective is to predict protein interactions in other, related species. In our methodology, we combine several state of the art machine learning approaches, namely, multiple kernel learning (MKL), pairwise kernels and kernelized structured output prediction in the supervised graph inference framework. For MKL, we apply recently proposed centered kernel alignment and p-norm path following approaches to integrate several feature sets describing the proteins, demonstrating improved performance. For graph inference, we apply input-output kernel regression (IOKR) in supervised and semi-supervised modes as well as output kernel trees (OK3). In our experiments simulating increasing genetic distance, Input-Output Kernel Regression proved to be the most robust prediction approach. We also show that the MKL approaches improve the predictions compared to uniform combination of the kernels. We evaluate the methods on the task of predicting protein-protein-interactions in the secretion pathways in fungi, S.cerevisiae, baker's yeast, being the source, T. reesei being the target of the inter-species transfer learning. We identify completely novel candidate secretion proteins conserved in filamentous fungi. These proteins could contribute to their unique secretion capabilities.

  7. Machine Learning of Protein Interactions in Fungal Secretory Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kludas, Jana; Arvas, Mikko; Castillo, Sandra; Pakula, Tiina; Oja, Merja; Brouard, Céline; Jäntti, Jussi; Penttilä, Merja

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we apply machine learning methods for predicting protein interactions in fungal secretion pathways. We assume an inter-species transfer setting, where training data is obtained from a single species and the objective is to predict protein interactions in other, related species. In our methodology, we combine several state of the art machine learning approaches, namely, multiple kernel learning (MKL), pairwise kernels and kernelized structured output prediction in the supervised graph inference framework. For MKL, we apply recently proposed centered kernel alignment and p-norm path following approaches to integrate several feature sets describing the proteins, demonstrating improved performance. For graph inference, we apply input-output kernel regression (IOKR) in supervised and semi-supervised modes as well as output kernel trees (OK3). In our experiments simulating increasing genetic distance, Input-Output Kernel Regression proved to be the most robust prediction approach. We also show that the MKL approaches improve the predictions compared to uniform combination of the kernels. We evaluate the methods on the task of predicting protein-protein-interactions in the secretion pathways in fungi, S.cerevisiae, baker’s yeast, being the source, T. reesei being the target of the inter-species transfer learning. We identify completely novel candidate secretion proteins conserved in filamentous fungi. These proteins could contribute to their unique secretion capabilities. PMID:27441920

  8. Effects of PDT on the endocytic pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessel, David

    2010-02-01

    Two lines of evidence point to an early effect of photodamage on membrane trafficking. [1] Internalization of a fluorescent probe for hydrophobic membrane loci was impaired by prior photodamage. [2] Interference with the endocytic pathway by the PI-3 kinase antagonist wortmannin led to accumulation of cytoplasmic vacuoles suggesting a block in the recycling of plasma membrane components. Prior photodamage blocked this pathway so that no vacuoles were formed upon exposure of cells to wortmannin. In a murine hepatoma line, the endocytic pathway was preferentially sensitive to lysosomal photodamage. The role of photodamage to the endocytic pathway as a factor in PDT efficacy remains to be assessed.

  9. Protein interaction network of the mammalian Hippo pathway reveals mechanisms of kinase-phosphatase interactions.

    PubMed

    Couzens, Amber L; Knight, James D R; Kean, Michelle J; Teo, Guoci; Weiss, Alexander; Dunham, Wade H; Lin, Zhen-Yuan; Bagshaw, Richard D; Sicheri, Frank; Pawson, Tony; Wrana, Jeffrey L; Choi, Hyungwon; Gingras, Anne-Claude

    2013-11-19

    The Hippo pathway regulates organ size and tissue homeostasis in response to multiple stimuli, including cell density and mechanotransduction. Pharmacological inhibition of phosphatases can also stimulate Hippo signaling in cell culture. We defined the Hippo protein-protein interaction network with and without inhibition of serine and threonine phosphatases by okadaic acid. We identified 749 protein interactions, including 599 previously unrecognized interactions, and demonstrated that several interactions with serine and threonine phosphatases were phosphorylation-dependent. Mutation of the T-loop of MST2 (mammalian STE20-like protein kinase 2), which prevented autophosphorylation, disrupted its association with STRIPAK (striatin-interacting phosphatase and kinase complex). Deletion of the amino-terminal forkhead-associated domain of SLMAP (sarcolemmal membrane-associated protein), a component of the STRIPAK complex, prevented its association with MST1 and MST2. Phosphatase inhibition produced temporally distinct changes in proteins that interacted with MOB1A and MOB1B (Mps one binder kinase activator-like 1A and 1B) and promoted interactions with upstream Hippo pathway proteins, such as MST1 and MST2, and with the trimeric protein phosphatase 6 complex (PP6). Mutation of three basic amino acids that are part of a phospho-serine- and phospho-threonine-binding domain in human MOB1B prevented its interaction with MST1 and PP6 in cells treated with okadaic acid. Collectively, our results indicated that changes in phosphorylation orchestrate interactions between kinases and phosphatases in Hippo signaling, providing a putative mechanism for pathway regulation.

  10. Abscisic acid interacts antagonistically with salicylic acid signaling pathway in rice-Magnaporthe grisea interaction.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chang-Jie; Shimono, Masaki; Sugano, Shoji; Kojima, Mikiko; Yazawa, Katsumi; Yoshida, Riichiro; Inoue, Haruhiko; Hayashi, Nagao; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Takatsuji, Hiroshi

    2010-06-01

    Plant hormones play pivotal signaling roles in plant-pathogen interactions. Here, we report characterization of an antagonistic interaction of abscisic acid (ABA) with salicylic acid (SA) signaling pathways in the rice-Magnaporthe grisea interaction. Exogenous application of ABA drastically compromised the rice resistance to both compatible and incompatible M. grisea strains, indicating that ABA negatively regulates both basal and resistance gene-mediated blast resistance. ABA markedly suppressed the transcriptional upregulation of WRKY45 and OsNPR1, the two key components of the SA signaling pathway in rice, induced by SA or benzothiadiazole or by blast infection. Overexpression of OsNPR1 or WRKY45 largely negated the enhancement of blast susceptibility by ABA, suggesting that ABA acts upstream of WRKY45 and OsNPR1 in the rice SA pathway. ABA-responsive genes were induced during blast infection in a pattern reciprocal to those of WRKY45 and OsPR1b in the compatible rice-blast interaction but only marginally in the incompatible one. These results suggest that the balance of SA and ABA signaling is an important determinant for the outcome of the rice-M. grisea interaction. ABA was detected in hyphae and conidia of M. grisea as well as in culture media, implying that blast-fungus-derived ABA could play a role in triggering ABA signaling at host infection sites.

  11. Joint inhibition of TOR and JNK pathways interacts to extend the lifespan of Brachionus manjavacas (Rotifera)

    PubMed Central

    Snell, Terry W.; Johnston, Rachel K.; Rabeneck, Brett; Zipperer, Cody; Teat, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    The TOR kinase pathway is central in modulating aging in a variety of animal models. The target of rapamycin (TOR) integrates a complex network of signals from growth conditions, nutrient availability, energy status, and physiological stresses and matches an organism’s growth rate to the resource environment. Important problems remaining are to identify the pathways that interact with TOR and characterize them as additive or synergistic. One of the most versatile stress sensors in metazoans is the Jun-N-terminal Kinase (JNK) signalling pathway. JNK is an evolutionarily conserved stress-activated protein kinase that is induced by a range of stressors, including UV irradiation, reactive oxygen species, DNA damage, heat, and bacterial antigens. JNK is thought to interact with the TOR pathway, but its effects on TOR are poorly understood. We used the rotifer Brachionus manjavacas as a model animal to probe the regulation of TOR and JNK pathways and explore their interaction. The effect of various chemical inhibitors was examined in life table and stressor challenge experiments. A survey of 12 inhibitors revealed two, rapamycin and JNK inhibitor, that significantly extended lifespan of B. manjavacas. At 1 μM concentration, exposure to rapamycin or JNK inhibitor extended mean rotifer lifespan by 35% and maximum lifespan by 37%. Exposure to both rapamycin and JNK inhibitor simultaneously extended mean rotifer lifespan 65% more than either alone. Exposure to a combination of rapamycin and JNK inhibitors conveyed greater protection to starvation, UV and osmotic stress than either inhibitor alone. RNAi knockdown of TOR and JNK gene expression was investigated for its ability to extend rotifer lifespan. RNAi knockdown of the TOR gene resulted in 29% extension of mean lifespan compared to control and knockdown of the JNK gene resulted in 51% mean lifespan extension. In addition to lifespan, we quantified mitochondria activity using the fluorescent marker Mitotracker and

  12. Joint inhibition of TOR and JNK pathways interacts to extend the lifespan of Brachionus manjavacas (Rotifera).

    PubMed

    Snell, Terry W; Johnston, Rachel K; Rabeneck, Brett; Zipperer, Cody; Teat, Stephanie

    2014-04-01

    The TOR kinase pathway is central in modulating aging in a variety of animal models. The target of rapamycin (TOR) integrates a complex network of signals from growth conditions, nutrient availability, energy status, and physiological stresses and matches an organism's growth rate to the resource environment. Important remaining problems are the identification of the pathways that interact with TOR and their characterization as additive or synergistic. One of the most versatile stress sensors in metazoans is the Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway. JNK is an evolutionarily conserved stress-activated protein kinase that is induced by a range of stressors, including UV irradiation, reactive oxygen species, DNA damage, heat, and bacterial antigens. JNK is thought to interact with the TOR pathway, but its effects on TOR are poorly understood. We used the rotifer Brachionus manjavacas as a model animal to probe the regulation of TOR and JNK pathways and explore their interaction. The effect of various chemical inhibitors was examined in life table and stressor challenge experiments. A survey of 12 inhibitors revealed two, rapamycin and JNK inhibitor, that significantly extended lifespan of B. manjavacas. At 1 μM concentration, exposure to rapamycin or JNK inhibitor extended mean rotifer lifespan by 35% and maximum lifespan by 37%. Exposure to both rapamycin and JNK inhibitor simultaneously extended mean rotifer lifespan by 65% more than either alone. Exposure to a combination of rapamycin and JNK inhibitors conveyed greater protection to starvation, UV and osmotic stress than either inhibitor alone. RNAi knockdown of TOR and JNK gene expression was investigated for its ability to extend rotifer lifespan. RNAi knockdown of the TOR gene resulted in 29% extension of the mean lifespan compared to control and knockdown of the JNK gene resulted in 51% mean lifespan extension. In addition to the lifespan, we quantified mitochondria activity using the fluorescent

  13. The Cbln family of proteins interact with multiple signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Wei, Peng; Pattarini, Roberto; Rong, Yongqi; Guo, Hong; Bansal, Parmil K; Kusnoor, Sheila V; Deutch, Ariel Y; Parris, Jennifer; Morgan, James I

    2012-06-01

    Cerebellin precursor protein (Cbln1) is essential for synapse integrity in cerebellum through assembly into complexes that bridge pre-synaptic β-neurexins (Nrxn) to post-synaptic GluRδ2. However, GluRδ2 is largely cerebellum-specific, yet Cbln1 and its little studied family members, Cbln2 and Cbln4, are expressed throughout brain. Therefore, we investigated whether additional proteins mediate Cbln family actions. Whereas Cbln1 and Cbln2 bound to GluRδ2 and Nrxns1-3, Cbln4 bound weakly or not at all, suggesting it has distinct binding partners. In a candidate receptor-screening assay, Cbln4 (but not Cbln1 or Cbln2) bound selectively to the netrin receptor, (deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC) in a netrin-displaceable fashion. To determine whether Cbln4 had a netrin-like function, Cbln4-null mice were generated. Cbln4-null mice did not phenocopy netrin-null mice. Cbln1 and Cbln4 were likely co-localized in neurons thought to be responsible for synaptic changes in striatum of Cbln1-null mice. Furthermore, complexes containing Cbln1 and Cbln4 had greatly reduced affinity to DCC but increased affinity to Nrxns, suggesting a functional interaction. However, Cbln4-null mice lacked the striatal synaptic changes seen in Cbln null mice. Thus, Cbln family members interact with multiple receptors/signaling pathways in a subunit composition-dependent manner and have independent functions with Cbln4 potentially involved in the less well-characterized role of netrin/DCC in adult brain.

  14. Interactions and Attachment Pathways between Functionalized Gold Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Tan, Shu Fen; Anand, Utkarsh; Mirsaidov, Utkur

    2017-01-31

    Nanoparticle (NP) self-assembly has been recognized as an important technological process for forming ordered nanostructures. However, the detailed dynamics of the assembly processes remain poorly understood. Using in situ liquid cell transmission electron microscopy, we describe the assembly modes of gold (Au) nanorods (NRs) in solution mediated by hydrogen bonding between NR-bound cysteamine linker molecules. Our observations reveal that by tuning the linker concentration, two different NR assembly modes can be achieved. These assembly modes proceed via the (1) end-to-end and (2) side-to-side attachment of NRs at low and high linker concentrations in solution, respectively. In addition, our time-resolved observations reveal that the side-to-side NR assemblies can occur through two different pathways: (i) prealigned attachment, where two Au NRs prealign to be parallel prior to assembly, and (ii) postattachment alignment, where two Au NRs first undergo end-to-end attachment and pivot around the attachment point to form the side-to-side assembly. We attributed the observed assembly modes to the distribution of linkers on the NR surfaces and the electrostatic interactions between the NRs. The intermediate steps in the assembly reported here reveal how the shape and surface functionalities of NPs drive their self-assembly, which is important for the rational design of hierarchical nanostructures.

  15. Integrated Analysis Identifies Interaction Patterns between Small Molecules and Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Li, Weiguo; Chen, Xin; Sun, Jiatong; Chen, Huan; Lv, Sali

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that the downstream proteins in a key pathway can be potential drug targets and that the pathway can play an important role in the action of drugs. So pathways could be considered as targets of small molecules. A link map between small molecules and pathways was constructed using gene expression profile, pathways, and gene expression of cancer cell line intervened by small molecules and then we analysed the topological characteristics of the link map. Three link patterns were identified based on different drug discovery implications for breast, liver, and lung cancer. Furthermore, molecules that significantly targeted the same pathways tended to treat the same diseases. These results can provide a valuable reference for identifying drug candidates and targets in molecularly targeted therapy. PMID:25114931

  16. Interactions between Trypanosoma cruzi Secreted Proteins and Host Cell Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe Costa, Renata; da Silveira, Jose F.; Bahia, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is one of the prevalent neglected tropical diseases, affecting at least 6–7 million individuals in Latin America. It is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which is transmitted to vertebrate hosts by blood-sucking insects. After infection, the parasite invades and multiplies in the myocardium, leading to acute myocarditis that kills around 5% of untreated individuals. T. cruzi secretes proteins that manipulate multiple host cell signaling pathways to promote host cell invasion. The primary secreted lysosomal peptidase in T. cruzi is cruzipain, which has been shown to modulate the host immune response. Cruzipain hinders macrophage activation during the early stages of infection by interrupting the NF-kB P65 mediated signaling pathway. This allows the parasite to survive and replicate, and may contribute to the spread of infection in acute Chagas disease. Another secreted protein P21, which is expressed in all of the developmental stages of T. cruzi, has been shown to modulate host phagocytosis signaling pathways. The parasite also secretes soluble factors that exert effects on host extracellular matrix, such as proteolytic degradation of collagens. Finally, secreted phospholipase A from T. cruzi contributes to lipid modifications on host cells and concomitantly activates the PKC signaling pathway. Here, we present a brief review of the interaction between secreted proteins from T. cruzi and the host cells, emphasizing the manipulation of host signaling pathways during invasion. PMID:27065960

  17. BBS proteins interact genetically with the IFT pathway to influence SHH-related phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qihong; Seo, Seongjin; Bugge, Kevin; Stone, Edwin M; Sheffield, Val C

    2012-05-01

    There are numerous genes for which loss-of-function mutations do not produce apparent phenotypes even though statistically significant quantitative changes to biological pathways are observed. To evaluate the biological meaning of small effects is challenging. Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder characterized by obesity, retinopathy, polydactyly, renal malformations, learning disabilities and hypogenitalism, as well as secondary phenotypes including diabetes and hypertension. BBS knockout mice recapitulate most human phenotypes including obesity, retinal degeneration and male infertility. However, BBS knockout mice do not develop polydacyly. Here we showed that the loss of BBS genes in mice result in accumulation of Smoothened and Patched 1 in cilia and have a decreased Shh response. Knockout of Bbs7 combined with a hypomorphic Ift88 allele (orpk as a model for Shh dysfuction) results in embryonic lethality with e12.5 embryos having exencephaly, pericardial edema, cleft palate and abnormal limb development, phenotypes not observed in Bbs7(-/-) mice. Our results indicate that BBS genes modulate Shh pathway activity and interact genetically with the intraflagellar transport (IFT) pathway to play a role in mammalian development. This study illustrates an effective approach to appreciate the biological significance of a small effect.

  18. BDNF-estrogen interactions in hippocampal mossy fiber pathway: implications for normal brain function and disease

    PubMed Central

    Harte-Hargrove, Lauren; MacLusky, Neil J.; Scharfman, Helen E.

    2013-01-01

    The neurotrophin BDNF and the steroid hormone estrogen exhibit potent effects on hippocampal neurons during development and in adulthood. BDNF and estrogen have also been implicated in the etiology of diverse types of neurological disorders or psychiatric illnesses, or have been discussed as potentially important in treatment. Although both are typically studied independently, it has been suggested that BDNF mediates several of the effects of estrogen in hippocampus, and that these interactions play a role in the normal brain as well as disease. Here we focus on the mossy fiber (MF) pathway of the hippocampus, a critical pathway in normal hippocampal function, and a prime example of a location where numerous studies support an interaction between BDNF and estrogen in the rodent brain. We first review the temporal and spatially-regulated expression of BDNF and estrogen in the MFs, as well as their receptors. Then we consider the results of studies that suggest that 17β-estradiol alters hippocampal function by its influence on BDNF expression in the MF pathway. We also address the hypothesis that estrogen influences hippocampus by mechanisms related not only to the mature form of BDNF, acting at trkB receptors, but also by regulating the precursor, proBDNF, acting at p75NTR. We suggest that the interactions between BDNF and 17β-estradiol in the MFs are potentially important in the normal function of the hippocampus, and have implications for sex differences in functions that depend on the MFs and in diseases where MF plasticity has been suggested to play an important role, Alzheimer’s disease, epilepsy and addiction. PMID:23276673

  19. Gene-Gene Interactions in the Folate Metabolic Pathway and the Risk of Conotruncal Heart Defects

    PubMed Central

    Lupo, Philip J.; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Mitchell, Laura E.

    2010-01-01

    Conotruncal and related heart defects (CTRD) are common, complex malformations. Although there are few established risk factors, there is evidence that genetic variation in the folate metabolic pathway influences CTRD risk. This study was undertaken to assess the association between inherited (i.e., case) and maternal gene-gene interactions in this pathway and the risk of CTRD. Case-parent triads (n = 727), ascertained from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, were genotyped for ten functional variants of nine folate metabolic genes. Analyses of inherited genotypes were consistent with the previously reported association between MTHFR A1298C and CTRD (adjusted P = .02), but provided no evidence that CTRD was associated with inherited gene-gene interactions. Analyses of the maternal genotypes provided evidence of a MTHFR C677T/CBS 844ins68 interaction and CTRD risk (unadjusted P = .02). This association is consistent with the effects of this genotype combination on folate-homocysteine biochemistry but remains to be confirmed in independent study populations. PMID:20111745

  20. Novel alpha1-adrenergic receptor signaling pathways: secreted factors and interactions with the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ting; Duan, Zhong-Hui; Papay, Robert; Pluskota, Elzbieta; Gaivin, Robert J; de la Motte, Carol A; Plow, Edward F; Perez, Dianne M

    2006-07-01

    alpha1-Adrenergic receptor (alpha1-ARs) subtypes (alpha1A, alpha1B, and alpha1D) regulate multiple signal pathways, such as phospholipase C, protein kinase C (PKC), and mitogen-activated protein kinases. We employed oligonucleotide microarray technology to explore the effects of both short- (1 h) and long-term (18 h) activation of the alpha1A-AR to enable RNA changes to occur downstream of earlier well characterized signaling pathways, promoting novel couplings. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) studies confirmed that PKC was a critical regulator of alpha1A-AR-mediated gene expression, and secreted interleukin (IL)-6 also contributed to gene expression alterations. We next focused on two novel signaling pathways that might be mediated through alpha1A-AR stimulation because of the clustering of gene expression changes for cell adhesion/motility (syndecan-4 and tenascin-C) and hyaluronan (HA) signaling. We confirmed that alpha1-ARs induced adhesion in three cell types to vitronectin, an interaction that was also integrin-, FGF7-, and PKC-dependent. alpha1-AR activation also inhibited cell migration, which was integrin- and PKC-independent but still required secretion of FGF7. alpha1-AR activation also increased the expression and deposition of HA, a glycosaminoglycan, which displayed two distinct structures: pericellular coats and long cable structures, as well as increasing expression of the HA receptor, CD44. Long cable structures of HA can bind leukocytes, which this suggests that alpha1-ARs may be involved in proinflammatory responses. Our results indicate alpha1-ARs induce the secretion of factors that interact with the extracellular matrix to regulate cell adhesion, motility and proinflammatory responses through novel signaling pathways.

  1. Rod-cone interactions and the temporal impulse response of the cone pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zele, Andrew J.; Cao, Dingcai; Pokorny, Joel

    2008-01-01

    Dark-adapted rods suppress cone-mediated flicker detection. This study evaluates the effect that rod activity has on cone temporal processing by investigating whether rod mediated suppression changes the cone pathway impulse response function, regardless of the form of the temporal signal. Stimuli were generated with a 2-channel photostimulator that has four primaries for the central field and four primaries for the surround. Cone pathway temporal impulse response functions were derived from temporal contrast sensitivity data with periodic stimuli, and from two-pulse discrimination data in which pairs of briefly pulsed stimuli were presented successively at a series of stimulus onset asynchronies. Dark-adapted rods altered the amplitude and timing of cone pathway temporal impulse response functions, irrespective of whether they were derived from measurements with temporally periodic stimuli or in a brief presentation temporal resolution task with pulsed stimuli. Rod-cone interactions are a fundamental operation in visual temporal processing under mesopic light levels, acting to decrease the temporal bandwidth of the visual system. PMID:18486960

  2. Detecting differential patterns of interaction in molecular pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yajima, Masanao; Telesca, Donatello; Ji, Yuan; Müller, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We consider statistical inference for potentially heterogeneous patterns of association characterizing the expression of bio-molecular pathways across different biologic conditions. We discuss a modeling approach based on Gaussian-directed acyclic graphs and provide computational and methodological details needed for posterior inference. Our application finds motivation in reverse phase protein array data from a study on acute myeloid leukemia, where interest centers on contrasting refractory versus relapsed patients. We illustrate the proposed method through both synthetic and case study data. PMID:25519431

  3. Wolbachia-induced paternal defect in Drosophila is likely by interaction with the juvenile hormone pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen; Wang, Jia-Lin; Zheng, Ya; Xiong, En-Juan; Li, Jing-Jing; Yuan, Lin-Ling; Yu, Xiao-Qiang; Wang, Yu-Feng

    2014-06-01

    Wolbachia are endosymbionts that infect many insect species. They can manipulate the host's reproduction to increase their own maternal transmission. Cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) is one such manipulation, which is expressed as embryonic lethality when Wolbachia-infected males mate with uninfected females. However, matings between males and females carrying the same Wolbachia strain result in viable progeny. The molecular mechanisms of CI are currently not clear. We have previously reported that the gene Juvenile hormone-inducible protein 26 (JhI-26) exhibited the highest upregulation in the 3rd instar larval testes of Drosophila melanogaster when infected by Wolbachia. This is reminiscent of an interaction between Wolbachia and juvenile hormone (JH) pathway in flies. Considering that Jhamt gene encodes JH acid methyltransferase, a key regulatory enzyme of JH biosynthesis, and that methoprene-tolerant (Met) has been regarded as the best JH receptor candidate, we first compared the expression of Jhamt and Met between Wolbachia-infected and uninfected fly testes to investigate whether Wolbachia infection influence the JH signaling pathway. We found that the expressions of Jhamt and Met were significantly increased in the presence of Wolbachia, suggesting an interaction of Wolbachia with the JH signaling pathway. Then, we found that overexpression of JhI-26 in Wolbachia-free transgenic male flies caused paternal-effect lethality that mimics the defects associated with CI. JhI-26 overexpressing males resulted in significantly decrease in hatch rate. Surprisingly, Wolbachia-infected females could rescue the egg hatch. In addition, we showed that overexpression of JhI-26 caused upregulation of the male accessory gland protein (Acp) gene CG10433, but not vice versa. This result suggests that JhI-26 may function at the upstream of CG10433. Likewise, overexpression of CG10433 also resulted in paternal-effect lethality. Both JhI-26 and CG10433 overexpressing males

  4. Meaningful relationships: the regulation of the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK pathway by protein interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Kolch, W

    2000-01-01

    The Ras/Raf/MEK (mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinase)/ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) pathway is at the heart of signalling networks that govern proliferation, differentiation and cell survival. Although the basic regulatory steps have been elucidated, many features of this pathway are only beginning to emerge. This review focuses on the role of protein-protein interactions in the regulation of this pathway, and how they contribute to co-ordinate activation steps, subcellular redistribution, substrate phosphorylation and cross-talk with other signalling pathways. PMID:11023813

  5. Transition model for ricin-aptamer interactions with multiple pathways and energy barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Xu, Bingqian

    2014-02-01

    We develop a transition model to interpret single-molecule ricin-aptamer interactions with multiple unbinding pathways and energy barriers measured by atomic force microscopy dynamic force spectroscopy. Molecular simulations establish the relationship between binding conformations and the corresponding unbinding pathways. Each unbinding pathway follows a Bell-Evans multiple-barrier model. Markov-type transition matrices are developed to analyze the redistribution of unbinding events among the pathways under different loading rates. Our study provides detailed information about complex behaviors in ricin-aptamer unbinding events.

  6. ALIX-CHMP4 Interactions in the Human ESCRT Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    McCullough, J.; Fisher, R.D.; Whitby, F.G.; Sundquist, W.I.; Hill, C.P.

    2009-05-26

    The ESCRT pathway facilitates membrane fission events during enveloped virus budding, multivesicular body formation, and cytokinesis. To promote HIV budding and cytokinesis, the ALIX protein must bind and recruit CHMP4 subunits of the ESCRT-III complex, which in turn participate in essential membrane remodeling functions. Here, we report that the Bro1 domain of ALIX binds specifically to C-terminal residues of the human CHMP4 proteins (CHMP4A-C). Crystal structures of the complexes reveal that the CHMP4 C-terminal peptides form amphipathic helices that bind across the conserved concave surface of ALIX{sub Bro1}. ALIX-dependent HIV-1 budding is blocked by mutations in exposed ALIX{sub Bro1} residues that help contribute to the binding sites for three essential hydrophobic residues that are displayed on one side of the CHMP4 recognition helix (M/L/IxxLxxW). The homologous CHMP1-3 classes of ESCRT-III proteins also have C-terminal amphipathic helices, but, in those cases, the three hydrophobic residues are arrayed with L/I/MxxxLxxL spacing. Thus, the distinct patterns of hydrophobic residues provide a 'code' that allows the different ESCRT-III subunits to bind different ESCRT pathway partners, with CHMP1-3 proteins binding MIT domain-containing proteins, such as VPS4 and Vta1/LIP5, and CHMP4 proteins binding Bro1 domain-containing proteins, such as ALIX.

  7. The interaction of estrogen and CSE/H2S pathway in the development of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongzhu; Mani, Sarathi; Wu, Lingyun; Fu, Ming; Shuang, Tian; Xu, Changqing; Wang, Rui

    2017-03-01

    Both estrogen and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) have been shown to inhibit the development of atherosclerosis. We previously reported that cystathionine γ-lyase knockout (CSE-KO) male mice develop atherosclerosis earlier than male wild-type (WT) mice. The present study investigated the interaction of CSE/H2S pathway and estrogen on the development of atherosclerosis in female mice. Plasma estrogen levels were significantly lower in female CSE-KO mice than in female WT mice. NaHS treatment had no effect on plasma estrogen levels in both WT and CSE-KO female mice. After CSE-KO and WT female mice were fed with atherogenic diet for 12 wk, plasma lipid levels were significantly increased and triglyceride levels decreased compared with those of control diet-fed mice. Atherogenic diet induced more atherosclerotic lesion, oxidative stress, intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and NF-κB in CSE-KO mice than in WT mice. Estrogen treatment of atherogenic diet-fed WT mice attenuated hypercholesterolemia, oxidative stress, ICAM-1 expression, and NF-κB in WT mice but not in atherogenic diet-fed CSE-KO mice. Furthermore, H2S production in both the liver and vascular tissues was enhanced by estrogen in WT mice but not in CSE-KO mice. It is concluded that the antiatherosclerotic effect of estrogen is mediated by CSE-generated H2S. This study provides new insights into the interaction of H2S and estrogen signaling pathways on the regulation of cardiovascular functions.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Female cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE)-knockout mice have significantly lower plasma estrogen levels and more severe early atherosclerotic lesion than female wild-type mice. H2S production in liver and vascular tissues is enhanced by estrogen via its stimulatory effect on CSE activity. The antiatherosclerotic effect of estrogen is mediated by CSE-generated H2S.

  8. Predicting metabolic pathways of small molecules and enzymes based on interaction information of chemicals and proteins.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yu-Fei; Chen, Lei; Cai, Yu-Dong; Feng, Kai-Yan; Huang, Tao; Jiang, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic pathway analysis, one of the most important fields in biochemistry, is pivotal to understanding the maintenance and modulation of the functions of an organism. Good comprehension of metabolic pathways is critical to understanding the mechanisms of some fundamental biological processes. Given a small molecule or an enzyme, how may one identify the metabolic pathways in which it may participate? Answering such a question is a first important step in understanding a metabolic pathway system. By utilizing the information provided by chemical-chemical interactions, chemical-protein interactions, and protein-protein interactions, a novel method was proposed by which to allocate small molecules and enzymes to 11 major classes of metabolic pathways. A benchmark dataset consisting of 3,348 small molecules and 654 enzymes of yeast was constructed to test the method. It was observed that the first order prediction accuracy evaluated by the jackknife test was 79.56% in identifying the small molecules and enzymes in a benchmark dataset. Our method may become a useful vehicle in predicting the metabolic pathways of small molecules and enzymes, providing a basis for some further analysis of the pathway systems.

  9. Determining the elastic properties of aptamer-ricin single molecule multiple pathway interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Park, Bosoon; Kwon, Yongkuk; Xu, Bingqian

    2014-05-01

    We report on the elastic properties of ricin and anti-ricin aptamer interactions, which showed three stable binding conformations, each of which has its special elastic properties. These different unbinding pathways were investigated by the dynamic force spectroscopy. A series-spring model combining the worm-like-chain model and Hook's law was used to estimate the apparent spring constants of the aptamer and linker molecule polyethylene glycol. The aptamer in its three different unbinding pathways showed different apparent spring constants. The two reaction barriers in the unbinding pathways also influence the apparent spring constant of the aptamer. This special elastic behavior of aptamer was used to distinguish its three unbinding pathways under different loading rates. This method also offered a way to distinguish and discard the non-specific interactions in single molecule experiments.

  10. Peptides interfering with protein-protein interactions in the ethylene signaling pathway delay tomato fruit ripening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisson, Melanie M. A.; Kessenbrock, Mareike; Müller, Lena; Hofmann, Alexander; Schmitz, Florian; Cristescu, Simona M.; Groth, Georg

    2016-08-01

    The plant hormone ethylene is involved in the regulation of several processes with high importance for agricultural applications, e.g. ripening, aging and senescence. Previous work in our group has identified a small peptide (NOP-1) derived from the nuclear localization signal of the Arabidopsis ethylene regulator ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE-2 (EIN2) C-terminal part as efficient inhibitor of ethylene responses. Here, we show that NOP-1 is also able to efficiently disrupt EIN2-ETR1 complex formation in tomato, indicating that the NOP-1 inhibition mode is conserved across plant species. Surface application of NOP-1 on green tomato fruits delays ripening similar to known inhibitors of ethylene perception (MCP) and ethylene biosynthesis (AVG). Fruits treated with NOP-1 showed similar ethylene production as untreated controls underlining that NOP-1 blocks ethylene signaling by targeting an essential interaction in this pathway, while having no effect on ethylene biosynthesis.

  11. Peptides interfering with protein-protein interactions in the ethylene signaling pathway delay tomato fruit ripening

    PubMed Central

    Bisson, Melanie M. A.; Kessenbrock, Mareike; Müller, Lena; Hofmann, Alexander; Schmitz, Florian; Cristescu, Simona M.; Groth, Georg

    2016-01-01

    The plant hormone ethylene is involved in the regulation of several processes with high importance for agricultural applications, e.g. ripening, aging and senescence. Previous work in our group has identified a small peptide (NOP-1) derived from the nuclear localization signal of the Arabidopsis ethylene regulator ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE-2 (EIN2) C-terminal part as efficient inhibitor of ethylene responses. Here, we show that NOP-1 is also able to efficiently disrupt EIN2-ETR1 complex formation in tomato, indicating that the NOP-1 inhibition mode is conserved across plant species. Surface application of NOP-1 on green tomato fruits delays ripening similar to known inhibitors of ethylene perception (MCP) and ethylene biosynthesis (AVG). Fruits treated with NOP-1 showed similar ethylene production as untreated controls underlining that NOP-1 blocks ethylene signaling by targeting an essential interaction in this pathway, while having no effect on ethylene biosynthesis. PMID:27477591

  12. A novel genetic score approach using instruments to investigate interactions between pathways and environment: application to air pollution.

    PubMed

    Bind, Marie-Abele; Coull, Brent; Suh, Helen; Wright, Robert; Baccarelli, Andrea; Vokonas, Pantel; Schwartz, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Air pollution has been associated with increased systemic inflammation markers. We developed a new pathway analysis approach to investigate whether gene variants within relevant pathways (oxidative stress, endothelial function, and metal processing) modified the association between particulate air pollution and fibrinogen, C-reactive protein (CRP), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Our study population consisted of 822 elderly participants of the Normative Aging Study (1999-2011). To investigate the role of biological mechanisms and to reduce the number of comparisons in the analysis, we created pathway-specific scores using gene variants related to each pathway. To select the most appropriate gene variants, we used the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (Lasso) to relate independent outcomes representative of each pathway (8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine for oxidative stress, augmentation index for endothelial function, and patella lead for metal processing) to gene variants. A high genetic score corresponds to a higher allelic risk profile. We fit mixed-effects models to examine modification by the genetic score of the weekly air pollution association with the outcome. Among participants with higher genetic scores within the oxidative stress pathway, we observed significant associations between particle number and fibrinogen, while we did not find any association among participants with lower scores (p(interaction) = 0.04). Compared to individuals with low genetic scores of metal processing gene variants, participants with higher scores had greater effects of particle number on fibrinogen (p(interaction) = 0.12), CRP (p(interaction) = 0.02), and ICAM-1 (pinteraction = 0.08). This two-stage penalization method is easy to implement and can be used for large-scale genetic applications.

  13. HPIminer: A text mining system for building and visualizing human protein interaction networks and pathways.

    PubMed

    Subramani, Suresh; Kalpana, Raja; Monickaraj, Pankaj Moses; Natarajan, Jeyakumar

    2015-04-01

    The knowledge on protein-protein interactions (PPI) and their related pathways are equally important to understand the biological functions of the living cell. Such information on human proteins is highly desirable to understand the mechanism of several diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and Alzheimer's disease. Because much of that information is buried in biomedical literature, an automated text mining system for visualizing human PPI and pathways is highly desirable. In this paper, we present HPIminer, a text mining system for visualizing human protein interactions and pathways from biomedical literature. HPIminer extracts human PPI information and PPI pairs from biomedical literature, and visualize their associated interactions, networks and pathways using two curated databases HPRD and KEGG. To our knowledge, HPIminer is the first system to build interaction networks from literature as well as curated databases. Further, the new interactions mined only from literature and not reported earlier in databases are highlighted as new. A comparative study with other similar tools shows that the resultant network is more informative and provides additional information on interacting proteins and their associated networks.

  14. Plant responses to insect herbivory: interactions between photosynthesis, reactive oxygen species and hormonal signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Kerchev, Pavel I; Fenton, Brian; Foyer, Christine H; Hancock, Robert D

    2012-02-01

    Under herbivore attack plants mount a defence response characterized by the accumulation of secondary metabolites and inhibitory proteins. Significant changes are observed in the transcriptional profiles of genes encoding enzymes of primary metabolism. Such changes have often been interpreted in terms of a requirement for an increased investment of resources to 'fuel' the synthesis of secondary metabolites. While enhanced secondary metabolism undoubtedly exerts an influence on primary metabolism, accumulating evidence suggests that rather than stimulating photosynthesis insect herbivory reduces photosynthetic carbon fixation and this response occurs by a re-programming of gene expression. Within this context, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reductant/oxidant (redox) signalling play a central role. Accumulating evidence suggests that ROS signalling pathways are closely interwoven with hormone-signalling pathways in plant-insect interactions. Here we consider how insect infestation impacts on the stress signalling network through effects on ROS and cellular redox metabolism with particular emphasis on the roles of ROS in the plant responses to phloem-feeding insects.

  15. Infant Pathways to Externalizing Behavior: Evidence of Genotype x Environment Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Leve, Leslie D.; Kerr, David C. R.; Shaw, Daniel; Ge, Xiaojia; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.; Scaramella, Laura V.; Reid, John B.; Conger, Rand; Reiss, David

    2009-01-01

    To further the understanding of the effects of early experience on the pathways to externalizing behavior, 9-month-old infants were observed during a frustration task. The analytical sample was composed of 348 linked triads of participants (adoptive parents, adopted child, and birth parent[s]) from a prospective adoption study, thereby permitting an examination of the interplay between genetic characteristics and early environmental experiences. It was hypothesized that genetic risk for externalizing problems (indexed by birth parents’ externalizing behavior) and affect dysregulation in the home (indexed by adoptive parents’ anxious/depressive symptoms) would independently and interactively predict a known precursor to externalizing problems: heightened infant attention to frustrating events. The results from the SEM analyses supported the moderation hypotheses involving adoptive mother affect dysregulation but did not support those involving adoptive father affect dysregulation: infants at genetic risk showed heightened attention to frustrating events only when the adoptive mother had higher levels of anxious/depressive symptoms. The Genotype x Environment interaction pattern held when substance use during pregnancy was considered. Sex-specific patterns of effects and future directions are discussed. PMID:20331671

  16. Thioredoxin-interacting protein regulates lipid metabolism via Akt/mTOR pathway in diabetic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Du, Chunyang; Wu, Ming; Liu, Huan; Ren, Yunzhuo; Du, Yunxia; Wu, Haijiang; Wei, Jinying; Liu, Chuxin; Yao, Fang; Wang, Hui; Zhu, Yan; Duan, Huijun; Shi, Yonghong

    2016-10-01

    Abnormal lipid metabolism contributes to the renal lipid accumulation, which is associated with diabetic kidney disease, but its precise mechanism remains unclear. The growing evidence demonstrates that thioredoxin-interacting protein is involved in regulating cellular glucose and lipid metabolism. Here, we investigated the effects of thioredoxin-interacting protein on lipid accumulation in diabetic kidney disease. In contrast to the diabetic wild-type mice, the physical and biochemical parameters were improved in the diabetic thioredoxin-interacting protein knockout mice. The increased renal lipid accumulation, expression of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, fatty acid synthase and sterol regulatory element binding protein-1, and phosphorylated Akt and mTOR associated with diabetes in wild-type mice was attenuated in diabetic thioredoxin-interacting protein knockout mice. Furthermore, thioredoxin-interacting protein knockout significantly increased the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α, acyl-coenzyme A oxidase 1 and carnitine palmitoyltransferaser 1 in diabetic kidneys. In vitro experiments, using HK-2 cells, revealed that knockdown of thioredoxin-interacting protein inhibited high glucose-mediated lipid accumulation, expression of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, fatty acid synthase and sterol regulatory element binding protein-1, as well as activation of Akt and mTOR. Moreover, knockdown of thioredoxin-interacting protein reversed high glucose-induced reduction of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α, acyl-coenzyme A oxidase 1 and carnitine palmitoyltransferaser 1 expression in HK-2 cells. Importantly, blockade of Akt/mTOR signaling pathway with LY294002, a specific PI3K inhibitor, replicated these effects of thioredoxin-interacting protein silencing. Taken together, these data suggest that thioredoxin-interacting protein deficiency alleviates diabetic renal lipid accumulation through regulation of Akt/mTOR pathway, thioredoxin-interacting

  17. Multi-shell effective interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunoda, Naofumi; Takayanagi, Kazuo; Hjorth-Jensen, Morten; Otsuka, Takaharu

    2014-02-01

    Background: Effective interactions, either derived from microscopic theories or based on fitting selected properties of nuclei in specific mass regions, are widely used inputs to shell-model studies of nuclei. The commonly used unperturbed basis functions are given by the harmonic oscillator. Until recently, most shell-model calculations have been confined to a single oscillator shell like the sd shell or the pf shell. Recent interest in nuclei away from the stability line requires, however, larger shell-model spaces. Because the derivation of microscopic effective interactions has been limited to degenerate models spaces, there are both conceptual and practical limits to present shell-model calculations that utilize such interactions. Purpose: The aim of this work is to present a novel microscopic method to calculate effective nucleon-nucleon interactions for the nuclear shell model. Its main difference from existing theories is that it can be applied not only to degenerate model spaces but also to nondegenerate model spaces. This has important consequences, in particular for intershell matrix elements of effective interactions. Methods: The formalism is presented in the form of a many-body perturbation theory based on the recently developed extended Kuo-Krenciglowa method. Our method enables us to microscopically construct effective interactions not only in one oscillator shell but also for several oscillator shells. Results: We present numerical results using effective interactions within (i) a single oscillator shell (a so-called degenerate model space) like the sd shell or the pf shell and (ii) two major shells (nondegenerate model space) like the sdf7p3 shell or the pfg9 shell. We also present energy levels of several nuclei that have two valence nucleons on top of a given closed-shell core. Conclusions: Our results show that the present method works excellently in shell-model spaces that comprise several oscillator shells, as well as in a single oscillator

  18. Chemical combinations elucidate pathway interactions and regulation relevant to Hepatitis C replication

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Christopher M; Mawhinney, Christina; Grenier, Jill M; Altmeyer, Ralf; Lee, Margaret S; Borisy, Alexis A; Lehár, Joseph; Johansen, Lisa M

    2010-01-01

    The search for effective Hepatitis C antiviral therapies has recently focused on host sterol metabolism and protein prenylation pathways that indirectly affect viral replication. However, inhibition of the sterol pathway with statin drugs has not yielded consistent results in patients. Here, we present a combination chemical genetic study to explore how the sterol and protein prenylation pathways work together to affect hepatitis C viral replication in a replicon assay. In addition to finding novel targets affecting viral replication, our data suggest that the viral replication is strongly affected by sterol pathway regulation. There is a marked transition from antagonistic to synergistic antiviral effects as the combination targets shift downstream along the sterol pathway. We also show how pathway regulation frustrates potential hepatitis C therapies based on the sterol pathway, and reveal novel synergies that selectively inhibit hepatitis C replication over host toxicity. In particular, combinations targeting the downstream sterol pathway enzymes produced robust and selective synergistic inhibition of hepatitis C replication. Our findings show how combination chemical genetics can reveal critical pathway connections relevant to viral replication, and can identify potential treatments with an increased therapeutic window. PMID:20531405

  19. Cooperative interaction of MUC1 with the HGF/c-Met pathway during hepatocarcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) induced c-Met activation is known as the main stimulus for hepatocyte proliferation and is essential for liver development and regeneration. Activation of HGF/c-Met signaling has been correlated with aggressive phenotype and poor prognosis in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). MUC1 is a transmembrane mucin, whose over-expression is reported in most cancers. Many of the oncogenic effects of MUC1 are believed to occur through the interaction of MUC1 with signaling molecules. To clarify the role of MUC1 in HGF/c-Met signaling, we determined whether MUC1 and c-Met interact cooperatively and what their role(s) is in hepatocarcinogenesis. Results MUC1 and c-Met over-expression levels were determined in highly motile and invasive, mesenchymal-like HCC cell lines, and in serial sections of cirrhotic and HCC tissues, and these levels were compared to those in normal liver tissues. Co-expression of both c-Met and MUC1 was found to be associated with the differentiation status of HCC. We further demonstrated an interaction between c-Met and MUC1 in HCC cells. HGF-induced c-Met phosphorylation decreased this interaction, and down-regulated MUC1 expression. Inhibition of c-Met activation restored HGF-mediated MUC1 down-regulation, and decreased the migratory and invasive abilities of HCC cells via inhibition of β-catenin activation and c-Myc expression. In contrast, siRNA silencing of MUC1 increased HGF-induced c-Met activation and HGF-induced cell motility and invasion. Conclusions These findings indicate that the crosstalk between MUC1 and c-Met in HCC could provide an advantage for invasion to HCC cells through the β-catenin/c-Myc pathway. Thus, MUC1 and c-Met could serve as potential therapeutic targets in HCC. PMID:22962849

  20. Uniform and Complementary Social Interaction: Distinct Pathways to Solidarity.

    PubMed

    Koudenburg, Namkje; Postmes, Tom; Gordijn, Ernestine H; van Mourik Broekman, Aafke

    2015-01-01

    We examine how different forms of co-action give rise to feelings of solidarity. We propose that (a) coordinated action elicits a sense of solidarity, and (b) the process through which such solidarity emerges differs for different forms of co-action. We suggest that whether solidarity within groups emerges from uniform action (e.g. synchronizing, as when people speak in unison) or from more complementary forms of action (e.g. alternating, when speaking in turns) has important consequences for the emergent position of individuals within the group. Uniform action relies on commonality, leaving little scope for individuality. In complementary action each individual makes a distinctive contribution to the group, thereby increasing a sense of personal value to the group, which should contribute to the emergence of solidarity. The predictions receive support from five studies, in which we study groups in laboratory and field settings. Results show that both complementary and uniform co-action increase a sense of solidarity compared to control conditions. However, in the complementary action condition, but not in the uniform action (or synchrony) condition, the effect on feelings of solidarity is mediated by a sense of personal value to the group.

  1. Uniform and Complementary Social Interaction: Distinct Pathways to Solidarity

    PubMed Central

    Koudenburg, Namkje; Postmes, Tom; Gordijn, Ernestine H.; van Mourik Broekman, Aafke

    2015-01-01

    We examine how different forms of co-action give rise to feelings of solidarity. We propose that (a) coordinated action elicits a sense of solidarity, and (b) the process through which such solidarity emerges differs for different forms of co-action. We suggest that whether solidarity within groups emerges from uniform action (e.g. synchronizing, as when people speak in unison) or from more complementary forms of action (e.g. alternating, when speaking in turns) has important consequences for the emergent position of individuals within the group. Uniform action relies on commonality, leaving little scope for individuality. In complementary action each individual makes a distinctive contribution to the group, thereby increasing a sense of personal value to the group, which should contribute to the emergence of solidarity. The predictions receive support from five studies, in which we study groups in laboratory and field settings. Results show that both complementary and uniform co-action increase a sense of solidarity compared to control conditions. However, in the complementary action condition, but not in the uniform action (or synchrony) condition, the effect on feelings of solidarity is mediated by a sense of personal value to the group. PMID:26047131

  2. Unified theory of effective interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayanagi, Kazuo

    2016-09-01

    We present a unified description of effective interaction theories in both algebraic and graphic representations. In our previous work, we have presented the Rayleigh-Schrödinger and Bloch perturbation theories in a unified fashion by introducing the main frame expansion of the effective interaction. In this work, we start also from the main frame expansion, and present various nonperturbative theories in a coherent manner, which include generalizations of the Brandow, Brillouin-Wigner, and Bloch-Horowitz theories on the formal side, and the extended Krenciglowa-Kuo and the extended Lee-Suzuki methods on the practical side. We thus establish a coherent and comprehensive description of both perturbative and nonperturbative theories on the basis of the main frame expansion.

  3. The PDZ Protein Canoe/AF-6 Links Ras-MAPK, Notch and Wingless/Wnt Signaling Pathways by Directly Interacting with Ras, Notch and Dishevelled

    PubMed Central

    Carmena, Ana; Speicher, Stephan; Baylies, Mary

    2006-01-01

    Over the past few years, it has become increasingly apparent that signal transduction pathways are not merely linear cascades; they are organized into complex signaling networks that require high levels of regulation to generate precise and unique cell responses. However, the underlying regulatory mechanisms by which signaling pathways cross-communicate remain poorly understood. Here we show that the Ras-binding protein Canoe (Cno)/AF-6, a PDZ protein normally associated with cellular junctions, is a key modulator of Wingless (Wg)/Wnt, Ras-Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) and Notch (N) signaling pathways cross-communication. Our data show a repressive effect of Cno/AF-6 on these three signaling pathways through physical interactions with Ras, N and the cytoplasmic protein Dishevelled (Dsh), a key Wg effector. We propose a model in which Cno, through those interactions, actively coordinates, at the membrane level, Ras-MAPK, N and Wg signaling pathways during progenitor specification. PMID:17183697

  4. Effective interactions between fluid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bing-Sui; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2015-08-01

    A self-consistent theory is proposed for the general problem of interacting undulating fluid membranes subject to the constraint that they do not interpenetrate. We implement the steric constraint via an exact functional integral representation and, through the use of a saddle-point approximation, transform it into a novel effective steric potential. The steric potential is found to consist of two contributions: one generated by zero-mode fluctuations of the membranes and the other by thermal bending fluctuations. For membranes of cross-sectional area S , we find that the bending fluctuation part scales with the intermembrane separation d as d-2 for d ≪√{S } but crosses over to d-4 scaling for d ≫√{S } , whereas the zero-mode part of the steric potential always scales as d-2. For membranes interacting exclusively via the steric potential, we obtain closed-form expressions for the effective interaction potential and for the rms undulation amplitude σ , which becomes small at low temperatures T and/or large bending stiffnesses κ . Moreover, σ scales as d for d ≪√{S } but saturates at √{kBT S /κ } for d ≫√{S } . In addition, using variational Gaussian theory, we apply our self-consistent treatment to study intermembrane interactions subject to different types of potentials: (i) the Moreira-Netz potential for a pair of strongly charged membranes with an intervening solution of multivalent counterions, (ii) an attractive square well, (iii) the Morse potential, and (iv) a combination of hydration and van der Waals interactions.

  5. Kinase Pathway Database: An Integrated Protein-Kinase and NLP-Based Protein-Interaction Resource

    PubMed Central

    Koike, Asako; Kobayashi, Yoshiyuki; Takagi, Toshihisa

    2003-01-01

    Protein kinases play a crucial role in the regulation of cellular functions. Various kinds of information about these molecules are important for understanding signaling pathways and organism characteristics. We have developed the Kinase Pathway Database, an integrated database involving major completely sequenced eukaryotes. It contains the classification of protein kinases and their functional conservation, ortholog tables among species, protein–protein, protein–gene, and protein–compound interaction data, domain information, and structural information. It also provides an automatic pathway graphic image interface. The protein, gene, and compound interactions are automatically extracted from abstracts for all genes and proteins by natural-language processing (NLP).The method of automatic extraction uses phrase patterns and the GENA protein, gene, and compound name dictionary, which was developed by our group. With this database, pathways are easily compared among species using data with more than 47,000 protein interactions and protein kinase ortholog tables. The database is available for querying and browsing at http://kinasedb.ontology.ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp/. PMID:12799355

  6. The segmentation clock in mice: interaction between the Wnt and Notch signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-González, J G; Santillán, M; Fowler, A C; Mackey, Michael C

    2007-09-07

    In the last few years, the efforts to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the segmentation clock in various vertebrate species have multiplied. Early evidence suggested that oscillations are caused by one of the genes under the Notch signalling pathway (like those of the her or Hes families). Recently, Aulehla et al. [Wnt3a plays a major role in the segmentation clock controlling somitogenesis. Dev. Cell 4, 395-406] discovered that Axin2 (a gene under the Wnt3a signalling pathway) also oscillates in the presomitic mesoderm (PSM) of mice embryos and proposed some mechanisms through which the Notch and Wnt3a pathways may interact. They further suggested that a decreasing concentration of Wnt3a along the PSM may be the gradient the segmentation clock interacts with to form somites. These results were reviewed by Rida et al. [A notch feeling of somite segmentation and beyond. Dev. Biol. 265, 2-22], who introduced a complex clockwork comprising genes Hes1, Lfng (under the Notch pathway), and Axin2, as well as their multiple interactions. In the present work we develop a mathematical model based on the Rida et al. review and use it to tackle some of the questions raided by the Aulehla et al. paper: can the Axin2 feedback loop constitute a clock? Could a decreasing Wnt3a signaling constitute the wavefront, where phase is recorded and the spatial pattern laid down? What is the master oscillator?

  7. Effective Interactions for Light Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, Bryan R.

    The G-matrix technique in which one is able to easily calculate ground and excited states of many-body systems is used to calculate the ground state energies and some excited levels of ^3H and ^4He. Energy independent effective interactions are obtained for these nuclei using the technique of Suzuki and Lee which requires the G-matrix and its derivatives with respect to starting energy. It is found that accurate energy derivatives of the G-matrix are necessary to obtain energy independence and thus analytic expressions are presented for these derivatives in both center-of-mass/relative and shell model coordinate systems. Several rules of thumb are given pertaining to the convergence criteria in both coordinate systems. Further, since the G-matrix includes only intra -channel two-body correlations outside the active space, we explore the effect on the binding energies when the active space is enlarged to include several major shells. By enlarging the active space, we hope to include the most important many-body correlations explicitly. It is found that when the active space includes more than 2 major shells, the effective interaction is well approximated by the G-matrix. Our results essentially agree with exact Faddeev calculations for ^3 H but underbind by about.5 MeV in ^4 He as compared to exact Yabukovsky and Green function Monte Carlo calculations. A possible reason for this underbinding, the inclusion of unlinked diagrams in the energy expansion, is studied. The energy independent G-matrix technique is then applied to the p-shell (^5He, ^6Li and ^7Li) where the active space includes all excitations up to 2 hbaromega. Zero, one, two and three -body effective interactions are extracted and it is found that a schematic two-parameter three-body potential can be used to approximate the effective three-body potential that results from the truncation of the active space.

  8. Visualization of ultradeformable liposomes penetration pathways and their skin interaction by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Subongkot, Thirapit; Wonglertnirant, Nanthida; Songprakhon, Pucharee; Rojanarata, Theerasak; Opanasopit, Praneet; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait

    2013-01-30

    The objective of this study was to elucidate the skin penetration pathway of the generated ultradeformable liposomes (ULs) with terpenes for transdermal drug delivery of fluorescein sodium (NaFl). ULs with d-limonene were selected to investigate the penetration pathways and vesicle-skin interaction in terms of release and attachment processes via Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM). A co-localization technique was employed to visualize the skin penetration behavior of UL-labeled red fluorescence (Rh-PE) and fluorescence-entrapped drug (NaFl) through porcine skin. Our results suggested that ULs with entrapped drug might attach to any part of the skin before releasing the entrapped drug into the skin. Most ULs and entrapped drug penetrated through hair follicles more than through the nonfollicular region. In summary, the transfollicular pathway was the major penetration pathway of ULs with d-limonene for transdermal drug delivery of NaFl, whereas the intercellular and transcellular pathways were the minor penetration pathways.

  9. Direct interaction of garcinol and related polyisoprenylated benzophenones of Garcinia cambogia fruits with the transcription factor STAT-1 as a likely mechanism of their inhibitory effect on cytokine signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Masullo, Milena; Menegazzi, Marta; Di Micco, Simone; Beffy, Pascale; Bifulco, Giuseppe; Dal Bosco, Martina; Novelli, Michela; Pizza, Cosimo; Masiello, Pellegrino; Piacente, Sonia

    2014-03-28

    Garcinol (1), a polyisoprenylated benzophenone occurring in Garcinia species, has been reported to exert anti-inflammatory activity in LPS-stimulated macrophages, through inhibition of NF-κB and/or JAK/STAT-1 activation. In order to provide deeper insight into its effects on the cytokine signaling pathway and to clarify the underlying molecular mechanisms, 1 was isolated from the fruits of Garcinia cambogia along with two other polyisoprenylated benzophenones, guttiferones K (2) and guttiferone M (3), differing from each other in their isoprenyl moieties and their positions on the benzophenone core. The affinities of 1-3 for the STAT-1 protein have been evaluated by surface plasmon resonance and molecular docking studies and resulted in KD values in the micromolar range. Consistent with the observed high affinity toward the STAT-1 protein, garcinol and guttiferones K and M were able to modulate cytokine signaling in different cultured cell lines, mainly by inhibiting STAT-1 nuclear transfer and DNA binding, as assessed by an electrophorectic mobility shift assay.

  10. The role of hydrogen-bonding interactions in acidic sugar reaction pathways.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xianghong; Johnson, David K; Himmel, Michael E; Nimlos, Mark R

    2010-09-03

    Previously, theoretical multiple sugar (beta-d-xylose and beta-d-glucose) reaction pathways were discovered that depended on the initial protonation site on the sugar molecules using Car-Parrinello-based molecular dynamics (CPMD) simulations [Qian, X. H.; Nimlos, M. R.; Davis, M.; Johnson, D. K.; Himmel, M. E. Carbohydr. Res.2005, 340, 2319-2327]. In addition, simulation results showed that water molecules could participate in the sugar reactions, thus altering the reaction pathways. In the present study, the temperature and water density effects on the sugar degradation pathways were investigated with CPMD. We found that changes in both temperature and water density could profoundly affect the mechanisms and pathways. We attributed these effects to both the strength of hydrogen bonding and proton affinity of water.

  11. Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide modulates trophoblast-derived cell line function and interaction with phagocytic cells through autocrine pathways

    PubMed Central

    Vota, Daiana; Paparini, Daniel; Hauk, Vanesa; Toro, Ayelén; Merech, Fatima; Varone, Cecilia; Ramhorst, Rosanna; Pérez Leirós, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Trophoblast cells migrate and invade the decidual stroma in a tightly regulated process to maintain immune homeostasis at the maternal-placental interface during the first weeks of pregnancy. Locally synthesized factors modulate trophoblast cell function and their interaction with maternal leukocytes to promote the silent clearance of apoptotic cells. The vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a pleiotropic polypeptide with trophic and anti-inflammatory effects in murine pregnancy models. We explored the effect of VIP on two human first trimester trophoblast cell lines, particularly on their migration, invasiveness and interaction with phagocytic cells, and the signalling and regulatory pathways involved. We found that VIP enhanced trophoblast cell migration and invasion through the activation of high affinity VPAC receptors and PKA-CRE signalling pathways. VIP knocked-down trophoblast cells showed reduced migration in basal and leukemic inhibitor factor (LIF)-elicited conditions. In parallel, VIP-silenced trophoblast cells failed to induce the phagocytosis of apoptotic bodies and the expression of immunosuppressant markers by human monocytes. Our results suggest that VIP-mediated autocrine pathways regulate trophoblast cell function and contribute to immune homeostasis maintenance at placentation and may provide new clues for therapeutic intervention in pregnancies complicated by defective deep placentation. PMID:27212399

  12. Differentially expressed genes and interacting pathways in bladder cancer revealed by bioinformatic analysis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yinzhou; Wang, Xuelei; Jin, Yongchao; Lu, Jiasun; Qiu, Guangming; Wen, Xiaofei

    2014-10-01

    The goal of this study was to identify cancer-associated differentially expressed genes (DEGs), analyze their biological functions and investigate the mechanism(s) of cancer occurrence and development, which may provide a theoretical foundation for bladder cancer (BCa) therapy. We downloaded the mRNA expression profiling dataset GSE13507 from the Gene Expression Omnibus database; the dataset includes 165 BCa and 68 control samples. T‑tests were used to identify DEGs. To further study the biological functions of the identified DEGs, we performed a Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway enrichment analysis. Next, we built a network of potentially interacting pathways to study the synergistic relationships among DEGs. A total of 12,105 genes were identified as DEGs, of which 5,239 were upregulated and 6,866 were downregulated in BCa. The DEGs encoding activator protein 1 (AP-1), nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) proteins, nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and interleukin (IL)-10 were revealed to participate in the significantly enriched immune pathways that were downregulated in BCa. KEGG enrichment analysis revealed 7 significantly upregulated and 47 significantly downregulated pathways enriched among the DEGs. We found a crosstalk interaction among a total of 44 pathways in the network of BCa-affected pathways. In conclusion, our results show that BCa involves dysfunctions in multiple systems. Our study is expected to pave ways for immune and inflammatory research and provide molecular insights for cancer therapy.

  13. O/S-1/ interactions - The product channels. [collisional electron quenching and chemical reaction pathway frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slanger, T. G.; Black, G.

    1978-01-01

    The first measurements are reported of the reaction pathways for the interaction between oxygen atoms in the 4.19 eV S-1 state, and four molecules, N2O, CO2, H2O, and NO. Distinction is made between three possible paths - quenching to O(D-1), quenching to O(P-3), and chemical reaction. With N2O, the most reasonable interpretation of the data indicates that there no reaction, in sharp contrast with the interaction between O(D-1) and N2O, which proceeds entirely by reaction. Similarly, there is no reaction with CO2. With H2O, the reactive pathway is the dominant one, although electronic quenching is not negligible. With NO, O(D-1) is the preferred product.

  14. Special issue: redox active natural products and their interaction with cellular signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Claus

    2014-11-26

    During the last decade, research into natural products has experienced a certain renaissance. The urgent need for more and more effective antibiotics in medicine, the demand for ecologically friendly plant protectants in agriculture, "natural" cosmetics and the issue of a sustainable and healthy nutrition in an ageing society have fuelled research into Nature's treasure chest of "green gold". Here, redox active secondary metabolites from plants, fungi, bacteria and other (micro-)organisms often have been at the forefront of the most interesting developments. These agents provide powerful means to interfere with many, probably most cellular signaling pathways in humans, animals and lower organisms, and therefore can be used to protect, i.e., in form of antioxidants, and to frighten off or even kill, i.e., in form of repellants, antibiotics, fungicides and selective, often catalytic "sensor/effector" anticancer agents. Interestingly, whilst natural product research dates back many decades, in some cases even centuries, and compounds such as allicin and various flavonoids have been investigated thoroughly in the past, it has only recently become possible to investigate their precise interactions and mode(s) of action inside living cells. Here, fluorescent staining and labelling on the one side, and appropriate detection, either qualitatively under the microscope or quantitatively in flow cytometers and plate readers, on the other, enable researchers to obtain the various pieces of information necessary to construct a fairly complete puzzle of how such compounds act and interact in living cells. Complemented by the more traditional activity assays and Western Blots, and increasingly joined by techniques such as proteomics, chemogenetic screening and mRNA profiling, these cell based bioanalytical techniques form a powerful platform for "intracellular diagnostics". In the case of redox active compounds, especially of Reactive Sulfur Species (RSS), such techniques have

  15. Interaction between glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and L-leucine catabolic enzymes: intersecting metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Hutson, Susan M; Islam, Mohammad Mainul; Zaganas, Ioannis

    2011-09-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) catabolism follows sequential reactions and their metabolites intersect with other metabolic pathways. The initial enzymes in BCAA metabolism, the mitochondrial branched-chain aminotransferase (BCATm), which deaminates the BCAAs to branched-chain α-keto acids (BCKAs); and the branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase enzyme complex (BCKDC), which oxidatively decarboxylates the BCKAs, are organized in a supramolecular complex termed metabolon. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH1) is found in the metabolon in rat tissues. Bovine GDH1 binds to the pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate (PMP)-form of human BCATm (PMP-BCATm) but not to pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-BCATm in vitro. This protein interaction facilitates reamination of the α-ketoglutarate (αKG) product of the GDH1 oxidative deamination reaction. Human GDH1 appears to act like bovine GDH1 but human GDH2 does not show the same enhancement of BCKDC enzyme activities. Another metabolic enzyme is also found in the metabolon is pyruvate carboxylase (PC). Kinetic results suggest that PC binds to the E1 decarboxylase of BCKDC but does not effect BCAA catabolism. The protein interaction of BCATm and GDH1 promotes regeneration of PLP-BCATm which then binds to BCKDC resulting in channeling of the BCKA products from BCATm first half reaction to E1 and promoting BCAA oxidation and net nitrogen transfer from BCAAs. The cycling of nitrogen through glutamate via the actions of BCATm and GDH1 releases free ammonia. Formation of ammonia may be important for astrocyte glutamine synthesis in the central nervous system. In peripheral tissue association of BCATm and GDH1 would promote BCAA oxidation at physiologically relevant BCAA concentrations.

  16. Chlamydial histone-DNA interactions are disrupted by a metabolite in the methylerythritol phosphate pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Grieshaber, Nicole A; Fischer, Elizabeth R; Mead, David J; Dooley, Cheryl A; Hackstadt, Ted

    2004-05-11

    The chlamydial developmental cycle is characterized by an intracellular replicative form, termed the reticulate body, and an extracellular form called the elementary body. Elementary bodies are characterized by a condensed chromatin, which is maintained by a histone H1-like protein, Hc1. Differentiation of elementary bodies to reticulate bodies is accompanied by dispersal of the chromatin as chlamydiae become transcriptionally active, although the mechanisms of Hc1 release from DNA have remained unknown. Dissociation of the nucleoid requires chlamydial transcription and translation with negligible loss of Hc1. A genetic screen was therefore designed to identify chlamydial genes rescuing Escherichia coli from the lethal effects of Hc1 overexpression. CT804, a gene homologous to ispE, which encodes an intermediate enzyme of the non-mevalonate methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis, was selected. E. coli coexpressing CT804 and Hc1 grew normally, although they expressed Hc1 to a level equivalent to that which condensed the chromatin of parent Hc1-expressing controls. Inhibition of the MEP pathway with fosmidomycin abolished IspE rescue of Hc1-expressing E. coli. Deproteinated extract from IspE-expressing bacteria caused dispersal of purified chlamydial nucleoids, suggesting that chlamydial histone-DNA interactions are disrupted by a small metabolite within the MEP pathway rather than by direct action of IspE. By partial reconstruction of the MEP pathway, we determined that 2-C-methylerythritol 2,4-cyclodiphosphate dissociated Hc1 from chlamydial chromatin. These results suggest that chlamydial histone-DNA interactions are disrupted upon germination by a small metabolite in the MEP pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis.

  17. Pathway-Driven Approaches of Interaction between Oxidative Balance and Genetic Polymorphism on Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Despite evidences of association between basic redox biology and metabolic syndrome (MetS), few studies have evaluated indices that account for multiple oxidative effectors for MetS. Oxidative balance score (OBS) has indicated the role of oxidative stress in chronic disease pathophysiology. In this study, we evaluated OBS as an oxidative balance indicator for estimating risk of MetS with 6414 study participants. OBS is a multiple exogenous factor score for development of disease; therefore, we investigated interplay between oxidative balance and genetic variation for development of MetS focusing on biological pathways by using gene-set-enrichment analysis. As a result, participants in the highest quartile of OBS were less likely to be at risk for MetS than those in the lowest quartile. In addition, persons in the highest quartile of OBS had the lowest level of inflammatory markers including C-reactive protein and WBC. With GWAS-based pathway analysis, we found that VEGF signaling pathway, glutathione metabolism, and Rac-1 pathway were significantly enriched biological pathways involved with OBS on MetS. These findings suggested that mechanism of angiogenesis, oxidative stress, and inflammation can be involved in interaction between OBS and genetic variation on risk of MetS. PMID:28191276

  18. IDENTIFYING MUTATION SPECIFIC CANCER PATHWAYS USING A STRUCTURALLY RESOLVED PROTEIN INTERACTION NETWORK

    PubMed Central

    ENGIN, H. BILLUR; HOFREE, MATAN; CARTER, HANNAH

    2014-01-01

    Here we present a method for extracting candidate cancer pathways from tumor ‘omics data while explicitly accounting for diverse consequences of mutations for protein interactions. Disease-causing mutations are frequently observed at either core or interface residues mediating protein interactions. Mutations at core residues frequently destabilize protein structure while mutations at interface residues can specifically affect the binding energies of protein-protein interactions. As a result, mutations in a protein may result in distinct interaction profiles and thus have different phenotypic consequences. We describe a protein structure-guided pipeline for extracting interacting protein sets specific to a particular mutation. Of 59 cancer genes with 3D co-complexed structures in the Protein Data Bank, 43 showed evidence of mutations with different functional consequences. Literature survey reciprocated functional predictions specific to distinct mutations on APC, ATRX, BRCA1, CBL and HRAS. Our analysis suggests that accounting for mutation-specific perturbations to cancer pathways will be essential for personalized cancer therapy. PMID:25592571

  19. A large scale Huntingtin protein interaction network implicates Rho GTPase signaling pathways in Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Tourette, Cendrine; Li, Biao; Bell, Russell; O'Hare, Shannon; Kaltenbach, Linda S; Mooney, Sean D; Hughes, Robert E

    2014-03-07

    Huntington disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by a CAG expansion in the HTT gene. Using yeast two-hybrid methods, we identified a large set of proteins that interact with huntingtin (HTT)-interacting proteins. This network, composed of HTT-interacting proteins (HIPs) and proteins interacting with these primary nodes, contains 3235 interactions among 2141 highly interconnected proteins. Analysis of functional annotations of these proteins indicates that primary and secondary HIPs are enriched in pathways implicated in HD, including mammalian target of rapamycin, Rho GTPase signaling, and oxidative stress response. To validate roles for HIPs in mutant HTT toxicity, we show that the Rho GTPase signaling components, BAIAP2, EZR, PIK3R1, PAK2, and RAC1, are modifiers of mutant HTT toxicity. We also demonstrate that Htt co-localizes with BAIAP2 in filopodia and that mutant HTT interferes with filopodial dynamics. These data indicate that HTT is involved directly in membrane dynamics, cell attachment, and motility. Furthermore, they implicate dysregulation in these pathways as pathological mechanisms in HD.

  20. Glutamate, Ornithine, Arginine, Proline, and Polyamine Metabolic Interactions: The Pathway Is Regulated at the Post-Transcriptional Level

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Rajtilak; Barchi, Boubker; Turlapati, Swathi A.; Gagne, Maegan; Minocha, Rakesh; Long, Stephanie; Minocha, Subhash C.

    2016-01-01

    The metabolism of glutamate into ornithine, arginine, proline, and polyamines is a major network of nitrogen-metabolizing pathways in plants, which also produces intermediates like nitric oxide, and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) that play critical roles in plant development and stress. While the accumulations of intermediates and the products of this network depend primarily on nitrogen assimilation, the overall regulation of the interacting sub-pathways is not well understood. We tested the hypothesis that diversion of ornithine into polyamine biosynthesis (by transgenic approach) not only plays a role in regulating its own biosynthesis from glutamate but also affects arginine and proline biosynthesis. Using two high putrescine producing lines of Arabidopsis thaliana (containing a transgenic mouse ornithine decarboxylase gene), we studied the: (1) effects of exogenous supply of carbon and nitrogen on polyamines and pools of soluble amino acids; and, (2) expression of genes encoding key enzymes in the interactive pathways of arginine, proline and GABA biosynthesis as well as the catabolism of polyamines. Our findings suggest that: (1) the overall conversion of glutamate to arginine and polyamines is enhanced by increased utilization of ornithine for polyamine biosynthesis by the transgene product; (2) proline and arginine biosynthesis are regulated independently of polyamines and GABA biosynthesis; (3) the expression of most genes (28 that were studied) that encode enzymes of the interacting sub-pathways of arginine and GABA biosynthesis does not change even though overall biosynthesis of Orn from glutamate is increased several fold; and (4) increased polyamine biosynthesis results in increased assimilation of both nitrogen and carbon by the cells. PMID:26909083

  1. Feedback regulation on PTEN/AKT pathway by the ER stress kinase PERK mediated by interaction with the Vault complex.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Neo, Suat Peng; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Poulsen, Anders; Boping, Liu; Ong, Esther Hongqian; Sangthongpitag, Kanda; Pendharkar, Vishal; Hill, Jeffrey; Cohen, Stephen M

    2015-03-01

    The high proliferation rate of cancer cells, together with environmental factors such as hypoxia and nutrient deprivation can cause Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) stress. The protein kinase PERK is an essential mediator in one of the three ER stress response pathways. Genetic and pharmacological inhibition of PERK has been reported to limit tumor growth in xenograft models. Here we provide evidence that inactive PERK interacts with the nuclear pore-associated Vault complex protein and that this compromises Vault-mediated nuclear transport of PTEN. Pharmacological inhibition of PERK under ER stress results is abnormal sequestration of the Vault complex, leading to increased cytoplasmic PTEN activity and lower AKT activation. As the PI3K/PTEN/AKT pathway is crucial for many aspects of cell growth and survival, this unexpected effect of PERK inhibitors on AKT activity may have implications for their potential use as therapeutic agents.

  2. The HVC microcircuit: the synaptic basis for interactions between song motor and vocal plasticity pathways.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Richard; Prather, Jonathan F

    2005-02-23

    Synaptic interactions between telencephalic neurons innervating descending motor or basal ganglia pathways are essential in the learning, planning, and execution of complex movements. Synaptic interactions within the songbird telencephalic nucleus HVC are implicated in motor and auditory activity associated with learned vocalizations. HVC contains projection neurons (PNs) (HVC(RA)) that innervate song premotor areas, other PNs (HVC(X)) that innervate a basal ganglia pathway necessary for vocal plasticity, and interneurons (HVC(INT)). During singing, HVC(RA) fire in temporally sparse bursts, possibly because of HVC(INT)-HVC(RA) interactions, and a corollary discharge can be detected in the basal ganglia pathway, likely because of synaptic transmission from HVC(RA) to HVC(X) cells. During song playback, local interactions, including inhibition onto HVC(X) cells, shape highly selective responses that distinguish HVC from its auditory afferents. To better understand the synaptic substrate for the motor and auditory properties of HVC, we made intracellular recordings from pairs of HVC neurons in adult male zebra finch brain slices and used spike-triggered averages to assess synaptic connectivity. A major synaptic interaction between the PNs was a disynaptic inhibition from HVC(RA) to HVC(X), which could link song motor signals in the two outputs of HVC and account for some of the song playback-evoked inhibition in HVC(X) cells. Furthermore, single interneurons made divergent connections onto PNs of both types, and either PN type could form reciprocal connections with interneurons. In these two regards, the synaptic architecture of HVC resembles that described in some pattern-generating networks, underscoring features likely to be important to singing and song learning.

  3. Partial Activation of SA- and JA-Defensive Pathways in Strawberry upon Colletotrichum acutatum Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Amil-Ruiz, Francisco; Garrido-Gala, José; Gadea, José; Blanco-Portales, Rosario; Muñoz-Mérida, Antonio; Trelles, Oswaldo; de los Santos, Berta; Arroyo, Francisco T.; Aguado-Puig, Ana; Romero, Fernando; Mercado, José-Ángel; Pliego-Alfaro, Fernando; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Caballero, José L.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the nature of pathogen host interaction may help improve strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) cultivars. Plant resistance to pathogenic agents usually operates through a complex network of defense mechanisms mediated by a diverse array of signaling molecules. In strawberry, resistance to a variety of pathogens has been reported to be mostly polygenic and quantitatively inherited, making it difficult to associate molecular markers with disease resistance genes. Colletotrichum acutatum spp. is a major strawberry pathogen, and completely resistant cultivars have not been reported. Moreover, strawberry defense network components and mechanisms remain largely unknown and poorly understood. Assessment of the strawberry response to C. acutatum included a global transcript analysis, and acidic hormones SA and JA measurements were analyzed after challenge with the pathogen. Induction of transcripts corresponding to the SA and JA signaling pathways and key genes controlling major steps within these defense pathways was detected. Accordingly, SA and JA accumulated in strawberry after infection. Contrastingly, induction of several important SA, JA, and oxidative stress-responsive defense genes, including FaPR1-1, FaLOX2, FaJAR1, FaPDF1, and FaGST1, was not detected, which suggests that specific branches in these defense pathways (those leading to FaPR1-2, FaPR2-1, FaPR2-2, FaAOS, FaPR5, and FaPR10) were activated. Our results reveal that specific aspects in SA and JA dependent signaling pathways are activated in strawberry upon interaction with C. acutatum. Certain described defense-associated transcripts related to these two known signaling pathways do not increase in abundance following infection. This finding suggests new insight into a specific putative molecular strategy for defense against this pathogen. PMID:27471515

  4. Partial Activation of SA- and JA-Defensive Pathways in Strawberry upon Colletotrichum acutatum Interaction.

    PubMed

    Amil-Ruiz, Francisco; Garrido-Gala, José; Gadea, José; Blanco-Portales, Rosario; Muñoz-Mérida, Antonio; Trelles, Oswaldo; de Los Santos, Berta; Arroyo, Francisco T; Aguado-Puig, Ana; Romero, Fernando; Mercado, José-Ángel; Pliego-Alfaro, Fernando; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Caballero, José L

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the nature of pathogen host interaction may help improve strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) cultivars. Plant resistance to pathogenic agents usually operates through a complex network of defense mechanisms mediated by a diverse array of signaling molecules. In strawberry, resistance to a variety of pathogens has been reported to be mostly polygenic and quantitatively inherited, making it difficult to associate molecular markers with disease resistance genes. Colletotrichum acutatum spp. is a major strawberry pathogen, and completely resistant cultivars have not been reported. Moreover, strawberry defense network components and mechanisms remain largely unknown and poorly understood. Assessment of the strawberry response to C. acutatum included a global transcript analysis, and acidic hormones SA and JA measurements were analyzed after challenge with the pathogen. Induction of transcripts corresponding to the SA and JA signaling pathways and key genes controlling major steps within these defense pathways was detected. Accordingly, SA and JA accumulated in strawberry after infection. Contrastingly, induction of several important SA, JA, and oxidative stress-responsive defense genes, including FaPR1-1, FaLOX2, FaJAR1, FaPDF1, and FaGST1, was not detected, which suggests that specific branches in these defense pathways (those leading to FaPR1-2, FaPR2-1, FaPR2-2, FaAOS, FaPR5, and FaPR10) were activated. Our results reveal that specific aspects in SA and JA dependent signaling pathways are activated in strawberry upon interaction with C. acutatum. Certain described defense-associated transcripts related to these two known signaling pathways do not increase in abundance following infection. This finding suggests new insight into a specific putative molecular strategy for defense against this pathogen.

  5. A systems biology approach using metabolomic data reveals genes and pathways interacting to modulate divergent growth in cattle

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Systems biology enables the identification of gene networks that modulate complex traits. Comprehensive metabolomic analyses provide innovative phenotypes that are intermediate between the initiator of genetic variability, the genome, and raw phenotypes that are influenced by a large number of environmental effects. The present study combines two concepts, systems biology and metabolic analyses, in an approach without prior functional hypothesis in order to dissect genes and molecular pathways that modulate differential growth at the onset of puberty in male cattle. Furthermore, this integrative strategy was applied to specifically explore distinctive gene interactions of non-SMC condensin I complex, subunit G (NCAPG) and myostatin (GDF8), known modulators of pre- and postnatal growth that are only partially understood for their molecular pathways affecting differential body weight. Results Our study successfully established gene networks and interacting partners affecting growth at the onset of puberty in cattle. We demonstrated the biological relevance of the created networks by comparison to randomly created networks. Our data showed that GnRH (Gonadotropin-releasing hormone) signaling is associated with divergent growth at the onset of puberty and revealed two highly connected hubs, BTC and DGKH, within the network. Both genes are known to directly interact with the GnRH signaling pathway. Furthermore, a gene interaction network for NCAPG containing 14 densely connected genes revealed novel information concerning the functional role of NCAPG in divergent growth. Conclusions Merging both concepts, systems biology and metabolomic analyses, successfully yielded new insights into gene networks and interacting partners affecting growth at the onset of puberty in cattle. Genetic modulation in GnRH signaling was identified as key modifier of differential cattle growth at the onset of puberty. In addition, the benefit of our innovative concept without prior

  6. Evaluation of the cardiolipin biosynthetic pathway and its interactions in the diabetic heart

    PubMed Central

    Croston, Tara L.; Shepherd, Danielle L.; Thapa, Dharendra; Nichols, Cody E.; Lewis, Sara E.; Dabkowski, Erinne R.; Jagannathan, Rajaganapathi; Baseler, Walter A.; Hollander, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Aims We have previously reported alterations in cardiolipin content and inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) proteomic make-up specifically in interfibrillar mitochondria (IFM) in the type 1 diabetic heart; however, the mechanism underlying this alteration is unknown. The goal of this study was to determine how the cardiolipin biosynthetic pathway and cardiolipin-IMM protein interactions are impacted by type 1 diabetes mellitus. Main methods Male FVB mice were made diabetic by multiple low-dose streptozotocin injections and sacrificed five weeks post-diabetic onset. Messenger RNA was measured and cardiac mitochondrial subpopulations were isolated. Further mitochondrial functional experimentation included evaluating the protein expression of the enzymes directly responsible for cardiolipin biosynthesis, as well as ATP synthase activity. Interactions between cardiolipin and ATP synthase subunits were also examined. Key findings Western blot analysis revealed a significant decrease in cardiolipin synthase (CRLS) protein content in diabetic IFM, with a concomitant decrease in its activity. ATP synthase activity was also significantly decreased. We identified two novel direct interactions between two subunits of the ATP synthase F0 complex (ATP5F1 and ATP5H), both of which were significantly decreased in diabetic IFM. Significance Overall, these results indicate that type 1 diabetes mellitus negatively impacts the cardiolipin biosynthetic pathway specifically at CRLS, contributing to decreased cardiolipin content and loss of interactions with key ATP synthase F0 complex constituents in the IFM. PMID:23872101

  7. Pharmacogenetic predictor of extrapyramidal symptoms induced by antipsychotics: multilocus interaction in the mTOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Mas, S; Gassó, P; Ritter, M A; Malagelada, C; Bernardo, M; Lafuente, A

    2015-01-01

    Antipsychotic (AP) treatment-emergent extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) are acute adverse reactions of APs. The aim of the present study is to analyze gene-gene interactions in nine genes related to the mTOR pathway, in order to develop genetic predictors of the appearance of EPS. 243 subjects (78 presenting EPS: 165 not) from three cohorts participated in the present study: Cohort 1, patients treated with risperidone, (n=114); Cohort 2, patients treated with APs other than risperidone (n=102); Cohort 3, AP-naïve patients with first-episode psychosis treated with risperidone, paliperidone or amisulpride, n=27. We analyzed gene-gene interactions by multifactor dimensionality reduction assay (MDR). In Cohort 1, we identified a four-way interaction, including the rs1130214 (AKT1), rs456998 (FCHSD1), rs7211818 (Raptor) and rs1053639 (DDIT4), that correctly predicted 97 of the 114 patients (85% accuracy). We validated the predictive power of the four-way interaction in Cohort 2 and in Cohort 3 with 86% and 88% accuracy respectively. We develop and validate a powerful pharmacogenetic predictor of AP-induced EPS. For the first time, the mTOR pathway has been related to EPS susceptibility and AP response. However, validation in larger and independent populations will be necessary for optimal generalization.

  8. Interactions among the Imagination, Expertise Reversal, and Element Interactivity Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leahy, Wayne; Sweller, John

    2005-01-01

    Interactions among the imagination, expertise reversal, and element interactivity effects were investigated in 2 experiments. In Experiment 1, less knowledgeable primary school students learning to use a bus timetable produced better performance under study than imagination conditions, but an increase in their experience reversed the result,…

  9. Characterization of MRFAP1 turnover and interactions downstream of the NEDD8 pathway.

    PubMed

    Larance, Mark; Kirkwood, Kathryn J; Xirodimas, Dimitris P; Lundberg, Emma; Uhlen, Mathias; Lamond, Angus I

    2012-03-01

    The NEDD8-Cullin E3 ligase pathway plays an important role in protein homeostasis, in particular the degradation of cell cycle regulators and transcriptional control networks. To characterize NEDD8-cullin target proteins, we performed a quantitative proteomic analysis of cells treated with MLN4924, a small molecule inhibitor of the NEDD8 conjugation pathway. MRFAP1 and its interaction partner, MORF4L1, were among the most up-regulated proteins after NEDD8 inhibition in multiple human cell lines. We show that MRFAP1 has a fast turnover rate in the absence of MLN4924 and is degraded via the ubiquitin-proteasome system. The increased abundance of MRFAP1 after MLN4924 treatment results from a decreased rate of degradation. Characterization of the binding partners of both MRFAP1 and MORF4L1 revealed a complex protein-protein interaction network. MRFAP1 bound to a number of E3 ubiquitin ligases, including CUL4B, but not to components of the NuA4 complex, including MRGBP, which bound to MORF4L1. These data indicate that MRFAP1 may regulate the ability of MORF4L1 to interact with chromatin-modifying enzymes by binding to MORF4L1 in a mutually exclusive manner with MRGBP. Analysis of MRFAP1 expression in human tissues by immunostaining with a MRFAP1-specific antibody revealed that it was detectable in only a small number of tissues, in particular testis and brain. Strikingly, analysis of the seminiferous tubules of the testis showed the highest nuclear staining in the spermatogonia and much weaker staining in the spermatocytes and spermatids. MRGBP was inversely correlated with MRFAP1 expression in these cell types, consistent with an exchange of MORF4L1 interaction partners as cells progress through meiosis in the testis. These data highlight an important new arm of the NEDD8-cullin pathway.

  10. SNP-SNP interaction analysis of NF-κB signaling pathway on breast cancer survival

    PubMed Central

    Jamshidi, Maral; Fagerholm, Rainer; Khan, Sofia; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Andrulis, Irene L.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Devilee, Peter; Fasching, Peter A.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Guo, Qi; Rhenius, Valerie; Cornelissen, Sten; Rudolph, Anja; Knight, Julia A.; Loehberg, Christian R.; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Flyger, Henrik; Brenner, Hermann; Holleczek, Bernd; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Dyck, Laurien Van; Nevelsteen, Ines; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Giles, Graham G.; McLean, Catriona; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Tollenaar, Rob A.E.M.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Hooning, Maartje J.; Martens, John W.M.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Simard, Jacques; Dunning, Alison M.; Easton, Douglas F.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Hall, Per; Blomqvist, Carl; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Nevanlinna, Heli

    2015-01-01

    In breast cancer, constitutive activation of NF-κB has been reported, however, the impact of genetic variation of the pathway on patient prognosis has been little studied. Furthermore, a combination of genetic variants, rather than single polymorphisms, may affect disease prognosis. Here, in an extensive dataset (n = 30,431) from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium, we investigated the association of 917 SNPs in 75 genes in the NF-κB pathway with breast cancer prognosis. We explored SNP-SNP interactions on survival using the likelihood-ratio test comparing multivariate Cox’ regression models of SNP pairs without and with an interaction term. We found two interacting pairs associating with prognosis: patients simultaneously homozygous for the rare alleles of rs5996080 and rs7973914 had worse survival (HRinteraction 6.98, 95% CI=3.3-14.4, P = 1.42E-07), and patients carrying at least one rare allele for rs17243893 and rs57890595 had better survival (HRinteraction 0.51, 95% CI=0.3-0.6, P = 2.19E-05). Based on in silico functional analyses and literature, we speculate that the rs5996080 and rs7973914 loci may affect the BAFFR and TNFR1/TNFR3 receptors and breast cancer survival, possibly by disturbing both the canonical and non-canonical NF-κB pathways or their dynamics, whereas, rs17243893-rs57890595 interaction on survival may be mediated through TRAF2-TRAIL-R4 interplay. These results warrant further validation and functional analyses. PMID:26317411

  11. Reciprocal regulatory interactions between the Notch and Ras signaling pathways in the Drosophila embryonic mesoderm.

    PubMed

    Carmena, Ana; Buff, Eugene; Halfon, Marc S; Gisselbrecht, Stephen; Jiménez, Fernando; Baylies, Mary K; Michelson, Alan M

    2002-04-15

    Convergent intercellular signals must be precisely integrated in order to elicit specific biological responses. During specification of muscle and cardiac progenitors from clusters of equivalent cells in the Drosophila embryonic mesoderm, the Ras/MAPK pathway--activated by both epidermal and fibroblast growth factor receptors--functions as an inductive cellular determination signal, while lateral inhibition mediated by Notch antagonizes this activity. A critical balance between these signals must be achieved to enable one cell of an equivalence group to segregate as a progenitor while its neighbors assume a nonprogenitor identity. We have investigated whether these opposing signals directly interact with each other, and we have examined how they are integrated by the responding cells to specify their unique fates. Our findings reveal that Ras and Notch do not function independently; rather, we have uncovered several modes of cross-talk between these pathways. Ras induces Notch, its ligand Delta, and the epidermal growth factor receptor antagonist, Argos. We show that Delta and Argos then synergize to nonautonomously block a positive autoregulatory feedback loop that amplifies a fate-inducing Ras signal. This feedback loop is characterized by Ras-mediated upregulation of proximal components of both the epidermal and fibroblast growth factor receptor pathways. In turn, Notch activation in nonprogenitors induces its own expression and simultaneously suppresses both Delta and Argos levels, thereby reinforcing a unidirectional inhibitory response. These reciprocal interactions combine to generate the signal thresholds that are essential for proper specification of progenitors and nonprogenitors from groups of initially equivalent cells.

  12. Synergistic interaction between the fibroblast growth factor and bone morphogenetic protein signaling pathways in lens cells.

    PubMed

    Boswell, Bruce A; Musil, Linda S

    2015-07-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) play a central role in two processes essential for lens transparency--fiber cell differentiation and gap junction-mediated intercellular communication (GJIC). Using serum-free primary cultures of chick lens epithelial cells (DCDMLs), we investigated how the FGF and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling pathways positively cooperate to regulate lens development and function. We found that culturing DCDMLs for 6 d with the BMP blocker noggin inhibits the canonical FGF-to-ERK pathway upstream of FRS2 activation and also prevents FGF from stimulating FRS2- and ERK-independent gene expression, indicating that BMP signaling is required at the level of FGF receptors. Other experiments revealed a second type of BMP/FGF interaction by which FGF promotes expression of BMP target genes as well as of BMP4. Together these studies reveal a novel mode of cooperation between the FGF and BMP pathways in which BMP keeps lens cells in an optimally FGF-responsive state and, reciprocally, FGF enhances BMP-mediated gene expression. This interaction provides a mechanistic explanation for why disruption of either FGF or BMP signaling in the lens leads to defects in lens development and function.

  13. Paradigms and paradox in the ethylene signaling pathway and interaction network.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiong; Guo, Hong-Wei

    2011-07-01

    Phytohormone ethylene plays pivotal roles in plant response to developmental and environmental signals. During the past few years, the emerging evidence has led us to a new understanding of the signaling mechanisms and regulatory networks of the ethylene action. In this review, we focus on the major advances made in the past three years, particularly the findings leading to new paradigms and the observations under debate. With the recent demonstration of the regulation of the protein stability of numerous key signaling components including EIN3, EIL1, EIN2, ETR2, EBF1/EBF2, and ETP1/ETP2, we highlight proteasome-dependent protein degradation as an essential regulatory mechanism that is widely adopted in the ethylene signaling pathway. We also discuss the implication of the negative feedback mechanism in the ethylene signaling pathway in light of ethylene-induced ETR2 and EBF2 gene expression. Meanwhile, we summarize the controversy on the involvement of MKK9-MPK3/6 cascade in the ethylene signaling versus biosynthesis pathway, and discuss the possible role of this MAPK module in the ethylene action. Finally, we describe the complex interactions between ethylene and other signaling pathways including auxin, light, and plant innate immunity, and propose that EIN3/EIL1 act as a convergence point in the ethylene-initiated signaling network.

  14. Consortium analysis of gene and gene-folate interactions in purine and pyrimidine metabolism pathways with ovarian carcinoma risk

    PubMed Central

    Kelemen, Linda E.; Terry, Kathryn L.; Goodman, Marc T.; Webb, Penelope M.; Bandera, Elisa V.; McGuire, Valerie; Rossing, Mary Anne; Wang, Qinggang; Dicks, Ed; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Song, Honglin; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Plisiecka-Halasa, Joanna; Timorek, Agnieszka; Menon, Usha; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Gayther, Simon A.; Ramus, Susan J.; Narod, Steven A.; Risch, Harvey A.; McLaughlin, John R.; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Glasspool, Rosalind; Paul, James; Carty, Karen; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubiński, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Cybulski, Cezary; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Massuger, Leon F. A. G.; van Altena, Anne M.; Aben, Katja K. H.; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Cramer, Daniel W.; Levine, Douglas A.; Bisogna, Maria; Giles, Graham G.; Southey, Melissa C.; Bruinsma, Fiona; Kjær, Susanne Krüger; Høgdall, Estrid; Jensen, Allan; Høgdall, Claus K.; Lundvall, Lene; Engelholm, Svend-Aage; Heitz, Florian; du Bois, Andreas; Harter, Philipp; Schwaab, Ira; Butzow, Ralf; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Leminen, Arto; Thompson, Pamela J.; Lurie, Galina; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Lambrechts, Diether; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Vergote, Ignace; Beesley, Jonathan; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B.; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Wu, Anna H.; Pearce, Celeste L.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Stram, Daniel; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Dörk, Thilo; Dürst, Matthias; Hillemanns, Peter; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Antonenkova, Natalia; Odunsi, Kunle; Edwards, Robert P.; Kelley, Joseph L.; Modugno, Francesmary; Ness, Roberta B.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Fridley, Brooke L.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Wu, Xifeng; Lu, Karen; Liang, Dong; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Iversen, Edwin S.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Krakstad, Camilla; Bjorge, Line; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Pejovic, Tanja; Bean, Yukie; Kellar, Melissa; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise A.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Campbell, Ian G.; Eccles, Diana; Whittemore, Alice S.; Sieh, Weiva; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Phelan, Catherine M.; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Goode, Ellen L.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Berchuck, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Cook, Linda S.; Le, Nhu D.

    2014-01-01

    Scope We re-evaluated previously reported associations between variants in pathways of one-carbon (folate) transfer genes and ovarian carcinoma (OC) risk, and in related pathways of purine and pyrimidine metabolism, and assessed interactions with folate intake. Methods and Results Odds ratios (OR) for 446 genetic variants were estimated among 13,410 OC cases and 22,635 controls and among 2,281 cases and 3,444 controls with folate information. Following multiple testing correction, the most significant main effect associations were for DPYD variants rs11587873 (OR=0.92, P=6x10−5) and rs828054 (OR=1.06, P=1x10−4). Thirteen variants in the pyrimidine metabolism genes, DPYD, DPYS, PPAT and TYMS, also interacted significantly with folate in a multi-variant analysis (corrected P=9.9x10−6) but collectively explained only 0.2% of OC risk. Although no other associations were significant after multiple testing correction, variants in SHMT1 in one-carbon transfer, previously reported with OC, suggested lower risk at higher folate (Pinteraction=0.03-0.006). Conclusions Variation in pyrimidine metabolism genes, particularly DPYD, which was previously reported to be associated with OC, may influence risk; however, stratification by folate intake is unlikely to modify disease risk appreciably in these women. SHMT1 SNP-byfolate interactions are plausible but require further validation. Polymorphisms in selected genes in purine metabolism were not associated with OC. PMID:25066213

  15. Can nutrient pathways and biotic interactions control eutrophication in riverine ecosystems? Evidence from a model driven mesocosm experiment.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Christoph G; Hagemann, Jeske; Borchardt, Dietrich

    2017-05-15

    Ecological theory predicts that the relative importance of benthic to planktonic primary production usually changes along the rivers' continuum from a predomination of benthic algae in lower stream orders to a predomination of planktonic algae at higher orders. Underlying mechanisms driving the interaction between algae in these habitats, its controlling factors and consequences for riverine ecosystems are, however, only partly understood. We present a mechanistic analysis of the governing ecological processes using a simplified, numerical model and examine how abiotic factors and biotic interactions influence benthic and planktonic algae by changing resource competition. We compare the outcome of the model with the results of a factorial mesocosm experiment mimicking the parameter spaces of the model. The results show a remarkable similarity with regard to the temporal development of benthic and pelagic algal biomass and shifting dominance patterns. In particular we analyse the effects of the pathways of nutrient supply (upwelling from the hyporheic zone, direct supply to the surface water, or via both pathways) and grazing in a gradient of river depths. Our results show that detachment of benthic algae, sinking of planktonic algae and the pathway of nutrient supply are key processes determining the respective algal biomass distributions particularly in shallow and intermediate deep systems. Increasing nutrient supply increases algal biomasses, but does not change the general pattern of the interactions. Decreasing light supply decreases the dominance of planktonic algae, but increases dissolved nutrients. At intermediate to high grazing rates algal biomass can be controlled by grazers, but however, at high grazing rates, dissolved nutrients accumulate in the surface water. Our results indicate that nutrient pathways, resource competition and internal control by grazing need to be considered explicitly for the understanding and explanation of eutrophication

  16. Signaling pathways regulating neuron-glia interaction and their implications in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Hong; Zheng, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes are the most abundant cells in the central nervous system. They play critical roles in neuronal homeostasis through their physical properties and neuron-glia signaling pathways. Astrocytes become reactive in response to neuronal injury and this process, referred to as reactive astrogliosis, is a common feature accompanying neurodegenerative conditions, particularly Alzheimer’s disease. Reactive astrogliosis represents a continuum of pathobiological processes and is associated with morphological, functional and gene expression changes of varying degrees. There has been a substantial growth of knowledge regarding the signaling pathways regulating glial biology and pathophysiology in recent years. Here we attempt to provide an unbiased review of some of the well-known players, namely calcium, proteoglycan, TGFβ, NFκB, and complement, in mediating neuron-glia interaction under physiological conditions as well as in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26546579

  17. 5-HT4 Receptors Constitutively Promote the Non-Amyloidogenic Pathway of APP Cleavage and Interact with ADAM10

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In addition to the amyloidogenic pathway, amyloid precursor protein (APP) can be cleaved by α-secretases, producing soluble and neuroprotective APP alpha (sAPPα) (nonamyloidogenic pathway) and thus preventing the generation of pathogenic amyloid-β. However, the mechanisms regulating APP cleavage by α-secretases remain poorly understood. Here, we showed that expression of serotonin type 4 receptors (5-HT4Rs) constitutively (without agonist stimulation) induced APP cleavage by the α-secretase ADAM10 and the release of neuroprotective sAPPα in HEK-293 cells and cortical neurons. This effect was independent of cAMP production. Interestingly, we demonstrated that 5-HT4 receptors physically interacted with the mature form of ADAM10. Stimulation of 5-HT4 receptors by an agonist further increased sAPPα secretion, and this effect was mediated by cAMP/Epac signaling. These findings describe a new mechanism whereby a GPCR constitutively stimulates the cleavage of APP by α-secretase and promotes the nonamyloidogenic pathway of APP processing. PMID:23336052

  18. Structural and Functional Characterization of a Caenorhabditis elegans Genetic Interaction Network within Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Benjamin; Lee, Anna Y.; Hallett, Michael; Jenna, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    A genetic interaction (GI) is defined when the mutation of one gene modifies the phenotypic expression associated with the mutation of a second gene. Genome-wide efforts to map GIs in yeast revealed structural and functional properties of a GI network. This provided insights into the mechanisms underlying the robustness of yeast to genetic and environmental insults, and also into the link existing between genotype and phenotype. While a significant conservation of GIs and GI network structure has been reported between distant yeast species, such a conservation is not clear between unicellular and multicellular organisms. Structural and functional characterization of a GI network in these latter organisms is consequently of high interest. In this study, we present an in-depth characterization of ~1.5K GIs in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We identify and characterize six distinct classes of GIs by examining a wide-range of structural and functional properties of genes and network, including co-expression, phenotypical manifestations, relationship with protein-protein interaction dense subnetworks (PDS) and pathways, molecular and biological functions, gene essentiality and pleiotropy. Our study shows that GI classes link genes within pathways and display distinctive properties, specifically towards PDS. It suggests a model in which pathways are composed of PDS-centric and PDS-independent GIs coordinating molecular machines through two specific classes of GIs involving pleiotropic and non-pleiotropic connectors. Our study provides the first in-depth characterization of a GI network within pathways of a multicellular organism. It also suggests a model to understand better how GIs control system robustness and evolution. PMID:26871911

  19. Photoperiodic and thermosensory pathways interact through CONSTANS to promote flowering at high temperature under short days.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Virginia; Takahashi, Yasuyuki; Le Gourrierec, José; Coupland, George

    2016-06-01

    Plants detect changes in day length to induce seasonal patterns of flowering. The photoperiodic pathway accelerates the flowering of Arabidopsis thaliana under long days (LDs) whereas it is inactive under short days (SDs), resulting in delayed flowering. This delay is overcome by exposure of plants to high temperature (27°C) under SDs (27°C-SD). Previously, the high-temperature flowering response was proposed to involve either the impaired activity of MADS-box transcription factor (TF) floral repressors or PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR 4 (PIF4) TF-mediated activation of FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT), which encodes the output signal of the photoperiodic pathway. We integrate these observations by studying several PIFs, the MADS-box SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE (SVP) and the photoperiodic pathway under 27°C-SD. We find that the mRNAs of FT and its paralogue TWIN SISTER OF FT (TSF) are increased at dusk under 27°C-SD compared with 21°C-SD, and that this requires PIF4 and PIF5 as well as CONSTANS (CO), a TF that promotes flowering under LDs. The CO and PIF4 proteins are present at dusk under 27°C-SD, and they physically interact. Although Col-0 plants flower at similar times under 27°C-SD and 21°C-LD the expression level of FT is approximately 10-fold higher under 21°C-LD, suggesting that responsiveness to FT is also increased under 27°C-SD, perhaps as a result of the reduced activity of SVP in the meristem. Accordingly, only svp-41 ft-10 tsf-1 plants flowered at the same time under 21°C-SD and 27°C-SD. Thus, we propose that under non-inductive SDs, elevated temperatures increase the activity and sensitize the response to the photoperiod pathway.

  20. Genetic loci in the photoperiod pathway interactively modulate reproductive development of winter wheat.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuwen; Carver, Brett; Yan, Liuling

    2009-05-01

    Responses to photoperiod and low temperature are the two primary adaptive mechanisms which enable wheat plants to synchronize developmental processes with changes in seasonal climate. In this study, the developmental process was characterized at two stages: stem length during the onset of stem elongation and heading date. These two developmental events were monitored and mapped in recombinant inbred lines (RILs) of a population generated from a cross between two complementary and locally adapted hard winter wheat cultivars. 'Intrada' undergoes stem elongation earlier but reaches heading later, whereas 'Cimarron' undergoes stem elongation later but reaches heading earlier. Variation in the developmental process in this population was associated with three major QTLs centered on Xbarc200 on chromosome 2B, PPD-D1 on chromosome 2D, and Xcfd14 on chromosome 7D. The Intrada Xbarc200 and Xcfd14 alleles and the Cimarron PPD-D1 allele accelerated both stem elongation and heading stages, or the Cimarron Xbarc200 and Xcfd14 alleles and the Intrada PPD-D1 allele delayed both stem elongation and heading stages. Integrative effects of the three QTLs accounted for 43% (initial stem length) and 68% (heading date) of the overall phenotypic variation in this population. PPD-D1 is a reasonable candidate gene for the QTL on chromosome 2D, PPD-B1 could be associated with the QTL on chromosome 2B, but VRN-D3 (=FT-D1) was not linked with the QTL on chromosome 7D, suggesting that this is a novel locus involved in winter wheat development. Because the PPD-D1 QTL was observed to interact with other two QTLs, all of these QTLs could play a role in the same pathway as involved in photoperiod response of winter wheat.

  1. Forest disturbance interactions and successional pathways in the Southern Rocky Mountains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu Liang,; Hawbaker, Todd J.; Zhu, Zhiliang; Xuecao Li,; Peng Gong,

    2016-01-01

    The pine forests in the southern portion of the Rocky Mountains are a heterogeneous mosaic of disturbance and recovery. The most extensive and intensive stress and mortality are received from human activity, fire, and mountain pine beetles (MPB;Dendroctonus ponderosae). Understanding disturbance interactions and disturbance-succession pathways are crucial for adapting management strategies to mitigate their impacts and anticipate future ecosystem change. Driven by this goal, we assessed the forest disturbance and recovery history in the Southern Rocky Mountains Ecoregion using a 13-year time series of Landsat image stacks. An automated classification workflow that integrates temporal segmentation techniques and a random forest classifier was used to examine disturbance patterns. To enhance efficiency in selecting representative samples at the ecoregion scale, a new sampling strategy that takes advantage of the scene-overlap among adjacent Landsat images was designed. The segment-based assessment revealed that the overall accuracy for all 14 scenes varied from 73.6% to 92.5%, with a mean of 83.1%. A design-based inference indicated the average producer’s and user’s accuracies for MPB mortality were 85.4% and 82.5% respectively. We found that burn severity was largely unrelated to the severity of pre-fire beetle outbreaks in this region, where the severity of post-fire beetle outbreaks generally decreased in relation to burn severity. Approximately half the clear-cut and burned areas were in various stages of recovery, but the regeneration rate was much slower for MPB-disturbed sites. Pre-fire beetle outbreaks and subsequent fire produced positive compound effects on seedling reestablishment in this ecoregion. Taken together, these results emphasize that although multiple disturbances do play a role in the resilience mechanism of the serotinous lodgepole pine, the overall recovery could be slow due to the vast area of beetle mortality.

  2. Direct molecular interactions between Beclin 1 and the canonical NFκB activation pathway.

    PubMed

    Niso-Santano, Mireia; Criollo, Alfredo; Malik, Shoaib Ahmad; Michaud, Michael; Morselli, Eugenia; Mariño, Guillermo; Lachkar, Sylvie; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Maiuri, Maria Chaira; Kroemer, Guido

    2012-02-01

    General (macro)autophagy and the activation of NFκB constitute prominent responses to a large array of intracellular and extracellular stress conditions. The depletion of any of the three subunits of the inhibitor of NFκB (IκB) kinase (IKKα, IKKβ, IKKγ/NEMO), each of which is essential for the canonical NFκB activation pathway, limits autophagy induction by physiological or pharmacological triggers, while constitutive active IKK subunits suffice to stimulate autophagy. The activation of IKK usually relies on TGFβ-activated kinase 1 (TAK1), which is also necessary for the optimal induction of autophagy in multiple settings. TAK1 interacts with two structurally similar co-activators, TAK1-binding proteins 2 and 3 (TAB2 and TAB3). Importantly, in resting conditions both TAB2 and TAB3 bind the essential autophagic factor Beclin 1, but not TAK1. In response to pro-autophagic stimuli, TAB2 and TAB3 dissociate from Beclin 1 and engage in stimulatory interactions with TAK1. The inhibitory interaction between TABs and Beclin 1 is mediated by their coiled-coil domains (CCDs). Accordingly, the overexpression of either TAB2 or TAB3 CCD stimulates Beclin 1- and TAK1-dependent autophagy. These results point to the existence of a direct molecular crosstalk between the canonical NFκB activation pathway and the autophagic core machinery that guarantees the coordinated induction of these processes in response to stress.

  3. Interaction of biologically active amines with mitochondria and their role in the mitochondrial-mediated pathway of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Toninello, A; Salvi, M; Mondovì, B

    2004-09-01

    The natural polyamines spermine, spermidine and putrescine, polycationic molecules at physiological pH, interact with mitochondrial membranes at two specific binding sites exhibiting low affinity and high binding capacity. This binding represents the first step in the electrophoretic mechanism of polyamine transport into mitochondria. Spermine accumulated into the mitochondrial matrix is able to flow out by an electroneutral mechanism. This process promotes bi-directional transport of polyamines in and out of mitochondria, driven by electrical potential and pH gradient, respectively. Polyamines and biogenic amines are oxidized by cytosolic and mitochondrial amine oxidases with the production of hydrogen peroxide and aldehydes, both of which are involved in the induction and/or amplification of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT). This phenomenon, which provokes a bioenergetic collapse and redox catastrophe, is strongly inhibited by polyamines in isolated mitochondria. Monoamines also exhibit an inhibitory effect at higher concentrations, but at low concentrations behave as inducer agents. MPT is characterized by the opening of a channel, the transition pore, which permits non-specific bi-directional traffic of solutes across the inner membrane, leading to swelling of the organelle and release of cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factors. These proteins in turn activate the caspase-cascade, which triggers the apoptotic pathway. Depending on their cytosolic concentration, metabolic conditions and cell type, polyamines act as promoting, modulating or protective agents in mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis. While their protective effect could reflect inhibition of MPT and retention of cytochrome c, the promoting effect can be explained by the generation of reactive oxygen species that induce the opposite effect on MPT and cytochrome c release. Polyamines and other active amines can also participate in the regulation of apoptotic pathways by interacting with

  4. Solar wind-magnetosphere interaction: energy transfer pathways and their predictability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassiliadis, D.

    2001-09-01

    The coupling of the solar wind to planets has been studied for several decades now. Much of the recent progress in understanding the complexity of the interaction is due to the variability of the magnetospheres in the solar system. The interaction with the terrestrial system is evidently the best known, although by far not the simplest one. The geospace and the surrounding solar wind constitute an input-output system where the various parts of the energy budget are measured simultaneously by a fleet of spacecraft. We integrate these measurements by combining plasma physics and simulation models with system analysis methods. The large-scale energy transfer is dominated by magnetic reconnection and its effects which supply electromagnetic and kinetic energy at the rate of ~10^15 W to the magnetosphere with part of it eventually dissipating at the ionospheric boundary. The storage-release of magnetic energy and its transformation to kinetic energy takes place continually through convection and more explosively during magnetospheric substorms. Long known from its effects, ranging from auroral displays to the more recent disruptions of electric power grid operation, this interaction involves many spatial and temporal pathways: The overall disturbance levels are represented by regional and global magnetic indices. Index time series were the first to be reproduced accurately by nonlinear dynamical systems driven by solar wind parameter data. The models have subsequently been used in prediction of the indices based on real-time interplanetary field and plasma parameters from the ACE and WIND spacecraft (http://lep694.gsfc.nasa.gov/RTSM/). The model time scales represent the physical responses, namely the directly driven convection and the less predictable substorm. Currently the approach has been extended to modeling the spatial distribution as well as temporal variations. Data from ground magnetometer arrays have replaced the scalar indices to provide magnetic field maps

  5. Sharing, liking, commenting, and distressed? The pathway between Facebook interaction and psychological distress.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenhong; Lee, Kye-Hyoung

    2013-10-01

    Studies on the mental health implications of social media have generated mixed results. Drawing on a survey of college students (N=513), this research uses structural equation modeling to assess the relationship between Facebook interaction and psychological distress and two underlying mechanisms: communication overload and self-esteem. It is the first study, to our knowledge, that examines how communication overload mediates the mental health implications of social media. Frequent Facebook interaction is associated with greater distress directly and indirectly via a two-step pathway that increases communication overload and reduces self-esteem. The research sheds light on new directions for understanding psychological well-being in an increasingly mediated social world as users share, like, and comment more and more.

  6. The cannabinoid CB1 receptor and mTORC1 signalling pathways interact to modulate glucose homeostasis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Bermudez-Silva, Francisco J.; Romero-Zerbo, Silvana Y.; Haissaguerre, Magalie; Ruz-Maldonado, Inmaculada; Lhamyani, Said; El Bekay, Rajaa; Tabarin, Antoine; Marsicano, Giovanni; Cota, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is an intercellular signalling mechanism that is present in the islets of Langerhans and plays a role in the modulation of insulin secretion and expansion of the β-cell mass. The downstream signalling pathways mediating these effects are poorly understood. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signalling is a key intracellular pathway involved in energy homeostasis and is known to importantly affect the physiology of pancreatic islets. We investigated the possible relationship between cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor signalling and the mTORC1 pathway in the endocrine pancreas of mice by using pharmacological analysis as well as mice genetically lacking the CB1 receptor or the downstream target of mTORC1, the kinase p70S6K1. In vitro static secretion experiments on islets, western blotting, and in vivo glucose and insulin tolerance tests were performed. The CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant decreased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) at 0.1 µM while increasing phosphorylation of p70S6K1 and ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) within the islets. Specific pharmacological blockade of mTORC1 by 3 nM rapamycin, as well as genetic deletion of p70S6K1, impaired the CB1-antagonist-mediated decrease in GSIS. In vivo experiments showed that 3 mg/kg body weight rimonabant decreased insulin levels and induced glucose intolerance in lean mice without altering peripheral insulin sensitivity; this effect was prevented by peripheral administration of low doses of rapamycin (0.1 mg/kg body weight), which increased insulin sensitivity. These findings suggest a functional interaction between the ECS and the mTORC1 pathway within the endocrine pancreas and at the whole-organism level, which could have implications for the development of new therapeutic approaches for pancreatic β-cell diseases. PMID:26563389

  7. Interaction of PACAP with Sonic hedgehog reveals complex regulation of the hedgehog pathway by PKA.

    PubMed

    Niewiadomski, Pawel; Zhujiang, Annie; Youssef, Mary; Waschek, James A

    2013-11-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling is essential for proliferation of cerebellar granule cell progenitors (cGCPs) and its aberrant activation causes a cerebellar cancer medulloblastoma. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) inhibits Shh-driven proliferation of cGCPs and acts as tumor suppressor in murine medulloblastoma. We show that PACAP blocks canonical Shh signaling by a mechanism that involves activation of protein kinase A (PKA) and inhibition of the translocation of the Shh-dependent transcription factor Gli2 into the primary cilium. PKA is shown to play an essential role in inhibiting gene transcription in the absence of Shh, but global PKA activity levels are found to be a poor predictor of the degree of Shh pathway activation. We propose that the core Shh pathway regulates a small compartmentalized pool of PKA in the vicinity of primary cilia. GPCRs that affect global PKA activity levels, such as the PACAP receptor, cooperate with the canonical Shh signal to regulate Gli protein phosphorylation by PKA. This interaction serves to fine-tune the transcriptional and physiological function of the Shh pathway.

  8. Detecting Pathway-Based Gene-Gene and Gene-Environment Interactions in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Duell, Eric J.; Bracci, Paige M.; Moore, Jason H.; Burk, Robert D.; Kelsey, Karl T.; Holly, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Data mining and data reduction methods to detect interactions in epidemiologic data are being developed and tested. In these analyses, multifactor dimensionality reduction, focused interaction testing framework, and traditional logistic regression models were used to identify potential interactions with up to three factors. These techniques were used in a population-based case-control study of pancreatic cancer from the San Francisco Bay Area (308 cases, 964 controls). From 7 biochemical pathways, along with tobacco smoking, 26 polymorphisms in 20 genes were included in these analyses. Combinations of genetic markers and cigarette smoking were identified as potential risk factors for pancreatic cancer, including genes in base excision repair (OGG1), nucleotide excision repair (XPD, XPA, XPC), and double-strand break repair (XRCC3). XPD.751, XPD.312, and cigarette smoking were the best single-factor predictors of pancreatic cancer risk, whereas XRCC3.241*smoking and OGG1.326*XPC.PAT were the best two-factor predictors. There was some evidence for a three-factor combination of OGG1.326*XPD.751*smoking, but the covariate-adjusted relative-risk estimates lacked precision. Multifactor dimensionality reduction and focused interaction testing framework showed little concordance, whereas logistic regression allowed for covariate adjustment and model confirmation. Our data suggest that multiple common alleles from DNA repair pathways in combination with cigarette smoking may increase the risk for pancreatic cancer, and that multiple approaches to data screening and analysis are necessary to identify potentially new risk factor combinations. PMID:18559563

  9. Pathways from parental AIDS to child psychological, educational and sexual risk: developing an empirically-based interactive theoretical model.

    PubMed

    Cluver, Lucie; Orkin, Mark; Boyes, Mark E; Sherr, Lorraine; Makasi, Daphne; Nikelo, Joy

    2013-06-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates negative psychological, health, and developmental outcomes for children associated with parental HIV/AIDS illness and death. However, little is known about how parental AIDS leads to negative child outcomes. This study used a structural equation modelling approach to develop an empirically-based theoretical model of interactive relationships between parental or primary caregiver AIDS-illness, AIDS-orphanhood and predicted intervening factors associated with children's psychological distress, educational access and sexual health. Cross-sectional data were collected in 2009-2011, from 6002 children aged 10-17 years in three provinces of South Africa using stratified random sampling. Comparison groups included children orphaned by AIDS, orphaned by other causes and non-orphans, and children whose parents or primary caregivers were unwell with AIDS, unwell with other causes or healthy. Participants reported on psychological symptoms, educational access, and sexual health risks, as well as hypothesized sociodemographic and intervening factors. In order to build an interactive theoretical model of multiple child outcomes, multivariate regression and structural equation models were developed for each individual outcome, and then combined into an overall model. Neither AIDS-orphanhood nor parental AIDS-illness were directly associated with psychological distress, educational access, or sexual health. Instead, significant indirect effects of AIDS-orphanhood and parental AIDS-illness were obtained on all measured outcomes. Child psychological, educational and sexual health risks share a common set of intervening variables including parental disability, poverty, community violence, stigma, and child abuse that together comprise chain effects. In all models, parental AIDS-illness had stronger effects and more risk pathways than AIDS-orphanhood, especially via poverty and parental disability. AIDS-orphanhood and parental AIDS-illness impact

  10. Non-equilibrium colloidal assembly pathways via synergistic dipolar, depletion, and hydrodynamic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlan, Anna; Bevan, Michael

    The ability to assemble nano- and micro- colloidal particles into ordered materials and controllable devices provides the basis for emerging technologies. However, current capabilities for manipulating colloidal assembly are limited by the degree of order, time to generate/reconfigure structures, and scalability to large areas. These limitations are due to problems with designing, controlling, and optimizing the thermodynamics and kinetics of colloidal assembly. Our approach is to provide viable non-equilibrium pathways for rapid assembly of defect free colloidal crystals using combinations of magnetic field and depletion mediated assembly. Results include video microscopy experiments and Stokesian Dynamic computer simulations of superparamagnetic colloidal particles experiencing depletion attraction in time varying magnetic fields. Findings show multi-body hydrodynamic interactions and magnetic dipole relaxation mechanisms are essential to capture assembly and annealing of attractive colloidal crystals. With the ability to measure, model and tune colloidal interactions and dynamics, we demonstrate the use of time varying fields to manipulate non-equilibrium pathways for the assembly, disassembly, and repair of colloidal microstructures.

  11. Interactions between Melanin Enzymes and Their Atypical Recruitment to the Secretory Pathway by Palmitoylation

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Srijana; Xu, Xinping

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Melanins are biopolymers that confer coloration and protection to the host organism against biotic or abiotic insults. The level of protection offered by melanin depends on its biosynthesis and its subcellular localization. Previously, we discovered that Aspergillus fumigatus compartmentalizes melanization in endosomes by recruiting all melanin enzymes to the secretory pathway. Surprisingly, although two laccases involved in the late steps of melanization are conventional secretory proteins, the four enzymes involved in the early steps of melanization lack a signal peptide or a transmembrane domain and are thus considered “atypical” secretory proteins. In this work, we found interactions among melanin enzymes and all melanin enzymes formed protein complexes. Surprisingly, the formation of protein complexes by melanin enzymes was not critical for their trafficking to the endosomal system. By palmitoylation profiling and biochemical analyses, we discovered that all four early melanin enzymes were strongly palmitoylated during conidiation. However, only the polyketide synthase (PKS) Alb1 was strongly palmitoylated during both vegetative hyphal growth and conidiation when constitutively expressed alone. This posttranslational lipid modification correlates the endosomal localization of all early melanin enzymes. Intriguingly, bioinformatic analyses predict that palmitoylation is a common mechanism for potential membrane association of polyketide synthases (PKSs) and nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) in A. fumigatus. Our findings indicate that protein-protein interactions facilitate melanization by metabolic channeling, while posttranslational lipid modifications help recruit the atypical enzymes to the secretory pathway, which is critical for compartmentalization of secondary metabolism. PMID:27879337

  12. Deciphering the biological effects of acupuncture treatment modulating multiple metabolism pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Aihua; Yan, Guangli; Sun, Hui; Cheng, Weiping; Meng, Xiangcai; Liu, Li; Xie, Ning; Wang, Xijun

    2016-02-16

    Acupuncture is an alternative therapy that is widely used to treat various diseases. However, detailed biological interpretation of the acupuncture stimulations is limited. We here used metabolomics and proteomics technology, thereby identifying the serum small molecular metabolites into the effect and mechanism pathways of standardized acupuncture treatments at 'Zusanli' acupoint which was the most often used acupoint in previous reports. Comprehensive overview of serum metabolic profiles during acupuncture stimulation was investigated. Thirty-four differential metabolites were identified in serum metabolome and associated with ten metabolism pathways. Importantly, we have found that high impact glycerophospholipid metabolism, fatty acid metabolism, ether lipid metabolism were acutely perturbed by acupuncture stimulation. As such, these alterations may be useful to clarify the biological mechanism of acupuncture stimulation. A series of differentially expressed proteins were identified and such effects of acupuncture stimulation were found to play a role in transport, enzymatic activity, signaling pathway or receptor interaction. Pathway analysis further revealed that most of these proteins were found to play a pivotal role in the regulation of multiple metabolism pathways. It demonstrated that the metabolomics coupled with proteomics as a powerful approach for potential applications in understanding the biological effects of acupuncture stimulation.

  13. Quantifying causal pathways of interactions in the complex tropical climate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runge, Jakob; Donges, Jonathan; Hlinka, Jaroslav; Jajcay, Nicola; Marwan, Norbert; Palus, Milan; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    The focus of this work is to better understand the complex interplay between different subprocesses in the climate system, especially how tropical processes such as El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), the Indian Ocean Dipole, Tropical Atlantic Variability, and the tropical monsoons affect global climate. Here a novel data-driven method is proposed based on: (1) a dimension reduction of the global surface pressure field yielding components that represent various known subprocesses such as ENSO or the North Atlantic Oscillation, (2) a causal reconstruction algorithm to detect which subprocesses are only indirectly interacting or are only spuriously correlated due to common drivers, and (3) measures to identify causal pathways in the reconstructed interaction network. Two main results will be presented: (1) an hypothesis of a mechanism by which ENSO influences the Indian Monsoon within the surface pressure field. (2) In an explorative analysis it is shown that the method correctly identifies the major regions of upwelling convergence in the tropical oceans and also regions of strong downwelling. The approach provides a novel causal interaction perspective on complex spatio-temporal systems. Reference: Runge, J., Petoukhov, V., & Kurths, J. (2014). Quantifying the strength and delay of climatic interactions: the ambiguities of cross correlation and a novel measure based on graphical models. Journal of Climate, 27(2), 720-739. doi:10.1175/JCLI-D-13-00159.1

  14. Theophylline-rifampicin interaction: non-selective induction of theophylline metabolic pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Robson, R A; Miners, J O; Wing, L M; Birkett, D J

    1984-01-01

    The effect of rifampicin pre-treatment (600 mg daily for 6 days) on theophylline disposition at steady state was investigated in six healthy males. Following rifampicin treatment total plasma clearance of theophylline increased by 82%. Theophylline clearance through each metabolic pathway was increased, 1-demethylation by (116 +/- 34%) (mean +/- s.e. mean), 3-demethylation by (91 +/- 16%) and 8-oxidation by (81 +/- 17%). Renal clearance of unchanged drug was not altered. Previous studies have suggested that two forms of cytochrome P-450 are involved in theophylline metabolism, one mediating the N-demethylations and the other 8-oxidation. Thus, unlike the selective inductive effect of rifampicin on antipyrine metabolic pathways, rifampicin does not differentially affect those forms of cytochrome P-450 involved in theophylline metabolism. The extent to which theophylline metabolism is induced by rifampicin is likely to have important clinical consequences. PMID:6487483

  15. Uncertainty quantification of effective nuclear interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Pérez, R. Navarro; Amaro, J. E.; Arriola, E. Ruiz

    2016-03-02

    We give a brief review on the development of phenomenological NN interactions and the corresponding quanti cation of statistical uncertainties. We look into the uncertainty of effective interactions broadly used in mean eld calculations through the Skyrme parameters and effective eld theory counter-terms by estimating both statistical and systematic uncertainties stemming from the NN interaction. We also comment on the role played by different tting strategies on the light of recent developments.

  16. The Clickable Guard Cell, Version II: Interactive Model of Guard Cell Signal Transduction Mechanisms and Pathways.

    PubMed

    Kwak, June M; Mäser, Pascal; Schroeder, Julian I

    2008-01-01

    Guard cells are located in the leaf epidermis and pairs of guard cells surround and form stomatal pores, which regulate CO(2) influx from the atmosphere into leaves for photosynthetic carbon fixation. Stomatal guard cells also regulate water loss of plants via transpiration to the atmosphere. Signal transduction mechanisms in guard cells integrate a multitude of different stimuli to modulate stomatal apertures. Stomata open in response to light. Stomata close in response to drought stress, elevated CO(2), ozone and low humidity. In response to drought, plants synthesize the hormone abscisic acid (ABA) that triggers closing of stomatal pores. Guard cells have become a highly developed model system for dissecting signal transduction mechanisms in plants and for elucidating how individual signaling mechanisms can interact within a network in a single cell. Many new findings have been made in the last few years. This chapter is an update of an electronic interactive chapter in the previous edition of The Arabidopsis Book (Mäser et al. 2003). Here we focus on mechanisms for which genes and mutations have been characterized, including signaling components for which there is substantial signaling, biochemical and genetic evidence. Ion channels have been shown to represent targets of early signal transduction mechanisms and provide functional signaling and quantitative analysis points to determine where and how mutations affect branches within the guard cell signaling network. Although a substantial number of genes and proteins that function in guard cell signaling have been identified in recent years, there are many more left to be identified and the protein-protein interactions within this network will be an important subject of future research. A fully interactive clickable electronic version of this publication can be accessed at the following web site: http://www-biology.ucsd.edu/labs/schroeder/clickablegc2/. The interactive clickable version includes the following

  17. Gene Interactions Provide Evidence for Signaling Pathways Involved in Cleft Lip/Palate in Humans.

    PubMed

    Velázquez-Aragón, J A; Alcántara-Ortigoza, M A; Estandia-Ortega, B; Reyna-Fabián, M E; Méndez-Adame, C D; González-Del Angel, A

    2016-10-01

    Nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL/P) is a common craniofacial birth defect that has a complex etiology. Genome-wide association studies have recently identified new loci associated with NSCL/P, but these loci have not been analyzed in a Mexican Mestizo population. A complex etiology implies the presence of genetic interactions, but there is little available information regarding this in NSCL/P, and no signaling pathway has been clearly implicated in humans. Here, we analyzed the associations of 24 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with NSCL/P in a Mexican Mestizo population (133 cases, 263 controls). The multifactorial dimensionality reduction method was used to examine gene-gene and gene-folic acid consumption interactions for the 24 SNPs analyzed in this study and for 2 additional SNPs that had previously been genotyped in the same study population. Six SNPs located in paired box 7, ventral anterior homeobox 1, sprouty RTK signaling antagonist 2, bone morphogenetic protein 4, and tropomyosin 1 genes were associated with higher risks of NSCL/P (P = 0.0001 to 0.04); 2 SNPs, 1 each in netrin 1 and V-maf avian musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog B, were associated with a lower risk of NSCL/P (P = 0.013 to 0.03); and 2 SNPs, 1 each in ATP binding cassette subfamily A member 4 (ABCA4) and noggin, showed associations with NSCL/P that approached the threshold of significance (P = 0.056 to 0.07). In addition, 6 gene-gene interactions (P = 0.0001 to 0.001) and an ABCA4-folic acid consumption interaction (P < 0.0001) were identified. On the basis of these results, combined with those of previous association studies in the literature and biological characterizations of murine models, we propose an interaction network in which interferon regulatory factor 6 plays a central role in the etiology of NSCL/P.

  18. The Hippo Pathway and YAP/TAZ-TEAD Protein-Protein Interaction as Targets for Regenerative Medicine and Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Santucci, Matteo; Vignudelli, Tatiana; Ferrari, Stefania; Mor, Marco; Scalvini, Laura; Bolognesi, Maria Laura; Uliassi, Elisa; Costi, Maria Paola

    2015-06-25

    The Hippo pathway is an important organ size control signaling network and the major regulatory mechanism of cell-contact inhibition. Yes associated protein (YAP) and transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) are its targets and terminal effectors: inhibition of the pathway promotes YAP/TAZ translocation to the nucleus, where they interact with transcriptional enhancer associate domain (TEAD) transcription factors and coactivate the expression of target genes, promoting cell proliferation. Defects in the pathway can result in overgrowth phenotypes due to deregulation of stem-cell proliferation and apoptosis; members of the pathway are directly involved in cancer development. The pharmacological regulation of the pathway might be useful in cancer prevention, treatment, and regenerative medicine applications; currently, a few compounds can selectively modulate the pathway. In this review, we present an overview of the Hippo pathway, the sequence and structural analysis of YAP/TAZ, the known pharmacological modulators of the pathway, especially those targeting YAP/TAZ-TEAD interaction.

  19. gigantea Suppresses immutans Variegation by Interactions with Cytokinin and Gibberellin Signaling Pathways1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Putarjunan, Aarthi; Rodermel, Steve

    2014-01-01

    The immutans (im) variegation mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is an ideal model to gain insight into factors that control chloroplast biogenesis. im defines the gene for PTOX, a plastoquinol terminal oxidase that participates in the control of thylakoid redox. Here, we report that the im defect can be suppressed during the late stages of plant development by gigantea (gi2), which defines the gene for GI, a central component of the circadian clock that plays a poorly understood role in diverse plant developmental processes. imgi2 mutants are late flowering and display other well-known phenotypes associated with gi2, such as starch accumulation and resistance to oxidative stress. We show that the restoration of chloroplast biogenesis in imgi2 is caused by a development-specific derepression of cytokinin signaling that involves cross talk with signaling pathways mediated by gibberellin (GA) and SPINDLY (SPY), a GA response inhibitor. Suppression of the plastid defect in imgi2 is likely caused by a relaxation of excitation pressures in developing plastids by factors contributed by gi2, including enhanced rates of photosynthesis and increased resistance to oxidative stress. Interestingly, the suppression phenotype of imgi can be mimicked by crossing im with the starch accumulation mutant, starch excess1 (sex1), perhaps because sex1 utilizes pathways similar to gi. We conclude that our studies provide a direct genetic linkage between GI and chloroplast biogenesis, and we construct a model of interactions between signaling pathways mediated by gi, GA, SPY, cytokinins, and sex1 that are required for chloroplast biogenesis. PMID:25349324

  20. Improved Protein Arrays for Quantitative Systems Analysis of the Dynamics of Signaling Pathway Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    YANG, CHIN-RANG

    2013-12-11

    Astronauts and workers in nuclear plants who repeatedly exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation (IR, <10 cGy) are likely to incur specific changes in signal transduction and gene expression in various tissues of their body. Remarkable advances in high throughput genomics and proteomics technologies enable researchers to broaden their focus from examining single gene/protein kinetics to better understanding global gene/protein expression profiling and biological pathway analyses, namely Systems Biology. An ultimate goal of systems biology is to develop dynamic mathematical models of interacting biological systems capable of simulating living systems in a computer. This Glue Grant is to complement Dr. Boothman’s existing DOE grant (No. DE-FG02-06ER64186) entitled “The IGF1/IGF-1R-MAPK-Secretory Clusterin (sCLU) Pathway: Mediator of a Low Dose IR-Inducible Bystander Effect” to develop sensitive and quantitative proteomic technology that suitable for low dose radiobiology researches. An improved version of quantitative protein array platform utilizing linear Quantum dot signaling for systematically measuring protein levels and phosphorylation states for systems biology modeling is presented. The signals are amplified by a confocal laser Quantum dot scanner resulting in ~1000-fold more sensitivity than traditional Western blots and show the good linearity that is impossible for the signals of HRP-amplification. Therefore this improved protein array technology is suitable to detect weak responses of low dose radiation. Software is developed to facilitate the quantitative readout of signaling network activities. Kinetics of EGFRvIII mutant signaling was analyzed to quantify cross-talks between EGFR and other signaling pathways.

  1. Interaction of Chlamydia trachomatis serovar L2 with the host autophagic pathway.

    PubMed

    Al-Younes, Hesham M; Brinkmann, Volker; Meyer, Thomas F

    2004-08-01

    Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular pathogens that replicate within a membrane-bound compartment (the inclusion) and are associated with important human diseases, such as trachoma, pneumonia, and atherosclerosis. We have examined the interaction of the host autophagic pathway with Chlamydia trachomatis serovar L2 by using the specific autophagosomal stain monodansylcadaverine, antibodies to autophagosome-associated markers, and traditionally used autophagic inhibitors, particularly 3-methyladenine and amino acids. Chlamydial inclusions did not sequester monodansylcadaverine, suggesting absence of fusion with autophagosomes. Interestingly, exposure of cultures infected for 19 h to 3-methyladenine or single amino acids until the end of infection (44 h) caused various degrees of abnormalities in the inclusion maturation and in the progeny infectivity. Incubation of host cells with chemicals throughout the entire period of infection modulated the growth of Chlamydia even more dramatically. Remarkably, autophagosomal markers MAP-LC3 and calreticulin were redistributed to the inclusion of Chlamydia, a process that appears to be sensitive to 3-methyladenine and some amino acids. The present data indicate the lack of autophagosomal fusion with the inclusion because it was devoid of monodansylcadaverine and no distinct rim of autophagosomal protein-specific staining around the inclusion could be observed. However, high sensitivity of Chlamydia to conditions that could inhibit host autophagic pathway and the close association of MAP-LC3 and calreticulin with the inclusion membrane still suggest a potential role of host autophagy in the pathogenesis of Chlamydia.

  2. Applied neuroanatomy elective to reinforce and promote engagement with neurosensory pathways using interactive and artistic activities.

    PubMed

    Dao, Vinh; Yeh, Pon-Hsiu; Vogel, Kristine S; Moore, Charleen M

    2015-01-01

    One in six Americans is currently affected by neurologic disease. As the United States population ages, the number of neurologic complaints is expected to increase. Thus, there is a pressing need for more neurologists as well as more neurology training in other specialties. Often interest in neurology begins during medical school, so improving education in medical neural courses is a critical step toward producing more neurologists and better neurology training in other specialists. To this end, a novel applied neuroanatomy elective was designed at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UTHSCSA) to complement the traditional first-year medical neuroscience course and promote engagement and deep learning of the material with a focus on neurosensory pathways. The elective covered four neurosensory modalities (proprioception/balance, vision, auditory, and taste/olfaction) over four sessions, each with a short classroom component and a much longer activity component. At each session, students reviewed the neurosensory pathways through structured presentations and then applied them to preplanned interactive activities, many of which allowed students to utilize their artistic talents. Students were required to complete subjective pre-course and post-course surveys and reflections. The survey results and positive student comments suggest that the elective was a valuable tool when used in parallel with the traditional medical neuroscience course in promoting engagement and reinforcement of the neurosensory material.

  3. Cellular and molecular pathways of extremely-low-frequency electromagnetic field interactions with living systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1992-06-01

    There is growing evidence that environmental electric and magnetic fields in the extremely-low-frequency (ELF) band below 300 Hz can influence biological functions by mechanisms that are only poorly understood at the present time. The primary objectives of this paper are to review the physical properties of ELF fields, their interactions with living systems at the tissue, cellular, and subcellular levels, and the key role of cell membranes ;in the transduction of signals from imposed ELF fields. Topics of discussion include signal-to-noise ratios for single cells and cell aggregates, resonance phenomena involving a combination of static and ELF magnetic fields, and the possible influence of ELF fields on molecular signaling pathways that involve membrane receptors and cytoplasmic second messengers.

  4. PRL-3 activates NF-κB signaling pathway by interacting with RAP1.

    PubMed

    Lian, Shenyi; Meng, Lin; Liu, Caiyun; Xing, Xiaofang; Song, Qian; Dong, Bin; Han, Yong; Yang, Yongyong; Peng, Lirong; Qu, Like; Shou, Chengchao

    2013-01-04

    Phosphatase of regenerating liver (PRL-3) promotes cancer metastasis through enhanced cell motility and invasiveness, however its role in tumorigenesis remains unclear. Herein, we reported that PRL-3 interacts with telomere-related protein RAP1. PRL-3 promotes the cytosolic localization of RAP1, which is counteracted by silencing of PRL-3. Immunohistochemical staining of colon cancer tissue array (n=170) revealed that high level of PRL-3 associates with cytosolic localization of RAP1 (p=0.01). Microarray analysis showed that PRL-3 regulates expression of diverse genes and enhances phosphorylation of p65 subunit of NF-κB in a RAP1-dependent manner. Furthermore, PRL-3 transcriptionally activates RAP1 expression, which is counteracted by ablating p65. Therefore, our results demonstrate PRL-3 as a novel regulator of NF-κB signaling pathway through RAP1.

  5. A Candidate-Pathway Approach to Identify Gene-Environment Interactions: Analyses of Colon Cancer Risk and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Sharafeldin, Noha; Slattery, Martha L.; Liu, Qi; Franco-Villalobos, Conrado; Caan, Bette J.; Potter, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Genetic association studies have traditionally focused on associations between individual single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and disease. Standard analysis ignores interactions between multiple SNPs and environmental exposures explaining a small portion of disease heritability: the often-cited issue of “missing heritability.” Methods: We present a novel three-step analytic framework for modeling gene-environment interactions (GEIs) between an angiogenesis candidate-gene pathway and three lifestyle exposures (dietary protein, smoking, and alcohol consumption) on colon cancer risk and survival. Logic regression was used to summarize the gene-pathway effects, and GEIs were modeled using logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards models. We analyzed data from 1541 colon cancer case patients and 1934 control subjects in the Diet, Activity and Lifestyle as a Risk Factor for Colon Cancer Study. Results: We identified five statistically significant GEIs for colon cancer risk. For risk interaction, odds ratios (ORINT) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were FLT1(rs678714) and BMP4(rs17563) and smoking (ORINT = 1.64, 95% CI = 1.11 to 2.41 and ORINT = 1.60, 95% CI = 1.10 to 2.32, respectively); FLT1(rs2387632 OR rs9513070) and protein intake (ORINT = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.03 to 2.77); KDR(rs6838752) and TLR2(rs3804099) and alcohol (ORINT = 1.53, 95% CI = 1.10 to 2.13 and ORINT = 1.59, 95% CI = 1.05 to 2.38, respectively). Three GEIs between TNF, BMP1, and BMPR2 genes and the three exposures were statistically significant at the 5% level in relation to colon cancer survival but not after multiple-testing adjustment. Conclusions: Adopting a comprehensive biologically informed candidate-pathway approach identified GEI effects on colon cancer. Findings may have important implications for public health and personalized medicine targeting prevention and therapeutic strategies. Findings from this study need to be validated in other studies. PMID:26072521

  6. Effective interactions of DNA-stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abaurrea Velasco, Clara; Likos, Christos N.; Kahl, Gerhard

    2015-09-01

    We put forward a model that allows the calculation of the effective potential of two interacting DNA-stars, i.e., three-armed, Y-shaped, charged macromolecules, built up by three intertwined single-stranded DNAs. These particles are assumed to float on a flat interface separating two media with different dielectric properties. As the only input, our model requires the charge density along the branches and the interaction between two infinitesimally short segments, along two interacting rods. With this effective interaction at hand, a detailed investigations of the self-assembly scenarios of these molecules either via computer simulations or via theoretical frameworks comes within reach.

  7. Inherited mitochondrial DNA variants can affect complement, inflammation and apoptosis pathways: insights into mitochondrial–nuclear interactions

    PubMed Central

    Cristina Kenney, M.; Chwa, Marilyn; Atilano, Shari R.; Falatoonzadeh, Payam; Ramirez, Claudio; Malik, Deepika; Tarek, Mohamed; Cáceres-del-Carpio, Javier; Nesburn, Anthony B.; Boyer, David S.; Kuppermann, Baruch D.; Vawter, Marquis; Michal Jazwinski, S.; Miceli, Michael; Wallace, Douglas C.; Udar, Nitin

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss in developed countries. While linked to genetic polymorphisms in the complement pathway, there are many individuals with high risk alleles that do not develop AMD, suggesting that other ‘modifiers’ may be involved. Mitochondrial (mt) haplogroups, defined by accumulations of specific mtDNA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) which represent population origins, may be one such modifier. J haplogroup has been associated with high risk for AMD while the H haplogroup is protective. It has been difficult to assign biological consequences for haplogroups so we created human ARPE-19 cybrids (cytoplasmic hybrids), which have identical nuclei but mitochondria of either J or H haplogroups, to investigate their effects upon bioenergetics and molecular pathways. J cybrids have altered bioenergetic profiles compared with H cybrids. Q-PCR analyses show significantly lower expression levels for seven respiratory complex genes encoded by mtDNA. J and H cybrids have significantly altered expression of eight nuclear genes of the alternative complement, inflammation and apoptosis pathways. Sequencing of the entire mtDNA was carried out for all the cybrids to identify haplogroup and non-haplogroup defining SNPs. mtDNA can mediate cellular bioenergetics and expression levels of nuclear genes related to complement, inflammation and apoptosis. Sequencing data suggest that observed effects are not due to rare mtDNA variants but rather the combination of SNPs representing the J versus H haplogroups. These findings represent a paradigm shift in our concepts of mt–nuclear interactions. PMID:24584571

  8. Notch1 Regulates Hippocampal Plasticity Through Interaction with the Reelin Pathway, Glutamatergic Transmission and CREB Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Brai, Emanuele; Marathe, Swananda; Astori, Simone; Fredj, Naila Ben; Perry, Elisabeth; Lamy, Christophe; Scotti, Alessandra; Alberi, Lavinia

    2015-01-01

    Notch signaling plays a crucial role in adult brain function such as synaptic plasticity, memory and olfaction. Several reports suggest an involvement of this pathway in neurodegenerative dementia. Yet, to date, the mechanism underlying Notch activity in mature neurons remains unresolved. In this work, we investigate how Notch regulates synaptic potentiation and contributes to the establishment of memory in mice. We observe that Notch1 is a postsynaptic receptor with functional interactions with the Reelin receptor, apolipoprotein E receptor 2 (ApoER2) and the ionotropic receptor, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). Targeted loss of Notch1 in the hippocampal CA fields affects Reelin signaling by influencing Dab1 expression and impairs the synaptic potentiation achieved through Reelin stimulation. Further analysis indicates that loss of Notch1 affects the expression and composition of the NMDAR but not AMPAR. Glutamatergic signaling is further compromised through downregulation of CamKII and its secondary and tertiary messengers resulting in reduced cAMP response element-binding (CREB) signaling. Our results identify Notch1 as an important regulator of mechanisms involved in synaptic plasticity and memory formation. These findings emphasize the possible involvement of this signaling receptor in dementia. Highlights In this paper, we propose a mechanism for Notch1-dependent plasticity that likely underlies the function of Notch1 in memory formation: Notch1 interacts with another important developmental pathway, the Reelin cascade. Notch1 regulates both NMDAR expression and composition. Notch1 influences a cascade of cellular events culminating in CREB activation. PMID:26635527

  9. Inflammation and MiR-21 pathways functionally interact to downregulate PDCD4 in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Peacock, Oliver; Lee, Andrew C; Cameron, Fraser; Tarbox, Rebecca; Vafadar-Isfahani, Natasha; Tufarelli, Cristina; Lund, Jonathan N

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation plays a direct role in colorectal cancer (CRC) progression; however the molecular mechanisms responsible for this effect are unclear. The inflammation induced cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) enzyme required for the production of Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), can promote colorectal cancer by decreasing expression of the tumour suppressor gene Programmed Cell Death 4 (PDCD4). As PDCD4 is also a direct target of the oncogene microRNA-21 (miR-21) we investigated the relationship between the COX-2 and miR-21 pathways in colorectal cancer progression. Gene expression profile in tumour and paired normal mucosa from 45 CRC patients demonstrated that up-regulation of COX-2 and miR-21 in tumour tissue correlates with worse Dukes' stage. In vitro studies in colonic adenocarcinoma cells revealed that treatment with the selective COX-2 inhibitor NS398 significantly decreased miR-21 levels (p = 0.0067) and increased PDCD4 protein levels (p<0.001), whilst treatment with PGE2 up-regulated miR-21 expression (p = 0.019) and down-regulated PDCD4 protein (p<0.05). These findings indicate that miR-21 is a component of the COX-2 inflammation pathway and that this pathway promotes worsening of disease stage in colorectal cancer by inducing accumulation of PGE2 and increasing expression of miR-21 with consequent downregulation of the tumour suppressor gene PDCD4.

  10. Partitioning the effects of an ecosystem engineer: kangaroo rats control community structure via multiple pathways.

    PubMed

    Prugh, Laura R; Brashares, Justin S

    2012-05-01

    1. Ecosystem engineers impact communities by altering habitat conditions, but they can also have strong effects through consumptive, competitive and other non-engineering pathways. 2. Engineering effects can lead to fundamentally different community dynamics than non-engineering effects, but the relative strengths of these interactions are seldom quantified. 3. We combined structural equation modelling and exclosure experiments to partition the effects of a keystone engineer, the giant kangaroo rat (Dipodomys ingens), on plants, invertebrates and vertebrates in a semi-arid California grassland. 4. We separated the effects of burrow creation from kangaroo rat density and found that kangaroo rats increased the diversity and abundance of other species via both engineering and non-engineering pathways. 5. Engineering was the primary factor structuring plant and small mammal communities, whereas non-engineering effects structured invertebrate communities and increased lizard abundance. 6. These results highlight the importance of the non-engineering effects of ecosystem engineers and shed new light on the multiple pathways by which strong-interactors shape communities.

  11. Insights into the TOR-S6K signaling pathway in maize (Zea mays L.). pathway activation by effector-receptor interaction.

    PubMed

    Garrocho-Villegas, Verónica; Aguilar C, Raúl; Sánchez de Jiménez, Estela

    2013-12-23

    The primordial TOR pathway, known to control growth and cell proliferation, has still not been fully described for plants. Nevertheless, in maize, an insulin-like growth factor (ZmIGF) peptide has been reported to stimulate this pathway. This research provides further insight into the TOR pathway in maize, using a biochemical approach in cultures of fast-growing (FG) and slow-growing (SG) calli, as a model system. Our results revealed that addition of either ZmIGF or insulin to SG calli stimulated DNA synthesis and increased the growth rate through cell proliferation and increased the rate of ribosomal protein (RP) synthesis by the selective mobilization of RP mRNAs into polysomes. Furthermore, analysis of the phosphorylation status of the main TOR and S6K kinases from the TOR pathway revealed stimulation by ZmIGF or insulin, whereas rapamycin inhibited its activation. Remarkably, a putative maize insulin-like receptor was recognized by a human insulin receptor antibody, as demonstrated by immunoprecipitation from membrane protein extracts of maize callus. Furthermore, competition experiments between ZmIGF and insulin for the receptor site on maize protoplasts suggested structural recognition of the putative receptor by either effector. These data were confirmed by confocal immunolocalization within the cell membrane of callus cells. Taken together, these data indicate that cell growth and cell proliferation in maize depend on the activation of the TOR-S6K pathway through the interaction of an insulin-like growth factor and its receptor. This evidence suggests that higher plants as well as metazoans have conserved this biochemical pathway to regulate their growth, supporting the conclusion that it is a highly evolved conserved pathway.

  12. Protein-Protein Interactions in the Yeast Pheromone Response Pathway: Ste5p Interacts with All Members of the Map Kinase Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Printen, J. A.; Sprague-Jr., G. F.

    1994-01-01

    We have used the two-hybrid system of Fields and Song to identify protein-protein interactions that occur in the pheromone response pathway of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Pathway components Ste4p, Ste5p, Ste7p, Ste11p, Ste12p, Ste20p, Fus3p and Kss1p were tested in all pairwise combinations. All of the interactions we detected involved at least one member of the MAP kinase cascade that is a central element of the response pathway. Ste5p, a protein of unknown biochemical function, interacted with protein kinases that operate at each step of the MAP kinase cascade, specifically with Ste11p (an MEKK), Ste7p (an MEK), and Fus3p (a MAP kinase). This finding suggests that one role of Ste5p is to serve as a scaffold to facilitate interactions among members of the kinase cascade. In this role as facilitator, Ste5p may make both signal propagation and signal attenuation more efficient. Ste5p may also help minimize cross-talk with other MAP kinase cascades and thus ensure the integrity of the pheromone response pathway. We also found that both Ste11p and Ste7p interact with Fus3p and Kss1p. Finally, we detected an interaction between one of the MAP kinases, Kss1p, and a presumptive target, the transcription factor Ste12p. We failed to detect interactions of Ste4p or Ste20p with any other component of the response pathway. PMID:7851759

  13. Targeting Plant Ethylene Responses by Controlling Essential Protein-Protein Interactions in the Ethylene Pathway.

    PubMed

    Bisson, Melanie M A; Groth, Georg

    2015-08-01

    The gaseous plant hormone ethylene regulates many processes of high agronomic relevance throughout the life span of plants. A central element in ethylene signaling is the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized membrane protein ethylene insensitive2 (EIN2). Recent studies indicate that in response to ethylene, the extra-membranous C-terminal end of EIN2 is proteolytically processed and translocated from the ER to the nucleus. Here, we report that the conserved nuclear localization signal (NLS) mediating nuclear import of the EIN2 C-terminus provides an important domain for complex formation with ethylene receptor ethylene response1 (ETR1). EIN2 lacking the NLS domain shows strongly reduced affinity for the receptor. Interaction of EIN2 and ETR1 is also blocked by a synthetic peptide of the NLS motif. The corresponding peptide substantially reduces ethylene responses in planta. Our results uncover a novel mechanism and type of inhibitor interfering with ethylene signal transduction and ethylene responses in plants. Disruption of essential protein-protein interactions in the ethylene signaling pathway as shown in our study for the EIN2-ETR1 complex has the potential to guide the development of innovative ethylene antagonists for modern agriculture and horticulture.

  14. Pathway-Dependent Effectiveness of Network Algorithms for Gene Prioritization

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Jung Eun; Hwang, Sohyun; Lee, Insuk

    2015-01-01

    A network-based approach has proven useful for the identification of novel genes associated with complex phenotypes, including human diseases. Because network-based gene prioritization algorithms are based on propagating information of known phenotype-associated genes through networks, the pathway structure of each phenotype might significantly affect the effectiveness of algorithms. We systematically compared two popular network algorithms with distinct mechanisms – direct neighborhood which propagates information to only direct network neighbors, and network diffusion which diffuses information throughout the entire network – in prioritization of genes for worm and human phenotypes. Previous studies reported that network diffusion generally outperforms direct neighborhood for human diseases. Although prioritization power is generally measured for all ranked genes, only the top candidates are significant for subsequent functional analysis. We found that high prioritizing power of a network algorithm for all genes cannot guarantee successful prioritization of top ranked candidates for a given phenotype. Indeed, the majority of the phenotypes that were more efficiently prioritized by network diffusion showed higher prioritizing power for top candidates by direct neighborhood. We also found that connectivity among pathway genes for each phenotype largely determines which network algorithm is more effective, suggesting that the network algorithm used for each phenotype should be chosen with consideration of pathway gene connectivity. PMID:26091506

  15. Broccoli Consumption Interacts with GSTM1 to Perturb Oncogenic Signalling Pathways in the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Traka, Maria; Gasper, Amy V.; Melchini, Antonietta; Bacon, James R.; Needs, Paul W.; Frost, Victoria; Chantry, Andrew; Jones, Alexandra M. E.; Ortori, Catharine A.; Barrett, David A.; Ball, Richard Y.; Mills, Robert D.; Mithen, Richard F.

    2008-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies suggest that people who consume more than one portion of cruciferous vegetables per week are at lower risk of both the incidence of prostate cancer and of developing aggressive prostate cancer but there is little understanding of the underlying mechanisms. In this study, we quantify and interpret changes in global gene expression patterns in the human prostate gland before, during and after a 12 month broccoli-rich diet. Methods and Findings Volunteers were randomly assigned to either a broccoli-rich or a pea-rich diet. After six months there were no differences in gene expression between glutathione S-transferase mu 1 (GSTM1) positive and null individuals on the pea-rich diet but significant differences between GSTM1 genotypes on the broccoli-rich diet, associated with transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFβ1) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) signalling pathways. Comparison of biopsies obtained pre and post intervention revealed more changes in gene expression occurred in individuals on a broccoli-rich diet than in those on a pea-rich diet. While there were changes in androgen signalling, regardless of diet, men on the broccoli diet had additional changes to mRNA processing, and TGFβ1, EGF and insulin signalling. We also provide evidence that sulforaphane (the isothiocyanate derived from 4-methylsuphinylbutyl glucosinolate that accumulates in broccoli) chemically interacts with TGFβ1, EGF and insulin peptides to form thioureas, and enhances TGFβ1/Smad-mediated transcription. Conclusions These findings suggest that consuming broccoli interacts with GSTM1 genotype to result in complex changes to signalling pathways associated with inflammation and carcinogenesis in the prostate. We propose that these changes may be mediated through the chemical interaction of isothiocyanates with signalling peptides in the plasma. This study provides, for the first time, experimental evidence obtained in humans to support observational studies

  16. Learning Communities: Pathways for Educational Success and Social Transformation through Interactive Groups in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    García-Carrión, Rocío; Díez-Palomar, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Schools as learning communities have been recommended by the European Commission as an effective model to support school quality and development. Aiming at studying how these schools are achieving such positive results, this article focuses on the analysis of a particular classroom intervention called "interactive groups". A five-year…

  17. A Model of an Integrated Immune System Pathway in Homo sapiens and Its Interaction with Superantigen Producing Expression Regulatory Pathway in Staphylococcus aureus: Comparing Behavior of Pathogen Perturbed and Unperturbed Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tomar, Namrata; De, Rajat K.

    2013-01-01

    Response of an immune system to a pathogen attack depends on the balance between the host immune defense and the virulence of the pathogen. Investigation of molecular interactions between the proteins of a host and a pathogen helps in identifying the pathogenic proteins. It is necessary to understand the dynamics of a normally behaved host system to evaluate the capacity of its immune system upon pathogen attack. In this study, we have compared the behavior of an unperturbed and pathogen perturbed host system. Moreover, we have developed a formalism under Flux Balance Analysis (FBA) for the optimization of conflicting objective functions. We have constructed an integrated pathway system, which includes Staphylococcal Superantigen (SAg) expression regulatory pathway and TCR signaling pathway of Homo sapiens. We have implemented the method on this pathway system and observed the behavior of host signaling molecules upon pathogen attack. The entire study has been divided into six different cases, based on the perturbed/unperturbed conditions. In other words, we have investigated unperturbed and pathogen perturbed human TCR signaling pathway, with different combinations of optimization of concentrations of regulatory and signaling molecules. One of these cases has aimed at finding out whether minimization of the toxin production in a pathogen leads to the change in the concentration levels of the proteins coded by TCR signaling pathway genes in the infected host. Based on the computed results, we have hypothesized that the balance between TCR signaling inhibitory and stimulatory molecules can keep TCR signaling system into resting/stimulating state, depending upon the perturbation. The proposed integrated host-pathogen interaction pathway model has accurately reflected the experimental evidences, which we have used for validation purpose. The significance of this kind of investigation lies in revealing the susceptible interaction points that can take back the

  18. Construction of a protein-protein interaction network of Wilms' tumor and pathway prediction of molecular complexes.

    PubMed

    Teng, W J; Zhou, C; Liu, L J; Cao, X J; Zhuang, J; Liu, G X; Sun, C G

    2016-05-23

    Wilms' tumor (WT), or nephroblastoma, is the most common malignant renal cancer that affects the pediatric population. Great progress has been achieved in the treatment of WT, but it cannot be cured at present. Nonetheless, a protein-protein interaction network of WT should provide some new ideas and methods. The purpose of this study was to analyze the protein-protein interaction network of WT. We screened the confirmed disease-related genes using the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database, created a protein-protein interaction network based on biological function in the Cytoscape software, and detected molecular complexes and relevant pathways that may be included in the network. The results showed that the protein-protein interaction network of WT contains 654 nodes, 1544 edges, and 5 molecular complexes. Among them, complex 1 is predicted to be related to the Jak-STAT signaling pathway, regulation of hematopoiesis by cytokines, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, cytokine and inflammatory responses, and hematopoietic cell lineage pathways. Molecular complex 4 shows a correlation of WT with colorectal cancer and the ErbB signaling pathway. The proposed method can provide the bioinformatic foundation for further elucidation of the mechanisms of WT development.

  19. Plasma interactions and surface/material effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandel, M.; Chutjian, A.; Hall, W.; Leung, P.; Robinson, P.; Stevens, N. J.

    1986-01-01

    A discussion on plasma interactions and surface/material effects is summarized. The key issues in this area were: (1) the lack of data on the material properties of common spacecraft surface materials; (2) lack of understanding of the contamination and decontamination processes; and (3) insufficient analytical tools to model synergistic phenomena related to plasma interactions. Without an adequate database of material properties, accurate system performance predictions cannot be made. The interdisciplinary nature of the surface-plasma interactions area makes it difficult to plan and maintain a coherent theoretical and experimental program. The shuttle glow phenomenon is an excellent example of an unanticipated, complex interaction involving synergism between surface and plasma effects. Building an adequate technology base for understanding and predicting surface-plasma interactions will require the coordinated efforts of engineers, chemists, and physicists. An interdisciplinary R and D program should be organized to deal with similar problems that the space systems of the 21st century may encounter.

  20. Mutual interactions between flavonoids and enzymatic and transporter elements responsible for flavonoid disposition via phase II metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wen; Hu, Ming

    2012-09-21

    Flavonoids, existing mainly as glycosides in nature, have multiple "claimed" beneficial effects in humans. Flavonoids are extensively metabolized in enterocytes and hepatocytes by phase II enzymes such as UGTs and SULTs to form glucuronides and sulfates, respectively. These glucuronides and sulfates are subsequently excreted via ABC transporters (e.g., MRP2 or BCRP). Therefore, it is the interplay between phase II enzymes and efflux transporters that affects the disposition of flavonoids and leads to the low bioavailability of flavonoid aglycones. Flavonoids can also serve as chemical regulators that affect the activity or expression levels of phase II enzymes including UGTs, SULTs and GSTs, and transporters including P-gp, MRP2, BCRP, OATP and OAT. In general, flavonoids may exert the inhibitory or inductive effects on the phase II enzymes and transporters via multiple mechanisms that may involve different nuclear receptors. Since flavonoids may affect the metabolic pathways shared by many important clinical drugs, drug-flavonoid interaction is becoming an increasingly important concern. This review article focused on the disposition of flavonoids and effects of flavonoids on relevant enzymes (e.g. UGTs and SULTs) and transporters (e.g. MRP2 and BCRP) involved in the interplay between phase II enzymes and efflux transporters. The effects of flavonoids on other metabolic enzymes (e.g. GSTs) or transporters (e.g. P-gp, OATP and OAT) are also addressed but that is not the emphasis of this review.

  1. Mutual interactions between flavonoids and enzymatic and transporter elements responsible for flavonoid disposition via phase II metabolic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wen; Hu, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Flavonoids, existing mainly as glycosides in nature, have multiple “claimed” beneficial effects in humans. Flavonoids are extensively metabolized in enterocytes and hepatocytes by phase II enzymes such as UGTs and SULTs to form glucuronides and sulfates, respectively. These glucuronides and sulfates are subsequently excreted via ABC transporters (e.g., MRP2 or BCRP). Therefore, it is the interplay between phase II enzymes and efflux transporters that affects the disposition of flavonoids and leads to the low bioavailability of flavonoid aglycones. Flavonoids can also serve as chemical regulators that affect the activity or expression levels of phase II enzymes including UGTs, SULTs and GSTs, and transporters including P-gp, MRP2, BCRP, OATP and OAT. In general, flavonoids may exert the inhibitory or inductive effects on the phase II enzymes and transporters via multiple mechanisms that may involve different nuclear receptors. Since flavonoids may affect the metabolic pathways shared by many important clinical drugs, drug-flavonoid interaction is becoming an increasingly important concern. This review article focused on the disposition of flavonoids and effects of flavonoids on relevant enzymes (e.g. UGTs and SULTs) and transporters (e.g. MRP2 and BCRP) involved in the interplay between phase II enzymes and efflux transporters. The effects of flavonoids on other metabolic enzymes (e.g. GSTs) or transporters (e.g. P-gp, OATP and OAT) are also addressed but that is not the emphasis of this review. PMID:25400909

  2. Technology Improvement Pathways to Cost-Effective Vehicle Electrification

    SciTech Connect

    Brooker, A.; Thornton, M.; Rugh, J. P.

    2010-04-01

    Electrifying transportation can reduce or eliminate dependence on foreign fuels, emission of green house gases, and emission of pollutants. One challenge is finding a pathway for vehicles that gains wide market acceptance to achieve a meaningful benefit. This paper evaluates several approaches aimed at making plug-in electric vehicles (EV) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) cost-effective including opportunity charging, replacing the battery over the vehicle life, improving battery life, reducing battery cost, and providing electric power directly to the vehicle during a portion of its travel. Many combinations of PHEV electric range and battery power are included. For each case, the model accounts for battery cycle life and the national distribution of driving distances to size the battery optimally. Using the current estimates of battery life and cost, only the dynamically plugged-in pathway was cost-effective to the consumer. Significant improvements in battery life and battery cost also made PHEVs more cost-effective than today's hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and conventional internal combustion engine vehicles (CVs).

  3. HIV’s Nef Interacts with β-Catenin of the Wnt Signaling Pathway in HEK293 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Weiser, Keren; Barton, Meredith; Gershoony, Dafna; DasGupta, Ramanuj; Cardozo, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway is implicated in major physiologic cellular functions, such as proliferation, migration, cell fate specification, maintenance of pluripotency and induction of tumorigenicity. Proliferation and migration are important responses of T-cells, which are major cellular targets of HIV infection. Using an informatics screen, we identified a previously unsuspected interaction between HIV’s Nef protein and β-catenin, a key component of the Wnt pathway. A segment in Nef contains identical amino acids at key positions and structurally mimics the β-catenin binding sites on endogenous β-catenin ligands. The interaction between Nef and β-catenin was confirmed in vitro and in a co-immunoprecipitation from HEK293 cells. Moreover, the introduction of Nef into HEK293 cells specifically inhibited a Wnt pathway reporter. PMID:24130899

  4. From a Subtractive to Multiplicative Approach: A Concept-Driven Interactive Pathway on the Selective Absorption of Light

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viennot, Laurence; de Hosson, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    This research documents the aims and the impact of a teaching experiment on how the absorption of light depends on the thickness of the absorbing medium. This teaching experiment is more specifically characterized as bringing to bear a "concept-driven interactive pathway". It is designed to make students analyse the absorption of light…

  5. Emory University: High-Throughput Protein-Protein Interaction Analysis for Hippo Pathway Profiling | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The CTD2 Center at Emory University used high-throughput protein-protein interaction (PPI) mapping for Hippo signaling pathway profiling to rapidly unveil promising PPIs as potential therapeutic targets and advance functional understanding of signaling circuitry in cells. Read the abstract.

  6. Wnt/β-Catenin and Sonic Hedgehog Pathways Interact in the Regulation of the Development of the Dorsal Mesenchymal Protrusion

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, Laura E.; Burns, Tara A.; Lockhart, Marie M.; Phelps, Aimee L.; Van den Hoff, Maurice J.B.; Wessels, Andy

    2016-01-01

    Background The dorsal mesenchymal protrusion (DMP) is a second heart field (SHF) derived tissue involved in cardiac septation. Molecular mechanisms controlling SHF/DMP development include the Bone Morphogenetic Protein and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways. Reduced expression of components in these pathways leads to inhibition of proliferation of the SHF/DMP precursor population and failure of the DMP to develop. While the Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) pathway has also been demonstrated to be critically important for SHF/DMP development and atrioventricular septation, its role in the regulation of SHF proliferation is contentious. Results Tissue-specific deletion of the Shh receptor Smoothened from the SHF resulted in compromised DMP formation and atrioventricular septal defects (AVSDs). Immunohistochemical analysis at critical stages of DMP development showed significant proliferation defect as well as reduction in levels of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway-intermediates β-catenin, Lef1, and Axin2. To determine whether the defects seen in the conditional Smoothened knock-out mouse could be attributed to reduced Wnt/β-catenin signaling, LiCl, a pharmacological activator of this Wnt/β-catenin pathway, was administered. This resulted in restoration of proliferation and partial rescue of the AVSD phenotype. Conclusions The data presented suggest that the Wnt/β-catenin pathway interact with the Shh pathway in the regulation of SHF/DMP-precursor proliferation and, hence, the development of the DMP. PMID:26297872

  7. Nectin-4 Co-stimulates the Prolactin Receptor by Interacting with SOCS1 and Inhibiting Its Activity on the JAK2-STAT5a Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Maruoka, Masahiro; Kedashiro, Shin; Ueda, Yuki; Mizutani, Kiyohito; Takai, Yoshimi

    2017-03-03

    Cell surface cytokine receptors are regulated by their cis-interacting stimulatory and inhibitory co-receptors. We previously showed that the immunoglobulin-like cell adhesion molecule nectin-4 cis-interacts with the prolactin receptor through the extracellular region and stimulates prolactin-induced prolactin receptor activation and signaling, resulting in alveolar development in the mouse mammary gland. However, it remains unknown how this interaction stimulates these effects. We show here that the cis-interaction of the extracellular region of nectin-4 with the prolactin receptor was not sufficient for eliciting these effects and that nectin-4's cytoplasmic region was also required for eliciting these effects. The cytoplasmic region of nectin-4 directly interacted with suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) 1, but not SOCS3, JAK2, or STAT5a, and inhibited SOCS1's interaction with JAK2, eventually resulting in the increased phosphorylation of STAT5a. The juxtamembrane region of nectin-4 interacts with the Src homology 2 domain of SOCS1. Both the interactions of nectin-4 with the extracellular region of the prolactin receptor and the interactions of SOCS1 with nectin-4's cytoplasmic region were required for the stimulatory effect of nectin-4 on the prolactin-induced prolactin receptor activation. The third immunoglobulin-like domain of nectin-4 and the second fibronectin type-III domain of the prolactin receptor were involved in this cis-interaction, and both the extracellular and transmembrane regions of nectin-4 and the prolactin receptor were required for this direct interaction. These results indicate that nectin-4 serves as a stimulatory co-receptor for the prolactin receptor by regulating the feedback inhibition of SOCS1 in the JAK2-STAT5a signaling pathway.

  8. Effects of an invasive plant transcend ecosystem boundaries through a dragonfly-mediated trophic pathway.

    PubMed

    Burkle, Laura A; Mihaljevic, Joseph R; Smith, Kevin G

    2012-12-01

    Trophic interactions can strongly influence the structure and function of terrestrial and aquatic communities through top-down and bottom-up processes. Species with life stages in both terrestrial and aquatic systems may be particularly likely to link the effects of trophic interactions across ecosystem boundaries. Using experimental wetlands planted with purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria), we tested the degree to which the bottom-up effects of floral density of this invasive plant could trigger a chain of interactions, changing the behavior of terrestrial flying insect prey and predators and ultimately cascading through top-down interactions to alter lower trophic levels in the aquatic community. The results of our experiment support the linkage of terrestrial and aquatic food webs through this hypothesized pathway, with high loosestrife floral density treatments attracting high levels of visiting insect pollinators and predatory adult dragonflies. High floral densities were also associated with increased adult dragonfly oviposition and subsequently high larval dragonfly abundance in the aquatic community. Finally, high-flower treatments were coupled with changes in zooplankton species richness and shifts in the composition of zooplankton communities. Through changes in animal behavior and trophic interactions in terrestrial and aquatic systems, this work illustrates the broad and potentially cryptic effects of invasive species, and provides additional compelling motivation for ecologists to conduct investigations that cross traditional ecosystem boundaries.

  9. Adhesion effects in contact interaction of solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goryacheva, Irina; Makhovskaya, Yulya

    2008-01-01

    An approach to solving problems of the interaction of axisymmetric elastic bodies in the presence of adhesion is developed. The different natures of adhesion, i.e. capillary adhesion, or molecular adhesion described by the Lennard-Jones potential are examined. The effect of additional loading of the interacting bodies outside the contact zone is also investigated. The approach is based on the representation of the pressure outside the contact zone arising from adhesion by a step function. The analytical solution is obtained and is used to analyze the influence of the form of the adhesion interaction potential, of the surface energy of interacting bodies or the films covering the bodies, their shapes (parabolic, higher power exponential function), volume of liquid in the meniscus, density of contact spots, of elastic modulus and the Poisson ratio on the characteristics of the interaction of the bodies in the presence of adhesion. To cite this article: I. Goryacheva, Y. Makhovskaya, C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  10. FOXP2 drives neuronal differentiation by interacting with retinoic acid signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Devanna, Paolo; Middelbeek, Jeroen; Vernes, Sonja C.

    2014-01-01

    FOXP2 was the first gene shown to cause a Mendelian form of speech and language disorder. Although developmentally expressed in many organs, loss of a single copy of FOXP2 leads to a phenotype that is largely restricted to orofacial impairment during articulation and linguistic processing deficits. Why perturbed FOXP2 function affects specific aspects of the developing brain remains elusive. We investigated the role of FOXP2 in neuronal differentiation and found that FOXP2 drives molecular changes consistent with neuronal differentiation in a human model system. We identified a network of FOXP2 regulated genes related to retinoic acid signaling and neuronal differentiation. FOXP2 also produced phenotypic changes associated with neuronal differentiation including increased neurite outgrowth and reduced migration. Crucially, cells expressing FOXP2 displayed increased sensitivity to retinoic acid exposure. This suggests a mechanism by which FOXP2 may be able to increase the cellular differentiation response to environmental retinoic acid cues for specific subsets of neurons in the brain. These data demonstrate that FOXP2 promotes neuronal differentiation by interacting with the retinoic acid signaling pathway and regulates key processes required for normal circuit formation such as neuronal migration and neurite outgrowth. In this way, FOXP2, which is found only in specific subpopulations of neurons in the brain, may drive precise neuronal differentiation patterns and/or control localization and connectivity of these FOXP2 positive cells. PMID:25309332

  11. Novel miRNA-mRNA interactions conserved in essential cancer pathways

    PubMed Central

    Andrés-León, Eduardo; Cases, Ildefonso; Alonso, Sergio; Rojas, Ana M.

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is a complex disease in which unrestrained cell proliferation results in tumour development. Extensive research into the molecular mechanisms underlying tumorigenesis has led to the characterization of oncogenes and tumour suppressors that are key elements in cancer growth and progression, as well as that of other important elements like microRNAs. These genes and miRNAs appear to be constitutively deregulated in cancer. To identify signatures of miRNA-mRNA interactions potentially conserved in essential cancer pathways, we have conducted an integrative analysis of transcriptomic data, also taking into account methylation and copy number alterations. We analysed 18,605 raw transcriptome samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas covering 15 of the most common types of human tumours. From this global transcriptome study, we recovered known cancer-associated miRNA-targets and importantly, we identified new potential targets from miRNA families, also analysing the phenotypic outcomes of these genes/mRNAs in terms of survival. Further analyses could lead to novel approaches in cancer therapy. PMID:28387377

  12. How does the Royal Family of Tudor rule the PIWI-interacting RNA pathway?

    PubMed Central

    Siomi, Mikiko C.; Mannen, Taro; Siomi, Haruhiko

    2010-01-01

    PIWI (P-element-induced wimpy testis) proteins are a subset of the Argonaute proteins and are expressed predominantly in the germlines of a variety of organisms, including Drosophila and mammals. PIWI proteins associate specifically with PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs), small RNAs that are also expressed predominantly in germlines, and silence transposable DNA elements and other genes showing complementarities to the sequences of associated piRNAs. This mechanism helps to maintain the integrity of the genome and the development of gametes. PIWI proteins have been shown recently to contain symmetrical dimethyl arginines (sDMAs), and this modification is mediated by the methyltransferase PRMT5 (also known as Dart5 or Capsuleen). It was then demonstrated that multiple members of the Tudor (Tud) family of proteins, which are necessary for gametogenesis in both flies and mice, associate with PIWI proteins specifically through sDMAs in various but particular combinations. Although Tud domains in Tud family members are known to be sDMA-binding modules, involvement of the Tudor family at the molecular level in the piRNA pathway has only recently come into focus. PMID:20360382

  13. Two Pathways for Water Interaction with Oxygen Adatoms on TiO2(110) Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lyubinetsky, Igor; Du, Yingge; Deskins, N. Aaron; Zhang, Zhenrong; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Dupuis, Michel

    2010-08-04

    Atomic-level investigation of the interaction of H2O with a partially re-oxidized TiO2(110) has been performed at 300 K by combining scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory. In particular, we demonstrate that oxygen adatoms (Oa), produced during O2 exposure of reduced TiO2(110) surfaces, alter water dissociation/ recombination chemistry through two different pathways. When H2O diffuses to Oa on the same Ti row, it becomes trapped near the Oa, exchanges a proton easily to dissociate and form a pair of terminal hydroxyls (OHt) along the row, which can then readily recombine and re-dissociate many times or overcome the barrier to move away. When H2O passes along the Oa on an adjacent row, an across-row proton transfer facilitated by the bridging O atom results in spontaneous dissociation of H2O on a Ti trough leading to the formation of a stable across-row OHt pair, which after awhile can recombine and H2O diffuses away. The across-row process has not been reported previously, and it starts from a ‘‘pseudo-dissociated’’ state of water. We also show how the H2O dissociation and OHt pair statistical reformation induce an apparent along- or across-row shift of Oa as a result of the oxygen scrambling process between H2O and Oa.

  14. Frontal-Brainstem Pathways Mediating Placebo Effects on Social Rejection.

    PubMed

    Koban, Leonie; Kross, Ethan; Woo, Choong-Wan; Ruzic, Luka; Wager, Tor D

    2017-03-29

    Placebo treatments can strongly affect clinical outcomes, but research on how they shape other life experiences and emotional well-being is in its infancy. We used fMRI in humans to examine placebo effects on a particularly impactful life experience, social pain elicited by a recent romantic rejection. We compared these effects with placebo effects on physical (heat) pain, which are thought to depend on pathways connecting prefrontal cortex and periaqueductal gray (PAG). Placebo treatment, compared with control, reduced both social and physical pain, and increased activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) in both modalities. Placebo further altered the relationship between affect and both dlPFC and PAG activity during social pain, and effects on behavior were mediated by a pathway connecting dlPFC to the PAG, building on recent work implicating opioidergic PAG activity in the regulation of social pain. These findings suggest that placebo treatments reduce emotional distress by altering affective representations in frontal-brainstem systems.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Placebo effects are improvements due to expectations and the socio-medical context in which treatment takes place. Whereas they have been extensively studied in the context of somatic conditions such as pain, much less is known of how treatment expectations shape the emotional experience of other important stressors and life events. Here, we use brain imaging to show that placebo treatment reduces the painful feelings associated with a recent romantic rejection by recruiting a prefrontal-brainstem network and by shifting the relationship between brain activity and affect. Our findings suggest that this brain network may be important for nonspecific treatment effects across a wide range of therapeutic approaches and mental health conditions.

  15. Identification of shared and unique susceptibility pathways among cancers of the lung, breast, and prostate from genome-wide association studies and tissue-specific protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Qian, David C.; Byun, Jinyoung; Han, Younghun; Greene, Casey S.; Field, John K.; Hung, Rayjean J.; Brhane, Yonathan; Mclaughlin, John R.; Fehringer, Gordon; Landi, Maria Teresa; Rosenberger, Albert; Bickeböller, Heike; Malhotra, Jyoti; Risch, Angela; Heinrich, Joachim; Hunter, David J.; Henderson, Brian E.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Seminara, Daniela; Amos, Christopher I.

    2015-01-01

    Results from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have indicated that strong single-gene effects are the exception, not the rule, for most diseases. We assessed the joint effects of germline genetic variations through a pathway-based approach that considers the tissue-specific contexts of GWAS findings. From GWAS meta-analyses of lung cancer (12 160 cases/16 838 controls), breast cancer (15 748 cases/18 084 controls) and prostate cancer (14 160 cases/12 724 controls) in individuals of European ancestry, we determined the tissue-specific interaction networks of proteins expressed from genes that are likely to be affected by disease-associated variants. Reactome pathways exhibiting enrichment of proteins from each network were compared across the cancers. Our results show that pathways associated with all three cancers tend to be broad cellular processes required for growth and survival. Significant examples include the nerve growth factor (P = 7.86 × 10−33), epidermal growth factor (P = 1.18 × 10−31) and fibroblast growth factor (P = 2.47 × 10−31) signaling pathways. However, within these shared pathways, the genes that influence risk largely differ by cancer. Pathways found to be unique for a single cancer focus on more specific cellular functions, such as interleukin signaling in lung cancer (P = 1.69 × 10−15), apoptosis initiation by Bad in breast cancer (P = 3.14 × 10−9) and cellular responses to hypoxia in prostate cancer (P = 2.14 × 10−9). We present the largest comparative cross-cancer pathway analysis of GWAS to date. Our approach can also be applied to the study of inherited mechanisms underlying risk across multiple diseases in general. PMID:26483192

  16. Electrostatic Interactions in the Binding Pathway of a Transient Protein Complex Studied by NMR and Isothermal Titration Calorimetry*

    PubMed Central

    Meneses, Erick; Mittermaier, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Much of our knowledge of protein binding pathways is derived from extremely stable complexes that interact very tightly, with lifetimes of hours to days. Much less is known about weaker interactions and transient complexes because these are challenging to characterize experimentally. Nevertheless, these types of interactions are ubiquitous in living systems. The combination of NMR relaxation dispersion Carr–Purcell–Meiboom–Gill (CPMG) experiments and isothermal titration calorimetry allows the quantification of rapid binding kinetics for complexes with submillisecond lifetimes that are difficult to study using conventional techniques. We have used this approach to investigate the binding pathway of the Src homology 3 (SH3) domain from the Fyn tyrosine kinase, which forms complexes with peptide targets whose lifetimes are on the order of about a millisecond. Long range electrostatic interactions have been shown to play a critical role in the binding pathways of tightly binding complexes. The role of electrostatics in the binding pathways of transient complexes is less well understood. Similarly to previously studied tight complexes, we find that SH3 domain association rates are enhanced by long range electrostatics, whereas short range interactions are formed late in the docking process. However, the extent of electrostatic association rate enhancement is several orders of magnitudes less, whereas the electrostatic-free basal association rate is significantly greater. Thus, the SH3 domain is far less reliant on electrostatic enhancement to achieve rapid association kinetics than are previously studied systems. This suggests that there may be overall differences in the role played by electrostatics in the binding pathways of extremely stable versus transient complexes. PMID:25122758

  17. Electrostatic interactions in the binding pathway of a transient protein complex studied by NMR and isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Meneses, Erick; Mittermaier, Anthony

    2014-10-03

    Much of our knowledge of protein binding pathways is derived from extremely stable complexes that interact very tightly, with lifetimes of hours to days. Much less is known about weaker interactions and transient complexes because these are challenging to characterize experimentally. Nevertheless, these types of interactions are ubiquitous in living systems. The combination of NMR relaxation dispersion Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) experiments and isothermal titration calorimetry allows the quantification of rapid binding kinetics for complexes with submillisecond lifetimes that are difficult to study using conventional techniques. We have used this approach to investigate the binding pathway of the Src homology 3 (SH3) domain from the Fyn tyrosine kinase, which forms complexes with peptide targets whose lifetimes are on the order of about a millisecond. Long range electrostatic interactions have been shown to play a critical role in the binding pathways of tightly binding complexes. The role of electrostatics in the binding pathways of transient complexes is less well understood. Similarly to previously studied tight complexes, we find that SH3 domain association rates are enhanced by long range electrostatics, whereas short range interactions are formed late in the docking process. However, the extent of electrostatic association rate enhancement is several orders of magnitudes less, whereas the electrostatic-free basal association rate is significantly greater. Thus, the SH3 domain is far less reliant on electrostatic enhancement to achieve rapid association kinetics than are previously studied systems. This suggests that there may be overall differences in the role played by electrostatics in the binding pathways of extremely stable versus transient complexes.

  18. Synergistic Neuroprotective Effects of Two Herbal Ingredients via CREB-Dependent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xu; Wang, Dongxiao; Zhao, Runqing; Dong, Xianzhe; Hu, Yuan; Liu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    As two natural oligosaccharide esters, 3,6’-Disinapoyl sucrose (DISS) and tenuifolisideA (TFSA) are originating from the root of Polygala tenuifolia Willd, a traditional Chinese medicine used in treatment of mental disorders. Previous reports have shown that both of them possess in vitro neuroprotective effects by stimulating different upstream pathways related with cyclic AMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB). In the present study, we investigated the additive neuroprotective effects of DISS and TFSA on Glu-induced damage of SY5Y cells and purposed the possible underlying mechanism. The interaction between DISS and TFSA showed a clear-cut synergistic effect as evidenced by combination index (CI). Additional evidence from biochemical (NOS activity) assays confirmed their additive inhibition on the Glu-induced NOS hyperactivation. Moreover, we showed that co-treatment of DISS and TFSA resulted in an additively up-regulated phosphorylation of CREB as well as increased expressions of CRTC1 and BDNF. Neuroprotective effects of DISS and TFSA on Glu-induced decrease in cell viability were blocked by MAPK/ERK1/2 inhibitor (U0126) and PI3-K inhibitor (LY290042). Nevertheless, the CRTC1 or BDNF expression induced by these two compounds was significantly reduced in the presence of either ERK or PI3-K inhibitor, indicating that the two oligosaccharide esters shared some common pathways in the regulation of CREB-BDNF pathway. Taken together, we, for the first time, showed that DISS and TFSA exerted the additive neuroprotective effects on CREB-BDNF signaling pathway through complementary mechanisms. PMID:27729863

  19. Cadmium and cellular signaling cascades: interactions between cell death and survival pathways.

    PubMed

    Thévenod, Frank; Lee, Wing-Kee

    2013-10-01

    Cellular stress elicited by the toxic metal Cd(2+) does not coerce the cell into committing to die from the onset. Rather, detoxification and adaptive processes are triggered concurrently, allowing survival until normal function is restored. With high Cd(2+), death pathways predominate. However, if sublethal stress levels affect cells for prolonged periods, as in chronic low Cd(2+) exposure, adaptive and survival mechanisms may deregulate, such that tumorigenesis ensues. Hence, death and malignancy are the two ends of a continuum of cellular responses to Cd(2+), determined by magnitude and duration of Cd(2+) stress. Signaling cascades are the key factors affecting cellular reactions to Cd(2+). This review critically surveys recent literature to outline major features of death and survival signaling pathways as well as their activation, interactions and cross talk in cells exposed to Cd(2+). Under physiological conditions, receptor activation generates 2nd messengers, which are short-lived and act specifically on effectors through their spatial and temporal dynamics to transiently alter effector activity. Cd(2+) recruits physiological 2nd messenger systems, in particular Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), which control key Ca(2+)- and redox-sensitive molecular switches dictating cell function and fate. Severe ROS/Ca(2+) signals activate cell death effectors (ceramides, ASK1-JNK/p38, calpains, caspases) and/or cause irreversible damage to vital organelles, such as mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER), whereas low localized ROS/Ca(2+) levels act as 2nd messengers promoting cellular adaptation and survival through signal transduction (ERK1/2, PI3K/Akt-PKB) and transcriptional regulators (Ref1-Nrf2, NF-κB, Wnt, AP-1, bestrophin-3). Other cellular proteins and processes targeted by ROS/Ca(2+) (metallothioneins, Bcl-2 proteins, ubiquitin-proteasome system, ER stress-associated unfolded protein response, autophagy, cell cycle) can evoke death or survival

  20. Interacting parallel pathways associate sounds with visual identity in auditory cortices.

    PubMed

    Ahveninen, Jyrki; Huang, Samantha; Ahlfors, Seppo P; Hämäläinen, Matti; Rossi, Stephanie; Sams, Mikko; Jääskeläinen, Iiro P

    2016-01-01

    Spatial and non-spatial information of sound events is presumably processed in parallel auditory cortex (AC) "what" and "where" streams, which are modulated by inputs from the respective visual-cortex subsystems. How these parallel processes are integrated to perceptual objects that remain stable across time and the source agent's movements is unknown. We recorded magneto- and electroencephalography (MEG/EEG) data while subjects viewed animated video clips featuring two audiovisual objects, a black cat and a gray cat. Adaptor-probe events were either linked to the same object (the black cat meowed twice in a row in the same location) or included a visually conveyed identity change (the black and then the gray cat meowed with identical voices in the same location). In addition to effects in visual (including fusiform, middle temporal or MT areas) and frontoparietal association areas, the visually conveyed object-identity change was associated with a release from adaptation of early (50-150ms) activity in posterior ACs, spreading to left anterior ACs at 250-450ms in our combined MEG/EEG source estimates. Repetition of events belonging to the same object resulted in increased theta-band (4-8Hz) synchronization within the "what" and "where" pathways (e.g., between anterior AC and fusiform areas). In contrast, the visually conveyed identity changes resulted in distributed synchronization at higher frequencies (alpha and beta bands, 8-32Hz) across different auditory, visual, and association areas. The results suggest that sound events become initially linked to perceptual objects in posterior AC, followed by modulations of representations in anterior AC. Hierarchical what and where pathways seem to operate in parallel after repeating audiovisual associations, whereas the resetting of such associations engages a distributed network across auditory, visual, and multisensory areas.

  1. Planning for effective interaction with FDA.

    PubMed

    Spurgin, Elizabeth A

    2004-12-01

    Manufacturers of diabetes devices can facilitate the formal regulatory approval process through early interaction with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Effective planning can help manage commonly perceived risks of interaction with the Agency, introduce new technologies to regulatory reviewers, and inform the manufacturer's product development strategy. This article reviews key aspects of the FDA evaluation process and suggests strategies that may facilitate effective communication with the Agency. Integrating early communication with FDA into broader product commercialization planning can streamline regulatory review and lead to early product launch into reimbursed markets.

  2. FYVE1/FREE1 Interacts with the PYL4 ABA Receptor and Mediates its Delivery to the Vacuolar Degradation Pathway.

    PubMed

    Belda-Palazon, Borja; Rodriguez, Lesia; Fernandez, Maria A; Castillo, Mari-Cruz; Anderson, Erin A; Gao, Caiji; González-Guzmán, Miguel; Peirats-Llobet, Marta; Zhao, Qiong; De Winne, Nancy; Gevaert, Kris; De Jaeger, Geert; Jiang, Liwen; Leon, Jose; Mullen, Robert T; Rodriguez, Pedro L

    2016-08-05

    Recently, we described the ubiquitylation of PYL4 and PYR1 by the RING E3 ubiquitin ligase RSL1 at the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis thaliana. This suggested that ubiquitylated ABA receptors might be targeted to the vacuolar degradation pathway because such ubiquitylation is usually an internalization signal for the endocytic route. Here, we show that FYVE1 (previously termed FREE1), a recently described component of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery, interacted with RSL1-receptor complexes and recruited PYL4 to endosomal compartments. Although the ESCRT pathway has been assumed to be reserved for integral membrane proteins, we show the involvement of this pathway in the degradation of ABA receptors, which can be associated with membranes but are not integral membrane proteins. Knock-down fyve1 alleles are hypersensitive to ABA, illustrating the biological relevance of the ESCRT pathway for the modulation of ABA signaling. In addition, fyve1 mutants are impaired in the targeting of ABA receptors for vacuolar degradation, leading to increased accumulation of PYL4 and an enhanced response to ABA. Pharmacological and genetic approaches revealed a dynamic turnover of ABA receptors from the plasma membrane to the endosomal/vacuolar degradation pathway, which was mediated by FYVE1 and was dependent on RSL1. This process involves clathrin-mediated endocytosis and trafficking of PYL4 through the ESCRT pathway, which helps to regulate the turnover of ABA receptors and attenuate ABA signaling.

  3. Deduction and Analysis of the Interacting Stress Response Pathways of Metal/Radionuclide-reducing Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jizhong; He, Zhili

    2010-02-28

    Project Title: Deduction and Analysis of the Interacting Stress Response Pathways of Metal/Radionuclide-reducing Bacteria DOE Grant Number: DE-FG02-06ER64205 Principal Investigator: Jizhong (Joe) Zhou (University of Oklahoma) Key members: Zhili He, Aifen Zhou, Christopher Hemme, Joy Van Nostrand, Ye Deng, and Qichao Tu Collaborators: Terry Hazen, Judy Wall, Adam Arkin, Matthew Fields, Aindrila Mukhopadhyay, and David Stahl Summary Three major objectives have been conducted in the Zhou group at the University of Oklahoma (OU): (i) understanding of gene function, regulation, network and evolution of Desulfovibrio vugaris Hildenborough in response to environmental stresses, (ii) development of metagenomics technologies for microbial community analysis, and (iii) functional characterization of microbial communities with metagenomic approaches. In the past a few years, we characterized four CRP/FNR regulators, sequenced ancestor and evolved D. vulgaris strains, and functionally analyzed those mutated genes identified in salt-adapted strains. Also, a new version of GeoChip 4.0 has been developed, which also includes stress response genes (StressChip), and a random matrix theory-based conceptual framework for identifying functional molecular ecological networks has been developed with the high throughput functional gene array hybridization data as well as pyrosequencing data from 16S rRNA genes. In addition, GeoChip and sequencing technologies as well as network analysis approaches have been used to analyze microbial communities from different habitats. Those studies provide a comprehensive understanding of gene function, regulation, network, and evolution in D. vulgaris, and microbial community diversity, composition and structure as well as their linkages with environmental factors and ecosystem functioning, which has resulted in more than 60 publications.

  4. Construction of gene/protein interaction networks for primary myelofibrosis and KEGG pathway-enrichment analysis of molecular compounds.

    PubMed

    Sun, C G; Cao, X J; Zhou, C; Liu, L J; Feng, F B; Liu, R J; Zhuang, J; Li, Y J

    2015-12-08

    The objective of this study was the development of a gene/protein interaction network for primary myelofibrosis based on gene expression, and the enrichment analysis of KEGG pathways underlying the molecular complexes in this network. To achieve this, genes involved in primary myelofibrosis were selected from the OMIM database. A gene/protein interaction network for primary myelofibrosis was obtained through Cytoscape with the literature mining performed using the Agilent Literature Search plugin. The molecular complexes in the network were detected by ClusterViz plugin and KEGG pathway enrichment of molecular complexes was performed using DAVID online. We found 75 genes associated with primary myelofibrosis in the OMIM database. The gene/protein interaction network of primary myelofibrosis contained 608 nodes, 2086 edges, and 4 molecular complexes with a correlation integral value greater than 4. Molecular complexes involved in KEGG pathways are related to cytokine regulation, immune function regulation, ECM-receptor interaction, focal adhesion, actin cytoskeleton regulation, cell adhesion molecules, and other biological behavior of tumors, which can provide a reliable direction for the treatment of primary myelofibrosis and the bioinformatic foundation for further understanding the molecular mechanisms of this disease.

  5. LRP4 association to bone properties and fracture and interaction with genes in the Wnt- and BMP signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Jitender; Swanberg, Maria; McGuigan, Fiona; Callreus, Mattias; Gerdhem, Paul; Akesson, Kristina

    2011-09-01

    Osteoporosis is a common complex disorder in postmenopausal women leading to changes in the micro-architecture of bone and increased risk of fracture. Members of the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) gene family regulates the development and physiology of bone through the Wnt/β-catenin (Wnt) pathway that in turn cross-talks with the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway. In two cohorts of Swedish women: OPRA (n=1002; age 75 years) and PEAK-25 (n=1005; age 25 years), eleven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from Wnt pathway genes (LRP4; LRP5; G protein-coupled receptor 177, GPR177) were analyzed for association with Bone Mineral Density (BMD), rate of bone loss, hip geometry, quantitative ultrasound and fracture. Additionally, interaction of LRP4 with LRP5, GPR177 and BMP2 were analyzed. LRP4 (rs6485702) was associated with higher total body (TB) and lumbar spine (LS) BMD in the PEAK-25 cohort (p=0.006 and 0.005 respectively), and interaction was observed with LRP5 (p=0.007) and BMP2 (p=0.004) for TB BMD. LRP4 also showed significant interaction with LRP5 for femoral neck (FN) and LS BMD in this cohort. In the OPRA cohort, LRP4 polymorphisms were associated with significantly lower fracture incidence overall (p=0.008-0.001) and fewer hip fractures (rs3816614, p=0.006). Significant interaction in the OPRA cohort was observed for LRP4 with BMP2 and GPR177 for FN BMD as well as for rate of bone loss at TB and FN (p=0.007-0.0001). In conclusion, LRP4 and interaction between LRP4 and genes in the Wnt and BMP signaling pathways modulate bone phenotypes including peak bone mass and fracture, the clinical endpoint of osteoporosis.

  6. Different forms of effective connectivity in primate frontotemporal pathways.

    PubMed

    Petkov, Christopher I; Kikuchi, Yukiko; Milne, Alice E; Mishkin, Mortimer; Rauschecker, Josef P; Logothetis, Nikos K

    2015-01-23

    It is generally held that non-primary sensory regions of the brain have a strong impact on frontal cortex. However, the effective connectivity of pathways to frontal cortex is poorly understood. Here we microstimulate sites in the superior temporal and ventral frontal cortex of monkeys and use functional magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate the functional activity resulting from the stimulation of interconnected regions. Surprisingly, we find that, although certain earlier stages of auditory cortical processing can strongly activate frontal cortex, downstream auditory regions, such as voice-sensitive cortex, appear to functionally engage primarily an ipsilateral temporal lobe network. Stimulating other sites within this activated temporal lobe network shows strong activation of frontal cortex. The results indicate that the relative stage of sensory processing does not predict the level of functional access to the frontal lobes. Rather, certain brain regions engage local networks, only parts of which have a strong functional impact on frontal cortex.

  7. Different forms of effective connectivity in primate frontotemporal pathways

    PubMed Central

    Petkov, Christopher I.; Kikuchi, Yukiko; Milne, Alice E.; Mishkin, Mortimer; Rauschecker, Josef P.; Logothetis, Nikos K.

    2015-01-01

    It is generally held that non-primary sensory regions of the brain have a strong impact on frontal cortex. However, the effective connectivity of pathways to frontal cortex is poorly understood. Here we microstimulate sites in the superior temporal and ventral frontal cortex of monkeys and use functional magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate the functional activity resulting from the stimulation of interconnected regions. Surprisingly, we find that, although certain earlier stages of auditory cortical processing can strongly activate frontal cortex, downstream auditory regions, such as voice-sensitive cortex, appear to functionally engage primarily an ipsilateral temporal lobe network. Stimulating other sites within this activated temporal lobe network shows strong activation of frontal cortex. The results indicate that the relative stage of sensory processing does not predict the level of functional access to the frontal lobes. Rather, certain brain regions engage local networks, only parts of which have a strong functional impact on frontal cortex. PMID:25613079

  8. A melanin-independent interaction between Mc1r and Met signalling pathways is required for HGF-dependent melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Wolnicka-Glubisz, Agnieszka; Strickland, Faith M.; Wielgus, Albert; Anver, Miriam; Merlino, Glenn; De Fabo, Edward C.; Noonan, Frances P.

    2014-01-01

    Melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) signaling stimulates black eumelanin production through a cAMP dependent pathway. MC1R polymorphisms can impair this process, resulting in a predominance of red phaeomelanin. The red hair, fair skin and UV sensitive phenotype is a well-described melanoma risk factor. MC1R polymorphisms also confer melanoma risk independent of pigment. We investigated the effect of Mc1r deficiency in a mouse model of UV-induced melanoma. C57BL/6-Mc1r+/+-HGF transgenic mice have a characteristic hyperpigmented black phenotype with extra-follicular dermal melanocytes located at the dermal/epidermal junction. UVB induces melanoma, independent of melanin pigmentation, but UVA-induced and spontaneous melanomas are dependent on black eumelanin. We crossed these mice with yellow C57BL/6-Mc1re/e animals which have a non-functional Mc1r and produce predominantly yellow phaeomelanin. Yellow C57BL/6-Mc1re/e-HGF mice produced no melanoma in response to UVR or spontaneously even though the HGF transgene and its receptor Met were expressed. Total melanin was less than in C57BL/6-Mc1r+/+-HGF mice, hyperpigmentation was not observed and there were few extra-follicular melanocytes. Thus, functional Mc1r was required for expression of the transgenic HGF phenotype. Heterozygous C57BL/6-Mc1re/+-HGF mice were black and hyperpigmented and, although extra-follicular melanocytes and skin melanin content were similar to C57BL/6-Mc1r+/+-HGF animals, they developed UV-induced and spontaneous melanomas with significantly less efficiency by all criteria. Thus, heterozygosity for Mc1r was sufficient to restore the transgenic HGF phenotype but insufficient to fully restore melanoma. We conclude that a previously unsuspected melanin-independent interaction between Mc1r and Met signaling pathways is required for HGF-dependent melanoma and postulate that this pathway is involved in human melanoma. PMID:24975581

  9. Allosteric pathway identification through network analysis: from molecular dynamics simulations to interactive 2D and 3D graphs.

    PubMed

    Allain, Ariane; Chauvot de Beauchêne, Isaure; Langenfeld, Florent; Guarracino, Yann; Laine, Elodie; Tchertanov, Luba

    2014-01-01

    Allostery is a universal phenomenon that couples the information induced by a local perturbation (effector) in a protein to spatially distant regulated sites. Such an event can be described in terms of a large scale transmission of information (communication) through a dynamic coupling between structurally rigid (minimally frustrated) and plastic (locally frustrated) clusters of residues. To elaborate a rational description of allosteric coupling, we propose an original approach - MOdular NETwork Analysis (MONETA) - based on the analysis of inter-residue dynamical correlations to localize the propagation of both structural and dynamical effects of a perturbation throughout a protein structure. MONETA uses inter-residue cross-correlations and commute times computed from molecular dynamics simulations and a topological description of a protein to build a modular network representation composed of clusters of residues (dynamic segments) linked together by chains of residues (communication pathways). MONETA provides a brand new direct and simple visualization of protein allosteric communication. A GEPHI module implemented in the MONETA package allows the generation of 2D graphs of the communication network. An interactive PyMOL plugin permits drawing of the communication pathways between chosen protein fragments or residues on a 3D representation. MONETA is a powerful tool for on-the-fly display of communication networks in proteins. We applied MONETA for the analysis of communication pathways (i) between the main regulatory fragments of receptors tyrosine kinases (RTKs), KIT and CSF-1R, in the native and mutated states and (ii) in proteins STAT5 (STAT5a and STAT5b) in the phosphorylated and the unphosphorylated forms. The description of the physical support for allosteric coupling by MONETA allowed a comparison of the mechanisms of (a) constitutive activation induced by equivalent mutations in two RTKs and (b) allosteric regulation in the activated and non

  10. A melanin-independent interaction between Mc1r and Met signaling pathways is required for HGF-dependent melanoma.

    PubMed

    Wolnicka-Glubisz, Agnieszka; Strickland, Faith M; Wielgus, Albert; Anver, Miriam; Merlino, Glenn; De Fabo, Edward C; Noonan, Frances P

    2015-02-15

    Melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) signaling stimulates black eumelanin production through a cAMP-dependent pathway. MC1R polymorphisms can impair this process, resulting in a predominance of red phaeomelanin. The red hair, fair skin and UV sensitive phenotype is a well-described melanoma risk factor. MC1R polymorphisms also confer melanoma risk independent of pigment. We investigated the effect of Mc1r deficiency in a mouse model of UV-induced melanoma. C57BL/6-Mc1r+/+-HGF transgenic mice have a characteristic hyperpigmented black phenotype with extra-follicular dermal melanocytes located at the dermal/epidermal junction. UVB induces melanoma, independent of melanin pigmentation, but UVA-induced and spontaneous melanomas are dependent on black eumelanin. We crossed these mice with yellow C57BL/6-Mc1re/e animals which have a non-functional Mc1r and produce predominantly yellow phaeomelanin. Yellow C57BL/6-Mc1re/e-HGF mice produced no melanoma in response to UVR or spontaneously even though the HGF transgene and its receptor Met were expressed. Total melanin was less than in C57BL/6-Mc1r+/+-HGF mice, hyperpigmentation was not observed and there were few extra-follicular melanocytes. Thus, functional Mc1r was required for expression of the transgenic HGF phenotype. Heterozygous C57BL/6-Mc1re/+-HGF mice were black and hyperpigmented and, although extra-follicular melanocytes and skin melanin content were similar to C57BL/6-Mc1r+/+-HGF animals, they developed UV-induced and spontaneous melanomas with significantly less efficiency by all criteria. Thus, heterozygosity for Mc1r was sufficient to restore the transgenic HGF phenotype but insufficient to fully restore melanoma. We conclude that a previously unsuspected melanin-independent interaction between Mc1r and Met signaling pathways is required for HGF-dependent melanoma and postulate that this pathway is involved in human melanoma.

  11. Interactions with community members and institutions: Preventive pathways for child maltreatment.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yiwen; Maguire-Jack, Kathryn

    2016-12-01

    Parents interact with their environment in important ways that may impact their ability to parent their children positively. The current study uses data from the age 3 wave of the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing study to investigate whether neighborhood processes and community participation relate to internal control, and whether these three variables are associated with child maltreatment behaviors. Using structural equation modeling, the direct and indirect effects of the environment (neighborhood disorder, social control, and social cohesion) and community participation on child maltreatment are tested. The mediating variable tested is internal control. The results show that neighborhood processes and community participation are associated with child neglect, physical child abuse, and psychological aggression but that these associations are driven through their effect on internal control.

  12. The effects on clinical coding of the critical pathway recording methodology.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Moira; Robinson, Kerin

    2004-01-01

    A two-stage study aimed to identify the effects of the critical pathway recording methodology on clinical coding practice and to determine coders' participation in pathway development. Critical pathways were found to be in widespread use, with low coder participation in pathway development and poor education on pathway data extraction. Coders favoured the traditional medical record format; private sector coders predominated amongst those who preferred to code from records containing pathways because of poor private sector clinical documentation. The documentation factors that most affected the clinical coding process were consistent with those identified previously and were primarily doctor-related.

  13. Interactions between auditory 'what' and 'where' pathways revealed by enhanced near-threshold discrimination of frequency and position.

    PubMed

    Tardif, Eric; Spierer, Lucas; Clarke, Stephanie; Murray, Micah M

    2008-03-07

    Partially segregated neuronal pathways ("what" and "where" pathways, respectively) are thought to mediate sound recognition and localization. Less studied are interactions between these pathways. In two experiments, we investigated whether near-threshold pitch discrimination sensitivity (d') is altered by supra-threshold task-irrelevant position differences and likewise whether near-threshold position discrimination sensitivity is altered by supra-threshold task-irrelevant pitch differences. Each experiment followed a 2 x 2 within-subjects design regarding changes/no change in the task-relevant and task-irrelevant stimulus dimensions. In Experiment 1, subjects discriminated between 750 Hz and 752 Hz pure tones, and d' for this near-threshold pitch change significantly increased by a factor of 1.09 when accompanied by a task-irrelevant position change of 65 micros interaural time difference (ITD). No response bias was induced by the task-irrelevant position change. In Experiment 2, subjects discriminated between 385 micros and 431 micros ITDs, and d' for this near-threshold position change significantly increased by a factor of 0.73 when accompanied by task-irrelevant pitch changes (6 Hz). In contrast to Experiment 1, task-irrelevant pitch changes induced a response criterion bias toward responding that the two stimuli differed. The collective results are indicative of facilitative interactions between "what" and "where" pathways. By demonstrating how these pathways may cooperate under impoverished listening conditions, our results bear implications for possible neuro-rehabilitation strategies. We discuss our results in terms of the dual-pathway model of auditory processing.

  14. Nuclear reaction inputs based on effective interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilaire, S.; Goriely, S.; Péru, S.; Dubray, N.; Dupuis, M.; Bauge, E.

    2016-11-01

    Extensive nuclear structure studies have been performed for decades using effective interactions as sole input. They have shown a remarkable ability to describe rather accurately many types of nuclear properties. In the early 2000s, a major effort has been engaged to produce nuclear reaction input data out of the Gogny interaction, in order to challenge its quality also with respect to nuclear reaction observables. The status of this project, well advanced today thanks to the use of modern computers as well as modern nuclear reaction codes, is reviewed and future developments are discussed.

  15. Evaluating protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks for diseases pathway, target discovery, and drug-design using 'in silico pharmacology'.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Doss C, George Priya; Chen, Luonan; Zhu, Hailong

    2014-01-01

    In silico pharmacology is a promising field in the current state-of drug discovery. This area exploits "protein-protein Interaction (PPI) network analysis for drug discovery using the drug "target class". To document the current status, we have discussed in this article how this an integrated system of PPI networks contribute to understand the disease pathways, present state-of-the-art drug target discovery and drug discovery process. This review article enhances our knowledge on conventional drug discovery and current drug discovery using in silico techniques, best "target class", universal architecture of PPI networks, the present scenario of disease pathways and protein-protein interaction networks as well as the method to comprehend the PPI networks. Taken all together, ultimately a snapshot has been discussed to be familiar with how PPI network architecture can used to validate a drug target. At the conclusion, we have illustrated the future directions of PPI in target discovery and drug-design.

  16. Quercetin, a Natural Flavonoid Interacts with DNA, Arrests Cell Cycle and Causes Tumor Regression by Activating Mitochondrial Pathway of Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Shikha; Somasagara, Ranganatha R.; Hegde, Mahesh; Nishana, Mayilaadumveettil; Tadi, Satish Kumar; Srivastava, Mrinal; Choudhary, Bibha; Raghavan, Sathees C.

    2016-01-01

    Naturally occurring compounds are considered as attractive candidates for cancer treatment and prevention. Quercetin and ellagic acid are naturally occurring flavonoids abundantly seen in several fruits and vegetables. In the present study, we evaluate and compare antitumor efficacies of quercetin and ellagic acid in animal models and cancer cell lines in a comprehensive manner. We found that quercetin induced cytotoxicity in leukemic cells in a dose-dependent manner, while ellagic acid showed only limited toxicity. Besides leukemic cells, quercetin also induced cytotoxicity in breast cancer cells, however, its effect on normal cells was limited or none. Further, quercetin caused S phase arrest during cell cycle progression in tested cancer cells. Quercetin induced tumor regression in mice at a concentration 3-fold lower than ellagic acid. Importantly, administration of quercetin lead to ~5 fold increase in the life span in tumor bearing mice compared to that of untreated controls. Further, we found that quercetin interacts with DNA directly, and could be one of the mechanisms for inducing apoptosis in both, cancer cell lines and tumor tissues by activating the intrinsic pathway. Thus, our data suggests that quercetin can be further explored for its potential to be used in cancer therapeutics and combination therapy. PMID:27068577

  17. Gene-gene interactions in the folate metabolic pathway influence the risk for acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children.

    PubMed

    Petra, Bohanec Grabar; Janez, Jazbec; Vita, Dolzan

    2007-04-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common pediatric cancer. Genetic polymorphisms in the folate metabolic pathway may contribute to the susceptibility to childhood ALL because they affect the DNA synthesis, methylation and repair. We analysed common genetic polymorphisms of 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), thymidylate synthase (TS), methionine synthase (MS) and methionine synthase reductase (MTRR) in 68 children with ALL and 258 healthy controls to investigate their influence on the risk for ALL. No significant differences in frequencies of separate polymorphisms were observed between both groups. Combined MTHFR 677CT/TT and MS 2756AG/GG genotypes showed a nonsignificant tendency to reduce the risk for ALL 2.24-fold (CI: 0.191 - 1.037, P: 0.061). The risk was significantly reduced in carriers of combined MTHFR 677CT/TT, MS 2756AG/GG and MTRR 66AG/GG genotypes (OR: 0.312; CI: 0.107 - 0.907; P: 0.032). Our results suggest that gene - gene interactions that may decrease the methylation capacity might have a protective effect on the risk for childhood ALL.

  18. A Large Scale Huntingtin Protein Interaction Network Implicates Rho GTPase Signaling Pathways in Huntington Disease*♦

    PubMed Central

    Tourette, Cendrine; Li, Biao; Bell, Russell; O'Hare, Shannon; Kaltenbach, Linda S.; Mooney, Sean D.; Hughes, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by a CAG expansion in the HTT gene. Using yeast two-hybrid methods, we identified a large set of proteins that interact with huntingtin (HTT)-interacting proteins. This network, composed of HTT-interacting proteins (HIPs) and proteins interacting with these primary nodes, contains 3235 interactions among 2141 highly interconnected proteins. Analysis of functional annotations of these proteins indicates that primary and secondary HIPs are enriched in pathways implicated in HD, including mammalian target of rapamycin, Rho GTPase signaling, and oxidative stress response. To validate roles for HIPs in mutant HTT toxicity, we show that the Rho GTPase signaling components, BAIAP2, EZR, PIK3R1, PAK2, and RAC1, are modifiers of mutant HTT toxicity. We also demonstrate that Htt co-localizes with BAIAP2 in filopodia and that mutant HTT interferes with filopodial dynamics. These data indicate that HTT is involved directly in membrane dynamics, cell attachment, and motility. Furthermore, they implicate dysregulation in these pathways as pathological mechanisms in HD. PMID:24407293

  19. New paradigm in ethylene signaling: EIN2, the central regulator of the signaling pathway, interacts directly with the upstream receptors.

    PubMed

    Bisson, Melanie M A; Groth, Georg

    2011-01-01

    The membrane protein ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE2 (EIN2), which is supposed to act between the soluble serine/threonine kinase CTR1 and the EIN3/EIL family of transcription factors, is a central and most critical element of the ethylene signaling pathway in Arabidopsis. In a recent study, we have identified that EIN2 interacts tightly with all members of the Arabidopsis ethylene receptor family - proteins that mark the starting point of the signaling pathway. Our studies show consistently that the kinase domain of the receptors is essential for the formation of the EIN2-receptor complex. Furthermore, mutational analysis demonstrates that phosphorylation is a key mechanism in controlling the interaction of EIN2 and the ethylene receptors. Interaction studies in the presence of the ethylene agonist cyanide revealed a causal link between hormone binding and complex formation. In the presence of the plant hormone agonist the auto-kinase activity of the receptors is inhibited and the non-phosphorylated kinase domain of the receptors binds tightly to the carboxyl-terminal domain of EIN2. In the absence of cyanide inhibition of the auto-kinase activity is relieved and complex formation with the phosphorylated kinase domain of the receptors is reduced. Our data suggest a novel model on the integration of EIN2 in the ethylene signaling pathway.

  20. Effective Interactions from No Core Shell Model

    SciTech Connect

    Dikmen, E.; Lisetskiy, A. F.; Barrett, B. R.; Navratil, P.; Vary, J. P.

    2008-11-11

    We construct the many-body effective Hamiltonian for pf-shell by carrying out 2({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){omega}. NCSM calculations at the 2-body cluster level. We demonstrate how the effective Hamiltonian derived from realistic nucleon-nucleon (NN) potentials for the 2({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){omega} NCSM space should be modified to properly account for the many-body correlations produced by truncating to the major pf-shell. We obtain two-body effective interactions for the pf-shell by using direct projection and use them to reproduce the results of large scale NCSM for other light Ca isotopes.

  1. Negative Regulation of Grb10 Interacting GYF Protein 2 on Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Receptor Signaling Pathway Caused Diabetic Mice Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jing; Wei, Qianping; Deng, Huacong; Li, Gang; Ma, Lingli; Zeng, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Heterozygous Gigyf2+/− mice exhibits histopathological evidence of neurodegeneration such as motor dysfunction. Several lines of evidence have demonstrated the important role of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) signaling pathway in the neuropathogenic process of cognitive impairment, while decreased Grb10-Interacting GYF Protein 2 (GIGYF2) expression can alter IGF1R trafficking and its downstream signaling pathways. Growth factor receptor-bound protein 10 (Grb10), a suppressor of IGF1R pathway, has been shown to play a critical role in regulating diabetes-associated cognitive impairment. It remains unknown whether endogenous GIGYF2 expression contributes to the development of diabetes-associated cognitive impairment. Using streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice model, we first demonstrated that a significantly increased level of GIGYF2 expression was correlated with a significant decrease in the expression of phosphorylated IGF1R as well as the phosphorylation of AKT and ERK1/2, two signaling pathways downstream of IGF1R, in the hippocampus of diabetic mice. On the contrary, in situ knockdown of GIGYF2 expression in hippocampus resulted in increased expression of phosphorylated IGF1R expression and correspondingly reversed the down-regulation of ERK1/2 phsophorylation but had no obvious effect on Grb10 expression. Functionally, knockdown of GIGYF2 expression markedly ameliorated diabetes-associated cognitive dysfunction as well as the ultrastructural pathology and abnormal neurobehavioral changes. These results suggest that increased expression of GIGYF2 might contribute to the development of diabetes-associated cognitive disorder via negatively regulating IGF1R signaling pathway. Therefore, down-regulation of GIGYF2 expression may provide a potential novel approach to treat diabetes-associated cognitive impairment caused by aberrant IGF1R signaling pathway. PMID:25268761

  2. Pathway Design Effects on Synthetic Vision Head-Up Displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, Lynda J.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Arthur, Jarvis J., III; Bailey, Randall E.

    2004-01-01

    NASA s Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) project is developing technologies with practical applications that will eliminate low visibility conditions as a causal factor to civil aircraft accidents while replicating the operational benefits of clear day flight operations, regardless of the actual outside visibility condition. A major thrust of the SVS project involves the development/demonstration of affordable, certifiable display configurations that provide intuitive out-the-window terrain and obstacle information with advanced pathway guidance for transport aircraft. This experiment evaluated the influence of different tunnel and guidance concepts upon pilot situation awareness (SA), mental workload, and flight path tracking performance for Synthetic Vision display concepts using a Head-Up Display (HUD). Two tunnel formats (dynamic, minimal) were evaluated against a baseline condition (no tunnel) during simulated IMC approaches to Reno-Tahoe International airport. Two guidance cues (tadpole, follow-me aircraft) were also evaluated to assess their influence on the tunnel formats. Results indicated that the presence of a tunnel on an SVS HUD had no effect on flight path performance but that it did have significant effects on pilot SA and mental workload. The dynamic tunnel concept with the follow-me aircraft guidance symbol produced the lowest workload and provided the highest SA among the tunnel concepts evaluated.

  3. Intergenerational continuity in parenting behavior: mediating pathways and child effects.

    PubMed

    Neppl, Tricia K; Conger, Rand D; Scaramella, Laura V; Ontai, Lenna L

    2009-09-01

    This prospective, longitudinal investigation examined mechanisms proposed to explain continuities in parenting behavior across 2 generations (G1, G2). Data came from 187 G2 adults, their mothers (G1), and their children (G3). Prospective information regarding G2 was collected both during adolescence and early adulthood. G1 data were collected during G2's adolescence, and G3 data were generated during the preschool years. Assessments included both observational and self-report measures. The results indicated a direct relationship between G1 and G2 harsh parenting, and between G1 and G2 positive parenting. As predicted, specific mediators accounted for intergenerational continuity in particular types of parenting behavior. G2 externalizing behavior mediated the relationship between G1 and G2 harsh parenting, whereas G2 academic attainment mediated the relationship between G1 and G2 positive parenting. In addition, the hypothesized mediating pathways remained statistically significant after taking into account possible G2 effects on G1 parenting and G3 effects on G2 parenting.

  4. Intergenerational Continuity in Parenting Behavior: Mediating Pathways and Child Effects

    PubMed Central

    Neppl, Tricia K.; Conger, Rand D.; Scaramella, Laura V.; Ontai, Lenna L.

    2009-01-01

    This prospective, longitudinal investigation examined mechanisms proposed to explain continuities in parenting behavior across two generations (G1, G2). Data came from 187 G2 adults, their mothers (G1), and their children (G3). Prospective information regarding G2 was collected both during adolescence and early adulthood. G1 data were collected during G2’s adolescence and G3 data were generated during the preschool years. Assessments included both observational and self-report measures. The results indicated a direct relationship between G1 and G2 harsh parenting and between G1 and G2 positive parenting. As predicted, specific mediators accounted for intergenerational continuity in particular types of parenting behavior. G2 externalizing behavior mediated the relationship between G1 and G2 harsh parenting, while G2 academic attainment mediated the relationship between G1 and G2 positive parenting. In addition, the hypothesized mediating pathways remained statistically significant after taking into account possible G2 effects on G1 parenting and G3 effects on G2 parenting. PMID:19702389

  5. The Efimov effect with finite range interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platter, Lucas

    2017-01-01

    Systems of strongly interacting atoms are receiving a lot of attention because of their interesting features in the few- and many-body sector. Strong interactions are frequently obtained in experiment by using a Feshbach resonance to tune the scattering to large values. A striking feature of three-body systems with a large scattering is the emergence of a discrete scaling symmetry that is also known as the Efimov effect. The Efimov effect has been observed through the measurement of loss rates in experiments with ultracold atoms. It is, however, also relevant to nuclear physics where the three-nucleon bound state and some halo nuclei are considered to be examples of Efimov states. Such systems can be modeled conveniently with the zero-range limit, however, in many of such experiments the finite range of the interaction leads to significant corrections that need to be taken into account. I will discuss how a finite effective range can be included in calculations for three-body systems that display the Efimov effect and how this leads to novel universal relations. Applications to experiments with homonuclear and heteronuclear ultracold atomic gases are discussed. National Science Foundation PHY-1516077, PHY-1555030.

  6. Signal Propagation in the Human Visual Pathways: An Effective Connectivity Analysis.

    PubMed

    Youssofzadeh, Vahab; Prasad, Girijesh; Fagan, Andrew J; Reilly, Richard B; Martens, Sven; Meaney, James F; Wong-Lin, KongFatt

    2015-09-30

    Although the visual system has been extensively investigated, an integrated account of the spatiotemporal dynamics of long-range signal propagation along the human visual pathways is not completely known or validated. In this work, we used dynamic causal modeling approach to provide insights into the underlying neural circuit dynamics of pattern reversal visual-evoked potentials extracted from concurrent EEG-fMRI data. A recurrent forward-backward connectivity model, consisting of multiple interacting brain regions identified by EEG source localization aided by fMRI spatial priors, best accounted for the data dynamics. Sources were first identified in the thalamic area, primary visual cortex, as well as higher cortical areas along the ventral and dorsal visual processing streams. Consistent with hierarchical early visual processing, the model disclosed and quantified the neural temporal dynamics across the identified activity sources. This signal propagation is dominated by a feedforward process, but we also found weaker effective feedback connectivity. Using effective connectivity analysis, the optimal dynamic causal modeling revealed enhanced connectivity along the dorsal pathway but slightly suppressed connectivity along the ventral pathway. A bias was also found in favor of the right hemisphere consistent with functional attentional asymmetry. This study validates, for the first time, the long-range signal propagation timing in the human visual pathways. A similar modeling approach can potentially be used to understand other cognitive processes and dysfunctions in signal propagation in neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. Significance statement: An integrated account of long-range visual signal propagation in the human brain is currently incomplete. Using computational neural modeling on our acquired concurrent EEG-fMRI data under a visual evoked task, we found not only a substantial forward propagation toward "higher-order" brain regions but also a

  7. Moesin is a glioma progression marker that induces proliferation and Wnt/β-catenin pathway activation via interaction with CD44.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoping; Morales, Fabiana C; Agarwal, Nitin Kumar; Dogruluk, Turgut; Gagea, Mihai; Georgescu, Maria-Magdalena

    2013-02-01

    Moesin is an ERM family protein that connects the actin cytoskeleton to transmembrane receptors. With the identification of the ERM family protein NF2 as a tumor suppressor in glioblastoma, we investigated roles for other ERM proteins in this malignancy. Here, we report that overexpression of moesin occurs generally in high-grade glioblastoma in a pattern correlated with the stem cell marker CD44. Unlike NF2, moesin acts as an oncogene by increasing cell proliferation and stem cell neurosphere formation, with its ectopic overexpression sufficient to shorten survival in an orthotopic mouse model of glioblastoma. Moesin was the major ERM member activated by phosphorylation in glioblastoma cells, where it interacted and colocalized with CD44 in membrane protrusions. Increasing the levels of moesin competitively displaced NF2 from CD44, increasing CD44 expression in a positive feedback loop driven by the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Therapeutic targeting of the moesin-CD44 interaction with the small-molecule inhibitor 7-cyanoquinocarcinol (DX-52-1) or with a CD44-mimetic peptide specifically reduced the proliferation of glioblastoma cells overexpressing moesin, where the Wnt/β-catenin pathway was activated. Our findings establish moesin and CD44 as progression markers and drugable targets in glioblastoma, relating their oncogenic effects to activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

  8. p53 amplifies Toll-like receptor 5 response in human primary and cancer cells through interaction with multiple signal transduction pathways

    PubMed Central

    Shatz, Maria; Shats, Igor; Menendez, Daniel; Resnick, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor regulates transcription of genes associated with diverse cellular functions including apoptosis, growth arrest, DNA repair and differentiation. Recently, we established that p53 can modulate expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR) innate immunity genes but the degree of cross-talk between p53 and TLR pathways remained unclear. Here, using gene expression profiling we characterize the global effect of p53 on the TLR5-mediated transcription in MCF7 cells. We found that combined activation of p53 and TLR5 pathways synergistically increases expression of over 200 genes, mostly associated with immunity and inflammation. The synergy was observed in several human cancer cells and primary lymphocytes. The p53-dependent amplification of transcriptional response to TLR5 activation required expression of NFκB subunit p65 and was mediated by several molecular mechanisms including increased phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase, PI3K and STAT3 signaling. Additionally, p53 induction increased cytokine expression in response to TNFα, another activator of NFκB and MAP kinase pathways, suggesting a broad interaction between p53 and these signaling pathways. The expression of many synergistically induced genes is elevated in breast cancer patients responsive to chemotherapy. We suggest that p53's capacity to enhance immune response could be exploited to increase antitumor immunity and to improve cancer treatment. PMID:26220208

  9. Inhibitory effects of marine-derived DNA-binding anti-tumour tetrahydroisoquinolines on the Fanconi anaemia pathway

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Sandra; Pérez, Laura; Galmarini, Carlos M; Aracil, Miguel; Tercero, Juan C; Gago, Federico; Albella, Beatriz; Bueren, Juan A

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE We have previously shown that cells with a defective Fanconi anaemia (FA) pathway are hypersensitive to trabectedin, a DNA-binding anti-cancer tetrahydroisoquinoline (DBAT) whose adducts functionally mimic a DNA inter-strand cross link (ICL). Here we expand these observations to new DBATs and investigate whether our findings in primary untransformed cells can be reproduced in human cancer cells. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Initially, the sensitivity of transformed and untransformed cells, deficient or not in one component of the FA pathway, to mitomycin C (MMC) and three DBATs, trabectedin, Zalypsis and PM01183, was assessed. Then, the functional interaction of these drugs with the FA pathway was comparatively investigated. KEY RESULTS While untransformed FA-deficient haematopoietic cells were hypersensitive to both MMC and DBATs, the response of FA-deficient squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cells to DBATs was similar to that of their respective FA-competent counterparts, even though these FA-deficient SCC cells were hypersensitive to MMC. Furthermore, while MMC always activated the FA pathway, the DBATs inhibited the FA pathway in the cancer cell lines tested and this enhanced their response to MMC. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our data show that although DBATs functionally interact with DNA as do agents that generate classical ICL, these drugs should be considered as FA pathway inhibitors rather than activators. Moreover, this effect was most significant in a variety of cancer cells. These inhibitory effects of DBATs on the FA pathway could be exploited clinically with the aim of ‘fanconizing’ cancer cells in order to make them more sensitive to other anti-tumour drugs. PMID:23937566

  10. Tumor-Derived Suppressor of Fused Mutations Reveal Hedgehog Pathway Interactions.

    PubMed

    Urman, Nicole M; Mirza, Amar; Atwood, Scott X; Whitson, Ramon J; Sarin, Kavita Y; Tang, Jean Y; Oro, Anthony E

    2016-01-01

    The Hedgehog pathway is a potent regulator of cellular growth and plays a central role in the development of many cancers including basal cell carcinoma (BCC). The majority of BCCs arise from mutations in the Patched receptor resulting in constitutive activation of the Hedgehog pathway. Secondary driver mutations promote BCC oncogenesis and occur frequently due to the high mutational burden resulting from sun exposure of the skin. Here, we uncover novel secondary mutations in Suppressor of Fused (SUFU), the major negative regulator of the Hedgehog pathway. SUFU normally binds to a Hedgehog transcriptional activator, GLI1, in order to prevent it from initiating transcription of Hedgehog target genes. We sequenced tumor-normal pairs from patients with early sporadic BCCs. This resulted in the discovery of nine mutations in SUFU, which were functionally investigated to determine whether they help drive BCC formation. Our results show that four of the SUFU mutations inappropriately activate the Hedgehog pathway, suggesting they may act as driver mutations for BCC development. Indeed, all four of the loss of function SUFU variants were found to disrupt its binding to GLI, leading to constitutive pathway activation. Our results from functional characterization of these mutations shed light on SUFU's role in Hedgehog signaling, tumor progression, and highlight a way in which BCCs can arise.

  11. Tumor-Derived Suppressor of Fused Mutations Reveal Hedgehog Pathway Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Urman, Nicole M.; Mirza, Amar; Atwood, Scott X.; Whitson, Ramon J.; Sarin, Kavita Y.; Tang, Jean Y.; Oro, Anthony E.

    2016-01-01

    The Hedgehog pathway is a potent regulator of cellular growth and plays a central role in the development of many cancers including basal cell carcinoma (BCC). The majority of BCCs arise from mutations in the Patched receptor resulting in constitutive activation of the Hedgehog pathway. Secondary driver mutations promote BCC oncogenesis and occur frequently due to the high mutational burden resulting from sun exposure of the skin. Here, we uncover novel secondary mutations in Suppressor of Fused (SUFU), the major negative regulator of the Hedgehog pathway. SUFU normally binds to a Hedgehog transcriptional activator, GLI1, in order to prevent it from initiating transcription of Hedgehog target genes. We sequenced tumor-normal pairs from patients with early sporadic BCCs. This resulted in the discovery of nine mutations in SUFU, which were functionally investigated to determine whether they help drive BCC formation. Our results show that four of the SUFU mutations inappropriately activate the Hedgehog pathway, suggesting they may act as driver mutations for BCC development. Indeed, all four of the loss of function SUFU variants were found to disrupt its binding to GLI, leading to constitutive pathway activation. Our results from functional characterization of these mutations shed light on SUFU’s role in Hedgehog signaling, tumor progression, and highlight a way in which BCCs can arise. PMID:28030567

  12. Nature of the effective interaction between dendrimers

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal, Taraknath Dasgupta, Chandan Maiti, Prabal K.

    2014-10-14

    We have performed fully atomistic classical molecular dynamics simulations to calculate the effective interaction between two polyamidoamine dendrimers. Using the umbrella sampling technique, we have obtained the potential of mean force (PMF) between the dendrimers and investigated the effects of protonation level and dendrimer size on the PMF. Our results show that the interaction between the dendrimers can be tuned from purely repulsive to partly attractive by changing the protonation level. The PMF profiles are well-fitted by the sum of an exponential and a Gaussian function with the weight of the exponential function dominating over that of the Gaussian function. This observation is in disagreement with the results obtained in previous analytic [C. Likos, M. Schmidt, H. Löwen, M. Ballauff, D. Pötschke, and P. Lindner, Macromolecules 34, 2914 (2001)] and coarse-grained simulation [I. Götze, H. Harreis, and C. Likos, J. Chem. Phys. 120, 7761 (2004)] studies which predicted the effective interaction to be Gaussian.

  13. AtVPS41-mediated endocytic pathway is essential for pollen tube–stigma interaction in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Lihong; Liu, Jingjing; Zhong, Sheng; Gu, Hongya; Qu, Li-Jia

    2016-01-01

    In flowering plants, extensive male–female interactions are required for successful fertilization in which various signaling cascades are involved. Prevacuolar compartments (PVC) and vacuoles are two types of subcellular compartments that terminate signal transduction by sequestrating signaling molecules in yeast and mammalian cells; however, the manner in which they might be involved in male–female interactions in plants is unknown. In this study, we identified Arabidopsis thaliana vacuolar protein sorting 41 (AtVPS41), encoded by a single-copy gene with sequence similarity to yeast Vps41p, as a new factor controlling pollen tube–stigma interaction. Loss of AtVPS41 function disrupted penetration of pollen tubes into the transmitting tissue and thus led to failed male transmission. In the pollen tubes, AtVPS41 protein is associated with PVCs and the tonoplast. We demonstrate that AtVPS41 is required for the late stage of the endocytic pathway (i.e., endomembrane trafficking from PVCs to vacuoles) because internalization of cell-surface molecules was normal in the vps41-deficient pollen tubes, whereas PVC-to-vacuole trafficking was impaired. We further show that the CHCR domain is required for subcellular localization and biological functioning of AtVPS41. These results indicate that the AtVPS41-mediated late stage of the endocytic pathway is essential for pollen tube–stigma interaction in Arabidopsis. PMID:27185920

  14. Apoptosis-linked gene-2 (ALG-2)/Sec31 interactions regulate endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-to-Golgi transport: a potential effector pathway for luminal calcium.

    PubMed

    Helm, Jared R; Bentley, Marvin; Thorsen, Kevin D; Wang, Ting; Foltz, Lauren; Oorschot, Viola; Klumperman, Judith; Hay, Jesse C

    2014-08-22

    Luminal calcium released from secretory organelles has been suggested to play a regulatory role in vesicle transport at several steps in the secretory pathway; however, its functional roles and effector pathways have not been elucidated. Here we demonstrate for the first time that specific luminal calcium depletion leads to a significant decrease in endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-to-Golgi transport rates in intact cells. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that luminal calcium depletion is accompanied by increased accumulation of intermediate compartment proteins in COPII buds and clusters of unfused COPII vesicles at ER exit sites. Furthermore, we present several lines of evidence suggesting that luminal calcium affected transport at least in part through calcium-dependent interactions between apoptosis-linked gene-2 (ALG-2) and the Sec31A proline-rich region: 1) targeted disruption of ALG-2/Sec31A interactions caused severe defects in ER-to-Golgi transport in intact cells; 2) effects of luminal calcium and ALG-2/Sec31A interactions on transport mutually required each other; and 3) Sec31A function in transport required luminal calcium. Morphological phenotypes of disrupted ALG-2/Sec31A interactions were characterized. We found that ALG-2/Sec31A interactions were not required for the localization of Sec31A to ER exit sites per se but appeared to acutely regulate the stability and trafficking of the cargo receptor p24 and the distribution of the vesicle tether protein p115. These results represent the first outline of a mechanism that connects luminal calcium to specific protein interactions regulating vesicle trafficking machinery.

  15. An ERP study of the interaction between verbal information and conditioning pathways to fear.

    PubMed

    Ugland, Carina C O; Dyson, Benjamin J; Field, Andy P

    2013-01-01

    Two experiments are described that explore the effects of verbal information and direct conditioning in the acquisition and extinction of fear responses. Participants were given verbal threat information about novel animals before conditioning trials in which the animals were presented alongside an aversive outcome (Experiment 1), or positive information about the animals before extinction trials (Experiment 2). Fear was measured using self-reported fear beliefs, expectancy of the unconditioned stimulus (US) and event-related brain potential (ERP). The results showed a direct effect of verbal information on acquisition (Experiment 1) and extinction (Experiment 2). There was a P2 peak latency shift at acquisition (Experiment 1) and P1 mean amplitude response at extinction (Experiment 2) based on the interaction between verbal information and US-contingency. However, the P2 response showed little evidence for an enhanced conditioned response (CR) when verbal threat information and direct conditioning combined: earlier P2 responses were found for all animals that had been associated with either threat information or the aversive US. Additionally, increase in P1 mean amplitude response (Experiment 2) seemed to stem from the conflict between verbal information and contingency information, rather than the predicted decrease in response where positive information and extinction training were combined. Future studies are suggested that might explore whether attention/arousal modulate the P1 response as a result of such expectation violations.

  16. Bone Biomarkers on the Pathway to Effective Spaceflight Countermeasures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spatz, Jordan

    2009-01-01

    Osteocyte cells are the most abundant yet least understood bone cell type in the human body. However, recent discovers in osteocyte cell biology have shed light on their importance as key mechanosensing cells regulating the bone remodeling process. Thus, we propose the first ever in vitro gene expression evaluation of osteocytes exposed to simulated microgravity to determine mechanistic pathways of their gravity sensing ability. Improved understanding of the fundamental mechanisms at the osteocyte cellular level may lead to improved treatment options to mitigate the effects of bone loss encountered by astronauts on long duration space missions and provide tailored treatment options for maintaining bone strength of immobilized/partially paralyzed patients here on Earth. Aim 1: Characterize the gene expression patterns and protein levels following exposure of murine osteocytelike cell line (MLO-Y4) to simulated microgravity using the NASA Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) Bioreactor. Osteocytes are theorized to be the mechanosensors and transducers of mechanical load for bones, yet the biological mechanism of this action remains elusive. We propose to investigate the genetic regulation of the mechanism of the MLO-Y4 cell in the NASA Bioreactor as it is the accepted ground-based analog for simulating vector averaged microgravity.

  17. A role for Drosophila Cyclin J in oogenesis revealed by genetic interactions with the piRNA pathway

    PubMed Central

    Atikukke, Govindaraja; Albosta, Paul; Zhang, Huamei; Finley, Russell L.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclin J (CycJ) is a poorly characterized member of the Cyclin superfamily of cyclin-dependent kinase regulators, many of which regulate the cell cycle or transcription. Although CycJ is conserved in metazoans its cellular function has not been identified and no mutant defects have been described. In Drosophila, CycJ transcript is present primarily in ovaries and very early embryos, suggesting a role in one or both of these tissues. The CycJ gene (CycJ) lies immediately downstream of armitage (armi), a gene involved in the Piwi-associated RNA (piRNA) pathways that are required for silencing transposons in the germline and adjacent somatic cells. Mutations in armi result in oogenesis defects but a role for CycJ in oogenesis has not been defined. Here we assessed oogenesis in CycJ mutants in the presence or absence of mutations in armi or other piRNA pathway genes. CycJ null ovaries appeared normal, indicating that CycJ is not essential for oogenesis under normal conditions. In contrast, armi null ovaries produced only two egg chambers per ovariole and the eggs had severe axis specification defects, as observed previously for armi and other piRNA pathway mutants. Surprisingly, the CycJ armi double mutant failed to produce any mature eggs. The double null ovaries generally had only one egg chamber per ovariole and the egg chambers frequently contained an overabundance of differentiated germline cells. Production of these compound egg chambers could be suppressed with CycJ transgenes but not with mutations in the checkpoint gene mnk, which suppress oogenesis defects in armi mutants. The CycJ null showed similar genetic interactions with the germline and somatic piRNA pathway gene piwi, and to a lesser extent with aubergine (aub), a member of the germline-specific piRNA pathway. The strong genetic interactions between CycJ and piRNA pathway genes reveal a role for CycJ in early oogenesis. Our results suggest that CycJ is required to regulate egg chamber production or

  18. A role for Drosophila Cyclin J in oogenesis revealed by genetic interactions with the piRNA pathway.

    PubMed

    Atikukke, Govindaraja; Albosta, Paul; Zhang, Huamei; Finley, Russell L

    2014-08-01

    Cyclin J (CycJ) is a poorly characterized member of the Cyclin superfamily of cyclin-dependent kinase regulators, many of which regulate the cell cycle or transcription. Although CycJ is conserved in metazoans its cellular function has not been identified and no mutant defects have been described. In Drosophila, CycJ transcript is present primarily in ovaries and very early embryos, suggesting a role in one or both of these tissues. The CycJ gene (CycJ) lies immediately downstream of armitage (armi), a gene involved in the Piwi-associated RNA (piRNA) pathways that are required for silencing transposons in the germline and adjacent somatic cells. Mutations in armi result in oogenesis defects but a role for CycJ in oogenesis has not been defined. Here we assessed oogenesis in CycJ mutants in the presence or absence of mutations in armi or other piRNA pathway genes. CycJ null ovaries appeared normal, indicating that CycJ is not essential for oogenesis under normal conditions. In contrast, armi null ovaries produced only two egg chambers per ovariole and the eggs had severe axis specification defects, as observed previously for armi and other piRNA pathway mutants. Surprisingly, the CycJ armi double mutant failed to produce any mature eggs. The double null ovaries generally had only one egg chamber per ovariole and the egg chambers frequently contained an overabundance of differentiated germline cells. Production of these compound egg chambers could be suppressed with CycJ transgenes but not with mutations in the checkpoint gene mnk, which suppress oogenesis defects in armi mutants. The CycJ null showed similar genetic interactions with the germline and somatic piRNA pathway gene piwi, and to a lesser extent with aubergine (aub), a member of the germline-specific piRNA pathway. The strong genetic interactions between CycJ and piRNA pathway genes reveal a role for CycJ in early oogenesis. Our results suggest that CycJ is required to regulate egg chamber production or

  19. Integrating both interaction pathways between warming and pesticide exposure on upper thermal tolerance in high- and low-latitude populations of an aquatic insect.

    PubMed

    Op de Beeck, Lin; Verheyen, Julie; Stoks, Robby

    2017-05-01

    Global warming and chemical pollution are key anthropogenic stressors with the potential to interact. While warming can change the impact of pollutants and pollutants can change the sensitivity to warming, both interaction pathways have never been integrated in a single experiment. Therefore, we tested the effects of warming and multiple pesticide pulses (allowing accumulation) of chlorpyrifos on upper thermal tolerance (CTmax) and associated physiological traits related to aerobic/anaerobic energy production in the damselfly Ischnura elegans. To also assess the role of latitude-specific thermal adaptation in shaping the impact of warming and pesticide exposure on thermal tolerance, we exposed larvae from replicated high- and low-latitude populations to the pesticide in a common garden rearing experiment at 20 and 24 °C, the mean summer water temperatures at high and low latitudes. As expected, exposure to chlorpyrifos resulted in a lower CTmax. Yet, this pesticide effect on CTmax was lower at 24 °C compared to 20 °C because of a lower accumulation of chlorpyrifos in the medium at 24 °C. The effects on CTmax could partly be explained by reduction of the aerobic scope. Given that these effects did not differ between latitudes, gradual thermal evolution is not expected to counteract the negative effect of the pesticide on thermal tolerance. By for the first time integrating both interaction pathways we were not only able to provide support for both of them, but more importantly demonstrate that they can directly affect each other. Indeed, the warming-induced reduction in pesticide impact generated a lower pesticide-induced climate change sensitivity (in terms of decreased upper thermal tolerance). Our results indicate that, assuming no increase in pesticide input, global warming might reduce the negative effect of multiple pulse exposures to pesticides on sensitivity to elevated temperatures.

  20. Stress Effects on Multiple Memory System Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Ness, Deborah; Calabrese, Pasquale

    2016-01-01

    Extensive behavioural, pharmacological, and neurological research reports stress effects on mammalian memory processes. While stress effects on memory quantity have been known for decades, the influence of stress on multiple memory systems and their distinct contributions to the learning process have only recently been described. In this paper, after summarizing the fundamental biological aspects of stress/emotional arousal and recapitulating functionally and anatomically distinct memory systems, we review recent animal and human studies exploring the effects of stress on multiple memory systems. Apart from discussing the interaction between distinct memory systems in stressful situations, we will also outline the fundamental role of the amygdala in mediating such stress effects. Additionally, based on the methods applied in the herein discussed studies, we will discuss how memory translates into behaviour. PMID:27034845

  1. Contamination Effects Due to Space Environmental Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Philip T.; Paquin, Krista C. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Molecular and particulate contaminants are commonly generated from the orbital spacecraft operations that are under the influence of the space environment. Once generated, these contaminants may attach to the surfaces of the spacecraft or may remain in the vicinity of the spacecraft. In the event these contaminants come to rest on the surfaces of the spacecraft or situated in the line-of-sight of the observation path, they will create various degrees of contamination effect which may cause undesirable effects for normal spacecraft operations, There will be circumstances in which the spacecraft may be subjected to special space environment due to operational conditions. Interactions between contaminants and special space environment may alter or greatly increase the contamination effect due to the synergistic effect. This paper will address the various types of contamination generation on orbit, the general effects of the contamination on spacecraft systems, and the typical impacts on the spacecraft operations due to the contamination effect. In addition, this paper will explain the contamination effect induced by the space environment and will discuss the intensified contamination effect resulting from the synergistic effect with the special space environment.

  2. Novel pathway analysis of genomic polymorphism-cancer risk interaction in the Breast Cancer Prevention Trial

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Barbara K; Greene, Mark H; Kelley, Jenny M; Costantino, Joseph P; Clifford, Robert J; Hu, Ying; Tang, Gong; Kazerouni, Neely; Rosenberg, Philip S; Meerzaman, Daoud M; Buetow, Kenneth H

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Tamoxifen was approved for breast cancer risk reduction in high-risk women based on the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project's Breast Cancer Prevention Trial (P-1:BCPT), which showed 50% fewer breast cancers with tamoxifen versus placebo, supporting tamoxifen's efficacy in preventing breast cancer. Poor metabolizing CYP2D6 variants are currently the subject of intensive scrutiny regarding their impact on clinical outcomes in the adjuvant setting. Our study extends to variants in a wider spectrum of tamoxifen-metabolizing genes and applies to the prevention setting. Methods: Our case-only study, nested within P-1:BCPT, explored associations of polymorphisms in estrogen/tamoxifen-metabolizing genes with responsiveness to preventive tamoxifen. Thirty-nine candidate polymorphisms in 17 candidate genes were genotyped in 249 P-1:BCPT cases. Results: CVP2D6_C1111T, individually and within a CYP2D6 haplotype, showed borderline significant association with treatment arm. Path analysis of the entire tamoxifen pathway gene network showed that the tamoxifen pathway model was consistent with the pattern of observed genotype variability within the placebo-arm dataset. However, correlation of variations in genes in the tamoxifen arm differed significantly from the predictions of the tamoxifen pathway model. Strong correlations between allelic variation in the tamoxifen pathway at CYP1A1-CYP3A4, CYP3A4-CYP2C9, and CYP2C9-SULT1A2, in addition to CYP2D6 and its adjacent genes, were seen in the placebo-arm but not the tamoxifen-arm. In conclusion, beyond reinforcing a role for CYP2D6 in tamoxifen response, our pathway analysis strongly suggests that specific combinations of allelic variants in other genes make major contributions to the tamoxifen-resistance phenotype. PMID:21152245

  3. Dual specificity phosphotase 18, interacting with SAPK, dephosphorylates SAPK and inhibits SAPK/JNK signal pathway in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qihan; Huang, Shengdong; Sun, Yaqiong; Gu, Shaohua; Lu, Fanglin; Dai, Jianfeng; Yin, Gang; Sun, Liyun; Zheng, Dan; Dou, Chao; Feng, Congjing; Ji, Chaoneng; Xie, Yi; Mao, Yumin

    2006-09-01

    The SAPK/JNKs play important roles in numerous cellular processes, and for this reason they have become putative drug targets. Most dual-specificity protein phosphatases (DSPs) play important roles in the regulation of mitogenic signal transduction and cell cycle control in response to extracellular stimuli. Dual-specificity phosphatase 18 (DUSP18), a newly recognized SAPK/JNK phosphatase, is widely expressed. This expression is modulated in response to extracellular stimuli. By phosphorylation assay, pull down and coimmunoprecipitation experiments, it is shown here that DUSP18 interacts with SAPK/JNK and dephosphorylates it both in vitro and in vivo. DUSP18 does not dephosphorylate p38 or p44ERK1. Furthermore, DUSP18 inhibits SAPK/JNK pathway in vivo. Based on these findings, DUSP18 appears to serve an important role by regulation of SAPK/JNK pathway.

  4. Role of the neural pathway from hindbrain to hypothalamus in interaction of GLP1 and leptin in rats.

    PubMed

    Akieda-Asai, Sayaka; Poleni, Paul-Emile; Hasegawa, Kazuya; Date, Yukari

    2014-02-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1) and leptin are anorectic hormones. Previously, we have shown that i.p. coadministration of subthreshold GLP1 with leptin dramatically reduced food intake in rats. In this study, by using midbrain-transected rats, we investigated the role of the neural pathway from the hindbrain to the hypothalamus in the interaction of GLP1 and leptin in reducing food intake. Food intake reduction induced by coinjection of GLP1 and leptin was blocked in midbrain-transected rats. These findings indicate that the ascending neural pathway from the hindbrain plays an important role in transmitting the anorectic signals provided by coinjection of GLP1 and leptin.

  5. Targeting the interaction of Aurora kinases and SIRT1 mediated by Wnt signaling pathway in colorectal cancer: A critical review.

    PubMed

    Subramaniyan, Boopathi; Jagadeesan, Kaviya; Ramakrishnan, Sabitha; Mathan, Ganeshan

    2016-08-01

    The Aurora kinases belong to the family of serine/threonine kinase, a central regulator of mitosis and their expression increased during G2/M phase. It is classified into Aurora A, B and C, each has distinct roles in cellular processes, which includes regulation of spindle assembly, function of centrosomes, cytoskeleton and cytokinesis. During cancer growth, their rapid increase makes most attractive marker for cancer treatment at present. However Aurora A kinase is known to be a marker for cancer therapy, the most important serine/threonine kinase of Aurora B kinase involvement in cancer is still inadequate. Subsequently, the recent findings revealed that the class III histone deacetylase of SIRT1 is a key regulator to activate Aurora kinases from S phase damaged DNA through Wnt signaling pathway. Even if both Aurora A kinase and SIRT1 serve as a marker for cancer therapy, the present review reveals it is interaction in Wnt signaling pathway that solely for colorectal cancer.

  6. Polymorphisms in maternal folate pathway genes interact with arsenic in drinking water to influence risk of myelomeningocele

    PubMed Central

    Mazumdar, Maitreyi; Valeri, Linda; Rodrigues, Ema G.; Hasan, Md Omar Sharif Ibne; Hamid, Rezina; Paul, Ligi; Selhub, Jacob; Silva, Fareesa; Mostofa, MdGolam; Quamruzzaman, Quazi; Rahman, Mahmuder; Christiani, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Arsenic induces neural tube defects in many animal models. Additionally, studies have shown that mice with specific genetic defects in folate metabolism and transport are more susceptible to arsenic-induced neural tube defects. We sought to determine whether 14 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in genes involved in folate metabolism modified the effect of exposure to drinking water contaminated with inorganic arsenic and posterior neural tube defect (myelomeningocele) risk. Methods Fifty-four mothers of children with myelomeningocele and 55 controls were enrolled through clinical sites in rural Bangladesh in a case-control study of the association between environmental arsenic exposure and risk of myelomeningocele. We assessed participants for level of myelomeningocele, administered questionnaires, conducted biological and environmental sample collection, and performed genotyping. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used to measure inorganic arsenic concentration in drinking water. Candidate single-nucleotide polymorphisms were identified through review of the literature. Results Drinking water inorganic arsenic concentration was associated with increased risk of myelomeningocele for participants with 4 of the 14 studied single-nucleotide polymorphisms in genes involved in folate metabolism: the AA/AG genotype of rs2236225 (MTHFD1), the GG genotype of rs1051266 (SLC19A1), the TT genotype of rs7560488 (DNMT3A), and the GG genotype of rs3740393 (AS3MT) with adjusted OR of 1.13, 1.31, 1.20, and 1.25 for rs2236225, rs1051266, rs7560488, and rs3740393, respectively. Conclusions Our results support the hypothesis that environmental arsenic exposure increases the risk of myelomeningocele via interaction with folate metabolic pathways. PMID:26250961

  7. Ecosystem services capacity across heterogeneous forest types: understanding the interactions and suggesting pathways for sustaining multiple ecosystem services.

    PubMed

    Alamgir, Mohammed; Turton, Stephen M; Macgregor, Colin J; Pert, Petina L

    2016-10-01

    As ecosystem services supply from tropical forests is declining due to deforestation and forest degradation, much effort is essential to sustain ecosystem services supply from tropical forested landscapes, because tropical forests provide the largest flow of multiple ecosystem services among the terrestrial ecosystems. In order to sustain multiple ecosystem services, understanding ecosystem services capacity across heterogeneous forest types and identifying certain ecosystem services that could be managed to leverage positive effects across the wider bundle of ecosystem services are required. We sampled three forest types, tropical rainforests, sclerophyll forests, and rehabilitated plantation forests, over an area of 32,000m(2) from Wet Tropics bioregion, Australia, aiming to compare supply and evaluate interactions and patterns of eight ecosystem services (global climate regulation, air quality regulation, erosion regulation, nutrient regulation, cyclone protection, habitat provision, energy provision, and timber provision). On average, multiple ecosystem services were highest in the rainforests, lowest in sclerophyll forests, and intermediate in rehabilitated plantation forests. However, a wide variation was apparent among the plots across the three forest types. Global climate regulation service had a synergistic impact on the supply of multiple ecosystem services, while nutrient regulation service was found to have a trade-off impact. Considering multiple ecosystem services, most of the rehabilitated plantation forest plots shared the same ordination space with rainforest plots in the ordination analysis, indicating that rehabilitated plantation forests may supply certain ecosystem services nearly equivalent to rainforests. Two synergy groups and one trade-off group were identified. Apart from conserving rainforests and sclerophyll forests, our findings suggest two additional integrated pathways to sustain the supply of multiple ecosystem services from a

  8. A novel pathway for amyloids self-assembly in aggregates at nanomolar concentration mediated by the interaction with surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Siddhartha; Hashemi, Mohtadin; Lv, Zhengjian; Maity, Sibaprasad; Rochet, Jean-Christophe; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2017-01-01

    A limitation of the amyloid hypothesis in explaining the development of neurodegenerative diseases is that the level of amyloidogenic polypeptide in vivo is below the critical concentration required to form the aggregates observed in post-mortem brains. We discovered a novel, on-surface aggregation pathway of amyloidogenic polypeptide that eliminates this long-standing controversy. We applied atomic force microscope (AFM) to demonstrate directly that on-surface aggregation takes place at a concentration at which no aggregation in solution is observed. The experiments were performed with the full-size Aβ protein (Aβ42), a decapeptide Aβ(14-23) and α-synuclein; all three systems demonstrate a dramatic preference of the on-surface aggregation pathway compared to the aggregation in the bulk solution. Time-lapse AFM imaging, in solution, show that over time, oligomers increase in size and number and release in solution, suggesting that assembled aggregates can serve as nuclei for aggregation in bulk solution. Computational modeling performed with the all-atom MD simulations for Aβ(14-23) peptide shows that surface interactions induce conformational transitions of the monomer, which facilitate interactions with another monomer that undergoes conformational changes stabilizing the dimer assembly. Our findings suggest that interactions of amyloidogenic polypeptides with cellular surfaces play a major role in determining disease onset. PMID:28358113

  9. Oncogenic activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway promotes cellular glucose uptake by downregulating the expression of thioredoxin-interacting protein.

    PubMed

    Hong, Shin Yee; Yu, Fa-Xing; Luo, Yan; Hagen, Thilo

    2016-05-01

    Oncogenic activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway is known to play an important role to promote glucose metabolism in cancer cells. However, the molecular mechanism through which the PI3K/Akt signalling pathway promotes glucose utilisation in cancer cells is still not well understood. It has recently been shown that the oncogenic activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signalling in lung adenocarcinoma is important in promoting the localisation of glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) at the plasma membrane. We thus hypothesised that the effect of constitutive activation of the PI3K/AKT signalling on glucose metabolism is mediated by thioredoxin interacting protein (TXNIP), a known regulator of the GLUT1 plasma membrane localisation. Consistent with previous studies, inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway decreased cellular glucose uptake. Furthermore, inhibition of PI3K/Akt signalling in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines using clinically used tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) resulted in a decrease in GLUT1 membrane localisation. We also observed that inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway in various cell lines, including NSCLC cells, resulted in an increase in TXNIP expression. Importantly, knockdown of TXNIP using siRNA in the NSCLC cells promoted GLUT1 to be localised at the plasma membrane and reversed the effect of PI3K/Akt inhibitors. Together, our results suggest that the oncogenic activation of PI3K/Akt signalling promotes cellular glucose uptake, at least in part, through the regulation of TXNIP expression. This mechanism may contribute to the Warburg effect in cancer cells.

  10. Interplay Between Hydrophobic Effect and Dipole Interactions in Peptide Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, Sai; Matysiak, Silvina

    In the past decade, the development of various coarse-grained models for proteins have provided key insights into the driving forces in folding and aggregation.We recently developed a low resolution Water Explicit Polarizable PROtein coarse-grained Model by adding oppositely charged dummy particles inside protein backbone beads.With this model,we were able to achieve significant α/ β secondary structure content,without any added bias.We now extend the model to study peptide aggregation at hydrophobic-hydrophilic interface using elastin-like octapeptides (GV)4 as a model system.A condensation-ordering mechanism of aggregation is observed in water.Our results suggest that backbone interpeptide dipolar interactions,not hydrophobicity,plays a more significant role in fibril-like peptide aggregation.We observe a cooperative effect in hydrogen bonding or dipolar interactions, with increase in aggregate size in water and interface.Based on this cooperative effect, we provide a potential explanation for the observed nucleus size in peptide aggregation pathways.Without dipolar particles,peptide aggregation is not observed at the hydrophilic-hydrophobic interface.Thus,the presence of dipoles,not hydrophobicity plays a key role in aggregation observed at hydrophobic interfaces.

  11. Solar electric propulsion thrust beam interactive effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellen, J. M., Jr.; Fitzgerald, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    Interactive effects between ion engine thrust beams and an SEP spacecraft and its science payload have been examined. AC electric contamination from thrust beam potential fluctuations of both 'common mode' and 'point-to-point' forms has been evaluated. Quenching of point-to-point E-fields by both thrust ion and charge exchange ion plasmas is expected. Reduction methods for AC electric contamination from common mode thrust beam potential fluctuations have been developed. Charged particle contamination of ambient space and plasma wave contamination may result from density magnitude and spatial extent of charge exchange plasma plumes. Reduction methods for cone of directions of high angle charge exchange ions have been examined.

  12. Cell cycle regulators interact with pathways that modulate microtubule stability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Shohat-Tal, Aya; Eshel, Dan

    2011-12-01

    The integrity of mitosis is dependent upon strict regulation of microtubule stability and dynamics. Although much information has been accumulated on regulators of the microtubule cytoskeleton, our knowledge of the specific pathways involved is still limited. Here we designed genetic screens to identify regulators of microtubule stability that are dispensable in the wild type yet become essential under microtubule-disrupting conditions. We found that the transcriptional cofactor Swi6p and activator Swi4p, as well as the G(2)/M-specific cyclin Clb2p, are required in a microtubule-destabilizing environment. Swi6p and Swi4p can combine as a transcriptional complex, called the SBF complex (SBF for Swi4/6 cell cycle box [SCB]-binding factor) that is functionally homologous to the metazoan DP1/2-E2F complex and that controls the G(1)/S transition through the genes it regulates. We show that Swi6p's contribution to microtubule stability can be either dependent or independent of the SBF complex. The SBF-dependent pathway requires downregulation of SBF complex levels and may thereby reroute the transcriptional program in favor of greater microtubule stability. This pathway can be triggered by overexpression of Fcp1p, a phosphatase in the general transcription machinery, or by expression of an allele of SWI6 that is associated with reduced transcription from SBF-controlled promoters. The SBF-independent pathway is activated by a constitutively nuclear allele of Swi6p. Our results introduce novel roles in microtubule stability for genes whose participation in the process may be masked under normal conditions yet nonetheless acquire a dominant role when microtubule stability is compromised.

  13. The Halo Effect: An Unintended Benefit of Care Pathways.

    PubMed

    Barber, Collin; Fraser, James F; Mendez, Guillermo G; Bradley, Barrie; Loftus, Terry J; Jacofsky, David J

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if implementation of a simplified care pathway for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) would affect outcomes of total hip arthroplasty (THA) patients in the same health care system. Data were collected from a total of 5,095 consecutive THA patients in the year before and 2 years after implementation of the care pathway for TKA patients. Postimplementation increases were observed in both early activity (p < 0.0001) and continuous urinary catheter avoidance (p < 0.0001) among THA patients. These improvements in protocol adherence were associated with decreased complications (p < 0.0001), fewer 30-day readmissions (p < 0.0019), and decreased hospital length of stay (p < 0.0001). Based on these results, the implementation of a simplified care pathway for TKA patients can also improve outcomes for THA patients in the same health care system.

  14. Effective connectivity of neural pathways underlying disgust by multivariate Granger causality analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hao; Wang, Yonghui; Tian, Jie; Liu, Yijun

    2011-03-01

    The disgust system arises phylogenetically in response to dangers to the internal milieu from pathogens and their toxic products. Functional imaging studies have demonstrated that a much wider range of neural structures was involved in triggering disgust reactions. However, less is known regarding how and what neural pathways these neural structures interact. To address this issue, we adopted an effective connectivity based analysis, namely the multivariate Granger causality approach, to explore the causal interactions within these brain networks. Results presented that disgust can induce a wide range of brain activities, such as the insula, the anterior cingulate cortex, the parahippocampus lobe, the dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex, the superior occipital gyrus, and the supplementary motor cortex. These brain areas constitute as a whole, with much denser connectivity following disgust stimuli, in comparison with that of the neutral condition. Moreover, the anterior insula, showing multiple casual interactions with limbic and subcortical areas, was implicated as a central hub in organizing multiple information processing in the disgust system.

  15. MANORAA (Mapping Analogous Nuclei Onto Residue And Affinity) for identifying protein–ligand fragment interaction, pathways and SNPs

    PubMed Central

    Tanramluk, Duangrudee; Narupiyakul, Lalita; Akavipat, Ruj; Gong, Sungsam; Charoensawan, Varodom

    2016-01-01

    Protein–ligand interaction analysis is an important step of drug design and protein engineering in order to predict the binding affinity and selectivity between ligands to the target proteins. To date, there are more than 100 000 structures available in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), of which ∼30% are protein–ligand (MW below 1000 Da) complexes. We have developed the integrative web server MANORAA (Mapping Analogous Nuclei Onto Residue And Affinity) with the aim of providing a user-friendly web interface to assist structural study and design of protein–ligand interactions. In brief, the server allows the users to input the chemical fragments and present all the unique molecular interactions to the target proteins with available three-dimensional structures in the PDB. The users can also link the ligands of interest to assess possible off-target proteins, human variants and pathway information using our all-in-one integrated tools. Taken together, we envisage that the server will facilitate and improve the study of protein–ligand interactions by allowing observation and comparison of ligand interactions with multiple proteins at the same time. (http://manoraa.org). PMID:27131358

  16. Assessing Spurious Interaction Effects in Structural Equation Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harring, Jeffrey R.; Weiss, Brandi A.; Li, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have stressed the importance of simultaneously estimating interaction and quadratic effects in multiple regression analyses, even if theory only suggests an interaction effect should be present. Specifically, past studies suggested that failing to simultaneously include quadratic effects when testing for interaction effects could…

  17. A nuclear-receptor-dependent phosphatidylcholine pathway with antidiabetic effects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nuclear hormone receptors regulate diverse metabolic pathways and the orphan nuclear receptor LRH-1 (also known as NR5A2) regulates bile acid biosynthesis. Structural studies have identified phospholipids as potential LRH-1 ligands, but their functional relevance is unclear. Here we show that an unu...

  18. Relating drug–protein interaction network with drug side effects

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, Sayaka; Pauwels, Edouard; Stoven, Véronique; Goto, Susumu; Yamanishi, Yoshihiro

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Identifying the emergence and underlying mechanisms of drug side effects is a challenging task in the drug development process. This underscores the importance of system–wide approaches for linking different scales of drug actions; namely drug-protein interactions (molecular scale) and side effects (phenotypic scale) toward side effect prediction for uncharacterized drugs. Results: We performed a large-scale analysis to extract correlated sets of targeted proteins and side effects, based on the co-occurrence of drugs in protein-binding profiles and side effect profiles, using sparse canonical correlation analysis. The analysis of 658 drugs with the two profiles for 1368 proteins and 1339 side effects led to the extraction of 80 correlated sets. Enrichment analyses using KEGG and Gene Ontology showed that most of the correlated sets were significantly enriched with proteins that are involved in the same biological pathways, even if their molecular functions are different. This allowed for a biologically relevant interpretation regarding the relationship between drug–targeted proteins and side effects. The extracted side effects can be regarded as possible phenotypic outcomes by drugs targeting the proteins that appear in the same correlated set. The proposed method is expected to be useful for predicting potential side effects of new drug candidate compounds based on their protein-binding profiles. Supplementary information: Datasets and all results are available at http://web.kuicr.kyoto-u.ac.jp/supp/smizutan/target-effect/. Availability: Software is available at the above supplementary website. Contact: yamanishi@bioreg.kyushu-u.ac.jp, or goto@kuicr.kyoto-u.ac.jp PMID:22962476

  19. GAIP interacting protein C-terminus regulates autophagy and exosome biogenesis of pancreatic cancer through metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Santanu; Pal, Krishnendu; Sharma, Anil K; Dutta, Shamit K; Lau, Julie S; Yan, Irene K; Wang, Enfeng; Elkhanany, Ahmed; Alkharfy, Khalid M; Sanyal, Arunik; Patel, Tushar C; Chari, Suresh T; Spaller, Mark R; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2014-01-01

    GAIP interacting protein C terminus (GIPC) is known to play an important role in a variety of physiological and disease states. In the present study, we have identified a novel role for GIPC as a master regulator of autophagy and the exocytotic pathways in cancer. We show that depletion of GIPC-induced autophagy in pancreatic cancer cells, as evident from the upregulation of the autophagy marker LC3II. We further report that GIPC regulates cellular trafficking pathways by modulating the secretion, biogenesis, and molecular composition of exosomes. We also identified the involvement of GIPC on metabolic stress pathways regulating autophagy and microvesicular shedding, and observed that GIPC status determines the loading of cellular cargo in the exosome. Furthermore, we have shown the overexpression of the drug resistance gene ABCG2 in exosomes from GIPC-depleted pancreatic cancer cells. We also demonstrated that depletion of GIPC from cancer cells sensitized them to gemcitabine treatment, an avenue that can be explored as a potential therapeutic strategy to overcome drug resistance in cancer.

  20. Effects of photorespiration, the cytochrome pathway, and the alternative pathway on the triple isotopic composition of atmospheric O2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angert, Alon; Rachmilevitch, Shimon; Barkan, Eugeni; Luz, Boaz

    2003-03-01

    The triple isotopic composition of atmospheric O2 is a new tracer used to estimate changes in global productivity. To estimate such changes, knowledge of the relationship between the discrimination against 17O and the discrimination against 18O is needed. This relationship is presented as θ = ln(17α)/ln(18α). Here, the value of theta was evaluated for the most important processes that affect the isotopic composition of oxygen. Similar values were found for dark respiration through the cytochrome pathway (0.516 ± 0.001) and the alternative pathway (0.514 ± 0.001), and slightly higher value was found for diffusion in air (0.521 ± 0.001). The combined effect of diffusion and respiration on the atmosphere was shown to be close to that of dark respiration. The value we found for photorespiration (0.506 ± 0.005) is considerably lower than that of dark respiration. Our results clearly show that the triple isotopic composition of the atmosphere is affected by the relative rates of photorespiration and dark respiration. Also, we show that closing the current global isotopic balance will enable the estimation of the current global rate of photorespiration. Using the Last Glacial Maximum as a case study, we show that variations in global rate of photorespiration affected the triple isotopic composition in the past. Strong fractionations measured in illuminated plants indicated that the alternative pathway is activated in the same conditions that favor high rate of photorespiration. This activation suggests that the global rate of the alternative pathway is higher than believed thus far, and may help to close the gap between the calculated and measured Dole Effect.

  1. Approaches to Testing Interaction Effects Using Structural Equation Modeling Methodology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Fuzhong; Harmer, Peter; Duncan, Terry E.; Duncan, Susan C.; Acock, Alan; Boles, Shawn

    1998-01-01

    Reviews a single indicator approach and multiple indicator approaches that simplify testing interaction effects using structural equation modeling. An illustrative application examines the interactive effect of perceptions of competence and perceptions of autonomy on exercise-intrinsic motivation. (SLD)

  2. Thioredoxin interacting protein (TXNIP) regulates tubular autophagy and mitophagy in diabetic nephropathy through the mTOR signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chunling; Zhang, Yuan; Kelly, Darren J.; Tan, Christina Y. R.; Gill, Anthony; Cheng, Delfine; Braet, Filip; Park, Jin-Sung; Sue, Carolyn M.; Pollock, Carol A.; Chen, Xin-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Hyperglycemia upregulates thioredoxin interacting protein (TXNIP) expression, which in turn induces ROS production, inflammatory and fibrotic responses in the diabetic kidney. Dysregulation of autophagy contributes to the development of diabetic nephropathy. However, the interaction of TXNIP with autophagy/mitophagy in diabetic nephropathy is unknown. In this study, streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were given TXNIP DNAzyme or scrambled DNAzyme for 12 weeks respectively. Fibrotic markers, mitochondrial function and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) were assessed in kidneys. Tubular autophagy and mitophagy were determined in kidneys from both human and rats with diabetic nephropathy. TXNIP and autophagic signaling molecules were examined. TXNIP DNAzyme dramatically attenuated extracellular matrix deposition in the diabetic kidneys compared to the control DNAzyme. Accumulation of autophagosomes and reduced autophagic clearance were shown in tubular cells of human diabetic compared to non-diabetic kidneys, which was reversed by TXNIP DNAzyme. High glucose induced mitochondrial dysfunction and mtROS production, and inhibited mitophagy in proximal tubular cells, which was reversed by TXNIP siRNA. TXNIP inhibition suppressed diabetes-induced BNIP3 expression and activation of the mTOR signaling pathway. Collectively, hyperglycemia-induced TXNIP contributes to the dysregulation of tubular autophagy and mitophagy in diabetic nephropathy through activation of the mTOR signaling pathway. PMID:27381856

  3. Non-Smc element 5 (Nse5) of the Smc5/6 complex interacts with SUMO pathway components.

    PubMed

    Bustard, Denise E; Ball, Lindsay G; Cobb, Jennifer A

    2016-06-15

    The Smc5/6 complex in Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains six essential non-Smc elements, Nse1-6. With the exception of Nse2 (also known as Mms21), which is an E3 small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) ligase, very little is understood about the role of these components or their contribution to Smc5/6 functionality. Our characterization of Nse5 establishes a previously unidentified relationship between the Smc5/6 complex and factors of the SUMO pathway. Nse5 physically associates with the E2 conjugating enzyme, Ubc9, where contacts are stabilized by non-covalent interactions with SUMO. SUMO also mediates the interactions between Nse5 and the two PIAS family E3 SUMO ligases, Siz1 and Siz2. Cells carrying the nse5-ts1 allele or lacking either SIZ1 or SIZ2 exhibit a reduction in Smc5 sumoylation upon MMS treatment and demonstrate functional redundancy for SUMO mediated events in the presence of DNA damage. Overall, given the extensive connection between Nse5 and components of the SUMO pathway, we speculate that one function of the Smc5/6 complex might be as a scaffold center to enable sumoylation events in budding yeast.

  4. Non-Smc element 5 (Nse5) of the Smc5/6 complex interacts with SUMO pathway components

    PubMed Central

    Bustard, Denise E.; Ball, Lindsay G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Smc5/6 complex in Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains six essential non-Smc elements, Nse1-6. With the exception of Nse2 (also known as Mms21), which is an E3 small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) ligase, very little is understood about the role of these components or their contribution to Smc5/6 functionality. Our characterization of Nse5 establishes a previously unidentified relationship between the Smc5/6 complex and factors of the SUMO pathway. Nse5 physically associates with the E2 conjugating enzyme, Ubc9, where contacts are stabilized by non-covalent interactions with SUMO. SUMO also mediates the interactions between Nse5 and the two PIAS family E3 SUMO ligases, Siz1 and Siz2. Cells carrying the nse5-ts1 allele or lacking either SIZ1 or SIZ2 exhibit a reduction in Smc5 sumoylation upon MMS treatment and demonstrate functional redundancy for SUMO mediated events in the presence of DNA damage. Overall, given the extensive connection between Nse5 and components of the SUMO pathway, we speculate that one function of the Smc5/6 complex might be as a scaffold center to enable sumoylation events in budding yeast. PMID:27215325

  5. The effect of chronic seaweed subsidies on herbivory: plant-mediated fertilization pathway overshadows lizard-mediated predator pathways.

    PubMed

    Piovia-Scott, Jonah; Spiller, David A; Takimoto, Gaku; Yang, Louie H; Wright, Amber N; Schoener, Thomas W

    2013-08-01

    Flows of energy and materials link ecosystems worldwide and have important consequences for the structure of ecological communities. While these resource subsidies typically enter recipient food webs through multiple channels, most previous studies focussed on a single pathway of resource input. We used path analysis to evaluate multiple pathways connecting chronic marine resource inputs (in the form of seaweed deposits) and herbivory in a shoreline terrestrial ecosystem. We found statistical support for a fertilization effect (seaweed increased foliar nitrogen content, leading to greater herbivory) and a lizard numerical response effect (seaweed increased lizard densities, leading to reduced herbivory), but not for a lizard diet-shift effect (seaweed increased the proportion of marine-derived prey in lizard diets, but lizard diet was not strongly associated with herbivory). Greater seaweed abundance was associated with greater herbivory, and the fertilization effect was larger than the combined lizard effects. Thus, the bottom-up, plant-mediated effect of fertilization on herbivory overshadowed the top-down effects of lizard predators. These results, from unmanipulated shoreline plots with persistent differences in chronic seaweed deposition, differ from those of a previous experimental study of the short-term effects of a pulse of seaweed deposition: while the increase in herbivory in response to chronic seaweed deposition was due to the fertilization effect, the short-term increase in herbivory in response to a pulse of seaweed deposition was due to the lizard diet-shift effect. This contrast highlights the importance of the temporal pattern of resource inputs in determining the mechanism of community response to resource subsidies.

  6. CDK5RAP2 interaction with components of the Hippo signaling pathway may play a role in primary microcephaly.

    PubMed

    Sukumaran, Salil K; Stumpf, Maria; Salamon, Sarah; Ahmad, Ilyas; Bhattacharya, Kurchi; Fischer, Sarah; Müller, Rolf; Altmüller, Janine; Budde, Birgit; Thiele, Holger; Tariq, Muhammad; Malik, Naveed Altaf; Nürnberg, Peter; Baig, Shahid Mahmood; Hussain, Muhammad Sajid; Noegel, Angelika A

    2017-04-01

    Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH) is characterized by a substantial reduction in brain size but with normal architecture. It is often linked to mutations in genes coding for centrosomal proteins; however, their role in brain size regulation is not completely understood. By combining homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing in an MCPH family from Pakistan, we identified a novel mutation (XM_011518861.1; c.4114C > T) in CDK5RAP2, the gene associated with primary microcephaly-3 (MCPH3), leading to a premature stop codon (p.Arg1372*). CDK5RAP2 is a component of the pericentriolar material important for the microtubule-organizing function of the centrosome. Patient-derived primary fibroblasts had strongly decreased CDK5RAP2 amounts, showed centrosomal and nuclear abnormalities and exhibited changes in cell size and migration. We further identified an interaction of CDK5RAP2 with the Hippo pathway components MST1 kinase and the transcriptional regulator TAZ. This finding potentially provides a mechanism through which the Hippo pathway with its roles in the regulation of centrosome number is linked to the centrosome. In the patient fibroblasts, we observed higher levels of TAZ and YAP. However, common target genes of the Hippo pathway were downregulated as compared to the control with the exception of BIRC5 (Survivin), which was significantly upregulated. We propose that the centrosomal deficiencies and the altered cellular properties in the patient fibroblasts can also result from the observed changes in the Hippo pathway components which could thus be relevant for MCPH and play a role in brain size regulation and development.

  7. Interaction between phosphoinositide turnover system and cyclic AMP pathway for the secretion of pancreastatin and somatostatin from QGP-1N cells.

    PubMed

    Tateishi, K; Funakoshi, A; Kitayama, N; Matsuoka, Y

    1992-06-30

    It is found that secretion of pancreastatin and somatostatin from QGP-1N cells is regulated through muscarinic receptor-mediated activation of phosphatidylinositide hydrolysis system. In this report, whether the cAMP pathway interacts with the phosphoinositide turnover system for the secretion of pancreastatin and somatostatin from QGP-1N cells through muscarinic receptors was studied. Stimulation of QGP-1N cells with carbachol increased intracellular cAMP levels. The carbachol-induced increase in cAMP levels was inhibited by atropine. Calcium ionophore (A23187) and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate increased cAMP synthesis. Dibutyryl cAMP, forskolin and theophylline stimulated secretion of pancreastatin and somatostatin. When either dibutyryl cAMP, forskolin or theophylline was added in culture medium with A23187, phorbol ester or carbachol, a synergistic effect was found on pancreastatin and somatostatin secretion. These results suggest that interaction between the phosphoinositide turnover system and the cAMP pathway occurs in QGP-1N cells through muscarinic receptor stimulation for the secretion of pancreastatin and somatostatin.

  8. Structural insight into dimeric interaction of the SARAH domains from Mst1 and RASSF family proteins in the apoptosis pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Eunha; Ryu, Kyoung-Seok; Pääkkönen, Kimmo; Güntert, Peter; Cheong, Hae-Kap; Lim, Dae-Sik; Lee, Jie-Oh; Jeon, Young Ho; Cheong, Chaejoon

    2007-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, apoptosis and cell cycle arrest by the Ras → RASSF → MST pathway are controlled by the interaction of SARAH (for Salvador/Rassf/Hippo) domains in the C-terminal part of tumor suppressor proteins. The Mst1 SARAH domain interacts with its homologous domain of Rassf1 and Rassf5 (also known as Nore1) by forming a heterodimer that mediates the apoptosis process. Here, we describe the homodimeric structure of the human Mst1 SARAH domain and its heterotypic interaction with the Rassf5 and Salvador (Sav) SARAH domain. The Mst1 SARAH structure forms a homodimer containing two helices per monomer. An antiparallel arrangement of the long α-helices (h2/h2′) provides an elongated binding interface between the two monomers, and the short 310 helices (h1/h1′) are folded toward that of the other monomer. Chemical shift perturbation experiments identified an elongated, tight-binding interface with the Rassf5 SARAH domain and a 1:1 heterodimer formation. The linker region between the kinase and the SARAH domain is shown to be disordered in the free protein. These results imply a novel mode of interaction with RASSF family proteins and provide insight into the mechanism of apoptosis control by the SARAH domain. PMID:17517604

  9. Association and gene-gene interactions study of reelin signaling pathway related genes with autism in the Han Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yidong; Xun, Guanglei; Guo, Hui; He, Yiqun; Ou, Jianjun; Dong, Huixi; Xia, Kun; Zhao, Jingping

    2016-04-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder with unclear etiology. Reelin had been proposed to participate in the etiology of autism due to its important role in brain development. The goal of this study was to explore the association and gene-gene interactions of reelin signaling pathway related genes (RELN, VLDLR, LRP8, DAB1, FYN, and CDK5) with autism in Han Chinese population. Genotyping data of the six genes were obtained from a recent genome-wide association study performed in 430 autistic children who fulfilled the DSM-IV-TR criteria for autistic disorder, and 1,074 healthy controls. Single marker case-control association analysis and haplotype case-control association analysis were conducted after the data was screened. Multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) was applied to further test gene-gene interactions. Neither the single marker nor the haplotype association tests found any significant difference between the autistic group and the control group after permutation test of 1,000 rounds. The 4-locus MDR model (comprising rs6143734, rs1858782, rs634500, and rs1924267 which belong to RELN and DAB1) was determined to be the model with the highest cross-validation consistency (CVC) and testing balanced accuracy. The results indicate that an interaction between RELN and DAB1 may increase the risk of autism in the Han Chinese population. Furthermore, it can also be inferred that the involvement of RELN in the etiology of autism would occur through interaction with DAB1.

  10. Interaction between Tbx1 and Hoxd10 and connection with TGFβ-BMP signal pathway during kidney development.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yu; Li, Fei; Zhao, Diana Yue; Zhang, Jing-Shu; Lv, Yuan; Li-Ling, Jesse

    2014-02-15

    Renal malformations are commonly found among patients carrying a 22q11 deletion which renders loss of Tbx1 gene, an important transcriptional factor implicated in a number of developmental processes. Smad1 is known to interact with Tbx1, but the exact mechanism remains unknown. In this study, we have measured the expression of Tbx1 in both murine and human tissues using RT-PCR, and analyzed its protein product and protein-protein interactions with Western blotting and immunoprecipitation assays. Precipitated proteins were verified with mass spectrometry. As discovered, Tbx1 binds with Hoxd10. Tbx1 and Hoxd10 genes also have similar expression profiles during murine kidney development. Based on homology between mouse and human, we hypothesized that such interaction also exists in human. Through a RNA interference experiment using a human embryonic kidney HEK293 cell line, we demonstrated that TBX1 can alter TGF-β/BMP, an important signaling pathway, through interacting with HOXD10. Above findings may shed light on the mechanism of TBX1 mutations leading to renal malformations found in patients carrying a 22q11 deletion.

  11. An Epidemiologic Study of Genetic Variation in Hormonal Pathways in Relation to the Effect of Hormone Replacement Therapy on Breast Cancer Risk

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    breast cancer risk to be modestly associated with one SNPs in each GSTP1 (rs1695: OR = 1.4 [95% CI: 1.02-1.9] for carriers of A allele); CYP1B1 ...In a multi-gene model including two genes with single gene effects within the estrogen pathway ( CYP1B1 *2 and GSTP1), breast cancer risk was 1.6 (95...pathways. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Genetic polymorphisms , epidemiology, exogenous risk factors, gene-environment interactions, hormonal pathway, estrogen

  12. Local and distal effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization on direct pathway Pi uptake and root growth in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Watts-Williams, Stephanie J; Jakobsen, Iver; Cavagnaro, Timothy R; Grønlund, Mette

    2015-07-01

    Two pathways exist for plant Pi uptake from soil: via root epidermal cells (direct pathway) or via associations with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, and the two pathways interact in a complex manner. This study investigated distal and local effects of AM colonization on direct root Pi uptake and root growth, at different soil P levels. Medicago truncatula was grown at three soil P levels in split-pots with or without AM fungal inoculation and where one root half grew into soil labelled with (33)P. Plant genotypes included the A17 wild type and the mtpt4 mutant. The mtpt4 mutant, colonized by AM fungi, but with no functional mycorrhizal pathway for Pi uptake, was included to better understand effects of AM colonization per se. Colonization by AM fungi decreased expression of direct Pi transporter genes locally, but not distally in the wild type. In mtpt4 mutant plants, direct Pi transporter genes and the Pi starvation-induced gene Mt4 were more highly expressed than in wild-type roots. In wild-type plants, less Pi was taken up via the direct pathway by non-colonized roots when the other root half was colonized by AM fungi, compared with non-mycorrhizal plants. Colonization by AM fungi strongly influenced root growth locally and distally, and direct root Pi uptake activity locally, but had only a weak influence on distal direct pathway activity. The responses to AM colonization in the mtpt4 mutant suggested that in the wild type, the increased P concentration of colonized roots was a major factor driving the effects of AM colonization on direct root Pi uptake.

  13. The effect of ball milling grinding pathways on the bulk and reactivity properties of calcium phosphate cements.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Heredia, M A; Bohner, M; Zhou, W; Winnubst, A J A; Wolke, J G C; Jansen, J A

    2011-07-01

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) are significant alternatives to autologous bone grafting. CPCs can be composed of biphasic or multiphase calcium phosphate (CaP) compounds. A common way to process CPCs is by ball milling. Ball milling can be used for grinding or mechanosynthesis. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of well-defined ball milling grinding parameters, applied via different milling pathways, on the properties of CPCs. Starting CaP compounds used included α-tricalcium phosphate, dicalcium phosphate anhydrous and precipitated hydroxyapatite. Scanning electron microscopy showed changes in the powder morphology, which were related to the behavior of the starting CaP materials. Specific surface area (SSA) and particle size (PS) measurements exposed the effect of ball milling on the CaP compounds and CPC powders. X-ray diffraction revealed no effect of ball milling pathways or milling time on the composition of CPCs or the starting materials, but affected their crystallographic properties. No contamination of the milling media or transformation into an amorphous calcium phosphate compound was found. The milling pathways affected setting and cohesion. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) revealed differences on the CPC v₄-PO₄³⁻ bands according to the interaction, created between the CaP compounds by the milling pathways. FTIR confirmed that the milling pathways changed the crystallographic properties. This study demonstrates that the pathways used for milling grinding modify the PS, SSA, and crystallographic properties of the powders, without affecting their composition. These modifications affected the bulk and reactivity properties of the CPCs by creating different setting and cohesion behaviors.

  14. Identification of a genetic interaction between the tumor suppressor EAF2 and the retinoblastoma protein (Rb) signaling pathway in C. elegans and prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Liquan; Wang, Dan; Fisher, Alfred L.; Wang, Zhou

    2014-05-02

    Highlights: • RNAi screen identified genetic enhancers for the C. elegans homolog of EAF2. • EAF2 and RBBP4 proteins physically bind to each other and alter transcription. • Overexpression of EAF2 and RBBP4 induces the cell death in prostate cancer cells. - Abstract: The tumor suppressor EAF2 is regulated by androgen signaling and associated with prostate cancer. While EAF2 and its partner ELL have been shown to be members of protein complexes involved in RNA polymerase II transcriptional elongation, the biologic roles for EAF2 especially with regards to the development of cancer remains poorly understood. We have previously identified the eaf-1 gene in Caenorhabditiselegans as the ortholog of EAF2, and shown that eaf-1 interacts with the ELL ortholog ell-1 to control development and fertility in worms. To identify genetic pathways that interact with eaf-1, we screened RNAi libraries consisting of transcription factors, phosphatases, and chromatin-modifying factors to identify genes which enhance the effects of eaf-1(tm3976) on fertility. From this screen, we identified lin-53, hmg-1.2, pha-4, ruvb-2 and set-6 as hits. LIN-53 is the C. elegans ortholog of human retinoblastoma binding protein 4/7 (RBBP 4/7), which binds to the retinoblastoma protein and inhibits the Ras signaling pathway. We find that lin-53 showed a synthetic interaction with eaf-1(tm3976) where knockdown of lin-53 in an eaf-1(tm3976) mutant resulted in sterile worms. This phenotype may be due to cell death as the treated worms contain degenerated embryos with increased expression of the ced-1:GFP cell death marker. Further we find that the interaction between eaf-1 and lin-53/RBBP4/7 also exists in vertebrates, which is reflected by the formation of a protein complex between EAF2 and RBBP4/7. Finally, overexpression of either human EAF2 or RBBP4 in LNCaP cells induced the cell death while knockdown of EAF2 in LNCaP enhanced cell proliferation, indicating an important role of EAF2 in

  15. Quasiconfigurations and the theory of effective interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poves, A.; Zuker, A.

    1981-05-01

    Perturbation theory is reformulated. Schrödinger's equation is recast as a non linear integral equation which yields by Neumann expansion a linked cluster series for the degenerate, quasi degenerate or non degenerate problem. An effective interaction theory emerges that can be formulated in a biorthogonal basis leading to a non Hermitian secular problem. Hermiticity can be recovered in a clear and rigorous way. As the mathematical form of the theory is dictated by the request of physical clarity the latter is obtained naturally. When written in diagrammatic many body language, the integral equation produces a set of linked coupled equations for the degenerate case. The classic summations (Brueckner, Bethe-Faddeev and RPA) emerge naturally. Possible extensions of nuclear matter theory are suggested.

  16. Hadronization of QCD and effective interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, M.R.

    1994-07-01

    An introductory treatment of hadronization through functional integral calculus and bifocal Bose fields is given. Emphasis is placed on the utility of this approach for providing a connection between QCD and effective hadronic field theories. The hadronic interactions obtained by this method are nonlocal due to the QCD substructure, yet, in the presence of an electromagnetic field, maintain the electromagnetic gauge invariance manifest at the quark level. A local chiral model which is structurally consistent with chiral perturbation theory is obtained through a derivative expansion of the nonlocalities with determined, finite coefficients. Tree-level calculations of the pion form factor and {pi} {minus} {pi} scattering, which illustrate the dual constituent-quark-chiral-model nature of this approach, are presented.

  17. Interaction between susceptibility loci in cGAS-STING pathway, MHC gene and HPV infection on the risk of cervical precancerous lesions in Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Di; Huang, Weihuang; Ou, Meiling; Guo, Congcong; Ye, Xingguang; Liu, Yang; Wang, Man; Zhang, Baohuan; Zhang, Na; Huang, Shiqi; Zang, Jiankun; Zhou, Zixing; Wen, Zihao; Zeng, Chengli; Wu, Chenfei; Huang, Chuican; Wei, Xiangcai; Yang, Guang; Jing, Chunxia

    2016-12-20

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a definite risk factor for cervical cancer. Nevertheless, only some infected individuals actually develop cervical cancer. The cGAS-STING pathway in innate immunity plays an important role in protecting against HPV infection. Chen et al. described that the rs2516448 SNP in the MHC locus may affect susceptibility to cervical cancer, a finding that we attempted to replicate in a Chinese population. To investigate the effects of cGAS, STING and MHC polymorphisms on susceptibility to cervical precancerous lesions, 9 SNPs were analyzed in 164 cervical precancerous lesion cases and 428 controls. Gene-gene and gene-environment interactions were also evaluated. We found a significantly decreased risk of cervical precancerous lesions for the GG genotype of rs311678 in the cGAS gene (ORadjusted = 0.40, 95% CI: 0.16-0.98). Moreover, MDR analysis identified a significant three-locus interaction model, involving HPV infection, age at menarche and rs311678 in cGAS. Additionally, a significant antagonistic interaction between HPV infection and rs311678 was found on an additive scale. In conclusion, our results indicate that the rs311678 polymorphism in the cGAS gene confers genetic susceptibility to cervical precancerous lesions. Moreover, the three-way gene-environment interactions further demonstrate that the rs311678 polymorphism in cGAS can significantly decrease the risk of HPV infection and the elder at menarche.

  18. Effects of bursty protein production on the noisy oscillatory properties of downstream pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toner, D. L. K.; Grima, R.

    2013-08-01

    Experiments show that proteins are translated in sharp bursts; similar bursty phenomena have been observed for protein import into compartments. Here we investigate the effect of burstiness in protein expression and import on the stochastic properties of downstream pathways. We consider two identical pathways with equal mean input rates, except in one pathway proteins are input one at a time and in the other proteins are input in bursts. Deterministically the dynamics of these two pathways are indistinguishable. However the stochastic behavior falls in three categories: (i) both pathways display or do not display noise-induced oscillations; (ii) the non-bursty input pathway displays noise-induced oscillations whereas the bursty one does not; (iii) the reverse of (ii). We derive necessary conditions for these three cases to classify systems involving autocatalysis, trimerization and genetic feedback loops. Our results suggest that single cell rhythms can be controlled by regulation of burstiness in protein production.

  19. The Pathway Active Learning Environment: An interactive web-based tool for physics education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Christopher Matthew

    The work described here represents an effort to design, construct, and test an interactive online multimedia learning environment that can provide physics instruction to students in their homes. The system was designed with one-on-one human tutoring in mind as the mode of instruction. The system uses an original combination of a video-based tutor that incorporates natural language processing video-centered lessons and additional illustrative multimedia. Our Synthetic Interview (SI) tutor provides pre-recorded video answers from expert physics instructors in response to students' typed natural language questions. Our lessons cover Newton's laws and provide a context for the tutoring interaction to occur, connect physics ideas to real-world behavior of mechanical systems, and allow for quantitative testing of physics. Additional multimedia can be used to supplement the SI tutors' explanations and illustrate the physics of interest. The system is targeted at students of algebra-based and concept-based physics at the college and high school level. The system logs queries to the SI tutor, responses to lesson questions and several other interactions with the system, tagging those interactions with a username and timestamp. We have provided several groups of students with access to our system under several different conditions ranging from the controlled conditions of our interview facility to the naturalistic conditions of use at home. In total nearly two-hundred students have accessed the system. To gain insight into the ways students might use the system and understand the utility of its various components we analyzed qualitative interview data collected with 22 algebra-based physics students who worked with our system in our interview facility. We also performed a descriptive analysis of data from the system's log of user interactions. Finally we explored the use of machine learning to explore the possibility of using automated assessment to augment the interactive

  20. Halo nuclei interactions using effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernando, Nippalage Lakma Kaushalya

    Effective field theory (EFT) provides a framework to exploit separation of scales in the physical system in order to perform systematic model-independent calculations. There has been significant interest in applying the methods of EFT to halo nuclei. Using halo effective field theory, I provide a model-independent calculation of the radiative neutron capture on lithium-7 over an energy range where the contribution from the 3+ resonance becomes important. This reaction initiate the sequence in the carbon-nitrogen-oxygen (CNO) cycle in the inhomogeneous BBN models, and determine the amount of heavy element production from its reaction rate. One finds that a satisfactory description of the capture reaction, in the present single-particle approximation, suggests the use of a resonance width about three times larger than the experimental value. Power counting arguments that establish a hierarchy for the electromagnetic one- and two-body currents is also presented. The neutron capture of Lithium7 calculation has direct impact on the proton capture on beryllium7 which plays an important role in the neutrino experiments studying physics beyond the Standard Model of particle physics. As a further study of halo nuclei interactions, the cross section of radiative capture of a neutron by carbon-14 is calculated by considering the dominant contribution from electric dipole transition. This is also a part of the CNO cycle and as the slowest reaction in the chain it limits the flow of the production of heavier nuclei A > 14. The cross section is expressed in terms of the elastic scattering parameters of an effective range expansion. Contributions from both the resonant and non-resonant interactions are calculated. Significant interferences between these leads to a capture contribution that deviates from a simple Breit-Wigner resonance form. Using EFT, I present electromagnetic form factors of several halo nuclei. The magnetic dipole moment and the charge radii of carbon-15

  1. Effectiveness of Artistic Interaction through Video Conferencing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eristi, Suzan Duygu

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated Turkish and Canadian primary school students' ways of expressing their perception of interactive art education through video conferencing and that of cultural interaction through pictorial representations. The qualitative research data were collected in the form of pictures and interviews on interactive art education along…

  2. Pathways of Understanding: the Interactions of Humanity and Global Environmental Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Harold K.; Katzenberger, John; Lousma, Jack; Mooney, Harold A.; Moss, Richard H.; Kuhn, William; Luterbacher, Urs; Wiegandt, Ellen

    1992-01-01

    How humans, interacting within social systems, affect and are affected by global change is explored. Recognizing the impact human activities have on the environment and responding to the need to document the interactions among human activities, the Consortium for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN) commissioned a group of 12 scientists to develop a framework illustrating the key human systems that contribute to global change. This framework, called the Social Process Diagram, will help natural and social scientists, educators, resource managers and policy makers envision and analyze how human systems interact among themselves and with the natural system. The Social Process Diagram consists of the following blocks that constitute the Diagram's structural framework: (1) fund of knowledge and experience; (2) preferences and expectations; (3) factors of production and technology; (4) population and social structure; (5) economic systems; (6) political systems and institutions; and (7) global scale environmental processes. To demonstrate potential ways the Diagram can be used, this document includes 3 hypothetical scenarios of global change issues: global warming and sea level rise; the environmental impact of human population migration; and energy and the environment. These scenarios demonstrate the Diagram's usefulness for visualizing specific processes that might be studied to evaluate a particular global change issues. The scenario also shows that interesting and unanticipated questions may emerge as links are explored between categories on the Diagram.

  3. Functional interactions between the macaque dorsal and ventral visual pathways during three-dimensional object vision.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Peter; Verhoef, Bram-Ernst; Premereur, Elsie

    2017-02-03

    The division of labor between the dorsal and the ventral visual stream in the primate brain has inspired numerous studies on the visual system in humans and in nonhuman primates. However, how and under which circumstances the two visual streams interact is still poorly understood. Here we review evidence from anatomy, modelling, electrophysiology, electrical microstimulation (EM), reversible inactivation and functional imaging in the macaque monkey aimed at clarifying at which levels in the hierarchy of visual areas the two streams interact, and what type of information might be exchanged between the two streams during three-dimensional (3D) object viewing. Neurons in both streams encode 3D structure from binocular disparity, synchronized activity between parietal and inferotemporal areas is present during 3D structure categorization, and clusters of 3D structure-selective neurons in parietal cortex are anatomically connected to ventral stream areas. In addition, caudal intraparietal cortex exerts a causal influence on 3D-structure related activations in more anterior parietal cortex and in inferotemporal cortex. Thus, both anatomical and functional evidence indicates that the dorsal and the ventral visual stream interact during 3D object viewing.

  4. iNOS signaling interacts with COX-2 pathway in colonic fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingting; Zhu, Min; Lance, Peter

    2012-10-01

    COX-2 and iNOS are two major inflammatory mediators implicated in colorectal inflammation and cancer. Previously, the role of colorectal fibroblasts involved in regulation of COX-2 and iNOS expression was largely ignored. In addition, the combined interaction of COX-2 and iNOS signalings and their significance in the progression of colorectal inflammation and cancer within the fibroblasts have received little investigation. To address those issues, we investigated the role of colonic fibroblasts in the regulation of COX-2 and iNOS gene expression, and explored possible mechanisms of interaction between COX-2 and iNOS signalings using a colonic CCD-18Co fibroblast line and LPS, a potential stimulator of COX-2 and iNOS. Our results clearly demonstrated that LPS activated COX-2 gene expression and enhanced PGE(2) production, stimulated iNOS gene expression and promoted NO production in the fibroblasts. Interestingly, activation of COX-2 signaling by LPS was not involved in activation of iNOS signaling, while activation of iNOS signaling by LPS contributed in part to activation of COX-2 signaling. Further analysis indicated that PKC plays a major role in the activation and interaction of COX-2 and iNOS signalings induced by LPS in the fibroblasts.

  5. Pathway deviation-based biomarker and multi-effect target identification in asbestos-related squamous cell carcinoma of the lung

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jiang; Zhang, Lin

    2017-01-01

    Asbestos-related lung carcinoma is one of the most devastating occupational cancers, and effective techniques for early diagnosis are still lacking. In the present study, a systematic approach was applied to detect a potential biomarker for asbestos-related lung cancer (ARLC); in particular asbestos-related squamous cell carcinoma (ARLC-SCC). Microarray data (GSE23822) were retrieved from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, including 26 ARLC-SCCs and 30 non-asbestos-related squamous cell lung carcinomas (NARLC-SCCs). Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified by the limma package, and then a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed according to the BioGRID and HPRD databases. A novel scoring approach integrating an expression deviation score and network degree of the gene was then proposed to weight the DEGs. Subsequently, the important genes were uploaded to DAVID for pathway enrichment analysis. Pathway correlation analysis was carried out using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient of the pathscore. In total, 1,333 DEGs, 391 upregulated and 942 downregulated, were obtained between the ARLC-SCCs and NARLC-SCCs. A total of 524 important genes for ARLC-SCC were significantly enriched in 22 KEGG pathways. Correlation analysis of these pathways showed that the pathway of SNARE interactions in vesicular transport was significantly correlated with 12 other pathways. Additionally, obvious correlations were found between multiple pathways by sharing cross-talk genes (EGFR, PRKX, PDGFB, PIK3R3, SLK, IGF1, CDC42 and PRKCA). On the whole, our data demonstrate that 8 cross-talk genes were found to bridge multiple ARLC-SCC-specific pathways, which may be used as candidate biomarkers and potential multi-effect targets. As these genes are involved in multiple pathways, it is possible that drugs targeting these genes may thus be able to influence multiple pathways simultaneously. PMID:28204826

  6. Interactive effects of pests increase seed yield.

    PubMed

    Gagic, Vesna; Riggi, Laura Ga; Ekbom, Barbara; Malsher, Gerard; Rusch, Adrien; Bommarco, Riccardo

    2016-04-01

    Loss in seed yield and therefore decrease in plant fitness due to simultaneous attacks by multiple herbivores is not necessarily additive, as demonstrated in evolutionary studies on wild plants. However, it is not clear how this transfers to crop plants that grow in very different conditions compared to wild plants. Nevertheless, loss in crop seed yield caused by any single pest is most often studied in isolation although crop plants are attacked by many pests that can cause substantial yield losses. This is especially important for crops able to compensate and even overcompensate for the damage. We investigated the interactive impacts on crop yield of four insect pests attacking different plant parts at different times during the cropping season. In 15 oilseed rape fields in Sweden, we estimated the damage caused by seed and stem weevils, pollen beetles, and pod midges. Pest pressure varied drastically among fields with very low correlation among pests, allowing us to explore interactive impacts on yield from attacks by multiple species. The plant damage caused by each pest species individually had, as expected, either no, or a negative impact on seed yield and the strongest negative effect was caused by pollen beetles. However, seed yield increased when plant damage caused by both seed and stem weevils was high, presumably due to the joint plant compensatory reaction to insect attack leading to overcompensation. Hence, attacks by several pests can change the impact on yield of individual pest species. Economic thresholds based on single species, on which pest management decisions currently rely, may therefore result in economically suboptimal choices being made and unnecessary excessive use of insecticides.

  7. Phenolic compounds: The inhibition effect on polyol pathway enzymes.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Hatice Esra; Beydemir, Şükrü

    2017-03-25

    The polyol pathway called as sorbitol way is a small part of glycose metabolism. The pathway is regarded as an important element in the pathogenesis of various diabetic complications in individuals with diabetes mellitus. The pathway plays a crucial role in hyperglycemia. The polyol pathway contains two enzymes as aldose reductase (AR) and sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH). In the present study, AR and SDH were purified from sheep liver by using simple chromatographic methods. AR was purified with a yield of 2.11% and approximately 162 fold and SDH was purified with a yield of 0.53% and approximately 9.07 purification fold. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was performed to check the purity and determine the subunit molecular weights of the enzymes. Subunit molecular weights of AR and SDH were 38.82 kDa and 37.74 kDa, respectively. Optimal pH, optimal ionic strength, optimal temperature, activation energy, activation enthalpy, Q10 value and stable pH were determined as 5.5, 10 mM, 50 °C, 2.16 kcal, 1.52 kcal, 1.33 and 8.0 for AR enzyme, respectively. The kinetic parameters Km and Vmax for AR were determined as 0.45 mM and 0.55 EU/mL, respectively. These parameters were studied for only AR in the present study, because it was previously studied for SDH. IC50 values of 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 3-hydroxybenzoic acid, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, salicylic acid, p-coumaric acid, ellagic acid, gallic acid, ferrulic acid and caffeic acid on AR and SDH activities were found as 120, 92.0, 49.0, 39.0, 40.0, 690, 7.00, 103, 84.0, 3.00 μM for AR enzyme and 5060, 8350, 6730, 7070, 5780, 24.0, 13.0, 26.0, 17.0, 21.0 μM for SDH enzyme, respectively. According to these results, caffeic acid was the strongest inhibitor for AR activity compared to the other phenolic acids and ellagic acid was also the strongest inhibitor for SDH activity.

  8. Interaction of the Human Papillomavirus E6 Oncoprotein with Sorting Nexin 27 Modulates Endocytic Cargo Transport Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ganti, Ketaki; Massimi, Paola; Manzo-Merino, Joaquin; Tomaić, Vjekoslav; Pim, David; Playford, Martin P.; Lizano, Marcela; Roberts, Sally; Kranjec, Christian; Doorbar, John; Banks, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    A subset of high-risk Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs) are the causative agents of a large number of human cancers, of which cervical is the most common. Two viral oncoproteins, E6 and E7, contribute directly towards the development and maintenance of malignancy. A characteristic feature of the E6 oncoproteins from cancer-causing HPV types is the presence of a PDZ binding motif (PBM) at its C-terminus, which confers interaction with cellular proteins harbouring PDZ domains. Here we show that this motif allows E6 interaction with Sorting Nexin 27 (SNX27), an essential component of endosomal recycling pathways. This interaction is highly conserved across E6 proteins from multiple high-risk HPV types and is mediated by a classical PBM-PDZ interaction but unlike many E6 targets, SNX27 is not targeted for degradation by E6. Rather, in HPV-18 positive cell lines the association of SNX27 with components of the retromer complex and the endocytic transport machinery is altered in an E6 PBM-dependent manner. Analysis of a SNX27 cargo, the glucose transporter GLUT1, reveals an E6-dependent maintenance of GLUT1 expression and alteration in its association with components of the endocytic transport machinery. Furthermore, knockdown of E6 in HPV-18 positive cervical cancer cells phenocopies the loss of SNX27, both in terms of GLUT1 expression levels and its vesicular localization, with a concomitant marked reduction in glucose uptake, whilst loss of SNX27 results in slower cell proliferation in low nutrient conditions. These results demonstrate that E6 interaction with SNX27 can alter the recycling of cargo molecules, one consequence of which is modulation of nutrient availability in HPV transformed tumour cells. PMID:27649450

  9. NMR studies on the interactions between yeast Vta1 and Did2 during the multivesicular bodies sorting pathway

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jie; Yang, Zhongzheng; Wang, Jiaolong; Zhao, Bin; Lan, Wenxian; Wang, Chunxi; Zhang, Xu; Wild, Cody J.; Liu, Maili; Xu, Zhaohui; Cao, Chunyang

    2016-01-01

    As an AAA-ATPase, Vps4 is important for function of multivesicular bodies (MVB) sorting pathway, which involves in cellular phenomena ranging from receptor down-regulation to viral budding to cytokinesis. The activity of Vps4 is stimulated by the interactions between Vta1 N-terminus (named as Vta1NTD) and Did2 fragment (176–204 aa) (termed as Did2176–204) or Vps60 (128–186 aa) (termed as Vps60128–186). The structural basis of how Vta1NTD binds to Did2176–204 is still unclear. To address this, in this report, the structure of Did2176–204 in complex with Vta1NTD was determined by NMR techniques, demonstrating that Did2176–204 interacts with Vta1NTD through its helix α6′ extending over the 2nd and the 3rd α-helices of Vta1NTD microtubule interacting and transport 1 (MIT1) domain. The residues within Did2176–204 helix α6′ in the interface make up of an amino acid sequence as E192′xxL195′xxR198′L199′xxL202′R203′, identical to type 1 MIT-interacting motif (MIM1) (D/E)xxLxxRLxxL(K/R) of CHMP1A180–196 observed in Vps4-CHMP1A complex structure, indicating that Did2 binds to Vta1NTD through canonical MIM1 interactions. Moreover, the Did2 binding does not result in Vta1NTD significant conformational changes, revealing that Did2, similar to Vps60, enhances Vta1 stimulation of Vps4 ATPase activity in an indirect manner. PMID:27924850

  10. Defining Adverse Outcome Pathways for Effects of the Fungicide Propiconazole of Fish Reproduction

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) are used to describe the linkage of chemical interactions in terms of molecular initiating events to whole organism responses suitable for risk assessment. This study was conducted to develop AOPs for the model fungicide propiconazole relative to r...

  11. Effects of the Insulin-like Growth Factor Pathway on the Regulation of Mammary Gland Development

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Woo Tae; Jeong, Ha Yeon; Lee, Seung Yoon; Song, Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) pathway is a key signal transduction pathway involved in cell proliferation, migration, and apoptosis. In dairy cows, IGF family proteins and binding receptors, including their intracellular binding partners, regulate mammary gland development. IGFs and IGF receptor interactions in mammary glands influence the early stages of mammogenesis, i.e., mammary ductal genesis until puberty. The IGF pathway includes three major components, IGFs (such as IGF-I, IGF-II, and insulin), their specific receptors, and their high-affinity binding partners (IGF binding proteins [IGFBPs]; i.e., IGFBP1–6), including specific proteases for each IGFBP. Additionally, IGFs and IGFBP interactions are critical for the bioactivities of various intracellular mechanisms, including cell proliferation, migration, and apoptosis. Notably, the interactions between IGFs and IGFBPs in the IGF pathway have been difficult to characterize during specific stages of bovine mammary gland development. In this review, we aim to describe the role of the interaction between IGFs and IGFBPs in overall mammary gland development in dairy cows. PMID:27795999

  12. Interactions between PPAR Gamma and the Canonical Wnt/Beta-Catenin Pathway in Type 2 Diabetes and Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Claes, Victor

    2017-01-01

    In both colon cancer and type 2 diabetes, metabolic changes induced by upregulation of the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling and downregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR gamma) may help account for the frequent association of these two diseases. In both diseases, PPAR gamma is downregulated while the canonical Wnt/beta-catenin pathway is upregulated. In colon cancer, upregulation of the canonical Wnt system induces activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase and deactivation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. As a result, a large part of cytosolic pyruvate is converted into lactate through activation of lactate dehydrogenase. Lactate is extruded out of the cell by means of activation of monocarboxylate lactate transporter-1. This phenomenon is called Warburg effect. PPAR gamma agonists induce beta-catenin inhibition, while inhibition of the canonical Wnt/beta-catenin pathway activates PPAR gamma. PMID:28298922

  13. Interaction of sonic hedgehog (SHH) pathway with cancer stem cell genes in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Samadani, Ali Akbar; Akhavan-Niaki, Haleh

    2015-03-01

    Gastric cancer may appear by frequent genetic or epigenetic changes in oncogenes, tumor suppressor or DNA mismatch repair genes. Molecular studies show the possibility of involvement of certain cancer pathways in gastric cancer. In this respect, DNA methylation is one of the most important epigenetic alterations in gastric cancer and identifying the signaling mechanism and also methylation of some genes that are involved in gastric cancer can help to improve treatment strategies. Relatively, there are many reported methylation alteration of genes in stem cells in all kinds of tumors with some of these genes having a key role in tumor development. Correspondingly, KLF5, CDX1/2, WNT1 and FEM1A are considerable genes in gastric cancer, although many researches and studies have illustrated that sonic hedgehog and expression of its signaling cascade proteins are related in gastric cancer. Relatively, modification in these genes causes many eclectic cancers such as rhabdomyosarcoma and diverse kinds of digestive system tumor development. Conspicuously, these master genes have a noticeable role in stem cell's growth regulation as well as other kinds of cancer such as breast cancer and leukemia. Hence, we concluded that research and studies on methylation and expression of these genes and also the investigation of molecular signaling in gastric cancer can acquire impressive conclusions in order to control and treat this common place and serious problem.

  14. TROL-FNR interaction reveals alternative pathways of electron partitioning in photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Vojta, Lea; Carić, Dejana; Cesar, Vera; Antunović Dunić, Jasenka; Lepeduš, Hrvoje; Kveder, Marina; Fulgosi, Hrvoje

    2015-06-04

    In photosynthesis, final electron transfer from ferredoxin to NADP(+) is accomplished by the flavo enzyme ferredoxin:NADP(+) oxidoreductase (FNR). FNR is recruited to thylakoid membranes via integral membrane thylakoid rhodanase-like protein TROL. We address the fate of electrons downstream of photosystem I when TROL is absent. We have employed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to study free radical formation and electron partitioning in TROL-depleted chloroplasts. DMPO was used to detect superoxide anion (O2(.-)) formation, while the generation of other free radicals was monitored by Tiron. Chloroplasts from trol plants pre-acclimated to different light conditions consistently exhibited diminished O2(.-) accumulation. Generation of other radical forms was elevated in trol chloroplasts in all tested conditions, except for the plants pre-acclimated to high-light. Remarkably, dark- and growth light-acclimated trol chloroplasts were resilient to O2(.-) generation induced by methyl-viologen. We propose that the dynamic binding and release of FNR from TROL can control the flow of photosynthetic electrons prior to activation of the pseudo-cyclic electron transfer pathway.

  15. TROL-FNR interaction reveals alternative pathways of electron partitioning in photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Vojta, Lea; Carić, Dejana; Cesar, Vera; Antunović Dunić, Jasenka; Lepeduš, Hrvoje; Kveder, Marina; Fulgosi, Hrvoje

    2015-01-01

    In photosynthesis, final electron transfer from ferredoxin to NADP+ is accomplished by the flavo enzyme ferredoxin:NADP+ oxidoreductase (FNR). FNR is recruited to thylakoid membranes via integral membrane thylakoid rhodanase-like protein TROL. We address the fate of electrons downstream of photosystem I when TROL is absent. We have employed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to study free radical formation and electron partitioning in TROL-depleted chloroplasts. DMPO was used to detect superoxide anion (O2.−) formation, while the generation of other free radicals was monitored by Tiron. Chloroplasts from trol plants pre-acclimated to different light conditions consistently exhibited diminished O2.− accumulation. Generation of other radical forms was elevated in trol chloroplasts in all tested conditions, except for the plants pre-acclimated to high-light. Remarkably, dark- and growth light-acclimated trol chloroplasts were resilient to O2.− generation induced by methyl-viologen. We propose that the dynamic binding and release of FNR from TROL can control the flow of photosynthetic electrons prior to activation of the pseudo-cyclic electron transfer pathway. PMID:26041075

  16. Conformational selection in a protein-protein interaction revealed by dynamic pathway analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Chakrabarti, Kalyan S.; Agafonov, Roman V.; Pontiggia, Francesco; ...

    2015-12-24

    Molecular recognition plays a central role in biology, and protein dynamics has been acknowledged to be important in this process. However, it is highly debated whether conformational changes happen before ligand binding to produce a binding-competent state (conformational selection) or are caused in response to ligand binding (induced fit). Proposals for both mechanisms in protein/protein recognition have been primarily based on structural arguments. However, the distinction between them is a question of the probabilities of going via these two opposing pathways. Here we present a direct demonstration of exclusive conformational selection in protein/protein recognition by measuring the flux for rhodopsinmore » kinase binding to its regulator recoverin, an important molecular recognition in the vision system. Using NMR spectroscopy, stopped-flow kinetics and isothermal titration calorimetry we show that recoverin populates a minor conformation in solution that exposes a hydrophobic binding pocket responsible for binding rhodopsin kinase. Lastly, protein dynamics in free recoverin limits the overall rate of binding.« less

  17. Respiratory responses to cold water immersion: neural pathways, interactions, and clinical consequences awake and asleep.

    PubMed

    Datta, Avijit; Tipton, Michael

    2006-06-01

    The ventilatory responses to immersion and changes in temperature are reviewed. A fall in skin temperature elicits a powerful cardiorespiratory response, termed "cold shock," comprising an initial gasp, hypertension, and hyperventilation despite a profound hypocapnia. The physiology and neural pathways of this are examined with data from original studies. The respiratory responses to skin cooling override both conscious and other autonomic respiratory controls and may act as a precursor to drowning. There is emerging evidence that the combination of the reestablishment of respiratory rhythm following apnea, hypoxemia, and coincident sympathetic nervous and cyclic vagal stimulation appears to be an arrhythmogenic trigger. The potential clinical implications of this during wakefulness and sleep are discussed in relation to sudden death during immersion, underwater birth, and sleep apnea. A drop in deep body temperature leads to a slowing of respiration, which is more profound than the reduced metabolic demand seen with hypothermia, leading to hypercapnia and hypoxia. The control of respiration is abnormal during hypothermia, and correction of the hypoxia by inhalation of oxygen may lead to a further depression of ventilation and even respiratory arrest. The immediate care of patients with hypothermia needs to take these factors into account to maximize the chances of a favorable outcome for the rescued casualty.

  18. Conformational selection in a protein-protein interaction revealed by dynamic pathway analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, Kalyan S.; Agafonov, Roman V.; Pontiggia, Francesco; Otten, Renee; Higgins, Matthew K.; Schertler, Gebhard F. X.; Oprian, Daniel D.; Kern, Dorothee

    2015-12-24

    Molecular recognition plays a central role in biology, and protein dynamics has been acknowledged to be important in this process. However, it is highly debated whether conformational changes happen before ligand binding to produce a binding-competent state (conformational selection) or are caused in response to ligand binding (induced fit). Proposals for both mechanisms in protein/protein recognition have been primarily based on structural arguments. However, the distinction between them is a question of the probabilities of going via these two opposing pathways. Here we present a direct demonstration of exclusive conformational selection in protein/protein recognition by measuring the flux for rhodopsin kinase binding to its regulator recoverin, an important molecular recognition in the vision system. Using NMR spectroscopy, stopped-flow kinetics and isothermal titration calorimetry we show that recoverin populates a minor conformation in solution that exposes a hydrophobic binding pocket responsible for binding rhodopsin kinase. Lastly, protein dynamics in free recoverin limits the overall rate of binding.

  19. Traf2 interacts with Smad4 and regulates BMP signaling pathway in MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, Koichi; Ikeda, Kyoko; Ito, Koichi

    2009-12-18

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) play important roles in osteoblast differentiation and maturation. In mammals, the BMP-induced receptor-regulated Smads form complexes with Smad4. These complexes translocate and accumulate in the nucleus, where they regulate the transcription of various target genes. However, the function of Smad4 remains unclear. We performed a yeast two-hybrid screen using Smad4 as bait and a cDNA library derived from bone marrow, to indentify the proteins interacting with Smad4. cDNA clones for Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated factor 2 (Traf2) were identified, and the interaction between the endogenous proteins was confirmed in the mouse osteoblast cell line MC3T3-E1. To investigate the function of Traf2, we silenced it with siRNA. The level of BMP-2 protein in the medium, the expression levels of the Bmp2 gene and BMP-induced transcription factor genes, including Runx2, Dlx5, Msx2, and Sp7, and the phosphorylated-Smad1 protein level were increased in cells transfected with Traf2 siRNA. The nuclear accumulation of Smad1 increased with TNF-{alpha} stimulation for 30 min at Traf2 silencing. These results suggest that the TNF-{alpha}-stimulated nuclear accumulation of Smad1 may be dependent on Traf2. Thus, the interaction between Traf2 and Smad4 may play a role in the cross-talk between TNF-{alpha} and BMP signaling pathways.

  20. Pentamidine blocks the interaction between mutant S100A5 and RAGE V domain and inhibits the RAGE signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Cho, Ching Chang; Chou, Ruey Hwang; Yu, Chin

    2016-08-19

    The human S100 protein family contains small, dimeric and acidic proteins that contain two EF-hand motifs and bind calcium. When S100A5 binds calcium, its conformation changes and promotes interaction with the target protein. The extracellular domain of RAGE (Receptor of Advanced Glycation End products) contain three domains: C1, C2 and V. The RAGE V domain is the target protein of S100A5 that promotes cell survival, growth and differentiation by activating several signaling pathways. Pentamidine is an apoptotic and antiparasitic drug that is used to treat or prevent pneumonia. Here, we found that pentamidine interacts with S100A5 using HSQC titration. We elucidated the interactions of S100A5 with RAGE V domain and pentamidine using fluorescence and NMR spectroscopy. We generated two binary models-the S100A5-RAGE V domain and S100A5-Pentamidine complex-and then observed that the pentamidine and RAGE V domain share a similar binding region in mS100A5. We also used the WST-1 assay to investigate the bioactivity of S100A5, RAGE V domain and pentamidine. These results indicated that pentamidine blocks the binding between S100A5 and RAGE V domain. This finding is useful for the development of new anti-proliferation drugs.

  1. Pathway to a Phenocopy: Heat Stress Effects in Early Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Crews, Sarah M.; McCleery, W. Tyler; Hutson, M. Shane

    2015-01-01

    Background Heat shocks applied at the onset of gastrulation in early Drosophila embryos frequently lead to phenocopies of U-shaped mutants – having characteristic failures in the late morphogenetic processes of germband retraction and dorsal closure. The pathway from non-specific heat stress to phenocopied abnormalities is unknown. Results Drosophila embryos subjected to 30-min, 38-°C heat shocks at gastrulation appear to recover and restart morphogenesis. Post-heat-shock development appears normal, albeit slower, until a large fraction of embryos develop amnioserosa holes (diameters > 100 μm). These holes are positively correlated with terminal U-shaped phenocopies. They initiate between amnioserosa cells and open over tens of minutes by evading normal wound healing responses. They are not caused by tissue-wide increases in mechanical stress or decreases in cell-cell adhesion, but instead appear to initiate from isolated apoptosis of amnioserosa cells. Conclusions The pathway from heat shock to U-shaped phenocopies involves the opening of one or more large holes in the amnioserosa that compromise its structural integrity and lead to failures in morphogenetic processes that rely on amnioserosa-generated tensile forces. The proposed mechanism by which heat shock leads to hole initiation and expansion is heterochonicity – i.e., disruption of morphogenetic coordination between embryonic and extra-embryonic cell types. PMID:26498920

  2. Optimal Scaling of Interaction Effects in Generalized Linear Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Rosmalen, Joost; Koning, Alex J.; Groenen, Patrick J. F.

    2009-01-01

    Multiplicative interaction models, such as Goodman's (1981) RC(M) association models, can be a useful tool for analyzing the content of interaction effects. However, most models for interaction effects are suitable only for data sets with two or three predictor variables. Here, we discuss an optimal scaling model for analyzing the content of…

  3. Modeling Effects of RNA on Capsid Assembly Pathways via Coarse-Grained Stochastic Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Gregory R.; Xie, Lu; Schwartz, Russell

    2016-01-01

    The environment of a living cell is vastly different from that of an in vitro reaction system, an issue that presents great challenges to the use of in vitro models, or computer simulations based on them, for understanding biochemistry in vivo. Virus capsids make an excellent model system for such questions because they typically have few distinct components, making them amenable to in vitro and modeling studies, yet their assembly can involve complex networks of possible reactions that cannot be resolved in detail by any current experimental technology. We previously fit kinetic simulation parameters to bulk in vitro assembly data to yield a close match between simulated and real data, and then used the simulations to study features of assembly that cannot be monitored experimentally. The present work seeks to project how assembly in these simulations fit to in vitro data would be altered by computationally adding features of the cellular environment to the system, specifically the presence of nucleic acid about which many capsids assemble. The major challenge of such work is computational: simulating fine-scale assembly pathways on the scale and in the parameter domains of real viruses is far too computationally costly to allow for explicit models of nucleic acid interaction. We bypass that limitation by applying analytical models of nucleic acid effects to adjust kinetic rate parameters learned from in vitro data to see how these adjustments, singly or in combination, might affect fine-scale assembly progress. The resulting simulations exhibit surprising behavioral complexity, with distinct effects often acting synergistically to drive efficient assembly and alter pathways relative to the in vitro model. The work demonstrates how computer simulations can help us understand how assembly might differ between the in vitro and in vivo environments and what features of the cellular environment account for these differences. PMID:27244559

  4. A quantitative chaperone interaction network reveals the architecture of cellular protein homeostasis pathways

    PubMed Central

    Taipale, Mikko; Tucker, George; Peng, Jian; Krykbaeva, Irina; Lin, Zhen-Yuan; Larsen, Brett; Choi, Hyungwon; Berger, Bonnie; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Lindquist, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Chaperones are abundant cellular proteins that promote the folding and function of their substrate proteins (clients). In vivo, chaperones also associate with a large and diverse set of co-factors (co-chaperones) that regulate their specificity and function. However, how these co-chaperones regulate protein folding and whether they have chaperone-independent biological functions is largely unknown. We have combined mass spectrometry and quantitative high-throughput LUMIER assays to systematically characterize the chaperone/co-chaperone/client interaction network in human cells. We uncover hundreds of novel chaperone clients, delineate their participation in specific co-chaperone complexes, and establish a surprisingly distinct network of protein/protein interactions for co-chaperones. As a salient example of the power of such analysis, we establish that NUDC family co-chaperones specifically associate with structurally related but evolutionarily distinct β-propeller folds. We provide a framework for deciphering the proteostasis network, its regulation in development and disease, and expand the use of chaperones as sensors for drug/target engagement. PMID:25036637

  5. AEG-1/MTDH/LYRIC: Signaling Pathways, Downstream Genes, Interacting Proteins, and Regulation of Tumor Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Emdad, Luni; Das, Swadesh K.; Dasgupta, Santanu; Hu, Bin; Sarkar, Devanand; Fisher, Paul B.

    2014-01-01

    Astrocyte elevated gene-1 (AEG-1), also known as metadherin (MTDH) and lysine-rich CEACAM1 coisolated (LYRIC), was initially cloned in 2002. AEG-1/MTDH/LYRIC has emerged as an important oncogene that is overexpressed in multiple types of human cancer. Expanded research on AEG-1/MTDH/LYRIC has established a functional role of this molecule in several crucial aspects of tumor progression, including transformation, proliferation, cell survival, evasion of apoptosis, migration and invasion, metastasis, angiogenesis, and chemoresistance. The multifunctional role of AEG-1/MTDH/LYRIC in tumor development and progression is associated with a number of signaling cascades, and recent studies identified several important interacting partners of AEG-1/MTDH/LYRIC in regulating cancer promotion and other biological functions. This review evaluates the current literature on AEG-1/MTDH/LYRIC function relative to signaling changes, interacting partners, and angiogenesis and highlights new perspectives of this molecule, indicating its potential as a significant target for the clinical treatment of various cancers and other diseases. PMID:23889988

  6. Designing Interactions for Learning: Physicality, Interactivity, and Interface Effects in Digital Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to better understand the role of physicality, interactivity, and interface effects in learning with digital content. Drawing on work in cognitive science, human-computer interaction, and multimedia learning, the study argues that interfaces that promote physical interaction can provide "conceptual leverage"…

  7. Interacting appetite-regulating pathways in the hypothalamic regulation of body weight.

    PubMed

    Kalra, S P; Dube, M G; Pu, S; Xu, B; Horvath, T L; Kalra, P S

    1999-02-01

    Various aspects of the complex spatio-temporal patterning of hypothalamic signaling that leads to the development of synchronized nocturnal feeding in the rat are critically examined. Undoubtedly, as depicted in Fig. 7, a distinct ARN in the hypothalamus is involved in the control of nocturnal appetite. At least four basic elements operate within this ARN. These are: 1) A discrete appetite-driving or orexigenic network of NPY, NE, GABA, GAL, EOP, and orexin transduces and releases appetite-stimulating signals. 2) Similarly, anorexigenic signal-producing pathways (e.g., CRH, GLP-1, alpha MSH, and CART) orchestrate neural events for dissipation of appetite and to terminate feeding, possibly by interrupting NPY efflux and action at a postsynaptic level within the hypothalamus. It is possible that some of these may represent the physiologically relevant "off" switches under the influence of GABA alone, or AgrP alone, or in combination with NPY released from the NPY-, GABA-, and AgrP-coproducing neurons. 3) Recent evidence shows that neural elements in the VMN-DMN complex tonically restrain the orexigenic signals during the intermeal interval; the restraint is greatly aided by leptin's action via diminution of orexigenic (NPY) and augmentation of anorexigenic (GLP-1, alpha MSH, and CART) signals. Since interruption of neurotransmission in the VMN resulted in hyperphagia and development of leptin resistance, it seems likely that the VMN is an effector site for the restraint exercised by leptin. The daily rhythms in leptin synthesis and release are temporally dissociable because the onset of daily rise in leptin gene expression in adipocytes precedes that in leptin secretion. Nevertheless, these rhythms are in phase with daily ingestive behavior because the peak in circulating leptin levels occurs during the middle of the feeding period. These observations, coupled with the fact that circulating levels of leptin are directly related to adiposity, pose a new challenge for

  8. A short revisit to Kuo-Brown effective interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, XiaoBao; Dong, GuoXiang

    2015-10-01

    This paper is a short revisit to Kuo-Brown effective interaction derived from the Hamada-Johnston nucleon-nucleon potential, done by Gerry Brown and Tom Kuo. This effective interaction, derived in year 1966, is the first attempt to describe nuclear structure properties from the free nucleon-nucleon potential. Nowadays much progress has been achieved for the effective interactions in shell model. We would compare the effective interactions obtained in the 1966 paper with up-to-date shell-model interactions in sd-shell and pf-shell model space. Recent knowledge of effective interactions on nuclear structure, can also be traced in the Kuo- Brown effective interaction, i.e., the universal roles of central and tensor forces, which reminds us that such discovery should be noticed much earlier.

  9. Cytosolic clearance of replication-deficient mutants reveals Francisella tularensis interactions with the autophagic pathway.

    PubMed

    Chong, Audrey; Wehrly, Tara D; Child, Robert; Hansen, Bryan; Hwang, Seungmin; Virgin, Herbert W; Celli, Jean

    2012-09-01

    Cytosolic bacterial pathogens must evade intracellular innate immune recognition and clearance systems such as autophagy to ensure their survival and proliferation. The intracellular cycle of the bacterium Francisella tularensis is characterized by rapid phagosomal escape followed by extensive proliferation in the macrophage cytoplasm. Cytosolic replication, but not phagosomal escape, requires the locus FTT0369c, which encodes the dipA gene (deficient in intracellular replication A). Here, we show that a replication-deficient, ∆dipA mutant of the prototypical SchuS4 strain is eventually captured from the cytosol of murine and human macrophages into double-membrane vacuoles displaying the late endosomal marker, LAMP1, and the autophagy-associated protein, LC3, coinciding with a reduction in viable intracellular bacteria. Capture of SchuS4ΔdipA was not dipA-specific as other replication-deficient bacteria, such as chloramphenicol-treated SchuS4 and a purine auxotroph mutant SchuS4ΔpurMCD, were similarly targeted to autophagic vacuoles. Vacuoles containing replication-deficient bacteria were labeled with ubiquitin and the autophagy receptors SQSTM1/p62 and NBR1, and their formation was decreased in macrophages from either ATG5-, LC3B- or SQSTM1-deficient mice, indicating recognition by the ubiquitin-SQSTM1-LC3 pathway. While a fraction of both the wild-type and the replication-impaired strains were ubiquitinated and recruited SQSTM1, only the replication-defective strains progressed to autophagic capture, suggesting that wild-type Francisella interferes with the autophagic cascade. Survival of replication-deficient strains was not restored in autophagy-deficient macrophages, as these bacteria died in the cytosol prior to autophagic capture. Collectively, our results demonstrate that replication-impaired strains of Francisella are cleared by autophagy, while replication-competent bacteria seem to interfere with autophagic recognition, therefore ensuring survival

  10. Neuron-astrocyte interactions, pyruvate carboxylation and the pentose phosphate pathway in the neonatal rat brain.

    PubMed

    Morken, Tora Sund; Brekke, Eva; Håberg, Asta; Widerøe, Marius; Brubakk, Ann-Mari; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Glucose and acetate metabolism and the synthesis of amino acid neurotransmitters, anaplerosis, glutamate-glutamine cycling and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) have been extensively investigated in the adult, but not the neonatal rat brain. To do this, 7 day postnatal (P7) rats were injected with [1-(13)C]glucose and [1,2-(13)C]acetate and sacrificed 5, 10, 15, 30 and 45 min later. Adult rats were injected and sacrificed after 15 min. To analyse pyruvate carboxylation and PPP activity during development, P7 rats received [1,2-(13)C]glucose and were sacrificed 30 min later. Brain extracts were analysed using (1)H- and (13)C-NMR spectroscopy. Numerous differences in metabolism were found between the neonatal and adult brain. The neonatal brain contained lower levels of glutamate, aspartate and N-acetylaspartate but similar levels of GABA and glutamine per mg tissue. Metabolism of [1-(13)C]glucose at the acetyl CoA stage was reduced much more than that of [1,2-(13)C]acetate. The transfer of glutamate from neurons to astrocytes was much lower while transfer of glutamine from astrocytes to glutamatergic neurons was relatively higher. However, transport of glutamine from astrocytes to GABAergic neurons was lower. Using [1,2-(13)C]glucose it could be shown that despite much lower pyruvate carboxylation, relatively more pyruvate from glycolysis was directed towards anaplerosis than pyruvate dehydrogenation in astrocytes. Moreover, the ratio of PPP/glucose-metabolism was higher. These findings indicate that only the part of the glutamate-glutamine cycle that transfers glutamine from astrocytes to neurons is operating in the neonatal brain and that compared to adults, relatively more glucose is prioritised to PPP and pyruvate carboxylation. Our results may have implications for the capacity to protect the neonatal brain against excitotoxicity and oxidative stress.

  11. Interactions of fluoroquinolone antibacterial agents with aqueous chlorine: reaction kinetics, mechanisms, and transformation pathways.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Michael C; Shah, Amisha D; von Gunten, Urs; Huang, Ching-Hua

    2005-09-15

    Kinetics, products, and mechanistic aspects of reactions between free available chlorine (HOCl/OCl-), ciprofloxacin (CF), and enrofloxacin (EF) were extensively investigated to elucidate the behavior of fluoroquinolone antibacterial agents during water chlorination processes. Although the molecular structures of these two substrates differ only with respect to degree of N(4) amine alkylation, CF and EF exhibit markedly different HOCl reaction kinetics and transformation pathways. HOCI reacts very rapidly at CF's secondary N(4) amine, forming a chloramine intermediate that spontaneously decays in aqueous solution by concerted piperazine fragmentation. In contrast, HOCl reacts relatively slowly at EF's tertiary N(4) amine, apparently forming a highly reactive chlorammonium intermediate (R3N-(4)Cl+) that can catalytically halogenate EF or other substrates present in solution. Flumequine, a fluoroquinolone that lacks the characteristic piperazine ring, exhibits no apparent reactivity toward HOCI but appears to undergo facile halodecarboxylation in the presence of R3N(4)-Cl+ species derived from EF. Measured reaction kinetics were validated in real water matrixes by modeling CF and EF losses in the presence of free chlorine residuals. Combined chlorine (CC) kinetics were determined under selected conditions to evaluate the potential significance of reactions with chloramines. CF's rapid kinetics in direct reactions with HOCl, and relatively high reactivity toward CC, indicate that secondary amine-containing fluoroquinolones should be readily transformed during chlorination of real waters, whether applied chlorine doses are present as free or combined residuals. However, EF's slower HOCl reaction kinetics, recalcitrance toward CC, and participation in the catalytic halogenation cycle described herein suggest that tertiary amine-containing fluoroquinolones will be comparatively stable during most full-scale water chlorination processes.

  12. The PUB domain: a putative protein-protein interaction domain implicated in the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Park, H; Till, E A; Lennarz, W J

    2001-10-12

    Cytoplasmic peptide:N-glycanase (PNGase) is a de-N-glycosylating enzyme which may be involved in the proteasome-dependent pathway for degradation of misfolded glycoproteins formed in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that are exported into the cytoplasm. A cytoplasmic PNGase found in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Png1p, is widely distributed in higher eukaryotes as well as in yeast (Suzuki, T., et al. J. Cell Biol. 149, 1039-1051, 2000). The recently uncovered complete genome sequence of Arabidopsis thaliana prompted us to search for the protein homologue of Png1p in this organism. Interestingly, when the mouse Png1p homologue sequence was used as a query, not only a Png1p homologue containing a transglutaminase-like domain that is believed to contain a catalytic triad for PNGase activity, but also four proteins which had a domain of 46 amino acids in length that exhibited significant similarity to the N-terminus of mouse Png1p were identified. Moreover, three of these homologous proteins were also found to possess a UBA or UBX domain, which are found in various proteins involved in the ubiquitin-related pathway. We name this newly found homologous region the PUB (Peptide:N-glycanase/UBA or UBX-containing proteins) domain and propose that this domain may mediate protein-protein interactions.

  13. Genetic Allee effects and their interaction with ecological Allee effects.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Meike J; Stuis, Hanna; Metzler, Dirk

    2016-10-12

    It is now widely accepted that genetic processes such as inbreeding depression and loss of genetic variation can increase the extinction risk of small populations. However, it is generally unclear whether extinction risk from genetic causes gradually increases with decreasing population size or whether there is a sharp transition around a specific threshold population size. In the ecological literature, such threshold phenomena are called 'strong Allee effects' and they can arise for example from mate limitation in small populations. In this study, we aim to (i) develop a meaningful notion of a 'strong genetic Allee effect', (ii) explore whether and under what conditions such an effect can arise from inbreeding depression due to recessive deleterious mutations, and (iii) quantify the interaction of potential genetic Allee effects with the well-known mate-finding Allee effect. We define a strong genetic Allee effect as a genetic process that causes a population's survival probability to be a sigmoid function of its initial size. The inflection point of this function defines the critical population size. To characterize survival-probability curves, we develop and analyse simple stochastic models for the ecology and genetics of small populations. Our results indicate that inbreeding depression can indeed cause a strong genetic Allee effect, but only if individuals carry sufficiently many deleterious mutations (lethal equivalents). Populations suffering from a genetic Allee effect often first grow, then decline as inbreeding depression sets in and then potentially recover as deleterious mutations are purged. Critical population sizes of ecological and genetic Allee effects appear to be often additive, but even superadditive interactions are possible. Many published estimates for the number of lethal equivalents in birds and mammals fall in the parameter range where strong genetic Allee effects are expected. Unfortunately, extinction risk due to genetic Allee effects

  14. Neuron-glia interactions through the Heartless FGF receptor signaling pathway mediate morphogenesis of Drosophila astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Stork, Tobias; Sheehan, Amy; Tasdemir-Yilmaz, Ozge E; Freeman, Marc R

    2014-07-16

    Astrocytes are critically important for neuronal circuit assembly and function. Mammalian protoplasmic astrocytes develop a dense ramified meshwork of cellular processes to form intimate contacts with neuronal cell bodies, neurites, and synapses. This close neuron-glia morphological relationship is essential for astrocyte function, but it remains unclear how astrocytes establish their intricate morphology, organize spatial domains, and associate with neurons and synapses in vivo. Here we characterize a Drosophila glial subtype that shows striking morphological and functional similarities to mammalian astrocytes. We demonstrate that the Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor Heartless autonomously controls astrocyte membrane growth, and the FGFs Pyramus and Thisbe direct astrocyte processes to ramify specifically in CNS synaptic regions. We further show that the shape and size of individual astrocytes are dynamically sculpted through inhibitory or competitive astrocyte-astrocyte interactions and Heartless FGF signaling. Our data identify FGF signaling through Heartless as a key regulator of astrocyte morphological elaboration in vivo.

  15. The Effect of Water on Crack Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaede, O.; Regenauer-Lieb, K.

    2009-04-01

    While the mechanical coupling between pore fluid and solid phase is relatively well understood, quantitative studies dealing with chemical-mechanical weakening in geological materials are rare. Many classical poroelastic problems can be addressed with the simple law of effective stress. Experimental studies show that the presence of a chemically active fluid can have effects that exceed the predictions of the law of effective stress. These chemical fluid-rock interactions alter the mechanical properties of the solid phase. Especially chemical-mechanical weakening has important ramifications for many areas of applied geosciences ranging from nuclear waste disposal over reservoir enhancement to fault stability. In this study, we model chemically induced changes of the size of the process zone around a crack tip. The knowledge of the process zone size is used to extend existing effective medium approximations of cracked solids. The stress distribution around a crack leads to a chemical potential gradient. This gradient will be a driver for mass diffusion through the solid phase. As an example, mass diffusion is towards the crack tip for a mode I crack. In this case a chemical reaction, that weakens the solid phase, will increase the size of the process zone around the crack tip. We apply our model to the prominent hydrolytic weakening effect observed in the quartz-water system (Griggs and Blacic, 1965). Hydrolytic weakening is generally attributed to water hydrolyzing the strong Si-O bonds of the quartz crystal. The hydrolysis replaces a Si-O-Si bridge with a relatively weak hydrogen bridge between two silanol groups. This enhances dislocation mobility and hence the yield stress is reduced. The plastic process zone around a crack tip is therefore larger in a wet crystal than in a dry crystal. We calculate the size of the process zone by solving this coupled mechanical-chemical problem with the Finite Element code ABAQUS. We consider single crack, collinear crack and

  16. Molecular interaction of the first 3 enzymes of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway of Trypanosoma cruzi

    SciTech Connect

    Nara, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Muneaki; Hirawake, Hiroko; Liao, Chien-Wei; Fukai, Yoshihisa; Suzuki, Shigeo; Tsubouchi, Akiko; Morales, Jorge; Takamiya, Shinzaburo; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Taka, Hikari; Mineki, Reiko; Fan, Chia-Kwung; Inaoka, Daniel Ken; Inoue, Masayuki; Tanaka, Akiko; Harada, Shigeharu; Kita, Kiyoshi; and others

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An Escherichia coli strain co-expressing CPSII, ATC, and DHO of Trypanosoma cruzi was constructed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Molecular interactions between CPSII, ATC, and DHO of T. cruzi were demonstrated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CPSII bound with both ATC and DHO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATC bound with both CPSII and DHO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A functional tri-enzyme complex might precede the establishment of the fused enzyme. -- Abstract: The first 3 reaction steps of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway are catalyzed by carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase II (CPSII), aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATC), and dihydroorotase (DHO), respectively. In eukaryotes, these enzymes are structurally classified into 2 types: (1) a CPSII-DHO-ATC fusion enzyme (CAD) found in animals, fungi, and amoebozoa, and (2) stand-alone enzymes found in plants and the protist groups. In the present study, we demonstrate direct intermolecular interactions between CPSII, ATC, and DHO of the parasitic protist Trypanosoma cruzi, which is the causative agent of Chagas disease. The 3 enzymes were expressed in a bacterial expression system and their interactions were examined. Immunoprecipitation using an antibody specific for each enzyme coupled with Western blotting-based detection using antibodies for the counterpart enzymes showed co-precipitation of all 3 enzymes. From an evolutionary viewpoint, the formation of a functional tri-enzyme complex may have preceded-and led to-gene fusion to produce the CAD protein. This is the first report to demonstrate the structural basis of these 3 enzymes as a model of CAD. Moreover, in conjunction with the essentiality of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis in the parasite, our findings provide a rationale for new strategies for developing drugs for Chagas disease, which target the intermolecular interactions of these 3 enzymes.

  17. MORN5 Expression during Craniofacial Development and Its Interaction with the BMP and TGFβ Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Cela, Petra; Hampl, Marek; Fu, Katherine K.; Kunova Bosakova, Michaela; Krejci, Pavel; Richman, Joy M.; Buchtova, Marcela

    2016-01-01

    MORN5 (MORN repeat containing 5) is encoded by a locus positioned on chromosome 17 in the chicken genome. The MORN motif is found in multiple copies in several proteins including junctophilins or phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinase family and the MORN proteins themselves are found across the animal and plant kingdoms. MORN5 protein has a characteristic punctate pattern in the cytoplasm in immunofluorescence imaging. Previously, MORN5 was found among differentially expressed genes in a microarray profiling experiment of the chicken embryo head. Here, we provided in situ hybridization to analyse, in detail, the MORN5 expression in chick craniofacial structures. The expression of MORN5 was first observed at stage HH17-18 (E2.5). MORN5 expression gradually appeared on either side of the primitive oral cavity, within the maxillary region. At stage HH20 (E3), prominent expression was localized in the mandibular prominences lateral to the midline. From stage HH20 up to HH29 (E6), there was strong expression in restricted regions of the maxillary and mandibular prominences. The frontonasal mass (in the midline of the face) expressed MORN5, starting at HH27 (E5). The expression was concentrated in the corners or globular processes, which will ultimately fuse with the cranial edges of the maxillary prominences. MORN5 expression was maintained in the fusion zone up to stage HH29. In sections MORN5 expression was localized preferentially in the mesenchyme. Previously, we examined signals that regulate MORN5 expression in the face based on a previous microarray study. Here, we validated the array results with in situ hybridization and QPCR. MORN5 was downregulated 24 h after Noggin and/or RA treatment. We also determined that BMP pathway genes are downstream of MORN5 following siRNA knockdown. Based on these results, we conclude that MORN5 is both regulated by and required for BMP signaling. The restricted expression of MORN5 in the lip fusion zone shown here supports the

  18. Interactive effects of fire and large herbivores on web-building spiders.

    PubMed

    Foster, C N; Barton, P S; Wood, J T; Lindenmayer, D B

    2015-09-01

    Altered disturbance regimes are a major driver of biodiversity loss worldwide. Maintaining or re-creating natural disturbance regimes is therefore the focus of many conservation programmes. A key challenge, however, is to understand how co-occurring disturbances interact to affect biodiversity. We experimentally tested for the interactive effects of prescribed fire and large macropod herbivores on the web-building spider assemblage of a eucalypt forest understorey and investigated the role of vegetation in mediating these effects using path analysis. Fire had strong negative effects on the density of web-building spiders, which were partly mediated by effects on vegetation structure, while negative effects of large herbivores on web density were not related to changes in vegetation. Fire amplified the effects of large herbivores on spiders, both via vegetation-mediated pathways and by increasing herbivore activity. The importance of vegetation-mediated pathways and fire-herbivore interactions differed for web density and richness and also differed between web types. Our results demonstrate that for some groups of web-building spiders, the effects of co-occurring disturbance drivers may be mostly additive, whereas for other groups, interactions between drivers can amplify disturbance effects. In our study system, the use of prescribed fire in the presence of high densities of herbivores could lead to reduced densities and altered composition of web-building spiders, with potential cascading effects through the arthropod food web. Our study highlights the importance of considering both the independent and interactive effects of disturbances, as well as the mechanisms driving their effects, in the management of disturbance regimes.

  19. Cytochrome c Oxidase Biogenesis and Metallochaperone Interactions: Steps in the Assembly Pathway of a Bacterial Complex

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    Biogenesis of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (COX) is a complex process involving the coordinate expression and assembly of numerous subunits (SU) of dual genetic origin. Moreover, several auxiliary factors are required to recruit and insert the redox-active metal compounds, which in most cases are buried in their protein scaffold deep inside the membrane. Here we used a combination of gel electrophoresis and pull-down assay techniques in conjunction with immunostaining as well as complexome profiling to identify and analyze the composition of assembly intermediates in solubilized membranes of the bacterium Paracoccus denitrificans. Our results show that the central SUI passes through at least three intermediate complexes with distinct subunit and cofactor composition before formation of the holoenzyme and its subsequent integration into supercomplexes. We propose a model for COX biogenesis in which maturation of newly translated COX SUI is initially assisted by CtaG, a chaperone implicated in CuB site metallation, followed by the interaction with the heme chaperone Surf1c to populate the redox-active metal-heme centers in SUI. Only then the remaining smaller subunits are recruited to form the mature enzyme which ultimately associates with respiratory complexes I and III into supercomplexes. PMID:28107462

  20. Endogenous tissue factor pathway inhibitor has a limited effect on host defence in murine pneumococcal pneumonia.

    PubMed

    van den Boogaard, Florry E; van 't Veer, Cornelis; Roelofs, Joris J T H; Meijers, Joost C M; Schultz, Marcus J; Broze, George J; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-07-01

    Streptococcus (S.) pneumoniae is the most common causative pathogen in community-acquired pneumonia. Coagulation and inflammation interact in the host response to infection. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) is a natural anticoagulant protein that inhibits tissue factor (TF), the main activator of inflammation-induced coagulation. It was the objective of this study to investigate the effect of endogenous TFPI levels on coagulation, inflammation and bacterial growth during S. pneumoniae pneumonia in mice. The effect of low endogenous TFPI levels was studied by administration of a neutralising anti-TFPI antibody to wild-type mice, and by using genetically modified mice expressing low levels of TFPI, due to a genetic deletion of the first Kunitz domain of TFPI (TFPIK1(-/-)) rescued with a human TFPI transgene. Pneumonia was induced by intranasal inoculation with S. pneumoniae and samples were obtained at 6, 24 and 48 hours after infection. Anti-TFPI reduced TFPI activity by ~50 %. Homozygous lowTFPI mice and heterozygous controls had ~10 % and ~50 % of normal TFPI activity, respectively. TFPI levels did not influence bacterial growth or dissemination. Whereas lung pathology was unaffected in all groups, mice with ~10 % (but not with ~50 %) of TFPI levels displayed elevated lung cytokine and chemokine concentrations 24 hours after infection. None of the groups with low TFPI levels showed an altered procoagulant response in lungs or plasma during pneumonia. These data argue against an important role for endogenous TFPI in the antibacterial, inflammatory and procoagulant response during pneumococcal pneumonia.

  1. Development of a pluripotent stem cell derived neuronal model to identify chemically induced pathway perturbations in relation to neurotoxicity: Effects of CREB pathway inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Pistollato, Francesca; Louisse, Jochem; Scelfo, Bibiana; Mennecozzi, Milena; Accordi, Benedetta; Basso, Giuseppe; Gaspar, John Antonydas; Zagoura, Dimitra; Barilari, Manuela; Palosaari, Taina; Sachinidis, Agapios; Bremer-Hoffmann, Susanne

    2014-10-15

    According to the advocated paradigm shift in toxicology, acquisition of knowledge on the mechanisms underlying the toxicity of chemicals, such as perturbations of biological pathways, is of primary interest. Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), such as human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), offer a unique opportunity to derive physiologically relevant human cell types to measure molecular and cellular effects of such pathway modulations. Here we compared the neuronal differentiation propensity of hESCs and hiPSCs with the aim to develop novel hiPSC-based tools for measuring pathway perturbation in relation to molecular and cellular effects in vitro. Among other fundamental pathways, also, the cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB) pathway was activated in our neuronal models and gave us the opportunity to study time-dependent effects elicited by chemical perturbations of the CREB pathway in relation to cellular effects. We show that the inhibition of the CREB pathway, using 2-naphthol-AS-E-phosphate (KG-501), induced an inhibition of neurite outgrowth and synaptogenesis, as well as a decrease of MAP2{sup +} neuronal cells. These data indicate that a CREB pathway inhibition can be related to molecular and cellular effects that may be relevant for neurotoxicity testing, and, thus, qualify the use of our hiPSC-derived neuronal model for studying chemical-induced neurotoxicity resulting from pathway perturbations. - Highlights: • HESCs derived neuronal cells serve as benchmark for iPSC based neuronal toxicity test development. • Comparisons between hESCs and hiPSCs demonstrated variability of the epigenetic state • CREB pathway modulation have been explored in relation to the neurotoxicant exposure KG-501 • hiPSC might be promising tools to translate theoretical AoPs into toxicological in vitro tests.

  2. Infant Pathways to Externalizing Behavior: Evidence of Genotype x Environment Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leve, Leslie D.; Kerr, David C. R.; Shaw, Daniel; Ge, Xiaojia; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.; Scaramella, Laura V.; Reid, John B.; Conger, Rand; Reiss, David

    2010-01-01

    To further the understanding of the effects of early experiences, 9-month-old infants were observed during a frustration task. The analytical sample was composed of 348 linked triads of participants (adoptive parents, adopted child, and birth parent[s]) from a prospective adoption study. It was hypothesized that genetic risk for externalizing…

  3. Targeting Hippo pathway by specific interruption of YAP-TEAD interaction using cyclic YAP-like peptides.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zheng; Hu, Taishan; Xu, Zhiheng; Lin, Zhaohu; Zhang, Zhisen; Feng, Teng; Zhu, Liangcheng; Rong, Yiping; Shen, Hong; Luk, John M; Zhang, Xiongwen; Qin, Ning

    2015-02-01

    Hippo signaling pathway is emerging as a novel target for anticancer therapy because it plays key roles in organ size control and tumorigenesis. As the downstream effectors, Yes-associated protein (YAP)-transcriptional enhancer activation domain family member (TEAD) association is essential for YAP-driven oncogenic activity, while TEAD is largely dispensable for normal tissue growth. We present the design of YAP-like peptides (17mer) to occupy the interface 3 on TEAD. Introducing cysteines at YAP sites 87 and 96 can induce disulfide formation, as confirmed by crystallography. The engineered peptide significantly improves the potency in disrupting YAP-TEAD interaction in vitro. To confirm that blocking YAP-TEAD complex formation by directly targeting on TEAD is a valid approach, we report a significant reduction in tumor growth rate in a hepatocellular carcinoma xenograft model after introducing the dominant-negative mutation (Y406H) of TEAD1 to abolish YAP-TEAD interaction. Our results suggest that targeting TEAD is a promising strategy against YAP-induced oncogenesis.

  4. Proapoptotic RYBP interacts with FANK1 and induces tumor cell apoptosis through the AP-1 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wen; Zhang, Xuan; Li, Meng; Ma, Xiaoli; Huang, Bingren; Chen, Hong; Chen, Deng

    2016-08-01

    Ring1 and YY1 Binding Protein (RYBP) induces tumor-specific cell apoptosis, but the underlying molecular mechanism has not been fully understood. Here we conducted a yeast two hybrid screen and identified FANK1 (Fibronectin type III and ankyrin repeat domains 1) as a novel RYBP-interacting protein. This interaction was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation, GST pulldown and immunofluorescence assays. We mapped that the FNIII domain at the N-terminal of FANK1 binds to the Serine/Threonine-rich region at the C-terminal of RYBP. Further studies showed that overexpression of RYBP stabilized, whereas knockdown of RYBP by its specific shRNAs reduced, the expression of FANK1. Mechanistic studies revealed that RYBP inhibited the proteasome degradation of polyubiquitinated FANK1, thus prolonging the half-life of FANK1 protein. Functional studies indicated that RYBP activates FANK1-mediated activator protein 1 (AP-1) signaling pathway which contributes to tumor cell apoptosis. Taken together, our current study uncovered a new mechanism which RYBP utilizes to exert its pro-apoptotic activity in human tumor cells.

  5. Cerebellar ataxias: β‐III spectrin's interactions suggest common pathogenic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Emma; Suminaite, Daumante

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders all characterised by postural abnormalities, motor deficits and cerebellar degeneration. Animal and in vitro models have revealed β‐III spectrin, a cytoskeletal protein present throughout the soma and dendritic tree of cerebellar Purkinje cells, to be required for the maintenance of dendritic architecture and for the trafficking and/or stabilisation of several membrane proteins: ankyrin‐R, cell adhesion molecules, metabotropic glutamate receptor‐1 (mGluR1), voltage‐gated sodium channels (Nav) and glutamate transporters. This scaffold of interactions connects β‐III spectrin to a wide variety of proteins implicated in the pathology of many SCAs. Heterozygous mutations in the gene encoding β‐III spectrin (SPTBN2) underlie SCA type‐5 whereas homozygous mutations cause spectrin associated autosomal recessive ataxia type‐1 (SPARCA1), an infantile form of ataxia with cognitive impairment. Loss‐of β‐III spectrin function appears to underpin cerebellar dysfunction and degeneration in both diseases resulting in thinner dendrites, excessive dendritic protrusion with loss of planarity, reduced resurgent sodium currents and abnormal glutamatergic neurotransmission. The initial physiological consequences are a decrease in spontaneous activity and excessive excitation, likely to be offsetting each other, but eventually hyperexcitability gives rise to dark cell degeneration and reduced cerebellar output. Similar molecular mechanisms have been implicated for SCA1, 2, 3, 7, 13, 14, 19, 22, 27 and 28, highlighting alterations to intrinsic Purkinje cell activity, dendritic architecture and glutamatergic transmission as possible common mechanisms downstream of various loss‐of‐function primary genetic defects. A key question for future research is whether similar mechanisms underlie progressive cerebellar decline in normal ageing. PMID:26821241

  6. Effective Theories Of The Strong Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ubirajara van Kolck

    2004-07-31

    This is the final report corresponding to the full funding period (08/01-07/04) in the Department of Energy Outstanding Junior Investigator Grant DE-FG03-01ER41196. The development of an understanding of the interplay between perturbative and non-perturbative effects in strong-interacting systems forms the broad context of this research. The main thrust is the application of effective theories to QCD. Topics included a new power counting in the pionful effective theory, low-energy Compton scattering, charge-symmetry breaking in pion production and in the two-nucleon potential, parity violation, coupled-channel scattering, shallow resonances and halo nuclei, chiral symmetry in the baryon spectrum, existence of a tetraquark state, and molecular meson states. DOE grant DE-FG03-01ER41196 was used to partially support in the period 08/01-07/04 the research activities of the Principal Investigator, Dr. Ubirajara van Kolck, one post-doctoral research associate, Dr. Boris A. Gelman, and one graduate student, Mr. Will Hockings. During the grant period the PI was first Assistant then Associate Professor of Physics at the University of Arizona (UA), and a RHIC Physics Fellow at the RIKEN-BNL Research Center (RBRC). The association with RBRC ended in the Summer of 2004. Since September of 2002 the PI has also been partially supported by a Sloan Research Fellowship. Dr. Boris Gelman was supported by the grant from September 2002 to May 2004. He joined the UA after receiving a Ph.D. from the University of Maryland in the Summer of 2002. He left to take a research associate position in the nuclear theory group of the State University of New York at Stony Brook. The support of a post-doctoral researcher on this grant for two years was only possible by carrying over first- and second-year funds to later years. In addition, Mr. William Hockings started doing research under the PI's guidance. Mr. Hockings took Independent Study courses with the PI, while working as a teaching

  7. Warfarin Side Effects: Watch for Interactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Q10 (ubidecarenone) Dong quai Garlic Ginkgo biloba Ginseng Green tea St. John's wort Vitamin E Many other supplements can interact with warfarin. Be sure to tell your health care provider about any supplements you take. Foods and ...

  8. Health service pathways for patients with chronic leg ulcers: identifying effective pathways for facilitation of evidence based wound care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic leg ulcers cause long term ill-health for older adults and the condition places a significant burden on health service resources. Although evidence on effective management of the condition is available, a significant evidence-practice gap is known to exist, with many suggested reasons e.g. multiple care providers, costs of care and treatments. This study aimed to identify effective health service pathways of care which facilitated evidence-based management of chronic leg ulcers. Methods A sample of 70 patients presenting with a lower limb leg or foot ulcer at specialist wound clinics in Queensland, Australia were recruited for an observational study and survey. Retrospective data were collected on demographics, health, medical history, treatments, costs and health service pathways in the previous 12 months. Prospective data were collected on health service pathways, pain, functional ability, quality of life, treatments, wound healing and recurrence outcomes for 24 weeks from admission. Results Retrospective data indicated that evidence based guidelines were poorly implemented prior to admission to the study, e.g. only 31% of participants with a lower limb ulcer had an ABPI or duplex assessment in the previous 12 months. On average, participants accessed care 2–3 times/week for 17 weeks from multiple health service providers in the twelve months before admission to the study clinics. Following admission to specialist wound clinics, participants accessed care on average once per week for 12 weeks from a smaller range of providers. The median ulcer duration on admission to the study was 22 weeks (range 2–728 weeks). Following admission to wound clinics, implementation of key indicators of evidence based care increased (p < 0.001) and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis found the median time to healing was 12 weeks (95% CI 9.3–14.7). Implementation of evidence based care was significantly related to improved healing outcomes (p < 0

  9. Artificial neural network-based exploration of gene-nutrient interactions in folate and xenobiotic metabolic pathways that modulate susceptibility to breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Naushad, Shaik Mohammad; Ramaiah, M Janaki; Pavithrakumari, Manickam; Jayapriya, Jaganathan; Hussain, Tajamul; Alrokayan, Salman A; Gottumukkala, Suryanarayana Raju; Digumarti, Raghunadharao; Kutala, Vijay Kumar

    2016-04-15

    In the current study, an artificial neural network (ANN)-based breast cancer prediction model was developed from the data of folate and xenobiotic pathway genetic polymorphisms along with the nutritional and demographic variables to investigate how micronutrients modulate susceptibility to breast cancer. The developed ANN model explained 94.2% variability in breast cancer prediction. Fixed effect models of folate (400 μg/day) and B12 (6 μg/day) showed 33.3% and 11.3% risk reduction, respectively. Multifactor dimensionality reduction analysis showed the following interactions in responders to folate: RFC1 G80A × MTHFR C677T (primary), COMT H108L × CYP1A1 m2 (secondary), MTR A2756G (tertiary). The interactions among responders to B12 were RFC1G80A × cSHMT C1420T and CYP1A1 m2 × CYP1A1 m4. ANN simulations revealed that increased folate might restore ER and PR expression and reduce the promoter CpG island methylation of extra cellular superoxide dismutase and BRCA1. Dietary intake of folate appears to confer protection against breast cancer through its modulating effects on ER and PR expression and methylation of EC-SOD and BRCA1.

  10. 40 CFR 610.23 - Operator interaction effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Operator interaction effects. 610.23... Analysis § 610.23 Operator interaction effects. The device will also be evaluated with respect to: (a) The..., operation and maintenance; (c) The extent to which device installation or use, or the effects of...

  11. Crystal Structure of UBA2[superscript ufd]-Ubc9: Insights into E1-E2 Interactions in Sumo Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing; Taherbhoy, Asad M.; Hunt, Harold W.; Seyedin, Steven N.; Miller, David W.; Miller, Darcie J.; Huang, Danny T.; Schulman, Brenda A.

    2012-04-30

    Canonical ubiquitin-like proteins (UBLs) such as ubiquitin, Sumo, NEDD8, and ISG15 are ligated to targets by E1-E2-E3 multienzyme cascades. The Sumo cascade, conserved among all eukaryotes, regulates numerous biological processes including protein localization, transcription, DNA replication, and mitosis. Sumo conjugation is initiated by the heterodimeric Aos1-Uba2 E1 enzyme (in humans called Sae1-Uba2), which activates Sumo's C-terminus, binds the dedicated E2 enzyme Ubc9, and promotes Sumo C-terminal transfer between the Uba2 and Ubc9 catalytic cysteines. To gain insights into details of E1-E2 interactions in the Sumo pathway, we determined crystal structures of the C-terminal ubiquitin fold domain (ufd) from yeast Uba2 (Uba2{sup ufd}), alone and in complex with Ubc9. The overall structures of both yeast Uba2{sup ufd} and Ubc9 superimpose well on their individual human counterparts, suggesting conservation of fundamental features of Sumo conjugation. Docking the Uba2{sup ufd}-Ubc9 and prior full-length human Uba2 structures allows generation of models for steps in Sumo transfer from Uba2 to Ubc9, and supports the notion that Uba2 undergoes remarkable conformational changes during the reaction. Comparisons to previous structures from the NEDD8 cascade demonstrate that UBL cascades generally utilize some parallel E1-E2 interaction surfaces. In addition, the structure of the Uba2{sup ufd}-Ubc9 complex reveals interactions unique to Sumo E1 and E2. Comparison with a previous Ubc9-E3 complex structure demonstrates overlap between Uba2 and E3 binding sites on Ubc9, indicating that loading with Sumo and E3-catalyzed transfer to substrates are strictly separate steps. The results suggest mechanisms establishing specificity and order in Sumo conjugation cascades.

  12. Effective interactions from q-deformed quark fields

    SciTech Connect

    Timoteo, V. S.; Lima, C. L.

    2007-02-12

    From the mass term for q-deformed quark fields, we obtain effective contact interactions of the NJL type. The parameters of the model that maps a system of non-interacting deformed fields into quarks interacting via NJL contact terms is discussed.

  13. Radium in the environment: exposure pathways and health effects.

    PubMed

    Brugge, Doug; Buchner, Virginia

    2012-01-01

    Radium is a naturally occurring radioactive element in the environment that can exist as several isotopes. Little information is available on the acute (short-term) non-cancer effects in humans. Radium exposure has resulted in acute leukopenia, anemia, necrosis of the jaw, and other effects. Cancer is the major effect of concern. Radium, via oral exposure, is known to cause bone, head, and nasal passage tumors in humans. The US Environmental Protection Agency has not classified radium for carcinogenicity.

  14. Effects of Trophic Status on Mercury Methylation Pathways in Peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hines, M. E.; Zhang, L.; Sampath, S.; Hu, R.; Barkay, T.

    2014-12-01

    Methyl mercury (MeHg) is a bioaccumulative toxicant. It was believed to be produced by sulfate (SO4)- and iron- reducing bacteria (SRB and FeRB), but recent studies suggest that organisms that possess the gene cluster (hgcAB) can methylate Hg, which includes other microbial groups besides SRB and FeRB. Many areas known to accumulate high levels of MeHg are freshwater wetlands that lack sufficient electron acceptors to support the production of MeHg. To test the hypothesis that oligotrophic wetlands are able to methylate Hg by pathways that are not respiratory, peat was collected from three wetland sites in Alaska and three in Massachusetts that represented a trophic gradient. We determined rates of gas (CH4, CO2, H2) and LMW organic acid (formate, acetate, propionate, butyrate) formation, and rates of Hg methylation using the short-lived radioisotope 197Hg (half life 2.67 days). Two temperate sites exhibited strong terminal respiration (methanogenesis) and syntrophy, while the Alaskan sites and an oligotrophic temperate site exhibited low rates of both. Primary fermentation was an important process in the latter sites. Hg methylation was most active at the minerotrophic sites that exhibited active syntrophy and methanogenesis. Methylation decreased greatly in the presence of a methanogenic inhibitor and was stimulated by H2 indicating that methanogens and perhaps syntrophs were primary methylators. In the oligotrophic sites, the addition of SO4 stimulated methylation while a SO4 reduction inhibitor decreased methylation. There was no evidence of SO4 reduction in these samples suggesting that methylation was conducted by SRB that were metabolizing via fermentation and not SO4 reduction. While further studies are required to decipher the role of syntrophs including SRB varieties such as Syntrophobacter sp., these results indicate that fermentative bacteria may be able to significantly methylate Hg in wetlands that do not support anaerobic respiration.

  15. Impact of global climate change on ecosystem-level interactions among sympatric plants from all three photosynthetic pathways. Terminal report

    SciTech Connect

    Nobel, P.S.

    1997-12-17

    The proposed research will determine biochemical and physiological responses to variations in environmental factors for plants of all three photosynthetic pathways under competitive situations in the field. These responses will be used to predict the effects of global climatic change on an ecosystem in the northwestern Sonoran Desert where the C{sub 3} subshrub Encelia farinosa, the C{sub 4} bunchgrass Hilaria rigida, and the CAM succulent Agave deserti are co-dominants. These perennials are relatively short with overlapping shallow roots facilitating the experimental measurements as well as leading to competition for soil water. Net CO{sub 2} uptake over 24-h periods measured in the laboratory will be analyzed using an environmental productivity index (EPI) that can incorporate simultaneous effects of soil water, air temperature, and light. Based on EPI, net CO{sub 2} uptake and hence plant productivity will be predicted for the three species in the field under various treatments. Activity of the two CO{sub 2} fixation enzymes, Rubisco and PEPCase, will be determined for these various environmental conditions; also, partitioning of carbon to various organs will be measured based on {sup 14}CO{sub 2} labeling and dry weight analysis. Thus, enzymatic and partitioning controls on competition among sympatric model plants representing all three photosynthetic pathways will be investigated.

  16. Low dose radiation interactions with the transformation growth factor (TFG)-beta pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslowski, Amy Jesse

    A major limiting factor for long-term, deep-space missions is the radiation dose to astronauts. Because the dose to the astronauts is a mixed field of low- and high-LET radiation, there is a need to understand the effects of both radiation types on whole tissue; however, there are limited published data on the effects of high-LET (linear-energy-transfer) radiation on tissue. Thus, we designed a perfusion chamber system for rat trachea in order to mimic in vivo respiratory tissue. We successfully maintained the perfused tracheal tissue ex vivo in a healthy and viable condition for up to three days. In addition, this project studied the effects of high-LET Fe particles on the overall transformation growth factor (TGF)-beta response after TGF-beta inactivation and compared the results to the TGF-beta response post x-ray irradiation. It was found that a TGF-beta response could be measured in the perfused tracheal tissue, for x-ray and Fe particle irradiations, despite the high autofluorescent background intrinsic to tissue. However, after comparing the TGF-beta response of x-ray irradiation to High-Z-High-energy (HZE) irradiation, there was not a significant difference in radiation types. The TGF-beta response in x-ray and HZE irradiated perfusion chambers was also measured over time post irradiation. It was found that for 6 hour and 8 hour post irradiation, the TGF-beta response was higher for lower doses of radiation than for higher doses. This is in contrast to the 0 hour fixation which found the TGF-beta response to increase with increased dose. The inverse relationship found for 6 hour and 8 hour fixation times may indicate a threshold response for TGF-beta response; i.e., for low doses, a threshold of dose must be reached for an immediate TGF-beta response, otherwise the tissue responds more slowly to the irradiation damage. This result was unexpected and will require further investigation to determine if the threshold can be determined for the 250 kVp x-rays and

  17. E1-E2 interactions in ubiquitin and Nedd8 ligation pathways.

    PubMed

    Tokgöz, Zeynep; Siepmann, Thomas J; Streich, Frederick; Kumar, Brajesh; Klein, Jennifer M; Haas, Arthur L

    2012-01-02

    Initial rates of E1-catalyzed E2 transthiolation have been used as a reporter function to probe the mechanism of 125I-ubiquitin transfer between activation and ligation half-reactions of ubiquitin conjugation. A functional survey of 11 representative human E2 paralogs reveals similar Km for binding to human Uba1 ternary complex (Km(ave)=121±72 nm) and kcat for ubiquitin transfer (kcat(ave)=4.0±1.2 s(-1)), suggesting that they possess a conserved binding site and transition state geometry and that they compete for charging through differences in intracellular concentration. Sequence analysis and mutagenesis localize this binding motif to three basic residues within Helix 1 of the E2 core domain, confirmed by transthiolation kinetics. Partial conservation of the motif among E2 paralogs not recognized by Uba1 suggests that another factor(s) account for the absolute specificity of cognate E2 binding. Truncation of the Uba1 carboxyl-terminal β-grasp domain reduces cognate Ubc2b binding by 31-fold and kcat by 3.5×10(4)-fold, indicating contributions to E2 binding and transition state stabilization. Truncation of the paralogous domain from the Nedd8 activating enzyme has negligible effect on cognate Ubc12 transthiolation but abrogates E2 specificity toward non-cognate carrier proteins. Exchange of the β-grasp domains between ubiquitin and Nedd8 activating enzymes fails to reverse the effect of truncation. Thus, the conserved Helix 1 binding motif and the β-grasp domain direct general E2 binding, whereas the latter additionally serves as a specificity filter to exclude charging of non-cognate E2 paralogs in order to maintain the fidelity of downstream signaling.

  18. Fungi, bacteria and soil pH: the oxalate-carbonate pathway as a model for metabolic interaction.

    PubMed

    Martin, Gaëtan; Guggiari, Matteo; Bravo, Daniel; Zopfi, Jakob; Cailleau, Guillaume; Aragno, Michel; Job, Daniel; Verrecchia, Eric; Junier, Pilar

    2012-11-01

    The oxalate-carbonate pathway involves the oxidation of calcium oxalate to low-magnesium calcite and represents a potential long-term terrestrial sink for atmospheric CO(2). In this pathway, bacterial oxalate degradation is associated with a strong local alkalinization and subsequent carbonate precipitation. In order to test whether this process occurs in soil, the role of bacteria, fungi and calcium oxalate amendments was studied using microcosms. In a model system with sterile soil amended with laboratory cultures of oxalotrophic bacteria and fungi, the addition of calcium oxalate induced a distinct pH shift and led to the final precipitation of calcite. However, the simultaneous presence of bacteria and fungi was essential to drive this pH shift. Growth of both oxalotrophic bacteria and fungi was confirmed by qPCR on the frc (oxalotrophic bacteria) and 16S rRNA genes, and the quantification of ergosterol (active fungal biomass) respectively. The experiment was replicated in microcosms with non-sterilized soil. In this case, the bacterial and fungal contribution to oxalate degradation was evaluated by treatments with specific biocides (cycloheximide and bronopol). Results showed that the autochthonous microflora oxidized calcium oxalate and induced a significant soil alkalinization. Moreover, data confirmed the results from the model soil showing that bacteria are essentially responsible for the pH shift, but require the presence of fungi for their oxalotrophic activity. The combined results highlight that the interaction between bacteria and fungi is essential to drive metabolic processes in complex environments such as soil.

  19. Reputation Effects in Public and Private Interactions.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuki, Hisashi; Iwasa, Yoh; Nowak, Martin A

    2015-11-01

    We study the evolution of cooperation in a model of indirect reciprocity where people interact in public and private situations. Public interactions have a high chance to be observed by others and always affect reputation. Private interactions have a lower chance to be observed and only occasionally affect reputation. We explore all second order social norms and study conditions for evolutionary stability of action rules. We observe the competition between "honest" and "hypocritical" strategies. The former cooperate both in public and in private. The later cooperate in public, where many others are watching, but try to get away with defection in private situations. The hypocritical idea is that in private situations it does not pay-off to cooperate, because there is a good chance that nobody will notice it. We find simple and intuitive conditions for the evolution of honest strategies.

  20. Reputation Effects in Public and Private Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Ohtsuki, Hisashi; Iwasa, Yoh; Nowak, Martin A.

    2015-01-01

    We study the evolution of cooperation in a model of indirect reciprocity where people interact in public and private situations. Public interactions have a high chance to be observed by others and always affect reputation. Private interactions have a lower chance to be observed and only occasionally affect reputation. We explore all second order social norms and study conditions for evolutionary stability of action rules. We observe the competition between “honest” and “hypocritical” strategies. The former cooperate both in public and in private. The later cooperate in public, where many others are watching, but try to get away with defection in private situations. The hypocritical idea is that in private situations it does not pay-off to cooperate, because there is a good chance that nobody will notice it. We find simple and intuitive conditions for the evolution of honest strategies. PMID:26606239

  1. Enzastaurin has anti-tumour effects in lung cancers with overexpressed JAK pathway molecules

    PubMed Central

    Shimokawa, T; Seike, M; Soeno, C; Uesaka, H; Miyanaga, A; Mizutani, H; Kitamura, K; Minegishi, Y; Noro, R; Okano, T; Yoshimura, A; Gemma, A

    2012-01-01

    Background: Enzastaurin, an oral serine–threonine kinase inhibitor, was initially developed as an ATP-competitive selective inhibitor against protein kinase Cβ. However, the mechanism by which enzastaurin contributes to tumourigenesis remains unclear. Methods: We analysed the anti-tumour effects of enzastaurin in 22 lung cancer cell lines to ascertain the potential for enzastaurin-based treatment of lung cancer. To identify molecules or signalling pathways associated with this sensitivity, we conducted a gene, receptor tyrosine kinases phosphorylation and microRNA expression profiling study on the same set of cell lines. Results: We identified eight genes by pathway analysis of molecules having gene-drug sensitivity correlation, and used them to build a support vector machine algorithm model by which sensitive cell lines were distinguished from resistant cell lines. Pathway analysis revealed that the JAK/STAT signalling pathway was one of the main ones involved in sensitivity to enzastaurin. Overexpression of JAK1 was observed in the sensitive cells by western blotting. Simultaneous administration of enzastaurin and JAK inhibitor inhibited enzastaurin-induced cell growth-inhibitory effect. Furthermore, lentiviral-mediated JAK1-overexpressing cells were more sensitive to enzastaurin than control cells. Conclusion: Our results suggested that the JAK1 pathway may be used as a single predictive biomarker for enzastaurin treatment. The anti-tumour effect of enzastaurin should be evaluated in lung cancer with overexpressed JAK pathway molecules. PMID:22333600

  2. Damaging effects of hyperglycemia on cardiovascular function: spotlight on glucose metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Mapanga, Rudo F; Essop, M Faadiel

    2016-01-15

    The incidence of cardiovascular complications associated with hyperglycemia is a growing global health problem. This review discusses the link between hyperglycemia and cardiovascular diseases onset, focusing on the role of recently emerging downstream mediators, namely, oxidative stress and glucose metabolic pathway perturbations. The role of hyperglycemia-mediated activation of nonoxidative glucose pathways (NOGPs) [i.e., the polyol pathway, hexosamine biosynthetic pathway, advanced glycation end products (AGEs), and protein kinase C] in this process is extensively reviewed. The proposal is made that there is a unique interplay between NOGPs and a downstream convergence of detrimental effects that especially affect cardiac endothelial cells, thereby contributing to contractile dysfunction. In this process the AGE pathway emerges as a crucial mediator of hyperglycemia-mediated detrimental effects. In addition, a vicious metabolic cycle is established whereby hyperglycemia-induced NOGPs further fuel their own activation by generating even more oxidative stress, thereby exacerbating damaging effects on cardiac function. Thus NOGP inhibition, and particularly that of the AGE pathway, emerges as a novel therapeutic intervention for the treatment of cardiovascular complications such as acute myocardial infarction in the presence hyperglycemia.

  3. Protein interacting with C kinase 1 (PICK1) reduces reinsertion rates of interaction partners sorted to Rab11-dependent slow recycling pathway.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Kenneth L; Thorsen, Thor S; Rahbek-Clemmensen, Troels; Eriksen, Jacob; Gether, Ulrik

    2012-04-06

    The scaffolding protein PICK1 (protein interacting with C kinase 1) contains an N-terminal PSD-95/Discs large/ZO-1 (PDZ) domain and a central lipid-binding Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domain. PICK1 is thought to regulate trafficking of its PDZ binding partners but different and even opposing functions have been suggested. Here, we apply ELISA-based assays and confocal microscopy in HEK293 cells with inducible PICK1 expression to assess in an isolated system the ability of PICK1 to regulate trafficking of natural and engineered PDZ binding partners. The dopamine transporter (DAT), which primarily sorts to degradation upon internalization, did not form perinuclear clusters with PICK1, and PICK1 did not affect DAT internalization/recycling. However, transfer of the PICK1-binding DAT C terminus to the β(2)-adrenergic receptor, which sorts to recycling upon internalization, led to formation of PICK1 co-clusters in Rab11-positive compartments. Furthermore, PICK1 inhibited Rab11-mediated recycling of the receptor in a BAR and PDZ domain-dependent manner. In contrast, transfer of the DAT C terminus to the δ-opioid receptor, which sorts to degradation, did not result in PICK1 co-clusters or any change in internalization/recycling. Further support for a role of PICK1 determined by its PDZ cargo was obtained for the PICK1 interaction partner prolactin-releasing peptide receptor (GPR10). GPR10 co-localized with Rab11 and clustered with PICK1 upon constitutive internalization but co-localized with the late endosomal marker Rab7 and did not cluster with PICK1 upon agonist-induced internalization. Our data suggest a selective role of PICK1 in clustering and reducing the recycling rates of PDZ domain binding partners sorted to the Rab11-dependent recycling pathway.

  4. rugose (rg), a Drosophila A kinase anchor protein, is required for retinal pattern formation and interacts genetically with multiple signaling pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Shamloula, Hoda K; Mbogho, Mkajuma P; Pimentel, Angel C; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zosia M A; Hyatt, Vanneta; Okano, Hideyuki; Venkatesh, Tadmiri R

    2002-01-01

    In the developing Drosophila eye, cell fate determination and pattern formation are directed by cell-cell interactions mediated by signal transduction cascades. Mutations at the rugose locus (rg) result in a rough eye phenotype due to a disorganized retina and aberrant cone cell differentiation, which leads to reduction or complete loss of cone cells. The cone cell phenotype is sensitive to the level of rugose gene function. Molecular analyses show that rugose encodes a Drosophila A kinase anchor protein (DAKAP 550). Genetic interaction studies show that rugose interacts with the components of the EGFR- and Notch-mediated signaling pathways. Our results suggest that rg is required for correct retinal pattern formation and may function in cell fate determination through its interactions with the EGFR and Notch signaling pathways. PMID:12072466

  5. Testing Interaction Effects without Discarding Variance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Kay A.

    Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and multiple regression are two of the most commonly used methods of data analysis in behavioral science research. Although ANOVA was intended for use with experimental designs, educational researchers have used ANOVA extensively in aptitude-treatment interaction (ATI) research. This practice tends to make researchers…

  6. Effects of Intergenerational Interaction on Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Carmen Requena; Gonzalez, Marta Zubiaur

    2008-01-01

    The world population pyramid has changed shape. However, this does not mean that societies have changed their negative concept of old age. Our study proposes an intergenerational service-learning program with 179 university students and 101 slightly depressed elderly people. The results show that the elderly people who interacted improved in…

  7. The Interactivity Effect in Multimedia Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Chris; Gibbons, Nicola J.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the addition of interactivity to a computer-based learning package enhances the learning process. A sample of 33 (22 male and 11 female) undergraduates on a Business and Management degree used a multimedia system to learn about the operation of a bicycle pump. The system consisted of a labelled…

  8. Enhancing Interactive Tutorial Effectiveness through Visual Cueing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jamet, Eric; Fernandez, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated whether learning how to use a web service with an interactive tutorial can be enhanced by cueing. We expected the attentional guidance provided by visual cues to facilitate the selection of information in static screen displays that corresponded to spoken explanations. Unlike most previous studies in this area, we…

  9. Single gene and gene interaction effects on fertilization and embryonic survival rates in cattle.

    PubMed

    Khatib, H; Huang, W; Wang, X; Tran, A H; Bindrim, A B; Schutzkus, V; Monson, R L; Yandell, B S

    2009-05-01

    Decrease in fertility and conception rates is a major cause of economic loss and cow culling in dairy herds. Conception rate is the product of fertilization rate and embryonic survival rate. Identification of genetic factors that cause the death of embryos is the first step in eliminating this problem from the population and thereby increasing reproductive efficiency. A candidate pathway approach was used to identify candidate genes affecting fertilization and embryo survival rates using an in vitro fertilization experimental system. A total of 7,413 in vitro fertilizations were performed using oocytes from 504 ovaries and semen samples from 10 different bulls. Fertilization rate was calculated as the number of cleaved embryos 48 h postfertilization out of the total number of oocytes exposed to sperm. Survival rate of embryos was calculated as the number of blastocysts on d 7 of development out of the number of total embryos cultured. All ovaries were genotyped for 8 genes in the POU1F1 signaling pathway. Single-gene analysis revealed significant associations of GHR, PRLR, STAT5A, and UTMP with survival rate and of POU1F1, GHR, STAT5A, and OPN with fertilization rate. To further characterize the contribution of the entire integrated POU1F1 pathway to fertilization and early embryonic survival, a model selection procedure was applied. Comparisons among the different models showed that interactions between adjacent genes in the pathway revealed a significant contribution to the variation in fertility traits compared with other models that analyzed only bull information or only genes without interactions. Moreover, some genes that were not significant in the single-gene analysis showed significant effects in the interaction analysis. Thus, we propose that single genes as well as an entire pathway can be used in selection programs to improve reproduction performance in dairy cattle.

  10. The effect of particle design on cellular internalization pathways

    PubMed Central

    Gratton, Stephanie E. A.; Ropp, Patricia A.; Pohlhaus, Patrick D.; Luft, J. Christopher; Madden, Victoria J.; Napier, Mary E.; DeSimone, Joseph M.

    2008-01-01

    The interaction of particles with cells is known to be strongly influenced by particle size, but little is known about the interdependent role that size, shape, and surface chemistry have on cellular internalization and intracellular trafficking. We report on the internalization of specially designed, monodisperse hydrogel particles into HeLa cells as a function of size, shape, and surface charge. We employ a top-down particle fabrication technique called PRINT that is able to generate uniform populations of organic micro- and nanoparticles with complete control of size, shape, and surface chemistry. Evidence of particle internalization was obtained by using conventional biological techniques and transmission electron microscopy. These findings suggest that HeLa cells readily internalize nonspherical particles with dimensions as large as 3 μm by using several different mechanisms of endocytosis. Moreover, it was found that rod-like particles enjoy an appreciable advantage when it comes to internalization rates, reminiscent of the advantage that many rod-like bacteria have for internalization in nonphagocytic cells. PMID:18697944

  11. A metabolomics strategy to explore urinary biomarkers and metabolic pathways for assessment of interaction between Danhong injection and low-dose aspirin during their synergistic treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianping; Guo, Jianming; Shang, Erxin; Zhu, Zhenhua; Zhu, Kevin Yue; Li, Shujiao; Zhao, Buchang; Jia, Lifu; Zhao, Jing; Tang, Zhishu; Duan, Jinao

    2016-07-15

    The drug combination of Danhong injection (DHI) and low-dose aspirin (ASA) was frequently applied for the treatment of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. Due to the drug interactions, a lot of potential benefits and risks might exist side by side in the course of combination therapy. However, there had been no studies of interaction between DHI and ASA. Metabolomics was a powerful tool to explore endogenous biomarkers and metabolic pathways. In present study, metabolic profiling with ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QTOF/MS) coupled with multivariate statistical analysis was performed to provide insight into understanding the interaction between DHI and low-dose ASA. Eleven potential biomarkers of three types were identified and seven metabolic pathways were constructed. The results showed that the interaction between DHI and low-dose ASA during synergistic treatment indeed affected some key endogenous biomarkers and metabolic pathways, which could not happen when DHI or low-dose ASA was used alone. The quality and quantity of endogenous metabolite were both influenced by interaction between DHI and low-dose ASA. In details, the amount of flavin mononucleotide, L-2, 4-diaminobutyric acid (DABA) and 4-aminohippuric acid were significantly increased. On the contrary, the amount of 3-methyluridine, 4, 6-dihydroxyquinoline, cortolone-3-glucuronide, and serotonin were significantly decreased. Furthermore, O-phosphotyrosine, 3-methyl-2-butenal, indoxyl sulfate and dolichyl diphosphate were disappeared in urine. As to metabolic pathways, riboflavin metabolism, pentose and glucuronate interconversions, and tryptophan metabolism were all significantly influenced. The emerging alterations of biomarkers and metabolic pathways were associated with a lot of drugs and diseases based on literature researches, which might influence the co-administration of other drugs or the treatments of relevant

  12. Benzo[a]pyrene and glycine N-methyltransferse Interactions: Gene expression profiles of the liver detoxification pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.-M.; Chen, S.-Y.; Lee, Y.-C.G.; Huang, C.-Y.F.; Chen, Y.-M. Arthur . E-mail: arthur@ym.edu.tw

    2006-07-15

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is one of many polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons that have been identified as major risk factors for developing various cancers. We previously demonstrated that the liver cancer susceptibility gene glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT) is capable of binding with BaP and protecting cells from BaP-7,8-diol 9,10-epoxide-DNA adduct formation. In this study, we used a cytotoxicity assay to demonstrate that the higher expression level of GNMT, the lower cytotoxicity occurred in the cells treated with BaP. In addition, a cDNA microarray containing 7,597 human genes was used to examine gene expression patterns in BaP-treated HepG2 (a liver cancer cell line that expresses very low levels of GNMT) and SCG2-1-1 (a stable HepG2 clone that expresses high levels of GNMT) cells. The results showed that among 6,018 readable HepG2 genes, 359 (6.0%) were up-regulated more than 1.5-fold and 768 (12.8%) were down-regulated. Overexpression of GNMT in SCG2-1-1 cells resulted in the down-regulation of genes related to the detoxification, kinase/phosphatase pathways, and oncogenes. Furthermore, real-time PCR was used to validate microarray data from 21 genes belonging to the detoxification pathway. Combining both microarray and real-time PCR data, the results showed that among 89 detoxification pathway genes analyzed, 22 (24.7%) were up-regulated and 6 (6.7%) were down-regulated in BaP-treated HepG2 cells, while in the BaP-treated SCG2-1-1 cells, 12 (13.5%) were up-regulated and 26 (29.2%) were down-regulated (P < 0.001). Therefore, GNMT sequesters BaP, diminishes BaP's effects to the liver detoxification pathway and prevents subsequent cytotoxicity.

  13. Antiurolithic effect of berberine is mediated through multiple pathways.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Samra; Gilani, Anwar H

    2011-01-25

    Berberine is an isoquinoline alkaloid, occurring in nature as the main constituent of several plants with medicinal use in kidney stone disease. This work was undertaken to evaluate its antiurolithic potential and explore the possible underlying mechanism(s). Berberine was tested in vitro for the antioxidant effect and in vivo for diuretic and antiurolithic effects on an animal model of calcium oxalate urolithiasis. Berberine exhibited concentration-dependent (50-150μg/ml) antioxidant effect against ferrous-ascorbate induced lipid peroxidation in rat kidney homogenate with potency slightly higher than the reference antioxidant, butylated hydroxytoluene. In Wistar rats, berberine (5-20mg/kg) increased urine output accompanied by increased pH and Na(+) and K(+) excretion and decreased Ca(2+) excretion, similar to hydrochlorothiazide. In an animal model of calcium oxalate urolithiasis developed in male Wistar rats by adding 0.75% ethylene glycol in drinking water, berberine (10mg/kg) prevented as well as eliminated calcium oxalate crystal deposition in renal tubules and protected against deleterious effects of lithogenic treatment including weight loss, impaired renal function and oxidative stress, manifested as increased malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl contents, depleted GSH and decreased antioxidant enzyme activities of the kidneys. In naïve rats, berberine (10mg/kg) increased urine volume and pH and decreased Ca(2+) excretion. Results of this study suggest the presence of antiurolithic effects in berberine against calcium oxalate stones mediated through a combination of antioxidant, diuretic, urinary alkalinizing and hypocalciuric effects. These data invite future studies on berberine to establish its efficacy for clinical use.

  14. Reactions of diborane with ammonia and ammonia borane: catalytic effects for multiple pathways for hydrogen release.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Vinh Son; Matus, Myrna H; Nguyen, Minh Tho; Dixon, David A

    2008-10-09

    High-level electronic structure calculations have been used to construct portions of the potential energy surfaces related to the reaction of diborane with ammonia and ammonia borane (B2H6 + NH3 and B2H6 + BH3NH3)to probe the molecular mechanism of H2 release. Geometries of stationary points were optimized at the MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ level. Total energies were computed at the coupled-cluster CCSD(T) theory level with the correlation-consistent basis sets. The results show a wide range of reaction pathways for H2 elimination. The initial interaction of B2H6 + NH3 leads to a weak preassociation complex, from which a B-H-B bridge bond is broken giving rise to a more stable H3BHBH2NH3 adduct. This intermediate, which is also formed from BH3NH3 + BH3, is connected with at least six transition states for H2 release with energies 18-93 kal/mol above the separated reactants. The lowest-lying transition state is a six-member cycle, in which BH3exerts a bifunctional catalytic effect accelerating H2 generation within a B-H-H-N framework. Diborane also induces a catalytic effect for H2 elimination from BH3NH3 via a three-step pathway with cyclic transition states. Following conformational changes, the rate-determining transition state for H2 release is approximately 27 kcal/mol above the B2H6 + BH3NH3 reactants, as compared with an energy barrier of approximately 37 kcal/mol for H2 release from BH3NH3. The behavior of two separated BH3 molecules is more complex and involves multiple reaction pathways. Channels from diborane or borane initially converge to a complex comprising the H3BHBH2NH3adduct plus BH3. The interaction of free BH3 with the BH3 moiety of BH3NH3 via a six-member transition state with diborane type of bonding leads to a lower-energy transition state. The corresponding energy barrier is approximately 8 kcal/mol, relative to the reference point H3BHBH2NH3 adduct + BH3. These transition states are 27-36 kcal/mol above BH3NH3 + B2H6, but 1-9 kcal/mol below the

  15. Effect of clinical nursing pathway for endoscopic thyroidectomy in Chinese patients: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Hu, Xinhua; Zhang, Qiang; Cao, Hui; Li, Jun; Wang, Junpeng; Shao, Yang; Xin, Shijie

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of the use of a clinical nursing pathway for patients undergoing endoscopic thyroidectomy by conducting a meta-analysis. Electronic databases were searched for relevant controlled trials published prior to August 2013. Only papers that compared the use of a clinical nursing pathway to usual care for patients undergoing endoscopic thyroidectomy were selected. The outcome measures were mean difference and 95% confidence interval for length of hospital stay and hospital charges and risk ratio for patient satisfaction. Six controlled trials were identified. The use of a clinical nursing pathway reduced the length of hospital stay and hospital charges. Furthermore, it improved patient satisfaction. This meta-analysis indicates that application of a clinical nursing pathway appears to reduce length of hospital stay and hospital charges and improve patient satisfaction for patients undergoing endoscopic thyroidectomy.

  16. Modelization of nanospace interaction involving a ferromagnetic atom: a spin polarization effect study by thermogravimetric analysis.

    PubMed

    Santhanam, K S V; Chen, Xu; Gupta, S

    2014-04-01

    Ab initio studies of ferromagnetic atom interacting with carbon nanotubes have been reported in the literature that predict when the interaction is strong, a higher hybridization with confinement effect will result in spin polarization in the ferromagnetic atom. The spin polarization effect on the thermal oxidation to form its oxide is modeled here for the ferromagnetic atom and its alloy, as the above studies predict the 4s electrons are polarized in the atom. The four models developed here provide a pathway for distinguishing the type of interaction that exists in the real system. The extent of spin polarization in the ferromagnetic atom has been examined by varying the amount of carbon nanotubes in the composites in the thermogravimetric experiments. In this study we report the experimental results on the CoNi alloy which appears to show selective spin polarization. The products of the thermal oxidation has been analyzed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy.

  17. Cardiovascular effects of Juniperus excelsa are mediated through multiple pathways.

    PubMed

    Khan, Munasib; Khan, Arif-Ullah; Najeeb-ur-Rehman; Zafar, Muhammad Abdullah; Hazrat, Ali; Gilani, Anwarul-Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Juniperus excelsa Bieb. is used in folk medicine for lowering blood pressure (BP). Its BP-lowering effect, endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasodilator effects, and cardio-modulatory effect are reported here. The crude extract of J. excelsa (Je.Cr) which tested positive for the presence of anthraquinone, flavonoids, saponins, sterols, terpenes, and tannins induced a dose-dependent (10-300 mg/kg) fall in the arterial BP of anesthetized rats. In isolated rabbit aorta, Je.Cr (0.01-5.0 mg/mL) inhibited high K(+) (80 mM)- and phenylephrine (1 μM)-induced contractions, like that caused by verapamil and papaverine. In endothelium-intact rat aortic preparations, N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride-sensitive vasodilator activity was noted from Je.Cr, which also relaxed the endothelium-denuded aorta tissues. In guinea pig atria, Je.Cr initially caused mild cardiac stimulation, followed by inhibition, like that exhibited by papaverine. Je.Cr prolonged the R-R interval in electrocardiogram of rats under anesthesia. These results reveal that cardiovascular effects of J. excelsa are mediated possibly through a combination of Ca(++) antagonism, nitric oxide-modulating mechanism, and phosphodiesterase inhibitory mechanism, which explain its medicinal use in hypertension.

  18. The Effects of Structured Transfer Pathways in Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Most of the students who set out to earn degrees in community colleges never do. Interventions that simplify the complex organizational structures of these schools are promising solutions to this problem. This article is the first to provide rigorous evidence of the effects of structured transfer programs, one such intervention. Leveraging the…

  19. PDCD10 interacts with Ste20-related kinase MST4 to promote cell growth and transformation via modulation of the ERK pathway.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xi; Zhao, Hongshan; Shan, Jingxuan; Long, Feng; Chen, Yaoyao; Chen, Yingyu; Zhang, Yingmei; Han, Xiao; Ma, Dalong

    2007-06-01

    PDCD10 (programmed cell death 10, TFAR15), a novel protein associated with cell apoptosis has been recently implicated in mutations associated with Cerebral Cavernous Malformations (CCM). Yeast two-hybrid screening revealed that PDCD10 interacts with MST4, a member of Ste20-related kinases. This interaction was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation and colocalization assays in mammalian cells. Furthermore, the co-overexpression of PDCD10 and MST4 promoted cell proliferation and transformation via modulation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. Potent short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) against PDCD10 (siPDCD10) and MST4 (siMST4) were designed to specifically inhibit the expression of PDCD10 and MST4 mRNA, respectively. The induction of siPDCD10 or siMST4 resulted in decreased expression of endogenous PDCD10 or MST4, which was accompanied by reduced ERK activity and attenuated cell growth and anchorage-independent growth. On the other hand, siMST4 had similar effects in PDCD10-overexpressed cells. And more importantly, we confirmed that either overexpressing or endogenous PDCD10 can increase the MST4 kinase activity in vitro. Our results demonstrated that PDCD10 modulation of ERK signaling was mediated by MST4, and PDCD10 could be a regulatory adaptor necessary for MST4 function, suggesting a link between cerebral cavernous malformation pathogenesis and the ERK-MAPK cascade via PDCD10/MST4.

  20. Agmatine enhances the antidepressant-like effect of lithium in mouse forced swimming test through NMDA pathway.

    PubMed

    Mohseni, Gholmreza; Ostadhadi, Sattar; Imran-Khan, Muhammad; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Zolfaghari, Samira; Haddadi, Nazgol-Sadat; Dehpour, Ahmad-Reza

    2017-04-01

    Depression is one the world leading global burdens leading to various comorbidities. Lithium as a mainstay in the treatment of depression is still considered gold standard treatment. Similar to lithium another agent agmatine has also central protective role against depression. Since, both agmatine and lithium modulate various effects through interaction with NMDA receptor, therefore, in current study we aimed to investigate the synergistic antidepressant-like effect of agmatine with lithium in mouse force swimming test. Also to know whether if such effect is due to interaction with NMDA receptor. In our present study we found that when potent dose of lithium (30mg/kg) was administered, it significantly decreased the immobility time. Also, when subeffective dose of agmatine (0.01mg/kg) was coadministered with subeffective dose of lithium (3mg/kg), it potentiated the antidepressant-like effect of subeffective dose of lithium. For the involvement of NMDA receptor in such effect, we administered NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 (0.05mg/kg) with a combination of subeffective dose of lithium (3mg/kg) and agmatine (0.001mg/kg). A significant antidepressant-like effect was observed. Furthermore, when subeffective dose (50 and 75mg/kg) of NMDA was given it inhibited the synergistic effect of agmatine (0.01mg/kg) with lithium (3mg/kg). Hence, our finding demonstrate that agmatine have synergistic effect with lithium which is mediated by NMDA receptor pathway.

  1. Experienced Elementary Music Teachers' Perceptions of Effective Classroom Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Beth Ellen

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how experienced elementary general music teachers perceived the effectiveness of their instructional interactions with students in the music classroom. The following questions were addressed in this study: What types of interactions do experienced teachers use most frequently and perceive as effective in…

  2. A Course on Effective Teacher-Child Interactions. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamre, Bridget K.; Pianta, Robert C.; Burchinal, Margaret; Field, Samuel; LoCasale-Crouch, Jennifer; Downer, Jason T.; Howes, Carollee; LaParo, Karen; Scott-Little, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    This study found that teachers who were randomly assigned to take a 14-week course on effective teacher-child interactions demonstrated significant changes in beliefs and knowledge about effective practices and provided more stimulating and engaging interactions in the classroom. [This research brief is based on: Hamre, B. K., Pianta, R. C.,…

  3. Identification of Significant Pathways Induced by PAX5 Haploinsufficiency Based on Protein-Protein Interaction Networks and Cluster Analysis in Raji Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jia; Li, TongJuan; Zhao, Lei; Liang, Xue; Fu, Xing; Wang, Jue; Shang, Zhen; Zhou, Jianfeng

    2017-01-01

    PAX5 encodes a transcription factor essential for B-cell differentiation, and PAX5 haploinsufficiency is involved in tumorigenesis. There were few studies on how PAX5 haploinsufficiency regulated genes expression to promote tumorigenesis. In this study, we constructed the cell model of PAX5 haploinsufficiency using gene editing technology in Raji cells, detected differentially expressed genes in PAX5 haploinsufficiency Raji cells, and used protein-protein interaction networks and cluster analysis to comprehensively investigate the cellular pathways involved in PAX5 haploinsufficiency. The clusters of gene transcription, inflammatory and immune response, and cancer pathways were identified as three important pathways associated with PAX5 haploinsufficiency in Raji cells. These changes hinted that the mechanism of PAX5 haploinsufficiency promoting tumorigenesis may be related to genomic instability, immune tolerance, and tumor pathways. PMID:28316978

  4. Molecular convergence of clock and photosensory pathways through PIF3-TOC1 interaction and co-occupancy of target promoters.

    PubMed

    Soy, Judit; Leivar, Pablo; González-Schain, Nahuel; Martín, Guiomar; Diaz, Céline; Sentandreu, Maria; Al-Sady, Bassem; Quail, Peter H; Monte, Elena

    2016-04-26

    A mechanism for integrating light perception and the endogenous circadian clock is central to a plant's capacity to coordinate its growth and development with the prevailing daily light/dark cycles. Under short-day (SD) photocycles, hypocotyl elongation is maximal at dawn, being promoted by the collective activity of a quartet of transcription factors, called PIF1, PIF3, PIF4, and PIF5 (phytochrome-interacting factors). PIF protein abundance in SDs oscillates as a balance between synthesis and photoactivated-phytochrome-imposed degradation, with maximum levels accumulating at the end of the long night. Previous evidence shows that elongation under diurnal conditions (as well as in shade) is also subjected to circadian gating. However, the mechanism underlying these phenomena is incompletely understood. Here we show that the PIFs and the core clock component Timing of CAB expression 1 (TOC1) display coincident cobinding to the promoters of predawn-phased, growth-related genes under SD conditions. TOC1 interacts with the PIFs and represses their transcriptional activation activity, antagonizing PIF-induced growth. Given the dynamics of TOC1 abundance (displaying high postdusk levels that progressively decline during the long night), our data suggest that TOC1 functions to provide a direct output from the core clock that transiently constrains the growth-promoting activity of the accumulating PIFs early postdusk, thereby gating growth to predawn, when conditions for cell elongation are optimal. These findings unveil a previously unrecognized mechanism whereby a core circadian clock output signal converges immediately with the phytochrome photosensory pathway to coregulate directly the activity of the PIF transcription factors positioned at the apex of a transcriptional network that regulates a diversity of downstream morphogenic responses.

  5. Evidence for multiple stressor interactions and effects on coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Ban, Stephen S; Graham, Nicholas A J; Connolly, Sean R

    2014-03-01

    Concern is growing about the potential effects of interacting multiple stressors, especially as the global climate changes. We provide a comprehensive review of multiple stressor interactions in coral reef ecosystems, which are widely considered to be one of the most sensitive ecosystems to global change. First, we synthesized coral reef studies that examined interactions of two or more stressors, highlighting stressor interactions (where one stressor directly influences another) and potentially synergistic effects on response variables (where two stressors interact to produce an effect that is greater than purely additive). For stressor-stressor interactions, we found 176 studies that examined at least 2 of the 13 stressors of interest. Applying network analysis to analyze relationships between stressors, we found that pathogens were exacerbated by more costressors than any other stressor, with ca. 78% of studies reporting an enhancing effect by another stressor. Sedimentation, storms, and water temperature directly affected the largest number of other stressors. Pathogens, nutrients, and crown-of-thorns starfish were the most-influenced stressors. We found 187 studies that examined the effects of two or more stressors on a third dependent variable. The interaction of irradiance and temperature on corals has been the subject of more research (62 studies, 33% of the total) than any other combination of stressors, with many studies reporting a synergistic effect on coral symbiont photosynthetic performance (n = 19). Second, we performed a quantitative meta-analysis of existing literature on this most-studied interaction (irradiance and temperature). We found that the mean effect size of combined treatments was statistically indistinguishable from a purely additive interaction, although it should be noted that the sample size was relatively small (n = 26). Overall, although in aggregate a large body of literature examines stressor effects on coral reefs and coral

  6. Spin effects in the weak interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, S.J. Chicago Univ., IL . Dept. of Physics Chicago Univ., IL . Enrico Fermi Inst.)

    1990-01-01

    Modern experiments investigating the beta decay of the neutron and light nuclei are still providing important constraints on the theory of the weak interaction. Beta decay experiments are yielding more precise values for allowed and induced weak coupling constants and putting constraints on possible extensions to the standard electroweak model. Here we emphasize the implications of recent experiments to pin down the strengths of the weak vector and axial vector couplings of the nucleon.

  7. Interaction and the Online Distance Classroom: Do Instructional Methods Effect the Quality of Interaction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanuka, Heather

    2011-01-01

    In this special issue, I bring together two studies to provide a comprehensive overview on diverse and interactive instructional methods aimed to facilitate higher levels of learning. One study explored the effects of group interaction using different instructional strategies focusing on the learning "process" using the Community of Inquiry…

  8. Effects of Ignoring Item Interaction on Item Parameter Estimation and Detection of Interacting Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Cheng-Te; Wang, Wen-Chung

    2007-01-01

    This study explores the effects of ignoring item interaction on item parameter estimation and the efficiency of using the local dependence index Q[subscript 3] and the SAS NLMIXED procedure to detect item interaction under the three-parameter logistic model and the generalized partial credit model. Through simulations, it was found that ignoring…

  9. Interaction between cAMP-dependent and insulin-dependent signal pathways in tyrosine phosphorylation in primary cultures of rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Y; Uchijima, Y; Ariga, M; Seki, T; Takenaka, A; Hakuno, F; Takahashi, S I; Ariga, T; Noguchi, T

    1997-01-01

    The present studies were undertaken to determine whether the interaction between cAMP-dependent and insulin-dependent pathways in primary cultures of rat hepatocytes affects biological functions and tyrosine phosphorylation. Quiescent hepatocytes were pretreated with dibutyryl cAMP or cAMP-generating agents such as glucagon, and then treated or not with insulin. Preincubation for 6 h with dibutyryl cAMP or glucagon enhanced the effect of insulin on DNA synthesis, but not the effect of insulin on amino acid transport or glycogen and protein synthesis. Tyrosine phosphorylation of intracellular proteins was determined by immunoblot analysis using an anti-phosphotyrosine antibody. Maximum tyrosine phosphorylation of a 195 kDa protein, which may be a substrate of insulin receptor kinase, of 175-180 kDa proteins, including insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1, and of 90-95 kDa proteins, including the insulin receptor beta-subunit, was reached within 30 s of incubation with insulin. Pretreatment for about 3 h with dibutyryl cAMP or cAMP-generating agents clearly increased insulin-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of the 195 kDa protein, but not IRS-1, IRS-2 or the insulin receptor beta-subunit. Because dibutyryl cAMP and cAMP-generating agents did not increase insulin receptor number or its kinase activity, the effect of cAMP on this potentiation of tyrosine phosphorylation is assumed to be exerted at a step distal to insulin receptor kinase activation. The potentiation by cAMP pretreatment of insulin-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation may in part be secondary to inhibition of phosphotyrosine phosphatase activity, because cAMP pretreatment blunted the effect of Na3VO4 on the net tyrosine phosphorylation of the 195 kDa protein as compared with cells pretreated with no additive. In summary, the interactions between cAMP-dependent and insulin-dependent pathways that lead to augmentation of DNA synthesis appear to parallel the changes in tyrosine phosphorylation. Further

  10. Error framing effects on performance: cognitive, motivational, and affective pathways.

    PubMed

    Steele-Johnson, Debra; Kalinoski, Zachary T

    2014-01-01

    Our purpose was to examine whether positive error framing, that is, making errors salient and cuing individuals to see errors as useful, can benefit learning when task exploration is constrained. Recent research has demonstrated the benefits of a newer approach to training, that is, error management training, that includes the opportunity to actively explore the task and framing errors as beneficial to learning complex tasks (Keith & Frese, 2008). Other research has highlighted the important role of errors in on-the-job learning in complex domains (Hutchins, 1995). Participants (N = 168) from a large undergraduate university performed a class scheduling task. Results provided support for a hypothesized path model in which error framing influenced cognitive, motivational, and affective factors which in turn differentially affected performance quantity and quality. Within this model, error framing had significant direct effects on metacognition and self-efficacy. Our results suggest that positive error framing can have beneficial effects even when tasks cannot be structured to support extensive exploration. Whereas future research can expand our understanding of error framing effects on outcomes, results from the current study suggest that positive error framing can facilitate learning from errors in real-time performance of tasks.

  11. Inhibin alpha gene expression in human trophoblasts is regulated by interactions between TFAP2 and cAMP signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Depoix, Christophe L; Debiève, Frédéric; Hubinont, Corinne

    2014-11-01

    Inhibin α (Inha) gene expression is regulated, in rat granulosa cells, via a cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-response element (CRE) found in a region of the promoter that is homologous to the human INHA promoter. We previously found that during in vitro cytotrophoblast differentiation, human INHA gene expression was regulated by TFAP2A via association with an AP-2 site located upstream of this CRE. The aim of this study was to evaluate if the human INHA gene was also regulated by cAMP in trophoblasts, and to investigate the possible crosstalk between TFAP2 and cAMP signaling pathways in the regulation of INHA gene expression. Treatment with cAMP or forskolin increased INHA mRNA expression by 7- and 2-fold in primary cytotrophoblasts and choriocarcinoma-derived BeWo cells, respectively. Treatment with the protein kinase A inhibitor H-89 reduced forskolin-induced luciferase activity by ∼40% in BeWo cells transfected with an INHA promoter-driven luciferase reporter vector. TFAP2 overexpression increased basal luciferase activity, whereas the dominant repressor KCREB abolished it. Surprisingly, mutation of the CRE also eliminated the TFAP2-induced transcription, although TFAP2 overexpression was still able to increase forskolin-induced luciferase activity when the AP-2 binding site, but not the CRE site, was mutated. Thus, INHA gene expression is upregulated by cAMP via CRE in human trophoblasts, and TFAP2 regulates this expression by interacting with CRE.

  12. Characterization of skn-1/wdr-23 phenotypes in Caenorhabditis elegans; pleiotrophy, aging, glutathione, and interactions with other longevity pathways.

    PubMed

    Tang, Lanlan; Choe, Keith P

    2015-07-01

    The SKN-1/Nrf transcription factors are master regulators of oxidative stress responses and are emerging as important determinants of longevity. We previously identified a protein named WDR-23 as a direct repressor of SKN-1 in C. elegans. Loss of wdr-23 influences stress resistance, longevity, development, and reproduction, but it is unknown if WDR-23 influences development and reproduction solely through SKN-1 and the mechanisms by which SKN-1 promotes stress resistance and longevity are poorly defined. Here, we characterize phenotypes of wdr-23 and skn-1 manipulation and explore the role of glutathione. We provide evidence that diverse wdr-23 phenotypes are dependent on SKN-1, that beneficial and detrimental phenotypes of wdr-23 and skn-1 can be partially decoupled, and that SKN-1 activation delays degenerative tissue changes during aging. We also show that total glutathione levels are substantially elevated when the wdr-23/skn-1 pathway is activated and that skn-1 is required for preserving this cellular antioxidant during stress and aging. Alternatively, total glutathione was not elevated in worms with reduced insulin/IGF-1-like signaling or dietary restriction suggesting that SKN-1 ensures longevity via different mechanisms under these conditions. Lastly, genetic interaction data revise our understanding of which skn-1 variants are required for longevity during dietary restriction.

  13. From a Subtractive to Multiplicative Approach: A concept-driven interactive pathway on the selective absorption of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viennot, Laurence; de Hosson, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    This research documents the aims and the impact of a teaching experiment on how the absorption of light depends on the thickness of the absorbing medium. This teaching experiment is more specifically characterized as bringing to bear a 'concept-driven interactive pathway'. It is designed to make students analyse the absorption of light by a medium as a selective multiplication (i.e. one depending on the wavelength) of the intensity by a factor smaller than one. Six teaching interviews conducted with fourth-year university students were recorded, transcribed and coded. Their analysis led us to evaluate the importance of the main obstacle expected, that is, of restricting the interpretation of absorption/transmission phenomena to the idea of 'less light', or, equivalently, of seeing a multiplication by a factor smaller than one as just a subtraction. The students' comments at the end of the interview introduce a discussion about the links between their intellectual satisfaction, critical attitude and comprehension of the topic.

  14. APC/C and retinoblastoma interaction: cross-talk of retinoblastoma protein with the ubiquitin proteasome pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ramanujan, Ajeena; Tiwari, Swati

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin (Ub) ligase anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) and the tumour suppressor retinoblastoma protein (pRB) play key roles in cell cycle regulation. APC/C is a critical regulator of mitosis and G1-phase of the cell cycle whereas pRB keeps a check on proliferation by inhibiting transition to the S-phase. APC/C and pRB interact with each other via the co-activator of APC/C, FZR1, providing an alternative pathway of regulation of G1 to S transition by pRB using a post-translational mechanism. Both pRB and FZR1 have complex roles and are implicated not only in regulation of cell proliferation but also in differentiation, quiescence, apoptosis, maintenance of chromosomal integrity and metabolism. Both are also targeted by transforming viruses. We discuss recent advances in our understanding of the involvement of APC/C and pRB in cell cycle based decisions and how these insights will be useful for development of anti-cancer and anti-viral drugs. PMID:27402801

  15. Competition between members of the tribbles pseudokinase protein family shapes their interactions with mitogen activated protein kinase pathways

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Hongtao; Shuaib, Aban; Leon, David Davila De; Angyal, Adrienn; Salazar, Maria; Velasco, Guillermo; Holcombe, Mike; Dower, Steven K.; Kiss-Toth, Endre

    2016-01-01

    Spatio-temporal regulation of intracellular signalling networks is key to normal cellular physiology; dysregulation of which leads to disease. The family of three mammalian tribbles proteins has emerged as an important controller of signalling via regulating the activity of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK), the PI3-kinase induced signalling network and E3 ubiquitin ligases. However, the importance of potential redundancy in the action of tribbles and how the differences in affinities for the various binding partners may influence signalling control is currently unclear. We report that tribbles proteins can bind to an overlapping set of MAPK-kinases (MAPKK) in live cells and dictate the localisation of the complexes. Binding studies in transfected cells reveal common regulatory mechanisms and suggest that tribbles and MAPKs may interact with MAPKKs in a competitive manner. Computational modelling of the impact of tribbles on MAPK activation suggests a high sensitivity of this system to changes in tribbles levels, highlighting that these proteins are ideally placed to control the dynamics and balance of activation of concurrent signalling pathways. PMID:27600771

  16. Interaction of cytokeratin 19 head domain and HER2 in the cytoplasm leads to activation of HER2-Erk pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ohtsuka, Tomoaki; Sakaguchi, Masakiyo; Yamamoto, Hiromasa; Tomida, Shuta; Takata, Katsuyoshi; Shien, Kazuhiko; Hashida, Shinsuke; Miyata-Takata, Tomoko; Watanabe, Mototsugu; Suzawa, Ken; Soh, Junichi; Youyi, Chen; Sato, Hiroki; Namba, Kei; Torigoe, Hidejiro; Tsukuda, Kazunori; Yoshino, Tadashi; Miyoshi, Shinichiro; Toyooka, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    HER2 is a receptor tyrosine kinase and its upregulation via activating mutations or amplification has been identified in some malignant tumors, including lung cancers. Because HER2 can be a therapeutic target in HER2-driven malignancies, it is important to understand the molecular mechanisms of HER2 activation. In the current study, we identified that cytokeratin 19 (KRT19) binds to HER2 at the inside face of plasma membrane. HER2 and KRT19, which were concurrently introduced to a human embryonic kidney 293 T cells, revealed an association with each other and resulted in phosphorylation of HER2 with the subsequent activation of a downstream Erk-associated pathway. A binding assay revealed that both the NH2-terminal head domain of KRT19 and the COOH-terminal domain of HER2 were essential for their binding. To investigate the impact of the interaction between HER2 and KRT19 in lung cancer, we examined their expressions and localizations in lung cancers. We found that KRT19 was highly expressed in HER2-positive lung cancer cells, and KRT19 and HER2 were co-localized at the cell membrane. In conclusion, we found that KRT19 intracellularly binds to HER2, playing a critical role in HER2 activation. PMID:28008968

  17. Antitumor effects of traditional Chinese medicine targeting the cellular apoptotic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huanli; Zhao, Xin; Liu, Xiaohui; Xu, Pingxiang; Zhang, Keming; Lin, Xiukun

    2015-01-01

    Defects in apoptosis are common phenomena in many types of cancer and are also a critical step in tumorigenesis. Targeting the apoptotic pathway has been considered an intriguing strategy for cancer therapy. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been used in the People’s Republic of China for thousands of years, and many of the medicines have been confirmed to be effective in the treatment of a number of tumors. With increasing cancer rates worldwide, the antitumor effects of TCMs have attracted more and more attention globally. Many of the TCMs have been shown to have antitumor activity through multiple targets, and apoptosis pathway-related targets have been extensively studied and defined to be promising. This review focuses on several antitumor TCMs, especially those with clinical efficacy, based on their effects on the apoptotic signaling pathway. The problems with and prospects of development of TCMs as anticancer agents are also presented. PMID:26056434

  18. Local nature of substituent effects in stacking interactions.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Steven E

    2011-07-06

    Popular explanations of substituent effects in π-stacking interactions hinge upon substituent-induced changes in the aryl π-system. This entrenched view has been used to explain substituent effects in countless stacking interactions over the past 2 decades. However, for a broad range of stacked dimers, it is shown that substituent effects are better described as arising from local, direct interactions of the substituent with the proximal vertex of the other ring. Consequently, substituent effects in stacking interactions are additive, regardless of whether the substituents are on the same or opposite rings. Substituent effects are also insensitive to the introduction of heteroatoms on distant parts of either stacked ring. This local, direct interaction viewpoint provides clear, unambiguous explanations of substituent effects for myriad stacking interactions that are in accord with robust computational data, including DFT-D and new benchmark CCSD(T) results. Many of these computational results cannot be readily explained using traditional π-polarization-based models. Analyses of stacking interactions based solely on the sign of the electrostatic potential above the face of an aromatic ring or the molecular quadrupole moment face a similar fate. The local, direct interaction model provides a simple means of analyzing substituent effects in complex aromatic systems and also offers simple explanations of the crystal packing of fluorinated benzenes and the recently published dependence of the stability of protein-RNA complexes on the regiochemistry of fluorinated base analogues [J. Am. Chem. Soc.2011, 133, 3687-3689].

  19. Interactions between cannabidiol and Δ(9)-THC following acute and repeated dosing: Rebound hyperactivity, sensorimotor gating and epigenetic and neuroadaptive changes in the mesolimbic pathway.

    PubMed

    Todd, Stephanie M; Zhou, Cilla; Clarke, David J; Chohan, Tariq W; Bahceci, Dilara; Arnold, Jonathon C

    2017-02-01

    The evidence base for the use of medical cannabis preparations containing specific ratios of cannabidiol (CBD) and Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is limited. While there is abundant data on acute interactions between CBD and THC, few studies have assessed the impact of their repeated co-administration. We previously reported that CBD inhibited or potentiated the acute effects of THC dependent on the measure being examined at a 1:1 CBD:THC dose ratio. Further, CBD decreased THC effects on brain regions involved in memory, anxiety and body temperature regulation. Here we extend on these finding by examining over 15 days of treatment whether CBD modulated the repeated effects of THC on behaviour and neuroadaption markers in the mesolimbic dopamine pathway. After acute locomotor suppression, repeated THC caused rebound locomotor hyperactivity that was modestly inhibited by CBD. CBD also slightly reduced the acute effects of THC on sensorimotor gating. These subtle effects were found at a 1:1 CBD:THC dose ratio but were not accentuated by a 5:1 dose ratio. CBD did not alter the trajectory of enduring THC-induced anxiety nor tolerance to the pharmacological effects of THC. There was no evidence of CBD potentiating the behavioural effects of THC. However we demonstrated for the first time that repeated co-administration of CBD and THC increased histone 3 acetylation (H3K9/14ac) in the VTA and ΔFosB expression in the nucleus accumbens. These changes suggest that while CBD may have protective effects acutely, its long-term molecular actions on the brain are more complex and may be supradditive.

  20. Screening for interaction effects in gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    Castaldi, Peter J.; Cho, Michael H.; Liang, Liming; Silverman, Edwin K.; Hersh, Craig P.; Rice, Kenneth

    2017-01-01

    Expression quantitative trait (eQTL) studies are a powerful tool for identifying genetic variants that affect levels of messenger RNA. Since gene expression is controlled by a complex network of gene-regulating factors, one way to identify these factors is to search for interaction effects between genetic variants and mRNA levels of transcription factors (TFs) and their respective target genes. However, identification of interaction effects in gene expression data pose a variety of methodological challenges, and it has become clear that such analyses should be conducted and interpreted with caution. Investigating the validity and interpretability of several interaction tests when screening for eQTL SNPs whose effect on the target gene expression is modified by the expression level of a transcription factor, we characterized two important methodological issues. First, we stress the scale-dependency of interaction effects and highlight that commonly applied transformation of gene expression data can induce or remove interactions, making interpretation of results more challenging. We then demonstrate that, in the setting of moderate to strong interaction effects on the order of what may be reasonably expected for eQTL studies, standard interaction screening can be biased due to heteroscedasticity induced by true interactions. Using simulation and real data analysis, we outline a set of reasonable minimum conditions and sample size requirements for reliable detection of variant-by-environment and variant-by-TF interactions using the heteroscedasticity consistent covariance-based approach. PMID:28301596

  1. Effects of support on bifunctional methanol oxidation pathways catalyzed by polyoxometallate keggin clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Haichao; Iglesia, Enrique

    2003-12-26

    H5PV2Mo10O40 polyoxometallate Keggin clusters supported on ZrO2, TiO2, SiO2, and Al2O3 are effective catalysts for CH3OH oxidation reactions to form HCHO, methyl formate (MF), and dimethoxymethane (DMM). Rates and selectivities and the structure of supported clusters depend on the surface properties of the oxide supports. Raman spectroscopy showed that Keggin structures remained essentially intact on ZrO2, TiO2, and SiO2 after treatment in air at 553 K, but decomposed to MoOx and VOx oligomers on Al2O3. Accessible protons per Keggin unit (KU) were measured during CH3OH oxidation by titration with 2,6-di-tert-butyl pyridine. For similar KU surface densities (0.28 0.37 KU/nm2), the number of accessible protons was larger on SiO2 than on ZrO2 and TiO2 and much smaller on Al2O3 supports, even though residual dimethyl ether (DME) synthesis rates after titrant saturation indicated that the fractional dispersion of KU was similar on the first three supports. These effects of support on structure and on H+ accessibility reflect varying extents of interaction between polyoxometallate clusters and supports. Rates of CH3OH oxidative dehydrogenation per KU were higher on ZrO2 and TiO2 than on SiO2 at similar KU surface densities (0.28 0.37 KU/nm2) and dispersion, indicating that redox properties of Keggin clusters depend on the identity of the support used to disperse them. ZrO2 and TiO2 supports appear to enhance the reducibility of anchored polyoxometallate clusters. Rates were much lower on Al2O3, because structural degradation led to less reactive MoOx and VOx domains. CH3OH reactions involve primary oxidation to form HCHO and subsequent secondary reactions to form DMM and MF. These reactions involve HCHO CH3OH acetalization steps leading to methoxymethanol (CH3OCH2OH) or hemiacetal intermediates, which condense with CH3OH on acid sites to form DMM or dehydrogenate to form MF. COx formation rates are much lower than those of other reactions, and DME forms in parallel

  2. Tetramethylpyrazine Produces Antidepressant-Like Effects in Mice Through Promotion of BDNF Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Bo; Huang, Chao; Chen, Xiang-Fan; Tong, Li-Juan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Current antidepressants are clinically effective only after several weeks of administration. Tetramethylpyrazine (TMP) is an identified component of Ligusticum wallichii with neuroprotective effects. Here, we investigated the antidepressant effects of TMP in mice models of depression. Methods: Antidepressant effects of TMP were first detected in the forced swim test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST), and further assessed in the chronic social defeat stress (CSDS) model. Changes in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling pathway and in hippocampal neurogenesis after CSDS and TMP treatment were then investigated. A tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor and BDNF signaling inhibitors were also used to determine the mechanisms of TMP. Results: TMP exhibited potent antidepressant effects in the FST and TST without affecting locomotor activity. TMP also prevented the CSDS-induced symptoms. Moreover, TMP completely restored the CSDS-induced decrease of BDNF signaling pathway and hippocampal neurogenesis. Furthermore, a blockade of the BDNF signaling pathway prevented the antidepressant effects of TMP, while TMP produced no influence on the monoaminergic system. Conclusions: In conclusion, these data provide the first evidence that TMP has antidepressant effects, and this was mediated by promoting the BDNF signaling pathway. PMID:25618406

  3. Mercury as a Global Pollutant: Sources, Pathways, and Effects

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a global pollutant that affects human and ecosystem health. We synthesize understanding of sources, atmosphere-land-ocean Hg dynamics and health effects, and consider the implications of Hg-control policies. Primary anthropogenic Hg emissions greatly exceed natural geogenic sources, resulting in increases in Hg reservoirs and subsequent secondary Hg emissions that facilitate its global distribution. The ultimate fate of emitted Hg is primarily recalcitrant soil pools and deep ocean waters and sediments. Transfers of Hg emissions to largely unavailable reservoirs occur over the time scale of centuries, and are primarily mediated through atmospheric exchanges of wet/dry deposition and evasion from vegetation, soil organic matter and ocean surfaces. A key link between inorganic Hg inputs and exposure of humans and wildlife is the net production of methylmercury, which occurs mainly in reducing zones in freshwater, terrestrial, and coastal environments, and the subsurface ocean. Elevated human exposure to methylmercury primarily results from consumption of estuarine and marine fish. Developing fetuses are most at risk from this neurotoxin but health effects of highly exposed populations and wildlife are also a concern. Integration of Hg science with national and international policy efforts is needed to target efforts and evaluate efficacy. PMID:23590191

  4. Identifying drug effects via pathway alterations using an integer linear programming optimization formulation on phosphoproteomic data.

    PubMed

    Mitsos, Alexander; Melas, Ioannis N; Siminelakis, Paraskeuas; Chairakaki, Aikaterini D; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Alexopoulos, Leonidas G

    2009-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of cell function and drug action is a major endeavor in the pharmaceutical industry. Drug effects are governed by the intrinsic properties of the drug (i.e., selectivity and potency) and the specific signaling transduction network of the host (i.e., normal vs. diseased cells). Here, we describe an unbiased, phosphoproteomic-based approach to identify drug effects by monitoring drug-induced topology alterations. With our proposed method, drug effects are investigated under diverse stimulations of the signaling network. Starting with a generic pathway made of logical gates, we build a cell-type specific map by constraining it to fit 13 key phopshoprotein signals under 55 experimental conditions. Fitting is performed via an Integer Linear Program (ILP) formulation and solution by standard ILP solvers; a procedure that drastically outperforms previous fitting schemes. Then, knowing the cell's topology, we monitor the same key phosphoprotein signals under the presence of drug and we re-optimize the specific map to reveal drug-induced topology alterations. To prove our case, we make a topology for the hepatocytic cell-line HepG2 and we evaluate the effects of 4 drugs: 3 selective inhibitors for the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) and a non-selective drug. We confirm effects easily predictable from the drugs' main target (i.e., EGFR inhibitors blocks the EGFR pathway) but we also uncover unanticipated effects due to either drug promiscuity or the cell's specific topology. An interesting finding is that the selective EGFR inhibitor Gefitinib inhibits signaling downstream the Interleukin-1alpha (IL1alpha) pathway; an effect that cannot be extracted from binding affinity-based approaches. Our method represents an unbiased approach to identify drug effects on small to medium size pathways which is scalable to larger topologies with any type of signaling interventions (small molecules, RNAi, etc). The method can reveal drug effects on

  5. Role of One-carbon Metabolizing Pathway Genes and Gene-Nutrient Interaction in the Risk of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qian; Lan, Qing; Zhang, Yawei; Bassig, Bryan A.; Holford, Theodore R.; Leaderer, Brian; Boyle, Peter; Zhu, Yong; Qin, Qin; Chanock, Stephen; Rothman, Nathaniel; Zheng, Tongzhang

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Genetic polymorphisms in one-carbon metabolizing pathway genes have been associated with risk of malignant lymphoma. However, the results have been inconsistent. The objectives of this study were to examine the potential relationship between gene-nutrient interactions and the risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Methods We examined 25 polymorphisms in 16 one-carbon metabolism genes for their main effect and gene-nutrient interactions in relation to NHL risk among 518 incident cases and 597 population-based controls of Connecticut women enrolled between 1996 and 2000. Results A significantly reduced risk of NHL was associated with the homozygous TT genotype in CBS (rs234706, Ex9+33C>T) (OR = 0.51, 95%CI, 0.31–0.84), the homozygous CC genotype in MBD2 (rs603097, −2176C>T) (OR = 0.37, 95%CI, 0.17–0.79), the heterozygote AG genotype in FTHFD (rs1127717, Ex21+31A>G) (OR = 0.73, 95%CI, 0.55–0.98), and a borderline significantly reduced risk of NHL was observed for the homozygous CC genotype in MTRR (rs161870, Ex5+136T>C) (OR = 0.23, 95%CI, 0.05–1.04). The reduced risk of NHL associated with these genotypes was predominately in those with higher dietary vitamin B6 and methionine intakes, as well as with higher dietary folate intake although results were less stable. A borderline significantly increased risk of NHL was also observed for CBS (rs1801181, Ex13+41C>T), FTHFD (rs2305230, Ex10-40G>T), SHMT1 (rs1979277, Ex12+138C>T), and SHMT1 (rs1979276, Ex12+236T>C), and these associations appeared to be contingent on dietary nutrient intakes. Conclusion Our results suggest that variation in several one-carbon metabolizing pathway genes may influence the risk of NHL through gene-nutrient interactions involving dietary nutrient intakes. PMID:23913011

  6. Interparticle interactions and polarization effects in colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Hayter, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    The physics of simple colloidal systems is usually dominated by three independent length scales: the particle size, the average interparticle distance, and the range of the interparticle potential. The dispersed particles typically have characteristic dimensions in the range 5 to 100 nm, often with spherical or cylindrical symmetry. Dispersion densities vary over volume fractions ranging from 0.5 to 10/sup -4/, with the corresponding mean interparticle distances ranging from about 1 to 10 diameters (in spherical systems). The interaction potential may be very short ranged (hard sphere), very long ranged (Coulomb or dipolar), or anywhere in between (screened Coulomb), and the correlations exhibited in the dispersion may be gas-like, liquid-like or crystalline, depending on the range of the potential relative to the interparticle distance. This rich phase behavior is responsible for the remarkable importance of colloidal studies in many areas of condensed matter physics and biophysics, but it poses often intractable problems in developing the statistical mechanical descriptions necessary for an understanding of scattering data from colloids. This paper will review the considerable recent progress in this field, in the context of SANS experiments on colloids in which the potentials are dominated by either screened Coulomb or magnetic dipolar interactions; in the case of magnetic colloids (ferrofluids), the use of polarization analysis will also be discussed. 32 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Climate targets and cost-effective climate stabilization pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Held, H.

    2015-08-01

    Climate economics has developed two main tools to derive an economically adequate response to the climate problem. Cost benefit analysis weighs in any available information on mitigation costs and benefits and thereby derives an "optimal" global mean temperature. Quite the contrary, cost effectiveness analysis allows deriving costs of potential policy targets and the corresponding cost- minimizing investment paths. The article highlights pros and cons of both approaches and then focusses on the implications of a policy that strives at limiting global warming to 2 °C compared to pre-industrial values. The related mitigation costs and changes in the energy sector are summarized according to the IPCC report of 2014. The article then points to conceptual difficulties when internalizing uncertainty in these types of analyses and suggests pragmatic solutions. Key statements on mitigation economics remain valid under uncertainty when being given the adequate interpretation. Furthermore, the expected economic value of perfect climate information is found to be on the order of hundreds of billions of Euro per year if a 2°-policy were requested. Finally, the prospects of climate policy are sketched.

  8. Nonstandard interaction effects on astrophysical neutrino fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Blennow, Mattias; Meloni, Davide

    2009-09-15

    We investigate new physics effects in the production and detection of high-energy neutrinos at neutrino telescopes. Analyzing the flavor ratios {phi}{sub {mu}}/{phi}{sub {tau}} and {phi}{sub {mu}}/({phi}{sub {tau}}+{phi}{sub e}), we find that the standard model predictions for them can be sensibly altered by new physics effects in the case of pion sources. However, the experimental precision required to see the effects would be very difficult to obtain.

  9. Oxidation pathways underlying the pro-oxidant effects of apigenin.

    PubMed

    Andueza, Aitor; García-Garzón, Antonia; Ruiz de Galarreta, Marina; Ansorena, Eduardo; Iraburu, María J; López-Zabalza, María J; Martínez-Irujo, Juan J

    2015-10-01

    Apigenin, a natural flavone, is emerging as a promising compound for the treatment of several diseases. One of the hallmarks of apigenin is the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), as judged by the oxidation of reduced dichlorofluorescein derivatives seen in many cell types. This study aimed to reveal some mechanisms by which apigenin can be oxidized and how apigenin-derived radicals affect the oxidation of 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein (H(2)DCF), a probe usually employed to detect intracellular ROS. Apigenin induced a rapid oxidation of H(2)DCF in two different immortalized cell lines derived from rat and human hepatic stellate cells. However, apigenin did not generate ROS in these cells, as judged by dihydroethidium oxidation and extracellular hydrogen peroxide production. In cell-free experiments we found that oxidation of apigenin leads to the generation of a phenoxyl radical, which directly oxidizes H(2)DCF with catalytic amounts of hydrogen peroxide. The net balance of the reaction was the oxidation of the probe by molecular oxygen due to redox cycling of apigenin. This flavonoid was also able to deplete NADH and glutathione by a similar mechanism. Interestingly, H(2)DCF oxidation was significantly accelerated by apigenin in the presence of horseradish peroxidase and xanthine oxidase, but not with other enzymes showing peroxidase-like activity, such as cytochrome c or catalase. We conclude that in cells treated with apigenin oxidation of reduced dichlorofluorescein derivatives does not measure intracellular ROS and that pro- and antioxidant effects of flavonoids deduced from these experiments are inconclusive and must be confirmed by other techniques.

  10. Exposure pathway-dependent effects of the fungicide epoxiconazole on a decomposer-detritivore system.

    PubMed

    Feckler, Alexander; Goedkoop, Willem; Zubrod, Jochen P; Schulz, Ralf; Bundschuh, Mirco

    2016-11-15

    Shredders play a central role in the breakdown of leaf material in aquatic systems. These organisms and the ecological function they provide may, however, be affected by chemical stressors either as a consequence of direct waterborne exposure or through alterations in food-quality (indirect pathway). To unravel the biological relevance of these effect pathways, we applied a 2×2-factorial test design. Leaf material was microbially colonized for 10days in absence or presence of the fungicide epoxiconazole (15μg/L) and subsequently fed to the shredder Asellus aquaticus under exposure to epoxiconazole (15μg/L) or in fungicide-free medium over a 28-day period (n=40). Both effect pathways caused alterations in asselids' food processing, physiological fitness, and growth, although not always statistically significantly: assimilation either increased or remained at a similar level relative to the control suggesting compensatory behavior of A. aquaticus to cope with the enhanced energy demand for detoxification processes and decreased nutritional quality of the food. The latter was driven by lowered microbial biomasses and the altered composition of fatty acids associated with the leaf material. Even with increased assimilation, direct and indirect effects caused decreases in the growth and lipid (fatty acid) content of A. aquaticus with relative effect sizes between 10 and 40%. Moreover, the concentrations of two essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (i.e., arachidonic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid) were non-significantly reduced (up to ~15%) in asselids. This effect was, however, independent of the exposure pathway. Although waterborne effects were generally stronger than the diet-related effects, results suggest impaired functioning of A. aquaticus via both effect pathways.

  11. X(1576) and the final state interaction effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiang; Zhang, Bo; Shen, Lei-Lei; Zhu, Shi-Lin

    2007-04-01

    We study whether the broad peak X(1576) observed by BES Collaboration arises from the final state interaction effect of ρ(14501700) decays. The interference effect could produce an enhancement around 1540 MeV in the K+K- spectrum with typical interference phases. However, the branching ratio B[J/ψ→π0ρ(14501700)]·B[ρ(14501700)→K+K-] from the final state interaction effect is far less than the experimental data.

  12. Effect Modification and Interaction Terms: It Takes Two to Tango.

    PubMed

    Jupiter, Daniel C

    2016-01-01

    In this Investigators' Corner I look more deeply into the previously discussed phenomenon of effect modification. I revisit an explanation and examples of the phenomenon and then examine how to account for it statistically. Specifically, I show, in detail, how to write a regression equation that includes interaction terms that account for the effect modification. Finally, I look at interpretation of regression coefficients both with and without the presence of effect modification, and the associated interaction terms.

  13. Effects of aerosol emission pathways on future warming and human health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partanen, Antti-Ilari; Matthews, Damon

    2016-04-01

    The peak global temperature is largely determined by cumulative emissions of long-lived greenhouse gases. However, anthropogenic emissions include also so-called short-lived climate forcers (SLCFs), which include aerosol particles and methane. Previous studies with simple models indicate that the timing of SLCF emission reductions has only a small effect on the rate of global warming and even less of an effect on global peak temperatures. However, these simple model analyses do not capture the spatial dynamics of aerosol-climate interactions, nor do they consider the additional effects of aerosol emissions on human health. There is therefore merit in assessing how the timing of aerosol emission reductions affects global temperature and premature mortality caused by elevated aerosol concentrations, using more comprehensive climate models. Here, we used an aerosol-climate model ECHAM-HAMMOZ to simulate the direct and indirect radiative forcing resulting from aerosol emissions. We simulated Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios, and we also designed idealized low and high aerosol emission pathways based on RCP4.5 scenario (LOW and HIGH, respectively). From these simulations, we calculated the Effective Radiative Forcing (ERF) from aerosol emissions between 1850 and 2100, as well as aerosol concentrations used to estimate the premature mortality caused by particulate pollution. We then use the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model to simulate the spatial and temporal pattern of climate response to these aerosol-forcing scenarios, in combination with prescribed emissions of both short and long-lived greenhouse gases according to the RCP4.5 scenario. In the RCP scenarios, global mean ERF declined during the 21st century from -1.3 W m-2 to -0.4 W m-2 (RCP8.5) and -0.2 W m-2 (RCP2.6). In the sensitivity scenarios, the forcing at the end of the 21st century was -1.6 W m-2 (HIGH) and practically zero (LOW). The difference in global mean temperature

  14. Personality Factors and Expectation Effects in Teacher-Student Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Robert S.

    Although the effect of teacher expectations on student performance has been well documented, little research has focused on the effect of teacher personality styles on student-teacher interactions. To investigate the effect of teachers' locus of control and their expectations of their own effectiveness on student success, 77 female college…

  15. Effects of Alkali Metal Ion Cationization on Fragmentation Pathways of Triazole-Epothilone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Xiyan; Luo, Guoan; Chen, Yue; Kong, Xianglei

    2012-06-01

    The collisionally activated dissociation mass spectra of the protonated and alkali metal cationized ions of a triazole-epothilone analogue were studied in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. The fragmentation pathway of the protonated ion was characterized by the loss of the unit of C3H4O3. However, another fragmentation pathway with the loss of C3H2O2 was identified for the complex ions with Na+, K+, Rb+, and Cs+. The branching ratio of the second pathway increases with the increment of the size of alkali metal ions. Theoretical calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) method show the difference in the binding position of the proton and the metal ions. With the increase of the radii of the metal ions, progressive changes in the macrocycle of the compound are induced, which cause the corresponding change in their fragmentation pathways. It has also been found that the interaction energy between the compound and the metal ion decreases with increase in the size of the latter. This is consistent with the experimental results, which show that cesiated complexes readily eject Cs+ when subject to collisions.

  16. Edge-effect interactions in fragmented and patchy landscapes.

    PubMed

    Porensky, Lauren M; Young, Truman P

    2013-06-01

    Ecological edges are increasingly recognized as drivers of landscape patterns and ecosystem processes. In fragmented and patchy landscapes (e.g., a fragmented forest or a savanna with scattered termite mounds), edges can become so numerous that their effects pervade the entire landscape. Results of recent studies in such landscapes show that edge effects can be altered by the presence or proximity of other nearby edges. We considered the theoretical significance of edge-effect interactions, illustrated various landscape configurations that support them and reviewed existing research on this topic. Results of studies from a variety of locations and ecosystem types show that edge-effect interactions can have significant consequences for ecosystems and conservation, including higher tree mortality rates in tropical rainforest fragments, reduced bird densities in grassland fragments, and bush encroachment and reduced wildlife densities in a tropical savanna. To clarify this underappreciated concept and synthesize existing work, we devised a conceptual framework for edge-effect interactions. We first worked to reduce terminological confusion by clarifying differences among terms such as edge intersection and edge interaction. For cases in which nearby edge effects interact, we proposed three possible forms of interaction: strengthening (presence of a second edge causes stronger edge effects), weakening (presence of a second edge causes weaker edge effects), and emergent (edge effects change completely in the presence of a second edge). By clarifying terms and concepts, this framework enables more precise descriptions of edge-effect interactions and facilitates comparisons of results among disparate study systems and response variables. A better understanding of edge-effect interactions will pave the way for more appropriate modeling, conservation, and management in complex landscapes.

  17. PfIRR Interacts with HrIGF-I and Activates the MAP-kinase and PI3-kinase Signaling Pathways to Regulate Glycogen Metabolism in Pinctada fucata

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yu; He, Mao-xian

    2016-01-01

    The insulin-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways are major intracellular signaling modules and conserved among eukaryotes that are known to regulate diverse cellular processes. However, they have not been investigated in the mollusk species Pinctada fucata. Here, we demonstrate that insulin-related peptide receptor of P. fucata (pfIRR) interacts with human recombinant insulin-like growth factor I (hrIGF-I), and stimulates the MAPK and PI3K signaling pathways in P. fucata oocytes. We also show that inhibition of pfIRR by the inhibitor PQ401 significantly attenuates the basal and hrIGF-I-induced phosphorylation of MAPK and PI3K/Akt at amino acid residues threonine 308 and serine 473. Furthermore, our experiments show that there is cross-talk between the MAPK and PI3K/Akt pathways, in which MAPK kinase positively regulates the PI3K pathway, and PI3K positively regulates the MAPK cascade. Intramuscular injection of hrIGF-I stimulates the PI3K and MAPK pathways to increase the expression of pfirr, protein phosphatase 1, glucokinase, and the phosphorylation of glycogen synthase, decreases the mRNA expression of glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta, decreases glucose levels in hemocytes, and increases glycogen levels in digestive glands. These results suggest that the MAPK and PI3K pathways in P. fucata transmit the hrIGF-I signal to regulate glycogen metabolism. PMID:26911653

  18. The quantum measurement effect of interaction without interaction for an atomic beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong-Yi

    When an atomic beam collectively and harmonically vibrates perpendicular to the wave vector of the beam, the number of atoms reaching the atomic detector will have a vibrant factor Δt / T if the measurement time interval Δt is shorter than the period T. This new quantum mechanical measurement effect for an atomic beam is called interaction without interaction: though the translational motion of the atomic beam does not interact with its collective and transverse harmonic vibration, the latter will have an effect on the measured number of atoms associated with the former. From the new measurement effect the classical harmonic vibration's period is evaluated. We give a clear physical picture and a satisfactory physical interpretation for the measurement effect based on the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics. We present an experimental proposal to verify this measurement effect for an ion beam instead of an atomic beam.

  19. Effect of situation on mother-infant interaction.

    PubMed

    Maas, A Janneke B M; Vreeswijk, Charlotte M J M; van Bakel, Hedwig J A

    2013-02-01

    Research has shown that the early parent-infant relationship is of critical importance for children's developmental outcomes. While the effect of different settings on mother-infant interactive behavior is well studied, only few researchers systematically examined the effect of situational variables on mother-infant interaction. In the present study the effect of situational variables within the home setting on the quality of mother-infant interaction at 6 months was examined as well as the consistency in the quality of behaviors of mother and infant across these situations. During a home visit 292 mother-infant dyads were videotaped in three different situations (i.e., free play, face-to-face play, and diaper change). Interactive behaviors of mother and infant were assessed with the NICHD global ratings scales. Results showed substantial effects of situation on the interactive behavior of the mother-infant dyad. Despite the observed situational effects maternal sensitivity to non-distress, intrusiveness, stimulation of development, and positive regard and all five infant behavioral scales remained stable across the different situations. Insight into situational effects within the home setting on the quality of mother-infant interactive behavior may assist researchers to make well-informed decisions about measuring the parent-infant interaction in one or more specific situations.

  20. miR-124 function during Ciona intestinalis neuronal development includes extensive interaction with the Notch signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jerry S; Pedro, Matthew San; Zeller, Robert W

    2011-11-01

    The nervous system-enriched microRNA miR-124 is necessary for proper nervous system development, although the mechanism remains poorly understood. Here, through a comprehensive analysis of miR-124 and its gene targets, we demonstrate that, in the chordate ascidian Ciona intestinalis, miR-124 plays an extensive role in promoting nervous system development. We discovered that feedback interaction between miR-124 and Notch signaling regulates the epidermal-peripheral nervous system (PNS) fate choice in tail midline cells. Notch signaling silences miR-124 in epidermal midline cells, whereas in PNS midline cells miR-124 silences Notch, Neuralized and all three Ciona Hairy/Enhancer-of-Split genes. Furthermore, ectopic expression of miR-124 is sufficient to convert epidermal midline cells into PNS neurons, consistent with a role in modulating Notch signaling. More broadly, genome-wide target extraction with validation using an in vivo tissue-specific sensor assay indicates that miR-124 shapes neuronal progenitor fields by downregulating non-neural genes, notably the muscle specifier Macho-1 and 50 Brachyury-regulated notochord genes, as well as several anti-neural factors including SCP1 and PTBP1. 3'UTR conservation analysis reveals that miR-124 targeting of SCP1 is likely to have arisen as a shared, derived trait in the vertebrate/tunicate ancestor and targeting of PTBP1 is conserved among bilaterians except for ecdysozoans, while extensive Notch pathway targeting appears to be Ciona specific. Altogether, our results provide a comprehensive insight into the specific mechanisms by which miR-124 promotes neuronal development.

  1. Effectiveness of Interactive Video to Teach CPR Theory and Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyness, Ann L.

    This study investigated whether an interactive video system of instruction taught cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) as effectively as traditional instruction. Using standards of the American Heart Association, the study was designed with two randomized groups to be taught either by live instruction or by interactive video. Subjects were 100…

  2. Modeling Interaction Effects in Latent Growth Curve Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Fuzhong; Duncan, Terry E.; Acock, Alan

    2000-01-01

    Presents an extension of the method of estimating interaction effects among latent variables to latent growth curve models developed by K. Joreskog and F. Yang (1996). Illustrates the procedure and discusses results in terms of practical and statistical problems associated with interaction analyses in latent curve models and structural equation…

  3. Understanding substituent effects in noncovalent interactions involving aromatic rings.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Steven E

    2013-04-16

    Noncovalent interactions involving aromatic rings such as π-stacking, cation/π, and anion/π interactions are central to many areas of modern chemistry. Decades of experimental studies have provided key insights into the impact of substituents on these interactions, leading to the development of simple intuitive models. However, gas-phase computational studies have raised some doubts about the physical underpinnings of these widespread models. In this Account we review our recent efforts to unravel the origin of substituent effects in π-stacking and ion/π interactions through computational studies of model noncovalent dimers. First, however, we dispel the notion that so-called aromatic interactions depend on the aromaticity of the interacting rings by studying model π-stacked dimers in which the aromaticity of one of the monomers can be "switched off". Somewhat surprisingly, the results show that not only is aromaticity unnecessary for π-stacking interactions, but it actually hinders these interactions to some extent. Consequently, when thinking about π-stacking interactions, researchers should consider broader classes of planar molecules, not just aromatic systems. Conventional models maintain that substituent effects in π-stacking interactions result from changes in the aryl π-system. This view suggests that π-stacking interactions are maximized when one ring is substituted with electron-withdrawing groups and the other with electron donors. In contrast to these prevailing models, we have shown that substituent effects in π-stacking interactions can be described in terms of direct, local interactions between the substituents and the nearby vertex of the other arene. As a result, in polysubstituted π-stacked dimers the substituents operate independently unless they are in each other's local environment. This means that in π-stacked dimers in which one arene is substituted with electron donors and the other with electron acceptors the interactions will

  4. Collective Genetic Interaction Effects and the Role of Antigen-Presenting Cells in Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Hyung Jun; Yu, Chenggang; Reifman, Jaques

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases occur when immune cells fail to develop or lose their tolerance toward self and destroy body’s own tissues. Both insufficient negative selection of self-reactive T cells and impaired development of regulatory T cells preventing effector cell activation are believed to contribute to autoimmunity. Genetic predispositions center around the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II loci involved in antigen presentation, the key determinant of CD4+ T cell activation. Recent studies suggested that variants in the MHC region also exhibit significant non-additive interaction effects. However, collective interactions involving large numbers of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) contributing to such effects are yet to be characterized. In addition, relatively little is known about the cell-type-specificity of such interactions in the context of cellular pathways. Here, we analyzed type 1 diabetes (T1D) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) genome-wide association data sets via large-scale, high-performance computations and inferred collective interaction effects involving MHC SNPs using the discrete discriminant analysis. Despite considerable differences in the details of SNP interactions in T1D and RA data, the enrichment pattern of interacting pairs in reference epigenomes was remarkably similar: statistically significant interactions were epigenetically active in cell-type combinations connecting B cells to T cells and intestinal epithelial cells, with both helper and regulatory T cells showing strong disease-associated interactions with B cells. Our results provide direct genetic evidence pointing to the important roles B cells play as antigen-presenting cells toward CD4+ T cells in the context of central and peripheral tolerance. In addition, they are consistent with recent experimental studies suggesting that the repertoire of B cell-specific self-antigens in the thymus are critical to the effective control of corresponding autoimmune activation

  5. Multilocus analyses of seven candidate genes suggest interacting pathways for obesity-related traits in Brazilian populations.

    PubMed

    Angeli, Cláudia B; Kimura, Lilian; Auricchio, Maria T; Vicente, João P; Mattevi, Vanessa S; Zembrzuski, Verônica M; Hutz, Mara H; Pereira, Alexandre C; Pereira, Tiago V; Mingroni-Netto, Regina C

    2011-06-01

    We investigated whether variants in major candidate genes for food intake and body weight regulation contribute to obesity-related traits under a multilocus perspective. We studied 375 Brazilian subjects from partially isolated African-derived populations (quilombos). Seven variants displaying conflicting results in previous reports and supposedly implicated in the susceptibility of obesity-related phenotypes were investigated: β2-adrenergic receptor (ADRB2) (Arg16Gly), insulin induced gene 2 (INSIG2) (rs7566605), leptin (LEP) (A19G), LEP receptor (LEPR) (Gln223Arg), perilipin (PLIN) (6209T > C), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARG) (Pro12Ala), and resistin (RETN) (-420 C > G). Regression models as well as generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction (GMDR) were employed to test the contribution of individual effects and higher-order interactions to BMI and waist-hip ratio (WHR) variation and risk of overweight/obesity. The best multilocus association signal identified in the quilombos was further examined in an independent sample of 334 Brazilian subjects of European ancestry. In quilombos, only the PPARG polymorphism displayed significant individual effects (WHR variation, P = 0.028). No association was observed either with the risk of overweight/obesity (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2), risk of obesity alone (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2) or BMI variation. However, GMDR analyses revealed an interaction between the LEPR and ADRB2 polymorphisms (P = 0.009) as well as a third-order effect involving the latter two variants plus INSIG2 (P = 0.034) with overweight/obesity. Assessment of the LEPR-ADRB2 interaction in the second sample indicated a marginally significant association (P = 0.0724), which was further verified to be limited to men (P = 0.0118). Together, our findings suggest evidence for a two-locus interaction between the LEPR Gln223Arg and ADRB2 Arg16Gly variants in the risk of overweight/obesity, and highlight further the importance of multilocus effects in

  6. Investigation of adverse effects of interactions between herbal drugs and natural blood clotting mechanism.

    PubMed

    Adhyapak, M S; Kachole, M S

    2016-05-01

    Throughout the world, herbal medicines are consumed by most of the patients without considering their adverse effects. Many herbal medicines/plant extracts have been reported to interact with the natural blood clotting system. In continuation to this effort, thirty medicinal plant extracts were allowed to interact with citrated human blood and the clotting time was measured after re-calcification in vitro using Lee and White method. The aq. leaf ext. of Syzygium cumini and Camellia sinensis significantly prolonged the clotting time. In response to the prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time tests, the ext. of C. sinensis showed normal APTT and marginally prolonged the PT to 16.7 s (control-15.2 s) while S. cumini showed normal PT but significantly prolonged the APTT to 66.9 s (control-20.7 s). This suggests that, C. sinensis acts on the extrinsic pathway while S. cumini on the intrinsic pathway. There are some common herbal formulations that are frequently used by the patients which contain above plant materials, like, Syzygium cumin in anti-diabetic formulations, while the ext. of C. sinensis is consumed frequently as beverage in many part of the world. Hence, patients having known bleeding tendency or haemophilia disease should take into account the interaction potential of these plants with the natural blood clotting system while taking herbal formulations containing above plants; specially, the patients suffering from intrinsic pathway factor deficiency should keep a limit on the consumption of S. cumini while extrinsic pathway factor deficiency patients should limit C. sinensis. Also, the medical practitioners should consider the patient's food consumption history before doing any major surgical procedures.

  7. Effect of Coulomb interaction on multi-electronwave packet dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Shiokawa, T.; Takada, Y.; Konabe, S.; Hatsugai, Y.; Muraguchi, M.; Endoh, T.; Shiraishi, K.

    2013-12-04

    We have investigated the effect of Coulomb interaction on electron transport in a one-dimensional nanoscale structure using a multi-electron wave packet approach. To study the time evolution, we numerically solve the time-dependent Hartree-Fock equation, finding that the electron wave packet dynamics strongly depends on the Coulomb interaction strength. When the Coulomb interaction is large, each electron wave packet moves separately in the presence of an electric field. With weak Coulomb interaction, however, the electron wave packets overlap, forming and moving as one collective wave packet.

  8. Pathway Cross-Talk Analysis in Detecting Significant Pathways in Barrett’s Esophagus Patients

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhengyuan; Yan, Yan; He, Jian; Shan, Xinfang; Wu, Weiguo

    2017-01-01

    Background The pathological mechanism of Barrett’s esophagus (BE) is still unclear. In the present study, pathway cross-talks were analyzed to identify hub pathways for BE, with the purpose of finding an efficient and cost-effective detection method to discover BE at its early stage and take steps to prevent its progression. Material/Methods We collected and preprocessed gene expression profile data, original pathway data, and protein-protein interaction (PPI) data. Then, we constructed a background pathway cross-talk network (BPCN) based on the original pathway data and PPI data, and a disease pathway cross-talk network (DPCN) based on the differential pathways between the PPI data and the BE and normal control. Finally, a comprehensive analysis was conducted on these 2 networks to identify hub pathway cross-talks for BE, so as to better understand the pathological mechanism of BE from the pathway level. Results A total of 12 411 genes, 300 pathways (6919 genes), and 787 896 PPI interactions (16 730 genes) were separately obtained from their own databases. Then, we constructed a BPCN with 300 nodes (42 293 interactions) and a DPCN with 296 nodes (15 073 interactions). We identified 4 hub pathways: AMP signaling pathway, cGMP-PKG signaling pathway, natural killer cell-mediated cytotoxicity, and osteoclast differentiation. We found that these pathways might play important roles during the occurrence and development of BE. Conclusions We predicted that these pathways (such as AMP signaling pathway and cAMP signaling pathway) could be used as potential biomarkers for early diagnosis and therapy of BE. PMID:28263955

  9. New effects in the interaction between electromagnetic sources mediated by nonminimal Lorentz violating interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges, L. H. C.; Ferrari, A. F.; Barone, F. A.

    2016-11-01

    This paper is dedicated to the study of interactions between external sources for the electromagnetic field in the presence of Lorentz symmetry breaking. We focus on a higher derivative, Lorentz violating interaction that arises from a specific model that was argued to lead to interesting effects in the low energy phenomenology of light pseudoscalars interacting with photons. The kind of higher derivative Lorentz violating interaction we discuss are called nonminimal. They are usually expected to be relevant only at very high energies, but we argue they might also induce relevant effects in low energy phenomena. Indeed, we show that the Lorentz violating background considered by us leads to several phenomena that have no counterpart in Maxwell theory, such as nontrivial torques on isolated electric dipoles, as well as nontrivial forces and torques between line currents and point like charges, as well as among Dirac strings and other electromagnetic sources.

  10. The Fanconi Anemia DNA Repair Pathway Is Regulated by an Interaction between Ubiquitin and the E2-like Fold Domain of FANCL.

    PubMed

    Miles, Jennifer A; Frost, Mark G; Carroll, Eilis; Rowe, Michelle L; Howard, Mark J; Sidhu, Ateesh; Chaugule, Viduth K; Alpi, Arno F; Walden, Helen

    2015-08-21

    The Fanconi Anemia (FA) DNA repair pathway is essential for the recognition and repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICL). Inefficient repair of these ICL can lead to leukemia and bone marrow failure. A critical step in the pathway is the monoubiquitination of FANCD2 by the RING E3 ligase FANCL. FANCL comprises 3 domains, a RING domain that interacts with E2 conjugating enzymes, a central domain required for substrate interaction, and an N-terminal E2-like fold (ELF) domain. The ELF domain is found in all FANCL homologues, yet the function of the domain remains unknown. We report here that the ELF domain of FANCL is required to mediate a non-covalent interaction between FANCL and ubiquitin. The interaction involves the canonical Ile44 patch on ubiquitin, and a functionally conserved patch on FANCL. We show that the interaction is not necessary for the recognition of the core complex, it does not enhance the interaction between FANCL and Ube2T, and is not required for FANCD2 monoubiquitination in vitro. However, we demonstrate that the ELF domain is required to promote efficient DNA damage-induced FANCD2 monoubiquitination in vertebrate cells, suggesting an important function of ubiquitin binding by FANCL in vivo.

  11. Effective interaction and condensation of dipolaritons in coupled quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrnes, Tim; Kolmakov, German V.; Kezerashvili, Roman Ya.; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2014-09-01

    Dipolaritons are a three-way superposition of a photon, a direct exciton, and an indirect exciton that are formed in coupled quantum well microcavities. As is the case with exciton-polaritons, dipolaritons have a self-interaction due to direct and exchange effects of the underlying electrons and holes. Here we present a theoretical description of dipolaritons and derive simple formulas for their basic parameters. In particular, we derive the effective dipolariton-dipolariton interaction taking into account exchange effects between the excitons. We obtain a simple relation to describe the effective interaction at low densities. We find that dipolaritons should condense under suitable conditions, described by a dissipative Gross-Pitaevskii equation. While the parameters for condensation are promising, we find that the level of tunability of the interactions is limited.

  12. Online Chemistry Modules: Interaction and Effective Faculty Facilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slocum, Laura E.; Towns Marcy Hamby; Zielinski, Theresa Julia

    2004-01-01

    Computer supported collaborative learning, cooperative learning combined with electronic communication, physical chemistry online modules, use of discussion boards, its advantages and limitations are experimented and discussed. The most important finding is the example of effective online faculty facilitation and interaction.

  13. Communication: Dimensionality of the ionic conduction pathways in glass and the mixed-alkali effect.

    PubMed

    Novy, Melissa; Avila-Paredes, Hugo; Kim, Sangtae; Sen, Sabyasachi

    2015-12-28

    A revised empirical relationship between the power law exponent of ac conductivity dispersion and the dimensionality of the ionic conduction pathway is established on the basis of electrical impedance spectroscopic (EIS) measurements on crystalline ionic conductors. These results imply that the "universal" ac conductivity dispersion observed in glassy solids is associated with ionic transport along fractal pathways. EIS measurements on single-alkali glasses indicate that the dimensionality of this pathway D is ∼2.5, while in mixed-alkali glasses, D is lower and goes through a minimum value of ∼2.2 when the concentrations of the two alkalis become equal. D and σ display similar variation with alkali composition, thus suggesting a topological origin of the mixed-alkali effect.

  14. Effects of Website Interactivity on Online Retail Shopping Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Hafizul

    Motivations to engage in retail online shopping can include both utilitarian and hedonic shopping dimensions. To cater to these consumers, online retailers can create a cognitively and esthetically rich shopping environment, through sophisticated levels of interactive web utilities and features, offering not only utilitarian benefits and attributes but also providing hedonic benefits of enjoyment. Since the effect of interactive websites has proven to stimulate online consumer’s perceptions, this study presumes that websites with multimedia rich interactive utilities and features can influence online consumers’ shopping motivations and entice them to modify or even transform their original shopping predispositions by providing them with attractive and enhanced interactive features and controls, thus generating a positive attitude towards products and services offered by the retailer. This study seeks to explore the effects of Web interactivity on online consumer behavior through an attitudinal model of technology acceptance.

  15. Anti-tumor effects of the Notch pathway in gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Amaury G; Yang, Yanwen; Reynoso, David; Katz, Daniela; Trent, Jonathan C; Hughes, Dennis P

    2012-09-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are driven by gain-of-function mutations of KIT or PDGFRa. The introduction of imatinib has significantly extended survival for patients. However, most patients develop resistances. Notch signaling is a conserved developmental pathway known to play a critical role in the development of several cancers, functioning as a tumor promoter or a tumor suppressor. Given that the normal progenitor cell for GIST, the interstitial cell of Cajal, has characteristics similar to those of cells of neuroendocrine origin, we hypothesized that Notch pathway impacts the biology of GIST cells. In this study, we retrovirally and pharmacologically manipulated the Notch pathway in human GIST cells. We also performed a retrospective analysis of a cohort on 15 primary tumors to determine the role of Hes1, a major target gene of Notch, as a prognostic marker for GIST. Constitutively, active intracellular domain of Notch1 (ICN1) expression potently induced growth arrest and downregulated KIT expression in vitro. Additionally, treatment with the histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid caused dose-dependent upregulation of Notch1 expression and a parallel decrease in viability in these cells. Retroviral silencing of downstream targets of Notch (dominant-negative Hes1) and pharmacological inhibition of Notch activation (γ-secretase inhibition) partially rescued GIST cells from suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid treatment. GIST patients with high Hes1 mRNA levels have a significantly longer relapse-free survival. These results identify a novel anti-tumor effect of Notch1 and cross talk between the Notch and KIT pathways. Thus, activation of this pathway by treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors is an appealing potential therapeutic strategy for GISTs. Précis: This study is the first report of the tumor suppressor effects of Notch pathway in gastrointestinal stromal tumors via a negative feedback with the oncogene KIT and may

  16. Pathway deviation-based biomarker and multi-effect target identification in asbestos-related squamous cell carcinoma of the lung.

    PubMed

    Du, Jiang; Zhang, Lin

    2017-03-01

    Asbestos-related lung carcinoma is one of the most devastating occupational cancers, and effective techniques for early diagnosis are still lacking. In the present study, a systematic approach was applied to detect a potential biomarker for asbestos-related lung cancer (ARLC); in particular asbestos-related squamous cell carcinoma (ARLC-SCC). Microarray data (GSE23822) were retrieved from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, including 26 ARLC-SCCs and 30 non-asbestos-related squamous cell lung carcinomas (NARLC-SCCs). Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified by the limma package, and then a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed according to the BioGRID and HPRD databases. A novel scoring approach integrating an expression deviation score and network degree of the gene was then proposed to weight the DEGs. Subsequently, the important genes were uploaded to DAVID for pathway enrichment analysis. Pathway correlation analysis was carried out using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient of the pathscore. In total, 1,333 DEGs, 391 upregulated and 942 downregulated, were obtained between the ARLC-SCCs and NARLC-SCCs. A total of 524 important genes for ARLC-SCC were significantly enriched in 22 KEGG pathways. Correlation analysis of these pathways showed that the pathway of SNARE interactions in vesicular transport was significantly correlated with 12 other pathways. Additionally, obvious correlations were found between multiple pathways by sharing cross-talk genes (EGFR, PRKX, PDGFB, PIK3R3, SLK, IGF1, CDC42 and PRKCA). On the whole, our data demonstrate that 8 cross-talk genes were found to bridge multiple ARLC-SCC-specific pathways, which may be used as candidate biomarkers and potential multi-effect targets. As these genes are involved in multiple pathways, it is possible that drugs targeting these genes may thus be able to influence multiple pathways simultaneously.

  17. Interactive effects of nutrient additions and predation on infaunal communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Posey, M.H.; Alphin, T.D.; Cahoon, L.; Lindquist, D.; Becker, M.E.

    1999-01-01

    Nutrient additions represent an important anthropogenic stress on coastal ecosystems. At moderate levels, increased nutrients may lead to increased primary production and, possibly, to increased biomass of consumers although complex trophic interactions may modify or mask these effects. We examined the influence of nutrient additions and interactive effects of trophic interactions (predation) on benthic infaunal composition and abundances through small-scale field experiments in 2 estuaries that differed in ambient nutrient conditions. A blocked experimental design was used that allowed an assessment of direct nutrient effects in the presence and absence of predation by epibenthic predators as well as an assessment of the independent effects of predation. Benthic microalgal production increased with experimental nutrient additions and was greater when infaunal abundances were lower, but there were no significant interactions between these factors. Increased abundances of one infaunal taxa, Laeonereis culveri, as well as the grazer feeding guild were observed with nutrient additions and a number of taxa exhibited higher abundances with predator exclusion. In contrast to results from freshwater systems there were no significant interactive effects between nutrient additions and predator exclusion as was predicted. The infaunal responses observed here emphasize the importance of both bottom-up (nutrient addition and primary producer driven) and top-down (predation) controls in structuring benthic communities. These processes may work at different spatial and temporal scales, and affect different taxa, making observation of potential interactive effects difficult.

  18. Crystal Structure of Vancosaminyltransferase GtfD from the Vancomycin Biosynthetic Pathway: Interactions with Acceptor and Nucleotide Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Mulichak, A.M.; Lu, W.; Losey, H.C.; Walsh, C.T.; Garavito, R.M.

    2010-03-08

    The TDP-vancosaminyltransferase GtfD catalyzes the attachment of L-vancosamine to a monoglucosylated heptapeptide intermediate during the final stage of vancomycin biosynthesis. Glycosyltransferases from this and similar antibiotic pathways are potential tools for the design of new compounds that are effective against vancomycin resistant bacterial strains. We have determined the X-ray crystal structure of GtfD as a complex with TDP and the natural glycopeptide substrate at 2.0 {angstrom} resolution. GtfD, a member of the bidomain GT-B glycosyltransferase superfamily, binds TDP in the interdomain cleft, while the aglycone acceptor binds in a deep crevice in the N-terminal domain. However, the two domains are more interdependent in terms of substrate binding and overall structure than was evident in the structures of closely related glycosyltransferases GtfA and GtfB. Structural and kinetic analyses support the identification of Asp13 as a catalytic general base, with a possible secondary role for Thr10. Several residues have also been identified as being involved in donor sugar binding and recognition.

  19. Evolution of high-level ethambutol-resistant tuberculosis through interacting mutations in decaprenylphosphoryl-β-D-arabinose biosynthetic and utilization pathway genes.

    PubMed

    Safi, Hassan; Lingaraju, Subramanya; Amin, Anita; Kim, Soyeon; Jones, Marcus; Holmes, Michael; McNeil, Michael; Peterson, Scott N; Chatterjee, Delphi; Fleischmann, Robert; Alland, David

    2013-10-01

    To study the evolution of drug resistance, we genetically and biochemically characterized Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains selected in vitro for ethambutol resistance. Mutations in decaprenylphosphoryl-β-D-arabinose (DPA) biosynthetic and utilization pathway genes Rv3806c, Rv3792, embB and embC accumulated to produce a wide range of ethambutol minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) that depended on mutation type and number. Rv3806c mutations increased DPA synthesis, causing MICs to double from 2 to 4 μg/ml in a wild-type background and to increase from 16 to 32 μg/ml in an embB codon 306 mutant background. Synonymous mutations in Rv3792 increased the expression of downstream embC, an ethambutol target, resulting in MICs of 8 μg/ml. Multistep selection was required for high-level resistance. Mutations in embC or very high embC expression were observed at the highest resistance level. In clinical isolates, Rv3806c mutations were associated with high-level resistance and had multiplicative effects with embB mutations on MICs. Ethambutol resistance is acquired through the acquisition of mutations that interact in complex ways to produce a range of MICs, from those falling below breakpoint values to ones representing high-level resistance.

  20. LncRNA MT1JP functions as a tumor suppressor by interacting with TIAR to modulate the p53 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Wei, Guifeng; Chen, Xiaomin; Lu, Youyong; Guo, Mingzhou; Luo, Jianjun; Chen, Runsheng

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play important roles in transcriptional regulation, whereas the extent to which the lncRNAs also function at the posttranscriptional level is less known. In the present study, we report a lncRNA named MT1JP which acts as a tumor suppressor through a posttranscriptional mechanism. We found that MT1JP is differentially expressed in tumor tissues by analyzing data from a customized microarray applied to 76 pairs of matched normal and cancer tissue samples. By associating with the RNA-binding protein TIAR, MT1JP enhanced the translation of the master transcription factor p53, thereby regulating a series of pathways involving p53, such as the cell cycle, apoptosis and proliferation. When MT1JP was down-regulated, the protein level of p53 declined, which in turn accelerated cell deterioration and tumor formation. Moreover, differential expression of MT1JP in cancerous and normal tissues suggests that it may be a promising prognostic marker and a therapeutic target. Taken together, we identified MT1JP as a critical factor in restraining cell transformation by modulating p53 translation through interactions with TIAR, and this finding is likely to shed new light on future investigations about posttranscriptional or translational effects of lncRNAs during cell transformation. PMID:26909858

  1. LncRNA MT1JP functions as a tumor suppressor by interacting with TIAR to modulate the p53 pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lihui; Yue, Haiyan; Liu, Qinghua; Yuan, Jiao; Li, Jing; Wei, Guifeng; Chen, Xiaomin; Lu, Youyong; Guo, Mingzhou; Luo, Jianjun; Chen, Runsheng

    2016-03-29

    Accumulating evidence suggests that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play important roles in transcriptional regulation, whereas the extent to which the lncRNAs also function at the posttranscriptional level is less known. In the present study, we report a lncRNA named MT1JP which acts as a tumor suppressor through a posttranscriptional mechanism. We found that MT1JP is differentially expressed in tumor tissues by analyzing data from a customized microarray applied to 76 pairs of matched normal and cancer tissue samples. By associating with the RNA-binding protein TIAR, MT1JP enhanced the translation of the master transcription factor p53, thereby regulating a series of pathways involving p53, such as the cell cycle, apoptosis and proliferation. When MT1JP was down-regulated, the protein level of p53 declined, which in turn accelerated cell deterioration and tumor formation. Moreover, differential expression of MT1JP in cancerous and normal tissues suggests that it may be a promising prognostic marker and a therapeutic target. Taken together, we identified MT1JP as a critical factor in restraining cell transformation by modulating p53 translation through interactions with TIAR, and this finding is likely to shed new light on future investigations about posttranscriptional or translational effects of lncRNAs during cell transformation.

  2. Mutational analysis of the BPTI folding pathway: I. Effects of aromatic-->leucine substitutions on the distribution of folding intermediates.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, J. X.; Goldenberg, D. P.

    1997-01-01

    The roles of aromatic residues in determining the folding pathway of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) were analyzed mutationally by examining the distribution of disulfide-bonded intermediates that accumulated during the refolding of protein variants in which tyrosine or phenylalanine residues were individually replaced with leucine. The eight substitutions examined all caused significant changes in the intermediate distribution. In some cases, the major effect was to decrease the accumulation of intermediates containing two of the three disulfides found in the native protein, without affecting the distribution of earlier intermediates. Other substitutions, however, led to much more random distributions of the intermediates containing only one disulfide. These results indicate that the individual residues making up the hydrophobic core of the native protein make clearly distinguishable contributions to conformation and stability early in folding: The early distribution of intermediates does not appear to be determined by a general hydrophobic collapse. The effects of the substitutions were generally consistent with the structures of the major intermediates determined by NMR studies of analogs, confirming that the distribution of disulfide-bonded species is determined by stabilizing interactions within the ordered regions of the intermediates. The plasticity of the BPTI folding pathway implied by these results can be described using conformational funnels to illustrate the degree to which conformational entropy is lost at different stages in the folding of the wild-type and mutant proteins. PMID:9232656

  3. [Parodontitis pathogenetic factors, their interaction and effects].

    PubMed

    Kipiani, Nana V; Iverieli, M; Mosemgvdlishvili, N; Kipiani, Nino V; Jafaridze, S

    2014-03-01

    Induced by microbial intervention oxidative stress causes electronic transport disorder in gingival cells mitochondrias as well as decrease of energogenesis and increase of lipoperoxidation. In oral cavity local immunity is decreased in parodontitis, that is related with immunoglobulin A deficiency and lysozyme activity decrease. Against this background, microbial factors damaging effect on periodont is intensified. In parodontitis the free nitric oxide (NO) content decrease in gingival tissues and its appearance in saliva is related with transformation of NO into toxic peroxinitrite, that on its turn enhances oxidation, parodontal injury, cell degra dation and necrosis. Nitrooxide defficiency in gingival mucosal cells is characterized by decreased protein P-53 expression and terminal differentiation disorder of the cells. Mitochodria related energogenesis disorder in gums causes inhibition of their cell regeneration, which together with apoptotic changes is characterized with parodontal tissue destruction and depletion.

  4. A cyclopalladated complex interacts with mitochondrial membrane thiol-groups and induces the apoptotic intrinsic pathway in murine and cisplatin-resistant human tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Systemic therapy for cancer metastatic lesions is difficult and generally renders a poor clinical response. Structural analogs of cisplatin, the most widely used synthetic metal complexes, show toxic side-effects and tumor cell resistance. Recently, palladium complexes with increased stability are being investigated to circumvent these limitations, and a biphosphinic cyclopalladated complex {Pd2 [S(-)C2, N-dmpa]2 (μ-dppe)Cl2} named C7a efficiently controls the subcutaneous development of B16F10-Nex2 murine melanoma in syngeneic mice. Presently, we investigated the melanoma cell killing mechanism induced by C7a, and extended preclinical studies. Methods B16F10-Nex2 cells were treated in vitro with C7a in the presence/absence of DTT, and several parameters related to apoptosis induction were evaluated. Preclinical studies were performed, and mice were endovenously inoculated with B16F10-Nex2 cells, intraperitoneally treated with C7a, and lung metastatic nodules were counted. The cytotoxic effects and the respiratory metabolism were also determined in human tumor cell lines treated in vitro with C7a. Results Cyclopalladated complex interacts with thiol groups on the mitochondrial membrane proteins, causes dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential, and induces Bax translocation from the cytosol to mitochondria, colocalizing with a mitochondrial tracker. C7a also induced an increase in cytosolic calcium concentration, mainly from intracellular compartments, and a significant decrease in the ATP levels. Activation of effector caspases, chromatin condensation and DNA degradation, suggested that C7a activates the apoptotic intrinsic pathway in murine melanoma cells. In the preclinical studies, the C7a complex protected against murine metastatic melanoma and induced death in several human tumor cell lineages in vitro, including cisplatin-resistant ones. The mitochondria-dependent cell death was also induced by C7a in human tumor cells. Conclusions The

  5. Veterinary team interactions, part one: the practice effect.

    PubMed

    Kinnison, T; May, S A; Guile, D

    2015-10-24

    Veterinary practices have evolved since the era of solo practitioners working on one site. Today veterinary practices tend to include veterinary surgeons, veterinary nurses, receptionists and business managers, leading to the notion of the veterinary team and the rise of interprofessional working. In addition, practices have grown in size and frequently include several branches, creating a distributed team. Research regarding veterinary teamwork is lacking. This paper uses Social Network Analysis (SNA) to address this issue. SNA measures interactions between members of a network. The types of interactions in practice and the effects of practice size and location (branches) are considered. Information sharing and asking for advice are straightforward, lower order interactions. Problem solving and being influenced by another are complex, higher order interactions. Smaller practices have higher densities of interactions, implying a more cohesive team. However, individuals in smaller practices still do not interact with everyone and therefore actively choose with whom to interact. Practices with little staff rotation across branches experience limited interactions across locations. The results of this study have implications for practices aiming to expand their team, either in a single site or by acquiring more branches. Suggestions for ways to maintain and improve interactions are made.

  6. Veterinary team interactions, part 2: the personal effect.

    PubMed

    Kinnison, T; Guile, D; May, S A

    2015-11-28

    Modern veterinary practices consist of multiple professions/occupations, often spread over multiple branches. Within these teams are identifiable 'key people' who are central to information and resource flow. Key people are frequently the appointed leaders, such as practice managers, but also include emergent leaders. Veterinary surgeons are commonly involved in the flow of higher order interactions such as problem solving, while administrators are often involved in information interactions. These key people are repeatedly boundary spanners, sharing resources across physical boundaries such as branches. Their marginal status (belonging to multiple groups) also allows them to interact across professional boundaries. Lower order interactions including asking for information and advice are often interprofessional; however, higher order interactions tend to be intraprofessional. Analysis of interaction reciprocity between professions demonstrated the prevalence of a profession based hierarchy, with veterinary surgeons at the top. Being social outside of work with a colleague is also linked to work based interactions. The results of this paper demonstrate the need for practices to consider key people and support them appropriately. Further to this, they suggest that, to promote an effective team, interactions should be based on experience as much as professional status, and that social interactions should be encouraged.

  7. Breit interaction effect on dielectronic recombination of heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Nobuyuki

    2016-11-01

    Interaction of highly charged heavy ions with electrons is one of the most important atomic processes in high temperature plasmas, including astrophysical plasmas such as solar corona and artificial plasmas such as fusion reactor plasmas. Therefore it has been well studied to date, both theoretically and experimentally, to accumulate the atomic data required for understanding or controlling such plasmas. However, there still remains interesting subjects that receive remarkable attention from the atomic physics point of view. One of them, which is the subject of this review, is substantially large Breit interaction effects on the resonance recombination process called dielectronic recombination. The Breit interaction is a relativistic effect in the electron-electron interaction potential; it is thus generally important for highly charged heavy ions. However, in the calculation of the energy levels for heavy ions, the Breit interaction is still a small perturbation compared with the main Coulomb term. On the other hand for the dielectronic recombination, it was found that the Breit interaction can enhance the cross sections significantly. It was also found that the Breit interaction can play not only an important, but even a dominant role in determining the angular distribution of x-rays emitted in the recombination processes. This topical review introduces the recent experimental and theoretical activities to clarify the essential origin of the strong effects.

  8. Effect of Surfactant Hydrophobicity on the Pathway for Unfolding of Ubiquitin

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Bryan F.; Schneider, Grégory F.; Whitesides, George M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the interaction between ubiquitin (UBI) and three sodium n-alkyl sulfates (SCnS) that have the same charge (Z = −1), but different hydrophobicity (n = 10, 12 and 14). Increasing the hydrophobicity of the n-alkyl sulfate resulted in: (i) an increase in the number of distinct intermediates (that is, complexes of UBI and surfactant) that form along the pathway of unfolding; (ii) a decrease in the minimum concentrations of surfactant at which intermediates begin to form (i.e., a more negative ΔGbinding of surfactant for UBI), and (iii) an increase in the number of surfactant molecules (p) bound to UBI in each intermediate or complex. These results demonstrate that small changes in the hydrophobicity of a surfactant can significantly alter the binding interactions with a folded or unfolded cytosolic protein. PMID:23095057

  9. Functional interaction between p21rap1A and components of the budding pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, P C; Haubruck, H; Polakis, P; McCormick, F; Innis, M A

    1992-01-01

    The rap1A gene encodes a 21-kDa, ras-related GTP-binding protein (p21rap1A) of unknown function. A close structural homolog of p21rap1A (65% identity in the amino-terminal two-thirds) is the RSR1 gene product (Rsr1p) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although Rsr1p is not essential for growth, its presence is required for nonrandom selection of bud sites. To assess the similarity of these proteins at the functional level, wild-type and mutant forms of p21rap1A were tested for complementation of activities known to be fulfilled by Rsr1p. Expression of p21rap1A, like multicopy expression of RSR1, suppressed the conditional lethality of a temperature-sensitive cdc24 mutation. Point mutations predicted to affect the localization of p21rap1A or its ability to cycle between GDP and GTP-bound states disrupted suppression of cdc24ts, while other mutations in the 61-65 loop region improved suppression. Expression of p21rap1A could not, however, suppress the random budding phenotype of rsr1 cells. p21rap1A also apparently interfered with the normal activity of Rsrlp, causing random budding in diploid wild-type cells, suggesting an inability of p21rap1A to interact appropriately with Rsr1p regulatory proteins. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found an Rsr1p-specific GTPase-activating protein (GAP) activity in yeast membranes which was not active toward p21rap1A, indicating that p21rap1A may be predominantly GTP bound in yeast cells. Coexpression of human Rap1-specific GAP suppressed the random budding due to expression of p21rap1A or its derivatives, including Rap1AVal-12. Although Rap1-specific GAP stimulated the GTPase of Rsr1p in vitro, it did not dominantly interfere with Rsr1p function in vivo. A chimera consisting of Rap1A1-165::Rsr1p166-272 did not exhibit normal Rsr1p function in the budding pathway. These results indicated that p21rap1A and Rsr1p share at least partial functional homology, which may have implications for p21rap1A function in mammalian cells. Images

  10. Role of hippocampal and prefrontal cortical signaling pathways in dextromethorphan effect on morphine-induced memory impairment in rats.

    PubMed

    Ghasemzadeh, Zahra; Rezayof, Ameneh

    2016-02-01

    Evidence suggests that dextromethorphan (DM), an NMDA receptor antagonist, induces memory impairment. Considering that DM is widely used in cough-treating medications, and the co-abuse of DM with morphine has recently been reported, the aims of the present study was (1) to investigate whether there is a functional interaction between morphine and DM in passive avoidance learning and (2) to assess the possible role of the hippocampal and prefrontal cortical (PFC) signaling pathways in the effects of the drugs on memory formation. Our findings indicated that post-training or pre-test administration of morphine (2 and 6 mg/kg) or DM (10-30 mg/kg) impaired memory consolidation and retrieval which was associated with the attenuation of the levels of phosphorylated Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (p-CAMKII) and cAMP responsive element-binding protein (p-CREB) in the targeted sites. Moreover, the memory impairment induced by post-training administration of morphine was reversed by pre-test administration of the same dose of morphine or DM (30 mg/kg), indicating state-dependent learning (SDL) and a cross-SDL between the drugs. It is important to note that the levels of p-CAMKII/CAMKII and p-CREB/CREB in the hippocampus and the PFC increased in drugs-induced SDL. In addition, DM administration potentiated morphine-induced SDL which was related to the enhanced levels of hippocampal and PFC CAMKII-CREB signaling pathways. It can be concluded that there is a relationship between the hippocampus and the PFC in the effect of DM and/or morphine on memory retrieval. Moreover, a cross SDL can be induced between the co-administration of DM and morphine. Interestingly, CAMKII-CREB signaling pathways also mediate the drugs-induced SDL.

  11. Complex interaction between serum folate levels and genetic polymorphisms in folate pathway genes: biomarkers of prostate cancer aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Maria D; Tulloch-Reid, Marshall K; McFarlane-Anderson, Norma; Watson, Alexis; Seers, Vestra; Bennett, Franklyn I; Egleston, Brian; Ragin, Camille

    2013-03-01

    Little is known about the role of folate and polymorphisms associated with folate metabolism on prostate cancer risk in populations of African origin. We examined the relationship between serum folate and prostate cancer and whether any association was modified by genetic polymorphisms for folate metabolism. The study was case-control in design and consisted of 218 men 40-80 years old with newly diagnosed, histologically confirmed prostate cancer and 236 cancer-free men attending the same urology clinics in Jamaica, March 2005-July 2007. Serum folate was measured by an immunoassay method and genomic DNA evaluated for MTHR (C677T and A1298C), MTRR A66G, and MTR A2756G polymorphisms. Mean serum folate concentration was higher among cases (12.3 ± 4.1 nmol/L) than controls (9.7 ± 4.2 nmol/L). Serum folate concentration showed a positive association with prostate cancer (OR, 4.41; CI, 2.52-7.72 per 10 nmol/L) regardless of grade. No interactions were observed between genotype and folate concentration, but a weak gene effect was observed for MTHFR A1298C and low-grade prostate cancer. Larger studies to investigate the role of gene-gene/gene-diet interactions in Black men are needed.

  12. Identification of BZR1-interacting Proteins as Potential Components of the Brassinosteroid Signaling Pathway in Arabidopsis Through Tandem Affinity Purification*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunming; Shang, Jian-Xiu; Chen, Qi-Xiu; Oses-Prieto, Juan A.; Bai, Ming-Yi; Yang, Yihong; Yuan, Min; Zhang, Yu-Lan; Mu, Cong-Cong; Deng, Zhiping; Wei, Chuang-Qi; Burlingame, Alma L.; Wang, Zhi-Yong; Sun, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are essential phytohormones for plant growth and development. BRs are perceived by the cell surface receptor kinase BRI1, and downstream signal transduction through multiple components leads to activation of the transcription factors BZR1 and BZR2/BES1. BZR1 activity is highly controlled by BR through reversible phosphorylation, protein degradation, and nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. To further understand the molecular function of BZR1, we performed tandem affinity purification of the BZR1 complex and identified BZR1-associated proteins using mass spectrometry. These BZR1-associated proteins included several known BR signaling components, such as BIN2, BSK1, 14–3-3λ, and PP2A, as well as a large number of proteins with previously unknown functions in BR signal transduction, including the kinases MKK5 and MAPK4, histone deacetylase 19, cysteine proteinase inhibitor 6, a DEAD-box RNA helicase, cysteine endopeptidases RD21A and RD21B, calmodulin-binding transcription activator 5, ubiquitin protease 12, cyclophilin 59, and phospholipid-binding protein synaptotagmin A. Their interactions with BZR1 were confirmed by in vivo and in vitro assays. Furthermore, MKK5 was found to phosphorylate BZR1 in vitro. This study demonstrates an effective method for purifying proteins associated with low-abundance transcription factors, and identifies new BZR1-interacting proteins with potentially important roles in BR response. PMID:24019147

  13. Effects of carbon/hardmask interactions on hardmask performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neef, Charles J.; Smith, Brian; James, Chris; Zhu, Zhimin; Weigand, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Interactions between the silicon hardmask and the photoresist have received considerable attention for utilization of these materials in a trilayer scheme. In contrast, the interactions between the carbon layer and the silicon hardmask have received little or no consideration. In this paper, we present the effects of these interactions on the performance of the silicon hardmask. Poor interactions were observed to result in a more hydrophilic surface and poor lithographic performance of the silicon hardmask. However, beneficial interactions between the carbon layer and the silicon hardmask resulted in a silicon film that was denser with a hydrophobic surface. The resulting denser film had a slower CF4 etch rate and produced square, clean profiles.

  14. Effect of ethanol on structures and interactions among globular proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Sarathi; Aswal, V. K.; Kohlbrecher, J.

    2017-02-01

    Structures and interactions among globular proteins BSA and lysozyme are explored by small angle neutron scattering (SANS) technique at pD ≈ 7.0 by varying ethanol concentration. Interaction behaviours are also obtained in presence of monovalent salt (NaCl). SANS analysis shows that for both lower and higher BSA concentrations and in presence of NaCl, combination of intermediate-range repulsion and weak long-range attraction is responsible for the effective interaction behaviours with the variation of ethanol concentration. For lysozyme, interaction nature is same as BSA in absence of NaCl but in presence of NaCl, fractal structure factor explains the interaction behaviours.

  15. Interaction mechanisms and biological effects of static magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1994-06-01

    Mechanisms through which static magnetic fields interact with living systems are described and illustrated by selected experimental observations. These mechanisms include electrodynamic interactions with moving, ionic charges (blood flow and nerve impulse conduction), magnetomechanical interactions (orientation and translation of molecules structures and magnetic particles), and interactions with electronic spin states in charge transfer reactions (photo-induced electron transfer in photosynthesis). A general summary is also presented of the biological effects of static magnetic fields. There is convincing experimental evidence for magnetoreception mechanisms in several classes of lower organisms, including bacteria and marine organisms. However, in more highly evolved species of animals, there is no evidence that the interactions of static magnetic fields with flux densities up to 2 Tesla (1 Tesla [T] = 10{sup 4} Gauss) produce either behavioral or physiolocical alterations. These results, based on controlled studies with laboratory animals, are consistent with the outcome of recent epidemiological surveys on human populations exposed occupationally to static magnetic fields.

  16. Systems Biology Model of Interactions between Tissue Growth Factors and DNA Damage Pathways: Low Dose Response and Cross-Talk in TGFβ and ATM Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Cucinotta, Francis A

    2016-09-01

    The etiology of radiation carcinogenesis has been described in terms of aberrant changes that span several levels of biological organization. Growth factors regulate many important cellular and tissue functions including apoptosis, differentiation and proliferation. A variety of genetic and epigenetic changes of growth factors have been shown to contribute to cancer initiation and progression. It is known that cellular and tissue damage to ionizing radiation is in part initiated by the production of reactive oxygen species, which can activate cytokine signaling, and the DNA damage response pathways, most notably the ATM signaling pathway. Recently the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) pathway has been shown to regulate or directly interact with the ATM pathway in the response to radiation. The relevance of this interaction with the ATM pathway is not known although p53 becomes phosphorylated and DNA damage responses are involved. However, growth factor interactions with DNA damage responses have not been elucidated particularly at low doses and further characterization of their relationship to cancer processes is warranted. Our goal will be to use a systems biology approach to mathematically and experimentally describe the low dose responses and cross-talk between the ATM and TGFβ pathways initiated by low and high LET radiation. We will characterize ATM and TGFβ signaling in epithelial and fibroblast cells using 2D models and ultimately extending to 3D organotypic cell culture models to begin to elucidate possible differences that may occur for different cell types and/or inter-cellular communication. We will investigate the roles of the Smad and Activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) proteins as the potential major contributors to crosstalk between the TGFβ and ATM pathways, and links to cell cycle control and/or the DNA damage response, and potential differences in their responses at low and high doses. We have developed various experimental approaches

  17. Systems Biology Model of Interactions Between Tissue Growth Factors and DNA Damage Pathways: Low Dose Response and Cross-Talk in TGFbeta and ATM Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neill, Peter; Anderson, Jennifer

    2014-10-02

    The etiology of radiation carcinogenesis has been described in terms of aberrant changes that span several levels of biological organization. Growth factors regulate many important cellular and tissue functions including apoptosis, differentiation and proliferation. A variety of genetic and epigenetic changes of growth factors have been shown to contribute to cancer initiation and progression. It is known that cellular and tissue damage to ionizing radiation is in part initiated by the production of reactive oxygen species, which can activate cytokine signaling, and the DNA damage response pathways, most notably the ATM signaling pathway. Recently the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) pathway has been shown to regulate or directly interact with the ATM pathway in the response to radiation. The relevance of this interaction with the ATM pathway is not known although p53 becomes phosphorylated and DNA damage responses are involved. However, growth factor interactions with DNA damage responses have not been elucidated particularly at low doses and further characterization of their relationship to cancer processes is warranted. Our goal will be to use a systems biology approach to mathematically and experimentally describe the low dose responses and cross-talk between the ATM and TGFβ pathways initiated by low and high LET radiation. We will characterize ATM and TGFβ signaling in epithelial and fibroblast cells using 2D models and ultimately extending to 3D organotypic cell culture models to begin to elucidate possible differences that may occur for different cell types and/or inter-cellular communication. We will investigate the roles of the Smad and Activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) proteins as the potential major contributors to cross- talk between the TGFβ and ATM pathways, and links to cell cycle control and/or the DNA damage response, and potential differences in their responses at low and high doses. We have developed various experimental

  18. Knowledgeable antenatal care as a pathway to skilled delivery: modelling the interactions between use of services and knowledge in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Ensor, Tim; Quigley, Paula; Green, Cathy; Razak Badru, Abdul; Kaluba, Dynes; Siziya, Seter

    2014-08-01

    The link between antenatal care (ANC) and facility delivery is a specific example of the effect of early medical contacts on later use of essential services. The role of ANC in improving maternal health remains unclear. High levels of ANC are reported in a number of countries where skilled delivery remains uncommon. ANC may influence the use of services by increasing willingness to use services and educating about maternal health. The objective of this study is to understand the interaction between use of skilled and unskilled ANC, knowledge of obstetric complications and danger signs, and the eventual use of a facility for delivery. The study makes use of data from a survey of around 1700 women who had recently given birth across 11 districts of Zambia in 2011. Multivariate analysis is used to explore the associations between ANC use, knowledge and place of delivery. The results suggest that place of care and number of visits is strongly associated with the eventual use of a facility for delivery; an effect that is stronger in remote areas. Both skilled and unskilled ANC and obstetric knowledge is linked to higher use of facility delivery care while care provided at home appears to have an opposite effect. The research suggests that ANC influences later use of delivery care in two ways: by developing a habit to use formal care services and in increasing maternal knowledge. The work might be generalized to other health seeking behaviour to explore how the quantity and quality of initial contacts influence later use of services.

  19. Effective spin-spin interaction in neutron matter

    SciTech Connect

    Zverev, M.V.; Khafizov, R.U.; Khodel, V.A.; Shaginyan, V.R.

    1995-09-01

    A set of equations for calculating the effective-interaction matrix R{sup ik}(q, {omega}) and the response function X{sup ik}(q, {omega}) is derived. These equations take into account the spin degrees of freedom of infinite neutron matter. For isotropic neutron matter with the Bethe interaction, the effective spin-spin interaction g(k) is calculated in the local approximation of the functional approach in the density range from {rho} = 0.17 to 25 fm{sup -3}. It is shown that this interaction weakly depends on the density within the range under consideration and that neither ferromagnetic nor antiferromagnetic phase transitions occur in the system. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  20. X(1576) and the final state interaction effect

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Xiang; Zhang Bo; Shen Leilei; Zhu Shilin

    2007-04-01

    We study whether the broad peak X(1576) observed by BES Collaboration arises from the final state interaction effect of {rho}(1450 1700) decays. The interference effect could produce an enhancement around 1540 MeV in the K{sup +}K{sup -} spectrum with typical interference phases. However, the branching ratio B[J/{psi}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{rho}(1450 1700)]{center_dot}B[{rho}(1450 1700){yields}K{sup +}K{sup -}] from the final state interaction effect is far less than the experimental data.

  1. Nuclear Effects in Neutrino Interactions at Low Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Miltenberger, Ethan Ryan

    2015-05-01

    This is a study to identify predicted effects of the carbon nucleus environment on neutrino - nucleus interactions with low momentum transfer. A large sample of neutrino interaction data collected by the MINERvA experiment is analyzed to show the distribution of charged hadron energy in a region with low momentum transfer. These distributions reveal a major discrepancy between the data and a popular interaction model with only the simplest Fermi gas nuclear effects. Detailed analysis of systematic uncertainties due to energy scale and resolution can account for only a little of the discrepancy. Two additional nuclear model effects, a suppression/screening effect (RPA), and the addition of a meson exchange current process (MEC), are shown to improve the description of the data.

  2. Nuclear effects in neutrino interactions at low momentum transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miltenberger, Ethan

    This is a study to identify predicted effects of the carbon nucleus environment on neutrino - nucleus interactions with low momentum transfer. A large sample of neutrino interaction data collected by the MINERvA experiment is analyzed to show the distribution of charged hadron energy in a region with low momentum transfer. These distributions reveal a major discrepancy between the data and a popular interaction model with only the simplest Fermi gas nuclear effects. Detailed analysis of systematic uncertainties due to energy scale and resolution can account for only a little of the discrepancy. Two additional nuclear model effects, a suppression/screening effect (RPA), and the addition of a meson exchange current process (MEC), are shown to improve the description of the data.

  3. Evaluating Differential Effects Using Regression Interactions and Regression Mixture Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Horn, M. Lee; Jaki, Thomas; Masyn, Katherine; Howe, George; Feaster, Daniel J.; Lamont, Andrea E.; George, Melissa R. W.; Kim, Minjung

    2015-01-01

    Research increasingly emphasizes understanding differential effects. This article focuses on understanding regression mixture models, which are relatively new statistical methods for assessing differential effects by comparing results to using an interactive term in linear regression. The research questions which each model answers, their…

  4. STUDENT-TEACHER INTERACTION AS A DETERMINER OF EFFECTIVE TEACHING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LEWIS, EDWIN C.

    THIS STUDY TESTED THE HYPOTHESIS THAT THE EFFECTIVENESS OF A GIVEN TEACHER VARIES FROM ONE STUDENT TO ANOTHER AND THAT THIS DIFFERENCE IN EFFECTIVENESS IS A RESULT OF THE INTERACTION OF THE PERSONALITY PATTERNS OF THE STUDENT AND TEACHER. STUDENTS MAJORING IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING, ANIMAL HUSBANDRY, AND HOME ECONOMICS WERE THE SUBJECTS. PERSONS…

  5. Retardation effects in induced atomic dipole-dipole interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, S. D.; McGuirk, J. M.

    2017-02-01

    We present mean-field calculations of azimuthally averaged retarded dipole-dipole interactions in a Bose-Einstein condensate induced by a laser, at both long and short wavelengths. Our calculations demonstrate that dipole-dipole interactions become significantly stronger at shorter wavelengths, by as much as 30-fold, due to retardation effects. This enhancement, along with the inclusion of the dynamic polarizability, indicate a method of inducing long-range interatomic interactions in neutral atom condensates at significantly lower intensities than previously realized.

  6. Aerodynamic Interaction Effects of a Helicopter Rotor and Fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, David D., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    A three year Cooperative Research Agreements made in each of the three years between the Subsonic Aerodynamics Branch of the NASA Langley Research Center and the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Va. Tech) has been completed. This document presents results from this three year endeavor. The goal of creating an efficient method to compute unsteady interactional effects between a helicopter rotor and fuselage has been accomplished. This paper also includes appendices to support these findings. The topics are: 1) Rotor-Fuselage Interactions Aerodynamics: An Unsteady Rotor Model; and 2) Rotor/Fuselage Unsteady Interactional Aerodynamics: A New Computational Model.

  7. Role of effective interaction in nuclear disintegration processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, D. N.

    2003-07-01

    A simple superasymmetric fission model using microscopically calculated nuclear potentials has shown itself to be outstandingly successful in describing highly asymmetric spontaneous disintegration of nuclei into two composite nuclear fragments. The nuclear interaction potentials required to describe these nuclear decay processes have been calculated by double folding the density distribution functions of the two fragments with a realistic effective interaction. The microscopic nucleus-nucleus potential thus obtained, along with the Coulomb interaction potential and the minimum centrifugal barrier required for the spin-parity conservation, has been used successfully for the lifetime calculations of these nuclear disintegration processes.

  8. Effect of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate on human pulp cell survival pathways ERK and AKT.

    PubMed

    Spagnuolo, Gianrico; D'Antò, Vincenzo; Valletta, Rosa; Strisciuglio, Caterina; Schmalz, Gottfried; Schweikl, Helmut; Rengo, Sandro

    2008-06-01

    Previous investigations have revealed that dental monomers could affect intracellular pathways leading to cell survival or cell death. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and protein kinase B (AKT) might mediate cell responses as well as cell survival and apoptosis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) on the ERK1/2 and AKT pathways in human primary pulp fibroblasts (HPCs). HPCs were treated with various concentrations of HEMA, after which viability and reactive oxygen species levels were determined by flow cytometry with Annexin V-PI staining and 2,7-dichlorofluorescine diacetate, respectively. Whole-cell extracts were immunoblotted with anti-P-Akt or anti-P-ERK1/2. Cell viability decreased in a dose-dependent manner after HEMA exposure, showing a significant decrease with 10 mmol/L HEMA (p < .05). HEMA treatment resulted in a 4-fold increase in reactive oxygen species formation (p < .05). A short HEMA exposure (30-90 minutes) increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation, whereas a decrease in the AKT phosphorylation was observed. Selective inhibitors of the ERK (PD98059) and AKT (LY294002) pathways amplified HPC cell damage after HEMA exposure. Our findings demonstrated that HEMA exposure modulates the ERK and AKT pathways in different manners, and that in turn, they function in parallel to mediate pro-survival signaling in pulp cells subjected to HEMA cytotoxicity.

  9. Coulomb interaction effects on the Majorana states in quantum wires.

    PubMed

    Manolescu, A; Marinescu, D C; Stanescu, T D

    2014-04-30

    The stability of the Majorana modes in the presence of a repulsive interaction is studied in the standard semiconductor wire-metallic superconductor configuration. The effects of short-range Coulomb interaction, which is incorporated using a purely repulsive δ-function to model the strong screening effect due to the presence of the superconductor, are determined within a Hartree-Fock approximation of the effective Bogoliubov-De Gennes Hamiltonian that describes the low-energy physics of the wire. Through a numerical diagonalization procedure we obtain interaction corrections to the single particle eigenstates and calculate the extended topological phase diagram in terms of the chemical potential and the Zeeman energy. We find that, for a fixed Zeeman energy, the interaction shifts the phase boundaries to a higher chemical potential, whereas for a fixed chemical potential this shift can occur either at lower or higher Zeeman energies. These effects can be interpreted as a renormalization of the g-factor due to the interaction. The minimum Zeeman energy needed to realize Majorana fermions decreases with the increasing strength of the Coulomb repulsion. Furthermore, we find that in wires with multi-band occupancy this effect can be enhanced by increasing the chemical potential, i.e. by occupying higher energy bands.

  10. The effect of diet interventions on hypothalamic nutrient sensing pathways in rodents.

    PubMed

    Rijnsburger, Merel; Belegri, Evita; Eggels, Leslie; Unmehopa, Unga A; Boelen, Anita; Serlie, Mireille J; la Fleur, Susanne E

    2016-08-01

    The hypothalamus plays a fundamental role in regulating homeostatic processes including regulation of food intake. Food intake is driven in part by energy balance, which is sensed by specific brain structures through signaling molecules such as nutrients and hormones. Both circulating glucose and fatty acids decrease food intake via a central mechanism involving the hypothalamus and brain stem. Besides playing a role in signaling energy status, glucose and fatty acids serve as fuel for neurons. This review focuses on the effects of glucose and fatty acids on hypothalamic pathways involved in regulation of energy metabolism as well as on the role of the family of peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs) which are implicated in regulation of central energy homeostasis. We further discuss the effects of different hypercaloric diets on these pathways.

  11. The effects of teacher fidelity of implementation of pathways to health on student outcomes.

    PubMed

    Little, Melissa A; Riggs, Nathaniel R; Shin, Hee-Sung; Tate, Eleanor B; Pentz, Mary Ann

    2015-03-01

    Previous research has demonstrated the importance of ensuring that programs are implemented as intended by program developers in order to achieve desired program effects. The current study examined implementation fidelity of Pathways to Health (Pathways), a newly developed obesity prevention program for fourth- through sixth-grade children. We explored the associations between self-reported and observed implementation fidelity scores and whether implementation fidelity differed across the first 2 years of program implementation. Additionally, we examined whether implementation fidelity affected program outcomes and whether teacher beliefs were associated with implementation fidelity. The program was better received, and implementation fidelity had more effects on program outcomes in fifth grade than in fourth grade. Findings suggest that implementation in school-based obesity programs may affect junk food intake and intentions to eat healthfully and exercise. School support was associated with implementation fidelity, suggesting that prevention programs may benefit from including a component that boosts school-wide support.

  12. Effect of Current Pathways During Spark Plasma Sintering of an Aluminum Alloy Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellogg, Frank; McWilliams, Brandon; Cho, Kyu

    2016-12-01

    Spark plasma sintering has been a well-studied processing technique primarily for its very high cooling and heating rates. However, the underlying phenomenon driving the sintering behavior of powders under an electric field is still poorly understood. In this study, we look at the effect of changing current pathways through the powder bed by changing die materials, from conductive graphite to insulating boron nitride for sintering aluminum alloy 5083 powder. We found that the aluminum powder itself was insulating and that by changing the current paths, we had to find alternate processing methods to initiate sintering. Altering the current pathways led to faster temperature raises and faster melting (and potentially densification) of the aluminum powder. A flash sintering effect in metallic powders is observed in which the powder compact undergoes a rapid transition from electrically insulating to conducting at a temperature of 583 K (310 °C).

  13. Effect of genetic polymorphisms in the folate pathway on methotrexate therapy in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Stamp, Lisa K; Roberts, Rebecca L

    2011-10-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is the first-line treatment for rheumatoid arthritis and is frequently used in the management of other forms of inflammatory arthritis. It is currently challenging to predict which patients will achieve adequate disease control and which patients will develop adverse effects while taking MTX. As an analog of dihydrofolic acid, MTX enters cells through the reduced folate carrier-1 protein, and is polyglutamated. MTX polyglutamates inhibit key enzymes in the folate pathway to produce an anti-inflammatory effect. It has been suggested that genetic polymorphisms in the folate pathway may influence intracellular folate and MTX polyglutamates pools, and thus MTX response. However, studies to identify genetic predictors have yielded inconclusive results. Nonreplication across studies has been attributed to insufficient statistical power as well as pharmacological and clinical confounders. Prospective studies, standardizing the definitions of response and toxicity, and application of genome-wide approaches may advance the search for genetic predictors of MTX response.

  14. Crosslinker-Induced Effects on the Gelation Pathway of a Low Molecular Weight Hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Noteborn, Willem E M; Zwagerman, Damy N H; Talens, Victorio Saez; Maity, Chandan; van der Mee, Lars; Poolman, Jos M; Mytnyk, Serhii; van Esch, Jan H; Kros, Alexander; Eelkema, Rienk; Kieltyka, Roxanne E

    2017-03-01

    The use of polymeric crosslinkers is an attractive method to modify the mechanical properties of supramolecular materials, but their effects on the self-assembly of the underlying supramolecular polymer networks are poorly understood. Modulation of the gelation pathway of a reaction-coupled low molecular weight hydrogelator is demonstrated using (bio)polymeric crosslinkers of disparate physicochemical identities, providing a handle for control over materials properties.

  15. Bisdemethoxycurcumin exerts pro-apoptotic effects in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells through mitochondrial dysfunction and a GRP78-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Haopeng; Fan, Shengjun; An, Yu; Wang, Xin; Pan, Yan; Xiaokaiti, Yilixiati; Duan, Jianhui; Li, Xin; Tie, Lu; Ye, Min; Li, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly aggressive malignancy, which is intrinsically resistant to current chemotherapies. Herein, we investigate whether bisdemethoxycurcumin (BDMC), a derivative of curcumin, potentiates gemcitabine in human pancreatic cancer cells. The result suggests that BDMC sensitizes gemcitabine by inducing mitochondrial dysfunctions and apoptosis in PANC-1 and MiaPaCa-2 pancreatic cancer cells. Utilizing two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, we identify 13 essential proteins with significantly altered expressions in response to gemcitabine alone or combined with BDMC. Protein-protein interaction network analysis pinpoints glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) as the key hub activated by BDMC. We then reveal that BDMC upregulates GRP78 and facilitates apoptosis through eIF2α/CHOP pathway. Moreover, DJ-1 and prohibitin, two identified markers of chemoresistance, are increased by gemcitabine in PANC-1 cells. This could be meaningfully reversed by BDMC, suggesting that BDMC partially offsets the chemoresistance induced by gemcitabine. In summary, these findings show that BDMC promotes apoptosis through a GRP78-dependent pathway and mitochondrial dysfunctions, and potentiates the antitumor effect of gemcitabine in human pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:27845899

  16. Nematode endogenous small RNA pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hoogstrate, Suzanne W; Volkers, Rita JM; Sterken, Mark G; Kammenga, Jan E; Snoek, L Basten

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of small RNA silencing pathways has greatly extended our knowledge of gene regulation. Small RNAs have been presumed to play a role in every field of biology because they affect many biological processes via regulation of gene expression and chromatin remodeling. Most well-known examples of affected processes are development, fertility, and maintenance of genome stability. Here we review the role of the three main endogenous small RNA silencing pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans: microRNAs, endogenous small interfering RNAs, and PIWI-interacting RNAs. After providing an entry-level overview on how these pathways function, we discuss research on other nematode species providing insight into the evolution of these small RNA pathways. In understanding the differences between the endogenous small RNA pathways and their evolution, a more comprehensive picture is formed of the functions and effects of small RNAs. PMID:25340013

  17. A High-Throughput Screening Strategy to Identify Protein-Protein Interaction Inhibitors That Block the Fanconi Anemia DNA Repair Pathway.

    PubMed

    Voter, Andrew F; Manthei, Kelly A; Keck, James L

    2016-07-01

    Induction of the Fanconi anemia (FA) DNA repair pathway is a common mechanism by which tumors evolve resistance to DNA crosslinking chemotherapies. Proper execution of the FA pathway requires interaction between the FA complementation group M protein (FANCM) and the RecQ-mediated genome instability protein (RMI) complex, and mutations that disrupt FANCM/RMI interactions sensitize cells to DNA crosslinking agents. Inhibitors that block FANCM/RMI complex formation could be useful therapeutics for resensitizing tumors that have acquired chemotherapeutic resistance. To identify such inhibitors, we have developed and validated high-throughput fluorescence polarization and proximity assays that are sensitive to inhibitors that disrupt interactions between the RMI complex and its binding site on FANCM (a peptide referred to as MM2). A pilot screen of 74,807 small molecules was performed using the fluorescence polarization assay. Hits from the primary screen were further tested using the proximity assay, and an orthogonal proximity assay was used to assess inhibitor selectivity. Direct physical interaction between the RMI complex and the most selective inhibitor identified through the screening process was measured by surface plasmon resonance and isothermal titration calorimetry. Observation of direct binding by this small molecule validates the screening protocol.

  18. Reactivity of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in the Diels-Alder Cycloaddition Reaction: Distortion-Interaction Analysis along the Reaction Pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingzi; Osuna, Sílvia; Garcia-Borràs, Marc; Qi, Xiaotian; Liu, Song; Houk, Kendall N; Lan, Yu

    2016-08-26

    Diels-Alder cycloaddition is one of the most powerful tools for the functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Density functional theory at the B3-LYP level of theory has been used to investigate the reactivity of different-diameter SWCNTs (4-9,5) in Diels-Alder reactions with 1,3-butadiene; the reactivity was found to decrease with increasing SWCNT diameter. Distortion/interaction analysis along the whole reaction pathway was found to be a better way to explore the reactivity of this type of reaction. The difference in interaction energy along the reaction pathway is larger than that of the corresponding distortion energy. However, the distortion energy plots for these reactions show the same trend. Therefore, the formation of the transition state can be determined from the interaction energy. A lower interaction energy leads to an earlier transition state, which indicates a lower activation energy. The computational results also indicate that the original distortion of the SWCNTs leads to an increase in the reactivity of the SWCNTs.

  19. Photonic Aharonov–Bohm effect in photon–phonon interactions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Enbang; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Fang, Kejie; Fan, Shanhui

    2014-01-01

    The Aharonov–Bohm effect is one of the most intriguing phenomena in both classical and quantum physics, and associates with a number of important and fundamental issues in quantum mechanics. The Aharonov–Bohm effects of charged particles have been experimentally demonstrated and found applications in various fields. Recently, attention has also focused on the Aharonov–Bohm effect for neutral particles, such as photons. Here we propose to utilize the photon–phonon interactions to demonstrate that photonic Aharonov–Bohm effects do exist for photons. By introducing nonreciprocal phases for photons, we observe experimentally a gauge potential for photons in the visible range based on the photon–phonon interactions in acousto-optic crystals, and demonstrate the photonic Aharonov–Bohm effect. The results presented here point to new possibilities to control and manipulate photons by designing an effective gauge potential. PMID:24476790

  20. Photonic Aharonov-Bohm effect in photon-phonon interactions.

    PubMed

    Li, Enbang; Eggleton, Benjamin J; Fang, Kejie; Fan, Shanhui

    2014-01-01

    The Aharonov-Bohm effect is one of the most intriguing phenomena in both classical and quantum physics, and associates with a number of important and fundamental issues in quantum mechanics. The Aharonov-Bohm effects of charged particles have been experimentally demonstrated and found applications in various fields. Recently, attention has also focused on the Aharonov-Bohm effect for neutral particles, such as photons. Here we propose to utilize the photon-phonon interactions to demonstrate that photonic Aharonov-Bohm effects do exist for photons. By introducing nonreciprocal phases for photons, we observe experimentally a gauge potential for photons in the visible range based on the photon-phonon interactions in acousto-optic crystals, and demonstrate the photonic Aharonov-Bohm effect. The results presented here point to new possibilities to control and manipulate photons by designing an effective gauge potential.

  1. The effect of lateral interaction on traffic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouadi, M.; Jetto, K.; Benyoussef, A.; Kenz, A.

    2016-10-01

    We propose an extended cellular automaton model for traffic flow, taking into account lateral interactions with defects and between vehicles. The fundamental diagram for a given defects density on the road is studied. It is found that the plateau size increases linearly with the decreasing road width for little defects densities. Furthermore, the capacity increases linearly with the increasing road width. However, for a fixed road width, the capacity decreases exponentially with the increasing defects density. The lateral effects for non-mutual interactions between lanes and for the same maximal velocity is also investigated. It is found that the lateral effects on one lane are meaningful only when the density on the other lane is above the critical density. However, the lateral effects are always present if fast and slow lanes exist. Little differences have been found for the mutual interactions.

  2. Climate-chemical interactions and greenhouse effects of trace gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Guang-Yu; Fan, Xiao-Biao

    1994-01-01

    A completely coupled one-dimensional radiative-convective (RC) and photochemical-diffusion (PC) model has been developed recently and used to study the climate-chemical interactions. The importance of radiative-chemical interactions within the troposphere and stratosphere has been examined in some detail. We find that increases of radiatively and/or chemically active trace gases such as CO2, CH4 and N2O have both the direct effects and the indirect effects on climate change by changing the atmospheric O3 profile through their interaction with chemical processes in the atmosphere. It is also found that the climatic effect of ozone depends strongly on its vertical distribution throughout the troposphere and stratosphere, as well on its column amount in the atmosphere.

  3. Effect of interparticle interaction on magnetic hyperthermia in ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubarev, A. Yu.; Iskakova, L.; Abu-Bakr, A. F.

    2015-11-01

    The work deals with the theoretical study of effect of magnetic interaction between single-domain ferromagnetic particles on the hyperthermia effect produced by these particles under the action of oscillating magnetic field. We consider a homogeneous (without heterogeneous aggregates) ferrofluid consisting of identical spherical Brownian particles. Effects of the particles diameter and their magnetic properties on the intensity of the heat production are studied.

  4. Upregulation of extrinsic apoptotic pathway in curcumin-mediated antiproliferative effect on human pancreatic carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Youns, Mahmoud; Fathy, Gihan Mahmoud

    2013-12-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal human cancers, with almost identical incidence and mortality rates. Curcumin, derived from the rhizome of Curcuma longa, has a long history of use as coloring agent and for a wide variety of disorders. Here, the antiproliferative activity of curcumin and its modulatory effect on gene expression of pancreatic cancer cell lines were investigated. The effect of curcumin on cellular proliferation and viability was monitored by sulphurhodamine B assay. Apoptotic effect was evaluated by flow cytometry and further confirmed by measuring amount of cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragments. Analysis of gene expression was performed with and without curcumin treatment using microarray expression profiling techniques. Array results were confirmed by real-time PCR. ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) has been used to classify the list of differentially expressed genes and to indentify common biomarkergenes modulating the chemopreventive effect of curcumin. Results showed that curcumin induces growth arrest and apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cell lines. Its effect was more obvious on the highly COX-2 expressing cell line. Additionally, the expression of 366 and 356 cancer-related genes, involved in regulation of apoptosis, cell cycle, metastasis, was significantly altered after curcumin treatment in BxPC-3 and MiaPaCa-2 cells, respectively. Our results suggested that up-regulation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway was among signaling pathways modulating the growth inhibitory effects of curcumin on pancreatic cancer cells. Curcumin effect was mediated through activation of TNFR, CASP 8, CASP3, BID, BAX, and down-regulation of NFκB, NDRG 1, and BCL2L10 genes.

  5. Effects of MAPK and PI3K Pathways on PD-L1 Expression in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Atefi, Mohammad; Avramis, Earl; Lassen, Amanda; Wong, Deborah; Robert, Lidia; Foulad, David; Cerniglia, Michael; Titz, Bjoern; Chodon, Thinle; Graeber, Thomas G.; Comin-Anduix, Begonya; Ribas, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Purpose PD-L1 is the main ligand for the immune inhibitory receptor PD-1. This ligand is frequently expressed by melanoma cells. In this study we investigated whether PD-L1 expression is controlled by melanoma driver mutations and modified by oncogenic signaling inhibition. Experimental Design Expression of PD-L1 was investigated in a panel of 51 melanoma cell lines containing different oncogenic mutations, including cell lines with innate and acquired resistance to BRAF inhibitors. The effects of targeted therapy drugs on expression of PD-L1 by melanoma cells were investigated. Results No association was found between the level of PD-L1 expression and mutations in BRAF, NRAS, PTEN or amplification of AKT. Resistance to vemurafenib due to the activation of alternative signaling pathways was accompanied with the induction of PD-L1 expression, while the resistance due to the reactivation of the MAPK pathway had no effect on PD-L1 expression. In melanoma cell lines the effects of BRAF, MEK and PI3K inhibitors on expression of PD-L1 were variable from reduction to induction, particularly in the presence of INFγ. In PD-L1-exposed lymphocytes, vemurafenib paradoxically restored activity of the MAPK pathway and increased the secretion of cytokines. Conclusions In melanoma cell lines, including BRAF inhibitor-resistant cells, PD-L1 expression is variably regulated by oncogenic signaling pathways. PD-L1-exposed lymphocytes decrease MAPK signaling, which is corrected by exposure to vemurafenib, providing potential benefits of combining this drug with immunotherapies. PMID:24812408

  6. Effect of N-nitrosodimethylamine on inducible nitric oxide synthase expression and production of nitric oxide by neutrophils and mononuclear cells: the role of JNK signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Ratajczak-Wrona, Wioletta; Jablonska, Ewa; Garley, Marzena; Jablonski, Jakub; Radziwon, Piotr

    2011-07-01

    In neutrophils (PMN) and mononuclear cells (PBMC), one of the enzymes responsible for nitric oxide (NO) synthesis is inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Changes in iNOS expression result from various signalling pathways including the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway activated by endogenic and exogenic factors. N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) is a xenobiotic with widespread occurrence in human environment and has an effect on cells of the immune system. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of NDMA on iNOS expression and NO production by human PMN and PBMC cells in the light of superoxide anion production by PMN cells. Moreover, the role of JNK and p38 pathways in NO production with involvement of iNOS was studied. Additionally, the function of JNK pathway in generation of superoxide anion was determined. Moreover, nitrotyrosine expression was studied in PMN and PBMC cells in the presence of NDMA. This work shows that NDMA increases iNOS expression and NO production by PMN and PBMC cells. In addition, elevated expression of phospho-JNK and phospho-p38, which are markers of JNK and p38 MAPK pathways activation, were observed. Lower iNOS expression and NO production by neutrophils exposed to extended action of NDMA were observed after application of inhibitor of JNK and p38 pathways. Lower phospho-p38 expression in PMN stimulated by NDMA was found as a result of arresting JNK pathway, whereas, application of inhibitor of p38 pathway resulted in enhanced phospho-JNK expression in PMN and PBMC cells. Increased ability to release superoxide anion by NDMA-stimulated PMN cells was observed. This ability was reduced after the application of inhibitor of JNK pathway. In PMN and PBMC cells exposed to NDMA, an increased expression of nitrotyrosine, which is dependant on JNK and p38 pathways that are activated by this particular xenobiotic, was observed. Generally, increased induction of iNOS related to elevated production of NO by PMN and PBMC

  7. The Alström Syndrome Protein, ALMS1, Interacts with α-Actinin and Components of the Endosome Recycling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Collin, Gayle B.; Marshall, Jan D.; King, Benjamin L.; Milan, Gabriella; Maffei, Pietro; Jagger, Daniel J.; Naggert, Jürgen K.

    2012-01-01

    Alström syndrome (ALMS) is a progressive multi-systemic disorder characterized by cone-rod dystrophy, sensorineural hearing loss, childhood obesity, insulin resistance and cardiac, renal, and hepatic dysfunction. The gene responsible for Alström syndrome, ALMS1, is ubiquitously expressed and has multiple splice variants. The protein encoded by this gene has been implicated in ciliary function, cell cycle control, and intracellular transport. To gain better insight into the pathways through which ALMS1 functions, we carried out a yeast two hybrid (Y2H) screen in several mouse tissue libraries to identify ALMS1 interacting partners. The majority of proteins found to interact with the murine carboxy-terminal end (19/32) of ALMS1 were α-actinin isoforms. Interestingly, several of the identified ALMS1 interacting partners (α-actinin 1, α-actinin 4, myosin Vb, rad50 interacting 1 and huntingtin associated protein1A) have been previously associated with endosome recycling and/or centrosome function. We examined dermal fibroblasts from human subjects bearing a disruption in ALMS1 for defects in the endocytic pathway. Fibroblasts from these patients had a lower uptake of transferrin and reduced clearance of transferrin compared to controls. Antibodies directed against ALMS1 N- and C-terminal epitopes label centrosomes and endosomal structures at the cleavage furrow of dividing MDCK cells, respectively, suggesting isoform-specific cellular functions. Our results suggest a role for ALMS1 variants in the recycling endosome pathway and give us new insights into the pathogenesis of a subset of clinical phenotypes associated with ALMS. PMID:22693585

  8. Genetic variability within the cholesterol lowering pathway and the effectiveness of statins in reducing the risk of MI

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Bas J.M.; Pett, Helmi; Klungel, Olaf H.; Stricker, Bruno H. Ch.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Glazer, Nicole L.; Wiggins, Kerri L.; Bis, Josh C.; de Boer, Anthonius; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke-Hilse

    2012-01-01

    Genetic variability has been shown to affect statin responsiveness. Participants from the Utrecht Cardiovascular Pharmacogenetics (UCP) studies were enrolled from a population-based registry of pharmacy records linked to hospital discharge records (PHARMO) to investigate tagging SNPs within candidate genes involved in the cholesterol lowering pathway for modification of the effectiveness of statins in reducing the risk of myocardial infarction (MI). Patients who received a prescription for an antihypertensive drug and/or had hypercholesterolemia were selected from the PHARMO database. We designed a nested case-control study in which cases were hospitalized for MI and controls were not. Patients were contacted through their community pharmacies. For this study, only hypercholesterolemic participants were selected. Logistic regression analysis was used to investigate pharmacogenetic interactions. The Heart and Vascular Health Study (HVH) was used to replicate findings from UCP. The study population included 668 cases and 1217 controls. We selected 231 SNPs of which 209 SNPs in 27 genes passed quality control. Ten SNPs in eight genes were found to influence the effectiveness of statins in UCP, of which the most significant interaction was found with SCARB1 rs4765615. Other genes that reached statistical significance (p<0.05) included two SNPs in PCSK9 (rs10888896 and rs505151 (E670G)), two SNPs in ABCG5 (rs4245786 and rs1864815), LIPC rs16940379, ABCA1 rs4149264, PPARG rs2972164, LRP1 rs715948, and SOAT1 rs2493121. None of the total of 5 SNPs that were available for replication in HVH reached statistical significance. In conclusion, ten SNPs were found to modify the effectiveness of statins in reducing the risk of MI in the UCP study. Five were also tested in the HVH study, but no interactions reached statistical significance. PMID:21741043

  9. Genetic variability within the cholesterol lowering pathway and the effectiveness of statins in reducing the risk of MI.

    PubMed

    Peters, Bas J M; Pett, Helmi; Klungel, Olaf H; Stricker, Bruno H Ch; Psaty, Bruce M; Glazer, Nicole L; Wiggins, Kerri L; Bis, Josh C; de Boer, Anthonius; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke-Hilse

    2011-08-01

    Genetic variability has been shown to affect statin responsiveness. Participants from the Utrecht Cardiovascular Pharmacogenetics (UCP) studies were enrolled from a population-based registry of pharmacy records linked to hospital discharge records (PHARMO) to investigate tagging SNPs within candidate genes involved in the cholesterol lowering pathway for modification of the effectiveness of statins in reducing the risk of myocardial infarction (MI). Patients who received a prescription for an antihypertensive drug and/or had hypercholesterolemia were selected from the PHARMO database. We designed a nested case-control study in which cases were hospitalized for MI and controls were not. Patients were contacted through their community pharmacies. For this study, only hypercholesterolemic participants were selected. Logistic regression analysis was used to investigate pharmacogenetic interactions. The Heart and Vascular Health Study (HVH) was used to replicate findings from UCP. The study population included 668 cases and 1217 controls. We selected 231 SNPs of which 209 SNPs in 27 genes passed quality control. Ten SNPs in eight genes were found to influence the effectiveness of statins in UCP, of which the most significant interaction was found with SCARB1 rs4765615. Other genes that reached statistical significance (p<0.05) included two SNPs in PCSK9 (rs10888896 and rs505151 (E670G)), two SNPs in ABCG5 (rs4245786 and rs1864815), LIPC rs16940379, ABCA1 rs4149264, PPARG rs2972164, LRP1 rs715948, and SOAT1 rs2493121. None of the total of 5 SNPs that were available for replication in HVH reached statistical significance. In conclusion, ten SNPs were found to modify the effectiveness of statins in reducing the risk of MI in the UCP study. Five were also tested in the HVH study, but no interactions reached statistical significance.

  10. Speed of sound in nuclear matter and Skyrme effective interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Su, R.K.; Kuo, T.T.S.

    1987-02-01

    Using a nuclear equation of state derived from a finite-temperature Green's function method and the Skyrme effective interactions SkI, SkIII and SkM*, the authors have calculated the speed of sound in symmetric nuclear matter. For certain densities and temperatures, this speed is found to become super-luminous. Causal boundaries in the density-temperature plane are determined, and they indicate that SkM* is a more desirable effective interaction than SkI and SkIII. Comparison with a similar calculation by Osnes and Strottman is made.

  11. Programmed Effects in Neurobehavior and Antioxidative Physiology in Zebrafish Embryonically Exposed to Cadmium: Observations and Hypothesized Adverse Outcome Pathway Framework

    PubMed Central

    Ruiter, Sander; Sippel, Josefine; Bouwmeester, Manon C.; Lommelaars, Tobias; Beekhof, Piet; Hodemaekers, Hennie M.; Bakker, Frank; van den Brandhof, Evert-Jan; Pennings, Jeroen L. A.; van der Ven, Leo T. M.

    2016-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are a major cause of premature mortality. Recent studies show that predispositions for NCDs may arise from early-life exposure to low concentrations of environmental contaminants. This developmental origins of health and disease (DOHaD) paradigm suggests that programming of an embryo can be disrupted, changing the homeostatic set point of biological functions. Epigenetic alterations are a possible underlying mechanism. Here, we investigated the DOHaD paradigm by exposing zebrafish to subtoxic concentrations of the ubiquitous contaminant cadmium during embryogenesis, followed by growth under normal conditions. Prolonged behavioral responses to physical stress and altered antioxidative physiology were observed approximately ten weeks after termination of embryonal exposure, at concentrations that were 50–3200-fold below the direct embryotoxic concentration, and interpreted as altered developmental programming. Literature was explored for possible mechanistic pathways that link embryonic subtoxic cadmium to the observed apical phenotypes, more specifically, the probability of molecular mechanisms induced by cadmium exposure leading to altered DNA methylation and subsequently to the observed apical phenotypes. This was done using the adverse outcome pathway model framework, and assessing key event relationship plausibility by tailored Bradford-Hill analysis. Thus, cadmium interaction with thiols appeared to be the major contributor to late-life effects. Cadmium-thiol interactions may lead to depletion of the methyl donor S-adenosyl-methionine, resulting in methylome alterations, and may, additionally, result in oxidative stress, which may lead to DNA oxidation, and subsequently altered DNA methyltransferase activity. In this way, DNA methylation may be affected at a critical developmental stage, causing the observed apical phenotypes. PMID:27827847

  12. The Effects of Real-Time Interactive Multimedia Teleradiology System

    PubMed Central

    Al-Safadi, Lilac

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the design of a real-time interactive multimedia teleradiology system and assesses how the system is used by referring physicians in point-of-care situations and supports or hinders aspects of physician-radiologist interaction. We developed a real-time multimedia teleradiology management system that automates the transfer of images and radiologists' reports and surveyed physicians to triangulate the findings and to verify the realism and results of the experiment. The web-based survey was delivered to 150 physicians from a range of specialties. The survey was completed by 72% of physicians. Data showed a correlation between rich interactivity, satisfaction, and effectiveness. The results of our experiments suggest that real-time multimedia teleradiology systems are valued by referring physicians and may have the potential for enhancing their practice and improving patient care and highlight the critical role of multimedia technologies to provide real-time multimode interactivity in current medical care. PMID:27294118

  13. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations with chiral effective field theory interactions.

    PubMed

    Gezerlis, A; Tews, I; Epelbaum, E; Gandolfi, S; Hebeler, K; Nogga, A; Schwenk, A

    2013-07-19

    We present the first quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations with chiral effective field theory (EFT) interactions. To achieve this, we remove all sources of nonlocality, which hamper the inclusion in QMC calculations, in nuclear forces to next-to-next-to-leading order. We perform auxiliary-field diffusion Monte Carlo (AFDMC) calculations for the neutron matter energy up to saturation density based on local leading-order, next-to-leading order, and next-to-next-to-leading order nucleon-nucleon interactions. Our results exhibit a systematic order-by-order convergence in chiral EFT and provide nonperturbative benchmarks with theoretical uncertainties. For the softer interactions, perturbative calculations are in excellent agreement with the AFDMC results. This work paves the way for QMC calculations with systematic chiral EFT interactions for nuclei and nuclear matter, for testing the perturbativeness of different orders, and allows for matching to lattice QCD results by varying the pion mass.

  14. The Effects of Real-Time Interactive Multimedia Teleradiology System.

    PubMed

    Al-Safadi, Lilac

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the design of a real-time interactive multimedia teleradiology system and assesses how the system is used by referring physicians in point-of-care situations and supports or hinders aspects of physician-radiologist interaction. We developed a real-time multimedia teleradiology management system that automates the transfer of images and radiologists' reports and surveyed physicians to triangulate the findings and to verify the realism and results of the experiment. The web-based survey was delivered to 150 physicians from a range of specialties. The survey was completed by 72% of physicians. Data showed a correlation between rich interactivity, satisfaction, and effectiveness. The results of our experiments suggest that real-time multimedia teleradiology systems are valued by referring physicians and may have the potential for enhancing their practice and improving patient care and highlight the critical role of multimedia technologies to provide real-time multimode interactivity in current medical care.

  15. Interactions between the Isolated-Interactive Elements Effect and Levels of Learner Expertise: Experimental Evidence from an Accountancy Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blayney, Paul; Kalyuga, Slava; Sweller, John

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated interactions between the isolated-interactive elements effect and levels of learner expertise with first year undergraduate university accounting students. The isolated-interactive elements effect occurs when learning is facilitated by initially presenting elements of information sequentially in an isolated form rather than…

  16. Pubertal Effects on Adjustment in Girls: Moving from Demonstrating Effects to Identifying Pathways

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graber, Julia A.; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; Warren, Michelle P.

    2006-01-01

    The present investigation examines mediated pathways from pubertal development to changes in depressive affect and aggression. Participants were 100 white girls who were between the ages of 10 and 14 (M=12.13, SD=0.80); girls were from well-educated, middle-to upper-middle class families, and attended private schools in a major northeastern urban…

  17. Organophosphate pesticides exposure among farmworkers: pathways and risk of adverse health effects.

    PubMed

    Suratman, Suratman; Edwards, John William; Babina, Kateryna

    2015-01-01

    Organophosphate (OP) compounds are the most widely used pesticides with more than 100 OP compounds in use around the world. The high-intensity use of OP pesticides contributes to morbidity and mortality in farmworkers and their families through acute or chronic pesticides-related illnesses. Many factors contributing to adverse health effects have been investigated by researchers to determine pathways of OP-pesticide exposure among farmers in developed and developing countries. Factors like wind/agricultural pesticide drift, mixing and spraying pesticides, use of personal protective equipment (PPE), knowledge, perceptions, washing hands, taking a shower, wearing contaminated clothes, eating, drinking, smoking, and hot weather are common in both groups of countries. Factors including low socioeconomic status areas, workplace conditions, duration of exposure, pesticide safety training, frequency of applying pesticides, spraying against the wind, and reuse of pesticide containers for storage are specific contributors in developing countries, whereas housing conditions, social contextual factors, and mechanical equipment were specific pathways in developed countries. This paper compares existing research in environmental and behavioural exposure modifying factors and biological monitoring between developing and developed countries. The main objective of this review is to explore the current depth of understanding of exposure pathways and factors increasing the risk of exposure potentially leading to adverse health effects specific to each group of countries.

  18. Effect of okadaic acid on cultured clam heart cells: involvement of MAPkinase pathways.

    PubMed

    Hanana, Houda; Talarmin, Hélène; Pennec, Jean-Pierre; Droguet, Mickael; Morel, Julie; Dorange, Germaine

    2012-12-15

    Okadaic acid (OA) is one of the main diarrhetic shellfish poisoning toxins and a potent inhibitor of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A. The downstream signal transduction pathways following the protein phosphatase inhibition are still unknown and the results of most of the previous studies are often conflicting. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of OA on heart clam cells and to analyse its possible mechanisms of action by investigating the signal transduction pathways involved in OA cytotoxicity. We showed that OA at 1 µM after 24 h of treatment induces disorganization of the actin cytoskeleton, rounding and detachment of fibroblastic cells. Moreover, treatment of heart cells revealed a sequential activation of MAPK proteins depending on the OA concentration. We suggest that the duration of p38 and JNK activation is a critical factor in determining cell apoptosis in clam cardiomyocytes. In the opposite, ERK activation could be involved in cell survival. The cell death induced by OA is a MAPK modulated pathway, mediated by caspase 3-dependent mechanism. OA was found to induce no significant effect on spontaneous beating rate or inward L-type calcium current in clam cardiomyocytes, suggesting that PP1 was not inhibited even by the highest dose of OA.

  19. Integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect in interacting dark energy models

    SciTech Connect

    Olivares, German; Pavon, Diego; Atrio-Barandela, Fernando

    2008-05-15

    Models with dark energy decaying into dark matter have been proposed in cosmology to solve the coincidence problem. We study the effect of such coupling on the cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropies. The interaction changes the rate of evolution of the metric potentials and the growth rate of matter density perturbations and modifies the integrated Sachs-Wolfe component of cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropies, enhancing the effect. Cross correlation of galaxy catalogs with cosmic microwave background maps provides a model-independent test to constrain the interaction. We particularize our analysis for a specific interacting model and show that galaxy catalogs with median redshifts z{sub m}=0.1-0.9 can rule out models with an interaction parameter strength of c{sup 2}{approx_equal}0.1 better than 99.95% confidence level. Values of c{sup 2}{<=}0.01 are compatible with the data and may account for the possible discrepancy between the fraction of dark energy derived from Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe 3 yr data and the fraction obtained from the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect. Measuring the fraction of dark energy by these two methods could provide evidence of an interaction.

  20. Molecular Signaling Pathways Behind the Biological Effects of Salvia Species Diterpenes in Neuropharmacology and Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Akaberi, M; Iranshahi, M; Mehri, S

    2016-06-01

    The genus Salvia, from the Lamiaceae family, has diverse biological properties that are primarily attributable to their diterpene contents. There is no comprehensive review on the molecular signaling pathways of these active components. In this review, we investigated the molecular targets of bioactive Salvia diterpenes responsible for the treatment of nervous and cardiovascular diseases. The effects on different pathways, including apoptosis signaling, oxidative stress phenomena, the accumulation of amyloid beta plaques, and tau phosphorylation, have all been considered to be mechanisms of the anti-Alzheimer properties of Salvia diterpenes. Additionally, effects on the benzodiazepine and kappa opioid receptors and neuroprotective effects are noted as neuropharmacological properties of Salvia diterpenes, including tanshinone IIA, salvinorin A, cryptotanshinone, and miltirone. Tanshinone IIA, as the primary diterpene of Salvia miltiorrhiza, has beneficial activities in heart diseases because of its ability to scavenge free radicals and its effects on transcription factors, such as nuclear transcription factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Additionally, tanshinone IIA has also been proposed to have cardioprotective properties including antiarrhythmic activities and effects on myocardial infarction. With respect to the potential therapeutic effects of Salvia diterpenes, comprehensive clinical trials are warranted to evaluate these valuable molecules as lead compounds. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. An Association Map on the Effect of Flavonoids on the Signaling Pathways in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koosha, Sanaz; Alshawsh, Mohammed A.; Looi, Chung Yeng; Seyedan, Atefehalsadat; Mohamed, Zahurin

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common type of cancer in the world, causing thousands of deaths annually. Although chemotherapy is known to be an effective treatment to combat colon cancer, it produces severe side effects. Natural products, on the other hand, appear to generate fewer side effects than do chemotherapeutic drugs. Flavonoids are polyphenolic compounds found in various fruits and vegetables known to possess antioxidant activities, and the literature shows that several of these flavonoids have anti-CRC propertiesFlavonoids are classified into five main subclasses: flavonols, flavanones, flavones, flavan-3-ols, and flavanonols. Of these subclasses, the flavanonols have a minimum effect against CRC, whereas the flavones play an important role. The main targets for the inhibitory effect of flavonoids on CRC signaling pathways are caspase; nuclear factor kappa B; mitogen-activated protein kinase/p38; matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-7, and MMP-9; p53; β-catenin; cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)2 and CDK4; and cyclins A, B, D, and E. In this review article, we summarize the in vitro and in vivo studies that have been performed since 2000 on the anti-CRC properties of flavonoids. We also describe the signaling pathways affected by flavonoids that have been found to be involved in CRC. Some flavonoids have the potential to be an effective alternative to chemotherapeutic drugs in the treatment of colon cancer; well-controlled clinical studies should, however, be conducted to support this proposal. PMID:27226778

  2. Mediators, Receptors, and Signalling Pathways in the Anti-Inflammatory and Antihyperalgesic Effects of Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, John L.; Cripps, Allan W.; Smith, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    Acupuncture has been used for millennia to treat allergic diseases including both intermittent rhinitis and persistent rhinitis. Besides the research on the efficacy and safety of acupuncture treatment for allergic rhinitis, research has also investigated how acupuncture might modulate immune function to exert anti-inflammatory effects. A proposed model has previously hypothesized that acupuncture might downregulate proinflammatory neuropeptides, proinflammatory cytokines, and neurotrophins, modulating transient receptor potential vallinoid (TRPV1), a G-protein coupled receptor which plays a central role in allergic rhinitis. Recent research has been largely supportive of this model. New advances in research include the discovery of a novel cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway activated by acupuncture. A chemokine-mediated proliferation of opioid-containing macrophages in inflamed tissues, in response to acupuncture, has also been demonstrated for the first time. Further research on the complex cross talk between receptors during inflammation is also helping to elucidate the mediators and signalling pathways activated by acupuncture. PMID:26339274

  3. The effect of aquaporin 5 overexpression on the Ras signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Janghee; Lee, Juna; Kim, Myoung Sook; Jang, Se Jin; Sidransky, David; Moon, Chulso

    2008-03-07

    Human aquaporin 5 (AQP5) has been shown to be overexpressed in multiple cancers, such as pancreatic cancer and colon cancer. Furthermore, it has been reported that ectopic expression of AQP5 leads to many phenotypic changes characteristic of transformation. However, the biochemical mechanism leading to transformation in AQP5-overexpressing cells has not been clearly elucidated. In this report, the overexpression of AQP5 in NIH3T3 cells demonstrated a significant effect on Ras activity and, thus, cell proliferation. Furthermore, this influence was shown to be mediated by phosphorylation of the PKA consensus site of AQP5. This is the first evidence demonstrating an association between AQP5 and a signaling pathway, namely the Ras signal transduction pathway, which may be the basis of the oncogenic properties seen in AQP-overexpressing cells.

  4. Effects of an electric field on interaction of aromatic systems.

    PubMed

    Youn, Il Seung; Cho, Woo Jong; Kim, Kwang S

    2016-04-30

    The effect of uniform external electric field on the interactions between small aromatic compounds and an argon atom is investigated using post-HF (MP2, SCS-MP2, and CCSD(T)) and density functional (PBE0-D3, PBE0-TS, and vdW-DF2) methods. The electric field effect is quantified by the difference of interaction energy calculated in the presence and absence of the electric field. All the post-HF methods describe electric field effects accurately although the interaction energy itself is overestimated by MP2. The electric field effect is explained by classical electrostatic models, where the permanent dipole moment from mutual polarization mainly determines its sign. The size of π-conjugated system does not have significant effect on the electric field dependence. We found out that PBE0-based methods give reasonable interaction energies and electric field response in every case, while vdW-DF2 sometimes shows spurious artifact owing to its sensitivity toward the real space electron density.

  5. Evaluating differential effects using regression interactions and regression mixture models

    PubMed Central

    Van Horn, M. Lee; Jaki, Thomas; Masyn, Katherine; Howe, George; Feaster, Daniel J.; Lamont, Andrea E.; George, Melissa R. W.; Kim, Minjung

    2015-01-01

    Research increasingly emphasizes understanding differential effects. This paper focuses on understanding regression mixture models, a relatively new statistical methods for assessing differential effects by comparing results to using an interactive term in linear regression. The research questions which each model answers, their formulation, and their assumptions are compared using Monte Carlo simulations and real data analysis. The capabilities of regression mixture models are described and specific issues to be addressed when conducting regression mixtures are proposed. The paper aims to clarify the role that regression mixtures can take in the estimation of differential effects and increase awareness of the benefits and potential pitfalls of this approach. Regression mixture models are shown to be a potentially effective exploratory method for finding differential effects when these effects can be defined by a small number of classes of respondents who share a typical relationship between a predictor and an outcome. It is also shown that the comparison between regression mixture models and interactions becomes substantially more complex as the number of classes increases. It is argued that regression interactions are well suited for direct tests of specific hypotheses about differential effects and regression mixtures provide a useful approach for exploring effect heterogeneity given adequate samples and study design. PMID:26556903

  6. The Pathway to a Safe and Effective Medication Formulary for Exploration Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, V. R.; Bayuse, T. M.; Mulcahy, R. A.; Mcguire, R. K. M.; Antonsen, E. L.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Exploration space missions pose several challenges to providing a comprehensive medication formulary designed to accommodate the size and space limitations of the spacecraft; while addressing the individual medications needs and preferences of the Crew; the negative outcome of a degrading inventory over time, the inability to resupply before expiration dates; and the need to properly forecast the best possible medication candidates to treat conditions that will occur in the future. METHODS: The Pharmacotherapeutics Discipline has partnered with the Exploration Medical Capabilities (ExMC) Element to develop and propose a research pathway that is comprehensively focused on evidence-based models and theories, as well as on new diagnostic tools and treatments or preventive measures aimed at closure of the Med02 “Pharmacy” Gap; defined in the Human Research Program’s (HRP) risk-based research strategy. The Med02 Gap promotes the challenge to identify a strategy to ensure that medications used to treat medical conditions during exploration space missions are available, safe, and effective. It is abundantly clear that pharmaceutical intervention is an essential component of risk management planning for astronaut healthcare during exploration space. However, the quandary still remains of how to assemble a formulary that is comprehensive enough to prevent or treat anticipated medical events; and is also chemically stable, safe, and robust enough to have sufficient potency to last for the duration of an exploration space mission. In cases where that is not possible, addressing this Gap requires exploration of novel drug development techniques, dosage forms, and dosage delivery platforms that enhance chemical stability as well as therapeutic effectiveness. RESULTS: The proposed research pathway outlines the steps, processes, procedures, and a research portfolio aimed at identifying a capability that will provide a safe and effective pharmacy for any specific

  7. Fanconi anemia complementation group FANCD2 protein serine 331 phosphorylation is important for fanconi anemia pathway function and BRCA2 interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Gang; Wilson, James B; Chen, Xiaoyong; Krause, Diane S; Xiao, Yuxuan; Jones, Nigel J; Kupfer, Gary M

    2009-11-15

    Fanconi anemia is a cancer-prone inherited bone marrow failure and cancer susceptibility syndrome with at least 13 complementation groups (FANCA, FANCB, FANCC, FANCD1, FANCD2, FANCE, FANCF, FANCG, FANCI, FANCJ, FANCL, FANCM, and FANCN). Our laboratory has previously described several regulatory phosphorylation events for core complex member proteins FANCG and FANCA by phosphorylation. In this study, we report a novel phosphorylation site serine 331 (S331) of FANCD2, the pivotal downstream player of the Fanconi anemia pathway. Phosphorylation of S331 is important for its DNA damage-inducible monoubiquitylation, resistance to DNA cross-linkers, and in vivo interaction with FANCD1/BRCA2. A phosphomimetic mutation at S331 restores all of these phenotypes to wild-type. In vitro and in vivo experiments show that phosphorylation of S331 is mediated by CHK1, the S-phase checkpoint kinase implicated in the Fanconi anemia DNA repair pathway.

  8. The effects of nonequilibrium chemistry on hypersonic viscous interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallgren, W. F.; Anderson, J. D., Jr.

    1991-09-01

    The effects of nonequilibrium, chemically reacting flow on classic hypersonic viscous interaction are investigated. The full Navier-stokes equations, including multicomponent diffusion, are solved for the flow over a sharp flat plate at zero incidence; an explicit-difference time marching scheme is used. Results show that finite-rate chemistry significantly reduces the effects of hypersonic viscous interaction, as predicted by a calorically perfect solution. Additionally, the results for both a calorically perfect and a chemically reacting gas positively confirm the hypothesis (based on an order-of-magnitude reduction of the Navier-Stokes equations) that at hypersonic speeds the pressure gradient through the boundary layer is not necessarily equal to zero. Furthermore, results and/or correlations derived from coupling an inviscid outer flow to a boundary layer are inaccurate in strong viscous interaction regions with a fully viscous shock layer.

  9. Predicting Molecular Crowding Effects in Ion-RNA Interactions.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tao; Zhu, Yuhong; He, Zhaojian; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2016-09-01

    We develop a new statistical mechanical model to predict the molecular crowding effects in ion-RNA interactions. By considering discrete distributions of the crowders, the model can treat the main crowder-induced effects, such as the competition with ions for RNA binding, changes of electrostatic interaction due to crowder-induced changes in the dielectric environment, and changes in the nonpolar hydration state of the crowder-RNA system. To enhance the computational efficiency, we sample the crowder distribution using a hybrid approach: For crowders in the close vicinity of RNA surface, we sample their discrete distributions; for crowders in the bulk solvent away from the RNA surface, we use a continuous mean-field distribution for the crowders. Moreover, using the tightly bound ion (TBI) model, we account for ion fluctuation and correlation effects in the calculation for ion-RNA interactions. Applications of the model to a variety of simple RNA structures such as RNA helices show a crowder-induced increase in free energy and decrease in ion binding. Such crowding effects tend to contribute to the destabilization of RNA structure. Further analysis indicates that these effects are associated with the crowder-ion competition in RNA binding and the effective decrease in the dielectric constant. This simple ion effect model may serve as a useful framework for modeling more realistic crowders with larger, more complex RNA structures.

  10. Synergistic effects of metformin with liraglutide against endothelial dysfunction through GLP-1 receptor and PKA signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Jing; Liu, Ye; Yang, Jin; Lu, Ran; Tian, Qing; Hou, Wenfang; Wang, Guang; Wei, Rui; Hong, Tianpei

    2017-01-01

    Metformin or glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogue liraglutide has cardiovascular benefits. However, it is not clear whether their combined treatment have additive or synergistic effects on the vasculature. In this study, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), exposed to palmitic acid (PA) to induce endothelial dysfunction, were incubated with metformin, liraglutide or their combination. High fat diet (HFD)-fed ApoE−/− mice were randomized into control, metformin, liraglutide, and combination treatment groups. Results showed that in PA-treated HUVECs and HFD-fed ApoE−/− mice, combination of metformin and liraglutide at lower dose significantly improved endothelial dysfunction compared with the single treatment. Metformin upregulated GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) level and protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation. However, PKA inhibition but not GLP-1R blockade eliminated the protective effects of metformin on endothelial function. Furthermore, AMPK inhibitor compound C abolished the metformin-mediated upregulation of GLP-1R level and PKA phosphorylation. In conclusion, combination of metformin and liraglutide has synergistic protective effects on endothelial function. Moreover, metformin stimulates GLP-1R and PKA signalling via AMPK-dependent pathway, which may account for its synergistic protective effects with liraglutide. Our findings provide new insights on the interaction between metformin and GLP-1, and provide important information for designing new GLP-1-based therapy strategies in treating type 2 diabetes. PMID:28145471

  11. Synergistic effects of metformin with liraglutide against endothelial dysfunction through GLP-1 receptor and PKA signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Ke, Jing; Liu, Ye; Yang, Jin; Lu, Ran; Tian, Qing; Hou, Wenfang; Wang, Guang; Wei, Rui; Hong, Tianpei

    2017-02-01

    Metformin or glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogue liraglutide has cardiovascular benefits. However, it is not clear whether their combined treatment have additive or synergistic effects on the vasculature. In this study, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), exposed to palmitic acid (PA) to induce endothelial dysfunction, were incubated with metformin, liraglutide or their combination. High fat diet (HFD)-fed ApoE(-/-) mice were randomized into control, metformin, liraglutide, and combination treatment groups. Results showed that in PA-treated HUVECs and HFD-fed ApoE(-/-) mice, combination of metformin and liraglutide at lower dose significantly improved endothelial dysfunction compared with the single treatment. Metformin upregulated GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) level and protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation. However, PKA inhibition but not GLP-1R blockade eliminated the protective effects of metformin on endothelial function. Furthermore, AMPK inhibitor compound C abolished the metformin-mediated upregulation of GLP-1R level and PKA phosphorylation. In conclusion, combination of metformin and liraglutide has synergistic protective effects on endothelial function. Moreover, metformin stimulates GLP-1R and PKA signalling via AMPK-dependent pathway, which may account for its synergistic protective effects with liraglutide. Our findings provide new insights on the interaction between metformin and GLP-1, and provide important information for designing new GLP-1-based therapy strategies in treating type 2 diabetes.

  12. The effects of organic solvents on the folding pathway and associated thermodynamics of proteins: a microscopic view.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yuqi; Wang, Jinan; Shao, Qiang; Shi, Jiye; Zhu, Weiliang

    2016-01-18

    Protein folding is subject to the effects of solvation environment. A variety of organic solvents are used as additives for in vitro refolding of denatured proteins. Examination of the solvent effects on protein folding could be of fundamental importance to understand the molecular interactions in determining protein structure. This article investigated the folding of α-helix and β-hairpin structures in water and the solutions of two representative refolding additives (methanol (MeOH) and 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (EMIM-Cl) ionic liquid) using REMD simulations. For both α-helix and β-hairpin in MeOH/water solution or α-helix in EMIM-Cl/water solution, the transient structures along the folding pathway are consistent with the counterparts in water but the relative statistical weights are changed, leading to the decrease in the overall folding free energy barrier. Accordingly, MeOH promotes the folding of both α-helix and β-hairpin but EMIM-Cl ionic liquid only promotes the folding of α-helix, consistent with experimental observations. The present study reveals for the first time the trivial