Science.gov

Sample records for patient care management

  1. Collaborative care management effectively promotes self-management: patient evaluation of care management for depression in primary care.

    PubMed

    DeJesus, Ramona S; Howell, Lisa; Williams, Mark; Hathaway, Julie; Vickers, Kristin S

    2014-03-01

    Chronic disease management in the primary care setting increasingly involves self-management support from a nurse care manager. Prior research had shown patient acceptance and willingness to work with care managers. This survey study evaluated patient-perceived satisfaction with care management and patient opinions on the effectiveness of care management in promoting self-management. Qualitative and quantitative survey responses were collected from 125 patients (79% female; average age 46; 94% Caucasian) enrolled in care management for depression. Qualitative responses were coded with methods of content analysis by 2 independent analysts. Patients were satisfied with depression care management. Patients felt that care management improved their treatment above and beyond other aspects of their depression treatment (mean score, 6.7 [SD, 2]; 10 = Very much), increased their understanding of depression self-management (mean score, 7.2 [SD, 2]; 10 = Very much), and increased the frequency of self-management goal setting (mean score, 6.9 [SD, 3]; 10 = Very much). Predominant qualitative themes emphasized that patients value emotional, motivational, and relational aspects of the care manager relationship. Patients viewed care managers as caring and supportive, helpful in creating accountability for patients and knowledgeable in the area of depression care. Care managers empower patients to take on an active role in depression self-management. Some logistical challenges associated with a telephonic intervention are described. Care manager training should include communication and motivation strategies, specifically self-management education, as these strategies are valued by patients. Barriers to care management, such as scheduling telephone calls, should be addressed in future care management implementation and study.

  2. Quality of Life and Patient Satisfaction: ESRD Managed Care Demonstration

    PubMed Central

    Pifer, Trinh B.; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Dykstra, Dawn M.; Shapiro, Jennifer R.; Oppenheimer, Caitlin Carroll; Gaylin, Daniel S.; Beronja, Nancy; Rubin, Robert J.; Held, Philip J.

    2003-01-01

    To study the effects of managed care on dialysis patients, we compared the quality of life and patient satisfaction of patients in a managed care demonstration with three comparison samples: fee-for-service (FFS) patients, managed care patients outside the demonstration, and patients in a separate national study. Managed care patients were less satisfied than FFS patients about access to health care providers, but more satisfied with the financial benefits (copayment coverage, prescription drugs, and nutritional supplements) provided under the demonstration managed care plan (MCP). After 1 year in the demonstration, patients exhibited statistically and clinically significant increases in quality of life scores. PMID:14628399

  3. Hyperbaric critical care patient data management system.

    PubMed

    Kronlund, Peter; Lind, Folke; Olsson, Daniel

    2012-06-01

    A patient data management system (PDMS) has been used for years in the intensive care unit (ICU) at the Karolinska University Hospital to provide bedside or remote clinical patient documentation and information. Data from monitors, mechanical ventilators and syringe pumps are fed into a central clinical information management system to monitor, display trends and record data of vital parameters, ventilator settings and drugs. In order to continue routine critical care monitoring and recording during hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT), without endangering the safety demands of hyperbaric procedures, we have modified the PDMS system for hyperbaric use. Via an ethernet box placed inside the chamber, data are transmitted to the Clinisoft™ system through the local area network. By standardised risk-analysis procedures, in close cooperation between the hyperbaric and biomedical engineering departments, the chamber producer and the notifying body (Germanischer Lloyd), the ethernet box was modified to receive full safety approval by all parties. The PDMS is now functioning routinely during HBOT for intensive care patients so that data can be seen bedside and followed on-line in the ICU. Data are also continuously stored on the clinical information management system for later clinical or research purposes. Work continues to obtain CE approval for hyperbaric use for modern syringe pumps and mechanical ventilators connected to the PDMS system. Improved documentation of ICU care will improve quality of care during HBOT and facilitate research and development in hyperbaric medicine.

  4. Crew Management Processes Revitalize Patient Care

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, two physicians, former NASA astronauts, created LifeWings Partners LLC in Memphis, Tennessee and began using Crew Resource Management (CRM) techniques developed at Ames Research Center in the 1970s to help improve safety and efficiency at hospitals. According to the company, when hospitals follow LifeWings? training, they can see major improvements in a number of areas, including efficiency, employee satisfaction, operating room turnaround, patient advocacy, and overall patient outcomes. LifeWings has brought its CRM training to over 90 health care organizations and annual sales have remained close to $3 million since 2007.

  5. Patient care management as a global nursing concern.

    PubMed

    Bower, Kathleen A

    2004-01-01

    Effective and efficient patient management is important in all health care environments because it influences clinical and financial outcomes as well as capacity. Design of care management processes is guided by specific principles. Roles (e.g., case management) and tools (e.g., clinical paths) provide essential foundations while attention to outcomes anchors the process.

  6. Use of Care Paths to Improve Patient Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Suzann K.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this special issue of Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics is to present an evidence-based system to guide the physical therapy management of patients in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Two systematic guides to patient management will be presented. The first is a care path intended primarily for use by physical…

  7. Use of Care Paths to Improve Patient Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Suzann K.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this special issue of Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics is to present an evidence-based system to guide the physical therapy management of patients in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Two systematic guides to patient management will be presented. The first is a care path intended primarily for use by physical…

  8. Care management: agreement between nursing prescriptions and patients' care needs

    PubMed Central

    Faeda, Marília Silveira; Perroca, Márcia Galan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: analyze agreement between nursing prescriptions recorded in medical files and patients' care needs; investigate the correlation between the nurses' professional background and agreement of prescriptions. Method: descriptive study with quantitative and documentary approach conducted in the medical clinic, surgical, and specialized units of a university hospital in the interior of São Paulo, Brazil. The new validated version of a Patient Classification Instrument was used and 380 nursing prescriptions written at the times of hospital admission and discharge were assessed. Results: 75% of the nursing prescriptions items were compatible with the patients' care needs. Only low correlation between nursing prescription agreement and professional background was found. Conclusion: the nursing prescriptions did not fully meet the care needs of patients. The care context and work process should be analyzed to enable more effective prescriptions, while strategies to assess the care needs of patients are recommended. PMID:27508902

  9. Palliative care in cancer: managing patients' expectations.

    PubMed

    Ghandourh, Wsam A

    2016-12-01

    Advanced cancer patients commonly have misunderstandings about the intentions of treatment and their overall prognosis. Several studies have shown that large numbers of patients receiving palliative radiation or chemotherapy hold unrealistic hopes of their cancer being cured by such therapies, which can affect their ability to make well-informed decisions about treatment options. This review aimed to explore this discrepancy between patients' and physicians' expectations by investigating three primary issues: (1) the factors associated with patients developing unrealistic expectations; (2) the implications of having unrealistic hopes and the effects of raising patients' awareness about prognosis; and (3) patients' and caregivers' perspective on disclosure and their preferences for communication styles. Relevant studies were identified by searching electronic databases including Pubmed, EMBASE and ScienceDirect using multiple combinations of keywords, which yielded a total of 65 articles meeting the inclusion criteria. The discrepancy between patients' and doctors' expectations was associated with many factors including doctors' reluctance to disclose terminal prognoses and patients' ability to understand or accept such information. The majority of patients and caregivers expressed a desire for detailed prognostic information; however, varied responses have been reported on the preferred style of conveying such information. Communication styles have profound effects on patients' experience and treatment choices. Patients' views on disclosure are influenced by many cultural, psychological and illness-related factors, therefore individuals' needs must be considered when conveying prognostic information. More research is needed to identify communication barriers and the interventions that could be used to increase patients' satisfaction with palliative care.

  10. Depression Care for Patients at Home (Depression CAREPATH): Home Care Depression Care Management Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Martha L.; Raue, Patrick J.; Sheeran, Thomas; Reilly, Catherine; Pomerantz, Judith C.; Meyers, Barnett S.; Weinberger, Mark I.; Zukowski, Diane

    2011-01-01

    High levels of depressive symptoms are common and contribute to poorer clinical outcomes even in geriatric patients who are already taking antidepressant medication. The Depression CARE for PATients at Home (Depression CAREPATH) intervention was designed to meet the needs of medical and surgical patients who suffer from depression. The intervention’s clinical protocols are designed to guide clinicians in managing depression as part of routine home care. PMID:21881429

  11. Identifying and managing patients with delirium in acute care settings.

    PubMed

    Bond, Penny; Goudie, Karen

    2015-11-01

    Delirium is an acute medical emergency affecting about one in eight acute hospital inpatients. It is associated with poor outcomes, is more prevalent in older people and it is estimated that half of all patients receiving intensive care or surgery for a hip fracture will be affected. Despite its prevalence and impact, delirium is not reliably identified or well managed. Improving the identification and management of patients with delirium has been a focus for the national improving older people's acute care work programme in NHS Scotland. A delirium toolkit has been developed, which includes the 4AT rapid assessment test, information for patients and carers and a care bundle for managing delirium based on existing guidance. This toolkit has been tested and implemented by teams from a range of acute care settings to support improvements in the identification and immediate management of delirium.

  12. Managed care and the nurse's ethical obligations to patients.

    PubMed

    Erlen, J A; Mellors, M P

    1995-01-01

    The goal of managed care is to control health care costs by such means as keeping people healthy and decreasing the length of hospital stays. This change in health care delivery has resulted in work redesign programs, lay-offs, cross-training, and the use of an increasing number of nonprofessional care providers. The challenge for nursing, as a result of these changes, is how to fulfill its obligations of fidelity and due care. The authors discuss these ethical responsibilities and the impact that managed care is having on the fiduciary relationship between nurse and patient. Four strategies that nurses can use to fulfill their obligations include engaging in personal reflection, communicating and collaborating, protecting patient's rights, and evaluating patient outcomes.

  13. PALLIATIVE CARE AND SYMPTOM MANAGEMENT IN OLDER CANCER PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Koshy; Goldberg, Jessica; Korc-Grodzicki, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Older cancer patients are best served by a multidisciplinary approach with Palliative Care (PC) playing an integral role. PC focuses on symptom control irrespective of its cause and should not be associated only with terminal care. It provides an additional layer of support in the care of the cancer patient with an emphasis on quality of life. In this article, we discuss the evaluation and management of pain and other common non-pain symptoms that occur in the elderly cancer patient, as well as end of life care. PMID:26614860

  14. Palliative Care and Symptom Management in Older Patients with Cancer.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Koshy; Goldberg, Jessica; Korc-Grodzicki, Beatriz

    2016-02-01

    Older patients with cancer are best served by a multidisciplinary approach with palliative care (PC) playing an integral role. PC focuses on symptom control irrespective of its cause and should not be associated only with terminal care. It provides an additional layer of support in the care of patients with cancer with an emphasis on quality of life. This article discusses the evaluation and management of pain and other common nonpain symptoms that occur in elderly patients with cancer, as well as end-of-life care.

  15. Implications of managed care for health systems, clinicians, and patients.

    PubMed Central

    Fairfield, G.; Hunter, D. J.; Mechanic, D.; Rosleff, F.

    1997-01-01

    The rhetoric and realities of managed care are easily confused. The rapid growth of managed care in the United States has had many implications for patients, doctors, employers, state and federal programmes, the health insurance industry, major medical institutions, medical research, and vulnerable patient populations. It has restricted patients' choice of doctors and limited access to specialists, reduced the professional autonomy and earnings of doctors, shifted power from the non-profit to the for-profit sectors and from hospitals and doctors to private corporations. It has also raised issues about the future structuring and financing of medical education and research and about practice ethics. However, managed care has also accorded greater prominence to the assessment of patient satisfaction, profiling and monitoring of doctors' work, the use of clinical guidelines and quality assurance procedures and indicated the potential to improve the integration and outcome of care. PMID:9224138

  16. European hospital managers' perceptions of patient-centred care.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Angelina; Groene, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The spotlight has recently been placed on managers' responsibility for patient-centred care as a result of Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust failings. In previous research, clinicians reported that managers do not have an adequate structured plan for implementing patient-centred care. The purpose of this paper is to assess the perceptions of European hospital management with respect to factors affecting the implementation of a patient-centred approach. In total, 15 semi-structured interviews were conducted with hospital managers (n=10), expert country informants (n=2), patient organisations (n=2) and a user representative (n=1) from around Europe. Participants were purposively and snowball sampled. Interviews were analysed using framework analysis. Most participants felt that current levels of patient-centred care are inadequate, but accounted that there were a number of macro, meso and micro challenges they faced in implementing this approach. These included budget constraints, political and historical factors, the resistance of clinicians and other frontline staff. Organisational culture emerged as a central theme, shaped by these multi-level factors and influencing the way in which patient-centred care was borne out in the hospital. Participants proposed that the needs of patients might be better met through increasing advocacy by patient organisations and greater staff contact with patients. This study is the first of its kind to obtain management views from around Europe. It offers an insight into different models of how patient-centred care is realised by management. It indicates that managers see the value of a patient-centred approach but that they feel restricted by a number of factors at multiple levels.

  17. Care and management of patients with skin-tunnelled catheters.

    PubMed

    Green, Julie

    Central venous access devices (CVADs) are used in secondary and, increasingly, primary care settings to provide access to the central circulation. Skin-tunnelled catheters (STCs) are frequently used as the vascular access device of choice, particularly for patients receiving chemotherapy and for those who require long-term access for repeated transfusions. Despite the increased use of STCs, practice varies between trusts and community teams. This article provides an overview of the care and management of patients with STCs.

  18. Clinical review: The critical care management of the burn patient

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Between 4 and 22% of burn patients presenting to the emergency department are admitted to critical care. Burn injury is characterised by a hypermetabolic response with physiologic, catabolic and immune effects. Burn care has seen renewed interest in colloid resuscitation, a change in transfusion practice and the development of anti-catabolic therapies. A literature search was conducted with priority given to review articles, meta-analyses and well-designed large trials; paediatric studies were included where adult studies were lacking with the aim to review the advances in adult intensive care burn management and place them in the general context of day-to-day practical burn management. PMID:24093225

  19. Care management: agreement between nursing prescriptions and patients' care needs.

    PubMed

    Faeda, Marília Silveira; Perroca, Márcia Galan

    2016-08-08

    analyze agreement between nursing prescriptions recorded in medical files and patients' care needs; investigate the correlation between the nurses' professional background and agreement of prescriptions. descriptive study with quantitative and documentary approach conducted in the medical clinic, surgical, and specialized units of a university hospital in the interior of São Paulo, Brazil. The new validated version of a Patient Classification Instrument was used and 380 nursing prescriptions written at the times of hospital admission and discharge were assessed. 75% of the nursing prescriptions items were compatible with the patients' care needs. Only low correlation between nursing prescription agreement and professional background was found. the nursing prescriptions did not fully meet the care needs of patients. The care context and work process should be analyzed to enable more effective prescriptions, while strategies to assess the care needs of patients are recommended. analisar a concordância entre prescrições de enfermagem, registradas nos prontuários, e as necessidades de cuidados dos pacientes; investigar a correlação entre o perfil profissional dos enfermeiros e a concordância das prescrições. estudo descritivo com abordagem quantitativa e documental, realizado em unidades de clínica médica, cirúrgica e especializada de um hospital de ensino, no interior do Estado de São Paulo. Foi aplicada a nova versão validada do Instrumento de Classificação de Pacientes e, posteriormente, investigadas 380 prescrições de enfermagem no momento da admissão e alta hospitalar. foi identificado que 75% dos itens das prescrições de enfermagem estavam compatíveis com as necessidades cuidativas dos pacientes. Encontrou-se baixa correlação entre a concordância da prescrição de enfermagem e o perfil profissional. as prescrições de enfermagem não estão sendo realizadas, em sua totalidade, em consonância com as necessidades dos pacientes. Para

  20. Empowerment, patient centred care and self‐management

    PubMed Central

    Pulvirenti, Mariastella; McMillan, John; Lawn, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background  Patient or person centred care is widely accepted as the philosophy and practice that underpins quality care. An examination of the Australian National Chronic Disease Strategy and literature in the field highlights assumptions about the self‐manager as patient and a focus on clinical settings. Objective and Conclusion  This paper considers patient or person centred care in the light of empowerment as it is understood in the health promotion charters first established in Alma Ata in 1977. We argue that patient or person centred care can be reconfigured within a social justice and rights framework and that doing so supports the creation of conditions for well‐being in the broader context, one that impacts strongly on individuals. These arguments have broader implications for the practice of patient centred care as it occurs between patient and health professional and for creating shared responsibility for management of the self. It also has implications for those who manage their health outside of the health sector. PMID:22212306

  1. Primary care managers' perceptions of their capability in providing care planning to patients with complex needs.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Lena Gunvor; Bäck-Pettersson, Siv; Kylén, Sven; Marklund, Bertil; Carlström, Eric

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate primary care managers' perceptions of their capability in providing care planning to patients with complex needs. Care planning is defined as a process where the patient, family and health professionals engage in dialogue about the patient's care needs and plan care interventions together. Semi-structured interviews with 18 primary care managers in western Sweden were conducted using Westrin's theoretical cooperation model. Data were analysed using a qualitative deductive method. Results reveal that the managers' approach to care planning was dominated by non-cooperation and separation. The managers were permeated by uncertainty about the meaning of the task of care planning as such. They did not seem to be familiar with the national legislation stipulating that every healthcare provider must meet patients' need for care interventions and participate in the care planning. To accomplish care planning, the process needs to cross - and overcome - both professional and organisational boundaries. There is also a need for incentives to develop working methods that promote local cooperation in order to facilitate optimal care for patients with complex needs. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  2. Utilizing patient satisfaction surveys to prepare for Medicaid managed care.

    PubMed

    Fields, T T; Gomez, P S

    2001-02-01

    To prepare for Medicaid managed care, a community health center incorporated the business principle of continuous quality improvement, often used in the private sector to improve customer service, into its planning process. The initial endeavor was to create a patient satisfaction survey that was appropriate for the uniqueness of the community. The survey, taken monthly, resulted in both staff and patients making active improvements in the clinic environment. Staff showed more enthusiasm, and patients were more assertive in their attitudes toward the clinic. The empowerment of the patient to take ownership in the clinic will be coupled with the next step of the formalized plan, that of educating patients on the steps necessary to ensure that their Medicaid managed care facility will be the local community health center.

  3. Patient perspectives of an individualized diabetes care management plan.

    PubMed

    Saucier, Ashley N; Ansa, Benjamin; Coffin, Janis; Akhtar, Mariam; Miller, Andre; Mahoney, Holly; Hodo, Denise M; Duffie, Carla; Fontenot, Brittney; Andrews, Holly E; Smith, Selina A

    2017-01-01

    This cross sectional study examines patients' knowledge, attitudes and beliefs about a diabetic care management plan (DCMP) that was developed to provide patient education on diabetes guidelines and display individual diabetic core measures. Secondary objectives included a comparison of diabetic core measures [hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C), systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP, DBP), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and urine microalbumin (Um)] before and after DCMP implementation. We hypothesize this tool will contribute to patients' awareness of current disease status, diabetes knowledge and diabetic core value improvement over time. A consecutive sample of 102 adult patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 in a primary care setting participated. Patients' perspectives on the care plan and knowledge about diabetes was collected via survey after care plan implementation. A comparison of selected diabetic core measures was conducted at baseline and post-DCMP. Descriptive statistics summarized survey response and diabetic core measures. A repeated measures ANOVA was used to assess change in diabetic core measures over time. Participants understood the DCMP (96%), found it important because it explained their laboratory results and medications (89%) and believed it would help them to have better diabetic control (99%). There was a significant interaction between time and being at goal pre-DCMP for HbA1c, SBP and LDL. Patients not at goal pre-DCMP for the above measures decreased significantly over time (P = <0.01 for HbA1c, SBP and LDL). Participants at goal for all diabetic core measures increased pre- to post-DCMP from 13% to 20% (P = 0.28). Patients perceived the diabetic care management plan favorably and their diabetic core measurements improved over time. This simple and reproducible self-management intervention can enhance self-management in a patient population with diabetes mellitus type 2.

  4. Nurse case managers: patient care implications at a Pakistani university.

    PubMed

    Walani, Laila

    The role of the nurse in hospital is varied and some are choosing to incorporate more managerial and administrative skills into their clinical role. One such role is that of the nurse case manager (NCM). This particular role concentrates on involving the family and the patient in his or her own care, facilitation of the care plan, and open discussions between the patient, medics and nursing staff. NCMs in the author's hospital have made a remarkable contribution to patient care. It is a challenging and exceedingly demanding role in both developing and developed countries, but one that is increasingly important. The NCMs are involved in coordination, facilitation of core process and mobilization of resources, not only in hospital but at the patient's home. In this short introductory article the role of NCM is highlighted and the author discusses how this diverse role is concerned with patient care. NCMs work with multidisciplinary teams to enhance the patient's care process. Their attention is also given to cost reduction and clinical pathway management.

  5. The Impact of Management on Knowledge and Patient Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iversen, Hans Petter

    2011-01-01

    How do approaches to management affect knowledge and patient care? In this paper, the establishment and dismantling of an organisational unit for research and development (R&D) in a mental health department of a Norwegian health enterprise are analysed. The characteristics of two adverse treatment ideologies and their coherence with approaches…

  6. The Impact of Management on Knowledge and Patient Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iversen, Hans Petter

    2011-01-01

    How do approaches to management affect knowledge and patient care? In this paper, the establishment and dismantling of an organisational unit for research and development (R&D) in a mental health department of a Norwegian health enterprise are analysed. The characteristics of two adverse treatment ideologies and their coherence with approaches…

  7. Qualities of care managers in chronic disease management: patients and providers' expectations.

    PubMed

    Dejesus, Ramona S; Vickers, Kristin S; Howell, Lisa A; Stroebel, Robert J

    2012-10-01

    The collaborative care model has been shown in studies to be effective in achieving sustained treatment outcomes in chronic disease management. Its success is highly dependent on active patient engagement, provider endorsement and effective care management. This study sought to ask patients and providers what qualities they look for in a care manager. A questionnaire with 3 open ended questions was mailed out randomly to 1000 patients residing in Olmsted County, MN identified through the registry to have type 2 diabetes mellitus. Forty-two primary care providers received similar questionnaire with 2 open ended questions. Answers were qualitatively analyzed using coding and identification of major themes. One hundred seventy-five patients and 22 providers responded. Both groups listed being knowledgeable, having good communication skills and certain personality traits as common themes on what are desirable qualities in a care manager. Patients felt that a care manager would be most helpful by being accessible. Providers listed undesirable qualities to include not being a team player and not knowing practice limitations. Both patients and providers have clear expectations of a care manager which carry significant implications in recruiting and training care managers for chronic disease management. Copyright © 2012 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Palliative wound care management strategies for palliative patients and their circles of care.

    PubMed

    Woo, Kevin Y; Krasner, Diane L; Kennedy, Bruce; Wardle, David; Moir, Olivia

    2015-03-01

    To provide information about palliative wound care management strategies for palliative patients and their circles of care. This continuing education activity is intended for physicians and nurses with an interest in skin and wound care. After participating in this educational activity, the participant should be better able to: 1. Recognize study findings, assessment tools, and non-pharmacologic strategies used for patients with palliative wounds. 2. Summarize pharmacologic and dressing treatment strategies used for wound care management of palliative patients. The principles of palliative wound care should be integrated along the continuum of wound care to address the whole person care needs of palliative patients and their circles of care, which includes members of the patient unit including family, significant others, caregivers, and other healthcare professionals that may be external to the current interprofessional team. Palliative patients often present with chronic debilitating diseases, advanced diseases associated with major organ failure (renal, hepatic, pulmonary, or cardiac), profound dementia, complex psychosocial issues, diminished self-care abilities, and challenging wound-related symptoms. This article introduces key concepts and strategies for palliative wound care that are essential for interprofessional team members to incorporate in clinical practice when caring for palliative patients with wounds and their circles of care.

  9. Managing patient populations in primary care: points of leverage.

    PubMed

    Eidus, Robert; Pace, Wilson D; Staton, Elizabeth W

    2012-01-01

    Common "quality" metrics may represent the quality of care for large populations; however, they do not adequately represent quality in individual primary care settings, especially as stand-alone indices. Using discreet threshold values to measure quality in primary care may result in physicians focusing on managing patients by the numbers at the expense of making individualized and nuanced clinical decisions. Current performance measures may be misapplied as proxies for both cost savings and quality. We posit that developing and focusing measurement on high-leverage activities will yield better clinical outcomes and potentially lower cost. As a starting point for further work in this area, we suggest the development of metrics that track identification and management of depression; management of transitions of care; care coordination; team-based care; identification and support of socially frail/isolated individuals; pharmacologic management, including optimizing medication and dealing with adherence issues; and establishment of a therapeutic environment. These processes, or others like them, will require infrastructure that may be costly and time-consuming, and measuring these processes will require thought and effort. Nevertheless, we believe developing metrics based on high-leverage activities will yield greater clinical and economic returns than relying on the metrics currently in place.

  10. Partnering With a Patient and Family Advisory Council to Improve Patient Care Experiences With Pain Management.

    PubMed

    Bookout, Michelle L; Staffileno, Beth A; Budzinsky, Christine M

    2016-04-01

    Patient-centered care is a key driver for the nation's health system, yet patient experience surveys indicate that hospitals are far from achieving favorable outcomes. Partnering with patients and families through a patient and family advisory council (PFAC) advances the practice of patient-centered care to improve outcomes and experiences. This article describes the process of implementing a PFAC and presents outcomes related to patients' perception of pain management in the acute care hospital setting.

  11. Care coordination and provider stress in primary care management of high-risk patients.

    PubMed

    Okunogbe, Adeyemi; Meredith, Lisa S; Chang, Evelyn T; Simon, Alissa; Stockdale, Susan E; Rubenstein, Lisa V

    2017-10-02

    Care coordination is a critical component of managing high-risk patients, who tend to have complex and multiple medical and psychosocial problems and are typically at high risk for increased hospitalization and incur high health care expenditures. Primary care models such as the patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs) are designed to improve care coordination and reduce care fragmentation. However, little is known about how the burden of care coordination for high-risk patients influences PCMH team members' stress. To evaluate the relationship between provider stress and care coordination time in high-risk patient care and whether availability of help is associated with reduced stress. Multivariable regression analysis of a cross-sectional survey of PCMH primary care providers (PCPs) and nurses. A total of 164 PCPs and 272 nurses in primary care practices at five geographically diverse Veteran Health Administration (VA) medical center health systems. The main outcome variable was provider stress due to high-risk patient care. Independent variables were the reported proportion of high-risk patients in PCP/nurse patient panels, time spent coordinating care for these patients, and provider satisfaction with help received in caring for them. The response rate was 44%. Spending more than 8 h per week coordinating care was significantly associated with a 0.21-point increase in reported provider stress compared to spending 8 h or less per week (95% CI: 0.04-0.39; p = 0.015). The magnitude of the association between stress and care coordination time was diminished when provider satisfaction with help received was included in the model. Perceived provider stress from care of high-risk patients may arise from challenges related to coordinating their care. Our findings suggest that the perception of receiving help for high-risk patient care may be valuable in reducing provider stress.

  12. Prehospital Management of Gunshot Patients at Major Trauma Care Centers: Exploring the Gaps in Patient Care

    PubMed Central

    Norouzpour, Amir; Khoshdel, Ali Reza; Modaghegh, Mohammad-Hadi; Kazemzadeh, Gholam-Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Background Prehospital management of gunshot-wounded (GW) patients influences injury-induced morbidity and mortality. Objectives To evaluate prehospital management to GW patients emphasizing the protocol of patient transfer to appropriate centers. Patients and Methods This prospective study, included all GW patients referred to four major, level-I hospitals in Mashhad, Iran. We evaluated demographic data, triage, transport vehicles of patients, hospitalization time and the outcome. Results There were 66 GW patients. The most affected body parts were extremities (60.6%, n = 40); 59% of cases (n = 39) were transferred to the hospitals with vehicles other than an ambulance. Furthermore, 77.3% of patients came to the hospitals directly from the site of event, and 22.7% of patients were referred from other medical centers. EMS action intervals from dispatchers to scene departure was not significantly different from established standards; however, arrival to hospital took longer than optimal standards. Additionally, time spent at emergency wards to stabilize vital signs was significantly less in patients who were transported by EMS ambulances (P = 0.01), but not with private ambulances (P = 0.47). However, ambulance pre-hospital care was not associated with a shorter hospital stay. Injury Severity was the only determinant of hospital stay duration (β = 0.36, P = 0.01) in multivariate analysis. Conclusions GW was more frequent in extremities and the most patients were directly transferred from the accident site. EMS (but not private) ambulance transport improved patients' emergency care and standard time intervals were achieved by EMS; however more than a half of the cases were transferred by vehicles other than an ambulance. Nevertheless, ambulance transportation (either by EMS or by private ambulance) was not associated with a shorter hospital stay. This showed that upgrade of ambulance equipment and training of private ambulance personnel may be needed. PMID:24350154

  13. Patient perspectives of an individualized diabetes care management plan

    PubMed Central

    Saucier, Ashley N.; Ansa, Benjamin; Coffin, Janis; Akhtar, Mariam; Miller, Andre; Mahoney, Holly; Hodo, Denise M.; Duffie, Carla; Fontenot, Brittney; Andrews, Holly E.; Smith, Selina A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This cross sectional study examines patients’ knowledge, attitudes and beliefs about a diabetic care management plan (DCMP) that was developed to provide patient education on diabetes guidelines and display individual diabetic core measures. Secondary objectives included a comparison of diabetic core measures [hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C), systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP, DBP), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and urine microalbumin (Um)] before and after DCMP implementation. We hypothesize this tool will contribute to patients’ awareness of current disease status, diabetes knowledge and diabetic core value improvement over time. Methods A consecutive sample of 102 adult patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 in a primary care setting participated. Patients’ perspectives on the care plan and knowledge about diabetes was collected via survey after care plan implementation. A comparison of selected diabetic core measures was conducted at baseline and post-DCMP. Descriptive statistics summarized survey response and diabetic core measures. A repeated measures ANOVA was used to assess change in diabetic core measures over time. Results Participants understood the DCMP (96%), found it important because it explained their laboratory results and medications (89%) and believed it would help them to have better diabetic control (99%). There was a significant interaction between time and being at goal pre-DCMP for HbA1c, SBP and LDL. Patients not at goal pre-DCMP for the above measures decreased significantly over time (P = <0.01 for HbA1c, SBP and LDL). Participants at goal for all diabetic core measures increased pre- to post-DCMP from 13% to 20% (P = 0.28). Conclusion Patients perceived the diabetic care management plan favorably and their diabetic core measurements improved over time. This simple and reproducible self-management intervention can enhance self-management in a patient population with diabetes mellitus type 2. PMID:28835847

  14. Prehospital management of gunshot patients at major trauma care centers: exploring the gaps in patient care.

    PubMed

    Norouzpour, Amir; Khoshdel, Ali Reza; Modaghegh, Mohammad-Hadi; Kazemzadeh, Gholam-Hossein

    2013-09-01

    Prehospital management of gunshot-wounded (GW) patients influences injury-induced morbidity and mortality. To evaluate prehospital management to GW patients emphasizing the protocol of patient transfer to appropriate centers. This prospective study, included all GW patients referred to four major, level-I hospitals in Mashhad, Iran. We evaluated demographic data, triage, transport vehicles of patients, hospitalization time and the outcome. There were 66 GW patients. The most affected body parts were extremities (60.6%, n = 40); 59% of cases (n = 39) were transferred to the hospitals with vehicles other than an ambulance. Furthermore, 77.3% of patients came to the hospitals directly from the site of event, and 22.7% of patients were referred from other medical centers. EMS action intervals from dispatchers to scene departure was not significantly different from established standards; however, arrival to hospital took longer than optimal standards. Additionally, time spent at emergency wards to stabilize vital signs was significantly less in patients who were transported by EMS ambulances (P = 0.01), but not with private ambulances (P = 0.47). However, ambulance pre-hospital care was not associated with a shorter hospital stay. Injury Severity was the only determinant of hospital stay duration (β = 0.36, P = 0.01) in multivariate analysis. GW was more frequent in extremities and the most patients were directly transferred from the accident site. EMS (but not private) ambulance transport improved patients' emergency care and standard time intervals were achieved by EMS; however more than a half of the cases were transferred by vehicles other than an ambulance. Nevertheless, ambulance transportation (either by EMS or by private ambulance) was not associated with a shorter hospital stay. This showed that upgrade of ambulance equipment and training of private ambulance personnel may be needed.

  15. Managing social awkwardness when caring for morbidly obese patients in intensive care: A focused ethnography.

    PubMed

    Hales, Caz; de Vries, Kay; Coombs, Maureen

    2016-06-01

    Critically ill morbidly obese patients pose considerable healthcare delivery and resource utilisation challenges in the intensive care setting. These are resultant from specific physiological responses to critical illness in this population and the nature of the interventional therapies used in the intensive care environment. An additional challenge arises for this population when considering the social stigma that is attached to being obese. Intensive care staff therefore not only attend to the physical and care needs of the critically ill morbidly obese patient but also navigate, both personally and professionally, the social terrain of stigma when providing care. To explore the culture and influences on doctors and nurses within the intensive care setting when caring for critically ill morbidly obese patients. A focused ethnographic approach was adopted to elicit the 'situated' experiences of caring for critically ill morbidly obese patients from the perspectives of intensive care staff. Participant observation of care practices and interviews with intensive care staff were undertaken over a four month period. Analysis was conducted using constant comparison technique to compare incidents applicable to each theme. An 18 bedded tertiary intensive care unit in New Zealand. Sixty-seven intensive care nurses and 13 intensive care doctors involved with the care and management of seven critically ill patients with a body mass index ≥40kg/m(2). Interactions between intensive care staff and morbidly obese patients were challenging due to the social stigma surrounding obesity. Social awkwardness and managing socially awkward moments were evident when caring for morbidly obese patients. Intensive care staff used strategies of face-work and mutual pretence to alleviate feelings of discomfort when engaged in aspects of care and caring. This was a strategy used to prevent embarrassment and distress for both the patients and staff. This study has brought new understandings

  16. Patient Selection in the ESRD Managed Care Demonstration

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Jennifer R.; Dykstra, Dawn M.; Pisoni, Ron; Beronja, Nancy; Gaylin, Daniel S.; Oppenheimer, Caitlin Carroll; Rubin, Robert J.; Held, Philip J.

    2003-01-01

    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Service's (CMS') end stage renal disease (ESRD) managed care demonstration offered an opportunity to assess patient selection among a chronically ill and inherently costly population. Patient selection refers to the phenomenon whereby those Medicare beneficiaries who choose to enroll or stay in health maintenance organizations (HMOs) are, on average, younger, healthier, and less costly to treat than beneficiaries who remain in the traditional Medicare fee-for-service (FFS) sector. The results presented in this article show that enrollees into the demonstration were generally younger and healthier than a representative group of comparison patients from the same geographic areas. PMID:14628398

  17. Open Source Software For Patient Data Management In Critical Care.

    PubMed

    Massaut, Jacques; Charretk, Nicolas; Gayraud, Olivia; Van Den Bergh, Rafael; Charles, Adelin; Edema, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    We have previously developed a Patient Data Management System for Intensive Care based on Open Source Software. The aim of this work was to adapt this software to use in Emergency Departments in low resource environments. The new software includes facilities for utilization of the South African Triage Scale and prediction of mortality based on independent predictive factors derived from data from the Tabarre Emergency Trauma Center in Port au Prince, Haiti.

  18. Management of Patients with Subclinical Hypothyroidism in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, E; Russell, A; Kearney, P M

    2016-01-01

    Subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) is defined as a raised serum thyroid stimulating hormone level with normal thyroxine. Despite a prevalence of up to 9% of the adult population there is widespread uncertainty on how to manage it. The aim of this study was to assess how older adults with SCH are managed in primary care. A retrospective case-note review was carried out on patients attending Mallow Primary Healthcare Centre. This study identified patients 65 years and over meeting the criteria for SCH in one year. The prevalence of SCH in this study was calculated as 2.9%. 22.2% of patients were treated with thyroxine. 6.1% of untreated patients progressed to clinical hypothyroidism within the study period while 18.2% spontaneously reverted to normal TSH levels.

  19. Managed Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... three types of managed care plans: Health Maintenance Organizations (HMO) usually only pay for care within the ... who coordinates most of your care. Preferred Provider Organizations (PPO) usually pay more if you get care ...

  20. Managing the care of the diabetic transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Siegel, J; DeVore, V S; Bosley, S M

    1997-07-01

    Care of the diabetic transplant patient presents many challenges for therapeutic management. Complications of diabetes such as retinopathy, neuropathy, hyperglycemia, and hypertension add to the already difficult management of nondiabetic transplant patients. The role of the pharmacist as an educator, counselor, and interaction and profile manager is an essential part of a successful transplant program. Understanding the purpose of the medications and their side effects is vital for the patient to comply with a demanding medication regimen. This depth of understanding cannot be conveyed without repetitive educational efforts that are reinforced by all of the health care practitioners and supportive family members. Although kidney transplantation offers freedom from dialysis, it does not offer freedom from insulin dependence. Kidney-pancreas, pancreas, or islet cell transplantation may provide insulin independence and are the only curative interventions available. Evaluation of the research literature compares the advantages and complications of these surgical modalities. Early intervention with transplantation may offer insulin-dependent diabetics a new opportunity to improve their quality of life; however, intensive educational efforts and assurance of compliance are essential for successful outcomes.

  1. Medication therapy management: its relationship to patient counseling, disease management, and pharmaceutical care.

    PubMed

    McGivney, Melissa Somma; Meyer, Susan M; Duncan-Hewitt, Wendy; Hall, Deanne L; Goode, Jean-Venable R; Smith, Randall B

    2007-01-01

    To delineate the relationship, including similarities and differences, between medication therapy management (MTM) and contemporary pharmacist-provided services, including patient counseling, disease management, and pharmaceutical care, to facilitate the continued evolution of commonly used language and a standard of practice across geographic areas and practice environments. Incorporation of MTM services into the array of Medicare-funded services affords an opportunity for pharmacists to develop direct patient care services in the community. Defining the role of MTM within the scope of pharmacist-provided patient care activities, including patient counseling, disease management, and all currently provided pharmacy services is essential to the delineation of a viable and sustainable practice model for pharmacists. The definitions of each of these services are offered, as well as comparisons and contrasts of the individual services. In addition to Medicare-eligible patients, MTM services are appropriate for anyone with medication-related needs. MTM is offered as an all-encompassing model that incorporates the philosophy of pharmaceutical care, techniques of patient counseling, and disease management in an environment that facilitates the direct collaboration of patients, pharmacists, and other health professionals. Defining the role of MTM within the current patient care models, including patient counseling, disease management, and all who provide pharmacy services, is essential in delineating a viable and sustainable practice model for pharmacists.

  2. Computerized Management of Patient Care in a Complex, Controlled Clinical Trial in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Sittig, Dean F.

    1987-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is often not responsive to conventional supportive therapy and the mortality rate may exceed 90%. A new form of supportive care, Extracorporeal Carbon Dioxide Removal (ECCO2R), has shown a dramatic increase in survival (48%). A controlled clinical trial of the new ECCO2R therapy versus conventional Continuous Positive Pressure Ventilation (CPPV) is being initiated. Detailed care protocols have been developed by “expert” critical care physicians for the management of patients. Using a blackboard control architecture, the protocols have been implemented on an existing hospital information system and will direct patient care and help manage the controlled clinical trial. Therapeutic instructions are automatically generated by the computer from data input by physicians, nurses, respiratory therapists, and the laboratory. Preliminary results show that the computerized protocol system can direct therapy for acutely ill patients.

  3. Perioperative critical care management for patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Choi, H. Alex; Edwards, Nancy; Chang, Tiffany; Sladen, Robert N.

    2014-01-01

    Despite significant regional and risk factor-related variations, the overall mortality rate in patients suffering from aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) remains high. Compared to ischemic stroke, which is typically irreversible, hemorrhagic stroke tends to carry a higher mortality, but patients who do survive have less disability. Technologies to monitor and treat complications of SAH have advanced considerably in recent years, but good long-term functional outcome still depends on prompt diagnosis, early aggressive management, and avoidance of premature withdrawal of support. Endovascular procedures and open craniotomy to secure a ruptured aneurysm represent some of the numerous critical steps required to achieve the best possible result. In this review, we have attempted to provide a contemporary, evidence-based outline of the perioperative critical care management of patients with SAH. This is a challenging and potentially fatal disease with a wide spectrum of severity and complications and an often protracted course. The dynamic nature of this illness, especially in its most severe forms, requires considerable flexibility in clinician management, especially given the panoply of available treatment modalities. Judicious hemodynamic monitoring and adaptive therapy are essential to respond to the fluctuating nature of cerebral vasospasm and the varying oxygen demands of the injured brain that may readily induce acute or delayed cerebral ischemia. PMID:25237442

  4. Confronting Disparities in Diabetes Care: The Clinical Effectiveness of Redesigning Care Management for Minority Patients in Rural Primary Care Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray, Paul; Thompson, Debra; Wynn, Joan D.; Cummings, Doyle M.; Whetstone, Lauren

    2005-01-01

    Context: Diabetes mellitus and its complications disproportionately affect minority citizens in rural communities, many of whom have limited access to comprehensive diabetes management services. Purpose: To explore the efficacy of combining care management and interdisciplinary group visits for rural African American patients with diabetes…

  5. Confronting Disparities in Diabetes Care: The Clinical Effectiveness of Redesigning Care Management for Minority Patients in Rural Primary Care Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray, Paul; Thompson, Debra; Wynn, Joan D.; Cummings, Doyle M.; Whetstone, Lauren

    2005-01-01

    Context: Diabetes mellitus and its complications disproportionately affect minority citizens in rural communities, many of whom have limited access to comprehensive diabetes management services. Purpose: To explore the efficacy of combining care management and interdisciplinary group visits for rural African American patients with diabetes…

  6. [Safe patient care: safety culture and risk management in otorhinolaryngology].

    PubMed

    St Pierre, M

    2013-04-01

    Safety culture is positioned at the heart of an organisation's vulnerability to error because of its role in framing organizational awareness to risk and in providing and sustaining effective strategies of risk management. Safety related attitudes of leadership and management play a crucial role in the development of a mature safety culture ("top-down process"). A type marker for organizational culture and thus a predictor for an organizations maturity in respect to safety is information flow and in particular an organization's general way of coping with information that suggests anomaly. As all values and beliefs, relationships, learning, and other aspects of organizational safety culture are about sharing and processing information, safety culture has been termed "informed culture". An informed culture is free of blame and open for information provided by incidents. "Incident reporting systems" are the backbone of a reporting culture, where good information flow is likely to support and encourage other kinds of cooperative behavior, such as problem solving, innovation, and inter-departmental bridging. Another facet of an informed culture is the free flow of information during perioperative patient care. The World Health Organisation's "safe surgery checklist" is the most prevalent example of a standardized information exchange aimed at preventing patient harm due to information deficit. In routine tasks mandatory standard operating procedures have gained widespread acceptance in guaranteeing the highest possible process quality.Technical and non-technical skills of healthcare professionals are the decisive human resource for an efficient and safe delivery of patient care and the avoidance of errors. The systematic enhancement of staff qualification by providing training opportunities can be a major investment in patient safety. In recent years several otorhinolaryngology departments have started to incorporate simulation based team trainings into their curriculum

  7. Strategies for identifying and channeling patients for depression care management.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jennifer K; Schoenbaum, Michael; Katon, Wayne J; Pincus, Harold A; Hogan, Diane M; Unutzer, Jurgen

    2008-08-01

    To determine optimal methods of identifying enrollees with possible depression for additional depression screening in the context of a care management program for chronically ill Medicare recipients. Observational analysis of telephone and mail survey and claims data collected for the Medicare Health Support (MHS) program. This study examines data from 14,902 participants with diabetes mellitus and/or congestive heart failure in the MHS program administered by Green Ribbon Health, LLC. Depression screening was performed by administering a 2-item screen (the Patient Health Questionnaire 2 [PHQ-2]) by telephone or by mail. Additional information about possible depression was drawn from International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) depression diagnoses on claims and from self-reported use of antidepressant medications. We evaluated positive depression screens using the PHQ-2 administered via telephone versus mail, examined variations in screener-positive findings by care manager, and compared rates of positive screens with antidepressant use and with claims diagnoses of depression. Almost 14% of participants received an ICD-9 diagnosis of depression during the year before program enrollment; 7.1% reported taking antidepressants, and 5.1% screened positive for depression on the PHQ-2. We found substantial variation in positive depression screens by care manager that could not be explained by case mix, prior depression diagnoses, or current depression treatment. After adjusting for demographic and clinical differences, the PHQ-2-positive screen rates were 6.5% by telephone and 14.1% by mail (P <.001). A multipronged effort composed of mail screening (using the PHQ-2), self-reported antidepressant use, and claims diagnoses of depression may capture the greatest number of enrollees with possible depression.

  8. Linking outcomes management and practice improvement. Structured care methodologies: evolution and use in patient care delivery.

    PubMed

    Cole, L; Houston, S

    1999-01-01

    Structured care methodologies are tools that provide a comprehensive approach to patient care delivery. These tools have evolved in their application and purpose over the years. In many situations, multiple tools are needed to obtain the best outcomes for a patient. The presence of a SCM does not preclude clinical judgment. On the contrary, the fundamental purpose of any SCM is to assist practitioners in implementing practice patterns associated with good clinical judgment, research-based interventions, and improved patient outcomes. These tools support smooth operation and appropriate use of resources, establish a means of patient management across the continuum of care, facilitate collaboration among disciplines, reflect patient outcomes, and provide outcomes data. Data from SCMs permit benchmarking, comparison of pre-implementation and post-implementation outcomes, development of action plans for quality enhancement, identification of high-risk patients, identification of issues and problems in the system that require interventions, and the development of research protocols and studies. Structured care methodology development and implementation can be challenging, rewarding, and at times frustrating. When used appropriately, these tools can have a major impact on the standardization of care and the achievement of desired outcomes. However, individual patient needs may supersede adherence to a tool. The challenge then becomes one of balancing the unique needs of each patient and appropriate use of SCMs. Change comes slowly, but persistence pays off.

  9. Swedish registered nurses' and nurse managers' attitudes towards patient advocacy in community care of older patients.

    PubMed

    Josse-Eklund, Anna; Petzäll, Kerstin; Sandin-Bojö, Ann-Kristin; Wilde-Larsson, Bodil

    2013-07-01

    To describe and compare registered nurses' (RNs) and nurse managers' (NMs) attitudes towards patient advocacy in the community care of older patients. RNs may act as patients' advocates in the care of older patients. NMs should support patient advocacy in order to make the best care available to patients. A modified Attitudes towards Patient Advocacy Scale was used to collect data from 207 RNs and 23 NMs in the Swedish community care of older patients. The response rate was 52%. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used. Both RNs and NMs showed positive attitudes towards patient advocacy. They were more positive towards patient advocacy for patients unable to help themselves than for competent patients. This study showed that RNs and NMs did not differ in their attitudes towards patient advocacy. This result is consistent with the idea of giving the neediest and vulnerable patients greater care. It is important for NMs to clarify their own and RNs attitudes towards patient advocacy as disparities may affect cooperation between the groups. Any effects on cooperation may, by extension, affect the quality of care. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Inpatient Standards of Care and the Suicidal Patient Part II: An Integration with Clinical Risk Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Morton M.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Elaborates on standards of care for assessment, management, and treatment of hospitalized suicidal patients. Attempts to synthesize concepts of minimal standard of care with clinical risk management and clinical judgment. Points out areas of overlap and shows where optimum care diverges from legal standards of care. Tables differentiate…

  11. Managing the stress of caring for rehabilitation patients.

    PubMed

    Ward, K S; Parsons, L C; Krau, S D

    2001-09-01

    Dealing with stress is stressful! Evaluation is important to determine whether your plan for overpowering stress is working. Do you feel less stress as a result of what you have tried? Nurses use creativity every day in caring for their patients; applying that same spirit of creativity for stress reduction becomes personally meaningful. Stress is a universal condition, so friends and colleagues are good sources of ideas for stress management. Although stress is a human condition, unlikely to be totally eliminated, decreasing it as much as possible is important. Efforts in a stress reduction program can be met with great success. Recognizing the problem, assessing its magnitude, and then implementing selected strategies are all that is required. Overpowering stress in their lives is possible for nurses who are then healthier, happier, and even better caregivers.

  12. [Coordinating home assistance and nursing care for global patient management].

    PubMed

    Cerf, Dominique

    Enabling patients to remain in their home is only possible when the different services, both from within and outside the hospital are able to communicate and when the recommended actions are properly coordinated. Entrusting the coordination of the care to the Spasad (polyvalent service for home assistance and nursing care) enables the expectations of the patients and family carers to be analysed. This allows the team to put in place the appropriate actions both in terms of assistance and nursing care.

  13. [Coordinating home assistance and nursing care for global patient management].

    PubMed

    Cerf, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Enabling patients to remain in their home is only possible when the different services, both from within and outside the hospital are able to communicate and when the recommended actions are properly coordinated. Entrusting the coordination of the care to the Spasad (polyvalent service for home assistance and nursing care) enables the expectations of the patients and family carers to be analysed. This allows the team to put in place the appropriate actions both in terms of assistance and nursing care.

  14. Relationship between chronic conditions and patient satisfaction with managed care.

    PubMed

    Gines, M D; Pinto, L A; Gocka, L T; Legorreta, A P

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the level of satisfaction among members with and without chronic health conditions (asthma, diabetes, hypertension, and elevated plasma lipoprotein) in a large California managed care organization. One year's worth of member satisfaction survey data was analyzed. Results showed that a high percentage of members were satisfied with the health plan and with their access to care. Members with chronic conditions were significantly more satisfied with their access to care than were members without such conditions.

  15. Care for a Patient With Cancer As a Project: Management of Complex Task Interdependence in Cancer Care Delivery.

    PubMed

    Trosman, Julia R; Carlos, Ruth C; Simon, Melissa A; Madden, Debra L; Gradishar, William J; Benson, Al B; Rapkin, Bruce D; Weiss, Elisa S; Gareen, Ilana F; Wagner, Lynne I; Khan, Seema A; Bunce, Mikele M; Small, Art; Weldon, Christine B

    2016-11-01

    Cancer care is highly complex and suffers from fragmentation and lack of coordination across provider specialties and clinical domains. As a result, patients often find that they must coordinate care on their own. Coordinated delivery teams may address these challenges and improve quality of cancer care. Task interdependence is a core principle of rigorous teamwork and is essential to addressing the complexity of cancer care, which is highly interdependent across specialties and modalities. We examined challenges faced by a patient with early-stage breast cancer that resulted from difficulties in understanding and managing task interdependence across clinical domains involved in this patient's care. We used team science supported by the project management discipline to discuss how various task interdependence aspects can be recognized, deliberately designed, and systematically managed to prevent care breakdowns. This case highlights how effective task interdependence management facilitated by project management methods could markedly improve the course of a patient's care. This work informs efforts of cancer centers and practices to redesign cancer care delivery through innovative, practical, and patient-centered approaches to management of task interdependence in cancer care. Future patient-reported outcomes research will help to determine optimal ways to engage patients, including those who are medically underserved, in managing task interdependence in their own care.

  16. Caring for high-need, high-cost patients: what makes for a successful care management program?

    PubMed

    Hong, Clemens S; Siegel, Allison L; Ferris, Timothy G

    2014-08-01

    Provider groups taking on risk for the overall costs of care in accountable care organizations are developing care management programs to improve care and thereby control costs. Many such programs target "high-need, high-cost" patients: those with multiple or complex conditions, often combined with behavioral health problems or socioeconomic challenges. In this study we compared the operational approaches of 18 successful complex care management programs in order to offer guidance to providers, payers, and policymakers on best practices for complex care management. We found that effective programs customize their approach to their local contexts and caseloads; use a combination of qualitative and quantitative methods to identify patients; consider care coordination one of their key roles; focus on building trusting relationships with patients as well as their primary care providers; match team composition and interventions to patient needs; offer specialized training for team members; and use technology to bolster their efforts.

  17. [Intensive care management [corrected] of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Diedler, J; Sykora, M; Herweh, C; Orakcioglu, B; Zweckberger, K; Steiner, T; Hacke, W

    2011-04-01

    Approximately 10-15% of acute strokes are caused by non-aneurysmatic intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and incidences are expected to increase due to an aging population. Studies from the 1990s estimated mortality of ICH to be as high as 50%. However, these figures may partly be attributed to the fact that patients suffering from ICH frequently received only supportive therapy and the poor prognosis may therefore be more a self-fulfilling prophecy. Recently it has been shown that treatment in a specialized neurological intensive care unit alone was associated with better outcomes after ICH. In recent years considerable efforts have been undertaken in order to develop new therapies for ICH and to assess them in randomized controlled trials. Apart from admission status, hemorrhage volume is considered to be the main prognostic factor and impeding the spread of the hematoma is thus a basic therapeutic principle. The use of activated factor VIIa (aFVIIa) to stop hematoma enlargement has been assessed in two large randomized controlled trials, however the promising results of the dose-finding study could not be confirmed in a phase III trial. Although hemostatic therapy with aFVIIa reduced growth of the hematoma it failed to improve clinical outcome. Similar results were found in a randomized controlled trial on blood pressure management in acute ICH. The link between reduction of hematoma growth and improved outcome is therefore still lacking. Likewise the value of surgical hematoma evacuation remains uncertain. In the largest randomized controlled trial on surgical treatment in ICH so far, only a small subgroup of patients with superficial hemorrhages seemed to benefit from hematoma evacuation. Whether improved intensive care can contribute to improved outcome after ICH will be shown by data obtained in the coming years.

  18. Managing the care of patients who have visual impairment.

    PubMed

    Watkinson, Sue; Scott, Eileen

    An ageing population means that the incidence of people who are visually impaired will increase. However, extending the role of ophthalmic nurses will promote delivery of a more effective health service for these patients. Using Maslow's hierarchy of needs as a basis for addressing the care of patients with visual impairment is a means of ensuring that they receive high quality, appropriate care at the right time.

  19. Nurse middle managers contributions to patient-centred care: A 'managerial work' analysis.

    PubMed

    Lalleman, Pcb; Smid, Gac; Dikken, J; Lagerwey, M D; Schuurmans, M J

    2017-03-21

    Nurse middle managers are in an ideal position to facilitate patient-centred care. However, their contribution is underexposed in literature due to difficulties to articulate this in practice. This paper explores how nurse middle managers contribute to patient-centred care in hospitals. A combination of time-use analysis and ethnographic work was used to disclose their contribution to patient-centred care at a micro level. Sixteen nurse managers were shadowed for over 560 hours in four hospitals. Some nurse middle managers seldom contribute to patient-centred care. Others are involved in direct patient care, but this does not result in patient-centred practices. At one hospital, the nurse middle managers did contribute to patient-centred care. Here balancing between "organizing work" and "caring work" is seen as a precondition for their patient-centeredness. Other important themes are feedback mechanisms; place matters; with whom to talk and how to frame the issues at stake; and behavioral style. Both "hands-on" and "heads-on" caring work of nurse middle managers enhances their patient-centeredness. This study is the first of its kind to obtain insight in the often difficult to articulate "doings" of nurse middle managers with regard to patient-centred care through combining time-use analysis with ethnographic work.

  20. Integrating digital image management software for improved patient care and optimal practice management.

    PubMed

    Starr, Jon C

    2006-06-01

    Photographic images provide vital documentation of preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative results in the clinical dermatologic surgery practice and can document histologic findings from skin biopsies, thereby enhancing patient care. Images may be printed as part of text documents, transmitted via electronic mail, or included in electronic medical records. To describe existing computer software that integrates digital photography and the medical record to improve patient care and practice management. A variety of computer applications are available to optimize the use of digital images in the dermatologic practice.

  1. Care for a Patient With Cancer As a Project: Management of Complex Task Interdependence in Cancer Care Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Carlos, Ruth C.; Simon, Melissa A.; Madden, Debra L.; Gradishar, William J.; Benson, Al B.; Rapkin, Bruce D.; Weiss, Elisa S.; Gareen, Ilana F.; Wagner, Lynne I.; Khan, Seema A.; Bunce, Mikele M.; Small, Art; Weldon, Christine B.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer care is highly complex and suffers from fragmentation and lack of coordination across provider specialties and clinical domains. As a result, patients often find that they must coordinate care on their own. Coordinated delivery teams may address these challenges and improve quality of cancer care. Task interdependence is a core principle of rigorous teamwork and is essential to addressing the complexity of cancer care, which is highly interdependent across specialties and modalities. We examined challenges faced by a patient with early-stage breast cancer that resulted from difficulties in understanding and managing task interdependence across clinical domains involved in this patient’s care. We used team science supported by the project management discipline to discuss how various task interdependence aspects can be recognized, deliberately designed, and systematically managed to prevent care breakdowns. This case highlights how effective task interdependence management facilitated by project management methods could markedly improve the course of a patient’s care. This work informs efforts of cancer centers and practices to redesign cancer care delivery through innovative, practical, and patient-centered approaches to management of task interdependence in cancer care. Future patient-reported outcomes research will help to determine optimal ways to engage patients, including those who are medically underserved, in managing task interdependence in their own care. PMID:27577619

  2. How family physicians address diagnosis and management of depression in palliative care patients.

    PubMed

    Warmenhoven, Franca; van Rijswijk, Eric; van Hoogstraten, Elise; van Spaendonck, Karel; Lucassen, Peter; Prins, Judith; Vissers, Kris; van Weel, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Depression is highly prevalent in palliative care patients. In clinical practice, there is concern about both insufficient and excessive diagnosis and treatment of depression. In the Netherlands, family physicians have a central role in delivering palliative care. We explored variation in family physicians' opinions regarding the recognition, diagnosis, and management of depression in palliative care patients. We conducted a focus group study in a sample of family physicians with varied practice locations and varying expertise in palliative care. Transcripts were analyzed independently by 2 researchers using constant comparative analysis in ATLAS.ti. In 4 focus group discussions with 22 family physicians, the physicians described the diagnostic and therapeutic process for depression in palliative care patients as a continuous and overlapping process. Differentiating between normal and abnormal sadness was viewed as challenging. The physicians did not strictly apply criteria of depressive disorder but rather relied on their clinical judgment and strongly considered patients' context and background factors. They indicated that managing depression in palliative care patients is mainly supportive and nonspecific. Antidepressant drugs were seldom prescribed. The physicians described difficulties in diagnosing and treating depression in palliative care, and gave suggestions to improve management of depression in palliative care patients in primary care. Family physicians perceive the diagnosis and management of depression in palliative care patients as challenging. They rely on open communication and a long-standing physician-patient relationship in which the patient's context is of great importance. This approach fits with the patient-centered care that is promoted in primary care.

  3. Health Care Professionals' Views about Supporting Patients' Self-Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikkonen, Irma; Hynynen, Marja-Anneli

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to describe nurses' and other health care professionals' views about their patient education skills and how to develop them. Design/methodology/approach: The data for the study were collected from the participants of the online education course on patient education. The data were analyzed using qualitative…

  4. Health Care Professionals' Views about Supporting Patients' Self-Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikkonen, Irma; Hynynen, Marja-Anneli

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to describe nurses' and other health care professionals' views about their patient education skills and how to develop them. Design/methodology/approach: The data for the study were collected from the participants of the online education course on patient education. The data were analyzed using qualitative…

  5. Expectations outpace reality: physicians' use of care management tools for patients with chronic conditions.

    PubMed

    Carrier, Emily; Reschovsky, James

    2009-12-01

    Use of care management tools--such as group visits or patient registries--varies widely among primary care physicians whose practices care for patients with four common chronic conditions--asthma, diabetes, congestive heart failure and depression--according to a new national study by the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC). For example, less than a third of these primary care physicians in 2008 reported their practices use nurse managers to coordinate care, and only four in 10 were in practices using registries to keep track of patients with chronic conditions. Physicians also used care management tools for patients with some chronic conditions but not others. Practice size and setting were strongly related to the likelihood that physicians used care management tools, with solo and smaller group practices least likely to use care management tools. The findings suggest that, along with experimenting with financial incentives for primary care physicians to adopt care management tools, policy makers might consider developing community-level care management resources, such as nurse managers, that could be shared among smaller physician practices.

  6. Understanding the experience of care managers and relationship with patient outcomes: the COMPASS initiative.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Karen J; Hemmila, Tani; Valenti, Mark D; Smith, Nasya; Quarrell, Rachel; Ruona, Lynnice K; Brandenfels, Emily; Hann, Barbara; Hinnenkamp, Todd; Parra, Margarita D; Monkman, Jeyn; Vos, Sue; Rossom, Rebecca C

    To understand how care managers implemented COMPASS and if this was related to patient health outcomes. A total of 96 COMPASS care managers were approached to participate in the online survey and 93 (97%) provided responses. Correlations were generated between key survey responses and the average number of care management contacts, patient depression, blood pressure and glycosylated hemoglobin outcomes. Patients of care managers who reported spending more time on COMPASS-related tasks had higher rates of depression improvement (r=0.34; P=.002) and remission (r=0.27; P=.02) as well as higher rates of blood pressure control (r=0.29; P=.03). To improve the effectiveness of care management in collaborative care models, particularly for patients with comorbid conditions and complex nonmedical needs, care managers need the support of social work and administrative support staff. Care managers for this patient population would also benefit from more intensive training in nonpharmacological depression treatment, such as motivational interviewing and behavioral activation. Additionally, systems support is needed such as education for primary care teams and psychiatry on the value of collaborative care models and integration of population management tools into electronic medical records. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Implementing practice management strategies to improve patient care: the EPIC project.

    PubMed

    Attwell, David; Rogers-Warnock, Leslie; Nemis-White, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    Healthcare gaps, the difference between usual care and best care, are evident in Canada, particularly with respect to our aging, ailing population. Primary care practitioners are challenged to identify, prevent and close care gaps in their practice environment given the competing demands of informed, litigious patients with complex medical needs, ever-evolving scientific evidence with new treatment recommendations across many disciplines and an enhanced emphasis on quality and accountability in healthcare. Patient-centred health and disease management partnerships using measurement, feedback and communication of practice patterns and outcomes have been shown to narrow care gaps. Practice management strategies such as the use of patient registries and recall systems have also been used to help practitioners better understand, follow and proactively manage populations of patients in their practice. The Enhancing Practice to Improve Care project was initiated to determine the impact of a patient-centred health and disease management partnership using practice management strategies to improve patient care and outcomes for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Forty-four general practices from four regions of British Columbia participated and, indeed, demonstrated that care and outcomes for patients with CKD could be improved via the implementation of practice management strategies in a patient-centred partnership measurement model of health and disease management.

  8. Nurse practitioners and managed care: patient satisfaction and intention to adhere to nurse practitioner plan of care.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Eileen

    2007-08-01

    To explore patient satisfaction, intention to adhere to nurse practitioner (NP) plan of care, and the impact of managed care on NPs' patients in multiple settings, the final phase of a three-part study of NPs and managed care. Postvisit questionnaires and narrative comments about patient satisfaction with NP communication, overall satisfaction with visit, recall of plan of care, intention to adhere to NP's recommendations, and impact of managed care on ease of obtaining healthcare resources. Patients were very satisfied with NP communication and with their healthcare visit. They mostly intended to adhere to the NP-recommended plan of care but less so to recommended lifestyle changes. Patients trusted their NPs, valued their expertise, were confident in the NPs' care, and believed that the NPs considered their best interests. They appreciated that the NPs took time to listen to their concerns and helped them to obtain healthcare resources. Most patients were not greatly impacted by managed care and obtained needed healthcare resources with little difficulty. Although the first two phases of this study found that many NPs had strong negative attitudes toward managed care, these attitudes were not conveyed toward patients in this sample. NPs, however, will continue to face new challenges as third-party payers attempt to reduce healthcare costs, further testing NP adaptability and resourcefulness.

  9. Outcomes for patients with dementia from the Cleveland Alzheimer's Managed Care Demonstration.

    PubMed

    Clark, P A; Bass, D M; Looman, W J; McCarthy, C A; Eckert, S

    2004-01-01

    This investigation evaluates effects of care consultation delivered within a partnership between a managed health care system and Alzheimer's Association chapter. Care consultation is a multi-component telephone intervention in which Association staff work with patients and caregivers to identify personal strengths and resources within the family, health plan, and community. The primary hypothesis is that care consultation will decrease utilization of managed care services and improve psychosocial outcomes. A secondary modifying-effects hypothesis posits benefits will be greater for patients with more severe memory impairment. The sample is composed of managed care patients whose medical records indicate a diagnosis of dementia or memory loss. Patients were randomly assigned to an intervention group, which was offered care consultation in addition to usual managed care services, or to a control group, which was offered only usual managed care services. Data come from two in-person interviews with patients, and medical and administrative records. Results supporting the primary hypothesis show intervention group patients feel less embarrassed and isolated because of their memory problems and report less difficulty coping. Findings consistent with the modifying-effects hypothesis show intervention group patients with more severe impairment have fewer physician visits, are less likely to have an emergency department visit or hospital admission, are more satisfied with managed care services, and have decreased depression and strain.

  10. The transition to managed care: experiences of planned parenthood patients.

    PubMed

    Lewis, V; Lawler, K

    1998-11-01

    A review of the findings from a 1996 survey of women visiting a Planned Parenthood clinic reveals that some members of managed care organizations (MCOs) may not be receiving appropriate preventive services and information from their primary care providers. This article details the results of a survey of 115 women who attended a Planned Parenthood of New York City clinic for reproductive health services. Based on these survey findings, the authors provide recommendations for MCOs and traditional providers of reproductive health to improve service delivery.

  11. Pilot Program to Improve Self-Management of Patients with Heart Failure by Redesigning Care Coordination

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Jessica D.; O'Neal, Daniel J.; Siddharthan, Kris; Neugaard, Britta I.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We tested both an educational and a care coordination element of health care to examine if better disease-specific knowledge leads to successful self-management of heart failure (HF). Background. The high utilization of health care resources and poor patient outcomes associated with HF justify tests of change to improve self-management of HF. Methods. This prospective study tested two components of the Chronic Care Model (clinical information systems and self-management support) to improve outcomes in the self-management of HF among patients who received intensive education and care coordination during their acute care stay. A postdischarge follow-up phone call assessed their knowledge of HF self-management compared to usual care patients. Results. There were 20 patients each in the intervention and usual care groups. Intervention patients were more likely to have a scale at home, write down their weight, and practice new or different health behaviors. Conclusion. Patients receiving more intensive education knew more about their disease and were better able to self-manage their weight compared to patients receiving standard care. PMID:24864206

  12. Web-Based Self-Management in Chronic Care: A Study of Change in Patient Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    Web-based self-management interventions (W-SMIs) are designed to help a large number of chronically ill people become more actively engaged in their health care. Despite the potential to engage more patients in self-managing their health, the use of W-SMIs by patients and their clinicians is low. Using a self-management conceptual model based on…

  13. Management plan and delivery of care in Graves' ophthalmopathy patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Morgan; Perros, Petros

    2012-06-01

    Most patients with Graves' orbitopathy have mild disease that requires no or minimal intervention. For the minority of patients with moderate or severe disease, multiple medical and surgical treatments may be required at different stages. It is crucial that such patients are monitored closely and treatments applied with care in the right sequence. Medical treatments should be used as early as possible and only during the active phase of the disease. Rehabilitative surgery is indicated in the inactive phase of the disease and should follow the sequence: surgical decompression followed by eye muscle surgery, followed by lid surgery. Delivery of care in a coordinated fashion that makes use of best available expertise is important and best implemented through a Combined Thyroid Eye clinic.

  14. Patient-centeredness and quality management in Dutch diabetes care organizations after a 1-year intervention.

    PubMed

    Campmans-Kuijpers, Marjo Je; Lemmens, Lidwien C; Baan, Caroline A; Rutten, Guy Ehm

    2016-01-01

    More focus on patient-centeredness in care for patients with type 2 diabetes requests increasing attention to diabetes quality management processes on patient-centeredness by managers in primary care groups and outpatient clinics. Although patient-centered care is ultimately determined by the quality of interactions between patients and clinicians at the practice level, it should be facilitated at organizational level too. This nationwide study aimed to assess the state of diabetes quality management on patient-centeredness at organizational level and its possibilities to improve after a tailored intervention. This before-after study compares the quality management on patient-centeredness within Dutch diabetes care groups and outpatient clinics before and after a 1-year stepwise intervention. At baseline, managers of 51 diabetes primary care groups and 28 outpatient diabetes clinics completed a questionnaire about the organization's quality management program. Patient-centeredness (0%-100%) was operationalized in six subdomains: facilitating self-management support, individualized care plan support, patients' access to medical files, patient education policy, safeguarding patients' interests, and formal patient involvement. The intervention consisted of feedback and benchmark and if requested a telephone call and/or a consultancy visit. After 1 year, the managers completed the questionnaire again. The 1-year changes were examined by dependent (non) parametric tests. Care groups improved significantly on patient-centeredness (from 47.1% to 53.3%; P=0.002), and on its subdomains "access to medical files" (from 42.0% to 49.4%), and "safeguarding patients' interests" (from 58.1% to 66.2%). Outpatient clinics, which scored higher at baseline (66.7%) than care groups, did not improve on patient-centeredness (65.6%: P=0.54) or its subdomains. "Formal patient involvement" remained low in both care groups (23.2%) and outpatient clinics (33.9%). After a simple intervention

  15. The Oral Health Care Manager in a Patient-Centered Health Facility.

    PubMed

    Theile, Cheryl Westphal; Strauss, Shiela M; Northridge, Mary Evelyn; Birenz, Shirley

    2016-06-01

    The dental hygienist team member has an opportunity to coordinate care within an interprofessional practice as an oral health care manager. Although dental hygienists are currently practicing within interprofessional teams in settings such as pediatric offices, hospitals, nursing homes, schools, and federally qualified health centers, they often still assume traditional responsibilities rather than practicing to the full extent of their training and licenses. This article explains the opportunity for the dental hygiene professional to embrace patient-centered care as an oral health care manager who can facilitate integration of oral and primary care in a variety of health care settings. Based on an innovative model of collaboration between a college of dentistry and a college of nursing, an idea emerged among several faculty members for a new management method for realizing continuity and coordination of comprehensive patient care. Involved faculty members began working on the development of an approach to interprofessional practice with the dental hygienist serving as an oral health care manager who would address both oral health care and a patient's related primary care issues through appropriate referrals and follow-up. This approach is explained in this article, along with the results of several pilot studies that begin to evaluate the feasibility of a dental hygienist as an oral health care manager. A health care provider with management skills and leadership qualities is required to coordinate the interprofessional provision of comprehensive health care. The dental hygienist has the opportunity to lead closer integration of oral and primary care as an oral health care manager, by coordinating the team of providers needed to implement comprehensive, patient-centered care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Quality of care provided to patients with diabetes mellitus in Puerto Rico; managed care versus fee-for-service experience.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Vigil, Efraín; Kianes-Pérez, Zaira

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate and compare the quality of diabetes care in a large managed care system and fee-for-service payment system in Puerto Rico. This retrospective cross-sectional study assessed the adherence to standards of diabetes care in 1,687,202 subjects--226,210 from a fee-for-service population and 1,460,992 from a managed care group. Patients with diabetes mellitus were identified from insurance claims reports. Type of health-care provider, service location, number of visits, and laboratory utilization were also assessed. From the analysis, we identified 90,616 patients with diabetes (5.4% of the overall study group). Of these, 66,587 (73.5%) were found to have at least one encounter with a physician in a medical visit. Of the 66,586 patients with diabetes who visited a physician, only 4% were treated by an endocrinologist. General laboratory utilization was 34% for the entire population of patients with diabetes studied. In the group of patients with documented laboratory tests, 93% had a documented fasting blood glucose test; in contrast, hemoglobin A lc testing was performed in only 9% of the patients. The fee-for-service group had a higher rate of visits to medical specialists and general laboratory utilization, whereas the managed care group had a higher rate of hospital admissions and emergency department visits. The quality of diabetes management and the subsequent outcomes are related to patient and health-care provider adherence to standards of care. In this analysis, we found that patients and physicians are responsible for low compliance with recognized standards of diabetes care in Puerto Rico. The lack of adequate management will lead to increased mortality, development and severity of chronic complications, and increased emergency department utilization. Therefore, health-care providers and payers should find ways to achieve more effective promotion of adherence to accepted standards of care for patients with diabetes.

  17. How technology in care at home affects patient self-care and self-management: a scoping review.

    PubMed

    Peeters, José M; Wiegers, Therese A; Friele, Roland D

    2013-10-29

    The use of technology in care at home has potential benefits such as improved quality of care. This includes greater focus on the patients' role in managing their health and increased patient involvement in the care process. The objective of this scoping review is to analyse the existing evidence for effects of technology in home-based care on patients' self-care and self-management. Using suitable search terms we searched the databases of Pubmed, Embase, Cochrane Library, Cinahl, Picarta and NIVEL dating from 2002 to 2012. Thirty-three studies (six review studies and twenty-seven individual studies) were selected. Effects were extracted from each study and were classified. In almost all the studies, the concepts self-care and self-management are not clearly defined or operationalized. Therefore, based on a meta-analysis, we made a new classification of outcome measures, with hierarchical levels: (1) competence (2) illness-management (3) independence (social participation, autonomy). In general, patient outcomes appear to be positive or promising, but most studies were pilot studies. We did not find strong evidence that technology in care at home has (a positive) effect on patient self-care and self-management according to the above classification. Future research is needed to clarify how technology can be used to maximize its benefits.

  18. Remote access to medical specialists: home care interactive patient management system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Peter J.; Draghic, Nicole; Wiesmann, William P.

    1999-07-01

    Diabetes management involves constant care and rigorous compliance. Glucose control is often difficult to maintain and onset of complications further compound health care needs. Status can be further hampered by geographic isolation from immediate medical infrastructures. The Home Care Interactive Patient Management System is an experimental telemedicine program that could improve chronic illness management through Internet-based applications. The goal of the system is to provide a customized, integrated approach to diabetes management to supplement and coordinate physician protocol while supporting routine patient activity, by supplying a set of customized automated services including health data collection, transmission, analysis and decision support.

  19. Tools and Equipment for Managing Special Care Patients Anywhere.

    PubMed

    Levy, Harvey; Rotenberg, Lena R

    2016-07-01

    This article describes many of the tools and equipment used by dental professionals to successfully treat special care patients in a variety of settings. Such equipment can be used in the dental office, operating room, hospital, surgical center, nursing home, private home, institution, hospice, and even in the field without electricity. Equipment discussed includes seating, laughing gas and sedation systems, body wraps and mouth props, lighting, radiographic exposure and imaging systems, dental isolation devices, and other tools the authors use.

  20. Patient-centeredness and quality management in Dutch diabetes care organizations after a 1-year intervention

    PubMed Central

    Campmans-Kuijpers, Marjo JE; Lemmens, Lidwien C; Baan, Caroline A; Rutten, Guy EHM

    2016-01-01

    Background More focus on patient-centeredness in care for patients with type 2 diabetes requests increasing attention to diabetes quality management processes on patient-centeredness by managers in primary care groups and outpatient clinics. Although patient-centered care is ultimately determined by the quality of interactions between patients and clinicians at the practice level, it should be facilitated at organizational level too. This nationwide study aimed to assess the state of diabetes quality management on patient-centeredness at organizational level and its possibilities to improve after a tailored intervention. Methods This before–after study compares the quality management on patient-centeredness within Dutch diabetes care groups and outpatient clinics before and after a 1-year stepwise intervention. At baseline, managers of 51 diabetes primary care groups and 28 outpatient diabetes clinics completed a questionnaire about the organization’s quality management program. Patient-centeredness (0%–100%) was operationalized in six subdomains: facilitating self-management support, individualized care plan support, patients’ access to medical files, patient education policy, safeguarding patients’ interests, and formal patient involvement. The intervention consisted of feedback and benchmark and if requested a telephone call and/or a consultancy visit. After 1 year, the managers completed the questionnaire again. The 1-year changes were examined by dependent (non) parametric tests. Results Care groups improved significantly on patient-centeredness (from 47.1% to 53.3%; P=0.002), and on its subdomains “access to medical files” (from 42.0% to 49.4%), and “safeguarding patients’ interests” (from 58.1% to 66.2%). Outpatient clinics, which scored higher at baseline (66.7%) than care groups, did not improve on patient-centeredness (65.6%: P=0.54) or its subdomains. “Formal patient involvement” remained low in both care groups (23.2%) and

  1. Collaborative depression care among Latino patients in diabetes disease management, Los Angeles, 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    Wu, Brian; Jin, Haomiao; Vidyanti, Irene; Lee, Pey-Jiuan; Ell, Kathleen; Wu, Shinyi

    2014-08-28

    The prevalence of comorbid diabetes and depression is high, especially in low-income Hispanic or Latino patients. The complex mix of factors in safety-net care systems impedes the adoption of evidence-based collaborative depression care and results in persistent disparities in depression outcomes. The Diabetes-Depression Care-Management Adoption Trial examined whether the collaborative depression care model is an effective approach in safety-net clinics to improve clinical care outcomes of depression and diabetes. A sample of 964 patients with diabetes from 5 safety-net clinics were enrolled in a quasi-experimental study that included 2 arms: usual care, in which primary medical providers and staff translated and adopted evidence-based depression care; and supportive care, in which providers of a disease management program delivered protocol-driven depression care. Because the study design established individual treatment centers as separate arms, we calculated propensity scores that interpreted the probability of treatment assignment conditional on observed baseline characteristics. Primary outcomes were 5 depression care outcomes and 7 diabetes care measures. Regression models with propensity score covariate adjustment were applied to analyze 6-month outcomes. Compared with usual care, supportive care significantly decreased Patient Health Questionnaire-9 scores, reduced the number of patients with moderate or severe depression, improved depression remission, increased satisfaction in care for patients with emotional problems, and significantly reduced functional impairment. Implementing collaborative depression care in a diabetes disease management program is a scalable approach to improve depression outcomes and patient care satisfaction among patients with diabetes in a safety-net care system.

  2. Care Management Medical Home Center Model: Preliminary Results of a Patient-Centered Approach to Improving Care Quality for Diabetic Patients.

    PubMed

    Page, Timothy F; Amofah, St Anthony; McCann, Shelia; Rivo, Julie; Varghese, Asha; James, Terisa; Rivo, Marc; Williams, Mark L

    2015-07-01

    This article presents preliminary findings of the impact of an innovative care management model for diabetic patients. The model was implemented by seven Federally Qualified Health Centers serving 10,000 diabetic patients in Miami-Dade County. A primary intervention of this model is a centralized care management team that makes previsit phone calls to diabetic patients who have scheduled appointments. These previsit phone calls optimize patient knowledge and self-management goals, and provide patient care coordinators with relevant clinical information to optimize the office visit and help to ensure completion of recommended diabetic preventive and chronic care services. Data suggest that following the implementation of this care management model, more diabetic patients are receiving regular care, and compliance with recommended tests and screenings has improved.

  3. Cognitive function and self-care management in older patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Harkness, Karen; Heckman, George A; Akhtar-Danesh, Noori; Demers, Catherine; Gunn, Elizabeth; McKelvie, Robert S

    2014-06-01

    People with heart failure have difficulty with self-care management. We do not know if patients with heart failure have difficulty with self-care management due to underlying, mild cognitive impairment (MCI). The purpose of this study was to determine whether MCI, as identified on a simple screening tool, is significantly associated with self-care management in a sample of community dwelling older patients with heart failure. Using a cross-sectional design, heart failure patients (n=100, mean age 72 SD 10 years) attending an outpatient heart failure clinic completed the Montreal Cognitive Assessment tool (MoCA), Self-Care in Heart Failure Index (SCHFI) and Geriatric Depression Scale. The presence of MCI, as defined by a MoCA score <26, was present in 73% patients; 21% had an adequate self-care management SCHFI score; and 12% reported symptoms of depression. Participants with a MoCA score <26 vs. ≥ 26 scored significantly lower on the self-care management subscale of the SCHFI (48.1 SD 24 vs. 59.3 SD 22 respectively, p=0.035). Using backward regression, the final model was fitted to self-care management while controlling for age and sex and was significant, with (F= 7.04 df (3, 96), and p<0.001), accounting for 18% of the total variance in self-care management (R (2) = 18.03%). The MoCA score was the only variable which remained in the model significantly with p= 0.001. Findings from this study highlight the difficulty older heart failure patients have with self-care management and the need to include formal screening for MCI when exploring variables contributing to self-care management in heart failure patients.

  4. Self-management in patients with COPD: theoretical context, content, outcomes, and integration into clinical care.

    PubMed

    Kaptein, Ad A; Fischer, Maarten J; Scharloo, Margreet

    2014-01-01

    In this narrative review, we put self-management in the context of a 50-year history of research about how patients with COPD respond to their illness. We review a definition of self-management, and emphasize that self-management should be combined with disease management and the chronic care model in order to be effective. Reviewing the empirical status of self-management in COPD, we conclude that self-management is part and parcel of modern, patient-oriented biopsychosocial care. In pulmonary rehabilitation programs, self-management is instrumental in improving patients' functional status and quality of life. We conclude by emphasizing how studying the way persons with COPD make sense of their illness helps in refining self-management, and thereby patient-reported outcomes in COPD.

  5. Sequential antibiotic therapy: Effective cost management and patient care

    PubMed Central

    Mandell, Lionel A; Bergeron, Michel G; Gribble, Marie J; Jewesson, Peter J; Low, Donald E; Marrie, Thomas J; Nicolle, Lindsay E

    1995-01-01

    The escalating costs associated with antimicrobial chemotherapy have become of increasing concern to physicians, pharmacists and patients alike. A number of strategies have been developed to address this problem. This article focuses specifically on sequential antibiotic therapy (sat), which is the strategy of converting patients from intravenous to oral medication regardless of whether the same or a different class of drug is used. Advantages of sat include economic benefits, patient benefits and benefits to the health care provider. Potential disadvantages are cost to the consumer and the risk of therapeutic failure. A critical review of the published literature shows that evidence from randomized controlled trials supports the role of sat. However, it is also clear that further studies are necessary to determine the optimal time for intravenous to oral changeover and to identify the variables that may interfere with the use of oral drugs. Procedures necessary for the implementation of a sat program in the hospital setting are also discussed. PMID:22550411

  6. Sequential antibiotic therapy: Effective cost management and patient care.

    PubMed

    Mandell, L A; Bergeron, M G; Gribble, M J; Jewesson, P J; Low, D E; Marrie, T J; Nicolle, L E

    1995-11-01

    The escalating costs associated with antimicrobial chemotherapy have become of increasing concern to physicians, pharmacists and patients alike. A number of strategies have been developed to address this problem. This article focuses specifically on sequential antibiotic therapy (sat), which is the strategy of converting patients from intravenous to oral medication regardless of whether the same or a different class of drug is used. Advantages of sat include economic benefits, patient benefits and benefits to the health care provider. Potential disadvantages are cost to the consumer and the risk of therapeutic failure. A critical review of the published literature shows that evidence from randomized controlled trials supports the role of sat. However, it is also clear that further studies are necessary to determine the optimal time for intravenous to oral changeover and to identify the variables that may interfere with the use of oral drugs. Procedures necessary for the implementation of a sat program in the hospital setting are also discussed.

  7. [Emergency care of vertigo patients: suggestions for efficient management].

    PubMed

    Kogashiwa, Yasunao; Takei, Yasuhiko; Matsuda, Takeaki; Karaho, Takehiro; Morita, Masahiro; Kohno, Naoyuki

    2009-10-01

    Some diseases in which persons show vertigo or dizziness may be life-threatening, regardless of symptom severity, and require careful attention. These include diseases of the inner ear, central nervous system, and cardiovascular manifestation. In May 2006, a group in charge of primary emergency consultation began work enabling physicians to treat vertigo patients more efficiently and safely, as detailed in this report. Of the 173 persons with vertigo hospitalized from January 2004 to March 2008, six had cerebrovascular manifestations clarified only after hospitalization, underscoring the importance of careful examination, especially of those 75 years of age older, having continuous headache, having severe trunk ataxia despite apparently mild eye nystagmus, or reporting a history of high blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, or ischemic heart disease.

  8. Educating Patients about CKD: The Path to Self-Management and Patient-Centered Care.

    PubMed

    Narva, Andrew S; Norton, Jenna M; Boulware, L Ebony

    2016-04-07

    Patient education is associated with better patient outcomes and supported by international guidelines and organizations, but a range of barriers prevent widespread implementation of comprehensive education for people with progressive kidney disease, especially in the United States. Among United States patients, obstacles to education include the complex nature of kidney disease information, low baseline awareness, limited health literacy and numeracy, limited availability of CKD information, and lack of readiness to learn. For providers, lack of time and clinical confidence combine with competing education priorities and confusion about diagnosing CKD to limit educational efforts. At the system level, lack of provider incentives, limited availability of practical decision support tools, and lack of established interdisciplinary care models inhibit patient education. Despite these barriers, innovative education approaches for people with CKD exist, including self-management support, shared decision making, use of digital media, and engaging families and communities. Education efficiency may be increased by focusing on people with progressive disease, establishing interdisciplinary care management including community health workers, and providing education in group settings. New educational approaches are being developed through research and quality improvement efforts, but challenges to evaluating public awareness and patient education programs inhibit identification of successful strategies for broader implementation. However, growing interest in improving patient-centered outcomes may provide new approaches to effective education of people with CKD. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  9. Educating Patients about CKD: The Path to Self-Management and Patient-Centered Care

    PubMed Central

    Norton, Jenna M.; Boulware, L. Ebony

    2016-01-01

    Patient education is associated with better patient outcomes and supported by international guidelines and organizations, but a range of barriers prevent widespread implementation of comprehensive education for people with progressive kidney disease, especially in the United States. Among United States patients, obstacles to education include the complex nature of kidney disease information, low baseline awareness, limited health literacy and numeracy, limited availability of CKD information, and lack of readiness to learn. For providers, lack of time and clinical confidence combine with competing education priorities and confusion about diagnosing CKD to limit educational efforts. At the system level, lack of provider incentives, limited availability of practical decision support tools, and lack of established interdisciplinary care models inhibit patient education. Despite these barriers, innovative education approaches for people with CKD exist, including self-management support, shared decision making, use of digital media, and engaging families and communities. Education efficiency may be increased by focusing on people with progressive disease, establishing interdisciplinary care management including community health workers, and providing education in group settings. New educational approaches are being developed through research and quality improvement efforts, but challenges to evaluating public awareness and patient education programs inhibit identification of successful strategies for broader implementation. However, growing interest in improving patient-centered outcomes may provide new approaches to effective education of people with CKD. PMID:26536899

  10. Management of specific symptom complexes in patients receiving palliative care

    PubMed Central

    Bruera, E; Neumann, C M

    1998-01-01

    During the past 10 years there have been major changes in the management of the most common symptoms of terminal cancer. Opioid agonists remain the mainstay in the management of cancer pain. Slow-release preparations are currently available for several of these agents. The increased use of opioids has led to the recognition of opioid-induced neurotoxic effects and to the development of effective adjuvant drugs and other strategies to counteract these side effects. A number of drugs are available for the management of symptoms of cachexia, including corticosteroids and progestational drugs. Prokinetic drugs, either alone or in combination with other agents such as corticosteroids, are highly effective in the treatment of chronic nausea. For patients with asthenia, it should first be determined whether there are any reversible causes; if not, corticosteroids and psychostimulants may diminish the symptoms. Haloperidol, other neuroleptics and benzodiazepines may be required to manage hyperactive delirium. Oxygen and opioids are effective in treating dyspnea, whereas there is limited evidence that benzodiazepines provide any relief of this symptom. More research on the assessment and management of these devastating clinical symptoms of cancer is badly needed. PMID:9676549

  11. Differential effectiveness of depression disease management for rural and urban primary care patients.

    PubMed

    Adams, Scott J; Xu, Stanley; Dong, Fran; Fortney, John; Rost, Kathryn

    2006-01-01

    Federally qualified health centers across the country are adopting depression disease management programs following federally mandated training; however, little is known about the relative effectiveness of depression disease management in rural versus urban patient populations. To explore whether a depression disease management program has a comparable impact on clinical outcomes over 2 years in patients treated in rural and urban primary care practices and whether the impact is mediated by receiving evidence-based care (antidepressant medication and specialty care counseling). A preplanned secondary analysis was conducted in a consecutively sampled cohort of 479 depressed primary care patients recruited from 12 practices in 10 states across the country participating in the Quality Enhancement for Strategic Teaming study. Depression disease management improved the mental health status of urban patients over 18 months but not rural patients. Effects were not mediated by antidepressant medication or specialty care counseling in urban or rural patients. Depression disease management appears to improve clinical outcomes in urban but not rural patients. Because these programs compete for scarce resources, health care organizations interested in delivering depression disease management to rural populations need to advocate for programs whose clinical effectiveness has been demonstrated for rural residents.

  12. How Technology in Care at Home Affects Patient Self-Care and Self-Management: A Scoping Review

    PubMed Central

    Peeters, José M.; Wiegers, Therese A.; Friele, Roland D.

    2013-01-01

    The use of technology in care at home has potential benefits such as improved quality of care. This includes greater focus on the patients’ role in managing their health and increased patient involvement in the care process. The objective of this scoping review is to analyse the existing evidence for effects of technology in home-based care on patients’ self-care and self-management. Using suitable search terms we searched the databases of Pubmed, Embase, Cochrane Library, Cinahl, Picarta and NIVEL dating from 2002 to 2012. Thirty-three studies (six review studies and twenty-seven individual studies) were selected. Effects were extracted from each study and were classified. In almost all the studies, the concepts self-care and self-management are not clearly defined or operationalized. Therefore, based on a meta-analysis, we made a new classification of outcome measures, with hierarchical levels: (1) competence (2) illness-management (3) independence (social participation, autonomy). In general, patient outcomes appear to be positive or promising, but most studies were pilot studies. We did not find strong evidence that technology in care at home has (a positive) effect on patient self-care and self-management according to the above classification. Future research is needed to clarify how technology can be used to maximize its benefits. PMID:24173139

  13. Active ambulatory care management supported by short message services and mobile phone technology in patients with arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kiselev, Anton R; Gridnev, Vladimir I; Shvartz, Vladimir A; Posnenkova, Olga M; Dovgalevsky, Pavel Ya

    2012-01-01

    The use of short message services and mobile phone technology for ambulatory care management is the most accessible and most inexpensive way to transition from traditional ambulatory care management to active ambulatory care management in patients with arterial hypertension (AH). The aim of this study was to compare the clinical efficacy of active ambulatory care management supported by short message services and mobile phone technology with traditional ambulatory care management in AH patients. The study included 97 hypertensive patients under active ambulatory care management and 102 patients under traditional ambulatory care management. Blood pressure levels, body mass, and smoking history of patients were analyzed in the study. The duration of study was 1 year. In the active ambulatory care management group, 36% of patients were withdrawn from the study within a year. At the end of the year, 77% of patients from the active care management group had achieved the goal blood pressure level. That was more than 5 times higher than that in the traditional ambulatory care management group (P < .001). The risk ratio of achieving and maintaining the goal blood pressure in patients of active care management group was 5.44, CI (3.2-9.9; P = .005). Implementation of active ambulatory care management supported by short message services and mobile phone improves the quality of ambulatory care of hypertensive patients.

  14. Potential for Self-Management in Chronic Care: Nurses' Assessments of Patients.

    PubMed

    Bos-Touwen, Irene; Dijkkamp, Evelien; Kars, Marijke; Trappenburg, Jaap; De Wit, Niek; Schuurmans, Marieke

    2015-01-01

    Although self-management interventions are, to some extent, individualized in clinical practice, the decision-making process is not fully understood. Exploring nurses' clinical reasoning about how and to what extent they currently tailor self-management support can provide new insights, enhancing process and outcome of chronic care. The aim of this study was to explore how nurses assess chronic patients concerning the potential of self-management and clinical reasoning with regard to tailoring care to the individual patient. A qualitative study was conducted using grounded theory. Semistructured interviews were held with 15 nurses working within chronic care. All interviews were carried out from February to July 2013. All nurses provided individualized care; however, a nurse's view of self-management influenced how tailoring was performed. Substantial differences were seen in patient assessments and how care was individualized. Patients' motivation, capacities, mindset, needs, and preferences were obtained through communication, experience, intuition, and trusting relationships. A typology with four patient types emerged: the unmotivated patient, the patient with limited capacities, the oblivious patient, and the ideal patient. Nurses elaborated on using different approaches for patients in each of these groups. A nurse's perception of self-management substantially impacted how care was individualized. Patient assessment was the key driver of tailoring, which was performed in various ways, and influenced how and the extent to which care was individualized. To enable responding to the unique wishes and needs of individual patients, both scientific and educational efforts need to be directed toward systematic assessments of patient capacity to self-manage their disease.

  15. Self-management in patients with COPD: theoretical context, content, outcomes, and integration into clinical care

    PubMed Central

    Kaptein, Ad A; Fischer, Maarten J; Scharloo, Margreet

    2014-01-01

    In this narrative review, we put self-management in the context of a 50-year history of research about how patients with COPD respond to their illness. We review a definition of self-management, and emphasize that self-management should be combined with disease management and the chronic care model in order to be effective. Reviewing the empirical status of self-management in COPD, we conclude that self-management is part and parcel of modern, patient-oriented biopsychosocial care. In pulmonary rehabilitation programs, self-management is instrumental in improving patients’ functional status and quality of life. We conclude by emphasizing how studying the way persons with COPD make sense of their illness helps in refining self-management, and thereby patient-reported outcomes in COPD. PMID:25214777

  16. Better for ourselves and better for our patients: chronic disease management in primary care networks.

    PubMed

    Every, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Capital Health in Edmonton, Alberta, implemented a system-wide chronic disease management model to support people with chronic disease and their primary care physicians. Groups of family physicians, in partnership with the health region, developed primary care networks to provide services that are customized to meet the priorities of the local community. Management of chronic disease is a cornerstone service, and diabetes management is the most fully developed program. Key to its success are standardized protocols, consistent follow-up and patient education by trained primary care nurses. This model will be used as a template for the management of other chronic diseases.

  17. Collaboration of hospital case managers and home care liaisons when transitioning patients.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Margaret M; Penney, Erika D

    2011-01-01

    Hospital case managers frequently collaborate with home care liaisons when coordinating special discharge plans. This article focuses on the collaborative relationship between the hospital case manager and on-site liaison whose primary role centers around care coordination and patient teaching. Ineffective collaboration between hospital case managers and these clinical on-site liaisons can lead to serious lapses in care and services for patients, families, and the health care team when transitioning from hospital to home care. In a review of literature, little detail was found about the collaborative practice between hospital case managers and home care liaisons. This article discusses how collegiality, collaboration, and role clarification between hospital case managers and on-site home care liaisons can improve coordination of care and services for patients and their families in the transition from hospital to home care. Included is a set of guidelines developed by case managers at a major metropolitan acute care hospital to inform and improve their practice with home care liaisons. The authors are nursing case managers who practice in a major metropolitan teaching hospital. They met by telephone and in person with case managers from 3 metropolitan medical centers as well as on-site liaisons from 2 skilled nursing facilities and 5 home care agencies to develop practice recommendations for their department regarding work with home care liaisons. Conversations between hospital case managers and on-site home care liaisons revealed that all had experiences in which suboptimal collaboration negatively impacted home care coordination for patients and their families. Furthermore, outcomes in similar patient scenarios varied widely based on the individual practices of the case managers and liaisons involved in discharge coordination. Multiple issues were discussed, including blurred role and responsibility delineations, variations in communication styles and practices

  18. Integrated care management.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J

    Some clinicians are at the leading edge of good practice in the introduction of integrated care management (ICM) (Wilson, 1996) based on partnership, quality and driven by performance. The new Government White Paper (Department of Health, 1997) outlines proposals for integrated care with all care planners and providers working collaboratively. A number of health and social care organizations have worked collaboratively to develop care programmes based on patient-centred care. One of the vehicles is multidisciplinary pathways of care (MPCs) which is the risk management tool for monitoring jointly agreed quality and patient outcome criteria from the performance of planning and providing individual patient care. ICM views the multidisciplinary approaches to collaborating care delivery by activity, cost and quality, and using a process approach to problem- and outcome-based care delivery. Involving patients and their carers in determining the process and outcomes of care provides a route to better communication, patient and staff satisfaction and the overall quality of care. This article deals with the use of ICM through the monitoring system of multidisciplinary pathways of care (MPCs) as a tool for minimizing risk and improving the continuous quality improvement of patient care. MPCs are one of the components of ICM which need to incorporate clinical guidelines, protocols, interdisciplinary standards, evidenced-based practice and clinical outcomes which are continuously monitored across all sectors of care.

  19. Care management for low-risk patients with heart failure: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    DeBusk, Robert Frank; Miller, Nancy Houston; Parker, Kathleen Marie; Bandura, Albert; Kraemer, Helena Chmura; Cher, Daniel Joseph; West, Jeffrey Alan; Fowler, Michael Bruce; Greenwald, George

    2004-10-19

    Nurse care management programs for patients with chronic illness have been shown to be safe and effective. To determine whether a telephone-mediated nurse care management program for heart failure reduced the rate of rehospitalization for heart failure and for all causes over a 1-year period. Randomized, controlled trial of usual care with nurse management versus usual care alone in patients hospitalized for heart failure from May 1998 through October 2001. 5 northern California hospitals in a large health maintenance organization. Of 2786 patients screened, 462 met clinical criteria for heart failure and were randomly assigned (228 to intervention and 234 to usual care). Nurse care management provided structured telephone surveillance and treatment for heart failure and coordination of patients' care with primary care physicians. Time to first rehospitalization for heart failure or for any cause and time to a combined end point of first rehospitalization, emergency department visit, or death. At 1 year, half of the patients had been rehospitalized at least once and 11% had died. Only one third of rehospitalizations were for heart failure. The rate of first rehospitalization for heart failure was similar in both groups (proportional hazard, 0.85 [95% CI, 0.46 to 1.57]). The rate of all-cause rehospitalization was similar (proportional hazard, 0.98 [CI, 0.76 to 1.27]). The findings of this study, conducted in a single health care system, may not be generalizable to other health care systems. The overall effect of the intervention was minor. Among patients with heart failure at low risk on the basis of sociodemographic and medical attributes, nurse care management did not statistically significantly reduce rehospitalizations for heart failure or for any cause. Such programs may be less effective for patients at low risk than those at high risk.

  20. Improving care of post-infarct patients: effects of disease management programmes and care according to international guidelines.

    PubMed

    Stark, Renee; Kirchberger, Inge; Hunger, Matthias; Heier, Margit; Leidl, Reiner; von Scheidt, Wolfgang; Meisinger, Christa; Holle, Rolf

    2014-03-01

    Cardiac disease management programmes (CHD-DMPs) and secondary cardiovascular prevention guidelines aim to improve complex care of post-myocardial infarction (MI) patients. In Germany, CHD-DMPs, in addition to incorporating medical care according to guidelines (guideline-care), also ensure regular quarterly follow-up. Thus, our aim was to examine whether CHD-DMPs increase the frequency of guideline-care and whether CHD-DMPs and guideline-care improve survival over 4 years. The study included 975 post-MI patients, registered by the KORA-MI Registry (Augsburg, Germany), who completed a questionnaire in 2006. CHD-DMP enrolment was reported by physicians. Guideline-care was based on patient reports regarding medical advice (smoking, diet, or exercise) and prescribed medications (statins and platelet aggregation inhibitors plus beta-blockers or renin-angiotensin inhibitors). All-cause mortality until December 31, 2010 was based on municipal registration data. Cox regression analyses were adjusted for age, sex, education, years since last MI, and smoking and diabetes. Physicians reported that 495 patients were CHD-DMP participants. CHD-DMP participation increased the likelihood of receiving guideline-care (odds ratio 1.55, 95% CI 1.20; 2.02) but did not significantly improve survival (hazard rate 0.90, 95% CI 0.64-1.27). Guideline-care significantly improved survival (HR 0.41, 95% CI 0.28; 0.59). Individual guideline-care components, which significantly improved survival, were beta-blockers, statins and platelet aggregation inhibitors. However, these improved survival less than guideline-care. This study shows that CHD-DMPs increase the likelihood of guideline care and that guideline care is the important component of CHD-DMPs for increasing survival. A relatively high percentage of usual care patients receiving guideline-care indicate high quality of care of post-MI patients. Reasons for not implementing guideline-care should be investigated.

  1. Training community-based primary care physicians in the screeningand management of mental health disorders among Latino primary care patients

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sapana R.; Gorritz, Magdaliz; Olfson, Mark; Bell, Michelle A.; Jackson, Elizabeth; Sánchez-Lacay, J. Arturo; Alfonso, César; Leeman, Eve; Lewis-Fernández, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Objective Toevaluate a quality improvementintervention to improve thescreening and management (e.g., referral to psychiatric care) of common mental disorders in small independent Latino primary care practices serving patient populations of predominantly low-income Latino immigrants. Methods In 7 practices, academic detailing and consultation/liaison psychiatry were first implemented (Stage 1) and then supplemented withappointment scheduling and reminders to primary care physicians (PCP’s) by clinic staff (Stage 2).Acceptability and feasibility were assessed with independent patient samples during each stage. Results Participating PCP found the interventions acceptable and noted that referrals to language-matched specialty care and case-by-case consultation on medication management were particularly beneficial. The academic detailing and consultation/liaison intervention (Stage 1) did not significantly affect PCP screening, management or patient satisfaction with care. When support for appointment scheduling and reminders (Stage 2) was added, however, PCP referral to psychiatric services increased (p=.04) and referred patients were significantly more likely to follow through and have more visits to mental health professionals (p=.04). Conclusion Improving the quality of mental health care in low-resourced primary care settings may require academic detailing and consultation/liaison psychiatric intervention supplemented with staff outreach to achieve meaningful improvement in the processes of care. PMID:26598287

  2. Misdiagnosis and Quality of Management in Paediatric Surgical Patients Referred to a Tertiary Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Cazares-Rangel, Joel; Zalles-Vidal, Cristian; Davila-Perez, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Background: The literature on diagnosis and management prior to transfer paediatric surgical patients to a tertiary care center is scarce. In referral centers, it is common to receive patients previously subjected to inadequate or inappropriate health care. Aim: Analyze the prevalence of misdiagnosis and quality of management in patients before being referred and factors related to misdiagnosis and inadequate management. Design: Prospective, longitudinal, comparative study between patients with appropriate and inappropriate submission diagnosis and between patients with adequate or inadequate treatment. Setting: Third level care hospital, Mexico City. Participants: Newborn to adolescents referred to Paediatric Surgery Department. Intervention(s): None. Main Outcome Measure(s): Misdiagnosis and quality of management prior to being referred. Result: Two hundred patients were evaluated. Correlation between submission diagnosis and final diagnosis showed that 70% were correct and 30% incorrect; 48.5% were properly managed and 51.5% inappropriately managed. Incorrect diagnosis was more frequent when referred from first-or second-level hospitals and in inflammatory conditions. Patients referred by paediatricians had a higher rate of adequate management. Conclusion: We present the frequency of incorrect diagnosis and inadequate patient management in a highly selected population. Sample size should be increased as well as performing these studies in other hospital settings in order to determine whether the results are reproducible. PMID:24959495

  3. The Effect of Medical Student Teaching on Patient Satisfaction in a Managed Care Setting

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Steven R; Peters, Antoinette S; Christiansen, Cindy L; Fletcher, Robert H

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To measure the effect on patient satisfaction of medical student participation in care and the presence of medical student teaching. DESIGN Prospective cohort study. SETTING Eight outpatient internal medicine departments of a university-affiliated HMO in Massachusetts. PATIENTS Two hundred seven patients seen on teaching days (81 patients who saw a medical student-preceptor dyad and 126 patients who saw the preceptor alone), and 360 patients who saw the preceptor on nonteaching days. Five hundred (88%) of 567 eligible patients responded. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Thirteen closed-response items on a written questionnaire, measuring satisfaction with specific dimensions of care and with care as a whole. Visit satisfaction was similar among patients on teaching and nonteaching days. Ninety-one percent of patients seeing a medical student, 93% of patients seeing the preceptor alone on teaching days, and 93% of patients on nonteaching days were satisfied or very satisfied with their visit; less than 2% of patients in each group were dissatisfied with their visit. Satisfaction on all measured dimensions of care was similar for patients seeing a medical student, patients seeing the preceptor alone on teaching days, and patients seeing the preceptor on nonteaching days. CONCLUSIONS Medical student participation and the presence of medical student teaching had little effect on patient satisfaction. Concerns about patient satisfaction should not prevent managed care organizations from participating in primary care education. PMID:10940131

  4. Patients' and clinicians' experiences and perceptions of the primary care management of insomnia: qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Davy, Zowie; Middlemass, Jo; Siriwardena, Aloysius N

    2015-10-01

    Insomnia is common leading to patients with sleep problems often presenting to primary care services including general practice, community pharmacies and community mental health teams. Little is known about how health professionals in primary care respond to patients with insomnia. We aimed to explore health professionals' and patients' experiences and perceptions of the management of insomnia in primary care. We used a qualitative design and thematic approach. Primary care in Nottinghamshire and Lincolnshire. We undertook focus groups and one-to-one interviews with a purposive sample of health professionals and adults with insomnia. We interviewed 28 patients and 23 health professionals. Practitioners focused on treating the cause of insomnia rather than the insomnia itself. They described providing stepped care for insomnia, but this focused on sleep hygiene which patients often disregarded, rather than cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia (CBT-I). Practitioners were ambivalent towards hypnotic drugs but often colluded with patients to prescribe to avoid confrontation or express empathy. Patients sometimes took hypnotics in ways that were not intended, for example together with over-the-counter medication. Practitioners and patients were sometimes but not always concerned about addiction. Practitioners sometimes prescribed despite these concerns but at other times withdrew hypnotics abruptly without treating insomnia. Both patients and practitioners wanted more options and better training for the management of insomnia in primary care. A better understanding of the current approaches and difficulties in the management of insomnia will help to inform more therapeutic options and health professional training. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Multidisciplinary team approach to improved chronic care management for diabetic patients in an urban safety net ambulatory care clinic.

    PubMed

    Tapp, Hazel; Phillips, Shay E; Waxman, Dael; Alexander, Matthew; Brown, Rhett; Hall, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Since the care of patients with multiple chronic diseases such as diabetes and depression accounts for the majority of health care costs, effective team approaches to managing such complex care in primary care are needed, particularly since psychosocial and physical disorders coexist. Uncontrolled diabetes is a leading health risk for morbidity, disability and premature mortality with between 18-31% of patients also having undiagnosed or undertreated depression. Here we describe a team driven approach that initially focused on patients with poorly controlled diabetes (A1c > 9) that took place at a family medicare office. The team included: resident and faculty physicians, a pharmacist, social worker, nurses, behavioral medicine interns, office scheduler, and an information technologist. The team developed immediate integrative care for diabetic patients during routine office visits.

  6. Health service utilization among Alzheimer's disease patients: evidence from managed care.

    PubMed

    Frytak, Jennifer R; Henk, Henry J; Zhao, Yang; Bowman, Lee; Flynn, Jennifer A; Nelson, Michael

    2008-09-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the disease burden of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in a commercial managed care setting by comparing direct health care costs and adverse event outcomes between patients with AD and without AD. The study design used eligibility, medical, and pharmacy claims data from a large, national, geographically diverse, fee-for-service U.S. managed health plan. Commercially insured patients aged 65 years and older with a pharmacy benefit with evidence of AD (n = 4,450) and a control group without AD (n = 13,650) were matched by age, gender, plan location, and length of enrollment. Adverse event outcomes, comorbid conditions, and annualized health care costs were compared. Incremental costs were calculated by using a two-part model to estimate the burden of illness; incremental cost confidence intervals were estimated by bootstrap analysis. Patients with AD had generally higher health care costs and higher risk of acute adverse outcomes than the control cohort. Annual adjusted total health care costs per patient were approximately $1,418 greater for the AD cohort. Patients with AD had an unadjusted fracture risk of 14.6% versus 6.2% in the matched cohort and accidental injury/falls risk of 27.4% versus 11.4%. Few studies have examined the disease burden of AD in commercial managed care settings. Similar to results of comparative studies with Medicare data, the disease burden is greater for patients with AD compared with a matched control cohort, with a different mix and a greater number of comorbid health care conditions partially accounting for this difference. As membership in commercial and Medicare managed care plans increases, plans will need to develop effective mechanisms to manage the health care of high-risk, high-cost patients with AD.

  7. Experience of hypertensive patients with self-management of health care.

    PubMed

    Balduino, Anice de Fátima Ahmad; Mantovani, Maria de Fátima; Lacerda, Maria Ribeiro; Marin, Maria José Sanches; Wal, Marilene Loewen

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to interpret how hypertensive patients experience health care self-management. Hypertension is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases worldwide. The involvement of individuals in the management of their health care to treat this disease is fundamental, with aid and advice from healthcare professionals, especially nurses, so that hypertensive patients can effectively self-manage their health care. Qualitative study. Hypertensive patients were recruited using theoretical sampling. The study sample consisted of 28 hypertensive patients aged 18-59 years who were registered in the e-Health programme of the Ministry of Health. Data were collected and analyzed between September 2012-October 2014 using a semi-structured interview based on the methodological framework of the constructivist grounded theory. The participants' statements depicted an outline of their experience with the disease: the beginning of the illness; understanding the disease process; incorporating behaviour for self-management of the disease; experiencing attitudes and actions in the control and treatment of the disease; and being treated in the public healthcare system. A central phenomenon emerged, namely hypertensive patients' experience of self-management of health care. This phenomenon has paths, actions and interactions. When patients discover that they have the disease and become aware of the disease process, they assume the identity of being hypertensive and become proactive in their health care and in living with their families and in communities. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Remote patient management: technology-enabled innovation and evolving business models for chronic disease care.

    PubMed

    Coye, Molly Joel; Haselkorn, Ateret; DeMello, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Remote patient management (RPM) is a transformative technology that improves chronic care management while reducing net spending for chronic disease. Broadly deployed within the Veterans Health Administration and in many small trials elsewhere, RPM has been shown to support patient self-management, shift responsibilities to non-clinical providers, and reduce the use of emergency department and hospital services. Because transformative technologies offer major opportunities to advance national goals of improved quality and efficiency in health care, it is important to understand their evolution, the experiences of early adopters, and the business models that may support their deployment.

  9. Patient compliance with managed care emergency department referral: an orthopaedic view.

    PubMed

    Saroff, Don; Dell, Rick; Brown, E Richard

    2002-04-01

    Patient compliance with emergency department (ED)-generated referral is an important part of the delivery of quality health care. Although many studies from non-managed care health centers have reported on ED patient compliance, no studies have reported on this in a managed care setting. The objective of this study is to examine patient compliance with ED-generated referral and to produce a benchmark of follow-up rates possible in a capitated managed care system. That is to say, in a health care system whose members pay a uniform per capita payment or fee, one that has salaried physicians, owns its own hospitals, and has a mechanism of transition from ED to outpatient clinic that ensures referral accessibility. Retrospective review of consecutive ED patient compliance with ED-generated referral. All consecutive patients who presented to a managed care hospital's ED with an acute fracture and who were given an outpatient referral during the period from 23rd December 1998 to 23rd January, 1999. Of 8000 consecutive ED patients, 234 were included in the study. Compliance with ED-generated referral was determined from outpatient clinic records. Of the 234 patients treated in the ED and referred, 222 (94.9%) complied with follow-up appointments. We have demonstrated that an ED patient follow-up compliance rate of 94.9% can be obtained. It is probable that the high compliance rate is due to the features of the system studied. The high rate may also be related to the specific diagnosis studied, although previous literature reports poor ED patient compliance for the same diagnosis in a different ED setting. Additional research is needed to determine whether the high compliance rate reported in this study can be obtained in ED settings that are not part of a similar managed care system and to determine the role of referral accessibility (or inaccessibility) in current ED settings.

  10. Critical care management of patients following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: recommendations from the Neurocritical Care Society's Multidisciplinary Consensus Conference.

    PubMed

    Diringer, Michael N; Bleck, Thomas P; Claude Hemphill, J; Menon, David; Shutter, Lori; Vespa, Paul; Bruder, Nicolas; Connolly, E Sander; Citerio, Giuseppe; Gress, Daryl; Hänggi, Daniel; Hoh, Brian L; Lanzino, Giuseppe; Le Roux, Peter; Rabinstein, Alejandro; Schmutzhard, Erich; Stocchetti, Nino; Suarez, Jose I; Treggiari, Miriam; Tseng, Ming-Yuan; Vergouwen, Mervyn D I; Wolf, Stefan; Zipfel, Gregory

    2011-09-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is an acute cerebrovascular event which can have devastating effects on the central nervous system as well as a profound impact on several other organs. SAH patients are routinely admitted to an intensive care unit and are cared for by a multidisciplinary team. A lack of high quality data has led to numerous approaches to management and limited guidance on choosing among them. Existing guidelines emphasize risk factors, prevention, natural history, and prevention of rebleeding, but provide limited discussion of the complex critical care issues involved in the care of SAH patients. The Neurocritical Care Society organized an international, multidisciplinary consensus conference on the critical care management of SAH to address this need. Experts from neurocritical care, neurosurgery, neurology, interventional neuroradiology, and neuroanesthesiology from Europe and North America were recruited based on their publications and expertise. A jury of four experienced neurointensivists was selected for their experience in clinical investigations and development of practice guidelines. Recommendations were developed based on literature review using the GRADE system, discussion integrating the literature with the collective experience of the participants and critical review by an impartial jury. Recommendations were developed using the GRADE system. Emphasis was placed on the principle that recommendations should be based not only on the quality of the data but also tradeoffs and translation into practice. Strong consideration was given to providing guidance and recommendations for all issues faced in the daily management of SAH patients, even in the absence of high quality data.

  11. What Do High-Risk Patients Value? Perspectives on a Care Management Program.

    PubMed

    Ganguli, Ishani; Orav, E John; Weil, Eric; Ferris, Timothy G; Vogeli, Christine

    2017-10-05

    There is growing interest in coordinating care for high-risk patients through care management programs despite inconsistent results on cost reduction. Early evidence suggests patient-centered benefits, but we know little about how participants engage with the programs and what aspects they value. To explore care management program participants' awareness and perceived utility of program offerings. Cross-sectional telephone survey administered December 2015-January 2016. Patients enrolled in a Boston-area primary care-based care management program. Our main outcome was the number of topics in which patients reported having "very helpful" interactions with their care team in the past year. We analyzed awareness of one's care manager as an intermediate outcome, and then as a primary predictor of the main outcome, along with patient demographics, years in the program, attitudes, and worries as secondary predictors. The survey response rate was 45.8% (n = 1220); non-respondents were similar to respondents. More respondents reported worrying about family (72.8%) or financial issues (52.5%) than about their own health (41.6%). Seventy-four percent reported care manager awareness, particularly women (OR 1.33, 95% CI 1.01-1.77) and those with more years in the program (OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.03-1.30). While interaction rates ranged from 19.8% to 72.4% across topics, 81.3% rated at least one interaction as very helpful. Those who were aware of their care manager reported very helpful interactions on more topics (OR 2.77, 95% CI 2.15-3.56), as did women (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.00-1.55), younger respondents (OR 0.98 for older age, 95% CI 0.97-0.99), and those with higher risk scores (OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.02-1.06), preference for deferring treatment decisions to doctors (OR 2.00, 95% CI 1.60-2.50), and reported control over their health (OR 1.67, 95% CI 1.33-2.10). High-risk patients reported helpful interactions with their care team around medical and social determinants of health

  12. "Damaged humanity": the call for a patient-centered medical ethic in the managed care era.

    PubMed

    Churchill, L R

    1997-01-01

    Edmund Pellegrino claims that medical ethics must be derived from a perception of the patient's "damaged humanity," rather than from the self-imposed duties of professionals. This essay explores the meaning and examines the challenges to this patient-centered ethic. Social scientific and bioethical interpretations of medicine constitute one kind of challenge. A more pervasive challenge is the ascendancy of managed care, and especially investor-owned, for-profit managed care. A list of questions addressed to patients, physicians and organizations is offered as one means of assessing this threat and moving toward morally trustworthy relationships.

  13. Palliative care patients' perceptions of the work involved in understanding and managing the network of care provision surrounding them.

    PubMed

    Jarrett, N; Porter, K; Davis, C; Lathlean, J; Duke, S; Corner, J; Addington-Hall, J

    2017-06-01

    To explore the work carried out for cancer palliative care patients in understanding and dealing with the often large network of care provision surrounding them. Qualitative thematic analysis of interviews with 24 patients (aged 48-85 years) with 15 different types/sites of cancer and palliative care needs. The main theme of 'patient work-their strategies and project management' is presented. Subthemes included: being organised and keeping records; planning ahead and coordinating care; information gathering; understanding the hierarchy and knowing who the key people are; strategies to remember names and roles; understanding and 'working the system'. Insights are given into the work carried out on patients' behalf by family, although it was unclear who would do this work if no family was available. Some of the challenges faced by patients and families are identified. These included limited information; uncertainty when care is transferred between different teams or locations; deciding who to contact and how; and negotiating through gatekeepers. The number and variety of people contributing to the care of a cancer palliative care patient can be difficult for patients and family to comprehend. Work is required by patients or family on their behalf to achieve the level of understanding required to become accomplished at navigating the system and project managing their care organisation, and is probably influenced by role expectations and previous experience. Much of this additional, often hidden, workload for patients and family could probably be reduced with clear, timely information provision by health professionals. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  14. Self-management of medication during hospitalisation: health care providers' and patients' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Vanwesemael, Toke; Boussery, Koen; Manias, Elizabeth; Petrovic, Mirko; Fraeyman, Jessica; Dilles, Tinne

    2017-09-27

    This study aimed to explore health care providers' and patients' perspectives on self-management of medication during the patients' hospital stay. Self-administration of medications relates to the process in which hospitalised patients -instead of health care professionals - prepare and consume medications by themselves. Literature suggests possible advantages of medication self-management such as increased patient satisfaction, adherence to pharmacotherapy, and self-care competence. A qualitative descriptive study design was adopted, using semi-structured interviews and qualitative content analysis to examine data. Six physicians, 11 nurses, six hospital pharmacists and seven patients were recruited from one regional hospital and two university hospitals, situated in Belgium. Interviews were conducted between October 2014 and January 2015. Strengths of medication self-management were described by participants, relating to benefits of self-management for patients, timesaving benefits for nurses and benefits for better collaboration between patients and health care providers. Weaknesses were also apparent for patients as well as for nurses and physicians. Opportunities for self-management of medication were described, relating to the organisation, the patient and the process for implementing self-management. Threats for self-management of medication included obstacles related to implementation of self-managed medications and the actual process of providing medication self-management. A structured overview of conditions that should be fulfilled before allowing self-management of medication concerned patient-related conditions, the self-managed medication and the organisation of self-management of medication. This study provides new insights on the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats from the perspectives of key stakeholders. Interpretation of these findings resulted in an overview of adaptations in the medication management process to facilitate

  15. Telemedicine seeks to empower patients to manage their care.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Mervyn

    2008-03-01

    The world of telemedicine is expanding the way in which care is being delivered in both the healthcare and the social care arena. This article explores how telemedicine will change the delivery of healthcare and presents recommendations for the future. Telemedicine is already having an impact on district nursing practice.

  16. Patients' views on improving sickle cell disease management in primary care: focus group discussion.

    PubMed

    Aljuburi, Ghida; Phekoo, Karen J; Okoye, Nv Ogo; Anie, Kofie; Green, Stuart A; Nkohkwo, Asaah; Ojeer, Patrick; Ndive, Comfort; Banarsee, Ricky; Oni, Lola; Majeed, Azeem

    2012-12-01

    To assess sickle cell disease (SCD) patient and carer perspectives on the primary care services related to SCD that they receive from their general practitioner (GP). A focus group discussion was used to elicit the views of patients about the quality of care they receive from their primary health-care providers and what they thought was the role of primary care in SCD management. The focus group discussion was video recorded. The recording was then examined by the project team and recurring themes were identified. A comparison was made with notes made by two scribes also present at the discussion. Sickle Cell Society in Brent, UK. Ten participants with SCD or caring for someone with SCD from Northwest London, UK. Patients' perceptions about the primary care services they received, and a list of key themes and suggestions. Patients and carers often bypassed GPs for acute problems but felt that GPs had an important role to play around repeat prescriptions and general health care. These service users believed SCD is often ignored and deemed unimportant by GPs. Participants wanted the health service to support primary health-care providers to improve their knowledge and understanding of SCD. Key themes and suggestions from this focus group have been used to help develop an educational intervention for general practice services that will be used to improve SCD management in primary care.

  17. How Can Home Care Patients and Their Caregivers Better Manage Fall Risks by Leveraging Information Technology?

    PubMed

    Alhuwail, Dari; Koru, Güneş; Nahm, Eun-Shim

    2016-12-01

    From the perspectives of home care patients and caregivers, this study aimed to (a) identify the challenges for better fall-risk management during home care episodes and (b) explore the opportunities for them to leverage health information technology (IT) solutions to improve fall-risk management during home care episodes. Twelve in-depth semistructured interviews with the patients and caregivers were conducted within a descriptive single case study design in 1 home health agency (HHA) in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States. Patients and caregivers faced challenges to manage fall risks such as unmanaged expectations, deteriorating cognitive abilities, and poor care coordination between the HHA and physician practices. Opportunities to leverage health IT solutions included patient portals, telehealth, and medication reminder apps on smartphones. Effectively leveraging health IT could further empower patients and caregivers to reduce fall risks by acquiring the necessary information and following clinical advice and recommendations. The HHAs could improve the quality of care by adopting IT solutions that show more promise of improving the experiences of patients and caregivers in fall-risk management.

  18. How Can Home Care Patients and Their Caregivers Better Manage Fall Risks by Leveraging Information Technology?

    PubMed Central

    Koru, Güneş; Nahm, Eun-Shim

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: From the perspectives of home care patients and caregivers, this study aimed to (a) identify the challenges for better fall-risk management during home care episodes and (b) explore the opportunities for them to leverage health information technology (IT) solutions to improve fall-risk management during home care episodes. Methods: Twelve in-depth semistructured interviews with the patients and caregivers were conducted within a descriptive single case study design in 1 home health agency (HHA) in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States. Results: Patients and caregivers faced challenges to manage fall risks such as unmanaged expectations, deteriorating cognitive abilities, and poor care coordination between the HHA and physician practices. Opportunities to leverage health IT solutions included patient portals, telehealth, and medication reminder apps on smartphones. Conclusion: Effectively leveraging health IT could further empower patients and caregivers to reduce fall risks by acquiring the necessary information and following clinical advice and recommendations. The HHAs could improve the quality of care by adopting IT solutions that show more promise of improving the experiences of patients and caregivers in fall-risk management. PMID:28725850

  19. Race/Ethnicity, Language, and Patients' Assessments of Care in Medicaid Managed Care

    PubMed Central

    Weech-Maldonado, Robert; Morales, Leo S; Elliott, Marc; Spritzer, Karen; Marshall, Grant; Hays, Ron D

    2003-01-01

    Objective Consumer assessments of health care provide important information about how well health plans and clinicians meet the needs of the people they serve. The purpose of this study was to examine whether consumer reports and ratings of care in Medicaid managed care vary by race/ethnicity and language. Data Sources Data were derived from the National CAHPS ® Benchmarking Database (NCBD) 3.0 and consisted of 49,327 adults enrolled in Medicaid managed care plans in 14 states in 2000. Data Collection The CAHPS® data were collected by telephone and mail. Surveys were administered in Spanish and English. The response rate across plans was 38 percent. Study Design Data were analyzed using linear regression models. The dependent variables were CAHPS ® 2.0 global rating items (personal doctor, specialist, health care, health plan) and multi-item reports of care (getting needed care, timeliness of care, provider communication, staff helpfulness, plan service). The independent variables were race/ethnicity, language spoken at home (English, Spanish, Other), and survey language (English or Spanish). Survey respondents were assigned to one of nine racial/ethnic categories based on Hispanic ethnicity and race: White, Hispanic/Latino, Black/African American, Asian/Pacific Islanders, American Indian/Alaskan native, American Indian/White, Black/White, Other Multiracial, Other Race/Ethnicity. Whites, Asians, and Hispanics were further classified into language subgroups based on the survey language and based on the language primarily spoken at home. Covariates included gender, age, education, and self-rated health. Principal Findings Racial/ethnic and linguistic minorities tended to report worse care than did whites. Linguistic minorities reported worse care than did racial and ethnic minorities. Conclusions This study suggests that racial and ethnic minorities and persons with limited English proficiency face barriers to care, despite Medicaid-enabled financial access

  20. Concussion management for the adolescent patient: an algorithm for primary-care providers.

    PubMed

    Kostyun, Regina O; Hafeez, Imran

    2012-09-01

    A sharp increase in the number of diagnosed concussions has been observed for the traditional adultathlete, as well as the young recreational athlete. An enhancing awareness and growing concern has been noted for the potentially larger number of concussions that go undiagnosed and the unknown capability for long-term complications associated with this injury. This increase in concussion awareness has appropriately led to an enhanced utilization of the health-care system for concussion evaluation and management. As is always the case in the practice of medicine, it is important for healthcare providers, from all points of entry in the healthcare system, to provide consistent management for the best outcomes for any disease process. Millions of sport-related concussions occur each year in the United States, placing a large demand on the healthcare system. Utilization of appropriate and congruent treatment plans during the medical discourse when transferring care of patients between providers is paramount. In the co-management model of care, subspecialists lend expertise to assist primary-care providers (PCPs) in gaining the core competencies necessary to provide appropriate levels of care for certain conditions. Increased use of co-management could make the health-care system more efficient and collaborative, leading to: increased access for patients, lower overall costs, and improved quality of care and health outcomes. Co-management allows patients and families to have access to the expert knowledge of subspecialist while receiving more of their care from their PCP, increasing their comfort and making treatment more convenient. The intent of this paper is to distribute an algorithm created by a multidisciplinary group of medical providers to provide a rational approach, congruent with the standard of care, for the primary-care provider to institute an individualized stepwise progression.

  1. Rheumatologist and Primary Care Management of Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Patient and Provider Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bartels, Christie M; Roberts, Tonya J; Hansen, Karen E; Jacobs, Elizabeth A; Gilmore, Andrea; Maxcy, Courtney; Bowers, Barbara J

    2016-04-01

    Despite increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients often lack CVD preventive care. We examined CVD preventive care processes from RA patient and provider perspectives to develop a process map for identifying targets for future interventions to improve CVD preventive care. Thirty-one participants (15 patients, 7 rheumatologists, and 9 primary care physicians [PCPs]) participated in interviews that were coded using NVivo software and analyzed using grounded theory techniques. Patients and providers reported that receipt of preventive care depends upon identifying and acting on risk factors, although most noted that both processes rarely occurred. Engagement in these processes was influenced by various provider-, system-, visit-, and patient-related conditions, such as patient activation or patients' knowledge about their risk. While nearly half of patients and PCPs were unaware of RA-CVD risk, all rheumatologists were aware of risk. Rheumatologists reported not systematically identifying risk factors, or, if identified, they described communicating about CVD risk factors via clinic notes to PCPs instead of acting directly due to perceived role boundaries. PCPs suggested that scheduling PCP visits could improve CVD risk management, and all participants viewed comanagement positively. Findings from this study illustrate important gaps and opportunities to support identifying and acting on CVD risk factors in RA patients from the provider, system, visit, and patient levels. Future work should investigate professional role support through improved guidelines, patient activation, and system-based RA-CVD preventive care strategies. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  2. Clinician considerations when selecting high-risk patients for care management.

    PubMed

    Haime, Vivian; Hong, Clemens; Mandel, Laura; Mohta, Namita; Iezzoni, Lisa I; Ferris, Timothy G; Vogeli, Christine

    2015-10-01

    Hybrid approaches to case finding show promise as a method to increase the success of care management programs (CMPs). A large healthcare system implemented a hybrid approach in which clinicians review algorithm-generated lists of potential high-risk patients within their practice and select the patients most appropriate for the CMP. We sought to understand the criteria clinicians used when selecting patients. We conducted 20 semi-structured interviews with a convenience sample of primary care clinicians and their care managers from a diverse set of practices. Two independent reviewers thematically coded interview responses through an iterative process. In addition to clinical need (eg, disease severity or multiple comorbidities), interviewees considered a number of nonclinical patient characteristics that they felt placed patients at risk for suboptimal healthcare utilization and poor adherence. These include patients' predisposing (eg, health literacy or navigation challenges, physical vulnerabilities, insight regarding their health) and enabling characteristics (eg, social and home environment, coping skills, financial resources). Interviewees also considered patients' existing linkages with the health system and whether other clinicians were already meeting a patient's care needs. In selecting patients for a CMP, clinicians considered patient characteristics that are not easily captured in standard clinical and administrative data. A hybrid approach to case finding concentrates clinician review on patients who meet standard clinical and healthcare utilization criteria, and allows clinicians to incorporate knowledge of patients' predisposing and enabling characteristics that are not readily maintained in clinical data.

  3. Patient self-management in the primary care treatment of depression.

    PubMed

    Bachman, John; Swenson, Sara; Reardon, M Elizabeth; Miller, Doriane

    2006-01-01

    Efforts to improve primary care treatment of depression incorporate elements of the chronic illness care model, including patient self-management strategies. Case studies, focus groups and the literature suggest six key components of depression self-management programs: (1) implement behavioral change interventions, (2) plan for crisis and relapse prevention, (3) re-establish personal meaning, (4) attend to patients' experience, context and community, (5) build a patient-clinician partnership and (6) create an integrated, self-management support structure. Successful implementation of these components is facilitated by (1) the care system's collective and empathic understanding of the disease itself; (2) sufficient time; (3) adequate funding and (4) robust clinical information systems.

  4. Feasibility and effectiveness of a disease and care management model in the primary health care system for patients with heart failure and diabetes (Project Leonardo).

    PubMed

    Ciccone, Marco Matteo; Aquilino, Ambrogio; Cortese, Francesca; Scicchitano, Pietro; Sassara, Marco; Mola, Ernesto; Rollo, Rodolfo; Caldarola, Pasquale; Giorgino, Francesco; Pomo, Vincenzo; Bux, Francesco

    2010-05-06

    Project Leonardo represented a feasibility study to evaluate the impact of a disease and care management (D&CM) model and of the introduction of "care manager" nurses, trained in this specialized role, into the primary health care system. Thirty care managers were placed into the offices of 83 general practitioners and family physicians in the Apulia Region of Italy with the purpose of creating a strong cooperative and collaborative "team" consisting of physicians, care managers, specialists, and patients. The central aim of the health team collaboration was to empower 1,160 patients living with cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes, heart failure, and/or at risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD risk) to take a more active role in their health. With the support of dedicated software for data collection and care management decision making, Project Leonardo implemented guidelines and recommendations for each condition aimed to improve patient health outcomes and promote appropriate resource utilization. Results show that Leonardo was feasible and highly effective in increasing patient health knowledge, self-management skills, and readiness to make changes in health behaviors. Patient skill-building and ongoing monitoring by the health care team of diagnostic tests and services as well as treatment paths helped promote confidence and enhance safety of chronic patient management at home. Physicians, care managers, and patients showed unanimous agreement regarding the positive impact on patient health and self-management, and attributed the outcomes to the strong "partnership" between the care manager and the patient and the collaboration between the physician and the care manager. Future studies should consider the possibility of incorporating a patient empowerment model which considers the patient as the most important member of the health team and care managers as key health care collaborators able to enhance and support services to patients provided by physicians in

  5. Using systematic change management to improve emergency patients' access to specialist care: the Big Squeeze.

    PubMed

    Rafman, Heidi; Lim, Siang Ngin; Quek, Swee Chye; Mahadevan, Malcolm; Lim, Chanelle; Lim, Aymeric

    2013-06-01

    Delayed access to specialist care for emergency patients is associated with increased risk of morbidity and mortality, and increased patient anxiety. (1) To provide timelier access to inpatient and urgent outpatient specialist care for emergency patients. (2) To influence multiple stakeholders to modify their traditional practices and sustain changes. National University Hospital of Singapore, an academic medical centre with 997 beds in Singapore and over 34 sub-specialties. A set of six interventions was implemented to meet three goals: (1) provide timely access to urgent outpatient specialist care requested by the emergency department ED; (2) increase early inpatient discharges (in order to better match timing of emergency admissions); and (3) provide earlier defined care by inpatient specialists at the ED. An eight-step organisational change management plan was implemented to ensure all specialties complied with the changes. The goals were achieved. (1) Specialist outpatient appointments given within the timeframe requested by the ED doctor increased from 51.7% to 80.8%. (2) Early discharges increased from 11.9% to 26.6% and were sustained at 27.2%. (3) 84% of eligible patients received earlier defined specialist care at the ED. The change management achieved excellent clinician compliance rates ranging from 84% to 100%. However the median wait for admission remained unchanged. The interventions reduced the time for ED patients to access specialist outpatient and inpatient care. The systematic organisational change management approach resulted in sustained compliance.

  6. Evaluating the link between human resource management decisions and patient satisfaction with quality of care.

    PubMed

    Oppel, Eva-Maria; Winter, Vera; Schreyögg, Jonas

    Patient satisfaction with quality of care is becoming increasingly important in the competitive hospital market. Simultaneously, the growing shortage of clinical staff poses a considerable challenge to ensuring a high quality of care. In this context, a question emerges regarding whether and how human resource management (HRM) might serve as a means to reduce staff shortage problems and to increase patient satisfaction. Although considerable efforts have been devoted to understanding the concepts of patient satisfaction and HRM, little is known about the interrelationships between these concepts or about the link between staff shortage problems and patients' satisfaction with quality of care. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between strategic human resource management (SHRM), staff shortage problems, and patients' satisfaction with care. Furthermore, we analyze how the HRM decision to fill short-term vacancies through temporary staffing affects patient satisfaction. We differentiate between physicians and nurses. We develop and empirically test a theoretical model. The data (n = 165) are derived from a survey on SHRM that was sent to 732 German hospitals and from a survey on patient satisfaction that comprises 436,848 patient satisfaction ratings. We use a structural equation modeling approach to test the model. The results indicate that SHRM significantly reduces staff shortage problems for both occupational groups. Having fewer physician shortage problems is significantly associated with higher levels of patient satisfaction, whereas this effect is not significant for nurses. Furthermore, the use of temporary staffing considerably reduces patients' satisfaction with care. Hospital managers are advised to consider the effects of HRM decisions on patients' satisfaction with care. In particular, investments in SHRM targeted at physicians have significantly positive effects on patient satisfaction, whereas the temporary staffing of physicians

  7. Feasibility and effectiveness of a disease and care management model in the primary health care system for patients with heart failure and diabetes (Project Leonardo)

    PubMed Central

    Ciccone, Marco Matteo; Aquilino, Ambrogio; Cortese, Francesca; Scicchitano, Pietro; Sassara, Marco; Mola, Ernesto; Rollo, Rodolfo; Caldarola, Pasquale; Giorgino, Francesco; Pomo, Vincenzo; Bux, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Project Leonardo represented a feasibility study to evaluate the impact of a disease and care management (D&CM) model and of the introduction of “care manager” nurses, trained in this specialized role, into the primary health care system. Patients and methods Thirty care managers were placed into the offices of 83 general practitioners and family physicians in the Apulia Region of Italy with the purpose of creating a strong cooperative and collaborative “team” consisting of physicians, care managers, specialists, and patients. The central aim of the health team collaboration was to empower 1,160 patients living with cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes, heart failure, and/or at risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD risk) to take a more active role in their health. With the support of dedicated software for data collection and care management decision making, Project Leonardo implemented guidelines and recommendations for each condition aimed to improve patient health outcomes and promote appropriate resource utilization. Results Results show that Leonardo was feasible and highly effective in increasing patient health knowledge, self-management skills, and readiness to make changes in health behaviors. Patient skill-building and ongoing monitoring by the health care team of diagnostic tests and services as well as treatment paths helped promote confidence and enhance safety of chronic patient management at home. Conclusion Physicians, care managers, and patients showed unanimous agreement regarding the positive impact on patient health and self-management, and attributed the outcomes to the strong “partnership” between the care manager and the patient and the collaboration between the physician and the care manager. Future studies should consider the possibility of incorporating a patient empowerment model which considers the patient as the most important member of the health team and care managers as key health care collaborators able to enhance

  8. Social networks of health care providers and patients in cardiovascular risk management: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In recent years, preventive and clinical interventions for cardiovascular risk management have been implemented widely in primary care in the Netherlands. Although this has enhanced quality and outcomes of cardiovascular risk management, further improvement remains possible. In the planned observational study, we aim to examine the role of social networks of healthcare providers and patients in quality and outcomes of cardiovascular risk management. Methods/Design In a longitudinal observational study, data on social networks of approximately 300 primary care providers from 30 general practices and 900 cardiovascular patients will be collected twice, with a six month interval, using a mix of measures. Social networks are documented with specifically designed questionnaires for patients, relatives, and healthcare professionals. For each included patient, we will extract from medical records to gather data on clinical processes and cardiovascular risk predictors. Data on self-management and psychosocial outcomes of patients will be collected using questionnaires for patients. The analysis focuses on identifying network characteristics, which are associated with (changes in) cardiovascular risk management or self-management. Discussion This research will provide insight into the role of social networks of patients and providers in cardiovascular risk management in primary practice. Trial registration Nederlands Trial Register NTR4069. PMID:24942555

  9. [Endorsement of risk management and patient safety by certification of conformity in health care quality assessment].

    PubMed

    Waßmuth, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Certification of conformity in health care should provide assurance of compliance with quality standards. This also includes risk management and patient safety. Based on a comprehensive definition of quality, beneficial effects on the management of risks and the enhancement of patient safety can be expected from certification of conformity. While these effects have strong face validity, they are currently not sufficiently supported by evidence from health care research. Whether this relates to a lack of evidence or a lack of investigation remains open. Advancing safety culture and "climate", as well as learning from adverse events rely in part on quality management and are at least in part reflected in the certification of healthcare quality. However, again, evidence of the effectiveness of such measures is limited. Moreover, additional factors related to personality, attitude and proactive action of healthcare professionals are crucial factors in advancing risk management and patient safety which are currently not adequately reflected in certification of conformity programs.

  10. Benchmarking in nursing care by the RAFAELA patient classification system - a possibility for nurse managers.

    PubMed

    Fagerström, Lisbeth; Rauhala, Auvo

    2007-10-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the possibilities of benchmarking with the RAFAELA system. In this study, comparisons are made between: (1) costs for one nursing care intensity point; (2) the nursing care intensity per nurse; (3) the relationship between nursing care intensity per nurse and (4) the optimal nursing care intensity. During the period from 1994 to 2000 a new system for patient classification, the RAFAELA system, was developed in Finland. 86 wards from 14 different hospitals in Finland took part in the study. The costs for one nursing care intensity point on the adults' wards were on average 7.80euro. The average workload was 25.2 nursing care intensity points per nurse. The optimal nursing care intensity was exceeded during 49.5% of the days and under during 20% of the days. The study shows that benchmarking with the RAFAELA system provides many opportunities for the nurse managers' resource allocation and their personnel administration.

  11. Evaluation and development of an ED management model: an effort to optimize patient-centered care.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Kelly S; Pemberton, Meg

    2013-09-01

    In 2008, the emergency department at Mary Washington Hospital was in the midst of a crisis marked by increasing volumes, increasing numbers of left without being seen (LWBS) patients, falling patient satisfaction numbers and a staff dissatisfied with ED leadership. The existing ED model of charge nurses, a nurse manager, and an administrative director was not working. The single nurse manager could not effectively manage the over 200 staff members he/she was assigned. Based upon the findings from the employee satisfaction survey the inability of the nurse managers to properly manage such large numbers of employees was at the core of the issue. Through benchmarking with a similar healthcare system, an evidence based leadership model was identified, developed, and implemented. The model included the addition of six patient care managers with 24-hour coverage in the department, led to a reduced number of direct reports per manager, and an increased connection with employees. The goal was to engage employees in the effort to provide patient centered, quality care. Residual benefits of our change effort improved the patient satisfaction scores as evidenced by meeting organizational goals within 12 months; goal was exceeded in the following year. Additionally, the walk out rate was reduced 75% over 18 months. The correlation between satisfied employees, patient satisfaction, and reduced walk-outs cannot be ignored. Engaged employees positively impact service and quality.

  12. Complexity of care and strategies of self-management in patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ose, Dominik; Winkler, Eva C; Berger, Sarah; Baudendistel, Ines; Kamradt, Martina; Eckrich, Felicitas; Szecsenyi, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    Given the inherent complexity of cancer care, in which personal, social, and clinical aspects accumulate and interact over time, self-management support need to become more comprehensive. This study has the following two aims: 1) to analyze and describe the complexity of individual patient situations and 2) to analyze and describe already established self-management strategies of patients to handle this complexity. A qualitative study was conducted. Ten focus groups were performed collecting perspectives of the following three user groups: patients with colorectal cancer (n=12) and representatives from support groups (n=2), physicians (n=17), and other health care professionals (HCPs; n=16). Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. The results showed that cancer patients are struggling with the complexity of their individual situations characterized by the 1) "complexity of disease", 2) "complexity of care", and 3) "complexity of treatment-related data". To deal with these multifaceted situations, patients have established several individual strategies. These strategies are "proactive demanding" (eg, to get support and guidance or a meaningful dialog with the doctor), "proactive behavior" (eg, preparation of visits), and "proactive data management" (eg, in terms of merging treatment-related data and to disseminate these to their health care providers). Patients with colorectal cancer have to handle a high complexity of individual situations within treatment and care of their disease. Private and social challenges have a culminating effect. This complexity increases as patients experience a longer duration of treatment and follow-up as patients have to handle a significantly higher amount of data over time. Self-management support should focus more on the individual complexity in a patient's life. This includes assisting patients with strategies that have already been established by themselves (like preparation of visits).

  13. Cost-effectiveness of chiropractic care versus self-management in patients with musculoskeletal chest pain

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Jan; Vach, Werner; Christensen, Henrik Wulff; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming; Hartvigsen, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Aims To assess whether primary sector healthcare in the form of chiropractic care is cost-effective compared with self-management in patients with musculoskeletal chest pain, that is, a subgroup of patients with non-specific chest pain. Methods and results 115 adults aged 18–75 years with acute, non-specific chest pain of musculoskeletal origin were recruited from a cardiology department in Denmark. After ruling out acute coronary syndrome and receiving usual care, patients with musculoskeletal chest pain were randomised to 4 weeks of community-based chiropractic care (n=59) or to a single information session aimed at encouraging self-management as complementary to usual care (n=56). Data on resource use were obtained from Danish national registries and valued from a societal perspective. Patient cost and health-related quality-adjusted life years (QALYs; based on EuroQol five-dimension questionnaire (EQ-5D) and Short Form 36-item Health Survey (SF-36)) were compared in cost-effectiveness analyses over 12 months from baseline. Mean costs were €2183 lower for the group with chiropractic care, but not statistically significant (95% CI −4410.5 to 43.0). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio suggested that chiropractic care was cost-effective with a probability of 97%, given a threshold value of €30 000 per QALY gained. In both groups, there was an increase in the health-related quality of life, and the mean increases were similar over the 12-month evaluation period. The mean differences in QALYs between the groups were negligible. Conclusions Chiropractic care was more cost-effective than self-management. Therefore, chiropractic care can be seen as a good example of a targeted primary care approach for a subgroup of patients with non-specific chest pain. Trial registration number NCT00462241. PMID:27175285

  14. Multidisciplinary Care of Patients with Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma: Updates in Management

    PubMed Central

    Lafaro, Kelly J.; Cosgrove, David; Geschwind, Jean-Francois H.; Kamel, Ihab; Herman, Joseph M.; Pawlik, Timothy M.

    2015-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma is a highly fatal primary cancer of the bile ducts which arises from malignant transformation of bile duct epithelium. While being an uncommon malignancy with an annual incidence in the United States of 5000 new cases, the incidence has been increasing over the past 30 years and comprises 3% of all gastrointestinal cancers. Cholangiocarcinoma can be classified into intrahepatic (ICC) and extrahepatic (including hilar and distal bile duct) according to its anatomic location within the biliary tree with respect to the liver. This paper reviews the management of ICC, focusing on the epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, and surgical and nonsurgical management. PMID:26089873

  15. Patient and provider interventions for managing osteoarthritis in primary care: protocols for two randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and knee are among the most common chronic conditions, resulting in substantial pain and functional limitations. Adequate management of OA requires a combination of medical and behavioral strategies. However, some recommended therapies are under-utilized in clinical settings, and the majority of patients with hip and knee OA are overweight and physically inactive. Consequently, interventions at the provider-level and patient-level both have potential for improving outcomes. This manuscript describes two ongoing randomized clinical trials being conducted in two different health care systems, examining patient-based and provider-based interventions for managing hip and knee OA in primary care. Methods / Design One study is being conducted within the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system and will compare a Combined Patient and Provider intervention relative to usual care among n = 300 patients (10 from each of 30 primary care providers). Another study is being conducted within the Duke Primary Care Research Consortium and will compare Patient Only, Provider Only, and Combined (Patient + Provider) interventions relative to usual care among n = 560 patients across 10 clinics. Participants in these studies have clinical and / or radiographic evidence of hip or knee osteoarthritis, are overweight, and do not meet current physical activity guidelines. The 12-month, telephone-based patient intervention focuses on physical activity, weight management, and cognitive behavioral pain management. The provider intervention involves provision of patient-specific recommendations for care (e.g., referral to physical therapy, knee brace, joint injection), based on evidence-based guidelines. Outcomes are collected at baseline, 6-months, and 12-months. The primary outcome is the Western Ontario and McMasters Universities Osteoarthritis Index (self-reported pain, stiffness, and function), and secondary outcomes are the

  16. Managing complex respiratory patients in the community: an evaluation of a pilot integrated respiratory care service

    PubMed Central

    Gillett, K; Lippiett, K; Astles, C; Longstaff, J; Orlando, R; Lin, S X; Powell, A; Roberts, C; Chauhan, A J; Thomas, M; Wilkinson, T M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In the UK, there is significant variation in respiratory care and outcomes. An integrated approach to the management of high-risk respiratory patients, incorporating specialist and primary care teams' expertise, is the basis for new integrated respiratory services designed to reduce this variation; however, this model needs evaluating. Methods To evaluate an integrated service managing high-risk respiratory patients, electronic searches for patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at risk of poor outcomes were performed in two general practitioner (GP) practices in a local service-development initiative. Patients were reviewed at joint clinics by primary and secondary care professionals. GPs also nominated patients for inclusion. Reviews were delivered to best standards of care including assessments of diagnosis, control, spirometry, self-management, education, medication, inhaler technique and smoking cessation support. Follow-up of routine clinical data collected at 9-months postclinic were compared with seasonally matched 9-months prior to integrated review. Results 82 patients were identified, 55 attended. 13 (23.6%) had their primary diagnosis changed. In comparison with the seasonally adjusted baseline period, in the 9-month follow-up there was an increase in inhaled corticosteroid prescriptions of 23.3%, a reduction in short-acting β2-agonist prescription of 33.3%, a reduction in acute respiratory exacerbations of 67.6%, in unscheduled GP surgery visits of 53.3% and acute respiratory hospital admissions reduced from 3 to 0. Only 4 patients (7.3%) required referral to secondary care. Health economic evaluation showed respiratory-related costs per patient reduced by £231.86. Conclusions Patients with respiratory disease in this region at risk of suboptimal outcomes identified proactively and managed by an integrated team improved outcomes without the need for hospital referral. PMID:28074134

  17. The role of the multidisciplinary health care team in the management of patients with Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    von Kodolitsch, Yskert; Rybczynski, Meike; Vogler, Marina; Mir, Thomas S; Schüler, Helke; Kutsche, Kerstin; Rosenberger, Georg; Detter, Christian; Bernhardt, Alexander M; Larena-Avellaneda, Axel; Kölbel, Tilo; Debus, E Sebastian; Schroeder, Malte; Linke, Stephan J; Fuisting, Bettina; Napp, Barbara; Kammal, Anna Lena; Püschel, Klaus; Bannas, Peter; Hoffmann, Boris A; Gessler, Nele; Vahle-Hinz, Eva; Kahl-Nieke, Bärbel; Thomalla, Götz; Weiler-Normann, Christina; Ohm, Gunda; Neumann, Stefan; Benninghoven, Dieter; Blankenberg, Stefan; Pyeritz, Reed E

    2016-01-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a rare, severe, chronic, life-threatening disease with multiorgan involvement that requires optimal multidisciplinary care to normalize both prognosis and quality of life. In this article, each key team member of all the medical disciplines of a multidisciplinary health care team at the Hamburg Marfan center gives a personal account of his or her contribution in the management of patients with MFS. The authors show how, with the support of health care managers, key team members organize themselves in an organizational structure to create a common meaning, to maximize therapeutic success for patients with MFS. First, we show how the initiative and collaboration of patient representatives, scientists, and physicians resulted in the foundation of Marfan centers, initially in the US and later in Germany, and how and why such centers evolved over time. Then, we elucidate the three main structural elements; a team of coordinators, core disciplines, and auxiliary disciplines of health care. Moreover, we explain how a multidisciplinary health care team integrates into many other health care structures of a university medical center, including external quality assurance; quality management system; clinical risk management; center for rare diseases; aorta center; health care teams for pregnancy, for neonates, and for rehabilitation; and in structures for patient centeredness. We provide accounts of medical goals and standards for each core discipline, including pediatricians, pediatric cardiologists, cardiologists, human geneticists, heart surgeons, vascular surgeons, vascular interventionists, orthopedic surgeons, ophthalmologists, and nurses; and of auxiliary disciplines including forensic pathologists, radiologists, rhythmologists, pulmonologists, sleep specialists, orthodontists, dentists, neurologists, obstetric surgeons, psychiatrist/psychologist, and rehabilitation specialists. We conclude that a multidisciplinary health care team is a means

  18. The role of the multidisciplinary health care team in the management of patients with Marfan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    von Kodolitsch, Yskert; Rybczynski, Meike; Vogler, Marina; Mir, Thomas S; Schüler, Helke; Kutsche, Kerstin; Rosenberger, Georg; Detter, Christian; Bernhardt, Alexander M; Larena-Avellaneda, Axel; Kölbel, Tilo; Debus, E Sebastian; Schroeder, Malte; Linke, Stephan J; Fuisting, Bettina; Napp, Barbara; Kammal, Anna Lena; Püschel, Klaus; Bannas, Peter; Hoffmann, Boris A; Gessler, Nele; Vahle-Hinz, Eva; Kahl-Nieke, Bärbel; Thomalla, Götz; Weiler-Normann, Christina; Ohm, Gunda; Neumann, Stefan; Benninghoven, Dieter; Blankenberg, Stefan; Pyeritz, Reed E

    2016-01-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a rare, severe, chronic, life-threatening disease with multiorgan involvement that requires optimal multidisciplinary care to normalize both prognosis and quality of life. In this article, each key team member of all the medical disciplines of a multidisciplinary health care team at the Hamburg Marfan center gives a personal account of his or her contribution in the management of patients with MFS. The authors show how, with the support of health care managers, key team members organize themselves in an organizational structure to create a common meaning, to maximize therapeutic success for patients with MFS. First, we show how the initiative and collaboration of patient representatives, scientists, and physicians resulted in the foundation of Marfan centers, initially in the US and later in Germany, and how and why such centers evolved over time. Then, we elucidate the three main structural elements; a team of coordinators, core disciplines, and auxiliary disciplines of health care. Moreover, we explain how a multidisciplinary health care team integrates into many other health care structures of a university medical center, including external quality assurance; quality management system; clinical risk management; center for rare diseases; aorta center; health care teams for pregnancy, for neonates, and for rehabilitation; and in structures for patient centeredness. We provide accounts of medical goals and standards for each core discipline, including pediatricians, pediatric cardiologists, cardiologists, human geneticists, heart surgeons, vascular surgeons, vascular interventionists, orthopedic surgeons, ophthalmologists, and nurses; and of auxiliary disciplines including forensic pathologists, radiologists, rhythmologists, pulmonologists, sleep specialists, orthodontists, dentists, neurologists, obstetric surgeons, psychiatrist/psychologist, and rehabilitation specialists. We conclude that a multidisciplinary health care team is a means

  19. Effect of crew resource management on diabetes care and patient outcomes in an inner‐city primary care clinic

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Cathy R; Hepworth, Joseph T; Buerhaus, Peter I; Dittus, Robert; Speroff, Theodore

    2007-01-01

    Background Diabetes care in our inner‐city primary care clinic was suboptimal, despite provider education and performance feedback targeting improved adherence to evidence‐based clinical guidelines. A crew resource management (CRM) intervention (communication and teamwork, process and workflow organisation, and standardised information debriefings) was implemented to improve diabetes care and patient outcomes. Objective To assess the effect of the CRM intervention on adherence to evidence‐based diabetes care standards, work processes, standardised clinical communication and patient outcomes. Methods Time‐series analysis was used to assess the effect on the delivery of standard diabetes services and patient outcomes among medically indigent adults (n = 619). Results The CRM principles were translated into useful process redesign and standardised care approaches. Significant improvements in microalbumin testing and associated patient outcome measures were attributed to the intervention. Conclusions The CRM approach provided tools for management that, in the short term, enabled reorganisation and prevention of service omissions and, in the long term, can produce change in the organisational culture for continuous improvement. PMID:17693668

  20. Effect of crew resource management on diabetes care and patient outcomes in an inner-city primary care clinic.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Cathy R; Hepworth, Joseph T; Buerhaus, Peter I; Dittus, Robert; Speroff, Theodore

    2007-08-01

    Diabetes care in our inner-city primary care clinic was suboptimal, despite provider education and performance feedback targeting improved adherence to evidence-based clinical guidelines. A crew resource management (CRM) intervention (communication and teamwork, process and workflow organisation, and standardised information debriefings) was implemented to improve diabetes care and patient outcomes. To assess the effect of the CRM intervention on adherence to evidence-based diabetes care standards, work processes, standardised clinical communication and patient outcomes. Time-series analysis was used to assess the effect on the delivery of standard diabetes services and patient outcomes among medically indigent adults (n = 619). The CRM principles were translated into useful process redesign and standardised care approaches. Significant improvements in microalbumin testing and associated patient outcome measures were attributed to the intervention. The CRM approach provided tools for management that, in the short term, enabled reorganisation and prevention of service omissions and, in the long term, can produce change in the organisational culture for continuous improvement.

  1. Mediation and managed care.

    PubMed

    Dubler, N N

    1998-03-01

    Managed care has not only intensified existing conflicts between patient and provider, it has, by its very nature, changed the shape and scope of the healthcare enterprise and introduced an entirely new set of disputes. The decision-making dynamics have been altered, and the cast of players has expanded. Traditionally, the therapeutic interaction took place between the physician and the patient although it occasionally included the patient's family. Whatever obligations existed, such as fidelity, confidentiality, and standard of care, they bound only those parties. Now, as the managed care organization has interposed itself between the patient and the physician, the dyad has become a triad. The power balance has shifted, and a new set of rights and responsibilities now flows between and among the players, each of whom has interests that may or may not coincide. This article argues that, because of its cost containment origins and orientation, managed care increases the likelihood that misunderstandings, disagreements and disputes will develop into full-blown conflicts. If managed care is to succeed financially and operate with integrity, it must develop techniques for managing the increasing conflicts that arise inevitably between and among the organizations, physicians, and patients. It is clear that the voice of the patient needs to be strengthened within the new complex decision-making, review, and appeal procedures. Mediation is the most appropriate method of dispute resolution for the managed care setting because it balances the disparities in power endemic to the bureaucratization of medicine and refocuses the interests of the various parties. Using bioethics consultation as a model for dispute mediation provides a set of principles and guideline tasks that can be applied effectively to managed care.

  2. Need and disparities in primary care management of patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Buja, Alessandra; Gini, Rosa; Visca, Modesta; Damiani, Gianfranco; Federico, Bruno; Donato, Daniele; Francesconi, Paolo; Marini, Alessandro; Donatini, Andrea; Brugaletta, Salvatore; Bardelle, Giorgia; Baldo, Vincenzo; Bellentani, Mariadonata

    2014-07-10

    An aging population means that chronic illnesses, such as diabetes, are becoming more prevalent and demands for care are rising. Members of primary care teams should organize and coordinate patient care with a view to improving quality of care and impartial adherence to evidence-based practices for all patients. The aims of the present study were: to ascertain the prevalence of diabetes in an Italian population, stratified by age, gender and citizenship; and to identify the rate of compliance with recommended guidelines for monitoring diabetes, to see whether disparities exist in the quality of diabetes patient management. A population-based analysis was performed on a dataset obtained by processing public health administration databases. The presence of diabetes and compliance with standards of care were estimated using appropriate algorithms. A multilevel logistic regression analysis was applied to assess factors affecting compliance with standards of care. 1,948,622 Italians aged 16+ were included in the study. In this population, 105,987 subjects were identified as having diabetes on January 1st, 2009. The prevalence of diabetes was 5.43% (95% CI 5.33-5.54) overall, 5.87% (95% CI 5.82-5.92) among males, and 5.05% (95% CI 5.00-5.09) among females. HbA1c levels had been tested in 60.50% of our diabetic subjects, LDL cholesterol levels in 57.50%, and creatinine levels in 63.27%, but only 44.19% of the diabetic individuals had undergone a comprehensive assessment during one year of care. Statistical differences in diabetes care management emerged relating to gender, age, diagnostic latency period, comorbidity and citizenship. Process management indicators need to be used not only for the overall assessment of health care processes, but also to monitor disparities in the provision of health care.

  3. Cost-effectiveness of a disease management program for major depression in elderly primary care patients.

    PubMed

    Bosmans, Judith; de Bruijne, Martine; van Hout, Hein; van Marwijk, Harm; Beekman, Aartjan; Bouter, Lex; Stalman, Wim; van Tulder, Maurits

    2006-10-01

    Major depression is common in older adults and is associated with increased health care costs. Depression often remains unrecognized in older adults, especially in primary care. To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a disease management program for major depression in elderly primary care patients compared with usual care. Economic evaluation alongside a cluster randomized-controlled trial. Consecutive patients of 55 years and older were screened for depression using the Geriatric Depression Scale and the PRIME-MD was used for diagnosis. General practitioners in the intervention group received training on how to implement the disease management program consisting of screening, patient education, drug therapy with paroxetine, and supportive contacts. General practitioners in the usual care group were blind to the screening results. Treatment in this group was not restricted in any way. Severity of depression, recovery from depression, and quality of life. Resource use measured over a 12-month period using interviews and valued using standard costs. Differences in clinical outcomes between the intervention and usual care group were small and statistically insignificant. Total costs were 2,123 dollars in the intervention and 2,259 dollars in the usual care group (mean difference -136 dollars, 95% confidence interval: -1,194 dollars; 1,110 dollars). Cost-effectiveness planes indicated that there were no statistically significant differences in cost-effectiveness between the 2 groups. This disease management program for major depression in elderly primary care patients had no statistically significant relationship with clinical outcomes, costs, and cost-effectiveness. Therefore, based on these results, continuing usual care is recommended.

  4. Caring for dying patients in the intensive care unit: managing pain, dyspnea, anxiety, delirium, and death rattle.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Margaret L

    2015-01-01

    Critically ill patients receiving palliative care at the end of life are at high risk for experiencing pain, dyspnea, and death rattle. Nearly all these patients are at risk for the development of delirium. Patients who are alert may experience anxiety. Advanced practice nurses and staff nurses are integral to detecting and treating these symptoms. Pain, dyspnea, and anxiety should be routinely assessed by patient self-report when possible. Routine behavioral screening for delirium is recommended. Behavioral observation tools to detect pain and dyspnea and proxy assessments guide symptom identification when the patient cannot provide a self-report. Evidence-based interventions are offered for both prevention and treatment of pain, dyspnea, anxiety, and delirium. Death rattle does not produce patient distress, and current pharmacological treatment lacks an evidence base. Pain management has a robust evidence base compared to management of dyspnea, anxiety, and delirium among this population; well-designed, adequately powered studies are needed.

  5. Satisfaction of health care professionals managing patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Casellas, Francesc; Ginard, Daniel; Vera, Isabel; Torrejón, Antonio

    2013-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the satisfaction of health care professionals who attend patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and to determine the variables more related with satisfaction/dissatisfaction. Cross-sectional, self-administered written 15-item questionnaire was evaluated using a Likert scale, completed by Spanish gastroenterologists and nurse practitioners specialized in IBD patient care. A total of 202 surveys, 133 physicians (65.8%) and 69 nurses (34.2%) were conducted. Global scoring of satisfaction was 54.0 for physicians and 64.2 for nurses (p<0.001). In both groups the highest scores were achieved in those items related to their professional careers and management of personal and professional lives as well as those that refer to their interdisciplinary relationship with other medical units, management of patients within the hospital setting and finally communication with the patient. The items that attained the lowest score included those related to the length and staff available for the medical consult, work environment and the balance among health care provider needs for contribution, recognition and fulfillment. With regard to the variables involved with satisfaction, the results show that those physicians that only took care of IBD patients achieved a higher degree of satisfaction. This could be related with the fulfillment of their own professional expectations. The level of satisfaction of health care professionals that take care of IBD patients is low and may impact on patient care. Therefore, new strategies to increase the degree of satisfaction of IBD health care providers should be implemented. Copyright © 2012 European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Critical care considerations in the management of the trauma patient following initial resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Care of the polytrauma patient does not end in the operating room or resuscitation bay. The patient presenting to the intensive care unit following initial resuscitation and damage control surgery may be far from stable with ongoing hemorrhage, resuscitation needs, and injuries still requiring definitive repair. The intensive care physician must understand the respiratory, cardiovascular, metabolic, and immunologic consequences of trauma resuscitation and massive transfusion in order to evaluate and adjust the ongoing resuscitative needs of the patient and address potential complications. In this review, we address ongoing resuscitation in the intensive care unit along with potential complications in the trauma patient after initial resuscitation. Complications such as abdominal compartment syndrome, transfusion related patterns of acute lung injury and metabolic consequences subsequent to post-trauma resuscitation are presented. Methods A non-systematic literature search was conducted using PubMed and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews up to May 2012. Results and conclusion Polytrauma patients with severe shock from hemorrhage and massive tissue injury present major challenges for management and resuscitation in the intensive care setting. Many of the current recommendations for “damage control resuscitation” including the use of fixed ratios in the treatment of trauma induced coagulopathy remain controversial. A lack of large, randomized, controlled trials leaves most recommendations at the level of consensus, expert opinion. Ongoing trials and improvements in monitoring and resuscitation technologies will further influence how we manage these complex and challenging patients. PMID:22989116

  7. Identification of patient's requirements in quality management system in health care institutions.

    PubMed

    Kaźmierczak, Daniel; Bogusz-Czerniewicz, Marta

    2011-12-16

    To present the solutions implemented in health care institution in the context of identification of patient's requirements, and evaluation of the level of patients' satisfaction in accordance with the requirements of ISO norm 9001:2008 based on the experience of GPCC. The fundamental mechanisms behind the free market, such as competition, start applying also to the public health sector. Health service providers are gradually realising that patients are actual clients of health care institutions, with physicians, nurses, supporting personnel, registration officers and other staff responding to patients demand for medical and auxiliary services (e.g. exam registration, provision of information). PN-EN ISO 9001:2009 "Quality Management Systems. Requirements", relevant literature and documentation of quality management system from the GPCC. The review of relevant literature and legal requirements; interpretation of provisions in relation to the functioning of health care institutions. Model of identification of patient's requirements and satisfaction in accordance with the requirements of ISO 9001:2008 has been elaborated and implemented in the GPCC. The identification of patient's requirements is much more complicated than evaluating the same parameters in manufacturing companies. In the context of medical services one should be aware of the subjectivity of patient's feelings, the psycho-social status and the general state of health during his or her treatment. Therefore, the identification of patient's requirements and satisfaction must be carefully thought out, implemented and regularly improved.

  8. Characteristics of patients with diabetes who accept referrals for care management services

    PubMed Central

    Holtz, Bree; Annis, Ann M; Morrish, Wendy; Davis Burns, Jennifer; Krein, Sarah L

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Patients with chronic conditions can improve their health through participation in self-care programs. However, awareness of and enrollment in these programs are generally low. Objective: We sought to identify factors influencing patients’ receptiveness to a referral for programs and services supporting chronic disease management. Methods: We analyzed data from 541 high-risk diabetic patients who completed an assessment between 2010 and 2013 from a computer-based, nurse-led Navigator referral program within a large primary care clinic. We compared patients who accepted a referral to those who declined. Results: A total of 318 patients (75%) accepted 583 referrals, of which 52% were for self-care programs. Patients who accepted a referral had more primary care visits in the previous year, were more likely to be enrolled in another program, expressed more interest in using the phone and family or friends for support, and were more likely to report recent pain than those who declined a referral. Discussion: Understanding what factors influence patients’ decisions to consider and participate in self-care programs has important implications for program design and development of strategies to connect patients to programs. This work informs outreach efforts to identify and engage patients who are likely to benefit from self-care activities. PMID:26835018

  9. Implementation of a quality care management system for patients with arthritis of the hip and knee.

    PubMed

    Doerr, Christine R; Graves, Stephen E; Mercer, Graham E; Osborne, Richard H

    2013-02-01

    The Orthopaedic Unit of the Repatriation General Hospital (RGH) in Adelaide, South Australia has implemented a quality care management system for patients with arthritis of the hip and knee. The system not only optimises conservative management but ensures that joint replacement surgery is undertaken in an appropriate and timely manner. This new service model addresses identified barriers to service access and provides a comprehensive, coordinated strategy for patient management. Over 4 years the model has reduced waiting times for initial outpatient assessment from 8 to 3 months and surgery from 18 to 8 months, while decreasing length of stay from 6.3 to 5.3 days for hips and 5.8 to 5.3 days for knees. The service reforms have been accompanied by positive feedback from patients and referring general practitioners in relation to the improved coordination of care and enhanced efficiency in service delivery.

  10. Self-Care Management among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes in East Jerusalem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daoud, Nihaya; Osman, Amira; Hart, Trevor A.; Berry, Elliott M.; Adler, Bella

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Little research exists on diabetes self-care management (DSCM) in Arab populations. We examined the contribution of health belief constructs, socioeconomic position (SEP) and clinical factors (glycated haemoglobin [HbA1C] level, type of diabetes treatments, and receiving professional guidance) to DSCM among Arab patients in East…

  11. Self-Care Management among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes in East Jerusalem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daoud, Nihaya; Osman, Amira; Hart, Trevor A.; Berry, Elliott M.; Adler, Bella

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Little research exists on diabetes self-care management (DSCM) in Arab populations. We examined the contribution of health belief constructs, socioeconomic position (SEP) and clinical factors (glycated haemoglobin [HbA1C] level, type of diabetes treatments, and receiving professional guidance) to DSCM among Arab patients in East…

  12. Patient engagement with infection management in secondary care: a qualitative investigation of current experiences.

    PubMed

    Rawson, Timothy M; Moore, Luke S P; Hernandez, Bernard; Castro-Sanchez, Enrique; Charani, Esmita; Georgiou, Pantelis; Ahmad, Raheelah; Holmes, Alison H

    2016-10-31

    To understand patient engagement with decision-making for infection management in secondary care and the consequences associated with current practices. A qualitative investigation using in-depth focus groups. Fourteen members of the public who had received antimicrobials from secondary care in the preceding 12 months in the UK were identified for recruitment. Ten agreed to participate. All participants had experience of infection management in secondary care pathways across a variety of South-East England healthcare institutes. Study findings were subsequently tested through follow-up focus groups with 20 newly recruited citizens. Participants reported feelings of disempowerment during episodes of infection in secondary care. Information is communicated in a unilateral manner with individuals 'told' that they have an infection and will receive an antimicrobial (often unnamed), leading to loss of ownership, frustration, anxiety and ultimately distancing them from engaging with decision-making. This poor communication drives individuals to seek information from alternative sources, including online, which is associated with concerns over reliability and individualisation. Failures in communication and information provision by clinicians in secondary care influence individuals' future ideas about infections and their management. This alters their future actions towards antimicrobials and can drive prescription non-adherence and loss to follow-up. Current infection management and antimicrobial prescribing practices in secondary care fail to engage patients with the decision-making process. Secondary care physicians must not view infection management episodes as discrete events, but as cumulative experiences which have the potential to shape future patient behaviour and understanding of antimicrobial use. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  13. Patient engagement with infection management in secondary care: a qualitative investigation of current experiences

    PubMed Central

    Rawson, Timothy M; Moore, Luke S P; Hernandez, Bernard; Castro-Sanchez, Enrique; Charani, Esmita; Georgiou, Pantelis; Ahmad, Raheelah; Holmes, Alison H

    2016-01-01

    Objective To understand patient engagement with decision-making for infection management in secondary care and the consequences associated with current practices. Design A qualitative investigation using in-depth focus groups. Participants Fourteen members of the public who had received antimicrobials from secondary care in the preceding 12 months in the UK were identified for recruitment. Ten agreed to participate. All participants had experience of infection management in secondary care pathways across a variety of South-East England healthcare institutes. Study findings were subsequently tested through follow-up focus groups with 20 newly recruited citizens. Results Participants reported feelings of disempowerment during episodes of infection in secondary care. Information is communicated in a unilateral manner with individuals ‘told’ that they have an infection and will receive an antimicrobial (often unnamed), leading to loss of ownership, frustration, anxiety and ultimately distancing them from engaging with decision-making. This poor communication drives individuals to seek information from alternative sources, including online, which is associated with concerns over reliability and individualisation. Failures in communication and information provision by clinicians in secondary care influence individuals’ future ideas about infections and their management. This alters their future actions towards antimicrobials and can drive prescription non-adherence and loss to follow-up. Conclusions Current infection management and antimicrobial prescribing practices in secondary care fail to engage patients with the decision-making process. Secondary care physicians must not view infection management episodes as discrete events, but as cumulative experiences which have the potential to shape future patient behaviour and understanding of antimicrobial use. PMID:27799238

  14. Direct costs of blindness experienced by patients enrolled in managed care.

    PubMed

    Frick, Kevin D; Walt, John G; Chiang, Tina H; Doyle, John J; Stern, Lee S; Katz, Laura M; Dolgitser, Margarita; Hendlish, Sarah K

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate total and condition-related charges incurred by blind patients in a managed care population in the United States and compare total charges with those of a matched nonblind cohort. Retrospective cohort study. Patients with blindness (N = 10 796) and a 1:1 matched cohort of nonblind patients were selected from a managed care claims database. All study subjects were required to be > or =18 years old at diagnosis (blind patients) or enrollment (nonblind patients) and to have had > or =1 years of continuous follow-up. Total and pharmacy-related direct medical charges in the first year of follow-up were calculated for both blind and nonblind cohorts. Among blind patients, condition-related charges, charge per treated person, and charge breakdown by age group were calculated. For patients with follow-up extending past 1 year, total charges (both cohorts) and condition-related charges (blind cohort only) were assessed and annualized. Mean and median charges were assessed for blind and nonblind patients within each stratum of matched covariates; a multivariate linear regression assessed the statistical significance of the difference in charges between the 2 cohorts. Total health care charges in the first year of follow-up and condition-related health care charges in the first year of follow-up for blind patients. For the blind population (mean age, 52 years [standard deviation (SD), 17.5]), the total mean and median health care charges per person in the first year were $20,677 (SD, $48,835) and $6854, respectively. Total mean and median health care charges per nonblind patient in the first year were $13,321 (SD, $40,059) and $3778, respectively. Condition-related charges among blind patients were substantially lower than total charges, with mean and median charges per person of $4565 (SD, $17,472) and $371, respectively. After adjusting for covariates, blind patients had significantly higher total health care charges in the first year of follow-up than nonblind

  15. [Current Status and Effectiveness of Perioperative Oral Health Care Management for Lung Cancer and Esophageal Cancer Patients].

    PubMed

    Nishino, Takeshi; Takizawa, Hiromitsu; Yoshida, Takahiro; Inui, Tomohiro; Takasugi, Haruka; Matsumoto, Daisuke; Kawakita, Naoya; Inoue, Seiya; Sakiyama, Shoji; Tangoku, Akira; Azuma, Masayuki; Yamamura, Yoshiko

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of perioperative oral health care management to decrease the risk of postoperative pneumonia have been reported lately. Since 2014, we introduced perioperative oral health care management for lung cancer and esophageal cancer patients. We report current status and effectiveness of perioperative oral health care management for lung cancer and esophageal cancer patients. Every 100 cases of lung cancer and esophageal cancer patients treated by surgery were classified 2 group with or without perioperative oral health care management and compared about postoperative complications retrospectively. In the lung cancer patients, the group with oral health care management could prevent postoperative pneumonia significantly and had shorter length of hospital stay than the group without oral health care management. In the esophageal cancer patients, there was little occurrence of postoperative pneumonia without significant difference between both group with or without oral health care management. A large number of esophageal cancer patients received neo-adjuvant chemotherapy and some patients developed oral mucositis and received oral care treatment before surgery. Treatment for oral mucositis probably improved oral environment and affected prevention of postoperative pneumonia. Perioperative oral health care management can prevent postoperative pneumonia of lung cancer and esophageal cancer patients by improvement of oral hygiene.

  16. Do employers voluntarily include patient protections in self-insured managed care plans?

    PubMed

    Lawlor, Janice S; Hall, Mark A

    2005-01-01

    Managed care patient protection laws passed by states do not apply to health plans sponsored by self-insured employers, although 54% of workers who receive health insurance coverage through their employer are in self-insured plans. In-depth interviews conducted in five states with employers offering self-insured health benefits and with other knowledgeable market informants provide evidence that self-insured managed care plans nonetheless include important features that strengthen subscribers' access to medical providers. Less common in these plans were features providing for independent external appeal of coverage denials and for protecting network providers from undue influence by plan administrators.

  17. The Core of Care Management: The Role of Authentic Relationships in Caring for Patients with Frequent Hospitalizations

    PubMed Central

    Hawthorne, Margaret; LaNoue, Marianna; Brenner, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In the movement to improve the health of patients with multiple chronic conditions and vulnerabilities, while reducing the need for hospitalizations, care management programs have garnered wide attention and support. The qualitative data presented in this paper sheds new light on key components of successful chronic care management programs. By going beyond a task- and temporal-based framework, this analysis identifies and defines the importance of “authentic healing relationships” in driving individual and systemic change. Drawing on the voices of 30 former clients of the Camden Coalition of Healthcare Providers, the investigators use qualitative methods to identify and elaborate the core elements of the authentic healing relationship—security, genuineness, and continuity—a relationship that is linked to patient motivation and active health management. Although not readily found in the traditional health care delivery system, these authentic healing relationships present significant implications for addressing the persistent health-related needs of patients with frequent hospitalizations. (Population Health Management 2016;19:248–256) PMID:26565379

  18. Identification of patient's requirements in quality management system in health care institutions

    PubMed Central

    Kaźmierczak, Daniel; Bogusz-Czerniewicz, Marta

    2011-01-01

    Aim To present the solutions implemented in health care institution in the context of identification of patient's requirements, and evaluation of the level of patients’ satisfaction in accordance with the requirements of ISO norm 9001:2008 based on the experience of GPCC. Background The fundamental mechanisms behind the free market, such as competition, start applying also to the public health sector. Health service providers are gradually realising that patients are actual clients of health care institutions, with physicians, nurses, supporting personnel, registration officers and other staff responding to patients demand for medical and auxiliary services (e.g. exam registration, provision of information). Material and methods PN-EN ISO 9001:2009 “Quality Management Systems. Requirements”, relevant literature and documentation of quality management system from the GPCC. The review of relevant literature and legal requirements; interpretation of provisions in relation to the functioning of health care institutions. Results Model of identification of patient's requirements and satisfaction in accordance with the requirements of ISO 9001:2008 has been elaborated and implemented in the GPCC. Conclusion The identification of patient's requirements is much more complicated than evaluating the same parameters in manufacturing companies. In the context of medical services one should be aware of the subjectivity of patient's feelings, the psycho-social status and the general state of health during his or her treatment. Therefore, the identification of patient's requirements and satisfaction must be carefully thought out, implemented and regularly improved. PMID:24376996

  19. Consumer Health Informatics: Promoting Patient Self-care Management of Illnesses and Health.

    PubMed

    Jung, Minsoo

    Consumer health informatics (CHI) is propelling important changes for medical providers and the lives of patients through information and communications technology. Independently, medical consumers seek, collect, and use health information for decision making. However, when constructing a CHI-based medical platform, high technology must be applied in a fully understandable and usable format for both health care providers and consumers. This study examines the present status of CHI and its effect on medical consumers. For the development of CHI, we discuss the need for tailored health communications and capacity building with chronic patients at the medical center. First, empowerment is a key characteristic needed for medical consumer health care management. However, promoting patient self-care management of illnesses and health is necessary to create conjugation where cooperation with medical service providers is possible. Also, establishing a health care delivery system that will support cooperation is necessary. Second, tailored health communications can uniquely construct the health information of patients, which prevents unnecessary or excessive information from leading patients to confused and inappropriate decisions. Ultimately, through the present environment of health communication, the innovation of a consumer health care information system has become the tide of the times and the positive effect of improved health can be expected.

  20. Regular control at the general practitioner is positively correlated with patient satisfaction with chronic care management.

    PubMed

    Bjørnholt Nielsen, Pernille; Witzel, Simone

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study is to identify how disease management programmes for patients with a chronic disease work. This issue is explored from the patients' perspective. Specifically, we study how transition and coordination are related to the patient's perception of quality of care, with a particular focus on the general practitioner's (GP) role. The study is based on a survey conducted among patients with Type 2 diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in the Central Denmark Region in 2011 and 2012. Data are analysed using logistic regression models. A total of 4,174 patients answered the questionnaire. The response rate was 43%. Whether the patient attends regular visits with the GP or not has a significant influence on both the patient's overall perception of the healthcare sector and on the patient's perception of the organisation of care. Variation among patient groups was identified and COPD patients had the least positive overall perception of the care received. Patients who visit their GP for regular control both have a better overall perception of the healthcare sector and are more likely to think that their treatment is well organised. Patients with COPD have a less positive score than patients with ACS and diabetes. none. not relevant.

  1. Self-Management Strategies for Stress and Anxiety Used by Nontreatment Seeking Veteran Primary Care Patients.

    PubMed

    Shepardson, Robyn L; Tapio, Jennie; Funderburk, Jennifer S

    2017-07-01

    One of the most common reasons individuals do not seek mental health treatment is a preference to manage emotional concerns on their own. Self-management refers to the strategies that individuals use on their own (i.e., without professional guidance) to manage symptoms. Little research has examined self-management for anxiety despite its potential utility as the first step in a stepped care approach to primary care. The objectives of this study were to describe patients' anxiety self-management strategies, identify which types were perceived to be effective, and explore potential correlates. This was an exploratory descriptive study (N = 182) of nontreatment seeking Veterans Health Administration primary care patients (M = 58.3 years of age, SD = 14.9) who reported current anxiety symptoms (≥8 on Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7). The Institutional Review Board approved the study, and all participants provided informed consent. We assessed self-management strategies, anxiety and depression symptoms, and past-year treatment via telephone. Two independent raters coded strategies into 1 of 7 categories (kappa = 0.85) and 23 subcategories (kappa M = 0.82, SD = 0.16). Participants reported nearly universal (98%) use of self-management, with an average of 2.96 (SD = 1.2) strategies used in the past 3 months, and 91% of all strategies perceived as effective. Self-care (37.0%), cognitive (15.8%), and avoidance (15.1%) strategies were reported most commonly; the most prevalent subcategories were exercise (11.0% of all strategies), redirecting thoughts (9.1%), and family/friends (8.1%). Age and depression screen status were associated with self-management strategy use. Our results demonstrate the ubiquity and high perceived effectiveness of self-management for anxiety among Veteran primary care patients. Although avoidance strategies were fairly common, self-care strategies, particularly exercising, and cognitive strategies, such as redirecting thoughts, were most prevalent

  2. Management of patients with status epilepticus treated at a pediatric intensive care unit in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Komur, Mustafa; Arslankoylu, Ali Ertug; Okuyaz, Cetin; Keceli, Meryem; Derici, Didem

    2012-06-01

    We investigated the etiology, treatment, and prognosis of patients treated for status epilepticus at a pediatric intensive care unit. Medical records of 89 patients admitted to a pediatric intensive care unit with status epilepticus were reviewed retrospectively. Patients ranged in age from 2 months to 18 years (mean age ± S.D., 4.7 ± 3.8 years). Seizure etiologies comprised remote symptomatic in 47 (52.7%), febrile in 15 (16.9%), acute symptomatic in 12 (13.5%), and unknown in 15 (16.9%). Seizure durations ranged from 30-60 minutes in 58 patients, whereas 31 manifested refractory seizures longer than 60 minutes. Seizure control was achieved within 30 minutes in 55 patients, from 30-60 minutes in 19, and after 60 minutes in 15. Rectal diazepam was administered to 38 (42.7%) patients before admission to the hospital. Length of intensive care unit stay increased with increasing seizure duration (P < 0.05). The total mortality rate was 3.4%. This lower mortality rate may be considered evidence of the effectiveness and reliability of the status epilepticus treatment protocol in our pediatric intensive care unit. Prehospital rectal diazepam administration and the treatment of brain edema in the intensive care unit may be useful in the management of patients with status epilepticus. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Managing costs and managing care.

    PubMed

    Rivers, P A; Tsai, K L

    2001-01-01

    With a defined population served, contracted provider panels and the nature of care delivery integration, managed care has provided a solution, though not a panacea, to provide equitable services, standardized and prevention oriented cares to its enrolled members. Combined with the earmarked capitation reimbursement system and a series of cost containment and utilization review techniques, managed care has also demonstrated potently its capacity in cost-saving and quality promotion. Presents steps and measures related to managed care that federal government has taken to manage care and contain cost. It is crucial to identify and promulgate best practices continually, while managing utilization of resources for improving health care, containing cost, and equalizing medical care access to a greater proportion of the population. Concludes that it may take time for a universal adoption of managed care. However, Americans may actually benefit more from having a standard level of health care that managed care could achieve and provide.

  4. Impact of Managed Care Health Insurance System for Indigent Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Santiago-Casas, Yesenia; González-Rivera, Tania; Castro-Santana, Lesliane; Ríos, Grissel; Martínez, David; Rodríguez, Vanessa; González-Alcover, Rafael; Mayor, Ángel M.; Vilá, Luis M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the clinical outcome among indigent patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in Puerto Rico receiving their healthcare in a managed care system, as compared to non-indigent patients treated in fee-for-service settings. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 214 Puerto Ricans with RA (per American College of Rheumatology classification criteria). Demographic features, health-related behaviors, cumulative clinical manifestations, disease activity (per Disease Activity Score 28), comorbid conditions, functional status (per Health Assessment Questionnaire, HAQ), and pharmacologic profile were determined. Data were examined using univariable and multivariable (logistic regression) analyses. The mean (standard deviation [SD]) age of the study population was 56.6 (13.5) years; 180 (84.1%) were women. The mean (SD) disease duration was 10.8 (9.6) years. Sixty-seven patients were treated in the managed care setting and 147 patients received their healthcare in fee-for-service settings. In the multivariable analyses RA patients treated in the managed care setting had more joint deformities, extra-articular manifestations, arterial hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular events, fibromyalgia syndrome, and poorer functional status, while having a lower exposure to biologic agents than those treated in fee-for-service settings. Efforts should be undertaken to curtail the gap of health disparities among these Hispanic patients in order to improve their long term outcomes. PMID:23314687

  5. Implementing a hybrid approach to select patients for care management: variations across practices.

    PubMed

    Vogeli, Christine; Spirt, Jenna; Brand, Richard; Hsu, John; Mohta, Namita; Hong, Clemens; Weil, Eric; Ferris, Timothy G

    2016-05-01

    Appropriate selection of patients is key to the success of care management programs (CMPs). Hybrid patient selection approaches, in which large data assets are culled to develop a list of patients for more targeted clinical review, are increasingly common. We sought to describe the patient and practice characteristics associated with high-risk patient identification and selection for a CMP during clinical review, and to explore variation across primary care practices. Retrospective cohort study. Standardized estimates of Medicare beneficiaries identified as high risk for poor outcomes and high medical expense, and appropriate for a CMP within a large Pioneer Accountable Care Organization, were developed using mixed effects logistic models. Study subjects were 2685 Medicare beneficiaries aged over 18 (includes individuals eligible for Medicare due to a disability) aligned to 35 primary care practices in 2013. Independent predictors of patient identification as high risk include older age; higher risk score; recent increases in medical conditions; higher numbers of medical hospitalizations, skilled nursing facility days, and primary care physician visits; and shorter relationships with the primary care physician. Older age, and lower income, but no prior hospice use were independently associated with patient selection for a CMP among the subset of patients identified as being high risk. Adjusted predicted percents of high-risk patients varied significantly across practices overall and for 5 of the 6 patient characteristics that were independently associated with identification as high risk. Inconsistency in high-risk patient identification and selection for a CMP may reflect differences in practice resources, but also highlight the need for continual training and feedback in order to protect against unintentional biases.

  6. Leadership for patient care.

    PubMed

    Nackel, J G; Shelley, S R

    1991-01-01

    In an era of change in health-care delivery and, particularly, change in patient care, leadership is the cornerstone of change management. The environment of the 1990s will challenge even the most sophisticated and capable health-care executives. This paper discusses key aspects of leadership and models them to the patient-care setting. Leadership will be the differentiating factor as organizations seek competitive advantage.

  7. Behind closed doors: management of patient expectations in primary care practices.

    PubMed

    Keitz, Sheri A; Stechuchak, Karen M; Grambow, Steven C; Koropchak, Celine M; Tulsky, James A

    2007-03-12

    Managed care restrictions on resource use may affect communication between patients and health care professionals. To characterize negotiations between primary care physicians and patients with expectations for new medications, tests, or referrals, this observational study combined survey data with audiotape recordings of clinical encounters. Fifty-five physicians from 20 randomly selected primary care practices in a managed care network and 211 patients who voiced specific expectations in a previsit survey were included. From the recorded clinic visits we determined modes of negotiation of patient expectations and requests. From the surveys we determined patient previsit expectations, postvisit fulfillment of expectations, satisfaction, and trust. Two-hundred fifty-six self-reported expectations were captured in 200 audiotape-recorded encounters. Of the previsit expectations, 97.3% were discussed during the encounter. Expectations were expressed by direct patient request (40.6%), mentioning of symptoms related to request (29.7%), or physician-initiated discussion (27.0%). Most expectations were met (66.8%); physicians suggested an alternative 21.6% of the time. Expectations for medications and tests were met more frequently than expectations for referrals (75.6% and 71.4% vs 40.8%). Patient satisfaction and trust remained high regardless of whether expectations were met. Physicians reported that they would not have ordered 62 (44.9%) of 138 requests had the patients not directly asked, and they were uncomfortable filling 8 requests (12.9%). Previsit expectations for medications, tests, or referrals were discussed at the visit, and physicians met or offered alternatives for nearly 90%. Patients generally received what they asked for and altered physician behavior nearly half of the time.

  8. [Management of voiding dysfunction in elderly patients: effectiveness of rehabilitation and familial care].

    PubMed

    Ueda, T; Yoshimura, N; Arai, Y; Yoshida, O

    1994-11-01

    We examined whether the improvement of impaired mobility correlates with the success rate in achievement of catheter-free or diaper-free status of 260 hospitalized elderly patients whose activities in daily life (ADL) were impaired and urinary tract dysfunctions including urinary incontinence were managed by indwelling catheters or diapers. The contribution of physical rehabilitation and/or care given by family to the improvement of impaired mobility was also investigated. All 154 patients whose ADL improved during the course of the treatment acquired the catheter-free or diaper-free status. Of 106 patients whose ADL did not improve, 85 patients became free of catheters or diapers. All of the remaining 19 patients who continued to be dependent upon catheter or diapers had been bed-ridden during the course of the treatment. Among 201 patients who were bed-ridden before the treatment, the success rate in the improvement of impaired ADL in 84 patients who underwent physical rehabilitation and received care given by family, was 83%. The ADL improved in 71% of the 70 who received rehabilitation and 53% of 17 bed-ridden patients who received familial care. By contrast, only 2 out of 30 patients who received neither of them were free from the bed-ridden condition. The remaining 28 patients continued to be bed-ridden, and the 19 cases who were not free of indwelling catheters or diapers were a part of this population of patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Retaining customers in a managed care market. Hospitals must understand the connection between patient satisfaction, loyalty, retention, and revenue.

    PubMed

    Gemme, E M

    1997-01-01

    Traditionally, health care patients have been treated by health care professionals as people with needs rather than as customers with options. Although managed care has restricted patient choice, choice has not been eliminated. The premise of this article is that patients are primary health care consumers. Adopting such a premise and developing an active customer retention program can help health care organizations change their culture for the better, which may lead to higher customer retention levels and increased revenues. Customer retention programs based on service excellence that empower employees to provide excellent care can eventually lead to a larger market share for health care organizations trying to survive this era of intense competition.

  10. Addressing hospital-acquired pressure ulcers: patient care managers enhancing outcomes at the point of service.

    PubMed

    Frumenti, Jeanine M; Kurtz, Abby

    2014-01-01

    An innovative leadership training program for patient care managers (PCMs) aimed at improving the management of operational failures was conducted at a large metropolitan hospital center. The program focused on developing and enhancing the transformational leadership skills of PCMs by improving their ability to manage operational failures in general and, in this case, hospital-acquired pressure ulcers. The PCMs received 8 weeks of intense training using the Toyota Production System process improvement approach, along with executive coaching. Compared with the control group, the gains made by the intervention group were statistically significant.

  11. Management of asthma in patients supervised by primary care physicians or by specialists.

    PubMed

    Laforest, L; Van Ganse, E; Devouassoux, G; Chretin, S; Osman, L; Bauguil, G; Pacheco, Y; Chamba, G

    2006-01-01

    French asthma patients may be supervised by general practitioners (GPs) and/or specialists. Therefore, this study examined asthma management in patients exclusively supervised by specialists (SPE), GPs, (GP) and both (GP+SPE group), and compared the findings. Asthma patients were consecutively recruited in 348 pharmacies. Each patient completed a questionnaire providing data on personal characteristics, asthma management, perception of disease and asthma supervision. Asthma control was measured using the Asthma Control Test. Questionnaires were linked to computerised records of medications which had been dispensed before inclusion in the study. From the 1,256 patients (mean age = 36.1 yrs, 54.3% females), 11.4, 36.6, and 52.0% were placed in the SPE, GP, and GP+SPE groups, respectively. During the previous 4 weeks, most patients in the SPE group were properly controlled (52.2 versus 26.4 and 21.5% in GP and GP+SPE groups, respectively). The SPE group made more use of fixed combinations of long-acting beta agonist and inhaled corticosteroid, while receiving less short-acting beta agonists, antitussives and antibiotics. Striking differences in symptoms and asthma management were observed according to the type of asthma supervision. The current results strongly support the need to improve the management of asthma in primary care, and the coordination of care between general practitioners and specialists.

  12. A managed clinical network for cardiac services: set-up, operation and impact on patient care

    PubMed Central

    E StC Hamilton, Karen; M Sullivan, Frank; T Donnan, Peter; Taylor, Rex; Ikenwilo, Divine; Scott, Anthony; Baker, Chris; Wyke, Sally

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Purpose To investigate the set up and operation of a Managed Clinical Network for cardiac services and assess its impact on patient care. Methods This single case study used process evaluation with observational before and after comparison of indicators of quality of care and costs. The study was conducted in Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland and used a three-level framework. Process evaluation of the network set-up and operation through a documentary review of minutes; guidelines and protocols; transcripts of fourteen semi-structured interviews with health service personnel including senior managers, general practitioners, nurses, cardiologists and members of the public. Outcome evaluation of the impact of the network through interrupted time series analysis of clinical data of 202 patients aged less than 76 years admitted to hospital with a confirmed myocardial infarction one-year pre and one-year post, the establishment of the network. The main outcome measures were differences between indicators of quality of care targeted by network protocols. Economic evaluation of the transaction costs of the set-up and operation of the network and the resource costs of the clinical care of the 202 myocardial infarction patients from the time of hospital admission to 6 months post discharge through interrupted time series analysis. The outcome measure was different in National Health Service resource use. Results Despite early difficulties, the network was successful in bringing together clinicians, patients and managers to redesign services, exhibiting most features of good network management. The role of the energetic lead clinician was crucial, but the network took time to develop and ‘bed down’. Its primary “modus operand” was the development of a myocardial infarction pathway and associated protocols. Of sixteen clinical care indicators, two improved significantly following the launch of the network and nine showed improvements, which were not

  13. The Bariatric Patient in the Intensive Care Unit: Pitfalls and Management.

    PubMed

    Pompilio, Carlos E; Pelosi, Paolo; Castro, Melina G

    2016-09-01

    The increasing number of bariatric/metabolic operations as important alternatives for the treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes brought several concerns about the intensive care of patients undergoing those procedures. Intensive Care Unit admission criteria are needed in order to better allocate resources and avoid unnecessary interventions. Furthermore, well-established protocols, helpful in many clinical situations, are not directly applicable to obese patients. Indeed, difficult airway management, mechanical ventilation, fluid therapy protocols, prophylaxis, and treatment of venous thromboembolic events have unique aspects that should be taken into consideration. Finally, new data related to planning nutrition therapy of the critically obese have been highlighted and deserve consideration. In this review, we provide an outline of recent studies related to those important aspects of the care of the bariatric/metabolic patients in critical conditions.

  14. Management of severe sepsis in patients admitted to Asian intensive care units: prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Phua, Jason; Koh, Younsuck; Du, Bin; Tang, Yao-Qing; Divatia, Jigeeshu V; Tan, Cheng Cheng; Gomersall, Charles D; Faruq, Mohammad Omar; Shrestha, Babu Raja; Gia Binh, Nguyen; Arabi, Yaseen M; Salahuddin, Nawal; Wahyuprajitno, Bambang; Tu, Mei-Lien; Wahab, Ahmad Yazid Haji Abd; Hameed, Akmal A; Nishimura, Masaji; Procyshyn, Mark; Chan, Yiong Huak

    2011-06-13

    To assess the compliance of Asian intensive care units and hospitals to the Surviving Sepsis Campaign's resuscitation and management bundles. Secondary objectives were to evaluate the impact of compliance on mortality and the organisational characteristics of hospitals that were associated with higher compliance. Prospective cohort study. 150 intensive care units in 16 Asian countries. 1285 adult patients with severe sepsis admitted to these intensive care units in July 2009. The organisational characteristics of participating centres, the patients' baseline characteristics, the achievement of targets within the resuscitation and management bundles, and outcome data were recorded. Compliance with the Surviving Sepsis Campaign's resuscitation (six hours) and management (24 hours) bundles. Hospital mortality was 44.5% (572/1285). Compliance rates for the resuscitation and management bundles were 7.6% (98/1285) and 3.5% (45/1285), respectively. On logistic regression analysis, compliance with the following bundle targets independently predicted decreased mortality: blood cultures (achieved in 803/1285; 62.5%, 95% confidence interval 59.8% to 65.1%), broad spectrum antibiotics (achieved in 821/1285; 63.9%, 61.3% to 66.5%), and central venous pressure (achieved in 345/870; 39.7%, 36.4% to 42.9%). High income countries, university hospitals, intensive care units with an accredited fellowship programme, and surgical intensive care units were more likely to be compliant with the resuscitation bundle. While mortality from severe sepsis is high, compliance with resuscitation and management bundles is generally poor in much of Asia. As the centres included in this study might not be fully representative, achievement rates reported might overestimate the true degree of compliance with recommended care and should be interpreted with caution. Achievement of targets for blood cultures, antibiotics, and central venous pressure was independently associated with improved survival.

  15. Barriers to the optimal rehabilitation of surgical cancer patients in the managed care environment: an administrator's perspective.

    PubMed

    Germain, Pamela

    2007-04-01

    Ensuring that surgical cancer patients obtain optimal rehabilitation care (defined here as all care provided post-operatively following cancer surgery) can be challenging because of the fragmented nature of the U.S. healthcare delivery and payment systems. In the managed care environment, surgical cancer patients' access to rehabilitation care is likely to vary by type of health insurance plan, by setting, by type of provider, and by whether care is provided in-network or out-of-network. The author of this article, who negotiates managed care contracts for the Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI), gives examples of strategies used with some success by RPCI to collaborate with local payers to ensure that surgical cancer patients get optimal rehabilitation care, especially as they make the transition from hospital to outpatient care. She suggests that further collaborations of healthcare providers, payers, consumers, and policymakers are needed to help ensure optimal rehabilitation care for surgical cancer patients.

  16. Managing multimorbidity in primary care in patients with chronic respiratory conditions

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Deborah; Agur, Karolina; Mercer, Stewart; Eiras, Andreia; González-Montalvo, Juan I; Gruffydd-Jones, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    The term multimorbidity is usually defined as the coexistence of two or more chronic conditions within an individual, whereas the term comorbidity traditionally describes patients with an index condition and one or more additional conditions. Multimorbidity of chronic conditions markedly worsens outcomes in patients, increases treatment burden and increases health service costs. Although patients with chronic respiratory disease often have physical comorbidities, they also commonly experience psychological problems such as depression and anxiety. Multimorbidity is associated with increased health-care utilisation and specifically with an increased number of prescription drugs in individuals with multiple chronic conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This npj Primary Care Respiratory Medicine Education Section case study involves a patient in a primary care consultation presenting several common diseases prevalent in people of this age. The patient takes nine different drugs at this moment, one or more pills for each condition, which amounts to polypharmacy. The problems related with polypharmacy recommend that a routine medication review by primary care physicians be performed to reduce the risk of adverse effects of polypharmacy among those with multiple chronic conditions. The primary care physician has the challenging role of integrating all of the clinical problems affecting the patient and reviewing all medicaments (including over-the-counter medications) taken by the patient at any point in time, and has the has the key to prevent the unwanted consequences of polypharmacy. Multimorbid chronic disease management can be achieved with the use of care planning, unified disease templates, use of information technology with appointment reminders and with the help of the wider primary care and community teams. PMID:27629064

  17. Clinical case management for patients with schizophrenia with high care needs.

    PubMed

    Mas-Expósito, Laia; Amador-Campos, Juan Antonio; Gómez-Benito, Juana; Mauri-Mas, Lluís; Lalucat-Jo, Lluís

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study is to establish the effectiveness of a clinical case management (CM) programme compared to a standard treatment programme (STP) in patients with schizophrenia. Patients for the CM programme were consecutively selected among patients in the STP with schizophrenia who had poor functioning. Seventy-five patients were admitted to the CM programme and were matched to 75 patients in the STP. Patients were evaluated at baseline and at 1 year follow-up. At baseline, patients in the CM programme showed lower levels of clinical and psychosocial functioning and more care needs than patients in the STP. Both treatment programmes were effective in maintaining contact with services but the CM programme did not show advantages over the STP on outcomes. Differences between groups at baseline may be masking the effects of CM at one year follow-up. A longer follow-up may be required to evaluate the real CM practices effects.

  18. Providing Care for Patients with Chronic Migraine: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Management.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Carrie; Silberstein, Stephen D

    2015-09-01

    Chronic migraine, a subtype of migraine defined as ≥ 15 headache days per month for ≥ 3 months, in which ≥ 8 days per month meet criteria for migraine with or without aura or respond to migraine-specific treatment, is a disabling, underdiagnosed, and undertreated disorder associated with significant disability, poor health-related quality of life, and high economic burden. The keys to caring for chronic migraine patients include: (1) making a proper diagnosis; (2) identifying and eliminating exacerbating factors; (3) assessing for medication overuse (patients with chronic headache often overuse acute medications); and (4) continued management. Communication between patient and physician about treatment goals is important. The patient management guidelines presented in this article should help physicians improve treatment success and proactively address common comorbidities among their patients with chronic migraine.

  19. Care of the patient after renal allograft failure: managing the present and planning for the future.

    PubMed

    Fuquay, Richard; Teitelbaum, Isaac

    2012-01-01

    The number of patients with end-stage renal disease undergoing kidney transplantation - both cadaveric and living-donor - continues to rise. With long-term graft survival relatively fixed, this trend means that increasing numbers of patients are returning to dialysis after graft loss. Most will never be retransplanted, which introduces a host of clinical questions regarding optimal management of this unique patient population. In this paper, we explore data that informs astute care of the patient requiring dialysis after graft loss. We address new data about the increased clinical risk and the optimal dialysis modality in renal allograft loss, explore new approaches to immunosuppression and transfusion management, and examine the risks and benefits of allograft nephrectomy and timing thereof. While there are no randomized clinical trials in this field, rapidly evolving data will aid the clinician whose practice includes patients who have been transplanted and are returning to dialysis. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. The Bipartisan Patient Protection Act: greater liability on managed care plans.

    PubMed

    Mayers, Urura W

    2003-01-01

    Mrs. Mayers' article notes the substantial differences that exist between the Senate and the House of Representatives' version of the Bipartisan Patient Protection Act of 2001. While observing the remedies made available to participants, beneficiaries, or enrollees under both bills, she shows that the Senate bill places greater liability on managed care plans because it favors consumer protection, while the House of Representatives' bill does not. In order to develop an understanding of why an act of this nature is needed, Mrs. Mayers provides a brief historical overview of how managed care entities developed. She also examines the Employee Retirement Income Security Act ("ERISA") and proposes amendments to them. She concludes her article by raising an even deeper concern, and that is: what happens to individuals without access to health care coverage.

  1. Nursing involvement in risk and patient safety management in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Coronado-Vázquez, Valle; García-López, Ana; López-Sauras, Susana; Turón Alcaine, José María

    Patient safety and quality of care in a highly complex healthcare system depends not only on the actions of professionals at an individual level, but also on interaction with the environment. Proactive risk management in the system to prevent incidents and activities targeting healthcare teams is crucial in establishing a culture of safety in centres. Nurses commonly lead these safety strategies. Even though safety incidents are relatively infrequent in primary care, since the majority are preventable, actions at this level of care are highly effective. Certification of services according to ISO standard 9001:2008 focuses on risk management in the system and its use in certifying healthcare centres is helping to build a safety culture amongst professionals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. BRIEF REPORT: Patient Cognitive Status and the Identification and Management of Depression by Primary Care Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Monica K; Bogner, Hillary R; Rabins, Peter V; Gallo, Joseph J

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES No known study has examined the role of patients' cognitive impairment in the identification and management of depression by primary care physicians. DESIGN A cross-sectional survey conducted between 2001 and 2003. PARTICIPANTS A sample of 330 adults aged 65 and older from Maryland primary care practices with complete information on cognitive and psychological status, and physician assessments. MEASUREMENTS Primary care physicians were asked to rate cognition and depression on a Likert scale, as well as report management of depression within 6 months of the index visit. Patient interviews included standardized measures of psychological and cognitive status. RESULTS Older adults identified as depressed by their physician were more likely to be identified as cognitively impaired (unadjusted odds ratio [OR]=3.71, [95% confidence interval] [CI] [1.93, 7.16]). Older adults identified as cognitively impaired had a tendency to be managed for depression (unadjusted OR=2.62, 95% CI [0.96, 7.19]). In adjusted multivariate models, these associations remained unchanged. CONCLUSIONS When physicians identified a patient as cognitively impaired, they were more likely to identify the patient as depressed and to report treatment of the depression. An understanding of how physicians think about depression in the context of cognitive impairment is important for designing depression interventions for older adults. PMID:16836621

  3. Distance from practice moderates the relationship between patient management involving nurse telephone triage consulting and patient satisfaction with care.

    PubMed

    Calitri, Raff; Warren, Fiona C; Wheeler, Benedict; Chaplin, Katherine; Fletcher, Emily; Murdoch, Jamie; Richards, Suzanne; Taylor, Rod S; Varley, Anna; Campbell, John

    2015-07-01

    The ESTEEM trial was a randomised-controlled trial of telephone triage consultations in general practice. We conducted exploratory analyses on data from 9154 patients from 42 UK general practices who returned a questionnaire containing self-reported ratings of satisfaction with care following a request for a same-day consultation. Mode of care was identified through case notes review. There were seven main types: a GP face-to-face consultation, GP or nurse telephone triage consultation with no subsequent same day care, or a GP or nurse telephone triage consultation with a subsequent face-to-face consultation with a GP or a nurse. We investigated the contribution of mode of care to patient satisfaction and distance between the patient׳s home and the practice as a potential moderating factor. There was no overall association between patient satisfaction and distance from practice. However, patients managed by a nurse telephone consultation showed lowest levels of satisfaction, and satisfaction for this group of patients increased the further they lived from the practice. There was no association between any of the other modes of management and distance from practice. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Impact of a telehealth and care management program for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Au, David H; Macaulay, Dendy S; Jarvis, John L; Desai, Urvi S; Birnbaum, Howard G

    2015-03-01

    Improving outcomes and health resource use for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) care is a priority for health systems. The Health Buddy Program, a content-driven telehealth system coupled with care management, is designed to enhance patient education, self-management, and timely access to care. To examine the effects of the Health Buddy Program on resource use among Medicare patients with COPD who participated in a Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services demonstration project from 2006 to 2010. Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries with COPD who enrolled in the intervention at two participating clinics were propensity-score matched to similar patients with COPD identified from a 5% random sample of Medicare patients. Difference-in-difference analyses descriptively compared the program's effect on quarterly healthcare resource use over the 3-year study period compared with baseline. Negative binomial models estimated the association of the program with healthcare resource outcomes adjusting for significant (P<0.05) baseline differences post matching. The effect of the Health Buddy Program on quarterly all-cause and respiratory-related hospital admissions, hospital admissions for COPD exacerbations, and all-cause emergency department use was assessed after matching. Intervention (n=619) and matched control subjects (n=619) had similar baseline characteristics after matching. The Health Buddy Program was associated with 23% lower quarterly all-cause hospital admissions and 40% lower quarterly respiratory-related hospital admissions compared with baseline for intervention beneficiaries versus control subjects. In subgroup analyses, patients who engaged in the intervention during the study period (n=247) demonstrated significantly lower quarterly hospital admissions for COPD exacerbations. The Health Buddy Program was not associated with reductions in quarterly emergency department use. Results were robust in analyses that adjusted for

  5. Inpatient cost for hip fracture patients managed with an orthogeriatric care model in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Lester Teong Jin; Wong, Seng Joung; Kwek, Ernest Beng Kee

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The estimated incidence of hip fractures worldwide was 1.26 million in 1990 and is expected to double to 2.6 million by 2025. The cost of care for hip fracture patients is a significant economic burden. This study aimed to look at the inpatient cost of hip fractures among elderly patients placed under a mature orthogeriatric co-managed system. METHODS This study was a retrospective analysis of 244 patients who were admitted to the Department of Orthopaedics of Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore, in 2011 for hip fractures under a mature orthogeriatric hip fracture care path. Information regarding costs, surgical procedures performed and patient demographics was collected. RESULTS The mean cost of hospitalisation was SGD 13,313.81. The mean cost was significantly higher for the patients who were managed surgically than for the patients who were managed non-surgically (SGD 14,815.70 vs. SGD 9,011.38; p < 0.01). Regardless of whether surgery was performed, the presence of complications resulted in a higher average cost (SGD 2,689.99 more than if there were no complications; p = 0.011). Every additional day from admission to time of surgery resulted in an increased cost of SGD 575.89, and the difference between the average cost of surgery within 48 hours and that of surgery > 48 hours was SGD 2,716.63. CONCLUSION Reducing the time to surgery and preventing pre- and postoperative complications can help reduce overall costs. A standardised care path that empowers allied health professionals can help to reduce perioperative complications, and a combined orthogeriatric care service can facilitate prompt surgical treatment. PMID:27056208

  6. Patient, Provider, and Combined Interventions for Managing Osteoarthritis in Primary Care: A Cluster Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Allen, Kelli D; Oddone, Eugene Z; Coffman, Cynthia J; Jeffreys, Amy S; Bosworth, Hayden B; Chatterjee, Ranee; McDuffie, Jennifer; Strauss, Jennifer L; Yancy, William S; Datta, Santanu K; Corsino, Leonor; Dolor, Rowena J

    2017-03-21

    A single-site study showed that a combined patient and provider intervention improved outcomes for patients with knee osteoarthritis, but it did not assess separate effects of the interventions. To examine whether patient-based, provider-based, and patient-provider interventions improve osteoarthritis outcomes. Cluster randomized trial with assignment to patient, provider, and patient-provider interventions or usual care. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01435109). 10 Duke University Health System community-based primary care clinics. 537 outpatients with symptomatic hip or knee osteoarthritis. The telephone-based patient intervention focused on weight management, physical activity, and cognitive behavioral pain management. The provider intervention involved electronic delivery of patient-specific osteoarthritis treatment recommendations to providers. The primary outcome was the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) total score at 12 months. Secondary outcomes were objective physical function (Short Physical Performance Battery) and depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire). Linear mixed models assessed the difference in improvement among groups. No difference was observed in WOMAC score changes from baseline to 12 months in the patient (-1.5 [95% CI, -5.1 to 2.0]; P = 0.40), provider (2.5 [CI, -0.9 to 5.9]; P = 0.152), or patient-provider (-0.7 [CI, -4.2 to 2.8]; P = 0.69) intervention groups compared with usual care. All groups had improvements in WOMAC scores at 12 months (range, -3.7 to -7.7). In addition, no differences were seen in objective physical function or depressive symptoms at 12 months in any of the intervention groups compared with usual care. The study involved 1 health care network. Data on provider referrals were not collected. Contrary to a previous study of a combined patient and provider intervention for osteoarthritis in a Department of Veterans Affairs medical center, this study found no statistically

  7. Management of severe sepsis in patients admitted to Asian intensive care units: prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Phua, Jason; Du, Bin; Tang, Yao-Qing; Divatia, Jigeeshu V; Tan, Cheng Cheng; Gomersall, Charles D; Faruq, Mohammad Omar; Shrestha, Babu Raja; Gia Binh, Nguyen; Arabi, Yaseen M; Salahuddin, Nawal; Wahyuprajitno, Bambang; Tu, Mei-Lien; Wahab, Ahmad Yazid Haji Abd; Hameed, Akmal A; Nishimura, Masaji; Procyshyn, Mark; Chan, Yiong Huak

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To assess the compliance of Asian intensive care units and hospitals to the Surviving Sepsis Campaign’s resuscitation and management bundles. Secondary objectives were to evaluate the impact of compliance on mortality and the organisational characteristics of hospitals that were associated with higher compliance. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting 150 intensive care units in 16 Asian countries. Participants 1285 adult patients with severe sepsis admitted to these intensive care units in July 2009. The organisational characteristics of participating centres, the patients’ baseline characteristics, the achievement of targets within the resuscitation and management bundles, and outcome data were recorded. Main outcome measure Compliance with the Surviving Sepsis Campaign’s resuscitation (six hours) and management (24 hours) bundles. Results Hospital mortality was 44.5% (572/1285). Compliance rates for the resuscitation and management bundles were 7.6% (98/1285) and 3.5% (45/1285), respectively. On logistic regression analysis, compliance with the following bundle targets independently predicted decreased mortality: blood cultures (achieved in 803/1285; 62.5%, 95% confidence interval 59.8% to 65.1%), broad spectrum antibiotics (achieved in 821/1285; 63.9%, 61.3% to 66.5%), and central venous pressure (achieved in 345/870; 39.7%, 36.4% to 42.9%). High income countries, university hospitals, intensive care units with an accredited fellowship programme, and surgical intensive care units were more likely to be compliant with the resuscitation bundle. Conclusions While mortality from severe sepsis is high, compliance with resuscitation and management bundles is generally poor in much of Asia. As the centres included in this study might not be fully representative, achievement rates reported might overestimate the true degree of compliance with recommended care and should be interpreted with caution. Achievement of targets for blood cultures

  8. Use of DHCP to provide essential information for care and management of HIV patients.

    PubMed Central

    Pfeil, C. N.; Ivey, J. L.; Hoffman, J. D.; Kuhn, I. M.

    1991-01-01

    The Department of Veterans' Affairs (VA) has reported over 10,000 Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) cases since the beginning of the epidemic. These cases were distributed throughout 152 of the VA's network of 172 medical centers and outpatient clinics. This network of health care facilities presents a unique opportunity to provide computer based information systems for clinical care and resource monitoring for these patients. The VA further facilitates such a venture through its commitment to the Decentralized Hospital Computer Program (DHCP). This paper describes a new application within DHCP known as the VA's HIV Registry. This project addresses the need to support clinical information as well as the added need to manage the resources necessary to care for HIV patients. PMID:1807575

  9. Facilitators and barriers in pain management for trauma patients in the chain of emergency care.

    PubMed

    Berben, Sivera A A; Meijs, Tineke H J M; van Grunsven, Pierre M; Schoonhoven, Lisette; van Achterberg, Theo

    2012-09-01

    The aim of the study is to give insight into facilitators and barriers in pain management in trauma patients in the chain of emergency care in the Netherlands. A qualitative approach was adopted with the use of the implementation Model of Change of Clinical Practice. The chain of emergency care concerned prehospital Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and Emergency Departments (EDs). We included two EMS ambulance services and three EDs and conducted five focus groups and 10 individual interviews. Stakeholders and managers of organisations were interviewed individually. Focus group participants were selected based on availability and general characteristics. Transcripts of the audio recordings and field notes were analysed in consecutive steps, based on thematic content analysis. Each step was independently performed by the researchers, and was discussed afterwards. We analysed differences and similarities supported by software for qualitative analysis MaxQDA. This study identified five concepts as facilitators and barriers in pain management for trauma patients in the chain of emergency care. We described the concepts of knowledge, attitude, professional communication, organisational aspects and patient input, illustrated with quotes from the interviews and focus group sessions. Furthermore, we identified whether the themes occurred in the chain of care. Knowledge deficits, attitude problems and patient input were similar for the EMS and ED settings, despite the different positions, backgrounds and educational levels of respondents. In the chain of care a lack of professional communication and organisational feedback occurred as new themes, and were specifically related to the organisational structure of the prehospital EMS and EDs. Identified organisational aspects stressed the importance of organisational embedding of improvement of pain management. However, change of clinical practice requires a comprehensive approach focused at all five concepts. We think a shift

  10. Effects of renal care coordinator case management on outcomes in incident dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Maddux, Dugan W; Usvyat, Len A; DeFalco, Daniel; Kotanko, Peter; Kooman, Jeroen P; van der Sande, Frank M; Maddux, Franklin W

    2016-03-01

    Pre-dialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD) care impacts dialysis start and incident dialysis outcomes. We describe the use of late stage CKD population data coupled with CKD case management to improve dialysis start. The Renal Care Coordinator (RCC) program is a nephrology practice and Fresenius Medical Care North America (FMCNA) partnership involving a case manager resource and data analytics. We studied patients starting dialysis between August 1, 2009 and February 28, 2013 in 9 nephrology practices partnering in the RCC program. Propensity score matching (PSM) was used to match patients who had participated in the RCC program to patients who had not. Primary outcomes were use of a permanent access or peritoneal dialysis (PD) at first outpatient dialysis. Serum albumin at the first outpatient dialysis treatment and mortality and hospitalization rates in the first 120 days of dialysis were secondary outcomes. In the nephrology practices studied, 7,626 patients started dialysis. Of these, 738 patients (9.7%) were enrolled in the RCC program; 693 RCC patients (93.9%) were matched with 693 patients who did not participate in the RCC program. Logistic regression analysis indicates that RCC program patients are more likely to start PD or use a permanent vascular access at dialysis start and are more likely to start treatment with a serum albumin level ≥ 4.0 g/ dL. Late stage CKD data-driven case management is associated with a higher rate of PD use, lower central venous catheter (CVC) use, and higher albumin levels at first outpatient dialysis.

  11. Knowledge and attitudes of primary care nurses about the management of patients with insomnia.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Thomàs, María Clara; Yañez-Amoros, Beatriz; Torrens, Isabel; Torres-Solera, Elena; Esteva, Magdalena

    To describe the knowledge, attitudes, and performance of primary care nurses in the management of patients with insomnia. Descriptive study. An online questionnaire was sent to all primary care nurses of the Majorca Primary Care Department between June-July 2014. sociodemographic variables, professional characteristics, tuition, usual clinical practice in the management of patients with insomnia. 138 nurses answered the questionnaire (47%). Most of them were women (92.8%), 50.42 years old (DE=8.9). The majority considered insomnia an important health problem. Only 11% had received some formative activity on insomnia in the last 5 years. Nearly half declares to ask patients about consequences of insomnia in their jobs and about habits that alter their sleep quality. 79.7% considered the possible adverse effects of insomnia drugs and take into consideration the age of patient (80.4%). The usual treatments were sleep hygiene (76%), phytotherapy (44.9%) and 22.4% cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). This therapy is considered effective and applicable by nurses (63.7%) and doctors (58%). Those nurses who attended courses in the last 5 years apply CBT more frequently. Nurses conduct a correct anamnesis and evaluation of patients with insomnia. However some therapies of known effectiveness, such as CBT, are still scarcely applied. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. The management of pain associated with wound care in severe burn patients in Spain.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Antonio; Santoyo, Fernando L; Agulló, Alberto; Fenández-Cañamaque, José L; Vivó, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    To describe the management of pain prevention associated with burn care. Multi-centre, observational, cross-sectional, descriptive study performed in 4 burn units in Spain. A total of 55 patients undergoing 64 procedures were analysed. Burns were classified as severe (90.4%), third-degree (78.2%) and caused by thermal agents (81.8%). Background analgesia consisted of non-opioid drugs (87.5%) and opioids (54.7%) [morphine (20.3%), morphine and fentanyl (14.1%) or fentanyl monotherapy (15.6%)]. Burn care was performed by experienced nurses (96.9%); 36.5% followed guidelines. The mean duration of procedures was 44 minutes (Statistical Deviation, SD: 20.2) and the mean duration of pain was 27 minutes (SD: 44.6). Procedural pain was primarily managed with opioid analgesics: fentanyl monotherapy and in combination (84%) and fentanyl monotherapy (48%) administered sublingually (89.1%). Patients described pain as different to usual baseline pain (97%), with a mean maximum intensity score of 4.2 points (SD: 3.3) on the VAS scale and a 34% increase in the intensity of pain. The mean patient and healthcare professional satisfaction score per procedure was 6/10 (SD: 1.9) and 5.5/10 (SD: 1.7), respectively. The results of the study describe the management of pain associated with burn care in clinical practice, helping optimise pain control.

  13. The management of pain associated with wound care in severe burn patients in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Antonio; Santoyo, Fernando L; Agulló, Alberto; Fenández-Cañamaque, José L; Vivó, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To describe the management of pain prevention associated with burn care. Methods: Multi-centre, observational, cross-sectional, descriptive study performed in 4 burn units in Spain. Results: A total of 55 patients undergoing 64 procedures were analysed. Burns were classified as severe (90.4%), third-degree (78.2%) and caused by thermal agents (81.8%). Background analgesia consisted of non-opioid drugs (87.5%) and opioids (54.7%) [morphine (20.3%), morphine and fentanyl (14.1%) or fentanyl monotherapy (15.6%)]. Burn care was performed by experienced nurses (96.9%); 36.5% followed guidelines. The mean duration of procedures was 44 minutes (Statistical Deviation, SD: 20.2) and the mean duration of pain was 27 minutes (SD: 44.6). Procedural pain was primarily managed with opioid analgesics: fentanyl monotherapy and in combination (84%) and fentanyl monotherapy (48%) administered sublingually (89.1%). Patients described pain as different to usual baseline pain (97%), with a mean maximum intensity score of 4.2 points (SD: 3.3) on the VAS scale and a 34% increase in the intensity of pain. The mean patient and healthcare professional satisfaction score per procedure was 6/10 (SD: 1.9) and 5.5/10 (SD: 1.7), respectively. Conclusion: The results of the study describe the management of pain associated with burn care in clinical practice, helping optimise pain control. PMID:27069760

  14. The Economic Impact of Intensive Care Management for High-Cost Medically Complex Patients: An Evaluation of New Mexico's Care One Program.

    PubMed

    Horn, Brady P; Crandall, Cameron; Moffett, Maurice; Hensley, Michael; Howarth, Sam; Binder, Douglas S; Sklar, David

    2016-12-01

    High-cost, medically complex patients have been a challenging population to manage in the US health care system, in terms of both improving health outcomes and containing costs. This paper evaluated the economic impact of Care One, an intensive care management program (data analysis, evaluation, empanelment, specialist disease management, nurse case management, and social support) designed to target the most expensive 1% of patients in a university health care system. Data were collected for a cohort of high-cost, medically complex patients (N = 753) who received care management and a control group (N = 794) of similarly complex health system users who did not receive access to the program. A pre-post empirical model estimated the Care One program to be associated with a per-patient reduction in billed charges of $92,227 (95% confidence interval [CI]: $83,988 to $100,466). A difference-in-difference model, which utilized the control group, estimated a per-patient reduction in billing charges of $44,504 (95% CI: $29,195 to $59,813). Results suggest that care management for high-cost, medically complex patients in primary care can reduce costs compared to a control group. In addition, significant reversion to the mean is found, providing support for the use of a difference-in-difference estimator when evaluating health programs for high-cost, medically complex patients.

  15. A complex case management system provides optimal care for all patients.

    PubMed

    Venter, Jan A; Hannan, Stephen J

    2009-07-01

    To describe the complex case management system developed by Optical Express, a large corporate provider of laser vision correction, and to detail the benefits this system offers for managing the surgical complications of laser vision correction. The classification scheme Optical Express uses to categorize surgical complications is described, and the various pathways patients can take through the complex case system are detailed. This process is illustrated with a case study describing the treatment of a patient with postoperative LASIK ectasia. The benefits of the complex case system are also discussed. A total of 1363 eyes were treated in the complex case management system during the 5-year period between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2008. These 1363 eyes represent a small fraction (0.45%) of the approximately 300,000 eyes treated during this period. The Optical Express complex case management system organizes complications based on severity and urgency. Grade A complications (40 eyes, 2.9% of all complications) are the most serious and urgent, followed by grade B (327 eyes, 24.0%), and grade C (996 eyes, 73.1%). For each complication, the patient's journey through the complex case system starts with an evaluation by an optometrist. Depending on the severity of the complication, the patient may then be referred to the treating surgeon, a regional complex case surgeon, or an external consultant. A complex case manager coordinates care and logistics throughout this process. The complex case management system used by Optical Express provides clinical care and support for patients who experience a surgical complication.

  16. How do informal self-care strategies evolve among patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease managed in primary care? A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Apps, Lindsay D; Harrison, Samantha L; Williams, Johanna E A; Hudson, Nicky; Steiner, Michael; Morgan, Mike D; Singh, Sally J

    2014-01-01

    There is much description in the literature of how patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) manage their breathlessness and engage in self-care activities; however, little of this is from the perspective of those with less severe disease, who are primarily managed in primary care. This study aimed to understand the self-care experiences of patients with COPD who are primarily managed in primary care, and to examine the challenges of engaging in such behaviors. Semistructured interviews were carried out with 15 patients with COPD as part of a larger project evaluating a self-management intervention. Thematic analysis was supported by NVivo software (version 8, QSR International, Melbourne, Australia). Three main themes are described, ie, experiencing and understanding symptoms of COPD, current self-care activities, and the importance of family perceptions in managing COPD. Self-care activities evolved spontaneously as participants experienced symptoms of COPD. However, there was a lack of awareness about whether these strategies would impact upon symptoms. Perceptions of COPD by family members posed a challenge to self-care for some participants. Health care professionals should elicit patients' prior disease experiences and utilize spontaneous attempts at disease management in future self-management. These findings have implications for promoting self-management and enhancing quality of life.

  17. Primary care practice-based care management for chronically ill patients (PraCMan): study protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial [ISRCTN56104508].

    PubMed

    Freund, Tobias; Peters-Klimm, Frank; Rochon, Justine; Mahler, Cornelia; Gensichen, Jochen; Erler, Antje; Beyer, Martin; Baldauf, Annika; Gerlach, Ferdinand M; Szecsenyi, Joachim

    2011-06-29

    Care management programmes are an effective approach to care for high risk patients with complex care needs resulting from multiple co-occurring medical and non-medical conditions. These patients are likely to be hospitalized for a potentially "avoidable" cause. Nurse-led care management programmes for high risk elderly patients showed promising results. Care management programmes based on health care assistants (HCAs) targeting adult patients with a high risk of hospitalisation may be an innovative approach to deliver cost-efficient intensified care to patients most in need. PraCMan is a cluster randomized controlled trial with primary care practices as unit of randomisation. The study evaluates a complex primary care practice-based care management of patients at high risk for future hospitalizations. Eligible patients either suffer from type 2 diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, chronic heart failure or any combination. Patients with a high likelihood of hospitalization within the following 12 months (based on insurance data) will be included in the trial. During 12 months of intervention patients of the care management group receive comprehensive assessment of medical and non-medical needs and resources as well as regular structured monitoring of symptoms. Assessment and monitoring will be performed by trained HCAs from the participating practices. Additionally, patients will receive written information, symptom diaries, action plans and a medication plan to improve self-management capabilities. This intervention is addition to usual care. Patients from the control group receive usual care. Primary outcome is the number of all-cause hospitalizations at 12 months follow-up, assessed by insurance claims data. Secondary outcomes are health-related quality of life (SF12, EQ5D), quality of chronic illness care (PACIC), health care utilisation and costs, medication adherence (MARS), depression status and severity (PHQ-9), self-management

  18. An examination of the relationship between care management with coaching for activation and patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Reistroffer, Cindy; Hearld, Larry R; Szychowski, Jeff M

    2017-02-01

    A growing body of research has established the benefits of patient activation, which is defined as the knowledge, skills, confidence, and motivation to make effective decisions and take action to maintain or improve one's health. Consequently, healthcare stakeholders of all types continue to seek ways to improve patient activation. The purpose of this study was to empirically examine whether enrollment in a health plan-sponsored care management (CM) program that included coaching for activation (CFA) was associated with utilization, medication adherence, and clinical outcomes. Cross-sectional, quantitative study of commercially insured enrollees in a Midwest-based health plan. Poisson, logistic, and ordinary least squares regression models were used to test the relationships between CM programs and outcomes. The benefit of measuring patient activation and offering CFA was associated with reduced healthcare utilization and better clinical outcomes. Relative to respondents in the CFA CM group (ie, intervention), respondents in the usual CM group experienced 18.29% more emergency department visits, 97.78% more hospital admissions, a higher glycated hemoglobin level (β = 0.48; P <.001), and higher systolic blood pressure (β = 1.19; P <.01). These findings suggest that coaching interventions based on activation level may help care managers engage in more effective interactions that strengthen a patient's role in managing his or her healthcare. Programs that are more targeted in their application, rather than uniformly developed and implemented, may be an important factor in reducing utilization and improving clinical outcomes.

  19. Caries management by risk assessment care paths for prosthodontic patients: oral microbial control and management.

    PubMed

    Yanase, Roy T; Le, Hamilton H

    2014-01-01

    The development of an oral care path focuses on the identification of the early indicators of disease. Once the risks have been identified and diagnosed, the proper therapies can be selected and prescribed. The experienced practitioner must meld clinical experience and observation with evidence-based scientific dentistry and information on the treatment and prevention of continued disease for the prosthodontic patient after restorations have been completed. The incorporation of dental implants has not allowed for complications of caries and periodontal disease on teeth and implants. Osseoseparation is necessary for justification of continued maintenance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Patient's experience with comorbidity management in primary care: a qualitative study of comorbid pain and obesity.

    PubMed

    Janke, E Amy; Ramirez, Michelle L; Haltzman, Brittany; Fritz, Megan; Kozak, Andrea T

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to examine perceptions of those with comorbid chronic pain and obesity regarding their experience of comorbidity management in primary care settings. Chronic pain and obesity are common comorbidities frequently managed in primary care settings. Evidence suggests individuals with this comorbidity may be at risk for suboptimal clinical interactions; however, treatment experiences and preferences of those with comorbid chronic pain and obesity have received little attention. Semi-structured interviews conducted with 30 primary care patients with mean body mass index=36.8 and comorbid persistent pain. The constant comparative method was used to analyze data. Participants discussed frustration with a perceived lack of information tailored to their needs and a desire for a personalized treatment experience. Participants found available medical approaches unsatisfying and sought a more holistic approach to management. Discussions also focused around the need for providers to initiate efforts at education and motivation enhancement and to show concern for and understanding of the unique difficulties associated with comorbidity. Findings suggest providers should engage in integrated communication regarding weight and pain, targeting this multimorbidity using methods aligned with priorities discussed by patients.

  1. Managed care organizations and products.

    PubMed

    Behnke, L M

    1997-12-01

    Managed care organizations and their products will continue to change in response to consumer demands, competitive pressures, and regulatory requirements. Providers who gain an understanding of the world managed care organizations live in can also expect to influence these organizations for mutual benefit. Just as managed care organizations differ in the sophistication of their functional elements, providers and their organizations differ in their ability to shift their focus from the physician-patient relationship to improving the health of a population. As the future of managed care evolves, there are opportunities for those physicians who strive for a greater understanding of the broad spectrum of forces shaping the health care industry.

  2. Patient-centered care in chronic disease management: a thematic analysis of the literature in family medicine.

    PubMed

    Hudon, Catherine; Fortin, Martin; Haggerty, Jeannie; Loignon, Christine; Lambert, Mireille; Poitras, Marie-Eve

    2012-08-01

    The objective was to provide a synthesis of the results of the research and discourse lines on main dimensions of patient-centered care in the context of chronic disease management in family medicine, building on Stewart et al.'s model. We developed search strategies for the Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases, from 1980 to April 2009. All articles addressing patient-centered care in the context of chronic disease management in family medicine were included. A thematic analysis was performed using mixed codification, based on Stewart's model of patient-centered care. Thirty-two articles were included. Six major themes emerged: (1) starting from the patient's situation; (2) legitimizing the illness experience; (3) acknowledging the patient's expertise; (4) offering realistic hope; (5) developing an ongoing partnership; (6) providing advocacy for the patient in the health care system. The context of chronic disease management brings forward new dimensions of patient-centered care such as legitimizing the illness experience, acknowledging patient expertise, offering hope and providing advocacy. Chronic disease management calls for the adaptation of the family physician's role to patients' fluctuating needs. Literature also suggests the involvement of the family physician in care transitions as a component of patient-centered care. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The relationship between intraoperative teamwork and management skills in patient care.

    PubMed

    Phitayakorn, Roy; Minehart, Rebecca D; Hemingway, Maureen W; Pian-Smith, May C M; Petrusa, Emil

    2015-11-01

    Optimal team performance in the operating room (OR) requires a combination of interactions among OR professionals and adherence to clinical guidelines. Theoretically, it is possible that OR teams could communicate very well but fail to follow acceptable standards of patient care and vice versa. OR simulations offer an ideal research environment to study this relationship. The goal of this study was to determine the relationship between ratings of OR teamwork and communication with adherence to patient care guidelines in a simulated scenarios of malignant hyperthermia (MH). An interprofessional research team (2 anesthesiologists, 1 surgeon, an OR nurse, and a social scientist) reviewed videos of 5 intraoperative teams managing a simulated patient who manifested MH while undergoing general anesthesia for an epigastric herniorraphy in a high-fidelity, in situ OR. Participant teams consisted of 2 residents from anesthesiology, 1 from surgery, 1 OR nurse, and 1 certified surgical technician. Teamwork and communication were assessed with 4 published tools: Anesthesiologists' Non-Technical Skills (ANTS), Scrub Practitioners List of Intra-operative Non-Technical Skills (SPLINTS), Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons (NOTSS), and Objective Teamwork Assessment System (OTAS). We developed an evidence-based MH checklist to assess overall patient care. Interrater agreement for teamwork tools was moderate. Average rater agreement was 0.51 For ANTS, 0.67 for SPLINTS, 0.51 for NOTSS, and 0.70 for OTAS. Observer agreement for the MH checklist was high (0.88). Correlations between teamwork and MH checklist were not significant. Teams were different in percent of the MH actions taken (range, 50-91%; P = .006). In this pilot study, intraoperative teamwork and communication were not related to overall patient care management. Separating nontechnical and technical skills when teaching OR teamwork is artificial and may even be damaging, because such an approach could produce teams with

  4. Involvement of a Case Manager in Palliative Care Reduces Hospitalisations at the End of Life in Cancer Patients; A Mortality Follow-Back Study in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    van der Plas, Annicka G M; Vissers, Kris C; Francke, Anneke L; Donker, Gé A; Jansen, Wim J J; Deliens, Luc; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D

    2015-01-01

    Case managers have been introduced in primary palliative care in the Netherlands; these are nurses with expertise in palliative care who offer support to patients and informal carers in addition to the care provided by the general practitioner (GP) and home-care nurse. To compare cancer patients with and without additional support from a case manager on: 1) the patients' general characteristics, 2) characteristics of care and support given by the GP, 3) palliative care outcomes. This article is based on questionnaire data provided by GPs participating in two different studies: the Sentimelc study (280 cancer patients) and the Capalca study (167 cancer patients). The Sentimelc study is a mortality follow-back study amongst a representative sample of GPs that monitors the care provided via GPs to a general population of end-of-life patients. Data from 2011 and 2012 were analysed. The Capalca study is a prospective study investigating the implementation and outcome of the support provided by case managers in primary palliative care. Data were gathered between March 2011 and December 2013. The GP is more likely to know the preferred place of death (OR 7.06; CI 3.47-14.36), the place of death is more likely to be at the home (OR 2.16; CI 1.33-3.51) and less likely to be the hospital (OR 0.26; CI 0.13-0.52), and there are fewer hospitalisations in the last 30 days of life (none: OR 1.99; CI 1.12-3.56 and one: OR 0.54; CI 0.30-0.96), when cancer patients receive additional support from a case manager compared with patients receiving the standard GP care. Involvement of a case manager has added value in addition to palliative care provided by the GP, even though the role of the case manager is 'only' advisory and he or she does not provide hands-on care or prescribe medication.

  5. [Decompensated right heart failure, intensive care and perioperative management in patients with pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Olsson, K M; Halank, M; Egenlauf, B; Fistera, D; Gall, H; Kaehler, C; Kortmann, K; Kramm, T; Lichtblau, M; Marra, A; Nagel, C; Sablotzki, A; Seyfarth, H-J; Schranz, D; Ulrich, S; Hoeper, M M; Lange, T J

    2016-10-01

    The 2015 European Guidelines on Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension are also valid for Germany. The guidelines contain detailed recommendations for the targeted treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). However, the practical implementation of the European Guidelines in Germany requires the consideration of several country-specific issues and already existing novel data. This requires a detailed commentary to the guidelines, and in some aspects an update already appears necessary. In June 2016, a Consensus Conference organized by the PH working groups of the German Society of Cardiology (DGK), the German Society of Respiratory Medicine (DGP) and the German Society of Pediatric Cardiology (DGPK) was held in Cologne, Germany. This conference aimed to solve practical and controversial issues surrounding the implementation of the European Guidelines in Germany. To this end, a number of working groups was initiated, one of which was specifically dedicated to the management of decompensated right heart failure, intensive care management and perioperative management in patients with pulmonary hypertension. This article summarizes the results and recommendations of the working group on decompensated right heart failure, intensive care and perioperative management in patients with pulmonary hypertension. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Impact of electronic order management on the timeliness of antibiotic administration in critical care patients.

    PubMed

    Cartmill, Randi S; Walker, James M; Blosky, Mary Ann; Brown, Roger L; Djurkovic, Svetolik; Dunham, Deborah B; Gardill, Debra; Haupt, Marilyn T; Parry, Dean; Wetterneck, Tosha B; Wood, Kenneth E; Carayon, Pascale

    2012-11-01

    To examine the effect of implementing electronic order management on the timely administration of antibiotics to critical-care patients. We used a prospective pre-post design, collecting data on first-dose IV antibiotic orders before and after the implementation of an integrated electronic medication-management system, which included computerized provider order entry (CPOE), pharmacy order processing and an electronic medication administration record (eMAR). The research was performed in a 24-bed adult medical/surgical ICU in a large, rural, tertiary medical center. Data on the time of ordering, pharmacy processing and administration were prospectively collected and time intervals for each stage and the overall process were calculated. The overall turnaround time from ordering to administration significantly decreased from a median of 100 min before order management implementation to a median of 64 min after implementation. The first part of the medication use process, i.e., from order entry to pharmacy processing, improved significantly whereas no change was observed in the phase from pharmacy processing to medication administration. The implementation of an electronic order-management system improved the timeliness of antibiotic administration to critical-care patients. Additional system changes are required to further decrease the turnaround time. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Using health information technology to manage a patient population in accountable care organizations.

    PubMed

    Wu, Frances M; Rundall, Thomas G; Shortell, Stephen M; Bloom, Joan R

    2016-06-20

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to describe the current landscape of health information technology (HIT) in early accountable care organizations (ACOs), the different strategies ACOs are using to develop HIT-based capabilities, and how ACOs are using these capabilities within their care management processes to advance health outcomes for their patient population. Design/methodology/approach - Mixed methods study pairing data from a cross-sectional National Survey of ACOs with in-depth, semi-structured interviews with leaders from 11 ACOs (both completed in 2013). Findings - Early ACOs vary widely in their electronic health record, data integration, and analytic capabilities. The most common HIT capability was drug-drug and drug-allergy interaction checks, with 53.2 percent of respondents reporting that the ACO possessed the capability to a high degree. Outpatient and inpatient data integration was the least common HIT capability (8.1 percent). In the interviews, ACO leaders commented on different HIT development strategies to gain a more comprehensive picture of patient needs and service utilization. ACOs realize the necessity for robust data analytics, and are exploring a variety of approaches to achieve it. Research limitations/implications - Data are self-reported. The qualitative portion was based on interviews with 11 ACOs, limiting generalizability to the universe of ACOs but allowing for a range of responses. Practical implications - ACOs are challenged with the development of sophisticated HIT infrastructure. They may benefit from targeted assistance and incentives to implement health information exchanges with other providers to promote more coordinated care management for their patient population. Originality/value - Using new empirical data, this study increases understanding of the extent of ACOs' current and developing HIT capabilities to support ongoing care management.

  8. Managing patients with multimorbidity: systematic review of interventions in primary care and community settings

    PubMed Central

    Soubhi, Hassan; Fortin, Martin; Hudon, Catherine; O’Dowd, Tom

    2012-01-01

    a change to the organisation of care delivery, usually through case management or enhanced multidisciplinary team work. In the remaining four studies, intervention components were predominantly patient oriented. Overall the results were mixed, with a trend towards improved prescribing and drug adherence. The results indicated that it is difficult to improve outcomes in this population but that interventions focusing on particular risk factors in comorbid conditions or functional difficulties in multimorbidity may be more effective. No economic analyses were included, although the improvements in prescribing and risk factor management in some studies could provide potentially important cost savings. Conclusions Evidence on the care of patients with multimorbidity is limited, despite the prevalence of multimorbidity and its impact on patients and healthcare systems. Interventions to date have had mixed effects, although are likely to be more effective if targeted at risk factors or specific functional difficulties. A need exists to clearly identify patients with multimorbidity and to develop cost effective and specifically targeted interventions that can improve health outcomes. PMID:22945950

  9. The role of primary care providers in patient activation and engagement in self-management: a cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Carmen; Greene, Jessica; Hibbard, Judith; Overton, Valerie

    2016-03-11

    The increasing burden of chronic illness highlights the importance of self-care and shifts from hierarchical and patriarchal models to partnerships. Primary care providers (PCPs) play an important role in supporting patients in self-management, enabling activation and supporting chronic care. We explored the extent to which PCPs' beliefs about the importance of the patients' role relate to the frequency in which they report engaging in collaborative and partnership-building behaviors with patients. PCPs' beliefs were measured using the Clinician Support for Patient Activation Measure (CS-PAM). We also assessed whether PCPs' CS-PAM scores were positively associated with changes in their patients' Patient Activation Measure (PAM) scores. Participants included 181 PCPs from a single accountable care organization in Minnesota who completed an online survey. We conducted bivariate analyses and multivariate regression models to examine relationships between CS-PAM and PCP self-management support behaviors and changes in level of patient activation. PCPs with high CS-PAM scores were much more likely to engage in supportive self-management and patient behavior change approaches, such as involving the patient in agenda-setting, problem-solving, and collaboratively setting behavioral goals, than were PCPs with low CS-PAM scores. More positive PCPs' belief in the patients' role in self-management was positively correlated with improvements in their patients' level of patient activation. More positive PCP beliefs about the patients' role in self-management was strongly related to PCP behaviors geared towards increasing patient activation.

  10. [EMOTIONAL MANAGEMENT AND CRITICAL THINKING IN THE AID RELATIONSHIP OF THE HOLISTIC CARE OF PALLIATIVE PATIENTS].

    PubMed

    De Blas Gómez, Irene; Rodríguez García, Marta

    2015-05-01

    To care for palliative patients is essential that healthcare professionals develop emotional competencies. This means acquiring the habit of self reflection and be emphatic with other people, in order to be able to identify the personal emotions of patients, family and team. Reflection involves a continuing effort to reason about aspects of professional practice, especially on issues as complex as suffering and death. Both reflective reasoning and emotional management are vital in an Aid Relationship. For nursing healthcare professionals, to care the emotional aspects means becoming aware of their own and others feelings, and get to understand and accept to handle them properly. Nursing actions involves many qualities of social competence, such as empathy, understanding, communication skills, honesty, flexibility and adaptability to the individual needs of people cared. In the context of palliative care patients and their families all these aspects are fundamental and are part of the same philosophy. Emotional education still remains a challenge in our profession both in the initial and continuing training.

  11. A management, leadership, and board road map to transforming care for patients.

    PubMed

    Toussaint, John

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade I have studied 115 healthcare organizations in II countries, examining them from the boardroom to the patient bedside. In that time, I have observed one critical element missing from just about every facility: a set of standards that could reliably produce zero-defect care for patients. This lack of standards is largely rooted in the Sloan management approach, a top-down management and leadership structure that is void of standardized accountability. This article offers an alternative approach: management by process--an operating system that engages frontline staff in decisions and imposes standards and processes on the act of managing. Organizations that have adopted management by process have seen quality improve and costs decrease because the people closest to the work are expected to identify problems and solve them. Also detailed are the leadership behaviors required for an organization to successfully implement the management-by-process operating system and the board of trustees' role in supporting the transformation.

  12. Does the Integration of Personalized Ultrasound Change Patient Management in Critical Care Medicine? Observational Trials

    PubMed Central

    Breitkreutz, Raoul; Campo delľ Orto, Marco; Hamm, Christian; Cuca, Colleen; Zechner, Peter M.; Stenger, Tanja; Walcher, Felix; Seeger, Florian H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To test the influence of personalized ultrasound (PersUS) on patient management in critical care. Design of the Study. Prospective, observational, and critical care setting. Four substudies compared PersUS and mobile ultrasound, work distribution, and diagnostic and procedural quality. Patients and Interventions. 640 patient ultrasound exams including 548 focused diagnostic exams and 92 interventional procedures. Main Outcome Measures. Number of studies, physician's judgement of feasibility, time of usage per patient, and referrals to echo lab. Results. Randomized availability of PersUS increased its application in ICU work shifts more than twofold from 33 to 68 exams mainly for detection and therapy of effusions. Diagnostic and procedural quality was rated as excellent/very good in PersUS-guided puncture in 95% of cases. Integrating PersUS within an initial physical examination of 48 randomized cases in an emergency department, PersUS extended the examination time by 100 seconds. Interestingly, PersUS integration into 53 randomized regular ward rounds of 1007 patients significantly reduced average contact time per patient by 103 seconds from 8.9 to 7.2 minutes. Moreover, it lowered the patient referral rate to an echo lab from 20% to 2% within the study population. Conclusions. We propose the development of novel ultrasound-based clinical pathways by integration of PersUS. PMID:24455272

  13. Does the integration of personalized ultrasound change patient management in critical care medicine? Observational trials.

    PubMed

    Breitkreutz, Raoul; Campo Delľ Orto, Marco; Hamm, Christian; Cuca, Colleen; Zechner, Peter M; Stenger, Tanja; Walcher, Felix; Seeger, Florian H

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To test the influence of personalized ultrasound (PersUS) on patient management in critical care. Design of the Study. Prospective, observational, and critical care setting. Four substudies compared PersUS and mobile ultrasound, work distribution, and diagnostic and procedural quality. Patients and Interventions. 640 patient ultrasound exams including 548 focused diagnostic exams and 92 interventional procedures. Main Outcome Measures. Number of studies, physician's judgement of feasibility, time of usage per patient, and referrals to echo lab. Results. Randomized availability of PersUS increased its application in ICU work shifts more than twofold from 33 to 68 exams mainly for detection and therapy of effusions. Diagnostic and procedural quality was rated as excellent/very good in PersUS-guided puncture in 95% of cases. Integrating PersUS within an initial physical examination of 48 randomized cases in an emergency department, PersUS extended the examination time by 100 seconds. Interestingly, PersUS integration into 53 randomized regular ward rounds of 1007 patients significantly reduced average contact time per patient by 103 seconds from 8.9 to 7.2 minutes. Moreover, it lowered the patient referral rate to an echo lab from 20% to 2% within the study population. Conclusions. We propose the development of novel ultrasound-based clinical pathways by integration of PersUS.

  14. Medical costs of managed care in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, S K; Else, B A

    1999-12-01

    The main objective of this study was to analyze the principal treatment cost drivers in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in a managed care setting. The study used retrospective integrated (linked) medical and pharmacy claims data for the calendar year 1995. The data were obtained from, and in cooperation with, the Hawaii Medical Service Association, Honolulu, Hawaii. The medical claims data included paid claims for services and procedures for diabetes and commonly associated comorbidities. Claims and associated costs for pharmacotherapy administered to the patient population were recorded in the pharmacy data. Patients aged > or =65 years were excluded because Medicare claims were unavailable for the type 2 diabetic population. The sample used in this study included 5171 patients. An ordinary least squares regression model was employed to identify principal cost drivers among the identified cohort to the managed care system. Independent variables in the analysis consisted of the presence or absence of a number of commonly observed comorbidities associated with diabetes mellitus (hypertension, hyperlipidemia, cardiovascular diseases, congestive heart failure, renal disorders, retinopathy, neurologic disorders, and any cardiac or noncardiac comorbidity combinations), pharmacologic therapy variables (insulin, oral medication, or both), a number of significant events (hospitalization, dialysis, hemoglobin A1c testing, and eye examination), patient enrollment category (fee-for-service vs a capitated system), and patient age and sex. The dependent variable was the natural logarithm of total medical costs of treatment for diabetes and commonly observed comorbidities. Results showed that among comorbidity variables, the 3 largest treatment cost drivers for patients with type 2 diabetes were the presence of neurologic disorders, renal disorders, and any comorbidity combination (cardiac or noncardiac or both), in decreasing order of significance. Similarly, higher

  15. Care Indicators in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation: Assessment of Sex Differences and Management of Clinical Problems.

    PubMed

    Barón-Esquivias, Gonzalo; Gómez, Silvia; Brufau, Helena; García, Lorena; Amo, Concepción; Gutiérrez, José M; Wu, Lourdes; Salmerón, Francisco; Pinilla, Santiago; López, Víctor

    2016-04-01

    To assess sex differences and the management of clinical problems in patients with atrial fibrillation through the use of care indicators. Over a 5-month period, the study included all consecutive patients attended in the cardiology outpatient clinics of 2 tertiary hospitals with an atrial fibrillation episode or a clinical process due to atrial fibrillation. A total of 533 patients were included (56.5% women; mean age, 70.5 ± 12.2 years), of whom 24.3% were younger than 65 years. Women had significantly more clinical problems and a higher stroke risk: CHADS2 (congestive heart failure, hypertension, age, diabetes, stroke [doubled]) (1.8 ± 1.2 vs 1.5 ± 1.1; P = .001) and CHA2DS2-VASc (congestive heart failure, hypertension, age ≥ 75 [doubled], diabetes, stroke [doubled]-vascular disease and sex category [female]) (3.7 ± 1.4 vs 2.2 ± 1.4; P = .0001). Referrals to the cardiology department were appropriate in 94% of the patients, the referral source was primary care or other hospital services in 53.8%, and echocardiography was performed or recommended in 93.4%. Treatment (antiarrhythmics and anticoagulants) was administered according to guideline recommendations. In the previous 3 months, the Rosendaal index was 48.4 ± 37.4. One in every 4 patients seeking care for problems associated with atrial fibrillation are young; women have more clinical problems and seek care more frequently than men. Patients are correctly referred to the cardiology department and most are not referred from the emergency department. Echocardiography and antiarrhythmic and anticoagulant therapy were provided according to the recommendations of clinical practice guidelines. Vitamin K antagonists for anticoagulation therapy are underused. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Veterans Health Administration Office of Nursing Services exploration of positive patient care synergies fueled by consumer demand: care coordination, advanced clinic access, and patient self-management.

    PubMed

    Wertenberger, Sydney; Yerardi, Ruth; Drake, Audrey C; Parlier, Renee

    2006-01-01

    The consumers who utilize the Veterans Health Administration healthcare system are older, and most are learning to live with chronic diseases. Their desires and needs have driven changes within the Veterans Health Administration. Through patient satisfaction initiatives and other feedback sources, consumers have made it clear that they do not want to wait for their care, they want a say in what care is provided to them, and they want to remain as independent as possible. Two interdisciplinary processes/models of healthcare are being implemented on the national level to address these issues: advanced clinic access and care coordination. These programs have a synergistic relationship and are integrated with patient self-management initiatives. Positive outcomes of these programs also meet the needs of our staff. As these new processes and programs are implemented nationwide, skills of both patients and nursing staff who provide their care need to be enhanced to meet the challenges of providing nursing care now and into the 21st century. Veterans Health Administration Office of Nursing Services Strategic Planning Work Group is defining and implementing processes/programs to ensure nurses have the knowledge, information, and skills to meet these patient care demands at all levels within the organization.

  17. Inadequate reimbursement for care management to primary care offices.

    PubMed

    Holtrop, Jodi Summers; Luo, Zhehui; Alexanders, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Care management in primary care can be effective in helping patients with chronic disease improve their health; however, primary care practices are often challenged to identify revenue to pay for it. This study explored the impact of direct reimbursement on the provision of care management in a primary care physician organization. Using data on expenses and health plan reimbursement during the initial 16 months of care management implementation at 5 practices, we calculated the percentage of related costs that were covered by payments. Qualitative data from interviews with practice members were used to identify their perceived barriers to care management reimbursement and the impact of current reimbursement strategies on service delivery. Direct reimbursement for care management covered only 21% of the costs. Reimbursement varied by care manager background, patient diagnoses, insurer, and indication for the visit. Barriers to gaining reimbursement included patient resistance to copay, clinician hesitation to bill for care management visits (for fear the patient may receive a bill), differential reimbursement policies of insurers, and general lack of reimbursement for care management in many cases. Although practice-level quality improvement incentives were an alternative means of supporting care management, because these incentives were not directly tied to the service of care management, they were used for other activities ultimately supporting patient care. This study highlights the need for sufficient reimbursement to initiate and maintain care management for patients in primary care as proposed for service reforms under the Affordable Care Act. © Copyright 2015 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  18. The primary health care physician and the cancer patient: tips and strategies for managing sexual health

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Eric S.; Nekhlyudov, Larissa

    2015-01-01

    There is a large and growing population of long-term cancer survivors. Primary care physicians (PCPs) are playing an increasingly greater role in the care of these patients across the continuum of cancer survivorship. In this role, PCPs are faced with the responsibility of managing a range of medical and psychosocial late effects of cancer treatment. In particular, the sexual side effects of treatment which are common and have significant impact on quality of life for the cancer survivor, often go unaddressed. This is an area of clinical care and research that has received increasing attention, highlighted by the presentation of this special issue on Cancer and Sexual Health. The aims of this review are 3-fold. First, we seek to overview common presentations of sexual dysfunction related to major cancer diagnoses in order to give the PCP a sense of the medical issues that the survivor may present with. Barriers to communication about sexual health issues between patient/PCPs in order are also described in order to emphasize the importance of PCPs initiating this important conversation. Next, we provide strategies and resources to help guide the PCP in the management of sexual dysfunction in cancer survivors. Finally, we discuss case examples of survivorship sexual health issues and highlight the role that a PCP can play in each of these case examples. PMID:26816826

  19. Nurse-patient communication in primary care diabetes management: an exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Diabetes is a major health issue for individuals and for health services. There is a considerable literature on the management of diabetes and also on communication in primary care consultations. However, few studies combine these two topics and specifically in relation to nurse communication. This paper describes the nature of nurse-patient communication in diabetes management. Methods Thirty-five primary health care consultations involving 18 patients and 10 nurses were video-recorded as part of a larger multi-site study tracking health care interactions between health professionals and patients who were newly diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. Patients and nurses were interviewed separately at the end of the 6-month study period and asked to describe their experience of managing diabetes. The analysis used ethnography and interaction analysis. In addition to analysis of the recorded consultations and interviews, the number of consultations for each patient and total time spent with nurses and other health professionals were quantified and compared. Results This study showed that initial consultations with nurses often incorporated completion of extensive checklists, physical examination, referral to other health professionals and distribution of written material, and were typically longer than consultations with other health professionals. The consultations were driven more by the nurses’ clinical agenda than by what the patient already knew or wanted to know. Interactional analysis showed that protocols and checklists both help and hinder the communication process. This contradictory outcome was also evident at a health systems level: although organisational targets may have been met, the patient did not always feel that their priorities were attended to. Both nurses and patients reported a sense of being overwhelmed arising from the sheer volume of information exchanged along with a mismatch in expectations. Conclusions Conscientious nursing work was

  20. Targeting patients for multimorbid care management interventions: the case for equity in high-risk patient identification

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Targeting patients for multimorbid care management interventions requires accurate and comprehensive assessment of patients’ need in order to direct resources to those who need and can benefit from them the most. Multimorbid patient selection is complicated due to the lack of clear criteria - unlike disease management programs for which patients with a specific condition are identified. This ambiguity can potentially result in inequitable selection, as biases in selection may differentially affect patients from disadvantaged population groups. Patient selection could in principal be performed in three ways: physician referral, patient screening surveys, or by statistical prediction algorithms. This paper discusses equity issues related to each method. We conclude that each method may result in inequitable selection and bias, such as physicians’ attentiveness or familiarity, or prediction models’ reliance on prior resource use, potentially affected by socio-cultural and economic barriers. These biases should be acknowledged and dealt with. We recommend combining patient selection approaches to achieve high care sensitivity, efficiency and equity. PMID:23962231

  1. A biopsychosocial model for the management of patients with sickle-cell disease transitioning to adult medical care.

    PubMed

    Crosby, Lori E; Quinn, Charles T; Kalinyak, Karen A

    2015-04-01

    The lifespan of patients with sickle-cell disease (SCD) continues to increase, and most affected individuals in high-resource countries now live into adulthood. This necessitates a successful transition from pediatric to adult health care. Care for transitioning patients with SCD often falls to primary care providers who may not be fully aware of the many challenges and issues faced by patients and the current management strategies for SCD. In this review, we aim to close the knowledge gap between primary care providers and specialists who treat transitioning patients with SCD. We describe the challenges and issues encountered by these patients, and we propose a biopsychosocial multidisciplinary approach to the management of the identified issues. Examples of this approach, such as transition-focused integrated care models and quality improvement collaboratives, with the potential to improve health outcomes in adulthood are also described.

  2. Pharmacists on primary care teams: Effect on antihypertensive medication management in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Omran, Dima; Majumdar, Sumit R; Johnson, Jeffrey A; Tsuyuki, Ross T; Lewanczuk, Richard Z; Guirguis, Lisa M; Makowsky, Mark; Simpson, Scot H

    2015-01-01

    To identify which activities produced a significant improvement in blood pressure control in patients with type 2 diabetes when pharmacists were added to primary care teams. This prespecified, secondary analysis evaluated medication management data from a randomized controlled trial. The primary outcome was a change in treatment, defined as addition, dosage increase, or switching of an antihypertensive medication during the 1-year study period. The secondary outcome was a change in antihypertensive medication adherence using the medication possession ratio (MPR). The 200 evaluable trial patients had a mean age of 59 (SD, 11) years, 44% were men, and mean blood pressure was 130 (SD, 16)/74 (SD, 10) mm Hg at baseline. Treatment changes occurred in 45 (42%) of 107 patients in the intervention group and 24 (26%) of 93 patients in the control group (RR, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.08-2.46). Addition of a new medication was the most common type of change, occurring in 34 (32%) patients in the intervention group and 17 (18%) patients in the control group (P = 0.029). Adherence to antihypertensive medication was high at baseline (MPR, 93%). Although medication adherence improved in the intervention group (MPR, 97%) and declined in the control group (MPR, 91%), the difference between groups was not significant (P = 0.21). The observed improvement in blood pressure control when pharmacists were added to primary care teams was likely achieved through antihypertensive treatment changes and not through improvements in antihypertensive medication adherence.

  3. Management of Chronic Kidney Disease Patients in the Intensive Care Unit: Mixing Acute and Chronic Illness.

    PubMed

    De Rosa, Silvia; Samoni, Sara; Villa, Gianluca; Ronco, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at high risk for developing critical illness and for admission to intensive care units (ICU). 'Critically ill CKD patients' frequently develop an acute worsening of renal function (i.e. acute-on-chronic, AoC) that contributes to long-term kidney dysfunction, potentially leading to end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). An integrated multidisciplinary effort is thus necessary to adequately manage the multi-organ damage of those kidney patients and contemporaneously reduce the progression of kidney dysfunction when they are critically ill. The aim of this review is to describe (1) the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the development of AoC kidney dysfunction and its role in the progression toward ESKD; (2) the most common clinical presentations of critical illness among CKD/ESKD patients; and (3) the continuum of care for CKD/ESKD patients from maintenance hemodialysis/peritoneal dialysis to acute renal replacement therapy performed in ICU and, vice-versa, for AoC patients who develop ESKD. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Cost-effectiveness of automated telephone self-management support with nurse care management among patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Handley, Margaret A; Shumway, Martha; Schillinger, Dean

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of an automated telephone self-management support with nurse care management (ATSM) intervention for patients with type 2 diabetes, which was tested among patients receiving primary care in publicly funded (safety net) clinics, focusing on non-English speakers. We performed cost analyses in the context of a randomized trial among primary care patients comparing the effects of ATSM (n = 112) and usual care (n = 114) on diabetes-related outcomes in 4 San Francisco safety net clinics. ATSM uses interactive phone technology to provide surveillance, patient education, and one-on-one counseling, and was implemented in 3 languages for a 9-month period. Cost utility was examined using quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) derived from changes in scores on the 12-Item Short Form Health Survey. We also examined cost-effectiveness for costs associated with a 10% increase in the proportion of patients meeting diabetes-specific public health goals for increasing exercise, as recommended by Healthy People 2010 and the American Diabetes Association. The annual cost of the ATSM intervention per QALY gained, relative to usual care, was $65,167 for start-up and ongoing implementation costs combined, and $32,333 for ongoing implementation costs alone. In sensitivity analyses, costs per QALY ranged from $29,402 to $72,407. The per-patient cost to achieve a 10% increase in the proportion of intervention patients meeting American Diabetes Association exercise guidelines was estimated to be $558 when all costs were considered and $277 when only ongoing costs were considered. The ATSM intervention for diverse patients with diabetes had a cost utility for functional outcomes similar to that of many other accepted interventions targeted at diabetes prevention and treatment, and achieved public health physical activity objectives at modest costs. Because a considerable proportion of costs were fixed, cost-utility and cost-effectiveness estimates

  5. Factors affecting home care patients' acceptance of a web-based interactive self-management technology

    PubMed Central

    Karsh, Ben-Tzion; Severtson, Dolores J; Burke, Laura J; Brown, Roger L; Brennan, Patricia Flatley

    2010-01-01

    Objective With the advent of personal health records and other patient-focused health technologies, there is a growing need to better understand factors that contribute to acceptance and use of such innovations. In this study, we employed the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology as the basis for determining what predicts patients' acceptance (measured by behavioral intention) and perceived effective use of a web-based, interactive self-management innovation among home care patients. Design Cross-sectional secondary analysis of data from a randomized field study evaluating a technology-assisted home care nursing practice with adults with chronic cardiac disease. Measurement and analysis A questionnaire was designed based on validated measurement scales from prior research and was completed by 101 participants for measuring the acceptance constructs as part of the parent study protocol. Latent variable modeling with item parceling guided assessment of patients' acceptance. Results Perceived usefulness accounted for 53.9% of the variability in behavioral intention, the measure of acceptance. Together, perceived usefulness, health care knowledge, and behavioral intention accounted for 68.5% of the variance in perceived effective use. Perceived ease of use and subjective norm indirectly influenced behavioral intention, through perceived usefulness. Perceived ease of use and subjective norm explained 48% of the total variance in perceived usefulness. Conclusion The study demonstrates that perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, subjective norm, and healthcare knowledge together predict most of the variance in patients' acceptance and self-reported use of the web-based self-management technology. PMID:21131605

  6. Negotiating managed care contracts.

    PubMed

    Beckman, P A; Fischer, T J

    1997-08-01

    Physicians currently have a major opportunity to help guide the rapid evolution of managed care in the United States. General principles on how physicians can successfully negotiate a managed care contract are discussed.

  7. The activities of hospital nursing unit managers and quality of patient care in South African hospitals: a paradox?

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Susan J.; Rispel, Laetitia C.; Penn-Kekana, Loveday

    2015-01-01

    Background Improving the quality of health care is central to the proposed health care reforms in South Africa. Nursing unit managers play a key role in coordinating patient care activities and in ensuring quality care in hospitals. Objective This paper examines whether the activities of nursing unit managers facilitate the provision of quality patient care in South African hospitals. Methods During 2011, a cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted in nine randomly selected hospitals (six public, three private) in two South African provinces. In each hospital, one of each of the medical, surgical, paediatric, and maternity units was selected (n=36). Following informed consent, each unit manager was observed for a period of 2 hours on the survey day and the activities recorded on a minute-by-minute basis. The activities were entered into Microsoft Excel, coded into categories, and analysed according to the time spent on activities in each category. The observation data were complemented by semi-structured interviews with the unit managers who were asked to recall their activities on the day preceding the interview. The interviews were analysed using thematic content analysis. Results The study found that nursing unit managers spent 25.8% of their time on direct patient care, 16% on hospital administration, 14% on patient administration, 3.6% on education, 13.4% on support and communication, 3.9% on managing stock and equipment, 11.5% on staff management, and 11.8% on miscellaneous activities. There were also numerous interruptions and distractions. The semi-structured interviews revealed concordance between unit managers’ recall of the time spent on patient care, but a marked inflation of their perceived time spent on hospital administration. Conclusion The creation of an enabling practice environment, supportive executive management, and continuing professional development are needed to enable nursing managers to lead the provision of consistent and high

  8. Management of pain induced by exercise and mobilization during physical therapy programs: views of patients and care providers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The expectations of patients for managing pain induced by exercise and mobilization (PIEM) have seldom been investigated. We identified the views of patients and care providers regarding pain management induced by exercise and mobilization during physical therapy programs. Methods We performed a qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews with a stratified sample of 12 patients (7 women) and 14 care providers (6 women): 4 general practitioners [GPs], 1 rheumatologist, 1 physical medicine physician, 1 geriatrician, 2 orthopedic surgeons, and 5 physical therapists. Results Patients and care providers have differing views on PIEM in the overall management of the state of disease. Patients' descriptions of PIEM were polymorphic, and they experienced it as decreased health-related quality of life. The impact of PIEM was complex, and patient views were sometimes ambivalent, ranging from denial of symptoms to discontinuation of therapy. Care providers agreed that PIEM is generally not integrated in management strategies. Care providers more often emphasized the positive and less often the negative dimensions of PIEM than did patients. However, the consequences of PIEM cited included worsened patient clinical condition, fears about physical therapy, rejection of the physical therapist and refusal of care. PIEM follow-up is not optimal and is characterized by poor transmission of information. Patients expected education on how better to prevent stress and anxiety generated by pain, education on mobilization, and adaptations of physical therapy programs according to pain intensity. Conclusion PIEM management could be optimized by alerting care providers to the situation, improving communication among care providers, and providing education to patients and care providers. PMID:21781296

  9. "They don't want anything to do with you": patient views of primary care management of chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Upshur, Carole C; Bacigalupe, Gonzalo; Luckmann, Roger

    2010-12-01

    Chronic pain is one of the most frequent complaints of patients in primary care, yet both patients and providers report low satisfaction with chronic pain care. This study was designed to explore the views held by a diverse sample of patients with chronic pain complaints about their care experiences to identify ways to improve care. Qualitative analysis of 17 patient focus groups (size 3-7 participants). Groups used structured questions and were tape recorded, transcribed, and coded using qualitative software. Eleven groups were conducted in English, six groups in Spanish. Convenience sample of 72 adult patients (68% female, 44% Latino, mean age=48.1 years) recruited from four diverse primary care practices in Central Massachusetts. Across all 17 groups, and all gender, ethnicity, and age groups, most patients reported suboptimal interactions with their providers when seeking care for chronic pain. Subjects acknowledged feeling disrespected and distrusted, suspected of drug-seeking, and having their symptoms dismissed as trivial and/or not warranting medical care. Patients reported more satisfaction when they felt a provider listened to them, trusted them, was accessible to address pain concerns between visits, and used patient-centered approaches to establish goals and treatment plans. Patients also recommended some management techniques related to the chronic disease management model to improve pain care. Implementing patient-centered approaches in caring for individuals with chronic pain and using principles drawn from the chronic disease management model to improve care systems may improve both patient and provider satisfaction with chronic pain care. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Intensive care and pregnancy: Epidemiology and general principles of management of obstetrics ICU patients during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Zieleskiewicz, Laurent; Chantry, Anne; Duclos, Gary; Bourgoin, Aurelie; Mignon, Alexandre; Deneux-Tharaux, Catherine; Leone, Marc

    2016-10-01

    In developed countries, the rate of obstetric ICU admissions (admission during pregnancy or the postpartum period) is between 0.5 and 4 per 1000 deliveries and the overall case-fatality rate is about 2%. The most two common causes of obstetric ICU admissions concerned direct obstetric pathologies: obstetric hemorrhage and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. This review summarized the principles of management of critically ill pregnant patient. Its imply taking care of two patients in the same time. A coordinated multidisciplinary team including intensivists, anesthesiologists, obstetricians, pediatricians and pharmacists is therefore necessary. This team must work effectively together with regular staff aiming to evaluate daily the need to maintain the patient in intensive care unit or to prompt delivery. Keeping mother and baby together and fetal well-being must be balanced with the need of specialized advanced life support for the mother. The maternal physiological changes imply various consequences on management. The uterus aorto-caval compression implies tilting left the parturient. In case of cardiac arrest, uterus displacement and urgent cesarean delivery are needed. The high risk of aspiration and difficult tracheal intubation must be anticipated. Even during acute respiratory distress syndrome, hypoxemia and permissive hypercapnia must be avoided due to their negative impact on the fetus. Careful analysis of the benefit-risk ratio is needed before all drug administration. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome and perineal fasciitis must be feared and a high level of suspicion of sepsis must be maintained. Finally the potential benefits of an ultrasound-based management are detailed.

  11. Management matters: the link between hospital organisation and quality of patient care

    PubMed Central

    West, E.

    2001-01-01

    Some hospital trusts and health authorities consistently outperform others on different dimensions of performance. Why? There is some evidence that "management matters", as well as the combined efforts of individual clinicians and teams. However, studies that have been conducted on the link between the organisation and management of services and quality of patient care can be criticised both theoretically and methodologically. A larger, and arguably more rigorous, body of work exists on the performance of firms in the private sector, often conducted within the disciplines of organisational behaviour or human resource management. Studies in these traditions have focused on the effects of decentralisation, participation, innovative work practices, and "complementarities" on outcome variables such as job satisfaction and performance. The aim of this paper is to identify a number of reviews and research traditions that might bring new ideas into future work on the determinants of hospital performance. Ideally, future research should be more theoretically informed and should use longitudinal rather than cross sectional research designs. The use of statistical methods such as multilevel modelling, which allow for the inclusion of variables at different levels of analysis, would enable estimation of the separate contribution that structure and process make to hospital outcomes. Key Words: hospital organisation; hospital performance; management; quality of care PMID:11239143

  12. Flexible monitoring in the management of patient care processes: one year after the pilot study.

    PubMed

    Jones, C; Gordon, G

    2001-01-01

    A pilot study at a large metropolitan hospital in Auckland identified a specific group of patients that can be safely monitored outside the Coronary Care Unit using Flexible Monitoring technology. This article describes the project management processes used to further develop the remote monitoring system into a hospital network of remote monitoring. The educational and staff support resources required throughout the project are described as are the strategies adopted to meet those needs including the utilization of online learning. Outcomes from the introduction of the system include improved electrokardiogram interpretation by nursing staff and improved ECG resource allocation.

  13. Management of Sepsis in Patients with Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension in the Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Tartavoulle, Todd M

    2017-03-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a lethal condition, and the management of sepsis in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension is challenging. As the disease progresses, the right ventricle is susceptible to failure due to a high pulmonary vascular resistance. The limited ability of the right ventricle to increase cardiac output in septic shock makes it difficult to deliver oxygen to the organ and tissues. Intravascular volume replacement and vasoactive drugs should only be considered after a thorough assessment. Priorities of care include improving cardiac output and oxygen delivery by optimizing preload, reducing afterload, and improving contractility.

  14. Influence of self-management and self-management support on chronic low back pain patients in primary care.

    PubMed

    Kawi, Jennifer

    2014-12-01

    This study utilized a nonexperimental, cross-sectional, descriptive design to examine self-management (SM), self-management support (SMS), and other pain-related variables in chronic low back pain (CLBP), and described participants' perceptions of their SM, SMS, and functional ablement. Data were collected from 120 participants in four primary care clinics using survey measures. SMS was found to significantly influence SM and mental health. Overall health significantly influenced functional ablement and pain intensity. Participants described using medications, exercising, and making lifestyle changes as most common SM strategies. Prescribing medications, giving encouragement, and providing information were main participant-perceived SMS activities. Depression and anxiety were key responses to perceptions on functional ablement. Study findings increase our understanding of the SM, SMS, and functional ablement of CLBP patients with relevance to application in practice. There is a great need to develop evidence-based SM and SMS programs specific to CLBP patients' needs. Nurses and nurse practitioners play major roles in leading this initiative. Study findings also reinforce the importance of psychologists and physical therapists' collaboration in the complex care of CLBP. Longitudinal and experimental studies are recommended to evaluate SM and SMS programs that include physical therapy and psychological care components. ©2014 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  15. Integrated Management of Physician-delivered Alcohol Care for Tuberculosis Patients (IMPACT): Design and Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Greenfield, Shelly F.; Shields, Alan; Connery, Hilary Smith; Livchits, Viktoria; Yanov, Sergey A.; Lastimoso, Charmaine S.; Strelis, Aivar K.; Mishustin, Sergey P.; Fitzmaurice, Garrett; Mathew, Trini; Shin, Sonya

    2010-01-01

    Background While the integration of alcohol screening, treatment and referral in primary care and other medical settings in the U.S. and world-wide has been recognized as a key health care priority, it is not routinely done. In spite of the high co-occurrence and excess mortality associated with alcohol use disorders (AUDs) among individuals with tuberculosis (TB), there are no studies evaluating effectiveness of integrating alcohol care into routine treatment for this disorder. Methods We designed and implemented a randomized controlled trial (RCT) to determine the effectiveness of integrating pharmacotherapy and behavioral treatments for AUDs into routine medical care for TB in the Tomsk Oblast Tuberculosis Service (TOTBS) in Tomsk, Russia. Eligible patients are diagnosed with alcohol abuse or dependence, are newly diagnosed with TB and initiating treatment in the TOTBS with Directly Observed Therapy-Short Course (DOTS) for TB. Utilizing a factorial design, the Integrated Management of Physician-delivered Alcohol Care for Tuberculosis Patients (IMPACT) study randomizes eligible patients who sign informed consent into one of four study arms: (1) Oral Naltrexone + Brief Behavioral Compliance Enhancement Therapy (BBCET) + treatment as usual (TAU), (2) Brief Counseling Intervention (BCI) + TAU, (3) Naltrexone + BBCET + BCI + TAU, or (4) TAU alone. Results Utilizing an iterative, collaborative approach, a multi-disciplinary U.S. and Russian team has implemented a model of alcohol management that is culturally appropriate to the patient and TB physician community in Russia. Implementation to date has achieved the integration of routine alcohol screening into TB care in Tomsk; an ethnographic assessment of knowledge, attitudes and practices of AUD management among TB physicians in Tomsk; translation and cultural adaptation of the BCI to Russia and the TB setting; and training and certification of TB physicians to deliver oral naltrexone and brief counseling

  16. Identifying patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease in a managed care organization.

    PubMed

    Ofman, J J; Ryu, S; Borenstein, J; Kania, S; Lee, J; Grogg, A; Farup, C; Weingarten, S

    2001-09-01

    The ability of various strategies to identify patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and the relative economic impact on disease management programs for GERD were studied. A telephone interview was conducted of a random sample of patients enrolled in any of three health plans in a 100,000-member managed care organization who had either a pharmacy claim or an encounter claim during 1997. The telephone interview identified patients with GERD and served as the standard by which the sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values of the following patient-identification strategies were compared: (1) telephone interview, (2) chart review, (3) use of encounter claims, (4) use of pharmacy claims, (5) use of both encounter claims, and pharmacy claims, and (6) use of encounter claims or pharmacy claims. Conservative estimates of costs and projected savings were then used to model the potential return on investment of the strategies. A total of 1186 patients completed the telephone interview, of whom 390 (33%) met the case definition of GERD. The most sensitive method for identifying patients with GERD was using either pharmacy or encounter claims (26%). The most specific strategy with the highest positive predictive value (PPV) (87%) was using both pharmacy and encounter claims, but this approach had a case-detection rate of only 3%. Encounter claims were significantly more sensitive than pharmacy claims and yielded a higher estimate of prevalence. The telephone interview identified the most subjects who could have benefited from a disease management program and cost 84% less than chart review. While use of administrative data (pharmacy and encounter claims) was the least costly strategy, it identified 74% fewer patients expected to benefit from disease management. The efficiency of disease management programs for GERD may depend on the method of patient identification, which in turn may depend on whether PPV or negative predictive value (NPV) should be

  17. Action on AMD. Optimising patient management: act now to ensure current and continual delivery of best possible patient care

    PubMed Central

    Amoaku, W; Blakeney, S; Freeman, M; Gale, R; Johnston, R; Kelly, S P; McLaughlan, B; Sahu, D; Varma, D

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, there have been significant advances in the clinical management of patients with wet age-related macular degeneration (wet AMD)—a rapidly progressing and potentially blinding degenerative eye disease. Wet AMD is responsible for more than half of registered severe sight impairment (blindness) in the United Kingdom, and patients who are being treated for wet AMD require frequent and long-term follow-up for treatment to be most effective. The clinical workload associated with the frequent follow-up required is substantial. Furthermore, as more new patients are diagnosed and the population continues to age, the patient population will continue to increase. It is thus vital that clinical services continue to adapt so that they can provide a fast and efficient service for patients with wet AMD. This Action on AMDdocument has been developed by eye health-care professionals and patient representatives, the Action on AMDgroup. It is intended to highlight the urgent and continuing need for change within wet AMD services. This document also serves as a guide for eye health-care professionals, NHS commissioners, and providers to present possible solutions for improving NHS retinal and macular services. Examples of good practice and service development are considered and can be drawn upon to help services meet the recommended quality of care and achieve best possible outcomes. PMID:22302094

  18. Action on AMD. Optimising patient management: act now to ensure current and continual delivery of best possible patient care.

    PubMed

    Amoaku, W; Blakeney, S; Freeman, M; Gale, R; Johnston, R; Kelly, S P; McLaughlan, B; Sahu, D; Varma, D

    2012-02-01

    In recent years, there have been significant advances in the clinical management of patients with wet age-related macular degeneration (wet AMD)--a rapidly progressing and potentially blinding degenerative eye disease. Wet AMD is responsible for more than half of registered severe sight impairment (blindness) in the United Kingdom, and patients who are being treated for wet AMD require frequent and long-term follow-up for treatment to be most effective. The clinical workload associated with the frequent follow-up required is substantial. Furthermore, as more new patients are diagnosed and the population continues to age, the patient population will continue to increase. It is thus vital that clinical services continue to adapt so that they can provide a fast and efficient service for patients with wet AMD. This Action on AMD document has been developed by eye health-care professionals and patient representatives, the Action on AMD group. It is intended to highlight the urgent and continuing need for change within wet AMD services. This document also serves as a guide for eye health-care professionals, NHS commissioners, and providers to present possible solutions for improving NHS retinal and macular services. Examples of good practice and service development are considered and can be drawn upon to help services meet the recommended quality of care and achieve best possible outcomes.

  19. Ethics in managed care.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, J A; Sharfstein, S S

    2000-06-01

    The current era of managed costs and care create ethical dilemmas based on economic constraints and incorporation of principles of distributive justice. Traditional ethical concerns related to confidentiality, conflicts of interest, double agentry, and honesty are complicated by interference in the doctor-patient relationship caused by intrusive utilization management. National health reform must take these issues seriously to ensure that the "cure" promised by such reform efforts is not worse than the disease. The challenge for psychiatrists is to adapt to these constraints without losing site of traditional medical ethical positions. Once the ethics become diseased, no cure may exist at all.

  20. 'The onus is on me': primary care patient views of Medicare-funded team care in chronic disease management in Australia.

    PubMed

    Foster, Michele M; Mitchell, Geoffrey K

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the views of primary care patients in receipt of Medicare-funded team care for chronic disease management (CDM) in Australia. A qualitative study using a repeat in-depth interview design. Twenty-three patients (17 female), aged 32-89, were recruited over a six-month period from two purposively selected general practices: one urban and one regional practice in Queensland, Australia. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with participants 6 months apart. An interview guide was used to ensure consistency of topics explored. Interviews were recorded and transcribed, and a thematic analysis was conducted. Patients in this study viewed the combined contributions of a GP and other health professionals in team care as thorough and reassuring. In this case of Medicare-funded team care, patients also saw obligations within the structured care routine which cultivated a personal ethics of CDM. This was further influenced by how patients viewed their role in the health-care relationship. Aside from personal obligations, Medicare funding got patients engaged in team care by providing financial incentives. Indeed, this was a defining factor in seeing allied health professionals. However, team care was also preferential due to patients' valuations of costs and benefits. Patients are likely to engage with a structured team care approach to CDM if there is a sense of personal obligation and sufficient financial incentive. The level of engagement in team care is likely to be optimized if patient expectations and preferences are considered in decisions. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. [The initial management in intensive care of pelvic ring injury patients].

    PubMed

    Vardon, F; Harrois, A; Duranteau, J; Geeraerts, T

    2014-05-01

    Pelvic trauma care is complex since it is frequently associated with multiple injuries and may lead to dramatic and uncontrollable haemorrhage. After pelvic trauma, the mortality, around 8 to 10%, is mainly related to severe pelvic hemorrhage but also to extrapelvic injuries (thoracic, abdominal or brain injuries). It is therefore crucial to manage pelvic trauma in specialized trauma center. The initial trauma assessment aims to determine the role of the pelvic injury in hemorrhage to define the therapeutic strategy of pelvic trauma care (arterial embolisation/pelvic ring stabilisation). This review was performed with a systematic review of the literature; it describes the pelvic fracture pathophysiology, and the efficacy and safety of haemostatic procedures and with their respective indications. A decision making algorithm is proposed for the treatment of trauma patients with pelvic fracture. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  2. An Australasian perspective on the curative treatment of patients with pancreatic cancer, supportive care, and future directions for management

    PubMed Central

    Muircroft, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    The management of patients with pancreatic cancer requires an individualised approach and the support of a multidisciplinary team to accurately stage patients and determine their suitability for curative treatment. Guidelines have been developed in Australasia to define the operability for patients who have been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. This is supported by advances in pancreatic cancer genetics, which show potential for developing targeted therapies for pancreatic cancer. Both surgery and targeted therapies aim to extend the overall survival of patients. Patients who are cured of their cancer may live with permanent changes in gut anatomy and physiology leading to distressing symptoms that may not be addressed. Patients who cannot be cured of pancreatic cancer may have supportive care issues that are often complex, and a strategic approach to manage these needs for patients with pancreatic cancer is underdeveloped in Australasia. Supportive care services need to be in a position to adapt patient care as the evidence base develops. PMID:28105071

  3. Bereavement debriefing sessions: an intervention to support health care professionals in managing their grief after the death of a patient.

    PubMed

    Keene, Elizabeth A; Hutton, Nancy; Hall, Barbara; Rushton, Cynda

    2010-01-01

    Health care professionals experience grief when caring for children with life-threatening conditions. Harriet Lane Compassionate Care, the pediatric palliative care program of the Johns Hopkins Children's Center, created an action plan to support health care professionals; one intervention-- the bereavement debriefing session - was specifically aimed at providing emotional support and increasing one's ability to manage grief. A structured format for conducting bereavement debriefing sessions was developed, and 113 sessions were held in a three-year period; data were collected to capture themes discussed. Bereavement debriefing sessions were conducted most frequently after unexpected deaths or deaths of long-term patients. Though attendance included all disciplines, nurses attended the sessions most often. Self-report evaluation forms revealed that health care professionals found the sessions helpful. Bereavement debriefing sessions can be one aspect of an effective approach to supporting health care professionals in managing their grief in caring for children with life-threatening conditions.

  4. Management of patients in a combined thyroid eye clinic in secondary care.

    PubMed

    Benzimra, J D; Quinn, A G; Kersey, T; McGrane, D; Goss, L; Vaidya, B

    2014-02-01

    The European Group on Graves' Orbitopathy (EUGOGO) recommends the use of specialised multidisciplinary clinics for the management of thyroid eye disease (TED). In the UK, many patients with TED are managed outside of specialised clinics. We describe the organisation of a combined TED clinic in a secondary care setting and present the result of a prospective audit of the patient characteristics and outcomes during the first four years of a combined TED clinic. Of a total of 132 patients referred to the TED clinic, 114 (86 %) had TED (90 females, median age 56 years; range 17-90 years). At presentation, 77 (67 %) were current or ex-smokers and 99 (87 %) were biochemically euthyroid. Median duration of eye symptoms was 12 months. Fifty-two percent, 45 and 3 had mild, moderate-to-severe and sight-threatening TED, respectively. Only 18 % of patients had a clinical activity score (CAS) of ≥3. Sixty-nine patients (61 %) required follow-up appointments in the TED clinic. In those who required follow-up, 43 % (n = 30) received either immunosuppressive or surgical treatment. CAS improved from first to final visit, with 29 % (n = 20) having a CAS of ≥3 at the first visit and 1 % (n = 1) at the final visit (p = 0.0001). There was also a decrease in prevalence of smoking and thyroid dysfunction at the final visit. A multidisciplinary specialised TED clinic offers an optimal setting for managing patients with TED; however, patients are often referred late to a specialist TED clinic.

  5. Long-term clinical outcomes of care management for chronically depressed primary care patients: a report from the depression in primary care project.

    PubMed

    Klinkman, Michael S; Bauroth, Sabrina; Fedewa, Stacey; Kerber, Kevin; Kuebler, Julie; Adman, Tanya; Sen, Ananda

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies examining depression disease management report improvements in short-term outcomes, but less is known about whether improvements are sustainable over time. This study evaluated the sustained clinical effectiveness of low-intensity depression disease management in chronically depressed patients. The Depression in Primary Care (DPC) intervention was introduced in 5 primary care practices in the University of Michigan Health System, with 5 matched practices selected as control sites. Clinicians were free to refer none, some, or all of their depressed patients at their discretion. Core clinical outcomes of remission and serial change in Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-8) scores for 728 DPC enrollees observed for up to 18 months after enrollment were compared with those for 78 patients receiving usual care who completed mailed questionnaires at baseline, 6, 12, and 18 months. DPC enrollees had sustained improvement in remission rates and reduced-function days over the full 18 months. Mean change in the PHQ-8 score over each 6-month interval was more favorable for DPC enrollees than for usual care patients, and the proportion of DPC enrollees in remission was higher at 6 months (43.4% vs 33.3%; P = .11), 12 months (52.0% vs 33.9%; P = .012), and 18 months (49.2% vs 27.3%; P = .004). Multivariate analysis controlling for age, sex, ethnicity, baseline severity, and comorbid medical illness confirmed that DPC enrollees had significantly more reduction in depressive symptom burden over 18 months. The DPC intervention produced sustained improvement in clinical outcomes over 18 months in a cohort of chronically depressed patients with persistent symptoms despite active treatment.

  6. Management of patients in a dedicated burns intensive care unit (BICU) in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Hashmi, Madiha; Kamal, Rehana

    2013-05-01

    In Pakistan the practice of managing extensive burns in dedicated intensive care units is not well established. This audit aims to define the characteristics of the victims of major burns and factors that increase mortality and outcome of the protocol-based management in a dedicated burns intensive care unit (BICU). This prospective audit included all patients admitted to the BICU of Suleiman Dawood Burns Unit in Karachi from 1st September 2002 to 31st August 2011. Demographic information, type and place of burn, total body surface area burn (TBSA), type of organ support provided, length of ICU stay, any associated medical diseases, and out outcome were documented. A total of 1597 patients were admitted to the BICU in 9 years. Median age of the patients was 22 (IQR =32-7). 32% victims were children <14 years and only 7% were >50 years old. Male to female ratio was 1.4:1. Fire was the leading cause of burns in adults (64%) and scald burns were most common in (64%) in children. 72.4% of the accidents happened at home, where kitchen was the commonest location (597 cases). Mean TBSA burnt was 32.5% (SD ± 22.95%, 95%CI: 31.36-33.61). 27% patients needed ventilatory support, 4% were dialyzed and split skin graftings were performed in 20% patients. Average length of ICU stay was 10.42 days. Epilepsy, psychiatric illness and drug addiction were not common associations with burns. Overall mortality was 41.30% but it decreased over the years from 75% to 27%. Groups of people most vulnerable to sustain burn are young females getting burnt in the kitchen, young males getting burnt at work, and small children falling in pots of hot water stored for drinking or bathing. TBSA >40%, age >50 years, fire burn and female gender were associated with a higher risk of death. Carefully planned, protocol based management of burn patients by burn teams of dedicated healthcare professionals, even with limited resources reduced mortality. Burn hazard awareness, prevention and educational

  7. A Simulation Curriculum for Management of Trauma and Surgical Critical Care Patients.

    PubMed

    Miyasaka, Kiyoyuki W; Martin, Niels D; Pascual, Jose L; Buchholz, Joseph; Aggarwal, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Expectations continue to rise for residency programs to provide integrated simulation training to address clinical competence. How to implement such training sustainably remains a challenge. We developed a compact module for first-year surgery residents integrating theory with practice in high-fidelity simulations, to reinforce the preparedness and confidence of junior residents in their ability to manage common emergent patient care scenarios in trauma and critical care surgery. The 3-day module features a combination of simulated patient encounters using standardized patients and electronic manikins, didactic sessions, and hands-on training. Manikin-based scenarios developed in-house were used to teach trauma and critical care management concepts and skills. Separate scenarios in collaboration with the regional organ donation program addressed communication in difficult situations such as brain death. Didactic material based on contemporary evidence, as well as skills stations, was developed to complement the scenarios. Residents were surveyed before and after training on their confidence in meeting the 14 learning objectives of the curriculum on a 5-point Likert scale. Data from 15 residents who underwent this training show an overall improvement in confidence across all learning objectives defined for the module, with confidence scores before to after training improving significantly from 2.8 (σ = 0.85, median = 3) to 3.9 (σ = 0.87, median = 4) of 5, p < 0.001. Although female residents reported higher posttraining confidence scores compared with male residents (average 4.2 female vs 3.8 male, p = 0.002), there were no other significant differences in confidence scores or changes to scores owing to resident sex or program status (categorical or preliminary). We successfully implemented a multimodal simulation-based curriculum that provides skills training integrated with the clinical context of managing trauma and critical care patients, simultaneously

  8. A Patient-Centered Transitional Care Case Management Program: Taking Case Management to the Streets and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Lovelace, Derenda; Hancock, Diane; Hughes, Sabrina S; Wyche, Phyllis R; Jenkins, Claire; Logan, Cindy

    In 2011, the Hunter Holmes McGuire Veterans Administration Medical Center (VAMC) in Richmond, VA, had a cumulative readmission rate and emergency department (ED) revisits for discharged Veterans of 1 in 5. In 2012, a transitional care program (TCP) was implemented to improve care coordination and outcomes among Veterans, with an emphasis on geriatric patients with chronic disease. This TCP was created with an interdisciplinary approach using intensive case management interventions, with a goal of reducing Veteran ED and hospital revisits by 30%. To examine the impact of the McGuire VAMC TCP on Veteran ED and hospital utilization and costs. Veterans being discharged to home following an inpatient admission, ED visit, and/or short rehab stay. The primary means of identifying patients for the program is through daily screening of the previous 24-hour admission and ED report, which the inpatient nurse practitioner performs. She completes an extensive review of each Veteran's electronic medical record to determine the number of ED visits and inpatient admissions at the VAMC and in the community. Initial criteria for consideration in the program included the following: more than two hospital admissions and/or ED visits in the past 90 days or at high risk for readmission based on a Care Assessment Need score of greater than 95. Two hundred Veterans participated in the program in fiscal year (FY) 2013, with 146 participating in FY 2014. A retrospective chart review of Veterans participating in the TCP in FYs 2013 and 2014 was conducted, with a focus on number of admissions and ED visits 90 days prior to admission to the TCP and 90 days following TCP admission. Average admission and ED costs for this VA were calculated to determine cost savings from pre- to post-90 days of admission and ED visits. Veterans who obtained TCP services in FYs 2013 and 2014 experienced a 67% decrease in hospital admissions and a 61% decrease in ED visits in the 90 days following participation in

  9. Feasibility and Impact of Telemonitor-Based Depression Care Management for Geriatric Homecare Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rabinowitz, Terry; Lotterman, Jennifer; Reilly, Catherine F.; Brown, Suzanne; Donehower, Patricia; Ellsworth, Elizabeth; Amour, Judith L.; Bruce, Martha L.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective The objective of this study was to test the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary clinical outcomes of a method to leverage existing home healthcare telemonitoring technology to deliver depression care management (DCM) to both Spanish- and English-speaking elderly homebound recipients of homecare services. Materials and Methods Three stand-alone, nonprofit community homecare agencies located in New York, Vermont, and Miami participated in this study. Evidence-based DCM was adapted to the telemonitor platform by programming questions and educational information on depression symptoms, antidepressant adherence, and side effects. Recruited patients participated for a minimum of 3 weeks. Telehealth nurses were trained on DCM and received biweekly supervision. On-site trained research assistants conducted in-home research interviews on depression diagnosis and severity and patient satisfaction with the protocol. Results An ethnically diverse sample of 48 English- and Spanish-only–speaking patients participated, along with seven telehealth nurses. Both patients and telehealth nurses reported high levels of protocol acceptance. Among 19 patients meeting diagnostic criteria for major depression, the mean depression severity was in the “markedly severe” range at baseline and in the “mild” range at follow-up. Conclusions Results of this pilot support the feasibility of using homecare's existing telemonitoring technology to deliver DCM to their elderly homebound patients. This was true for both English- and Spanish-speaking patients. Preliminary clinical outcomes suggest improvement in depression severity, although these findings require testing in a randomized clinical trial. Implications for the science and service of telehealth-based depression care for elderly patients are discussed. PMID:21780942

  10. The effect of primary care management on lipids testing and LDL-C control of elderly patients with comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Schraeder, Cheryl; Fraser, Cynthia; Clark, Ida; Newcomer, Robert; Stoll, John; Krock, Curtis; Shelton, Paul

    2009-01-01

    This article presents results of a randomized clinical trial evaluating the effectiveness of the Medicare Coordinated Care Demonstration, Illinois site, on selected clinical outcomes over 36 months. Interdisciplinary teams, located at primary care practices, provided case and disease management services to 999 patients. Intervention group patients had higher lipids-testing rates during the first 2 years than control group patients. Once tested, more than 80% of patients in both groups were retested in subsequent years. There were no differences in the percentage of intervention group patients who were in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) control at program entry and at the end of 36 months as compared with control group patients (maintained control). However, a higher percentage of intervention group patients who were not in the LDL-C control at baseline were in control after 36 months as compared with control group patients (achieved control). This study suggests that physician-nurse case management team care has the potential to augment the effectiveness of primary care by increasing adherence to testing protocols among elderly patients with multiple chronic illnesses, but this effect diminishes over time as guidelines are adopted into general practice. It suggests that LDL-C therapeutic control can be improved through increased lipids testing and the use of lipid-lowering medications. The results also indicate that care management strategies targeting more intensive patients versus less intensive patients are cost-effective strategies that can be expanded beyond lipids testing and control to other clinical health status measures.

  11. Determinants of Heart Failure Self-Care Maintenance and Management in Patients and Caregivers: A Dyadic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bidwell, Julie T; Vellone, Ercole; Lyons, Karen S; D'Agostino, Fabio; Riegel, Barbara; Juárez-Vela, Raúl; Hiatt, Shirin O; Alvaro, Rosaria; Lee, Christopher S

    2015-10-01

    Disease self-management is a critical component of maintaining clinical stability for patients with chronic illness. This is particularly evident in the context of heart failure (HF), which is the leading cause of hospitalization for older adults. HF self-management, commonly known as HF self-care, is often performed with the support of informal caregivers. However, little is known about how a HF dyad manages the patient's care together. The purpose of this study was to identify determinants of patient and caregiver contributions to HF self-care maintenance (daily adherence and symptom monitoring) and management (appropriate recognition and response to symptoms), utilizing an approach that controls for dyadic interdependence. This was a secondary analysis of cross-sectional data from 364 dyads of Italian HF patients and caregivers. Multilevel modeling was used to identify determinants of HF self-care within patient-caregiver dyads. Patients averaged 76.2 (SD = 10.7) years old, and a slight majority (56.9%) was male, whereas caregivers averaged 57.4 (SD = 14.6) years old, and about half (48.1%) were male. Most caregivers were adult children (48.4%) or spouses (32.7%) of patients. Both patients and caregivers reported low levels of HF maintenance and management behaviors. Significant individual and dyadic determinants of self-care maintenance and self-care management included gender, quality of life, comorbid burden, impaired ADLs, cognition, hospitalizations, HF duration, relationship type, relationship quality, and social support. These comprehensive dyadic models assist in elucidating the complex nature of patient-caregiver relationships and their influence on HF self-care, leading to more effective ways to intervene and optimize outcomes.

  12. A Recommendation for the Management of Illness Anxiety Disorder Patients Abusing the Health Care System

    PubMed Central

    Almalki, Mohammad; Al-Tawayjri, Ibrahim; Al-Anazi, Ahmed; Mahmoud, Sami

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Illness anxiety disorder (IAD) entails a preoccupation with having a serious, undiagnosed illness in which somatic symptoms are, if present, mild in intensity (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). Case Report. This is a case of seventy-three-year-old Saudi man who started visiting the primary health care center around twenty-five years ago. With concerns of having cancer, the patient continuously visited the hospital, costing over $170,000. Throughout this period, the patient has been exposed to extensive unnecessary imaging studies and laboratory tests that have effects on his life in all aspects with such concerns. Five years ago, a family doctor has put an end to that by directing the patient to the right path. The doctor made several actions; most importantly, he directed the patient to a cognitive behavioral therapy which significantly improved a range of hypochondriacal beliefs and attitudes. This patient's case demonstrates the fundamental importance of a proper health system that limits such patients from abusing the health system and depleting the medical resources. Moreover, this case emphasizes the important role of the family physician who can be the first physician to encounter such patients. Thus, proper understanding of the nature of such disorder is a key element for better diagnosis and management. PMID:27313939

  13. Patient-related barriers to cancer pain management in a palliative care setting in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Chung, T K; French, P; Chan, S

    1999-06-01

    This article reviews a study of pain management and its barriers in Hong Kong. Using an interview technique, several measures were used to understand the level of concern in patients about pain, the patients' hesitancy in reporting pain, use of analgesics, and adequacy of medication for pain. A total of nine barriers were identified, which include "addiction," "tolerance," "side effects," "physician distraction," "good patient," "fear of injection," "time interval," "fatalism," and "disease progression." Thirty-nine interviews were carried out. The interviewees were all cancer patients with pain in a palliative setting in Hong Kong. When the findings in Taiwan and the United States were compared, it was found that the cancer patients in Hong Kong had a higher level of concern toward the patient-related barriers. It was also found that the level of concern was generally higher in the group with hesitancy in reporting pain and using analgesics. Last of all, this project also identified the educational needs of patients and health care workers in Hong Kong.

  14. Risk management by early recognition of warning signs in patients in forensic psychiatric care.

    PubMed

    Fluttert, Frans; Van Meijel, Berno; Webster, Chris; Nijman, Henk; Bartels, Arnold; Grypdonck, Mieke

    2008-08-01

    To clarify the concept of early recognition for the field of forensic nursing. The concept is based on the proposition that patient behavior deteriorating toward aggression is idiosyncratic but nevertheless reconstructable like a "signature." Once reconstructed, this signature can be used to detect "early signs" of deterioration and thus prevent violent behavior. Early recognition is approached from the perspective of deteriorating behavior. Special attention is paid to the social and interpersonal factors related to the individual behaving violently. From this perspective, the thoughts, feelings, and behavior of the patient can indicate the onset of aggression, and early recognition of these warning signs can help thwart such deterioration. The aviation metaphor of a "black box" is used to emphasize the importance of attention to early warning signs. Patients in forensic care must draw upon their previous experiences (i.e., their own black boxes) to gain insight into their violent behavior and the warning signals for this. The emphasis is on the cooperation between the patient and the nurse in the application of risk management strategies. The Early Recognition Method provides an approach in which patients and nurses also gradually attune their perspectives on aggressive behavior. The concept of early recognition is important because it extends the idea of early intervention to include enabling patients to control their own behavior. Early recognition has strong practical implications for forensic nurses as it allows them to attenuate aggression by assisting patients with the detection of early warning signs.

  15. Leading processes of patient care and treatment in hierarchical healthcare organizations in Sweden--process managers' experiences.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Kerstin; Sandoff, Mette

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to gain better understanding of the roles and functions of process managers by describing Swedish process managers' experiences of leading processes involving patient care and treatment when working in a hierarchical health-care organization. This study is based on an explorative design. The data were gathered from interviews with 12 process managers at three Swedish hospitals. These data underwent qualitative and interpretative analysis with a modified editing style. The process managers' experiences of leading processes in a hierarchical health-care organization are described under three themes: having or not having a mandate, exposure to conflict situations and leading process development. The results indicate a need for clarity regarding process manager's responsibility and work content, which need to be communicated to all managers and staff involved in the patient care and treatment process, irrespective of department. There also needs to be an emphasis on realistic expectations and orientation of the goals that are an intrinsic part of the task of being a process manager. Generalizations from the results of the qualitative interview studies are limited, but a deeper understanding of the phenomenon was reached, which, in turn, can be transferred to similar settings. This study contributes qualitative descriptions of leading care and treatment processes in a functional, hierarchical health-care organization from process managers' experiences, a subject that has not been investigated earlier.

  16. Patient-centered approach to ensuring appropriateness of care through blood management.

    PubMed

    King, Rita; Michelman, Mark; Curran, Vivian; Bean, Jo; Rowden, Paul; Lindsey, Jeffrey

    2013-06-01

    Concerns have been raised about the safety and efficacy of blood transfusions. Blood products are in demand and a decreasing supply is projected, with resource conservation a global concern. A consultant group determined that the transfusion rate at Mease Countryside Hospital was higher than an average baseline. A process-improvement project was initiated using a multidisciplinary team approach to improve blood utilization and ensure appropriateness in transfusion practice. The foundation of this project was to create new guidelines for transfusion; provide detailed education, communication, reporting, and feedback; and develop criteria to ensure compliance. The mean monthly usage of red blood cell units per 1000 inpatient discharges between April 2010 and October 2011 was 321.4 compared with 212.0 for the 5 months after implementation. The mean monthly number of patients transfused per 1000 inpatient discharges from April 2010 to October 2011 was 135.2 compared with 90.2 after implementation. In both cases, this reduction was found to be statistically significant at a 95% confidence level (P = 0.000 in both respects). The success of this project was the result of careful planning and execution, administrative support, physician leadership, and teamwork. Blood management includes strategies to avoid inappropriate transfusions and proactively treat anemia. Anemia management should be based on the patient's symptoms, laboratory values, and clinical assessment. Treatment of anemia should encompass a patient-centered approach, with the aim of promoting patient safety and minimizing the risk from exposure to blood products.

  17. [Nursing care management in dermatological patient on phototherapy narrow band UVB].

    PubMed

    de Argila Fernández-Durán, Nuria; Blasco Maldonado, Celeste; Martín Gómez, Mónica

    2013-01-01

    Phototherapy with narrow band ultraviolet B is a treatment used in some dermatology units, and is the first choice in some dermatological diseases due to being comfortable and cheap. The aim of this paper is to describe the management and nursing care by grouping more specific diagnoses, following NANDA-NIC/NOC taxonomy, such as the methodology from application, technique, material, and personnel to space-related aspects, with the aim of avoiding the clinical variability and the possible associated risks for the patients, and for the nurses who administer the treatment. The continuity of the same nurse in the follow-up sessions stimulates the relationship between medical personnel and patients, key points for loyalty and therapeutic adherence. This paper examines a consensus procedure with the Dermatology Unit Team and accredited by the Hospital Quality Unit.

  18. Barriers and facilitators influencing self-management among COPD patients: a mixed methods exploration in primary and affiliated specialist care.

    PubMed

    Hillebregt, Chantal F; Vlonk, Auke J; Bruijnzeels, Marc A; van Schayck, Onno Cp; Chavannes, Niels H

    2017-01-01

    Self-management is becoming increasingly important in COPD health care although it remains difficult to embed self-management into routine clinical care. The implementation of self-management is understood as a complex interaction at the level of patient, health care provider (HCP), and health system. Nonetheless there is still a poor understanding of the barriers and effective facilitators. Comprehension of these determinants can have significant implications in optimizing self-management implementation and give further directions for the development of self-management interventions. Data were collected among COPD patients (N=46) and their HCPs (N=11) in three general practices and their collaborating affiliated hospitals. Mixed methods exploration of the data was conducted and collected by interviews, video-recorded consultations (N=50), and questionnaires on consultation skills. Influencing determinants were monitored by 1) interaction and communication between the patient and HCP, 2) visible and invisible competencies of both the patient and the HCP, and 3) degree of embedding self-management into the health care system. Video observations showed little emphasis on effective behavioral change and follow-up of given lifestyle advice during consultation. A strong presence of COPD assessment and monitoring negatively affects the patient-centered communication. Both patients and HCPs experience difficulties in defining personalized goals. The satisfaction of both patients and HCPs concerning patient centeredness during consultation was measured by the patient feedback questionnaire on consultation skills. The patients scored high (84.3% maximum score) and differed from the HCPs (26.5% maximum score). Although the patient-centered approach accentuating self-management is one of the dominant paradigms in modern medicine, our observations show several influencing determinants causing difficulties in daily practice implementation. This research is a first step

  19. Barriers and facilitators influencing self-management among COPD patients: a mixed methods exploration in primary and affiliated specialist care

    PubMed Central

    Hillebregt, Chantal F; Vlonk, Auke J; Bruijnzeels, Marc A; van Schayck, Onno CP; Chavannes, Niels H

    2017-01-01

    Self-management is becoming increasingly important in COPD health care although it remains difficult to embed self-management into routine clinical care. The implementation of self-management is understood as a complex interaction at the level of patient, health care provider (HCP), and health system. Nonetheless there is still a poor understanding of the barriers and effective facilitators. Comprehension of these determinants can have significant implications in optimizing self-management implementation and give further directions for the development of self-management interventions. Data were collected among COPD patients (N=46) and their HCPs (N=11) in three general practices and their collaborating affiliated hospitals. Mixed methods exploration of the data was conducted and collected by interviews, video-recorded consultations (N=50), and questionnaires on consultation skills. Influencing determinants were monitored by 1) interaction and communication between the patient and HCP, 2) visible and invisible competencies of both the patient and the HCP, and 3) degree of embedding self-management into the health care system. Video observations showed little emphasis on effective behavioral change and follow-up of given lifestyle advice during consultation. A strong presence of COPD assessment and monitoring negatively affects the patient-centered communication. Both patients and HCPs experience difficulties in defining personalized goals. The satisfaction of both patients and HCPs concerning patient centeredness during consultation was measured by the patient feedback questionnaire on consultation skills. The patients scored high (84.3% maximum score) and differed from the HCPs (26.5% maximum score). Although the patient-centered approach accentuating self-management is one of the dominant paradigms in modern medicine, our observations show several influencing determinants causing difficulties in daily practice implementation. This research is a first step

  20. Safe patient care – safety culture and risk management in otorhinolaryngology

    PubMed Central

    St. Pierre, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Safety culture is positioned at the heart of an organization’s vulnerability to error because of its role in framing organizational awareness to risk and in providing and sustaining effective strategies of risk management. Safety related attitudes of leadership and management play a crucial role in the development of a mature safety culture (“top-down process”). A type marker for organizational culture and thus a predictor for an organization’s maturity in respect to safety is information flow and in particular an organization’s general way of coping with information that suggests anomaly. As all values and beliefs, relationships, learning, and other aspects of organizational safety culture are about sharing and processing information, safety culture has been termed “informed culture”. An informed culture is free of blame and open for information provided by incidents. “Incident reporting systems” are the backbone of a reporting culture, where good information flow is likely to support and encourage other kinds of cooperative behavior, such as problem solving, innovation, and inter-departmental bridging. Another facet of an informed culture is the free flow of information during perioperative patient care. The World Health Organization’s safe surgery checklist” is the most prevalent example of a standardized information exchange aimed at preventing patient harm due to information deficit. In routine tasks mandatory standard operating procedures have gained widespread acceptance in guaranteeing the highest possible process quality. Technical and non-technical skills of healthcare professionals are the decisive human resource for an efficient and safe delivery of patient care and the avoidance of errors. The systematic enhancement of staff qualification by providing training opportunities can be a major investment in patient safety. In recent years several otorhinolaryngology departments have started to incorporate stimulation based team

  1. Quality management in nuclear medicine for better patient care: the IAEA program.

    PubMed

    Dondi, Maurizio; Kashyap, Ravi; Pascual, Thomas; Paez, Diana; Nunez-Miller, Rodolfo

    2013-05-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency promotes the practice of nuclear medicine among its Member States with a focus on quality and safety. It considers quality culture as a part of the educational process and as a tool to reduce heterogeneity in the practice of nuclear medicine, and in turn, patient care. Sensitization about quality is incorporated in all its delivery mechanisms. The Agency has developed a structured peer-review process called quality management (QM) audits in nuclear medicine practices to help nuclear medicine facilities improve their quality through this voluntary comprehensive audit process. The process is multidisciplinary, covering all aspects of nuclear medicine practice with a focus on the patient. It complements other QM and accreditation approaches developed by professional societies or accreditation agencies. The Agency is committed to propagate its utility and assist in the implementation process. Similar auditing programs for practice in diagnostic radiology and radiotherapy, called QUADRIL and QUATRO, respectively, are also in place. Necessary amendments in the auditing process and content are incorporated based on technological and practice changes with time. The reader will become familiar with the approach of the Agency on QM in nuclear medicine and its implementation process to improve patient care.

  2. Patterns of disease presentation and management in Egyptian primary care: findings from a survey of 2458 primary care patient consultations.

    PubMed

    Aboulghate, Ahmed; Abel, Gary; Lyratzopoulos, Georgios; Abdelmohsen, Aida; Hamed, Ahmed R; Roland, Martin

    2013-10-22

    The Egyptian government is considering embarking on a new wave of health sector reform. Although primary care is seen as central to the anticipated reforms, little is known about the current morbidity and utilization patterns in Egyptian publicly funded primary care. We conducted this survey study of patient encounters to describe the demographic characteristics of patients attending publicly-funded primary care practices, the relative frequency of conditions encountered in these practices, and the rates of drug prescription, investigation and referral. Cross-sectional survey of twelve primary care practices and 2458 patient consultations. Additional secondary data were collected from five of the twelve practices for preventive services provided at these practices i.e. immunizations, family planning and ante-natal care. 54% of the attendances were for people below the age of twenty, of which 54% were females. In patients above the age of twenty, women accounted for 73% of consultations. Upper respiratory tract infection was the most common reason for encounter, accounting for 24% of the presentations, followed by gastroenteritis (10%), intestinal parasites (5%), and lower respiratory tract infections (5%). Over 97% of patients were prescribed at least one drug, whereas investigation and referral rates were low (15% and 5% respectively). When the analysis was repeated for practices where data on both curative and preventive services were available (5 practices and 2146 consultations), substantial proportions of patients were found to seek care for immunizations (25%), family planning (12%), and ante-natal care (11%). Most patients utilizing primary care practices in Egypt seek care for minor and preventive services with relatively few consultations for more serious conditions. There is also a pattern of prescribing drugs to most primary care patients which may reflect over-prescribing by primary care doctors.

  3. Patterns of disease presentation and management in Egyptian primary care: findings from a survey of 2458 primary care patient consultations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Egyptian government is considering embarking on a new wave of health sector reform. Although primary care is seen as central to the anticipated reforms, little is known about the current morbidity and utilization patterns in Egyptian publicly funded primary care. We conducted this survey study of patient encounters to describe the demographic characteristics of patients attending publicly-funded primary care practices, the relative frequency of conditions encountered in these practices, and the rates of drug prescription, investigation and referral. Method Cross-sectional survey of twelve primary care practices and 2458 patient consultations. Additional secondary data were collected from five of the twelve practices for preventive services provided at these practices i.e. immunizations, family planning and ante-natal care. Results 54% of the attendances were for people below the age of twenty, of which 54% were females. In patients above the age of twenty, women accounted for 73% of consultations. Upper respiratory tract infection was the most common reason for encounter, accounting for 24% of the presentations, followed by gastroenteritis (10%), intestinal parasites (5%), and lower respiratory tract infections (5%). Over 97% of patients were prescribed at least one drug, whereas investigation and referral rates were low (15% and 5% respectively). When the analysis was repeated for practices where data on both curative and preventive services were available (5 practices and 2146 consultations), substantial proportions of patients were found to seek care for immunizations (25%), family planning (12%), and ante-natal care (11%). Conclusion Most patients utilizing primary care practices in Egypt seek care for minor and preventive services with relatively few consultations for more serious conditions. There is also a pattern of prescribing drugs to most primary care patients which may reflect over-prescribing by primary care doctors. PMID:24148873

  4. Physician - nurse practitioner teams in chronic disease management: the impact on costs, clinical effectiveness, and patients' perception of care.

    PubMed

    Litaker, David; Mion, Lorraine; Planavsky, Loretta; Kippes, Christopher; Mehta, Neil; Frolkis, Joseph

    2003-08-01

    Increasing demand to deliver and document therapeutic and preventive care sharpens the need for disease management strategies that accomplish these goals efficiently while preserving quality of care. The purpose of this study was to compare selected outcomes for a new chronic disease management program involving a nurse practitioner - physician team with those of an existing model of care. One hundred fifty-seven patients with hypertension and diabetes mellitus were randomly assigned to their primary care physician and a nurse practitioner or their primary care physician alone. Costs for personnel directly involved in patient management, calculated from hourly rates and encounter time with patients, and pre- and post-study glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c), satisfaction with care and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) were assessed. Although 1-year costs for personnel were higher in the team-treated group, participants experienced significant improvements in mean HbA(1c) ( - 0.7%, p = 0.02) and HDL-c ( + 2.6 mg dL( - 1), p = 0.02). Additionally, satisfaction with care improved significantly for team-treated subjects in several sub-scales whereas the mean change over time in HRQoL did not differ significantly between groups. This study demonstrates the value of a complementary team approach to chronic disease management in improving patient-derived and clinical outcomes at modest incremental costs.

  5. Training community-based primary care physicians in the screening and management of mental health disorders among Latino primary care patients.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sapana R; Gorritz, Magdaliz; Olfson, Mark; Bell, Michelle A; Jackson, Elizabeth; Sánchez-Lacay, J Arturo; Alfonso, César; Leeman, Eve; Lewis-Fernández, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate a quality improvement intervention to improve the screening and management (e.g., referral to psychiatric care) of common mental disorders in small independent Latino primary care practices serving patient populations of predominantly low-income Latino immigrants. In seven practices, academic detailing and consultation/liaison psychiatry were first implemented (Stage 1) and then supplemented with appointment scheduling and reminders to primary care physicians (PCPs) by clinic staff (Stage 2). Acceptability and feasibility were assessed with independent patient samples during each stage. Participating PCP found the interventions acceptable and noted that referrals to language-matched specialty care and case-by-case consultation on medication management were particularly beneficial. The academic detailing and consultation/liaison intervention (Stage 1) did not significantly affect PCP screening, management or patient satisfaction with care. When support for appointment scheduling and reminders (Stage 2) was added, however, PCP referral to psychiatric services increased (P=.04), and referred patients were significantly more likely to follow through and have more visits to mental health professionals (P=.04). Improving the quality of mental health care in low-resourced primary care settings may require academic detailing and consultation/liaison psychiatric intervention supplemented with staff outreach to achieve meaningful improvement in the processes of care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Management of arterial lines and blood sampling in intensive care: a threat to patient safety.

    PubMed

    Leslie, R A; Gouldson, S; Habib, N; Harris, N; Murray, H; Wells, V; Cook, T M

    2013-11-01

    In 2008, the UK National Patient Safety Agency (NPSA) made recommendations for safe arterial line management. Following a patient safety incident in our intensive care unit (ICU), we surveyed current practice in arterial line management and determined whether these recommendations had been adopted. We contacted all 241 adult ICUs in the UK; 228 (94.6%) completed the survey. Some NPSA recommendations have been widely implemented - use of sodium chloride 0.9% as flush fluid, two-person checking of fluids before use - and their practice was consistent. Others have been incompletely implemented and many areas of practice (prescription of fluids, two-person checking at shift changes, use of opaque pressure bags, arterial sampling technique) were highly variable. More importantly, the use of the wrong fluid as an arterial flush was reported by 30% of respondents for ICU practice, and a further 30% for practice elsewhere in the hospital. Our survey provides evidence of continuing risk to patients. © 2013 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  7. Topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for management of osteoarthritis in long-term care patients

    PubMed Central

    Argoff, Charles E; Gloth, F Michael

    2011-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is common in patients ≥65 years of age. Although nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are often prescribed for osteoarthritis pain, they pose age-related cardiovascular, renal, and gastrointestinal risks. Two topical NSAIDs, diclofenac sodium 1% gel (DSG) and diclofenac sodium 1.5% in 45.5% dimethylsulfoxide solution (D-DMSO), are approved in the US for the treatment of osteoarthritis pain. Topical NSAIDs have shown efficacy and safety in knee (DSG, D-DMSO) and hand (DSG) osteoarthritis. Analyses of data from randomized controlled trials of DSG in hand and knee osteoarthritis demonstrate significant improvement of pain and function in both younger patients (<65 years) and older patients (≥65 years) and suggest good safety and tolerability. However, long-term safety data in older patients are limited. Topical NSAIDs can ease medication administration and help address barriers to pain management in older patients, such as taking multiple medications and inability to swallow, and are a valuable option for long-term care providers. PMID:22076115

  8. Technology-facilitated depression care management among predominantly Latino diabetes patients within a public safety net care system: comparative effectiveness trial design.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shinyi; Ell, Kathleen; Gross-Schulman, Sandra G; Sklaroff, Laura Myerchin; Katon, Wayne J; Nezu, Art M; Lee, Pey-Jiuan; Vidyanti, Irene; Chou, Chih-Ping; Guterman, Jeffrey J

    2014-03-01

    Health disparities in minority populations are well recognized. Hispanics and Latinos constitute the largest ethnic minority group in the United States; a significant proportion receives their care via a safety net. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus and comorbid depression is high among this group, but the uptake of evidence-based collaborative depression care management has been suboptimal. The study design and baseline characteristics of the enrolled sample in the Diabetes-Depression Care-management Adoption Trial (DCAT) establishes a quasi-experimental comparative effectiveness research clinical trial aimed at accelerating the adoption of collaborative depression care in safety net clinics. The study was conducted in collaboration with the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services at eight county-operated clinics. DCAT has enrolled 1406 low-income, predominantly Hispanic/Latino patients with diabetes to test a translational model of depression care management. This three-group study compares usual care with a collaborative care team support model and a technology-facilitated depression care model that provides automated telephonic depression screening and monitoring tailored to patient conditions and preferences. Call results are integrated into a diabetes disease management registry that delivers provider notifications, generates tasks, and issues critical alerts. All subjects receive comprehensive assessments at baseline, 6, 12, and 18 months by independent English-Spanish bilingual interviewers. Study outcomes include depression outcomes, treatment adherence, satisfaction, acceptance of assessment and monitoring technology, social and economic stress reduction, diabetes self-care management, health care utilization, and care management model cost and cost-effectiveness comparisons. DCAT's goal is to optimize depression screening, treatment, follow-up, outcomes, and cost savings to reduce health disparities.

  9. A CNS-managed diabetes foot-care clinic: a descriptive survey of characteristics and foot-care behaviors of the patient population.

    PubMed

    Willoughby, D; Burroughs, D

    2001-03-01

    Lower extremity lesions are the primary cause of hospitalization for people with diabetes, resulting in enormous personal and financial costs. This study used a survey designed to describe the characteristics and foot-care behaviors of people with diabetes who attended a clinical nurse specialist managed foot-care clinic. Forty-eight patients who received care at the participating foot-care clinic completed a 21-item multiple-choice questionnaire designed to determine the presence of foot pathology and foot-care behaviors. Most of the patients were between 65 and 74 years of age, had concurrent illnesses, and had four or more primary care visits per year. Although 69% had existing foot pathology, only 44% reported inspecting their feet daily and only 54% reported that their primary care provider examined their feet on each visit. Twenty-five percent reported going barefoot sometimes and eight percent would either treat a foot lesion themselves or wait for it to get better.

  10. INFORM—A Data Base Management System for Patient Care Data

    PubMed Central

    Naddor, Eliezer; Drachman, Robert H.; O'Neill, Michael J.

    1982-01-01

    INFORM is a highly flexible data base management system, which rapidly and efficiently permits the organization and preparation of a data base. It then provides options for adding, searching, and tabulating information. Depending on the complexity of a new system, it may be ready for use in just a few hours. Additions to the data base are carefully edited and many options are available for entering information, including an audit trail. INFORM is particularly suited to situations where the exact content and magnitude of patient records are subject to modifications over time. The Master record in INFORM may include patient identifying information as well as fields that summarize visits or other events, which appear in detail in other subfiles of the system. The subfile records may contain information about patient care and laboratory events and are automatically linked to the corresponding master summary record. Fields may be transferred from the subsidiary records to the master record, or counters in the master records may be incremented as information is added to the subfiles. For example, the master may contain a counter for the number of hematology tests carried out, as well as fields which are updated as new hematology results are reported. Consequently, the master may contain counts of the number of determinations, as well as the last white blood count, hematocrit or hemoglobin, and differential, if so desired. INFORM has been used for a pediatric medical records system, a prenatal clinic, a demonstration child abuse registry as well as other projects. Its application to an Ambulatory Care visit summary system is discussed and illustrated.

  11. A disease management programme for patients with diabetes mellitus is associated with improved quality of care within existing budgets.

    PubMed

    Steuten, L M G; Vrijhoef, H J M; Landewé-Cleuren, S; Schaper, N; Van Merode, G G; Spreeuwenberg, C

    2007-10-01

    To assess the impact of a disease management programme for patients with diabetes mellitus (Type 1 and Type 2) on cost-effectiveness, quality of life and patient self-management. By organizing care in accordance with the principles of disease management, it is aimed to increase quality of care within existing budgets. Single-group, pre-post design with 2-year follow-up in 473 patients. Substantial significant improvements in glycaemic control, health-related quality of life (HRQL) and patient self-management were found. No significant changes were detected in total costs of care. The probability that the disease management programme is cost-effective compared with usual care amounts to 74%, expressed in an average saving of 117 per additional life year at 5% improved HRQL. Introduction of a disease management programme for patients with diabetes is associated with improved intermediate outcomes within existing budgets. Further research should focus on long-term cost-effectiveness, including diabetic complications and mortality, in a controlled setting or by using decision-analytic modelling techniques.

  12. Nursing Care Management: Influence on Bundled Payments.

    PubMed

    Lentz, Shaynie; Luther, Brenda

    Fragmented and uncoordinated care is the third highest driver of U.S. healthcare costs. Although less than 10% of patients experience uncoordinated care, these patients represent 36% of total healthcare costs; care management interaction makes a significant impact on the utilization of healthcare dollars. A literature search was conducted to construct a model of care coordination for elective surgical procedures by collecting best practices for acute, transitions, and post-acute care periods. A case study was used to demonstrate the model developed. Care management defines care coordination as a model of care to address improving patient and caregiver engagement, communication across settings of care, and ultimately improved patient outcomes of care. Nurse-led care coordination in the presurgical, inpatient, and post-acute care settings requires systems change and administrative support to effectively meet the goals of the Affordable Care Act of reducing redundancy and costs while improving the patient experience. Nursing is the lynchpin of care management processes in all settings of care; thus, this model of care coordination for elective surgical admissions can provide nursing care management leaders a comprehensive view of coordinating care for these patient across settings of care during the predetermined time period of care. As bundled payment structures increasingly affect hospital systems, nursing leaders need to be ready to create or improve their care management processes; care coordination is one such process requiring immediate attention.

  13. Trust and trustworthy care in the managed care era.

    PubMed

    Gray, B H

    1997-01-01

    Trust is essential to the doctor/patient relationship, but trust in physicians' fiduciary ethic has become less plausible as a protector of patients' interests. The rise of managed care often is seen as undermining the fiduciary ethic and lessening the trustworthiness of care. But can managed care enhance that trustworthiness? Four possible sources of trustworthiness in managed care are discussed: ethical standards in the managed care industry, nonprofit organizations, physician control, and performance monitoring by purchasers. Limitations on all of these fronts suggest the continuing importance of a strong fiduciary ethic on the part of physicians who make patient care decisions.

  14. Improvements in Care and Reduced Self-Management Barriers Among Rural Patients With Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dettori, Nancy; Flook, Benjamin N.; Pessl, Erich; Quesenberry, Kim; Loh, Johnson; Harris, Colleen; McDowall, Janet M.; Butcher, Marcene K.; Helgerson, Steven D.; Gohdes, Dorothy; Harwell, Todd S.

    2005-01-01

    Improved preventive care and clinical outcomes among patients with diabetes can reduce complications and costs; however, diabetes care continues to be suboptimal. Few studies have described effective strategies for improving care among rural populations with diabetes. In 2000, the Park County Diabetes Project and the Montana Diabetes Control…

  15. Improvements in Care and Reduced Self-Management Barriers Among Rural Patients With Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dettori, Nancy; Flook, Benjamin N.; Pessl, Erich; Quesenberry, Kim; Loh, Johnson; Harris, Colleen; McDowall, Janet M.; Butcher, Marcene K.; Helgerson, Steven D.; Gohdes, Dorothy; Harwell, Todd S.

    2005-01-01

    Improved preventive care and clinical outcomes among patients with diabetes can reduce complications and costs; however, diabetes care continues to be suboptimal. Few studies have described effective strategies for improving care among rural populations with diabetes. In 2000, the Park County Diabetes Project and the Montana Diabetes Control…

  16. Management of ethical issues related to care of seriously ill dialysis patients in free-standing facilities.

    PubMed

    Song, Mi-Kyung; Hanson, Laura C; Gilet, Constance A; Jo, Minjeong; Reed, Teresa J; Hladik, Gerald A

    2014-09-01

    There are few data on the frequency and current management of clinical ethical issues related to care of seriously ill dialysis patients in free-standing dialysis facilities. To examine the extent of clinical ethical challenges experienced by care providers in free-standing facilities and their perceptions about how those issues are managed. A total of 183 care providers recruited from 15 facilities in North Carolina completed a survey regarding the occurrence and management of ethical issues in the past year. Care plan meetings were observed at four of the facilities for three consecutive months. Also, current policies and procedures at each of the facilities were reviewed. The two most frequently experienced challenges involved dialyzing frail patients with multiple comorbidities and caring for disruptive/difficult patients. The most common ways of managing ethical issues were discussions in care plan meetings (n = 47) or discussions with the clinic manager (n = 47). Although policies were in place to guide management of some of the challenges, respondents were often not aware of those policies. Also, although participants reported that ethical issues related to dialyzing undocumented immigrants were fairly common, no facility had a policy for managing this challenge. Participants suggested that all staff obtain training in clinical ethics and communication skills, facilities develop ethics teams, and there be clear policies to guide management of ethical challenges. The scope of ethical challenges was extensive, how these challenges were managed varied widely, and there were limited resources for assistance. Multifaceted efforts, encompassing endeavors at the individual, facility, organization, and national levels, are needed to support staff in improving the management of ethical challenges in dialysis facilities. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Pediatric irritable bowel syndrome patient and parental characteristics differ by care management type

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study evaluates whether certain patient or parental characteristics are associated with gastroenterology (GI) referral versus primary pediatrics care for pediatric irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). A retrospective clinical trial sample of patients meeting pediatric Rome III IBS criteria was assem...

  18. Curbing the urge to care: A Bourdieusian analysis of the effect of the caring disposition on nurse middle managers' clinical leadership in patient safety practices.

    PubMed

    Lalleman, P C B; Smid, G A C; Lagerwey, M D; Shortridge-Baggett, L M; Schuurmans, M J

    2016-11-01

    Nurse managers play an important role in implementing patient safety practices in hospitals. However, the influence of their professional background on their clinical leadership behaviour remains unclear. Research has demonstrated that concepts of Bourdieu (dispositions of habitus, capital and field) help to describe this influence. It revealed various configurations of dispositions of the habitus in which a caring disposition plays a crucial role. We explore how the caring disposition of nurse middle managers' habitus influences their clinical leadership behaviour in patient safety practices. Our paper reports the findings of a Bourdieusian, multi-site, ethnographic case study. Two Dutch and two American acute care, mid-sized, non-profit hospitals. A total of 16 nurse middle managers of adult care units. Observations were made over 560h of shadowing nurse middle managers, semi-structured interviews and member check meetings with the participants. We observed three distinct configurations of dispositions of the habitus which influenced the clinical leadership of nurse middle managers in patient safety practices; they all include a caring disposition: (1) a configuration with a dominant caring disposition that was helpful (via solving urgent matters) and hindering (via ad hoc and reactive actions, leading to quick fixes and 'compensatory modes'); (2) a configuration with an interaction of caring and collegial dispositions that led to an absence of clinical involvement and discouraged patient safety practices; and (3) a configuration with a dominant scientific disposition showing an investigative, non-judging, analytic stance, a focus on evidence-based practice that curbs the ad hoc repertoire of the caring disposition. The dispositions of the nurse middle managers' habitus influenced their clinical leadership in patient safety practices. A dominance of the caring disposition, which meant 'always' answering calls for help and reactive and ad hoc reactions, did not

  19. [Self-responsibility in health care using the example of medication management from the chronically ill patient's perspective].

    PubMed

    Haslbeck, J W; Schaeffer, D

    2011-03-01

    With rising costs in health care, especially in the area of pharmaceuticals, patients are expected to be more involved in managing their care. Concepts such as shared decision-making or self-management support in chronic illness have been suggested as a way to facilitate this process and to empower patients. It is unclear however, whether the self-responsible patient role outlined in these concepts aligns with the patient's needs. The aim of this paper is to examine this proposed self-responsible role with regard to the patient's medication management needs and to discuss whether self-responsibility and autonomy are suitable concepts when illness-related challenges become difficult or complex. Selected findings from a qualitative longitudinal study on medication management from the perspective of people with chronic conditions are presented. Results from interviews with 27 patients indicate that both the patient's view and the challenges people with chronic conditions face in everyday life remain a 'blind spot' in health care. Providing information to improve health literacy may not be enough; there is a need to systematically support patients in developing skills to adequately (self-)manage a chronic condition. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Patient participation in quality pain management during an acute care admission.

    PubMed

    McTier, Lauren J; Botti, Mari; Duke, Maxine

    2014-04-01

    The objective of the study was to explore patient participation in the context of pain management during a hospital admission for a cardiac surgical intervention of patients with cardiovascular disease. This is a single-institution study, with a case-study design. The unit of analysis was a cardiothoracic ward of a major metropolitan, tertiary referral hospital in Melbourne, Australia. Multiple methods of data collection were used including preadmission and predischarge patient interviews (n=98), naturalistic observations (n=48), and focus group interviews (n=2). Patients' preference for participation in pain management was not always commensurate with their involvement in pain management. Patients displayed a greater understanding of their role in pain management in terms of reporting pain and the use of multimodal analgesics after surgery. The majority of patients, however, did not understand the importance of reporting pain to avoid complications. Patients had limited opportunity to participate in their pain management. On occasions in which clinicians did involve patients, the involvement appeared to be focused on reporting pain rather than treatment of pain. Patient participation in pain management during hospitalization is not optimal. This has implications for the quality of pain management patients receive. Higher engagement of patients in their pain management during hospitalization is required to ensure comfort, reduce potential for complications, and adequately prepare the patients to manage their pain following discharge from hospital.

  1. Bumps on the managed care road: the search for an alternative model to reduce collisions between HMOs, physicians, and patients.

    PubMed

    Reece, R L

    2000-01-01

    Managed care is experiencing political, litigious, and financial bumps on the road. There are various reasons for this bumpy ride: out-of-control costs, prescription drug expense, negative media reports, public revolt at denials of care or limited access to specialists, bad physician relations, patients' rights legislation, dropping health maintenance organization (HMO) stock prices, the ripple effect of the Harvard Pilgrim bankruptcy, and threat of massive litigation against HMOs. Two reasons not often mentioned, but explored in this article, are the orthodox managed care's flawed market model and lack of enough understanding of physician culture and emerging consumer trends to effectively address these two key constituencies.

  2. Management of primary metastatic breast cancer in elderly patients--an international comparison of oncogeriatric versus standard care.

    PubMed

    van de Water, Willemien; Bastiaannet, Esther; Egan, Kathleen M; de Craen, Anton J M; Westendorp, Rudi G J; Balducci, Lodovico; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Liefers, Gerrit-Jan; Extermann, Martine

    2014-07-01

    An oncogeriatric approach may affect management of elderly patients with breast cancer. However, little is known about oncogeriatric care in the metastatic setting. Therefore, we performed an international comparison of management of elderly patients with primary metastatic disease who were treated in two different care settings. Patients who were ≥70years at diagnosis of primary metastatic disease were eligible. The first cohort comprised a population-based cohort of 104 patients (Comprehensive Cancer Center West, The Netherlands), who all received standard care. The second cohort comprised a hospital-based cohort of 42 patients (H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Florida, United States), who all received oncogeriatric care. No large differences in patient and tumor characteristics were observed between both cohorts. Most patients in the standard care cohort received systemic therapy as primary therapy, whereas most patients in the oncogeriatric cohort received a combination of systemic and local therapy. Patients in the standard care cohort received fewer lines of treatment (mean number of treatments 2.1 vs. 3.6, p<0.001), and particularly received less breast surgery, chemotherapy, and trastuzumab. Three-year overall mortality was 71% (95% CI: 61-83%) as compared to 58% (95% CI: 42-75%) among patients in the oncogeriatric care cohort (multivariable HR: 1.59 [95% CI: 0.88-2.87], p=0.125). In primary metastatic breast cancer, oncogeriatric care intensifies treatment and might improve survival in elderly patients. Future studies on a larger scale should investigate the potential for improved survival, and whether this is accompanied by a better (preservation of) quality of life and functional status. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Six-Month Outcomes for Collaborative Care Management of Depression Among Smoking and Nonsmoking Patients.

    PubMed

    Witt, Daniel R; Garrison, Gregory M; Gonzalez, Cesar A; Witt, Terrence J; Angstman, Kurt B

    2017-01-01

    Collaborative care management (CCM) is an evidence-based model that contributes to better outcomes for depression treatment in the primary care setting. Tobacco use increases overall economic costs, morbidity, and mortality and has been shown to impact behavioral health outcomes. Our study aims to observe clinical outcomes for depression treatment for patients with comorbid tobacco use and depression within the CCM model. A retrospective chart review study of 2826 adult patients with depression enrolled in CCM was performed to determine the association between regular tobacco use and depression outcomes. Baseline intake data consisting of clinical and demographic variables along with 6-month follow-up of Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) scores for smokers (n = 727, 25.7%) and nonsmokers (n = 2099, 74.3%) were obtained. Depression remission was defined as a PHQ-9 score <5 and persistent depressive symptoms (PDS) as a PHQ-9 score ≥10 at 6 months. Using an intention-to-treat analysis, the multivariate modeling demonstrated that smokers, at 6 months, had an increased adjusted odds ratio (AOR) for PDS: 1.624 (95% CI: 1.353-1.949). Furthermore, smokers had a lower AOR of depression remission: 0.603 (95% CI: 0.492-0.739). Patient adherence to treatment was also lower in smokers with an AOR of 0.666 (95% CI: 0.553-0.802). Smokers enrolled in CCM were associated with reduced treatment adherence and worse outcomes for depression treatment at 6 months compared to nonsmokers, even when baseline clinical and demographic variables were controlled. Thus, new tailored practices may be warranted within the CCM model to treat comorbid depression and tobacco use disorders.

  4. Case Management in Primary Care for Frequent Users of Health Care Services With Chronic Diseases: A Qualitative Study of Patient and Family Experience

    PubMed Central

    Hudon, Catherine; Chouinard, Maud-Christine; Diadiou, Fatoumata; Lambert, Mireille; Bouliane, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Although case management (CM) is increasingly being implemented to address the complex needs of vulnerable clienteles, few studies have examined the patient experience of CM. This study aimed to examine the experience of patients and their family members with care integration as part of a primary care CM intervention. Patients in the study were frequent users of health care services who had chronic diseases. METHODS A descriptive, qualitative approach was conducted involving 25 patients and 8 of their family members. Data were collected through in-depth interviews of the patients and 2 focus groups of family members and were analyzed thematically. RESULTS While some participants did not fully understand the CM intervention and a few believed that it involved too many appointments, the CM nurses were patients’ preferred contact with primary care. The nurses actively involved the patients in developing and carrying out their individualized services plans (ISPs) with other health care partners. Patients felt that their needs were taken into consideration, especially regarding access to the health care system. The case manager facilitated access to information as well as communication and coordination among health care and community partners. This improved communication comforted the patients and nurtured a relationship of trust. Participants were actively involved in decision-making. Their ISPs helped them know where they were going and improved transitions between services. CONCLUSIONS The experience of patients and family members was overall very positive regarding care integration. They reported improved access, communication, coordination, and involvement in decision-making as well as better health care transitions. PMID:26553891

  5. Health care engineering management.

    PubMed

    Jarzembski, W B

    1980-01-01

    Today, health care engineering management is merely a concept of dreamers, with most engineering decisions in health care being made by nonengineers. It is the purpose of this paper to present a rationale for an integrated hospital engineering group, and to acquaint the clinical engineer with some of the salient features of management concepts. Included are general management concepts, organization, personnel management, and hospital engineering systems.

  6. Do critical care units play a role in the management of gynaecological oncology patients? The contribution of gynaecologic oncologist in running critical care units.

    PubMed

    Davidovic-Grigoraki, Miona; Thomakos, Nikolaos; Haidopoulos, Dimitrios; Vlahos, Giorgos; Rodolakis, Alexandros

    2017-03-01

    Routine post-operative care in high dependency unit (HDU), surgical intensive care unit (SICU) and intensive care unit (ICU) after high-risk gynaecological oncology surgical procedures may allow for greater recognition and correct management of post-operative complications, thereby reducing long-term morbidity and mortality. On the other hand, unnecessary admissions to these units lead to increased morbidity - nosocomial infections, increased length of hospital stay and higher hospital costs. Gynaecological oncology surgeons continue to look after their patient in the HDU/SICU and have the final role in decision-making on day-to-day basis, making it important to be well versed in critical care management and ensure the best care for their patients. Post-operative monitoring and the presence of comorbid illnesses are the most common reasons for admission to the HDU/SICU. Elderly and malnutritioned patients, as well as, bowel resection, blood loss or greater fluid resuscitation during the surgery have prolonged HDU/SICU stay. Patients with ovarian cancer have a worse survival outcome than the patients with other types of gynaecological cancer. Dependency care is a part of surgical management and it should be incorporated formally into gynaecologic oncology training programme.

  7. Managed health care.

    PubMed

    Curtiss, F R

    1989-04-01

    The fundamental components of managed-care plans are described; the development of managed-care programs is discussed; and the impact of managed care on pharmacy services and the price, quality, and accessibility of health care are reviewed. Health care can be considered to be managed when at least one of the following fundamental components is present: prospective pricing, "UCR" (usual, customary, and reasonable) pricing of services, peer review, mandatory use review, benefit redesign, capitation payments, channeling, quality criteria, and health promotion. The managed-care industry consists of health maintenance organizations (HMOs), preferred provider organizations (PPOs), and managed fee-for-service plans. Managed-care reimbursement principles involve transferring some or all of the impetus for controlling use of services to the health-care provider. Means by which this is done include prospective pricing, services bundling, price discounts and negotiated fees, and capitation financing and reimbursement. Financial risk-sharing arrangements with providers--including hospitals, physicians, pharmacies, and home-care companies--are necessary for any managed-care plan to attain true control over its service costs. Use-review and use-management services are also fundamental to containing health-care spending. These include retrospective, concurrent, and prospective reviews of the necessity and appropriateness of medical services. Use management, like services bundling and prospective pricing, has been more effective in reducing costs of hospital inpatient services than costs associated with ambulatory care. Per case payments and services bundling have made individual charges for items irrelevant to hospital revenue. This has forced hospital pharmacy managers to become more sensitive to cost management. Drug formularies, improved productivity, and use of prescribing protocols are means by which hospital pharmacies have controlled costs. However, since shorter hospital

  8. Involvement of a Case Manager in Palliative Care Reduces Hospitalisations at the End of Life in Cancer Patients; A Mortality Follow-Back Study in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    van der Plas, Annicka G. M.; Vissers, Kris C.; Francke, Anneke L.; Donker, Gé A.; Jansen, Wim J. J.; Deliens, Luc; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Case managers have been introduced in primary palliative care in the Netherlands; these are nurses with expertise in palliative care who offer support to patients and informal carers in addition to the care provided by the general practitioner (GP) and home-care nurse. Objectives To compare cancer patients with and without additional support from a case manager on: 1) the patients’ general characteristics, 2) characteristics of care and support given by the GP, 3) palliative care outcomes. Methods This article is based on questionnaire data provided by GPs participating in two different studies: the Sentimelc study (280 cancer patients) and the Capalca study (167 cancer patients). The Sentimelc study is a mortality follow-back study amongst a representative sample of GPs that monitors the care provided via GPs to a general population of end-of-life patients. Data from 2011 and 2012 were analysed. The Capalca study is a prospective study investigating the implementation and outcome of the support provided by case managers in primary palliative care. Data were gathered between March 2011 and December 2013. Results The GP is more likely to know the preferred place of death (OR 7.06; CI 3.47-14.36), the place of death is more likely to be at the home (OR 2.16; CI 1.33-3.51) and less likely to be the hospital (OR 0.26; CI 0.13-0.52), and there are fewer hospitalisations in the last 30 days of life (none: OR 1.99; CI 1.12-3.56 and one: OR 0.54; CI 0.30-0.96), when cancer patients receive additional support from a case manager compared with patients receiving the standard GP care. Conclusions Involvement of a case manager has added value in addition to palliative care provided by the GP, even though the role of the case manager is ‘only’ advisory and he or she does not provide hands-on care or prescribe medication. PMID:26208099

  9. Care Coordination/Home Telehealth: the systematic implementation of health informatics, home telehealth, and disease management to support the care of veteran patients with chronic conditions.

    PubMed

    Darkins, Adam; Ryan, Patricia; Kobb, Rita; Foster, Linda; Edmonson, Ellen; Wakefield, Bonnie; Lancaster, Anne E

    2008-12-01

    Between July 2003 and December 2007, the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) introduced a national home telehealth program, Care Coordination/Home Telehealth (CCHT). Its purpose was to coordinate the care of veteran patients with chronic conditions and avoid their unnecessary admission to long-term institutional care. Demographic changes in the veteran population necessitate VHA increase its noninstitutional care (NIC) services 100% above its 2007 level to provide care for 110,000 NIC patients by 2011. By 2011, CCHT will meet 50% of VHA's anticipated NIC provision. CCHT involves the systematic implementation of health informatics, home telehealth, and disease management technologies. It helps patients live independently at home. Between 2003 and 2007, the census figure (point prevalence) for VHA CCHT patients increased from 2,000 to 31,570 (1,500% growth). CCHT is now a routine NIC service provided by VHA to support veteran patients with chronic conditions as they age. CCHT patients are predominantly male (95%) and aged 65 years or older. Strict criteria determine patient eligibility for enrollment into the program and VHA internally assesses how well its CCHT programs meet standardized clinical, technology, and managerial requirements. VHA has trained 5,000 staff to provide CCHT. Routine analysis of data obtained for quality and performance purposes from a cohort of 17,025 CCHT patients shows the benefits of a 25% reduction in numbers of bed days of care, 19% reduction in numbers of hospital admissions, and mean satisfaction score rating of 86% after enrolment into the program. The cost of CCHT is $1,600 per patient per annum, substantially less than other NIC programs and nursing home care. VHA's experience is that an enterprise-wide home telehealth implementation is an appropriate and cost-effective way of managing chronic care patients in both urban and rural settings.

  10. Chronic care management for patients with COPD: a critical review of available evidence.

    PubMed

    Lemmens, Karin M M; Lemmens, Lidwien C; Boom, José H C; Drewes, Hanneke W; Meeuwissen, Jolanda A C; Steuten, Lotte M G; Vrijhoef, Hubertus J M; Baan, Caroline A

    2013-10-01

    Clinical diversity and methodological heterogeneity exists between studies on chronic care management. This study aimed to examine the effectiveness of chronic care management in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) while taking heterogeneity into account, enabling the understanding of and the decision making about such programmes. Three investigated sources of heterogeneity were study quality, length of follow-up, and number of intervention components. We performed a review of previously published reviews and meta-analyses on COPD chronic care management. Their primary studies that were analyzed as statistical, clinical and methodological heterogeneity were present. Meta-regression analyses were performed to explain the variances among the primary studies. Generally, the included reviews showed positive results on quality of life and hospitalizations. Inconclusive effects were found on emergency department visits and no effects on mortality. Pooled effects on hospitalizations, emergency department visits and quality of life of primary studies did not reach significant improvement. No effects were found on mortality. Meta-regression showed that the number of components of chronic care management programmes explained present heterogeneity for hospitalizations and emergency department visits. Four components showed significant effects on hospitalizations, whereas two components had significant effects on emergency department visits. Methodological study quality and length of follow-up did not significantly explain heterogeneity. This study demonstrated that COPD chronic care management has the potential to improve outcomes of care; heterogeneity in outcomes was explained. Further research is needed to elucidate the diversity between COPD chronic care management studies in terms of the effects measured and strengthen the support for chronic care management. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Answers to Clinical Questions in the Primary Care Management of People with Obesity: Communication and Patient Self-Management.

    PubMed

    Campos, Carlos; Nadglowski, Joseph

    2016-07-01

    Body weight is a sensitive subject for most people; this statement is particularly true for people who are overweight or have obesity, because social stigmatization is common not only in society but also in the health care setting. Health care providers are often unaware of their own biases toward patients with obesity. Here's how to improve your communication and support of these patients.

  12. Engaging Patients in Online Self-Care Technologies for Chronic Disease Management.

    PubMed

    Picton, Peter; Wiljer, David; Urowitz, Sara; Cafazzo, Joseph A

    2016-01-01

    A common perception is that the use of Internet-based self-care systems is best suited for a younger, tech-proficient population, and that these systems will increase the burden on patients with complex chronic conditions. The study stratified patients with diabetes into three regimens of use of an Internet-based diabetes self-care portal. Results show that patients were more likely to adhere to a diurnal regimen than a variable regimen, and older patients, over the age of 60, were more adherent than younger patients, regardless of regimen. This suggests that common misconceptions should be reconsidered when prescribing Internet-based interventions for patients with chronic illness.

  13. Physician reimbursement perception for outpatient procedures and procedures among managed care patients with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Catherine; Tierney, Edward F.; Herman, William H.; Mangione, Carol M.; Venkat Narayan, K.M.; Gerzoff, Robert B.; Bilik, Dori; Ettner, Susan L.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the association between physicians’ reimbursement perceptions and outpatient test performance. Previous studies have documented an association between reimbursement perceptions and electrocardiogram performance, but not for other common outpatient procedures. STUDY DESIGN Cross-sectional analysis. METHODS Participants were physicians (n = 766) and their managed care patients with diabetes mellitus (n = 2758) enrolled in 6 plans in 2003. Procedures measured included electrocardiograms, radiographs or x-rays, urine microalbumin measures, hemoglobin A1cs, and Pap smears for women. Hierarchical logistic regression models were adjusted for health plan and physician level clustering and for physician and patient covariates. To minimize confounding by unmeasured health plan variables, we adjusted for plan as a fixed effect. Thus, we estimated variation between physicians using only the variance within health plans. RESULTS Patients of physicians who reported reimbursement for electrocardiograms were more likely to receive electrocardiograms than patients of physicians who did not perceive reimbursement (unadjusted mean difference 4.9% (95% confidence interval, 1.1% to 8.9%)) and adjusted mean difference 3.9% (95% confidence interval, 0.21% to 7.8%)). For the other tests examined, no significant differences in procedure performance were found between patients of physicians who perceived reimbursement and patients of physicians who did not perceive reimbursement. CONCLUSIONS Our findings suggest that reimbursement perception was associated with electrocardiograms, but not with other commonly performed outpatient procedures. Future research should investigate how associations change with perceived amount of reimbursement and interactions with other influences upon test-ordering behavior such as perceived appropriateness. PMID:19146362

  14. Management of Hypoglycemia in Nondiabetic Palliative Care Patients: A Prognosis-Based Approach

    PubMed Central

    Kok, Victor C.; Lee, Ping-Hsueh

    2016-01-01

    Hypoglycemia due to underlying terminal illness in nondiabetic end-of-life patients receiving palliative care has not been fully studied. For example, we do not have adequate information on the frequency of spontaneous hypoglycemia in patients as occurs during the different stages of palliative care. Depending on the case-mix nature of the palliative care ward, at least 2% of palliative care patients may develop hypoglycemia near the end of life when the remaining life expectancy counts down in days. As many as 25%–60% of these patients will neither have autonomic response nor have neuroglycopenic symptoms during a hypoglycemic episode. Although it is not difficult to diagnose and confirm a true hypoglycemia when it is suspected clinically, an episode of hypoglycemic attack may go unnoticed in some patients in a hospice setting. Current trends in palliative care focus on providing treatments based on a prognosis-based framework, involving shared decision-making between the patient and caregivers, after considering the prognosis, professional recommendations, patient’s autonomy, family expectations, and the current methods for treating the patient’s physical symptoms and existential suffering. This paper provides professional care teams with both moral and literature support for providing care to nondiabetic patients presenting with hypoglycemia. PMID:27920549

  15. Palliative Care Office Hours for Patients with Hematologic Malignancies: An Innovative Model for Symptom Management and Education.

    PubMed

    Foxwell, Anessa M; Moyer, Mary E; Casarett, David J; O'Connor, Nina R

    2017-10-01

    Palliative care programs are experiencing rapid growth, with demand for consults surpassing staffing. Innovative models are needed to equip nonpalliative care providers to manage basic palliative care issues. To develop a novel program of palliative care office hours for hematologic oncology advanced practice providers, and to evaluate its impact on palliative care consult volume and composition. A palliative care nurse practitioner or pharmacist was available for weekday office hours to all inpatient hematologic oncology advanced practice providers at an academic medical center to offer advice on pain, nonpain symptoms, and psychosocial distress. A retrospective study looking at outcome measures after six months of office hour utilization and palliative care consults from the hematologic oncology services. Palliative care office hours had a mean duration of 16 minutes per day (range 5 to 55). A mean of 11 patients were discussed per week (range 4 to 20). Pain, nausea, and anxiety were the issues most frequently raised. Of 299 patients discussed during office hours, 44 (14.7%) subsequently required a full palliative care consult. Overall, palliative care consults from the hematologic oncology services decreased from 19.6% to 10.2% of admissions (87/445 vs. 61/594, p < 0.001) with an increase in consults for goals of care. Office hours are an efficient way to address palliative care needs when demand for palliative care consults exceeds capacity. Office hours may serve an educational function as well, enabling primary teams to manage basic palliative care issues with increasing independence over time.

  16. Patient Self-Management of Diabetes Care in the Inpatient Setting

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Arti D.; Rushakoff, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Self-management of diabetes by inpatients can be problematic. People with type 1 diabetes often prefer to self-manage their diabetes in the inpatient setting. We report the case of a patient admitted to the surgical service who was self-administering his home insulin, often without telling his nurse or physician. He was aiming for tight glycemic control, which resulted in life-threatening hypoglycemia. While patients can often self-manage their diabetes in the outpatient setting, inpatient management of diabetes is very different. Patients may not be familiar with common scenarios requiring adjustments of insulin therapy. Therefore, we recommend against self-management of diabetes in the hospital. However, the patients should be involved in discussions about management of their diabetes in the hospital to allay their concerns about changes made to their insulin regimens. An example of successful cooperative management is with use of protocols that allow continued use of insulin pumps in the hospital. PMID:25990293

  17. Effectiveness of Case Management for 'At Risk' Patients in Primary Care: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, Jonathan; Panagioti, Maria; Alam, Rahul; Checkland, Kath; Cheraghi-Sohi, Sudeh; Bower, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background An ageing population with multimorbidity is putting pressure on health systems. A popular method of managing this pressure is identification of patients in primary care ‘at-risk’ of hospitalisation, and delivering case management to improve outcomes and avoid admissions. However, the effectiveness of this model has not been subjected to rigorous quantitative synthesis. Methods and Findings We carried out a systematic review and meta-analysis of the effectiveness of case management for ‘at-risk’ patients in primary care. Six bibliographic databases were searched using terms for ‘case management’, ‘primary care’, and a methodology filter (Cochrane EPOC group). Effectiveness compared to usual care was measured across a number of relevant outcomes: Health – self-assessed health status, mortality; Cost – total cost of care, healthcare utilisation (primary and non-specialist care and secondary care separately), and; Satisfaction – patient satisfaction. We conducted secondary subgroup analyses to assess whether effectiveness was moderated by the particular model of case management, context, and study design. A total of 15,327 titles and abstracts were screened, 36 unique studies were included. Meta-analyses showed no significant differences in total cost, mortality, utilisation of primary or secondary care. A very small significant effect favouring case management was found for self-reported health status in the short-term (0.07, 95% CI 0.00 to 0.14). A small significant effect favouring case management was found for patient satisfaction in the short- (0.26, 0.16 to 0.36) and long-term (0.35, 0.04 to 0.66). Secondary subgroup analyses suggested the effectiveness of case management may be increased when delivered by a multidisciplinary team, when a social worker was involved, and when delivered in a setting rated as low in initial ‘strength’ of primary care. Conclusions This was the first meta-analytic review which examined the effects

  18. Health Care Systems Support to Enhance Patient-Centered Care: Lessons from a Primary Care-Based Chronic Pain Management Initiative.

    PubMed

    Elder, Charles R; Debar, Lynn L; Ritenbaugh, Cheryl; Rumptz, Maureen H; Patterson, Charlotte; Bonifay, Allison; Cowan, Penney; Lancaster, Lindsay; Deyo, Richard A

    2017-01-01

    Supporting day-to-day self-care activities has emerged as a best practice when caring for patients with chronic pain, yet providing this support may introduce challenges for both patients and primary care physicians. It is essential to develop tools that help patients identify the issues and outcomes that are most important to them and to communicate this information to primary care physicians at the point of care. We describe our process to engage patients, primary care physicians, and other stakeholders in the context of a pilot randomized controlled trial of a patient-centered assessment process implemented in an everyday practice setting. We identify lessons on how to engage stakeholders and improve patient-centered care for those with chronic conditions within the primary care setting. A qualitative analysis of project minutes, interviews, and focus groups was conducted to evaluate stakeholder experiences. Stakeholders included patients, caregivers, clinicians, medical office support staff, health plan administrators, an information technology consultant, and a patient advocate. Our stakeholders included many patients with no prior experience with research. This approach enriched the applicability of feedback but necessitated extra time for stakeholder training and meeting preparation. Types of stakeholders varied over the course of the project, and more involvement of medical assistants and Information Technology staff was required than originally anticipated. Meaningful engagement of patient and physician stakeholders must be solicited in a well-coordinated manner with broad health care system supports in place to ensure full execution of patient-centered processes.

  19. A framework for measuring self-management effectiveness and health care use among pediatric asthma patients and families.

    PubMed

    Rangachari, Pavani

    2017-01-01

    Asthma is associated with substantial health care expenditures, including an estimated US$56 billion per year in direct costs. A recurring theme in the asthma management literature is that costly asthma symptoms, including hospitalizations and multiple emergency department (ED)/outpatient visits, can often be prevented through patient/family adherence to the national (National Institutes of Health Expert Panel Report-3) guidelines for effective self-management of asthma, specifically 1) medication adherence and 2) environmental trigger avoidance, as outlined in the patient's personalized Asthma-Action Plan. It is important to note however that while effective self-management of asthma is known to reduce ED visits and hospitalizations, the relationship between asthma self-management effectiveness and outpatient visit frequency remains ambiguous, reflecting a gap in the literature. For instance, do patients/families who self-manage effectively visit outpatient clinics more frequently for asthma care (compared to those who do not self-manage effectively), after accounting for differences in asthma severity, demographic characteristics, and risk factors? Do patients/families who visit outpatient clinics more frequently for asthma care, in turn have fewer ED and inpatient encounters for asthma? On the other hand, do patients/families who do not revisit outpatient clinics regularly have higher ED visits and hospitalizations? It is important to address these gaps, in order to reduce the costs and public health burden of asthma. This paper provides a foundation for addressing these gaps, by conducting an integrative review of the asthma management literature, to develop a conceptual framework for measuring self-management effectiveness and health care use among pediatric asthma patients/families. In doing so, the paper lays the groundwork for future research seeking to explicate the relationship between asthma self-management effectiveness and health care use, which in

  20. Trust in managed care organizations.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Allen

    2000-09-01

    Two basic criticisms of managed care are that it erodes patient trust in physicians and subjects physicians to incentives and pressures that compromise the physician's fiduciary obligation to the patient. In this article, I first distinguish between status trust and merit trust, and then argue (1) that the value of status trust in physicians is probably over-rated and certainly underdocumented; (2) that erosion of status trust may not be detrimental if accompanied by an increase in well-founded merit trust; and (3) that under conditions of managed care the physician's commitment to traditional medical ethics cannot serve as an adequate basis for merit trust. Next, drawing on an analogy between managed care organzations and politics, I argue that (4) the most appropriate basis for merit trust in managed care is a conception of organizational legitimacy that includes procedural justice, empowerment of constructive criticism within the organization, and organizational accommodation of the noninstrumental commitment to patient well-being that is distinctive of medical professionalism. I then explore the conditions necessary for robust competition for merit trust among managed care organizations and indicate the kinds of public policies needed to facilitate such competition. Finally, I show how the account of organization-based merit trust can accommodate the special fiduciary obligation of medical professionals, without indulging in the delusion that it is the physician's fiduciary obligation always to provide all care that is expected to be of any net benefit to the patient.

  1. Managing risk during care transitions when approaching end of life: A qualitative study of patients' and health care professionals' decision making.

    PubMed

    Coombs, Maureen A; Parker, Roses; de Vries, Kay

    2017-07-01

    Increasing importance is being placed on the coordination of services at the end of life. To describe decision-making processes that influence transitions in care when approaching the end of life. Qualitative study using field observations and longitudinal semi-structured interviews. Field observations were undertaken in three sites: a residential care home, a medical assessment unit and a general medical unit in New Zealand. The Supportive and Palliative Care Indicators Tool was used to identify participants with advanced and progressive illness. Patients and family members were interviewed on recruitment and 3-4 months later. Four weeks of fieldwork were conducted in each site. A total of 40 interviews were conducted: 29 initial interviews and 11 follow-up interviews. Thematic analysis was undertaken. Managing risk was an important factor that influenced transitions in care. Patients and health care staff held different perspectives on how such risks were managed. At home, patients tolerated increasing risk and used specific support measures to manage often escalating health and social problems. In contrast, decisions about discharge in hospital were driven by hospital staff who were risk-adverse. Availability of community and carer services supported risk management while a perceived need for early discharge decision making in hospital and making 'safe' discharge options informed hospital discharge decisions. While managing risk is an important factor during care transitions, patients should be able to make choices on how to live with risk at the end of life. This requires reconsideration of transitional care and current discharge planning processes at the end of life.

  2. Effectiveness of integrated disease management for primary care chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients: results of cluster randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Kruis, Annemarije L; Boland, Melinde R S; Assendelft, Willem J J; Gussekloo, Jacobijn; Tsiachristas, Apostolos; Stijnen, Theo; Blom, Coert; Sont, Jacob K; Rutten-van Mölken, Maureen P H M; Chavannes, Niels H

    2014-09-10

    To investigate the long term effectiveness of integrated disease management delivered in primary care on quality of life in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) compared with usual care. 24 month, multicentre, pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial 40 general practices in the western part of the Netherlands Patients with COPD according to GOLD (Global Initiative for COPD) criteria. Exclusion criteria were terminal illness, cognitive impairment, alcohol or drug misuse, and inability to fill in Dutch questionnaires. Practices were included if they were willing to create a multidisciplinary COPD team. General practitioners, practice nurses, and specialised physiotherapists in the intervention group received a two day training course on incorporating integrated disease management in practice, including early recognition of exacerbations and self management, smoking cessation, physiotherapeutic reactivation, optimal diagnosis, and drug adherence. Additionally, the course served as a network platform and collaborating healthcare providers designed an individual practice plan to integrate integrated disease management into daily practice. The control group continued usual care (based on international guidelines). The primary outcome was difference in health status at 12 months, measured by the Clinical COPD Questionnaire (CCQ); quality of life, Medical Research Council dyspnoea, exacerbation related outcomes, self management, physical activity, and level of integrated care (PACIC) were also assessed as secondary outcomes. Of a total of 1086 patients from 40 clusters, 20 practices (554 patients) were randomly assigned to the intervention group and 20 clusters (532 patients) to the usual care group. No difference was seen between groups in the CCQ at 12 months (mean difference -0.01, 95% confidence interval -0.10 to 0.08; P=0.8). After 12 months, no differences were seen in secondary outcomes between groups, except for the PACIC domain "follow

  3. Effectiveness of integrated disease management for primary care chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients: results of cluster randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Boland, Melinde R S; Assendelft, Willem J J; Gussekloo, Jacobijn; Tsiachristas, Apostolos; Stijnen, Theo; Blom, Coert; Sont, Jacob K; Rutten-van Mölken, Maureen P H M; Chavannes, Niels H

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the long term effectiveness of integrated disease management delivered in primary care on quality of life in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) compared with usual care. Design 24 month, multicentre, pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial Setting 40 general practices in the western part of the Netherlands Participants Patients with COPD according to GOLD (Global Initiative for COPD) criteria. Exclusion criteria were terminal illness, cognitive impairment, alcohol or drug misuse, and inability to fill in Dutch questionnaires. Practices were included if they were willing to create a multidisciplinary COPD team. Intervention General practitioners, practice nurses, and specialised physiotherapists in the intervention group received a two day training course on incorporating integrated disease management in practice, including early recognition of exacerbations and self management, smoking cessation, physiotherapeutic reactivation, optimal diagnosis, and drug adherence. Additionally, the course served as a network platform and collaborating healthcare providers designed an individual practice plan to integrate integrated disease management into daily practice. The control group continued usual care (based on international guidelines). Main outcome measures The primary outcome was difference in health status at 12 months, measured by the Clinical COPD Questionnaire (CCQ); quality of life, Medical Research Council dyspnoea, exacerbation related outcomes, self management, physical activity, and level of integrated care (PACIC) were also assessed as secondary outcomes. Results Of a total of 1086 patients from 40 clusters, 20 practices (554 patients) were randomly assigned to the intervention group and 20 clusters (532 patients) to the usual care group. No difference was seen between groups in the CCQ at 12 months (mean difference –0.01, 95% confidence interval –0.10 to 0.08; P=0.8). After 12 months, no differences

  4. Primary care physician management, referral, and relations with specialists concerning patients at risk for cancer due to family history.

    PubMed

    Wood, M E; Flynn, B S; Stockdale, A

    2013-01-01

    Risk stratification based on family history is a feature of screening guidelines for a number of cancers and referral guidelines for genetic counseling/testing for cancer risk. Our aim was to describe primary care physician perceptions of their role in managing cancer risk based on family history. Structured interviews were conducted by a medical anthropologist with primary care physicians in 3 settings in 2 north-eastern states. Transcripts were systematically analyzed by a research team to identify major themes expressed by participants. Forty interviews were conducted from May 2003 through May 2006. Physicians provided a diversity of views on roles in management of cancer risk based on family history, management practices and patient responses to risk information. They also provided a wide range of perspectives on criteria used for referral to specialists, types of specialists referred to and expected management roles for referred patients. Some primary care physicians appeared to make effective use of family history information for cancer risk management, but many in this sample did not. Increased focus on efficient assessment tools based on recognized guidelines, accessible guides to management options, and patient education and decision aids may be useful directions to facilitate broader use of family history information for cancer risk management. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Pain management in trauma patients in (pre)hospital based emergency care: current practice versus new guideline.

    PubMed

    Scholten, A C; Berben, S A A; Westmaas, A H; van Grunsven, P M; de Vaal, E T; Rood, P P M; Hoogerwerf, N; Doggen, C J M; Schoonhoven, L

    2015-05-01

    Acute pain in trauma patients in emergency care is still undertreated. Early pain treatment is assumed to effectively reduce pain in patients and improve long-term outcomes. In order to improve pain management in the chain of emergency care, a national evidence-based guideline was developed. The aim of this study was to assess whether current practice is in compliance with the guideline 'Pain management for trauma patients in the chain of emergency care' from the Netherlands Association for Emergency Nurses (in Dutch NVSHV), and to evaluate early and initial pain management for adult trauma patients in emergency care. Chart reviews were conducted in three regions of the Netherlands using electronic patient files of trauma patients from the chain of emergency care. We included one after-hours General Practitioner Co-operation (GPC), one ambulance Emergency Medical Services (EMS), two Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS), and three Emergency Departments (EDs). Organisation of pain management, pain assessment, and pain treatment was examined and compared with national guideline recommendations, including quality indicators. We assessed a random sample of 1066 electronic patient files. The use of standardised tools to assess pain was registered in zero to 52% of the electronic patient files per organisation. Registration of (non-)pharmacological pain treatment was found in less than half of the files. According to the files, pharmacological pain treatment deviated from the guideline in 73-99% of the files. Time of administration of medication was missing in 73-100%. Reassessment of pain following pain medication was recorded in half of the files by the HEMS, but not in files of the other organisations. The (registration of) current pain management in trauma patients in the chain of emergency care varies widely between healthcare organisation, and deviates from national guideline recommendations. Although guideline compliance differs across groups of healthcare

  6. Coupling Direct Collection of Health Risk Information from Patients through Kiosks with Decision Support for Proactive Care Management

    PubMed Central

    Lobach, David F.; Silvey, Garry M.; Willis, Janese M.; Kooy, Kevin R.; Kawamoto, Kensaku; Anstrom, Kevin J.; Eisenstein, Eric L.; Johnson, Frederick

    2008-01-01

    Data collection from patients for use in clinical decision making is foundational for medical practice. Increasingly, kiosks are being used to facilitate direct data collection from patients. However, kiosk-collected data are generally not integrated into the care process. In this project, 4,014 people initiated a kiosk-administered health risk assessment questionnaire using a free-standing public-access kiosk. For 201 of these initiated sessions, kiosk users supplied a Medicaid identification number which allowed their data to be integrated into a regional health information exchange and reviewed by a standards-based clinical decision support system. This system identified 479 survey responses which had been predetermined to warrant follow-up. Notices about these sentinel responses were emailed to care managers and sent to clinical sites. While this study demonstrates the feasibility of collecting and acting on patient-entered health data, it also identifies key challenges to providing proactive care management in this manner. PMID:18999181

  7. Coupling direct collection of health risk information from patients through kiosks with decision support for proactive care management.

    PubMed

    Lobach, David F; Silvey, Garry M; Willis, Janese M; Kooy, Kevin R; Kawamoto, Kensaku; Anstrom, Kevin J; Eisenstein, Eric L; Johnson, Fredrick

    2008-11-06

    Data collection from patients for use in clinical decision making is foundational for medical practice. Increasingly, kiosks are being used to facilitate direct data collection from patients. However, kiosk-collected data are generally not integrated into the care process. In this project, 4,014 people initiated a kiosk-administered health risk assessment questionnaire using a free-standing public-access kiosk. For 201 of these initiated sessions, kiosk users supplied a Medicaid identification number which allowed their data to be integrated into a regional health information exchange and reviewed by a standards-based clinical decision support system. This system identified 479 survey responses which had been predetermined to warrant follow-up. Notices about these sentinel responses were emailed to care managers and sent to clinical sites. While this study demonstrates the feasibility of collecting and acting on patient-entered health data, it also identifies key challenges to providing proactive care management in this manner.

  8. Disease Management, Case Management, Care Management, and Care Coordination: A Framework and a Brief Manual for Care Programs and Staff.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Osman I

    2016-01-01

    With the changing landscape of health care delivery in the United States since the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act in 2010, health care organizations have struggled to keep pace with the evolving paradigm, particularly as it pertains to population health management. New nomenclature emerged to describe components of the new environment, and familiar words were put to use in an entirely different context. This article proposes a working framework for activities performed in case management, disease management, care management, and care coordination. The author offers standard working definitions for some of the most frequently used words in the health care industry with the goal of increasing consistency for their use, especially in the backdrop of the Centers for Medicaid & Medicare Services offering a "chronic case management fee" to primary care providers for managing the sickest, high-cost Medicare patients. Health care organizations performing case management, care management, disease management, and care coordination. Road map for consistency among users, in reporting, comparison, and for success of care management/coordination programs. This article offers a working framework for disease managers, case and care managers, and care coordinators. It suggests standard definitions to use for disease management, case management, care management, and care coordination. Moreover, the use of clear terminology will facilitate comparing, contrasting, and evaluating all care programs and increase consistency. The article can improve understanding of care program components and success factors, estimate program value and effectiveness, heighten awareness of consumer engagement tools, recognize current state and challenges for care programs, understand the role of health information technology solutions in care programs, and use information and knowledge gained to assess and improve care programs to design the "next generation" of programs.

  9. Physician-Driven Management of Patient Progress Notes in an Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Lauren; Lu, Jie; Lai, Jennifer; Feiner, Steven; Jordan, Desmond

    2016-01-01

    We describe fieldwork in which we studied hospital ICU physicians and their strategies and documentation aids for composing patient progress notes. We then present a clinical documentation prototype, activeNotes, that supports the creation of these notes, using techniques designed based on our fieldwork. ActiveNotes integrates automated, context-sensitive patient data retrieval, and user control of automated data updates and alerts via tagging, into the documentation process. We performed a qualitative study of activeNotes with 15 physicians at the hospital to explore the utility of our information retrieval and tagging techniques. The physicians indicated their desire to use tags for a number of purposes, some of them extensions to what we intended, and others new to us and unexplored in other systems of which we are aware. We discuss the physicians’ responses to our prototype and distill several of their proposed uses of tags: to assist in note content management, communication with other clinicians, and care delivery. PMID:28004041

  10. RCT of a Care Manager Intervention for Major Depression in Primary Care: 2-Year Costs for Patients With Physical vs Psychological Complaints

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, L. Miriam; Rost, Kathryn; Nutting, Paul A.; Elliott, Carl E.; Keeley, Robert D.; Pincus, Harold

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE Depression care management for primary care patients results in sustained improvement in clinical outcomes with diminishing costs over time. Clinical benefits, however, are concentrated primarily in patients who report to their primary care clinicians psychological rather than exclusively physical symptoms. This study proposes to determine whether the intervention affects outpatient costs differentially when comparing patients who have psychological with patients who have physical complaints. METHODS We undertook a group-randomized controlled trial (RCT) of depression comparing intervention with usual care in 12 primary care practices. Intervention practices encouraged depressed patients to engage in active treatment, using nurses to provide regularly scheduled care management for 24 months. The study sample included 200 adults beginning a new depression treatment episode where patient presentation style could be identified. Outpatient costs were defined as intervention plus outpatient treatment costs for the 2 years. Cost-offset analysis used general linear mixed models, 2-part models, and bootstrapping to test hypotheses regarding a differential intervention effect by patients’ style, and to obtain 95% confidence intervals for costs. RESULTS Intervention effects on outpatient costs over time differed by patient style (P <.05), resulting in a $980 cost decrease for depressed patients who complain of psychological symptoms and a $1,378 cost increase for depressed patients who complain of physical symptoms only. CONCLUSIONS Depression intervention for a 2-year period produced observable clinical benefit with decreased outpatient costs for depressed patients who complain of psychological symptoms. It produced limited clinical benefit with increased costs, however, for depressed patients who complain exclusively of physical symptoms, suggesting the need for developing new intervention approaches for this group. PMID:15671186

  11. A framework for measuring self-management effectiveness and health care use among pediatric asthma patients and families

    PubMed Central

    Rangachari, Pavani

    2017-01-01

    Asthma is associated with substantial health care expenditures, including an estimated US$56 billion per year in direct costs. A recurring theme in the asthma management literature is that costly asthma symptoms, including hospitalizations and multiple emergency department (ED)/outpatient visits, can often be prevented through patient/family adherence to the national (National Institutes of Health Expert Panel Report-3) guidelines for effective self-management of asthma, specifically 1) medication adherence and 2) environmental trigger avoidance, as outlined in the patient’s personalized Asthma-Action Plan. It is important to note however that while effective self-management of asthma is known to reduce ED visits and hospitalizations, the relationship between asthma self-management effectiveness and outpatient visit frequency remains ambiguous, reflecting a gap in the literature. For instance, do patients/families who self-manage effectively visit outpatient clinics more frequently for asthma care (compared to those who do not self-manage effectively), after accounting for differences in asthma severity, demographic characteristics, and risk factors? Do patients/families who visit outpatient clinics more frequently for asthma care, in turn have fewer ED and inpatient encounters for asthma? On the other hand, do patients/families who do not revisit outpatient clinics regularly have higher ED visits and hospitalizations? It is important to address these gaps, in order to reduce the costs and public health burden of asthma. This paper provides a foundation for addressing these gaps, by conducting an integrative review of the asthma management literature, to develop a conceptual framework for measuring self-management effectiveness and health care use among pediatric asthma patients/families. In doing so, the paper lays the groundwork for future research seeking to explicate the relationship between asthma self-management effectiveness and health care use, which in

  12. [Model of a prospective follow-up study of patients managed in intensive care].

    PubMed

    Ritz, R

    1988-04-30

    For ethical and economic reasons, follow-up--especially after intensive care--is important as a form of quality control which could serve as a basis for more differentiated indications for patient admission. A follow-up model, involving questionnaires 3 months, 1 year and 3 years after intensive care, and preliminary results of patients in 1985 are presented. Only a few patients described their present health situation as bad, but unstable situations showed little improvement between 3 months and 1 year after intensive care. There was a rather high percentage of rehospitalization and/or need for continued medical care. Only 10% of respondent patients were unable to work 1 year after intensive care, and 12% still depended on help from others. 15-35% described their quality of life as restricted; only 4% had negative memories of intensive care (fear, pain), and only 0.6% of respondent patients thought their previous admission to the intensive care unit had been a wrong decision.

  13. The Impact of Systematic Point-of-Care Ultrasound on Management of Patients in a Resource-Limited Setting.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Alastair; Wajanga, Bahati M K; Jaka, Hyasinta; Purcell, Rachael; Byrne, Lauren; Williams, Felicity; Rypien, Candace; Sharpe, Abigail; Laws, Patrick; Faustine, Lucas; Leeme, Tshepo; Mwabutwa, Emmanuel; Peck, Robert; Stephens, Matthew; Kaminstein, Daniel

    2017-02-08

    Although target point-of-care (POC) ultrasonography has been shown to benefit patients in resource-limited settings, it is not clear whether a systematic POC ultrasound assessment in these settings can also lead to similar changes in patient management. A predefined systematic set of POC ultrasound scans were performed on inpatients at a tertiary referral hospital in Tanzania to see if this resulted in changes to patient management. Of the 55 patients scanned, an abnormality was detected in 75% (N = 41), and a change in patient management was recommended or implemented on the basis of POC ultrasound findings in 53% (N = 29). The main impact was earlier initiation of treatment due to more rapid and accurate diagnosis. Further research is warranted to determine whether systematic POC ultrasonography would result in improved patient outcomes in resource-limited settings.

  14. Use of telephone care in a cardiovascular disease management programme for type 2 diabetes patients in Santiago, Chile.

    PubMed

    Piette, John D; Lange, Ilta; Issel, Michelle; Campos, Solange; Bustamante, Claudia; Sapag, Jaime; Poblete, Fernando; Tugwell, Peter; O'Connor, Annette M

    2006-06-01

    In 2004, the Chilean National Ministry of Health instituted a cardiovascular disease (CVD) management programme aimed at improving diabetes care among patients treated in the public healthcare system. We sought to identify the characteristics of patients participating in the CVD programme and the feasibility of extending its reach through structured nurse telephone contacts between outpatient encounters. We surveyed 569 low-income adults with type 2 diabetes treated in public clinics of Santiago, to assess patients' participation in the CVD programme and willingness to use telephone care services. Surveys were linked to information from medical records. One-third of patients met the target of two visits to the CVD programme in the previous 6 months, and an additional 32% made more than three visits. Use of the CVD programme was associated with greater patient satisfaction, even after controlling for potential confounders. However, 27% of patients had inadequate programme contact, and many of these patients were in poor health. Many CVD programme participants reported difficulties with lifestyle changes, and greater contact with the CVD programme was not associated with healthier behaviours. Most patients (95%) reported telephone access and 37% had used the telephone to contact their clinic. The majority of patients would be willing to use telephone care for additional behaviour change and emotional support. Patients with fewer CVD programme visits were particularly likely to report willingness to use telephone care. Clinic-based CVD disease management services reach a large number of socio-economically vulnerable Chileans with diabetes. However, barriers to access remain, and planned telephone care services may increase the reach of self-management support.

  15. Simulating Patterns of Patient Engagement, Treatment Adherence, and Viral Suppression: A System Dynamics Approach to Evaluating HIV Care Management

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Brian; Palma, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Abstract System dynamics (SD) modeling belongs to the rapidly evolving, interdisciplinary field of system science research. This field adds value to more traditional health research by contributing to the design and testing of complex integrated models of change, to examine health system performance and patient outcomes. Using selected milestones in HIV care management to frame our simulation research, we created a SD model to examine three patient subgroups of women of color (WOC) represented in our multi-site cohort, classified by their health care seeking status at baseline. Asked to reflect on their circumstance 6 months prior to enrollment in the MSE cohort, 53% noted they were receiving some care (In Care, n=341), 31% that they had been seeking care (Seeking Care, n=201), and 16% that they were undecided about seeking care (i.e., answered that they may or may not look for care) for treatment of their HIV (May or May Not Seek Care, n=103). Our SD model compared simulated patterns of patient retention over 24 months in relation to: (1) access to antiretroviral therapy (ART), (2) adherence to ART, and (3) viral suppression. Assessed patterns yielded insights about system capacities and constraints in the context of the SPNS initiative under evaluation. PMID:25561309

  16. [Access to care, access to rights, and health education: stakes of the global management fo patients].

    PubMed

    Moutel, G; Hervé, C

    2001-04-21

    Together with primary care physicians, the public health clinic of the Max Fourestier Hospital (Nanterre, France) initiated a pilot experience within the framework of its access to health care network (ADES). In addition to full access to traditional health care, patients who agree to participate in this unique network benefit from a medical and social risk screening and prevention program. This program is proposed to all patients who, by definition, have one or more medical or social risk factors. At each visit, targeted history taking and the physical exam can lead to individualized propositions for a global approach to screening and prevention, whatever the initial reason for consulting. In addition, patients who require permanent care benefit from the dose link between the medical care and social care teams. Over the last year, this experience has involved 3430 consultations in a polyvalent clinic that has provided global care including health education and screening for health risks. Our analysis of the medical and ethical issues involved points out the importance of a global approach to health care.

  17. Legal aspects of orthodontic practice: risk management concepts. The uncooperative patient: terminating orthodontic care.

    PubMed

    Machen, D E

    1990-06-01

    In this and succeeding issues of the American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, factual risk management scenarios will be presented. These scenarios are based on composites of actual court cases that have been tried to verdict or decision. Valuable risk management lessons may be learned from careful analysis of the course of the events described. Please be advised that the standard of care determined in any case is specific for that jurisdiction and that set of facts as established by expert testimony for the prevailing party.

  18. Managing HIV/hepatitis positive patients: present approach of dental health care workers and students.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Nagesh; Baad, Rajendra; Nagpal, Deepak Kumar J; Prabhu, Prashant R; Surekha, L Chavan; Karande, Prasad

    2012-11-01

    People with HIV/HBsAg in India frequently encounter discrimination while seeking and receiving health care services. The knowledge and attitudes of health care workers (HCWs) influences the willingness and ability of people with HIV/HBsAg to access care, and the quality of the care they receive. The objective of this study was to asses HIV/HBsAg-related knowledge, attitudes and risk perception among students and dental HCWs. A cross-sectional survey was conducted on 250 students and 120 dental HCWs in the form of objective questionnaire. Information was gathered regarding demographic details (age, sex, duration of employment, job category); HIV/ HBsAg-related knowledge and attitudes; risk perception; and previous experience caring for HIV-positive patients. The HCWs in this study generally had a positive attitude to care for the people with HIV/HBsAg. However, this was tempered by substantial concerns about providing care, and the fear of occupational infection with HIV/HBsAg. A continuing dental education program was conducted to resolve all the queries found interfering to provide care to HIV/HBsAg patients. But even after the queries were resolved the care providing capability was not attained. These findings show that even with advanced knowledge and facilities the attitude of dental HCWs and students require more strategic training with regards to the ethics and moral stigma associated with the dreaded infectious diseases (HIV/HBsAg).

  19. Information technology-enabled team-based, patient-centered care: The example of depression screening and management in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, Gurvaneet S; Ahern, David K; Hesse, Bradford W

    2017-03-01

    The existing healthcare delivery systems across the world need to be redesigned to ensure high-quality care is delivered to all patients. This redesign needs to ensure care is knowledge-based, patient-centered and systems-minded. The rapid advances in the capabilities of information and communication technology and its recent rapid adoption in healthcare delivery have ensured this technology will play a vital role in the redesign of the healthcare delivery system. This commentary highlights promising new developments in health information technology (IT) that can support patient engagement and self-management as well as team-based, patient-centered care. Collaborative care is an effective approach to screen and treat depression in cancer patients and it is a good example of the benefits of team-based and patient-centered care. However, this approach was developed prior to the widespread adoption and use of health IT. We provide examples to illustrate how health IT can improve prevention and treatment of depression in cancer patients. We found several knowledge gaps that limit our ability to realize the full potential of health IT in the context of cancer and comorbid depression care. These gaps need to be filled to improve patient engagement; enhance the reach and effectiveness of collaborative care and web-based programs to prevent and treat depression in cancer patients. We also identify knowledge gaps in health IT design and implementation. Filling these gaps will help shape policies that enable clinical teams to deliver high-quality cancer care globally.

  20. Usual care and management of fall risk increasing drugs in older dizzy patients in Dutch general practice.

    PubMed

    Stam, Hanneke; Harting, Thomas; Sluijs, Marjolijn van der; Marum, Rob van; Horst, Henriëtte van der; Wouden, Johannes C van der; Maarsingh, Otto R

    2016-06-01

    For general practitioners (GPs) dizziness is a challenging condition to deal with. Data on the management of dizziness in older patients are mostly lacking. Furthermore, it is unknown whether GPs attempt to decrease Fall Risk Increasing Drugs (FRIDs) use in the management of dizziness in older patients. The aim of this study is to gain more insight into GP's management of dizziness in older patients, including FRID evaluation and adjustment. Data were derived from electronic medical records, obtained over a 12-month period in 2013. Forty-six Dutch general practices. The study sample comprised of 2812 older dizzy patients of 65 years and over. Patients were identified using International Classification of Primary Care codes and free text. Usual care was categorized into wait-and-see strategy (no treatment initiated); education and advice; additional testing; medication adjustment; and referral. Frequently applied treatments included a wait-and-see strategy (28.4%) and education and advice (28.0%). Additional testing was performed in 26.8%; 19.0% of the patients were referred. Of the patients 87.2% had at least one FRID prescription. During the observation period, GPs adjusted the use of one or more FRIDs for 11.7% of the patients. This study revealed a wide variety in management strategies for dizziness in older adults. The referral rate for dizziness was high compared to prior research. Although many older dizzy patients use at least one FRID, FRID evaluation and adjustment is scarce. We expect that more FRID adjustments may reduce dizziness and dizziness-related impairment. Key Points It is important to know how general practitioners manage dizziness in older patients in order to assess potential cues for improvement. This study revealed a wide variety in management strategies for dizziness in older patients. There was a scarcity in Fall Risk Increasing Drug (FRID) evaluation and adjustment. The referral rate for dizziness was high compared with previous research.

  1. Assessing the extent of provision of comprehensive medical care management for female sexual assault patients in US hospital emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ashlesha; Roston, Alicia; Tilmon, Sandra; Stern, Lisa; Roston, Arden; Patel, Daksha; Keith, Louis

    2013-10-01

    To describe medical services provided to sexual assault patients in US emergency departments and to identify the percentage of hospitals always providing the 10 elements of comprehensive medical care management (CMCM). A cross-sectional study was conducted in a national sample of US hospitals. A 26-item telephone survey assessed provision of services to sexual assault survivors in accordance with CMCM. Management included acute medical care comprising history and physical examination; acute and long-term rape crisis counseling; STI testing and prophylaxis; emergency contraception counseling and provision; and HIV testing and prophylaxis. The primary outcome was extent of provision of these elements. Overall, 582 emergency departments responded to the survey. The following components of CMCM were provided: acute medical care (582 [100.0%]); rape crisis counseling (234 [40.2%]); STI management (448 [77.0%]); emergency contraception (351 [60.3%]); and HIV management (380 [65.3%]). Only 101 (17.4%) hospitals provided all 10 elements of CMCM. Less than one-fifth of US hospitals provide comprehensive services to sexual assault patients. A national program incorporating clinical guidelines, checklists, and funding for sexual assault forensic/nurse examiner programs could improve the standard of care provided in emergency departments-the primary point of contact for acute care of sexual assault survivors. © 2013.

  2. The impact of managed care in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Clouse, H R

    1999-01-01

    Managed care plans attempt to control health care expenditures aggressively. These plans directly influence access to medical care and the type, level, and frequency of care rendered. As a result, hospital stays are reduced, focus shifts from inpatient to outpatient care, and patients are responsible for a larger share of health care costs. Dentistry is not immune from the impact of managed care. The attractiveness of the dental market has drawn many managed care organizations, insurers, and entrepreneurs to encourage dentists to participate in a wide variety of managed care programs. However, the delivery of dental care differs markedly in many respects from that of medical care. Therefore, many of the cost saving aspects of managed care that have been so successful in medicine may not result in similar cost savings in dentistry.

  3. Use of the short form 36 in a primary care based disease management program for patients with congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Sidorov, Jaan; Shull, Robert D; Girolami, Sabrina; Mensch, Debra

    2003-01-01

    While disease management has been described as an important strategy for the care of patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) in the managed care setting, little is known about the impact of this approach on overall health-related quality of life. In this study the Short Form 36 (SF-36) was administered to all patients entering CHF disease management at the time of program entry and at 1 year following entry. Scores on the eight subscales and the two composite scales were calculated and compared before and after. Patients were enrolled from a mixed-model health maintenance organization (HMO) with 34,740 Medicare + Choice enrollees residing in 38 counties in central and northeastern Pennsylvania. Two hundred sixty-eight continuously enrolled patients in an HMO-sponsored CHF disease state management program with completed baseline and follow-up SF-36 surveys were sampled. All patients entered into disease management received primary care based, nurse-directed education about CHF self-management including instruction on etiology of CHF, the importance of medication compliance, home care services if indicated, monitoring weight gain, increased understanding of the warning signs of worsening CHF, and coaching on strategies to contact a physician in a timely manner when CHF worsens. Nurses also facilitated for CHF guidelines among primary care physicians, including the need to obtain a baseline assessment of cardiac function, prescribe angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and beta blockers when appropriate, and initiated appropriate specialist referral. Compared with enrollees who did not complete a pair of SF-36 surveys, the 268 respondents were younger and had a significantly higher rate of cardiac imaging as well as use of ACE inhibitors and beta blocker medications. Analysis of the SF-36 data revealed that three of the eight (Role Physical, General Health Perceptions, and Role Emotional) subscales increased in a statistically significant manner, as

  4. Intensive care unit versus hospital floor: a comparative study of postoperative management of patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Shan, Le-Qun; Skaggs, David L; Lee, Christopher; Kissinger, Catherine; Myung, Karen S

    2013-04-03

    Patients undergoing posterior spinal instrumentation and fusion surgery for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis were admitted to the intensive care unit until two years ago, at which time we changed our protocol to admit these patients to the general hospital floor following a brief stay in a postanesthesia care unit. This study compared postoperative management on a hospital floor with that in the intensive care unit for patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis undergoing posterior spinal fusion. A retrospective review of 124 consecutive patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis treated with spinal fusion from August 2007 to August 2010 was performed. Inclusion criteria were a diagnosis of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and posterior spinal instrumentation and fusion surgery. Of 124 patients, sixty-six were managed postoperatively in the intensive care unit and fifty-eight, on the hospital floor. The mean age at the time of surgery was fourteen years. A mean of eleven vertebral levels (range, six to fifteen levels) were fused. No significant difference between the groups was found with respect to the mean age at the time of surgery, mean weight, mean preoperative and postoperative Cobb angles, and mean number of levels fused (p ≥ 0.12). However, the use of analgesic and antianxiety medication, number of postoperative blood tests, days of hospital stay, and number of physical therapy sessions were significantly decreased in the floor group compared with the intensive care unit group (p ≤ 0.05). No patient from the floor group had to be admitted to the intensive care unit. The mean charge was $33,121 for the floor group and $39,252 for the intensive care unit group (p < 0.001). Initial postoperative management of patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis following a posterior spinal instrumentation and fusion surgery on a general hospital floor, rather than in an intensive care unit, was associated with a shorter hospital stay, fewer blood tests, less

  5. Case management and patient reactions: a study of STD care in a province in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Hanson, S; Engvall, J; Sunkutu, R M; Kamanga, J; Mushanga, M; Höjer, B

    1997-05-01

    Sexually transmitted disease (STD) case management was evaluated through observation and interviews at 2 urban and 4 rural health centres and 2 district hospital STD clinics in one urban and 2 rural districts in Central Province, Zambia. The analysis was limited to 59 patients (42 men and 17 women) who paid first visits for their disease and were managed by a clinical officer. The evaluation suffered from the lack of a standard for case management. Results showed that the patients engaged in risky sexual behaviour without being aware of the risks. At the health institutions, few patients were informed about condoms, the risk of HIV, and abstinence from sex during treatment and few were asked to notify their partners. Clinical officers with special STD training performed better than others but sill informed only one-fifth of the patients. Few clinical officers managed patients according to the syndromic approach recommended by the STD control programme.

  6. Are Geriatricians More Efficient than Other Physicians at Managing Inpatient Care for Elderly Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Sorbero, Melony E.; Saul, Melissa I.; Liu, Hangsheng; Resnick, Neil M.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives Geriatricians may be more effective and efficient in their management of elderly patients than other physicians. This study compared patient outcomes and measures of efficiency for hospitalized elderly patients managed by geriatricians and other physicians. Design Secondary data analysis using a system that integrates clinical and financial information for inpatient and outpatient services delivered throughout the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC). Propensity scores were developed based on patient socio-demographic and clinical characteristics and used to match patients based on the attending physician’s specialty (a geriatrician (n=701) or a non-geriatrician (n=11,549)). Multivariate analyses using generalized estimating equations methods were performed. Setting Two UPMC hospitals in Pittsburgh, PA. Participants Patients age 65 and older who were admitted in 2002 and had a medical diagnosis related group (DRG). Measurements Patient outcomes (inpatient mortality, 30-day mortality, readmissions) and efficiency measures (length of stay, total costs and surplus, which is the difference between hospital costs and payment received for an admission). Results Elderly patients managed by geriatricians were significantly older (p<.01), more likely to be male (p<.01), and had a higher number of diagnoses (p<.01). Propensity scores successfully balanced patient characteristics managed by the two groups. Patients of geriatricians had lower inpatient mortality (p=.04), shorter length of stay (p<.01), lower costs per admission (p<.01) and greater surplus (p<.01). In multivariate analyses, there were not significant differences in patient outcomes, but patients of geriatricians had significantly shorter length of stay, lower costs per admission and generated more surplus for the hospitals. Conclusion Geriatricians were more efficient than other PCPs in managing hospitalized elderly patients with medical DRGs frequently managed by geriatricians

  7. Development of an Automated Healthcare Kiosk for the Management of Chronic Disease Patients in the Primary Care Setting.

    PubMed

    Ng, Grace; Tan, Nicolette; Bahadin, Juliana; Shum, Eugene; Tan, Sze Wee

    2016-07-01

    An increase in the prevalence of chronic disease has led to a rise in the demand for primary healthcare services in many developed countries. Healthcare technology tools may provide the leverage to alleviate the shortage of primary care providers. Here we describe the development and usage of an automated healthcare kiosk for the management of patients with stable chronic disease in the primary care setting. One-hundred patients with stable chronic disease were recruited from a primary care clinic. They used a kiosk in place of doctors' consultations for two subsequent follow-up visits. Patient and physician satisfaction with kiosk usage were measured on a Likert scale. Kiosk blood pressure measurements and triage decisions were validated and optimized. Patients were assessed if they could use the kiosk independently. Patients and physicians were satisfied with all areas of kiosk usage. Kiosk triage decisions were accurate by the 2nd month of the study. Blood pressure measurements by the kiosk were equivalent to that taken by a nurse (p = 0.30, 0.14). Independent kiosk usage depended on patients' language skills and educational levels. Healthcare kiosks represent an alternative way to manage patients with stable chronic disease. They have the potential to replace physician visits and improve access to primary healthcare. Patients welcome the use of healthcare technology tools, including those with limited literacy and education. Optimization of environmental and patient factors may be required prior to the implementation of kiosk-based technology in the healthcare setting.

  8. Managing hospital quality performance in two related areas: patient care and customer service.

    PubMed

    Dwore, R B

    1993-01-01

    The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organization's new emphasis on continuous quality improvement provides hospitals with an opportunity to enhance both customer service as well as patient care. Both are expected by patients and delivered by providers. Patient care is the core product; customer service augments it by adding value and providing the opportunity for a competitive advantage. This article discusses issues for administrators to consider before including customer service as a component of continuous quality improvement and then presents methods for bringing about change.

  9. Involvement of patients or their representatives in quality management functions in EU hospitals: implementation and impact on patient-centred care strategies.

    PubMed

    Groene, Oliver; Sunol, Rosa; Klazinga, Niek S; Wang, Aolin; Dersarkissian, Maral; Thompson, Caroline A; Thompson, Andrew; Arah, Onyebuchi A

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the involvement of patients or their representatives in quality management (QM) functions and to assess associations between levels of involvement and the implementation of patient-centred care strategies. A cross-sectional, multilevel that surveyed quality managers and department heads and data from an organizational audit. Randomly selected hospitals (n = 74) from seven European countries (The Czech Republic, France, Germany, Poland, Portugal, Spain and Turkey). Hospital quality managers (n = 74) and heads of clinical departments (n = 262) in charge of four patient pathways (acute myocardial infarction, stroke, hip fracture and deliveries) participated in the data collection between May 2011 and February 2012. Four items reflecting essential patient-centred care strategies based on an on-site hospital visit: (1) formal survey seeking views of patients and carers, (2) written policies on patients' rights, (3) patient information literature including guidelines and (4) fact sheets for post-discharge care. The main predictors were patient involvement in QM at the (i) hospital level and (ii) pathway level. Current levels of involving patients and their representatives in QM functions in European hospitals are low at hospital level (mean score 1.6 on a scale of 0 to 5, SD 0.7), but even lower at departmental level (mean 0.6, SD 0.7). We did not detect associations between levels of involving patients and their representatives in QM functions and the implementation of patient-centred care strategies; however, the smallest hospitals were more likely to have implemented patient-centred care strategies. There is insufficient evidence that involving patients and their representatives in QM leads to establishing or implementing strategies and procedures that facilitate patient-centred care; however, lack of evidence should not be interpreted as evidence of no effect.

  10. Involvement of patients or their representatives in quality management functions in EU hospitals: implementation and impact on patient-centred care strategies

    PubMed Central

    Groene, Oliver; Sunol, Rosa; Klazinga, Niek S.; Wang, Aolin; Dersarkissian, Maral; Thompson, Caroline A.; Thompson, Andrew; Arah, Onyebuchi A.; Klazinga, N; Kringos, DS; Lombarts, MJMH; Plochg, T; Lopez, MA; Secanell, M; Sunol, R; Vallejo, P; Bartels, P; Kristensen, S; Michel, P; Saillour-Glenisson, F; Vlcek, F; Car, M; Jones, S; Klaus, E; Bottaro, S; Garel, P; Saluvan, M; Bruneau, C; Depaigne-Loth, A; Shaw, C; Hammer, A; Ommen, O; Pfaff, H; Groene, O; Botje, D; Wagner, C; Kutaj-Wasikowska, H; Kutryba, B; Escoval, A; Lívio, A; Eiras, M; Franca, M; Leite, I; Almeman, F; Kus, H; Ozturk, K; Mannion, R; Arah, OA; DerSarkissian, M; Thompson, CA; Wang, A; Thompson, A

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to describe the involvement of patients or their representatives in quality management (QM) functions and to assess associations between levels of involvement and the implementation of patient-centred care strategies. Design A cross-sectional, multilevel study design that surveyed quality managers and department heads and data from an organizational audit. Setting Randomly selected hospitals (n = 74) from seven European countries (The Czech Republic, France, Germany, Poland, Portugal, Spain and Turkey). Participants Hospital quality managers (n = 74) and heads of clinical departments (n = 262) in charge of four patient pathways (acute myocardial infarction, stroke, hip fracture and deliveries) participated in the data collection between May 2011 and February 2012. Main Outcome Measures Four items reflecting essential patient-centred care strategies based on an on-site hospital visit: (1) formal survey seeking views of patients and carers, (2) written policies on patients' rights, (3) patient information literature including guidelines and (4) fact sheets for post-discharge care. The main predictors were patient involvement in QM at the (i) hospital level and (ii) pathway level. Results Current levels of involving patients and their representatives in QM functions in European hospitals are low at hospital level (mean score 1.6 on a scale of 0 to 5, SD 0.7), but even lower at departmental level (mean 0.6, SD 0.7). We did not detect associations between levels of involving patients and their representatives in QM functions and the implementation of patient-centred care strategies; however, the smallest hospitals were more likely to have implemented patient-centred care strategies. Conclusions There is insufficient evidence that involving patients and their representatives in QM leads to establishing or implementing strategies and procedures that facilitate patient-centred care; however, lack of evidence should not be

  11. SUM (Service Unit Management): An Organizational Approach To Improved Patient Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jelinek, Richard C.; And Others

    To evaluate the effectiveness of Service Unit Management (SUM) in reducing costs, improving quality of care, saving professional nursing time, increasing personnel satisfaction, and setting a stage for further improvements, a national questionnaire survey identified the characteristics of SUM units, and compared the performance of a total of 55…

  12. Rethinking attitudes to student clinical supervision and patient care: a change management success story.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, Maree; Wade, Victoria; McAllister, Sue; Stupans, Ieva; Miller, Jennifer; Burgess, Teresa; LeCouteur, Amanda; Starr, Linda

    2014-08-30

    The aim of this project was to explore the process of change in a busy community dental clinic following a team development intervention designed to improve the management of student supervision during clinical placements. An action research model was used. Seven members of a community dental clinic team (three dentists, two dental therapists, one dental assistant and the clinic manager), together with the university clinical placement supervisor participated in the team development intervention. The intervention consisted of two profiling activities and associated workshops spread six months apart. These activities focused on individual work preferences and overall team performance with the aim of improving the functioning of the clinic as a learning environment for dental students. Evaluation data consisted of 20 participant interviews, fourteen hours of workplace observation and six sets of field notes. Following initial thematic analysis, project outcomes were re-analysed using activity theory and expansive learning as a theoretical framework. At project commencement students were not well integrated into the day-to-day clinic functioning. Staff expressed a general view that greater attention to student supervision would compromise patient care. Following the intervention greater clinical team cohesion and workflow changes delivered efficiencies in practice, enhanced relationships among team members, and more positive attitudes towards students. The physical layout of the clinic and clinical workloads were changed to achieve greater involvement of all team members in supporting student learning. Unexpectedly, these changes also improved clinic functioning and increased the number of student placements available. In navigating the sequential stages of the expansive learning cycle, the clinical team ultimately redefined the 'object' of their activity and crossed previously impervious boundaries between healthcare delivery and student supervision with benefits to

  13. Foster Care and Medicaid Managed Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leslie, Laurel K.; Kelleher, Kelly J.; Burns, Barbara J.; Landsverk, John; Rolls, Jennifer A.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews issues surrounding the delivery of managed health care services to children in foster care. Details the unique characteristics of children in foster care, including limited medical histories upon entry into foster care, multiple health care needs, lack of a clearly identified medical care coordinator, and frequent placement changes.…

  14. The primary-specialty care interface in chronic diseases: patient and practice characteristics associated with co-management.

    PubMed

    Larochelle, Jean-Louis; Feldman, Debbie Ehrmann; Levesque, Jean-Frederic

    2014-11-01

    Specialist physicians may act either as consultants or co-managers for patients with chronic diseases along with their primary healthcare (PHC) physician. We assessed factors associated with specialist involvement. We used questionnaire and administrative data to measure co-management and patient and PHC practice characteristics in 702 primary care patients with common chronic diseases. Analysis included multilevel logistic regressions. In all, 27% of the participants were co-managed. Persons with more severe chronic diseases and lower health-related quality of life were more likely to be co-managed. Persons who were older, had a lower socioeconomic status, resided in rural regions and who were followed in a PHC practice with an advanced practice nurse were less likely to be co-managed. Co-management of patients with chronic diseases by a specialist is associated with higher clinical needs but demonstrates social inequalities. PHC practices more adapted to chronic care may help optimize specialist resources utilization. Copyright © 2014 Longwoods Publishing.

  15. Guideline for the management of terminal haemorrhage in palliative care patients with advanced cancer discharged home for end-of-life care.

    PubMed

    Ubogagu, Edith; Harris, Dylan G

    2012-12-01

    Terminal haemorrhage is a rare and distressing emergency in palliative oncology. We present an algorithm for the management of terminal haemorrhage in patients likely to receive end-of-life care at home, based on a literature review of the management of terminal haemorrhage for patients with advanced cancer, where a DNAR (do not attempt resuscitation) order is in place and the patient wishes to die at home. A literature review was conducted to identify literature on the management of terminal haemorrhage in patients with advanced cancer who are no longer amenable to active interventional/invasive procedures. Electronic databases, the grey literature, local guidelines from hospitals and hospices, and online web portals were all searched systematically. The literature review was used to formulate a management algorithm. The evidence base is very limited. A three-step practical algorithm is suggested: preparing for the event, managing the event ('ABC') and 'aftercare'. Step 1 involves the identification and optimisation of risk factors. Step 2 (the event) consists of A (assure and re-assure the patient), B (be there - above all stay with the patient) and C (comfort, calm, consider dark towels and anxiolytics if possible). Step 3 (the aftercare) involves the provision of practical and psychological support to those involved including relatives and professionals. Terminal haemorrhage is a rare yet highly feared complication of advanced cancer, for which there is a limited evidence base to guide management. The suggested three-step approach to managing this situation gives professionals a logical framework within which to work.

  16. Self-management in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: strategies, outcomes, and integration into clinical care.

    PubMed

    Plevinsky, Jill M; Greenley, Rachel N; Fishman, Laurie N

    2016-01-01

    Self-management, including medication adherence, is associated with improved health and outcomes for patients with inflammatory bowel disease. The concept of self-management is complex, but can be divided into those aspects that involve the individual patient, those that involve the provider-patient relationship, and those that encompass the social environment. At the individual level, enhancing problem-solving skills and self-efficacy have both been shown to improve self-management tasks, particularly adherence to treatment. However, it is critical to consider these domains from a lifespan perspective because these processes by which self-management can be improved are distinct for children, adolescents, young adults, and adults. A particular emphasis is placed on strategies to improve self-management of older adolescents and young adults as they transition from pediatric to adult providers. The review concludes with recommendations for providers, including rationale and techniques for assessing and promoting patient self-efficacy, encouraging the development of problem-solving skills, improving the patient-provider relationship, and enhancing social support. Providers are encouraged to utilize elements of problem-solving skills training, engage in collaborative relationships with their patients, and offer their patients recommendations for how to increase the quality of their social support networks as ways of increasing overall self-management.

  17. Implementation of a chest pain management service improves patient care and reduces length of stay.

    PubMed

    Scott, Adam C; O'Dwyer, Kristina M; Cullen, Louise; Brown, Anthony; Denaro, Charles; Parsonage, William

    2014-03-01

    Chest pain is one of the most common complaints in patients presenting to an emergency department. Delays in management due to a lack of readily available objective tests to risk stratify patients with possible acute coronary syndromes can lead to an unnecessarily lengthy admission placing pressure on hospital beds or inappropriate discharge. The need for a co-ordinated system of clinical management based on enhanced communication between departments, timely and appropriate triage, clinical investigation, diagnosis, and treatment was identified. An evidence-based Chest Pain Management Service and clinical pathway were developed and implemented, including the introduction of after-hours exercise stress testing. Between November 2005 and March 2013, 5662 patients were managed according to a Chest Pain Management pathway resulting in a reduction of 5181 admission nights by more timely identification of patients at low risk who could then be discharged. In addition, 1360 days were avoided in high-risk patients who received earlier diagnosis and treatment. The creation of a Chest Pain Management pathway and the extended exercise stress testing service resulted in earlier discharge for low-risk patients; and timely treatment for patients with positive and equivocal exercise stress test results. This service demonstrated a significant saving in overnight admissions.

  18. Medical Assistant-Based Care Management for High-Risk Patients in Small Primary Care Practices: A Cluster Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Freund, Tobias; Peters-Klimm, Frank; Boyd, Cynthia M; Mahler, Cornelia; Gensichen, Jochen; Erler, Antje; Beyer, Martin; Gondan, Matthias; Rochon, Justine; Gerlach, Ferdinand M; Szecsenyi, Joachim

    2016-03-01

    Patients with multiple chronic conditions are at high risk for potentially avoidable hospitalizations, which may be reduced by care coordination and self-management support. Medical assistants are an increasingly available resource for patient care in primary care practices. To determine whether protocol-based care management delivered by medical assistants improves care in patients at high risk for future hospitalization in primary care. Two-year cluster randomized clinical trial. (Current Controlled Trials: ISRCTN56104508). 115 primary care practices in Germany. 2076 patients with type 2 diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or chronic heart failure and a likelihood of hospitalization in the upper quartile of the population, as predicted by an analysis of insurance data. Protocol-based care management, including structured assessment, action planning, and monitoring delivered by medical assistants, compared with usual care. All-cause hospitalizations at 12 months (primary outcome) and quality-of-life scores (12-Item Short Form Health Survey [SF-12] and EuroQol instrument [EQ-5D]). Included patients had an average of 4 co-occurring chronic conditions. All-cause hospitalizations did not differ between groups at 12 months (risk ratio [RR], 1.01 [95% CI, 0.87 to 1.18]) and 24 months (RR, 0.98 [CI, 0.85 to 1.12]). Quality of life (differences, 1.16 [CI, 0.24 to 2.08] on SF-12 physical component and 1.68 [CI, 0.60 to 2.77] on SF-12 mental component) and general health (difference on EQ-5D, 0.03 [CI, 0.00 to 0.05]) improved significantly at 24 months. Intervention costs totaled $10 per patient per month. Small number of primary care practices and low intensity of intervention. This low-intensity intervention did not reduce all-cause hospitalizations but showed positive effects on quality of life at reasonable costs in high-risk multimorbid patients. AOK Baden-Württemberg and AOK Bundesverband.

  19. Influence of patient literacy on the effectiveness of a primary care-based diabetes disease management program.

    PubMed

    Rothman, Russell L; DeWalt, Darren A; Malone, Robb; Bryant, Betsy; Shintani, Ayumi; Crigler, Britton; Weinberger, Morris; Pignone, Michael

    2004-10-13

    Low literacy is an important barrier for patients with diabetes, but interventions to address low literacy have not been well examined. To examine the role of literacy on the effectiveness of a comprehensive disease management program for patients with diabetes. Analysis of the influence of literacy on glycemic control and systolic blood pressure using data from a randomized controlled trial (conducted from February 2001 through April 2003) of a comprehensive diabetes management program. Participants were 217 patients aged 18 years or older with type 2 diabetes and poor glycemic control (glycosylated hemoglobin [HbA1c] levels > or =8.0%) and presenting to a US academic general internal medicine practice. All communication to patients was individualized and delivered to enhance comprehension among patients with low literacy. Intervention patients received intensive disease management from a multidisciplinary team. Control patients received an initial management session and continued with usual care. Achievement of goal HbA1c levels and systolic blood pressure at 12-month follow-up for control and intervention patients stratified by literacy status. Complete 12-month data were available for 193 patients (89%). Among patients with low literacy, intervention patients were more likely than control patients to achieve goal HbA1c levels (< or =7.0%) (42% vs 15%, respectively; adjusted odds ratio [OR], 4.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3 to 17.2; P = .02). Patients with higher literacy had similar odds of achieving goal HbA1c levels regardless of intervention status (24% vs 23%; adjusted OR, 1.0; 95% CI, 0.4 to 2.5; P = .98). Improvements in systolic blood pressure were similar by literacy status. Literacy may be an important factor for predicting who will benefit from an intervention for diabetes management. A diabetes disease management program that addresses literacy may be particularly beneficial for patients with low literacy, and increasing access to such a

  20. Development and Implementation of Nonpharmacologic Protocols for the Management of Patients with Alzheimer's Disease and Their Families in a Multiracial Primary Care Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austrom, Mary Guerriero; Damush, Teresa M.; Hartwell, Cora West; Perkins, Tony; Unverzagt, Frederick; Boustani, Malaz; Hendrie, Hugh C.; Callahan, Christopher M.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose. Most patients and families with dementia are cared for in primary care clinics. These clinics are seldom designed to provide the necessary comprehensive care. The purpose of this article is to describe nonpharmacologic protocols for the management of patients with Alzheimer's disease and their families that are administered as part of a…

  1. Development and Implementation of Nonpharmacologic Protocols for the Management of Patients with Alzheimer's Disease and Their Families in a Multiracial Primary Care Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austrom, Mary Guerriero; Damush, Teresa M.; Hartwell, Cora West; Perkins, Tony; Unverzagt, Frederick; Boustani, Malaz; Hendrie, Hugh C.; Callahan, Christopher M.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose. Most patients and families with dementia are cared for in primary care clinics. These clinics are seldom designed to provide the necessary comprehensive care. The purpose of this article is to describe nonpharmacologic protocols for the management of patients with Alzheimer's disease and their families that are administered as part of a…

  2. Management of dental patients on warfarin therapy in a primary care setting.

    PubMed

    Chugani, Vikram

    2004-09-01

    The surgical management of patients on anticoagulant therapy is often poorly understood in all fields of medicine (not just dentistry). Until now there has been no uniform approach to managing these patients and much of the advice routinely given by medical practitioners and haematologists has fallen behind the recent evidence. Many medical conditions from atrial fibrillation to prosthetic heart valves predispose patients to venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism (Table 1). In order to prevent these complications, these patients are normally placed on an anticoagulant. By far the most common one in use is Warfarin, which is a derivative of 4 hydroxycoumarin.

  3. Alcohol withdrawal management in adult patients in a high acuity medical surgical transitional care unit: a best practice implementation project.

    PubMed

    Sukhenko, Olga

    2016-01-15

    Excessive alcohol consumption, a major health problem worldwide, affects about 6% of the United States population. Caring for patients with alcohol withdrawal syndrome in a hospital ward presents complex physiologic and psycho-social challenges which are best met with evidence-based practices. An academic medical center in the United States has been experiencing an increase in patients with alcohol withdrawal syndrome. However, gaps in clinician knowledge and infrastructure supporting the management of these patients still existed. The aim of this project was to improve the continuity of care of patients undergoing alcohol withdrawal in a medical surgical high acuity transitional care unit by incorporating evidence-based practices, and thereby to positively impact on patient outcomes. Specific objectives were related to standardized assessments and pharmacologic management strategies. The project used the Joanna Briggs Institute's Practical Application of Clinical Evidence System and Getting Research into Practice audit tool for promoting change in health practice. A baseline clinical audit was conducted to assess compliance with best practices for managing alcohol withdrawal syndrome, which was followed by several interventions targeted at nurses and providers. A follow-up audit was conducted to assess compliance with the implemented strategies. The follow-up audit used the same evidence-based audit criteria as those used for the baseline audit. A non-probabilistic, convenience sampling approach was used. A sample size of 15 patients was used for both the baseline and follow-up audits. The baseline audit revealed a high compliance rate for four of the five audit criteria concerning risk assessment and pharmacologic strategies. There was sub-optimal compliance (53%) with the criterion regarding use of the Clinical Institute Withdrawal Assessment of Alcohol Scale (revised) (CIWA-Ar) scale to assess patients with alcohol withdrawal. After the interventions were

  4. Differential Effectiveness of Depression Disease Management for Rural and Urban Primary Care Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Scott J.; Xu, Stanley; Dong, Fran; Fortney, John; Rost, Kathryn

    2006-01-01

    Context: Federally qualified health centers across the country are adopting depression disease management programs following federally mandated training; however, little is known about the relative effectiveness of depression disease management in rural versus urban patient populations. Purpose: To explore whether a depression disease management…

  5. Differential Effectiveness of Depression Disease Management for Rural and Urban Primary Care Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Scott J.; Xu, Stanley; Dong, Fran; Fortney, John; Rost, Kathryn

    2006-01-01

    Context: Federally qualified health centers across the country are adopting depression disease management programs following federally mandated training; however, little is known about the relative effectiveness of depression disease management in rural versus urban patient populations. Purpose: To explore whether a depression disease management…

  6. Managing Difficult Patients: Roles of Psychologists in the Age of Interdisciplinary Care.

    PubMed

    Robiner, William N; Petrik, Megan L

    2017-03-10

    Various problems can occur during encounters between health providers and patients. In some instances, clinicians attribute these problems to patients being "difficult." However, clinicians' perception of difficulties in the clinical encounter are also influenced by: clinicians' own attitudes, thoughts, and behavior; the specific setting in which patient and clinician interact; and properties of the healthcare organization in which they are embedded. This article explores how psychologists in medical settings can serve as a resource that: improves patient care for difficult patients; supports provider wellness; provides relevant education to clinical providers; and reduces the stress that difficult patients place on the healthcare system. The definition, scope, and impact of difficult patients in healthcare settings are reviewed, including an examination of patient, clinician, and systems factors that contribute to the etiology of difficult clinical encounters. Strategies are discussed that may prevent or limit the adverse impact of difficult patients in healthcare, with special emphasis on the roles of psychologists in interprofessional healthcare teams.

  7. Self-management in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: strategies, outcomes, and integration into clinical care

    PubMed Central

    Plevinsky, Jill M; Greenley, Rachel N; Fishman, Laurie N

    2016-01-01

    Self-management, including medication adherence, is associated with improved health and outcomes for patients with inflammatory bowel disease. The concept of self-management is complex, but can be divided into those aspects that involve the individual patient, those that involve the provider–patient relationship, and those that encompass the social environment. At the individual level, enhancing problem-solving skills and self-efficacy have both been shown to improve self-management tasks, particularly adherence to treatment. However, it is critical to consider these domains from a lifespan perspective because these processes by which self-management can be improved are distinct for children, adolescents, young adults, and adults. A particular emphasis is placed on strategies to improve self-management of older adolescents and young adults as they transition from pediatric to adult providers. The review concludes with recommendations for providers, including rationale and techniques for assessing and promoting patient self-efficacy, encouraging the development of problem-solving skills, improving the patient–provider relationship, and enhancing social support. Providers are encouraged to utilize elements of problem-solving skills training, engage in collaborative relationships with their patients, and offer their patients recommendations for how to increase the quality of their social support networks as ways of increasing overall self-management. PMID:27601930

  8. Liability issues in managed care.

    PubMed

    Ellis, M S

    1997-05-01

    The explosive growth in Managed Care Organizations as a mechanism for providing health care in the United States has generated an equal explosion in litigation and new legislation related to problems within this delivery system. Abuses have included the "gagging" of physicians from providing full disclosure of medical options for their patients, inappropriate denial of care, denial of specialty referral, false claims data, insurer insolvency, economic credentialling, deselection, financial disincentives to render care, and lack of appeal or grievance mechanisms. These issues and others have resulted in injuries to patients and damage to the patient/physician relationship. This article discusses some of the more dramatic litigated cases and endeavors to alert both physicians and patients to potential legal matters that should be considered before becoming involved within this structure.

  9. Sex disparity in the management of dyslipidemia among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in a managed care organization.

    PubMed

    Nau, David P; Mallya, Usha

    2005-02-01

    To determine whether there were sex-related differences in the management of dyslipidemia among managed care enrollees with diabetes mellitus. Retrospective analyses were conducted using medical and pharmacy claims data from a health maintenance organization during 2000 and 2001. Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus were identified through a validated algorithm of medication and diagnosis codes. Chi-squared analysis was used to determine if women were less likely than men to receive a lipid test or a lipid-modifying drug. Logistic regression models were constructed to compare sex-related differences while controlling for age, cardiovascular disease diagnosis, and 2 proxies of illness severity (hospitalization in 2000 and the intensity of diabetes mellitus drug therapy). During 2000 and 2001, 79.4% of women received a lipid test compared with 84.2% of men (chi2 = 6.69, P = .01). Also, 33.2% of women received a lipid-modifying drug compared with 45.5% of men (chi2 = 27.31, P < .01). Logistic regression analysis revealed that men were more likely than women to receive a lipid test when controlling for age, cardiovascular disease diagnosis, and illness severity (odds ratio [OR], 1.45; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-1.81). Men were also more likely than women to receive a lipid-modifying drug when controlling for age, cardiovascular disease diagnosis, illness severity, and lipid testing (OR, 1.51; 95% confidence interval, 1.22-1.86). Women with type 2 diabetes mellitus were less likely than men with type 2 diabetes mellitus to receive lipid tests or lipid-modifying drugs.

  10. Hospitalist management of vaso-occlusive pain crisis in patients with sickle cell disease using a pathway of care.

    PubMed

    Allen Liles, Edmund; Kirsch, Jonathan; Gilchrist, Michael; Adem, Mukhtar

    2014-04-01

    Patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) suffer from intermittent vaso-occlusive pain crises (VOCs). These crises lead to frequent hospitalizations, significant morbidity, and increased mortality risk. Care pathways can enhance efficiency and quality of care. Our study sought to evaluate the development and implementation of a care pathway for patients with SCD experiencing VOCs. The University of North Carolina (UNC) Comprehensive Sickle Cell Program provides all levels of care for a large population of patients with sickle cell anemia. All patients admitted to UNC Hospitals with SCD VOCs from January 2009 through June 2011 were evaluated. During this time period, we also assessed sequential prospective cohorts during progressive phases of developing and implementing a quality improvement and pathway of care program for this patient population in our study. The developed pathway entailed geographic localization for VOC patients, a single group of faculty physicians caring for these patients, and early use of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) to achieve pain control. Physicians from the UNC Hospital Medicine Program were responsible for the initiatives. Cohorts were compared to a baseline historical control. Outcomes of interest included patient length of stay (LOS) in the hospital, 30-day readmission rate, need for transfusion, incidence of acute chest syndrome, use of naloxone, and use of PCA. Compared with an historical baseline cohort, the development and implementation of a VOC care pathway for patients with SCD led to reduction in average hospital LOS by 1.44 days (P < 0.05) and an increase in use of PCAs (P < 0.05). Patient readmission rates, number of transfusions, incidence of acute chest syndrome, and use of naloxone did not significantly change. Hospitalist-led management of patients with SCD VOCs using a care pathway that emphasizes early, aggressive PCA-based pain control is associated with reduced hospital LOS. The LOS reduction seen in our study is

  11. Variability Among US Intensive Care Units in Managing the Care of Patients Admitted With Preexisting Limits on Life-Sustaining Therapies.

    PubMed

    Hart, Joanna L; Harhay, Michael O; Gabler, Nicole B; Ratcliffe, Sarah J; Quill, Caroline M; Halpern, Scott D

    2015-06-01

    during or following ICU admission (20.2% [95% CI, 1.8%-76.2%]). The observed variability could not be consistently explained using measurable center-level characteristics. Intensive care units vary dramatically in how they manage care for patients admitted with treatment limitations. Among patients who survive, escalations in the aggressiveness of care are more common during the ICU stay than are de-escalations in aggressiveness. This study cannot directly measure whether care received was consistent with patients' preferences but suggests that ICU culture and physicians' practice styles contribute to the aggressiveness of care.

  12. Managing acute care.

    PubMed

    Russell, J S

    1993-02-01

    In the last few years, much medical-facility construction has been driven by what insurers want. Hospitals have built facilities for well-reimbursed procedures and closed money-losing ones. Health-maintenance organizations increasingly expect to hold down costs by making prepayment arrangements with doctors and their hospitals. President Clinton has pledged early action on health-care reform, which will likely change planners' priorities. Whether the nation goes to Clintonian "managed competition" or a Canadian-style nationwide single-payer system (the two most likely options), the projects on these pages reflect two large-scale trends that are likely to continue: the movement of more procedures from inpatient to outpatient facilities and the separation of treatment functions from ordinary office and administrative tasks so that the latter are not performed in the same high-cost buildings as technology-intensive procedures. Various schemes that make care more "patient-centered" have been tried and been shown to speed healing, even for outpatients, but such hard-to-quantify issues get short shrift in an era of knee-jerk cost containment. The challenge in tomorrow's healthcare universe--whatever it becomes--will be to keep these issues on the table.

  13. Respiratory care management information systems.

    PubMed

    Ford, Richard M

    2004-04-01

    Hospital-wide computerized information systems evolved from the need to capture patient information and perform billing and other financial functions. These systems, however, have fallen short of meeting the needs of respiratory care departments regarding work load assessment, productivity management, and the level of outcome reporting required to support programs such as patient-driven protocols. The respiratory care management information systems (RCMIS) of today offer many advantages over paper-based systems and hospital-wide computer systems. RCMIS are designed to facilitate functions specific to respiratory care, including assessing work demand, assigning and tracking resources, charting, billing, and reporting results. RCMIS incorporate mobile, point-of-care charting and are highly configurable to meet the specific needs of individual respiratory care departments. Important and substantial benefits can be realized with an RCMIS and mobile, wireless charting devices. The initial and ongoing costs of an RCMIS are justified by increased charge capture and reduced costs, by way of improved productivity and efficiency. It is not unusual to recover the total cost of an RCMIS within the first year of its operation. In addition, such systems can facilitate and monitor patient-care protocols and help to efficiently manage the vast amounts of information encountered during the practitioner's workday. Respiratory care departments that invest in RCMIS have an advantage in the provision of quality care and in reducing expenses. A centralized respiratory therapy department with an RCMIS is the most efficient and cost-effective way to monitor work demand and manage the hospital-wide allocation of respiratory care services.

  14. The feasibility of assessing the Flinders Program™ of patient self-management in New Zealand primary care settings.

    PubMed

    Horsburgh, Margaret P; Bycroft, Janine J; Mahony, Faith M; Roy, Dianne E; Miller, Denise J; Goodyear-Smith, Felicity A; Donnell, Erin Cj

    2010-12-01

    The Flinders Program™ has been adopted in New Zealand as a useful and appropriate approach for self-management with primary care clients who have chronic conditions. The Flinders Program™ has not been evaluated in New Zealand settings. To assess the feasibility of undertaking a substantive long-term trial to gauge the effectiveness of primary care nurses using the Flinders Program™ to improve health outcomes for New Zealand populations. A pilot study was undertaken considering four components of feasibility of conducting a long-term trial: practice recruitment, participant recruitment, delivery of the intervention and outcome measures. This included comparing 27 intervention and 30 control patients with long-term health conditions with respect to change in self-management capacity-Partners in Health (PIH) scale-quality of care using the Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (PACIC) scale and self-efficacy across six months. Intervention participants received care planning with practice nurses using the Flinders Program™ in general practices, while control participants received usual care in comparable practices. General practice and participant recruitment was challenging, together with a lack of organisational capacity and resources in general practice for the Flinders Program™. The measures of self-management capacity (PIH), quality of care (PACIC) and self-efficacy were useful and valuable primary outcome measures. The overall findings do not support a substantive trial of the Flinders Program™ in primary care. Difficulties associated with participant recruitment and ability of practice nurses to undertake the Flinders Program™ within general practice need to be resolved.

  15. Impact of Neurointensivist Co-management on the Clinical Outcomes of Patients Admitted to a Neurosurgical Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jeong Am; Yang, Jeong Hoon; Chung, Chi Ryang; Suh, Gee Young; Hong, Seung Chyul

    2017-06-01

    Limited data are available on improved outcomes after initiation of neurointensivist co-management in neurosurgical intensive care units (NSICUs) in Korea. We evaluated the impact of a newly appointed neurointensivist on the outcomes of neurosurgical patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU). This retrospective observational study involved neurosurgical patients admitted to the NSICU at Samsung Medical Center between March 2013 and May 2016. Neurointensivist co-management was initiated in October 1 2014. We compared the outcomes of neurosurgical patients before and after neurointensivist co-management. The primary outcome was ICU mortality. A total of 571 patients were admitted to the NSICU during the study period, 291 prior to the initiation of neurointensivist co-management and 280 thereafter. Intracranial hemorrhage (29.6%) and traumatic brain injury (TBI) (26.6%) were the most frequent reasons for ICU admission. TBI was the most common cause of death (39.0%). There were no significant differences in mortality rates and length of ICU stay before and after co-management. However, the rates of ICU and 30-day mortality among the TBI patients were significantly lower after compared to before initiation of neurointensivist co-management (8.5% vs. 22.9%; P = 0.014 and 11.0% vs. 27.1%; P = 0.010, respectively). Although overall outcomes were not different after neurointensivist co-management, initiation of a strategy of routine involvement of a neurointensivist significantly reduced the ICU and 30-day mortality rates of TBI patients. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  16. Impact of Neurointensivist Co-management on the Clinical Outcomes of Patients Admitted to a Neurosurgical Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Limited data are available on improved outcomes after initiation of neurointensivist co-management in neurosurgical intensive care units (NSICUs) in Korea. We evaluated the impact of a newly appointed neurointensivist on the outcomes of neurosurgical patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU). This retrospective observational study involved neurosurgical patients admitted to the NSICU at Samsung Medical Center between March 2013 and May 2016. Neurointensivist co-management was initiated in October 1 2014. We compared the outcomes of neurosurgical patients before and after neurointensivist co-management. The primary outcome was ICU mortality. A total of 571 patients were admitted to the NSICU during the study period, 291 prior to the initiation of neurointensivist co-management and 280 thereafter. Intracranial hemorrhage (29.6%) and traumatic brain injury (TBI) (26.6%) were the most frequent reasons for ICU admission. TBI was the most common cause of death (39.0%). There were no significant differences in mortality rates and length of ICU stay before and after co-management. However, the rates of ICU and 30-day mortality among the TBI patients were significantly lower after compared to before initiation of neurointensivist co-management (8.5% vs. 22.9%; P = 0.014 and 11.0% vs. 27.1%; P = 0.010, respectively). Although overall outcomes were not different after neurointensivist co-management, initiation of a strategy of routine involvement of a neurointensivist significantly reduced the ICU and 30-day mortality rates of TBI patients. PMID:28480662

  17. Impact of managed care on the treatment, costs, and outcomes of fee-for-service Medicare patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Bundorf, M Kate; Schulman, Kevin A; Stafford, Judith A; Gaskin, Darrell; Jollis, James G; Escarce, José J

    2004-02-01

    To examine the effects of market-level managed care activity on the treatment, cost, and outcomes of care for Medicare fee-for-service acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients. Patients from the Cooperative Cardiovascular Project (CCP), a sample of Medicare beneficiaries discharged from nonfederal acute-care hospitals with a primary discharge diagnosis of AMI from January 1994 to February 1996. We estimated models of patient treatment, costs, and outcomes using ordinary least squares and logistic regression. The independent variables of primary interest were market-area managed care penetration and competition. The models included controls for patient, hospital, and other market area characteristics. We merged the CCP data with Medicare claims and other data sources. The study sample included CCP patients aged 65 and older who were admitted during 1994 and 1995 with a confirmed AMI to a nonrural hospital. Rates of revascularization and cardiac catheterization for Medicare fee-for-service patients with AMI are lower in high-HMO penetration markets than in low-penetration ones. Patients admitted in high-HMO-competition markets, in contrast, are more likely to receive cardiac catheterization for treatment of their AMI and had higher treatment costs than those admitted in low-competition markets. The level of managed care activity in the health care market affects the process of care for Medicare fee-for-service AMI patients. Spillovers from managed care activity to patients with other types of insurance are more likely when managed care organizations have greater market power.

  18. Does patient experience of multimorbidity predict self-management and health outcomes in a prospective study in primary care?

    PubMed Central

    Kenning, Cassandra; Coventry, Peter A; Gibbons, Chris; Bee, Penny; Fisher, Louise; Bower, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background. There is a need to better understand the mechanisms which lead to poor outcomes in patients with multimorbidity, especially those factors that might be amenable to intervention. Objective. This research aims to explore what factors predict self-management behaviour and health outcomes in patients with multimorbidity in primary care in the UK. Methods. A prospective study design was used. Questionnaires were mailed out to 1460 patients with multimorbidity. Patients were asked to complete a range of self-report measures including measures of multimorbidity, measures of their experience of multimorbidity and service delivery and outcomes (three measures of self-management: behaviours, Self-monitoring and Insight and medication adherence; and a measure of self-reported health). Results. In total, 36% (n = 499) of patients responded to the baseline survey and 80% of those respondents completed follow-up. Self-management behaviour at 4 months was predicted by illness perceptions around the consequences of individual conditions. Self-monitoring and Insight at 4 months was predicted by patient experience of ‘Hassles’ in health services. Self-reported medication adherence at 4 months was predicted by health status, Self-monitoring and Insight and ‘Hassles’ in health services. Perceived health status at 4 months was predicted by age and patient experience of multimorbidity. Conclusions. This research shows that different factors, particularly around patients’ experiences of health care and control over their treatment, impact on various types of self-management. Patient experience of multimorbidity was not a critical predictor of self-management but did predict health status in the short term. The findings can help to develop and target interventions that might improve outcomes in patients with multimorbidity. PMID:25715962

  19. [Management of patients receiving home respiratory care with tracheostomy and positive-pressure ventilation].

    PubMed

    Aoki, Masashi

    2013-01-01

    On March 11, 2011, the Great East Japan Earthquake occurred and a massive tsunami hit the northeastern coast of Japan. In Miyagi prefecture in Tokoku district, 49 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis were supported by home respiratory care with tracheostomy and positive-pressure ventilation at that time. Among them, two patients were died in the tsunami and 25 patients were forced to evacuate to hospitals. We should hurry to submit a guideline for medical transportation for patients with neuromuscular diseases requiring artificial ventilation. We also should research the disaster medicine in the field of neurology.

  20. Invited article: Managing disruptive physician behavior: impact on staff relationships and patient care.

    PubMed

    Rosenstein, Alan H; O'Daniel, Michelle

    2008-04-22

    Disruptive behavior can have a significant impact on care delivery, which can adversely affect patient safety and quality outcomes of care. Disruptive behavior occurs across all disciplines but is of particular concern when it involves physicians and nurses who have primary responsibility for patient care. There is a higher frequency of disruptive behavior in neurologists compared to most other nonsurgical specialties. Disruptive behavior causes stress, anxiety, frustration, and anger, which can impede communication and collaboration, which can result in avoidable medical errors, adverse events, and other compromises in quality care. Health care organizations need to be aware of the significance of disruptive behaviors and develop appropriate policies, standards, and procedures to effectively deal with this serious issue and reinforce appropriate standards of behavior. Having a better understanding of what contributes to, incites, or provokes disruptive behaviors will help organizations provide appropriate educational and training programs that can lessen the likelihood of occurrence and improve the overall effectiveness of communication among the health care team.

  1. Physicians' view of primary care-based case management for patients with heart failure: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Peters-Klimm, Frank; Olbort, Rebecca; Campbell, Stephen; Mahler, Cornelia; Miksch, Antje; Baldauf, Annika; Szecsenyi, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    Background As part of a trial aiming to improve care for patients with chronic (systolic) heart failure, a standardized, multifaceted case management approach was evaluated in German general practices. It consisted of regular telephone monitoring, home visits, health counselling, diagnostic screening and booklets for patients. Practice-based doctors' assistants (equivalent to a nursing role) adopted these new tasks and reported regularly to the employing general practitioner (GP). Objective To explore GPs' perceptions of case management, subsequent changes in relationships within the practice team and the potential future role. Method Twenty-four GPs participated in five moderated, semi-structured, audio-taped focus groups. Full transcription and thematic content analysis was undertaken. Results GPs rated all elements and instruments of case management conducted by doctors' assistants feasible, except for the geriatric assessment as patients had not been at risk. GPs perceived difficulties in their own role in delivering health behaviour counselling. Relationships between doctors' assistants and patients and between GPs and patients or doctors' assistants remained stable or improved. All GPs perceived a variety of role changes in doctors' assistants including more in-depth medical knowledge and higher responsibilities yielding more recognition by patients and GPs. Some GPs suggested transferring the case management programme to other chronic conditions and that it should form part of a further education curriculum for doctors' assistants. Conclusion This primary care-based case management model characterized by the orchestrated delegation of tasks to doctors' assistants offers a promising strategy of enhanced chronic illness care, but it needs further adaptation and evaluation. PMID:19684033

  2. [Implementation of a patient data management system. Effects on intensive care documentation].

    PubMed

    Castellanos, I; Ganslandt, T; Prokosch, H U; Schüttler, J; Bürkle, T

    2013-11-01

    Patient data management systems (PDMS) enable digital documentation on intensive care units (ICU). A commercial PDMS was implemented in a 25-bed ICU replacing paper-based patient charting. The ICU electronic patient record is completely managed inside the PDMS. It compiles data from vital signs monitors, ventilators and further medical devices and facilitates some drug dose and fluid balance calculations as well as data reuse for administrative purposes. Ventilation time and patient severity scoring as well as coding of diagnoses and procedures is supported. Billing data transferred via interface to the central billing system of the hospital. Such benefits should show in measurable parameters, such as documented ventilator time, number of coded diagnoses and procedures and others. These parameters influence reimbursement in the German DRG system. Therefore, measurable changes in cost and reimbursement data of the ICU were expected. A retrospective analysis of documentation quality parameters, cost data and mortality rate of a 25-bed surgical ICU within a German university hospital 3 years before (2004-2006) and 5 years after (2007-2011) PDMS implementation. Selected parameters were documented electronically, consistently and reproducibly for the complete time span of 8 years including those years where no electronic patient recording was available. The following parameters were included: number of cleared DRG, cleared ventilator time, case mix (CM), case mix index (CMI), length of stay, number of coded diagnoses and procedures, detailed overview of a specific procedure code based on daily Apache II and TISS Core 10 scores, mortality, total ICU costs and revenues and partial profits for specific ICU procedures, such as renal replacement therapy and blood products. Systematic shifts were detected over the study period, such as increasing case numbers and decreasing length of stay as well as annual fluctuations in severity of disease seen in the CM and CMI. After PDMS

  3. Patient-provider relationship as mediator between adult attachment and self-management in primary care patients with multiple chronic conditions.

    PubMed

    Brenk-Franz, Katja; Strauß, Bernhard; Tiesler, Fabian; Fleischhauer, Christian; Schneider, Nico; Gensichen, Jochen

    2017-06-01

    The conceptual model of attachment theory has been applied to understand the predispositions of patients in medical care and the patient-provider relationship. In patients with chronic conditions insecure attachment was connected to poorer self-management. The patient-provider relationship is associated with a range of health related outcomes and self-management skills. We determined whether the quality of the patient-provider relationship mediates the link between adult attachment and self-management among primary care patients with multiple chronic diseases. 209 patients with a minimum of three chronic diseases (including type II diabetes, hypertension and at least one other chronic condition) between the ages of 50 and 85 from eight general practices were included in the APRICARE cohort study. Adult attachment was measured via self-report (ECR-RD), self-management skills by the FERUS and the patient-provider relationship by the PRA-D. The health status and chronicity were assessed by the GP. Multiple mediation analyses were used to examine whether aspects of the patient-provider relationship (communication, information, affectivity) are a mediators of associations between adult attachment and self-management. The analysis revealed that the quality of the patient-provider relationship mediated the effect of attachment on self-management in patients with multiple chronic conditions. Particularly the quality of communication and information over the course of treatment has a significant mediating influence. A personalized, attachment-related approach that promotes active patient-provider communication and gives information about the treatment to the patient may improve self-management skills in patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparison of physician referral and insurance claims data-based risk prediction as approaches to identify patients for care management in primary care: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Freund, Tobias; Gondan, Matthias; Rochon, Justine; Peters-Klimm, Frank; Campbell, Stephen; Wensing, Michel; Szecsenyi, Joachim

    2013-10-20

    Primary care-based care management (CM) could reduce hospital admissions in high-risk patients. Identification of patients most likely to benefit is needed as resources for CM are limited. This study aimed to compare hospitalization and mortality rates of patients identified for CM either by treating primary care physicians (PCPs) or predictive modelling software for hospitalization risk (PM). In 2009, a cohort of 6,026 beneficiaries of a German statutory health insurance served as a sample for patient identification for CM by PCPs or commercial PM (CSSG 0.8, Verisk Health). The resulting samples were compared regarding hospitalization and mortality rates in 2010 and in the two year period before patient selection. No CM-intervention was delivered until the end of 2010 and PCPs were blinded for the assessment of hospitalization rates. In 2010, hospitalization rates of PM-identified patients were 80% higher compared to PCP-identified patients. Mortality rates were also 8% higher in PM-identified patients if compared to PCP-identified patients (10% vs. 2%). The hospitalization rate of patients independently identified by both PM and PCPs was numerically between PM- and PCP-identified patients. Time trend between 2007 and 2010 showed decreasing hospitalization rates in PM-identified patients (-15% per year) compared to increasing rates in PCP-identified patients (+34% per year). PM identified patients with higher hospitalization and mortality rates compared to PCP-referred patients. But the latter showed increasing hospitalization rates over time thereby suggesting that PCPs may be able to predict future deterioration in patients with relatively good current health status. These patients may most likely benefit from preventive services like CM.

  5. Optimizing health care resource utilization in the surgical management of patients with suspected lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Sebastien; Zhang, Hanfei; Villeneuve, Patrick J; Seely, Andrew J; Maziak, Donna E; Shamji, Farid M; Cadaval, Andrea; Sundaresan, Sudhir

    2012-11-01

    Surgical resection for tissue diagnosis of lung nodules exposes patients to unnecessary risks and consumes health care resources for questionable benefit. We describe the impact of routine percutaneous lung biopsy on the management of suspicious lung nodules. A retrospective review of consecutive patients referred to a regional cancer assessment center for evaluation of suspected primary or metastatic lung cancer was performed. From 2008 to 2010, 901 patients (male to female ratio, 0.97:1 [443 to 458]; mean age, 69.4 ± 0.3 years) underwent 1,016 percutaneous lung biopsy (fluoroscopy, 77%; computed tomography-guided, 20%). Diagnoses were non-small cell lung cancer (602 of 901; 66.8%), other malignancy (159 of 901; 17.6%), indeterminate (61 of 901; 6.8%), benign (47 of 901; 5.2%), or nondiagnostic (32 of 901; 3.6%). Of these, 393 (43.6%) were surgical candidates. Operation was avoided in 16.0% (63 of 393; benign, 36; indeterminate, 13; nondiagnostic, 14). Computed tomography follow-up in 82.5% (52 of 63) showed no change or resolution at 14.0 ± 1 months. Only 2.7% (9 of 330) underwent resection of a pathologically benign nodule. Diagnostic yield of percutaneous lung biopsy was 82.7%. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values, respectively, were 100% (95% confidence interval, 98 to 100), 75% (95% confidence interval, 22 to 99), 99.7% (95% confidence interval, 98 to 100), and 100% (95% confidence interval, 31 to 100). The mean operating room time saved with this strategy was 165 ± 13.2 hours. The total cost of performing routine percutaneous biopsy ($395,500) was 44.5% of the cost of upfront wedge resection for tissue diagnosis ($888,300). In surgical candidates, routine needle biopsy of suspicious lung nodules may lead to decreased costs, more efficient use of limited operating room resources, and a low probability of resecting pathologically benign lesions. Copyright © 2012 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc

  6. End-of-life issues in caring for patients with dementia: the case for palliative care in management of terminal dementia.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Albert M E

    2012-02-01

    The number of people suffering with dementia is increasing in the general population and the trend is projected to continue as people live longer, especially in countries with developed economies. The most common cause of dementia (among the many other causes) is Alzheimer's dementia, which is considered a terminal illness. The disease could eventually lead to death, or death could occur as a consequence of co-morbid physical complications. The problem of end of life (EOL) care for patients suffering from dementia though spoken of and written about, does not get the attention and system support as for example patients suffering from cancer receive. Many reasons have been advanced for the current state of affairs where EOL issues for patients suffering from dementia are concerned. This article attempts to revisit the issues, and the reasons, that may contribute to this. Some guidelines on palliative management in cases of patients suffering from severe dementia exist; the evidence base for these guidelines though is relatively weak. The ethical and legal issues that may influence or impact on the decision to initiate the palliative care pathway in the management of EOL issues for dementia patients in the terminal or end stage of the illness is highlighted. Initiatives by the department of health in England and Wales, and other bodies with interest in dementia issues and palliative care in the United Kingdom to ensure good and acceptable EOL pathways for patients with dementia are mentioned.

  7. Using an electronic self-management tool to support patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD): a CKD clinic self-care model.

    PubMed

    Ong, Stephanie W; Jassal, Sarbjit V; Porter, Eveline; Logan, Alexander G; Miller, Judith A

    2013-01-01

    New healthcare delivery models are needed to enhance the patient experience and improve quality of care for individuals with chronic conditions such as kidney disease. One potential avenue is to implement self-management strategies. There is growing evidence that self-management interventions help optimize various aspects of chronic disease management. With the increasing use of information technology (IT) in health care, chronic disease management programs are incorporating IT solutions to support patient self-management practices. IT solutions have the ability to promote key principles of self-management, namely education, empowerment, and collaboration. Positive clinical outcomes have been demonstrated for a number of chronic conditions when IT solutions were incorporated into self-management programs. There is a paucity of evidence for self-management in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Furthermore, IT strategies have not been tested in this patient population to the same extent as other chronic conditions (e.g., diabetes, hypertension). Therefore, it is currently unknown if IT strategies will promote self-management behaviors and lead to improvements in overall patient care. We designed and developed an IT solution called My KidneyCare Centre to support self-management strategies for patients with CKD. In this review, we discuss the rationale and vision of incorporating an electronic self-management tool to support the care of patients with CKD. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. [Prehospital management of very elderly patients with ST segment elevation in Paris by mobile intensive care units (Samu)].

    PubMed

    Leroy, J E; Bensouda, C; Durand, E; Greffet, A; Scemama, A; Carli, P; Danchin, N; Sauval, P

    2005-03-01

    More and more elderly people are hospitalised with myocardial infarction. Little is known on their pre-hospital management. In 2001 and 2002, 105 patients aged 80 years or more with suspected ST elevation infarction were managed by the mobile intensive care unit system of the SAMU de Paris-Necker. Diagnosis of infarction was confirmed in 92 (88%). Over 60% of the patients were women. Median time delay from symptom onset to call to the emergency service was 127 minutes, longer in nonagenarians (175 vs 101 minutes). Prehospital use of aspirin was 81% and 39% received an intravenous bolus of heparin. A reperfusion strategy was decided in only 30% (primary PCI: 23/26). One-month mortality was 21% and was related to older age, time when the call to the Samu was made, and absence of current smoking. Overall, the prehospital management of very elderly patients with suspected ST elevation infarction appears far from optimal.

  9. Blood pressure control and management of very elderly patients with hypertension in primary care settings in Spain.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Roca, Gustavo C; Llisterri, Jose L; Prieto-Diaz, Miguel A; Alonso-Moreno, Francisco J; Escobar-Cervantes, Carlos; Pallares-Carratala, Vicente; Valls-Roca, Francisco; Barrios, Vivencio; Banegas, Jose R; Alsina, Diegogonzalez-Segura

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to determine the clinical profile, blood pressure (BP) control rates, therapeutic management and physicians' therapeutic behavior regarding very elderly hypertensive patients. A total of 1540 hypertensive patients 80 years old on antihypertensive therapy and receiving care in primary care settings in Spain were included in this cross-sectional study. The mean patient age was 83.4±3.1 years, 61.9% of patients were women and 49.3% of patients had cardiovascular disease. Of the patients, 27.7% were on monotherapy and 72.3% were on combined therapy (47.4% on two antihypertensive agents and 24.9% on three or more antihypertensive agents). A total of 40.8% (95% confidence interval (CI): 38.4-43.3%) of patients achieved BP goals (<140/90 mm Hg; <130/80 in patients with diabetes, chronic renal disease or cardiovascular disease). Patients with uncontrolled BP were more likely to have metabolic syndrome, diabetes, obesity, a history of cardiovascular disease, ischemic heart disease, renal disease and stroke and were more frequently smokers. Physicians modified the antihypertensive regimens for 27.4% (95% CI: 23.9-30.8%) of the patients with uncontrolled BP, and the addition of another antihypertensive agent was the most frequent modification. With regard to the physicians' perception of patients' BP control, the BPs of 44.1% of the patients with uncontrolled BP were considered well controlled by the physicians.

  10. Diabetes Patient Tracker, a personal digital assistant-based diabetes management system for primary care practices in Oklahoma.

    PubMed

    Nagykaldi, Zsolt; Mold, James W

    2003-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that electronic patient registries combined with a clinical decision support system have a significant positive impact on the documentation and delivery of services provided by health care professionals. While implementation of available commercial systems has not always been proven effective in a number of primary care practices, development and implementation of such a system in a practice-based research network might enhance successful implementation. Physicians in our practice-based research network (Oklahoma Physicians Resource/Research Network) initiated a project that aimed at designing, testing, and implementing a personal digital assistant-based diabetes management system. We utilized the "best practice" approach to determine the principles on which the application must operate. System development and beta testing were also accomplished based on the direct feedback of user clinicians. Practice Enhancement Assistants (PEAs) were available in the practices for assistance with implementation. Implementation of the Diabetes Patient Tracker (DPT) resulted in a significant improvement (p<0.05) in nine of 10 diabetic quality of care measures compared with pre-intervention levels in 20 primary care practices. Regular PEA visits similarly increased the number of foot exams and retinal exams performed in the last year (p=0.03 and 0.02, respectively). DPT is a low-cost, feasible, easily implementable, and very effective paper-less tool that significantly improves patient care and documentation in primary care practices.

  11. Quality of care in patients with psoriasis: an initial clinical study of an international disease management programme.

    PubMed

    de Korte, J; Van Onselen, J; Kownacki, S; Sprangers, M A G; Bos, J D

    2005-01-01

    Patients with psoriasis have to cope with their disease for many years or even throughout their entire life. To provide optimal care, a disease management programme was developed. This programme consisted of disease education, disease management training, and psychological support, together with topical treatment. To test a disease management programme in dermatological practice, to assess patients' satisfaction with this programme, and adherence to topical treatment. Additionally, disease severity and quality of life were assessed. An initial clinical investigation was conducted in 10 European treatment centres. A total of 330 patients were included. Patient satisfaction, adherence, disease severity and quality of life were measured with study-specific and standardized self-report questionnaires. Patients reported a high degree of satisfaction with the programme, and a high degree of adherence to topical treatment. Disease severity and quality of life significantly improved. The programme was well received by the participating professionals. The disease management programme was found to be a useful tool in the management of psoriasis, providing patients with relief from the burden of psoriasis in everyday life. A full-scale evaluation is recommended.

  12. The effect of a diabetes collaborative care management program on clinical and economic outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    McAdam-Marx, Carrie; Dahal, Arati; Jennings, Brandon; Singhal, Mukul; Gunning, Karen

    2015-06-01

    Clinical pharmacy services (CPS) in the primary care setting have been shown to help patients attain treatment goals and improve outcomes. However, the availability of CPS in community-based primary care is not widespread. One reason is that current fee-for-service models offer limited reimbursement opportunities for CPS in the community setting. Furthermore, data demonstrating the value of CPS in this setting are limited, making it difficult for providers to determine the feasibility and sustainability of incorporating CPS into primary care practice. To (a) evaluate the association between a pharmacist-led, diabetes collaborative drug therapy management program and patient outcomes, including glycemic control and health care costs, and (b) assess short-term economic outcomes in a primary care setting. A retrospective cohort analysis was conducted using medical record data. This study was conducted using patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes (T2DM), defined as HbA1c ≥ 7.0%. Outcomes were compared between patients referred to a diabetes collaborative care management (DCCM) intervention from 2009-2012 and patients who did not participate in the DCCM program. To illustrate the difference in HbA1c between the 2 cohorts over the follow-up period, mean time adjusted HbA1c values were estimated using a panel-type random effects regression model, with results plotted at 90-day intervals from index date through the end of the study period. To help control for confounding by other factors, multivariate regression models were run. A difference-in-difference model was employed to estimate the effect of the program on resource utilization and all-cause charges. A total of 303 DCCM and 394 comparison patients were included. Mean (95% CI) age was 57.4 years (55.963, 58.902) versus 59.9 years (58.613, 61.276; P < 0.001) with 48% and 44% female for DCCM and comparison patients, respectively (P = 0.49). Mean baseline HbA1c was higher for DCCM (10.3%; 10.10, 10.53) than

  13. Are Tuberculosis Patients in a Tertiary Care Hospital in Hyderabad, India Being Managed According to National Guidelines?

    PubMed Central

    Kondapaka, Kiran Kumar; Prasad, Surapaneni Venkateswara; Satyanarayana, Srinath; Kandi, Subhakar; Zachariah, Rony; Harries, Anthony David; Nagaraja, Sharath Burugina; Tetali, Shailaja; Anchala, Raghupathy; Kannuri, Nanda Kishore; Murthy, Krishna; Koppu, Dhanamurthy; Vangari, Latha; Rao, Sreenivas

    2012-01-01

    Setting A tertiary health care facility (Government General and Chest hospital) in Hyderabad, India. Objectives To assess a) the extent of compliance of specialists to standardized national (RNTCP) tuberculosis management guidelines and b) if patients on discharge from hospital were being appropriately linked up with peripheral health facilities for continuation of anti-Tuberculosis (TB) treatment. Methods A descriptive study using routine programme data and involving all TB patients admitted to inpatient care from 1st January to 30th June, 2010. Results and Conclusions There were a total of 3120 patients admitted of whom, 1218 (39%) required anti-TB treatment. Of these 1104 (98%) were treated with one of the RNTCP recommended regimens, while 28 (2%) were treated with non-RNTCP regimens. The latter included individually tailored MDR-TB treatment regimens for 19 patients and adhoc regimens for nine patients. A total of 957 (86%) patients were eventually discharged from the hospital of whom 921 (96%) had a referral form filled for continuing treatment at a peripheral health facility. Formal feedback from peripheral health facilities on continuation of TB treatment was received for 682 (74%) patients. In a tertiary health facility with specialists the great majority of TB patients are managed in line with national guidelines. However a number of short-comings were revealed and measures to rectify these are discussed. PMID:22272323

  14. Managing depression in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Kerry A.; Wolfe, Vicky V.; Fisman, Sandra; DePace, JoAnne; Steele, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate family physicians’ practice patterns for managing depression and mental health concerns among adolescent and adult patients. DESIGN Cross-sectional survey. SETTING London, Ont, a mid-sized Canadian city. PARTICIPANTS One hundred sixty-three family physicians identified through the London and District Academy of Medicine. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Practice patterns for managing depression, including screening, pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, shared care, and training needs. RESULTS Response rate was 63%. Family physicians reported spending a substantial portion of their time during patient visits (26% to 50%) addressing mental health issues, with depression being the most common issue (51% to 75% of patients with mental health issues). About 40% of respondents did routine mental health screening, and 60% screened patients with risk factors for depression. Shared care with mental health professionals was common (care was shared for 26% to 50% of patients). Physicians and patients were moderately satisfied with shared care, but were frustrated by long waiting lists and communication barriers. Most physicians provided psychotherapy to patients in the form of general advice. Differences in practice patterns were observed; physicians treated more adults than adolescents with depression, and they reported greater comfort in treating adults. Although 33% of physicians described using cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), they reported having little training in CBT. Moderate interest was expressed in CBT training, with a preference for a workshop format. CONCLUSION Although 40% of family physicians routinely screen patients for mental health issues, depression is often not detected. Satisfaction with shared care can be increased through better communication with mental health professionals. Physicians’ management of adolescent patients can be improved by further medical training, consultation, and collaboration with mental health professionals

  15. Creating opportunities for interdisciplinary collaboration and patient-centred care: how nurses, doctors, pharmacists and patients use communication strategies when managing medications in an acute hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Gerdtz, Marie; Manias, Elizabeth

    2016-10-01

    This paper examines the communication strategies that nurses, doctors, pharmacists and patients use when managing medications. Patient-centred medication management is best accomplished through interdisciplinary practice. Effective communication about managing medications between clinicians and patients has a direct influence on patient outcomes. There is a lack of research that adopts a multidisciplinary approach and involves critical in-depth analysis of medication interactions among nurses, doctors, pharmacists and patients. A critical ethnographic approach with video reflexivity was adopted to capture communication strategies during medication activities in two general medical wards of an acute care hospital in Melbourne, Australia. A mixed ethnographic approach combining participant observations, field interviews, video recordings and video reflexive focus groups and interviews was employed. Seventy-six nurses, 31 doctors, 1 pharmacist and 27 patients gave written consent to participate in the study. Data analysis was informed by Fairclough's critical discourse analytic framework. Clinicians' use of communication strategies was demonstrated in their interpersonal, authoritative and instructive talk with patients. Doctors adopted the language discourse of normalisation to standardise patients' illness experiences. Nurses and pharmacists employed the language discourses of preparedness and scrutiny to ensure that patient safety was maintained. Patients took up the discourse of politeness to raise medication concerns and question treatment decisions made by doctors, in their attempts to challenge decision-making about their health care treatment. In addition, the video method revealed clinicians' extensive use of body language in communication processes for medication management. The use of communication strategies by nurses, doctors, pharmacists and patients created opportunities for improved interdisciplinary collaboration and patient-centred medication

  16. Patient Participation in Research in the Managed Care Environment: Key Perceptions of Members in an HMO

    PubMed Central

    Purdy, Sarah; Finkelstein, Jonathan A; Fletcher, Robert; Christiansen, Cindy; Inui, Thomas S

    2000-01-01

    This study's objective was to elicit the views of research among enrollees in an HMO. A questionnaire was mailed to 207 adult enrollees, 55% had been exposed to research and 45% had not. Ninety-four percent of respondents supported research within the HMO, and 87% thought using information from medical records for research was acceptable. Sixty-three percent thought participation in research increased patient understanding of health care. Significantly more prior research participants thought that participation in research improves care. More patients would participate if written information were provided (67%), if feedback of results was provided (72%), and if their clinician invited them (67%). Only a modest percentage (20%) of patients would participate in a randomized trial. PMID:10940136

  17. [Management of tuberculosis patients in the urban setting: health service delivery and health care-seeking behavior].

    PubMed

    Nana Yakam, André; Noeske, Juergen; Angumua, Carrine; Bowong, Samuel; Aimé Fono, Louis

    2013-01-01

    This descriptive and prospective study was designed to determine the incidence of smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB+) by health area (HA) in Douala, use of Diagnosis and Treatment Centres (DTCs) and the factors influencing the choice of DTC. Over a one-year period, the residence of all PTB+ patients and the DTC at which they were treated were located by means of a GPS system and represented on a geo-referenced health map. Incidence of PTB+ per HA was calculated. Focus group discussions with TB patients were then held in seven of the nineteen DTCs chosen by convenience. The incidence of PTB+ is not randomly distributed between HAs, as the incidence is fivefold higher than the mean in some HAs. More than one half of patients (65%) were not treated in the DTC to which they were designated by the health system. Attendance in a DTC mostly depends on chance decisions based on previous experiences with a health care unit, recommendations from family members, friends or strangers, or the (sometimes erroneous) reference by health care personnel. References rarely follow the logic of the system. The provision of health care for TB in the city of Douala and health care-seeking behaviour of patients frequently do not correspond. Information and communication on TB care delivery could make the management of tuberculosis more efficient and more effective.

  18. Effects of 2 educational interventions on the management of hypertensive patients in primary health care.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Henderson Barbosa; Caldeira, Antonio Prates; Mamede, Sílvia

    2014-01-01

    Experimental studies on the effectiveness of educational interventions to improve patient care are scarce, especially for low-resources settings. This study investigated the effects of 2 educational interventions on the treatment of hypertensive patients in primary health care in Brazil. Forty-one physicians were randomly assigned either to an "active educational intervention" (21 physicians) or to a "passive educational intervention" (20 physicians). The former comprised 1 small group discussion of routine practices, 1 outreach visit, and 3 reminders. The latter consisted of delivery of printed guidelines. Measures of quality of treatment provided for hypertensive patients (181 patients of physicians from the active intervention; 136 patients of physicians from the passive intervention) were obtained through patient interview and charts review, before and 3 months after the intervention. Chi-square and independent t-tests were performed for comparison between the conditions. The groups did not differ before the study. After the intervention, the active intervention group outperformed the passive intervention group in several measures, such as improved prescription of antihypertensive drugs (80% of patients of physicians from the active intervention vs 51% patients of physicians from the passive intervention; p < .01), prescription of aspirin (18% vs 6%; p < .01) and hypolipidemic drugs for high-risk patients (39% vs 21%; p < .01), dietary counseling (76% vs 61%; p < .01), guidance on cardiovascular risk (20% vs 3%; p < .01). Patient outcomes did not differ. A multifaceted intervention based on review of practices improved treatment of hypertensive patients in a low-resource setting whereas delivery of guidelines did not help. None of the interventions affected patient outcomes. © 2014 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on Continuing Medical Education, Association

  19. Primary care providers’ views on chronic pain management among high-risk patients in safety net settings

    PubMed Central

    Vijayaraghavan, Maya; Penko, Joanne; Guzman, David; Miaskowski, Christine; Kushel, Margot B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective We examined chronic pain management practices and confidence and satisfaction levels in treating chronic pain among primary care providers (PCPs) who cared for high-risk patients in safety net health settings. Design We recruited PCPs (n=61) through their HIV-infected patients who were enrolled in a longitudinal study on pain, use and misuse of opioid analgesics (Pain Study). We asked PCPs to complete a questionnaire about all of their patients in their practice on the prevalence of chronic pain and illicit substance use, use of opioid analgesics, confidence and satisfaction levels in treating chronic pain, and likelihood of prescribing opioid analgesics in response to clinical vignettes. Results All PCPs cared for at least some patients with chronic pain, and the majority prescribed opioid analgesics for its treatment. All PCPs cared for at least some patients who used illicit substances. PCPs reported low confidence and satisfaction levels in treating chronic pain. The majority (73.8%) of PCPs were highly likely to prescribe opioid analgesics to a patient without a history of substance use who had chronic pain. The majority (88.5%) were somewhat to highly likely to prescribe opioid analgesics to a patient with a prior history of substance use but not active use. Most (67.2%) were somewhat to highly likely to prescribe opioids to a patient with active substance use. Conclusion In order to improve PCPs confidence and satisfaction in managing chronic pain, further work should explore the root causes of low confidence and satisfaction and also explore possible remedies. PMID:22846057

  20. Containment Care Units for Managing Patients With Highly Hazardous Infectious Diseases: A Concept Whose Time Has Come.

    PubMed

    Kortepeter, Mark G; Kwon, Elena H; Hewlett, Angela L; Smith, Philip W; Cieslak, Theodore J

    2016-10-15

    The concept of containment care for patients with highly hazardous infectious diseases originated in conjunction with the development of sophisticated biosafety level 4 laboratories at the US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases in the late 1960s. Over time, the original containment facility served as a model for the development of other facilities in the United States at government and academic centers. The Ebola outbreak of 2014-2015 brought the issue of containment care into the mainstream and led to the development of such capabilities at strategic points around the country. We describe the original concepts behind development of such facilities, how the concept and acceptance has evolved over time, and how the guidelines for managing patients infected with viral hemorrhagic fevers have evolved as new information has been learned about protecting medical care providers from highly hazardous infectious pathogens.

  1. Nurse-managed health centers and patient-centered medical homes could mitigate expected primary care physician shortage.

    PubMed

    Auerbach, David I; Chen, Peggy G; Friedberg, Mark W; Reid, Rachel; Lau, Christopher; Buerhaus, Peter I; Mehrotra, Ateev

    2013-11-01

    Numerous forecasts have predicted shortages of primary care providers, particularly in light of an expected increase in patient demand resulting from the Affordable Care Act. Yet these forecasts could be inaccurate because they generally do not allow for changes in the way primary care is delivered. We analyzed the impact of two emerging models of care--the patient-centered medical home and the nurse-managed health center--both of which use a provider mix that is richer in nurse practitioners and physician assistants than today's predominant models of care delivery. We found that projected physician shortages were substantially reduced in plausible scenarios that envisioned greater reliance on these new models, even without increases in the supply of physicians. Some less plausible scenarios even eliminated the shortage. All of these scenarios, however, may require additional changes, such as liberalized scope-of-practice laws; a larger supply of medical assistants, licensed practical nurses, and aides; and payment changes that reward providers for population health management.

  2. Pressure ulcers are associated with 6-month mortality in elderly patients with hip fracture managed in orthogeriatric care pathway.

    PubMed

    Magny, Emmanuelle; Vallet, Helene; Cohen-Bittan, Judith; Raux, Mathieu; Meziere, Antony; Verny, Marc; Riou, Bruno; Khiami, Frédéric; Boddaert, Jacques

    2017-08-29

    Despite orthogeriatric management, 12% of the elderly experienced PUs after hip fracture surgery. PUs were significantly associated with a low albumin level, history of atrial fibrillation coronary artery disease, and diabetes. The risk ratio of death at 6 months associated with pressure ulcer was 2.38 (95% CI 1.31-4.32%, p = 0.044). Pressure ulcers in hip fracture patients are frequent and associated with a poor outcome. An orthogeriatric management, recommended by international guidelines in hip fracture patients and including pressure ulcer prevention and treatment, could influence causes and consequences of pressure ulcer. However, remaining factors associated with pressure ulcer occurrence and prognostic value of pressure ulcer in hip fracture patients managed in an orthogeriatric care pathway remain unknown. From June 2009 to April 2015, all consecutive patients with hip fracture admitted to a unit for Post-operative geriatric care were evaluated for eligibility. Patients were included if their primary presentation was due to hip fracture and if they were ≥ 70 years of age. Patients were excluded in the presence of pathological fracture or if they were already hospitalized at the time of the fracture. In our unit, orthogeriatric principles are implemented, including a multi-component intervention to improve pressure ulcer prevention and management. Patients were followed-up until 6 months after discharge. Five hundred sixty-seven patients were included, with an overall 14.4% 6-month mortality (95% CI 11.6-17.8%). Of these, 67 patients (12%) experienced at least one pressure ulcer. Despite orthogeriatric management, pressure ulcers were significantly associated with a low albumin level (RR 0.90, 95% CI 0.84-0.96; p = 0.003) and history of atrial fibrillation (RR 1.91, 95% CI 1.05-3.46; p = 0.033), coronary artery disease (RR 2.16, 95% CI 1.17-3.99; p = 0.014), and diabetes (RR 2.33, 95% CI 1.14-4.75; p = 0.02). A pressure ulcer was associated

  3. Disease management strategies: managing care giving in managed care.

    PubMed

    Nesse, R E; Hagedorn, S D; Scheitel, S M; Nyman, M A; Broers, J K

    2000-01-01

    The rapid rate of change in health care delivery systems has challenged and troubled health care providers. Some new health care delivery systems primarily emphasize the economics of medical care and leave providers with a sense that their profession has strayed from its mission. In addition, there is an increasing demand by payers and the public for public accountability for the quality and expense of clinical services. One response to these changes in health care is the use of disease management strategies. There is a growing body of knowledge regarding disease management strategies and practice guidelines in the literature. This article discusses how a provider group can implement improvement in the clinical process successfully by applying techniques of disease management.

  4. Self-management practices among type 2 diabetes patients attending primary health-care centres in Medina, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al Johani, K A; Kendall, G E; Snider, P D

    2015-10-02

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the frequency of self-management activities among people who have type 2 diabetes in Saudi Arabia. The Arabic version of the Summary of Diabetes Self-care Activities questionnaire was used to identify self-management practices among 210 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Only 15% of participants had a blood glucose level indicative of good glycaemic control (glycosylated haemoglobin ≤ 7 mmol/L). Most reported that they took their medication as prescribed, but many demonstrated low levels of compliance with other self-management practices (overall mean 3.7 days per week). Males and those with lower incomes were less likely to practise self-care activities. Most were given basic advice to undertake self-care activities, but only some were given more detailed information. There are opportunities to improve type 2 diabetes mellitus self-management practices in Saudi Arabia and increase the proportion of patients who achieve good glycaemic control.

  5. Implementing managed care and case management: the neuroscience experience.

    PubMed

    Marr, J A; Reid, B

    1992-10-01

    The case management model for patient care in the neuroscience area was recently implemented in the neurosciences area at a tertiary care hospital. Understanding of the concepts of case management and managed care were essential to the implementation process. Clustering of case types and appointment of group leaders made the development of individual care maps a manageable task. Case management of 2 case types, Parkinson's disease and Guillain Barré syndrome are described, including the rationale for selection, care map development and education. The process of continuing education focused on operational issues regarding utilization of the map and professional issues such as health teaching responsibilities.

  6. [Dementia Care Manager for patients with dementia. Determination of the requirements and qualifications contents for nurses in the DelpHi-MV study].

    PubMed

    Dreier, A; Hoffmann, W

    2013-10-01

    Dementia is one of the most prevalent chronic progressive diseases in older age. The progression of dementia is associated with an increasing demand for patient care. Thus, the nursing profession fulfills important tasks in the supply of care in dementia. Care of dementia patients requires nurses with more specialized professional knowledge. Consequently, the development of new qualification concepts in dementia is needed. Therefore, the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Rostock/Greifswald, has developed a qualification according to the Dementia Care Management concept. A prospective cross-sectional study identified the tasks and qualifications of nurses as Dementia Care Managers. Overall, 27 tasks and 28 qualification items were identified for a nurse to qualify as a Dementia Care Manager. In the next step, the first version of the Dementia Care Management Curriculum was developed.

  7. Electronic managed care: the utilization of information technology in a managed care environment.

    PubMed

    Kiel, Joan M

    2003-01-01

    Health care managers must use information technology in managed care negotiations with all players in the managed care model-employers, managed care organizations, providers, and patients. Information technology effectuates these negotiations, provides a value added to all those involved in terms of efficiency and communication, and helps managers remain within regulations. This article describes each phase of the managed care model and how information technology is used. It also provides an operational overview of how to integrate the technology into health care settings.

  8. Medicare Pays for Chronic Care Management.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2015-09-01

    As of January, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services began paying for chronic care management of patients with two or more conditions under its Chronic Care Management program. The payment applies to patients in traditional fee-for-service and noncapitated Medicare Advantage plan arrangements. Texas Medical Association leaders caution the program has some hefty requirements.

  9. Beyond utilization control: managing care with customers.

    PubMed

    Morath, J

    1998-01-01

    Allina Health System embarked on a rigorous process to better understand the customer's perception of care and service. The milestone for quality is the participation of the patient, member, and family in the health care system to determine care and service quality. The challenge for those in health care is to understand and manage the complex cultural changes this inclusion implies.

  10. Do the benefits of participation in a hypertension self-management trial persist after patients resume usual care?

    PubMed

    Maciejewski, Matthew L; Bosworth, Hayden B; Olsen, Maren K; Smith, Valerie A; Edelman, David; Powers, Benjamin J; Kaufman, Miriam A; Oddone, Eugene Z; Jackson, George L

    2014-03-01

    Hypertension self-management has been shown to improve systolic blood pressure (BP) control, but longer-term economic and clinical impacts are unknown. The purpose of this article is to examine clinical and economic outcomes 18 months after completion of a hypertension self-management trial. This study is a follow-up analysis of an 18-month, 4-arm, hypertension self-management trial of 591 veterans with hypertension who were randomized to usual care or 1 of 3 interventions. Clinic-derived systolic blood pressure obtained before, during, and after the trial were estimated using linear mixed models. Inpatient admissions, outpatient expenditures, and total expenditures were estimated using generalized estimating equations. The 3 telephone-based interventions were nurse-administered health behavior promotion, provider-administered medication adjustments based on hypertension treatment guidelines, or a combination of both. Intervention calls were triggered by home BP values transmitted via telemonitoring devices. Clinical and economic outcomes were examined 12 months before, 18 months during, and 18 months after trial completion. Compared with usual care, patients randomized to the combined arm had greater improvement in proportion of BP control during and after the 18-month trial and estimated proportion of BP control improved 18 months after trial completion for patients in the behavioral and medication management arms. Among the patients with inadequate baseline BP control, estimated mean systolic BP was significantly lower in the combined arm as compared with usual care during and after the 18-month trial. Utilization and expenditure trends were similar for patients in all 4 arms. Behavioral and medication management can generate systolic BP improvements that are sustained 18 months after trial completion. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00237692.

  11. Management of constipation in palliative care patients undergoing opioid therapy: is polyethylene glycol an option?

    PubMed

    Wirz, Stefan; Klaschik, Eberhard

    2005-01-01

    This study assessed the efficacy of laxative use for treatment of constipation in patients receiving opioid therapy, with special attention to polyethylene glycol 3350/electrolyte solution (PEG-ES). Computerized data from 206 patients were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Subgroups were analyzed using confirmatory statistics. Constipation occurred in 42.7 percent of patients. Laxatives were administered to 74.3 percent of these patients using a standardized step scheme, with good results in 78.4 percent. As a therapy for constipation, the combined administration of PEG-ES, sodium picosulphate, and liquid paraffin proved most effective, although statistical analysis yielded no significance. Early use of PEG-ES using a step scheme holds promise for treatment of opioid-related constipation in palliative care patients, although further investigation is warranted.

  12. Quality management: patients reflections on health care at outpatient clinic of internal medicine department.

    PubMed

    Ljubičić, Neven; Boban, Marko; Gaćina, Petar; Adzija, Jasminka; Benceković, Zeljka; Rajković, Ana

    2009-06-01

    Middle and older age group relative share in the community permanently grows. Those are commonly burdened with several chronic health conditions or elevated incidence of acute ones and in more frequent need for consulting health services. In the era of modern technical medicine, it is important to increase quality of services particularly patients orientated. Department of Internal Medicine developed questionnaire to assess reflections on medical care from the receiver of medical services point of view. Sample was formed from individuals that visited outpatient triage Unit (OTU) and voluntary enrolled, during period April 1-August 31, 2008 for any medical reason. Study population structure had similarly equally of both genders, socio-economical background, and was in age range 18-87. Questionnaire was developed by team of experienced personnel covering satisfaction on received medical care. There were 279 returned formulary in a sample of 6700 patients (4.18%). Patients visited OTU chiefly on behalf medical condition secondary to address of residency, followed by personal choice, on advice given by general practitioner, by emergency transportation services, or just due to earlier experiences. Regarding provided medical care extent, 4/5 of patients were examined in lesser than 2 hours, while total workup lasted mostly for 2-4, followed by over four. Over half of patients were moderate toward highly satisfied with provided medical information, personnel communication style and general reflection on all services while being in the Department premises. Astonishing proportion of patients (93%) was satisfied with positive personnel communication. Integration of patients' self-perceived reports about medical services in organizing process is inevitable for augmenting content and at the same time valuable for developing overall quality of treatment. Communication excellence is of premier importance and unavoidable for giving additional positive effect to remain health

  13. Suboptimal management of cardiovascular risk factors in coronary heart disease patients in primary care occurs particularly in women.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, A; Beauchamp, A; Lyubomirsky, G; Demos, L; McNeil, J; Tonkin, A

    2011-10-01

    Patients with established coronary heart disease (CHD) are at the highest risk of further events. Despite proven therapies, secondary prevention is often suboptimal. General practitioners (GPs) are in an ideal position to improve secondary prevention. To contrast management of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with established CHD in primary care to those in clinical guidelines and according to gender. GPs throughout Australia were approached to participate in a programme incorporating a disease management software (mdCare) program. Participating practitioners (1258 GPs) recruited individual patients whose cardiovascular risk factor levels were measured. The mdCare programme included 12,509 patients (58% male) diagnosed with CHD. Their mean age was 71.7years (intra-quartile range 66-78) for men and 74years (intra-quartile range 68-80) for women. Low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol was above target levels in 69% (2032) of women compared with 58% (2487) in men (P < 0.0001). There was also a higher proportion of women with total cholesterol above target levels (76%, 3592) compared with men (57%, 3787) (P < 0.0001). In patients who were prescribed lipid-lowering medication, 53% (2504) of men and 72% (2285) of women continued to have a total cholesterol higher than recommended target levels (P < 0.0001). Overall, over half (52%, 6538) had at least five cardiovascular risk factors (55% (2914) in women and 50% (3624) in men, P < 0.0001). This study found less intensive management of cardiovascular risk factors in CHD patients, particularly among women, despite equivalent cardiovascular risk. This study has shown that these patients have multiple risk factors where gender also plays a role. © 2011 The Authors. Internal Medicine Journal © 2011 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  14. Design and Testing of the Safety Agenda Mobile App for Managing Health Care Managers' Patient Safety Responsibilities.

    PubMed

    Mira, José Joaquín; Carrillo, Irene; Fernandez, Cesar; Vicente, Maria Asuncion; Guilabert, Mercedes

    2016-12-08

    Adverse events are a reality in clinical practice. Reducing the prevalence of preventable adverse events by stemming their causes requires health managers' engagement. The objective of our study was to develop an app for mobile phones and tablets that would provide managers with an overview of their responsibilities in matters of patient safety and would help them manage interventions that are expected to be carried out throughout the year. The Safety Agenda Mobile App (SAMA) was designed based on standardized regulations and reviews of studies about health managers' roles in patient safety. A total of 7 managers used a beta version of SAMA for 2 months and then they assessed and proposed improvements in its design. Their experience permitted redesigning SAMA, improving functions and navigation. A total of 74 Spanish health managers tried out the revised version of SAMA. After 4 months, their assessment was requested in a voluntary and anonymous manner. SAMA is an iOS app that includes 37 predefined tasks that are the responsibility of health managers. Health managers can adapt these tasks to their schedule, add new ones, and share them with their team. SAMA menus are structured in 4 main areas: information, registry, task list, and settings. Of the 74 users who tested SAMA, 64 (86%) users provided a positive assessment of SAMA characteristics and utility. Over an 11-month period, 238 users downloaded SAMA. This mobile app has obtained the AppSaludable (HealthyApp) Quality Seal. SAMA includes a set of activities that are expected to be carried out by health managers in matters of patient safety and contributes toward improving the awareness of their responsibilities in matters of safety.

  15. [Team Care and Patient Safety].

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Michio

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of patient safety management is to nurture an environment which provides optimal care for each patient through the cooperation of each healthcare staff member based on the idea of team care. This is based on the safety culture of an organization that places value on sharing information. Laboratory medicine is expected to become more important in the areas of staff, patient, and community education.

  16. Adult HIV care resources, management practices and patient characteristics in the Phase 1 IeDEA Central Africa cohort.

    PubMed

    Divaris, Kimon; Newman, Jamie; Hemingway-Foday, Jennifer; Akam, Wilfred; Balimba, Ashu; Dusengamungu, Cyrille; Kalenga, Lucien; Mbaya, Marcel; Molu, Brigitte Mfangam; Mugisha, Veronicah; Mukumbi, Henri; Mushingantahe, Jules; Nash, Denis; Niyongabo, Théodore; Atibu, Joseph; Azinyue, Innocent; Kiumbu, Modeste; Woelk, Godfrey

    2012-11-21

    Despite recent advances in the management of HIV infection and increased access to treatment, prevention, care and support, the HIV/AIDS epidemic continues to be a major global health problem, with sub-Saharan Africa suffering by far the greatest humanitarian, demographic and socio-economic burden of the epidemic. Information on HIV/AIDS clinical care and established cohorts' characteristics in the Central Africa region are sparse. A survey of clinical care resources, management practices and patient characteristics was undertaken among 12 adult HIV care sites in four countries of the International Epidemiologic Databases to Evaluate AIDS Central Africa (IeDEA-CA) Phase 1 regional network in October 2009. These facilities served predominantly urban populations and offered primary care in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC; six sites), secondary care in Rwanda (two sites) and tertiary care in Cameroon (three sites) and Burundi (one site). Despite some variation in facility characteristics, sites reported high levels of monitoring resources, including electronic databases, as well as linkages to prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission programs. At the time of the survey, there were 21,599 HIV-positive adults (median age=37 years) enrolled in the clinical cohort. Though two-thirds were women, few adults (6.5%) entered HIV care through prevention of mother-to-child transmission services, whereas 55% of the cohort entered care through voluntary counselling and testing. Two-thirds of patients at sites in Cameroon and DRC were in WHO Stage III and IV at baseline, whereas nearly all patients in the Rwanda facilities with clinical stage information available were in Stage I and II. WHO criteria were used for antiretroviral therapy initiation. The most common treatment regimen was stavudine/lamivudine/nevirapine (64%), followed by zidovudine/lamivudine/nevirapine (19%). Our findings demonstrate the feasibility of establishing large clinical cohorts of HIV

  17. [Marketing aspects of managing of health care delivery to patients with sexually transmitted infections in modern practice].

    PubMed

    Martynenko, O V

    2003-01-01

    The article is devoted to the study of scientific-and-practical researches carried out in the field of management, organization, and marketing of medical care provided to patients presenting with infections transmitted through sexual contacts. The conducted investigations proved to be of current concern as evidenced by the analysis of the relevant literature now available, based on which analysis major lines of further research have been outlined, that include problems of marketing, process, strategic management and planning of activities of the health system in the face of the impact of the external conditions and within the framework of the market economy existing in the country.

  18. Usual care and management of fall risk increasing drugs in older dizzy patients in Dutch general practice

    PubMed Central

    Stam, Hanneke; Harting, Thomas; van der Sluijs, Marjolijn; van Marum, Rob; van der Horst, Henriëtte; van der Wouden, Johannes C.; Maarsingh, Otto R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective For general practitioners (GPs) dizziness is a challenging condition to deal with. Data on the management of dizziness in older patients are mostly lacking. Furthermore, it is unknown whether GPs attempt to decrease Fall Risk Increasing Drugs (FRIDs) use in the management of dizziness in older patients. The aim of this study is to gain more insight into GP’s management of dizziness in older patients, including FRID evaluation and adjustment. Design Data were derived from electronic medical records, obtained over a 12-month period in 2013. Setting Forty-six Dutch general practices. Patients The study sample comprised of 2812 older dizzy patients of 65 years and over. Patients were identified using International Classification of Primary Care codes and free text. Main outcome measures Usual care was categorized into wait-and-see strategy (no treatment initiated); education and advice; additional testing; medication adjustment; and referral. Results Frequently applied treatments included a wait-and-see strategy (28.4%) and education and advice (28.0%). Additional testing was performed in 26.8%; 19.0% of the patients were referred. Of the patients 87.2% had at least one FRID prescription. During the observation period, GPs adjusted the use of one or more FRIDs for 11.7% of the patients. Conclusion This study revealed a wide variety in management strategies for dizziness in older adults. The referral rate for dizziness was high compared to prior research. Although many older dizzy patients use at least one FRID, FRID evaluation and adjustment is scarce. We expect that more FRID adjustments may reduce dizziness and dizziness-related impairment. Key PointsIt is important to know how general practitioners manage dizziness in older patients in order to assess potential cues for improvement.This study revealed a wide variety in management strategies for dizziness in older patients.There was a scarcity in Fall Risk Increasing Drug (FRID) evaluation and adjustment

  19. Patient management.

    PubMed

    Guptill, Lynn

    2015-03-01

    Hospital-associated infections, including those caused by zoonotic agents, represent an increasing concern in veterinary practice. Veterinarians and hospital staff are obligated and expected to provide education about and protection from transmission of pathogens among animal patients and between animal patients and human beings (eg, veterinary staff, volunteers, owners) who come into contact with infected animals. Patient management involves assessing risks of pathogen transmission, identification of animals either suspected of or proved to be infected with a transmissible infectious disease agent, and the implementation of measures that minimize the likelihood of transmission of the infectious agent.

  20. Stress Management in the Health Care Setting: Matching Interventions with Patient Coping Styles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martelli, Michael F.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Prospective preprosthetic oral surgery patients were presented with a problem-focused, emotion-focused, or mixed-focus stress management intervention. The mixed-focus intervention produced the best overall response to surgery; the emotion-focused intervention produced the lowest adjustment levels. Better adjustment and satisfaction and lower…

  1. Levothyroxine absorption and difficult management of hypothyroid patients in the intensive care unit: two case reports and a literature review.

    PubMed

    Vinagre, Ana Lúcia Marinho; Souza, Marcus Vinícius Leitão de

    2011-06-01

    Levothyroxine absorption in hypothyroid patients can be influenced by several factors, particularly medications and concomitant food administration. This is especially evident in intensive care unit patients, where a continual enteral diet and the administration of multiple medications changes its absorption. Changes or adaptations in the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis, in conjunction with clinical abnormalities possibly related to under-treatment of hypothyroidism, render levothyroxine replacement therapy very challenging. Here, we report two intensive care hypothyroidism patients and their respective levothyroxine replacement management issues, focusing on a number of controversial issues, such as the optimal replacement dose, how fast the levothyroxine doses should be increased, triiodothyronine requirements, the interference of an enteral diet with absorption, and finally, the possible consequences of undertreated hypothyroidism and levothyroxine replacement monitoring useful clinical/laboratory parameters.

  2. Risk of Nonfatal Stroke in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients: A Retrospective Comparison Between Disease Management Programs and Standard Care.

    PubMed

    Wiefarn, Stefan; Heumann, Christian; Rettelbach, Anja; Kostev, Karel

    2017-07-01

    The present retrospective study examines the influence of disease management programs on nonfatal stroke in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients in Germany. The evaluation is based on retrospective patient data from the Disease Analyzer (IMS Health). The analysis included 169 414 T2DM patients aged 40 years and older with an initial prescription of antihyperglycemic therapy between January 2004 and December 2014. A total of 86 713 patients participated in a disease management program (DMP) for T2DM and 82 701 patients received standard care. The main outcome measure of this study was nonfatal stroke. Kaplan-Meier curves of DMP and SC patients were compared using log rank test. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to provide an adjusted estimate of the DMP effect. It is apparent from the baseline characteristics that the general health of patients receiving standard care was poorer than that of patients participating in a DMP. The baseline HbA1c value was 7.6% in the DMP group and 7.8% in the SC group. Furthermore, the SC group had a higher proportion of preexisting conditions, such as coronary heart disease (CHD), peripheral arterial occlusive disease (pAOD), and renal insufficiency. The proportion of patients who received insulin in first year therapy was higher in the SC group. Time to event analysis showed that DMP was associated with a delayed occurrence of stroke, because stroke occurred an average of 350 days later in DMP patients than in patients receiving SC (DMP: 1.216 days, RV: 866 days). The Cox model with covariable adjustment confirmed the significant association of DMPs with nonfatal stroke in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (HR 0.71; 95% CI: 0.69-0.74). The present study indicates that DMPs are positively associated with stroke. The possible reasons for this must be verified in further studies.

  3. Assessing and managing wounds of Buruli ulcer patients at the primary and secondary health care levels in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Addison, Naa Okaikor; Pfau, Stefanie; Koka, Eric; Aboagye, Samuel Yaw; Kpeli, Grace; Pluschke, Gerd; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Junghanss, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    Beyond Mycobacterium ulcerans-specific therapy, sound general wound management is required for successful management of Buruli ulcer (BU) patients which places them among the large and diverse group of patients in poor countries with a broken skin barrier. Clinically BU suspicious patients were enrolled between October 2013 and August 2015 at a primary health care (PHC) center and a municipal hospital, secondary health care (SHC) center in Ghana. All patients were IS2404 PCR tested and divided into IS2404 PCR positive and negative groups. The course of wound healing was prospectively investigated including predictors of wound closure and assessment of infrastructure, supply and health staff performance. 53 IS2404 PCR positive patients-31 at the PHC center and 22 at the SHC center were enrolled-and additionally, 80 clinically BU suspicious, IS2404 PCR negative patients at the PHC center. The majority of the skin ulcers at the PHC center closed, without the need for surgical intervention (86.7%) compared to 40% at the SHC center, where the majority required split-skin grafting (75%) or excision (12.5%). Only 9% of wounds at the PHC center, but 50% at the SHC center were complicated by bacterial infection. The majority of patients, 54.8% at the PHC center and 68.4% at the SHC center, experienced wound pain, mostly severe and associated with wound dressing. Failure of ulcers to heal was reliably predicted by wound area reduction between week 2 and 4 after initiation of treatment in 75% at the PHC center, and 90% at the SHC center. Obvious reasons for arrested wound healing or deterioration of wound were missed additional severe pathology; at the PHC center (chronic osteomyelitis, chronic lymphedema, squamous cell carcinoma) and at the SHC center (malignant ulceration, chronic lymphedema) in addition to hygiene and wound care deficiencies. When clinically suspicious, but IS2404 PCR negative patients were recaptured in the community, 76/77 (98.7%) of analyzed wounds were

  4. Cost-effectiveness of supported self-management for CFS/ME patients in primary care.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Gerry; Epstein, David; Chew-Graham, Carolyn; Dowrick, Christopher; Bentall, Richard P; Morriss, Richard K; Peters, Sarah; Riste, Lisa; Lovell, Karina; Dunn, Graham; Wearden, Alison J

    2013-01-18

    Nurse led self-help treatments for people with chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalitis (CFS/ME) have been shown to be effective in reducing fatigue but their cost-effectiveness is unknown. Cost-effectiveness analysis conducted alongside a single blind randomised controlled trial comparing pragmatic rehabilitation (PR) and supportive listening (SL) delivered by primary care nurses, and treatment as usual (TAU) delivered by the general practitioner (GP) in North West England. A within trial analysis was conducted comparing the costs and quality adjusted life years (QALYs) measured within the time frame of the trial. 296 patients aged 18 and over with CFS/ME diagnosed using the Oxford criteria were included in the cost-effectiveness analysis. Treatment as usual is less expensive and leads to better patient outcomes compared with Supportive Listening. Treatment as usual is also less expensive than Pragmatic Rehabilitation. PR was effective at reducing fatigue in the short term, but the impact of the intervention on QALYs was uncertain. However, based on the results of this trial, PR is unlikely to be cost-effective in this patient population. This analysis does not support the introduction of SL. Any benefits generated by PR are unlikely to be of sufficient magnitude to warrant recommending PR for this patient group on cost-effectiveness grounds alone. However, dissatisfaction with current treatment options means simply continuing with 'treatment as usual' in primary care is unlikely to be acceptable to patients and practitioners. The trial registration number is IRCTN74156610.

  5. When should managed care firms terminate private benefits for chronically mentally ill patients?

    PubMed

    Gerson, S N

    1994-01-01

    Corporate America's healthcare cost crisis and the country's budget deficit are forcing limits on the resources used to finance healthcare, including mental healthcare. At the same time, the 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act bars discrimination against patients with chronic illnesses, including chronic mental illness. Therefore, corporate benefits managers need guidance on how to ethically and rationally allocate scarce clinical resources to those high-morbidity insureds who utilize disproportionate amounts of these resources. In particular, how should we define the public/private interface: When do patients who repeatedly fail to respond to treatment fall out of the private sector's responsibility? The author, medical director for a leading behavioral healthcare utilization management company, offers the following guidelines recommending reasonable and practical limitations on trials of treatment for seven common categories of difficult psychiatric patients.

  6. The relationship between self-management abilities, quality of chronic care delivery, and wellbeing among patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Cramm, Jane Murray; Nieboer, Anna Petra

    2013-01-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to identify the relationship between quality of chronic care delivery, self-management abilities, and wellbeing among patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The study was conducted in 2012 and included 548 (out of 1303; 42% response rate) patients with COPD enrolled in a COPD care program in the region of Noord-Kennemerland in The Netherlands. We employed a multilevel random-effects model (548 patients nested in 47 healthcare practices) to investigate the relationship between quality of chronic care delivery, self-management abilities, and patients' wellbeing. In the multilevel analyses we controlled for patients' background characteristics and health behaviors. Multilevel analyses clearly showed a significant relationship between quality of chronic care delivery and wellbeing of patients with COPD (P ≤ 0.001). When self-management abilities were included in the equation while controlling for background characteristics, health behaviors, and quality of chronic care delivery, these abilities were found to have a strong positive relationship with patients' wellbeing (P ≤ 0.001). Low educational level, single marital status, and physical exercise were not significantly associated with wellbeing when self-management abilities were included in the equation. Self-management abilities and the quality of chronic care delivery are important for the wellbeing of patients with COPD. Furthermore, self-management abilities acted as mediators between wellbeing and low educational level, single status, and physical exercise among these patients.

  7. Managing respiratory care: where is the science?

    PubMed

    Stewart, Karen J

    2008-07-01

    Managing a respiratory care department is challenging. Health care is one of the few businesses in which the fees for services are dictated by the payers. Recent changes in focus and expectations in the overall health care industry have strongly affected the job of the respiratory care manager. There is now stronger emphasis on improving the management of human resources. Good human-resources management requires understanding the work force, minimizing staff turnover, and finding ways to do more work with fewer employees. Respiratory care managers must: marshal strong evidence and compelling reasoning to compete for funding; make evidence-based (or at least carefully researched) purchasing decisions; implement protocols to optimize patient and clinical outcomes (including work efficiency); implement patient-safety initiatives such as "care bundles," to avoid preventable complications; and vigorously pursue initiatives that optimize the work flow and advance the professional status of respiratory therapists, such as rapid-response teams.

  8. Geriatric co-management of proximal femur fractures: total quality management and protocol-driven care result in better outcomes for a frail patient population.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Susan M; Mendelson, Daniel A; Kates, Stephen L; McCann, Robert M

    2008-07-01

    Hip fractures in older adults are a common event, leading to substantial morbidity and mortality. Hip fractures have been previously described as a "geriatric, rather than orthopedic disease." Patients with this condition have a high prevalence of comorbidity and a high risk of complications from surgery, and for this reason, geriatricians may be well suited to improve outcomes of care. Co-management of hip fracture patients by orthopedic surgeons and geriatricians has led to better outcomes in other countries but has rarely been described in the United States. This article describes a co-managed Geriatric Fracture Center program that has resulted in lower-than-predicted length of stay and readmission rates, with short time to surgery, low complication rates, and low mortality. This program is based on the principles of early evaluation of patients, ongoing co-management, protocol-driven geriatric-focused care, and early discharge planning. This is a potentially replicable model of