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Sample records for patient dose reduction

  1. Low Dose MDCT with Tube Current Modulation: Role in Detection of Urolithiasis and Patient Effective Dose Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Kakkar, Chandan; Sripathi, Smiti; Parakh, Anushri; Shrivastav, Rajendra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Urolithiasis is one of the major, recurring problem in young individuals and CT being the commonest diagnostic modality used. In order to reduce the radiation dose to the patient who are young and as stone formation is a recurring process; one of the simplest way would be, low dose CT along with tube current modulation. Aim Aim of this study was to compare the sensitivity and specificity of low dose (70mAs) with standard dose (250mAs) protocol in detecting urolithiasis and to define the tube current and mean effective patient dose by these protocols. Materials and Methods A prospective study was conducted in 200 patients over a period of 2 years with acute flank pain presentation. CT was performed in 100 cases with standard dose and another 100 with low dose protocol using tube current modulation. Sensitivity and specificity for calculus detection, percentage reduction of dose and tube current with low dose protocol was calculated. Results Urolithiasis was detected in 138 patients, 67 were examined by high dose and 71 were by low dose protocol. Sensitivity and Specificity of low dose protocol was 97.1% and 96.4% with similar results found in high BMI patients. Tube current modulation resulted in reduction of effective tube current by 12.17%. The mean effective patient dose for standard dose was 10.33 mSv whereas 2.92 mSv for low dose with 51.13–53.8% reduction in low dose protocol. Conclusion The study has reinforced that low-dose CT with tube current modulation is appropriate for diagnosis of urolithiasis with significant reduction in tube current and patient effective dose. PMID:27437322

  2. Dose reduction and image quality optimizations in CT of pediatric and adult patients: phantom studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, P.-H.; Lee, C.-L.; Kim, D.-H.; Lee, Y.-J.; Jeon, S.-S.; Kim, H.-J.

    2014-03-01

    Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) can be used to easily and rapidly perform numerous acquisitions, possibly leading to a marked increase in the radiation dose to individual patients. Technical options dedicated to automatically adjusting the acquisition parameters according to the patient's size are of specific interest in pediatric radiology. A constant tube potential reduction can be achieved for adults and children, while maintaining a constant detector energy fluence. To evaluate radiation dose, the weighted CT dose index (CTDIw) was calculated based on the CT dose index (CTDI) measured using an ion chamber, and image noise and image contrast were measured from a scanned image to evaluate image quality. The dose-weighted contrast-to-noise ratio (CNRD) was calculated from the radiation dose, image noise, and image contrast measured from a scanned image. The noise derivative (ND) is a quality index for dose efficiency. X-ray spectra with tube voltages ranging from 80 to 140 kVp were used to compute the average photon energy. Image contrast and the corresponding contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were determined for lesions of soft tissue, muscle, bone, and iodine relative to a uniform water background, as the iodine contrast increases at lower energy (i.e., k-edge of iodine is 33 keV closer to the beam energy) using mixed water-iodine contrast normalization (water 0, iodine 25, 100, 200, and 1000 HU, respectively). The proposed values correspond to high quality images and can be reduced if only high-contrast organs are assessed. The potential benefit of lowering the tube voltage is an improved CNRD, resulting in a lower radiation dose and optimization of image quality. Adjusting the tube potential in abdominal CT would be useful in current pediatric radiography, where the choice of X-ray techniques generally takes into account the size of the patient as well as the need to balance the conflicting requirements of diagnostic image quality and radiation dose

  3. Dose Reduction versus Dose-interval Prolongation in Eribulin Mesilate Monotherapy in Patients with Metastatic Breast Cancer: A Retrospective Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Toshinori; Oshima, Yumiko; Mishima, Etsuko; Ban, Akiko; Katsuragawa, Kenji; Nagamatsu, Hidetsugu; Yoshioka, Yuki; Tsukiyama, Ikuto; Hisada, Tatsuya; Itakura, Yukari; Mizutani, Mitsuhiro

    2016-07-01

    It is often necessary to modify the dose or schedule of eribulin mesilate (Eri) because of adverse events. Therefore, we retrospectively investigated the optimal approach for Eri dose adjustment and/or dosage interval adjustment. Patients who received Eri at the institutions affiliated with the Division of Oncology of the Aichi Prefectural Society of Hospital Pharmacists between July 2011 and November 2013 were enrolled in this study. We compared the group that underwent dose reduction without changes to their dosage interval (dose reduction group) with the group that had a change in their dosage interval (dose-interval prolongation group). The primary end-point was time to treatment failure (TTF), and the secondary end-points were overall survival (OS), overall response rate (ORR), clinical benefit rate (CBR), and adverse events. The TTF and OS of the dose reduction group were approximately two times longer than those of the dose-interval prolongation group. In addition, the dose reduction group had significantly improved ORR and CBR, which together indicate an antitumor effect (p=0.013 and 0.002, respectively). Although peripheral neuropathy occurred significantly more frequently in the patients in the dose reduction group (p=0.026), it was grade 1 and controllable in most of the cases. There were no differences in the occurrence of other adverse effects between the two groups. Therefore, we suggest that dose reduction with maintenance of the dosage interval is the preferred treatment approach in cases where Eri dose or schedule modification is necessary. PMID:27040459

  4. Evaluation of the stepwise collimation method for the reduction of the patient dose in full spine radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Boram; Lee, Sunyoung; Yang, Injeong; Yoon, Myeonggeun

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dose reduction when using the stepwise collimation method for scoliosis patients undergoing full spine radiography. A Monte Carlo simulation was carried out to acquire dose vs. volume data for organs at risk (OAR) in the human body. While the effective doses in full spine radiography were reduced by 8, 15, 27 and 44% by using four different sizes of the collimation, the doses to the skin were reduced by 31, 44, 55 and 66%, indicating that the reduction of the dose to the skin is higher than that to organs inside the body. Although the reduction rates were low for the gonad, being 9, 14, 18 and 23%, there was more than a 30% reduction in the dose to the heart, suggesting that the dose reduction depends significantly on the location of the OARs in the human body. The reduction rate of the secondary cancer risk based on the excess absolute risk (EAR) varied from 0.6 to 3.4 per 10,000 persons, depending on the size of the collimation. Our results suggest that the stepwise collimation method in full spine radiography can effectively reduce the patient dose and the radiation-induced secondary cancer risk.

  5. A method for patient dose reduction in dynamic contrast enhanced CT study

    SciTech Connect

    Mo Kim, Sun; Haider, Masoom A.; Milosevic, Michael; Jaffray, David A.; Yeung, Ivan W. T.

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: In dynamic contrast enhanced CT (DCE-CT) study, prolonged CT scanning with high temporal resolution is required to give accurate and precise estimates of kinetic parameters. However, such scanning protocol could lead to substantial radiation dose to the patient. A novel method is proposed to reduce radiation dose to patient, while maintaining high accuracy for kinetic parameter estimates in DCE-CT study. Methods: The method is based on a previous investigation that the arterial impulse response (AIR) in DCE-CT study can be predicted using a population-based scheme. In the proposed method, DCE-CT scanning is performed with relatively low temporal resolution, hence, giving rise to reduction in patient dose. A novel method is proposed to estimate the arterial input function (AIF) based on the coarsely sampled AIF. By using the estimated AIF in the tracer kinetic analysis of the coarsely sampled DCE-CT study, the calculated kinetic parameters are able to achieve a high degree of accuracy. The method was tested on a DCE-CT data set of 48 patients with cervical cancer scanned at high temporal resolution. A random cohort of 34 patients was chosen to construct the orthonormal bases of the AIRs via singular value decomposition method. The determined set of orthonormal bases was used to fit the AIFs in the second cohort (14 patients) at varying levels of down sampling. For each dataset in the second cohort, the estimated AIF was used for kinetic analyses of the modified Tofts and adiabatic tissue homogeneity models for each of the down-sampling schemes between intervals from 2 to 15 s. The results were compared with analyses done with the ''raw'' down-sampled AIF. Results: In the first group of 34 patients, there were 11 orthonormal bases identified to describe the AIRs. The AIFs in the second group were estimated in high accuracy based on the 11 orthonormal bases established in the first group along with down-sampled AIFs. Using the 11 orthonormal bases, the

  6. Dose Reduction Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    WAGGONER, L.O.

    2000-05-16

    As radiation safety specialists, one of the things we are required to do is evaluate tools, equipment, materials and work practices and decide whether the use of these products or work practices will reduce radiation dose or risk to the environment. There is a tendency for many workers that work with radioactive material to accomplish radiological work the same way they have always done it rather than look for new technology or change their work practices. New technology is being developed all the time that can make radiological work easier and result in less radiation dose to the worker or reduce the possibility that contamination will be spread to the environment. As we discuss the various tools and techniques that reduce radiation dose, keep in mind that the radiological controls should be reasonable. We can not always get the dose to zero, so we must try to accomplish the work efficiently and cost-effectively. There are times we may have to accept there is only so much you can do. The goal is to do the smart things that protect the worker but do not hinder him while the task is being accomplished. In addition, we should not demand that large amounts of money be spent for equipment that has marginal value in order to save a few millirem. We have broken the handout into sections that should simplify the presentation. Time, distance, shielding, and source reduction are methods used to reduce dose and are covered in Part I on work execution. We then look at operational considerations, radiological design parameters, and discuss the characteristics of personnel who deal with ALARA. This handout should give you an overview of what it takes to have an effective dose reduction program.

  7. Prediction of Warfarin Dose Reductions in Puerto Rican Patients, Based on Combinatorial CYP2C9 and VKORC1 Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Valentin, Isa Ivette; Vazquez, Joan; Rivera-Miranda, Giselle; Seip, Richard L; Velez, Meredith; Kocherla, Mohan; Bogaard, Kali; Cruz-Gonzalez, Iadelisse; Cadilla, Carmen L; Renta, Jessica Y; Felliu, Juan F; Ramos, Alga S; Alejandro-Cowan, Yirelia; Gorowski, Krystyna; Ruaño, Gualberto; Duconge, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND The influence of CYP2C9 and VKORC1 polymorphisms on warfarin dose has been investigated in white, Asian, and African American populations but not in Puerto Rican Hispanic patients. OBJECTIVE To test the associations between genotypes, international normalized ratio (INR) measurements, and warfarin dosing and gauge the impact of these polymorphisms on warfarin dose, using a published algorithm. METHODS A retrospective warfarin pharmacogenetic association study in 106 Puerto Rican patients was performed. DNA samples from patients were assayed for 12 variants in both CYP2C9 and VKORC1 loci by HILOmet PhyzioType assay. Demographic and clinical nongenetic data were retrospectively collected from medical records. Allele and genotype frequencies were determined and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) was tested. RESULTS Sixty-nine percent of patients were carriers of at least one polymorphism in either the CYP2C9 or the VKORC1 gene. Double, triple, and quadruple carriers accounted for 22%, 5%, and 1%, respectively. No significant departure from HWE was found. Among patients with a given CYP2C9 genotype, warfarin dose requirements declined from GG to AA haplotypes; whereas, within each VKORC1 haplotype, the dose decreased as the number of CYP2C9 variants increased. The presence of these loss-of-function alleles was associated with more out-of-range INR measurements (OR = 1.38) but not with significant INR >4 during the initiation phase. Analyses based on a published pharmacogenetic algorithm predicted dose reductions of up to 4.9 mg/day in carriers and provided better dose prediction in an extreme subgroup of highly sensitive patients, but also suggested the need to improve predictability by developing a customized model for use in Puerto Rican patients. CONCLUSIONS This study laid important groundwork for supporting a prospective pharmacogenetic trial in Puerto Ricans to detect the benefits of incorporating relevant genomic information into a customized DNA

  8. Feasibility of patient dose reduction based on various noise suppression filters for cone-beam computed tomography in an image-guided patient positioning system.

    PubMed

    Kamezawa, Hidemi; Arimura, Hidetaka; Shirieda, Katsutoshi; Kameda, Noboru; Ohki, Masafumi

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the feasibility of patient dose reduction based on six noise suppression filters for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in an image-guided patient positioning (IGPP) system. A midpoint dose was employed as a patient dose index. First, a reference dose (RD) and low-dose (LD)-CBCT images were acquired with a reference dose and various low doses. Second, an automated rigid registration was performed for three axis translations to estimate patient setup errors between a planning CT image and the LD-CBCT images processed by six noise suppression filters (averaging filter, median filter, Gaussian filter, edge-preserving smoothing filter, bilateral filter, and adaptive partial median filter (AMF)). Third, residual errors representing the patient positioning accuracy were calculated as Euclidean distances between the setup error vectors estimated using the LD-CBCT and RD-CBCT images. Finally, the residual errors as a function of the patient dose index were estimated for LD-CBCT images processed by six noise suppression filters, and then the patient dose indices for the filtered LD-CBCT images were obtained at the same residual error as the RD-CBCT image. This approach was applied to an anthropomorphic phantom and four cancer patients. The patient dose for the LD-CBCT images was reduced to 19% of that for the RD-CBCT image for the phantom by using AMF, while keeping a same residual error of 0.47 mm as the RD-CBCT image by applying the noise suppression filters to the LD-CBCT images. The average patient dose was reduced to 31.1% for prostate cancer patients, and it was reduced to 82.5% for a lung cancer patient by applying the AMF. These preliminary results suggested that the proposed approach based on noise suppression filters could decrease the patient dose in IGPP systems.

  9. Feasibility of patient dose reduction based on various noise suppression filters for cone-beam computed tomography in an image-guided patient positioning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamezawa, Hidemi; Arimura, Hidetaka; Shirieda, Katsutoshi; Kameda, Noboru; Ohki, Masafumi

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the feasibility of patient dose reduction based on six noise suppression filters for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in an image-guided patient positioning (IGPP) system. A midpoint dose was employed as a patient dose index. First, a reference dose (RD) and low-dose (LD)-CBCT images were acquired with a reference dose and various low doses. Second, an automated rigid registration was performed for three axis translations to estimate patient setup errors between a planning CT image and the LD-CBCT images processed by six noise suppression filters (averaging filter, median filter, Gaussian filter, edge-preserving smoothing filter, bilateral filter, and adaptive partial median filter (AMF)). Third, residual errors representing the patient positioning accuracy were calculated as Euclidean distances between the setup error vectors estimated using the LD-CBCT and RD-CBCT images. Finally, the residual errors as a function of the patient dose index were estimated for LD-CBCT images processed by six noise suppression filters, and then the patient dose indices for the filtered LD-CBCT images were obtained at the same residual error as the RD-CBCT image. This approach was applied to an anthropomorphic phantom and four cancer patients. The patient dose for the LD-CBCT images was reduced to 19% of that for the RD-CBCT image for the phantom by using AMF, while keeping a same residual error of 0.47 mm as the RD-CBCT image by applying the noise suppression filters to the LD-CBCT images. The average patient dose was reduced to 31.1% for prostate cancer patients, and it was reduced to 82.5% for a lung cancer patient by applying the AMF. These preliminary results suggested that the proposed approach based on noise suppression filters could decrease the patient dose in IGPP systems.

  10. Rapid Automated Treatment Planning Process to Select Breast Cancer Patients for Active Breathing Control to Achieve Cardiac Dose Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Wei; Purdie, Thomas G.; Rahman, Mohammad; Marshall, Andrea; Liu Feifei; Fyles, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a rapid automated treatment planning process for the selection of patients with left-sided breast cancer for a moderate deep inspiration breath-hold (mDIBH) technique using active breathing control (ABC); and to determine the dose reduction to the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) and the heart using mDIBH. Method and Materials: Treatment plans were generated using an automated method for patients undergoing left-sided breast radiotherapy (n = 53) with two-field tangential intensity-modulated radiotherapy. All patients with unfavorable cardiac anatomy, defined as having >10 cm{sup 3} of the heart receiving 50% of the prescribed dose (V{sub 50}) on the free-breathing automated treatment plan, underwent repeat scanning on a protocol using a mDIBH technique and ABC. The doses to the LAD and heart were compared between the free-breathing and mDIBH plans. Results: The automated planning process required approximately 9 min to generate a breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy plan. Using the dose-volume criteria, 20 of the 53 patients were selected for ABC. Significant differences were found between the free-breathing and mDIBH plans for the heart V{sub 50} (29.9 vs. 3.7 cm{sup 3}), mean heart dose (317 vs. 132 cGy), mean LAD dose (2,047 vs. 594 cGy), and maximal dose to 0.2 cm{sup 3} of the LAD (4,155 vs. 1,507 cGy, all p <.001). Of the 17 patients who had a breath-hold threshold of {>=}0.8 L, 14 achieved a {>=}90% reduction in the heart V{sub 50} using the mDIBH technique. The 3 patients who had had a breath-hold threshold <0.8 L achieved a lower, but still significant, reduction in the heart V{sub 50}. Conclusions: A rapid automated treatment planning process can be used to select patients who will benefit most from mDIBH. For selected patients with unfavorable cardiac anatomy, the mDIBH technique using ABC can significantly reduce the dose to the LAD and heart, potentially reducing the cardiac risks.

  11. Reduction of Dose Delivered to Organs at Risk in Prostate Cancer Patients via Image-Guided Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlowski, Jason M.; Yang, Eddy S.; Malcolm, Arnold W.; Coffey, Charles W.; Ding, George X.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To determine whether image guidance can improve the dose delivered to target organs and organs at risk (OARs) for prostate cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Eight prostate cancer patients were treated with IMRT to 76 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction. Daily target localization was performed via alignment of three intraprostatic fiducials and weekly kV-cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. The prostate and OARs were manually contoured on each CBCT by a single physician. Daily patient setup shifts were obtained by comparing alignment of skin tattoos with the treatment position based on fiducials. Treatment fields were retrospectively applied to CBCT scans. The dose distributions were calculated using actual treatment plans (an 8-mm PTV margin everywhere except for 6-mm posteriorly) with and without image guidance shifts. Furthermore, the feasibility of margin reduction was evaluated by reducing planning margins to 4 mm everywhere except for 3 mm posteriorly. Results: For the eight treatment plans on the 56 CBCT scans, the average doses to 98% of the prostate (D98) were 102% (range, 99-104%) and 99% (range, 45-104%) with and without image guidance, respectively. Using margin reduction, the average D98s were 100% (range, 84-104%) and 92% (range, 40-104%) with and without image guidance, respectively. Conclusions: Currently, margins used in IMRT plans are adequate to deliver a dose to the prostate with conventional patient positioning using skin tattoos or bony anatomy. The use of image guidance may facilitate significant reduction of planning margins. Future studies to assess the efficacy of decreasing margins and improvement of treatment-related toxicities are warranted.

  12. Fast patient-specific Monte Carlo brachytherapy dose calculations via the correlated sampling variance reduction technique

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, Andrew; Le, Yi; Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate potential of correlated sampling Monte Carlo (CMC) simulation to improve the calculation efficiency for permanent seed brachytherapy (PSB) implants without loss of accuracy. Methods: CMC was implemented within an in-house MC code family (PTRAN) and used to compute 3D dose distributions for two patient cases: a clinical PSB postimplant prostate CT imaging study and a simulated post lumpectomy breast PSB implant planned on a screening dedicated breast cone-beam CT patient exam. CMC tallies the dose difference, ΔD, between highly correlated histories in homogeneous and heterogeneous geometries. The heterogeneous geometry histories were derived from photon collisions sampled in a geometrically identical but purely homogeneous medium geometry, by altering their particle weights to correct for bias. The prostate case consisted of 78 Model-6711 125I seeds. The breast case consisted of 87 Model-200 103Pd seeds embedded around a simulated lumpectomy cavity. Systematic and random errors in CMC were unfolded using low-uncertainty uncorrelated MC (UMC) as the benchmark. CMC efficiency gains, relative to UMC, were computed for all voxels, and the mean was classified in regions that received minimum doses greater than 20%, 50%, and 90% of D90, as well as for various anatomical regions. Results: Systematic errors in CMC relative to UMC were less than 0.6% for 99% of the voxels and 0.04% for 100% of the voxels for the prostate and breast cases, respectively. For a 1 × 1 × 1 mm3 dose grid, efficiency gains were realized in all structures with 38.1- and 59.8-fold average gains within the prostate and breast clinical target volumes (CTVs), respectively. Greater than 99% of the voxels within the prostate and breast CTVs experienced an efficiency gain. Additionally, it was shown that efficiency losses were confined to low dose regions while the largest gains were located where little difference exists between the homogeneous and heterogeneous doses

  13. Reduction of eye lens radiation dose by orbital bismuth shielding in pediatric patients undergoing CT of the head: A Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Perisinakis, Kostas; Raissaki, Maria; Tzedakis, Antonis; Theocharopoulos, Nicholas; Damilakis, John; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas

    2005-04-01

    Our aim in the study was to assess the eye lens dose reduction resulting from the use of radioprotective bismuth garments to shield the eyes of pediatric patients undergoing head CT. The Monte Carlo N-particle transport code and mathematical humanoid phantoms representing the average individual at different ages were used to determine eye lens dose reduction accomplished with bismuth shielding of the eye in the following simulated CT scans: (a) scanning of the orbits, (b) scanning of the whole head, and (c) 20 deg. angled scanning of the brain excluding the orbits. The effect of bismuth shielding on the eye lens dose was also investigated using an anthropomorphic phantom and thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD). Eye lens dose reduction achieved by bismuth shielding was measured in 16 patients undergoing multiphase CT scanning of the head. The patient's scans were divided in the following: CT examinations where the eye globes were entirely included (n=5), partly included (n=6) and excluded (n=5) from the scanned region. The eye lens dose reduction depended mainly on the scan boundaries set by an operator. The average eye lens dose reduction determined by Monte Carlo simulation was 38.2%, 33.0% and <1% for CT scans of the orbits, whole head, and brain with an angled gantry, respectively. The difference between the Monte Carlo derived eye lens dose reduction factor values and corresponding values determined directly by using the anthropomorphic phantom head was found less than 5%. The mean eye lens dose reduction achieved by bismuth shielding in pediatric patients were 34%, 20% and <2% when eye globes were entirely included, partly included and excluded from the scanned region, respectively. A significant reduction in eye lens dose may be achieved by using superficial orbital bismuth shielding during pediatric head CT scans. However, bismuth garments should not be used in children when the eyes are excluded from the primarily exposed region.

  14. The Influences of Withdrawal and Daily Dose Reduction of Pioglitazone on Metabolic Parameters in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Retrospective Longitudinal Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Katsuyama, Hisayuki; Fukunaga, Takayuki; Hamasaki, Hidetaka; Adachi, Hiroki; Moriyama, Sumie; Kawaguchi, Akiko; Mishima, Shuichi; Sako, Akahito; Yanai, Hidekatsu

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to understand the influences of withdrawal or dose reduction of pioglitazone in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods We retrospectively picked up patients who had undergone withdrawal or daily dose reduction of pioglitazone after a continuous prescription for 3 months or longer between January 2010 and March 2014. We compared the data before the withdrawal or dose reduction of pioglitazone with the data at 3 or 6 months after those by a chart-based analysis. Results Among 713 patients taking pioglitazone at least once during the studied period, 20 patients had undergone withdrawal of pioglitazone (group A) and 51 patients had undergone daily dose reduction (group B). The mean pioglitazone dose at baseline was 23 mg in subjects of group A, and 30 mg in group B. The number of subjects who had taken high-dose metformin (≥ 1,000 mg) and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors increased after the withdrawal or dose reduction of pioglitazone in both groups. Although no significant change was observed in plasma glucose and HbA1c levels, body weight significantly decreased at 3 and 6 months after the dose reduction in group B. The same tendency was observed in group A. Serum high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) levels significantly decreased at 3 and 6 months after the withdrawal in group A. The serum alanine aminotransferase levels significantly increased 3 months after the withdrawal in group A. Conclusions Present study demonstrated that the withdrawal of pioglitazone exacerbated serum HDL-C and liver function in patients with type 2 diabetes, although glycemic control could be maintained by using high-dose metformin or DPP-4 inhibitors. PMID:27429679

  15. [Effect of reduction in the Bothrops antivenin dose administrated in patients bitten by the Bothrops snake].

    PubMed

    Jorge, M T; Ribeiro, L A

    1994-01-01

    Seven hundred and thirty accidents by Bothrops snake bite attended at Hospital Vital Brazil-Instituto Butantan (HVB-IB) were studied: 411 of in 1983/84 (group A) and 319 in 1986 (group B). All the patients were seen in the Hospital 6 hours after the bite. As an average, all the 411 patients of the group A and the 319 patients of the group B received antivenom capable of neutralizing 215 mg and 117 mg of Bothrops jararaca, respectively. Both groups were similar concerning to: sex and age of the patients; anatomic region bitten; frequency of incision and tourniquet use at the site bite; time in between of the accident and the admission at HVB-IB; classification of B. jararaca either young or adult; frequency of the coagulation impairment. There was no difference in the evolution of the local envenoming manifestations and there were no cases of death. PMID:8061698

  16. Simulation of dose reduction in tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Svalkvist, Angelica; Baath, Magnus

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: Methods for simulating dose reduction are valuable tools in the work of optimizing radiographic examinations. Using such methods, clinical images can be simulated to have been collected at other, lower, dose levels without the need of additional patient exposure. A recent technology introduced to healthcare that needs optimization is tomosynthesis, where a number of low-dose projection images collected at different angles is used to reconstruct section images of an imaged object. The aim of the present work was to develop a method of simulating dose reduction for digital radiographic systems, suitable for tomosynthesis. Methods: The developed method uses information about the noise power spectrum (NPS) at the original dose level and the simulated dose level to create a noise image that is added to the original image to produce an image that has the same noise properties as an image actually collected at the simulated dose level. As the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of digital detectors operating at the low dose levels used for tomosynthesis may show a strong dependency on the dose level, it is important that a method for simulating dose reduction for tomosynthesis takes this dependency into account. By applying an experimentally determined relationship between pixel mean and pixel variance, variations in both dose and DQE in relevant dose ranges are taken into account. Results: The developed method was tested on a chest tomosynthesis system and was shown to produce NPS of simulated dose-reduced projection images that agreed well with the NPS of images actually collected at the simulated dose level. The simulated dose reduction method was also applied to tomosynthesis examinations of an anthropomorphic chest phantom, and the obtained noise in the reconstructed section images was very similar to that of an examination actually performed at the simulated dose level. Conclusions: In conclusion, the present article describes a method for simulating dose

  17. Radiation dose reduction for patients with extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma with complete response after initial induction chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liang; Bi, Xi-wen; Xia, Zhong-jun; Huang, Hui-qiang; Jiang, Wen-qi; Zhang, Yu-jing

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have found that radiotherapy (RT) dose less than 50 Gy resulted in inferior outcomes for early stage extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma (ENKTL). Nowadays, induction chemotherapy (CT) followed by RT consolidation is often used. For patients who get complete response (CR) after CT, whether RT dose can be safely reduced or not remains unknown. This retrospective study compared the survival outcomes between patients who received higher dose (>50 Gy) and lower dose (≤50 Gy) RT after CR was attained by CT. One hundred and forty four patients of early stage ENKTL got CR after induction CT and received RT consolidation. Thirty-one patients received lower dose RT (median 46 Gy, range, 36–50 Gy), and 113 patients received higher dose RT (median 56 Gy, range, 52–66 Gy). In univariate survival analysis, age >60, local tumor invasion, and non-asparaginase-based CT were associated with inferior progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). However, there were no differences in PFS and OS between patients treated with higher and lower dose RT, which was confirmed in the multivariate survival analysis. Furthermore, reduced dose RT did not affect local control rate. Most common RT-related side effects were grade 1/2 mucositis and dermatitis, and the incidence rate of grade 3 mucositis or dermatitis was lower in patients treated with reduced dose RT (9.7% vs 15.0% for mucositis, and 6.5% vs 17.7% for dermatitis). In conclusion, this study found that RT dose could be safely reduced without compromising survival outcomes and further improved RT-related side effects. Prospective randomized controlled trials are warranted to validate our findings. PMID:27713641

  18. A double-blind randomized clinical trial of different doses of transdermal nicotine patch for smoking reduction and cessation in long-term hospitalized schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsing-Kang; Lan, Tsuo-Hung; Wu, Bo-Jian

    2013-02-01

    There have been many studies of smoking cessation using nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) with schizophrenic patients, but none exploring the smoking-reduction effects of varying doses of NRT in long-stay patients with schizophrenia. This study aimed to examine the effect of different doses of the nicotine transdermal patch on smoking-reduction and cessation outcomes in long-term hospitalized schizophrenic patients. A total of 184 subjects participated in a randomized, controlled, double-blind 8-week clinical trial. Participants were randomized into two groups using two different doses of NRT: a high-dose NRT group (31.2 mg for the first 4 weeks, then 20.8 mg for 4 weeks, n = 92) or a low-dose NRT group (20.8 mg for 8 weeks, n = 92). The 7-day point prevalence of abstinence was 2.7 % (5/184). Participants in the low-dose NRT group reduced smoking by 3.1 more cigarettes on average than those in the high-dose group (p = 0.005). However, a repeated measures analysis of variance revealed that the main effect of changes in the number of cigarettes smoked, comparing the two types of treatment across periods, was not significant (p = 0.35, partial eta square = 0.018). In summary, among a cohort of chronic institutionalized schizophrenic patients, smoking cessation and reduction outcomes were not correlated with NRT dose, and the cessation rate was much lower than rates in similar studies. It indicates that long-term hospitalized schizophrenic patients have more difficulties with quitting smoking. More effective integrative smoking cessation programs should be addressed for these patients.

  19. Examining Margin Reduction and Its Impact on Dose Distribution for Prostate Cancer Patients Undergoing Daily Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Hammoud, Rabih Patel, Samir H.; Pradhan, Deepak; Kim, Jinkoo; Guan, Harrison; Li Shidong; Movsas, Benjamin

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: To examine the dosimetric impact of margin reduction and quantify residual error after three-dimensional (3D) image registration using daily cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) for prostate cancer patients. Methods and Materials: One hundred forty CBCTs from 5 prostate cancer patients were examined. Two intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans were generated on CT simulation on the basis of two planning target volume (PTV) margins: 10 mm all around the prostate and seminal vesicles except 6 mm posteriorly (10/6) and 5 mm all around except 3 mm posteriorly (5/3). Daily CBCT using the Varian On-Board Imaging System was acquired. The 10/6 and 5/3 simulation plans were overlaid onto each CBCT, and each CBCT plan was calculated. To examine residual error, PlanCT/CBCT intensity-based 3D image registration was performed for prostate localization using center of mass and maximal border displacement. Results: Prostate coverage was within 2% between the 10/6 and 5/3 plans. Seminal vesicle coverage was reduced with the 5/3 plan compared with the 10/6 plan, with coverage difference within 7%. The 5/3 plan allowed 30-50% sparing of bladder and rectal high-dose regions. For residual error quantification, center of mass data show that 99%, 93%, and 96% of observations fall within 3 mm in the left-right, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior directions, respectively. Maximal border displacement observations range from 79% to 99%, within 5 mm for all directions. Conclusion: Cone-beam CT dosimetrically validated a 10/6 margin when soft-tissue localization is not used. Intensity-based 3D image registration has the potential to improve target localization and to provide guidelines for margin definition.

  20. Long-term efficiency of infliximab in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: real life data confirm the potential for dose reduction

    PubMed Central

    Heldmann, F; van den Bosch, F; Burmester, G; Gaston, H; van der Horst-Bruinsma, I E; Krause, A; Schmidt, R; Schneider, M; Sieper, J; Andermann, B; van Tubergen, A; Witt, M; Braun, J

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyse the treatment outcome of patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in the European AS infliximab cohort (EASIC) study after a total period of 8 years with specific focus on dosage and the duration of intervals between infliximab infusions. Methods EASIC included patients with AS who had received infliximab for 2 years as part of the ASSERT trial. After that period, rheumatologists were free to change the dose or the intervals of infliximab. Clinical data were status at baseline, end of ASSERT and for a total of 8 years of follow-up. Results Of the initially 71 patients with AS from EASIC, 55 patients (77.5%) had completed the 8th year of anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) treatment. Of those, 48 patients (87.3%) still continued on infliximab. The mean infusion interval increased slightly from 6 to 7.1±1.5 weeks, while 45.8% patients had increased the intervals up to a maximum of 12 weeks. The mean infliximab dose remained stable over time, with a minimum of 3.1 mg/kg and a maximum of 6.4 mg/kg. In patients receiving <5 mg/kg infliximab, the mean infusion interval increased to 7.0±1.2 weeks. In total, the mean cumulative dose per patient and per year decreased from 3566.30 to 2973.60 mg. Conclusions We could observe that over a follow-up of 8 years of treatment with infliximab, >85% patients still remained on the same treatment, without any major safety events. Furthermore, both the infusion intervals and also the mean infliximab dose were modestly reduced in ≥70% of the patients without the loss of clinical efficiency. PMID:27493791

  1. Exhaling a budesonide inhaler through the nose results in a significant reduction in dose requirement of budesonide nasal spray in patients having asthma with rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, W A

    1999-01-01

    Budesonide, an inhaled corticosteroid is used routinely in the treatment of bronchial asthma and rhinitis. Although inhaled corticosteroids in therapeutic doses are unlikely to result in systemic side effects, there is as yet skepticism about their routine and prolonged use. The aim of this study was to determine whether budesonide inhalation through a metered dose inhaler, when exhaled through the nose could result in a reduction in the dose requirement of budesonide metered nasal spray in patients having perennial allergic asthma with rhinitis. This study was an open, parallel, comparative, crossover trial in which 49 young patients having perennial allergic asthma with rhinitis were divided into two groups and administered either a combination of budesonide metered dose inhaler with a budesonide nasal spray or a budesonide inhaler alone, which was to be exhaled through the nose. Both groups were later crossed over and weekly symptom scores and peak nasal inspiratory flow rates were monitored during each phase of the study. Finally, patients who volunteered from both groups were instructed to note the reduction in dose requirement of budesonide nasal spray while using a budesonide inhaler and exhaling it through the nose. The results of this study reveal that when a budesonide inhaler is exhaled through the nose, it results in an improvement in symptom scores and peak nasal inspiratory flow rates, which were significantly less than those obtained in the group using both a budesonide nasal spray and a metered dose inhaler. In addition, exhaling budesonide through the nose results in a 40.1% reduction in the dose requirement of a budesonide nasal spray, which is statistically significant (p < 0.001).

  2. Radiation-induced noncancer risks in interventional cardiology: optimisation of procedures and staff and patient dose reduction.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhonghua; AbAziz, Aini; Yusof, Ahmad Khairuddin Md

    2013-01-01

    Concerns about ionizing radiation during interventional cardiology have been increased in recent years as a result of rapid growth in interventional procedure volumes and the high radiation doses associated with some procedures. Noncancer radiation risks to cardiologists and medical staff in terms of radiation-induced cataracts and skin injuries for patients appear clear potential consequences of interventional cardiology procedures, while radiation-induced potential risk of developing cardiovascular effects remains less clear. This paper provides an overview of the evidence-based reviews of concerns about noncancer risks of radiation exposure in interventional cardiology. Strategies commonly undertaken to reduce radiation doses to both medical staff and patients during interventional cardiology procedures are discussed; optimisation of interventional cardiology procedures is highlighted.

  3. Radiation-Induced Noncancer Risks in Interventional Cardiology: Optimisation of Procedures and Staff and Patient Dose Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Khairuddin Md Yusof, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Concerns about ionizing radiation during interventional cardiology have been increased in recent years as a result of rapid growth in interventional procedure volumes and the high radiation doses associated with some procedures. Noncancer radiation risks to cardiologists and medical staff in terms of radiation-induced cataracts and skin injuries for patients appear clear potential consequences of interventional cardiology procedures, while radiation-induced potential risk of developing cardiovascular effects remains less clear. This paper provides an overview of the evidence-based reviews of concerns about noncancer risks of radiation exposure in interventional cardiology. Strategies commonly undertaken to reduce radiation doses to both medical staff and patients during interventional cardiology procedures are discussed; optimisation of interventional cardiology procedures is highlighted. PMID:24027768

  4. Reduction of radiation dose during facet joint injection using the new image guidance system SabreSource™: a prospective study in 60 patients

    PubMed Central

    Proschek, Dirk; Kafchitsas, K.; Rauschmann, M. A.; Kurth, A. A.; Vogl, T. J.

    2008-01-01

    Interventional procedures are associated with high radiation doses for both patients and surgeons. To reduce the risk from ionizing radiation, it is essential to minimize radiation dose. This prospective study was performed to evaluate the effectiveness in reducing radiation dose during facet joint injection in the lumbar spine and to evaluate the feasibility and possibilities of the new real time image guidance system SabreSource™. A total of 60 patients, treated with a standardized injection therapy of the facet joints L4–L5 or L5–S1, were included in this study. A total of 30 patients were treated by fluoroscopy guidance alone, the following 30 patients were treated using the new SabreSource™ system. Thus a total of 120 injections to the facet joints were performed. Pain, according to the visual analogue scale (VAS), was documented before and 6 h after the intervention. Radiation dose, time of radiation and the number of exposures needed to place the needle were recorded. No significant differences concerning age (mean age 60.5 years, range 51–69), body mass index (mean BMI 26.2, range 22.2–29.9) and preoperative pain (VAS 7.9, range 6–10) were found between the two groups. There was no difference in pain reduction between the two groups (60 vs. 61.5%; P = 0.001) but the radiation dose was significantly smaller with the new SabreSource™ system (reduction of radiation dose 32.7%, P = 0.01; reduction of mean entrance surface dose 32.3%, P = 0.01). The SabreSource™ System significantly reduced the radiation dose received during the injection therapy of the lumbar facet joints. With minimal effort for the setup at the beginning of a session, the system is easy to handle and can be helpful for other injection therapies (e.g. nerve root block therapies). PMID:19082641

  5. SU-E-J-183: Quantifying the Image Quality and Dose Reduction of Respiratory Triggered 4D Cone-Beam Computed Tomography with Patient- Measured Breathing

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, B; OBrien, R; Kipritidis, J; Keall, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Respiratory triggered four dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (RT 4D CBCT) is a novel technique that uses a patient's respiratory signal to drive the image acquisition with the goal of imaging dose reduction without degrading image quality. This work investigates image quality and dose using patient-measured respiratory signals for RT 4D CBCT simulations instead of synthetic sinusoidal signals used in previous work. Methods: Studies were performed that simulate a 4D CBCT image acquisition using both the novel RT 4D CBCT technique and a conventional 4D CBCT technique from a database of oversampled Rando phantom CBCT projections. A database containing 111 free breathing lung cancer patient respiratory signal files was used to create 111 RT 4D CBCT and 111 conventional 4D CBCT image datasets from realistic simulations of a 4D RT CBCT system. Each of these image datasets were compared to a ground truth dataset from which a root mean square error (RMSE) metric was calculated to quantify the degradation of image quality. The number of projections used in each simulation is counted and was assumed as a surrogate for imaging dose. Results: Based on 111 breathing traces, when comparing RT 4D CBCT with conventional 4D CBCT the average image quality was reduced by 7.6%. However, the average imaging dose reduction was 53% based on needing fewer projections (617 on average) than conventional 4D CBCT (1320 projections). Conclusion: The simulation studies using a wide range of patient breathing traces have demonstrated that the RT 4D CBCT method can potentially offer a substantial saving of imaging dose of 53% on average compared to conventional 4D CBCT in simulation studies with a minimal impact on image quality. A patent application (PCT/US2012/048693) has been filed which is related to this work.

  6. Quantifying the image quality and dose reduction of respiratory triggered 4D cone-beam computed tomography with patient-measured breathing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Benjamin J.; O'Brien, Ricky T.; Kipritidis, John; Shieh, Chun-Chien; Keall, Paul J.

    2015-12-01

    Respiratory triggered four dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (RT 4D CBCT) is a novel technique that uses a patient’s respiratory signal to drive the image acquisition with the goal of imaging dose reduction without degrading image quality. This work investigates image quality and dose using patient-measured respiratory signals for RT 4D CBCT simulations. Studies were performed that simulate a 4D CBCT image acquisition using both the novel RT 4D CBCT technique and a conventional 4D CBCT technique. A set containing 111 free breathing lung cancer patient respiratory signal files was used to create 111 pairs of RT 4D CBCT and conventional 4D CBCT image sets from realistic simulations of a 4D CBCT system using a Rando phantom and the digital phantom, XCAT. Each of these image sets were compared to a ground truth dataset from which a mean absolute pixel difference (MAPD) metric was calculated to quantify the degradation of image quality. The number of projections used in each simulation was counted and was assumed as a surrogate for imaging dose. Based on 111 breathing traces, when comparing RT 4D CBCT with conventional 4D CBCT, the average image quality was reduced by 7.6% (Rando study) and 11.1% (XCAT study). However, the average imaging dose reduction was 53% based on needing fewer projections (617 on average) than conventional 4D CBCT (1320 projections). The simulation studies have demonstrated that the RT 4D CBCT method can potentially offer a 53% saving in imaging dose on average compared to conventional 4D CBCT in simulation studies using a wide range of patient-measured breathing traces with a minimal impact on image quality.

  7. A combination of spatial and recursive temporal filtering for noise reduction when using region of interest (ROI) fluoroscopy for patient dose reduction in image guided vascular interventions with significant anatomical motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setlur Nagesh, S. V.; Khobragade, P.; Ionita, C.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2015-03-01

    Because x-ray based image-guided vascular interventions are minimally invasive they are currently the most preferred method of treating disorders such as stroke, arterial stenosis, and aneurysms; however, the x-ray exposure to the patient during long image-guided interventional procedures could cause harmful effects such as cancer in the long run and even tissue damage in the short term. ROI fluoroscopy reduces patient dose by differentially attenuating the incident x-rays outside the region-of-interest. To reduce the noise in the dose-reduced regions previously recursive temporal filtering was successfully demonstrated for neurovascular interventions. However, in cardiac interventions, anatomical motion is significant and excessive recursive filtering could cause blur. In this work the effects of three noise-reduction schemes, including recursive temporal filtering, spatial mean filtering, and a combination of spatial and recursive temporal filtering, were investigated in a simulated ROI dose-reduced cardiac intervention. First a model to simulate the aortic arch and its movement was built. A coronary stent was used to simulate a bioprosthetic valve used in TAVR procedures and was deployed under dose-reduced ROI fluoroscopy during the simulated heart motion. The images were then retrospectively processed for noise reduction in the periphery, using recursive temporal filtering, spatial filtering and a combination of both. Quantitative metrics for all three noise reduction schemes are calculated and are presented as results. From these it can be concluded that with significant anatomical motion, a combination of spatial and recursive temporal filtering scheme is best suited for reducing the excess quantum noise in the periphery. This new noise-reduction technique in combination with ROI fluoroscopy has the potential for substantial patient-dose savings in cardiac interventions.

  8. Role of cardiac ultrafast cameras with CZT solid-state detectors and software developments on radiation absorbed dose reduction to the patients.

    PubMed

    Gunalp, Bengul

    2015-07-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) is one the most contributing nuclear medicine technique to the annual population dose. The purpose of this study is to compare radiation-absorbed doses to the patients examined by conventional cardiac SPECT (CSPECT) camera and ultrafast cardiac (UFC) camera with cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) solid-state detectors. Total injected activity was reduced by 50 % when both stress and rest images were acquired and by 75 % when only stress images were taken with UFC camera. As a result of this, the mean total effective dose was found significantly lower with UFC camera (2.2 ± 1.2 mSv) than CSPECT (7.7 ± 3.8 mSv) (p < 0.001). Further dose reduction was obtained by reducing equivocal test results and unnecessary additional examinations with UFC camera. Using UFC camera, MPI can be conveniently used for the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD) much less increasing annual population radiation dose as it had been before. PMID:25848109

  9. Maintenance of remission following 2 years of standard treatment then dose reduction with abatacept in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis and poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Westhovens, Rene; Robles, Manuel; Ximenes, Antonio Carlos; Wollenhaupt, Jurgen; Durez, Patrick; Gomez-Reino, Juan; Grassi, Walter; Haraoui, Boulos; Shergy, William; Park, Sung-Hwan; Genant, Harry; Peterfy, Charles; Becker, Jean-Claude; Murthy, Bindu

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate maintenance of response while reducing intravenous abatacept dose from ∼10 mg/kg to ∼5 mg/kg in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who achieved disease activity score (DAS)28 (erythrocyte sedimentation rate, ESR) <2.6. Methods This 1-year, multinational, randomised, double-blind substudy evaluated the efficacy and safety of ∼10 mg/kg and ∼5 mg/kg abatacept in patients with early RA with poor prognosis who had reached DAS28 (ESR) <2.6 at year 2 of the AGREE study. The primary outcome was time to disease relapse (defined as additional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, ≥2 courses high-dose steroids, return to open-label abatacept ∼10 mg/kg, or DAS28 (C reactive protein) ≥3.2 at two consecutive visits). Results 108 patients were randomised (∼10 mg/kg, n=58; ∼5 mg/kg, n=50). Three and five patients, respectively, discontinued, and four per group returned to open-label abatacept. Relapse over time and the proportion of patients relapsing were similar in both groups (31% (∼10 mg/kg) vs 34% (∼5 mg/kg); HR: 0.87 (95% CI 0.45 to 1.69)). Mean steady-state trough serum concentration for the ∼10 mg/kg group was 20.3–24.1 µg/mL, compared with 8.8–12.0 µg/mL for the ∼5 mg/kg group. Conclusions This exploratory study suggests that abatacept dose reduction may be an option in patients with poor prognosis early RA who achieve DAS28 (ESR) <2.6 after ≥1 year on abatacept (∼10 mg/kg). Trial registration number NCT00989235. PMID:25550337

  10. Are there dangers in biologic dose reduction strategies?

    PubMed

    Chan, Christopher K Y; Holroyd, Christopher R; Mason, Alice; Zarroug, Jalaa; Edwards, Christopher J

    2016-07-01

    Biologic dose reduction strategies, for patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases, have been assessed in multiple studies to assess outcomes compared to ongoing maintenance dosing. Whilst cessation in established disease usually leads to disease flare, dose tapering approaches for those achieving low disease activity often appear to be successful in the short term. However, tapering can be associated with a higher risk of losing disease control and rates of recapture of disease control using the original biologic dose vary between studies. Over relatively short periods of follow-up, a number of studies have shown no statistical difference in radiographic progression in patients tapering or discontinuing biologics. However, a Cochrane review found that radiographic and functional outcomes may be worse after TNF inhibitor discontinuation, and over long-term disease follow-up flares have been associated with radiographic progression and worse patient reported outcomes. To date, no studies of biological therapy dose reduction have specifically investigated the risk of increased immunogenicity or the effects on cardiovascular risk and other co-morbidities, although these remain important potential risks. In addition, whether there are greater dangers in certain dose reduction approaches such as a reduction in dose at the same frequency or a spacing of doses is not established.

  11. Toward time resolved 4D cardiac CT imaging with patient dose reduction: estimating the global heart motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Segars, W. Paul; Fung, George S. K.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2006-03-01

    Coronary artery imaging with multi-slice helical computed tomography is a promising noninvasive imaging technique. The current major issues include the insufficient temporal resolution and large patient dose. We propose an image reconstruction method which provides a solution to both of the problems. The method uses an iterative approach repeating the following four steps until the difference between the two projection data sets falls below a certain criteria in step-4: 1) estimating or updating the cardiac motion vectors, 2) reconstructing the time-resolved 4D dynamic volume images using the motion vectors, 3) calculating the projection data from the current 4D images, 4) comparing them with the measured ones. In this study, we obtain the first estimate of the motion vector. We use the 4D NCAT phantom, a realistic computer model for the human anatomy and cardiac motions, to generate the dynamic fan-beam projection data sets as well to provide a known truth for the motion. Then, the halfscan reconstruction with the sliding time-window technique is used to generate cine images: f(t, r r). Here, we use one heart beat for each position r so that the time information is retained. Next, the magnitude of the first derivative of f(t, r r) with respect to time, i.e., |df/dt|, is calculated and summed over a region-of-interest (ROI), which is called the mean-absolute difference (MAD). The initial estimation of the vector field are obtained using MAD for each ROI. Results of the preliminary study are presented.

  12. Impact of Safety-Related Dose Reductions or Discontinuations on Sustained Virologic Response in HCV-Infected Patients: Results from the GUARD-C Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Graham R.; Coppola, Carmine; Derbala, Moutaz; Ferenci, Peter; Orlandini, Alessandra; Reddy, K. Rajender; Tallarico, Ludovico; Shiffman, Mitchell L.; Ahlers, Silke; Bakalos, Georgios; Hassanein, Tarek

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the introduction of direct-acting antiviral agents for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, peginterferon alfa/ribavirin remains relevant in many resource-constrained settings. The non-randomized GUARD-C cohort investigated baseline predictors of safety-related dose reductions or discontinuations (sr-RD) and their impact on sustained virologic response (SVR) in patients receiving peginterferon alfa/ribavirin in routine practice. Methods A total of 3181 HCV-mono-infected treatment-naive patients were assigned to 24 or 48 weeks of peginterferon alfa/ribavirin by their physician. Patients were categorized by time-to-first sr-RD (Week 4/12). Detailed analyses of the impact of sr-RD on SVR24 (HCV RNA <50 IU/mL) were conducted in 951 Caucasian, noncirrhotic genotype (G)1 patients assigned to peginterferon alfa-2a/ribavirin for 48 weeks. The probability of SVR24 was identified by a baseline scoring system (range: 0–9 points) on which scores of 5 to 9 and <5 represent high and low probability of SVR24, respectively. Results SVR24 rates were 46.1% (754/1634), 77.1% (279/362), 68.0% (514/756), and 51.3% (203/396), respectively, in G1, 2, 3, and 4 patients. Overall, 16.9% and 21.8% patients experienced ≥1 sr-RD for peginterferon alfa and ribavirin, respectively. Among Caucasian noncirrhotic G1 patients: female sex, lower body mass index, pre-existing cardiovascular/pulmonary disease, and low hematological indices were prognostic factors of sr-RD; SVR24 was lower in patients with ≥1 vs. no sr-RD by Week 4 (37.9% vs. 54.4%; P = 0.0046) and Week 12 (41.7% vs. 55.3%; P = 0.0016); sr-RD by Week 4/12 significantly reduced SVR24 in patients with scores <5 but not ≥5. Conclusions In conclusion, sr-RD to peginterferon alfa-2a/ribavirin significantly impacts on SVR24 rates in treatment-naive G1 noncirrhotic Caucasian patients. Baseline characteristics can help select patients with a high probability of SVR24 and a low probability of sr-RD with

  13. Strategies for reduction of radiation dose in cardiac multislice CT.

    PubMed

    Paul, Jean-François; Abada, Hicham T

    2007-08-01

    Because cardiac computed tomography (CT) (mainly coronary CT angiography) is a very promising technique, used more and more for coronary artery evaluation, the benefits and risks of this new low-invasive technique must be balanced. Radiation dose is a major concern for coronary CT angiography, especially in case of repeated examinations or in particular subgroups of patients (for example young female patients). Radiation dose to patient tends to increase from 16- to 64-slice CT. Radiation exposure in ECG-gated acquisitions may reach up to 40 mSv; considerable differences are attributable to the performance of CT machines, to technical dose-sparing tools, but also to radiological habits. Setting radiation dose at the lowest level possible should be a constant goal for the radiologist. Current technological tools are detailed in regard to their efficiency. Optimisation is necessary, by a judicious use of technological tools and also by individual adaptation of kV or mAs. This paper reviews the different current strategies for radiation dose reduction, keeping image quality constant. Data from the literature are discussed, and future technological developments are considered in regards to radiation dose reduction. The particular case of paediatric patients with congenital heart disease is also addressed.

  14. Validation of CT dose-reduction simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Massoumzadeh, Parinaz; Don, Steven; Hildebolt, Charles F.; Bae, Kyongtae T.; Whiting, Bruce R.

    2009-01-15

    The objective of this research was to develop and validate a custom computed tomography dose-reduction simulation technique for producing images that have an appearance consistent with the same scan performed at a lower mAs (with fixed kVp, rotation time, and collimation). Synthetic noise is added to projection (sinogram) data, incorporating a stochastic noise model that includes energy-integrating detectors, tube-current modulation, bowtie beam filtering, and electronic system noise. Experimental methods were developed to determine the parameters required for each component of the noise model. As a validation, the outputs of the simulations were compared to measurements with cadavers in the image domain and with phantoms in both the sinogram and image domain, using an unbiased root-mean-square relative error metric to quantify agreement in noise processes. Four-alternative forced-choice (4AFC) observer studies were conducted to confirm the realistic appearance of simulated noise, and the effects of various system model components on visual noise were studied. The ''just noticeable difference (JND)'' in noise levels was analyzed to determine the sensitivity of observers to changes in noise level. Individual detector measurements were shown to be normally distributed (p>0.54), justifying the use of a Gaussian random noise generator for simulations. Phantom tests showed the ability to match original and simulated noise variance in the sinogram domain to within 5.6%{+-}1.6% (standard deviation), which was then propagated into the image domain with errors less than 4.1%{+-}1.6%. Cadaver measurements indicated that image noise was matched to within 2.6%{+-}2.0%. More importantly, the 4AFC observer studies indicated that the simulated images were realistic, i.e., no detectable difference between simulated and original images (p=0.86) was observed. JND studies indicated that observers' sensitivity to change in noise levels corresponded to a 25% difference in dose, which

  15. Dose reduction in molecular breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenaar, Douglas J.; Chowdhury, Samir; Hugg, James W.; Moats, Rex A.; Patt, Bradley E.

    2011-10-01

    Molecular Breast Imaging (MBI) is the imaging of radiolabeled drugs, cells, or nanoparticles for breast cancer detection, diagnosis, and treatment. Screening of broad populations of women for breast cancer with mammography has been augmented by the emergence of breast MRI in screening of women at high risk for breast cancer. Screening MBI may benefit the sub-population of women with dense breast tissue that obscures small tumors in mammography. Dedicated breast imaging equipment is necessary to enable detection of early-stage tumors less than 1 cm in size. Recent progress in the development of these instruments is reviewed. Pixellated CZT for single photon MBI imaging of 99mTc-sestamibi gives high detection sensitivity for early-stage tumors. The use of registered collimators in a near-field geometry gives significantly higher detection efficiency - a factor of 3.6-, which translates into an equivalent dose reduction factor given the same acquisition time. The radiation dose in the current MBI procedure has been reduced to the level of a four-view digital mammography study. In addition to screening of selected sub-populations, reduced MBI dose allows for dual-isotope, treatment planning, and repeated therapy assessment studies in the era of molecular medicine guided by quantitative molecular imaging.

  16. Monte Carlo study of the potential reduction in out-of-field dose using a patient-specific aperture in pencil beam scanning proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Dowdell, Stephen J; Clasie, Benjamin; Depauw, Nicolas; Metcalfe, Peter; Rosenfeld, Anatoly B; Kooy, Hanne M; Flanz, Jacob B; Paganetti, Harald

    2012-05-21

    This study is aimed at identifying the potential benefits of using a patient-specific aperture in proton beam scanning. For this purpose, an accurate Monte Carlo model of the pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy (PT) treatment head at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) was developed based on an existing model of the passive double-scattering (DS) system. The Monte Carlo code specifies the treatment head at MGH with sub-millimeter accuracy. The code was configured based on the results of experimental measurements performed at MGH. This model was then used to compare out-of-field doses in simulated DS treatments and PBS treatments. For the conditions explored, the penumbra in PBS is wider than in DS, leading to higher absorbed doses and equivalent doses adjacent to the primary field edge. For lateral distances greater than 10 cm from the field edge, the doses in PBS appear to be lower than those observed for DS. We found that placing a patient-specific aperture at nozzle exit during PBS treatments can potentially reduce doses lateral to the primary radiation field by over an order of magnitude. In conclusion, using a patient-specific aperture has the potential to further improve the normal tissue sparing capabilities of PBS.

  17. Monte Carlo study of the potential reduction in out-of-field dose using a patient-specific aperture in pencil beam scanning proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dowdell, S J; Clasie, B; Depauw, N; Metcalfe, P; Rosenfeld, A B; Kooy, H M; Flanz, J; Paganetti, H

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed at identifying the potential benefits of using a patient specific aperture in proton beam scanning. For this purpose an accurate Monte Carlo model of the pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy (PT) treatment head at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) was developed based on an existing model of the passive double-scattering (DS) system. The Monte Carlo code specifies the treatment head at MGH with sub-millimeter accuracy. The code was configured based on the results of experimental measurements performed at MGH. This model was then used to compare out-of-field doses in simulated double-scattering (DS) treatments and PBS treatments For the conditions explored, the penumbra in PBS is wider than in DS, leading to higher absorbed doses and equivalent doses adjacent to the primary field edge. For lateral distances greater than 10cm from the field edge, the doses in PBS appear to be lower than those observed for DS. We found that placing a patient-specific aperture at nozzle exit during PBS treatments can potentially reduce doses lateral to the primary radiation field by over an order of magnitude. In conclusion, using a patient-specific aperture has the potential to further improve the normal tissue sparing capabilities of PBS. PMID:22513726

  18. SU-E-J-243: Possibility of Exposure Dose Reduction of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography in An Image Guided Patient Positioning System by Using Various Noise Suppression Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Kamezawa, H; Arimura, H; Ohki, M; Shirieda, K; Kameda, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the possibility of exposure dose reduction of the cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in an image guided patient positioning system by using 6 noise suppression filters. Methods: First, a reference dose (RD) and low-dose (LD)-CBCT (X-ray volume imaging system, Elekta Co.) images were acquired with a reference dose of 86.2 mGy (weighted CT dose index: CTDIw) and various low doses of 1.4 to 43.1 mGy, respectively. Second, an automated rigid registration for three axes was performed for estimating setup errors between a planning CT image and the LD-CBCT images, which were processed by 6 noise suppression filters, i.e., averaging filter (AF), median filter (MF), Gaussian filter (GF), bilateral filter (BF), edge preserving smoothing filter (EPF) and adaptive partial median filter (AMF). Third, residual errors representing the patient positioning accuracy were calculated as an Euclidean distance between the setup error vectors estimated using the LD-CBCT image and RD-CBCT image. Finally, the relationships between the residual error and CTDIw were obtained for 6 noise suppression filters, and then the CTDIw for LD-CBCT images processed by the noise suppression filters were measured at the same residual error, which was obtained with the RD-CBCT. This approach was applied to an anthropomorphic pelvic phantom and two cancer patients. Results: For the phantom, the exposure dose could be reduced from 61% (GF) to 78% (AMF) by applying the noise suppression filters to the CBCT images. The exposure dose in a prostate cancer case could be reduced from 8% (AF) to 61% (AMF), and the exposure dose in a lung cancer case could be reduced from 9% (AF) to 37% (AMF). Conclusion: Using noise suppression filters, particularly an adaptive partial median filter, could be feasible to decrease the additional exposure dose to patients in image guided patient positioning systems.

  19. Radiation dose reduction for coronary artery calcium scoring at 320-detector CT with adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D.

    PubMed

    Tatsugami, Fuminari; Higaki, Toru; Fukumoto, Wataru; Kaichi, Yoko; Fujioka, Chikako; Kiguchi, Masao; Yamamoto, Hideya; Kihara, Yasuki; Awai, Kazuo

    2015-06-01

    To assess the possibility of reducing the radiation dose for coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring by using adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D (AIDR 3D) on a 320-detector CT scanner. Fifty-four patients underwent routine- and low-dose CT for CAC scoring. Low-dose CT was performed at one-third of the tube current used for routine-dose CT. Routine-dose CT was reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) and low-dose CT was reconstructed with AIDR 3D. We compared the calculated Agatston-, volume-, and mass scores of these images. The overall percentage difference in the Agatston-, volume-, and mass scores between routine- and low-dose CT studies was 15.9, 11.6, and 12.6%, respectively. There were no significant differences in the routine- and low-dose CT studies irrespective of the scoring algorithms applied. The CAC measurements of both imaging modalities were highly correlated with respect to the Agatston- (r = 0.996), volume- (r = 0.996), and mass score (r = 0.997; p < 0.001, all); the Bland-Altman limits of agreement scores were -37.4 to 51.4, -31.2 to 36.4 and -30.3 to 40.9%, respectively, suggesting that AIDR 3D was a good alternative for FBP. The mean effective radiation dose for routine- and low-dose CT was 2.2 and 0.7 mSv, respectively. The use of AIDR 3D made it possible to reduce the radiation dose by 67% for CAC scoring without impairing the quantification of coronary calcification.

  20. Radiation dose reduction for coronary artery calcium scoring at 320-detector CT with adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D.

    PubMed

    Tatsugami, Fuminari; Higaki, Toru; Fukumoto, Wataru; Kaichi, Yoko; Fujioka, Chikako; Kiguchi, Masao; Yamamoto, Hideya; Kihara, Yasuki; Awai, Kazuo

    2015-06-01

    To assess the possibility of reducing the radiation dose for coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring by using adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D (AIDR 3D) on a 320-detector CT scanner. Fifty-four patients underwent routine- and low-dose CT for CAC scoring. Low-dose CT was performed at one-third of the tube current used for routine-dose CT. Routine-dose CT was reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) and low-dose CT was reconstructed with AIDR 3D. We compared the calculated Agatston-, volume-, and mass scores of these images. The overall percentage difference in the Agatston-, volume-, and mass scores between routine- and low-dose CT studies was 15.9, 11.6, and 12.6%, respectively. There were no significant differences in the routine- and low-dose CT studies irrespective of the scoring algorithms applied. The CAC measurements of both imaging modalities were highly correlated with respect to the Agatston- (r = 0.996), volume- (r = 0.996), and mass score (r = 0.997; p < 0.001, all); the Bland-Altman limits of agreement scores were -37.4 to 51.4, -31.2 to 36.4 and -30.3 to 40.9%, respectively, suggesting that AIDR 3D was a good alternative for FBP. The mean effective radiation dose for routine- and low-dose CT was 2.2 and 0.7 mSv, respectively. The use of AIDR 3D made it possible to reduce the radiation dose by 67% for CAC scoring without impairing the quantification of coronary calcification. PMID:25754302

  1. Patient Dose Management: Focus on Practical Actions

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Medical radiation is a very important part of modern medicine, and should be only used when needed and optimized. Justification and optimization of radiation examinations must be performed. The first step of reduction of medical exposure is to know the radiation dose in currently performed examinations. This review covers radiation units, how various imaging modalities report dose, and the current status of radiation dose reports and legislation. Also, practical tips that can be applied to clinical practice are introduced. Afterwards, the importance of radiology exposure related education is emphasized and the current status of education for medical personal and the public is explained, and appropriate education strategies are suggested. Commonly asked radiation dose related example questions and answers are provided in detail to allow medical personnel to answer patients. Lastly, we talk about computerized programs that can be used in medical facilities for managing patient dose. While patient dose monitoring and management should be used to decrease and optimize overall radiation dose, it should not be used to assess individual cancer risk. One must always remember that medically justified examinations should always be performed, and unneeded examinations should be avoided in the first place. PMID:26908988

  2. Patient Dose Management: Focus on Practical Actions.

    PubMed

    Park, Michael Yong; Jung, Seung Eun

    2016-02-01

    Medical radiation is a very important part of modern medicine, and should be only used when needed and optimized. Justification and optimization of radiation examinations must be performed. The first step of reduction of medical exposure is to know the radiation dose in currently performed examinations. This review covers radiation units, how various imaging modalities report dose, and the current status of radiation dose reports and legislation. Also, practical tips that can be applied to clinical practice are introduced. Afterwards, the importance of radiology exposure related education is emphasized and the current status of education for medical personal and the public is explained, and appropriate education strategies are suggested. Commonly asked radiation dose related example questions and answers are provided in detail to allow medical personnel to answer patients. Lastly, we talk about computerized programs that can be used in medical facilities for managing patient dose. While patient dose monitoring and management should be used to decrease and optimize overall radiation dose, it should not be used to assess individual cancer risk. One must always remember that medically justified examinations should always be performed, and unneeded examinations should be avoided in the first place. PMID:26908988

  3. Dose reduction using a dynamic, piecewise-linear attenuator

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Scott S.; Fleischmann, Dominik; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: The authors recently proposed a dynamic, prepatient x-ray attenuator capable of producing a piecewise-linear attenuation profile customized to each patient and viewing angle. This attenuator was intended to reduce scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR), dynamic range, and dose by redistributing flux. In this work the authors tested the ability of the attenuator to reduce dose and SPR in simulations. Methods: The authors selected four clinical applications, including routine full field-of-view scans of the thorax and abdomen, and targeted reconstruction tasks for an abdominal aortic aneurysm and the pancreas. Raw data were estimated by forward projection of the image volume datasets. The dynamic attenuator was controlled to reduce dose while maintaining peak variance by solving a convex optimization problem, assuminga priori knowledge of the patient anatomy. In targeted reconstruction tasks, the noise in specific regions was given increased weighting. A system with a standard attenuator (or “bowtie filter”) was used as a reference, and used either convex optimized tube current modulation (TCM) or a standard TCM heuristic. The noise of the scan was determined analytically while the dose was estimated using Monte Carlo simulations. Scatter was also estimated using Monte Carlo simulations. The sensitivity of the dynamic attenuator to patient centering was also examined by shifting the abdomen in 2 cm intervals. Results: Compared to a reference system with optimized TCM, use of the dynamic attenuator reduced dose by about 30% in routine scans and 50% in targeted scans. Compared to the TCM heuristics which are typically used withouta priori knowledge, the dose reduction is about 50% for routine scans. The dynamic attenuator gives the ability to redistribute noise and variance and produces more uniform noise profiles than systems with a conventional bowtie filter. The SPR was also modestly reduced by 10% in the thorax and 24% in the abdomen. Imaging with the dynamic

  4. Losartan/hydrochlorothiazide combination therapy surpasses high-dose angiotensin receptor blocker in the reduction of morning home blood pressure in patients with morning hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hanayama, Yoshihisa; Uchida, Haruhito Adam; Nakamura, Yoshio; Makino, Hirofumi

    2012-01-01

    Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are the first-line antihypertensive agents. In clinical practice, it is often difficult to achieve the recommended blood pressure level by ARBs in their ordinal dosages alone. This study examined the practical efficacy of a combination therapy of ARB with thiazide diuretics for lowering morning home blood pressure (MHBP) in comparison to high-dose ARB therapy in patients with morning hypertension administered an ordinal dosage of ARB. This study was performed in a prospective, randomized, open-labeled and blind-endpoint fashion. Patients were considered to have morning hypertension when their self-measured systolic MHBPs were 135mmHg or higher, irrespective of their diastolic MHBP and office blood pressures (OBPs). Forty-eight outpatients with morning hypertension receiving the ordinal dosage of ARB were given either losartan/hydrochlorothiazide (n = 26) or high-dose ARB (n = 22) in place of their previously prescribed ARB. No change in any medication was permitted during this period. Decreases of both systolic and diastolic MHBP after 3 months of treatment were significantly greater in the losartan/hydrochlorothiazide group than in the high-dose ARB group (p < 0.05, respectively). The ratio of adverse events was somewhat high (23.1% in the losartan/hydrochlorothiazide group, 9.1% in the high-dose ARB group, respectively). However, there were no significant differences in any particular adverse event between groups. This study suggested losartan/hydrochlorothiazide might be superior to high-dose ARB for reducing morning home blood pressure. PMID:23254579

  5. Antimicrobial Dose in Obese Patient

    PubMed Central

    Kassab, Sawsan; Syed Sulaiman, Syed Azhar; Abdul Aziz, Noorizan

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Obesity is a chronic disease that has become one of major public health issue in Malaysia because of its association with other disease states including cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Despite continuous efforts to educate the public about the health risks associated with obesity, prevalence of the disease continues to increase. Dosing of many medications are based on weight, limited data are available on how antimicrobial agents should be dosed in obesity. The aim of this case presentation is to discuss dose of antibiotic in obese patient. Case report: Patient: GMN, Malay, Female, 45 year old, 150kg, transferred from medical ward to ICU with problems of fever, orthopnea, sepsis secondary to nosocomial pneumonia. She was admitted to hospital a week ago for SOB on exertion, cyanosis, mildly dyspneic, somasthenia, bilateral ankle swelling. There was no fever, cough, chest pain, clubbing, flapping tremor. Her grand father has pre-morbid history of obesity, HPT, DM and asthma. She was non alcoholic, smoker, and not on diet control. The diagnosis Pickwickian syndrome was made. Patient was treated with IV Dopamine 11mcg/kg/min, IV Morphine 4mg/h. IV GTN 15mcg/min, IV Ca gluconate 10g/24h for 3/7, IV Zantac 50mg tds, IV Augmentin 1.2g tds, IV Lasix 40mg od, IV Plasil 10mg tds, S.c heparin 5000IU bd. patient become stable and moved to medical ward to continue her treatment. Discussion: The altered physiologic function seen in obese patients is a concern in patients receiving antimicrobial agents because therapeutic outcomes depend on achieving a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). The therapeutic effect of any drug can be altered when any of the 4 pharmacokinetic processes (absorption, distribution, metabolism, or elimination) are altered. Decreased blood flow rates and increased renal clearance in obese patients can affect drug distribution and elimination. Changes in serum protein levels can change the metabolism and distribution of drugs that are

  6. A patient-specific therapeutic approach for tumour cell population extinction and drug toxicity reduction using control systems-based dose-profile design

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background When anti-tumour therapy is administered to a tumour-host environment, an asymptotic tapering extremity of the tumour cell distribution is noticed. This extremity harbors a small number of residual tumour cells that later lead to secondary malignances. Thus, a method is needed that would enable the malignant population to be completely eliminated within a desired time-frame, negating the possibility of recurrence and drug-induced toxicity. Methods In this study, we delineate a computational procedure using the inverse input-reconstruction approach to calculate the unknown drug stimulus input, when one desires a known output tissue-response (full tumour cell elimination, no excess toxicity). The asymptotic extremity is taken care of using a bias shift of tumour-cell distribution and guided control of drug administration, with toxicity limits enforced, during mutually-synchronized chemotherapy (as Temozolomide) and immunotherapy (Interleukin-2 and Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte). Results Quantitative modeling is done using representative characteristics of rapidly and slowly-growing tumours. Both were fully eliminated within 2 months with checks for recurrence and toxicity over a two-year time-line. The dose-time profile of the therapeutic agents has similar features across tumours: biphasic (lymphocytes), monophasic (chemotherapy) and stationary (interleukin), with terminal pulses of the three agents together ensuring elimination of all malignant cells. The model is then justified with clinical case studies and animal models of different neurooncological tumours like glioma, meningioma and glioblastoma. Conclusion The conflicting oncological objectives of tumour-cell extinction and host protection can be simultaneously accommodated using the techniques of drug input reconstruction by enforcing a bias shift and guided control over the drug dose-time profile. For translational applicability, the procedure can be adapted to accommodate varying patient parameters

  7. Cyclosporine dose reduction by ketoconazole administration in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    First, M R; Schroeder, T J; Alexander, J W; Stephens, G W; Weiskittel, P; Myre, S A; Pesce, A J

    1991-02-01

    Cyclosporine metabolism occurs in the liver via hepatic cytochrome P-450 microsomal enzymes. Ketoconazole, an imidazole derivative, has been shown to inhibit the cytochrome P-450 enzyme system. Thirty-six renal transplant recipients receiving cyclosporine as part of a triple immunosuppressive drug regimen were started on 200 mg/day of oral ketoconazole. The dose of cyclosporine was reduced by 70% at the start of ketoconazole; this dose reduction was based on our previous experience with concomitant cyclosporine-ketoconazole therapy. Ketoconazole was started in patients who had been on cyclosporine for between 10 days and 74 months. The mean cyclosporine dose was 420 mg/day (5.9 mg/kg/day) before starting ketoconazole and 66 mg/day (0.9 mg/kg/day) one year after the addition of ketoconazole; this represents a cyclosporine dose reduction of 84.7% (P less than 0.0001). The mean trough whole-blood cyclosporine concentrations measured by HPLC, were 130 ng/mL preketoconazole and 149 ng/mL after 1 year of combination therapy. Mean serum creatinine and BUN levels were unchanged before and during ketoconazole administration, and no changes in liver function tests were noted. Cyclosporine pharmacokinetics were performed before and after at least three weeks of ketoconazole. Hourly whole-blood samples were measured by HPLC (parent cyclosporine only) and TDX (parent + metabolites). Combination therapy resulted in decreases in the maximum blood concentration and the steady-state volume of distribution divided by the fractional absorption, and increases in mean residence time and the parent-to-parent plus metabolite ratio (calculated by dividing the HPLC by the TDX value). The addition of ketoconazole to cyclosporine-treated patients resulted in a significant inhibition of cyclosporine metabolism and decrease in the dosage. There was minimal nephrotoxicity, and only four rejection episodes occurred on combined therapy. The concomitant administration of the two drugs was well

  8. Dose reduction in paediatric MDCT: general principles.

    PubMed

    Paterson, A; Frush, D P

    2007-06-01

    The number of multi-detector array computed tomography (MDCT) examinations performed per annum continues to increase in both the adult and paediatric populations. Estimates from 2003 suggested that CT contributed 17% of a radiology department's workload, yet was responsible for up to 75% of the collective population dose from medical radiation. The effective doses for some CT examinations today overlap with those argued to have an increased risk of cancer. This is especially pertinent for paediatric CT, as children are more radiosensitive than adults (and girls more radiosensitive than boys). In addition, children have a longer life ahead of them, in which radiation induced cancers may become manifest. Radiologists must be aware of these facts and practise the ALARA (as low as is reasonably achievable) principle, when it comes to deciding CT protocols and parameters. PMID:17467387

  9. CT dose optimisation and reduction in osteoarticular disease.

    PubMed

    Gervaise, A; Teixeira, P; Villani, N; Lecocq, S; Louis, M; Blum, A

    2013-04-01

    With an improvement in the temporal and spatial resolution, computed tomography (CT) is indicated in the evaluation of a great many osteoarticular diseases. New exploration techniques such as the dynamic CT and CT bone perfusion also provide new indications. However, CT is still an irradiating imaging technique and dose optimisation and reduction remains primordial. In this paper, the authors first present the typical doses delivered during CT in osteoarticular disease. They then discuss the different ways to optimise and reduce these doses by distinguishing the behavioural factors from the technical factors. Among the latter, the optimisation of the milliamps and kilovoltage is indispensable and should be adapted to the type of exploration and the morphotype of each individual. These technical factors also benefit from recent technological evolutions with the distribution of iterative reconstructions. In this way, the dose may be divided by two and provide an image of equal quality. With these dose optimisation and reduction techniques, it is now possible, while maintaining an excellent quality of the image, to obtain low-dose or even very low-dose acquisitions with a dose sometimes similar that of a standard X-ray assessment. Nevertheless, although these technical factors provide a major reduction in the dose delivered, behavioural factors, such as compliance with the indications, remain fundamental. Finally, the authors describe how to optimise and reduce the dose with specific applications in musculoskeletal imaging such as the dynamic CT, CT bone perfusion and dual energy CT.

  10. Low-dose digital urography in the pregnant patient

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, S.A.; Richter, J.O.; Rosenfield, A.T.

    1987-04-01

    In the pregnant patient when visualization of the ureters is requested, excretory urography is often ordered. We propose the use of digital radiography using single exposure as an alternative to conventional urography. This technique allows significant dose reduction while visualizing the entire urinary tract. It can be performed on most current-generation computerized tomographic scanners. In addition to dose reduction, the ability to manipulate, magnify, and avoid repeat exposures makes this an attractive alternative to the conventional film-screen technique.

  11. Order of magnitude reduction of fluoroscopic x-ray dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bal, Abhinav; Robert, Normand; Machan, Lindsay; Deutsch, Meir; Kisselgoff, David; Babyn, Paul; Rowlands, John A.

    2012-03-01

    The role of fluoroscopic imaging is critical for diagnostic and image guided therapy. However, fluoroscopic imaging can require significant radiation leading to increased cancer risk and non-stochastic effects such as radiation burns. Our purpose is to reduce the exposure and dose to the patient by an order of magnitude in these procedures by use of the region of interest method. Method and Materials: Region of interest fluoroscopy (ROIF) uses a partial attenuator. The central region of the image has full exposure while the image periphery, there to provide context only, has a reduced exposure rate. ROIF using a static partial attenuator has been shown in our previous studies to reduce the dose area product (DAP) to the patient by at least 2.5 times. Significantly greater reductions in DAP would require improvements in flat panel detectors performance at low x-ray exposures or a different x-ray attenuation strategy. Thus we have investigated a second, dynamic, approach. We have constructed an x-ray shutter system allowing a normal x-ray exposure in the region of interest while reducing the number of x-ray exposures in the periphery through the rapid introduction, positioning and removal of an x-ray attenuating shutter to block radiation only for selected frames. This dynamic approach eliminates the DQE(0) loss associated with the use of static partial attenuator applied to every frame thus permitting a greater reduction in DAP. Results: We have compared the two methods by modeling and determined their fundamental limits.

  12. Objective and Longitudinal Assessment of Dermatitis After Postoperative Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy in Patients With Breast Cancer Treated With Breast Conserving Therapy: Reduction of Moisture Deterioration by APBI

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Eiichi; Yamazaki, Hideya; Yoshida, Ken; Takenaka, Tadashi; Masuda, Norikazu; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Inoue, Takehiro

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To objectively evaluate the radiation dermatitis caused by accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy. Patients and Methods: The skin color and moisture changes were examined using a newly installed spectrophotometer and corneometer in 22 patients who had undergone APBI using open cavity implant high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (36 Gy in six fractions) and compared with the corresponding values for 44 patients in an external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) control group (50-60 Gy in 25-30 fractions within 5-6 weeks) after breast conserving surgery. Results: All values changed significantly as a result of APBI. The extent of elevation in a Asterisk-Operator (reddish) and reduction in L Asterisk-Operator (black) values caused by APBI were similar to those for EBRT, with slightly delayed recovery for 6-12 months after treatment owing to the surgical procedure. In contrast, only APBI caused a change in the b Asterisk-Operator values, and EBRT did not, demonstrating that the reduction in b Asterisk-Operator values (yellowish) depends largely on the surgical procedure. The changes in moisture were less severe after APBI than after EBRT, and the recovery was more rapid. The toxicity assessment using the Common Toxicity Criteria, version 3, showed that all dermatitis caused by APBI was Grade 2 or less. Conclusion: An objective analysis can quantify the effects of APBI procedures on color and moisture cosmesis. The radiation dermatitis caused by APBI using the present schedule showed an equivalent effect on skin color and a less severe effect on moisture than the effects caused by standard EBRT.

  13. Dose reduction improvements in storage basins of spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Fan-Hsiung F.

    1997-08-13

    Spent nuclear fuel in storage basins at the Hanford Site has corroded and contaminated basin water, which has leaked into the soil; the fuel also had deposited a layer of radioactive sludge on basin floors. The SNF is to be removed from the basins to protect the nearby Columbia River. Because the radiation level is high, measures have been taken to reduce the background dose rate to as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) to prevent radiation doses from becoming the limiting factor for removal of the SW in the basins to long-term dry storage. All activities of the SNF Project require application of ALARA principles for the workers. On the basis of these principles dose reduction improvements have been made by first identifying radiological sources. Principal radiological sources in the basin are basin walls, basin water, recirculation piping and equipment. Dose reduction activities focus on cleaning and coating basin walls to permit raising the water level, hydrolasing piping, and placing lead plates. In addition, the transfer bay floor will be refinished to make decontamination easier and reduce worker exposures in the radiation field. The background dose rates in the basin will be estimated before each task commences and after it is completed; these dose reduction data will provide the basis for cost benefit analysis.

  14. Patient Radiation Doses from Diagnostic Radiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, D.

    1996-01-01

    Explains how x-ray doses to patients are measured. Describes how different techniques expose patients to differing amounts of ionizing radiation. Compares these figures with other natural and man-made sources. (Author/MKR)

  15. Method for inserting noise in digital mammography to simulate reduction in radiation dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges, Lucas R.; de Oliveira, Helder C. R.; Nunes, Polyana F.; Vieira, Marcelo A. C.

    2015-03-01

    The quality of clinical x-ray images is closely related to the radiation dose used in the imaging study. The general principle for selecting the radiation is ALARA ("as low as reasonably achievable"). The practical optimization, however, remains challenging. It is well known that reducing the radiation dose increases the quantum noise, which could compromise the image quality. In order to conduct studies about dose reduction in mammography, it would be necessary to acquire repeated clinical images, from the same patient, with different dose levels. However, such practice would be unethical due to radiation related risks. One solution is to simulate the effects of dose reduction in clinical images. This work proposes a new method, based on the Anscombe transformation, which simulates dose reduction in digital mammography by inserting quantum noise into clinical mammograms acquired with the standard radiation dose. Thus, it is possible to simulate different levels of radiation doses without exposing the patient to new levels of radiation. Results showed that the achieved quality of simulated images generated with our method is the same as when using other methods found in the literature, with the novelty of using the Anscombe transformation for converting signal-independent Gaussian noise into signal-dependent quantum noise.

  16. Patient-specific dose estimation for pediatric chest CT

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Frush, Donald P.

    2008-12-15

    any other patient in the same size/protocol group who undergoes the chest scan. In summary, this work reported the first assessment of dose variations across pediatric CT patients in the same size/protocol group due to the variability of patient anatomy and body habitus and provided a previously unavailable method for patient-specific organ dose estimation, which will help in assessing patient risk and optimizing dose reduction strategies, including the development of scan protocols.

  17. Dose reduction in a paediatric X-ray department following optimization of radiographic technique.

    PubMed

    Mooney, R; Thomas, P S

    1998-08-01

    A survey of radiation doses to children from diagnostic radiography has been carried out in a dedicated paediatric X-ray room. Entrance surface dose (ESD) and dose-area product (DAP) per radiograph were simultaneously measured with thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) and a DAP meter to provide mean dose values for separate age ranges. Results of ESD and DAP were lower than the mean values from other UK studies for all ages and radiographs, except for the infant pelvis AP radiograph. Comparison of ESD and radiographic technique with CEC quality criteria highlighted a need for reduction of dose to infants and implied an increase in tube filtration might overcome the limitations of the room's three-phase, 12-pulse generator, allowing higher tube potentials to be used on infants. Additional tube filtration of 3 mmA1 was installed following assessment of dose reduction and image quality with test objects and phantoms, and confirmation from the paediatric radiologist that clinical image quality was not-significantly altered. The tube potential was increased from 50 to 56 kVp for the infant pelvis AP radiograph. The resulting ESD and effective dose fell by 51% and 38%, respectively. The CEC quality criteria have proved useful as a benchmark against which technique in X-ray departments can be compared, and as such are a useful tool for optimizing radiographic technique and reducing patient dose.

  18. Kilovoltage Imaging Doses in the Radiotherapy of Pediatric Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Jun; Chen Zhe; Roberts, Kenneth B.; Nath, Ravinder

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate doses induced by kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kVCBCT) to pediatric cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy, as well as strategies for dose reduction. Methods and Materials: An EGS4 Monte Carlo code was used to calculate three-dimensional dose deposition due to kVCBCT on 4 pediatric cancer patients. Absorbed doses to various organs were analyzed for both half-fan and full-fan modes. Clinical conditions, such as distance from organ at risk (OAR) to CBCT field border, kV peak energy, and testicular shielding, were studied. Results: The mean doses induced by one CBCT scan operated at 125 kV in half-fan mode to testes, liver, kidneys, femoral heads, spinal cord, brain, eyes, lens, and optical nerves were 2.9, 4.7, 7.7, 10.5, 8.8, 7.6, 7.7, 7.8, and 7.2 cGy, respectively. Increasing the distances from OARs to CBCT field border greatly reduced the doses to OARs, ranging from 33% reduction for spinal cord to 2300% reduction for testes. As photon beam energy increased from 60 to 125 kV, the dose increase due to kVCBCT ranged from 170% for lens to 460% for brain and spinal cord. A testicular shielding made of 1-cm cerrobend could reduce CBCT doses down to 31%, 51%, 68%, and 82%, respectively, for 60, 80, 100, and 125 kV when the testes lay within the CBCT field. Conclusions: Generally speaking, kVCBCT deposits much larger doses to critical structures in children than in adults, usually by a factor of 2 to 3. Increasing the distances from OARs to CBCT field border greatly reduces doses to OARs. Depending on OARs, kVCBCT-induced doses increase linearly or exponentially with photon beam energy. Testicular shielding works more efficiently at lower kV energies. On the basis of our study, it is essential to choose an appropriate scanning protocol when kVCBCT is applied to pediatric cancer patients routinely.

  19. On the Need to Compensate for Edema-Induced Dose Reductions in Preplanned {sup 131}Cs Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z. Jay Deng Jun; Roberts, Kenneth; Nath, Ravinder

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Surgical trauma-induced edema and its protracted resolution can lead to significant dose reductions in preplanned {sup 131}Cs prostate brachytherapy. The purpose of this work was to examine whether these dose reductions should be actively compensated for and to estimate the magnitude of the additional irradiation needed for dose compensation. Methods and Materials: The quantitative edema resolution characteristics observed by Waterman et al. were used to examine the physical and radiobiologic effects of prostate edema in preplanned {sup 131}Cs implants. The need for dose compensation was assessed using the dose responses observed in {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd prostate implants. The biologically effective dose, calculated with full consideration of edema evolution, was used to estimate the additional irradiation needed for dose compensation. Results: We found that the edema-induced dose reduction in preplanned {sup 131}Cs implants could easily exceed 10% of the prescription dose for implants with moderate or large edema. These dose reductions could lead to a >10% reduction in the biochemical recurrence-free survival for individual patients if the effect of edema was ignored. For a prescribed dose of 120 Gy, the number of 2-Gy external beam fractions needed to compensate for a 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, and 25% edema-induced dose reduction would be one, four, six, seven, and nine, respectively, for prostate cancer with a median potential doubling time of 42 days. The required additional irradiation increased for fast-growing tumors and/or those less efficient in sublethal damage repair. Conclusion: Compensation of edema-induced dose reductions in preplanned {sup 131}Cs prostate brachytherapy should be actively considered for those implants with moderate or large edema.

  20. Potential of combining iterative reconstruction with noise efficient detector design: aggressive dose reduction in head CT

    PubMed Central

    Bender, B; Schabel, C; Fenchel, M; Ernemann, U; Korn, A

    2015-01-01

    Objective: With further increase of CT numbers and their dominant contribution to medical exposure, there is a recent quest for more effective dose control. While reintroduction of iterative reconstruction (IR) has proved its potential in many applications, a novel focus is placed on more noise efficient detectors. Our purpose was to assess the potential of IR in combination with an integrated circuit detector (ICD) for aggressive dose reduction in head CT. Methods: Non-contrast low-dose head CT [190 mAs; weighted volume CT dose index (CTDIvol), 33.2 mGy] was performed in 50 consecutive patients, using a new noise efficient detector and IR. Images were assessed in terms of quantitative and qualitative image quality and compared with standard dose acquisitions (320 mAs; CTDIvol, 59.7 mGy) using a conventional detector and filtered back projection. Results: By combining ICD and IR in low-dose examinations, the signal to noise was improved by about 13% above the baseline level in the standard-dose control group. Both, contrast-to-noise ratio (2.02 ± 0.6 vs 1.88 ± 0.4; p = 0.18) and objective measurements of image sharpness (695 ± 84 vs 705 ± 151 change in Hounsfield units per pixel; p = 0.79) were fully preserved in the low-dose group. Likewise, there was no significant difference in the grading of several subjective image quality parameters when both noise-reducing strategies were used in low-dose examinations. Conclusion: Combination of noise efficient detector with IR allows for meaningful dose reduction in head CT without compromise of standard image quality. Advances in knowledge: Our study demonstrates the feasibility of almost 50% dose reduction in head CT dose (1.1 mSv per scan) through combination of novel dose-reducing strategies. PMID:25827204

  1. Iterative methods for dose reduction and image enhancement in tomography

    DOEpatents

    Miao, Jianwei; Fahimian, Benjamin Pooya

    2012-09-18

    A system and method for creating a three dimensional cross sectional image of an object by the reconstruction of its projections that have been iteratively refined through modification in object space and Fourier space is disclosed. The invention provides systems and methods for use with any tomographic imaging system that reconstructs an object from its projections. In one embodiment, the invention presents a method to eliminate interpolations present in conventional tomography. The method has been experimentally shown to provide higher resolution and improved image quality parameters over existing approaches. A primary benefit of the method is radiation dose reduction since the invention can produce an image of a desired quality with a fewer number projections than seen with conventional methods.

  2. Optimizing CT radiation dose based on patient size and image quality: the size-specific dose estimate method.

    PubMed

    Larson, David B

    2014-10-01

    The principle of ALARA (dose as low as reasonably achievable) calls for dose optimization rather than dose reduction, per se. Optimization of CT radiation dose is accomplished by producing images of acceptable diagnostic image quality using the lowest dose method available. Because it is image quality that constrains the dose, CT dose optimization is primarily a problem of image quality rather than radiation dose. Therefore, the primary focus in CT radiation dose optimization should be on image quality. However, no reliable direct measure of image quality has been developed for routine clinical practice. Until such measures become available, size-specific dose estimates (SSDE) can be used as a reasonable image-quality estimate. The SSDE method of radiation dose optimization for CT abdomen and pelvis consists of plotting SSDE for a sample of examinations as a function of patient size, establishing an SSDE threshold curve based on radiologists' assessment of image quality, and modifying protocols to consistently produce doses that are slightly above the threshold SSDE curve. Challenges in operationalizing CT radiation dose optimization include data gathering and monitoring, managing the complexities of the numerous protocols, scanners and operators, and understanding the relationship of the automated tube current modulation (ATCM) parameters to image quality. Because CT manufacturers currently maintain their ATCM algorithms as secret for proprietary reasons, prospective modeling of SSDE for patient populations is not possible without reverse engineering the ATCM algorithm and, hence, optimization by this method requires a trial-and-error approach.

  3. Generalized pustular psoriasis induced by systemic steroid dose reduction*

    PubMed Central

    Westphal, Danielle Cristine; Schettini, Antonio Pedro Mendes; de Souza, Petra Pereira; Castiel, Jessica; Chirano, Carlos Alberto; Santos, Mônica

    2016-01-01

    Generalized pustular psoriasis, or psoriasis of von Zumbusch, is an acute and severe clinical form of psoriasis, which usually occurs in patients with psoriasis undergoing aggravating factors. In this work, we report the case of a female patient, 70 years old, who developed generalized pustular psoriasis symptoms while reducing the dose of oral corticosteroids, improperly introduced for the treatment of alleged acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis. The differential diagnosis of generalized pustular psoriasis should be made with other pustular dermatoses, such as subcorneal pustulosis, IgA pemphigus and especially with acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis. Personal history of psoriasis and histopathological findings with psoriasiform changes and subcorneal pustule favored the diagnosis. She was treated with acitretin 30 mg / day, progressing to complete regression of the lesions.

  4. The effect of decitabine dose modification and myelosuppression on response and survival in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Jabbour, Elias; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Cornelison, A Megan; Cortes, Jorge E; Ravandi, Farhad; Daver, Naval; Kadia, Tapan; Teng, Angela; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2015-02-01

    Myelosuppression in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is associated with the hypomethylating agent decitabine. A retrospective pooled analysis of two decitabine clinical trials in patients with MDS conducted Cox regression analyses of red blood cell or platelet dependence, myelosuppression, dose modification, cycle delay or dose reduction, and survival effects. In 182 patients, baseline platelet dependence was a predictor for dose modification, reduction or delay, and death (modification: p=0.006, hazard ratio [HR]=2.04; reduction/delay: p=0.011, HR=2.00; death: p=0.003, HR=1.94). Patients with dose modifications had significantly higher overall response rates versus those with none (22% vs. 10%; p=0.015). Patients with no dose modifications had faster progression to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) versus patients with dose modifications (p=0.004). Without dose modifications, patients tended to drop out due to disease progression or other reasons. Decitabine dose modifications on treatment may indicate response to treatment.

  5. Feasibility study of dose reduction in digital breast tomosynthesis using non-local denoising algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Marcelo A. C.; de Oliveira, Helder C. R.; Nunes, Polyana F.; Borges, Lucas R.; Bakic, Predrag R.; Barufaldi, Bruno; Acciavatti, Raymond J.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2015-03-01

    The main purpose of this work is to study the ability of denoising algorithms to reduce the radiation dose in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) examinations. Clinical use of DBT is normally performed in "combo-mode", in which, in addition to DBT projections, a 2D mammogram is taken with the standard radiation dose. As a result, patients have been exposed to radiation doses higher than used in digital mammography. Thus, efforts to reduce the radiation dose in DBT examinations are of great interest. However, a decrease in dose leads to an increased quantum noise level, and related decrease in image quality. This work is aimed at addressing this problem by the use of denoising techniques, which could allow for dose reduction while keeping the image quality acceptable. We have studied two "state of the art" denoising techniques for filtering the quantum noise due to the reduced dose in DBT projections: Non-local Means (NLM) and Block-matching 3D (BM3D). We acquired DBT projections at different dose levels of an anthropomorphic physical breast phantom with inserted simulated microcalcifications. Then, we found the optimal filtering parameters where the denoising algorithms are capable of recovering the quality from the DBT images acquired with the standard radiation dose. Results using objective image quality assessment metrics showed that BM3D algorithm achieved better noise adjustment (mean difference in peak signal to noise ratio < 0.1dB) and less blurring (mean difference in image sharpness ~ 6%) than the NLM for the projections acquired with lower radiation doses.

  6. Dose reduction in LDR brachytherapy by implanted prostate gold fiducial markers

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Lutgens, Ludy; Murrer, Lars; Afsharpour, Hossein; Haas-Kock, Danielle de; Visser, Peter; Gils, Francis van; Verhaegen, Frank

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: The dosimetric impact of gold fiducial markers (FM) implanted prior to external beam radiotherapy of prostate cancer on low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy seed implants performed in the context of combined therapy was investigated. Methods: A virtual water phantom was designed containing a single FM. Single and multi source scenarios were investigated by performing Monte Carlo dose calculations, along with the influence of varying orientation and distance of the FM with respect to the sources. Three prostate cancer patients treated with LDR brachytherapy for a recurrence following external beam radiotherapy with implanted FM were studied as surrogate cases to combined therapy. FM and brachytherapy seeds were identified on post implant CT scans and Monte Carlo dose calculations were performed with and without FM. The dosimetric impact of the FM was evaluated by quantifying the amplitude of dose shadows and the volume of cold spots. D{sub 90} was reported based on the post implant CT prostate contour. Results: Large shadows are observed in the single source-FM scenarios. As expected from geometric considerations, the shadows are dependent on source-FM distance and orientation. Large dose reductions are observed at the distal side of FM, while at the proximal side a dose enhancement is observed. In multisource scenarios, the importance of shadows appears mitigated, although FM at the periphery of the seed distribution caused underdosage (dose). In clinical cases, the FM reduced the dose to some voxels by up to 50% and generated shadows with extents of the order of 4 mm. Within the prostate contour, cold spots (<95% prescription dose) of the order of 20 mm{sup 3} were observed. D{sub 90} proved insensitive to the presence of FM for the cases selected. Conclusions: There is a major local impact of FM present in LDR brachytherapy seed implant dose distributions. Therefore, reduced tumor control could be expected from FM implanted in tumors, although

  7. Antibiotic dose optimization in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Cotta, M O; Roberts, J A; Lipman, J

    2015-12-01

    The judicious use of existing antibiotics is essential for preserving their activity against infections. In the era of multi-drug resistance, this is of particular importance in clinical areas characterized by high antibiotic use, such as the ICU. Antibiotic dose optimization in critically ill patients requires sound knowledge not only of the altered physiology in serious infections - including severe sepsis, septic shock and ventilator-associated pneumonia - but also of the pathogen-drug exposure relationship (i.e. pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic index). An important consideration is the fact that extreme shifts in organ function, such as those seen in hyperdynamic patients or those with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, can have an impact upon drug exposure, and constant vigilance is required when reviewing antibiotic dosing regimens in the critically ill. The use of continuous renal replacement therapy and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation remain important interventions in these patients; however, both of these treatments can have a profound effect on antibiotic exposure. We suggest placing emphasis on the use of therapeutic drug monitoring and dose individualization when optimizing therapy in these settings.

  8. Carboplatin dosing for adult Japanese patients.

    PubMed

    Ando, Yuichi; Shimokata, Tomoya; Yasuda, Yoshinari; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2014-02-01

    Carboplatin is a platinum-based anticancer drug that has been long used to treat many types of solid cancer. Because the clearance of carboplatin strongly correlates with the glomerular filtration rate (GFR), its dosage is calculated with the Calvert formula on the basis of the patient's GFR to achieve the target area under the plasma drug concentration-time curve (AUC) for each patient. However, many lines of evidence from previous clinical studies should be interpreted with caution because different methods were used to estimate drug clearance and derive the dosage of carboplatin. There is a particularly high risk of carboplatin overdosing when the dosage is determined on the basis of standardized serum creatinine values. When deciding the dose of carboplatin for adult Japanese patients, preferred methods to assess renal function instead of directly measuring GFR include (1) 24-h urinary collection-based creatinine clearance adjusted by adding 0.2 mg/dl to the serum creatinine concentration measured by standardized methods, and (2) equation-based GFR (eGFR) with a back calculation to units of ml/min per subject. Given the limitations of serum creatinine-based GFR estimations, the GFR or creatinine clearance should be directly measured in each patient whenever possible. To ensure patient safety and facilitate a medical-team approach, the single most appropriate method available at each institute or medical team should be consistently used to calculate the dose of carboplatin with the Calvert formula.

  9. CT-guided brachytherapy of prostate cancer: reduction of effective dose from X-ray examination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanin, Dmitriy B.; Biryukov, Vitaliy A.; Rusetskiy, Sergey S.; Sviridov, Pavel V.; Volodina, Tatiana V.

    2014-03-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is one of the most effective and informative diagnostic method. Though the number of CT scans among all radiographic procedures in the USA and European countries is 11% and 4% respectively, CT makes the highest contribution to the collective effective dose from all radiographic procedures, it is 67% in the USA and 40% in European countries [1-5]. Therefore it is necessary to understand the significance of dose value from CT imaging to a patient . Though CT dose from multiple scans and potential risk is of great concern in pediatric patients, this applies to adults as well. In this connection it is very important to develop optimal approaches to dose reduction and optimization of CT examination. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in its publications recommends radiologists to be aware that often CT image quality is higher than it is necessary for diagnostic confidence[6], and there is a potential to reduce the dose which patient gets from CT examination [7]. In recent years many procedures, such as minimally invasive surgery, biopsy, brachytherapy and different types of ablation are carried out under guidance of computed tomography [6;7], and during a procedures multiple CT scans focusing on a specific anatomic region are performed. At the Clinics of MRRC different types of treatment for patients with prostate cancer are used, incuding conformal CT-guided brachytherapy, implantation of microsources of I into the gland under guidance of spiral CT [8]. So, the purpose of the study is to choose optimal method to reduce radiation dose from CT during CT-guided prostate brachytherapy and to obtain the image of desired quality.

  10. [Dialysis dose quantification in critically ill patients].

    PubMed

    Casino, Francesco Gaetano

    2010-01-01

    Acute kidney injury affects about 35% of intensive care unit patients. Renal replacement therapy is required in about 5% of such patients and is associated with a mortality rate as high as 50% to 80%. The latter is likely more related to the failure of extrarenal organs than to an insufficient dialysis dose. This could explain, at least in part, the findings of 2 recent trials (VA/ NIH and RENAL) where the expected dose-outcome relationship was not confirmed. These results cannot be taken to infer that assessing the dialysis dose is no longer required. The contrary is true, in that the common finding of large differences between prescribed and delivered doses calls for accurate dose assessment, at least to avoid underdialysis. The minimum adequate levels are now a Kt/V urea of 1.2 to 1.4 three times a week (3x/wk) on intermittent hemodialysis (IHD), and an effluent of 20 mL/kg/h for 85% of the time on continuous renal replacement therapy (CRTT). Both these parameters can be easily measured but are far from ideal indices because they account neither for residual renal function nor for irregular dose delivery. The equivalent renal urea clearance (EKRjc), by expressing the averaged renal+dialytic urea clearance over the whole treatment period, is able to account for the above factors. Although assessing EKRjc is quite complex, for regular 3x/wk IHD one could use the formula EKRjc=10 Kt/V+1 to compute that a Kt/V of 1.2 and 1.4 corresponds to an EKRjc of 13 and 15 mL/min, respectively. On the other hand, the hourly effluent per kg is numerically similar to EKRjc. On this basis it can be calculated that in non-prediluted really continuous treatment, the recommended CRRT dose (EKRjc=20 mL/min) is 33% higher than the EKRjc of 15 mL/min, corresponding to the recommended Kt/V of 1.4 on 3x/wk IHD.

  11. Dose reduction using non lineal diffusion and smoothing filters in computed radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, M. G.; Juste, B.; Vidal, V.; Verdú, G.; Mayo, P.; Rodenas, F.

    2014-02-01

    The use of Computed Radiography (CR) into clinical practice has been followed by a high increase in the number of examinations performed and overdose cases in patients, especially children in pediatric applications. Computed radiographic images are corrupted by noise because either data acquisition or data transmission. The level of this inherent noise is related with the X-ray dose exposure: lower radiation exposure involves higher noise level. The main aim of this work is to reduce the noise present in a low radiation dose CR image in order to the get a CR image of the same quality as a higher radiation exposure image. In this work, we use a non lineal diffusion filtering method to reduce the noise level in a CR, this means that we are able to reduce the exposure, milliampere-second (mAs), and the dose absorbed by the patients. In order to get an optimal result, the diffusive filter is complemented with a smoothing filter with edge detection in order to preserve edges. Therefore, the proposed method consists in obtaining a good quality CR image for diagnostic purposes by selection of lower X-ray exposure jointly with a reduction of the noise. We conclude that a good solution to minimize the dose to patients, especially children in pediatric applications, in X-ray computed radiography consists in decreasing the mAs of the X-ray exposure and then processing the image with the proposed method.

  12. Dose-dependent effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus on quantitative reduction of faecal rotavirus shedding in children.

    PubMed

    Fang, Shiuh-Bin; Lee, Hung-Chang; Hu, Jen-Jan; Hou, Shao-Yi; Liu, Hsuan-Liang; Fang, Hsu-Wei

    2009-10-01

    Beneficial effects of probiotics in acute infectious diarrhoea in children are mainly seen in watery diarrhoea and viral gastroenteritis. Lactobacillus rhamnosus, one the most extensively studied probiotic strains, is effective in shortening courses of acute diarrhoea in children. However, the dose-dependent effect of Lactobacillus upon quantification of faecal rotavirus shedding in humans remains little known. Thus, an open-label randomized trial in 23 children with acute rotaviral gastroenteritis was undertaken by randomly allocating patients to receive one of the three regimens for 3 days: daily Lactobacillus rhamnosus 35 (Lcr35) with 0 CFU/day to six patients in the control group, 2 x 10(8) CFU/day to nine patients in the low-dose group, and 6 x 10(8) CFU/day to eight patients in the high-dose group. Faecal samples were collected before and after the 3-day regimen for measurements of rotavirus concentrations by ELISA. There was no statistically significant change in faecal rotavirus concentrations in either the control group (119.2 x 10(5) particles/ml vs. 23.7 x 10(5) particles/ml, p = 0.075) or the low-dose group (36.1 x 10(5) particles/ml vs. 73.5 x 10(5) particles/ml, p = 0.859). However, the high-dose group had a significant reduction of faecal rotavirus concentration (64.2 x 10(5) particles/ml vs. 9.0 x 10(5) particles/ml, p = 0.012). Without any exception, the faecal rotavirus concentrations of all eight patients in the high-dose Lcr35 group declined by 86% after 3 days when compared with those before Lcr35 administration. In conclusion, this is the first report to provide quantitative evidence of the dose-dependent effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus, a minimal effective dose of 6 x 10(8) CFU for 3 days, upon the faecal rotavirus shedding in paediatric patients.

  13. [Breast dose reduction in female CT screening for lung cancer using various metallic shields].

    PubMed

    Takada, Kenta; Kaneko, Junichi; Aoki, Kiyoshi

    2009-12-20

    We evaluated the effectiveness of metallic shields that were used for reduction of the breast dose in thoracic computed tomography(CT). For the evaluation, we measured breast surface dose and image standard deviation(SD)in the lung area. The metallic shields were made from bismuth, zinc, copper, and iron. The bismuth shield has been marketed and used for dose reduction. The other three metallic shields were chosen because they have lower atomic numbers and a lower yield of characteristic X-rays. As a result, use of the metallic shields showed a lower breast dose than the decrement of the tube current in the same image SD. The insertion of a thin aluminum sheet between the shield and a phantom was also effective in reducing breast surface dose. We calculated the dose reduction rate to evaluate the effectiveness of these metallic shields. This dose reduction rate was defined as the ratio of the decrease in breast surface dose by metallic shields to the breast surface dose measured with the tube current decrement in the same image SD. The maximum dose reduction rate was 6.4% for the bismuth shield, and 12.0-13.3% for the other shields. These results indicate that the shields made from zinc, copper, and iron are more effective for dose reduction than the shield made form bismuth. The best dose reduction rate, 13.3%, has been achieved when the zinc shield placed 20 mm apart from a phantom with 0.2 mm aluminum was used.

  14. Radiation Dose Estimation for Pediatric Patients Undergoing Cardiac Catheterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chu

    correction factors for the MOSFET organ dose measurements in the following studies. Minor angular dependence (< +/-20% at all angles tested, < +/-10% at clinically relevant angles in cardiac catheterization) was observed. Second, the cardiac dose for common fluoroscopic imaging techniques for pediatric patients in the two age groups was measured. Imaging technique settings with variations of individual key imaging parameters were tested to observe the quantitative effect of imaging optimization or lack thereof. Along with each measurement, the two standard system output indices, the Air Kerma (AK) and Dose-Area Product (DAP), were also recorded and compared to the measured cardiac and skin doses -- the lack of correlation between the indices and the organ doses shed light to the substantial limitation of the indices in representing patient radiation dose, at least within the scope of this dissertation. Third, the effective dose (ED) for Posterior-Anterior and Lateral fluoroscopic imaging techniques for pediatric patients in the two age groups was determined. In addition, the dosimetric effect of removing the anti-scatter grid was studied, for which a factor-of-two ED rate reduction was observed for the imaging techniques. The Clinical Component involved analytical research to develop a validated retrospective cardiac dose reconstruction formulation and to propose the new Optimization Index which evaluates the level of optimization of the clinician's imaging usage during a procedure; and small sample group of actual procedures were used to demonstrate applicability of these formulations. In its entirety, the research represents a first-of-its-kind comprehensive approach in radiation dosimetry for pediatric cardiac catheterization; and separately, it is also modular enough that each individual section can serve as study templates for small-scale dosimetric studies of similar purposes. The data collected and algorithmic formulations developed can be of use in areas of

  15. Pediatric cT: Implementation of ASIR for Substantial Radiation Dose Reduction While Maintaining Pre-ASIR Image Noise1

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Samuel L.; Moore, Bria M.; Yee, Brian S.; Kaufman, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine a comprehensive method for the implementation of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) for maximal radiation dose reduction in pediatric computed tomography (CT) without changing the magnitude of noise in the reconstructed image or the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the patient. Materials and Methods The institutional review board waived the need to obtain informed consent for this HIPAA-compliant quality analysis. Chest and abdominopelvic CT images obtained before ASIR implementation (183 patient examinations; mean patient age, 8.8 years ± 6.2 [standard deviation]; range, 1 month to 27 years) were analyzed for image noise and CNR. These measurements were used in conjunction with noise models derived from anthropomorphic phantoms to establish new beam current–modulated CT parameters to implement 40% ASIR at 120 and 100 kVp without changing noise texture or magnitude. Image noise was assessed in images obtained after ASIR implementation (492 patient examinations; mean patient age, 7.6 years ± 5.4; range, 2 months to 28 years) the same way it was assessed in the pre-ASIR analysis. Dose reduction was determined by comparing size-specific dose estimates in the pre- and post-ASIR patient cohorts. Data were analyzed with paired t tests. Results With 40% ASIR implementation, the average relative dose reduction for chest CT was 39% (2.7/4.4 mGy), with a maximum reduction of 72% (5.3/18.8 mGy). The average relative dose reduction for abdominopelvic CT was 29% (4.8/6.8 mGy), with a maximum reduction of 64% (7.6/20.9 mGy). Beam current modulation was unnecessary for patients weighing 40 kg or less. The difference between 0% and 40% ASIR noise magnitude was less than 1 HU, with statistically nonsignificant increases in patient CNR at 100 kVp of 8% (15.3/14.2; P = .41) for chest CT and 13% (7.8/6.8; P = .40) for abdominopelvic CT. Conclusion Radiation dose reduction at pediatric CT was achieved when 40% ASIR was implemented as a dose

  16. Postimplantation Analysis Enables Improvement of Dose-Volume Histograms and Reduction of Toxicity for Permanent Seed Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Wust, Peter Postrach, Johanna; Kahmann, Frank; Henkel, Thomas; Graf, Reinhold; Cho, Chie Hee; Budach, Volker; Boehmer, Dirk

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate how postimplantation analysis is useful for improving permanent seed implantation and reducing toxicity. Patients and Methods: We evaluated 197 questionnaires completed by patients after permanent seed implantation (monotherapy between 1999 and 2003). For 70% of these patients, a computed tomography was available to perform postimplantation analysis. The index doses and volumes of the dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were determined and categorized with respect to the date of implantation. Differences in symptom scores relative to pretherapeutic status were analyzed with regard to follow-up times and DVH descriptors. Acute and subacute toxicities in a control group of 117 patients from an earlier study (June 1999 to September 2001) by Wust et al. (2004) were compared with a matched subgroup from this study equaling 110 patients treated between October 2001 and August 2003. Results: Improved performance, identifying a characteristic time dependency of DVH parameters (after implantation) and toxicity scores, was demonstrated. Although coverage (volume covered by 100% of the prescription dose of the prostate) increased slightly, high-dose regions decreased with the growing experience of the users. Improvement in the DVH and a reduction of toxicities were found in the patient group implanted in the later period. A decline in symptoms with follow-up time counteracts this gain of experience and must be considered. Urinary and sexual discomfort was enhanced by dose heterogeneities (e.g., dose covering 10% of the prostate volume, volume covered by 200% of prescription dose). In contrast, rectal toxicities correlated with exposed rectal volumes, especially the rectal volume covered by 100% of the prescription dose. Conclusion: The typical side effects occurring after permanent seed implantation can be reduced by improving the dose distributions. An improvement in dose distributions and a reduction of toxicities were identified with elapsed time between

  17. Enhanced cholesterol reduction by simvastatin in diltiazem-treated patients

    PubMed Central

    Rowland Yeo, K; Yeo, W W; Wallis, E J; Ramsay, L E

    1999-01-01

    Aims To investigate whether an interaction between diltiazem and the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor simvastatin may enhance the cholesterol-lowering response to simvastatin in diltiazem-treated patients. Methods One hundred and thirty-five patients attending the Sheffield hypertension clinic who started consecutively on simvastatin for primary or secondary prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD) during the 2 years June, 1996—May 1998 were surveyed. From the clinic records we extracted and recorded absolute and percentage cholesterol responses to the starting dose of simvastatin and coprescription of diltiazem. Results The cholesterol reduction for the 19 patients on diltiazem was 33.3% compared with 24.7% in the remaining 116 patients (median difference 8.6%, 95% CI 1.1–12.2%, P < 0.02). The interindividual variability of cholesterol response to simvastatin was greater for patients not taking diltiazem than for those patients taking diltiazem. The ratio of the variances in response for the nondiltiazem group relative to the diltiazem group was 1.34 at 10 mg simvastatin daily (not significant, 95% CI 0.16–4.11), and 3.42 at 20 mg daily (P < 0.01, 95% CI 1.26–7.18). Concurrent diltiazem therapy (P < 0.04), age (P = 0.001) and starting dose of simvastatin (P = 0.002) were found to be significant independent predictors of percentage cholesterol response. Conclusions Patients who take both simvastatin and diltiazem may need lower doses of simvastatin to achieve the recommended reduction in cholesterol. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic aspects of this interaction need further study to confirm an enhanced effect on cholesterol reduction, and exclude an increased risk of adverse events. PMID:10583033

  18. Noise Reduction in Low-Dose X-Ray Fluoroscopy for Image-Guided Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jing Zhu Lei; Xing Lei

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: To improve the quality of low-dose X-ray fluoroscopic images using statistics-based restoration algorithm so that the patient fluoroscopy can be performed with reduced radiation dose. Method and Materials: Noise in the low-dose fluoroscopy was suppressed by temporal and spatial filtering. The temporal correlation among neighboring frames was considered by the Karhunen-Loeve (KL) transform (i.e., principal component analysis). After the KL transform, the selected neighboring frames of fluoroscopy were decomposed to uncorrelated and ordered principal components. For each KL component, a penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) objective function was constructed to restore the ideal image. The penalty was chosen as anisotropic quadratic, and the penalty parameter in each KL component was inversely proportional to its corresponding eigenvalue. Smaller KL eigenvalue is associated with the KL component of lower signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and a larger penalty parameter should be used for such KL component. The low-dose fluoroscopic images were acquired using a Varian Acuity simulator. A quality assurance phantom and an anthropomorphic chest phantom were used to evaluate the presented algorithm. Results: In the images restored by the proposed KL domain PWLS algorithm, noise is greatly suppressed, whereas fine structures are well preserved. Average improvement rate of SNR is 75% among selected regions of interest. Comparison studies with traditional techniques, such as the mean and median filters, show that the proposed algorithm is advantageous in terms of structure preservation. Conclusions: The proposed noise reduction algorithm can significantly improve the quality of low-dose X-ray fluoroscopic image and allows for dose reduction in X-ray fluoroscopy.

  19. An adaptive gating approach for x-ray dose reduction during cardiac interventional procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Malek, A.; Yassa, F.; Bloomer, J. )

    1994-03-01

    The increasing number of cardiac interventional procedures has resulted in a tremendous increase in the absorbed x-ray dose by radiologists as well as patients. A new method is presented for x-ray dose reduction which utilizes adaptive tube pulse-rate scheduling in pulsed fluoroscopic systems. In the proposed system, pulse-rate scheduling depends on the heart muscle activity phase determined through continuous guided segmentation of the patient's electrocardiogram (ECG). Displaying images generated at the proposed adaptive nonuniform rate is visually unacceptable; therefore, a frame-filling approach is devised to ensure a 30 frame/sec display rate. The authors adopted two approaches for the frame-filling portion of the system depending on the imaging mode used in the procedure. During cine-mode imaging (high x-ray dose), collected image frame-to-frame pixel motion is estimated using a pel-recursive algorithm followed by motion-based pixel interpolation to estimate the frames necessary to increase the rate to 30 frames/sec. The other frame-filling approach is adopted during fluoro-mode imaging (low x-ray dose), characterized by low signal-to-noise ratio images. This approach consists of simply holding the last collected frame for as many frames as necessary to maintain the real-time display rate.

  20. Does administering iodine in radiological procedures increase patient doses?

    SciTech Connect

    He, Wenjun; Yao, Hai; Huda, Walter; Mah, Eugene

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The authors investigated the changes in the pattern of energy deposition in tissue equivalent phantoms following the introduction of iodinated contrast media. Methods: The phantom consisted of a small “contrast sphere,” filled with water or iodinated contrast, located at the center of a 28 cm diameter water sphere. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using MCNP5 codes, validated by simulating irradiations with analytical solutions. Monoenergetic x-rays ranging from 35 to 150 keV were used to simulate exposures to spheres containing contrast agent with iodine concentrations ranging from 1 to 100 mg/ml. Relative values of energy imparted to the contrast sphere, as well as to the whole phantom, were calculated. Changes in patterns of energy deposition around the contrast sphere were also investigated. Results: Small contrast spheres can increase local absorbed dose by a factor of 13, but the corresponding increase in total energy absorbed was negligible (<1%). The highest localized dose increases were found to occur at incident photon energies of about 60 keV. For a concentration of about 10 mg/ml, typical of clinical practice, localized absorbed doses were generally increased by about a factor of two. At this concentration of 10 mg/ml, the maximum increase in total energy deposition in the phantom was only 6%. These simulations demonstrated that increases in contrast sphere doses were offset by corresponding dose reductions at distal and posterior locations. Conclusions: Adding iodine can result in values of localized absorbed dose increasing by more than an order of magnitude, but the total energy deposition is generally very modest (i.e., <10%). Their data show that adding iodine primarily changes the pattern of energy deposition in the irradiated region, rather than increasing patient doses per se.

  1. Dose reconstruction for real-time patient-specific dose estimation in CT

    SciTech Connect

    De Man, Bruno Yin, Zhye; Wu, Mingye; FitzGerald, Paul; Kalra, Mannudeep

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: Many recent computed tomography (CT) dose reduction approaches belong to one of three categories: statistical reconstruction algorithms, efficient x-ray detectors, and optimized CT acquisition schemes with precise control over the x-ray distribution. The latter category could greatly benefit from fast and accurate methods for dose estimation, which would enable real-time patient-specific protocol optimization. Methods: The authors present a new method for volumetrically reconstructing absorbed dose on a per-voxel basis, directly from the actual CT images. The authors’ specific implementation combines a distance-driven pencil-beam approach to model the first-order x-ray interactions with a set of Gaussian convolution kernels to model the higher-order x-ray interactions. The authors performed a number of 3D simulation experiments comparing the proposed method to a Monte Carlo based ground truth. Results: The authors’ results indicate that the proposed approach offers a good trade-off between accuracy and computational efficiency. The images show a good qualitative correspondence to Monte Carlo estimates. Preliminary quantitative results show errors below 10%, except in bone regions, where the authors see a bigger model mismatch. The computational complexity is similar to that of a low-resolution filtered-backprojection algorithm. Conclusions: The authors present a method for analytic dose reconstruction in CT, similar to the techniques used in radiation therapy planning with megavoltage energies. Future work will include refinements of the proposed method to improve the accuracy as well as a more extensive validation study. The proposed method is not intended to replace methods that track individual x-ray photons, but the authors expect that it may prove useful in applications where real-time patient-specific dose estimation is required.

  2. Order of magnitude dose reduction in intraoral radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Kircos, L.T.; Angin, L.L.; Lorton, L.

    1987-03-01

    This comparative clinical investigation concerns the radiation dose from intraoral radiography using E-speed film and rectangular and circular beam collimation. Dose to organs not of diagnostic importance (brain, lens of the eye, thyroid, and breast) is reduced by approximately an order of magnitude when rectangular collimation and E-speed film are used in periapical radiography. And dose to the thyroid and breast is further reduced by a third with the use of a full leaded apron and thyroid shield.

  3. Dose reduction of up to 89% while maintaining image quality in cardiovascular CT achieved with prospective ECG gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Londt, John H.; Shreter, Uri; Vass, Melissa; Hsieh, Jiang; Ge, Zhanyu; Adda, Olivier; Dowe, David A.; Sabllayrolles, Jean-Louis

    2007-03-01

    We present the results of dose and image quality performance evaluation of a novel, prospective ECG-gated Coronary CT Angiography acquisition mode (SnapShot Pulse, LightSpeed VCT-XT scanner, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI), and compare it to conventional retrospective ECG gated helical acquisition in clinical and phantom studies. Image quality phantoms were used to measure noise, slice sensitivity profile, in-plane resolution, low contrast detectability and dose, using the two acquisition modes. Clinical image quality and diagnostic confidence were evaluated in a study of 31 patients scanned with the two acquisition modes. Radiation dose reduction in clinical practice was evaluated by tracking 120 consecutive patients scanned with the prospectively gated scan mode. In the phantom measurements, the prospectively gated mode resulted in equivalent or better image quality measures at dose reductions of up to 89% compared to non-ECG modulated conventional helical scans. In the clinical study, image quality was rated excellent by expert radiologist reviewing the cases, with pathology being identical using the two acquisition modes. The average dose to patients in the clinical practice study was 5.6 mSv, representing 50% reduction compared to a similar patient population scanned with the conventional helical mode.

  4. Performance evaluation of iterative reconstruction algorithms for achieving CT radiation dose reduction - a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Dodge, Cristina T; Tamm, Eric P; Cody, Dianna D; Liu, Xinming; Jensen, Corey T; Wei, Wei; Kundra, Vikas; Rong, X John

    2016-01-01

    improved with increasing dose and pitch. Unlike FBP, MBIR and ASiR may have the potential for patient imaging at around 1 mGy CTDIvol. The improved low-contrast detectability observed with MBIR, especially at low-dose levels, indicate the potential for considerable dose reduction. PMID:27074454

  5. Reduction of absorbed doses in radiography of the facial skeleton

    SciTech Connect

    Julin, P.; Kraepelien, T.

    1984-11-01

    Radiation absorbed doses from radiography of the paranasal sinuses and the facial skeleton were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) on a phantom head using high-sensitivity screens in an Orbix stand. The entrance doses to the skin of the head ranged from 0.31 to 2.9 mGy per exposure. The absorbed dose from a full series of sinus exposures averaged 0.33 mGy for the oral mucous membrane, 0.33 mGy for the maxillary sinus mucous membrane, 0.11 MgY for the parotid gland, 0.15 MgY for the submandibular gland, 0.61 mGy for the eye lens, and 0.75 mGy for the thyroid gland region. A leaded soft collar adapted to the thyroid region reduced the thyroid doses by more than one order of magnitude, but also reduced the image field.

  6. Space Radiation Quality Factors and the Delta Ray Dose and Dose-Rate Reduction Effectiveness Factor.

    PubMed

    Cucinotta, Francis A; Cacao, Eliedonna; Alp, Murat

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the authors recommend that the dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor used for space radiation risk assessments should be based on a comparison of the biological effects of energetic electrons produced along a cosmic ray particles path in low fluence exposures to high dose-rate gamma-ray exposures of doses of about 1 Gy. Methods to implement this approach are described.

  7. Space Radiation Quality Factors and the Delta Ray Dose and Dose-Rate Reduction Effectiveness Factor.

    PubMed

    Cucinotta, Francis A; Cacao, Eliedonna; Alp, Murat

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the authors recommend that the dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor used for space radiation risk assessments should be based on a comparison of the biological effects of energetic electrons produced along a cosmic ray particles path in low fluence exposures to high dose-rate gamma-ray exposures of doses of about 1 Gy. Methods to implement this approach are described. PMID:26808878

  8. Radiation dose reduction efficiency of buildings after the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station.

    PubMed

    Monzen, Satoru; Hosoda, Masahiro; Osanai, Minoru; Tokonami, Shinji

    2014-01-01

    Numerous radionuclides were released from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (F1-NPS) in Japan following the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011. Local residents have been eager to calculate their individual radiation exposure. Thus, absorbed dose rates in the indoor and outdoor air at evacuation sites in the Fukushima Prefecture were measured using a gamma-ray measuring devices, and individual radiation exposure was calculated by assessing the radiation dose reduction efficiency (defined as the ratio of absorbed dose rate in the indoor air to the absorbed dose rate in the outdoor air) of wood, aluminum, and reinforced concrete buildings. Between March 2011 and July 2011, dose reduction efficiencies of wood, aluminum, and reinforced concrete buildings were 0.55 ± 0.04, 0.15 ± 0.02, and 0.19 ± 0.04, respectively. The reduction efficiency of wood structures was 1.4 times higher than that reported by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The efficiency of reinforced concrete was similar to previously reported values, whereas that of aluminum structures has not been previously reported. Dose reduction efficiency increased in proportion to the distance from F1-NPS at 8 of the 18 evacuation sites. Time variations did not reflect dose reduction efficiencies at evacuation sites although absorbed dose rates in the outdoor air decreased. These data suggest that dose reduction efficiency depends on structure types, levels of contamination, and evacuee behaviors at evacuation sites.

  9. Radiation Dose Reduction Efficiency of Buildings after the Accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station

    PubMed Central

    Monzen, Satoru; Hosoda, Masahiro; Osanai, Minoru; Tokonami, Shinji

    2014-01-01

    Numerous radionuclides were released from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (F1-NPS) in Japan following the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011. Local residents have been eager to calculate their individual radiation exposure. Thus, absorbed dose rates in the indoor and outdoor air at evacuation sites in the Fukushima Prefecture were measured using a gamma-ray measuring devices, and individual radiation exposure was calculated by assessing the radiation dose reduction efficiency (defined as the ratio of absorbed dose rate in the indoor air to the absorbed dose rate in the outdoor air) of wood, aluminum, and reinforced concrete buildings. Between March 2011 and July 2011, dose reduction efficiencies of wood, aluminum, and reinforced concrete buildings were 0.55±0.04, 0.15±0.02, and 0.19±0.04, respectively. The reduction efficiency of wood structures was 1.4 times higher than that reported by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The efficiency of reinforced concrete was similar to previously reported values, whereas that of aluminum structures has not been previously reported. Dose reduction efficiency increased in proportion to the distance from F1-NPS at 8 of the 18 evacuation sites. Time variations did not reflect dose reduction efficiencies at evacuation sites although absorbed dose rates in the outdoor air decreased. These data suggest that dose reduction efficiency depends on structure types, levels of contamination, and evacuee behaviors at evacuation sites. PMID:24999992

  10. Radiation dose reduction efficiency of buildings after the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station.

    PubMed

    Monzen, Satoru; Hosoda, Masahiro; Osanai, Minoru; Tokonami, Shinji

    2014-01-01

    Numerous radionuclides were released from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (F1-NPS) in Japan following the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011. Local residents have been eager to calculate their individual radiation exposure. Thus, absorbed dose rates in the indoor and outdoor air at evacuation sites in the Fukushima Prefecture were measured using a gamma-ray measuring devices, and individual radiation exposure was calculated by assessing the radiation dose reduction efficiency (defined as the ratio of absorbed dose rate in the indoor air to the absorbed dose rate in the outdoor air) of wood, aluminum, and reinforced concrete buildings. Between March 2011 and July 2011, dose reduction efficiencies of wood, aluminum, and reinforced concrete buildings were 0.55 ± 0.04, 0.15 ± 0.02, and 0.19 ± 0.04, respectively. The reduction efficiency of wood structures was 1.4 times higher than that reported by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The efficiency of reinforced concrete was similar to previously reported values, whereas that of aluminum structures has not been previously reported. Dose reduction efficiency increased in proportion to the distance from F1-NPS at 8 of the 18 evacuation sites. Time variations did not reflect dose reduction efficiencies at evacuation sites although absorbed dose rates in the outdoor air decreased. These data suggest that dose reduction efficiency depends on structure types, levels of contamination, and evacuee behaviors at evacuation sites. PMID:24999992

  11. Dose reduction for cardiac CT using a registration-based approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wierzbicki, Marcin; Guiraudon, Gerard M.; Jones, Douglas L.; Peters, Terry

    2007-06-15

    Two reasons for the recent rise in radiation exposure from CT are increases in its clinical applicability and the desire to maintain high SNR while acquiring smaller voxels. To address this emerging dose problem, several strategies for reducing patient exposure have already been proposed. One method employed in cardiac imaging is ECG-driven modulation of the tube current between 100% at one time point in the cardiac cycle and a reduced fraction at the remaining phases. In this paper, we describe how images obtained during such acquisition can be used to reconstruct 4D data of consistent high quality throughout the cardiac cycle. In our approach, we assume that the mid-diastole (MD) phase is imaged with full dose. The MD image is then independently registered to lower dose images (lower SNR) at other frames, resulting in a set of transformations. Finally, the transformations are used to warp the MD frame through the cardiac cycle to generate the full 4D image. In addition, the transformations may be interpolated to increase the temporal sampling or to generate images at arbitrary time points. Our approach was validated using various data obtained with simulated and scanner-implemented dose modulation. We determined that as little as 10% of the total dose was required to reproduce full quality images with a 1 mm spatial error and an error in intensity values on the order of the image noise. Thus, our technique offers considerable dose reductions compared to standard imaging protocols, with minimal effects on the quality of the final data.

  12. High-dose oral ziprasidone versus conventional dosing in schizophrenia patients with residual symptoms: the ZEBRAS study.

    PubMed

    Goff, Donald C; McEvoy, Joseph P; Citrome, Leslie; Mech, Arnold W; Bustillo, Juan R; Gil, Roberto; Buckley, Peter; Manschreck, Theo C; Achtyes, Eric D; Macklin, Eric A

    2013-08-01

    Uncontrolled studies have suggested that increasing the dose of ziprasidone above the standard maximum daily dose of 160 mg may be more effective for some patients with schizophrenia. To test this hypothesis, we conducted an 8-week, placebo-controlled, fixed-dose escalation trial comparing ziprasidone 160 versus 320 mg/d in individuals with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder who remained symptomatic despite treatment with ziprasidone 160 mg/d for at least 3 weeks. Of 75 randomized patients, 42 completed the study. Serum ziprasidone concentrations increased significantly in the high-dose group compared with the standard-dose group at week 4 but did not differ between groups at week 8. Both treatment groups exhibited significant symptomatic improvement. Response did not differ between treatment groups; however, in the high-dose group, higher ziprasidone serum concentrations were associated with better response at a trend level. Higher ziprasidone concentrations were also associated with reductions in diastolic blood pressure and, at a trend level, with more prominent negative symptoms and greater QTc prolongation. In summary, increasing the ziprasidone dose to 320 mg/d did not produce a sustained elevation in serum concentrations or symptomatic improvement compared with a standard ziprasidone dose of 160 mg/d.

  13. Energy deposition in the breast during CT scanning: quantification and implications for dose reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupcich, Franco; Kyprianou, Iacovos; Badal, Andreu; Schmidt, Taly G.

    2011-03-01

    Studies suggest that dose to the breast leads to a higher lifetime attributable cancer incidence risk from a chest CT scan for women compared to men. Numerous methods have been proposed for reducing dose to the breast during CT scanning, including bismuth shielding, tube current modulation, partial-angular scanning, and reduced kVp. These methods differ in how they alter the spectrum and fluence across projection angle. This study used Monte Carlo CT simulations of a voxelized female phantom to investigate the energy (dose) deposition in the breast as a function of both photon energy and projection angle. The resulting dose deposition matrix was then used to investigate several questions regarding dose reduction to the breast: (1) Which photon energies deposit the most dose in the breast, (2) How does increased filtration compare to tube current reduction in reducing breast dose, and (3) Do reduced kVp scans reduce dose to breast, and if so, by what mechanism? The results demonstrate that while high-energy photons deposit more dose per emitted photon, the low-energy photons deposit more dose to the breast for a 120 kVp acquisition. The results also demonstrate that decreasing the tube current for the AP views to match the fluence exiting a shield deposits nearly the same dose to the breast as when using a shield (within ~1%). Finally, results suggest that the dose reduction observed during lower kVp scans is caused by reduced photon fluence rather than the elimination of high-energy photons from the beam. Overall, understanding the mechanisms of dose deposition in the breast as a function of photon energy and projection angle enables comparisons of dose reduction methods and facilitates further development of optimized dose reduction schemes.

  14. Effect of PACS on patient radiation doses for examination of the lateral lumbar spine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weatherburn, Gwyneth C.; Bryan, Stirling; Buxton, Martin J.

    1998-07-01

    The aim of the study described in this paper was to identify and measure any changes in radiation dose attributable to the implementation of the hospital wide Hammersmith PACS system. The authors believe this study to be a comprehensive study of changes in patient dose for the examination of the lateral lumbar spine associated with the introduction of PACS: the study has fully monitored the many factors which affect these patient doses. Some very optimistic claims of large dose reductions with the introduction PACS at other hospitals have been based upon minimal reported evidence, or comparisons have been made with very old high dose systems with film/screen sensitivities as low as 100. In this study the patient doses with the PACS system have been compared with those measured when a conventional film/screen system with a sensitivity of 300 was used.

  15. Decreasing Methadone Dose Via Anxiety Reduction: A Treatment Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kushner, Marlene; And Others

    This manual describes a Relaxation-Information Presentation program based on the clinical observation that anxiety is a serious barrier to detoxification for many methadone clients, and on experimental evidence indicating that expectations may play a greater role in the discomfort experienced during detoxification than the actual methadone dose.…

  16. Reduction of absorbed doses in radiography of the facial skeleton

    SciTech Connect

    Julin, P.; Kraepelien, T.

    1984-11-01

    Radiation absorbed doses from radiography of the paranasal sinuses and the facial skeleton were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) on a phantom head using high-sensitivity screens in an Orbix stand. The entrance doses to the skin of the head ranged from 0.31 to 2.9 mGy per exposure. The absorbed dose from a full series of sinus exposures averaged 0.33 mGy for the oral mucous membrane, 0.33 mGy for the maxillary sinus mucous membrane, 0.11 mGy for the parotid gland, 0.15 mGy for the submandibular gland, 0.61 mGy for the eye lens, and 0.75 mGy for the thyroid gland region. A leaded soft collar adapted to the thyroid region reduced the thyroid doses by more than one order of magnitude, but also reduced the image field. The mean energy imparted from a full series of paranasal sinus projections was 4.8 mJ and from a total series of the facial skeleton, 7.9 mJ.

  17. SU-C-12A-07: Effect of Vertical Position On Dose Reduction Using X-Care

    SciTech Connect

    Silosky, M; Marsh, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Reduction of absorbed dose to radiosensitive tissues is an important goal in diagnostic radiology. Siemens Medical has introduced a technique (X-CARE) to lower CT dose to anterior anatomy by reducing the tube current during 80° of rotation over radiosensitive tissues. Phantom studies have shown 30-40% dose reduction when phantoms are positioned at isocenter. However, for CT face and sinus exams, the center of the head is commonly positioned below isocenter. This work investigated the effects of vertical patient positioning on dose reduction using X-CARE. Methods: A 16cm Computed Tomography Dose Index phantom was scanned on a Siemens Definition Flash CT scanner using a routine head protocol, with the phantom positioned at scanner isocenter. Optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters were placed on the anterior and posterior sides of the phantom. The phantom was lowered in increments of 2cm and rescanned, up to 8cm below isocenter. The experiment was then repeated using the same scan parameters but adding the X-CARE technique. The mean dosimeter counts were determined for each phantom position, and the difference between XCARE and routine scans was plotted as a function of distance from isocenter. Results: With the phantom positioned at isocenter, using XCARE reduced dose to the anterior side of the phantom by 40%, compared to dose when X-CARE was not used. Positioned below isocenter, anterior dose was reduced by only 20-27%. Additionally, using X-CARE at isocenter reduced dose to the anterior portion of the phantom by 45.6% compared to scans performed without X-CARE 8cm below isocenter. Conclusion: While using X-CARE substantially reduced dose to the anterior side of the phantom, this effect was diminished when the phantom was positioned below isocenter, simulating common practice for face and sinus scans. This indicates that centering the head in the gantry will maximize the effect of X-CARE.

  18. Warfarin maintenance dose in older patients: higher average dose and wider dose frequency distribution in patients of African ancestry than those of European ancestry.

    PubMed

    Garwood, Candice L; Clemente, Jennifer L; Ibe, George N; Kandula, Vijay A; Curtis, Kristy D; Whittaker, Peter

    2010-06-15

    Studies report that warfarin doses required to maintain therapeutic anticoagulation decrease with age; however, these studies almost exclusively enrolled patients of European ancestry. Consequently, universal application of dosing paradigms based on such evidence may be confounded because ethnicity also influences dose. Therefore, we determined if warfarin dose decreased with age in Americans of African ancestry, if older African and European ancestry patients required different doses, and if their daily dose frequency distributions differed. Our chart review examined 170 patients of African ancestry and 49 patients of European ancestry cared for in our anticoagulation clinic. We calculated the average weekly dose required for each stable, anticoagulated patient to maintain an international normalized ratio of 2.0 to 3.0, determined dose averages for groups <70, 70-79, and >80 years of age and plotted dose as a function of age. The maintenance dose in patients of African ancestry decreased with age (P<0.001). In addition, older patients of African ancestry required higher average weekly doses than patients of European ancestry: 33% higher in the 70- to 79-year-old group (38.2+/-1.9 vs. 28.8+/-1.7 mg; P=0.006) and 52% in the >80-year-old group (33.2+/-1.7 vs. 21.8+/-3.8 mg; P=0.011). Therefore, 43% of older patients of African ancestry required daily doses >5mg and hence would have been under-dosed using current starting-dose guidelines. The dose frequency distribution was wider for older patients of African ancestry compared to those of European ancestry (P<0.01). The higher doses required by older patients of African ancestry indicate that strategies for initiating warfarin therapy based on studies of patients of European ancestry could result in insufficient anticoagulation and thereby potentially increase their thromboembolism risk.

  19. Patient radiation doses for electron beam CT.

    PubMed

    Castellano, Isabel A; Dance, David R; Skinner, Claire L; Evans, Phil M

    2005-08-01

    A Monte Carlo based computer model has been developed for electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) to calculate organ and effective doses in a humanoid hermaphrodite phantom. The program has been validated by comparison with experimental measurements of the CT dose index in standard head and body CT dose phantoms; agreement to better than 8% has been found. The robustness of the model has been established by varying the input parameters. The amount of energy deposited at the 12:00 position of the standard body CT dose phantom is most susceptible to rotation angle, whereas that in the central region is strongly influenced by the beam quality. The program has been used to investigate the changes in organ absorbed doses arising from partial and full rotation about supine and prone subjects. Superficial organs experience the largest changes in absorbed dose with a change in subject orientation and for partial rotation. Effective doses for typical clinical scan protocols have been calculated and compared with values obtained using existing dosimetry techniques based on full rotation. Calculations which make use of Monte Carlo conversion factors for the scanner that best matches the EBCT dosimetric characteristics consistently overestimate the effective dose in supine subjects by typically 20%, and underestimate the effective dose in prone subjects by typically 13%. These factors can therefore be used to correct values obtained in this way. Empirical dosimetric techniques based on the dose-length product yield errors as great as 77%. This is due to the sensitivity of the dose length product to individual scan lengths. The magnitude of these errors is reduced if empirical dosimetric techniques based on the average absorbed dose in the irradiated volume (CTDIvol) are used. Therefore conversion factors specific to EBCT have been calculated to convert the CTDIvol to an effective dose. PMID:16193782

  20. Patient radiation doses for electron beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Castellano, Isabel A.; Dance, David R.; Skinner, Claire L.; Evans, Phil M.

    2005-08-15

    A Monte Carlo based computer model has been developed for electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) to calculate organ and effective doses in a humanoid hermaphrodite phantom. The program has been validated by comparison with experimental measurements of the CT dose index in standard head and body CT dose phantoms; agreement to better than 8% has been found. The robustness of the model has been established by varying the input parameters. The amount of energy deposited at the 12:00 position of the standard body CT dose phantom is most susceptible to rotation angle, whereas that in the central region is strongly influenced by the beam quality. The program has been used to investigate the changes in organ absorbed doses arising from partial and full rotation about supine and prone subjects. Superficial organs experience the largest changes in absorbed dose with a change in subject orientation and for partial rotation. Effective doses for typical clinical scan protocols have been calculated and compared with values obtained using existing dosimetry techniques based on full rotation. Calculations which make use of Monte Carlo conversion factors for the scanner that best matches the EBCT dosimetric characteristics consistently overestimate the effective dose in supine subjects by typically 20%, and underestimate the effective dose in prone subjects by typically 13%. These factors can therefore be used to correct values obtained in this way. Empirical dosimetric techniques based on the dose-length product yield errors as great as 77%. This is due to the sensitivity of the dose length product to individual scan lengths. The magnitude of these errors is reduced if empirical dosimetric techniques based on the average absorbed dose in the irradiated volume (CTDI{sub vol}) are used. Therefore conversion factors specific to EBCT have been calculated to convert the CTDI{sub vol} to an effective dose.

  1. Shaped, lead-loaded acrylic filters for patient exposure reduction and image-quality improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, J.E.; Stears, J.G.; Frank, E.D.

    1983-03-01

    Shaped filters that are constructed of lead-loaded acrylic material for use in patient radiography are discussed. Use of the filters will result in improved overall image quality with significant exposure reduction to the patient (approximately a 2X reduction in breast exposure and a 3X reduction in thyroid gland exposure). Detailed drawings of the shaped filters for scoliosis radiography, cervical spine radiography, and for long film changers in special procedures are provided. The use of the scoliosis filters is detailed and includes phantom and patient radiographs and dose reduction information.

  2. Ribavirin dose reduction during telaprevir/ribavirin/peg-interferon therapy overcomes the effect of the ITPA gene polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, S; Hayes, C N; Tsuge, M; Murakami, E; Hiraga, N; Abe, H; Miki, D; Imamura, M; Ochi, H; Chayama, K

    2015-02-01

    Treatment success of chronic hepatitis C virus genotype 1 infection has improved with the advent of telaprevir plus peg-interferon/ribavirin triple combination therapy. However, the effect of inosine triphosphatase (ITPA) polymorphism on dose reduction during triple therapy, especially during the postmarketing phase, has not been sufficiently evaluated. We analysed 273 patients with genotype 1 infection who were treated with triple therapy and assessed the effect of the ITPA polymorphism on dose reduction. ITPA and IFNL4 SNP genotypes were determined by the Invader assay. A stepwise multivariate regression analysis was performed to identify factors associated with outcome of the therapy. The overall sustained viral response (SVR) rate 12 weeks after the end of therapy was 80.2% (219/273). Decline of haemoglobin was significantly faster, and ribavirin was more extensively reduced in patients with ITPA SNP rs1127354 genotype CC than CA/AA. Extensive reduction of ribavirin resulted in mild reduction of telaprevir and peg-interferon, but no significant increase in viral breakthrough. Although the amount of telaprevir given was slightly higher in CA/AA patients, the total dose of peg-interferon and the SVR rate did not differ between the two groups. Multivariate analysis showed that IFNL4 but not ITPA SNP genotype, platelet count and peg-interferon adherence were significantly associated with outcome of therapy. Postmarketing-phase triple therapy resulted in a high SVR rate in spite of extensive ribavirin dose reduction in a diverse patient population, indicating the importance of treatment continuation and appropriate management of adverse events. PMID:24930407

  3. Measurement of patient imaging dose for real-time kilovoltage x-ray intrafraction tumour position monitoring in prostate patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocker, James K.; Aun Ng, Jin; Keall, Paul J.; Booth, Jeremy T.

    2012-05-01

    The dose for image-based motion monitoring of prostate tumours during radiotherapy delivery has not been established. This study aimed to provide quantitative analysis and optimization of the fluoroscopic patient imaging dose during radiotherapy for IMRT and VMAT treatments using standard and hypofractionated treatment schedules. Twenty-two patients with type T1c N0/M0 prostate cancer and three implanted fiducial markers were considered. Minimum field sizes encompassing all fiducial markers plus a 7.5 mm motion margin were determined for each treatment beam, each patient and the complete cohort. Imaging doses were measured for different field sizes and depths in a phantom at 75 and 120 kV. Based on these measurements, the patient imaging doses were then estimated according to beam-on time for clinical settings. The population minimum field size was 5.3 × 6.1 cm2, yielding doses of 406 and 185 mGy over the course of an IMRT treatment for 75 kV (10 mAs) and 120 kV (1.04 mAs) imaging respectively, at 1 Hz. The imaging dose was reduced by an average of 28% and 32% by adopting patient-specific and treatment-beam-specific field sizes respectively. Standard fractionation VMAT imaging doses were 37% lower than IMRT doses over a complete treatment. Hypofractionated IMRT stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) and VMAT SBRT imaging doses were 58% and 76% lower than IMRT doses respectively. The patient dose for kilovoltage intrafraction monitoring of the prostate was quantified. Tailoring imaging field sizes to specific patients yielded a significant reduction in the imaging dose, as did adoption of faster treatment modalities such as VMAT.

  4. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic study of two doses of bortezomib in patients with relapsed multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Dan; Lonial, Sagar; Mohrbacher, Ann F.; Chatta, Gurkamal; Shustik, Chaim; Burris, Howard; Venkatakrishnan, Karthik; Neuwirth, Rachel; Riordan, William J.; Karol, Michael; von Moltke, Lisa L.; Acharya, Milin; Zannikos, Peter; Stewart, A. Keith

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Characterize bortezomib pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics in relapsed myeloma patients after single and repeat intravenous administration at two doses. Methods Forty-two patients were randomized to receive bortezomib 1.0 or 1.3 mg/m2, days 1, 4, 8, 11, for up to eight 21-day treatment cycles (n = 21, each dose group). Serial blood samples for pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis were taken on days 1 and 11, cycles 1 and 3. Observational efficacy and safety data were collected. Results Twelve patients in each dose group were evaluable for pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics. Plasma clearance decreased with repeat dosing (102–112 L/h for first dose; 15–32 L/h following repeat dosing), with associated increases in systemic exposure and terminal half-life. Systemic exposures of bortezomib were similar between dose groups considering the relatively narrow dose range and the observed pharmacokinetic variability, although there was no readily apparent deviation from dose-proportionality. Blood 20S proteasome inhibition profiles were similar between groups with mean maximum inhibition ranging from 70 to 84% and decreasing toward baseline over the dosing interval. Response rate (all 42 patients) was 50%, including 7% complete responses. The safety profile was consistent with the predictable and manageable profile previously established; data suggested milder toxicity in the 1.0 mg/m2 group. Conclusions Bortezomib pharmacokinetics change with repeat dose administration, characterized by a reduction in plasma clearance and associated increase in systemic exposure. Bortezomib is pharmacodynamically active and tolerable at 1.0 and 1.3 mg/m2 doses, with recovery toward baseline blood proteasome activity over the dosing interval following repeat dose administration, supporting the current clinical dosing regimen. PMID:20306195

  5. Preliminary design review report for K Basin Dose Reduction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn, L.D.

    1996-01-01

    The strategy for reducing radiation dose, originating from radionuclides absorbed in the K East Basin concrete, is to raise the pool water level to provide additional shielding. This report documents a preliminary design review conducted to ensure that design approaches for cleaning/coating basin walls and modifying other basin components were appropriate. The conclusion of this review was that design documents presently conclusion of this review was that design documents presently completed or in process of modification are and acceptable basis for proceeding to complete the design.

  6. Preliminary validation of a new methodology for estimating dose reduction protocols in neonatal chest computed radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Don, Steven; Whiting, Bruce R.; Hildebolt, Charles F.; Sehnert, W. James; Ellinwood, Jacquelyn S.; Töpfer, Karin; Masoumzadeh, Parinaz; Kraus, Richard A.; Kronemer, Keith A.; Herman, Thomas; McAlister, William H.

    2006-03-01

    The risk of radiation exposure is greatest for pediatric patients and, thus, there is a great incentive to reduce the radiation dose used in diagnostic procedures for children to "as low as reasonably achievable" (ALARA). Testing of low-dose protocols presents a dilemma, as it is unethical to repeatedly expose patients to ionizing radiation in order to determine optimum protocols. To overcome this problem, we have developed a computed-radiography (CR) dose-reduction simulation tool that takes existing images and adds synthetic noise to create realistic images that correspond to images generated with lower doses. The objective of our study was to determine the extent to which simulated, low-dose images corresponded with original (non-simulated) low-dose images. To make this determination, we created pneumothoraces of known volumes in five neonate cadavers and obtained images of the neonates at 10 mR, 1 mR and 0.1 mR (as measured at the cassette plate). The 10-mR exposures were considered "relatively-noise-free" images. We used these 10 mR-images and our simulation tool to create simulated 0.1- and 1-mR images. For the simulated and original images, we identified regions of interest (ROI) of the entire chest, free-in-air region, and liver. We compared the means and standard deviations of the ROI grey-scale values of the simulated and original images with paired t tests. We also had observers rate simulated and original images for image quality and for the presence or absence of pneumothoraces. There was no statistically significant difference in grey-scale-value means nor standard deviations between simulated and original entire chest ROI regions. The observer performance suggests that an exposure >=0.2 mR is required to detect the presence or absence of pneumothoraces. These preliminary results indicate that the use of the simulation tool is promising for achieving ALARA exposures in children.

  7. CT Radiation Dose Management: A Comprehensive Optimization Process for Improving Patient Safety.

    PubMed

    Parakh, Anushri; Kortesniemi, Mika; Schindera, Sebastian T

    2016-09-01

    Rising concerns of radiation exposure from computed tomography have caused various advances in dose reduction technologies. While proper justification and optimization of scans has been the main focus to address increasing doses, the value of dose management has been largely overlooked. The purpose of this article is to explain the importance of dose management, provide an overview of the available options for dose tracking, and discuss the importance of a dedicated dose team. The authors also describe how a digital radiation tracking software can be used for analyzing the big data on doses for auditing patient safety, scanner utilization, and productivity, all of which have enormous personal and institutional implications. (©) RSNA, 2016. PMID:27533027

  8. [Reduction of radiation dose by the use of carbon fiber cassettes].

    PubMed

    Hajek, P; Nowotny, R

    1984-03-01

    A new type of radiographic cassette, reinforced by PEEK-CFK is discussed. The amount of reduction of radiation dose by this cassette was evaluated by means of an experimental physical and clinical trial. Dose reduction may reach 30% depending on the type of examination and the organ studied. An increase of contrast of the radiographs could not be verified. This type of cassette can be recommended for routine clinical use.

  9. Measuring radiation dose to patients undergoing fluoroscopically-guided interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubis, L. E.; Badawy, M. K.

    2016-03-01

    The increasing prevalence and complexity of fluoroscopically guided interventions (FGI) raises concern regarding radiation dose to patients subjected to the procedure. Despite current evidence showing the risk to patients from the deterministic effects of radiation (e.g. skin burns), radiation induced injuries remain commonplace. This review aims to increase the awareness surrounding radiation dose measurement for patients undergoing FGI. A review of the literature was conducted alongside previous researches from the authors’ department. Studies pertaining to patient dose measurement, its formalism along with current advances and present challenges were reviewed. Current patient monitoring techniques (using available radiation dosimeters), as well as the inadequacy of accepting displayed dose as patient radiation dose is discussed. Furthermore, advances in real-time patient radiation dose estimation during FGI are considered. Patient dosimetry in FGI, particularly in real time, remains an ongoing challenge. The increasing occurrence and sophistication of these procedures calls for further advances in the field of patient radiation dose monitoring. Improved measuring techniques will aid clinicians in better predicting and managing radiation induced injury following FGI, thus improving patient care.

  10. Feasibility of normal tissue dose reduction in radiotherapy using low strength magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Youngseob; Jung, In-Hye; Kwak, Jungwon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Toxicity of mucosa is one of the major concerns of radiotherapy (RT), when a target tumor is located near a mucosal lined organ. Energy of photon RT is transferred primarily by secondary electrons. If these secondary electrons could be removed in an internal cavity of mucosal lined organ, the mucosa will be spared without compromising the target tumor dose. The purpose of this study was to present a RT dose reduction in near target inner-surface (NTIS) of internal cavity, using Lorentz force of magnetic field. Materials and Methods Tissue equivalent phantoms, composed with a cylinder shaped internal cavity, and adjacent a target tumor part, were developed. The phantoms were irradiated using 6 MV photon beam, with or without 0.3 T of perpendicular magnetic field. Two experimental models were developed: single beam model (SBM) to analyze central axis dose distributions and multiple beam model (MBM) to simulate a clinical case of prostate cancer with rectum. RT dose of NTIS of internal cavity and target tumor area (TTA) were measured. Results With magnetic field applied, bending effect of dose distribution was visualized. The depth dose distribution of SBM showed 28.1% dose reduction of NTIS and little difference in dose of TTA with magnetic field. In MBM, cross-sectional dose of NTIS was reduced by 33.1% with magnetic field, while TTA dose were the same, irrespective of magnetic field. Conclusion RT dose of mucosal lined organ, located near treatment target, could be modulated by perpendicular magnetic field. PMID:26484306

  11. Outcomes for newly diagnosed patients with acute myeloid leukemia dosed on actual or adjusted body weight

    PubMed Central

    Bivona, Cory; Rockey, Michelle; Henry, Dave; Grauer, Dennis; Abhyankar, Sunil; Aljitawi, Omar; Ganguly, Siddhartha; McGuirk, Joseph; Singh, Anurag; Lin, Tara L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Data from solid tumor malignancies suggest that actual body weight (ABW) dosing improves overall outcomes. There is the potential to compromise efficacy when chemotherapy dosages are reduced, but the impact of dose adjustment on clinical response and toxicity in hematologic malignancies is unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of utilizing a percent of ABW for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) induction chemotherapy dosing. Methods This retrospective, single-center study included 146 patients who received 7 + 3 induction (cytarabine and anthracycline) for treatment of AML. Study design evaluated the relationship between percentage of ABW dosing and complete response (CR) rates in patients newly diagnosed with AML. Results Percentage of ABW dosing did not influence CR rates in patients undergoing induction chemotherapy for AML (p = 0.83); nor did it influence rate of death at 30 days or relapse at 6 months (p = 0.94). When comparing patients dosed at 90–100 % of ABW compared to <90 % ABW, CR rates were not significantly different in patients classified as poor risk (p = 0.907). All favorable risk category patients obtained CR. Conclusions Preemptive dose reductions for obesity did not influence CR rates for patients with AML undergoing induction chemotherapy and did not influence the composite endpoint of death at 30 days or disease relapse at 6 months. PMID:26231954

  12. Radiation dose reduction in medical x-ray CT via Fourier-based iterative reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Fahimian, Benjamin P.; Zhao, Yunzhe; Huang, Zhifeng; Fung, Russell; Mao, Yu; Zhu, Chun; Khatonabadi, Maryam; DeMarco, John J.; Osher, Stanley J.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; Miao, Jianwei

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: A Fourier-based iterative reconstruction technique, termed Equally Sloped Tomography (EST), is developed in conjunction with advanced mathematical regularization to investigate radiation dose reduction in x-ray CT. The method is experimentally implemented on fan-beam CT and evaluated as a function of imaging dose on a series of image quality phantoms and anonymous pediatric patient data sets. Numerical simulation experiments are also performed to explore the extension of EST to helical cone-beam geometry. Methods: EST is a Fourier based iterative algorithm, which iterates back and forth between real and Fourier space utilizing the algebraically exact pseudopolar fast Fourier transform (PPFFT). In each iteration, physical constraints and mathematical regularization are applied in real space, while the measured data are enforced in Fourier space. The algorithm is automatically terminated when a proposed termination criterion is met. Experimentally, fan-beam projections were acquired by the Siemens z-flying focal spot technology, and subsequently interleaved and rebinned to a pseudopolar grid. Image quality phantoms were scanned at systematically varied mAs settings, reconstructed by EST and conventional reconstruction methods such as filtered back projection (FBP), and quantified using metrics including resolution, signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs). Pediatric data sets were reconstructed at their original acquisition settings and additionally simulated to lower dose settings for comparison and evaluation of the potential for radiation dose reduction. Numerical experiments were conducted to quantify EST and other iterative methods in terms of image quality and computation time. The extension of EST to helical cone-beam CT was implemented by using the advanced single-slice rebinning (ASSR) method. Results: Based on the phantom and pediatric patient fan-beam CT data, it is demonstrated that EST reconstructions with the lowest

  13. Radiation dose reduction in medical x-ray CT via Fourier-based iterative reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Fahimian, Benjamin P.; Zhao Yunzhe; Huang Zhifeng; Fung, Russell; Zhu Chun; Miao Jianwei; Mao Yu; Khatonabadi, Maryam; DeMarco, John J.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; Osher, Stanley J.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: A Fourier-based iterative reconstruction technique, termed Equally Sloped Tomography (EST), is developed in conjunction with advanced mathematical regularization to investigate radiation dose reduction in x-ray CT. The method is experimentally implemented on fan-beam CT and evaluated as a function of imaging dose on a series of image quality phantoms and anonymous pediatric patient data sets. Numerical simulation experiments are also performed to explore the extension of EST to helical cone-beam geometry. Methods: EST is a Fourier based iterative algorithm, which iterates back and forth between real and Fourier space utilizing the algebraically exact pseudopolar fast Fourier transform (PPFFT). In each iteration, physical constraints and mathematical regularization are applied in real space, while the measured data are enforced in Fourier space. The algorithm is automatically terminated when a proposed termination criterion is met. Experimentally, fan-beam projections were acquired by the Siemens z-flying focal spot technology, and subsequently interleaved and rebinned to a pseudopolar grid. Image quality phantoms were scanned at systematically varied mAs settings, reconstructed by EST and conventional reconstruction methods such as filtered back projection (FBP), and quantified using metrics including resolution, signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs). Pediatric data sets were reconstructed at their original acquisition settings and additionally simulated to lower dose settings for comparison and evaluation of the potential for radiation dose reduction. Numerical experiments were conducted to quantify EST and other iterative methods in terms of image quality and computation time. The extension of EST to helical cone-beam CT was implemented by using the advanced single-slice rebinning (ASSR) method. Results: Based on the phantom and pediatric patient fan-beam CT data, it is demonstrated that EST reconstructions with the lowest

  14. SU-F-BRF-11: Dose Rearrangement in High Dose Locally Advanced Lung Patients Based On Perfusion Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Matrosic, C; Jarema, D; Kong, F; McShan, D; Stenmark, M; Owen, D; Ten Haken, R; Matuszak, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The use of mean lung dose (MLD) limits allows individualization of lung patient tumor doses at safe levels. However, MLD does not account for local lung function differences between patients, leading to toxicity variability at the same MLD. We investigated dose rearrangement to minimize dose to functional lung, as measured by perfusion SPECT, while maintaining target coverage and conventional MLD limits. Methods: Retrospective plans were optimized for 15 locally advanced NSCLC patients enrolled in a prospective imaging trial. A priority-based optimization system was used. The baseline priorities were (1) meet OAR dose constraints, (2) maximize target gEUD, and (3) minimize physical MLD. As a final step, normal tissue doses were minimized. To determine the benefit of rearranging dose using perfusion SPECT, plans were reoptimized to minimize functional lung gEUD as the 4th priority. Results: When only minimizing physical MLD, the functional lung gEUD was 10.8+/−5.0 Gy (4.3–19.8 Gy). Only 3/15 cases showed a decrease in functional lung gEUD of ≥4% when rearranging dose to minimize functional gEUD in the cost function (10.5+/−5.0 Gy range 4.3−19.7). Although OAR constraints were respected, the dose rearrangement resulted in ≥10% increases in gEUD to an OAR in 4/15 cases. Only slight reductions in functional lung gEUD were noted when omitting the minimization of physical MLD, suggesting that constraining the target gEUD minimizes the potential to redistribute dose. Conclusion: Prioritydriven optimization permits the generation of plans that respect traditional OAR limits and target coverage, but with the ability to rearrange dose based on functional imaging. The latter appears to be limited due to the decreased solution space when constraining target coverage. Since dose rearrangement may increase dose to other OARs, it is also worthwhile to investigate global biomarkers of lung toxicity to further individualize treatment in this population

  15. Radiation Dose Reduction in Pediatric Body CT Using Iterative Reconstruction and a Novel Image-Based Denoising Method

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lifeng; Fletcher, Joel G.; Shiung, Maria; Thomas, Kristen B.; Matsumoto, Jane M.; Zingula, Shannon N.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to evaluate the radiation dose reduction potential of a novel image-based denoising technique in pediatric abdominopelvic and chest CT examinations and compare it with a commercial iterative reconstruction method. MATERIALS AND METHODS Data were retrospectively collected from 50 (25 abdominopelvic and 25 chest) clinically indicated pediatric CT examinations. For each examination, a validated noise-insertion tool was used to simulate half-dose data, which were reconstructed using filtered back-projection (FBP) and sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) methods. A newly developed denoising technique, adaptive nonlocal means (aNLM), was also applied. For each of the 50 patients, three pediatric radiologists evaluated four datasets: full dose plus FBP, half dose plus FBP, half dose plus SAFIRE, and half dose plus aNLM. For each examination, the order of preference for the four datasets was ranked. The organ-specific diagnosis and diagnostic confidence for five primary organs were recorded. RESULTS The mean (± SD) volume CT dose index for the full-dose scan was 5.3 ± 2.1 mGy for abdominopelvic examinations and 2.4 ± 1.1 mGy for chest examinations. For abdominopelvic examinations, there was no statistically significant difference between the half dose plus aNLM dataset and the full dose plus FBP dataset (3.6 ± 1.0 vs 3.6 ± 0.9, respectively; p = 0.52), and aNLM performed better than SAFIRE. For chest examinations, there was no statistically significant difference between the half dose plus SAFIRE and the full dose plus FBP (4.1 ± 0.6 vs 4.2 ± 0.6, respectively; p = 0.67), and SAFIRE performed better than aNLM. For all organs, there was more than 85% agreement in organ-specific diagnosis among the three half-dose configurations and the full dose plus FBP configuration. CONCLUSION Although a novel image-based denoising technique performed better than a commercial iterative reconstruction method in pediatric

  16. IMRT in a Pregnant Patient: How to Reduce the Fetal Dose?

    SciTech Connect

    Josipovic, Mirjana Nystroem, Hakan; Kjaer-Kristoffersen, Flemming

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to find a solution for fetal dose reduction during head-and-neck intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of a pregnant patient. The first step was optimization of the IMRT treatment plan with as few monitor units (MUs) as possible, while maintaining an acceptable dose distribution. The peripheral dose originating from the final IMRT plan was measured at distances reaching from the most proximal to the most distal fetal position, along the accelerator's longitudinal axis, using an anthropomorphic phantom extended with water-equivalent plastic. The measured peripheral dose was divided into leakage, and internal and collimator scatter, to find the degree to which each component influences the peripheral dose to build an appropriate shield. Collimator scatter was the greatest contributor to the peripheral dose throughout the range of the growing fetus. A shield was built and placed beneath the accelerator head, extending caudally from the field edge, to function as an extra collimator jaw. This shield reduced the fetal dose by a factor of 3.5. The peripheral dose components were also measured for simple rectangular fields and also here the collimator scatter was the greatest contributor to the peripheral dose. Therefore, the shielding used for the IMRT treatment of our patient could also be used when shielding in conventional radiotherapy. It is important for a radiation therapy department to be prepared for treatment of a pregnant patient to shield the fetus efficiently.

  17. VirtualDose: a software for reporting organ doses from CT for adult and pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Ding, Aiping; Gao, Yiming; Liu, Haikuan; Caracappa, Peter F; Long, Daniel J; Bolch, Wesley E; Liu, Bob; Xu, X George

    2015-07-21

    This paper describes the development and testing of VirtualDose--a software for reporting organ doses for adult and pediatric patients who undergo x-ray computed tomography (CT) examinations. The software is based on a comprehensive database of organ doses derived from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations involving a library of 25 anatomically realistic phantoms that represent patients of different ages, body sizes, body masses, and pregnant stages. Models of GE Lightspeed Pro 16 and Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 scanners were carefully validated for use in MC dose calculations. The software framework is designed with the 'software as a service (SaaS)' delivery concept under which multiple clients can access the web-based interface simultaneously from any computer without having to install software locally. The RESTful web service API also allows a third-party picture archiving and communication system software package to seamlessly integrate with VirtualDose's functions. Software testing showed that VirtualDose was compatible with numerous operating systems including Windows, Linux, Apple OS X, and mobile and portable devices. The organ doses from VirtualDose were compared against those reported by CT-Expo and ImPACT-two dosimetry tools that were based on the stylized pediatric and adult patient models that were known to be anatomically simple. The organ doses reported by VirtualDose differed from those reported by CT-Expo and ImPACT by as much as 300% in some of the patient models. These results confirm the conclusion from past studies that differences in anatomical realism offered by stylized and voxel phantoms have caused significant discrepancies in CT dose estimations.

  18. VirtualDose: a software for reporting organ doses from CT for adult and pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Ding, Aiping; Gao, Yiming; Liu, Haikuan; Caracappa, Peter F; Long, Daniel J; Bolch, Wesley E; Liu, Bob; Xu, X George

    2015-07-21

    This paper describes the development and testing of VirtualDose--a software for reporting organ doses for adult and pediatric patients who undergo x-ray computed tomography (CT) examinations. The software is based on a comprehensive database of organ doses derived from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations involving a library of 25 anatomically realistic phantoms that represent patients of different ages, body sizes, body masses, and pregnant stages. Models of GE Lightspeed Pro 16 and Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 scanners were carefully validated for use in MC dose calculations. The software framework is designed with the 'software as a service (SaaS)' delivery concept under which multiple clients can access the web-based interface simultaneously from any computer without having to install software locally. The RESTful web service API also allows a third-party picture archiving and communication system software package to seamlessly integrate with VirtualDose's functions. Software testing showed that VirtualDose was compatible with numerous operating systems including Windows, Linux, Apple OS X, and mobile and portable devices. The organ doses from VirtualDose were compared against those reported by CT-Expo and ImPACT-two dosimetry tools that were based on the stylized pediatric and adult patient models that were known to be anatomically simple. The organ doses reported by VirtualDose differed from those reported by CT-Expo and ImPACT by as much as 300% in some of the patient models. These results confirm the conclusion from past studies that differences in anatomical realism offered by stylized and voxel phantoms have caused significant discrepancies in CT dose estimations. PMID:26134511

  19. Ultra-low-dose dual-source CT coronary angiography with high pitch: diagnostic yield of a volumetric planning scan and effects on dose reduction and imaging strategy

    PubMed Central

    Hamm, B; Huppertz, A; Lembcke, A

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the role of an ultra-low-dose dual-source CT coronary angiography (CTCA) scan with high pitch for delimiting the range of the subsequent standard CTCA scan. Methods: 30 patients with an indication for CTCA were prospectively examined using a two-scan dual-source CTCA protocol (2.0 × 64.0 × 0.6 mm; pitch, 3.4; rotation time of 280 ms; 100 kV): Scan 1 was acquired with one-fifth of the tube current suggested by the automatic exposure control software [CareDose 4D™ (Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany) using 100 kV and 370 mAs as a reference] with the scan length from the tracheal bifurcation to the diaphragmatic border. Scan 2 was acquired with standard tube current extending with reduced scan length based on Scan 1. Nine central coronary artery segments were analysed qualitatively on both scans. Results: Scan 2 (105.1 ± 10.1 mm) was significantly shorter than Scan 1 (127.0 ± 8.7 mm). Image quality scores were significantly better for Scan 2. However, in 5 of 6 (83%) patients with stenotic coronary artery disease, a stenosis was already detected in Scan 1 and in 13 of 24 (54%) patients with non-stenotic coronary arteries, a stenosis was already excluded by Scan 1. Using Scan 2 as reference, the positive- and negative-predictive value of Scan 1 was 83% (5 of 6 patients) and 100% (13 of 13 patients), respectively. Conclusion: An ultra-low-dose CTCA planning scan enables a reliable scan length reduction of the following standard CTCA scan and allows for correct diagnosis in a substantial proportion of patients. Advances in knowledge: Further dose reductions are possible owing to a change in the individual patient's imaging strategy as a prior ultra-low-dose CTCA scan may already rule out the presence of a stenosis or may lead to a direct transferal to an invasive catheter procedure. PMID:25710210

  20. Patient release criteria for low dose rate brachytherapy implants.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Dale E; Sheetz, Michael A

    2013-04-01

    A lack of consensus regarding a model governing the release of patients following sealed source brachytherapy has led to a set of patient release policies that vary from institution to institution. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has issued regulatory guidance on patient release in NUREG 1556, Volume 9, Rev. 2, Appendix U, which allows calculation of release limits following implant brachytherapy. While the formalism presented in NUREG is meaningful for the calculation of release limits in the context of relatively high energy gamma emitters, it does not estimate accurately the effective dose equivalent for the common low dose rate brachytherapy sources Cs, I, and Pd. NUREG 1556 states that patient release may be based on patient-specific calculations as long as the calculation is documented. This work is intended to provide a format for patient-specific calculations to be used for the consideration of patients' release following the implantation of certain low dose rate brachytherapy isotopes. PMID:23439145

  1. SU-E-I-37: Eye Lens Dose Reduction From CT Scan Using Organ Based Tube Current Modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H; Liu, T; Xu, X; Wu, J; Zhuo, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the eye lens dose reduction by CT scan with organ based tube current modulation (OBTCM) using GPU Monte Carlo code ARCHER-CT. Methods: 36 X-ray sources and bowtie filters were placed around the patient head with the projection angle interval of 10° for one rotation of CT scan, each projection was simulated respectively. The voxel eye models with high resolution(0.1mm*0.1mm*0.1mm) were used in the simulation and different tube voltage including 80kVp, 100kVp, 120kVp and 140kVp were taken into consideration. Results: The radiation doses to the eye lens increased with the tube voltage raised from 80kVp to 140kVp, and the dose results from 0° (AP) direction are much higher than those from 180° (PA) direction for all the 4 different tube voltage investigated. This 360° projection dose characteristic enables organ based TCM, which can reduce the eye lens dose by more than 55%. Conclusion: As the eye lens belongs to superficial tissues, its radiation dose to external exposure like CT is direction sensitive, and this characteristic feature makes organ based TCM to be an effective way to reduce the eye lens dose, so more clinical use of this technique were recommended. National Nature Science Foundation of China(No.11475047)

  2. Low-dose glimepiride with sitagliptin improves glycemic control without dose-dependency in patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled on high-dose glimepiride.

    PubMed

    Umayahara, Rieko; Yonemoto, Takako; Kyou, Chika; Morishita, Kae; Ogawa, Tatsuo; Taguchi, Yoshitaka; Inoue, Tatsuhide

    2014-01-01

    This randomized, prospective study was conducted in 76 subjects to assess whether low-dose (0.5-2 mg/day) glimepiride, in combination therapy with sitagliptin, improves glycemic control in a dose-dependent manner in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes. Eligible subjects had been treated with glimepiride at doses of 3-6 mg/day for at least 3 months and had a HbA1c level of ≥6.9%. Subjects were randomly assigned to three treatment groups of reduced doses of glimepiride (0.5 mg/day, 1 mg/day, or 2 mg/day) in addition to sitagliptin for 24 weeks. The primary efficacy analysis evaluated the change in HbA1c from baseline to week 24. Secondary efficacy endpoints included the changes in fasting plasma glucose, insulin secretion capacity, and β-cell function. Safety endpoints included hypoglycemia and any adverse event. Despite dose reduction of glimepiride, combination therapy with sitagliptin induced significant improvements in HbA1c levels (-0.8%, p < 0.001). Insulin secretion parameters (CPI, SUIT) also increased significantly. There were no significant differences between groups in changes from baseline HbA1c, insulin secretion capacity, and β-cell function (proinsulin/insulin) at 24 weeks of combination therapy. Multivariate analysis showed that baseline HbA1c was the only predictor for efficacy of combination therapy with sitagliptin and low-dose glimeripide. No changes in body weight were noted and no symptomatic hypoglycemia was documented. These findings indicate that combination therapy with sitagliptin and low-dose glimepiride (0.5 mg/day) is both effective for glycemic control and safe in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with high-dose glimepiride. PMID:25168659

  3. Evaluation of exposure dose reduction in multislice CT coronary angiography (MS-CTA) with prospective ECG-gated helical scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Takamasa; Tsuyuki, Masaharu; Okumura, Miwa; Sano, Tomonari; Kondo, Takeshi; Takase, Shinichi

    2008-03-01

    A novel low-dose ECG-gated helical scan method to investigate coronary artery diseases was developed. This method uses a high pitch for scanning (based on the patient's heart rate) and X-rays are generated only during the optimal cardiac phases. The dose reduction was obtained using a two-level approach: 1) To use a 64-slice CT scanner (Aquilion, Toshiba, Otawara, Tochigi, Japan) with a scan speed of 0.35 s/rot. to helically scan the heart at a high pitch based on the patient's heart rate. By changing the pitch from the conventional 0.175 to 0.271 for a heart rate of 60 bpm, the exposure dose was reduced to 65%. 2) To employ tube current gating that predicts the timing of optimal cardiac phases from the previous cardiac cycle and generates X-rays only during the required cardiac phases. The combination of high speed scanning with a high pitch and appropriate X-ray generation only in the cardiac phases from 60% to 90% allows the exposure dose to be reduced to 5.6 mSv for patients with a heart rate lower than 65 bpm. This is a dose reduction of approximately 70% compared to the conventional scanning method recommended by the manufacturer when segmental reconstruction is considered. This low-dose protocol seamlessly allows for wide scan ranges (e.g., aortic dissection) with the benefits of ECG-gated helical scanning: smooth continuity for longitudinal direction and utilization of data from all cardiac cycles.

  4. Successful Within-patient Dose Escalation of Olipudase Alfa in Acid Sphingomyelinase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Wasserstein, Melissa P.; Jones, Simon A.; Soran, Handrean; Diaz, George A.; Lippa, Natalie; Thurberg, Beth L.; Culm-Merdek, Kerry; Shamiyeh, Elias; Inguilizian, Haig; Cox, Gerald F.; Puga, Ana Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Background Olipudase alfa, a recombinant human acid sphingomyelinase (rhASM), is an investigational enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for patients with ASM deficiency [ASMD; Niemann-Pick Disease (NPD) A and B]. This open-label phase 1b study assessed the safety and tolerability of olipudase alfa using within-patient dose escalation to gradually debulk accumulated sphingomyelin and mitigate the rapid production of metabolites, which can be toxic. Secondary objectives were pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and exploratory efficacy. Methods Five adults with nonneuronopathic ASMD (NPD B) received escalating doses (0.1 to 3.0 mg/kg) of olipudase alfa intravenously every 2 weeks for 26 weeks. Results All patients successfully reached 3.0 mg/kg without serious or severe adverse events. One patient repeated a dose (2.0 mg/kg) and another had a temporary dose reduction (1.0 to 0.6 mg/kg). Most adverse events (97%) were mild and all resolved without sequelae. The most common adverse events were headache, arthralgia, nausea and abdominal pain. Two patients experienced single acute phase reactions. No patient developed hypersensitivity or anti-olipudase alfa antibodies. The mean circulating half-life of olipudase alfa ranged from 20.9 to 23.4 hours across doses without accumulation. Ceramide, a sphingomyelin catabolite, rose transiently in plasma after each dose, but decreased over time. Reductions in sphingomyelin storage, spleen and liver volumes, and serum chitotriosidase activity, as well as improvements in infiltrative lung disease, lipid profiles, platelet counts, and quality of life assessments, were observed. Conclusions This study provides proof-of-concept for the safety and efficacy of within-patient dose escalation of olipudase alfa in patients with nonneuronopathic ASMD. PMID:26049896

  5. Development of radiation dose reduction techniques for cadmium zinc telluride detectors in molecular breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Michael K.; Hruska, Carrie B.; Weinmann, Amanda; Manduca, Armando; Rhodes, Deborah J.

    2010-08-01

    Background: Molecular breast imaging (MBI) is a novel breast imaging technique that uses Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) gamma cameras to detect the uptake of Tc-99m sestamibi in breast tumors. Current techniques employ an administered dose of 20-30 mCi Tc-99m, delivering an effective dose of 6.5-10 mSv to the body. This is ~ 5-10 times that of mammography. The goal of this study was to reduce the radiation dose by a factor of 5-10, while maintaining image quality. Methods: A total of 4 dose reduction schemes were evaluated - a) optimized collimation, b) improved utilization of the energy spectrum below the photopeak, c) adaptive geometric mean algorithm developed for combination of images from opposing detectors, and d) non local means filtering (NLMF) for noise reduction and image enhancement. Validation of the various schemes was performed using a breast phantom containing a variety of tumors and containing activity matched to that observed in clinical studies. Results: Development of tungsten collimators with holes matched to the CZT pixels yielded a 2.1-2.9 gain in system sensitivity. Improved utilization of the energy spectra yielded a 1.5-2.0 gain in sensitivity. Development of a modified geometric mean algorithm yielded a 1.4 reduction in image noise, while retaining contrast. Images of the breast phantom demonstrated that a factor of 5 reduction in dose was achieved. Additional refinements to the NLMF should enable an additional factor of 2 reduction in dose. Conclusion: Significant dose reduction in MBI to levels comparable to mammography can be achieved while maintaining image quality.

  6. Objective assessment of image quality and dose reduction in CT iterative reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Vaishnav, J. Y. Jung, W. C.; Popescu, L. M.; Zeng, R.; Myers, K. J.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms have the potential to reduce radiation dose in CT diagnostic imaging. As these algorithms become available on the market, a standardizable method of quantifying the dose reduction that a particular IR method can achieve would be valuable. Such a method would assist manufacturers in making promotional claims about dose reduction, buyers in comparing different devices, physicists in independently validating the claims, and the United States Food and Drug Administration in regulating the labeling of CT devices. However, the nonlinear nature of commercially available IR algorithms poses challenges to objectively assessing image quality, a necessary step in establishing the amount of dose reduction that a given IR algorithm can achieve without compromising that image quality. This review paper seeks to consolidate information relevant to objectively assessing the quality of CT IR images, and thereby measuring the level of dose reduction that a given IR algorithm can achieve. Methods: The authors discuss task-based methods for assessing the quality of CT IR images and evaluating dose reduction. Results: The authors explain and review recent literature on signal detection and localization tasks in CT IR image quality assessment, the design of an appropriate phantom for these tasks, possible choices of observers (including human and model observers), and methods of evaluating observer performance. Conclusions: Standardizing the measurement of dose reduction is a problem of broad interest to the CT community and to public health. A necessary step in the process is the objective assessment of CT image quality, for which various task-based methods may be suitable. This paper attempts to consolidate recent literature that is relevant to the development and implementation of task-based methods for the assessment of CT IR image quality.

  7. Effects of dose limits reduction on the Argentine nuclear power plants.

    PubMed

    Palacios, E; Curti, A; Massera, G; Spano, F; Boutet, L

    1993-11-01

    Occupational doses are evaluated in different stages of the fuel cycle and in the operation of nuclear power plants. Trends in individual dose distribution and collective doses are analyzed. The most contributive working conditions to collective dose are identified and the implications of dose limit reduction recommended by the ICRP in 1990 are assessed. It is concluded that no relevant difficulties should appear in accomplishing the new recommendations except for implementation at Atucha I, a nuclear power plant designed in the 1960s. Some options to reduce individual and collective doses in this plant are analyzed. The change of fuel channels by new ones free from cobalt is essential to get effective improvement of occupational exposures.

  8. A study on the indirect urea dosing method in the Selective Catalytic Reduction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzeżański, M.; Sala, R.

    2016-09-01

    This article presents the results of studies on concept solution of dosing urea in a gas phase in a selective catalytic reduction system. The idea of the concept was to heat-up and evaporate the water urea solution before introducing it into the exhaust gas stream. The aim was to enhance the processes of urea converting into ammonia, what is the target reductant for nitrogen oxides treatment. The study was conducted on a medium-duty Euro 5 diesel engine with exhaust line consisting of DOC catalyst, DPF filter and an SCR system with a changeable setup allowing to dose the urea in liquid phase (regular solution) and to dose it in a gas phase (concept solution). The main criteria was to assess the effect of physical state of urea dosed on the NOx conversion ratio in the SCR catalyst. In order to compare both urea dosing methods a special test procedure was developed which consisted of six test steps covering a wide temperature range of exhaust gas generated at steady state engine operation condition. Tests were conducted for different urea dosing quantities defined by the a equivalence ratio. Based on the obtained results, a remarkable improvement in NOx reduction was found for gas urea application in comparison to the standard liquid urea dosing. Measured results indicate a high potential to increase an efficiency of the SCR catalyst by using a gas phase urea and provide the basis for further scientific research on this type of concept.

  9. Reduction of the scatter dose to the testicle outside the radiation treatment fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, H.; Shipley, W.U.

    1982-10-01

    A technique is described to reduce the dose to the contralateral testicle of patients with testis tumors during retroperitoneal therapy with 10 MV X-rays. When a conventional clam-shell shielding device was used, the dose to the testis from the photons scattered by the patient and the collimator jaws was found to be about 1.6% of the prescribed midplane dose. A more substantial gonadal shield made of low melting Ostalloy, that reduced further the dose from internal scattered X rays, was therefore designed. A 10 cm thick lead scrotal block above the scrotum immediately outside the field is shown to reduce the external scattered radiation to negligible levels. Using the shield and the block, it is possible to reduce the dose to the testicle to one-tenth of one percent of the prescribed midplane dose.

  10. Reduction of the scatter dose to the testicle outside the radiation treatment fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, H.; Shipley, W.U.

    1982-10-01

    A technique is described to reduce the dose to the contralateral testicle of patients with testis tumors during retroperitoneal therapy with 10 MV X rays. When a conventional clam-shell shielding device was used, the dose to the testis from the photons scattered by the patient and collimator jaws was found to be about 1.6% of the prescribed midplane dose. A more substantial gonadal shield made of low melting point Ostalloy, that reduced further the dose from internal scattered X rays, was therefore designed. A 10 cm thick lead scrotal block above the scrotum immediately outside the field is shown to reduce the external scattering radiation to negligible levels. Using the shield and the block, it is possible to reduce the dose to the testicle to one-tenth of one percent of the prescribed midplane dose.

  11. Dose reduction of edoxaban preserves efficacy and safety for the treatment of venous thromboembolism. An analysis of the randomised, double-blind HOKUSAI VTE trial.

    PubMed

    Verhamme, Peter; Wells, Philip S; Segers, Annelise; Ageno, Walter; Brekelmans, Marjolein P A; Cohen, Alexander T; Meyer, Guy; Grosso, Michael A; Raskob, Gary; Weitz, Jeffrey I; Zhang, George; Buller, Harry

    2016-09-27

    Direct oral anticoagulants simplify venous thromboembolism (VTE) treatment by obviating the need for coagulation monitoring. Nonetheless, renal function, body weight and P-glycoprotein inhibitors influence drug levels. The objective of this analysis was to determine whether reduction in edoxaban dose based on clinical criteria avoids excess drug exposure and preserves efficacy and safety in the Hokusai-VTE study. After initial heparin, patients received edoxaban or warfarin for 3-12 months. Edoxaban was given once daily at a dose of 60 mg, which was reduced to 30 mg in patients with a creatinine clearance of 30-50 ml/minute, body weight ≤60 kg or receiving certain P-glycoprotein inhibitors. The primary efficacy outcome was recurrent VTE and the principal safety outcome was major or clinically relevant non-major bleeding. A total of 8292 patients with acute VTE were randomised, 733 and 719 patients in the edoxaban and warfarin groups met the criteria for dose reduction. These patients were older, more often female or Asian and had more extensive VTE. Edoxaban levels were lower in the 30 mg edoxaban group. Rates of recurrent VTE and bleeding with the 30 mg and 60 mg edoxaban dose were comparable: VTE rates were 3.0 % and 3.2 % and clinically relevant bleeding rates were 7.9 % and 8.6 %, respectively. Rates of recurrent VTE and bleeding in the warfarin-treated patients meeting the criteria for dose reduction were 4.2 % and 12.8 %, respectively. The reduced dose edoxaban regimen maintained efficacy and safety compared with the 60 mg dose but was safer than warfarin in patients meeting the criteria for dose reduction.

  12. Dose reduction of edoxaban preserves efficacy and safety for the treatment of venous thromboembolism. An analysis of the randomised, double-blind HOKUSAI VTE trial.

    PubMed

    Verhamme, Peter; Wells, Philip S; Segers, Annelise; Ageno, Walter; Brekelmans, Marjolein P A; Cohen, Alexander T; Meyer, Guy; Grosso, Michael A; Raskob, Gary; Weitz, Jeffrey I; Zhang, George; Buller, Harry

    2016-09-27

    Direct oral anticoagulants simplify venous thromboembolism (VTE) treatment by obviating the need for coagulation monitoring. Nonetheless, renal function, body weight and P-glycoprotein inhibitors influence drug levels. The objective of this analysis was to determine whether reduction in edoxaban dose based on clinical criteria avoids excess drug exposure and preserves efficacy and safety in the Hokusai-VTE study. After initial heparin, patients received edoxaban or warfarin for 3-12 months. Edoxaban was given once daily at a dose of 60 mg, which was reduced to 30 mg in patients with a creatinine clearance of 30-50 ml/minute, body weight ≤60 kg or receiving certain P-glycoprotein inhibitors. The primary efficacy outcome was recurrent VTE and the principal safety outcome was major or clinically relevant non-major bleeding. A total of 8292 patients with acute VTE were randomised, 733 and 719 patients in the edoxaban and warfarin groups met the criteria for dose reduction. These patients were older, more often female or Asian and had more extensive VTE. Edoxaban levels were lower in the 30 mg edoxaban group. Rates of recurrent VTE and bleeding with the 30 mg and 60 mg edoxaban dose were comparable: VTE rates were 3.0 % and 3.2 % and clinically relevant bleeding rates were 7.9 % and 8.6 %, respectively. Rates of recurrent VTE and bleeding in the warfarin-treated patients meeting the criteria for dose reduction were 4.2 % and 12.8 %, respectively. The reduced dose edoxaban regimen maintained efficacy and safety compared with the 60 mg dose but was safer than warfarin in patients meeting the criteria for dose reduction. PMID:27440518

  13. Organ doses to adult patients for chest CT

    SciTech Connect

    Huda, Walter; Sterzik, Alexander; Tipnis, Sameer; Schoepf, U. Joseph

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to estimate organ doses for chest CT examinations using volume computed tomography dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) data as well as accounting for patient weight. Methods: A CT dosimetry spreadsheet (ImPACT CT patient dosimetry calculator) was used to compute organ doses for a 70 kg patient undergoing chest CT examinations, as well as volume computed tomography dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) in a body CT dosimetry phantom at the same CT technique factors. Ratios of organ dose to CTDI{sub vol} (f{sub organ}) were generated as a function of anatomical location in the chest for the breasts, lungs, stomach, red bone marrow, liver, thyroid, liver, and thymus. Values of f{sub organ} were obtained for x-ray tube voltages ranging from 80 to 140 kV for 1, 4, 16, and 64 slice CT scanners from two vendors. For constant CT techniques, we computed ratios of dose in water phantoms of differing diameter. By modeling patients of different weights as equivalent water cylinders of different diameters, we generated factors that permit the estimation of the organ doses in patients weighing between 50 and 100 kg who undergo chest CT examinations relative to the corresponding organ doses received by a 70 kg adult. Results: For a 32 cm long CT scan encompassing the complete lungs, values of f{sub organ} ranged from 1.7 (thymus) to 0.3 (stomach). Organs that are directly in the x-ray beam, and are completely irradiated, generally had f{sub organ} values well above 1 (i.e., breast, lung, heart, and thymus). Organs that are not completely irradiated in a total chest CT scan generally had f{sub organ} values that are less than 1 (e.g., red bone marrow, liver, and stomach). Increasing the x-ray tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV resulted in modest increases in f{sub organ} for the heart (9%) and thymus (8%), but resulted in larger increases for the breast (19%) and red bone marrow (21%). Adult patient chests have been modeled by water cylinders with diameters between

  14. Method for simulating dose reduction in digital mammography using the Anscombe transformation

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Lucas R.; de Oliveira, Helder C. R.; Nunes, Polyana F.; Bakic, Predrag R.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Vieira, Marcelo A. C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This work proposes an accurate method for simulating dose reduction in digital mammography starting from a clinical image acquired with a standard dose. Methods: The method developed in this work consists of scaling a mammogram acquired at the standard radiation dose and adding signal-dependent noise. The algorithm accounts for specific issues relevant in digital mammography images, such as anisotropic noise, spatial variations in pixel gain, and the effect of dose reduction on the detective quantum efficiency. The scaling process takes into account the linearity of the system and the offset of the detector elements. The inserted noise is obtained by acquiring images of a flat-field phantom at the standard radiation dose and at the simulated dose. Using the Anscombe transformation, a relationship is created between the calculated noise mask and the scaled image, resulting in a clinical mammogram with the same noise and gray level characteristics as an image acquired at the lower-radiation dose. Results: The performance of the proposed algorithm was validated using real images acquired with an anthropomorphic breast phantom at four different doses, with five exposures for each dose and 256 nonoverlapping ROIs extracted from each image and with uniform images. The authors simulated lower-dose images and compared these with the real images. The authors evaluated the similarity between the normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS) and power spectrum (PS) of simulated images and real images acquired with the same dose. The maximum relative error was less than 2.5% for every ROI. The added noise was also evaluated by measuring the local variance in the real and simulated images. The relative average error for the local variance was smaller than 1%. Conclusions: A new method is proposed for simulating dose reduction in clinical mammograms. In this method, the dependency between image noise and image signal is addressed using a novel application of the Anscombe

  15. Dose response studies of bevantolol in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Okawa, K K

    1986-03-01

    This multicenter study, conducted to determine the antihypertensive efficacy of bevantolol at different fixed doses compared with placebo was carried out at four separate institutions using a common protocol. One hundred thirty-nine patients with mild to moderate essential hypertension were enrolled. At doses of 200 to 400 mg/day bevantolol was clearly effective in lowering diastolic blood pressure and in maintaining this effect over the eight weeks of this double-blind study. Twice a day dosing is indicated since efficacy was evident 12 hours post-dosing. Bevantolol was well tolerated.

  16. VirtualDose: a software for reporting organ doses from CT for adult and pediatric patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Aiping; Gao, Yiming; Liu, Haikuan; Caracappa, Peter F.; Long, Daniel J.; Bolch, Wesley E.; Liu, Bob; Xu, X. George

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes the development and testing of VirtualDose—a software for reporting organ doses for adult and pediatric patients who undergo x-ray computed tomography (CT) examinations. The software is based on a comprehensive database of organ doses derived from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations involving a library of 25 anatomically realistic phantoms that represent patients of different ages, body sizes, body masses, and pregnant stages. Models of GE Lightspeed Pro 16 and Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 scanners were carefully validated for use in MC dose calculations. The software framework is designed with the ‘software as a service (SaaS)’ delivery concept under which multiple clients can access the web-based interface simultaneously from any computer without having to install software locally. The RESTful web service API also allows a third-party picture archiving and communication system software package to seamlessly integrate with VirtualDose’s functions. Software testing showed that VirtualDose was compatible with numerous operating systems including Windows, Linux, Apple OS X, and mobile and portable devices. The organ doses from VirtualDose were compared against those reported by CT-Expo and ImPACT—two dosimetry tools that were based on the stylized pediatric and adult patient models that were known to be anatomically simple. The organ doses reported by VirtualDose differed from those reported by CT-Expo and ImPACT by as much as 300% in some of the patient models. These results confirm the conclusion from past studies that differences in anatomical realism offered by stylized and voxel phantoms have caused significant discrepancies in CT dose estimations.

  17. Survey of patient dose in computed tomography in Syria 2009.

    PubMed

    Kharita, M H; Khazzam, S

    2010-09-01

    The radiation doses to patient in computed tomography (CT) in Syria have been investigated and compared with similar studies in different countries. This work surveyed 30 CT scanners from six different manufacturers distributed all over Syria. Some of the results in this paper were part of a project launched by the International Atomic Energy Agency in different regions of the world covering Asia, Africa and Eastern Europe. The dose quantities covered are CT dose index (CTDI(w)), dose-length product (DLP), effective dose (E) and collective dose. It was found that most CTDI(w) and DLP values were similar to the European reference levels and in line with the results of similar surveys in the world. The results were in good agreement with the UNSCEAR Report 2007. This study concluded a recommendation for national diagnostic reference level for the most common CT protocols in Syria. The results can be used as a base for future optimisation studies in the country.

  18. Patient radiation doses in the most common interventional cardiology procedures in Croatia: first results.

    PubMed

    Brnić, Z; Krpan, T; Faj, D; Kubelka, D; Ramac, J Popić; Posedel, D; Steiner, R; Vidjak, V; Brnić, V; Visković, K; Baraban, V

    2010-02-01

    Apart from its benefits, the interventional cardiology (IC) is known to generate high radiation doses to patients and medical staff involved. The European Union Medical Exposures Directive 97/43/Euroatom strongly recommend patient dosimetry in interventional radiology, including IC. IC patient radiation doses in four representative IC rooms in Croatia were investigated. Setting reference levels for these procedures have difficulties due to the large difference in procedure complexity. Nevertheless, it is important that some guideline values are available as a benchmark to guide the operators during these potentially high-dose procedures. Local and national diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) were proposed as a guidance. A total of 138 diagnostic (coronary angiography, CA) and 151 therapeutic (PTCA, stenting) procedures were included. Patient irradiation was measured in terms of kerma-area product (KAP), fluoroscopy time (FT) and number of cine-frames (F). KAP was recorded using calibrated KAP-meters. DRLs of KAP, FT and F were calculated as third quartile values rounded up to the integer. Skin doses were assessed on a selected sample of high skin dose procedures, using radiochromic films, and peak skin doses (PSD) were presented. A relative large range of doses in IC was detected. National DRLs were proposed as follows: 32 Gy cm(2), 6.6 min and 610 frames for CA and 72 Gy cm(2), 19 min and 1270 frames for PTCA. PSD <1 Gy were measured in 72 % and PSD >2 Gy in 8 % of selected patients. Measuring the patient doses in radiological procedures is required by law, but rarely implemented in Croatia. The doses recorded in the study are acceptable when compared with the literature, but optimisation is possible. The preliminary DRL values proposed may be used as a guideline for local departments, and should be a basis for radiation reduction measures and quality assurance programmes in IC in Croatia. PMID:19880413

  19. Patient radiation doses in the most common interventional cardiology procedures in Croatia: first results.

    PubMed

    Brnić, Z; Krpan, T; Faj, D; Kubelka, D; Ramac, J Popić; Posedel, D; Steiner, R; Vidjak, V; Brnić, V; Visković, K; Baraban, V

    2010-02-01

    Apart from its benefits, the interventional cardiology (IC) is known to generate high radiation doses to patients and medical staff involved. The European Union Medical Exposures Directive 97/43/Euroatom strongly recommend patient dosimetry in interventional radiology, including IC. IC patient radiation doses in four representative IC rooms in Croatia were investigated. Setting reference levels for these procedures have difficulties due to the large difference in procedure complexity. Nevertheless, it is important that some guideline values are available as a benchmark to guide the operators during these potentially high-dose procedures. Local and national diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) were proposed as a guidance. A total of 138 diagnostic (coronary angiography, CA) and 151 therapeutic (PTCA, stenting) procedures were included. Patient irradiation was measured in terms of kerma-area product (KAP), fluoroscopy time (FT) and number of cine-frames (F). KAP was recorded using calibrated KAP-meters. DRLs of KAP, FT and F were calculated as third quartile values rounded up to the integer. Skin doses were assessed on a selected sample of high skin dose procedures, using radiochromic films, and peak skin doses (PSD) were presented. A relative large range of doses in IC was detected. National DRLs were proposed as follows: 32 Gy cm(2), 6.6 min and 610 frames for CA and 72 Gy cm(2), 19 min and 1270 frames for PTCA. PSD <1 Gy were measured in 72 % and PSD >2 Gy in 8 % of selected patients. Measuring the patient doses in radiological procedures is required by law, but rarely implemented in Croatia. The doses recorded in the study are acceptable when compared with the literature, but optimisation is possible. The preliminary DRL values proposed may be used as a guideline for local departments, and should be a basis for radiation reduction measures and quality assurance programmes in IC in Croatia.

  20. The influence of novel CT reconstruction technique and ECG-gated technique on image quality and patient dose of cardiac computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Dyakov, I; Stoinova, V; Groudeva, V; Vassileva, J

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare image quality and patient dose in cardiac computed tomography angiography (CTA) in terms of volume computed tomography dose index (CTDI vol), dose length product (DLP) and effective dose, when changing from filtered back projection (FBP) to adaptive iterative dose reduction (AIDR) reconstruction techniques. Further aim was to implement prospective electrocardiogram (ECG) gating for patient dose reduction. The study was performed with Aquilion ONE 320-row CT of Toshiba Medical Systems. Analysis of cardiac CT protocols was performed before and after integration of the new software. The AIDR technique showed more than 50 % reduction in CTDIvol values and 57 % in effective dose. The subjective evaluation of clinical images confirmed the adequate image quality acquired by the AIDR technique. The preliminary results indicated significant dose reduction when using prospective ECG gating by keeping the adequate diagnostic quality of clinical images. PMID:25836680

  1. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics with Extended Dosing of CC-486 in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Cogle, Christopher R.; Gore, Steven D.; Hetzer, Joel; Kumar, Keshava; Skikne, Barry; MacBeth, Kyle J.

    2015-01-01

    CC-486 (oral azacitidine) is an epigenetic modifier in development for patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia. In part 1 of this two-part study, a 7-day CC-486 dosing schedule showed clinical activity, was generally well tolerated, and reduced DNA methylation. Extending dosing of CC-486 beyond 7 days would increase duration of azacitidine exposure. We hypothesized that extended dosing would therefore provide more sustained epigenetic activity. Reported here are the pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) profiles of CC-486 extended dosing schedules in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) from part 2 of this study. PK and/or PD data were available for 59 patients who were sequentially assigned to 1 of 4 extended CC-486 dosing schedules: 300mg once-daily or 200mg twice-daily for 14 or 21 days per 28-day cycle. Both 300mg once-daily schedules and the 200mg twice-daily 21-day schedule significantly (all P < .05) reduced global DNA methylation in whole blood at all measured time points (days 15, 22, and 28 of the treatment cycle), with sustained hypomethylation at cycle end compared with baseline. CC-486 exposures and reduced DNA methylation were significantly correlated. Patients who had a hematologic response had significantly greater methylation reductions than non-responding patients. These data demonstrate that extended dosing of CC-486 sustains epigenetic effects through the treatment cycle. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00528983 PMID:26296092

  2. Impact of sweating on equivalent dose of patients treated with 131Iiodine

    PubMed Central

    Haghighatafshar, Mahdi; Banani, Aida; Gheisari, Farshid; Alikhani, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Radioiodine therapy is used for the treatment of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) who undergo total thyroidectomy. After radioiodine administration, regulations require to quarantine these patients until their retained activity reduces to <33 mCi. Some of the injected radioiodine is excreted by perspiration which helps dose reduction so that performing the activities which stimulate sweating such as exercise may shorten the time of dose reduction. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study in the literature that has evaluated the impact of specific exercise program on the ambient equivalent dose of 131I gamma rays. Materials and Methods: Patients with DTC without metastasis who had undergone total thyroidectomy and were treated with radioiodine were included in this study. 30 patients were chosen among patients who were able to exercise, did not have renal failure, and did not use diuretics. Patients were divided into two control and intervention groups. Intervention group members walked on treadmills under a specific program, in 3 time intervals. The control group did not have any specific activity. Immediately after each exercise process, both groups took a shower, and their doses were measured by a survey dosimeter. Results: It was revealed that there was a significant difference between mean values before and after each exercise time. The calculated P value which evaluates the overall impact was 0.939 which revealed that there was no significant difference between total ambient equivalent dose reductions of both groups. Conclusion: According to the study, it may conclude that sweating is an effective alternative way for radioiodine excretion, and if sweating is accompanied with well-hydrated status they may have synergism effect to shorten quarantine period. This could be an important consideration in patients which over-hydration is intolerable especially those with cardiac, liver, or renal problems. PMID:27385884

  3. Adjuvant chemotherapy dosing in low-income women: the impact of Hispanic ethnicity and patient self-efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yihang; Sorbero, Melony E.; Jagielski, Christina H.; Maly, Rose C.

    2015-01-01

    Unwarranted breast cancer adjuvant chemotherapy dose reductions have been documented in black women, women of lower socioeconomic status, and those who are obese. No information on the quality of chemotherapy is available in Hispanic women. The purpose of this study was to characterize factors associated with first cycle chemotherapy dose selection in a multi-ethnic sample of low-income women receiving chemotherapy through the Breast and Cervical Cancer Prevention Treatment Program (BCCPT) and to investigate the impact of Hispanic ethnicity and patient self-efficacy on adjuvant chemotherapy dose selection. Survey and chemotherapy information were obtained from consenting participants enrolled in the California BCCPT. Analyses identified clinical and non-clinical factors associated with first cycle chemotherapy doses less than 90 % of expected doses. Of 552 patients who received chemotherapy, 397 (72 %) were eligible for inclusion. First cycle dose reductions were given to 14 % of the sample. In multivariate analyses, increasing body mass index and non-academic treatment site were associated with doses below 90 % of the expected doses. No other clinical or non-clinical factors, including ethnicity, were associated with first cycle doses selection. In this universally low-income sample, we identified no association between Hispanic ethnicity and other non-clinical patient factors, including patient self-efficacy, in chemotherapy dose selection. As seen in other studies, obesity was associated with systematic dose limits. The guidelines on chemotherapy dose selection in the obese may help address such dose reductions. A greater understanding of the association between type of treatment site and dose selection is warranted. Overall, access to adequate health care allows the vast majority of low-income women with breast cancer to receive high-quality breast cancer chemotherapy. PMID:24596046

  4. Adjuvant chemotherapy dosing in low-income women: the impact of Hispanic ethnicity and patient self-efficacy.

    PubMed

    Griggs, Jennifer J; Liu, Yihang; Sorbero, Melony E; Jagielski, Christina H; Maly, Rose C

    2014-04-01

    Unwarranted breast cancer adjuvant chemotherapy dose reductions have been documented in black women, women of lower socioeconomic status, and those who are obese. No information on the quality of chemotherapy is available in Hispanic women. The purpose of this study was to characterize factors associated with first cycle chemotherapy dose selection in a multi-ethnic sample of low-income women receiving chemotherapy through the Breast and Cervical Cancer Prevention Treatment Program (BCCPT) and to investigate the impact of Hispanic ethnicity and patient self-efficacy on adjuvant chemotherapy dose selection. Survey and chemotherapy information were obtained from consenting participants enrolled in the California BCCPT. Analyses identified clinical and non-clinical factors associated with first cycle chemotherapy doses less than 90 % of expected doses. Of 552 patients who received chemotherapy, 397 (72 %) were eligible for inclusion. First cycle dose reductions were given to 14 % of the sample. In multivariate analyses, increasing body mass index and non-academic treatment site were associated with doses below 90 % of the expected doses. No other clinical or non-clinical factors, including ethnicity, were associated with first cycle doses selection. In this universally low-income sample, we identified no association between Hispanic ethnicity and other non-clinical patient factors, including patient self-efficacy, in chemotherapy dose selection. As seen in other studies, obesity was associated with systematic dose limits. The guidelines on chemotherapy dose selection in the obese may help address such dose reductions. A greater understanding of the association between type of treatment site and dose selection is warranted. Overall, access to adequate health care allows the vast majority of low-income women with breast cancer to receive high-quality breast cancer chemotherapy.

  5. Pilot Study on Image Quality and Radiation Dose of CT Colonography with Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction Three-Dimensional

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hesong; Liang, Dan; Luo, Mingyue; Duan, Chaijie; Cai, Wenli; Zhu, Shanshan; Qiu, Jianping; Li, Wenru

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate image quality and radiation dose of CT colonography (CTC) with adaptive iterative dose reduction three-dimensional (AIDR3D). Methods Ten segments of porcine colon phantom were collected, and 30 pedunculate polyps with diameters ranging from 1 to 15 mm were simulated on each segment. Image data were acquired with tube voltage of 120 kVp, and current doses of 10 mAs, 20 mAs, 30 mAs, 40 mAs, 50 mAs, respectively. CTC images were reconstructed using filtered back projection (FBP) and AIDR3D. Two radiologists blindly evaluated image quality. Quantitative evaluation of image quality included image noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Qualitative image quality was evaluated with a five-score scale. Radiation dose was calculated based on dose-length product. Ten volunteers were examined supine 50 mAs with FBP and prone 20 mAs with AIDR3D, and image qualities were assessed. Paired t test was performed for statistical analysis. Results For 20 mAs with AIDR3D and 50 mAs with FBP, image noise, SNRs and CNRs were (16.4 ± 1.6) HU vs. (16.8 ± 2.6) HU, 1.9 ± 0.2 vs. 1.9 ± 0.4, and 62.3 ± 6.8 vs. 62.0 ± 6.2, respectively; qualitative image quality scores were 4.1 and 4.3, respectively; their differences were all not statistically significant. Compared with 50 mAs with FBP, radiation dose (1.62 mSv) of 20 mAs with AIDR3D was decreased by 60.0%. There was no statistically significant difference in image noise, SNRs, CNRs and qualitative image quality scores between prone 20 mAs with AIDR3D and supine 50 mAs with FBP in 10 volunteers, the former reduced radiation dose by 61.1%. Conclusion Image quality of CTC using 20 mAs with AIDR3D could be comparable to standard 50 mAs with FBP, radiation dose of the former reduced by about 60.0% and was only 1.62 mSv. PMID:25635839

  6. Monte Carlo calculation of patient organ doses from computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Oono, Takeshi; Araki, Fujio; Tsuduki, Shoya; Kawasaki, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to evaluate quantitatively the patient organ dose from computed tomography (CT) using Monte Carlo calculations. A multidetector CT unit (Aquilion 16, TOSHIBA Medical Systems) was modeled with the GMctdospp (IMPS, Germany) software based on the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code. The X-ray spectrum and the configuration of the bowtie filter for the Monte Carlo modeling were determined from the chamber measurements for the half-value layer (HVL) of aluminum and the dose profile (off-center ratio, OCR) in air. The calculated HVL and OCR were compared with measured values for body irradiation with 120 kVp. The Monte Carlo-calculated patient dose distribution was converted to the absorbed dose measured by a Farmer chamber with a (60)Co calibration factor at the center of a CT water phantom. The patient dose was evaluated from dose-volume histograms for the internal organs in the pelvis. The calculated Al HVL was in agreement within 0.3% with the measured value of 5.2 mm. The calculated dose profile in air matched the measured value within 5% in a range of 15 cm from the central axis. The mean doses for soft tissues were 23.5, 23.8, and 27.9 mGy for the prostate, rectum, and bladder, respectively, under exposure conditions of 120 kVp, 200 mA, a beam pitch of 0.938, and beam collimation of 32 mm. For bones of the femur and pelvis, the mean doses were 56.1 and 63.6 mGy, respectively. The doses for bone increased by up to 2-3 times that of soft tissue, corresponding to the ratio of their mass-energy absorption coefficients.

  7. Effects of Low-Dose Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR-ld) on Working Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klatt, Maryanna D.; Buckworth, Janet; Malarkey, William B.

    2009-01-01

    Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) has produced behavioral, psychological, and physiological benefits, but these programs typically require a substantial time commitment from the participants. This study assessed the effects of a shortened (low-dose [ld]) work-site MBSR intervention (MBSR-ld) on indicators of stress in healthy working…

  8. Limits to dose reduction from iterative reconstruction and the effect of through-slice blurring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Scott S.; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2016-03-01

    Iterative reconstruction methods have become very popular and show the potential to reduce dose. We present a limit to the maximum dose reduction possible with new reconstruction algorithms obtained by analyzing the information content of the raw data, assuming the reconstruction algorithm does not have a priori knowledge about the object or correlations between pixels. This limit applies to the task of estimating the density of a lesion embedded in a known background object, where the shape of the lesion is known but its density is not. Under these conditions, the density of the lesion can be estimated directly from the raw data in an optimal manner. This optimal estimate will meet or outperform the performance of any reconstruction method operating on the raw data, under the condition that the reconstruction method does not introduce a priori information. The raw data bound can be compared to the lesion density estimate from FBP in order to produce a limit on the dose reduction possible from new reconstruction algorithms. The possible dose reduction from iterative reconstruction varies with the object, but for a lesion embedded in the center of a water cylinder, it is less than 40%. Additionally, comparisons between iterative reconstruction and filtered backprojection are sometimes confounded by the effect of through-slice blurring in the iterative reconstruction. We analyzed the magnitude of the variance reduction brought about by through-slice blurring on scanners from two different vendors and found it to range between 11% and 48%.

  9. Characterization of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm for dose reduction in CT: A pediatric oncology perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, S. L.; Yee, B. S.; Kaufman, R. A.

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: This study demonstrates a means of implementing an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign ) technique for dose reduction in computed tomography (CT) while maintaining similar noise levels in the reconstructed image. The effects of image quality and noise texture were assessed at all implementation levels of ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign . Empirically derived dose reduction limits were established for ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign for imaging of the trunk for a pediatric oncology population ranging from 1 yr old through adolescence/adulthood. Methods: Image quality was assessed using metrics established by the American College of Radiology (ACR) CT accreditation program. Each image quality metric was tested using the ACR CT phantom with 0%-100% ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign blended with filtered back projection (FBP) reconstructed images. Additionally, the noise power spectrum (NPS) was calculated for three common reconstruction filters of the trunk. The empirically derived limitations on ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign implementation for dose reduction were assessed using (1, 5, 10) yr old and adolescent/adult anthropomorphic phantoms. To assess dose reduction limits, the phantoms were scanned in increments of increased noise index (decrementing mA using automatic tube current modulation) balanced with ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign reconstruction to maintain noise equivalence of the 0% ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign image. Results: The ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign algorithm did not produce any unfavorable effects on image quality as assessed by ACR criteria. Conversely, low-contrast resolution was found to improve due to the reduction of noise in the reconstructed images. NPS calculations demonstrated that images with lower frequency noise had lower noise variance and coarser graininess at progressively higher percentages of ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign reconstruction; and in spite of the similar magnitudes of noise, the image reconstructed with 50% or more ASiR Trade-Mark-Sign presented a more

  10. Dosing celecoxib in pediatric patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Krishnaswami, Sriram; Hutmacher, Matt M; Robbins, Jeffery L; Bello, Akintunde; West, Christine; Bloom, Bradley J

    2012-08-01

    The objective was to derive dosing recommendations for the use of celecoxib in patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) using pharmacokinetic (PK) and exposure-response data. PK and efficacy data from a randomized, double-blind, 12-week study of celecoxib dosed at 3 and 6 mg/kg twice a day (bid) as an investigational suspension formulation in 152 JRA patients aged 2 to 17 years, PK data from 36 adult RA patients, and relative bioavailability data in healthy adults comparing suspension or capsule sprinkles with the commercial capsule were analyzed. Typical oral clearance (L/h) values were 40% and 24% lower in patients weighing 10 and 25 kg, respectively, compared with a 70-kg patient. Longitudinal, logistic pharmacodynamic models incorporating linear effects of dose/area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) over 0 to 12 hours (AUC(0-12)) suggested that the percentage of responders increased with celecoxib exposure. Systemic exposures (AUC) were similar for the suspension, capsule sprinkles, and intact capsule. Administration of a 50-mg bid capsule (or sprinkles) for patients weighing 10 to 25 kg and 100 mg bid for patients >25 kg was predicted to yield similar exposures and response rates as those observed in the JRA trial. Doses and dosage forms not studied in the JRA trial were approved based on the results of this analysis.

  11. Development of CT scanner models for patient organ dose calculations using Monte Carlo methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jianwei

    There is a serious and growing concern about the CT dose delivered by diagnostic CT examinations or image-guided radiation therapy imaging procedures. To better understand and to accurately quantify radiation dose due to CT imaging, Monte Carlo based CT scanner models are needed. This dissertation describes the development, validation, and application of detailed CT scanner models including a GE LightSpeed 16 MDCT scanner and two image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) cone beam CT (CBCT) scanners, kV CBCT and MV CBCT. The modeling process considered the energy spectrum, beam geometry and movement, and bowtie filter (BTF). The methodology of validating the scanner models using reported CTDI values was also developed and implemented. Finally, the organ doses to different patients undergoing CT scan were obtained by integrating the CT scanner models with anatomically-realistic patient phantoms. The tube current modulation (TCM) technique was also investigated for dose reduction. It was found that for RPI-AM, thyroid, kidneys and thymus received largest dose of 13.05, 11.41 and 11.56 mGy/100 mAs from chest scan, abdomen-pelvis scan and CAP scan, respectively using 120 kVp protocols. For RPI-AF, thymus, small intestine and kidneys received largest dose of 10.28, 12.08 and 11.35 mGy/100 mAs from chest scan, abdomen-pelvis scan and CAP scan, respectively using 120 kVp protocols. The dose to the fetus of the 3 month pregnant patient phantom was 0.13 mGy/100 mAs and 0.57 mGy/100 mAs from the chest and kidney scan, respectively. For the chest scan of the 6 month patient phantom and the 9 month patient phantom, the fetal doses were 0.21 mGy/100 mAs and 0.26 mGy/100 mAs, respectively. For MDCT with TCM schemas, the fetal dose can be reduced with 14%-25%. To demonstrate the applicability of the method proposed in this dissertation for modeling the CT scanner, additional MDCT scanner was modeled and validated by using the measured CTDI values. These results demonstrated that the

  12. High-dose gallium-67 therapy in patients with relapsed acute leukaemia: a feasibility study.

    PubMed Central

    Jonkhoff, A. R.; Plaizier, M. A.; Ossenkoppele, G. J.; Teule, G. J.; Huijgens, P. C.

    1995-01-01

    Gallium-67 (67Ga) accumulates in malignant tissues via the transferrin receptor without need for a monoclonal antibody and emits cytotoxic low-energy electrons. In this study we investigated the feasibility, pharmacokinetics, toxicity and preliminary efficiency of high-dose 67Ga injected intravenously (i.v.) in patients with acute leukaemia not responding to conventional therapy. Twelve doses of 36-105 mCi of Gallium67 citrate were administered as a push injection to eight patients with resistant leukaemia in a pilot study. All five patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and three patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) had resistant disease or resistant relapse. No (sub)acute toxicity was observed. Independent of the administered dose, whole-blood radioactivity levels 10 min after administration measured only 1.25 +/- 1.39 microCi ml-1, indicating a large volume of distribution. Urine excretion in the first 24 h ranged from 18% to 51.5% (median 29.5%) of the administered dose. Cellular uptake of 67Ga was less than in previous in vitro studies. Whole-body radiation dose was estimated to be 0.25 +/- 0.03 cGy mCi-1. Red marrow dose was estimated to be between 0.18 +/- 0.02 and 0.97 +/- 0.12 cGy mCi-1. One definite response was observed in an ALL patient with disappearance of skin lesions, normalisation of the enlarged spleen and profound leucopenia. Three other patients showed transient reductions in white blood cell counts without disappearance of blasts from the peripheral blood. We conclude that high-dose i.v. 67Ga can be safely administered but that the uptake of 67Ga in blast cells must increase to make 67Ga therapeutically useful in patients with relapsed leukaemia. Images Figure 2 PMID:8519674

  13. KERMA-based radiation dose management system for real-time patient dose measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyo-Tae; Heo, Ye-Ji; Oh, Kyung-Min; Nam, Sang-Hee; Kang, Sang-Sik; Park, Ji-Koon; Song, Yong-Keun; Park, Sung-Kwang

    2016-07-01

    Because systems that reduce radiation exposure during diagnostic procedures must be developed, significant time and financial resources have been invested in constructing radiation dose management systems. In the present study, the characteristics of an existing ionization-based system were compared to those of a system based on the kinetic energy released per unit mass (KERMA). Furthermore, the feasibility of using the KERMA-based system for patient radiation dose management was verified. The ionization-based system corrected the effects resulting from radiation parameter perturbations in general radiography whereas the KERMA-based system did not. Because of this difference, the KERMA-based radiation dose management system might overestimate the patient's radiation dose due to changes in the radiation conditions. Therefore, if a correction factor describing the correlation between the systems is applied to resolve this issue, then a radiation dose management system can be developed that will enable real-time measurement of the patient's radiation exposure and acquisition of diagnostic images.

  14. A review of patient dose and optimisation methods in adult and paediatric CT scanning.

    PubMed

    Dougeni, E; Faulkner, K; Panayiotakis, G

    2012-04-01

    An increasing number of publications and international reports on computed tomography (CT) have addressed important issues on optimised imaging practice and patient dose. This is partially due to recent technological developments as well as to the striking rise in the number of CT scans being requested. CT imaging has extended its role to newer applications, such as cardiac CT, CT colonography, angiography and urology. The proportion of paediatric patients undergoing CT scans has also increased. The published scientific literature was reviewed to collect information regarding effective dose levels during the most common CT examinations in adults and paediatrics. Large dose variations were observed (up to 32-fold) with some individual sites exceeding the recommended dose reference levels, indicating a large potential to reduce dose. Current estimates on radiation-related cancer risks are alarming. CT doses account for about 70% of collective dose in the UK and are amongst the highest in diagnostic radiology, however the majority of physicians underestimate the risk, demonstrating a decreased level of awareness. Exposure parameters are not always adjusted appropriately to the clinical question or to patient size, especially for children. Dose reduction techniques, such as tube-current modulation, low-tube voltage protocols, prospective echocardiography-triggered coronary angiography and iterative reconstruction algorithms can substantially decrease doses. An overview of optimisation studies is provided. The justification principle is discussed along with tools that assist clinicians in the decision-making process. There is the potential to eliminate clinically non-indicated CT scans by replacing them with alternative examinations especially for children or patients receiving multiple CT scans.

  15. Analysis of patient CT dose data using virtualdose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Richard

    X-ray computer tomography has many benefits to medical and research applications. Recently, over the last decade CT has had a large increase in usage in hospitals and medical diagnosis. In pediatric care, from 2000 to 2006, abdominal CT scans increased by 49 % and chest CT by 425 % in the emergency room (Broder 2007). Enormous amounts of effort have been performed across multiple academic and government groups to determine an accurate measure of organ dose to patients who undergo a CT scan due to the inherent risks with ionizing radiation. Considering these intrinsic risks, CT dose estimating software becomes a necessary tool that health care providers and radiologist must use to determine many metrics to base the risks versus rewards of having an x-ray CT scan. This thesis models the resultant organ dose as body mass increases for patients with all other related scan parameters fixed. In addition to this,this thesis compares a modern dose estimating software, VirtualDose CT to two other programs, CT-Expo and ImPACT CT. The comparison shows how the software's theoretical basis and the phantom they use to represent the human body affect the range of results in organ dose. CT-Expo and ImPACT CT dose estimating software uses a different model for anatomical representation of the organs in the human body and the results show how that approach dramatically changes the outcome. The results categorizes four datasets as compared to the three software types where the appropriate phantom was available. Modeling was done to simulate chest abdominal pelvis scans and whole body scans. Organ dose difference versus body mass index shows as body mass index (BMI) ranges from 23.5 kg/m 2 to 45 kg/m2 the amount of organ dose also trends a percent change from -4.58 to -176.19 %. Comparing organ dose difference with increasing x-ray tube potential from 120 kVp to 140 kVp the percent change in organ dose increases from 55 % to 65 % across all phantoms. In comparing VirtualDose to CT

  16. SU-F-18C-15: Model-Based Multiscale Noise Reduction On Low Dose Cone Beam Projection

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, W; Farr, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To improve image quality of low dose cone beam CT for patient positioning in radiation therapy. Methods: In low dose cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging systems, Poisson process governs the randomness of photon fluence at x-ray source and the detector because of the independent binomial process of photon absorption in medium. On a CBCT projection, the variance of fluence consists of the variance of noiseless imaging structure and that of Poisson noise, which is proportional to the mean (noiseless) of the fluence at the detector. This requires multiscale filters to smoothen noise while keeping the structure information of the imaged object. We used a mathematical model of Poisson process to design multiscale filters and established the balance of noise correction and structure blurring. The algorithm was checked with low dose kilo-voltage CBCT projections acquired from a Varian OBI system. Results: From the investigation of low dose CBCT of a Catphan phantom and patients, it showed that our model-based multiscale technique could efficiently reduce noise and meanwhile keep the fine structure of the imaged object. After the image processing, the number of visible line pairs in Catphan phantom scanned with 4 ms pulse time was similar to that scanned with 32 ms, and soft tissue structure from simulated 4 ms patient head-and-neck images was also comparable with scanned 20 ms ones. Compared with fixed-scale technique, the image quality from multiscale one was improved. Conclusion: Use of projection-specific multiscale filters can reach better balance on noise reduction and structure information loss. The image quality of low dose CBCT can be improved by using multiscale filters.

  17. Comparison of Patient Dose in Two-Dimensional Carotid Arteriography and Three-Dimensional Rotational Angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Tsapaki, Virginia Vano, Eliseo; Mavrikou, Irini; Neofotistou, Vassiliki; Gallego, Juan Jose; Fernandez, Jose Miguel; Santos, Ernesto; Mendez, Jose

    2008-05-15

    Background and Purpose. It is known that interventional neuroradiology (IN) involves high radiation dose to both patients and staff even if performed by trained operators using modern fluoroscopic X-ray equipment and dose-reducing technology. Therefore, every new technology or imaging tool introduced, such as three-dimensional rotational angiography (3D RA), should be evaluated in terms of radiation dose. 3D RA requires a series with a large number of images in comparison with 2D angiography and it is sometimes considered a high-dose IN procedure. The literature is scarce on the 3D RA radiation dose and in particular there are no data on carotid arteriography (CA). The aim of this study was to investigate patient dose differences between 2D and 3D CA. Methods. The study included 35 patients undergoing 2D CA in hospital 1 and 25 patients undergoing 3D CA in hospital 2. Patient technical data collection included information on the kerma area product (KAP), fluoroscopy time (T), total number of series (S), and total number of acquired images (F). Results. Median KAP was 112 Gy cm{sup 2} and 41 Gy cm{sup 2} for hospitals 1 and 2, respectively, median T was 8.2 min and 5.1 min, median S was 13 and 4, and median F was 247 and 242. Entrance surface air-kerma rate, as measured in 'medium' fluoroscopy mode measured in 2D acquisition using a 20 cm phantom of polymethylmethacrylate, was 17.3 mGy/min for hospital 1 and 9.2 mGy/min for hospital 2. Conclusion. 3D CA allows a substantial reduction in patient radiation dose compared with 2D CA, while providing the necessary diagnostic information.

  18. Drug dosing guidelines in patients with renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Swan, S. K.; Bennett, W. M.

    1992-01-01

    The metabolism and excretion of many drugs and their pharmacologically active metabolites depend on normal renal function. Accumulation and toxicity can develop rapidly if dosages are not adjusted in patients with impaired renal function. In addition, many drugs that are not dependent on the kidneys for elimination may exert untoward effects in the uremic milieu of advanced renal disease. A familiarity with basic pharmacologic principles and a systematic approach are necessary when adjusting drug dosages in patients with abnormal kidney function. The distinct steps involve calculating the patient's glomerular filtration rate, choosing and administering a loading dose, determining a maintenance dose, and a decision regarding monitoring of drug concentrations. If done properly, therapy in renal patients should achieve the desired pharmacologic effects while avoiding drug toxicity. Physicians must not oversimplify the pharmacologic complexities presented by patients with renal failure by relying excessively on nomograms and "cookbook" equations. In addition to a reduced glomerular filtration rate, patients with renal disease often have alterations in pharmacokinetics such as bioavailability, protein binding, hepatic biotransformation, and volume of distribution. An awareness of biologically active or toxic metabolites of parent compounds that accumulate when the glomerular filtration rate is reduced is also necessary to avoid toxicity. The effects of dialysis on drug elimination and the need for supplemental dosing are additional considerations in patients undergoing renal replacement therapy. PMID:1615656

  19. Vancomycin dosing in haemodialysis patients and Bayesian estimate of individual pharmacokinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Keller, F; Hörstensmeyer, C; Looby, M; Borner, K; Pommer, W; Erdmann, K; Giehl, M

    1994-01-01

    A dose reduction of vancomycin to 1000 mg once a week usually is recommended for haemodialysis patients. Our modified dosing schedule consists of a loading dose of 1000 mg and a maintenance dose of 500 mg administered 3 times a week after haemodialysis. Different vancomycin regimens were retrospectively evaluated by therapeutic drug monitoring and bayesian parameter estimates in 39 dialysis patients. The mean (+/- SD) trough level in 7 patients receiving only the conventional dosage regimen was significantly lower than in 17 patients strictly treated by the modified schedule (7 +/- 4 versus 17 +/- 8 mg/L; p = 0.001). The corresponding peaks were low in both groups and no different (23 +/- 10 versus 27 +/- 12 mg/L). The one week average vancomycin clearance was significantly lower in the conventional dosage group compared to the modified dosage group (6 +/- 3 versus 10 +/- 3 ml/min; p = 0.001). High-flux dialysers were not used in the conventional dosage group but for 30 percent of the procedures in the modified dosage group, where the vancomycin one week average elimination half-life was 66 hours (+/- 18) and the volume of distribution 50 litres (+/- 5). As compared to the bayesian programme, NONMEM calculated comparable pharmacokinetic parameters but could be applied only in 5 cases with a sufficient number of concentration measurements. Ototoxicity occurred in 1 patient, whereas vancomycin treatment was judged as ineffective against infection in 5 of the 39 patients. Their troughs were below 15 mg/L.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Automatic computed tomography patient dose calculation using DICOM header metadata.

    PubMed

    Jahnen, A; Kohler, S; Hermen, J; Tack, D; Back, C

    2011-09-01

    The present work describes a method that calculates the patient dose values in computed tomography (CT) based on metadata contained in DICOM images in support of patient dose studies. The DICOM metadata is preprocessed to extract necessary calculation parameters. Vendor-specific DICOM header information is harmonized using vendor translation tables and unavailable DICOM tags can be completed with a graphical user interface. CT-Expo, an MS Excel application for calculating the radiation dose, is used to calculate the patient doses. All relevant data and calculation results are stored for further analysis in a relational database. Final results are compiled by utilizing data mining tools. This solution was successfully used for the 2009 CT dose study in Luxembourg. National diagnostic reference levels for standard examinations were calculated based on each of the countries' hospitals. The benefits using this new automatic system saved time as well as resources during the data acquisition and the evaluation when compared with earlier questionnaire-based surveys. PMID:21831868

  1. Effect of dialysis dose and membrane flux on hemoglobin cycling in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    He, Liyu; Fu, Min; Chen, Xian; Liu, Hong; Chen, Xing; Peng, Xiaofei; Liu, Fuyou; Peng, Youming

    2015-04-01

    Many studies found that hemoglobin (Hb) fluctuation was closely related to the prognosis of the maintenance hemodialysis patients. We investigated the association of factors relating dialysis dose and dialyzer membrane with Hb levels. We undertook a randomized clinical trial in 140 patients undergoing thrice-weekly dialysis and assigned patients randomly to a standard or high dose of dialysis; Hb level was measured every month for 12 months. In the standard-dose group, the mean (±SD) urea reduction ratio was 65.1% ± 7.3%, the single-pool Kt/V was 1.26 ± 0.11, and the equilibrated Kt/V was 1.05 ± 0.09; in the high-dose group, the values were 73.5% ± 8.7%, 1.68 ± 0.15, and 1.47 ± 0.11, respectively. The standard deviation (SD) and residual SD (liner regression of Hb) values of Hb were significantly higher in the standard-dose group and low-flux group. The percentage achievement of target Hb in the high-dose dialysis group and high-flux dialyzer group was significantly higher than the standard-dose group and low-flux group, respectively. Patients undergoing hemodialysis thrice weekly appear to have benefit from a higher dialysis dose than that recommended by current KDQQI (Kidney Disease Qutcome Quality Initiative) guidelines or from the use of a high-flux membrane, which is in favor of maintaining stable Hb levels.

  2. Dose-escalation study of octanoic acid in patients with essential tremor

    PubMed Central

    Voller, Bernhard; Lines, Emily; McCrossin, Gayle; Tinaz, Sule; Lungu, Codrin; Grimes, George; Starling, Judith; Potti, Gopal; Haubenberger, Dietrich

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Recently, 1-octanol has been shown to have efficacy in treating patients with essential tremor (ET). The primary metabolite of 1-octanol is octanoic acid (OA), which is now thought to be the active substance that mediates tremor suppression. Our aim was to describe the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of oral OA in patients with ET and assess the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) profile of OA. METHODS. The MTD was studied using an open-label, single-ascending 3 + 3 dose–escalation design. Predefined single doses ranged from 8 to 128 mg/kg, with grade 2 adverse events (AEs) defined as dose-limiting toxicity. Tremor was assessed using accelerometry, digital spiral analysis, and a standard clinical rating scale at baseline and up to 600 minutes after intake. Safety assessments and PK sampling were also performed. RESULTS. Dose-limiting toxicity was not reached. The most frequent AE was mild abdominal discomfort. Exposure (AUC) increased linearly with the dose. Secondary efficacy measures suggested a dose-dependent reduction of tremor. Accordingly, a single unified PK/PD model with an effect compartment and sigmoid maximum effect (Emax) response could be built that accounted well for the time profiles of plasma concentrations as well as effects on tremor severity across the 5 dose levels. CONCLUSION. Although our trial did not reach an MTD, a dose-dependent effect was demonstrated in the PK/PD model as well as in secondary efficacy outcomes. Future studies are needed to explore the safety in higher dose ranges and to confirm dose-dependent efficacy in a placebo-controlled design. TRIAL REGISTRATION. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01468948 FUNDING. NINDS Intramural Research Program; TG Therapeutics Inc. PMID:26927672

  3. Patient dose monitoring in Dubai in radiography and interventional procedures.

    PubMed

    AlSuwaidi, J S; AlMazrouei, N K; Pottybindu, S; Siraj, M; Mathew, D; Al Blooshi, A A; Kuriakose, V P

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents ongoing actions in Dubai on patient dose monitoring in digital radiographic examinations, mammography, interventional procedures, and dental radiological procedures. The aim of Dubai Health Authority (DHA) is to move towards the establishment of local diagnostic reference levels. DHA has participated in national and regional projects under the umbrella of the International Atomic Energy Agency. The need for local radiation protection educational programmes and wider patient dosimetry monitoring and recording emerged from this work.

  4. Patient dose measurements in diagnostic radiology procedures in Montenegro.

    PubMed

    Milatović, Aleksandra; Ciraj-Bjelac, Olivera; Ivanović, Sonja; Jovanović, Slobodan; Spasić-Jokić, Vesna

    2012-05-01

    It was the aim of the study presented here to estimate for the first time patient dose levels in conventional diagnostic radiology in Montenegro. Measurements of patient dose in terms of entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and kerma-area product (KAP) were performed on at least 10 patients for each examination type, in each of five randomly selected health institutions in Montenegro, so that a total of 872 patients for 16 different examination categories were included in the survey (817 patients for 1049 radiographies and 55 fluoroscopy patients). Exposure settings and individual data were recorded for each patient. Mean, median and third quartile values ESAK of patient doses are reported. The estimated mean ESAK values obtained are as follows: 4.7 mGy for pelvis anteroposterior (AP), 4.5 mGy for lumbar spine AP, 7.8 mGy for lumbar spine lateral (LAT), 3.1 mGy for thoracic spine AP and 4.3 mGy for thoracic spine LAT. When compared with the European diagnostic reference values, the mean ESAK for all studied examination types are found to be below the reference levels, except in chest radiography. Mean ESAK values for chest radiography are 0.9 mGy for posteroanterior (PA) projection and 2.0 mGy for LAT. The results exhibit a wide range of variation. For fluoroscopy examinations, the total KAP was measured. The mean KAP value per procedure for barium meal is found to be 22 Gy cm(2), 41 Gy cm(2) for barium enema and 19 Gy cm(2) for intravenous urography. Broad dose ranges for the same types of examinations indicate the necessity of applying practice optimisation in diagnostic radiology and establishment of national diagnostic reference levels.

  5. Cumulative Lung Dose for Several Motion Management Strategies as a Function of Pretreatment Patient Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Hugo, Geoffrey D. Campbell, Jonathon; Zhang Tiezhi; Yan Di

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate patient parameters that may predict for relative differences in cumulative four-dimensional (4D) lung dose among several motion management strategies. Methods and Materials: Deformable image registration and dose accumulation were used to generate 4D treatment plans for 18 patients with 4D computed tomography scans. Three plans were generated to simulate breath hold at normal inspiration, target tracking with the beam aperture, and mid-ventilation aperture (control of the target at the mean daily position and application of an iteratively computed margin to compensate for respiration). The relative reduction in mean lung dose (MLD) between breath hold and mid-ventilation aperture ({delta}MLD{sub BH}) and between target tracking and mid-ventilation aperture ({delta}MLD{sub TT}) was calculated. Associations between these two variables and parameters of the lesion (excursion, size, location, and deformation) and dose distribution (local dose gradient near the target) were also calculated. Results: The largest absolute and percentage differences in MLD were 1.0 Gy and 21.5% between breath hold and mid-ventilation aperture. {delta}MLD{sub BH} was significantly associated (p < 0.05) with tumor excursion. The {delta}MLD{sub TT} was significantly associated with excursion, deformation, and local dose gradient. A linear model was constructed to represent {delta}MLD vs. excursion. For each 5 mm of excursion, target tracking reduced the MLD by 4% compared with the results of a mid-ventilation aperture plan. For breath hold, the reduction was 5% per 5 mm of excursion. Conclusions: The relative difference in MLD among different motion management strategies varied with patient and tumor characteristics for a given dosimetric target coverage. Tumor excursion is useful to aid in stratifying patients according to appropriate motion management strategies.

  6. Patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk estimation in CT: Part II. Application to patients

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Toncheva, Greta; Yoshizumi, Terry T.; Frush, Donald P.

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Current methods for estimating and reporting radiation dose from CT examinations are largely patient-generic; the body size and hence dose variation from patient to patient is not reflected. Furthermore, the current protocol designs rely on dose as a surrogate for the risk of cancer incidence, neglecting the strong dependence of risk on age and gender. The purpose of this study was to develop a method for estimating patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk from CT examinations. Methods: The study included two patients (a 5-week-old female patient and a 12-year-old male patient), who underwent 64-slice CT examinations (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare) of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis at our institution in 2006. For each patient, a nonuniform rational B-spine (NURBS) based full-body computer model was created based on the patient's clinical CT data. Large organs and structures inside the image volume were individually segmented and modeled. Other organs were created by transforming an existing adult male or female full-body computer model (developed from visible human data) to match the framework defined by the segmented organs, referencing the organ volume and anthropometry data in ICRP Publication 89. A Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated for dose simulation on the LightSpeed VCT scanner was used to estimate patient-specific organ dose, from which effective dose and risks of cancer incidence were derived. Patient-specific organ dose and effective dose were compared with patient-generic CT dose quantities in current clinical use: the volume-weighted CT dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) and the effective dose derived from the dose-length product (DLP). Results: The effective dose for the CT examination of the newborn patient (5.7 mSv) was higher but comparable to that for the CT examination of the teenager patient (4.9 mSv) due to the size-based clinical CT protocols at our institution, which employ lower scan techniques for smaller

  7. Development of mammography system using CdTe photon counting detector for the exposure dose reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Sho; Niwa, Naoko; Yamazaki, Misaki; Yamakawa, Tsutomu; Nagano, Tatsuya; Kodera, Yoshie

    2014-03-01

    We propose a new mammography system using a cadmium telluride (CdTe) photon-counting detector for exposure dose reduction. In contrast to conventional mammography, this system uses high-energy X-rays. This study evaluates the usefulness of this system in terms of the absorbed dose distribution and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) at acrylic step using a Monte Carlo simulation. In addition, we created a prototype system that uses a CdTe detector and automatic movement stage. For various conditions, we measured the properties and evaluated the quality of images produced by the system. The simulation result for a tube voltage of 40 kV and tungsten/barium (W/Ba) as a target/filter shows that the surface dose was reduced more than 60% compared to that under conventional conditions. The CNR of our proposal system also became higher than that under conventional conditions. The point at which the CNRs coincide for 4 cm polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) at the 2-mm-thick step corresponds to a dose reduction of 30%, and these differences increased with increasing phantom thickness. To improve the image quality, we determined the problematic aspects of the scanning system. The results of this study indicate that, by using a higher X-ray energy than in conventional mammography, it is possible to obtain a significant exposure dose reduction without loss of image quality. Further, the image quality of the prototype system can be improved by optimizing the balance between the shift-and-add operation and the output of the X-ray tube. In future work, we will further examine these improvement points.

  8. 4.5 Doses to Patients in Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noßke, D.; Mattsson, S.; Johansson, L.

    This document is part of Subvolume A 'Fundamentals and Data in Radiobiology, Radiation Biophysics, Dosimetry and Medical Radiological Protection' of Volume 7 'Medical Radiological Physics' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII 'Advanced Materials and Technologies'. It contains the Section '4.5 Doses to Patients in Diagnostics' of the Chapter '4 Dosimetry in Nuclear Medicine Diagnosis and Therapy' with the contents:

  9. 4.6 Doses to Patients in Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noßke, D.; Mattsson, S.; Johansson, L.

    This document is part of Subvolume A 'Fundamentals and Data in Radiobiology, Radiation Biophysics, Dosimetry and Medical Radiological Protection' of Volume 7 'Medical Radiological Physics' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII 'Advanced Materials and Technologies'. It contains the Section '4.6 Doses to Patients in Therapy' of the Chapter '4 Dosimetry in Nuclear Medicine Diagnosis and Therapy' with the contents:

  10. Uncertainties of organ-absorbed doses to patients from 18f-choline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W. B.; Janzen, T.; Zankl, M.; Giussani, A.; Hoeschen, C.

    2011-03-01

    caused by the variability and uncertainty of individual human phantoms. The sensitivity study showed that the metabolic transfer parameter from the blood to soft tissues has a strong influence on blood sample collection from the beginning until 500 min. post administration; the transfer pathways between blood and liver impact strongly the liver imaging during the time course. The results of this study suggest that organ image acquisition of liver and kidneys after 100 min. as well as blood and urine sample collection are necessary for the reduction of uncertainties of absorbed dose estimates to patients.

  11. The reduction of dose in paediatric panoramic radiography: the impact of collimator height and programme selection

    PubMed Central

    Safi, H; Maddison, S M

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this work was to estimate the doses to radiosensitive organs in the head of a young child undergoing panoramic radiography and to establish the effectiveness of a short collimator in reducing dose. Methods: Thermoluminescent dosemeters were used in a paediatric head phantom to simulate an examination on a 5-year-old child. The panoramic system used was an Instrumentarium OP200 D (Instrumentarium Dental, Tuusula, Finland). The collimator height options were 110 and 140 mm. Organ doses were measured using exposure programmes intended for use with adult and child size heads. The performance of the automatic exposure control (AEC) system was also assessed. Results: The short collimator reduced the dose to the brain and the eyes by 57% and 41%, respectively. The dose to the submandibular and sublingual glands increased by 32% and 20%, respectively, when using a programme with a narrower focal trough intended for a small jaw. The effective dose measured with the short collimator and paediatric programme was 7.7 μSv. The dose to the lens of the eye was 17 μGy. When used, the AEC system produced some asymmetry in the dose distribution across the head. Conclusions: Panoramic systems when used to frequently image children should have programmes specifically designed for imaging small heads. There should be a shorter collimator available and programmes that deliver a reduced exposure time and allow reduction of tube current. Programme selection should also provide flexibility for focal trough size, shape and position to match the smaller head size. PMID:25352427

  12. Data base on dose reduction research projects for nuclear power plants. Volume 5

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, T.A.; Yu, C.K.; Roecklein, A.K.

    1994-05-01

    This is the fifth volume in a series of reports that provide information on dose reduction research and health physics technology or nuclear power plants. The information is taken from two of several databases maintained by Brookhaven National Laboratory`s ALARA Center for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The research section of the report covers dose reduction projects that are in the experimental or developmental phase. It includes topics such as steam generator degradation, decontamination, robotics, improvements in reactor materials, and inspection techniques. The section on health physics technology discusses dose reduction efforts that are in place or in the process of being implemented at nuclear power plants. A total of 105 new or updated projects are described. All project abstracts from this report are available to nuclear industry professionals with access to a fax machine through the ACEFAX system or a computer with a modem and the proper communications software through the ACE system. Detailed descriptions of how to access all the databases electronically are in the appendices of the report.

  13. Image Quality and Radiation Dose of CT Coronary Angiography with Automatic Tube Current Modulation and Strong Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction Three-Dimensional (AIDR3D)

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hesong; Dai, Guochao; Luo, Mingyue; Duan, Chaijie; Cai, Wenli; Liang, Dan; Wang, Xinhua; Zhu, Dongyun; Li, Wenru; Qiu, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate image quality and radiation dose of CT coronary angiography (CTCA) scanned using automatic tube current modulation (ATCM) and reconstructed by strong adaptive iterative dose reduction three-dimensional (AIDR3D). Methods Eighty-four consecutive CTCA patients were collected for the study. All patients were scanned using ATCM and reconstructed with strong AIDR3D, standard AIDR3D and filtered back-projection (FBP) respectively. Two radiologists who were blinded to the patients' clinical data and reconstruction methods evaluated image quality. Quantitative image quality evaluation included image noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). To evaluate image quality qualitatively, coronary artery is classified into 15 segments based on the modified guidelines of the American Heart Association. Qualitative image quality was evaluated using a 4-point scale. Radiation dose was calculated based on dose-length product. Results Compared with standard AIDR3D, strong AIDR3D had lower image noise, higher SNR and CNR, their differences were all statistically significant (P<0.05); compared with FBP, strong AIDR3D decreased image noise by 46.1%, increased SNR by 84.7%, and improved CNR by 82.2%, their differences were all statistically significant (P<0.05 or 0.001). Segments with diagnostic image quality for strong AIDR3D were 336 (100.0%), 486 (96.4%), and 394 (93.8%) in proximal, middle, and distal part respectively; whereas those for standard AIDR3D were 332 (98.8%), 472 (93.7%), 378 (90.0%), respectively; those for FBP were 217 (64.6%), 173 (34.3%), 114 (27.1%), respectively; total segments with diagnostic image quality in strong AIDR3D (1216, 96.5%) were higher than those of standard AIDR3D (1182, 93.8%) and FBP (504, 40.0%); the differences between strong AIDR3D and standard AIDR3D, strong AIDR3D and FBP were all statistically significant (P<0.05 or 0.001). The mean effective radiation dose was (2.55±1.21) mSv. Conclusion

  14. Eye lens dosimetry in interventional cardiology: results of staff dose measurements and link to patient dose levels.

    PubMed

    Antic, V; Ciraj-Bjelac, O; Rehani, M; Aleksandric, S; Arandjic, D; Ostojic, M

    2013-01-01

    Workers involved in interventional cardiology procedures receive high eye lens dose if protection is not used. Currently, there is no suitable method for routine use for the measurement of eye dose. Since most angiography machines are equipped with suitable patient dosemeters, deriving factors linking staff eye doses to the patient doses can be helpful. In this study the patient kerma-area product, cumulative dose at an interventional reference point and eye dose in terms of Hp(3) of the cardiologists, nurses and radiographers for interventional cardiology procedures have been measured. Correlations between the patient dose and the staff eye dose were obtained. The mean eye dose was 121 µSv for the first operator, 33 µSv for the second operator/nurse and 12 µSv for radiographer. Normalised eye lens doses per unit kerma-area product were 0.94 µSv Gy⁻¹ cm⁻² for the first operator, 0.33 µSv Gy⁻¹ cm⁻² for the second operator/nurse and 0.16 µSv Gy⁻¹ cm⁻² for radiographers. Statistical analysis indicated that there is a weak but significant (p < 0.01) correlation between the eye dose and the kerma-area product for all three staff categories. These values are based on a local practice and may provide useful reference for other studies for validation and for wider utilisation in assessing the eye dose using patient dose values. PMID:23152146

  15. A real time dose monitoring and dose reconstruction tool for patient specific VMAT QA and delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Tyagi, Neelam; Yang Kai; Gersten, David; Yan Di

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To develop a real time dose monitoring and dose reconstruction tool to identify and quantify sources of errors during patient specific volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery and quality assurance. Methods: The authors develop a VMAT delivery monitor tool called linac data monitor that connects to the linac in clinical mode and records, displays, and compares real time machine parameters with the planned parameters. A new measure, called integral error, keeps a running total of leaf overshoot and undershoot errors in each leaf pair, multiplied by leaf width, and the amount of time during which the error exists in monitor unit delivery. Another tool reconstructs Pinnacle{sup 3} Trade-Mark-Sign format delivered plan based on the saved machine logfile and recalculates actual delivered dose in patient anatomy. Delivery characteristics of various standard fractionation and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) VMAT plans delivered on Elekta Axesse and Synergy linacs were quantified. Results: The MLC and gantry errors for all the treatment sites were 0.00 {+-} 0.59 mm and 0.05 {+-} 0.31 Degree-Sign , indicating a good MLC gain calibration. Standard fractionation plans had a larger gantry error than SBRT plans due to frequent dose rate changes. On average, the MLC errors were negligible but larger errors of up to 6 mm and 2.5 Degree-Sign were seen when dose rate varied frequently. Large gantry errors occurred during the acceleration and deceleration process, and correlated well with MLC errors (r= 0.858, p= 0.0004). PTV mean, minimum, and maximum dose discrepancies were 0.87 {+-} 0.21%, 0.99 {+-} 0.59%, and 1.18 {+-} 0.52%, respectively. The organs at risk (OAR) doses were within 2.5%, except some OARs that showed up to 5.6% discrepancy in maximum dose. Real time displayed normalized total positive integral error (normalized to the total monitor units) correlated linearly with MLC (r= 0.9279, p < 0.001) and gantry errors (r= 0.742, p= 0.005). There

  16. Patient effective dose from endovascular brachytherapy with 192Ir sources.

    PubMed

    Perma, L; Bianchi, C; Nicolini, G; Novario, R; Tanzi, F; Conte, L

    2002-01-01

    The growing use of endovascular brachytherapy has been accompanied by the publication of a large number of studies in several fields, but few studies on patient dose have been found in the literature. Moreover, these studies were carried out on the basis of Monte Carlo simulation. The aim of the present study was to estimate the effective dose to the patient undergoing endovascular brachytherapy treatment with 112Ir sources, by means of experimental measurements. Two standard treatments were taken into account: an endovascular brachytherapy of the coronary artery corresponding to the activity x time product of 184 GBq.min and an endovascular brachytherapy of the renal artery (898 GBq.min). Experimental assessment was accomplished by thermoluminescence dosemeters positioned in more than 300 measurement points in a properly adapted Rqndo phantom. A method has been developed to estimate the mean organ doses for all tissues and organs concerned in order to calculate the effective dose associated with intravascular brachytherapy. The normalised organ doses resulting from cronary treatment were 2.4 x 10(-2) mSv.GBq(-1).min(-1) for lung, 0.9 x 10(-2) mSv.GBSq(-1).min(-1) for oesophagus and 0.48 x 10(-2) mS.GBq(-1).min(-1) for bone marrow. During brachytherapy of the renal artery, the corresponding normalised doses were 4.2 x 10(-2) mS.GBq(-1).min(-1) for colon, 7.8 x 10(-2) mSv.GBq(-1).min(-1) for stomach and 1.7 x 10(-2) mSv.GBq(-1).min(-1) for liver. Coronary treatment iJnvlled an efl'fective dose of (0.046 mSv.GBq(-1).min(-1), whereas the treatment of the renal artery resulted in an effective dose of 0.15 mSv.GBq(-1).min(-1); there were many similarities with data from former studies. Based on these results it can be concluded that the dose level of patients exposed during brachytherapy treatment is low.

  17. Estimating radiation dose to organs of patients undergoing conventional and novel multidetector CT exams using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angel, Erin

    Advances in Computed Tomography (CT) technology have led to an increase in the modality's diagnostic capabilities and therefore its utilization, which has in turn led to an increase in radiation exposure to the patient population. As a result, CT imaging currently constitutes approximately half of the collective exposure to ionizing radiation from medical procedures. In order to understand the radiation risk, it is necessary to estimate the radiation doses absorbed by patients undergoing CT imaging. The most widely accepted risk models are based on radiosensitive organ dose as opposed to whole body dose. In this research, radiosensitive organ dose was estimated using Monte Carlo based simulations incorporating detailed multidetector CT (MDCT) scanner models, specific scan protocols, and using patient models based on accurate patient anatomy and representing a range of patient sizes. Organ dose estimates were estimated for clinical MDCT exam protocols which pose a specific concern for radiosensitive organs or regions. These dose estimates include estimation of fetal dose for pregnant patients undergoing abdomen pelvis CT exams or undergoing exams to diagnose pulmonary embolism and venous thromboembolism. Breast and lung dose were estimated for patients undergoing coronary CTA imaging, conventional fixed tube current chest CT, and conventional tube current modulated (TCM) chest CT exams. The correlation of organ dose with patient size was quantified for pregnant patients undergoing abdomen/pelvis exams and for all breast and lung dose estimates presented. Novel dose reduction techniques were developed that incorporate organ location and are specifically designed to reduce close to radiosensitive organs during CT acquisition. A generalizable model was created for simulating conventional and novel attenuation-based TCM algorithms which can be used in simulations estimating organ dose for any patient model. The generalizable model is a significant contribution of this

  18. Evaluation of patient's dose during investigations with radioactive tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palumbo, R.; Gobbi, G.; Leogrande, M. P.

    1982-10-01

    The dose received is defined in function of the half life of the radioactive material and the biological half life (transit time in the body). The Loevingen and Berinan equations to compute the activity in a target organ due to the activity in a source organ are reviewed. The biokinetics of radioactive drugs is discussed. The influence of patient age is examined. A radionuclide with a half life of hours, a high percentage of gamma radiation between 100 and 200 KeV and a low emission of non penetrating radiation is suggested. The effect of impurities on the dose absorbed is shown from experimental data.

  19. Reduction of radiation dose and imaging costs in scoliosis radiography. Application of large-screen image intensifier photofluorography

    SciTech Connect

    Manninen, H.; Kiekara, O.; Soimakallio, S.; Vainio, J.

    1988-04-01

    Photofluorography using a large-field image intensifier (Siemens Optilux 57) was applied to scoliosis radiography and compared with a full-size rare-earth screen/film technique. When scoliosis radiography (PA-projection) was performed on 25 adolescent patients, the photofluorographs were found to be of comparable diagnostic quality with full-size films. A close correspondence between the imaging techniques was found in the Cobb angle measurements as well as in the grading of rotation with the pedicle method. The use of photofluorography results in a radiation dose reduction of about one-half and considerable savings in direct imaging costs and archive space. In our opinion the method is particularly well-suited for follow-up and screening evaluation of scoliosis, but in tall patients the image field size of 40 x 40 cm restricts its usefulness as initial examination.

  20. Dose adjustment of carboplatin in patients on peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Guddati, Achuta K; Joy, Parijat S; Marak, Creticus P

    2014-05-01

    The Calvert equation has been extensively used to determine the dosage of carboplatin. However, in patients on dialysis, it predicts the same dosage regardless of the frequency of dialysis. Clearance of carboplatin during hemodialysis has been studied to a lesser extent, but there have been very few studies which have investigated the clearance of carboplatin in patients on peritoneal dialysis. A mathematical formula is proposed here to predict the dose of carboplatin for a given AUC in patients on peritoneal dialysis. This formula takes into account the frequency of dialysis sessions and the time delay between carboplatin infusion and the initiation of dialysis. The formula predicts an approximately similar dosage of carboplatin as that of the Calvert formula in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis four times per day if dialysis is initiated 12 h after infusion. The formula may help in guiding the adjustment of carboplatin dose in patients who receive a lesser number of dialysis sessions per day and in those patients whose dialysis is initiated at different times (0-24 h) after carboplatin infusion. It is suggested that usage of this formula will result in a better dosage of carboplatin to suit specific dialysis frequencies in specific patients and eventually may result in a better efficacy and toxicity profile.

  1. Vancomycin Dosing and Pharmacokinetics in Postoperative Pediatric Cardiothoracic Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Benefield, Emily C.; Hagemann, Tracy M.; Allen, H. Christine; Farmer, Kevin; Burton, Michael E.; Chavez-Bueno, Susana

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study compared vancomycin trough concentrations and pharmacokinetic parameters in pediatric cardiothoracic surgery (CTS) patients versus those in controls receiving 20 mg/kg/dose, intravenously, every 8 hours. METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted in children <18 years of age, following CTS, versus an age-and sex-matched control group. The primary objective was to determine differences in trough concentrations between groups. Secondary objectives included comparisons of pharmacokinetics between groups and development of vancomycin-associated acute kidney injury (AKI), defined as a doubling in serum creatinine from baseline. Also dosing projections were developed to target an area-under-the-curve-to-minimum inhibitory concentration (AUC:MIC) ratio of ≥400. RESULTS: Twenty-seven patients in each group were evaluated. Mean trough concentrations were significantly different between groups (CTS: 18.4 mg/L; control: 8.8 mg/L; p < 0.01). Vancomycin-associated acute kidney injury AKI was significantly higher in the CTS group than in controls (25.9% versus 0%, respectively, p<0.01). There were significant differences in vancomycin elimination rates, with a high degree of variability, but no statistical differences in other parameters. Based on dosing projections, CTS patients would require 21 to 88 mg/kg/day, with a dosage interval determined by the child's glomerular filtration rate to achieve the target AUC:MIC ≥400. CONCLUSIONS: Vancomycin dosage of 20 mg/kg/dose intravenously every 8 hours achieved significantly higher trough concentrations in CTS patients than in controls. Pharmacokinetic parameters were highly variable in CTS patients, indicating more individualization of dosage is needed. A future prospective study is needed to determine whether the revised dosage projections achieve the AUC:MIC target and to determine whether these regimens are associated with less vancomycin-associated AKI. PMID:26997930

  2. Patient doses and dosimetric evaluations in interventional cardiology.

    PubMed

    Bor, Dogan; Olğar, Turan; Toklu, Türkay; Cağlan, Ayça; Onal, Elif; Padovani, Renato

    2009-03-01

    Interventional cardiological examinations may be associated with excessive radiation exposures which may cause skin injuries and higher probabilities of stochastic effects. Dose-area product (DAP) and skin doses of 325 patients were measured using alternative dosimetric techniques for different cardiological examinations. Data were collected from five different systems with the involvement of 11 cardiologists. All these dosimetric information has been collected separately for each of 10 projections together with the exposure parameters of X-ray systems. Mean DAP values measured with a transparent ion chamber were 49.1 Gy cm(2), 66.8 Gy cm(2), 106.9 Gy cm(2) and 124.7 Gy cm(2), respectively, for coronary angiography (CA), percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) or stent (PT-SI), coronary angiography and/or PTCA and/or stent (CA-PT-SI), and ablation examinations. Radiochromic films, thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) and point measurement of air kerma (AK) were carried out for skin dose assessments. Skin doses of 23 patients measured with radiochromic films were found to be between 2 Gy and 6 Gy. Although the complexity of the procedures was the major reason for these excessive doses, considerable contributions of high X-ray output of some fluoroscopy units were also noticed. In addition to the direct measurement of DAP, alternative DAP values were also determined from the skin dose measurement techniques; exposed areas were summed on digitized radiochromic films in one technique, The product of AK reading with X-ray field size measured at the patient entrance using slow X-ray films was taken as another DAP. Good correlations were found among the DAP results and also between the entrance skin doses calculated from AK measurements and direct DAP readings (R(2)=0.91). A trigger DAP value of 130 Gy cm(2) for the 2 Gy of skin doses was derived from this relationship. Collection of dosimetric data for each projection was also investigated regarding a

  3. Characterization of a lead breast shielding for dose reduction in computed tomography*

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Paula Duarte; Granzotti, Cristiano Roberto Fabri; Santos, Yago da Silva; Brochi, Marco Aurelio Corte; de Azevedo-Marques, Paulo Mazzoncini

    2014-01-01

    Objective Several studies have been published regarding the use of bismuth shielding to protect the breast in computed tomography (CT) scans and, up to the writing of this article, only one publication about barium shielding was found. The present study was aimed at characterizing, for the first time, a lead breast shielding. Materials and Methods The percentage dose reduction and the influence of the shielding on quantitative imaging parameters were evaluated. Dose measurements were made on a CT equipment with the aid of specific phantoms and radiation detectors. A processing software assisted in the qualitative analysis evaluating variations in average CT number and noise on images. Results The authors observed a reduction in entrance dose by 30% and in CTDIvol by 17%. In all measurements, in agreement with studies in the literature, the utilization of cotton fiber as spacer object reduced significantly the presence of artifacts on the images. All the measurements demonstrated increase in the average CT number and noise on the images with the presence of the shielding. Conclusion As expected, the data observed with the use of lead shielding were of the same order as those found in the literature about bismuth shielding. PMID:25741089

  4. Radiation dose reduction in digital radiography using wavelet-based image processing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Haruyuki; Tsai, Du-Yih; Lee, Yongbum; Matsuyama, Eri; Kojima, Katsuyuki

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the effect of the use of wavelet transform for image processing on radiation dose reduction in computed radiography (CR), by measuring various physical characteristics of the wavelet-transformed images. Moreover, we propose a wavelet-based method for offering a possibility to reduce radiation dose while maintaining a clinically acceptable image quality. The proposed method integrates the advantages of a previously proposed technique, i.e., sigmoid-type transfer curve for wavelet coefficient weighting adjustment technique, as well as a wavelet soft-thresholding technique. The former can improve contrast and spatial resolution of CR images, the latter is able to improve the performance of image noise. In the investigation of physical characteristics, modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, and contrast-to-noise ratio of CR images processed by the proposed method and other different methods were measured and compared. Furthermore, visual evaluation was performed using Scheffe's pair comparison method. Experimental results showed that the proposed method could improve overall image quality as compared to other methods. Our visual evaluation showed that an approximately 40% reduction in exposure dose might be achieved in hip joint radiography by using the proposed method.

  5. Effects of dose reduction on the detectability of standardized radiolucent lesions in digital panoramic radiography.

    PubMed

    Dula, K; Sanderink, G; van der Stelt, P F; Mini, R; Buser, D

    1998-08-01

    Dose reduction in digital panoramic radiography was studied. Intentional underexposure was performed with the Orthophos DS while six different human mandibles were radiographed. Exposure settings were 69 kV/15 mA (standard), 64 kV/16 mA, and 60 kV/16 mA. Standardized spherical defects, each either 1 or 1.25 mm in diameter, were simulated in 288 of 432 images, and seven observers decided whether defects were present or not. Areas under the receiver operating characteristics curves were calculated. They showed no significant differences in the detectability of the 1-mm defect at 69, 64, or 60 kV. For the 1.25-mm defect, no difference was found between the 69 and 60 kV images, but a statistically significant different detectability was found for 64 kV images in comparison with both 69 and 60 kV images. A dose reduction of up to 43% was ascertained with a Pedo-RT-Humanoid phantom when panoramic radiography was performed at 60 kV/16 mA. The conclusion is that with the Orthophos DS, it seems possible to reduce the dose rate of x-rays without loss of diagnostic quality in the case of radiolucent changes. PMID:9720100

  6. Effects of dose reduction on the detectability of standardized radiolucent lesions in digital panoramic radiography.

    PubMed

    Dula, K; Sanderink, G; van der Stelt, P F; Mini, R; Buser, D

    1998-08-01

    Dose reduction in digital panoramic radiography was studied. Intentional underexposure was performed with the Orthophos DS while six different human mandibles were radiographed. Exposure settings were 69 kV/15 mA (standard), 64 kV/16 mA, and 60 kV/16 mA. Standardized spherical defects, each either 1 or 1.25 mm in diameter, were simulated in 288 of 432 images, and seven observers decided whether defects were present or not. Areas under the receiver operating characteristics curves were calculated. They showed no significant differences in the detectability of the 1-mm defect at 69, 64, or 60 kV. For the 1.25-mm defect, no difference was found between the 69 and 60 kV images, but a statistically significant different detectability was found for 64 kV images in comparison with both 69 and 60 kV images. A dose reduction of up to 43% was ascertained with a Pedo-RT-Humanoid phantom when panoramic radiography was performed at 60 kV/16 mA. The conclusion is that with the Orthophos DS, it seems possible to reduce the dose rate of x-rays without loss of diagnostic quality in the case of radiolucent changes.

  7. Angular on-line tube current modulation in multidetector CT examinations of children and adults: The influence of different scanning parameters on dose reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Papadakis, Antonios E.; Perisinakis, Kostas; Damilakis, John

    2007-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the potential of angular on-line tube current modulation on dose reduction in pediatric and adult patients undergoing multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) examinations. Five physical anthropomorphic phantoms that simulate the average individual as neonate, 1-year-old, 5-year-old, 10-year-old, and adult were employed in the current study. Phantoms were scanned with the use of on-line tube current modulation (TCM). Percent dose reduction (%DR) factors achieved by applying TCM, were determined for standard protocols used for head and neck, shoulder, thorax, thorax and abdomen, abdomen, abdomen and pelvis, pelvis, and whole body examinations. A preliminary study on the application of TCM in MDCT examinations of adult patients was performed to validate the results obtained in anthropomorphic phantoms. Dose reduction was estimated as the percentage difference of the modulated milliamperes for each scan and the preset milliamperes prescribed by the scan protocol. The dose reduction in children was found to be much lower than the corresponding reduction achieved for adults. For helical scans the %DR factors, ranged between 1.6% and 7.4% for the neonate, 2.9% and 8.7% for the 1-year old, 2% and 6% for the 5-year-old, 5% and 10.9% for the 10-year-old, and 10.4% and 20.7% for the adult individual. For sequential scans the corresponding %DR factors ranged between 1.3% and 6.7%, 4.5% and 11%, 4.2% and 6.6%, 6.4% and 12.3%, and 8.9% and 23.3%, respectively. Broader beam collimations are associated with decreased %DR factors, when other scanning parameters are held constant. TCM did not impair image noise. In adult patients, the %DR values were found to be in good agreement with the corresponding results obtained in the anthropomorphic adult phantom. In conclusion, on-line TCM may be considered as a valuable tool for reducing dose in routine CT examinations of pediatric and adult patients. However, the dose reduction achieved with TCM

  8. Photon beam dose distributions for patients with implanted temporary tissue expanders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asena, A.; Kairn, T.; Crowe, S. B.; Trapp, J. V.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the effects of temporary tissue expanders (TTEs) on the dose distributions of photon beams in breast cancer radiotherapy treatments. EBT2 radiochromic film and ion chamber measurements were taken to quantify the attenuation and backscatter effects of the inhomogeneity. Results illustrate that the internal magnetic port present in a tissue expander causes a dose reduction of approximately 25% in photon tangent fields immediately downstream of the implant. It was also shown that the silicone elastomer shell of the tissue expander reduced the dose to the target volume by as much as 8%. This work demonstrates the importance for an accurately modelled high-density implant in the treatment planning system for post-mastectomy breast cancer patients.

  9. Measurement of patient imaging dose for real-time kilovoltage x-ray intra-fraction tumour position monitoring in prostate patients

    PubMed Central

    Crocker, James K; Ng, Jin Aun; Keall, Paul J; Booth, Jeremy T

    2012-01-01

    The dose for image-based motion monitoring of prostate tumours during radiotherapy delivery has not been established. This study aimed to provide quantitative analysis and optimisation of the fluoroscopic patient imaging dose during radiotherapy for IMRT and VMAT treatments using standard and hypofractionated treatment schedules. Twenty-two patients with type T1c N0/M0 prostate cancer and three implanted fiducial markers were considered. Minimum field sizes encompassing all fiducial markers plus a 7.5mm motion margin were determined for each treatment beam, each patient and the complete cohort. Imaging doses were measured for different field sizes and depths in a phantom at 75kV and 120kV. Based on these measurements, the patient imaging doses were then estimated according to beam-on time for clinical settings. The population minimum field size was 5.3 × 6.1cm2, yielding doses of 406mGy and 185mGy over the course of an IMRT treatment for 75kV (10 mAs) and 120kV (1.04 mAs) imaging, respectively at 1Hz. The imaging dose was reduced by an average of 28% and 32% by adopting patient specific and treatment-beam specific field sizes respectively. Standard fractionation VMAT imaging doses were 37% lower than IMRT doses over a complete treatment. Hypofractionated IMRT SBRT and VMAT SBRT imaging doses were 58% and 76% lower than IMRT doses respectively. The patient dose for kilovoltage intrafraction monitoring of the prostate was quantified. Tailoring imaging field sizes to specific patients yielded a significant reduction in the imaging dose, as did adoption of faster treatment modalities such as VMAT. PMID:22517054

  10. Patient doses from fluoroscopically guided cardiac procedures in pediatrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, L. C.; Vano, E.; Gutierrez, F.; Rodriguez, C.; Gilarranz, R.; Manzanas, M. J.

    2007-08-01

    Infants and children are a higher risk population for radiation cancer induction compared to adults. Although some values on pediatric patient doses for cardiac procedures have been reported, data to determine reference levels are scarce, especially when compared to those available for adults in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. The aim of this study is to make a new contribution to the scarce published data in pediatric cardiac procedures and help in the determination of future dose reference levels. This paper presents a set of patient dose values, in terms of air kerma area product (KAP) and entrance surface air kerma (ESAK), measured in a pediatric cardiac catheterization laboratory equipped with a biplane x-ray system with dynamic flat panel detectors. Cardiologists were properly trained in radiation protection. The study includes 137 patients aged between 10 days and 16 years who underwent diagnostic catheterizations or therapeutic procedures. Demographic data and technical details of the procedures were also gathered. The x-ray system was submitted to a quality control programme, including the calibration of the transmission ionization chamber. The age distribution of the patients was 47 for <1 year; 52 for 1-<5 years; 25 for 5-<10 years and 13 for 10-<16 years. Median values of KAP were 1.9, 2.9, 4.5 and 15.4 Gy cm2 respectively for the four age bands. These KAP values increase by a factor of 8 when moving through the four age bands. The probability of a fatal cancer per fluoroscopically guided cardiac procedure is about 0.07%. Median values of ESAK for the four age bands were 46, 50, 56 and 163 mGy, which lie far below the threshold for deterministic effects on the skin. These dose values are lower than those published in previous papers.

  11. Delivered dialysis dose is suboptimal in hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Obialo, C I; Hernandez, B; Carter, D

    1998-01-01

    Underdialyzed patients have high hospitalization and mortality rates. It is unclear if such patients receive adequate dialysis during hospitalization. In this cross-sectional study, we evaluated single treatment delivered dialysis dose during hospitalization and compared this to the dosage received at the free-standing outpatient clinics in the same patients. Eighty-four patients (54% male) aged 23-63 years (means +/- SD 55.5 +/- 14.6) who have been on dialysis for at least 3 months were evaluated. Hypertension and diabetes were the most common diagnoses, while thrombosed graft or fistula accounted for 40% of admissions. The mean dialysis treatment time (Td) was 30 min longer in the outpatient (OP) setting than the hospital (H): 3.6 +/- 0.3 vs. 3.1 +/- 0.2 h (p < 0.0001). Attained blood flow (QB) was 15% greater in the OP than H: 394 +/- 40 vs. 331 +/- 54 ml/min (p < 0.0001). The Kt/V was analyzed in 49 of 84 patients; the OP Kt/V was 20% greater than the H Kt/V: 1.38 +/- 0.2 vs. 1.11 +/- 0.1 (p < 0.0001). A further breakdown of H Kt/V according to access and membrane types showed that patients with functional grafts/fistula had a higher Kt/V than those with temporary accesses 1.14 +/- 0.1 vs. 1.07 +/- 0.1 (p = 0.01). We conclude that hospitalized patients receive suboptimal dialysis dose, this could have a negative impact on survival if hospitalization is recurrent and prolonged. Kinetic modeling should be routinely performed in such patients and Td should be increased in patients with temporary accesses. PMID:9845829

  12. Radiation dose reduction in computed tomography perfusion using spatial-temporal Bayesian methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ruogu; Raj, Ashish; Chen, Tsuhan; Sanelli, Pina C.

    2012-03-01

    In current computed tomography (CT) examinations, the associated X-ray radiation dose is of significant concern to patients and operators, especially CT perfusion (CTP) imaging that has higher radiation dose due to its cine scanning technique. A simple and cost-effective means to perform the examinations is to lower the milliampere-seconds (mAs) parameter as low as reasonably achievable in data acquisition. However, lowering the mAs parameter will unavoidably increase data noise and degrade CT perfusion maps greatly if no adequate noise control is applied during image reconstruction. To capture the essential dynamics of CT perfusion, a simple spatial-temporal Bayesian method that uses a piecewise parametric model of the residual function is used, and then the model parameters are estimated from a Bayesian formulation of prior smoothness constraints on perfusion parameters. From the fitted residual function, reliable CTP parameter maps are obtained from low dose CT data. The merit of this scheme exists in the combination of analytical piecewise residual function with Bayesian framework using a simpler prior spatial constrain for CT perfusion application. On a dataset of 22 patients, this dynamic spatial-temporal Bayesian model yielded an increase in signal-tonoise-ratio (SNR) of 78% and a decrease in mean-square-error (MSE) of 40% at low dose radiation of 43mA.

  13. [Dyslipidemic patients with coronary cardiopathy. Effect of different doses of OMEGA-3 fatty acids on serum lipids and lipoproteins].

    PubMed

    Arteaga, A; Villanueva, C L; Skorin, C; Guasch, V; Solís de Ovando, F; Velasco, N; Acosta, A M; Leighton, F

    1993-06-01

    Twenty one male patients aged 35 to 70 years, with coronary artery disease and dislipidemia refractory to dietary treatment, were assigned to three parallel groups of 7 individuals each that received a supplemental dose of 2, 4 and 6 g/day of omega-3 fatty acids during 60 days. After a 30 days wash-out period and 60 of supplementation, subjects were weighed, a dietary survey was performed, serum levels of total cholesterol and triglycerides, the lipid content of serum lipoproteins and the content of EPA+DHA in plasma phospholipids were measured. A dose dependent increase in EPA+DHA content of phospholipids and no changes in weight or nutrient intake were observed during the supplementation period. With the 6 g dose, a significant reduction in total cholesterol, with a reduction in VLDL and increase in LDL cholesterol and a decline in VLDL triglycerides was observed. With the 4 g dose a reduction in total cholesterol at the expense of VLDL and HDL cholesterol and a reduction in VLDL triglycerides but no changes in total triglycerides was observed. No changes in serum lipids were observed with 2 g dose. In patients with type IIA hyperlipidemia, a significant positive correlation was observed between DHA+EPA content of plasma phospholipids and LDL cholesterol, this correlation was not observed in patients with IIB or IV phenotypes. It is concluded that omega-3 fatty acids are ineffective as the only treatment for dislipidemias refractory to diet.

  14. Monte Carlo 20 and 45 MeV Bremsstrahlung and dose-reduction calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Goosman, D.R.

    1984-08-14

    The SANDYL electron-photon coupled Monte Carlo code has been compared with previously published experimental bremsstrahlung data at 20.9 MeV electron energy. The code was then used to calculate forward-directed spectra, angular distributions and dose-reduction factors for three practical configurations. These are: 20 MeV electrons incident on 1 mm of W + 59 mm of Be, 45 MeV electrons of 1 mm of W and 45 MeV electrons on 1 mm of W + 147 mm of Be. The application of these results to flash radiography is discussed. 7 references, 12 figures, 1 table.

  15. Dosing of carboplatin in a patient with amputated legs: A case report.

    PubMed

    van Gorp, F; van Rens, M Th M; Kuck, E M; Rozemeijer, R; Huitema, A D R; Brouwers, E E M

    2014-12-01

    Carboplatin is a platinum derivative that is commonly used in combination chemotherapy for treatment of several malignancies, including small-cell lung carcinoma (SCLC). Because the estimated glomerular filtration rate, and therefore the carboplatin dose, is based on the serum creatinine level, dosing of carboplatin for amputees is a challenge. This case report describes how serum carboplatin levels were used to determine the most suitable carboplatin dose for an amputee. The patient received four cycles of etoposide in combination with carboplatin area under the curve = 5 mg·min/ml, with a dose reduction of 25% and concurrent radiotherapy. The measured area under the curve was found to be 3.41 mg·min/ml, while the target area under the curve was 3.75 mg·min/ml (75% of 5 mg·min/ml). Therefore, for the next cycles, the carboplatin dose was calculated using the Calvert formula. No recurrence of disease was seen within two years after completion of therapy. This case demonstrates that therapeutic drug monitoring can successfully be used to determine the carboplatin dose for an amputee.

  16. Patient Dose Reference Levels for Interventional Radiology: A National Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Vano, Eliseo Sanchez, R.; Fernandez, J. M.; Gallego, J. J.; Verdu, J. F.; Garay, M. Gonzalez de; Azpiazu, A.; Segarra, A.; Hernandez, M. T.; Canis, M.; Diaz, F.; Moreno, F.; Palmero, J.

    2009-01-15

    A set of patient dose reference levels (RLs) for fluoroscopically guided interventional procedures was obtained in a survey launched by the National Society of Interventional Radiology (IR), involving 10 public hospitals, as recommended by the European Medical Exposures Directive. A sample of 1391 dose values (kerma area product [KAP]) was collected randomly during clinical procedures for seven of the most frequent procedures. Third quartiles of the KAP distributions were used to set the RLs. A regular quality control of the X-ray systems and a calibration of the dose meters were performed during the survey. The fluoroscopy time and total number of digital subtraction angiography images per procedure were also analyzed. The RL values proposed were 12 Gy cm{sup 2} for fistulography (hemodialysis access; sample of 180 cases), 73 Gy cm{sup 2} for lower limb arteriography (685 cases), 89 Gy cm{sup 2} for renal arteriography (55 cases), 80 Gy cm{sup 2} for biliary drainage (205 cases), 289 Gy cm{sup 2} for hepatic chemoembolization (151 cases), 94 Gy cm{sup 2} for iliac stent (70 cases), and 236 Gy cm{sup 2} for uterine embolization (45 cases). The provisional national RL values are lower than those obtained in a similar survey carried out in the United States from 2002 to 2004. These new values could be used to improve the practice of centers consistently working with doses higher than the RLs. This national survey also had a positive impact, as it helped increase the awareness of the members of the National Society of IR on a topic as crucial as patient dose values and programs on radiation protection.

  17. Effects of low-dose mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR-ld) on working adults.

    PubMed

    Klatt, Maryanna D; Buckworth, Janet; Malarkey, William B

    2009-06-01

    Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) has produced behavioral, psychological, and physiological benefits, but these programs typically require a substantial time commitment from the participants. This study assessed the effects of a shortened (low-dose [ld]) work-site MBSR intervention (MBSR-ld) on indicators of stress in healthy working adults to determine if results similar to those obtained in traditional MBSR could be demonstrated. Participants were randomized into MBSR-ld and wait-list control groups. Self-reported perceived stress, sleep quality, and mindfulness were measured at the beginning and end of the 6-week intervention. Salivary cortisol was assessed weekly. Significant reductions in perceived stress (p = .0025) and increases in mindfulness (p = .0149) were obtained for only the MBSR-ld group (n = 22). Scores on the global measure of sleep improved for the MBSR-ld group (p = .0018) as well as for the control group (p = .0072; n = 20). Implications and future research are discussed.

  18. Assessing patient dose in interventional fluoroscopy using patient-dependent hybrid phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Perry Barnett

    Interventional fluoroscopy uses ionizing radiation to guide small instruments through blood vessels or other body pathways to sites of clinical interest. The technique represents a tremendous advantage over invasive surgical procedures, as it requires only a small incision, thus reducing the risk of infection and providing for shorter recovery times. The growing use and increasing complexity of interventional procedures, however, has resulted in public health concerns regarding radiation exposures, particularly with respect to localized skin dose. Tracking and documenting patient-specific skin and internal organ dose has been specifically identified for interventional fluoroscopy where extended irradiation times, multiple projections, and repeat procedures can lead to some of the largest doses encountered in radiology. Furthermore, inprocedure knowledge of localized skin doses can be of significant clinical importance to managing patient risk and in training radiology residents. In this dissertation, a framework is presented for monitoring the radiation dose delivered to patients undergoing interventional procedures. The framework is built around two key points, developing better anthropomorphic models, and designing clinically relevant software systems for dose estimation. To begin, a library of 50 hybrid patient-dependent computational phantoms was developed based on the UF hybrid male and female reference phantoms. These phantoms represent a different type of anthropomorphic model whereby anthropometric parameters from an individual patient are used during phantom selection. The patient-dependent library was first validated and then used in two patient-phantom matching studies focused on cumulative organ and local skin dose. In terms of organ dose, patient-phantom matching was shown most beneficial for estimating the dose to large patients where error associated with soft tissue attenuation differences could be minimized. For small patients, inherent difference

  19. High-dose inhaled corticosteroids or addition of theophylline in patients with poorly controlled asthma?

    PubMed

    Celis, Pilar; Rada, Gabriel

    2015-08-19

    There are several management strategies for patients with poorly controlled asthma despite usual treatment. Increasing doses of inhaled corticosteroids or adding theophylline are among the therapeutic alternatives. However, the latter is associated with important adverse effects. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified only one systematic review including four pertinent randomized controlled trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded it is not clear whether theophylline or high-dose inhaled corticosteroids constitute a better alternative for symptomatic control or reduction in exacerbations in poorly controlled asthmatic patients because the certainty of the evidence is very low.

  20. Characterization of statistical prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS): II. Application to dose reduction

    PubMed Central

    Lauzier, Pascal Thériault; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The ionizing radiation imparted to patients during computed tomography exams is raising concerns. This paper studies the performance of a scheme called dose reduction using prior image constrained compressed sensing (DR-PICCS). The purpose of this study is to characterize the effects of a statistical model of x-ray detection in the DR-PICCS framework and its impact on spatial resolution. Methods: Both numerical simulations with known ground truth and in vivo animal dataset were used in this study. In numerical simulations, a phantom was simulated with Poisson noise and with varying levels of eccentricity. Both the conventional filtered backprojection (FBP) and the PICCS algorithms were used to reconstruct images. In PICCS reconstructions, the prior image was generated using two different denoising methods: a simple Gaussian blur and a more advanced diffusion filter. Due to the lack of shift-invariance in nonlinear image reconstruction such as the one studied in this paper, the concept of local spatial resolution was used to study the sharpness of a reconstructed image. Specifically, a directional metric of image sharpness, the so-called pseudopoint spread function (pseudo-PSF), was employed to investigate local spatial resolution. Results: In the numerical studies, the pseudo-PSF was reduced from twice the voxel width in the prior image down to less than 1.1 times the voxel width in DR-PICCS reconstructions when the statistical model was not included. At the same noise level, when statistical weighting was used, the pseudo-PSF width in DR-PICCS reconstructed images varied between 1.5 and 0.75 times the voxel width depending on the direction along which it was measured. However, this anisotropy was largely eliminated when the prior image was generated using diffusion filtering; the pseudo-PSF width was reduced to below one voxel width in that case. In the in vivo study, a fourfold improvement in CNR was achieved while qualitatively maintaining sharpness

  1. Estimated UV doses to psoriasis patients during climate therapy at Gran Canaria in March 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsen, L. T. N.; Søyland, E.; Krogstad, A. L.

    2008-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease involving about 2-3% of the Norwegian population. Sun exposure has a positive effect on most psoriasis lesions, but ultraviolet (UV) radiation also causes a direct DNA damage in the skin cells and comprises a carcinogenic potential. UV exposure on the skin causes a local as well as a systemic immune suppressive effect, but the relation between sun exposure and these biological effects is not well known. In March 2006 a study was carried out to investigate possible therapeutic outcome mechanisms in 20 psoriasis patients receiving climate therapy at Gran Canaria. This paper presents estimates of their individual skin UV-doses based on UV measurements and the patients' diaries with information on time spent in the sun. On the first day of exposure the patients received on average 5.1 Standard Erythema Doses (SED: median=4.0 SED, range 2.6-10.3 SED) estimated to the skin. During the 15 days study they received 165.8 SED (range 104.3-210.1 SED). The reduction in PASI score was 72.8% on average, but there was no obvious relation between the improvement and the UV dose. The UV doses were higher than those found from climate therapy studies at other locations. It seems beneficial to use more strict exposure schedules that consider the available UV irradiance, depending on time of the day, time of the year and weather conditions.

  2. Patient radiation dose audits for fluoroscopically guided interventional procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Balter, Stephen; Rosenstein, Marvin; Miller, Donald L.; Schueler, Beth; Spelic, David

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: Quality management for any use of medical x-ray imaging should include monitoring of radiation dose. Fluoroscopically guided interventional (FGI) procedures are inherently clinically variable and have the potential for inducing deterministic injuries in patients. The use of a conventional diagnostic reference level is not appropriate for FGI procedures. A similar but more detailed quality process for management of radiation dose in FGI procedures is described. Methods: A method that takes into account both the inherent variability of FGI procedures and the risk of deterministic injuries from these procedures is suggested. The substantial radiation dose level (SRDL) is an absolute action level (with regard to patient follow-up) below which skin injury is highly unlikely and above which skin injury is possible. The quality process for FGI procedures collects data from all instances of a given procedure from a number of facilities into an advisory data set (ADS). An individual facility collects a facility data set (FDS) comprised of all instances of the same procedure at that facility. The individual FDS is then compared to the multifacility ADS with regard to the overall shape of the dose distributions and the percent of instances in both the ADS and the FDS that exceed the SRDL. Results: Samples of an ADS and FDS for percutaneous coronary intervention, using the dose metric of reference air kerma (K{sub a,r}) (i.e., the cumulative air kerma at the reference point), are used to illustrate the proposed quality process for FGI procedures. Investigation is warranted whenever the FDS is noticeably different from the ADS for the specific FGI procedure and particularly in two circumstances: (1) When the facility's local median K{sub a,r} exceeds the 75th percentile of the ADS and (2) when the percent of instances where K{sub a,r} exceeds the facility-selected SRDL is greater for the FDS than for the ADS. Conclusions: Analysis of the two data sets (ADS and FDS) and

  3. High dose tigecycline in critically ill patients with severe infections due to multidrug-resistant bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The high incidence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria among patients admitted to ICUs has determined an increase of tigecycline (TGC) use for the treatment of severe infections. Many concerns have been raised about the efficacy of this molecule and increased dosages have been proposed. Our purpose is to investigate TGC safety and efficacy at higher than standard doses. Methods We conducted a retrospective study of prospectively collected data in the ICU of a teaching hospital in Rome. Data from all patients treated with TGC for a microbiologically confirmed infection were analyzed. The safety profile and efficacy of high dosing regimen use were investigated. Results Over the study period, 54 patients (pts) received TGC at a standard dose (SD group: 50 mg every 12 hours) and 46 at a high dose (HD group: 100 mg every 12 hours). Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter.baumannii (blaOXA-58 and blaOXA-23 genes) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (blaKPC-3 gene) were the main isolated pathogens (n = 79). There were no patients requiring TGC discontinuation or dose reduction because of adverse events. In the ventilation-associated pneumonia population (VAP) subgroup (63 patients: 30 received SD and 33 HD), the only independent predictor of clinical cure was the use of high tigecycline dose (odds ratio (OR) 6.25; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.59 to 24.57; P = 0.009) whilst initial inadequate antimicrobial treatment (IIAT) (OR 0.18; 95% CI 0.05 to 0.68; P = 0.01) and higher Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score (OR 0.66; 95% CI 0.51 to 0.87; P = 0.003) were independently associated with clinical failure. Conclusions TGC was well tolerated at a higher than standard dose in a cohort of critically ill patients with severe infections. In the VAP subgroup the high-dose regimen was associated with better outcomes than conventional administration due to Gram-negative MDR bacteria. PMID:24887101

  4. [Efficacy of a fixed-dose combination of perindopril and amlodipine in the treatment of hypertensive patients. A clinical case].

    PubMed

    Poteshkina, N G; Khashieva, F M

    2014-01-01

    The paper describes a clinical case of the efficacy of a fixed-dose combination of perindopril and amlodipine used in a hypertensive patient. It shows its clinical effectiveness with no impact on blood lipid and glucose levels. 24-hour blood pressure monitoring revealed a reduction in daily blood pressure, including its variability, in pulse wave propagation velocity and central aortic pressure. PMID:25804046

  5. Multiple-dose pharmacokinetics of ceftazidime in cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, I; Fainstein, V; Smith, R G; Bodey, G P

    1983-01-01

    The pharmacokinetic parameters of ceftazidime were determined in 25 patients with neoplastic diseases. A group of 13 patients each received 1 g of ceftazidime over 15 min as a single intravenous dose. The mean peak drug concentration in serum was 77.4 micrograms/ml, and the serum half-life was 144 min. Urinary excretion at 12 h was 64.5%. These 13 patients also received 2 g of ceftazidime over 15 min at 8-h intervals for 7 or 8 days. The mean peak drug concentrations in serum were 103.6 micrograms/ml on day 1 and 87 micrograms/ml on day 7 or 8. A second group of 12 patients received 1 g of ceftazidime over 30 min, followed by 1 g over 2 h and every 4 h thereafter. The mean peak drug concentration in serum at 30 min was 57.5 micrograms/ml. Average peak and trough levels obtained on day 2 or 3 were 65 and 34.8 micrograms/ml, respectively, and remained in this range thereafter. The above-mentioned dose schedules produced high and adequate ceftazidime concentrations in serum. Images PMID:6357067

  6. Radiation dose reduction and new image modalities development for interventional C-arm imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Kai

    Cardiovascular disease and stroke are the leading health problems and causes of death in the US. Due to the minimally invasive nature of the evolution of image guided techniques, interventional radiological procedures are becoming more common and are preferred in treating many cardiovascular diseases and strokes. In addition, with the recent advances in hardware and device technology, the speed and efficacy of interventional treatment has significantly improved. This implies that more image modalities can be developed based on the current C-arm system and patients treated in interventional suites can potentially experience better health outcomes. However, during the treatment patients are irradiated with substantial amounts of ionizing radiation with a high dose rate (digital subtraction angiography (DSA) with 3muGy/frame and 3D cone beam CT image with 0.36muGy/frame for a Siemens Artis Zee biplane system) and/or a long irradiation time (a roadmapping image sequence can be as long as one hour during aneurysm embolization). As a result, the patient entrance dose is extremely high. Despite the fact that the radiation dose is already substantial, image quality is not always satisfactory. By default a temporal average is used in roadmapping images to overcome poor image quality, but this technique can result in motion blurred images. Therefore, reducing radiation dose while maintaining or even improving the image quality is an important area for continued research. This thesis is focused on improving the clinical applications of C-arm cone beam CT systems in two ways: (1) Improve the performance of current image modalities on the C-arm system. (2) Develop new image modalities based on the current system. To be more specific, the objectives are to reduce radiation dose for current modalities (e.g., DSA, fluoroscopy, roadmapping, and cone beam CT) and enable cone beam CT perfusion and time resolved cone beam CT angiography that can be used to diagnose and triage acute

  7. Experimental proof of an idea for a CT-scanner with dose reduction potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de las Heras, Hugo; Tischenko, Oleg; Renger, Bernhard; Xu, Yuan; Hoeschen, Christoph

    2008-03-01

    Preliminary results for a new CT scanning device with dose-reduction potential were presented at the SPIE Medical Imaging conference 2007. The new device acquires the Radon data after the X-ray beam is collimated through a special mask. This mask is combined with a new and efficient data collection geometry; thus the device has the potential of reducing the dose by a factor of two. In this work, we report the first complete proof of the idea using the same simplified mask of 197 detectors as last year, and a clinical C-arm with a flat panel detector to simulate the gantry. This addition enables the acquisition of two independent and complementary data sets for reconstruction. Moreover, this clinical set-up enables the acquisition of data for clinically relevant phantoms. Phantom data were acquired using both detector sets and were reconstructed with the robust algorithm OPED. The independent sinograms were matched to a single one, and from this a diagnostic image was reconstructed successfully. This image has improved resolution, as well as less noise and artifacts compared to each single independent reconstruction. The results obtained are highly promising, even though the current device acquires only 197 views. Dose comparisons can be carried out in the future with a more precise prototype, comparable to current clinical devices with respect to imaging performance.

  8. Fludarabine Allows Dose Reduction for Total Body Irradiation in Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Kornguth, David G. . E-mail: dkorngut@mdanderson.org; Mahajan, Anita; Woo, Shiao; Chan, Ka Wah; Antolak, John; Ha, Chul S.

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To examine, in the setting of total body irradiation (TBI) for the preparation of pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), whether TBI dose can be reduced without compromising the efficacy of a regimen consisting of fludarabine and radiotherapy; and whether there is any increased risk of pulmonary toxicity due to the radiosensitizing effect of fludarabine. Methods and Materials: A total of 52 pediatric patients with hematologic malignancies received TBI-based conditioning regimens in preparation for allogeneic HSCT. Twenty-three patients received 12 Gy in 4 daily fractions in combination with cyclophosphamide, either alone or with other chemotherapeutic and biologic agents. Twenty-nine patients received 9 Gy in 3 fractions in conjunction with fludarabine and melphalan. Clinical and radiation records were reviewed to determine engraftment, pulmonary toxicity (according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria), transplant-related mortality, recurrence of primary disease, and overall survival. Results: The two groups of patients had comparable pretransplant clinical characteristics. For the 12-Gy and 9-Gy regimens, the engraftment (89% and 93%; p = 0.82), freedom from life-threatening pulmonary events (65% and 79%; p = 0.33), freedom from relapse (60% and 73%; p = 0.24), and overall survival (26% and 47%; p = 0.09) were not statistically different. Conclusions: The addition of fludarabine and melphalan seems to allow the dose of TBI to be lowered to 9 Gy without loss of engraftment or antitumor efficacy.

  9. Lamotrigine Dosing for Pregnant Patients With Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Crystal T.; Klein, Autumn M.; Perel, James M.; Helsel, Joseph; Wisner, Katherine L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Little information is available on the need for dosage changes for lamotrigine in pregnant women with bipolar disorder. The authors present new data on serial serum levels of lamotrigine in pregnant patients on lamotrigine monotherapy. They also review the epilepsy literature on use of lamotrigine during pregnancy. Method Lamotrigine serum samples were obtained from eight mother-infant pairs at different time points during pregnancy and the postpartum period. Results All of the women were taking lamotrigine throughout pregnancy. Serum-level-to-dose ratios were lower during pregnancy than the postpartum period. Lamotrigine was taken once daily in doses ranging from 100 mg to 300 mg. Three patients had an increase of 50 mg to their daily dose across pregnancy. The change in serum lamotrigine levels in the postpartum period ranged from a 30% decrease to a 640% increase compared with the first level obtained during pregnancy. Level-to-dose ratios obtained within 4 weeks after delivery reflected a mean level 402% greater than the baseline level during gestation. Compared with the third trimester, lamotrigine serum concentration increased an average of 154% within 5 weeks after delivery. The most dramatic increase in lamotrigine serum level early after delivery occurred at 1.5 weeks. The mean infant cord level was 66% of the maternal serum level at delivery. The mean breast-fed infant serum level was 32.5% of the maternal serum levels. Conclusions The pattern of lamotrigine changes during pregnancy in these women with bipolar disorder was consistent with that described in the epilepsy literature. PMID:24185239

  10. Dose reduction by moving a region of interest (ROI) beam attenuator to follow a moving object of interest

    PubMed Central

    Panse, Ashish S.; Swetadri Vasan, S. N.; Jain, A.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2012-01-01

    Region-of-interest (ROI) fluoroscopy takes advantage of the fact that most neurovascular interventional activity is performed in only a small portion of an x-ray imaging field of view (FOV). The ROI beam filter is an attenuating material that reduces patient dose in the area peripheral to the object of interest. This project explores a method of moving the beam-attenuator aperture with the object of interest such that it always remains in the ROI. In this study, the ROI attenuator, which reduces the dose by 80% in the peripheral region, is mounted on a linear stage placed near the x-ray tube. Fluoroscopy is performed using the Microangiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) which is a high-resolution, CCD-based x-ray detector. A stainless-steel stent is selected as the object of interest, and is moved across the FOV and localized using an object-detection algorithm available in the IMAQ Vision package of LabVIEW. The ROI is moved to follow the stent motion. The pixel intensities are equalized in both FOV regions and an adaptive temporal filter dependent on the motion of the object of interest is implemented inside the ROI. With a temporal filter weight of 5% for the current image in the peripheral region, the SNR measured is 47.8. The weights inside the ROI vary between 10% and 33% with a measured SNR of 57.9 and 35.3 when the object is stationary and moving, respectively. This method allows patient dose reduction as well as maintenance of superior image quality in the ROI while tracking the object. PMID:22866212

  11. Dose reduction by moving a region of interest (ROI) beam attenuator to follow a moving object of interest.

    PubMed

    Panse, Ashish S; Swetadri Vasan, S N; Jain, A; Bednarek, D R; Rudin, S

    2012-01-01

    Region-of-interest (ROI) fluoroscopy takes advantage of the fact that most neurovascular interventional activity is performed in only a small portion of an x-ray imaging field of view (FOV). The ROI beam filter is an attenuating material that reduces patient dose in the area peripheral to the object of interest. This project explores a method of moving the beam-attenuator aperture with the object of interest such that it always remains in the ROI. In this study, the ROI attenuator, which reduces the dose by 80% in the peripheral region, is mounted on a linear stage placed near the x-ray tube. Fluoroscopy is performed using the Microangiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) which is a high-resolution, CCD-based x-ray detector. A stainless-steel stent is selected as the object of interest, and is moved across the FOV and localized using an object-detection algorithm available in the IMAQ Vision package of LabVIEW. The ROI is moved to follow the stent motion. The pixel intensities are equalized in both FOV regions and an adaptive temporal filter dependent on the motion of the object of interest is implemented inside the ROI. With a temporal filter weight of 5% for the current image in the peripheral region, the SNR measured is 47.8. The weights inside the ROI vary between 10% and 33% with a measured SNR of 57.9 and 35.3 when the object is stationary and moving, respectively. This method allows patient dose reduction as well as maintenance of superior image quality in the ROI while tracking the object. PMID:22866212

  12. PWR Facility Dose Modeling Using MCNP5 and the CADIS/ADVANTG Variance-Reduction Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Blakeman, Edward D; Peplow, Douglas E.; Wagner, John C; Murphy, Brian D; Mueller, Don

    2007-09-01

    The feasibility of modeling a pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) facility and calculating dose rates at all locations within the containment and adjoining structures using MCNP5 with mesh tallies is presented. Calculations of dose rates resulting from neutron and photon sources from the reactor (operating and shut down for various periods) and the spent fuel pool, as well as for the photon source from the primary coolant loop, were all of interest. Identification of the PWR facility, development of the MCNP-based model and automation of the run process, calculation of the various sources, and development of methods for visually examining mesh tally files and extracting dose rates were all a significant part of the project. Advanced variance reduction, which was required because of the size of the model and the large amount of shielding, was performed via the CADIS/ADVANTG approach. This methodology uses an automatically generated three-dimensional discrete ordinates model to calculate adjoint fluxes from which MCNP weight windows and source bias parameters are generated. Investigative calculations were performed using a simple block model and a simplified full-scale model of the PWR containment, in which the adjoint source was placed in various regions. In general, it was shown that placement of the adjoint source on the periphery of the model provided adequate results for regions reasonably close to the source (e.g., within the containment structure for the reactor source). A modification to the CADIS/ADVANTG methodology was also studied in which a global adjoint source is weighted by the reciprocal of the dose response calculated by an earlier forward discrete ordinates calculation. This method showed improved results over those using the standard CADIS/ADVANTG approach, and its further investigation is recommended for future efforts.

  13. Reduction in radiation dose with reconstruction technique in the brain perfusion CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. J.; Lee, H. K.; Song, H.; Ju, M. S.; Dong, K. R.; Chung, W. K.; Cho, M. S.; Cho, J. H.

    2011-12-01

    The principal objective of this study was to verify the utility of the reconstruction imaging technique in the brain perfusion computed tomography (PCT) scan by assessing reductions in the radiation dose and analyzing the generated images. The setting used for image acquisition had a detector coverage of 40 mm, a helical thickness of 0.625 mm, a helical shuttle mode scan type and a rotation time of 0.5 s as the image parameters used for the brain PCT scan. Additionally, a phantom experiment and an animal experiment were carried out. In the phantom and animal experiments, noise was measured in the scanning with the tube voltage fixed at 80 kVp (kilovolt peak) and the level of the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) was changed from 0% to 100% at 10% intervals. The standard deviation of the CT coefficient was measured three times to calculate the mean value. In the phantom and animal experiments, the absorbed dose was measured 10 times under the same conditions as the ones for noise measurement before the mean value was calculated. In the animal experiment, pencil-type and CT-dedicated ionization chambers were inserted into the central portion of pig heads for measurement. In the phantom study, as the level of the ASIR changed from 0% to 100% under identical scanning conditions, the noise value and dose were proportionally reduced. In our animal experiment, the noise value was lowest when the ASIR level was 50%, unlike in the phantom study. The dose was reduced as in the phantom study.

  14. A Novel Approach to Brachial Plexus Catheter Management: A Brachial Plexus Test Dose for Phrenic Nerve Paralysis and Patient-Controlled, Demand-Only Dosing for a Patient With Extreme Obesity.

    PubMed

    Meier, Adam W; Lin, Shin-E; Hanson, Neil A; Auyong, David B

    2016-09-15

    A 53-year-old woman with extreme obesity (body mass index = 82 kg/m) presented for an open reduction and internal fixation of the proximal humerus. This report describes the novel management of her continuous brachial plexus catheter in the setting of her comorbidities. Phrenic nerve paralysis from brachial plexus blocks can cause clinically significant dyspnea in obese patients. Brachial plexus catheters can be used effectively for these patients with some modification to routine management. We detail our use of a short-acting chloroprocaine test dose for phrenic paralysis and demand-only dosing to provide effective analgesia while avoiding respiratory complications associated with these blocks. PMID:27464944

  15. Patient-specific Monte Carlo dose calculations for 103Pd breast brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miksys, N.; Cygler, J. E.; Caudrelier, J. M.; Thomson, R. M.

    2016-04-01

    This work retrospectively investigates patient-specific Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations for 103Pd permanent implant breast brachytherapy, exploring various necessary assumptions for deriving virtual patient models: post-implant CT image metallic artifact reduction (MAR), tissue assignment schemes (TAS), and elemental tissue compositions. Three MAR methods (thresholding, 3D median filter, virtual sinogram) are applied to CT images; resulting images are compared to each other and to uncorrected images. Virtual patient models are then derived by application of different TAS ranging from TG-186 basic recommendations (mixed adipose and gland tissue at uniform literature-derived density) to detailed schemes (segmented adipose and gland with CT-derived densities). For detailed schemes, alternate mass density segmentation thresholds between adipose and gland are considered. Several literature-derived elemental compositions for adipose, gland and skin are compared. MC models derived from uncorrected CT images can yield large errors in dose calculations especially when used with detailed TAS. Differences in MAR method result in large differences in local doses when variations in CT number cause differences in tissue assignment. Between different MAR models (same TAS), PTV {{D}90} and skin {{D}1~\\text{c{{\\text{m}}3}}} each vary by up to 6%. Basic TAS (mixed adipose/gland tissue) generally yield higher dose metrics than detailed segmented schemes: PTV {{D}90} and skin {{D}1~\\text{c{{\\text{m}}3}}} are higher by up to 13% and 9% respectively. Employing alternate adipose, gland and skin elemental compositions can cause variations in PTV {{D}90} of up to 11% and skin {{D}1~\\text{c{{\\text{m}}3}}} of up to 30%. Overall, AAPM TG-43 overestimates dose to the PTV ({{D}90} on average 10% and up to 27%) and underestimates dose to the skin ({{D}1~\\text{c{{\\text{m}}3}}} on average 29% and up to 48%) compared to the various MC models derived using the post-MAR CT images studied

  16. Simultaneous reduction of radiation dose and scatter for CBCT by using collimators

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tianfang; Li, Xiang; Yang, Yong; Zhang, Yongqian; Heron, Dwight E.; Huq, M. Saiful

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: On-board cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging has been widely available in radiotherapy clinic for target localization. However, the extra radiation dose from CBCT is always a concern for its frequent use. Additionally, the relatively large scatter in CBCT often degrades the image quality. By using collimators, some of the X-rays can be stopped from reaching the patient and the detectors, hence both the scatter and the patient doses are simultaneously reduced. The authors show in this work that the collimated CBCT data can be reconstructed without any noticeable artifacts for certain collimator blocking ratios and blocking patterns, and the focus of this work is to study the relationship between the image quality and these two collimator factors.Methods: A CBCT system with collimators was simulated following the typical geometry used in clinic. Different collimator designs were tested by varying the size and the number of the collimator slits, and at the same time, the ratio of transmitted beams to total beams was varied from 100% to 10%, resulting in hundreds of different simulation scenarios. Lung and pelvis phantoms created from patients CT images were used in the simulations, and an iterative reconstruction algorithm using the compressed sensing technique was adopted. The image quality was examined by root mean square errors (RMSEs) and compared with the conventional CBCT images.Results: The CBCT image quality increases as the amount of beams passing through the collimators increases, and decreases as the size of the collimator slits increases. With ultra-high resolution collimators, the RMSEs were comparable to the conventional CBCT image quality until the beam transmission rate is reduced below 25%.Conclusions: Collimators can reduce the scatters and radiation dose, however, the collimated CBCT image quality is strongly dependent on both the collimator blocking ratio and the blocking pattern. To achieve image quality comparable to the conventional CBCT, the

  17. Sci—Fri AM: Mountain — 02: A comparison of dose reduction methods on image quality for cone beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, R; Buckley, LA

    2014-08-15

    Modern radiotherapy uses highly conformai dose distributions and therefore relies on daily image guidance for accurate patient positioning. Kilovoltage cone beam CT is one technique that is routinely used for patient set-up and results in a high dose to the patient relative to planar imaging techniques. This study uses an Elekta Synergy linac equipped with XVI cone beam CT to investigate the impact of various imaging parameters on dose and image quality. Dose and image quality are assessed as functions of x-ray tube voltage, tube current and the number of projections in the scan. In each case, the dose measurements confirm that as each parameter increases the dose increases. The assessment of high contrast resolution shows little dependence on changes to the image technique. However, low contrast visibility suggests a trade off between dose and image quality. Particularly for changes in tube potential, the dose increases much faster as a function of voltage than the corresponding increase in low contrast image quality. This suggests using moderate values of the peak tube voltage (100 – 120 kVp) since higher values result in significant dose increases with little gain in image quality. Measurements also indicate that increasing tube current achieves the greatest degree of improvement in the low contrast visibility. The results of this study highlight the need to establish careful imaging protocols to limit dose to the patient and to limit changes to the imaging parameters to those cases where there is a clear clinical requirement for improved image quality.

  18. SU-C-18C-06: Radiation Dose Reduction in Body Interventional Radiology: Clinical Results Utilizing a New Imaging Acquisition and Processing Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Kohlbrenner, R; Kolli, KP; Taylor, A; Kohi, M; Fidelman, N; LaBerge, J; Kerlan, R; Gould, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the patient radiation dose reduction achieved during transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) procedures performed in a body interventional radiology suite equipped with the Philips Allura Clarity imaging acquisition and processing platform, compared to TACE procedures performed in the same suite equipped with the Philips Allura Xper platform. Methods: Total fluoroscopy time, cumulative dose area product, and cumulative air kerma were recorded for the first 25 TACE procedures performed to treat hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in a Philips body interventional radiology suite equipped with Philips Allura Clarity. The same data were collected for the prior 85 TACE procedures performed to treat HCC in the same suite equipped with Philips Allura Xper. Mean values from these cohorts were compared using two-tailed t tests. Results: Following installation of the Philips Allura Clarity platform, a 42.8% reduction in mean cumulative dose area product (3033.2 versus 1733.6 mGycm∧2, p < 0.0001) and a 31.2% reduction in mean cumulative air kerma (1445.4 versus 994.2 mGy, p < 0.001) was achieved compared to similar procedures performed in the same suite equipped with the Philips Allura Xper platform. Mean total fluoroscopy time was not significantly different between the two cohorts (1679.3 versus 1791.3 seconds, p = 0.41). Conclusion: This study demonstrates a significant patient radiation dose reduction during TACE procedures performed to treat HCC after a body interventional radiology suite was converted to the Philips Allura Clarity platform from the Philips Allura Xper platform. Future work will focus on evaluation of patient dose reduction in a larger cohort of patients across a broader range of procedures and in specific populations, including obese patients and pediatric patients, and comparison of image quality between the two platforms. Funding for this study was provided by Philips Healthcare, with 5% salary support provided to authors K. Pallav

  19. Continuing patient care with metered-dose inhalers.

    PubMed

    Woodcock, A

    1995-01-01

    International guidelines recommend inhaled therapy over oral therapy for asthma because of greater efficacy and safety. Metered-dose inhalers (MDIs) are the delivery system of choice for the majority of patients with asthma. They have been well tried and tested and proven to be safe, reliably delivering a reproducible and precise dose, and account for 85% of the 400 million inhalers currently sold worldwide. Current products using chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) 11/12 as the propellant are being reformulated. Under the Montreal Protocol, CFCs are to be phased out worldwide, though MDIs have been granted temporary exemption, thus far until 1997. Two propellants, hydrofluoroalkane (HFA) 134a and 227, have been identified by the pharmaceutical industry to replace CFCs. However, they have different properties and reformulation has been difficult in relation to surfactants, valves and elastomeric seals. The manufacturing process has been re-engineered to take place at high pressure, because at normal pressure HFA134a is a gas, in contrast with CFC 11 which is a liquid at room temperature. Glaxo has carried out an extensive toxicological assessment of HFA134a and thorough clinical testing has shown it to be well tolerated. To date they have carried out safety and efficacy testing on reformulations of salbutamol, salmeterol and fluticasone propionate (FP). Single-dose studies of salbutamol, 200 micrograms, with HFA134a have been shown to provide equivalent protection against bronchial provocation by histamine in both adults and children with asthma when compared with the currently available CFC preparations. In a subsequent 4-week study, both formulations had similar effects on morning peak flow and the patients believed that the two preparations were equivalent.

  20. Single-dose pharmacokinetics of oral fleroxacin in bacteremic patients.

    PubMed Central

    Schrenzel, J; Cerruti, F; Herrmann, M; Leemann, T; Weidekamm, E; Portmann, R; Hirschel, B; Lew, D P

    1994-01-01

    Fleroxacin is a new broad-spectrum quinolone which can be given by the oral route. The present study was designed to assess the influence of bacteremia on the pharmacokinetics of a single oral dose of fleroxacin. Thirteen patients with proven bacteremia (one or more pairs of positive blood cultures, no hypotension) were given a single 400-mg fleroxacin dose orally on two occasions while also receiving standard antibiotic therapy. The first dose was administered 12 to 36 h after the last positive blood culture was drawn (day 1), and a second dose was administered 7 days later (day 7 +/- 2) to compare the pharmacokinetics between the acute and the convalescent phases of the disease. Following each administration of fleroxacin, serial plasma samples were collected for up to 72 h and were analyzed for unchanged drug by a reversed phase high-pressure liquid chromatography technique. There were no significant changes in the following pharmacokinetic parameters (mean standard deviation) the maximum concentration of drug in serum (6.4 +/- 1.5 versus 6.7 +/- 1.9 mg/liter), the minimum concentration of drug in serum, defined as the concentration of drug in serum at 24 h postdose (3.0 +/- 1.7 versus 2.5 +/- 1.2 mg/liter), the time to the maximum concentration of drug in serum (2.3 +/- 1.4 versus 2.0 +/- 1.2 h), and the elimination half-life (19.7 +/- 8.0 versus 17.9 +/- 6.9 h). Fleroxacin clearances were compared for each individual patient. A positive correlation (R2 = 0.787) was found between the values measured on day 1 and day 7. Oral clearance of fleroxacin (CL = CL/F, where F is bioavailability was slightly, but not significantly, reduced during the bacteremic phase (oral clearance, 43.8+/- 23.5 versus 48.5 +/- 17.5 ml/min.). When compared with previous results obtained in healthy young subjects, longer times to the maximum concentration of drug in serum and elimination half-lives and higher areas under the curve were observed. This could be due to the bacteremic state

  1. Low-dose preview for patient-specific, task-specific technique selection in cone-beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Adam S.; Stayman, J. Webster; Otake, Yoshito; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Vogt, Sebastian; Kleinszig, Gerhard; Khanna, A. Jay; Gallia, Gary L.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose : A method is presented for generating simulated low-dose cone-beam CT (CBCT) preview images from which patient- and task-specific minimum-dose protocols can be confidently selected prospectively in clinical scenarios involving repeat scans. Methods : In clinical scenarios involving a series of CBCT images, the low-dose preview (LDP) method operates upon the first scan to create a projection dataset that accurately simulates the effects of dose reduction in subsequent scans by injecting noise of proper magnitude and correlation, including both quantum and electronic readout noise as important components of image noise in flat-panel detector CBCT. Experiments were conducted to validate the LDP method in both a head phantom and a cadaveric torso by performing CBCT acquisitions spanning a wide dose range (head: 0.8–13.2 mGy, body: 0.8–12.4 mGy) with a prototype mobile C-arm system. After injecting correlated noise to simulate dose reduction, the projections were reconstructed using both conventional filtered backprojection (FBP) and an iterative, model-based image reconstruction method (MBIR). The LDP images were then compared to real CBCT images in terms of noise magnitude, noise-power spectrum (NPS), spatial resolution, contrast, and artifacts. Results : For both FBP and MBIR, the LDP images exhibited accurate levels of spatial resolution and contrast that were unaffected by the correlated noise injection, as expected. Furthermore, the LDP image noise magnitude and NPS were in strong agreement with real CBCT images acquired at the corresponding, reduced dose level across the entire dose range considered. The noise magnitude agreed within 7% for both the head phantom and cadaveric torso, and the NPS showed a similar level of agreement up to the Nyquist frequency. Therefore, the LDP images were highly representative of real image quality across a broad range of dose and reconstruction methods. On the other hand, naïve injection ofuncorrelated noise

  2. Radiation dose reduction in the evaluation of scoliosis: an application of digital radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Kushner, D.C.; Cleveland, R.H.; Herman, T.E.; Zaleske, D.J.; Ehrlich, M.G.; Correia, J.A.

    1986-10-01

    This report documents the clinical testing of scanning beam digital radiography as an imaging method in patients with scoliosis. This type of digital imaging requires a skin exposure of only 2.4 mR (0.619 microC/kg) per image, compared with the lowest possible posteroanterior screen-film exposure of 10 mR (2.58 microC/kg) at the chest and 60 mR (15.48 microC/kg) at the lumbar spine. Digital radiographic and screen-film images were obtained on multiple test objects and 273 patients. Scoliosis measurements using screen-film radiographs and digital radiographs were comparable to within a mean difference of 1 degrees at many different degrees of severity. The low-dose digital images were found to be useful and accurate for the detection and measurement of scoliosis after the first screen-film radiographs have excluded tumors and structural abnormalities.

  3. A technique optimization protocol and the potential for dose reduction in digital mammography

    PubMed Central

    Ranger, Nicole T.; Lo, Joseph Y.; Samei, Ehsan

    2010-01-01

    Digital mammography requires revisiting techniques that have been optimized for prior screen∕film mammography systems. The objective of the study was to determine optimized radiographic technique for a digital mammography system and demonstrate the potential for dose reduction in comparison to the clinically established techniques based on screen- film. An objective figure of merit (FOM) was employed to evaluate a direct-conversion amorphous selenium (a-Se) FFDM system (Siemens Mammomat NovationDR, Siemens AG Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany) and was derived from the quotient of the squared signal-difference-to-noise ratio to mean glandular dose, for various combinations of technique factors and breast phantom configurations including kilovoltage settings (23–35 kVp), target∕filter combinations (Mo–Mo and W–Rh), breast-equivalent plastic in various thicknesses (2–8 cm) and densities (100% adipose, 50% adipose∕50% glandular, and 100% glandular), and simulated mass and calcification lesions. When using a W–Rh spectrum, the optimized FOM results for the simulated mass and calcification lesions showed highly consistent trends with kVp for each combination of breast density and thickness. The optimized kVp ranged from 26 kVp for 2 cm 100% adipose breasts to 30 kVp for 8 cm 100% glandular breasts. The use of the optimized W–Rh technique compared to standard Mo–Mo techniques provided dose savings ranging from 9% for 2 cm thick, 100% adipose breasts, to 63% for 6 cm thick, 100% glandular breasts, and for breasts with a 50% adipose∕50% glandular composition, from 12% for 2 cm thick breasts up to 57% for 8 cm thick breasts. PMID:20384232

  4. A technique optimization protocol and the potential for dose reduction in digital mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Ranger, Nicole T.; Lo, Joseph Y.; Samei, Ehsan

    2010-03-15

    Digital mammography requires revisiting techniques that have been optimized for prior screen/film mammography systems. The objective of the study was to determine optimized radiographic technique for a digital mammography system and demonstrate the potential for dose reduction in comparison to the clinically established techniques based on screen- film. An objective figure of merit (FOM) was employed to evaluate a direct-conversion amorphous selenium (a-Se) FFDM system (Siemens Mammomat Novation{sup DR}, Siemens AG Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany) and was derived from the quotient of the squared signal-difference-to-noise ratio to mean glandular dose, for various combinations of technique factors and breast phantom configurations including kilovoltage settings (23-35 kVp), target/filter combinations (Mo-Mo and W-Rh), breast-equivalent plastic in various thicknesses (2-8 cm) and densities (100% adipose, 50% adipose/50% glandular, and 100% glandular), and simulated mass and calcification lesions. When using a W-Rh spectrum, the optimized FOM results for the simulated mass and calcification lesions showed highly consistent trends with kVp for each combination of breast density and thickness. The optimized kVp ranged from 26 kVp for 2 cm 100% adipose breasts to 30 kVp for 8 cm 100% glandular breasts. The use of the optimized W-Rh technique compared to standard Mo-Mo techniques provided dose savings ranging from 9% for 2 cm thick, 100% adipose breasts, to 63% for 6 cm thick, 100% glandular breasts, and for breasts with a 50% adipose/50% glandular composition, from 12% for 2 cm thick breasts up to 57% for 8 cm thick breasts.

  5. A Phase I Dose Escalation Study of the Triple Angiokinase Inhibitor Nintedanib Combined with Low-Dose Cytarabine in Elderly Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Schliemann, Christoph; Gerss, Joachim; Wiebe, Stefanie; Mikesch, Jan-Henrik; Knoblauch, Nicola; Sauer, Tim; Angenendt, Linus; Kewitz, Tobias; Urban, Marc; Butterfass-Bahloul, Trude; Edemir, Sabine; Vehring, Kerstin; Müller-Tidow, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Nintedanib (BIBF 1120), a potent multikinase inhibitor of VEGFR-1/-2/-3, FGFR-1/-2/-3 and PDGFR-α/-β, exerts growth inhibitory and pro-apoptotic effects in myeloid leukemic cells, especially when used in combination with cytarabine. This phase I study evaluated nintedanib in combination with low-dose cytarabine (LDAC) in elderly patients with untreated or relapsed/refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) ineligible for intensive chemotherapy in a 3+3 design. Nintedanib (dose levels 100, 150, and 200 mg orally twice daily) and LDAC (20 mg subcutaneous injection twice daily for 10 days) were administered in 28-day cycles. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as non-hematological severe adverse reaction CTC grade ≥ 4 with possible or definite relationship to nintedanib. Between April 2012 and October 2013, 13 patients (median age 73 [range: 62–86] years) were enrolled. One patient did not receive study medication and was replaced. Nine (69%) patients had relapsed or refractory disease and 6 (46%) patients had unfavorable cytogenetics. The most frequently reported treatment-related adverse events (AE) were gastrointestinal events. Twelve SAEs irrespective of relatedness were reported. Two SUSARs were observed, one fatal hypercalcemia and one fatal gastrointestinal infection. Two patients (17%) with relapsed AML achieved a complete remission (one CR, one CRi) and bone marrow blast reductions without fulfilling PR criteria were observed in 3 patients (25%). One-year overall survival was 33%. Nintedanib combined with LDAC shows an adequate safety profile and survival data are promising in a difficult-to-treat patient population. Continuation of this trial with a phase II recommended dose of 2 x 200 mg nintedanib in a randomized, placebo-controlled phase II study is planned. The trial is registered to EudraCT as 2011-001086-41. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01488344 PMID:27716819

  6. Stimulant Reduction Intervention using Dosed Exercise (STRIDE) - CTN 0037: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is a need for novel approaches to the treatment of stimulant abuse and dependence. Clinical data examining the use of exercise as a treatment for the abuse of nicotine, alcohol, and other substances suggest that exercise may be a beneficial treatment for stimulant abuse, with direct effects on decreased use and craving. In addition, exercise has the potential to improve other health domains that may be adversely affected by stimulant use or its treatment, such as sleep disturbance, cognitive function, mood, weight gain, quality of life, and anhedonia, since it has been shown to improve many of these domains in a number of other clinical disorders. Furthermore, neurobiological evidence provides plausible mechanisms by which exercise could positively affect treatment outcomes. The current manuscript presents the rationale, design considerations, and study design of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Clinical Trials Network (CTN) CTN-0037 Stimulant Reduction Intervention using Dosed Exercise (STRIDE) study. Methods/Design STRIDE is a multisite randomized clinical trial that compares exercise to health education as potential treatments for stimulant abuse or dependence. This study will evaluate individuals diagnosed with stimulant abuse or dependence who are receiving treatment in a residential setting. Three hundred and thirty eligible and interested participants who provide informed consent will be randomized to one of two treatment arms: Vigorous Intensity High Dose Exercise Augmentation (DEI) or Health Education Intervention Augmentation (HEI). Both groups will receive TAU (i.e., usual care). The treatment arms are structured such that the quantity of visits is similar to allow for equivalent contact between groups. In both arms, participants will begin with supervised sessions 3 times per week during the 12-week acute phase of the study. Supervised sessions will be conducted as one-on-one (i.e., individual) sessions, although other

  7. Reduction of radiation risks in patients undergoing some X-ray examinations by using optimal projections: A Monte Carlo program-based mathematical calculation.

    PubMed

    Chaparian, A; Kanani, A; Baghbanian, M

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this paper were calculation and comparison of the effective doses, the risks of exposure-induced cancer, and dose reduction in the gonads for male and female patients in different projections of some X-ray examinations. Radiographies of lumbar spine [in the eight projections of anteroposterior (AP), posteroanterior (PA), right lateral (RLAT), left lateral (LLAT), right anterior-posterior oblique (RAO), left anterior-posterior oblique (LAO), right posterior-anterior oblique (RPO), and left posterior-anterior oblique (LPO)], abdomen (in the two projections of AP and PA), and pelvis (in the two projections of AP and PA) were investigated. A solid-state dosimeter was used for the measuring of the entrance skin exposure. A Monte Carlo program was used for calculation of effective doses, the risks of radiation-induced cancer, and doses to the gonads related to the different projections. Results of this study showed that PA projection of abdomen, lumbar spine, and pelvis radiographies caused 50%-57% lower effective doses than AP projection and 50%-60% reduction in radiation risks. Also use of LAO projection of lumbar spine X-ray examination caused 53% lower effective dose than RPO projection and 56% and 63% reduction in radiation risk for male and female, respectively, and RAO projection caused 28% lower effective dose than LPO projection and 52% and 39% reduction in radiation risk for males and females, respectively. About dose reduction in the gonads, using of the PA position rather than AP in the radiographies of the abdomen, lumbar spine, and pelvis can result in reduction of the ovaries doses in women, 38%, 31%, and 25%, respectively and reduction of the testicles doses in males, 76%, 86%, and 94%, respectively. Also for oblique projections of lumbar spine X-ray examination, with employment of LAO rather than RPO and also RAO rather than LPO, demonstrated 22% and 13% reductions to the ovaries doses and 66% and 54% reductions in the testicles doses

  8. A multiscale filter for noise reduction of low-dose cone beam projections.

    PubMed

    Yao, Weiguang; Farr, Jonathan B

    2015-08-21

    The Poisson or compound Poisson process governs the randomness of photon fluence in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging systems. The probability density function depends on the mean (noiseless) of the fluence at a certain detector. This dependence indicates the natural requirement of multiscale filters to smooth noise while preserving structures of the imaged object on the low-dose cone beam projection. In this work, we used a Gaussian filter, exp(-x2/2σ(2)(f)) as the multiscale filter to de-noise the low-dose cone beam projections. We analytically obtained the expression of σ(f), which represents the scale of the filter, by minimizing local noise-to-signal ratio. We analytically derived the variance of residual noise from the Poisson or compound Poisson processes after Gaussian filtering. From the derived analytical form of the variance of residual noise, optimal σ(2)(f)) is proved to be proportional to the noiseless fluence and modulated by local structure strength expressed as the linear fitting error of the structure. A strategy was used to obtain the reliable linear fitting error: smoothing the projection along the longitudinal direction to calculate the linear fitting error along the lateral direction and vice versa. The performance of our multiscale filter was examined on low-dose cone beam projections of a Catphan phantom and a head-and-neck patient. After performing the filter on the Catphan phantom projections scanned with pulse time 4 ms, the number of visible line pairs was similar to that scanned with 16 ms, and the contrast-to-noise ratio of the inserts was higher than that scanned with 16 ms about 64% in average. For the simulated head-and-neck patient projections with pulse time 4 ms, the visibility of soft tissue structures in the patient was comparable to that scanned with 20 ms. The image processing took less than 0.5 s per projection with 1024   ×   768 pixels.

  9. A multiscale filter for noise reduction of low-dose cone beam projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Weiguang; Farr, Jonathan B.

    2015-08-01

    The Poisson or compound Poisson process governs the randomness of photon fluence in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging systems. The probability density function depends on the mean (noiseless) of the fluence at a certain detector. This dependence indicates the natural requirement of multiscale filters to smooth noise while preserving structures of the imaged object on the low-dose cone beam projection. In this work, we used a Gaussian filter, \\text{exp}≤ft(-{{x}2}/2σ f2\\right) as the multiscale filter to de-noise the low-dose cone beam projections. We analytically obtained the expression of {σf} , which represents the scale of the filter, by minimizing local noise-to-signal ratio. We analytically derived the variance of residual noise from the Poisson or compound Poisson processes after Gaussian filtering. From the derived analytical form of the variance of residual noise, optimal σ f2 is proved to be proportional to the noiseless fluence and modulated by local structure strength expressed as the linear fitting error of the structure. A strategy was used to obtain the reliable linear fitting error: smoothing the projection along the longitudinal direction to calculate the linear fitting error along the lateral direction and vice versa. The performance of our multiscale filter was examined on low-dose cone beam projections of a Catphan phantom and a head-and-neck patient. After performing the filter on the Catphan phantom projections scanned with pulse time 4 ms, the number of visible line pairs was similar to that scanned with 16 ms, and the contrast-to-noise ratio of the inserts was higher than that scanned with 16 ms about 64% in average. For the simulated head-and-neck patient projections with pulse time 4 ms, the visibility of soft tissue structures in the patient was comparable to that scanned with 20 ms. The image processing took less than 0.5 s per projection with 1024   ×   768 pixels.

  10. Insular Volume Reduction in Patients with Social Anxiety Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, Akiko; Nemoto, Kiyotaka; Nakaaki, Shutaro; Kawaguchi, Takatsune; Kan, Hirohito; Arai, Nobuyuki; Shiraishi, Nao; Hashimoto, Nobuhiko; Akechi, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that social anxiety disorder (SAD) is highly prevalent, there have been only a few structural imaging studies. Moreover, most of them reported about a volume reduction in amygdale, which plays a key role in the neural function of SAD. Insula is another region of interest. Its hyperactivity in regard to processing negative emotional information or interoceptive awareness has been detected in patients with SAD. Referring to these studies, we hypothesized that insular volumes might reduce in patients with SAD and made a comparison of insular volumes between 13 patients with SAD and 18 healthy controls with matched age and gender using voxel-based morphometry. As a result, we found a significant volume reduction in insula in the SAD group. Our results suggest that the patients with SAD might have an insular volume reduction apart from amygdala. Since insula plays a critical role in the pathology of SAD, more attention should be paid not only to functional study but also morphometrical study of insula. PMID:26834652

  11. Sex differences in nicotine self-administration in rats during progressive unit dose reduction: implications for nicotine regulation policy.

    PubMed

    Grebenstein, Patricia; Burroughs, Danielle; Zhang, Yan; LeSage, Mark G

    2013-12-01

    Reducing the nicotine content in tobacco products is being considered by the FDA as a policy to reduce the addictiveness of tobacco products. Understanding individual differences in response to nicotine reduction will be critical to developing safe and effective policy. Animal and human research demonstrating sex differences in the reinforcing effects of nicotine suggests that males and females may respond differently to nicotine-reduction policies. However, no studies have directly examined sex differences in the effects of nicotine unit-dose reduction on nicotine self-administration (NSA) in animals. The purpose of the present study was to examine this issue in a rodent self-administration model. Male and female rats were trained to self-administer nicotine (0.06mg/kg) under an FR 3 schedule during daily 23h sessions. Rats were then exposed to saline extinction and reacquisition of NSA, followed by weekly reductions in the unit dose (0.03 to 0.00025mg/kg) until extinction levels of responding were achieved. Males and females were compared with respect to baseline levels of intake, resistance to extinction, degree of compensatory increases in responding during dose reduction, and the threshold reinforcing unit dose of nicotine. Exponential demand-curve analysis was also conducted to compare the sensitivity of males and females to increases in the unit price (FR/unit dose) of nicotine (i.e., elasticity of demand or reinforcing efficacy). Females exhibited significantly higher baseline intake and less compensation than males. However, there were no sex differences in the reinforcement threshold or elasticity of demand. Dose-response relationships were very well described by the exponential demand function (r(2) values>0.96 for individual subjects). These findings suggest that females may exhibit less compensatory smoking in response to nicotine reduction policies, even though their nicotine reinforcement threshold and elasticity of demand may not differ from males

  12. Skin-sparing reduction effects of thermoplastics used for patient immobilization in head and neck radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fiorino, C; Cattaneo, G M; Del Vecchio, A; Fusca, M; Longobardi, B; Signorotto, P; Calandrino, R

    1994-03-01

    Skin-sparing benefits derived from the use of megavoltage photon beams can be strongly reduced when filters are inserted between the source and the patient. The use of plastic masks for immobilizing the patient is the most important cause of this reduction in head and neck treatments. The influence of thermoplastics, commercially available for patient immobilization systems (Orfit Raycast (Luxilon Ind. Co.), Posicast (Sinmed bv) and Optimold (WFR Aquaplast Corp.)), on the patient skin dose value has been investigated by using an NE2534 'Markus' chamber. Indicative measurements with moulded masks (carried out with 2-mm Orfit and 3.2-mm Optimold layers) show significant differences between masks moulded with the two thermoplastics.

  13. Patient-Specific Three-Dimensional Concomitant Dose From Cone Beam Computed Tomography Exposure in Image-Guided Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Spezi, Emiliano; Downes, Patrick; Jarvis, Richard; Radu, Emil; Staffurth, John

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to quantify the concomitant dose received by patients undergoing cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanning in different clinical scenarios as a part of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) procedures. Methods and Materials: We calculated the three-dimensional concomitant dose received as a result of CBCT scans in 6 patients representing different clinical scenarios: two pelvis, two head and neck, and two chest. We assessed the effect that a daily on-line IGRT strategy would have on the patient dose distribution, assuming 40 CBCT scans throughout the treatment course. The additional dose to the planning target volume margin region was also estimated. Results: In the pelvis, a single CBCT scan delivered a mean dose to the femoral heads of 2-6 cGy and the rectum of 1-2 cGy. An additional dose to the planning target volume was within 1-3 cGy. In the chest, the mean dose to the planning target volume varied from 2.5 to 5 cGy. The lung and spinal cord planning organ at risk volume received {<=}4 cGy and {<=}5 cGy, respectively. In the head and neck, a single CBCT scan delivered a mean dose of 0.3 cGy, with bony structures receiving 0.5-0.8 cGy. The femoral heads received an additional dose of 1.5-2.5 Gy. A reduction of 20-30% in the mean dose to the organs at risk was achieved using bowtie filtration. In the head and neck, the dose to the eyes and brainstem was eliminated by decreasing the craniocaudal field size. Conclusions: The additional dose from on-line IGRT procedures can be clinically relevant. The organ dose can be significantly reduced with the use of appropriate patient-specific settings. The concomitant dose from CBCT should be accounted for and the acquisition settings optimized for optimal IGRT strategies on a patient basis.

  14. Dose reduction using prior image constrained compressed sensing (DR-PICCS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jie; Thériault Lauzier, Pascal; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2011-03-01

    A technique for dose reduction using prior image constrained compressed sensing (DR-PICCS) in computed tomography (CT) is proposed in this work. In DR-PICCS, a standard FBP reconstructed image is forward projected to get a fully sampled projection data set. Meanwhile, it is low-pass filtered and used as the prior image in the PICCS reconstruction framework. Next, the prior image and the forward projection data are used together by the PICCS algorithm to obtain a low noise DR-PICCS reconstruction, which maintains the spatial resolution of the original FBP images. The spatial resolution of DR-PICCS was studied using a Catphan phantom by MTF measurement. The noise reduction factor, CT number change and noise texture were studied using human subject data consisting of 20 CT colonography exams performed under an IRB-approved protocol. In each human subject study, six ROIs (two soft tissue, two colonic air columns, and two subcutaneous fat) were selected for the CT number and noise measurements study. Skewness and kurtosis were used as figures of merit to indicate the noise texture. A Bland-Altman analysis was performed to study the accuracy of the CT number. The results showed that, compared with FBP reconstructions, the MTF curve shows very little change in DR-PICCS reconstructions, spatial resolution loss is less than 0.1 lp/cm, and the noise standard deviation can be reduced by a factor of 3 with DR-PICCS. The CT numbers in FBP and DR-PICCS reconstructions agree well, which indicates that DR-PICCS does not change CT numbers. The noise textures indicators measured from DR-PICCS images are in a similar range as FBP images.

  15. Alternate-day dosing of linagliptin in type 2 diabetes patients controlled on once daily dose: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Baruah, Manash P.; Bhuyan, Sonali B.; Deka, Jumi; Bora, Jatin; Bora, Smritisikha; Barkakati, Murchana

    2016-01-01

    Linagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP 4) inhibitor with a long terminal half life, significantly inhibits the DPP 4 enzyme at a steady state up to 48 h after the last dose. The present case series examined the hypothesis that linagliptin retains its efficacy during alternate day dosing in type 2 diabetes patients when switched over from once daily (OD) dosing. Eight type 2 diabetes patients maintaining stable glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) with acceptable fasting plasma glucose and postprandial glucose levels and receiving linagliptin 5 mg OD for at least 6 weeks, with a stable dose of concomitant antidiabetic medications were given linagliptin 5 mg every alternate day. The median HbA1c while on the OD regimen was 6.1% (43 mmol/mol) (range: 5.8–6.9% [40–52 mmol/mol]) and median duration of diabetes was 7 years (range: 0.75–16 years). After a median follow-up period of 21weeks,the glycemic control was maintained in all patients similar to their baseline values (median HbA1c: 6.0% [42 mmol/mol], range: 5.1–7.1% [32–54 mmol/mol]). The body weight, fasting, and random glucose levels at baseline were also well maintained at the end of treatment. Optimal glycemic status maintained in our study population favors our hypothesis that linagliptin used alternate daily after switching from initial OD dose of the drug in patients on a stable background antidiabetic medications retains its efficacy. Paradoxically, alternate day dosing may affect compliance if the patient forgets when they took the last dose. Further studies including larger cohorts are needed to validate this finding and identify patients who can benefit from the alternate day regimen. PMID:27366728

  16. Investigation of variance reduction techniques for Monte Carlo photon dose calculation using XVMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawrakow, Iwan; Fippel, Matthias

    2000-08-01

    Several variance reduction techniques, such as photon splitting, electron history repetition, Russian roulette and the use of quasi-random numbers are investigated and shown to significantly improve the efficiency of the recently developed XVMC Monte Carlo code for photon beams in radiation therapy. It is demonstrated that it is possible to further improve the efficiency by optimizing transport parameters such as electron energy cut-off, maximum electron energy step size, photon energy cut-off and a cut-off for kerma approximation, without loss of calculation accuracy. These methods increase the efficiency by a factor of up to 10 compared with the initial XVMC ray-tracing technique or a factor of 50 to 80 compared with EGS4/PRESTA. Therefore, a common treatment plan (6 MV photons, 10×10 cm2 field size, 5 mm voxel resolution, 1% statistical uncertainty) can be calculated within 7 min using a single CPU 500 MHz personal computer. If the requirement on the statistical uncertainty is relaxed to 2%, the calculation time will be less than 2 min. In addition, a technique is presented which allows for the quantitative comparison of Monte Carlo calculated dose distributions and the separation of systematic and statistical errors. Employing this technique it is shown that XVMC calculations agree with EGSnrc on a sub-per cent level for simulations in the energy and material range of interest for radiation therapy.

  17. Sex differences in nicotine self-administration in rats during progressive unit dose reduction: Implications for nicotine regulation policy

    PubMed Central

    Grebenstein, Patricia; Burroughs, Danielle; Zhang, Yan; LeSage, Mark G.

    2013-01-01

    Reducing the nicotine content in tobacco products is being considered by the FDA as a policy to reduce the addictiveness of tobacco products. Understanding individual differences in response to nicotine reduction will be critical to developing safe and effective policy. Animal and human research demonstrating sex differences in the reinforcing effects of nicotine suggests that males and females may respond differently to nicotine-reduction policies. However, no studies have directly examined sex differences in the effects of nicotine unit-dose reduction on nicotine self-administration (NSA) in animals. The purpose of the present study was to examine this issue in a rodent self-administration model. Male and female rats were trained to self-administer nicotine (0.06 mg/kg) under an FR 3 schedule during daily 23 h sessions. Rats were then exposed to saline extinction and reacquisition of NSA, followed by weekly reductions in the unit dose (0.03 to 0.00025 mg/kg) until extinction levels of responding were achieved. Males and females were compared with respect to baseline levels of intake, resistance to extinction, degree of compensatory increases in responding during dose reduction, and the threshold reinforcing unit dose of nicotine. Exponential demand-curve analysis was also conducted to compare the sensitivity of males and females to increases in the unit price (FR/unit dose) of nicotine (i.e., elasticity of demand or reinforcing efficacy). Females exhibited significantly higher baseline intake and less compensation than males. However, there were no sex differences in the reinforcement threshold or elasticity of demand. Dose–response relationships were very well described by the exponential demand function (r2 values > 0.96 for individual subjects). These findings suggest that females may exhibit less compensatory smoking in response to nicotine reduction policies, even though their nicotine reinforcement threshold and elasticity of demand may not differ from

  18. The adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction-V technique for radiation dose reduction in abdominal CT: comparison with the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction technique

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jinhan; Oh, Jongyeong; Kim, Dongwon; Cho, Junghyun; Kim, Sanghyun; Lee, Sangyun; Lee, Jihyun

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether reduced radiation dose abdominal CT images reconstructed with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction V (ASIR-V) compromise the depiction of clinically competent features when compared with the currently used routine radiation dose CT images reconstructed with ASIR. Methods: 27 consecutive patients (mean body mass index: 23.55 kg m−2 underwent CT of the abdomen at two time points. At the first time point, abdominal CT was scanned at 21.45 noise index levels of automatic current modulation at 120 kV. Images were reconstructed with 40% ASIR, the routine protocol of Dong-A University Hospital. At the second time point, follow-up scans were performed at 30 noise index levels. Images were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP), 40% ASIR, 30% ASIR-V, 50% ASIR-V and 70% ASIR-V for the reduced radiation dose. Both quantitative and qualitative analyses of image quality were conducted. The CT dose index was also recorded. Results: At the follow-up study, the mean dose reduction relative to the currently used common radiation dose was 35.37% (range: 19–49%). The overall subjective image quality and diagnostic acceptability of the 50% ASIR-V scores at the reduced radiation dose were nearly identical to those recorded when using the initial routine-dose CT with 40% ASIR. Subjective ratings of the qualitative analysis revealed that of all reduced radiation dose CT series reconstructed, 30% ASIR-V and 50% ASIR-V were associated with higher image quality with lower noise and artefacts as well as good sharpness when compared with 40% ASIR and FBP. However, the sharpness score at 70% ASIR-V was considered to be worse than that at 40% ASIR. Objective image noise for 50% ASIR-V was 34.24% and 46.34% which was lower than 40% ASIR and FBP. Conclusion: Abdominal CT images reconstructed with ASIR-V facilitate radiation dose reductions of to 35% when compared with the ASIR. Advances in knowledge: This study represents the first

  19. Effectiveness of low-dose pasireotide in a patient with Cushing's disease: antiproliferative effect and predictivity of a short pasireotide suppression test.

    PubMed

    Grossrubatscher, Erika; Zampetti, Benedetta; Dalino Ciaramella, Paolo; Doneda, Paola; Loli, Paola

    2015-08-01

    This case shows efficacy of low-dose pasireotide in biochemical and clinical control of severe hypercortisolism and in tumor volume reduction in a patient with an ACTH-secreting macroadenoma. The drug may be an option for long-term treatment in some patients where control of tumor mass is an important clinical endpoint. PMID:26331021

  20. Effectiveness of low-dose pasireotide in a patient with Cushing’s disease: antiproliferative effect and predictivity of a short pasireotide suppression test

    PubMed Central

    Grossrubatscher, Erika; Zampetti, Benedetta; Dalino Ciaramella, Paolo; Doneda, Paola; Loli, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message This case shows efficacy of low-dose pasireotide in biochemical and clinical control of severe hypercortisolism and in tumor volume reduction in a patient with an ACTH-secreting macroadenoma. The drug may be an option for long-term treatment in some patients where control of tumor mass is an important clinical endpoint. PMID:26331021

  1. Effectiveness of low-dose pasireotide in a patient with Cushing's disease: antiproliferative effect and predictivity of a short pasireotide suppression test.

    PubMed

    Grossrubatscher, Erika; Zampetti, Benedetta; Dalino Ciaramella, Paolo; Doneda, Paola; Loli, Paola

    2015-08-01

    This case shows efficacy of low-dose pasireotide in biochemical and clinical control of severe hypercortisolism and in tumor volume reduction in a patient with an ACTH-secreting macroadenoma. The drug may be an option for long-term treatment in some patients where control of tumor mass is an important clinical endpoint.

  2. [State of the art and future trends in technology for computed tomography dose reduction].

    PubMed

    Calzado Cantera, A; Hernández-Girón, I; Salvadó Artells, M; Rodríguez González, R

    2013-12-01

    The introduction of helical and multislice acquisitions in CT scanners together with decreased image reconstruction times has had a tremendous impact on radiological practice. Technological developments in the last 10 to 12 years have enabled very high quality images to be obtained in a very short time. Improved image quality has led to an increase in the number of indications for CT. In parallel to this development, radiation exposure in patients has increased considerably. Concern about the potential health risks posed by CT imaging, reflected in diverse initiatives and actions by official organs and scientific societies, has prompted the search for ways to reduce radiation exposure in patients without compromising diagnostic efficacy. To this end, good practice guidelines have been established, special applications have been developed for scanners, and research has been undertaken to optimize the clinical use of CT. Noteworthy technical developments incorporated in scanners include the different modes of X-ray tube current modulation, automatic selection of voltage settings, selective organ protection, adaptive collimation, and iterative reconstruction. The appropriate use of these tools to reduce radiation doses requires thorough knowledge of how they work. PMID:24211196

  3. [State of the art and future trends in technology for computed tomography dose reduction].

    PubMed

    Calzado Cantera, A; Hernández-Girón, I; Salvadó Artells, M; Rodríguez González, R

    2013-12-01

    The introduction of helical and multislice acquisitions in CT scanners together with decreased image reconstruction times has had a tremendous impact on radiological practice. Technological developments in the last 10 to 12 years have enabled very high quality images to be obtained in a very short time. Improved image quality has led to an increase in the number of indications for CT. In parallel to this development, radiation exposure in patients has increased considerably. Concern about the potential health risks posed by CT imaging, reflected in diverse initiatives and actions by official organs and scientific societies, has prompted the search for ways to reduce radiation exposure in patients without compromising diagnostic efficacy. To this end, good practice guidelines have been established, special applications have been developed for scanners, and research has been undertaken to optimize the clinical use of CT. Noteworthy technical developments incorporated in scanners include the different modes of X-ray tube current modulation, automatic selection of voltage settings, selective organ protection, adaptive collimation, and iterative reconstruction. The appropriate use of these tools to reduce radiation doses requires thorough knowledge of how they work.

  4. Application of time sampling in brain CT perfusion imaging for dose reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. H.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. G.; Park, S. J.; Im, Jung Gi

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine a stable sampling rate not to be affected by sampling shift for reducing radiation exposure with time sampling and interpolation in cerebral perfusion CT examination. Original images were obtained every 1 second for 40 time series from 3 patients, respectively. Time sampling was performed with sampling intervals (SI) from 2 to 10 seconds. Sampling shift was applied from +1 to SI-1 for each sampling rate. For each patient, 30 tissue concentration time-course data were collected, and arterial input curves were fitted by gamma-variate function. The sinc function was introduced for interpolation. Deconvolution analysis based on SVD was performed for quantifying perfusion parameters. The perfusion values through time-varying sampling and interpolation were statistically compared with the original perfusion values. The mean CBF values with increase of sampling interval and shift magnitude from the collected data had a wider fluctuation pattern centering around the original mean CBF. The mean CBV values had a similar tendency to the mean CBF values, but a relatively narrower deviation. The mean MTT values were fluctuated reversely to the trend of the mean CBF values. The stable sampling interval for quantifying perfusion parameters with lower radiation exposure was statistically acceptable up to 4 seconds. These results indicate that sampling shift limits sampling rate for acquiring acceptable perfusion values. This study will help in selecting more reasonable sampling rate for low-radiation-dose CT examination.

  5. Effects of low-dose tacrolimus therapy in combination with methotrexate in patients with methotrexate-refractory rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Isozaki, Takeo; Sato, Michihito; Takahashi, Ryo; Wakabayashi, Kuninobu; Yajima, Nobuyuki; Miwa, Yusuke; Negishi, Masao; Ide, Hirotsugu; Kasama, Tsuyoshi

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present clinical trial was to determine the efficacy and safety of low-dose administration of tacrolimus in combination with methotrexate (MTX) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with an insufficient clinical response to MTX alone. Eleven patients with active RA, despite treatment with MTX, were enrolled and given tacrolimus in combination with MTX for 24 weeks. The primary endpoint was the assessment of clinical improvement using the European League against Rheumatism criteria. Administration of tacrolimus to RA patients with an insufficient response to MTX produced significant improvement in the Disease Activity Score 28 after 8–24 weeks. In addition, after 24 weeks, 50% and 25% of patients had achieved moderate and good responses, respectively, and there were significant reductions in the Modified Health Assessment Questionnaire, the rheumatoid factor and serum matrix metalloproteinase-3 levels. The present preliminary study suggests that low-dose tacrolimus in combination with MTX is well tolerated and provides both clinical and economic benefits.

  6. Local-Reference Patient Dose Evaluation in Conventional Radiography Examinations in Mazandaran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Khoshdel-Navi, D.; Shabestani-Monfared, A.; Deevband, M. R.; Abdi, R.; Nabahati, M.

    2016-01-01

    quality while reduction of patient dose. PMID:27672626

  7. Local-Reference Patient Dose Evaluation in Conventional Radiography Examinations in Mazandaran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Khoshdel-Navi, D.; Shabestani-Monfared, A.; Deevband, M. R.; Abdi, R.; Nabahati, M.

    2016-01-01

    quality while reduction of patient dose.

  8. Four-Dimensional Patient Dose Reconstruction for Scanned Ion Beam Therapy of Moving Liver Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, Daniel; Saito, Nami; Chaudhri, Naved; Härtig, Martin; Ellerbrock, Malte; Jäkel, Oliver; Combs, Stephanie E.; Habermehl, Daniel; Herfarth, Klaus; Durante, Marco; Bert, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: Estimation of the actual delivered 4-dimensional (4D) dose in treatments of patients with mobile hepatocellular cancer with scanned carbon ion beam therapy. Methods and Materials: Six patients were treated with 4 fractions to a total relative biological effectiveness (RBE)–weighted dose of 40 Gy (RBE) using a single field. Respiratory motion was addressed by dedicated margins and abdominal compression (5 patients) or gating (1 patient). 4D treatment dose reconstructions based on the treatment records and the measured motion monitoring data were performed for the single-fraction dose and a total of 17 fractions. To assess the impact of uncertainties in the temporal correlation between motion trajectory and beam delivery sequence, 3 dose distributions for varying temporal correlation were calculated per fraction. For 3 patients, the total treatment dose was formed from the fractional distributions using all possible combinations. Clinical target volume (CTV) coverage was analyzed using the volumes receiving at least 95% (V{sub 95}) and 107% (V{sub 107}) of the planned doses. Results: 4D dose reconstruction based on daily measured data is possible in a clinical setting. V{sub 95} and V{sub 107} values for the single fractions ranged between 72% and 100%, and 0% and 32%, respectively. The estimated total treatment dose to the CTV exhibited improved and more robust dose coverage (mean V{sub 95} > 87%, SD < 3%) and overdose (mean V{sub 107} < 4%, SD < 3%) with respect to the single-fraction dose for all analyzed patients. Conclusions: A considerable impact of interplay effects on the single-fraction CTV dose was found for most of the analyzed patients. However, due to the fractionated treatment, dose heterogeneities were substantially reduced for the total treatment dose. 4D treatment dose reconstruction for scanned ion beam therapy is technically feasible and may evolve into a valuable tool for dose assessment.

  9. Curtailing patient-specific IMRT QA procedures from 2D dose error distribution

    PubMed Central

    Kurosu, Keita; Sumida, Iori; Mizuno, Hirokazu; Otani, Yuki; Oda, Michio; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Seo, Yuji; Suzuki, Osamu; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    A patient-specific quality assurance (QA) test is conducted to verify the accuracy of dose delivery. It generally consists of three verification processes: the absolute point dose difference, the planar dose differences at each gantry angle, and the planar dose differences by 3D composite irradiation. However, this imposes a substantial workload on medical physicists. The objective of this study was to determine whether our novel method that predicts the 3D delivered dose allows certain patient-specific IMRT QAs to be curtailed. The object was IMRT QA for the pelvic region with regard to point dose and composite planar dose differences. We compared measured doses, doses calculated in the treatment planning system, and doses predicted by in-house software. The 3D predicted dose was reconstructed from the per-field measurement by incorporating the relative dose error distribution into the original dose grid of each beam. All point dose differences between the measured and the calculated dose were within ±3%, whereas 93.3% of them between the predicted and the calculated dose were within ±3%. As for planar dose differences, the gamma passing rates between the calculated and the predicted dose were higher than those between the calculated and the measured dose. Comparison and statistical analysis revealed a correlation between the predicted and the measured dose with regard to both point dose and planar dose differences. We concluded that the prediction-based approach is an accurate substitute for the conventional measurement-based approach in IMRT QA for the pelvic region. Our novel approach will help medical physicists save time on IMRT QA. PMID:26661854

  10. Effects of shielding the radiosensitive superficial organs of ORNL pediatric phantoms on dose reduction in computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Akhlaghi, Parisa; Miri-Hakimabad, Hashem; Rafat-Motavalli, Laleh

    2014-01-01

    In computed tomography (CT), some superficial organs which have increased sensitivity to radiation, receive doses that are significant enough to be matter of concern. Therefore, in this study, the effects of using shields on the amount of dose reduction and image quality was investigated for pediatric imaging. Absorbed doses of breasts, eyes, thyroid and testes of a series of pediatric phantoms without and with different thickness of bismuth and lead were calculated by Monte Carlo simulation. Appropriate thicknesses of shields were chosen based on their weights, X-ray spectrum, and the amount of dose reduction. In addition, the effect of lead shield on image quality of a simple phantom was assessed quantitatively using region of interest (ROI) measurements. Considering the maximum reduction in absorbed doses and X-ray spectrum, using a lead shield with a maximum thickness of 0.4 mm would be appropriate for testes and thyroid and two other organs (which are exposed directly) should be protected with thinner shields. Moreover, the image quality assessment showed that lead was associated with significant increases in both noise and CT attenuation values, especially in the anterior of the phantom. Overall, the results suggested that shielding is a useful optimization tool in CT. PMID:25525312

  11. Occupational dose reduction at nuclear power plants: Annotated bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA: Volume 4

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.

    1989-06-01

    This report is the fourth in the series of bibliographies supporting the efforts at the Brookhaven National Laboratory on dose reduction at nuclear power plants. Abstracts for this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings, journals, research reports and searches of the DOE's Energy Data Base. The abstracts included in this report to operational health physics as well as other subjects which have a bearing on dose reduction at nuclear power plants, such as stress corrosion, cracking, plant chemistry, use of robotics and remote devices, etc. Material on improved design, materials selection, planning and other topics which are related to dose reduction efforts are also included. The report contains 327 abstracts as well as subject and author indices. All information in the current volume is also available from the ALARA Center's bulletin board service which is accessible by personal computers with the help of a modem. The last section of the report explains the features of the bulletin board. The bulletin board will be kept up-to-date with new information and should be of help in keeping people current in the area of dose reduction.

  12. Computational assessment of effective dose and patient specific doses for kilovoltage stereotactic radiosurgery of wet age-related macular degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanlon, Justin Mitchell

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of vision loss and a major health problem for people over the age of 50 in industrialized nations. The current standard of care, ranibizumab, is used to help slow and in some cases stabilize the process of AMD, but requires frequent invasive injections into the eye. Interest continues for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), an option that provides a non-invasive treatment for the wet form of AMD, through the development of the IRay(TM) (Oraya Therapeutics, Inc., Newark, CA). The goal of this modality is to destroy choroidal neovascularization beneath the pigment epithelium via delivery of three 100 kVp photon beams entering through the sclera and overlapping on the macula delivering up to 24 Gy of therapeutic dose over a span of approximately 5 minutes. The divergent x-ray beams targeting the fovea are robotically positioned and the eye is gently immobilized by a suction-enabled contact lens. Device development requires assessment of patient effective dose, reference patient mean absorbed doses to radiosensitive tissues, and patient specific doses to the lens and optic nerve. A series of head phantoms, including both reference and patient specific, was derived from CT data and employed in conjunction with the MCNPX 2.5.0 radiation transport code to simulate treatment and evaluate absorbed doses to potential tissues-at-risk. The reference phantoms were used to evaluate effective dose and mean absorbed doses to several radiosensitive tissues. The optic nerve was modeled with changeable positions based on individual patient variability seen in a review of head CT scans gathered. Patient specific phantoms were used to determine the effect of varying anatomy and gaze. The results showed that absorbed doses to the non-targeted tissues were below the threshold levels for serious complications; specifically the development of radiogenic cataracts and radiation induced optic neuropathy (RON). The effective dose

  13. The Study of External Dose Rate and Retained Body Activity of Patients Receiving 131I Therapy for Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiying; Jiao, Ling; Cui, Songye; Wang, Liang; Tan, Jian; Zhang, Guizhi; He, Yajing; Ruan, Shuzhou; Fan, Saijun; Zhang, Wenyi

    2014-01-01

    Radiation safety is an integral part of targeted radionuclide therapy. The aim of this work was to study the external dose rate and retained body activity as functions of time in differentiated thyroid carcinoma patients receiving 131I therapy. Seventy patients were stratified into two groups: the ablation group (A) and the follow-up group (FU). The patients’ external dose rate was measured, and simultaneously, their retained body radiation activity was monitored at various time points. The equations of the external dose rate and the retained body activity, described as a function of hours post administration, were fitted. Additionally, the release time for patients was calculated. The reduction in activity in the group receiving a second or subsequent treatment was more rapid than the group receiving only the initial treatment. Most important, an expeditious method was established to indirectly evaluate the retained body activity of patients by measuring the external dose rate with a portable radiation survey meter. By this method, the calculated external dose rate limits are 19.2, 8.85, 5.08 and 2.32 μSv·h−1 at 1, 1.5, 2 and 3 m, respectively, according to a patient’s released threshold level of retained body activity <400 MBq. This study is beneficial for radiation safety decision-making. PMID:25337944

  14. The Effect of Significant Tumor Reduction on the Dose Distribution in Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Head-And-Neck Cancer: A Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Mechalakos, James Lee, Nancy; Hunt, Margie; Ling, C. Clifton; Amols, Howard I.

    2009-10-01

    We present a unique case in which a patient with significant tissue loss was monitored for dosimetric changes using weekly cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. A previously treated nasopharynx patient presented with a large, exophytic, recurrent left neck mass. The patient underwent re-irradiation to 70 Gy using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with shielding blocks over the spinal cord and brain stem. Weekly CBCT scans were acquired during treatment. Target contours and treatment fields were then transferred from the original treatment planning computed tomography (CT) to the CBCT scans and dose calculations were performed on all CBCT scans and compared to the planning doses. In addition, a 'research' treatment plan was created that assumed the patient had not been previously treated, and the above analysis was repeated. Finally, to remove the effects of setup error, the outer contours of 2 CBCT scans with significant tumor reductions were transferred to the planning scan and dose in the planning scan was recalculated. Planning treatment volume (PTV) decreased 45% during treatment. Spinal cord D05 differed from the planned value by 3.5 {+-} 9.8% (average + standard deviation). Mean dose to the oral cavity and D05 of the mandible differed from the planned value by 0.9 {+-} 2.1% and 0.6 {+-} 1.5%, respectively. Results for the research plan were comparable. Target coverage did not change appreciably (-0.2 {+-} 2.5%). When the planning scan was recalculated with the reduced outer contour from the CBCT, spinal cord D05 decreased slightly due to the reduction in scattered dose. Weekly imaging provided us the unique opportunity to use different methods to examine the dosimetric effects of an unusually large loss of tissue. We did not see that tissue loss alone resulted in a significant effect on the dose delivered to the spinal cord for this case, as most fluctuation was due to setup error. In the IGRT era, delivered dose distributions can be more

  15. Optimal dose of gemcitabine for the treatment of biliary tract or pancreatic cancer in patients with liver dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Takashi; Ebata, Tomoki; Fujita, Ken-ichi; Shimokata, Tomoya; Maeda, Osamu; Mitsuma, Ayako; Sasaki, Yasutsuna; Nagino, Masato; Ando, Yuichi

    2016-02-01

    A clear consensus does not exist about whether the initial dose of gemcitabine, an essential anticancer antimetabolite, should be reduced in patients with liver dysfunction. Adult patients with biliary tract or pancreatic cancer were divided into three groups according to whether they had mild, moderate, or severe liver dysfunction, evaluated on the basis of serum bilirubin and liver transaminase levels at baseline. As anticancer treatment, gemcitabine at a dose of 800 or 1000 mg/m(2) was given as an i.v. infusion once weekly for 3 weeks of a 4-week cycle. The patients were prospectively evaluated for adverse events during the first cycle, and the pharmacokinetics of gemcitabine and its inactive metabolite, difluorodeoxyuridine, were studied to determine the optimal initial dose of gemcitabine as monotherapy according to the severity of liver dysfunction. A total of 15 patients were studied. Liver dysfunction was mild in one patient, moderate in six, and severe in eight. All 15 patients had been undergoing biliary drainage for obstructive jaundice when they received gemcitabine. Grade 3 cholangitis developed in one patient with moderate liver dysfunction who received gemcitabine at the dose level of 1000 mg/m(2). No other patients had severe treatment-related adverse events resulting in the omission or discontinuation of gemcitabine treatment. The plasma concentrations of gemcitabine and difluorodeoxyuridine were similar among the groups. An initial dose reduction of gemcitabine as monotherapy for the treatment of biliary tract or pancreatic cancers is not necessary for patients with hyperbilirubinemia, provided that obstructive jaundice is well managed. (Clinical trial registration no. UMIN000005363.)

  16. A Multi-institutional Clinical Trial of Rectal Dose Reduction via Injected Polyethylene-Glycol Hydrogel During Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer: Analysis of Dosimetric Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Danny Y.; Herfarth, Klaus K.; Uhl, Matthias; Eble, Michael J.; Pinkawa, Michael; Triest, Baukelien van; Kalisvaart, Robin; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Ford, Eric C.

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To characterize the effect of a prostate-rectum spacer on dose to rectum during external beam radiation therapy for prostate cancer and to assess for factors correlated with rectal dose reduction. Methods and Materials: Fifty-two patients at 4 institutions were enrolled into a prospective pilot clinical trial. Patients underwent baseline scans and then were injected with perirectal spacing hydrogel and rescanned. Intensity modulated radiation therapy plans were created on both scans for comparison. The objectives were to establish rates of creation of ≥7.5 mm of prostate-rectal separation, and decrease in rectal V70 of ≥25%. Multiple regression analysis was performed to evaluate the associations between preinjection and postinjection changes in rectal V70 and changes in plan conformity, rectal volume, bladder volume, bladder V70, planning target volume (PTV), and postinjection midgland separation, gel volume, gel thickness, length of PTV/gel contact, and gel left-to-right symmetry. Results: Hydrogel resulted in ≥7.5-mm prostate-rectal separation in 95.8% of patients; 95.7% had decreased rectal V70 of ≥25%, with a mean reduction of 8.0 Gy. There were no significant differences in preinjection and postinjection prostate, PTV, rectal, and bladder volumes. Plan conformities were significantly different before versus after injection (P=.02); plans with worse conformity indexes after injection compared with before injection (n=13) still had improvements in rectal V70. In multiple regression analysis, greater postinjection reduction in V70 was associated with decreased relative postinjection plan conformity (P=.01). Reductions in V70 did not significantly vary by institution, despite significant interinstitutional variations in plan conformity. There were no significant relationships between reduction in V70 and the other characteristics analyzed. Conclusions: Injection of hydrogel into the prostate-rectal interface resulted in dose reductions to rectum

  17. Can reduction mammoplasty patients be promised a particular size postoperatively?

    PubMed

    Dal Cin, Arianna; Jeans, Elizabeth Rose

    2005-01-01

    This retrospective study used self-reported bra sizes, heights and weights pre- and postoperatively in patients who underwent reduction mammoplasty by one surgeon between 2001 and 2003. Preoperative data were collected on 91 patients. Postoperative data were collected from 69 respondents by telephone survey. Bra sizes were standardized according to cup size. In bra-making, the cup is the same size for decreasing cup letter size as the band size increases. The most common standardized cup size was seven, representing bra sizes 34 F, 36 E, 38 D, 40 C, etc. The range of preoperative cup sizes was five (34 D) to 17 (42 L). The mass of tissue removed from each breast was averaged for each patient and ranged from 147 g to 2453 g (mean 522 g). The average body mass index was 29.6 kg/m(2) preoperatively and 29.3 kg/m(2) postoperatively, with six patients reporting weight gain, 13 reporting weight loss and 50 reporting no change at all. Postoperative standardized cup sizes ranged from five (34 D) to 14 (44 H). The difference between pre- and postoperative cup size ranged from zero to eight as follows: for no cup size change (n=17), mean tissue removed per breast was 577.1 g; decrease by one cup size (n=23), 489.2 g; decrease by two cup sizes (n=25), 425.8 g. These data indicate that when self-reported data from patients are used, a plastic surgeon may find that as many as 25% report no change in bra size after reduction mammoplasty, even when more than 500 g of tissue is removed from each breast, which may adversely affect patients' satisfaction with the surgical results. Future studies will determine the cause of the apparent discrepancy between operative and self-reported results.

  18. Dose-Dependent Effect of Granulocyte Transfusions in Hematological Patients with Febrile Neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Teofili, Luciana; Valentini, Caterina Giovanna; Di Blasi, Roberta; Orlando, Nicoletta; Fianchi, Luana; Zini, Gina; Sica, Simona; De Stefano, Valerio; Pagano, Livio

    2016-01-01

    It is still under debate whether granulocyte transfusions (GTs) substantially increase survival in patients with febrile neutropenia. We retrospectively examined data relative to 96 patients with hematological malignancies receiving 491 GTs during 114 infectious episodes (IE). Patients were grouped according to the median doses of granulocytes transfused during the infectious episode (low-dose group: <1.5-x108 cells/Kg; standard-dose group: 1.5-3.0x108 cells/Kg and high-dose group: >3.0x108 cells/Kg). The impact of clinical, microbiological and GT-related variables on the infection-related mortality (IRM) was investigated. The IRM was not influenced by the number of GTs or by the total amount of granulocytes received, whereas a dose-related effect of the median dose received for IE was detected at univariate analysis (IRM of 18.4% in the standard-dose group, 44.4% in the low-dose group and 48.4% in the high-dose group, p = 0.040) and confirmed at multivariate analysis (OR 3.7, IC 95% 1.5-8.9; 0.004 for patients not receiving standard doses of GTs). Moreover, patients receiving GTs at doses lower or greater than standard had increased risk for subsequent ICU admission and reduced overall survival. The dose-related effect of GTs was confirmed in bacterial but not in fungal infections. Preliminary findings obtained from a subgroup of patients candidate to GTs revealed that levels of inflammatory response mediators increase in a dose-related manner after GTs, providing a possible explanation for the detrimental effect exerted by high-dose transfusions. GTs can constitute a valuable tool to improve the outcome of infections in neutropenic patients, provided that adequate recipient-tailored doses are supplied. Further investigations of the immunomodulatory effects of GTs are recommended. PMID:27487075

  19. Dose-Dependent Effect of Granulocyte Transfusions in Hematological Patients with Febrile Neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Di Blasi, Roberta; Orlando, Nicoletta; Fianchi, Luana; Zini, Gina; Sica, Simona; De Stefano, Valerio; Pagano, Livio

    2016-01-01

    It is still under debate whether granulocyte transfusions (GTs) substantially increase survival in patients with febrile neutropenia. We retrospectively examined data relative to 96 patients with hematological malignancies receiving 491 GTs during 114 infectious episodes (IE). Patients were grouped according to the median doses of granulocytes transfused during the infectious episode (low-dose group: <1.5-x108 cells/Kg; standard-dose group: 1.5–3.0x108 cells/Kg and high-dose group: >3.0x108 cells/Kg). The impact of clinical, microbiological and GT-related variables on the infection-related mortality (IRM) was investigated. The IRM was not influenced by the number of GTs or by the total amount of granulocytes received, whereas a dose-related effect of the median dose received for IE was detected at univariate analysis (IRM of 18.4% in the standard-dose group, 44.4% in the low-dose group and 48.4% in the high-dose group, p = 0.040) and confirmed at multivariate analysis (OR 3.7, IC 95% 1.5–8.9; 0.004 for patients not receiving standard doses of GTs). Moreover, patients receiving GTs at doses lower or greater than standard had increased risk for subsequent ICU admission and reduced overall survival. The dose-related effect of GTs was confirmed in bacterial but not in fungal infections. Preliminary findings obtained from a subgroup of patients candidate to GTs revealed that levels of inflammatory response mediators increase in a dose-related manner after GTs, providing a possible explanation for the detrimental effect exerted by high-dose transfusions. GTs can constitute a valuable tool to improve the outcome of infections in neutropenic patients, provided that adequate recipient-tailored doses are supplied. Further investigations of the immunomodulatory effects of GTs are recommended. PMID:27487075

  20. Suitability of laser stimulated TLD arrays as patient dose monitors in high dose x-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Geise, R A; Schueler, B A; Lien, W; Jones, S C

    1997-10-01

    Skin entrance doses of patients undergoing interventional x-ray procedures are capable of causing skin damage and should be monitored routinely. Single TLD chips are not suitable because the location of maximum skin exposure cannot be predicted. Most photographic films are too sensitive at diagnostic x-ray energies for dosimetry, exhibit temporal changes in response, and require special packaging by the user. We have investigated the suitability of laser heated MgB4O7 TLDs in a polyimide binder in the range of 0.2-20 Gy. These are available in radioluscent arrays up to 30 x 30 cm for direct measurement of patient skin dose. Dose response was compared with a calibrated ion chamber dosimeter. Exposures were made at 60, 90, and 120 kVp, at low (fluoroscopy) and high (DSA) dose rates, and at different beam incidence angles. Longitudinal reproducibility and response to temperature changes during exposure were also checked. The dose response is linear below approximately 6 Gy where the slope starts to increase 2% per Gy. Errors were less than +/- 2% over a 0-80 degrees range of beam incidence angles; less than +/- 3% for both dose rate variations and kVp differences between 70 and 120 kVp. The response was unaffected by temperature changes between 20 and 37 degrees C. Reproducibility is current +/- 7%. MgB4O7 TLD arrays are suitable for patient dosimetry in high dose fluoroscopy procedures if appropriate calibrations are used. Uncertainty in skin dose measurement is less than 10%, which is substantially better than film dosimetry. PMID:9350720

  1. Practical considerations for dose selection in pediatric patients to ensure target exposure requirements.

    PubMed

    Barbour, April M; Fossler, Michael J; Barrett, Jeffrey

    2014-07-01

    Pediatric dosing recommendations are often not based on allometry, despite recognition that metabolic processes in mammals scale to the ¾ power. This report reviews the allometric size model for clearance and its implications for defining doses for children while considering practical limitations. Fondaparinux exposures in children were predicted using allometric and mg/kg dosing. Additional simulations further refined the dose based on the predicted Cmax, target exposure range, complexity of the dosing regimen, and previous exposure/response data. The percent reduction of the adult dose of an oral lozenge fixed-dose formulation which would predict similar exposures in children and adults was recommended based on simulations. Allometric dosing predicted a consistent fondaparinux exposure across the weight range. Size-optimized mg/kg dosing, which partially approximates the allometric relationship, allows for consistent fondaparinux exposures (i.e., 0.12 mg/kg ≤35 kg or 0.1 mg/kg >35 kg). Simulations of the oral lozenge formulation demonstrated rapidly changing clearance in children less than 6 years prohibiting practical dosing recommendations for satisfying all conventional exposure metrics (Cmax and AUC) in this age group. In children between 13 and 18 or 6 and 13 years, a 8.6% and 54% reduction in dose would maintain target exposures but dose reductions of 12.5% or 62.5% were ultimately recommended as deemed manufacturable. Dose selection in children should consider the known and/or predicted covariate relationships which affect exposure. Presented examples applied the allometric model in dose selection with the goal of PK bridging and considered practical limitations in dose selection. PMID:24841797

  2. Effective Dose from Stray Radiation for a Patient Receiving Proton Therapy for Liver Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddei, Phillip J.; Krishnan, Sunil; Mirkovic, Dragan; Yepes, Pablo; Newhauser, Wayne D.

    2009-03-01

    Because of its advantageous depth-dose relationship, proton radiotherapy is an emerging treatment modality for patients with liver cancer. Although the proton dose distribution conforms to the target, healthy tissues throughout the body receive low doses of stray radiation, particularly neutrons that originate in the treatment unit or in the patient. The aim of this study was to calculate the effective dose from stray radiation and estimate the corresponding risk of second cancer fatality for a patient receiving proton beam therapy for liver cancer. Effective dose from stray radiation was calculated using detailed Monte Carlo simulations of a double-scattering proton therapy treatment unit and a voxelized human phantom. The treatment plan and phantom were based on CT images of an actual adult patient diagnosed with primary hepatocellular carcinoma. For a prescribed dose of 60 Gy to the clinical target volume, the effective dose from stray radiation was 370 mSv; 61% of this dose was from neutrons originating outside of the patient while the remaining 39% was from neutrons originating within the patient. The excess lifetime risk of fatal second cancer corresponding to the total effective dose from stray radiation was 1.2%. The results of this study establish a baseline estimate of the stray radiation dose and corresponding risk for an adult patient undergoing proton radiotherapy for liver cancer and provide new evidence to corroborate the suitability of proton beam therapy for the treatment of liver tumors.

  3. Effect of low dose nicotinic acid on hyperphosphatemia in patients with end stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Zahed, N. S.; Zamanifar, N.; Nikbakht, H.

    2016-01-01

    Hyperphosphatemia is a risk factor for ectopic calcification and coronary artery diseases in end stage renal diseases (ESRD). The aim of this study was to assess the effect of low-dose nicotinic acid on hyperphosphatemia in patients with ESRD. This randomized, double-blind clinical trial was done on 70 ESRD patients with serum phosphoure ≥5.5 mg/dl. Patients were randomly divided into two equal groups (n = 35) and the intervention group received niacin 25 mg/day as the initial dose. After 4 weeks, in patients who did not respond to treatment, niacin dose was increased up to 50 mg/dl. At the end of week 8, in case there was no treatment effect, the dose was raised to 100 mg/day. The appropriate response to treatment was defined as serum phosphorous level reductions <5.5 mg/dl. The age was 50.5 ± 14.3 years and duration of dialysis 5.1 ± 5.3 months. In the niacin group, mean phosphorus level decreased from 6.7 ± 0.84 mg/dl at the end of the 1st month to 5.8 ± 1.0 mg/dl at the end of the 2nd month and to 4.4 ± 1.4 mg/dl at the end of the 3rd month (P = 0.004). In the placebo group, mean phosphorus level increased from 6.5 ± 1.2 mg/dl to 7.2 ± 0.91 mg/dl at the end of the 3rd month (P = 0.006). In the niacin group, high density lipoprotein (HDL) increased significantly from 45.00 ± 14.9 to 47.2 ± 11.6 (P = 0.009). We conclude that niacin (100 mg/day) decreased phosphorus serum level and increased HDL serum level in patients on dialysis. PMID:27512294

  4. Effect of low dose nicotinic acid on hyperphosphatemia in patients with end stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Zahed, N S; Zamanifar, N; Nikbakht, H

    2016-01-01

    Hyperphosphatemia is a risk factor for ectopic calcification and coronary artery diseases in end stage renal diseases (ESRD). The aim of this study was to assess the effect of low-dose nicotinic acid on hyperphosphatemia in patients with ESRD. This randomized, double-blind clinical trial was done on 70 ESRD patients with serum phosphoure ≥5.5 mg/dl. Patients were randomly divided into two equal groups (n = 35) and the intervention group received niacin 25 mg/day as the initial dose. After 4 weeks, in patients who did not respond to treatment, niacin dose was increased up to 50 mg/dl. At the end of week 8, in case there was no treatment effect, the dose was raised to 100 mg/day. The appropriate response to treatment was defined as serum phosphorous level reductions <5.5 mg/dl. The age was 50.5 ± 14.3 years and duration of dialysis 5.1 ± 5.3 months. In the niacin group, mean phosphorus level decreased from 6.7 ± 0.84 mg/dl at the end of the 1(st) month to 5.8 ± 1.0 mg/dl at the end of the 2(nd) month and to 4.4 ± 1.4 mg/dl at the end of the 3(rd) month (P = 0.004). In the placebo group, mean phosphorus level increased from 6.5 ± 1.2 mg/dl to 7.2 ± 0.91 mg/dl at the end of the 3(rd) month (P = 0.006). In the niacin group, high density lipoprotein (HDL) increased significantly from 45.00 ± 14.9 to 47.2 ± 11.6 (P = 0.009). We conclude that niacin (100 mg/day) decreased phosphorus serum level and increased HDL serum level in patients on dialysis. PMID:27512294

  5. Do atypical antipsychotics really enhance smoking reduction more than typical ones?: the effects of antipsychotics on smoking reduction in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bo-Jian; Chen, Hsing-Kang; Lee, Shin-Min

    2013-06-01

    Whether atypical antipsychotics (AAs) can enhance smoking reduction in schizophrenic patients remains controversial because of methodological limitations in existing studies. This study explored whether certain types of antipsychotics predict smoking reduction in schizophrenic patients. Three hundred eight smoking, predominantly male schizophrenic patients (271/308 [88.9%]) participated in an 8-week open-label study with antismoking medications (high-dose, low-dose nicotine transdermal patch and bupropion). Antipsychotics were classified into (1) typical antipsychotics (TAs) and (2) AAs, including multiacting receptor-targeted antipsychotics (clozapine, olanzapine, and quetiapine), serotonin-dopamine antagonists (risperidone), D2/D3 receptor antagonists (amisulpride), and partial dopamine receptor agonists (aripiprazole). A general linear model was used to explore whether types of antipsychotic predict changes in the number of cigarettes smoked per day (CPD) and the score of the Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND) while controlling for confounding factors. The type of antipsychotic (TAs or AAs) was not significantly associated with smoking cessation (n = 21; χ = 1.8; df = 4; P = 0.77). Regarding smoking reduction, the type of antipsychotic was significantly predictive of a change in the CPD (P = 0.027; partial eta square = 0.055) and FTND scores (P = 0.002; partial eta square = 0.073). The 95% confidence intervals of the estimated means of change in the CPD and FTND scores did not contain zero only among subjects on TAs or clozapine.These findings suggest that TAs and clozapine enhance smoking reduction compared with nonclozapine atypical antipsychotics in schizophrenic patients. The mechanisms underlying the effects of various antipsychotics on smoking reduction remain unclear and warrant future study.

  6. The Impact of Different Levels of Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction 3D on Image Quality of 320-Row Coronary CT Angiography: A Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Feger, Sarah; Rief, Matthias; Zimmermann, Elke; Martus, Peter; Schuijf, Joanne Désirée; Blobel, Jörg; Richter, Felicitas; Dewey, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was the systematic image quality evaluation of coronary CT angiography (CTA), reconstructed with the 3 different levels of adaptive iterative dose reduction (AIDR 3D) and compared to filtered back projection (FBP) with quantum denoising software (QDS). Methods Standard-dose CTA raw data of 30 patients with mean radiation dose of 3.2 ± 2.6 mSv were reconstructed using AIDR 3D mild, standard, strong and compared to FBP/QDS. Objective image quality comparison (signal, noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), contour sharpness) was performed using 21 measurement points per patient, including measurements in each coronary artery from proximal to distal. Results Objective image quality parameters improved with increasing levels of AIDR 3D. Noise was lowest in AIDR 3D strong (p≤0.001 at 20/21 measurement points; compared with FBP/QDS). Signal and contour sharpness analysis showed no significant difference between the reconstruction algorithms for most measurement points. Best coronary SNR and CNR were achieved with AIDR 3D strong. No loss of SNR or CNR in distal segments was seen with AIDR 3D as compared to FBP. Conclusions On standard-dose coronary CTA images, AIDR 3D strong showed higher objective image quality than FBP/QDS without reducing contour sharpness. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00967876 PMID:25945924

  7. Pharmacodynamic effects of standard dose prasugrel versus high dose clopidogrel in non-diabetic obese patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Darlington, Andrew; Tello-Montoliu, Antonio; Rollini, Fabiana; Ueno, Masafumi; Ferreiro, José Luis; Patel, Ronakkumar; Desai, Bhaloo; Guzman, Luis A; Bass, Theodore A; Angiolillo, Dominick J

    2014-02-01

    Increased body weight is independently associated with impaired clopidogrel pharmacodynamic (PD) response. Prasugrel has more potent PD effects compared with clopidogrel, although its PD effects in obese patients are unknown. The aim of this prospective, randomised, study was to compare the PD effects of standard-dose prasugrel [60 mg loading dose (LD)/10 mg daily maintenance dose (MD)] with high-dose clopidogrel (900 mg LD/150 mg daily MD) in non-diabetic obese [body mass index (BMI) ≥30 kg/m²] patients, with coronary artery disease (CAD) on aspirin therapy. PD assessments (baseline, 2 hours post-LD and 6 ± 2 days after MD) were conducted using four platelet function assays, and the platelet reactivity index (PRI) assessed by VASP was used for sample size estimation. A total of 42 patients with a BMI of 36.42 ± 5.6 kg/m² completed the study. There were no differences in baseline PD measures between groups. At 2 hours post-LD, prasugrel was associated with lower PRI compared with clopidogrel (24.3 ± 5.5 vs 58.7 ± 5.7, p≤0.001), with consistent findings for all assays. At one-week, PRI values on prasugrel MD were lower than clopidogrel MD without reaching statistical significance (34.7 ± 5.8 vs 42.9 ± 5.8, p=0.32), with consistent findings for all assays. Accordingly, rates of high on-treatment platelet reactivity were markedly reduced after prasugrel LD, but not after MD. In conclusion, in non-diabetic obese patients with CAD, standard prasugrel dosing achieved more potent PD effects than high-dose clopidogrel in the acute phase of treatment, but this was not sustained during maintenance phase treatment. Whether an intensified prasugrel regimen is required in obese patients warrants investigation.

  8. A spatially encoded dose difference maximal intensity projection map for patient dose evaluation: A new first line patient quality assurance tool

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Weigang; Graff, Pierre; Boettger, Thomas; Pouliot, Jean; and others

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: To develop a spatially encoded dose difference maximal intensity projection (DD-MIP) as an online patient dose evaluation tool for visualizing the dose differences between the planning dose and dose on the treatment day. Methods: Megavoltage cone-beam CT (MVCBCT) images acquired on the treatment day are used for generating the dose difference index. Each index is represented by different colors for underdose, acceptable, and overdose regions. A maximal intensity projection (MIP) algorithm is developed to compress all the information of an arbitrary 3D dose difference index into a 2D DD-MIP image. In such an algorithm, a distance transformation is generated based on the planning CT. Then, two new volumes representing the overdose and underdose regions of the dose difference index are encoded with the distance transformation map. The distance-encoded indices of each volume are normalized using the skin distance obtained on the planning CT. After that, two MIPs are generated based on the underdose and overdose volumes with green-to-blue and green-to-red lookup tables, respectively. Finally, the two MIPs are merged with an appropriate transparency level and rendered in planning CT images. Results: The spatially encoded DD-MIP was implemented in a dose-guided radiotherapy prototype and tested on 33 MVCBCT images from six patients. The user can easily establish the threshold for the overdose and underdose. A 3% difference between the treatment and planning dose was used as the threshold in the study; hence, the DD-MIP shows red or blue color for the dose difference >3% or {<=}3%, respectively. With such a method, the overdose and underdose regions can be visualized and distinguished without being overshadowed by superficial dose differences. Conclusions: A DD-MIP algorithm was developed that compresses information from 3D into a single or two orthogonal projections while hinting the user whether the dose difference is on the skin surface or deeper.

  9. Reduction of aspirin-induced fecal blood loss with low-dose misoprostol tablets in man

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, M.M.; Clark, L.; Armstrong, L.; D'Souza, J.

    1985-07-01

    Misoprostol (SC-29333), a synthetic prostaglandin E1 methyl ester analog, was given simultaneously with acetylsalicylic acid in a double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized prospective study of 32 healthy human male subjects. Fecal blood loss was measured for eight days using the /sup 51/Cr-labeled red blood cell technique. Aspirin (650 mg qid) and misoprostol (25 micrograms qid) or placebo were given during days 3, 4, and 5. There was a significant (P less than 0.05) increase in median blood loss (modified Friedman test) from 0.81 to 6.05 ml/day in the aspirin with placebo group (N = 16). Median blood loss was increased (from 0.75 to 3.75 ml/day) in the aspirin with misoprostol group (N = 16), but this was significantly less (Mann-Whitney U test, P less than 0.01) than the placebo group. Mean serum salicylate concentrations in the placebo and misoprostol groups were similar (7.8 and 6.8 micrograms/ml, respectively). There were no significant changes in laboratory values in any of the subjects studied, nor were any major side-effects encountered. This study demonstrates that oral misoprostol reduces aspirin-induced gastrointestinal bleeding even when administered simultaneously and at a dose level below its threshold for significant acid inhibition. This indicates a potential role for misoprostol in the prevention of gastric mucosal damage in selected patients.

  10. Radiation dose reduction using a CdZnTe-based computed tomography system: Comparison to flat-panel detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Le, Huy Q.; Ducote, Justin L.; Molloi, Sabee

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Although x-ray projection mammography has been very effective in early detection of breast cancer, its utility is reduced in the detection of small lesions that are occult or in dense breasts. One drawback is that the inherent superposition of parenchymal structures makes visualization of small lesions difficult. Breast computed tomography using flat-panel detectors has been developed to address this limitation by producing three-dimensional data while at the same time providing more comfort to the patients by eliminating breast compression. Flat panels are charge integrating detectors and therefore lack energy resolution capability. Recent advances in solid state semiconductor x-ray detector materials and associated electronics allow the investigation of x-ray imaging systems that use a photon counting and energy discriminating detector, which is the subject of this article. Methods: A small field-of-view computed tomography (CT) system that uses CdZnTe (CZT) photon counting detector was compared to one that uses a flat-panel detector for different imaging tasks in breast imaging. The benefits afforded by the CZT detector in the energy weighting modes were investigated. Two types of energy weighting methods were studied: Projection based and image based. Simulation and phantom studies were performed with a 2.5 cm polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) cylinder filled with iodine and calcium contrast objects. Simulation was also performed on a 10 cm breast specimen. Results: The contrast-to-noise ratio improvements as compared to flat-panel detectors were 1.30 and 1.28 (projection based) and 1.35 and 1.25 (image based) for iodine over PMMA and hydroxylapatite over PMMA, respectively. Corresponding simulation values were 1.81 and 1.48 (projection based) and 1.85 and 1.48 (image based). Dose reductions using the CZT detector were 52.05% and 49.45% for iodine and hydroxyapatite imaging, respectively. Image-based weighting was also found to have the least beam

  11. Radiation doses to paediatric patients and comforters undergoing chest X rays.

    PubMed

    Sulieman, A; Vlychou, M; Tsougos, I; Theodorou, K

    2011-09-01

    Pneumonia is an important cause of hospital admission among children in the developed world and it is estimated to be responsible for 3-18 % of all paediatric admissions. Chest X ray is an important examination for pneumonia diagnosis and for evaluation of complications. This study aims to determine the entrance surface dose (ESD), organ, effective doses and propose a local diagnostic reference level. The study was carried out at the university hospital of Larissa, Greece. Patients were divided into three groups: organ and effective doses were estimated using National Radiological Protection Board software. The ESD was determined by thermoluminescent dosemeters for 132 children and 76 comforters. The average ESD value was 55 ± 8 µGy. The effective dose for patients was 11.2 ± 5 µSv. The mean radiation dose for comforter is 22 ± 3 µGy. The radiation dose to the patients is well within dose constraint, in the light of the current practice.

  12. Comparison of different dose reduction system in computed tomography for orthodontic applications

    PubMed Central

    FANUCCI, E.; FIASCHETTI, V.; OTTRIA, L.; MATALONI, M; ACAMPORA, V.; LIONE, R.; BARLATTANI, A.; SIMONETTI, G.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY To correlate different CT system: MSCT (multislice computed tomography) with different acquisition parameters (100KV, 80KV), different reconstruction algorithm (ASIR) and CBCT (cone beam computed tomography) examination in terms of absorbed X-ray dose and diagnostic accuracy. 80 KV protocols compared with 100 KV protocols resulted in reduced total radiation dose without relevant loss of diagnostic image information and quality. CBCT protocols compared with 80 KV MSCT protocols resulted in reduced total radiation dose but loss of diagnostic image information and quality although no so relevant. In addition the new system applies to equipment ASIR applicable on MSCT allows 50% of the dose without compromising image quality. PMID:23285397

  13. Perfusion Scintigraphy and Patient Selection for Lung Volume Reduction Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Divay; Lipson, David A.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Hansen-Flaschen, John; Sciurba, Frank C.; DeCamp, Malcolm M.; Reilly, John J.; Washko, George R.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: It is unclear if lung perfusion can predict response to lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS). Objectives: To study the role of perfusion scintigraphy in patient selection for LVRS. Methods: We performed an intention-to-treat analysis of 1,045 of 1,218 patients enrolled in the National Emphysema Treatment Trial who were non–high risk for LVRS and had complete perfusion scintigraphy results at baseline. The median follow-up was 6.0 years. Patients were classified as having upper or non–upper lobe–predominant emphysema on visual examination of the chest computed tomography and high or low exercise capacity on cardiopulmonary exercise testing at baseline. Low upper zone perfusion was defined as less than 20% of total lung perfusion distributed to the upper third of both lungs as measured on perfusion scintigraphy. Measurements and Main Results: Among 284 of 1,045 patients with upper lobe–predominant emphysema and low exercise capacity at baseline, the 202 with low upper zone perfusion had lower mortality with LVRS versus medical management (risk ratio [RR], 0.56; P = 0.008) unlike the remaining 82 with high perfusion where mortality was unchanged (RR, 0.97; P = 0.62). Similarly, among 404 of 1,045 patients with upper lobe–predominant emphysema and high exercise capacity, the 278 with low upper zone perfusion had lower mortality with LVRS (RR, 0.70; P = 0.02) unlike the remaining 126 with high perfusion (RR, 1.05; P = 1.00). Among the 357 patients with non–upper lobe–predominant emphysema (75 with low and 282 with high exercise capacity) there was no improvement in survival with LVRS and measurement of upper zone perfusion did not contribute new prognostic information. Conclusions: Compared with optimal medical management, LVRS reduces mortality in patients with upper lobe–predominant emphysema when there is low rather than high perfusion to the upper lung. PMID:20538961

  14. A novel treatment planning methodology for high dose (166)Ho-DOTMP therapy in patients with multiple myeloma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullough, Steven Patrick

    2000-09-01

    Bone marrow ablation, i.e., the complete sterilization of the active bone marrow, followed by bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is a comment treatment of hematological malignancies. The use of targeted bone- seeking radiopharmaceuticals to selectively deliver radiation to the adjacent bone marrow cavities while sparing normal tissues is a promising technique. Current radiopharmaceutical treatment planning methods do not properly compensate for the patient-specific variable distribution of radioactive material within the skeleton. To improve the current method of internal dosimetry, novel methods for measuring the radiopharmaceutical distribution within the skeleton were developed. 99mTc-MDP was proven as an adequate surrogate for measuring 166Ho-DOTMP skeletal uptake and biodistribution, allowing these measures to be obtained faster, safer, and with higher spatial resolution. This translates directly into better measurements of the radiation dose distribution within the bone marrow. The resulting bone marrow dose-volume histograms allow prediction of the patient disease response where conventional organ scale dosimetry failed. They indicate that complete remission is only achieved when greater than 90% of the bone marrow receives at least 30 Gy. Comprehensive treatment planning requires combining target and non-target organ dosimetry. Organs in the urinary tract were of special concern. The kidney dose is primarily dependent upon the mean transit time of 166 Ho-DOTMP through the kidney. Deconvolution analysis of renograms predicted a mean transit time of 2.6 minutes for 166Ho- DOTMP. The radiation dose to the urinary bladder wall is dependent upon numerous factors including patient hydration and void schedule. For beta-emitting isotopes such as 166Ho, reduction of the bladder wall dose is best accomplished through good patient hydration and ensuring a partially full bladder at the time of injection. Encouraging the patient to void frequently, or catheterizing the

  15. Patient doses in {gamma}-intracoronary radiotherapy: The Radiation Burden Assessment Study

    SciTech Connect

    Thierens, Hubert . E-mail: hubert.thierens@Ughent.be; Reynaert, Nick; Bacher, Klaus; Eijkeren, Marc van; Taeymans, Yves

    2004-10-01

    Purpose: To determine accurately the radiation burden of both patients and staff from intracoronary radiotherapy (IRT) with {sup 192}Ir and to investigate the importance of IRT in the patient dose compared with interventional X-rays. Methods and materials: The Radiation Burden Assessment Study (RABAS) population consisted of 9 patients undergoing {gamma}-IRT after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty and 14 patients undergoing percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty only as the control group. For each patient, the dose to the organs and tissues from the internal and external exposure was determined in detail by Monte Carlo N-particle simulations. Patient skin dose measurements with thermoluminescence dosimeters served as verification. Staff dosimetry was performed with electronic dosimeters, thermoluminescence dosimeters, and double film badge dosimetry. Results: With respect to the patient dose from IRT, the critical organs are the thymus (58 mGy), lungs (31 mGy), and esophagus (27 mGy). The mean effective dose from IRT was 8 mSv. The effective dose values from interventional X-rays showed a broad range (2-28 mSv), with mean values of 8 mSv for the IRT patients and 13 mSv for the control group. The mean dose received by the radiotherapist from IRT was 4 {mu}Sv/treatment. The doses to the other staff members were completely negligible. Conclusion: Our results have shown that the patient and personnel doses in {gamma}-IRT remain at an acceptable level. The patient dose from IRT was within the variations in dose from the accompanying interventional X-rays.

  16. Supplemental dose of antithrombin use in disseminated intravascular coagulation patients after abdominal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Tagami, Takashi; Matsui, Hiroki; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Yasunaga, Hideo

    2015-08-31

    The effectiveness of supplemental dose antithrombin administration (1,500 to 3,000 IU/ day) for patients with sepsis-associated disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), especially sepsis due to abdominal origin, remains uncertain. This was a retrospective cohort study of patients with mechanically ventilated septic shock and DIC after emergency surgery for perforation of the lower intestinal tract using a nationwide administrative database, Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination inpatient database. A total of 2,164 patients treated at 612 hospitals during the 33-month study period between 2010 and 2013 were divided into an antithrombin group (n=1,021) and a control group (n=1,143), from which 518 propensity score-matched pairs were generated. Although there was no significant 28-day mortality difference between the two groups in the unmatched groups (control vs antithrombin: 25.7 vs 22.9 %; difference, 2.8 %; 95 % confidence interval [CI], -0.8-6.4), a significant difference existed between the two groups in propensity-score weighted groups (26.3 vs 21.7 %; difference, 4.6 %; 95 % CI, 2.0-7.1) and propensity-score matched groups (27.6 vs 19.9 %; difference, 7.7 %; 95 % CI, 2.5-12.9). Logistic regression analyses showed a significant association between antithrombin use and lower 28-day mortality in propensity-matched groups (odds ratio, 0.65; 95 % CI, 0.49-0.87). Analysis using the hospital antithrombin-prescribing rate as an instrumental variable showed that receipt of antithrombin was associated with a 6.5 % (95 % CI, 0.05-13.0) reduction in 28-day mortality. Supplemental dose of antithrombin administration may be associated with reduced 28-day mortality in sepsis-associated DIC patients after emergency laparotomy for intestinal perforation.

  17. SU-C-207-05: A Comparative Study of Noise-Reduction Algorithms for Low-Dose Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, S; Yao, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To study different noise-reduction algorithms and to improve the image quality of low dose cone beam CT for patient positioning in radiation therapy. Methods: In low-dose cone-beam CT, the reconstructed image is contaminated with excessive quantum noise. In this study, three well-developed noise reduction algorithms namely, a) penalized weighted least square (PWLS) method, b) split-Bregman total variation (TV) method, and c) compressed sensing (CS) method were studied and applied to the images of a computer–simulated “Shepp-Logan” phantom and a physical CATPHAN phantom. Up to 20% additive Gaussian noise was added to the Shepp-Logan phantom. The CATPHAN phantom was scanned by a Varian OBI system with 100 kVp, 4 ms and 20 mA. For comparing the performance of these algorithms, peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) of the denoised images was computed. Results: The algorithms were shown to have the potential in reducing the noise level for low-dose CBCT images. For Shepp-Logan phantom, an improvement of PSNR of 2 dB, 3.1 dB and 4 dB was observed using PWLS, TV and CS respectively, while for CATPHAN, the improvement was 1.2 dB, 1.8 dB and 2.1 dB, respectively. Conclusion: Penalized weighted least square, total variation and compressed sensing methods were studied and compared for reducing the noise on a simulated phantom and a physical phantom scanned by low-dose CBCT. The techniques have shown promising results for noise reduction in terms of PSNR improvement. However, reducing the noise without compromising the smoothness and resolution of the image needs more extensive research.

  18. MO-E-17A-05: Individualized Patient Dosimetry in CT Using the Patient Dose (PATDOSE) Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, A; Boone, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Radiation dose to the patient undergoing a CT examination has been the focus of many recent studies. While CTDIvol and SSDE-based methods are important tools for patient dose management, the CT image data provides important information with respect to CT dose and its distribution. Coupled with the known geometry and output factors (kV, mAs, pitch, etc.) of the CT scanner, the CT dataset can be used directly for computing absorbed dose. Methods: The HU numbers in a patient's CT data set can be converted to linear attenuation coefficients (LACs) with some assumptions. With this (PAT-DOSE) method, which is not Monte Carlo-based, the primary and scatter dose are computed separately. The primary dose is computed directly from the geometry of the scanner, x-ray spectrum, and the known patient LACs. Once the primary dose has been computed to all voxels in the patient, the scatter dose algorithm redistributes a fraction of the absorbed primary dose (based on the HU number of each source voxel), and the methods here invoke both tissue attenuation and absorption and solid angle geometry. The scatter dose algorithm can be run N times to include Nth-scatter redistribution. PAT-DOSE was deployed using simple PMMA phantoms, to validate its performance against Monte Carlo-derived dose distributions. Results: Comparison between PAT-DOSE and MCNPX primary dose distributions showed excellent agreement for several scan lengths. The 1st-scatter dose distributions showed relatively higher-amplitude, long-range scatter tails for the PAT-DOSE algorithm then for MCNPX simulations. Conclusion: The PAT-DOSE algorithm provides a fast, deterministic assessment of the 3-D dose distribution in CT, making use of scanner geometry and the patient image data set. The preliminary implementation of the algorithm produces accurate primary dose distributions however achieving scatter distribution agreement is more challenging. Addressing the polyenergetic x-ray spectrum and spatially dependent

  19. WE-A-18A-01: TG246 On Patient Dose From Diagnostic Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Supanich, M; Dong, F; Andersson, J; Pavlicek, W; Bolch, W; Fetterly, K

    2014-06-15

    Radiation dose from diagnostic and interventional radiations continues to be a focus of the regulatory, accreditation and standards organizations in the US and Europe. A Joint AAPM/EFOMP effort has been underway in the past year — having the goal to assist the clinical medical physicist with communicating optional and varied approaches in estimating (and validating) patient dose. In particular, the tools provided by DICOM Radiation Dose Structured Reports, either by themselves or as part of a networked data repository of dose related information are a rich source of actionable information. The tools of the medical physicist have evolved to include using DICOM data in meaningful ways to look at patient dose with respect to imaging practices. In addition to how accurate or reproducible a dose value is (totally necessary and our traditional workspace) it is now being asked how reproducible (patient to patient, device to device) are the delivered doses (new tasking)? Clinical medical physicists are best equipped to assist our radiology and technologist colleagues with this effort. The purpose of this session is to review the efforts of TG246 - bringing forward a summary content of the TG246 Report including specific dose descriptors for CT and Fluoroscopy — particularly in a focus of leveraging the RDSR as a means for monitoring good practices ALARA. Additionally, rapidly evolving technologies for more refined dose estimates are now in use. These will be presented as they look to having highly patient specific dose estimates in automated use.

  20. Integrating COPD into Patient-Centered Hospital Readmissions Reduction Programs

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Jerry A.; Gussin, Hélène A.; Prieto-Centurion, Valentin; Sullivan, Jamie L.; Zaidi, Farhan; Thomashow, Byron M.

    2015-01-01

    About 1 in 5 patients hospitalized for exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the United States are readmitted within 30 days. The U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has recently expanded its Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program to financially penalize hospitals with higher than expected all-cause 30-day readmission rates following a hospitalization for COPD exacerbation. In October 2013, the COPD Foundation convened a multi-stakeholder National COPD Readmissions Summit to summarize our understanding of how to reduce hospital readmissions in patients hospitalized for COPD exacerbations. Over 225 individuals participated in the Summit, including patients, clinicians, health service researchers, policy makers and representatives of academic health care centers, industry, and payers. Summit participants recommend that programs to reduce hospital readmissions: 1) Include specific recommendations about how to promote COPD self-management skills training for patients and their caregivers; 2) Adequately address co-existing disorders common to COPD in care plans during and after hospitalizations; 3) Include an evaluation of adverse events when implementing strategies to reduce hospital readmissions; and 4) Develop a strategy (e.g., a learning collaboratory) to connect groups who are engaged in developing, testing, and implementing programs to reduce hospital readmissions for COPD and other conditions. PMID:25927076

  1. Patient-based estimation of organ dose for a population of 58 adult patients across 13 protocol categories

    SciTech Connect

    Sahbaee, Pooyan; Segars, W. Paul; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: This study aimed to provide a comprehensive patient-specific organ dose estimation across a multiplicity of computed tomography (CT) examination protocols. Methods: A validated Monte Carlo program was employed to model a common CT system (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare). The organ and effective doses were estimated from 13 commonly used body and neurological CT examination. The dose estimation was performed on 58 adult computational extended cardiac-torso phantoms (35 male, 23 female, mean age 51.5 years, mean weight 80.2 kg). The organ dose normalized by CTDI{sub vol} (h factor) and effective dose normalized by the dose length product (DLP) (k factor) were calculated from the results. A mathematical model was derived for the correlation between the h and k factors with the patient size across the protocols. Based on this mathematical model, a dose estimation iPhone operating system application was designed and developed to be used as a tool to estimate dose to the patients for a variety of routinely used CT examinations. Results: The organ dose results across all the protocols showed an exponential decrease with patient body size. The correlation was generally strong for the organs which were fully or partially located inside the scan coverage (Pearson sample correlation coefficient (r) of 0.49). The correlation was weaker for organs outside the scan coverage for which distance between the organ and the irradiation area was a stronger predictor of dose to the organ. For body protocols, the effective dose before and after normalization by DLP decreased exponentially with increasing patient's body diameter (r > 0.85). The exponential relationship between effective dose and patient's body diameter was significantly weaker for neurological protocols (r < 0.41), where the trunk length was a slightly stronger predictor of effective dose (0.15 < r < 0.46). Conclusions: While the most accurate estimation of a patient dose requires specific modeling of the patient

  2. Patient-based estimation of organ dose for a population of 58 adult patients across 13 protocol categories

    PubMed Central

    Sahbaee, Pooyan; Segars, W. Paul; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to provide a comprehensive patient-specific organ dose estimation across a multiplicity of computed tomography (CT) examination protocols. Methods: A validated Monte Carlo program was employed to model a common CT system (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare). The organ and effective doses were estimated from 13 commonly used body and neurological CT examination. The dose estimation was performed on 58 adult computational extended cardiac-torso phantoms (35 male, 23 female, mean age 51.5 years, mean weight 80.2 kg). The organ dose normalized by CTDIvol (h factor) and effective dose normalized by the dose length product (DLP) (k factor) were calculated from the results. A mathematical model was derived for the correlation between the h and k factors with the patient size across the protocols. Based on this mathematical model, a dose estimation iPhone operating system application was designed and developed to be used as a tool to estimate dose to the patients for a variety of routinely used CT examinations. Results: The organ dose results across all the protocols showed an exponential decrease with patient body size. The correlation was generally strong for the organs which were fully or partially located inside the scan coverage (Pearson sample correlation coefficient (r) of 0.49). The correlation was weaker for organs outside the scan coverage for which distance between the organ and the irradiation area was a stronger predictor of dose to the organ. For body protocols, the effective dose before and after normalization by DLP decreased exponentially with increasing patient's body diameter (r > 0.85). The exponential relationship between effective dose and patient's body diameter was significantly weaker for neurological protocols (r < 0.41), where the trunk length was a slightly stronger predictor of effective dose (0.15 < r < 0.46). Conclusions: While the most accurate estimation of a patient dose requires specific modeling of the patient

  3. Patient dose estimation from CT scans at the Mexican National Neurology and Neurosurgery Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alva-Sánchez, Héctor; Reynoso-Mejía, Alberto; Casares-Cruz, Katiuzka; Taboada-Barajas, Jesús

    2014-11-01

    In the radiology department of the Mexican National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery, a dedicated institute in Mexico City, on average 19.3 computed tomography (CT) examinations are performed daily on hospitalized patients for neurological disease diagnosis, control scans and follow-up imaging. The purpose of this work was to estimate the effective dose received by hospitalized patients who underwent a diagnostic CT scan using typical effective dose values for all CT types and to obtain the estimated effective dose distributions received by surgical and non-surgical patients. Effective patient doses were estimated from values per study type reported in the applications guide provided by the scanner manufacturer. This retrospective study included all hospitalized patients who underwent a diagnostic CT scan between 1 January 2011 and 31 December 2012. A total of 8777 CT scans were performed in this two-year period. Simple brain scan was the CT type performed the most (74.3%) followed by contrasted brain scan (6.1%) and head angiotomography (5.7%). The average number of CT scans per patient was 2.83; the average effective dose per patient was 7.9 mSv; the mean estimated radiation dose was significantly higher for surgical (9.1 mSv) than non-surgical patients (6.0 mSv). Three percent of the patients had 10 or more brain CT scans and exceeded the organ radiation dose threshold set by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for deterministic effects of the eye-lens. Although radiation patient doses from CT scans were in general relatively low, 187 patients received a high effective dose (>20 mSv) and 3% might develop cataract from cumulative doses to the eye lens.

  4. Patient dose estimation from CT scans at the Mexican National Neurology and Neurosurgery Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Alva-Sánchez, Héctor

    2014-11-07

    In the radiology department of the Mexican National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery, a dedicated institute in Mexico City, on average 19.3 computed tomography (CT) examinations are performed daily on hospitalized patients for neurological disease diagnosis, control scans and follow-up imaging. The purpose of this work was to estimate the effective dose received by hospitalized patients who underwent a diagnostic CT scan using typical effective dose values for all CT types and to obtain the estimated effective dose distributions received by surgical and non-surgical patients. Effective patient doses were estimated from values per study type reported in the applications guide provided by the scanner manufacturer. This retrospective study included all hospitalized patients who underwent a diagnostic CT scan between 1 January 2011 and 31 December 2012. A total of 8777 CT scans were performed in this two-year period. Simple brain scan was the CT type performed the most (74.3%) followed by contrasted brain scan (6.1%) and head angiotomography (5.7%). The average number of CT scans per patient was 2.83; the average effective dose per patient was 7.9 mSv; the mean estimated radiation dose was significantly higher for surgical (9.1 mSv) than non-surgical patients (6.0 mSv). Three percent of the patients had 10 or more brain CT scans and exceeded the organ radiation dose threshold set by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for deterministic effects of the eye-lens. Although radiation patient doses from CT scans were in general relatively low, 187 patients received a high effective dose (>20 mSv) and 3% might develop cataract from cumulative doses to the eye lens.

  5. Energy imparted-based estimates of the effect of z overscanning on adult and pediatric patient effective doses from multi-slice computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Theocharopoulos, Nicholas; Damilakis, John; Perisinakis, Kostas; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas

    2007-04-15

    In the present study effective dose values normalized to computed tomography dose index measured free in air were calculated for adult, newborn, 1, 5, 10 and 15 year old patients regarding scans of the head, chest, abdomen, pelvis, abdomen and pelvis, and trunk, using the energy imparted method. The effect of z overscanning on patient doses was accounted for, and normalized doses are provided for varying beam collimation, pitch and reconstruction slice width values. The contribution of overscanning depends on patient age, anatomic region imaged, acquisition and reconstruction settings. For a head scan it constitutes 15% of the adult effective dose and 24% of the effective dose to a newborn but for an abdomen scan it may be as high as 58% for a newborn and 31% for an adult. The ratios of normalized pediatric doses relative to that for adults for helical scans depend not only on age but also on acquisition and reconstruction parameters, because of variations in the relative distance between the primary beam and the radiosensitive tissues/organs of the body. Regarding scans of the trunk, pediatric doses are up to a factor of 2.5 times higher compared to adult doses (abdominal scans), whereas for scans of the head up to a factor of 1.5. Increasing the pitch value of helical scans while maintaining the same effective mAs setting, and hence noise levels, leads to an increase in patient doses which depends on age, body region, scan and reconstruction parameters. The % difference between doses at pitch 1.5 and pitch 1 is more pronounced in the abdominal region (14% increase for adults) and in young patients (31% in a newborn and 18% in a 10 year old patient) and it is minimal in head scans (4% increase in newborns and 1% in adults). If multiple body regions are to be imaged, doses to adults can be reduced by up to 15% and 36% to children by performing single long-range scans. Scanning adult patients at 100 kVp instead of 120 kVp, results in a 32% reduction in effective

  6. Radiation Dose Predicts for Biochemical Control in Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Alice Y.; Burri, Ryan J.; Cesaretti, Jamie A.; Stone, Nelson N.; Stock, Richard G.

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of patient- and treatment-related factors on freedom from biochemical failure (FFbF) in patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: From a prospectively collected database of 2250 men treated at Mount Sinai Hospital from 1990 to 2004 with low-dose-rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer, 558 men with either one or more intermediate-risk features (prostate-specific antigen [PSA] level 10-20 ng/mL, Gleason score 7, or Stage T2b) were identified who had a minimum follow-up of 24 months and postimplant CT-based dosimetric analysis. Biologically effective dose (BED) values were calculated to compare doses from different isotopes and treatment regimens. Patients were treated with brachytherapy with or without hormone therapy and/or external-beam radiotherapy. Patient- and treatment-related factors were analyzed with respect to FFbF. The median follow-up was 60 months (range, 24-167 months). Biochemical failure was defined according to the Phoenix definition. Univariate analyses were used to determine whether any variable was predictive of FFbF. A two-sided p value of <0.05 was considered significant. Results: Overall, the actuarial FFbF at 10 years was 86%. Dose (BED <150 Gy{sub 2} vs. {>=}150 Gy{sub 2}) was the only significant predictor of FFbF (p < 0.001). None of the other variables (PSA, external-beam radiotherapy, Gleason score, treatment type, hormones, stage, and number of risk factors) was found to be a statistically significant predictor of 10-year FFbF. Conclusions: Radiation dose is an important predictor of FFbF in intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Treatment should continue to be individualized according to presenting disease characteristics until results from Radiation Therapy Oncology Group trial 0232 become available.

  7. Persistent hiccups due to aripiprazole in an adolescent with obsessive compulsive disorder responding to dose reduction and rechallenge.

    PubMed

    Kutuk, Meryem Ozlem; Tufan, Ali Evren; Guler, Gulen; Yildirim, Veli; Toros, Fevziye

    2016-04-01

    Our case involves persistent hiccup arising in an adolescent with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) who was using aripiprazole as an augmentation to fluoxetine and whose hiccups remitted with dose reduction and rechallenge. Treatment suggested that aripiprazole might lead to hiccups. Antipsychotics are also used for the treatment of hiccups, but recent case reports suggest that they cause hiccups as well. Within 12 h of taking 5 mg aripiprazole, the 13-year-old girl began having continuous hiccups, which lasted for 3-4 h. The hiccups resolved when the dose of aripiprazole was reduced to 2.5 mg. To achieve augmentation, aripiprazole was replaced with risperidone 0.5 mg/day for 1 month, but excess sedation was observed. As a result, aripiprazole was restarted at a dose of 2.5 mg/day, and 1 week later, it was increased to 5 mg/every other day. No hiccups were observed. PMID:27099770

  8. Effective Dose Reduction to Cardiac Structures Using Protons Compared With 3DCRT and IMRT in Mediastinal Hodgkin Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, Bradford S.; Flampouri, Stella; Su Zhong; Latif, Naeem; Dang, Nam H.; Lynch, James; Joyce, Michael; Sandler, Eric

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: We investigated the dosimetric impact of proton therapy (PT) on various cardiac subunits in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Methods and Materials: From June 2009 through December 2010, 13 patients were enrolled on an institutional review board-approved protocol for consolidative involved-node radiotherapy (INRT) for HL. Three separate treatment plans were developed prospectively by using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and PT. Cardiac subunits were retrospectively contoured on the 11 patients with intravenous-contrast simulation scans, and the doses were calculated for all treatment plans. A Wilcoxon paired test was performed to evaluate the statistical significance (p < 0.05) of 3DCRT and IMRT compared with PT. Results: The mean heart doses were 21 Gy, 12 Gy, and 8 Gy (relative biologic effectiveness [RBE]) with 3DCRT, IMRT, and PT, respectively. Compared with 3DCRT and IMRT, PT reduced the mean doses to the left and right atria; the left and right ventricles; the aortic, mitral, and tricuspid valves; and the left anterior descending, left circumflex, and right circumflex coronary arteries. Conclusions: Compared with 3DCRT and IMRT, PT reduced the radiation doses to all major cardiac subunits. Limiting the doses to these structures should translate into lower rates of cardiac toxicities.

  9. The efficacy and safety of high-dose arbekacin sulfate therapy (once-daily treatment) in patients with MRSA infection.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Izumikawa, Koichi; Hashiguchi, Koji; Fukuda, Yuichi; Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Kondo, Akira; Inoue, Yuichi; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Nakamura, Shigeki; Imamura, Yoshifumi; Miyazaki, Taiga; Kakeya, Hiroshi; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Kohno, Shigeru

    2012-04-01

    The efficacy and safety of once-daily high-dose arbekacin sulfate therapy for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection were evaluated, with analysis of their relationship to blood drug levels. The study was conducted in patients with pneumonia or sepsis, the cause of which was suspected to be MRSA, who were admitted to the Nagasaki University Hospital or its affiliated hospitals between January 2009 and December 2010. The initial drug dose was set at a level expected to yield the goal peak of 20 μg/ml and a trough level of less than 2 μg/ml, using the Habekacin Therapeutic Drug Monitoring analysis software. Thirteen patients were enrolled: 10 patients had pneumonia and 3 patients had sepsis. Patient mean age was 72.0 years; mean initial drug dose was 269.2 mg. Clinical efficacy at completion of treatment and bacterial eradication-reduction were achieved in 66.7% (6/9) and 62.5% (5/8) of patients, respectively. Incidence of adverse reactions was 38.5% (5/13). In analysis of efficacy in relationship to serum drug levels, the peak drug level was 22.7 ± 5.50 μg/ml, on average, and 15 μg/ml or higher in all 6 responders. Also, in patients with renal dysfunction, it seemed to be essential to ensure a certain peak drug level and to control the trough level appropriately. Although the number of patients was limited, once-daily high-dose arbekacin sulfate therapy may be highly effective, without posing any major safety problems. Further larger-scale studies are needed.

  10. Effect of Peginterferon or Ribavirin Dosing on Efficacy of Therapy With Telaprevir in Treatment-Experienced Patients With Chronic Hepatitis C and Advanced Liver Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Janczewska, Ewa; Flisiak, Robert; Zarebska-Michaluk, Dorota; Kozielewicz, Dorota; Berak, Hanna; Dobracka, Beata; Librant-Suska, Marta; Lojewski, Wladyslaw; Jurczyk, Krzysztof; Musialik, Joanna; Postawa-Klosińska, Barbara; Wroblewski, Jacek; Augustyniak, Krystyna; Dudziak, Marek; Olszok, Iwona; Ruszala, Agata; Pisula, Arkadiusz; Lapinski, Tadeusz; Kryczka, Wieslaw; Horban, Andrzej; Dobracki, Witold

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We investigated the safety, efficacy, and impact of ribavirin and peginterferon dose reduction on complete early virologic response and sustained virologic response (SVR) to triple therapy with telaprevir in treatment-experienced patients with advanced liver fibrosis. Treatment was initiated for 211 patients who failed treatment with peginterferon and ribavirin, with bridging fibrosis (F3, n = 68) or cirrhosis (F4, n = 143), including 103 (49%) null-responders (NR), 30 (14%) partial responders (PR), and 78 (37%) relapsers (REL). Impaired liver function (ILF) platelets <100,000/mm3 or albumin <35 g/L were present in 40 patients. The distribution of hepatitis C virus subtypes was: 1a, 1b, or 1, with undetermined subtype for 10 (5%), 187 (89%), and 14 (6%) patients, respectively. Treatment was started with peginterferon alpha-2a or alpha-2b, ribavirin, and telaprevir at standard doses. The overall SVR24 rate was 56% and was lower in cirrhotic patients (NR: 35%, PR: 40%, and REL: 63%, respectively) than in patients with bridging fibrosis (NR: 50%, PR: 75%, and REL: 75%, respectively). The lowest probability of SVR24 was in NRs with ILF (26%). The SVR24 rate significantly decreased in NRs receiving <60% vs >60% of the total ribavirin dose (23% vs 44%, respectively) or <80% vs >80% of the total ribavirin dose (33% vs 48%, respectively). A significant SVR24 decrease was noted subsequent to a total peginterferon dose reduction, both when comparing patients who received <60% vs >60% of the total dose (NR: 0% vs 44%; REL: 33% vs 68%) and patients who received <80% vs >80% of the total dose (NR: 17% vs 50%; REL: 46% vs 71%). Serious adverse events were observed in 31 patients (15%). Deaths occurred in 4 patients. All of the deceased subjects were cirrhotic members of the ILF (baseline serum albumin level <35 g/L and/or platelet count <100,000/mm3) group. Ribavirin dose reduction did not affect efficacy in REL but did in NR. Peginterferon dose reduction

  11. Standard dosing of amikacin and gentamicin in critically ill patients results in variable and subtherapeutic concentrations.

    PubMed

    Roger, Claire; Nucci, Bastian; Molinari, Nicolas; Bastide, Sophie; Saissi, Gilbert; Pradel, Gael; Barbar, Saber; Aubert, Clément; Lloret, Sophie; Elotmani, Loubna; Polge, Anne; Lefrant, Jean-Yves; Roberts, Jason A; Muller, Laurent

    2015-07-01

    Low peak plasma concentrations (Cmax) of amikacin and gentamicin are reported in intensive care unit (ICU) patients after administration of the first dose. The present study aimed to describe the proportion of ICU patients in whom an adequate Cmax was achieved throughout the course of therapy. Septic ICU patients with an indication for intravenous amikacin or gentamicin were eligible for inclusion in this single-centre observational study. The first and subsequent doses and the corresponding Cmax values were recorded. The target Cmax was ≥60mg/L for amikacin and ≥30mg/L for gentamicin. Amikacin and gentamicin plasma concentrations were available in 66 and 24 patients, respectively (59±17 years; 79±19kg; height 169±12cm; SAPS II score 46±19). Pulmonary, abdominal and urinary tract infections were diagnosed in 64 patients. Culture-positive infection was confirmed in 65 patients (72%). A target first Cmax was achieved in 17/90 patients (19%). For amikacin, the target Cmax was achieved in 16/66 patients (24%) after the initial dose. In the 50 remaining patients, a change in dosing was performed in 14 patients, leading adequate peak plasma level in 2 patients. For gentamicin, the targeted Cmax was achieved in only 1/24 patient (4%) after the initial dose and was never achieved after the third dose. In conclusion, standard dosing of amikacin or gentamicin led to adequate Cmax in only 19% of patients. Subtherapeutic Cmax were not significantly corrected after subsequent doses. PMID:25857948

  12. The Effect of Patient Weight and Provider Training and Experience on Dosing of Rocuronium

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, L.; Banks, S.; Major, B. T.; Rodriguez, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Maintenance dosing of neuromuscular blocking agents is complex and varies with patient, procedure, and clinical situation. With this in mind, we sought to identify factors impacting the maintenance dosing of neuromuscular blockers as a step toward identifying best practice with respect to minimizing residual neuromuscular blockade. Methods. Cases utilizing rocuronium from July 1, 2010, to June 30, 2014, at the sponsoring institution were analyzed. Using a mixed model to account for repeated measures, patients were analyzed by dose and weight category as defined by the World Health Organization (eight categories ranging from very severely underweight to very severely obese) as well as by the administering provider's level of experience. Results. The study included 12,671 patients with a mean age of 49.7 (SD 16.7). Increasing weight category and higher levels of provider experience were associated with higher doses for rocuronium. There were no differences in initial dose or in frequency of maintenance dosing by weight category after controlling for case length. Discussion. The two dosing patterns identified, higher doses for overweight patients and higher doses administered by experienced providers, are modifiable factors that could enhance patient safety. PMID:27429615

  13. The Effect of Patient Weight and Provider Training and Experience on Dosing of Rocuronium.

    PubMed

    Godwin, N C; Rodriguez, L; Banks, S; Major, B T; Rodriguez, Y

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Maintenance dosing of neuromuscular blocking agents is complex and varies with patient, procedure, and clinical situation. With this in mind, we sought to identify factors impacting the maintenance dosing of neuromuscular blockers as a step toward identifying best practice with respect to minimizing residual neuromuscular blockade. Methods. Cases utilizing rocuronium from July 1, 2010, to June 30, 2014, at the sponsoring institution were analyzed. Using a mixed model to account for repeated measures, patients were analyzed by dose and weight category as defined by the World Health Organization (eight categories ranging from very severely underweight to very severely obese) as well as by the administering provider's level of experience. Results. The study included 12,671 patients with a mean age of 49.7 (SD 16.7). Increasing weight category and higher levels of provider experience were associated with higher doses for rocuronium. There were no differences in initial dose or in frequency of maintenance dosing by weight category after controlling for case length. Discussion. The two dosing patterns identified, higher doses for overweight patients and higher doses administered by experienced providers, are modifiable factors that could enhance patient safety.

  14. Estimation of the Dose of Radiation Received by Patient and Physician During a Videofluoroscopic Swallowing Study.

    PubMed

    Morishima, Yoshiaki; Chida, Koichi; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) is considered the standard diagnostic imaging technique to investigate swallowing disorders and dysphagia. Few studies have been reported concerning the dose of radiation a patient receives and the scattering radiation dose received by a physician during VFSS. In this study, we investigated the dose of radiation (entrance skin dose, ESD) estimated to be received by a patient during VFSS using a human phantom (via a skin-dose monitor sensor placed on the neck of the human phantom). We also investigated the effective dose (ED) and dose equivalent (DE) received by a physician (wearing two personal dosimeters) during an actual patient procedure. One dosimeter (whole body) was worn under a lead apron at the chest, and the other (specially placed to measure doses received by the lens of the eye) outside the lead apron on the neck collar to monitor radiation doses in parts of the body not protected by the lead apron. The ESD for the patient was 7.8 mGy in 5 min. We estimated the average patient dose at 12.79 mGy per VFSS procedure. The physician ED and DE during VFSS were 0.9 mSv/year and 2.3 mSv/year, respectively. The dose of radiation received by the physician in this study was lower than regulatory dose limits. However, in accordance with the principle that radiation exposure should be as low as reasonably achievable, every effort should be made (e.g., wearing lead glasses) to reduce exposure doses. PMID:27318941

  15. The effect of increased body mass index on patient dose in paediatric radiography.

    PubMed

    Ladia, Arsenoi P; Skiadopoulos, Spyros G; Karahaliou, Anna Ν; Messaris, Gerasimos A T; Delis, Harry B; Panayiotakis, George S

    2016-10-01

    Radiation protection is of particular importance in paediatric radiology. In this study, the influence of increased body mass index (BMI) in radiation dose and associated risk was investigated for paediatric patients aged 5-6.5 years, undergoing chest (64 patients) or abdomen (64 patients) radiography. Patients were categorized into normal and overweight, according to the BMI classification scheme. Entrance surface dose (ESD), organ dose, effective dose (ED) and risk of exposure induced cancer death (REID) were calculated using the Monte Carlo based code PCXMC 2.0. Statistically significant increase in patient radiation dose and REID was obtained for overweight patients as compared to normal ones, in both chest and abdomen examinations (Wilcoxon singed-rank test for paired data, p<0.001). The percentage increase in overweight as compared to normal patients of ESD, organ dose (maximum value), ED and REID was 13.6%, 24.4%, 18.9% and 20.6%, respectively, in case of chest radiographs. Corresponding values in case of abdomen radiographs were 15.0%, 24.7%, 21.8% and 19.8%, respectively. An increased BMI results in increased patient radiation dose in chest and abdomen paediatric radiography. PMID:27666603

  16. Is patient size important in dose determination and optimization in cardiology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reay, J.; Chapple, C. L.; Kotre, C. J.

    2003-12-01

    Patient dose determination and optimization have become more topical in recent years with the implementation of the Medical Exposures Directive into national legislation, the Ionising Radiation (Medical Exposure) Regulations. This legislation incorporates a requirement for new equipment to provide a means of displaying a measure of patient exposure and introduces the concept of diagnostic reference levels. It is normally assumed that patient dose is governed largely by patient size; however, in cardiology, where procedures are often very complex, the significance of patient size is less well understood. This study considers over 9000 cardiology procedures, undertaken throughout the north of England, and investigates the relationship between patient size and dose. It uses simple linear regression to calculate both correlation coefficients and significance levels for data sorted by both room and individual clinician for the four most common examinations, left ventrical and/or coronary angiography, single vessel stent insertion and single vessel angioplasty. This paper concludes that the correlation between patient size and dose is weak for the procedures considered. It also illustrates the use of an existing method for removing the effect of patient size from dose survey data. This allows typical doses and, therefore, reference levels to be defined for the purposes of dose optimization.

  17. Reduction of bacterial titers by low-dose aspirin in experimental aortic valve endocarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Nicolau, D P; Freeman, C D; Nightingale, C H; Quintiliani, R; Coe, C J; Maderazo, E G; Cooper, B W

    1993-01-01

    Using a rabbit model of Staphylococcus aureus endocarditis, we studied the effects of aspirin on the natural progression of this infection. Compared with untreated animals, the aspirin-treated animals showed a 30% (P = 0.11) reduction in the weight of the vegetations and an 84% (P = 0.03) reduction in the bacterial titer of the vegetations. PMID:8454370

  18. Infused vincristine and adriamycin with high dose methylprednisolone (VAMP) in advanced previously treated multiple myeloma patients.

    PubMed Central

    Forgeson, G. V.; Selby, P.; Lakhani, S.; Zulian, G.; Viner, C.; Maitland, J.; McElwain, T. J.

    1988-01-01

    Forty-five patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma received continuous infusions of vincristine (0.4 mg total dose daily for 4 days) and adriamycin (9 mg m-2 daily for 4 days) with a high dose of methylprednisolone (1 g m-2 i.v. or p.o. daily by 1 h infusion), the VAMP regimen. Sixteen (36%) responded, with a median duration of remission of 11 months and median survival of 20 months. Major toxicities encountered were infective and cardiovascular. Two smaller groups of myeloma patients were treated with high dose methylprednisolone (HDMP) alone, or VAMP plus weekly low dose cyclophosphamide (Cyclo-VAMP). HDMP produced short responses in 25% of patients with less toxicity than VAMP. Cyclo-VAMP was used in a highly selected group of patients who had previously responded to high dose melphalan. It was well tolerated and produced responses in 61% of this group. PMID:3207601

  19. Patient- and cohort-specific dose and risk estimation for abdominopelvic CT: a study based on 100 patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Li, Xiang; Segars, W. Paul; Frush, Donald P.; Samei, Ehsan

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this work was twofold: (a) to estimate patient- and cohort-specific radiation dose and cancer risk index for abdominopelvic computer tomography (CT) scans; (b) to evaluate the effects of patient anatomical characteristics (size, age, and gender) and CT scanner model on dose and risk conversion coefficients. The study included 100 patient models (42 pediatric models, 58 adult models) and multi-detector array CT scanners from two commercial manufacturers (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare; SOMATOM Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare). A previously-validated Monte Carlo program was used to simulate organ dose for each patient model and each scanner, from which DLP-normalized-effective dose (k factor) and DLP-normalized-risk index values (q factor) were derived. The k factor showed exponential decrease with increasing patient size. For a given gender, q factor showed exponential decrease with both increasing patient size and patient age. The discrepancies in k and q factors across scanners were on average 8% and 15%, respectively. This study demonstrates the feasibility of estimating patient-specific organ dose and cohort-specific effective dose and risk index in abdominopelvic CT requiring only the knowledge of patient size, gender, and age.

  20. Comparison of patient specific dose metrics between chest radiography, tomosynthesis, and CT for adult patients of wide ranging body habitus

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yakun; Li, Xiang; Segars, W. Paul; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Given the radiation concerns inherent to the x-ray modalities, accurately estimating the radiation doses that patients receive during different imaging modalities is crucial. This study estimated organ doses, effective doses, and risk indices for the three clinical chest x-ray imaging techniques (chest radiography, tomosynthesis, and CT) using 59 anatomically variable voxelized phantoms and Monte Carlo simulation methods. Methods: A total of 59 computational anthropomorphic male and female extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) adult phantoms were used in this study. Organ doses and effective doses were estimated for a clinical radiography system with the capability of conducting chest radiography and tomosynthesis (Definium 8000, VolumeRAD, GE Healthcare) and a clinical CT system (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare). A Monte Carlo dose simulation program (PENELOPE, version 2006, Universitat de Barcelona, Spain) was used to mimic these two clinical systems. The Duke University (Durham, NC) technique charts were used to determine the clinical techniques for the radiographic modalities. An exponential relationship between CTDI{sub vol} and patient diameter was used to determine the absolute dose values for CT. The simulations of the two clinical systems compute organ and tissue doses, which were then used to calculate effective dose and risk index. The calculation of the two dose metrics used the tissue weighting factors from ICRP Publication 103 and BEIR VII report. Results: The average effective dose of the chest posteroanterior examination was found to be 0.04 mSv, which was 1.3% that of the chest CT examination. The average effective dose of the chest tomosynthesis examination was found to be about ten times that of the chest posteroanterior examination and about 12% that of the chest CT examination. With increasing patient average chest diameter, both the effective dose and risk index for CT increased considerably in an exponential fashion, while these two dose

  1. Patient-specific dose estimation for pediatric abdomen-pelvis CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Frush, Donald P.

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a method for estimating patient-specific dose from abdomen-pelvis CT examinations and to investigate dose variation across patients in the same weight group. Our study consisted of seven pediatric patients in the same weight/protocol group, for whom full-body computer models were previously created based on the patients' CT data obtained for clinical indications. Organ and effective dose of these patients from an abdomen-pelvis scan protocol (LightSpeed VCT scanner, 120-kVp, 85-90 mA, 0.4-s gantry rotation period, 1.375-pitch, 40-mm beam collimation, and small body scan field-of-view) was calculated using a Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated for the same CT system. The seven patients had effective dose of 2.4-2.8 mSv, corresponding to normalized effective dose of 6.6-8.3 mSv/100mAs (coefficient of variation: 7.6%). Dose variations across the patients were small for large organs in the scan coverage (mean: 6.6%; range: 4.9%-9.2%), larger for small organs in the scan coverage (mean: 10.3%; range: 1.4%-15.6%), and the largest for organs partially or completely outside the scan coverage (mean: 14.8%; range: 5.7%-27.7%). Normalized effective dose correlated strongly with body weight (correlation coefficient: r = -0.94). Normalized dose to the kidney and the adrenal gland correlated strongly with mid-liver equivalent diameter (kidney: r = -0.97; adrenal glands: r = -0.98). Normalized dose to the small intestine correlated strongly with mid-intestine equivalent diameter (r = -0.97). These strong correlations suggest that patient-specific dose may be estimated for any other child in the same size group who undergoes the abdomen-pelvis scan.

  2. Individualised antibiotic dosing for patients who are critically ill: challenges and potential solutions.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jason A; Abdul-Aziz, Mohd H; Lipman, Jeffrey; Mouton, Johan W; Vinks, Alexander A; Felton, Timothy W; Hope, William W; Farkas, Andras; Neely, Michael N; Schentag, Jerome J; Drusano, George; Frey, Otto R; Theuretzbacher, Ursula; Kuti, Joseph L

    2014-06-01

    Infections in critically ill patients are associated with persistently poor clinical outcomes. These patients have severely altered and variable antibiotic pharmacokinetics and are infected by less susceptible pathogens. Antibiotic dosing that does not account for these features is likely to result in suboptimum outcomes. In this Review, we explore the challenges related to patients and pathogens that contribute to inadequate antibiotic dosing and discuss how to implement a process for individualised antibiotic therapy that increases the accuracy of dosing and optimises care for critically ill patients. To improve antibiotic dosing, any physiological changes in patients that could alter antibiotic concentrations should first be established; such changes include altered fluid status, changes in serum albumin concentrations and renal and hepatic function, and microvascular failure. Second, antibiotic susceptibility of pathogens should be confirmed with microbiological techniques. Data for bacterial susceptibility could then be combined with measured data for antibiotic concentrations (when available) in clinical dosing software, which uses pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic derived models from critically ill patients to predict accurately the dosing needs for individual patients. Individualisation of dosing could optimise antibiotic exposure and maximise effectiveness.

  3. NCICT: a computational solution to estimate organ doses for pediatric and adult patients undergoing CT scans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Choonsik; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Bolch, Wesley E; Moroz, Brian E; Folio, Les

    2015-12-01

    We developed computational methods and tools to assess organ doses for pediatric and adult patients undergoing computed tomography (CT) examinations. We used the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference pediatric and adult phantoms combined with the Monte Carlo simulation of a reference CT scanner to establish comprehensive organ dose coefficients (DC), organ absorbed dose per unit volumetric CT Dose Index (CTDIvol) (mGy/mGy). We also developed methods to estimate organ doses with tube current modulation techniques and size specific dose estimates. A graphical user interface was designed to obtain user input of patient- and scan-specific parameters, and to calculate and display organ doses. A batch calculation routine was also integrated into the program to automatically calculate organ doses for a large number of patients. We entitled the computer program, National Cancer Institute dosimetry system for CT(NCICT). We compared our dose coefficients with those from CT-Expo, and evaluated the performance of our program using CT patient data. Our pediatric DCs show good agreements of organ dose estimation with those from CT-Expo except for thyroid. Our results support that the adult phantom in CT-Expo seems to represent a pediatric individual between 10 and 15 years rather than an adult. The comparison of CTDIvol values between NCICT and dose pages from 10 selected CT scans shows good agreements less than 12% except for two cases (up to 20%). The organ dose comparison between mean and modulated mAs shows that mean mAs-based calculation significantly overestimates dose (up to 2.4-fold) to the organs in close proximity to lungs in chest and chest-abdomen-pelvis scans. Our program provides more realistic anatomy based on the ICRP reference phantoms, higher age resolution, the most up-to-date bone marrow dosimetry, and several convenient features compared to previous tools. The NCICT will be available for research purpose in the near future.

  4. Variations of Patient Doses in Interventional Examinations at Different Angiographic Units

    SciTech Connect

    Bor, Dogan Toklu, Tuerkay; Olgar, Turan; Sancak, Tanzer; Cekirge, Saruhan; Onal, Baran; Bilgic, Sadik

    2006-10-15

    Purpose. We analyzed doses for various angiographic procedures using different X-ray systems in order to assess dose variations. Methods. Dose-area product (DAP), skin doses from thermoluminescent dosimeters and air kerma measurements of 308 patients (239 diagnostic and 69 interventional) were assessed for five different angiographic units. All fluoroscopic and radiographic exposure parameters were recorded online for single and multiprojection studies. Radiation outputs of each X-ray system were also measured for all the modes of exposure using standard protocols for such measurements. Results. In general, the complexity of the angiographic procedure was found to be the most important reason for high radiation doses. Skill of the radiologist, management of the exposure parameters and calibration of the system are the other factors to be considered. Lateral cerebral interventional studies carry the highest risk for deterministic effects on the lens of the eye. Effective doses were calculated from DAP measurements and maximum fatal cancer risk factors were found for carotid studies. Conclusions. Interventional radiologists should measure patient doses for their examinations. If there is a lack of necessary instrumentation for this purpose, then published dose reports should be used in order to predict the dose levels from some of the exposure parameters. Patient dose information should include not only the measured quantity but also the measured radiation output of the X-ray unit and exposure parameters used during radiographic and fluoroscopic exposures.

  5. Effect of Increasing Radiation Doses on Local and Distant Failures in Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kupelian, Patrick A. Ciezki, Jay; Reddy, Chandana A.; Klein, Eric A.; Mahadevan, Arul

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: To study the effect of radiation dose on local failure (LF) and distant metastasis (DM) in prostate cancer patients treated with external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The study sample consisted of 919 Stage T1-T3N0M0 patients treated with radiotherapy alone. Three separate dose groups were analyzed: <72 Gy (n = 552, median dose, 68.4 Gy), {>=}72 but <82 Gy (n = 215, median dose, 78 Gy), and {>=}82 Gy (n = 152, median dose, 83 Gy). The median follow-up period for all patients and those receiving <72 Gy, {>=}72 but <82 Gy, and {>=}82 Gy was 97, 112, 94, and 65 months, respectively. Results: For all patients, the LF rate at 10 and 15 years was 6% and 13%, respectively. The 7-year LF rate stratified by dose group (<72 Gy, {>=}72 but <82 Gy, and {>=}82 Gy) was 6%, 2%, and 2%, respectively (p 0.012). For all patients, the DM rate at 10 and 15 years was 10% and 17%, respectively. The 7-year DM rate stratified by dose group (<72 Gy, {>=}72 but <82 Gy, and {>=}82 Gy) was 9%, 6%, and 1%, respectively (p = 0.008). Multivariate analysis revealed T stage (p < 0.001), pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level (p = 0.001), Gleason score (p < 0.001), and dose (p = 0.018) to be independent predictors of DM. For all 919 patients, multivariate analysis revealed only Gleason score (p = 0.009) and dose (p 0.004) to be independent predictors of LF. Conclusion: Although the effect of increasing radiation doses has been documented mostly for biochemical failure rates, the results of our study have shown a clear association between greater radiation doses and lower LF and DM rates.

  6. Radiation Exposure During Uterine Artery Embolization: Effective Measures to Minimize Dose to the Patient

    SciTech Connect

    Scheurig-Muenkler, Christian; Powerski, Maciej J.; Mueller, Johann-Christoph; Kroencke, Thomas J.

    2015-06-15

    PurposeEvaluation of patient radiation exposure during uterine artery embolization (UAE) and literature review to identify techniques minimizing required dose.MethodsA total of 224 of all included 286 (78 %) women underwent UAE according to a standard UAE-protocol (bilateral UAE from unilateral approach using a Rösch inferior mesenteric and a microcatheter, no aortography, no ovarian artery catheterization or embolization) and were analyzed for radiation exposure. Treatment was performed on three different generations of angiography systems: (I) new generation flat-panel detector (N = 108/151); (II) classical image amplifier and pulsed fluoroscopy (N = 79/98); (III) classical image amplifier and continuous fluoroscopy (N = 37/37). Fluoroscopy time (FT) and dose-area product (DAP) were documented. Whenever possible, the following dose-saving measures were applied: optimized source-object, source-image, and object-image distances, pulsed fluoroscopy, angiographic runs in posterior-anterior direction with 0.5 frames per second, no magnification, tight collimation, no additional aortography.ResultsIn a standard bilateral UAE, the use of the new generation flat-panel detector in group I led to a significantly lower DAP of 3,156 cGy × cm{sup 2} (544–45,980) compared with 4,000 cGy × cm{sup 2} (1,400–13,000) in group II (P = 0.033). Both doses were significantly lower than those of group III with 8,547 cGy × cm{sup 2} (3,324–35,729; P < 0.001). Other reasons for dose escalation were longer FT due to difficult anatomy or a large leiomyoma load, additional angiographic runs, supplementary ovarian artery embolization, and obesity.ConclusionsThe use of modern angiographic units with flat panel detectors and strict application of methods of radiation reduction lead to a significantly lower radiation exposure. Target DAP for UAE should be kept below 5,000 cGy × cm{sup 2}.

  7. Assessing image quality and dose reduction of a new x-ray computed tomography iterative reconstruction algorithm using model observers

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, Hsin-Wu Kupinski, Matthew A.; Fan, Jiahua; Sainath, Paavana; Hsieh, Jiang

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: A number of different techniques have been developed to reduce radiation dose in x-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging. In this paper, the authors will compare task-based measures of image quality of CT images reconstructed by two algorithms: conventional filtered back projection (FBP), and a new iterative reconstruction algorithm (IR). Methods: To assess image quality, the authors used the performance of a channelized Hotelling observer acting on reconstructed image slices. The selected channels are dense difference Gaussian channels (DDOG).A body phantom and a head phantom were imaged 50 times at different dose levels to obtain the data needed to assess image quality. The phantoms consisted of uniform backgrounds with low contrast signals embedded at various locations. The tasks the observer model performed included (1) detection of a signal of known location and shape, and (2) detection and localization of a signal of known shape. The employed DDOG channels are based on the response of the human visual system. Performance was assessed using the areas under ROC curves and areas under localization ROC curves. Results: For signal known exactly (SKE) and location unknown/signal shape known tasks with circular signals of different sizes and contrasts, the authors’ task-based measures showed that a FBP equivalent image quality can be achieved at lower dose levels using the IR algorithm. For the SKE case, the range of dose reduction is 50%–67% (head phantom) and 68%–82% (body phantom). For the study of location unknown/signal shape known, the dose reduction range can be reached at 67%–75% for head phantom and 67%–77% for body phantom case. These results suggest that the IR images at lower dose settings can reach the same image quality when compared to full dose conventional FBP images. Conclusions: The work presented provides an objective way to quantitatively assess the image quality of a newly introduced CT IR algorithm. The performance of the

  8. Radiation dose measurement and risk estimation for paediatric patients undergoing micturating cystourethrography.

    PubMed

    Sulieman, A; Theodorou, K; Vlychou, M; Topaltzikis, T; Kanavou, D; Fezoulidis, I; Kappas, C

    2007-09-01

    Micturating cystourethrography (MCU) is considered to be the gold-standard method used to detect and grade vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) and show urethral and bladder abnormalities. It accounts for 30-50% of all fluoroscopic examinations in children. Therefore, it is crucial to define and optimize the radiation dose received by a child during MCU examination, taking into account that children have a higher risk of developing radiation-induced cancer than adults. This study aims to quantify and evaluate, by means of thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD), the radiation dose to the newborn and paediatric populations undergoing MCU using fluoroscopic imaging. Evaluation of entrance surface dose (ESD), organ and surface dose to specific radiosensitive organs was carried out. Furthermore, the surface dose to the co-patient, i.e. individuals helping in the support, care and comfort of the children during the examination, was evaluated in order to estimate the level of risk. 52 patients with mean age of 0.36 years who had undergone MCU using digital fluoroscopy were studied. ESD, surface doses to thyroid, testes/ovaries and co-patients were measured with TLDs. MCU with digital equipment and fluoroscopy-captured image technique can reduce the radiation dose by approximately 50% while still obtaining the necessary diagnostic information. Radiographic exposures were made in cases of the presence of reflux or of the difficulty in evaluating a finding. The radiation surface doses to the thyroid and testes are relatively low, whereas the radiation dose to the co-patient is negligible. The risks associated with MCU for patients and co-patients are negligible. The results of this study provide baseline data to establish reference dose levels for MCU examination in very young patients.

  9. Actual Dose Variation of Parotid Glands and Spinal Cord for Nasopharyngeal Cancer Patients During Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Han Chunhui Chen Yijen; Liu An; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: For intensity-modulated radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal cancer, accurate dose delivery is crucial to the success of treatment. This study aimed to evaluate the significance of daily image-guided patient setup corrections and to quantify the parotid gland volume and dose variations for nasopharyngeal cancer patients using helical tomotherapy megavoltage computed tomography (CT). Methods and Materials: Five nasopharyngeal cancer patients who underwent helical tomotherapy were selected retrospectively. Each patient had received 70 Gy in 35 fractions. Daily megavoltage CT scans were registered with the planning CT images to correct the patient setup errors. Contours of the spinal cord and parotid glands were drawn on the megavoltage CT images at fixed treatment intervals. The actual doses delivered to the critical structures were calculated using the helical tomotherapy Planned Adaptive application. Results: The maximal dose to the spinal cord showed a significant increase and greater variation without daily setup corrections. The significant decrease in the parotid gland volume led to a greater median dose in the later phase of treatment. The average parotid gland volume had decreased from 20.5 to 13.2 cm{sup 3} by the end of treatment. On average, the median dose to the parotid glands was 83 cGy and 145 cGy for the first and the last treatment fractions, respectively. Conclusions: Daily image-guided setup corrections can eliminate significant dose variations to critical structures. Constant monitoring of patient anatomic changes and selective replanning should be used during radiotherapy to avoid critical structure complications.

  10. Drug Utilization, Dosing, and Costs After Implementation of Intravenous Acetaminophen Guidelines for Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Nicholas M.; Parbuoni, Kristine; Morgan, Jill A.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The objectives of this evaluation of medication use were to characterize the use of intravenous acetaminophen at our institution and to determine if acetaminophen was prescribed at age-appropriate dosages per institutional guidelines, as well as to evaluate compliance with restrictions for use. Total acquisition costs associated with intravenous acetaminophen usage is described as well. METHODS This retrospective study evaluated the use of acetaminophen in pediatric patients younger than 18 years of age, admitted to a tertiary care hospital, who received at least 1 dose of intravenous acet-aminophen between August 1, 2011, and January 31, 2012. RESULTS A total of 52 doses of intravenous acetaminophen were administered to 31 patients during the 6-month study period. Most patients were admitted to the otorhinolaryngology service (55%), and the majority of doses were administered either in the operating room (46%) or in the intensive care unit (46%). Nineteen doses (37%) of intravenous acetaminophen were administered to patients who did not meet institutional guidelines' eligibility criteria. Three patients received single doses of intravenous acetaminophen that were greater than the dose recommended for their age. One patient during the study period received more than the recommended 24-hour maximum cumulative dose for acetaminophen. Total acquisition cost of intravenous acetaminophen therapy over the 6-month study period was $530.40. CONCLUSIONS Intravenous acetaminophen was used most frequently among pediatric patients admitted to the otorhinolaryngology service during the perioperative period. Nineteen doses (37%) were administered to patients who did not meet the institutional guidelines' eligibility criteria. Our data support reinforcing the availability of institutional guidelines to promote cost-effective use of intravenous acetaminophen while minimizing the prescription of inappropriate doses. PMID:24782690

  11. Dose delivered from Varian's CBCT to patients receiving IMRT for prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Ning; Guan, Huaiqun; Hammoud, Rabih; Pradhan, Deepak; Nurushev, T.; Li, Shidong; Movsas, Benjamin

    2007-04-01

    With the increased use of cone beam CT (CBCT) for daily patient setup, the accumulated dose from CBCT may be significantly higher than that from simulation CT or portal imaging. The objective of this work is to measure the dose from daily pelvic scans with fixed technical settings and collimations. CBCT scans were acquired in half-fan mode using a half bowtie and x-rays were delivered in pulsed-fluoro mode. The skin doses for seven prostate patients were measured on an IRB-approved protocol. TLD capsules were placed on the patient's skin at the central axis of three beams: AP, left lateral (Lt Lat) and right lateral (Rt Lat). To avoid the ring artefacts centred in the prostate, the treatment couch was dropped 3 cm from the patient's tattoo (central axis). The measured AP skin doses ranged 3-6 cGy for 20-33 cm separation. The larger the patient size the less the AP skin dose. Lateral doses did not change much with patient size. The Lt Lat dose was ~4.0 cGy, which was ~40% higher than the Rt Lat dose of ~2.6 cGy. To verify this dose asymmetry, surface doses on an IMRT QA phantom (oval shaped, 30 cm × 20 cm) were measured at the same three sites using TLD capsules with 3 cm table-drop. The dose asymmetry was due to: (1) kV source rotation which always starts from the patient's Lt Lat and ends at Lt Lat. Gantry rotation gets much slower near the end of rotation but dose rate stays constant and (2) 370° scan rotation (10° scan overlap on the Lt Lat side). In vivo doses were measured inside a Rando pelvic heterogeneous phantom using TLDs. The left hip (femoral head and neck) received the highest doses of ~10-11 cGy while the right hip received ~6-7 cGy. The surface and in vivo doses were also measured for phantoms at the central-axis setup. The difference was less than ~12% to the table-drop setup.

  12. Nurse exposure doses resulted from bone scintigraphy patient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunçman, Duygu; Kovan, Bilal; Poyraz, Leyla; ćapali, Veli; Demir, Bayram; Türkmen, Cüneyt

    2016-03-01

    Bone scintigraphy is used for displaying the radiologic undiagnosed bone lesions in nuclear medicine. It's general indications are researching bone metastases, detection of radiographically occult fractures, staging and follow-up in primary bone tumors, diagnosis of paget's disease, investigation of loosening and infection in orthopedic implants. It is applied with using 99mTc labeled radiopharmaceuticals (e.g 99m Tc MDP,99mTc HEDP and 99mTc HMDP). 20 -25 mCi IV radiotracer was injected into vein and radiotracer emits gamma radiation. Patient waits in isolated room for about 3 hours then a gamma camera scans radiation area and creates an image. When some patient's situation is not good, patients are hospitalized until the scanning because of patients' close contact care need. In this study, measurements were taken from ten patients using Geiger Muller counter. After these measurements, we calculated nurse's exposure radiations from patient's routine treatment, examination and emergency station.

  13. Dose reduction in digital breast tomosynthesis using a penalized maximum likelihood reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Mini; Gifford, Howard; O'Connor, Michael; Glick, Stephen J.

    2009-02-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a 3D imaging modality with limited angle projection data. The ability of tomosynthesis systems to accurately detect smaller microcalcifications is debatable. This is because of the higher noise in the projection data (lower average dose per projection), which is then propagated through the reconstructed image . Reconstruction methods that minimize the propagation of quantum noise have potential to improve microcalcification detectability using DBT. In this paper we show that penalized maximum likelihood (PML) reconstruction in DBT yields images with an improved resolution/noise tradeoff as compared to conventional filtered backprojection (FBP). Signal to noise ratio (SNR) using PML was observed to be higher than that obtained using the standard FBP algorithm. Our results indicate that for microcalcifications, using the PML algorithm, reconstructions obtained with a mean glandular dose (MGD) of 1.5 mGy yielded better SNR than that those obtained with FBP using a 4mGy total dose. Thus perhaps total dose could be reduced to one-third or lower with same microcalcification detectability, if PML reconstruction is used instead of FBP. Visibility of low contrast masses with various contrast levels were studied using a contrast-detail phantom in a breast shape structure with an average breast density. Images generated using various dose levels indicate that visibility of low contrast masses generated using PML reconstructions are significantly better than those generated using FBP. SNR measurements in the low-contrast study did not appear to correlate with the visual subjective analysis of the reconstruction indicating that SNR is not a good figure of merit to be used.

  14. Feasibility study of patient-specific quality assurance system for high-dose-rate brachytherapy in patients with cervical cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Boram; Ahn, Sung Hwan; Kim, Hyeyoung; Han, Youngyih; Huh, Seung Jae; Kim, Jin Sung; Kim, Dong Wook; Sim, Jina; Yoon, Myonggeun

    2016-04-01

    This study was conducted for the purpose of establishing a quality-assurance (QA) system for brachytherapy that can ensure patient-specific QA by enhancing dosimetric accuracy for the patient's therapy plan. To measure the point-absorbed dose and the 2D dose distribution for the patient's therapy plan, we fabricated a solid phantom that allowed for the insertion of an applicator for patient-specific QA and used an ion chamber and a film as measuring devices. The patient treatment plan was exported to the QA dose-calculation software, which calculated the time weight of dwell position stored in the plan DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) file to obtain an overall beam quality correction factor, and that correction was applied to the dose calculations. Experiments were conducted after importing the patient's treatment planning source data for the fabricated phantom and inserting the applicator, ion chamber, and film into the phantom. On completion of dose delivery, the doses to the ion chamber and film were checked against the corresponding treatment plan to evaluate the dosimetric accuracy. For experimental purposes, five treatment plans were randomly selected. The beam quality correction factors for ovoid and tandem brachytherapy applicators were found to be 1.15 and 1.10 - 1.12, respectively. The beam quality correction factor in tandem fluctuated by approximately 2%, depending on the changes in the dwell position. The doses measured by using the ion chamber showed differences ranging from -2.4% to 0.6%, compared to the planned doses. As for the film, the passing rate was 90% or higher when assessed using a gamma value of the local dose difference of 3% and a distance to agreement of 3 mm. The results show that the self-fabricated phantom was suitable for QA in clinical settings. The proposed patient-specific QA for the treatment planning is expected to contribute to reduce dosimetric errors in brachytherapy and, thus, to enhancing treatment

  15. Reconstruction of organ dose for external radiotherapy patients in retrospective epidemiologic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Choonik; Jung, Jae Won; Pelletier, Christopher; Pyakuryal, Anil; Lamart, Stephanie; Kim, Jong Oh; Lee, Choonsik

    2015-03-01

    Organ dose estimation for retrospective epidemiological studies of late effects in radiotherapy patients involves two challenges: radiological images to represent patient anatomy are not usually available for patient cohorts who were treated years ago, and efficient dose reconstruction methods for large-scale patient cohorts are not well established. In the current study, we developed methods to reconstruct organ doses for radiotherapy patients by using a series of computational human phantoms coupled with a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) and a radiotherapy-dedicated Monte Carlo transport code, and performed illustrative dose calculations. First, we developed methods to convert the anatomy and organ contours of the pediatric and adult hybrid computational phantom series to Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM)-image and DICOM-structure files, respectively. The resulting DICOM files were imported to a commercial TPS for simulating radiotherapy and dose calculation for in-field organs. The conversion process was validated by comparing electron densities relative to water and organ volumes between the hybrid phantoms and the DICOM files imported in TPS, which showed agreements within 0.1 and 2%, respectively. Second, we developed a procedure to transfer DICOM-RT files generated from the TPS directly to a Monte Carlo transport code, x-ray Voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) for more accurate dose calculations. Third, to illustrate the performance of the established methods, we simulated a whole brain treatment for the 10 year-old male phantom and a prostate treatment for the adult male phantom. Radiation doses to selected organs were calculated using the TPS and XVMC, and compared to each other. Organ average doses from the two methods matched within 7%, whereas maximum and minimum point doses differed up to 45%. The dosimetry methods and procedures established in this study will be useful for the reconstruction of organ dose to support

  16. Liver fat reduction with niacin is influenced by DGAT-2 polymorphisms in hypertriglyceridemic patients

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Miao; Chu, Winnie Chiu Wing; Yamashita, Shizuya; Yeung, David Ka Wai; Shi, Lin; Wang, Defeng; Masuda, Daisaku; Yang, Yaling; Tomlinson, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Niacin reduces plasma triglycerides, but it may increase free fatty acids and insulin resistance during long-term treatment. We examined the effect of extended-release niacin on liver fat content in Chinese patients with dyslipidemia and whether the common diacylglycerol acyltransferase-2 (DGAT2) polymorphisms influenced this effect. The 39 patients (baseline liver fat content: 12.8 ± 7.6%, triglycerides: 3.30 ± 1.67 mmol/l) were treated with niacin, gradually increasing the dose to 2 g/day for a total of 23 weeks. The liver fat content and visceral/subcutaneous fat was measured before and after treatment. Subjects were genotyped for the DGAT2 rs3060 and rs101899116 polymorphisms. There were significant (P < 0.001) reductions in plasma triglycerides (−34.9 ± 37.6%), liver fat content (−47.2 ± 32.8%), and visceral fat (−6.3 ± 15.8%, P < 0.05) after niacin treatment. Mean body weight decreased by 1.46 ± 2.7% (1.17 ± 2.44 kg, P < 0.001) during the study, but liver fat changes remained significant after adjustment for age, gender, and body weight changes [mean absolute change (95% CI): −6.1% (−8.0, −4.3), P < 0.001]. The DGAT2 variant alleles were associated with a smaller reduction in liver fat content in response to niacin after adjustment for other covariates (P < 0.01). These findings suggest that niacin treatment may reduce liver fat content in Chinese patients with dyslipidemia and that the mechanism may involve inhibition of DGAT2. However, the findings might have been confounded by the small but significant reductions in body weight during the study. Future large randomized controlled trials are needed to verify these findings. PMID:22315393

  17. Pediatric patient and staff dose measurements in barium meal fluoroscopic procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipov, D.; Schelin, H. R.; Denyak, V.; Paschuk, S. A.; Porto, L. E.; Ledesma, J. A.; Nascimento, E. X.; Legnani, A.; Andrade, M. E. A.; Khoury, H. J.

    2015-11-01

    This study investigates patient and staff dose measurements in pediatric barium meal series fluoroscopic procedures. It aims to analyze radiographic techniques, measure the air kerma-area product (PKA), and estimate the staff's eye lens, thyroid and hands equivalent doses. The procedures of 41 patients were studied, and PKA values were calculated using LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) positioned at the center of the patient's upper chest. Furthermore, LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs were used to estimate the equivalent doses. The results showed a discrepancy in the radiographic techniques when compared to the European Commission recommendations. Half of the results of the analyzed literature presented lower PKA and dose reference level values than the present study. The staff's equivalent doses strongly depends on the distance from the beam. A 55-cm distance can be considered satisfactory. However, a distance decrease of ~20% leads to, at least, two times higher equivalent doses. For eye lenses this dose is significantly greater than the annual limit set by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. In addition, the occupational doses were found to be much higher than in the literature. Changing the used radiographic techniques to the ones recommended by the European Communities, it is expected to achieve lower PKA values ​​and occupational doses.

  18. Patient radiation dose from computed tomography angiography and digital subtraction angiography of the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netwong, Y.; Krisanachinda, A.

    2016-03-01

    The 64-row multidetector computed tomography angiography (64-MDCTA) provides vascular image quality of the brain similar to digital subtraction angiography (DSA), but the effective dose of CTA is lower than DSA studied in phantom. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effective dose from 64-MDCTA and DSA. Effective dose (according to ICRP 103) from 64-MDCTA and DSA flat panel detector for cerebral vessels examination of the brain using standard protocols as recommended by the manufacturer was calculated for 30 cases of MDCTA (15 male and 15 female).The mean patient age was 49.5 (23-89) yrs. 30 cases of DSA (14 male and 16 female), the mean patient age was 46.8 (21-81) yrs. For CTA, the mean effective dose was 3.7 (2.82- 5.19) mSv. For DSA, the mean effective dose was 5.78 (3.3-10.06) mSv. The effective dose of CTA depends on the scanning protocol and scan length. Low tube current can reduce patient dose whereas the number of exposures and number of series in 3D rotational angiography (3D RA) resulted in increasing effective dose in DSA patients.

  19. The influence of patient centering on CT dose and image noise

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, Thomas; Ge Zhanyu; Daly, Michael P.

    2007-07-15

    Although x-ray intensity shaping filters (bowtie filters) have been used since the introduction of some of the earliest CT scanner models, the clinical implications on dose and noise are not well understood. To achieve the intended dose and noise advantage requires the patient to be centered in the scan field of view. In this study we explore the implications of patient centering in clinical practice. We scanned various size and shape phantoms on a GE LightSpeed VCT scanner using each available source filter with the phantom centers positioned at 0, 3, and 6 cm below the center of rotation (isocenter). Surface doses were measured along with image noise over a large image region. Regression models of surface dose and noise were generated as a function of phantom size and centering error. Methods were also developed to determine the amount of miscentering using a scout scan projection radiograph (SPR). These models were then used to retrospectively evaluate 273 adult body patients for clinical implications. When miscentered by 3 and 6 cm, the surface dose on a 32 cm CTDI phantom increased by 18% and 41% while image noise also increased by 6% and 22%. The retrospective analysis of adult body scout SPR scans shows that 46% of patients were miscentered in elevation by 20-60 mm with a mean position 23 mm below the center of rotation (isocenter). The analysis indicated a surface dose penalty of up to 140% with a mean dose penalty of 33% assuming that tube current is increased to compensate for the increased noise due to miscentering. Clinical image quality and dose efficiency can be improved on scanners with bowtie filters if care is exercised when positioning patients. Automatically providing patient specific centering and scan parameter selection information can help the technologist improve workflow, achieve more consistent image quality and reduce patient dose.

  20. The influence of patient centering on CT dose and image noise.

    PubMed

    Toth, Thomas; Ge, Zhanyu; Daly, Michael P

    2007-07-01

    Although x-ray intensity shaping filters (bowtie filters) have been used since the introduction of some of the earliest CT scanner models, the clinical implications on dose and noise are not well understood. To achieve the intended dose and noise advantage requires the patient to be centered in the scan field of view. In this study we explore the implications of patient centering in clinical practice. We scanned various size and shape phantoms on a GE LightSpeed VCT scanner using each available source filter with the phantom centers positioned at 0, 3, and 6 cm below the center of rotation (isocenter). Surface doses were measured along with image noise over a large image region. Regression models of surface dose and noise were generated as a function of phantom size and centering error. Methods were also developed to determine the amount of miscentering using a scout scan projection radiograph (SPR). These models were then used to retrospectively evaluate 273 adult body patients for clinical implications. When miscentered by 3 and 6 cm, the surface dose on a 32 cm CTDI phantom increased by 18% and 41% while image noise also increased by 6% and 22%. The retrospective analysis of adult body scout SPR scans shows that 46% of patients were miscentered in elevation by 20-60 mm with a mean position 23 mm below the center of rotation (isocenter). The analysis indicated a surface dose penalty of up to 140% with a mean dose penalty of 33% assuming that tube current is increased to compensate for the increased noise due to miscentering. Clinical image quality and dose efficiency can be improved on scanners with bowtie filters if care is exercised when positioning patients. Automatically providing patient specific centering and scan parameter selection information can help the technologist improve workflow, achieve more consistent image quality and reduce patient dose.

  1. Dose Adjustment for Normal Eating: A Role for the Expert Patient?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The Dose Adjustment for Normal Eating (DAFNE) programme of intensive insulin therapy for type 1 diabetes provides a structured educational intervention to improve glycemic control, reduce hypoglycemia and improve quality of life. Enhancement of self-management skills is a key element of DAFNE and patients acquire detailed skills in insulin dose adjustment. Following DAFNE training, patients report improved confidence in their ability to manage their own insulin dosing, but generally still seek and require the assistance of health professionals when making substantial changes to their insulin regimens. Some DAFNE trained patients may be able to assist their peers in aspects of diabetes management within a group environment, but widespread introduction of the expert patient/peer educator role in the self-management of type 1 diabetes, in particular related to insulin dose management, would require formal and detailed evaluation, preferably in randomized controlled clinical trials, before being introduced into routine clinical practice. PMID:24851201

  2. High-Dose Ketamine Sedation of an Agitated Patient During Air Medical Transport.

    PubMed

    Reicher, David

    2016-01-01

    We report a case in which a high-dose ketamine infusion was used to sedate an agitated patient for air medical transport, avoiding the risks of general anesthesia and causing no exacerbation of psychiatric symptoms. PMID:27021674

  3. Variation of patient imaging doses with scanning parameters for linac-integrated kilovoltage cone beam CT.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xiongfei; Wang, Yunlai; Lang, Jinyi; Wang, Pei; Li, Jie; Ge, Ruigang; Yang, Jack

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the Elekta kilovoltage CBCT doses and the associated technical protocols with patient dosimetry estimation. Image guidance technique with cone-beam CT (CBCT) in radiation oncology on a daily basis can deliver a significant dose to the patient. To evaluate the patient dose from LINAC-integrated kV cone beam CT imaging in image-guided radiotherapy. CT dose index (CTDI) were measured with PTW TM30009 CT ion chamber in air, in head phantom and body phantom, respectively; with different combinations of tube voltage, current, exposure time per frame, collimator and gantry rotation range. Dose length products (DLP) were subsequently calculated to account for volume integration effects. The CTDI and DLP were also compared to AcQSim™ simulator CT for routine clinical protocols. Both CTDIair and CTDIw depended quadratically on the voltage, while linearly on milliampere x seconds (mAs) settings. It was shown that CTDIw and DLP had very close relationship with the collimator settings and the gantry rotation ranges. Normalized CTDIw for Elekta XVI™ CBCT was lower than that of ACQSim simulator CT owing to its pulsed radiation output characteristics. CTDIw can be used to assess the patient dose in CBCT due to its simplicity for measurement and reproducibility. Regular measurement should be performed in QA & QC program. Optimal image parameters should be chosen to reduce patient dose during CBCT. PMID:26405932

  4. Radiation Dose Reduction Methods For Use With Fluoroscopic Imaging, Computers And Implications For Image Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, E. W.; Hynes, D. M.; Rowlands, J. A.; Toth, B. D.; Porter, A. J.

    1988-06-01

    The use of a beam splitting device for medical gastro-intestinal fluoroscopy has demonstrated that clinical images obtained with a 100mm photofluorographic camera, and a 1024 X 1024 digital matrix with pulsed progressive readout acquisition techniques, are identical. In addition, it has been found that clinical images can be obtained with digital systems at dose levels lower than those possible with film. The use of pulsed fluoroscopy with intermittent storage of the fluoroscopic image has also been demonstrated to reduce the fluoroscopy part of the examination to very low dose levels, particularly when low repetition rates of about 2 frames per second (fps) are used. The use of digital methods reduces the amount of radiation required and also the heat generated by the x-ray tube. Images can therefore be produced using a very small focal spot on the x-ray tube, which can produce further improvement in the resolution of the clinical images.

  5. Conceptual design review report for K Basin Dose Reduction Project clean and coat task

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn, L.D.

    1996-01-01

    The strategy for reducing radiation dose originating from radionuclides absorbed in the concrete is to raise the pool water level to provide additional shielding. The concrete walls need to be coated to prevent future radionuclide absorption into the walls. This report documents a conceptual design review of equipment to clean and coat basin walls. The review concluded that the proposed concepts were and acceptable basis for proceeding with detailed final design.

  6. Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Study of ALARA programs. Status 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Dionne, B.J.; Meinhold, C.B.; Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.

    1992-08-01

    This report provides the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors with information that will be useful for reducing occupational radiation doses at DOE`s nuclear facilities. In 1989 and 1990, health physicists from the Brookhaven National Laboratory`s (BNL) ALARA Center visited twelve DOE contractor facilities with annual collective dose equivalents greater than 100 person-rem (100 person-cSv). The health physicists interviewed radiological safety staff, engineers, and training personnel who were responsible for dose control. The status of ALARA practices at the major contractor facilities was compared with the requirements and recommendation in DOE Order 5480.11 ``Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers`` and PNL-6577 ``Health Physics Manual of Good Practices for Reducing Radiation Exposure to Levels that are as Low as Reasonably Achievable.`` The information and data collected are described and examples of successful practices are presented. The findings on the status of the DOE Contractor ALARA Programs are summarized and evaluated. In addition, the supplement to this report contains examples of good-practice documents associated with implementing the major elements of a formally documented ALARA program for a major DOE contractor facility.

  7. Patient dose and image quality from mega-voltage cone beam computed tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Gayou, Olivier; Parda, David S; Johnson, Mark; Miften, Moyed

    2007-02-01

    The evolution of ever more conformal radiation delivery techniques makes the subject of accurate localization of increasing importance in radiotherapy. Several systems can be utilized including kilo-voltage and mega-voltage cone-beam computed tomography (MV-CBCT), CT on rail or helical tomography. One of the attractive aspects of mega-voltage cone-beam CT is that it uses the therapy beam along with an electronic portal imaging device to image the patient prior to the delivery of treatment. However, the use of a photon beam energy in the mega-voltage range for volumetric imaging degrades the image quality and increases the patient radiation dose. To optimize image quality and patient dose in MV-CBCT imaging procedures, a series of dose measurements in cylindrical and anthropomorphic phantoms using an ionization chamber, radiographic films, and thermoluminescent dosimeters was performed. Furthermore, the dependence of the contrast to noise ratio and spatial resolution of the image upon the dose delivered for a 20-cm-diam cylindrical phantom was evaluated. Depending on the anatomical site and patient thickness, we found that the minimum dose deposited in the irradiated volume was 5-9 cGy and the maximum dose was between 9 and 17 cGy for our clinical MV-CBCT imaging protocols. Results also demonstrated that for high contrast areas such as bony anatomy, low doses are sufficient for image registration and visualization of the three-dimensional boundaries between soft tissue and bony structures. However, as the difference in tissue density decreased, the dose required to identify soft tissue boundaries increased. Finally, the dose delivered by MV-CBCT was simulated using a treatment planning system (TPS), thereby allowing the incorporation of MV-CBCT dose in the treatment planning process. The TPS-calculated doses agreed well with measurements for a wide range of imaging protocols.

  8. Moving from gamma passing rates to patient DVH-based QA metrics in pretreatment dose QA

    SciTech Connect

    Zhen, Heming; Nelms, Benjamin E.; Tome, Wolfgang A.

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to explore the usefulness of the gamma passing rate metric for per-patient, pretreatment dose QA and to validate a novel patient-dose/DVH-based method and its accuracy and correlation. Specifically, correlations between: (1) gamma passing rates for three 3D dosimeter detector geometries vs clinically relevant patient DVH-based metrics; (2) Gamma passing rates of whole patient dose grids vs DVH-based metrics, (3) gamma passing rates filtered by region of interest (ROI) vs DVH-based metrics, and (4) the capability of a novel software algorithm that estimates corrected patient Dose-DVH based on conventional phan-tom QA data are analyzed. Methods: Ninety six unique ''imperfect'' step-and-shoot IMRT plans were generated by applying four different types of errors on 24 clinical Head/Neck patients. The 3D patient doses as well as the dose to a cylindrical QA phantom were then recalculated using an error-free beam model to serve as a simulated measurement for comparison. Resulting deviations to the planned vs simulated measured DVH-based metrics were generated, as were gamma passing rates for a variety of difference/distance criteria covering: dose-in-phantom comparisons and dose-in-patient comparisons, with the in-patient results calculated both over the whole grid and per-ROI volume. Finally, patient dose and DVH were predicted using the conventional per-beam planar data as input into a commercial ''planned dose perturbation'' (PDP) algorithm, and the results of these predicted DVH-based metrics were compared to the known values. Results: A range of weak to moderate correlations were found between clinically relevant patient DVH metrics (CTV-D95, parotid D{sub mean}, spinal cord D1cc, and larynx D{sub mean}) and both 3D detector and 3D patient gamma passing rate (3%/3 mm, 2%/2 mm) for dose-in-phantom along with dose-in-patient for both whole patient volume and filtered per-ROI. There was considerable scatter in the gamma passing rate

  9. Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA; Volume 5

    SciTech Connect

    Dionne, B.J.; Sullivan, S.G.; Baum, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    Promoting the exchange of information related to implementation of the As Low as Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) philosophy is a continuing objective for the Department of Energy (DOE). This report was prepared by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) ALARA Center for the DOE Office of Health. It contains the fifth in a series of bibliographies on dose reduction at DOE facilities. The BNL ALARA Center was originally established in 1983 under the sponsorship of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to monitor dose-reduction research and ALARA activities at nuclear power plants. This effort was expanded in 1988 by the DOE`s Office of Environment, Safety and Health, to include DOE nuclear facilities. This bibliography contains abstracts relating to various aspects of ALARA program implementation and dose-reduction activities, with a specific focus on DOE facilities. Abstracts included in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings, journals, research reports, searches of the DOE Energy, Science and Technology Database (in general, the citation and abstract information is presented as obtained from this database), and reprints of published articles provided by the authors. Facility types and activities covered in the scope of this report include: radioactive waste, uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, spent fuel storage and reprocessing, facility decommissioning, hot laboratories, tritium production, research, test and production reactors, weapons fabrication and testing, fusion, uranium and plutonium processing, radiography, and accelerators. Information on improved shielding design, decontamination, containments, robotics, source prevention and control, job planning, improved operational and design techniques, as well as on other topics, has been included. In addition, DOE/EH reports not included in previous volumes of the bibliography are in this volume (abstracts 611 to 684). This volume (Volume 5 of the series) contains 217 abstracts.

  10. Determination of the Optimal Dose Reduction Level via Iterative Reconstruction Using 640-Slice Volume Chest CT in a Pig Model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xingli; Wang, Jingshi; Liu, Qin; Zhao, Pengfei; Hou, Yang; Ma, Yue; Guo, Qiyong

    2015-01-01

    Aim To determine the optimal dose reduction level of iterative reconstruction technique for paediatric chest CT in pig models. Materials and Methods 27 infant pigs underwent 640-slice volume chest CT with 80kVp and different mAs. Automatic exposure control technique was used, and the index of noise was set to SD10 (Group A, routine dose), SD12.5, SD15, SD17.5, SD20 (Groups from B to E) to reduce dose respectively. Group A was reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP), and Groups from B to E were reconstructed using iterative reconstruction (IR). Objective and subjective image quality (IQ) among groups were compared to determine an optimal radiation reduction level. Results The noise and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in Group D had no significant statistical difference from that in Group A (P = 1.0). The scores of subjective IQ in Group A were not significantly different from those in Group D (P>0.05). There were no obvious statistical differences in the objective and subjective index values among the subgroups (small, medium and large subgroups) of Group D. The effective dose (ED) of Group D was 58.9% lower than that of Group A (0.20±0.05mSv vs 0.48±0.10mSv, p <0.001). Conclusions In infant pig chest CT, using iterative reconstruction can provide diagnostic image quality; furthermore, it can reduce the dosage by 58.9%. PMID:25764485

  11. Dose-finding Study of Peginesatide for Anemia Correction in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wiecek, Andrzej; Tucker, Beatriz; Yaqoob, Magdi; Mikhail, Ashraf; Nowicki, Michal; MacPhee, Iain; Mysliwiec, Michal; Smolenski, Olgierd; Sułowicz, Władysław; Mayo, Martha; Francisco, Carol; Polu, Krishna R.; Schatz, Peter J.; Duliege, Anne-Marie

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Peginesatide is a synthetic, PEGylated, investigational, peptide-based erythropoiesis-stimulating agent. We report the first assessment of its efficacy and safety in correcting renal anemia in a population of 139 nondialysis chronic kidney disease patients. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Chronic kidney disease patients who were not on dialysis and not receiving treatment with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents in the 12 weeks before study drug administration were sequentially assigned to one of 10 cohorts; cohorts differed in starting peginesatide dose (different body weight-based or absolute doses), route of administration (intravenous or subcutaneous), and frequency of administration (every 4 or 2 weeks). Results Across all cohorts, 96% of patients achieved a hemoglobin response. A dose-response relationship was evident for hemoglobin increase. Comparable subcutaneous and intravenous peginesatide doses produced similar hemoglobin responses. Rapid rates of hemoglobin rise and hemoglobin excursions >13 g/dl tended to occur more frequently with every-2-weeks dosing than they did with every-4-weeks dosing. The range of final median doses in the every-4-weeks dosing groups was 0.019 to 0.043 mg/kg. Across all cohorts, 20% of patients reported serious adverse events (one patient had a possibly drug-related serious event) and 81% reported adverse events (11.5% reported possibly drug-related events); these events were consistent with those routinely observed in this patient population. Conclusions This study suggests that peginesatide administered every 4 weeks can increase and maintain hemoglobin in nondialysis chronic kidney disease patients. Additional long-term data in larger groups of patients are required to further elucidate the efficacy and safety of this peptide-based erythropoiesis-stimulating agent. PMID:21940838

  12. Appropriate Enoxaparin Dose for Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis in Patients with Extreme Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Shelkrot, Max; Miraka, Jonida

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To evaluate the appropriate dose of enoxaparin for venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis in patients with extreme obesity. Methods: A literature search was performed using MEDLINE (1950-April 2013) to analyze all English-language articles that evaluated incidence of VTE and/or anti-Xa levels with enoxaparin for thromboprophylaxis in patients with extreme obesity. Results: Eight studies were included in the analysis. Six of the studies were done in patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Mean body mass index ranged from 44.9 to 63.4 kg/m2 within studies. Studies done with bariatric surgery patients utilized doses of enoxaparin that ranged from the standard dose of 30 mg subcutaneous (SQ) every 12 hours to 60 mg SQ every 12 hours. Other studies evaluated doses ranging from 40 mg SQ every 24 hours to 0.5 mg/kg/day. Only 3 studies evaluated the incidence of VTE as the primary endpoint; the other studies evaluated anti-Xa levels. The studies showed that appropriate anti-Xa levels were achieved more often with higher than standard doses of enoxaparin. One study showed that enoxaparin 40 mg SQ every 12 hours decreased the incidence of VTE in patients undergoing bariatric surgery compared to standard doses. Overall risk of bleeding was similar between study groups. Conclusions: Higher than standard doses of enoxaparin may be needed for patients with extreme obesity. Patients undergoing bariatric surgery may benefit from enoxaparin 40 mg SQ every 12 hours. Additional large randomized, controlled trials are needed to determine the efficacy and safety of higher than standard doses of enoxaparin for VTE prophylaxis in patients with extreme obesity. PMID:25477599

  13. The relationship between organ dose and patient size in tube current modulated adult thoracic CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatonabadi, Maryam; Zhang, Di; Yang, Jeffrey; DeMarco, John J.; Cagnon, Chris C.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.

    2012-03-01

    Recently published AAPM Task Group 204 developed conversion coefficients that use scanner reported CTDIvol to estimate dose to the center of patient undergoing fixed tube current body exam. However, most performed CT exams use TCM to reduce dose to patients. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between organ dose and a variety of patient size metrics in adult chest CT scans that use tube current modulation (TCM). Monte Carlo simulations were performed for 32 voxelized models with contoured lungs and glandular breasts tissue, consisting of females and males. These simulations made use of patient's actual TCM data to estimate organ dose. Using image data, different size metrics were calculated, these measurements were all performed on one slice, at the level of patient's nipple. Estimated doses were normalized by scanner-reported CTDIvol and plotted versus different metrics. CTDIvol values were plotted versus different metrics to look at scanner's output versus size. The metrics performed similarly in terms of correlating with organ dose. Looking at each gender separately, for male models normalized lung dose showed a better linear correlation (r2=0.91) with effective diameter, while female models showed higher correlation (r2=0.59) with the anterior-posterior measurement. There was essentially no correlation observed between size and CTDIvol-normalized breast dose. However, a linear relationship was observed between absolute breast dose and size. Dose to lungs and breasts were consistently higher in females with similar size as males which could be due to shape and composition differences between genders in the thoracic region.

  14. Patient grouping for dose surveys and establishment of diagnostic reference levels in paediatric computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Vassileva, J; Rehani, M

    2015-07-01

    There has been confusion in literature on whether paediatric patients should be grouped according to age, weight or other parameters when dealing with dose surveys. The present work aims to suggest a pragmatic approach to achieve reasonable accuracy for performing patient dose surveys in countries with limited resources. The analysis is based on a subset of data collected within the IAEA survey of paediatric computed tomography (CT) doses, involving 82 CT facilities from 32 countries in Asia, Europe, Africa and Latin America. Data for 6115 patients were collected, in 34.5 % of which data for weight were available. The present study suggests that using four age groups, <1, >1-5, >5-10 and >10-15 y, is realistic and pragmatic for dose surveys in less resourced countries and for the establishment of DRLs. To ensure relevant accuracy of results, data for >30 patients in a particular age group should be collected if patient weight is not known. If a smaller sample is used, patient weight should be recorded and the median weight in the sample should be within 5-10 % from the median weight of the sample for which the DRLs were established. Comparison of results from different surveys should always be performed with caution, taking into consideration the way of grouping of paediatric patients. Dose results can be corrected for differences in patient weight/age group.

  15. Patient grouping for dose surveys and establishment of diagnostic reference levels in paediatric computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Vassileva, J; Rehani, M

    2015-07-01

    There has been confusion in literature on whether paediatric patients should be grouped according to age, weight or other parameters when dealing with dose surveys. The present work aims to suggest a pragmatic approach to achieve reasonable accuracy for performing patient dose surveys in countries with limited resources. The analysis is based on a subset of data collected within the IAEA survey of paediatric computed tomography (CT) doses, involving 82 CT facilities from 32 countries in Asia, Europe, Africa and Latin America. Data for 6115 patients were collected, in 34.5 % of which data for weight were available. The present study suggests that using four age groups, <1, >1-5, >5-10 and >10-15 y, is realistic and pragmatic for dose surveys in less resourced countries and for the establishment of DRLs. To ensure relevant accuracy of results, data for >30 patients in a particular age group should be collected if patient weight is not known. If a smaller sample is used, patient weight should be recorded and the median weight in the sample should be within 5-10 % from the median weight of the sample for which the DRLs were established. Comparison of results from different surveys should always be performed with caution, taking into consideration the way of grouping of paediatric patients. Dose results can be corrected for differences in patient weight/age group. PMID:25836695

  16. Occupational dose reduction at nuclear power plants: Annotated bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, J.W.; Khan, T.A.

    1986-10-01

    This report is the third in a series of bibliographies supporting the efforts at Brookhaven National Laboratory on dose reduction at nuclear power plants. Abstracts for this report were selected from papers presented at recent technical meetings, journals and research reports reviewed at the BNL ALARA Center, and searches of the DOE/RECON data base on energy-related publications. The references selected for inclusion in the bibliography relate not only to operational health physics topics but also to plant chemistry, stress corrosion cracking, and other aspects of plant operation which have important impacts on occupational exposure. Also included are references to improved design, planning, materials selection and other topics related to what might be called ALARA engineering. Thus, an attempt has been made to cover a broad spectrum of topics related directly or indirectly to occupational exposure reduction. The report contains 252 abstracts and both author and subject indices.

  17. [5 years of "concerted action dose reduction in CT" -- what has been achieved and what remains to be done?].

    PubMed

    Nagel, H D; Blobel, J; Brix, G; Ewen, K; Galanski, M; Höfs, P; Loose, R; Prokop, M; Schneider, K; Stamm, G; Stender, H-S; Süss, C; Türkay, S; Vogel, H; Wucherer, M

    2004-11-01

    In May 1998, the German "Concerted Action Dose Reduction in CT" was founded by all parties involved in CT. Its intention was to achieve a significant reduction of the radiation exposure caused by CT, a matter that has increasingly been considered a major challenge since the early nineties. As a result of a number of joint efforts, the essential preconditions have been established by now. The fifth anniversary of the Concerted Action gave rise for both retrospection and outlook on the tasks that have already been accomplished and those that still need to be done. For this purpose, a one-day symposium took place in Berlin on November 4, 2003. The contents of a total of 18 contributions will be outlined here in brief. PMID:15497088

  18. Effects of CT dose and nodule characteristics on lung-nodule detectability in a cohort of 90 national lung screening trial patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Stefano; Lo, Pechin; Hoffman, John M.; Kim, H. J. Grace; Brown, Matthew S.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.

    2016-03-01

    Lung cancer screening CT is already performed at low dose. There are many techniques to reduce the dose even further, but it is not clear how such techniques will affect nodule detectability. In this work, we used an in-house CAD algorithm to evaluate detectability. 90348 patients and their raw CT data files were drawn from the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) database. All scans were acquired at ~2 mGy CTDIvol with fixed tube current, 1 mm slice thickness, and B50 reconstruction kernel on a Sensation 64 scanner (Siemens Healthcare). We used the raw CT data to simulate two additional reduced-dose scans for each patient corresponding to 1 mGy (50%) and 0.5 mGy (25%). Radiologists' findings on the NLST reader forms indicated 65 nodules in the cohort, which we subdivided based on LungRADS criteria. For larger category 4 nodules, median sensitivities were 100% at all three dose levels, and mean sensitivity decreased with dose. For smaller nodules meeting the category 2 or 3 criteria, the dose dependence was less obvious. Overall, mean patient-level sensitivity varied from 38.5% at 100% dose to 40.4% at 50% dose, a difference of only 1.9%. However, the false-positive rate quadrupled from 1 per case at 100% dose to 4 per case at 25% dose. Dose reduction affected lung-nodule detectability differently depending on the LungRADS category, and the false-positive rate was very sensitive at sub-screening dose levels. Thus, care should be taken to adapt CAD for the very challenging noise characteristics of screening.

  19. Fetus absorbed dose evaluation in head and neck radiotherapy procedures of pregnant patients.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Etieli C; da Rosa, Luiz Antonio R; Batista, Delano Valdivino S

    2015-06-01

    In this work the head and neck cancer treatment of a pregnant patient was experimentally simulated. A female anthropomorphic Alderson phantom was used and the absorbed dose to the fetus was evaluated protecting the patient's abdomen with a 7cm lead layer and using no abdomen shielding. The target volume dose was 50Gy. The fetus doses evaluated with and without the lead shielding were, respectively, 0.52±0.039 and 0.88±0.052cGy. PMID:25620113

  20. VMAT QA: Measurement-guided 4D dose reconstruction on a patient

    SciTech Connect

    Nelms, Benjamin E.; Opp, Daniel; Robinson, Joshua; Wolf, Theresa K.; Zhang, Geoffrey; Moros, Eduardo; Feygelman, Vladimir

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To develop and validate a volume-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) quality assurance (QA) tool that takes as input a time-resolved, low-density ({approx}10 mm) cylindrical surface dose map from a commercial helical diode array, and outputs a high density, volumetric, time-resolved dose matrix on an arbitrary patient dataset. This first validation study is limited to a homogeneous 'patient.'Methods: A VMAT treatment is delivered to a diode array phantom (ARCCHECK, Sun Nuclear Corp., Melbourne, FL). 3DVH software (Sun Nuclear) derives the high-density volumetric dose using measurement-guided dose reconstruction (MGDR). MGDR cylindrical phantom results are then used to perturb the three-dimensional (3D) treatment planning dose on the patient dataset, producing a semiempirical volumetric dose grid. Four-dimensional (4D) dose reconstruction on the patient is also possible by morphing individual sub-beam doses instead of the composite. For conventional (3D) dose comparison two methods were developed, using the four plans (Multi-Target, C-shape, Mock Prostate, and Head and Neck), including their structures and objectives, from the AAPM TG-119 report. First, 3DVH and treatment planning system (TPS) cumulative point doses were compared to ion chamber in a cube water-equivalent phantom ('patient'). The shape of the phantom is different from the ARCCHECK and furthermore the targets were placed asymmetrically. Second, coronal and sagittal absolute film dose distributions in the cube were compared with 3DVH and TPS. For time-resolved (4D) comparisons, three tests were performed. First, volumetric dose differences were calculated between the 3D MGDR and cumulative time-resolved patient (4D MGDR) dose at the end of delivery, where they ideally should be identical. Second, time-resolved (10 Hz sampling rate) ion chamber doses were compared to cumulative point dose vs time curves from 4D MGDR. Finally, accelerator output was varied to assess the linearity of the 4D MGDR with

  1. Prediction of Warfarin Dose in Pediatric Patients: An Evaluation of the Predictive Performance of Several Models

    PubMed Central

    Marek, Elizabeth; Momper, Jeremiah D.; Hines, Ronald N.; Takao, Cheryl M.; Gill, Joan C.; Pravica, Vera; Gaedigk, Andrea; Neville, Kathleen A.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of pediatric pharmacogenetic-based dose prediction models by using an independent cohort of pediatric patients from a multicenter trial. METHODS: Clinical and genetic data (CYP2C9 [cytochrome P450 2C9] and VKORC1 [vitamin K epoxide reductase]) were collected from pediatric patients aged 3 months to 17 years who were receiving warfarin as part of standard care at 3 separate clinical sites. The accuracy of 8 previously published pediatric pharmacogenetic-based dose models was evaluated in the validation cohort by comparing predicted maintenance doses to actual stable warfarin doses. The predictive ability was assessed by using the proportion of variance (R2), mean prediction error (MPE), and the percentage of predictions that fell within 20% of the actual maintenance dose. RESULTS: Thirty-two children reached a stable international normalized ratio and were included in the validation cohort. The pharmacogenetic-based warfarin dose models showed a proportion of variance ranging from 35% to 78% and an MPE ranging from −2.67 to 0.85 mg/day in the validation cohort. Overall, the model developed by Hamberg et al showed the best performance in the validation cohort (R2 = 78%; MPE = 0.15 mg/day) with 38% of the predictions falling within 20% of observed doses. CONCLUSIONS: Pharmacogenetic-based algorithms provide better predictions than a fixed-dose approach, although an optimal dose algorithm has not yet been developed. PMID:27453700

  2. Estimating Radiation Dose Metrics for Patients Undergoing Tube Current Modulation CT Scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Kyle Lorin

    Computed tomography (CT) has long been a powerful tool in the diagnosis of disease, identification of tumors and guidance of interventional procedures. With CT examinations comes the concern of radiation exposure and the associated risks. In order to properly understand those risks on a patient-specific level, organ dose must be quantified for each CT scan. Some of the most widely used organ dose estimates are derived from fixed tube current (FTC) scans of a standard sized idealized patient model. However, in current clinical practice, patient size varies from neonates weighing just a few kg to morbidly obese patients weighing over 200 kg, and nearly all CT exams are performed with tube current modulation (TCM), a scanning technique that adjusts scanner output according to changes in patient attenuation. Methods to account for TCM in CT organ dose estimates have been previously demonstrated, but these methods are limited in scope and/or restricted to idealized TCM profiles that are not based on physical observations and not scanner specific (e.g. don't account for tube limits, scanner-specific effects, etc.). The goal of this work was to develop methods to estimate organ doses to patients undergoing CT scans that take into account both the patient size as well as the effects of TCM. This work started with the development and validation of methods to estimate scanner-specific TCM schemes for any voxelized patient model. An approach was developed to generate estimated TCM schemes that match actual TCM schemes that would have been acquired on the scanner for any patient model. Using this approach, TCM schemes were then generated for a variety of body CT protocols for a set of reference voxelized phantoms for which TCM information does not currently exist. These are whole body patient models representing a variety of sizes, ages and genders that have all radiosensitive organs identified. TCM schemes for these models facilitated Monte Carlo-based estimates of fully

  3. Reduction of Methylphenidate Induced Anxiety, Depression and Cognition Impairment by Various doses of Venlafaxine in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Motaghinejad, Majid; Motevalian, Manijeh; Ebrahimzadeh, Andia; larijani, Setare Farokhi; Khajehamedi, Zohreh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Methylphenidate (MPH) is a neural stimulant agent, which its neurochemical and behavioral effect remain unclear. Venlafaxine is a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor antidepressant, which was used for management of depression and anxiety. In this study, protective effects of venlafaxine on MPH induced anxiety, depression and cognition impairment were investigated. Methods: Forty-eight adult male rats were divided randomly to 5 groups. Group 1, received normal saline (0.2 ml/rat) for 21 days and served as control group. Group 2, received MPH (10 mg/kg) for 21 days. Groups, 3, 4, 5 and 6 concurrently were treated by MPH (10 mg/kg) and venlafaxine at doses of 25, 50, 75 and 100 mg/kg respectively for 21 days. On day 22, elevated plus maze (EPM), open field test (OFT), forced swim test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST) were used to investigate the level of anxiety and depression in animals. In addition, between days 17 and 21, Morris water maze (MWM) was used to evaluate the effect of MPH on spatial learning and memory. Results: MPH caused depression and anxiety in a dose-dependent manner in FST, OFT, EPM and TST, which were significantly different compared with control group. Furthermore, MPH can significantly attenuate the motor activity in OFT. Venlafaxine in all doses can attenuate MPH induced anxiety, depression and motor activity alterations. MPH also can disturb learning and memory in MWM, but venlafaxine did not alter this effect of MPH. Conclusions: We conclude that venlafaxine can be protective in the brain against MPH induced anxiety and depression. PMID:26124949

  4. Statin therapy and thromboxane generation in patients with coronary artery disease treated with high-dose aspirin.

    PubMed

    Bliden, K P; Singla, A; Gesheff, M G; Toth, P P; Tabrizchi, A; Ens, G; Guyer, K; Singh, M; Franzese, C J; Stapleton, D; Tantry, U S; Gurbel, P A

    2014-08-01

    Aspirin and statin therapy are mainstay treatments in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). The relation between statin therapy, in vivo thromboxane (Tx) generation; a marker of inflammation, and blood thrombogenicity has never been explored. Urinary 11-dehydro (dh) TxB2 was determined in patients with suspected CAD on 325 mg daily aspirin therapy prior to undergoing cardiac catheterisation (n=281). Thrombogenicity was estimated by thrombelastographic measurement of thrombin-induced platelet-fibrin clot strength (TIP-FCS) and lipids/lipoproteins were determined by vertical density gradient ultracentrifugation/ELISA. The influence of statin therapy and dose was analysed by the atorvastatin equivalent dose (5-10 mg, 20-40 mg, or 80 mg daily). Statin therapy (n=186) was associated with a dose-dependent reduction in urinary 11-dh TxB2 (p=0.046) that was independent of LDL and apo B100 levels but was strongly related to TIP-FCS (p=0.006). By multivariate analysis, no statin therapy (n=95) and female gender were independently associated with high urinary 11-dh TxB2 [OR=2.95 (0.1.57-5.50, p=0.0007); OR=2.25 (1.24-4.05, p=0.007)], respectively. In aspirin-treated patients, statin therapy was independently and inversely associated with inflammation in a dose-dependent manner. Elevated 11-dh TxB2 was associated with a prothrombotic state indicated by high TIP-FCS. Our data suggest that measurement of urinary 11-dTxB2 may be a useful method to optimise statin dosing in order to reduce thrombotic risk. PMID:24763965

  5. Age influences initial dose and compliance to imatinib in chronic myeloid leukemia elderly patients but concomitant comorbidities appear to influence overall and event-free survival.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Luciano, Luigiana; Latagliata, Roberto; Castagnetti, Fausto; Ferrero, Dario; Cavazzini, Francesco; Trawinska, Malgorzata Monica; Annunziata, Mario; Stagno, Fabio; Tiribelli, Mario; Binotto, Gianni; Crisà, Elena; Musto, Pellegrino; Gozzini, Antonella; Cavalli, Laura; Montefusco, Enrico; Iurlo, Alessandra; Russo, Sabina; Cedrone, Michele; Rossi, Antonella Russo; Pregno, Patrizia; Endri, Mauro; Spadea, Antonio; Molica, Matteo; Giglio, Gianfranco; Celesti, Francesca; Sorà, Federica; Storti, Sergio; D'Addosio, Ada; Cambrin, Giovanna Rege; Isidori, Alessandro; Sica, Simona; Abruzzese, Elisabetta; Speccha, Giorgina; Rosti, Gianantonio; Alimena, Giuliana

    2014-10-01

    We applied Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) stratification on a large cohort of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) very elderly patients (>75 years) treated with imatinib, in order to observe the impact of concomitant diseases on both compliance and outcome. One hundred and eighty-one patients were recruited by 21 Italian centers. There were 95 males and 86 females, median age 78.6 years (range 75-93.6). According to Sokal score, 106 patients were classified as intermediate risk and 55 as high risk (not available in 20 patients). According to CCI stratification, 71 patients had score 0 and 110 a score ≥ 1. Imatinib standard dose was reduced at start of therapy (200-300 mg/day) in 68 patients independently from the evaluation of baseline comorbidities, but based only on physician judgement: 43.6% of these patients had score 0 compared to 34% of patients who had score ≥ 1. Significant differences were found in terms of subsequent dose reduction (39% of patients with score 0 compared to 53% of patients with score ≥ 1) and in terms of drug discontinuation due to toxicity (35% of patients with score 0 vs 65% of patients with score ≥ 1). We did not find significant differences as regards occurrence of hematologic side effects, probably as a consequence of the initial dose reduction: 39% of patients with score 0 experienced grade 3/4 hematologic toxicity (most commonly anemia) compared to 42% of patients with score ≥ 1. Independently from the initial dose, comorbidities again did not have an impact on development of grade 3/4 non-hematologic side effects (most commonly skin rash, muscle cramps and fluid retention): 62% of patients with score 0 compared to 52.5% of patients with score ≥ 1. Notwithstanding the reduced dose and the weight of comorbidities we did not find significant differences but only a trend in terms of efficacy: 66% of patients with score 0 achieved a CCyR compared to 54% of patients with score ≥ 1. Comorbidities appeared to have an impact on

  6. Age influences initial dose and compliance to imatinib in chronic myeloid leukemia elderly patients but concomitant comorbidities appear to influence overall and event-free survival.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Luciano, Luigiana; Latagliata, Roberto; Castagnetti, Fausto; Ferrero, Dario; Cavazzini, Francesco; Trawinska, Malgorzata Monica; Annunziata, Mario; Stagno, Fabio; Tiribelli, Mario; Binotto, Gianni; Crisà, Elena; Musto, Pellegrino; Gozzini, Antonella; Cavalli, Laura; Montefusco, Enrico; Iurlo, Alessandra; Russo, Sabina; Cedrone, Michele; Rossi, Antonella Russo; Pregno, Patrizia; Endri, Mauro; Spadea, Antonio; Molica, Matteo; Giglio, Gianfranco; Celesti, Francesca; Sorà, Federica; Storti, Sergio; D'Addosio, Ada; Cambrin, Giovanna Rege; Isidori, Alessandro; Sica, Simona; Abruzzese, Elisabetta; Speccha, Giorgina; Rosti, Gianantonio; Alimena, Giuliana

    2014-10-01

    We applied Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) stratification on a large cohort of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) very elderly patients (>75 years) treated with imatinib, in order to observe the impact of concomitant diseases on both compliance and outcome. One hundred and eighty-one patients were recruited by 21 Italian centers. There were 95 males and 86 females, median age 78.6 years (range 75-93.6). According to Sokal score, 106 patients were classified as intermediate risk and 55 as high risk (not available in 20 patients). According to CCI stratification, 71 patients had score 0 and 110 a score ≥ 1. Imatinib standard dose was reduced at start of therapy (200-300 mg/day) in 68 patients independently from the evaluation of baseline comorbidities, but based only on physician judgement: 43.6% of these patients had score 0 compared to 34% of patients who had score ≥ 1. Significant differences were found in terms of subsequent dose reduction (39% of patients with score 0 compared to 53% of patients with score ≥ 1) and in terms of drug discontinuation due to toxicity (35% of patients with score 0 vs 65% of patients with score ≥ 1). We did not find significant differences as regards occurrence of hematologic side effects, probably as a consequence of the initial dose reduction: 39% of patients with score 0 experienced grade 3/4 hematologic toxicity (most commonly anemia) compared to 42% of patients with score ≥ 1. Independently from the initial dose, comorbidities again did not have an impact on development of grade 3/4 non-hematologic side effects (most commonly skin rash, muscle cramps and fluid retention): 62% of patients with score 0 compared to 52.5% of patients with score ≥ 1. Notwithstanding the reduced dose and the weight of comorbidities we did not find significant differences but only a trend in terms of efficacy: 66% of patients with score 0 achieved a CCyR compared to 54% of patients with score ≥ 1. Comorbidities appeared to have an impact on

  7. Application of Antibiotic Pharmacodynamics and Dosing Principles in Patients With Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Droege, Molly E; Van Fleet, Suzanne L; Mueller, Eric W

    2016-04-01

    Sepsis is associated with marked mortality, which may be reduced by prompt initiation of adequate, appropriate doses of antibiotic. Critically ill patients often have physiological changes that reduce blood and tissue concentrations of antibiotic and high rates of multidrug-resistant pathogens, which may affect patients' outcomes. All critical care professionals, including critical care nurses, should understand antibiotic pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics to ensure sound antibiotic dosing and administration strategies for optimal microbial killing and patients' outcomes. Effective pathogen eradication occurs when the dose of antibiotic reaches or maintains optimal concentrations relative to the minimum inhibitory concentration for the pathogen. Time-dependent antibiotics, such as β-lactams, can be given as extended or continuous infusions. Concentration-dependent antibiotics such as aminoglycosides are optimized by using high, once-daily dosing strategies with serum concentration monitoring. Vancomycin and fluoroquinolones are dependent on both time and concentration above the minimum inhibitory concentration. PMID:27037336

  8. Application of Antibiotic Pharmacodynamics and Dosing Principles in Patients With Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Droege, Molly E; Van Fleet, Suzanne L; Mueller, Eric W

    2016-04-01

    Sepsis is associated with marked mortality, which may be reduced by prompt initiation of adequate, appropriate doses of antibiotic. Critically ill patients often have physiological changes that reduce blood and tissue concentrations of antibiotic and high rates of multidrug-resistant pathogens, which may affect patients' outcomes. All critical care professionals, including critical care nurses, should understand antibiotic pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics to ensure sound antibiotic dosing and administration strategies for optimal microbial killing and patients' outcomes. Effective pathogen eradication occurs when the dose of antibiotic reaches or maintains optimal concentrations relative to the minimum inhibitory concentration for the pathogen. Time-dependent antibiotics, such as β-lactams, can be given as extended or continuous infusions. Concentration-dependent antibiotics such as aminoglycosides are optimized by using high, once-daily dosing strategies with serum concentration monitoring. Vancomycin and fluoroquinolones are dependent on both time and concentration above the minimum inhibitory concentration.

  9. Skin dose measurements using MOSFET and TLD for head and neck patients treated with tomotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kinhikar, Rajesh A; Murthy, Vedang; Goel, Vineeta; Tambe, Chandrashekar M; Dhote, Dipak S; Deshpande, Deepak D

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to estimate skin dose for the patients treated with tomotherapy using metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). In vivo measurements were performed for two head and neck patients treated with tomotherapy and compared to TLD measurements. The measurements were subsequently carried out for five days to estimate the inter-fraction deviations in MOSFET measurements. The variation between skin dose measured with MOSFET and TLD for first patient was 2.2%. Similarly, the variation of 2.3% was observed between skin dose measured with MOSFET and TLD for second patient. The tomotherapy treatment planning system overestimated the skin dose as much as by 10-12% when compared to both MOSFET and TLD. However, the MOSFET measured patient skin doses also had good reproducibility, with inter-fraction deviations ranging from 1% to 1.4%. MOSFETs may be used as a viable dosimeter for measuring skin dose in areas where the treatment planning system may not be accurate.

  10. Organ doses for reference pediatric and adolescent patients undergoing computed tomography estimated by Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Choonsik; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Long, Daniel J.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: To establish an organ dose database for pediatric and adolescent reference individuals undergoing computed tomography (CT) examinations by using Monte Carlo simulation. The data will permit rapid estimates of organ and effective doses for patients of different age, gender, examination type, and CT scanner model. Methods: The Monte Carlo simulation model of a Siemens Sensation 16 CT scanner previously published was employed as a base CT scanner model. A set of absorbed doses for 33 organs/tissues normalized to the product of 100 mAs and CTDI{sub vol} (mGy/100 mAs mGy) was established by coupling the CT scanner model with age-dependent reference pediatric hybrid phantoms. A series of single axial scans from the top of head to the feet of the phantoms was performed at a slice thickness of 10 mm, and at tube potentials of 80, 100, and 120 kVp. Using the established CTDI{sub vol}- and 100 mAs-normalized dose matrix, organ doses for different pediatric phantoms undergoing head, chest, abdomen-pelvis, and chest-abdomen-pelvis (CAP) scans with the Siemens Sensation 16 scanner were estimated and analyzed. The results were then compared with the values obtained from three independent published methods: CT-Expo software, organ dose for abdominal CT scan derived empirically from patient abdominal circumference, and effective dose per dose-length product (DLP). Results: Organ and effective doses were calculated and normalized to 100 mAs and CTDI{sub vol} for different CT examinations. At the same technical setting, dose to the organs, which were entirely included in the CT beam coverage, were higher by from 40 to 80% for newborn phantoms compared to those of 15-year phantoms. An increase of tube potential from 80 to 120 kVp resulted in 2.5-2.9-fold greater brain dose for head scans. The results from this study were compared with three different published studies and/or techniques. First, organ doses were compared to those given by CT-Expo which revealed dose

  11. Patient safety, error reduction, and pediatric nurses' perceptions of smart pump technology.

    PubMed

    Mason, Janice Jackson; Roberts-Turner, Renée; Amendola, Virginia; Sill, Anne M; Hinds, Pamela S

    2014-01-01

    Patient safety and error reduction are essential to improve patient care, and new technology is expected to contribute to such improvements while reducing costs and increasing care efficiency in health care organizations. The purpose of this study was to assess the relationships among pediatric nurses' perceptions of smart infusion pump (SIP) technology, patient safety, and error reduction. Findings revealed that RNs' perceptions of SIP correlated with patient safety. No significant relationship was found between RNs' perceptions of SIP and error reduction, but data retrieved from the pumps revealed 93 manipulations of the pumps, of which error reduction was captured 65 times.

  12. Dual antiangiogenic inhibition: a phase I dose escalation and expansion trial targeting VEGF-A and VEGFR in patients with advanced solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wheler, Jennifer J.; Naing, Aung; Piha-Paul, Sarina A.; Fu, Siqing; Tsimberidou, Apostolia M.; Hong, David S.; Janku, Filip; Zinner, Ralph; Jiang, Yunfang; Huang, Mei; Lin, Quan; Parkhurst, Kristin; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2015-01-01

    Summary Purpose Angiogenesis plays a pivotal role in tumor growth and metastasis. Sorafenib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR), combined with bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A), would vertically inhibit VEGF/VEGFR signaling. A phase I trial was performed to assess safety, maximum tolerated dose (MTD), and clinical correlates. Experimental design Patients with advanced solid tumors refractory to standard therapy were eligible. In cohorts of escalating doses, patients received sorafenib daily for 28 days and bevacizumab every two weeks. Clinical correlates included VEGF polymorphisms. Expansion cohorts of responding tumor types were enrolled. Results One hundred fifteen patients were treated, and the MTD was identified as 200 mg twice daily sorafenib and 5 mg/kg bevacizumab every two weeks. Median number of prior therapies was four. Twenty-nine patients (25 %) achieved stable disease ≥6 months; six patients (5 %) achieved a partial response (total SD≥6 months/PR=35 (30 %)). 76 patients (66 %) experienced adverse events of grade 2 or higher, most commonly hand and foot syndrome (n=27, 24 %) and hypertension (n=24, 21 %). Dose-limiting toxicity occurred in eight patients (7 %), and 45 patients (39 %) required dose reduction for toxicity. Grade 3 and 4 hypertension was associated with longer time to treatment failure, overall survival, and higher response rate. Conclusions Combination sorafenib and bevacizumab was well-tolerated and demonstrated antitumor activity in heavily pretreated patients with advanced solid tumors. PMID:25363205

  13. Occupational dose reduction at nuclear power plants: Annotated bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA. Volume 7

    SciTech Connect

    Kaurin, D.G.; Khan, T.A.; Sullivan, S.G.; Baum, J.W.

    1993-07-01

    The ALARA Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory publishes a series of bibliographies of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA in the continuing effort to collect and disseminate information on radiation dose reduction at nuclear power plants. This is volume 7 of the series. The abstracts in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings and conferences, journals, research reports, and searches of the Energy Science and Technology database of the US Department of Energy. The subject material of these abstracts relates to radiation protection and dose reduction, and ranges from use of robotics to operational health physics, to water chemistry. Material on the design, planning, and management of nuclear power stations is included, as well as information on decommissioning and safe storage efforts. Volume 7 contains 293 abstract, an author index, and a subject index. The author index is specific for this volume. The subject index is cumulative and lists all abstract numbers from volumes 1 to 7. The numbers in boldface indicate the abstracts in this volume; the numbers not in boldface represent abstracts in previous volumes.

  14. Occupational dose reduction at nuclear power plants: Annotated bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA. Volume 8

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, S.G.; Khan, T.A.; Xie, J.W.

    1995-05-01

    The ALARA Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory publishes a series of bibliographies of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA in a continuing effort to collect and disseminate information on radiation dose reduction at nuclear power plants. This volume 8 of the series. The abstracts in this bibliography were selected form proceedings of technical meetings and conference journals, research reports, and searches of the Energy Science and Technology database of the US Department of Energy. The subject material of these abstracts relates to the many aspects of radiation protection and dose reduction, and ranges form use of robotics, to operational health physics, to water chemistry. Material on the design, planning, and management of nuclear power stations is included, as well as information on decommissioning and safe storage efforts. Volume 8 contains 232 abstracts, an author index, and a subject index. The author index is specific for this volume. The subject index is cumulative and lists all abstract numbers from volumes 1 to 8. The numbers in boldface indicate the abstracts in this volume; the numbers not in boldface represent abstracts in previous volumes.

  15. Differential Impact of Relative Dose-Intensity Reductions in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Treated with R-CHOP21 or R-CHOP14

    PubMed Central

    Bautista-Gili, Antonia Maria; Garcia, Francesc; Martinez-Serra, Jordi; Sanchez, Blanca; Martorell, Clara; Gines, Jordi; Garcia, Lucia; Gimeno, Eva; Ferraro, Mariana; Del Campo, Raquel; Bargay, Joan; Perez, Albert; Vercher, Javier; Scaff, Miguel; Pacheco, Ana; Ballester, Carmen; Garcia, Florencia; Ramos, Rafael; Salar, Antonio; Besalduch, Joan

    2015-01-01

    DLBCL is an aggressive lymphoma treated with R-CHOP. Recently, attempts have been made to improve the outcome by increasing both dose-density and intensity but there have been no benefits in terms of survival. When treating malignancies RDI is important to consider but there is little published information on DLBCL. The purpose of this study was to analyze the differential prognostic impact of RDI in two cohorts of DLBCL patients treated with R-CHOP21 or R-CHOP14. From January 2001 to August 2013 we included DLBCL patients homogenously treated with R-CHOP21 or R-CHOP14, with or without radiotherapy, at University Hospital Son Espases, Hospital Son Llatzer of Palma and Hospital del Mar of Barcelona (N = 157). In order to avoid selection bias the patients were retrospectively identified from the Pathology Department and Pharmacy registries. Median follow-up was 68 months. There was no difference in the response or survival between the two cohorts. In the R-CHOP21 group, both a reduction higher than 15% in RDI (RR 7.41) and R-IPI (RR 2.99) were independently associated with OS. However, a reduction higher than 15% in RDI (RR 4.41) was only noted for PFS. In the R-CHOP14 group, NCCN-IPI (RR 7.09) and B-symptoms (RR 5.37) for OS; AA stage III-IV (RR 6.26) and bulky disease (RR 4.05) for PFS. There was a trend towards a higher rate of RDI reduction observed in the R-CHOP14 group but it only made an impact in the R-CHOP21 group. We conclude that R-CHOP21 and R-CHOP14 are equivalent regimens in terms of response and survival, but only if RDI reductions are avoided. For patients receiving R-CHOP21 we recommend using clinical and support measures in order to avoid RDI reductions. PMID:25909361

  16. Patient-specific organ dose estimation during transcatheter arterial embolization using Monte Carlo method and adaptive organ segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Hui-Yu; Lin, Yung-Chieh; Tyan, Yeu-Sheng

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate organ doses for individual patients undergoing interventional transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using measurement-based Monte Carlo simulation and adaptive organ segmentation. Five patients were enrolled in this study after institutional ethical approval and informed consent. Gafchromic XR-RV3 films were used to measure entrance surface dose to reconstruct the nonuniform fluence distribution field as the input data in the Monte Carlo simulation. XR-RV3 films were used to measure entrance surface doses due to their lower energy dependence compared with that of XR-RV2 films. To calculate organ doses, each patient's three-dimensional dose distribution was incorporated into CT DICOM images with image segmentation using thresholding and k-means clustering. Organ doses for all patients were estimated. Our dose evaluation system not only evaluated entrance surface doses based on measurements, but also evaluated the 3D dose distribution within patients using simulations. When film measurements were unavailable, the peak skin dose (between 0.68 and 0.82 of a fraction of the cumulative dose) can be calculated from the cumulative dose obtained from TAE dose reports. Successful implementation of this dose evaluation system will aid radiologists and technologists in determining the actual dose distributions within patients undergoing TAE.

  17. Reductions in systolic blood pressure with liraglutide in patients with type 2 diabetes: Insights from a patient-level pooled analysis of six randomized clinical trials☆

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Vivian A.; DeVries, J. Hans; Henry, Robert R.; Donsmark, Morten; Thomsen, Henrik F.; Plutzky, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Aims To quantify the effect of liraglutide on systolic blood pressure (SBP) and pulse in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D), and assess the influence of covariates on observed SBP reductions. Methods A patient-level pooled analysis of six phase 3, randomized trials was conducted. Results The analysis included 2792 randomized patients. In the intention-to-treat population (n = 2783), mean [±SE] SBP reductions from baseline with liraglutide 1.2 mg (2.7 [0.8] mmHg) and 1.8 mg (2.9 [0.7] mmHg) once daily were significantly greater than with placebo (0.5 [0.9] mmHg; P = 0.0029 and P = 0.0004, respectively) after 26 weeks, and were evident after 2 weeks. Liraglutide was also associated with significantly greater SBP reductions than glimepiride and, at a dose of 1.8 mg, insulin glargine and rosiglitazone. SBP reductions with liraglutide weakly correlated with weight loss (Pearson’s correlation coefficient: 0.08–0.12; P ≤ 0.0148). No dependence of these reductions on concomitant antihypertensive medications was detected (P = 0.1304). Liraglutide 1.2 and 1.8 mg were associated with mean increases in pulse of 3 beats per minute (bpm), versus a 1 bpm increase with placebo (P < 0.0001 for each dose versus placebo). Conclusions Liraglutide reduces SBP in patients with T2D, including those receiving concomitant antihypertensive medication. PMID:24561125

  18. Consolidation Radiotherapy in Primary Central Nervous System Lymphomas: Impact on Outcome of Different Fields and Doses in Patients in Complete Remission After Upfront Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreri, Andres Jose Maria; Verona, Chiara; Politi, Letterio Salvatore; Chiara, Anna; Perna, Lucia; Villa, Eugenio; Reni, Michele

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: Avoidance radiotherapy or reduction of irradiation doses in patients with primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) in complete remission (CR) after high-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX)-based chemotherapy has been proposed to minimize the neurotoxicity risk. Nevertheless, no study has focused on the survival impact of radiation parameters, as far as we know, and the optimal radiation schedule remains to be defined. Methods and Materials: The impact on outcome and neurologic performance of different radiation fields and doses was assessed in 33 patients with PCNSL who achieved CR after MTX-containing chemotherapy and were referred to consolidation whole-brain irradiation (WBRT). Patterns of relapse were analyzed on computed tomography-guided treatment planning, and neurologic impairment was assessed by the Mini Mental Status Examination. Results: At a median follow-up of 50 months, 21 patients are relapse-free (5-year failure-free survival [FFS], 51%). WBRT doses {>=}40 Gy were not associated with improved disease control in comparison with a WBRT dose of 30 to 36 Gy (relapse rate, 46% vs. 30%; 5-year FFS, 51% vs. 50%; p = 0.26). Disease control was not significantly different between patients irradiated to the tumor bed with 45 to 54 Gy or with 36 to 44 Gy, with a 5-year FFS of 35% and 44% (p = 0.43), respectively. Twenty patients are alive (5-year overall survival, 54%); WB and tumor bed doses did not have an impact on survival. Impairment as assessed by the Mini Mental Status Examination was significantly more common in patients treated with a WBRT dose {>=}40 Gy. Conclusion: Consolidation with WBRT 36 Gy is advisable in patients with PCNSL in CR after HD-MTX-based chemotherapy. Higher doses do not change the outcome and could increase the risk of neurotoxicity.

  19. Dose coefficients in pediatric and adult abdominopelvic CT based on 100 patient models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Li, Xiang; Segars, W. Paul; Frush, Donald P.; Paulson, Erik K.; Samei, Ehsan

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies have shown the feasibility of estimating patient dose from a CT exam using CTDIvol-normalized-organ dose (denoted as h), DLP-normalized-effective dose (denoted as k), and DLP-normalized-risk index (denoted as q). However, previous studies were limited to a small number of phantom models. The purpose of this work was to provide dose coefficients (h, k, and q) across a large number of computational models covering a broad range of patient anatomy, age, size percentile, and gender. The study consisted of 100 patient computer models (age range, 0 to 78 y.o.; weight range, 2-180 kg) including 42 pediatric models (age range, 0 to 16 y.o.; weight range, 2-80 kg) and 58 adult models (age range, 18 to 78 y.o.; weight range, 57-180 kg). Multi-detector array CT scanners from two commercial manufacturers (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare; SOMATOM Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare) were included. A previously-validated Monte Carlo program was used to simulate organ dose for each patient model and each scanner, from which h, k, and q were derived. The relationships between h, k, and q and patient characteristics (size, age, and gender) were ascertained. The differences in conversion coefficients across the scanners were further characterized. CTDIvol-normalized-organ dose (h) showed an exponential decrease with increasing patient size. For organs within the image coverage, the average differences of h across scanners were less than 15%. That value increased to 29% for organs on the periphery or outside the image coverage, and to 8% for distributed organs, respectively. The DLP-normalized-effective dose (k) decreased exponentially with increasing patient size. For a given gender, the DLP-normalized-risk index (q) showed an exponential decrease with both increasing patient size and patient age. The average differences in k and q across scanners were 8% and 10%, respectively. This study demonstrated that the knowledge of patient information and CTDIvol/DLP values may

  20. Noise correlation in CBCT projection data and its application for noise reduction in low-dose CBCT

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hua; Ouyang, Luo; Wang, Jing E-mail: jing.wang@utsouthwestern.edu; Ma, Jianhua E-mail: jing.wang@utsouthwestern.edu; Huang, Jing; Chen, Wufan

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To study the noise correlation properties of cone-beam CT (CBCT) projection data and to incorporate the noise correlation information to a statistics-based projection restoration algorithm for noise reduction in low-dose CBCT. Methods: In this study, the authors systematically investigated the noise correlation properties among detector bins of CBCT projection data by analyzing repeated projection measurements. The measurements were performed on a TrueBeam onboard CBCT imaging system with a 4030CB flat panel detector. An anthropomorphic male pelvis phantom was used to acquire 500 repeated projection data at six different dose levels from 0.1 to 1.6 mAs per projection at three fixed angles. To minimize the influence of the lag effect, lag correction was performed on the consecutively acquired projection data. The noise correlation coefficient between detector bin pairs was calculated from the corrected projection data. The noise correlation among CBCT projection data was then incorporated into the covariance matrix of the penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) criterion for noise reduction of low-dose CBCT. Results: The analyses of the repeated measurements show that noise correlation coefficients are nonzero between the nearest neighboring bins of CBCT projection data. The average noise correlation coefficients for the first- and second-order neighbors are 0.20 and 0.06, respectively. The noise correlation coefficients are independent of the dose level. Reconstruction of the pelvis phantom shows that the PWLS criterion with consideration of noise correlation (PWLS-Cor) results in a lower noise level as compared to the PWLS criterion without considering the noise correlation (PWLS-Dia) at the matched resolution. At the 2.0 mm resolution level in the axial-plane noise resolution tradeoff analysis, the noise level of the PWLS-Cor reconstruction is 6.3% lower than that of the PWLS-Dia reconstruction. Conclusions: Noise is correlated among nearest neighboring

  1. Effect of low-dose (single-dose) magnesium sulfate on postoperative analgesia in hysterectomy patients receiving balanced general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Taheri, Arman; Haryalchi, Katayoun; Mansour Ghanaie, Mandana; Habibi Arejan, Neda

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim. Aparallel, randomized, double blinded, placebo-controlled trial study was designed to assess the efficacy of single low dose of intravenous magnesium sulfate on post-total abdominal hysterectomy (TAH) pain relief under balanced general anesthesia. Subject and Methods. Forty women undergoing TAH surgery were assigned to two magnesium sulfate (N = 20) and normal saline (N = 20) groups randomly. The magnesium group received magnesium sulfate 50 mg·kg(-1) in 100 mL of normal saline solution i.v as single-dose, just 15 minutes before induction of anesthesia whereas patients in control group received 100 mL of 0.9% sodium chloride solution at the same time. The same balanced general anesthesia was induced for two groups. Pethidine consumption was recorded over 24 hours precisely as postoperative analgesic. Pain score was evaluated with Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) at 0, 6, 12, and 24 hours after the surgeries. Results. Postoperative pain score was lower in magnesium group at 6, 12, and 24 hours after the operations significantly (P < 0.05). Pethidine requirement was significantly lower in magnesium group throughout 24 hours after the surgeries (P = 0.0001). Conclusion. Single dose of magnesium sulfate during balanced general anesthesia could be considered as effective and safe method to reduce postoperative pain and opioid consumption after TAH.

  2. Comparison of effective radiation doses from X-ray, CT, and PET/CT in pediatric patients with neuroblastoma using a dose monitoring program

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeun Yoon; Shin, Hyun Joo; Kim, Myung-Joon; Lee, Mi-Jung

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate the use of a dose monitoring program for calculating and comparing the diagnostic radiation doses in pediatric patients with neuroblastoma. METHODS We retrospectively reviewed diagnostic and therapeutic imaging studies performed on pediatric patients with neuroblastoma from 2003 to 2014. We calculated the mean effective dose per exam for X-ray, conventional computed tomography (CT), and CT of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) from the data collected using a dose monitoring program (DoseTrack group) since October 2012. Using the data, we estimated the cumulative dose per person and the relative dose from each modality in all patients (Total group). The effective dose from PET was manually calculated for all patients. RESULTS We included 63 patients with a mean age of 3.2±3.5 years; 28 had a history of radiation therapy, with a mean irradiated dose of 31.9±23.2 Gy. The mean effective dose per exam was 0.04±0.19 mSv for X-ray, 1.09±1.11 mSv for CT, and 8.35±7.45 mSv for CT of PET/CT in 31 patients of the Dose-Track group. The mean estimated cumulative dose per patient in the Total group was 3.43±2.86 mSv from X-ray (8.5%), 7.66±6.09 mSv from CT (19.1%), 18.35±13.52 mSv from CT of PET/CT (45.7%), and 10.71±10.05 mSv from PET (26.7%). CONCLUSION CT of PET/CT contributed nearly half of the total cumulative dose in pediatric patients with neuroblastoma. The radiation dose from X-ray was not negligible because of the large number of X-ray images. A dose monitoring program can be useful for calculating radiation doses in patients with cancer. PMID:27306659

  3. SU-F-18C-12: On the Relationship of the Weighted Dose to the Surface Dose In Abdominal CT - Patient Size Dependency

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Y; Scott, A; Allahverdian, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: It is possible to measure the patient surface dose non-invasively using radiolucent dosimeters. However, the patient size specific weighted dose remains unknown. We attempted to study the weighted dose to surface dose relationship as the patient size varies in abdominal CT. Methods: Seven abdomen phantoms (CIRS TE series) simulating patients from an infant to a large adult were used. Size specific doses were measured with a 100 mm CT chamber under axial scans using a Siemens Sensation 64 (mCT) and a GE 750 HD. The scanner settings were 120 kVp, 200 mAs with fully opened collimations. Additional kVps (80, 100, 140) were added depending on the phantom sizes. The ratios (r) of the weighted CT dose (Dw) to the surface dose (Ds) were related to the phantom size (L) defined as the diameter resulting the equivalent cross-sectional area. Results: The Dw versus Ds ratio (r) was fitted to a linear relationship: r = 1.083 − 0.007L (R square = 0.995), and r = 1.064 − 0.007L (R square = 0.953), for Siemens Sensation 64 and GE 750 HD, respectively. The relationship appears to be independent of the scanner specifics. Conclusion: The surface dose to the weighted dose ratio decreases linearly as the patient size increases. The result is independent of the scanner specifics. The result can be used to obtain in vivo CT dosimetry in abdominal CT.

  4. Patient-size-dependent radiation dose optimisation technique for abdominal CT examinations.

    PubMed

    Ngaile, J E; Msaki, P; Kazema, R

    2012-01-01

    Since patient doses from computed tomography (CT) are relatively high, risk-benefit analysis requires dose to patients and image quality be optimised. The aim of this study was to develop a patient-dependent optimisation technique that uses patient diameter to select a combination of CT scanning parameters that minimise dose delivered to patients undergoing abdominal CT examinations. The study was performed using cylindrical phantoms of diameters ranging from 16 to 40 cm in order to establish the relationship between image degradation, CT scanning techniques, patient dose and patient size from two CT scanners. These relationships were established by scanning the phantoms using standard scanning technique followed by selected combinations of scanning parameters. The image noises through phantom images were determined using region of interest software available in both scanners. The energy depositions to the X-ray detector through phantoms were determined from measurements of CT dose index in air corrected for attenuation of the phantom materials. The results demonstrate that exposure settings (milliampere seconds) could be reduced by up to 82 % for smaller phantom relative to standard milliampere seconds, while detector signal could be reduced by up to 93 % for smaller phantom relative to energy depositions required when scanned using standard scanning protocols. It was further revealed that the use of the object-specific scanning parameters on studies performed with phantom of different diameters could reduce the incident radiation to small size object by up to 86 % to obtain the same image quality required for standard adult object. In view of the earlier mentioned fact, substantial dose saving from small-sized adults and children patients undergoing abdomen CT examinations could be achieved through optimal adjustment of CT scanning technique based on the patient transverse diameter.

  5. Patient dose, gray level and exposure index with a computed radiography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, T. R.; Yoshimura, E. M.

    2014-02-01

    Computed radiography (CR) is gradually replacing conventional screen-film system in Brazil. To assess image quality, manufactures provide the calculation of an exposure index through the acquisition software of the CR system. The objective of this study is to verify if the CR image can be used as an evaluator of patient absorbed dose too, through a relationship between the entrance skin dose and the exposure index or the gray level values obtained in the image. The CR system used for this study (Agfa model 30-X with NX acquisition software) calculates an exposure index called Log of the Median (lgM), related to the absorbed dose to the IP. The lgM value depends on the average gray level (called Scan Average Level (SAL)) of the segmented pixel value histogram of the whole image. A Rando male phantom was used to simulate a human body (chest and head), and was irradiated with an X-ray equipment, using usual radiologic techniques for chest exams. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (LiF, TLD100) were used to evaluate entrance skin dose and exit dose. The results showed a logarithm relation between entrance dose and SAL in the image center, regardless of the beam filtration. The exposure index varies linearly with the entrance dose, but the angular coefficient is beam quality dependent. We conclude that, with an adequate calibration, the CR system can be used to evaluate the patient absorbed dose.

  6. Patient radiation dose in prospectively gated axial CT coronary angiography and retrospectively gated helical technique with a 320-detector row CT scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Seguchi, Shigenobu; Aoyama, Takahiko; Koyama, Shuji; Fujii, Keisuke; Yamauchi-Kawaura, Chiyo

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate radiation dose to patients undergoing computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) for prospectively gated axial (PGA) technique and retrospectively gated helical (RGH) technique. Methods: Radiation doses were measured for a 320-detector row CT scanner (Toshiba Aquilion ONE) using small sized silicon-photodiode dosimeters, which were implanted at various tissue and organ positions within an anthropomorphic phantom for a standard Japanese adult male. Output signals from photodiode dosimeters were read out on a personal computer, from which organ and effective doses were computed according to guidelines published in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 103. Results: Organs that received high doses were breast, followed by lung, esophagus, and liver. Breast doses obtained with PGA technique and a phase window width of 16% at a simulated heart rate of 60 beats per minute were 13 mGy compared to 53 mGy with RGH technique using electrocardiographically dependent dose modulation at the same phase window width as that in PGA technique. Effective doses obtained in this case were 4.7 and 20 mSv for the PGA and RGH techniques, respectively. Conversion factors of dose length product to the effective dose in PGA and RGH were 0.022 and 0.025 mSv mGy{sup -1} cm{sup -1} with a scan length of 140 mm. Conclusions: CTCA performed with PGA technique provided a substantial effective dose reduction, i.e., 70%-76%, compared to RGH technique using the dose modulation at the same phase windows as those in PGA technique. Though radiation doses in CTCA with RGH technique were the same level as, or some higher than, those in conventional coronary angiography (CCA), the use of PGA technique reduced organ and effective doses to levels less than CCA except for breast dose.

  7. Erythropoietin Dose and Mortality in Hemodialysis Patients: Marginal Structural Model to Examine Causality

    PubMed Central

    Streja, Elani; Park, Jongha; Chan, Ting-Yan; Lee, Janet; Soohoo, Melissa; Rhee, Connie M.; Arah, Onyebuchi A.; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2016-01-01

    It has been previously reported that a higher erythropoiesis stimulating agent (ESA) dose in hemodialysis patients is associated with adverse outcomes including mortality; however the causal relationship between ESA and mortality is still hotly debated. We hypothesize ESA dose indeed exhibits a direct linear relationship with mortality in models of association implementing the use of a marginal structural model (MSM), which controls for time-varying confounding and examines causality in the ESA dose-mortality relationship. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 128 598 adult hemodialysis patients over a 5-year follow-up period to evaluate the association between weekly ESA (epoetin-α) dose and mortality risk. A MSM was used to account for baseline and time-varying covariates especially laboratory measures including hemoglobin level and markers of malnutrition-inflammation status. There was a dose-dependent positive association between weekly epoetin-α doses ≥18 000 U/week and mortality risk. Compared to ESA dose of <6 000 U/week, adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval) were 1.02 (0.94–1.10), 1.08 (1.00–1.18), 1.17 (1.06–1.28), 1.27 (1.15–1.41), and 1.52 (1.37–1.69) for ESA dose of 6 000 to <12 000, 12 000 to <18 000, 18 000 to <24 000, 24 000 to <30 000, and ≥30 000 U/week, respectively. High ESA dose may be causally associated with excessive mortality, which is supportive of guidelines which advocate for conservative management of ESA dosing regimen in hemodialysis patients. PMID:27298736

  8. Interactive dose shaping part 2: proof of concept study for six prostate patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamerling, Cornelis Ph; Ziegenhein, Peter; Sterzing, Florian; Oelfke, Uwe

    2016-03-01

    Recently we introduced interactive dose shaping (IDS) as a new IMRT planning strategy. This planning concept is based on a hierarchical sequence of local dose modification and recovery operations. The purpose of this work is to provide a feasibility study for the IDS planning strategy based on a small set of six prostate patients. The IDS planning paradigm aims to perform interactive local dose adaptations of an IMRT plan without compromising already established valuable dose features in real-time. Various IDS tools were developed in our in-house treatment planning software Dynaplan and were utilized to create IMRT treatment plans for six patients with an adeno-carcinoma of the prostate. The sequenced IDS treatment plans were compared to conventionally optimized clinically approved plans (9 beams, co-planar). For each patient, several IDS plans were created, with different trade-offs between organ sparing and target coverage. The reference dose distributions were imported into Dynaplan. For each patient, the IDS treatment plan with a similar or better trade-off between target coverage and OAR sparing was selected for plan evaluation, guided by a physician. For this initial study we were able to generate treatment plans for prostate geometries in 15-45 min. Individual local dose adaptations could be performed in less than one second. The average differences compared to the reference plans were for the mean dose: 0.0 Gy (boost) and 1.2 Gy (PTV), for {{D}98%}:-1.1 Gy and for {{D}2%}:1.1 Gy (both target volumes). The dose-volume quality indicators were well below the Quantec constraints. However, we also observed limitations of our currently implemented approach. Most prominent was an increase of the non-tumor integral dose by 16.4% on average, demonstrating that further developments of our planning strategy are required.

  9. Determination of Optimal Amikacin Dosing Regimens for Pediatric Patients With Burn Wound Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tian; Stockmann, Chris; Healy, Daniel P; Olson, Jared; Wead, Stephanie; Neely, Alice N; Kagan, Richard J; Spigarelli, Michael G; Sherwin, Catherine M T

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to develop optimal amikacin dosing regimens for the empirical treatment of Gram-negative bacterial sepsis in pediatric patients with burn injuries. A pharmacodynamic (PD) target in which the peak concentration (Cmax) is ≥8 times the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) (Cmax/MIC ≥ 8) is reflective of optimal bactericidal activity and has been used to predict clinical outcomes. Population pharmacokinetic modeling was performed in NONMEM 7.2 for pediatric patients with and without burn injuries. Amikacin pharmacokinetic parameters were compared between the two groups and multiple dosing regimens were simulated using MATLAB to achieve the PD target in ≥90% of patients with burn injuries. The pharmacokinetic analysis included 282 amikacin concentrations from 70 pediatric patients with burn injuries and 99 concentrations from 32 pediatric patients without burns. A one-compartment model with first-order elimination described amikacin pharmacokinetics well for both groups. Clearance (CL) was significantly higher in patients with burn injuries than in patients without (7.22 vs 5.36 L/h, P < .001). The volume of distribution (V) was also significantly increased in patients with burn injuries (22.7 vs 18.7 L, P < .01). Weight significantly influenced amikacin CL (P < .001) and V (P < .001) for both groups. Model-based simulations showed that a higher amikacin dose (≥25 mg/kg) achieved a Cmax/MIC ≥8 in ≥90% of patients with assumed infections of organisms with an MIC = 8 mg/L. Amikacin pharmacokinetics are altered in patients with burn injuries, including a significant increase in CL and V. In simulations, increased doses (≥25 mg/kg) led to improved PD target attainment rates. Further clinical evaluation of this proposed dosing regimen is warranted to assess clinical and microbiological outcomes in pediatric patients with burn wound sepsis.

  10. Radiotherapy dosimetry of the breast : Factors affecting dose to the patient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venables, Karen

    The work presented in this thesis developed from the quality assurance for the START trial. This provided a unique opportunity to perform measurements in a breast shaped, soft tissue equivalent phantom in over 40 hospitals, representing 75% of the radiotherapy centres in the UK. A wide range of planning systems using beam library, beam model and convolution based algorithms have been compared. The limitations of current algorithms as applied to breast radiotherapy have been investigated by analysing the results of the START quality assurance programme, performing further measurements of surface dose and setting up of a Monte Carlo system to calculate dose distributions and superficial doses. Measurements in both 2D and 3D breast phantoms indicated that the average measured dose at the centre of the breast was lower than that calculated on the planning system by approximately 2%. Surface dose measurements showed good agreement between measurements and Monte Carlo calculations with values ranging from 6% of the maximum dose for a small field (5cmx5cm) at normal incidence to 37% for a large field (9cmx20cm) at an angle of 75°. Calculation on CT plans with pixel by pixel correction for the breast density indicated that monitor units are lower by an average 3% compared to a bulk density corrected plan assuming a density of 1g.cm-3. The average dose estimated from TLD in build-up caps placed on the patient surface was 0.99 of the prescribed dose. This shows that the underestimation of dose due to the assumption of unit density tissue is partially cancelled by the overestimation of dose by the algorithms. The work showed that simple calculation algorithms can be used for calculation of dose to the breast, however they are less accurate for patients who have undergone a mastectomy and in regions close to inhomogeneities where more complex algorithms are needed.

  11. Dose tailoring strategies in haemodialysis patients: a discussion of case histories.

    PubMed

    Kleophas, Werner

    2005-06-01

    Tailoring of the epoetin dose to the needs, clinical condition and circumstances of individual patients with renal anaemia offers potential for optimizing the benefits and costs of epoetin therapy. This can be achieved through alterations to dosing frequency, administration route and/or delivery device. Two case histories are presented to illustrate dose tailoring of epoetin therapy in daily clinical practice. The first patient was a man aged 23 years with renal failure secondary to vasculitis. Haemoglobin (Hb) levels were stable during treatment with subcutaneous (s.c.) epoetin-beta. Switching to intravenous (i.v.) epoetin-beta required, after a 5 month period of complex dose adjustments, a 50% increase in the dose of epoetin-beta to maintain Hb levels. The second patient was a woman aged 50 years with diabetic nephropathy. She self-administered epoetin-beta via the Reco-Pen device to maintain stable Hb levels. Epoetin-beta is approved for administration at dosing frequencies ranging from three times weekly to once every 2 weeks, is safe and effective whether administered by the s.c. or i.v. route and is available in a range of delivery devices. Epoetin-beta therapy can be easily tailored according to the needs, preferences and circumstances of individual patients, thereby maximizing treatment outcomes. PMID:15958825

  12. A dose-comparative endocrine-clinical study of leuprorelin in premenopausal breast cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Dowsett, M.; Mehta, A.; Mansi, J.; Smith, I. E.

    1990-01-01

    Twelve premenopausal patients with advanced breast cancer were randomised to receive 3.75 or 7.5 mg of a slow release formulation of the luteinising hormone releasing hormone agonist leuprorelin once every 4 weeks. All patients were oestrogen receptor positive or unknown. Serum levels of gonadotrophins and oestrogens were suppressed markedly by both doses. All oestrogen values during treatment were within the postmenopausal range except for a single oestradiol level (274 pmol l-1) in one patient on the lower dose. There was no other indication that this lower dose was less effective as an oestrogen suppressant. There were two objective responders to the 3.75 mg dose and three to the 7.5 mg dose. Toxicity was confined almost entirely to hot flushes which occurred in 11/12 patients. We conclude that the slow release formulation of leuprorelin is effective in breast cancer treatment and that there is no major detriment to the use of the 3.75 rather than 7.5 mg dose. PMID:2123115

  13. Reductions in carotid chemoreceptor activity with low-dose dopamine improves baroreflex control of heart rate during hypoxia in humans.

    PubMed

    Mozer, Michael T; Holbein, Walter W; Joyner, Michael J; Curry, Timothy B; Limberg, Jacqueline K

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to examine the contribution of the carotid body chemoreceptors to changes in baroreflex control of heart rate with exposure to hypoxia. We hypothesized spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (scBRS) would be reduced with hypoxia and this effect would be blunted when carotid chemoreceptor activity was reduced with low-dose dopamine. Fifteen healthy adults (11 M/4 F) completed two visits randomized to intravenous dopamine or placebo (saline). On each visit, subjects were exposed to 5-min normoxia (~99% SpO2), followed by 5-min hypoxia (~84% SpO2). Blood pressure (intra-arterial catheter) and heart rate (ECG) were measured continuously and scBRS was assessed by spectrum and sequence methodologies. scBRS was reduced with hypoxia (P < 0.01). Using the spectrum analysis approach, the fall in scBRS with hypoxia was attenuated with infusion of low-dose dopamine (P < 0.01). The decrease in baroreflex sensitivity to rising pressures (scBRS "up-up") was also attenuated with low-dose dopamine (P < 0.05). However, dopamine did not attenuate the decrease in baroreflex sensitivity to falling pressures (scBRS "down-down"; P > 0.05). Present findings are consistent with a reduction in scBRS with systemic hypoxia. Furthermore, we show this effect is partially mediated by the carotid body chemoreceptors, given the fall in scBRS is attenuated when activity of the chemoreceptors is reduced with low-dose dopamine. However, the improvement in scBRS with dopamine appears to be specific to rising blood pressures. These results may have important implications for impairments in baroreflex function common in disease states of acute and/or chronic hypoxemia, as well as the experimental use of dopamine to assess such changes. PMID:27418545

  14. Reductions in carotid chemoreceptor activity with low-dose dopamine improves baroreflex control of heart rate during hypoxia in humans.

    PubMed

    Mozer, Michael T; Holbein, Walter W; Joyner, Michael J; Curry, Timothy B; Limberg, Jacqueline K

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to examine the contribution of the carotid body chemoreceptors to changes in baroreflex control of heart rate with exposure to hypoxia. We hypothesized spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (scBRS) would be reduced with hypoxia and this effect would be blunted when carotid chemoreceptor activity was reduced with low-dose dopamine. Fifteen healthy adults (11 M/4 F) completed two visits randomized to intravenous dopamine or placebo (saline). On each visit, subjects were exposed to 5-min normoxia (~99% SpO2), followed by 5-min hypoxia (~84% SpO2). Blood pressure (intra-arterial catheter) and heart rate (ECG) were measured continuously and scBRS was assessed by spectrum and sequence methodologies. scBRS was reduced with hypoxia (P < 0.01). Using the spectrum analysis approach, the fall in scBRS with hypoxia was attenuated with infusion of low-dose dopamine (P < 0.01). The decrease in baroreflex sensitivity to rising pressures (scBRS "up-up") was also attenuated with low-dose dopamine (P < 0.05). However, dopamine did not attenuate the decrease in baroreflex sensitivity to falling pressures (scBRS "down-down"; P > 0.05). Present findings are consistent with a reduction in scBRS with systemic hypoxia. Furthermore, we show this effect is partially mediated by the carotid body chemoreceptors, given the fall in scBRS is attenuated when activity of the chemoreceptors is reduced with low-dose dopamine. However, the improvement in scBRS with dopamine appears to be specific to rising blood pressures. These results may have important implications for impairments in baroreflex function common in disease states of acute and/or chronic hypoxemia, as well as the experimental use of dopamine to assess such changes.

  15. Risk Factors and Dose-Effect Relationship for Mandibular Osteoradionecrosis in Oral and Oropharyngeal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ik Jae; Koom, Woong Sub; Lee, Chang Geol; Kim, Yong Bae; Yoo, Sei Whan; Keum, Ki Chang; Kim, Gwi Eon; Choi, Eun Chang; Cha, In Ho

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To analyze risk factors and the dose-effect relationship for osteoradionecrosis (ORN) of the mandible after radiotherapy of oral and oropharyngeal cancers. Materials and Methods: One-hundred ninety-eight patients with oral (45%) and oropharyngeal cancer (55%) who had received external radiotherapy between 1990 and 2000 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients had a dental evaluation before radiotherapy. The median radiation dose was 60 Gy (range, 16-75 Gy), and the median biologically effective dose for late effects (BED{sub late}) in bone was 114 Gy{sub 2} (range, 30-167 Gy{sub 2}). Results: The frequency of ORN was 13 patients (6.6%). Among patients with mandibular surgery, eight had ORN at the surgical site. Among patients without mandibular surgery, five patients had ORN on the molar area of the mandible. The median time to ORN was 22 months (range, 1-69 months). Univariate analysis revealed that mandibular surgery and Co-60 were significant risk factors for ORN (p = 0.01 and 0.04, respectively). In multivariate analysis, mandibular surgery was the most important factor (p = 0.001). High radiation doses over BED 102.6 Gy{sub 2} (conventional dose of 54 Gy at 1.8 Gy/fraction) were also a significant factor for ORN (p = 0.008) and showed a positive dose-effect relationship in logistic regression (p = 0.04) for patients who had undergone mandibular surgery. Conclusions: Mandibular surgery was the most significant risk factor for ORN of mandible in oral and oropharyngeal cancers patients. A BED of 102.6 Gy{sub 2} or higher to the mandible also significantly increases the risk of ORN.

  16. Phase I Dose Escalation Trial of Vandetanib With Fractionated Radiosurgery in Patients With Recurrent Malignant Gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, Emma C.; Damek, Denise; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Liu, Arthur K.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Waziri, Allen; Lillehei, Kevin; Chen, Changhu

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of vandetanib with fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in patients with recurrent malignant gliomas. Methods and Materials: Patients with a recurrent malignant glioma and T1-enhancing recurrent tumor {<=}6 cm were eligible. Vandetanib was given orally, once per day, 7 days a week, starting at least 7 days before SRS and continued until a dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) or disease progression. The planned vandetanib daily dose was 100 mg, 200 mg, and 300 mg for the cohorts 1, 2, and 3, respectively, and was escalated using a standard 3+3 design. A total SRS dose of 36 Gy, 12 Gy per fraction, was delivered over 3 consecutive days. The MTD was defined as the dose of vandetanib at which less than 33% of patients developed DLTs, defined by the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 3 as any Grade 3 or greater nonhematologic toxicity and Grade 4 or greater hematologic toxicity. Results: Ten patients were treated, 6 on cohort 1 and 4 on cohort 2. Treatment characteristics were: 7 men, 3 women; median age, 40 years (range, 22-72); 7 GBM, 3 anaplastic astrocytoma (AA); median initial radiation (RT) dose, 60 Gy (range, 59.4-70); median interval since initial RT, 14.5 months (range, 7-123); All patients received SRS per protocol. The median follow-up time was 4 months (range, 1-10 months). Median time on vandetanib was 3 months (range 1-11). One of 6 patients in the first cohort developed a DLT of Grade 3 hemothorax while on anticoagulation. The MTD was reached when 2 of the 4 patients enrolled in the second cohort developed DLTs. Six patients had radiographic response, 2 with stable disease. Conclusion: The MTD of vandetanib, with SRS in recurrent malignant glioma, is 100 mg daily. Further evaluation of safety and efficacy is warranted.

  17. Patient-specific quantification of respiratory motion-induced dose uncertainty for step-and-shoot IMRT of lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Heng; Park, Peter; Liu, Wei; Matney, Jason; Balter, Peter; Zhang, Xiaodong; Li, Xiaoqiang; Zhu, X. Ronald; Liao, Zhongxing; Li, Yupeng

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to quantify respiratory motion-induced dose uncertainty at the planning stage for step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using an analytical technique.Methods: Ten patients with stage II/III lung cancer who had undergone a planning four-dimensional (4D) computed tomographic scan and step-and-shoot IMRT planning were selected with a mix of motion and tumor size for this retrospective study. A step-and-shoot IMRT plan was generated for each patient. The maximum and minimum doses with respiratory motion were calculated for each plan, and the mean deviation from the 4D dose was calculated, taking delivery time, fractionation, and patient breathing cycle into consideration.Results: For all patients evaluated in this study, the mean deviation from the 4D dose in the planning target volume (PTV) was <2.5%, with a standard deviation <1.2%, and maximum point dose variation from the 4D dose was <6.2% in the PTV assuming delivery dose rate of 200 MU/min and patient breathing cycle of 8 s. The motion-induced dose uncertainty is a function of motion, fractionation, MU (plan modulation), dose rate, and patient breathing cycle.Conclusions: Respiratory motion-induced dose uncertainty varies from patient to patient. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the dose uncertainty on a patient-specific basis, which could be useful for plan evaluation and treatment strategy determination for selected patients.

  18. Patient-specific quantification of respiratory motion-induced dose uncertainty for step-and-shoot IMRT of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Heng; Park, Peter; Liu, Wei; Matney, Jason; Liao, Zhongxing; Balter, Peter; Li, Yupeng; Zhang, Xiaodong; Li, Xiaoqiang; Zhu, X. Ronald

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to quantify respiratory motion-induced dose uncertainty at the planning stage for step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using an analytical technique. Methods: Ten patients with stage II/III lung cancer who had undergone a planning four-dimensional (4D) computed tomographic scan and step-and-shoot IMRT planning were selected with a mix of motion and tumor size for this retrospective study. A step-and-shoot IMRT plan was generated for each patient. The maximum and minimum doses with respiratory motion were calculated for each plan, and the mean deviation from the 4D dose was calculated, taking delivery time, fractionation, and patient breathing cycle into consideration. Results: For all patients evaluated in this study, the mean deviation from the 4D dose in the planning target volume (PTV) was <2.5%, with a standard deviation <1.2%, and maximum point dose variation from the 4D dose was <6.2% in the PTV assuming delivery dose rate of 200 MU/min and patient breathing cycle of 8 s. The motion-induced dose uncertainty is a function of motion, fractionation, MU (plan modulation), dose rate, and patient breathing cycle. Conclusions: Respiratory motion-induced dose uncertainty varies from patient to patient. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the dose uncertainty on a patient-specific basis, which could be useful for plan evaluation and treatment strategy determination for selected patients. PMID:24320498

  19. The influence of patient positioning uncertainties in proton radiotherapy on proton range and dose distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Liebl, Jakob; Paganetti, Harald; Zhu, Mingyao; Winey, Brian A.

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Proton radiotherapy allows radiation treatment delivery with high dose gradients. The nature of such dose distributions increases the influence of patient positioning uncertainties on their fidelity when compared to photon radiotherapy. The present work quantitatively analyzes the influence of setup uncertainties on proton range and dose distributions. Methods: Thirty-eight clinical passive scattering treatment fields for small lesions in the head were studied. Dose distributions for shifted and rotated patient positions were Monte Carlo-simulated. Proton range uncertainties at the 50%- and 90%-dose falloff position were calculated considering 18 arbitrary combinations of maximal patient position shifts and rotations for two patient positioning methods. Normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs), equivalent uniform doses (EUDs), and tumor control probabilities (TCPs) were studied for organs at risk (OARs) and target volumes of eight patients. Results: The authors identified a median 1σ proton range uncertainty at the 50%-dose falloff of 2.8 mm for anatomy-based patient positioning and 1.6 mm for fiducial-based patient positioning as well as 7.2 and 5.8 mm for the 90%-dose falloff position, respectively. These range uncertainties were correlated to heterogeneity indices (HIs) calculated for each treatment field (38% < R{sup 2} < 50%). A NTCP increase of more than 10% (absolute) was observed for less than 2.9% (anatomy-based positioning) and 1.2% (fiducial-based positioning) of the studied OARs and patient shifts. For target volumes TCP decreases by more than 10% (absolute) occurred in less than 2.2% of the considered treatment scenarios for anatomy-based patient positioning and were nonexistent for fiducial-based patient positioning. EUD changes for target volumes were up to 35% (anatomy-based positioning) and 16% (fiducial-based positioning). Conclusions: The influence of patient positioning uncertainties on proton range in therapy of small lesions

  20. The Impact of Dose on Parotid Salivary Recovery in Head and Neck Cancer Patients Treated with Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yun; Taylor, Jeremy M.G.; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2007-01-01

    Purpose A common side effect experienced by head and neck cancer patients after radiotherapy (RT) is impairment of the parotid glands’ ability to produce saliva. Our purpose is to investigate the relationship between radiation dose and saliva changes in the two years following treatment. Methods and Materials The study population includes 142 patients treated with conformal or intensity modulated radiotherapy. Saliva flow rates from 266 parotid glands are measured before and 1, 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months after treatment. Measurements are collected separately from each gland under both stimulated and unstimulated conditions. Bayesian nonlinear hierarchical models were developed and fit to the data. Results Parotids receiving higher radiation produce less saliva. The largest reduction is at 1–3 months after RT followed by gradual recovery. When mean doses are lower (e.g. <25Gy), the model-predicted average stimulated saliva recovers to pre-treatment levels at 12 months and exceeds it at 18 and 24 months. For higher doses (e.g. >30Gy), the stimulated saliva does not return to original levels after two years. Without stimulation, at 24 months, the predicted saliva is 86% of pre-treatment levels for 25Gy and <31% for >40Gy. We do not find evidence to support that the over-production of stimulated saliva at 18 and 24 months after low dose in one parotid gland is due to low saliva production from the other parotid gland. Conclusions Saliva production is impacted significantly by radiation, but with doses <25–30Gy, recovery is substantial and returns to pre-treatment levels two years after RT. PMID:17141973

  1. The impact of dose on parotid salivary recovery in head and neck cancer patients treated with radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yun; Taylor, Jeremy . E-mail: jmgt@umich.edu; Haken, Randall K. ten; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: A common side effect experienced by head and neck cancer patients after radiation therapy (RT) is impairment of the parotid glands' ability to produce saliva. Our purpose is to investigate the relationship between radiation dose and saliva changes in the 2 years after treatment. Methods and Materials: The study population includes 142 patients treated with conformal or intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Saliva flow rates from 266 parotid glands are measured before and 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after treatment. Measurements are collected separately from each gland under both stimulated and unstimulated conditions. Bayesian nonlinear hierarchical models were developed and fit to the data. Results: Parotids receiving higher radiation produce less saliva. The largest reduction is at 1-3 months after RT followed by gradual recovery. When mean doses are lower (e.g., <25 Gy), the model-predicted average stimulated saliva recovers to pretreatment levels at 12 months and exceeds it at 18 and 24 months. For higher doses (e.g., >30 Gy), the stimulated saliva does not return to original levels after 2 years. Without stimulation, at 24 months, the predicted saliva is 86% of pretreatment levels for 25 Gy and <31% for >40 Gy. We do not find evidence to support that the overproduction of stimulated saliva at 18 and 24 months after low dose in 1 parotid gland is the result of low saliva production from the other parotid gland. Conclusions: Saliva production is affected significantly by radiation, but with doses <25-30 Gy, recovery is substantial and returns to pretreatment levels 2 years after RT.

  2. A Prospective Study to Assess Vancomycin Serum Concentrations inPediatric Patients with Current Dosing Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Arfa, Peyman; Karimi, Abdollah; Rafiei Tabatabaei, Sedigheh; Fahimzad, Alireza; Armin, Shahnaz; Sistanizad, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Concerns about increasing bacterial resistance to vancomycin, have caused the adult treatment guidelines to recommend higher trough concentrations based on the type and location of infectious disease. Although these recommendations are not specific to children, the values can be extrapolated. This prospective study was designed to evaluate efficacy of current vancomycin dosing recommendations to achieve therapeutic trough serum concentration in pediatric patients. Laboratory data, vancomycin dosing and subsequent serum concentrations of children in a community teaching pediatrics hospital were collected and analyzed. Trough serum levels were determined at steady state and compared with Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA) 2011 guidelines for the treatment of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) infections. In a prospective observational, cross-sectional study in a university medical center in Tehran, Iran, 50 patients, who received vancomycin for more than 4 doses, were recruited and their trough vancomycin level was determined. The mean age and creatinine clearance of patients were 5.47 ± 4.24 and 87.5 ± 31.25, respectively. Eleven (22%) patients received vancomycin at 40 mg/kg/day (low dose) and 39 (78%) at 60 mg/kg/day (high dose). Considering trough goals of 10-14 and 15-20 mg/L in low and high dose groups, serum levels in 91% (73% sub- therapeutics) and 85% (69% sub-therapeutics) of patients were not in recommended therapeutic range, respectively. This study has shown that current recommended vancomycin dosing regimens in pediatric patients (40-60 mg/kg/day), resulted in sub-therapeutic serum concentrations in our study population. PMID:27610175

  3. A Prospective Study to Assess Vancomycin Serum Concentrations inPediatric Patients with Current Dosing Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Arfa, Peyman; Karimi, Abdollah; Rafiei Tabatabaei, Sedigheh; Fahimzad, Alireza; Armin, Shahnaz; Sistanizad, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Concerns about increasing bacterial resistance to vancomycin, have caused the adult treatment guidelines to recommend higher trough concentrations based on the type and location of infectious disease. Although these recommendations are not specific to children, the values can be extrapolated. This prospective study was designed to evaluate efficacy of current vancomycin dosing recommendations to achieve therapeutic trough serum concentration in pediatric patients. Laboratory data, vancomycin dosing and subsequent serum concentrations of children in a community teaching pediatrics hospital were collected and analyzed. Trough serum levels were determined at steady state and compared with Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA) 2011 guidelines for the treatment of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) infections. In a prospective observational, cross-sectional study in a university medical center in Tehran, Iran, 50 patients, who received vancomycin for more than 4 doses, were recruited and their trough vancomycin level was determined. The mean age and creatinine clearance of patients were 5.47 ± 4.24 and 87.5 ± 31.25, respectively. Eleven (22%) patients received vancomycin at 40 mg/kg/day (low dose) and 39 (78%) at 60 mg/kg/day (high dose). Considering trough goals of 10-14 and 15-20 mg/L in low and high dose groups, serum levels in 91% (73% sub- therapeutics) and 85% (69% sub-therapeutics) of patients were not in recommended therapeutic range, respectively. This study has shown that current recommended vancomycin dosing regimens in pediatric patients (40-60 mg/kg/day), resulted in sub-therapeutic serum concentrations in our study population. PMID:27610175

  4. Radiation dose reduction in CBCT imaging using K-edge filtering and energy weighting.

    PubMed

    Kang, Se-Ryong; Lee, Woo-Jin; Woo, Sang-Yoon; Kim, Dae-Seung; Yi, Won-Jin

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents K-edge filtering and energy weighting methods which enhance the contrast with less radiation does. Usually, energy weighting methods are used with photon-counting detector based CT for each energy bin data obtained to enhance the quality of image. However, we used these methods combine with K-edge filtering in energy-integrating detector. Using K-edge filtering, different energy bin data for energy weighting methods were obtained, and then energy weighting factors were calculated to enhance the contrast of image. We report an evaluation of the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of reconstructed image with and without these two methods. This evaluation was proceeded with two phantoms; one is the phantom created personally, and the other is Sendentexct IQ dental CBCT (SENDENTEXCT, EU). As for the phantom created personally, the CNR of images reconstructed with these methods were increased than CNR of standard images. It was seen that 31% to 81% in each energy weighting method for optimizing each material (cortical bone, inner bone, soft tissue, iodine (18.5 g/l), iodine (37 g/l)). In conclusion, we can enhance the contrast of CT images with less radiation dose using K-edge filtering and energy weighting method. PMID:25571149

  5. Design and functionalities of the MADOR® software suite for dose-reduction management after DTPA therapy.

    PubMed

    Leprince, B; Fritsch, P; Bérard, P; Roméo, P-H

    2016-03-01

    A software suite on biokinetics of radionuclides and internal dosimetry intended for the occupational health practitioners of nuclear industry and for expert opinions has been developed under Borland C++ Builder™. These computing tools allow physicians to improve the dosimetric follow-up of workers in agreement with the French regulations and to manage new internal contaminations by radionuclides such as Pu and/or Am after diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid treatments. In this paper, the concept and functionalities of the first two computing tools of this MADOR(®) suite are described. The release 0.0 is the forensic application, which allows calculating the derived recording levels for intake by inhalation or ingestion of the main radioisotopes encountered in occupational environment. Indeed, these reference values of activity are convenient to interpret rapidly the bioassay measurements and make decisions as part of medical monitoring. The release 1.0 addresses the effect of DTPA treatments on Pu/Am biokinetics and the dose benefit. The forensic results of the MADOR(®) suite were validated by comparison with reference data.

  6. A hybrid electron and photon IMRT planning technique that lowers normal tissue integral patient dose using standard hardware

    SciTech Connect

    Rosca, Florin

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: To present a mixed electron and photon IMRT planning technique using electron beams with an energy range of 6-22 MeV and standard hardware that minimizes integral dose to patients for targets as deep as 7.5 cm. Methods: Ten brain cases, two lung, a thyroid, an abdominal, and a parotid case were planned using two planning techniques: a photon-only IMRT (IMRT) versus a mixed modality treatment (E + IMRT) that includes an enface electron beam and a photon IMRT portion that ensures a uniform target coverage. The electron beam is delivered using a regular cutout placed in an electron cone. The electron energy was chosen to provide a good trade-off between minimizing integral dose and generating a uniform, deliverable plan. The authors choose electron energies that cover the deepest part of PTV with the 65%-70% isodose line. The normal tissue integral dose, the dose for ring structures around the PTV, and the volumes of the 75%, 50%, and 25% isosurfaces were used to compare the dose distributions generated by the two planning techniques. Results: The normal tissue integral dose was lowered by about 20% by the E + IMRT plans compared to the photon-only IMRT ones for most studied cases. With the exception of lungs, the dose reduction associated to the E + IMRT plans was more pronounced further away from the target. The average dose ratio delivered to the 0-2 cm and the 2-4 cm ring structures for brain patients for the two planning techniques were 89.6% and 70.8%, respectively. The enhanced dose sparing away from the target for the brain patients can also be observed in the ratio of the 75%, 50%, and 25% isodose line volumes for the two techniques, which decreases from 85.5% to 72.6% and further to 65.1%, respectively. For lungs, the lateral electron beams used in the E + IMRT plans were perpendicular to the mostly anterior/posterior photon beams, generating much more conformal plans. Conclusions: The authors proved that even using the existing electron delivery

  7. Method to Calculate the Protamine Dose Necessary for Reversal of Heparin as a Function of Activated Clotting Time in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cuenca, Javier Suárez; Diz, Pilar Gayoso; Sampedro, Francisco Gude; Zincke, J. Marcos Gómez; Acuña, Helena Rey; Fontanillo, M. Manuela Fontanillo

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: Activated clotting time (ACT) has been used to monitor coagulation and guide management of anticoagulation control in patients undergoing cardiac surgery for decades. However, reversal of heparin with protamine is typically empirically based on total heparin administered. Dose-related adverse effects of protamine are well described. The aim of this study was to evaluate a heparin reversal strategy based on calculation of the protamine dose based on ACT measurements. We present a method using a mathematical formula based on the dose–response line (1). To check the formula, we performed a retrospective observational cohort study of 177 patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). The study group of 80 patients was administered the dose of protamine obtained using our formula, and the control group of 97 patients was administered the empirically calculated dose. The ACT returned to normal values in patients who were given doses of protamine that were calculated using our formula; all but two had a final ACT of 141. The application of the formula resulted in a significant reduction in the dose of protamine (p < .023). The formula we present is a valid method for calculating the dose of protamine necessary to neutralize heparin. This same method can be used working with a target ACT to adjust the dose of heparin. As a result of its functionality, it allows application on a daily basis standardizing the process. We believe that the formula we developed can be applied in all those procedures in which it is necessary to anticoagulate patients with heparin and later neutralization (cardiac surgery with or without CPB, vascular surgery, procedures of interventional cardiology, and extracorporeal depuration procedures). PMID:24649571

  8. Evaluation of radiation dose to pediatric patients during certain special procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulieman, A.; Alzimami, K.; Elhag, B.; Babikir, E.; Alsafi, K.

    2014-11-01

    This study was intended to measure pediatric entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and effective dose during micturating cystourethrography (MCU), intravenous urography (IVU) and barium studies (barium meal, enema, and swallow) and to propose a local diagnostic reference level (DRL). ESAK was measured for patients using calibrated thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs, GR200A). Effective doses (E) were calculated using the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) software. A total of 236 special pediatric procedures were investigated. 21.7% of the sample comprised barium procedures, 18.6% were MCU procedures while 59.5% of the sample were IVU procedures. The mean ESAK measurements (mGy) were 2.1±0.8, 3.0±23 and 1.2±0.2 for barium meal, enema and swallow in the same order. The mean patient dose for IVU procedures was 12.4±8.7 mGy per procedure and the mean patient dose per MCU procedure was 5.8±7 mGy. Local DRLs were proposed for all procedures. The patient doses in this study are within the reported values, suggesting that pediatric patients are adequately protected.

  9. Osteonecrosis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus develops very early after starting high dose corticosteroid treatment

    PubMed Central

    Oinuma, K; Harada, Y; Nawata, Y; Takabayashi, K; Abe, I; Kamikawa, K; Moriya, H

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To investigate the actual time of onset of osteonecrosis (ON) after high dose corticosteroid treatment in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).
METHODS—72 patients with active SLE, who received high dose corticosteroid for the first time, for the development of ON at hips and knees were monitored by magnetic resonance imaging for at least 12 months.
RESULTS—ON lesions were detected in 32/72 patients (44%) between one and five months (3.1 months on average) after starting high dose corticosteroid treatment. No osteonecrotic lesion was newly detected from the sixth month of treatment until the end of the follow up period.
CONCLUSION—The findings suggested that the actual time of onset of ON in SLE is within the first month of high dose corticosteroid treatment.

 PMID:11709458

  10. Assessment of occupational and patient dose from diagnostic and therapeutic radiation exposure using thermoluminescent dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Banu, H; Alam, M N; Chowdhury, M I; Kamal, M; Bardhan, D K; Chakraborty, D

    1998-04-01

    Radiation doses of occupational personnel exposed from diagnostic x rays, therapeutic installations, and patients were measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters. The monthly occupational doses from diagnostic x ray ranged from 0.1076 mSv to 0.5774 mSv, and those from therapeutic treatment ranged from 0.365 mSv to 0.657 mSv, which is within the dose limit recommended by ICRP 60. The patient organ doses were evaluated and found to range from 0.0615 mSv s(-1) to 2.8823 mSv s(-1) for gonad, 0.3676 mSv s(-1) to 2.1088 mSv s(-1) for thyroid, and 0.00972 mSv s(-1) to 4.01 mSv s(-1) for eyes. PMID:9525423

  11. Influence of Errors in Patient Positioning on Resulting Dose Distribution during IMRT Treatment for Head and Neck Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navrátil, Matěj

    2010-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) irradiation technique uses steep dose gradients to protect organs at risk (OAR) during treatment course. Therefore even small mistakes in patient positioning during treatment course may lead to significant changes in dose distribution. The influence of small errors (order of millimeters) in patient's positioning on resulting dose absorbed in OARs and target volume (PTV, GTV) was simulated in this work.

  12. WE-E-18A-10: Comparison of Patient Dose and Vessel Visibility Between Antiscatter Grid Removal and Lower Angiographic Radiation Dose Settings for Pediatric Imaging: A Preclinical Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, K; Nachabe, R; Racadio, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To define an alternative to antiscatter grid (ASG) removal in angiographic systems which achieves similar patient dose reduction as ASG removal without degrading image quality during pediatric imaging. Methods: This study was approved by the local institution animal care and use committee (IACUC). Six different digital subtraction angiography settings were evaluated that altered the mAs, (100, 70, 50, 35, 25, 17.5% of reference mAs) with and without ASG. Three pigs of 5, 15, and 20 kg (9, 15, and 17 cm abdominal thickness; smaller than a newborn, average 3 yr old, and average 10 year old human abdomen respectively) were imaged using the six dose settings with and without ASG. Image quality was defined as the order of vessel branch that is visible relative to the injected vessel. Five interventional radiologists evaluated all images. Image quality and patient dose were statistically compared using analysis of variance and receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis to define the preferred dose level and use of ASG for a minimum visibility of 2nd or 3rd order branches of vessel visibility. Results: ASG grid removal reduces dose by 26% with reduced image quality. Only with the ASG present can 3rd order branches be visualized; 100% mAs is required for 9 cm pig while 70% mAs is adequate for the larger pigs. 2nd order branches can be visualized with ASG at 17.5% mAs for all three pig sizes. Without the ASG, 50%, 35% and 35% mAs is required for smallest to largest pig. Conclusion: Removing ASG reduces patient dose and image quality. Image quality can be improved with the ASG present while further reducing patient dose if an optimized radiographic technique is used. Rami Nachabe is an employee of Philips Health Care; Keith Strauss is a paid consultant of Philips Health Care.

  13. Less Is More: Low-dose Prothrombin Complex Concentrate Effective in Acute Care Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Quick, Jacob A; Meyer, Jennifer M; Coughenour, Jeffrey P; Barnes, Stephen L

    2015-06-01

    Optimal dosing of prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) has yet to be defined and varies widely due to concerns of efficacy and thrombosis. We hypothesized a dose of 15 IU/kg actual body weight of a three-factor PCC would effectively correct coagulopathy in acute care surgery patients. Retrospective review of 41 acute care surgery patients who received 15 IU/kg (± 10%) actual body weight PCC for correction of coagulopathy. Demographics, laboratory results, PCC dose, blood and plasma transfusions, and thrombotic complications were analyzed. We performed subset analyses of trauma patients and those taking warfarin. Mean age was 69 years (18-94 years). Thirty (73%) trauma patients, 8 (20%) emergency surgery patients, 2 (5%) burns, and 1 (2%) nontrauma neurosurgical patient were included. Mean PCC dose was 1305.4 IU (14.2 IU/kg actual body weight). Mean change in INR was 2.52 to 1.42 (p 0.00004). Successful correction (INR <1.5) was seen in 78 per cent. Treatment failures had a higher initial INR (4.3 vs 2.03, p 0.01). Mean plasma transfusion was 1.46 units. Mean blood transfusion was 1.61 units. Patients taking prehospital warfarin (n = 29, 71%) had higher initial INR (2.78 vs 1.92, p 0.05) and received more units of plasma (1.93 vs 0.33, p 0.01) than those not taking warfarin. No statistical differences were seen between trauma and nontrauma patients. One thrombotic event occurred. Administration of low-dose PCC, 15 IU/kg actual body weight, effectively corrects coagulopathy in acute care surgery patients regardless of warfarin use, diagnosis or plasma transfusion. PMID:26031281

  14. Proposal of human spinal cord reirradiation dose based on collection of data from 40 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Nieder, Carsten . E-mail: cnied@hotmail.com; Grosu, Anca L.; Andratschke, Nicolaus H.; Molls, Michael

    2005-03-01

    Purpose: Driven by numerous reports on recovery of occult radiation injury, reirradiation of the spinal cord today is considered a realistic option. In rodents, long-term recovery was observed to start at approximately 8 weeks. However, prospective clinical studies are lacking. Therefore, a combined analysis of all published clinical data might provide a valuable basis for future trials. Methods and materials: We collected data from 40 individual patients published in eight different reports after a comprehensive MEDLINE search. These represent all patients with data available for dose per fraction and total dose of each of both treatment courses. We recalculated the biologically effective dose (BED) according to the linear-quadratic model using an {alpha}/{beta} value of 2 Gy for the cervical and thoracic cord and 4 Gy for the lumbar cord. In this model, a dose of 50 Gy given in single daily fractions of 2 Gy is equivalent to a BED of 100 Gy{sub 2} or 75 Gy{sub 4}. For treatment with two daily fractions, a correction term was introduced to take incomplete repair of sublethal damage into account. Results: The cumulative doses ranged from 108 to 205 Gy{sub 2} (median dose, 135 Gy{sub 2}). The median interval between both series was 20 months. Three patients were treated to the lumbar segments only. The median follow-up was 17 months for patients without myelopathy. Eleven patients developed myelopathy after 4-25 months (median, 11 months). Myelopathy was seen only in patients who had received one course to a dose of {>=}102 Gy{sub 2} (n = 9) or were retreated after 2 months (n = 2). In the absence of these two risk factors, no myelopathy developed in 19 patients treated with {<=}135.5 Gy{sub 2} or 7 patients treated with 136-150 Gy{sub 2}. A risk score based on the cumulative BED, the greatest BED for all treatment series in a particular individual, and interval was developed. Low-risk patients remained free of myelopathy and 33% of intermediate-risk patients and 90

  15. A pharmacogenetics-based warfarin maintenance dosing algorithm from Northern Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinxing; Shao, Liying; Gong, Ling; Luo, Fang; Wang, Jin'e; Shi, Yi; Tan, Yu; Chen, Qianlong; Zhang, Yu; Hui, Rutai; Wang, Yibo

    2014-01-01

    Inconsistent associations with warfarin dose were observed in genetic variants except VKORC1 haplotype and CYP2C9*3 in Chinese people, and few studies on warfarin dose algorithm was performed in a large Chinese Han population lived in Northern China. Of 787 consenting patients with heart-valve replacements who were receiving long-term warfarin maintenance therapy, 20 related Single nucleotide polymorphisms were genotyped. Only VKORC1 and CYP2C9 SNPs were observed to be significantly associated with warfarin dose. In the derivation cohort (n = 551), warfarin dose variability was influenced, in decreasing order, by VKORC1 rs7294 (27.3%), CYP2C9*3(7.0%), body surface area(4.2%), age(2.7%), target INR(1.4%), CYP4F2 rs2108622 (0.7%), amiodarone use(0.6%), diabetes mellitus(0.6%), and digoxin use(0.5%), which account for 45.1% of the warfarin dose variability. In the validation cohort (n = 236), the actual maintenance dose was significantly correlated with predicted dose (r = 0.609, P<0.001). Our algorithm could improve the personalized management of warfarin use in Northern Chinese patients. PMID:25126975

  16. SU-E-T-215: Interactive Dose Shaping: Proof of Concept Study for Six Prostate Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Kamerling, CP; Ziegenhein, P; Oelfke, U; Sterzing, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To provide a proof of concept study for IMRT treatment planning through interactive dose shaping (IDS) by utilising the respective tools to create IMRT treatment plans for six prostate patients. Methods: The IDS planning paradigm aims to perform interactive local dose adaptations of an IMRT plan without compromising already established valuable dose features in real-time. Various IDS tools are available in our in-house treatment planning software Dynaplan and were utilised to create IMRT treatment plans for six patients with an adeno-carcinoma of the prostate. The sequenced IDS treatment plans were compared to conventionally optimised clinically approved plans (9 beams, co-planar). The starting point consisted of open fields. The IDS tools were utilised to sculpt dose out of the rectum and bladder. For each patient, several IDS plans were created, with different trade-offs between organ sparing and target coverage. The reference dose distributions were imported into Dynaplan. For each patient, the IDS treatment plan with a similar or better trade-off between target coverage and OAR sparing was selected for plan evaluation, guided by a physician. Pencil beam dose calculation was performed on a grid with a voxel size of 1.95×1.95×2.0 mm{sup 3}. D98%, D2%, mean dose and dose-volume indicators as specified by Quantec were calculated for plan evaluation. Results: It was possible to utilise the software prototype to generate treatment plans for prostate patient geometries in 15–45 minutes. Individual local dose adaptations could be performed in less than one second. The average differences compared to the reference plans were for the mean dose: 0.0 Gy (boost) and 1.2 Gy (CTV), for D98%: −1.1 Gy and for D2%: 1.1 Gy (both target volumes). The dose-volume quality indicators were well below the Quantec constraints. Conclusion: Real-time treatment planning utilising IDS is feasible and has the potential to be implemented clinically. Research at The Institute of

  17. A Proposal for Early Dosing Regimens in Heart Transplant Patients Receiving Thymoglobulin and Calcineurin Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Barten, Markus J; Schulz, Uwe; Beiras-Fernandez, Andres; Berchtold-Herz, Michael; Boeken, Udo; Garbade, Jens; Hirt, Stephan; Richter, Manfred; Ruhpawar, Arjang; Schmitto, Jan Dieter; Schönrath, Felix; Schramm, Rene; Schweiger, Martin; Wilhelm, Markus; Zuckermann, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    There is currently no consensus regarding the dose or duration of rabbit antithymocyte globulin (rATG) induction in different types of heart transplant patients, or the timing and intensity of initial calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) therapy in rATG-treated individuals. Based on limited data and personal experience, the authors propose an approach to rATG dosing and initial CNI administration. Usually rATG is initiated immediately after exclusion of primary graft failure, although intraoperative initiation may be appropriate in specific cases. A total rATG dose of 4.5 to 7.5 mg/kg is advisable, tailored within that range according to immunologic risk and adjusted according to immune monitoring. Lower doses (eg, 3.0 mg/kg) of rATG can be used in patients at low immunological risk, or 1.5 to 2.5 mg/kg for patients with infection on mechanical circulatory support. The timing of CNI introduction is dictated by renal recovery, varying between day 3 and day 0 after heart transplantation, and the initial target exposure is influenced by immunological risk and presence of infection. Rabbit antithymocyte globulin and CNI dosing should not overlap except in high-risk cases. There is a clear need for more studies to define the optimal dosing regimens for rATG and early CNI exposure according to risk profile in heart transplantation. PMID:27500271

  18. A Proposal for Early Dosing Regimens in Heart Transplant Patients Receiving Thymoglobulin and Calcineurin Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Barten, Markus J.; Schulz, Uwe; Beiras-Fernandez, Andres; Berchtold-Herz, Michael; Boeken, Udo; Garbade, Jens; Hirt, Stephan; Richter, Manfred; Ruhpawar, Arjang; Schmitto, Jan Dieter; Schönrath, Felix; Schramm, Rene; Schweiger, Martin; Wilhelm, Markus; Zuckermann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    There is currently no consensus regarding the dose or duration of rabbit antithymocyte globulin (rATG) induction in different types of heart transplant patients, or the timing and intensity of initial calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) therapy in rATG-treated individuals. Based on limited data and personal experience, the authors propose an approach to rATG dosing and initial CNI administration. Usually rATG is initiated immediately after exclusion of primary graft failure, although intraoperative initiation may be appropriate in specific cases. A total rATG dose of 4.5 to 7.5 mg/kg is advisable, tailored within that range according to immunologic risk and adjusted according to immune monitoring. Lower doses (eg, 3.0 mg/kg) of rATG can be used in patients at low immunological risk, or 1.5 to 2.5 mg/kg for patients with infection on mechanical circulatory support. The timing of CNI introduction is dictated by renal recovery, varying between day 3 and day 0 after heart transplantation, and the initial target exposure is influenced by immunological risk and presence of infection. Rabbit antithymocyte globulin and CNI dosing should not overlap except in high-risk cases. There is a clear need for more studies to define the optimal dosing regimens for rATG and early CNI exposure according to risk profile in heart transplantation. PMID:27500271

  19. Management of patient and staff radiation dose in interventional radiology: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Bartal, Gabriel; Vano, Eliseo; Paulo, Graciano; Miller, Donald L

    2014-04-01

    The increasing complexity and numbers of interventional fluoroscopy procedures have led to increasing patient doses of radiation and to increasing concern over staff doses. Hybrid rooms incorporate multiple imaging modalities and are used by multidisciplinary teams in interventional fluoroscopy suites and operating theaters. These rooms present additional radiation protection challenges. The new low annual exposure limit for the lens of the eye also requires specific measures to prevent cataracts in operators. The traditional attitude of radiation protection must be changed to one of proactive management of radiation dose and image quality. Incorporation of a comprehensive dose management program into the departmental quality assurance program is now essential. Physicians, radiographers, and medical physicists play an essential role in the safe use of fluoroscopy in medical practice. Efficient use of all imaging modalities (e.g., fluoroscopy, digital subtraction angiography, cone-beam CT) requires knowledge of the effects of different equipment settings on patient and staff doses as well as the skill and competence to optimize these settings for each procedure and patient. Updates and recommendations on radiation protection and dose management programs, including aspects of education and training, are presented.

  20. Correction for FDG PET dose extravasations: Monte Carlo validation and quantitative evaluation of patient studies

    SciTech Connect

    Silva-Rodríguez, Jesús Aguiar, Pablo; Sánchez, Manuel; Mosquera, Javier; Luna-Vega, Víctor; Cortés, Julia; Garrido, Miguel; Pombar, Miguel; Ruibal, Álvaro

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Current procedure guidelines for whole body [18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) state that studies with visible dose extravasations should be rejected for quantification protocols. Our work is focused on the development and validation of methods for estimating extravasated doses in order to correct standard uptake value (SUV) values for this effect in clinical routine. Methods: One thousand three hundred sixty-seven consecutive whole body FDG-PET studies were visually inspected looking for extravasation cases. Two methods for estimating the extravasated dose were proposed and validated in different scenarios using Monte Carlo simulations. All visible extravasations were retrospectively evaluated using a manual ROI based method. In addition, the 50 patients with higher extravasated doses were also evaluated using a threshold-based method. Results: Simulation studies showed that the proposed methods for estimating extravasated doses allow us to compensate the impact of extravasations on SUV values with an error below 5%. The quantitative evaluation of patient studies revealed that paravenous injection is a relatively frequent effect (18%) with a small fraction of patients presenting considerable extravasations ranging from 1% to a maximum of 22% of the injected dose. A criterion based on the extravasated volume and maximum concentration was established in order to identify this fraction of patients that might be corrected for paravenous injection effect. Conclusions: The authors propose the use of a manual ROI based method for estimating the effectively administered FDG dose and then correct SUV quantification in those patients fulfilling the proposed criterion.

  1. Busulfan dosing algorithm and sampling strategy in stem cell transplantation patients

    PubMed Central

    de Castro, Francine A; Piana, Chiara; Simões, Belinda P; Lanchote, Vera L; Della Pasqua, O

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim of this investigation was to develop a model-based dosing algorithm for busulfan and identify an optimal sampling scheme for use in routine clinical practice. Methods Clinical data from an ongoing study (n = 29) in stem cell transplantation patients were used for the purposes our analysis. A one compartment model was selected as basis for sampling optimization and subsequent evaluation of a suitable dosing algorithm. Internal and external model validation procedures were performed prior to the optimization steps using ED-optimality criteria. Using systemic exposure as parameter of interest, dosing algorithms were considered for individual patients with the scope of minimizing the deviation from target range as determined by AUC(0,6 h). Results Busulfan exposure after oral administration was best predicted after the inclusion of adjusted ideal body weight and alanine transferase as covariates on clearance. Population parameter estimates were 3.98 h–1, 48.8 l and 12.3 l h–1 for the absorption rate constant, volume of distribution and oral clearance, respectively. Inter-occasion variability was used to describe the differences between test dose and treatment. Based on simulation scenarios, a dosing algorithm was identified, which ensures target exposure values are attained after a test dose. Moreover, our findings show that a sparse sampling scheme with five samples per patient is sufficient to characterize the pharmacokinetics of busulfan in individual patients. Conclusion The use of the proposed dosing algorithm in conjunction with a sparse sampling scheme may contribute to considerable improvement in the safety and efficacy profile of patients undergoing treatment for stem cell transplantation. PMID:25819742

  2. Target and peripheral dose during patient repositioning with the Gamma Knife automatic positioning system (APS) device.

    PubMed

    Tran, Tuan-Anh; Stanley, Thomas R; Malhotra, Harish K; De Boer, Steven F; Prasad, Dheerendra; Podgorsak, Matthew B

    2010-01-28

    The GammaPlan treatment planning system does not account for the leakage and scatter dose during APS repositioning. In this study, the dose delivered to the target site and its periphery from the defocus stage and intershot couch transit (couch motion from the focus to defocus position and back) associated with APS repositioning are measured for the Gamma Knife model 4C. A stereotactic head-frame was attached to a Leksell 16 cm diameter spherical phantom with a calibrated ion chamber at its center. Using a fiducial box, CT images of the phantom were acquired and registered in the GammaPlan treatment planning system to determine the coordinates of the target (center of the phantom). An absorbed dose of 10 Gy to the 50% isodose line was prescribed to the target site for all measurements. Plans were generated for the 8, 14 and 18 mm collimator helmets to determine the relationship of measured dose to the number of repositions of the APS system and to the helmet size. The target coordinate was identical throughout entire study and there was no movement of the APS between various shots. This allowed for measurement of intershot transit dose at the target site and its periphery. The couch was paused in the defocus position, allowing defocus dose measurements at the intracranial target and periphery. Measured dose increases with frequency of repositioning and with helmet collimator size. During couch transit, the target receives more dose than peripheral regions; however, in the defocus position, the greatest dose is superior to the target site. The automatic positioning system for the Leksell Gamma Knife model 4C results in an additional dose of up to 3.87 +/- 0.07%, 4.97 +/- 0.04%, and 5.71 +/- 0.07% to the target site; its periphery receives additional dose that varies depending on its position relative to the target. There is also dose contribution to the patient in the defocus position, where the APS repositions the patient from one treatment coordinate to another

  3. Patient dose simulations for scanning-beam digital x-ray tomosynthesis of the lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Geoff; Fahrig, Rebecca; Yoon, Sungwon; Krishna, Ganesh; Wilfley, Brian

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: An improved method of image guidance for lung tumor biopsies could help reduce the high rate of false negatives. The aim of this work is to optimize the geometry of the scanning-beam digital tomography system (SBDX) for providing real-time 3D tomographic reconstructions for target verification. The unique geometry of the system requires trade-offs between patient dose, imaging field of view (FOV), and tomographic angle.Methods: Tomosynthetic angle as a function of tumor-to-detector distance was calculated. Monte Carlo Software (PCXMC) was used to calculate organ doses and effective dose for source-to-detector distances (SDDs) from 90 to 150 cm, patient locations with the tumor at 20 cm from the source to 20 cm from the detector, and FOVs centered on left lung and right lung as well as medial and distal peripheries of the lungs. These calculations were done for two systems, a SBDX system and a GE OEC-9800 C-arm fluoroscopic unit. To evaluate the dose effect of the system geometry, results from PCXMC were calculated using a scan of 300 mAs for both SBDX and fluoroscopy. The Rose Criterion was used to find the fluence required for a tumor SNR of 5, factoring in scatter, air-gap, system geometry, and patient position for all models generated with PCXMC. Using the calculated fluence for constant tumor SNR, the results from PCXMC were used to compare the patient dose for a given SNR between SBDX and fluoroscopy.Results: Tomographic angle changes with SDD only in the region near the detector. Due to their geometry, the source array and detector have a peak tomographic angle for any given SDD at a source to tumor distance that is 69.7% of the SDD assuming constant source and detector size. Changing the patient location in order to increase tomographic angle has a significant effect on organ dose distribution due to geometrical considerations. With SBDX and fluoroscopy geometries, the dose to organs typically changes in an opposing manner with changing patient

  4. Patient dose simulations for scanning-beam digital x-ray tomosynthesis of the lungs

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Geoff; Yoon, Sungwon; Krishna, Ganesh; Wilfley, Brian; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: An improved method of image guidance for lung tumor biopsies could help reduce the high rate of false negatives. The aim of this work is to optimize the geometry of the scanning-beam digital tomography system (SBDX) for providing real-time 3D tomographic reconstructions for target verification. The unique geometry of the system requires trade-offs between patient dose, imaging field of view (FOV), and tomographic angle. Methods: Tomosynthetic angle as a function of tumor-to-detector distance was calculated. Monte Carlo Software (PCXMC) was used to calculate organ doses and effective dose for source-to-detector distances (SDDs) from 90 to 150 cm, patient locations with the tumor at 20 cm from the source to 20 cm from the detector, and FOVs centered on left lung and right lung as well as medial and distal peripheries of the lungs. These calculations were done for two systems, a SBDX system and a GE OEC-9800 C-arm fluoroscopic unit. To evaluate the dose effect of the system geometry, results from PCXMC were calculated using a scan of 300 mAs for both SBDX and fluoroscopy. The Rose Criterion was used to find the fluence required for a tumor SNR of 5, factoring in scatter, air-gap, system geometry, and patient position for all models generated with PCXMC. Using the calculated fluence for constant tumor SNR, the results from PCXMC were used to compare the patient dose for a given SNR between SBDX and fluoroscopy. Results: Tomographic angle changes with SDD only in the region near the detector. Due to their geometry, the source array and detector have a peak tomographic angle for any given SDD at a source to tumor distance that is 69.7% of the SDD assuming constant source and detector size. Changing the patient location in order to increase tomographic angle has a significant effect on organ dose distribution due to geometrical considerations. With SBDX and fluoroscopy geometries, the dose to organs typically changes in an opposing manner with changing patient

  5. Low dose heparin: bleeding and wound complications in the surgical patient. A prospective randomized study.

    PubMed Central

    Pachter, H L; Riles, T S

    1977-01-01

    A randomized prospective study of low dose heparin was performed in 175 surgical patients to determine the frequency of bleeding and wound complications. The patients were divided into three groups: (1) low dose heparin (5000 units two hours before operation and 5000 units every 12 hours following operation for five days); (2) low dose heparin postoperatively only; and (3) a control group. The frequency of bleeding and wound complications was 27% in group I, 7.5% in group II, and 1.4% in group III. The difference between the control patients and those heparinized pre- and postoperatively is statistically significant (p less than 0.005). None of the patients in any of the three groups had a pulmonary embolus, but the number of patients involved is too small to assess the significance of this finding. However, a bleeding and wound complication rate of 27% is significant. These findings indicate that perhaps the routine use of low dose heparin should be reserved for those patients with preoperative factors indicating an increased risk from thromboembolism. PMID:603271

  6. Molybdenum target specifications for cyclotron production of 99mTc based on patient dose estimates.

    PubMed

    Hou, X; Tanguay, J; Buckley, K; Schaffer, P; Bénard, F; Ruth, T J; Celler, A

    2016-01-21

    In response to the recognized fragility of reactor-produced (99)Mo supply, direct production of (99m)Tc via (100)Mo(p,2n)(99m)Tc reaction using medical cyclotrons has been investigated. However, due to the existence of other Molybdenum (Mo) isotopes in the target, in parallel with (99m)Tc, other technetium (Tc) radioactive isotopes (impurities) will be produced. They will be incorporated into the labeled radiopharmaceuticals and result in increased patient dose. The isotopic composition of the target and beam energy are main factors that determine production of impurities, thus also dose increases. Therefore, they both must be considered when selecting targets for clinical (99m)Tc production. Although for any given Mo target, the patient dose can be predicted based on complicated calculations of production yields for each Tc radioisotope, it would be very difficult to reverse these calculations to specify target composition based on dosimetry considerations. In this article, a relationship between patient dosimetry and Mo target composition is studied. A simple and easy algorithm for dose estimation, based solely on the knowledge of target composition and beam energy, is described. Using this algorithm, the patient dose increase due to every Mo isotope that could be present in the target is estimated. Most importantly, a technique to determine Mo target composition thresholds that would meet any given dosimetry requirement is proposed.

  7. Influence of the characteristic curve on the clinical image quality and patient absorbed dose in lumbar spine radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tingberg, Anders; Herrmann, Clemens; Lanhede, Birgitta; Almen, Anja; Mattsson, Saron; Panzer, Werner; Besjakov, Jack; Mansson, Lars G.; Kheddache, Susanne; Zankl, Maria

    2001-06-01

    The 'European Guidelines on Quality Criteria for Diagnostic Radiographic Images' do not address the choice of film characteristic (H/D) curve, which is an important parameter for the description of a radiographic screen-film system. Since it is not possible to investigate this influence by taking repeated exposures of the same patients on films with systematically varied H/D curves, patient images of lumbar spine were digitised in the current study. The image contrast was altered by digital image processing techniques, simulating images with H/D curves varying from flat over standard latitude to a film type steeper than a mammography film. The manipulated images were printed on film for evaluation. Seven European radiologists evaluated the clinical image quality of in total 224 images by analysing the fulfilment of the European Image Criteria and by visual grading analysis of the images. The results show that the local quality can be significantly improved by the application of films with a steeper film H/D curve compared to the standard latitude film. For images with an average optical density of about 1.25, the application of the steeper film results in a reduction of patient absorbed dose by about 10-15% without a loss of diagnostically relevant image information. The results also show that the patient absorbed dose reduction obtained by altering the tube voltage from 70 kV to 90 kV coincides with a loss of image information that cannot be compensated for by simply changing the shape of the H/D curve.

  8. [Study of immutable variables determining rHuEPO dose requirements on hemodialysis patients].

    PubMed

    Gascón, A; Virto, R; Lou, L M; Pernaute, R; Moreno, R; Pérez, J; Aladrén, M J; Moragrega, B; Castillón, E; Gómez, R; Vives, P J; Alvarez, R; García, F J; Castilla, J; Gutiérrez Colón, J A

    2005-01-01

    Patients receiving recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) therapy show wide variability in their responsiveness to the drug. Variables that affect rHuEPO dose requirements can be broadly divided into modificable and immutable characteristics. Most of the scientific research on rHuEPO hyporesponsiveness has focused on modificable variables (iron status, dialysis adequacy), while immutable variables such as gender, etiology of chronic renal failure (CRF) and age have been insufficiently explored. A cross sectional study was performed in order to evaluate if immutable patient characteristics determine rHuEPO dose requirements among 215 patients (52% males; mean age 66 +/- 14 years) on hemodialysis (HD) for more than twelve months. Data were collected at 10 hemodialysis units in Aragon. Patients were divided into three groups according to their gender, their cause of CRF (diabetic nephropathy, vascular nephropathy, tubulointerstitial nephropathy and primary glomerulonephritis) and their age (younger than 60 years, from 60 to 75 years, older than 75 years). Despite a similar dose of rHuEPO, women had lower mean hemoglobin (11.1 +/- 1.5 versus 11.6 +/- 1.7 g/dl; p = 0.0258) than men. The greater hemoglobin in men than women may be attributed to greater serum albumin in men (3.5 +/- 0.3 versus 3.7 +/- 0.3 mg/dl; p = 0.0001). Requirements of rHuEPO were higher in the patients with etiology of primary glomerulonephritis compared with those with the other etiologies, even those with diabetic nephropathy (p = 0.0374). The rHuE-PO doses required to obtain similar hemoglobin levels were higher in patients younger than 60 years (p = 0.0249). We conclude that women, patients with primary glomerulonephritis as cause of CRF, and patients younger than 60 years showed the highest requirements of rHuEPO doses. PMID:16392304

  9. Pharmacokinetic Changes and Dosing Modification of Aminoglycosides in Critically Ill Obese Patients: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Velissaris, Dimitrios; Karamouzos, Vasilios; Marangos, Markos; Pierrakos, Charalampos; Karanikolas, Menelaos

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the paper is to review the literature and provide recommendations for use of aminoglycoside antibiotics in critically ill obese patients. Literature search in PubMed for all articles on the use of aminoglycosides in critically ill obese patients was conducted, and all articles related to pharmacokinetics in obesity were reviewed. Bibliographies of all searched manuscripts were also reviewed in an attempt to find additional references. Although aminoglycoside pharmacokinetics have been described in detail, data on aminoglycoside use and appropriate dose modification in critically ill obese patients are very limited. Knowledge on aminoglycoside pharmacokinetics and use in critically ill obese patients is incomplete. Pathophysiologic changes in obesity can result in sub- or supra-therapeutic aminoglycoside plasma concentrations, especially in the presence of sepsis. Rigorous clinical studies are needed to establish aminoglycoside dosing guidelines in critically ill obese patients with sepsis. PMID:24883145

  10. A randomized phase II trial of personalized peptide vaccine plus low dose estramustine phosphate (EMP) versus standard dose EMP in patients with castration resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Masanori; Kakuma, Tatsuyuki; Uemura, Hirotsugu; Nasu, Yasutomo; Kumon, Hiromi; Hirao, Yasuhiko; Moriya, Fukuko; Suekane, Shigetaka; Matsuoka, Kei; Komatsu, Nobukazu; Shichijo, Shigeki; Yamada, Akira; Itoh, Kyogo

    2010-07-01

    Personalized peptide vaccination (PPV) combined with chemotherapy could be a novel approach for many cancer patients. In this randomized study, we evaluated the anti-tumor effect and safety of PPV plus low-dose estramustine phosphate (EMP) as compared to standard-dose EMP for HLA-A2- or -A24-positive patients with castration resistant prostate cancer. Patients were randomized into groups receiving either PPV plus low-dose EMP (280 mg/day) or standard-dose EMP (560 mg/day). After disease progression, patients were switched to the opposite regime. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). We randomly assigned 28 patients to receive PPV plus low-dose EMP and 29 patients to receive standard-dose EMP. Nineteen events in the PPV group and 20 events in the EMP group occurred during the first treatment. Median PFS for the first treatment was 8.5 months in the PPV group and 2.8 months in the EMP group with a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.28 (95% CI, 0.14-0.61; log-rank P = 0.0012), while there was no difference for median PFS for the second treatment. The HR for overall survival was 0.3 (95% CI, 0.1-0.91) in favor of the PPV plus low-dose EMP group (log-rank, P = 0.0328). The PPV plus low-dose EMP was well tolerated without major adverse effects and with increased levels of IgG and cytotoxic-T cell responses to the vaccinated peptides. PPV plus low-dose EMP was associated with an improvement in PSA-based PFS as compared to the standard-dose EMP alone.

  11. Cardiac computed tomography radiation dose reduction using interior reconstruction algorithm with the aorta and vertebra as known information.

    PubMed

    Bharkhada, Deepak; Yu, Hengyong; Ge, Shuping; Carr, J Jeffrey; Wang, Ge

    2009-01-01

    High x-ray radiation dose<