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Sample records for patient decision aid

  1. Legal briefing: Shared decision making and patient decision aids.

    PubMed

    Pope, Thaddeus Mason; Hexum, Melinda

    2013-01-01

    This "Legal Briefing" column covers recent legal developments involving patient decision aids.This topic has been the subject of recent articles in JCE. It is included in the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. And it has received significant attention in the biomedical literature, including a new book, a thematic issue of Health Affairs, and a recent article in the New England Journal of Medicine. Moreover, physicians and health systems across the United States are increasingly integrating decision aids into their clinical practice. Both federal and state laws play a significant role in promoting this expanded use. On the other hand, concerns about liability could stymie development and implementation. We categorize legal developments concerning patient decision aids into the following five sections: 1. Development of decision aids. 2. Effectiveness of decision aids. 3. Federal regulation of decision aids. 4. State regulation of decision aids. 5. Legal concerns regarding decision aids.

  2. Development and application of patient decision aids.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jong-Myon

    2015-01-01

    With the current overdiagnosis of thyroid cancer resulting from routine screening in Korea, it is necessary to educate the public that not all cancers are malignant. The exposure to patient decision aids (PtDAs) compared to usual care reduced the number of people choosing to undergo prostate-specific antigen screening. This article introduces the definition, usefulness, and developmental processes of PtDAs and suggests the urgent need for a Korean PtDA related to thyroid cancer screening.

  3. Addressing health literacy in patient decision aids

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Effective use of a patient decision aid (PtDA) can be affected by the user’s health literacy and the PtDA’s characteristics. Systematic reviews of the relevant literature can guide PtDA developers to attend to the health literacy needs of patients. The reviews reported here aimed to assess: 1. a) the effects of health literacy / numeracy on selected decision-making outcomes, and b) the effects of interventions designed to mitigate the influence of lower health literacy on decision-making outcomes, and 2. the extent to which existing PtDAs a) account for health literacy, and b) are tested in lower health literacy populations. Methods We reviewed literature for evidence relevant to these two aims. When high-quality systematic reviews existed, we summarized their evidence. When reviews were unavailable, we conducted our own systematic reviews. Results Aim 1: In an existing systematic review of PtDA trials, lower health literacy was associated with lower patient health knowledge (14 of 16 eligible studies). Fourteen studies reported practical design strategies to improve knowledge for lower health literacy patients. In our own systematic review, no studies reported on values clarity per se, but in 2 lower health literacy was related to higher decisional uncertainty and regret. Lower health literacy was associated with less desire for involvement in 3 studies, less question-asking in 2, and less patient-centered communication in 4 studies; its effects on other measures of patient involvement were mixed. Only one study assessed the effects of a health literacy intervention on outcomes; it showed that using video to improve the salience of health states reduced decisional uncertainty. Aim 2: In our review of 97 trials, only 3 PtDAs overtly addressed the needs of lower health literacy users. In 90% of trials, user health literacy and readability of the PtDA were not reported. However, increases in knowledge and informed choice were reported in those studies

  4. A Review of Shared Decision-Making and Patient Decision Aids in Radiation Oncology.

    PubMed

    Woodhouse, Kristina Demas; Tremont, Katie; Vachani, Anil; Schapira, Marilyn M; Vapiwala, Neha; Simone, Charles B; Berman, Abigail T

    2017-01-30

    Cancer treatment decisions are complex and may be challenging for patients, as multiple treatment options can often be reasonably considered. As a result, decisional support tools have been developed to assist patients in the decision-making process. A commonly used intervention to facilitate shared decision-making is a decision aid, which provides evidence-based outcomes information and guides patients towards choosing the treatment option that best aligns with their preferences and values. To ensure high quality, systematic frameworks and standards have been proposed for the development of an optimal aid for decision making. Studies have examined the impact of these tools on facilitating treatment decisions and improving decision-related outcomes. In radiation oncology, randomized controlled trials have demonstrated that decision aids have the potential to improve patient outcomes, including increased knowledge about treatment options and decreased decisional conflict with decision-making. This article provides an overview of the shared-decision making process and summarizes the development, validation, and implementation of decision aids as patient educational tools in radiation oncology. Finally, this article reviews the findings from decision aid studies in radiation oncology and offers various strategies to effectively implement shared decision-making into clinical practice.

  5. Evaluation of a Computerized Contraceptive Decision Aid for Adolescent Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chewning, Betty; Mosena, Pat; Wilson, Dale; Erdman, Harold; Potthoff, Sandra; Murphy, Anita; Kuhnen, Kathleen Kennedy

    1999-01-01

    Discusses a computer-based contraceptive decision aid used with adolescent female family planning clinic patients (N=949). Results show improved short-term knowledge of and confidence in oral contraceptive (OC) efficacy. Higher OC knowledge after one year and fewer pregnancies were seen in one group. Findings suggest the usefulness of informatics…

  6. The perspectives of iranian physicians and patients towards patient decision aids: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Patient preference is one of the main components of clinical decision making, therefore leading to the development of patient decision aids. The goal of this study was to describe physicians’ and patients’ viewpoints on the barriers and limitations of using patient decision aids in Iran, their proposed solutions, and, the benefits of using these tools. Methods This qualitative study was conducted in 2011 in Iran by holding in-depth interviews with 14 physicians and 8 arthritis patient. Interviewees were selected through purposeful and maximum variation sampling. As an example, a patient decision aid on the treatment of knee arthritis was developed upon literature reviews and gathering expert opinion, and was presented at the time of interview. Thematic analysis was conducted to analyze the data by using the OpenCode software. Results The results were summarized into three categories and ten codes. The extracted categories were the perceived benefits of using the tools, as well as the patient-related and physician-related barriers in using decision aids. The following barriers in using patient decision aids were identified in this study: lack of patients and physicians’ trainings in shared decision making, lack of specialist per capita, low treatment tariffs and lack of an exact evaluation system for patient participation in decision making. Conclusions No doubt these barriers demand the health authorities’ special attention. Hence, despite patients and physicians’ inclination toward using patient decision aids, these problems have hindered the practical usage of these tools in Iran - as a developing country. PMID:24066792

  7. Professional centred shared decision making: Patient decision aids in practice in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Burges Watson, Duika; Thomson, Richard G; Murtagh, Madeleine J

    2008-01-01

    Background Patient decision aids are increasingly regarded as important components of clinical practice that enable shared decision making (SDM) and evidence based patient choice. Despite broad acceptance of their value, there remains little evidence of their successful implementation in primary care settings. Methods Health care practitioners from five general practice surgeries in northern England participated in focus group sessions around the themes of patient decision aids, patient and practitioner preferences and SDM. Participants included general practitioners (n = 19), practice nurses (n = 5) and auxiliary staff (n = 3). Transcripts were analysed using a framework approach. Results We report a) practitioners' discussion of the current impetus towards sharing decisions and their perspectives on barriers to SDM, and b) the implementation of patient decision aids in practice and impediments such as lack of an evidence base and time available in consultations. Conclusion We demonstrate two orientations to sharing decisions: practitioner-centred and patient-centred with the former predominating. We argue that it is necessary to rethink the changes required in practice for the implementation of SDM. PMID:18190683

  8. Do choosing wisely tools meet criteria for patient decision aids? A descriptive analysis of patient materials

    PubMed Central

    Légaré, France; Hébert, Jessica; Goh, Larissa; Lewis, Krystina B; Leiva Portocarrero, Maria Ester; Robitaille, Hubert; Stacey, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Choosing Wisely is a remarkable physician-led campaign to reduce unnecessary or harmful health services. Some of the literature identifies Choosing Wisely as a shared decision-making approach. We evaluated the patient materials developed by Choosing Wisely Canada to determine whether they meet the criteria for shared decision-making tools known as patient decision aids. Design Descriptive analysis of all Choosing Wisely Canada patient materials. Data source In May 2015, we selected all Choosing Wisely Canada patient materials from its official website. Main outcomes and measures Four team members independently extracted characteristics of the English materials using the International Patient Decision Aid Standards (IPDAS) modified 16-item minimum criteria for qualifying and certifying patient decision aids. The research team discussed discrepancies between data extractors and reached a consensus. Descriptive analysis was conducted. Results Of the 24 patient materials assessed, 12 were about treatments, 11 were about screening and 1 was about prevention. The median score for patient materials using IPDAS criteria was 10/16 (range: 8–11) for screening topics and 6/12 (range: 6–9) for prevention and treatment topics. Commonly missed criteria were stating the decision (21/24 did not), providing balanced information on option benefits/harms (24/24 did not), citing evidence (24/24 did not) and updating policy (24/24 did not). Out of 24 patient materials, only 2 met the 6 IPDAS criteria to qualify as patient decision aids, and neither of these 2 met the 6 certifying criteria. Conclusions Patient materials developed by Choosing Wisely Canada do not meet the IPDAS minimal qualifying or certifying criteria for patient decision aids. Modifications to the Choosing Wisely Canada patient materials would help to ensure that they qualify as patient decision aids and thus as more effective shared decision-making tools. PMID:27566638

  9. A systematic development process for patient decision aids

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The original version of the International Patient Decision Aid Standards (IPDAS) recommended that patient decision aids (PtDAs) should be carefully developed, user-tested and open to scrutiny, with a well-documented and systematically applied development process. We carried out a review to check the relevance and scope of this quality dimension and, if necessary, to update it. Methods Our review drew on three sources: a) published papers describing PtDAs evaluated in randomised controlled trials and included in the most recent Cochrane Collaboration review; b) linked papers cited in the trial reports that described how the PtDAs had been developed; and c) papers and web reports outlining the development process used by organisations experienced in developing multiple PtDAs. We then developed an extended model of the development process indicating the various steps on which documentation is required, as well as a checklist to assess the frequency with which each of the elements was publicly reported. Results Key features common to all patient decision aid (PtDA) development processes include: scoping and design; development of a prototype; ‘alpha’ testing with patients and clinicians in an iterative process; ‘beta’ testing in ‘real life’ conditions (field tests); and production of a final version for use and/or further evaluation. Only about half of the published reports on the development of PtDAs that we reviewed appear to have been field tested with patients, and even fewer had been reviewed or tested by clinicians not involved in the development process. Very few described a distribution strategy, and surprisingly few (17%) described a method for reviewing and synthesizing the clinical evidence. We describe a model development process that includes all the original elements of the original IPDAS criterion, expanded to include consideration of format and distribution plans as well as prototype development. Conclusions The case for including

  10. Shared Decision Making and Patient Decision Aids: Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices Among Hawai‘i Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Friend, John; Chun, Maria BJ

    2013-01-01

    Background: As the health care field moves toward patient-centered care (PCC), increasing emphasis has been placed on the benefits of patient decision aids for promoting shared decision making (SDM). This study provides a baseline measure of knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) among Hawai‘i's physicians with respect to patient decision aids (DAs). Physicians throughout the State of Hawai‘i were invited to complete a survey assessing their knowledge, attitudes, and practices with respect to the clinical use of DAs. One hundred and seventy four valid surveys were analyzed. Reported awareness and use of DAs were low, but recognition of the benefits of SDM and openness to the use of DAs were very high. The leading perceived barriers to the implementation of DAs were lack of awareness, lack of resources, and limited physician time to learn about DA technology. However, a significant majority of the respondents reported that DAs could empower patients by improving knowledge (88%), increasing satisfaction with the consultation process (81%), and increasing compliance (74%). Among physicians currently employing DAs, use of brochures or options matrix sheets was the most common aid tool. However, leading recommended DA formats were paper-based brochures for clinic use (75%) and interactive online website programs for outside clinic use (73.5%). Given growing emphasis on the PCC model and the recognized desire of many patients to participate in the medical decision making process, positive responses toward SDM and the use of DAs by Hawai‘i physicians are promising. PMID:24251086

  11. Ten years of the International Patient Decision Aid Standards Collaboration: evolution of the core dimensions for assessing the quality of patient decision aids.

    PubMed

    Volk, Robert J; Llewellyn-Thomas, Hilary; Stacey, Dawn; Elwyn, Glyn

    2013-01-01

    In 2003, the International Patient Decision Aid Standards (IPDAS) Collaboration was established to enhance the quality and effectiveness of patient decision aids by establishing an evidence-informed framework for improving their content, development, implementation, and evaluation. Over this 10 year period, the Collaboration has established: a) the background document on 12 core dimensions to inform the original modified Delphi process to establish the IPDAS checklist (74 items); b) the valid and reliable IPDAS instrument (47 items); and c) the IPDAS qualifying (6 items), certifying (6 items + 4 items for screening), and quality criteria (28 items). The objective of this paper is to describe the evolution of the IPDAS Collaboration and discuss the standardized process used to update the background documents on the theoretical rationales, evidence and emerging issues underlying the 12 core dimensions for assessing the quality of patient decision aids.

  12. Shared Decision Aids: Increasing Patient Acceptance of Long-Acting Reversible Contraception

    PubMed Central

    George, Tracy P.; DeCristofaro, Claire; Dumas, Bonnie P.; Murphy, Pamela F.

    2015-01-01

    Unintended pregnancies are an important public health issue. Long-acting reversible contraceptive methods (LARCs) are reliable, safe, highly effective methods for most women; however they are underutilized in the United States. Shared decision aids were added to usual care in five public health family planning clinics in the Southeastern United States, staffed by advance practice nurses and registered nurses. All five sites showed an increase in the use of LARCs during the time period that shared decision aids were used (results statistically significant to p < 0.001). It is important for women to make informed choices about contraception, and shared decision aids can be utilized to support this decision making. This resource has been adopted for statewide use in all public health clinics, and implications for practice suggest that the use of shared decision aids is an effective method to support informed patient decision making and acceptance of LARC methods of contraception. PMID:27417757

  13. Do personal stories make patient decision aids more effective? A critical review of theory and evidence

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Patient decision aids support people to make informed decisions between healthcare options. Personal stories provide illustrative examples of others’ experiences and are seen as a useful way to communicate information about health and illness. Evidence indicates that providing information within personal stories affects the judgments and values people have, and the choices they make, differentially from facts presented in non-narrative prose. It is unclear if including narrative communications within patient decision aids enhances their effectiveness to support people to make informed decisions. Methods A survey of primary empirical research employing a systematic review method investigated the effect of patient decision aids with or without a personal story on people’s healthcare judgements and decisions. Searches were carried out between 2005-2012 of electronic databases (Medline, PsycINFO), and reference lists of identified articles, review articles, and key authors. A narrative analysis described and synthesised findings. Results Of 734 citations identified, 11 were included describing 13 studies. All studies found participants’ judgments and/or decisions differed depending on whether or not their decision aid included a patient story. Knowledge was equally facilitated when the decision aids with and without stories had similar information content. Story-enhanced aids may help people recall information over time and/or their motivation to engage with health information. Personal stories affected both “system 1” (e.g., less counterfactual reasoning, more emotional reactions and perceptions) and “system 2” (e.g., more perceived deliberative decision making, more stable evaluations over time) decision-making strategies. Findings exploring associations with narrative communications, decision quality measures, and different levels of literacy and numeracy were mixed. The pattern of findings was similar for both experimental and real

  14. Delivering patient decision aids on the Internet: definitions, theories, current evidence, and emerging research areas

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In 2005, the International Patient Decision Aids Standards Collaboration identified twelve quality dimensions to guide assessment of patient decision aids. One dimension—the delivery of patient decision aids on the Internet—is relevant when the Internet is used to provide some or all components of a patient decision aid. Building on the original background chapter, this paper provides an updated definition for this dimension, outlines a theoretical rationale, describes current evidence, and discusses emerging research areas. Methods An international, multidisciplinary panel of authors examined the relevant theoretical literature and empirical evidence through 2012. Results The updated definition distinguishes Internet-delivery of patient decision aids from online health information and clinical practice guidelines. Theories in cognitive psychology, decision psychology, communication, and education support the value of Internet features for providing interactive information and deliberative support. Dissemination and implementation theories support Internet-delivery for providing the right information (rapidly updated), to the right person (tailored), at the right time (the appropriate point in the decision making process). Additional efforts are needed to integrate the theoretical rationale and empirical evidence from health technology perspectives, such as consumer health informatics, user experience design, and human-computer interaction. Despite Internet usage ranging from 74% to 85% in developed countries and 80% of users searching for health information, it is unknown how many individuals specifically seek patient decision aids on the Internet. Among the 86 randomized controlled trials in the 2011 Cochrane Collaboration’s review of patient decision aids, only four studies focused on Internet-delivery. Given the limited number of published studies, this paper particularly focused on identifying gaps in the empirical evidence base and

  15. Can patient decision aids help people make good decisions about participating in clinical trials? A study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Brehaut, Jamie C; Lott, Alison; Fergusson, Dean A; Shojania, Kaveh G; Kimmelman, Jonathan; Saginur, Raphael

    2008-01-01

    Background Evidence shows that the standard process for obtaining informed consent in clinical trials can be inadequate, with study participants frequently not understanding even basic information fundamental to giving informed consent. Patient decision aids are effective decision support tools originally designed to help patients make difficult treatment or screening decisions. We propose that incorporating decision aids into the informed consent process will improve the extent to which participants make decisions that are informed and consistent with their preferences. A mixed methods study will test this proposal. Methods Phase one of this project will involve assessment of a stratified random sample of 50 consent documents from recently completed investigator-initiated clinical trials, according to existing standards for supporting good decision making. Phase two will involve interviews of a purposive sample of 50 trial participants (10 participants from each of five different clinical areas) about their experience of the informed consent process, and how it could be improved. In phase three, we will convert consent forms for two completed clinical trials into decision aids and pilot test these new tools using a user-centered design approach, an iterative development process commonly employed in computer usability literature. In phase four, we will conduct a pilot observational study comparing the new tools to standard consent forms, with potential recruits to two hypothetical clinical trials. Outcomes will include knowledge of key aspects of the decision, knowledge of the probabilities of different outcomes, decisional conflict, the hypothetical participation decision, and qualitative impressions of the experience. Discussion This work will provide initial evidence about whether a patient decision aid can improve the informed consent process. The larger goal of this work is to examine whether study recruitment can be improved from (barely) informed consent

  16. Presenting quantitative information about decision outcomes: a risk communication primer for patient decision aid developers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Making evidence-based decisions often requires comparison of two or more options. Research-based evidence may exist which quantifies how likely the outcomes are for each option. Understanding these numeric estimates improves patients’ risk perception and leads to better informed decision making. This paper summarises current “best practices” in communication of evidence-based numeric outcomes for developers of patient decision aids (PtDAs) and other health communication tools. Method An expert consensus group of fourteen researchers from North America, Europe, and Australasia identified eleven main issues in risk communication. Two experts for each issue wrote a “state of the art” summary of best evidence, drawing on the PtDA, health, psychological, and broader scientific literature. In addition, commonly used terms were defined and a set of guiding principles and key messages derived from the results. Results The eleven key components of risk communication were: 1) Presenting the chance an event will occur; 2) Presenting changes in numeric outcomes; 3) Outcome estimates for test and screening decisions; 4) Numeric estimates in context and with evaluative labels; 5) Conveying uncertainty; 6) Visual formats; 7) Tailoring estimates; 8) Formats for understanding outcomes over time; 9) Narrative methods for conveying the chance of an event; 10) Important skills for understanding numerical estimates; and 11) Interactive web-based formats. Guiding principles from the evidence summaries advise that risk communication formats should reflect the task required of the user, should always define a relevant reference class (i.e., denominator) over time, should aim to use a consistent format throughout documents, should avoid “1 in x” formats and variable denominators, consider the magnitude of numbers used and the possibility of format bias, and should take into account the numeracy and graph literacy of the audience. Conclusion A substantial and

  17. Trustworthy patient decision aids: a qualitative analysis addressing the risk of competing interests

    PubMed Central

    Elwyn, Glyn; Dannenberg, Michelle; Blaine, Arianna; Poddar, Urbashi; Durand, Marie-Anne

    2016-01-01

    Objective Our aim in this study was to examine the competing interest policies and procedures of organisations who develop and maintain patient decision aids. Design Descriptive and thematic analysis of data collected from a cross-sectional survey of patient decision aid developer's competing interest policies and disclosure forms. Results We contacted 25 organisations likely to meet the inclusion criteria. 12 eligible organisations provided data. 11 organisations did not reply and 2 declined to participate. Most patient decision aid developers recognise the need to consider the issue of competing interests. Assessment processes vary widely and, for the most part, are insufficiently robust to minimise the risk of competing interests. Only half of the 12 organisations had competing interest policies. Some considered disclosure to be sufficient, while others imposed differing levels of exclusion. Conclusions Patient decision aid developers do not have a consistent approach to managing competing interests. Some have developed policies and procedures, while others pay no attention to the issue. As is the case for clinical practice guidelines, increasing attention will need to be given to how the competing interests of contributors of evidence-based publications may influence materials, especially if they are designed for patient use. PMID:27612542

  18. An overview and discussion of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute's decision aid portfolio.

    PubMed

    Gayer, Christopher C; Crowley, Matthew J; Lawrence, William F; Gierisch, Jennifer M; Gaglio, Bridget; Williams, John W; Myers, Evan R; Kendrick, Amy; Slutsky, Jean; Sanders, Gillian D

    2016-07-01

    Decision aids (DAs) help patients make informed healthcare decisions in a manner consistent with their values and preferences. Despite their promise, DAs developed with public research dollars are not being implemented and adopted in real-world patient care settings at a rate consistent with which they are being developed. To appraise the sum of the parts of the portfolio and create a strategic imperative surrounding future funding, the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) tasked the Duke Evidence Synthesis Group with evaluating its DA portfolio. This paper describes PCORI's portfolio of DAs according to the Duke Evidence Synthesis Group's analysis in the context of PCORI's mission and the field of decision science. The results revealed a diversity within PCORI's portfolio of funded DA projects. Findings support the movement toward more rigorous DA development, assessment and maintenance. PCORI's funding priorities related to DAs are clarified and comparative questions of interest are posed.

  19. Use of the Diabetes Medication Choice Decision Aid in patients with type 2 diabetes in Greece: a cluster randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Karagiannis, Thomas; Liakos, Aris; Branda, Megan E; Athanasiadou, Eleni; Mainou, Maria; Boura, Panagiota; Goulis, Dimitrios G; LeBlanc, Annie; Montori, Victor M

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the efficacy of the Diabetes Medication Choice Decision Aid among patients with type 2 diabetes in Greece. Design Open-label cluster randomised controlled trial. Setting Primary and secondary care practices across Greece. Participants 5 sites allocated to the decision aid (n=101 patients) and 4 sites to control (n=103 patients). Intervention Clinicians and patients in the intervention arm used a decision aid, based on outcomes that both consider important when choosing among antihyperglycaemic medications. Patients in the control arm received usual care. Outcome measures The primary outcome was patient's level of decisional comfort after the initial clinical encounter. Secondary outcomes included patient's knowledge about type 2 diabetes and medications, and patient's and clinician's satisfaction. Adherence to prescribed antihyperglycaemic medication and change in glycated haemoglobin were assessed at 24 weeks. Results Patients in both arms had similar scores in overall decisional comfort (mean difference between the usual care and decision aid arms −6.9, 95% CI −21.5 to 7.7) and its subscales. Patients' knowledge was high in both arms (mean difference 2.3%, 95% CI −15.7% to 20.4%). Patients and clinicians in both groups were equally satisfied with the decision-making. No significant difference in medication adherence and glycaemic control was found across arms. Clinicians found the decision aid useful and reported that its integration in their daily routine was easy. Conclusions The decision aid was implemented and positively received in the clinical setting in Greece, in line with the patient-centred approach endorsed by current guidelines. However, this trial yielded imprecise results in terms of patient outcomes. Further research is needed to investigate the interaction between the patient and the clinician in order to clarify the association between the use of decision aids and implementation of shared decision-making. Trial

  20. Using decision aids in community-based primary care: A theory-driven evaluation with ethnically diverse patients

    PubMed Central

    Frosch, Dominick L.; Légaré, France; Mangione, Carol M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To assess the effects of informational brochures and video decision aids about cancer screening on patient intention to engage in shared decision making and its predictors in a racially diverse sample. Methods Participants were recruited from 13 community-based primary care practices serving racially and ethnically diverse patients in predominately economically disadvantaged neighborhoods. Participants completed theory-based measures assessing attitudes, perceived social norms, self-efficacy and intentions for working with their physician to make a cancer screening decision after reviewing a brochure or video decision aid, but before seeing the physician. A post-questionnaire assessed screening decisions and participant knowledge. Results Participants who reviewed a video decision aid had higher knowledge and were more likely to want to be the primary decision-maker. They reported lower perceived social norms, self-efficacy and intentions to work with their physicians than participants who reviewed a brochure. Participants who decided against cancer screening reported lower intentions to work with their physician in making a decision and were less likely to report having spoken with their physician about screening. Conclusion Participants who opted against cancer screening after reviewing a brochure or decision aid were less likely to discuss their decision with their physician. The tendency toward autonomous decision-making was stronger among participants who reviewed a video decision aid. PMID:18771875

  1. A systematic review of decision aids for patients making a decision about treatment for early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Nicholas Zdenkowski; Butow, Phyllis; Tesson, Stephanie; Boyle, Frances

    2016-04-01

    Several complex treatment decisions may be offered to women with early stage breast cancer, about a range of treatments from different modalities including surgery, radiotherapy, and endocrine and chemotherapy. Decision aids can facilitate shared decision-making and improve decision-related outcomes. We aimed to systematically identify, describe and appraise the literature on treatment decision aids for women with early breast cancer, synthesise the data and identify breast cancer decisions that lack a decision aid. A prospectively developed search strategy was applied to MEDLINE, the Cochrane databases, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Web of Science and abstract databases from major conferences. Data were extracted into a pre-piloted form. Quality and risk of bias were measured using Qualsyst criteria. Results were synthesised into narrative format. Thirty-three eligible articles were identified, evaluating 23 individual treatment decision aids, comprising 13 randomised controlled trial reports, seven non-randomised comparative studies, eight single-arm pre-post studies and five cross-sectional studies. The decisions addressed by these decision aids were: breast conserving surgery versus mastectomy (+/- reconstruction); use of chemotherapy and/or endocrine therapy; radiotherapy; and fertility preservation. Outcome measures were heterogeneous, precluding meta-analysis. Decisional conflict decreased, and knowledge and satisfaction increased, without any change in anxiety or depression, in most studies. No studies were identified that evaluated decision aids for neoadjuvant systemic therapy, or contralateral prophylactic mastectomy. Decision aids are available and improved decision-related outcomes for many breast cancer treatment decisions including surgery, radiotherapy, and endocrine and chemotherapy. Decision aids for neoadjuvant systemic therapy and contralateral prophylactic mastectomy could not be found, and may be warranted.

  2. Design and development of a decision aid to enhance shared decision making by patients with an asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Ubbink, Dirk T; Knops, Anouk M; Molenaar, Sjaak; Goossens, Astrid

    2008-01-01

    Objective To design, develop, and evaluate an evidence-based decision aid (DA) for patients with an asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) to inform them about the pros and cons of their treatment options (ie, surgery or watchful observation) and to help them make a shared decision. Methods A multidisciplinary team defined criteria for the desired DA as to design, medical content and functionality, particularly for elderly users. Development was according to the international standard (IPDAS). Fifteen patients with an AAA, who were either treated or not yet treated, evaluated the tool. Results A DA was developed to offer information about the disease, the risks and benefits of surgical treatment and watchful observation, and the individual possibilities and threats based on the patient’s aneurysm diameter and risk profile. The DA was improved and judged favorably by physicians and patients. Conclusion This evidence-based DA for AAA patients, developed according to IPDAS criteria, is likely to be a simple, user-friendly tool to offer patients evidence-based information about the pros and cons of treatment options for AAA, to improve patients’ understanding of the disease and treatment options, and may support decision making based on individual values. PMID:19920978

  3. Cultural targeting and tailoring of shared decision making technology: a theoretical framework for improving the effectiveness of patient decision aids in culturally diverse groups.

    PubMed

    Alden, Dana L; Friend, John; Schapira, Marilyn; Stiggelbout, Anne

    2014-03-01

    Patient decision aids are known to positively impact outcomes critical to shared decision making (SDM), such as gist knowledge and decision preparedness. However, research on the potential improvement of these and other important outcomes through cultural targeting and tailoring of decision aids is very limited. This is the case despite extensive evidence supporting use of cultural targeting and tailoring to improve the effectiveness of health communications. Building on prominent psychological theory, we propose a two-stage framework incorporating cultural concepts into the design process for screening and treatment decision aids. The first phase recommends use of cultural constructs, such as collectivism and individualism, to differentially target patients whose cultures are known to vary on these dimensions. Decision aid targeting is operationalized through use of symbols and values that appeal to members of the given culture. Content dimensions within decision aids that appear particularly appropriate for targeting include surface level visual characteristics, language, beliefs, attitudes and values. The second phase of the framework is based on evidence that individuals vary in terms of how strongly cultural norms influence their approach to problem solving and decision making. In particular, the framework hypothesizes that differences in terms of access to cultural mindsets (e.g., access to interdependent versus independent self) can be measured up front and used to tailor decision aids. Thus, the second phase in the framework emphasizes the importance of not only targeting decision aid content, but also tailoring the information to the individual based on measurement of how strongly he/she is connected to dominant cultural mindsets. Overall, the framework provides a theory-based guide for researchers and practitioners who are interested in using cultural targeting and tailoring to develop and test decision aids that move beyond a "one-size fits all" approach

  4. Coaching and guidance with patient decision aids: A review of theoretical and empirical evidence

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Coaching and guidance are structured approaches that can be used within or alongside patient decision aids (PtDAs) to facilitate the process of decision making. Coaching is provided by an individual, and guidance is embedded within the decision support materials. The purpose of this paper is to: a) present updated definitions of the concepts “coaching” and “guidance”; b) present an updated summary of current theoretical and empirical insights into the roles played by coaching/guidance in the context of PtDAs; and c) highlight emerging issues and research opportunities in this aspect of PtDA design. Methods We identified literature published since 2003 on shared decision making theoretical frameworks inclusive of coaching or guidance. We also conducted a sub-analysis of randomized controlled trials included in the 2011 Cochrane Collaboration Review of PtDAs with search results updated to December 2010. The sub-analysis was conducted on the characteristics of coaching and/or guidance included in any trial of PtDAs and trials that allowed the impact of coaching and/or guidance with PtDA to be compared to another intervention or usual care. Results Theoretical evidence continues to justify the use of coaching and/or guidance to better support patients in the process of thinking about a decision and in communicating their values/preferences with others. In 98 randomized controlled trials of PtDAs, 11 trials (11.2%) included coaching and 63 trials (64.3%) provided guidance. Compared to usual care, coaching provided alongside a PtDA improved knowledge and decreased mean costs. The impact on some other outcomes (e.g., participation in decision making, satisfaction, option chosen) was more variable, with some trials showing positive effects and other trials reporting no differences. For values-choice agreement, decisional conflict, adherence, and anxiety there were no differences between groups. None of these outcomes were worse when patients were exposed

  5. Usability testing of ANSWER: a web-based methotrexate decision aid for patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Decision aids are evidence-based tools designed to inform people of the potential benefit and harm of treatment options, clarify their preferences and provide a shared decision-making structure for discussion at a clinic visit. For patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who are considering methotrexate, we have developed a web-based patient decision aid called the ANSWER (Animated, Self-serve, Web-based Research Tool). This study aimed to: 1) assess the usability of the ANSWER prototype; 2) identify strengths and limitations of the ANSWER from the patient’s perspective. Methods The ANSWER prototype consisted of: 1) six animated patient stories and narrated information on the evidence of methotrexate for RA; 2) interactive questionnaires to clarify patients’ treatment preferences. Eligible participants for the usability test were patients with RA who had been prescribed methotrexate. They were asked to verbalize their thoughts (i.e., think aloud) while using the ANSWER, and to complete the System Usability Scale (SUS) to assess overall usability (range = 0-100; higher = more user friendly). Participants were audiotaped and observed, and field notes were taken. The testing continued until no new modifiable issues were found. We used descriptive statistics to summarize participant characteristics and the SUS scores. Content analysis was used to identified usability issues and navigation problems. Results 15 patients participated in the usability testing. The majority were aged 50 or over and were university/college graduates (n = 8, 53.4%). On average they took 56 minutes (SD = 34.8) to complete the tool. The mean SUS score was 81.2 (SD = 13.5). Content analysis of audiotapes and field notes revealed four categories of modifiable usability issues: 1) information delivery (i.e., clarity of the information and presentation style); 2) navigation control (i.e., difficulties in recognizing and using the navigation control buttons); 3

  6. Impact of a Decision Aid on Surrogate Decision-makers’ Perceptions of Feeding Options for Patients with Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, E. Amanda; Caprio, Anthony J.; Wessell, Kathryn; Lin, Feng Chang; Hanson, Laura C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective In advanced dementia, feeding problems are nearly universal, and families face difficult decisions about feeding options. Initial interviews for a randomized trial were used to describe surrogates’ perceptions feeding options, and to determine if a decision aid on feeding options in advanced dementia would improve knowledge, reduce expectation of benefit from tube feeding, and reduce conflict over treatment choices for persons with advanced dementia. Design Semi-structured interview with pre-post study design for surrogates in the intervention group. Setting Twenty-four skilled nursing facilities across North Carolina participating in a cluster randomized trial. Participants Two hundred fifty-five surrogate decision-makers for nursing home residents with advanced dementia and feeding problems, in control (n=129) and intervention (n=126) groups. Intervention For intervention surrogates only, an audiovisual-print decision aid provided information on dementia, feeding problems in dementia, advantages and disadvantages of feeding tubes or assisted oral feeding options and the role of surrogates in making these decisions. Measurements The interview included open-ended items asking surrogates to report advantages and disadvantages of tube feeding and assisted oral feeding. Knowledge of feeding options was measured with 19 true-false items, and items measuring expectation of benefit from tube feeding. Surrogates reported which of these two feeding options they preferred for the person with dementia, and how confident they were in this choice; their level of conflict about the choice was measured using the Decisional Conflict Scale. Results Prior to the decision aid, surrogates described advantages and disadvantages of assisted oral feeding and tube feeding in practical, ethical and medical terms. After review of the decision aid, intervention surrogates had improved knowledge scores (15.5 vs. 16.8; p<0.001), decreased expectation of benefits from tube feeding

  7. All stories are not alike: a purpose-, content-, and valence-based taxonomy of patient narratives in decision aids.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Victoria A; Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J

    2013-01-01

    The use of patient stories in decision aids is a highly controversial practice. However, the resulting debates and research have yielded little consensus about the impact of patient stories due to vague operational definitions of narratives. In this article, we argue that narratives are not homogeneous in either content or effect and hence should not be considered a single construct in research. The purpose of this article is to provide a taxonomy that guides both the development of decision aids and future research on this topic. We define three dimensions of narratives that are likely to moderate their impact on decision making: 1) the purpose of the narrative, 2) the content of the message, and 3) the evaluative valence, or overall tone, of the message. In addition, we describe predicted effects of different types of narratives on decision making and discuss their potential interactions. Our taxonomy provides a framework that will allow for the precise documentation of different narrative types, the use of appropriate outcome measures, and a systematic evaluation of narratives in all types of decision aids. Failures to recognize the complex structure of narratives will result both in research that does little to inform our understanding of the impact of patient stories and in the use of narratives in patient education materials that have unintended consequences on both decision processes and behavior.

  8. Pilot test of a patient decision aid about liver transplant organ quality.

    PubMed

    Volk, Michael L; Roney, Meghan; Fagerlin, Angela

    2014-07-01

    Prior studies have shown that patients are reluctant to accept donor-specific risks, and transplant professionals lack an effective and time-efficient means of obtaining informed consent. We designed and pilot-tested a Web-based patient decision aid (DA) on organ quality. The DA was administered to 53 liver transplant candidates (median Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score = 14, range = 7-26), and they took a mean of 15 minutes to complete it. Questions about knowledge and attitudes were asked before and after the DA. Subjects' knowledge improved, with 53% and 60% correctly answering questions about hepatitis B virus and human immunodeficiency virus transmission before the DA and 94% and 100%, respectively, correctly answering them afterward (P < 0.001). The accuracy of mortality prediction also improved from a mean 3-month mortality estimate of 22% before the DA to 12% afterward (P < 0.001). After the DA, subjects felt that it was more likely that they might be offered a less-than-perfect liver (P = 0.001), and they were more likely to consider accepting such a liver (P < 0.001). In conclusion, implementing a Web-based patient DA is feasible and improves knowledge among liver transplant candidates. The use of this tool may decrease candidates' reluctance to accept extended criteria organs.

  9. Development of a Decision Aid for Patients with Advanced Heart Failure Considering a Destination Therapy Left Ventricular Assist Device

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Jocelyn S.; Matlock, Daniel D.; McIlvennan, Colleen K.; Jenkins, Amy R.; Allen, Larry A.

    2015-01-01

    STRUCTURED ABSTRACT Objective We aimed to create decision aids (DAs) for patients considering destination therapy left ventricular assist device (DT LVAD). Background DT LVAD is a major decision for patients with end-stage heart failure. Patients facing decisions with complex tradeoffs may benefit from high-quality decision support resources. Methods Following the International Patient Decision Aid Standards (IPDAS) guidelines and based on a needs assessment with stakeholders, we developed drafts of paper and video DAs. With input from patients, caregivers, and clinicians through alpha testing, we iteratively modified the DAs to ensure acceptability. Results We conducted semi-structured interviews with 24 patients, 20 caregivers, and 24 clinicians to assess readability, bias, and usability of the DAs. Stakeholder feedback allowed us to integrate aspects critical to decision-making around highly invasive therapies for life-threatening diseases, including addressing emotion and fear of death, using gain frames for all options that focus on living, highlighting palliative and hospice care, integrating the caregiver role, and utilizing a range of balanced testimonials. After 19 iterative versions of the paper DA and four versions of the video DA, final materials were made available for wider use. Conclusion We developed the first IPDAS-level DAs for DT LVAD. Given the extreme nature of this medical decision, we augmented traditional DA characteristics with non-traditional DA features to address a spectrum of cognitive, automatic, and emotional aspects of end-of-life decision-making. Not only are the DAs important tools for those confronting end-stage heart failure, but the lessons learned will likely inform decision support for other invasive therapies. UNSTRUCTURED ABSTRACT Destination therapy left ventricular assist device (DT LVAD) is a major decision for patients with end-stage heart failure. We aimed to create decision aids (DAs) to support patients and their

  10. Automation: Decision Aid or Decision Maker?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skitka, Linda J.

    1998-01-01

    This study clarified that automation bias is something unique to automated decision making contexts, and is not the result of a general tendency toward complacency. By comparing performance on exactly the same events on the same tasks with and without an automated decision aid, we were able to determine that at least the omission error part of automation bias is due to the unique context created by having an automated decision aid, and is not a phenomena that would occur even if people were not in an automated context. However, this study also revealed that having an automated decision aid did lead to modestly improved performance across all non-error events. Participants in the non- automated condition responded with 83.68% accuracy, whereas participants in the automated condition responded with 88.67% accuracy, across all events. Automated decision aids clearly led to better overall performance when they were accurate. People performed almost exactly at the level of reliability as the automation (which across events was 88% reliable). However, also clear, is that the presence of less than 100% accurate automated decision aids creates a context in which new kinds of errors in decision making can occur. Participants in the non-automated condition responded with 97% accuracy on the six "error" events, whereas participants in the automated condition had only a 65% accuracy rate when confronted with those same six events. In short, the presence of an AMA can lead to vigilance decrements that can lead to errors in decision making.

  11. A patient decision aid to support shared decision‐making on anti‐thrombotic treatment of patients with atrial fibrillation: randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Richard G; Eccles, Martin P; Steen, I Nick; Greenaway, Jane; Stobbart, Lynne; Murtagh, Madeleine J; May, Carl R

    2007-01-01

    Objective To determine the efficacy of a computerised decision aid in patients with atrial fibrillation making decisions on whether to take warfarin or aspirin therapy. Design Two‐armed open exploratory randomised controlled trial. Setting Two research clinics deriving participants from general practices in Northeast England. Participants 109 patients with atrial fibrillation aged over 60. Interventions Computerised decision aid applied in shared decision‐making clinic compared to evidence‐based paper guidelines applied as direct advice. Main outcome measures Primary outcome measure was the decision conflict scale. Secondary outcome measures included anxiety, knowledge, decision‐making preference, treatment decision, use of primary and secondary care services and health outcomes. Results Decision conflict was lower in the computerised decision aid group immediately after the clinic; mean difference −0.18 (95% CI −0.34 to −0.01). Participants in this group not already on warfarin were much less likely to start warfarin than those in the guidelines arm (4/16, 25% compared to the guidelines group 15/16, 93.8%, RR 0.27, 95% CI 0.11 to 0.63). Conclusions Decision conflict was lower immediately following the use of a computerised decision aid in a shared decision‐making consultation than immediately following direct doctor‐led advice based on paper guidelines. Furthermore, participants in the computerised decision aid group were significantly much less likely to start warfarin than those in the guidelines arm. The results show that such an approach has a positive impact on decision conflict comparable to other studies of decision aids, but also reduces the uptake of a clinically effective treatment that may have important implications for health outcomes. PMID:17545350

  12. Difficult Decisions: AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slesnick, Irwin L.

    1988-01-01

    Focuses on public education about the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic. Discusses the problems of a second epidemic of fear and anxiety. Presents several questions for classroom discussion and analysis of the public fear of AIDS. Gives some statistics highlighting misinformation about AIDS. (CW)

  13. Proposal for Development of EBM-CDSS (Evidence-based Clinical Decision Support System) to Aid Prognostication in Terminally Ill Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    TITLE: Proposal for Development of EBM-CDSS (Evidence-based Clinical Decision Support System) to Aid Prognostication in Terminally Ill Patients...SUBTITLE Proposal for development of EBM-CDSS (Evidence-based Clinical Decision Support System) to aid prognostication in terminally ill patients 5a...to improve prognostication of the life expectancy of terminally ill patients to improve referral of patients to hospice. In addition, the EBM-CDSS

  14. Naval Tactical Decision Aids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    Strike Planning Aid ( ESPA ) . .V-14 5.4. Tactical Environmental Ship Routing (TESR) V-24 5.5. Chaff Prediction and Planning System (CHAPPS).. V-29...chapter four TDAS from TESS: NAVSAR, acAS program for search and rescue (SARjat sea; ESPA , the Environmental Strike Planning Aid; TESR, the Tactical...STATISTICS CURRENT LOCATION AND CHARACTERISTICS SATELLITE DATA CONVERSION CONSTANTS In 5.1, we give a brief history of TESS. The TDAS NAVSAR, ESPA

  15. Use of a computerised decision aid (DA) to inform the decision process on adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with stage II colorectal cancer: development and preliminary evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Miles, A; Chronakis, I; Fox, J; Mayer, A

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To develop a computerised decision aid (DA) to inform the decision process on adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with stage II colorectal cancer, and examine perceived usefulness, acceptability and areas for improvement of the DA. Design Mixed methods. Setting Single outpatient oncology department in central London. Participants Consecutive recruitment of 13 patients with stage II colorectal cancer, 12 of whom completed the study. Inclusion criteria were: age >18 years; complete resection for stage II adenocarcinoma of the colon or rectum; patients within 14–56 days after surgery; no contraindication to adjuvant chemotherapy; able to give written informed consent. Exclusion criterion: previous chemotherapy. Primary outcomes Patient perceived usefulness (assessed by the PrepDM questionnaire) and acceptability of the DA. Results PrepDM scores, measuring the perceived usefulness of the DA in preparing the patient to communicate with their doctor and make a health decision, were above those reported in other patient groups. Patient acceptability scores were also high; however, interviews showed that there was evidence of a lack of understanding of key information among some patients, in particular their baseline risk of recurrence, the net benefit of combination chemotherapy and the rationale for having chemotherapy when cancer had apparently gone. Conclusions Patients found the DA acceptable and useful in supporting their decision about whether or not to have adjuvant chemotherapy. Suggested improvements for the DA include: sequential presentation of treatment options (eg, no treatment vs 1 drug, 1 drug vs 2 drugs) to enhance patient understanding of the difference between combination and single therapy, diagrams to help patients understand the rationale for chemotherapy to prevent a recurrence and inbuilt checks on patient understanding of baseline risk of recurrence and net benefit of chemotherapy. PMID:28341685

  16. The Effect of Patient Narratives on Information Search in a Web-Based Breast Cancer Decision Aid: An Eye-Tracking Study

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Justin; Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous research has examined the impact of patient narratives on treatment choices, but to our knowledge, no study has examined the effect of narratives on information search. Further, no research has considered the relative impact of their format (text vs video) on health care decisions in a single study. Objective Our goal was to examine the impact of video and text-based narratives on information search in a Web-based patient decision aid for early stage breast cancer. Methods Fifty-six women were asked to imagine that they had been diagnosed with early stage breast cancer and needed to choose between two surgical treatments (lumpectomy with radiation or mastectomy). Participants were randomly assigned to view one of four versions of a Web decision aid. Two versions of the decision aid included videos of interviews with patients and physicians or videos of interviews with physicians only. To distinguish between the effect of narratives and the effect of videos, we created two text versions of the Web decision aid by replacing the patient and physician interviews with text transcripts of the videos. Participants could freely browse the Web decision aid until they developed a treatment preference. We recorded participants’ eye movements using the Tobii 1750 eye-tracking system equipped with Tobii Studio software. A priori, we defined 24 areas of interest (AOIs) in the Web decision aid. These AOIs were either separate pages of the Web decision aid or sections within a single page covering different content. Results We used multilevel modeling to examine the effect of narrative presence, narrative format, and their interaction on information search. There was a significant main effect of condition, P=.02; participants viewing decision aids with patient narratives spent more time searching for information than participants viewing the decision aids without narratives. The main effect of format was not significant, P=.10. However, there was a

  17. Patient-Centered Robot-Aided Passive Neurorehabilitation Exercise Based on Safety-Motion Decision-Making Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Suolin; Yu, Zhuqing

    2017-01-01

    Safety is one of the crucial issues for robot-aided neurorehabilitation exercise. When it comes to the passive rehabilitation training for stroke patients, the existing control strategies are usually just based on position control to carry out the training, and the patient is out of the controller. However, to some extent, the patient should be taken as a “cooperator” of the training activity, and the movement speed and range of the training movement should be dynamically regulated according to the internal or external state of the subject, just as what the therapist does in clinical therapy. This research presents a novel motion control strategy for patient-centered robot-aided passive neurorehabilitation exercise from the point of the safety. The safety-motion decision-making mechanism is developed to online observe and assess the physical state of training impaired-limb and motion performances and regulate the training parameters (motion speed and training rage), ensuring the safety of the supplied rehabilitation exercise. Meanwhile, position-based impedance control is employed to realize the trajectory tracking motion with interactive compliance. Functional experiments and clinical experiments are investigated with a healthy adult and four recruited stroke patients, respectively. The two types of experimental results demonstrate that the suggested control strategy not only serves with safety-motion training but also presents rehabilitation efficacy. PMID:28194413

  18. Development of Patients' Decision Aid for Older Women With Stage I Breast Cancer Considering Radiotherapy After Lumpectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Jennifer; D'Alimonte, Laura; Angus, Jan; Paszat, Larry; Metcalfe, Kelly; Whelan, Tim; Llewellyn-Thomas, Hilary; Warner, Eiran; Franssen, Edmee; Szumacher, Ewa

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To develop a patient decision aid (PtDA) for older women with Stage I, pathologically node negative, estrogen receptor-positive progesterone receptor-positive breast cancer who are considering adjuvant radiotherapy after lumpectomy and to examine its impact on patients' decision making. Methods and Materials: A PtDA was developed and evaluated in three steps according to the Ottawa Decision Support Framework: (1) needs assessment (n = 16); (2) Pilot I to examine PtDA acceptability (n = 12); and (3) Pilot II, a pretest posttest (n = 38) with older women with estrogen receptor-positive progesterone receptor-positive breast cancer after lumpectomy who were receiving adjuvant radiation therapy. Measures included patients' satisfaction with the PtDA, self-reported decisional conflict, level of distress, treatment-related knowledge, and choice predisposition. Results: The PtDA is a booklet that details each adjuvant treatment option's benefits, risks, and side effects tailored to the patient's clinical profile; includes a values clarification exercise; and includes steps to guide patients towards their decision. On the basis of qualitative comments and satisfaction ratings, all women thought that the PtDA was helpful and informative. In comparison with their baseline scores, patients had a statistically significant (p < 0.05) reduction in decisional conflict (adjusted mean difference [AMD], -7.18; 95% confidence interval [CI], -13.50 to 12.59); increased clarity of the benefits and risks (AMD, -10.86; CI, -20.33 to 21.49); and improved general treatment knowledge (AMD, 8.99; CI, 2.88-10.28) after using the PtDA. General trends were also reported in the patients' choice predisposition scores that suggested potential differences in treatment decision after PtDA use. Conclusions: This study provides evidence that this PtDA may be a helpful educational tool for this group of women. The quality of care for older breast cancer patients may be enhanced by the use of a

  19. Barriers and Facilitators to Patient-Provider Communication When Discussing Breast Cancer Risk to Aid in the Development of Decision Support Tools

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Haeseung; Xiao, Tong; Thomas, Parijatham S.; Aguirre, Alejandra N.; Smalletz, Cindy; Dimond, Jill; Finkelstein, Joseph; Infante, Katherine; Trivedi, Meghna; David, Raven; Vargas, Jennifer; Crew, Katherine D.; Kukafka, Rita

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify barriers and facilitators to patient-provider communication when discussing breast cancer risk to aid in the development of decision support tools. Four patient focus groups (N=34) and eight provider focus groups (N=10) took place in Northern Manhattan. A qualitative analysis was conducted using Atlas.ti software. The coding yielded 62.3%–94.5% agreement. The results showed that 1) barriers are time constraints, lack of knowledge, low health literacy, and language barriers, and 2) facilitators are information needs, desire for personalization, and autonomy when communicating risk in patient-provider encounters. These results will inform the development of a patient-centered decision aid (RealRisks) and a provider-facing breast cancer risk navigation (BNAV) tool, which are designed to facilitate patient-provider risk communication and shared decision-making about breast cancer prevention strategies, such as chemoprevention. PMID:26958276

  20. Barriers and Facilitators to Patient-Provider Communication When Discussing Breast Cancer Risk to Aid in the Development of Decision Support Tools.

    PubMed

    Yi, Haeseung; Xiao, Tong; Thomas, Parijatham S; Aguirre, Alejandra N; Smalletz, Cindy; Dimond, Jill; Finkelstein, Joseph; Infante, Katherine; Trivedi, Meghna; David, Raven; Vargas, Jennifer; Crew, Katherine D; Kukafka, Rita

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify barriers and facilitators to patient-provider communication when discussing breast cancer risk to aid in the development of decision support tools. Four patient focus groups (N=34) and eight provider focus groups (N=10) took place in Northern Manhattan. A qualitative analysis was conducted using Atlas.ti software. The coding yielded 62.3%-94.5% agreement. The results showed that 1) barriers are time constraints, lack of knowledge, low health literacy, and language barriers, and 2) facilitators are information needs, desire for personalization, and autonomy when communicating risk in patient-provider encounters. These results will inform the development of a patient-centered decision aid (RealRisks) and a provider-facing breast cancer risk navigation (BNAV) tool, which are designed to facilitate patient-provider risk communication and shared decision-making about breast cancer prevention strategies, such as chemoprevention.

  1. Usability and utility evaluation of the web-based "Should I Start Insulin?" patient decision aid for patients with type 2 diabetes among older people.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yew Kong; Lee, Ping Yein; Ng, Chirk Jenn; Teo, Chin Hai; Abu Bakar, Ahmad Ihsan; Abdullah, Khatijah Lim; Khoo, Ee Ming; Hanafi, Nik Sherina; Low, Wah Yun; Chiew, Thiam Kian

    2017-01-31

    This study aimed to evaluate the usability (ease of use) and utility (impact on user's decision-making process) of a web-based patient decision aid (PDA) among older-age users. A pragmatic, qualitative research design was used. We recruited patients with type 2 diabetes who were at the point of making a decision about starting insulin from a tertiary teaching hospital in Malaysia in 2014. Computer screen recording software was used to record the website browsing session and in-depth interviews were conducted while playing back the website recording. The interviews were analyzed using the framework approach to identify usability and utility issues. Three cycles of iteration were conducted until no more major issues emerged. Thirteen patients participated: median age 65 years old, 10 men, and nine had secondary education/diploma, four were graduates/had postgraduate degree. Four usability issues were identified (navigation between pages and sections, a layout with open display, simple language, and equipment preferences). For utility, participants commented that the website influenced their decision about insulin in three ways: it had provided information about insulin, it helped them deliberate choices using the option-attribute matrix, and it allowed them to involve others in their decision making by sharing the PDA summary printout.

  2. Enhanced Decision-Making: The Use of a Videotape Decision-Aid for Patients with Prostate Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schapira, Marilyn M.; Meade, Cathy; Nattinger, Ann B.

    1997-01-01

    The development of a videotape for patients considering treatment options for clinically localized prostate cancer is described. The effectiveness of videotape in improving short-term recall of treatment options and outcomes was assessed quantitatively; qualitative analysis was used to assess the likelihood of patient's active participation in the…

  3. The AFFORD Clinical Decision Aid To Identify Emergency Department Patients With Atrial Fibrillation At Low Risk For 30-Day Adverse Events

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Tyler W.; Storrow, Alan B.; Jenkins, Cathy A.; Abraham, Robert L.; Liu, Dandan; Miller, Karen F.; Moser, Kelly M.; Russ, Stephan; Roden, Dan M.; Harrell, Frank E.; Darbar, Dawood

    2015-01-01

    There is wide variation in the management of emergency department (ED) patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). We aimed to derive and internally validate the first prospective, ED-based clinical decision aid to identify patients with AF at low risk for 30-day adverse events. We performed a prospective cohort study at a university-affiliated, tertiary-care, ED. Patients were enrolled from June 9, 2010 to February 28, 2013 and followed for 30 days. We enrolled a convenience sample of ED patients presenting with symptomatic AF. Candidate predictors were based on ED data available in the first two hours. The decision aid was derived using model approximation (preconditioning) followed by strong bootstrap internal validation. We utilized an ordinal outcome hierarchy defined as the incidence of the most severe adverse event within 30 days of the ED evaluation. Of 497 patients enrolled, stroke and AF-related death occurred in 13 (3%) and 4 (<1%) patients, respectively. The decision aid included the following: age, triage vitals (systolic blood pressure, temperature, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, supplemental oxygen requirement); medical history (heart failure, home sotalol use, prior percutaneous coronary intervention, electrical cardioversion, cardiac ablation, frequency of AF symptoms); ED data (2 hour heart rate, chest radiograph results, hemoglobin, creatinine, and brain natriuretic peptide). The decision aid’s c-statistic in predicting any 30-day adverse event was 0.7 (95% CI, 0.65, 0.76). In conclusion, among ED patients with AF, AFFORD provides the first evidence based decision aid for identifying patients who are at low risk for 30-day adverse events and candidates for safe discharge. PMID:25633190

  4. Severe Weather Forecast Decision Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William H., III; Wheeler, Mark M.; Short, David A.

    2005-01-01

    This report presents a 15-year climatological study of severe weather events and related severe weather atmospheric parameters. Data sources included local forecast rules, archived sounding data, Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Surveillance System (CGLSS) data, surface and upper air maps, and two severe weather event databases covering east-central Florida. The local forecast rules were used to set threat assessment thresholds for stability parameters that were derived from the sounding data. The severe weather events databases were used to identify days with reported severe weather and the CGLSS data was used to differentiate between lightning and non-lightning days. These data sets provided the foundation for analyzing the stability parameters and synoptic patterns that were used to develop an objective tool to aid in forecasting severe weather events. The period of record for the analysis was May - September, 1989 - 2003. The results indicate that there are certain synoptic patterns more prevalent on days with severe weather and some of the stability parameters are better predictors of severe weather days based on locally tuned threat values. The results also revealed the stability parameters that did not display any skill related to severe weather days. An interactive web-based Severe Weather Decision Aid was developed to assist the duty forecaster by providing a level of objective guidance based on the analysis of the stability parameters, CGLSS data, and synoptic-scale dynamics. The tool will be tested and evaluated during the 2005 warm season.

  5. Compliance assessment of ambulatory Alzheimer patients to aid therapeutic decisions by healthcare professionals

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Compliance represents a major determinant for the effectiveness of pharmacotherapy. Compliance reports summarising electronically compiled compliance data qualify healthcare needs and can be utilised as part of a compliance enhancing intervention. Nevertheless, evidence-based information on a sufficient level of compliance is scarce complicating the interpretation of compliance reports. The purpose of our pilot study was to determine the compliance of ambulatory Alzheimer patients to antidementia drugs under routine therapeutic use using electronic monitoring. In addition, the forgiveness of donepezil (i.e. its ability to sustain adequate pharmacological response despite suboptimal compliance) was characterised and evidence-based guidance for the interpretation of compliance reports was intended to be developed. Methods We determined the compliance of four different antidementia drugs by electronic monitoring in 31 patients over six months. All patients were recruited from the gerontopsychiatric clinic of a university hospital as part of a pilot study. The so called medication event monitoring system (MEMS) was employed, consisting of a vial with a microprocessor in the lid which records the time (date, hour, minute) of every opening. Daily compliance served as primary outcome measure, defined as percentage of days with correctly administered doses of medication. In addition, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of donepezil were simulated to systematically assess therapeutic undersupply also incorporating study compliance patterns. Statistical analyses were performed with SPSS and Microsoft Excel. Results Median daily compliance was 94% (range 48%-99%). Ten patients (32%) were non-compliant at least for one month. One-sixth of patients taking donepezil displayed periods of therapeutic undersupply. For 10 mg and 5 mg donepezil once-daily dosing, the estimated forgiveness of donepezil was 80% and 90% daily compliance or two and one dosage omissions at

  6. Impact of Adding a Decision Aid to Patient Education in Adults with Asthma: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Légaré, France; Moisan, Jocelyne; Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Background Not providing adequate patient education interventions to asthma patients remains a major care gap. To help asthma patients and caregivers discuss inhaled controller medication use, our team has previously developed a decision aid (DA). We sought to assess whether adding this DA to education interventions improved knowledge, decisional conflict, and asthma control among adults with asthma. Methods A parallel clinical trial (NCT02516449). We recruited adults with asthma, aged 18 to 65 years, prescribed inhaled controller medication to optimize asthma control. Educators randomly allocated participants either to the education + DA or to the education group. At baseline and two-month follow-up, we measured asthma knowledge (primary outcome) with a validated self-administered questionnaire (score –37 to +37). Secondary outcomes included decisional conflict and asthma control. Blinded assessors collected data. Between the two time points, the within- and between-group changes were estimated by generalized linear mixed models. Results Fifty-one participants (response rate: 53%; age: 44 ± 13 years; women: n = 32) were randomized either to the education + DA group (n = 26) or to the education group (n = 25), and included in statistical analyses. Between baseline and follow-up, mean [95% CI] knowledge scores increased from 21.5 [19.9–23.2] to 25.1 [23.1–27.0] in the education + DA group (P = 0.0002) and from 24.0 [22.3–25.7] to 26.0 [24.0–28.0] in the education group (P = 0.0298). In both of the groups, decisional conflict and asthma control improved. There were no differences between groups. Conclusions Education improved knowledge, decisional conflict, and asthma control whether the DA was added or not. PMID:28107540

  7. A Pilot Randomized Trial of a Video Patient Decision Aid to Facilitate Early Intervention Referrals From Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Manuel E; DuRivage, Nathalie E; Bezpalko, Orysia; Suh, Andrew; Wade, Roy; Blum, Nathan J; Fiks, Alexander G

    2017-03-01

    Many young children identified with developmental concerns in pediatric settings do not receive early intervention (EI). We assessed the impact of a video decision aid and text message reminder on knowledge and attitudes regarding developmental delay and EI as well as referral completion. We conducted a pilot randomized controlled trial in an urban setting and enrolled 64 parent-child dyads referred to EI. Compared with controls, participants who received the intervention demonstrated increased knowledge regarding developmental delay and EI as well as more favorable attitudes in certain topics. Although we did not find a significant difference between arms in EI intake and evaluation, we found a pattern suggestive of increased intake and evaluation among participants with low health literacy in the intervention arm. Additional study is needed to identify strategies that improve the EI referral process for families and to understand the potential targeted role for decision aids and text messages.

  8. Job Aiding/Training Decision Process Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    I[ -, . 1’, oo Ii AL-CR-i1992-0004 AD-A256 947lEE = IIEI ifl ll 1l I JOB AIDING/TRAINING DECISION PROCESS MODEL A R M John P. Zenyuh DTIC S Phillip C...March 1990 - April 1990 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS C - F33615-86-C-0545 Job Aiding/Training Decision Process Model PE - 62205F PR - 1121 6...Components to Process Model Decision and Selection Points ........... 32 13. Summary of Subject Recommendations for Aiding Approaches

  9. FAmily CEntered (FACE) advance care planning: Study design and methods for a patient-centered communication and decision-making intervention for patients with HIV/AIDS and their surrogate decision-makers.

    PubMed

    Kimmel, Allison L; Wang, Jichuan; Scott, Rachel K; Briggs, Linda; Lyon, Maureen E

    2015-07-01

    Although the human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) has become a chronic illness, disease-specific advance care planning has not yet been evaluated for the palliative care needs of adults with HIV/AIDS. This prospective, longitudinal, randomized, two-arm controlled clinical trial aims to test the efficacy of FAmily CEntered advance care planning among adults living with AIDS and/or HIV with co-morbidities on congruence in treatment preferences, healthcare utilization, and quality of life. The FAmily CEntered intervention arm is two face-to-face sessions with a trained, certified facilitator: Session 1) Disease-Specific Advance Care Planning Respecting Choices Interview; Session 2) Completion of advance directive. The Healthy Living Control arm is: Session 1) Developmental/Relationship History; Session 2) Nutrition. Follow-up data will be collected at 3, 6, 12, and 18 months post-intervention. A total of 288 patient/surrogate dyads will be enrolled from five hospital-based, out-patient clinics in Washington, District of Columbia. Participants will be HIV positive and ≥ 21 years of age; surrogates will be ≥ 18 years of age. Exclusion criteria are homicidality, suicidality, psychosis, and impaired cognitive functioning. We hypothesize that this intervention will enhance patient-centered communication with a surrogate decision-maker about end of life treatment preferences over time, enhance patient quality of life and decrease health care utilization. We further hypothesize that this intervention will decrease health disparities for Blacks in completion of advance directives. If proposed aims are achieved, the benefits of palliative care, particularly increased treatment preferences about end-of-life care and enhanced quality of life, will be extended to people living with AIDS.

  10. Fracture risk assessment: improved evaluation of vertebral integrity among metastatic cancer patients to aid in surgical decision-making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustine, Kurt E.; Camp, Jon J.; Holmes, David R.; Huddleston, Paul M.; Lu, Lichun; Yaszemski, Michael J.; Robb, Richard A.

    2012-03-01

    Failure of the spine's structural integrity from metastatic disease can lead to both pain and neurologic deficit. Fractures that require treatment occur in over 30% of bony metastases. Our objective is to use computed tomography (CT) in conjunction with analytic techniques that have been previously developed to predict fracture risk in cancer patients with metastatic disease to the spine. Current clinical practice for cancer patients with spine metastasis often requires an empirical decision regarding spinal reconstructive surgery. Early image-based software systems used for CT analysis are time consuming and poorly suited for clinical application. The Biomedical Image Resource (BIR) at Mayo Clinic, Rochester has developed an image analysis computer program that calculates from CT scans, the residual load-bearing capacity in a vertebra with metastatic cancer. The Spine Cancer Assessment (SCA) program is built on a platform designed for clinical practice, with a workflow format that allows for rapid selection of patient CT exams, followed by guided image analysis tasks, resulting in a fracture risk report. The analysis features allow the surgeon to quickly isolate a single vertebra and obtain an immediate pre-surgical multiple parallel section composite beam fracture risk analysis based on algorithms developed at Mayo Clinic. The analysis software is undergoing clinical validation studies. We expect this approach will facilitate patient management and utilization of reliable guidelines for selecting among various treatment option based on fracture risk.

  11. Towards personalised intra-arterial treatment of patients with acute ischaemic stroke: a study protocol for development and validation of a clinical decision aid

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, Maxim J H L; Venema, Esmee; Roozenbeek, Bob; Broderick, Joseph P; Yeatts, Sharon D; Khatri, Pooja; Berkhemer, Olvert A; Roos, Yvo B W E M; Majoie, Charles B L M; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J; van Zwam, Wim H; van der Lugt, Aad; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Dippel, Diederik W J; Lingsma, Hester F

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Overall, intra-arterial treatment (IAT) proved to be beneficial in patients with acute ischaemic stroke due to a proximal occlusion in the anterior circulation. However, heterogeneity in treatment benefit may be relevant for personalised clinical decision-making. Our aim is to improve selection of patients for IAT by predicting individual treatment benefit or harm. Methods and analysis We will use data collected in the Multicenter Randomized Clinical Trial of Endovascular Treatment for Acute Ischemic Stroke in the Netherlands (MR CLEAN) trial to analyse the effect of baseline characteristics on outcome and treatment effect. A multivariable proportional odds model with interaction terms will be developed to predict the outcome for each individual patient, both with and without IAT. Model performance will be expressed as discrimination and calibration, after bootstrap resampling and shrinkage of regression coefficients, to correct for optimism. External validation will be conducted on data of patients in the Interventional Management of Stroke III trial (IMS III). Primary outcome will be the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) at 90 days after stroke. Ethics and dissemination The proposed study will provide an internationally applicable clinical decision aid for IAT. Findings will be disseminated widely through peer-reviewed publications, conference presentations and in an online web application tool. Formal ethical approval was not required as primary data were already collected. Trial registration numbers ISRCTN10888758; Post-results and NCT00359424; Post-resultsc. PMID:28336740

  12. Decision Aiding in Europe: Assessment Report,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-26

    bodies and ship contours BRLT ratings, the decision-maker keeps produced in this way are quite striking, working on a goal point or reference point and...graphic functions but are multicriteria aspirations are often contra- not specifically European. Cinematic dictory and cannot be achieved simulta...above a certain threshold, then more of Hamburg. Starting from a bare minimum information and aiding are of little use, of assumptions (e.g., rigidity

  13. Decision aids for localized prostate cancer treatment choice: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Violette, Philippe D; Agoritsas, Thomas; Alexander, Paul; Riikonen, Jarno; Santti, Henrikki; Agarwal, Arnav; Bhatnagar, Neera; Dahm, Philipp; Montori, Victor; Guyatt, Gordon H; Tikkinen, Kari A O

    2015-01-01

    Patients who are diagnosed with localized prostate cancer need to make critical treatment decisions that are sensitive to their values and preferences. The role of decision aids in facilitating these decisions is unknown. The authors conducted a systematic review of randomized trials of decision aids for localized prostate cancer. Teams of 2 reviewers independently identified, selected, and abstracted data from 14 eligible trials (n = 3377 men), of which 10 were conducted in North America. Of these, 11 trials compared decision aids with usual care, and 3 trials compared decision aids with other decision aids. Two trials suggested a modest positive impact on decisional regret. Results across studies varied widely for decisional conflict (4 studies), satisfaction with decision (2 studies), and knowledge (2 studies). No impact on treatment choices was observed (6 studies). In conclusion, scant evidence at high risk of bias suggests the variable impact of existing decision aids on a limited set of decisional processes and outcomes. Because current decision aids provide information but do not directly facilitate shared decision making, subsequent efforts would benefit from user-centered design of decision aids that promote shared decision making.

  14. Pharmacotherapeutics for the AIDS Patient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fife, Kenneth H.

    1991-01-01

    Anticipated shifts in the demographics of the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) epidemic are examined, current state-of-the-art AIDS patient management is summarized, and some unique facets of drug therapy in the AIDS patient are discussed, including adverse reactions, complex drug interactions, use of investigational drugs, and…

  15. The Effect of a Decision Aid on the Quality of Colorectal Cancer Screening Decisions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-29

    Wiley & Sons, Inc. 153. Arterburn, D.E., et al., Randomized trial of a video-based patient decision aid for bariatric surgery . Obesity (Silver Spring... surgery than those who did not, while those who felt strongly about preserving their sexual function were less likely to have surgery 25 [104...knowledge and treatment decision making for breast cancer surgery : a randomized trial. Jama, 2004. 139 292(4): p. 435-41. 118. Street, R.L., Jr., et al

  16. Promoting Shared Decision Making in Disorders of Sex Development (DSD): Decision Aids and Support Tools.

    PubMed

    Siminoff, L A; Sandberg, D E

    2015-05-01

    Specific complaints and grievances from adult patients with disorders of sex development (DSD), and their advocates center around the lack of information or misinformation they were given about their condition and feeling stigmatized and shamed by the secrecy surrounding their condition and its management. Many also attribute poor sexual function to damaging genital surgery and/or repeated, insensitive genital examinations. These reports suggest the need to reconsider the decision-making process for the treatment of children born with DSD. This paper proposes that shared decision making, an important concept in adult health care, be operationalized for the major decisions commonly encountered in DSD care and facilitated through the utilization of decision aids and support tools. This approach may help patients and their families make informed decisions that are better aligned with their personal values and goals. It may also lead to greater confidence in decision making with greater satisfaction and less regret. A brief review of the past and current approach to DSD decision making is provided, along with a review of shared decision making and decision aids and support tools. A case study explores the need and potential utility of this suggested new approach.

  17. Adaptive Computer Aiding in Dynamic Decision Processes: An Experimental Study of Aiding Effectiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-05-01

    and a larger subject group. 1-2 Adaptive Decision Aiding 1-2 The primary function of ADDAM is not simply to model the decision maker’s behavior...maximum expected utility (OEVMAXEU) during the course of the test session was the primary measure of decision performance. As a group, the aided...in Chapter 3. The primary function of ADDAM is not simply to model the decision maker’s behavior but to provide a basis for decision aiding. Once

  18. Proposal for Development of EBM-CDSS (Evidence-Based Clinical Decision Support System) to Aid Prognostication in Terminally Ill Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    regarding continuation of life-sustaining vs. palliative care . Finally, using regret DCA, the optimal decision for the specific patient is suggested...is to develop an Evidence-based Clinical Decision Support (CDSS-EBM) system and make it available at the point of care to improve prognostication of...Analysis and Regret theory to compare multiple decision strategies based on the decision maker’s personal attitudes towards each strategy

  19. Development of a Nonlinear Internal Wave Tactical Decision Aid

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    Development of a Nonlinear Internal Wave Tactical Decision Aid Christopher R. Jackson Global Ocean Associates 6220 Jean Louise Way Alexandria...internal waves that can be used as the basis for a future Tactical Decision Aid . OBJECTIVES The principal objective is to establish a procedure and...of a Nonlinear Internal Wave Tactical Decision Aid 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER

  20. Adaptive Peircean decision aid project summary assessments.

    SciTech Connect

    Senglaub, Michael E.

    2007-01-01

    This efforts objective was to identify and hybridize a suite of technologies enabling the development of predictive decision aids for use principally in combat environments but also in any complex information terrain. The technologies required included formal concept analysis for knowledge representation and information operations, Peircean reasoning to support hypothesis generation, Mill's's canons to begin defining information operators that support the first two technologies and co-evolutionary game theory to provide the environment/domain to assess predictions from the reasoning engines. The intended application domain is the IED problem because of its inherent evolutionary nature. While a fully functioning integrated algorithm was not achieved the hybridization and demonstration of the technologies was accomplished and demonstration of utility provided for a number of ancillary queries.

  1. Developing the Optimal Protocol to Aid in Ethical Decision Making Involving Terminally Ill Patients at Womack Army Community Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    the prognosis ! that no reasonable possibility exists of the patient’s return to a cognitive, sapient state. These committees should not be composed of...possi- bility that he will return to a cognitive sapient state or is mentally incapacitated, and: (1) It is determined by the attending physician that

  2. [The AIDS patient in anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Jalowy, A; Flesche, C W; Lorenz, C

    1997-02-01

    Treatment of a patient with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is very challenging, and makes great demands on the anaesthesiologist. Any of an AIDS patient's vital organ systems may be compromised, either by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) itself, opportunistic infections, by tumours, or as a result of AIDS-related drug therapies. Infections of the lungs (e.g., Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia) are prevalent, and cardiac impairment can be found in as many as 50% of AIDS patients. In addition, disorders of the central and peripheral nervous system and water and electrolyte imbalances are often seen. Perioperatively, the AIDS patient is especially prone to infections as a result of a compromised immune system. The choice of anaesthetic procedure for the AIDS patient-aside from the type of operation-depends on the severity of the illness and progression of organ impairment. All anaesthesia personnel must be careful to avoid infection, as they frequently come in contact with the blood or body fluids of their patients. However, the risk of being infected by an AIDS patient is very low, provided hygiene regulations are followed strictly. The rate of seroconversion after accidental needle-stick injury is below 1%. If exposure does occur, regular serologic controls should be continued for one year. Prophylactic treatment with azidothymidine after exposition to HIV is recommended.

  3. Can Gait Signatures Provide Quantitative Measures for Aiding Clinical Decision-Making? A Systematic Meta-Analysis of Gait Variability Behavior in Patients with Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    König, Niklas; Singh, Navrag B.; Baumann, Christian R.; Taylor, William R.

    2016-01-01

    A disturbed, inconsistent walking pattern is a common feature of patients with Parkinson's disease (PwPD). Such extreme variability in both temporal and spatial parameters of gait has been associated with unstable walking and an elevated prevalence of falls. However, despite their ability to discretise healthy from pathological function, normative variability values for key gait parameters are still missing. Furthermore, an understanding of each parameter's response to pathology, as well as the inter-parameter relationships, has received little attention. The aim of this systematic literature review and meta-analysis was therefore to define threshold levels for pathological gait variability as well as to investigate whether all gait parameters are equally perturbed in PwPD. Based on a broader systematic literature search that included 13′195 titles, 34 studies addressed Parkinson's disease, presenting 800 PwPD and 854 healthy subjects. Eight gait parameters were compared, of which six showed increased levels of variability during walking in PwPD. The most commonly reported parameter, coefficient of variation of stride time, revealed an upper threshold of 2.4% to discriminate the two groups. Variability of step width, however, was consistently lower in PwPD compared to healthy subjects, and therefore suggests an explicit sensory motor system control mechanism to prioritize balance during walking. The results provide a clear functional threshold for monitoring treatment efficacy in patients with Parkinson's disease. More importantly, however, quantification of specific functional deficits could well provide a basis for locating the source and extent of the neurological damage, and therefore aid clinical decision-making for individualizing therapies. PMID:27445759

  4. An Interactive Computer Aiding System for Group Decision Making

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-05-01

    In addition, system evaluation studies will continue. The specific items of work for the next period include: (1) Operational testing of the color...Aid with other DDF decision aids; and (3) continuation of full scale experimental studies of the Group Decision Aid. The following specific tasks were...experimental studies are in progress at Perceptronics’ California office. The previously completed experimental hypotheses and the CACI-developed scenario

  5. Domain specific software design for decision aiding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Kirby; Stanley, Kevin

    1992-01-01

    McDonnell Aircraft Company (MCAIR) is involved in many large multi-discipline design and development efforts of tactical aircraft. These involve a number of design disciplines that must be coordinated to produce an integrated design and a successful product. Our interpretation of a domain specific software design (DSSD) is that of a representation or framework that is specialized to support a limited problem domain. A DSSD is an abstract software design that is shaped by the problem characteristics. This parallels the theme of object-oriented analysis and design of letting the problem model directly drive the design. The DSSD concept extends the notion of software reusability to include representations or frameworks. It supports the entire software life cycle and specifically leads to improved prototyping capability, supports system integration, and promotes reuse of software designs and supporting frameworks. The example presented in this paper is the task network architecture or design which was developed for the MCAIR Pilot's Associate program. The task network concept supported both module development and system integration within the domain of operator decision aiding. It is presented as an instance where a software design exhibited many of the attributes associated with DSSD concept.

  6. Development of Automated Aids for Decision Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-05-01

    called state variables (or environ- mental variables) since they define the state of the decision environment. Decision variables must be defined in such...Vaibeison Endlogetious STRUCTURAL MODELO Varabls ~State Variables* (INTERACTION MODEL) Outcome Variables’ (Either State or Prefeence$Decision...decisions and states of the environment. This type of model requires the decision maker to aggregate mentally the effects of the interactions among his

  7. Decision aids for familial breast cancer: exploring women's views using focus groups

    PubMed Central

    Rapport, Frances; Iredale, Rachel; Jones, Wendy; Sivell, Stephanie; Edwards, Adrian; Gray, Jonathon; Elwyn, Glyn

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background  There is increasing need for accessible information about familial breast cancer for those facing complex decisions around genetic testing, screening and treatment. Information currently includes leaflets and computerized decision aids, offering interactive interfaces to clarify complex choices. Objective  Exploration of users’ views and reactions to three decision aids for genetic testing for breast cancer using focus groups. Setting  A regional cancer genetics service in the UK. Participants  Women over 18 years of age who had been referred to Cancer Genetics Service for Wales (CGSW) and had received a risk assessment for familial breast cancer. Methods  Qualitative study involving one pilot and six extended focus groups with 39 women at high, moderate and population risk. Two CD‐ROMs and one paper‐based aid evaluated for: clarity of presentation, ease of handling, emotive response, increased knowledge and greater informed choice. Results  Women reported variable preferences for different types of decision aids and mixed emotions, indicating the sensitivity of raising issues in decision support tools, lack of consensus over the most appropriate aid and no systematic differences between risk groups. Women remarked that aids increased their knowledge, particularly about breast cancer genes and risk and wanted a decision aid designed within the context of the NHS, in both paper‐based and CD‐ROM formats from an authoritative source. Mixed views about presentation styles suggest decision aids would be most effective with a user‐selected range of formats. Conclusions  Decision aid development should be informed by users and should meet the needs of those concerned about their risk of breast cancer in the UK. Without such aids, patients will continue to search for information from a variety of sources of varying quality. PMID:16911137

  8. Observational study of the development and evaluation of a fertility preservation patient decision aid for teenage and adult women diagnosed with cancer: the Cancer, Fertility and Me research protocol

    PubMed Central

    Jones, G L; Hughes, J; Mahmoodi, N; Greenfield, D; Brauten-Smith, G; Skull, J; Gath, J; Yeomanson, D; Baskind, E; Snowden, J A; Velikova, G; Collins, K; Stark, D; Phillips, R; Lane, S; Bekker, H L

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Women diagnosed with cancer and facing potentially sterilising cancer treatment have to make time-pressured decisions regarding fertility preservation with specialist fertility services while undergoing treatment of their cancer with oncology services. Oncologists identify a need for resources enabling them to support women's fertility preservation decisions more effectively; women report wanting more specialist information to make these decisions. The overall aim of the ‘Cancer, Fertility and Me’ study is to develop and evaluate a new evidence-based patient decision aid (PtDA) for women with any cancer considering fertility preservation to address this unmet need. Methods and analysis This is a prospective mixed-method observational study including women of reproductive age (16 years +) with a new diagnosis of any cancer across two regional cancer and fertility centres in Yorkshire, UK. The research involves three stages. In stage 1, the aim is to develop the PtDA using a systematic method of evidence synthesis and multidisciplinary expert review of current clinical practice and patient information. In stage 2, the aim is to assess the face validity of the PtDA. Feedback on its content and format will be ascertained using questionnaires and interviews with patients, user groups and key stakeholders. Finally, in stage 3 the acceptability of using this resource when integrated into usual cancer care pathways at the point of cancer diagnosis and treatment planning will be evaluated. This will involve a quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the PtDA in clinical practice. Measures chosen include using count data of the PtDAs administered in clinics and accessed online, decisional and patient-reported outcome measures and qualitative feedback. Quantitative data will be analysed using descriptive statistics, paired sample t-tests and CIs; interviews will be analysed using thematic analysis. Ethics and dissemination Research Ethics Committee

  9. Features of Computer-Based Decision Aids: Systematic Review, Thematic Synthesis, and Meta-Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Krömker, Dörthe; Meguerditchian, Ari N; Tamblyn, Robyn

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient information and education, such as decision aids, are gradually moving toward online, computer-based environments. Considerable research has been conducted to guide content and presentation of decision aids. However, given the relatively new shift to computer-based support, little attention has been given to how multimedia and interactivity can improve upon paper-based decision aids. Objective The first objective of this review was to summarize published literature into a proposed classification of features that have been integrated into computer-based decision aids. Building on this classification, the second objective was to assess whether integration of specific features was associated with higher-quality decision making. Methods Relevant studies were located by searching MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, and CENTRAL databases. The review identified studies that evaluated computer-based decision aids for adults faced with preference-sensitive medical decisions and reported quality of decision-making outcomes. A thematic synthesis was conducted to develop the classification of features. Subsequently, meta-analyses were conducted based on standardized mean differences (SMD) from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that reported knowledge or decisional conflict. Further subgroup analyses compared pooled SMDs for decision aids that incorporated a specific feature to other computer-based decision aids that did not incorporate the feature, to assess whether specific features improved quality of decision making. Results Of 3541 unique publications, 58 studies met the target criteria and were included in the thematic synthesis. The synthesis identified six features: content control, tailoring, patient narratives, explicit values clarification, feedback, and social support. A subset of 26 RCTs from the thematic synthesis was used to conduct the meta-analyses. As expected, computer-based decision aids performed better than usual care or alternative aids; however

  10. Practical Aspects of a Visual Aid to Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Z.; Bailey, R.; Willner, P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Previous research has demonstrated that people with mild intellectual disabilities (ID) have difficulty in "weighing up" information, defined as integrating disparate items of information in order to reach a decision. However, this problem could be overcome by the use of a visual aid to decision making. In an earlier study,…

  11. Decision Aids and Shared Decision-Making in Neurocritical Care: An Unmet Need in Our NeuroICUs.

    PubMed

    Muehlschlegel, Susanne; Shutter, Lori; Col, Nananda; Goldberg, Robert

    2015-08-01

    Improved resuscitation methods and advances in critical care have significantly increased the survival of patients presenting with devastating brain injuries compared to prior decades. After the patient's stabilization phase, families and patients are faced with "goals-of-care" decisions about continuation of aggressive intensive care unit care or comfort care only (CMO). Highly varying rates of CMO between centers raise the question of "self-fulfilling prophecies." Disease severity, the physician's communication and the family's understanding of projected outcomes, their uncertainties, complication risks with continued care, physician bias, and the patient's and surrogate's wishes and values all influence a CMO decision. Disease-specific decision support interventions, decision aids (DAs), may remedy these issues in the neurocritical care unit, potentially leading to better-informed and less-biased goals-of-care decisions in neurocritically ill patients, while increasing decision knowledge, confidence, and realistic expectations and decreasing decisional conflict and regret. Shared decision-making (SDM) is a collaborative process that enhances patients' and proxies' understanding about prognosis, encourages them to actively weigh the risks and benefits of a treatment, and considers the patient's preferences and values to make better decisions. DAs are SDM tools, which have been successfully implemented for many other conditions to assist difficult decision-making. In this article, we summarize the purposes of SDM, the derivation of DAs, and their potential application in neurocritical care.

  12. Telemedicine for AIDS patients accommodations.

    PubMed

    Kulik, J F; de la Tribonnière, X; Bricon-Souf, N; Beuscart, R J; Mouton, Y

    1997-01-01

    People suffering from AIDS are subject to frequent hospitalisations. In some cases, they cannot go back home after hospitalisations, due to severe illness, family or sociologic problems. This is the reason why some therapeutic flats are at their disposal to make easier their medical follow-up after the hospital's discharge. In these Therapy Accommodation, they are treated by trained GP who often suffer from lack of information and lack of expertise in difficult cases. For this purpose we included these flats in the regional Telemedicine AIDS network to give these physicians free access to the computerised multimedia medical record of their patients and to provide them with synchronous co-operation facilities.

  13. Comparison of display enhancement with intelligent decision-aiding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirlik, Alex; Markert, Wendy J.; Kossack, Merrick

    1992-01-01

    Currently, two main approaches exist for improving the human-machine interface component of a system in order to improve overall system performance, display enhancement and intelligent decision aiding. Each of these two approaches has its own set of advantages and disadvantages, as well as introduce its own set of additional performance problems. These characteristics should help identify which types of problem situations and domains are better aided by which type of strategy. The characteristic issues are described of these two decision aiding strategies. Then differences in expert and novice decision making are described in order to help determine whether a particular strategy may be better for a particular type of user. Finally, research is outlined to compare and contrast the two technologies, as well as to examine the interaction effects introduced by the different skill levels and the different methods for training operators.

  14. The impact of decision aids to enhance shared decision making for diabetes (the DAD study): protocol of a cluster randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Shared decision making contributes to high quality healthcare by promoting a patient-centered approach. Patient involvement in selecting the components of a diabetes medication program that best match the patient’s values and preferences may also enhance medication adherence and improve outcomes. Decision aids are tools designed to involve patients in shared decision making, but their adoption in practice has been limited. In this study, we propose to obtain a preliminary estimate of the impact of patient decision aids vs. usual care on measures of patient involvement in decision making, diabetes care processes, medication adherence, glycemic and cardiovascular risk factor control, and resource utilization. In addition, we propose to identify, describe, and explain factors that promote or inhibit the routine embedding of decision aids in practice. Methods/Design We will be conducting a mixed-methods study comprised of a cluster-randomized, practical, multicentered trial enrolling clinicians and their patients (n = 240) with type 2 diabetes from rural and suburban primary care practices (n = 8), with an embedded qualitative study to examine factors that influence the incorporation of decision aids into routine practice. The intervention will consist of the use of a decision aid (Statin Choice and Aspirin Choice, or Diabetes Medication Choice) during the clinical encounter. The qualitative study will include analysis of video recordings of clinical encounters and in-depth, semi-structured interviews with participating patients, clinicians, and clinic support staff, in both trial arms. Discussion Upon completion of this trial, we will have new knowledge about the effectiveness of diabetes decision aids in these practices. We will also better understand the factors that promote or inhibit the successful implementation and normalization of medication choice decision aids in the care of chronic patients in primary care practices. Trial registration

  15. Radiological Decision Aid to determine suitability for medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, T. W.; Pandit, H. G.; Lombardi, A. V.; Adams, J. B.; Oosthuizen, C. R.; Clavé, A.; Dodd, C. A. F.; Berend, K. R.; Murray, D. W.

    2016-01-01

    Aims An evidence-based radiographic Decision Aid for meniscal-bearing unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) has been developed and this study investigates its performance at an independent centre. Patients and Methods Pre-operative radiographs, including stress views, from a consecutive cohort of 550 knees undergoing arthroplasty (UKA or total knee arthroplasty; TKA) by a single-surgeon were assessed. Suitability for UKA was determined using the Decision Aid, with the assessor blinded to treatment received, and compared with actual treatment received, which was determined by an experienced UKA surgeon based on history, examination, radiographic assessment including stress radiographs, and intra-operative assessment in line with the recommended indications as described in the literature. Results The sensitivity and specificity of the Decision Aid was 92% and 88%, respectively. Excluding knees where a clear pre-operative plan was made to perform TKA, i.e. patient request, the sensitivity was 93% and specificity 96%. The false-positive rate was low (2.4%) with all affected patients readily identifiable during joint inspection at surgery. In patients meeting Decision Aid criteria and receiving UKA, the five-year survival was 99% (95% confidence intervals (CI) 97 to 100). The false negatives (3.5%), who received UKA but did not meet the criteria, had significantly worse functional outcomes (flexion p < 0.001, American Knee Society Score - Functional p < 0.001, University of California Los Angeles score p = 0.04), and lower implant survival of 93.1% (95% CI 77.6 to 100). Conclusion The radiographic Decision Aid safely and reliably identifies appropriate patients for meniscal-bearing UKA and achieves good results in this population. The widespread use of the Decision Aid should improve the results of UKA. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B(10 Suppl B):3–10. PMID:27694509

  16. Collaborative Platforms Aid Emergency Decision Making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    Terra. Aqua. Cloudsat. Landsat. NASA runs and partners in many missions dedicated to monitoring the Earth, and the tools used in these missions continuously return data on everything from shifts in temperature to cloud formation to pollution levels over highways. The data are of great scientific value, but they also provide information that can play a critical role in decision making during times of crisis. Real-time developments in weather, wind, ocean currents, and numerous other conditions can have a significant impact on the way disasters, both natural and human-caused, unfold. "NASA has long recognized the need to make its data from real-time sources compatible and accessible for the purposes of decision making," says Michael Goodman, who was Disasters Program manager at NASA Headquarters from 2009-2012. "There are practical applications of NASA Earth science data, and we d like to accelerate the use of those applications." One of the main obstacles standing in the way of eminently practical data is the fact that the data from different missions are collected, formatted, and stored in different ways. Combining data sets in a way that makes them useful for decision makers has proven to be a difficult task. And while the need for a collaborative platform is widely recognized, very few have successfully made it work. Dave Jones, founder and CEO of StormCenter Communications Inc., which consults with decision makers to prepare for emergencies, says that "when I talk to public authorities, they say, If I had a nickel for every time someone told me they had a common operating platform, I d be rich. But one thing we ve seen over the years is that no one has been able to give end users the ability to ingest NASA data sets and merge them with their own."

  17. Operational hydrological projections to aid decision making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnetler, Thomas; Davis, Richard; Waddingham, John; James, Karen

    2014-05-01

    The Environment Agency of England has wide ranging responsibility for environmental regulation that includes both water resources management and flood management. In order to best fulfil its role decisions need to be taken using the best available evidence in the time available. The manipulation of large amounts of hydrological data in a way that best meets the needs of decision makers is a complex challenge. Not only should any analysis be technically robust but it should also be presented in a way that communicates key messages clearly and quickly. The Environment Agency and its predecessor organisations has a long history of working with hydrological data but in recent years there has been a need to better incorporate risk and uncertainty into hydrological analysis so that subsequent decisions can take this into account. In the face of recent extreme weather events, there has been an increasing demand for forward look projections from water resource and flood risk practitioners, decision makers and contingency planners. These assessments are required to give appropriate lead in time to allow risk mitigation measures to be implemented to minimise impact upon people, the environment and infrastructure. This presentation will outline the methodologies developed by the Environment Agency to produce and publish monthly routine forward look projections using both a scenario and climate ensemble approach. It will cover how information is disseminated, providing a good example of communicating science to decision makers and to the public. Examples of practical applications of these methodologies include: • Risk based planning and forecasting of water availability for inter basin water transfers into water stressed catchments. • Assessment of water resources prospects during droughts for people and the environment • The likelihood and medium term risk of high groundwater levels impacting upon people and infrastructure. There are also a number of future challenges

  18. Submarine Periscope Depth Course Selection Tactical Decision Aid

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-12-01

    Tactical Decision Aid, Simulations using PAGES Visual Basic Programming 64 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 18. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF 19...27 APPENDIX A. COMPOSITE OUTPUT DISPLAYS ..................................................................... 29 APPENDIX B. VISUAL BASIC SOURCE...41 APPENDIX D. VISUAL BASIC SOURCE CODE FOR SIMULATION ......................................... 43 APPENDIX E

  19. The Use of Graphs as Decision Aids in Relation to Information Overload and Managerial Decision Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Siu Y.

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of information overload focuses on a study of masters degree students at a Hong Kong university that investigated the effectiveness of graphs as decision aids to reduce adverse effects of information overload on decision quality. Results of a simulation of a business prediction task with a sample of business managers are presented.…

  20. Impact of an Abbreviated Cardiac Enzyme Protocol to Aid Rapid Discharge of Patients with Cocaine-associated Chest Pain in the Clinical Decision Unit

    PubMed Central

    Guirgis, Faheem W.; Gray-Eurom, Kelly; Mayfield, Teri L.; Imbt, David M.; Kalynych, Colleen J.; Kraemer, Dale F.; Godwin, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In 2007 there were 64,000 visits to the emergency department (ED) for possible myocardial infarction (MI) related to cocaine use. Prior studies have demonstrated that low- to intermediate-risk patients with cocaine-associated chest pain can be safely discharged after 9–12 hours of observation. The goal of this study was to determine the safety of an 8-hour protocol for ruling out MI in patients who presented with cocaine-associated chest pain. Methods We conducted a retrospective review of patients treated with an 8-hour cocaine chest pain protocol between May 1, 2011 and November 30, 2012 who were sent to the clinical decision unit (CDU) for observation. The protocol included serial cardiac biomarker testing with Troponin-T, CK-MB (including delta CK-MB), and total CK at 0, 2, 4, and 8 hours after presentation with cardiac monitoring for the observation period. Patients were followed up for adverse cardiac events or death within 30 days of discharge. Results There were 111 admissions to the CDU for cocaine chest pain during the study period. One patient had a delta CK-MB of 1.6 ng/ml, but had negative Troponin-T at all time points. No patient had a positive Troponin-T or CK-MB at 0, 2, 4 or 8 hours, and there were no MIs or deaths within 30 days of discharge. Most patients were discharged home (103) and there were 8 inpatient admissions from the CDU. Of the admitted patients, 2 had additional stress tests that were negative, 1 had additional cardiac biomarkers that were negative, and all 8 patients were discharged home. The estimated risk of missing MI using our protocol is, with 99% confidence, less than 5.1% and with 95% confidence, less than 3.6% (99% CI, 0–5.1%; 95% CI, 0–3.6%). Conclusion Application of an abbreviated cardiac enzyme protocol resulted in the safe and rapid discharge of patients presenting to the ED with cocaine-associated chest pain. PMID:24672608

  1. Decision aids for advance care planning: an overview of the state of the science.

    PubMed

    Butler, Mary; Ratner, Edward; McCreedy, Ellen; Shippee, Nathan; Kane, Robert L

    2014-09-16

    Advance care planning honors patients' goals and preferences for future care by creating a plan for when illness or injury impedes the ability to think or communicate about health decisions. Fewer than 50% of severely or terminally ill patients have an advance directive in their medical record, and physicians are accurate only about 65% of the time when predicting patient preferences for intensive care. Decision aids can support the advance care planning process by providing a structured approach to informing patients about care options and prompting them to document and communicate their preferences. This review, commissioned as a technical brief by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Effective Health Care Program, provides a broad overview of current use of and research related to decision aids for adult advance care planning. Using interviews of key informants and a search of the gray and published literature from January 1990 to May 2014, the authors found that many decision aids are widely available but are not assessed in the empirical literature. The 16 published studies testing decision aids as interventions for adult advance care planning found that most are proprietary or not publicly available. Some are constructed for the general population, whereas others address disease-specific conditions that have more predictable end-of-life scenarios and, therefore, more discrete choices. New decision aids should be designed that are responsive to diverse philosophical perspectives and flexible enough to change as patients gain experience with their personal illness courses. Future efforts should include further research, training of advance care planning facilitators, dissemination and access, and tapping potential opportunities in social media or other technologies.

  2. Aiding Lay Decision Making Using a Cognitive Competencies Approach

    PubMed Central

    Maule, A. J.; Maule, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Two prescriptive approaches have evolved to aid human decision making: just in time interventions that provide support as a decision is being made; and just in case interventions that educate people about future events that they may encounter so that they are better prepared to make an informed decision when these events occur. We review research on these two approaches developed in the context of supporting everyday decisions such as choosing an apartment, a financial product or a medical procedure. We argue that the lack of an underlying prescriptive theory has limited the development and evaluation of these interventions. We draw on recent descriptive research on the cognitive competencies that underpin human decision making to suggest new ways of interpreting how and why existing decision aids may be effective and suggest a different way of evaluating their effectiveness. We also briefly outline how our approach has the potential to develop new interventions to support everyday decision making and highlight the benefits of drawing on descriptive research when developing and evaluating interventions. PMID:26779052

  3. Biomedical informatics for computer-aided decision support systems: a survey.

    PubMed

    Belle, Ashwin; Kon, Mark A; Najarian, Kayvan

    2013-01-01

    The volumes of current patient data as well as their complexity make clinical decision making more challenging than ever for physicians and other care givers. This situation calls for the use of biomedical informatics methods to process data and form recommendations and/or predictions to assist such decision makers. The design, implementation, and use of biomedical informatics systems in the form of computer-aided decision support have become essential and widely used over the last two decades. This paper provides a brief review of such systems, their application protocols and methodologies, and the future challenges and directions they suggest.

  4. Biomedical Informatics for Computer-Aided Decision Support Systems: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    Belle, Ashwin; Kon, Mark A.; Najarian, Kayvan

    2013-01-01

    The volumes of current patient data as well as their complexity make clinical decision making more challenging than ever for physicians and other care givers. This situation calls for the use of biomedical informatics methods to process data and form recommendations and/or predictions to assist such decision makers. The design, implementation, and use of biomedical informatics systems in the form of computer-aided decision support have become essential and widely used over the last two decades. This paper provides a brief review of such systems, their application protocols and methodologies, and the future challenges and directions they suggest. PMID:23431259

  5. Preference for One or Two Hearing Aids among Adult Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Robyn M; Schwartz, Kathryn S.; Noe, Colleen M.; Alexander, Genevieve C.

    2010-01-01

    , clinical judgment, and patient preferences. The results of this research challenge practitioners to recognize that many patients who appear to be ideal candidates for bilateral aiding will actually prefer to wear only one hearing aid. Further, at this time there is not an accurate method that will predict which patients will prefer one hearing aid rather than two. Currently, the most effective approach open to practitioners would be to conduct a candid unbiased systematic field trial allowing each patient to compare unilateral and bilateral fittings in daily life. This might necessitate more fitting sessions and could perhaps add to the practitioner's burden. This downside should be weighed against the additional patient satisfaction that can be anticipated as a result of transparency in the fitting protocol, collaboration with the patient in the treatment decisions, and the knowledge of selecting the most cost-effective patient-centered solution. PMID:20890203

  6. Proposal for Development of EBM-CDSS (Evidence-Based Clinical Decision Support System) to Aid Prognostication in Terminally Ill Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    Applied Survival Analysis: Regression Modeling of Time to Event Data,” John Wiley & Sons, Chichester, 1999. [4] W. A. Knaus, F. E. Harrell Jr, J. Lynn...Review 2003, 93:1449-1475. 39. Krantz DH, Kunreuther HC: Goals and plans in decision making Judgement and decision making 2007, 2(3):137-168. 40. Rawls

  7. Refinement of Probability of Survival Decision Aid (PSDA)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    Approved for public release; distribution unlimited PSDA predicts the impact of hypothermia and dehydration on survival time during exposure for a wide...thus will have a minimal impact on the heat loss from the body to the environment. survival, model, hypothermia , dehydration, immersion...Decision Aid (PSDA v1.0). PSDA predicts the impact of hypothermia and dehydration on survival time during exposure for a wide range of conditions in

  8. The Ship Response Tactical Decision Aid. Phase 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    was conducted in April 1988 to validate the Phase I Ship Response Tactical Decision Aid. The ship, USS CONYNGHAM ( DDG -17), was equipped with the SPS...the relative direction of the seas and ship. Comparisons between measured and predicted ship motions made aboard USS CONYN- GHAM are presented in Figs...environment. 1 I I I I 18! I I ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The kind cooperation of the USS CONYNGHAM, under the capable leadership of Commander David Rose, allowed

  9. In search of tools to aid logical thinking and communicating about medical decision making.

    PubMed

    Hunink, M G

    2001-01-01

    To have real-time impact on medical decision making, decision analysts need a wide variety of tools to aid logical thinking and communication. Decision models provide a formal framework to integrate evidence and values, but they are commonly perceived as complex and difficult to understand by those unfamiliar with the methods, especially in the context of clinical decision making. The theory of constraints, introduced by Eliyahu Goldratt in the business world, provides a set of tools for logical thinking and communication that could potentially be useful in medical decision making. The author used the concept of a conflict resolution diagram to analyze the decision to perform carotid endarterectomy prior to coronary artery bypass grafting in a patient with both symptomatic coronary and asymptomatic carotid artery disease. The method enabled clinicians to visualize and analyze the issues, identify and discuss the underlying assumptions, search for the best available evidence, and use the evidence to make a well-founded decision. The method also facilitated communication among those involved in the care of the patient. Techniques from fields other than decision analysis can potentially expand the repertoire of tools available to support medical decision making and to facilitate communication in decision consults.

  10. Decision Making in Prostate Cancer Screening Using Decision Aids vs Usual Care

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Kathryn L.; Williams, Randi M.; Davis, Kimberly; Luta, George; Penek, Sofiya; Barry, Samantha; Kelly, Scott; Tomko, Catherine; Schwartz, Marc; Krist, Alexander H.; Woolf, Steven H.; Fishman, Mary B.; Cole, Carmella; Miller, Edward

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The conflicting recommendations for prostate cancer (PCa) screening and the mixed messages communicated to the public about screening effectiveness make it critical to assist men in making informed decisions. OBJECTIVE To assess the effectiveness of 2 decision aids in helping men make informed PCa screening decisions. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A racially diverse group of male outpatients aged 45 to 70 years from 3 sites were interviewed by telephone at baseline, 1 month, and 13 months, from 2007 through 2011. We conducted intention-to-treat univariate analyses and multivariable linear and logistic regression analyses, adjusting for baseline outcome measures. INTERVENTION Random assignment to print-based decision aid (n = 628), web-based interactive decision aid (n = 625), or usual care (UC) (n = 626). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Prostate cancer knowledge, decisional conflict, decisional satisfaction, and whether participants underwent PCa screening. RESULTS Of 4794 eligible men approached, 1893 were randomized. At each follow-up assessment, univariate and multivariable analyses indicated that both decision aids resulted in significantly improved PCa knowledge and reduced decisional conflict compared with UC (all P <.001). At 1 month, the standardized mean difference (Cohen’s d) in knowledge for the web group vs UC was 0.74, and in the print group vs UC, 0.73. Decisional conflict was significantly lower for web vs UC (d = 0.33) and print vs UC (d = 0.36). At 13 months, these differences were smaller but remained significant. At 1 month, high satisfaction was reported by significantly more print (60.4%) than web participants (52.2%; P = .009) and significantly more web (P = .001) and print (P = .03) than UC participants (45.5%). At 13 months, differences in the proportion reporting high satisfaction among print (55.7%) compared with UC (49.8%; P = .06) and web participants (50.4%; P = .10) were not significant. Screening rates at 13 months did not

  11. Regional Climate Change and Development of Public Health Decision Aids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegedus, A. M.; Darmenova, K.; Grant, F.; Kiley, H.; Higgins, G. J.; Apling, D.

    2011-12-01

    According to the World Heath Organization (WHO) climate change is a significant and emerging threat to public health, and changes the way we must look at protecting vulnerable populations. Worldwide, the occurrence of some diseases and other threats to human health depend predominantly on local climate patterns. Rising average temperatures, in combination with changing rainfall patterns and humidity levels, alter the lifecycle and regional distribution of certain disease-carrying vectors, such as mosquitoes, ticks and rodents. In addition, higher surface temperatures will bring heat waves and heat stress to urban regions worldwide and will likely increase heat-related health risks. A growing body of scientific evidence also suggests an increase in extreme weather events such as floods, droughts and hurricanes that can be destructive to human health and well-being. Therefore, climate adaptation and health decision aids are urgently needed by city planners and health officials to determine high risk areas, evaluate vulnerable populations and develop public health infrastructure and surveillance systems. To address current deficiencies in local planning and decision making with respect to regional climate change and its effect on human health, our research is focused on performing a dynamical downscaling with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to develop decision aids that translate the regional climate data into actionable information for users. WRF model is initialized with the Max Planck Institute European Center/Hamburg Model version 5 (ECHAM5) General Circulation Model simulations forced with the Special Report on Emissions (SRES) A1B emissions scenario. Our methodology involves development of climatological indices of extreme weather, quantifying the risk of occurrence of water/rodent/vector-borne diseases as well as developing various heat stress related decision aids. Our results indicate that the downscale simulations provide the necessary

  12. Supporting Shared Decision-making for Children's Complex Behavioral Problems: Development and User Testing of an Option Grid™ Decision Aid.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Erin R; Boucher, Elizabeth A; Daviss, William B; Elwyn, Glyn

    2017-04-11

    There is a lack of research to guide collaborative treatment decision-making for children who have complex behavioral problems, despite the extensive use of mental health services in this population. We developed and pilot-tested a one-page Option Grid™ patient decision aid to facilitate shared decision-making for these situations. An editorial team of parents, child psychiatrists, researchers, and other stakeholders developed the scope and structure of the decision aid. Researchers included information about a carefully chosen number of psychosocial and pharmacological treatment options, using descriptions based on the best available evidence. Using semi-structured qualitative interviews (n = 18), we conducted user testing with four parents and four clinical prescribers and field testing with four parents, four clinical prescribers, and two clinic administrators. The researchers coded and synthesized the interview responses using mixed inductive and deductive methods. Parents, clinicians, and administrators felt the Option Grid had significant value, although they reported that additional training and other support would be required in order to successfully implement the Option Grid and achieve shared decision-making in clinical practice.

  13. Application of expert systems in project management decision aiding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Regina; Shaffer, Steven; Stokes, James; Goldstein, David

    1987-01-01

    The feasibility of developing an expert systems-based project management decision aid to enhance the performance of NASA project managers was assessed. The research effort included extensive literature reviews in the areas of project management, project management decision aiding, expert systems technology, and human-computer interface engineering. Literature reviews were augmented by focused interviews with NASA managers. Time estimation for project scheduling was identified as the target activity for decision augmentation, and a design was developed for an Integrated NASA System for Intelligent Time Estimation (INSITE). The proposed INSITE design was judged feasible with a low level of risk. A partial proof-of-concept experiment was performed and was successful. Specific conclusions drawn from the research and analyses are included. The INSITE concept is potentially applicable in any management sphere, commercial or government, where time estimation is required for project scheduling. As project scheduling is a nearly universal management activity, the range of possibilities is considerable. The INSITE concept also holds potential for enhancing other management tasks, especially in areas such as cost estimation, where estimation-by-analogy is already a proven method.

  14. Capturing Treatment Decision Making Among Patients With Solid Tumors and Their Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Randy A.; Steeves, Richard; Ropka, Mary E.; Hollen, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To examine the feasibility and acceptability of using a decision aid with an interactive decision-making process in patients with solid tumors and their caregivers during cancer-related treatment. Research Approach A phenomenologic approach was used to analyze qualitative data, with a focus on the meaning of participants’ lived experiences. Interviews were conducted by telephone or in person. Setting Outpatient clinics at two regional cancer centers. Participants 160 total individuals; 80 patients with newly diagnosed breast (n = 22), advanced-stage prostate (n = 19), or advanced-stage lung (n = 39) cancer, and their caregivers (n = 80). Methodologic Approach Twenty-seven of the 80 pairs engaged in audio recorded interviews that were conducted using a semistructured interview guide. Continuous text immersion revealed themes. Validity of qualitative analysis was achieved by member checking. Findings Significant findings included three themes: (a) the decision aid helped patients and caregivers understand treatment decisions better, (b) the decision aid helped patients and caregivers to be more involved in treatment decisions, and (c) frequent contact with the study nurse was valuable. Conclusions Decision making was more complex than participants expected. The decision aid helped patients and caregivers make satisfying treatment decisions and become integral in a shared treatment decision-making process. Interpretation Decision aids can help patients and their caregivers make difficult treatment decisions affecting quantity and quality of life during cancer treatment. The findings provide valuable information for healthcare providers helping patients and their caregivers make treatment decisions through a shared, informed, decision-making process. Knowledge Translation Decision aids can be helpful with treatment choices. Caregivers’ understanding about treatment is just as important in the decision-making process as the patients

  15. DASACT: A decision aiding software for axiomatic consensus theory.

    PubMed

    Domenach, Florent; Tayari, Ali

    2016-01-01

    There have been various attempts, solutions, and approaches towards constructing an appropriate consensus tree based on a given set of phylogenetic trees. However, for practitioners, it is not always clear, for a given data set, which of these would create the most relevant consensus tree. In this paper, we introduce an open-source software called DASACT (Decision Aiding Software for Axiomatic Consensus Theory) created to assist practitioners on choosing the most appropriate consensus function. It is based on an exhaustive evaluation of axiomatic properties and consensus functions, which define the knowledge space as a concept lattice. Using a selection of axiomatic properties provided by the user, it is able to aid the user in choosing the most suitable function. DASACT is freely available at http://www.cs.unic.ac.cy/florent/software.htm.

  16. InformedTogether: Usability Evaluation of a Web-Based Decision Aid to Facilitate Shared Advance Care Planning for Severe Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Uhler, Lauren M; Pérez Figueroa, Rafael E; Dickson, Mark; McCullagh, Lauren; Kushniruk, Andre; Monkman, Helen; Witteman, Holly O

    2015-01-01

    Background Advance care planning may help patients receive treatments that better align with their goals for care. We developed a Web-based decision aid called InformedTogether to facilitate shared advance care planning between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and their doctors. Objective Our objective was to assess the usability of the InformedTogether decision aid, including whether users could interact with the decision aid to engage in tasks required for shared decision making, whether users found the decision aid acceptable, and implications for redesign. Methods We conducted an observational study with 15 patients and 8 doctors at two ethnically and socioeconomically diverse outpatient clinics. Data included quantitative and qualitative observations of patients and doctors using the decision aid on tablet or laptop computers and data from semistructured interviews. Patients were shown the decision aid by a researcher acting as the doctor. Pulmonary doctors were observed using the decision aid independently and asked to think aloud (ie, verbalize their thoughts). A thematic analysis was implemented to explore key issues related to decision aid usability. Results Although patients and doctors found InformedTogether acceptable and would recommend that doctors use the decision aid with COPD patients, many patients had difficulty understanding the icon arrays that were used to communicate estimated prognoses and could not articulate the definitions of the two treatment choices—Full Code and Do Not Resuscitate (DNR). Minor usability problems regarding content, links, layout, and consistency were also identified and corresponding recommendations were outlined. In particular, participants suggested including more information about potential changes in quality of life resulting from the alternative advance directives. Some doctor participants thought the decision aid was too long and some thought it may cause nervousness among patients due to

  17. Thailand's fear of AIDS patients.

    PubMed

    Sivaraman, S

    1995-07-01

    Because of a terrorist incident against Bangkok's Relief Center for HIV/AIDS Carriers, it is feared that a rising intolerance is occurring in Thailand. Such fears are damaging efforts to help those with HIV/AIDS. Misconceptions about the nature of HIV/AIDS continue to dominate Thai society. The Thai government is particularly worried that an overemphasis on HIV/AIDS will hurt tourism. According to the Population and Community Development Association, Thai people are infected with HIV at the rate of 500 per day and treatment costs may exceed $170 million a year by the year 2000. Unfortunately, the lack of nongovernmental institutions (other than Buddhist monasteries) and the lack of positive response from other Thai social institutions is driving relatives and friends to take care of the afflicted, and the terrorist attack shows that many Thai people are still unprepared for the challenge.

  18. Photoelectric log data aids deep-well completion decisions

    SciTech Connect

    Maher, T.M.; Boykin, W.; Heysse, D.R.

    1997-09-01

    In several deep, overpressured wells in Oklahoma and Louisiana, Apache Corp. has used photoelectric measurements provided by wireline density tools to aid in completion decisions. The information helped identify permeable zones in several tight formations; these zones were subsequently perforated, hydraulically fractured and successfully produced. Because formation conditions and small borehole sizes precluded running traditional micrologs as permeability indicators, the photoelectric information proved to be particularly valuable on these wells. The operating principles of the tool, supplied by Halliburton Energy Services, are presented here. And example applications in Caddo County, Oklahoma, and Jackson Parish, Louisiana, deep wells are presented.

  19. FIESTA: An operational decision aid for space network fault isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, Dawn; Quillin, Bob; Matteson, Nadine; Wilkinson, Bill; Miksell, Steve

    1987-01-01

    The Fault Tolerance Expert System for Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) Applications (FIESTA) is a fault detection and fault diagnosis expert system being developed as a decision aid to support operations in the Network Control Center (NCC) for NASA's Space Network. The operational objectives which influenced FIESTA development are presented and an overview of the architecture used to achieve these goals are provided. The approach to the knowledge engineering effort and the methodology employed are also presented and illustrated with examples drawn from the FIESTA domain.

  20. Decision Aids for Airborne Intercept Operations in Advanced Aircrafts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madni, A.; Freedy, A.

    1981-01-01

    A tactical decision aid (TDA) for the F-14 aircrew, i.e., the naval flight officer and pilot, in conducting a multitarget attack during the performance of a Combat Air Patrol (CAP) role is presented. The TDA employs hierarchical multiattribute utility models for characterizing mission objectives in operationally measurable terms, rule based AI-models for tactical posture selection, and fast time simulation for maneuver consequence prediction. The TDA makes aspect maneuver recommendations, selects and displays the optimum mission posture, evaluates attackable and potentially attackable subsets, and recommends the 'best' attackable subset along with the required course perturbation.

  1. Development of a Decision Aid for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Involving Intensive Care Unit Patients' and Health Professionals' Participation Using User-Centered Design and a Wiki Platform for Rapid Prototyping: A Research Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Heyland, Daren Keith; Ebell, Mark H; Dupuis, Audrey; Lavoie-Bérard, Carole-Anne; Légaré, France; Archambault, Patrick Michel

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an intervention used in cases of cardiac arrest to revive patients whose heart has stopped. Because cardiac arrest can have potentially devastating outcomes such as severe neurological deficits even if CPR is performed, patients must be involved in determining in advance if they want CPR in the case of an unexpected arrest. Shared decision making (SDM) facilitates discussions about goals of care regarding CPR in intensive care units (ICUs). Patient decision aids (DAs) are proven to support the implementation of SDM. Many patient DAs about CPR exist, but they are not universally implemented in ICUs in part due to lack of context and cultural adaptation. Adaptation to local context is an important phase of implementing any type of knowledge tool such as patient DAs. User-centered design supported by a wiki platform to perform rapid prototyping has previously been successful in creating knowledge tools adapted to the needs of patients and health professionals (eg, asthma action plans). This project aims to explore how user-centered design and a wiki platform can support the adaptation of an existing DA for CPR to the local context. Objective The primary objective is to use an existing DA about CPR to create a wiki-based DA that is adapted to the context of a single ICU and tailorable to individual patient’s risk factors while employing user-centered design. The secondary objective is to document the use of a wiki platform for the adaptation of patient DAs. Methods This study will be conducted in a mixed surgical and medical ICU at Hôtel-Dieu de Lévis, Quebec, Canada. We plan to involve all 5 intensivists and recruit at least 20 alert and oriented patients admitted to the ICU and their family members if available. In the first phase of this study, we will observe 3 weeks of daily interactions between patients, families, intensivists, and other allied health professionals. We will specifically observe 5 dyads of

  2. Proposal for Development of EBM-CDSS (Evidence-based Clinical Decision Support System) to Aid Prognostication in Terminally Ill Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    therapy, pain medication, nutritional and psychological support, thoracocentesis and/or tube thorascopy.”44 Three studies described supportive care... gestalt survival expectation is presented without loss of contradictory information. This increases the transparency and traceability of the...and/ or psychological damages to the patient. Specifically, a patient may suffer harms due to a treatment strategy (e. g. adverse effects) or

  3. A Conceptual Design of a Departure Planner Decision Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anagnostakis, Ioannis; Idris, Husni R.; Clark, John-Paul; Feron, Eric; Hansman, R. John; Odoni, Amedeo R.; Hall, William D.

    2000-01-01

    Terminal area Air Traffic Management handles both arriving and departing traffic. To date, research work on terminal area operations has focused primarily on the arrival flow and typically departures are taken into account only in an approximate manner. However, arrivals and departures are highly coupled processes especially in the terminal airspace, with complex interactions and sharing of the same airport resources between arrivals and departures taking place in practically every important terminal area. Therefore, the addition of automation aids for departures, possibly in co-operation with existing arrival flow automation systems, could have a profound contribution in enhancing the overall efficiency of airport operations. This paper presents the conceptual system architecture for such an automation aid, the Departure Planner (DP). This architecture can be used as a core in the development of decision-aiding systems to assist air traffic controllers in improving the performance of departure operations and optimize runway time allocation among different operations at major congested airports. The design of such systems is expected to increase the overall efficiency of terminal area operations and yield benefits for all stakeholders involved in Air Traffic Management (ATM) operations, users as well as service providers.

  4. Decision aids for multiple-decision disease management as affected by weather input errors.

    PubMed

    Pfender, W F; Gent, D H; Mahaffee, W F; Coop, L B; Fox, A D

    2011-06-01

    Many disease management decision support systems (DSSs) rely, exclusively or in part, on weather inputs to calculate an indicator for disease hazard. Error in the weather inputs, typically due to forecasting, interpolation, or estimation from off-site sources, may affect model calculations and management decision recommendations. The extent to which errors in weather inputs affect the quality of the final management outcome depends on a number of aspects of the disease management context, including whether management consists of a single dichotomous decision, or of a multi-decision process extending over the cropping season(s). Decision aids for multi-decision disease management typically are based on simple or complex algorithms of weather data which may be accumulated over several days or weeks. It is difficult to quantify accuracy of multi-decision DSSs due to temporally overlapping disease events, existence of more than one solution to optimizing the outcome, opportunities to take later recourse to modify earlier decisions, and the ongoing, complex decision process in which the DSS is only one component. One approach to assessing importance of weather input errors is to conduct an error analysis in which the DSS outcome from high-quality weather data is compared with that from weather data with various levels of bias and/or variance from the original data. We illustrate this analytical approach for two types of DSS, an infection risk index for hop powdery mildew and a simulation model for grass stem rust. Further exploration of analysis methods is needed to address problems associated with assessing uncertainty in multi-decision DSSs.

  5. Adapting My Weather Impacts Decision Aid (MyWIDA) to Additional Web Application Server Technologies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    ARL-TN-0688 ● AUG 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Adapting My Weather Impacts Decision Aid (MyWIDA) to Additional Web...Laboratory Adapting My Weather Impacts Decision Aid (MyWIDA) to Additional Web Application Server Technologies by Jacob C Randall and Jeffrey O...COVERED (From - To) May–Aug 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Adapting My Weather Impacts Decision Aid (MyWIDA) to Additional Web Application Server

  6. Computerized Aid Improves Safety Decision Process for Survivors of Intimate Partner Violence

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Nancy; Eden, Karen B.; Bloom, Tina; Perrin, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    A computerized safety decision aid was developed and tested with Spanish or English-speaking abused women in shelters or domestic violence (DV) support groups (n = 90). The decision aid provides feedback about risk for lethal violence, options for safety, assistance with setting priorities for safety, and a safety plan personalized to the user. Women reported that the decision aid was useful and provided much-needed privacy for making safety decisions. The majority (69%) reported severe to extreme danger in their relationship as scored by Danger Assessment (DA); only 60% reported having made a safety plan. After using the safety decision aid, the women felt more supported in their decision (p = .012) and had less total decisional conflict (p = .014). The study demonstrated that a computerized safety decision aid improved the safety planning process, as demonstrated by reduced decisional conflict after only one use in a sample of abused women. PMID:20040709

  7. Medical communication and technology: a video-based process study of the use of decision aids in primary care consultations

    PubMed Central

    Kaner, Eileen; Heaven, Ben; Rapley, Tim; Murtagh, Madeleine; Graham, Ruth; Thomson, Richard; May, Carl

    2007-01-01

    Background Much of the research on decision-making in health care has focused on consultation outcomes. Less is known about the process by which clinicians and patients come to a treatment decision. This study aimed to quantitatively describe the behaviour shown by doctors and patients during primary care consultations when three types of decision aids were used to promote treatment decision-making in a randomised controlled trial. Methods A video-based study set in an efficacy trial which compared the use of paper-based guidelines (control) with two forms of computer-based decision aids (implicit and explicit versions of DARTS II). Treatment decision concerned warfarin anti-coagulation to reduce the risk of stroke in older patients with atrial fibrillation. Twenty nine consultations were video-recorded. A ten-minute 'slice' of the consultation was sampled for detailed content analysis using existing interaction analysis protocols for verbal behaviour and ethological techniques for non-verbal behaviour. Results Median consultation times (quartiles) differed significantly depending on the technology used. Paper-based guidelines took 21 (19–26) minutes to work through compared to 31 (16–41) minutes for the implicit tool; and 44 (39–55) minutes for the explicit tool. In the ten minutes immediately preceding the decision point, GPs dominated the conversation, accounting for 64% (58–66%) of all utterances and this trend was similar across all three arms of the trial. Information-giving was the most frequent activity for both GPs and patients, although GPs did this at twice the rate compared to patients and at higher rates in consultations involving computerised decision aids. GPs' language was highly technically focused and just 7% of their conversation was socio-emotional in content; this was half the socio-emotional content shown by patients (15%). However, frequent head nodding and a close mirroring in the direction of eye-gaze suggested that both parties

  8. Review of Multi-Criteria Decision Aid for Integrated Sustainability Assessment of Urban Water Systems - MCEARD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Integrated sustainability assessment is part of a new paradigm for urban water decision making. Multi-criteria decision aid (MCDA) is an integrative framework used in urban water sustainability assessment, which has a particular focus on utilising stakeholder participation. Here ...

  9. [Vision aids for multiple sclerosis patients].

    PubMed

    Frieling, E; Kornhuber, H H; Nissl, K

    1986-02-07

    Optical or electronic vision aids enabled 35 of 39 visually handicapped multiple sclerosis patients to read. Six patients had an uncorrected ametropia. 15 could read again with the help of magnifying optical aids and 11 with the help of an electronic television system. An electronic television reader was useful when visual acuities were below 0.1 and in patients with oscillating nystagmus or tremor capitis. Contact lenses helped 3 patients who had a neurogenous visual defect and oscillating nystagmus. Although acquired oscillating nystagmus disappears on eyelid closure and only reappears again on fixation, its amplitude, when unable to read, is greater. On overcoming the neurogenous visual defect with vision aids it becomes smaller.

  10. Herpetic whitlow in an AIDS patient.

    PubMed

    García-Plata, M D; Moreno-Giménez, J C; Vélez García, A; Valverde Blanco, F; Fernandez Roldán, J C

    1999-05-01

    This case confirms that cutaneous herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections in many AIDS patients is important not only for the difficulty in diagnosis of herpetic lesions, but also for the possibility that co-infection by HSV and HIV can adversely affect prognosis in these patients.

  11. A Decision Aid for Women Considering Neoadjuvant Systemic Therapy for Operable Invasive Breast Cancer: Development and Protocol of a Phase II Evaluation Study (ANZ1301 DOMINO)

    PubMed Central

    Butow, Phyllis; Hutchings, Elizabeth; Douglas, Charles; Coll, Joseph R; Boyle, Frances M

    2016-01-01

    Background Neoadjuvant systemic therapy is offered to selected women with large and/or highly proliferative operable breast cancers. This option adds further complexity to an already complex breast cancer treatment decision tree. Patient decision aids are an established method of increasing patient involvement and knowledge while decreasing decisional conflict. There is currently no decision aid available for women considering neoadjuvant systemic therapy. Objective We aimed to develop a decision aid for women diagnosed with operable breast cancer and considered suitable for neoadjuvant systemic therapy, and the protocol for a multicenter pre-post study evaluating the acceptability and feasibility of the decision aid. Methods The decision aid was developed through literature review, expert advisory panel, adherence to the International Patient Decision Aid Standards, and iterative review. The protocol for evaluation of the decision aid consists of the following: eligible women will undertake a series of questionnaires prior to and after using the decision aid. The primary endpoint is decision aid acceptability to patients and investigators and the feasibility of use. Secondary endpoints include change in decisional conflict, participant knowledge, and information involvement preference. Feasibility is defined as the proportion of eligible participants who use the decision aid to help inform their treatment decision. Results This study has recruited 29 out of a planned 50 participants at four Australian sites. A 12-month recruitment period is expected with a further 12-months follow-up. Conclusions The decision aid has the potential to allow patients with operable breast cancer, who have been offered neoadjuvant systemic therapy, decreased decisional conflict, and greater involvement in the decision. If this study finds that an online decision aid is feasible and acceptable, it will be made widely available for routine clinical practice. Trial Registration

  12. Using old technology to implement modern computer-aided decision support for primary diabetes care.

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, D. L.; Haynes, R. B.; Morgan, D.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Implementation rates of interventions known to be beneficial for people with diabetes mellitus are often suboptimal. Computer-aided decision support systems (CDSSs) can improve these rates. The complexity of establishing a fully integrated electronic medical record that provides decision support, however, often prevents their use. OBJECTIVE: To develop a CDSS for diabetes care that can be easily introduced into primary care settings and diabetes clinics. THE SYSTEM: The CDSS uses fax-machine-based optical character recognition software for acquiring patient information. Simple, 1-page paper forms, completed by patients or health practitioners, are faxed to a central location. The information is interpreted and recorded in a database. This initiates a routine that matches the information against a knowledge base so that patient-specific recommendations can be generated. These are formatted and faxed back within 4-5 minutes. IMPLEMENTATION: The system is being introduced into 2 diabetes clinics. We are collecting information on frequency of use of the system, as well as satisfaction with the information provided. CONCLUSION: Computer-aided decision support can be provided in any setting with a fax machine, without the need for integrated electronic medical records or computerized data-collection devices. PMID:11825194

  13. Computerized Aid Improves Safety Decision Process for Survivors of Intimate Partner Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Nancy; Eden, Karen B.; Bloom, Tina; Perrin, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    A computerized safety decision aid was developed and tested with Spanish or English-speaking abused women in shelters or domestic violence (DV) support groups (n = 90). The decision aid provides feedback about risk for lethal violence, options for safety, assistance with setting priorities for safety, and a safety plan personalized to the user.…

  14. Translating comparative effectiveness of depression medications into practice by comparing the depression medication choice decision aid to usual care: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Comparative effectiveness research (CER) documents important differences in antidepressants in terms of efficacy, safety, cost, and burden to the patient. Decision aids can adapt this evidence to help patients participate in making informed choices. In turn, antidepressant therapy will more likely reflect patients’ values and context, leading to improved adherence and mood outcomes. Methods/Design The objective of this study is to develop the Depression Medication Choice decision aid for use during primary care encounters, and to test its efficacy by conducting a clustered practical randomized trial comparing the decision aid to usual depression care in primary care practices. We will use a novel practice-based, patient-centered approach based on participatory action research that involves a multidisciplinary team of designers, investigators, clinicians, patient representatives, and other stakeholders for the development of the decision aid. We will then conduct a clustered practical randomized trial enrolling clinicians and their patients (n = 300) with moderate to severe depression from rural, suburban and inner city primary care practices (n = 10). The intervention will consist of the use of the depression medication choice decision aid during the clinical encounter. This trial will generate preliminary evidence of the relative impact of the decision aid on patient involvement in decision making, decision making quality, patient knowledge, and 6-month measures of medication adherence and mental health compared to usual depression care. Discussion Upon completion of the proposed research, we will have developed and evaluated the efficacy of the decision aid depression medication choice as a novel translational tool for CER in depression treatment, engaged patients with depression in their care, and refined the process by which we conduct practice-based trials with limited research footprint. Trial registration Clinical Trials.gov: NCT01502891 PMID

  15. Otologic surgery in patients with HIV-1 and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Kohan, D; Giacchi, R J

    1999-10-01

    Otologic disease in patients infected with HIV occurs frequently and usually represents rhinologic disease and associated eustachian tube dysfunction rather than manifestations of HIV infection. As in all patients, the decision to operate on an HIV-infected individual who would benefit from major otologic surgery is a balance between the risks of the procedure and the possible benefits to the patient. Many concerns regarding wound infection and healing have been raised. The objective of this study is to evaluate the outcome of otologic procedures in this population. The charts of 9 men and 4 women were reviewed. Seven patients (54%) met the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria for AIDS. Patients with chronic otitis media (46%) underwent tympanomastoidectomies, and the cases of acute mastoiditis (31%) were managed with simple mastoidectomies. Other procedures included repair of cerebrospinal fluid leak (15%) and stapedectomy (8%). Two patients had early complications and died during their hospitalizations. Three patients had prolonged hospital courses requiring long-term antibiotics. These 5 patients underwent urgent procedures and were severely immunocompromised. Of the remaining 8 patients only 2 had AIDS, and all had an uncomplicated postoperative course. Six of these patients were followed up for more than 1 year, and only 2 developed subsequent otologic disease.

  16. Psychotherapy with AIDS Patients: Countertransference Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilk, Carole A.

    This paper provides a personal account of the process of psychotherapy for Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) patients, as seen from both the client's and the psychotherapist's perspective, with a focus on countertransference issues found in the early phases of treatment. Based on case material, the discussion explores themes presented by…

  17. Diverter Decision Aiding for In-Flight Diversions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudolph, Frederick M.; Homoki, David A.; Sexton, George A.

    1990-01-01

    It was determined that artificial intelligence technology can provide pilots with the help they need in making the complex decisions concerning en route changes in a flight plan. A diverter system should have the capability to take all of the available information and produce a recommendation to the pilot. Phase three illustrated that using Joshua to develop rules for an expert system and a Statice database provided additional flexibility by permitting the development of dynamic weighting of diversion relevant parameters. This increases the fidelity of the AI functions cited as useful in aiding the pilot to perform situational assessment, navigation rerouting, flight planning/replanning, and maneuver execution. Additionally, a prototype pilot-vehicle interface (PVI) was designed providing for the integration of both text and graphical based information. Advanced technologies were applied to PVI design, resulting in a hierarchical menu based architecture to increase the efficiency of information transfer while reducing expected workload. Additional efficiency was gained by integrating spatial and text displays into an integrated user interface.

  18. Perceptions of Prostate Cancer Screening Controversy and Informed Decision Making: Implications for Development of a Targeted Decision Aid for Unaffected Male First-Degree Relatives

    PubMed Central

    Gwede, Clement K.; Davis, Stacy N.; Wilson, Shaenelle; Patel, Mitul; Vadaparampil, Susan T.; Meade, Cathy D.; Rivers, Brian M.; Yu, Daohai; Torres-Roca, Javier; Heysek, Randy; Spiess, Philippe E.; Pow-Sang, Julio; Jacobsen, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Purpose First-degree relatives (FDRs) of prostate cancer (PC) patients should consider multiple concurrent personal risk factors when engaging in informed decision making (IDM) about PC screening. This study assessed perceptions of IDM recommendations and risk-appropriate strategies for IDM among FDRs of varied race/ethnicity. Design A cross-sectional, qualitative Setting Study setting was a cancer center in southwest Florida. Participants The study comprised 44 participants (24 PC patients and 20 unaffected FDRs). Method Focus groups and individual interviews were conducted and analyzed using content analysis and constant comparison methods. Results Patients and FDRs found the PC screening debate and IDM recommendations to be complex and counterintuitive. They overwhelmingly believed screening saves lives and does not have associated harms. There was a strongly expressed need to improve communication between patients and FDRs. A single decision aid that addresses the needs of all FDRs, rather than separating by race/ethnicity, was recommended as sufficient by study participants. These perspectives guided the development of an innovative decision aid that deconstructs the screening controversy and IDM processes into simpler concepts and provides step-by-step strategies for FDRs to engage in IDM. Conclusion Implementing IDM among FDRs is challenging because the IDM paradigm departs from historical messages promoting routine screening. These contradictions should be recognized and addressed for men to participate effectively in IDM. A randomized pilot study evaluating outcomes of the resulting decision aid is underway. PMID:24968183

  19. Development and application of culturally appropriate decision aids for smoking cessation in Korea: a pragmatic clustered randomization crossover trial

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Eun; Shin, Dong Wook; Suh, Beomseok; Chun, Sohyun; Nam, You-Seon; Cho, Belong

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In Asian countries, reluctance to seek pharmacological intervention is a major barrier for smoking cessation. Culturally appropriate decision aids are expected to help people in the decision making for the use of smoking cessation medication. Objective The aim of this study was to develop a culturally tailored decision aid for smoking cessation and evaluate its effect on the use of smoking cessation medication. Patients and methods A 7-minute video on smoking cessation information and options was developed. Physicians were randomized into intervention and control groups. The decision aid was provided to patients in the intervention group, and they watched it, while those in the control group were provided usual medical care for smoking cessation. The primary outcome was the proportion of smokers who were prescribed smoking cessation medication within 1 month after consultation. The secondary outcomes were abstinence rate and use of smoking cessation medication within 6 months. A logistic regression analysis was used to assess the effect of the decision aid on the outcomes. Results In total, 414 current smokers (intervention group: 195; control group: 219) were enrolled. The mean age of the participants was 48.2 years, and 381 subjects (92%) were males. In total, 11.8% of the participants in the intervention group and 10.5% in the control group were prescribed smoking cessation medications within 1 month. The odds ratio was 1.02 (95% CI: 0.40–2.63) after adjustment for baseline characteristics. Within 6 months, 17.4% of the participants in the intervention group and 15% in the control group were prescribed medication (adjusted odds ratio 1.12, 95% CI: 0.59–2.13). Conclusion The culturally tailored smoking cessation decision aid developed in this study did not show a significant impact on the decision to use smoking cessation medication. Further research to develop more effective and more interactive interventions is expected. PMID:27703338

  20. Disseminated adiaspiromycosis in a patient with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Echavarria, E; Cano, E L; Restrepo, A

    1993-01-01

    A case of disseminated adiaspiromycosis in an AIDS patient is described. The most notable characteristic of the infection was the extensive osteomyelitis exhibited by the patient. Positive cultures for Chrysosporium parvum var. parvum were obtained from pus taken from a lesion of the wrist during surgery as well as from sputum samples and a bone marrow aspirate. Treatment with amphotericin B controlled the fungal infection.

  1. Development and pilot testing of a decision aid for drivers with dementia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background An increasing number of older adults drive automobiles. Given that the prevalence of dementia is rising, it is necessary to address the issue of driving retirement. The purpose of this study is to evaluate how a self-administered decision aid contributed to decision making about driving retirement by individuals living with dementia. The primary outcome measure in this study was decisional conflict. Knowledge, decision, satisfaction with decision, booklet use and booklet acceptability were the secondary outcome measures. Methods A mixed methods approach was adopted. Drivers with dementia were recruited from an Aged Care clinic and a Primary Care center in NSW, Australia. Telephone surveys were conducted before and after participants read the decision aid. Results Twelve participants were recruited (mean age 75, SD 6.7). The primary outcome measure, decisional conflict, improved following use of the decision aid. Most participants felt that the decision aid: (i) was balanced; (ii) presented information well; and (iii) helped them decide about driving. In addition, mean knowledge scores improved after booklet use. Conclusions This decision aid shows promise as an acceptable, useful and low-cost tool for drivers with dementia. A self-administered decision aid can be used to assist individuals with dementia decide about driving retirement. A randomized controlled trial is underway to evaluate the effectiveness of the tool. PMID:24642051

  2. Childbearing Decision Making: A Qualitative Study of Women Living with HIV/AIDS in Southwest Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Sofolahan, Y. A.; Airhihenbuwa, C. O.

    2012-01-01

    Using the PEN-3 model, the purpose of this qualitative study was to understand the factors responsible for the childbearing decisions of women living with HIV/AIDS (WLHA) in Lagos, Nigeria. Sixty WLHA who sought care at a teaching hospital in Lagos were recruited to participate in in-depth interviews. The average age of the participants was 30 years, and 48 participants were receiving antiretroviral therapy. Healthcare and spiritual practices, healthcare provider-patient communication about childbearing, and husband/partner support emerged as factors that contribute to the childbearing decisions of WLHA. The findings reveal the importance of discussing sexual reproductive health and childbearing issues with WLHA in the healthcare context prior to pregnancy. PMID:23320152

  3. Distributed training, testing, and decision aids within one solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strini, Robert A.; Strini, Keith

    2002-07-01

    Military air operations in the European theater require U.S. and NATO participants to send various mission experts to 10 Combined Air Operations Centers (CAOCs). Little or no training occurs prior to their arrival for tours of duty ranging between 90 days to 3 years. When training does occur, there is little assessment of its effectiveness in raising CAOC mission readiness. A comprehensive training management system has been developed that utilizes traditional and web based distance-learning methods for providing instruction and task practice as well as distributed simulation to provide mission rehearsal training opportunities on demand for the C2 warrior. This system incorporates new technologies, such as voice interaction and virtual tutors, and a Learning Management System (LMS) that tracks trainee progress from academic learning through procedural practice and mission training exercises. Supervisors can monitor their subordinate's progress through synchronous or asynchronous methods. Embedded within this system are virtual tutors, which provide automated performance measurement as well as tutoring. The training system offers a true time management savings for current instructors and training providers that today must perform On the Job Training (OJT) duties before, during and after each event. Many units do not have the resources to support OJT and are forced to maintain an overlap of several days to minimally maintain unit readiness. One CAOC Commander affected by this paradigm has advocated supporting a beta version of this system to test its ability to offer training on-demand and track the progress of its personnel and unit readiness. If successful, aircrew simulation devices can be connected through either Distributed Interactive Simulation or High Level Architecture methods to provide a DMT-C2 air operations training environment in Europe. This paper presents an approach to establishing a training, testing and decision aid capability and means to assess

  4. Utilizing computerized entertainment education in the development of decision aids for lower literate and naïve computer users.

    PubMed

    Jibaja-Weiss, Maria L; Volk, Robert J

    2007-01-01

    Decision aids have been developed by using various delivery methods, including interactive computer programs. Such programs, however, still rely heavily on written information, health and digital literacy, and reading ease. We describe an approach to overcome these potential barriers for low-literate, underserved populations by making design considerations for poor readers and naïve computer users and by using concepts from entertainment education to engage the user and to contextualize the content for the user. The system design goals are to make the program both didactic and entertaining and the navigation and graphical user interface as simple as possible. One entertainment education strategy, the soap opera, is linked seamlessly to interactive learning modules to enhance the content of the soap opera episodes. The edutainment decision aid model (EDAM) guides developers through the design process. Although designing patient decision aids that are educational, entertaining, and targeted toward poor readers and those with limited computer skills is a complex task, it is a promising strategy for aiding this population. Entertainment education may be a highly effective approach to promoting informed decision making for patients with low health literacy.

  5. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy in an AIDS patient.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ming-Hsing; Chen, Yan-Zhong; Wang, Lih-Shinn; Yen, Pao-Sheng; Hsu, Yung-Hsiang

    2007-03-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a demyelinating brain disease caused by Jamestown Canyon virus (JCV). This disease is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients. We report a 34-year-old man infected with HIV-1 who presented with frequent general tonic clonic seizure and left side weakness for 2 months. Clinical features and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings with hyperintensity on T2-weighted imaging and low density on T2 fluid attenuated inversion recovery involving multiple white matter were compatible with PML. He died of sepsis 2 months after diagnosis. Autopsy demonstrated progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy according to characteristic histopathologic picture with multifocal demyelination, bizarre astrocytes formation and basophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies in the oligodendrocytes. JCV genome was demonstrated in the nucleus of oligodendrocytes using in situ hybridization. In conclusion, in AIDS patients with neurologic signs and typical MRI findings who present with multifocal demyelination lesions, PML should be diagnosed clinically.

  6. Microsporidial keratoconjunctivitis in a patient with AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Metcalfe, T W; Doran, R M; Rowlands, P L; Curry, A; Lacey, C J

    1992-01-01

    A male patient is described with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) who developed chronic keratoconjunctivitis and chronic sinusitis due to infection with the microsporidian Encephalitozoon cuniculi. Diagnosis was confirmed by electron microscopic examination of conjunctival epithelial cells and nasal polypectomy specimens. Treatment with propamidine isethionate 0.1% (Brolene) eye drops six times daily led to a prompt resolution of the keratoconjunctivitis. Images PMID:1540567

  7. Evaluation of Weather Service Heat Indices Using the USARIEM Heat Strain Decision Aid (HSDA) Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-06-01

    and Canadian indices differ. The U.S. uses the Heat Index (HI) based on Steadman’s model. Canada uses Humidex (HD). Our comparison used the USARIEM Heat Strain Decision Aid (HSDA) to evaluate both indices.

  8. Effects of Viewing an Evidence-Based Video Decision Aid on Patients’ Treatment Preferences for Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lurie, Jon D.; Spratt, Kevin F.; Blood, Emily A.; Tosteson, Tor D.; Tosteson, Anna N. A.; Weinstein, James N.

    2011-01-01

    Study Design Secondary analysis within a large clinical trial Objective To evaluate the changes in treatment preference before and after watching a video decision aid as part of an informed consent process. Summary of Background Data A randomized trial with a similar decision aid in herniated disc patients had shown decreased rate of surgery in the video group, but the effect of the video on expressed preferences is not known. Methods Subjects enrolling in the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT) with intervertebral disc herniation (IDH), spinal stenosis (SPS), or degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) at thirteen multidisciplinary spine centers across the US were given an evidence-based videotape decision aid viewed prior to enrollment as part of informed consent. Results Of the 2505 patients, 86% (n=2151) watched the video and 14% (n=354) did not. Watchers shifted their preference more often than non-watchers(37.9% vs. 20.8%, p < 0.0001) and more often demonstrated a strengthened preference (26.2% vs. 11.1%, p < 0.0001). Among the 806 patients whose preference shifted after watching the video, 55% shifted toward surgery (p=0.003). Among the 617 who started with no preference, after the video 27% preferred non-operative care, 22% preferred surgery, and 51% remained uncertain. Conclusion After watching the evidence-based patient decision aid (video) used in SPORT, patients with specific lumbar spine disorders formed and/or strengthened their treatment preferences in a balanced way that did not appear biased toward or away from surgery. PMID:21358485

  9. arriba-lib: Analyses of user interactions with an electronic library of decision aids on the basis of log data.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Oliver; Szabo, Elisabeth; Keller, Heidemarie; Kramer, Lena; Krones, Tanja; Donner-Banzhoff, Norbert

    2012-12-01

    Computerised log files are important for analysing user behaviour in health informatics to gain insight into processes that lead to suboptimal user patterns. This is important for software training programmes or for changes to improve usability. Technical user behaviour regarding decision aids has not so far been thoroughly investigated with log files. The aim of our study was to examine more detailed user interactions of primary-care physicians and their patients with arriba-lib, our multimodular electronic library of decision aids used during consultations, on the basis of log data. We analysed 184 consultation log files from 28 primary-care physicians. The average consultation time of our modules was about 8 min. Two-thirds of the consultation time were spent in the history information part of the programme. In this part, mainly bar charts were used to display risk information. Our electronic library of decision aids does not generate specific user behaviour based on physician characteristics such as age, gender, years in practice, or prior experience with decision aids. This supports the widespread use of our e-library in the primary-care sector and probably beyond.

  10. The Creative Use of Psychotherapy with Terminally Ill AIDS Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraenkel, William A.

    One clinical psychologist who worked with terminally ill, end-stage Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) patients in a hospice type setting experienced more than 150 deaths over an 18-month time period. Many of the patients denied that they had AIDS; some distinguished between having AIDS and testing positive for Human Immunodeficiency Virus…

  11. CT of disseminated plasmacytoma - in an AIDS patient

    SciTech Connect

    Leder, D.S.; Nazarian, L.N.; Burke, M.

    1996-05-01

    It is well known that acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is associated with increased risk of neoplasms, particularly Kaposi sarcoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. There have been several recent reports in the literature describing plasma cell tumors in AIDS patients. We report the imaging findings in a case of widely disseminated plasmacytoma in a patient with known AIDS. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Fungal infections in patients with AIDS and AIDS-related complex.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, K; Meyer, R D

    1986-01-01

    Persons with AIDS are predisposed to a variety of previously rare bacterial and fungal infections. Improvement in the quality and duration of survival of AIDS patients depends on the efficacy of treatment for these infections. Between 58-81% of AIDS patients contract fungal infections at some time, and 10-20% of AIDS patients die as a direct consequence of such infections. Oral candidiasis, commonly known as thrush, is the most common fungal infection among AIDS and AIDS Related Complex patients, occurring in 80-90% of cases. In a recent U.S. study, 59% of persons with oral candidiasis who were at high risk of contracting AIDS went on to develop Kaposi's sarcoma and other life- threatening infections. The most common life-threatening fungal infection experienced by AIDS patients is cryptococcosis, a disease occurring among 6% of American AIDS patients and having a mortality rate of 17% during initial infections and 75-100% on relapse. Other opportunistic infections associated with AIDS and AIDS Related Complex are bronchial candidiasis, invasive aspergillosis, disseminated histoplasmosis, and disseminated coccidioidomycosis. All are treatable but eradication i s difficult and relapse common.

  13. Shared decision making, paternalism and patient choice.

    PubMed

    Sandman, Lars; Munthe, Christian

    2010-03-01

    In patient centred care, shared decision making is a central feature and widely referred to as a norm for patient centred medical consultation. However, it is far from clear how to distinguish SDM from standard models and ideals for medical decision making, such as paternalism and patient choice, and e.g., whether paternalism and patient choice can involve a greater degree of the sort of sharing involved in SDM and still retain their essential features. In the article, different versions of SDM are explored, versions compatible with paternalism and patient choice as well as versions that go beyond these traditional decision making models. Whenever SDM is discussed or introduced it is of importance to be clear over which of these different versions are being pursued, since they connect to basic values and ideals of health care in different ways. It is further argued that we have reason to pursue versions of SDM involving, what is called, a high level dynamics in medical decision-making. This leaves four alternative models to choose between depending on how we balance between the values of patient best interest, patient autonomy, and an effective decision in terms of patient compliance or adherence: Shared Rational Deliberative Patient Choice, Shared Rational Deliberative Paternalism, Shared Rational Deliberative Joint Decision, and Professionally Driven Best Interest Compromise. In relation to these models it is argued that we ideally should use the Shared Rational Deliberative Joint Decision model. However, when the patient and professional fail to reach consensus we will have reason to pursue the Professionally Driven Best Interest Compromise model since this will best harmonise between the different values at stake: patient best interest, patient autonomy, patient adherence and a continued care relationship.

  14. Visual aid tool to improve decision making in acute stroke care.

    PubMed

    Saposnik, Gustavo; Goyal, Mayank; Majoie, Charles; Dippel, Diederik; Roos, Yvo; Demchuk, Andrew; Menon, Bijoy; Mitchell, Peter; Campbell, Bruce; Dávalos, Antoni; Jovin, Tudor; Hill, Michael D

    2016-10-01

    Background Acute stroke care represents a challenge for decision makers. Recent randomized trials showed the benefits of endovascular therapy. Our goal was to provide a visual aid tool to guide clinicians in the decision process of endovascular intervention in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods We created visual plots (Cates' plots; www.nntonline.net ) representing benefits of standard of care vs. endovascular thrombectomy from the pooled analysis of five RCTs using stent retrievers. These plots represent the following clinically relevant outcomes (1) functionally independent state (modified Rankin scale (mRS) 0 to 2 at 90 days) (2) excellent recovery (mRS 0-1) at 90 days, (3) NIHSS 0-2 (4) early neurological recovery, and (5) revascularization at 24 h. Subgroups visually represented include time to treatment and baseline stroke severity strata. Results Overall, 1287 patients (634 assigned to endovascular thrombectomy, 653 assigned to control were included to create the visual plots. Cates' visual plots revealed that for every 100 patients with acute ischemic stroke and large vessel occlusion, 27 would achieve independence at 90 days (mRS 0-2) in the control group compared to 49 (95% CI 43-56) in the intervention group. Similarly, 21 patients would achieve early neurological recovery at 24 h compared to 54 (95% CI 45-63) out of 100 for the intervention group. Conclusion Cates' plots may assist clinicians and patients to visualize and compare potential outcomes after an acute ischemic stroke. Our results suggest that for every 100 treated individuals with an acute ischemic stroke and a large vessel occlusion, endovascular thrombectomy would provide 22 additional patients reaching independency at three months and 33 more patients achieving ENR compared to controls.

  15. Collaborative Brain-Computer Interface for Aiding Decision-Making

    PubMed Central

    Poli, Riccardo; Valeriani, Davide; Cinel, Caterina

    2014-01-01

    We look at the possibility of integrating the percepts from multiple non-communicating observers as a means of achieving better joint perception and better group decisions. Our approach involves the combination of a brain-computer interface with human behavioural responses. To test ideas in controlled conditions, we asked observers to perform a simple matching task involving the rapid sequential presentation of pairs of visual patterns and the subsequent decision as whether the two patterns in a pair were the same or different. We recorded the response times of observers as well as a neural feature which predicts incorrect decisions and, thus, indirectly indicates the confidence of the decisions made by the observers. We then built a composite neuro-behavioural feature which optimally combines the two measures. For group decisions, we uses a majority rule and three rules which weigh the decisions of each observer based on response times and our neural and neuro-behavioural features. Results indicate that the integration of behavioural responses and neural features can significantly improve accuracy when compared with the majority rule. An analysis of event-related potentials indicates that substantial differences are present in the proximity of the response for correct and incorrect trials, further corroborating the idea of using hybrids of brain-computer interfaces and traditional strategies for improving decision making. PMID:25072739

  16. Development and Testing of a Decision Aid on Goals of Care for Advanced Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Einterz, Seth F.; Gilliam, Robin; Lin, Feng Chang; McBride, J. Marvin; Hanson, Laura C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Decision aids are effective to improve decision-making, yet they are rarely tested in nursing homes (NHs). Study objectives were to 1) examine the feasibility of a Goals of Care (GOC) decision aid for surrogate decision-makers (SDMs)of persons with dementia; and 2) test its effect on quality of communication and decision-making. Design Pre-post intervention to test a GOC decision aid intervention for SDMs for persons with dementia in NHs. Investigators collected data from reviews of resident health records and interviews with SDMs at baseline and 3-month follow up. Setting Two NHs in North Carolina. Participants 18 residents who were over 65 years of age, had moderate to severe dementia on the Global Deterioration Scale (GDS=5,6,7), and an English-speaking surrogate decision-maker. Intervention 1) GOC Decision Aid video viewed by the SDM, and 2) a structured care plan meeting between the SDM and interdisciplinary NH team Measurements Surrogate knowledge, quality of communication with health care providers, surrogate-provider concordance on goals of care, and palliative care domains addressed in the care plan. Results 89% of the SDMs thought the decision aid was relevant to their needs. After viewing the video decision aid, SDMs increased the number of correct responses on knowledge-based questions (12.5 vs 14.2, P<.001). At 3 months they reported improved quality of communication scores (6.1 vs 6.8, P=.01) and improved concordance on primary goal of care with nursing home team (50% vs 78%, P=.003). The number of palliative care domains addressed in the care plan increased (1.8 vs 4.3, P<.001). Conclusion The decision-support intervention piloted in this study was feasible and relevant for surrogate decision-makers of persons with advanced dementia in nursing homes, and it improved quality of communication between SDM and NH providers. A larger randomized clinical trial is underway to provide further evidence of the effects of this decision aid

  17. [Pulmonary fungal infection in patients with AIDS].

    PubMed

    Denis, B; Lortholary, O

    2013-10-01

    Fungal infections are the most common opportunistic infections (OI) occurring during the course of HIV infection, though their incidence has decreased dramatically with the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (cART). Most cases occur in untreated patients, noncompliant patients or patients whose multiple antiretroviral regimens have failed and they are a good marker of the severity of cellular immunodepression. Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia is the second most frequent OI in France and cryptococcosis remains a major problem in the Southern Hemisphere. With the increase in travel, imported endemic fungal infection can occur and may mimic other infections, notably tuberculosis. Fungal infections often have a pulmonary presentation but an exhaustive search for dissemination should be made in patients infected with HIV, at least those at an advanced stage of immune deficiency. Introduction of cART in combination with anti-fungal treatment depends on the risk of AIDS progression and on the risk of cumulative toxicity and the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) if introduced too early. Fungal infections in HIV infected patients remain a problem in the cART era. IRIS can complicate the management and requires an optimised treatment regime.

  18. A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Mobile Clinical Decision Aid to Improve Access to Kidney Transplantation: iChoose Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Patzer, Rachel E.; Basu, Mohua; Mohan, Sumit; Smith, Kayla D.; Wolf, Michael; Ladner, Daniela; Friedewald, John J.; Chiles, Mariana; Russell, Allison; McPherson, Laura; Gander, Jennifer; Pastan, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the preferred treatment for patients with end-stage renal disease, as it substantially increases a patient's survival and is cost saving compared to a lifetime of dialysis. However, transplantation is not universally chosen by patients with renal failure, and limited knowledge about the survival benefit of transplantation vs. dialysis may play a role. We created a mobile application clinical decision aid called iChoose Kidney to improve access to individualized prognosis information comparing dialysis and transplantation outcomes. We describe the iChoose Kidney study, a randomized controlled trial designed to test the clinical efficacy of a mobile health decision aid among end-stage renal disease patients referred for kidney transplantation at three large, diverse transplant centers across the U.S. Approximately 450 patients will be randomized to receive either: (1) standard of care or “usual” transplantation education, or (2) standard of care plus iChoose Kidney. The primary outcome is change in knowledge about the survival benefit of kidney transplantation vs. dialysis from baseline to immediate follow-up; secondary outcomes include change in treatment preferences, improved decisional conflict, and increased access to kidney transplantation. Analyses are also planned to examine effectiveness across subgroups of race, socioeconomic status, health literacy and health numeracy. Engaging patients in health care choices can increase patient empowerment and improve knowledge and understanding of treatment choices. If the effectiveness of iChoose Kidney has a greater impact on patients with low health literacy, lower socioeconomic status, and minority race, this decision aid could help reduce disparities in access to kidney transplantation. PMID:27610423

  19. Shared decision making in patients with low risk chest pain: prospective randomized pragmatic trial

    PubMed Central

    Hollander, Judd E; Schaffer, Jason T; Kline, Jeffrey A; Torres, Carlos A; Diercks, Deborah B; Jones, Russell; Owen, Kelly P; Meisel, Zachary F; Demers, Michel; Leblanc, Annie; Shah, Nilay D; Inselman, Jonathan; Herrin, Jeph; Castaneda-Guarderas, Ana; Montori, Victor M

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the effectiveness of shared decision making with usual care in choice of admission for observation and further cardiac testing or for referral for outpatient evaluation in patients with possible acute coronary syndrome. Design Multicenter pragmatic parallel randomized controlled trial. Setting Six emergency departments in the United States. Participants 898 adults (aged >17 years) with a primary complaint of chest pain who were being considered for admission to an observation unit for cardiac testing (451 were allocated to the decision aid and 447 to usual care), and 361 emergency clinicians (emergency physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants) caring for patients with chest pain. Interventions Patients were randomly assigned (1:1) by an electronic, web based system to shared decision making facilitated by a decision aid or to usual care. The primary outcome, selected by patient and caregiver advisers, was patient knowledge of their risk for acute coronary syndrome and options for care; secondary outcomes were involvement in the decision to be admitted, proportion of patients admitted for cardiac testing, and the 30 day rate of major adverse cardiac events. Results Compared with the usual care arm, patients in the decision aid arm had greater knowledge of their risk for acute coronary syndrome and options for care (questions correct: decision aid, 4.2 v usual care, 3.6; mean difference 0.66, 95% confidence interval 0.46 to 0.86), were more involved in the decision (observing patient involvement scores: decision aid, 18.3 v usual care, 7.9; 10.3, 9.1 to 11.5), and less frequently decided with their clinician to be admitted for cardiac testing (decision aid, 37% v usual care, 52%; absolute difference 15%; P<0.001). There were no major adverse cardiac events due to the intervention. Conclusions Use of a decision aid in patients at low risk for acute coronary syndrome increased patient knowledge about their risk, increased

  20. Forecasting for Computer Aided Career Decisions: Prospects and Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durstine, Richard M.

    This paper is the second step in the preparation of forecasts of occupational and industrial information which will meet the needs of the Information System for Vocational Decisions (ISVD). The author discusses the computation routines which need to be developed, tested and operationalized toward the goal of combining occupational and industrial…

  1. Solitary ring enhancing brain lesion in a patient with AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Aldeen, Taha; Lunn, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis in immune competent patients usually causes asymptomatic infection or mild symptoms, while in immunocompromised and AIDS patients it can be a life threatening condition. We report a case of cerebral toxoplasmosis in a patient with AIDS and review the causes of brain ring enhancing lesions. PMID:22132018

  2. Decision aid systems for evaluating sustainability: a critical survey

    SciTech Connect

    Brunner, Norbert; Starkl, Markus

    2004-05-01

    Assessing sustainability in compliance with the EU water framework directive is affected by numerous conflicting interests. As they can no longer be resolved by means of intuitive reasoning, some authors propose the integration of the major fragmented indicators into one common indicator of the overall sustainability by means of a codified multi-criteria decision support methodology (DSM). Practitioners in urban water management, however, usually object to the use of a codified DSM, as in the legal context (negotiations between the stakeholders, tendering procedure) it might jeopardize the feasibility of the decision making process (DMP). Here we show that a feasible implementation of a DSM into the DMP is possible. To this end, we design a cooperative approach, which by means of an axiomatic evaluation helps to select an appropriate DSM. We illustrate it by a hypothetical dialogue between the relevant authority and the developer. It will expose the inherent limitations of the DSM, which are due to their underlying mathematical features.

  3. Participation of patients and citizens in healthcare decisions in Italy.

    PubMed

    Goss, Claudia; Mosconi, Paola; Renzi, Cristina; Deledda, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    WHAT ABOUT POLICY REGARDING SDM? The Italian National Health Plan and many regional and local health authorities explicitly recognise the importance of patient/citizen participation. These official documents rarely mention the specific concept of SDM, but they use terms such as patient involvement, participation, and empowerment. Patient associations are actively involved in promoting patient/citizen participation, but still play a marginal role in the health debate compared to health professionals, clinicians and healthcare managers. WHAT ABOUT TOOLS - DECISION SUPPORT FOR PATIENTS? There are only a few examples of decision aids designed for patients according to SDM concepts. A critical point is the lack of specific tools for the evaluation of SDM processes. Exceptions include the Italian versions of the OPTION scale and the SDM-Q, used at the micro-level for the evaluation of SDM. What about professional interest and real implementation? Health professionals recognise that doctor-patient communication is an important area. Italian research in SDM has grown and improved. It is very promising, but still limited. Undergraduate and postgraduate courses of some medical schools include specific programs on doctor-patient communication skills, focusing also on promotion of patient participation. WHAT DOES THE FUTURE LOOK LIKE? In conclusion, there is room for improving the Italian efforts to implement SDM into practice at both the individual and public level.

  4. Warfighter Associate: Decision Aiding and Metrics for Mission Command

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-23

    planning and in execution, and in determining the best means for error correction. • Agile Development of Knowledge . The underlying knowledge can...experimentation plan focuses on providing decision-support to three of those individuals: S3 (maneuver), S2 (intel), and FSO (fires) Top 20% Laboratory...I n meline " Refresh FSO 12-03-201111:59:48 - ongoing Active Activity Based P ... • lnstanceld: Demonstration Concept Current Commonality Slider

  5. Balancing emotion and cognition: a case for decision aiding in conservation efforts.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Robyn S

    2008-12-01

    Despite advances in the quality of participatory decision making for conservation, many current efforts still suffer from an inability to bridge the gap between science and policy. Judgment and decision-making research suggests this gap may result from a person's reliance on affect-based shortcuts in complex decision contexts. I examined the results from 3 experiments that demonstrate how affect (i.e., the instantaneous reaction one has to a stimulus) influences individual judgments in these contexts and identified techniques from the decision-aiding literature that help encourage a balance between affect-based emotion and cognition in complex decision processes. In the first study, subjects displayed a lack of focus on their stated conservation objectives and made decisions that reflected their initial affective impressions. Value-focused approaches may help individuals incorporate all the decision-relevant objectives by making the technical and value-based objectives more salient. In the second study, subjects displayed a lack of focus on statistical risk and again made affect-based decisions. Trade-off techniques may help individuals incorporate relevant technical data, even when it conflicts with their initial affective impressions or other value-based objectives. In the third study, subjects displayed a lack of trust in decision-making authorities when the decision involved a negatively affect-rich outcome (i.e., a loss). Identifying shared salient values and increasing procedural fairness may help build social trust in both decision-making authorities and the decision process.

  6. Patient satisfaction and normative decision theory.

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, P F

    1995-01-01

    This article explores the application of normative decision theory (NDT) to the challenge of facilitating and measuring patient satisfaction. Patient satisfaction is the appraisal, by an individual, of the extent to which the care provided has met that individual's expectations and preferences. Classic decision analysis provides a graphic and computational strategy to link patient preferences for outcomes to the treatment choices likely to produce the outcomes. Multiple criteria models enable the complex judgment task of measuring patient satisfaction to be decomposed into elemental factors that reflect patient preferences, thus facilitating evaluation of care in terms of factors relevant to the individual patient. Through the application of NDT models, it is possible to use patient preferences as a guide to the treatment planning and care monitoring process and to construct measures of patient satisfaction that are meaningful to the individual. Nursing informatics, with its foundations in both information management and decision sciences, provides the tools and data necessary to promote care provided in accord with patient preferences and to ensure appraisal of satisfaction that aptly captures the complex, multidimensional nature of patient preferences. PMID:7583649

  7. Selecting a risk-based tool to aid in decision making

    SciTech Connect

    Bendure, A.O.

    1995-03-01

    Selecting a risk-based tool to aid in decision making is as much of a challenge as properly using the tool once it has been selected. Failure to consider customer and stakeholder requirements and the technical bases and differences in risk-based decision making tools will produce confounding and/or politically unacceptable results when the tool is used. Selecting a risk-based decisionmaking tool must therefore be undertaken with the same, if not greater, rigor than the use of the tool once it is selected. This paper presents a process for selecting a risk-based tool appropriate to a set of prioritization or resource allocation tasks, discusses the results of applying the process to four risk-based decision-making tools, and identifies the ``musts`` for successful selection and implementation of a risk-based tool to aid in decision making.

  8. Pilot decision making in a computer-aided flight management situation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Y. Y.; Rouse, W. B.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental representation of a computer-aided multi-task flight management situation has been developed. A computer aiding program was implemented to serve as a back-up decision maker. An experiment was conducted with a balanced design of several subject runs for different workload levels. This was achieved using three levels of subsystem event arrival rates, three levels of control task involvement, and three levels of availability of computer aiding. Experimental results compared quite favorably with those from a computer simulation which employed a queueing model. It was shown that the aiding had enhanced system performance as well as subjective ratings, and that the adaptive aiding policy further reduced subsystem delay.

  9. Decision trees and integrated features for computer aided mammographic screening

    SciTech Connect

    Kegelmeyer, W.P. Jr.; Groshong, B.; Allmen, M.; Woods, K.

    1997-02-01

    Breast cancer is a serious problem, which in the United States causes 43,000 deaths a year, eventually striking 1 in 9 women. Early detection is the only effective countermeasure, and mass mammography screening is the only reliable means for early detection. Mass screening has many shortcomings which could be addressed by a computer-aided mammographic screening system. Accordingly, we have applied the pattern recognition methods developed in earlier investigations of speculated lesions in mammograms to the detection of microcalcifications and circumscribed masses, generating new, more rigorous and uniform methods for the detection of both those signs. We have also improved the pattern recognition methods themselves, through the development of a new approach to combinations of multiple classifiers.

  10. Solitary hypothalamopituitary toxoplasmosis abscess in a patient with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Legrand, L; Catherine, L; Brivet, F; Musset, D

    2011-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a disease caused by an obligate intracellular protozoal parasite, Toxoplasma gondii. It is the most common cause of focal brain lesions in patients with AIDS. The imaging features and endocrine disorders of CNS toxoplasmosis in patients with AIDS are reviewed.

  11. The effect of offering different numbers of colorectal cancer screening test options in a decision aid: a pilot randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Jennifer M; Lewis, Carmen L; Brenner, Alison RT; Pignone, Michael P

    2008-01-01

    Background Decision aids can improve decision making processes, but the amount and type of information that they should attempt to communicate is controversial. We sought to compare, in a pilot randomized trial, two colorectal cancer (CRC) screening decision aids that differed in the number of screening options presented. Methods Adults ages 48–75 not currently up to date with screening were recruited from the community and randomized to view one of two versions of our previously tested CRC screening decision aid. The first version included five screening options: fecal occult blood test (FOBT), sigmoidoscopy, a combination of FOBT and sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, and barium enema. The second discussed only the two most frequently selected screening options, FOBT and colonoscopy. Main outcomes were differences in screening interest and test preferences between groups after decision aid viewing. Patient test preference was elicited first without any associated out-of-pocket costs (OPC), and then with the following costs: FOBT-$10, sigmoidoscopy-$50, barium enema-$50, and colonoscopy-$200. Results 62 adults participated: 25 viewed the 5-option decision aid, and 37 viewed the 2-option version. Mean age was 54 (range 48–72), 58% were women, 71% were White, 24% African-American; 58% had completed at least a 4-year college degree. Comparing participants that viewed the 5-option version with participants who viewed the 2-option version, there were no differences in screening interest after viewing (1.8 vs. 1.9, t-test p = 0.76). Those viewing the 2-option version were somewhat more likely to choose colonoscopy than those viewing the 5-option version when no out of pocket costs were assumed (68% vs. 46%, p = 0.11), but not when such costs were imposed (41% vs. 42%, p = 1.00). Conclusion The number of screening options available does not appear to have a large effect on interest in colorectal cancer screening. The effect of offering differing numbers of options may

  12. Computer-aided decision support systems for endoscopy in the gastrointestinal tract: a review.

    PubMed

    Liedlgruber, Michael; Uhl, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Today, medical endoscopy is a widely used procedure to inspect the inner cavities of the human body. The advent of endoscopic imaging techniques-allowing the acquisition of images or videos-created the possibility for the development of the whole new branch of computer-aided decision support systems. Such systems aim at helping physicians to identify possibly malignant abnormalities more accurately. At the beginning of this paper, we give a brief introduction to the history of endoscopy, followed by introducing the main types of endoscopes which emerged so far (flexible endoscope, wireless capsule endoscope, and confocal laser endomicroscope). We then give a brief introduction to computer-aided decision support systems specifically targeted at endoscopy in the gastrointestinal tract. Then we present general facts and figures concerning computer-aided decision support systems and summarize work specifically targeted at computer-aided decision support in the gastrointestinal tract. This summary is followed by a discussion of some common issues concerning the approaches reviewed and suggestions of possible ways to resolve them.

  13. UK: AIDS treatment main factor in decision to grant permission to appeal immigration decision.

    PubMed

    Gold, Jennifer

    2003-12-01

    On 26 June 2003, the England and Wales Court of Appeal (Civil Division) granted an application for leave to appeal a decision of the Immigration Appeal Tribunal, which had overturned an adjudicator's decision to allow an HIV-positive citizen of Uganda to immigrate to the United Kingdom (UK).

  14. Early Commitment on Financial Aid and College Decision Making of Poor Students: Evidence from a Randomized Evaluation in Rural China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Chengfang; Zhang, Linxiu; Luo, Renfu; Wang, Xiaobing; Rozelle, Scott; Sharbono, Brian; Adams, Jennifer; Shi, Yaojiang; Yue, Ai; Li, Hongbin; Glauben, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Many educational systems have struggled with the question about how best to give out financial aid. In particular, if students do not know the amount of financial aid that they can receive before they make a decision about where to go to college and what major to study, it may distort their decision. This study utilizes an experiment (implemented…

  15. Graphical representation of life paths to better convey results of decision models to patients.

    PubMed

    Rubrichi, Stefania; Rognoni, Carla; Sacchi, Lucia; Parimbelli, Enea; Napolitano, Carlo; Mazzanti, Andrea; Quaglini, Silvana

    2015-04-01

    The inclusion of patients' perspectives in clinical practice has become an important matter for health professionals, in view of the increasing attention to patient-centered care. In this regard, this report illustrates a method for developing a visual aid that supports the physician in the process of informing patients about a critical decisional problem. In particular, we focused on interpretation of the results of decision trees embedding Markov models implemented with the commercial tool TreeAge Pro. Starting from patient-level simulations and exploiting some advanced functionalities of TreeAge Pro, we combined results to produce a novel graphical output that represents the distributions of outcomes over the lifetime for the different decision options, thus becoming a more informative decision support in a context of shared decision making. The training example used to illustrate the method is a decision tree for thromboembolism risk prevention in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation.

  16. Radiology of AIDS in the pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Grattan-Smith, D; Harrison, L F; Singleton, E B

    1992-01-01

    The Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) has involved the pediatric age group and is especially prevalent in babies born of mothers who are intravenous drug abusers or prostitutes. Approximately 30% of children born to mothers who are seropositive for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) will develop HIV infection. There are several important differences in children and adults with AIDS. The incubation period of the disease is shorter, and initial clinical manifestations occur earlier in children. In addition, certain infections are more common in children, and the different types of malignancy, especially Kaposi's sarcoma, are unusual in the pediatric age group. The altered immune system involves both T cells and humoral immunity and increases susceptibility to a variety of infections, particularly opportunistic organisms. In this publication the complications of pediatric AIDS involving the lungs, cardiovascular system, gastrointestinal tract, genitourinary system, and neurological system are described. The most common pulmonary complications in our experience are Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia and pulmonary lymphoid hyperplasia. The spectrum of cardiovascular involvement in pediatric AIDS includes myocarditis, pericarditis, and infectious endocarditis. Gastrointestinal tract involvement is usually due to opportunistic organisms that produce esophagitis, gastritis, and colitis. Abdominal lymphadenopathy is a common finding either due to disseminating Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare infection or nonspecific lymphadenopathy. Although cholangitis is more commonly seen in adults, it may occur in children with AIDS and, in most cases, is due to related opportunistic infections. Genitourinary infections may be the first evidence of HIV disease. Cystitis, pyelonephritis, renal abscesses, and nephropathy with renal insufficiency are complications of pediatric AIDS. A variety of neurological abnormalities may occur in pediatric AIDS. The most common cause of

  17. The Use of Computer-Aided Decision Support Systems for Complex Source Selection Decisions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    making processes under which virtually all decisions can be categorized. Optimizing. To optimize is to make the best possible decision under the... community ; 45 AFIT students may not be a representative sample. A subjective case may be made, however, that these subjects were relatively typical...career paths of the population studied, compared with that which apparently exists in the acquisition community . Discussion of Variables Major Constructs

  18. An Integrated Decision-Making Model for Categorizing Weather Products and Decision Aids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elgin, Peter D.; Thomas, Rickey P.

    2004-01-01

    The National Airspace System s capacity will experience considerable growth in the next few decades. Weather adversely affects safe air travel. The FAA and NASA are working to develop new technologies that display weather information to support situation awareness and optimize pilot decision-making in avoiding hazardous weather. Understanding situation awareness and naturalistic decision-making is an important step in achieving this goal. Information representation and situation time stress greatly influence attentional resource allocation and working memory capacity, potentially obstructing accurate situation awareness assessments. Three naturalistic decision-making theories were integrated to provide an understanding of the levels of decision making incorporated in three operational situations and two conditions. The task characteristics associated with each phase of flight govern the level of situation awareness attained and the decision making processes utilized. Weather product s attributes and situation task characteristics combine to classify weather products according to the decision-making processes best supported. In addition, a graphical interface is described that affords intuitive selection of the appropriate weather product relative to the pilot s current flight situation.

  19. Problems in Financing the Care of AIDS Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozawa, Martha N.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Notes that financing care of patients with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) has reached crisis proportions. Discusses how components of U.S. health care financing system attempt to minimize their financial exposure to AIDS. Presents remedies that have been suggested in literature. Points out flaws in current system for dealing with…

  20. Nurses' Attitudes toward Gay and Hemophiliac Patients with AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strasser, Judith A.; Damrosch, Shirley

    A sample of nurses (N=183) enrolled in a School of Nursing's master degree program was randomly assigned to read one of six vignettes about a patient who differed only in terms of diagnosis and lifestyle. Possible diagnoses were Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), AIDS acquired by a hemophiliac through blood therapy, and leukemia; possible…

  1. Burnout in Hospital Social Workers Who Work with AIDS Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oktay, Julianne S.

    1992-01-01

    Surveyed 128 hospital social workers who worked with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) patients. Found that hospital AIDS social workers had slightly higher rates of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization on Maslach Burnout Inventory but also felt substantially higher level of personal accomplishment. Age, autonomy, and belonging to…

  2. Patient decision-making for clinical genetics.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Gwen

    2007-03-01

    Medicine is incorporating genetic services into all avenues of health-care, ranging from the rarest to the most common diseases. Cognitive theories of decision-making still dominate professionals' understanding of patient decision-making about how to use genetic information and whether to have testing. I discovered a conceptual model of decision-making while carrying out a phenomenological-hermeneutic descriptive study of a convenience sample of 12 couples who were interviewed while deciding whether to undergo prenatal genetic testing. Thirty-two interviews were conducted with 12 men and 12 women separately. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and all data were analyzed using three levels of coding that were sorted into 30 categories and then abstracted into three emergent meta-themes that described men's and women's attempts to make sense and find meaning in how to best use prenatal genetic technology. Their descriptions of how they thought about, communicated, and coped with their decision were so detailed it was possible to discern nine different types of thinking they engaged in while deciding to accept or decline testing. They believed that decision-making is a process of working through your own personal style of thinking. This might include only one or any combination of the following types of thinking: analytical, ethical, moral, reflective, practical, hypothetical, judgmental, scary, and second sight, as described in detail by these 12 couples.

  3. Anti-class II antibodies in AIDS patients and AIDS-risk groups.

    PubMed Central

    de la Barrera, S; Fainboim, L; Lugo, S; Picchio, G R; Muchinik, G R; de Bracco, M M

    1987-01-01

    The specificity of anti-lymphocyte antibodies was evaluated in AIDS patients and in individuals at risk of AIDS [R-AIDS: male homosexuals (Ho) and haemophiliacs (He)]. Antibodies capable of inducing antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) against non-T cells and lymphoblastoid cell lines (P3HR-1K and Raji) were detected in AIDS patients and in R-AIDS with positive or negative human immune deficiency virus (HIV) serology. Anti-class II antigen specificity was revealed by experiments in which class II antigens on target cells were blocked with monoclonal anti-class II antibody (DA6,231) and the cytotoxic reaction induced by patient's sera was abolished. In contrast, ADCC was not impaired by preincubating the target cells with anti-class I monoclonal antibody (W6/32). Prevalence of antibodies to non-T cells was confirmed by standard C-mediated microlymphocytotoxicity. However, with this technique anti-T lymphocyte cytotoxicity was also observed in three AIDS patients with haemophilia. R-AIDS peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were also cytotoxic against autologous non-T cells, and lysis was slightly increased by sensitization of the target cells with autologous serum. In addition to ADCC and C-mediated cytotoxicity, the specificity of anti-lymphocyte antibodies was assayed by their ability to interfere the binding of fluorescein-labelled anti-class II (HLA-DR) and anti-class I (W6/32) monoclonal antibodies to PBMC, non-T cells, P3HR-1K and Raji. Anti-class II specificity was confirmed, and antibody titres tended to be higher in Ho than in He R-AIDS, using non-T cells and Raji as targets. Higher titres of anti-class II antibodies in the Ho group could play a role in the different susceptibility of HIV-infected Ho when compared to HIV (+) He to develop AIDS. PMID:3501399

  4. Bibliometrics: a potential decision making aid in hiring, reappointment, tenure and promotion decisions.

    PubMed

    Holden, Gary; Rosenberg, Gary; Barker, Kathleen

    2005-01-01

    The assessment of scholarship assumes a central role in the evaluation of individual faculty, educational programs and academic fields. Because the production and assessment of scholarship is so central to the faculty role, it is incumbent upon decision makers to strive to make assessments of scholarship fair and equitable. This paper will focus on an approach to the assessment of the quantity and impact of the most important subset of an individual's scholarship-peer-reviewed journal articles. The primary goal of this paper is to stimulate discussion regarding scholarship assessment in hiring, reappointment, tenure and promotion decisions.

  5. Weather Avoidance Using Route Optimization as a Decision Aid: An AWIN Topical Study. Phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The aviation community is faced with reducing the fatal aircraft accident rate by 80 percent within 10 years. This must be achieved even with ever increasing, traffic and a changing National Airspace System. This is not just an altruistic goal, but a real necessity, if our growing level of commerce is to continue. Honeywell Technology Center's topical study, "Weather Avoidance Using Route Optimization as a Decision Aid", addresses these pressing needs. The goal of this program is to use route optimization and user interface technologies to develop a prototype decision aid for dispatchers and pilots. This decision aid will suggest possible diversions through single or multiple weather hazards and present weather information with a human-centered design. At the conclusion of the program, we will have a laptop prototype decision aid that will be used to demonstrate concepts to industry for integration into commercialized products for dispatchers and/or pilots. With weather a factor in 30% of aircraft accidents, our program will prevent accidents by strategically avoiding weather hazards in flight. By supplying more relevant weather information in a human-centered format along with the tools to generate flight plans around weather, aircraft exposure to weather hazards can be reduced. Our program directly addresses the NASA's five year investment areas of Strategic Weather Information and Weather Operations (simulation/hazard characterization and crew/dispatch/ATChazard monitoring, display, and decision support) (NASA Aeronautics Safety Investment Strategy: Weather Investment Recommendations, April 15, 1997). This program is comprised of two phases, Phase I concluded December 31, 1998. This first phase defined weather data requirements, lateral routing algorithms, an conceptual displays for a user-centered design. Phase II runs from January 1999 through September 1999. The second phase integrates vertical routing into the lateral optimizer and combines the user

  6. WESVA: A decision aid for comparing warhead advanced surety R&D options

    SciTech Connect

    Homsy, R.V.; Sicherman, A.; Stephens, D.R.

    1993-10-01

    Newly designed warheads that incorporate advanced surety concepts can reduce the risks of accidental radiological material dispersal, nuclear detonation, and unauthorized use. But these potential surety benefits entail cost and performance penalties. Present constraints on R&D budgets, time, and allowable nuclear tests also create significant uncertainties as to whether new concepts can be successfully developed and implemented. These factors complicate the decisions involved in selecting surety concepts for more extensive R&D. To help decision makers compare R&D options, we developed a decision aid called Weapon Safety Value Assessment (WESVA). This paper describes WESVA and suggests how a WESVA-like approach can be of interest in other decision-making contexts.

  7. Decision Aids for Multiple-Decision Disease Management as Affected by Weather Input Errors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many disease management decision support systems (DSS) rely, exclusively or in part, on weather inputs to calculate an indicator for disease hazard. Error in the weather inputs, typically due to forecasting, interpolation or estimation from off-site sources, may affect model calculations and manage...

  8. Decision support for patient care: implementing cybernetics.

    PubMed

    Ozbolt, Judy; Ozdas, Asli; Waitman, Lemuel R; Smith, Janis B; Brennan, Grace V; Miller, Randolph A

    2004-01-01

    The application of principles and methods of cybernetics permits clinicians and managers to use feedback about care effectiveness and resource expenditure to improve quality and to control costs. Keys to the process are the specification of therapeutic goals and the creation of an organizational culture that supports the use of feedback to improve care. Daily feedback on the achievement of each patient's therapeutic goals provides tactical decision support, enabling clinicians to adjust care as needed. Monthly or quarterly feedback on aggregated goal achievement for all patients on a clinical pathway provides strategic decision support, enabling clinicians and managers to identify problems with supposed "best practices" and to test hypotheses about solutions. Work is underway at Vanderbilt University Medical Center to implement feedback loops in care and management processes and to evaluate the effects.

  9. A patient with a large pulmonary saddle embolus eluding both clinical gestalt and validated decision rules.

    PubMed

    Hennessey, Adam; Setyono, Devy A; Lau, Wayne Bond; Fields, Jason Matthew

    2012-06-01

    We report a patient with chest pain who was classified as having low risk for pulmonary embolism with clinical gestalt and accepted clinical decision rules. An inadvertently ordered D-dimer and abnormal result, however, led to the identification of a large saddle embolus. This case illustrates the fallibility of even well-validated decision aids and that an embolism missed by these tools is not necessarily low risk or indicative of a low clot burden.

  10. Decision-aided sampling frequency offset compensation for reduced-guard-interval coherent optical OFDM systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Zhuge, Qunbi; Morsy-Osman, Mohamed; Gao, Yuliang; Xu, Xian; Chagnon, Mathieu; Qiu, Meng; Hoang, Minh Thang; Zhang, Fangyuan; Li, Rui; Plant, David V

    2014-11-03

    We propose a decision-aided algorithm to compensate the sampling frequency offset (SFO) between the transmitter and receiver for reduced-guard-interval (RGI) coherent optical (CO) OFDM systems. In this paper, we first derive the cyclic prefix (CP) requirement for preventing OFDM symbols from SFO induced inter-symbol interference (ISI). Then we propose a new decision-aided SFO compensation (DA-SFOC) algorithm, which shows a high SFO tolerance and reduces the CP requirement. The performance of DA-SFOC is numerically investigated for various situations. Finally, the proposed algorithm is verified in a single channel 28 Gbaud polarization division multiplexing (PDM) RGI CO-OFDM experiment with QPSK, 8 QAM and 16 QAM modulation formats, respectively. Both numerical and experimental results show that the proposed DA-SFOC method is highly robust against the standard SFO in optical fiber transmission.

  11. Verification and validation of the night vision goggle tactical decision aid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elrick, John R.

    1995-05-01

    The Night Vision Goggle (NVG) Tactical Decision Aid (TDA) was developed to support Army operations in situations requiring accurate predictions of light levels. Minimum thresholds of illumination are used by the Army to plan and execute missions during periods of darkness or near darkness. The NVG TDA is part of a suite of decision aids that will become part of the fielded Integrated Meteorological System (IMETS). The IMETS is a system designed to be operated by Air Force Staff Weather Officers supporting Army tactical operations in peacetime and in times of conflict. The verification and validation (V & V) effort discussed in this report is part of the Battlefield Environment Directorate configuration management plan to field physically correct and user-friendly software to Army units over the entire conflict spectrum. The V & V described is thorough and shows that the NVG TDA is physically correct and applicable for accreditation before use.

  12. Energy Technology Investments: Maximizing Efficiency Through a Maritime Energy Portfolio Interface and Decision Aid

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-09

    APPROACH The Maritime Energy Portfolio Management Approach provides a means for determining the best course of action where several initiatives...Decision Aid also provides a means for determining the best course of action where several ECMs compete for scarce funds. Efficient, user friendly...Investment (ROI) and Break Even Point ( BEP ). These metrics are essential for determining whether an initiative would be worth pursuing. Balanced

  13. Markov model aided decoding for image transmission using soft-decision-feedback.

    PubMed

    Link, R; Kallel, S

    2000-01-01

    Soft-decision-feedback MAP decoders are developed for joint source/channel decoding (JSCD) which uses the residual redundancy in two-dimensional sources. The source redundancy is described by a second order Markov model which is made available to the receiver for row-by-row decoding, wherein the output for one row is used to aid the decoding of the next row. Performance can be improved by generalizing so as to increase the vertical depth of the decoder. This is called sheet decoding, and entails generalizing trellis decoding of one-dimensional data to trellis decoding of two-dimensional data (2-D). The proposed soft-decision-feedback sheet decoder is based on the Bahl algorithm, and it is compared to a hard-decision-feedback sheet decoder which is based on the Viterbi algorithm. The method is applied to 3-bit DPCM picture transmission over a binary symmetric channel, and it is found that the soft-decision-feedback decoder with vertical depth V performs approximately as well as the hard-decision-feedback decoder with vertical depth V+1. Because the computational requirement of the decoders depends exponentially on the vertical depth, the soft-decision-feedbark decoder offers significant reduction in complexity. For standard monochrome Lena, at a channel bit error rate of 0.05, the V=1 and V=2 soft-decision-feedback decoder JSCD gains in RSNR are 5.0 and 6.3 dB, respectively.

  14. Medical Students' Perceptions and Proposed Treatment Strategies for AIDS Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladany, Nicholas; Stern, Marilyn

    Research has consistently found that health care providers report having negative attitudes and perceptions toward Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) patients. This study was conducted to examine the independent and joint influences of a patient's mode of acquisition of illness (blood transfusion versus sexual promiscuity), patient blame…

  15. Low Literacy Decision Aid Enhances Knowledge and Reduces Decisional Conflict among Diverse Population of Adults with Rheumatoid Arthritis: Results of a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Jennifer L.; Trupin, Laura; Schillinger, Dean; Evans-Young, Gina; Imboden, John; Montori, Victor M.; Yelin, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Objective Despite innovations in treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), adherence is poor and disparities persist. Shared decision making (SDM) promotes patient engagement and enhances adherence, however few tools support SDM in RA. Our objective was to pilot a low literacy medication guide and decision aid to facilitate patient-clinician conversations about RA medications. Methods RA patients were consecutively enrolled into one of three arms: (1) control, patients received existing medication guide prior to clinic visit; (2) adapted guide prior to visit; (3) adapted guide prior plus decision aid during visit. Outcomes were collected immediately post-visit, at 1-week, 3- and 6-month interviews. Eligible adults had to have failed at least one DMARD and fulfill one of the following: age >65, immigrant, non-English speaker, < high school education, limited health literacy, racial/ethnic minority. Primary outcomes were knowledge of RA medications, decisional conflict, and acceptability of interventions. Results Majority of 166 patients were immigrants (66%), non-English speakers (54%), and had limited health literacy (71%). Adequate RA knowledge post visit in arm 3 was higher (78%) than arm 1 (53%, adjusted OR 2.7, 95% CI 1.2–6.1). Among patients with a medication change, there was lower (better) mean decisional conflict in arms 2 and 3 (p=0.03). No significant differences in acceptability. Conclusion A low literacy medication guide and decision aid was acceptable, improved knowledge, and reduced decisional conflict among vulnerable RA patients. Enhancing knowledge and patient engagement with decision support tools may lead to medication choices better aligned with patient values and preferences in RA. PMID:26605752

  16. QTc interval prolongation in patients with HIV and AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Sani, Mahmoud U.; Okeahialam, Basil N.

    2005-01-01

    A higher prevalence of QT prolongation has been reported among HIV/AIDS patients, possibly related to drugs prescribed for them or to an acquired form of long QT syndrome. A prolonged QTc is a predictor of cardiovascular mortality. We set out to study this interval in a group of AIDS patients. One-hundred consecutive AIDS patients admitted into the Jos University Teaching Hospital and who satisfied the inclusion criteria were recruited. All were evaluated for symptomatology of cardiovascular disease and had a 12-lead surface electrocardiogram recording. QT interval, taken from the onset of the QRS complex to the end of the T wave, was corrected for heart rate. Eighty HIV-negative, healthy persons and 78 HIV-positive, asymptomatic subjects were used as controls. Forty-five percent of the AIDS patients had prolonged QTc interval. Prolonged QTc was present in 28% of HIV-positive controls and 10% of HIV-negative controls. The mean QTc interval differs significantly between the AIDS patients and the two control groups. From our study, Nigerian HIV-positive asymptomatic subjects have higher prevalence of QTc prolongation compared to HIV-negative subjects and, as they move to AIDS, the prevalence of QTc prolongation increases. This makes for increased cardiovascular mortality. PMID:16396057

  17. Frequent hemorrhagic lesions in cerebral toxoplasmosis in AIDS patients.

    PubMed

    Bhagavati, Satyakam; Choi, Jan

    2009-04-01

    Cerebral toxoplasmosis is a frequent complication in immunosuppressed patients such as AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome). Frequently, lesions are located deep in the brain which are inaccessible for biopsy making rapid diagnosis dependent on accurate interpretation of neuroimaging findings. The commonest cranial CT findings reported in toxoplasmosis are ring enhancing hypodense lesions in basal ganglia or cortical gray matter. Hemorrhage has only rarely been described and is usually seen following antitoxoplasma treatment. We reviewed the records of 11 AIDS patients with cerebral toxoplasmosis and found multiple hemorrhagic cerebral, cerebellar, or brain stem lesions in 7 of 11 patients. Six patients had hemorrhage at the time of initial clinical presentation and one developed hemorrhage following 2 weeks of antitoxoplasma treatment. We conclude that hemorrhagic lesions are frequently found on cranial MRI scans in cerebral toxoplasmosis. AIDS patients presenting with hemorrhagic cerebral lesions should be considered for a trial of presumptive antitoxoplasma treatment.

  18. Shared decision making in the physician-patient encounter in France: a general overview in 2011.

    PubMed

    Moumjid, Nora; Christine Durif-Bruckert; Denois-Régnier, Véronique; Roux, Pauline; Soum-Pouyalet, Fanny

    2011-01-01

    WHAT ABOUT POLICY REGARDING SDM? There is a social demand in France for more healthcare user information and greater patient participation in the decision making process, as reflected by the law of March 4(th) 2002 pertaining to patients' rights and the quality of the healthcare system known as the Law on Democracy in healthcare. WHAT ABOUT TOOLS - DECISION SUPPORT FOR PATIENTS? At the micro level, some research projects are being developed, some of them using decision aids. Preliminary results show that patients want to be informed but that the concept of shared decision making needs to be analysed and refined from both the patients' and the physicians' points of views. WHAT ABOUT PROFESSIONAL INTEREST AND IMPLEMENTATION? However, the relationship between physicians/healthcare professionals and patients/healthcare users is very complex and progress in this field takes time. Only ten years after enactment of the Law on Democracy in healthcare, it might be premature to try and determine the state of the art of shared medical decision making at the macro and meso levels in France. WHAT DOES THE FUTURE LOOK LIKE? There is room in France for further studies on shared decision making in the medical encounter. Researchers, decision makers, healthcare users and healthcare professionals need a place to meet and exchange. An observatory dedicated to shared decision making will be launched in the coming months, both at the national level and in collaboration with several other French-speaking areas like Switzerland and the province of Quebec.

  19. Evaluating a Web-Based MMR Decision Aid to Support Informed Decision-Making by UK Parents: A Before-and-After Feasibility Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Cath; Cheater, Francine M.; Peacock, Rose; Leask, Julie; Trevena, Lyndal

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this feasibility study was to evaluate the acceptability and potential effectiveness of a web-based MMR decision aid in supporting informed decision-making for the MMR vaccine. Design: This was a prospective before-and-after evaluation. Setting: Thirty parents of children eligible for MMR vaccination were recruited from…

  20. Detection of AIDS Virus in Macrophages in Brain Tissue from AIDS Patients with Encephalopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Scott; Gendelman, Howard E.; Orenstein, Jan M.; Canto, Mauro C.; Pezeshkpour, Gholam H.; Yungbluth, Margaret; Janotta, Frank; Aksamit, Allen; Martin, Malcolm A.; Fauci, Anthony S.

    1986-09-01

    One of the common neurological complications in patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a subacute encephalopathy with progressive dementia. By using the techniques of cocultivation for virus isolation, in situ hybridization, immunocytochemistry, and transmission electron microscopy, the identity of an important cell type that supports replication of the AIDS retrovirus in brain tissue was determined in two affected individuals. These cells were mononucleated and multinucleated macrophages that actively synthesized viral RNA and produced progeny virions in the brains of the patients. Infected brain macrophages may serve as a reservoir for virus and as a vehicle for viral dissemination in the infected host.

  1. Mobile decision support for transplantation patient data.

    PubMed

    Krause, Andreas; Hartl, Dominik; Theis, Fabian; Stangl, Manfred; Gerauer, Klaus E; Mehlhorn, Alexander T

    2004-06-15

    In high-critical medical fields instant information delivery is essential. Task-flow analyses within the transplantation unit of the Technische Universität München revealed that valuable time could be saved in pre-transplantation management being able to retrieve data of organ receivers ubiquitously. Inspired by this clinical scenario, a mobile application was designed and implemented providing surgeons with decision-relevant information on potential organ receivers. It assists them in considering the prospects of forthcoming organ transplantations and facilitates decision making and documentation with regard to high security demands. The described system services three organ receiver lists and is used by the surgeons in every transplantation procedure. After a 6-month period of clinical usage, the system has been evaluated in terms of handling, clinical benefit and total time savings. Intuitive, ubiquitous access to decision-relevant patient data and authenticated documentation were the major improvements with average total time savings of 50 min in comparison to the old system.

  2. A study on spatial decision support systems for HIV/AIDS prevention based on COM GIS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kun; Luo, Huasong; Peng, Shungyun; Xu, Quanli

    2007-06-01

    Based on the deeply analysis of the current status and the existing problems of GIS technology applications in Epidemiology, this paper has proposed the method and process for establishing the spatial decision support systems of AIDS epidemic prevention by integrating the COM GIS, Spatial Database, GPS, Remote Sensing, and Communication technologies, as well as ASP and ActiveX software development technologies. One of the most important issues for constructing the spatial decision support systems of AIDS epidemic prevention is how to integrate the AIDS spreading models with GIS. The capabilities of GIS applications in the AIDS epidemic prevention have been described here in this paper firstly. Then some mature epidemic spreading models have also been discussed for extracting the computation parameters. Furthermore, a technical schema has been proposed for integrating the AIDS spreading models with GIS and relevant geospatial technologies, in which the GIS and model running platforms share a common spatial database and the computing results can be spatially visualized on Desktop or Web GIS clients. Finally, a complete solution for establishing the decision support systems of AIDS epidemic prevention has been offered in this paper based on the model integrating methods and ESRI COM GIS software packages. The general decision support systems are composed of data acquisition sub-systems, network communication sub-systems, model integrating sub-systems, AIDS epidemic information spatial database sub-systems, AIDS epidemic information querying and statistical analysis sub-systems, AIDS epidemic dynamic surveillance sub-systems, AIDS epidemic information spatial analysis and decision support sub-systems, as well as AIDS epidemic information publishing sub-systems based on Web GIS.

  3. The changing face of HIV/AIDS in treated patients.

    PubMed

    Llibre, Josep M; Falco, Vicenç; Tural, Cristina; Negredo, Eugenia; Pineda, Juan A; Muñoz, Jose; Ortega, Enrique; Videla, Sebastia; Sirera, Guillem; Martinez, Esteban; Miralles, Celia; Iribarren, Josean; Galindo, Maria J; Domingo, Pere; d'Arminio-Monforte, Antonella; Miro, Jose M; Clotet, Bonaventura

    2009-07-01

    The spectrum of complications emerging in successfully treated HIV-infected patients has dramatically changed since the advent of HAART. Typical AIDS-defining illnesses have been substituted by new comorbid conditions that threaten even those patients who maintain virologic suppression. Proper management of cardiovascular risk, and early diagnosis of AIDS-related and, particularly, non-AIDS-related malignancies (including papilomavirus-related neoplasms) must be introduced into the routine of care. Hot areas of investigation include HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders, hepatitis B and C coinfection, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy and tuberculosis. Bone and kidney long-term toxicities and lipoatrophy remain as issues of paramount importance. The identification and early treatment of immune reconstitution disease is also of major interest, specially in those patients starting their antiretroviral treatment with severe CD4 cell depletion. The present review focuses on these twelve areas of increasing interest for physicians currently facing successfully treated HIV+ patients.

  4. The Relationship between Graphic Aids in a Business Report and Decision-Making and Cognitive Style of a Report Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Paula E.

    1992-01-01

    Findings of three tests given to 267 undergraduates (Wonderlic Personnel Test, Group Embedded Figures Test, and a case problem in 4 formats) were that neither graphic aids alone nor cognitive style alone significantly affected decision making; and when graphic aids and cognitive style are considered in conjunction, cognitive style is responsible…

  5. Understanding diabetes in patients with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the incidence, pathogenetic mechanisms and management strategies of diabetes mellitus in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). It classifies patients based on the aetiopathogenetic mechanisms, and proposes rational methods of management of the condition, based on aetiopathogenesis and concomitant pharmacotherapy. PMID:21232158

  6. Latent ocular deviations in patients with advanced AIDS.

    PubMed

    España-Gregori, E; Montés-Micó, R; Bueno-Gimeno, I; Díaz-Llopi, M; Menezo-Rozalén, J L

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine horizontal latent ocular deviations in patients with advanced AIDS (CD4+ count <0.050 x 10(9)/l) and to compare with normal values by means of the von Graefe technique. Twenty patients aged between 17 and 44 years with AIDS and aged-matched control groups were submitted to study. The AC/A ratio was also measured in both groups using the Gradient test. The AIDS patients showed a horizontal latent deviation value of 0.28+/-1.07delta exo at near (40 cm.) and 2.12+/-1.37delta eso at distance (6 m). The AC/A ratio obtained was 2.03+/-0.65. Statistically significant differences were obtained in relation to aged-matched control group at near and at distance (p<0.01). The horizontal latent ocular deviation at near and at distance in advanced AIDS patients showed lower values than the expected. The AC/A relationship also was lower. The results obtained in this study indicate that AIDS patients suffer a divergence insufficiency, which could add to other visual complaints such as blurred vision, photophobia, nyctalopia and reading difficulty.

  7. Informed choice about breast cancer prevention: randomized controlled trial of an online decision aid intervention

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Tamoxifen and raloxifene are chemopreventive drugs that can reduce women's relative risk of primary breast cancer by 50%; however, most women eligible for these drugs have chosen not to take them. The reasons for low uptake may be related to women's knowledge or attitudes towards the drugs. We aimed to examine the impact of an online breast cancer chemoprevention decision aid (DA) on informed intentions and decisions of women at high risk of breast cancer. Methods We conducted a randomized clinical trial, assessing the effect of a DA about breast cancer chemoprevention on informed choices about chemoprevention. Women (n = 585), 46- to 74-years old old, completed online baseline, post-test, and three-month follow-up questionnaires. Participants were randomly assigned to either an intervention group, a standard control group that answered questions about chemoprevention at baseline, or a three-month control group that did not answer questions about chemoprevention at baseline. The main outcome measures were whether women's intentions and decisions regarding chemoprevention drugs were informed, and whether women who viewed the DA were more likely to make informed decisions than women who did not view the DA, using a dichotomous composite variable 'informed choice' (yes/no) to classify informed decisions as those reflecting sufficient knowledge and concordance between a woman's decision and relevant attitudes. Results Analyses showed that more intervention than standard control participants (52.7% versus 5.9%) made informed decisions at post-test, P <0.001. At the three-month follow-up, differences in rates of informed choice between intervention (16.9%) and both control groups (11.8% and 8.0%) were statistically non-significant, P = 0.067. Conclusions The DA increased informed decision making about breast cancer chemoprevention, although the impact on knowledge diminished over time. This study was not designed to determine how much knowledge decision

  8. Randomized Trial of a Computerized Touch Screen Decision Aid to Increase Acceptance of Colonoscopy Screening in an African American Population with Limited Literacy.

    PubMed

    Ruzek, Sheryl B; Bass, Sarah Bauerle; Greener, Judith; Wolak, Caitlin; Gordon, Thomas F

    2016-10-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a touch screen decision aid to increase acceptance of colonoscopy screening among African American patients with low literacy, developed and tailored using perceptual mapping methods grounded in Illness Self-Regulation and Information-Communication Theories. The pilot randomized controlled trial investigated the effects of a theory-based intervention on patients' acceptance of screening, including their perceptions of educational value, feelings about colonoscopy, likelihood to undergo screening, and decisional conflict about colonoscopy screening. Sixty-one African American patients with low literacy, aged 50-70 years, with no history of colonoscopy, were randomly assigned to receive a computerized touch screen decision aid (CDA; n = 33) or a literacy appropriate print tool (PT; n = 28) immediately before a primary care appointment in an urban, university-affiliated general internal medicine clinic. Patients rated the CDA significantly higher than the PT on all indicators of acceptance, including the helpfulness of the information for making a screening decision, and reported positive feelings about colonoscopy, greater likelihood to be screened, and lower decisional conflict. Results showed that a touch screen decision tool is acceptable to African American patients with low iteracy and, by increasing intent to screen, may increase rates of colonoscopy screening.

  9. Health Concerns (excluding AIDS) for Male Homosexual Patients

    PubMed Central

    Willoughby, Brian C.

    1988-01-01

    Since 1981, the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) has emerged as the major infectious epidemic of our time and has focused much attention on the male homosexual community. While AIDS is the most serious of gay-related health concerns, it is only one of several infectious diseases that have particular relevance for this group of patients. In addition, the mere acknowledgement of homosexuality by a male patient evokes unique psychosocial concerns that are important considerations for the primary health-care provider. The author of this article describes an approach to gay male patients for those who provide health care to such men and provides a review of specific infectious diseases (excluding AIDS) for which they are at risk. PMID:21253077

  10. [Diagnosis and treatment of ocular viral infections in AIDS patients].

    PubMed

    Guex-Crosier, Y

    1998-11-01

    Ocular complication of AIDS are seen in about 75% of patients. Viral infections are predominant and can involve either external segment in the eye (Herpes type 8 in Kaposi sarcoma, molluscum contagiosum, Herpes simplex and zoster), or the posterior segment of the eye (CMV retinitis). The introduction of a Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) which associates two reverse transcriptase inhibitors and one antiprotease has changed the evolution of AIDS. The decrease of onset of CMV retinitis in AIDS patient is one of the best exemple. For the first time it was possible to stop the maintenance therapy against CMV retinitis in patients that have a sufficient increase in CD4+ cells and they did not present any relapse of CMV retinitis. But an increase of ocular inflammation can be observed with the onset of HAART such as uveitis or cystoid macular edema.

  11. Informed Choice for Participation in Down Syndrome Screening: Development and Content of a Web-Based Decision Aid

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Helle Ploug; Draborg, Eva; Pedersen, Claus Duedal; Lamont, Ronald F; Jørgensen, Jan Stener

    2015-01-01

    Background In Denmark, all pregnant women are offered screening in early pregnancy to estimate the risk of having a fetus with Down syndrome. Pregnant women participating in the screening program should be provided with information and support to allow them to make an informed choice. There is increasing interest in the use of Web-based technology to provide information and digital solutions for the delivery of health care. Objective The aim of this study was to develop an eHealth tool that contained accurate and relevant information to allow pregnant women to make an informed choice about whether to accept or reject participation in screening for Down syndrome. Methods The development of the eHealth tool involved the cooperation of researchers, technology experts, clinicians, and users. The underlying theoretical framework was based on participatory design, the International Patient Decision Aid Standards (IPDAS) Collaboration guide to develop a patient decision aid, and the roadmap for developing eHealth technologies from the Center for eHealth Research and Disease Management (CeHRes). The methods employed were a systematic literature search, focus group interviews with 3 care providers and 14 pregnant women, and 2 weeks of field observations. A qualitative descriptive approach was used in this study. Results Relevant themes from pregnant women and care providers with respect to information about Down syndrome screening were identified. Based on formalized processes for developing patient decision aids and eHealth technologies, an interactive website containing information about Down syndrome, methods of screening, and consequences of the test was developed. The intervention was based on user requests and needs, and reflected the current hospital practice and national guidelines. Conclusions This paper describes the development and content of an interactive website to support pregnant women in making informed choices about Down syndrome screening. To develop the

  12. Evaluation of a Dispatcher's Route Optimization Decision Aid to Avoid Aviation Weather Hazards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorneich, Michael C.; Olofinboba, Olu; Pratt, Steve; Osborne, Dannielle; Feyereisen, Thea; Latorella, Kara

    2003-01-01

    This document describes the results and analysis of the formal evaluation plan for the Honeywell software tool developed under the NASA AWIN (Aviation Weather Information) 'Weather Avoidance using Route Optimization as a Decision Aid' project. The software tool aims to provide airline dispatchers with a decision aid for selecting optimal routes that avoid weather and other hazards. This evaluation compares and contrasts route selection performance with the AWIN tool to that of subjects using a more traditional dispatcher environment. The evaluation assesses gains in safety, in fuel efficiency of planned routes, and in time efficiency in the pre-flight dispatch process through the use of the AWIN decision aid. In addition, we are interested in how this AWIN tool affects constructs that can be related to performance. The construct of Situation Awareness (SA), workload, trust in an information system, and operator acceptance are assessed using established scales, where these exist, as well as through the evaluation of questionnaire responses and subject comments. The intention of the experiment is to set up a simulated operations area for the dispatchers to work in. They will be given scenarios in which they are presented with stored company routes for a particular city-pair and aircraft type. A diverse set of external weather information sources is represented by a stand-alone display (MOCK), containing the actual historical weather data typically used by dispatchers. There is also the possibility of presenting selected weather data on the route visualization tool. The company routes have not been modified to avoid the weather except in the case of one additional route generated by the Honeywell prototype flight planning system. The dispatcher will be required to choose the most appropriate and efficient flight plan route in the displayed weather conditions. The route may be modified manually or may be chosen from those automatically displayed.

  13. A decision aid regarding long-term tube feeding targeting substitute decision makers for cognitively impaired older persons in Japan: A small-scale before-and-after study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In Japan, there is no decision-making guide regarding long-term tube feeding that specifically targets individuals making decisions on behalf of cognitively impaired older persons (substitute decision makers). The objective of this study was to describe the development and evaluation of such a decision aid. Methods In this before-and-after study, participants comprised substitute decision makers for 13 cognitively impaired inpatients aged 65 years and older who were being considered for placement of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube in acute care hospitals and mixed-care hospitals in Japan. Questionnaires were used to compare substitute decision makers’ knowledge, decisional conflict, and predisposition regarding feeding tube placement before and after exposure to a decision aid. The acceptability of the decision aid was also assessed. Paired t-tests were used to compare participants’ knowledge and decisional conflict scores before and after using the decision aid. Results Substitute decision makers showed significantly increased knowledge (P < .001) and decreased decisional conflict (P < .01) regarding long-term tube feeding after using the decision aid. All substitute decision makers found the decision aid helpful and acceptable. Conclusions The decision aid facilitated the decision-making process of substitute decision makers by decreasing decisional conflict and increasing knowledge. PMID:24495735

  14. Enhanced mucosal reactions in AIDS patients receiving oropharyngeal irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, E.B.; Findlay, P.; Gelmann, E.; Lane, H.C.; Zabell, A.

    1987-09-01

    The oropharynx and hypopharynx are common sites of involvement in AIDS patients with mucocutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma. The radiotherapist is often asked to intervene with these patients due to problems with pain, difficulty in swallowing, or impending airway obstruction. We have noted an unexpected decrease in normal tissue tolerance of the oropharyngeal mucosa to irradiation in AIDS patients treated in our department. Data on 12 patients with AIDS and Kaposi's sarcoma receiving oropharyngeal irradiation are presented here. Doses ranged from 1000 cGy to 1800 cGy delivered in 150-300 cGy fractions. Seven of eight patients receiving doses of 1200 cGy or more developed some degree of mucositis, four of these developed mucositis severe enough to require termination of treatment. All patients in this study received some form of systemic therapy during the course of their disease, but no influence on mucosal response to irradiation was noted. Four patients received total body skin electron treatments, but no effect on degree of mucositis was seen. Presence or absence of oral candidiasis was not an obvious factor in the radiation response of the oral mucosa in these patients. T4 counts were done on 9 of the 12 patients. Although the timing of the T4 counts was quite variable, no correlation with immune status and degree of mucositis was found. The degree of mucositis seen in these patients occurred at doses much lower than expected based on normal tissue tolerances seen in other patient populations receiving head and neck irradiations. We believe that the ability of the oral mucosa to repair radiation damage is somehow altered in patients with AIDS.

  15. A multi-criteria decision aid methodology to design electric vehicles public charging networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raposo, João; Rodrigues, Ana; Silva, Carlos; Dentinho, Tomaz

    2015-05-01

    This article presents a new multi-criteria decision aid methodology, dynamic-PROMETHEE, here used to design electric vehicle charging networks. In applying this methodology to a Portuguese city, results suggest that it is effective in designing electric vehicle charging networks, generating time and policy based scenarios, considering offer and demand and the city's urban structure. Dynamic-PROMETHE adds to the already known PROMETHEE's characteristics other useful features, such as decision memory over time, versatility and adaptability. The case study, used here to present the dynamic-PROMETHEE, served as inspiration and base to create this new methodology. It can be used to model different problems and scenarios that may present similar requirement characteristics.

  16. The NIAID Division of AIDS enterprise information system: integrated decision support for global clinical research programs.

    PubMed

    Kagan, Jonathan M; Gupta, Nitin; Varghese, Suresh; Virkar, Hemant

    2011-12-01

    The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Division of AIDS (DAIDS) Enterprise Information System (DAIDS-ES) is a web-based system that supports NIAID in the scientific, strategic, and tactical management of its global clinical research programs for HIV/AIDS vaccines, prevention, and therapeutics. Different from most commercial clinical trials information systems, which are typically protocol-driven, the DAIDS-ES was built to exchange information with those types of systems and integrate it in ways that help scientific program directors lead the research effort and keep pace with the complex and ever-changing global HIV/AIDS pandemic. Whereas commercially available clinical trials support systems are not usually disease-focused, DAIDS-ES was specifically designed to capture and incorporate unique scientific, demographic, and logistical aspects of HIV/AIDS treatment, prevention, and vaccine research in order to provide a rich source of information to guide informed decision-making. Sharing data across its internal components and with external systems, using defined vocabularies, open standards and flexible interfaces, the DAIDS-ES enables NIAID, its global collaborators and stakeholders, access to timely, quality information about NIAID-supported clinical trials which is utilized to: (1) analyze the research portfolio, assess capacity, identify opportunities, and avoid redundancies; (2) help support study safety, quality, ethics, and regulatory compliance; (3) conduct evidence-based policy analysis and business process re-engineering for improved efficiency. This report summarizes how the DAIDS-ES was conceptualized, how it differs from typical clinical trial support systems, the rationale for key design choices, and examples of how it is being used to advance the efficiency and effectiveness of NIAID's HIV/AIDS clinical research programs.

  17. Data-driven decision-making tools to improve public resource allocation for care and prevention of HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Gery W; Bloom, Evan W; Lowsky, David J; Linthicum, Mark T; Juday, Timothy; Rosenblatt, Lisa; Kulkarni, Sonali; Goldman, Dana P; Sayles, Jennifer N

    2014-03-01

    Public health agencies face difficult decisions when allocating scarce resources to control the spread of HIV/AIDS. Decisions are often made with few local empirical data. We demonstrated the use of the robust decision making approach in Los Angeles County, an approach that is data driven and allows decision makers to compare the performance of various intervention strategies across thousands of simulated future scenarios. We found that the prevailing strategy of emphasizing behavioral risk reduction interventions was unlikely to achieve the policy goals of the national HIV/AIDS strategy. Of the alternative strategies we examined, those that invested most heavily in interventions to initiate antiretroviral treatment and support treatment adherence were the most likely to achieve policy objectives. By employing similar methods, other public health agencies can identify robust strategies and invest in interventions more likely to achieve HIV/AIDS policy goals.

  18. Preliminary testing of a just‐in‐time, user‐defined values clarification exercise to aid lower literate women in making informed breast cancer treatment decisions

    PubMed Central

    Jibaja‐Weiss, Maria L.; Volk, Robert J.; Friedman, Lois C.; Granchi, Thomas S.; Neff, Nancy E.; Spann, Stephen J.; Robinson, Emily K.; Aoki, Noriaki; Robert Beck, J.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Objective  To report on the initial testing of a values clarification exercise utilizing a jewellery box within a computerized patient decision aid (CPtDA) designed to assist women in making a surgical breast cancer treatment decision. Design  Pre‐post design, with patients interviewed after diagnosis, and then after completing the CPtDA sometime later at their preoperative visit. Sample  Fifty‐one female patients, who are low literate and naïve computer users, newly diagnosed with early stage breast cancer from two urban public hospitals. Intervention  A computerized decision aid that combines entertainment‐education (edutainment) with enhanced (factual) content. An interactive jewellery box is featured to assist women in: (1) recording and reflecting over issues of concern with possible treatments, (2) deliberating over surgery decision, and (3) communicating with physician and significant others. Outcomes  Patients’ use of the jewellery box to store issues during completion of the CPtDA, and perceived clarity of values in making a treatment decision, as measured by a low literacy version of the Decisional Conflict Scale (DCS). Results  Over half of the participants utilized the jewellery box to store issues they found concerning about the treatments. On average, users flagged over 13 issues of concern with the treatments. Scores on the DCS Uncertainty and Feeling Unclear about Values subscales were lower after the intervention compared to before the decision was made. Conclusions  A values clarification exercise using an interactive jewellery box may be a promising method for promoting informed treatment decision making by low literacy breast cancer patients. PMID:16911136

  19. Neuropsychological abnormalities in AIDS and asymptomatic HIV seropositive patients.

    PubMed Central

    Villa, G; Monteleone, D; Marra, C; Bartoli, A; Antinori, A; Pallavicini, F; Tamburrini, E; Izzi, I

    1993-01-01

    Neuropsychological and immunological parameters were studied in 36 AIDS patients with early disease and without clinical, laboratory, and neuroradiological signs of CNS impairment, and also in 33 asymptomatic HIV seropositive subjects. Many AIDS patients performed abnormally on timed psychomotor tasks, tasks involving sequencing and "set-shifting", and memory tasks stressing attention, learning, active retrieval, and monitoring of information. Asymptomatic HIV seropositive subjects as a group did not perform significantly worse than controls. However, on the basis of a cut off number of pathological performances on neuropsychological tasks, 52.8% of AIDS and 30.3% of asymptomatic HIV seropositive subjects had cognitive impairment, compared with 3.9% of HIV seronegative controls. Low values of CD4+ cells and of CD4+/CD8+ ratio and high titres of P-24 antigen in the blood prevailed among subjects with cognitive impairment, especially in the asymptomatic HIV seropositive group. PMID:8350104

  20. Results from a randomized trial of a web-based, tailored decision aid for women at high risk for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Banegas, Matthew P.; McClure, Jennifer B.; Barlow, William E.; Ubel, Peter A.; Smith, Dylan M.; Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J.; Greene, Sarah M.; Fagerlin, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the impact of Guide to Decide (GtD), a web-based, personally-tailored decision aid designed to inform women’s decisions about prophylactic tamoxifen and raloxifene use. Methods Postmenopausal women, age 46–74, with BCRAT 5-year risk ≥1.66% and no prior history of breast cancer were randomized to one of three study arms: intervention (n = 690), Time 1 control (n = 160), or 3-month control (n = 162). Intervention participants viewed GtD prior to completing a post-test and 3 month follow-up assessment. Controls did not. We assessed the impact of GtD on women’s decisional conflict levels and treatment decision behavior at post-test and at 3 months, respectively. Results Intervention participants had significantly lower decisional conflict levels at post-test (p < 0.001) and significantly higher odds of making a decision about whether or not to take prophylactic tamoxifen or raloxifene at 3-month follow-up (p < 0.001) compared to control participants. Conclusion GtD lowered decisional conflict and helped women at high risk of breast cancer decide whether to take prophylactic tamoxifen or raloxifene to reduce their cancer risk. Practice implications Web-based, tailored decision aids should be used more routinely to facilitate informed medical decisions, reduce patients’ decisional conflict, and empower patients to choose the treatment strategy that best reflects their own values. PMID:23395006

  1. Patient participation in palliative care decisions: An ethnographic discourse analysis.

    PubMed

    Bélanger, Emmanuelle; Rodríguez, Charo; Groleau, Danielle; Légaré, France; MacDonald, Mary Ellen; Marchand, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The participation of patients in making decisions about their care is especially important towards the end of life because palliative care decisions involve extensive uncertainty and are heavily influenced by personal values. Yet, there is a scarcity of studies directly observing clinical interactions between palliative patients and their health care providers. In this study, we aimed to understand how patient participation in palliative care decisions is constructed through discourse in a community hospital-based palliative care team. This qualitative study combined ethnographic observations of a palliative care team with discourse analysis. Eighteen palliative care patients with cancer diagnoses, six family physicians, and two nurses were involved in the study. Multiple interactions were observed between each patient and health care providers over the course of 1 year, for a total of 101 consultations, 24 of which were audio-recorded. The analysis consisted in looking for the interpretive repertoires (i.e., familiar lines of argument used to justify actions) that were used to justify patient participation in decision-making during clinical interactions, as well as exploring their implications for decision roles and end-of-life care. Patients and their health care providers seldom addressed their decision-making roles explicitly. Rather, they constructed patient participation in palliative care decisions in a covert manner. Four interpretive repertoires were used to justify patient participation: (1) exposing uncertainty, (2) co-constructing patient preferences, (3) affirming patient autonomy, and finally (4) upholding the authority of health care providers. The results demonstrate how patients and health care providers used these arguments to negotiate their respective roles in decision-making. In conclusion, patients and health care providers used a variety of interpretive repertoires to covertly negotiate their roles in decision-making, and to legitimize

  2. A qualitative study on a decision aid for breast cancer screening: Views from women and health professionals.

    PubMed

    Toledo-Chávarri, A; Rué, M; Codern-Bové, N; Carles-Lavila, M; Perestelo-Pérez, L; Pérez-Lacasta, M J; Feijoo-Cid, M

    2017-02-01

    This qualitative study evaluates a decision aid that includes the benefits and harms of breast cancer screening and analyses women's perception of the information received and healthcare professionals' perceptions of the convenience of providing it. Seven focus groups of women aged 40-69 years (n = 39) and two groups of healthcare professionals (n = 23) were conducted in Catalonia and the Canary Islands. The focus groups consisted of guided discussions regarding decision-making about breast cancer screening, and acceptability and feasibility of the decision aid. A content analysis was performed. Women positively value receiving information regarding the benefits and harms of breast cancer screening. Several women had difficulties understanding some concepts, especially those regarding overdiagnosis. Women preferred to share the decisions on screening with healthcare professionals. The professionals noted the lack of inclusion of some harms and benefits in the decision aid, and proposed improving the clarity of the statistical information. The information on overdiagnosis generates confusion among women and controversy among professionals. Faced with the new information presented by the decision aid, the majority of women prefer shared decision-making; however, its feasibility might be limited by a lack of knowledge and attitudes of rejection from healthcare professionals.

  3. Cultural and Linguistic Adaptation of a Multimedia Colorectal Cancer Screening Decision Aid for Spanish Speaking Latinos

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Linda K.; Reuland, Daniel; Jolles, Monica; Clay, Rebecca; Pignone, Michael

    2014-01-01

    As the United States becomes more linguistically and culturally diverse, there is a need for effective health communication interventions that target diverse and most vulnerable populations. Latinos also have the lowest colorectal (CRC) screening rates of any ethnic group in the U.S. To address such disparities, health communication interventionists are often faced with the challenge to adapt existing interventions from English into Spanish in a way that retains essential elements of the original intervention while also addressing the linguistic needs and cultural perspectives of the target population. We describe the conceptual framework, context, rationale, methods, and findings of a formative research process used in creating a Spanish language version of an evidenced-based (English language) multimedia CRC screening decision aid. Our multi-step process included identification of essential elements of the existing intervention, literature review, assessment of the regional context and engagement of key stakeholders, and solicitation of direct input from target population. We integrated these findings in the creation of the new adapted intervention. We describe how we used this process to identify and integrate socio-cultural themes such as personalism (personalismo), familism (familismo), fear (miedo), embarrassment (verguenza), power distance (respeto), machismo, and trust (confianza) into the Spanish language decision aid. PMID:24328496

  4. Patient participation in palliative care decisions: An ethnographic discourse analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bélanger, Emmanuelle; Rodríguez, Charo; Groleau, Danielle; Légaré, France; MacDonald, Mary Ellen; Marchand, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The participation of patients in making decisions about their care is especially important towards the end of life because palliative care decisions involve extensive uncertainty and are heavily influenced by personal values. Yet, there is a scarcity of studies directly observing clinical interactions between palliative patients and their health care providers. In this study, we aimed to understand how patient participation in palliative care decisions is constructed through discourse in a community hospital-based palliative care team. This qualitative study combined ethnographic observations of a palliative care team with discourse analysis. Eighteen palliative care patients with cancer diagnoses, six family physicians, and two nurses were involved in the study. Multiple interactions were observed between each patient and health care providers over the course of 1 year, for a total of 101 consultations, 24 of which were audio-recorded. The analysis consisted in looking for the interpretive repertoires (i.e., familiar lines of argument used to justify actions) that were used to justify patient participation in decision-making during clinical interactions, as well as exploring their implications for decision roles and end-of-life care. Patients and their health care providers seldom addressed their decision-making roles explicitly. Rather, they constructed patient participation in palliative care decisions in a covert manner. Four interpretive repertoires were used to justify patient participation: (1) exposing uncertainty, (2) co-constructing patient preferences, (3) affirming patient autonomy, and finally (4) upholding the authority of health care providers. The results demonstrate how patients and health care providers used these arguments to negotiate their respective roles in decision-making. In conclusion, patients and health care providers used a variety of interpretive repertoires to covertly negotiate their roles in decision-making, and to legitimize

  5. [Secondary bladder lymphoma in a patient with AIDS].

    PubMed

    Vendrell, J R; Alcaraz, A; Gutíerrez, R; Rodríguez, A; Barranco, M A; Carretero, P

    1996-10-01

    Contribution of one case of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) with vesical involvement, that presented clinically with urological symptomatology. Vesical involvement is typical of NHL, and is becoming more frequent in association with the increased number of AIDS patients under immunosuppressive therapy. It should be expected that this currently unusual entity will become more common in the future.

  6. Bordetella bronchiseptica pneumonia in a patient with AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    de la Fuente, J; Albo, C; Rodríguez, A; Sopeña, B; Martínez, C

    1994-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica is recognised as a respiratory tract pathogen in many mammalian species, but has rarely been implicated in human infection. A case is reported of pneumonia caused by B bronchiseptica in a patient suffering from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Images PMID:8066571

  7. Shared decision making for patients with type 2 diabetes: a randomized trial in primary care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Patient-centered diabetes care requires shared decision making (SDM). Decision aids promote SDM, but their efficacy in nonacademic and rural primary care clinics is unclear. Methods We cluster-randomized 10 practices in a concealed fashion to implement either a decision aid (DA) about starting statins or one about choosing antihyperglycemic agents. Each practice served as a control group for another practice implementing the other type of DA. From April 2011 to July 2012, 103 (DA=53) patients with type 2 diabetes participated in the trial. We used patient and clinician surveys administered after the clinical encounter to collect decisional outcomes (patient knowledge and comfort with decision making, patient and clinician satisfaction). Medical records provided data on metabolic control. Pharmacy fill profiles provided data for estimating adherence to therapy. Results Compared to usual care, patients receiving the DA were more likely to report discussing medications (77% vs. 45%, p<.001), were more likely to answer knowledge questions correctly (risk reduction with statins 61% vs. 33%, p=.07; knowledge about options 57% vs. 33%, p=.002) and were more engaged by their clinicians in decision making (50. vs. 28, difference 21.4 (95% CI 6.4, 36.3), p=.01). We found no significant impact on patient satisfaction, medication starts, adherence or clinical outcomes, in part due to limited statistical power. Conclusion DAs improved decisional outcomes without significant effect on clinical outcomes. DAs designed for point-of-care use with type 2 diabetes patients promoted shared decision making in nonacademic and rural primary care practices. Trial Registration NCT01029288 PMID:23927490

  8. Assessing the feasibility and quality of shared decision making in China: evaluating a clinical encounter intervention for Chinese patients

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Rongchong; Song, Xiantao; Wu, Jian; Huang, Wei; Leppin, Aaron L; Gionfriddo, Michael R; Liu, Yongxian; Boehmer, Kasey R; Ting, Henry H; Montori, Victor M

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using the Statin Choice decision aid to have discussions about starting a statin medication for cardiovascular risk reduction in Chinese patients with stable coronary artery diseases. Methods A prospective, pilot study of the Statin Choice decision aid in two teaching hospitals in Northern China was conducted. A total of seven clinicians were enrolled and underwent a 12-hour, group-based, in-person training on shared decision making (SDM) and the Statin Choice decision aid. Then, these clinicians used the Statin Choice decision aid in patients during a clinical encounter. A total of 86 patients aged 40−80 years, who had stable angina, were enrolled. All clinical encounters were video recorded. A team of three researchers viewed and scored all the encounter recordings to evaluate the SDM process and fidelity to the intervention using the OPTION scale and Fidelity scale, respectively. All the patients were followed up for 12 months to record adherence to statin and any major adverse cardiac events (MACEs). Results The average scores on the OPTION normalized score and Fidelity scale were 21 (range, 3–32; out of a possible, 48) and 10 (range, 6–10; out of a possible, 10), respectively. This suggested that Chinese clinicians who were using Statin Choice in their patients were able to exhibit behaviors consistent with SDM at a level that is similar to that reported in Western countries. After SDM, the statin adherence was 94.5% (69/73), and the proportion of MACEs was 2.9% (2/69). Conclusion Using an encounter decision aid developed in the US, it was feasible to implement SDM in a referral cardiology practice in Mainland China. Further work to ensure that the encounter aid is pertinent to the Chinese population and that SDM is tested in at-risk patients could contribute to the implementation of SDM across Mainland China. PMID:27881912

  9. Perceived Barriers and Facilitators of Using a Web-Based Interactive Decision Aid for Colorectal Cancer Screening in Community Practice Settings: Findings From Focus Groups With Primary Care Clinicians and Medical Office Staff

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Information is lacking about the capacity of those working in community practice settings to utilize health information technology for colorectal cancer screening. Objective To address this gap we asked those working in community practice settings to share their perspectives about how the implementation of a Web-based patient-led decision aid might affect patient-clinician conversations about colorectal cancer screening and the day-to-day clinical workflow. Methods Five focus groups in five community practice settings were conducted with 8 physicians, 1 physician assistant, and 18 clinic staff. Focus groups were organized using a semistructured discussion guide designed to identify factors that mediate and impede the use of a Web-based decision aid intended to clarify patient preferences for colorectal cancer screening and to trigger shared decision making during the clinical encounter. Results All physicians, the physician assistant, and 8 of the 18 clinic staff were active participants in the focus groups. Clinician and staff participants from each setting reported a belief that the Web-based patient-led decision aid could be an informative and educational tool; in all but one setting participants reported a readiness to recommend the tool to patients. The exception related to clinicians from one clinic who described a preference for patients having fewer screening choices, noting that a colonoscopy was the preferred screening modality for patients in their clinic. Perceived barriers to utilizing the Web-based decision aid included patients’ lack of Internet access or low computer literacy, and potential impediments to the clinics’ daily workflow. Expanding patients’ use of an online decision aid that is both easy to access and understand and that is utilized by patients outside of the office visit was described as a potentially efficient means for soliciting patients’ screening preferences. Participants described that a system to link the

  10. AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000594.htm HIV/AIDS To use the sharing features on this page, ... immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the virus that causes AIDS. When a person becomes infected with HIV, the ...

  11. Clinico-Epidemiological Analysis of HIV/AIDS Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ertunc, Baris; Kaya, Selcuk; Koksal, Iftihar

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to examine clinico-epidemiological properties of HIV/AIDS patients. Materials and Methods: For this purpose, 115 HIV/AIDS patients monitored in our clinic between January 1, 1998, and December 31, 2013, were retrospectively evaluated. Results: For the 115 patients with a diagnosis of HIV/AIDS that we monitored, the mean age at the time of presentation was 34.5±13.21 (10–79) years. Eighty-nine (76.5%) patients were male and 27 (23.5%), female. In this study, HIV/AIDS was the most prevalent in the young male population with a low educational and sociocultural level. The most common mode of transmission in our patients was heterosexual relations: approximately 1 patient in 3 had a history of traveling to countries with a high prevalence of HIV/AIDS, namely, Russia and Ukraine. The examination of diagnosis with respect to years showed an increase in new cases since 2008. Only 21 (18.3%) of our patients were diagnosed through clinical symptoms, while 91 (81.7%) during routine scanning. At first presentation, 68% of our patients were stage A; 4.7%, stage B; and 27.3%, stage C. The mean length of the monitoring of our patients was 2.74 years (2–180 months). Thirteen (11.3%) patients died due to opportunistic infections and malignities. The most common opportunistic infection was tuberculosis (16.5%), followed by syphilis and HBV. Malignity, most commonly intracranial tumor, was seen in 8.6% patients. Conclusion: The disease was generally seen in the young male population with a low sociocultural level, and it was most frequently transmitted by heterosexual sexual contact. This clearly shows the importance of sufficient, accurate information, and education on the subject of the disease and its prevention. The fact that many of our patients were diagnosed in the late stage due to stigma and that diagnosis was largely made through scanning tests confirms the importance of these tests in early diagnosis. PMID:28149137

  12. Nutritional status in patients with HIV infection and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Stambullian, Marcela; Feliu, Susana; Slobodianik, Nora H

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the nutritional status of adults with HIV infection or with AIDS through the use of biochemical parameters. The study was performed on 43 patients (19 HIV+ and 24 AIDS patients), between 26 and 44 years of age, from low and medium socioeconomic status, with access to health care services; 35 patients were under highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) treatment. Body weight and height were determined, and the Body Mass Index calculated (kg/m2). Blood samples were collected from fasting patients. Plasma cholesterol (total, HDL and LDL), triacylglycerol, total protein, apolipoproteins A-I and B, albumin, transthyretin, retinol binding protein, and ceruloplasmin concentrations were determined. Plasma levels of zinc, copper, and selenium were determined in a haemolysis-free sample by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Statistical analyses were performed with the Student's t-test. AIDS patients showed changes in biochemical parameters, particularly an increase in fibrinogen and a trend to decreased transthyretin levels. These findings stress the importance of the inclusion of functional biochemical parameters in the periodic evaluation of these patients. This would allow an early assessment of the need for appropriate nutritional support, implemented along with the specific retroviral treatment. This would aim at delaying the progression of the disease, and might improve the prospects of survival and quality of life.

  13. Opsoclonus-myoclonus-ataxia syndrome in an AIDS patient.

    PubMed

    Vale, Thiago Cardoso; Silva, Rodrigo Alencar E; Cunningham, Mauro César Quintão E Silva; Maia, Débora Palma; Camargos, Sarah Teixeira; Cardoso, Francisco

    2013-12-01

    We report the case of a 38-year-old woman with AIDS who developed opsoclonus-myoclonus-ataxia syndrome during a period different from other cases reported in literature. Opsoclonus-myoclonus-ataxia syndrome had already been reported as the initial neurological presentation of AIDS, as well as at the time of HIV-seroconversion and immune reconstitution syndrome. Our case is unique since the patient had an elevated CD4 count and negative viral load in the period when the opsoclonus-myoclonus-ataxia syndrome occurred.

  14. Cognitive Predictors of Understanding Treatment Decisions in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Gerstenecker, Adam; Meneses, Karen; Duff, Kevin; Fiveash, John B.; Marson, Daniel C.; Triebel, Kristen L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Medical decision-making capacity is a higher-order functional skill that refers to a patient’s ability to make informed, sound decisions related to care and treatment. In a medical context, understanding is the most cognitively demanding consent standard and refers to a patient’s ability to comprehend information to the extent that informed decisions can be made. Methods The association between reasoning and cognition was examined using data from 41 patients with diagnosed brain metastasis. All diagnoses were made by a board-certified radiation oncologist and were verified histologically. In total, 41 demographically-matched, cognitively healthy controls were also included to aid in classifying patients with brain metastasis according to reasoning status (i.e., intact or impaired). Results Results indicate that measures of simple attention, verbal fluency, verbal memory, processing speed, and executive functioning were all associated with understanding, and that verbal memory and phonemic fluency were the primary cognitive predictors. Using these two primary predictors, equations can be constructed to predict the ability to understand treatment decisions in patients with brain metastasis. Conclusions Although preliminary, these data demonstrate how cognitive measures can estimate understanding as it relates to medical decision-making capacities in these patients. Clinically, these findings suggest that poor verbal memory and expressive language function could serve as “red flags” for reduced consent capacity in this patient population, and, thus, signal that a more comprehensive medical decision-making capacity evaluation is warranted. PMID:25735262

  15. Beneficent persuasion: techniques and ethical guidelines to improve patients' decisions.

    PubMed

    Swindell, J S; McGuire, Amy L; Halpern, Scott D

    2010-01-01

    Physicians frequently encounter patients who make decisions that contravene their long-term goals. Behavioral economists have shown that irrationalities and self-thwarting tendencies pervade human decision making, and they have identified a number of specific heuristics (rules of thumb) and biases that help explain why patients sometimes make such counterproductive decisions. In this essay, we use clinical examples to describe the many ways in which these heuristics and biases influence patients' decisions. We argue that physicians should develop their understanding of these potentially counterproductive decisional biases and, in many cases, use this knowledge to rebias their patients in ways that promote patients' health or other values. Using knowledge of decision-making psychology to persuade patients to engage in healthy behaviors or to make treatment decisions that foster their long-term goals is ethically justified by physicians' duties to promote their patients' interests and will often enhance, rather than limit, their patients' autonomy. We describe techniques that physicians may use to frame health decisions to patients in ways that are more likely to motivate patients to make choices that are less biased and more conducive to their long-term goals. Marketers have been using these methods for decades to get patients to engage in unhealthy behaviors; employers and policy makers are beginning to consider the use of similar approaches to influence healthy choices. It is time for clinicians also to make use of behavioral psychology in their interactions with patients.

  16. Development of a decision aid for energy resource management for the Navajo Nation incorporating environmental cultural values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Necefer, Len Edward

    Decision-making surrounding pathways of future energy resource management are complexity and requires balancing tradeoffs of multiple environmental, social, economic, and technical outcomes. Technical decision aid can provide a framework for informed decision making, allowing individuals to better understand the tradeoff between resources, technology, energy services, and prices. While technical decision aid have made significant advances in evaluating these quantitative aspects of energy planning and performance, they have not been designed to incorporate human factors, such as preferences and behavior that are informed by cultural values. Incorporating cultural values into decision tools can provide not only an improved decision framework for the Navajo Nation, but also generate new insights on how these perspective can improve decision making on energy resources. Ensuring these aids are a cultural fit for each context has the potential to increase trust and promote understanding of the tradeoffs involved in energy resource management. In this dissertation I present the development of a technical tool that explicitly addresses cultural and spiritual values and experimentally assesses their influence on the preferences and decision making of Navajo citizens. Chapter 2 describes the results of a public elicitation effort to gather information about stakeholder views and concerns related to energy development in the Navajo Nation in order to develop a larger sample survey and a decision-support tool that links techno-economic energy models with sociocultural attributes. Chapter 3 details the methods of developing the energy decision aid and its underlying assumptions for alternative energy projects and their impacts. This tool also provides an alternative to economic valuation of cultural impacts based upon an ordinal index tied to environmental impacts. Chapter 4 details the the influence of various cultural, environmental, and economic outcome information provided

  17. Informed choice in bowel cancer screening: a qualitative study to explore how adults with lower education use decision aids

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sian K; Kearney, Paul; Trevena, Lyndal; Barratt, Alexandra; Nutbeam, Don; McCaffery, Kirsten J

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background  Offering informed choice in screening is increasingly advocated, but little is known about how evidence‐based information about the benefits and harms of screening influences understanding and participation in screening. Objective  We aimed to explore how a bowel cancer screening decision aid influenced decision making and screening behaviour among adults with lower education and literacy. Methods  Twenty‐one men and women aged 55–64 years with lower education levels were interviewed about using a decision aid to make their screening decision. Participants were purposively selected to include those who had and had not made an informed choice. Results  Understanding the purpose of the decision aid was an important factor in whether participants made an informed choice about screening. Participants varied in how they understood and integrated quantitative risk information about the benefits and harms of screening into their decision making; some read it carefully and used it to justify their screening decision, whereas others dismissed it because they were sceptical of it or lacked confidence in their own numeracy ability. Participants’ prior knowledge and beliefs about screening influenced how they made sense of the information. Discussion and conclusions  Participants valued information that offered them a choice in a non‐directive way, but were concerned that it would deter people from screening. Healthcare providers need to be aware that people respond to screening information in diverse ways involving a range of literacy skills and cognitive processes. PMID:22512746

  18. Hepatic disease in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Lodenyo, Hudson; Segal, Issy

    2004-01-01

    The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome is now the leading cause of death in the world. Liver involvement in opportunistic infections and neoplasms affecting patients with human immunodeficiency disease syndrome are common. Many of these patients also take many medicines and toxins that are potentially harmful to the liver. This is an overview on the aetiology and possible diagnostic guide to determine liver involvement in patients with HIV infection. A literature review was performed on major published series on the liver and HIV infection between 1985 and 1999, both years inclusive. Data and opinions from 5 general reviews and 31 original articles from MEDLINE on liver disease in patients with HIV infection regarding aetiology, pathology, presentation and patient evaluation are summarised. The liver is frequently affected in patients with AIDS. The majority of the patients have hepatomegaly and abnormal liver enzymes secondary to involvement with opportunities infections, AIDS associated neoplasms and drug therapy. Most of the infections reach the liver by lymphohaematogeneous spread from other sites in the body. Methodical approach in patient evaluation is therefore essential for prompt diagnosis and treatment to minimise morbidity and early mortality.

  19. [Cavum lymphoma in a hemophilic patient with AIDS].

    PubMed

    Corti, M; Villafañe, M F; Cermelj, M; Candela, M; Pérez Blanco, R; Tezanos Pinto, M

    2000-01-01

    Intermediate and highly malignant non-Hodgkin and primary central nervous system lymphomas are marker diseases for AIDS. Cavum and oropharynx involvement by these tumors is uncommon. Although there are few cases reported in the literature, these may be primary localizations of the tumor. We present a hemophilic HIV+ patient with non-Hodgkin lymphoma of the cavum. The histologic diagnosis was high-grade, pleomorphic, centroblastic lymphoma. The patient was treated with chemotherapy plus intrathecal chemotherapy and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). His evolution has been excellent. One year after diagnosis, the patient is asymptomatic with no evidence of residual tumor, and responding well to HAART.

  20. Usability Testing of a Web-Based Decision Aid for Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Among Multi-Ethnic Women.

    PubMed

    Coe, Austin M; Ueng, William; Vargas, Jennifer M; David, Raven; Vanegas, Alejandro; Infante, Katherine; Trivedi, Meghna; Yi, Haeseung; Dimond, Jill; Crew, Katherine D; Kukafka, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Chemoprevention with antiestrogens could decrease the incidence of invasive breast cancer but uptake has been low among high-risk women in the United States. We have designed a web-based patient-facing decision aid, called RealRisks, to inform high-risk women about the risks and benefits of chemoprevention and facilitate shared decision-making with their primary care provider. We conducted two rounds of usability testing to determine how subjects engaged with and understood the information in RealRisks. A total of 7 English-speaking and 4 Spanish-speaking subjects completed testing. Using surveys, think-aloud protocols, and subject recordings, we identified several themes relating to the usability of RealRisks, specifically in the content, ease of use, and navigability of the application. By conducting studies in two languages with a diverse multi-ethnic population, we were able to implement interface changes to make RealRisks accessible to users with varying health literacy and acculturation.

  1. Usability Testing of a Web-Based Decision Aid for Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Among Multi-Ethnic Women

    PubMed Central

    Coe, Austin M.; Ueng, William; Vargas, Jennifer M.; David, Raven; Vanegas, Alejandro; Infante, Katherine; Trivedi, Meghna; Yi, Haeseung; Dimond, Jill; Crew, Katherine D.; Kukafka, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Chemoprevention with antiestrogens could decrease the incidence of invasive breast cancer but uptake has been low among high-risk women in the United States. We have designed a web-based patient-facing decision aid, called RealRisks, to inform high-risk women about the risks and benefits of chemoprevention and facilitate shared decision-making with their primary care provider. We conducted two rounds of usability testing to determine how subjects engaged with and understood the information in RealRisks. A total of 7 English-speaking and 4 Spanish-speaking subjects completed testing. Using surveys, think-aloud protocols, and subject recordings, we identified several themes relating to the usability of RealRisks, specifically in the content, ease of use, and navigability of the application. By conducting studies in two languages with a diverse multi-ethnic population, we were able to implement interface changes to make RealRisks accessible to users with varying health literacy and acculturation. PMID:28269836

  2. Design model of computerized personal decision aid for youth: An expert review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarif, Siti Mahfuzah; Ibrahim, Norfiza; Shiratuddin, Norshuhada

    2016-08-01

    This paper provides a structured review of a design model of a computerized personal decision aid that is intended for youth, named as YouthPDA Design Model. The proposed design model was examined by experts in related areas to ensure the appropriateness of the proposed components and elements, relevancy of the terminologies used, logic of the flow, usability, and practicality of the design model towards development of YouthPDA application. Seven experts from related areas were involved in the evaluation. Discussions on the findings obtained from the expert review are included in this paper. Finally, a revised design model of YouthPDA is proposed as main guidance to develop YouthPDA application.

  3. Optimal management of cytomegalovirus retinitis in patients with AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Michael W

    2010-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis is the most common cause of vision loss in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). CMV retinitis afflicted 25% to 42% of AIDS patients in the pre-highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) era, with most vision loss due to macula-involving retinitis or retinal detachment. The introduction of HAART significantly decreased the incidence and severity of CMV retinitis. Optimal treatment of CMV retinitis requires a thorough evaluation of the patient’s immune status and an accurate classification of the retinal lesions. When retinitis is diagnosed, HAART therapy should be started or improved, and anti-CMV therapy with oral valganciclovir, intravenous ganciclovir, foscarnet, or cidofovir should be administered. Selected patients, especially those with zone 1 retinitis, may receive intravitreal drug injections or surgical implantation of a sustained-release ganciclovir reservoir. Effective anti-CMV therapy coupled with HAART significantly decreases the incidence of vision loss and improves patient survival. Immune recovery uveitis and retinal detachments are important causes of moderate to severe loss of vision. Compared with the early years of the AIDS epidemic, the treatment emphasis in the post- HAART era has changed from short-term control of retinitis to long-term preservation of vision. Developing countries face shortages of health care professionals and inadequate supplies of anti-CMV and anti-HIV medications. Intravitreal ganciclovir injections may be the most cost effective strategy to treat CMV retinitis in these areas. PMID:20463796

  4. Pseudomembranous candidiasis in HIV/AIDS patients in Cali, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Castro, Luz Ángela; Álvarez, María Inés; Martínez, Ernesto

    2013-02-01

    Candida albicans is the most frequently isolated yeast from the oral cavity of HIV/AIDS individuals. The use of fluconazole has increased the number of resistant or less-sensitive Candida species different than C. albicans. The purpose of this study was to identify the Candida species producing pseudomembranous candidiasis in patients suffering from AIDS, their relationship with CD4(+) counts and their sensitivity to fluconazole and itraconazole. We studied 71 patients at a hospital in the city of Cali. Samples of white plaque were seeded on CHROMagar Candida, yeast identification was done with API 20C Aux, and susceptibility testing was determined by E test. Ninety-three yeast isolates were obtained, 52 single and 41 mixed. C. albicans was the most isolated, followed by C. glabrata. An increased frequency of isolates and variety of Candida species occurred in patients with a CD4(+) cell count ≤100 cells/mm(3) without significant differences (p = 0.29). The susceptibility study showed that 8 (8.6%) isolates were resistant to fluconazole and 11 (11.8%) to itraconazole, while 6 (8.8%) C. albicans were simultaneously resistant. No association was found between the isolates of C. albicans or Candida species different than C. albicans and the use of fluconazole (p = 0.21). The results of this study indicate that in the tested population, fluconazole continues to be the best treatment option for oropharyngeal candidiasis in patients suffering from AIDS (HIV/AIDS); however, susceptibility tests are necessary in patients who present therapeutic failure.

  5. Decision-Aiding and Optimization for Vertical Navigation of Long-Haul Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patrick, Nicholas J. M.; Sheridan, Thomas B.

    1996-01-01

    different airspace design and air traffic management policies. A decision aid is proposed which would combine the pilot's notion of optimility with the GA-based optimization, provide the pilot with a number of alternative pareto-optimal trajectories, and allow him to consider un-modelled attributes and constraints in choosing among them. A solution to the problem of displaying alternatives in a multi-attribute decision space is also presented.

  6. Decision-Aiding and Optimization for Vertical Navigation of Long-Haul Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patrick, Nicholas J. M.; Sheridan, Thomas B.

    1996-01-01

    different airspace design and air traffic management policies. A decision aid is proposed which would combine the pilot's notion of optimality with the GA-based optimization, provide the pilot with a number of alternative pareto-optimal trajectories, and allow him to consider unmodelled attributes and constraints in choosing among them. A solution to the problem of displaying alternatives in a multi-attribute decision space is also presented.

  7. LG based decision aid for naval tactical action officer's (TAO) workstation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stilman, Boris; Yakhnis, Vladimir; Umanskiy, Oleg; Boyd, Ron

    2005-05-01

    In the increasingly NetCentric battlespace of the 21st century, Stilman Advanced Strategies Linguistic Geometry software has the potential to revolutionize the way that the Navy fights in two key areas: as a Tactical Decision Aid and for creating a relevant Common Operating Picture. Incorporating STILMAN's software into a prototype Tactical Action Officers (TAO) workstation as a Tactical Decision Aid (TDA) will allow warfighters to manage their assets more intelligently and effectively. This prototype workstation will be developed using human-centered design principles and will be an open, component-based architecture for combat control systems for future small surface combatants. It will integrate both uninhabited vehicles and onboard sensors and weapon systems across a squadron of small surface combatants. In addition, the hypergame representation of complex operations provides a paradigm for the presentation of a common operating picture to operators and personnel throughout the command hierarchy. In the hypergame technology there are game levels that span the range from the tactical to the global strategy level, with each level informing the others. This same principle will be applied to presenting the relevant common operating picture to operators. Each operator will receive a common operating picture that is appropriate for their level in the command hierarchy. The area covered by this operating picture and the level of detail contained within it will be dependent upon the specific tasks the operator is performing (supervisory vice tactical control) and the level of the operator (or command personnel) within the command hierarchy. Each level will inform the others to keep the picture concurrent and up-to-date.

  8. Non-cytomegalovirus ocular opportunistic infections in patients with AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Gangaputra, Sapna; Drye, Lea; Vaidya, Vijay; Thorne, Jennifer E.; Jabs, Douglas A; Lyon, Alice T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To report the incidence and clinical outcomes of non-cytomegalovirus (non-CMV) ocular opportunistic infections in patients with AIDS in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Design Multicenter, prospective, observational study of patients with AIDS Methods Medical history, ophthalmologic examination, and laboratory tests were performed at enrollment and every 6 months subsequently. Once an ocular opportunistic infection was diagnosed, patients were seen every 3 months for outcomes. Results At enrollment, 37 non-CMV ocular opportunistic infections were diagnosed: 16 patients, herpetic retinitis; 11 patients, toxoplasmic retinitis; and 10 patients, choroiditis. During the follow-up period, the estimated incidences (and 95% confidence intervals [CI]) of these were: herpetic retinitis, 0.007/100 person-years (PY) (95% CI 0.0004, 0.039); toxoplasmic retinitis, 0.007/100 PY (95% CI 0.004, 0.039); and choroiditis 0.014/100 PY (95% CI 0.0025, 0.050). The mortality rates appeared higher among those patients with newly diagnosed or incident herpetic retinitis and choroiditis (rates=21.7 deaths/100 PY [P=0.02] and 12.8 deaths/100 PY [P=0.04]) respectively, than that for patients with AIDS without an ocular opportunistic infection (4.1 deaths/100 PY); Toxoplasmic retinitis did not appear to be associated with greater mortality (6.4/100 PY, P=0.47). Eyes with newly-diagnosed herpetic retinitis appeared to have a poor visual prognosis with high rates of visual impairment (37.9/100 PY) and blindness (17.5/100 PY), whereas those outcomes in eyes with choroiditis appeared to be lower (2.3/100 PY and 0/100 PY, respectively). Conclusions Although uncommon, non-CMV ocular opportunistic infections may be associated with high rates of visual loss and/or mortality. PMID:23068916

  9. An economic theory of patient decision-making.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Douglas O; DeMarco, Joseph P

    2005-01-01

    Patient autonomy, as exercised in the informed consent process, is a central concern in bioethics. The typical bioethicist's analysis of autonomy centers on decisional capacity--finding the line between autonomy and its absence. This approach leaves unexplored the structure of reasoning behind patient treatment decisions. To counter that approach, we present a microeconomic theory of patient decision-making regarding the acceptable level of medical treatment from the patient's perspective. We show that a rational patient's desired treatment level typically departs from the level yielding an absence of symptoms, the level we call ideal. This microeconomic theory demonstrates why patients have good reason not to pursue treatment to the point of absence of physical symptoms. We defend our view against possible objections that it is unrealistic and that it fails to adequately consider harm a patient may suffer by curtailing treatment. Our analysis is fruitful in various ways. It shows why decisions often considered unreasonable might be fully reasonable. It offers a theoretical account of how physician misinformation may adversely affect a patient's decision. It shows how billing costs influence patient decision-making. It indicates that health care professionals' beliefs about the 'unreasonable' attitudes of patients might often be wrong. It provides a better understanding of patient rationality that should help to ensure fuller information as well as increased respect for patient decision-making.

  10. Prioritization of rehabilitation interventions for urban water assets using multiple criteria decision-aid methods.

    PubMed

    Carriço, N; Covas, D I C; Almeida, M Céu; Leitão, J P; Alegre, H

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to compare sorting and ranking methods for prioritization of rehabilitation interventions of sewers, taking into account risk, performance and cost. For that purpose multiple criteria decision-aid (MCDA) methods such as ELECTRE TRI for sorting and ELECTRE III for ranking are applied in a real case-study and the results obtained are compared. The case study is a small sanitary sewer system from a Portuguese utility located in the metropolitan area of Lisbon. The problem to investigate is the prioritization of the sewer candidates for rehabilitation. The decision maker (a panel group of specialists) has chosen five assessment measures: water level and maximum flow velocity (hydraulic performance indices), sewer importance and failure repair cost (collapse-related consequences of failure) and the risk of collapse. The results show that the outcomes from ELECTRE III are easier to understand than those from ELECTRE TRI method. Two different sets of weights were used, and the sorting and ranking results from both methods were found to be sensitive to them. ELECTRE TRI method is not straightforward as it involves technical parameters that are difficult to define, such as reference profiles and cut levels.

  11. Toxoplasmosis in HIV/AIDS patients in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Nissapatorn, V; Lee, C K C; Cho, S M; Rohela, M; Anuar, A Khirul; Quek, K F; Latt, H M

    2003-01-01

    Three hundred and one sera of HIV/AIDS patients were tested for anti-Toxoplasma IgG antibody by ELISA technique. The seroprevalence of toxoplasmosis was 41.2% (95% CI: 35.5-46.9) in HIV/AIDS patients. The seroprevalence was significantly higher in the Malay (57.9%) than the Chinese (38.7%), followed by the Indian patients (29.6%) (p<0.05). No possible risk factor, such as contact with cats, consumption of uncooked meat, and history of blood transfusions was found to have any significant association with the presence of anti-Toxoplasma antibody in the study sample (p>0.05). Multivariate analysis was employed to find any association between Toxoplasma seroprevalence and a single subject having single or multiple risk factors. It was found that the association was not statistically significant (p>0.05). Among the HIV/AIDS study samples, 124 (41.2%) samples were found to have positive anti-Toxoplasma antibody, the association between the presence of anti-Toxoplasma antibody and CD4 cell count was determined but no statistically significant association was found (p>0.05). During the study period, only one case of active CNS toxoplasmosis was registered and the diagnostic criteria included: clinical presentations, CT scan finding, serological evidence of anti-Toxoplasma IgG antibody, and respose to anti-Toxoplasma therapy.

  12. Lessons learned from the conduct of a multisite cluster randomized practical trial of decision aids in rural and suburban primary care practices

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The decision aids for diabetes (DAD) trial explored the feasibility of testing the effectiveness of decision aids (DAs) about coronary prevention and diabetes medications in community-based primary care practices, including rural clinics that care for patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods As originally designed, we invited clinicians in eight practices to participate in the trial, reviewed the patient panel of clinicians who accepted our invitation for potentially eligible patients, and contacted these patients by phone, enrolling those who accepted our invitation. As enrollment failed to meet targets, we recruited four new practices. After discussing the study with the clinicians and receiving their support, we reviewed all clinic panels for potentially eligible patients. Clinicians were approached to confirm participation and patient eligibility, and patients were approached before their visit to provide written informed consent. This in-clinic approach required study coordinators to travel and stay longer at the clinics as well as to screen more patient records for eligibility. The in-clinic approach was associated with better recruitment rates, lower patient retention and outcome completion rates, and a better intervention effect. Results We drew four lessons: 1) difficulties identifying potentially eligible patients threaten the viability of practical trials of DAs; 2) to improve the recruitment yield, recruit clinicians and patients for the study at the clinic, just before their visit; 3) approaches that improve recruitment may be associated with reduced retention and survey response; and 4) procedures that involve working closely with the practice may improve recruitment and may also affect the quality of the implementation of the interventions. Conclusion Success in practice-based trials in usual primary care including rural clinics may require the smallest possible research footprint on the practice while implementing a streamlined protocol

  13. Use of graphics in decision aids for telerobotic control: (Parts 5-8 of an 8-part MIT progress report)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheridan, Thomas B.; Roseborough, James B.; Das, Hari; Chin, Kan-Ping; Inoue, Seiichi

    1989-01-01

    Four separate projects recently completed or in progress at the MIT Man-Machine Systems Laboratory are summarized. They are: a decision aid for retrieving a tumbling satellite in space; kinematic control and graphic display of redundant teleoperators; real time terrain/object generation: a quad-tree approach; and two dimensional control for three dimensional obstacle avoidance.

  14. The Factors that Influence Data Utilization in Decision-Making: The Case of HIV/AIDS Programs in Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Daniela Cristina

    2011-01-01

    In Mexico, as in many other countries, HIV/AIDS strategies are developed at the federal level and implemented at the state level. Local programs are expected to use data, in particular surveillance data, to drive their decisions on programmatic activities and prioritize populations with which the program will engage. Since the early 1980s Mexico…

  15. Evaluation of the ryegrass stem rust model STEMRUST_G and its implementation as a decision aid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    STEMRUST_G, a simulation model for epidemics of stem rust in perennial ryegrass grown to maturity as a seed crop, was validated for use as an heuristic tool and as a decision aid for disease management with fungicides. Model validation was by comparison of model output with observed disease severit...

  16. Effects of a Web-Based Decision Aid Regarding Diagnostic Self-Testing. A Single-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ickenroth, Martine H. P.; Grispen, J. E. J.; de Vries, N. K.; Dinant, G. J.; Ronda, G.; van der Weijden, T.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there are many diagnostic self-tests on body materials available to consumers. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of an online decision aid on diagnostic self-testing for cholesterol and diabetes on knowledge among consumers with an intention to take these tests. A randomized controlled trial was designed. A total of 1259…

  17. Decision Support for Patient Preference-based Care Planning

    PubMed Central

    Ruland, Cornelia M.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: While preference elicitation techniques have been effective in helping patients make decisions consistent with their preferences, little is known about whether information about patient preferences affects clinicians in clinical decision making and improves patient outcomes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a decision support system for eliciting elderly patients' preferences for self-care capability and providing this information to nurses in clinical practice—specifically, its effect on nurses' care priorities and the patient outcomes of preference achievement and patient satisfaction. Design: Three-group quasi-experimental design with one experimental and two control groups (N = 151). In the experimental group computer-processed information about individual patient's preferences was placed in patients' charts to be used for care planning. Results: Information about patient preferences changed nurses' care priorities to be more consistent with patient preferences and improved patients' preference achievement and physical functioning. Further, higher consistency between patient preferences and nurses' care priorities was associated with higher preference achievement, and higher preference achievement with greater patient satisfaction. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that decision support for eliciting patient preferences and including them in nursing care planning is an effective and feasible strategy for improving nursing care and patient outcomes. PMID:10428003

  18. Use of online safety decision aid by abused women: effect on decisional conflict in randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Eden, Karen B.; Perrin, Nancy A.; Hanson, Ginger C.; Messing, Jill T.; Bloom, Tina L.; Campbell, Jacquelyn C.; Gielen, Andrea C.; Clough, Amber S.; Barnes-Hoyt, Jamie S.; Glass, Nancy E.

    2014-01-01

    Background An Internet safety decision aid was developed to help abused women understand their risk for repeat and near-lethal intimate partner violence, clarify priorities related to safety, and develop an action plan customized to these priorities. Purpose The overall purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of a safety decision aid compared with usual safety planning (control) delivered through a secure website, using a multi-state randomized controlled trial design. The paper evaluated the effectiveness of the safety decision aid in reducing decisional conflict after a single use by abused women. Design Randomized controlled trial referred to as IRIS, Internet Resource for Intervention and Safety Participants Abused women who spoke English (N = 708) were enrolled in a four-state, randomized controlled trial. Intervention and Control The intervention was an interactive safety decision aid with personalized safety plan; the control condition was usual safety planning resources. Both were delivered to participants through the secure study website. Main Outcome Measures This paper compared women’s decisional conflict about safety: total decisional conflict and the four subscales of this measure (feeling: uninformed, uncertain, unclear about safety priorities; and sensing lack of support) between intervention/control conditions. Data were collected 3/2011–5/2013 and analyzed 1/2014–3/2014. Results Immediately following the first use of the interactive safety decision aid, intervention women had significantly lower total decisional conflict than control women, controlling for baseline value of decisional conflict (p=0.002, effect size=.12). After controlling for baseline values, the safety decision aid group had significantly greater reduction in feeling uncertain (p=0.006, effect size=.07), and in feeling unsupported (p=0.008, effect size=.07) about safety than the usual safety planning group. Conclusions Abused women randomized to the safety

  19. Weight and patients' decision to undergo cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    King-Shier, Kathryn M; LeBlanc, Pamela; Mather, Charles; Sandham, Sarah; Seneviratne, Cydnee; Maitland, Andrew

    2013-05-01

    Obese patients are less likely to have cardiac surgery than normal weight patients. This could be due to physician or patient decision-making. We undertook a qualitative descriptive study to explore the influence of obesity on patients' decision-making to have cardiac surgery. Forty-seven people referred for coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery were theoretically sampled. Twelve people had declined cardiac surgery. Participants underwent in-depth interviews aimed at exploring their decision-making process. Data were analyzed using conventional content analysis. Though patients' weight did not play a role in their decision, their relationship with their cardiologist/surgeon, the rapidity and orchestration of the diagnosis and treatment, appraisal of risks and benefits, previous experience with other illness or others who had cardiac surgery, and openness to other alternatives had an impact. It is possible that there is a lack of comfort or acknowledgment by all parties in discussing the influence of weight on CABG surgery risks.

  20. Cognitive impairment in patients with AIDS – prevalence and severity

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Crystal C; Treisman, Glenn J

    2015-01-01

    The advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy has prolonged the life expectancy of HIV patients and decreased the number of adults who progress to AIDS and HIV-associated dementia. However, neurocognitive deficits remain a pronounced consequence of HIV/AIDS. HIV-1 infection targets the central nervous system in subcortical brain areas and leads to high rates of delirium, depression, opportunistic central nervous system infections, and dementia. Long-term HIV replication in the brain occurs in astrocytes and microglia, allowing the virus to hide from antiviral medication and later compromise neuronal function. The associated cognitive disturbance is linked to both viral activity and inflammatory and other mediators from these immune cells that lead to the damage associated with HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders, a general term given for these disturbances. We review the severity and prevalence of the neuropsychiatric complications of HIV including delirium, neurobehavioral impairments (depression), minor cognitive-motor dysfunction, and HIV-associated dementia. PMID:25678819

  1. Sensitivity of disease management decision aids to temperature input errors associated with out-of-canopy and reduced time-resolution measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant disease management decision aids typically require inputs of weather elements such as air temperature. Whereas many disease models are created based on weather elements at the crop canopy, and with relatively fine time resolution, the decision aids commonly are implemented with hourly weather...

  2. 75 FR 997 - Record of Decision (ROD) on the U.S. Coast Guard Long Range Aids to Navigation (Loran-C) Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-07

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Record of Decision (ROD) on the U.S. Coast Guard Long Range Aids to Navigation (Loran... ``USCG Long Range Aids to Navigation (Loran-C) Program'' Web site at http://loranpeis.uscg.e2m-inc.com....1D., and ``Aids to Navigation Authorized,'' which appears at 14 U.S.C. 81. Dated: January 4,...

  3. Integration of Visibility Sensors in NOAA PORTS® to aid in Decision Making for Safe Navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roggenstein, E. B.

    2012-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Ocean Service (NOS) Physical Oceanographic Real-Time System (PORTS®) provides real-time water level, currents and meteorological data for aid to navigation in twenty-three major ports and harbors. In response to PORTS® users' requests for visibility data, NOS began testing several varieties of visibility sensors for operations in a marine environment. Extensive testing resulted in the selection of the Vaisala FS11 visibility sensor. The FS11 sensor uses forward scattering technology to measure the amount of scattering in a small volume of air between the transmitter and receiver, resulting in an extrapolated visibility at a set height out to 75 km. Two sensors have been successfully operating in the Mobile Bay PORTS® at Middle Bay Port and Pinto Island since installation in 2010. The sensors are positioned at a height of 3 m above the ground, 24 km apart along the western shore of the bay in areas susceptible to fog formation. Real-time data from these sensors are disseminated on NOAA's Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (COOPS) PORTS® website every 6 minutes (min) and for distances up to 10 km (5.4 nm) from the instrument. This has proven to aid port pilots' decision making for safe movement of vessels in the harbor. Additionally, the Pinto Island sensor is located directly adjacent to the shipping channel - an area with high levels of atmospheric particulates of high carbon content. These particulates do not appear to have negatively affected sensor performance. This success has prompted interest in visibility sensors from other harbors with PORTS®. The ports of San Francisco, Narragansett Bay, Chesapeake Bay, Jacksonville FL, and Gulfport MS are planning or exploring the addition of visibility sensors to their PORTS® to aid in navigation. Additionally, the NOAA/COOPS Ocean System Test Evaluation Program (OSTEP) has continued with additional field testing of the FS11

  4. Not All Patients Want to Participate in Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Levinson, Wendy; Kao, Audiey; Kuby, Alma; Thisted, Ronald A

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND The Institute of Medicine calls for physicians to engage patients in making clinical decisions, but not every patient may want the same level of participation. OBJECTIVES 1) To assess public preferences for participation in decision making in a representative sample of the U.S. population. 2) To understand how demographic variables and health status influence people's preferences for participation in decision making. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS A population-based survey of a fully representative sample of English-speaking adults was conducted in concert with the 2002 General Social Survey (N= 2,765). Respondents expressed preferences ranging from patient-directed to physician-directed styles on each of 3 aspects of decision making (seeking information, discussing options, making the final decision). Logistic regression was used to assess the relationships of demographic variables and health status to preferences. MAIN RESULTS Nearly all respondents (96%) preferred to be offered choices and to be asked their opinions. In contrast, half of the respondents (52%) preferred to leave final decisions to their physicians and 44% preferred to rely on physicians for medical knowledge rather than seeking out information themselves. Women, more educated, and healthier people were more likely to prefer an active role in decision making. African-American and Hispanic respondents were more likely to prefer that physicians make the decisions. Preferences for an active role increased with age up to 45 years, but then declined. CONCLUSION This population-based study demonstrates that people vary substantially in their preferences for participation in decision making. Physicians and health care organizations should not assume that patients wish to participate in clinical decision making, but must assess individual patient preferences and tailor care accordingly. PMID:15987329

  5. Evaluation of a decision aid for prenatal testing of fetal abnormalities: a cluster randomised trial [ISRCTN22532458

    PubMed Central

    Nagle, Cate; Lewis, Sharon; Meiser, Bettina; Metcalfe, Sylvia; Carlin, John B; Bell, Robin; Gunn, Jane; Halliday, Jane

    2006-01-01

    Background By providing information on the relative merits and potential harms of the options available and a framework to clarify preferences, decision aids can improve knowledge and realistic expectations and decrease decisional conflict in individuals facing decisions between alternative forms of action. Decision-making about prenatal testing for fetal abnormalities is often confusing and difficult for women and the effectiveness of decision aids in this field has not been established. This study aims to test whether a decision aid for prenatal testing of fetal abnormalities, when compared to a pamphlet, improves women's informed decision-making and decreases decisional conflict. Methods/design A cluster designed randomised controlled trial is being conducted in Victoria, Australia. Fifty General Practitioners (GPs) have been randomised to one of two arms: providing women with either a decision aid or a pamphlet. The two primary outcomes will be measured by comparing the difference in percentages of women identified as making an informed choice and the difference in mean decisional conflict scores between the two groups. Data will be collected from women using questionnaires at 14 weeks and 24 weeks gestation. The sample size of 159 women in both arms of the trial has been calculated to detect a difference of 18% (50 to 68%) in informed choice between the two groups. The required numbers have been adjusted to accommodate the cluster design, miscarriage and participant lost – to – follow up. Baseline characteristics of women will be summarised for both arms of the trial. Similarly, characteristics of GPs will be compared between arms. Differences in the primary outcomes will be analysed using 'intention-to-treat' principles. Appropriate regression techniques will adjust for the effects of clustering and include covariates to adjust for the stratifying variable and major potential confounding factors. Discussion The findings from this trial will make a

  6. Survey on computer aided decision support for diagnosis of celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Hegenbart, Sebastian; Uhl, Andreas; Vécsei, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a complex autoimmune disorder in genetically predisposed individuals of all age groups triggered by the ingestion of food containing gluten. A reliable diagnosis is of high interest in view of embarking on a strict gluten-free diet, which is the CD treatment modality of first choice. The gold standard for diagnosis of CD is currently based on a histological confirmation of serology, using biopsies performed during upper endoscopy. Computer aided decision support is an emerging option in medicine and endoscopy in particular. Such systems could potentially save costs and manpower while simultaneously increasing the safety of the procedure. Research focused on computer-assisted systems in the context of automated diagnosis of CD has started in 2008. Since then, over 40 publications on the topic have appeared. In this context, data from classical flexible endoscopy as well as wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) and confocal laser endomicrosopy (CLE) has been used. In this survey paper, we try to give a comprehensive overview of the research focused on computer-assisted diagnosis of CD. PMID:25770906

  7. A prototype decision aid for evaluating and selecting R&D proposals

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ayat, R.A.; Lamont, A.; Sicherman, A.

    1992-05-01

    This report describes a prototype decision aid which has been developed to assist the Institutional Research and Development (IR&D) Committee in selecting proposals for funding. This tool was requested to help address the following concerns about the IR&D proposal selection process: Some good proposals might be overlooked simply because no one on the Committee advocates them forcefully. The process takes a lot of time. The final portfolio of proposals selected may not maximize the long-run benefits to the Laboratory. These concerns stem from the observation that there is no formal framework for making distinctions between proposals, or weighing and comparing those distinctions. It was felt that the process could be improved by a framework that: Provides explicit descriptors that Committee members can use to evaluate and compare different features of proposals. Encourages the Committee to use a uniform, systematic scheme for evaluating the proposals. Helps the Committee focus more quickly on the issues that are truly relevant for distinguishing between proposals.

  8. An architecture for integrating distributed and cooperating knowledge-based Air Force decision aids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nugent, Richard O.; Tucker, Richard W.

    1988-01-01

    MITRE has been developing a Knowledge-Based Battle Management Testbed for evaluating the viability of integrating independently-developed knowledge-based decision aids in the Air Force tactical domain. The primary goal for the testbed architecture is to permit a new system to be added to a testbed with little change to the system's software. Each system that connects to the testbed network declares that it can provide a number of services to other systems. When a system wants to use another system's service, it does not address the server system by name, but instead transmits a request to the testbed network asking for a particular service to be performed. A key component of the testbed architecture is a common database which uses a relational database management system (RDBMS). The RDBMS provides a database update notification service to requesting systems. Normally, each system is expected to monitor data relations of interest to it. Alternatively, a system may broadcast an announcement message to inform other systems that an event of potential interest has occurred. Current research is aimed at dealing with issues resulting from integration efforts, such as dealing with potential mismatches of each system's assumptions about the common database, decentralizing network control, and coordinating multiple agents.

  9. Patient perspectives on informed decision-making surrounding dialysis initiation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Mi-Kyung; Lin, Feng-Chang; Gilet, Constance A.; Arnold, Robert M.; Bridgman, Jessica C.; Ward, Sandra E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Careful patient–clinician shared decision-making about dialysis initiation has been promoted, but few studies have addressed patient perspectives on the extent of information provided and how decisions to start dialysis are made. Methods Ninety-nine maintenance dialysis patients recruited from 15 outpatient dialysis centers in North Carolina completed semistructured interviews on information provision and communication about the initiation of dialysis. These data were examined with content analysis. In addition, informed decision-making (IDM) scores were created by summing patient responses (yes/no) to 10 questions about the decision-making. Results The mean IDM score was 4.4 (of 10; SD = 2.0); 67% scored 5 or lower. Age at the time of decision-making (r = −0.27, P = 0.006), years of education (r = 0.24, P = 0.02) and presence of a warning about progressing to end-stage kidney disease (t = 2.9, P = 0.005) were significantly associated with IDM scores. Nearly 70% said that the risks and burdens of dialysis were not mentioned at all, and only one patient recalled that the doctor offered the option of not starting dialysis. While a majority (67%) said that they felt they had no choice about starting dialysis (because the alternative would be death) or about dialysis modality, only 21.2% said that they had felt rushed to make a decision. About one-third of the patients perceived that the decision to start dialysis and modality was already made by the doctor. Conclusions A majority of patients felt unprepared and ill-informed about the initiation of dialysis. Improving the extent of IDM about dialysis may optimize patient preparation prior to starting treatment and their perceptions about the decision-making process. PMID:23901048

  10. Tuberculosis and histoplasmosis co-infection in AIDS patients.

    PubMed

    Agudelo, Carlos A; Restrepo, Carlos A; Molina, Diego A; Tobón, Angela M; Kauffman, Carol A; Murillo, Carolina; Restrepo, Angela

    2012-12-01

    Abstract. Coinfection with tuberculosis in some countries occurs in 8-15% of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) -infected patients who have histoplasmosis. This coinfection interferes with prompt diagnosis, and treatment is difficult because of drug interactions. We retrospectively reviewed the cases of 14 HIV-infected patients who had concomitant tuberculosis and histoplasmosis. The most frequent clinical manifestations were weight loss (85.7%), asthenia (78.5%), and fever (64.2%). The diagnosis of histoplasmosis was made primarily by histopathology (71.4%), and the diagnosis of tuberculosis was made by means of direct microscopic examination (71.4%). Death occurred in two patients, and relapse of both infections occurred in one patient. Moxifloxacin was substituted for rifampicin in six patients, with good outcomes noted for both infections. The clinical presentation does not readily identify acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients who have tuberculosis and histoplasmosis. The use of a fluoroquinolone as an alternative agent in place of rifampicin for tuberculosis allows effective therapy with itraconazole for histoplasmosis.

  11. Effects of Instructional Aids on the Acquisition of Dynamic Decision-Making Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frederiksen, Christian; Kehoe, E. James; Wood, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This study tested the effects of two instructional aids in a complex, dynamic environment, specifically, a business simulation. Participants studied (1) a "causal map," which depicted key variables in an interconnected network, (2) a textual outline of the same relationships, or (3) no-aid. With the relevant aid still available, the participants…

  12. What are the public obligations to AIDS patients?

    PubMed

    Kelley, David

    2002-01-01

    The operating assumption in most discussions of health policy is that government has some responsibility for the health of its citizens and that it may legitimately tax, subsidize, and regulate its citizens in the exercise of that responsibility. On this assumption, public obligations to HIV/AIDS patients are a function of their needs in relationship to other health needs. This paper challenges the operating assumption by arguing that it cannot be grounded in the obligations that individuals have to each other. The paper rests on its own assumption: the moral theory of individualism. On this theory, individuals are ends in themselves who have the right to choose their own actions and uses of their resources; they do not have unchosen obligations to help others. In regard to HIV/AIDS patients, consequently, individuals have no duty to help, nor any other obligation beyond that of respecting their rights; and there is no valid basis for government regulations or subsidies on their behalf. The paper argues against the two approaches commonly used to defend a more expansive view of individual obligations and the role of government. The first is the assumption of welfare rights to goods and services; the second is the assumption that distributive justice requires some redistribution of health care resources.

  13. Patient Reflections on Decision Making for Laryngeal Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Shuman, Andrew G; Larkin, Knoll; Thomas, Dorothy; Palmer, Frank L; Fins, Joseph J; Baxi, Shrujal S; Lee, Nancy; Shah, Jatin P; Fagerlin, Angela; Patel, Snehal G

    2017-02-01

    Objective To describe the reflections of patients treated for laryngeal cancer with regard to treatment-related decision making. Study Design Cross-sectional survey-based pilot study. Setting Single-institution tertiary care cancer center. Subjects/Methods Adults with laryngeal carcinoma were eligible to participate (N = 57; 46% treated surgically, 54% nonsurgically). Validated surveys measuring decisional conflict and regret explored patients' reflections on their preferences and priorities regarding treatment-related decision making for laryngeal cancer and how patient-reported functional outcomes, professional referral patterns, and desired provider input influenced these reflections. Results When considering the level of involvement of surgeons, radiation oncologists, and medical oncologists in their care, patients were more likely to believe that the specialist whom they saw first was the most important factor in deciding how to treat their cancer (Fisher's exact, ~χ(2) = 16.2, df = 6, P = .02). Patients who were treated for laryngeal cancer who reported worse voice-related quality of life recalled more decisional conflict ( P = .01) and experienced more decisional regret ( P < .001). Of the patients for whom speech was a top priority prior to treatment, better voice-related quality of life overall scores were correlated with less decision regret about treatment decisions ( P < .02). Of the patients for whom eating and drinking were top priorities prior to treatment, better MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory global scores were correlated with less decision regret about treatment decisions ( P < .002). Conclusion Patient priorities and attitudes, coupled with functional outcomes and professional referral patterns, influence how patients reflect on their choices regarding management of laryngeal cancer. Better understanding of these variables may assist in ensuring that patients' voices are integrated into individualized laryngeal cancer treatment planning.

  14. Balance Sheets versus Decision Dashboards to support patient treatment choices: A comparative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dolan, James G.; Veazie, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Growing recognition of the importance of involving patients in preference-driven healthcare decisions has highlighted the need to develop practical strategies to implement patient-centered shared decision making. The use of tabular balance sheets to support clinical decision making is well established. More recent evidence suggests that graphic, interactive decision dashboards can help people derive a deeper understanding of information within a specific decision context. We therefore conducted a non-randomized trial comparing the effects of adding an interactive dashboard to a static tabular balance sheet on patient decision-making. Method The study population consisted of members of the ResearchMatch registry who volunteered to participate in a study of medical decision making. Two separate surveys were conducted: one for the control group and one for the intervention group. All participants were instructed to imagine they were newly diagnosed with a chronic illness and asked to choose between three hypothetical drug treatments that varied with regard to effectiveness, side effects, and out-of-pocket cost. Both groups made an initial treatment choice after reviewing a balance sheet. After a brief washout period, members of the control group made a second treatment choice after reviewing the balance sheet again while intervention group members made a second treatment choice after reviewing an interactive decision dashboard containing the same information. After both choices participants rated their degree of confidence in their choice on a 1–10 scale. Results Members of the dashboard intervention group were more likely to change their choice of preferred drug, (10.2% vs. 7.5%, p=0.054) and had a larger increase in decision confidence than the control group: 0.67 vs. 0.075, p<0.03. There were no statistically significant between group differences in decisional conflict or decision aid acceptability. Conclusion These findings suggest that clinical

  15. The social sharing of emotions in HIV/AIDS: a comparative study of HIV/AIDS, diabetic and cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Cantisano, Nicole; Rimé, Bernard; Muñoz-Sastre, María T

    2013-10-01

    Studies have shown that chronic illness patients encounter difficulties in the social sharing of emotions. Do HIV/AIDS patients present distinguishing traits in the inhibition of illness and non-illness-related emotions? The differences in the social sharing of emotion between 35 HIV/AIDS, 35 diabetic and 34 cancer outpatients were studied. A questionnaire assessed illness-related emotions, social sharing of emotion and emotional inhibition. The HIV/AIDS group significantly presented superior scoring in shame, guilt and non-sharing of illness-related emotions, lower frequencies of social sharing of emotion and less sharing partners. These findings could lead to future research examining the emotional expression of guilt and shame in HIV/AIDS.

  16. Raised intracranial pressure and visual complications in AIDS patients with cryptococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Johnston, S R; Corbett, E L; Foster, O; Ash, S; Cohen, J

    1992-03-01

    The clinical course of cryptococcal meningitis in AIDS shows some important differences from the features of the illness in non-AIDS patients. Complications such as raised intracranial pressure and visual impairment that are recognised in non-AIDS patients may be less frequent in those with AIDS. Persistent intracranial hypertension should be managed actively to prevent visual impairment. In AIDS patients, in whom ventriculo-peritoneal shunts carry additional risks, acetazolamide can be used successfully to lower the CSF pressure and prevent visual loss.

  17. Evaluation of the Ryegrass Stem Rust Model STEMRUST_G and Its Implementation as a Decision Aid.

    PubMed

    Pfender, W F; Coop, L B; Seguin, S G; Mellbye, M E; Gingrich, G A; Silberstein, T B

    2015-01-01

    STEMRUST_G, a simulation model for epidemics of stem rust in perennial ryegrass grown to maturity as a seed crop, was validated for use as a heuristic tool and as a decision aid for disease management with fungicides. Multistage validation had been used in model creation by incorporating previously validated submodels for infection, latent period duration, sporulation, fungicide effects, and plant growth. Validation of the complete model was by comparison of model output with observed disease severities in 35 epidemics at nine location-years in the Pacific Northwest of the United States. We judge the model acceptable for its purposes, based on several tests. Graphs of modeled disease progress were generally congruent with plotted disease severity observations. There was negligible average bias in the 570 modeled-versus-observed comparisons across all data, although there was large variance in size of the deviances. Modeled severities were accurate in >80% of the comparisons, where accuracy is defined as the modeled value being within twice the 95% confidence interval of the observed value, within ±1 day of the observation date. An interactive website was created to produce disease estimates by running STEMRUST_G with user-supplied disease scouting information and automated daily weather data inputs from field sites. The model and decision aid supplement disease managers' information by estimating the level of latent (invisible) and expressed disease since the last scouting observation, given season-long weather conditions up to the present, and it estimates effects of fungicides on epidemic development. In additional large-plot experiments conducted in grower fields, the decision aid produced disease management outcomes (management cost and seed yield) as good as or better than the growers' standard practice. In future, STEMRUST_G could be modified to create similar models and decision aids for stem rust of wheat and barley, after additional experiments to

  18. A Shared Decision-Making Approach to Telemedicine: Engaging Rural Patients in Glycemic Management

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Michelle L.; Siminerio, Linda; Payne, Tammie; Krall, Jodi

    2016-01-01

    Telemedicine can connect specialist health care providers with patients in remote and underserved areas. It is especially relevant in diabetes care, where a proliferation of treatment options has added further complexity to the care of an already complex, highly prevalent disease. Recent developments in health reform encourage delivery systems to use team-based models and engage patients in shared decision-making (SDM), where patients and providers together make health care decisions that are tailored to the specific characteristics and values of the patient. The goal of this project was to design, integrate, and evaluate a team-based, SDM approach delivered to patients with diabetes in a rural community, building upon the previously established telemedicine for reach, education, access, and treatment (TREAT) model. Patients in this feasibility study demonstrated improvement in hemoglobin A1c values, and reported better understanding of diabetes. Providers reported the SDM aids increased cohesion among team members (including patients) and facilitated patient education and behavioral goal setting. This project demonstrated that SDM could be integrated into the workflow of a telemedicine team visit with good provider and patient satisfaction. PMID:27869655

  19. A Shared Decision-Making Approach to Telemedicine: Engaging Rural Patients in Glycemic Management.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Michelle L; Siminerio, Linda; Payne, Tammie; Krall, Jodi

    2016-11-17

    Telemedicine can connect specialist health care providers with patients in remote and underserved areas. It is especially relevant in diabetes care, where a proliferation of treatment options has added further complexity to the care of an already complex, highly prevalent disease. Recent developments in health reform encourage delivery systems to use team-based models and engage patients in shared decision-making (SDM), where patients and providers together make health care decisions that are tailored to the specific characteristics and values of the patient. The goal of this project was to design, integrate, and evaluate a team-based, SDM approach delivered to patients with diabetes in a rural community, building upon the previously established telemedicine for reach, education, access, and treatment (TREAT) model. Patients in this feasibility study demonstrated improvement in hemoglobin A1c values, and reported better understanding of diabetes. Providers reported the SDM aids increased cohesion among team members (including patients) and facilitated patient education and behavioral goal setting. This project demonstrated that SDM could be integrated into the workflow of a telemedicine team visit with good provider and patient satisfaction.

  20. Toxoplasmosis in HIV/AIDS patients: a current situation.

    PubMed

    Nissapatorn, Veeranoot; Lee, Christopher; Quek, Kia Fatt; Leong, Chee Loon; Mahmud, Rohela; Abdullah, Khairul Anuar

    2004-08-01

    The seroprevalence of toxoplasmosis among 505 of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS patients was 226 (44.8%; 95% CI 42.64-51.76): 27 (47.4%) and 199 (44.4%) showed Toxoplasma seropositivity with and without toxoplasmic encephalitis (TE), respectively (P <0.05). The majority of these patients were in the 25-34 age group (44 versus 39%), male (86 versus 76%), and Chinese (49 versus 53%), though no statistical significance was found between the two. Significant differences between these two groups were noted, however, in terms of marital status, occupation, and present address. The heterosexual exhibited the most frequent behavior at risk for HIV infection, and accounted for 51 and 59% of patients with and without TE, respectively. Only 17/260 (6.5%) and 1/137 (0.7%) of them later acquired TE after receiving primary chemoprophylaxis (cotrimoxazole) and antiretroviral therapy including HAART (P <0.05). Fifty-seven (11.3%) out of those 505 patients were diagnosed with AIDS-related TE. The most common clinical manifestation was headache (56%). The computed tomography scan findings showed most lesions to be multiple (96.4%), hypodense (66.7%), and in the parietal region (39.3%). Twenty-seven (47.4%) patients had chronic (latent) Toxoplasma infection as evidenced by seropositivity for anti-Toxoplasma (IgG) antibody. At the time of diagnosis, the range of CD4 cell count was from 0-239 with a median of 25 cells/cumm. We also found that a CD4 count of less than 100 cells/cumm was significantly associated with development of TE (P <0.05). Clinical outcomes showed that among those who survived, 21 (36.8%), 16 (28.1%), and 2 (3.5%) of patients had completed treatment, transferred out, and were lost to follow up, respectively. Unfortunately, 18 (31.6%) of the cases were officially pronounced dead. Overall, 7 (12.3%) patients were detected as recurrent TE in this study.

  1. High-energy laser tactical decision aid (HELTDA) for mission planning and predictive avoidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burley, Jarred L.; Fiorino, Steven T.; Randall, Robb M.; Bartell, Richard J.; Cusumano, Salvatore J.

    2012-06-01

    This study demonstrates the development of a high energy laser tactical decision aid (HELTDA) by the AFIT/CDE for mission planning High Energy Laser (HEL) weapon system engagements as well as centralized, decentralized, or hybrid predictive avoidance (CPA/DPA/HPA) assessments. Analyses of example HEL mission engagements are described as well as how mission planners are expected to employ the software. Example HEL engagement simulations are based on geographic location and recent/current atmospheric weather conditions. The atmospheric effects are defined through the AFIT/CDE Laser Environmental Effects Definition and Reference (LEEDR) model or the High Energy Laser End-to-End Operational Simulation (HELEEOS) model upon which the HELTDA is based. These models enable the creation of vertical profiles of temperature, pressure, water vapor content, optical turbulence, and atmospheric particulates and hydrometeors as they relate to line-by-line layer extinction coefficient magnitude at wavelengths from the UV to the RF. Seasonal and boundary layer variations (summer/winter) and time of day variations for a range of relative humidity percentile conditions are considered to determine optimum efficiency in a specific environment. Each atmospheric particulate/hydrometeor is evaluated based on its wavelength-dependent forward and off-axis scattering characteristics and absorption effects on the propagating environment to and beyond the target. In addition to realistic vertical profiles of molecular and aerosol absorption and scattering, correlated optical turbulence profiles in probabilistic (percentile) format are included. Numerical weather model forecasts are incorporated in the model to develop comprehensive understanding of HEL weapon system performance.

  2. A digital patient for computer-aided prosthesis design

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Giorgio; Facoetti, Giancarlo; Rizzi, Caterina

    2013-01-01

    This article concerns the design of lower limb prosthesis, both below and above knee. It describes a new computer-based design framework and a digital model of the patient around which the prosthesis is designed and tested in a completely virtual environment. The virtual model of the patient is the backbone of the whole system, and it is based on a biomechanical general-purpose model customized with the patient's characteristics (e.g. anthropometric measures). The software platform adopts computer-aided and knowledge-guided approaches with the goal of replacing the current development process, mainly hand made, with a virtual one. It provides the prosthetics with a set of tools to design, configure and test the prosthesis and comprehends two main environments: the prosthesis modelling laboratory and the virtual testing laboratory. The first permits the three-dimensional model of the prosthesis to be configured and generated, while the second allows the prosthetics to virtually set up the artificial leg and simulate the patient's postures and movements, validating its functionality and configuration. General architecture and modelling/simulation tools for the platform are described as well as main aspects and results of the experimentation. PMID:24427528

  3. Longitudinal feasibility of MINDSET: a clinic decision aid for epilepsy self-management.

    PubMed

    Begley, Charles; Shegog, Ross; Harding, Angelique; Goldsmith, Corey; Hope, Omotola; Newmark, Michael

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report on the development and feasibility of the longitudinal version of MINDSET, a clinical tool to assist patients and health-care providers in epilepsy self-management. A previous study described the feasibility of using MINDSET to identify and prioritize self-management issues during a clinic visit. This paper describes the development of the longitudinal version of MINDSET and feasibility test over multiple visits with a printed action plan for goal setting and the capacity for monitoring changes in self-management. Feasibility was assessed based on 1) postvisit patient and provider interviews addressing ease of use and usefulness, patient/provider communication, and shared decision-making and 2) the capacity of the tool to monitor epilepsy characteristics and self-management over time. Results indicate MINDSET feasibility for 1) identifying and facilitating discussion of self-management issues during clinic visits, 2) providing a printable list of prioritized issues and tailored self-management goals, and 3) tracking changes in epilepsy characteristics and self-management over time.

  4. Hearing Function in Patients Living with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Luque, Amneris E.; Orlando, Mark S.; Leong, U-Cheng; Allen, Paul D.; Guido, Joseph J.; Yang, Hongmei; Wu, Hulin

    2014-01-01

    Background During the earlier years of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, initial reports described sensorineural hearing loss in up to 49% of individuals with HIV/AIDS. During those years, patients commonly progressed to advanced stages of HIV disease, and frequently had neurological complications. However, the abnormalities on pure-tone audiometry and brainstem evoked responses outlined in small studies were not always consistently correlated with advanced stages of HIV/AIDS. Moreover, these studies could not exclude the confounding effect of concurrent opportunistic infections and syphilis. Additional reports also have indicated that some antiretroviral (ARV) medications may be ototoxic, thus it has been difficult to make conclusions regarding the cause of changes in hearing function in HIV-infected patients. More recently, accelerated aging has been suggested as a potential explanation for the disproportionate increase in complications of aging described in many HIV-infected patients, hence accelerated aging associated hearing loss may also be playing a role in these patients. Methods We conducted a large cross-sectional analysis of hearing function in over 300 patients with HIV-1 infection and in 137 HIV-uninfected controls. HIV-infected participants and HIV-uninfected controls underwent a two-hour battery of hearing tests including the Hearing Handicap Inventory, standard audiometric pure-tone air and bone conduction testing, tympanometric testing and speech reception and discrimination testing. Results Three-way ANOVA and logistic regression analysis of 278 eligible HIV-infected subjects stratified by disease stage in early HIV disease (n= 127) and late HIV disease (n=148) and 120 eligible HIV-uninfected controls revealed no statistical significant differences among the three study groups in either overall 4-PTA or hearing loss prevalence in either ear. Three-way ANOVA showed significant differences in word recognition scores (WRS) in the right ear among groups; a

  5. Dying cancer patients talk about physician and patient roles in DNR decision making

    PubMed Central

    Eliott, Jaklin A.; Olver, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background  Within medical and bioethical discourse, there are many models depicting the relationships between, and roles of, physician and patient in medical decision making. Contestation similarly exists over the roles of physician and patient with regard to the decision not to provide cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) following cardiac arrest [the do‐not‐resuscitate or do‐not‐resuscitate (DNR) decision], but there is little analysis of patient perspectives. Objective  Analyse what patients with cancer within weeks before dying say about the decision to forego CPR and the roles of patient and physician in this decision. Design and participants  Discursive analysis of qualitative data gathered during semi‐structured interviews with 28 adult cancer patients close to death and attending palliative or oncology clinics of an Australian teaching hospital. Results  Participants’ descriptions of appropriate patient or physician roles in decisions about CPR appeared related to how they conceptualized the decision: as a personal or a medical issue, with patient and doctor respectively identified as appropriate decision makers; or alternatively, both medical and personal, with various roles assigned embodying different versions of a shared decision‐making process. Participants’ endorsement of physicians as decision makers rested upon physicians’ enactment of the rational, knowledgeable and compassionate expert, which legitimized entrusting them to make the DNR decision. Where this was called into question, physicians were positioned as inappropriate decision makers. Conclusion  When patients’ and physicians’ understandings of the best decision, or of the preferred role of either party, diverge, conflict may ensue. In order to elicit and negotiate with patient preferences, flexibility is required during clinical interactions about decision making. PMID:20860782

  6. Cognitive Predictors of Reasoning through Treatment Decisions in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Brain Metastases.

    PubMed

    Gerstenecker, Adam; Duff, Kevin; Meneses, Karen; Fiveash, John B; Nabors, Louis B; Triebel, Kristen L

    2015-07-01

    To examine the association between reasoning through medical treatment decisions and cognition in a sample of patients with brain metastasis. The association between reasoning and cognition was examined using data from 41 patients with diagnosed brain metastasis. All diagnoses were made by a board-certified radiation oncologist and were verified histologically. In total, 41 demographically matched, cognitively healthy controls were also included to aid in classifying patients with brain metastasis according to reasoning status (i.e., intact or impaired). Results indicate that measures of episodic memory and processing speed were associated with reasoning. Using these two predictors, actuarial equations were constructed that can be used to help screen for impaired reasoning ability in patients' with brain metastasis. The equations presented in this study have clinical significance as they can be used to help identify patients at risk for possessing a diminished ability to reason through medical treatment decisions and, thus, are in need of a more comprehensive evaluation of their medical decision-making capacity.

  7. [Reciprocal acknowledgement and decision-making shared with the patient].

    PubMed

    Costa-Alcaraz, A M; Siurana-Aparisi, J C; Almendro-Padilla, C; García-Vicente, S; Ordovás-Casaurrán, R

    2011-12-01

    "Reciprocal recognition" is a philosophical concept that is essential to understand the attitudes that are basic for peaceful personal relationships. When it is not present, relationships in which people struggle for recognition are established. When the patients are excluded from the decision making regarding their health, their autonomy is not respected. This may make the patients feel like they are being treated as objects, with the consequent loss of trust in the doctor. An informed patient, that it, with their own criteria and desires to participate in what concerns them, is generating a group of growing tendencies. Reciprocal recognition applied to the physician-patient relationship need for one hand, the patient's trust in professional consulting and, secondly, the professional's initiative of sharing decisions with patients. The authors reflect on the concept of reciprocal recognition, with scenarios illustrating the consultation.

  8. Computer-aided diagnosis of pneumonia in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez Morillo, Daniel; León Jiménez, Antonio; Moreno, Sonia Astorga

    2013-01-01

    Background Early diagnosis of pneumonia and discrimination between this disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations in patients with COPD are crucial for optimal clinical management and treatment. Objectives To examine the use of computerized analysis of respiratory sounds, a hybrid system based on principal component analysis (PCA) and probabilistic neural networks (PNNs), to aid the detection of coexisting pneumonia in patients with COPD. Methods and materials A convenience sample of 58 patients with COPD (25 patients hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia and 33 owing to acute exacerbation of COPD) was studied. Auscultations were performed by the patients themselves on their suprasternal notch. Short-time Fourier transform analysis was used to extract features from the recorded respiratory sounds, PCA was selected for dimensionality reduction and a PNN was trained as classifier. 10-Fold cross-validation and receiver operating characteristic curve analysis were used to estimate the system performance. Results Based on the cross-validation results, a sensitivity and a specificity of 72% and 81.8%, respectively, were achieved in validation data. The operating point was selected to maximize the specificity and sensitivity pair in the training set. Discussion The results strongly suggest that electronic self-auscultation at a single location (suprasternal notch) can support diagnosis of pneumonia in patients with COPD. Conclusions A simple, cost-effective method has been proposed to aid decision-making in areas with no radiological facilities available and in resource-constrained settings, and could have a great diagnostic impact on telemedicine applications. PMID:23396513

  9. [Social support and psychological stability in HIV/AIDS patients].

    PubMed

    Laszig, P; Clement, U; Gramatikov, L

    1998-06-01

    An explorative meta-analytic study analysed all published empirical studies on social support of HIV/AIDS patients (n = 57 studies with 347 data sets). Empirical and conceptual questions are addressed. The focus of the empirical questions is to identify meta-analytically confirmed correlates of social support. The conceptual question aims at differentiating the large-scale construct "social support". Results indicate that social support 1. is independent of objective physical parameters, 2. is positively correlated with approach coping and negatively with avoidance coping, 3. shows a substantial negative correlation with indicators of psychological distress, 4. is positively correlated with condom use. The conceptual analysis shows that 5. there is no consensus on how to operationalise the construct of "social support".

  10. Patient and citizen participation in health care decisions in Italy.

    PubMed

    Goss, Claudia; Renzi, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    In recent years there has been a growing recognition in Western healthcare systems of the importance of considering preferences of patients and the public in tailoring health services and treatment plans. The active collaboration between doctor and patient has recently been encouraged through the shared decision-making model. Aim of the present contribution is to describe the current state of patient and public participation in healthcare in Italy. First, we will briefly outline the organization of the Italian National Health Service; second, we will describe the governmental and institutional initiatives regarding participation; third, some examples of associations and initiatives promoting patient participation will be provided; forth, we will report on research projects on patient participation published in peer-reviewed journals; and finally, we will provide some examples on training activities promoting patient participation. The Italian National Health Plan and many regional and local health authorities in Italy explicitly recognize the importance of patient/citizen participation in healthcare decisions at the macro, meso and micro level of decision-making. However, application of a shared model is still at an early stage in Italy. The reported experiences have yielded positive results and have shown that particular attention should be dedicated to more disadvantaged subgroups of the population, involving patient organisations, enhancing patient/citizen knowledge and adopting approaches that take the specific context into account.

  11. The Design of an IEP Decision Aid: A Tool for Diverse Parents of Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuttler, Jessica Oeth

    2012-01-01

    Decision-making is a universal process that occurs constantly in life. Parent participation in educational decision-making is recognized as important by special education law, by special education and school psychology literature (Christenson & Sheridan, 2001; IDEIA, 2004;). Partnership in decision-making is especially important for parents of…

  12. EPA Growing DASEES (Decision Analysis For A Sustainable Environment, Economy & Society) - To Aid In Making Decisions On Complex Environmental Issues

    EPA Science Inventory

    Having a framework and tools to help sort through complicated environmental issues in an objective way would be useful to communities and risk managers, and all the stakeholders affected by these issues. This is one need that DASEES (Decision Analysis for a Sustainable En...

  13. Patient decision making in the face of conflicting medication information

    PubMed Central

    Elstad, Emily; Carpenter, Delesha M.; Devellis, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    When patients consult more than one source of information about their medications, they may encounter conflicting information. Although conflicting information has been associated with negative outcomes, including worse medication adherence, little is known about how patients make health decisions when they receive conflicting information. The objective of this study was to explore the decision making strategies that individuals with arthritis use when they receive conflicting medication information. Qualitative telephone interviews were conducted with 20 men and women with arthritis. Interview vignettes posed scenarios involving conflicting information from different sources (e.g., doctor, pharmacist, and relative), and respondents were asked how they would respond to the situation. Data analysis involved inductive coding to identify emergent themes and deductive contextualization to make meaning from the emergent themes. In response to conflicting medication information, patients used rules of thumb, trial and error, weighed benefits and risks, and sought more information, especially from a doctor. Patients relied heavily on trial and error when there was no conflicting information involved in the vignette. In contrast, patients used rules of thumb as a unique response to conflicting information. These findings increase our understanding of what patients do when they receive conflicting medication information. Given that patient exposure to conflicting information is likely to increase alongside the proliferation of medication information on the Internet, patients may benefit from assistance in identifying the most appropriate decision strategies for dealing with conflicting information, including information about best information sources. PMID:22943889

  14. Cognitive Predictors of Reasoning Through Treatment Decisions in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Gerstenecker, Adam; Duff, Kevin; Meneses, Karen; Fiveash, John B.; Nabors, Louis B.; Triebel, Kristen L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between reasoning through medical treatment decisions and cognition in a sample of patients with brain metastasis. Methods The association between reasoning and cognition was examined using data from 41 patients with diagnosed brain metastasis. All diagnoses were made by a board-certified radiation oncologist and were verified histologically. In total, 41 demographically-matched, cognitively healthy controls were also included to aid in classifying patients with brain metastasis according to reasoning status (i.e., intact or impaired). Results Results indicate that measures of episodic memory and processing speed were associated with reasoning. Using these two predictors, actuarial equations were constructed that can be used to help screen for impaired reasoning ability in patients’ with brain metastasis. Conclusions The equations presented in this study have clinical significance as they can be used to help identify patients at risk for possessing a diminished ability to reason through medical treatment decisions and, thus, are in need of a more comprehensive evaluation of their medical decision-making capacity. PMID:26149751

  15. Caries detection methods: can they aid decision making for invasive sealant treatment?

    PubMed

    Pereira, A C; Verdonschot, E H; Huysmans, M C

    2001-01-01

    The decision to place sealants is a difficult one, and it has been suggested that in a low risk population it may be efficient to wait until caries is detected in the fissure. An invasive sealant technique with fissure preparation may then be indicated. The diagnostic method used in the indication of such a procedure should accurately detect both dentine caries and sound fissures: high sensitivity for dentine caries (at D3 threshold) with high specificity for enamel caries (at D1 threshold). The aims of this study were to assess the diagnostic performance of selected diagnostic methods at normal cut-offs for traditional dentine caries detection and at reduced cut-offs in relation to the desired performance mentioned above, and to assess whether fissure opening allows for accurate visual detection of dentinal caries. Data were obtained from 230 occlusal sites of 101 extracted human molar teeth. Diagnostic methods used on the entire sample were: visual inspection, electrical conductance measurements and laser fluorescence measurements. The sample was then divided into two groups. Group 1 was subjected to visual inspection after application of a dye. Group 2 was subjected to visual inspection after fissure opening only, and after subsequent dye application. Validation was performed by histological investigation. The results with cut-offs normally used in dentine caries detection were roughly in accordance with the literature, except for laser fluorescence. The sensitivity of visual inspection for dentinal caries (D3) was 17% before and 70% after fissure opening. Using reduced cut-offs, a 100% sensitivity (D3) was achieved with 2 methods, but this also resulted in 63 or 87% false positive diagnoses of sound surfaces. Visual inspection and electrical methods both showed a moderate to high sensitivity (D3) with a higher than 50% specificity (D1). It was concluded that visual inspection and electrical methods at reduced cut-offs may aid the indication of invasive sealant

  16. [Penicillium marneffei isolated from a Thai AIDS patient with fungemia].

    PubMed

    Uehara, Masae; Sano, Ayako; Yarita, Kyoko; Kamei, Katsuhiko; Haketa, Makio; Ide, Kyoko; Nagai, Keiko; Takayama, Yoshihiro; Nishimura, Kazuko

    2008-01-01

    Penicillium marneffei was isolated from three blood cultures of a Thai woman with AIDS and then identified as such. The patient, 41 a year-old female from northeast Thailand came to Japan 10 years ago and married a Japanese man. She was reportedly the third patient infected with this fungal species in Japan, and considered to be the first case from whom the causative fungus was successfully cultured, which led to the diagnosis of penicilliosis marneffei. The colony of the isolate, which was cultured on Sabouraud dextrose agar at 25-27 degrees C, was initially white and pannose, gradually turned in color from yellow to yellow-green, and diffused a deep red pigment into the medium. Conidial heads were divergent, and chains of conidia were formed from phialides. Colonies of the isolate, which was cultured on brain-heart infusion agar at 35 degrees C, had a grayish white, membranous yeast-like form with fine plicae and microscopically consisted of short hyphae. Furthermore, 560 bases of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the ribosomal RNA gene including the 5.8S region (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2) (DDBJ accession number AB298970) were sequenced and allowed an unequivocal species identification.

  17. Selecting a provider: what factors influence patients' decision making?

    PubMed

    Abraham, Jean; Sick, Brian; Anderson, Joseph; Berg, Andrea; Dehmer, Chad; Tufano, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    Each year consumers make a variety of decisions relating to their healthcare. Some experts argue that stronger consumer engagement in decisions about where to obtain medical care is an important mechanism for improving efficiency in healthcare delivery and financing. Consumers' ability and motivation to become more active decision makers are affected by several factors, including financial incentives and access to information. This study investigates the set of factors that consumers consider when selecting a provider, including attributes of the provider and the care experience and the reputation of the provider. Additionally, the study evaluates consumers awareness and use of formal sources of provider selection information. Our results from analyzing data from a survey of 467 patients at four clinics in Minnesota suggest that the factors considered of greatest importance include reputation of the physician and reputation of the healthcare organization. Contractual and logistical factors also play a role, with respondents highlighting the importance of seeing a provider affiliated with their health plan and appointment availability. Few respondents indicated that advertisements or formal sources of quality information affected their decision making. The key implication for provider organizations is to carefully manage referral sources to ensure that they consistently meet the needs of referrers. Excellent service to existing patients and to the network of referring physicians yields patient and referrer satisfaction that is critical to attracting new patients. Finally, organizations more generally may want to explore the capabilities of new media and social networking sites for building reputation.

  18. Enhanced support for shared decision making reduced costs of care for patients with preference-sensitive conditions.

    PubMed

    Veroff, David; Marr, Amy; Wennberg, David E

    2013-02-01

    Shared decision making is an approach to care that seeks to fully inform patients about the risks and benefits of available treatments and engage them as participants in decisions about the treatments. Although recent federal and state policies pursue the expanded use of shared decision making as a way to improve care quality and patient experience, payers and providers want evidence that this emerging model of care is cost-effective. We examined data obtained from a year-long randomized investigation. The study compared the effects on patients of receiving a usual level of support in making a medical treatment decision with the effects of receiving enhanced support, which included more contact with trained health coaches through telephone, mail, e-mail, and the Internet. We found that patients who received enhanced support had 5.3 percent lower overall medical costs than patients who received the usual level of support. The enhanced-support group had 12.5 percent fewer hospital admissions than the usual-support group, and 9.9 percent fewer preference-sensitive surgeries, including 20.9 percent fewer preference-sensitive heart surgeries. These findings indicate that support for shared decision making can generate savings. They also suggest that a "remote" model of support-combining telephonic coaching with decision aids, for example-may constitute a relatively low-cost and effective intervention that could reach broader populations without the need for the direct involvement of regular medical care team members.

  19. Development of a decision support system to predict physicians' rehabilitation protocols for patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Hawamdeh, Ziad M; Alshraideh, Mohammad A; Al-Ajlouni, Jihad M; Salah, Imad K; Holm, Margo B; Otom, Ali H

    2012-09-01

    To design a medical decision support system (MDSS) that would accurately predict the rehabilitation protocols prescribed by the physicians for patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) using only their demographic and clinical characteristics. The demographic and clinical variables for 170 patients receiving one of three treatment protocols for knee OA were entered into the MDSS. Demographic variables in the model were age and sex. Clinical variables entered into the model were height, weight, BMI, affected side, severity of knee OA, and severity of pain. All patients in the study received one of three treatment protocols for patients with knee OA: (a) hot packs, followed by electrotherapy and exercise, (b) ice packs, followed by ultrasound and exercise and (c) exercise alone. The resilient back propagation artificial neural network algorithm was used, with a ten-fold cross-validation. It was estimated that the MDSS is able to accurately predict the treatment prescribed by the physician for 87% of the patients. We developed an artificial neural network-based decision support system that can viably aid physicians in determining which treatment protocol would best match the anthropometric and clinical characteristics of patients with knee OA.

  20. Similarity, Self-Esteem and Reactions to Aid in a Simulated Decision Making Task.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The study explored the effects of the overall similarity between donor and recipient of resistance and the recipient’s level of self - esteem on his... esteem -low self esteem recipients were the three experimental factors. The effect of these experimental variables on the recipients self -perceptions...reactions to being helped. A 2 x 2 x 2 factorial between subjects design was employed in which aid-no aid, similar donor-dissimilar donor and high self

  1. Ventriculitis: a rare case of primary cerebral toxoplasmosis in AIDS patient and literature review.

    PubMed

    Cota, Gláucia Fernandes; Assad, Elisa Caroline Pereira; Christo, Paulo Pereira; Giannetti, Alexandre Varella; Santos Filho, José Augusto Malheiros Dos; Xavier, Marcelo Antonio Pascoal

    2008-02-01

    Cerebral toxoplasmosis remains the most important neurological opportunistic infection and the most common cause of intracerebral mass lesion in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). We report a case of an adult AIDS patient with an atypical pattern of toxoplasma encephalitis, presenting with ventriculitis and obstructive hydrocephalus without any focal parenchymal lesion.

  2. Willingness of Health-Professions Students to Treat Patients with AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currey, Charles J.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This 1988-89 survey of 319 students in the medical, dental, nursing, and allied health-care professions revealed that over one-third had reservations about treating AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) patients. Unwillingness to treat AIDS patients was strongly associated with homophobic attitudes. Education should emphasize methods for the…

  3. Treatment decision making for incapacitated patients: is development and use of a patient preference predictor feasible?

    PubMed

    Rid, Annette; Wendler, David

    2014-04-01

    It has recently been proposed to incorporate the use of a "Patient Preference Predictor" (PPP) into the process of making treatment decisions for incapacitated patients. A PPP would predict which treatment option a given incapacitated patient would most likely prefer, based on the individual's characteristics and information on what treatment preferences are correlated with these characteristics. Including a PPP in the shared decision-making process between clinicians and surrogates has the potential to better realize important ethical goals for making treatment decisions for incapacitated patients. However, developing and implementing a PPP poses significant practical challenges. The present paper discusses these practical challenges and considers ways to address them.

  4. An audit of first-aid treatment of pediatric burns patients and their clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Cuttle, Leila; Kravchuk, Olena; Wallis, Belinda; Kimble, Roy M

    2009-01-01

    This study describes the first aid used and clinical outcomes of all patients who presented to the Royal Children's Hospital, Brisbane, Australia in 2005 with an acute burn injury. A retrospective audit was performed with the charts of 459 patients and information concerning burn injury, first-aid treatment, and clinical outcomes was collected. First aid was used on 86.1% of patients, with 8.7% receiving no first aid and unknown treatment in 5.2% of cases. A majority of patients had cold water as first aid (80.2%), however, only 12.1% applied the cold water for the recommended 20 minutes or longer. Recommended first aid (cold water for >or=20 minutes) was associated with significantly reduced reepithelialization time for children with contact injuries (P=.011). Superficial depth burns were significantly more likely to be associated with the use of recommended first aid (P=.03). Suboptimal treatment was more common for children younger than 3.5 years (P<.001) and for children with friction burns. This report is one of the few publications to relate first-aid treatment to clinical outcomes. Some positive clinical outcomes were associated with recommended first-aid use; however, wound outcomes were more strongly associated with burn depth and mechanism of injury. There is also a need for more public awareness of recommended first-aid treatment.

  5. Patients' and parents' concerns and decisions about orthodontic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Aydoğan, Cihan; Alkan, Özer

    2016-01-01

    Objective Patients' and parents' expectations are important in orthodontic treatment decision making. The literature generally demonstrates the perceived benefits of orthodontic treatment, but patients' and their parents' concerns about orthodontic treatment have not been investigated comprehensively. The aim of this study was to identify patients' and parents' concerns about orthodontic treatment and compare them according to sex, age, and treatment demand level. Methods One hundred and eighty-nine children and their parents were interviewed about concerns related to orthodontic treatment. Patients and parents were asked about orthodontic treatment decisions. Answers were recorded as "yes," "no," or "don't know." Chi-squared and Fisher's exact tests were used to compare concerns between age groups, sexes, and treatment demand levels. Kappa statistics were used to assess agreement between patients and their parents. Results Concerns about orthodontic treatment were gathered under 10 items as follows: "feeling pain," "the appearance of braces," "being teased," "avoiding smiling," "speech problems," "dietary changes," "problems with transportation," "economic problems," "long treatment duration," and "missing school." There was no statistically significant difference in concerns between the sexes or age groups. Some concern items and treatment demand were inversely related in patients. Conclusions The results of this study demonstrate patients' and parents' concerns about orthodontic treatment. Differences between the concerns of patients with different treatment demands imply that children might reject orthodontic treatment because of their concerns. Appropriate consultation of patients addressing their concerns may help reduce anxiety and improve the acceptance of treatment. PMID:26877979

  6. A Socioecological Model of Rape Survivors' Decisions to Aid in Case Prosecution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anders, Mary C.; Christopher, F. Scott

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to identify factors underlying rape survivors' post-assault prosecution decisions by testing a decision model that included the complex relations between the multiple social ecological systems within which rape survivors are embedded. We coded 440 police rape cases for characteristics of the assault and characteristics…

  7. Evaluation of patient satisfaction with different hearing aids: A study of 107 patients.

    PubMed

    Ulusoy, Seçkin; Muluk, Nuray Bayar; San, Turhan; Cingi, Cemal

    2017-01-01

    We retrospectively investigated patient satisfaction with different types of hearing aids in 107 patients-60 males and 47 females, aged 8 to 84 years (mean: 53.8)-with unilateral or bilateral hearing loss, each of whom used two different hearing devices for at least 3 years per device. The International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids, Turkish edition (IOI-HA-TR) was used to evaluate satisfaction levels; we also calculated our own total individual subjective satisfaction (TISS) scores. We divided 16 different hearing devices into two types: device 1 and device 2; on average, device 2 had more channels, a lower minimum frequency, and a higher maximum frequency. We found that the IOI-HA-TR scores and TISS scores were higher and usage time was greater during device 2 use, and that there was a positive correlation between IOI-HA-TR and TISS scores. A total of 69 patients (64.5%) used device 2 for more than 8 hours per day, while 38 patients (35.5%) used it for 4 to 8 hours per day during the final 2 weeks of the trial. In contrast, 40 patients (37.4%) used device 1 for more than 8 hours, 50 (46.7%) used it for 4 to 8 hours, and the remaining 17 (15.9%) used it for less than 4 hours; the difference in the duration of use of the two devices was statistically significant (p < 0.001). Younger patients and patients with more education were more satisfied with their devices than were older patients and those who were not as well educated. We conclude that devices with good technologic features such as more channels, a lower minimum frequency, and a higher maximum frequency result in better hearing. Also, based on the age difference that we observed, we recommend that psychological support be provided to older patients with aided hearing to enhance their mental health and quality of life.

  8. [Acute abdomen due to cytomegalovirus in AIDS patients. Apropos 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Ferré, C; Mascaró, J; Benasco, C; Ramos, E; Pérez, J L; Podzamczer, D

    1994-07-09

    Two cases of acute abdomen--because of acute appendicitis and paralytic ileus--due to cytomegalovirus infection in AIDS patients are reported. In both patients evolution was subacute and cytomegalic inclusions were seen in the histologic examination of the surgical samples. The two patients died after surgery. The possibility of cytomegalovirus infection must be kept in mind in AIDS patients who undergo urgent abdominal laparatomy and early treatment should be instituted.

  9. Vascular access choice in incident hemodialysis patients: a decision analysis.

    PubMed

    Drew, David A; Lok, Charmaine E; Cohen, Joshua T; Wagner, Martin; Tangri, Navdeep; Weiner, Daniel E

    2015-01-01

    Hemodialysis vascular access recommendations promote arteriovenous (AV) fistulas first; however, it may not be the best approach for all hemodialysis patients, because likelihood of successful fistula placement, procedure-related and subsequent costs, and patient survival modify the optimal access choice. We performed a decision analysis evaluating AV fistula, AV graft, and central venous catheter (CVC) strategies for patients initiating hemodialysis with a CVC, a scenario occurring in over 70% of United States dialysis patients. A decision tree model was constructed to reflect progression from hemodialysis initiation. Patients were classified into one of three vascular access choices: maintain CVC, attempt fistula, or attempt graft. We explicitly modeled probabilities of primary and secondary patency for each access type, with success modified by age, sex, and diabetes. Access-specific mortality was incorporated using preexisting cohort data, including terms for age, sex, and diabetes. Costs were ascertained from the 2010 USRDS report and Medicare for procedure costs. An AV fistula attempt strategy was found to be superior to AV grafts and CVCs in regard to mortality and cost for the majority of patient characteristic combinations, especially younger men without diabetes. Women with diabetes and elderly men with diabetes had similar outcomes, regardless of access type. Overall, the advantages of an AV fistula attempt strategy lessened considerably among older patients, particularly women with diabetes, reflecting the effect of lower AV fistula success rates and lower life expectancy. These results suggest that vascular access-related outcomes may be optimized by considering individual patient characteristics.

  10. Vascular Access Choice in Incident Hemodialysis Patients: A Decision Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Drew, David A.; Lok, Charmaine E.; Cohen, Joshua T.; Wagner, Martin; Tangri, Navdeep

    2015-01-01

    Hemodialysis vascular access recommendations promote arteriovenous (AV) fistulas first; however, it may not be the best approach for all hemodialysis patients, because likelihood of successful fistula placement, procedure-related and subsequent costs, and patient survival modify the optimal access choice. We performed a decision analysis evaluating AV fistula, AV graft, and central venous catheter (CVC) strategies for patients initiating hemodialysis with a CVC, a scenario occurring in over 70% of United States dialysis patients. A decision tree model was constructed to reflect progression from hemodialysis initiation. Patients were classified into one of three vascular access choices: maintain CVC, attempt fistula, or attempt graft. We explicitly modeled probabilities of primary and secondary patency for each access type, with success modified by age, sex, and diabetes. Access-specific mortality was incorporated using preexisting cohort data, including terms for age, sex, and diabetes. Costs were ascertained from the 2010 USRDS report and Medicare for procedure costs. An AV fistula attempt strategy was found to be superior to AV grafts and CVCs in regard to mortality and cost for the majority of patient characteristic combinations, especially younger men without diabetes. Women with diabetes and elderly men with diabetes had similar outcomes, regardless of access type. Overall, the advantages of an AV fistula attempt strategy lessened considerably among older patients, particularly women with diabetes, reflecting the effect of lower AV fistula success rates and lower life expectancy. These results suggest that vascular access-related outcomes may be optimized by considering individual patient characteristics. PMID:25063436

  11. HIV positive patients first presenting with an AIDS defining illness: characteristics and survival.

    PubMed Central

    Poznansky, M. C.; Coker, R.; Skinner, C.; Hill, A.; Bailey, S.; Whitaker, L.; Renton, A.; Weber, J.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To study the presentation and survival of patients who present with their first diagnosis of being HIV positive at the same time as their AIDS defining illness. DESIGN--Retrospective study of patients presenting with AIDS between 1991 and 1993. SETTING--Department of genitourinary medicine, St Mary's Hospital, London. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--AIDS defining illness at presentation and survival after diagnosis of AIDS. RESULTS--Between January 1991 and December 1993, 97 out of 436 patients (22%) presented with their first AIDS defining illness coincident with their first positive result of an HIV test (group B). The remaining 339 patients (78%) had tested positive for HIV-1 infection within the previous eight years and had consequently been followed up in clinics before developing their first AIDS defining illness (group A). The two groups of patients did not differ in age and sex distribution, risk factors for HIV-1 infection, nationality, country of origin, or haematological variables determined at the time of the AIDS defining illness. However, the defining illnesses differed between the two groups. Illnesses associated with severe immunodeficiency (the wasting syndrome, cryptosporidiosis, and cytomegalovirus infection) were seen almost exclusively in group A whereas extrapulmonary tuberculosis and Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia were more common in group B. The survival of patients in group B after the onset of AIDS was significantly longer than that of patients in group A as determined by Kaplan-Meier log rank analysis (P = 0.0026). CONCLUSIONS--Subjects who are HIV positive and present late are a challenge to the control of the spread of HIV infection because they progress from asymptomatic HIV infection to AIDS without receiving health care. The finding that presentation with an AIDS defining illness coincident with a positive result in an HIV test did not have a detrimental effect on survival gives insights into the effects of medical intervention on

  12. Database architecture for data mining to aid real-time range safety decision in a test range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Checker, A. K.; Raj, R. Appavu

    2006-04-01

    Flight vehicles carrying sensitive payloads and large amount of propellants pose danger to life and property around launch pad area. There are inherent limitations in conventional decision support system and at times the man in the loop is under severe strain while analyzing the real time data of flight vehicle for range safety decision support system. It is essential to use newer technological input for designing flight termination system for handling high speed, high maneuvering and multi-platform based flight vehicles. This calls for extensive trajectory simulation under various flight conditions and failure modes, collection of actual test data of sub systems and post flight data along with geographical, metrological and tracking instrument data to be collected and organized in a data warehouse for data mining. The information obtained in real time using large data base will aid range safety decision making in a complex scenario of flight testing in a test range. This paper highlights briefly the existing system and its constraints and attempt to evolve an innovative system combining knowledge base and real time data from multiple sensors and fusing the data from similar and dissimilar sensors using state-vector fusion technique for more reliable and quick range safety decision making.

  13. Personalization and Patient Involvement in Decision Support Systems: Current Trends

    PubMed Central

    Sacchi, L.; Lanzola, G.; Viani, N.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objectives This survey aims at highlighting the latest trends (2012-2014) on the development, use, and evaluation of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) based decision support systems (DSSs) in medicine, with a particular focus on patient-centered and personalized care. Methods We considered papers published on scientific journals, by querying PubMed and Web of Science™. Included studies focused on the implementation or evaluation of ICT-based tools used in clinical practice. A separate search was performed on computerized physician order entry systems (CPOEs), since they are increasingly embedding patient-tailored decision support. Results We found 73 papers on DSSs (53 on specific ICT tools) and 72 papers on CPOEs. Although decision support through the delivery of recommendations is frequent (28/53 papers), our review highlighted also DSSs only based on efficient information presentation (25/53). Patient participation in making decisions is still limited (9/53), and mostly focused on risk communication. The most represented medical area is cancer (12%). Policy makers are beginning to be included among stakeholders (6/73), but integration with hospital information systems is still low. Concerning knowledge representation/management issues, we identified a trend towards building inference engines on top of standard data models. Most of the tools (57%) underwent a formal assessment study, even if half of them aimed at evaluating usability and not effectiveness. Conclusions Overall, we have noticed interesting evolutions of medical DSSs to improve communication with the patient, consider the economic and organizational impact, and use standard models for knowledge representation. However, systems focusing on patient-centered care still do not seem to be available at large. PMID:26293857

  14. [Assessment criteria in the choice of aids for the lifting of patients].

    PubMed

    Panciera, D; Menoni, O; Ricci, M G; Occhipinti, E

    1999-01-01

    A fundamental part of the prevention strategies aimed at reducing risk due to manual handling of patients is the use of appropriate aids. This paper defines the basic types of aids for hospital wards: patient lifting devices, aids for hygiene and minor aids; and also proposes a procedure for choice of the type of aid: the procedure uses a specific protocol and also analyzes work organization and the environmental features of the ward. The proposed criteria for choice concern in the first place the fundamental requirements of the equipment: safety for operator and patient, simplicity of use and comfort for the patient. Secondly the basic determinants for choice of the type of aid are the type of disabled patient usually present in the ward and the analysis of the movements made in handling patients. On this basis, for each type of aid, the specific features are defined which direct the choice of supply for the various wards that will be adequate and effective both in reducing risk due to manual handling of patients and in improving the comfort of the patients.

  15. Design of an Aircrew Scheduling Decision Aid for the 6916th Electronic Security Squadron.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    air squadron. Roege formulated the problem as an assignment problem. The objective was to assign pilots to duties at a specified cost subject to crew...rest conitraints. Roege solved the problem using integer programming. Roege used the requirements in TACM 51-50 to form an objective function. The costs ...Measures: Measure of the impact the DSS has on decisions. Examples of productivity measures include the time required to reach a decision, the cost of making

  16. "Patient Zero": the absence of a patient's view of the early North American AIDS epidemic.

    PubMed

    McKay, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    This article contextualizes the production and reception of And the Band Played On, Randy Shilts's popular history of the initial recognition of the American AIDS epidemic. Published over twenty-five years ago, the book and its most notorious character, "Patient Zero," are in particular need of a critical historical treatment. The article presents a more balanced consideration-a "patient's view"-of Gaétan Dugas's experience of the early years of AIDS. I oppose the assertion that Dugas, the so-called Patient Zero, ignored incontrovertible information about the condition and was intent on spreading his infection. Instead I argue that scientific ideas in 1982 and 1983 about AIDS and the transmissibility of a causative agent were later portrayed to be more self-evident than they were at the time. The article also traces how Shilts's highly selective-and highly readable-characterization of Dugas rapidly became embedded in discussions about the need to criminalize the reckless transmission of HIV.

  17. Effectiveness and Cost Benefits of Computer-Based Decision Aids for Equipment Maintenance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-02-01

    Computer-based assessment of problem solving. Computers in Human Behavior , 15, 269–282. Booher, H.R. (1978). Job performance aids: Research and...Perspectives on computer-based performance assessment of problem solving. Computers in Human Behavior , 15, 255–268. Orasanu, J., and Connolly, T. (1993). The

  18. Cultural and linguistic adaptation of a multimedia colorectal cancer screening decision aid for Spanish-speaking Latinos.

    PubMed

    Ko, Linda K; Reuland, Daniel; Jolles, Monica; Clay, Rebecca; Pignone, Michael

    2014-01-01

    As the United States becomes more linguistically and culturally diverse, there is a need for effective health communication interventions that target diverse, vulnerable populations, including Latinos. To address such disparities, health communication interventionists often face the challenge to adapt existing interventions from English into Spanish in a way that retains essential elements of the original intervention while also addressing the linguistic needs and cultural perspectives of the target population. The authors describe the conceptual framework, context, rationale, methods, and findings of a formative research process used in creating a Spanish-language version of an evidence-based (English language) multimedia colorectal cancer screening decision aid. The multistep process included identification of essential elements of the existing intervention, literature review, assessment of the regional context and engagement of key stakeholders, and solicitation of direct input from target population. The authors integrated these findings in the creation of the new adapted intervention. They describe how they used this process to identify and integrate sociocultural themes such as personalism (personalismo), familism (familismo), fear (miedo), embarrassment (verguenza), power distance (respeto), machismo, and trust (confianza) into the Spanish-language decision aid.

  19. Decision support system based semantic web for personalized patient care.

    PubMed

    Douali, Nassim; De Roo, Jos; Jaulent, Marie-Christine

    2012-01-01

    Personalized medicine may be considered an extension of traditional approaches to understanding and treating diseases, but with greater precision. A profile of a patient's genetic variation can guide the selection of drugs or treatment protocols that minimize harmful side effects or ensure a more successful outcome. In this paper we describe a decision support system designed to assist physicians for personalized care, and methodology for integration in the clinical workflow. A reasoning method for interacting heterogeneous knowledge and data is a necessity in the context of personalized medicine. Development of clinical decision support based semantic web for personalized patient care is to achieve its potential and improve the quality, safety and efficiency of healthcare.

  20. The impact of counselling with a practical statistical model on patients' decision-making about treatment for epilepsy: findings from a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, A; Baker, G; Chadwick, D; Johnson, A

    1993-12-01

    To ascertain the impact of a computer-based predictive model on patients' decisions about continuing treatment of their epilepsy, 72 subjects were asked to complete questionnaires prior to and following counselling with the model. The subjects were attending the neurology out-patient clinic in a large UK hospital, and were identified from medical records as eligible for withdrawal of AEDs. The effect of counselling with the model was to make the majority of patients opt to continue AED therapy. Positive or negative framing of risk information appeared to influence the decisions of patients who were initially uncertain about continuing treatment, as did patients' perceptions of the clinician's views. The prognostic model appeared to allow relatively complex statistical information to be conveyed to patients in an accessible form. We suggest its use will aid clinicians in counselling patients and will help patients reach better-informed decisions about treatment.

  1. Rupioid histoplasmosis: first case reported in an AIDS patient in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Corti, Marcelo; Villafañe, María F; Palmieri, Omar; Negroni, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    Disseminated histoplasmosis is a relatively common AIDS-defining illness, occurring in almost 4% of patients living in endemic areas and it may be the first clinical expression of the HIV infection. A broad spectrum of clinical skin lesions associated with Histoplasma capsulatum infection have been described in AIDS patients, such as erythematous macules, papules, nodules, and pustules. Herpetic, acneiform, erythema multiforme-like, molluscum contagiosum-like, vasculitic, and exfoliative forms have also been reported. To our knowledge, this is the first case of disseminated histoplasmosis in an AIDS patient presented as a rupioid eruption.

  2. Patterns of gallium-67 scintigraphy in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and the AIDS related complex

    SciTech Connect

    Bitran, J.; Bekerman, C.; Weinstein, R.; Bennett, C.; Ryo, U.; Pinsky, S.

    1987-07-01

    Thirty-two patients with AIDS related complex (ARC) or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) underwent /sup 67/Ga scans as part of their evaluation. Three patterns of /sup 67/Ga biodistribution were found: lymph node uptake alone; diffuse pulmonary uptake; normal scan. Gallium-67 scans were useful in identifying clinically occult Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in seven of 15 patients with ARC who were asymptomatic and had normal chest radiographs. Gallium scans are a useful ancillary procedure in the evaluation of patients with ARC or AIDS.

  3. Limited usefulness of lymphocytopenia in screening for AIDS in hospital patients.

    PubMed Central

    Boyko, W J; Schechter, M T; Constance, P; Nitz, R

    1985-01-01

    Lymphocytopenia is often present in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and has been suggested as a useful screening test for AIDS. Of 625 patients consecutively admitted to an acute care university teaching hospital 91 (15%) were found to have a lymphocyte count of less than 1 X 10(9)/L, and 25 (4%) had a count of less than 0.5 X 10(9)/L. The corresponding figures for 32 patients at the hospital in whom AIDS had been diagnosed were 13 (41%) and 4 (13%). Absolute lymphocyte counts in hospitalized patients should not be used as the sole means of identifying patients at high risk for AIDS. PMID:4016638

  4. Unilateral Ischemic Maculopathy Associated with Cytomegalovirus Retinitis in Patients with AIDS: Optical Coherence Tomography Findings

    PubMed Central

    Arevalo, J. Fernando; Garcia, Reinaldo A.; Arevalo, Fernando A.; Fernandez, Carlos F.

    2015-01-01

    To describe the clinical and optical coherence tomography (OCT) characteristics of ischemic maculopathy in two patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Two patients with AIDS and cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis developed ischemic maculopathy. Both patients presented with central visual loss and active granular CMV retinitis. The presence of opacification of the superficial retina in the macular area and intraretinal edema suggested the diagnosis. Fluorescein angiography changes were similar in the two cases with enlargement of the foveal avascular zone and late staining of juxtafoveal vessels. OCT changes were suggestive of retinal ischemia: Increased reflectivity from the inner retinal layer and decreased backscattering from the retinal photoreceptors due to fluid and retinal edema. Ischemic maculopathy may cause a severe and permanent decrease in vision in AIDS patients. Fluorescein angiography and OCT should be considered in any patient with AIDS and unexplained visual loss. The mechanism of ischemic maculopathy may be multifactorial. PMID:27051496

  5. Collective AIDS Activism and Individuals' Perceived Self-Advocacy in Physician-Patient Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brashers, Dale E.; Haas, Stephen M.; Klingle, Renee S.; Neidig, Judith L.

    2000-01-01

    Describes parallel persuasive processes between social or political activism and personal self-advocacy in a study of AIDS activism and communication patterns between people with HIV or AIDS and health care personnel. Encourages greater patient education about the illness and treatment options. Promotes a more assertive stance toward health care,…

  6. Cultural Competence in a Group Intervention Designed for Latino Patients Living with HIV/AIDS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acevedo, Vanessa

    2008-01-01

    Although the trajectory of the HIV/AIDS epidemic has changed dramatically over the past 25 years, addressing the psychosocial needs of patients living with HIV/AIDS remains vital. Ensuring the effective delivery of services demands that interventions be rooted in cultural competence and aimed at vulnerable populations. This article describes a…

  7. 21 CFR 801.420 - Hearing aid devices; professional and patient labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hearing aid devices; professional and patient labeling. 801.420 Section 801.420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...) Identification of any known side effects associated with the use of a hearing aid that may warrant...

  8. 21 CFR 801.420 - Hearing aid devices; professional and patient labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hearing aid devices; professional and patient labeling. 801.420 Section 801.420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...) Identification of any known side effects associated with the use of a hearing aid that may warrant...

  9. Manual and computer-aided materials selection for industrial production: An exercise in decision making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, Seth P.

    1990-01-01

    Students are introduced to methods and concepts for systematic selection and evaluation of materials which are to be used to manufacture specific products in industry. For this laboratory exercise, students are asked to work in groups to identify and describe a product, then to proceed through the process to select a list of three candidates to make the item from. The exercise draws on knowledge of mechanical, physical, and chemical properties, common materials test techniques, and resource management skills in finding and assessing property data. A very important part of the exercise is the students' introduction to decision making algorithms, and learning how to apply them to a complex decision making process.

  10. Design Principles for Personalized Decision Aiding: An Application to Tactical Air Force Route Planning.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-01

    contingency plans have not been in- corporated in an option, but significant information is likely to become available during its execution. 2.6.1.4...Technology Corporation , 16 September 1983. Riemenschneider, R.A., Rockmore, A.J., and Wikman, T.A.A. Route planning aid: System specification (PAR Report...83-135). New Hartford, NY: PAR Technology Corporation , 31 October 1983. Savage, L.J. The foundations of statistics. NY: Wiley, 1954. Schum, D

  11. A Clinical Decision Support System for Breast Cancer Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Ana S.; Alves, Pedro; Jarman, Ian H.; Etchells, Terence A.; Fonseca, José M.; Lisboa, Paulo J. G.

    This paper proposes a Web clinical decision support system for clinical oncologists and for breast cancer patients making prognostic assessments, using the particular characteristics of the individual patient. This system comprises three different prognostic modelling methodologies: the clinically widely used Nottingham prognostic index (NPI); the Cox regression modelling and a partial logistic artificial neural network with automatic relevance determination (PLANN-ARD). All three models yield a different prognostic index that can be analysed together in order to obtain a more accurate prognostic assessment of the patient. Missing data is incorporated in the mentioned models, a common issue in medical data that was overcome using multiple imputation techniques. Risk group assignments are also provided through a methodology based on regression trees, where Boolean rules can be obtained expressed with patient characteristics.

  12. Put a Face to a Name (Part A): The Effects of Photographic Aids on Patient Satisfaction, Clinician Communication, and Quality of Care

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-04

    Effects of Photographic Aids (Photos of Faces) on Patient Recall of Their Clinical Care Team; Effects of Photographic Aids (Photos of Faces) on Clinician-patient Communication; Effects of Photographic Aids (Photos of Faces) on Overall Patient Satisfaction

  13. Multi-Stakeholder Decision Aid for Improved Prioritization of the Public Health Impact of Climate Sensitive Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hongoh, Valerie; Michel, Pascal; Gosselin, Pierre; Samoura, Karim; Ravel, André; Campagna, Céline; Cissé, Hassane Djibrilla; Waaub, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The effects of climate change on infectious diseases are an important global health concern and necessitate decisions for allocation of resources. Economic tools have been used previously; however, how prioritization results might differ when done using broader considerations identified by local stakeholders has yet to be assessed. A multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA) approach was used to assess multi-stakeholder expressed concerns around disease prioritization via focus groups held in Quebec and Burkina Faso. Stakeholders weighted criteria and comparisons were made across study sites. A pilot disease prioritization was done to examine effects on disease rankings. A majority of identified criteria were common to both sites. The effect of context specific criteria and weights resulted in similar yet distinct prioritizations of diseases. The presence of consistent criteria between sites suggests that common concerns exist for prioritization; however, context-specific adjustments reveal much regarding resource availability, capacity and concerns that should be considered as this impacts disease ranking. Participatory decision aid approaches facilitate rich knowledge exchange and problem structuring. Furthermore, given multiple actors in low- and middle-income countries settings, multi-actor collaborations across non-governmental organizations, local government and community are important. Formal mechanisms such as MCDA provide means to foster consensus, shared awareness and collaboration. PMID:27077875

  14. Adaptive Decision Aiding in Computer-Assisted Instruction: Adaptive Computerized Training System (ACTS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    CATALOG NUMBERTechnical Report 475%; , ADAPTIVE DECISION &IDING IN OMPUTER-ASSISTED *JECHNICAL REPOT INSTRUCTION: ADAPTIVE COMPUTERIZED TRAINING )16...alternative. For example, in auto maintenance, the mechanic is trained to adjust the dis- tributor with a "feeler" guage or a dwell tachometer . He

  15. FORBEEF: A Forage-Livestock System Computer Model Used as a Teaching Aid for Decision Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stringer, W. C.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Describes the development of a computer simulation model of forage-beef production systems, which is intended to incorporate soil, forage, and animal decisions into an enterprise scenario. Produces a summary of forage production and livestock needs. Cites positive assessment of the program's value by participants in inservice training workshops.…

  16. Modeling Comparative Daily Enrollment Indicators To Aid Intelligent College Decisions. AIR 2001 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lajubutu, Oyebanjo A.

    This paper shows how three critical enrollment indicators drawn from a relationship database were used to guide planning and management decisions. The paper discusses the guidelines for the development of the model, attributes needed, variables to be calculated, and other issues that may improve the effectiveness and efficiency of daily enrollment…

  17. Adaptive Decision Aiding in Computer-Assisted Instruction: Adaptive Computerized Training System (ACTS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopf-Weichel, Rosemarie; And Others

    This report describes results of the first year of a three-year program to develop and evaluate a new Adaptive Computerized Training System (ACTS) for electronics maintenance training. (ACTS incorporates an adaptive computer program that learns the student's diagnostic and decision value structure, compares it to that of an expert, and adapts the…

  18. Effects of Practice and Memory Aiding on Decision Performance and Information Search in Command and Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    this area are still relatively scant in general (Brehmer, 1987; Flin et al 1997; Kerstholt, 1996; Mynatt et al 1977; Roelofsma, 1995; Zsambok & Klein...in a dynamic decision environment. Management Science, 31, 680-702. Mynatt , C.R., Doherty, M.E. and Tweney, R.T. (1977). Confirmation Bias in a

  19. Computer-Aided Decisions in Human Services: Expert Systems and Multivariate Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sicoly, Fiore

    1989-01-01

    This comparison of two approaches to the development of computerized supports for decision making--expert systems and multivariate models--focuses on computerized systems that assist professionals with tasks related to diagnosis or classification in human services. Validation of both expert systems and statistical models is emphasized. (39…

  20. Commander’s Decision Aid for Predictive Battlespace Awareness (CDA4PBA)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    Air Force Research Laboratory Human Effectiveness Directorate Warfighter Interface Division Cognitive Systems Branch...REPORT Warfighter Interface Division NUMBER(S) Cognitive Systems Branch Wright-Patterson AFB OH 45433-7604 AFRL-HE-WP-TR-2007-0042 12...training to support a commanders’ predictive battle-space awareness ability. The program provided an understanding of the decisions and other cognitive

  1. [Drug clearance as a decision aid for further invasive liver diagnosis--studies with hexobarbital as a model substrate].

    PubMed

    Zilly, W; Richter, E

    1992-05-01

    The clearance of a drug predominantly metabolized in the liver may serve as an estimate of quantitative liver function. In 260 consecutive patients presenting with a history of liver disease and abnormal laboratory findings but without a current definite diagnosis we have measured the clearance of hexobarbital and investigated if low values in patients are able to support the decision for an invasive diagnostic procedure such as needle biopsy or laparoscopy. 250 mg of hexobarbital was given orally to the patients between 8 and 10 hrs p.m. 12 hrs later blood samples were taken. Hexobarbital was determined by gas chromatography with N-selective detection, and a single point clearance was calculated. We recommended liver biopsy or laparoscopy to all patients with a hexobarbital clearance below 2.7 ml/min/kg body weight (normal 2.66-5.34 ml/min/kg). 73 out of 260 patients showed a reduced hexobarbital clearance. In 44 patients blind liver biopsy (n = 14) or laparoscopy (n = 30) was performed, 29 patients refused an invasive diagnostic procedure. 17 out of 26 patients with the tentative diagnosis chronic hepatitis had already an incomplete or complete liver cirrhosis. In 11 out of 18 patients with the tentative diagnosis alcohol toxic liver injury we found a progressive portal fibrosis or complete liver cirrhosis. Reduced drug clearance reflecting quantitative liver function can be an indicator of advanced liver disease, thus adding substantially to the decision for further invasive diagnostic procedures.

  2. Preservation of monocyte effector functions against Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare in patients with AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, J L; Shiratsuchi, H; Toba, H; Ellner, J J

    1991-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare is a frequent cause of late disseminated infection in patients with AIDS. The ability of human peripheral blood monocytes to phagocytose and kill M. avium was examined in an in vitro model. Monocytes were obtained from 13 healthy volunteers and 11 patients with AIDS, three of whom had documented disseminated M. avium infection. Monocytes were precultured for 2 days before infection with two AIDS-associated and two non-AIDS-associated strains of M. avium. Uptake of M. avium as measured by counting intracellular acid-fast bacilli did not differ among healthy subjects, patients with AIDS, or patients with AIDS and previously documented disseminated M. avium infection. Intracellular growth of M. avium was examined by a CFU assay of cell lysates from M. avium-infected monocytes after 0, 4, and 7 days of culture. Intracellular growth inhibition of M. avium at 7 days after infection was comparable between patients with AIDS and healthy donors for all M. avium strains tested. The effects of the addition of recombinant gamma interferon on M. avium uptake and intracellular growth in monocytes also were studied. Pretreatment of monocytes with gamma interferon prior to infection suppressed monocyte phagocytosis of M. avium. Continuously coculturing of monocytes with gamma interferon after infection augmented killing of M. avium among both patients with AIDS and healthy controls for three of the four strains of M. avium tested. The magnitude of this effect, however, was variable from donor to donor and strain to strain. No significant differences were noted between the growth-inhibiting abilities of gamma-interferon-treated monocytes obtained from healthy volunteers and those obtained from patients with AIDS. PMID:1910011

  3. [Hygiene practices for patients with HIV/AIDS].

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Gilmara Holanda; de Araujo, Thelma Leite; Lima, Francisca Elisângela Teixeira; Cavalcante, Tahissa Frota; Galvão, Marli Teresinha Gimeniz

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the scientific production on health interventions related to hygiene for adults with HIV/AIDS. An integrative literature review was performed using six databases in June 2013. The descriptors AIDS and Hygiene were used, in Portuguese, English or Spanish. A total of 682 articles were found and 16 were selected. Personal hygiene practices were identified, such as hand washing, showers, tooth brushing and quitting smoking. Food hygiene practices involved washing food and kitchen utensils, using treated water, conserving and cooking food. Environmental hygiene took into account raising domestic animals, control of disease vectors, household cleanliness, waste disposal and basic sanitation. In conclusion, these specific hygiene interventions can be applied to the general population and, especially, to people with HIV/AIDS, due to immunosuppression.

  4. Decision tool for the early diagnosis of trauma patient hypovolemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liangyou; McKenna, Thomas M; Reisner, Andrew T; Gribok, Andrei; Reifman, Jaques

    2008-06-01

    We present a classifier for use as a decision assist tool to identify a hypovolemic state in trauma patients during helicopter transport to a hospital, when reliable acquisition of vital-sign data may be difficult. The decision tool uses basic vital-sign variables as input into linear classifiers, which are then combined into an ensemble classifier. The classifier identifies hypovolemic patients with an area under a receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.76 (standard deviation 0.05, for 100 randomly-reselected patient subsets). The ensemble classifier is robust; classification performance degrades only slowly as variables are dropped, and the ensemble structure does not require identification of a set of variables for use as best-feature inputs into the classifier. The ensemble classifier consistently outperforms best-features-based linear classifiers (the classification AUC is greater, and the standard deviation is smaller, p<0.05). The simple computational requirements of ensemble classifiers will permit them to function in small fieldable devices for continuous monitoring of trauma patients.

  5. CAPACITY OF PATIENTS WITH BRAIN METASTASES TO MAKE TREATMENT DECISIONS

    PubMed Central

    Triebel, Kristen L.; Gerstenecker, Adam; Meneses, Karen; Fiveash, John B.; Meyers, Christina A.; Cutter, Gary; Marson, Daniel C.; Martin, Roy C.; Eakin, Amanda; Watts, Olivia; Nabors, Louis B.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate medical decision-making capacity (MDC) in patients with brain metastasis. METHODS Participants were 41 adults with brain metastases with Karnofsky Performance Status scores ≥70 were recruited from an academic medical center and 41 demographically-matched controls recruited from the community. We evaluated MDC using the Capacity to Consent to Treatment Instrument (CCTI) and its four clinically relevant consent standards (expressing a treatment choice, appreciation, reasoning, and understanding). Capacity impairment ratings (no impairment, mild/moderate impairment, and severe impairment) on the consent standards were also assigned to each participant with brain metastasis using cutoff scores derived statistically from the performance of the control group. RESULTS The brain metastases patient group performed significantly below controls on consent standards of understanding and reasoning. Capacity compromise was defined as performance ≤1.5 standard deviations (SD) below the control group mean. Using this definition, approximately 60% of the participants with brain metastases demonstrated capacity compromise on at least one MDC standard. CONCLUSION When defining capacity compromise as performance ≤1.5 SD below the control group mean, over half of patients with brain metastases have reduced capacity to make treatment decisions. This impairment is demonstrated shortly after initial diagnosis of brain metastases and highlights the importance of routine clinical assessment of MDC following diagnosis of brain metastasis. These results also indicate a need for the development and investigation of interventions to support or improve MDC in this patient population. PMID:25613039

  6. The prevalence and management of pain in patients with AIDS: a review of 134 cases.

    PubMed

    Lebovits, A H; Lefkowitz, M; McCarthy, D; Simon, R; Wilpon, H; Jung, R; Fried, E

    1989-09-01

    In light of the lack of any prior systematic evaluations of the prevalence and types of pain syndromes and treatments found in patients with AIDS, a chart review study was undertaken to evaluate this issue. Fifty-two of 96 charts reviewed (54%) had at least one note on nonprocedural pain or analgesic prescription. Although chest pain was the most prevalent pain location (22%), presumably because of the high incidence of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, other possible AIDS-related entities, such as peripheral neuropathy and thrombophlebitis, were also found. No specific AIDS syndromes could be identified that were related to a higher incidence of pain. Nearly one-third of patients with pain received codeine (31%), others received acetaminophen (27%), and 17% of patients received acetaminophen and oxycodone HCl. Specific pain management interventions must be evaluated and applied to control the nontrivial occurrence of pain in patients who have AIDS symptoms that may be overlooked by the physician given the overwhelming disease process.

  7. Development and pilot testing of a decision aid for men considering genetic testing for breast and/or ovarian cancer-related mutations (BRCA1/2).

    PubMed

    Juan, Anne S; Wakefield, Claire E; Kasparian, Nadine A; Kirk, Judy; Tyler, Janet; Tucker, Kathy

    2008-12-01

    Despite the fact that both men and women can carry a breast/ovarian cancer-related mutation, the main emphasis in genetic counseling for breast/ovarian cancer-related risk remains on females. This study aimed to develop and pilot a decision aid specifically designed for men with a strong family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer who are considering genetic testing. The decision aid was developed by a multidisciplinary team of experts and a consumer representative. It was then reviewed by 27 men who had previously undergone genetic testing to identify a mutation in a BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene. All men who reviewed the decision aid indicated that they would recommend the booklet to other men in the same situation, and 96% of the sample (n = 26) reported being "very satisfied" or "satisfied" with the information contained in the decision aid. The decision aid was perceived by all participants as "very relevant" or "quite relevant" for men considering genetic testing. Ninety-three percent of men felt that it was easy to weigh the pros and cons of genetic testing with the help of the decision aid. The perceived impact on participants' emotions and understanding of the genetic testing process was also assessed. Several factors may hinder men from effectively weighing up the potential benefits and risks of genetic testing. A greater understanding of these issues may help health professionals to encourage men with a strong family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer to learn about cancer risk and the appropriate management strategies for themselves and their female relatives.

  8. Energy Technology Investments: Maximizing Efficiency through a Maritime Energy Portfolio Interface and Decision Aid

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    APPROACH The Maritime Energy Portfolio Management Approach provides a means for determining the best course of action where several initiatives...course of action where several ECMs compete for scarce funds. Efficient, user friendly use of the Maritime Energy Portfolio Interface and Decision...ship application. Outputs from the Business Case Analysis (BCA) include: Return on Investment (ROI) and Break Even Point ( BEP ). These metrics are

  9. [AIDS Study Group/Spanish AIDS Consensus Plan Document on sexually transmitted infections in HIV-infected patients].

    PubMed

    2011-04-01

    Sexually transmitted infections (STI) are a major public health problem. Considering their high morbidity and potential short and long term after effects, physicians must have enough knowledge on the management of these infections for a correct prevention, diagnosis and treatment. HIV infection is associated with STI, not only because they share route of transmission, but also because they lead to an increased risk of HIV transmission. In this article, we summarise the updated clinical practice guidelines, for the evaluation, management and prevention of STI in HIV-infected patients, from a panel of experts in HIV, dermatologists, proctologic surgeons, and microbiologists on behalf of the Spanish AIDS Study Group (GESIDA) and the National AIDS Plan (PNS).

  10. Thyroid cancer patient perceptions of radioactive iodine treatment choice: Follow‐up from a decision‐aid randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Straus, Sharon; Rodin, Gary; Heus, Lineke; Brierley, James D.; Tsang, Richard W.; Rotstein, Lorne; Ezzat, Shereen; Segal, Phillip; Gafni, Amiram; Thorpe, Kevin E.; Goldstein, David P.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patient decision aids (P‐DAs) inform medical decision making, but longer term effects are unknown. This article describes extended follow‐up from a thyroid cancer treatment P‐DA trial. METHODS In this single‐center, parallel‐design randomized controlled trial conducted at a Canadian tertiary/quaternary care center, early‐stage thyroid cancer patients from a P‐DA trial were contacted 15 to 23 months after randomization/radioactive iodine (RAI) decision making to evaluate longer term outcomes. It was previously reported that the use of the computerized P‐DA in thyroid cancer patients considering postsurgical RAI treatment significantly improved medical knowledge in comparison with usual care alone. The P‐DA and control groups were compared for the following outcomes: feeling informed about the RAI treatment choice, decision satisfaction, decision regret, cancer‐related worry, and physician trust. In a subgroup of 20 participants, in‐depth interviews were conducted for a qualitative analysis. RESULTS Ninety‐five percent (70 of 74) of the original population enrolled in follow‐up at a mean of 17.1 months after randomization. P‐DA users perceived themselves to be significantly more 1) informed about the treatment choice (P = .008), 2) aware of options (P = .009), 3) knowledgeable about treatment benefits (P = .020), and 4) knowledgeable about treatment risks/side effects (P = .001) in comparison with controls. There were no significant group differences in decision satisfaction (P = .142), decision regret (P = .199), cancer‐related worry (P = .645), mood (P = .211), or physician trust (P = .764). In the qualitative analysis, the P‐DA was perceived to have increased patient knowledge and confidence in decision making. CONCLUSIONS The P‐DA improved cancer survivors’ actual and long‐term perceived medical knowledge with no adverse effects. More research on the long‐term outcomes of P

  11. Evaluation of bone mineral density in Iranian HIV/AIDS patients.

    PubMed

    Badie, Banafsheh Moradmand; Soori, Tahereh; Kheirandish, Parastoo; Izadyar, Saeed; SeyedAlinagh, SeyedAhmad; Foroughi, Maryam; Rostamian, Alireza; Mohraz, Minoo

    2011-01-01

    Bone disorders have emerged as a worrisome complication in HIV-infected patients in recent years. It is not clear that HIV infection itself or antiretroviral treatment or both are causes of bone loss. However, most studies have found a high prevalence of osteopenia and osteoporosis in HIV/AIDS patients. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of osteopenia and osteoporosis in HIV-infected patients either untreated or receiving Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy as compared with HIV negative persons. We also assessed the factors associated with these conditions. Bone Mineral Density was assessed by Dual Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry scans at the hip and lumbar spine in 36 AIDS patients receiving antiretroviral therapy and 44 HIV infected patients not receiving antiretroviral therapy (naïve patients) and 40 HIV negative individuals as control. Factors that affect BMD were also determined. Prevalence of osteopenia or osteoporosis in different regions was significantly higher in HIV/AIDS patients compared with HIV negative subjects (77.3% in HIV positive naïve patients, 86.1% in HAART-treated patients and 60% in the control group, P=0.002). Mean serum alkaline phosphatase was higher in HIV/AIDS patients than the control group (P=0.003). Osteopenia and osteoporosis in HIV-infected patients were associated with duration of HIV infection (P<0.0001) and antiretroviral treatment (P=0.012). Prevalence of osteopenia and osteoporosis in HIV/AIDS patients was higher than HIV negative individuals. Osteopenia and osteoporosis in HIV/AIDS patients was associated with duration of HIV infection and antiretroviral treatment.

  12. Shared decision making in transplantation: how patients see their role in the decision process of accepting a donor liver.

    PubMed

    Op den Dries, Sanna; Annema, Coby; Berg, Aad P van den; Ranchor, Adelita V; Porte, Robert J

    2014-09-01

    At the time of the organ offer for transplantation, donor-related risks such as disease transmission and graft failure are weighed against the patient's risk of remaining on the waiting list. The patient's commonly inactive role in decision making and the timing and extent of donor-specific risk information have been discussed in the medical literature. This is the first study revealing the opinions of liver patients on these issues. Forty patients listed for liver transplantation and 179 liver transplant patients participated in an anonymous questionnaire-based survey. The majority of the patients wanted to be informed about donor-related risks (59.8%-74.8%). The preferred timing for being informed about donor-related risks was the time of the organ offer for 53.3% of the patients. Among these patients, 79.8% wished to be involved in making the decision to accept or not accept a liver for transplantation, 10.6% wished to make the final decision alone, and only 9.6% did not want to be involved in the decision-making process. Implementing this knowledge through the standardization of the content, the manner of transfer, and the amount of information that we provide to our patients will improve opportunities for shared decision making at different time points during the transplant allocation process. This will enable us to provide the same opportunities and care to every patient on the waiting list.

  13. The influence of significant others in complementary and alternative medicine decisions by cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Ohlén, Joakim; Balneaves, Lynda G; Bottorff, Joan L; Brazier, Alison S A

    2006-09-01

    Individuals living with cancer are faced with numerous treatment decisions that encompass both conventional therapies and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Although a beginning body of research has explored the CAM decision-making process by cancer patients, the social context of these treatment decisions has been largely ignored. As a part of a larger grounded theory research project exploring CAM decision-making processes of cancer patients living in British Columbia, Canada, the purpose of this secondary inquiry was to explore how significant others were involved in patients' decisions related to CAM. In total, 61 patients with early and advanced-stage breast and prostate cancer and 31 significant others participated in semi-structured interviews. Using constant comparative analysis, four main types of decisional involvement by significant others were identified: creating a safe place for the patient to make a decision, "becoming a team": collaborative decision-making, moving the patient towards a decision, and making the decision for the patient. Significant others were often found to engage in more than one type of decision involvement as a consequence of several key factors. Within the types of decisional involvement, nine distinct roles in the CAM decision-making process were described by the significant others. The findings of this inquiry extend previous research by highlighting the importance of significant others in cancer patients' CAM decisions and challenge past conceptualizations of autonomy in treatment decision making.

  14. Making Therapeutic Decisions in IBD: The Role of Patients

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Corey A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review The treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is becoming more complex due to the introduction of new medications and evolving treatment algorithms. Data suggest that more aggressive treatment will yield improved clinical results. Although promising, it is not clear if patients will agree to this forceful approach. This review aims to describe what we know about patients’ perceptions of risks and benefits of treatment, how much risk IBD patients are willing to accept, and to introduce ideas to facilitate better patient communication. Recent findings Patients and parents of children with IBD appear to be willing to accept the known risks associated with IBD therapies, but demand substantial treatment benefit to make this tradeoff. Since patients with IBD have misperceptions about the risks and benefits of treatment, it is important to develop better methods of communicating medical information. Summary There are now more treatment options for patients with IBD. To increase patients’ participation in medical decisions, it is critical to fairly present the tradeoffs of risks versus benefits of treatment. Tools are being developed to more clearly present clinical trial data, risks of medication side effects and for calculating individualized risks of disease complications and response to therapy. PMID:19417646

  15. Real-Time Monitoring and Evaluation of a Visual-Based Cervical Cancer Screening Program Using a Decision Support Job Aid.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Curtis W; Rose, Donny; Mink, Jonah; Levitz, David

    2016-05-16

    In many developing nations, cervical cancer screening is done by visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA). Monitoring and evaluation (M&E) of such screening programs is challenging. An enhanced visual assessment (EVA) system was developed to augment VIA procedures in low-resource settings. The EVA System consists of a mobile colposcope built around a smartphone, and an online image portal for storing and annotating images. A smartphone app is used to control the mobile colposcope, and upload pictures to the image portal. In this paper, a new app feature that documents clinical decisions using an integrated job aid was deployed in a cervical cancer screening camp in Kenya. Six organizations conducting VIA used the EVA System to screen 824 patients over the course of a week, and providers recorded their diagnoses and treatments in the application. Real-time aggregated statistics were broadcast on a public website. Screening organizations were able to assess the number of patients screened, alongside treatment rates, and the patients who tested positive and required treatment in real time, which allowed them to make adjustments as needed. The real-time M&E enabled by "smart" diagnostic medical devices holds promise for broader use in screening programs in low-resource settings.

  16. Real-Time Monitoring and Evaluation of a Visual-Based Cervical Cancer Screening Program Using a Decision Support Job Aid

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Curtis W.; Rose, Donny; Mink, Jonah; Levitz, David

    2016-01-01

    In many developing nations, cervical cancer screening is done by visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA). Monitoring and evaluation (M&E) of such screening programs is challenging. An enhanced visual assessment (EVA) system was developed to augment VIA procedures in low-resource settings. The EVA System consists of a mobile colposcope built around a smartphone, and an online image portal for storing and annotating images. A smartphone app is used to control the mobile colposcope, and upload pictures to the image portal. In this paper, a new app feature that documents clinical decisions using an integrated job aid was deployed in a cervical cancer screening camp in Kenya. Six organizations conducting VIA used the EVA System to screen 824 patients over the course of a week, and providers recorded their diagnoses and treatments in the application. Real-time aggregated statistics were broadcast on a public website. Screening organizations were able to assess the number of patients screened, alongside treatment rates, and the patients who tested positive and required treatment in real time, which allowed them to make adjustments as needed. The real-time M&E enabled by “smart” diagnostic medical devices holds promise for broader use in screening programs in low-resource settings. PMID:27196932

  17. Hospital care for patients with AIDS at "Lazzaro Spallanzani" Institute in the last decade.

    PubMed

    Lauria, F N; Petrecchia, A; Girardi, E; Ippolito, G

    2001-01-01

    We reviewed data on hospital care of HIV/AIDS patients at Lazzaro Spallazani Institute between 1991 and 1999. The number of newly diagnosed AIDS cases increased until 1995 and decreased constantly thereafter. The proportion of AIDS cases diagnosed at our institution over the total number of cases reported in our region and in our country increased from 31.2 to 59.8% and from 3.9 to 8.7% respectively (p<0.001). In the entire study period, 10044 out of 18,434 (54.5%) of patients admitted to acute care wards were diagnosed with HIV related pathologies. The number of admission of HIV/AIDS patients to acute-care wards increased until 1995 and remained constant thereafter. Our data suggest that a consistent need for inpatient hospital care remains even in the era of HAART.

  18. Real-time decision aiding - Aircraft guidance for wind shear avoidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stratton, D. A.; Stengel, Robert F.

    1992-01-01

    Modern control theory and artificial intelligence technology are applied to the Wind Shear Safety Advisor, a conceptual airborne advisory system to help flight crews avoid or survive encounter with hazardous low-altitude wind shear. Numerical and symbolic processes of the system fuse diverse, time-varying data from ground-based and airborne measurements. Simulated wind-shear-encounter scenarios illustrate the need to consider a variety of factors for optimal decision reliability. The wind-shear-encounter simulations show the Wind Shear Safety Advisor's potential for effectively integrating the available information, highlighting the benefits of the computational techniques employed.

  19. Patient-Provider Engagement and Chronic Pain in Drug-Using, Primarily African American Persons Living with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Mary M; Nguyen, Trang Q; Maragh-Bass, Allysha C; Isenberg, Sarina R; Beach, Mary Catherine; Knowlton, Amy R

    2016-10-27

    Among disadvantaged persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV), patient-provider engagement, which has been defined as patient-provider relationships that promote the use of health care services and are characterized by active listening and supportive decision making, has been associated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) maintenance and viral suppression. However, chronic pain, depression, and substance use, all of which are prevalent in this population, can reduce the quality of patient-provider engagement. We hypothesized a model in which chronic pain, depression, and substance use would be associated with poorer patient-provider engagement, which would be positively associated with adherence, with the latter associated positively with viral suppression. We analyzed data from the BEACON study, which included surveys from 383 PLHIV who were primarily African American, on ART, and had histories of drug use. Due to six missing cases on the chronic pain variable, we used data from 377 respondents in a structural equation model. Chronic pain and depressive symptoms were significantly associated with poorer patient-provider engagement, while substance use was associated with better engagement. Patient-provider engagement in turn was associated with better ART adherence, which was associated with higher viral suppression. Results suggest the role of chronic pain in poor patient-physician engagement in this population, which has potential implications for quality of HIV patient care and health outcomes. Findings suggest the need for attention to patient-provider engagement in PLHIV.

  20. [Diagnosis and treatment of opportunistic infections in HIV/AIDS adult patients].

    PubMed

    Lasso B, Martín

    2011-10-01

    The following guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of opportunistic infections (OI) in adult HIV/AIDS patients represent the first approach to standardize the management of this patient group in Chile. The guidelines are based on scientific evidence. They intend to serve as a practical and easy-to-use tool for physicians during the process of selecting appropriate diagnostic tests and effective treatments for their patients. They also include the local experience in Chile related to OI in HIV/AIDS patients. Regular up-dates to include new scientific knowledge are proposed.

  1. Isolation of Mycobacterium avium complex from bone marrow aspirates of AIDS patients in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Barreto, J A; Palaci, M; Ferrazoli, L; Martins, M C; Suleiman, J; Lorenço, R; Ferreira, O C; Riley, L W; Johnson, W D; Galvão, P A

    1993-09-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection has not been reported as a major opportunistic infection among patients with AIDS in Latin America or Africa. In this study, 125 AIDS patients who had persistent fever, anemia, and leukopenia were examined among 2628 AIDS patients admitted to Instituto de Infectologia Emilio Ribas between May 1990 and April 1992. From the bone marrow aspirates of the 125 patients, MAC was isolated from 23 (18.4%) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis was isolated from 9 (7.2%). Between 1985 and 1990, only 11 MAC isolations among 60,000 cultures obtained from human immunodeficiency virus-seronegative patients were documented in São Paulo. Hence, the minimal estimated rate of MAC infection in AIDS patients in this city was 23/2628, or 0.88%. These findings suggest that MAC infection is an important opportunistic infection, especially among a subset of patients with AIDS in Brazil who have clinical characteristics and risk activities similar to those associated with MAC infections in North America and Europe.

  2. Patients' and Observers' Perceptions of Involvement Differ. Validation Study on Inter-Relating Measures for Shared Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Kasper, Jürgen; Heesen, Christoph; Köpke, Sascha; Fulcher, Gary; Geiger, Friedemann

    2011-01-01

    Objective Patient involvement into medical decisions as conceived in the shared decision making method (SDM) is essential in evidence based medicine. However, it is not conclusively evident how best to define, realize and evaluate involvement to enable patients making informed choices. We aimed at investigating the ability of four measures to indicate patient involvement. While use and reporting of these instruments might imply wide overlap regarding the addressed constructs this assumption seems questionable with respect to the diversity of the perspectives from which the assessments are administered. Methods The study investigated a nested cohort (N = 79) of a randomized trial evaluating a patient decision aid on immunotherapy for multiple sclerosis. Convergent validities were calculated between observer ratings of videotaped physician-patient consultations (OPTION) and patients' perceptions of the communication (Shared Decision Making Questionnaire, Control Preference Scale & Decisional Conflict Scale). Results OPTION reliability was high to excellent. Communication performance was low according to OPTION and high according to the three patient administered measures. No correlations were found between observer and patient judges, neither for means nor for single items. Patient report measures showed some moderate correlations. Conclusion Existing SDM measures do not refer to a single construct. A gold standard is missing to decide whether any of these measures has the potential to indicate patient involvement. Practice Implications Pronounced heterogeneity of the underpinning constructs implies difficulties regarding the interpretation of existing evidence on the efficacy of SDM. Consideration of communication theory and basic definitions of SDM would recommend an inter-subjective focus of measurement. Trial Registration Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN25267500. PMID:22043310

  3. Multicriteria decision-aid method to evaluate the performance of stormwater infiltration systems over the time.

    PubMed

    Moura, P; Barraud, S; Baptista, M B; Malard, F

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays, stormwater infiltration systems are frequently used because of their ability to reduce flows and volumes in downstream sewers, decrease overflows in surface waters and make it possible to recharge groundwater. Moreover, they come in various forms with different uses. Despite these advantages the long term sustainability of these systems is questionable and their real performances have to be assessed taking into account various and sometimes conflicting aspects. To address this problem a decision support system is proposed. It is based on a multicriteria method built to help managers to evaluate the performance of an existing infiltration system at different stages of its lifespan and identify whether it performs correctly or not, according to environmental, socio-economic, technical and sanitary aspects. The paper presents successively: the performance indicators and the way they were built, the multicriteria method to identify if the system works properly and a case study.

  4. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii Infection among HIV/AIDS Patients in Eastern China.

    PubMed

    Shen, Guoqiang; Wang, Xiaoming; Sun, Hui; Gao, Yaying

    2016-02-01

    Toxoplasmosis, a neglected tropical disease caused by the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii, occurs throughout the world. Human T. gondii infection is asymptomatic in 80% of the population; however, the infection is life-threatening and causes substantial neurologic damage in immunocompromised patients such as HIV-infected persons. The major purpose of this study was to investigate the seroprevalence of T. gondii infection in subjects infected with HIV/AIDS in eastern China. Our findings showed 9.7% prevalence of anti-T. gondii IgG antibody in HIV/AIDS patients, which was higher than in intravenous drug users (2.2%) and healthy controls (4.7%), while no significant difference was observed in the seroprevalence of anti-Toxoplasma IgM antibody among all participants (P>0.05). Among all HIV/AIDS patients, 15 men (7.7%) and 10 women (15.9%) were positive for anti-T. gondii IgG antibody; however, no significant difference was detected in the seroprevalence of anti-Toxoplasma IgG antibody between males and females. The frequency of anti-Toxoplasma IgG antibody was 8.0%, 13.2%, 5.5%, and 0% in patients with normal immune function (CD4(+) T-lymphocyte count ≥500 cells/ml), immunocompromised patients (cell count ≥200 and <500 cells/ml), severely immunocompromised patients (cell count ≥50 and <200 cells/ml), and advanced AIDS patients, respectively (cell count <50 cells/ml), while only 3 immunocompromised patients were positive for anti-T. gondii IgM antibody. The results indicate a high seroprevalence of T. gondii infection in HIV/AIDS patients in eastern China, and a preventive therapy for toxoplasmosis may be given to HIV/AIDS patients based on CD4(+) T lymphocyte count.

  5. Intelligent information extraction to aid science decision making in autonomous space exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merényi, Erzsébet; Tasdemir, Kadim; Farrand, William H.

    2008-04-01

    Effective scientific exploration of remote targets such as solar system objects increasingly calls for autonomous data analysis and decision making on-board. Today, robots in space missions are programmed to traverse from one location to another without regard to what they might be passing by. By not processing data as they travel, they can miss important discoveries, or will need to travel back if scientists on Earth find the data warrant backtracking. This is a suboptimal use of resources even on relatively close targets such as the Moon or Mars. The farther mankind ventures into space, the longer the delay in communication, due to which interesting findings from data sent back to Earth are made too late to command a (roving, floating, or orbiting) robot to further examine a given location. However, autonomous commanding of robots in scientific exploration can only be as reliable as the scientific information extracted from the data that is collected and provided for decision making. In this paper, we focus on the discovery scenario, where information extraction is accomplished with unsupervised clustering. For high-dimensional data with complicated structure, detailed segmentation that identifies all significant groups and discovers the small, surprising anomalies in the data, is a challenging task at which conventional algorithms often fail. We approach the problem with precision manifold learning using self-organizing neural maps with non-standard features developed in the course of our research. We demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of this approach on multi-spectral imagery from the Mars Exploration Rovers Pancam, and on synthetic hyperspectral imagery.

  6. The relationship between personality traits and AIDS in patients with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Bahman; Zarinfar, Nader; Noori, Hasan

    2016-06-01

    This study carried out to survey the relationship between personality traits and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) in patients with human immunodeficiency virus. This case-control study was conducted on 79 AIDS patients of Triangle Clinic in Arak (case group) and 80 healthy people of Valiasr Hospital in Arak (control group). Demographic information checklist and Cloninger' Temperament and Character inventory (TCI) were two instruments applied in the study. SPSS software V.19 and tests independent t-tests, Chi squared and Spearman correlation coefficient were used for data analysis with significant level of <0.05. The average of innovativeness variables (M:74.12), harm avoidance (M: 65.17), reward dependence (M:50.030), and self-directedness (M:35.02) in case group in comparison with control group was significantly higher, and there was a significant difference between two groups variables (P-0.000). The novelty seeking had the highest average in the AIDS patients with a history of addiction (M:74.00), and there was statistically significant difference between perseverance variable (P-0.021) and cooperativeness variable (P-0.041) in the two groups of AIDS patients. There was a significant relationship between novelty seeking and age at the onset of AIDS (P-0.038), harm avoidance and age at the onset of addiction (P-0.046), persistence and age at the onset of AIDS (P-0.035) and the time infected with HIV (P-0.033). It is found that two groups are different due to the personalities, so it is essential to consider the personality traits in order to prevent AIDS and also successfully treat patients suffering from AIDS.

  7. Nursing research on a first aid model of double personnel for major burn patients.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weiwei; Shi, Kai; Jin, Zhenghua; Liu, Shuang; Cai, Duo; Zhao, Jingchun; Chi, Cheng; Yu, Jiaao

    2015-03-01

    This study explored the effect of a first aid model employing two nurses on the efficient rescue operation time and the efficient resuscitation time for major burn patients. A two-nurse model of first aid was designed for major burn patients. The model includes a division of labor between the first aid nurses and the re-organization of emergency carts. The clinical effectiveness of the process was examined in a retrospective chart review of 156 cases of major burn patients, experiencing shock and low blood volume, who were admitted to the intensive care unit of the department of burn surgery between November 2009 and June 2013. Of the 156 major burn cases, 87 patients who received first aid using the double personnel model were assigned to the test group and the 69 patients who received first aid using the standard first aid model were assigned to the control group. The efficient rescue operation time and the efficient resuscitation time for the patients were compared between the two groups. Student's t tests were used to the compare the mean difference between the groups. Statistically significant differences between the two groups were found on both measures (P's < 0.05), with the test group having lower times than the control group. The efficient rescue operation time was 14.90 ± 3.31 min in the test group and 30.42 ± 5.65 min in the control group. The efficient resuscitation time was 7.4 ± 3.2 h in the test group and 9.5 ± 2.7 h in the control group. A two-nurse first aid model based on scientifically validated procedures and a reasonable division of labor can shorten the efficient rescue operation time and the efficient resuscitation time for major burn patients. Given these findings, the model appears to be worthy of clinical application.

  8. COMPARISON OF LARGE RESTRICTION FRAGMENTS OF MYCOBACATERIUM AVIUM ISOLATES RECOVERED FROM AIDS AND NON-AIDS PATIENTS WITH THOSE OF ISOLATES FROM POTABLE WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined potable water in Los Angeles, California, as a possible source of infection in AIDS and non-AIDS patients. Nontuberculous mycobacteria were recovered from 12 (92%) of 13 reservoirs, 45 (82%) of 55 homes, 31 (100%) of 31 commercial buildings, and 15 (100%) of 15 hospi...

  9. COMPARISON OF LARGE RESTRICTION FRAGMENTS OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM ISOLATES RECOVERED FROM AIDS AND NON-AIDS PATIENTS WITH THOSE OF ISOLATES FROM POTABLE WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined potable water in Los Angeles, California, as a possible source of infection in AIDS and non-AIDS patients. Nontuberculous mycobacteria were recovered from 12 (92%) of 13 reservoirs, 45 (82%) of 55 homes, 31 (100%) of 31 commercial buildings, and 15 (100%) of 15 hospit...

  10. Disseminated Acanthamoeba sinusitis in a patient with AIDS: a possible role for early antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Carter, Wendy W; Gompf, Sandra G; Toney, John F; Greene, John N; Cutolo, Edward P

    2004-01-01

    Acanthamoeba, a free-living ameba, has been reported to infect humans with subacute encephalitis, sinusitis, or keratitis. Multiple cases of Acanthamoeba sinusitis with dissemination have been reported in association with AIDS, with high mortality. We report successful treatment of a 35-year-old woman who presented with sinusitis that progressed to disseminated acanthamebiasis as her initial manifestation of AIDS. To our knowledge, our patient was one of the few and longest-lived survivors of disseminated Acanthamoeba infection with AIDS. As with other opportunistic infections, early aggressive therapy including HAART may alter the outcome in this almost uniformly fatal disease.

  11. Post-ART epidermodysplasia verruciformis in a patient with AIDS.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Leila Cristina Ferreira; Miranda, Angelica Espinosa; Ferreira, Luiz Carlos de Lima; da Silva, Roberto Moreira; Mira, Marcelo Távora; Talhari, Carolina; Talhari, Sinésio

    2010-01-01

    Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is a rare disorder characterized by persistent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Here, we describe a 48-year-old, black, married male with AIDS, presenting a 1-year history of asymptomatic hypopigmented lesions that appeared 3 years after antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation. Pre-ART, the initial CD4 count was 32 cells/mm(3) and the skin lesions appeared when the CD4 count reached 122 cells/mm(3). Dermatological examination demonstrated thin, scaly, slightly verrucous hypopigmented macules and papules, isolated or presenting with a linear aspect (Köbner phenomenon) in some areas, distributed on the neck, trunk, and superior and inferior members. Skin biopsy of a macular lesion revealed epidermal acanthosis with vacuolated keratinocytes presenting blue-gray pallor, arranged in clusters at the granular and upper spinous layer. Immunohistochemistry revealed expression of p16( INK4a) with diffuse positivity in the upper third of the epithelium, corresponding to the vacuolated keratinocytes. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was positive for type 12 HPV, and a diagnosis of EV-like associated to AIDS was made. EV-like is a rare disease and in this patent might be a manifestation of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome.

  12. Access to Breast Reconstruction and Patient Perspectives on Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, Monica; Li, Yun; Alderman, Amy K.; Jagsi, Reshma; Hamilton, Ann S.; Graff, John J.; Hawley, Sarah T.; Katz, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Most women having mastectomy for breast cancer treatment do not have breast reconstruction. OBJECTIVE To examine correlates of reconstruction and determine if there is a significant unmet need for reconstruction. DESIGN Los Angeles and Detroit SEER registries utilized rapid case ascertainment to identify a sample of women diagnosed with breast cancer. Subjects were surveyed a median of 9mos post-diagnosis initially; those remaining disease-free were surveyed again at 4yrs to determine the frequency of immediate and delayed reconstruction, and patient attitudes toward the procedure. SETTING Two metropolitan area population-based SEER registries were used to identify subjects; Latina/Black women were oversampled to ensure adequate minority representation. PARTICIPANTS Women age 20-79 with DCIS and stage 1-3 invasive carcinoma diagnosed between 6/05-2/07 were eligible if they could complete a questionnaire in English or Spanish. Initial survey was sent to 3252 women. 2290 completed it. 1536 completed the follow-up survey. The 485 undergoing initial mastectomy and remaining disease-free at follow-up are this report’s subject. MAIN OUTCOMES/MEASURES Participants were surveyed a mean of 9mos and again at 50mos post-diagnosis. Latina and Black women were oversampled. RESULTS Response rates in the initial and follow-up surveys were 73% and 68%, respectively (overall, 50%). Of 485 patients reporting mastectomy at initial survey and remaining disease-free, 41.6% had reconstruction—24.8% immediate, 16.8% delayed. Factors significantly associated with not receiving reconstruction were Black race, lower education level, older age, major co-morbidity, and receipt of chemotherapy. Only 13% of women were dissatisfied with reconstruction decision making, but dissatisfaction was higher among non-whites in the sample(p=.032). The most common patient-reported reasons for not having reconstruction were the desire to avoid additional surgery and feeling that it was not

  13. Meningitis caused by Alcaligenes xylosoxidans in a patient with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Espinoza-Gómez, F; Newton-Sánchez, O A; Melnikov, V; Virgen-González, O; Unrau, J

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of the present work was to inform about the first case of meningitis associated to the bacteria Alcaligenes xylosoxidans in a patient with HIV/AIDS. The patient was a 46-year-old male, with the antecedent of have been diagnosed for HIV/ AIDS, who attended in the Hospital Universitario de Colima, Mexico, with fever, shock and meningismus. The study of the cerebrospinal fluid showed pleocytosis, elevated protein levels and hypoglycorrhachia. The culture yielded the presence of Alcaligenes xylosoxidans with sensitivity to ciprofloxacin. After 14 days of treatment with this antibiotic, the patient showed neurologic improvement and was able to continue with his outpatient antiretroviral treatment. The present case shows the importance of the inclusion of this bacterium in the differential diagnosis of the neurological infections in HIV/AIDS patients and emphasizes the importance of considering the bacterial meningitis in this population.

  14. Concurrent cerebral american trypanosomiasis and toxoplasmosis in a patient with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Thomas W; Mlikotic, Anton; Cornford, Marcia E; Beck, C Keith

    2004-08-15

    We report a case of concurrent cerebral infection with Trypanosoma cruzi and Toxoplasma gondii in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). A 22-year-old El Salvadoran man initially improved during receipt of antitoxoplasmosis therapy, but he had rapidly progressive hemiplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an abnormal finding in the left internal capsule, and cytological analysis of cerebrospinal fluid revealed T. cruzi trypomastigotes. Despite prompt therapy with nifurtimox, the patient's mental status declined, and he died of nosocomial complications. Although infrequent, T. cruzi infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of brain lesions in patients with AIDS from regions of endemicity.

  15. Mycobacterium ulcerans infection as a cause of chronic diarrhea in an AIDS patient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Huh, Jin-Gook; Kim, You-Sun; Lee, Jong-Sung; Jeong, Tae-Yeob; Ryu, Soo-Hyung; Lee, Jung-Hwan; Moon, Jeong-Seop; Kang, Yun-Kyung; Shim, Myung-Shup; Oh, Myoung-Don

    2008-02-07

    Chronic diarrhea is one of the most frequent gastro-intestinal manifestations in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Protozoa and nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are opportunistic pathogens that can easily infect these patients. Among the NTM, Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) is the most frequently observed pathogen in HIV-infected patients. However, NTMs other than MAC have not been reported as a gastrointestinal pathogen as yet. We present a case of chronic diarrhea in an AIDS patient in whom Mycobacterium ulcerans and cryptosporidium co-infection is evidenced from colonic tissue.

  16. International exchange of emergency phase information and assessments: an aid to national/international decision makers.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Thomas J; Chino, Masamichi; Ehrhardt, Joachim; Shershakov, Vyacheslav

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses a collaborative project (1) to demonstrate the feasibility and benefit of a system seeking early review, in a 'quasi peer review' mode, of nuclear accident plume and dose assessment predictions by four major international nuclear accident emergency response systems before release of calculations to respective national authorities followed by (2) sharing these results with responsible national/international authorities, (3) development of an affordable/accessible system to distribute results to countries without prediction capabilities and (4) utilisation for exercises and collaboration studies. The project exploits Internet browser technology and low-cost PC hardware, incorporates an Internet node, with access control, for depositing a minimal set of XML-based graphics files for presentation in an identical map format. Side-by-side viewing and televideo conferencing will permit rapid evaluation, data elaboration and recalculation (if necessary) and should produce strong consensus among decision makers. Successful completion affords easy utilisation by national/international organisations and non-nuclear states at risk of trans-boundary incursion.

  17. Technologies and decision support systems to aid solid-waste management: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Vitorino de Souza Melaré, Angelina; Montenegro González, Sahudy; Faceli, Katti; Casadei, Vitor

    2017-01-01

    Population growth associated with population migration to urban areas and industrial development have led to a consumption relation that results in environmental, social, and economic problems. With respect to the environment, a critical concern is the lack of control and the inadequate management of the solid waste generated in urban centers. Among the challenges are proper waste-collection management, treatment, and disposal, with an emphasis on sustainable management. This paper presents a systematic review on scientific publications concerning decision support systems applied to Solid Waste Management (SWM) using ICTs and OR in the period of 2010-2013. A statistical analysis of the eighty-seven most relevant publications is presented, encompassing the ICTs and OR methods adopted in SWM, the processes of solid-waste management where they were adopted, and which countries are investigating solutions for the management of solid waste. A detailed discussion on how the ICTs and OR methods have been combined in the solutions was also presented. The analysis and discussion provided aims to help researchers and managers to gather insights on technologies/methods suitable the SWM challenges they have at hand, and on gaps that can be explored regarding technologies/methods that could be useful as well as the processes in SWM that currently do not benefit from using ICTs and OR methods.

  18. Computer-aided selection of diagnostic tests in jaundiced patients.

    PubMed Central

    Saint-Marc Girardin, M F; Le Minor, M; Alperovitch, A; Roudot-Thoraval, F; Metreau, J M; Dhumeaux, D

    1985-01-01

    A model has been developed for ordering diagnostic tests in jaundiced patients. The system proceeds in two steps: (i) diagnostic hypotheses are calculated for each patient from the results of physical examination and routine biological investigations; (ii) given these hypotheses, the most efficient test (out of 22) for reaching the final diagnosis is selected using four criteria: diagnostic value, risk, financial cost, and time in obtaining the result. This model was tested in 62 patients. In 43 of them (69%), the selected test was sufficient for reaching a diagnostic accuracy of 100%. In this group of patients, a mean of 3.7 (range 1-6) tests per patient was ordered by physicians. In the 19 remaining patients, the selected test was not sufficient for the final diagnosis, thus requiring a multiple choice process. It is suggested that such a system could help physicians to improve the care of patients by more efficient ordering of diagnostic tests. PMID:3896962

  19. Theory-informed design of values clarification methods: a cognitive psychological perspective on patient health-related decision making.

    PubMed

    Pieterse, Arwen H; de Vries, Marieke; Kunneman, Marleen; Stiggelbout, Anne M; Feldman-Stewart, Deb

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare decisions, particularly those involving weighing benefits and harms that may significantly affect quality and/or length of life, should reflect patients' preferences. To support patients in making choices, patient decision aids and values clarification methods (VCM) in particular have been developed. VCM intend to help patients to determine the aspects of the choices that are important to their selection of a preferred option. Several types of VCM exist. However, they are often designed without clear reference to theory, which makes it difficult for their development to be systematic and internally coherent. Our goal was to provide theory-informed recommendations for the design of VCM. Process theories of decision making specify components of decision processes, thus, identify particular processes that VCM could aim to facilitate. We conducted a review of the MEDLINE and PsycINFO databases and of references to theories included in retrieved papers, to identify process theories of decision making. We selected a theory if (a) it fulfilled criteria for a process theory; (b) provided a coherent description of the whole process of decision making; and (c) empirical evidence supports at least some of its postulates. Four theories met our criteria: Image Theory, Differentiation and Consolidation theory, Parallel Constraint Satisfaction theory, and Fuzzy-trace Theory. Based on these, we propose that VCM should: help optimize mental representations; encourage considering all potentially appropriate options; delay selection of an initially favoured option; facilitate the retrieval of relevant values from memory; facilitate the comparison of options and their attributes; and offer time to decide. In conclusion, our theory-based design recommendations are explicit and transparent, providing an opportunity to test each in a systematic manner.

  20. Peginterferon alfa-2a for AIDS-associated Kaposi sarcoma: experience with 10 patients.

    PubMed

    Rokx, Casper; van der Ende, Marchina E; Verbon, Annelies; Rijnders, Bart J A

    2013-11-01

    In this observational cohort study, 10 patients with extensive or treatment-refractory AIDS-associated Kaposi sarcoma were treated with peginterferon alfa-2a. Tumor responses were observed in 9 patients with a median progression-free survival of 645 days. Peginterferon alfa-2a could be an effective therapy for extensive or treatment-resistant Kaposi sarcoma.

  1. Clinical analysis of HIV/AIDS patients with drug eruption in Yunnan, China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu-Ye; Jin, Yong-Mei; He, Li-Ping; Bai, Jin-Song; Liu, Jun; Yu, Min; Chen, Jian-Hua; Wen, Jing; Kuang, Yi-Qun

    2016-01-01

    Drug eruption is the most common clinical presentation in patients with HIV/AIDS. The systemic clinical and risk factors associated with drug eruption remain unknown. A retrospective analysis in HIV/AIDS patients with drug eruption was carried out with demographic data, epidemiological data, clinical characteristics, laboratory data and follow-up data. The risk factors correlated with prognosis were assessed by case control analysis. A total of 134 out of 1817 HIV/AIDS patients (7.4%) presented drug eruptions. The major class of sensitizing drug was HAART drugs (47.7%), followed by antibiotics (47.0%). Nevirapine (39.6%) was the most common sensitizing drug in the HAART regimens. The patients received HAART or had allergic history were prone to develop drug eruption. The alanine aminotransferase, albumin, globulin, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), lymphocytes, red blood cells (RBC) and eosinophils of the drug eruption patients were significantly different the control patients. The allergic history, opportunistic infection, viral load, CD4 cell count, high globulin and low albumin were the risk factors correlated with death in HIV/AIDS patients with drug eruption. It is proposed that patients with higher viral loads, higher globulin levels and lower white blood cells (WBC) should be given special attention for the prevention of complications and death. PMID:27796328

  2. Emerging medical informatics with case-based reasoning for aiding clinical decision in multi-agent system.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ying; Colloc, Joël; Jacquet-Andrieu, Armelle; Lei, Kai

    2015-08-01

    This research aims to depict the methodological steps and tools about the combined operation of case-based reasoning (CBR) and multi-agent system (MAS) to expose the ontological application in the field of clinical decision support. The multi-agent architecture works for the consideration of the whole cycle of clinical decision-making adaptable to many medical aspects such as the diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, therapeutic monitoring of gastric cancer. In the multi-agent architecture, the ontological agent type employs the domain knowledge to ease the extraction of similar clinical cases and provide treatment suggestions to patients and physicians. Ontological agent is used for the extension of domain hierarchy and the interpretation of input requests. Case-based reasoning memorizes and restores experience data for solving similar problems, with the help of matching approach and defined interfaces of ontologies. A typical case is developed to illustrate the implementation of the knowledge acquisition and restitution of medical experts.

  3. Short communication: oral lesions in HIV/AIDS patients undergoing HAART including efavirenz.

    PubMed

    Aquino-García, S I; Rivas, M A; Ceballos-Salobreña, A; Acosta-Gio, A E; Gaitán-Cepeda, L A

    2008-06-01

    Oral lesions (OL) have an important prognostic value for HIV/AIDS patients. However, the behavior of OL in HIV/AIDS patients undergoing highly active antiretroviral therapy including efavirenz (HAART/EFV) has not been documented. Our objective was to establish the prevalence of OL in HIV/AIDS patients undergoing HAART/EFV and to compare it with the prevalence of OL in patients undergoing antiretroviral therapy including a protease inhibitor (HAART/PI). Seventy-three HIV/AIDS patients undergoing antiretroviral treatment for at least for 6 months at "La Raza" Medical Center's Internal Medicine Unit (IMSS, Mexico City) were included. To detect OL, a detailed examination of oral soft tissues was performed in each patient. Patient records recorded gender, seropositivity time, route of contagion, antiretroviral therapy type and duration, CD4 lymphocyte count/ml, and viral load. Two groups were formed: 38 patients receiving HAART/EFV [two nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NARTI) plus efavirenz] and 35 patients receiving HAART/PI (two NARTIs plus one PI). OL prevalence was established in each study group. The Chi-square test was applied (p < 0.05(IC95%)). OL prevalence in the HAART/EFV group (32%) was lower (p < 0.007) than in the HAART/PI group (63%). Candidosis was the most prevalent OL in both groups. Herpes labialis, HIV-associated necrotizing periodontitis, xerostomia, hairy leukoplakia, and nonspecific oral sores were identified. The highest prevalence for all OL was found in the HAART/PI group. These findings suggest that HIV/AIDS patients undergoing HAART/EFV show a lower prevalence of oral lesions than patients undergoing HAART/PI.

  4. Patient Access to Online Visit Notes: Perceptions of Doctors and Patients at an Urban HIV/AIDS Clinic.

    PubMed

    Oster, Natalia V; Jackson, Sara L; Dhanireddy, Shireesha; Mejilla, Roanne; Ralston, James D; Leveille, Suzanne; Delbanco, Tom; Walker, Janice D; Bell, Sigall K; Elmore, Joann G

    2015-01-01

    Patients living with HIV/AIDS face large societal and medical challenges. Inviting patients to read their doctors' visit notes via secure electronic portals may empower patients and improve health. We investigated whether utilization and perceptions about access to doctors' notes differed among doctors and patients in an HIV/AIDS clinic versus primary care setting. We analyzed pre- and 1-year postintervention data from 99 doctors and 3819 patients. HIV clinic patients did not report differences in perceived risks and benefits compared to primary care clinic patients, however, they were more likely to share notes with friends (33% versus 9%, P=.002), other health professionals (24% versus 8%, P=.03), or another doctor (38% versus 9%, P<.0001). HIV clinic doctors were less likely than primary care doctors to change the level of candor in visit notes (P<.04). Our findings suggest that HIV clinic patients and doctors are ready to share visit notes online.

  5. International Exchange of Emergency Phase Information and Assessment: An Aid to Inter/National Decision Makers

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, T J; Chino, M; Ehrhardt, J; Shershakov, V

    2003-09-01

    This paper discusses a collaborative project whose purpose is (1) to demonstrate the technical feasibility and mutual benefit of a system seeking early review or preview, in a ''quasi peer review'' mode, of nuclear accident plume and dose assessment predictions by four major international nuclear accident emergency response systems before release of their calculations to their respective national authorities followed by (2) sharing these results with responsible international authorities. The extreme sensitivity of the general public to any nuclear accident information has been a strong motivation to seek peer review prior to public release. Another intended objective of this work is (3) the development of an affordable/accessible system for distribution of prediction results to countries having no prediction capabilities and (4) utilization of the link for exercises and collaboration studies. The project exploits the Internet as a ubiquitous communications medium, browser technology as a simple, user friendly interface, and low-cost PC level hardware. The participants are developing a web based dedicated node with ID and password access control, where the four systems can deposit a minimal set of XML-based data and graphics files, which are then displayed in a common identical map format. Side-by-side viewing and televideo conferencing will permit rapid evaluation, correction or elaboration of data, recalculation (if necessary) and should produce a strong level of consensus to assist international decision makers. Successful completion of this work could lead to easy utilization by national and international organizations, such as the IAEA and WHO, as well as by non-nuclear states at risk of a trans-boundary incursion on their territory.

  6. Opportunistic Neurologic Infections in Patients with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Albarillo, Fritzie; O'Keefe, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Infections of the central nervous system (CNS) in individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) remain a substantial cause of morbidity and mortality despite the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) especially in the resource-limited regions of the world. Diagnosis of these infections may be challenging because findings on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis and brain imaging are nonspecific. While brain biopsy provides a definitive diagnosis, it is an invasive procedure associated with a relatively low mortality rate, thus less invasive modalities have been studied in recent years. Diagnosis, therefore, can be established based on a combination of a compatible clinical syndrome, radiologic and CSF findings, and understanding of the role of HIV in these infections. The most common CNS opportunistic infections are AIDS-defining conditions; thus, treatment of these infections in combination with HAART has greatly improved survival.

  7. Patient management scenario: a framework for clinical decision and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Gospodarowicz, Mary; O'Sullivan, Brian

    2003-01-01

    The depiction of prognosis is one of the main activities and a mainstay in medical practice. In cancer, as in other diseases, the prognosis differs for a variety of situations and evolves with time and with medical interventions. Although most commonly described at diagnosis, prognosis may be defined at any time during the course of the disease and for any endpoint including response to therapy, failure of treatment, survival, or preservation of function, and so forth. To facilitate the accurate portrayal of the future, the prognosis should be defined within a specific setting, referred to as a 'management scenario'. In the concept of a management scenario, the prognosis is defined using systematically considered prognostic factors, interventions and the outcome of interest. A deliberate and careful determination of prognosis is essential to clinical decision making and patient care. We illustrate the use of the concept of management scenario in several clinical examples.

  8. Seroprevalence of toxoplasmosis in HIV(+)/AIDS patients in Iran.

    PubMed

    Mohraz, Minoo; Mehrkhani, Farhad; Jam, Sara; SeyedAlinaghi, SeyedAhmad; Sabzvari, Duman; Fattahi, Fatemeh; Jabbari, Hossain; Hajiabdolbaghi, Mahboubeh

    2011-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii has arisen as an important opportunistic agent especially in the central nervous system and in advanced HIV disease can cause significant morbidity and mortality. This study was carried out to determine the seroprevalence of toxoplasmosis among HIV-positive patients in Iran. Blood samples were collected from 201 HIV-positive patients and anti-toxoplasma antibodies were detected by using conventional ELISA. An antibody titer of >3 IU/ml was considered positive. The majority of studied patients were male (male to female ratio: 5 to 1) with the mean age of 36 ± 1 yrs. The seroprevalence of toxoplasmosis in HIV-positive patients was 49.75%. The mean CD4 count in HIV patients with positive toxoplasma serology was 332.5 ± 22.4 cells/µl. Only 1% of the patients had IgM anti-toxoplasma antibodies and 10% of the patients had clinical toxoplasma encephalitis. The mean CD4 count in this group was 66.4 ± 15.5 cells/µl and there was a significant association between CD4 count and rate of toxoplasma encephalitis (P<0.001). Previous reports suggested that toxoplasma encephalitis could be prevented by appropriate chemoprophylaxis. In view of the relatively high prevalence of toxoplasma infection found among the HIV-infected patients in our study, we suggest that routine screening for toxoplasma should be undertaken for all HIV-infected patients in Iran.

  9. Malignancies in the AIDS patient: natural history, treatment strategies, and preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Longo, D L; Steis, R G; Lane, H C; Lotze, M T; Rosenberg, S A; Preble, O; Masur, H; Rook, A H; Fauci, A S; Jacob, J

    1984-01-01

    Almost 40% of the 3000 US patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) have a malignancy at the time of reporting, and the incidence of AIDS patients who develop a malignancy during the course of the disease may be 65-70%. 2 types of malignancies have been noted with increased frequency in AIDS victims: Kaposi's sarcoma and malignant lymphomas. About 35% of all AIDS patients and 50% of homosexual or bisexual victims have developed Kaposi's sarcoma, and those with coincident opportunistic infection have 2.5 times the mortality of those without such infection. There are 2 essential features to the histopathology of Kaposi's sarcoma: 1) vascular proliferation and 2) spindle-shaped neoplastic cells in a network of reticulin fibers that appear to be of endothelial origin. The treatment of the epidemic form of Kaposi's sarcoma has not been successful, and the projected 2-year survival is only 30%. The causes of death in the majority of such patients are overwhelming opportunistic infections, especially cytomegalovirus and Pneumocystis carinii, and irreversible cachexia and wasting. Interferon therapy has had a beneficial effect in patients with disease limited to skin, with T4/T8 ratios over 0.5, and without a prior history of opportunistic infection; however, there is no evidence that interferon exerts any beneficial effects on the underlying immune defects. An aggressive 6-drug combination chemotherapy regimen has been tried on patients whose tumors appeared to be life-threatening and was effective in controlling the Kaposi's sarcoma, but again did not appreciably alter immune parameters. Several other approaches to the treatment of epidemic Kaposi's sarcoma are under evaluation, including gamma interferon, interleukin-2, and plasmapheresis. Patients who develop malignant lymphomas require combined treatment with central nervous system radiation and systemic combination chemotherapy. There is no evidence that the antitumor responses obtained in AIDS

  10. Impact of Treatment for Depression on Desire for Hastened Death in Patients With Advanced AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Breitbart, William; Rosenfeld, Barry; Gibson, Christopher; Kramer, Michael; Li, Yuelin; Tomarken, Alexis; Nelson, Christian; Pessin, Hayley; Esch, Julie; Galietta, Michele; Garcia, Nerina; Brechtl, John; Schuster, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the development of multi-drug regimens for HIV, palliative care and quality-of-life issues in patients with advanced AIDS remain important areas of clinical investigation. Objective Authors assessed the impact of treatment for depression on desire for hastened death in patients with advanced AIDS. Method Patients with advanced AIDS (N=372) were interviewed shortly after admission to a palliative-care facility, and were reinterviewed monthly for the next 2 months. Patients diagnosed with a major depressive syndrome were provided with antidepressant treatment and reinterviewed weekly. Desire for hastened death was assessed with two questionnaire measures. Results Desire for death was highly associated with depression, and it decreased dramatically in patients who responded to antidepressant treatment. Little change in desire for hastened death was observed in patients whose depression did not improve. Although improved depression was not significantly associated with the use of antidepressant medication, those individuals prescribed antidepressant medication showed the largest decreases in desire for hastened death. Discussion Successful treatment for depression appears to substantially decrease desire for hastened death in patients with advanced AIDS. The authors discuss implications of these findings for palliative-care treatment and the physician-assisted suicide debate. PMID:20332284

  11. Do physicians have an ethical obligation to care for patients with AIDS?

    PubMed Central

    Angoff, N. R.

    1991-01-01

    This paper responds to the question: Do physicians have an ethical obligation to care for patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)? First, the social and political milieu in which this question arises is sampled. Here physicians as well as other members of the community are found declaring an unwillingness to be exposed to people with AIDS. Next, laws, regulations, ethical codes and principles, and the history of the practice of medicine are examined, and the literature as it pertains to these areas is reviewed. The obligation to care for patients with AIDS, however, cannot be located in an orientation to morality defined in rules and codes and an appeal to legalistic fairness. By turning to the orientation to morality that emerges naturally from connection and is defined in caring, the physicians' ethical obligation to care for patients with AIDS is found. Through an exploration of the writings of modern medical ethicists, it is clear that the purpose of the practice of medicine is healing, which can only be accomplished in relationship to the patient. It is in relationship to patients that the physician has the opportunity for self-realization. In fact, the physician is physician in relationship to patients and only to the extent that he or she acts virtuously by being morally responsible for and to those patients. Not to do so diminishes the physician's ethical ideal, a vision of the physician as good physician, which has consequences for the physician's capacity to care and for the practice of medicine. PMID:1788990

  12. The role of advance euthanasia directives as an aid to communication and shared decision-making in dementia.

    PubMed

    Hertogh, C M P M

    2009-02-01

    Recent evaluation of the practice of euthanasia and related medical decisions at the end of life in the Netherlands has shown a slight decrease in the frequency of physician-assisted death since the enactment of the Euthanasia Law in 2002. This paper focuses on the absence of euthanasia cases concerning patients with dementia and a written advance euthanasia directive, despite the fact that the only real innovation of the Euthanasia Law consisted precisely in allowing physicians to act upon such directives. The author discusses two principal reasons for this absence. One relates to the uncertainty about whether patients with advanced dementia truly experience the suffering they formerly feared. There is reason to assume that they don't, as a consequence of psychological adaptation and progressive unawareness (anosognosia). The second, more fundamental reason touches upon the ethical relevance of shared understanding and reciprocity. The author argues that, next to autonomy and mercifulness, "reciprocity" is a condition sine qua non for euthanasia. The absence thereof in advanced dementia renders euthanasia morally inconceivable, even if there are signs of suffering and notwithstanding the presence of an advance euthanasia directive. This does not mean, however, that advance euthanasia directives of patients with dementia are worthless. They might very well have a role in the earlier stages of certain subtypes of the disease. To illustrate this point the author presents a case in which the advance directive helped to create a window of opportunity for reciprocity and shared decision-making.

  13. [Musculoskeletal disorders in HIV-infected patients.National AIDS Plan (PNS) and the AIDS Study Group (GESIDA)].

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the most relevant musculoskeletal disorders, their diagnosis and treatment to the scientific community and the professionals in charge of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. These recommendations have been agreed by a panel of experts from the National AIDS Plan (PNS) and the AIDS Study Group (GESIDA). The group have reviewed the efficacy and safety results of clinical trials, cohort studies and pharmacokinetic studies published in biomedical journals (PubMed and Embase), or presented at conferences. Three levels of evidence have been defined according to the sources of data: level A, randomized controlled trials; level B, cohort or case-control; and level C, descriptive studies and expert opinion. Based on this evidence, the authors have decided to recommend, consider or not recommend for each situation. The decrease in bone mineral density is common in HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral treatment, especially during the first year (from 2 to 4%), with a subsequent partial recovery. A dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scan is recommended in patients over 50 years old with HIV infection, history of bone fractures and/or risk factors. Treatment with bisphosphonates has been shown to be effective. Osteoarticular infections are more frequent than in the non-infected population. The level of immunosuppression, risk practice, and antiretroviral treatment should be considered for a proper diagnosis and therapeutic approach. Laboratory and imaging procedures recommended for the study of musculoskeletal processes in HIV infected subjects are the same as in the general population. Osteonecrosis and decreased bone mineral density are the most frequent alterations in children. An early diagnosis of bone disorders is needed. The influence of modifiable risk factors must be avoided and initiate treatment when necessary. Bisphosphonates have been effective in osteoporosis.

  14. Vibrant Soundbridge and Bone Conduction Hearing Aid in Patients with Bilateral Malformation of External Ear.

    PubMed

    Mondelli, Maria Fernanda Capoani Garcia; Mariano, Thais Cristina Barbosa; Honório, Heitor Marques; Brito, Rubens Vuono de

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hearing loss is the most common clinical finding in patients with malformation of the external ear canal. Among the possibilities of treatment, there is the adaptation of hearing aids by bone conduction and the adaptation of implantable hearing aids. Objective To assess speech perception with the use of Vibrant Soundbridge (VBS - MED-EL, Innsbruck, Austria) associated with additional amplification in patients with bilateral craniofacial malformation. Method We evaluated 11 patients with bilateral malformation over 12 years with mixed hearing loss or bilateral conductive. They were using the Softband (Oticon Medical, Sweden) and bone conduction hearing aid in the ear opposite the one with the VSB. We performed the evaluation of speech perception using the Hearing in Noise Test. Results Participants were eight men and three women with a mean of 19.5 years. The signal / noise ratio presented significant results in patients fitted with VSB and bone conduction hearing aid. Conclusion The results of speech perception were significantly better with use of VBS combined with bone conduction hearing aids.

  15. Vibrant Soundbridge and Bone Conduction Hearing Aid in Patients with Bilateral Malformation of External Ear

    PubMed Central

    Mondelli, Maria Fernanda Capoani Garcia; Mariano, Thais Cristina Barbosa; Honório, Heitor Marques; Brito, Rubens Vuono de

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hearing loss is the most common clinical finding in patients with malformation of the external ear canal. Among the possibilities of treatment, there is the adaptation of hearing aids by bone conduction and the adaptation of implantable hearing aids. Objective To assess speech perception with the use of Vibrant Soundbridge (VBS - MED-EL, Innsbruck, Austria) associated with additional amplification in patients with bilateral craniofacial malformation. Method We evaluated 11 patients with bilateral malformation over 12 years with mixed hearing loss or bilateral conductive. They were using the Softband (Oticon Medical, Sweden) and bone conduction hearing aid in the ear opposite the one with the VSB. We performed the evaluation of speech perception using the Hearing in Noise Test. Results Participants were eight men and three women with a mean of 19.5 years. The signal / noise ratio presented significant results in patients fitted with VSB and bone conduction hearing aid. Conclusion The results of speech perception were significantly better with use of VBS combined with bone conduction hearing aids. PMID:26722343

  16. Aspergillus Tracheobronchitis and Influenza A Co-infection in a Patient with AIDS and Neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Yong; Yeom, Joon-Sup; Song, Jae-Uk; Yim, Seo-Hyung; Shin, Dong-Suk; Yu, Jung-Hee; Ju, Deok-Yun; Yim, Jae-Wan; Song, Young-Seok; Sohn, Yoon-Jeong; Do, Sung-Im

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus tracheobronchitis (AT), an unusual form of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA), is characterized by pseudomembrane formation, ulcer or obstruction that is predominantly confined to tracheobronchial tree. Hematologic malignancies, neutropenia, solid organ transplantation, chronic corticosteroid therapy and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) are known to be major predisposing conditions. However, since the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy, there is only one reported case of AT in AIDS patient. After pandemic of influenza A/H1N1 2009, there are several reports of IPA in patient with influenza and most of them received corticosteroid or immunosuppressive therapy before the development of IPA. We present a 45 year-old AIDS patient with influenza A infection who developed pseudomembranous AT without corticosteroid use or immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:25298912

  17. First detection of acalculous cholecystitis associated with Sarcocystis infection in a patient with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Agholi, Mahmoud; Heidarian, Hamid Reza; Moghadami, Mohsen; Hatam, Gholam Reza

    2014-06-01

    Acalculous cholecystitis and cholangitis are increasingly being recognized as complications of AIDS. The opportunistic parasites that have been most commonly associated with these disorders are Cryptosporidium species, Isospora belli, Cyclospora cayetanensis and Enterocytozoon bieneusi. The authors performed a parasitological survey on the gallbladder tissue sections of patients underwent cholecystectomy due to chronic acalculous cholecystitis at the Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. Light microscopic investigation in more than three hundred archived histopathological slides revealed the presence of sexual stages (i.e., mature sporocysts) of a coccidial protozoan in a patient with AIDS who developed acalculous cholecystitis as confirmed by histological, parasitological and molecular tests in which Sarcocystis species was the only identifiable pathogen in gallbladder sections. In the best of our knowledge it's the first documented case of chronic non-calculous cholecystitis due to Sarcocystis parasite in an Iranian AIDS patient from worldwide.

  18. The Use of Art in the Medical Decision-Making Process of Oncology Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czamanski-Cohen, Johanna

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of written informed consent in the 1970s created expectations of shared decision making between doctors and patients that has led to decisional conflict for some patients. This study utilized a collaborative, intrinsic case study approach to the decision-making process of oncology patients who participated in an open art therapy…

  19. Toxoplasmosis of the central nervous system in patients with AIDS in Mexico.

    PubMed

    del Rio-Chiriboga, C; Orzechowski-Rallo, A; Sanchez-Mejorada, G

    1997-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis of the central nervous system (CNS) is the most common cause of intracerebral lesions in patients with AIDS. It is now standard clinical practice to treat empirically, based on clinical and radiographic findings, and to perform a biopsy of the lesion only in those patients who fail to have a clinical and radiographic response after two weeks of therapy. This study describes the presentation and response to therapy of central nervous system toxoplasmosis in patients with AIDS at a private practice in Mexico City. A retrospective chart and radiology review of all patients with AIDS treated empirically for toxoplasmosis between 1988 and 1993 was performed. A total of 177 patients with AIDS were seen, nine (5.1%) had toxoplasmosis. Patients with toxoplasmosis were males with a median age of 39 years (range 26 - 65). In two patients, toxoplamosis of the CNS was the initial manifestation of HIV infection, all others had a prior diagnosis of AIDS with a mean of 10 months between their first AIDS defining event and the diagnosis of toxoplasmosis. The median CD4+ T-cell count at the time of the diagnosis of toxoplamsosis was 78 cells/microL. Most patients had headache associated with other focal neurological symptoms such as hemiplegia (2), hemiparesis (2) or seizures (4). Only 4 out of 9 patients had fever as part of their initial clinical presentation. Serum IgG antibodies against Toxoplasma gondii were positive in 6 out of 7 patients tested, while IgM antibodies were negative in all patients. On imaging studies (Computerized Tomography or Magnetic Resonance Imaging), 4 patients had a single lesion while the rest had two or more lesions. Two patients were initially treated with pyrimethamine/sulfadiazine and were later changed to pyrimethamine/clindamycin, which was the treatment given from the beginning to all other patients. One patient died of an intralesional hemorrhage two weeks after the diagnosis despite adequate therapy. The probability of surviving

  20. Thyroid hormone: a "prime suspect" in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV/AIDS) patients?

    PubMed

    Amadi, K; Sabo, A M; Ogunkeye, O O; Oluwole, F S

    2008-01-01

    Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is the final and most serious stage of the disease caused by human immunodeficiency virus. The Immune system is the target of AIDS. We investigate presently any possible involvement of thyroid hormone, the deficiency of which gives rise to oedema and susceptibility to nonspecific infections; with a view to finding the primary factor seeding the disease. It has been reported that circumcision reduced the incidence of HIV/AIDS infection. Beyond circumcision however there might be some constitutional factor that comprises HIV infection to clinical AIDS. It is against this background that our research team turned to possible dyshormonopoisis and to thyroid hormone as a prime suspect among other possible factors that cause clinical AIDS. Moreover the hormone has been reported to be crucial for optimum immune function. A population of 200 seropositive AIDS patients were investigated against a control of 50 subjects made up of 25 healthy circumcised males and 25 healthy females; all of who were seronegative for the disease. The parameters investigated include thyrotropin (TSH), Thyroxine (T4), Total protein (TP), Albumin (Alb), Globulin (Glob), Immune complex (IC3) and Bence Jones proteins (BJP) levels in serum or urine. All seropositive clinically HIV/AIDS patients were hypothyroid. Seronegatives had significantly higher T4, TP, and Alb levels at P < 0.001 and P < 0.05 for Glob than seropositives. Seropositive females exhibited significant (P < 0.001) higher levels of IC3 than seronegative males. The globulin levels of all HIV patients were significantly (P < 0.05) higher than control. BJP was also isolated in the urine of patients. The findings suggest that thyroid hormone deficiency is a primary culprit for the other inert or dormant factors to be activated.

  1. Stigmatization of patients with HIV/AIDS among doctors and nurses in Belize.

    PubMed

    Andrewin, Aisha; Chien, Li-Yin

    2008-11-01

    This study, conducted from August to September 2007, utilized a population-based survey to investigate stigmatizing attitudes and acts of discrimination against HIV/AIDS patients among doctors and nurses working in public hospitals in Belize. A total of 230 subjects (81.0%) completed the survey. The mean age was 36.8 years; 75% were women; 61% were nurses; 74% were Belizean. Stigmatization was greatest for "attitudes of blame/judgment"; disclosing a patient's HIV/AIDS status to colleagues was the most frequent act of discrimination (29%). Formal HIV/AIDS training was significantly associated with less stigmatization for "attitudes towards imposed measures" (p < .01); "attitudes of blame/judgment" (p < 0.05); and testing without consent (p < 0.05). Doctors showed more stigmatization in "attitudes towards imposed measures," conducted HIV tests without consent and disclosed patient status to colleagues more frequently than nurses (p < 0.05) while nurses gave differential care to patients based on HIV status more frequently (p < 0.01) than doctors. Female and religious health care workers (HCWs) were more stigmatizing in their "attitudes of blame/judgment" than male and nonreligious HCWs (p < 0.05). Cuban HCWs were more stigmatizing in their "attitudes toward imposed measures" and were less comfortable dealing with HIV/AIDS patients than their Belizean counterparts (p < 0.01). Older age was associated with less frequent disclosure of patients' HIV status (p < 0.05). HIV/AIDS training that incorporates stigma reduction strategies tailored to the target groups identified is needed. Additionally, we recommend that the effectiveness of national HIV/AIDS policies be investigated.

  2. Developing a computer touch-screen interactive colorectal screening decision aid for a low-literacy African American population: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Bass, Sarah Bauerle; Gordon, Thomas F; Ruzek, Sheryl Burt; Wolak, Caitlin; Ruggieri, Dominique; Mora, Gabriella; Rovito, Michael J; Britto, Johnson; Parameswaran, Lalitha; Abedin, Zainab; Ward, Stephanie; Paranjape, Anuradha; Lin, Karen; Meyer, Brian; Pitts, Khaliah

    2013-07-01

    African Americans have higher colorectal cancer (CRC) mortality than White Americans and yet have lower rates of CRC screening. Increased screening aids in early detection and higher survival rates. Coupled with low literacy rates, the burden of CRC morbidity and mortality is exacerbated in this population, making it important to develop culturally and literacy appropriate aids to help low-literacy African Americans make informed decisions about CRC screening. This article outlines the development of a low-literacy computer touch-screen colonoscopy decision aid using an innovative marketing method called perceptual mapping and message vector modeling. This method was used to mathematically model key messages for the decision aid, which were then used to modify an existing CRC screening tutorial with different messages. The final tutorial was delivered through computer touch-screen technology to increase access and ease of use for participants. Testing showed users were not only more comfortable with the touch-screen technology but were also significantly more willing to have a colonoscopy compared with a "usual care group." Results confirm the importance of including participants in planning and that the use of these innovative mapping and message design methods can lead to significant CRC screening attitude change.

  3. Discriminatory Attitudes and Practices by Health Workers toward Patients with HIV/AIDS in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Background Nigeria has an estimated 3.6 million people with HIV/AIDS and is home to one out of every 11 people with HIV/AIDS worldwide. This study is the first population-based assessment of discrimination against people living with HIV/AIDS in the health sector of a country. The purpose of this study was to characterize the nature and extent of discriminatory practices and attitudes in the health sector and indicate possible contributing factors and intervention strategies. The study involved a cross-sectional survey of 1,021 Nigerian health-care professionals (including 324 physicians, 541 nurses, and 133 midwives identified by profession) in 111 health-care facilities in four Nigerian states. Methods and Findings Fifty-four percent of the health-care professionals (550/1,021) were sampled from public tertiary care facilities. Nine percent of professionals reported refusing to care for an HIV/AIDS patient, and 9% indicated that they had refused an HIV/AIDS patient admission to a hospital. Fifty-nine percent agreed that people with HIV/AIDS should be on a separate ward, and 40% believed a person's HIV status could be determined by his or her appearance. Ninety-one percent agreed that staff and health-care professionals should be informed when a patient is HIV-positive so they can protect themselves. Forty percent believed that health-care professionals with HIV/AIDS should not be allowed to work in any area of health-care that requires patient contact. Twenty percent agreed that many with HIV/AIDS behaved immorally and deserve the disease. Basic materials needed for treatment and prevention of HIV were not adequately available. Twelve percent agreed that treatment of opportunistic infections in HIV/AIDS patients wastes resources, and 8% indicated that treating someone with HIV/AIDS is a waste of precious resources. Providers who reported working in facilities that did not always practice universal precautions were more likely to favor restrictive policies toward

  4. The DREAM model's effectiveness in health promotion of AIDS patients in Africa.

    PubMed

    Magnano San Lio, M; Mancinelli, S; Palombi, L; Buonomo, E; Altan, A Doro; Germano, P; Magid, N A; Pesaresi, A; Renzi, E; Scarcella, P; Zimba, I; Marazzi, M C

    2009-03-01

    This study evaluates the effectiveness of a holistic model for treating people living with AIDS in Africa; the model aims to improve knowledge about AIDS prevention and care, increase trust in the health centre, impact behaviour, and promote a high level of adherence to HAART. The study took place in the context of the DREAM (Drug Resource Enhancement against AIDS and Malnutrition) programme in Mozambique, designed by the Community of Sant'Egidio to treat HIV patients in Africa. It provides patients with free anti-retroviral drugs, laboratory tests (including viral load), home care and nutritional support. This is a prospective study involving 531 patients over a 12-month period. The patients, predominantly poor and with a low level of education, demonstrated a good level of knowledge about AIDS (more than 90% know how it is transmitted) and trust in the treatment, with a relatively small percentage turning to traditional healers. Overall the patients had a low level of engaging in risky sexual behaviour and a very good level of adherence to HAART (69.5% of the 531 subjects had a pill count higher than 95%). The positive results of the programme's educational initiatives were confirmed with the patients' good clinical results.

  5. Decision-aided maximum likelihood phase estimation with optimum block length in hybrid QPSK/16QAM coherent optical WDM systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Wang, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    We propose a general model to entirely describe XPM effects induced by 16QAM channels in hybrid QPSK/16QAM wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) systems. A power spectral density (PSD) formula is presented to predict the statistical properties of XPM effects at the end of dispersion management (DM) fiber links. We derive the analytical expression of phase error variance for optimizing block length of QPSK channel coherent receiver with decision-aided (DA) maximum-likelihood (ML) phase estimation (PE). With our theoretical analysis, the optimum block length can be employed to improve the performance of coherent receiver. Bit error rate (BER) performance in QPSK channel is evaluated and compared through both theoretical derivation and Monte Carlo simulation. The results show that by using the DA-ML with optimum block length, bit signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) improvement over DA-ML with fixed block length of 10, 20 and 40 at BER of 10-3 is 0.18 dB, 0.46 dB and 0.65 dB, respectively, when in-line residual dispersion is 0 ps/nm.

  6. A flexible decision-aided maximum likelihood phase estimation in hybrid QPSK/OOK coherent optical WDM systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Wang, Yulong

    2016-04-01

    Although decision-aided (DA) maximum likelihood (ML) phase estimation (PE) algorithm has been investigated intensively, block length effect impacts system performance and leads to the increasing of hardware complexity. In this paper, a flexible DA-ML algorithm is proposed in hybrid QPSK/OOK coherent optical wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) systems. We present a general cross phase modulation (XPM) model based on Volterra series transfer function (VSTF) method to describe XPM effects induced by OOK channels at the end of dispersion management (DM) fiber links. Based on our model, the weighted factors obtained from maximum likelihood method are introduced to eliminate the block length effect. We derive the analytical expression of phase error variance for the performance prediction of coherent receiver with the flexible DA-ML algorithm. Bit error ratio (BER) performance is evaluated and compared through both theoretical derivation and Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. The results show that our flexible DA-ML algorithm has significant improvement in performance compared with the conventional DA-ML algorithm as block length is a fixed value. Compared with the conventional DA-ML with optimum block length, our flexible DA-ML can obtain better system performance. It means our flexible DA-ML algorithm is more effective for mitigating phase noise than conventional DA-ML algorithm.

  7. Joining forces for food security - Linking earth observation and crowd-sourcing for improved decision-support to aid organizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enenkel, M.; Dorigo, W.; See, L. M.; Vinck, P.; Pham, P.

    2013-12-01

    Droughts statistically exceed all other natural disasters in spatio-temporal extent, number of people affected or financial loss. Triggered by crop failure, food insecurity is a major manifestation of agricultural drought and water scarcity. However, other socio-economic precursors, such as chronically low levels of disaster preparedness, hampered access to food security or a lack of social safety nets are equally important factors. Consequently, this study is focused on two complementary developments - a new satellite-derived agricultural drought index and a mobile phone application. The Combined Drought Index (CDI) is enhanced by replacing field measurements of temperature and rainfall modelled/assimilated data. The vegetation component is replaced by a smoothed NDVI dataset. A soil moisture component is introduced to close the gap between rainfall deficiencies and the first visible impacts of atmospheric anomalies on vegetation. The mobile phone application enables the validation of drought index outputs and gives aid organizations an opportunity to increase the speed of socio-economic vulnerability assessments. Supported by Doctors without Borders (MSF) this approach aims at decreasing uncertainties in decision-making via a more holistic risk framework.

  8. Osteomyelitis and skin ulcers caused by Mycobacterium szulgai in an AIDS patient.

    PubMed

    Tappe, Dennis; Langmann, Peter; Zilly, Michael; Klinker, Hartwig; Schmausser, Bernd; Frosch, Matthias

    2004-01-01

    Mycobacterium szulgai is a ubiquitious non-tuberculous mycobacterium causing infection in immunocompetent and immunocompromized patients. Clinically mimicking pulmonary tuberculosis in most cases described, rarely other manifestations occur. Here we report the case of an AIDS patient with osteomyelitis of the hand and toe, accompanied by multiple cutaneous ulcers of the chest and forearm. The case highlights the unusual combination of osteomyelitis and skin ulcers without pulmonary infection and describes the likely cutaneous route of infection in a patient who keeps tropical fish.

  9. Psychological support and counselling for patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed Central

    Miller, D; Green, J

    1985-01-01

    The growing numbers of patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) in England had led to the development of a counselling service for patients, their sexual partners, contacts, and others. The nature of the counselling is described with reference to the primary qualitative issues arising from diagnosis. The necessity for preventative education for patients and those at risk is stressed, and guidelines for low risk sexual activities are outlined. PMID:2991121

  10. Gastroduodenal Cryptococcus in an AIDS Patient Presenting With Melena

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Patel, Anish A.; Shaw, Janet C.; Fillman, Eric P.; Lamb, Paul B.

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal cryptococcosis is extremely rare with only a few case reports found in the literature and involvement primarily identified post-mortem. This is a case of 54-year-old man with a 20-year history of poorly controlled human immunodeficiency virus presented with constitutional symptoms along with melena. Diagnostic work up with esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed 4 irregular ulcers in the stomach notable for red-pigmented lesions within the ulcers, erythematous mucosa in the antrum and patchy friable mucosa in the duodenum. H&E staining and Mucicarmine staining showed findings consistent with C. neoformans. Blood culture and cerebrospinal fluid studies also revealed C. neoformans. Cryptococcus neoformans is an AIDS defining illness that most commonly presents as meningoencephalitis and pneumonitis. Key management principles includes: induction of antifungal therapy followed by consolidation and maintenance; management of elevated intracranial pressure and immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. Although the organism can infect nearly all organs, gastrointestinal involvement is rarely described. Our case highlights the fact that gastrointestinal C. neoformans infection can be associated with upper gastrointestinal symptoms and may be the initial presentation of disseminated cryptococcosis. PMID:27785222

  11. A factorial randomised controlled trial of decision analysis and an information video plus leaflet for newly diagnosed hypertensive patients.

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Alan A; Fahey, Tom; Peters, Tim J

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a lack of evidence regarding the value of tools designed to aid decision making in patients with newly diagnosed hypertension. AIM: To evaluate two interventions for assisting newly diagnosed hypertensive patients in the decision whether to start drug therapy for reducing blood pressure. DESIGN OF STUDY: Factorial randomised controlled trial. SETTING: Twenty-one general practices in south-west England, UK. METHOD: Adults aged 32 to 80 years with newly diagnosed hypertension were randomised to receive either: (a) computerised utility assessment interview with individualized risk assessment and decision analysis; or (b) information video and leaflet about high blood pressure; or (c) both interventions; or (d) neither intervention. Outcome measures were decisional conflict, knowledge, state anxiety, intentions regarding starting treatment, and actual treatment decision. RESULTS: Of 217 patients randomised, 212 (98%) were analysed at the primary follow-up (mean age = 59 years, 49% female). Decision analysis patients had lower decisional conflict than those who did not receive this intervention (27.6 versus 38.9, 95% confidence interval [CI] for adjusted difference = -13.0 to -5.8, P < 0.001), greater knowledge about hypertension (73% versus 67%, adjusted 95% CI = 2% to 9%, P = 0.003) and no evidence of increased state anxiety (34.8 versus 36.8, adjusted 95% CI = -5.6 to 0.1, P = 0.055). Video/leaflet patients had lower decisional conflict than corresponding controls (30.3 versus 36.8, adjusted 95% CI = -7.4 to -0.6, P = 0.021), greater knowledge (75% versus 65%, adjusted 95% CI = 6% to 13%, P < 0.001) and no evidence of increased state anxiety (35.7 versus 36.1, adjusted 95% CI = -3.9 to 1.7, P = 0.46). There were no differences between either of the interventions and their respective controls in the proportion of patients prescribed antihypertensive medication (67%). CONCLUSIONS: This trial demonstrates that, among patients facing a real treatment

  12. Rethinking autonomy: decision making between patient and surgeon in advanced illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Hinshaw, Daniel B.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with advanced illness such as advanced stage cancer presenting with the need for possible surgical intervention can be some of the most challenging cases for a surgeon. Often there are multiple factors influencing the decisions made. For patients they are facing not just the effects of the disease on their body, but the stark realization that the disease will also limit their life. Not only are these factors a consideration when patients are making decisions, but also the desire to make the decision that is best for themselves, the autonomous decision. Also included in this process for the patient facing the possible need for an intervention is the surgeon. While patient autonomy remains one of the main principles within medicine, guiding treatment decisions, there is also the surgeon’s autonomy to be considered. Surgeons determine if there is even a possible intervention to be offered to patients, a decision making process that respects surgeons’ autonomous choices and includes elements of paternalism as surgeons utilize their expertise to make decisions. Included in the treatment decisions that are made and the care of the patient is the impact patients’ outcomes have on the surgeon, the inherent drive to be the best for the patient and desire for good outcomes for the patient. While both the patient’s and surgeon’s autonomy are a dynamic interface influencing decision making, the main goal for the patient facing a palliative procedure is that of making treatment decisions based on the concept of shared decision making, always giving primary consideration to the patient’s goals and values. Lastly, regardless of the decision made, it is the responsibility of surgeons to their patients to be a source of support through this challenging time. PMID:27004224

  13. The Role of Emotion in Decision-Making: Evidence from Neurological Patients with Orbitofrontal Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bechara, Antoine

    2004-01-01

    Most theories of choice assume that decisions derive from an assessment of the future outcomes of various options and alternatives through some type of cost-benefit analyses. The influence of emotions on decision-making is largely ignored. The studies of decision-making in neurological patients who can no longer process emotional information…

  14. [Tuberculosis in HIV-infected and AIDS patients].

    PubMed

    Rakhmanova, A G; Stepanova, E V; Romanova, E I; Evseeva, I D

    2003-01-01

    The course of the combined infection (tuberculosis plus HIV-infection) has been analysed in 41 patients. Of them, 24 patients developed tuberculosis in the presence of HIV-infection (group 1) and 17 were infected with HIV when they already had tuberculosis running up to 5 years. HIV-infection in group 1 ran a more severe course, the patients developed generalized, disseminated and complicated forms of tuberculosis with more frequent lethal outcome. 39 patients of both groups received specific antituberculous therapy including 1-5 drugs. A response to treatment was achieved in 23 (60%) patients (52 and 47.8% at early and late HIV-infection stages, respectively). Treatment failure was explained by development of severe opportunistic infections and secondary diseases (generalized cytomegalovirus infection, advanced candidiasis, toxoplasmosis), poor compliance, asocial life style, advanced tuberculosis process, late diagnosis, inadequate treatment. It is shown that in late HIV-infection positive results of treatment can be expected only in early detection of tuberculosis and active long-term treatment.

  15. A comparison of death anxiety and quality of life of patients with advanced cancer or AIDS and their family caregivers.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Deborah Witt; Norman, Robert; McSherry, Christina Beyer

    2010-01-01

    As an existential crisis, death anxiety may create suffering and impact quality of life. Based on a sample of 101 patients (63 patients with AIDS and 38 with advanced cancer) and 79 family caregivers (43 AIDS patients' caregivers and 36 cancer patients' caregivers), this study examined the death anxiety of patients with advanced cancer and patients with AIDS and that of their family caregivers and the relationship of death anxiety and quality of life. The results indicated that AIDS patients expressed greater death anxiety than cancer patients, but death anxiety was not different among family caregivers. Both AIDS and cancer patients experienced greater death anxiety than their caregivers. Greater death anxiety was associated with lower quality of life, particularly in the psychological domain for AIDS patients. There were significant correlations between the death anxiety subscales and the quality of life subscales for family caregivers, especially for AIDS caregivers. Interventions that lessen death anxiety may enhance quality of life as death approaches, particularly for AIDS patients and their family caregivers.

  16. How Can I Change My Patients' Treatment Decision Making by Becoming a Nurse Scientist?
.

    PubMed

    Gray, Tamryn F

    2017-04-01

    "What would you do?" I have heard this question numerous times throughout my nursing career by patients and families affected by cancer. As a pediatric blood and marrow transplantation nurse, I have often seen patients and their families wrestle with difficult treatment decisions. I have witnessed parents struggle between beginning end-of-life care for their child, or pursuing a risky but potentially life-saving clinical trial. With science driving advances in cancer treatments and patients playing more active roles in their care, uncertainty around cancer treatment decisions will only become more complicated. For me, being a good nurse meant helping these patients navigate this uncertainty. I was compelled to pursue research to understand the process patients experience as they make treatment decisions, who they choose to involve in decision making, and what role the unique nurse-
patient relationship could play in facilitating patient-centered decisions.
.

  17. Biochemical aids in the monitoring of patients with ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Meerwaldt, J H; Haije, W G; Cooper, E H; Pidcock, N B; v d Burg, M E

    1983-10-01

    A study of possible biochemical markers of tumor recurrence and progression was made in 93 patients with ovarian cancer followed longitudinally for up to 2 years during treatment by moderate or aggressive chemotherapy regimens. A panel of potential indicators was tested; the combination of serum albumin, C-reactive protein, alpha 1-acid glycoprotein, and phosphohexose isomerase levels was found to provide information that is useful as an adjunct to the clinical assessment of patients with advanced disease. However, the system could not detect a small tumor burden. The level of beta 2-microglobulin may have value in those patients whose tumor is associated with an increase of this analyte (77%), but it would appear to reflect a large tumor mass. Serum CEA, carcino-placental alkaline phosphatase, transferrin, and prealbumin were not found to be helpful.

  18. Interpretation of chest radiographs in AIDS patients: usefulness of CD4 lymphocyte counts.

    PubMed

    Shah, R M; Kaji, A V; Ostrum, B J; Friedman, A C

    1997-01-01

    Specific infections and neoplasms that are complications of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) occur within various CD4 lymphocyte count ranges. Knowledge of how these counts correlate with radiographic appearances of these entities can limit the differential diagnosis because certain conditions are uncommon above a specific count. In patients with CD4 lymphocyte counts above 200 cells/mm3 and radiographic findings of cavitary and noncavitary consolidation, bacterial pneumonia and Mycobacterium tuberculosis are the major diagnostic considerations. As the CD4 lymphocyte count falls, these infections are still common; however, cavitation is seen less frequently with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and unusual bacterial infections, including those caused by Rhodococcus equi and Nocardia asteroides, should be considered. In patients with counts below 200 cells/mm3, Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia is the most common infection, usually manifesting radiographically as a reticular interstitial pattern. At CD4 lymphocyte counts of 50-200 cells/mm3, disseminated fungal infection and Kaposi sarcoma become prevalent. In patients with advanced AIDS and counts below 50 cells/mm3, radiographic nodular or reticular patterns may indicate AIDS-related lymphoma and cytomegalovirus and Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare infections. When CD4 lymphocyte counts are applied to interpretation of chest radiographs in AIDS patients, the working differential diagnosis of a radiographic pattern can be tailored to the clinical situation of a given patient.

  19. [Characterization of Cryptococcus neoformans strains isolated from patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)].

    PubMed

    Garza-Garza, D; Buendía-Uribe, J L; Martínez-Cruz, E; Argüero-Licea, B

    1995-01-01

    In Mexico cryptococosis ranks third in frequency among the mycoses ocurring as complications in AIDS patients. Neither the prevalence of the two varieties of C. neoformans in these patients nor the morphological and physiological changes suffered by these strains in AIDS patients are known. A total of 60 isolates were obtained from patients with AIDS from the Hospital de Infectología, Centro Médico "La Raza" IMSS. The identity of each isolate was established by: growth at 37 degrees C, colony and microscopic characteristics, urease and phenoloxidase activity, carbon sources assimilation. The canavanine glycine-bromothymol blue agar was used to distinguish C. neoformans var. neoformans and C. neoformans var. gattii. Pathogenicity in mice was also tested. Fifty one isolates of C. neoformans var. neoformans and nine of C. neoformans var. gattii were identified. All strains grew well at 37 degrees C, urease and phenoloxidase were positive, the morphology and the auxanographic profile were variable. C. neoformans var. neoformans was more virulent in mouse than C. neoformans var. gattii. This study has confirmed the presence of the two varieties of C. neoformans in Mexico with 85% prevalence of var. neoformans and 15% of var. gattii in AIDS patients. This frequency was higher than in reports from other countries.

  20. Immunologic studies in asymptomatic hemophilia patients. Relationship to acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Landay, A; Poon, M C; Abo, T; Stagno, S; Lurie, A; Cooper, M D

    1983-05-01

    Asymptomatic hemophilia patients receiving Factor VIII concentrate were found to have normal natural killer (NK) cells and B cells, and an inverted T helper/suppressor ratio due to an increase in cells of T suppressor phenotype. In contrast, a hemophilia patient with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) exhibited nonfunctional NK cells, low B cells, and an inverted T helper/suppressor ratio due to very low numbers of T helper cells. Hemophilia patients on cryoprecipitate therapy exhibited normal immune parameters. A high percentage of hemophilia patients on both treatments had antibody to hepatitis B virus. The isolated finding of elevated levels of T suppressor cells in hemophilia patients receiving Factor VIII concentrate has not been recognized as an early indicator of impending AIDS, and longitudinal studies will be required to determine its clinical significance.

  1. Implementation of shared decision making in anaesthesia and its influence on patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Flierler, W J; Nübling, M; Kasper, J; Heidegger, T

    2013-07-01

    There is a lack of data about the implementation of shared decision making in anaesthesia. To assess patients' preference to be involved in medical decision making and its influence on patient satisfaction, we studied 197 matched pairs (patients and anaesthetists) using two previously validated questionnaires. Before surgery, patients had to decide between general vs regional anaesthesia and, where appropriate, between conventional postoperative pain therapy vs catheter techniques. One hundred and eighty-six patients (94%) wished to be involved in shared decision making. One hundred and twenty-two patients (62%) experienced the exact amount of shared decision making that they wanted; 44 (22%) were slightly more involved and 20 (10%) slightly less involved in shared decision making than they desired. Preferences regarding involvement in shared decision making were similar between patients and anaesthetists with mean (SD) points of 54.1 (16.2) vs 56.4 (27.6) (p=0.244), respectively on a 0-100 scale; however, patients were found to have a stronger preference for a totally balanced shared decision-making process (65% vs 32%). Overall patient satisfaction was high: 88% were very satisfied and 12% satisfied with a mean (SD) value of 96.1 (10.6) on a 0-100 scale. Shared decision making is important for providing high levels of patient satisfaction.

  2. Patient Participation in Surgical Treatment Decision Making from the Patients' Perspective: Validation of an Instrument

    PubMed Central

    Heggland, Liv-Helen; Øgaard, Torvald; Mikkelsen, Aslaug; Hausken, Kjell

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the development of a new, brief, easy-to-administer self-reported instrument designed to assess patient participation in decision making in surgical treatment. We describe item generation, psychometric testing, and validity of the instrument. The final scale consisted of four factors: information dissemination (5 items), formulation of options (4 items), integration of information (4 items), and control (3 items). The analysis demonstrated a reasonable level of construct validity and reliability. The instrument applies to patients in surgical wards and can be used to identify the health services that are being provided and the areas that could strengthen patient participation. PMID:22830010

  3. [The strategy of emergency aid to patients with botulism].

    PubMed

    Urazbakhtina, Z A; Tuktarova, R R; Ivanov, V B; Sarmanaev, S Kh

    2014-01-01

    This clinical observation demonstrates difficulty of differential diagnostics of botulism in a patient suspected to have acute pancreatitis and admitted to a multifield medical institution. Difficulties of interpretation of urgent clinical and instrumental examination are discussed. The therapeutic strategy is described.

  4. Assessment of ventricular diastolic function in AIDS patients from Congo: a Doppler echocardiographic study

    PubMed Central

    Longo-Mbenza, B; Seghers, L; Vita, E; Tonduangu, K; Bayekula, M

    1998-01-01

    Objective—To investigate the prevalence of left ventricular dysfunction in African patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The hypothesis was that HIV infected patients with left ventricular dysfunction are asymptomatic.
Methods—M mode, cross sectional, and Doppler echocardiography were performed in 49 consecutive patients (30 HIV positive (HIV+) carriers and 19 AIDS patients). None of the patients or 58 controls had a medical history of cardiovascular abnormalities.
Results—Cardiac abnormalities were not suspected on physical, electrocardiographic, and radiological examination. Forty two of the HIV infected patients had left ventricular diastolic dysfunction; this was more pronounced in AIDS patients than in HIV+ carriers. Systolic function was normal in both stages of HIV infection. Left ventricular isovolumic relaxation time (mean (SD)) increased from 87.2 (12.4) ms in the carrier state to 103.9 (19.3) ms in AIDS (p < 0.05, Bonferoni correction), peak early filling velocity declined from 0.54 (0.1) to 0.44 (0.1) m/s (p < 0.05), and late velocity increased from 0.64 (0.1) to 0.69 (0.2) m/s. A restrictive filling pattern was explained by concentric hypertrophy in 23 HIV infected patients, and by systemic amyloidosis with left ventricular dilatation in 12 of 49 HIV infected patients.
Conclusions—Echocardiography is a useful technique for detecting left ventricular diastolic dysfunction in HIV infected patients with clinically unsuspected cardiac lesions. Systolic function was normal despite the presence of such cardiac abnormalities.

 Keywords: HIV infection;  AIDS;  diastolic dysfunction;  black Africans;  echocardiography PMID:9813567

  5. Cultural Competency of a Mobile, Customized Patient Education Tool for Improving Potential Kidney Transplant Recipients' Knowledge and Decision-Making.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, David A; Kynard-Amerson, Crystal S; Wojciechowski, David; Jacobs, Marie; Lentine, Krista L; Schnitzler, Mark; Peipert, John D; Waterman, Amy D

    2017-03-06

    Patients considering renal transplantation face an increasingly complex array of choices as a result of the revised kidney transplant allocation system. Decision aids have been shown to improve patient decision making through the provision of detailed, relevant, individualized clinical data. A mobile iOS based application (app) including animated patient education and individualized risk adjusted outcomes following kidney transplants with varying donor characteristics and DSA waiting times was piloted in 2 large US transplant programs with a diverse group of renal transplant candidates (N=81). The majority (86%) of patients felt that the app improved their knowledge and was culturally appropriate for their race/ethnicity (67%-85%). Patients scored significantly higher on transplant knowledge testing (9.1/20 to 13.8/20 p<0.001) after viewing the app, including patients with low health literacy (8.0 to 13.0 p<0.001). Overall knowledge of and interest in living and deceased donor kidney transplantation increased. This pilot project confirmed the benefit and cultural acceptability of this educational tool, and further refinement will explore how to better communicate the risks and benefits of non-standard donors. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. The Role of a Hospital Ethics Consultation Service in Decision-Making for Unrepresented Patients.

    PubMed

    Courtwright, Andrew M; Abrams, Joshua; Robinson, Ellen M

    2017-03-06

    Despite increased calls for hospital ethics committees to serve as default decision-makers about life-sustaining treatment (LST) for unrepresented patients who lack decision-making capacity or a surrogate decision-maker and whose wishes regarding medical care are not known, little is known about how committees currently function in these cases. This was a retrospective cohort study of all ethics committee consultations involving decision-making about LST for unrepresented patients at a large academic hospital from 2007 to 2013. There were 310 ethics committee consultations, twenty-five (8.1 per cent) of which involved unrepresented patients. In thirteen (52.0 per cent) cases, the ethics consultants evaluated a possible substitute decision-maker identified by social workers and/or case managers. In the remaining cases, the ethics consultants worked with the medical team to contact previous healthcare professionals to provide substituted judgement, found prior advance care planning documents, or identified the patient's best interest as the decision-making standard. In the majority of cases, the final decision was to limit or withdraw LST (72 per cent) or to change code status to Do Not Resuscitate/Do Not Intubate (12 per cent). Substitute decision-makers who had been evaluated through the ethics consultation process and who made the final decision alone were more likely to continue LST than cases in which physicians made the final decision (50 per cent vs 6.3 per cent, p = 0.04). In our centre, the primary role of ethics consultants in decision-making for unrepresented patients is to identify appropriate decision-making standards. In the absence of other data suggesting that ethics committees, as currently constituted, are ready to serve as substitute decision-makers for unrepresented patients, caution is necessary before designating these committees as default decision-makers.

  7. Disseminated toxoplasmosis presenting as sepsis in two AIDS patients.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Carlos José Dornas Gonçalves; Molina, Rodrigo Juliano; de Souza, Murilo Barcelos; Silva, Ana Cristina A; Micheletti, Adilha Rua; dos Reis, Marlene Antonia; de Paula Antunes Teixeira, Vicente; Silva-Vergara, Mario León

    2007-01-01

    This report describes two patients who presented acute disseminated and severe toxoplasmosis as the first opportunistic disease related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. At admission, clinical and laboratory findings were similar to sepsis or septic shock and a fast evolutive course to death occurred in both cases. At necropsy, an inflammatory reaction and presence of a great number of Toxoplasma gondii cysts and tachyzoites were observed in most organs examined.

  8. Incidental finding of a microsporidian parasite from an AIDS patient.

    PubMed Central

    McDougall, R J; Tandy, M W; Boreham, R E; Stenzel, D J; O'Donoghue, P J

    1993-01-01

    Light microscopic examination of feces from a human immunodeficiency virus-positive patient with chronic diarrhea, anorexia, and lethargy revealed the presence of numerous refractile bodies resembling microsporidian spores. They were subsequently identified as belonging to the genus Nosema on the basis of their ultrastructural characteristics. However, the microsporidia were enclosed within striated muscle cells, suggesting that they were probably ingested in food; thus, this represented an incidental finding rather than a true infection. Images PMID:8432833

  9. How can we best respect patient autonomy in breast cancer treatment decisions?

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Kathryn A; Kurian, Allison W

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Helping patients to maximize their autonomy in breast cancer decision-making is an important aspect of patient-centered care. Shared decision-making is a strategy that aims to maximize patient autonomy by integrating the values and preferences of the patient with the biomedical expertise of the physician. Application of this approach in breast cancer decision-making has not been uniform across cancer-specific interventions (e.g., surgery, chemotherapy), and in some circumstances may present challenges to evidence-based care delivery. Increasingly precise estimates of individual patients’ risk of recurrence and commensurate predicted benefit from certain therapies hold significant promise in helping patients exercise autonomous decision-making for their breast cancer care, yet will also likely complicate decision-making for certain subgroups of patients. PMID:25733982

  10. Assessing the impact of HAART on the incidence of defining and non-defining AIDS cancers among patients with HIV/AIDS: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cobucci, Ricardo Ney Oliveira; Lima, Paulo Henrique; de Souza, Pollyana Carvalho; Costa, Vanessa Viana; Cornetta, Maria da Conceição de Mesquita; Fernandes, José Veríssimo; Gonçalves, Ana Katherine

    2015-01-01

    After highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) became widespread, several studies demonstrated changes in the incidence of defining and non-defining AIDS cancers among HIV/AIDS patients. We conducted a systematic review of observational studies evaluating the incidence of malignancies before and after the introduction of HAART in people with HIV/AIDS. Eligible studies were searched up to December 2012 in the following databases: Pubmed, Embase, Scielo, Cancerlit and Google Scholar. In this study, we determined the cancer risk ratio by comparing the pre- and post-HAART eras. Twenty-one relevant articles were found, involving more than 600,000 people with HIV/AIDS and 10,891 new cases of cancers. The risk for the development of an AIDS-defining cancer decreased after the introduction of HAART: Kaposi's sarcoma (RR=0.30, 95% CI: 0.28-0.33) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (RR=0.52, 95% CI: 0.48-0.56), in contrast to invasive cervical cancer (RR=1.46, 95% CI: 1.09-1.94). Among the non-AIDS-defining cancers, the overall risk increased after the introduction of HAART (RR=2.00, 95% CI: 1.79-2.23). The incidence of AIDS-defining cancers decreased and the incidence of non-AIDS-defining cancers increased after the early use of HAART, probably due to better control of viral replication, increased immunity and increased survival provided by new drugs.

  11. Access to antiretroviral therapy among HIV/AIDS patients in Chiang Mai province, Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Himakalasa, Woraluck; Grisurapong, Siriwan; Phuangsaichai, Sasipen

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the access to antiretroviral treatment among human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) patients in Chiang Mai province, Thailand. Access to antiretroviral treatment is defined in terms of availability, affordability, and acceptability. The data for the study were collected during the period of April 1, 2012–May 31, 2012 from a sample of 380 HIV/AIDS patients in eight hospitals who had received antiretroviral treatment for more than 6 months at the time of data collection. The results of the study show that for most patients, the average traveling time to access health care was acceptable, but the nearly half day waiting time caused them to be absent from their work. In particular, it took longer for patients in the rural and lower income groups to access the treatment than the other groups. Their travel times and food costs relating to the treatment were found to be relatively high and therefore these patients had a higher tendency to borrow or seek financial assistance from their relatives. However, due to improvements in the access to treatment, most patients were satisfied with the services they received. The results imply that policy should be implemented to raise the potential of subdistrict hospitals where access to antiretroviral treatment is available, with participating HIV/AIDS patients acting as volunteers in providing services and other forms of health promotion to new patients. Privacy issues could be reduced if the antiretroviral treatment was isolated from other health services. Additionally, efforts to educate HIV/AIDS patients and society at large should be made. PMID:23986652

  12. Secondary mania due to AIDS and cryptococcal meningitis in a 78-year-old patient.

    PubMed

    Chou, Po-Han; Ouyang, Wen-Chen; Lan, Tsuo-Hung; Chan, Chin-Hong

    2016-03-01

    We report a 78-year-old man without past psychiatric history who experienced his first manic episode successfully treated with quetiapine and lorazepam, but was ultimately found to have AIDS and Cryptococcus neoformans meningitis. Our presented case highlights the importance of comprehensive differential diagnoses to rule out secondary causes of psychiatric symptoms presenting for the first time in elderly patients.

  13. Assessing Riverside Community College Nursing Student Attitudes toward Exposure to AIDS/HIV-Positive Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kross, Carolyn Sue

    In fall 1990, a study was conducted to assess the attitudes of nursing students who were attending Riverside Community College (RCC), in California, toward exposure to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome/Human Immunodeficiency Virus (AIDS/HIV) positive patients in a hospital setting. All students enrolled in RCC's associate degree nursing program…

  14. Both IgA subclasses are reduced in parotid saliva from patients with AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Müller, F; Frøland, S S; Hvatum, M; Radl, J; Brandtzaeg, P

    1991-01-01

    Secretory IgA (SIgA), the isotypes IgA1 and IgA2, and IgM were measured by ELISA in stimulated parotid saliva from patients with AIDS (n = 16), subjects with asymptomatic HIV infection (n = 28), and HIV-seronegative healthy controls (n = 19). SIgA was significantly reduced in the AIDS group (10.4 micrograms/ml) compared with the asymptomatic HIV-infected subjects (17.1 micrograms/ml) and the controls (23.0 micrograms/ml). This decrease comprised both IgA1 and IgA2 to a similar extent on a relative basis. The SIgA decrease in AIDS patients was in striking contrast to their serum IgA level, which was significantly increased (6.9 g/l) compared with the asymptomatic HIV-infected subjects (2.9 g/l) as well as the controls (2.8 g/l). Low parotid output of SIgA in patients with HIV infection was associated with low numbers of CD4+ lymphocytes in peripheral blood as well as the presence of oral infections. The parotid output of IgM was similar in all groups. A low level of SIgA in the external secretions of patients with AIDS may well contribute to their frequent mucosal infections of opportunistic microorganisms. PMID:1899629

  15. INTESTINAL AND PULMONARY INFECTION BY Cryptosporidium parvum IN TWO PATIENTS WITH HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    REINA, Fábio Tadeu Rodrigues; RIBEIRO, Camila Aparecida; de ARAÚJO, Ronalda Silva; MATTÉ, Maria Helena; CASTANHO, Roberto Esteves Pires; TANAKA, Ioshie Ibara; VIGGIANI, Ana Maria Ferreira Sornas; MARTINS, Luciamáre Perinetti Alves

    2016-01-01

    We describe two patients with HIV/AIDS who presented pulmonary and intestinal infection caused by Cryptosporidium parvum, with a fatal outcome. The lack of available description of changes in clinical signs and radiographic characteristics of this disease when it is located in the extra-intestinal region causes low prevalence of early diagnosis and a subsequent lack of treatment. PMID:27007564

  16. Predictors of Medication Adherence in an AIDS Clinical Trial: Patient and Clinician Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Lisa E.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents data from an AIDS clinical trial that evaluated 238 (60 percent nonwhite) patients infected with HIV and their clinician's perceptions of medication adherence and visit attendance in relationship to lifestyle, psychosocial, and health belief model (HBM) variables. Twelve sites collected data via a prospective, multisite…

  17. 21 CFR 801.420 - Hearing aid devices; professional and patient labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hearing aid devices; professional and patient... a waiver statement declining the medical evaluation for religious or personal beliefs that preclude... strongly discouraged. children with hearing loss In addition to seeing a physician for a medical...

  18. 21 CFR 801.420 - Hearing aid devices; professional and patient labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hearing aid devices; professional and patient... a waiver statement declining the medical evaluation for religious or personal beliefs that preclude... strongly discouraged. children with hearing loss In addition to seeing a physician for a medical...

  19. 21 CFR 801.420 - Hearing aid devices; professional and patient labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hearing aid devices; professional and patient... a waiver statement declining the medical evaluation for religious or personal beliefs that preclude... strongly discouraged. children with hearing loss In addition to seeing a physician for a medical...

  20. Anti-chlamydophila pneumoniae antibodies as associated factor for carotid atherosclerosis in patients with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Gaona-Flores, Verónica; García-Elorriaga, Guadalupe; Valerio-Minero, Maricela; González-Veyrand, Emma; Navarrete-Castro, Rogelio; Palacios-Jiménez, Norma; Del Rey-Pineda, Guillermo; González-Bonilla, César; Monasta, Lorenzo

    2008-05-01

    Atherosclerosis is a multifactor disease. Lately, infectious factors such as C. pneumoniae have been found to be involved. To determine whether the infection by C. pneumoniae is a risk factor for atherosclerosis in patients with AIDS. Case-control study on 43 patients with AIDS under HAART (16 cases and 27 controls). To document atherosclerosis, a carotid and transcranial Doppler ultrasound was performed. Anti-C pneumoniae antibodies were searched using a microimmunofluorescence test for IgM and IgG levels. To study the associations with risk of atherosclerosis, Odds Ratios were calculated for each IgG anti-C. pneumoniae antibody titre. A titre of 1:64 significantly increased the risk of atherosclerosis. These results suggest that hypertriglyceridemia and C. pneumoniae infection coexistence significantly increases the risk of atherosclerosis. The inverse geometric average of the antibodies titre against C. pneumoniae in individuals with atheromatous plaque fell to 64, two titres above the controls. This difference turned out to be statistically significant. Exposure to C. pneumoniae with antibodies (IgG) should be considered in any HIV diagnosed patient as a risk factor for atherosclerosis, having found that the inverse geometric averages of antibodies titre are significantly different comparing cases and controls, especially in patients with dyslipidemia, hypertriglyceridemia or in patients whose treatments could cause these conditions. In patients with concomitant hypertriglyceridemia, the association increases up to three times. It is advisable that AIDS patients take a serological test to determine exposure to C. pneumoniae, and to assess treatment options.

  1. [Organization of therapeutic aid to patients with hereditary neuromuscular diseases].

    PubMed

    Kalinin, V A; Temin, P A; Arkhipov, B A; Zavadenko, N N

    1989-01-01

    The paper summarizes experience gained for many years by the All-Union Research Methodological Center for Study of Hereditary Neuromuscular Diseases. The specialists of the Center render counselling and therapeutic assistance to patients afflicted with neuromuscular diseases. The counselling and diagnostic services are characterized by the fact that it is based on the activity of a large hospital intended for the treatment of various diseases. The problems which are being solved by the out- and inpatient services of the Center are considered in detail. The advantages of the setting up of the common in- and outpatient complex on the basis of the hospital intended for the treatment of various diseases are described.

  2. Long-Term Survival of AIDS Patients Treated with Only Traditional Chinese Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yifei; Jin, Fujun; Wang, Qiaoli

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Traditional Chinese herbal medicine (TCM) has been used in Chinese society for more than 5,000 years to treat diseases from inflammation to cancer. Here, we report the case of nine living AIDS patients in the age range of 51 to 67 who were treated with either a unique formula of TCM alone from 2001 to 2009 or the TCM from 2001 to 2006 and then switched to occasional antiretroviral therapy. Surprisingly, the viral loads of eight patients were at undetectable levels on June 28, 2016, while the remaining patient had a low viral load of 29 copies/ml. The CD4+ counts (170–592 cells/μl) and CD4+/CD8+ ratios (0.21–0.90) of the nine patients are excellent, contributing to their current good health. Thus, the case study suggests that the TCM has the potential to become a functional cure for HIV/AIDS. PMID:28067535

  3. Eye examination for early diagnosis of disseminated tuberculosis in patients with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Heiden, David; Saranchuk, Peter; Keenan, Jeremy D; Ford, Nathan; Lowinger, Alan; Yen, Michael; McCune, Joseph; Rao, Narsing A

    2016-04-01

    Choroidal tuberculosis is present in 5-20% of patients with disseminated tuberculosis, and point-of-care dilated binocular indirect ophthalmoscopy eye examination can provide immediate diagnosis. In geographical areas of high tuberculosis prevalence and in susceptible patients (CD4 counts less than 200 cells per μL) detection of choroidal granulomas should be accepted as evidence of disseminated tuberculosis. With training and proper support, eye screening can be done by HIV/AIDS clinicians, allowing early tuberculosis treatment. In regions with a high burden of tuberculosis, we recommend that eye screening be a standard part of the initial assessment of susceptible patients, including at a minimum all patients with HIV/AIDS with CD4 less than 100 cells per μL with or without eye symptoms, and with or without suspicion of disseminated tuberculosis.

  4. Archetypes as interface between patient data and a decision support system.

    PubMed

    Niès, Julie; Steichen, Olivier; Jaulent, Marie-Christine

    2007-10-11

    We propose an experiment to validate the hypothesis that archetypes enable better access and reliable use of patient data by a decision support system, mainly because they are designed to consistently link patient data with terminological systems and metadata.

  5. Gene Therapy and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With AIDS-Related Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-23

    AIDS-Related Burkitt Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Plasmablastic Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Primary Effusion Lymphoma; HIV Infection; AIDS Related Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  6. Citric acid treatment of post operative wound infections in HIV/AIDS patients.

    PubMed

    Nagoba, Basavraj; Patil Dawale, Chandrakala; Raju, Reena; Wadher, Bharat; Chidrawar, Shruti; Selkar, Sohan; Suryawanshi, Namdev

    2014-02-01

    The normal cellular immunity is required for normal wound healing. The HIV infection affects wound healing adversely. Wound infections in HIV/AIDS patients are difficult to manage because of compromised immunity. The result is delayed wound healing and increased susceptibility to wound infection. Here we report two cases of HIV positive patients who had developed the post operative wound gape, not responding to the conventional treatment, treated simply by local application of three percent citric acid ointment.

  7. Disseminated cryptococcosis and fluconazole resistant oral candidiasis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Kothavade, Rajendra J; Oberai, Chetan M; Valand, Arvind G; Panthaki, Mehroo H

    2010-10-28

    Disseminated cryptococcosis and recurrent oral candidiasis was presented in a-heterosexual AIDS patient. Candida tropicalis (C.tropicalis) was isolated from the oral pseudomembranous plaques and Cryptococcus neoformans (C. neoformans) was isolated from maculopapular lesions on body parts (face, hands and chest) and body fluids (urine, expectorated sputum, and cerebrospinal fluid). In vitro drug susceptibility testing on the yeast isolates demonstrated resistance to fluconazole acquired by C. tropicalis which was a suggestive possible root cause of recurrent oral candidiasis in this patient.

  8. Occupational Risk of HIV, HBV and HSV-2 Infections in Health Care Personnel Caring for AIDS Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhls, Thomas L.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Female health care workers with exposure to AIDS patients were studied. Two of the 246 workers showed evidence of opportunistic infections. This analysis confirms the low risk of occupationally acquired HIV infection when hospital infection control practices are employed around AIDS patients. (Author/VM)

  9. [Disseminated mycobacterial infections in patients with HIV/AIDS. Evaluation of blood cultures].

    PubMed

    Coitinho, C; Brandes, E; Pardiñas, M; Rivas, C

    2005-01-01

    One thousand-forty blood cultures corresponding to 451 Uruguayan patients with AIDS and clinic diagnosis of disseminated mycobacterial infection were evaluated between 1999 and 2003. Samples were processed in the National Reference Center for Mycobacteria (Montevideo, Uruguay), using the automated blood culture system for mycobacteria MB-BacT (BioMérieux). Forty-five positive samples were detected (4.3%) corresponding to 26 patients with AIDS (average 2.3 samples per patient). In 10/26 patients M. avium complex (MAC) was identified and in 13/26 the isolated germ was M. tuberculosis. The average time of incubation was of 12.4 days (range 6-19 days) for MAC and of 22.6 days (range 7-35 days) for M. tuberculosis. Blood culture has demonstrated to be the best sample for the bacteriological confirmation of the disseminated mycobacterial infections when at least 2 samples by patient are studied. The frequency of isolates of M. tuberculosis and MAC in AIDS patients is according with a moderate prevalence of tuberculosis in Uruguay.

  10. Scintigraphic pattern of pneumothorax complicating Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in patients with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Finestone, H; Goldfarb, C R; Ongseng, F; Wasserman, I; Garcia, H

    1990-08-01

    Spontaneous pneumothorax is a serious though infrequently reported pulmonary complication of AIDS. An unsuspected lung collapse was discovered via gallium scintigraphy for the study of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Neither the pneumonia nor the pneumothorax were apparent on the most recent chest roentgenogram. In evaluating gallium images during the work-up of AIDS patients with associated pulmonary pathology, the possible complication of lung collapse should be considered. If pneumothorax is suspected on gallium imaging, a chest roentgenogram in expiration must be obtained for prompt delineation of this serious, yet correctable, condition.

  11. Roles of nurse aides and family members in acute patient care in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Huey-Ming

    2004-01-01

    To improve the nursing care quality in acute care hospitals in Taiwan after the 2003 SARS epidemic, the Taipei City Government Department of Health has allocated about US dollars 6 million for nurse aides' salaries and costs for recruitment, training, and administration of this program. Yet, there have been no corresponding changes in payments for nursing services by the National Health Insurance system in Taiwan such as increasing nurse fees for inpatient services. This article examines the roles of nurse aides and family members in providing acute patient care in Taiwan and discusses issues of nursing care quality as related to nurse staffing in acute care hospitals.

  12. Scintigraphic pattern of pneumothorax complicating Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in patients with AIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Finestone, H.; Goldfarb, C.R.; Ongseng, F.; Wasserman, I.; Garcia, H. )

    1990-08-01

    Spontaneous pneumothorax is a serious though infrequently reported pulmonary complication of AIDS. An unsuspected lung collapse was discovered via gallium scintigraphy for the study of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Neither the pneumonia nor the pneumothorax were apparent on the most recent chest roentgenogram. In evaluating gallium images during the work-up of AIDS patients with associated pulmonary pathology, the possible complication of lung collapse should be considered. If pneumothorax is suspected on gallium imaging, a chest roentgenogram in expiration must be obtained for prompt delineation of this serious, yet correctable, condition.

  13. Cutaneous gallium uptake in patients with AIDS with mycobacterium avium-intracellulare septicemia

    SciTech Connect

    Allwright, S.J.; Chapman, P.R.; Antico, V.F.; Gruenewald, S.M.

    1988-07-01

    Gallium imaging is increasingly being used for the early detection of complications in patients with AIDS. A 26-year-old homosexual man who was HIV antibody positive underwent gallium imaging for investigation of possible Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Widespread cutaneous focal uptake was seen, which was subsequently shown to be due to mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI) septicemia. This case demonstrates the importance of whole body imaging rather than imaging target areas only, the utility of gallium imaging in aiding the early detection of clinically unsuspected disease, and shows a new pattern of gallium uptake in disseminated MAI infection.

  14. Multi-criteria clinical decision support: A primer on the use of multiple criteria decision making methods to promote evidence-based, patient-centered healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Dolan, James G.

    2010-01-01

    Current models of healthcare quality recommend that patient management decisions be evidence-based and patient-centered. Evidence-based decisions require a thorough understanding of current information regarding the natural history of disease and the anticipated outcomes of different management options. Patient-centered decisions incorporate patient preferences, values, and unique personal circumstances into the decision making process and actively involve both patients along with health care providers as much as possible. Fundamentally, therefore, evidence-based, patient-centered decisions are multi-dimensional and typically involve multiple decision makers. Advances in the decision sciences have led to the development of a number of multiple criteria decision making methods. These multi-criteria methods are designed to help people make better choices when faced with complex decisions involving several dimensions. They are especially helpful when there is a need to combine “hard data” with subjective preferences, to make trade-offs between desired outcomes, and to involve multiple decision makers. Evidence-based, patient-centered clinical decision making has all of these characteristics. This close match suggests that clinical decision support systems based on multi-criteria decision making techniques have the potential to enable patients and providers to carry out the tasks required to implement evidence-based, patient-centered care effectively and efficiently in clinical settings. The goal of this paper is to give readers a general introduction to the range of multi-criteria methods available and show how they could be used to support clinical decision-making. Methods discussed include the balance sheet, the even swap method, ordinal ranking methods, direct weighting methods, multi-attribute decision analysis, and the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) PMID:21394218

  15. Application of stereotactic biopsy for diagnosing intracranial lesions in patients with AIDS in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ji-bo; Fu, Kai; Gong, Rui; Liu, Xue-meng; Chen, Li-dao; Zhang, Yong-xi; Yang, Gui-fang; Zhang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: The aim of the study was to evaluate stereotactic biopsy for diagnosing intracranial lesions in patients with AIDS. Patient concerns: Seven AIDS patients with an intracranial lesion who underwent stereotactic biopsy were included in this retrospective study (4 males and 3 females, 15 to 49 years old). The patients’ disease history ranged from 1 month to 1 year. The samples were examined by hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining and immunohistochemical examination. Diagnoses, interventions and outcomes: All patients were successfully sampled, and the histological results showed inflammation in 4 cases, toxoplasma gondii infection in 1 case, astrocytoma in 1 case, and abscess in 1 case. The clinical diagnosis included toxoplasma encephalitis (TE) in 2 cases, cryptococcus encephalitis in 2 cases, cytomegalovirus (CMV) encephalitis in 2 case, tubercular abscess in 1 case, astrocytoma in 1 case, and co-infection of TE with Cryptococcus infection in 1 patient. The clinical diagnosis was made according to the plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) laboratory testing, the imaging data and the histological findings. The diagnostic yield was 100%, and the post-operation morbidity was 14.3% (1/7) with an asymptomatic haemorrhage and seizure in 1 case. There was no operation-related mortality. Patients were followed up for 6 months to 6 years; 1 case fully recovered, 4 cases significantly improved in symptoms, and 2 died. Lessons: Stereotactic biopsy is a safe and effective way of diagnosing intracranial lesions in patient with AIDS. It is helpful for the differential diagnosis and for choosing a suitable therapy. Due to the broad spectrum of nervous system abnormalities in AIDS, histological findings are very valuable. However, histology is not a unique tool for making a definite diagnosis, whereas the combination of molecular pathology and stereotactic biopsy should play a more important role in the future. PMID:27930545

  16. STD Clinic Patients' Awareness of Non-AIDS Complications of HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Castro, José Guillermo; Granovsky, Inna; Jones, Deborah; Weiss, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    Participants were recruited from a sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic in Florida and were assessed regarding the knowledge and awareness of non-AIDS conditions associated with HIV infection. Questionnaires were administered before and after a brief information session on non-AIDS conditions associated with HIV infection. Participants included men (n = 46) and women (n = 51). Prior to the information session, at baseline, only 34% of the participants were worried about HIV infection. Most participants (82%) agreed that HIV could be treated with antiretroviral therapy (ART), while only 38% were aware that HIV-associated conditions cannot be easily treated with ART. After the information session, almost all participants reported they were concerned regarding the risk of HIV infection. High-risk patients may have limited knowledge about the consequences of HIV infection beyond the traditional AIDS-associated conditions. Increased awareness of these less known consequences of HIV infection may decrease the potential for complacency regarding acquiring HIV infection. PMID:25331221

  17. Antibody to hepatitis E virus in HIV-infected individuals and AIDS patients.

    PubMed

    Balayan, M S; Fedorova, O E; Mikhailov, M I; Rytick, P G; Eremin, V F; Danilova, T I; Shevelev, B I; Gorbacheva, E C; Pankova, G Y

    1997-07-01

    Antibody to hepatitis E virus of IgG class (anti-HEV IgG) is regularly detected in industrialized countries, where HEV is non-endemic, at levels not exceeding 2-3%; seropositive individuals are often found in certain groups of patients and professionals exposed to an increased risk of blood-borne infections. The present study was aimed at the identification of anti-HEV IgG in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, including acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), living in Russia and Belarus, an area of low anti-HEV prevalence with a moderate spread of HIV infection and AIDS. In Russia, 13 out of 117 HIV-infected patients (11.1%) were found to be anti-HEV seropositive. This differed significantly from the frequency observed in the normal population (1.7%) but not from the frequency in a matching control, high-risk group consisting of male prisoners (8.0%). No difference in the frequency of anti-HEV IgG seropositivity was found between groups of HIV-infected men subdivided by sexual orientation. The rate of anti-HEV seropositivity increased with the progression of HIV infection, reaching 43.3% in AIDS patients and 38.1% in those who died from AIDS. In Belarus, anti-HEV IgG seropositivity was not found among 20 HIV-infected subjects nor among individuals from the control risk group, which consisted of 25 intravenous drug users. In conclusion, HEV infection may have common transmission mechanisms (risk factors) with HIV infection rather than represent an additional opportunistic infection in AIDS.

  18. The influence of gender and of AIDS on the immunity of autopsied patients' esophagus.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Laura Penna; de Melo E Silva, Ana Teresa; Gomes, Nayara Cândida; Faria, Humberto Aparecido; Silva, Renata Beatriz; Olegário, Janaínna Grazielle Pacheco; Corrêa, Rosana Rosa Miranda; de Paula Antunes Teixeira, Vicente; Cavellani, Camila Lourencini

    2011-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that males who have AIDS are more frequently affected by infectious diseases than females. The esophagus is the organ in the digestive tube that is more commonly affected by opportunistic infections during the syndrome. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of AIDS and of gender on local immunity of the esophageal epithelium. Fragments of the esophagus from 29 autopsied women and 37 autopsied men were collected at a university hospital from 1980 to 2009 and were divided in groups with and without AIDS. The IgA-, IgG-, and IgM-positive cells and Langerhans cells (LCs) were immunostained, respectively, with anti-IgA, anti-IgG, anti-IgM, and anti-S100. The software Image J was used to measure the esophageal epithelium and to count the epithelium cellular layers. Patients with AIDS, apart from gender, showed an increase in IgA-, IgG-, and IgM-positive cells and a reduction of Langerhans cells, in thickness and in number of cellular layers in the esophageal epithelium. However, among individuals with AIDS, men presented lower secretory expression of IgA-, IgG-, and IgM-positive cells than women and more intense reduction of LCs. Women have naturally presented better local esophageal immunity than men. Although AIDS possibly causes immunological and morphological alterations in the esophageal epithelium in both genders, women have better esophageal immunity, which may explain a greater frequency of hospital admissions due to infection of men with AIDS when compared with women.

  19. BK virus associated meningoencephalitis in an AIDS patient treated with HAART

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, José E; Fink, Maria C; Cedeno-Laurent, Filiberto; Delbue, Serena; Ferrante, Pasquale; Dauar, Rafi F; Filho, Francisco Bonasser; Nogueira, Roberta Schiavon; Calore, Eduardo E; Pannuti, Claudio S; Trujillo, J Roberto; de Oliveira, Augusto C Penalva

    2007-01-01

    A severely immune-suppressed AIDS patient was suspected of suffering from BK virus (BKV) meningoencephalitis, after being studied for common causes of neurological complications of co-infectious origin. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequence analysis of cerebrospinal fluid and brain samples, confirmed the presence of BKV. His clinical condition improved along with the regression of brain lesions, after modifications on his antiretroviral regime. Five months after discharge, the patient was readmitted because of frequent headaches, and a marked inflammatory reaction was evidenced by a new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The symptoms paralleled a rising CD4+ lymphocyte count, and immune reconstitution syndrome was suspected. This is the first non-postmortem report of BKV meningoencephalitis in an AIDS patient, showing clinical and radiographic improvement solely under HAART. PMID:17559655

  20. Detection of HTLV-III RNA in lungs of patients with AIDS and pulmonary involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Chayt, K.J.; Harper, M.E.; Marselle, L.M.; Lewin, E.B.; Rose, R.M.; Oleske, J.M.; Epstein, L.G.; Wong-Staal, F.; Gallo, R.C.

    1986-11-07

    A majority of pediatric patients and rare adult patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) develop a chronic respiratory disorder referred to as lymphocytic interstitial pneumonitis (LIP). Efforts to identify an infectious agent responsible for this process so far have failed. In this study, frozen sections of lungs from patients with AIDS and pulmonary disease were tested by in situ molecular hybridization for the presence of cells infected with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III (HTLV-III) and expressing viral RNA. In the case of an infant with LIP, a relatively high frequency (0.1%) of cells in the lung were found to be positive for HTLV-III RNA. This number is the lower limit of total cells infected since the in situ hybridization technique as applied in this study depends on expression of HTLV-III genes, and previous evidence indicates that a proportion of cells infected with HTLV-III may not express viral RNA. Moreover, this degree of infection of the lung is likely limited to LIP, since in ten patients with AIDS and pulmonary diseases other than LIP, only 0% to 0.002% of cells in lung were positive for viral RNA expression. Thus, HTLV-III may play a direct causal role in the development of LIP in infected patients, implicating its involvement in yet another of the diverse clinical diseases associated with this virus.

  1. Hypertrophic herpes simplex simulating anal neoplasia in AIDS patients: report of five cases.

    PubMed

    Nadal, Sidney R; Calore, Edenilson E; Manzione, Carmen R; Horta, Sergio C; Ferreira, Aurea F; Almeida, Lis V

    2005-12-01

    Five patients (4 males; mean age, 46.4 years) with painful verrucous perianal lesions caused by herpes simplex virus are described. All patients had had AIDS for a long time and were using highly active antiretroviral therapy. CD4+ counts ranged from 73 to 370/mm3. All lesions were submitted to resection under subdural anesthesia. Histologic examinations revealed epithelial hyperplasia and dense inflammatory process, composed mainly of lymphocytes and plasma cells, extended just to the hypodermis. Immunohistochemistry was positive for herpes simplex virus Type 2 in four patients and for herpes simplex virus Type 1 in one patient, and did not detect human papillomavirus antigens. Three patients had recurrences after 3, 10, and 12 months. Resection was performed on two patients; one had a new recurrence after three months. Oral acyclovir eliminated the lesion in the third patient. The analysis of our patients suggests that herpes simplex virus, Types 1 and 2, may cause verrucous lesions simulating neoplasia in patients with AIDS using antiretroviral therapy.

  2. Patients' participation in decision-making in the medical field--'projectification' of patients in a neoliberal framed healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Glasdam, Stinne; Oeye, Christine; Thrysoee, Lars

    2015-10-01

    This article focuses on patients' participation in decision-making in meetings with healthcare professionals in a healthcare system, based on neoliberal regulations and ideas. Drawing on two constructed empirical cases, primarily from the perspective of patients, this article analyses and discusses the clinical practice around decision-making meetings within a Foucauldian perspective. Patients' participation in decision-making can be seen as an offshoot of respect for patient autonomy. A treatment must be chosen, when patients consult physicians. From the perspective of patients, there is a tendency for healthcare professionals to supply the patients with the information that they think are necessary for them to make their own decision. But patients do not always want to be a 'customer' in the healthcare system; they want to be a patient, consulting an expert for help and advice, which creates resistance to some parts of the decision-making process. Both professionals and patients are subject to the structural frame of the medical field, formed of both neoliberal framework and medical logic. The decision-making competence in relation to the choice of treatment is placed away from the professionals and seen as belonging to the patient. A 'projectification' of the patient occurs, whereby the patient becomes responsible for his/her choices in treatment and care and the professionals support him/her with knowledge, preferences, and alternative views, out of which he/she must make his/her own choices, and the responsibility for those choices now and in the future. At the same time, there is a tendency towards de-professionalization. In that light, participation of patients in decision-making can be regarded as a tacit governmentality strategy that shapes the location of responsibility between individual and society, and independent patients and healthcare professionals, despite the basically desirable, appropriate, and necessary idea of involving patients in their own

  3. Can a patient designate his doctor as his proxy decision maker?

    PubMed

    Black, Philip G; Derse, Arthur R; Derrington, Sabrina; Lantos, John D

    2013-05-01

    Most lawyers and bioethicists recommend that patients enact a durable power of attorney for health care designating somebody as their proxy decision maker should they become unable to make decisions. Most people choose family members as their agent. But what if a patient wants his or her doctor to be his or her proxy decision maker? Can the doctor be both physician and surrogate decision maker? Or should those roles necessarily be kept separate? We present a case in which those issues arose, and sought comments from Sabrina Derrington, a pediatric palliative care physician; Arthur Derse, an emergency department physician and lawyer; and Phil Black, a pulmonologist.

  4. A Case on Streptococcal Pneumonia Associated with Leptomeningitis, Osteomyelitis and Epidural Abscess in a Patient with AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jae Woong; Kim, Joo Seok; Ryu, Il Hwan; Choi, Ji Wook; Kim, Min Gyu; Na, Young Min; Yun, Hyeon Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) are at higher risks of bacterial pneumonia than the general population, and the pathogen is the most commonly involved Streptococcus pneumoniae. We hereby report a case of pneumococcal pneumonia associated with leptomeningitis, osteomyelitis and epidural abscess in a patient with AIDS. He is being successfully treated with ampicillin/sulbactam and clindamycin. And because the pneumococcal infection is usually associated with morbidity and mortality rates in the setting of AIDS, we should consider for pneumococcal vaccinations among the AIDS populations. PMID:24624217

  5. Framing of information: its influence upon decisions of doctors and patients.

    PubMed

    Marteau, T M

    1989-03-01

    Prospect theory postulates that decisions are influenced not only by probability and value of possible outcomes, but also by the manner in which these probabilities are presented. Variations in the presentation of the same information, in several areas of care, are considered to determine their influence upon health decisions of both doctors and patients. Three health-related predicaments involving varying levels of risk are presented either in a positive or a negative frame and were given to 74 medical students who stated whether they would advise a patient or be prepared themselves to undergo one of three medical procedures. The influence of framing upon these decisions was evident both when subjects responded as patients and as doctors, but its influence was bounded by the level of risk and the type of health decision. These findings raise questions concerning how probabilistic information should be presented to both patients and doctors to counteract the effect of framing upon their decisions.

  6. Not a Humbug: the evolution of patient-centred medical decision-making.

    PubMed

    Trump, Benjamin D; Linkov, Faina; Edwards, Robert P; Linkov, Igor

    2015-12-01

    This 'Christmas Issue'-type paper uses the framework of 'A Christmas Carol' to tell about the evolution of decision-making in evidence-based medicine (EBM). The Ghost of the Past represents paternalistic medicine, the Ghost of the Present symbolises EBM, while the Ghost of the Future serves as a patient-centred system where research data and tools of decision science are jointly used to make optimal medical decisions for individual patients. We argue that this shift towards a patient-centred approach to EBM and medical care is the next step in the evolution of medical decision-making, which would help to empower patients with the capability to make educated decisions throughout the course of their medical treatment.

  7. The Evolution of Patient Decision-Making Regarding Medical Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, Alexandra L.; Coleska, Adriana; Burns, Patricia B.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2016-01-01

    Background The migration of health care toward a consumer driven system favors increased patient participation during the treatment decision-making process. Patient involvement in treatment decision discussions has been linked to increased treatment adherence and patient satisfaction. Previous studies have quantified decision-making styles of patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA); however, none have considered the evolution in patient involvement after living with RA for decades. Objective We conducted a qualitative study to determine the decision-making model used by long-term RA patients, and to describe the changes in their involvement over time. Methods Twenty participants were recruited from the ongoing Silicone Arthroplasty in Rheumatoid Arthritis (SARA) study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and data were analyzed using Grounded Theory methodology. Results Nineteen out of 20 participants recalled using the paternalistic decision-making model immediately following their diagnosis. Fourteen of the 19 interviewees evolved to shared decision-making (SDM). Participants attributed the change in involvement to the development of a trusting relationship with their physician as well as becoming educated about the disease. Conclusion When initially diagnosed with RA, patients may let their physician decide on the best treatment course. However, over time patients may evolve to exercise a more collaborative role. Physicians should understand that even within SDM, each patient can demonstrate a varied amount of autonomy. It is up to the physician to have a discussion with each patient to determine his or her desired level of involvement. PMID:26315611

  8. Decision-Making of Older Patients in Context of the Doctor-Patient Relationship: A Typology Ranging from “Self-Determined” to “Doctor-Trusting” Patients

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Isabel; Diederichs-Egidi, Heike; Hummers-Pradier, Eva; Dierks, Marie-Luise; Junius-Walker, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    Background. This qualitative study aims to gain insight into the perceptions and experiences of older patients with regard to sharing health care decisions with their general practitioners. Patients and Methods. Thirty-four general practice patients (≥70 years) were asked about their preferences and experiences concerning shared decision making with their doctors using qualitative semistructured interviews. All interviews were analysed according to principles of content analysis. The resulting categories were then arranged into a classification grid to develop a typology of preferences for participating in decision-making processes. Results. Older patients generally preferred to make decisions concerning everyday life rather than medical decisions, which they preferred to leave to their doctors. We characterised eight different patient types based on four interdependent positions (self-determination, adherence, information seeking, and trust). Experiences of a good doctor-patient relationship were associated with trust, reliance on the doctor for information and decision making, and adherence. Conclusion. Owing to the varied patient decision-making types, it is not easy for doctors to anticipate the desired level of patient involvement. However, the decision matter and the self-determination of patients provide good starting points in preparing the ground for shared decision making. A good relationship with the doctor facilitates satisfying decision-making experiences. PMID:23691317

  9. Decision-making of older patients in context of the doctor-patient relationship: a typology ranging from "self-determined" to "doctor-trusting" patients.

    PubMed

    Wrede-Sach, Jennifer; Voigt, Isabel; Diederichs-Egidi, Heike; Hummers-Pradier, Eva; Dierks, Marie-Luise; Junius-Walker, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    Background. This qualitative study aims to gain insight into the perceptions and experiences of older patients with regard to sharing health care decisions with their general practitioners. Patients and Methods. Thirty-four general practice patients (≥70 years) were asked about their preferences and experiences concerning shared decision making with their doctors using qualitative semistructured interviews. All interviews were analysed according to principles of content analysis. The resulting categories were then arranged into a classification grid to develop a typology of preferences for participating in decision-making processes. Results. Older patients generally preferred to make decisions concerning everyday life rather than medical decisions, which they preferred to leave to their doctors. We characterised eight different patient types based on four interdependent positions (self-determination, adherence, information seeking, and trust). Experiences of a good doctor-patient relationship were associated with trust, reliance on the doctor for information and decision making, and adherence. Conclusion. Owing to the varied patient decision-making types, it is not easy for doctors to anticipate the desired level of patient involvement. However, the decision matter and the self-determination of patients provide good starting points in preparing the ground for shared decision making. A good relationship with the doctor facilitates satisfying decision-making experiences.

  10. Patient Preferences and Surrogate Decision Making in Neuroscience Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xuemei; Robinson, Jennifer; Muehlschlegel, Susanne; White, Douglas B.; Holloway, Robert G.; Sheth, Kevin N.; Fraenkel, Liana; Hwang, David Y.

    2016-01-01

    In the neuroscience intensive care unit (NICU), most patients lack the capacity to make their own preferences known. This fact leads to situations where surrogate decision makers must fill the role of the patient in terms of making preference-based treatment decisions, oftentimes in challenging situations where prognosis is uncertain. The neurointensivist has a large responsibility and role to play in this shared decision making process. This review covers how NICU patient preferences are determined through existing advance care documentation or surrogate decision makers and how the optimum roles of the physician and surrogate decision maker are addressed. We outline the process of reaching a shared decision between family and care team and describe a practice for conducting optimum family meetings based on studies of ICU families in crisis. We review challenges in the decision making process between surrogate decision makers and medical teams in neurocritical care settings, as well as methods to ameliorate conflicts. Ultimately, the goal of shared decision making is to increase knowledge amongst surrogates and care providers, decrease decisional conflict, promote realistic expectations and preference-centered treatment strategies, and lift the emotional burden on families of neurocritical care patients. PMID:25990137

  11. Detection of the microsporidian parasite Enterocytozoon bieneusi in specimens from patients with AIDS by PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Velásquez, J N; Carnevale, S; Guarnera, E A; Labbé, J H; Chertcoff, A; Cabrera, M G; Rodríguez, M I

    1996-01-01

    Microsporidia are protozoa parasites responsible for significant gastrointestinal disease in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus. We evaluated a PCR assay of stool samples, duodenal aspirates, and biopsy specimens from patients with Enterocytozoon bieneusi infection. A 210-bp DNA fragment of the unique rRNA intergenic spacer could be amplified from all samples infected with E. bieneusi, but no amplification was seen by using DNA purified from samples with Septata intestinalis or other parasites and from negative control human cells. These results suggest that the PCR in stool samples may be a useful tool for the diagnosis of intestinal microsporidiosis in patients with AIDS. PMID:8940480

  12. Patient preferences versus physicians' judgement: does it make a difference in healthcare decision making?

    PubMed

    Mühlbacher, Axel C; Juhnke, Christin

    2013-06-01

    Clinicians and public health experts make evidence-based decisions for individual patients, patient groups and even whole populations. In addition to the principles of internal and external validity (evidence), patient preferences must also influence decision making. Great Britain, Australia and Germany are currently discussing methods and procedures for valuing patient preferences in regulatory (authorization and pricing) and in health policy decision making. However, many questions remain on how to best balance patient and public preferences with physicians' judgement in healthcare and health policy decision making. For example, how to define evaluation criteria regarding the perceived value from a patient's perspective? How do physicians' fact-based opinions also reflect patients' preferences based on personal values? Can empirically grounded theories explain differences between patients and experts-and, if so, how? This article aims to identify and compare studies that used different preference elicitation methods and to highlight differences between patient and physician preferences. Therefore, studies comparing patient preferences and physician judgements were analysed in a review. This review shows a limited amount of literature analysing and comparing patient and physician preferences for healthcare interventions and outcomes. Moreover, it shows that methodology used to compare preferences is diverse. A total of 46 studies used the following methods-discrete-choice experiments, conjoint analyses, standard gamble, time trade-offs and paired comparisons-to compare patient preferences with doctor judgements. All studies were published between 1985 and 2011. Most studies reveal a disparity between the preferences of actual patients and those of physicians. For most conditions, physicians underestimated the impact of intervention characteristics on patients' decision making. Differentiated perceptions may reflect ineffective communication between the provider

  13. Effectiveness of Two Topical Anaesthetic Agents used along with Audio Visual Aids in Paediatric Dental Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dhawan, Jayata; Kumar, Dipanshu; Anand, Ashish; Tangri, Karan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Topical anaesthetic agents enable pain free intraoral procedures, symptomatic pain relief for toothache, superficial mucosal lesions and pain related to post extraction time. Most common anxiety provoking and fearful experience for children in dental operatory is administration of local anaesthesia because on seeing the needle, children usually become uncooperative. One of recent trend of behaviour management technique is using non-aversive techniques out of which audiovisual distraction has emerged as a very successful technique for managing children in dental settings. Audio visual distraction could decrease the procedure related anxiety of patients undergoing dental treatment and can be very relaxing for highly anxious patients. Aim The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of topical anaesthetics EMLA (Eutectic Mixture of Local Anaesthetics) cream and benzocaine (20%) gel in reducing the pain during the needle insertion with and without the use of Audio Visual (AV) aids. Materials and Methods The study was conducted on 120 children, the age range of 3-14 years attending the outpatient department for their treatment. EMLA and benzocaine gel (20%) were assessed for their effectiveness in reducing the pain on needle insertion during local anaesthesia administration. Based on the inclusion and the exclusion criteria, children requiring local anaesthesia for the dental treatment were randomly divided into four equal groups of 30 children based upon whether AV aids were used or not. AV aids were given using Sony Vaio laptop with earphones with nursery rhymes and cartoon movies DVD. The pain assessment was done by using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) scale and measurement of the physiological responses of pulse rate and oxygen saturation were done by pulse oximeter. Results There was a statistically significant difference in the mean pain score, pulse rate and mean oxygen saturation rate when it was compared between the four

  14. Patient-Focused Benefit-Risk Analysis to Inform Regulatory Decisions: The European Union Perspective.

    PubMed

    Mühlbacher, Axel C; Juhnke, Christin; Beyer, Andrea R; Garner, Sarah

    Regulatory decisions are often based on multiple clinical end points, but the perspectives used to judge the relative importance of those end points are predominantly those of expert decision makers rather than of the patient. However, there is a growing awareness that active patient and public participation can improve decision making, increase acceptance of decisions, and improve adherence to treatments. The assessment of risk versus benefit requires not only information on clinical outcomes but also value judgments about which outcomes are important and whether the potential benefits outweigh the harms. There are a number of mechanisms for capturing the input of patients, and regulatory bodies within the European Union are participating in several initiatives. These can include patients directly participating in the regulatory decision-making process or using information derived from patients in empirical studies as part of the evidence considered. One promising method that is being explored is the elicitation of "patient preferences." Preferences, in this context, refer to the individual's evaluation of health outcomes and can be understood as statements regarding the relative desirability of a range of treatment options, treatment characteristics, and health states. Several methods for preference measurement have been proposed, and pilot studies have been undertaken to use patient preference information in regulatory decision making. This article describes how preferences are currently being considered in the benefit-risk assessment context, and shows how different methods of preference elicitation are used to support decision making within the European context.

  15. The Havemann-Taylor Fast Radiative Transfer Code (HT-FRTC) and its application within Tactical Decision Aids (TDAs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thelen, Jean-Claude; Havemann, Stephan; Wong, Gerald

    2015-10-01

    The Havemann-Taylor Fast Radiative Transfer Code (HT-FRTC) is a core component of the Met Office NEON Tactical Decision Aid (TDA). Within NEON, the HT-FRTC has for a number of years been used to predict the infrared apparent thermal contrasts between different surface types as observed by an airborne sensor. To achieve this, the HT-FRTC is supplied with the inherent temperatures and spectral properties of these surfaces (i.e. ground target(s) and backgrounds). A key strength of the HT-FRTC is its ability to take into account the detailed properties of the atmosphere, which in the context of NEON tend to be provided by a Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) forecast model. While water vapour and ozone are generally the most important gases, additional trace gases are now being incorporated into the HT-FRTC. The HT-FRTC also includes an exact treatment of atmospheric scattering based on spherical harmonics. This allows for the treatment of several different aerosol species and of liquid and ice clouds. Recent developments can even account for rain and falling snow. The HT-FRTC works in Principal Component (PC) space and is trained on a wide variety of atmospheric and surface conditions, which significantly reduces the computational requirements regarding memory and processing time. One clear-sky simulation takes approximately one millisecond at the time of writing. Recent developments allow the training of HT-FRTC to be both completely generalised and sensor independent. This is significant as the user of the code can add new sensors and new surfaces/targets by supplying extra files which contain their (possibly classified) spectral properties. The HT-FRTC has been extended to cover the spectral range of Photopic and NVG sensors. One aim here is to give guidance on the expected, directionally resolved sky brightness, especially at night, again taking the actual or forecast atmospheric conditions into account. Recent developments include light level predictions during

  16. Multidisciplinary decisions in breast cancer: does the patient receive what the team has recommended?

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, S; Foreman, J; Wallis, M G; Caldas, C; Britton, P

    2013-01-01

    Background: A multidisciplinary team (MDT) approach to breast cancer management is the gold standard. The aim is to evaluate MDT decision making in a modern breast unit. Methods: All referrals to the breast MDT where breast cancer was diagnosed from 1 July 2009 to 30 June 2011 were included. Multidisciplinary team decisions were compared with subsequent patient management and classified as concordant or discordant. Results: Over the study period, there were 3230 MDT decisions relating to 705 patients. Overall, 91.5% (2956 out of 3230) of decisions were concordant, 4.5% (146 out of 3230), were discordant and 4% (128 out of 3230) had no MDT decision. Of 146 discordant decisions, 26 (17.8%) were considered ‘unjustifiable' as there was no additional information available after the MDT to account for the change in management. The remaining 120 discordant MDT decisions were considered ‘justifiable', as management was altered due to patient choice (n=61), additional information available after MDT (n=54) or MDT error (n=5). Conclusion: The vast majority of MDT decisions are implemented. Management alteration was most often due to patient choice or additional information available after the MDT. A minority of management alterations were ‘unjustifiable' and the authors recommend that any patient whose treatment is subsequently changed should have MDT rediscussion prior to treatment. PMID:23736032

  17. The doctor-patient relationship as a toolkit for uncertain clinical decisions.

    PubMed

    Diamond-Brown, Lauren

    2016-06-01

    Medical uncertainty is a well-recognized problem in healthcare, yet how doctors make decisions in the face of uncertainty remains to be understood. This article draws on interdisciplinary literature on uncertainty and physician decision-making to examine a specific physician response to uncertainty: using the doctor-patient relationship as a toolkit. Additionally, I ask what happens to this process when the doctor-patient relationship becomes fragmented. I answer these questions by examining obstetrician-gynecologists' narratives regarding how they make decisions when faced with uncertainty in childbirth. Between 2013 and 2014, I performed 21 semi-structured interviews with obstetricians in the United States. Obstetricians were selected to maximize variation in relevant physician, hospital, and practice characteristics. I began with grounded theory and moved to analytical coding of themes in relation to relevant literature. My analysis renders it evident that some physicians use the doctor-patient relationship as a toolkit for dealing with uncertainty. I analyze how this process varies for physicians in different models of care by comparing doctors' experiences in models with continuous versus fragmented doctor-patient relationships. My key findings are that obstetricians in both models appealed to the ideal of patient-centered decision-making to cope with uncertain decisions, but in practice physicians in fragmented care faced a number of challenges to using the doctor-patient relationship as a toolkit for decision-making. These challenges led to additional uncertainties and in some cases to poor outcomes for doctors and/or patients; they also raised concerns about the reproduction of inequality. Thus organization of care delivery mitigates the efficacy of doctors' use of the doctor-patient relationship toolkit for uncertain decisions. These findings have implications for theorizing about decision-making under conditions of medical uncertainty, for understanding

  18. Evaluation of seroepidemiological toxoplasmosis in HIV/AIDS patients in the south of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Graciela Augusto; Cademartori, Beatris Gonzalez; Cunha Filho, Nilton Azevedo da; Farias, Nara Amélia da Rosa

    2013-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is considered one of the opportunistic infections for individuals with the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS), and is also a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of neurotoxoplasmosis, ocular toxoplasmosis and antibodies for Toxoplasma gondii in HIV-positive patients attending the SAE (Specialized Assistance Service for HIV/AIDS), as well as to associate their serological profile with epidemiological and clinical data. A total of 250 patients participated in the study from December, 2009 to November, 2010. Serological analysis was performed using the indirect immunofluorescent technique; epidemiological data were gathered by a questionnaire, and clinical history was based on the analysis of medical charts. Prevalence of seropositivity was 80%, with history of neurotoxoplasmosis in 4.8% and of ocular toxoplasmosis in 1.6% of the patients. The Highly Active Antiretroviral Treatment (HAART) was not used by 32% of the patients, 18.4% of the patients had CD4+ T- lymphocyte count less than 200 cells/mm³ and 96.8% of them were not aware of the modes of disease transmission. These findings led us to conclude that the study population is at high risk of clinical toxoplasmosis, because of both reactivation of infection in the seropositive patients who do not make a regular use of HAART, and primo-infection in seronegative patients worsened by an unawareness of the modes of infection reported in this study.

  19. Cerebral Toxoplasmosis in a Patient with AIDS on F-18 FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hae Won; Won, Kyoung Sook; Choi, Byung Wook; Zeon, Seok Kil

    2010-04-01

    The distinction between primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma and nonmalignant lesions due to opportunistic infections, in particular cerebral toxoplasmosis, is important because of the different treatments involved. A 32-year-old patient with AIDS was hospitalized for intermittent headaches. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a small well-enhanced nodular lesion in the right frontal lobe. A fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) scan showed moderate FDG uptake in the nodular lesion of the right frontal lobe. We present a case of cerebral toxoplasmosis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the usefulness of F-18 FDG PET/CT in the differential diagnosis of the cerebral toxoplasmosis will be discussed.

  20. What are the Essential Elements to Enable Patient Participation in Medical Decision Making?

    PubMed Central

    McGraw, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patient participation in shared decision making (SDM) results in increased patient knowledge, adherence, and improved outcomes. Despite the benefits of the SDM model, many patients do not attain the level of participation they desire. OBJECTIVE To gain a more complete understanding of the essential elements, or the prerequisites, critical to active patient participation in medical decision making from the patient’s perspective. DESIGN Qualitative study. SETTING Individual, in-depth patient interviews were conducted until thematic saturation was reached. Two analysts independently read the transcripts and jointly developed a list of codes. PATIENTS Twenty-six consecutive subjects drawn from community dwelling subjects undergoing bone density measurements. MEASUREMENTS Respondents’ experiences and beliefs related to patient participation in SDM. RESULTS Five elements were repeatedly described by respondents as being essential to enable patient participation in medical decision making: (1) patient knowledge, (2) explicit encouragement of patient participation by physicians, (3) appreciation of the patient’s responsibility/rights to play an active role in decision making, (4) awareness of choice, and (5) time. LIMITATIONS The generalizability of the results is limited by the homogeneity of the study sample. CONCLUSIONS Our findings have important clinical implications and suggest that several needs must be met before patients can become active participants in decisions related to their health care. These needs include ensuring that patients (1) appreciate that there is uncertainty in medicine and “buy in” to the importance of active patient participation in decisions related to their health care, (2) understand the trade-offs related to available options, and (3) have the opportunity to discuss these options with their physician to arrive at a decision concordant with their values. PMID:17443368

  1. Pathogenic Nocardia isolated from clinical specimens including those of AIDS patients in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Poonwan, N; Kusum, M; Mikami, Y; Yazawa, K; Tanaka, Y; Gonoi, T; Hasegawa, S; Konyama, K

    1995-10-01

    Forty strains of nocardioform microorganisms were isolated as clinical specimens including several from AIDS patients in Thailand. Among them, 37 strains were found to belong to the genus Nocardia. Our identification studies revealed that most of the strains (25 strains) belong to the N. asteroides group, i.e., N. asteroides sensu stricto and N. farcinica. Three strains were identified as N. otitidiscaviarum and two strains N. brasiliensis. In addition, 7 strains of rare pathogenic N. transvalensis were also isolated.

  2. Isolated Kaposi sarcoma of the finger pulp in an AIDS patient.

    PubMed

    Aïm, F; Rosier, L; Dumontier, C

    2012-02-01

    A 63-year-old woman with long-standing AIDS and previous Kaposi sarcomas of the lower limb presented to our consultation complaining of a painful left ring finger with pulp enlargement. X-rays revealed an osteolytic lesion of the distal phalanx. We suspected an isolated osseous Kaposi sarcoma and at surgery we found a hemorrhagic lesion with bone extension into the phalanx. Bone involvement is rare in Kaposi sarcoma and even rarer in patients without a cutaneous location.

  3. Autochthonous disseminated dermal and visceral leishmaniasis in an AIDS patient, southern Thailand, caused by Leishmania siamensis.

    PubMed

    Bualert, Lertwut; Charungkiattikul, Wiwat; Thongsuksai, Paramee; Mungthin, Mathirut; Siripattanapipong, Suradej; Khositnithikul, Rommanee; Naaglor, Tawee; Ravel, Christophe; El Baidouri, Fouad; Leelayoova, Saovanee

    2012-05-01

    We report the first establishment of in vitro cultivation and genotypic characterization of Leishmania siamensis isolated from an autochthonous disseminated dermal and visceral leishmaniasis in a Thai acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patient. The molecular identification has shown that the parasite was identical to L. siamensis, a recently described Leishmania species reported in the southern provinces of Thailand. The phylogenetic analysis has confirmed L. siamensis as closely related to the zoonotic Leishmania species L. enrietti.

  4. Isolation of the newly described species Mycobacterium celatum from AIDS patients.

    PubMed Central

    Tortoli, E; Piersimoni, C; Bacosi, D; Bartoloni, A; Betti, F; Bono, L; Burrini, C; De Sio, G; Lacchini, C; Mantella, A

    1995-01-01

    Mycobacterium celatum is a recently described species which, on the basis of conventional tests, may be misidentified as Mycobacterium xenopi or as belonging to the Mycobacterium avium complex. Only genomic sequencing or high-performance liquid chromatography of cell wall mycolic acids can presently allow a correct identification of this mycobacterium. Two cases of infection due to M. celatum, in AIDS patients, are described here. The quantitative susceptibility pattern of the isolates to a wide spectrum of drugs is also reported. PMID:7699029

  5. Relationships between life attitude profile and symptoms experienced with treatment decision evaluation in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Erci, Behice; Özdemir, Süreyya

    2013-01-01

    Despite many researches that have examined life attitude profile, treatment decision evaluation, and symptoms experienced in cancer populations, the relationships between life attitude profile and symptoms experienced with treatment decision evaluation are still not well understood. A thorough understanding of these relationships is critical for health care professionals to provide appropriate management to patients. The aim of this study was to determine relationships among life attitude profile, the treatment decision evaluation, and symptoms experienced in Turkish patients with cancer. A convenience sample of 199 patients with cancer at a Turkish university hospital completed a structured questionnaire including demographic characteristics and the Life Attitude Profile-Revised Scale for patients with cancer in 2007. The researchers visited the oncology clinic 5 work days every week and conducted interviews with the patients. The life attitude profile was not correlated with the treatment decision evaluation and symptoms experienced (r = 0.082, r = -026). The treatment decision evaluation showed that the patients were uncertain about their satisfaction with the treatment decision. Significant correlations were found between the treatment decision evaluation and symptoms experienced (r = 0.206; P <.01). Holistic nursing interventions can be implemented as they promote healing of the whole person processes as facilitating self-awareness, living meaningfully, and promotion connection with others and with nature and a higher power.

  6. Microbial translocation is associated with increased monocyte activation and dementia in AIDS patients.

    PubMed

    Ancuta, Petronela; Kamat, Anupa; Kunstman, Kevin J; Kim, Eun-Young; Autissier, Patrick; Wurcel, Alysse; Zaman, Tauheed; Stone, David; Mefford, Megan; Morgello, Susan; Singer, Elyse J; Wolinsky, Steven M; Gabuzda, Dana

    2008-06-25

    Elevated plasma lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an indicator of microbial translocation from the gut, is a likely cause of systemic immune activation in chronic HIV infection. LPS induces monocyte activation and trafficking into brain, which are key mechanisms in the pathogenesis of HIV-associated dementia (HAD). To determine whether high LPS levels are associated with increased monocyte activation and HAD, we obtained peripheral blood samples from AIDS patients and examined plasma LPS by Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) assay, peripheral blood monocytes by FACS, and soluble markers of monocyte activation by ELISA. Purified monocytes were isolated by FACS sorting, and HIV DNA and RNA levels were quantified by real time PCR. Circulating monocytes expressed high levels of the activation markers CD69 and HLA-DR, and harbored low levels of HIV compared to CD4(+) T-cells. High plasma LPS levels were associated with increased plasma sCD14 and LPS-binding protein (LBP) levels, and low endotoxin core antibody levels. LPS levels were higher in HAD patients compared to control groups, and were associated with HAD independently of plasma viral load and CD4 counts. LPS levels were higher in AIDS patients using intravenous heroin and/or ethanol, or with Hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infection, compared to control groups. These results suggest a role for elevated LPS levels in driving monocyte activation in AIDS, thereby contributing to the pathogenesis of HAD, and provide evidence that cofactors linked to substance abuse and HCV co-infection influence these processes.

  7. Pneumocystis carinii mutations are associated with duration of sulfa or sulfone prophylaxis exposure in AIDS patients.

    PubMed

    Kazanjian, P; Armstrong, W; Hossler, P A; Burman, W; Richardson, J; Lee, C H; Crane, L; Katz, J; Meshnick, S R

    2000-08-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether Pneumocystis carinii dyhydropteroate synthase (DHPS) gene mutations in AIDS patients with P. carinii pneumonia (PCP) are affected by duration of sulfa or sulfone prophylaxis and influence response to sulfa or sulfone therapy. The P. carinii DHPS genes from 97 AIDS patients with PCP between 1991 and 1999 from 4 medical centers were amplified, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and sequenced. Mutations were observed in 76% of isolates from patients exposed to sulfa or sulfone prophylaxis compared with 23% of isolates from patients not exposed (P=.001). Duration of prophylaxis increased the risk of mutations (relative risk [RR] for each exposure month, 1.06; P=.02). Twenty-eight percent of patients with mutations failed sulfa or sulfone treatment; mutations increased the risk of sulfa or sulfone treatment failure (RR, 2.1; P=0.01). Thus, an increased duration of sulfa or sulfone prophylaxis increases the chance of developing a P. carinii mutation. The majority of patients with mutations respond to sulfa or sulfone therapy.

  8. Design and fabrication of facial prostheses for cancer patient applying computer aided method and manufacturing (CADCAM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Din, Tengku Noor Daimah Tengku; Jamayet, Nafij; Rajion, Zainul Ahmad; Luddin, Norhayati; Abdullah, Johari Yap; Abdullah, Abdul Manaf; Yahya, Suzana

    2016-12-01

    Facial defects are either congenital or caused by trauma or cancer where most of them affect the person appearance. The emotional pressure and low self-esteem are problems commonly related to patient with facial defect. To overcome this problem, silicone prosthesis was designed to cover the defect part. This study describes the techniques in designing and fabrication for facial prosthesis applying computer aided method and manufacturing (CADCAM). The steps of fabricating the facial prosthesis were based on a patient case. The patient was diagnosed for Gorlin Gotz syndrome and came to Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (HUSM) for prosthesis. The 3D image of the patient was reconstructed from CT data using MIMICS software. Based on the 3D image, the intercanthal and zygomatic measurements of the patient were compared with available data in the database to find the suitable nose shape. The normal nose shape for the patient was retrieved from the nasal digital library. Mirror imaging technique was used to mirror the facial part. The final design of facial prosthesis including eye, nose and cheek was superimposed to see the result virtually. After the final design was confirmed, the mould design was created. The mould of nasal prosthesis was printed using Objet 3D printer. Silicone casting was done using the 3D print mould. The final prosthesis produced from the computer aided method was acceptable to be used for facial rehabilitation to provide better quality of life.

  9. [Cancer screening in clinical practice: the value of shared decision-making].

    PubMed

    Cornuz, Jacques; Junod, Noëlle; Pasche, Olivier; Guessous, Idris

    2010-07-14

    Shared decision-making approach to uncertain clinical situations such as cancer screening seems more appropriate than ever. Shared decision making can be defined as an interactive process where physician and patient share all the stages of the decision making process. For patients who wish to be implicated in the management of their health conditions, physicians might express difficulty to do so. Use of patient decision aids appears to improve such process of shared decision making.

  10. A Study of the Attitudes of Nursing Students toward Caring for AIDS Patients. Law, Politics, and Economics of Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malloy, Suzanne E.

    This study examined the attitudes of undergraduate and graduate nursing students (N=282) towards caring for Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) patients. A 57-item Likert type AIDS attitude questionnaire focused on the following questions: (1) Is there a difference in the comfort level of juniors, seniors, or graduate students caring for…

  11. [Nursing consultation in an HIV/AIDS outpatient clinic: patients' perception].

    PubMed

    de Macêdo, Simara Moreira; Sena, Márcia Cristina dos Santos; Miranda, Karla Corrêa Lima

    2012-09-01

    The study aims to understand the patients' perception regarding the nursing consultation at an outpatient clinic for Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) in the city of Fortaleza-CE (State of Ceará). This is an exploratory and descriptive qualitative approach. Data was collected through semi-structured interviews with fifteen patients of this institution and analyzed with the support of content analysis. The nursing consultation was reported by patients as a learning moment, focused onproviding information. The trust and emotional support provided by the professional act as a support to the conflicts experienced by the patients, allowing the construction of a new perspective of the disease. We believe that the implementation of the nursing consultation in a dialogic perspective can provide a new meaning to the conflicts surrounding the patients' illness.

  12. [Expectations of hospitalized patients with HIV/AIDS regarding nursing care].

    PubMed

    da Costa, Juliana Palhano; da Silva, Lucilane Maria Sales; da Silva, Maria Rocineide Ferreira; Miranda, Karla Corrêa Lima

    2006-01-01

    This study aimed at verifying the expectations of patients with HIV serum-positive patients, regarding to nursing care. This is a study with qualitative approach developed in the inpatient unit of a state public hospital in the municipal district of Fortaleza, CE. Data were collected in the period of September to October of 2003 through semi-structured interview, applied to 12 patients, randomly selected among the patients with diagnosis of HIV/AIDS. For data analysis it was used the Collective Subject's Speech (DSC) through emission of central ideas and/or key-expression. It was conclude that the patients expectations are for a more human care, more attention, contact verbal, more affectivity of the nursing team, a qualified and worthy attention. Besides their needs they should be informed daily about the vulnerabilities that they are submitted during the hospitalization.

  13. Oesophagobronchial fistula caused by varicella zoster virus in a patient with AIDS: a unique case

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, F; Uberti-Foppa, C; Quiros-Roldan, E; Fanti, L; Lillo, F; Lazzarin, A

    2002-01-01

    Human herpesvirus oesophagitis in human immunodeficiency virus positive patients is caused by cytomegalovirus and herpes simplex virus; no cases of oesophagitis and oesophagobrochial fistula as a result of varicella zoster virus (VZV) have been reported to date. This report describes the case of a patient with a 2–3 mm deep oesophageal ulcer whose viral culture was positive for VZV. The patient was treated with acyclovir with resolution of the symptomatology. After the end of the induction treatment, because of the onset of fever and fits of coughing during eating, the patient underwent oesophagography, which showed an ulcer with an oesophagobronchial fistula in the middle and lower third of the oesophagus. This case report stresses the role of VZV infection as a possible cause of oesophagobronchial fistula, a rare but benign condition in patients with AIDS. PMID:11986352

  14. Computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacture (CAD/CAM) system for construction of spinal orthosis for patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Wong, M S

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Spinal orthoses are commonly prescribed to patients with moderate adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) for prevention of further curve deterioration. In conventional manufacturing method, plaster bandages are used to obtain the patient's body contour and then the plaster cast is rectified manually. With computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacture (CAD/CAM) system, a series of automated processes from body scanning to digital rectification and milling of the positive model can be performed in a fast and accurate fashion. The purpose of this manuscript is to introduce the application of CAD/CAM system to the construction of spinal orthosis for patients with AIS. Based on evidence within the literature, CAD/CAM method can achieve similar clinical outcomes but with higher efficiency than the conventional fabrication method. Therefore, CAD/CAM method should be considered a substitute to the conventional method in fabrication of spinal orthoses for patients with AIS.

  15. Crofelemer for the treatment of chronic diarrhea in patients living with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Twisha S; Crutchley, Rustin D; Tucker, Anne M; Cottreau, Jessica; Garey, Kevin W

    2013-01-01

    Diarrhea is a common comorbidity present in patients with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) who are treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy. With a multifactorial etiology, this diarrhea often becomes difficult to manage. In addition, some antiretrovirals are associated with chronic diarrhea, which potentially creates an adherence barrier to antiretrovirals and may ultimately affect treatment outcomes and future therapeutic options for HIV. A predominant type of diarrhea that develops in HIV patients has secretory characteristics, including increased secretion of chloride ions and water into the intestinal lumen. One proposed mechanism that may lead to this type of secretory diarrhea is explained by the activation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and calcium-activated chloride channels. Crofelemer is a novel antidiarrheal agent that works by inhibiting both of these channels. The efficacy and safety of crofelemer has been evaluated in clinical trials for various types of secretory diarrhea, including cholera-related and acute infectious diarrhea. More recently, crofelemer was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the symptomatic relief of noninfectious diarrhea in adult patients with HIV/AIDS on antiretroviral therapy. Results from the ADVENT trial showed that crofelemer reduced symptoms of secretory diarrhea in HIV/AIDS patients. Because crofelemer is not systemically absorbed, this agent is well tolerated by patients, and in clinical trials it has been associated with minimal adverse events. Crofelemer has a unique mechanism of action, which may offer a more reliable treatment option for HIV patients who experience chronic secretory diarrhea from antiretroviral therapy. PMID:23888120

  16. Clinical outcomes in breast cancer patients with HIV/AIDS: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Alexandra; Montero, Alberto J; Hurley, Judith

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of the study is to describe what is the presentation of breast cancer in women with HIV, their tolerance to therapy, the most common complications of treatment and their outcomes. Retrospective chart review of patients with HIV diagnosed with breast cancer between January 1, 1989 and December 31, 2013 at the University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital (UM/JMH) 47 females and 1 male were included in the analysis. The median age of diagnosis was 46 years (IQR 41-52) and 64% of the women were premenopausal. Median CD4(+) count was 330 cells/µL (IQR 131-589 cells/µL). 41% had AIDS at time of diagnosis. 94% of patients presented with locoregional disease and 6% with late stage breast cancer. 52% had ER(+) tumors. 6% had HER-2/neu tumor expression and 21 % had triple negative disease. The 5 year PFS was 50% (95% CI 34-64%), the 5 year OS was 44% (95% CI 29-58%), and the Breast cancer-specific survival was 57% (95% CI 40-70%). Death was attributed to breast cancer in 22 patients, AIDS progression in 6 patients, other medical condition in 1, and for 4, the cause was unknown. Serious adverse events were documented in 46% of patients treated with chemotherapy. Targeted therapy was well tolerated. Patients with HIV/AIDS and breast cancer pose a major challenge for oncologists. Surgery, radiation, and endocrine therapy are well tolerated. Standard dose chemotherapy can have life-threatening side effects which can be managed with growth factor support and antimicrobial prophylaxis. All cancer therapy can be given while continuing with antiviral therapy at full dose.

  17. Excess mortality in patients with AIDS in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy: Temporal changes and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Puhan, Milo A.; Van Natta, Mark L.; Palella, Frank J.; Addessi, Adrienne; Meinert, Curtis

    2010-01-01

    Background Excess mortality has declined among HIV infected patients but without evidence of a decline in patients with AIDS. We assessed temporal changes in excess mortality and elucidated risk factors for excess mortality in patients with AIDS diagnosed in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Methods We included 1,188 patients of the Longitudinal Study of Ocular Complications in AIDS who were between 25-64 years old at enrollment and diagnosed with AIDS after 1995. We calculated excess mortality as the age-, year- and sex-adjusted difference in mortality rates between patients with AIDS and persons in the US general population, between 1999 and 2007, and used a relative survival model to identify risk factors for excess mortality. Results There were an average of 50 excess deaths (95% CI 44-57) per 1,000 person years between 1999 and 2007. Excess mortality almost halved with an annual decline of 8.0% per year (3.0-12.7 p=0.002) but remained high at 36 excess deaths per 1,000 person years in 2007. Viral load >400 vs. ≤400 copies/mL (risk ratio 3.4 [2.3-5.0]), CD4+ count <200 vs. ≥200 cells/μL (2.7 [1.9-3.9]) and cytomegalovirus retinitis (1.6 [1.2-2.1]) were the strongest risk factors for excess mortality. Conclusions Excess mortality among patients with AIDS was nearly halved in the HAART era and most strongly linked to stage of HIV disease. These results reflect the continuing improvements in AIDS management but also highlight that excess mortality remains about five times higher in patients with AIDS than in patients with HIV-infection but no AIDS. PMID:20825306

  18. [Avascular osteonecrosis of femoral head and neck in an AIDS patient].

    PubMed

    Villafañe, Maria F; Corti, Marcelo E; Candela, Miguel; Perez Bianco, Raul; Tezanos Pinto, Miguel

    2004-01-01

    Avascular osteonecrosis (AON) has increased in the last few years in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). The most commonly affected bone is the femoral head and neck. Frequently these bilateral and clinical findings include moderate to severe pain and functional impotence of the affected joints. The etiology is multifactorial and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) with protease inhibitors (PI) is probably related to its development. In the evolution, a total hip replacement may be needed. We present an hemophilic patient with AIDS, who developed a bilateral AON of the femoral head and neck during HAART.

  19. Electromagnetic detection of HIV DNA in the blood of AIDS patients treated by antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Montagnier, Luc; Aïssa, Jamal; Lavallée, Claude; Mbamy, Mireille; Varon, Joseph; Chenal, Henri

    2009-12-01

    Electromagnetic signals of low frequency have been shown to be durably produced in aqueous dilutions of the Human Imunodeficiency Virus DNA. In vivo, HIV DNA signals are detected only in patients previously treated by antiretroviral therapy and having no detectable viral RNA copies in their blood. We suggest that the treatment of AIDS patients pushes the virus towards a new mode of replication implying only DNA, thus forming a reservoir insensitive to retroviral inhibitors. Implications for new approaches aimed at eradicating HIV infection are discussed.

  20. Tuberculoid leprosy and cytomegalovirus retinitis as immune restoration disease in a patient with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shishir; Ghosh, Manab Kumar; Sarkar, Somenath; Mallik, Sudeshna; Biswas, Pradyot Narayan; Saha, Bibhuti

    2012-02-01

    Here we report a unique case of tuberculoid leprosy and cytomegalovirus retinitis in a 27-year-old female patient with AIDS, suggestive of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)-induced immune restoration disease. After initiation of HAART, the patient presented with decreased visual acuity, hypoesthetic patch with local nerve thickening, and an increase in her CD4+ T cell count. On further investigations cytomegalovirus retinitis and tuberculoid leprosy were confirmed. To our knowledge no case with such a co-existence has previously been reported.

  1. Clinical analysis of non-AIDS patients pathologically diagnosed with pulmonary cryptococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kaixiong; Ding, Haibo; Xu, Bing; You, Ruixiong; Xing, Zhen; Chen, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    Background Pulmonary cryptococcosis (PC) was not a rare infectious disease in non-AIDS patients. However, data on the immune status were lacking in southern China for comparative analysis of differences between immunocompromised and immunocompetent hosts. This study was to investigate the epidemiological, clinical, radiological, and treatment profiles for patients with PC. Methods We performed a retrospective review of 88 patients diagnosed with tissue-confirmed PC who were not HIV-infected from 2003 to 2013. Results Of 88 patients, 35(39.7%) were immunocompromised host. Fever and CNS symptom were significantly common in immunocompromised patients compared to immunocompetent patients (P=0.019 and P=0.036, respectively). The most frequent radiologic abnormalities were solitary or multiple pulmonary nodules, and masses or consolidations, and most lesions were located in the peripheral lung field. Cavitations and halo sign were significantly frequent in immunocompromised patients than in immunocompetent patients (P<0.05). The most frequently applied and reliable diagnostic procedure was CT-guided percutaneous translung biopsy. Treatment included antifungal drug alone in 20 patients, surgery alone in 20 including 3 treated by VATS, surgery plus antifungal drugs in 20 patients. Conclusions PC was not rare in immunocompetent host in southern China. Special differences remained in clinical manifestation and radiological findings of PC between immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients. Future work on the mechanisms of possible differences is required. PMID:27867557

  2. A multiattribute utility analysis of sites nominated for characterization for the first radioactive-waste repository: A decision-aiding methodology

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1986-05-01

    In December 1984, the Department of Energy (DOE) published draft environmental assessments (EAs) to support the proposed nomination of five sites and the recommendation of three sites for characterization for the first radioactive-waste repository. A chapter common to all the draft EAs (Chapter 7) presented rankings of the five sites against the postclosure and the preclosure technical siting guidelines. To determine which three sites appeared most favorable for recommendation for characterization, three simple quantitative methods were used to aggregate the rankings assigned to each site for the various technical guidelines. In response to numerous comments on the methods, the DOE has undertaken a formal application of one of them (hereafter referred to as the decision-aiding methodology) for the purpose of obtaining a more rigorous evaluation of the nominated sites. The application of the revised methodology is described in this report. The method of analysis is known as multiattribute utility analysis; it is a tool for providing insights as to which sites are preferable and why. The decision-aiding methodology accounts for all the fundamental considerations specified by the siting guidelines and uses as source information the data and evaluations reported or referenced in the EAs. It explicitly addresses the uncertainties and value judgments that are part of all siting problems. Furthermore, all scientific and value judgments are made explicit for the reviewer. An independent review of the application of the decision-aiding methodology has been conducted by the Board on Radioactive Waste Management of the National Academy of Sciences; the comments of the Board are included as an appendix to this report.

  3. Dentist-Patient Interactions in Treatment Decision-Making: A Qualitative Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redford, Maryann; Gift, Helen C.

    1997-01-01

    A University of North Carolina study using focus groups of dentists and patients found dentist-patient interactions play an important role in treatment decision-making, and are predicated on non-clinical factors, including dentists' intuition and judgment and patient impressions of dentists' examination styles, personalities, and interpersonal…

  4. Programmable Calculators and Minicomputers in Agriculture. A Symposium Exploring Computerized Decision-Making Aids and Their Extension to the Farm Level. Proceedings of a Symposium (Hot Springs, Arkansas, February 6-7, 1980)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentley, Ernest, Ed.

    Ten papers presented at a symposium discuss the array of computerized decision-making aids currently available to farmers and ways to speed up the rate of adoption of computers by agriculturalists. Topics presented include the development of software for agricultural decision-making; the role of programmable calculators and minicomputers in…

  5. A computer-aided program for helping patients with moderate Alzheimer's disease engage in verbal reminiscence.

    PubMed

    Lancioni, Giulio E; Singh, Nirbhay N; O'Reilly, Mark F; Sigafoos, Jeff; Ferlisi, Gabriele; Zullo, Valeria; Schirone, Simona; Prisco, Raffaella; Denitto, Floriana

    2014-11-01

    This study assessed a simple computer-aided program for helping patients with moderate Alzheimer's disease engage in verbal reminiscence. In practice, the program was aimed at fostering the patient's verbal engagement on a number of life experiences/topics previously selected for him or her and introduced in the sessions through a friendly female, who appeared on the computer screen. The female asked the patient about the aforementioned experiences/topics, and provided him or her with positive attention, and possibly verbal guidance (i.e., prompts/encouragements). Eight patients were involved in the study, which was carried out according to non-concurrent multiple baseline designs across participants. Seven of them showed clear improvement during the intervention phase (i.e., with the program). Their mean percentages of intervals with verbal engagement/reminiscence ranged from close to zero to about 15 during the baseline and from above 50 to above 75 during the intervention. The results were discussed in relation to previous literature on reminiscence therapy, with specific emphasis on the need for (a) replication studies and (b) the development of new versions of the technology-aided program to improve its impact and reach a wider number of patients.

  6. GT-MSOCC - A domain for research on human-computer interaction and decision aiding in supervisory control systems. [Georgia Tech - Multisatellite Operations Control Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Christine M.

    1987-01-01

    The Georgia Tech-Multisatellite Operations Control Center (GT-MSOCC), a real-time interactive simulation of the operator interface to a NASA ground control system for unmanned earth-orbiting satellites, is described. The GT-MSOCC program for investigating a range of modeling, decision aiding, and workstation design issues related to the human-computer interaction is discussed. A GT-MSOCC operator function model is described in which operator actions, both cognitive and manual, are represented as the lowest level discrete control network nodes, and operator action nodes are linked to information needs or system reconfiguration commands.

  7. Why are some HIV/AIDS patients reluctant to receive antiviral therapy as soon as possible in China?

    PubMed

    Sun, Yang; Lu, Hongzhou

    2014-06-01

    In more than 20 years of medical practice, a surprising phenomenon has often occurred: some patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) decide not to go to the hospital and they do not let others know that they are suffering from the disease unless they believe that they are dieing. Zhang Shan (a pseudonym) is one such patient with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS who was reluctant to receive antiviral therapy as soon as possible, and this paper shares Zhang's story as he related it. Clearly, there are numerous views as to why patients in China behave as Zhang did. Presented here are several reasons, including society, history, morality and ideology, family, and education. Although all of these reasons do play a role, the patient's mindset and behavior is the most significant reason for a patient's reluctance to seek treatment or disclose his/her status. If the individual patient's mindset and behavior are not dealt with effectively, then HIV/AIDS can continue to spread and threaten additional lives and even the fabric of society. This paper analyzes the reasons why patients are hesitant to receive antiviral therapy, but this paper also suggests steps healthcare personnel can take to encourage patients to seek treatment. Such steps can save the lives of current patients with HIV/AIDS. In addition, sound public health measures and a rational approach to treatment are important to helping potential patients with HIV/AIDS.

  8. Exploring salivary microbiota in AIDS patients with different periodontal statuses using 454 GS-FLX Titanium pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fang; He, Shenghua; Jin, Jieqi; Dong, Guangyan; Wu, Hongkun

    2015-01-01

    Patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) are at high risk of opportunistic infections. Oral manifestations have been associated with the level of immunosuppression, these include periodontal diseases, and understanding the microbial populations in the oral cavity is crucial for clinical management. The aim of this study was to examine the salivary bacterial diversity in patients newly admitted to the AIDS ward of the Public Health Clinical Center (China). Saliva samples were collected from 15 patients with AIDS who were randomly recruited between December 2013 and March 2014. Extracted DNA was used as template to amplify bacterial 16S rRNA. Sequencing of the amplicon library was performed using a 454 GS-FLX Titanium sequencing platform. Reads were optimized and clustered into operational taxonomic units for further analysis. A total of 10 bacterial phyla (106 genera) were detected. Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Proteobacteria were preponderant in the salivary microbiota in AIDS patients. The pathogen, Capnocytophaga sp., and others not considered pathogenic such as Neisseria elongata, Streptococcus mitis, and Mycoplasma salivarium but which may be opportunistic infective agents were detected. Dialister pneumosintes, Eubacterium infirmum, Rothia mucilaginosa, and Treponema parvum were preponderant in AIDS patients with periodontitis. Patients with necrotic periodontitis had a distinct salivary bacterial profile from those with chronic periodontitis. This is the first study using advanced sequencing techniques focused on hospitalized AIDS patients showing the diversity of their salivary microbiota. PMID:26191508

  9. Effective follow-up consultations: the importance of patient-centered communication and shared decision making.

    PubMed

    Brand, Paul L P; Stiggelbout, Anne M

    2013-12-01

    Paediatricians spend a considerable proportion of their time performing follow-up visits for children with chronic conditions, but they rarely receive specific training on how best to perform such consultations. The traditional method of running a follow-up consultation is based on the doctor's agenda, and is problem-oriented. Patients and parents, however, prefer a patient-centered, and solution-focused approach. Although many physicians now recognize the importance of addressing the patient's perspective in a follow-up consultation, a number of barriers hamper its implementation in practice, including time constraints, lack of appropriate training, and a strong tradition of the biomedical, doctor-centered approach. Addressing the patient's perspective successfully can be achieved through shared decision making, clinicians and patients making decisions together based on the best clinical evidence. Research shows that shared decision making not only increases patient, parent, and physician satisfaction with the consultation, but also may improve health outcomes. Shared decision making involves building a physician-patient-parent partnership, agreeing on the problem at hand, laying out the available options with their benefits and risks, eliciting the patient's views and preferences on these options, and agreeing on a course of action. Shared decision making requires specific communication skills, which can be learned, and should be mastered through deliberate practice.

  10. Mycobacterium kansasii causing chronic monoarticular synovitis in a patient with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Menashe, Leo; Kerr, Leslie Dubin; Hermann, George

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium kansasii is a nontuberculous mycobacterium that primarily causes pulmonary disease in AIDS patients, however it has also been known, rarely, to result in skeletal infection. When skeletal infection occurs, the time from onset of symptoms to diagnosis is up to 5 years in previously reported cases. We describe a 48-year-old woman with HIV/AIDS who presented with chronic, isolated left knee pain and swelling of over two decades which had recently worsened. Radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated marked subarticular erosions, synovial thickening, and bone marrow edema, which had progressed compared with prior imaging done seven years earlier. Synovial biopsy grew Mycobacterium kansasii. Following the presentation of our case, clinical and imaging findings, including the differential diagnosis, of monoarticular arthritis caused by Mycobacterium kansasii are reviewed and discussed. PMID:26629306

  11. Effects of Smoking on Non-AIDS-Related Morbidity in HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shirley, Daniel K.; Kaner, Robert J.; Glesby, Marshall J.

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco smoking has many adverse health consequences. Patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection smoke at very high rates, and many of the comorbidities associated with smoking in the general population are more prevalent in this population. It is likely that a combination of higher smoking rates along with an altered response to cigarette smoke throughout the body in persons with HIV infection leads to increased rates of the known conditions related to smoking. Several AIDS-defining conditions associated with smoking have been reviewed elsewhere. This review aims to summarize the data on non-AIDS-related health consequences of smoking in the HIV-infected population and explore evidence for the potential compounding effects on chronic systemic inflammation due to HIV infection and smoking. PMID:23572487

  12. Mycobacterium kansasii causing chronic monoarticular synovitis in a patient with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Menashe, Leo; Kerr, Leslie Dubin; Hermann, George

    2015-09-01

    Mycobacterium kansasii is a nontuberculous mycobacterium that primarily causes pulmonary disease in AIDS patients, however it has also been known, rarely, to result in skeletal infection. When skeletal infection occurs, the time from onset of symptoms to diagnosis is up to 5 years in previously reported cases. We describe a 48-year-old woman with HIV/AIDS who presented with chronic, isolated left knee pain and swelling of over two decades which had recently worsened. Radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated marked subarticular erosions, synovial thickening, and bone marrow edema, which had progressed compared with prior imaging done seven years earlier. Synovial biopsy grew Mycobacterium kansasii. Following the presentation of our case, clinical and imaging findings, including the differential diagnosis, of monoarticular arthritis caused by Mycobacterium kansasii are reviewed and discussed.

  13. Exploring patient involvement in healthcare decision making across different education and functional health literacy groups.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sian K; Dixon, Ann; Trevena, Lyndal; Nutbeam, Don; McCaffery, Kirsten J

    2009-12-01

    Education and health literacy potentially limit a person's ability to be involved in decisions about their health. Few studies, however, have explored understandings and experiences of involvement in decision making among patients varying in education and health literacy. This paper reports on a qualitative interview study of 73 men and women living in Sydney, Australia, with varying education and functional health literacy levels. Participants were recruited from a community sample with lower educational attainment, plus an educated sample of University of Sydney alumni. The transcripts were analysed using the 'Framework' approach, a matrix-based method of thematic analysis. We found that participants with different education conceptualised their involvement in decision making in diverse ways. Participants with higher education appeared to conceive their involvement as sharing the responsibility with the doctor throughout the decision-making process. This entailed verifying the credibility of the information and exploring options beyond those presented in the consultation. They also viewed themselves as helping others in their health decisions and acting as information resources. In contrast, participants with lower education appeared to conceive their involvement in terms of consenting to an option recommended by the doctor, and having responsibility for the ultimate decision, to agree or disagree with the recommendation. They also described how relatives and friends sought information on their behalf and played a key role in their decisions. Both education groups described how aspects of the patient-practitioner relationship (e.g. continuity, negotiation, trust) and the practitioner's interpersonal communication skills influenced their involvement. Health information served a variety of needs for all groups (e.g. supporting psychosocial, practical and decision support needs). These findings have practical implications for how to involve patients with different

  14. Why Breast Cancer Risk by the Numbers Is Not Enough: Evaluation of a Decision Aid in Multi-Ethnic, Low-Numerate Women

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Haeseung; Xiao, Tong; Thomas, Parijatham; Aguirre, Alejandra; Smalletz, Cindy; David, Raven; Crew, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Background Breast cancer risk assessment including genetic testing can be used to classify people into different risk groups with screening and preventive interventions tailored to the needs of each group, yet the implementation of risk-stratified breast cancer prevention in primary care settings is complex. Objective To address barriers to breast cancer risk assessment, risk communication, and prevention strategies in primary care settings, we developed a Web-based decision aid, RealRisks, that aims to improve preference-based decision-making for breast cancer prevention, particularly in low-numerate women. Methods RealRisks incorporates experience-based dynamic interfaces to communicate risk aimed at reducing inaccurate risk perceptions, with modules on breast cancer risk, genetic testing, and chemoprevention that are tailored. To begin, participants learn about risk by interacting with two games of experience-based risk interfaces, demonstrating average 5-year and lifetime breast cancer risk. We conducted four focus groups in English-speaking women (age ≥18 years), a questionnaire completed before and after interacting with the decision aid, and a semistructured group discussion. We employed a mixed-methods approach to assess accuracy of perceived breast cancer risk and acceptability of RealRisks. The qu