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Sample records for pathways regulate tnf-a

  1. The Hippo pathway: regulators and regulations

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Fa-Xing; Guan, Kun-Liang

    2013-01-01

    Control of cell number is crucial in animal development and tissue homeostasis, and its dysregulation may result in tumor formation or organ degeneration. The Hippo pathway in both Drosophila and mammals regulates cell number by modulating cell proliferation, cell death, and cell differentiation. Recently, numerous upstream components involved in the Hippo pathway have been identified, such as cell polarity, mechanotransduction, and G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling. Actin cytoskeleton or cellular tension appears to be the master mediator that integrates and transmits upstream signals to the core Hippo signaling cascade. Here, we review regulatory mechanisms of the Hippo pathway and discuss potential implications involved in different physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:23431053

  2. Mechanisms of Hippo pathway regulation.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zhipeng; Moroishi, Toshiro; Guan, Kun-Liang

    2016-01-01

    The Hippo pathway was initially identified in Drosophila melanogaster screens for tissue growth two decades ago and has been a subject extensively studied in both Drosophila and mammals in the last several years. The core of the Hippo pathway consists of a kinase cascade, transcription coactivators, and DNA-binding partners. Recent studies have expanded the Hippo pathway as a complex signaling network with >30 components. This pathway is regulated by intrinsic cell machineries, such as cell-cell contact, cell polarity, and actin cytoskeleton, as well as a wide range of signals, including cellular energy status, mechanical cues, and hormonal signals that act through G-protein-coupled receptors. The major functions of the Hippo pathway have been defined to restrict tissue growth in adults and modulate cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration in developing organs. Furthermore, dysregulation of the Hippo pathway leads to aberrant cell growth and neoplasia. In this review, we focus on recent developments in our understanding of the molecular actions of the core Hippo kinase cascade and discuss key open questions in the regulation and function of the Hippo pathway. PMID:26728553

  3. Mechanisms of Hippo pathway regulation

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Zhipeng; Moroishi, Toshiro; Guan, Kun-Liang

    2016-01-01

    The Hippo pathway was initially identified in Drosophila melanogaster screens for tissue growth two decades ago and has been a subject extensively studied in both Drosophila and mammals in the last several years. The core of the Hippo pathway consists of a kinase cascade, transcription coactivators, and DNA-binding partners. Recent studies have expanded the Hippo pathway as a complex signaling network with >30 components. This pathway is regulated by intrinsic cell machineries, such as cell–cell contact, cell polarity, and actin cytoskeleton, as well as a wide range of signals, including cellular energy status, mechanical cues, and hormonal signals that act through G-protein-coupled receptors. The major functions of the Hippo pathway have been defined to restrict tissue growth in adults and modulate cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration in developing organs. Furthermore, dysregulation of the Hippo pathway leads to aberrant cell growth and neoplasia. In this review, we focus on recent developments in our understanding of the molecular actions of the core Hippo kinase cascade and discuss key open questions in the regulation and function of the Hippo pathway. PMID:26728553

  4. Multiple pathways regulate shoot branching

    PubMed Central

    Rameau, Catherine; Bertheloot, Jessica; Leduc, Nathalie; Andrieu, Bruno; Foucher, Fabrice; Sakr, Soulaiman

    2015-01-01

    Shoot branching patterns result from the spatio-temporal regulation of axillary bud outgrowth. Numerous endogenous, developmental and environmental factors are integrated at the bud and plant levels to determine numbers of growing shoots. Multiple pathways that converge to common integrators are most probably involved. We propose several pathways involving not only the classical hormones auxin, cytokinins and strigolactones, but also other signals with a strong influence on shoot branching such as gibberellins, sugars or molecular actors of plant phase transition. We also deal with recent findings about the molecular mechanisms and the pathway involved in the response to shade as an example of an environmental signal controlling branching. We propose the TEOSINTE BRANCHED1, CYCLOIDEA, PCF transcription factor TB1/BRC1 and the polar auxin transport stream in the stem as possible integrators of these pathways. We finally discuss how modeling can help to represent this highly dynamic system by articulating knowledges and hypothesis and calculating the phenotype properties they imply. PMID:25628627

  5. Hippo pathway regulation of gastrointestinal tissues.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fa-Xing; Meng, Zhipeng; Plouffe, Steven W; Guan, Kun-Liang

    2015-01-01

    The Hippo pathway plays a crucial role in regulating tissue homeostasis and organ size, and its deregulation is frequently observed in human cancer. Yap is the major effector of and is inhibited by the Hippo pathway. In mouse model studies, inducible Yap expression in multiple tissues results in organ overgrowth. In the liver, knockout of upstream Hippo pathway components or transgenic expression of Yap leads to liver enlargement and hepatocellular carcinoma. In the small intestine or colon, deletion of upstream Hippo pathway components also results in expansion of intestinal progenitor cells and eventual development of adenomas. Genetic deletion of Yap in the intestine does not change the intestinal structure, but Yap is essential for intestinal repair upon certain types of tissue injury. The function of the Hippo pathway has also been studied in other gastrointestinal tissues, including the pancreas and stomach. Here we provide a brief overview of the Hippo pathway and discuss the physiological and pathological functions of this tumor suppressor pathway in gastrointestinal tissues.

  6. Wnt pathway regulation of intestinal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mah, Amanda T; Yan, Kelley S; Kuo, Calvin J

    2016-09-01

    Wnt signalling is involved in multiple aspects of embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis, notably via controlling cellular proliferation and differentiation. Wnt signalling is subject to stringent positive and negative regulation to promote proper development and homeostasis yet avoid aberrant growth. Such multi-layer regulation includes post-translational modification and processing of Wnt proteins themselves, R-spondin (Rspo) amplification of Wnt signalling, diverse receptor families, and intracellular and extracellular antagonists and destruction and transcription complexes. In the gastrointestinal tract, Wnt signalling is crucial for development and renewal of the intestinal epithelium. Intestinal stem cells (ISCs) undergo symmetric division and neutral drift dynamics to renew the intestinal epithelium. Sources of Wnts and Wnt amplifers such as R-spondins are beginning to be elucidated as well as their functional contribution to intestinal homeostasis. In this review we focus on regulation of ISCs and intestinal homeostasis by the Wnt/Rspo pathway, the potential cellular sources of Wnt signalling regulators and highlight potential future areas of study. PMID:27581568

  7. Crosstalk among Epigenetic Pathways Regulates Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jobe, Emily M; McQuate, Andrea L; Zhao, Xinyu

    2012-01-01

    The process of neurogenesis includes neural stem cell proliferation, fate specification, young neuron migration, neuronal maturation, and functional integration into existing circuits. Although neurogenesis occurs largely during embryonic development, low levels but functionally important neurogenesis persists in restricted regions of the postnatal brain, including the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus in the hippocampus and the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles. This review will cover both embryonic and adult neurogenesis with an emphasis on the latter. Of the many endogenous mediators of postnatal neurogenesis, epigenetic pathways, such as mediators of DNA methylation, chromatin remodeling systems, and non-coding RNA modulators, appear to play an integral role. Mounting evidence shows that such epigenetic factors form regulatory networks, which govern each step of postnatal neurogenesis. In this review, we explore the emerging roles of epigenetic mechanisms particularly microRNAs, element-1 silencing transcription factor/neuron-restrictive silencing factor (REST/NRSF), polycomb proteins, and methyl-CpG bindings proteins, in regulating the entire process of postnatal and adult neurogenesis. We further summarize recent data regarding how the crosstalk among these different epigenetic proteins forms the critical regulatory network that regulates neuronal development. We finally discuss how crosstalk between these pathways may serve to translate environmental cues into control of the neurogenic process. PMID:22586361

  8. Global Regulation of a Differentiation MAPK Pathway in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Chavel, Colin A.; Caccamise, Lauren M.; Li, Boyang; Cullen, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Cell differentiation requires different pathways to act in concert to produce a specialized cell type. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergoes filamentous growth in response to nutrient limitation. Differentiation to the filamentous cell type requires multiple signaling pathways, including a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. To identify new regulators of the filamentous growth MAPK pathway, a genetic screen was performed with a collection of 4072 nonessential deletion mutants constructed in the filamentous (Σ1278b) strain background. The screen, in combination with directed gene-deletion analysis, uncovered 97 new regulators of the filamentous growth MAPK pathway comprising 40% of the major regulators of filamentous growth. Functional classification extended known connections to the pathway and identified new connections. One function for the extensive regulatory network was to adjust the activity of the filamentous growth MAPK pathway to the activity of other pathways that regulate the response. In support of this idea, an unregulated filamentous growth MAPK pathway led to an uncoordinated response. Many of the pathways that regulate filamentous growth also regulated each other’s targets, which brings to light an integrated signaling network that regulates the differentiation response. The regulatory network characterized here provides a template for understanding MAPK-dependent differentiation that may extend to other systems, including fungal pathogens and metazoans. PMID:25189875

  9. Oscillatory Dynamics of the Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Shankaran, Harish; Wiley, H. S.

    2010-12-01

    The extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway is a central signaling pathway in development and disease and is regulated by multiple negative and positive feedback loops. Recent studies have shown negative feedback from ERK to upstream regulators can give rise to biochemical oscillations with a periodicity of between 15-30 minutes. Feedback due to the stimulated transcription of negative regulators of the ERK pathway can also give rise to transcriptional oscillations with a periodicity of 1-2h. The biological significance of these oscillations is not clear, but recent evidence suggests that transcriptional oscillations participate in developmental processes, such as somite formation. Biochemical oscillations are more enigmatic, but could provide a mechanism for encoding different types of inputs into a common signaling pathway.

  10. BMP pathway regulation of and by macrophages.

    PubMed

    Talati, Megha; West, James; Zaynagetdinov, Rinat; Hong, Charles C; Han, Wei; Blackwell, Tom; Robinson, Linda; Blackwell, Timothy S; Lane, Kirk

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a disease of progressively increasing pulmonary vascular resistance, associated with mutations of the type 2 receptor for the BMP pathway, BMPR2. The canonical signaling pathway for BMPR2 is through the SMAD family of transcription factors. BMPR2 is expressed in every cell type, but the impact of BMPR2 mutations affecting SMAD signaling, such as Bmpr2delx4+, had only previously been investigated in smooth muscle and endothelium. In the present study, we created a mouse with universal doxycycline-inducible expression of Bmpr2delx4+ in order to determine if broader expression had an impact relevant to the development of PAH. We found that the most obvious phenotype was a dramatic, but patchy, increase in pulmonary inflammation. We crossed these double transgenic mice onto an NF-κB reporter strain, and by luciferase assays on live mice, individual organs and isolated macrophages, we narrowed down the origin of the inflammatory phenotype to constitutive activation of tissue macrophages. Study of bone marrow-derived macrophages from mutant and wild-type mice suggested a baseline difference in differentiation state in Bmpr2 mutants. When activated with LPS, both mutant and wild-type macrophages secrete BMP pathway inhibitors sufficient to suppress BMP pathway activity in smooth muscle cells (SMC) treated with conditioned media. Functionally, co-culture with macrophages results in a BMP signaling-dependent increase in scratch closure in cultured SMC. We conclude that SMAD signaling through BMP is responsible, in part, for preventing macrophage activation in both live animals and in cells in culture, and that activated macrophages secrete BMP inhibitors in sufficient quantity to cause paracrine effect on vascular smooth muscle. PMID:24713633

  11. Regulation of the gibberellin pathway by auxin and DELLA proteins.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Damian P; Davidson, Sandra E; Clarke, Victoria C; Yamauchi, Yukika; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro; Kamiya, Yuji; Reid, James B; Ross, John J

    2010-10-01

    The synthesis and deactivation of bioactive gibberellins (GA) are regulated by auxin and by GA signalling. The effect of GA on its own pathway is mediated by DELLA proteins. Like auxin, the DELLAs promote GA synthesis and inhibit its deactivation. Here, we investigate the relationships between auxin and DELLA regulation of the GA pathway in stems, using a pea double mutant that is deficient in DELLA proteins. In general terms our results demonstrate that auxin and DELLAs independently regulate the GA pathway, contrary to some previous suggestions. The extent to which DELLA regulation was able to counteract the effects of auxin regulation varied from gene to gene. For Mendel's LE gene (PsGA3ox1) no counteraction was observed. However, for another synthesis gene, a GA 20-oxidase, the effect of auxin was weak and in WT plants appeared to be completely over-ridden by DELLA regulation. For a key GA deactivation (2-oxidase) gene, PsGA2ox1, the up-regulation induced by auxin deficiency was reduced to some extent by DELLA regulation. A second pea 2-oxidase gene, PsGA2ox2, was up-regulated by auxin, in a DELLA-independent manner. In Arabidopsis also, one 2-oxidase gene was down-regulated by auxin while another was up-regulated. Monitoring the metabolism pattern of GA(20) showed that in Arabidopsis, as in pea, auxin can promote the accumulation of bioactive GA. PMID:20706734

  12. The Hippo pathway regulates hematopoiesis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Milton, Claire C; Grusche, Felix A; Degoutin, Joffrey L; Yu, Eefang; Dai, Qi; Lai, Eric C; Harvey, Kieran F

    2014-11-17

    The Salvador-Warts-Hippo (Hippo) pathway is an evolutionarily conserved regulator of organ growth and cell fate. It performs these functions in epithelial and neural tissues of both insects and mammals, as well as in mammalian organs such as the liver and heart. Despite rapid advances in Hippo pathway research, a definitive role for this pathway in hematopoiesis has remained enigmatic. The hematopoietic compartments of Drosophila melanogaster and mammals possess several conserved features. D. melanogaster possess three types of hematopoietic cells that most closely resemble mammalian myeloid cells: plasmatocytes (macrophage-like cells), crystal cells (involved in wound healing), and lamellocytes (which encapsulate parasites). The proteins that control differentiation of these cells also control important blood lineage decisions in mammals. Here, we define the Hippo pathway as a key mediator of hematopoiesis by showing that it controls differentiation and proliferation of the two major types of D. melanogaster blood cells, plasmatocytes and crystal cells. In animals lacking the downstream Hippo pathway kinase Warts, lymph gland cells overproliferated, differentiated prematurely, and often adopted a mixed lineage fate. The Hippo pathway regulated crystal cell numbers by both cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous mechanisms. Yorkie and its partner transcription factor Scalloped were found to regulate transcription of the Runx family transcription factor Lozenge, which is a key regulator of crystal cell fate. Further, Yorkie or Scalloped hyperactivation induced ectopic crystal cells in a non-cell-autonomous and Notch-pathway-dependent fashion. PMID:25454587

  13. The Hippo pathway regulates hematopoiesis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Milton, Claire C; Grusche, Felix A; Degoutin, Joffrey L; Yu, Eefang; Dai, Qi; Lai, Eric C; Harvey, Kieran F

    2014-11-17

    The Salvador-Warts-Hippo (Hippo) pathway is an evolutionarily conserved regulator of organ growth and cell fate. It performs these functions in epithelial and neural tissues of both insects and mammals, as well as in mammalian organs such as the liver and heart. Despite rapid advances in Hippo pathway research, a definitive role for this pathway in hematopoiesis has remained enigmatic. The hematopoietic compartments of Drosophila melanogaster and mammals possess several conserved features. D. melanogaster possess three types of hematopoietic cells that most closely resemble mammalian myeloid cells: plasmatocytes (macrophage-like cells), crystal cells (involved in wound healing), and lamellocytes (which encapsulate parasites). The proteins that control differentiation of these cells also control important blood lineage decisions in mammals. Here, we define the Hippo pathway as a key mediator of hematopoiesis by showing that it controls differentiation and proliferation of the two major types of D. melanogaster blood cells, plasmatocytes and crystal cells. In animals lacking the downstream Hippo pathway kinase Warts, lymph gland cells overproliferated, differentiated prematurely, and often adopted a mixed lineage fate. The Hippo pathway regulated crystal cell numbers by both cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous mechanisms. Yorkie and its partner transcription factor Scalloped were found to regulate transcription of the Runx family transcription factor Lozenge, which is a key regulator of crystal cell fate. Further, Yorkie or Scalloped hyperactivation induced ectopic crystal cells in a non-cell-autonomous and Notch-pathway-dependent fashion.

  14. The roles of signaling pathways in regulating kidney development.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Qiu; Rongfei, Wei; Lingqiang, Zhang; Fuchu, He

    2015-01-01

    The development of mammalian kidney is a complex process. The reciprocal inductive interactions between epithelial cells and metanephric mesenchymal cells determine cell fates including proliferation, growth, apoptosis, and eventually contribute to the formation of an intact kidney. Multiple signaling pathways, including the GDNF/Ret, Wnt and BMP signaling pathways, have been shown to regulate the development of kidney. A myriad of signaling pathways and their cross-talks form a precise spatiotemporal regulatory network, which ensures the kidney to be properly organized. In this review, we summarize the physiological process of kidney development as well as the involved signaling pathways and their interplay.

  15. Mevalonate Pathway Regulates Cell Size Homeostasis and Proteostasis through Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Miettinen, Teemu P.; Björklund, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    Summary Balance between cell growth and proliferation determines cell size homeostasis, but little is known about how metabolic pathways are involved in the maintenance of this balance. Here, we perform a screen with a library of clinically used drug molecules for their effects on cell size. We find that statins, inhibitors of the mevalonate pathway, reduce cell proliferation and increase cell size and cellular protein density in various cell types, including primary human cells. Mevalonate pathway effects on cell size and protein density are mediated through geranylgeranylation of the small GTPase RAB11, which is required for basal autophagic flux. Our results identify the mevalonate pathway as a metabolic regulator of autophagy and expose a paradox in the regulation of cell size and proteostasis, where inhibition of an anabolic pathway can cause an increase in cell size and cellular protein density. PMID:26686643

  16. Chloride Regulation in the Pain Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Price, Theodore J; Cervero, Fernando; Gold, Michael S; Hammond, Donna L; Prescott, Steven A

    2009-01-01

    Melzack and Wall’s Gate Control Theory of Pain laid the theoretical groundwork for a role of spinal inhibition in endogenous pain control. While the Gate Control Theory was based on the notion that spinal inhibition is dynamically regulated, mechanisms underlying the regulation of inhibition have turned out to be far more complex than Melzack and Wall could have ever imagined. Recent evidence indicates that an exquisitely sensitive form of regulation involves changes in anion equilibrium potential (Eanion), which subsequently impacts fast synaptic inhibition mediated GABAA, and to a lesser extent, glycine receptor activation, the prototypic ligand gated anion channels. The cation-chloride co-transporters (in particular NKCC1 and KCC2) have emerged as proteins that play a critical role in the dynamic regulation of Eanion which in turn appears to play a critical role in hyperalgesia and allodynia following peripheral inflammation or nerve injury. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge in this area with particular attention to how such findings relate to endogenous mechanisms of hyperalgesia and allodynia and potential applications for therapeutics based on modulation of intracellular Cl− gradients or pharmacological interventions targeting GABAA receptors PMID:19167425

  17. Arrestins: ubiquitous regulators of cellular signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Gurevich, Eugenia V; Gurevich, Vsevolod V

    2006-01-01

    In vertebrates, the arrestins are a family of four proteins that regulate the signaling and trafficking of hundreds of different G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Arrestin homologs are also found in insects, protochordates and nematodes. Fungi and protists have related proteins but do not have true arrestins. Structural information is available only for free (unbound) vertebrate arrestins, and shows that the conserved overall fold is elongated and composed of two domains, with the core of each domain consisting of a seven-stranded beta-sandwich. Two main intramolecular interactions keep the two domains in the correct relative orientation, but both of these interactions are destabilized in the process of receptor binding, suggesting that the conformation of bound arrestin is quite different. As well as binding to hundreds of GPCR subtypes, arrestins interact with other classes of membrane receptors and more than 20 surprisingly diverse types of soluble signaling protein. Arrestins thus serve as ubiquitous signaling regulators in the cytoplasm and nucleus.

  18. MAPK/JNK signalling: a potential autophagy regulation pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Ying; Jiang, Wei-Qin; Zhou, Lin-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy refers to a lysosomal degradative pathway or a process of self-cannibalization. This pathway maintains nutrients levels for vital cellular functions during periods of starvation and it provides cells with survival advantages under various stress situations. However, the mechanisms responsible for the induction and regulation of autophagy are poorly understood. The c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) signal transduction pathway functions to induce defence mechanisms that protect organisms against acute oxidative and xenobiotic insults. This pathway has also been repeatedly linked to the molecular events involved in autophagy regulation. The present review will focus on recent advances in understanding of the relationship between mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/JNK signalling and autophagic cell death. PMID:26182361

  19. Neurotrophin signalling pathways regulating neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Miller, F D; Kaplan, D R

    2001-07-01

    Recent evidence indicates that naturally occurring neuronal death in mammals is regulated by the interplay between receptor-mediated prosurvival and proapoptotic signals. The neurotrophins, a family of growth factors best known for their positive effects on neuronal biology, have now been shown to mediate both positive and negative survival signals, by signalling through the Trk and p75 neurotrophin receptors, respectively. The mechanisms whereby these two neurotrophin receptors interact to determine neuronal survival have been difficult to decipher, largely because both can signal independently or coincidentally, depending upon the cell or developmental context. Nonetheless, the past several years have seen significant advances in our understanding of this receptor signalling system. In this review, we focus on the proapoptotic actions of the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), and on the interplay between Trk and p75NTR that determines neuronal survival.

  20. Neurotrophin signalling pathways regulating neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Miller, F D; Kaplan, D R

    2001-07-01

    Recent evidence indicates that naturally occurring neuronal death in mammals is regulated by the interplay between receptor-mediated prosurvival and proapoptotic signals. The neurotrophins, a family of growth factors best known for their positive effects on neuronal biology, have now been shown to mediate both positive and negative survival signals, by signalling through the Trk and p75 neurotrophin receptors, respectively. The mechanisms whereby these two neurotrophin receptors interact to determine neuronal survival have been difficult to decipher, largely because both can signal independently or coincidentally, depending upon the cell or developmental context. Nonetheless, the past several years have seen significant advances in our understanding of this receptor signalling system. In this review, we focus on the proapoptotic actions of the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), and on the interplay between Trk and p75NTR that determines neuronal survival. PMID:11529497

  1. The Hippo-Salvador signaling pathway regulates renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Seo, Eunjeong; Kim, Wan-Young; Hur, Jeongmi; Kim, Hanbyul; Nam, Sun Ah; Choi, Arum; Kim, Yu-Mi; Park, Sang Hee; Chung, Chaeuk; Kim, Jin; Min, Soohong; Myung, Seung-Jae; Lim, Dae-Sik; Kim, Yong Kyun

    2016-08-23

    Renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis (TIF) is the final pathway of various renal injuries that result in chronic kidney disease. The mammalian Hippo-Salvador signaling pathway has been implicated in the regulation of cell proliferation, cell death, tissue regeneration, and tumorigenesis. Here, we report that the Hippo-Salvador pathway plays a role in disease development in patients with TIF and in a mouse model of TIF. Mice with tubular epithelial cell (TEC)-specific deletions of Sav1 (Salvador homolog 1) exhibited aggravated renal TIF, enhanced epithelial-mesenchymal transition-like phenotypic changes, apoptosis, and proliferation after unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO). Moreover, Sav1 depletion in TECs increased transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and activated β-catenin expression after UUO, which likely accounts for the abovementioned enhanced TEC fibrotic phenotype. In addition, TAZ (transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif), a major downstream effector of the Hippo pathway, was significantly activated in Sav1-knockout mice in vivo. An in vitro study showed that TAZ directly regulates TGF-β and TGF-β receptor II expression. Collectively, our data indicate that the Hippo-Salvador pathway plays a role in the pathogenesis of TIF and that regulating this pathway may be a therapeutic strategy for reducing TIF.

  2. The Hippo-Salvador signaling pathway regulates renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Eunjeong; Kim, Wan-Young; Hur, Jeongmi; Kim, Hanbyul; Nam, Sun Ah; Choi, Arum; Kim, Yu-Mi; Park, Sang Hee; Chung, Chaeuk; Kim, Jin; Min, Soohong; Myung, Seung-Jae; Lim, Dae-Sik; Kim, Yong Kyun

    2016-01-01

    Renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis (TIF) is the final pathway of various renal injuries that result in chronic kidney disease. The mammalian Hippo-Salvador signaling pathway has been implicated in the regulation of cell proliferation, cell death, tissue regeneration, and tumorigenesis. Here, we report that the Hippo-Salvador pathway plays a role in disease development in patients with TIF and in a mouse model of TIF. Mice with tubular epithelial cell (TEC)-specific deletions of Sav1 (Salvador homolog 1) exhibited aggravated renal TIF, enhanced epithelial-mesenchymal transition-like phenotypic changes, apoptosis, and proliferation after unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO). Moreover, Sav1 depletion in TECs increased transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and activated β-catenin expression after UUO, which likely accounts for the abovementioned enhanced TEC fibrotic phenotype. In addition, TAZ (transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif), a major downstream effector of the Hippo pathway, was significantly activated in Sav1-knockout mice in vivo. An in vitro study showed that TAZ directly regulates TGF-β and TGF-β receptor II expression. Collectively, our data indicate that the Hippo-Salvador pathway plays a role in the pathogenesis of TIF and that regulating this pathway may be a therapeutic strategy for reducing TIF. PMID:27550469

  3. Feedback Regulation of Kinase Signaling Pathways by AREs and GREs

    PubMed Central

    Vlasova-St. Louis, Irina; Bohjanen, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    In response to environmental signals, kinases phosphorylate numerous proteins, including RNA-binding proteins such as the AU-rich element (ARE) binding proteins, and the GU-rich element (GRE) binding proteins. Posttranslational modifications of these proteins lead to a significant changes in the abundance of target mRNAs, and affect gene expression during cellular activation, proliferation, and stress responses. In this review, we summarize the effect of phosphorylation on the function of ARE-binding proteins ZFP36 and ELAVL1 and the GRE-binding protein CELF1. The networks of target mRNAs that these proteins bind and regulate include transcripts encoding kinases and kinase signaling pathways (KSP) components. Thus, kinase signaling pathways are involved in feedback regulation, whereby kinases regulate RNA-binding proteins that subsequently regulate mRNA stability of ARE- or GRE-containing transcripts that encode components of KSP. PMID:26821046

  4. Eosinophil granule cationic proteins regulate the classical pathway of complement.

    PubMed Central

    Weiler, J M; Edens, R E; Bell, C S; Gleich, G J

    1995-01-01

    Major basic protein, the primary constituent of eosinophil granules, regulates the alternative and classical pathways of complement. Major basic protein and other eosinophil granule cationic proteins, which are important in mediating tissue damage in allergic disease, regulate the alternative pathway by interfering with C3b interaction with factor B to assemble an alternative pathway C3 convertase. In the present study, eosinophil peroxidase, eosinophil cationic protein and eosinophil-derived neurotoxin, as well as major basic protein, were examined for capacity to regulate the classical pathway. Eosinophil peroxidase, eosinophil cationic protein and major basic protein inhibited formation of cell-bound classical pathway C3 convertase (EAC1,4b,2a), causing 50% inhibition of complement-mediated lysis at about 0.19, 0.75 and 0.5 micrograms/10(7) cellular intermediates, respectively. Eosinophil-derived neurotoxin had no activity on this pathway of complement. The eosinophil granule proteins were examined for activity on the formation of the membrane attack complex. Major basic protein and eosinophil cationic protein had no activity on terminal lysis. In contrast, eosinophil peroxidase inhibited lysis of EAC1,4b,2a,3b,5b, but had only minimal activity on later events in complement lysis. These polycations were then examined to determine the site(s) at which they regulated the early classical pathway. Eosinophil granule polycationic proteins: (1) reduced the Zmax at all time points but had only minimal effect on the Tmax during the formation of the classical pathway C3 convertase (EAC1,4b,2a); (2) inhibited formation of EAC1,4b,2a proportional to C4 but independent of C2 concentration; (3) inhibited fluid phase formation of C1,4b,2a, as reflected by a decrease in C1-induced consumption of C2 over time; and (4) inhibited C1 activity over time without a direct effect on either C4 or C2. These observations suggest that polycations regulate the early classical pathway by

  5. Mechanism and regulation of the nonsense-mediated decay pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hug, Nele; Longman, Dasa; Cáceres, Javier F.

    2016-01-01

    The Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway selectively degrades mRNAs harboring premature termination codons (PTCs) but also regulates the abundance of a large number of cellular RNAs. The central role of NMD in the control of gene expression requires the existence of buffering mechanisms that tightly regulate the magnitude of this pathway. Here, we will focus on the mechanism of NMD with an emphasis on the role of RNA helicases in the transition from NMD complexes that recognize a PTC to those that promote mRNA decay. We will also review recent strategies aimed at uncovering novel trans-acting factors and their functional role in the NMD pathway. Finally, we will describe recent progress in the study of the physiological role of the NMD response. PMID:26773057

  6. Smad8/9 Is Regulated Through the BMP Pathway.

    PubMed

    Katakawa, Yuko; Funaba, Masayuki; Murakami, Masaru

    2016-08-01

    Members of the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family function through Smad-dependent and Smad-independent pathways. The Smad-dependent pathway is stimulated through the phosphorylation of receptor-regulated Smad (R-Smad) and inhibited through the dephosphorylation of R-Smad or the gene induction of inhibitory Smad (I-Smad). Little information is available on the regulation of R-Smad gene expression. BMP4 potentiated the up-regulation of Smad8/9 expression in C2C12, H9c2, 3T3-L1, HepG2, B16, and primary fibroblasts. BMP4-induced Smad8/9 expression was cycloheximide-insensitive and LDN-193189-sensitive, suggesting a direct event mediated through BMP type I receptors. BMP4 transcriptionally stimulated the Smad8/9 gene, and BMP-responsive elements (BREs) spanning nt -121 to nt -44 are involved in the up-regulation of Smad8/9 expression in response to BMP4. Phosphorylated Smad1/5/8/9 specifically bound to the BREs of Smad8/9 gene. The present study reveals that Smad8/9 is a unique R-Smad regulated through the BMP pathway at the mRNA level. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1788-1796, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26748560

  7. Transcriptional Regulation of Carbohydrate Utilization Pathways in the Bifidobacterium Genus.

    PubMed

    Khoroshkin, Matvei S; Leyn, Semen A; Van Sinderen, Douwe; Rodionov, Dmitry A

    2016-01-01

    Bifidobacteria, which represent common commensals of mammalian gut, are believed to have positive effects on human health. The influence of certain non-digestible carbohydrates (and their use as so-called prebiotics) on growth and metabolic activity of bifidobacteria is of increasing interest; however, mechanisms of transcriptional control of carbohydrate metabolism are poorly understood in these species. We used a comparative genomics approach to reconstruct carbohydrate utilization pathways and transcriptional regulons in 10 Bifidobacterium genomes. Analysis of regulatory gene regions revealed candidate DNA motifs and reconstructed regulons for 268 transcription factors from the LacI, ROK, DeoR, AraC, GntR, and TetR families that form 64 orthologous groups of regulators. Most of the reconstructed regulons are local and control specific catabolic pathways for host- and diet-derived glycans and monosaccharides. Mosaic distributions of many of these local regulators across Bifidobacterium species correlate with distribution of corresponding catabolic pathways. In contrast, the maltose, galactose, sucrose, and fructose regulons, as well as a novel global LacI-family regulator that is predicted to control the central carbohydrate metabolism and arabinose catabolism genes, are universally present in all 10 studied bifidobacteria. A novel group of TetR-family regulators presumably controls the glucoside and galactoside utilization pathways. Paralogs of the ribose repressor RbsR control the pyrimidine nucleoside utilization genes. Multiple paralogs of the maltose regulator MalR co-regulate large sets of genes involved in maltodextrin utilization. The inferred metabolic regulons provide new insights on diverse carbohydrate utilization networks in bifidobacteria that can be employed in metabolic modeling, phenotype prediction and the rational development of novel prebiotics.

  8. Transcriptional Regulation of Carbohydrate Utilization Pathways in the Bifidobacterium Genus

    PubMed Central

    Khoroshkin, Matvei S.; Leyn, Semen A.; Van Sinderen, Douwe; Rodionov, Dmitry A.

    2016-01-01

    Bifidobacteria, which represent common commensals of mammalian gut, are believed to have positive effects on human health. The influence of certain non-digestible carbohydrates (and their use as so-called prebiotics) on growth and metabolic activity of bifidobacteria is of increasing interest; however, mechanisms of transcriptional control of carbohydrate metabolism are poorly understood in these species. We used a comparative genomics approach to reconstruct carbohydrate utilization pathways and transcriptional regulons in 10 Bifidobacterium genomes. Analysis of regulatory gene regions revealed candidate DNA motifs and reconstructed regulons for 268 transcription factors from the LacI, ROK, DeoR, AraC, GntR, and TetR families that form 64 orthologous groups of regulators. Most of the reconstructed regulons are local and control specific catabolic pathways for host- and diet-derived glycans and monosaccharides. Mosaic distributions of many of these local regulators across Bifidobacterium species correlate with distribution of corresponding catabolic pathways. In contrast, the maltose, galactose, sucrose, and fructose regulons, as well as a novel global LacI-family regulator that is predicted to control the central carbohydrate metabolism and arabinose catabolism genes, are universally present in all 10 studied bifidobacteria. A novel group of TetR-family regulators presumably controls the glucoside and galactoside utilization pathways. Paralogs of the ribose repressor RbsR control the pyrimidine nucleoside utilization genes. Multiple paralogs of the maltose regulator MalR co-regulate large sets of genes involved in maltodextrin utilization. The inferred metabolic regulons provide new insights on diverse carbohydrate utilization networks in bifidobacteria that can be employed in metabolic modeling, phenotype prediction and the rational development of novel prebiotics. PMID:26903998

  9. Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chory, Joanne

    2004-12-31

    The process of chloroplast differentiation, involves the coordinate regulation of many nuclear and chloroplast genes. The cues for the initiation of this developmental program are both extrinsic (e.g., light) and intrinsic (cell-type and plastid signals). During this project period, we utilized a molecular genetic approach to select for Arabidopsis mutants that did not respond properly to environmental light conditions, as well as mutants that were unable to perceive plastid damage. These latter mutants, called gun mutants, define two retrograde signaling pathways that regulate nuclear gene expression in response to chloroplasts. A major finding was to identify a signal from chloroplasts that regulates nuclear gene transcription. This signal is the build-up of Mg-Protoporphyrin IX, a key intermediate of the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. The signaling pathways downstream of this signal are currently being studied. Completion of this project has provided an increased understanding of the input signals and retrograde signaling pathways that control nuclear gene expression in response to the functional state of chloroplasts. These studies should ultimately influence our abilities to manipulate plant growth and development, and will aid in the understanding of the developmental control of photosynthesis.

  10. Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chory, Joanne

    2006-01-16

    The process of chloroplast differentiation, involves the coordinate regulation of many nuclear and chloroplast genes. The cues for the initiation of this developmental program are both extrinsic (e.g., light) and intrinsic (cell-type and plastid signals). During this project period, we utilized a molecular genetic approach to select for Arabidopsis mutants that did not respond properly to environmental light conditions, as well as mutants that were unable to perceive plastid damage. These latter mutants, called gun mutants, define two retrograde signaling pathways that regulate nuclear gene expression in response to chloroplasts. A major finding was to identify a signal from chloroplasts that regulates nuclear gene transcription. This signal is the build-up of Mg-Protoporphyrin IX, a key intermediate of the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. The signaling pathways downstream of this signal are currently being studied. Completion of this project has provided an increased understanding of the input signals and retrograde signaling pathways that control nuclear gene expression in response to the functional state of chloroplasts. These studies should ultimately influence our abilities to manipulate plant growth and development, and will aid in the understanding of the developmental control of photosynthesis.

  11. YAP regulates neuronal differentiation through Sonic hedgehog signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yi-Ting; Ding, Jing-Ya; Li, Ming-Yang; Yeh, Tien-Shun; Wang, Tsu-Wei; Yu, Jenn-Yah

    2012-09-10

    Tight regulation of cell numbers by controlling cell proliferation and apoptosis is important during development. Recently, the Hippo pathway has been shown to regulate tissue growth and organ size in Drosophila. In mammalian cells, it also affects cell proliferation and differentiation in various tissues, including the nervous system. Interplay of several signaling cascades, such as Notch, Wnt, and Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) pathways, control cell proliferation during neuronal differentiation. However, it remains unclear whether the Hippo pathway coordinates with other signaling cascades in regulating neuronal differentiation. Here, we used P19 cells, a mouse embryonic carcinoma cell line, as a model to study roles of YAP, a core component of the Hippo pathway, in neuronal differentiation. P19 cells can be induced to differentiate into neurons by expressing a neural bHLH transcription factor gene Ascl1. Our results showed that YAP promoted cell proliferation and inhibited neuronal differentiation. Expression of Yap activated Shh but not Wnt or Notch signaling activity during neuronal differentiation. Furthermore, expression of Yap increased the expression of Patched homolog 1 (Ptch1), a downstream target of the Shh signaling. Knockdown of Gli2, a transcription factor of the Shh pathway, promoted neuronal differentiation even when Yap was over-expressed. We further demonstrated that over-expression of Yap inhibited neuronal differentiation in primary mouse cortical progenitors and Gli2 knockdown rescued the differentiation defect in Yap over-expressing cells. In conclusion, our study reveals that Shh signaling acts downstream of YAP in regulating neuronal differentiation. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer YAP promotes cell proliferation and inhibits neuronal differentiation in P19 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer YAP promotes Sonic hedgehog signaling activity during neuronal differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of Gli2 rescues the Yap

  12. Protein Kinases of the Hippo Pathway: Regulation and Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Avruch, Joseph; Zhou, Dawang; Fitamant, Julien; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Mou, Fan; Barrufet, Laura Regué

    2012-01-01

    The “Hippo” signaling pathway has emerged as a major regulator of cell proliferation and survival in metazoans. The pathway, as delineated by genetic and biochemical studies in Drosophila, consists of a kinase cascade regulated by cell-cell contact and cell polarity that inhibits the transcriptional coactivator Yorkie and its proliferative, anti-differentiation, antiapoptotic transcriptional program. The core pathway components are the GC kinase Hippo, which phosphorylates the noncatalytic polypeptide Mats/Mob1 and, with the assistance of the scaffold protein Salvador, phosphorylates the ndr-family kinase Lats. In turn phospho-Lats, after binding to phospho-Mats, autoactivates and phosphorylates Yorkie, resulting in its nuclear exit. Hippo also uses the scaffold protein Furry and a different Mob protein to control another ndr-like kinase, the morphogenetic regulator Tricornered. Architecturally homologous kinase cascades consisting of a GC kinase, a Mob protein, a scaffolding polypeptide and an ndr-like kinase are well described in yeast; in S. cerevisiae e.g., the MEN pathway promotes mitotic exit whereas the RAM network, using a different GC kinase, Mob protein, scaffold and ndr-like kinase, regulates cell polarity and morphogenesis. In mammals, the Hippo orthologues Mst1 and Mst2 utilize the Salvador ortholog WW45/Sav1 and other scaffolds to regulate the kinases Lats1/Lats2 and ndr1/ndr2. As in Drosophila, murine Mst1/Mst2, in a redundant manner, negatively regulate the Yorkie ortholog YAP in the epithelial cells of the liver and gut; loss of both Mst1 and Mst2 results in hyperproliferation and tumorigenesis that can be largely negated by reduction or elimination of YAP. Despite this conservation, considerable diversification in pathway composition and regulation is already evident; in skin e.g., YAP phosphorylation is independent of Mst1Mst2 and Lats1Lats2. Moreover, in lymphoid cells, Mst1/Mst2, under the control of the Rap1 GTPase and independent of YAP

  13. A biosynthetic regulated secretory pathway in constitutive secretory cells

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    It has frequently been proposed that while the constitutive secretory pathway is present in all cells, the regulated secretory pathway is found only in specialized cells such as neuronal, endocrine, or exocrine types. In this study we provide evidence that suggests that this distinction is not as restrictive as proposed. We have identified a population of post-Golgi storage vesicles in several constitutive secretory cells using [35S]SO4-labeled glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains as a marker. A fraction of this pool of vesicles can undergo exocytosis in response to stimuli such as cytoplasmic Ca2+ and phorbol esters. The effect of Ca2+ was demonstrated both in intact cells in the presence of the ionophore A23187 and in streptolysin-O-permeabilized semi-intact cells. N-ethylmaleiimide, under conditions known to block regulated and constitutive secretion, inhibited the stimulated secretion from these cells, suggesting that the observed release of labeled GAG chains was not due to a leakage artefact. Subcellular fractionation revealed that the stored GAG chains were in low-density membrane granules (d approximately 1.12 g/ml), whose size was greater than that of synaptic- like vesicles found in PC12 cells. In addition, in CHO cells that express epitope-tagged rab 3D, the labeled GAG chains were found to cofractionate with the exogenous rab protein. When expressed in the regulated cell line AtT-20, this tagged rab protein was found to colocalize with ACTH-containing dense-core granules by indirect immunofluorescence. Taken together, these results provide evidence for the presence of a cryptic regulated secretory pathway in "constitutive" cells and suggest that the regulated secretory pathway is more widespread amongst different cell types than previously believed. PMID:8682857

  14. The various roles of ubiquitin in Wnt pathway regulation

    PubMed Central

    Tauriello, Daniele VF

    2010-01-01

    Wnt signaling mediates key developmental and homeostatic processes including stem cell maintenance, growth and cell fate specification, cell polarity and migration. Inappropriate activation of Wnt signaling is linked to a range of human disorders, most notably cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. In the Wnt/β-catenin cascade, signaling events converge on the regulation of ubiquitin-mediated degradation of the crucial transcriptional regulator β-catenin. The emerging mechanisms by which ubiquitin modification of proteins controls cellular pathways comprise both proteolytic and nonproteolytic functions. In nonproteolytic functions, ubiquitin acts as a signaling device in the control of protein activity, subcellular localization and complex formation. Here, we review and discuss recent developments that implicate ubiquitin-mediated mechanisms at multiple steps of Wnt pathway activation. PMID:20930545

  15. Regulation of insect behavior via the insulin-signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Erion, Renske; Sehgal, Amita

    2013-01-01

    The insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling (IIS) pathway is well-established as a critical regulator of growth and metabolic homeostasis across the animal kingdom. Insulin-like peptides (ILPs), the functional analogs of mammalian insulin, were initially discovered in the silkmoth Bombyx mori and subsequently identified in many other insect species. Initial research focused on the role of insulin signaling in metabolism, cell proliferation, development, reproduction and aging. More recently however, increasing attention has been given to the role of insulin in the regulation of neuronal function and behavior. Here we review the role of insulin signaling in two specific insect behaviors: feeding and locomotion. PMID:24348428

  16. Plant vacuolar trafficking occurs through distinctly regulated pathways.

    PubMed

    Ebine, Kazuo; Inoue, Takeshi; Ito, Jun; Ito, Emi; Uemura, Tomohiro; Goh, Tatsuaki; Abe, Hiroshi; Sato, Ken; Nakano, Akihiko; Ueda, Takashi

    2014-06-16

    The multifunctional vacuole is the largest organelle in plant cells, and many proteins are transported to and stored in this organelle; thus, the vacuole has great physiological and agronomical importance. However, the molecular mechanism and regulation of plant vacuolar traffic remain largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that multiple vacuolar trafficking pathways operate in plants. RAB5 and RAB7 are evolutionarily conserved subfamilies of Rab GTPase, whose animal and yeast counterparts regulate vacuolar/endosomal trafficking in a sequential manner. Functional analyses of a putative activating complex for RAB7 indicated that this complex is responsible for maturation from RAB5- to RAB7-positive endosomes in plant cells. Moreover, these machinery components are recruited to a more complex trafficking network. Mutations in RAB5 and RAB7 conferred counteracting effects on the vti11 mutant. Furthermore, impairment of RAB5- and RAB7-dependent pathways differentially affected the transport of distinctive cargos. These results indicate that plants have developed a complex vacuolar transport system distinct from that of nonplant systems by assigning evolutionarily conserved machinery to unique trafficking pathways. These pathways provide a fundamental basis for plant development at the cellular and higher-ordered levels.

  17. A divergent canonical WNT-signaling pathway regulates microtubule dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ciani, Lorenza; Krylova, Olga; Smalley, Matthew J.; Dale, Trevor C.; Salinas, Patricia C.

    2004-01-01

    Dishevelled (DVL) is associated with axonal microtubules and regulates microtubule stability through the inhibition of the serine/threonine kinase, glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β). In the canonical WNT pathway, the negative regulator Axin forms a complex with β-catenin and GSK-3β, resulting in β-catenin degradation. Inhibition of GSK-3β by DVL increases β-catenin stability and TCF transcriptional activation. Here, we show that Axin associates with microtubules and unexpectedly stabilizes microtubules through DVL. In turn, DVL stabilizes microtubules by inhibiting GSK-3β through a transcription- and β-catenin–independent pathway. More importantly, axonal microtubules are stabilized after DVL localizes to axons. Increased microtubule stability is correlated with a decrease in GSK-3β–mediated phosphorylation of MAP-1B. We propose a model in which Axin, through DVL, stabilizes microtubules by inhibiting a pool of GSK-3β, resulting in local changes in the phosphorylation of cellular targets. Our data indicate a bifurcation in the so-called canonical WNT-signaling pathway to regulate microtubule stability. PMID:14734535

  18. p53 regulates the mevalonate pathway in human glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Laezza, C; D'Alessandro, A; Di Croce, L; Picardi, P; Ciaglia, E; Pisanti, S; Malfitano, A M; Comegna, M; Faraonio, R; Gazzerro, P; Bifulco, M

    2015-01-01

    The mevalonate (MVA) pathway is an important metabolic pathway implicated in multiple aspects of tumorigenesis. In this study, we provided evidence that p53 induces the expression of a group of enzymes of the MVA pathway including 3′-hydroxy-3′-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, MVA kinase, farnesyl diphosphate synthase and farnesyl diphosphate farnesyl transferase 1, in the human glioblastoma multiforme cell line, U343 cells, and in normal human astrocytes, NHAs. Genetic and pharmacologic perturbation of p53 directly influences the expression of these genes. Furthermore, p53 is recruited to the gene promoters in designated p53-responsive elements, thereby increasing their transcription. Such effect was abolished by site-directed mutagenesis in the p53-responsive element of promoter of the genes. These findings highlight another aspect of p53 functions unrelated to tumor suppression and suggest p53 as a novel regulator of the MVA pathway providing insight into the role of this pathway in cancer progression. PMID:26469958

  19. New insights into transduction pathways that regulate boar sperm function.

    PubMed

    Hurtado de Llera, A; Martin-Hidalgo, D; Gil, M C; Garcia-Marin, L J; Bragado, M J

    2016-01-01

    Detailed molecular mechanisms mediating signal transduction cascades that regulate boar sperm function involving Ser/Thr and tyrosine phosphorylation of proteins have been reviewed previously. Therefore, this review will focus in those kinase pathways identified recently (<10 years) in boar spermatozoa that regulate different functional spermatozoa processes. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a cell energy sensor kinase that was first identified in mammalian spermatozoa in 2012, and since then it has emerged as an essential regulator of boar sperm function. Signaling pathways leading to AMPK activation in boar sperm are highlighted in this review (PKA, CaMKKα/β, and PKC as well as Ca(2+) and cAMP messengers as upstream regulators). Interestingly, stimuli considered as cell stress (hyperosmotic stress, inhibition of mitochondrial activity, absence of intracellular Ca(2+)) markedly activate AMPK in boar spermatozoa. Moreover, AMPK plays a remarkable and necessary regulatory role in mammalian sperm function, controlling essential boar sperm functional processes such as motility, viability, mitochondrial membrane potential, organization and fluidity of plasma membrane, and outer acrosome membrane integrity. These mentioned processes are all required under fluctuating environment of spermatozoa when transiting through the female reproductive tract to achieve fertilization. An applied role of AMPK in artificial insemination techniques is also suggested as during boar seminal doses preservation at 17 °C, physiological levels of AMPK activity markedly increase (maximum on Day 7) and result essential to maintain the aforementioned fundamental sperm processes. Moreover, regulation of sperm function exerted by the glycogen synthase kinase 3 and Src family kinase pathways is summarized.

  20. Epigenetic regulator Lid maintains germline stem cells through regulating JAK-STAT signaling pathway activity

    PubMed Central

    Tarayrah, Lama; Li, Yuping; Gan, Qiang; Chen, Xin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Signaling pathways and epigenetic mechanisms have both been shown to play essential roles in regulating stem cell activity. While the role of either mechanism in this regulation is well established in multiple stem cell lineages, how the two mechanisms interact to regulate stem cell activity is not as well understood. Here we report that in the Drosophila testis, an H3K4me3-specific histone demethylase encoded by little imaginal discs (lid) maintains germline stem cell (GSC) mitotic index and prevents GSC premature differentiation. Lid is required in germ cells for proper expression of the Stat92E transcription factor, the downstream effector of the Janus kinase signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT) signaling pathway. Our findings support a germ cell autonomous role for the JAK-STAT pathway in maintaining GSCs and place Lid as an upstream regulator of this pathway. Our study provides new insights into the biological functions of a histone demethylase in vivo and sheds light on the interaction between epigenetic mechanisms and signaling pathways in regulating stem cell activities. PMID:26490676

  1. TIGAR regulates DNA damage and repair through pentosephosphate pathway and Cdk5-ATM pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hong-Pei; Xie, Jia-Ming; Li, Bin; Sun, Yi-Hui; Gao, Quan-Geng; Ding, Zhi-Hui; Wu, Hao-Rong; Qin, Zheng-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Previous study revealed that the protective effect of TIGAR in cell survival is mediated through the increase in PPP (pentose phosphate pathway) flux. However, it remains unexplored if TIGAR plays an important role in DNA damage and repair. This study investigated the role of TIGAR in DNA damage response (DDR) induced by genotoxic drugs and hypoxia in tumor cells. Results showed that TIGAR was increased and relocated to the nucleus after epirubicin or hypoxia treatment in cancer cells. Knockdown of TIGAR exacerbated DNA damage and the effects were partly reversed by the supplementation of PPP products NADPH, ribose, or the ROS scavenger NAC. Further studies with pharmacological and genetic approaches revealed that TIGAR regulated the phosphorylation of ATM, a key protein in DDR, through Cdk5. The Cdk5-AMT signal pathway involved in regulation of DDR by TIGAR defines a new role of TIGAR in cancer cell survival and it suggests that TIGAR may be a therapeutic target for cancers. PMID:25928429

  2. Regulation of the pentose phosphate pathway in cancer.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Peng; Du, Wenjing; Wu, Mian

    2014-01-01

    Energy metabolism is significantly reprogrammed in many human cancers, and these alterations confer many advantages to cancer cells, including the promotion of biosynthesis, ATP generation, detoxification and support of rapid proliferation. The pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) is a major pathway for glucose catabolism. The PPP directs glucose flux to its oxidative branch and produces a reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH), an essential reductant in anabolic processes. It has become clear that the PPP plays a critical role in regulating cancer cell growth by supplying cells with not only ribose-5-phosphate but also NADPH for detoxification of intracellular reactive oxygen species, reductive biosynthesis and ribose biogenesis. Thus, alteration of the PPP contributes directly to cell proliferation, survival and senescence. Furthermore, recent studies have shown that the PPP is regulated oncogenically and/or metabolically by numerous factors, including tumor suppressors, oncoproteins and intracellular metabolites. Dysregulation of PPP flux dramatically impacts cancer growth and survival. Therefore, a better understanding of how the PPP is reprogrammed and the mechanism underlying the balance between glycolysis and PPP flux in cancer will be valuable in developing therapeutic strategies targeting this pathway.

  3. Copper as a key regulator of cell signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Grubman, Alexandra; White, Anthony R

    2014-05-22

    Copper is an essential element in many biological processes. The critical functions associated with copper have resulted from evolutionary harnessing of its potent redox activity. This same property also places copper in a unique role as a key modulator of cell signal transduction pathways. These pathways are the complex sequence of molecular interactions that drive all cellular mechanisms and are often associated with the interplay of key enzymes including kinases and phosphatases but also including intracellular changes in pools of smaller molecules. A growing body of evidence is beginning to delineate the how, when and where of copper-mediated control over cell signal transduction. This has been driven by research demonstrating critical changes to copper homeostasis in many disorders including cancer and neurodegeneration and therapeutic potential through control of disease-associated cell signalling changes by modulation of copper-protein interactions. This timely review brings together for the first time the diverse actions of copper as a key regulator of cell signalling pathways and discusses the potential strategies for controlling disease-associated signalling processes using copper modulators. It is hoped that this review will provide a valuable insight into copper as a key signal regulator and stimulate further research to promote our understanding of copper in disease and therapy.

  4. Planar Cell Polarity Pathway Regulates Nephrin Endocytosis in Developing Podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Babayeva, Sima; Rocque, Brittany; Aoudjit, Lamine; Zilber, Yulia; Li, Jane; Baldwin, Cindy; Kawachi, Hiroshi; Takano, Tomoko; Torban, Elena

    2013-01-01

    The noncanonical Wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway controls a variety of cell behaviors such as polarized protrusive cell activity, directional cell movement, and oriented cell division and is crucial for the normal development of many tissues. Mutations in the PCP genes cause malformation in multiple organs. Recently, the PCP pathway was shown to control endocytosis of PCP and non-PCP proteins necessary for cell shape remodeling and formation of specific junctional protein complexes. During formation of the renal glomerulus, the glomerular capillary becomes enveloped by highly specialized epithelial cells, podocytes, that display unique architecture and are connected via specialized cell-cell junctions (slit diaphragms) that restrict passage of protein into the urine; podocyte differentiation requires active remodeling of cytoskeleton and junctional protein complexes. We report here that in cultured human podocytes, activation of the PCP pathway significantly stimulates endocytosis of the core slit diaphragm protein, nephrin, via a clathrin/β-arrestin-dependent endocytic route. In contrast, depletion of the PCP protein Vangl2 leads to an increase of nephrin at the cell surface; loss of Vangl2 functions in Looptail mice results in disturbed glomerular maturation. We propose that the PCP pathway contributes to podocyte development by regulating nephrin turnover during junctional remodeling as the cells differentiate. PMID:23824190

  5. Autopalmitoylation of TEAD Proteins Regulates Transcriptional Output of Hippo Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chan, PuiYee; Han, Xiao; Zheng, Baohui; DeRan, Michael; Yu, Jianzhong; Jarugumilli, Gopala K.; Deng, Hua; Pan, Duojia; Luo, Xuelian; Wu, Xu

    2016-01-01

    TEA domain (TEAD) transcription factors bind to the co-activator YAP/TAZ, and regulate the transcriptional output of Hippo pathway, playing critical roles in organ size control and tumorigenesis. Protein S-palmitoylation attaches fatty acid (palmitate) to cysteine residues, and regulates protein trafficking, membrane localization and signaling activities. Using activity-based chemical probes, we discovered that human TEADs possess intrinsic palmitoylating enzyme-like activities, and undergo autopalmitoylation at evolutionarily conserved cysteine residues under physiological conditions. We determined the crystal structures of lipid-bound TEADs, and found that the lipid chain of palmitate inserts into a conserved deep hydrophobic pocket. Strikingly, palmitoylation is required for TEAD’s binding to YAP/TAZ, but dispensable for the binding to Vgll4 tumor suppressor. In addition, palmitoylation does not alter TEAD’s localization. Moreover, TEAD palmitoylation-deficient mutants impaired TAZ-mediated muscle differentiation in vitro, and Yorkie-mediated tissue overgrowth in Drosophila in vivo. Our study directly linked autopalmitoylation to the transcriptional regulation of Hippo pathway. PMID:26900866

  6. SEPT4 is regulated by the Notch signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenbin

    2012-04-01

    Notch receptor-mediated signaling is an evolutionarily conserved pathway that regulates diverse developmental processes and its dysregulation has been implicated in a variety of developmental disorders and cancers. Notch functions in these processes by activating expression of its target genes. Septin 4 (SEPT4) is a polymerizing GTP-binding protein that serves as scaffold for diverse molecules and is involved in cell proliferation and apoptosis. After activation of the Notch signal, the expression of SEPT4 is up-regulated and cell proliferation is inhibited. When the Notch signal is inhibited by the CSL (CBF1/Su(H)/Lag-1)-binding-domain-negative Mastermind-like protein 1, the expression of SEPT4 is down-regulated, proliferation and colony formation of cells are promoted, but cell adhesion ability is decreased. Nevertheless, the SEPT4 expression is not affected after knock-down of CSL. Meanwhile, if SEPT4 activity is inhibited through RNA interference, the protein level and activity of NOTCH1 remains unchanged, but cell proliferation is dysregulated. This indicates that SEPT4 is a Notch target gene. This relationship between Notch signaling pathway and SEPT4 offers a potential basis for further study of developmental control and carcinogenesis. PMID:21938432

  7. Crossover localisation is regulated by the neddylation posttranslational regulatory pathway.

    PubMed

    Jahns, Marina Tagliaro; Vezon, Daniel; Chambon, Aurélie; Pereira, Lucie; Falque, Matthieu; Martin, Olivier C; Chelysheva, Liudmila; Grelon, Mathilde

    2014-08-01

    Crossovers (COs) are at the origin of genetic variability, occurring across successive generations, and they are also essential for the correct segregation of chromosomes during meiosis. Their number and position are precisely controlled, however the mechanisms underlying these controls are poorly understood. Neddylation/rubylation is a regulatory pathway of posttranslational protein modification that is required for numerous cellular processes in eukaryotes, but has not yet been linked to homologous recombination. In a screen for meiotic recombination-defective mutants, we identified several axr1 alleles, disrupting the gene encoding the E1 enzyme of the neddylation complex in Arabidopsis. Using genetic and cytological approaches we found that axr1 mutants are characterised by a shortage in bivalent formation correlated with strong synapsis defects. We determined that the bivalent shortage in axr1 is not due to a general decrease in CO formation but rather due to a mislocalisation of class I COs. In axr1, as in wild type, COs are still under the control of the ZMM group of proteins. However, in contrast to wild type, they tend to cluster together and no longer follow the obligatory CO rule. Lastly, we showed that this deregulation of CO localisation is likely to be mediated by the activity of a cullin 4 RING ligase, known to be involved in DNA damage sensing during somatic DNA repair and mouse spermatogenesis. In conclusion, we provide evidence that the neddylation/rubylation pathway of protein modification is a key regulator of meiotic recombination. We propose that rather than regulating the number of recombination events, this pathway regulates their localisation, through the activation of cullin 4 RING ligase complexes. Possible targets for these ligases are discussed. PMID:25116939

  8. Crossover Localisation Is Regulated by the Neddylation Posttranslational Regulatory Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jahns, Marina Tagliaro; Vezon, Daniel; Chambon, Aurélie; Pereira, Lucie; Falque, Matthieu; Martin, Olivier C.; Chelysheva, Liudmila; Grelon, Mathilde

    2014-01-01

    Crossovers (COs) are at the origin of genetic variability, occurring across successive generations, and they are also essential for the correct segregation of chromosomes during meiosis. Their number and position are precisely controlled, however the mechanisms underlying these controls are poorly understood. Neddylation/rubylation is a regulatory pathway of posttranslational protein modification that is required for numerous cellular processes in eukaryotes, but has not yet been linked to homologous recombination. In a screen for meiotic recombination-defective mutants, we identified several axr1 alleles, disrupting the gene encoding the E1 enzyme of the neddylation complex in Arabidopsis. Using genetic and cytological approaches we found that axr1 mutants are characterised by a shortage in bivalent formation correlated with strong synapsis defects. We determined that the bivalent shortage in axr1 is not due to a general decrease in CO formation but rather due to a mislocalisation of class I COs. In axr1, as in wild type, COs are still under the control of the ZMM group of proteins. However, in contrast to wild type, they tend to cluster together and no longer follow the obligatory CO rule. Lastly, we showed that this deregulation of CO localisation is likely to be mediated by the activity of a cullin 4 RING ligase, known to be involved in DNA damage sensing during somatic DNA repair and mouse spermatogenesis. In conclusion, we provide evidence that the neddylation/rubylation pathway of protein modification is a key regulator of meiotic recombination. We propose that rather than regulating the number of recombination events, this pathway regulates their localisation, through the activation of cullin 4 RING ligase complexes. Possible targets for these ligases are discussed. PMID:25116939

  9. Crossover localisation is regulated by the neddylation posttranslational regulatory pathway.

    PubMed

    Jahns, Marina Tagliaro; Vezon, Daniel; Chambon, Aurélie; Pereira, Lucie; Falque, Matthieu; Martin, Olivier C; Chelysheva, Liudmila; Grelon, Mathilde

    2014-08-01

    Crossovers (COs) are at the origin of genetic variability, occurring across successive generations, and they are also essential for the correct segregation of chromosomes during meiosis. Their number and position are precisely controlled, however the mechanisms underlying these controls are poorly understood. Neddylation/rubylation is a regulatory pathway of posttranslational protein modification that is required for numerous cellular processes in eukaryotes, but has not yet been linked to homologous recombination. In a screen for meiotic recombination-defective mutants, we identified several axr1 alleles, disrupting the gene encoding the E1 enzyme of the neddylation complex in Arabidopsis. Using genetic and cytological approaches we found that axr1 mutants are characterised by a shortage in bivalent formation correlated with strong synapsis defects. We determined that the bivalent shortage in axr1 is not due to a general decrease in CO formation but rather due to a mislocalisation of class I COs. In axr1, as in wild type, COs are still under the control of the ZMM group of proteins. However, in contrast to wild type, they tend to cluster together and no longer follow the obligatory CO rule. Lastly, we showed that this deregulation of CO localisation is likely to be mediated by the activity of a cullin 4 RING ligase, known to be involved in DNA damage sensing during somatic DNA repair and mouse spermatogenesis. In conclusion, we provide evidence that the neddylation/rubylation pathway of protein modification is a key regulator of meiotic recombination. We propose that rather than regulating the number of recombination events, this pathway regulates their localisation, through the activation of cullin 4 RING ligase complexes. Possible targets for these ligases are discussed.

  10. Regulation of ribosomal DNA amplification by the TOR pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jack, Carmen V.; Cruz, Cristina; Hull, Ryan M.; Keller, Markus A.; Ralser, Markus; Houseley, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Repeated regions are widespread in eukaryotic genomes, and key functional elements such as the ribosomal DNA tend to be formed of high copy repeated sequences organized in tandem arrays. In general, high copy repeats are remarkably stable, but a number of organisms display rapid ribosomal DNA amplification at specific times or under specific conditions. Here we demonstrate that target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling stimulates ribosomal DNA amplification in budding yeast, linking external nutrient availability to ribosomal DNA copy number. We show that ribosomal DNA amplification is regulated by three histone deacetylases: Sir2, Hst3, and Hst4. These enzymes control homologous recombination-dependent and nonhomologous recombination-dependent amplification pathways that act in concert to mediate rapid, directional ribosomal DNA copy number change. Amplification is completely repressed by rapamycin, an inhibitor of the nutrient-responsive TOR pathway; this effect is separable from growth rate and is mediated directly through Sir2, Hst3, and Hst4. Caloric restriction is known to up-regulate expression of nicotinamidase Pnc1, an enzyme that enhances Sir2, Hst3, and Hst4 activity. In contrast, normal glucose concentrations stretch the ribosome synthesis capacity of cells with low ribosomal DNA copy number, and we find that these cells show a previously unrecognized transcriptional response to caloric excess by reducing PNC1 expression. PNC1 down-regulation forms a key element in the control of ribosomal DNA amplification as overexpression of PNC1 substantially reduces ribosomal DNA amplification rate. Our results reveal how a signaling pathway can orchestrate specific genome changes and demonstrate that the copy number of repetitive DNA can be altered to suit environmental conditions. PMID:26195783

  11. Regulation of ribosomal DNA amplification by the TOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Jack, Carmen V; Cruz, Cristina; Hull, Ryan M; Keller, Markus A; Ralser, Markus; Houseley, Jonathan

    2015-08-01

    Repeated regions are widespread in eukaryotic genomes, and key functional elements such as the ribosomal DNA tend to be formed of high copy repeated sequences organized in tandem arrays. In general, high copy repeats are remarkably stable, but a number of organisms display rapid ribosomal DNA amplification at specific times or under specific conditions. Here we demonstrate that target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling stimulates ribosomal DNA amplification in budding yeast, linking external nutrient availability to ribosomal DNA copy number. We show that ribosomal DNA amplification is regulated by three histone deacetylases: Sir2, Hst3, and Hst4. These enzymes control homologous recombination-dependent and nonhomologous recombination-dependent amplification pathways that act in concert to mediate rapid, directional ribosomal DNA copy number change. Amplification is completely repressed by rapamycin, an inhibitor of the nutrient-responsive TOR pathway; this effect is separable from growth rate and is mediated directly through Sir2, Hst3, and Hst4. Caloric restriction is known to up-regulate expression of nicotinamidase Pnc1, an enzyme that enhances Sir2, Hst3, and Hst4 activity. In contrast, normal glucose concentrations stretch the ribosome synthesis capacity of cells with low ribosomal DNA copy number, and we find that these cells show a previously unrecognized transcriptional response to caloric excess by reducing PNC1 expression. PNC1 down-regulation forms a key element in the control of ribosomal DNA amplification as overexpression of PNC1 substantially reduces ribosomal DNA amplification rate. Our results reveal how a signaling pathway can orchestrate specific genome changes and demonstrate that the copy number of repetitive DNA can be altered to suit environmental conditions.

  12. The Pentose Phosphate Pathway Regulates the Circadian Clock.

    PubMed

    Rey, Guillaume; Valekunja, Utham K; Feeney, Kevin A; Wulund, Lisa; Milev, Nikolay B; Stangherlin, Alessandra; Ansel-Bollepalli, Laura; Velagapudi, Vidya; O'Neill, John S; Reddy, Akhilesh B

    2016-09-13

    The circadian clock is a ubiquitous timekeeping system that organizes the behavior and physiology of organisms over the day and night. Current models rely on transcriptional networks that coordinate circadian gene expression of thousands of transcripts. However, recent studies have uncovered phylogenetically conserved redox rhythms that can occur independently of transcriptional cycles. Here we identify the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), a critical source of the redox cofactor NADPH, as an important regulator of redox and transcriptional oscillations. Our results show that genetic and pharmacological inhibition of the PPP prolongs the period of circadian rhythms in human cells, mouse tissues, and fruit flies. These metabolic manipulations also cause a remodeling of circadian gene expression programs that involves the circadian transcription factors BMAL1 and CLOCK, and the redox-sensitive transcription factor NRF2. Thus, the PPP regulates circadian rhythms via NADPH metabolism, suggesting a pivotal role for NADPH availability in circadian timekeeping.

  13. Metabolic control of signalling pathways and metabolic auto-regulation.

    PubMed

    Lorendeau, Doriane; Christen, Stefan; Rinaldi, Gianmarco; Fendt, Sarah-Maria

    2015-08-01

    Metabolic alterations have emerged as an important hallmark in the development of various diseases. Thus, understanding the complex interplay of metabolism with other cellular processes such as cell signalling is critical to rationally control and modulate cellular physiology. Here, we review in the context of mammalian target of rapamycin, AMP-activated protein kinase and p53, the orchestrated interplay between metabolism and cellular signalling as well as transcriptional regulation. Moreover, we discuss recent discoveries in auto-regulation of metabolism (i.e. how metabolic parameters such as metabolite levels activate or inhibit enzymes and thus metabolic pathways). Finally, we review functional consequences of post-translational modification on metabolic enzyme abundance and/or activities.

  14. Bioinformatic dissecting of TP53 regulation pathway underlying butyrate-induced histone modification in epigenetic regulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butyrate affects cell proliferation, differentiation and motility. Butyrate inhibits histone deacetylase (HDAC) activities and induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. TP53 is one of the most active upstream regulators discovered by IPA in our RNA sequencing data set. The TP53 signaling pathway pl...

  15. Regulation of the MAPK pathway by raf kinase inhibitory protein.

    PubMed

    Vandamme, Drieke; Herrero, Ana; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Kolch, Walter

    2014-01-01

    The Raf kinase inhibitor protein 1 (RKIP-1) was the first reported endogenous inhibitor of Raf-1-MEK-ERK/MAPK cascade, by interfering with the phosphorylation of MEK by Raf-1. However, RKIP's functions related to the MAPK signaling are far more complex. Newer data indicate that by modulating different protein-protein interactions, RKIP is involved in fine-tuning cell signaling, modulating ERK dynamics, and regulating cross talk between different pathways. Here, we describe the molecular mechanisms by which RKIP controls MAPK signaling at different levels and vice versa and its regulation via feedback phosphorylation. We also focus on several discrepancies and questions that remain, such as the RKIP binding regulation by Raf-1 N-region phosphorylation, the possible B-Raf inhibition, and the effects of RKIP-lipid binding. We also describe how RKIP's role as key signaling modulator of many cell fate decisions leads to the fact that fine control of RKIP activity and regulation is crucial to avoid pathological processes, such as metastasis, pulmonary arterial hypertension, and heart failure.

  16. Identification of a neurovascular signaling pathway regulating seizures in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fredriksson, Linda; Stevenson, Tamara K; Su, Enming J; Ragsdale, Margaret; Moore, Shannon; Craciun, Stefan; Schielke, Gerald P; Murphy, Geoffrey G; Lawrence, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    Objective A growing body of evidence suggests that increased blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability can contribute to the development of seizures. The protease tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) has been shown to promote BBB permeability and susceptibility to seizures. In this study, we examined the pathway regulated by tPA in seizures. Methods An experimental model of kainate-induced seizures was used in genetically modified mice, including mice deficient in tPA (tPA−/−), its inhibitor neuroserpin (Nsp−/−), or both (Nsp:tPA−/−), and in mice conditionally deficient in the platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRα). Results Compared to wild-type (WT) mice, Nsp−/− mice have significantly reduced latency to seizure onset and generalization; whereas tPA−/− mice have the opposite phenotype, as do Nsp:tPA−/− mice. Furthermore, interventions that maintain BBB integrity delay seizure propagation, whereas osmotic disruption of the BBB in seizure-resistant tPA−/− mice dramatically reduces the time to seizure onset and accelerates seizure progression. The phenotypic differences in seizure progression between WT, tPA−/−, and Nsp−/− mice are also observed in electroencephalogram recordings in vivo, but absent in ex vivo electrophysiological recordings where regulation of the BBB is no longer necessary to maintain the extracellular environment. Finally, we demonstrate that these effects on seizure progression are mediated through signaling by PDGFRα on perivascular astrocytes. Interpretation Together, these data identify a specific molecular pathway involving tPA-mediated PDGFRα signaling in perivascular astrocytes that regulates seizure progression through control of the BBB. Inhibition of PDGFRα signaling and maintenance of BBB integrity might therefore offer a novel clinical approach for managing seizures. PMID:26273685

  17. Tubedown regulation of retinal endothelial permeability signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Nhu; Gendron, Robert L.; Grozinger, Kindra; Whelan, Maria A.; Hicks, Emily Anne; Tennakoon, Bimal; Gardiner, Danielle; Good, William V.; Paradis, Hélène

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tubedown (Tbdn; Naa15), a subunit of the N-terminal acetyltransferase NatA, complexes with the c-Src substrate Cortactin and supports adult retinal homeostasis through regulation of vascular permeability. Here we investigate the role of Tbdn expression on signaling components of retinal endothelial permeability to understand how Tbdn regulates the vasculature and supports retinal homeostasis. Tbdn knockdown-induced hyperpermeability to Albumin in retinal endothelial cells was associated with an increase in the levels of activation of the Src family kinases (SFK) c-Src, Fyn and Lyn and phospho-Cortactin (Tyr421). The knockdown of Cortactin expression reduced Tbdn knockdown-induced permeability to Albumin and the levels of activated SFK. Inhibition of SFK in retinal endothelial cells decreased Tbdn knockdown-induced permeability to Albumin and phospho-Cortactin (Tyr421) levels. Retinal lesions of endothelial-specific Tbdn knockdown mice, with tissue thickening, fibrovascular growth, and hyperpermeable vessels displayed an increase in the levels of activated c-Src. Moreover, the retinal lesions of patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) associated with a loss of Tbdn expression and hyperpermeability to Albumin displayed increased levels of activated SFK in retinal blood vessels. Taken together, these results implicate Tbdn as an important regulator of retinal endothelial permeability and homeostasis by modulating a signaling pathway involving c-Src and Cortactin. PMID:26142315

  18. SIRT1 regulates MAPK pathways in vitiligo skin: insight into the molecular pathways of cell survival.

    PubMed

    Becatti, Matteo; Fiorillo, Claudia; Barygina, Victoria; Cecchi, Cristina; Lotti, Torello; Prignano, Francesca; Silvestro, Agrippino; Nassi, Paolo; Taddei, Niccolò

    2014-03-01

    Vitiligo is an acquired and progressive hypomelanotic disease that manifests as circumscribed depigmented patches on the skin. The aetiology of vitiligo remains unclear, but recent experimental data underline the interactions between melanocytes and other typical skin cells, particularly keratinocytes. Our previous results indicate that keratinocytes from perilesional skin show the features of damaged cells. Sirtuins (silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog) 1, well-known modulators of lifespan in many species, have a role in gene repression, metabolic control, apoptosis and cell survival, DNA repair, development, inflammation, neuroprotection and healthy ageing. In the literature there is no evidence for SIRT1 signalling in vitiligo and its possible involvement in disease progression. Here, biopsies were taken from the perilesional skin of 16 patients suffering from non-segmental vitiligo and SIRT1 signalling was investigated in these cells. For the first time, a new SIRT1/Akt, also known as Protein Kinase B (PKB)/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling has been revealed in vitiligo. SIRT1 regulates MAPK pathway via Akt-apoptosis signal-regulating kinase-1 and down-regulates pro-apoptotic molecules, leading to decreased oxidative stress and apoptotic cell death in perilesional vitiligo keratinocytes. We therefore propose SIRT1 activation as a novel way of protecting perilesional vitiligo keratinocytes from damage.

  19. SIRT1 regulates MAPK pathways in vitiligo skin: insight into the molecular pathways of cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Becatti, Matteo; Fiorillo, Claudia; Barygina, Victoria; Cecchi, Cristina; Lotti, Torello; Prignano, Francesca; Silvestro, Agrippino; Nassi, Paolo; Taddei, Niccolò

    2014-01-01

    Vitiligo is an acquired and progressive hypomelanotic disease that manifests as circumscribed depigmented patches on the skin. The aetiology of vitiligo remains unclear, but recent experimental data underline the interactions between melanocytes and other typical skin cells, particularly keratinocytes. Our previous results indicate that keratinocytes from perilesional skin show the features of damaged cells. Sirtuins (silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog) 1, well-known modulators of lifespan in many species, have a role in gene repression, metabolic control, apoptosis and cell survival, DNA repair, development, inflammation, neuroprotection and healthy ageing. In the literature there is no evidence for SIRT1 signalling in vitiligo and its possible involvement in disease progression. Here, biopsies were taken from the perilesional skin of 16 patients suffering from non-segmental vitiligo and SIRT1 signalling was investigated in these cells. For the first time, a new SIRT1/Akt, also known as Protein Kinase B (PKB)/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling has been revealed in vitiligo. SIRT1 regulates MAPK pathway via Akt-apoptosis signal-regulating kinase-1 and down-regulates pro-apoptotic molecules, leading to decreased oxidative stress and apoptotic cell death in perilesional vitiligo keratinocytes. We therefore propose SIRT1 activation as a novel way of protecting perilesional vitiligo keratinocytes from damage. PMID:24410795

  20. Compartmentalization and Regulation of Sulfate Assimilation Pathways in Plants.

    PubMed

    Bohrer, A-S; Takahashi, H

    2016-01-01

    Plants utilize sulfate to synthesize primary and secondary sulfur-containing metabolites required for growth and survival in the environment. Sulfate is taken up into roots from the soil and distributed to various organs through the functions of membrane-bound sulfate transporters, while it is utilized as the primary substrate for synthesizing sulfur-containing metabolites in the sulfate assimilation pathways. Transporters and enzymes for the assimilative conversion of sulfate are regulated in highly organized manners depending on changes in sulfate supply from the environment and demand for biosynthesis of reduced sulfur compounds in the plant systems. Over the past few decades, the effect of sulfur nutrition on gene expression of sulfate transporters and assimilatory enzymes has been extensively studied with the aim of understanding the full landscape of regulatory networks. PMID:27572125

  1. TOR and RAS pathways regulate desiccation tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Aaron Z.; Gibney, Patrick A.; Botstein, David; Koshland, Douglas E.

    2013-01-01

    Tolerance to desiccation in cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is inducible; only one in a million cells from an exponential culture survive desiccation compared with one in five cells in stationary phase. Here we exploit the desiccation sensitivity of exponentially dividing cells to understand the stresses imposed by desiccation and their stress response pathways. We found that induction of desiccation tolerance is cell autonomous and that there is an inverse correlation between desiccation tolerance and growth rate in glucose-, ammonia-, or phosphate-limited continuous cultures. A transient heat shock induces a 5000–fold increase in desiccation tolerance, whereas hyper-ionic, -reductive, -oxidative, or -osmotic stress induced much less. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the Sch9p-regulated branch of the TOR and Ras-cAMP pathway inhibits desiccation tolerance by inhibiting the stress response transcription factors Gis1p, Msn2p, and Msn4p and by activating Sfp1p, a ribosome biogenesis transcription factor. Among 41 mutants defective in ribosome biogenesis, a subset defective in 60S showed a dramatic increase in desiccation tolerance independent of growth rate. We suggest that reduction of a specific intermediate in 60S biogenesis, resulting from conditions such as heat shock and nutrient deprivation, increases desiccation tolerance. PMID:23171550

  2. Cyclic AMP signalling pathways in the regulation of uterine relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Wei; López Bernal, Andrés

    2007-01-01

    Studying the mechanism(s) of uterine relaxation is important and will be helpful in the prevention of obstetric difficulties such as preterm labour, which remains a major cause of perinatal mortality and morbidity. Multiple signalling pathways regulate the balance between maintaining relative uterine quiescence during gestation, and the transition to the contractile state at the onset of parturition. Elevation of intracellular cyclic AMP promotes myometrial relaxation, and thus quiescence, via effects on multiple intracellular targets including calcium channels, potassium channels and myosin light chain kinase. A complete understanding of cAMP regulatory pathways (synthesis and hydrolysis) would assist in the development of better tocolytics to delay or inhibit preterm labour. Here we review the enzymes involved in cAMP homoeostasis (adenylyl cyclases and phosphodiesterases) and possible myometrial substrates for the cAMP dependent protein kinase. We must emphasise the need to identify novel pharmacological targets in human pregnant myometrium to achieve safe and selective uterine relaxation when this is indicated in preterm labour or other obstetric complications. PMID:17570154

  3. Cross-regulation of signaling pathways: An example of nuclear hormone receptors and the canonical Wnt pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Beildeck, Marcy E.; Gelmann, Edward P.; Byers, Stephen W.

    2010-07-01

    Predicting the potential physiological outcome(s) of any given molecular pathway is complex because of cross-talk with other pathways. This is particularly evident in the case of the nuclear hormone receptor and canonical Wnt pathways, which regulate cell growth and proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and metastatic potential in numerous tissues. These pathways are known to intersect at many levels: in the intracellular space, at the membrane, in the cytoplasm, and within the nucleus. The outcomes of these interactions are important in the control of stem cell differentiation and maintenance, feedback loops, and regulating oncogenic potential. The aim of this review is to demonstrate the importance of considering pathway cross-talk when predicting functional outcomes of signaling, using nuclear hormone receptor/canonical Wnt pathway cross-talk as an example.

  4. The calcineurin-NFAT pathway negatively regulates megakaryopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Zaslavsky, Alexander; Chou, Stella T; Schadler, Keri; Lieberman, Allyson; Pimkin, Maxim; Kim, Yeo Jung; Baek, Kwan-Hyuck; Aird, William C; Weiss, Mitchell J; Ryeom, Sandra

    2013-04-18

    The calcium regulated calcineurin-nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) pathway modulates the physiology of numerous cell types, including hematopoietic. Upon activation, calcineurin dephosphorylates NFAT family transcription factors, triggering their nuclear entry and activation or repression of target genes. NFATc1 and c2 isoforms are expressed in megakaryocytes. Moreover, human chromosome 21 (Hsa21) encodes several negative regulators of calcineurin-NFAT, candidates in the pathogenesis of Down syndrome (trisomy 21)-associated transient myeloproliferative disorder and acute megakaryoblastic leukemia. To investigate the role of calcineurin-NFAT in megakaryopoiesis, we examined wild-type mice treated with the calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporin A and transgenic mice expressing a targeted single extra copy of Dscr1, an Hsa21-encoded calcineurin inhibitor. Both murine models exhibited thrombocytosis with increased megakaryocytes and megakaryocyte progenitors. Pharmacological or genetic inhibition of calcineurin in mice caused accumulation of megakaryocytes exhibiting enhanced 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine uptake and increased expression of messenger RNAs encoding CDK4 and G1 cyclins, which promote cell division. Additionally, human megakaryocytes with trisomy 21 show increased proliferation and decreased NFAT activation compared with euploid controls. Our data indicate that inhibition of calcineurin-NFAT drives proliferation of megakaryocyte precursors by de-repressing genes that drive cell division, providing insights into mechanisms of normal megakaryopoiesis and megakaryocytic abnormalities that accompany Down syndrome.

  5. Biochemical pathways analysis of microarray results: regulation of myogenesis in pigs

    PubMed Central

    te Pas, Marinus FW; Hulsegge, Ina; Coster, Albart; Pool, Marco H; Heuven, Henri H; Janss, Luc LG

    2007-01-01

    Background Combining microarray results and biological pathway information will add insight into biological processes. Pathway information is widely available in databases through the internet. Mammalian muscle formation has been previously studied using microarray technology in pigs because these animals are an interesting animal model for muscle formation due to selection for increased muscle mass. Results indicated regulation of the expression of genes involved in proliferation and differentiation of myoblasts, and energy metabolism. The aim of the present study was to analyse microarrays studying myogenesis in pigs. It was necessary to develop methods to search biochemical pathways databases. Results PERL scripts were developed that used the names of the genes on the microarray to search databases. Synonyms of gene names were added to the list by searching the Gene Ontology database. The KEGG database was searched for pathway information using this updated gene list. The KEGG database returned 88 pathways. Most genes were found in a single pathway, but others were found in up to seven pathways. Combining the pathways and the microarray information 21 pathways showed sufficient information content for further analysis. These pathways were related to regulation of several steps in myogenesis and energy metabolism. Pathways regulating myoblast proliferation and muscle fibre formation were described. Furthermore, two networks of pathways describing the formation of the myoblast cytoskeleton and regulation of the energy metabolism during myogenesis were presented. Conclusion Combining microarray results and pathways information available through the internet provide biological insight in how the process of porcine myogenesis is regulated. PMID:17567520

  6. From tyrosine to melanin: Signaling pathways and factors regulating melanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rzepka, Zuzanna; Buszman, Ewa; Beberok, Artur; Wrześniok, Dorota

    2016-01-01

    Melanins are natural pigments of skin, hair and eyes and can be classified into two main types: brown to black eumelanin and yellow to reddish-brown pheomelanin. Biosynthesis of melanins takes place in melanosomes, which are specialized cytoplasmic organelles of melanocytes - dendritic cells located in the basal layer of the epidermis, uveal tract of the eye, hair follicles, as well as in the inner ear, central nervous system and heart. Melanogenesis is a multistep process and begins with the conversion of amino acid L-tyrosine to DOPAquinone. The addition of cysteine or glutathione to DOPAquinone leads to the intermediates formation, followed by subsequent transformations and polymerization to the final product, pheomelanin. In the absence of thiol compounds DOPAquinone undergoes an intramolecular cyclization and oxidation to form DOPAchrome, which is then converted to 5,6-dihydroksyindole (DHI) or 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid (DHICA). Eumelanin is formed by polymerization of DHI and DHICA and their quinones. Regulation of melanogenesis is achieved by physical and biochemical factors. The article presents the intracellular signaling pathways: cAMP/PKA/CREB/MITF cascade, MAP kinases cascade, PLC/DAG/PKCβ cascade and NO/cGMP/PKG cascade, which are involved in the regulation of expression and activity of the melanogenesis-related proteins by ultraviolet radiation and endogenous agents (cytokines, hormones). Activity of the key melanogenic enzyme, tyrosinase, is also affected by pH and temperature. Many pharmacologically active substances are able to inhibit or stimulate melanin biosynthesis, as evidenced by in vitro studies on cultured pigment cells. PMID:27356601

  7. Runx2/DICER/miRNA Pathway in Regulating Osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Leilei; Tu, Qisheng; Meng, Shu; Zhang, Lan; Yu, Liming; Song, Jinlin; Hu, Yun; Sui, Lei; Zhang, Jin; Dard, Michel; Cheng, Jessica; Murray, Dana; Tang, Yin; Lian, Jane B; Stein, Gary S; Chen, Jake

    2017-01-01

    DICER is the central enzyme that cleaves precursor microRNAs (miRNAs) into 21-25 nucleotide duplex in cell lineage differentiation, identity, and survival. In the current study, we characterized the specific bone metabolism genes and corresponding miRNAs and found that DICER and Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) expressions increased simultaneously during osteogenic differentiation. Luciferase assay showed that Runx2 significantly increased the expression levels of DICER luciferase promoter reporter. Our analysis also revealed weaker DICER expression in embryos of Runx2 knock out mice (Runx2 -/-) compared with that of Runx2 +/- and Runx2 +/+ mice. We further established the calvarial bone critical-size defect (CSD) mouse model. The bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) transfected with siRNA targeting DICER were combined with silk scaffolds and transplanted into calvarial bone CSDs. Five weeks post-surgery, micro-CT analysis revealed impaired bone formation, and repairing in calvarial defects with the siRNA targeting DICER group. In conclusion, our results suggest that DICER is specifically regulated by osteogenic master gene Runx2 that binds to the DICER promoter. Consequently, DICER cleaves precursors of miR-335-5p and miR-17-92 cluster to form mature miRNAs, which target and decrease the Dickkopf-related protein 1 (DKK1), and proapoptotic factor BIM levels, respectively, leading to an enhanced Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. These intriguing results reveal a central mechanism underlying lineage-specific regulation by a Runx2/DICER/miRNAs cascade during osteogenic differentiation and bone development. Our study, also suggests a potential application of modulating DICER expression for bone tissue repair and regeneration. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 182-191, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Runx2/DICER/miRNA Pathway in Regulating Osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Leilei; Tu, Qisheng; Meng, Shu; Zhang, Lan; Yu, Liming; Song, Jinlin; Hu, Yun; Sui, Lei; Zhang, Jin; Dard, Michel; Cheng, Jessica; Murray, Dana; Tang, Yin; Lian, Jane B; Stein, Gary S; Chen, Jake

    2017-01-01

    DICER is the central enzyme that cleaves precursor microRNAs (miRNAs) into 21-25 nucleotide duplex in cell lineage differentiation, identity, and survival. In the current study, we characterized the specific bone metabolism genes and corresponding miRNAs and found that DICER and Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) expressions increased simultaneously during osteogenic differentiation. Luciferase assay showed that Runx2 significantly increased the expression levels of DICER luciferase promoter reporter. Our analysis also revealed weaker DICER expression in embryos of Runx2 knock out mice (Runx2 -/-) compared with that of Runx2 +/- and Runx2 +/+ mice. We further established the calvarial bone critical-size defect (CSD) mouse model. The bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) transfected with siRNA targeting DICER were combined with silk scaffolds and transplanted into calvarial bone CSDs. Five weeks post-surgery, micro-CT analysis revealed impaired bone formation, and repairing in calvarial defects with the siRNA targeting DICER group. In conclusion, our results suggest that DICER is specifically regulated by osteogenic master gene Runx2 that binds to the DICER promoter. Consequently, DICER cleaves precursors of miR-335-5p and miR-17-92 cluster to form mature miRNAs, which target and decrease the Dickkopf-related protein 1 (DKK1), and proapoptotic factor BIM levels, respectively, leading to an enhanced Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. These intriguing results reveal a central mechanism underlying lineage-specific regulation by a Runx2/DICER/miRNAs cascade during osteogenic differentiation and bone development. Our study, also suggests a potential application of modulating DICER expression for bone tissue repair and regeneration. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 182-191, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27064596

  9. A cyclic GMP-dependent signalling pathway regulates bacterial phytopathogenesis.

    PubMed

    An, Shi-Qi; Chin, Ko-Hsin; Febrer, Melanie; McCarthy, Yvonne; Yang, Jauo-Guey; Liu, Chung-Liang; Swarbreck, David; Rogers, Jane; Maxwell Dow, J; Chou, Shan-Ho; Ryan, Robert P

    2013-09-11

    Cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cyclic GMP) is a second messenger whose role in bacterial signalling is poorly understood. A genetic screen in the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris (Xcc) identified that XC_0250, which encodes a protein with a class III nucleotidyl cyclase domain, is required for cyclic GMP synthesis. Purified XC_0250 was active in cyclic GMP synthesis in vitro. The linked gene XC_0249 encodes a protein with a cyclic mononucleotide-binding (cNMP) domain and a GGDEF diguanylate cyclase domain. The activity of XC_0249 in cyclic di-GMP synthesis was enhanced by addition of cyclic GMP. The isolated cNMP domain of XC_0249 bound cyclic GMP and a structure-function analysis, directed by determination of the crystal structure of the holo-complex, demonstrated the site of cyclic GMP binding that modulates cyclic di-GMP synthesis. Mutation of either XC_0250 or XC_0249 led to a reduced virulence to plants and reduced biofilm formation in vitro. These findings describe a regulatory pathway in which cyclic GMP regulates virulence and biofilm formation through interaction with a novel effector that directly links cyclic GMP and cyclic di-GMP signalling.

  10. OASIS modulates hypoxia pathway activity to regulate bone angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Min; Kanemoto, Soshi; Cui, Xiang; Kaneko, Masayuki; Asada, Rie; Matsuhisa, Koji; Tanimoto, Keiji; Yoshimoto, Yuki; Shukunami, Chisa; Imaizumi, Kazunori

    2015-11-12

    OASIS/CREB3L1, an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident transcription factor, plays important roles in osteoblast differentiation. In this study, we identified new crosstalk between OASIS and the hypoxia signaling pathway, which regulates vascularization during bone development. RT-PCR and real-time PCR analyses revealed significant decreases in the expression levels of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) target genes such as vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) in OASIS-deficient (Oasis(-/-)) mouse embryonic fibroblasts. In coimmunoprecipitation experiments, the N-terminal fragment of OASIS (OASIS-N; activated form of OASIS) bound to HIF-1α through the bZIP domain. Luciferase assays showed that OASIS-N promoted the transcription activities of a reporter gene via a hypoxia-response element (HRE). Furthermore, the expression levels of an angiogenic factor Vegfa was decreased in Oasis(-/-) osteoblasts. Immunostaining and metatarsal angiogenesis assay showed retarded vascularization in bone tissue of Oasis(-/-) mice. These results suggest that OASIS affects the expression of HIF-1α target genes through the protein interaction with HIF-1α, and that OASIS-HIF-1α complexes may play essential roles in angiogenesis during bone development.

  11. OASIS modulates hypoxia pathway activity to regulate bone angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Min; Kanemoto, Soshi; Cui, Xiang; Kaneko, Masayuki; Asada, Rie; Matsuhisa, Koji; Tanimoto, Keiji; Yoshimoto, Yuki; Shukunami, Chisa; Imaizumi, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    OASIS/CREB3L1, an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident transcription factor, plays important roles in osteoblast differentiation. In this study, we identified new crosstalk between OASIS and the hypoxia signaling pathway, which regulates vascularization during bone development. RT-PCR and real-time PCR analyses revealed significant decreases in the expression levels of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) target genes such as vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) in OASIS-deficient (Oasis−/−) mouse embryonic fibroblasts. In coimmunoprecipitation experiments, the N-terminal fragment of OASIS (OASIS-N; activated form of OASIS) bound to HIF-1α through the bZIP domain. Luciferase assays showed that OASIS-N promoted the transcription activities of a reporter gene via a hypoxia-response element (HRE). Furthermore, the expression levels of an angiogenic factor Vegfa was decreased in Oasis−/− osteoblasts. Immunostaining and metatarsal angiogenesis assay showed retarded vascularization in bone tissue of Oasis−/− mice. These results suggest that OASIS affects the expression of HIF-1α target genes through the protein interaction with HIF-1α, and that OASIS-HIF-1α complexes may play essential roles in angiogenesis during bone development. PMID:26558437

  12. Rad51 Regulates Reprogramming Efficiency through DNA Repair Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae-Young; Kim, Dae-Kwan; Ko, Jeong-Jae; Kim, Keun Pil; Park, Kyung-Soon

    2016-01-01

    Rad51 is a key component of homologous recombination (HR) to repair DNA double-strand breaks and it forms Rad51 recombinase filaments of broken single-stranded DNA to promote HR. In addition to its role in DNA repair and cell cycle progression, Rad51 contributes to the reprogramming process during the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells. In light of this, we performed reprogramming experiments to examine the effect of co-expression of Rad51 and four reprogramming factors, Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc, on the reprogramming efficiency. Co-expression of Rad51 significantly increased the numbers of alkaline phosphatase-positive colonies and embryonic stem cell-like colonies during the process of reprogramming. Co-expression ofRad51 significantly increased the expression of epithelial markers at an early stage of reprogramming compared with control cells. Phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX), which initiates the DNA double-strand break repair system, was highly accumulated in reprogramming intermediates upon co-expression of Rad51. This study identified a novel role of Rad51 in enhancing the reprogramming efficiency, possibly by facilitating mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition and by regulating a DNA damage repair pathway during the early phase of the reprogramming process. PMID:27660832

  13. Trim69 regulates zebrafish brain development by ap-1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ruiqin; Wang, Renxian; Zhao, Qing; Han, Yongqing; Zong, Shudong; Miao, Shiying; Song, Wei; Wang, Linfang

    2016-01-01

    Proteins belonging to the TRIM family have been implicated in a variety of cellular processes such as apoptosis, differentiation, neurogenesis, muscular physiology and innate immune responses. Trim69, previously identified as a novel gene cloned from a human testis cDNA library, has a homologous gene in zebrafish and this study focused on investigating the function of trim69 in zebrafish neurogenesis. Trim69 was found to be expressed in zebrafish embryo brain at the early stages. Knockdown of trim69 led to deformed brain development, obvious signs of apoptosis present in the head, and decreased expression of neuronal differentiation and stem cell markers. This phenotype was rescued upon co-injection of human mRNA together along with the trim69 knockdown. Results of this study also showed an interaction between TRIM69 and c-Jun in human cells, and upon TRIM69 knock down c-Jun expression subsequently increased, whereas the over-expression of TRIM69 led to the down-regulation of c-Jun. Additionally, knockdown both c-Jun and trim69 can rescue the deformed brain, evident cellular apoptosis in the head and decreased expression of neuronal differentiation and stem cell markers. Overall, our results support a role for trim69 in the development of the zebrafish brain through ap-1 pathway. PMID:27050765

  14. Rad51 Regulates Reprogramming Efficiency through DNA Repair Pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Young; Kim, Dae-Kwan; Ko, Jeong-Jae; Kim, Keun Pil; Park, Kyung-Soon

    2016-06-01

    Rad51 is a key component of homologous recombination (HR) to repair DNA double-strand breaks and it forms Rad51 recombinase filaments of broken single-stranded DNA to promote HR. In addition to its role in DNA repair and cell cycle progression, Rad51 contributes to the reprogramming process during the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells. In light of this, we performed reprogramming experiments to examine the effect of co-expression of Rad51 and four reprogramming factors, Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc, on the reprogramming efficiency. Co-expression of Rad51 significantly increased the numbers of alkaline phosphatase-positive colonies and embryonic stem cell-like colonies during the process of reprogramming. Co-expression ofRad51 significantly increased the expression of epithelial markers at an early stage of reprogramming compared with control cells. Phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX), which initiates the DNA double-strand break repair system, was highly accumulated in reprogramming intermediates upon co-expression of Rad51. This study identified a novel role of Rad51 in enhancing the reprogramming efficiency, possibly by facilitating mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition and by regulating a DNA damage repair pathway during the early phase of the reprogramming process. PMID:27660832

  15. Cinnamon polyphenols regulate multiple metabolic pathways involved in intestinal lipid metabolism of primary small intestinal enterocytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasing evidence suggests that dietary factors may affect the expression of multiple genes and signaling pathways including those that regulate intestinal lipoprotein metabolism. The small intestine is actively involved in the regulation of dietary lipid absorption, intracellular transport and me...

  16. Dynamic optimization identifies optimal programmes for pathway regulation in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Bartl, Martin; Kötzing, Martin; Schuster, Stefan; Li, Pu; Kaleta, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    To survive in fluctuating environmental conditions, microorganisms must be able to quickly react to environmental challenges by upregulating the expression of genes encoding metabolic pathways. Here we show that protein abundance and protein synthesis capacity are key factors that determine the optimal strategy for the activation of a metabolic pathway. If protein abundance relative to protein synthesis capacity increases, the strategies shift from the simultaneous activation of all enzymes to the sequential activation of groups of enzymes and finally to a sequential activation of individual enzymes along the pathway. In the case of pathways with large differences in protein abundance, even more complex pathway activation strategies with a delayed activation of low abundance enzymes and an accelerated activation of high abundance enzymes are optimal. We confirm the existence of these pathway activation strategies as well as their dependence on our proposed constraints for a large number of metabolic pathways in several hundred prokaryotes.

  17. Dynamic regulation of genetic pathways and targets during aging in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Tao; Shao, Jiaofang; Ren, Xiaoliang; Zhao, Zhongying

    2014-01-01

    Numerous genetic targets and some individual pathways associated with aging have been identified using the worm model. However, less is known about the genetic mechanisms of aging in genome wide, particularly at the level of multiple pathways as well as the regulatory networks during aging. Here, we employed the gene expression datasets of three time points during aging in Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) and performed the approach of gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) on each dataset between adjacent stages. As a result, multiple genetic pathways and targets were identified as significantly down- or up-regulated. Among them, 5 truly aging-dependent signaling pathways including MAPK signaling pathway, mTOR signaling pathway, Wnt signaling pathway, TGF-beta signaling pathway and ErbB signaling pathway as well as 12 significantly associated genes were identified with dynamic expression pattern during aging. On the other hand, the continued declines in the regulation of several metabolic pathways have been demonstrated to display age-related changes. Furthermore, the reconstructed regulatory networks based on three of aging related Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments followed by sequencing (ChIP–seq) datasets and the expression matrices of 154 involved genes in above signaling pathways provide new insights into aging at the multiple pathways level. The combination of multiple genetic pathways and targets needs to be taken into consideration in future studies of aging, in which the dynamic regulation would be uncovered. PMID:24739375

  18. Dynamic regulation of genetic pathways and targets during aging in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    He, Kan; Zhou, Tao; Shao, Jiaofang; Ren, Xiaoliang; Zhao, Zhongying; Liu, Dahai

    2014-03-01

    Numerous genetic targets and some individual pathways associated with aging have been identified using the worm model. However, less is known about the genetic mechanisms of aging in genome wide, particularly at the level of multiple pathways as well as the regulatory networks during aging. Here, we employed the gene expression datasets of three time points during aging in Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) and performed the approach of gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) on each dataset between adjacent stages. As a result, multiple genetic pathways and targets were identified as significantly down- or up-regulated. Among them, 5 truly aging-dependent signaling pathways including MAPK signaling pathway, mTOR signaling pathway, Wnt signaling pathway, TGF-beta signaling pathway and ErbB signaling pathway as well as 12 significantly associated genes were identified with dynamic expression pattern during aging. On the other hand, the continued declines in the regulation of several metabolic pathways have been demonstrated to display age-related changes. Furthermore, the reconstructed regulatory networks based on three of aging related Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq) datasets and the expression matrices of 154 involved genes in above signaling pathways provide new insights into aging at the multiple pathways level. The combination of multiple genetic pathways and targets needs to be taken into consideration in future studies of aging, in which the dynamic regulation would be uncovered.

  19. Resveratrol Regulates Pathologic Angiogenesis by a Eukaryotic Elongation Factor-2 Kinase-Regulated Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Aslam A.; Dace, Dru S.; Ryazanov, Alexey G.; Kelly, Jennifer; Apte, Rajendra S.

    2010-01-01

    Abnormal angiogenesis is central to the pathophysiology of diverse disease processes including cancers, ischemic and atherosclerotic heart disease, and visually debilitating eye disease. Resveratrol is a naturally occurring phytoalexin that has been demonstrated to ameliorate and decelerate the aging process as well as blunt end organ damage from obesity. These effects of resveratrol are largely mediated by members of the sirtuin family of proteins. We demonstrate that resveratrol can inhibit pathological angiogenesis in vivo and in vitro by a sirtuin-independent pathway. Resveratrol inhibits the proliferation and migration of vascular endothelial cells by activating eukaryotic elongation factor-2 kinase. The active kinase in turn phosphorylates and inactivates elongation factor-2, a key mediator of ribosomal transfer and protein translation. Functional inhibition of the kinase by gene deletion in vivo or RNA as well as pharmacological inhibition in vitro is able to completely reverse the effects of resveratrol on blood vessel growth. These studies have identified a novel and critical pathway that promotes aberrant vascular proliferation and one that is amenable to modulation by pharmacological means. In addition, these results have uncovered a sirtuin-independent pathway by which resveratrol regulates angiogenesis. PMID:20472894

  20. Nrf2-driven TERT regulates pentose phosphate pathway in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, F; Dixit, D; Sharma, V; Kumar, A; Joshi, S D; Sarkar, C; Sen, E

    2016-05-05

    Given the involvement of telomerase activation and dysregulated metabolism in glioma progression, the connection between these two critical players was investigated. Pharmacological inhibition of human Telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) by Costunolide induced glioma cell apoptosis in a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent manner. Costunolide induced an ROS-dependent increase in p53 abrogated telomerase activity. Costunolide decreased Nrf2 level; and ectopic Nrf2 expression decreased Costunolide-induced ROS generation. While TERT knock-down abrogated Nrf2 levels, overexpression of Nrf2 increased TERT expression. Inhibition of hTERT either by Costunolide, or by siRNA or dominant-negative hTERT (DN-hTERT) abrogated (i) expression of Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and Transketolase (TKT) - two major nodes in the pentose phosphate (PPP) pathway; and (ii) phosphorylation of glycogen synthase (GS). hTERT knock-down decreased TKT activity and increased glycogen accumulation. Interestingly, siRNA-mediated knock-down of TKT elevated glycogen accumulation. Coherent with the in vitro findings, Costunolide reduced tumor burden in heterotypic xenograft glioma mouse model. Costunolide-treated tumors exhibited diminished TKT activity, heightened glycogen accumulation, and increased senescence. Importantly, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patient tumors bearing TERT promoter mutations (C228T and C250T) known to be associated with increased telomerase activity; exhibited elevated Nrf2 and TKT expression and decreased glycogen accumulation. Taken together, our findings highlight the previously unknown (i) role of telomerase in the regulation of PPP and glycogen accumulation and (ii) the involvement of Nrf2-TERT loop in maintaining oxidative defense responses in glioma cells.

  1. Nrf2-driven TERT regulates pentose phosphate pathway in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, F; Dixit, D; Sharma, V; Kumar, A; Joshi, S D; Sarkar, C; Sen, E

    2016-01-01

    Given the involvement of telomerase activation and dysregulated metabolism in glioma progression, the connection between these two critical players was investigated. Pharmacological inhibition of human Telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) by Costunolide induced glioma cell apoptosis in a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent manner. Costunolide induced an ROS-dependent increase in p53 abrogated telomerase activity. Costunolide decreased Nrf2 level; and ectopic Nrf2 expression decreased Costunolide-induced ROS generation. While TERT knock-down abrogated Nrf2 levels, overexpression of Nrf2 increased TERT expression. Inhibition of hTERT either by Costunolide, or by siRNA or dominant-negative hTERT (DN-hTERT) abrogated (i) expression of Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and Transketolase (TKT) – two major nodes in the pentose phosphate (PPP) pathway; and (ii) phosphorylation of glycogen synthase (GS). hTERT knock-down decreased TKT activity and increased glycogen accumulation. Interestingly, siRNA-mediated knock-down of TKT elevated glycogen accumulation. Coherent with the in vitro findings, Costunolide reduced tumor burden in heterotypic xenograft glioma mouse model. Costunolide-treated tumors exhibited diminished TKT activity, heightened glycogen accumulation, and increased senescence. Importantly, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patient tumors bearing TERT promoter mutations (C228T and C250T) known to be associated with increased telomerase activity; exhibited elevated Nrf2 and TKT expression and decreased glycogen accumulation. Taken together, our findings highlight the previously unknown (i) role of telomerase in the regulation of PPP and glycogen accumulation and (ii) the involvement of Nrf2-TERT loop in maintaining oxidative defense responses in glioma cells. PMID:27148686

  2. Intracellular pathways regulating ciliary beating of rat brain ependymal cells

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thien; Chin, Wei-Chun; O’Brien, Jennifer A; Verdugo, Pedro; Berger, Albert J

    2001-01-01

    The mammalian brain ventricles are lined with ciliated ependymal cells. As yet little is known about the mechanisms by which neurotransmitters regulate cilia beat frequency (CBF). Application of 5-HT to ependymal cells in cultured rat brainstem slices caused CBF to increase. 5-HT had an EC50 of 30 μM and at 100 μM attained a near-maximal CBF increase of 52.7 ± 4.1 % (mean ± s.d.) (n= 8). Bathing slices in Ca2+-free solution markedly reduced the 5-HT-mediated increase in CBF. Fluorescence measurements revealed that 5-HT caused a marked transient elevation in cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]c) that then slowly decreased to a plateau level. Analysis showed that the [Ca2+]c transient was due to release of Ca2+ from inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-sensitive stores; the plateau was probably due to extracellular Ca2+ influx through Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels. Application of ATP caused a sustained decrease in CBF. ATP had an EC50 of about 50 μM and 100 μM ATP resulted in a maximal 57.5 ± 6.5 % (n= 12) decrease in CBF. The ATP-induced decrease in CBF was unaffected by lowering extracellular [Ca2+], and no changes in [Ca2+]c were observed. Exposure of ependymal cells to forskolin caused a decrease in CBF. Ciliated ependymal cells loaded with caged cAMP exhibited a 54.3 ± 7.5 % (n= 9) decrease in CBF following uncaging. These results suggest that ATP reduces CBF by a Ca2+-independent cAMP-mediated pathway. Application of 5-HT and adenosine-5′-O-3-thiotriphosphate (ATP-γ-S) to acutely isolated ciliated ependymal cells resulted in CBF responses similar to those of ependymal cells in cultured slices suggesting that these neurotransmitters act directly on these cells. The opposite response of ciliated ependymal cells to 5-HT and ATP provides a novel mechanism for their active involvement in central nervous system signalling. PMID:11179397

  3. Logical Analysis of Regulation of Interleukin-12 Expression Pathway Regulation During HCV Infection.

    PubMed

    Farooqi, Zia-Ur-Rehman; Tareen, Samar H K; Ahmed, Jamil; Zaidi, Najam-Us-Sahar S

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) triggers coordinated innate and adaptive response in host cell. HCV genome and proteins of the replicating virus are recognized as non-self-antigens by host cell to activate Toll Like Receptors (TLRs). Activated TLRs ultimately express cytokines, which can clear virus either by activating interferon (IFN), protein kinase C (PKC) and RNA Lase system or through activation of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes. Interleukin-12 (IL-12) is a potent antiviral cytokine, capable of clearing HCV by bridging both innate and adaptive antiviral immune response. Activation of TLR-4 on macrophages surface induces expression of IL-12 via NF-κB and AP-1 transcriptional pathway. After expression, IL- 12 releases IFN-γ, which activates anti-HCV cytotoxic lymphocytes. Conversely, in chronic HCV infection downregulation of IL-12 has been reported instead of by number of studies. Keeping in view of the above mentioned facts, this study was designed to evaluate HCV-core mediated down-regulation of IL-12 transcriptional pathway by employing a logical modeling approach based on the Ren´e Thomas formalism. The logical parameters of entities were estimated by using SMBioNet. The Logical model represents all possible dynamics of protein expression involved during course of HCV pathology. Results demonstrated that at chronic stage of infection, though TLR-4 was constantly active but yet it failed to express the NF-κB, AP-1, IL-12 and IFN-γ. This mechanism was indicative of incorporation of core mediated changes in IL-12 regulatory pathway. Moreover, results also indicate that HCV adopts different trajectories to accomplish the persistence of chronic phase of infection. It also implicated that human immune system tries to clear HCV but core is capable of inducing system oscillations to evade the immunity.

  4. Casein kinase iepsilon in the wnt pathway: regulation of beta-catenin function.

    PubMed

    Sakanaka, C; Leong, P; Xu, L; Harrison, S D; Williams, L T

    1999-10-26

    Wnt and its intracellular effector beta-catenin regulate developmental and oncogenic processes. Using expression cloning to identify novel components of the Wnt pathway, we isolated casein kinase Iepsilon (CKIepsilon). CKIepsilon mimicked Wnt in inducing a secondary axis in Xenopus, stabilizing beta-catenin, and stimulating gene transcription in cells. Inhibition of endogenous CKIepsilon by kinase-defective CKIepsilon or CKIepsilon antisense-oligonucleotides attenuated Wnt signaling. CKIepsilon was in a complex with axin and other downstream components of the Wnt pathway, including Dishevelled. CKIepsilon appears to be a positive regulator of the pathway and a link between upstream signals and the complexes that regulate beta-catenin. PMID:10535959

  5. Carbohydrate metabolism in Archaea: current insights into unusual enzymes and pathways and their regulation.

    PubMed

    Bräsen, Christopher; Esser, Dominik; Rauch, Bernadette; Siebers, Bettina

    2014-03-01

    The metabolism of Archaea, the third domain of life, resembles in its complexity those of Bacteria and lower Eukarya. However, this metabolic complexity in Archaea is accompanied by the absence of many "classical" pathways, particularly in central carbohydrate metabolism. Instead, Archaea are characterized by the presence of unique, modified variants of classical pathways such as the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas (EMP) pathway and the Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway. The pentose phosphate pathway is only partly present (if at all), and pentose degradation also significantly differs from that known for bacterial model organisms. These modifications are accompanied by the invention of "new," unusual enzymes which cause fundamental consequences for the underlying regulatory principles, and classical allosteric regulation sites well established in Bacteria and Eukarya are lost. The aim of this review is to present the current understanding of central carbohydrate metabolic pathways and their regulation in Archaea. In order to give an overview of their complexity, pathway modifications are discussed with respect to unusual archaeal biocatalysts, their structural and mechanistic characteristics, and their regulatory properties in comparison to their classic counterparts from Bacteria and Eukarya. Furthermore, an overview focusing on hexose metabolic, i.e., glycolytic as well as gluconeogenic, pathways identified in archaeal model organisms is given. Their energy gain is discussed, and new insights into different levels of regulation that have been observed so far, including the transcript and protein levels (e.g., gene regulation, known transcription regulators, and posttranslational modification via reversible protein phosphorylation), are presented.

  6. Negative regulation of Gq-mediated pathways in platelets by G(12/13) pathways through Fyn kinase.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soochong; Kunapuli, Satya P

    2011-07-01

    Platelets contain high levels of Src family kinases (SFKs), but their functional role downstream of G protein pathways has not been completely understood. We found that platelet shape change induced by selective G(12/13) stimulation was potentiated by SFK inhibitors, which was abolished by intracellular calcium chelation. Platelet aggregation, secretion, and intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization mediated by low concentrations of SFLLRN or YFLLRNP were potentiated by SFK inhibitors. However, 2-methylthio-ADP-induced intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization and platelet aggregation were not affected by PP2, suggesting the contribution of SFKs downstream of G(12/13), but not G(q)/G(i), as a negative regulator to platelet activation. Moreover, PP2 potentiated YFLLRNP- and AYPGKF-induced PKC activation, indicating that SFKs downstream of G(12/13) regulate platelet responses through the negative regulation of PKC activation as well as calcium response. SFK inhibitors failed to potentiate platelet responses in the presence of G(q)-selective inhibitor YM254890 or in G(q)-deficient platelets, indicating that SFKs negatively regulate platelet responses through modulation of G(q) pathways. Importantly, AYPGKF-induced platelet aggregation and PKC activation were potentiated in Fyn-deficient but not in Lyn-deficient mice compared with wild-type littermates. We conclude that SFKs, especially Fyn, activated downstream of G(12/13) negatively regulate platelet responses by inhibiting intracellular calcium mobilization and PKC activation through G(q) pathways. PMID:21592972

  7. Adverse Outcome Pathways: From Research to Regulation - Scientific Workshop Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    An adverse outcome pathway (AOP) organizes existing knowledge on chemical mode of action, starting with a molecular initiating event such as receptor binding, continuing through key events, and ending with an adverse outcome such as reproductive impairment. AOPs can help identify...

  8. Mathematical modelling of the diurnal regulation of the MEP pathway in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Pokhilko, Alexandra; Bou-Torrent, Jordi; Pulido, Pablo; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel; Ebenhöh, Oliver

    2015-05-01

    Isoprenoid molecules are essential elements of plant metabolism. Many important plant isoprenoids, such as chlorophylls, carotenoids, tocopherols, prenylated quinones and hormones are synthesised in chloroplasts via the 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. Here we develop a mathematical model of diurnal regulation of the MEP pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana. We used both experimental and theoretical approaches to integrate mechanisms potentially involved in the diurnal control of the pathway. Our data show that flux through the MEP pathway is accelerated in light due to the photosynthesis-dependent supply of metabolic substrates of the pathway and the transcriptional regulation of key biosynthetic genes by the circadian clock. We also demonstrate that feedback regulation of both the activity and the abundance of the first enzyme of the MEP pathway (1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase, DXS) by pathway products stabilizes the flux against changes in substrate supply and adjusts the flux according to product demand under normal growth conditions. These data illustrate the central relevance of photosynthesis, the circadian clock and feedback control of DXS for the diurnal regulation of the MEP pathway.

  9. Regulation of the expression of the whole genome of Ustilago maydis by a MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Soto, Domingo; Ruiz-Herrera, José

    2015-05-01

    The operation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signal transduction pathways is one of the most important mechanisms for the transfer of extracellular information into the cell. These pathways are highly conserved in eukaryotic organisms. In fungi, MAPK pathways are involved in the regulation of a number of cellular processes such as metabolism, homeostasis, pathogenesis and cell differentiation and morphogenesis. Considering the importance of pathways, in the present work we proceeded to identify all the genes that are regulated by the signal transduction pathway involved in mating, pathogenesis and morphogenesis of Ustilago maydis. Accordingly we made a comparison between the transcriptomes from a wild-type strain and an Ubc2 mutant affected in the interacting protein of this pathway by use of microarrays. By this methodology, we identified 939 genes regulated directly or indirectly by the MAPK pathway. Of them, 432 were positively, and 507 were negatively found regulated. By functional grouping, genes encoding cyclin-dependent kinases, transcription factors, proteins involved in signal transduction, in synthesis of wall and cell membrane, and involved in dimorphism were identified as differentially regulated. These data reveal the importance of these global studies, and the large (and unsuspected) number of functions of the fungus under the control of this MAPK, providing clues to the possible mechanisms involved.

  10. Regulation of the Mandelate Pathway in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, S. L.

    1971-01-01

    The pathway of mandelate metabolism in Pseudomonas aeruginosa is composed of the following steps: l(+)-mandelate → benzoylformate → benzaldehyde → benzoate. These three steps are unique to mandelate oxidation; the benzoate formed is further metabolized via the β-ketoadipate pathway. The first enzyme, l(+)-mandelate dehydrogenase, is induced by its substrate. The second and third enzymes, benzoylformate decarboxylase and benzaldehyde dehydrogenase, are both induced by benzoylformate. The same benzaldehyde dehydrogenase, or one very similar to it, is also induced by β-ketoadipate, an intermediate in the subsequent metabolism of benzoate. This dehydrogenase may also be induced by adipate or a metabolite of adipate. These conclusions have been drawn from the physiological and genetic properties of wild-type P. aeruginosa strains and from the study of mutants lacking the second and third enzyme activities. PMID:5003176

  11. The Retinoblastoma pathway regulates stem cell proliferation in freshwater planarians.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shu Jun; Pearson, Bret J

    2013-01-15

    Freshwater planarians are flatworms of the Lophotrochozoan superphylum and are well known for their regenerative abilities, which rely on a large population of pluripotent adult stem cells. However, the mechanisms by which planarians maintain a precise population of adult stem cells while balancing proliferation and cell death, remain to be elucidated. Here we have identified, characterized, and functionally tested the core Retinoblastoma (Rb) pathway components in planarian adult stem cell biology. The Rb pathway is an ancient and conserved mechanism of proliferation control from plants to animals and is composed of three core components: an Rb protein, and a transcription factor heterodimer of E2F and DP proteins. Although the planarian genome contains all components of the Rb pathway, we found that they have undergone gene loss from the ancestral state, similar to other species in their phylum. The single Rb homolog (Smed-Rb) was highly expressed in planarian stem cells and was required for stem cell maintenance, similar to the Rb-homologs p107 and p130 in vertebrates. We show that planarians and their phylum have undergone the most severe reduction in E2F genes observed thus far, and the single remaining E2F was predicted to be a repressive-type E2F (Smed-E2F4-1). Knockdown of either Smed-E2F4-1 or its dimerization partner Dp (Smed-Dp) by RNAi resulted in temporary hyper-proliferation. Finally, we showed that known Rb-interacting genes in other systems, histone deacetylase 1 and cyclinD (Smed-HDAC1; Smed-cycD), were similar to Rb in expression and phenotypes when knocked down by RNAi, suggesting that these established interactions with Rb may also be conserved in planarians. Together, these results showed that planarians use the conserved components of the Rb tumor suppressor pathway to control proliferation and cell survival.

  12. The Retinoblastoma pathway regulates stem cell proliferation in freshwater planarians.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shu Jun; Pearson, Bret J

    2013-01-15

    Freshwater planarians are flatworms of the Lophotrochozoan superphylum and are well known for their regenerative abilities, which rely on a large population of pluripotent adult stem cells. However, the mechanisms by which planarians maintain a precise population of adult stem cells while balancing proliferation and cell death, remain to be elucidated. Here we have identified, characterized, and functionally tested the core Retinoblastoma (Rb) pathway components in planarian adult stem cell biology. The Rb pathway is an ancient and conserved mechanism of proliferation control from plants to animals and is composed of three core components: an Rb protein, and a transcription factor heterodimer of E2F and DP proteins. Although the planarian genome contains all components of the Rb pathway, we found that they have undergone gene loss from the ancestral state, similar to other species in their phylum. The single Rb homolog (Smed-Rb) was highly expressed in planarian stem cells and was required for stem cell maintenance, similar to the Rb-homologs p107 and p130 in vertebrates. We show that planarians and their phylum have undergone the most severe reduction in E2F genes observed thus far, and the single remaining E2F was predicted to be a repressive-type E2F (Smed-E2F4-1). Knockdown of either Smed-E2F4-1 or its dimerization partner Dp (Smed-Dp) by RNAi resulted in temporary hyper-proliferation. Finally, we showed that known Rb-interacting genes in other systems, histone deacetylase 1 and cyclinD (Smed-HDAC1; Smed-cycD), were similar to Rb in expression and phenotypes when knocked down by RNAi, suggesting that these established interactions with Rb may also be conserved in planarians. Together, these results showed that planarians use the conserved components of the Rb tumor suppressor pathway to control proliferation and cell survival. PMID:23123964

  13. Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Interferons and Their Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are low molecular weight cell-derived proteins that include the type I, II, and III IFN families. IFNs are critical for an optimal immune response during microbial infections while dysregulated expression can lead to autoimmune diseases. Given its role in disease, it is important to understand cellular mechanisms of IFN regulation. 3′ untranslated regions (3′ UTRs) have emerged as potent regulators of mRNA and protein dosage and are controlled through multiple regulatory elements including adenylate uridylate (AU)-rich elements (AREs) and microRNA (miRNA) recognition elements. These AREs are targeted by RNA-binding proteins (ARE-BPs) for degradation and/or stabilization through an ARE-mediated decay process. miRNA are endogenous, single-stranded RNA molecules ∼22 nucleotides in length that regulate mRNA translation through the miRNA-induced silencing complex. IFN transcripts, like other labile mRNAs, harbor AREs in their 3′ UTRs that dictate the turnover of mRNA. This review is a survey of the literature related to IFN regulation by miRNA, ARE-BPs, and how these complexes interact dynamically on the 3′ UTR. Additionally, downstream effects of these post-transcriptional regulators on the immune response will be discussed. Review topics include past studies, current understanding, and future challenges in the study of post-transcriptional regulation affecting IFN responses. PMID:24702117

  14. Circadian acetylome reveals regulation of mitochondrial metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Masri, Selma; Patel, Vishal R; Eckel-Mahan, Kristin L; Peleg, Shahaf; Forne, Ignasi; Ladurner, Andreas G; Baldi, Pierre; Imhof, Axel; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2013-02-26

    The circadian clock is constituted by a complex molecular network that integrates a number of regulatory cues needed to maintain organismal homeostasis. To this effect, posttranslational modifications of clock proteins modulate circadian rhythms and are thought to convert physiological signals into changes in protein regulatory function. To explore reversible lysine acetylation that is dependent on the clock, we have characterized the circadian acetylome in WT and Clock-deficient (Clock(-/-)) mouse liver by quantitative mass spectrometry. Our analysis revealed that a number of mitochondrial proteins involved in metabolic pathways are heavily influenced by clock-driven acetylation. Pathways such as glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, citric acid cycle, amino acid metabolism, and fatty acid metabolism were found to be highly enriched hits. The significant number of metabolic pathways whose protein acetylation profile is altered in Clock(-/-) mice prompted us to link the acetylome to the circadian metabolome previously characterized in our laboratory. Changes in enzyme acetylation over the circadian cycle and the link to metabolite levels are discussed, revealing biological implications connecting the circadian clock to cellular metabolic state.

  15. Innate immunity pathways regulate the nephropathy gene Apolipoprotein L1

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Brendan; Jog, Prachi; Lee, Jessica; Blackler, Daniel; Wilmot, Michael; D’Agati, Vivette; Markowitz, Glen; Kopp, Jeffrey; Alper, Seth L.; Pollak, Martin R.; Friedman, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1) risk variants greatly elevate the risk of kidney disease in African Americans. Here we report a cohort of patients who developed collapsing focal segmental glomerulosclerosis while receiving therapeutic interferon, all of whom carried the APOL1 high-risk genotype. This finding raised the possibility that interferons and the molecular pattern recognition receptors that stimulate interferon production may contribute to APOL1-associated kidney disease. In cell culture, interferons and toll-like receptor agonists increased APOL1 expression by up to 200-fold, in some cases with the appearance of transcripts not detected under basal conditions. PolyI:C, a double-stranded RNA TLR3 agonist, increased APOL1 expression by upregulating interferons directly or through an interferon-independent, IRF-3 dependent pathway. Using pharmacological inhibitors, shRNA knockdown, and chromatin immunoprecipitation, we found that the interferon-independent TLR3 pathway relied on signaling through TBK1, NF-kB, and Jak kinases, and on binding of IRF1, IRF2, and STAT2 at the APOL1 transcription start site. We also demonstrate that overexpression of the APOL1 risk variants is more injurious to cells than overexpression of the wild-type APOL1 protein. Our study illustrates that anti-viral pathways may be an important inducer of kidney disease in individuals with the APOL1 high-risk genotype and identifies potential targets for prevention or treatment. PMID:25100047

  16. Regulation of the transforming growth factor β pathway by reversible ubiquitylation.

    PubMed

    Al-Salihi, Mazin A; Herhaus, Lina; Sapkota, Gopal P

    2012-05-01

    The transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signalling pathway plays a central role during embryonic development and in adult tissue homeostasis. It regulates gene transcription through a signalling cascade from cell surface receptors to intracellular SMAD transcription factors and their nuclear cofactors. The extent, duration and potency of signalling in response to TGFβ cytokines are intricately regulated by complex biochemical processes. The corruption of these regulatory processes results in aberrant TGFβ signalling and leads to numerous human diseases, including cancer. Reversible ubiquitylation of pathway components is a key regulatory process that plays a critical role in ensuring a balanced response to TGFβ signals. Many studies have investigated the mechanisms by which various E3 ubiquitin ligases regulate the turnover and activity of TGFβ pathway components by ubiquitylation. Moreover, recent studies have shed new light into their regulation by deubiquitylating enzymes. In this report, we provide an overview of current understanding of the regulation of TGFβ signalling by E3 ubiquitin ligases and deubiquitylases.

  17. Influence maximization in time bounded network identifies transcription factors regulating perturbed pathways

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Kyuri; Jung, Inuk; Moon, Ji Hwan; Kim, Sun

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: To understand the dynamic nature of the biological process, it is crucial to identify perturbed pathways in an altered environment and also to infer regulators that trigger the response. Current time-series analysis methods, however, are not powerful enough to identify perturbed pathways and regulators simultaneously. Widely used methods include methods to determine gene sets such as differentially expressed genes or gene clusters and these genes sets need to be further interpreted in terms of biological pathways using other tools. Most pathway analysis methods are not designed for time series data and they do not consider gene-gene influence on the time dimension. Results: In this article, we propose a novel time-series analysis method TimeTP for determining transcription factors (TFs) regulating pathway perturbation, which narrows the focus to perturbed sub-pathways and utilizes the gene regulatory network and protein–protein interaction network to locate TFs triggering the perturbation. TimeTP first identifies perturbed sub-pathways that propagate the expression changes along the time. Starting points of the perturbed sub-pathways are mapped into the network and the most influential TFs are determined by influence maximization technique. The analysis result is visually summarized in TF-Pathway map in time clock. TimeTP was applied to PIK3CA knock-in dataset and found significant sub-pathways and their regulators relevant to the PIP3 signaling pathway. Availability and Implementation: TimeTP is implemented in Python and available at http://biohealth.snu.ac.kr/software/TimeTP/. Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. Contact: sunkim.bioinfo@snu.ac.kr PMID:27307609

  18. Nitric Oxide Regulation of H-NOX Signaling Pathways in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nisbett, Lisa-Marie; Boon, Elizabeth M

    2016-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a freely diffusible, radical gas that has now been established as an integral signaling molecule in eukaryotes and bacteria. It has been demonstrated that NO signaling is initiated upon ligation to the heme iron of an H-NOX domain in mammals and in some bacteria. Bacterial H-NOX proteins have been found to interact with enzymes that participate in signaling pathways and regulate bacterial processes such as quorum sensing, biofilm formation, and symbiosis. Here, we review the biochemical characterization of these signaling pathways and, where available, describe how ligation of NO to H-NOX specifically regulates the activity of these pathways and their associated bacterial phenotypes.

  19. Reconstitution of the Cytoplasmic Regulation of the Wnt Signaling Pathway Using Xenopus Egg Extracts.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Annastasia Simone; Hang, Brian I; Lee, Ethan

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of β-catenin turnover is the central mechanism governing activation of the Wnt signaling pathway. All components of the pathway are present in the early embryo of Xenopus laevis, and Xenopus egg extracts have been used to recapitulate complex biological reactions such as microtubule dynamics, DNA replication, chromatin assembly, and phases of the cell cycle. Herein, we describe a biochemical method for analyzing β-catenin degradation using radiolabeled and luciferase-fusion proteins in Xenopus egg extracts. We show that in such a biochemical system, cytoplasmic β-catenin degradation is regulated by soluble components of the Wnt pathway as well as small molecules. PMID:27590156

  20. Prefrontal–striatal pathway underlies cognitive regulation of craving

    PubMed Central

    Kober, Hedy; Mende-Siedlecki, Peter; Kross, Ethan F.; Weber, Jochen; Mischel, Walter; Hart, Carl L.; Ochsner, Kevin N.

    2010-01-01

    The ability to control craving for substances that offer immediate rewards but whose long-term consumption may pose serious risks lies at the root of substance use disorders and is critical for mental and physical health. Despite its importance, the neural systems supporting this ability remain unclear. Here, we investigated this issue using functional imaging to examine neural activity in cigarette smokers, the most prevalent substance-dependent population in the United States, as they used cognitive strategies to regulate craving for cigarettes and food. We found that the cognitive down-regulation of craving was associated with (i) activity in regions previously associated with regulating emotion in particular and cognitive control in general, including dorsomedial, dorsolateral, and ventrolateral prefrontal cortices, and (ii) decreased activity in regions previously associated with craving, including the ventral striatum, subgenual cingulate, amygdala, and ventral tegmental area. Decreases in craving correlated with decreases in ventral striatum activity and increases in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex activity, with ventral striatal activity fully mediating the relationship between lateral prefrontal cortex and reported craving. These results provide insight into the mechanisms that enable cognitive strategies to effectively regulate craving, suggesting that it involves neural dynamics parallel to those involved in regulating other emotions. In so doing, this study provides a methodological tool and conceptual foundation for studying this ability across substance using populations and developing more effective treatments for substance use disorders. PMID:20679212

  1. Method to determine transcriptional regulation pathways in organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, Timothy S.; Collins, James J.; Hayete, Boris; Faith, Jeremiah

    2012-11-06

    The invention relates to computer-implemented methods and systems for identifying regulatory relationships between expressed regulating polypeptides and targets of the regulatory activities of such regulating polypeptides. More specifically, the invention provides a new method for identifying regulatory dependencies between biochemical species in a cell. In particular embodiments, provided are computer-implemented methods for identifying a regulatory interaction between a transcription factor and a gene target of the transcription factor, or between a transcription factor and a set of gene targets of the transcription factor. Further provided are genome-scale methods for predicting regulatory interactions between a set of transcription factors and a corresponding set of transcriptional target substrates thereof.

  2. Regulation of Transient Receptor Potential channels by the phospholipase C pathway

    PubMed Central

    Rohacs, Tibor

    2013-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) channels were discovered while analyzing visual mutants in drosophila. The protein encoded by the transient receptor potential (trp) gene is a Ca2+ permeable cation channel activated downstream of the phospholipase C (PLC) pathway. While searching for homologues in other organisms, a surprisingly large number of mammalian TRP channels were cloned. The regulation of TRP channels is quite diverse, but many of them are either activated downstream of the PLC pathway, or modulated by it. This review will summarize the current knowledge on regulation of TRP channels by the PLC pathway, with special focus on TRPC-s, which can be considered as effectors of the PLC pathway, and the heat and capsaicin sensitive TRPV1, which is modulated by the PLC pathway in a complex manner. PMID:23916247

  3. Regulation of various proteolytic pathways by insulin and amino acids in human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Esteban, Inmaculada; Aguado, Carmen; Sánchez, Maribel; Knecht, Erwin

    2007-07-24

    Intracellular protein degradation is a regulated process with several proteolytic pathways. Although regulation of macroautophagy has been investigated in some detail in hepatocytes and in few other cells, less is known on this regulation in other cells and proteolytic pathways. We show that in human fibroblasts insulin and amino acids reduce protein degradation by different signalling pathways and that this inhibition proceeds in part via the mammalian target of rapamycin, especially with amino acids, which probably increase lysosomal pH. Moreover, the regulatory amino acids (Phe, Arg, Met, Tyr, Trp and Cys) are partially different from other cells. Finally, and in addition to macroautophagy, insulin and amino acids modify, to different extents and sometimes in opposite directions, the activities of other proteolytic pathways.

  4. Transcriptomic analysis in the developing zebrafish embryo after compound exposure: Individual gene expression and pathway regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hermsen, Sanne A.B.; Pronk, Tessa E.; Brandhof, Evert-Jan van den; Ven, Leo T.M. van der; Piersma, Aldert H.

    2013-10-01

    The zebrafish embryotoxicity test is a promising alternative assay for developmental toxicity. Classically, morphological assessment of the embryos is applied to evaluate the effects of compound exposure. However, by applying differential gene expression analysis the sensitivity and predictability of the test may be increased. For defining gene expression signatures of developmental toxicity, we explored the possibility of using gene expression signatures of compound exposures based on commonly expressed individual genes as well as based on regulated gene pathways. Four developmental toxic compounds were tested in concentration-response design, caffeine, carbamazepine, retinoic acid and valproic acid, and two non-embryotoxic compounds, D-mannitol and saccharin, were included. With transcriptomic analyses we were able to identify commonly expressed genes, which were mostly development related, after exposure to the embryotoxicants. We also identified gene pathways regulated by the embryotoxicants, suggestive of their modes of action. Furthermore, whereas pathways may be regulated by all compounds, individual gene expression within these pathways can differ for each compound. Overall, the present study suggests that the use of individual gene expression signatures as well as pathway regulation may be useful starting points for defining gene biomarkers for predicting embryotoxicity. - Highlights: • The zebrafish embryotoxicity test in combination with transcriptomics was used. • We explored two approaches of defining gene biomarkers for developmental toxicity. • Four compounds in concentration-response design were tested. • We identified commonly expressed individual genes as well as regulated gene pathways. • Both approaches seem suitable starting points for defining gene biomarkers.

  5. Developmental Pathways of Emotion Regulation in Childhood: A Neuropsychological Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woltering, Steven; Lewis, Marc D.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a model featuring two types of emotion regulation--reactive and deliberate--and discusses the developmental trajectory of both types. We argue that the later-developing capacity for deliberate control builds on and coevolves with earlier-developing reactive control. Findings from the field of developmental neuroscience are…

  6. Soil formate regulates the fungal nitrous oxide emission pathway.

    PubMed

    Ma, W K; Farrell, R E; Siciliano, S D

    2008-11-01

    Fungal activity is a major driver in the global nitrogen cycle, and mounting evidence suggests that fungal denitrification activity contributes significantly to soil emissions of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N(2)O). The metabolic pathway and oxygen requirement for fungal denitrification are different from those for bacterial denitrification. We hypothesized that the soil N(2)O emission from fungi is formate and O(2) dependent and that land use and landforms could influence the proportion of N(2)O coming from fungi. Using substrate-induced respiration inhibition under anaerobic and aerobic conditions in combination with (15)N gas analysis, we found that formate and hypoxia (versus anaerobiosis) were essential for the fungal reduction of (15)N-labeled nitrate to (15)N(2)O. As much as 65% of soil-emitted N(2)O was attributable to fungi; however, this was found only in soils from water-accumulating landforms. From these results, we hypothesize that plant root exudates could affect N(2)O production from fungi via the proposed formate-dependent pathway. PMID:18791019

  7. IL-1α Counteract TGF-β Regulated Genes and Pathways in Human Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Koskela von Sydow, Anita; Janbaz, Chris; Kardeby, Caroline; Repsilber, Dirk; Ivarsson, Mikael

    2016-07-01

    Dysregulated wound healing is commonly associated with excessive fibrosis. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) is characteristically overexpressed in fibrotic diseases and stimulated by transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) in dermal fibroblasts. We previously showed that interleukin-1 (IL-1α) counteracts TGF-β-stimulated CTGF mRNA and protein expression in these cells. The aim of this study was to explore the effects of IL-1α on further genes and pathways in TGF-β regulated fibroblasts. Transcriptional microarray and multiple comparison analysis showed that the antagonizing effects of IL-1α was much more prominent than the synergistic effects, both with respect to number of genes and extent of changes in gene expression. Moreover, comparing canonical pathways by gene set enrichment analysis and the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis tool revealed that IL-1α counteracted TGF-β in the top six most confident pathways regulated by both cytokines. Interferon and IL-1 signaling, as well as two pathways involved in apoptosis signaling were suppressed by TGF-β and activated by IL-1α. Pathways involving actin remodeling and focal adhesion dynamics were activated by TGF-β and suppressed by IL-1α. Analyzing upstream regulators in part corroborate the comparison of canonical pathways and added cell cycle regulators as another functional group regulated by IL-1α. Finally, gene set enrichment analysis of fibrosis-related genes indicated that IL-1 moderately counteracts the collective effect of TGF-β on these genes. Microarray results were validated by qPCR. Taken together, the results indicate prominent antagonistic effects of IL-1α on TGF-β regulated interferon signaling, as well as on a wide variety of other genes and pathways in fibroblasts. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1622-1632, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The ubiquitin–proteasome system and signal transduction pathways regulating Epithelial Mesenchymal transition of cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Epithelial to Mesenchymal transition (EMT) in cancer, a process permitting cancer cells to become mobile and metastatic, has a signaling hardwire forged from development. Multiple signaling pathways that regulate carcinogenesis enabling characteristics in neoplastic cells such as proliferation, resistance to apoptosis and angiogenesis are also the main players in EMT. These pathways, as almost all cellular processes, are in their turn regulated by ubiquitination and the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System (UPS). Ubiquitination is the covalent link of target proteins with the small protein ubiquitin and serves as a signal to target protein degradation by the proteasome or to other outcomes such as endocytosis, degradation by the lysosome or specification of cellular localization. This paper reviews signal transduction pathways regulating EMT and being regulated by ubiquitination. PMID:22827778

  9. Mechanisms and pathways of innate immune activation and regulation in health and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jun; Chen, Yongjun; Wang, Helen Y; Wang, Rong-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Research on innate immune signaling and regulation has recently focused on pathogen recognition receptors (PRRs) and their signaling pathways. Members of PRRs sense diverse microbial invasions or danger signals, and initiate innate immune signaling pathways, leading to proinflammatory cytokines production, which, in turn, instructs adaptive immune response development. Despite the diverse functions employed by innate immune signaling to respond to a variety of different pathogens, the innate immune response must be tightly regulated. Otherwise, aberrant, uncontrolled immune responses will lead to harmful, or even fatal, consequences. Therefore, it is essential to better discern innate immune signaling and many regulators, controlling various signaling pathways, have been identified. In this review, we focus on the recent advances in our understanding of the activation and regulation of innate immune signaling in the host response to pathogens and cancer. PMID:25625930

  10. Nitrogen regulates CRY1 phosphorylation and circadian clock input pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yang-Hong; Zhang, Zhong-Wei; Zheng, Chong; Yuan, Shu; He, Yikun

    2016-09-01

    The delayed flowering phenotype caused by nitrogen (N) fertilizer application has been known for a long time, but we know little about the specific molecular mechanism for this phenomenon before. Our study indicated that low nitrogen increases the NADPH/NADP(+) and ATP/AMP ratios which affect adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity and phosphorylation and abundance of nuclear CRY1 protein. Then CRY1 acts in the N signal input pathway to the circadian clock. Here we further discuss: (1) the role of C/N ratio in flowering, (2) circadian oscillation of plant AMPK transcripts and proteins, (3) conservation of nutrition-mediated CRY1 phosphorylation and degradation, and (4) crosstalks between nitrogen signals and nitric oxide (NO) signals in flowering. PMID:27617369

  11. Negative regulation of DAB2IP by Akt and SCFFbw7 pathways

    PubMed Central

    Inuzuka, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Deletion of ovarian carcinoma 2/disabled homolog 2 (DOC-2/DAB2) interacting protein (DAB2IP), is a tumor suppressor that serves as a scaffold protein involved in coordinately regulating cell proliferation, survival and apoptotic pathways. DAB2IP is epigenetically down-regulated in a variety of tumors through the action of the histone methyltransferase EZH2. Although DAB2IP is transcriptionally down-regulated in a variety of tumors, it remains unclear if other mechanisms contribute to functional inactivation of DAB2IP. Here we demonstrate that DAB2IP can be functionally down-regulated by two independent mechanisms. First, we identified that Akt1 can phosphorylate DAB2IP on S847, which regulates the interaction between DAB2IP and its effector molecules H-Ras and TRAF2. Second, we demonstrated that DAB2IP can be degraded in part through ubiquitin-proteasome pathway by SCFFbw7. DAB2IP harbors two Fbw7 phosho-degron motifs, which can be regulated by the kinase, CK1δ. Our data hence indicate that in addition to epigenetic down-regulation, two additional pathways can functional inactivate DAB2IP. Given that DAB2IP has previously been identified to possess direct causal role in tumorigenesis and metastasis, our data indicate that a variety of pathways may pass through DAB2IP to govern cancer development, and therefore highlight DAB2IP agonists as potential therapeutic approaches for future anti-cancer drug development. PMID:24912918

  12. A sugar phosphatase regulates the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway in malaria parasites

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Rachel L.; Kelly, Megan L.; Hodge, Dana M.; Tolia, Niraj H.; Odom, Audrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Isoprenoid biosynthesis through the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway generates commercially important products and is a target for antimicrobial drug development. MEP pathway regulation is poorly understood in microorganisms. We employ a forward genetics approach to understand MEP pathway regulation in the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. The antimalarial fosmidomycin inhibits the MEP pathway enzyme deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR). Fosmidomycin-resistant P. falciparum are enriched for changes in the PF3D7_1033400 locus (hereafter referred to as PfHAD1), encoding a homologue of haloacid dehalogenase (HAD)-like sugar phosphatases. We describe the structural basis for loss-of-function PfHAD1 alleles and find that PfHAD1 dephosphorylates a variety of sugar phosphates, including glycolytic intermediates. Loss of PfHAD1 is required for fosmidomycin resistance. Parasites lacking PfHAD1 have increased MEP pathway metabolites, particularly the DXR substrate, deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate. PfHAD1 therefore controls substrate availability to the MEP pathway. Because PfHAD1 has homologs in plants and bacteria, other HAD proteins may be MEP pathway regulators. PMID:25058848

  13. Carbohydrate Metabolism in Archaea: Current Insights into Unusual Enzymes and Pathways and Their Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Esser, Dominik; Rauch, Bernadette

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The metabolism of Archaea, the third domain of life, resembles in its complexity those of Bacteria and lower Eukarya. However, this metabolic complexity in Archaea is accompanied by the absence of many “classical” pathways, particularly in central carbohydrate metabolism. Instead, Archaea are characterized by the presence of unique, modified variants of classical pathways such as the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas (EMP) pathway and the Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway. The pentose phosphate pathway is only partly present (if at all), and pentose degradation also significantly differs from that known for bacterial model organisms. These modifications are accompanied by the invention of “new,” unusual enzymes which cause fundamental consequences for the underlying regulatory principles, and classical allosteric regulation sites well established in Bacteria and Eukarya are lost. The aim of this review is to present the current understanding of central carbohydrate metabolic pathways and their regulation in Archaea. In order to give an overview of their complexity, pathway modifications are discussed with respect to unusual archaeal biocatalysts, their structural and mechanistic characteristics, and their regulatory properties in comparison to their classic counterparts from Bacteria and Eukarya. Furthermore, an overview focusing on hexose metabolic, i.e., glycolytic as well as gluconeogenic, pathways identified in archaeal model organisms is given. Their energy gain is discussed, and new insights into different levels of regulation that have been observed so far, including the transcript and protein levels (e.g., gene regulation, known transcription regulators, and posttranslational modification via reversible protein phosphorylation), are presented. PMID:24600042

  14. Regulation of PCP by the Fat signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Matis, Maja; Axelrod, Jeffrey D.

    2013-01-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) in epithelia, orthogonal to the apical–basal axis, is essential for numerous developmental events and physiological functions. Drosophila model systems have been at the forefront of studies revealing insights into mechanisms regulating PCP and have revealed distinct signaling modules. One of these, involving the atypical cadherins Fat and Dachsous and the ectokinase Four-jointed, appears to link the direction of cell polarization to the tissue axes. We discuss models for the function of this signaling module as well as several unanswered questions that may guide future investigations. PMID:24142873

  15. Regulation and function of the FGF23/klotho endocrine pathways.

    PubMed

    Martin, Aline; David, Valentin; Quarles, L Darryl

    2012-01-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) and phosphate (PO(4)(3-)) homeostasis are coordinated by systemic and local factors that regulate intestinal absorption, influx and efflux from bone, and kidney excretion and reabsorption of these ions through a complex hormonal network. Traditionally, the parathyroid hormone (PTH)/vitamin D axis provided the conceptual framework to understand mineral metabolism. PTH secreted by the parathyroid gland in response to hypocalcemia functions to maintain serum Ca(2+) levels by increasing Ca(2+) reabsorption and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)(2)D] production by the kidney, enhancing Ca(2+) and PO(4)(3-) intestinal absorption and increasing Ca(2+) and PO(4)(3-) efflux from bone, while maintaining neutral phosphate balance through phosphaturic effects. FGF23 is a recently discovered hormone, predominately produced by osteoblasts/osteocytes, whose major functions are to inhibit renal tubular phosphate reabsorption and suppress circulating 1,25(OH)(2)D levels by decreasing Cyp27b1-mediated formation and stimulating Cyp24-mediated catabolism of 1,25(OH)(2)D. FGF23 participates in a new bone/kidney axis that protects the organism from excess vitamin D and coordinates renal PO(4)(3-) handling with bone mineralization/turnover. Abnormalities of FGF23 production underlie many inherited and acquired disorders of phosphate homeostasis. This review discusses the known and emerging functions of FGF23, its regulation in response to systemic and local signals, as well as the implications of FGF23 in different pathological and physiological contexts.

  16. Pathway and regulation of erythritol formation in Leuconostoc oenos.

    PubMed Central

    Veiga-da-Cunha, M; Santos, H; Van Schaftingen, E

    1993-01-01

    It was recently observed that Leuconostoc oenos GM, a wine lactic acid bacterium, produced erythritol anaerobically from glucose but not from fructose or ribose and that this production was almost absent in the presence of O2. In this study, the pathway of formation of erythritol from glucose in L. oenos was shown to involve the isomerization of glucose 6-phosphate to fructose 6-phosphate by a phosphoglucose isomerase, the cleavage of fructose 6-phosphate by a phosphoketolase, the reduction of erythrose 4-phosphate by an erythritol 4-phosphate dehydrogenase and, finally, the hydrolysis of erythritol 4-phosphate to erythritol by a phosphatase. Fructose 6-phosphate phosphoketolase was copurified with xylulose 5-phosphate phosphoketolase, and the activity of the latter was competitively inhibited by fructose 6-phosphate, with a Ki of 26 mM, corresponding to the Km of fructose 6-phosphate phosphoketolase (22 mM). These results suggest that the two phosphoketolase activities are borne by a single enzyme. Extracts of L. oenos were also found to contain NAD(P)H oxidase, which must be largely responsible for the reoxidation of NADPH and NADH in cells incubated in the presence of O2. In cells incubated with glucose, the concentrations of glucose 6-phosphate and of fructose 6-phosphate were higher in the absence of O2 than in its presence, explaining the stimulation by anaerobiosis of erythritol production. The increase in the hexose 6-phosphate concentration is presumably the result of a functional inhibition of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase because of a reduction in the availability of NADP. PMID:8391532

  17. Cross-regulation among disparate antibiotic biosynthetic pathways of Streptomyces coelicolor.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianqiang; Shi, Jing; Molle, Virginie; Sohlberg, Björn; Weaver, David; Bibb, Maureen J; Karoonuthaisiri, Nitsara; Lih, Chih-Jian; Kao, Camilla M; Buttner, Mark J; Cohen, Stanley N

    2005-12-01

    A complex programme of regulation governs gene expression during development of the morphologically and biochemically complex eubacterial genus Streptomyces. Earlier work has suggested a model in which 'higher level' pleiotropic regulators activate 'pathway-specific' regulators located within chromosomal gene clusters encoding biosynthesis of individual antibiotics. We used mutational analysis and adventitious overexpression of key Streptomyces coelicolor regulators to investigate functional interactions among them. We report here that cluster-situated regulators (CSRs) thought to be pathway-specific can also control other antibiotic biosynthetic gene clusters, and thus have pleiotropic actions. Surprisingly, we also find that CSRs exhibit growth-phase-dependent control over afsR2/afsS, a 'higher level' pleiotropic regulatory locus not located within any of the chromosomal gene clusters it targets, and further demonstrate that cross-regulation by CSRs is modulated globally and differentially during the S. coelicolor growth cycle by the RNaseIII homologue AbsB. Our results, which reveal a network of functional interactions among regulators that govern production of antibiotics and other secondary metabolites in S. coelicolor, suggest that revision of the currently prevalent view of higher-level versus pathway-specific regulation of secondary metabolism in Streptomyces species is warranted.

  18. CDX2 can be regulated through the signalling pathways activated by IL-6 in gastric cells.

    PubMed

    Cobler, Lara; Pera, Manuel; Garrido, Marta; Iglesias, Mar; de Bolós, Carme

    2014-09-01

    The inflammatory infiltrate of the gastric mucosa associated with Helicobacter pylori infection increases the presence of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 that activates both the SHP-2/ERK/MAPK and the JAK/STAT signalling pathways. Furthermore, the ectopic expression of CDX2 is detected in pre-neoplasic lesions associated with decreased levels of SOX2, and we found that in gastric adenocarcinomas their expression is inversely correlated. To determine the role of IL-6 in the regulation of CDX2, MKN45 that constitutively expresses p-STAT3, and NUGC-4 gastric cancer cell lines were treated with IL-6, which induced the CDX2 up-regulation and SOX2 down-regulation. ChIP assays determined that in IL-6-treated cells, c-JUN and p-STAT3 bound to CDX2 promoter in MKN45 cells whereas in NUGC-4 cells, p-STAT3 binds to and c-JUN releases from the CDX2 promoter. Specific inhibition of STAT3 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation through AG490 and U0126, respectively, and STAT3 down-regulation using shRNA verified that the SHP-2/ERK/MAPK pathway regulates the expression of CDX2 in basal conditions, and the CDX2 up-regulation by IL-6 is through the JAK/STAT pathway in NUGC-4 cells whereas in MKN45 cells both pathways contribute to the CDX2 up-regulation. In conclusion, the signalling pathways activated by IL-6 have a crucial role in the regulation of CDX2 that is a key factor in the process of gastric carcinogenesis, suggesting that the inflammatory infiltrate in the gastric mucosa is relevant in this process and a potential target for new therapeutic approaches. PMID:24953186

  19. The transcription factor TFEB acts as a molecular switch that regulates exogenous antigen-presentation pathways.

    PubMed

    Samie, Mohammad; Cresswell, Peter

    2015-07-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) can initiate immune responses by presenting exogenous antigens to T cells via both major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I pathways and MHC class II pathways. Lysosomal activity has an important role in modulating the balance between these two pathways. The transcription factor TFEB regulates lysosomal function by inducing lysosomal activation. Here we report that TFEB expression inhibited the presentation of exogenous antigen by MHC class I while enhancing presentation via MHC class II. TFEB promoted phagosomal acidification and protein degradation. Furthermore, we found that the activation of TFEB was regulated during DC maturation and that phagosomal acidification was impaired in DCs in which the gene encoding TFEB was silenced. Our data indicate that TFEB is a key participant in the differential regulation of the presentation of exogenous antigens by DCs.

  20. Regulation and function of the cGAS-STING pathway of cytosolic DNA sensing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qi; Sun, Lijun; Chen, Zhijian J

    2016-09-20

    The recognition of microbial nucleic acids is a major mechanism by which the immune system detects pathogens. Cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS) is a cytosolic DNA sensor that activates innate immune responses through production of the second messenger cGAMP, which activates the adaptor STING. The cGAS-STING pathway not only mediates protective immune defense against infection by a large variety of DNA-containing pathogens but also detects tumor-derived DNA and generates intrinsic antitumor immunity. However, aberrant activation of the cGAS pathway by self DNA can also lead to autoimmune and inflammatory disease. Thus, the cGAS pathway must be properly regulated. Here we review the recent advances in understanding of the cGAS-STING pathway, focusing on the regulatory mechanisms and roles of this pathway in heath and disease. PMID:27648547

  1. Adaptive Control Model Reveals Systematic Feedback and Key Molecules in Metabolic Pathway Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Moffitt, Richard A.; Merrill, Alfred H.; Wang, May D.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Robust behavior in metabolic pathways resembles stabilized performance in systems under autonomous control. This suggests we can apply control theory to study existing regulation in these cellular networks. Here, we use model-reference adaptive control (MRAC) to investigate the dynamics of de novo sphingolipid synthesis regulation in a combined theoretical and experimental case study. The effects of serine palmitoyltransferase over-expression on this pathway are studied in vitro using human embryonic kidney cells. We report two key results from comparing numerical simulations with observed data. First, MRAC simulations of pathway dynamics are comparable to simulations from a standard model using mass action kinetics. The root-sum-square (RSS) between data and simulations in both cases differ by less than 5%. Second, MRAC simulations suggest systematic pathway regulation in terms of adaptive feedback from individual molecules. In response to increased metabolite levels available for de novo sphingolipid synthesis, feedback from molecules along the main artery of the pathway is regulated more frequently and with greater amplitude than from other molecules along the branches. These biological insights are consistent with current knowledge while being new that they may guide future research in sphingolipid biology. In summary, we report a novel approach to study regulation in cellular networks by applying control theory in the context of robust metabolic pathways. We do this to uncover potential insight into the dynamics of regulation and the reverse engineering of cellular networks for systems biology. This new modeling approach and the implementation routines designed for this case study may be extended to other systems. Supplementary Material is available at www.liebertonline.com/cmb. PMID:21314456

  2. Role of bile acids in the regulation of the metabolic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Taoka, Hiroki; Yokoyama, Yoko; Morimoto, Kohkichi; Kitamura, Naho; Tanigaki, Tatsuya; Takashina, Yoko; Tsubota, Kazuo; Watanabe, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that bile acids (BAs) are not only facilitators of dietary lipid absorption but also important signaling molecules exerting multiple physiological functions. Some major signaling pathways involving the nuclear BAs receptor farnesoid X receptor and the G protein-coupled BAs receptor TGR5/M-BAR have been identified to be the targets of BAs. BAs regulate their own homeostasis via signaling pathways. BAs also affect diverse metabolic pathways including glucose metabolism, lipid metabolism and energy expenditure. This paper suggests the mechanism of controlling metabolism via BA signaling and demonstrates that BA signaling is an attractive therapeutic target of the metabolic syndrome. PMID:27433295

  3. Dissecting dysfunctional crosstalk pathways regulated by miRNAs during glioma progression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng; Li, Xiang; Feng, Li; Shi, Xinrui; Wang, Lihua; Li, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Glioma is a malignant nervous system tumor with a high fatality rate and poor prognosis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important post-transcriptional modulators of glioma initiation and progression. Tumor progression often results from dysfunctional co-operation between pathways regulated by miRNAs. We therefore constructed a glioma progression-related miRNA-pathway crosstalk network that not only revealed some key miRNA-pathway patterns, but also helped characterize the functional roles of miRNAs during glioma progression. Our data indicate that crosstalk between cell cycle and p53 pathways is associated with grade II to grade III progression, while cell communications-related pathways involving regulation of actin cytoskeleton and adherens junctions are associated with grade IV glioblastoma progression. Furthermore, miRNAs and their crosstalk pathways may be useful for stratifying glioma and glioblastoma patients into groups with short or long survival times. Our data indicate that a combination of miRNA and pathway crosstalk information can be used for survival prediction. PMID:27013589

  4. Regulation of the Hippo-YAP pathway by G-protein coupled receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Fa-Xing; Zhao, Bin; Panupinthu, Nattapon; Jewell, Jenna L.; Lian, Ian; Wang, Lloyd H.; Zhao, Jiagang; Yuan, Haixin; Tumaneng, Karen; Li, Hairi; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Mills, Gordon B.; Guan, Kun-Liang

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The Hippo pathway is crucial in organ size control and its dysregulation contributes to tumorigenesis. However, upstream signals that regulate the mammalian Hippo pathway have remained elusive. Here we report that the Hippo pathway is regulated by G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling. Serum-borne lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and sphingosine 1-phosphophate (S1P) act through G12/13-coupled receptors to inhibit the Hippo pathway kinases Lats1/2 thereby activating YAP and TAZ transcription co-activators, which are oncoproteins repressed by Lats1/2. YAP and TAZ are involved in LPA-induced gene expression, cell migration, and proliferation. In contrast, stimulation of Gs-coupled receptors by glucagon or epinephrine activates Lats1/2 kinase activity, thereby inhibiting YAP function. Thus, GPCR signaling can either activate or inhibit the Hippo-YAP pathway depending on the coupled G-protein. Our study identifies extracellular diffusible signals that modulate the Hippo pathway and also establishes the Hippo-YAP pathway as a critical signaling branch downstream of GPCR. PMID:22863277

  5. Evidence for cross-pathway regulation of metabolic gene expression in plants.

    PubMed Central

    Guyer, D; Patton, D; Ward, E

    1995-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, blocking histidine biosynthesis with a specific inhibitor of imidazoleglycerol-phosphate dehydratase caused increased expression of eight genes involved in the biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids, histidine, lysine, and purines. A decrease in expression of glutamine synthetase was also observed. Addition of histidine eliminated the gene-regulating effects of the inhibitor, demonstrating that the changes in gene expression resulted from histidine-pathway blockage. These results show that plants are capable of cross-pathway metabolic regulation. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7761437

  6. Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenases as Reporters for Circadian-Regulated Pathways1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yinghong; Michael, Todd P.; Hudson, Matthew E.; Kay, Steve A.; Chory, Joanne; Schuler, Mary A.

    2009-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) play important roles in the synthesis of diverse secondary compounds in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Comparison of four data sets analyzing seedlings harvested over a 2-d period of constant conditions after growth with varying photoperiods and thermocycles recorded a total of 98 P450 loci as circadian regulated for at least one of the four conditions. Here, we further describe the circadian-regulated pathways using, as reporters, individual P450 loci that are likely to be rate limiting in secondary metabolic pathways. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction gel blot analyses have confirmed circadian regulation of P450s in phenylpropanoid, carotenoid, oxylipin, glucosinolate, and brassinosteroid biosyntheses and have shown that both P450 and non-P450 genes in the many branches of the phenylpropanoid pathway have similar circadian patterns of expression. In silico analyses of the subsets of coregulated promoters have identified overrepresented promoter elements in various biosynthetic pathway genes, including MYB and MYB4 elements that are significantly more abundant in promoters for the core and lignin sections of phenylpropanoid metabolism. Interactions with these elements important for circadian regulation do not involve the MYB transcription factor PAP1, as previously proposed, since the expression patterns of circadian-regulated P450s are the same in pap1-D mutant seedlings as in wild-type seedlings. Further analysis of circadian-regulated promoters in other biochemical pathways provides us with the opportunity to identify novel promoter motifs that might be important in P450 circadian regulation. PMID:19386812

  7. Claudin-7 indirectly regulates the integrin/FAK signaling pathway in human colon cancer tissue.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lei; Wang, Liyong; Sui, Leiming; Zhao, Huanying; Xu, Xiaoxue; Li, Tengyan; Wang, Xiaonan; Li, Wenjing; Zhou, Ping; Kong, Lu

    2016-08-01

    The claudin family of proteins is integral to the structure and function of tight junctions. The role of claudin-7 (Cldn-7, CLDN7) in regulating the integrin/focal adhesion kinase (FAK)/ERK signaling pathway remains poorly understood. Therefore, we investigated differences in gene expression, primarily focusing on CLDN7 and integrin/FAK/ERK signaling pathway genes, between colon cancer and adjacent normal tissues. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR and immunohistochemistry were utilized to verify the results of mRNA and protein expression, respectively. In silico analysis was used to predict co-regulation between Cldn-7 and integrin/FAK/ERK signaling pathway components, and the STRING database was used to analyze protein-protein interaction pairs among these proteins. Meta-analysis of expression microarrays in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database was used to identify significant correlations between Cldn-7 and components of predicted genes in the integrin/FAK/ERK signaling pathway. Our results showed marked cancer stage-specific decreases in the protein expression of Cldn-7, Gelsolin, MAPK1 and MAPK3 in colon cancer samples, and the observed changes for all proteins except Cldn-7 were in agreement with changes in the corresponding mRNA levels. Cldn-7 might indirectly regulate MAPK3 via KRT8 due to KRT8 co-expression with MAPK3 or CLDN7. Our bioinformatics methods supported the hypothesis that Cldn-7 does not directly regulate any genes in the integrin/FAK/ERK signaling pathway. These factors may participate in a common network that regulates cancer progression in which the MAPK pathway serves as the central node.

  8. A constitutive active MAPK/ERK pathway due to BRAFV600E positively regulates AHR pathway in PTC

    PubMed Central

    Regazzo, Daniela; Bertazza, Loris; Galuppini, Francesca; Guzzardo, Vincenza; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie Lise; Vianello, Federica; Ciato, Denis; Ceccato, Filippo; Watutantrige-Fernando, Sara; Bisognin, Andrea; Bortoluzzi, Stefania; Pennelli, Gianmaria; Boscaro, Marco; Scaroni, Carla; Mian, Caterina

    2015-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor mediating the toxicity and tumor-promoting properties of dioxin. AHR has been reported to be overexpressed and constitutively active in a variety of solid tumors, but few data are currently available concerning its role in thyroid cancer. In this study we quantitatively explored a series of 51 paired-normal and papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) tissues for AHR-related genes. We identified an increased AHR expression/activity in PTC, independently from its nuclear dimerization partner and repressor but strictly related to a constitutive active MAPK/ERK pathway. The AHR up-regulation followed by an increased expression of AHR target genes was confirmed by a meta-analysis of published microarray data, suggesting a ligand-independent active AHR pathway in PTC. In-vitro studies using a PTC-derived cell line (BCPAP) and HEK293 cells showed that BRAFV600E may directly modulate AHR localization, induce AHR expression and activity in an exogenous ligand-independent manner. The AHR pathway might represent a potential novel therapeutic target for PTC in the clinical practice. PMID:26392334

  9. Molecular chaperone Hsp27 regulates the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vahid, Sepideh; Thaper, Daksh; Gibson, Kate F.; Bishop, Jennifer L.; Zoubeidi, Amina

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) is a molecular chaperone highly expressed in aggressive cancers, where it is involved in numerous pro-tumorigenic signaling pathways. Using functional genomics we identified for the first time that Hsp27 regulates the gene signature of transcriptional co-activators YAP and TAZ, which are negatively regulated by the Hippo Tumor Suppressor pathway. The Hippo pathway inactivates YAP by phosphorylating and increasing its cytoplasmic retention with the 14.3.3 proteins. Gain and loss of function experiments in prostate, breast and lung cancer cells showed that Hsp27 knockdown induced YAP phosphorylation and cytoplasmic localization while overexpression of Hsp27 displayed opposite results. Mechanistically, Hsp27 regulates the Hippo pathway by accelerating the proteasomal degradation of ubiquitinated MST1, the core Hippo kinase, resulting in reduced phosphorylation/activity of LATS1 and MOB1, its downstream effectors. Importantly, our in vitro results were supported by data from human tumors; clinically, high expression of Hsp27 in prostate tumors is correlated with increased expression of YAP gene signature and reduced phosphorylation of YAP in lung and invasive breast cancer clinical samples. This study reveals for the first time a link between Hsp27 and the Hippo cascade, providing a novel mechanism of deregulation of this tumor suppressor pathway across multiple cancers. PMID:27555231

  10. Regulation of mRNA export by the PI3 kinase/AKT signal transduction pathway

    PubMed Central

    Quaresma, Alexandre Jose Christino; Sievert, Rachel; Nickerson, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    UAP56, ALY/REF, and NXF1 are mRNA export factors that sequentially bind at the 5′ end of a nuclear mRNA but are also reported to associate with the exon junction complex (EJC). To screen for signal transduction pathways regulating mRNA export complex assembly, we used fluorescence recovery after photobleaching to measure the binding of mRNA export and EJC core proteins in nuclear complexes. The fraction of UAP56, ALY/REF, and NXF1 tightly bound in complexes was reduced by drug inhibition of the phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3 kinase)/AKT pathway, as was the tightly bound fraction of the core EJC proteins eIF4A3, MAGOH, and Y14. Inhibition of the mTOR mTORC1 pathway decreased the tight binding of MAGOH. Inhibition of the PI3 kinase/AKT pathway increased the export of poly(A) RNA and of a subset of candidate mRNAs. A similar effect of PI3 kinase/AKT inhibition was observed for mRNAs from both intron-containing and intronless histone genes. However, the nuclear export of mRNAs coding for proteins targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum or to mitochondria was not affected by the PI3 kinase/AKT pathway. These results show that the active PI3 kinase/AKT pathway can regulate mRNA export and promote the nuclear retention of some mRNAs. PMID:23427269

  11. Putting the pieces together: How is the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis regulated in cancer and chemotherapy?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In order to solve a jigsaw puzzle, one must first have the complete picture to logically connect the pieces. However, in cancer biology, we are still gaining an understanding of all the signaling pathways that promote tumorigenesis and how these pathways can be pharmacologically manipulated by conventional and targeted therapies. Despite not having complete knowledge of the mechanisms that cause cancer, the signaling networks responsible for cancer are becoming clearer, and this information is serving as a solid foundation for the development of rationally designed therapies. One goal of chemotherapy is to induce cancer cell death through the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Within this review, we present the pathways that govern the cellular decision to undergo apoptosis as three distinct, yet connected puzzle pieces: (1) How do oncogene and tumor suppressor pathways regulate apoptosis upstream of mitochondria? (2) How does the B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL-2) family influence tumorigenesis and chemotherapeutic responses? (3) How is post-mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) regulation of cell death relevant in cancer? When these pieces are united, it is possible to appreciate how cancer signaling directly impacts upon the fundamental cellular mechanisms of apoptosis and potentially reveals novel pharmacological targets within these pathways that may enhance chemotherapeutic success. PMID:25621172

  12. Neurotrophins regulate Schwann cell migration by activating divergent signaling pathways dependent on Rho GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Junji; Chan, Jonah R.; Shooter, Eric M.

    2004-01-01

    Neurotrophins are recognized widely as essential factors in the developing nervous system. Previously, we demonstrated that neurotrophin 3 activation of TrkC inhibits Schwann cell myelination and enhances the migration of primary Schwann cells through the signaling pathway regulated by the Rho GTPases Rac1 and Cdc42. Here, we show that neurotrophins activate divergent signaling pathways to promote or inhibit Schwann cell migration. Endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor acting through p75NTR inhibits Schwann cell migration dramatically by Src kinase-dependent activation of the guanine-nucleotide exchange factor Vav2 and RhoA. Together, these results suggest that neurotrophins and their receptors differentially regulate Schwann cell migration through the signaling pathways that depend on Rho GTPases. PMID:15161978

  13. miRNA Profiling Reveals Dysregulation of RET and RET-Regulating Pathways in Hirschsprung's Disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuangshuang; Wang, Shiqi; Guo, Zhenhua; Wu, Huan; Jin, Xianqing; Wang, Yi; Li, Xiaoqing; Liang, Shaoyan

    2016-01-01

    Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR), the most common congenital malformation of the gut, is regulated by multiple signal transduction pathways. Several components of these pathways are important targets for microRNAs (miRNAs). Multiple miRNAs have been associated with the pathophysiology of HSCR, and serum miRNAs profiles of HSCR patients have been reported, but miRNA expression in HSCR colon tissue is almost completely unexplored. Using microarray technology, we screened colon tissue to detect miRNAs whose expression profiles were altered in HSCR and identify targets of differentially expressed miRNAs. Following filtering of low-intensity signals, data normalization, and volcano plot filtering, we identified 168 differentially expressed miRNAs (104 up-regulated and 64 down-regulated). Fifty of these mRNAs represent major targets of dysegulated miRNAs and may thus important roles in the pathophysiology of HSCR. Pathway analysis revealed that 7 of the miRNA targets encode proteins involved in regulation of cell proliferation and migration via RET and related signaling pathways (MAPK and PI3K/AKT). Our results identify miRNAs that play key roles in the pathophysiology of the complex multi-factorial disease HSCR. PMID:26933947

  14. miRNA Profiling Reveals Dysregulation of RET and RET-Regulating Pathways in Hirschsprung's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuangshuang; Wang, Shiqi; Guo, Zhenhua; Wu, Huan; Jin, Xianqing; Wang, Yi; Li, Xiaoqing; Liang, Shaoyan

    2016-01-01

    Hirschsprung’s disease (HSCR), the most common congenital malformation of the gut, is regulated by multiple signal transduction pathways. Several components of these pathways are important targets for microRNAs (miRNAs). Multiple miRNAs have been associated with the pathophysiology of HSCR, and serum miRNAs profiles of HSCR patients have been reported, but miRNA expression in HSCR colon tissue is almost completely unexplored. Using microarray technology, we screened colon tissue to detect miRNAs whose expression profiles were altered in HSCR and identify targets of differentially expressed miRNAs. Following filtering of low-intensity signals, data normalization, and volcano plot filtering, we identified 168 differentially expressed miRNAs (104 up-regulated and 64 down-regulated). Fifty of these mRNAs represent major targets of dysegulated miRNAs and may thus important roles in the pathophysiology of HSCR. Pathway analysis revealed that 7 of the miRNA targets encode proteins involved in regulation of cell proliferation and migration via RET and related signaling pathways (MAPK and PI3K/AKT). Our results identify miRNAs that play key roles in the pathophysiology of the complex multi-factorial disease HSCR. PMID:26933947

  15. Cln3-associated kinase activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is regulated by the mating factor pathway.

    PubMed

    Jeoung, D I; Oehlen, L J; Cross, F R

    1998-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell cycle is arrested in G1 phase by the mating factor pathway. Genetic evidence has suggested that the G1 cyclins Cln1, Cln2, and Cln3 are targets of this pathway whose inhibition results in G1 arrest. Inhibition of Cln1- and Cln2-associated kinase activity by the mating factor pathway acting through Far1 has been described. Here we report that Cln3-associated kinase activity is inhibited by mating factor treatment, with dose response and timing consistent with involvement in cell cycle arrest. No regulation of Cln3-associated kinase was observed in a fus3 kss1 strain deficient in mating factor pathway mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases. Inhibition occurs mainly at the level of specific activity of Cln3-Cdc28 complexes. Inhibition of the C-terminally truncated Cln3-1-associated kinase is not observed; such truncations were previously identified genetically as causing resistance to mating factor-induced cell cycle arrest. Regulation of Cln3-associated kinase specific activity by mating factor treatment requires Far1. Overexpression of Far1 restores inhibition of C-terminally truncated Cln3-1-associated kinase activity. G2/M-arrested cells are unable to regulate Cln3-associated kinase, possibly because of cell cycle regulation of Far1 abundance. Inhibition of Cln3-associated kinase activity by the mating factor pathway may allow this pathway to block the earliest step in normal cell cycle initiation, since Cln3 functions as the most upstream G1-acting cyclin, activating transcription of the G1 cyclins CLN1 and CLN2 as well as of the S-phase cyclins CLB5 and CLB6. PMID:9418890

  16. FLC, a repressor of flowering, is regulated by genes in different inductive pathways.

    PubMed

    Rouse, Dean T; Sheldon, Candice C; Bagnall, David J; Peacock, W James; Dennis, Elizabeth S

    2002-01-01

    The MADS-box protein encoded by FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) is a repressor of flowering. Loci in the autonomous flowering pathway control FLC levels. We show the epistatic groupings of autonomous pathway mutants fca/fy and fve/fpa, based on their effects on flowering time, are consistent with their effects on FLC transcript and protein levels. We demonstrate that synergistic increases in FLC mRNA and protein expression occur in response to interactions between the autonomous pathway mutants fca and fpa and mutants in other pathways (fe, ft, fha) that do not regulate FLC when present as single mutants. These changes in FLC levels provide the molecular basis of the interactions previously shown in genetic analyses. The interactions between genes of multiple pathways emphasize the central position of FLC in the control of floral initiation. FLC protein levels match those of its mRNA for a range of genetic, developmental and environmental variables, indicating that control of FLC is at the level of transcription or transcript stability. The autonomous and photoperiod pathways also interact at the level of SOC1. FLC acts as a repressor of SOC1, and SOC1 levels are low when FLC levels are high. In C24 plants which have moderately high FLC levels, flowering occurs without a decrease in FLC level, but the SOC1 level does increase. Thus SOC1 levels can be upregulated through the activities of other pathways, despite the repression by FLC.

  17. The Atg1-Tor pathway regulates yolk catabolism in Drosophila embryos.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Hallie; Sopko, Richelle; Coughlin, Margaret; Perrimon, Norbert; Mitchison, Tim

    2015-11-15

    Yolk provides an important source of nutrients during the early development of oviparous organisms. It is composed mainly of vitellogenin proteins packed into membrane-bound compartments called yolk platelets. Catabolism of yolk is initiated by acidification of the yolk platelet, leading to the activation of Cathepsin-like proteinases, but it is unknown how this process is triggered. Yolk catabolism initiates at cellularization in Drosophila melanogaster embryos. Using maternal shRNA technology we found that yolk catabolism depends on the Tor pathway and on the autophagy-initiating kinase Atg1. Whereas Atg1 was required for a burst of spatially regulated autophagy during late cellularization, autophagy was not required for initiating yolk catabolism. We propose that the conserved Tor metabolic sensing pathway regulates yolk catabolism, similar to Tor-dependent metabolic regulation on the lysosome.

  18. The STARS signaling pathway: a key regulator of skeletal muscle function.

    PubMed

    Lamon, Séverine; Wallace, Marita A; Russell, Aaron P

    2014-09-01

    During the last decade, the striated muscle activator of Rho signaling (STARS), a muscle-specific protein, has been proposed to play an increasingly important role in skeletal muscle growth, metabolism, regeneration and stress adaptation. STARS influences actin dynamics and, as a consequence, regulates the myocardin-related transcription factor A/serum response factor (MRTF-A/SRF) transcriptional program, a well-known pathway controlling skeletal muscle development and function. Muscle-specific stress conditions, such as exercise, positively regulates, while disuse and degenerative muscle diseases are associated with a downregulation of STARS and its downstream partners, suggesting a pivotal role for STARS in skeletal muscle health. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the known role and regulation of STARS and the members of its signaling pathway, RhoA, MRTF-A and SRF, in skeletal muscle.

  19. Activation of the TOR Signalling Pathway by Glutamine Regulates Insect Fecundity.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yifan; Sun, Zhongxiang; Zhang, Jianqing; Kang, Kui; Chen, Jie; Zhang, Wenqing

    2015-01-01

    The target of rapamycin (TOR) positively controls cell growth in response to nutrients such as amino acids. However, research on the specific nutrients sensed by TOR is limited. Glutamine (Gln), a particularly important amino acid involved in metabolism in organisms, is synthesised and catalysed exclusively by glutamine synthetase (GS), and our previous studies have shown that Gln may regulate fecundity in vivo levels of the brown planthopper (BPH) Nilaparvata lugens. Until now, it has remained unclear whether Gln activates or inhibits the TOR signalling pathway. Here, we performed the combined analyses of iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification) and DGE (tag-based digital gene expression) data in N. lugens at the protein and transcript levels after GS RNAi, and we found that 52 pathways overlap, including the TOR pathway. We further experimentally demonstrate that Gln activates the TOR pathway by promoting the serine/threonine protein kinase AKT and inhibiting the 5'AMP-activated protein kinase AMPK phosphorylation activity in the pest. Furthermore, TOR regulates the fecundity of N. lugens probably by mediating vitellogenin (Vg) expression. This work is the first report that Gln activates the TOR pathway in vivo. PMID:26024507

  20. IDENTIFICATION OF A DEVELOPMENTALLY-REGULATED PATHWAY OF MEMBRANE RETRIEVAL IN NEURONAL GROWTH CONES

    PubMed Central

    Bonanomi, Dario; Fornasiero, Eugenio F.; Valdez, Gregorio; Halegoua, Simon; Benfenati, Fabio; Menegon, Andrea; Valtorta, Flavia

    2009-01-01

    During axon navigation and upon target recognition the growth cone plasma membrane is constantly reconfigured as a result of changes in cytoskeletal and membrane dynamics. The identity and regulation of the membrane pathway(s) participating in remodeling of the growth cone surface remain elusive. Here, we identify a constitutive, high capacity plasma membrane recycling activity in the axonal growth cones which is mediated by a novel bulk endocytic pathway mechanistically related to macropinocytosis. This pathway, involving large compartments distributed at sites of intense actin-based membrane ruffling, requires phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity, the small GTPase Rac1 and the pinocytic chaperone Pincher. At early developmental stages, the synaptic vesicle and classical endosomal recycling pathways do not participate in the rapid retrieval of the growth cone plasma membrane. At later stages, during the onset of synaptogenesis, an intrinsic program of maturation leads to downregulation of basal bulk endocytosis and the emergence of depolarization-induced synaptic vesicle exo-endocytosis. We propose that the control of bulk membrane retrieval contributes to the homeostatic regulation of the axonal plasma membrane and growth cone remodeling during axonal outgrowth. In addition, we suggest that the downregulation of bulk endocytosis during synaptogenesis might contribute to the preservation of synaptic vesicle specificity. PMID:18940911

  1. Activation of the TOR Signalling Pathway by Glutamine Regulates Insect Fecundity.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yifan; Sun, Zhongxiang; Zhang, Jianqing; Kang, Kui; Chen, Jie; Zhang, Wenqing

    2015-05-29

    The target of rapamycin (TOR) positively controls cell growth in response to nutrients such as amino acids. However, research on the specific nutrients sensed by TOR is limited. Glutamine (Gln), a particularly important amino acid involved in metabolism in organisms, is synthesised and catalysed exclusively by glutamine synthetase (GS), and our previous studies have shown that Gln may regulate fecundity in vivo levels of the brown planthopper (BPH) Nilaparvata lugens. Until now, it has remained unclear whether Gln activates or inhibits the TOR signalling pathway. Here, we performed the combined analyses of iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification) and DGE (tag-based digital gene expression) data in N. lugens at the protein and transcript levels after GS RNAi, and we found that 52 pathways overlap, including the TOR pathway. We further experimentally demonstrate that Gln activates the TOR pathway by promoting the serine/threonine protein kinase AKT and inhibiting the 5'AMP-activated protein kinase AMPK phosphorylation activity in the pest. Furthermore, TOR regulates the fecundity of N. lugens probably by mediating vitellogenin (Vg) expression. This work is the first report that Gln activates the TOR pathway in vivo.

  2. New insights into the regulation of plant immunity by amino acid metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Zeier, Jürgen

    2013-12-01

    Besides defence pathways regulated by classical stress hormones, distinct amino acid metabolic pathways constitute integral parts of the plant immune system. Mutations in several genes involved in Asp-derived amino acid biosynthetic pathways can have profound impact on plant resistance to specific pathogen types. For instance, amino acid imbalances associated with homoserine or threonine accumulation elevate plant immunity to oomycete pathogens but not to pathogenic fungi or bacteria. The catabolism of Lys produces the immune signal pipecolic acid (Pip), a cyclic, non-protein amino acid. Pip amplifies plant defence responses and acts as a critical regulator of plant systemic acquired resistance, defence priming and local resistance to bacterial pathogens. Asp-derived pyridine nucleotides influence both pre- and post-invasion immunity, and the catabolism of branched chain amino acids appears to affect plant resistance to distinct pathogen classes by modulating crosstalk of salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid-regulated defence pathways. It also emerges that, besides polyamine oxidation and NADPH oxidase, Pro metabolism is involved in the oxidative burst and the hypersensitive response associated with avirulent pathogen recognition. Moreover, the acylation of amino acids can control plant resistance to pathogens and pests by the formation of protective plant metabolites or by the modulation of plant hormone activity.

  3. The SLIT-ROBO pathway: a regulator of cell function with implications for the reproductive system.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Rachel E; Duncan, W Colin

    2010-04-01

    The secreted SLIT glycoproteins and their Roundabout (ROBO) receptors were originally identified as important axon guidance molecules. They function as a repulsive cue with an evolutionarily conserved role in preventing axons from migrating to inappropriate locations during the assembly of the nervous system. In addition the SLIT-ROBO interaction is involved in the regulation of cell migration, cell death and angiogenesis and, as such, has a pivotal role during the development of other tissues such as the lung, kidney, liver and breast. The cellular functions that the SLIT/ROBO pathway controls during tissue morphogenesis are processes that are dysregulated during cancer development. Therefore inactivation of certain SLITs and ROBOs is associated with advanced tumour formation and progression in disparate tissues. Recent research has indicated that the SLIT/ROBO pathway could also have important functions in the reproductive system. The fetal ovary expresses most members of the SLIT and ROBO families. The SLITs and ROBOs also appear to be regulated by steroid hormones and regulate physiological cell functions in adult reproductive tissues such as the ovary and endometrium. Furthermore several SLITs and ROBOs are aberrantly expressed during the development of ovarian, endometrial, cervical and prostate cancer. This review will examine the roles this pathway could have in the development, physiology and pathology of the reproductive system and highlight areas for future research that could further dissect the influence of the SLIT/ROBO pathway in reproduction.

  4. Coordinate regulation of the tryptophan biosynthetic pathway and indolic phytoalexin accumulation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, J; Last, R L

    1996-01-01

    Little is known about the mechanisms that couple regulation of secondary metabolic pathways to the synthesis of primary metabolic precursors. Camalexin, an indolic secondary metabolite, appears to be the major phytoalexin in Arabidopsis. It was previously shown that camalexin accumulation is caused by infection with plant pathogens, by abiotic elicitors, and in spontaneous lesions in the accelerated cell death mutant acd2. We demonstrate that the accumulation of this phytoalexin is accompanied by the induction of the mRNAs and proteins for all of the tryptophan biosynthetic enzymes tested. A strong correlation was observed between the magnitude of camalexin accumulation and the induction of tryptophan biosynthetic proteins, indicating coordinate regulation of these processes. Production of disease symptoms is not sufficient for the response because systemic infection with cauliflower mosaic virus or cucumber mosaic virus did not induce the tryptophan pathway enzymes or camalexin accumulation. Salicylic acid appears to be required, but unlike other documented pathogenesis-related proteins, it is not sufficient for the coordinate induction. Results with trp mutants suggest that the tryptophan pathway is not rate limiting for camalexin accumulation. Taken together, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that the regulation of the tryptophan pathway in plants responds to needs for biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. PMID:8989880

  5. Coordinate regulation of the tryptophan biosynthetic pathway and indolic phytoalexin accumulation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, J; Last, R L

    1996-12-01

    Little is known about the mechanisms that couple regulation of secondary metabolic pathways to the synthesis of primary metabolic precursors. Camalexin, an indolic secondary metabolite, appears to be the major phytoalexin in Arabidopsis. It was previously shown that camalexin accumulation is caused by infection with plant pathogens, by abiotic elicitors, and in spontaneous lesions in the accelerated cell death mutant acd2. We demonstrate that the accumulation of this phytoalexin is accompanied by the induction of the mRNAs and proteins for all of the tryptophan biosynthetic enzymes tested. A strong correlation was observed between the magnitude of camalexin accumulation and the induction of tryptophan biosynthetic proteins, indicating coordinate regulation of these processes. Production of disease symptoms is not sufficient for the response because systemic infection with cauliflower mosaic virus or cucumber mosaic virus did not induce the tryptophan pathway enzymes or camalexin accumulation. Salicylic acid appears to be required, but unlike other documented pathogenesis-related proteins, it is not sufficient for the coordinate induction. Results with trp mutants suggest that the tryptophan pathway is not rate limiting for camalexin accumulation. Taken together, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that the regulation of the tryptophan pathway in plants responds to needs for biosynthesis of secondary metabolites.

  6. Association genetics and transcriptome analysis reveal a gibberellin-responsive pathway involved in regulating photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jianbo; Tian, Jiaxing; Du, Qingzhang; Chen, Jinhui; Li, Ying; Yang, Xiaohui; Li, Bailian; Zhang, Deqiang

    2016-05-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) regulate a wide range of important processes in plant growth and development, including photosynthesis. However, the mechanism by which GAs regulate photosynthesis remains to be understood. Here, we used multi-gene association to investigate the effect of genes in the GA-responsive pathway, as constructed by RNA sequencing, on photosynthesis, growth, and wood property traits, in a population of 435 Populus tomentosa By analyzing changes in the transcriptome following GA treatment, we identified many key photosynthetic genes, in agreement with the observed increase in measurements of photosynthesis. Regulatory motif enrichment analysis revealed that 37 differentially expressed genes related to photosynthesis shared two essential GA-related cis-regulatory elements, the GA response element and the pyrimidine box. Thus, we constructed a GA-responsive pathway consisting of 47 genes involved in regulating photosynthesis, including GID1, RGA, GID2, MYBGa, and 37 photosynthetic differentially expressed genes. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based association analysis showed that 142 SNPs, representing 40 candidate genes in this pathway, were significantly associated with photosynthesis, growth, and wood property traits. Epistasis analysis uncovered interactions between 310 SNP-SNP pairs from 37 genes in this pathway, revealing possible genetic interactions. Moreover, a structural gene-gene matrix based on a time-course of transcript abundances provided a better understanding of the multi-gene pathway affecting photosynthesis. The results imply a functional role for these genes in mediating photosynthesis, growth, and wood properties, demonstrating the potential of combining transcriptome-based regulatory pathway construction and genetic association approaches to detect the complex genetic networks underlying quantitative traits.

  7. Amarogentin regulates self renewal pathways to restrict liver carcinogenesis in experimental mouse model.

    PubMed

    Sur, Subhayan; Pal, Debolina; Banerjee, Kaustav; Mandal, Suvra; Das, Ashes; Roy, Anup; Panda, Chinmay Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Amarogentin, a secoiridoid glycoside isolated from medicinal plant Swertia chirata, was found to restrict CCl4 /N-nitrosodiethyl amine (NDEA) induced mouse liver carcinogenesis by modulating G1/S cell cycle check point and inducing apoptosis. To understand its therapeutic efficacy on stem cell self renewal pathways, prevalence of CD44 positive cancer stem cell (CSC) population, expressions (mRNA/protein) of some key regulatory genes of self renewal Wnt and Hedgehog pathways along with expressions of E-cadherin and EGFR were analyzed during the liver carcinogenesis and in liver cancer cell line HepG2. It was observed that amarogentin could significantly reduce CD44 positive CSCs in both pre and post initiation stages of carcinogenesis than carcinogen control mice. In Wnt pathway, amarogentin could inhibit expressions of β-catenin, phospho β-catenin (Y-654) and activate expressions of antagonists sFRP1/2 and APC in the liver lesions. In Hedgehog pathway, decreased expressions of Gli1, sonic hedgehog ligand, and SMO along with up-regulation of PTCH1 were seen in the liver lesions due to amarogentin treatment. Moreover, amarogentin could up-regulate E-cadherin expression and down-regulate expression of EGFR in the liver lesions. Similarly, amarogentin could inhibit HepG2 cell growth along with expression and prevalence of CD44 positive CSCs. Similar to in vivo analysis, amarogentin could modulate the expressions of the key regulatory genes of the Wnt and hedgehog pathways and EGFR in HepG2 cells. Thus, our data suggests that the restriction of liver carcinogenesis by amarogentin might be due to reduction of CD44 positive CSCs and modulation of the self renewal pathways. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26154024

  8. Association genetics and transcriptome analysis reveal a gibberellin-responsive pathway involved in regulating photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jianbo; Tian, Jiaxing; Du, Qingzhang; Chen, Jinhui; Li, Ying; Yang, Xiaohui; Li, Bailian; Zhang, Deqiang

    2016-05-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) regulate a wide range of important processes in plant growth and development, including photosynthesis. However, the mechanism by which GAs regulate photosynthesis remains to be understood. Here, we used multi-gene association to investigate the effect of genes in the GA-responsive pathway, as constructed by RNA sequencing, on photosynthesis, growth, and wood property traits, in a population of 435 Populus tomentosa By analyzing changes in the transcriptome following GA treatment, we identified many key photosynthetic genes, in agreement with the observed increase in measurements of photosynthesis. Regulatory motif enrichment analysis revealed that 37 differentially expressed genes related to photosynthesis shared two essential GA-related cis-regulatory elements, the GA response element and the pyrimidine box. Thus, we constructed a GA-responsive pathway consisting of 47 genes involved in regulating photosynthesis, including GID1, RGA, GID2, MYBGa, and 37 photosynthetic differentially expressed genes. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based association analysis showed that 142 SNPs, representing 40 candidate genes in this pathway, were significantly associated with photosynthesis, growth, and wood property traits. Epistasis analysis uncovered interactions between 310 SNP-SNP pairs from 37 genes in this pathway, revealing possible genetic interactions. Moreover, a structural gene-gene matrix based on a time-course of transcript abundances provided a better understanding of the multi-gene pathway affecting photosynthesis. The results imply a functional role for these genes in mediating photosynthesis, growth, and wood properties, demonstrating the potential of combining transcriptome-based regulatory pathway construction and genetic association approaches to detect the complex genetic networks underlying quantitative traits. PMID:27091876

  9. Global transcriptome analysis reveals circadian regulation of key pathways in plant growth and development

    PubMed Central

    Covington, Michael F; Maloof, Julin N; Straume, Marty; Kay, Steve A; Harmer, Stacey L

    2008-01-01

    Background As nonmotile organisms, plants must rapidly adapt to ever-changing environmental conditions, including those caused by daily light/dark cycles. One important mechanism for anticipating and preparing for such predictable changes is the circadian clock. Nearly all organisms have circadian oscillators that, when they are in phase with the Earth's rotation, provide a competitive advantage. In order to understand how circadian clocks benefit plants, it is necessary to identify the pathways and processes that are clock controlled. Results We have integrated information from multiple circadian microarray experiments performed on Arabidopsis thaliana in order to better estimate the fraction of the plant transcriptome that is circadian regulated. Analyzing the promoters of clock-controlled genes, we identified circadian clock regulatory elements correlated with phase-specific transcript accumulation. We have also identified several physiological pathways enriched for clock-regulated changes in transcript abundance, suggesting they may be modulated by the circadian clock. Conclusion Our analysis suggests that transcript abundance of roughly one-third of expressed A. thaliana genes is circadian regulated. We found four promoter elements, enriched in the promoters of genes with four discrete phases, which may contribute to the time-of-day specific changes in the transcript abundance of these genes. Clock-regulated genes are over-represented among all of the classical plant hormone and multiple stress response pathways, suggesting that all of these pathways are influenced by the circadian clock. Further exploration of the links between the clock and these pathways will lead to a better understanding of how the circadian clock affects plant growth and leads to improved fitness. PMID:18710561

  10. The TOR signaling pathway regulates vegetative development and virulence in Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fangwei; Gu, Qin; Yun, Yingzi; Yin, Yanni; Xu, Jin-Rong; Shim, Won-Bo; Ma, Zhonghua

    2014-07-01

    The target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling pathway plays critical roles in controlling cell growth in a variety of eukaryotes. However, the contribution of this pathway in regulating virulence of plant pathogenic fungi is unknown. We identified and characterized nine genes encoding components of the TOR pathway in Fusarium graminearum. Biological, genetic and biochemical functions of each component were investigated. The FgFkbp12-rapamycin complex binds to the FgTor kinase. The type 2A phosphatases FgPp2A, FgSit4 and FgPpg1 were found to interact with FgTap42, a downstream component of FgTor. Among these, we determined that FgPp2A is likely to be essential for F. graminearum survival, and FgSit4 and FgPpg1 play important roles in cell wall integrity by positively regulating the phosphorylation of FgMgv1, a key MAP kinase in the cell wall integrity pathway. In addition, the FgPpg1 interacting protein, FgTip41, is involved in regulating mycelial growth and virulence. Notably, FgTip41 does not interact with FgTap42 but with FgPpg1, suggesting the existence of FgTap42:FgPpg1:FgTip41 heterotrimer in F. graminearum, a complex not observed in the yeast model. Collectively, we defined a genetic regulatory framework that elucidates how the TOR pathway regulates virulence and vegetative development in F. graminearum.

  11. Hedgehog pathway regulators influence cervical cancer cell proliferation, survival and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Samarzija, Ivana; Beard, Peter

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unknown cellular mutations complement papillomavirus-induced carcinogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hedgehog pathway components are expressed by cervical cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hedgehog pathway activators and inhibitors regulate cervical cancer cell biology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell immortalization by papillomavirus and activation of Hedgehog are independent. -- Abstract: Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is considered to be a primary hit that causes cervical cancer. However, infection with this agent, although needed, is not sufficient for a cancer to develop. Additional cellular changes are required to complement the action of HPV, but the precise nature of these changes is not clear. Here, we studied the function of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway in cervical cancer. The Hh pathway can have a role in a number of cancers, including those of liver, lung and digestive tract. We found that components of the Hh pathway are expressed in several cervical cancer cell lines, indicating that there could exists an autocrine Hh signaling loop in these cells. Inhibition of Hh signaling reduces proliferation and survival of the cervical cancer cells and induces their apoptosis as seen by the up-regulation of the pro-apoptotic protein cleaved caspase 3. Our results indicate that Hh signaling is not induced directly by HPV-encoded proteins but rather that Hh-activating mutations are selected in cells initially immortalized by HPV. Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) ligand induces proliferation and promotes migration of the cervical cancer cells studied. Together, these results indicate pro-survival and protective roles of an activated Hh signaling pathway in cervical cancer-derived cells, and suggest that inhibition of this pathway may be a therapeutic option in fighting cervical cancer.

  12. Modeling of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug Effect within Signaling Pathways and miRNA-Regulation Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian; Mansmann, Ulrich R.

    2013-01-01

    To date, it is widely recognized that Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) can exert considerable anti-tumor effects regarding many types of cancers. The prolonged use of NSAIDs is highly associated with diverse side effects. Therefore, tailoring down the NSAID application onto individual patients has become a necessary and relevant step towards personalized medicine. This study conducts the systemsbiological approach to construct a molecular model (NSAID model) containing a cyclooxygenase (COX)-pathway and its related signaling pathways. Four cancer hallmarks are integrated into the model to reflect different developmental aspects of tumorigenesis. In addition, a Flux-Comparative-Analysis (FCA) based on Petri net is developed to transfer the dynamic properties (including drug responsiveness) of individual cellular system into the model. The gene expression profiles of different tumor-types with available drug-response information are applied to validate the predictive ability of the NSAID model. Moreover, two therapeutic developmental strategies, synthetic lethality and microRNA (miRNA) biomarker discovery, are investigated based on the COX-pathway. In conclusion, the result of this study demonstrates that the NSAID model involving gene expression, gene regulation, signal transduction, protein interaction and other cellular processes, is able to predict the individual cellular responses for different therapeutic interventions (such as NS-398 and COX-2 specific siRNA inhibition). This strongly indicates that this type of model is able to reflect the physiological, developmental and pathological processes of an individual. The approach of miRNA biomarker discovery is demonstrated for identifying miRNAs with oncogenic and tumor suppressive functions for individual cell lines of breast-, colon- and lung-tumor. The achieved results are in line with different independent studies that investigated miRNA biomarker related to diagnostics of cancer treatments

  13. Utilization of economical substrate-derived carbohydrates by solventogenic clostridia: pathway dissection, regulation and engineering.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yang; Jiang, Yu; Yang, Sheng; Jiang, Weihong

    2014-10-01

    Solventogenic clostridia can produce acetone, butanol and ethanol (ABE) by using different carbohydrates. For economical reasons, the utilization of cheap and renewable biomass in clostridia-based ABE fermentation has recently attracted increasing interests. With the study of molecular microbiology and development of genetic tools, the understanding of carbohydrate metabolism in clostridia has increased in recent years. Here, we review the pioneering work in this field, with a focus on dissecting the pathways and describing the regulation of the metabolism of economical substrate-derived carbohydrates by clostridia. Recent progress in the metabolic engineering of carbohydrate utilization pathways is also described.

  14. Nuclear mRNA degradation pathway(s) are implicated in Xist regulation and X chromosome inactivation.

    PubMed

    Ciaudo, Constance; Bourdet, Agnès; Cohen-Tannoudji, Michel; Dietz, Harry C; Rougeulle, Claire; Avner, Philip

    2006-06-01

    A critical step in X-chromosome inactivation (XCI), which results in the dosage compensation of X-linked gene expression in mammals, is the coating of the presumptive inactive X chromosome by the large noncoding Xist RNA, which then leads to the recruitment of other factors essential for the heterochromatinisation of the inactive X and its transcriptional silencing. In an approach aimed at identifying genes implicated in the X-inactivation process by comparative transcriptional profiling of female and male mouse gastrula, we identified the Eif1 gene involved in translation initiation and RNA degradation. We show here that female embryonic stem cell lines, silenced by RNA interference for the Eif1 gene, are unable to form Xist RNA domains upon differentiation and fail to undergo X-inactivation. To probe further an effect involving RNA degradation pathways, the inhibition by RNA interference of Rent1, a factor essential for nonsense-mediated decay and Exosc10, a specific nuclear component of the exosome, was analysed and shown to similarly impair Xist upregulation and XCI. In Eif1-, Rent1-, and Exosc10-interfered clones, Xist spliced form(s) are strongly downregulated, while the levels of unspliced form(s) of Xist and the stability of Xist RNA remain comparable to that of the control cell lines. Our data suggests a role for mRNA nuclear degradation pathways in the critical regulation of spliced Xist mRNA levels and the onset of the X-inactivation process.

  15. Postprandial Regulation of Hepatic MicroRNAs Predicted to Target the Insulin Pathway in Rainbow Trout

    PubMed Central

    Mennigen, Jan A.; Panserat, Stéphane; Larquier, Mélanie; Plagnes-Juan, Elisabeth; Medale, Françoise; Seiliez, Iban; Skiba-Cassy, Sandrine

    2012-01-01

    Rainbow trout are carnivorous fish and poor metabolizers of carbohydrates, which established this species as a model organism to study the comparative physiology of insulin. Following the recent characterisation of key roles of several miRNAs in the insulin action on hepatic intermediary metabolism in mammalian models, we investigated the hypothesis that hepatic miRNA expression is postprandially regulated in the rainbow trout and temporally coordinated in the context of insulin-mediated regulation of metabolic gene expression in the liver. To address this hypothesis, we used a time-course experiment in which rainbow trout were fed a commercial diet after short-term fasting. We investigated hepatic miRNA expression, activation of the insulin pathway, and insulin regulated metabolic target genes at several time points. Several miRNAs which negatively regulate hepatic insulin signaling in mammalian model organisms were transiently increased 4 h after the meal, consistent with a potential role in acute postprandial negative feed-back regulation of the insulin pathway and attenuation of gluconeogenic gene expression. We equally observed a transient increase in omy- miRNA-33 and omy-miRNA-122b 4 h after feeding, whose homologues have potent lipogenic roles in the liver of mammalian model systems. A concurrent increase in the activity of the hepatic insulin signaling pathway and the expression of lipogenic genes (srebp1c, fas, acly) was equally observed, while lipolytic gene expression (cpt1a and cpt1b) decreased significantly 4 h after the meal. This suggests lipogenic roles of omy-miRNA-33 and omy-miRNA-122b may be conserved between rainbow trout and mammals and that these miRNAs may furthermore contribute to acute postprandial regulation of de novo hepatic lipid synthesis in rainbow trout. These findings provide a framework for future research of miRNA regulation of hepatic metabolism in trout and will help to further elucidate the metabolic phenotype of rainbow trout

  16. Regulatory architecture determines optimal regulation of gene expression in metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Chubukov, Victor; Zuleta, Ignacio A; Li, Hao

    2012-03-27

    In response to environmental changes, the connections ("arrows") in gene regulatory networks determine which genes modulate their expression, but the quantitative parameters of the network ("the numbers on the arrows") are equally important in determining the resulting phenotype. What are the objectives and constraints by which evolution determines these parameters? We explore these issues by analyzing gene expression changes in a number of yeast metabolic pathways in response to nutrient depletion. We find that a striking pattern emerges that couples the regulatory architecture of the pathway to the gene expression response. In particular, we find that pathways controlled by the intermediate metabolite activation (IMA) architecture, in which an intermediate metabolite activates transcription of pathway genes, exhibit the following response: the enzyme immediately downstream of the regulatory metabolite is under the strongest transcriptional control, whereas the induction of the enzymes upstream of the regulatory intermediate is relatively weak. This pattern of responses is absent in pathways not controlled by an IMA architecture. The observation can be explained by the constraint imposed by the fundamental feedback structure of the network, which places downstream enzymes under a negative feedback loop and upstream ones under a positive feedback loop. This general design principle for transcriptional control of a metabolic pathway can be derived from a simple cost/benefit model of gene expression, in which the observed pattern is an optimal solution. Our results suggest that the parameters regulating metabolic enzyme expression are optimized by evolution, under the strong constraint of the underlying regulatory architecture.

  17. Methionine sulfoxide reductase A regulates cell growth through the p53-p21 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Seung Hee; Kim, Hwa-Young

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Down-regulation of MsrA inhibits normal cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MsrA deficiency leads to an increase in p21 by enhanced p53 acetylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Down-regulation of MsrA causes cell cycle arrest at the G{sub 2}/M stage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MsrA is a regulator of cell growth that mediates the p53-p21 pathway. -- Abstract: MsrA is an oxidoreductase that catalyzes the stereospecific reduction of methionine-S-sulfoxide to methionine. Although MsrA is well-characterized as an antioxidant and has been implicated in the aging process and cellular senescence, its roles in cell proliferation are poorly understood. Here, we report a critical role of MsrA in normal cell proliferation and describe the regulation mechanism of cell growth by this protein. Down-regulation of MsrA inhibited cell proliferation, but MsrA overexpression did not promote it. MsrA deficiency led to an increase in p21, a major cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, thereby causing cell cycle arrest at the G{sub 2}/M stage. While protein levels of p53 were not altered upon MsrA deficiency, its acetylation level was significantly elevated, which subsequently activated p21 transcription. The data suggest that MsrA is a regulator of cell growth that mediates the p53-p21 pathway.

  18. Identification of pathways directly regulated by SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE during vegetative and reproductive development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background MADS-domain transcription factors play important roles during plant development. The Arabidopsis MADS-box gene SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE (SVP) is a key regulator of two developmental phases. It functions as a repressor of the floral transition during the vegetative phase and later it contributes to the specification of floral meristems. How these distinct activities are conferred by a single transcription factor is unclear, but interactions with other MADS domain proteins which specify binding to different genomic regions is likely one mechanism. Results To compare the genome-wide DNA binding profile of SVP during vegetative and reproductive development we performed ChIP-seq analyses. These ChIP-seq data were combined with tiling array expression analysis, induction experiments and qRT-PCR to identify biologically relevant binding sites. In addition, we compared genome-wide target genes of SVP with those published for the MADS domain transcription factors FLC and AP1, which interact with SVP during the vegetative and reproductive phases, respectively. Conclusions Our analyses resulted in the identification of pathways that are regulated by SVP including those controlling meristem development during vegetative growth and flower development whereas floral transition pathways and hormonal signaling were regulated predominantly during the vegetative phase. Thus, SVP regulates many developmental pathways, some of which are common to both of its developmental roles whereas others are specific to only one of them. PMID:23759218

  19. The N-end rule pathway regulates pathogen responses in plants.

    PubMed

    de Marchi, Rémi; Sorel, Maud; Mooney, Brian; Fudal, Isabelle; Goslin, Kevin; Kwaśniewska, Kamila; Ryan, Patrick T; Pfalz, Marina; Kroymann, Juergen; Pollmann, Stephan; Feechan, Angela; Wellmer, Frank; Rivas, Susana; Graciet, Emmanuelle

    2016-01-01

    To efficiently counteract pathogens, plants rely on a complex set of immune responses that are tightly regulated to allow the timely activation, appropriate duration and adequate amplitude of defense programs. The coordination of the plant immune response is known to require the activity of the ubiquitin/proteasome system, which controls the stability of proteins in eukaryotes. Here, we demonstrate that the N-end rule pathway, a subset of the ubiquitin/proteasome system, regulates the defense against a wide range of bacterial and fungal pathogens in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We show that this pathway positively regulates the biosynthesis of plant-defense metabolites such as glucosinolates, as well as the biosynthesis and response to the phytohormone jasmonic acid, which plays a key role in plant immunity. Our results also suggest that the arginylation branch of the N-end rule pathway regulates the timing and amplitude of the defense program against the model pathogen Pseudomonas syringae AvrRpm1. PMID:27173012

  20. The N-end rule pathway regulates pathogen responses in plants

    PubMed Central

    de Marchi, Rémi; Sorel, Maud; Mooney, Brian; Fudal, Isabelle; Goslin, Kevin; Kwaśniewska, Kamila; Ryan, Patrick T.; Pfalz, Marina; Kroymann, Juergen; Pollmann, Stephan; Feechan, Angela; Wellmer, Frank; Rivas, Susana; Graciet, Emmanuelle

    2016-01-01

    To efficiently counteract pathogens, plants rely on a complex set of immune responses that are tightly regulated to allow the timely activation, appropriate duration and adequate amplitude of defense programs. The coordination of the plant immune response is known to require the activity of the ubiquitin/proteasome system, which controls the stability of proteins in eukaryotes. Here, we demonstrate that the N-end rule pathway, a subset of the ubiquitin/proteasome system, regulates the defense against a wide range of bacterial and fungal pathogens in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We show that this pathway positively regulates the biosynthesis of plant-defense metabolites such as glucosinolates, as well as the biosynthesis and response to the phytohormone jasmonic acid, which plays a key role in plant immunity. Our results also suggest that the arginylation branch of the N-end rule pathway regulates the timing and amplitude of the defense program against the model pathogen Pseudomonas syringae AvrRpm1. PMID:27173012

  1. The TOR signaling pathway regulates starvation-induced pseudouridylation of yeast U2 snRNA.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guowei; Radwan, Mohamed K; Xiao, Mu; Adachi, Hironori; Fan, Jason; Yu, Yi-Tao

    2016-08-01

    Pseudouridine (Ψ) has been identified in various types of RNAs, including mRNA, rRNA, tRNA, snRNA, and many other noncoding RNAs. We have previously shown that RNA pseudouridylation, like DNA and protein modifications, can be induced by stress. For instance, growing yeast cells to saturation induces the formation of Ψ93 in U2 snRNA. Here, we further investigate this inducible RNA modification. We show that switching yeast cells from nutrient-rich medium to different nutrient-deprived media (including water) results in the formation of Ψ93 in U2 snRNA. Using gene deletion/conditional depletion as well as rapamycin treatment, we further show that the TOR signaling pathway, which controls cell entry into stationary phase, regulates Ψ93 formation. The RAS/cAMP signaling pathway, which parallels the TOR pathway, plays no role in this inducible modification.

  2. Aristolochia Manshuriensis Kom Inhibits Adipocyte Differentiation by Regulation of ERK1/2 and Akt Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Dong Hoon; Lee, Ji-Hye; Kim, Taesoo; Ahn, Hyo Sun; Cho, Won-Kyung; Ha, Hyunil; Hwang, Youn-Hwan; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2012-01-01

    Aristolochia manshuriensis Kom (AMK) is a traditional medicinal herb used for the treatment of arthritis, rheumatism, hepatitis, and anti-obesity. Because of nephrotoxicity and carcinogenicity of AMK, there are no pharmacological reports on anti-obesity potential of AMK. Here, we showed AMK has an inhibitory effect on adipocyte differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells along with significantly decrease in the lipid accumulation by downregulating several adipocyte-specific transcription factors including peroxisome proliferation-activity receptor γ (PPAR-γ), CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (C/EBP-α) and C/EBP-β, which are critical for adipogenesis in vitro. AMK also markedly activated the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) pathway including Ras, Raf1, and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 (MEK1), and significantly suppressed Akt pathway by inhibition of phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1). Aristolochic acid (AA) and ethyl acetate (EtOAc) fraction of AMK with AA were significantly inhibited TG accumulation, and regulated two pathway (ERK1/2 and Akt) during adipocyte differentiation, and was not due to its cytotoxicity. These two pathways were upstream of PPAR-γ and C/EBPα in the adipogenesis. In addition, gene expressions of secreting factors such as fatty acid synthase (FAS), adiponectin, lipopreotein lipase (LPL), and aP2 were significantly inhibited by treatment of AMK during adipogenesis. We used the high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity mouse model to determine the inhibitory effects of AMK on obesity. Oral administration of AMK (62.5 mg/kg/day) significantly decreased the fat tissue weight, total cholesterol (TC), and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) concentration in the blood. The results of this study suggested that AMK inhibited lipid accumulation by the down-regulation of the major transcription factors of the adipogensis pathway including PPAR-γ and C/EBP-α through regulation of Akt pathway and ERK 1

  3. Regulation of Hydroxylation and Nitroreduction Pathways during Metabolism of the Neonicotinoid Insecticide Imidacloprid by Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tian-Qi; Mao, Shi-Yun; Sun, Shi-Lei; Yang, Wen-Long; Ge, Feng; Dai, Yi-Jun

    2016-06-22

    Imidacloprid (IMI) is mainly metabolized via nitroreduction and hydroxylation pathways, which produce different metabolites that are toxic to mammals and insects. However, regulation of IMI metabolic flux between nitroreduction and hydroxylation pathways is still unclear. In this study, Pseudomonas putida was found to metabolize IMI to 5-hydroxy and nitroso IMI and was therefore used for investigating the regulation of IMI metabolic flux. The cell growth time, cosubstrate, dissolved oxygen concentration, and pH showed significant effect on IMI degradation and nitroso and 5-hydroxy IMI formation. Gene cloning and overexpression in Escherichia coli proved that P. putida KT2440 aldehyde oxidase mediated IMI nitroreduction to nitroso IMI, while cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (CYP) failed to improve IMI hydroxylation. Moreover, E. coli cells without CYP could hydroxylate IMI, demonstrating the role of a non-CYP enzyme in IMI hydroxylation. Thus, the present study helps to further understand the environmental fate of IMI and its underlying mechanism. PMID:27230024

  4. Mitotic catenation is monitored and resolved by a PKCε-regulated pathway.

    PubMed

    Brownlow, Nicola; Pike, Tanya; Zicha, Daniel; Collinson, Lucy; Parker, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Exit from mitosis is controlled by silencing of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). It is important that preceding exit, all sister chromatid pairs are correctly bioriented, and that residual catenation is resolved, permitting complete sister chromatid separation in the ensuing anaphase. Here we determine that the metaphase response to catenation in mammalian cells operates through PKCε. The PKCε-controlled pathway regulates exit from the SAC only when mitotic cells are challenged by retained catenation and this delayed exit is characterized by BubR1-high and Mad2-low kinetochores. In addition, we show that this pathway is necessary to facilitate resolution of retained catenanes in mitosis. When delayed by catenation in mitosis, inhibition of PKCε results in premature entry into anaphase with PICH-positive strands and chromosome bridging. These findings demonstrate the importance of PKCε-mediated regulation in protection from loss of chromosome integrity in cells failing to resolve catenation in G2. PMID:25483024

  5. The orphan GPCR, Gpr161, regulates the retinoic acid and canonical Wnt pathways during neurulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo I; Matteson, Paul G; Ababon, Myka F; Nato, Alejandro Q; Lin, Yong; Nanda, Vikas; Matise, Tara C; Millonig, James H

    2015-06-01

    The vacuolated lens (vl) mouse mutation arose on the C3H/HeSnJ background and results in lethality, neural tube defects (NTDs) and cataracts. The vl phenotypes are due to a deletion/frameshift mutation in the orphan GPCR, Gpr161. A recent study using a null allele demonstrated that Gpr161 functions in primary cilia and represses the Shh pathway. We show the hypomorphic Gpr161(vl) allele does not severely affect the Shh pathway. To identify additional pathways regulated by Gpr161 during neurulation, we took advantage of naturally occurring genetic variation in the mouse. Previously Gpr161(vl-C3H) was crossed to different inbred backgrounds including MOLF/EiJ and the Gpr161(vl) mutant phenotypes were rescued. Five modifiers were mapped (Modvl: Modifier of vl) including Modvl5(MOLF). In this study we demonstrate the Modvl5(MOLF) congenic rescues the Gpr161(vl)-associated lethality and NTDs but not cataracts. Bioinformatics determined the transcription factor, Cdx1, is the only annotated gene within the Modvl5 95% CI co-expressed with Gpr161 during neurulation and not expressed in the eye. Using Cdx1 as an entry point, we identified the retinoid acid (RA) and canonical Wnt pathways as downstream targets of Gpr161. QRT-PCR, ISH and IHC determined that expression of RA and Wnt genes are down-regulated in Gpr161(vl/vl) but rescued by the Modvl5(MOLF) congenic during neurulation. Intraperitoneal RA injection restores expression of canonical Wnt markers and rescues Gpr161(vl/vl) NTDs. These results establish the RA and canonical Wnt as pathways downstream of Gpr161 during neurulation, and suggest that Modvl5(MOLF) bypasses the Gpr161(vl) mutation by restoring the activity of these pathways. PMID:25753732

  6. Essential Role of TGF-β/Smad Pathway on Statin Dependent Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Vita, Juan; Sánchez-Galán, Eva; Santamaría, Beatriz; Sánchez-López, Elsa; Rodrigues-Díez, Raquel; Blanco-Colio, Luís Miguel; Egido, Jesús; Ortiz, Alberto; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta

    2008-01-01

    Background The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase inhibitors (also called statins) exert proven beneficial effects on cardiovascular diseases. Recent data suggest a protective role for Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) in atherosclerosis by regulating the balance between inflammation and extracellular matrix accumulation. However, there are no studies about the effect of statins on TGF-β/Smad pathway in atherosclerosis and vascular cells. Methodology In cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) statins enhanced Smad pathway activation caused by TGF-β. In addition, statins upregulated TGF-β receptor type II (TRII), and increased TGF-β synthesis and TGF-β/Smad-dependent actions. In this sense, statins, through Smad activation, render VSMCs more susceptible to TGF-β induced apoptosis and increased TGF-β-mediated ECM production. It is well documented that high doses of statins induce apoptosis in cultured VSMC in the presence of serum; however the precise mechanism of this effect remains to be elucidated. We have found that statins-induced apoptosis was mediated by TGF-β/Smad pathway. Finally, we have described that RhoA inhibition is a common intracellular mechanisms involved in statins effects. The in vivo relevance of these findings was assessed in an experimental model of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E deficient mice: Treatment with Atorvastatin increased Smad3 phosphorylation and TRII overexpression, associated to elevated ECM deposition in the VSMCs within atheroma plaques, while apoptosis was not detected. Conclusions Statins enhance TGF-β/Smad pathway, regulating ligand levels, receptor, main signaling pathway and cellular responses of VSMC, including apoptosis and ECM accumulation. Our findings show that TGF-β/Smad pathway is essential for statins-dependent actions in VSMCs. PMID:19088845

  7. Hedgehog signaling pathway regulated the target genes for adipogenesis in silkworm Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shuang; Chen, Rui-Ting; Zhang, Deng-Pan; Xin, Hu-Hu; Lu, Yan; Wang, Mei-Xian; Miao, Yun-Gen

    2015-10-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signals regulate invertebrate and vertebrate development, yet the role of the pathway in adipose development remains poorly understood. In this report, we found that Hh pathway components are expressed in the fat body of silkworm larvae. Functional analysis of these components in a BmN cell line model revealed that activation of the Hh gene stimulated transcription of Hh pathway components, but inhibited the expression of the adipose marker gene AP2. Conversely, specific RNA interference-mediated knockdown of Hh resulted in increased AP2 expression. This further showed the regulation of Hh signal on the adipose marker gene. In silkworm larval models, enhanced adipocyte differentiation and an increase in adipocyte cell size were observed in silkworms that had been treated with a specific Hh signaling pathway antagonist, cyclopamine. The fat-body-specific Hh blockade tests were consistent with Hh signaling inhibiting silkworm adipogenesis. Our results indicate that the role of Hh signaling in inhibiting fat formation is conserved in vertebrates and invertebrates.

  8. The PINK1-Parkin pathway is involved in the regulation of mitochondrial remodeling process

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jeehye; Lee, Gina; Chung, Jongkyeong

    2009-01-16

    The two Parkinson's disease (PD) genes, PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) and parkin, are linked in a common pathway which affects mitochondrial integrity and function. However, it is still not known what this pathway does in the mitochondria. Therefore, we investigated its physiological function in Drosophila. Because Drosophila PINK1 and parkin mutants show changes in mitochondrial morphology in both indirect flight muscles and dopaminergic neurons, we here investigated whether the PINK1-Parkin pathway genetically interacts with the regulators of mitochondrial fusion and fission such as Drp1, which promotes mitochondrial fission, and Opa1 or Marf, which induces mitochondrial fusion. Surprisingly, DrosophilaPINK1 and parkin mutant phenotypes were markedly suppressed by overexpression of Drp1 or downregulation of Opa1 or Marf, indicating that the PINK1-Parkin pathway regulates mitochondrial remodeling process in the direction of promoting mitochondrial fission. Therefore, we strongly suggest that mitochondrial fusion and fission process could be a prominent therapeutic target for the treatment of PD.

  9. Regulation of Cell Wall Biogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: The Cell Wall Integrity Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Levin, David E.

    2011-01-01

    The yeast cell wall is a strong, but elastic, structure that is essential not only for the maintenance of cell shape and integrity, but also for progression through the cell cycle. During growth and morphogenesis, and in response to environmental challenges, the cell wall is remodeled in a highly regulated and polarized manner, a process that is principally under the control of the cell wall integrity (CWI) signaling pathway. This pathway transmits wall stress signals from the cell surface to the Rho1 GTPase, which mobilizes a physiologic response through a variety of effectors. Activation of CWI signaling regulates the production of various carbohydrate polymers of the cell wall, as well as their polarized delivery to the site of cell wall remodeling. This review article centers on CWI signaling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae through the cell cycle and in response to cell wall stress. The interface of this signaling pathway with other pathways that contribute to the maintenance of cell wall integrity is also discussed. PMID:22174182

  10. Signaling molecules and pathways regulating the fate of spermatogonial stem cells

    PubMed Central

    He, Zuping; Kokkinaki, Maria; Dym, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is the process that involves the division and differentiation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) into mature spermatozoa. SSCs are a subpopulation of type A spermatogonia resting on the basement membrane in the mammalian testis. Self-renewal and differentiation of SSCs are the foundation of normal spermatogenesis, and thus a better understanding of molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways in the SSCs is of paramount importance for the regulation of spermatogenesis and may eventually lead to novel targets for male contraception as well as for gene therapy of male infertility and testicular cancer. Uncovering the molecular mechanisms is also of great interest to a better understanding of SSC aging and for developing novel therapeutic strategies for degenerative diseases in view of the recent work demonstrating the pluripotent potential of the SSC. Progress has recently been made in elucidating the signaling molecules and pathways that determine cell fate decisions of SSCs. In this review, we first address the morphological features, phenotypic characteristics, and the potential of SSCs. And then we focus on the recent advances in defining the key signaling molecules and crucial signaling pathways regulating self-renewal and differentiation of SSCs. The association of aberrant expression of signaling molecules and cascades with abnormal spermatogenesis and testicular cancer are also discussed. Finally we point out potential future directions to pursue in research on signaling pathways of SSCs. PMID:19263492

  11. Lovastatin inhibits the extracellular-signal-regulated kinase pathway in immortalized rat brain neuroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Cerezo-Guisado, Maria Isabel; GarcíA-Román, Natalia; García-MaríN, Luis Jesús; Álvarez-Barrientos, Alberto; Bragado, Maria Julia; Lorenzo, Maria Jesús

    2006-01-01

    We have shown previously that lovastatin, a 3-hydroxy-3-methyl- glutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor, induces apoptosis in spontaneously immortalized rat brain neuroblasts. In the present study, we analysed the intracellular signal transduction pathways by which lovastatin induces neuroblast apoptosis. We showed that lovastatin efficiently inhibited Ras activation, which was associ-ated with a significant decrease in ERK1/2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2) phosphorylation. Lovastatin also decreased CREB phosphorylation and CREB-mediated gene expression. The effects of lovastatin on the Ras/ERK1/2/CREB pathway were time- and concentration-dependent and fully prevented by meva-lonate. In addition, we showed that two MEK [MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase)/ERK kinase] inhibitors, PD98059 and PD184352, were poor inducers of apoptosis in serum-treated neuroblasts. However, these inhibitors significantly increased apop-tosis induced by lovastatin treatment. Furthermore, we showed that pharmacological inhibition of both MEK and phosphoinos-itide 3-kinase activities was able to induce neuroblast apoptosis with similar efficacy as lovastatin. Our results suggest that lovast-atin triggers neuroblast apoptosis by regulating several signalling pathways, including the Ras/ERK1/2 pathway. These findings might also contribute to elucidate the intracellular mechanisms involved in the central nervous system side effects associated with statin therapy. PMID:16952276

  12. Genome-Wide Analysis of a Wnt1-Regulated Transcriptional Network Implicates Neurodegenerative Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wexler, Eric M.; Rosen, Ezra; Lu, Daning; Osborn, Gregory E.; Martin, Elizabeth; Raybould, Helen; Geschwind, Daniel H.

    2013-01-01

    Wnt proteins are critical to mammalian brain development and function. The canonical Wnt signaling pathway involves the stabilization and nuclear translocation of β-catenin; however, Wnt also signals through alternative, noncanonical pathways. To gain a systems-level, genome-wide view of Wnt signaling, we analyzed Wnt1-stimulated changes in gene expression by transcriptional microarray analysis in cultured human neural progenitor (hNP) cells at multiple time points over a 72-hour time course. We observed a widespread oscillatory-like pattern of changes in gene expression, involving components of both the canonical and the noncanonical Wnt signaling pathways. A higher-order, systems-level analysis that combined independent component analysis, waveform analysis, and mutual information–based network construction revealed effects on pathways related to cell death and neurodegenerative disease. Wnt effectors were tightly clustered with presenilin1 (PSEN1) and granulin (GRN), which cause dominantly inherited forms of Alzheimer’s disease and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), respectively. We further explored a potential link between Wnt1 and GRN and found that Wnt1 decreased GRN expression by hNPs. Conversely, GRN knockdown increased WNT1 expression, demonstrating that Wnt and GRN reciprocally regulate each other. Finally, we provided in vivo validation of the in vitro findings by analyzing gene expression data from individuals with FTD. These unbiased and genome-wide analyses provide evidence for a connection between Wnt signaling and the transcriptional regulation of neurodegenerative disease genes. PMID:21971039

  13. ERK5 pathway regulates the phosphorylation of tumour suppressor hDlg during mitosis

    SciTech Connect

    Inesta-Vaquera, Francisco A.; Campbell, David G.; Arthur, J. Simon C.; Cuenda, Ana

    2010-08-13

    Research highlights: {yields} hDlg is phosphorylated during mitosis in multiple residues. {yields} Prospho-hDlg is excluded from the midbody during mitosis. {yields} hDlg is not phosphorylated by p38{gamma} or JNK1/2 during mitosis. {yields} ERK5 pathway mediates hDlg phosphorylation in mitosis. -- Abstract: Human disc-large (hDlg) is a scaffold protein critical for the maintenance of cell polarity and adhesion. hDlg is thought to be a tumour suppressor that regulates the cell cycle and proliferation. However, the mechanism and pathways involved in hDlg regulation during these processes is still unclear. Here we report that hDlg is phosphorylated during mitosis, and we establish the identity of at least three residues phosphorylated in hDlg; some are previously unreported. Phosphorylation affects hDlg localisation excluding it from the contact point between the two daughter cells. Our results reveal a previously unreported pathway for hDlg phosphorylation in mitosis and show that ERK5 pathway mediates hDlg cell cycle dependent phosphorylation. This is likely to have important implications in the correct timely mitotic entry and mitosis progression.

  14. IFT80 is essential for chondrocyte differentiation by regulating hedgehog and Wnt signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changdong; Yuan, Xue; Yang, Shuying

    2013-01-01

    Partial mutation of intraflagellar transport 80 (IFT80) in humans causes Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (JATD) and short-rib polydactyly (SRP) syndrome type III. These diseases are autosomal recessive chondrodysplasias that share clinical similarities, including shortened long bones and constricted thoracic cage. However, the role and mechanism of IFT80 in the regulation of chondrocyte differentiation and function remain largely unknown. We hypothesize that IFT80 is required for the formation and function of cilia and plays a critical role in chondrogenic differentiation by regulating Hedgehog (Hh) and Wingless (Wnt) signaling pathways. To test this hypothesis, we first analyzed the IFT80 expression pattern and found that IFT80 was predominantly expressed in growth plate chondrocytes and during chondrogenic differentiation. Silencing IFT80 impaired cilia formation and chondrogenic differentiation in mouse bone marrow derived stromal cells (BMSCs), and decreased the expression of chondrocyte marker genes—collagen II and aggrecan. Additionally, silencing IFT80 down-regulated Hh signaling activity whereas up-regulated Wnt signaling activity. The overexpression of Gli2 in IFT80-silenced cells promoted chondrogenesis and recovered the chondrogenic deficiency from IFT80 silencing. Overall, our results demonstrate that IFT80 is essential for chondrocyte differentiation by regulating the Hh and Wnt signaling pathways. PMID:23333501

  15. Functional CRISPR screening identifies the ufmylation pathway as a regulator of SQSTM1/p62

    PubMed Central

    DeJesus, Rowena; Moretti, Francesca; McAllister, Gregory; Wang, Zuncai; Bergman, Phil; Liu, Shanming; Frias, Elizabeth; Alford, John; Reece-Hoyes, John S; Lindeman, Alicia; Kelliher, Jennifer; Russ, Carsten; Knehr, Judith; Carbone, Walter; Beibel, Martin; Roma, Guglielmo; Ng, Aylwin; Tallarico, John A; Porter, Jeffery A; Xavier, Ramnik J; Mickanin, Craig; Murphy, Leon O; Hoffman, Gregory R; Nyfeler, Beat

    2016-01-01

    SQSTM1 is an adaptor protein that integrates multiple cellular signaling pathways and whose expression is tightly regulated at the transcriptional and post-translational level. Here, we describe a forward genetic screening paradigm exploiting CRISPR-mediated genome editing coupled to a cell selection step by FACS to identify regulators of SQSTM1. Through systematic comparison of pooled libraries, we show that CRISPR is superior to RNAi in identifying known SQSTM1 modulators. A genome-wide CRISPR screen exposed MTOR signalling and the entire macroautophagy machinery as key regulators of SQSTM1 and identified several novel modulators including HNRNPM, SLC39A14, SRRD, PGK1 and the ufmylation cascade. We show that ufmylation regulates SQSTM1 by eliciting a cell type-specific ER stress response which induces SQSTM1 expression and results in its accumulation in the cytosol. This study validates pooled CRISPR screening as a powerful method to map the repertoire of cellular pathways that regulate the fate of an individual target protein. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17290.001 PMID:27351204

  16. A GRHL3-regulated repair pathway suppresses immune-mediated epidermal hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, William M.; Zeller, Michael D.; Klein, Rachel H.; Swindell, William R.; Ho, Hsiang; Espetia, Francisco; Gudjonsson, Johann E.; Baldi, Pierre F.; Andersen, Bogi

    2014-01-01

    Dermal infiltration of T cells is an important step in the onset and progression of immune-mediated skin diseases such as psoriasis; however, it is not known whether epidermal factors play a primary role in the development of these diseases. Here, we determined that the prodifferentiation transcription factor grainyhead-like 3 (GRHL3), which is essential during epidermal development, is dispensable for adult skin homeostasis, but required for barrier repair after adult epidermal injury. Consistent with activation of a GRHL3-regulated repair pathway in psoriasis, we found that GRHL3 is upregulated in lesional skin and binds known epidermal differentiation gene targets. Using an imiquimod-induced model of immune-mediated epidermal hyperplasia, we found that mice lacking GRHL3 have an exacerbated epidermal damage response, greater sensitivity to disease induction, delayed resolution of epidermal lesions, and resistance to anti–IL-22 therapy compared with WT animals. ChIP-Seq and gene expression profiling of murine skin revealed that while GRHL3 regulates differentiation pathways both during development and during repair from immune-mediated damage, it targets distinct sets of genes in the 2 processes. In particular, GRHL3 suppressed a number of alarmin and other proinflammatory genes after immune injury. This study identifies a GRHL3-regulated epidermal barrier repair pathway that suppresses disease initiation and helps resolve existing lesions in immune-mediated epidermal hyperplasia. PMID:25347468

  17. Mechanisms of JAK/STAT pathway negative regulation by the short coreceptor Eye Transformer/Latran.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Katherine H; Stec, Wojciech; Brown, Stephen; Zeidler, Martin P

    2016-02-01

    Transmembrane receptors interact with extracellular ligands to transduce intracellular signaling cascades, modulate target gene expression, and regulate processes such as proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, and homeostasis. As a consequence, aberrant signaling events often underlie human disease. Whereas the vertebrate JAK/STAT signaling cascade is transduced via multiple receptor combinations, the Drosophila pathway has only one full-length signaling receptor, Domeless (Dome), and a single negatively acting receptor, Eye Transformer/Latran (Et/Lat). Here we investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying Et/Lat activity. We demonstrate that Et/Lat negatively regulates the JAK/STAT pathway activity and can bind to Dome, thus reducing Dome:Dome homodimerization by creating signaling-incompetent Dome:Et/Lat heterodimers. Surprisingly, we find that Et/Lat is able to bind to both JAK and STAT92E but, despite the presence of putative cytokine-binding motifs, does not detectably interact with pathway ligands. We find that Et/Lat is trafficked through the endocytic machinery for lysosomal degradation but at a much slower rate than Dome, a difference that may enhance its ability to sequester Dome into signaling-incompetent complexes. Our data offer new insights into the molecular mechanism and regulation of Et/Lat in Drosophila that may inform our understanding of how short receptors function in other organisms.

  18. Chromatin protein HMGB2 regulates articular cartilage surface maintenance via β-catenin pathway

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Noboru; Caramés, Beatriz; Kawakami, Yasuhiko; Amendt, Brad A.; Komiya, Setsuro; Lotz, Martin

    2009-01-01

    The superficial zone (SZ) of articular cartilage is critical in maintaining tissue function and homeostasis and represents the site of the earliest changes in osteoarthritis. Mechanisms that regulate the unique phenotype of SZ chondrocytes and maintain SZ integrity are unknown. We recently demonstrated that expression of the chromatin protein high mobility group box (HMGB) protein 2 is restricted to the SZ in articular cartilage suggesting a transcriptional regulation involving HMGB2 in SZ. Here, we show that an interaction between HMGB2 and the Wnt/β-catenin pathway regulates the maintenance of the SZ. We found that the Wnt/β-catenin pathway is active specifically in the SZ in normal mouse knee joints and colocalizes with HMGB2. Both Wnt signaling and HMGB2 expression decrease with aging in mouse joints. Our molecular studies show that HMGB2 enhances the binding of Lef-1 to its target sequence and potentiates transcriptional activation of the Lef-1-β-catenin complex. The HMG domain within HMGB2 is crucial for interaction with Lef-1, suggesting that both HMGB2 and HMGB1 may be involved in this function. Furthermore, conditional deletion of β-catenin in cultured mouse chondrocytes induced apoptosis. These findings define a pathway where protein interactions of HMGB2 and Lef-1 enhance Wnt signaling and promote SZ chondrocyte survival. Loss of the HMGB2-Wnt signaling interaction is a new mechanism in aging-related cartilage pathology. PMID:19805379

  19. The role of the phosphoinositide pathway in hormonal regulation of the epithelial sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Blazer-Yost, Bonnie L; Nofziger, Charity

    2004-01-01

    In summary, insulin and aldosterone stimulate phosphatidylinositol phosphorylation, thus indicating the existence of a regulated protein at or before the PI3-kinase step. Aldosterone induces the synthesis of sgk, a downstream element of the PI pathway. Sgk is necessary, but not rate-limiting, for aldosterone- and insulin-stimulated Na+ transport. However, the enzyme appears to be rate-limiting for the natriferic action of ADH. Insulin-stimulated Na+ transport, an acute response, is dependent on PI3-kinase activity but the magnitude of the response is not altered by a cellular excess of sgk. ADH-stimulated transport is not dependent on PI3-kinase but is potentiated by an excess of sgk. The foregoing data indicate that the PI pathway is involved in several steps of the natriferic action of hormones and intersects with other pathways which regulate ENaC. Furthermore, the data are consistent with the hypothesis that activation of PI3-kinase may ultimately stimulate channel insertion as well as regulate channel endocytosis. Both of these phenomena can result in an increase of ENaC-mediated Na+ transport. PMID:18727255

  20. Mutations modulating the Argos-regulated signaling pathway in Drosophila eye development.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, A; Sawamoto, K; Okano, H

    2000-04-01

    Argos is a secreted protein that contains an EGF-like domain and acts as an inhibitor of Drosophila EGF receptor activation. To identify genes that function in the Argos-regulated signaling pathway, we performed a genetic screen for enhancers and suppressors of the eye phenotype caused by the overexpression of argos. As a result, new alleles of known genes encoding components of the EGF receptor pathway, such as Star, sprouty, bulge, and clown, were isolated. To study the role of clown in development, we examined the eye and wing phenotypes of the clown mutants in detail. In the eye discs of clown mutants, the pattern of neuronal differentiation was impaired, showing a phenotype similar to those caused by a gain-of-function EGF receptor mutation and overexpression of secreted Spitz, an activating ligand for the EGF receptor. There was also an increased number of pigment cells in the clown eyes. Epistatic analysis placed clown between argos and Ras1. In addition, we found that clown negatively regulated the development of wing veins. These results suggest that the clown gene product is important for the Argos-mediated inhibition of EGF receptor activation during the development of various tissues. In addition to the known genes, we identified six mutations of novel genes. Genetic characterization of these mutants suggested that they have distinct roles in cell differentiation and/or survival regulated by the EGF receptor pathway.

  1. Leptin differentially regulates NPY secretion in hypothalamic cell lines through distinct intracellular signal transduction pathways.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Sandeep S; Belsham, Denise D

    2011-04-11

    Leptin acts as a key peripheral hormone in distinct neurons in the hypothalamus to modulate both reproductive function and energy homeostasis. The control of neuropeptide Y (NPY) secretion is an example of a process that can be differentially regulated by leptin. In order to further understand these distinct modulatory effects, we have used immortalized, neuronal hypothalamic cell lines expressing NPY, mHypoE-38 and mHypoE-46. We found that these cell lines express the endogenous leptin receptor, ObRb, and secrete detectable levels of NPY. We exposed the neurons to 100nM leptin for 1h and determined that the basal levels of NPY in the cell lines were differentially regulated: NPY secretion was inhibited in mHypoE-46 neurons, whereas NPY secretion was induced in the mHypoE-38 neurons. In order to determine the mechanisms involved in the divergent regulation of NPY release, we analyzed the activity of a number of signaling components using phospho-specific antibodies directed towards specific proteins in the MAP kinase, PI3K, and AMPK pathways, among others. We found that leptin activated a different combination of second messengers in each cell line. Importantly, we could link the regulation of NPY secretion to different signaling pathways, AMPK in the mHypoE-46 and both MAPK and PI3K in the mHypoE-38 neurons. This is the first demonstration that leptin can specifically regulate individual NPY neuron secretory responses through distinct signaling pathways.

  2. Stress-Induced Nuclear RNA Degradation Pathways Regulate Yeast Bromodomain Factor 2 to Promote Cell Survival

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Kevin; Chanfreau, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Bromodomain proteins are key regulators of gene expression. How the levels of these factors are regulated in specific environmental conditions is unknown. Previous work has established that expression of yeast Bromodomain factor 2 (BDF2) is limited by spliceosome-mediated decay (SMD). Here we show that BDF2 is subject to an additional layer of post-transcriptional control through RNase III-mediated decay (RMD). We found that the yeast RNase III Rnt1p cleaves a stem-loop structure within the BDF2 mRNA to down-regulate its expression. However, these two nuclear RNA degradation pathways play distinct roles in the regulation of BDF2 expression, as we show that the RMD and SMD pathways of the BDF2 mRNA are differentially activated or repressed in specific environmental conditions. RMD is hyper-activated by salt stress and repressed by hydroxyurea-induced DNA damage while SMD is inactivated by salt stress and predominates during DNA damage. Mutations of cis-acting signals that control SMD and RMD rescue numerous growth defects of cells lacking Bdf1p, and show that SMD plays an important role in the DNA damage response. These results demonstrate that specific environmental conditions modulate nuclear RNA degradation pathways to control BDF2 expression and Bdf2p-mediated gene regulation. Moreover, these results show that precise dosage of Bromodomain factors is essential for cell survival in specific environmental conditions, emphasizing their importance for controlling chromatin structure and gene expression in response to environmental stress. PMID:25232960

  3. Regulation of Autophagic Activation by Rta of Epstein-Barr Virus via the Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lee-Wen; Wang, Wen-Hung; Chang, Pey-Jium; Chiu, Ya-Fang; Hung, Chen-Chia; Lin, Ying-Ju; Liou, Jieh-Yuan; Tsai, Wan-Ju; Hung, Chia-Ling

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autophagy is an intracellular degradation pathway that provides a host defense mechanism against intracellular pathogens. However, many viruses exploit this mechanism to promote their replication. This study shows that lytic induction of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) increases the membrane-bound form of LC3 (LC3-II) and LC3-containing punctate structures in EBV-positive cells. Transfecting 293T cells with a plasmid that expresses Rta also induces autophagy, revealing that Rta is responsible for autophagic activation. The activation involves Atg5, a key component of autophagy, but not the mTOR pathway. The expression of Rta also activates the transcription of the genes that participate in the formation of autophagosomes, including LC3A, LC3B, and ATG9B genes, as well as those that are involved in the regulation of autophagy, including the genes TNF, IRGM, and TRAIL. Additionally, treatment with U0126 inhibits the Rta-induced autophagy and the expression of autophagy genes, indicating that the autophagic activation is caused by the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling by Rta. Finally, the inhibition of autophagic activity by an autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine, or Atg5 small interfering RNA, reduces the expression of EBV lytic proteins and the production of viral particles, revealing that autophagy is critical to EBV lytic progression. This investigation reveals how an EBV-encoded transcription factor promotes autophagy to affect viral lytic development. PMID:25122800

  4. Feedback inhibition of deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase regulates the methylerythritol 4-phosphate pathway.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Aparajita; Wu, Yan; Banerjee, Rahul; Li, Yue; Yan, Honggao; Sharkey, Thomas D

    2013-06-01

    The 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway leads to the biosynthesis of isopentenyl diphosphate (IDP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMADP), the precursors for isoprene and higher isoprenoids. Isoprene has significant effects on atmospheric chemistry, whereas other isoprenoids have diverse roles ranging from various biological processes to applications in commercial uses. Understanding the metabolic regulation of the MEP pathway is important considering the numerous applications of this pathway. The 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase (DXS) enzyme was cloned from Populus trichocarpa, and the recombinant protein (PtDXS) was purified from Escherichia coli. The steady-state kinetic parameters were measured by a coupled enzyme assay. An LC-MS/MS-based assay involving the direct quantification of the end product of the enzymatic reaction, 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate (DXP), was developed. The effect of different metabolites of the MEP pathway on PtDXS activity was tested. PtDXS was inhibited by IDP and DMADP. Both of these metabolites compete with thiamine pyrophosphate for binding with the enzyme. An atomic structural model of PtDXS in complex with thiamine pyrophosphate and Mg(2+) was built by homology modeling and refined by molecular dynamics simulations. The refined structure was used to model the binding of IDP and DMADP and indicated that IDP and DMADP might bind with the enzyme in a manner very similar to the binding of thiamine pyrophosphate. The feedback inhibition of PtDXS by IDP and DMADP constitutes an important mechanism of metabolic regulation of the MEP pathway and indicates that thiamine pyrophosphate-dependent enzymes may often be affected by IDP and DMADP.

  5. Dishevelled genes mediate a conserved mammalian PCP pathway to regulate convergent extension during neurulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianbo; Hamblet, Natasha S; Mark, Sharayne; Dickinson, Mary E; Brinkman, Brendan C; Segil, Neil; Fraser, Scott E; Chen, Ping; Wallingford, John B; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony

    2006-05-01

    The planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway is conserved throughout evolution, but it mediates distinct developmental processes. In Drosophila, members of the PCP pathway localize in a polarized fashion to specify the cellular polarity within the plane of the epithelium, perpendicular to the apicobasal axis of the cell. In Xenopus and zebrafish, several homologs of the components of the fly PCP pathway control convergent extension. We have shown previously that mammalian PCP homologs regulate both cell polarity and polarized extension in the cochlea in the mouse. Here we show, using mice with null mutations in two mammalian Dishevelled homologs, Dvl1 and Dvl2, that during neurulation a homologous mammalian PCP pathway regulates concomitant lengthening and narrowing of the neural plate, a morphogenetic process defined as convergent extension. Dvl2 genetically interacts with Loop-tail, a point mutation in the mammalian PCP gene Vangl2, during neurulation. By generating Dvl2 BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) transgenes and introducing different domain deletions and a point mutation identical to the dsh1 allele in fly, we further demonstrated a high degree of conservation between Dvl function in mammalian convergent extension and the PCP pathway in fly. In the neuroepithelium of neurulating embryos, Dvl2 shows DEP domain-dependent membrane localization, a pre-requisite for its involvement in convergent extension. Intriguing, the Loop-tail mutation that disrupts both convergent extension in the neuroepithelium and PCP in the cochlea does not disrupt Dvl2 membrane distribution in the neuroepithelium, in contrast to its drastic effect on Dvl2 localization in the cochlea. These results are discussed in light of recent models on PCP and convergent extension.

  6. Regulation of cpg15 by signaling pathways that mediate synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Tadahiro; Lee, Wei-Chung Allen; Nedivi, Elly

    2003-11-01

    Transcriptional activation is a key link between neuronal activity and long-term synaptic plasticity. Little is known about genes responding to this activation whose products directly effect functional and structural changes at the synapse. cpg15 is an activity-regulated gene encoding a membrane-bound ligand that regulates dendritic and axonal arbor growth and synaptic maturation. We report that cpg15 is an immediate-early gene induced by Ca(2+) influx through NMDA receptors and L-type voltage-sensitive calcium channels. Activity-dependent cpg15 expression requires convergent activation of the CaM kinase and MAP kinase pathways. Although activation of PKA is not required for activity-dependent expression, cpg15 is induced by cAMP in active neurons. CREB binds the cpg15 promoter in vivo and partially regulates its activity-dependent expression. cpg15 is an effector gene that is a target for signal transduction pathways that mediate synaptic plasticity and thus may take part in an activity-regulated transcriptional program that directs long-term changes in synaptic connections. PMID:14664806

  7. A YAP/TAZ-induced feedback mechanism regulates Hippo pathway homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Moroishi, Toshiro; Park, Hyun Woo; Qin, Baodong; Chen, Qian; Meng, Zhipeng; Plouffe, Steven W; Taniguchi, Koji; Yu, Fa-Xing; Karin, Michael; Pan, Duojia; Guan, Kun-Liang

    2015-06-15

    YAP (Yes-associated protein) and TAZ (transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif) are major downstream effectors of the Hippo pathway that influences tissue homeostasis, organ size, and cancer development. Aberrant hyperactivation of YAP/TAZ causes tissue overgrowth and tumorigenesis, whereas their inactivation impairs tissue development and regeneration. Dynamic and precise control of YAP/TAZ activity is thus important to ensure proper physiological regulation and homeostasis of the cells. Here, we show that YAP/TAZ activation results in activation of their negative regulators, LATS1/2 (large tumor suppressor 1/2) kinases, to constitute a negative feedback loop of the Hippo pathway in both cultured cells and mouse tissues. YAP/TAZ in complex with the transcription factor TEAD (TEA domain family member) directly induce LATS2 expression. Furthermore, YAP/TAZ also stimulate the kinase activity of LATS1/2 through inducing NF2 (neurofibromin 2). This feedback regulation is responsible for the transient activation of YAP upon lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) stimulation and the inhibition of YAP-induced cell migration. Thus, this LATS-mediated feedback loop provides an efficient mechanism to establish the robustness and homeostasis of YAP/TAZ regulation.

  8. Deubiquitylating enzyme USP9x regulates hippo pathway activity by controlling angiomotin protein turnover

    PubMed Central

    Thanh Nguyen, Hung; Andrejeva, Diana; Gupta, Rajat; Choudhary, Chunaram; Hong, Xin; Eichhorn, Pieter J A; Loya, Anand C; Cohen, Stephen M

    2016-01-01

    The Hippo pathway has been identified as a key barrier for tumorigenesis, acting through downregulation of YAP/TAZ activity. Elevated YAP/TAZ activity has been documented in many human cancers. Ubiquitylation has been shown to play a key role in regulating YAP/TAZ activity through downregulation of a number of Hippo pathway components. Several ubiquitin ligase complexes have been implicated in this process, however, little is known about the deubiquitylating enzymes that counteract these activities to regulate YAP/TAZ. Here we identify the deubiquitylating enzyme USP9x as a regulator of YAP/TAZ activity. We demonstrate that USPx regulates ubiquitin-mediated turnover of the YAP inhibitor, Angiomotin. USP9x acts to deubiquitylate Angiomotin at lysine 496, resulting in stabilization of Angiomotin and lower YAP/TAZ activity. USP9x mRNA levels were reduced in several cancers. Clinically, USP9x mRNA levels were reduced in several cancers with low USPx expression correlating with poor prognosis in renal clear cell carcinoma. Our data indicate that USP9x may be a useful biomarker for renal clear cell carcinoma. PMID:27462448

  9. Merlin inhibits growth hormone-regulated Raf-ERKs pathways by binding to Grb2 protein

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Jung Yeon; Kim, Hongtae; Jeun, Sin-Soo . E-mail: ssjeun@catholic.ac.kr; Kang, Seok-Gu; Lee, Kyung-Jin

    2006-02-24

    Numerous studies have suggested that the NF2 protein merlin is involved in the regulation of abnormal cell growth and proliferation. In this study, to better understand the merlin's mechanisms that contribute to the inhibition of tumorigenesis, we examined the potential action of merlin on the cell proliferative signaling pathways in response to growth hormone (GH). Merlin effectively attenuated the GH-induced serum response element (SRE) and Elk-1-mediated transcriptional activation, as well as the endogenous SRE-regulated gene c-fos expression in NIH3T3 cells. In addition, merlin prevented the Raf-1 complex activation process, which resulted in the suppression of MAP kinase/ERK, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERKs), and Elk-1 phosphorylation, which are the downstream signals of Raf-1. Moreover, it was shown that merlin interacted with endogenous growth factor receptor bound 2 (Grb2) protein and inhibited its expression. These results suggest that merlin contributes, via its protein-to-protein interaction with Grb2 and consequent inhibition of the MAPK pathways, to the regulation of the abnormal cell proliferation, and this provides a further mechanism underlying the tumor suppressor function of merlin.

  10. Kaempferol regulates OPN-CD44 pathway to inhibit the atherogenesis of apolipoprotein E deficient mice

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Hong-Bo; Lu, Xiang-Yang; Sun, Zhi-Liang; Zhang, Heng-Bo

    2011-12-15

    Recent studies show that osteopontin (OPN) and its receptor cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44) are two pro-inflammatory cytokines contributing to the development of atherosclerosis. The objective of this study was to explore the inhibitory effect of kaempferol, a naturally occurring flavonoid compound, on atherogenesis and the mechanisms involved. The experiments were performed in aorta and plasma from C57BL/6J control and apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE{sup -/-}) mice treated or not with kaempferol (50 or 100 mg/kg, intragastrically) for 4 weeks. Kaempferol treatment decreased atherosclerotic lesion area, improved endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation, and increased the maximal relaxation value concomitantly with decrease in the half-maximum effective concentration, plasma OPN level, aortic OPN expression, and aortic CD44 expression in ApoE{sup -/-} mice. In addition, treatment with kaempferol also significantly decreased reactive oxygen species production in mice aorta. The present results suggest that kaempferol regulates OPN-CD44 pathway to inhibit the atherogenesis of ApoE{sup -/-} mice. -- Graphical abstract: Kaempferol regulates OPN-CD44 pathway to inhibit the atherogenesis of ApoE{sup -/-} mice. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer OPN-CD44 pathway plays a critical role in the development of atherosclerosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine lesion area, OPN and CD44 changes after kaempferol treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kaempferol treatment decreased atherosclerotic lesion area in ApoE{sup -/-} mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kaempferol treatment decreased aortic OPN and CD44 expressions in ApoE{sup -/-} mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kaempferol regulates OPN-CD44 pathway to inhibit the atherogenesis.

  11. Recent advances in the transcriptional regulation of the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Hichri, Imène; Barrieu, François; Bogs, Jochen; Kappel, Christian; Delrot, Serge; Lauvergeat, Virginie

    2011-05-01

    Flavonoids are secondary metabolites involved in several aspects of plant development and defence. They colour fruits and flowers, favouring seed and pollen dispersal, and contribute to plant adaptation to environmental conditions such as cold or UV stresses, and pathogen attacks. Because they affect the quality of flowers (for horticulture), fruits and vegetables, and their derivatives (colour, aroma, stringency, etc.), flavonoids have a high economic value. Furthermore, these compounds possess pharmaceutical properties extremely attractive for human health. Thanks to easily detectable mutant phenotypes, such as modification of petal pigmentation and seeds exhibiting transparent testa, the enzymes involved in the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway have been characterized in several plant species. Conserved features as well as specific differences have been described. Regulation of structural gene expression appears tightly organized in a spatial and temporal way during plant development, and is orchestrated by a ternary complex involving transcription factors from the R2R3-MYB, basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH), and WD40 classes. This MYB-bHLH-WD40 (MBW) complex regulates the genes that encode enzymes specifically involved in the late steps of the pathway leading to the biosynthesis of anthocyanins and condensed tannins. Although several genes encoding transcription factors from these three families have been identified, many gaps remain in our understanding of the regulation of this biosynthetic pathway, especially about the respective roles of bHLH and WD40 proteins. A better knowledge of the regulatory mechanisms of the flavonoid pathway is likely to favour the development of new biotechnological tools for the generation of value-added plants with optimized flavonoid content.

  12. DNA repair choice defines a common pathway for recruitment of chromatin regulators

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Gwendolyn; Papamichos-Chronakis, Manolis; Peterson, Craig L.

    2013-01-01

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair is essential for maintenance of genome stability. Recent work has implicated a host of chromatin regulators in the DNA damage response, and although several functional roles have been defined, the mechanisms that control their recruitment to DNA lesions remain unclear. Here, we find that efficient DSB recruitment of the INO80, SWR-C, NuA4, SWI/SNF, and RSC enzymes is inhibited by the non-homologous end joining machinery, and that their recruitment is controlled by early steps of homologous recombination. Strikingly, we find no significant role for H2A.X phosphorylation (γH2AX) in the recruitment of chromatin regulators, but rather their recruitment coincides with reduced levels of γH2AX. Our work indicates that cell cycle position plays a key role in DNA repair pathway choice and that recruitment of chromatin regulators is tightly coupled to homologous recombination. PMID:23811932

  13. BMAL1-dependent regulation of the mTOR signaling pathway delays aging.

    PubMed

    Khapre, Rohini V; Kondratova, Anna A; Patel, Sonal; Dubrovsky, Yuliya; Wrobel, Michelle; Antoch, Marina P; Kondratov, Roman V

    2014-01-01

    The circadian clock, an internal time-keeping system, has been linked with control of aging, but molecular mechanisms of regulation are not known. BMAL1 is a transcriptional factor and core component of the circadian clock; BMAL1 deficiency is associated with premature aging and reduced lifespan. Here we report that activity of mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) is increased upon BMAL1 deficiency both in vivo and in cell culture. Increased mTOR signaling is associated with accelerated aging; in accordance with that, treatment with the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin increased lifespan of Bmal1-/- mice by 50%. Our data suggest that BMAL1 is a negative regulator of mTORC1 signaling. We propose that the circadian clock controls the activity of the mTOR pathway through BMAL1-dependent mechanisms and this regulation is important for control of aging and metabolism.

  14. Opposite phenotypes of cancer and aging arise from alternative regulation of common signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Ukraintseva, Svetlana V; Yashin, Anatoly I

    2003-12-01

    Phenotypic features of malignant and senescent cells are in many instances opposite. Cancer cells do not "age"; their metabolic, proliferative, and growth characteristics are opposite to those observed with cellular aging (both replicative and functional). In many such characteristics cancer cells resemble embryonic cells. One can say that cancer manifests itself as a local, uncontrolled "rejuvenation" in an organism. Available evidence from human and animal studies suggests that the opposite phenotypic features of aging and cancer arise from the opposite regulation of genes participating in apoptosis/growth arrest or growth signal transduction pathways in cells. This fact may be applicable in the development of new anti-aging treatments. Genes that are contrarily regulated in cancer and aging cells (e.g., proto-oncogenes or tumor suppressors) could be candidate targets for anti-aging interventions. Their "cancer-like" regulation, if strictly controlled, might help to rejuvenate the human organism. PMID:15033776

  15. Comprehensive profiling analysis of actively resorbing osteoclasts identifies critical signaling pathways regulated by bone substrate

    PubMed Central

    Purdue, P. Edward; Crotti, Tania N.; Shen, Zhenxin; Swantek, Jennifer; Li, Jun; Hill, Jonathan; Hanidu, Adedayo; Dimock, Janice; Nabozny, Gerald; Goldring, Steven R.; McHugh, Kevin P.

    2014-01-01

    As the only cells capable of efficiently resorbing bone, osteoclasts are central mediators of both normal bone remodeling and pathologies associates with excessive bone resorption. However, despite the clear evidence of interplay between osteoclasts and the bone surface in vivo, the role of the bone substrate in regulating osteoclast differentiation and activation at a molecular level has not been fully defined. Here, we present the first comprehensive expression profiles of osteoclasts differentiated on authentic resorbable bone substrates. This analysis has identified numerous critical pathways coordinately regulated by osteoclastogenic cytokines and bone substrate, including the transition from proliferation to differentiation, and sphingosine-1-phosphate signaling. Whilst, as expected, much of this program is dependent upon integrin beta 3, the pre-eminent mediator of osteoclast-bone interaction, a surprisingly significant portion of the bone substrate regulated expression signature is independent of this receptor. Together, these findings identify an important hitherto underappreciated role for bone substrate in osteoclastogenesis. PMID:25534583

  16. Universality and diversity in the signal transduction pathway that regulates seasonal reproduction in vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Nakane, Yusuke; Yoshimura, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Most vertebrates living outside the tropical zone show robust physiological responses in response to seasonal changes in photoperiod, such as seasonal reproduction, molt, and migration. The highly sophisticated photoperiodic mechanism in Japanese quail has been used to uncover the mechanism of seasonal reproduction. Molecular analysis of quail mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH) revealed that local thyroid hormone activation within the MBH plays a critical role in the photoperiodic response of gonads. This activation is accomplished by two gene switches: thyroid hormone-activating (DIO2) and thyroid hormone-inactivating enzymes (DIO3). Functional genomics studies have shown that long-day induced thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in the pars tuberalis (PT) of the pituitary gland regulates DIO2/3 switching. In birds, light information received directly by deep brain photoreceptors regulates PT TSH. Recent studies demonstrated that Opsin 5-positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-contacting neurons are deep brain photoreceptors that regulate avian seasonal reproduction. Although the involvement of TSH and DIO2/3 in seasonal reproduction has been confirmed in various mammals, the light input pathway that regulates PT TSH in mammals differs from that of birds. In mammals, the eye is the only photoreceptor organ and light information received by the eye is transmitted to the pineal gland through the circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Nocturnal melatonin secretion from the pineal gland indicates the length of night and regulates the PT TSH. In fish, the regulatory machinery for seasonal reproduction, from light input to neuroendocrine output, has been recently demonstrated in the coronet cells of the saccus vasculosus (SV). The SV is unique to fish and coronet cells are CSF-contacting neurons. Here, we discuss the universality and diversity of signal transduction pathways that regulate vertebrate seasonal reproduction. PMID:24959116

  17. GAME9 regulates the biosynthesis of steroidal alkaloids and upstream isoprenoids in the plant mevalonate pathway.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, Pablo D; Sonawane, Prashant D; Pollier, Jacob; Vanden Bossche, Robin; Dewangan, Veena; Weithorn, Efrat; Tal, Lior; Meir, Sagit; Rogachev, Ilana; Malitsky, Sergey; Giri, Ashok P; Goossens, Alain; Burdman, Saul; Aharoni, Asaph

    2016-01-01

    Steroidal glycoalkaloids (SGAs) are cholesterol-derived molecules produced by solanaceous species. They contribute to pathogen defence but are toxic to humans and considered as anti-nutritional compounds. Here we show that GLYCOALKALOID METABOLISM 9 (GAME9), an APETALA2/Ethylene Response Factor, related to regulators of alkaloid production in tobacco and Catharanthus roseus, controls SGA biosynthesis. GAME9 knockdown and overexpression in tomato and potato alters expression of SGAs and upstream mevalonate pathway genes including the cholesterol biosynthesis gene STEROL SIDE CHAIN REDUCTASE 2 (SSR2). Levels of SGAs, C24-alkylsterols and the upstream mevalonate and cholesterol pathways intermediates are modified in these plants. Δ(7)-STEROL-C5(6)-DESATURASE (C5-SD) in the hitherto unresolved cholesterol pathway is a direct target of GAME9. Transactivation and promoter-binding assays show that GAME9 exerts its activity either directly or cooperatively with the SlMYC2 transcription factor as in the case of the C5-SD gene promoter. Our findings provide insight into the regulation of SGA biosynthesis and means for manipulating these metabolites in crops. PMID:26876023

  18. Molecular Pathways Regulating Macrovascular Pathology and Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Phenotype in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Casella, Sara; Bielli, Alessandra; Mauriello, Alessandro; Orlandi, Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a disease reaching a pandemic proportion in developed countries and a major risk factor for almost all cardiovascular diseases and their adverse clinical manifestations. T2DM leads to several macrovascular and microvascular alterations that influence the progression of cardiovascular diseases. Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) are fundamental players in macrovascular alterations of T2DM patients. VSMCs display phenotypic and functional alterations that reflect an altered intracellular biomolecular scenario of great vessels of T2DM patients. Hyperglycemia itself and through intraparietal accumulation of advanced glycation-end products (AGEs) activate different pathways, in particular nuclear factor-κB and MAPKs, while insulin and insulin growth-factor receptors (IGFR) are implicated in the activation of Akt and extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2. Nuclear factor-κB is also responsible of increased susceptibility of VSMCs to pro-apoptotic stimuli. Down-regulation of insulin growth-factor 1 receptors (IGFR-1R) activity in diabetic vessels also influences negatively miR-133a levels, so increasing apoptotic susceptibility of VSMCs. Alterations of those bimolecular pathways and related genes associate to the prevalence of a synthetic phenotype of VSMCs induces extracellular matrix alterations of great vessels. A better knowledge of those biomolecular pathways and related genes in VSMCs will help to understand the mechanisms leading to macrovascular alterations in T2DM patients and to suggest new targeted therapies. PMID:26473856

  19. MicroRNAs regulate signaling pathways in osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (Review)

    PubMed Central

    PENG, SHUPING; GAO, DAN; GAO, CHENGDE; WEI, PINGPIN; NIU, MAN; SHUAI, CIJUN

    2016-01-01

    Osteogenesis is a complex multi-step process involving the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into osteoblast progenitor cells, preosteoblasts, osteoblasts and osteocytes, and the crosstalk between multiple cell types for the formation and remodeling of bone. The signaling regulatory networks during osteogenesis include various components, including growth factors, transcription factors, micro (mi)RNAs and effectors, a number of which form feedback loops controlling the balance of osteogenic differentiation by positive or negative regulation. miRNAs have been found to be important regulators of osteogenic signaling pathways in multiple aspects and multiple signaling pathways. The present review focusses on the progress in elucidating the role of miRNA in the osteogenesis signaling networks of MSCs as a substitute for bone implantation the the field of bone tissue engineering. In particular, the review classifies which miRNAs promote or suppress the osteogenic process, and summarizes which signaling pathway these miRNAs are involved in. Improvements in knowledge of the characteristics of miRNAs in osteogenesis provide an important step for their application in translational investigations of bone tissue engineering and bone disease. PMID:27222009

  20. MAN3 gene regulates cadmium tolerance through the glutathione-dependent pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Yang, Libo; Gu, Ju; Bai, Xiaoya; Ren, Yongbin; Fan, Tingting; Han, Yi; Jiang, Li; Xiao, Fangming; Liu, Yongsheng; Cao, Shuqing

    2015-01-01

    Pollution of soil by the heavy metal cadmium (Cd) is a global environmental problem. The glutathione (GSH)-dependent phytochelatin (PC) synthesis pathway is one of the most important mechanisms contributing to Cd accumulation and tolerance. However, the regulation of this pathway is poorly understood. Here, we identified an Arabidopsis thaliana cadmium-tolerant dominant mutant xcd1-D (XVE system-induced cadmium-tolerance 1) and cloned XCD1 gene (previously called MAN3), which encodes an endo-β-mannanase. Overexpression of MAN3 led to enhanced Cd accumulation and tolerance, whereas loss-of-function of MAN3 resulted in decreased Cd accumulation and tolerance. In the presence of estradiol, enhanced Cd accumulation and tolerance in xcd1-D was associated with GSH-dependent, Cd-activated synthesis of PCs, which was correlated with coordinated activation of gene expression. Cd stress-induced expression of MAN3 and the consequently increased mannanase activity, led to increased mannose content in cell walls. Moreover, mannose treatment not only rescued the Cd-sensitive phenotype of the xcd1-2 mutant, but also improved the Cd tolerance of wild-type plants. Significantly, this mannose-mediated Cd accumulation and tolerance is dependent on GSH-dependent PC concentrations via coordinated control of expression of genes involved in PC synthesis. Our results suggest that MAN3 regulates the GSH-dependent PC synthesis pathway that contributes to Cd accumulation and tolerance in A. thaliana by coordinated control of gene expression. PMID:25329733

  1. Interaction of PACAP with Sonic hedgehog reveals complex regulation of the hedgehog pathway by PKA.

    PubMed

    Niewiadomski, Pawel; Zhujiang, Annie; Youssef, Mary; Waschek, James A

    2013-11-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling is essential for proliferation of cerebellar granule cell progenitors (cGCPs) and its aberrant activation causes a cerebellar cancer medulloblastoma. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) inhibits Shh-driven proliferation of cGCPs and acts as tumor suppressor in murine medulloblastoma. We show that PACAP blocks canonical Shh signaling by a mechanism that involves activation of protein kinase A (PKA) and inhibition of the translocation of the Shh-dependent transcription factor Gli2 into the primary cilium. PKA is shown to play an essential role in inhibiting gene transcription in the absence of Shh, but global PKA activity levels are found to be a poor predictor of the degree of Shh pathway activation. We propose that the core Shh pathway regulates a small compartmentalized pool of PKA in the vicinity of primary cilia. GPCRs that affect global PKA activity levels, such as the PACAP receptor, cooperate with the canonical Shh signal to regulate Gli protein phosphorylation by PKA. This interaction serves to fine-tune the transcriptional and physiological function of the Shh pathway. PMID:23872071

  2. Regulation of the PI3K pathway through a p85α monomer–homodimer equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Lydia WT; Walkiewicz, Katarzyna W; Besong, Tabot MD; Guo, Huifang; Hawke, David H; Arold, Stefan T; Mills, Gordon B

    2015-01-01

    The canonical action of the p85α regulatory subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) is to associate with the p110α catalytic subunit to allow stimuli-dependent activation of the PI3K pathway. We elucidate a p110α-independent role of homodimerized p85α in the positive regulation of PTEN stability and activity. p110α-free p85α homodimerizes via two intermolecular interactions (SH3:proline-rich region and BH:BH) to selectively bind unphosphorylated activated PTEN. As a consequence, homodimeric but not monomeric p85α suppresses the PI3K pathway by protecting PTEN from E3 ligase WWP2-mediated proteasomal degradation. Further, the p85α homodimer enhances the lipid phosphatase activity and membrane association of PTEN. Strikingly, we identified cancer patient-derived oncogenic p85α mutations that target the homodimerization or PTEN interaction surface. Collectively, our data suggest the equilibrium of p85α monomer–dimers regulates the PI3K pathway and disrupting this equilibrium could lead to disease development. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06866.001 PMID:26222500

  3. The SUMO pathway is developmentally regulated and required for programmed DNA elimination in Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Atsushi; Forney, James D

    2006-05-01

    Extensive genome-wide remodeling occurs during the formation of the somatic macronuclei from the germ line micronuclei in ciliated protozoa. This process is limited to sexual reproduction and includes DNA amplification, chromosome fragmentation, and the elimination of internal segments of DNA. Our efforts to define the pathways regulating these events revealed a gene encoding a homologue of ubiquitin activating enzyme 2 (UBA2) that is upregulated at the onset of macronuclear development in Paramecium tetraurelia. Uba2 enzymes are known to activate the protein called small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) that is covalently attached to target proteins. Consistent with this relationship, Northern analysis showed increased abundance of SUMO transcripts during sexual reproduction in Paramecium. RNA interference (RNAi) against UBA2 or SUMO during vegetative growth had little effect on cell survival or fission rates. In contrast, RNAi of mating cells resulted in failure to form a functional macronucleus. Despite normal amplification of the genome, excision of internal eliminated sequences was completely blocked. Additional experiments showed that the homologous UBA2 and SUMO genes in Tetrahymena thermophila are also upregulated during conjugation. These results provide evidence for the developmental regulation of the SUMO pathway in ciliates and suggest a key role for the pathway in controlling genome remodeling. PMID:16682458

  4. Regulation of Inflammatory Pathways in Cancer and Infectious Disease of the Cervix

    PubMed Central

    Adefuye, Anthonio; Sales, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the leading gynaecological malignancies worldwide. It is an infectious disease of the cervix, associated with human papillomavirus infection (HPV), infection with bacterial agents such as Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoea as well as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Furthermore, it is an AIDS-defining disease with an accelerated mortality in HIV-infected women with cervical cancer. With the introduction of robust vaccination strategies against HPV in the developed world, it is anticipated that the incidence of cervical cancer will decrease in the coming years. However, vaccination has limited benefit for women already infected with high-risk HPV, and alternative therapeutic intervention strategies are needed for these women. Many pathological disorders, including cervical cancer, are characterised by the exacerbated activation and maintenance of inflammatory pathways which are considered to be regulated by infectious agents. In cervical cancer, hyperactivation of these inflammatory pathways and regulation of immune infiltrate into tissues can potentially play a role not only in tumorigenesis but also in HIV infection. In this paper we will discuss the contribution of inflammatory pathways to cervical cancer progression and HIV infection and the role of HIV in cervical cancer progression. PMID:24278714

  5. Distinct amino acid-sensing mTOR pathways regulate skeletal myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Mee-Sup; Chen, Jie

    2013-12-01

    Signaling through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in response to amino acid availability controls many cellular and developmental processes. mTOR is a master regulator of myogenic differentiation, but the pathways mediating amino acid signals in this process are not known. Here we examine the Rag GTPases and the class III phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) Vps34, two mediators of amino acid signals upstream of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in cell growth regulation, for their potential involvement in myogenesis. We find that, although both Rag and Vps34 mediate amino acid activation of mTORC1 in C2C12 myoblasts, they have opposing functions in myogenic differentiation. Knockdown of RagA/B enhances, whereas overexpression of active RagB/C mutants impairs, differentiation, and this inhibitory function of Rag is mediated by mTORC1 suppression of the IRS1-PI3K-Akt pathway. On the other hand, Vps34 is required for myogenic differentiation. Amino acids activate a Vps34-phospholipase D1 (PLD1) pathway that controls the production of insulin-like growth factor II, an autocrine inducer of differentiation, through the Igf2 muscle enhancer. The product of PLD, phosphatidic acid, activates the enhancer in a rapamycin-sensitive but mTOR kinase-independent manner. Our results uncover amino acid-sensing mechanisms controlling the homeostasis of myogenesis and underline the versatility and context dependence of mTOR signaling.

  6. GAME9 regulates the biosynthesis of steroidal alkaloids and upstream isoprenoids in the plant mevalonate pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas, Pablo D.; Sonawane, Prashant D.; Pollier, Jacob; Vanden Bossche, Robin; Dewangan, Veena; Weithorn, Efrat; Tal, Lior; Meir, Sagit; Rogachev, Ilana; Malitsky, Sergey; Giri, Ashok P.; Goossens, Alain; Burdman, Saul; Aharoni, Asaph

    2016-01-01

    Steroidal glycoalkaloids (SGAs) are cholesterol-derived molecules produced by solanaceous species. They contribute to pathogen defence but are toxic to humans and considered as anti-nutritional compounds. Here we show that GLYCOALKALOID METABOLISM 9 (GAME9), an APETALA2/Ethylene Response Factor, related to regulators of alkaloid production in tobacco and Catharanthus roseus, controls SGA biosynthesis. GAME9 knockdown and overexpression in tomato and potato alters expression of SGAs and upstream mevalonate pathway genes including the cholesterol biosynthesis gene STEROL SIDE CHAIN REDUCTASE 2 (SSR2). Levels of SGAs, C24-alkylsterols and the upstream mevalonate and cholesterol pathways intermediates are modified in these plants. Δ(7)-STEROL-C5(6)-DESATURASE (C5-SD) in the hitherto unresolved cholesterol pathway is a direct target of GAME9. Transactivation and promoter-binding assays show that GAME9 exerts its activity either directly or cooperatively with the SlMYC2 transcription factor as in the case of the C5-SD gene promoter. Our findings provide insight into the regulation of SGA biosynthesis and means for manipulating these metabolites in crops. PMID:26876023

  7. Neurofilament heavy polypeptide regulates the Akt-beta-catenin pathway in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myoung Sook; Chang, Xiaofei; LeBron, Cynthia; Nagpal, Jatin K; Lee, Juna; Huang, Yiping; Yamashita, Keishi; Trink, Barry; Ratovitski, Edward A; Sidransky, David

    2010-01-01

    Aerobic glycolysis and mitochondrial dysfunction are common features of aggressive cancer growth. We observed promoter methylation and loss of expression in neurofilament heavy polypeptide (NEFH) in a significant proportion of primary esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) samples that were of a high tumor grade and advanced stage. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of NEFH accelerated ESCC cell growth in culture and increased tumorigenicity in vivo, whereas forced expression of NEFH significantly inhibited cell growth and colony formation. Loss of NEFH caused up-regulation of pyruvate kinase-M2 type and down-regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase, via activation of the Akt/beta-catenin pathway, resulting in enhanced aerobic glycolysis and mitochondrial dysfunction. The acceleration of glycolysis and mitochondrial dysfunction in NEFH-knockdown cells was suppressed in the absence of beta-catenin expression, and was decreased by the treatment of 2-Deoxyglucose, a glycolytic inhibitor, or API-2, an Akt inhibitor. Loss of NEFH activates the Akt/beta-catenin pathway and increases glycolysis and mitochondrial dysfunction. Cancer cells with methylated NEFH can be targeted for destruction with specific inhibitors of deregulated downstream pathways.

  8. Dopamine is a key regulator in the signalling pathway underlying predator-induced defences in Daphnia.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Linda C; Leese, Florian; Laforsch, Christian; Tollrian, Ralph

    2015-10-01

    The waterflea Daphnia is a model to investigate the genetic basis of phenotypic plasticity resulting from one differentially expressed genome. Daphnia develops adaptive phenotypes (e.g. morphological defences) thwarting predators, based on chemical predator cue perception. To understand the genomic basis of phenotypic plasticity, the description of the precedent cellular and neuronal mechanisms is fundamental. However, key regulators remain unknown. All neuronal and endocrine stimulants were able to modulate but not induce defences, indicating a pathway of interlinked steps. A candidate able to link neuronal with endocrine responses is the multi-functional amine dopamine. We here tested its involvement in trait formation in Daphnia pulex and Daphnia longicephala using an induction assay composed of predator cues combined with dopaminergic and cholinergic stimulants. The mere application of both stimulants was sufficient to induce morphological defences. We determined dopamine localization in cells found in close association with the defensive trait. These cells serve as centres controlling divergent morphologies. As a mitogen and sclerotization agent, we anticipate that dopamine is involved in proliferation and structural formation of morphological defences. Furthermore, dopamine pathways appear to be interconnected with endocrine pathways, and control juvenile hormone and ecdysone levels. In conclusion, dopamine is suggested as a key regulator of phenotypic plasticity.

  9. Cdc42p-Interacting Protein Bem4p Regulates the Filamentous-Growth Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pitoniak, Andrew; Chavel, Colin A.; Chow, Jacky; Smith, Jeremy; Camara, Diawoye; Karunanithi, Sheelarani; Li, Boyang; Wolfe, Kennith H.

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitous Rho (Ras homology) GTPase Cdc42p can function in different settings to regulate cell polarity and cellular signaling. How Cdc42p and other proteins are directed to function in a particular context remains unclear. We show that the Cdc42p-interacting protein Bem4p regulates the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway that controls filamentous growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Bem4p controlled the filamentous-growth pathway but not other MAPK pathways (mating or high-osmolarity glycerol response [HOG]) that also require Cdc42p and other shared components. Bem4p associated with the plasma membrane (PM) protein, Sho1p, to regulate MAPK activity and cell polarization under nutrient-limiting conditions that favor filamentous growth. Bem4p also interacted with the major activator of Cdc42p, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Cdc24p, which we show also regulates the filamentous-growth pathway. Bem4p interacted with the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of Cdc24p, which functions in an autoinhibitory capacity, and was required, along with other pathway regulators, to maintain Cdc24p at polarized sites during filamentous growth. Bem4p also interacted with the MAPK kinase kinase (MAPKKK) Ste11p. Thus, Bem4p is a new regulator of the filamentous-growth MAPK pathway and binds to general proteins, like Cdc42p and Ste11p, to promote a pathway-specific response. PMID:25384973

  10. Two independent pathways of regulated necrosis mediate ischemia–reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Linkermann, Andreas; Bräsen, Jan Hinrich; Darding, Maurice; Jin, Mi Kyung; Sanz, Ana B.; Heller, Jan-Ole; De Zen, Federica; Weinlich, Ricardo; Ortiz, Alberto; Walczak, Henning; Weinberg, Joel M.; Green, Douglas R.; Kunzendorf, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Regulated necrosis (RN) may result from cyclophilin (Cyp)D-mediated mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) and receptor-interacting protein kinase (RIPK)1-mediated necroptosis, but it is currently unclear whether there is one common pathway in which CypD and RIPK1 act in or whether separate RN pathways exist. Here, we demonstrate that necroptosis in ischemia–reperfusion injury (IRI) in mice occurs as primary organ damage, independent of the immune system, and that mice deficient for RIPK3, the essential downstream partner of RIPK1 in necroptosis, are protected from IRI. Protection of RIPK3-knockout mice was significantly stronger than of CypD-deficient mice. Mechanistically, in vivo analysis of cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury and hyperacute TNF-shock models in mice suggested the distinctness of CypD-mediated MPT from RIPK1/RIPK3-mediated necroptosis. We, therefore, generated CypD-RIPK3 double-deficient mice that are viable and fertile without an overt phenotype and that survived prolonged IRI, which was lethal to each single knockout. Combined application of the RIPK1 inhibitor necrostatin-1 and the MPT inhibitor sanglifehrin A confirmed the results with mutant mice. The data demonstrate the pathophysiological coexistence and corelevance of two separate pathways of RN in IRI and suggest that combination therapy targeting distinct RN pathways can be beneficial in the treatment of ischemic injury. PMID:23818611

  11. Two independent pathways of regulated necrosis mediate ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Linkermann, Andreas; Bräsen, Jan Hinrich; Darding, Maurice; Jin, Mi Kyung; Sanz, Ana B; Heller, Jan-Ole; De Zen, Federica; Weinlich, Ricardo; Ortiz, Alberto; Walczak, Henning; Weinberg, Joel M; Green, Douglas R; Kunzendorf, Ulrich; Krautwald, Stefan

    2013-07-16

    Regulated necrosis (RN) may result from cyclophilin (Cyp)D-mediated mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) and receptor-interacting protein kinase (RIPK)1-mediated necroptosis, but it is currently unclear whether there is one common pathway in which CypD and RIPK1 act in or whether separate RN pathways exist. Here, we demonstrate that necroptosis in ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) in mice occurs as primary organ damage, independent of the immune system, and that mice deficient for RIPK3, the essential downstream partner of RIPK1 in necroptosis, are protected from IRI. Protection of RIPK3-knockout mice was significantly stronger than of CypD-deficient mice. Mechanistically, in vivo analysis of cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury and hyperacute TNF-shock models in mice suggested the distinctness of CypD-mediated MPT from RIPK1/RIPK3-mediated necroptosis. We, therefore, generated CypD-RIPK3 double-deficient mice that are viable and fertile without an overt phenotype and that survived prolonged IRI, which was lethal to each single knockout. Combined application of the RIPK1 inhibitor necrostatin-1 and the MPT inhibitor sanglifehrin A confirmed the results with mutant mice. The data demonstrate the pathophysiological coexistence and corelevance of two separate pathways of RN in IRI and suggest that combination therapy targeting distinct RN pathways can be beneficial in the treatment of ischemic injury. PMID:23818611

  12. RICTOR involvement in the PI3K/AKT pathway regulation in melanocytes and melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Laugier, Florence; Finet-Benyair, Adeline; André, Jocelyne; Rachakonda, P. Sivaramakrishna; Kumar, Rajiv; Bensussan, Armand; Dumaz, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have highlighted the importance of the PI3K pathway in melanocytes and its frequent over-activation in melanoma. However, little is known about regulation of the PI3K pathway in melanocytic cells. We showed that normal human melanocytes are less sensitive to selective PI3K or mTOR inhibitors than to dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitors. The resistance to PI3K inhibitor was due to a rapid AKT reactivation limiting the inhibitor effect on proliferation. Reactivation of AKT was linked to a feedback mechanism involving the mTORC2 complex and in particular its scaffold protein RICTOR. RICTOR overexpression in melanocytes disrupted the negative feedback, activated the AKT pathway and stimulated clonogenicity highlighting the importance of this feedback to restrict melanocyte proliferation. We found that the RICTOR locus is frequently amplified and overexpressed in melanoma and that RICTOR over-expression in NRAS-transformed melanocytes stimulates their clonogenicity, demonstrating that RICTOR amplification can cooperate with NRAS mutation to stimulate melanoma proliferation. These results show that RICTOR plays a central role in PI3K pathway negative feedback in melanocytes and that its deregulation could be involved in melanoma development. PMID:26356562

  13. LncRNA mediated regulation of aging pathways in Drosophila melanogaster during dietary restriction

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Jianbo; Gaur, Uma; Mao, Xueping; Fan, Xiaolan; Li, Diyan; Li, Ying; Yang, Mingyao

    2016-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) extends lifespan in many species which is a well-known phenomenon. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play an important role in regulation of cell senescence and important age-related signaling pathways. Here, we profiled the lncRNA and mRNA transcriptome of fruit flies at 7 day and 42 day during DR and fully-fed conditions, respectively. In general, 102 differentially expressed lncRNAs and 1406 differentially expressed coding genes were identified. Most informatively we found a large number of differentially expressed lncRNAs and their targets enriched in GO and KEGG analysis. We discovered some new aging related signaling pathways during DR, such as hippo signaling pathway-fly, phototransduction-fly and protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum etc. Novel lncRNAs XLOC_092363 and XLOC_166557 are found to be located in 10 kb upstream sequences of hairy and ems promoters, respectively. Furthermore, tissue specificity of some novel lncRNAs had been analyzed at 7 day of DR in fly head, gut and fat body. Also the silencing of lncRNA XLOC_076307 resulted in altered expression level of its targets including Gadd45 (involved in FoxO signaling pathway). Together, the results implicated many lncRNAs closely associated with dietary restriction, which could provide a resource for lncRNA in aging and age-related disease field. PMID:27687893

  14. The role of phosphatidylinositol signaling pathway in regulating serotonin-induced oocyte maturation in Mercenaria mercenaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qing; Zhang, Tao

    2011-05-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) has been found to stimulate meiotic maturation of oocytes in many molluscs. During maturation, several signaling pathways are involved, especially the phosphatidylinositol and cAMP pathways. In order to examine the possible role of the phosphatidylinositol signaling pathway in regulating oocyte maturation in Mercenaria mercenaria, the effects of the activator/inhibitor of phospholipase (PLC) and protein kinase C (PKC) on serotonin-induced maturation were studied. Results show that high-concentrations of neomycin (inhibitor of PLC) blocked oocyte maturation, while 9, 10-dimethyl-1, 2-benzanthracene (DMBA, activator of PLC) promoted oocyte maturation in the presence of serotonin. It was also found that in the presence of serotonin, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, activator of PKC) inhibited oocyte maturation, while sphingosine (inhibitor of PKC) stimulated oocyte maturation. These results indicate that serotonin-induced oocyte maturation requires the activation of the phosphatidylinositol pathway. Decrease of PLC inhibited serotonin-induced oocyte maturation, whereas a decrease of PKC stimulated the maturation. Thus, our study indicates that serotonin promotes maturation of M. mercenaria oocytes through PLC stimulated increase in calcium ion concentration via inositol-1, 4, 5-trisphosphate (IP3) but not PKC.

  15. Berberine regulates neurite outgrowth through AMPK-dependent pathways by lowering energy status

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jiaqi; Cao, Yuanzhao; Cheng, Kuoyuan; Xu, Bo; Wang, Tianchang; Yang, Qi; Yang, Qin; Feng, Xudong; Xia, Qing

    2015-06-10

    As a widely used anti-bacterial agent and a metabolic inhibitor as well as AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator, berberine (BBR) has been shown to cross the blood–brain barrier. Its efficacy has been investigated in various disease models of the central nervous system. Neurite outgrowth is critical for nervous system development and is a highly energy-dependent process regulated by AMPK-related pathways. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effects of BBR on AMPK activation and neurite outgrowth in neurons. The neurite outgrowth of primary rat cortical neurons at different stages of polarization was monitored after exposure of BBR. Intracellular energy level, AMPK activation and polarity-related pathways were also inspected. The results showed that BBR suppressed neurite outgrowth and affected cytoskeleton stability in the early stages of neuronal polarization, which was mediated by lowered energy status and AMPK activation. Liver kinase B1 and PI3K–Akt–GSK3β signaling pathways were also involved. In addition, mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress contributed to the lowered energy status induced by BBR. This study highlighted the knowledge of the complex activities of BBR in neurons and corroborated the significance of energy status during the neuronal polarization. - Highlights: • BBR inhibited neurite outgrowth in early stages of neuronal development. • Lowered neuronal energy status was induced by BBR treatment. • Neuronal energy stress induced by BBR activated AMPK-related pathways. • BBR induced mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

  16. RICTOR involvement in the PI3K/AKT pathway regulation in melanocytes and melanoma.

    PubMed

    Laugier, Florence; Finet-Benyair, Adeline; André, Jocelyne; Rachakonda, P Sivaramakrishna; Kumar, Rajiv; Bensussan, Armand; Dumaz, Nicolas

    2015-09-29

    Several studies have highlighted the importance of the PI3K pathway in melanocytes and its frequent over-activation in melanoma. However, little is known about regulation of the PI3K pathway in melanocytic cells. We showed that normal human melanocytes are less sensitive to selective PI3K or mTOR inhibitors than to dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitors. The resistance to PI3K inhibitor was due to a rapid AKT reactivation limiting the inhibitor effect on proliferation. Reactivation of AKT was linked to a feedback mechanism involving the mTORC2 complex and in particular its scaffold protein RICTOR. RICTOR overexpression in melanocytes disrupted the negative feedback, activated the AKT pathway and stimulated clonogenicity highlighting the importance of this feedback to restrict melanocyte proliferation. We found that the RICTOR locus is frequently amplified and overexpressed in melanoma and that RICTOR over-expression in NRAS-transformed melanocytes stimulates their clonogenicity, demonstrating that RICTOR amplification can cooperate with NRAS mutation to stimulate melanoma proliferation. These results show that RICTOR plays a central role in PI3K pathway negative feedback in melanocytes and that its deregulation could be involved in melanoma development.

  17. Reciprocal regulation of the nitric oxide and cyclooxygenase pathway in pathophysiology: relevance and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangwon F.; Mollace, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    The nitric oxide (NO) and cyclooxygenase (COX) pathways share a number of similarities. Nitric oxide is the mediator generated from the NO synthase (NOS) pathway, and COX converts arachidonic acid to prostaglandins, prostacyclin, and thromboxane A2. Two major forms of NOS and COX have been identified to date. The constitutive isoforms critically regulate several physiological states. The inducible isoforms are overexpressed during inflammation in a variety of cells, producing large amounts of NO and prostaglandins, which may underlie pathological processes. The cross-talk between the COX and NOS pathways was initially reported by Salvemini and colleagues in 1993, when they demonstrated in a series of in vitro and in vivo studies that NO activates the COX enzymes to produce increased amounts of prostaglandins. Those studies led to the concept that COX enzymes represent important endogenous “receptor” targets for amplifying or modulating the multifaceted roles of NO in physiology and pathology. Since then, numerous studies have furthered our mechanistic understanding of these interactions in pathophysiological settings and delineated potential clinical outcomes. In addition, emerging evidence suggests that the canonical nitroxidative species (NO, superoxide, and/or peroxynitrite) modulate biosynthesis of prostaglandins through non-COX-related pathways. This article provides a comprehensive state-of-the art overview in this area. PMID:23389111

  18. A R2R3-MYB transcription factor from Epimedium sagittatum regulates the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenjun; Sun, Wei; Lv, Haiyan; Luo, Ming; Zeng, Shaohua; Pattanaik, Sitakanta; Yuan, Ling; Wang, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Herba epimedii (Epimedium), a traditional Chinese medicine, has been widely used as a kidney tonic and antirheumatic medicine for thousands of years. The bioactive components in herba epimedii are mainly prenylated flavonol glycosides, end-products of the flavonoid pathway. Epimedium species are also used as garden plants due to the colorful flowers and leaves. Many R2R3-MYB transcription factors (TFs) have been identified to regulate the flavonoid and anthocyanin biosynthetic pathways. However, little is known about the R2R3-MYB TFs involved in regulation of the flavonoid pathway in Epimedium. Here, we reported the isolation and functional characterization of the first R2R3-MYB TF (EsMYBA1) from Epimedium sagittatum (Sieb. Et Zucc.) Maxim. Conserved domains and phylogenetic analysis showed that EsMYBA1 belonged to the subgroup 6 clade (anthocyanin-related MYB clade) of R2R3-MYB family, which includes Arabidopsis AtPAP1, apple MdMYB10 and legume MtLAP1. EsMYBA1 was preferentially expressed in leaves, especially in red leaves that contain higher content of anthocyanin. Alternative splicing of EsMYBA1 resulted in three transcripts and two of them encoded a MYB-related protein. Yeast two-hybrid and transient luciferase expression assay showed that EsMYBA1 can interact with several bHLH regulators of the flavonoid pathway and activate the promoters of dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR) and anthocyanidin synthase (ANS). In both transgenic tobacco and Arabidopsis, overexpression of EsMYBA1 induced strong anthocyanin accumulation in reproductive and/or vegetative tissues via up-regulation of the main flavonoid-related genes. Furthermore, transient expression of EsMYBA1 in E. sagittatum leaves by Agrobacterium infiltration also induced anthocyanin accumulation in the wounded area. This first functional characterization of R2R3-MYB TFs in Epimedium species will promote further studies of the flavonoid biosynthesis and regulation in medicinal plants. PMID:23936468

  19. Pathway landscapes and epigenetic regulation in breast cancer and melanoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Epigenetic variation is a main regulation mechanism of gene expression in various cancer histotypes, and due to its reversibility, the potential impact in therapy can be very relevant. Methods Based on a selected pair, breast cancer (BC) and melanoma, we conducted inference analysis in parallel on a few cell lines (MCF-7 for BC and A375 for melanoma). Starting from differential expression after treatment with a demethylating agent, the 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC), we provided pathway enrichment analysis and gene regulatory maps with cross-linked microRNAs and transcription factors. Results Several oncogenic signaling pathways altered upon DAC treatment were detected with significant enrichment. We represented the association between these cancers by depicting the landscape of common and specific variation affecting them. PMID:25077705

  20. CD47 Receptor Globally Regulates Metabolic Pathways That Control Resistance to Ionizing Radiation.

    PubMed

    Miller, Thomas W; Soto-Pantoja, David R; Schwartz, Anthony L; Sipes, John M; DeGraff, William G; Ridnour, Lisa A; Wink, David A; Roberts, David D

    2015-10-01

    Modulating tissue responses to stress is an important therapeutic objective. Oxidative and genotoxic stresses caused by ionizing radiation are detrimental to healthy tissues but beneficial for treatment of cancer. CD47 is a signaling receptor for thrombospondin-1 and an attractive therapeutic target because blocking CD47 signaling protects normal tissues while sensitizing tumors to ionizing radiation. Here we utilized a metabolomic approach to define molecular mechanisms underlying this radioprotective activity. CD47-deficient cells and cd47-null mice exhibited global advantages in preserving metabolite levels after irradiation. Metabolic pathways required for controlling oxidative stress and mediating DNA repair were enhanced. Some cellular energetics pathways differed basally in CD47-deficient cells, and the global declines in the glycolytic and tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolites characteristic of normal cell and tissue responses to irradiation were prevented in the absence of CD47. Thus, CD47 mediates signaling from the extracellular matrix that coordinately regulates basal metabolism and cytoprotective responses to radiation injury.

  1. Regulated ADAM17-dependent EGF family ligand release by substrate-selecting signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Dang, Michelle; Armbruster, Nicole; Miller, Miles A; Cermeno, Efrain; Hartmann, Monika; Bell, George W; Root, David E; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Lodish, Harvey F; Herrlich, Andreas

    2013-06-11

    Ectodomain cleavage of cell-surface proteins by A disintegrin and metalloproteinases (ADAMs) is highly regulated, and its dysregulation has been linked to many diseases. ADAM10 and ADAM17 cleave most disease-relevant substrates. Broad-spectrum metalloprotease inhibitors have failed clinically, and targeting the cleavage of a specific substrate has remained impossible. It is therefore necessary to identify signaling intermediates that determine substrate specificity of cleavage. We show here that phorbol ester or angiotensin II-induced proteolytic release of EGF family members may not require a significant increase in ADAM17 protease activity. Rather, inducers activate a signaling pathway using PKC-α and the PKC-regulated protein phosphatase 1 inhibitor 14D that is required for ADAM17 cleavage of TGF-α, heparin-binding EGF, and amphiregulin. A second pathway involving PKC-δ is required for neuregulin (NRG) cleavage, and, indeed, PKC-δ phosphorylation of serine 286 in the NRG cytosolic domain is essential for induced NRG cleavage. Thus, signaling-mediated substrate selection is clearly distinct from regulation of enzyme activity, an important mechanism that offers itself for application in disease.

  2. Insulin and mTOR Pathway Regulate HDAC3-Mediated Deacetylation and Activation of PGK1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shiwen; Jiang, Bowen; Zhang, Tengfei; Liu, Lixia; Wang, Yi; Wang, Yiping; Chen, Xiufei; Lin, Huaipeng; Zhou, Lisha; Xia, Yukun; Chen, Leilei; Yang, Chen; Xiong, Yue; Ye, Dan; Guan, Kun-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK1) catalyzes the reversible transfer of a phosphoryl group from 1, 3-bisphosphoglycerate (1, 3-BPG) to ADP, producing 3-phosphoglycerate (3-PG) and ATP. PGK1 plays a key role in coordinating glycolytic energy production with one-carbon metabolism, serine biosynthesis, and cellular redox regulation. Here, we report that PGK1 is acetylated at lysine 220 (K220), which inhibits PGK1 activity by disrupting the binding with its substrate, ADP. We have identified KAT9 and HDAC3 as the potential acetyltransferase and deacetylase, respectively, for PGK1. Insulin promotes K220 deacetylation to stimulate PGK1 activity. We show that the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway regulates HDAC3 S424 phosphorylation, which promotes HDAC3-PGK1 interaction and PGK1 K220 deacetylation. Our study uncovers a previously unknown mechanism for the insulin and mTOR pathway in regulation of glycolytic ATP production and cellular redox potential via HDAC3-mediated PGK1 deacetylation. PMID:26356530

  3. MicroRNA-221 and -222 Regulate Radiation Sensitivity by Targeting the PTEN Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Chunzhi; Kang Chunsheng; Wang Ping; Cao Yongzhen; Lv Zhonghong; Yu Shizhu; Wang Guangxiu; Zhang Anling; Jia Zhifan; Han Lei; Yang Chunying; Ishiyama, Hiromichi; Teh, Bin S.; Xu Bo; Pu Peiyu

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are noncoding RNAs inhibiting expression of numerous target genes by posttranscriptional regulation. miRNA-221 and miRNA-222 (miRNA-221/-222) expression is elevated in radioresistant tumor cell lines; however, it is not known whether and how miRNAs control cellular responses to ionizing irradiation. Methods and Materials: We used bioinformatic analyses, luciferase reporter assay, and genetic knockdown and biochemical assays to characterize the regulation pathways of miRNA-221/-222 in response to radiation treatment. Results: We identified the PTEN gene as a target of miRNA-221/-222. Furthermore, we found that knocking down miRNA-221/-222 by antisense oligonucleotides upregulated PTEN expression. Upregulated PTEN expression suppressed AKT activity and increased radiation-induced apoptosis, resulting in enhancement of radiosensitivity in tumor cells. Conclusions: miRNA-221/-222 control radiation sensitivity by regulating the PTEN/AKT pathway and can be explored as novel targets for radiosensitization.

  4. Spatial Regulation of Root Growth: Placing the Plant TOR Pathway in a Developmental Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Barrada, Adam; Montané, Marie-Hélène; Robaglia, Christophe; Menand, Benoît

    2015-01-01

    Plant cells contain specialized structures, such as a cell wall and a large vacuole, which play a major role in cell growth. Roots follow an organized pattern of development, making them the organs of choice for studying the spatio-temporal regulation of cell proliferation and growth in plants. During root growth, cells originate from the initials surrounding the quiescent center, proliferate in the division zone of the meristem, and then increase in length in the elongation zone, reaching their final size and differentiation stage in the mature zone. Phytohormones, especially auxins and cytokinins, control the dynamic balance between cell division and differentiation and therefore organ size. Plant growth is also regulated by metabolites and nutrients, such as the sugars produced by photosynthesis or nitrate assimilated from the soil. Recent literature has shown that the conserved eukaryotic TOR (target of rapamycin) kinase pathway plays an important role in orchestrating plant growth. We will summarize how the regulation of cell proliferation and cell expansion by phytohormones are at the heart of root growth and then discuss recent data indicating that the TOR pathway integrates hormonal and nutritive signals to orchestrate root growth. PMID:26295391

  5. The CRTC1-SIK1 Pathway Regulates Entrainment of the Circadian Clock

    PubMed Central

    Jagannath, Aarti; Butler, Rachel; Godinho, Sofia I.H.; Couch, Yvonne; Brown, Laurence A.; Vasudevan, Sridhar R.; Flanagan, Kevin C.; Anthony, Daniel; Churchill, Grant C.; Wood, Matthew J.A.; Steiner, Guido; Ebeling, Martin; Hossbach, Markus; Wettstein, Joseph G.; Duffield, Giles E.; Gatti, Silvia; Hankins, Mark W.; Foster, Russell G.; Peirson, Stuart N.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Retinal photoreceptors entrain the circadian system to the solar day. This photic resetting involves cAMP response element binding protein (CREB)-mediated upregulation of Per genes within individual cells of the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN). Our detailed understanding of this pathway is poor, and it remains unclear why entrainment to a new time zone takes several days. By analyzing the light-regulated transcriptome of the SCN, we have identified a key role for salt inducible kinase 1 (SIK1) and CREB-regulated transcription coactivator 1 (CRTC1) in clock re-setting. An entrainment stimulus causes CRTC1 to coactivate CREB, inducing the expression of Per1 and Sik1. SIK1 then inhibits further shifts of the clock by phosphorylation and deactivation of CRTC1. Knockdown of Sik1 within the SCN results in increased behavioral phase shifts and rapid re-entrainment following experimental jet lag. Thus SIK1 provides negative feedback, acting to suppress the effects of light on the clock. This pathway provides a potential target for the regulation of circadian rhythms. PMID:23993098

  6. Spatial Regulation of Root Growth: Placing the Plant TOR Pathway in a Developmental Perspective.

    PubMed

    Barrada, Adam; Montané, Marie-Hélène; Robaglia, Christophe; Menand, Benoît

    2015-08-19

    Plant cells contain specialized structures, such as a cell wall and a large vacuole, which play a major role in cell growth. Roots follow an organized pattern of development, making them the organs of choice for studying the spatio-temporal regulation of cell proliferation and growth in plants. During root growth, cells originate from the initials surrounding the quiescent center, proliferate in the division zone of the meristem, and then increase in length in the elongation zone, reaching their final size and differentiation stage in the mature zone. Phytohormones, especially auxins and cytokinins, control the dynamic balance between cell division and differentiation and therefore organ size. Plant growth is also regulated by metabolites and nutrients, such as the sugars produced by photosynthesis or nitrate assimilated from the soil. Recent literature has shown that the conserved eukaryotic TOR (target of rapamycin) kinase pathway plays an important role in orchestrating plant growth. We will summarize how the regulation of cell proliferation and cell expansion by phytohormones are at the heart of root growth and then discuss recent data indicating that the TOR pathway integrates hormonal and nutritive signals to orchestrate root growth.

  7. p205, a potential tumor suppressor, inhibits cell proliferation via multiple pathways of cell cycle regulation.

    PubMed

    Asefa, Benyam; Dermott, Jonathan M; Kaldis, Philipp; Stefanisko, Karen; Garfinkel, David J; Keller, Jonathan R

    2006-02-20

    p205 is a member of the interferon-inducible p200 family of proteins that regulate cell proliferation. Over-expression of p205 inhibits cell growth, although its mechanism of action is currently unknown. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of p205 on the p53 and Rb-dependent pathways of cell cycle regulation. p205 expression results in elevated levels of p21, and activates the p21 promoter in vitro in a p53-dependent manner. In addition, p205 induces increased expression of Rb, and binds directly to Rb and p53. Interestingly, p205 also induces growth inhibition independent of p53 and Rb by delaying G2/M progression in proliferating cells, and is a substrate for Cdk2 kinase activity. Finally, we have identified other binding partners of p205 by a yeast two-hybrid screen, including the paired homeodomain protein HoxB2. Taken together, our results indicate that p205 induces growth arrest by interaction with multiple transcription factors that regulate the cell cycle, including but not entirely dependent on the Rb- and p53-mediated pathways of growth inhibition. PMID:16458891

  8. Crosstalk between the unfolded protein response and pathways that regulate pathogenic development in Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Heimel, Kai; Freitag, Johannes; Hampel, Martin; Ast, Julia; Bölker, Michael; Kämper, Jörg

    2013-10-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a conserved eukaryotic signaling pathway regulating endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis during ER stress, which results, for example, from an increased demand for protein secretion. Here, we characterize the homologs of the central UPR regulatory proteins Hac1 (for Homologous to ATF/CREB1) and Inositol Requiring Enzyme1 in the plant pathogenic fungus Ustilago maydis and demonstrate that the UPR is tightly interlinked with the b mating-type-dependent signaling pathway that regulates pathogenic development. Exact timing of UPR is required for virulence, since premature activation interferes with the b-dependent switch from budding to filamentous growth. In addition, we found crosstalk between UPR and the b target Clampless1 (Clp1), which is essential for cell cycle release and proliferation in planta. The unusual C-terminal extension of the U. maydis Hac1 homolog, Cib1 (for Clp1 interacting bZIP1), mediates direct interaction with Clp1. The interaction between Clp1 and Cib1 promotes stabilization of Clp1, resulting in enhanced ER stress tolerance that prevents deleterious UPR hyperactivation. Thus, the interaction between Cib1 and Clp1 constitutes a checkpoint to time developmental progression and increased secretion of effector proteins at the onset of biotrophic development. Crosstalk between UPR and the b mating-type regulated developmental program adapts ER homeostasis to the changing demands during biotrophy.

  9. Autopalmitoylation of TEAD proteins regulates transcriptional output of the Hippo pathway.

    PubMed

    Chan, PuiYee; Han, Xiao; Zheng, Baohui; DeRan, Michael; Yu, Jianzhong; Jarugumilli, Gopala K; Deng, Hua; Pan, Duojia; Luo, Xuelian; Wu, Xu

    2016-04-01

    TEA domain (TEAD) transcription factors bind to the coactivators YAP and TAZ and regulate the transcriptional output of the Hippo pathway, playing critical roles in organ size control and tumorigenesis. Protein S-palmitoylation attaches a fatty acid, palmitate, to cysteine residues and regulates protein trafficking, membrane localization and signaling activities. Using activity-based chemical probes, we discovered that human TEADs possess intrinsic palmitoylating enzyme-like activities and undergo autopalmitoylation at evolutionarily conserved cysteine residues under physiological conditions. We determined the crystal structures of lipid-bound TEADs and found that the lipid chain of palmitate inserts into a conserved deep hydrophobic pocket. Strikingly, palmitoylation did not alter TEAD's localization, but it was required for TEAD's binding to YAP and TAZ and was dispensable for its binding to the Vgll4 tumor suppressor. Moreover, palmitoylation-deficient TEAD mutants impaired TAZ-mediated muscle differentiation in vitro and tissue overgrowth mediated by the Drosophila YAP homolog Yorkie in vivo. Our study directly links autopalmitoylation to the transcriptional regulation of the Hippo pathway. PMID:26900866

  10. The CRTC1-SIK1 pathway regulates entrainment of the circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Jagannath, Aarti; Butler, Rachel; Godinho, Sofia I H; Couch, Yvonne; Brown, Laurence A; Vasudevan, Sridhar R; Flanagan, Kevin C; Anthony, Daniel; Churchill, Grant C; Wood, Matthew J A; Steiner, Guido; Ebeling, Martin; Hossbach, Markus; Wettstein, Joseph G; Duffield, Giles E; Gatti, Silvia; Hankins, Mark W; Foster, Russell G; Peirson, Stuart N

    2013-08-29

    Retinal photoreceptors entrain the circadian system to the solar day. This photic resetting involves cAMP response element binding protein (CREB)-mediated upregulation of Per genes within individual cells of the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN). Our detailed understanding of this pathway is poor, and it remains unclear why entrainment to a new time zone takes several days. By analyzing the light-regulated transcriptome of the SCN, we have identified a key role for salt inducible kinase 1 (SIK1) and CREB-regulated transcription coactivator 1 (CRTC1) in clock re-setting. An entrainment stimulus causes CRTC1 to coactivate CREB, inducing the expression of Per1 and Sik1. SIK1 then inhibits further shifts of the clock by phosphorylation and deactivation of CRTC1. Knockdown of Sik1 within the SCN results in increased behavioral phase shifts and rapid re-entrainment following experimental jet lag. Thus SIK1 provides negative feedback, acting to suppress the effects of light on the clock. This pathway provides a potential target for the regulation of circadian rhythms.

  11. Unraveling the specific regulation of the central pathway for anaerobic degradation of 3-methylbenzoate.

    PubMed

    Juárez, Javier F; Liu, Huixiang; Zamarro, María T; McMahon, Stephen; Liu, Huanting; Naismith, James H; Eberlein, Christian; Boll, Matthias; Carmona, Manuel; Díaz, Eduardo

    2015-05-01

    The mbd cluster encodes the anaerobic degradation of 3-methylbenzoate in the β-proteobacterium Azoarcus sp. CIB. The specific transcriptional regulation circuit that controls the expression of the mbd genes was investigated. The PO, PB 1, and P3 R promoters responsible for the expression of the mbd genes, their cognate MbdR transcriptional repressor, as well as the MbdR operator regions (ATACN10GTAT) have been characterized. The three-dimensional structure of MbdR has been solved revealing a conformation similar to that of other TetR family transcriptional regulators. The first intermediate of the catabolic pathway, i.e. 3-methylbenzoyl-CoA, was shown to act as the inducer molecule. An additional MbdR-dependent promoter, PA, which contributes to the expression of the CoA ligase that activates 3-methylbenzoate to 3-methylbenzoyl-CoA, was shown to be necessary for an efficient induction of the mbd genes. Our results suggest that the mbd cluster recruited a regulatory system based on the MbdR regulator and its target promoters to evolve a distinct central catabolic pathway that is only expressed for the anaerobic degradation of aromatic compounds that generate 3-methylbenzoyl-CoA as the central metabolite. All these results highlight the importance of the regulatory systems in the evolution and adaptation of bacteria to the anaerobic degradation of aromatic compounds.

  12. Unraveling the Specific Regulation of the Central Pathway for Anaerobic Degradation of 3-Methylbenzoate*

    PubMed Central

    Juárez, Javier F.; Liu, Huixiang; Zamarro, María T.; McMahon, Stephen; Liu, Huanting; Naismith, James H.; Eberlein, Christian; Boll, Matthias; Carmona, Manuel; Díaz, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    The mbd cluster encodes the anaerobic degradation of 3-methylbenzoate in the β-proteobacterium Azoarcus sp. CIB. The specific transcriptional regulation circuit that controls the expression of the mbd genes was investigated. The PO, PB1, and P3R promoters responsible for the expression of the mbd genes, their cognate MbdR transcriptional repressor, as well as the MbdR operator regions (ATACN10GTAT) have been characterized. The three-dimensional structure of MbdR has been solved revealing a conformation similar to that of other TetR family transcriptional regulators. The first intermediate of the catabolic pathway, i.e. 3-methylbenzoyl-CoA, was shown to act as the inducer molecule. An additional MbdR-dependent promoter, PA, which contributes to the expression of the CoA ligase that activates 3-methylbenzoate to 3-methylbenzoyl-CoA, was shown to be necessary for an efficient induction of the mbd genes. Our results suggest that the mbd cluster recruited a regulatory system based on the MbdR regulator and its target promoters to evolve a distinct central catabolic pathway that is only expressed for the anaerobic degradation of aromatic compounds that generate 3-methylbenzoyl-CoA as the central metabolite. All these results highlight the importance of the regulatory systems in the evolution and adaptation of bacteria to the anaerobic degradation of aromatic compounds. PMID:25795774

  13. MicroRNA-142-3p Negatively Regulates Canonical Wnt Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Tanyu; Phiwpan, Krung; Guo, Jitao; Zhang, Wei; Guo, Jie; Zhang, Zhongmei; Zou, Mangge; Zhang, Xuejie; Zhang, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway plays essential roles in mammalian development and tissue homeostasis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of regulators involved in modulating this pathway. In this study, we screened miRNAs regulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling by using a TopFlash based luciferase reporter. Surprisingly, we found that miR-142 inhibited Wnt/β-catenin signaling, which was inconsistent with a recent study showing that miR-142-3p targeted Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) to upregulate Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Due to the discordance, we elaborated experiments by using extensive mutagenesis, which demonstrated that the stem-loop structure was important for miR-142 to efficiently suppress Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of miR-142 relies on miR-142-3p rather than miR-142-5p. Further, we found that miR-142-3p directly modulated translation of Ctnnb1 mRNA (encoding β-catenin) through binding to its 3’ untranslated region (3’ UTR). Finally, miR-142 was able to repress cell cycle progression by inhibiting active Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Thus, our findings highlight the inhibitory role of miR-142-3p in Wnt/β-catenin signaling, which help to understand the complex regulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:27348426

  14. THE E2/FRB PATHWAY REGULATION OF DNA REPLICATION AND PROTEIN BIOSYNTHESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The E2F/Rb pathway plays a pivotal role in the control of cell cycle progression and regulates the expression of genes required for Gl/S transition. Our study examines the genomic response in Drosophila embryos after overexpression and mutation of E2F/Rb pathway molecules. Hierar...

  15. Identification of cisplatin-regulated metabolic pathways in pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    von Stechow, Louise; Ruiz-Aracama, Ainhoa; van de Water, Bob; Peijnenburg, Ad; Danen, Erik; Lommen, Arjen

    2013-01-01

    The chemotherapeutic compound, cisplatin causes various kinds of DNA lesions but also triggers other pertubations, such as ER and oxidative stress. We and others have shown that treatment of pluripotent stem cells with cisplatin causes a plethora of transcriptional and post-translational alterations that, to a major extent, point to DNA damage response (DDR) signaling. The orchestrated DDR signaling network is important to arrest the cell cycle and repair the lesions or, in case of damage beyond repair, eliminate affected cells. Failure to properly balance the various aspects of the DDR in stem cells contributes to ageing and cancer. Here, we performed metabolic profiling by mass spectrometry of embryonic stem (ES) cells treated for different time periods with cisplatin. We then integrated metabolomics with transcriptomics analyses and connected cisplatin-regulated metabolites with regulated metabolic enzymes to identify enriched metabolic pathways. These included nucleotide metabolism, urea cycle and arginine and proline metabolism. Silencing of identified proline metabolic and catabolic enzymes indicated that altered proline metabolism serves as an adaptive, rather than a toxic response. A group of enriched metabolic pathways clustered around the metabolite S-adenosylmethionine, which is a hub for methylation and transsulfuration reactions and polyamine metabolism. Enzymes and metabolites with pro- or anti-oxidant functions were also enriched but enhanced levels of reactive oxygen species were not measured in cisplatin-treated ES cells. Lastly, a number of the differentially regulated metabolic enzymes were identified as target genes of the transcription factor p53, pointing to p53-mediated alterations in metabolism in response to genotoxic stress. Altogether, our findings reveal interconnecting metabolic pathways that are responsive to cisplatin and may serve as signaling modules in the DDR in pluripotent stem cells.

  16. Identification of Cisplatin-Regulated Metabolic Pathways in Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    van de Water, Bob; Peijnenburg, Ad; Danen, Erik; Lommen, Arjen

    2013-01-01

    The chemotherapeutic compound, cisplatin causes various kinds of DNA lesions but also triggers other pertubations, such as ER and oxidative stress. We and others have shown that treatment of pluripotent stem cells with cisplatin causes a plethora of transcriptional and post-translational alterations that, to a major extent, point to DNA damage response (DDR) signaling. The orchestrated DDR signaling network is important to arrest the cell cycle and repair the lesions or, in case of damage beyond repair, eliminate affected cells. Failure to properly balance the various aspects of the DDR in stem cells contributes to ageing and cancer. Here, we performed metabolic profiling by mass spectrometry of embryonic stem (ES) cells treated for different time periods with cisplatin. We then integrated metabolomics with transcriptomics analyses and connected cisplatin-regulated metabolites with regulated metabolic enzymes to identify enriched metabolic pathways. These included nucleotide metabolism, urea cycle and arginine and proline metabolism. Silencing of identified proline metabolic and catabolic enzymes indicated that altered proline metabolism serves as an adaptive, rather than a toxic response. A group of enriched metabolic pathways clustered around the metabolite S-adenosylmethionine, which is a hub for methylation and transsulfuration reactions and polyamine metabolism. Enzymes and metabolites with pro- or anti-oxidant functions were also enriched but enhanced levels of reactive oxygen species were not measured in cisplatin-treated ES cells. Lastly, a number of the differentially regulated metabolic enzymes were identified as target genes of the transcription factor p53, pointing to p53-mediated alterations in metabolism in response to genotoxic stress. Altogether, our findings reveal interconnecting metabolic pathways that are responsive to cisplatin and may serve as signaling modules in the DDR in pluripotent stem cells. PMID:24146875

  17. Salinity-induced regulation of the myo-inositol biosynthesis pathway in tilapia gill epithelium.

    PubMed

    Sacchi, Romina; Li, Johnathon; Villarreal, Fernando; Gardell, Alison M; Kültz, Dietmar

    2013-12-15

    The myo-inositol biosynthesis (MIB) pathway converts glucose-6-phosphate to the compatible osmolyte myo-inositol that protects cells from osmotic stress. Using proteomics, the enzymes that constitute the MIB pathway, myo-inositol phosphate synthase (MIPS) and inositol monophosphatase 1 (IMPA1), are identified in tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) gill epithelium. Targeted, quantitative, label-free proteomics reveals that they are both upregulated during salinity stress. Upregulation is stronger when fish are exposed to severe (34 ppt acute and 90 ppt gradual) relative to moderate (70 ppt gradual) salinity stress. IMPA1 always responds more strongly than MIPS, suggesting that MIPS is more stable during salinity stress. MIPS is N-terminally acetylated and the corresponding peptide increases proportionally to MIPS protein, while non-acetylated N-terminal peptide is not detectable, indicating that MIPS acetylation is constitutive and may serve to stabilize the protein. Hyperosmotic induction of MIPS and IMPA1 is confirmed using western blot and real-time qPCR and is much higher at the mRNA than at the protein level. Two distinct MIPS mRNA variants are expressed in the gill, but one is more strongly regulated by salinity than the other. A single MIPS gene is encoded in the tilapia genome whereas the zebrafish genome lacks MIPS entirely. The genome of euryhaline tilapia contains four IMPA genes, two of which are expressed, but only one is salinity regulated in gill epithelium. The genome of stenohaline zebrafish contains a single IMPA gene. We conclude that the MIB pathway represents a major salinity stress coping mechanism that is regulated at multiple levels in euryhaline fish but absent in stenohaline zebrafish.

  18. Salinity-induced regulation of the myo-inositol biosynthesis pathway in tilapia gill epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Sacchi, Romina; Li, Johnathon; Villarreal, Fernando; Gardell, Alison M.; Kültz, Dietmar

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The myo-inositol biosynthesis (MIB) pathway converts glucose-6-phosphate to the compatible osmolyte myo-inositol that protects cells from osmotic stress. Using proteomics, the enzymes that constitute the MIB pathway, myo-inositol phosphate synthase (MIPS) and inositol monophosphatase 1 (IMPA1), are identified in tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) gill epithelium. Targeted, quantitative, label-free proteomics reveals that they are both upregulated during salinity stress. Upregulation is stronger when fish are exposed to severe (34 ppt acute and 90 ppt gradual) relative to moderate (70 ppt gradual) salinity stress. IMPA1 always responds more strongly than MIPS, suggesting that MIPS is more stable during salinity stress. MIPS is N-terminally acetylated and the corresponding peptide increases proportionally to MIPS protein, while non-acetylated N-terminal peptide is not detectable, indicating that MIPS acetylation is constitutive and may serve to stabilize the protein. Hyperosmotic induction of MIPS and IMPA1 is confirmed using western blot and real-time qPCR and is much higher at the mRNA than at the protein level. Two distinct MIPS mRNA variants are expressed in the gill, but one is more strongly regulated by salinity than the other. A single MIPS gene is encoded in the tilapia genome whereas the zebrafish genome lacks MIPS entirely. The genome of euryhaline tilapia contains four IMPA genes, two of which are expressed, but only one is salinity regulated in gill epithelium. The genome of stenohaline zebrafish contains a single IMPA gene. We conclude that the MIB pathway represents a major salinity stress coping mechanism that is regulated at multiple levels in euryhaline fish but absent in stenohaline zebrafish. PMID:24072791

  19. Regulation of the STARS signaling pathway in response to endurance and resistance exercise and training.

    PubMed

    Lamon, Séverine; Wallace, Marita A; Stefanetti, Renae J; Rahbek, Stine K; Vendelbo, Mikkel H; Russell, Aaron P; Vissing, Kristian

    2013-09-01

    The striated muscle activator of Rho signaling (STARS) protein and members of its downstream signaling pathway, including myocardin-related transcription factor-A (MRTF-A) and SRF, are increased in response to prolonged resistance exercise training but also following a single bout of endurance cycling. The aim of the present study was to measure and compare the regulation of STARS, MRTF-A and SRF mRNA and protein following 10 weeks of endurance training (ET) versus resistance training (RT), as well as before and following a single bout of endurance (EE) versus resistance exercise (RE). Following prolonged training, STARS, MRTF-A and SRF mRNA levels were all increased by similar magnitude, irrespective of training type. In the training-habituated state, STARS mRNA increased following a single-bout RE when measured 2.5 and 5 h post-exercise and had returned to resting level by 22 h following exercise. MRTF-A and SRF mRNA levels were decreased by 2.5, 5, and 22 h following a single bout of RE and EE exercise when compared to their respective basal levels, with no significant difference seen between the groups at any of the time points. No changes in protein levels were observed following the two modes of exercise training or a single bout of exercise. This study demonstrates that the stress signals elicited by ET and RT result in a comparable regulation of members of the STARS pathway. In contrast, a single bout of EE and RE, performed in the trained state, elicit different responses. These observations suggest that in the trained state, the acute regulation of the STARS pathway following EE or RE may be responsible for exercise-specific muscle adaptations.

  20. p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway Regulates Genes during Proliferation and Differentiation in Oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Haines, Jeffery D.; Fulton, Debra L.; Richard, Stephane; Almazan, Guillermina

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) is important for oligodendrocyte (OLG) differentiation and myelination. However, the precise cellular mechanisms by which p38 regulates OLG differentiation remain largely unknown. To determine whether p38 functions in part through transcriptional events in regulating OLG identity, we performed microarray analysis on differentiating oligodendrocyte progenitors (OLPs) treated with a p38 inhibitor. Consistent with a role in OLG differentiation, pharmacological inhibition of p38 down-regulated the transcription of genes that are involved in myelin biogenesis, transcriptional control and cell cycle. Proliferation assays showed that OLPs treated with the p38 inhibitor retained a proliferative capacity which could be induced upon application of mitogens demonstrating that after two days of p38-inhibition OLGs remained poised to continue mitosis. Together, our results suggest that the p38 pathway regulates gene transcription which can coordinate OLG differentiation. Our microarray dataset will provide a useful resource for future studies investigating the molecular mechanisms by which p38 regulates oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination. PMID:26714323

  1. Regulation of Abscisic Acid Signaling by the Ethylene Response Pathway in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Ghassemian, Majid; Nambara, Eiji; Cutler, Sean; Kawaide, Hiroshi; Kamiya, Yuji; McCourt, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Although abscisic acid (ABA) is involved in a variety of plant growth and developmental processes, few genes that actually regulate the transduction of the ABA signal into a cellular response have been identified. In an attempt to determine negative regulators of ABA signaling, we identified mutants, designated enhanced response to ABA3 (era3), that increased the sensitivity of the seed to ABA. Biochemical and molecular analyses demonstrated that era3 mutants overaccumulate ABA, suggesting that era3 is a negative regulator of ABA synthesis. Subsequent genetic analysis of era3 alleles, however, showed that these are new alleles at the ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE2 locus. Other mutants defective in their response to ethylene also showed altered ABA sensitivity; from these results, we conclude that ethylene appears to be a negative regulator of ABA action during germination. In contrast, the ethylene response pathway positively regulates some aspects of ABA action that involve root growth in the absence of ethylene. We discuss the response of plants to ethylene and ABA in the context of how these two hormones could influence the same growth responses. PMID:10899978

  2. RNF4-mediated polyubiquitination regulates the Fanconi anemia/BRCA pathway.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jenny; Kim, Hyungjin; Moreau, Lisa A; Puhalla, Shannon; Garber, Judy; Al Abo, Muthana; Takeda, Shunichi; D'Andrea, Alan D

    2015-04-01

    The Fanconi anemia/BRCA (FA/BRCA) pathway is a DNA repair pathway that is required for excision of DNA interstrand cross-links. The 17 known FA proteins, along with several FA-associated proteins (FAAPs), cooperate in this pathway to detect, unhook, and excise DNA cross-links and to subsequently repair the double-strand breaks generated in the process. In the current study, we identified a patient with FA with a point mutation in FANCA, which encodes a mutant FANCA protein (FANCAI939S). FANCAI939S failed to bind to the FAAP20 subunit of the FA core complex, leading to decreased stability. Loss of FAAP20 binding exposed a SUMOylation site on FANCA at amino acid residue K921, resulting in E2 SUMO-conjugating enzyme UBC9-mediated SUMOylation, RING finger protein 4-mediated (RNF4-mediated) polyubiquitination, and proteasome-mediated degradation of FANCA. Mutation of the SUMOylation site of FANCA rescued the expression of the mutant protein. Wild-type FANCA was also subject to SUMOylation, RNF4-mediated polyubiquitination, and degradation, suggesting that regulated release of FAAP20 from FANCA is a critical step in the normal FA pathway. Consistent with this model, cells lacking RNF4 exhibited interstrand cross-linker hypersensitivity, and the gene encoding RNF4 was epistatic with the other genes encoding members of the FA/BRCA pathway. Together, the results from our study underscore the importance of analyzing unique patient-derived mutations for dissecting complex DNA repair processes.

  3. RNAseq Analysis of the Parasitic Nematode Strongyloides stercoralis Reveals Divergent Regulation of Canonical Dauer Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Stoltzfus, Jonathan D.; Minot, Samuel; Berriman, Matthew; Nolan, Thomas J.; Lok, James B.

    2012-01-01

    The infectious form of many parasitic nematodes, which afflict over one billion people globally, is a developmentally arrested third-stage larva (L3i). The parasitic nematode Strongyloides stercoralis differs from other nematode species that infect humans, in that its life cycle includes both parasitic and free-living forms, which can be leveraged to investigate the mechanisms of L3i arrest and activation. The free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has a similar developmentally arrested larval form, the dauer, whose formation is controlled by four pathways: cyclic GMP (cGMP) signaling, insulin/IGF-1-like signaling (IIS), transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signaling, and biosynthesis of dafachronic acid (DA) ligands that regulate a nuclear hormone receptor. We hypothesized that homologous pathways are present in S. stercoralis, have similar developmental regulation, and are involved in L3i arrest and activation. To test this, we undertook a deep-sequencing study of the polyadenylated transcriptome, generating over 2.3 billion paired-end reads from seven developmental stages. We constructed developmental expression profiles for S. stercoralis homologs of C. elegans dauer genes identified by BLAST searches of the S. stercoralis genome as well as de novo assembled transcripts. Intriguingly, genes encoding cGMP pathway components were coordinately up-regulated in L3i. In comparison to C. elegans, S. stercoralis has a paucity of genes encoding IIS ligands, several of which have abundance profiles suggesting involvement in L3i development. We also identified seven S. stercoralis genes encoding homologs of the single C. elegans dauer regulatory TGFβ ligand, three of which are only expressed in L3i. Putative DA biosynthetic genes did not appear to be coordinately regulated in L3i development. Our data suggest that while dauer pathway genes are present in S. stercoralis and may play a role in L3i development, there are significant differences between the two species

  4. β-Arrestins Negatively Regulate the Toll Pathway in Shrimp by Preventing Dorsal Translocation and Inhibiting Dorsal Transcriptional Activity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jie-Jie; Lan, Jiang-Feng; Shi, Xiu-Zhen; Yang, Ming-Chong; Niu, Guo-Juan; Ding, Ding; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Yu, Xiao-Qiang; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2016-04-01

    The Toll signaling pathway plays an important role in the innate immunity ofDrosophila melanogasterand mammals. The activation and termination of Toll signaling are finely regulated in these animals. Although the primary components of the Toll pathway were identified in shrimp, the functions and regulation of the pathway are seldom studied. We first demonstrated that the Toll signaling pathway plays a central role in host defense againstStaphylococcus aureusby regulating expression of antimicrobial peptides in shrimp. We then found that β-arrestins negatively regulate Toll signaling in two different ways. β-Arrestins interact with the C-terminal PEST domain of Cactus through the arrestin-N domain, and Cactus interacts with the RHD domain of Dorsal via the ankyrin repeats domain, forming a heterotrimeric complex of β-arrestin·Cactus·Dorsal, with Cactus as the bridge. This complex prevents Cactus phosphorylation and degradation, as well as Dorsal translocation into the nucleus, thus inhibiting activation of the Toll signaling pathway. β-Arrestins also interact with non-phosphorylated ERK (extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase) through the arrestin-C domain to inhibit ERK phosphorylation, which affects Dorsal translocation into the nucleus and phosphorylation of Dorsal at Ser(276)that impairs Dorsal transcriptional activity. Our study suggests that β-arrestins negatively regulate the Toll signaling pathway by preventing Dorsal translocation and inhibiting Dorsal phosphorylation and transcriptional activity. PMID:26846853

  5. The transcription factor AREB1 regulates primary metabolic pathways in tomato fruits

    PubMed Central

    Bastías, Adriana; Osorio, Sonia; Casaretto, José A.

    2014-01-01

    Tomato fruit development is regulated both by the action of plant hormones and by tight genetic control. Recent studies suggest that abscisic acid (ABA) signalling may affect different aspects of fruit maturation. Previously, it was shown that SlAREB1, an ABA-regulated transcription factor involved in stress-induced responses, is expressed in seeds and in fruit tissues in tomato. Here, the role of SlAREB1 in regulating the expression of genes relevant for primary metabolic pathways and affecting the metabolic profile of the fruit was investigated using transgenic tomato lines. Metabolite profiling using gas chromatography–time of flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF-MS) and non-targeted liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC-MS) was performed on pericarp tissue from fruits harvested at three stages of fruit development. Principal component analysis of the data could distinguish the metabolite profiles of non-transgenic fruits from those that overexpress and down-regulate SlAREB1. Overexpression of SlAREB1 resulted in increased content of organic acids, hexoses, hexose-phosphates, and amino acids in immature green, mature green, and red ripe fruits, and these modifications correlated with the up-regulation of enzyme-encoding genes involved in primary carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. A non-targeted LC-MS analysis indicated that the composition of secondary metabolites is also affected in transgenic lines. In addition, gene expression data revealed that some genes associated with fruit ripening are also up-regulated in SlAREB1-overexpressing lines compared with wild-type and antisense lines. Taken together, the results suggest that SlAREB1 participates in the regulation of the metabolic programming that takes place during fruit ripening and that may explain part of the role of ABA in fruit development in tomato. PMID:24659489

  6. The transcription factor AREB1 regulates primary metabolic pathways in tomato fruits.

    PubMed

    Bastías, Adriana; Yañez, Mónica; Osorio, Sonia; Arbona, Vicent; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio; Fernie, Alisdair R; Casaretto, José A

    2014-06-01

    Tomato fruit development is regulated both by the action of plant hormones and by tight genetic control. Recent studies suggest that abscisic acid (ABA) signalling may affect different aspects of fruit maturation. Previously, it was shown that SlAREB1, an ABA-regulated transcription factor involved in stress-induced responses, is expressed in seeds and in fruit tissues in tomato. Here, the role of SlAREB1 in regulating the expression of genes relevant for primary metabolic pathways and affecting the metabolic profile of the fruit was investigated using transgenic tomato lines. Metabolite profiling using gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF-MS) and non-targeted liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) was performed on pericarp tissue from fruits harvested at three stages of fruit development. Principal component analysis of the data could distinguish the metabolite profiles of non-transgenic fruits from those that overexpress and down-regulate SlAREB1. Overexpression of SlAREB1 resulted in increased content of organic acids, hexoses, hexose-phosphates, and amino acids in immature green, mature green, and red ripe fruits, and these modifications correlated with the up-regulation of enzyme-encoding genes involved in primary carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. A non-targeted LC-MS analysis indicated that the composition of secondary metabolites is also affected in transgenic lines. In addition, gene expression data revealed that some genes associated with fruit ripening are also up-regulated in SlAREB1-overexpressing lines compared with wild-type and antisense lines. Taken together, the results suggest that SlAREB1 participates in the regulation of the metabolic programming that takes place during fruit ripening and that may explain part of the role of ABA in fruit development in tomato.

  7. Characterization of the cis elements in the proximal promoter regions of the anthocyanin pathway genes reveals a common regulatory logic that governs pathway regulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhixin; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Yiting; Guan, Shan; Wang, Fang; Tang, Jingyu; Zhang, Ruijuan; Xie, Lulu; Lu, Yingqing

    2015-01-01

    Cellular activities such as compound synthesis often require the transcriptional activation of an entire pathway; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying pathway activation have rarely been explained. Here, the cis regulatory architecture of the anthocyanin pathway genes targeted by the transcription factor (TF) complex including MYB, bHLH, and WDR was systematically analysed in one species and the findings extended to others. In Ipomoea purpurea, the IpMYB1-IpbHLH2-IpWDR1 (IpMBW) complex was found to be orthologous to the PAP1-GL3-TTG1 (AtPGT) complex of Arabidopsis thaliana, and interacted with a 7-bp MYB-recognizing element (MRE) and a 6-bp bHLH-recognizing element (BRE) at the proximal promoter region of the pathway genes. There was little transcription of the gene in the absence of the MRE or BRE. The cis elements identified experimentally converged on two syntaxes, ANCNNCC for MREs and CACN(A/C/T)(G/T) for BREs, and our bioinformatic analysis showed that these were present within anthocyanin gene promoters in at least 35 species, including both gymnosperms and angiosperms. For the anthocyanin pathway, IpMBW and AtPGT recognized the interspecific promoters of both early and later genes. In A. thaliana, the seed-specific TF complex (TT2, TT8, and TTG1) may regulate all the anthocyanin pathway genes, in addition to the proanthocyanidin-specific BAN. When multiple TF complexes in the anthocyanin pathway were compared, the cis architecture played a role larger than the TF complex in determining the variation in promoter activity. Collectively, a cis logic common to the pathway gene promoters was found, and this logic is essential for the trans factors to regulate the pathway. PMID:25911741

  8. Theta oscillations regulate the speed of locomotion via a hippocampus to lateral septum pathway.

    PubMed

    Bender, Franziska; Gorbati, Maria; Cadavieco, Marta Carus; Denisova, Natalia; Gao, Xiaojie; Holman, Constance; Korotkova, Tatiana; Ponomarenko, Alexey

    2015-10-12

    Hippocampal theta oscillations support encoding of an animal's position during spatial navigation, yet longstanding questions about their impact on locomotion remain unanswered. Combining optogenetic control of hippocampal theta oscillations with electrophysiological recordings in mice, we show that hippocampal theta oscillations regulate locomotion. In particular, we demonstrate that their regularity underlies more stable and slower running speeds during exploration. More regular theta oscillations are accompanied by more regular theta-rhythmic spiking output of pyramidal cells. Theta oscillations are coordinated between the hippocampus and its main subcortical output, the lateral septum (LS). Chemo- or optogenetic inhibition of this pathway reveals its necessity for the hippocampal regulation of running speed. Moreover, theta-rhythmic stimulation of LS projections to the lateral hypothalamus replicates the reduction of running speed induced by more regular hippocampal theta oscillations. These results suggest that changes in hippocampal theta synchronization are translated into rapid adjustment of running speed via the LS.

  9. Theta oscillations regulate the speed of locomotion via a hippocampus to lateral septum pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Franziska; Gorbati, Maria; Cadavieco, Marta Carus; Denisova, Natalia; Gao, Xiaojie; Holman, Constance; Korotkova, Tatiana; Ponomarenko, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    Hippocampal theta oscillations support encoding of an animal's position during spatial navigation, yet longstanding questions about their impact on locomotion remain unanswered. Combining optogenetic control of hippocampal theta oscillations with electrophysiological recordings in mice, we show that hippocampal theta oscillations regulate locomotion. In particular, we demonstrate that their regularity underlies more stable and slower running speeds during exploration. More regular theta oscillations are accompanied by more regular theta-rhythmic spiking output of pyramidal cells. Theta oscillations are coordinated between the hippocampus and its main subcortical output, the lateral septum (LS). Chemo- or optogenetic inhibition of this pathway reveals its necessity for the hippocampal regulation of running speed. Moreover, theta-rhythmic stimulation of LS projections to the lateral hypothalamus replicates the reduction of running speed induced by more regular hippocampal theta oscillations. These results suggest that changes in hippocampal theta synchronization are translated into rapid adjustment of running speed via the LS. PMID:26455912

  10. Atypical PKC-iota Controls Stem Cell Expansion via Regulation of the Notch Pathway.

    PubMed

    Mah, In Kyoung; Soloff, Rachel; Hedrick, Stephen M; Mariani, Francesca V

    2015-11-10

    The number of stem/progenitor cells available can profoundly impact tissue homeostasis and the response to injury or disease. Here, we propose that an atypical PKC, Prkci, is a key player in regulating the switch from an expansion to a differentiation/maintenance phase via regulation of Notch, thus linking the polarity pathway with the control of stem cell self-renewal. Prkci is known to influence symmetric cell division in invertebrates; however a definitive role in mammals has not yet emerged. Using a genetic approach, we find that loss of Prkci results in a marked increase in the number of various stem/progenitor cells. The mechanism used likely involves inactivation and symmetric localization of NUMB, leading to the activation of NOTCH1 and its downstream effectors. Inhibition of atypical PKCs may be useful for boosting the production of pluripotent stem cells, multipotent stem cells, or possibly even primordial germ cells by promoting the stem cell/progenitor fate.

  11. Theta oscillations regulate the speed of locomotion via a hippocampus to lateral septum pathway.

    PubMed

    Bender, Franziska; Gorbati, Maria; Cadavieco, Marta Carus; Denisova, Natalia; Gao, Xiaojie; Holman, Constance; Korotkova, Tatiana; Ponomarenko, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    Hippocampal theta oscillations support encoding of an animal's position during spatial navigation, yet longstanding questions about their impact on locomotion remain unanswered. Combining optogenetic control of hippocampal theta oscillations with electrophysiological recordings in mice, we show that hippocampal theta oscillations regulate locomotion. In particular, we demonstrate that their regularity underlies more stable and slower running speeds during exploration. More regular theta oscillations are accompanied by more regular theta-rhythmic spiking output of pyramidal cells. Theta oscillations are coordinated between the hippocampus and its main subcortical output, the lateral septum (LS). Chemo- or optogenetic inhibition of this pathway reveals its necessity for the hippocampal regulation of running speed. Moreover, theta-rhythmic stimulation of LS projections to the lateral hypothalamus replicates the reduction of running speed induced by more regular hippocampal theta oscillations. These results suggest that changes in hippocampal theta synchronization are translated into rapid adjustment of running speed via the LS. PMID:26455912

  12. The dynamics of NF-κB pathway regulated by circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xia; Yu, Wenbao; Zheng, Lei

    2015-02-01

    The circadian clock regulates many physiological parameters involving immune response to infectious agents, which is mediated by activation of the transcription factor NF-κB. Thus, understanding the NF-κB dynamics regulated by circadian clocks will help in developing better therapeutics. To this end, we proposed a detailed model in the present work on the basis of understanding inflammatory response under control from circadian clocks. Our results show that the frequencies and amplitudes of the NF-κB oscillation are dependent on the strength and modes of coupling to circadian clock. This circadian control of NF-κB pathway can therefore serve as a useful mechanism in keeping the system in check and controlling inflammatory response induced by infection and other agents. The results are consistent with earlier experimental findings.

  13. Effective Strategies for Monitoring and Regulating Chemical Mixtures and Contaminants Sharing Pathways of Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, Arjun K.; Halden, Rolf U.

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, hazardous chemicals have been regulated in the U.S. on a one-by-one basis, an approach that is slow, expensive and can be inefficient, as illustrated by a decades-long succession of replacing one type of organohalogen flame retardants (OHFRs) with another one, without addressing the root cause of toxicity and associated public health threats posed. The present article expounds on the need for efficient monitoring strategies and pragmatic steps in reducing environmental pollution and adverse human health impacts. A promising approach is to combine specific bioassays with state-of-the-art chemical screening to identify chemicals and chemical mixtures sharing specific modes of action (MOAs) and pathways of toxicity (PoTs). This approach could be used to identify and regulate hazardous chemicals as classes or compound families, featuring similar biological end-points, such as endocrine disruption and mutagenicity. Opportunities and potential obstacles of implementing this approach are discussed. PMID:26343697

  14. Chromatin landscaping in algae reveals novel regulation pathway for biofuels production

    SciTech Connect

    Ngan, Chew Yee; Wong, Chee-Hong; Choi, Cindy; Pratap, Abhishek; Han, James; Wei, Chia-Lin

    2013-02-19

    The diminishing reserve of fossil fuels calls for the development of biofuels. Biofuels are produced from renewable resources, including photosynthetic organisms, generating clean energy. Microalgae is one of the potential feedstock for biofuels production. It grows easily even in waste water, and poses no competition to agricultural crops for arable land. However, little is known about the algae lipid biosynthetic regulatory mechanisms. Most studies relied on the homology to other plant model organisms, in particular Arabidopsis or through low coverage expression analysis to identify key enzymes. This limits the discovery of new components in the biosynthetic pathways, particularly the genetic regulators and effort to maximize the production efficiency of algal biofuels. Here we report an unprecedented and de novo approach to dissect the algal lipid pathways through disclosing the temporal regulations of chromatin states during lipid biosynthesis. We have generated genome wide chromatin maps in chlamydomonas genome using ChIP-seq targeting 7 histone modifications and RNA polymerase II in a time-series manner throughout conditions activating lipid biosynthesis. To our surprise, the combinatory profiles of histone codes uncovered new regulatory mechanism in gene expression in algae. Coupled with matched RNA-seq data, chromatin changes revealed potential novel regulators and candidate genes involved in the activation of lipid accumulations. Genetic perturbation on these candidate regulators further demonstrated the potential to manipulate the regulatory cascade for lipid synthesis efficiency. Exploring epigenetic landscape in microalgae shown here provides powerful tools needed in improving biofuel production and new technology platform for renewable energy generation, global carbon management, and environmental survey.

  15. Regulation of the Flavonoid Biosynthesis Pathway Genes in Purple and Black Grains of Hordeum vulgare

    PubMed Central

    Mock, Hans-Peter; Kukoeva, Tatjana V.; Börner, Andreas; Khlestkina, Elena K.

    2016-01-01

    Barley grain at maturity can have yellow, purple, blue, and black pigmentations which are suggested to play a protective role under stress conditions. The first three types of the colors are caused by phenolic compounds flavonoids; the last one is caused by phytomelanins, oxidized and polymerized phenolic compounds. Although the genetic basis of the flavonoid biosynthesis pathway in barley has been thoroughly studied, there is no data yet on its regulation in purple and black barley grains. In the current study, genetic model of Hordeum vulgare ‘Bowman’ near-isogenic lines (NILs) was used to investigate the regulation of the flavonoid biosynthesis in white, purple, and black barley grains. Microsatellite genotyping revealed donor segments in the purple- and black-grained lines on chromosomes 2H (in region of the Ant2 gene determining purple color of grains) and 1H (in region of the Blp gene determining black lemma and pericarp), respectively. The isolated dominant Ant2 allele of the purple-grained line has high level of sequence similarity with the recessive Bowman’s ant2 in coding region, whereas an insertion of 179 bp was detected in promoter region of ant2. This structural divergence between Ant2 and ant2 alleles may underlie their different expression in grain pericarp: Bowman’s Ant2 is not transcribed, whereas it was up-regulated in the purple-grained line with coordinately co-expressed flavonoid biosynthesis structural genes (Chs, Chi, F3h, F3’h, Dfr, Ans). This led to total anthocyain content increase in purple-grained line identified by ultra-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Collectively, these results proved the regulatory function of the Ant2 gene in anthocyanin biosynthesis in barley grain pericarp. In the black-grained line, the specific transcriptional regulation of the flavonoid biosynthesis pathway genes was not detected, suggesting that flavonoid pigments are not involved in development of black lemma and pericarp trait. PMID

  16. Comparative genomics reveals candidate carotenoid pathway regulators of ripening watermelon fruit

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Many fruits, including watermelon, are proficient in carotenoid accumulation during ripening. While most genes encoding steps in the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway have been cloned, few transcriptional regulators of these genes have been defined to date. Here we describe the identification of a set of putative carotenoid-related transcription factors resulting from fresh watermelon carotenoid and transcriptome analysis during fruit development and ripening. Our goal is to both clarify the expression profiles of carotenoid pathway genes and to identify candidate regulators and molecular targets for crop improvement. Results Total carotenoids progressively increased during fruit ripening up to ~55 μg g-1 fw in red-ripe fruits. Trans-lycopene was the carotenoid that contributed most to this increase. Many of the genes related to carotenoid metabolism displayed changing expression levels during fruit ripening generating a metabolic flux toward carotenoid synthesis. Constitutive low expression of lycopene cyclase genes resulted in lycopene accumulation. RNA-seq expression profiling of watermelon fruit development yielded a set of transcription factors whose expression was correlated with ripening and carotenoid accumulation. Nineteen putative transcription factor genes from watermelon and homologous to tomato carotenoid-associated genes were identified. Among these, six were differentially expressed in the flesh of both species during fruit development and ripening. Conclusions Taken together the data suggest that, while the regulation of a common set of metabolic genes likely influences carotenoid synthesis and accumulation in watermelon and tomato fruits during development and ripening, specific and limiting regulators may differ between climacteric and non-climacteric fruits, possibly related to their differential susceptibility to and use of ethylene during ripening. PMID:24219562

  17. A Myb transcription factor regulates genes of the phenylalanine pathway in maritime pine.

    PubMed

    Craven-Bartle, Blanca; Pascual, M Belen; Cánovas, Francisco M; Avila, Concepción

    2013-06-01

    During the life cycles of conifer trees, such as maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Ait.), large quantities of carbon skeletons are irreversibly immobilized in the wood. In energetic terms this is an expensive process, in which carbon from photosynthesis is channelled through the shikimate pathway for the biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids. This crucial metabolic pathway is finely regulated, primarily through transcriptional control, and because phenylalanine is the precursor for phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, the precise regulation of phenylalanine synthesis and use should occur simultaneously. The promoters of three genes encoding the enzymes prephenate aminotransferase (PAT), phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and glutamine synthetase (GS1b) contain AC elements involved in the transcriptional activation mediated by R2R3-Myb factors. We have examined the capacity of the R2R3-Myb transcription factors Myb1, Myb4 and Myb8 to co-regulate the expression of PAT, PAL and GS1b. Only Myb8 was able to activate the transcription of the three genes. Moreover, the expression of this transcription factor is higher in lignified tissues, in which a high demand for phenylpropanoids exits. In a gain-of-function experiment, we have shown that Myb8 can specifically bind a well-conserved eight-nucleotide-long AC-II element in the promoter regions of PAT, PAL and GS1b, thereby activating their expression. Our results show that Myb8 regulates the expression of these genes involved in phenylalanine metabolism, which is required for channelling photosynthetic carbon to promote wood formation. The co-localization of PAT, PAL, GS1b and MYB8 transcripts in vascular cells further supports this conclusion.

  18. The Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase/Akt Pathway Negatively Regulates Nod2-Mediated NF-kB Pathway

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain containing proteins (Nods) are intracellular pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that recognize conserved moieties of bacterial peptidoglycan and activate downstream signaling pathways including NF-kB pathway. Here, we show that Nod2 agonist MDP induces Ak...

  19. Importance of Mediator complex in the regulation and integration of diverse signaling pathways in plants

    PubMed Central

    Samanta, Subhasis; Thakur, Jitendra K.

    2015-01-01

    Basic transcriptional machinery in eukaryotes is assisted by a number of cofactors, which either increase or decrease the rate of transcription. Mediator complex is one such cofactor, and recently has drawn a lot of interest because of its integrative power to converge different signaling pathways before channeling the transcription instructions to the RNA polymerase II machinery. Like yeast and metazoans, plants do possess the Mediator complex across the kingdom, and its isolation and subunit analyses have been reported from the model plant, Arabidopsis. Genetic, and molecular analyses have unraveled important regulatory roles of Mediator subunits at every stage of plant life cycle starting from flowering to embryo and organ development, to even size determination. It also contributes immensely to the survival of plants against different environmental vagaries by the timely activation of its resistance mechanisms. Here, we have provided an overview of plant Mediator complex starting from its discovery to regulation of stoichiometry of its subunits. We have also reviewed involvement of different Mediator subunits in different processes and pathways including defense response pathways evoked by diverse biotic cues. Wherever possible, attempts have been made to provide mechanistic insight of Mediator's involvement in these processes. PMID:26442070

  20. Flexible metabolic pathway construction using modular and divisible selection gene regulators.

    PubMed

    Rugbjerg, Peter; Myling-Petersen, Nils; Sommer, Morten O A

    2015-09-01

    Genetic selections are important to biological engineering. Although selectable traits are limited, currently each trait only permits simultaneous introduction of a single DNA fragment. Complex pathway and strain construction however depends on rapid, combinatorial introduction of many genes that encode putative pathway candidates and homologs. To triple the utility of existing selection genes, we have developed divisible selection in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, independent DNA fragments can be introduced and selected for simultaneously using a set of split hybrid transcription factors composed of parts from Escherichia coli LexA and Herpes simplex VP16 to regulate one single selectable phenotype of choice. Only when co-expressed, these split hybrid transcription factors promote transcription of a selection gene, causing tight selection of transformants containing all desired DNA fragments. Upon transformation, 94% of the selected colonies resulted strictly from transforming all three modules based on ARS/CEN plasmids. Similarly when used for chromosome integration, 95% of the transformants contained all three modules. The divisible selection system acts dominantly and thus expands selection gene utility from one to three without any genomic pre-modifications of the strain. We demonstrate the approach by introducing the fungal rubrofusarin polyketide pathway at a gene load of 11 kb distributed on three different plasmids, using a single selection trait and one yeast transformation step. By tripling the utility of existing selection genes, the employment of divisible selection improves flexibility and freedom in the strain engineering process.

  1. An endocytosis pathway initiated through neuropilin-1 and regulated by nutrient availability

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Hong-Bo; Braun, Gary B.; Friman, Tomas; Aza-Blanc, Pedro; Ruidiaz, Manuel E.; Sugahara, Kazuki N.; Teesalu, Tambet; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2014-01-01

    Neuropilins (NRPs) are trans-membrane receptors involved in axon guidance and vascular development. Many growth factors and other signaling molecules bind to NRPs through a C-terminal, basic sequence motif (C-end Rule or CendR motif). Peptides with this motif (CendR peptides) are taken up into cells by endocytosis. Tumor-homing CendR peptides penetrate through tumor tissue and have shown utility in enhancing drug delivery into tumors. Here we show, using RNAi screening and subsequent validation studies, that NRP1-mediated endocytosis of CendR peptides is distinct from known endocytic pathways. Ultrastructurally, CendR endocytosis resembles macropinocytosis, but is mechanistically different. We also show that nutrient-sensing networks such as mTOR signaling regulate CendR endocytosis and subsequent intercellular transport of CendR cargo, both of which are stimulated by nutrient depletion. As CendR is a bulk transport pathway, our results suggest a role for it in nutrient transport; CendR-enhanced drug delivery then makes use of this natural pathway. PMID:25277522

  2. Integration of cardiac myofilament activity and regulation with pathways signaling hypertrophy and failure.

    PubMed

    de Tombe, P P; Solaro, R J

    2000-08-01

    The syndrome of congestive heart failure (CHF) is an entity of ever increasing clinical significance. CHF is characterized by a steady decrease in cardiac pump function, which is eventually lethal. The mechanisms that underlie the decline in cardiac function are incompletely understood. A central theme in solving the mystery of heart failure is the identification of mechanisms by which the myofilament contractile machine of the myocardium is altered in CHF and how these alterations act in concert with pathways that signal cell growth and death. The cardiac myofilaments are a point of confluence of signals that promote the hypertrophic/failure process. Our hypothesis is that a prevailing hemodynamic stress leads to an increased strain on the myocardium. The increased strain in turn leads to miscues of the normal physiological pathway by which heart cells are signaled to match and adapt the intensity and dynamics of their mechanical activity to prevailing hemodynamic demands. These miscues result in a maladaptation to the stressor and failure of the heart to respond to hemodynamic loads at optimal end diastolic volumes. The result is a vicious cycle exacerbating the failure. Cardiac myofilament activity, the ultimate determinant of cellular dynamics and force, is a central player in the integration and regulation of pathways that signal hypertrophy and failure.

  3. A neurofibromatosis-1-regulated pathway is required for learning in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Guo, H F; Tong, J; Hannan, F; Luo, L; Zhong, Y

    2000-02-24

    The tumour-suppressor gene Neurofibromatosis 1 (Nf1) encodes a Ras-specific GTPase activating protein (Ras-GAP). In addition to being involved in tumour formation, NF1 has been reported to cause learning defects in humans and Nf1 knockout mice. However, it remains to be determined whether the observed learning defect is secondary to abnormal development. The Drosophila NF1 protein is highly conserved, showing 60% identity of its 2,803 amino acids with human NF1 (ref. 12). Previous studies have suggested that Drosophila NF1 acts not only as a Ras-GAP but also as a possible regulator of the cAMP pathway that involves the rutabaga (rut)-encoded adenylyl cyclase. Because rut was isolated as a learning and short-term memory mutant, we have pursued the hypothesis that NF1 may affect learning through its control of the Rut-adenylyl cyclase/cAMP pathway. Here we show that NF1 affects learning and short-term memory independently of its developmental effects. We show that G-protein-activated adenylyl cyclase activity consists of NF1-independent and NF1-dependent components, and that the mechanism of the NF1-dependent activation of the Rut-adenylyl cyclase pathway is essential for mediating Drosophila learning and memory. PMID:10706287

  4. Ginsenoside Rb1 inhibits matrix metalloproteinase 13 through down-regulating Notch signaling pathway in osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Zeng, Li; Wang, Ze-ming; Zhang, Sihan; Rong, Xiao-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that an excess of matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) plays an important role in the breakdown of extracellular matrix in osteoarthritis (OA). Here, the effects of ginsenoside Rb1 (GRb1) on the expression of MMP-13 in IL-1β-induced SW 1353 chondrosarcoma cells and an experimental rat model of OA induced by anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) were investigated. SW1353 chondrosarcoma cells were pretreated with or without GRb1 and Notch signaling pathway inhibitor, DAPT, then were stimulated with IL-1β. In rats, experimental OA was induced by ACLT. These rats then received intra-articular injections of vehicle, an inhibitor of γ-secretase, DAPT, and/or GRb1. Expression of MMP-13, collagen type II (CII), Notch1, and jagged 1 (JAG1) were verified by western blotting and immunohistochemistry. In addition, levels of MMP-13 mRNA were detected using quantitative real-time PCR. In histological analyses, treatment with DAPT reduced the number of cartilage lesions present and the expressions of MMP-13, CII, Notch1, and JAG1. In addition, treatment with GRb1 was associated with lower levels of Notch1 and JAG1 in both IL-1β-induced SW1353 chondrosarcoma cells and in the rat OA model. Furthermore, the suppressive effect of GRb1 on MMP-13 was greater than that exhibited by the signaling pathway inhibitor. In conclusion, GRb1 inhibits MMP-13 through down-regulating Notch signaling pathway in OA. PMID:26062798

  5. Signalling pathway for RKIP and Let-7 regulates and predicts metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jieun; Frankenberger, Casey A; Kuo, Wen-Liang; Boelens, Mirjam C; Eves, Eva M; Cheng, Nancy; Liang, Han; Li, Wen-Hsiung; Ishwaran, Hemant; Minn, Andy J; Rosner, Marsha Rich

    2011-01-01

    Tumour metastasis suppressors are inhibitors of metastasis but their mechanisms of action are generally not understood. We previously showed that the suppressor Raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP) inhibits breast tumour metastasis in part via let-7. Here, we demonstrate an integrated approach combining statistical analysis of breast tumour gene expression data and experimental validation to extend the signalling pathway for RKIP. We show that RKIP inhibits let-7 targets (HMGA2, BACH1) that in turn upregulate bone metastasis genes (MMP1, OPN, CXCR4). Our results reveal BACH1 as a novel let-7-regulated transcription factor that induces matrix metalloproteinase1 (MMP1) expression and promotes metastasis. An RKIP pathway metastasis signature (designated RPMS) derived from the complete signalling cascade predicts high metastatic risk better than the individual genes. These results highlight a powerful approach for identifying signalling pathways downstream of a key metastasis suppressor and indicate that analysis of genes in the context of their signalling environment is critical for understanding their predictive and therapeutic potential. PMID:21873975

  6. Metabolomics and proteomics annotate therapeutic properties of geniposide: targeting and regulating multiple perturbed pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xijun; Zhang, Aihua; Yan, Guangli; Sun, Wenjun; Han, Ying; Sun, Hui

    2013-01-01

    Geniposide is an important constituent of Gardenia jasminoides Ellis, a famous Chinese medicinal plant, and has displayed bright prospects in prevention and therapy of hepatic injury (HI). Unfortunately, the working mechanisms of this compound are difficult to determine and thus remain unknown. To determine the mechanisms that underlie this compound, we conducted a systematic analysis of the therapeutic effects of geniposide using biochemistry, metabolomics and proteomics. Geniposide significantly intensified the therapeutic efficacy as indicated by our modern biochemical analysis. Metabolomics results indicate 9 ions in the positive mode as differentiating metabolites which were associated with perturbations in primary bile acid biosynthesis, butanoate metabolism, citrate cycle (TCA cycle), alanine, aspartate and glutamate metabolism. Of note, geniposide has potential pharmacological effect through regulating multiple perturbed pathways to normal state. In an attempt to address the benefits of geniposide based on the proteomics approaches, the protein-interacting networks were constructed to aid identifying the drug targets of geniposide. Six identified differential proteins appear to be involved in antioxidation and signal transduction, energy production, immunity, metabolism, chaperoning. These proteins were closely related in the protein-protein interaction network and the modulation of multiple vital physiological pathways. These data will help to understand the molecular therapeutic mechanisms of geniposide on hepatic damage rats. We also conclude that metabolomics and proteomics are powerful and versatile tools for both biomarker discovery and exploring the complex relationships between biological pathways and drug response, highlighting insights into drug discovery. PMID:23967205

  7. Importance of Mediator complex in the regulation and integration of diverse signaling pathways in plants.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Subhasis; Thakur, Jitendra K

    2015-01-01

    Basic transcriptional machinery in eukaryotes is assisted by a number of cofactors, which either increase or decrease the rate of transcription. Mediator complex is one such cofactor, and recently has drawn a lot of interest because of its integrative power to converge different signaling pathways before channeling the transcription instructions to the RNA polymerase II machinery. Like yeast and metazoans, plants do possess the Mediator complex across the kingdom, and its isolation and subunit analyses have been reported from the model plant, Arabidopsis. Genetic, and molecular analyses have unraveled important regulatory roles of Mediator subunits at every stage of plant life cycle starting from flowering to embryo and organ development, to even size determination. It also contributes immensely to the survival of plants against different environmental vagaries by the timely activation of its resistance mechanisms. Here, we have provided an overview of plant Mediator complex starting from its discovery to regulation of stoichiometry of its subunits. We have also reviewed involvement of different Mediator subunits in different processes and pathways including defense response pathways evoked by diverse biotic cues. Wherever possible, attempts have been made to provide mechanistic insight of Mediator's involvement in these processes.

  8. Leptin-mediated ion channel regulation: PI3K pathways, physiological role, and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Gavello, Daniela; Carbone, Emilio; Carabelli, Valentina

    2016-07-01

    Leptin is produced by adipose tissue and identified as a "satiety signal," informing the brain when the body has consumed enough food. Specific areas of the hypothalamus express leptin receptors (LEPRs) and are the primary site of leptin action for body weight regulation. In response to leptin, appetite is suppressed and energy expenditure allowed. Beside this hypothalamic action, leptin targets other brain areas in addition to neuroendocrine cells. LEPRs are expressed also in the hippocampus, neocortex, cerebellum, substantia nigra, pancreatic β-cells, and chromaffin cells of the adrenal gland. It is intriguing how leptin is able to activate different ionic conductances, thus affecting excitability, synaptic plasticity and neurotransmitter release, depending on the target cell. Most of the intracellular pathways activated by leptin and directed to ion channels involve PI3K, which in turn phosphorylates different downstream substrates, although parallel pathways involve AMPK and MAPK. In this review we will describe the effects of leptin on BK, KATP, KV, CaV, TRPC, NMDAR and AMPAR channels and clarify the landscape of pathways involved. Given the ability of leptin to influence neuronal excitability and synaptic plasticity by modulating ion channels activity, we also provide a short overview of the growing potentiality of leptin as therapeutic agent for treating neurological disorders.

  9. [Regulation of isoprenoid pathway for enhanced production of linalool in Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    PubMed

    Sun, Mingxue; Liu, Jidong; Du, Guocheng; Zhou, Jingwen; Chen, Jian

    2013-06-01

    Linalool is an important monoterpene, and widely used in food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industry. The low concentration in plants and the difficulties in extraction restrict its large scale production. Saccharomyces cerevisiae can provide the monoterpene precursor, geranyl diphosphate (GPP) through its endogenous isoprenoid pathway. Therefore, it could be used as the host for monoterpene production. However, the weak metabolic flux through the isoprenoid pathway leads to the insufficient supply of GPP, and results in low monoterpene productivity. In order to increase the metabolic flux, we constructed the integrated expression plasmid pRS305-tHMG1 and free expression plasmid pYLIS-IDI1 to enhance the expression levels of isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase (IDI1) and a truncated 3-hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase gene (tHMG1). The two plasmids were separately transformed into S. cerevisiae CEN.PK2-1C, resulting in strains LS01 and LS02. The plasmid pYLIS-IDI1 was further transformed into strain LS01, resulting in strain LS03. GC-MS analysis showed that the linalool concentration was increased by 1.3 times and reached (127.71 +/- 7.68) microg/L. In conclusion, enhancement of the supply of GPP precursors through the regulation of isoprenoid pathway could increase the linalool production in S. cerevisiae.

  10. Intracellular signaling pathway regulation of myelination and remyelination in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Gaesser, Jenna M; Fyffe-Maricich, Sharyl L

    2016-09-01

    The restoration of myelin sheaths on demyelinated axons remains a major obstacle in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). Currently approved therapies work by modulating the immune system to reduce the number and rate of lesion formation but are only partially effective since they are not able to restore lost myelin. In the healthy CNS, myelin continues to be generated throughout life and spontaneous remyelination occurs readily in response to insults. In patients with MS, however, remyelination eventually fails, at least in part as a result of a failure of oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) differentiation and the subsequent production of new myelin. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways that drive the process of myelin sheath formation is therefore important in order to speed the development of novel therapeutics designed to target remyelination. Here we review data supporting critical roles for three highly conserved intracellular signaling pathways: Wnt/β-catenin, PI3K/AKT/mTOR, and ERK/MAPK in the regulation of OPC differentiation and myelination both during development and in remyelination. Potential points of crosstalk between the three pathways and important areas for future research are also discussed.

  11. Opposite transcriptional regulation of integrated vs unintegrated HIV genomes by the NF-κB pathway

    PubMed Central

    Thierry, Sylvain; Thierry, Eloïse; Subra, Frédéric; Deprez, Eric; Leh, Hervé; Bury-Moné, Stéphanie; Delelis, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Integration of HIV-1 linear DNA into host chromatin is required for high levels of viral expression, and constitutes a key therapeutic target. Unintegrated viral DNA (uDNA) can support only limited transcription but may contribute to viral propagation, persistence and/or treatment escape under specific situations. The molecular mechanisms involved in the differential expression of HIV uDNA vs integrated genome (iDNA) remain to be elucidated. Here, we demonstrate, for the first time, that the expression of HIV uDNA is mainly supported by 1-LTR circles, and regulated in the opposite way, relatively to iDNA, following NF-κB pathway modulation. Upon treatment activating the NF-κB pathway, NF-κB p65 and AP-1 (cFos/cJun) binding to HIV LTR iDNA correlates with increased iDNA expression, while uDNA expression decreases. On the contrary, inhibition of the NF-κB pathway promotes the expression of circular uDNA, and correlates with Bcl-3 and AP-1 binding to its LTR region. Finally, this study identifies NF-κB subunits and Bcl-3 as transcription factors binding the HIV promoter differently depending on viral genome topology, and opens new insights on the potential roles of episomal genomes during the HIV-1 latency and persistence. PMID:27167871

  12. Signal transduction pathways in FSH regulation of rat Sertoli cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Riera, María F; Regueira, Mariana; Galardo, María N; Pellizzari, Eliana H; Meroni, Silvina B; Cigorraga, Selva B

    2012-04-15

    The final number of Sertoli cells reached during the proliferative periods determines sperm production capacity in adulthood. It is well known that FSH is the major Sertoli cell mitogen; however, little is known about the signal transduction pathways that regulate the proliferation of Sertoli cells. The hypothesis of this investigation was that FSH regulates proliferation through a PI3K/Akt/mTORC1 pathway, and additionally, AMPK-dependent mechanisms counteract FSH proliferative effects. The present study was performed in 8-day-old rat Sertoli cell cultures. The results presented herein show that FSH, in addition to increasing p-Akt, p-mTOR, and p-p70S6K levels, increases p-PRAS40 levels, probably contributing to improving mTORC1 signaling. Furthermore, the decrease in FSH-stimulated p-Akt, p-mTOR, p-p70S6K, and p-PRAS40 levels in the presence of wortmannin emphasizes the participation of PI3K in FSH signaling. Additionally, the inhibition of FSH-stimulated Sertoli cell proliferation by the effect of wortmannin and rapamycin point to the relevance of the PI3K/Akt/mTORC1 signaling pathway in the mitotic activity of FSH. On the other hand, by activating AMPK, several interesting observations were made. Activation of AMPK produced an increase in Raptor phosphorylation, a decrease in p70S6K phosphorylation, and a decrease in FSH-stimulated Sertoli cell proliferation. The decrease in FSH-stimulated cell proliferation was accompanied by an increased expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CDKIs) p19INK4d, p21Cip1, and p27Kip1. In summary, it is concluded that FSH regulates Sertoli cell proliferation with the participation of a PI3K/Akt/mTORC1 pathway and that AMPK activation may be involved in the detention of proliferation by, at least in part, a decrease in mTORC1 signaling and an increase in CDKI expression.

  13. Plasma Membrane Abundance of Human Aquaporin 5 Is Dynamically Regulated by Multiple Pathways.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, Philip; Öberg, Fredrik; Sjöhamn, Jennie; Hedfalk, Kristina; Bill, Roslyn M; Conner, Alex C; Conner, Matthew T; Törnroth-Horsefield, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    Aquaporin membrane protein channels mediate cellular water flow. Human aquaporin 5 (AQP5) is highly expressed in the respiratory system and secretory glands where it facilitates the osmotically-driven generation of pulmonary secretions, saliva, sweat and tears. Dysfunctional trafficking of AQP5 has been implicated in several human disease states, including Sjögren's syndrome, bronchitis and cystic fibrosis. In order to investigate how the plasma membrane expression levels of AQP5 are regulated, we studied real-time translocation of GFP-tagged AQP5 in HEK293 cells. We show that AQP5 plasma membrane abundance in transfected HEK293 cells is rapidly and reversibly regulated by at least three independent mechanisms involving phosphorylation at Ser156, protein kinase A activity and extracellular tonicity. The crystal structure of a Ser156 phosphomimetic mutant indicates that its involvement in regulating AQP5 membrane abundance is not mediated by a conformational change of the carboxy-terminus. We suggest that together these pathways regulate cellular water flow. PMID:26569106

  14. Constitutive Negative Regulation of R Proteins in Arabidopsis also via Autophagy Related Pathway?

    PubMed Central

    Pečenková, Tamara; Sabol, Peter; Kulich, Ivan; Ortmannová, Jitka; Žárský, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Even though resistance (R) genes are among the most studied components of the plant immunity, there remain still a lot of aspects to be explained about the regulation of their function. Many gain-of-function mutants of R genes and loss-of-function of their regulators often demonstrate up-regulated defense responses in combination with dwarf stature and/or spontaneous leaf lesions formation. For most of these mutants, phenotypes are a consequence of an ectopic activation of R genes. Based on the compilation and comparison of published results in this field, we have concluded that the constitutively activated defense phenotypes recurrently arise by disruption of tight, constitutive and multilevel negative control of some of R proteins that might involve also their targeting to the autophagy pathway. This mode of R protein regulation is supported also by protein–protein interactions listed in available databases, as well as in silico search for autophagy machinery interacting motifs. The suggested model could resolve some explanatory discrepancies found in the studies of the immunity responses of autophagy mutants. PMID:26973696

  15. Plasma Membrane Abundance of Human Aquaporin 5 Is Dynamically Regulated by Multiple Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kitchen, Philip; Öberg, Fredrik; Sjöhamn, Jennie; Hedfalk, Kristina; Bill, Roslyn M.; Conner, Alex C.; Conner, Matthew T.; Törnroth-Horsefield, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    Aquaporin membrane protein channels mediate cellular water flow. Human aquaporin 5 (AQP5) is highly expressed in the respiratory system and secretory glands where it facilitates the osmotically-driven generation of pulmonary secretions, saliva, sweat and tears. Dysfunctional trafficking of AQP5 has been implicated in several human disease states, including Sjögren’s syndrome, bronchitis and cystic fibrosis. In order to investigate how the plasma membrane expression levels of AQP5 are regulated, we studied real-time translocation of GFP-tagged AQP5 in HEK293 cells. We show that AQP5 plasma membrane abundance in transfected HEK293 cells is rapidly and reversibly regulated by at least three independent mechanisms involving phosphorylation at Ser156, protein kinase A activity and extracellular tonicity. The crystal structure of a Ser156 phosphomimetic mutant indicates that its involvement in regulating AQP5 membrane abundance is not mediated by a conformational change of the carboxy-terminus. We suggest that together these pathways regulate cellular water flow. PMID:26569106

  16. Activation of p53-regulated pro-apoptotic signaling pathways in PrP-mediated myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jingjing; Parchaliuk, Debra; Medina, Sarah; Sorensen, Garrett; Landry, Laura; Huang, Shenghai; Wang, Meiling; Kong, Qingzhong; Booth, Stephanie A

    2009-01-01

    Background We have reported that doxycycline-induced over-expression of wild type prion protein (PrP) in skeletal muscles of Tg(HQK) mice is sufficient to cause a primary myopathy with no signs of peripheral neuropathy. The preferential accumulation of the truncated PrP C1 fragment was closely correlated with these myopathic changes. In this study we use gene expression profiling to explore the temporal program of molecular changes underlying the PrP-mediated myopathy. Results We used DNA microarrays, and confirmatory real-time PCR and Western blot analysis to demonstrate deregulation of a large number of genes in the course of the progressive myopathy in the skeletal muscles of doxycycline-treated Tg(HQK) mice. These include the down-regulation of genes coding for the myofibrillar proteins and transcription factor MEF2c, and up-regulation of genes for lysosomal proteins that is concomitant with increased lysosomal activity in the skeletal muscles. Significantly, there was prominent up-regulation of p53 and p53-regulated genes involved in cell cycle arrest and promotion of apoptosis that paralleled the initiation and progression of the muscle pathology. Conclusion The data provides the first in vivo evidence that directly links p53 to a wild type PrP-mediated disease. It is evident that several mechanistic features contribute to the myopathy observed in PrP over-expressing mice and that p53-related apoptotic pathways appear to play a major role. PMID:19400950

  17. The mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter: regulation by auxiliary subunits and signal transduction pathways.

    PubMed

    Jhun, Bong Sook; Mishra, Jyotsna; Monaco, Sarah; Fu, Deming; Jiang, Wenmin; Sheu, Shey-Shing; O-Uchi, Jin

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondrial Ca(2+) homeostasis, the Ca(2+) influx-efflux balance, is responsible for the control of numerous cellular functions, including energy metabolism, generation of reactive oxygen species, spatiotemporal dynamics of Ca(2+) signaling, and cell growth and death. Recent discovery of the molecular identity of the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU) provides new possibilities for application of genetic approaches to study the mitochondrial Ca(2+) influx mechanism in various cell types and tissues. In addition, the subsequent discovery of various auxiliary subunits associated with MCU suggests that mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake is not solely regulated by a single protein (MCU), but likely by a macromolecular protein complex, referred to as the MCU-protein complex (mtCUC). Moreover, recent reports have shown the potential role of MCU posttranslational modifications in the regulation of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake through mtCUC. These observations indicate that mtCUCs form a local signaling complex at the inner mitochondrial membrane that could significantly regulate mitochondrial Ca(2+) handling, as well as numerous mitochondrial and cellular functions. In this review we discuss the current literature on mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake mechanisms, with a particular focus on the structure and function of mtCUC, as well as its regulation by signal transduction pathways, highlighting current controversies and discrepancies.

  18. MicroRNA-regulated pathways in hematological malignancies: how to avoid cells playing out of tune.

    PubMed

    Fatica, Alessandro; Fazi, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    The coordinated expression and interplay among lineage specific transcription factors and microRNAs contribute to the regulation of gene expression and determination of cell specificity. In hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), unique combinations of transcription factors largely control growth and maturation of different blood cell lineages through cooperative regulation of specific target genes. MicroRNAs provide an additional level of control beyond transcription factors. By acting as regulators of crucial lineage-specific genetic programs, microRNAs direct early multipotential progenitor cells to adopt a certain cell fate program. Thus, alteration of specific microRNA levels may affect proliferation, differentiation and genetic stability of HSCs, contributing to the onset of myeloproliferative disorders and leukemia. The major aim of this review is to highlight the critical role of microRNA-regulated pathways during the establishment and progression of hematological malignancies, with a particular attention to leukemia, lymphomas and myelodysplastic syndromes. This will give us the opportunity to discuss the potential use of microRNA-based therapeutic approaches in these diseases. MicroRNAs are indeed emerging as relevant tools to improve the efficacy of currently used therapeutic protocols.

  19. The RhoA-ROCK pathway in the regulation of T and B cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Ricker, Edd; Chowdhury, Luvana; Yi, Woelsung; Pernis, Alessandra B.

    2016-01-01

    Effective immune responses require the precise regulation of dynamic interactions between hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells. The Rho subfamily of GTPases, which includes RhoA, is rapidly activated downstream of a diverse array of biochemical and biomechanical signals, and is emerging as an important mediator of this cross-talk. Key downstream effectors of RhoA are the Rho kinases, or ROCKs. The ROCKs are two serine-threonine kinases that can act as global coordinators of a tissue’s response to stress and injury because of their ability to regulate a wide range of biological processes. Although the RhoA-ROCK pathway has been extensively investigated in the non-hematopoietic compartment, its role in the immune system is just now becoming appreciated. In this commentary, we provide a brief overview of recent findings that highlight the contribution of this pathway to lymphocyte development and activation, and the impact that dysregulation in the activation of RhoA and/or the ROCKs may exert on a growing list of autoimmune and lymphoproliferative disorders.

  20. 3D culture broadly regulates tumor cell hypoxia response and angiogenesis via pro-inflammatory pathways

    PubMed Central

    DelNero, Peter; Lane, Maureen; Verbridge, Scott S.; Kwee, Brian; Kermani, Pouneh; Hempstead, Barbara; Stroock, Abraham; Fischbach, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen status and tissue dimensionality are critical determinants of tumor angiogenesis, a hallmark of cancer and an enduring target for therapeutic intervention. However, it is unclear how these microenvironmental conditions interact to promote neovascularization, due in part to a lack of comprehensive, unbiased data sets describing tumor cell gene expression as a function of oxygen levels within three-dimensional (3D) culture. Here, we utilized alginate-based, oxygen-controlled 3D tumor models to study the interdependence of culture context and the hypoxia response. Microarray gene expression analysis of tumor cells cultured in 2D versus 3D under ambient or hypoxic conditions revealed striking interdependence between culture dimensionality and hypoxia response, which was mediated in part by pro-inflammatory signaling pathways. In particular, interleukin-8 (IL-8) emerged as a major player in the microenvironmental regulation of the hypoxia program. Notably, this interaction between dimensionality and oxygen status via IL-8 increased angiogenic sprouting in a 3D endothelial invasion assay. Taken together, our data suggest that pro-inflammatory pathways are critical regulators of tumor hypoxia response within 3D environments that ultimately impact tumor angiogenesis, potentially providing important therapeutic targets. Furthermore, these results highlight the importance of pathologically relevant tissue culture models to study the complex physical and chemical processes by which the cancer microenvironment mediates new vessel formation. PMID:25934456

  1. Microbial regulation of terrestrial nitrous oxide formation: understanding the biological pathways for prediction of emission rates.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hang-Wei; Chen, Deli; He, Ji-Zheng

    2015-09-01

    The continuous increase of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) in the atmosphere due to increasing anthropogenic nitrogen input in agriculture has become a global concern. In recent years, identification of the microbial assemblages responsible for soil N2O production has substantially advanced with the development of molecular technologies and the discoveries of novel functional guilds and new types of metabolism. However, few practical tools are available to effectively reduce in situ soil N2O flux. Combating the negative impacts of increasing N2O fluxes poses considerable challenges and will be ineffective without successfully incorporating microbially regulated N2O processes into ecosystem modeling and mitigation strategies. Here, we synthesize the latest knowledge of (i) the key microbial pathways regulating N2O production and consumption processes in terrestrial ecosystems and the critical environmental factors influencing their occurrence, and (ii) the relative contributions of major biological pathways to soil N2O emissions by analyzing available natural isotopic signatures of N2O and by using stable isotope enrichment and inhibition techniques. We argue that it is urgently necessary to incorporate microbial traits into biogeochemical ecosystem modeling in order to increase the estimation reliability of N2O emissions. We further propose a molecular methodology oriented framework from gene to ecosystem scales for more robust prediction and mitigation of future N2O emissions. PMID:25934121

  2. MreA Functions in the Global Regulation of Methanogenic Pathways in Methanosarcina acetivorans

    PubMed Central

    Reichlen,, Matthew J.; Vepachedu, Venkata R.; Murakami, Katsuhiko S.; Ferry, James G.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Results are presented supporting a regulatory role for the product of the MA3302 gene locus (designated MreA) previously annotated as a hypothetical protein in the methanogenic species Methanosarcina acetivorans of the domain Archaea. Sequence analysis of MreA revealed identity to the TrmB family of transcription factors, albeit the sequence is lacking the sensor domain analogous to TrmBL2, abundant in nonmethanogenic species of the domain Archaea. Transcription of mreA was highly upregulated during growth on acetate versus methylotrophic substrates, and an mreA deletion (ΔmreA) strain was impaired for growth with acetate in contrast to normal growth with methylotrophic substrates. Transcriptional profiling of acetate-grown cells identified 280 genes with altered expression in the ΔmreA strain versus the wild-type strain. Expression of genes unique to the acetate pathway decreased whereas expression of genes unique to methylotrophic metabolism increased in the ΔmreA strain relative to the wild type, results indicative of a dual role for MreA in either the direct or indirect activation of acetate-specific genes and repression of methylotrophic-specific genes. Gel shift experiments revealed specific binding of MreA to promoter regions of regulated genes. Homologs of MreA were identified in M. acetivorans and other Methanosarcina species for which expression patterns indicate roles in regulating methylotrophic pathways. PMID:22851658

  3. Histone deacetylase 1 and 2 regulate Wnt and p53 pathways in the ureteric bud epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shaowei; Yao, Xiao; Li, Yuwen; Saifudeen, Zubaida; Bachvarov, Dimcho; El-Dahr, Samir S.

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) regulate a broad range of biological processes through removal of acetyl groups from histones as well as non-histone proteins. Our previous studies showed that Hdac1 and Hdac2 are bound to promoters of key renal developmental regulators and that HDAC activity is required for embryonic kidney gene expression. However, the existence of many HDAC isoforms in embryonic kidneys raises questions concerning the possible specificity or redundancy of their functions. We report here that targeted deletion of both the Hdac1 and Hdac2 genes from the ureteric bud (UB) cell lineage of mice causes bilateral renal hypodysplasia. One copy of either Hdac1 or Hdac2 is sufficient to sustain normal renal development. In addition to defective cell proliferation and survival, genome-wide transcriptional profiling revealed that the canonical Wnt signaling pathway is specifically impaired in UBHdac1,2−/− kidneys. Our results also demonstrate that loss of Hdac1 and Hdac2 in the UB epithelium leads to marked hyperacetylation of the tumor suppressor protein p53 on lysine 370, 379 and 383; these post-translational modifications are known to boost p53 stability and transcriptional activity. Genetic deletion of p53 partially rescues the development of UBHdac1,2−/− kidneys. Together, these data indicate that Hdac1 and Hdac2 are crucial for kidney development. They perform redundant, yet essential, cell lineage-autonomous functions via p53-dependent and -independent pathways. PMID:25758227

  4. Evaluation of MicroRNAs Regulating Anoikis Pathways and Its Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Malagobadan, Sharan; Nagoor, Noor Hasima

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) has been implicated in almost every known survival mechanisms utilized by cancer cells. One of such mechanisms, anoikis resistance, plays a pivotal role in enabling metastasis by allowing cancer cells to circumvent cell death induced by lack of attachment. Understanding how miRNAs regulate the various anoikis pathways has become the research question of increasing number of studies published in the past years. Through these studies, a growing list of miRNAs has been identified to be important players in promoting either anoikis or resistance to anoikis. In this review, we will be focusing on these miRNAs and how the findings from those studies can contribute to novel therapeutic strategies against cancer progression. We will be examining miRNAs that have been found to promote anoikis sensitivity in numerous cancer types followed by miRNAs that inhibit anoikis. In addition, we will also be taking a look at major signaling pathways involved in the action of the each of these miRNAs to gain a better understanding on how miRNAs regulate anoikis. PMID:26587543

  5. 3D culture broadly regulates tumor cell hypoxia response and angiogenesis via pro-inflammatory pathways.

    PubMed

    DelNero, Peter; Lane, Maureen; Verbridge, Scott S; Kwee, Brian; Kermani, Pouneh; Hempstead, Barbara; Stroock, Abraham; Fischbach, Claudia

    2015-07-01

    Oxygen status and tissue dimensionality are critical determinants of tumor angiogenesis, a hallmark of cancer and an enduring target for therapeutic intervention. However, it is unclear how these microenvironmental conditions interact to promote neovascularization, due in part to a lack of comprehensive, unbiased data sets describing tumor cell gene expression as a function of oxygen levels within three-dimensional (3D) culture. Here, we utilized alginate-based, oxygen-controlled 3D tumor models to study the interdependence of culture context and the hypoxia response. Microarray gene expression analysis of tumor cells cultured in 2D versus 3D under ambient or hypoxic conditions revealed striking interdependence between culture dimensionality and hypoxia response, which was mediated in part by pro-inflammatory signaling pathways. In particular, interleukin-8 (IL-8) emerged as a major player in the microenvironmental regulation of the hypoxia program. Notably, this interaction between dimensionality and oxygen status via IL-8 increased angiogenic sprouting in a 3D endothelial invasion assay. Taken together, our data suggest that pro-inflammatory pathways are critical regulators of tumor hypoxia response within 3D environments that ultimately impact tumor angiogenesis, potentially providing important therapeutic targets. Furthermore, these results highlight the importance of pathologically relevant tissue culture models to study the complex physical and chemical processes by which the cancer microenvironment mediates new vessel formation.

  6. Regulation of the TGF-β pathway by deubiquitinases in cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sijia; de Boeck, Miriam; van Dam, Hans; Ten Dijke, Peter

    2016-07-01

    The transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) pathway regulates diverse cellular processes. It signals via serine/threonine kinase receptors and intracellular Smad and non-Smad effector proteins. In cancer cells, aberrant TGF-β signalling can lead to loss of growth inhibition and an increase in invasion, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and metastasis. Therapeutic targeting of the pro-oncogenic TGF-β responses is currently being explored as a potential therapy against certain invasive and metastatic cancer types. The ubiquitin post-translational regulation system is emerging as a key regulatory mechanism for the control of TGF-β pathway components. In this review, we focus on the role of deubiquitinases (DUBs), which counteract the activity of E3 ubiquitin ligases. We will discuss the mechanisms by which specific DUBs control Smad and non-Smad TGF-β signalling routes, and how perturbation of the expression and function of DUBs contributes to misregulation of TGF-β signalling in cancer.

  7. Distinct amino acid-sensing mTOR pathways regulate skeletal myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Mee-Sup; Chen, Jie

    2013-12-01

    Signaling through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in response to amino acid availability controls many cellular and developmental processes. mTOR is a master regulator of myogenic differentiation, but the pathways mediating amino acid signals in this process are not known. Here we examine the Rag GTPases and the class III phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) Vps34, two mediators of amino acid signals upstream of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in cell growth regulation, for their potential involvement in myogenesis. We find that, although both Rag and Vps34 mediate amino acid activation of mTORC1 in C2C12 myoblasts, they have opposing functions in myogenic differentiation. Knockdown of RagA/B enhances, whereas overexpression of active RagB/C mutants impairs, differentiation, and this inhibitory function of Rag is mediated by mTORC1 suppression of the IRS1-PI3K-Akt pathway. On the other hand, Vps34 is required for myogenic differentiation. Amino acids activate a Vps34-phospholipase D1 (PLD1) pathway that controls the production of insulin-like growth factor II, an autocrine inducer of differentiation, through the Igf2 muscle enhancer. The product of PLD, phosphatidic acid, activates the enhancer in a rapamycin-sensitive but mTOR kinase-independent manner. Our results uncover amino acid-sensing mechanisms controlling the homeostasis of myogenesis and underline the versatility and context dependence of mTOR signaling. PMID:24068326

  8. Pathways regulating the removal of nitrogen in planted and unplanted subsurface flow constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Paranychianakis, Nikolaos V; Tsiknia, Myrto; Kalogerakis, Nicolas

    2016-10-01

    Single-stage constructed wetlands (CWs) are characterized by a low potential for N removal. Understanding the pathways regulating N cycling as well as their dependence on environmental variables might improve the potential of CWs for N removal and results in more accurate simulation tools. In this study we employed qPCR targeting marker functional genes (amoA, nirK, nirS, clade I and II nosZ) or microorganisms (anammox) regulating key pathways of N cycling to unravel their relative importance. Furthermore, the influence of plant species on treatment performance was studied. Our findings indicated nitrification-denitrification as the principal route of N removal in CWs, while anammox did not have a strong contribution. Evidence was also arisen that ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA) contributed on NH3 oxidation. Overall, plant species had a weak effect on the abundance of N functional genes (amoA of AOA), but it strongly affected the performance of CWs in terms of N removal in the following order: unplanted < Phragmites communis < Typha latifolia. These findings suggest that plant species stimulate N removal by upregulating the rates that the responsible biochemical pathways operate, probably by increasing O2 supply. In addition, our study revealed differences in indicators linked to N2O emissions. The abundance of clade II nosZ genes remained low across the season scaling down a strong contribution in the reduction of the emitted N2O. The increasing ratios of nosZ/Σnir and nirS/nirK with the progress of season indicate a shift in the composition of denitrifiers towards strains with a lower genetic potential for N2O release. Similar trends were observed among the treatments but the mechanisms differed. The planted treatments stimulated an increase in the ΣnosZ/Σnir ratio, while the unplanted an increase in the nirS/nirK ratio. PMID:27379728

  9. Pathways regulating the removal of nitrogen in planted and unplanted subsurface flow constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Paranychianakis, Nikolaos V; Tsiknia, Myrto; Kalogerakis, Nicolas

    2016-10-01

    Single-stage constructed wetlands (CWs) are characterized by a low potential for N removal. Understanding the pathways regulating N cycling as well as their dependence on environmental variables might improve the potential of CWs for N removal and results in more accurate simulation tools. In this study we employed qPCR targeting marker functional genes (amoA, nirK, nirS, clade I and II nosZ) or microorganisms (anammox) regulating key pathways of N cycling to unravel their relative importance. Furthermore, the influence of plant species on treatment performance was studied. Our findings indicated nitrification-denitrification as the principal route of N removal in CWs, while anammox did not have a strong contribution. Evidence was also arisen that ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA) contributed on NH3 oxidation. Overall, plant species had a weak effect on the abundance of N functional genes (amoA of AOA), but it strongly affected the performance of CWs in terms of N removal in the following order: unplanted < Phragmites communis < Typha latifolia. These findings suggest that plant species stimulate N removal by upregulating the rates that the responsible biochemical pathways operate, probably by increasing O2 supply. In addition, our study revealed differences in indicators linked to N2O emissions. The abundance of clade II nosZ genes remained low across the season scaling down a strong contribution in the reduction of the emitted N2O. The increasing ratios of nosZ/Σnir and nirS/nirK with the progress of season indicate a shift in the composition of denitrifiers towards strains with a lower genetic potential for N2O release. Similar trends were observed among the treatments but the mechanisms differed. The planted treatments stimulated an increase in the ΣnosZ/Σnir ratio, while the unplanted an increase in the nirS/nirK ratio.

  10. The canonical Notch pathway effector RBP-J regulates neuronal plasticity and expression of GABA transporters in hippocampal networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuxi; Wang, Yue; Worley, Paul F; Mattson, Mark P; Gaiano, Nicholas

    2015-05-01

    Activation of the Notch pathway in neurons is essential for learning and memory in various species from invertebrates to mammals. However, it remains unclear how Notch signaling regulates neuronal plasticity, and whether the transcriptional regulator and canonical pathway effector RBP-J plays a role. Here, we report that conditional disruption of RBP-J in the postnatal hippocampus leads to defects in long-term potentiation, long-term depression, and in learning and memory. Using gene expression profiling and chromatin immunoprecipitation, we identified two GABA transporters, GAT2 and BGT1, as putative Notch/RBP-J pathway targets, which may function downstream of RBP-J to limit the accumulation of GABA in the Schaffer collateral pathway. Our results reveal an essential role for canonical Notch/RBP-J signaling in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and suggest that role, at least in part, is mediated by the regulation of GABAergic signaling. PMID:25515406

  11. The canonical Notch pathway effector RBP-J regulates neuronal plasticity and expression of GABA transporters in hippocampal networks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuxi; Wang, Yue; Worley, Paul F.; Mattson, Mark P.; Gaiano, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the Notch pathway in neurons is essential for learning and memory in various species from invertebrates to mammals. However, it remains unclear how Notch signaling regulates neuronal plasticity, and whether the transcriptional regulator and canonical pathway effector RBP-J plays a role. Here we report that conditional disruption of RBP-J in the postnatal hippocampus leads to defects in long-term potentiation (LTP), long-term depression (LTD), and in learning and memory. Using gene expression profiling and chromatin immunoprecipitation, we identified two GABA transporters, GAT2 and BGT1, as putative Notch/RBP-J pathway targets, which may function downstream of RBP-J to limit the accumulation of GABA in the Schaffer collateral pathway. Our results reveal an essential role for canonical Notch/RBP-J signaling in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and suggest that role, at least in part, is mediated by the regulation of GABAergic signaling. PMID:25515406

  12. The canonical Notch pathway effector RBP-J regulates neuronal plasticity and expression of GABA transporters in hippocampal networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuxi; Wang, Yue; Worley, Paul F; Mattson, Mark P; Gaiano, Nicholas

    2015-05-01

    Activation of the Notch pathway in neurons is essential for learning and memory in various species from invertebrates to mammals. However, it remains unclear how Notch signaling regulates neuronal plasticity, and whether the transcriptional regulator and canonical pathway effector RBP-J plays a role. Here, we report that conditional disruption of RBP-J in the postnatal hippocampus leads to defects in long-term potentiation, long-term depression, and in learning and memory. Using gene expression profiling and chromatin immunoprecipitation, we identified two GABA transporters, GAT2 and BGT1, as putative Notch/RBP-J pathway targets, which may function downstream of RBP-J to limit the accumulation of GABA in the Schaffer collateral pathway. Our results reveal an essential role for canonical Notch/RBP-J signaling in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and suggest that role, at least in part, is mediated by the regulation of GABAergic signaling.

  13. Stimulation of growth by proteorhodopsin phototrophy involves regulation of central metabolic pathways in marine planktonic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Palovaara, Joakim; Akram, Neelam; Baltar, Federico; Bunse, Carina; Forsberg, Jeremy; Pedrós-Alió, Carlos; González, José M; Pinhassi, Jarone

    2014-09-01

    Proteorhodopsin (PR) is present in half of surface ocean bacterioplankton, where its light-driven proton pumping provides energy to cells. Indeed, PR promotes growth or survival in different bacteria. However, the metabolic pathways mediating the light responses remain unknown. We analyzed growth of the PR-containing Dokdonia sp. MED134 (where light-stimulated growth had been found) in seawater with low concentrations of mixed [yeast extract and peptone (YEP)] or single (alanine, Ala) carbon compounds as models for rich and poor environments. We discovered changes in gene expression revealing a tightly regulated shift in central metabolic pathways between light and dark conditions. Bacteria showed relatively stronger light responses in Ala compared with YEP. Notably, carbon acquisition pathways shifted toward anaplerotic CO2 fixation in the light, contributing 31 ± 8% and 24 ± 6% of the carbon incorporated into biomass in Ala and YEP, respectively. Thus, MED134 was a facultative double mixotroph, i.e., photo- and chemotrophic for its energy source and using both bicarbonate and organic matter as carbon sources. Unexpectedly, relative expression of the glyoxylate shunt genes (isocitrate lyase and malate synthase) was >300-fold higher in the light--but only in Ala--contributing a more efficient use of carbon from organic compounds. We explored these findings in metagenomes and metatranscriptomes and observed similar prevalence of the glyoxylate shunt compared with PR genes and highest expression of the isocitrate lyase gene coinciding with highest solar irradiance. Thus, regulatory interactions between dissolved organic carbon quality and central metabolic pathways critically determine the fitness of surface ocean bacteria engaging in PR phototrophy.

  14. The regulation of the oxidative phase of the pentose phosphate pathway: new answers to old problems.

    PubMed

    Barcia-Vieitez, Ramiro; Ramos-Martínez, Juan Ignacio

    2014-11-01

    There is a paradox in the oxidizing phase of the phosphate pentose pathway that has not yet been solved. The flow through the pathway is reduced in basal conditions; however, it must rise notably when a NADPH supplement is required. The paradox consists of the strong inhibition that the NADPH exerts on the both dehydrogenases of the pathway, especially on the regulating enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD). Theoretically, in anabolic situations, the increase of gene expression of G6PD and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase can induce a rise in the production of NADPH, which would cause the immediate inhibition of the enzyme and a drastic flow reduction. However, increasing the flow through oxidative phase of the pentose phosphate pathway (OPPP) has been experimentally demonstrated in many physiological states. However, this situation will be resolved if the NADPH metabolized or otherwise sufficient NADPH is sequestered to relax the inhibition of the dehydrogenases of OPPP and to maintain high ratio of NADPH/NADP(+) needed to ensure the reducing environment of the cell cytoplasm and the contribution of NADPH for anabolic processes. In 1974, the presence of a protein capable of reversing the inhibition of G6PD by NADPH was detected; however, to date, this paradox remains undisclosed. This review deals with the possibility that such reverting action might be similar to the activity of a protein named HSCARG, which is responsible for the abduction of NADPH, thus keeping a portion of the coenzyme away from the catalytic action and, simultaneously, the immune response through the NF-κB (nuclear factor kappa light-chain enhancer of activated B cells) system. The model has many similarities with the hypothesis proposed some 40 years back on the reversion of G6PD inhibition by NADPH.

  15. The role of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathway in mood modulation.

    PubMed

    Einat, Haim; Yuan, Peixiong; Gould, Todd D; Li, Jianling; Du, JianHua; Zhang, Lei; Manji, Husseini K; Chen, Guang

    2003-08-13

    The neurobiological underpinnings of mood modulation, molecular pathophysiology of manic-depressive illness, and therapeutic mechanism of mood stabilizers are largely unknown. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway is activated by neurotrophins and other neuroactive chemicals to produce their effects on neuronal differentiation, survival, regeneration, and structural and functional plasticity. We found that lithium and valproate, commonly used mood stabilizers for the treatment of manic-depressive illness, stimulated the ERK pathway in the rat hippocampus and frontal cortex. Both drugs increased the levels of activated phospho-ERK44/42, activated phospho-ribosomal protein S6 kinase-1 (RSK1) (a substrate of ERK), phospho-CREB (cAMP response element-binding protein) and phospho-B cell lymphoma protein-2 antagonist of cell death (substrates of RSK), and BDNF. Inhibiting the ERK pathway with the blood-brain barrier-penetrating mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase)/ERK kinase (MEK) kinase inhibitor SL327, but not with the nonblood-brain barrier-penetrating MEK inhibitor U0126, decreased immobility time and increased swimming time of rats in the forced-swim test. SL327, but not U0126, also increased locomotion time and distance traveled in a large open field. The behavioral changes in the open field were prevented with chronic lithium pretreatment. SL327-induced behavioral changes are qualitatively similar to the changes induced by amphetamine, a compound that induces relapse in remitted manic patients and mood elevation in normal subjects. These data suggest that the ERK pathway may mediate the antimanic effects of mood stabilizers.

  16. Computational inference of the structure and regulation of the lignin pathway in Panicum virgatum

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Faraji, Mojdeh; Fonseca, Luis L.; Escamilla-Treviño, Luis; Dixon, Richard A.; Voit, Eberhard O.

    2015-09-17

    Switchgrass is a prime target for biofuel production from inedible plant parts and has been the subject of numerous investigations in recent years. Yet, one of the main obstacles to effective biofuel production remains to be the major problem of recalcitrance. Recalcitrance emerges in part from the 3-D structure of lignin as a polymer in the secondary cell wall. Lignin limits accessibility of the sugars in the cellulose and hemicellulose polymers to enzymes and ultimately decreases ethanol yield. Monolignols, the building blocks of lignin polymers, are synthesized in the cytosol and translocated to the plant cell wall, where they undergomore » polymerization. The biosynthetic pathway leading to monolignols in switchgrass is not completely known, and difficulties associated with in vivo measurements of these intermediates pose a challenge for a true understanding of the functioning of the pathway. In this study, a systems biological modeling approach is used to address this challenge and to elucidate the structure and regulation of the lignin pathway through a computational characterization of alternate candidate topologies. The analysis is based on experimental data characterizing stem and tiller tissue of four transgenic lines (knock-downs of genes coding for key enzymes in the pathway) as well as wild-type switchgrass plants. These data consist of the observed content and composition of monolignols. The possibility of a G-lignin specific metabolic channel associated with the production and degradation of coniferaldehyde is examined, and the results support previous findings from another plant species. The computational analysis suggests regulatory mechanisms of product inhibition and enzyme competition, which are well known in biochemistry, but so far had not been reported in switchgrass. By including these mechanisms, the pathway model is able to represent all observations. In conclusion, the results show that the presence of the coniferaldehyde channel is

  17. Computational inference of the structure and regulation of the lignin pathway in Panicum virgatum

    SciTech Connect

    Faraji, Mojdeh; Fonseca, Luis L.; Escamilla-Treviño, Luis; Dixon, Richard A.; Voit, Eberhard O.

    2015-09-17

    Switchgrass is a prime target for biofuel production from inedible plant parts and has been the subject of numerous investigations in recent years. Yet, one of the main obstacles to effective biofuel production remains to be the major problem of recalcitrance. Recalcitrance emerges in part from the 3-D structure of lignin as a polymer in the secondary cell wall. Lignin limits accessibility of the sugars in the cellulose and hemicellulose polymers to enzymes and ultimately decreases ethanol yield. Monolignols, the building blocks of lignin polymers, are synthesized in the cytosol and translocated to the plant cell wall, where they undergo polymerization. The biosynthetic pathway leading to monolignols in switchgrass is not completely known, and difficulties associated with in vivo measurements of these intermediates pose a challenge for a true understanding of the functioning of the pathway. In this study, a systems biological modeling approach is used to address this challenge and to elucidate the structure and regulation of the lignin pathway through a computational characterization of alternate candidate topologies. The analysis is based on experimental data characterizing stem and tiller tissue of four transgenic lines (knock-downs of genes coding for key enzymes in the pathway) as well as wild-type switchgrass plants. These data consist of the observed content and composition of monolignols. The possibility of a G-lignin specific metabolic channel associated with the production and degradation of coniferaldehyde is examined, and the results support previous findings from another plant species. The computational analysis suggests regulatory mechanisms of product inhibition and enzyme competition, which are well known in biochemistry, but so far had not been reported in switchgrass. By including these mechanisms, the pathway model is able to represent all observations. In conclusion, the results show that the presence of the coniferaldehyde channel is necessary

  18. Pathway-Based Genome-Wide Association Analysis Identified the Importance of Regulation-of-Autophagy Pathway for Ultradistal Radius BMD

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lishu; Guo, Yan-Fang; Liu, Yao-Zhong; Liu, Yong-Jun; Xiong, Dong-Hai; Liu, Xiao-Gang; Wang, Liang; Yang, Tie-Lin; Lei, Shu-Feng; Guo, Yan; Yan, Han; Pei, Yu-Fang; Zhang, Feng; Papasian, Christopher J; Recker, Robert R; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2010-01-01

    Wrist fracture is not only one of the most common osteoporotic fractures but also a predictor of future fractures at other sites. Wrist bone mineral density (BMD) is an important determinant of wrist fracture risk, with high heritability. Specific genes underlying wrist BMD variation are largely unknown. Most published genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have focused only on a few top-ranking single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)/genes and considered each of the identified SNPs/genes independently. To identify biologic pathways important to wrist BMD variation, we used a novel pathway-based analysis approach in our GWAS of wrist ultradistal radius (UD) BMD, examining approximately 500,000 SNPs genome-wide from 984 unrelated whites. A total of 963 biologic pathways/gene sets were analyzed. We identified the regulation-of-autophagy (ROA) pathway that achieved the most significant result (p = .005, qfdr = 0.043, pfwer = 0.016) for association with UD BMD. The ROA pathway also showed significant association with arm BMD in the Framingham Heart Study sample containing 2187 subjects, which further confirmed our findings in the discovery cohort. Earlier studies indicated that during endochondral ossification, autophagy occurs prior to apoptosis of hypertrophic chondrocytes, and it also has been shown that some genes in the ROA pathway (e.g., INFG) may play important roles in osteoblastogenesis or osteoclastogenesis. Our study supports the potential role of the ROA pathway in human wrist BMD variation and osteoporosis. Further functional evaluation of this pathway to determine the mechanism by which it regulates wrist BMD should be pursued to provide new insights into the pathogenesis of wrist osteoporosis. © 2010 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:20200951

  19. The DAF-7/TGF-β signaling pathway regulates abundance of the Caenorhabditis elegans glutamate receptor GLR-1.

    PubMed

    McGehee, Annette M; Moss, Benjamin J; Juo, Peter

    2015-07-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family signaling pathways have roles in both neuronal development and the regulation of synaptic function. Here we identify a novel role for the Caenorhabditis elegans DAF-7/TGF-β signaling pathway in the regulation of the AMPA-type glutamate receptor GLR-1. We found that the abundance of GLR-1 increases at synapses in the ventral nerve cord (VNC) of animals with loss-of-function mutations in multiple DAF-7/TGF-β pathway components including the TGF-β ligand DAF-7, the type I receptor DAF-1, and the Smads DAF-8 and DAF-14. The GLR-1 defect can be rescued by expression of daf-8 specifically in glr-1-expressing interneurons. The effect on GLR-1 was specific for the DAF-7 pathway because mutations in the DBL-1/TGF-β family pathway did not increase GLR-1 levels in the VNC. Immunoblot analysis indicates that total levels of GLR-1 protein are increased in neurons of DAF-7/TGF-β pathway mutants. The increased abundance of GLR-1 in the VNC of daf-7 pathway mutants is dependent on the transcriptional regulator DAF-3/Smad suggesting that DAF-3-dependent transcription controls GLR-1 levels. Furthermore, we found that glr-1 transcription is increased in daf-7 mutants based on a glr-1 transcriptional reporter. Together these results suggest that the DAF-7/TGF-β signaling pathway functions in neurons and negatively regulates the abundance of GLR-1, in part, by controlling transcription of the receptor itself. Finally, DAF-7/TGF-β pathway mutants exhibit changes in spontaneous locomotion that are dependent on endogenous GLR-1 and consistent with increased glutamatergic signaling. These results reveal a novel mechanism by which TGF-β signaling functions in the nervous system to regulate behavior.

  20. Meta-analysis of gene expression profiles indicates genes in spliceosome pathway are up-regulated in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).

    PubMed

    Xu, Weijin; Huang, Huixing; Yu, Long; Cao, Lihuan

    2015-04-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is among the commonest kind of malignant tumors, which accounts for more than 500,000 cases of newly diagnosed cancer annually. Many microarray studies for identifying differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in HCC have been conducted, but results have varied across different studies. Here, we performed a meta-analysis of publicly available microarray Gene Expression Omnibus datasets, which covers five independent studies, containing 753 HCC samples and 638 non-tumor liver samples. We identified 192 DEGs that were consistently up-regulated in HCC vs. normal liver tissue. For the 192 up-regulated genes, we performed Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis. To our surprise, besides several cell growth-related pathways, spliceosome pathway was also up-regulated in HCC. For further exploring the relationship between spliceosome pathway and HCC, we investigated the expression data of spliceosome pathway genes in 15 independent studies in Nextbio database ( https://www.nextbio.com/b/nextbioCorp.nb ). It was found that many genes of spliceosome pathway such as HSPA1A, SNRPE, SF3B2, SF3B4 and TRA2A genes which we identified to be up-regulated in our meta-analysis were generally overexpressed in HCC. At last, using real-time PCR, we also found that BUD31, SF3B2, SF3B4, SNRPE, SPINK1, TPA2A and HSPA1A genes are significantly up-regulated in clinical HCC samples when compared to the corresponding non-tumorous liver tissues. Our study for the first time indicates that many genes of spliceosome pathway are up-regulated in HCC. This finding might put new insights for people's understanding about the relationship of spliceosome pathway and HCC.

  1. Identification of biological pathways regulated by PGRN and GRN peptide treatments using transcriptome analysis.

    PubMed

    Rollinson, Sara; Young, Kate; Bennion-Callister, Janis; Pickering-Brown, Stuart M

    2016-09-01

    Mutations in progranulin (PGRN) have been linked to two neurodegenerative disorders, heterozygote mutations with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and homozygote mutations with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL). Human PGRN is 593aa secreted growth factor, made up of seven and a half repeats of a highly conserved granulin motif that is cleaved to produce the granulin peptides A-G and paragranulin. While it is thought that PGRN protects against neurodegeneration through its role in inflammation and tissue repair, the role of PGRN and granulins in the nervous system is currently unclear. To better understand this, we prepared recombinant PGRN, granulin A-F and paragranulin, and used these to treat differentiated neuronal SH-SY5Y cells. Using RNA sequencing and bioinformatics techniques we investigated the functional effects of PGRN and the individual granulins upon the transcriptome. For PGRN treatment we show that the main effect of short-duration treatments is the down-regulation of transcripts, supporting that signalling pathway induction appears to be dominant effect. Gene ontology analysis, however, also supports the regulation of biological processes such as the spliceosome and proteasome in response to PGRN treatment, as well as the lysosomal pathway constituents such as CHMP1A, further supporting the role of PGRN in lysosomal function. We also show that the response to granulin treatments involves the regulation of numerous non-coding RNA's, and the granulins cluster into groups of similar activity on the basis of expression profile with paragranulin and PGRN having similar expression profiles, while granulins B, D, E and G appear more similar. PMID:27307215

  2. TRPV4 channels regulate tumor angiogenesis via modulation of Rho/Rho kinase pathway

    PubMed Central

    Adapala, Ravi K.; Kanugula, Anantha K.; Paruchuri, Sailaja; Thodeti, Charles K.

    2016-01-01

    Targeting angiogenesis is considered a promising therapy for cancer. Besides curtailing soluble factor mediated tumor angiogenesis, understanding the unexplored regulation of angiogenesis by mechanical cues may lead to the identification of novel therapeutic targets. We have recently shown that expression and activity of mechanosensitive ion channel transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) is suppressed in tumor endothelial cells and restoring TRPV4 expression or activation induces vascular normalization and improves cancer therapy. However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which TRPV4 modulates angiogenesis are still in their infancy. To explore how TRPV4 regulates angiogenesis, we have employed TRPV4 null endothelial cells (TRPV4KO EC) and TRPV4KO mice. We found that absence of TRPV4 (TRPV4KO EC) resulted in a significant increase in proliferation, migration, and abnormal tube formation in vitro when compared to WT EC. Concomitantly, sprouting angiogenesis ex vivo and vascular growth in vivo was enhanced in TRPV4KO mice. Mechanistically, we observed that loss of TRPV4 leads to a significant increase in basal Rho activity in TRPV4KO EC that corresponded to their aberrant mechanosensitivity on varying stiffness ECM gels. Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of the Rho/Rho kinase pathway by Y-27632 normalized abnormal mechanosensitivity and angiogenesis exhibited by TRPV4KO EC in vitro. Finally, Y-27632 treatment increased pericyte coverage and in conjunction with Cisplatin, significantly reduced tumor growth in TRPV4KO mice. Taken together, these data suggest that TRPV4 regulates angiogenesis endogenously via modulation of EC mechanosensitivity through the Rho/Rho kinase pathway and can serve as a potential therapeutic target for cancer therapy. PMID:27029071

  3. LAPTM5 Protein Is a Positive Regulator of Proinflammatory Signaling Pathways in Macrophages*

    PubMed Central

    Glowacka, Wioletta K.; Alberts, Philipp; Ouchida, Rika; Wang, Ji-Yang; Rotin, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    LAPTM5 (lysosomal-associated protein transmembrane 5) is a protein that is preferentially expressed in immune cells, and it interacts with the Nedd4 family of ubiquitin ligases. Recent studies in T and B cells identified LAPTM5 as a negative regulator of T and B cell receptor levels at the plasma membrane. Here we investigated the function of LAPTM5 in macrophages. We demonstrate that expression of LAPTM5 is required for the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in response to Toll-like receptor ligands. We also show that RAW264.7 cells knocked down for LAPTM5 or macrophages from LAPTM5−/− mice exhibit reduced activation of NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways mediated by the TNF receptor, as well as multiple pattern recognition receptors in various cellular compartments. TNF stimulation of LAPTM5-deficient macrophages leads to reduced ubiquitination of RIP1 (receptor-interacting protein 1), suggesting a role for LAPTM5 at the receptor-proximate level. Interestingly, we find that macrophages from LAPTM5−/− mice display up-regulated levels of A20, a ubiquitin-editing enzyme responsible for deubiquitination of RIP1 and subsequent termination of NF-κB activation. Our studies thus indicate that, in contrast to its negative role in T and B cell activation, LAPTM5 acts as a positive modulator of inflammatory signaling pathways and hence cytokine secretion in macrophages. They also highlight a role for the endosomal/lysosomal system in regulating signaling via cytokine and pattern recognition receptors. PMID:22733818

  4. Notch1 Regulates Hippocampal Plasticity Through Interaction with the Reelin Pathway, Glutamatergic Transmission and CREB Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Brai, Emanuele; Marathe, Swananda; Astori, Simone; Fredj, Naila Ben; Perry, Elisabeth; Lamy, Christophe; Scotti, Alessandra; Alberi, Lavinia

    2015-01-01

    Notch signaling plays a crucial role in adult brain function such as synaptic plasticity, memory and olfaction. Several reports suggest an involvement of this pathway in neurodegenerative dementia. Yet, to date, the mechanism underlying Notch activity in mature neurons remains unresolved. In this work, we investigate how Notch regulates synaptic potentiation and contributes to the establishment of memory in mice. We observe that Notch1 is a postsynaptic receptor with functional interactions with the Reelin receptor, apolipoprotein E receptor 2 (ApoER2) and the ionotropic receptor, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). Targeted loss of Notch1 in the hippocampal CA fields affects Reelin signaling by influencing Dab1 expression and impairs the synaptic potentiation achieved through Reelin stimulation. Further analysis indicates that loss of Notch1 affects the expression and composition of the NMDAR but not AMPAR. Glutamatergic signaling is further compromised through downregulation of CamKII and its secondary and tertiary messengers resulting in reduced cAMP response element-binding (CREB) signaling. Our results identify Notch1 as an important regulator of mechanisms involved in synaptic plasticity and memory formation. These findings emphasize the possible involvement of this signaling receptor in dementia. Highlights In this paper, we propose a mechanism for Notch1-dependent plasticity that likely underlies the function of Notch1 in memory formation: Notch1 interacts with another important developmental pathway, the Reelin cascade. Notch1 regulates both NMDAR expression and composition. Notch1 influences a cascade of cellular events culminating in CREB activation. PMID:26635527

  5. Importance of understanding the main metabolic regulation in response to the specific pathway mutation for metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, Yu; Shimizu, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Recent metabolic engineering practice was briefly reviewed in particular for the useful metabolite production such as natural products and biofuel productions. With the emphasis on systems biology approach, the metabolic regulation of the main metabolic pathways in E. coli was discussed from the points of view of enzyme level (allosteric and phosphorylation/ dephosphorylation) regulation, and gene level (transcriptional) regulation. Then the effects of the specific pathway gene knockout such as pts, pgi, zwf, gnd, pyk, ppc, pckA, lpdA, pfl gene knockout on the metabolism in E. coli were overviewed from the systems biology point of view with possible application for strain improvement point. PMID:24688678

  6. The Strip-Hippo Pathway Regulates Synaptic Terminal Formation by Modulating Actin Organization at the Drosophila Neuromuscular Synapses.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Chisako; Saito, Yoshie; Umehara, Tomoki; Kamimura, Keisuke; Maeda, Nobuaki; Mosca, Timothy J; Miura, Masayuki; Chihara, Takahiro

    2016-08-30

    Synapse formation requires the precise coordination of axon elongation, cytoskeletal stability, and diverse modes of cell signaling. The underlying mechanisms of this interplay, however, remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that Strip, a component of the striatin-interacting phosphatase and kinase (STRIPAK) complex that regulates these processes, is required to ensure the proper development of synaptic boutons at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction. In doing so, Strip negatively regulates the activity of the Hippo (Hpo) pathway, an evolutionarily conserved regulator of organ size whose role in synapse formation is currently unappreciated. Strip functions genetically with Enabled, an actin assembly/elongation factor and the presumptive downstream target of Hpo signaling, to modulate local actin organization at synaptic termini. This regulation occurs independently of the transcriptional co-activator Yorkie, the canonical downstream target of the Hpo pathway. Our study identifies a previously unanticipated role of the Strip-Hippo pathway in synaptic development, linking cell signaling to actin organization. PMID:27545887

  7. The Ras/Raf/MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway induces autocrine-paracrine growth inhibition via the leukemia inhibitory factor/JAK/STAT pathway.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-In; Strock, Christopher J; Ball, Douglas W; Nelkin, Barry D

    2003-01-01

    Sustained activation of the Ras/Raf/MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway can lead to cell cycle arrest in many cell types. We have found, with human medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) cells, that activated Ras or c-Raf-1 can induce growth arrest by producing and secreting an autocrine-paracrine factor. This protein was purified from cell culture medium conditioned by Raf-activated MTC cells and was identified by mass spectrometry as leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). LIF expression upon Raf activation and subsequent activation of JAK-STAT3 was also observed in small cell lung carcinoma cells, suggesting that this autocrine-paracrine signaling may be a common response to Ras/Raf activation. LIF was sufficient to induce growth arrest and differentiation of MTC cells. This effect was mediated through the gp130/JAK/STAT3 pathway, since anti-gp130 blocking antibody or dominant-negative STAT3 blocked the effects of LIF. Thus, LIF expression provides a novel mechanism allowing Ras/Raf signaling to activate the JAK-STAT3 pathway. In addition to this cell-extrinsic growth inhibitory pathway, we find that the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK pathway induces an intracellular growth inhibitory signal, independent of the LIF/JAK/STAT3 pathway. Therefore, activation of the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK pathway can lead to growth arrest and differentiation via at least two different signaling pathways. This use of multiple pathways may be important for "fail-safe" induction and maintenance of cell cycle arrest.

  8. The Ras/Raf/MEK/Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Pathway Induces Autocrine-Paracrine Growth Inhibition via the Leukemia Inhibitory Factor/JAK/STAT Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-In; Strock, Christopher J.; Ball, Douglas W.; Nelkin, Barry D.

    2003-01-01

    Sustained activation of the Ras/Raf/MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway can lead to cell cycle arrest in many cell types. We have found, with human medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) cells, that activated Ras or c-Raf-1 can induce growth arrest by producing and secreting an autocrine-paracrine factor. This protein was purified from cell culture medium conditioned by Raf-activated MTC cells and was identified by mass spectrometry as leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). LIF expression upon Raf activation and subsequent activation of JAK-STAT3 was also observed in small cell lung carcinoma cells, suggesting that this autocrine-paracrine signaling may be a common response to Ras/Raf activation. LIF was sufficient to induce growth arrest and differentiation of MTC cells. This effect was mediated through the gp130/JAK/STAT3 pathway, since anti-gp130 blocking antibody or dominant-negative STAT3 blocked the effects of LIF. Thus, LIF expression provides a novel mechanism allowing Ras/Raf signaling to activate the JAK-STAT3 pathway. In addition to this cell-extrinsic growth inhibitory pathway, we find that the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK pathway induces an intracellular growth inhibitory signal, independent of the LIF/JAK/STAT3 pathway. Therefore, activation of the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK pathway can lead to growth arrest and differentiation via at least two different signaling pathways. This use of multiple pathways may be important for “fail-safe” induction and maintenance of cell cycle arrest. PMID:12509453

  9. Identification of REST-regulated genes and pathways using a REST-targeted antisense approach.

    PubMed

    Sedaghat, Yalda; Bui, Huynh-Hoa; Mazur, Curt; Monia, Brett P

    2013-12-01

    The repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor/neuron-restrictive silencer factor (REST/NRSF) is one of the first negative-acting transcriptional regulators implicated in vertebrate development thought to regulate hundreds of neuron-specific genes. However, its function in the adult system remains elusive. Here we employ second-generation antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) to study the impact of rest-mediated suppression on gene expression. We demonstrate specific reductions in REST levels in vitro, and in vivo in mouse liver following treatment with ASOs, and we show that ASO mediated-REST suppression results in the elevation in expression of many neuronal genes including brain-derived neurotrophic factor, Synapsin1 (syn1) and β3-tubulin in BALB/c liver. Furthermore, we show the elevation of the affected proteins in plasma following ASO treatment. Finally, microarray analysis was applied to identify a broad range of genes modulated by REST suppression in mouse liver. Our findings suggest that REST may be an important target for neurodegenerative diseases like Huntington's disease, is also involved in the regulation of a broad range of additional cellular pathways, and that the antisense approach is a viable strategy for selectively modulating REST activity in vivo. PMID:24329414

  10. Pds5 regulators segregate cohesion and condensation pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tong, Kevin; Skibbens, Robert V

    2015-06-01

    Cohesins are required both for the tethering together of sister chromatids (termed cohesion) and subsequent condensation into discrete structures-processes fundamental for faithful chromosome segregation into daughter cells. Differentiating between cohesin roles in cohesion and condensation would provide an important advance in studying chromatin metabolism. Pds5 is a cohesin-associated factor that is essential for both cohesion maintenance and condensation. Recent studies revealed that ELG1 deletion suppresses the temperature sensitivity of pds5 mutant cells. However, the mechanisms through which Elg1 may regulate cohesion and condensation remain unknown. Here, we report that ELG1 deletion from pds5-1 mutant cells results in a significant rescue of cohesion, but not condensation, defects. Based on evidence that Elg1 unloads the DNA replication clamp PCNA from DNA, we tested whether PCNA overexpression would similarly rescue pds5-1 mutant cell cohesion defects. The results indeed reveal that elevated levels of PCNA rescue pds5-1 temperature sensitivity and cohesion defects, but do not rescue pds5-1 mutant cell condensation defects. In contrast, RAD61 deletion rescues the condensation defect, but importantly, neither the temperature sensitivity nor cohesion defects exhibited by pds5-1 mutant cells. In combination, these findings reveal that cohesion and condensation are separable pathways and regulated in nonredundant mechanisms. These results are discussed in terms of a new model through which cohesion and condensation are spatially regulated.

  11. Epigenetic Pathways Regulating Bone Homeostasis: Potential Targeting for Intervention of Skeletal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Jonathan A. R.; Montecino, Martin A.; Aqeilan, Rami I.; Stein, Janet L.; Stein, Gary S.; Lian, Jane B.

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation utilizes different mechanisms to convey heritable traits to progeny cells that are independent of DNA sequence, including DNA silencing, post-translational modifications of histone proteins and the post-transcriptional modulation of RNA transcript levels by non-coding RNAs. Although long non-coding RNAs have recently emerged as important regulators of gene imprinting, but their functions during osteogenesis are as yet unexplored. In contrast, microRNAs (miRNAs) are well characterized for their control of osteogenic and osteoclastic pathways; thus, further defining how gene regulatory networks essential for skeleton functions are coordinated and finely tuned through the activities of miRNAs. Roles of miRNAs are constantly expanding as new studies uncover associations with skeletal disorders. The distinct functions of epigenetic regulators and evidence for integrating their activities to control normal bone gene expression and bone disease will be presented. In addition, potential for using “signature microRNAs” to identify, manage and therapeutically treat osteosarcoma will be discussed in this review. PMID:25260661

  12. Transforming growth factor-beta regulates stearoyl coenzyme A desaturase expression through a Smad signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Samuel, William; Nagineni, Chandrasekharam N; Kutty, R Krishnan; Parks, W Tony; Gordon, Joel S; Prouty, Stephen M; Hooks, John J; Wiggert, Barbara

    2002-01-01

    The regulation of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD), a rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of unsaturated fatty acids, is physiologically important because the ratio of saturated to unsaturated fatty acids is thought to control cellular functions by modulating the structural integrity and fluidity of cell membranes. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), a multifunctional cytokine, increased SCD mRNA expression in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial cells. This response was elicited by all three TGF-beta isoforms, beta1, beta2, and beta3. However, SCD mRNA expression was not increased either by other members of the TGF-beta family or by other growth factors or cytokines. TGF-beta also increased SCD mRNA expression in several other cell lines tested. The increase in SCD mRNA expression was preceded by a marked increase in Smad2 phosphorylation in TGF-beta-treated human retinal pigment epithelial cells. TGF-beta did not induce SCD mRNA expression in a Smad4-deficient cell line. However, Smad4 overexpression restored the TGF-beta effect in this cell line. Moreover, TGF-beta-induced SCD mRNA expression was effectively blocked by the overexpression of Smad7, an inhibitory Smad. Thus, a TGF-beta signal transduction pathway involving Smad proteins appears to regulate the cellular expression of the SCD gene, and this regulation may play an important role in lipid metabolism.

  13. hCLP46 regulates U937 cell proliferation via Notch signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Wenzhan; Du, Jie; Chu, Qiaoyun; Wang, Youxin; Liu, Lixin; Song, Manshu; Wang, Wei

    2011-04-29

    Highlights: {yields} Knock down of hCLP46 by RNAi impairs mammalian Notch signaling. {yields} hCLP46 affects neither cell surface Notch1 expression nor ligand-receptor binding. {yields} Knock down of hCLP46 inhibits U937 cell-growth by up-regulation of CDKN1B. -- Abstract: Human CAP10-like protein 46 kDa (hCLP46) is the homolog of Rumi, which is the first identified protein O-glucosyltransferase that modifies Notch receptor in Drosophila. Dysregulation of hCLP46 occurs in many hematologic diseases, but the role of hCLP46 remains unclear. Knockdown of hCLP46 by RNA interference resulted in decreased protein levels of endogenous Notch1, Notch intracellular domain (NICD) and Notch target gene Hes-1, suggesting the impairment of the Notch signaling. However, neither cell surface Notch expression nor ligand binding activities were affected. In addition, down-regulated expression of hCLP46 inhibited the proliferation of U937 cells, which was correlated with increased cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CDKI) CDKN1B (p27) and decreased phosphorylation of retinoblastoma (RB) protein. We showed that lack of hCLP46 results in impaired ligand induced Notch activation in mammalian cell, and hCLP46 regulates the proliferation of U937 cell through CDKI-RB signaling pathway, which may be important for the pathogenesis of leukemia.

  14. The Arabidopsis RGA gene encodes a transcriptional regulator repressing the gibberellin signal transduction pathway.

    PubMed

    Silverstone, A L; Ciampaglio, C N; Sun, T

    1998-02-01

    The recessive rga mutation is able to partially suppress phenotypic defects of the Arabidopsis gibberellin (GA) biosynthetic mutant ga1-3. Defects in stem elongation, flowering time, and leaf abaxial trichome initiation are suppressed by rga. This indicates that RGA is a negative regulator of the GA signal transduction pathway. We have identified 10 additional alleles of rga from a fast-neutron mutagenized ga1-3 population and used them to isolate the RGA gene by genomic subtraction. Our data suggest that RGA may be functioning as a transcriptional regulator. RGA was found to be a member of the VHIID regulatory family, which includes the radial root organizing gene SCARECROW and another GA signal transduction repressor, GAI. RGA and GAI proteins share a high degree of homology, but their N termini are more divergent. The presence of several structural features, including homopolymeric serine and threonine residues, a putative nuclear localization signal, leucine heptad repeats, and an LXXLL motif, indicates that the RGA protein may be a transcriptional regulator that represses the GA response. In support of the putative nuclear localization signal, we demonstrated that a transiently expressed green fluorescent protein-RGA fusion protein is localized to the nucleus in onion epidermal cells. Because the rga mutation abolished the high level of expression of the GA biosynthetic gene GA4 in the ga1-3 mutant background, we conclude that RGA may also play a role in controlling GA biosynthesis.

  15. The Vac14-interaction network is linked to regulators of the endolysosomal and autophagic pathway.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Ulf; Vollenbröker, Beate; Braun, Daniela A; Van Le, Truc; Granado, Daniel; Kremerskothen, Joachim; Fränzel, Benjamin; Klosowski, Rafael; Barth, Johannes; Fufezan, Christian; Wolters, Dirk A; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Weide, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    The scaffold protein Vac14 acts in a complex with the lipid kinase PIKfyve and its counteracting phosphatase FIG4, regulating the interconversion of phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate to phosphatidylinositol-3,5-bisphosphate. Dysfunctional Vac14 mutants, a deficiency of one of the Vac14 complex components, or inhibition of PIKfyve enzymatic activity results in the formation of large vacuoles in cells. How these vacuoles are generated and which processes are involved are only poorly understood. Here we show that ectopic overexpression of wild-type Vac14 as well as of the PIKfyve-binding deficient Vac14 L156R mutant causes vacuoles. Vac14-dependent vacuoles and PIKfyve inhibitor-dependent vacuoles resulted in elevated levels of late endosomal, lysosomal, and autophagy-associated proteins. However, only late endosomal marker proteins were bound to the membranes of these enlarged vacuoles. In order to decipher the linkage between the Vac14 complex and regulators of the endolysosomal pathway, a protein affinity approach combined with multidimensional protein identification technology was conducted, and novel molecular links were unraveled. We found and verified the interaction of Rab9 and the Rab7 GAP TBC1D15 with Vac14. The identified Rab-related interaction partners support the theory that the regulation of vesicular transport processes and phosphatidylinositol-modifying enzymes are tightly interconnected.

  16. Metabolic pathways regulated by TAp73 in response to oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Agostini, Massimiliano; Annicchiarico-Petruzzelli, Margherita; Melino, Gerry; Rufini, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species are involved in both physiological and pathological processes including neurodegeneration and cancer. Therefore, cells have developed scavenging mechanisms to maintain redox homeostasis under control. Tumor suppressor genes play a critical role in the regulation of antioxidant genes. Here, we investigated whether the tumor suppressor gene TAp73 is involved in the regulation of metabolic adaptations triggered in response to oxidative stress. H2O2 treatment resulted in numerous biochemical changes in both control and TAp73 knockout (TAp73−/−) mouse embryonic fibroblasts, however the extent of these changes was more pronounced in TAp73−/− cells when compared to control cells. In particular, loss of TAp73 led to alterations in glucose, nucleotide and amino acid metabolism. In addition, H2O2 treatment resulted in increased pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) activity in null mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Overall, our results suggest that in the absence of TAp73, H2O2 treatment results in an enhanced oxidative environment, and at the same time in an increased pro-anabolic phenotype. In conclusion, the metabolic profile observed reinforces the role of TAp73 as tumor suppressor and indicates that TAp73 exerts this function, at least partially, by regulation of cellular metabolism. PMID:27119504

  17. Regulation of the Phenylpropanoid Pathway: A Mechanism of Selenium Tolerance in Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) Seedlings.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang; Wu, Liying; Zhang, Hong; Wu, Wenjia; Zhang, Mengmeng; Li, Xiaofeng; Wu, Hui

    2016-05-11

    To clarify the mechanisms of selenium (Se) tolerance in peanut seedlings, we grew peanut seedlings with sodium selenite (0, 3, and 6 mg/L), and investigated the phenylpropanoids metabolism in seedling roots. The results showed that selenite up-regulated the expression of genes and related enzyme activities involving in the phenylpropanoids biosynthesis cascade, such as phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, trans-cinnamate-4-hydroxylase, chalcone synthase, chalcone isomerase, and cinnamyl-alcohol dehydrogenase. Selenite significantly increased phenolic acids and flavonoids, which contributed to the alleviation of selenite-induced stress. Moreover, selenite enhanced the formation of endodermis in roots, which may be attributed to the up-regulation of lignin biosynthesis mediated by the selenite-induced changes of H2O2 and NO, which probably regulated the selenite uptake from an external medium. Accumulation of polyphenolic compounds via the phenylpropanoid pathway may be one of the mechanisms of the increasing selenite tolerance in plants, by which peanut seedlings survived in seleniferous soil, accompanied by accumulation of Se.

  18. Protein cofactor competition regulates the action of a multifunctional RNA helicase in different pathways.

    PubMed

    Heininger, Annika U; Hackert, Philipp; Andreou, Alexandra Z; Boon, Kum-Loong; Memet, Indira; Prior, Mira; Clancy, Anne; Schmidt, Bernhard; Urlaub, Henning; Schleiff, Enrico; Sloan, Katherine E; Deckers, Markus; Lührmann, Reinhard; Enderlein, Jörg; Klostermeier, Dagmar; Rehling, Peter; Bohnsack, Markus T

    2016-01-01

    A rapidly increasing number of RNA helicases are implicated in several distinct cellular processes, however, the modes of regulation of multifunctional RNA helicases and their recruitment to different target complexes have remained unknown. Here, we show that the distribution of the multifunctional DEAH-box RNA helicase Prp43 between its diverse cellular functions can be regulated by the interplay of its G-patch protein cofactors. We identify the orphan G-patch protein Cmg1 (YLR271W) as a novel cofactor of Prp43 and show that it stimulates the RNA binding and ATPase activity of the helicase. Interestingly, Cmg1 localizes to the cytoplasm and to the intermembrane space of mitochondria and its overexpression promotes apoptosis. Furthermore, our data reveal that different G-patch protein cofactors compete for interaction with Prp43. Changes in the expression levels of Prp43-interacting G-patch proteins modulate the cellular localization of Prp43 and G-patch protein overexpression causes accumulation of the helicase in the cytoplasm or nucleoplasm. Overexpression of several G-patch proteins also leads to defects in ribosome biogenesis that are consistent with withdrawal of the helicase from this pathway. Together, these findings suggest that the availability of cofactors and the sequestering of the helicase are means to regulate the activity of multifunctional RNA helicases and their distribution between different cellular processes. PMID:26821976

  19. Regulation of the Phenylpropanoid Pathway: A Mechanism of Selenium Tolerance in Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) Seedlings.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang; Wu, Liying; Zhang, Hong; Wu, Wenjia; Zhang, Mengmeng; Li, Xiaofeng; Wu, Hui

    2016-05-11

    To clarify the mechanisms of selenium (Se) tolerance in peanut seedlings, we grew peanut seedlings with sodium selenite (0, 3, and 6 mg/L), and investigated the phenylpropanoids metabolism in seedling roots. The results showed that selenite up-regulated the expression of genes and related enzyme activities involving in the phenylpropanoids biosynthesis cascade, such as phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, trans-cinnamate-4-hydroxylase, chalcone synthase, chalcone isomerase, and cinnamyl-alcohol dehydrogenase. Selenite significantly increased phenolic acids and flavonoids, which contributed to the alleviation of selenite-induced stress. Moreover, selenite enhanced the formation of endodermis in roots, which may be attributed to the up-regulation of lignin biosynthesis mediated by the selenite-induced changes of H2O2 and NO, which probably regulated the selenite uptake from an external medium. Accumulation of polyphenolic compounds via the phenylpropanoid pathway may be one of the mechanisms of the increasing selenite tolerance in plants, by which peanut seedlings survived in seleniferous soil, accompanied by accumulation of Se. PMID:27089243

  20. REGγ regulates ERα degradation via ubiquitin–proteasome pathway in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chai, Fan; Liang, Yan; Bi, Jiong; Chen, Li; Zhang, Fan; Cui, Youhong; Jiang, Jun

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • High expression of REGγ is correlated with ERα status and poor clinical features. • Cell growth, mobility and invasion are significantly impaired by REGγ knockdown. • REGγ indirectly regulates ERα protein expression. - Abstract: REGγ is a proteasome coactivator which regulates proteolytic activity in eukaryotic cells. Abundant lines of evidence have showed that REGγ is over expressed in a number of human carcinomas. However, its precise role in the pathogenesis of cancer is still unclear. In this study, by examining 200 human breast cancer specimens, we demonstrated that REGγ was highly expressed in breast cancers, and the expression of REGγ was positively correlated with breast cancer patient estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) status. Moreover, the expression of REGγ was found positively associated with poor clinical features and low survival rates in ERα positive breast cancer patients. Further cell culture studies using MCF7 and BT474 breast cancer cell lines showed that cell proliferation, motility, and invasion capacities were decreased significantly by REGγ knockdown. Lastly, we demonstrated that REGγ indirectly regulates the degradation of ERα protein via ubiquitin–proteasome pathway. In conclusion, our findings provide the evidence that REGγ expression was positively correlated with ERα status and poor clinical prognosis in ERα positive breast cancer patients. As well, we disclose a new connection between the two molecules that are both highly expressed in most breast cancer cases.

  1. Endospanins Regulate a Postinternalization Step of the Leptin Receptor Endocytic Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Séron, Karin; Couturier, Cyril; Belouzard, Sandrine; Bacart, Johan; Monté, Didier; Corset, Laetitia; Bocquet, Olivier; Dam, Julie; Vauthier, Virginie; Lecœur, Cécile; Bailleul, Bernard; Hoflack, Bernard; Froguel, Philippe; Jockers, Ralf; Rouillé, Yves

    2011-01-01

    Endospanin-1 is a negative regulator of the cell surface expression of leptin receptor (OB-R), and endospanin-2 is a homologue of unknown function. We investigated the mechanism for endospanin-1 action in regulating OB-R cell surface expression. Here we show that endospanin-1 and -2 are small integral membrane proteins that localize in endosomes and the trans-Golgi network. Antibody uptake experiments showed that both endospanins are transported to the plasma membrane and then internalized into early endosomes but do not recycle back to the trans-Golgi network. Overexpression of endospanin-1 or endospanin-2 led to a decrease of OB-R cell surface expression, whereas shRNA-mediated depletion of each protein increased OB-R cell surface expression. This increased cell surface expression was not observed with OB-Ra mutants defective in endocytosis or with transferrin and EGF receptors. Endospanin-1 or endospanin-2 depletion did not change the internalization rate of OB-Ra but slowed down its lysosomal degradation. Thus, both endospanins are regulators of postinternalization membrane traffic of the endocytic pathway of OB-R. PMID:21454707

  2. Endospanins regulate a postinternalization step of the leptin receptor endocytic pathway.

    PubMed

    Séron, Karin; Couturier, Cyril; Belouzard, Sandrine; Bacart, Johan; Monté, Didier; Corset, Laetitia; Bocquet, Olivier; Dam, Julie; Vauthier, Virginie; Lecœur, Cécile; Bailleul, Bernard; Hoflack, Bernard; Froguel, Philippe; Jockers, Ralf; Rouillé, Yves

    2011-05-20

    Endospanin-1 is a negative regulator of the cell surface expression of leptin receptor (OB-R), and endospanin-2 is a homologue of unknown function. We investigated the mechanism for endospanin-1 action in regulating OB-R cell surface expression. Here we show that endospanin-1 and -2 are small integral membrane proteins that localize in endosomes and the trans-Golgi network. Antibody uptake experiments showed that both endospanins are transported to the plasma membrane and then internalized into early endosomes but do not recycle back to the trans-Golgi network. Overexpression of endospanin-1 or endospanin-2 led to a decrease of OB-R cell surface expression, whereas shRNA-mediated depletion of each protein increased OB-R cell surface expression. This increased cell surface expression was not observed with OB-Ra mutants defective in endocytosis or with transferrin and EGF receptors. Endospanin-1 or endospanin-2 depletion did not change the internalization rate of OB-Ra but slowed down its lysosomal degradation. Thus, both endospanins are regulators of postinternalization membrane traffic of the endocytic pathway of OB-R. PMID:21454707

  3. Distinct light-mediated pathways regulate the biosynthesis and exchange of isoprenoid precursors during Arabidopsis seedling development.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel; Forés, Oriol; Martinez-García, Jaime F; González, Victor; Phillips, Michael A; Ferrer, Albert; Boronat, Albert

    2004-01-01

    Plants synthesize an astonishing diversity of isoprenoids, some of which play essential roles in photosynthesis, respiration, and the regulation of growth and development. Two independent pathways for the biosynthesis of isoprenoid precursors coexist within the plant cell: the cytosolic mevalonic acid (MVA) pathway and the plastidial methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway. In at least some plants (including Arabidopsis), common precursors are exchanged between the cytosol and the plastid. However, little is known about the signals that coordinate their biosynthesis and exchange. To identify such signals, we arrested seedling development by specifically blocking the MVA pathway with mevinolin (MEV) or the MEP pathway with fosmidomycin (FSM) and searched for MEV-resistant Arabidopsis mutants that also could survive in the presence of FSM. Here, we show that one such mutant, rim1, is a new phyB allele (phyB-m1). Although the MEV-resistant phenotype of mutant seedlings is caused by the upregulation of MVA synthesis, its resistance to FSM most likely is the result of an enhanced intake of MVA-derived isoprenoid precursors by the plastid. The analysis of other light-hyposensitive mutants showed that distinct light perception and signal transduction pathways regulate these two differential mechanisms for resistance, providing evidence for a coordinated regulation of the activity of the MVA pathway and the crosstalk between cell compartments for isoprenoid biosynthesis during the first stages of seedling development.

  4. Coordinated transcriptional regulation of isopentenyl diphosphate biosynthetic pathway enzymes in plastids by phytochrome-interacting factor 5.

    PubMed

    Mannen, Kazuto; Matsumoto, Takuro; Takahashi, Seiji; Yamaguchi, Yuta; Tsukagoshi, Masanori; Sano, Ryosuke; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Sakurai, Nozomu; Shibata, Daisuke; Koyama, Tanetoshi; Nakayama, Toru

    2014-01-10

    All isoprenoids are derived from a common C5 unit, isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP). In plants, IPP is synthesized via two distinct pathways; the cytosolic mevalonate pathway and the plastidial non-mevalonate (MEP) pathway. In this study, we used a co-expression analysis to identify transcription factors that coordinately regulate the expression of multiple genes encoding enzymes in the IPP biosynthetic pathway. Some candidates showed especially strong correlations with multiple genes encoding MEP-pathway enzymes. We report here that phytochrome-interacting factor 5 (PIF5), a basic-helix-loop-helix type transcription factor, functions as a positive regulator of the MEP pathway. Its overexpression in T87 suspension cultured cells resulted in increased accumulation of chlorophylls and carotenoids. Detailed analyses of carotenoids by HPLC indicated that some carotenoid biosynthetic pathways were concomitantly up-regulated, possibly as a result of enhanced IPP metabolic flow. Our results also revealed other PIF family proteins that play different roles from that of PIF5 in IPP metabolism.

  5. The Hippo Pathway Targets Rae1 to Regulate Mitosis and Organ Size and to Feed Back to Regulate Upstream Components Merlin, Hippo, and Warts.

    PubMed

    Jahanshahi, Maryam; Hsiao, Kuangfu; Jenny, Andreas; Pfleger, Cathie M

    2016-08-01

    Hippo signaling acts as a master regulatory pathway controlling growth, proliferation, and apoptosis and also ensures that variations in proliferation do not alter organ size. How the pathway coordinates restricting proliferation with organ size control remains a major unanswered question. Here we identify Rae1 as a highly-conserved target of the Hippo Pathway integrating proliferation and organ size. Genetic and biochemical studies in Drosophila cells and tissues and in mammalian cells indicate that Hippo signaling promotes Rae1 degradation downstream of Warts/Lats. In proliferating cells, Rae1 loss restricts cyclin B levels and organ size while Rae1 over-expression increases cyclin B levels and organ size, similar to Hippo Pathway over-activation or loss-of-function, respectively. Importantly, Rae1 regulation by the Hippo Pathway is crucial for its regulation of cyclin B and organ size; reducing Rae1 blocks cyclin B accumulation and suppresses overgrowth caused by Hippo Pathway loss. Surprisingly, in addition to suppressing overgrowth, reducing Rae1 also compromises survival of epithelial tissue overgrowing due to loss of Hippo signaling leading to a tissue "synthetic lethality" phenotype. Excitingly, Rae1 plays a highly conserved role to reduce the levels and activity of the Yki/YAP oncogene. Rae1 increases activation of the core kinases Hippo and Warts and plays a post-transcriptional role to increase the protein levels of the Merlin, Hippo, and Warts components of the pathway; therefore, in addition to Rae1 coordinating organ size regulation with proliferative control, we propose that Rae1 also acts in a feedback circuit to regulate pathway homeostasis. PMID:27494403

  6. The Hippo Pathway Targets Rae1 to Regulate Mitosis and Organ Size and to Feed Back to Regulate Upstream Components Merlin, Hippo, and Warts

    PubMed Central

    Jenny, Andreas; Pfleger, Cathie M.

    2016-01-01

    Hippo signaling acts as a master regulatory pathway controlling growth, proliferation, and apoptosis and also ensures that variations in proliferation do not alter organ size. How the pathway coordinates restricting proliferation with organ size control remains a major unanswered question. Here we identify Rae1 as a highly-conserved target of the Hippo Pathway integrating proliferation and organ size. Genetic and biochemical studies in Drosophila cells and tissues and in mammalian cells indicate that Hippo signaling promotes Rae1 degradation downstream of Warts/Lats. In proliferating cells, Rae1 loss restricts cyclin B levels and organ size while Rae1 over-expression increases cyclin B levels and organ size, similar to Hippo Pathway over-activation or loss-of-function, respectively. Importantly, Rae1 regulation by the Hippo Pathway is crucial for its regulation of cyclin B and organ size; reducing Rae1 blocks cyclin B accumulation and suppresses overgrowth caused by Hippo Pathway loss. Surprisingly, in addition to suppressing overgrowth, reducing Rae1 also compromises survival of epithelial tissue overgrowing due to loss of Hippo signaling leading to a tissue “synthetic lethality” phenotype. Excitingly, Rae1 plays a highly conserved role to reduce the levels and activity of the Yki/YAP oncogene. Rae1 increases activation of the core kinases Hippo and Warts and plays a post-transcriptional role to increase the protein levels of the Merlin, Hippo, and Warts components of the pathway; therefore, in addition to Rae1 coordinating organ size regulation with proliferative control, we propose that Rae1 also acts in a feedback circuit to regulate pathway homeostasis. PMID:27494403

  7. Blockade of Wnt/β-Catenin Pathway Aggravated Silica-Induced Lung Inflammation through Tregs Regulation on Th Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Wujing; Liu, Fangwei; Li, Chao; Lu, Yiping; Lu, Xiaowei; Du, Sitong; Chen, Ying; Weng, Dong; Chen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    CD4+ T cells play an important role in regulating silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis. Recent studies showed that Wnt/β-catenin pathway could modulate the function and the differentiation of CD4+ T cells. Therefore, Wnt/β-catenin pathway may participate in the development and progress of silicosis. To investigate the role of Wnt/β-catenin pathway, we used lentivirus expressing β-catenin shRNA to block the Wnt/β-catenin pathway by intratracheal instillation to the mice model of silicosis. Treatment of lentivirus could significantly aggravate the silica-induced lung inflammation and attenuated the fibrosis at the late stage. By analyzing CD4+ T cells, we found that blockade of Wnt/β-catenin pathway suppressed regulatory T cells (Tregs). Reciprocally, enhanced Th17 response was responsible for the further accumulation of neutrophils and production of proinflammatory cytokines. In addition, blockade of Wnt/β-catenin pathway delayed the Th1/Th2 polarization by inhibiting Tregs and Th2 response. These results indicated that Wnt/β-catenin pathway could regulate Tregs to modulate Th immune response, which finally altered the pathological character of silicosis. Our study suggested that Wnt/β-catenin pathway might be a potential target to treat the silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis. PMID:27069316

  8. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae-Induced MyD88 Short Expression Is Regulated by Positive IKKβ and CREB Pathways and Negative ERK1/2 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Carla S.; Miyata, Masanori; Susuki-Miyata, Seiko; Lee, Byung-Cheol; Komatsu, Kensei; Li, Jian-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Airway diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are characterized by excessive inflammation and are exacerbated by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). Airway epithelial cells mount the initial innate immune responses to invading pathogens and thus modulate inflammation. While inflammation is necessary to eliminate a pathogen, excessive inflammation can cause damage to the host tissue. Therefore, the inflammatory response must be tightly regulated and deciphering the signaling pathways involved in this response will enhance our understanding of the regulation of the host inflammatory response. NTHi binds to TLR2 and signal propagation requires the adaptor molecule myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88). An alternative spliced form of MyD88 is called MyD88 short (MyD88s) and has been identified in macrophages and embryonic cell lines as a negative regulator of inflammation. However, the role of MyD88s in NTHi-induced inflammation in airway epithelial cells remains unknown. Here we show that NTHi induces MyD88s expression and MyD88s is a negative regulator of inflammation in airway epithelial cells. We further demonstrate that MyD88s is positively regulated by IKKβ and CREB and negatively regulated by ERK1/2 signaling pathways. Taken together these data indicate that airway inflammation is controlled in a negative feedback manner involving MyD88s and suggest that airway epithelial cells are essential to maintain immune homeostasis. PMID:26669856

  9. Genome Engineering of the 2,3-Butanediol Biosynthetic Pathway for Tight Regulation in Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Nozzi, Nicole E; Atsumi, Shota

    2015-11-20

    Cyanobacteria have gained popularity among the metabolic engineering community as a tractable photosynthetic host for renewable chemical production. However, though a number of successfully engineered production systems have been reported, long-term genetic stability remains an issue for cyanobacterial systems. The genetic engineering toolbox for cyanobacteria is largely lacking inducible systems for expression control. The characterization of tight regulation systems for use in cyanobacteria may help to alleviate this problem. In this work we explore the function of the IPTG inducible promoter P(L)lacO1 in the model cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 as well as the effect of gene order within an operon on pathway expression. According to our experiments, P(L)lacO1 functions well as an inducible promoter in S. elongatus. Additionally, we found that gene order within an operon can strongly influence control of expression of each gene.

  10. β-Spectrin regulates the hippo signaling pathway and modulates the basal actin network.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kenneth Kin Lam; Li, Wenyang; An, Yanru; Duan, Yangyang; Li, Zhuoheng; Kang, Yibin; Yan, Yan

    2015-03-01

    Emerging evidence suggests functional regulation of the Hippo pathway by the actin cytoskeleton, although the detailed molecular mechanism remains incomplete. In a genetic screen, we identified a requirement for β-Spectrin in the posterior follicle cells for the oocyte repolarization process during Drosophila mid-oogenesis. β-spectrin mutations lead to loss of Hippo signaling activity in the follicle cells. A similar reduction of Hippo signaling activity was observed after β-Spectrin knockdown in mammalian cells. We further demonstrated that β-spectrin mutations disrupt the basal actin network in follicle cells. The abnormal stress fiber-like actin structure on the basal side of follicle cells provides a likely link between the β-spectrin mutations and the loss of the Hippo signaling activity phenotype.

  11. S-nitrosothiols regulate nitric oxide production and storage in plants through the nitrogen assimilation pathway

    PubMed Central

    Frungillo, Lucas; Skelly, Michael J.; Loake, Gary J.; Spoel, Steven H.; Salgado, Ione

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen assimilation plays a vital role in plant metabolism. Assimilation of nitrate, the primary source of nitrogen in soil, is linked to generation of the redox signal nitric oxide (NO). An important mechanism by which NO regulates plant development and stress responses is through S-nitrosylation, i.e. covalent attachment of NO to cysteines to form S-nitrosothiols (SNO). Despite the importance of nitrogen assimilation and NO signalling, it remains largely unknown how these pathways are interconnected. Here we show that SNO signalling suppresses both nitrate uptake and reduction by transporters and reductases, respectively, to fine-tune nitrate homeostasis. Moreover, NO derived from nitrate assimilation suppresses the redox enzyme S-nitrosoglutathione Reductase 1 (GSNOR1) by S-nitrosylation, preventing scavenging of S-nitrosoglutathione, a major cellular bio-reservoir of NO. Hence, our data demonstrates that (S)NO controls its own generation and scavenging by modulating nitrate assimilation and GSNOR1 activity. PMID:25384398

  12. Direct evidences on bacterial growth pattern regulating pyrene degradation pathway and genotypic dioxygenase expression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Baowei; Huang, Jinyin; Yuan, Ke; Lin, Li; Wang, Xiaowei; Yang, Lihua; Luan, Tiangang

    2016-04-15

    Pyrene degradation by Mycobacterium sp. strain A1-PYR was investigated in the presence of nutrient broth, phenanthrene and fluoranthene, respectively. Fast bacterial growth in the nutrient broth considerably enhanced pyrene degradation rate, whereas degradation efficiency per cell was substantially decreased. The addition of nutrient broth could not alter the transcription levels of all dioxygenase genotypes. In the PAH-only substrates, bacterial growth completely relied on biological conversion of PAHs into the effective carbon sources, which led to a higher degradation efficiency of pyrene per cell than the case of nutrient broth. Significant correlations were only observed between nidA-related dioxygenase expression and pyrene degradation or bacterial growth. The highest pyrene degradation rate in the presence of phenanthrene was consistent with the highest transcription level of nidA and 4,5-pyrenediol as the sole initial metabolite. This study reveals that bacterial growth requirement can invigorate degradation of PAHs by regulating metabolic pathway and genotypic enzyme expression.

  13. TRAIL regulates normal erythroid maturation through an ERK-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Secchiero, Paola; Melloni, Elisabetta; Heikinheimo, Markku; Mannisto, Susanna; Di Pietro, Roberta; Iacone, Antonio; Zauli, Giorgio

    2004-01-15

    In order to investigate the biologic activity of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) on human erythropoiesis, glycophorin A (GPA)+ erythroid cells were generated in serum-free liquid phase from human cord blood (CB) CD34+ progenitor cells. The surface expression of TRAIL-R1 was weakly detectable in the early-intermediate phase of erythroid differentiation (days 4-6; dim-intermediate GPA expression), whereas a clear-cut expression of TRAIL-R2 was observed through the entire course of erythroid differentiation (up to days 12-14; bright GPA expression). On the other hand, surface TRAIL-R3 and -R4 were not detected at any culture time. Besides inducing a rapid but small increase of apoptotic cell death, which was abrogated by the pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk, the addition of recombinant TRAIL at day 6 of culture inhibited the generation of morphologically mature erythroblasts. Among the intracellular pathways investigated, TRAIL significantly stimulated the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) but not the p38/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) or the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway. Consistently with a key role of ERK1/2 in mediating the negative effects of TRAIL on erythroid maturation, PD98059, a pharmacologic inhibitor of the ERK pathway, but not z-VAD-fmk or SB203580, a pharmacologic inhibitor of p38/MAPK, reverted the antidifferentiative effect of TRAIL on CB-derived erythroblasts. PMID:12969966

  14. Gene expression changes in the tyrosine metabolic pathway regulate caste-specific cuticular pigmentation of termites.

    PubMed

    Masuoka, Yudai; Maekawa, Kiyoto

    2016-07-01

    In social insects, all castes have characteristic phenotypes suitable for their own tasks and to engage in social behavior. The acquisition of caste-specific phenotypes was a key event in the course of social insect evolution. However, understanding of the genetic basis and the developmental mechanisms that produce these phenotypes is still very limited. In particular, termites normally possess more than two castes with specific phenotypes (i.e. workers, soldiers, and reproductives), but proximate developmental mechanisms are far from being fully understood. In this study, we focused on the pigmentation of the cuticle as a model trait for caste-specific phenotypes, during the molts of each caste; workers, soldiers, presoldiers (intermediate stage of soldiers), and alates (primary reproductives) in Zootermopsis nevadensis. Expression patterns of cuticular tanning genes (members of the tyrosine metabolic pathway) were different among each molt, and high expression levels of several "key genes" were observed during each caste differentiation. For the differentiation of castes with well-tanned cuticles (i.e. soldiers and alates), all focal genes except DDC in the former were highly expressed. On the other hand, high expression levels of yellow and aaNAT were observed during worker and presoldier molts, respectively, but most other genes in the pathway were expressed at low levels. RNA interference (RNAi) of these key genes affected caste-specific cuticular pigmentation, leading to soldiers with yellowish-white heads and pigmented mandibular tips, presoldiers with partly pigmented head cuticles, and alates with the yellow head capsules. These results suggest that the pigmentation of caste-specific cuticles is achieved by the regulation of gene expression in the tyrosine metabolic pathway. PMID:27125584

  15. BMP9 Crosstalk with the Hippo Pathway Regulates Endothelial Cell Matricellular and Chemokine Responses

    PubMed Central

    Young, Kira; Tweedie, Eric; Conley, Barbara; Ames, Jacquelyn; FitzSimons, MaryLynn; Brooks, Peter; Liaw, Lucy; Vary, Calvin P. H.

    2015-01-01

    Endoglin is a type III TGFβ auxiliary receptor that is upregulated in endothelial cells during angiogenesis and, when mutated in humans, results in the vascular disease hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Though endoglin has been implicated in cell adhesion, the underlying molecular mechanisms are still poorly understood. Here we show endoglin expression in endothelial cells regulates subcellular localization of zyxin in focal adhesions in response to BMP9. RNA knockdown of endoglin resulted in mislocalization of zyxin and altered formation of focal adhesions. The mechanotransduction role of focal adhesions and their ability to transmit regulatory signals through binding of the extracellular matrix are altered by endoglin deficiency. BMP/TGFβ transcription factors, SMADs, and zyxin have recently been implicated in a newly emerging signaling cascade, the Hippo pathway. The Hippo transcription coactivator, YAP1 (yes-associated protein 1), has been suggested to play a crucial role in mechanotransduction and cell-cell contact. Identification of BMP9-dependent nuclear localization of YAP1 in response to endoglin expression suggests a mechanism of crosstalk between the two pathways. Suppression of endoglin and YAP1 alters BMP9-dependent expression of YAP1 target genes CCN1 (cysteine-rich 61, CYR61) and CCN2 (connective tissue growth factor, CTGF) as well as the chemokine CCL2 (monocyte chemotactic protein 1, MCP-1). These results suggest a coordinate effect of endoglin deficiency on cell matrix remodeling and local inflammatory responses. Identification of a direct link between the Hippo pathway and endoglin may reveal novel mechanisms in the etiology of HHT. PMID:25909848

  16. BMP9 Crosstalk with the Hippo Pathway Regulates Endothelial Cell Matricellular and Chemokine Responses.

    PubMed

    Young, Kira; Tweedie, Eric; Conley, Barbara; Ames, Jacquelyn; FitzSimons, MaryLynn; Brooks, Peter; Liaw, Lucy; Vary, Calvin P H

    2015-01-01

    Endoglin is a type III TGFβ auxiliary receptor that is upregulated in endothelial cells during angiogenesis and, when mutated in humans, results in the vascular disease hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Though endoglin has been implicated in cell adhesion, the underlying molecular mechanisms are still poorly understood. Here we show endoglin expression in endothelial cells regulates subcellular localization of zyxin in focal adhesions in response to BMP9. RNA knockdown of endoglin resulted in mislocalization of zyxin and altered formation of focal adhesions. The mechanotransduction role of focal adhesions and their ability to transmit regulatory signals through binding of the extracellular matrix are altered by endoglin deficiency. BMP/TGFβ transcription factors, SMADs, and zyxin have recently been implicated in a newly emerging signaling cascade, the Hippo pathway. The Hippo transcription coactivator, YAP1 (yes-associated protein 1), has been suggested to play a crucial role in mechanotransduction and cell-cell contact. Identification of BMP9-dependent nuclear localization of YAP1 in response to endoglin expression suggests a mechanism of crosstalk between the two pathways. Suppression of endoglin and YAP1 alters BMP9-dependent expression of YAP1 target genes CCN1 (cysteine-rich 61, CYR61) and CCN2 (connective tissue growth factor, CTGF) as well as the chemokine CCL2 (monocyte chemotactic protein 1, MCP-1). These results suggest a coordinate effect of endoglin deficiency on cell matrix remodeling and local inflammatory responses. Identification of a direct link between the Hippo pathway and endoglin may reveal novel mechanisms in the etiology of HHT.

  17. YAP forms autocrine loops with the ERBB pathway to regulate ovarian cancer initiation and progression

    PubMed Central

    He, Chunbo; Lv, Xiangmin; Hua, Guohua; Lele, Subodh M; Remmenga, Steven; Dong, Jixin; Davis, John S; Wang, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying ovarian cancer initiation and progression are unclear. Herein, we report that the Yes-associated protein (YAP), a major effector of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway, interacts with ERBB signaling pathways to regulate the initiation and progression of ovarian cancer. Immunohistochemistry studies indicate that YAP expression is associated with poor clinical outcomes in patients. Overexpression or constitutive activation of YAP leads to transformation and tumorigenesis in human ovarian surface epithelial cells, and promotes growth of cancer cells in vivo and in vitro. YAP induces expression of EGF receptors (EGFR, ERBB3) and production of EGF-like ligands (HBEGF, NRG1 and NRG2). HBEGF or NRG1, in turn, activates YAP and stimulates cancer cell growth. Knockdown of ERBB3 or HBEGF eliminates YAP effects on cell growth and transformation, while knockdown of YAP abrogates NRG1- and HBEGF-stimulated cell proliferation. Collectively, our study demonstrates the existence of HBEGF&NRGs/ERBBs/YAP/HBEGF&NRGs autocrine loop that controls ovarian cell tumorigenesis and cancer progression. PMID:25798835

  18. Two anthranilate synthase genes in Arabidopsis: defense-related regulation of the tryptophan pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Niyogi, K K; Fink, G R

    1992-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana has two genes, ASA1 and ASA2, encoding the alpha subunit of anthranilate synthase, the enzyme catalyzing the first reaction in the tryptophan biosynthetic pathway. As a branchpoint enzyme in aromatic amino acid biosynthesis, anthranilate synthase has an important regulatory role. The sequences of the plant genes are homologous to their microbial counterparts. Both predicted proteins have putative chloroplast transit peptides at their amino termini and conserved amino acids involved in feedback inhibition by tryptophan. ASA1 and ASA2 cDNAs complement anthranilate synthase alpha subunit mutations in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in Escherichia coli, confirming that both genes encode functional anthranilate synthase proteins. The distributions of ASA1 and ASA2 mRNAs in various parts of Arabidopsis plants are overlapping but nonidentical, and ASA1 mRNA is approximately 10 times more abundant in whole plants. Whereas ASA2 is expressed at a constitutive basal level, ASA1 is induced by wounding and bacterial pathogen infiltration, suggesting a novel role for ASA1 in the production of tryptophan pathway metabolites as part of an Arabidopsis defense response. Regulation of key steps in aromatic amino acid biosynthesis in Arabidopsis appears to involve differential expression of duplicated genes. PMID:1392592

  19. NRSF/REST regulates the mTOR signaling pathway in oral cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eugene; Moon, Sung-Min; Park, Bo Ram; Kim, Do Kyung; Lee, Byung-Kwon; Kim, Chun Sung

    2015-03-01

    The neuron-restrictive silencer factor/repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor (NRSF/REST) was originally discovered as a transcriptional repressor of neuronal genes in non-neuronal cells. However, it was recently reported to be abundantly expressed in several types of aggressive cancer cells, as well as in mature neurons. In the present study, the role of NRSF/REST in the human oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) KB cell line was evaluated. NRSF/REST was expressed at a higher level in KB cells when compared with that in normal human oral keratinocytes (NHOKs). Knockdown of NRSF/REST by siRNA reduced cell viability only in KB cells in a time-dependent manner, and this effect was due to the activation of apoptosis components and DNA fragmentation. In addition, knockdown of NRSF/REST disrupted the mTOR signaling pathway which is a key survival factor in many types of cancer cells. For example, the phosphorylation of elF4G, elF4E and 4E-BP1 was significantly reduced in the KΒ cells upon NRSF/REST knockdown. These results imply that NRSF/REST plays an important role in the survival of oral cancer cells by regulating the mTOR signaling pathway. PMID:25524378

  20. Engineering of the glycerol decomposition pathway and cofactor regulation in an industrial yeast improves ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Tang, Yan; Guo, Zhongpeng; Shi, Guiyang

    2013-10-01

    Glycerol is a major by-product of industrial ethanol production and its formation consumes up to 4 % of the sugar substrate. This study modified the glycerol decomposition pathway of an industrial strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to optimize the consumption of substrate and yield of ethanol. This study is the first to couple glycerol degradation with ethanol formation, to the best of our knowledge. The recombinant strain overexpressing GCY1 and DAK1, encoding glycerol dehydrogenase and dihydroxyacetone kinase, respectively, in glycerol degradation pathway, exhibited a moderate increase in ethanol yield (2.9 %) and decrease in glycerol yield (24.9 %) compared to the wild type with the initial glucose concentration of 15 % under anaerobic conditions. However, when the mhpF gene, encoding acetylating NAD⁺-dependent acetaldehyde dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli, was co-expressed in the aforementioned recombinant strain, a further increase in ethanol yield by 5.5 % and decrease in glycerol yield by 48 % were observed for the resultant recombinant strain GDMS1 when acetic acid was added into the medium prior to inoculation compared to the wild type. The process outlined in this study which enhances glycerol consumption and cofactor regulation in an industrial yeast is a promising metabolic engineering strategy to increase ethanol production by reducing the formation of glycerol.

  1. NRF2 Regulates HER2 and HER3 Signaling Pathway to Modulate Sensitivity to Targeted Immunotherapies

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Hilal S.; Langdon, Simon P.; Kankia, Ibrahim H.; Bown, James; Deeni, Yusuf Y.

    2016-01-01

    NF-E2 related factor-2 (NRF2) is an essential transcription factor for multiple genes encoding antioxidants and detoxification enzymes. NRF2 is implicated in promoting cancer therapeutic resistance by its detoxification function and crosstalk with proproliferative pathways. However, the exact mechanism of this intricate connectivity between NRF2 and growth factor induced proliferative pathway remains elusive. Here, we have demonstrated that pharmacological activation of NRF2 by tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ) upregulates the HER family receptors, HER2 and HER3 expression, elevates pAKT levels, and enhances the proliferation of ovarian cancer cells. Preactivation of NRF2 also attenuates the combined growth inhibitory effects of HER2 targeting monoclonal antibodies, Pertuzumab and Trastuzumab. Further, tBHQ caused transcriptional induction of HER2 and HER3, while SiRNA-mediated knockdown of NRF2 prevented this and further caused transcriptional repression and enhanced cytotoxicity of the HER2 inhibitors. Hence, NRF2 regulates both HER2 and HER3 receptors to influence cellular responses to HER2 targeting monoclonal antibodies. This deciphered crosstalk mechanism reinforces the role of NRF2 in drug resistance and as a relevant anticancer target. PMID:26770651

  2. Late Phase of the Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Response Pathway Is Regulated by Hog1 MAP Kinase*

    PubMed Central

    Bicknell, Alicia A.; Tourtellotte, Joel; Niwa, Maho

    2010-01-01

    When unfolded proteins accumulate in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causing ER stress, the unfolded protein response (UPR) responds rapidly to induce a transcriptional program that functions to alleviate the stress. However, under extreme conditions, when UPR activation is not sufficient to alleviate ER stress, the stress may persist long term. Very little is known about how the cell responds to persistent ER stress that is not resolved by the immediate activation of the UPR. We show that Hog1 MAP kinase becomes phosphorylated during the late stage of ER stress and helps the ER regain homeostasis. Although Hog1 is well known to function in osmotic stress and cell wall integrity pathways, we show that the activation mechanism for Hog1 during ER stress is distinct from both of these pathways. During late stage ER stress, upon phosphorylation, Hog1 translocates into the nucleus and regulates gene expression. Subsequently, Hog1 returns to the cytoplasm, where its phosphorylation levels remain high. From its cytoplasmic location, Hog1 contributes to the activation of autophagy by enhancing the stability of Atg8, a critical autophagy protein. Thus, Hog1 coordinates a multifaceted response to persistent ER stress. PMID:20382742

  3. A chemical proteomic atlas of brain serine hydrolases identifies cell type-specific pathways regulating neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Viader, Andreu; Ogasawara, Daisuke; Joslyn, Christopher M; Sanchez-Alavez, Manuel; Mori, Simone; Nguyen, William; Conti, Bruno; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic specialization among major brain cell types is central to nervous system function and determined in large part by the cellular distribution of enzymes. Serine hydrolases are a diverse enzyme class that plays fundamental roles in CNS metabolism and signaling. Here, we perform an activity-based proteomic analysis of primary mouse neurons, astrocytes, and microglia to furnish a global portrait of the cellular anatomy of serine hydrolases in the brain. We uncover compelling evidence for the cellular compartmentalization of key chemical transmission pathways, including the functional segregation of endocannabinoid (eCB) biosynthetic enzymes diacylglycerol lipase-alpha (DAGLα) and –beta (DAGLβ) to neurons and microglia, respectively. Disruption of DAGLβ perturbed eCB-eicosanoid crosstalk specifically in microglia and suppressed neuroinflammatory events in vivo independently of broader effects on eCB content. Mapping the cellular distribution of metabolic enzymes thus identifies pathways for regulating specialized inflammatory responses in the brain while avoiding global alterations in CNS function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12345.001 PMID:26779719

  4. Extracellular sulfatases support cartilage homeostasis by regulating BMP and FGF signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Otsuki, Shuhei; Hanson, Sarah R.; Miyaki, Shigeru; Grogan, Shawn P.; Kinoshita, Mitsuo; Asahara, Hiroshi; Wong, Chi-Huey; Lotz, Martin K.

    2010-01-01

    The balance between anabolic and catabolic signaling pathways is critical in maintaining cartilage homeostasis and its disturbance contributes to joint diseases such as osteoarthritis (OA). A unique mechanism that modulates the activity of cell signaling pathways is controlled by extracellular heparan endosulfatases Sulf-1 and Sulf-2 (Sulfs) that are overexpressed in OA cartilage. This study addressed the role of Sulfs in cartilage homeostasis and in regulating bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)/Smad and fibroblast growth factor (FGF)/Erk signaling in articular cartilage. Spontaneous cartilage degeneration and surgically induced OA were significantly more severe in Sulf-1−/− and Sulf-2−/− mice compared with wild-type mice. MMP-13, ADAMTS-5, and the BMP antagonist noggin were elevated whereas col2a1 and aggrecan were reduced in cartilage and chondrocytes from Sulf−/− mice. Articular cartilage and cultured chondrocytes from Sulf−/− mice showed reduced Smad1 protein expression and Smad1/5 phosphorylation, whereas Erk1/2 phosphorylation was increased. In human chondrocytes, Sulfs siRNA reduced Smad phosphorylation but enhanced FGF-2-induced Erk1/2 signaling. These findings suggest that Sulfs simultaneously enhance BMP but inhibit FGF signaling in chondrocytes and maintain cartilage homeostasis. Approaches to correct abnormal Sulf expression have the potential to protect against cartilage degradation and promote cartilage repair in OA. PMID:20479257

  5. γ-SNAP stimulates disassembly of endosomal SNARE complexes and regulates endocytic trafficking pathways.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hiroki; Matsuzaki, Yuka; Tanaka, Ayaka; Hosoi, Kaori; Ichimura, Kaoru; Arasaki, Kohei; Wakana, Yuichi; Asano, Kenichi; Tanaka, Masato; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Tani, Katsuko; Tagaya, Mitsuo

    2015-08-01

    Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) that reside in the target membranes and transport vesicles assemble into specific SNARE complexes to drive membrane fusion. N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF) and its attachment protein, α-SNAP (encoded by NAPA), catalyze disassembly of the SNARE complexes in the secretory and endocytic pathways to recycle them for the next round of fusion events. γ-SNAP (encoded by NAPG) is a SNAP isoform, but its function in SNARE-mediated membrane trafficking remains unknown. Here, we show that γ-SNAP regulates the endosomal trafficking of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) and transferrin. Immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry analyses revealed that γ-SNAP interacts with a limited range of SNAREs, including endosomal ones. γ-SNAP, as well as α-SNAP, mediated the disassembly of endosomal syntaxin-7-containing SNARE complexes. Overexpression and small interfering (si)RNA-mediated depletion of γ-SNAP changed the morphologies and intracellular distributions of endosomes. Moreover, the depletion partially suppressed the exit of EGFR and transferrin from EEA1-positive early endosomes to delay their degradation and uptake. Taken together, our findings suggest that γ-SNAP is a unique SNAP that functions in a limited range of organelles - including endosomes - and their trafficking pathways.

  6. Multiple cone pathways are involved in photic regulation of retinal dopamine

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Sheng-Nan; Zhang, Zhijing; Ribelayga, Christophe P.; Zhong, Yong-Mei; Zhang, Dao-Qi

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine is a key neurotransmitter in the retina and plays a central role in the light adaptive processes of the visual system. The sole source of retinal dopamine is dopaminergic amacrine cells (DACs). We and others have previously demonstrated that DACs are activated by rods, cones, and intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) upon illumination. However, it is still not clear how each class of photosensitive cells generates light responses in DACs. We genetically isolated cone function in mice to specifically examine the cone-mediated responses of DACs and their neural pathways. In addition to the reported excitatory input to DACs from light-increment (ON) bipolar cells, we found that cones alternatively signal to DACs via a retrograde signalling pathway from ipRGCs. Cones also produce ON and light-decrement (OFF) inhibitory responses in DACs, which are mediated by other amacrine cells, likely driven by type 1 and type 2/3a OFF bipolar cells, respectively. Dye injections indicated that DACs had similar morphological profiles with or without ON/OFF inhibition. Our data demonstrate that cones utilize specific parallel excitatory and inhibitory circuits to modulate DAC activity and efficiently regulate dopamine release and the light-adaptive state of the retina. PMID:27356880

  7. miR-58 family and TGF-β pathways regulate each other in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    de Lucas, María Pilar; Sáez, Alberto G; Lozano, Encarnación

    2015-11-16

    Despite the fact that microRNAs (miRNAs) modulate the expression of around 60% of protein-coding genes, it is often hard to elucidate their precise role and target genes. Studying miRNA families as opposed to single miRNAs alone increases our chances of observing not only mutant phenotypes but also changes in the expression of target genes. Here we ask whether the TGF-β signalling pathways, which control many animal processes, might be modulated by miRNAs in Caenorhabditis elegans. Using a mutant for four members of the mir-58 family, we show that both TGF-β Sma/Mab (controlling body size) and TGF-β Dauer (regulating dauer, a stress-resistant larval stage) are upregulated. Thus, mir-58 family directly inhibits the expression of dbl-1 (ligand), daf-1, daf-4 and sma-6 (receptors) of TGF-β pathways. Epistasis experiments reveal that whereas the small body phenotype of the mir-58 family mutant must invoke unknown targets independent from TGF-β Sma/Mab, its dauer defectiveness can be rescued by DAF-1 depletion. Additionally, we found a negative feedback loop between TGF-β Sma/Mab and mir-58 and the related mir-80. Our results suggest that the interaction between mir-58 family and TGF-β genes is key on decisions about animal growth and stress resistance in C. elegans and perhaps other organisms.

  8. Selective overproduction of the proteasome inhibitor salinosporamide A via precursor pathway regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lechner, Anna; Eustáquio, Alessandra S.; Gulder, Tobias A. M.; Hafner, Mathias; Moore, Bradley S.

    2011-01-01

    The chlorinated natural product salinosporamide A is a potent 20S proteasome inhibitor currently in clinical trials as an anticancer agent. To deepen our understanding of salinosporamide biosynthesis, we investigated the function of a LuxR-type pathway-specific regulatory gene, salR2, and observed a selective effect on the production of salinosporamide A over its less active aliphatic analogs. SalR2 was shown to specifically activate genes involved in the biosynthesis of the halogenated precursor chloroethylmalonyl-CoA, which is a dedicated precursor of salinosporamide A. Specifically, SalR2 activates transcription of two divergent operons – one of which contains the unique S-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent chlorinase encoding gene salL. By applying this knowledge towards rational engineering, we were able to selectively double salinosporamide A production. This study exemplifies the specialized regulation of a polyketide precursor pathway and its application to the selective overproduction of a specific natural product congener. PMID:22195555

  9. Ndel1 suppresses ciliogenesis in proliferating cells by regulating the trichoplein-Aurora A pathway.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Hironori; Goto, Hidemasa; Kasahara, Kousuke; Kumamoto, Kanako; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Inoko, Akihito; Yamano, Shotaro; Wanibuchi, Hideki; He, Dongwei; Goshima, Naoki; Kiyono, Tohru; Hirotsune, Shinji; Inagaki, Masaki

    2016-02-15

    Primary cilia protrude from the surface of quiescent cells and disassemble at cell cycle reentry. We previously showed that ciliary reassembly is suppressed by trichoplein-mediated Aurora A activation pathway in growing cells. Here, we report that Ndel1, a well-known modulator of dynein activity, localizes at the subdistal appendage of the mother centriole, which nucleates a primary cilium. In the presence of serum, Ndel1 depletion reduces trichoplein at the mother centriole and induces unscheduled primary cilia formation, which is reverted by forced trichoplein expression or coknockdown of KCTD17 (an E3 ligase component protein for trichoplein). Serum starvation induced transient Ndel1 degradation, subsequent to the disappearance of trichoplein at the mother centriole. Forced expression of Ndel1 suppressed trichoplein degradation and axonemal microtubule extension during ciliogenesis, similar to trichoplein induction or KCTD17 knockdown. Most importantly, the proportion of ciliated and quiescent cells was increased in the kidney tubular epithelia of newborn Ndel1-hypomorphic mice. Thus, Ndel1 acts as a novel upstream regulator of the trichoplein-Aurora A pathway to inhibit primary cilia assembly. PMID:26880200

  10. CD47 Receptor Globally Regulates Metabolic Pathways That Control Resistance to Ionizing Radiation*

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Thomas W.; Soto-Pantoja, David R.; Schwartz, Anthony L.; Sipes, John M.; DeGraff, William G.; Ridnour, Lisa A.; Wink, David A.; Roberts, David D.

    2015-01-01

    Modulating tissue responses to stress is an important therapeutic objective. Oxidative and genotoxic stresses caused by ionizing radiation are detrimental to healthy tissues but beneficial for treatment of cancer. CD47 is a signaling receptor for thrombospondin-1 and an attractive therapeutic target because blocking CD47 signaling protects normal tissues while sensitizing tumors to ionizing radiation. Here we utilized a metabolomic approach to define molecular mechanisms underlying this radioprotective activity. CD47-deficient cells and cd47-null mice exhibited global advantages in preserving metabolite levels after irradiation. Metabolic pathways required for controlling oxidative stress and mediating DNA repair were enhanced. Some cellular energetics pathways differed basally in CD47-deficient cells, and the global declines in the glycolytic and tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolites characteristic of normal cell and tissue responses to irradiation were prevented in the absence of CD47. Thus, CD47 mediates signaling from the extracellular matrix that coordinately regulates basal metabolism and cytoprotective responses to radiation injury. PMID:26311851

  11. UV-B signaling pathways and fluence rate dependent transcriptional regulation of ARIADNE12.

    PubMed

    Lang-Mladek, Christina; Xie, Lisi; Nigam, Neha; Chumak, Nina; Binkert, Melanie; Neubert, Susanne; Hauser, Marie-Theres

    2012-08-01

    ARI12 belongs to a family of 'RING between RING fingers' (RBR) domain proteins with E3 ligase activity (Eisenhaber et al. 2007). The Arabidopsis genome codes for 14 ARI genes and two pseudogenes (Mladek et al. 2003). Under standard growth conditions ARI12 is predominantly expressed in roots. In addition, ARI12 is strongly induced in leaves following exposure to ultraviolet (UV)-B radiation at dosages similar to those in areas under a reduced ozone layer. With quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analyses and promoter:reporter constructs we show that the expression of ARI12 peaks 2-4 h after UV-B radiation exposure. To test if ARI12's transcriptional activation depends on key players of the UV-B signaling pathway, ARI12 expression was quantified in mutants of the ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL5 (HY5), HY5 HOMOLOG (HYH) and the UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 (UVR8) genes. ARI12 transcription was reduced by 50-70% in hy5, hyh and hy5/hyh double mutants, but not in uvr8 mutants. However, under low fluence rate UV-B conditions ARI12 is not induced in these mutants. Our results show that ARI12 represents a downstream target of the low fluence rate UVR8/HY5/HYH UV-B signaling pathway while under high fluence rates its expression is regulated by the two bZIP transcription factors HY5 and HYH in an UVR8-independent manner.

  12. Frankincense and myrrh suppress inflammation via regulation of the metabolic profiling and the MAPK signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Su, Shulan; Duan, Jinao; Chen, Ting; Huang, Xiaochen; Shang, Erxin; Yu, Li; Wei, Kaifeng; Zhu, Yue; Guo, Jianming; Guo, Sheng; Liu, Pei; Qian, Dawei; Tang, Yuping

    2015-01-01

    Frankincense and myrrh are highly effective in treatment of inflammatary diseases, but lacking of the therapy mechanisms. We undertook this stuty to evaluate the effects on Adjuvant-induced Arthritis (AIA) rats and to explore the underlying mechanisms by analyzing the metabolic profiling and signaling pathway evaluated by expression of inflammatory cytokines, c-jun and c-fos and corresponding phosphorylation levels. The results stated the elevated expression levels of TNFα, PGE2, IL-2, NO, and MDA in serum and swelling paw of AIA rats were significantly decreased after treatment, which exerted more remarkable inhibitive effects of combined therapy. The metbolic profiling of plasma and urine were clearly improved and twenty-one potential biomarkers were identified. Moreover, the inhibited effects of five bioactive components on cytokine transcription in PHA stimulated-PBMC showed the MAPK pathway might account for this phenomenon with considerable reduction in phosphorylated forms of all the three MAPK (ERK1/2, p38 and JNK) and down regulation of c-jun and c-fos. PMID:26329643

  13. YB-1 Synthesis Is Regulated by mTOR Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lyabin, Dmitry N.; Eliseeva, Irina A.; Ovchinnikov, Lev P.

    2012-01-01

    YB-1 is a eukaryotic protein with numerous intra- and extracellular functions based on its ability to interact with RNA, DNA, and many proteins. In spite of achievements in studying its functions, regulation of YB-1 synthesis in the cell remains poorly understood. In the current study Western and Northern blotting were used to determine the amounts of YB-1 and YB-1 mRNA in rabbit organs and several cell lines. As found, in the majority of studied eukaryotic cells a considerable proportion of YB-1 mRNA was stored in free mRNPs, i.e., was poorly translated. Also, we demonstrated that YB-1 synthesis depended on conditions that determined the rate of cell division. Specific suppression of YB-1 synthesis resulted from inhibition of the mTOR signaling pathway with inhibitor PP242, but not rapamycin. Experiments on reporter constructs showed that dependence of YB-1 mRNA translation on activity of the mTOR signaling pathway was dictated by 5′ untranslated regions of this mRNA, irrelatively of the TOP-like sequences at the beginning of 5′ UTR. PMID:23285076

  14. HLH-29 regulates ovulation in C. elegans by targeting genes in the inositol triphosphate signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    White, Ana; Fearon, Abegail; Johnson, Casonya M

    2012-03-15

    The reproductive cycle in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans depends in part on the ability of the mature oocyte to ovulate into the spermatheca, fuse with the sperm during fertilization, and then exit the spermatheca as a fertilized egg. This cycle requires the integration of signals between the germ cells and the somatic gonad and relies heavily on the precise control of inositol 1,4,5 triphosphate (IP(3))levels. The HLH-29 protein, one of five Hairy/Enhancer of Split (HES) homologs in C. elegans, was previously shown to affect development of the somatic gonad. Here we show that HLH-29 expression in the adult spermatheca is strongly localized to the distal spermatheca valve and to the spermatheca-uterine valve, and that loss of hlh-29 activity interferes with oocyte entry into and egg exit from the spermatheca. We show that HLH-29 can regulate the transcriptional activity of the IP(3) signaling pathway genes ppk-1, ipp-5, and plc-1 and provide evidence that hlh-29 acts in a genetic pathway with each of these genes. We propose that the HES-like protein HLH-29 acts in the spermatheca of larval and adult animals to effectively increase IP(3) levels during the reproductive cycle.

  15. Ndel1 suppresses ciliogenesis in proliferating cells by regulating the trichoplein–Aurora A pathway

    PubMed Central

    Inaba, Hironori; Goto, Hidemasa; Kasahara, Kousuke; Kumamoto, Kanako; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Inoko, Akihito; Yamano, Shotaro; Wanibuchi, Hideki; He, Dongwei; Goshima, Naoki; Kiyono, Tohru; Hirotsune, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Primary cilia protrude from the surface of quiescent cells and disassemble at cell cycle reentry. We previously showed that ciliary reassembly is suppressed by trichoplein-mediated Aurora A activation pathway in growing cells. Here, we report that Ndel1, a well-known modulator of dynein activity, localizes at the subdistal appendage of the mother centriole, which nucleates a primary cilium. In the presence of serum, Ndel1 depletion reduces trichoplein at the mother centriole and induces unscheduled primary cilia formation, which is reverted by forced trichoplein expression or coknockdown of KCTD17 (an E3 ligase component protein for trichoplein). Serum starvation induced transient Ndel1 degradation, subsequent to the disappearance of trichoplein at the mother centriole. Forced expression of Ndel1 suppressed trichoplein degradation and axonemal microtubule extension during ciliogenesis, similar to trichoplein induction or KCTD17 knockdown. Most importantly, the proportion of ciliated and quiescent cells was increased in the kidney tubular epithelia of newborn Ndel1-hypomorphic mice. Thus, Ndel1 acts as a novel upstream regulator of the trichoplein–Aurora A pathway to inhibit primary cilia assembly. PMID:26880200

  16. PP2ARts1 is a master regulator of pathways that control cell size

    PubMed Central

    Zapata, Jessica; Dephoure, Noah; MacDonough, Tracy; Yu, Yaxin; Parnell, Emily J.; Mooring, Meghan; Gygi, Steven P.; Stillman, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Cell size checkpoints ensure that passage through G1 and mitosis occurs only when sufficient growth has occurred. The mechanisms by which these checkpoints work are largely unknown. PP2A associated with the Rts1 regulatory subunit (PP2ARts1) is required for cell size control in budding yeast, but the relevant targets are unknown. In this paper, we used quantitative proteome-wide mass spectrometry to identify proteins controlled by PP2ARts1. This revealed that PP2ARts1 controls the two key checkpoint pathways thought to regulate the cell cycle in response to cell growth. To investigate the role of PP2ARts1 in these pathways, we focused on the Ace2 transcription factor, which is thought to delay cell cycle entry by repressing transcription of the G1 cyclin CLN3. Diverse experiments suggest that PP2ARts1 promotes cell cycle entry by inhibiting the repressor functions of Ace2. We hypothesize that control of Ace2 by PP2ARts1 plays a role in mechanisms that link G1 cyclin accumulation to cell growth. PMID:24493588

  17. Up-regulation of cyclin E in breast cancer via estrogen receptor pathway.

    PubMed

    Niu, Dehong; Wang, Gang; Wang, Xiuwen

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that cell cycle dysregulation plays an important role in breast cancer. The mechanism, however, is not fully understood. In this study, we aimed to explore whether estrogen and estrogen receptor pathway play a role in the regulation of cell cycle protein cyclin E expression, and whether the expression of cyclin E is associated with breast cancer prognosis. We first examined the level of cyclin E expression in breast cancer by immunohistochemistry. Benign fibroadenoma was used as controls. Next we cultured MCF-7 cells with different concentration of 17β-estradiol or tamoxifen for 48 hours. Then we employ qRT-PCR to determine changes of cyclin E in MCF-7 cells. Cyclin E is overexpressed in breast cancer and its expression is associated with the status of estrogen receptor and lymph node metastasis. After treatment with 17β-estradiol, the gene expression of cyclin E was enhanced, and as the concentration increased, the enhancement increased. After treatment with tamoxifen, the gene expression of cyclin E was inhibited, and as the concentration decreased, the inhibition increased. We demonstrated that estrogen induces, while tamoxifen inhibits cyclin E expression. This indicate that estrogen receptor pathway play a critical role in cell cycle dysregulation in breast cancer.

  18. miR-58 family and TGF-β pathways regulate each other in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    de Lucas, María Pilar; Sáez, Alberto G.; Lozano, Encarnación

    2015-01-01

    Despite the fact that microRNAs (miRNAs) modulate the expression of around 60% of protein-coding genes, it is often hard to elucidate their precise role and target genes. Studying miRNA families as opposed to single miRNAs alone increases our chances of observing not only mutant phenotypes but also changes in the expression of target genes. Here we ask whether the TGF-β signalling pathways, which control many animal processes, might be modulated by miRNAs in Caenorhabditis elegans. Using a mutant for four members of the mir-58 family, we show that both TGF-β Sma/Mab (controlling body size) and TGF-β Dauer (regulating dauer, a stress-resistant larval stage) are upregulated. Thus, mir-58 family directly inhibits the expression of dbl-1 (ligand), daf-1, daf-4 and sma-6 (receptors) of TGF-β pathways. Epistasis experiments reveal that whereas the small body phenotype of the mir-58 family mutant must invoke unknown targets independent from TGF-β Sma/Mab, its dauer defectiveness can be rescued by DAF-1 depletion. Additionally, we found a negative feedback loop between TGF-β Sma/Mab and mir-58 and the related mir-80. Our results suggest that the interaction between mir-58 family and TGF-β genes is key on decisions about animal growth and stress resistance in C. elegans and perhaps other organisms. PMID:26400166

  19. BAFF activation of the ERK5 MAP kinase pathway regulates B cell survival.

    PubMed

    Jacque, Emilie; Schweighoffer, Edina; Tybulewicz, Victor L J; Ley, Steven C

    2015-06-01

    B cell activating factor (BAFF) stimulation of the BAFF receptor (BAFF-R) is essential for the homeostatic survival of mature B cells. Earlier in vitro experiments with inhibitors that block MEK 1 and 2 suggested that activation of ERK 1 and 2 MAP kinases is required for BAFF-R to promote B cell survival. However, these inhibitors are now known to also inhibit MEK5, which activates the related MAP kinase ERK5. In the present study, we demonstrated that BAFF-induced B cell survival was actually independent of ERK1/2 activation but required ERK5 activation. Consistent with this, we showed that conditional deletion of ERK5 in B cells led to a pronounced global reduction in mature B2 B cell numbers, which correlated with impaired survival of ERK5-deficient B cells after BAFF stimulation. ERK5 was required for optimal BAFF up-regulation of Mcl1 and Bcl2a1, which are prosurvival members of the Bcl-2 family. However, ERK5 deficiency did not alter BAFF activation of the PI3-kinase-Akt or NF-κB signaling pathways, which are also important for BAFF to promote mature B cell survival. Our study reveals a critical role for the MEK5-ERK5 MAP kinase signaling pathway in BAFF-induced mature B cell survival and homeostatic maintenance of B2 cell numbers.

  20. TGF-β/SMAD Pathway and Its Regulation in Hepatic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fengyun; Liu, Changwei; Zhou, Dandan; Zhang, Lei

    2016-03-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1), a key member in the TGF-β superfamily, plays a critical role in the development of hepatic fibrosis. Its expression is consistently elevated in affected organs, which correlates with increased extracellular matrix deposition. SMAD proteins have been studied extensively as pivotal intracellular effectors of TGF-β1, acting as transcription factors. In the context of hepatic fibrosis, SMAD3 and SMAD4 are pro-fibrotic, whereas SMAD2 and SMAD7 are protective. Deletion of SMAD3 inhibits type I collagen expression and blocks epithelial-myofibroblast transition. In contrast, disruption of SMAD2 upregulates type I collagen expression. SMAD4 plays an essential role in fibrosis disease by enhancing SMAD3 responsive promoter activity, whereas SMAD7 negatively mediates SMAD3-induced fibrogenesis. Accumulating evidence suggests that divergent miRNAs participate in the liver fibrotic process, which partially regulates members of the TGF-β/SMAD signaling pathway. In this review, we focus on the TGF-β/SMAD and other relative signaling pathways, and discussed the role and molecular mechanisms of TGF-β/SMAD in the pathogenesis of hepatic fibrosis. Moreover, we address the possibility of novel therapeutic approaches to hepatic fibrosis by targeting to TGF-β/SMAD signaling.

  1. Thermodynamic basis for redox regulation of the Yap1 signal transduction pathway.

    PubMed

    Mason, Jeremy T; Kim, Sung-Kun; Knaff, David B; Wood, Matthew J

    2006-11-14

    The Yap1 oxidative stress signal transduction pathway found in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is redox-regulated. We have examined the thermodynamic basis of the disulfide/dithiol couples that are involved in the regulation of this pathway. The oxidized form of the Yap1 redox domain (Yap1-RD) fragment, derived from the Yap1 transcription factor, contains two disulfide bonds, one between Cys303 and Cys598 and one between Cys310 and Cys629. Oxidation-reduction titrations reveal the presence of two separate two-electron redox couples in Yap1-RD, with redox midpoint potentials (E(m)) of -155 and -330 mV, respectively, at pH 7.0. We measured E(m) values of -275 and -265 mV for the two cytoplasmic S. cerevisiae thioredoxins, Trx1 and Trx2, respectively, both at pH 7.0. Last, we measured an E(m) value of -255 mV for the Cys36-Cys82 disulfide bond at pH 6.0 in the glutathione peroxidase-like enzyme, oxidant receptor protein (Orp1). We were unable to obtain satisfactory redox titration data for Orp1 at pH 7.0, but if the redox-active disulfide of Orp1 exhibits the -59 mV per pH unit dependence for E(m) typical of protein disulfides in this pH region, an E(m) value of -315 mV can be estimated for Orp1 at pH 7.0 by extrapolation. Together, these data suggest that, at physiological ratios of Trx(ox)/Trx(red), the reduction of both the E(m) = -315 mV disulfide of Orp1 and the E(m) = -330 mV disulfide of Yap1 by either Trx1 or Trx2 would be thermodynamically possible. PMID:17087494

  2. The Akt1/IL-6/STAT3 pathway regulates growth of lung tumor initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Malanga, Donatella; De Marco, Carmela; Guerriero, Ilaria; Colelli, Fabiana; Rinaldo, Nicola; Scrima, Marianna; Mirante, Teresa; De Vitis, Claudia; Zoppoli, Pietro; Ceccarelli, Michele; Riccardi, Miriam; Ravo, Maria; Weisz, Alessandro; Federico, Antonella; Franco, Renato; Rocco, Gaetano; Mancini, Rita; Rizzuto, Antonia; Gulletta, Elio; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Viglietto, Giuseppe

    2015-12-15

    Here we report that the PI3K/Akt1/IL-6/STAT3 signalling pathway regulates generation and stem cell-like properties of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) tumor initiating cells (TICs). Mutant Akt1, mutant PIK3CA or PTEN loss enhances formation of lung cancer spheroids (LCS), self-renewal, expression of stemness markers and tumorigenic potential of human immortalized bronchial cells (BEAS-2B) whereas Akt inhibition suppresses these activities in established (NCI-H460) and primary NSCLC cells. Matched microarray analysis of Akt1-interfered cells and LCSs identified IL-6 as a critical target of Akt signalling in NSCLC TICs. Accordingly, suppression of Akt in NSCLC cells decreases IL-6 levels, phosphorylation of IkK and IkB, NF-kB transcriptional activity, phosphorylation and transcriptional activity of STAT3 whereas active Akt1 up-regulates them. Exposure of LCSs isolated from NSCLC cells to blocking anti-IL-6 mAbs, shRNA to IL-6 receptor or to STAT3 markedly reduces the capability to generate LCSs, to self-renew and to form tumors, whereas administration of IL-6 to Akt-interfered cells restores the capability to generate LCSs. Finally, immunohistochemical studies in NSCLC patients demonstrated a positive correlative trend between activated Akt, IL-6 expression and STAT3 phosphorylation (n = 94; p < 0.05). In conclusion, our data indicate that aberrant Akt signalling contributes to maintaining stemness in lung cancer TICs through a NF-kB/IL-6/STAT3 pathway and provide novel potential therapeutic targets for eliminating these malignant cells in NSCLC.

  3. Differential regulation of the Hippo pathway by adherens junctions and apical–basal cell polarity modules

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chih-Chao; Graves, Hillary K.; Moya, Ivan M.; Tao, Chunyao; Hamaratoglu, Fisun; Gladden, Andrew B.; Halder, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Adherens junctions (AJs) and cell polarity complexes are key players in the establishment and maintenance of apical–basal cell polarity. Loss of AJs or basolateral polarity components promotes tumor formation and metastasis. Recent studies in vertebrate models show that loss of AJs or loss of the basolateral component Scribble (Scrib) cause deregulation of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway and hyperactivation of its downstream effectors Yes-associated protein (YAP) and Transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ). However, whether AJs and Scrib act through the same or independent mechanisms to regulate Hippo pathway activity is not known. Here, we dissect how disruption of AJs or loss of basolateral components affect the activity of the Drosophila YAP homolog Yorkie (Yki) during imaginal disc development. Surprisingly, disruption of AJs and loss of basolateral proteins produced very different effects on Yki activity. Yki activity was cell-autonomously decreased but non–cell-autonomously elevated in tissues where the AJ components E-cadherin (E-cad) or α-catenin (α-cat) were knocked down. In contrast, scrib knockdown caused a predominantly cell-autonomous activation of Yki. Moreover, disruption of AJs or basolateral proteins had different effects on cell polarity and tissue size. Simultaneous knockdown of α-cat and scrib induced both cell-autonomous and non–cell-autonomous Yki activity. In mammalian cells, knockdown of E-cad or α-cat caused nuclear accumulation and activation of YAP without overt effects on Scrib localization and vice versa. Therefore, our results indicate the existence of multiple, genetically separable inputs from AJs and cell polarity complexes into Yki/YAP regulation. PMID:25624491

  4. The Akt1/IL-6/STAT3 pathway regulates growth of lung tumor initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Malanga, Donatella; De Marco, Carmela; Guerriero, Ilaria; Colelli, Fabiana; Rinaldo, Nicola; Scrima, Marianna; Mirante, Teresa; De Vitis, Claudia; Zoppoli, Pietro; Ceccarelli, Michele; Riccardi, Miriam; Ravo, Maria; Weisz, Alessandro; Federico, Antonella; Franco, Renato; Rocco, Gaetano; Mancini, Rita; Rizzuto, Antonia; Gulletta, Elio; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Viglietto, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Here we report that the PI3K/Akt1/IL-6/STAT3 signalling pathway regulates generation and stem cell-like properties of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) tumor initiating cells (TICs). Mutant Akt1, mutant PIK3CA or PTEN loss enhances formation of lung cancer spheroids (LCS), self-renewal, expression of stemness markers and tumorigenic potential of human immortalized bronchial cells (BEAS-2B) whereas Akt inhibition suppresses these activities in established (NCI-H460) and primary NSCLC cells. Matched microarray analysis of Akt1-interfered cells and LCSs identified IL-6 as a critical target of Akt signalling in NSCLC TICs. Accordingly, suppression of Akt in NSCLC cells decreases IL-6 levels, phosphorylation of IkK and IkB, NF-kB transcriptional activity, phosphorylation and transcriptional activity of STAT3 whereas active Akt1 up-regulates them. Exposure of LCSs isolated from NSCLC cells to blocking anti-IL-6 mAbs, shRNA to IL-6 receptor or to STAT3 markedly reduces the capability to generate LCSs, to self-renew and to form tumors, whereas administration of IL-6 to Akt-interfered cells restores the capability to generate LCSs. Finally, immunohistochemical studies in NSCLC patients demonstrated a positive correlative trend between activated Akt, IL-6 expression and STAT3 phosphorylation (n = 94; p < 0.05). In conclusion, our data indicate that aberrant Akt signalling contributes to maintaining stemness in lung cancer TICs through a NF-kB/IL-6/STAT3 pathway and provide novel potential therapeutic targets for eliminating these malignant cells in NSCLC. PMID:26486080

  5. The proprotein convertase PC1/3 regulates TLR9 trafficking and the associated signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Duhamel, M; Rodet, F; Murgoci, A N; Desjardins, R; Gagnon, H; Wisztorski, M; Fournier, I; Day, R; Salzet, M

    2016-01-01

    Endosomal TLR9 is considered as a potent anti-tumoral therapeutic target. Therefore, it is crucial to decipher the mechanisms controlling its trafficking since it determines TLR9 activation and signalling. At present, the scarcity of molecular information regarding the control of this trafficking and signalling is noticeable. We have recently demonstrated that in macrophages, proprotein convertase 1/3 (PC1/3) is a key regulator of TLR4 Myd88-dependent signalling. In the present study, we established that PC1/3 also regulates the endosomal TLR9. Under CpG-ODN challenge, we found that PC1/3 traffics rapidly to co-localize with TLR9 in CpG-ODN-containing endosomes with acidic pH. In PC1/3 knockdown macrophages, compartmentalization of TLR9 was altered and TLR9 clustered in multivesicular bodies (MVB) as demonstrated by co-localization with Rab7. This demonstrates that PC1/3 controls TLR9 trafficking. This clustering of TLR9 in MVB dampened the anti-inflammatory STAT3 signalling pathway while it promoted the pro-inflammatory NF-kB pathway. As a result, macrophages from PC1/3 KO mice and rat PC1/3-KD NR8383 macrophages secreted more pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL6, IL1α and CXCL2. This is indicative of a M1 pro-inflammatory phenotype. Therefore, PC1/3 KD macrophages represent a relevant mean for cell therapy as "Trojan" macrophages. PMID:26778167

  6. Differential regulation of the Hippo pathway by adherens junctions and apical-basal cell polarity modules.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chih-Chao; Graves, Hillary K; Moya, Ivan M; Tao, Chunyao; Hamaratoglu, Fisun; Gladden, Andrew B; Halder, Georg

    2015-02-10

    Adherens junctions (AJs) and cell polarity complexes are key players in the establishment and maintenance of apical-basal cell polarity. Loss of AJs or basolateral polarity components promotes tumor formation and metastasis. Recent studies in vertebrate models show that loss of AJs or loss of the basolateral component Scribble (Scrib) cause deregulation of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway and hyperactivation of its downstream effectors Yes-associated protein (YAP) and Transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ). However, whether AJs and Scrib act through the same or independent mechanisms to regulate Hippo pathway activity is not known. Here, we dissect how disruption of AJs or loss of basolateral components affect the activity of the Drosophila YAP homolog Yorkie (Yki) during imaginal disc development. Surprisingly, disruption of AJs and loss of basolateral proteins produced very different effects on Yki activity. Yki activity was cell-autonomously decreased but non-cell-autonomously elevated in tissues where the AJ components E-cadherin (E-cad) or α-catenin (α-cat) were knocked down. In contrast, scrib knockdown caused a predominantly cell-autonomous activation of Yki. Moreover, disruption of AJs or basolateral proteins had different effects on cell polarity and tissue size. Simultaneous knockdown of α-cat and scrib induced both cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous Yki activity. In mammalian cells, knockdown of E-cad or α-cat caused nuclear accumulation and activation of YAP without overt effects on Scrib localization and vice versa. Therefore, our results indicate the existence of multiple, genetically separable inputs from AJs and cell polarity complexes into Yki/YAP regulation.

  7. Activity-Dependent Regulation of Substance P Expression and Topographic Map Maintenance by a Cholinergic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Shichun; Butt, Christopher M.; Pauly, James R.; Debski, Elizabeth A.

    2008-01-01

    We have assessed the role of activity in the adult frog visual system in modulating two aspects of neuronal plasticity: neurotransmitter expression and topographic map maintenance. Chronic treatment of one tectal lobe with the non-NMDA receptor antagonist, 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione decreased the percentage of substance P-like immunoreactive (SP-IR) tectal cells in the untreated lobe while disrupting topographic map formation in the treated one. Treatment with the NMDA receptor antagonist d-(−)-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (d-AP-5) disrupted the topographic map but had no affect on SP-IR cells. These results indicate that maintenance of the topographic map is dependent on direct input from the glutamatergic retinal ganglion cells, whereas substance P (SP) expression is being regulated by a pathway that relays activity from one tectal lobe to the other. Such a pathway is provided by the cholinergic nucleus isthmi, which is reciprocally connected to the ipsilateral tectum and sends a projection to the contralateral one. Mecamylamine and atropine, antagonists of nicotinic and muscarinic receptors, respectively, were used together to block all cholinergic activity or alone to block receptor subclass activity. All three treatments decreased SP expression and disrupted the topographic map in the treated tectal lobe. We conclude that both SP expression and topographic map maintenance in the adult optic tectum are activity-dependent processes. Although our results are consistent with the maintenance of the topographic map through an NMDA receptor-based mechanism, they suggest that SP expression is regulated by a cholinergic interaction that depends on retinal ganglion cell input only for its activation. PMID:10884319

  8. Regulation of the PI3-K/Akt survival pathway in the rat endometrium.

    PubMed

    Veillette, Annabelle; Grenier, Kathy; Brasseur, Kevin; Fréchette-Frigon, Guylaine; Leblanc, Valérie; Parent, Sophie; Asselin, Eric

    2013-03-01

    The occurrence of apoptosis and cell survival in the receptive uterus is intimately involved in the embryo implantation process in order to facilitate embryo attachment to the maternal endometrium. The initial stimulus leading to successful implantation might be triggered by the conceptus itself. By the end of rat embryo implantation, decidualization begins, followed by the regression of the decidua basalis on Day 14. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K) survival pathway and TGF-beta have been thought to play a role in this process. The objective of the present study was to investigate the regulation of the PI3-K/PTEN/Akt pathway in rat endometrium during pregnancy. Rats were killed on different days of pregnancy (Day 1-22 and postpartum) or pseudopregnancy (Day 1-9), and uteri were removed to collect endometrial tissues. The active form of Akt (pAkt) was increased at Day 5 of pregnancy and at Day 3 of pseudopregnancy as well as at Day 12 of pregnancy and at Day 1 postpartum. Of the three Akt isoforms (Akt1, Akt2, and Akt3), Akt3 was the only isoform phosphorylated at Day 5 during the implantation process and at postpartum as demonstrated by immunoprecipitation studies. PI3-K inhibition in vivo blocked Akt phosphorylation, reduced Smad2 phosphorylation, and reduced both TGF-beta2 and XIAP expression. PI3-K inhibition in cultured decidual cells led to inhibition of pAkt and decrease XIAP expression. These results suggest that Akt and XIAP may be important surviving signaling molecules by which apoptosis is regulated in the rat endometrium during pregnancy and that TGF-beta could be linked to this process.

  9. Berberine regulates AMP-activated protein kinase signaling pathways and inhibits colon tumorigenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Weidong; Hua, Baojin; Saud, Shakir M; Lin, Hongsheng; Hou, Wei; Matter, Matthias S; Jia, Libin; Colburn, Nancy H; Young, Matthew R

    2015-10-01

    Colorectal cancer, a leading cause of cancer death, has been linked to inflammation and obesity. Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, possesses anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetes and anti-tumor properties. In the azoxymethane initiated and dextran sulfate sodium (AOM/DSS) promoted colorectal carcinogenesis mouse model, berberine treated mice showed a 60% reduction in tumor number (P = 0.009), a 48% reduction in tumors <2 mm, (P = 0.05); 94% reduction in tumors 2-4 mm, (P = 0.001), and 100% reduction in tumors >4 mm (P = 0.02) compared to vehicle treated mice. Berberine also decreased AOM/DSS induced Ki-67 and COX-2 expression. In vitro analysis showed that in addition to its anti-proliferation activity, berberine also induced apoptosis in colorectal cancer cell lines. Berberine activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a major regulator of metabolic pathways, and inhibited mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a downstream target of AMPK. Furthermore, 4E-binding protein-1 and p70 ribosomal S6 kinases, downstream targets of mTOR, were down regulated by berberine treatment. Berberine did not affect Liver kinase B1 (LKB1) activity or the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Berberine inhibited Nuclear Factor kappa-B (NF-κB) activity, reduced the expression of cyclin D1 and survivin, induced phosphorylation of p53 and increased caspase-3 cleavage in vitro. Berberine inhibition of mTOR activity and p53 phosphorylation was found to be AMPK dependent, while inhibition NF-κB was AMPK independent. In vivo, berberine also activated AMPK, inhibited mTOR and p65 phosphorylation and activated caspase-3 cleavage. Our data suggests that berberine suppresses colon epithelial proliferation and tumorigenesis via AMPK dependent inhibition of mTOR activity and AMPK independent inhibition of NF-κB.

  10. Rac regulation of transformation, gene expression, and actin organization by multiple, PAK-independent pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Westwick, J K; Lambert, Q T; Clark, G J; Symons, M; Van Aelst, L; Pestell, R G; Der, C J

    1997-01-01

    Rac1 and RhoA are members of the Rho family of Ras-related proteins and function as regulators of actin cytoskeletal organization, gene expression, and cell cycle progression. Constitutive activation of Rac1 and RhoA causes tumorigenic transformation of NIH 3T3 cells, and their functions may be required for full Ras transformation. The effectors by which Rac1 and RhoA mediate these diverse activities, as well as the interrelationship between these events, remain poorly understood. Rac1 is distinct from RhoA in its ability to bind and activate the p65 PAK serine/threonine kinase, to induce lamellipodia and membrane ruffling, and to activate the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK). To assess the role of PAK in Rac1 function, we identified effector domain mutants of Rac1 and Rac1-RhoA chimeric proteins that no longer bound PAK. Surprisingly, PAK binding was dispensable for Rac1-induced transformation and lamellipodium formation, as well as activation of JNK, p38, and serum response factor (SRF). However, the ability of Rac1 to bind to and activate PAK correlated with its ability to stimulate transcription from the cyclin D1 promoter. Furthermore, Rac1 activation of JNK or SRF, or induction of lamellipodia, was neither necessary nor sufficient for Rac1 transforming activity. Finally, the signaling pathways that mediate Rac1 activation of SRF or JNK were distinct from those that mediate Rac1 induction of lamellipodia. Taken together, these observations suggest that Rac1 regulates at least four distinct effector-mediated functions and that multiple pathways may contribute to Rac1-induced cellular transformation. PMID:9032259

  11. The proprotein convertase PC1/3 regulates TLR9 trafficking and the associated signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Duhamel, M.; Rodet, F.; Murgoci, A. N.; Desjardins, R.; Gagnon, H.; Wisztorski, M.; Fournier, I.; Day, R.; Salzet, M.

    2016-01-01

    Endosomal TLR9 is considered as a potent anti-tumoral therapeutic target. Therefore, it is crucial to decipher the mechanisms controlling its trafficking since it determines TLR9 activation and signalling. At present, the scarcity of molecular information regarding the control of this trafficking and signalling is noticeable. We have recently demonstrated that in macrophages, proprotein convertase 1/3 (PC1/3) is a key regulator of TLR4 Myd88-dependent signalling. In the present study, we established that PC1/3 also regulates the endosomal TLR9. Under CpG-ODN challenge, we found that PC1/3 traffics rapidly to co-localize with TLR9 in CpG-ODN-containing endosomes with acidic pH. In PC1/3 knockdown macrophages, compartmentalization of TLR9 was altered and TLR9 clustered in multivesicular bodies (MVB) as demonstrated by co-localization with Rab7. This demonstrates that PC1/3 controls TLR9 trafficking. This clustering of TLR9 in MVB dampened the anti-inflammatory STAT3 signalling pathway while it promoted the pro-inflammatory NF-kB pathway. As a result, macrophages from PC1/3 KO mice and rat PC1/3-KD NR8383 macrophages secreted more pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL6, IL1α and CXCL2. This is indicative of a M1 pro-inflammatory phenotype. Therefore, PC1/3 KD macrophages represent a relevant mean for cell therapy as “Trojan” macrophages. PMID:26778167

  12. Extending the translational potential of targeting NO/cGMP-regulated pathways in the CVS

    PubMed Central

    Papapetropoulos, Andreas; Hobbs, Adrian J; Topouzis, Stavros

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of NO as both an endogenous signalling molecule and as a mediator of the cardiovascular effects of organic nitrates was acknowledged in 1998 by the Nobel Prize in Physiology/Medicine. The characterization of its downstream signalling, mediated through stimulation of soluble GC (sGC) and cGMP generation, initiated significant translational interest, but until recently this was almost exclusively embodied by the use of PDE5 inhibitors in erectile dysfunction. Since then, research progress in two areas has contributed to an impressive expansion of the therapeutic targeting of the NO-sGC-cGMP axis: first, an increased understanding of the molecular events operating within this complex pathway and second, a better insight into its dys-regulation and uncoupling in human disease. Already-approved PDE5 inhibitors and novel, first-in-class molecules, which up-regulate the activity of sGC independently of NO and/or of the enzyme's haem prosthetic group, are undergoing clinical evaluation to treat pulmonary hypertension and myocardial failure. These molecules, as well as combinations or second-generation compounds, are also being assessed in additional experimental disease models and in patients in a wide spectrum of novel indications, such as endotoxic shock, diabetic cardiomyopathy and Becker's muscular dystrophy. There is well-founded optimism that the modulation of the NO-sGC-cGMP pathway will sustain the development of an increasing number of successful clinical candidates for years to come. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Pharmacology of the Gasotransmitters. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue–6 PMID:25302549

  13. Parathyroid hormone-dependent signaling pathways regulating genes in bone cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swarthout, John T.; D'Alonzo, Richard C.; Selvamurugan, Nagarajan; Partridge, Nicola C.

    2002-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is an 84-amino-acid polypeptide hormone functioning as a major mediator of bone remodeling and as an essential regulator of calcium homeostasis. PTH and PTH-related protein (PTHrP) indirectly activate osteoclasts resulting in increased bone resorption. During this process, PTH changes the phenotype of the osteoblast from a cell involved in bone formation to one directing bone resorption. In addition to these catabolic effects, PTH has been demonstrated to be an anabolic factor in skeletal tissue and in vitro. As a result, PTH has potential medical application to the treatment of osteoporosis, since intermittent administration of PTH stimulates bone formation. Activation of osteoblasts by PTH results in expression of genes important for the degradation of the extracellular matrix, production of growth factors, and stimulation and recruitment of osteoclasts. The ability of PTH to drive changes in gene expression is dependent upon activation of transcription factors such as the activator protein-1 family, RUNX2, and cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). Much of the regulation of these processes by PTH is protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent. However, while PKA is linked to many of the changes in gene expression directed by PTH, PKA activation has been shown to inhibit mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and proliferation of osteoblasts. It is now known that stimulation of MAPK and proliferation by PTH at low concentrations is protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent in both osteoblastic and kidney cells. Furthermore, PTH has been demonstrated to regulate components of the cell cycle. However, whether this regulation requires PKC and/or extracellular signal-regulated kinases or whether PTH is able to stimulate other components of the cell cycle is unknown. It is possible that stimulation of this signaling pathway by PTH mediates a unique pattern of gene expression resulting in proliferation in osteoblastic and kidney cells; however, specific

  14. Parathyroid hormone-dependent signaling pathways regulating genes in bone cells.

    PubMed

    Swarthout, John T; D'Alonzo, Richard C; Selvamurugan, Nagarajan; Partridge, Nicola C

    2002-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is an 84-amino-acid polypeptide hormone functioning as a major mediator of bone remodeling and as an essential regulator of calcium homeostasis. PTH and PTH-related protein (PTHrP) indirectly activate osteoclasts resulting in increased bone resorption. During this process, PTH changes the phenotype of the osteoblast from a cell involved in bone formation to one directing bone resorption. In addition to these catabolic effects, PTH has been demonstrated to be an anabolic factor in skeletal tissue and in vitro. As a result, PTH has potential medical application to the treatment of osteoporosis, since intermittent administration of PTH stimulates bone formation. Activation of osteoblasts by PTH results in expression of genes important for the degradation of the extracellular matrix, production of growth factors, and stimulation and recruitment of osteoclasts. The ability of PTH to drive changes in gene expression is dependent upon activation of transcription factors such as the activator protein-1 family, RUNX2, and cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). Much of the regulation of these processes by PTH is protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent. However, while PKA is linked to many of the changes in gene expression directed by PTH, PKA activation has been shown to inhibit mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and proliferation of osteoblasts. It is now known that stimulation of MAPK and proliferation by PTH at low concentrations is protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent in both osteoblastic and kidney cells. Furthermore, PTH has been demonstrated to regulate components of the cell cycle. However, whether this regulation requires PKC and/or extracellular signal-regulated kinases or whether PTH is able to stimulate other components of the cell cycle is unknown. It is possible that stimulation of this signaling pathway by PTH mediates a unique pattern of gene expression resulting in proliferation in osteoblastic and kidney cells; however, specific

  15. Protein Analysis of Sapienic Acid-Treated Porphyromonas gingivalis Suggests Differential Regulation of Multiple Metabolic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Deborah V.; Blanchette, Derek R.; Drake, David R.; Wertz, Philip W.; Brogden, Kim A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lipids endogenous to skin and mucosal surfaces exhibit potent antimicrobial activity against Porphyromonas gingivalis, an important colonizer of the oral cavity implicated in periodontitis. Our previous work demonstrated the antimicrobial activity of the fatty acid sapienic acid (C16:1Δ6) against P. gingivalis and found that sapienic acid treatment alters both protein and lipid composition from those in controls. In this study, we further examined whole-cell protein differences between sapienic acid-treated bacteria and untreated controls, and we utilized open-source functional association and annotation programs to explore potential mechanisms for the antimicrobial activity of sapienic acid. Our analyses indicated that sapienic acid treatment induces a unique stress response in P. gingivalis resulting in differential expression of proteins involved in a variety of metabolic pathways. This network of differentially regulated proteins was enriched in protein-protein interactions (P = 2.98 × 10−8), including six KEGG pathways (P value ranges, 2.30 × 10−5 to 0.05) and four Gene Ontology (GO) molecular functions (P value ranges, 0.02 to 0.04), with multiple suggestive enriched relationships in KEGG pathways and GO molecular functions. Upregulated metabolic pathways suggest increases in energy production, lipid metabolism, iron acquisition and processing, and respiration. Combined with a suggested preferential metabolism of serine, which is necessary for fatty acid biosynthesis, these data support our previous findings that the site of sapienic acid antimicrobial activity is likely at the bacterial membrane. IMPORTANCE P. gingivalis is an important opportunistic pathogen implicated in periodontitis. Affecting nearly 50% of the population, periodontitis is treatable, but the resulting damage is irreversible and eventually progresses to tooth loss. There is a great need for natural products that can be used to treat and/or prevent the overgrowth of

  16. Regulating ehrlich and demethiolation pathways for alcohols production by the expression of ubiquitin-protein ligase gene HUWE1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Quan; Jia, Kai-Zhi; Xia, Shi-Tao; Xu, Yang-Hua; Liu, Rui-Sang; Li, Hong-Mei; Tang, Ya-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Ehrlich and demethiolation pathways as two competing branches converted amino acid into alcohols. Controlling both pathways offers considerable potential for industrial applications including alcohols overproduction, flavor-quality control and developing new flavors. While how to regulate ehrlich and demethiolation pathways is still not applicable. Taking the conversion of methionine into methionol and methanethiol for example, we constructed two suppression subtractive cDNA libraries of Clonostachys rosea by using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) technology for screening regulators controlling the conversion. E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase gene HUWE1 screened from forward SSH library was validated to be related with the biosynthesis of end products. Overexpressing HUWE1 in C. rosea and S. cerevisiae significantly increased the biosynthesis of methanethiol and its derivatives in demethiolation pathway, while suppressed the biosynthesis of methional and methionol in ehrlich pathway. These results attained the directional regulation of both pathways by overexpressing HUWE1. Thus, HUWE1 has potential to be a key target for controlling and enhancing alcohols production by metabolic engineering. PMID:26860895

  17. Effect of surface chemistry on the integrin induced pathway in regulating vascular endothelial cells migration.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yang; Gao, Min; Ma, Yunlong; Yu, Hongchi; Cui, Fu-zhai; Gregersen, Hans; Yu, Qingsong; Wang, Guixue; Liu, Xiaoheng

    2015-02-01

    The migration of vascular endothelial cells (ECs) is essential for reendothelialization after implantation of cardiovascular biomaterials. Reendothelialization is largely determined by surface properties of implants. In this study, surfaces modified with various chemical functional groups (CH3, NH2, COOH, OH) prepared by self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) were used as model system. Expressions and distributions of critical proteins in the integrin-induced signaling pathway were examined to explore the mechanisms of surface chemistry regulating EC migration. The results showed that SAMs modulated cell migration were in the order CH3>NH2>OH>COOH, determined by differences in the expressions of focal adhesion components and Rho GTPases. Multiple integrin subunits showed difference in a surface chemistry-dependent manner, which induced a stepwise activation of signaling cascades associated with EC migration. This work provides a broad overview of surface chemistry regulated endothelial cell migration and establishes association among the surface chemistry, cell migration behavior and associated integrin signaling events. Understanding the relationship between these factors will help us to understand the surface/interface behavior between biomaterials and cells, reveal molecular mechanism of cells sensing surface characterization, and guide surface modification of cardiovascular implanted materials. PMID:25575348

  18. Regulation and Disregulation of Mammalian Nucleotide Excision Repair: a Pathway to Non-germline Breast Carcinogenesis†

    PubMed Central

    Latimer, Jean J.; Majekwana, Vongai J.; Pabón-Padín, Yashira R.; Pimpley, Manasi R.; Grant, Stephen G.

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is important as a modulator of disease, especially in constitutive deficiencies, such as the cancer predisposition syndrome Xeroderma pigmentosum. We have found profound variation of NER capacity among normal individuals, between cell-types and during carcinogenesis. NER is a repair system for many types of DNA damage, and therefore many types of genotoxic carcinogenic exposures, including ultraviolet light, products of organic combustion, metals, oxidative stress, etc. Since NER is intimately related to cellular metabolism, requiring components of both the DNA replicative and transcription machinery, it has a narrow range of functional viability. Thus, genes in the NER pathway are expressed at the low levels manifested by, for example, nuclear transcription factors. Since NER activity and gene expression vary by cell-type, it is inherently epigenetically regulated. Furthermore, this epigenetic regulation is disregulated during sporadic breast carcinogenesis. Loss of NER is one basis of genomic instability, a required element in cellular transformation, and one that potentially modulates response to therapy. In this paper, we demonstrate differences in NER capacity in eight adult mouse tissues, and place this result into the context of our previous work on mouse extraembryonic tissues, normal human tissues and sporadic early stage human breast cancer. PMID:25393451

  19. SMN regulates axonal local translation via miR-183/mTOR pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kye, Min Jeong; Niederst, Emily D.; Wertz, Mary H.; Gonçalves, Inês do Carmo G.; Akten, Bikem; Dover, Katarzyna Z.; Peters, Miriam; Riessland, Markus; Neveu, Pierre; Wirth, Brunhilde; Kosik, Kenneth S.; Sardi, S. Pablo; Monani, Umrao R.; Passini, Marco A.; Sahin, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Reduced expression of SMN protein causes spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a neurodegenerative disorder leading to motor neuron dysfunction and loss. However, the molecular mechanisms by which SMN regulates neuronal dysfunction are not fully understood. Here, we report that reduced SMN protein level alters miRNA expression and distribution in neurons. In particular, miR-183 levels are increased in neurites of SMN-deficient neurons. We demonstrate that miR-183 regulates translation of mTor via direct binding to its 3′ UTR. Interestingly, local axonal translation of mTor is reduced in SMN-deficient neurons, and this can be recovered by miR-183 inhibition. Finally, inhibition of miR-183 expression in the spinal cord of an SMA mouse model prolongs survival and improves motor function of Smn-mutant mice. Together, these observations suggest that axonal miRNAs and the mTOR pathway are previously unidentified molecular mechanisms contributing to SMA pathology. PMID:25055867

  20. The Abl/Enabled signaling pathway regulates Golgi architecture in Drosophila photoreceptor neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Ramakrishnan; Kuzina, Irina; Wincovitch, Stephen; Nowotarski, Stephanie H.; Giniger, Edward

    2014-01-01

    The Golgi apparatus is optimized separately in different tissues for efficient protein trafficking, but we know little of how cell signaling shapes this organelle. We now find that the Abl tyrosine kinase signaling pathway controls the architecture of the Golgi complex in Drosophila photoreceptor (PR) neurons. The Abl effector, Enabled (Ena), selectively labels the cis-Golgi in developing PRs. Overexpression or loss of function of Ena increases the number of cis- and trans-Golgi cisternae per cell, and Ena overexpression also redistributes Golgi to the most basal portion of the cell soma. Loss of Abl or its upstream regulator, the adaptor protein Disabled, lead to the same alterations of Golgi as does overexpression of Ena. The increase in Golgi number in Abl mutants arises in part from increased frequency of Golgi fission events and a decrease in fusions, as revealed by live imaging. Finally, we demonstrate that the effects of Abl signaling on Golgi are mediated via regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. Together, these data reveal a direct link between cell signaling and Golgi architecture. Moreover, they raise the possibility that some of the effects of Abl signaling may arise, in part, from alterations of protein trafficking and secretion. PMID:25103244

  1. An Ancient Bacterial Signaling Pathway Regulates Chloroplast Function to Influence Growth and Development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sugliani, Matteo; Abdelkefi, Hela; Ke, Hang; Bouveret, Emmanuelle; Robaglia, Christophe; Caffarri, Stefano; Field, Ben

    2016-03-01

    The chloroplast originated from the endosymbiosis of an ancient photosynthetic bacterium by a eukaryotic cell. Remarkably, the chloroplast has retained elements of a bacterial stress response pathway that is mediated by the signaling nucleotides guanosine penta- and tetraphosphate (ppGpp). However, an understanding of the mechanism and outcomes of ppGpp signaling in the photosynthetic eukaryotes has remained elusive. Using the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, we show that ppGpp is a potent regulator of chloroplast gene expression in vivo that directly reduces the quantity of chloroplast transcripts and chloroplast-encoded proteins. We then go on to demonstrate that the antagonistic functions of different plant RelA SpoT homologs together modulate ppGpp levels to regulate chloroplast function and show that they are required for optimal plant growth, chloroplast volume, and chloroplast breakdown during dark-induced and developmental senescence. Therefore, our results show that ppGpp signaling is not only linked to stress responses in plants but is also an important mediator of cooperation between the chloroplast and the nucleocytoplasmic compartment during plant growth and development.

  2. Chemical genetics reveals negative regulation of abscisic acid signaling by a plant immune response pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Houn; Hauser, Felix; Ha, Tracy; Xue, Shaowu; Böhmer, Maik; Nishimura, Noriyuki; Munemasa, Shintaro; Hubbard, Katharine; Peine, Nora; Lee, Byeong-Ha; Lee, Stephen; Robert, Nadia; Parker, Jane E; Schroeder, Julian I

    2011-06-01

    Coordinated regulation of protection mechanisms against environmental abiotic stress and pathogen attack is essential for plant adaptation and survival. Initial abiotic stress can interfere with disease-resistance signaling [1-6]. Conversely, initial plant immune signaling may interrupt subsequent abscisic acid (ABA) signal transduction [7, 8]. However, the processes involved in this crosstalk between these signaling networks have not been determined. By screening a 9600-compound chemical library, we identified a small molecule [5-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)furan-2-yl]-piperidine-1-ylmethanethione (DFPM) that rapidly downregulates ABA-dependent gene expression and also inhibits ABA-induced stomatal closure. Transcriptome analyses show that DFPM also stimulates expression of plant defense-related genes. Major early regulators of pathogen-resistance responses, including EDS1, PAD4, RAR1, and SGT1b, are required for DFPM-and notably also for Pseudomonas-interference with ABA signal transduction, whereas salicylic acid, EDS16, and NPR1 are not necessary. Although DFPM does not interfere with early ABA perception by PYR/RCAR receptors or ABA activation of SnRK2 kinases, it disrupts cytosolic Ca(2+) signaling and downstream anion channel activation in a PAD4-dependent manner. Our findings provide evidence that activation of EDS1/PAD4-dependent plant immune responses rapidly disrupts ABA signal transduction and that this occurs at the level of Ca(2+) signaling, illuminating how the initial biotic stress pathway interferes with ABA signaling.

  3. Redox and trace metal regulation of ion channels in the pain pathway

    PubMed Central

    Evans, J. Grayson; Todorovic, Slobodan M.

    2015-01-01

    Given the clinical significance of pain disorders and the relative ineffectiveness of current therapeutics, it is important to identify alternative means of modulating nociception. The most obvious pharmacological targets are the ion channels that facilitate nervous transmission from pain sensors in the periphery to the processing regions within the brain and spinal cord. In order to design effective pharmacological tools for this purpose, however, it is first necessary to understand how these channels are regulated. A growing area of research involves the investigation of the role that trace metals and endogenous redox agents play in modulating the activity of a diverse group of ion channels within the pain pathway. In the present review, the most recent literature concerning trace metal and redox regulation of T-type calcium channels, NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptors, GABAA (γ-aminobutyric acid A) receptors and TRP (transient receptor potential) channels are described to gain a comprehensive understanding of the current state of the field as well as to provide a basis for future thought and experimentation. PMID:26341484

  4. Nanog-like Regulates Endoderm Formation through the Mxtx2-Nodal Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Cong; Fan, Zi Peng; Müller, Patrick; Fogley, Rachel; DiBiase, Anthony; Trompouki, Eirini; Unternaehrer, Juli; Xiong, Fengzhu; Torregroza, Ingrid; Evans, Todd; Megason, Sean G.; Daley, George Q.; Schier, Alexander F.; Young, Richard A.; Zon, Leonard I.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY In mammalian embryonic stem cells, the acquisition of pluripotency is dependent upon Nanog, but the in vivo analysis of Nanog has been hampered by its requirement for early mouse development. In an effort to examine the role of Nanog in vivo, we identified a zebrafish Nanog ortholog, and found that its knockdown impaired endoderm formation. Genome-wide transcription analysis revealed that nanog-like morphants fail to develop the extra-embryonic yolk syncytial layer (YSL), which produces Nodal required for endoderm induction. We examined the genes that were regulated by Nanog-like, and identified the homeobox gene mxtx2, which is both necessary and sufficient for YSL induction. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays and genetic studies indicated that Nanog-like directly activates mxtx2, which in turn specifies the YSL lineage by directly activating YSL genes. Our study identifies a Nanog-like-Mxtx2-Nodal pathway and establishes a role for Nanog-like in regulating the formation of the extra-embryonic tissue required for endoderm induction. PMID:22421047

  5. N-Myristoylation Regulates the SnRK1 Pathway in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Pierre, Michèle; Traverso, José A.; Boisson, Bertrand; Domenichini, Séverine; Bouchez, David; Giglione, Carmela; Meinnel, Thierry

    2007-01-01

    Cotranslational and posttranslational modifications are increasingly recognized as important in the regulation of numerous essential cellular functions. N-myristoylation is a lipid modification ensuring the proper function and intracellular trafficking of proteins involved in many signaling pathways. Arabidopsis thaliana, like human, has two tightly regulated N-myristoyltransferase (NMT) genes, NMT1 and NMT2. Characterization of knockout mutants showed that NMT1 was strictly required for plant viability, whereas NMT2 accelerated flowering. NMT1 impairment induced extremely severe defects in the shoot apical meristem during embryonic development, causing growth arrest after germination. A transgenic plant line with an inducible NMT1 gene demonstrated that NMT1 expression had further effects at later stages. NMT2 did not compensate for NMT1 in the nmt1-1 mutant, but NMT2 overexpression resulted in shoot and root meristem abnormalities. Various data from complementation experiments in the nmt1-1 background, using either yeast or human NMTs, demonstrated a functional link between the developmental arrest of nmt1-1 mutants and the myristoylation state of an extremely small set of protein targets. We show here that protein N-myristoylation is systematically associated with shoot meristem development and that SnRK1 (for SNF1-related kinase) is one of its essential primary targets. PMID:17827350

  6. TH2 and TH17 inflammatory pathways are reciprocally regulated in asthma.

    PubMed

    Choy, David F; Hart, Kevin M; Borthwick, Lee A; Shikotra, Aarti; Nagarkar, Deepti R; Siddiqui, Salman; Jia, Guiquan; Ohri, Chandra M; Doran, Emma; Vannella, Kevin M; Butler, Claire A; Hargadon, Beverley; Sciurba, Joshua C; Gieseck, Richard L; Thompson, Robert W; White, Sandra; Abbas, Alexander R; Jackman, Janet; Wu, Lawren C; Egen, Jackson G; Heaney, Liam G; Ramalingam, Thirumalai R; Arron, Joseph R; Wynn, Thomas A; Bradding, Peter

    2015-08-19

    Increasing evidence suggests that asthma is a heterogeneous disorder regulated by distinct molecular mechanisms. In a cross-sectional study of asthmatics of varying severity (n = 51), endobronchial tissue gene expression analysis revealed three major patient clusters: TH2-high, TH17-high, and TH2/17-low. TH2-high and TH17-high patterns were mutually exclusive in individual patient samples, and their gene signatures were inversely correlated and differentially regulated by interleukin-13 (IL-13) and IL-17A. To understand this dichotomous pattern of T helper 2 (TH2) and TH17 signatures, we investigated the potential of type 2 cytokine suppression in promoting TH17 responses in a preclinical model of allergen-induced asthma. Neutralization of IL-4 and/or IL-13 resulted in increased TH17 cells and neutrophilic inflammation in the lung. However, neutralization of IL-13 and IL-17 protected mice from eosinophilia, mucus hyperplasia, and airway hyperreactivity and abolished the neutrophilic inflammation, suggesting that combination therapies targeting both pathways may maximize therapeutic efficacy across a patient population comprising both TH2 and TH17 endotypes.

  7. Gap Junctions in the Ventral Hippocampal-Medial Prefrontal Pathway Are Involved in Anxiety Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfeld, Timothy J.; Kloth, Alexander D.; Hsueh, Brian; Runkle, Matthew B.; Kane, Gary A.; Wang, Samuel S.-H.

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent but little is known about their underlying mechanisms. Gap junctions exist in brain regions important for anxiety regulation, such as the ventral hippocampus (vHIP) and mPFC, but their functions in these areas have not been investigated. Using pharmacological blockade of neuronal gap junctions combined with electrophysiological recordings, we found that gap junctions play a role in theta rhythm in the vHIP and mPFC of adult mice. Bilateral infusion of neuronal gap junction blockers into the vHIP decreased anxiety-like behavior on the elevated plus maze and open field. Similar anxiolytic effects were observed with unilateral infusion of these drugs into the vHIP combined with contralateral infusion into the mPFC. No change in anxious behavior was observed with gap junction blockade in the unilateral vHIP alone or in the bilateral dorsal HIP. Since physical exercise is known to reduce anxiety, we examined the effects of long-term running on the expression of the neuronal gap junction protein connexin-36 among inhibitory interneurons and found a reduction in the vHIP. Despite this change, we observed no alteration in theta frequency or power in long-term runners. Collectively, these findings suggest that neuronal gap junctions in the vHIP–mPFC pathway are important for theta rhythm and anxiety regulation under sedentary conditions but that additional mechanisms are likely involved in running-induced reduction in anxiety. PMID:25411496

  8. Xenopus Shugoshin 2 regulates the spindle assembly pathway mediated by the chromosomal passenger complex

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Teresa; Ghenoiu, Cristina; Rodríguez-Corsino, Miriam; Mochida, Satoru; Funabiki, Hironori; Losada, Ana

    2012-01-01

    Shugoshins (Sgo) are conserved proteins that act as protectors of centromeric cohesion and as sensors of tension for the machinery that eliminates improper kinetochore–microtubule attachments. Most vertebrates contain two Sgo proteins, but their specific functions are not always clear. Xenopus laevis Sgo1, XSgo1, protects centromeric cohesin from the prophase dissociation pathway. Here, we report the identification of XSgo2 and show that it does not regulate cohesion. Instead, we find that it participates in bipolar spindle assembly. Both Sgo proteins interact physically with the Chromosomal Passenger Complex (CPC) containing Aurora B, a key regulator of mitosis, but the functional consequences of such interaction are distinct. XSgo1 is required for proper localization of the CPC while XSgo2 positively contributes to its activation and the subsequent phosphorylation of at least one key substrate for bipolar spindle assembly, the microtubule depolymerizing kinesin MCAK (Mitotic Centromere-Associated Kinesin). Thus, the two Xenopus Sgo proteins have non-overlapping functions in chromosome segregation. Our results further suggest that this functional specificity could rely on the association of XSgo1 and XSgo2 with different regulatory subunits of the PP2A complex. PMID:22274615

  9. Slug contributes to cancer progression by direct regulation of ERα signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Youqiang; Wu, Yanyuan; Abbatiello, Thomas C; Wu, Warren L; Kim, Ju Ri; Sarkissyan, Marianna; Sarkissyan, Suren; Chung, Seyung S; Elshimali, Yahya; Vadgama, Jaydutt V

    2015-04-01

    Hormone therapy targeting estrogen receptor α (ERα) is the most effective treatment for breast cancer. However, this treatment eventually fails as the tumor develops resistance. Although reduced expression of ER-α is a known contributing factor to endocrine resistance, the mechanism of ER-α downregulation in endocrine resistance is still not fully understood. The present study shows that Slug has an inverse relationship with ERα in breast and prostate cancer patient samples. Also the inhibition of Slug blocks mammary stem cell activity in primary mammary epithelial cells. We hypothesize that Slug may be a key transcription factor in the regulation of ERα expression. To understand the Slug-ERα signaling pathway, we employed resistant cell line MCF-TAMR (ERα relatively negative) derived from its parental MCF-7 (ERα positive) cell line and assessed changes in cell phenotype, activity and response to therapy. Conversely, we performed knockdown of Slug in the high-Slug expressing cell line MDA-MB-231 and assessed reversal of the mesenchymal phenotype. Microarray analysis showed that Slug is overexpressed in high grade breast and prostate cancer tissues. Additionally, Slug overexpression leads to drug resistance. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Slug binds directly to ERα promoter E-boxes and represses ERα expression. This resulted in decrease in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in cancer cells. These findings demonstrate that Slug, by regulation of ERα expression, contributes to tumor progression and could serve as an important target for cancer therapy.

  10. miRNA-Regulated Key Components of Cytokine Signaling Pathways and Inflammation in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashish Ranjan; Sharma, Garima; Lee, Sang-Soo; Chakraborty, Chiranjib

    2016-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory disease that primarily affects joints. This autoimmune disease pathogenesis is related to cytokine signaling. In this review, we have described the existence of various microRNAs (miRNAs) involved in regulation of major protein cascades of cytokine signaling associated with RA. Moreover, we have tried to portray the role of various miRNAs in different cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17, IL-18, IL-21, and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GMCSF). Along with this, we have also discussed the miRNA regulation in T cells and synovial tissue. From the analyzed data, we suggest that miR-146a and miR-155 might be the potential therapeutic target for treating RA. The insight illustrated in this review will offer a better understanding of the role of miRNA in cytokine signaling pathways and inflammation during RA and could project them as diagnostic or therapeutic agents in near future. PMID:26786912

  11. Phytochrome and retrograde signalling pathways converge to antagonistically regulate a light-induced transcriptional network

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Guiomar; Leivar, Pablo; Ludevid, Dolores; Tepperman, James M.; Quail, Peter H.; Monte, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Plastid-to-nucleus retrograde signals emitted by dysfunctional chloroplasts impact photomorphogenic development, but the molecular link between retrograde- and photosensory-receptor signalling has remained unclear. Here, we show that the phytochrome and retrograde signalling (RS) pathways converge antagonistically to regulate the expression of the nuclear-encoded transcription factor GLK1, a key regulator of a light-induced transcriptional network central to photomorphogenesis. GLK1 gene transcription is directly repressed by PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR (PIF)-class bHLH transcription factors in darkness, but light-activated phytochrome reverses this activity, thereby inducing expression. Conversely, we show that retrograde signals repress this induction by a mechanism independent of PIF mediation. Collectively, our data indicate that light at moderate levels acts through the plant's nuclear-localized sensory-photoreceptor system to induce appropriate photomorphogenic development, but at excessive levels, sensed through the separate plastid-localized RS system, acts to suppress such development, thus providing a mechanism for protection against photo-oxidative damage by minimizing the tissue exposure to deleterious radiation. PMID:27150909

  12. DNMT1-PPARγ pathway in macrophages regulates chronic inflammation and atherosclerosis development in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jie; Qiu, Youzhu; Yang, Jie; Bian, Shizhu; Chen, Guozhu; Deng, Mengyang; Kang, Huali; Huang, Lan

    2016-01-01

    The DNA methyltransferase-mediated proinflammatory activation of macrophages is causally linked to the development of atherosclerosis (AS). However, the role of DNMT1, a DNA methylation maintenance enzyme, in macrophage polarization and AS development remains obscure. Here, we established transgenic mice with macrophage-specific overexpression of DNMT1 (TgDNMT1) or PPAR-γ (TgPPAR-γ) to investigate their effects on AS progression in ApoE-knockout mice fed an atherogenic diet. Primary macrophages were extracted to study the role of the DNMT1/PPAR-γ pathway in regulating inflammatory cytokine production. We demonstrated that TgDNMT1 significantly increased proinflammatory cytokine production in macrophages and plasma, and it accelerated the progression of AS in the atherogenic diet-treated ApoE-knockout mice. Further, we found that the DNA methylation status of the proximal PPAR-γ promoter was regulated by DNMT1 in macrophages. Notably, additional TgPPAR-γ or pharmacological activation of PPAR-γ effectively prevented TgDNMT1-induced proinflammatory cytokine production in macrophages and AS development in the mouse model. Finally, we demonstrated that elevated DNMT1 was correlated with decreased PPAR-γ, and increased proinflammatory cytokine production in the peripheral blood monocytes isolated from the patients with AS, compared to those of healthy donors. Our findings shed light on a novel strategy for the prevention and therapy of AS. PMID:27530451

  13. Neuroprotection by Polynitrogen Manganese Complexes: Regulation of Reactive Oxygen Species-Related Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chunxia; Cao, Jing; Ma, Xiaoyan; Wang, Xiaobo; Chen, Qiuyun; Yan, Shihai; Zhao, Ningwei; Geng, Zhirong; Wang, Zhilin

    2016-01-01

    Cell death in the central nervous system causes neurologic diseases, in which reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a critical role by either inducing cellular oxidative stress or by increasing the cell tolerance against insult. Neurologic diseases may potentially be treated by regulating ROS levels in a certain range with small molecules. We studied preconditioning with two polynitrogen manganese complexes (1 and 2) to regulate intracellular ROS levels in the protection of both the differentiated rat pheochromocytoma cell line (PC12 cells) and neurons against H2O2-induced apoptosis. Pre-treatment with the two complexes attenuated the cell apoptosis caused by H2O2. And the ROS-related neuroprotective mechanisms were explored. Both complexes activate the hypoxia inducible factor-related pathways and increase the cell adaptation to oxidative stress. Pre-treatment with complex 1 eliminated intracellular ROS, which also activated antioxidase system, while short-term incubation of complex 2, generated low levels of ROS leading to cell survival. PMID:26857964

  14. Spatial landmarks regulate a Cdc42-dependent MAPK pathway to control differentiation and the response to positional compromise

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Sukanya; Vadaie, Nadia; Prabhakar, Aditi; Li, Boyang; Adhikari, Hema; Pitoniak, Andrew; Chow, Jacky; Chavel, Colin A.; Cullen, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental problem in cell biology is to understand how spatial information is recognized and integrated into morphogenetic responses. Budding yeast undergoes differentiation to filamentous growth, which involves changes in cell polarity through mechanisms that remain obscure. Here we define a regulatory input where spatial landmarks (bud-site–selection proteins) regulate the MAPK pathway that controls filamentous growth (fMAPK pathway). The bud-site GTPase Rsr1p regulated the fMAPK pathway through Cdc24p, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the polarity establishment GTPase Cdc42p. Positional landmarks that direct Rsr1p to bud sites conditionally regulated the fMAPK pathway, corresponding to their roles in regulating bud-site selection. Therefore, cell differentiation is achieved in part by the reorganization of polarity at bud sites. In line with this conclusion, dynamic changes in budding pattern during filamentous growth induced corresponding changes in fMAPK activity. Intrinsic compromise of bud-site selection also impacted fMAPK activity. Therefore, a surveillance mechanism monitors spatial position in response to extrinsic and intrinsic stress and modulates the response through a differentiation MAPK pathway. PMID:27001830

  15. Auxin Produced by the Indole-3-Pyruvic Acid Pathway Regulates Development and Gemmae Dormancy in the Liverwort Marchantia polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Eklund, D Magnus; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Flores-Sandoval, Eduardo; Kikuchi, Saya; Takebayashi, Yumiko; Tsukamoto, Shigeyuki; Hirakawa, Yuki; Nonomura, Maiko; Kato, Hirotaka; Kouno, Masaru; Bhalerao, Rishikesh P; Lagercrantz, Ulf; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Kohchi, Takayuki; Bowman, John L

    2015-06-01

    The plant hormone auxin (indole-3-acetic acid [IAA]) has previously been suggested to regulate diverse forms of dormancy in both seed plants and liverworts. Here, we use loss- and gain-of-function alleles for auxin synthesis- and signaling-related genes, as well as pharmacological approaches, to study how auxin regulates development and dormancy in the gametophyte generation of the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha. We found that M. polymorpha possess the smallest known toolkit for the indole-3-pyruvic acid (IPyA) pathway in any land plant and that this auxin synthesis pathway mainly is active in meristematic regions of the thallus. Previously a Trp-independent auxin synthesis pathway has been suggested to produce a majority of IAA in bryophytes. Our results indicate that the Trp-dependent IPyA pathway produces IAA that is essential for proper development of the gametophyte thallus of M. polymorpha. Furthermore, we show that dormancy of gemmae is positively regulated by auxin synthesized by the IPyA pathway in the apex of the thallus. Our results indicate that auxin synthesis, transport, and signaling, in addition to its role in growth and development, have a critical role in regulation of gemmae dormancy in M. polymorpha. PMID:26036256

  16. Auxin Produced by the Indole-3-Pyruvic Acid Pathway Regulates Development and Gemmae Dormancy in the Liverwort Marchantia polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Eklund, D Magnus; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Flores-Sandoval, Eduardo; Kikuchi, Saya; Takebayashi, Yumiko; Tsukamoto, Shigeyuki; Hirakawa, Yuki; Nonomura, Maiko; Kato, Hirotaka; Kouno, Masaru; Bhalerao, Rishikesh P; Lagercrantz, Ulf; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Kohchi, Takayuki; Bowman, John L

    2015-06-01

    The plant hormone auxin (indole-3-acetic acid [IAA]) has previously been suggested to regulate diverse forms of dormancy in both seed plants and liverworts. Here, we use loss- and gain-of-function alleles for auxin synthesis- and signaling-related genes, as well as pharmacological approaches, to study how auxin regulates development and dormancy in the gametophyte generation of the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha. We found that M. polymorpha possess the smallest known toolkit for the indole-3-pyruvic acid (IPyA) pathway in any land plant and that this auxin synthesis pathway mainly is active in meristematic regions of the thallus. Previously a Trp-independent auxin synthesis pathway has been suggested to produce a majority of IAA in bryophytes. Our results indicate that the Trp-dependent IPyA pathway produces IAA that is essential for proper development of the gametophyte thallus of M. polymorpha. Furthermore, we show that dormancy of gemmae is positively regulated by auxin synthesized by the IPyA pathway in the apex of the thallus. Our results indicate that auxin synthesis, transport, and signaling, in addition to its role in growth and development, have a critical role in regulation of gemmae dormancy in M. polymorpha.

  17. Wnt/β-Catenin and Sonic Hedgehog Pathways Interact in the Regulation of the Development of the Dorsal Mesenchymal Protrusion

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, Laura E.; Burns, Tara A.; Lockhart, Marie M.; Phelps, Aimee L.; Van den Hoff, Maurice J.B.; Wessels, Andy

    2016-01-01

    Background The dorsal mesenchymal protrusion (DMP) is a second heart field (SHF) derived tissue involved in cardiac septation. Molecular mechanisms controlling SHF/DMP development include the Bone Morphogenetic Protein and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways. Reduced expression of components in these pathways leads to inhibition of proliferation of the SHF/DMP precursor population and failure of the DMP to develop. While the Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) pathway has also been demonstrated to be critically important for SHF/DMP development and atrioventricular septation, its role in the regulation of SHF proliferation is contentious. Results Tissue-specific deletion of the Shh receptor Smoothened from the SHF resulted in compromised DMP formation and atrioventricular septal defects (AVSDs). Immunohistochemical analysis at critical stages of DMP development showed significant proliferation defect as well as reduction in levels of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway-intermediates β-catenin, Lef1, and Axin2. To determine whether the defects seen in the conditional Smoothened knock-out mouse could be attributed to reduced Wnt/β-catenin signaling, LiCl, a pharmacological activator of this Wnt/β-catenin pathway, was administered. This resulted in restoration of proliferation and partial rescue of the AVSD phenotype. Conclusions The data presented suggest that the Wnt/β-catenin pathway interact with the Shh pathway in the regulation of SHF/DMP-precursor proliferation and, hence, the development of the DMP. PMID:26297872

  18. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Uses Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase (Lpd) to Bind to the Human Terminal Pathway Regulators Vitronectin and Clusterin to Inhibit Terminal Pathway Complement Attack

    PubMed Central

    Hallström, Teresia; Uhde, Melanie; Singh, Birendra; Skerka, Christine; Riesbeck, Kristian; Zipfel, Peter F.

    2015-01-01

    The opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa controls host innate immune and complement attack. Here we identify Dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (Lpd), a 57 kDa moonlighting protein, as the first P. aeruginosa protein that binds the two human terminal pathway inhibitors vitronectin and clusterin. Both human regulators when bound to the bacterium inhibited effector function of the terminal complement, blocked C5b-9 deposition and protected the bacterium from complement damage. P. aeruginosa when challenged with complement active human serum depleted from vitronectin was severely damaged and bacterial survival was reduced by over 50%. Similarly, when in human serum clusterin was blocked by a mAb, bacterial survival was reduced by 44%. Thus, demonstrating that Pseudomonas benefits from attachment of each human regulator and controls complement attack. The Lpd binding site in vitronectin was localized to the C-terminal region, i.e. to residues 354–363. Thus, Lpd of P. aeruginosa is a surface exposed moonlighting protein that binds two human terminal pathway inhibitors, vitronectin and clusterin and each human inhibitor when attached protected the bacterial pathogen from the action of the terminal complement pathway. Our results showed insights into the important function of Lpd as a complement regulator binding protein that might play an important role in virulence of P. aeruginosa. PMID:26368530

  19. HDAC6 regulates glucocorticoid receptor signaling in serotonin pathways with critical impact on stress resilience.

    PubMed

    Espallergues, Julie; Teegarden, Sarah L; Veerakumar, Avin; Boulden, Janette; Challis, Collin; Jochems, Jeanine; Chan, Michael; Petersen, Tess; Deneris, Evan; Matthias, Patrick; Hahn, Chang-Gyu; Lucki, Irwin; Beck, Sheryl G; Berton, Olivier

    2012-03-28

    Genetic variations in certain components of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) chaperone complex have been associated with the development of stress-related affective disorders and individual variability in therapeutic responses to antidepressants. Mechanisms that link GR chaperoning and stress susceptibility are not well understood. Here, we show that the effects of glucocorticoid hormones on socioaffective behaviors are critically regulated via reversible acetylation of Hsp90, a key component of the GR chaperone complex. We provide pharmacological and genetic evidence indicating that the cytoplasmic lysine deacetylase HDAC6 controls Hsp90 acetylation in the brain, and thereby modulates Hsp90-GR protein-protein interactions, as well as hormone- and stress-induced GR translocation, with a critical impact on GR downstream signaling and behavior. Pet1-Cre-driven deletion of HDAC6 in serotonin neurons, the densest HDAC6-expressing cell group in the mouse brain, dramatically reduced acute anxiogenic effects of the glucocorticoid hormone corticosterone in the open-field, elevated plus maze, and social interaction tests. Serotonin-selective depletion of HDAC6 also blocked the expression of social avoidance in mice exposed to chronic social defeat and concurrently prevented the electrophysiological and morphological changes induced, in serotonin neurons, by this murine model of traumatic stress. Together, these results identify HDAC6 inhibition as a potential new strategy for proresilience and antidepressant interventions through regulation of the Hsp90-GR heterocomplex and focal prevention of GR signaling in serotonin pathways. Our data thus uncover an alternate mechanism by which pan-HDAC inhibitors may regulate stress-related behaviors independently of their action on histones.

  20. Complex Regulation Pathways of AmpC-Mediated β-Lactam Resistance in Enterobacter cloacae Complex.

    PubMed

    Guérin, François; Isnard, Christophe; Cattoir, Vincent; Giard, Jean Christophe

    2015-12-01

    Enterobacter cloacae complex (ECC), an opportunistic pathogen causing numerous infections in hospitalized patients worldwide, is able to resist β-lactams mainly by producing the AmpC β-lactamase enzyme. AmpC expression is highly inducible in the presence of some β-lactams, but the underlying genetic regulation, which is intricately linked to peptidoglycan recycling, is still poorly understood. In this study, we constructed different mutant strains that were affected in genes encoding enzymes suspected to be involved in this pathway. As expected, the inactivation of ampC, ampR (which encodes the regulator protein of ampC), and ampG (encoding a permease) abolished β-lactam resistance. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) experiments combined with phenotypic studies showed that cefotaxime (at high concentrations) and cefoxitin induced the expression of ampC in different ways: one involving NagZ (a N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase) and another independent of NagZ. Unlike the model established for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, inactivation of DacB (also known as PBP4) was not responsible for a constitutive ampC overexpression in ECC, whereas it caused AmpC-mediated high-level β-lactam resistance, suggesting a post-transcriptional regulation mechanism. Global transcriptomic analysis by transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) of a dacB deletion mutant confirmed these results. Lastly, analysis of 37 ECC clinical isolates showed that amino acid changes in the AmpD sequence were likely the most crucial event involved in the development of high-level β-lactam resistance in vivo as opposed to P. aeruginosa where dacB mutations have been commonly found. These findings bring new elements for a better understanding of β-lactam resistance in ECC, which is essential for the identification of novel potential drug targets. PMID:26438498

  1. Complex Regulation Pathways of AmpC-Mediated β-Lactam Resistance in Enterobacter cloacae Complex

    PubMed Central

    Guérin, François; Isnard, Christophe; Giard, Jean Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Enterobacter cloacae complex (ECC), an opportunistic pathogen causing numerous infections in hospitalized patients worldwide, is able to resist β-lactams mainly by producing the AmpC β-lactamase enzyme. AmpC expression is highly inducible in the presence of some β-lactams, but the underlying genetic regulation, which is intricately linked to peptidoglycan recycling, is still poorly understood. In this study, we constructed different mutant strains that were affected in genes encoding enzymes suspected to be involved in this pathway. As expected, the inactivation of ampC, ampR (which encodes the regulator protein of ampC), and ampG (encoding a permease) abolished β-lactam resistance. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) experiments combined with phenotypic studies showed that cefotaxime (at high concentrations) and cefoxitin induced the expression of ampC in different ways: one involving NagZ (a N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase) and another independent of NagZ. Unlike the model established for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, inactivation of DacB (also known as PBP4) was not responsible for a constitutive ampC overexpression in ECC, whereas it caused AmpC-mediated high-level β-lactam resistance, suggesting a post-transcriptional regulation mechanism. Global transcriptomic analysis by transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) of a dacB deletion mutant confirmed these results. Lastly, analysis of 37 ECC clinical isolates showed that amino acid changes in the AmpD sequence were likely the most crucial event involved in the development of high-level β-lactam resistance in vivo as opposed to P. aeruginosa where dacB mutations have been commonly found. These findings bring new elements for a better understanding of β-lactam resistance in ECC, which is essential for the identification of novel potential drug targets. PMID:26438498

  2. Regulation of Molecular Pathways in Ischemia Reperfusion Injury after Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Gehrau, Ricardo C.; Mas, Valeria R.; Dumur, Catherine I.; Ladie, Danielle E.; Suh, Jihee L.; Luebbert, Samuel; Maluf, Daniel G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is a multifactorial phenomenon that occurs during the transplant event and frequently compromise early graft function after liver transplantation (LT). Current comprehension of molecular mechanisms and regulation processes of I/R injury lacks clarity. MicroRNA (miRNA) regulation results critical in several biological processes. Patients and Methods: This study evaluated gene expression and microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles using microarrays in 34 graft biopsies collected at pre-implantation (L1) and at 90 minutes post-reperfusion (L2) from consecutives deceased donor LT recipients. MiRNA profiles were first analyzed. Data integration analysis (gene expression / microRNA expression) aimed to identify potential target genes for each identified miRNA from the L1/L2 differential gene expression profile. Results Pairwise comparison analyses identified 40 miRNAs and 3,168 significantly differentially expressed genes at post-reperfusion time compared with pre-reperfusion time. Pathway analysis of miRNAs associated these profiles with anti-apoptosis, inhibition of cellular proliferation, and pro-inflammatory processes. Target analysis identified a miRNA-associated molecular profile of 2,172 genes involved in cellular growth and proliferation modulation by cell cycle regulation, cell death and survival, and pro- and anti-inflammatory processes. MiRNA-independent genes involved pro-inflammatory molecules. Conclusion We identified a miRNA profile involved in post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in I/R injury post-LT. A better understanding of these molecular processes involved in I/R may contribute to develop new strategies to minimize graft injury. PMID:23985720

  3. Capsaicin inhibits the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway by down-regulating PP2A.

    PubMed

    Park, Dong-Seok; Yoon, Gang-Ho; Lee, Hyun-Shik; Choi, Sun-Cheol

    2016-09-01

    Xenopus embryo serves as an ideal model for teratogenesis assays to examine the effects of any substances on the cellular processes critical for early development and adult tissue homeostasis. In our chemical library screening with frog embryo, capsaicin was found to repress the Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Depending on the stages at which embryos became exposed to capsaicin, it could disrupt formation of dorsal or posterior body axis of embryo, which is associated with inhibition of maternal or zygotic Wnt signal in early development. In agreement with these phenotypes, capsaicin suppressed the expression of Wnt target genes such as Siamois and Chordin in the organizer region of embryo and in Wnt signals-stimulated tissue explants. In addition, the cellular level of β-catenin, a key component of Wnt pathway, was down-regulated in capsaicin-treated embryonic cells. Unlike wild-type β-catenin, its non-phosphorylatable mutant in which serine and threonine residues phosphorylated by GSK3 are substituted with alanine was not destabilized by capsaicin, indicative of the effect of this chemical on the phosphorylation status of β-catenin. In support of this, capsaicin up-regulated the level of GSK3- or CK1-phosphorylated β-catenin, concomitantly lowering that of its de-phosphorylated version. Notably, capsaicin augmented the phosphorylation of a phosphatase, PP2A at tyrosine 307, suggesting its repression of the enzymatic activity of the phosphatase. Furthermore, capsaicin still enhanced β-catenin phosphorylation in cells treated with a GSK3 inhibitor, LiCl but not in those treated with a phosphatase inhibitor, okadaic acid. Together, these results indicate that capsaicin inhibits the patterning of the dorso-ventral and anterior-posterior body axes of embryo by repressing PP2A and thereby down-regulating the Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:27318088

  4. Regulation of Endothelial Cell Proliferation and Vascular Assembly through Distinct mTORC2 Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan; Amato, Katherine R.; Song, Wenqiang; Youngblood, Victoria; Lee, Keunwook; Boothby, Mark; Brantley-Sieders, Dana M.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine/threonine kinase that regulates a diverse array of cellular processes, including cell growth, survival, metabolism, and cytoskeleton dynamics. mTOR functions in two distinct complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2, whose activities and substrate specificities are regulated by complex specific cofactors, including Raptor and Rictor, respectively. Little is known regarding the relative contribution of mTORC1 versus mTORC2 in vascular endothelial cells. Using mouse models of Raptor or Rictor gene targeting, we discovered that Rictor ablation inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced endothelial cell proliferation and assembly in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo, whereas the loss of Raptor had only a modest effect on endothelial cells (ECs). Mechanistically, the loss of Rictor reduced the phosphorylation of AKT, protein kinase Cα (PKCα), and NDRG1 without affecting the mTORC1 pathway. In contrast, the loss of Raptor increased the phosphorylation of AKT despite inhibiting the phosphorylation of S6K1, a direct target of mTORC1. Reconstitution of Rictor-null cells with myristoylated AKT (Myr-AKT) rescued vascular assembly in Rictor-deficient endothelial cells, whereas PKCα rescued proliferation defects. Furthermore, tumor neovascularization in vivo was significantly decreased upon EC-specific Rictor deletion in mice. These data indicate that mTORC2 is a critical signaling node required for VEGF-mediated angiogenesis through the regulation of AKT and PKCα in vascular endothelial cells. PMID:25582201

  5. HDAC6 regulates GR signaling in serotonin pathways with critical impact on stress resilience

    PubMed Central

    Espallergues, Julie; Teegarden, Sarah L.; Veerakumar, Avin; Boulden, Janette; Challis, Collin; Jochems, Jeanine; Chan, Michael; Petersen, Tess; Deneris, Evan; Matthias, Patrick; Hahn, Chang-Gyu; Lucki, Irwin; Beck, Sheryl G.; Berton, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Genetic variations in certain components of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) chaperone complex have been associated with the development of stress-related affective disorders and individual variability in therapeutic responses to antidepressants. Mechanisms that link GR chaperoning and stress susceptibility are not well understood. Here, we show that the effects of glucocorticoid hormones on socioaffective behaviors are critically regulated via reversible acetylation of Hsp90, a key component of the GR chaperone complex. We provide pharmacological and genetic evidence indicating that the cytoplasmic lysine deacetylase HDAC6 controls Hsp90 acetylation in the brain, and thereby modulates Hsp90-GR protein-protein interactions, as well as hormone- and stress-induced GR translocation, with a critical impact on GR downstream signaling and behavior. Pet1-Cre driven deletion of HDAC6 in serotonin neurons, the densest HDAC6-expressing cell group in the mouse brain, dramatically reduced acute anxiogenic effects of the glucocorticoid hormone corticosterone in the open field, elevated plus maze, and social interaction tests. Serotonin-selective depletion of HDAC6 also blocked the expression of social avoidance in mice exposed to chronic social defeat and concurrently prevented the electrophysiological and morphological changes induced, in serotonin neurons, by this murine model of traumatic stress. Together, these results identify HDAC6 inhibition as a potential new strategy for pro-resilience and antidepressant interventions through regulation of the Hsp90-GR heterocomplex and focal prevention of GR signaling in serotonin pathways. Our data thus uncover an alternate mechanism by which pan-HDAC inhibitors may regulate stress-related behaviors independently of their action on histones. PMID:22457490

  6. Peroxiredoxin 1 suppresses apoptosis via regulation of the apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 signaling pathway in human oral leukoplakia

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, MIN; NIU, WENWEN; ZHANG, JIANFEI; GE, LIHUA; YANG, JING; SUN, ZHENG; TANG, XIAOFEI

    2015-01-01

    Peroxiredoxin 1 (Prx1) has a significant role in several malignant types of tumor. However, the role of Prx1 in oral leukoplakia (OLK) has remained to be elucidated. OLK is a common precancerous lesion of the oral mucosa that has a very high malignant transformation rate. The aim of the present study was to investigate the roles of Prx1, and its association with apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) and p38 in OLK. A total of 20 OLK samples and 10 normal oral mucosa samples were obtained from patients at the Beijing Stomatological Hospital (Beijing, China). The messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression levels of Prx1, ASK1 and p38 were determined by polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis, respectively. Flow cytometry was used to detect cell apoptosis. The interaction between Prx1 and ASK1 was examined in H2O2-treated DOK cells by glutathione-S-transferase pull-down assays and by co-immunoprecipitation in vitro. Compared with those of the normal oral mucosa, the mRNA levels of Prx1, ASK1 and p38 were elevated in OLK tissues (P<0.05). The protein expression levels of Prx1, phosphorylated-ASK1 (p-ASK1) and p-p38 were also significantly enhanced in OLK tissues compared with those of the normal mucosa (P<0.05). In Prx1-knockdown DOK cells, ASK1 and p38 were activated, leading to enhanced levels of apoptosis in response to H2O2. No clear interaction between Prx1 and ASK1 was detected in H2O2-treated DOK cells. Prx1 was suggested to be involved in OLK pathogenesis by providing resistance against extracellular damages from oxidative stress via inhibition of the ASK1-induced apoptotic signaling pathway. Targeting Prx1 may provide a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of patients with OLK. PMID:26622762

  7. An Evaluation of Active Learning Causal Discovery Methods for Reverse-Engineering Local Causal Pathways of Gene Regulation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Sisi; Kemmeren, Patrick; Aliferis, Constantin F; Statnikov, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Reverse-engineering of causal pathways that implicate diseases and vital cellular functions is a fundamental problem in biomedicine. Discovery of the local causal pathway of a target variable (that consists of its direct causes and direct effects) is essential for effective intervention and can facilitate accurate diagnosis and prognosis. Recent research has provided several active learning methods that can leverage passively observed high-throughput data to draft causal pathways and then refine the inferred relations with a limited number of experiments. The current study provides a comprehensive evaluation of the performance of active learning methods for local causal pathway discovery in real biological data. Specifically, 54 active learning methods/variants from 3 families of algorithms were applied for local causal pathways reconstruction of gene regulation for 5 transcription factors in S. cerevisiae. Four aspects of the methods' performance were assessed, including adjacency discovery quality, edge orientation accuracy, complete pathway discovery quality, and experimental cost. The results of this study show that some methods provide significant performance benefits over others and therefore should be routinely used for local causal pathway discovery tasks. This study also demonstrates the feasibility of local causal pathway reconstruction in real biological systems with significant quality and low experimental cost.

  8. An Evaluation of Active Learning Causal Discovery Methods for Reverse-Engineering Local Causal Pathways of Gene Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Sisi; Kemmeren, Patrick; Aliferis, Constantin F.; Statnikov, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Reverse-engineering of causal pathways that implicate diseases and vital cellular functions is a fundamental problem in biomedicine. Discovery of the local causal pathway of a target variable (that consists of its direct causes and direct effects) is essential for effective intervention and can facilitate accurate diagnosis and prognosis. Recent research has provided several active learning methods that can leverage passively observed high-throughput data to draft causal pathways and then refine the inferred relations with a limited number of experiments. The current study provides a comprehensive evaluation of the performance of active learning methods for local causal pathway discovery in real biological data. Specifically, 54 active learning methods/variants from 3 families of algorithms were applied for local causal pathways reconstruction of gene regulation for 5 transcription factors in S. cerevisiae. Four aspects of the methods’ performance were assessed, including adjacency discovery quality, edge orientation accuracy, complete pathway discovery quality, and experimental cost. The results of this study show that some methods provide significant performance benefits over others and therefore should be routinely used for local causal pathway discovery tasks. This study also demonstrates the feasibility of local causal pathway reconstruction in real biological systems with significant quality and low experimental cost. PMID:26939894

  9. Regulation of PGE2 signaling pathways and TNF-alpha signaling pathways on the function of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and the effects of CP-25.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Sheng, Kangliang; Chen, Jingyu; Wu, Yujing; Zhang, Feng; Chang, Yan; Wu, Huaxun; Fu, Jingjing; Zhang, Lingling; Wei, Wei

    2015-12-15

    This study was to investigate PGE2 and TNF-alpha signaling pathway involving in the maturation and activation of bone marrow dendritic cells (DCs) and the effect of CP-25. Bone marrow DCs were isolated and stimulated by PGE2 and TNF-alpha respectively. The markers of maturation and activation expressed on DCs, such as CD40, CD80, CD83, CD86, MHC-II, and the ability of antigen uptake of DCs were analyzed by flow cytometry. The proliferation of T cells co-cultured with DCs, the signaling pathways of PGE2-EP4-cAMP and TNF-alpha-TRADD-TRAF2-NF-κB in DCs were analyzed. The results showed that both PGE2 and TNF-alpha up-regulated the expressions of CD40, CD80, CD83, CD86, and MHC-II, decreased the antigen uptake of DCs, and DCs stimulated by PGE2 or TNF-alpha could increase T cell proliferation. CP-25 (10(-5), 10(-6), and 10(-7)mol/l) decreased significantly the expressions of CD40, CD80, CD83, CD86 and MHC-II, increased the antigen uptake of DCs, and suppressed T cell proliferation induced by DCs. PGE2 increased the expressions of EP4, NF-κB and down-regulated cAMP level of DCs. TNF-alpha could also up-regulate TNFR1, TRADD, TRAF2, and NF-κB expression of DCs. CP-25 (10(-5), 10(-6), and 10(-7)mol/l) decreased the expressions of EP4 and NF-κB, increased cAMP level in DCs stimulated by PGE2. CP-25 (10(-5), 10(-6), and 10(-7)mol/l) also could down-regulate significantly TNFR1, TRADD, TRAF2, and NF-κB expression in DCs stimulated by TNF-alpha. These results demonstrate that PGE2 and TNF-alpha could enhance DCs functions by mediating PGE2-EP4-cAMP pathway, TNF-alpha-TNFR1-TRADD-TRAF2-NF-κB pathway respectively. CP-25 might inhibit the function of DCs through regulating PGE2-EP4-cAMP and TNF-alpha-TNFR1-TRADD-TRAF2-NF-κB pathways.

  10. Notch pathway regulates female germ cell meiosis progression and early oogenesis events in fetal mouse.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yan-Min; Liang, Gui-Jin; Pan, Bo; Qin, Xun-Si; Zhang, Xi-Feng; Chen, Chun-Lei; Li, Lan; Cheng, Shun-Feng; De Felici, Massimo; Shen, Wei

    2014-01-01

    A critical process of early oogenesis is the entry of mitotic oogonia into meiosis, a cell cycle switch regulated by a complex gene regulatory network. Although Notch pathway is involved in numerous important aspects of oogenesis in invertebrate species, whether it plays roles in early oogenesis events in mammals is unknown. Therefore, the rationale of the present study was to investigate the roles of Notch signaling in crucial processes of early oogenesis, such as meiosis entry and early oocyte growth. Notch receptors and ligands were localized in mouse embryonic female gonads and 2 Notch inhibitors, namely DAPT and L-685,458, were used to attenuate its signaling in an in vitro culture system of ovarian tissues from 12.5 days post coitum (dpc) fetus. The results demonstrated that the expression of Stra8, a master gene for germ cell meiosis, and its stimulation by retinoic acid (RA) were reduced after suppression of Notch signaling, and the other meiotic genes, Dazl, Dmc1, and Rec8, were abolished or markedly decreased. Furthermore, RNAi of Notch1 also markedly inhibited the expression of Stra8 and SCP3 in cultured female germ cells. The increased methylation status of CpG islands within the Stra8 promoter of the oocytes was observed in the presence of DAPT, indicating that Notch signaling is probably necessary for maintaining the epigenetic state of this gene in a way suitable for RA stimulation. Furthermore, in the presence of Notch inhibitors, progression of oocytes through meiosis I was markedly delayed. At later culture periods, the rate of oocyte growth was decreased, which impaired subsequent primordial follicle assembly in cultured ovarian tissues. Taken together, these results suggested new roles of the Notch signaling pathway in female germ cell meiosis progression and early oogenesis events in mammals.

  11. mir-30d Regulates multiple genes in the autophagy pathway and impairs autophagy process in human cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaojun; Zhong, Xiaomin; Tanyi, Janos L.; Shen, Jianfeng; Xu, Congjian; Gao, Peng; Zheng, Tim M.; DeMichele, Angela; Zhang, Lin

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► Gene set enrichment analysis indicated mir-30d might regulate the autophagy pathway. ► mir-30d represses the expression of BECN1, BNIP3L, ATG12, ATG5 and ATG2. ► BECN1, BNIP3L, ATG12, ATG5 and ATG2 are direct targets of mir-30d. ► mir-30d inhibits autophagosome formation and LC3B-I conversion to LC3B-II. ► mir-30d regulates the autophagy process. -- Abstract: In human epithelial cancers, the microRNA (miRNA) mir-30d is amplified with high frequency and serves as a critical oncomir by regulating metastasis, apoptosis, proliferation, and differentiation. Autophagy, a degradation pathway for long-lived protein and organelles, regulates the survival and death of many cell types. Increasing evidence suggests that autophagy plays an important function in epithelial tumor initiation and progression. Using a combined bioinformatics approach, gene set enrichment analysis, and miRNA target prediction, we found that mir-30d might regulate multiple genes in the autophagy pathway including BECN1, BNIP3L, ATG12, ATG5, and ATG2. Our further functional experiments demonstrated that the expression of these core proteins in the autophagy pathway was directly suppressed by mir-30d in cancer cells. Finally, we showed that mir-30d regulated the autophagy process by inhibiting autophagosome formation and LC3B-I conversion to LC3B-II. Taken together, our results provide evidence that the oncomir mir-30d impairs the autophagy process by targeting multiple genes in the autophagy pathway. This result will contribute to understanding the molecular mechanism of mir-30d in tumorigenesis and developing novel cancer therapy strategy.

  12. Metabolomic Identification of a Novel Pathway of Blood Pressure Regulation Involving Hexadecanedioate

    PubMed Central

    Menni, Cristina; Graham, Delyth; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Alharbi, Nora H.J.; Alsanosi, Safaa Md; McBride, Martin; Mangino, Massimo; Titcombe, Philip; Shin, So-Youn; Psatha, Maria; Geisendorfer, Thomas; Huber, Anja; Peters, Annette; Wang-Sattler, Rui; Xu, Tao; Brosnan, Mary Julia; Trimmer, Jeff; Reichel, Christian; Mohney, Robert P.; Soranzo, Nicole; Edwards, Mark H.; Cooper, Cyrus; Church, Alistair C.; Suhre, Karsten; Gieger, Christian; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Spector, Tim D.; Valdes, Ana M.

    2015-01-01

    High blood pressure is a major contributor to the global burden of disease and discovering novel causal pathways of blood pressure regulation has been challenging. We tested blood pressure associations with 280 fasting blood metabolites in 3980 TwinsUK females. Survival analysis for all-cause mortality was performed on significant independent metabolites (P<8.9×10−5). Replication was conducted in 2 independent cohorts KORA (n=1494) and Hertfordshire (n=1515). Three independent animal experiments were performed to establish causality: (1) blood pressure change after increasing circulating metabolite levels in Wistar–Kyoto rats; (2) circulating metabolite change after salt-induced blood pressure elevation in spontaneously hypertensive stroke-prone rats; and (3) mesenteric artery response to noradrenaline and carbachol in metabolite treated and control rats. Of the15 metabolites that showed an independent significant association with blood pressure, only hexadecanedioate, a dicarboxylic acid, showed concordant association with blood pressure (systolic BP: β [95% confidence interval], 1.31 [0.83–1.78], P=6.81×10−8; diastolic BP: 0.81 [0.5–1.11], P=2.96×10−7) and mortality (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval], 1.49 [1.08–2.05]; P=0.02) in TwinsUK. The blood pressure association was replicated in KORA and Hertfordshire. In the animal experiments, we showed that oral hexadecanedioate increased both circulating hexadecanedioate and blood pressure in Wistar–Kyoto rats, whereas blood pressure elevation with oral sodium chloride in hypertensive rats did not affect hexadecanedioate levels. Vascular reactivity to noradrenaline was significantly increased in mesenteric resistance arteries from hexadecanedioate-treated rats compared with controls, indicated by the shift to the left of the concentration–response curve (P=0.013). Relaxation to carbachol did not show any difference. Our findings indicate that hexadecanedioate is causally associated with

  13. The p53-p21-DREAM-CDE/CHR pathway regulates G2/M cell cycle genes.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Martin; Quaas, Marianne; Steiner, Lydia; Engeland, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 functions predominantly as a transcription factor by activating and downregulating gene expression, leading to cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. p53 was shown to indirectly repress transcription of the CCNB2, KIF23 and PLK4 cell cycle genes through the recently discovered p53-p21-DREAM-CDE/CHR pathway. However, it remained unclear whether this pathway is commonly used. Here, we identify genes regulated by p53 through this pathway in a genome-wide computational approach. The bioinformatic analysis is based on genome-wide DREAM complex binding data, p53-depedent mRNA expression data and a genome-wide definition of phylogenetically conserved CHR promoter elements. We find 210 target genes that are expected to be regulated by the p53-p21-DREAM-CDE/CHR pathway. The target gene list was verified by detailed analysis of p53-dependent repression of the cell cycle genes B-MYB (MYBL2), BUB1, CCNA2, CCNB1, CHEK2, MELK, POLD1, RAD18 and RAD54L. Most of the 210 target genes are essential regulators of G2 phase and mitosis. Thus, downregulation of these genes through the p53-p21-DREAM-CDE/CHR pathway appears to be a principal mechanism for G2/M cell cycle arrest by p53.

  14. The p53-p21-DREAM-CDE/CHR pathway regulates G2/M cell cycle genes

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Martin; Quaas, Marianne; Steiner, Lydia; Engeland, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 functions predominantly as a transcription factor by activating and downregulating gene expression, leading to cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. p53 was shown to indirectly repress transcription of the CCNB2, KIF23 and PLK4 cell cycle genes through the recently discovered p53-p21-DREAM-CDE/CHR pathway. However, it remained unclear whether this pathway is commonly used. Here, we identify genes regulated by p53 through this pathway in a genome-wide computational approach. The bioinformatic analysis is based on genome-wide DREAM complex binding data, p53-depedent mRNA expression data and a genome-wide definition of phylogenetically conserved CHR promoter elements. We find 210 target genes that are expected to be regulated by the p53-p21-DREAM-CDE/CHR pathway. The target gene list was verified by detailed analysis of p53-dependent repression of the cell cycle genes B-MYB (MYBL2), BUB1, CCNA2, CCNB1, CHEK2, MELK, POLD1, RAD18 and RAD54L. Most of the 210 target genes are essential regulators of G2 phase and mitosis. Thus, downregulation of these genes through the p53-p21-DREAM-CDE/CHR pathway appears to be a principal mechanism for G2/M cell cycle arrest by p53. PMID:26384566

  15. Regulation of the Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathway by Human Papillomavirus E6 and E7 Oncoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz Bello, Jesus Omar; Olmedo Nieva, Leslie; Contreras Paredes, Adriana; Fuentes Gonzalez, Alma Mariana; Rocha Zavaleta, Leticia; Lizano, Marcela

    2015-01-01

    Cell signaling pathways are the mechanisms by which cells transduce external stimuli, which control the transcription of genes, to regulate diverse biological effects. In cancer, distinct signaling pathways, such as the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, have been implicated in the deregulation of critical molecular processes that affect cell proliferation and differentiation. For example, changes in β-catenin localization have been identified in Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancers as the lesion progresses. Specifically, β-catenin relocates from the membrane/cytoplasm to the nucleus, suggesting that this transcription regulator participates in cervical carcinogenesis. The E6 and E7 oncoproteins are responsible for the transforming activity of HPV, and some studies have implicated these viral oncoproteins in the regulation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Nevertheless, new interactions of HPV oncoproteins with cellular proteins are emerging, and the study of the biological effects of such interactions will help to understand HPV-related carcinogenesis. This review addresses the accumulated evidence of the involvement of the HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins in the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. PMID:26295406

  16. The general amino acid control pathway regulates mTOR and autophagy during serum/glutamine starvation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui; Zou, Yilong; Mao, Dongxue; Sun, Daxiao; Gao, Guanguang; Shi, Jingwen; Liu, Xiaoqing; Zhu, Chen; Yang, Mingyu; Ye, Wanlu; Hao, Qianqian; Li, Ruiqiang; Yu, Li

    2014-07-21

    Organisms have evolved elaborate mechanisms to adjust intracellular nutrient levels in response to fluctuating availability of exogenous nutrients. During starvation, cells can enhance amino acid uptake and synthesis through the general amino acid control (GAAC) pathway, whereas nonessential cellular contents are recycled by autophagy. How these two pathways are coordinated in response to starvation is currently unknown. Here we show that the GAAC pathway couples exogenous amino acid availability with autophagy. Starvation caused deactivation of mTOR, which then activated autophagy. In parallel, serum/glutamine starvation activated the GAAC pathway, which up-regulated amino acid transporters, leading to increased amino acid uptake. This elevated the intracellular amino acid level, which in turn reactivated mTOR and suppressed autophagy. Knockdown of activating transcription factor 4, the major transcription factor in the GAAC pathway, or of SLC7A5, a leucine transporter, caused impaired mTOR reactivation and much higher levels of autophagy. Thus, the GAAC pathway modulates autophagy by regulating amino acid uptake and mTOR reactivation during serum/glutamine starvation.

  17. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling pathway in normal and malignant B cells: activation mechanisms, regulation and impact on cellular functions.

    PubMed

    Pauls, Samantha D; Lafarge, Sandrine T; Landego, Ivan; Zhang, Tingting; Marshall, Aaron J

    2012-01-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway is a central signal transduction axis controlling normal B cell homeostasis and activation in humoral immunity. The p110δ PI3K catalytic subunit has emerged as a critical mediator of multiple B cell functions. The activity of this pathway is regulated at multiple levels, with inositol phosphatases PTEN and SHIP both playing critical roles. When deregulated, the PI3K pathway can contribute to B cell malignancies and autoantibody production. This review summarizes current knowledge on key mechanisms that activate and regulate the PI3K pathway and influence normal B cell functional responses including the development of B cell subsets, antigen presentation, immunoglobulin isotype switch, germinal center responses, and maintenance of B cell anergy. We also discuss PI3K pathway alterations reported in select B cell malignancies and highlight studies indicating the functional significance of this pathway in malignant B cell survival and growth within tissue microenvironments. Finally, we comment on early clinical trial results, which support PI3K inhibition as a promising treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

  18. Signaling pathways regulating aromatase and cyclooxygenases in normal and malignant breast cells.

    PubMed

    Richards, Jeanette A; Petrel, Trevor A; Brueggemeier, Robert W

    2002-02-01

    Aromatase (estrogen synthase) is the cytochrome P450 enzyme complex that converts C(19) androgens to C(18) estrogens. Aromatase activity has been demonstrated in breast tissue in vitro, and expression of aromatase is highest in or near breast tumor sites. Thus, local regulation of aromatase by both endogenous factors as well as exogenous medicinal agents will influence the levels of estrogen available for breast cancer growth. The prostaglandin PGE(2) increases intracellular cAMP levels and stimulates estrogen biosynthesis, and our recent studies have shown a strong linear association between CYP19 expression and the sum of cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in breast cancer specimens. Knowledge of the signaling pathways that regulate the expression and enzyme activity of aromatase and cyclooxygenases (COXs) in stromal and epithelial breast cells will aid in understanding the interrelationships of these two enzyme systems and potentially identify novel targets for regulation. The effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta), and tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate (TPA) on aromatase and COXs were studied in primary cultures of normal human adipose stromal cells and in cell cultures of normal immortalized human breast epithelial cells MCF-10F, estrogen-responsive human breast cancer cells MCF-7, and estrogen-unresponsive human breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231. Levels of the constitutive COX isozyme, COX-1, were not altered by the various treatments in the cell systems studied. In breast adenocarcinoma cells, EGF and TGFbeta did not alter COX-2 levels at 24h, while TPA induced COX-2 levels by 75% in MDA-MB-231 cells. EGF and TPA in MCF-7 cells significantly increased aromatase activity while TGFbeta did not. In contrast to MCF-7 cells, TGFbeta and TPA significantly increased activity in MDA-MB-231 cells, while only a modest increase with EGF was observed. Untreated normal adipose stromal cells exhibited

  19. FLOWERING LOCUS C -dependent and -independent regulation of the circadian clock by the autonomous and vernalization pathways

    PubMed Central

    Salathia, Neeraj; Davis, Seth J; Lynn, James R; Michaels, Scott D; Amasino, Richard M; Millar, Andrew J

    2006-01-01

    Background The circadian system drives pervasive biological rhythms in plants. Circadian clocks integrate endogenous timing information with environmental signals, in order to match rhythmic outputs to the local day/night cycle. Multiple signaling pathways affect the circadian system, in ways that are likely to be adaptively significant. Our previous studies of natural genetic variation in Arabidopsis thaliana accessions implicated FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) as a circadian-clock regulator. The MADS-box transcription factor FLC is best known as a regulator of flowering time. Its activity is regulated by many regulatory genes in the "autonomous" and vernalization-dependent flowering pathways. We tested whether these same pathways affect the circadian system. Results Genes in the autonomous flowering pathway, including FLC, were found to regulate circadian period in Arabidopsis. The mechanisms involved are similar, but not identical, to the control of flowering time. By mutant analyses, we demonstrate a graded effect of FLC expression upon circadian period. Related MADS-box genes had less effect on clock function. We also reveal an unexpected vernalization-dependent alteration of periodicity. Conclusion This study has aided in the understanding of FLC's role in the clock, as it reveals that the network affecting circadian timing is partially overlapping with the floral-regulatory network. We also show a link between vernalization and circadian period. This finding may be of ecological relevance for developmental programing in other plant species. PMID:16737527

  20. Overexpression of a pathway specific negative regulator enhances production of daunorubicin in bldA deficient Streptomyces peucetius ATCC 27952.

    PubMed

    Pokhrel, Anaya Raj; Chaudhary, Amit Kumar; Nguyen, Hue Thi; Dhakal, Dipesh; Le, Tuoi Thi; Shrestha, Anil; Liou, Kwangkyoung; Sohng, Jae Kyung

    2016-11-01

    The dnrO gene is the first regulator to be activated in the daunorubicin (DNR) biosynthesis pathway of Streptomyces peucetius ATCC 27952. DnrO is known for its self-repression capability while it activates rest of the DNR biosynthesis pathway through cascades of regulatory events. S. peucetius was found to contain no functional copy of bldA-tRNA while a detailed examination of dnrO codons reveals the presence of TTA codon, which is rarely encoded by bldA-tRNA. Therefore, for evaluating the role of dnrO in DNR production, multiple engineered strains of S. peucetius were generated by heterologously expressing bldA, dnrO and combination of bldA and dnrO. Using these strains, the effects of heterologously expressed bldA and overexpressed dnrO were evaluated on pathway specific regulators, mycelial densities and production of DNR. The results showed that the transcription level of dnrO and master regulator dnrI, was found to be elevated in bldA containing strain in comparison to dnrO overexpressed strain. The bldA containing strain produces 45.7% higher DNR than bldA deficient wild type strain from culture broth with OD600 of 1.45 at 72h. Heterologous expression of bldA-tRNA is accounted for increased transcription levels of the DNR pathway specific regulators and enhanced DNR production. PMID:27664727

  1. Sorting of cyst wall proteins to a regulated secretory pathway during differentiation of the primitive eukaryote, Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Reiner, D S; McCaffery, M; Gillin, F D

    1990-10-01

    Giardia lamblia, which belongs to the earliest identified lineage to diverge from the eukaryotic line of descent, is one of many protists reported to lack a Golgi apparatus. Our recent finding of a developmentally regulated secretory pathway in G. lamblia makes it an ideal organism with which to test the hypothesis that the Golgi may be more readily demonstrated in actively secreting cells. These ultrastructural studies now show that a regulated pathway of transport and secretion of cyst wall antigens via a novel class of large, osmiophilic secretory vesicles, the encystation-specific vesicles (ESV), is assembled during encystation of G. lamblia. Early in encystation, cyst antigens are localized in simple Golgi membrane stacks and concentrated within enlarged Golgi cisternae which appear to be precursors of ESV. This would represent an unusual mechanism of secretory vesicle biogenesis. Later in differentiation, cyst antigens are localized within ESV, which transport them to the plasma membrane and release them by exocytosis to the nascent cell wall. ESV are not observed after completion of the cyst wall. In contrast to the regulated transport of cyst wall proteins, we demonstrate a distinct constitutive lysosomal pathway. During encystation, acid phosphatase activity is localized in endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi, and small constitutive peripheral vacuoles which function as lysosomes. However, acid phosphatase activity is not detectable in ESV. These studies show that G. lamblia, an early eukaryote, is capable of carrying out Golgi-mediated sorting of proteins to distinct regulated secretory and constitutive lysosomal pathways.

  2. The Role of IRE-XBP1 Pathway in Regulation of Retinal Pigment Epithelium Tight Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jacey H.; Wang, Joshua J.; Li, Junhua; Pfeffer, Bruce A.; Zhong, Yiming; Zhang, Sarah X.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) tight junctions play a pivotal role in maintaining the homeostatic environment of the neural retina. Herein, we investigated the role of X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1), an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-responsive transcription factor, in regulation of RPE tight junctions. Methods Human RPE cell line (ARPE-19) and primary primate RPE cells were used for in vitro experiments and RPE-specific XBP1 knockout (KO) mice were used for in vivo study. Endoplasmic reticulum stress was induced by a sublethal dose of thapsigargin or tunicamycin. XBP1 activation was manipulated by IRE inhibitor 4μ8C, which suppresses XBP1 mRNA splicing. The integrity of tight junctions and the involvement of calcium-dependent RhoA/Rho kinase pathway were examined. Results Induction of ER stress by thapsigargin, but not tunicamycin, disrupted RPE tight junctions in ARPE-19 cells. Inhibition of XBP1 activation by 4μ8C resulted in a remarkable downregulation of tight junction proteins (ZO-1 and occludin) and defects in tight junction formation in the presence or absence of ER stress inducers. Overexpression of active XBP1 partially reversed 4μ8C-induced anomalies in tight junctions. Mechanistically, XBP1 inhibition resulted in increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration, upregulation of RhoA expression, redistribution of F-actin, and tight junction damage, which was attenuated by Rho kinase inhibitor Y27632. In vivo, deletion of XBP1 in the RPE resulted in defective RPE tight junctions accompanied by increased VEGF expression. Conclusions Taken together, these results suggest a protective role of XBP1 in maintaining RPE tight junctions possibly through regulation of calcium-dependent RhoA/Rho kinase signaling and actin cytoskeletal reorganization. PMID:27701635

  3. Streptococcus pyogenes malate degradation pathway links pH regulation and virulence.

    PubMed

    Paluscio, Elyse; Caparon, Michael G

    2015-03-01

    The ability of Streptococcus pyogenes to infect different niches within its human host most likely relies on its ability to utilize alternative carbon sources. In examining this question, we discovered that all sequenced S. pyogenes strains possess the genes for the malic enzyme (ME) pathway, which allows malate to be used as a supplemental carbon source for growth. ME is comprised of four genes in two adjacent operons, with the regulatory two-component MaeKR required for expression of genes encoding a malate permease (maeP) and malic enzyme (maeE). Analysis of transcription indicated that expression of maeP and maeE is induced by both malate and low pH, and induction in response to both cues is dependent on the MaeK sensor kinase. Furthermore, both maePE and maeKR are repressed by glucose, which occurs via a CcpA-independent mechanism. Additionally, malate utilization requires the PTS transporter EI enzyme (PtsI), as a PtsI(-) mutant fails to express the ME genes and is unable to utilize malate. Virulence of selected ME mutants was assessed in a murine model of soft tissue infection. MaeP(-), MaeK(-), and MaeR(-) mutants were attenuated for virulence, whereas a MaeE(-) mutant showed enhanced virulence compared to that of the wild type. Taken together, these data show that ME contributes to S. pyogenes' carbon source repertory, that malate utilization is a highly regulated process, and that a single regulator controls ME expression in response to diverse signals. Furthermore, malate uptake and utilization contribute to the adaptive pH response, and ME can influence the outcome of infection.

  4. The piRNA pathway is developmentally regulated during spermatogenesis in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Quénerch'du, Emilie; Anand, Amit; Kai, Toshie

    2016-07-01

    PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are predominantly produced in animal gonads to suppress transposons during germline development. Our understanding about the piRNA biogenesis and function is predominantly from studies of the Drosophila female germline. piRNA pathway function in the male germline, however, remains poorly understood. To study overall and stage-specific features of piRNAs during spermatogenesis, we analyzed small RNAs extracted from entire wild-type testes and stage-specific arrest mutant testes enriched with spermatogonia or primary spermatocytes. We show that most active piRNA clusters in the female germline do not majorly contribute to piRNAs in testes, and abundance patterns of piRNAs mapping to different transposon families also differ between male and female germlines. piRNA production is regulated in a stage-specific manner during spermatogenesis. The piRNAs in spermatogonia-enriched testes are predominantly transposon-mapping piRNAs, and almost half of those exhibit a ping-pong signature. In contrast, the primary spermatocyte-enriched testes have a dramatically high amount of piRNAs targeting repeats like suppressor of stellate and AT-chX The transposon-mapping piRNAs in the primary spermatocyte stages lacking Argonaute3 expression also show a ping-pong signature, albeit to a lesser extent. Consistently, argonaute3 mutant testes also retain ping-pong signature-bearing piRNAs, suggesting that a noncanonical ping-pong cycle might act during spermatogenesis. Our study shows stage-specific regulation of piRNA biogenesis during spermatogenesis: An active ping-pong cycle produces abundant transposon-mapping piRNAs in spermatogonia, while in primary spermatocytes, piRNAs act to suppress the repeats and transposons. PMID:27208314

  5. Streptococcus pyogenes Malate Degradation Pathway Links pH Regulation and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Paluscio, Elyse

    2015-01-01

    The ability of Streptococcus pyogenes to infect different niches within its human host most likely relies on its ability to utilize alternative carbon sources. In examining this question, we discovered that all sequenced S. pyogenes strains possess the genes for the malic enzyme (ME) pathway, which allows malate to be used as a supplemental carbon source for growth. ME is comprised of four genes in two adjacent operons, with the regulatory two-component MaeKR required for expression of genes encoding a malate permease (maeP) and malic enzyme (maeE). Analysis of transcription indicated that expression of maeP and maeE is induced by both malate and low pH, and induction in response to both cues is dependent on the MaeK sensor kinase. Furthermore, both maePE and maeKR are repressed by glucose, which occurs via a CcpA-independent mechanism. Additionally, malate utilization requires the PTS transporter EI enzyme (PtsI), as a PtsI– mutant fails to express the ME genes and is unable to utilize malate. Virulence of selected ME mutants was assessed in a murine model of soft tissue infection. MaeP–, MaeK–, and MaeR– mutants were attenuated for virulence, whereas a MaeE– mutant showed enhanced virulence compared to that of the wild type. Taken together, these data show that ME contributes to S. pyogenes' carbon source repertory, that malate utilization is a highly regulated process, and that a single regulator controls ME expression in response to diverse signals. Furthermore, malate uptake and utilization contribute to the adaptive pH response, and ME can influence the outcome of infection. PMID:25583521

  6. Regulation of the two kiss promoters in goldfish (Carassius auratus) by estrogen via different ERα pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Sham, Kathy W Y; Ogawa, Satoshi; Li, Shuisheng; Parhar, Ishwar S; Cheng, Christopher H K; Liu, Xiaochun; Lin, Haoran

    2013-08-15

    Kisspeptin stimulates the synthesis and release of gonadotropin via controlling the secretion of gonadotropin releasing hormone in vertebrates. It also mediates the positive or negative feedback regulation of sex steroids on the hypothalamus-gonadotropic axis. In contrast to mammals, two paralogous genes of kisspeptin (kiss1 and kiss2) have been identified in several teleosts, implying the multiplicity of their physiological functions. In the present study, we cloned the promoters of kiss1 and kiss2 genes in goldfish (Carassius auratus), and identified the presence of putative binding sites for estrogen receptors, glucocorticoid receptors, Sp1, AP1, C/EBP and Oct-1. We further demonstrated that the goldfish Kiss neurons co-express the estrogen receptors, with era1 and erb1 in the habenula Kiss1 neurons and era1, era2 and erb1 in the preoptic and hypothalamic Kiss2 neurons. Using transient transfection in HEK293T cells of the two goldfish kiss gene promoters cloned upstream of a luciferase reporter, estrogen (E2, 17β-estradiol) treatment was shown to enhance the promoter activities of the two goldfish kiss genes in the presence of ERα. Deletion analysis of kiss1 promoter indicated that the E2-induced promoter activity was located between position -633 and -317 where no half ERE motifs were found. Point mutation studies on the kiss2 promoter indicated that the E2-stimulated promoter activity was mediated by a half ERE site located at position -57. Results of the present study provide evidence that E2 is capable of exerting positive feedback regulation on the expression of kiss1 and kiss2 in goldfish via ERE-independent or ERE-dependent ERα pathway, respectively.

  7. Feeding and Fasting Signals Converge on the LKB1-SIK3 Pathway to Regulate Lipid Metabolism in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sekyu; Lim, Dae-Sik; Chung, Jongkyeong

    2015-05-01

    LKB1 plays important roles in governing energy homeostasis by regulating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and other AMPK-related kinases, including the salt-inducible kinases (SIKs). However, the roles and regulation of LKB1 in lipid metabolism are poorly understood. Here we show that Drosophila LKB1 mutants display decreased lipid storage and increased gene expression of brummer, the Drosophila homolog of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL). These phenotypes are consistent with those of SIK3 mutants and are rescued by expression of constitutively active SIK3 in the fat body, suggesting that SIK3 is a key downstream kinase of LKB1. Using genetic and biochemical analyses, we identify HDAC4, a class IIa histone deacetylase, as a lipolytic target of the LKB1-SIK3 pathway. Interestingly, we found that the LKB1-SIK3-HDAC4 signaling axis is modulated by dietary conditions. In short-term fasting, the adipokinetic hormone (AKH) pathway, related to the mammalian glucagon pathway, inhibits the kinase activity of LKB1 as shown by decreased SIK3 Thr196 phosphorylation, and consequently induces HDAC4 nuclear localization and brummer gene expression. However, under prolonged fasting conditions, AKH-independent signaling decreases the activity of the LKB1-SIK3 pathway to induce lipolytic responses. We also identify that the Drosophila insulin-like peptides (DILPs) pathway, related to mammalian insulin pathway, regulates SIK3 activity in feeding conditions independently of increasing LKB1 kinase activity. Overall, these data suggest that fasting stimuli specifically control the kinase activity of LKB1 and establish the LKB1-SIK3 pathway as a converging point between feeding and fasting signals to control lipid homeostasis in Drosophila.

  8. Feeding and Fasting Signals Converge on the LKB1-SIK3 Pathway to Regulate Lipid Metabolism in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sekyu; Lim, Dae-Sik; Chung, Jongkyeong

    2015-01-01

    LKB1 plays important roles in governing energy homeostasis by regulating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and other AMPK-related kinases, including the salt-inducible kinases (SIKs). However, the roles and regulation of LKB1 in lipid metabolism are poorly understood. Here we show that Drosophila LKB1 mutants display decreased lipid storage and increased gene expression of brummer, the Drosophila homolog of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL). These phenotypes are consistent with those of SIK3 mutants and are rescued by expression of constitutively active SIK3 in the fat body, suggesting that SIK3 is a key downstream kinase of LKB1. Using genetic and biochemical analyses, we identify HDAC4, a class IIa histone deacetylase, as a lipolytic target of the LKB1-SIK3 pathway. Interestingly, we found that the LKB1-SIK3-HDAC4 signaling axis is modulated by dietary conditions. In short-term fasting, the adipokinetic hormone (AKH) pathway, related to the mammalian glucagon pathway, inhibits the kinase activity of LKB1 as shown by decreased SIK3 Thr196 phosphorylation, and consequently induces HDAC4 nuclear localization and brummer gene expression. However, under prolonged fasting conditions, AKH-independent signaling decreases the activity of the LKB1-SIK3 pathway to induce lipolytic responses. We also identify that the Drosophila insulin-like peptides (DILPs) pathway, related to mammalian insulin pathway, regulates SIK3 activity in feeding conditions independently of increasing LKB1 kinase activity. Overall, these data suggest that fasting stimuli specifically control the kinase activity of LKB1 and establish the LKB1-SIK3 pathway as a converging point between feeding and fasting signals to control lipid homeostasis in Drosophila. PMID:25996931

  9. Dietary regulation of PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β pathway in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by the formation of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles composed of phosphorylated Tau. Several findings suggest that correcting signal dysregulation for Tau phosphorylation in AD may offer a potential therapeutic approach. The PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β pathway has been shown to play a pivotal role in neuroprotection, enhancing cell survival by stimulating cell proliferation and inhibiting apoptosis. This pathway appears to be crucial in AD because it promotes protein hyper-phosphorylation in Tau. Understanding those regulations may provide a better efficacy of new therapeutic approaches. In this review, we summarize advances in the involvement of the PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β pathways in cell signaling of neuronal cells. We also review recent studies on the features of several diets and the signaling pathway involved in AD. PMID:25031641

  10. Arabidopsis CPR5 Independently Regulates Seed Germination and Postgermination Arrest of Development through LOX Pathway and ABA Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiang; Wang, Yaqin; Su, Xiaojun; Du, Jinju; Yang, Chengwei

    2011-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) and the lipoxygenases (LOXs) pathway play important roles in seed germination and seedling growth and development. Here, we reported on the functional characterization of Arabidopsis CPR5 in the ABA signaling and LOX pathways. The cpr5 mutant was hypersensitive to ABA in the seed germination, cotyledon greening and root growth, whereas transgenic plants overexpressing CPR5 were insensitive. Genetic analysis demonstrated that CPR5 gene may be located downstream of the ABI1 in the ABA signaling pathway. However, the cpr5 mutant showed an ABA independent drought-resistant phenotype. It was also found that the cpr5 mutant was hypersensitive to NDGA and NDGA treatment aggravated the ABA-induced delay in the seed germination and cotyledon greening. Taken together, these results suggest that the CPR5 plays a regulatory role in the regulation of seed germination and early seedling growth through ABA and LOX pathways independently. PMID:21556325

  11. Relevance of biotic pathways to the regulation of nuclear waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; McKenzie, D.H.; Cadwell, L.L.

    1982-09-01

    Alternatives for licensing and regulating low-level waste burial sites need to be selected on the basis of reasonable evaluations of risk. With regard to low-level sites, biotic transport processes must be evaluated along with other transport processes (e.g. groundwater, agricultural food chains) if the consequences of alternative courses of action are to be understood. Biotic transport (amounts and rates or radionuclide transport by biota) at waste facilities is poorly understood when compared to current understanding of routes and movements of radionuclides through agricultural food chains. This presentation includes work on Phase I of this research program conducted for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (1). Our objective was to assess current biotic transport modeling. Our efforts have focused on evaluating the relevance of biotic transport to the assessment of impacts of waste disposal on humans and their environment. Our assessment considered available dose pathway analysis computer models and the potential applications of biotic transport models at low-level waste (LLW) disposal sites. An identification and review of biotic transport mechanisms and processes for terrestrial systems was provided. Current efforts are to estimate the comparative magnitude of dose to man resulting from biotic transport. The final report for Phase I will contain: (1) a critical review of available modeling techniques; (2) an assessment of the possible significance of biotic transport of radionuclides from low-level waste disposal sites to man; and (3) if appropriate, a summary of additional investigations needed to apply biotic transport modeling to regulatory concerns effectively.

  12. Abiotic Stresses: Insight into Gene Regulation and Protein Expression in Photosynthetic Pathways of Plants.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Mohammad-Zaman; Moumeni, Ali; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2015-01-01

    Global warming and climate change intensified the occurrence and severity of abiotic stresses that seriously affect the growth and development of plants,especially, plant photosynthesis. The direct impact of abiotic stress on the activity of photosynthesis is disruption of all photosynthesis components such as photosystem I and II, electron transport, carbon fixation, ATP generating system and stomatal conductance. The photosynthetic system of plants reacts to the stress differently, according to the plant type, photosynthetic systems (C₃ or C₄), type of the stress, time and duration of the occurrence and several other factors. The plant responds to the stresses by a coordinate chloroplast and nuclear gene expression. Chloroplast, thylakoid membrane, and nucleus are the main targets of regulated proteins and metabolites associated with photosynthetic pathways. Rapid responses of plant cell metabolism and adaptation to photosynthetic machinery are key factors for survival of plants in a fluctuating environment. This review gives a comprehensive view of photosynthesis-related alterations at the gene and protein levels for plant adaptation or reaction in response to abiotic stress.

  13. Abiotic Stresses: Insight into Gene Regulation and Protein Expression in Photosynthetic Pathways of Plants

    PubMed Central

    Nouri, Mohammad-Zaman; Moumeni, Ali; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2015-01-01

    Global warming and climate change intensified the occurrence and severity of abiotic stresses that seriously affect the growth and development of plants, especially, plant photosynthesis. The direct impact of abiotic stress on the activity of photosynthesis is disruption of all photosynthesis components such as photosystem I and II, electron transport, carbon fixation, ATP generating system and stomatal conductance. The photosynthetic system of plants reacts to the stress differently, according to the plant type, photosynthetic systems (C3 or C4), type of the stress, time and duration of the occurrence and several other factors. The plant responds to the stresses by a coordinate chloroplast and nuclear gene expression. Chloroplast, thylakoid membrane, and nucleus are the main targets of regulated proteins and metabolites associated with photosynthetic pathways. Rapid responses of plant cell metabolism and adaptation to photosynthetic machinery are key factors for survival of plants in a fluctuating environment. This review gives a comprehensive view of photosynthesis-related alterations at the gene and protein levels for plant adaptation or reaction in response to abiotic stress. PMID:26343644

  14. Abiotic Stresses: Insight into Gene Regulation and Protein Expression in Photosynthetic Pathways of Plants.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Mohammad-Zaman; Moumeni, Ali; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2015-01-01

    Global warming and climate change intensified the occurrence and severity of abiotic stresses that seriously affect the growth and development of plants,especially, plant photosynthesis. The direct impact of abiotic stress on the activity of photosynthesis is disruption of all photosynthesis components such as photosystem I and II, electron transport, carbon fixation, ATP generating system and stomatal conductance. The photosynthetic system of plants reacts to the stress differently, according to the plant type, photosynthetic systems (C₃ or C₄), type of the stress, time and duration of the occurrence and several other factors. The plant responds to the stresses by a coordinate chloroplast and nuclear gene expression. Chloroplast, thylakoid membrane, and nucleus are the main targets of regulated proteins and metabolites associated with photosynthetic pathways. Rapid responses of plant cell metabolism and adaptation to photosynthetic machinery are key factors for survival of plants in a fluctuating environment. This review gives a comprehensive view of photosynthesis-related alterations at the gene and protein levels for plant adaptation or reaction in response to abiotic stress. PMID:26343644

  15. Functional water flow pathways and hydraulic regulation in the xylem network of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Park, Joonghyuk; Kim, Hae Koo; Ryu, Jeongeun; Ahn, Sungsook; Lee, Sang Joon; Hwang, Ildoo

    2015-03-01

    In vascular plants, the xylem network constitutes a complex microfluidic system. The relationship between vascular network architecture and functional hydraulic regulation during actual water flow remains unexplored. Here, we developed a method to visualize individual xylem vessels of the 3D xylem network of Arabidopsis thaliana, and to analyze the functional activities of these vessels using synchrotron X-ray computed tomography with hydrophilic gold nanoparticles as flow tracers. We show how the organization of the xylem network changes dynamically throughout the plant, and reveal how the elementary units of this transport system are organized to ensure both long-distance axial water transport and local lateral water transport. Xylem vessels form distinct clusters that operate as functional units, and the activity of these units, which determines water flow pathways, is modulated not only by varying the number and size of xylem vessels, but also by altering their interconnectivity and spatial arrangement. Based on these findings, we propose a regulatory model of water transport that ensures hydraulic efficiency and safety.

  16. Circadian and Dopaminergic Regulation of Fatty Acid Oxidation Pathway Genes in Retina and Photoreceptor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vancura, Patrick; Wolloscheck, Tanja; Baba, Kenkichi; Tosini, Gianluca; Iuvone, P. Michael; Spessert, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    The energy metabolism of the retina might comply with daily changes in energy demand and is impaired in diabetic retinopathy—one of the most common causes of blindness in Europe and the USA. The aim of this study was to investigate putative adaptation of energy metabolism in healthy and diabetic retina. Hence expression analysis of metabolic pathway genes was performed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, semi-quantitative western blot and immunohistochemistry. Transcriptional profiling of key enzymes of energy metabolism identified transcripts of mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation enzymes, i.e. carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1α (Cpt-1α) and medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (Acadm) to display daily rhythms with peak values during daytime in preparations of the whole retina and microdissected photoreceptors. The cycling of both enzymes persisted in constant darkness, was dampened in mice deficient for dopamine D4 (D4) receptors and was altered in db/db mice—a model of diabetic retinopathy. The data of the present study are consistent with circadian clock-dependent and dopaminergic regulation of fatty acid oxidation in retina and its putative disturbance in diabetic retina. PMID:27727308

  17. DEK Depletion Negatively Regulates Rho/ROCK/MLC Pathway in Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junying; Sun, Limei; Yang, Mingyue; Luo, Wenting; Gao, Ying; Liu, Zihui; Wang, Enhua

    2013-01-01

    The human DEK proto-oncogene is a nuclear protein with suspected roles in human carcinogenesis. DEK appears to function in several nuclear processes, including transcriptional regulation and modulation of chromatin structure. To investigate the clinicopathological significance of DEK in patients with non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), we analyzed DEK immunohistochemistry in 112 NSCLC cases. The results showed that DEK was overexpressed mainly in the nuclear compartment of tumor cells. In squamous cell carcinoma, DEK-positive expression occurred in 47.9% (23/48) of cases, and in lung adenocarcinoma, DEK-positive expression occurred in 67.2% (43/64) of cases and correlated with differentiation, p-TNM stage, and nodal status. Moreover, in lung adenocarcinoma, DEK expression was significantly higher compared with DEK expression in squamous cell carcinoma. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that patients with low DEK expression had higher overall survival compared with patients with high DEK expression. Depleting DEK expression inhibited cellular proliferation and migration. Furthermore, in DEK-depleted NSCLC cells, we found that RhoA expression was markedly reduced; in conjunction, active RhoA-GTP levels and the downstream effector phosphorylated MLC2 were also reduced. Taken together, DEK depletion inhibited cellular migration in lung cancer cell lines possibly through inactivation of the RhoA/ROCK/MLC signal transduction pathway. PMID:23571382

  18. Regulation of Transport Pathways in Tumor Vessels: Role of Tumor Type and Microenvironment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Susan K.; Monsky, Wayne L.; Yuan, Fan; Roberts, W. Gregory; Griffith, Linda; Torchilin, Vladimir P.; Jain, Rakesh K.

    1998-04-01

    Novel anti-neoplastic agents such as gene targeting vectors and encapsulated carriers are quite large (approximately 100-300 nm in diameter). An understanding of the functional size and physiological regulation of transvascular pathways is necessary to optimize delivery of these agents. Here we analyze the functional limits of transvascular transport and its modulation by the microenvironment. One human and five murine tumors including mammary and colorectal carcinomas, hepatoma, glioma, and sarcoma were implanted in the dorsal skin-fold chamber or cranial window, and the pore cutoff size, a functional measure of transvascular gap size, was determined. The microenvironment was modulated: (i) spatially, by growing tumors in subcutaneous or cranial locations and (ii) temporally, by inducing vascular regression in hormone-dependent tumors. Tumors grown subcutaneously exhibited a characteristic pore cutoff size ranging from 200 nm to 1.2 μ m. This pore cutoff size was reduced in tumors grown in the cranium or in regressing tumors after hormone withdrawal. Vessels induced in basic fibroblast growth factor-containing gels had a pore cutoff size of 200 nm. Albumin permeability was independent of pore cutoff size. These results have three major implications for the delivery of therapeutic agents: (i) delivery may be less efficient in cranial tumors than in subcutaneous tumors, (ii) delivery may be reduced during tumor regression induced by hormonal ablation, and (iii) permeability to a molecule is independent of pore cutoff size as long as the diameter of the molecule is much less than the pore diameter.

  19. Reciprocal regulation of cilia and autophagy via the MTOR and proteasome pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shixuan; Livingston, Man J; Su, Yunchao; Dong, Zheng

    2015-04-01

    Primary cilium is an organelle that plays significant roles in a number of cellular functions ranging from cell mechanosensation, proliferation, and differentiation to apoptosis. Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved cellular function in biology and indispensable for cellular homeostasis. Both cilia and autophagy have been linked to different types of genetic and acquired human diseases. Their interaction has been suggested very recently, but the underlying mechanisms are still not fully understood. We examined autophagy in cells with suppressed cilia and measured cilium length in autophagy-activated or -suppressed cells. It was found that autophagy was repressed in cells with short cilia. Further investigation showed that MTOR activation was enhanced in cilia-suppressed cells and the MTOR inhibitor rapamycin could largely reverse autophagy suppression. In human kidney proximal tubular cells (HK2), autophagy induction was associated with cilium elongation. Conversely, autophagy inhibition by 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and chloroquine (CQ) as well as bafilomycin A1 (Baf) led to short cilia. Cilia were also shorter in cultured atg5-knockout (KO) cells and in atg7-KO kidney proximal tubular cells in mice. MG132, an inhibitor of the proteasome, could significantly restore cilium length in atg5-KO cells, being concomitant with the proteasome activity. Together, the results suggest that cilia and autophagy regulate reciprocally through the MTOR signaling pathway and ubiquitin-proteasome system.

  20. Endogenous cGMP regulates adult longevity via the insulin signaling pathway in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Hahm, Jeong-Hoon; Kim, Sunhee; Paik, Young-Ki

    2009-08-01

    G-proteins, including GPA-3, play an important role in regulating physiological responses in Caenorhabditis elegans. When confronted with an environmental stimulus such as dauer pheromone, or poor nutrients, C. elegans receives and integrates external signals through its nervous system (i.e. amphid neurons), which interprets and translates them into biological action. Here it is shown that a suppressed neuronal cGMP level caused by GPA-3 activation leads to a significant increase (47.3%) in the mean lifespan of adult C. elegans through forkhead transcription factor family O (FOXO)-mediated signal. A reduced neuronal cGMP level was found to be caused by an increased cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase activity at the transcriptional level. Our results using C. elegans mutants with specific deficits in TGF-beta and FOXO RNAi system suggest a mechanism in that cGMP, TGF-beta, and FOXO signaling interact to differentially produce the insulin-like molecules, ins-7 and daf-28, causing suppression of the insulin/IGF-1 pathway and promoting lifespan extension. Our findings provide not only a new mechanism of cGMP-mediated induction of longevity in adult C. elegans but also a possible therapeutic strategy for neuronal disease, which has been likened to brain diabetes. PMID:19489741

  1. Signal transduction pathways mediating parathyroid hormone regulation of osteoblastic gene expression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, N. C.; Bloch, S. R.; Pearman, A. T.

    1994-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) plays a central role in regulation of calcium metabolism. For example, excessive or inappropriate production of PTH or the related hormone, parathyroid hormone related protein (PTHrP), accounts for the majority of the causes of hypercalcemia. Both hormones act through the same receptor on the osteoblast to elicit enhanced bone resorption by the osteoclast. Thus, the osteoblast mediates the effect of PTH in the resorption process. In this process, PTH causes a change in the function and phenotype of the osteoblast from a cell involved in bone formation to one directing the process of bone resorption. In response to PTH, the osteoblast decreases collagen, alkaline phosphatase, and osteopontin expression and increases production of osteocalcin, cytokines, and neutral proteases. Many of these changes have been shown to be due to effects on mRNA abundance through either transcriptional or post-transcriptional mechanisms. However, the signal transduction pathway for the hormone to cause these changes is not completely elucidated in any case. Binding of PTH and PTHrP to their common receptor has been shown to result in activation of protein kinases A and C and increases in intracellular calcium. The latter has not been implicated in any changes in mRNA of osteoblastic genes. On the other hand activation of PKA can mimic all the effects of PTH; protein kinase C may be involved in some responses. We will discuss possible mechanisms linking PKA and PKC activation to changes in gene expression, particularly at the nuclear level.

  2. Rare Copy Number Variants Identified Suggest the Regulating Pathways in Hypertension-Related Left Ventricular Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Christian R.; Majid, Fadhlina; Danuri, Norlaila; Basir, Fashieha; Thiruvahindrapuram, Bhooma; Scherer, Stephen W.; Yusoff, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and a powerful predictor of adverse cardiovascular outcomes in the hypertensive patients. It has complex multifactorial and polygenic basis for its pathogenesis. We hypothesized that rare copy number variants (CNVs) contribute to the LVH pathogenesis in hypertensive patients. Copy number variants (CNV) were identified in 258 hypertensive patients, 95 of whom had LVH, after genotyping with a high resolution SNP array. Following stringent filtering criteria, we identified 208 rare, or private CNVs that were only present in our patients with hypertension related LVH. Preliminary findings from Gene Ontology and pathway analysis of this study confirmed the involvement of the genes known to be functionally involved in cardiac development and phenotypes, in line with previously reported transcriptomic studies. Network enrichment analyses suggested that the gene-set was, directly or indirectly, involved in the transcription factors regulating the “foetal cardiac gene programme” which triggered the hypertrophic cascade, confirming previous reports. These findings suggest that multiple, individually rare copy number variants altering genes may contribute to the pathogenesis of hypertension-related LVH. In summary, we have provided further supporting evidence that rare CNV could potentially impact this common and complex disease susceptibility with lower heritability. PMID:26930585

  3. QTL analysis for sugar-regulated leaf senescence supports flowering-dependent and -independent senescence pathways.

    PubMed

    Wingler, Astrid; Purdy, Sarah Jane; Edwards, Sally-Anne; Chardon, Fabien; Masclaux-Daubresse, Céline

    2010-01-01

    *The aim of this work was to determine the genetic basis of sugar-regulated senescence and to explore the relationship with other traits, including flowering and nitrogen-use efficiency. *Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for senescence were mapped in the Arabidopsis Bay-0 x Shahdara recombinant-inbred line (RIL) population after growth on glucose-containing medium, which accelerates senescence. The extent of whole-rosette senescence was determined by imaging the maximum quantum yield of photosystem II (F(v)/F(m)). *A major QTL on the top of chromosome 4 colocalized with FRI, a major determinant of flowering. This QTL interacted epistatically with a QTL on chromosome 5, where the floral repressor FLC localizes. Vernalization accelerated senescence in late-flowering lines with functional FRI and FLC alleles. Comparison with previous results using the Bay-0 x Shahdara population showed that rapid rosette senescence on glucose-containing medium was correlated with early flowering and high sugar content in compost-grown plants. In addition, correlation was found between the expression of flowering and senescence-associated genes in Arabidopsis accessions. However, an additional QTL on chromosome 3 was not linked to flowering, but to nitrogen-use efficiency. *The results show that whole-rosette senescence is genetically linked to the vernalization-dependent control of flowering, but is also controlled by flowering-independent pathways.

  4. Introns Regulate Gene Expression in Cryptococcus neoformans in a Pab2p Dependent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Goebels, Carolin; Thonn, Aline; Gonzalez-Hilarion, Sara; Rolland, Olga; Moyrand, Frederique; Beilharz, Traude H.; Janbon, Guilhem

    2013-01-01

    Most Cryptococccus neoformans genes are interrupted by introns, and alternative splicing occurs very often. In this study, we examined the influence of introns on C. neoformans gene expression. For most tested genes, elimination of introns greatly reduces mRNA accumulation. Strikingly, the number and the position of introns modulate the gene expression level in a cumulative manner. A screen for mutant strains able to express functionally an intronless allele revealed that the nuclear poly(A) binding protein Pab2 modulates intron-dependent regulation of gene expression in C. neoformans. PAB2 deletion partially restored accumulation of intronless mRNA. In addition, our results demonstrated that the essential nucleases Rrp44p and Xrn2p are implicated in the degradation of mRNA transcribed from an intronless allele in C. neoformans. Double mutant constructions and over-expression experiments suggested that Pab2p and Xrn2p could act in the same pathway whereas Rrp44p appears to act independently. Finally, deletion of the RRP6 or the CID14 gene, encoding the nuclear exosome nuclease and the TRAMP complex associated poly(A) polymerase, respectively, has no effect on intronless allele expression. PMID:23966870

  5. RNA sequencing analysis of human podocytes reveals glucocorticoid regulated gene networks targeting non-immune pathways

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lulu; Hindmarch, Charles C. T.; Rogers, Mark; Campbell, Colin; Waterfall, Christy; Coghill, Jane; Mathieson, Peter W.; Welsh, Gavin I.

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are steroids that reduce inflammation and are used as immunosuppressive drugs for many diseases. They are also the mainstay for the treatment of minimal change nephropathy (MCN), which is characterised by an absence of inflammation. Their mechanisms of action remain elusive. Evidence suggests that immunomodulatory drugs can directly act on glomerular epithelial cells or ‘podocytes’, the cell type which is the main target of injury in MCN. To understand the nature of glucocorticoid effects on non-immune cell functions, we generated RNA sequencing data from human podocyte cell lines and identified the genes that are significantly regulated in dexamethasone-treated podocytes compared to vehicle-treated cells. The upregulated genes are of functional relevance to cytoskeleton-related processes, whereas the downregulated genes mostly encode pro-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors. We observed a tendency for dexamethasone-upregulated genes to be downregulated in MCN patients. Integrative analysis revealed gene networks composed of critical signaling pathways that are likely targeted by dexamethasone in podocytes. PMID:27774996

  6. Negative regulation of TLR-signaling pathways by activating transcription factor-3.

    PubMed

    Whitmore, Mark M; Iparraguirre, Amaya; Kubelka, Lindsey; Weninger, Wolfgang; Hai, Tsonwin; Williams, Bryan R G

    2007-09-15

    Activating transcription factor-3 (ATF3) is rapidly induced by LPS in mouse macrophages and regulates TLR4 responses. We show that ATF3 is rapidly induced by various TLRs in mouse macrophages and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (DCs), as well as plasmacytoid and myeloid subsets of human DCs. In primary macrophages from mice with a targeted deletion of the atf3 gene (ATF3-knockout (KO)), TLR-stimulated levels of IL-12 and IL-6 were elevated relative to responses in wild-type macrophages. Similarly, targeted deletion of atf3 correlated with enhanced responsiveness of myeloid DCs to TLR activation as measured by IL-12 secretion. Ectopic expression of ATF3 antagonized TLR-stimulated IL-12p40 activation in a reporter assay. In vivo, CpG-oligodeoxynucleotide, a TLR9 agonist, given i.p. to ATF3-KO mice resulted in enhanced cytokine production from splenocytes. Furthermore, while ATF3-KO mice challenged with a sublethal dose of PR8 influenza virus were delayed in body weight recovery in comparison to wild type, the ATF3-KO mice showed higher titers of serum neutralizing Ab against PR8 5 mo postinfection. Thus, ATF3 behaves as a negative regulatory transcription factor in TLR pathways and, accordingly, deficiency in atf3 alters responses to immunological challenges in vivo. ATF3 dysregulation merits further exploration in diseases such as type I diabetes and cancer, where altered innate immunity has been implicated in their pathogenesis.

  7. Octopamine neuromodulation regulates Gr32a-linked aggression and courtship pathways in Drosophila males.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Jonathan C; Fernández, María Paz; Yu, Qin; Leary, Greg P; Leung, Adelaine K W; Kavanaugh, Michael P; Kravitz, Edward A; Certel, Sarah J

    2014-05-01

    Chemosensory pheromonal information regulates aggression and reproduction in many species, but how pheromonal signals are transduced to reliably produce behavior is not well understood. Here we demonstrate that the pheromonal signals detected by Gr32a-expressing chemosensory neurons to enhance male aggression are filtered through octopamine (OA, invertebrate equivalent of norepinephrine) neurons. Using behavioral assays, we find males lacking both octopamine and Gr32a gustatory receptors exhibit parallel delays in the onset of aggression and reductions in aggression. Physiological and anatomical experiments identify Gr32a to octopamine neuron synaptic and functional connections in the suboesophageal ganglion. Refining the Gr32a-expressing population indicates that mouth Gr32a neurons promote male aggression and form synaptic contacts with OA neurons. By restricting the monoamine neuron target population, we show that three previously identified OA-Fru(M) neurons involved in behavioral choice are among the Gr32a-OA connections. Our findings demonstrate that octopaminergic neuromodulatory neurons function as early as a second-order step in this chemosensory-driven male social behavior pathway.

  8. TNFR1 and TNFR2 regulate the extrinsic apoptotic pathway in myeloma cells by multiple mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Rauert, H; Stühmer, T; Bargou, R; Wajant, H; Siegmund, D

    2011-01-01

    The huge majority of myeloma cell lines express TNFR2 while a substantial subset of them failed to show TNFR1 expression. Stimulation of TNFR1 in the TNFR1-expressing subset of MM cell lines had no or only a very mild effect on cellular viability. Surprisingly, however, TNF stimulation enhanced cell death induction by CD95L and attenuated the apoptotic effect of TRAIL. The contrasting regulation of TRAIL- and CD95L-induced cell death by TNF could be traced back to the concomitant NFκB-mediated upregulation of CD95 and the antiapoptotic FLIP protein. It appeared that CD95 induction, due to its strength, overcompensated a rather moderate upregulation of FLIP so that the net effect of TNF-induced NFκB activation in the context of CD95 signaling is pro-apoptotic. TRAIL-induced cell death, however, was antagonized in response to TNF because in this context only the induction of FLIP is relevant. Stimulation of TNFR2 in myeloma cells leads to TRAF2 depletion. In line with this, we observed cell death induction in TNFR1-TNFR2-costimulated JJN3 cells. Our studies revealed that the TNF-TNF receptor system adjusts the responsiveness of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway in myeloma cells by multiple mechanisms that generate a highly context-dependent net effect on myeloma cell survival. PMID:21850048

  9. Resveratrol induces apoptosis in K562 cells via the regulation of mitochondrial signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, Binghua; Liu, Jiao; Gong, Zhanfeng

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol, an edible polyphenolic phytoalexin obtained primarily from root extracts of the oriental plant, Polygonum cuspidatum and from grapes and red wine, has been reported as an anticancer compound against several types of cancer, the accurate molecular mechanisms of by which it induces apoptosis are limited. In the present study, the molecular mechanisms of resveratrol on human leukemia K562 cells apoptosis was examined. Our results showed that resveratrol significantly decreased cell viability and triggered cell apoptosis in K562 cells. Resveratrol-induced apoptosis of K562 cells was associated with the dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and the release of cytochrome c into the cytosol. Furthermore, the up-regulation of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, the activation of caspase-3 and increased cleaved PARP was also observed in K562 cells treated with resveratrol. Thus, we considered that the resveratrol-induced apoptosis of K562 cells might be mediated through the mitochondria pathway, which gives the rationale for in vivo studies on the utilization of resveratrol as a potential cancer therapeutic compound. PMID:26629245

  10. Prospore membrane formation defines a developmentally regulated branch of the secretory pathway in yeast.

    PubMed

    Neiman, A M

    1998-01-12

    Spore formation in yeast is an unusual form of cell division in which the daughter cells are formed within the mother cell cytoplasm. This division requires the de novo synthesis of a membrane compartment, termed the prospore membrane, which engulfs the daughter nuclei. The effect of mutations in late-acting genes on sporulation was investigated. Mutation of SEC1, SEC4, or SEC8 blocked spore formation, and electron microscopic analysis of the sec4-8 mutant indicated that this inability to produce spores was caused by a failure to form the prospore membrane. The soluble NSF attachment protein 25 (SNAP-25) homologue SEC9, by contrast, was not required for sporulation. The absence of a requirement for SEC9 was shown to be due to the sporulation-specific induction of a second, previously undescribed, SNAP-25 homologue, termed SPO20. These results define a developmentally regulated branch of the secretory pathway and suggest that spore morphogenesis in yeast proceeds by the targeting and fusion of secretory vesicles to form new plasma membranes in the interior of the mother cell. Consistent with this model, the extracellular proteins Gas1p and Cts1p were localized to an internal compartment in sporulating cells. Spore formation in yeast may be a useful model for understanding secretion-driven cell division events in a variety of plant and animal systems.

  11. The M-type receptor PLA2R regulates senescence through the p53 pathway.

    PubMed

    Augert, Arnaud; Payré, Christine; de Launoit, Yvan; Gil, Jesus; Lambeau, Gérard; Bernard, David

    2009-03-01

    Senescence is a stable proliferative arrest induced by various stresses such as telomere erosion, oncogenic or oxidative stress. Compelling evidence suggests that it acts as a barrier against tumour development. Describing new mechanisms that favour an escape from senescence can thus reveal new insights into tumorigenesis. To identify new genes controlling the senescence programme, we performed a loss-of-function genetic screen in primary human fibroblasts. We report that knockdown of the M-type receptor PLA2R (phospholipase A2 receptor) prevents the onset of replicative senescence and diminishes stress-induced senescence. Interestingly, expression of PLA2R increases during replicative senescence, and its ectopic expression results in premature senescence. We show that PLA2R regulates senescence in a reactive oxygen species-DNA damage-p53-dependent manner. Taken together, our study identifies PLA2R as a potential new tumour suppressor gene crucial in the induction of cellular senescence through the activation of the p53 pathway.

  12. The M-type receptor PLA2R regulates senescence through the p53 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Augert, Arnaud; Payré, Christine; de Launoit, Yvan; Gil, Jesus; Lambeau, Gérard; Bernard, David

    2009-01-01

    Senescence is a stable proliferative arrest induced by various stresses such as telomere erosion, oncogenic or oxidative stress. Compelling evidence suggests that it acts as a barrier against tumour development. Describing new mechanisms that favour an escape from senescence can thus reveal new insights into tumorigenesis. To identify new genes controlling the senescence programme, we performed a loss-of-function genetic screen in primary human fibroblasts. We report that knockdown of the M-type receptor PLA2R (phospholipase A2 receptor) prevents the onset of replicative senescence and diminishes stress-induced senescence. Interestingly, expression of PLA2R increases during replicative senescence, and its ectopic expression results in premature senescence. We show that PLA2R regulates senescence in a reactive oxygen species–DNA damage–p53-dependent manner. Taken together, our study identifies PLA2R as a potential new tumour suppressor gene crucial in the induction of cellular senescence through the activation of the p53 pathway. PMID:19197340

  13. Frankincense and myrrh suppress inflammation via regulation of the metabolic profiling and the MAPK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Su, Shulan; Duan, Jinao; Chen, Ting; Huang, Xiaochen; Shang, Erxin; Yu, Li; Wei, Kaifeng; Zhu, Yue; Guo, Jianming; Guo, Sheng; Liu, Pei; Qian, Dawei; Tang, Yuping

    2015-01-01

    Frankincense and myrrh are highly effective in treatment of inflammatory diseases, but lacking of thetherapy mechanisms. We undertook this study to evaluate the effects on Adjuvant-induced Arthritis(AIA) rats and to explore the underlying mechanisms by analyzing the metabolic profiling and signalingpathway evaluated by expression of inflammatory cytokines, c-jun and c-fos and corresponding phosphorylationlevels. [corrected]. The results stated the elevated expression levels of TNFα, PGE2, IL-2, NO, and MDA in serum and swelling paw of AIA rats were significantly decreased after treatment, which exerted more remarkable inhibitive effects of combined therapy. The metbolic profiling of plasma and urine were clearly improved and twenty-one potential biomarkers were identified. Moreover, the inhibited effects of five bioactive components on cytokine transcription in PHA stimulated-PBMC showed the MAPK pathway might account for this phenomenon with considerable reduction in phosphorylated forms of all the three MAPK (ERK1/2, p38 and JNK) and down regulation of c-jun and c-fos. PMID:26329643

  14. A maternal effect rough deal mutation suggests that multiple pathways regulate Drosophila RZZ kinetochore recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Défachelles, Lénaïg; Hainline, Sarah G.; Menant, Alexandra; Lee, Laura A.; Karess, Roger E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Proper kinetochore recruitment and regulation of dynein and the Mad1–Mad2 complex requires the Rod–Zw10–Zwilch (RZZ) complex. Here, we describe rodZ3, a maternal-effect Drosophila mutation changing a single residue in the Rough Deal (Rod) subunit of RZZ. Although the RZZ complex containing this altered subunit (denoted RZ3ZZ) is present in early syncytial stage embryos laid by homozygous rodZ3 mothers, it is not recruited to kinetochores. Consequently, the embryos have no spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), and syncytial mitoses are profoundly perturbed. The polar body (residual meiotic products) cannot remain in its SAC-dependent metaphase-like state, and decondenses into chromatin. In neuroblasts of homozygous rodZ3 larvae, RZ3ZZ recruitment is only partially reduced, the SAC is functional and mitosis is relatively normal. RZ3ZZ nevertheless behaves abnormally: it does not further accumulate on kinetochores when microtubules are depolymerized; it reduces the rate of Mad1 recruitment; and it dominantly interferes with the dynein-mediated streaming of RZZ from attached kinetochores. These results suggest that the mutated residue of rodZ3 is required for normal RZZ kinetochore recruitment and function and, moreover, that the RZZ recruitment pathway might differ in syncytial stage embryos and post-embryonic somatic cells. PMID:25616898

  15. A maternal effect rough deal mutation suggests that multiple pathways regulate Drosophila RZZ kinetochore recruitment.

    PubMed

    Défachelles, Lénaïg; Hainline, Sarah G; Menant, Alexandra; Lee, Laura A; Karess, Roger E

    2015-03-15

    Proper kinetochore recruitment and regulation of dynein and the Mad1-Mad2 complex requires the Rod-Zw10-Zwilch (RZZ) complex. Here, we describe rod(Z3), a maternal-effect Drosophila mutation changing a single residue in the Rough Deal (Rod) subunit of RZZ. Although the RZZ complex containing this altered subunit (denoted R(Z3)ZZ) is present in early syncytial stage embryos laid by homozygous rod(Z3) mothers, it is not recruited to kinetochores. Consequently, the embryos have no spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), and syncytial mitoses are profoundly perturbed. The polar body (residual meiotic products) cannot remain in its SAC-dependent metaphase-like state, and decondenses into chromatin. In neuroblasts of homozygous rod(Z3) larvae, R(Z3)ZZ recruitment is only partially reduced, the SAC is functional and mitosis is relatively normal. R(Z3)ZZ nevertheless behaves abnormally: it does not further accumulate on kinetochores when microtubules are depolymerized; it reduces the rate of Mad1 recruitment; and it dominantly interferes with the dynein-mediated streaming of RZZ from attached kinetochores. These results suggest that the mutated residue of rod(Z3) is required for normal RZZ kinetochore recruitment and function and, moreover, that the RZZ recruitment pathway might differ in syncytial stage embryos and post-embryonic somatic cells.

  16. A TIGAR-regulated metabolic pathway is critical for protection of brain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei; Sun, Meiling; Cao, Lijuan; Gu, Jin-hua; Ge, Jianbin; Chen, Jieyu; Han, Rong; Qin, Yuan-Yuan; Zhou, Zhi-Peng; Ding, Yuqiang; Qin, Zheng-Hong

    2014-05-28

    TP53-induced glycolysis and apoptosis regulator (TIGAR) inhibits glycolysis and increases the flow of pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), which generates NADPH and pentose. We hypothesized that TIGAR plays a neuroprotective role in brain ischemia as neurons do not rely on glycolysis but are vulnerable to oxidative stress. We found that TIGAR was highly expressed in brain neurons and was rapidly upregulated in response to ischemia/reperfusion insult in a TP53-independent manner. Overexpression of TIGAR in normal mice with lentivirus reduced ischemic neuronal injury, whereas lentivirus-mediated TIGAR knockdown aggravated it. In cultured primary neurons, increasing TIGAR expression reduced oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD)/reoxygenation-induced injury, whereas decreasing its expression worsened the injury. The glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase was upregulated in mouse and cellular models of stroke, and its upregulation was further enhanced by overexpression of TIGAR. Supplementation of NADPH also reduced ischemia/reperfusion brain injury and alleviated TIGAR knockdown-induced aggravation of ischemic injury. In animal and cellular stroke models, ischemia/reperfusion increased mitochondrial localization of TIGAR. OGD/reoxygenation-induced elevation of ROS, reduction of GSH, dysfunction of mitochondria, and activation of caspase-3 were rescued by overexpression of TIGAR or supplementation of NADPH, while knockdown of TIGAR aggravated these changes. Together, our results show that TIGAR protects ischemic brain injury via enhancing PPP flux and preserving mitochondria function, and thus may be a valuable therapeutic target for ischemic brain injury.

  17. miR-194 is a negative regulator of GEF-H1 pathway in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Guo, Bingyu; Hui, Qiang; Zhang, Yu; Chang, Peng; Tao, Kai

    2016-10-01

    The incidence and associated mortality of melanoma continues to increase worldwide. At present, there is no curative therapy for advanced stage of melanoma. It is necessary to find new indicators of prognosis and therapeutic targets. Increasing evidence shows that miRNA can provide poten