Science.gov

Sample records for patient information system

  1. A Computerized Hospital Patient Information Management System

    PubMed Central

    Wig, Eldon D.

    1982-01-01

    The information processing needs of a hospital are many, with varying degrees of complexity. The prime concern in providing an integrated hospital information management system lies in the ability to process the data relating to the single entity for which every hospital functions - the patient. This paper examines the PRIMIS computer system developed to accommodate hospital needs with respect to a central patient registry, inpatients (i.e., Admission/Transfer/Discharge), and out-patients. Finally, the potential for expansion to permit the incorporation of more hospital functions within PRIMIS is examined.

  2. Remote patient monitoring and information system.

    PubMed

    Al-Rousan, Mohammad; Al-Ali, A R; Eberlein, Armin

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a remote healthcare patient monitoring system, called the Virtual Eye (VI), that utilises the World Wide Web infrastructure to monitor, collect, analyse and record patients' health status. The data is stored in the hospital database and can be accessed from anywhere through the internet. When a patient is in an alarming situation, the VI sends SMS messages to the mobile of the designated health personnel via the public GSM network. The novelty of the system lies in its security and its ability to use both the internet and the GSM network as communication media. Doctors can access the database server to compare the patient's current status with his/her medical history. It can be used by one physician to monitor a group of patients simultaneously, or by a group of physicians who all monitor the same patient. It allows plug-and-play of multivendor off-the-shelf hardware devices, thus avoiding proprietary standards.

  3. Radiology Information Systems: DREAM. patient management.

    PubMed

    Bucci, C; Scorretti, D; Floris, E; Capocasa, G

    1996-01-01

    Until recently Radiology Information Systems (RISs) were considered a set of separate, often heterogeneous applications at the functional, technological and architectural level. In last years, the need for an integrated methodological approach and an engineering vision of the system design has become the most important aspect in the implementation of RISs. Based on this approach, the fundamental organizational, operational and clinical objectives of an advanced RIS together with the major critical factors of success, are presented. Such objectives and requirements have constituted the starting basis for the implementation of the DREAM (Distributed radiological environment advanced and multimedia) system, the result of the collaboration of the "Università Cattolica del S. Cuore, Policlinico A. Gemelli" of Rome and "GESI-Gestione Sistemi per l'Informatica". An overview of the main functional characteristics, the most qualifying aspects of the system and the methodological approach followed in its implementation, are reported.

  4. Information security requirements in patient-centred healthcare support systems.

    PubMed

    Alsalamah, Shada; Gray, W Alex; Hilton, Jeremy; Alsalamah, Hessah

    2013-01-01

    Enabling Patient-Centred (PC) care in modern healthcare requires the flow of medical information with the patient between different healthcare providers as they follow the patient's treatment plan. However, PC care threatens the stability of the balance of information security in the support systems since legacy systems fall short of attaining a security balance when sharing their information due to compromises made between its availability, integrity, and confidentiality. Results show that the main reason for this is that information security implementation in discrete legacy systems focused mainly on information confidentiality and integrity leaving availability a challenge in collaboration. Through an empirical study using domain analysis, observations, and interviews, this paper identifies a need for six information security requirements in legacy systems to cope with this situation in order to attain the security balance in systems supporting PC care implementation in modern healthcare.

  5. On-Line Patient Information System with Query

    PubMed Central

    Hayeck, Elie G.; Berman, William J.; Anné, Antharvedi

    1979-01-01

    Background, current state and future plans for the University of Virginia Biomedical Engineering Division Patient Information System are given. System design is highlighted. When fully implemented, the system will make extensive use of “block transmission,” made for user-computer interaction, for data input, retrieval, and update. Other features will include the possibility of multiple primary keys per patient, frequency distribution, on-line patient query (i.e., search on secondary keys), and general printouts.

  6. An intelligent interactive system for delivering individualized information to patients.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, B G; Moore, J D; Forsythe, D E; Carenini, G; Ohlsson, S; Banks, G

    1995-04-01

    This paper is a report on the first phase of a long-term, interdisciplinary project whose goal is to increase the overall effectiveness of physicians' time, and thus the quality of health care, by improving the information exchange between physicians and patients in clinical settings. We are focusing on patients with long-term and chronic conditions, initially on migraine patients, who require periodic interaction with their physicians for effective management of their condition. We are using medical informatics to focus on the information needs of patients, as well as of physicians, and to address problems of information exchange. This requires understanding patients' concerns to design an appropriate system, and using state-of-the-art artificial intelligence techniques to build an interactive explanation system. In contrast to many other knowledge-based systems, our system's design is based on empirical data on actual information needs. We used ethnographic techniques to observe explanations actually given in clinic settings, and to conduct interviews with migraine sufferers and physicians. Our system has an extensive knowledge base that contains both general medical terminology and specific knowledge about migraine, such as common trigger factors and symptoms of migraine, the common therapies, and the most common effects and side effects of those therapies. The system consists of two main components: (a) an interactive history-taking module that collects information from patients prior to each visit, builds a patient model, and summarizes the patients' status for their physicians; and (b) an intelligent explanation module that produces an interactive information sheet containing explanations in everyday language that are tailored to individual patients, and responds intelligently to follow-up questions about topics covered in the information sheet.

  7. A patient privacy protection scheme for medical information system.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chenglang; Wu, Zongda; Liu, Mingyong; Chen, Wei; Guo, Junfang

    2013-12-01

    In medical information systems, there are a lot of confidential information about patient privacy. It is therefore an important problem how to prevent patient's personal privacy information from being disclosed. Although traditional security protection strategies (such as identity authentication and authorization access control) can well ensure data integrity, they cannot prevent system's internal staff (such as administrators) from accessing and disclosing patient privacy information. In this paper, we present an effective scheme to protect patients' personal privacy for a medical information system. In the scheme, privacy data before being stored in the database of the server of a medical information system would be encrypted using traditional encryption algorithms, so that the data even if being disclosed are also difficult to be decrypted and understood. However, to execute various kinds of query operations over the encrypted data efficiently, we would also augment the encrypted data with additional index, so as to process as much of the query as possible at the server side, without the need to decrypt the data. Thus, in this paper, we mainly explore how the index of privacy data is constructed, and how a query operation over privacy data is translated into a new query over the corresponding index so that it can be executed at the server side immediately. Finally, both theoretical analysis and experimental evaluation validate the practicality and effectiveness of our proposed scheme.

  8. Development of an electronic radiation oncology patient information management system.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Abhijit; Asthana, Anupam Kumar; Aggarwal, Lalit Mohan

    2008-01-01

    The quality of patient care is critically influenced by the availability of accurate information and its efficient management. Radiation oncology consists of many information components, for example there may be information related to the patient (e.g., profile, disease site, stage, etc.), to people (radiation oncologists, radiological physicists, technologists, etc.), and to equipment (diagnostic, planning, treatment, etc.). These different data must be integrated. A comprehensive information management system is essential for efficient storage and retrieval of the enormous amounts of information. A radiation therapy patient information system (RTPIS) has been developed using open source software. PHP and JAVA script was used as the programming languages, MySQL as the database, and HTML and CSF as the design tool. This system utilizes typical web browsing technology using a WAMP5 server. Any user having a unique user ID and password can access this RTPIS. The user ID and password is issued separately to each individual according to the person's job responsibilities and accountability, so that users will be able to only access data that is related to their job responsibilities. With this system authentic users will be able to use a simple web browsing procedure to gain instant access. All types of users in the radiation oncology department should find it user-friendly. The maintenance of the system will not require large human resources or space. The file storage and retrieval process would be be satisfactory, unique, uniform, and easily accessible with adequate data protection. There will be very little possibility of unauthorized handling with this system. There will also be minimal risk of loss or accidental destruction of information.

  9. A Cloud Computing Based Patient Centric Medical Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Ankur; Henehan, Nathan; Somashekarappa, Vivek; Pandya, A. S.; Kalva, Hari; Furht, Borko

    This chapter discusses an emerging concept of a cloud computing based Patient Centric Medical Information System framework that will allow various authorized users to securely access patient records from various Care Delivery Organizations (CDOs) such as hospitals, urgent care centers, doctors, laboratories, imaging centers among others, from any location. Such a system must seamlessly integrate all patient records including images such as CT-SCANS and MRI'S which can easily be accessed from any location and reviewed by any authorized user. In such a scenario the storage and transmission of medical records will have be conducted in a totally secure and safe environment with a very high standard of data integrity, protecting patient privacy and complying with all Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) regulations.

  10. Professional and organizational impact of using patient care information systems.

    PubMed

    Hebert, M

    1998-01-01

    Evaluation of information systems has often been limited to success factors in relation to system implementation (on time and on budget), training and use of the system. Little attention has been paid to the longer-term effect of using these systems and the resulting issues for health care professionals and organizations. This paper reports on a multiple case study of community hospitals, which examined the impact of using Patient Care Information Systems. An analytic framework incorporated Donabedian's 3 aspects of quality care: structure, process and outcome. These were examined at three levels of impact; direct substitution, proceduralization and new capabilities. Many of the anticipated benefits in the study did not occur because changes occurring in structure (generally taks done by pharmacists and laboratory technologists) did not automatically influence process changes (such as decision making of physicians and nurses) or patient outcomes. Four themes illustrate important professional and organizational issues with implications for worklife of professionals, management and career training. They include the effects of increased efficiency and productivity; "visible" accountability; changing roles and responsibilities; and learning to use new technology versus using new information.

  11. OPIC: Ontology-driven Patient Information Capturing System for Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Satya S.; Zhao, Meng; Luo, Lingyun; Bozorgi, Alireza; Gupta, Deepak; Lhatoo, Samden D; Zhang, Guo-Qiang

    2012-01-01

    The widespread use of paper or document-based forms for capturing patient information in various clinical settings, for example in epilepsy centers, is a critical barrier for large-scale, multi-center research studies that require interoperable, consistent, and error-free data collection. This challenge can be addressed by a web-accessible and flexible patient data capture system that is supported by a common terminological system to facilitate data re-usability, sharing, and integration. We present OPIC, an Ontology-driven Patient Information Capture (OPIC) system that uses a domain-specific epilepsy and seizure ontology (EpSO) to (1) support structured entry of multi-modal epilepsy data, (2) proactively ensure quality of data through use of ontology terms in drop-down menus, and (3) identify and index clinically relevant ontology terms in free-text fields to improve accuracy of subsequent analytical queries (e.g. cohort identification). EpSO, modeled using the Web Ontology Language (OWL), conforms to the recommendations of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) classification and terminological commission. OPIC has been developed using agile software engineering methodology for rapid development cycles in close collaboration with domain expert and end users. We report the result from the initial deployment of OPIC at the University Hospitals Case Medical Center (UH CMC) epilepsy monitoring unit (EMU) as part of the NIH-funded project on Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP). Preliminary user evaluation shows that OPIC has achieved its design objectives to be an intuitive patient information capturing system that also reduces the potential for data entry errors and variability in use of epilepsy terms. PMID:23304354

  12. OPIC: Ontology-driven Patient Information Capturing system for epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Satya S; Zhao, Meng; Luo, Lingyun; Bozorgi, Alireza; Gupta, Deepak; Lhatoo, Samden D; Zhang, Guo-Qiang

    2012-01-01

    The widespread use of paper or document-based forms for capturing patient information in various clinical settings, for example in epilepsy centers, is a critical barrier for large-scale, multi-center research studies that require interoperable, consistent, and error-free data collection. This challenge can be addressed by a web-accessible and flexible patient data capture system that is supported by a common terminological system to facilitate data re-usability, sharing, and integration. We present OPIC, an Ontology-driven Patient Information Capture (OPIC) system that uses a domain-specific epilepsy and seizure ontology (EpSO) to (1) support structured entry of multi-modal epilepsy data, (2) proactively ensure quality of data through use of ontology terms in drop-down menus, and (3) identify and index clinically relevant ontology terms in free-text fields to improve accuracy of subsequent analytical queries (e.g. cohort identification). EpSO, modeled using the Web Ontology Language (OWL), conforms to the recommendations of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) classification and terminological commission. OPIC has been developed using agile software engineering methodology for rapid development cycles in close collaboration with domain expert and end users. We report the result from the initial deployment of OPIC at the University Hospitals Case Medical Center (UH CMC) epilepsy monitoring unit (EMU) as part of the NIH-funded project on Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP). Preliminary user evaluation shows that OPIC has achieved its design objectives to be an intuitive patient information capturing system that also reduces the potential for data entry errors and variability in use of epilepsy terms.

  13. Making Patient Risk Visible: Implementation of a Nursing Document Information System to Improve Patient Safety.

    PubMed

    Wang, Panfeng; Zhang, Hongjun; Li, Baohua; Lin, Keke

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to develop a nursing information system (NIS), enhance the visibility of patient risk, and identify challenges and facilitators to adoption of the NIS risk assessment system for nurse leaders. This article describes the function of a nursing risk assessment information system, and the results of a survey on the risk assessment system. The results suggested that quality of information processing in nursing significantly improved patient safety. Nurses surveyed demonstrated a high degree of satisfaction, with saving time and improving safety. The nursing document information system described was introduced to improve patient safety and decrease risk. The application of the system has greatly enhanced the efficiency of nursing work, and guides the nurses to make an accurate, comprehensive and objective assessment of patient information, contributing significantly to further improvement in care standards and care decisions.

  14. MobiDis: Toward a Patient Centric Healthcare Information System.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Fabrizio L; Serbanati, Luca D

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents some results of the MobiDis project. MobiDis is an information system that includes healthcare consumers and providers in a unique, virtual organisation aimed at promoting a patient centric paradigm in healthcare. It allows logons from desktop or laptop computers, as well as wireless PDAs or tablet PCs connected to Internet. In MobiDis the clinical data of each consumer are stored in the consumer's virtual healthcare record (VHR), a highly structured entity that exists on the network and is simultaneously updated with information from multiple locations. The MobiDis architecture creates an environment for VHRs by providing them with a large variety of services. In order to prove that our proposed architectural solution meets the project goals a prototype was developed. The paper describes the MobiDis architecture and the VHR services, and briefly presents the prototype.

  15. Using geographic information systems to simulate patient access areas.

    PubMed

    Doi, Shunsuke; Inoue, Takashi; Ide, Hiroo; Nakamura, Toshihito; Fujita, Shinsuke; Suzuki, Takahiro; Takabayashi, Katsuhiko

    2014-01-01

    We constructed a simulation model with a geographic information system (GIS) to predict the future shortage of beds in the Tokyo Metropolitan Area. With a grid square method, we calculated patient numbers for every 500 square meters of the Tokyo Metropolitan Area until 2040 and estimated whether those in need could be admitted to hospitals within an hour's drive from their homes. The simulation demonstrates that after 2025 many patients may not be able to find hospitals within this time framework. The situation will be especially serious in the center of Tokyo and along the railway lines, where many senior citizens reside. We can now apply this innovative GIS method in many fields and especially for the precise estimation of future demands for and supply of medical assistance.

  16. Patient Education as an Information System, Healthcare Tool and Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirhonen, Antti; Silvennoinen, Minna; Sillence, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Patient education (PE) has a crucial role in the function of a healthcare organisation. For the care process of a patient, it is essential to get the right information at the right moment and in the right form. This paper analyses PE as the primary mode of interaction between a patient and a healthcare organisation. The approach is illustrated…

  17. Patient Education as an Information System, Healthcare Tool and Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirhonen, Antti; Silvennoinen, Minna; Sillence, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Patient education (PE) has a crucial role in the function of a healthcare organisation. For the care process of a patient, it is essential to get the right information at the right moment and in the right form. This paper analyses PE as the primary mode of interaction between a patient and a healthcare organisation. The approach is illustrated…

  18. The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS)

    PubMed Central

    Cella, David; Yount, Susan; Rothrock, Nan; Gershon, Richard; Cook, Karon; Reeve, Bryce; Ader, Deborah; Fries, James F.; Bruce, Bonnie; Rose, Mattias

    2010-01-01

    Background The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Roadmap initiative (www.nihpromis.org) is a 5-year cooperative group program of research designed to develop, validate, and standardize item banks to measure patient-reported outcomes (PROs) relevant across common medical conditions. In this article, we will summarize the organization and scientific activity of the PROMIS network during its first 2 years. Design The network consists of 6 primary research sites (PRSs), a statistical coordinating center (SCC), and NIH research scientists. Governed by a steering committee, the network is organized into functional subcommittees and working groups. In the first year, we created an item library and activated 3 interacting protocols: Domain Mapping, Archival Data Analysis, and Qualitative Item Review (QIR). In the second year, we developed and initiated testing of item banks covering 5 broad domains of self-reported health. Results The domain mapping process is built on the World Health Organization (WHO) framework of physical, mental, and social health. From this framework, pain, fatigue, emotional distress, physical functioning, social role participation, and global health perceptions were selected for the first wave of testing. Item response theory (IRT)-based analysis of 11 large datasets supplemented and informed item-level qualitative review of nearly 7000 items from available PRO measures in the item library. Items were selected for rewriting or creation with further detailed review before the first round of testing in the general population and target patient populations. Conclusions The NIH PROMIS network derived a consensus-based framework for self-reported health, systematically reviewed available instruments and datasets that address the initial PROMIS domains. Qualitative item research led to the first wave of network testing which began in the second year. PMID:17443116

  19. Nursing Information Systems Requirements: A Milestone for Patient Outcome and Patient Safety Improvement.

    PubMed

    Farzandipour, Mehrdad; Meidani, Zahra; Riazi, Hossein; Sadeqi Jabali, Monireh

    2016-12-01

    Considering the integral role of understanding users' requirements in information system success, this research aimed to determine functional requirements of nursing information systems through a national survey. Delphi technique method was applied to conduct this study through three phases: focus group method modified Delphi technique and classic Delphi technique. A cross-sectional study was conducted to evaluate the proposed requirements within 15 general hospitals in Iran. Forty-three of 76 approved requirements were clinical, and 33 were administrative ones. Nurses' mean agreements for clinical requirements were higher than those of administrative requirements; minimum and maximum means of clinical requirements were 3.3 and 3.88, respectively. Minimum and maximum means of administrative requirements were 3.1 and 3.47, respectively. Research findings indicated that those information system requirements that support nurses in doing tasks including direct care, medicine prescription, patient treatment management, and patient safety have been the target of special attention. As nurses' requirements deal directly with patient outcome and patient safety, nursing information systems requirements should not only address automation but also nurses' tasks and work processes based on work analysis.

  20. Improving the Transcription of Patient Information From Image Requisitions to the Radiology Information System.

    PubMed

    DiRoberto, Cole; Lehto, Crystal; Baccei, Steven J

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to improve the transcription of patient information from imaging study requisitions to the radiology information database at a single institution. Five hundred radiology reports from adult outpatient radiographic examinations were chosen randomly from the radiology information system (RIS) and categorized according to their degree of concordance with their corresponding clinical order indications. The number and types of grammatical errors and types of order forms were also recorded. Countermeasures centered on the education of the technical staff and referring physician offices and the implementation of a checklist. Another sample of 500 reports was taken after the implementation of the countermeasures and compared with the baseline data using a χ(2) test. The number of RIS indications perfectly concordant with their corresponding clinical order indications increased from 232 (46.4%) to 314 (62.8%) after the implementation of the countermeasures (P < .0001). The number of partially concordant matches due to inadequate RIS indications dropped from 162 (32.4%) to 114 (22.8%) (P < .001), whereas the number of partially concordant matches due to inadequate clinical order indications increased from 22 (4.4%) to 57 (11.4%) (P < .0001). The number of discordant pairings dropped from 84 (16.8%) to 15 (3%) (P < .0001). Technologists began to input additional patient information obtained from the patients (not present in the image requisitions) in the RIS after the implementation of the countermeasures. The education of technical staff members and the implementation of a checklist markedly improved the information provided to radiologists on image requisitions from referring providers. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A Laboratory Information System, Developed within IBM's Hospital-Based Patient Care System

    PubMed Central

    Floering, David A.; Farber, Glenn

    1982-01-01

    Using IBM's Patient Care System (PCS) we developed a laboratory information system that includes accessioning, workstation and log book functions. The accessioning function allows clerks to “clock-in” specimens, bills or credits patients' accounts, notifies nursing stations of the acceptability of specimens or requests, and assigns test requests to appropriate workstations. The workstation function provides a list of requests from which technologists identify future workload and report preliminary, interim or final results for interfaced instruments and manual procedures. The log book records test results and patient information, and it is provided daily to each lab section. These functions improved productivity in the laboratory, increased accessibility of information to the user, and provided a foundation for future applications.

  2. 21 CFR 880.6300 - Implantable radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information. (a) Identification. An implantable radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information is a device... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Implantable radiofrequency transponder system...

  3. 21 CFR 880.6300 - Implantable radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information. (a) Identification. An implantable radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information is a device... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Implantable radiofrequency transponder system...

  4. 21 CFR 880.6300 - Implantable radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information. (a) Identification. An implantable radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information is a device... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Implantable radiofrequency transponder system...

  5. 21 CFR 880.6300 - Implantable radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information. (a) Identification. An implantable radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information is a device... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Implantable radiofrequency transponder system...

  6. 21 CFR 880.6300 - Implantable radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information. (a) Identification. An implantable radiofrequency transponder system for patient identification and health information is a device... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Implantable radiofrequency transponder system...

  7. Development of Information System for Patients with Cleft Lip and Palate undergoing Operation.

    PubMed

    Augsornwan, Darawan; Pattangtanang, Pantamanas; Surakunprapha, Palakorn

    2015-08-01

    Srinagarind Hospital has 150-200 patients with cleft lip and palate each year. When patients are admitted to hospital for surgery patients and family feel they are in a crisis of life, they feel fear anxiety and need to know about how to take care of wound, they worry if patient will feel pain, how to feed patients and many things about patients. Information is very important for patients/family to prevent complications and help their decision process, decrease parents stress and encourage better co-operation. To develop information system for patients with cleft lip-palate undergoing operation. This is an action research divided into 3 phases. Phase 1 Situation review: in this phase we interview, nursing care observation, and review nursing documents about the information giving. Phase 2 Develop information system: focus groups, for discussion about what nurses can do to develop the system to give information to patients/parents. Phase 3 evaluation: by interviewing 61 parents using the structure questionnaire. 100 percent of patients/parents received information but some items were not received. Patients/parents satisfaction was 94.9 percent, no complications. The information system development provides optimal care for patients and family with cleft lip and palate, but needs to improve some techniques or tools to give more information and evaluate further the nursing outcome after.

  8. Practical Implementation of a Large Primary Care Pediatric Practice Patient Care Information System

    PubMed Central

    Mize, Susan G.; Kramer, Robert I.

    1987-01-01

    THIS PAPER PRESENTS THE USE OF A PATIENT CARE INFORMATION PORTION OF A COMPUTERIZED OFFICE PRACTICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM. THE KEY TO IMPLEMENTING THIS SYSTEM IN A COST EFFECTIVE MANNER WAS THE ABILITY TO AUTOMATICALLY ABSTRACT MEDICAL INFORMATION FROM THE ACCOUNTING PROGRAMS WITHOUT HAVING TO REKEY THE DESIGNATED PATIENT MEDICAL INFORMATION ITEMS. THE PATIENT MANAGEMENT FUNCTIONS SPECIFICALLY INCLUDE: (1) A MINIMAL PATIENT MEDICAL INFORMATION SET WHICH IS PRINTED ON THE PATIENT “CARE SLIP” OR “SUPERBILL”; (2) CLINICAL NOTES WHICH ALLOW NURSES AND PHYSICIANS TO DOCUMENT PATIENT PHONE CALLS; (3) A THERAPEUTIC GUIDE WHICH GIVES ACCESS TO NURSES TO READ ON THE TERMINAL SCREEN STANDARD RECOMMENDATIONS BY THEIR PHYSICIANS FOR THE MORE COMMON PROBLEMS AND QUESTIONS ENCOUNTERED WHILE HANDLING PATIENT PHONE CALLS; AND (4) A NURSE TELEPHONE MESSAGE SYSTEM.

  9. [Development of Internet-based system to collect and provide drug information for patients/consumers].

    PubMed

    Kurimoto, Fuki; Hori, Satoko; Satoh, Hiroki; Miki, Akiko; Sawada, Yasufumi

    2013-01-01

    For drug fostering and evolution, it is important to collect information directly from patients on the efficacy and safety of drugs as well as patient needs. At present, however, information gathered by healthcare professionals, pharmaceutical companies, or governments is not sufficient. There is concern that patients may fail to recognize the importance of providing information voluntarily. The present study was conducted to provide drug information to patients/consumers, to enlighten them on the importance of providing drug information by themselves, and to develop an Internet website, called "Minkusu," for collecting drug information from patients. This website is based on a registration system (free of charge). It is designed to provide information on proper drug use, and to collect opinions about drugs. As of May 31, 2012, a total of 1149 people had been registered. The male/female ratio of registered members was approximately 1:1, and patients/consumers accounted for 23%. According to the results of a questionnaire survey, several patient/consumer members appreciated the usefulness of the information service, and they took an opportunity to know of the concepts of drug development and evolution (Ikuyaku, in Japanese) through the information services provided by this site. In conclusion, the developed information system would contribute to the proper use of drugs by patients/consumers and to the promotion of drug development and evolution.

  10. Integrated care: an Information Model for Patient Safety and Vigilance Reporting Systems.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Jean-Marie; Schulz, Stefan; Souvignet, Julien

    2015-01-01

    Quality management information systems for safety as a whole or for specific vigilances share the same information types but are not interoperable. An international initiative tries to develop an integrated information model for patient safety and vigilance reporting to support a global approach of heath care quality.

  11. The development and evaluation of a nursing information system for caring clinical in-patient.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yu-Wen; Li, Chih-Ping; Wang, Mei-Hua

    2015-01-01

    The research aimed to develop a nursing information system in order to simplify the admission procedure for caring clinical in-patient, enhance the efficiency of medical information documentation. Therefore, by correctly delivering patients’ health records, and providing continues care, patient safety and care quality would be effectively improved. The study method was to apply Spiral Model development system to compose a nursing information team. By using strategies of data collection, working environment observation, applying use-case modeling, and conferences of Joint Application Design (JAD) to complete the system requirement analysis and design. The Admission Care Management Information System (ACMIS) mainly included: (1) Admission nursing management information system. (2) Inter-shift meeting information management system. (3) The linkage of drug management system and physical examination record system. The framework contained qualitative and quantitative components that provided both formative and summative elements of the evaluation. System evaluation was to apply information success model, and developed questionnaire of consisting nurses’ acceptance and satisfaction. The results of questionnaires were users’ satisfaction, the perceived self-involvement, age and information quality were positively to personal and organizational effectiveness. According to the results of this study, the Admission Care Management Information System was practical to simplifying clinic working procedure and effective in communicating and documenting admission medical information.

  12. Evaluation research studies essential to ensuring health information systems meet the needs of users, including patients.

    PubMed

    Callen, Joanne

    2016-04-12

    Electronic health records and the Internet will continue to transform how information is accessed and shared. Users of health data such as health professionals, governments, policymakers, researchers and patients themselves need to be able to access the right information at the right time and be confident in the quality of that information, whether personal, aggregated or knowledge based. It is essential to evaluate information systems and applications that claim to improve information quality and access in order to provide evidence that they support healthcare delivery and improve patient outcomes.

  13. Optimizing health system response to patient's needs: an argument for the importance of functioning information.

    PubMed

    Hopfe, Maren; Prodinger, Birgit; Bickenbach, Jerome E; Stucki, Gerold

    2017-06-06

    Current health systems are increasingly challenged to meet the needs of a growing number of patients living with chronic and often multiple health conditions. The primary outcome of care, it is argued, is not merely curing disease but also optimizing functioning over a person's life span. According to the World Health Organization, functioning can serve as foundation for a comprehensive picture of health and augment the biomedical perspective with a broader and more comprehensive picture of health as it plays out in people's lives. The crucial importance of information about patient's functioning for a well-performing health system, however, has yet to be sufficiently appreciated. This paper argues that functioning information is fundamental in all components of health systems and enhances the capacity of health systems to optimize patients' health and health-related needs. Beyond making sense of biomedical disease patterns, health systems can profit from using functioning information to improve interprofessional collaboration and achieve cross-cutting disease treatment outcomes. Implications for rehabilitation Functioning is a key health outcome for rehabilitation within health systems. Information on restoring, maintaining, and optimizing human functioning can strengthen health system response to patients' health and rehabilitative needs. Functioning information guides health systems to achieve cross-cutting health outcomes that respond to the needs of the growing number of individuals living with chronic and multiple health conditions. Accounting for individuals functioning helps to overcome fragmentation of care and to improve interprofessional collaboration across settings.

  14. Using a Medical Information System to Improve the Quality of Patient Care

    PubMed Central

    Sneider, Richard M.

    1978-01-01

    A Medical Information System (MIS) impacts virtually every department in a hospital. Technicon's MATRIX MIS is designed to improve patient care while reducing the cost of delivering that care. This paper discusses several of the features designed to improve the quality of patient care at user hospitals.

  15. Anesthesia information management systems.

    PubMed

    Williams, Joe R

    2005-06-01

    Documentation is the last component of anesthesia patient management to be affected by technology. Anesthesia information management systems (AIMS) have been introduced in a limited number of practice sites. The automated systems provide unbiased reporting of most patient information. This results in improved patient care and possible medical legal advantages. AIMS also allow anesthesia departments to monitor their business related activity.

  16. Health information technologies in systemic lupus erythematosus: focus on patient assessment.

    PubMed

    Tani, Chiara; Trieste, Leopoldo; Lorenzoni, Valentina; Cannizzo, Sara; Turchetti, Giuseppe; Mosca, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in health information technologies (HIT) in systemic lupus erythematosus have included electronic databases and registries, computerised clinical charts for patient monitoring, computerised diagnostic tools, computerised prediction rules and, more recently, disease-specific applications for mobile devices for physicians, health care professionals, and patients. Traditionally, HIT development has been oriented primarily to physicians and public administrators. However, more recent development of patient-centered Apps could improve communication and empower patients in the daily management of their disease. Economic advantages could also result from the use of HIT, including these Apps by collecting real life data that could be used in both economic analyses and to improve patient care.

  17. Design of access control methods for protecting the confidentiality of patient information in networked systems.

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, J. W.; Klimczak, J. C.; Ruiz, M.; Barnes, M.

    1997-01-01

    Public awareness of the potential for violation of personal privacy in clinical information systems is increasing. Much of this increase can be attributed to the popularity and publicity of the World Wide Web. Nightly news reports of intruder break-ins and flaws in Internet software security have stimulated public interest in the security of clinical information systems available over the web. As part of the development of systems designed to provide clinical narratives to physicians over the Internet, we are exploring designs that provide additional protection and security to these systems. Specifically, we are developing and testing automated access control measures based on provider-patient relationships for controlling access to personally identifiable patient information. PMID:9357586

  18. ICT use for information management in healthcare system for chronic disease patient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawrzyniak, Zbigniew M.; Lisiecka-Biełanowicz, Mira

    2013-10-01

    Modern healthcare systems are designed to fulfill needs of the patient, his system environment and other determinants of the treatment with proper support of technical aids. A whole system of care is compatible to the technical solutions and organizational framework based on legal rules. The purpose of this study is to present how can we use Information and Communication Technology (ICT) systemic tools in a new model of patient-oriented care, improving the effectiveness of healthcare for patients with chronic diseases. The study material is the long-term process of healthcare for patients with chronic illness. Basing on the knowledge of the whole circumstances of patient's ecosystem and his needs allow us to build a new ICT model of long term care. The method used is construction, modeling and constant improvement the efficient ICT layer for the patient-centered healthcare model. We present a new constructive approach to systemic process how to use ICT for information management in healthcare system for chronic disease patient. The use of ICT tools in the model for chronic disease can improve all aspects of data management and communication, and the effectiveness of long-term complex healthcare. In conclusion: ICT based model of healthcare can be constructed basing on the interactions of ecosystem's functional parts through information feedback and the provision of services and models as well as the knowledge of the patient itself. Systematic approach to the model of long term healthcare assisted functionally by ICT tools and data management methods will increase the effectiveness of patient care and organizational efficiency.

  19. Health care information systems. Patient-centered integration is the key.

    PubMed

    Korpman, R A

    1991-03-01

    In today's cost-constrained health care delivery environment, hospitals are recognizing the need to optimize their care operations to improve the efficiency, efficacy, and service quality of primary health care providers, particularly the medical staff and nursing services, which comprise about 50% of the hospital's total personnel. Because health care institutions are in the business of caring for patients (not for accounts or departments), and because health care delivery largely is a personnel-intensive information industry, operations optimization is supported best by information systems that fully integrate all information concerning the patient. The goal of this is to simplify the job duties of direct care providers. The benefits of an integrated, patient-centered approach include demonstrable improvements in over-all patient care quality and staff satisfaction as well as a significant reduction in costs.

  20. How geographical information systems analysis influences the continuum of patient care.

    PubMed

    Pliskie, Jennifer; Wallenfang, Laura

    2014-01-01

    As the vast repository of data about millions of patients grows, the analysis of this information is changing the provider-patient relationship and influencing the continuum of care for broad swaths of the population. At the same time, while population health management moves from a volume-based model to a value-based one and additional patients seek care due to healthcare reform, hospitals and healthcare networks are evaluating their business models and searching for new revenue streams. Utilizing geographical information systems to model and analyze large amounts of data is helping organizations better understand the characteristics of their patient population, demographic and socioeconomic trends, and shifts in the utilization of healthcare. In turn, organizations can more effectively conduct service line planning, strategic business plans, market growth strategies, and human resource planning. Healthcare organizations that use GIS modeling can set themselves apart by making more informed and objective business strategy decisions.

  1. Supporting Active Patient and Health Care Collaboration: A Prototype for Future Health Care Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Åhlfeldt, Rose-Mharie; Persson, Anne; Rexhepi, Hanife; Wåhlander, Kalle

    2016-12-01

    This article presents and illustrates the main features of a proposed process-oriented approach for patient information distribution in future health care information systems, by using a prototype of a process support system. The development of the prototype was based on the Visuera method, which includes five defined steps. The results indicate that a visualized prototype is a suitable tool for illustrating both the opportunities and constraints of future ideas and solutions in e-Health. The main challenges for developing and implementing a fully functional process support system concern both technical and organizational/management aspects.

  2. Improving Hospital Quality and Patient Safety an Examination of Organizational Culture and Information Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, John Wallace

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines the effects of safety culture, including operational climate and practices, as well as the adoption and use of information systems for delivering high quality healthcare and improved patient experience. Chapter 2 studies the influence of both general and outcome-specific hospital climate and quality practices on process…

  3. Develop security architecture for both in-house healthcare information systems and electronic patient record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianguo; Chen, Xiaomeng; Zhuang, Jun; Jiang, Jianrong; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wu, Dongqing; Huang, H. K.

    2003-05-01

    In this paper, we presented a new security approach to provide security measures and features in both healthcare information systems (PACS, RIS/HIS), and electronic patient record (EPR). We introduced two security components, certificate authoring (CA) system and patient record digital signature management (DSPR) system, as well as electronic envelope technology, into the current hospital healthcare information infrastructure to provide security measures and functions such as confidential or privacy, authenticity, integrity, reliability, non-repudiation, and authentication for in-house healthcare information systems daily operating, and EPR exchanging among the hospitals or healthcare administration levels, and the DSPR component manages the all the digital signatures of patient medical records signed through using an-symmetry key encryption technologies. The electronic envelopes used for EPR exchanging are created based on the information of signers, digital signatures, and identifications of patient records stored in CAS and DSMS, as well as the destinations and the remote users. The CAS and DSMS were developed and integrated into a RIS-integrated PACS, and the integration of these new security components is seamless and painless. The electronic envelopes designed for EPR were used successfully in multimedia data transmission.

  4. Improving Hospital Quality and Patient Safety an Examination of Organizational Culture and Information Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, John Wallace

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines the effects of safety culture, including operational climate and practices, as well as the adoption and use of information systems for delivering high quality healthcare and improved patient experience. Chapter 2 studies the influence of both general and outcome-specific hospital climate and quality practices on process…

  5. Electronic patient information systems and care pathways: the organisational challenges of implementation and integration.

    PubMed

    Dent, Mike; Tutt, Dylan

    2014-09-01

    Our interest here is with the 'marriage' of e-patient information systems with care pathways in order to deliver integrated care. We report on the development and implementation of four such pathways within two National Health Service primary care trusts in England: (a) frail elderly care, (b) stroke care, (c) diabetic retinopathy screening and (d) intermediate care. The pathways were selected because each represents a different type of information and data 'couplings', in terms of task interdependency with some pathways/systems reflecting more complex coordinating patterns than others. Our aim here is identify and explain how health professionals and information specialists in two organisational National Health Service primary care trusts organisationally construct and use such systems and, in particular, the implications this has for issues of professional and managerial control and autonomy. The article is informed by an institutionalist analysis.

  6. An end-to-end secure patient information access card system.

    PubMed

    Alkhateeb, A; Singer, H; Yakami, M; Takahashi, T

    2000-03-01

    The rapid development of the Internet and the increasing interest in Internet-based solutions has promoted the idea of creating Internet-based health information applications. This will force a change in the role of IC cards in healthcare card systems from a data carrier to an access key medium. At the Medical Informatics Department of Kyoto University Hospital we are developing a smart card patient information project where patient databases are accessed via the Internet. Strong end-to-end data encryption is performed via Secure Socket Layers, transparent to transmit patient information. The smart card is playing the crucial role of access key to the database: user authentication is performed internally without ever revealing the actual key. For easy acceptance by healthcare professionals, the user interface is integrated as a plug-in for two familiar Web browsers, Netscape Navigator and MS Internet Explorer.

  7. Supporting work practices, improving patient flow and monitoring performance using a clinical information management system.

    PubMed

    Poulos, Christopher J; Gazibarich, Boris M; Eagar, Kathy

    2007-04-01

    Providing information technology solutions to clinicians to support their work practices benefits clinicians, administrators and patients. We present our 8-year experience with an inexpensive information management system which provides clinical and business process support for clinicians and bed managers. The system has been used by an area rehabilitation and aged care service to manage inpatient consultations and patient flow across nine hospitals. Performance monitoring of the time from referral to consultation, the number, type and outcome of consultations, and the time taken to access a rehabilitation or subacute bed is also provided. Read-only access to the system for clinicians and bed managers outside the rehabilitation and aged care service allows greater transparency.

  8. Wavelet-Based ECG Steganography for Protecting Patient Confidential Information in Point-of-Care Systems.

    PubMed

    Ibaida, Ayman; Khalil, Ibrahim

    2013-12-01

    With the growing number of aging population and a significant portion of that suffering from cardiac diseases, it is conceivable that remote ECG patient monitoring systems are expected to be widely used as point-of-care (PoC) applications in hospitals around the world. Therefore, huge amount of ECG signal collected by body sensor networks from remote patients at homes will be transmitted along with other physiological readings such as blood pressure, temperature, glucose level, etc., and diagnosed by those remote patient monitoring systems. It is utterly important that patient confidentiality is protected while data are being transmitted over the public network as well as when they are stored in hospital servers used by remote monitoring systems. In this paper, a wavelet-based steganography technique has been introduced which combines encryption and scrambling technique to protect patient confidential data. The proposed method allows ECG signal to hide its corresponding patient confidential data and other physiological information thus guaranteeing the integration between ECG and the rest. To evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed technique on the ECG signal, two distortion measurement metrics have been used: the percentage residual difference and the wavelet weighted PRD. It is found that the proposed technique provides high-security protection for patients data with low (less than 1%) distortion and ECG data remain diagnosable after watermarking (i.e., hiding patient confidential data) and as well as after watermarks (i.e., hidden data) are removed from the watermarked data.

  9. Routine data from hospital information systems can support patient recruitment for clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Dugas, Martin; Lange, Matthias; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Kirchhof, Paulus; Prokosch, Hans-Ulrich

    2010-04-01

    Delayed patient recruitment is a common problem in clinical studies. Hospital information systems (HIS) contain data items relevant for inclusion or exclusion criteria of these studies. We developed and assessed a system to support patient recruitment using HIS data. We developed a workflow integrated in our HIS to notify study physicians about potential trial subjects. Automatic HIS database queries based on inclusion and exclusion criteria for each clinical study are performed regularly and generate e-mail notifications via a communication server. Study physicians can verify eligibility with a specific HIS study module. The system performance was assessed with a survey addressing utility, usability, stability, change in recruitment rate, and estimated time savings. During 10 months of operation, 1328 notifications were generated and 329 enrollments (25%) were documented for seven studies. Precision of alerts depends on availability of appropriate HIS items. Utility and usability were assessed as good, and stability as excellent. Users reported an increased patient recruitment rate for three studies. Three studies reported an estimated time saving of 10 min per recruited patient. The main perceived benefit was systematic identification of potentially eligible patients without time-consuming patient screening procedures in the different parts of the hospital. Notifications about potentially eligible patients depend on HIS data quality regarding inclusion/exclusion criteria, in particular, completeness, timeliness, and validity. Routine HIS data can support patient recruitment for clinical studies by means of an automated notification workflow and efficient access to clinical data.

  10. Quality of life and urolithiasis: the patient - reported outcomes measurement information system (PROMIS).

    PubMed

    Patel, Nishant; Brown, Robert D; Sarkissian, Carl; De, Shubha; Monga, Manoj

    2017-08-08

    With a high rate of recurrence, urolithiasis is a chronic disease that impacts quality of life. The Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System is an NIH validated questionnaire to assess patient quality of life. We evaluated the impact of urolithiasis on quality of life using the NIH-sponsored PROMIS-43 questionnaire. Patients reporting to the kidney stone clinic were interviewed to collect information on stone history and demographic information and were asked to complete the PROMIS-43 questionnaire. Quality of life scores were analyzed using gender and age matched groups for the general US population. Statistical comparisons were made based on demographic information and patient stone history. Statistical significance was P<0.05. 103 patients completed the survey. 36% of respondents were male, the average age of the group was 52 years old, with 58% primary income earners, and 35% primary caregivers. 7% had never passed a stone or had a procedure while 17% passed 10 or more stones in their lifetime. Overall, pain and physical function were worse in patients with urolithiasis. Primary income earners had better quality of life while primary caregivers and those with other chronic medical conditions were worse. Patients on dietary and medical therapy had better quality of life scores. Urolithiasis patients subjectively have worse pain and physical function than the general population. The impact of pain on quality of life was greatest in those patients who had more stone episodes, underscoring the importance of preventive measures. Stone prevention measures improve quality of life. Copyright® by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  11. Patient Privacy, Consent, and Identity Management in Health Information Exchange: Issues for the Military Health System.

    PubMed

    Hosek, Susan D; Straus, Susan G

    2013-01-01

    The Military Health System (MHS) and the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) have been among the nation's leaders in health information technology (IT), including the development of health IT systems and electronic health records that summarize patients' care from multiple providers. Health IT interoperability within MHS and across MHS partners, including VHA, is one of ten goals in the current MHS Strategic Plan. As a step toward achieving improved interoperability, the MHS is seeking to develop a research roadmap to better coordinate health IT research efforts, address IT capability gaps, and reduce programmatic risk for its enterprise projects. This article contributes to that effort by identifying gaps in research, policy, and practice involving patient privacy, consent, and identity management that need to be addressed to bring about improved quality and efficiency of care through health information exchange. Major challenges include (1) designing a meaningful patient consent procedure, (2) recording patients' consent preferences and designing procedures to implement restrictions on disclosures of protected health information, and (3) advancing knowledge regarding the best technical approaches to performing patient identity matches and how best to monitor results over time. Using a sociotechnical framework, this article suggests steps for overcoming these challenges and topics for future research.

  12. Medical Information Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterescu, S.; Hipkins, K. R.; Friedman, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    On-line interactive information processing system easily and rapidly handles all aspects of data management related to patient care. General purpose system is flexible enough to be applied to other data management situations found in areas such as occupational safety data, judicial information, or personnel records.

  13. Scaling-up health information systems to improve HIV treatment: An assessment of initial patient monitoring systems in Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Hochgesang, Mindy; Zamudio-Haas, Sophia; Moran, Lissa; Nhampossa, Leopoldo; Packel, Laura; Leslie, Hannah; Richards, Janise; Shade, Starley B

    2017-01-01

    The rapid scale-up of HIV care and treatment in resource-limited countries requires concurrent, rapid development of health information systems to support quality service delivery. Mozambique, a country with an 11.5% prevalence of HIV, has developed nation-wide patient monitoring systems (PMS) with standardized reporting tools, utilized by all HIV treatment providers in paper or electronic form. Evaluation of the initial implementation of PMS can inform and strengthen future development as the country moves towards a harmonized, sustainable health information system. This assessment was conducted in order to 1) characterize data collection and reporting processes and PMS resources available and 2) provide evidence-based recommendations for harmonization and sustainability of PMS. This baseline assessment of PMS was conducted with eight non-governmental organizations that supported the Ministry of Health to provide 90% of HIV care and treatment in Mozambique. The study team conducted structured and semi-structured surveys at 18 health facilities located in all 11 provinces. Seventy-nine staff were interviewed. Deductive a priori analytic categories guided analysis. Health facilities have implemented paper and electronic monitoring systems with varying success. Where in use, robust electronic PMS facilitate facility-level reporting of required indicators; improve ability to identify patients lost to follow-up; and support facility and patient management. Challenges to implementation of monitoring systems include a lack of national guidelines and norms for patient level HIS, variable system implementation and functionality, and limited human and infrastructure resources to maximize system functionality and information use. This initial assessment supports the need for national guidelines to harmonize, expand, and strengthen HIV-related health information systems. Recommendations may benefit other countries with similar epidemiologic and resource

  14. Producing computer-generated tailored written information for stroke patients and their carers: system development and preliminary evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Tammy; Russell, Trevor; McKenna, Kryss

    2004-11-01

    The aim of this project was to design and evaluate a system that would produce tailored information for stroke patients and their carers, customised according to their informational needs, and facilitate communication between the patient and health professional. A human factors development approach was used to develop a computer system, which dynamically compiles stroke education booklets for patients and carers. Patients and carers are able to select the topics about which they wish to receive information, the amount of information they want, and the font size of the printed booklet. The system is designed so that the health professional interacts with it, thereby providing opportunities for communication between the health professional and patient/carer at a number of points in time. Preliminary evaluation of the system by health professionals, patients and carers was positive. A randomised controlled trial that examines the effect of the system on patient and carer outcomes is underway.

  15. An information management system for patients with tuberculosis: usability assessment with end-users.

    PubMed

    Darby, Jonathan; Black, Jim; Morrison, David; Buising, Kirsty

    2012-01-01

    Information systems with clinical decision support (CDS) offer great potential to assist the co-ordination of patients with chronic diseases and to improve patient care. Despite this, few have entered routine clinical use. Tuberculosis (TB) is an infection of public health importance. It has complex interactions with many comorbid conditions, requires close supervised care and prolonged treatment for effective cure. These features make it suitable for use with an information management system with CDS features. In close consultation with key stakeholders, a clinical application was developed for the management of TB patients in Victoria. A formal usability assessment using semi-structured case-scenario based exercises was performed. Subjects were 12 individuals closely involved in the care of TB patients, including Infectious Diseases and Respiratory Physicians, and Public Health Nurses. Two researchers conducted the sessions, independently analysed responses and discrepancies compared to the voice record for validity. Despite varied computer experience, responses were positive regarding user interface and content. Data location was not always intuitive, however this improved with familiarity of the program. Decision support was considered valuable, with useful suggestions for expansion of these features. Automated reporting for correspondence and notification to the Health Department were felt worth the initial investment in data entry. An important workflow-based issue regarding dismissal of alerts and several errors were detected. Usability assessment validated many design elements of the system, provided a unique insight into workflow issues faced by users and hopefully will impact on its ultimate clinical utility.

  16. [Use of the DIAPHANE information system for the monitoring of patients treated by home hemodialysis].

    PubMed

    Masselot, J P; Adhemar, J P; Laederich, J; Degoulet, P; Kleinknecht, D

    1979-12-01

    Data of the DIAPHANE Dialyse-Informatique system of the Society of Nephrology have been collected by patients just on a home dialysis program after training in the hemodialysis Unit of the Hospital of Montreuil. 35 patients have been using the computerized records since January 1978. A critical analysis of the first year has been made and results obtained have been compared with those obtained during the same period in patients dialysed in the Hospital. Results show that home dialysis patients are well able to fill in the computerized medical record concerning the dialysis session follow-up, and that the quality of the recorded information is similar to that recorded in hospital by nurses. Nevertheless few simplifications of home dialysis data sheet are considered. Computerized treatment of data collected on home dialysis program should allow useful comparisons required to improve the quality of care and expansion of this dialysis method.

  17. Application of Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System to chronic pelvic pain.

    PubMed

    Fenton, Bradford W; Palmieri, Patrick; Diantonio, Gina; Vongruenigen, Vivian

    2011-01-01

    To apply the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) recently developed by the National Institutes of Health in patients with chronic pelvic pain. Secondary objectives included evaluation of individual pain categories and of the effect of the occurrence of myofascial abdominal wall and pelvic floor muscle pain. Retrospective study (Canadian Task Force classification III). Chronic pelvic pain multidisciplinary referral center. A total of 149 consecutive patients with chronic pelvic pain provided evaluable results. As part of a comprehensive evaluation, patients were assigned diagnoses based on standard criteria, and completed the 96-item short-form PROMIS. Pain-related and global PROMIS scores were significantly worse than in the reference population (p <.05). The presence of myofascial pain was also associated with worse PROMIS scores. Chronic pelvic pain is associated with impaired quality of life regardless of the diagnosis, including myofascial pain. Copyright © 2011 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Measures to prevent patient identification errors in blood collection/physiological function testing utilizing a laboratory information system].

    PubMed

    Shimazu, Chisato; Hoshino, Satoshi; Furukawa, Taiji

    2013-08-01

    We constructed an integrated personal identification workflow chart using both bar code reading and an all in-one laboratory information system. The information system not only handles test data but also the information needed for patient guidance in the laboratory department. The reception terminals at the entrance, displays for patient guidance and patient identification tools at blood-sampling booths are all controlled by the information system. The number of patient identification errors was greatly reduced by the system. However, identification errors have not been abolished in the ultrasound department. After re-evaluation of the patient identification process in this department, we recognized that the major reason for the errors came from excessive identification workflow. Ordinarily, an ultrasound test requires patient identification 3 times, because 3 different systems are required during the entire test process, i.e. ultrasound modality system, laboratory information system and a system for producing reports. We are trying to connect the 3 different systems to develop a one-time identification workflow, but it is not a simple task and has not been completed yet. Utilization of the laboratory information system is effective, but is not yet perfect for patient identification. The most fundamental procedure for patient identification is to ask a person's name even today. Everyday checks in the ordinary workflow and everyone's participation in safety-management activity are important for the prevention of patient identification errors.

  19. Some Unintended Consequences of Information Technology in Health Care: The Nature of Patient Care Information System-related Errors

    PubMed Central

    Ash, Joan S.; Berg, Marc; Coiera, Enrico

    2004-01-01

    Medical error reduction is an international issue, as is the implementation of patient care information systems (PCISs) as a potential means to achieving it. As researchers conducting separate studies in the United States, The Netherlands, and Australia, using similar qualitative methods to investigate implementing PCISs, the authors have encountered many instances in which PCIS applications seem to foster errors rather than reduce their likelihood. The authors describe the kinds of silent errors they have witnessed and, from their different social science perspectives (information science, sociology, and cognitive science), they interpret the nature of these errors. The errors fall into two main categories: those in the process of entering and retrieving information, and those in the communication and coordination process that the PCIS is supposed to support. The authors believe that with a heightened awareness of these issues, informaticians can educate, design systems, implement, and conduct research in such a way that they might be able to avoid the unintended consequences of these subtle silent errors. PMID:14633936

  20. Embedding patients confidential data in ECG signal for healthcare information systems.

    PubMed

    Ibaida, Ayman; Khalil, Ibrahim; Al-Shammary, Dhiah

    2010-01-01

    In Wireless tele-cardiology applications, ECG signal is widely used to monitor cardiac activities of patients. Accordingly, in most e-health applications, ECG signals need to be combined with patient confidential information. Data hiding and watermarking techniques can play a crucial role in ECG wireless tele-monitoring systems by combining the confidential information with the ECG signal since digital ECG data is huge enough to act as host to carry tiny amount of additional secret data. In this paper, a new steganography technique is proposed that helps embed confidential information of patients into specific locations (called special range numbers) of digital ECG host signal that will cause minimal distortion to ECG, and at the same time, any secret information embedded is completely extractable. We show that there are 2.1475 × 10(9) possible special range numbers making it extremely difficult for intruders to identify locations of secret bits. Experiments show that percentage residual difference (PRD) of watermarked ECGs can be as low as 0.0247% and 0.0678% for normal and abnormal ECG segments (taken from MIT-BIH Arrhythmia database) respectively.

  1. Two intelligent order viewers for chronic condition patients on clinical information system.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Shuichi; Niki, Noboru; Nishitani, Hiromu

    2008-01-01

    The computerization of patient data is proceeding and the amount of patient records has greatly increased. However, physicians have limited time to review and process patient records. In order to use these records effectively, medical institutions need to access the information in a variety of forms. This paper comparatively describes two intelligent viewers that are SAKURA-Viewer and FUJI-Viewer. These viewers reorganize order-related data. SAKURA-Viewer is based on a concept hierarchy method and focuses the view of consolidated information. This viewer represents order history from two viewpoints simultaneously to eliminate semantic redundancies. FUJI-Viewer is based on two-dimensional mapping method and focuses the flow of periodic information. This viewer represents differences between the plan history and the order history to manage a long-term test order history and test plan history concurrently. These viewers also support data entry methods that input order-related data efficiently and accurately. This interface reduces the workload of the medical stuff. These intelligent viewers are incorporated into a clinical information system.

  2. A System Design for Studying Geriatric Patients with Dementia and Hypertension Based on Daily Living Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Weifeng; Betz, Willian R.; Frezza, Stephen T.; Liu, Yunkai

    2011-08-01

    Geriatric patients with dementia and hypertension (DAH) suffer both physically and financially. The needs of these patients mainly include improving the quality of daily living and reducing the cost of long-term care. Traditional treatment approaches are strained to meet these needs. The goal of the paper is to design an innovative system to provide cost-effective quality treatments for geriatric patients with DAH by collecting and analyzing the multi-dimensional personal information, such as observations in daily living (ODL) from a non-clinical environment. The proposed ODLs in paper include activities, cleanliness, blood pressure, medication compliance and mood changes. To complete the system design, an incremental user-centered strategy is exploited to assemble needs of patients, caregivers, and clinicians. A service-oriented architecture (SOA) is employed to make full use of existing devices, software systems, and platforms. This health-related knowledge can be interpreted and utilized to help patients with DAH remain in their homes safely and improve their life quality while reducing medical expenditures.

  3. Utilizing patient geographic information system data to plan telemedicine service locations.

    PubMed

    Soares, Neelkamal; Dewalle, Joseph; Marsh, Ben

    2017-09-01

    To understand potential utilization of clinical services at a rural integrated health care system by generating optimal groups of telemedicine locations from electronic health record (EHR) data using geographic information systems (GISs). This retrospective study extracted nonidentifiable grouped data of patients over a 2-year period from the EHR, including geomasked locations. Spatially optimal groupings were created using available telemedicine sites by calculating patients' average travel distance (ATD) to the closest clinic site. A total of 4027 visits by 2049 unique patients were analyzed. The best travel distances for site groupings of 3, 4, 5, or 6 site locations were ranked based on increasing ATD. Each one-site increase in the number of available telemedicine sites decreased minimum ATD by about 8%. For a given group size, the best groupings were very similar in minimum travel distance. There were significant differences in predicted patient load imbalance between otherwise similar groupings. A majority of the best site groupings used the same small number of sites, and urban sites were heavily used. With EHR geospatial data at an individual patient level, we can model potential telemedicine sites for specialty access in a rural geographic area. Relatively few sites could serve most of the population. Direct access to patient GIS data from an EHR provides direct knowledge of the client base compared to methods that allocate aggregated data. Geospatial data and methods can assist health care location planning, generating data about load, load balance, and spatial accessibility.

  4. Use of a patient information system to audit the introduction of modified early warning scoring.

    PubMed

    Quarterman, C P J; Thomas, A N; McKenna, M; McNamee, R

    2005-04-01

    Modified early warning scoring (MEWS) uses abnormalities in routine observations to identify patients at risk of critical illness. Nurses recorded scores at or above the medical response score of 3 on a hospital clinical information system during the first year of introducing MEWS to 10 wards in a university hospital. A total of 619 triggers were recorded in 365 patients. Fifty-nine required intensive care unit (ICU)/high dependency unit (HDU) care; 71 died. Survival was significantly worse for initial scores >4 (35/104 patients died) than for scores 3-4 (P<0.004). Multivariant analysis showed age (P<0.001) and trigger score (P<0.001) but not ward specialty (P=0.1) predicted death. Mean ages of survivors and non-survivors were 64 years (SD 18) and 74 years (SD 17), respectively. Addition of a score for age did not significantly increase the area under a receiver operator characteristic curve for the predictive value of MEWS scores. The study shows that increasing MEWS score is associated with worse outcome across a range of specialties and that nursing staff will use a patient information system to audit MEWS scores.

  5. The POIS (Parkland On-Line Information System) Implementation of the IBM Health Care Support/Patient Care System

    PubMed Central

    Mishelevich, David J.; Hudson, Betty G.; Van Slyke, Donald; Mize, Elaine I.; Robinson, Anna L.; Brieden, Helen C.; Atkinson, Jack; Robertson, James

    1980-01-01

    The installation of major components of a comprehensive Hospital Information System (HIS) called POIS, the Parkland On-line Information System, including identified success factors is described for the Dallas County Hospital District (DCHD) known also as the Parkland Memorial Hospital. Installation of the on-line IBM Health Care Support (HCS) Registration and Admissions Packages occurred in 1976 and implementation of the HCS Patient Care System (PCS) began in 1977 which includes on-line support of health care areas such as nursing stations and ancillary areas. The Duke Hospital Information System (DHIS) is marketed as the IBM HCS/Patient Care System (PCS). DCHD was the validation site. POIS has order entry, result reporting and work management components. While most of the patient care components are currently installed for the inpatient service, the Laboratories are being installed for the outpatient and Emergency areas as well. The Clinic Appointment System developed at the University of Michigan is also installed. The HCS family of programs use DL/1 and CICS and were installed in the OS versions, currently running under MVS on an IBM 370/168 Model 3 with 8 megabytes of main memory. ImagesFigure 1-AFigure 1-B

  6. Individualized patient-centered lifestyle recommendations: an expert system for communicating patient specific cardiovascular risk information and prioritizing lifestyle options.

    PubMed

    Chi, Chih-Lin; Nick Street, W; Robinson, Jennifer G; Crawford, Matthew A

    2012-12-01

    We propose a proof-of-concept machine-learning expert system that learned knowledge of lifestyle and the associated 10-year cardiovascular disease (CVD) risks from individual-level data (i.e., Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study, ARIC). The expert system prioritizes lifestyle options and identifies the one that maximally reduce an individual's 10-year CVD risk by (1) using the knowledge learned from the ARIC data and (2) communicating for patient-specific cardiovascular risk information and personal limitations and preferences (as defined by variables used in this study). As a result, the optimal lifestyle is not only prioritized based on an individual's characteristics but is also relevant to personal circumstances. We also explored probable uses and tested the system in several examples using real-world scenarios and patient preferences. For example, the system identifies the most effective lifestyle activities as the starting point for an individual's behavior change, shows different levels of BMI changes and the associated CVD risk reductions to encourage weight loss, identifies whether weight loss or smoking cessation is the most urgent change for a diabetes patient, etc. Answers to the questions noted above vary based on an individual's characteristics. Our validation results from clinical trial simulations, which compared original with the optimal lifestyle using an independent dataset, show that the optimal individualized patient-centered lifestyle consistently reduced 10-year CVD risks.

  7. Development of the NIH Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Gastrointestinal Symptom Scales

    PubMed Central

    Spiegel, Brennan M.R.; Hays, Ron D.; Bolus, Roger; Melmed, Gil Y.; Chang, Lin; Whitman, Cynthia; Khanna, Puja P.; Paz, Sylvia H.; Hays, Tonya; Reise, Steve; Khanna, Dinesh

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS®) is a standardized set of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) that cover physical, mental, and social health. The aim of this study was to develop the NIH PROMIS gastrointestinal (GI) symptom measures. METHODS We first conducted a systematic literature review to develop a broad conceptual model of GI symptoms. We complemented the review with 12 focus groups including 102 GI patients. We developed PROMIS items based on the literature and input from the focus groups followed by cognitive debriefing in 28 patients. We administered the items to diverse GI patients (irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), systemic sclerosis (SSc), and other common GI disorders) and a census-based US general population (GP) control sample. We created scales based on confirmatory factor analyses and item response theory modeling, and evaluated the scales for reliability and validity. RESULTS A total of 102 items were developed and administered to 865 patients with GI conditions and 1,177 GP participants. Factor analyses provided support for eight scales: gastroesophageal reflux (13 items), disrupted swallowing (7 items), diarrhea (5 items), bowel incontinence/soilage (4 items), nausea and vomiting (4 items), constipation (9 items), belly pain (6 items), and gas/bloat/flatulence (12 items). The scales correlated significantly with both generic and disease-targeted legacy instruments, and demonstrate evidence of reliability. CONCLUSIONS Using the NIH PROMIS framework, we developed eight GI symptom scales that can now be used for clinical care and research across the full range of GI disorders. PMID:25199473

  8. Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Tools for Collecting Patient-Reported Outcomes in Children With Juvenile Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Brandon, Timothy G; Becker, Brandon D; Bevans, Katherine B; Weiss, Pamela F

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the precision and construct validity of pediatric Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) instruments in a population of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients and parent proxies. A convenience sample of JIA patients and parents of JIA patients completed PROMIS instruments for 8 domains: anger, anxiety, depressive symptoms, fatigue, mobility, pain interference, peer relationships, and upper-extremity function. Short form and computerized adaptive test (CAT) scores were derived from item bank responses. Raw scores were translated to standardized T scores with corresponding SEs. Discrimination between inactive versus active disease was evaluated as an indicator of each measure's construct validity. SEs were plotted to evaluate each instrument's relative precision. Patient-parent concordance was assessed using intraclass correlations (ICCs). A total of 228 patients and 223 parents participated, providing 71-78 responses per domain. Patient- and parent-reported anger, fatigue, mobility, and pain interference scores significantly differed between those with inactive and active disease. Anxiety, depressive symptoms, and peer relationships differed by disease activity levels for parent-report only. Short forms and CATs provided comparable reliability to the full item banks across the full range of each outcome. Patient-parent agreement ranged from ICC 0.3 to 0.8. CATs did not reduce the number of items for any domain compared to the short form. Precision and discriminatory abilities of PROMIS instruments depend on health domain and report type (self-report versus parent proxy-report) for children with JIA. Varying levels of patient-parent concordance reinforces the importance of considering both perspectives in comprehensive health outcomes assessments. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  9. [Patient medication record in pharmacy: development of specialized information system and possibilities of its application in Lithuanian community pharmacies].

    PubMed

    Skyrius, Vaidas; Kapocius, Kestutis; Radziūnas, Raimondas

    2003-01-01

    To examine whether the managers of Lithuanian community pharmacies need a special information system for the creation of patients' medication record in the pharmacy. To design the system and to analyze the possibilities of its application. RESEARCH MATERIALS AND METHODS: In order to determine the need for a specialized information system a questionnaire-based survey of pharmacies managers was used. During the development of information system the detailed requirements analysis was performed and basing on this analysis the architecture of the system and its user interface were designed. System was built using "Microsoft Access 2000" and "Visual Basic 6" development tools. Survey revealed that managers of community pharmacies require an information system for the creation of patients' medication record in the pharmacy. The design of the system was prepared and the initial version was built. Examinations of the developed system showed that it could be used to form the patient information database, which would improve the quality of service. The developed information system or its analogue should be used in community pharmacies because absence of the patients medical records database makes it impossible to implement the recommendations of good pharmacy practice.

  10. Preoperative Performance of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System in Patients With Rotator Cuff Pathology.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Chris A; Glass, Natalie; Hancock, Kyle; Bollier, Matt; Hettrich, Carolyn M; Wolf, Brian R

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System upper extremity item bank (PROMIS UE) and physical function computerized adaptive test (PROMIS PF CAT) in patients with rotator cuff (RC) pathology at their preoperative clinic visit. Patient data were collected from January 2015 to September 2015. Patients with a preoperative diagnosis of RC pathology were prospectively enrolled at the time of their surgical indication for RC repair. Each patient was asked to fill out the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index (WORC), American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Shoulder Assessment Form, Marx Shoulder Activity Scale, Short Form 36 Health Survey Physical Function and General Health (SF-36 PF and GH), EuroQol-5 Dimension (EQ-5D), PROMIS PF CAT, and PROMIS UE. Correlation was defined as excellent (>0.7), excellent-good (0.61-0.7), good (0.4-0.6), and poor (0.2-0.3). Patient data were collected from January 2015 to September 2015. No patients were excluded from participation in the study. In 82 patients with preoperative RC pathology, the PROMIS UE showed excellent correlation with American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Shoulder Assessment Form (r = 0.77, P < .01), WORC (r = 0.73, P < .01), and the EQ-5D (r = 0.73, P < .01); there was excellent-good correlation with the SF-36 PF (r = .66, P < .01) and PROMIS PF CAT (r = .70, P < .01). The PROMIS PF CAT showed excellent correlation with the SF-36 PF (r = 0.77, P < .01); there was excellent-good correlation with EQ-5D (r = 0.65, P < .01) and WORC (r = 0.61, P < .01). There were no significant floor or ceiling effects using the PROMIS UE item bank or PROMIS PF CAT. We report that in a patient population with preoperative RC pathology, the PROMIS UE and PROMIS CAT are valid patient-reported outcome alternatives that have high correlation with traditional shoulder and upper extremity patient-reported outcomes. We find a decreased question burden using the PROMIS PF CAT. We find no significant floor or

  11. Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) in the upper extremity: the future of outcomes reporting?

    PubMed

    Makhni, Eric C; Meadows, Molly; Hamamoto, Jason T; Higgins, John D; Romeo, Anthony A; Verma, Nikhil N

    2017-02-01

    Patient reported outcomes (PROs) serve an integral role in clinical research by helping to determine the impact of clinical care as experienced by the patient. With recent initiatives in health care policy and pay for performance, outcome reporting is now recognized as a policy-driven requirement in addition to a clinical research tool. For outcome measures to satisfy these regulatory requirements and provide value in understanding disease outcomes, they must be responsive and efficient. Recent research has uncovered certain concerns regarding traditional PROs in patients with upper extremity disability and injury. These include lack of consensus regarding selection of PROs for a given diagnoses, inconsistent techniques of administration of the same PROs, and the administrative burden to patients and providers of completing these forms. To address these limitations, emphasis has been placed on streamlining the outcomes reporting process, and, as a result, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) created the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS). PROMIS forms were created to comprehensively and efficiently measure outcomes across multiple disease states, including orthopedics. These tools exist in computer adaptive testing and short forms with the intention of more efficiently measuring outcomes compared with legacy PROs. The goals of this review are to highlight the main components of PROMIS reporting tools and identify recent use of the scores in the upper extremity literature. The review will also highlight the research and health policy potentials and limitations of implementing PROMIS into everyday orthopedic practice. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Information retrieval for patient care.

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, M.

    1997-01-01

    Doctors need clinical information during most consultations with patients, and much of this need could be satisfied by material from online sources. Advances in data communication technologies mean that multimedia information can be transported rapidly to various clinical care locations. However, selecting the few items of information likely to be useful in a particular clinical situation from the mass of information available is a major problem. Current information retrieval systems are designed primarily for use in research rather than clinical care. The design, implementation, and critical evaluation of new information retrieval systems for clinical care should be guided by knowledgeable clinical users. PMID:9099122

  13. Data Systems vs. Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    Amatayakul, Margret K.

    1982-01-01

    This paper examines the current status of “hospital information systems” with respect to the distinction between data systems and information systems. It is proposed that the systems currently existing are incomplete data dystems resulting in ineffective information systems.

  14. Quantify information system benefits

    SciTech Connect

    Koppel, L.B.

    1995-06-01

    What are information systems and how do they relate to control systems? How do information systems produce benefits in hydrocarbon processing? What are some examples of benefit-generating information system applications? Information System Benefits (ISBEN) is a structured methodology for estimating information system benefits in hydrocarbon processing. The paper discusses information and control systems, information system benefits and applications, objectives, strategies and measures of ISBEN, ISBEN business drivers, ISBEN database, ISBEN methodology, and implementation.

  15. American Health Information Management Association. Position statement. Issue: healthcare reform--information systems and the need for computer-based patient records.

    PubMed

    1994-01-01

    Timely, reliable information is a critical part of healthcare reform. The Clinton Administration's current proposal would streamline health information through the use of standard forms and data definitions and establish a nationwide electronic highway to link health records and exchange needed information. Information would be captured, retained, and transmitted as a routine byproduct of patient care. These goals can be achieved only through broad implementation of the computer-based patient record (CPR). The CPR will contribute to more effective and cost-efficient care through (1) ready access to longitudinal (lifetime) health information; (2) support for continuous quality improvement; (3) easy access to clinical knowledge bases; and (4) patient participation in health documentation and disease prevention. The technology exists to implement the CPR, but further work is needed to develop the necessary standards and security mechanisms. The American Health Information Management Association is committed to working with applicable state and federal agencies, professional associations, accrediting agencies, voluntary standards organizations, and the Computer-Based Patient Record Institute (CPRI) to achieve the information management objectives of the current health care reform plan. With their expertise in health information systems and strong commitment to patient privacy, health information management professionals can make significant contributions to the development, implementation, and ongoing security of national and state health information networks.

  16. A framework of a patient safety information system for Iranian hospitals: lessons learned from Australia, England and the US.

    PubMed

    Sheikhtaheri, Abbas; Sadoughi, Farahnaz; Ahmadi, Maryam; Moghaddasi, Hamid

    2013-05-01

    Patient Safety Information Systems (PSIS) are prerequisite for any patient safety program. The purpose of the study was to review PSISs in developed countries and to customize a preliminary framework for such systems for Iran. Three developed countries in the field of patient safety including the USA, England and Australia were selected and their PSISs or reporting systems were studied. In addition, 15 unstructured interviews were conducted with Iranian informants. In the developed countries, specific regulations have been formulated regarding reporting and recording of patient safety incidents. Based on these regulations, a variety of patient safety data needs to be collected. In addition, the reportable incidents, the mechanisms of data analysis, the entities involved in the system, tools and technologies as well as feedback mechanisms have been defined well. In the field of patient safety, the Iranian health system is still in its infancy and lacks a formal information system for collecting, analyzing, disseminating and sharing patient safety information. Based on other countries' experiences, a preliminary framework for an Iranian PSIS was suggested. Developing a PSIS for Iranian hospitals is crucially needed. In this regard, Iranian hospitals and health authorities should develop standardized data sets, standard forms for reporting, mechanisms for data analysis and feedback modes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Using the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System to Evaluate Psychosocial Functioning among Children with Craniofacial Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Danielle N; Waljee, Jennifer; Ranganathan, Kavitha; Buchman, Steven; Warschausky, Seth

    2015-06-01

    Children with craniofacial anomalies are at risk for social exclusion, bullying, and psychological symptoms, all of which are associated with poor developmental and health outcomes. The National Institutes of Health-developed Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System instruments may be useful tools for monitoring psychosocial functioning in clinical settings and for integrating patient and parent perspectives. The current study included 74 children (50 percent male) with craniofacial anomalies recruited through a multidisciplinary clinic. The authors obtained child self-report and parent-proxy ratings of depression, anxiety, and peer relationship quality using National Institutes of Health Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System instruments. The authors compared sample means to Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System instruments norms and analyzed the reliability of parents' and children's reporting of psychosocial variables. All reliability statistics were satisfactory (α values ranging from 0.74 to 0.96) and sample standard deviations were similar to those obtained in a general population, suggesting that Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System instruments are reliable among children with craniofacial anomalies. In general, children and parents did not report unusual levels of psychological distress; however, they did report poorer peer relationship quality relative to normed data, a trend that was particularly pronounced among boys. National Institutes of Health Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System instruments are efficient and accurate tools for monitoring psychosocial adjustment among children with craniofacial anomalies. It may be especially important to monitor social functioning, particularly among boys.

  18. Patients' preferences for information

    PubMed Central

    Kindelan, K.; Kent, G.

    1986-01-01

    In a study of patients' views of the type of information they would like to receive from the doctor 265 patients from four general practices were given a list of five areas of information — diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, aetiology and social effects of their illness — and asked to rank these in order of importance for that visit. In general, information on diagnosis and prognosis was the most highly valued, while the ways the illness would affect daily activities was the least preferred. Although information on treatment was rarely selected as the first preference it was often the second or third preference. Conversely, diagnosis was the first choice of the largest proportion of patients and the least valued information for 26%. PMID:3440990

  19. Validity and Reliability of Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Computerized Adaptive Tests in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Kasturi, Shanthini; Szymonifka, Jackie; Burket, Jayme C; Berman, Jessica R; Kirou, Kyriakos A; Levine, Alana B; Sammaritano, Lisa R; Mandl, Lisa A

    2017-07-01

    The aims of this study were to assess the construct validity and the test-retest reliability of Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) computerized adaptive tests (CAT) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Adults with SLE completed the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36, LupusQoL-US version ("legacy instruments"), and 14 selected PROMIS CAT. Using Spearman correlations, PROMIS CAT were compared with similar domains measured with legacy instruments. CAT were also correlated with the Safety of Estrogens in Lupus Erythematosus National Assessment-Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SELENA-SLEDAI) disease activity and the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology Damage Index (SDI) scores. Test-retest reliability was evaluated using ICC. There were 204 outpatients with SLE enrolled in the study and 162 completed a retest. PROMIS CAT showed good performance characteristics and moderate to strong correlations with similar domains in the 2 legacy instruments (r = -0.49 to 0.86, p < 0.001). However, correlations between PROMIS CAT and the SELENA-SLEDAI disease activity and SDI were generally weak and statistically insignificant. PROMIS CAT test-retest ICC were good to excellent, ranging from 0.72 to 0.88. To our knowledge, these data are the first to show that PROMIS CAT are valid and reliable for many SLE-relevant domains. Importantly, PROMIS scores did not correlate well with physician-derived measures. This disconnect between objective signs and symptoms and the subjective patient disease experience underscores the crucial need to integrate patient-reported outcomes into clinical care to ensure optimal disease management.

  20. Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System in Children with Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Arvanitis, Marina; DeWalt, Darren A; Martin, Christopher F; Long, Millie D; Chen, Wenli; Jaeger, Beth; Sandler, Robert S; Kappelman, Michael D

    2016-07-01

    To assess the criterion validity and responsiveness of Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) in a web-based cohort of children with Crohn's disease. We recruited children with Crohn's disease (ages 9-17 years) and their parents from the web-based Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America Kids and Teens Study cohort. Upon entry into the cohort and 6 months later, children self-reported Crohn's disease activity, health-related quality of life, and PROMIS domains of pain interference, anxiety, depression, fatigue, and peer relationships. Mean PROMIS scores for the 276 participating patients were worse among those with worse self-reported Crohn's disease activity (per Short Crohn's Disease Activity Index, P < .005 for all), Crohn's disease activity in the prior 6 months (per Manitoba Index, P < .01 for all), and health-related quality of life (per IMPACT-35, P < .001 for all). One hundred forty-three patients and their parents completed follow-up questionnaires, 75% of whom reported stable disease activity. Those with improved Crohn's disease activity reported improved PROMIS scores, and those with worsened Crohn's disease activity reported worse PROMIS scores for all domains except anxiety. All participants reported improved anxiety from baseline, but those with stable or worsened Crohn's disease activity reported less improvement (P = .07). PROMIS scores were significantly associated with Crohn's disease activity in a linear and clinically meaningful manner, and responded to change in Crohn's disease activity over a 6-month period. This supports the criterion validity and responsiveness of pediatric PROMIS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Ranking sources of hospital quality information for orthopedic surgery patients: consequences for the system of managed competition.

    PubMed

    Bes, Romy Evelien; van den Berg, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare quality information is crucial for the system of managed competition. Within a system of managed competition, health insurers can selectively contract care providers and are allowed to channel patients towards contracted providers. The idea is that insurers have a stronger bargaining position compared to care providers when they are able to channel patients. In the Dutch system of managed competition that was implemented in 2006, channelling patients to preferred providers has not yet been very successful. Empirical knowledge of which sources of hospital quality information they find important may help us to understand how to channel patients to preferred providers. The objective of this survey was to measure how patients rank various sources of information when they compare hospital quality in a system of managed competition. A written survey was conducted among clients of a large Dutch health insurance company. These clients underwent orthopedic surgery on the hip or knee no longer than 12 months ago. Two major players within a system of managed competition-health insurers and the government-were not seen as important sources of hospital quality information. In contrast, own experience and general practitioners (GPs) were seen as the most important sources of hospital quality information within the Dutch system of managed competition. Health insurers should take the main finding-that GPs are the most important source of hospital quality information-into account when they contract care providers and develop strategies for channeling patients towards preferred providers. A well-functioning system of managed competition will benefit patients, as it involves incentives for care providers to increase healthcare quality and to produce at the lowest cost per unit of quality.

  2. Online patient information.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Amanda

    2002-09-01

    Information appropriate for patients with skin diseases is readily available on the Internet. Patients primarily seek disease-related information, but may also search for a dermatologist, shop for skin care products, or look to a consumer organization for support. Authoritative educational material is supplied by academic dermatologic associations and institutions and distributed by independent websites, large health portals, and search directories. Interactive opportunities include bulletin boards, ask-an-expert forums, and live chat. Although it is easy to find excellent dermatological information, the Internet is dynamic and unmoderated and patients can be misled or exploited by inaccurate or fraudulent websites. Health on the Net and other organizations have developed ethical principles to aid consumers in evaluating the quality of health-related information.

  3. Automated Methods to Extract Patient New Information from Clinical Notes in Electronic Health Record Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Rui

    2013-01-01

    The widespread adoption of Electronic Health Record (EHR) has resulted in rapid text proliferation within clinical care. Clinicians' use of copying and pasting functions in EHR systems further compounds this by creating a large amount of redundant clinical information in clinical documents. A mixture of redundant information (especially outdated…

  4. Automated Methods to Extract Patient New Information from Clinical Notes in Electronic Health Record Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Rui

    2013-01-01

    The widespread adoption of Electronic Health Record (EHR) has resulted in rapid text proliferation within clinical care. Clinicians' use of copying and pasting functions in EHR systems further compounds this by creating a large amount of redundant clinical information in clinical documents. A mixture of redundant information (especially outdated…

  5. Information technologies and patient safety.

    PubMed

    Ellner, Scott J; Joyner, Paul W

    2012-02-01

    Advances in health information technology provide significant opportunities for improvements in surgical patient safety. The adoption and use of electronic health records can enhance communication along the surgical spectrum of care. Bar coding and radiofrequency identification technology are strategies to prevent retained surgical sponges and for tracking the operating room supply chain. Computerized intraoperative monitoring systems can improve the performance of the operating room team. Automated data registries collect patient information to be analyzed and used for surgical quality improvement.

  6. A DICOM-RT based ePR radiation therapy information system for managing brain tumor patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Brent J.; Law, Maria; Huang, H. K.; Zee, C. S.; Chan, Lawrence

    2005-04-01

    The need for comprehensive clinical image data and relevant information in image-guided Radiation Therapy (RT) is becoming steadily apparent. Multiple standalone systems utilizing the most technological advancements in imaging, therapeutic radiation, and computerized treatment planning systems acquire key data during the RT treatment course of a patient. One example are patients treated for brain tumors of greater sizes and irregular shapes that utilize state-of-the-art RT technology to deliver pinpoint accurate radiation doses. One such system, the Cyberknife, is a radiation treatment system that utilizes image-guided information to control a multi-jointed, six degrees of freedom, robotic arm to deliver precise and required radiation dose to the tumor site of a cancer patient. The image-guided system is capable of tracking the lesion orientations with respect to the patient"s position throughout the treatment process. This is done by correlating live radiographic images with pre-operative, CT and MR imaging information to determine relative patient and tumor position repeatedly over the course of the treatment. The disparate and complex data generated by the Cyberknife system along with related data is scattered throughout the RT department compromising an efficient clinical workflow since the data crucial for a clinical decision may be time-consuming to retrieve, temporarily missing, or even lost. To address these shortcomings, the ACR-NEMA Standards Committee extended its DICOM (Digital Imaging & Communications in Medicine) Standard from Radiology to RT by ratifying seven DICOM RT objects starting in 1997. However, they are rarely used by the RT community in daily clinical operations. In the past, the research focus of an RT department has primarily been developing new protocols and devices to improve treatment process and outcomes of cancer patients with minimal effort dedicated to integration of imaging and information systems. Our research, tightly

  7. The message will be in the patient's receipt as New Brunswick prepares high-tech information system.

    PubMed

    Robb, N

    1995-06-01

    An effort to make the public appreciate the real cost of medical services has led to the development of an extensive medical-information and billing system in New Brunswick that uses a personal-information card. Likened to a credit card with unlimited credit, each has a magnetic strip with essential personal information with which to feed a province-wide computer system that eventually will link medicare, patients, doctors, prescription-drug programs and hospitals. The province hopes to have a pilot project running by year's end and then to introduce the system region by region.

  8. The Determination of Relevant Goals and Criteria Used to Select an Automated Patient Care Information System

    PubMed Central

    Chocholik, Joan K.; Bouchard, Susan E.; Tan, Joseph K. H.; Ostrow, David N.

    1999-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the relevant weighted goals and criteria for use in the selection of an automated patient care information system (PCIS) using a modified Delphi technique to achieve consensus. Design: A three-phase, six-round modified Delphi process was implemented by a ten-member PCIS selection task force. The first phase consisted of an exploratory round. It was followed by the second phase, of two rounds, to determine the selection goals and finally the third phase, of three rounds, to finalize the selection criteria. Results: Consensus on the goals and criteria for selecting a PCIS was measured during the Delphi process by reviewing the mean and standard deviation of the previous round's responses. After the study was completed, the results were analyzed using a limits-of-agreement indicator that showed strong agreement of each individual's responses between each of the goal determination rounds. Further analysis for variability in the group's response showed a significant movement to consensus after the first goal-determination iteration, with consensus reached on all goals by the end of the second iteration. Conclusion: The results indicated that the relevant weighted goals and criteria used to make the final decision for an automated PCIS were developed as a result of strong agreement among members of the PCIS selection task force. It is therefore recognized that the use of the Delphi process was beneficial in achieving consensus among clinical and nonclinical members in a relatively short time while avoiding a decision based on political biases and the “groupthink” of traditional committee meetings. The results suggest that improvements could be made in lessening the number of rounds by having information available through side conversations, by having other statistical indicators besides the mean and standard deviation available between rounds, and by having a content expert address questions between rounds. PMID:10332655

  9. The impacts of informatics competencies and user training on patient information system implementation.

    PubMed

    Lemmetty, Kaisa; Häyrinen, Kristiina; Sundgren, Sirpa

    2009-01-01

    User training of information systems is crucial for the employees. However, it is not only the basic skills of information technology that determine what kind of training is required for the implementation. This study describes the users' professional competence and the implementation training, including information of the computer user training and learning methods. The target group consisted of the employees trained first to implement electronic health record systems in the Central Finland hospital district (n=290). Statistical methods such as frequency and percentage distributions, mean values and cluster averages were used in the analysis. The sum variables were made up by using factor analysis. Respondents were mainly satisfied with the classroom teaching. Almost half of them had practised the use of information systems after the teaching in the training environment. Good learning results were obtained when practising with personal guidance.

  10. Validation of Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Short Forms for Use in Childhood-Onset Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jordan T; Carle, Adam C; Wootton, Janet; Liberio, Brianna; Lee, Jiha; Schanberg, Laura E; Ying, Jun; Morgan DeWitt, Esi; Brunner, Hermine I

    2017-01-01

    To validate the pediatric Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System short forms (PROMIS-SFs) in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in a clinical setting. At 3 study visits, childhood-onset SLE patients completed the PROMIS-SFs (anger, anxiety, depressive symptoms, fatigue, physical function-mobility, physical function-upper extremity, pain interference, and peer relationships) using the PROMIS assessment center, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) legacy measures (Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory, Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire, Simple Measure of Impact of Lupus Erythematosus in Youngsters [SMILEY], and visual analog scales [VAS] of pain and well-being). Physicians rated childhood-onset SLE activity on a VAS and completed the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index 2000. Using a global rating scale of change (GRC) between study visits, physicians rated change of childhood-onset SLE activity (GRC-MD1: better/same/worse) and change of patient overall health (GRC-MD2: better/same/worse). Questionnaire scores were compared in support of validity and responsiveness to change (external standards: GRC-MD1, GRC-MD2). In this population-based cohort (n = 100) with a mean age of 15.8 years (range 10-20 years), the PROMIS-SFs were completed in less than 5 minutes in a clinical setting. The PROMIS-SF scores correlated at least moderately (Pearson's r ≥ 0.5) with those of legacy HRQoL measures, except for the SMILEY. Measures of childhood-onset SLE activity did not correlate with the PROMIS-SFs. Responsiveness to change of the PROMIS-SFs was supported by path, mixed-model, and correlation analyses. To assess HRQoL in childhood-onset SLE, the PROMIS-SFs demonstrated feasibility, internal consistency, construct validity, and responsiveness to change in a clinical setting. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  11. The impact of a clinic move on vulnerable patients with chronic disease: a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) analysis.

    PubMed

    Bazemore, Andrew; Diller, Philip; Carrozza, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Changing locations disrupts the populations served by primary health care clinics, and such changes may differentially affect access to care for vulnerable populations. Online geographic information systems mapping tools were used to define how the relocation of a family medicine center impacted access to care for black and Hispanic patients with chronic disease. Maps created from practice management data revealed a distinct shift in black and Hispanic patients with chronic disease being served in the new location. Geographic information systems tools are valuable aids in defining changing service areas of primary health care clinics.

  12. A proposed key escrow system for secure patient information disclosure in biomedical research databases.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Todd A; Garrison, Gregory M; Lowe, Henry J

    2002-01-01

    Access to clinical data is of increasing importance to biomedical research. The pending HIPAA privacy regulations provide specific requirements for the release of protected health information. Under the regulations, biomedical researchers may utilize anonymized data, or adhere to HIPAA requirements regarding protected health information. In order to provide researchers with anonymized data from a clinical research database, we reviewed several published strategies for de-identification of protected health information. Critical analysis with respect to this project suggests that de-identification alone is problematic when applied to clinical research databases. We propose a hybrid system; utilizing secure key escrow, de-identification, and role-based access for IRB approved researchers.

  13. Statistical disclosure control architectures for patient records in biomedical information systems.

    PubMed

    Elliot, M; Purdam, K; Smith, D

    2008-02-01

    Patient record data are potentially highly sensitive and their secondary use raises both ethical and data protection issues. Disclosure of patient data could cause serious difficulties for the medical profession and be potentially damaging for individual patients and clinicians. Yet at the same time patient records are a hugely valuable resource in terms of clinical research and patient treatment. A secure, remote access system for such data would therefore provide numerous benefits. In this paper we outline the statistical disclosure risks posed by patient record data in the context of establishing a grid based medical data repository. We review good practice in existing patient databases, outline a scenario model for assessing risk and suggest a new model for statistical disclosure control of patient data. The architecture and the research method we have described have general relevance for any remote data access system where maximizing both data utility and security is a priority, and has specific relevance to medical data and bioinformatics. It can straightforwardly be integrated into data access and analysis tools.

  14. Development of a mobile emergency patient information and imaging communication system based on CDMA-1X EVDO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Keon Ho; Jung, Haijo; Kang, Won-Suk; Jang, Bong Mun; Kim, Joong Il; Han, Dong Hoon; Yoo, Sun-Kook; Yoo, Hyung-Sik; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2006-03-01

    The wireless mobile service with a high bit rate using CDMA-1X EVDO is now widely used in Korea. Mobile devices are also increasingly being used as the conventional communication mechanism. We have developed a web-based mobile system that communicates patient information and images, using CDMA-1X EVDO for emergency diagnosis. It is composed of a Mobile web application system using the Microsoft Windows 2003 server and an internet information service. Also, a mobile web PACS used for a database managing patient information and images was developed by using Microsoft access 2003. A wireless mobile emergency patient information and imaging communication system is developed by using Microsoft Visual Studio.NET, and JPEG 2000 ActiveX control for PDA phone was developed by using the Microsoft Embedded Visual C++. Also, the CDMA-1X EVDO is used for connections between mobile web servers and the PDA phone. This system allows fast access to the patient information database, storing both medical images and patient information anytime and anywhere. Especially, images were compressed into a JPEG2000 format and transmitted from a mobile web PACS inside the hospital to the radiologist using a PDA phone located outside the hospital. Also, this system shows radiological images as well as physiological signal data, including blood pressure, vital signs and so on, in the web browser of the PDA phone so radiologists can diagnose more effectively. Also, we acquired good results using an RW-6100 PDA phone used in the university hospital system of the Sinchon Severance Hospital in Korea.

  15. CSI-ISC--Concepts for smooth integration of health care information system components into established processes of patient care.

    PubMed

    Garde, S; Wolff, A C; Kutscha, U; Wetter, T; Knaup, P

    2006-01-01

    The introduction of information system components (ISCs) usually leads to a change in existing processes, e.g. processes of patient care. These processes might become even more complex and variable than before. An early participation of end users and a better understanding of human factors during design and introduction of ISCs are key factors for a successful introduction of ISCs in health care. Nonetheless no specialized methods have been developed until now to systematically support the integration of ISCs in existing processes of patient care while taking into account these requirements. In this paper, therefore, we introduce a procedure model to implement Concepts for Smooth Integration of ISCs (CSI-ISC). Established theories from economics and social sciences have been applied in our model, among them the stress-strain-concept, the contrastive task analysis (KABA), and the phase model for the management of information systems. CSI-ISC is based on the fact that while introducing new information system components, users experience additional workload. One essential aim during the introduction process therefore should be to systematically identify, prioritize and ameliorate workloads that are being imposed on human beings by information technology in health care. To support this, CSI-ISC consists of a static part (workload framework) and a dynamic part (guideline for the introduction of information system components into existing processes of patient care). The application of CSI-ISC offers the potential to minimize additional workload caused by information system components systematically. CSI-ISC rationalizes decisions and supports the integration of the information system component into existing processes of patient care.

  16. Information Systems in Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Masic, Fedja

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Almost the entire human creativity today, from the standpoint of its efficiency and expediency, is conditioned with the existence of information systems. Most information systems are oriented to the management and decision-making, including health information system. System of health and health insurance together form one of the most important segments of society and its functioning as a compact unit. Increasing requirements for reducing health care costs while preserving or improving the quality of services provided represent a difficult task for the health system. Material and methods: Using descriptive metods by retreiiving literature we analyzed the latest solutions in information and telecommunications technology is the basis for building an effective and efficient health system. Computerization does not have the primary objective of saving, but the rationalization of spending in health care. It is estimated that at least 20-30% of money spent in health care can be rationally utilized. Computerization should give the necessary data and indicators for this rationalization. Very important are the goals of this project and the achievement of other uses and benefits, improving overall care for patients and policyholders, increasing the speed and accuracy of diagnosis in determining treatment using electronic diagnostic and therapeutic guidelines. Results and discussion: Computerization in dentistry began similarly as in other human activities–recording large amounts of data on digital media, and by replacing manual data processing to machine one. But specifics of the dental profession have led to the specifics of the application of information technology (IT), and continue to require special development of dental oriented and applied IT. Harmonization of dental software with global standards will enable doctors and dentists to with a few mouse clicks via the internet reach the general medical information about their patients from the central

  17. Longitudinal evaluation of patient-reported outcomes measurement information systems measures in pediatric chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita; Carle, Adam; Barnett, Kimberly; Goldschneider, Kenneth R; Sherry, David D; Mara, Constance A; Cunningham, Natoshia; Farrell, Jennifer; Tress, Jenna; DeWitt, Esi Morgan

    2016-02-01

    The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) initiative is a comprehensive strategy by the National Institutes of Health to support the development and validation of precise instruments to assess self-reported health domains across healthy and disease-specific populations. Much progress has been made in instrument development, but there remains a gap in the validation of PROMIS measures for pediatric chronic pain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the construct validity and responsiveness to change of 7 PROMIS domains for the assessment of children (ages: 8-18) with chronic pain--Pain Interference, Fatigue, Anxiety, Depression, Mobility, Upper Extremity Function, and Peer Relationships. The PROMIS measures were administered at the initial visit and 2 follow-up visits at an outpatient chronic pain clinic (CPC; N = 82) and at an intensive amplified musculoskeletal pain day-treatment program (N = 63). Aim 1 examined construct validity of PROMIS measures by comparing them with corresponding "legacy" measures administered as part of usual care in the CPC sample. Aim 2 examined sensitivity to change in both CPC and amplified musculoskeletal pain samples. Longitudinal growth models showed that PROMIS' Pain Interference, Anxiety, Depression, Mobility, Upper Extremity, and Peer Relationship measures and legacy instruments generally performed similarly with slightly steeper slopes of improvement in legacy measures. All 7 PROMIS domains showed responsiveness to change. Results offered initial support for the validity of PROMIS measures in pediatric chronic pain. Further validation with larger and more diverse pediatric pain samples and additional legacy measures would broaden the scope of use of PROMIS in clinical research.

  18. Longitudinal evaluation of Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information Systems (PROMIS) measures in pediatric chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita; Carle, Adam; Barnett, Kimberly; Goldschneider, Kenneth R.; Sherry, David D.; Mara, Constance A.; Cunningham, Natoshia; Farrell, Jennifer; Tress, Jenna; DeWitt, Esi Morgan

    2015-01-01

    The Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) initiative is a comprehensive strategy by the National Institutes of Health to support the development and validation of precise instruments to assess self-reported health domains across healthy and disease-specific populations. Much progress has been made in instrument development but there remains a gap in the validation of PROMIS measures for pediatric chronic pain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the construct validity and responsiveness to change of seven PROMIS domains for the assessment of children (ages 8-18) with chronic pain – Pain Interference, Fatigue, Anxiety, Depression, Mobility, Upper Extremity Function and Peer Relationships. PROMIS measures were administered at the initial visit and two follow-up visits at an outpatient chronic pain clinic (CPC; N=82) and at an intensive amplified pain day-treatment program (AMP; N= 63). Aim 1 examined construct validity of PROMIS measures by comparing them with corresponding “legacy” measures administered as part of usual care in the CPC sample. Aim 2 examined sensitivity to change in both CPC and AMP samples. Longitudinal growth models showed that PROMIS Pain Interference, Anxiety, Depression, Mobility, Upper Extremity and Peer Relationship measures and legacy instruments generally performed similarly with slightly steeper slopes of improvement in legacy measures. All seven PROMIS domains showed responsiveness to change. Results offered initial support for the validity of PROMIS measures in pediatric chronic pain. Further validation with larger and more diverse pediatric pain samples and additional legacy measures would broaden the scope of use of PROMIS in clinical research. PMID:26447704

  19. A Proposed Framework to Enrich Norwegian EHR System with Health-trusted Information for Patients and Professionals.

    PubMed

    Konstantinidis, Stathis Th; Kummervold, Per Egil; Luque, Luis Fernandez; Vognild, Lars Kristian

    2015-01-01

    In the era of social media, semantic web and big data, a huge amount of health-related information, knowledge and resources exist on the Web. Patients and healthcare professionals should spend enormous effort and time in order to find health-trusted information, while the appropriate technologies to interlink and retrieve this type of information already exist. In this paper we propose a framework to enrich DIPS, the most deployed Norwegian EHR System, with health-trusted information for patients and state-of-the-art resources for healthcare professionals. The framework based upon the new architecture of DIPS, namely DIPS Arena, and upon the interlinking with the semantic web, social media and open linked data cloud information, knowledge and resources through well-established medical thesauri like SNOMED CT and MeSH.

  20. An Integrated Patient Information and In-Home Health Monitoring System Using Smartphones and Web Services.

    PubMed

    Sorwar, Golam; Ali, Mortuza; Islam, Md Kamrul; Miah, Mohammad Selim

    2016-01-01

    Modern healthcare systems are undergoing a paradigm shift from in-hospital care to in-home monitoring, leveraging the emerging technologies in the area of bio-sensing, wireless communication, mobile computing, and artificial intelligence. In-home monitoring promises to significantly reduce healthcare spending by preventing unnecessary hospital admissions and visits to healthcare professionals. Most of the in-home monitoring systems, proposed in the literature, focus on monitoring a set of specific vital signs. However, from the perspective of caregivers it is infeasible to maintain a collection of specialized monitoring systems. In this paper, we view the problem of in-home monitoring from the perspective of caregivers and present a framework that supports various monitoring capabilities while making the complexity transparent to the end users. The essential idea of the framework is to define a 'general purpose architecture' where the system specifies a particular protocol for communication and makes it public. Then any bio-sensing system can communicate with the system as long as it conforms to the protocol. We then argue that as the system grows in terms of number of patients and bio-sensing systems, artificial intelligence technologies need to be employed for patients' risk assessment, prioritization, and recommendation. Finally, we present an initial prototype of the system designed according to the proposed framework.

  1. Materials management information systems.

    PubMed

    1996-01-01

    The hospital materials management function--ensuring that goods and services get from a source to an end user--encompasses many areas of the hospital and can significantly affect hospital costs. Performing this function in a manner that will keep costs down and ensure adequate cash flow requires effective management of a large amount of information from a variety of sources. To effectively coordinate such information, most hospitals have implemented some form of materials management information system (MMIS). These systems can be used to automate or facilitate functions such as purchasing, accounting, inventory management, and patient supply charges. In this study, we evaluated seven MMISs from seven vendors, focusing on the functional capabilities of each system and the quality of the service and support provided by the vendor. This Evaluation is intended to (1) assist hospitals purchasing an MMIS by educating materials managers about the capabilities, benefits, and limitations of MMISs and (2) educate clinical engineers and information system managers about the scope of materials management within a healthcare facility. Because software products cannot be evaluated in the same manner as most devices typically included in Health Devices Evaluations, our standard Evaluation protocol was not applicable for this technology. Instead, we based our ratings on our observations (e.g., during site visits), interviews we conducted with current users of each system, and information provided by the vendor (e.g., in response to a request for information [RFI]). We divided the Evaluation into the following sections: Section 1. Responsibilities and Information Requirements of Materials Management: Provides an overview of typical materials management functions and describes the capabilities, benefits, and limitations of MMISs. Also includes the supplementary article, "Inventory Cost and Reimbursement Issues" and the glossary, "Materials Management Terminology." Section 2. The

  2. [Cystic Fibrosis Cloud database: An information system for storage and management of clinical and microbiological data of cystic fibrosis patients].

    PubMed

    Prieto, Claudia I; Palau, María J; Martina, Pablo; Achiary, Carlos; Achiary, Andrés; Bettiol, Marisa; Montanaro, Patricia; Cazzola, María L; Leguizamón, Mariana; Massillo, Cintia; Figoli, Cecilia; Valeiras, Brenda; Perez, Silvia; Rentería, Fernando; Diez, Graciela; Yantorno, Osvaldo M; Bosch, Alejandra

    2016-01-01

    The epidemiological and clinical management of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients suffering from acute pulmonary exacerbations or chronic lung infections demands continuous updating of medical and microbiological processes associated with the constant evolution of pathogens during host colonization. In order to monitor the dynamics of these processes, it is essential to have expert systems capable of storing and subsequently extracting the information generated from different studies of the patients and microorganisms isolated from them. In this work we have designed and developed an on-line database based on an information system that allows to store, manage and visualize data from clinical studies and microbiological analysis of bacteria obtained from the respiratory tract of patients suffering from cystic fibrosis. The information system, named Cystic Fibrosis Cloud database is available on the http://servoy.infocomsa.com/cfc_database site and is composed of a main database and a web-based interface, which uses Servoy's product architecture based on Java technology. Although the CFC database system can be implemented as a local program for private use in CF centers, it can also be used, updated and shared by different users who can access the stored information in a systematic, practical and safe manner. The implementation of the CFC database could have a significant impact on the monitoring of respiratory infections, the prevention of exacerbations, the detection of emerging organisms, and the adequacy of control strategies for lung infections in CF patients.

  3. 'Trying to find information is like hating yourself every day': the collision of electronic information systems in transition with patients in transition.

    PubMed

    McMurray, Josephine; Hicks, Elisabeth; Johnson, Helen; Elliott, Jacobi; Byrne, Kerry; Stolee, Paul

    2013-09-01

    The consequences of parallel paper and electronic medical records (EMR) and their impact on informational continuity are examined. An interdisciplinary team conducted a multi-site, ethnographic field study and retrospective documentation review from January 2010 to December 2010. Three case studies from the sample of older patients with hip fractures who were transitioning across care settings were selected for examination. Analysis of data from interviews with care providers in each setting, field observation notes, and reviews of medical records yielded two themes. First, the lack of interoperability between electronic information systems has complicated, not eased providers' ability to communicate with others. Second, rather than transforming the system, digital records have sustained health care's 'culture of documentation'. While some information is more accessible and communications streamlined, parallel paper and electronic systems have added to front line providers' burden, not lessened it. Implementation of truly interoperable electronic health information systems need to be expedited to improve care continuity for patients with complex health-care needs, such as older patients with hip fractures.

  4. Ontology driven health information systems architectures enable pHealth for empowered patients.

    PubMed

    Blobel, Bernd

    2011-02-01

    The paradigm shift from organization-centered to managed care and on to personal health settings increases specialization and distribution of actors and services related to the health of patients or even citizens before becoming patients. As a consequence, extended communication and cooperation is required between all principals involved in health services such as persons, organizations, devices, systems, applications, and components. Personal health (pHealth) environments range over many disciplines, where domain experts present their knowledge by using domain-specific terminologies and ontologies. Therefore, the mapping of domain ontologies is inevitable for ensuring interoperability. The paper introduces the care paradigms and the related requirements as well as an architectural approach for meeting the business objectives. Furthermore, it discusses some theoretical challenges and practical examples of ontologies, concept and knowledge representations, starting general and then focusing on security and privacy related services. The requirements and solutions for empowering the patient or the citizen before becoming a patient are especially emphasized.

  5. Evolution of a Patient Information Management System in a Local Area Network Environment at Loyola University of Chicago Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Price, Ronald N; Chandrasekhar, Arcot J; Tamirisa, Balaji

    1990-01-01

    The Department of Medicine at Loyola University Medical Center (LUMC) of Chicago has implemented a local area network (LAN) based Patient Information Management System (PIMS) as part of its integrated departmental database management system. PIMS consists of related database applications encompassing demographic information, current medications, problem lists, clinical data, prior events, and on-line procedure results. Integration into the existing departmental database system permits PIMS to capture and manipulate data in other departmental applications. Standardization of clinical data is accomplished through three data tables that verify diagnosis codes, procedures codes and a standardized set of clinical data elements. The modularity of the system, coupled with standardized data formats, allowed the development of a Patient Information Protocol System (PIPS). PIPS, a userdefinable protocol processor, provides physicians with individualized data entry or review screens customized for their specific research protocols or practice habits. Physician feedback indicates that the PIMS/PIPS combination enhances their ability to collect and review specific patient information by filtering large amount of clinical data.

  6. A proposed key escrow system for secure patient information disclosure in biomedical research databases.

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Todd A.; Garrison, Gregory M.; Lowe, Henry J.

    2002-01-01

    Access to clinical data is of increasing importance to biomedical research. The pending HIPAA privacy regulations provide specific requirements for the release of protected health information. Under the regulations, biomedical researchers may utilize anonymized data, or adhere to HIPAA requirements regarding protected health information. In order to provide researchers with anonymized data from a clinical research database, we reviewed several published strategies for de-identification of protected health information. Critical analysis with respect to this project suggests that de-identification alone is problematic when applied to clinical research databases. We propose a hybrid system; utilizing secure key escrow, de-identification, and role-based access for IRB approved researchers. PMID:12463824

  7. Geographic information system analysis on the distribution of patients visiting the periodontology department at a dental college hospital.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Byungjoon; Joo, Hyun-Tae; Shin, Hyun-Seung; Lim, Mi-Hwa; Park, Jung-Chul

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze and visualize the distribution of patients visiting the periodontology department at a dental college hospital, using a geographic information system (GIS) to utilize these data in patient care and treatment planning, which may help to assess the risk and prevent periodontal diseases. Basic patient information data were obtained from Dankook University Dental Hospital, including the unit number, gender, date of birth, and address, down to the dong (neighborhood) administrative district unit, of 306,656 patients who visited the hospital between 2007 and 2014. The data of only 26,457 patients who visited the periodontology department were included in this analysis. The patient distribution was visualized using GIS. Statistical analyses including multiple regression, logistic regression, and geographically weighted regression were performed using SAS 9.3 and ArcGIS 10.1. Five factors, namely proximity, accessibility, age, gender, and socioeconomic status, were investigated as the explanatory variables of the patient distribution. The visualized patient data showed a nationwide scale of the patient distribution. The mean distance from each patient's regional center to the hospital was 30.94±29.62 km and was inversely proportional to the number of patients from the respective regions. The distance from a regional center to the adjacent toll gate had various effects depending on the local distance from the hospital. The average age of the patients was 52.41±12.97 years. Further, a majority of regions showed a male dominance. Personal income had inconsistent results between analyses. The distribution of patients is significantly affected by the proximity, accessibility, age, gender and socioeconomic status of patients, and the patients visiting the periodontology department travelled farther distances than those visiting the other departments. The underlying reason for this needs to be analyzed further.

  8. Capturing patients' needs in casemix: a systematic literature review on the value of adding functioning information in reimbursement systems.

    PubMed

    Hopfe, Maren; Stucki, Gerold; Marshall, Ric; Twomey, Conal D; Üstün, T Bedirhan; Prodinger, Birgit

    2016-02-03

    Contemporary casemix systems for health services need to ensure that payment rates adequately account for actual resource consumption based on patients' needs for services. It has been argued that functioning information, as one important determinant of health service provision and resource use, should be taken into account when developing casemix systems. However, there has to date been little systematic collation of the evidence on the extent to which the addition of functioning information into existing casemix systems adds value to those systems with regard to the predictive power and resource variation explained by the groupings of these systems. Thus, the objective of this research was to examine the value of adding functioning information into casemix systems with respect to the prediction of resource use as measured by costs and length of stay. A systematic literature review was performed. Peer-reviewed studies, published before May 2014 were retrieved from CINAHL, EconLit, Embase, JSTOR, PubMed and Sociological Abstracts using keywords related to functioning ('Functioning', 'Functional status', 'Function*, 'ICF', 'International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health', 'Activities of Daily Living' or 'ADL') and casemix systems ('Casemix', 'case mix', 'Diagnosis Related Groups', 'Function Related Groups', 'Resource Utilization Groups' or 'AN-SNAP'). In addition, a hand search of reference lists of included articles was conducted. Information about study aims, design, country, setting, methods, outcome variables, study results, and information regarding the authors' discussion of results, study limitations and implications was extracted. Ten included studies provided evidence demonstrating that adding functioning information into casemix systems improves predictive ability and fosters homogeneity in casemix groups with regard to costs and length of stay. Collection and integration of functioning information varied across studies. Results suggest

  9. The Promise of Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System-Turning Theory into Reality: A Uniform Approach to Patient-Reported Outcomes Across Rheumatic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Witter, James P

    2016-05-01

    PROMIS, the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System, is opening new possibilities to explore and learn how patient (or proxy) self-report of core symptoms and health-related quality of life can meaningfully advance clinical research and patient care. PROMIS leverages Item Response Theory to agnostically assess, across diseases and conditions or clinical settings, numerous universally applicable core "domains" of health (symptoms and functioning) from the patient perspective. Importantly, PROMIS is enabling the testing and adoption of computerized adaptive testing, which holds great potential to minimize patient burden while maximizing accuracy.

  10. Medical Information Management System (MIMS): An automated hospital information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterescu, S.; Simmons, P. B.; Schwartz, R. A.

    1971-01-01

    An automated hospital information system that handles all data related to patient-care activities is described. The description is designed to serve as a manual for potential users, nontechnical medical personnel who may use the system. Examples of the system's operation, commentary on the examples, and a complete listing of the system program are included.

  11. Geographic information system analysis on the distribution of patients visiting the periodontology department at a dental college hospital

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to analyze and visualize the distribution of patients visiting the periodontology department at a dental college hospital, using a geographic information system (GIS) to utilize these data in patient care and treatment planning, which may help to assess the risk and prevent periodontal diseases. Methods Basic patient information data were obtained from Dankook University Dental Hospital, including the unit number, gender, date of birth, and address, down to the dong (neighborhood) administrative district unit, of 306,656 patients who visited the hospital between 2007 and 2014. The data of only 26,457 patients who visited the periodontology department were included in this analysis. The patient distribution was visualized using GIS. Statistical analyses including multiple regression, logistic regression, and geographically weighted regression were performed using SAS 9.3 and ArcGIS 10.1. Five factors, namely proximity, accessibility, age, gender, and socioeconomic status, were investigated as the explanatory variables of the patient distribution. Results The visualized patient data showed a nationwide scale of the patient distribution. The mean distance from each patient’s regional center to the hospital was 30.94±29.62 km and was inversely proportional to the number of patients from the respective regions. The distance from a regional center to the adjacent toll gate had various effects depending on the local distance from the hospital. The average age of the patients was 52.41±12.97 years. Further, a majority of regions showed a male dominance. Personal income had inconsistent results between analyses. Conclusions The distribution of patients is significantly affected by the proximity, accessibility, age, gender and socioeconomic status of patients, and the patients visiting the periodontology department travelled farther distances than those visiting the other departments. The underlying reason for this needs to be analyzed

  12. Mission Medical Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.; Joe, John C.; Follansbee, Nicole M.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of the Mission Medical Information System (MMIS). The topics include: 1) What is MMIS?; 2) MMIS Goals; 3) Terrestrial Health Information Technology Vision; 4) NASA Health Information Technology Needs; 5) Mission Medical Information System Components; 6) Electronic Medical Record; 7) Longitudinal Study of Astronaut Health (LSAH); 8) Methods; and 9) Data Submission Agreement (example).

  13. MILITARY INFORMATION SYSTEMS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    upward are usually indications of how effectively the system is developing or operating. The use of computers in information systems tends to increase...computers into information systems must always begin at the lowest level of aggregation in the job hierarchy. Only those information-processing jobs

  14. MERIS (Medical Error Reporting Information System) as an innovative patient safety intervention: a health policy perspective.

    PubMed

    Riga, Marina; Vozikis, Athanassios; Pollalis, Yannis; Souliotis, Kyriakos

    2015-04-01

    The economic crisis in Greece poses the necessity to resolve problems concerning both the spiralling cost and the quality assurance in the health system. The detection and the analysis of patient adverse events and medical errors are considered crucial elements of this course. The implementation of MERIS embodies a mandatory module, which adopts the trigger tool methodology for measuring adverse events and medical errors an intensive care unit [ICU] environment, and a voluntary one with web-based public reporting methodology. A pilot implementation of MERIS running in a public hospital identified 35 adverse events, with approx. 12 additional hospital days and an extra healthcare cost of €12,000 per adverse event or of about €312,000 per annum for ICU costs only. At the same time, the voluntary module unveiled 510 reports on adverse events submitted by citizens or patients. MERIS has been evaluated as a comprehensive and effective system; it succeeded in detecting the main factors that cause adverse events and discloses severe omissions of the Greek health system. MERIS may be incorporated and run efficiently nationally, adapted to the needs and peculiarities of each hospital or clinic. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Information and communication technology systems to improve quality of life and safety of Alzheimer's disease patients: a multicenter international survey.

    PubMed

    Pilotto, Alberto; D'Onofrio, Grazia; Benelli, Edoardo; Zanesco, Antonio; Cabello, Ana; Margelí, M Carmen; Wanche-Politis, Sophia; Seferis, Kostas; Sancarlo, Daniele; Kilias, Dimitrios

    2011-01-01

    Within the frame of the European Commission funded Smart Home for Elderly People (HOPE) Project, relatives/caregivers of 223 Alzheimer's Disease (AD) patients were recruited in Italy, Spain, and Greece for a multicenter international survey on the potential role of Information and Communication Technology system (ICT-systems) for AD patients. A five-minute video on HOPE ICT-systems was shown, and all relatives/caregivers completed a 13-item questionnaire that evaluated the potential role of: A) ICT-systems in improving quality of life, care, and safety; B) devices for monitoring personal movements, medication use, and ambient environmental conditions; C) devices to improve communication, home-based rehabilitation, and reduction of specific risks; and D) possible agreement in using ICT-systems by AD patients. Relatives/caregivers reported that ICT-systems could be very useful to improve: A) quality of life (66.4%), care (56.1%), and safety (87.0%); B) monitoring bed rest and movements (80.7%), medication use (87.4%), and ambient environmental conditions (85.2%); and C) emergency communication (83.4%). Relatives/caregivers reported that ICT-systems could be significantly more useful for AD patients aged 75-84 than patients aged <75 or ≥85 years (p < 0.0001) and with moderate than mild or severe dementia (p < 0.0001). Relatives/caregivers aged ≥50 years and with low educational level considered ICT-systems more useful than relatives/caregivers aged <50 years (p < 0.0001) and with high educational level (p < 0.0001). In conclusion, relatives/caregivers considered that the HOPE ICT-system could be useful to improve the management of AD patients.

  16. The patient work system: an analysis of self-care performance barriers among elderly heart failure patients and their informal caregivers.

    PubMed

    Holden, Richard J; Schubert, Christiane C; Mickelson, Robin S

    2015-03-01

    Human factors and ergonomics approaches have been successfully applied to study and improve the work performance of healthcare professionals. However, there has been relatively little work in "patient-engaged human factors," or the application of human factors to the health-related work of patients and other nonprofessionals. This study applied a foundational human factors tool, the systems model, to investigate the barriers to self-care performance among chronically ill elderly patients and their informal (family) caregivers. A Patient Work System model was developed to guide the collection and analysis of interviews, surveys, and observations of patients with heart failure (n = 30) and their informal caregivers (n = 14). Iterative analyses revealed the nature and prevalence of self-care barriers across components of the Patient Work System. Person-related barriers were common and stemmed from patients' biomedical conditions, limitations, knowledge deficits, preferences, and perceptions as well as the characteristics of informal caregivers and healthcare professionals. Task barriers were also highly prevalent and included task difficulty, timing, complexity, ambiguity, conflict, and undesirable consequences. Tool barriers were related to both availability and access of tools and technologies and their design, usability, and impact. Context barriers were found across three domains-physical-spatial, social-cultural, and organizational-and multiple "spaces" such as "at home," "on the go," and "in the community." Barriers often stemmed not from single factors but from the interaction of several work system components. Study findings suggest the need to further explore multiple actors, contexts, and interactions in the patient work system during research and intervention design, as well as the need to develop new models and measures for studying patient and family work.

  17. Patients at the Centre: Methodological Considerations for Evaluating Evidence from Health Interventions Involving Patients Use of Web-Based Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Elizabeth; Turner, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Building an evidence base for healthcare interventions has long been advocated as both professionally and ethically desirable. By supporting meaningful comparison amongst different approaches, a good evidence base has been viewed as an important element in optimising clinical decision-making and the safety and quality of care. Unsurprisingly, medical research has put considerable effort into supporting the development of this evidence base, and the randomised controlled trial has become the dominant methodology. Recently however, a body of research has begun to question, not just this methodology per se, but also the extent to which the evidence it produces may marginalise individual patient experiences, priorities and perceptions. Simultaneously, the widespread adoption and utilisation of information systems (IS) in health care has also prompted initiatives to develop a stronger base of evidence about their impacts. These calls have been stimulated both by numerous system failures and research expressing concerns about the limitations of information systems methodologies in health care environments. Alongside the potential of information systems to produce positive, negative and unintended consequences, many measures of success, impact or benefit appear to have little to do with improvements in care, health outcomes or individual patient experiences. Combined these methodological concerns suggest the need for more detailed examination. This is particularly the case, given the prevalence within contemporary clinical and IS discourses on health interventions advocating the need to put the ‘patient at the centre’ by engaging them in their own care and/or ‘empowering’ them through the use of information systems. This paper aims to contribute to these on-going debates by focusing on the socio-technical processes by which patients’ interests and outcomes are measured, defined and evaluated within health interventions that involve them using web

  18. Mobile Student Information System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asif, Muhammad; Krogstie, John

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: A mobile student information system (MSIS) based on mobile computing and context-aware application concepts can provide more user-centric information services to students. The purpose of this paper is to describe a system for providing relevant information to students on a mobile platform. Design/methodology/approach: The research…

  19. Community Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Andrew

    Information is provided on technological and social trends as background for a workshop designed to heighten the consciousness of workers in community information systems. Initially, the basic terminology is considered in its implications for an integrated perspective of community information systems, with particular attention given to the meaning…

  20. Strategic Information Systems Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowley, Jennifer

    1995-01-01

    Strategic Information Systems Planning (SISP) is the process of establishing a program for implementation and use of information systems in ways that will optimize effectiveness of information resources and use them to support the objectives of the organization. Basic steps in SISP methodology are outlined. (JKP)

  1. Mobile Student Information System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asif, Muhammad; Krogstie, John

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: A mobile student information system (MSIS) based on mobile computing and context-aware application concepts can provide more user-centric information services to students. The purpose of this paper is to describe a system for providing relevant information to students on a mobile platform. Design/methodology/approach: The research…

  2. Item Banks for Measuring Emotional Distress From the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS®): Depression, Anxiety, and Anger

    PubMed Central

    Pilkonis, Paul A.; Choi, Seung W.; Reise, Steven P.; Stover, Angela M.; Riley, William T.; Cella, David

    2011-01-01

    The authors report on the development and calibration of item banks for depression, anxiety, and anger as part of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS®). Comprehensive literature searches yielded an initial bank of 1,404 items from 305 instruments. After qualitative item analysis (including focus groups and cognitive interviewing), 168 items (56 for each construct) were written in a first person, past tense format with a 7-day time frame and five response options reflecting frequency. The calibration sample included nearly 15,000 respondents. Final banks of 28, 29, and 29 items were calibrated for depression, anxiety, and anger, respectively, using item response theory. Test information curves showed that the PROMIS item banks provided more information than conventional measures in a range of severity from approximately −1 to +3 standard deviations (with higher scores indicating greater distress). Short forms consisting of seven to eight items provided information comparable to legacy measures containing more items. PMID:21697139

  3. The patient work system: An analysis of self-care performance barriers among elderly heart failure patients and their informal caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Richard J.; Schubert, Christiane C.; Mickelson, Robin S.

    2014-01-01

    Human factors and ergonomics approaches have been successfully applied to study and improve the work performance of healthcare professionals. However, there has been relatively little work in “patient-engaged human factors,” or the application of human factors to the health-related work of patients and other nonprofessionals. This study applied a foundational human factors tool, the systems model, to investigate the barriers to self-care performance among chronically ill elderly patients and their informal (family) caregivers. A Patient Work System model was developed to guide the collection and analysis of interviews, surveys, and observations of patients with heart failure (n=30) and their informal caregivers (n=14). Iterative analyses revealed the nature and prevalence of self-care barriers across components of the Patient Work System. Person-related barriers were common and stemmed from patients’ biomedical conditions, limitations, knowledge deficits, preferences, and perceptions as well as the characteristics of informal caregivers and healthcare professionals. Task barriers were also highly prevalent and included task difficulty, timing, complexity, ambiguity, conflict, and undesirable consequences. Tool barriers were related to both availability and access of tools and technologies and their design, usability, and impact. Context barriers were found across three domains—physical-spatial, social-cultural, and organizational—and multiple “spaces” such as “at home,” “on the go,” and “in the community.” Barriers often stemmed not from single factors but from the interaction of several work system components. Study findings suggest the need to further explore multiple actors, context, and interactions in the patient work system during research and intervention design, as well as the need to develop new models and measures for studying patient and family work. PMID:25479983

  4. A DICOM-RT Based ePR radiation therapy information system for decision-support of brain tumor patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B. J.; Law, M.; Huang, H. K.; Zee, C. S.; Chan, L.

    2006-03-01

    The need for comprehensive clinical image data and relevant information in image-guided Radiation Therapy (RT) is becoming steadily apparent. Multiple standalone systems utilizing the most technological advancements in imaging, therapeutic radiation, and computerized treatment planning systems acquire key data during the RT treatment course of a patient. One example are patients treated for brain tumors of greater sizes and irregular shapes that utilize state-of-the-art RT technology to deliver pinpoint accurate radiation doses. Various treatment options are available to the patient from Radiation Therapy to Stereotactic Radiosurgery and utilize different RT modalities. The disparate and complex data generated by the RT modalities along with related data scattered throughout the RT department in RT Information/Management systems, Record & Verify systems, and Treatment Planning Systems (TPS) compromise an efficient clinical workflow since the data crucial for a clinical decision may be time-consuming to retrieve, temporarily missing, or even lost. To address these shortcomings, the ACR-NEMA Standards Committee extended its DICOM (Digital Imaging & Communications in Medicine) Standard from Radiology to RT by ratifying seven DICOM RT objects starting in 1997. However, they are rarely used by the RT community in daily clinical operations. In the past, the research focus of an RT department has primarily been developing new protocols and devices to improve treatment process and outcomes of cancer patients with minimal effort dedicated to integration of imaging and information systems. By combining our past experience in medical imaging informatics research, DICOM-RT expertise, and system integration, our research involves using a brain tumor case model to show proof-of-concept that a DICOM-Standard electronic patient record (ePR) system can be developed as a foundation to perform medical imaging informatics research in developing decision-support tools and knowledge

  5. Information extraction system

    DOEpatents

    Lemmond, Tracy D; Hanley, William G; Guensche, Joseph Wendell; Perry, Nathan C; Nitao, John J; Kidwell, Paul Brandon; Boakye, Kofi Agyeman; Glaser, Ron E; Prenger, Ryan James

    2014-05-13

    An information extraction system and methods of operating the system are provided. In particular, an information extraction system for performing meta-extraction of named entities of people, organizations, and locations as well as relationships and events from text documents are described herein.

  6. Regional Health Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Sherrilynne

    1997-01-01

    Abstract In general, there is agreement that robust integrated information systems are the foundation for building successful regional health care delivery systems. Integrated Advanced Information Management System (IAIMS) institutions that, over the years, have developed strategies for creating cohesive institutional information systems and services are finding that IAIMS strategies work well in the even more complex regional environment. The key elements of IAIMS planning are described and lessons learned are discussed in the context of regional health information systems developed. The challenges of aligning the various information agencies and agendas in support of a regional health information system are complex ; however, the potential rewards for health care in quality, efficacy, and cost savings are enormous. PMID:9067887

  7. ECONOMICS OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The paper presents a study of the rational choice-making of an individual from among available information systems , or available components of such...components, of information systems . The available set depends on the choices made by suppliers. Joint choices by demanders and suppliers would...determine which information systems are in fact produced and used under given external conditions. These conditions include the technological knowledge of those concerned.

  8. Management Information Systems Research.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Research on management information systems is illusive in many respects. Part of the basic research problem in MIS stems from the absence of standard...definitions and the lack of a unified body of theory. Organizations continue to develop large and often very efficient information systems , but...decision making. But the transition from these results to the realization of ’satisfactory’ management information systems remains difficult indeed. The

  9. The case for an international patient-reported outcomes measurement information system (PROMIS®) initiative

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) play an increasingly important role in clinical practice and research. Modern psychometric methods such as item response theory (IRT) enable the creation of item banks that support fixed-length forms as well as computerized adaptive testing (CAT), often resulting in improved measurement precision and responsiveness. Here we describe and discuss the case for developing an international core set of PROs building from the US PROMIS® network. PROMIS is a U.S.-based cooperative group of research sites and centers of excellence convened to develop and standardize PRO measures across studies and settings. If extended to a global collaboration, PROMIS has the potential to transform PRO measurement by creating a shared, unifying terminology and metric for reporting of common symptoms and functional life domains. Extending a common set of standardized PRO measures to the international community offers great potential for improving patient-centered research, clinical trials reporting, population monitoring, and health care worldwide. Benefits of such standardization include the possibility of: international syntheses (such as meta-analyses) of research findings; international population monitoring and policy development; health services administrators and planners access to relevant information on the populations they serve; better assessment and monitoring of patients by providers; and improved shared decision making. The goal of the current PROMIS International initiative is to ensure that item banks are translated and culturally adapted for use in adults and children in as many countries as possible. The process includes 3 key steps: translation/cultural adaptation, calibration, and validation. A universal translation, an approach focusing on commonalities, rather than differences across versions developed in regions or countries speaking the same language, is proposed to ensure conceptual equivalence for all items. International item

  10. The case for an international patient-reported outcomes measurement information system (PROMIS®) initiative.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Jordi; Bartlett, Susan J; Rose, Matthias; Aaronson, Neil K; Chaplin, John E; Efficace, Fabio; Leplège, Alain; Lu, Aiping; Tulsky, David S; Raat, Hein; Ravens-Sieberer, Ulrike; Revicki, Dennis; Terwee, Caroline B; Valderas, Jose M; Cella, David; Forrest, Christopher B

    2013-12-20

    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) play an increasingly important role in clinical practice and research. Modern psychometric methods such as item response theory (IRT) enable the creation of item banks that support fixed-length forms as well as computerized adaptive testing (CAT), often resulting in improved measurement precision and responsiveness. Here we describe and discuss the case for developing an international core set of PROs building from the US PROMIS® network.PROMIS is a U.S.-based cooperative group of research sites and centers of excellence convened to develop and standardize PRO measures across studies and settings. If extended to a global collaboration, PROMIS has the potential to transform PRO measurement by creating a shared, unifying terminology and metric for reporting of common symptoms and functional life domains. Extending a common set of standardized PRO measures to the international community offers great potential for improving patient-centered research, clinical trials reporting, population monitoring, and health care worldwide. Benefits of such standardization include the possibility of: international syntheses (such as meta-analyses) of research findings; international population monitoring and policy development; health services administrators and planners access to relevant information on the populations they serve; better assessment and monitoring of patients by providers; and improved shared decision making.The goal of the current PROMIS International initiative is to ensure that item banks are translated and culturally adapted for use in adults and children in as many countries as possible. The process includes 3 key steps: translation/cultural adaptation, calibration, and validation. A universal translation, an approach focusing on commonalities, rather than differences across versions developed in regions or countries speaking the same language, is proposed to ensure conceptual equivalence for all items. International item

  11. Weather Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    WxLink is an aviation weather system based on advanced airborne sensors, precise positioning available from the satellite-based Global Positioning System, cockpit graphics and a low-cost datalink. It is a two-way system that uplinks weather information to the aircraft and downlinks automatic pilot reports of weather conditions aloft. Manufactured by ARNAV Systems, Inc., the original technology came from Langley Research Center's cockpit weather information system, CWIN (Cockpit Weather INformation). The system creates radar maps of storms, lightning and reports of surface observations, offering improved safety, better weather monitoring and substantial fuel savings.

  12. Medical-Information-Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterescu, Sidney; Friedman, Carl A.; Frankowski, James W.

    1989-01-01

    Medical Information Management System (MIMS) computer program interactive, general-purpose software system for storage and retrieval of information. Offers immediate assistance where manipulation of large data bases required. User quickly and efficiently extracts, displays, and analyzes data. Used in management of medical data and handling all aspects of data related to care of patients. Other applications include management of data on occupational safety in public and private sectors, handling judicial information, systemizing purchasing and procurement systems, and analyses of cost structures of organizations. Written in Microsoft FORTRAN 77.

  13. Medical-Information-Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterescu, Sidney; Friedman, Carl A.; Frankowski, James W.

    1989-01-01

    Medical Information Management System (MIMS) computer program interactive, general-purpose software system for storage and retrieval of information. Offers immediate assistance where manipulation of large data bases required. User quickly and efficiently extracts, displays, and analyzes data. Used in management of medical data and handling all aspects of data related to care of patients. Other applications include management of data on occupational safety in public and private sectors, handling judicial information, systemizing purchasing and procurement systems, and analyses of cost structures of organizations. Written in Microsoft FORTRAN 77.

  14. Information retrieval system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, R. F.; Holcomb, J. E.; Kelroy, E. A.; Levine, D. A.; Mee, C., III

    1970-01-01

    Generalized information storage and retrieval system capable of generating and maintaining a file, gathering statistics, sorting output, and generating final reports for output is reviewed. File generation and file maintenance programs written for the system are general purpose routines.

  15. [Patient information in radiooncology Information seeking behaviour and patient characteristics].

    PubMed

    Pour-Haring, Herta Farassati; Volleritsch, Christa; Roth, Roswith

    2009-01-01

    Provision of relevant and accurate information is an important factor for patient-satisfaction. This study investigated the self-assessed level of information, information needs and sources of information of patients undergoing radiotherapy in correlation between socio-demographic, medical and psychological variables. A self-ministered questionnaire designed to measure the self-assessed level of information and information needs was distributed to 133 cancer patients before (t(1)) and 14 days after the first medical consultation (t(2)). "Anxiety" and "Social desirability" were assessed at t(1) and four groups of coping methods (repressive, sensitive, anxious, non-defensive/non-anxious) were derived. Sources of information were elicited at t(2). The self-assessed level of information increased, while the demand for information declined. Female patients felt better informed than males. Older patients had a lower self-assessed level of information than younger patients. Among the four groups using different methods of coping, the repressive group wanted the least information. Generally medical consultations were preferred and other sources of information rarely were used. Where there are a large number of older patients with a low educational background, the use of computers is not appropriate at the moment. It can, however, be assumed that the next generation of patients will have a more practical knowledge of computers, and will thus make better use of this method of communication.

  16. Effective retrieval in Hospital Information Systems: the use of context in answering queries to Patient Discharge Summaries.

    PubMed

    Nangle, B; Keane, M T

    1994-06-01

    The move towards the electronic storage of medical records in Hospital Information Systems (HISs) presents significant challenges for AI retrieval techniques. In this paper, we argue that adequate information retrieval in such systems will have to rely on the exploitation of the conceptual knowledge in those records rather than superficial string searches. However, this course of action is dependent on the developments of natural language processing techniques and on retrieval systems that can exploit semantic/conceptual knowledge. We present a retrieval system, which attempts to realise the second of these developments. This system, called CONIR [developed in the context of the European Community project MENELAS (AIM 2023)] operates in the domain of Patient Discharge Summaries on coronary illness. CONIR uses flexible retrieval techniques, that exploit conceptual context information, over a database of elaborated semantic records. In the course of the paper we outline the sorts of knowledge structures that are required to do this type of retrieval and indicate how they are constructed.

  17. Environmental geographic information system.

    SciTech Connect

    Peek, Dennis W; Helfrich, Donald Alan; Gorman, Susan

    2010-08-01

    This document describes how the Environmental Geographic Information System (EGIS) was used, along with externally received data, to create maps for the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement (SWEIS) Source Document project. Data quality among the various classes of geographic information system (GIS) data is addressed. A complete listing of map layers used is provided.

  18. Information Retrieval System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahle, Jack D., Jr.

    The Fort Detrick Information Retrieval System is a system of computer programs written in COBOL for a CDC 3150 to store and retrieve information about the scientific and technical reports and documents of the Fort Detrick Technical Library. The documents and reports have been abstracted and indexed. This abstract, the subject matter descriptors,…

  19. Archival Information Management System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-02-01

    management system named Archival Information Management System (AIMS), designed to meet the audit trail requirement for studies completed under the...are to be archived to the extent that future reproducibility and interrogation of results will exist. This report presents a prototype information

  20. Utilizing Geographic Information Systems to Identify Clusters of Severe Sepsis Patients Presenting in the Out-of-Hospital Environment.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Allison C; Studnek, Jonathan R; Puskarich, Michael A; Jones, Alan E

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the geographic distribution of critical illness within a community may provide public health stakeholders with information that can be used to expedite access to specialized care. We hypothesized that severe sepsis patients transported by emergency medical services (EMS) exhibit geospatial clustering and that prehospital providers would recognize sepsis more frequently in patients transported from sepsis clusters. Retrospective review of a prospective, observational study of patients with severe sepsis transported to the emergency department (ED) by EMS and treated with early goal-directed therapy (EGDT). suspected infection, 2 or more criteria for systemic inflammation, and either systolic blood pressure <90 mmHg after a fluid bolus or lactate >4 mmol/liter. age <18 or need for immediate surgery. Patient location at the time of EMS activation was recorded. Analysis of the addresses identified clusters, defined as a location in which EMS transported more than one patient experiencing the above associated signs and symptoms of septic shock. Other data collected included self-reported patient location as private residence or chronic care facility. One hundred sixty severe sepsis patients transported by EMS were eligible for analysis, presenting from 125 locations. Ninety-one patients (57%) presented from a private residence and 69 (37%) from a chronic care facility. Fifty (31%) patients were transported from 15 locations, with 25 of those transported from just 4 locations. Cluster patients tended to be older, come from medical facilities, and were more likely to have sepsis recognized by prehospital providers. Results from this study demonstrate low pre-hospital recognition of sepsis, as well as geospatially clustered presentations, most notably from skilled nursing facilities. Community education, public health initiatives, and EMS interventions could be targeted in such clusters of cases in order to both improve sepsis recognition and potentially

  1. A flexible home monitoring platform for patients affected by chronic heart failure directly integrated with the remote Hospital Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donati, Massimiliano; Bacchillone, Tony; Saponara, Sergio; Fanucci, Luca

    2011-05-01

    Today Chronic Heart Failure (CHF) represents one of leading cause of hospitalization among chronic disease, especially for elderly citizens, with a consequent considerable impact on patient quality of life, resources congestion and healthcare costs for the National Sanitary System. The current healthcare model is mostly in-hospital based and consists of periodic visits, but unfortunately it does not allow to promptly detect exacerbations resulting in a large number of rehospitalization. Recently physicians and administrators identify telemonitoring systems as a strategy able to provide effective and cost efficient healthcare services for CHF patients, ensuring early diagnosis and treatments in case of necessity. This work presents a complete and integrated ICT solution to improve the management of chronic heart failure through the remote monitoring of vital signs at patient home, able to connect in-hospital care of acute syndrome with out-of-hospital follow-up. The proposed platform represents the patient's interface, acting as link between biomedical sensors and the data collection point at the Hospital Information System (HIS) in order to handle in transparent way the reception, analysis and forwarding of the main physiological parameters.

  2. Next generation information systems

    SciTech Connect

    Limback, Nathan P; Medina, Melanie A; Silva, Michelle E

    2010-01-01

    The Information Systems Analysis and Development (ISAD) Team of the Safeguards Systems Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been developing web based information and knowledge management systems for sixteen years. Our vision is to rapidly and cost effectively provide knowledge management solutions in the form of interactive information systems that help customers organize, archive, post and retrieve nonproliferation and safeguards knowledge and information vital to their success. The team has developed several comprehensive information systems that assist users in the betterment and growth of their organizations and programs. Through our information systems, users are able to streamline operations, increase productivity, and share and access information from diverse geographic locations. The ISAD team is also producing interactive visual models. Interactive visual models provide many benefits to customers beyond the scope of traditional full-scale modeling. We have the ability to simulate a vision that a customer may propose, without the time constraints of traditional engineering modeling tools. Our interactive visual models can be used to access specialized training areas, controlled areas, and highly radioactive areas, as well as review site-specific training for complex facilities, and asset management. Like the information systems that the ISAD team develops, these models can be shared and accessed from any location with access to the internet. The purpose of this paper is to elaborate on the capabilities of information systems and interactive visual models as well as consider the possibility of combining the two capabilities to provide the next generation of infonnation systems. The collection, processing, and integration of data in new ways can contribute to the security of the nation by providing indicators and information for timely action to decrease the traditional and new nuclear threats. Modeling and simulation tied to comprehensive

  3. A Microbiology Information System

    PubMed Central

    Peebles, James E.; Ryan, Kenneth J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes a microbiology information system which is integrated into a general purpose laboratory information system as well as into the normal workflow of the microbiology laboratory. Data entry using “customized” terminal keyboards greatly simplify technologists interaction with the system allowing direct entry of results at each workstation. Results are reported in a user oriented format utilizing full English description of all terms.

  4. Racial Differences in Geographic Access to Medical Care as Measured by Patient Report and Geographic Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Wong, Michelle S; Grande, David T; Mitra, Nandita; Radhakrishnan, Archana; Branas, Charles C; Ward, Katelyn R; Pollack, Craig E

    2017-09-01

    Geographic access-the travel burden required to reach medical care-is an important aspect of care. Studies, which typically rely on geographic information system (GIS) calculated travel times, have found some evidence of racial disparities in spatial access to care. However, the validity of these studies depends on the accuracy of travel times by patient race. To determine if there are racial differences when comparing patient-reported and GIS-calculated travel times. Data came from the Philadelphia Area Prostate Cancer Access Study (P Access), a cohort study of men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer. We conducted cross-sectional analysis of 2136 men using multivariable linear mixed-effects models to examine the effect of race on differences in patient-reported and GIS-calculated travel times to urology and radiation oncology cancer providers. Patient-reported travel times were, on an average, longer than GIS-calculated times. For urology practices, median patient-reported travel times were 12.7 minutes longer than GIS-calculated travel times for blacks versus 7.2 minutes longer for whites. After adjusting for potential confounders, including socioeconomic status and car access, the difference was significantly greater for black patients than white patients (2.0 min; 95% confidence interval, 0.58-3.44). GIS-calculated travel time may underestimate access to care, especially for black patients. Future studies that use GIS-calculated travel times to examine racial disparities in spatial access to care might consider including patient-reported travel times and controlling for factors that might affect the accuracy of GIS-calculated travel times.

  5. Health Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Sirintrapun, S Joseph; Artz, David R

    2015-06-01

    This article provides surgical pathologists an overview of health information systems (HISs): what they are, what they do, and how such systems relate to the practice of surgical pathology. Much of this article is dedicated to the electronic medical record. Information, in how it is captured, transmitted, and conveyed, drives the effectiveness of such electronic medical record functionalities. So critical is information from pathology in integrated clinical care that surgical pathologists are becoming gatekeepers of not only tissue but also information. Better understanding of HISs can empower surgical pathologists to become stakeholders who have an impact on the future direction of quality integrated clinical care.

  6. Health Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Sirintrapun, S Joseph; Artz, David R

    2016-03-01

    This article provides surgical pathologists an overview of health information systems (HISs): what they are, what they do, and how such systems relate to the practice of surgical pathology. Much of this article is dedicated to the electronic medical record. Information, in how it is captured, transmitted, and conveyed, drives the effectiveness of such electronic medical record functionalities. So critical is information from pathology in integrated clinical care that surgical pathologists are becoming gatekeepers of not only tissue but also information. Better understanding of HISs can empower surgical pathologists to become stakeholders who have an impact on the future direction of quality integrated clinical care.

  7. Earthquake Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-01-01

    IAEMIS (Integrated Automated Emergency Management Information System) is the principal tool of an earthquake preparedness program developed by Martin Marietta and the Mid-America Remote Sensing Center (MARC). It is a two-component set of software, data and procedures to provide information enabling management personnel to make informed decisions in disaster situations. The NASA-developed program ELAS, originally used to analyze Landsat data, provides MARC with a spatially-oriented information management system. Additional MARC projects include land resources management, and development of socioeconomic data.

  8. Information of Open Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimontovich, Yuri L.

    In the theory of communication two definitions of the concept "information" are known. One of them coincides according to its form with the Boltzmann entropy. The second definition of information is the difference between unconditional and conditional entropies. In the present work this latter is used for the definition of the information about states of open systems with various meanings of the control parameter. Two kinds of open systems are considered. The first class of systems concerns those which with zero value of the control parameter are in an equilibrium state. The information on an equilibrium state is equal to zero. During self- organizing in the process of departing from an equilibrium state the information increases. For open systems of this class the conservation law for the sum of the information and entropy with all values of control parameter is proved. In open systems of the second class the equilibrium condition is impossible. For them the concept "norm of a chaoticity" is introduced. It allows to consider two kinds of processes of self-organization and to give the corresponding definitions of information. The statement is carried out on a number of (classical and quantum) examples of physical systems. The example of a medico-biological system also is considered.

  9. Air System Information Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filman, Robert E.

    2004-01-01

    I flew to Washington last week, a trip rich in distributed information management. Buying tickets, at the gate, in flight, landing and at the baggage claim, myriad messages about my reservation, the weather, our flight plans, gates, bags and so forth flew among a variety of travel agency, airline and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) computers and personnel. By and large, each kind of information ran on a particular application, often specialized to own data formats and communications network. I went to Washington to attend an FAA meeting on System-Wide Information Management (SWIM) for the National Airspace System (NAS) (http://www.nasarchitecture.faa.gov/Tutorials/NAS101.cfm). NAS (and its information infrastructure, SWIM) is an attempt to bring greater regularity, efficiency and uniformity to the collection of stovepipe applications now used to manage air traffic. Current systems hold information about flight plans, flight trajectories, weather, air turbulence, current and forecast weather, radar summaries, hazardous condition warnings, airport and airspace capacity constraints, temporary flight restrictions, and so forth. Information moving among these stovepipe systems is usually mediated by people (for example, air traffic controllers) or single-purpose applications. People, whose intelligence is critical for difficult tasks and unusual circumstances, are not as efficient as computers for tasks that can be automated. Better information sharing can lead to higher system capacity, more efficient utilization and safer operations. Better information sharing through greater automation is possible though not necessarily easy.

  10. Air System Information Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filman, Robert E.

    2004-01-01

    I flew to Washington last week, a trip rich in distributed information management. Buying tickets, at the gate, in flight, landing and at the baggage claim, myriad messages about my reservation, the weather, our flight plans, gates, bags and so forth flew among a variety of travel agency, airline and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) computers and personnel. By and large, each kind of information ran on a particular application, often specialized to own data formats and communications network. I went to Washington to attend an FAA meeting on System-Wide Information Management (SWIM) for the National Airspace System (NAS) (http://www.nasarchitecture.faa.gov/Tutorials/NAS101.cfm). NAS (and its information infrastructure, SWIM) is an attempt to bring greater regularity, efficiency and uniformity to the collection of stovepipe applications now used to manage air traffic. Current systems hold information about flight plans, flight trajectories, weather, air turbulence, current and forecast weather, radar summaries, hazardous condition warnings, airport and airspace capacity constraints, temporary flight restrictions, and so forth. Information moving among these stovepipe systems is usually mediated by people (for example, air traffic controllers) or single-purpose applications. People, whose intelligence is critical for difficult tasks and unusual circumstances, are not as efficient as computers for tasks that can be automated. Better information sharing can lead to higher system capacity, more efficient utilization and safer operations. Better information sharing through greater automation is possible though not necessarily easy.

  11. Arkansas Technology Information System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanBiervliet, Alan; Parette, Howard P., Jr.

    The Arkansas Technology Information System (ARTIS) was developed to fill a significant void in existing systems of technical support to Arkansans with disabilities by creating and maintaining a consumer-responsive statewide system of data storage and retrieval regarding assistive technology and services. ARTIS goals also include establishment of a…

  12. Organizing Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Charles R.

    The development of information systems is described with regard to the roles of the system user and the data processing specialist. Institutional needs are best served by coordination efforts, usually handled by a management systems office, which is also responsible for the maintenance and production of an institutional data element dictionary and…

  13. Informing patients: a guide for providing patient health information.

    PubMed

    Tang, P C; Newcomb, C

    1998-01-01

    To understand and address patients' need for information surrounding ambulatory-care visits. The authors conducted two patient focus groups regarding patient education. The first covered general information needs of patients and the second explored their reactions to a computer-generated patient handout that was developed in response to the results of the first focus group and implemented in a clinic. Participants sought information about their health--generally after the encounter with their caregiver. They wanted a permanent record of personal health data and relevant educational information. Participants recommended that the information be concise, clear, and illustrated with graphics if appropriate. Receiving health-related information from their providers favorably affected the participants' trust in, relationship with, and confidence in their physicians. When given printouts with graphic trends depicting their responses to therapy, participants reported that they were more motivated to adhere to a treatment plan and were more satisfied with their care. Based on the results of the focus groups, we developed a set of attributes (P.A.T.I.E.N.T.) to guide the development of patient and consumer health information. Patients participating in our focus groups felt that providing printed summary information to patients at the end of a clinic visit improves their understanding of their care, enhances their relationships with providers, improves their satisfaction with care, and motivates them to adhere to treatment plans. Further empirical studies are necessary to test their perceptions.

  14. Information Technology in Critical Care: Review of Monitoring and Data Acquisition Systems for Patient Care and Research

    PubMed Central

    De Georgia, Michael A.; Kaffashi, Farhad; Jacono, Frank J.; Loparo, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    There is a broad consensus that 21st century health care will require intensive use of information technology to acquire and analyze data and then manage and disseminate information extracted from the data. No area is more data intensive than the intensive care unit. While there have been major improvements in intensive care monitoring, the medical industry, for the most part, has not incorporated many of the advances in computer science, biomedical engineering, signal processing, and mathematics that many other industries have embraced. Acquiring, synchronizing, integrating, and analyzing patient data remain frustratingly difficult because of incompatibilities among monitoring equipment, proprietary limitations from industry, and the absence of standard data formatting. In this paper, we will review the history of computers in the intensive care unit along with commonly used monitoring and data acquisition systems, both those commercially available and those being developed for research purposes. PMID:25734185

  15. A network system of medical and welfare information service for the patients, their families, hospitals, local governments, and commercial companies in a medical service area.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Kouji; Antoku, Yasuaki; Inoue, Reika; Kobayashi, Mariko; Hanada, Eisuke; Iwasaki, Yasutaka; Kumagai, Yasushi; Iwamoto, Haruya; Tsuchihashi, Saburo; Iwaki, Miho; Kira, Jun-ichi; Nose, Yoshiaki

    2002-06-01

    A service information system using the Internet, which connected the various people who are related to medical treatment and nursing welfare, was constructed. An intractable neurological disease patient who lives in the Onga district, Fukuoka, Japan, and the people who are related to the service were chosen as test users in an experimental model. The communicated service information was divided into open-use data (electronic bulletin board, welfare service, medical care service, and link to private company service home page) and closed-use data (the individual patient's hysterics). The open data server was installed in an Internet service provider The open data could be accessed not only by the patient, but also by the family, information center, companies, hospitals, and nursing commodity store related to patient's nursing and medical treatment. Closed data server was installed in an information center (public health center). Only patient and information center staff can access the closed data. Patients should search and collect the service information of various medical and welfare services by themselves. Therefore, services prepared for the patient are difficult to know, and they cannot be sufficiently utilized. With the use of this information system, all usable service information became accessible, and patients could easily use it. The electronic bulletin board system (BBS) was used by patients for knowing each other or each others' family, and was used as a device for exchange of wisdom. Also, the questions for the specialist, such as doctor, dentist, teacher, physical therapist, care manager, welfare office staff member, and public health nurse, and the answers were shown on the BBS. By arranging data file, a reference of various patients in question and answer, which appeared in this BBS, was made as "advisory hints" and was added to the open data. The advisory hints became the new service information for the patients and their family. This BBS discovered

  16. Information System Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrows, J. H.

    This paper was prepared for distribution to the California Educational Administrators participating in the "Executive Information Systems" Unit of Instruction as part of the instructional program of Operation PEP (Prepare Educational Planners). The purpose of the course was to introduce some basic concepts of information systems…

  17. Improved glycemic control without hypoglycemia in elderly diabetic patients using the ubiquitous healthcare service, a new medical information system.

    PubMed

    Lim, Soo; Kang, Seon Mee; Shin, Hayley; Lee, Hak Jong; Won Yoon, Ji; Yu, Sung Hoon; Kim, So-Youn; Yoo, Soo Young; Jung, Hye Seung; Park, Kyong Soo; Ryu, Jun Oh; Jang, Hak C

    2011-02-01

    To improve quality and efficiency of care for elderly patients with type 2 diabetes, we introduced elderly-friendly strategies to the clinical decision support system (CDSS)-based ubiquitous healthcare (u-healthcare) service, which is an individualized health management system using advanced medical information technology. We conducted a 6-month randomized, controlled clinical trial involving 144 patients aged >60 years. Participants were randomly assigned to receive routine care (control, n = 48), to the self-monitored blood glucose (SMBG, n = 47) group, or to the u-healthcare group (n = 49). The primary end point was the proportion of patients achieving A1C <7% without hypoglycemia at 6 months. U-healthcare system refers to an individualized medical service in which medical instructions are given through the patient's mobile phone. Patients receive a glucometer with a public switched telephone network-connected cradle that automatically transfers test results to a hospital-based server. Once the data are transferred to the server, an automated system, the CDSS rule engine, generates and sends patient-specific messages by mobile phone. After 6 months of follow-up, the mean A1C level was significantly decreased from 7.8 ± 1.3% to 7.4 ± 1.0% (P < 0.001) in the u-healthcare group and from 7.9 ± 1.0% to 7.7 ± 1.0% (P = 0.020) in the SMBG group, compared with 7.9 ± 0.8% to 7.8 ± 1.0% (P = 0.274) in the control group. The proportion of patients with A1C <7% without hypoglycemia was 30.6% in the u-healthcare group, 23.4% in the SMBG group (23.4%), and 14.0% in the control group (P < 0.05). The CDSS-based u-healthcare service achieved better glycemic control with less hypoglycemia than SMBG and routine care and may provide effective and safe diabetes management in the elderly diabetic patients.

  18. Information systems definition architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Calapristi, A.J.

    1996-06-20

    The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Information Systems Definition architecture evaluated information Management (IM) processes in several key organizations. The intent of the study is to identify improvements in TWRS IM processes that will enable better support to the TWRS mission, and accommodate changes in TWRS business environment. The ultimate goals of the study are to reduce IM costs, Manage the configuration of TWRS IM elements, and improve IM-related process performance.

  19. Content Validity of Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Items in the Context of HIV Clinical Care

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Todd C.; Fredericksen, Rob J.; Crane, Heidi M.; Crane, Paul K.; Kitahata, Mari M.; Matthews, William C.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Morales, Leo S.; Mugavero, Michael J.; Solorio, Rosa; Yang, Frances M.; Patrick, Donald L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess content validity and patient and provider prioritization of Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Depression, Anxiety, Fatigue, and Alcohol Use items in the context of clinical care for people living with HIV (PLWH), and to develop and assess new items as needed. Methods We conducted concept elicitation interviews (n=161), item pool matching, prioritization focus groups (n=227 participants), and cognitive interviews (n=48) with English-speaking (~75%) and Spanish-speaking (~25%) PLWH from clinical sites in Seattle, San Diego, Birmingham, and Boston. For each domain we also conducted item review and prioritization with two HIV provider panels of 3 to 8 members each. Results Among items most highly prioritized by PLWH and providers were those that included information regarding personal impacts of the concept being assessed, in addition to severity level. Items that addressed impact were considered most actionable for clinical care. We developed additional items addressing this. For depression we developed items related to suicide and other forms of self-harm, and for all domains we developed items addressing impacts PLWH and/or providers indicated were particularly relevant to clinical care. Across the 4 domains, 16 new items were retained for further psychometric testing. Conclusion PLWH and providers had priorities for what they believed providers should know to provide optimal care for PLWH. Incorporation of these priorities into clinical assessments used in clinical care of PLWH may facilitate patient-centered care. PMID:26245710

  20. Usability evaluation of a web-based patient information system for individuals with severe mental health problems.

    PubMed

    Kuosmanen, Lauri; Jakobsson, Tiina; Hyttinen, Jari; Koivunen, Marita; Välimäki, Maritta

    2010-12-01

    This paper is a report of a study conducted to compare service users', nursing students' and Registered Nurses' evaluations of the usability of a patient education website intended for individuals with severe mental health problems. There is an obvious need for reliable mental health information on the Internet. When evaluating the usability of Internet-based patient education methods, the opinions of all parties need to be ascertained. An explorative descriptive design was used. Twenty-one service users, 20 nursing students and 35 Registered Nurses were recruited for the study in 2003 and 2004. Data were collected using a self-developed questionnaire on the content, structure and visual appearance of the website. Service users had positive attitudes towards computer and Internet use but they needed support when using the computer and Internet. According to the evaluations, the content, structure and visual appearance of the website were good and it could be adopted for clinical practise after minor revisions. There were some differences in the evaluations between participant groups. Nurses were the most critical group, and the service user group was the most satisfied, although they were less experienced with using both computers and the Internet. It is especially important to include service users' evaluations at the early stages of the development process of Web-based patient education systems. It is possible to produce an information technology-based patient education system for individuals with severe mental health problems. Nurses working in psychiatric services need to pay more attention to supporting service users in computer and Internet use. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. A cloud-based home health care information sharing system to connect patients with home healthcare staff -A case report of a study in a mountainous region.

    PubMed

    Nomoto, Shinichi; Utsumi, Momoe; Sasayama, Satoshi; Dekigai, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a cloud system, the e-Renraku Notebook (e-RN) for sharing of home care information based on the concept of "patient-centricity". In order to assess the likelihood that our system will enhance the communication and sharing of information between home healthcare staff members and home-care patients, we selected patients who were residing in mountainous regions for inclusion in our study. We herein report the findings.Eighteen staff members from 7 medical facilities and 9 patients participated in the present study.The e-RN was developed for two reasons: to allow patients to independently report their health status and to have staff members view and respond to the information received. The patients and staff members were given iPads with the pre-installed applications and the information being exchanged was reviewed over a 54-day period.Information was mainly input by the patients (61.6%), followed by the nurses who performed home visits (19.9%). The amount of information input by patients requiring high-level nursing care and their corresponding staff member was significantly greater than that input by patients who required low-level of nursing care.This patient-centric system in which patients can independently report and share information with a member of the healthcare staff provides a sense of security. It also allows staff members to understand the patient's health status before making a home visit, thereby giving them a sense of security and confidence. It was also noteworthy that elderly patients requiring high-level nursing care and their staff counterpart input information in the system significantly more frequently than patients who required low-level care.

  2. HS3 Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maskey, M.; Conover, H.; Ramachandran, R.; Kulkarni, A.; Mceniry, M.; Stone, B.

    2015-12-01

    The Global Hydrology Resource Center (GHRC) is developing an enterprise information system to manage and better serve data for Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3), a NASA airborne field campaign. HS3 is a multiyear campaign aimed at helping scientists understand the physical processes that contribute to hurricane intensification. For in-depth analysis, HS3 encompasses not only airborne data but also variety of in-situ, satellite, simulation, and flight report data. Thus, HS3 provides a unique challenge in information system design. The GHRC team is experienced with previous airborne campaigns to handle such challenge. Many supplementary information and reports collected during the mission include information rich contents that provide mission snapshots. In particular, flight information, instrument status, weather reports, and summary statistics offer vital knowledge about the corresponding science data. Furthermore, such information help narrow the science data of interest. Therefore, the GHRC team is building HS3 information system that augments the current GHRC data management framework to support search and discover of airborne science data with interactive visual exploration. Specifically, the HS3 information system is developing a tool to visually playback mission flights along with other traditional search and discover interfaces. This playback capability allows the users to follow the flight in time and visualize collected data. The flight summary and analyzed information are also presented during the playback. If the observed data is of interest, then they can order the data from GHRC using the interface. The users will be able to order just the data for the part of the flight that they are interested in. This presentation will demonstrate use of visual exploration to data download along with other components that comprise the HS3 information system.

  3. Usability Testing and the Relation of Clinical Information Systems to Patient Safety

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    with a past medical history significant for severe COPD FEV1 300 cc., and CHF with EF of 20% who presents to ED with 3 days of increased shortness of...110/60, P 120, T 100, O2 sat 88% on 40%. The patient has one peripheral IV and a triple lumen in his right subclavian. In the triple lumen, one...night to the ward. BP is 132/60, P 98, T 97. The patient has one peripheral IV and a triple lumen in his right subclavian. In the triple lumen, one

  4. Efficacy of a New Medical Information system, Ubiquitous Healthcare Service with Voice Inception Technique in Elderly Diabetic Patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung Min; Park, Kyeong Seon; Lee, Hyun Ju; Lee, Yun Hee; Bae, Ji Seon; Lee, Young Joon; Choi, Sung Hee; Jang, Hak Chul; Lim, Soo

    2015-12-11

    We have demonstrated previously that an individualized health management system using advanced medical information technology, named ubiquitous (u)-healthcare, was helpful in achieving better glycemic control than routine care. Recently, we generated a new u-healthcare system using a voice inception technique for elderly diabetic patients to communicate information about their glucose control, physical activity, and diet more easily. In a randomized clinical trial, 70 diabetic patients aged 60-85 years were assigned randomly to a standard care group or u-healthcare group for 6 months. The primary end points were the changes in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and glucose fluctuation assessed by the mean amplitude glycemic excursion (MAGE). Changes in body weight, lifestyle, and knowledge about diabetes were also investigated. After 6 months, the HbA1c levels decreased significantly in the u-healthcare group (from 8.6 ± 1.0% to 7.5 ± 0.6%) compared with the standard care group (from 8.7 ± 0.9% to 8.2 ± 1.1%, P < 0.01). The MAGE decreased more in the u-healthcare group than in the standard care group. Systolic blood pressure and body weight decreased and liver functions improved in the u-healthcare group, but not in the standard care group. The u-healthcare system with voice inception technique was effective in achieving glycemic control without hypoglycemia in elderly diabetic patients (Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01891474).

  5. Efficacy of a New Medical Information system, Ubiquitous Healthcare Service with Voice Inception Technique in Elderly Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung Min; Park, Kyeong Seon; Lee, Hyun Ju; Lee, Yun Hee; Bae, Ji Seon; Lee, Young Joon; Choi, Sung Hee; Jang, Hak Chul; Lim, Soo

    2015-01-01

    We have demonstrated previously that an individualized health management system using advanced medical information technology, named ubiquitous (u)-healthcare, was helpful in achieving better glycemic control than routine care. Recently, we generated a new u-healthcare system using a voice inception technique for elderly diabetic patients to communicate information about their glucose control, physical activity, and diet more easily. In a randomized clinical trial, 70 diabetic patients aged 60–85 years were assigned randomly to a standard care group or u-healthcare group for 6 months. The primary end points were the changes in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and glucose fluctuation assessed by the mean amplitude glycemic excursion (MAGE). Changes in body weight, lifestyle, and knowledge about diabetes were also investigated. After 6 months, the HbA1c levels decreased significantly in the u-healthcare group (from 8.6 ± 1.0% to 7.5 ± 0.6%) compared with the standard care group (from 8.7 ± 0.9% to 8.2 ± 1.1%, P < 0.01). The MAGE decreased more in the u-healthcare group than in the standard care group. Systolic blood pressure and body weight decreased and liver functions improved in the u-healthcare group, but not in the standard care group. The u-healthcare system with voice inception technique was effective in achieving glycemic control without hypoglycemia in elderly diabetic patients (Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01891474). PMID:26658492

  6. Management Information System Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Walter J.; Harr, Gordon G.

    The Management Information System (MIS) described in this report represents a plan to utilize modern management techniques to facilitate the goal of a learner-responsive school system. The MIS component is being developed to meet the need for the coordination of the resources of staff, facilities, and time with the long range planning and…

  7. Intelligent Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zabezhailo, M. I.; Finn, V. K.

    1996-01-01

    An Intelligent Information System (IIS) uses data warehouse technology to facilitate the cycle of data and knowledge processing, including input, standardization, storage, representation, retrieval, calculation, and delivery. This article provides an overview of IIS products and artificial intelligence systems, illustrates examples of IIS…

  8. National healthcare information system in Croatian primary care: the foundation for improvement of quality and efficiency in patient care.

    PubMed

    Gvozdanović, Darko; Koncar, Miroslav; Kojundzić, Vinko; Jezidzić, Hrvoje

    2007-01-01

    In order to improve the quality of patient care, while at the same time keeping up with the pace of increased needs of the population for healthcare services that directly impacts on the cost of care delivery processes, the Republic of Croatia, under the leadership of the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, has formed a strategy and campaign for national public healthcare system reform. The strategy is very comprehensive and addresses all niches of care delivery processes; it is founded on the enterprise information systems that will aim to support end-to-end business processes in the healthcare domain. Two major requirements are in focus: (1) to provide efficient healthcare-related data management in support of decision-making processes; (2) to support a continuous process of healthcare resource spending optimisation. The first project is the Integrated Healthcare Information System (IHCIS) on the primary care level; this encompasses the integration of all primary point-of-care facilities and subjects with the Croatian Institute for Health Insurance and Croatian National Institute of Public Health. In years to come, IHCIS will serve as the main integration platform for connecting all other stakeholders and levels of health care (that is, hospitals, pharmacies, laboratories) into a single enterprise healthcare network. This article gives an overview of Croatian public healthcare system strategy aims and goals, and focuses on properties and characteristics of the primary care project implementation that started in 2003; it achieved a major milestone in early 2007 - the official grand opening of the project with 350 GPs already fully connected to the integrated healthcare information infrastructure based on the IHCIS solution.

  9. NEEDS - Information Adaptive System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, W. L.; Benz, H. F.; Meredith, B. D.

    1980-01-01

    The Information Adaptive System (IAS) is an element of the NASA End-to-End Data System (NEEDS) Phase II and is focused toward onboard image processing. The IAS is a data preprocessing system which is closely coupled to the sensor system. Some of the functions planned for the IAS include sensor response nonuniformity correction, geometric correction, data set selection, data formatting, packetization, and adaptive system control. The inclusion of these sensor data preprocessing functions onboard the spacecraft will significantly improve the extraction of information from the sensor data in a timely and cost effective manner, and provide the opportunity to design sensor systems which can be reconfigured in near real-time for optimum performance. The purpose of this paper is to present the preliminary design of the IAS and the plans for its development.

  10. Management Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    New Automated Management Information Center (AMIC) employs innovative microcomputer techniques to create color charts, viewgraphs, or other data displays in a fraction of the time formerly required. Developed under Kennedy Space Center's contract by Boeing Services International Inc., Seattle, WA, AMIC can produce an entirely new informational chart in 30 minutes, or an updated chart in only five minutes. AMIC also has considerable potential as a management system for business firms.

  11. Training Management Information System

    SciTech Connect

    Rackley, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    The Training Management Information System (TMIS) is an integrated information system for all training related activities. TMIS is at the leading edge of training information systems used in the nuclear industry. The database contains all the necessary records to confirm the department's adherence to accreditation criteria and houses all test questions, student records and information needed to evaluate the training process. The key to the TMIS system is that the impact of any change (i.e., procedure change, new equipment, safety incident in the commercial nuclear industry, etc.) can be tracked throughout the training process. This ensures the best training can be performed that meets the needs of the employees. TMIS is comprised of six functional areas: Job and Task Analysis, Training Materials Design and Development, Exam Management, Student Records/Scheduling, Evaluation, and Commitment Tracking. The system consists of a VAX 6320 Cluster with IBM and MacIntosh computers tied into an ethernet with the VAX. Other peripherals are also tied into the system: Exam Generation Stations to include mark sense readers for test grading, Production PC's for Desk-Top Publishing of Training Material, and PC Image Workstations. 5 figs.

  12. CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maidment, D. R.

    2005-12-01

    The Consortium of Universities for Advancement of Hydrologic Science, Inc. (CUAHSI) seeks to build a Hydrologic Information System (HIS) for which hydrologic data sources will be assembled in space and time to create a digital representation of atmospheric, surface and subsurface water flow through a watershed or other hydrologic system. A common data window for automatically accessing water observation data from US federal agencies is being developed based on web data services. Together with the related CLEANER program in environmental engineering, a cybercollaboratory is being used to foster remote access to data and shared research concerning its interpretation and model. A Digital Library to index hydrologic information within a river basin or aquifer has been developed and a Digital Watershed to synthesize observations, GIS, weather and climate grids and remote sensing is being designed and prootyped. Examples are presented from the Neuse basin in North Carolina and other locations to illustrate these components of a Hydrologic Information System.

  13. Application of the National Institutes of Health Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS®) to Mental Health Research

    PubMed Central

    Riley, William T.; Pilkonis, Paul; Cella, David

    2013-01-01

    Background The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) is a National Institutes of Health initiative to develop item banks measuring patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and to create and make available a computerized adaptive testing system (CAT) that allows for efficient and precise assessment of PROs in clinical research and practice. Aims of the Study Based on the presentation from a symposium on “Evidence-based Outcomes in Psychiatry: Updates on Measurement Using Patient-Reported Outcomes (PRO)” at the 2011 American Psychiatry Association Convention, this paper provides an overview of PROMIS and its application to mental health research. Methods The PROMIS methodology for item bank development and testing is described, with a focus on the implications of this work for mental health research. Results Utilizing qualitative item review and state-of-the-art applications of item response theory (IRT), PROMIS investigators have developed, tested, and released item banks measuring physical, mental, and social health components. Ongoing efforts continue to add new item banks and further validate existing banks. Discussion PROMIS provides item banks measuring several domains of interest to mental health researchers including emotional distress, social function, and sleep. PROMIS methodology also provides a rigorous standard for the development of new mental health measures. Implications for Health Care Provision Web-based CAT or administration of short forms derived from PROMIS item banks provide efficient and precise dimensional estimates of clinical outcomes that can be utilized to monitor patient progress and assess quality improvement. Implications for Future Research Use of the dimensional PROMIS metrics (and co-calibration of the PROMIS item banks with existing PROs) will allow comparisons of mental health and related health outcomes across disorders and studies. PMID:22345362

  14. Design of an eMonitor system to transport electronic patient care report (ePCR) information in unstable MobileIP wireless environment.

    PubMed

    Giovanni, Mazza G; Shenvi, Rohit; Battles, Marcie; Orthner, Helmuth F

    2008-11-06

    The eMonitor is a component of the ePatient system; a prototype system used by emergency medical services (EMS) personnel in the field to record and transmits electronic patient care report (ePCR) information interactively. The eMonitor component allows each Mobile Data Terminal (MDT) on an unreliable Cisco MobileIP wireless network to securely send and received XML messages used to update patient information to and from the MDT before, during and after the transport of a patient.

  15. Geographic information systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    Information and activities are provided to: (1) enhance the ability to distinguish between a Geographic Information System (GIS) and a data management system; (2) develop understanding of spatial data handling by conventional methods versus the automated approach; (3) promote awareness of GIS design and capabilities; (4) foster understanding of the concepts and problems of data base development and management; (5) facilitate recognition of how a computerized GIS can model conditions in the present "real world" to project conditions in the future; and (6) appreciate the utility of integrating LANDSAT and other remotely sensed data into the GIS.

  16. Geographic information systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    Information and activities are provided to: (1) enhance the ability to distinguish between a Geographic Information System (GIS) and a data management system; (2) develop understanding of spatial data handling by conventional methods versus the automated approach; (3) promote awareness of GIS design and capabilities; (4) foster understanding of the concepts and problems of data base development and management; (5) facilitate recognition of how a computerized GIS can model conditions in the present "real world" to project conditions in the future; and (6) appreciate the utility of integrating LANDSAT and other remotely sensed data into the GIS.

  17. Global Land Information System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1999-01-01

    The Global Land Information System (GLIS) is a World Wide Web-based query tool developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to provide data and information about the Earth's land surface. Examples of holdings available through the GLIS include cartographic data, topographic data, soils data, aerial photographs, and satellite images from various agencies and cooperators located around the world. Both hard copy and digital data collections are represented in the GLIS, and preview images are available for millions of the products in the system.

  18. The transition from 'informed patient' care to 'patient informed' care.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Ruth

    2008-01-01

    We are in the midst of a real change in the application of information technology to support the delivery of healthcare. We are seeing a shift from the 'informed patient' which has resulted from improved access to healthcare information, primarily from the Web, to the 'participative patient' as we move into Web 2.0 territory. The last decade has seen significant strides in the application of healthcare information to support patient care including: Increased access to healthcare related information by the patient through access to healthcare information on the Web (1.0). The development of electronic patient/health records. Improved access to knowledge for care professionals has enabled the dissipation of professional clinical skills with the introduction of nurse practitioners and increased use of therapies. Improved access to patient related information across disciplines is beginning to enable the shift from acute based to community based care. The introduction of home care technologies has enabled self monitoring in supporting self care. There are also developments in the way care is provided with an increasing diversity of healthcare providers with the challenges this has presented in exchanging patient related information to support continuity of care. We are now at another major turning point that could present greater challenges for healthcare professionals, organisations and the patient or client. These developments include: The application of information sharing services commonly referred to as Web 2.0. As a result we are seeing a transition from the 'informed patient' to the 'participative patient' that will present increasing challenges for healthcare professionals and healthcare organisations in adapting care to embrace this evolution. New entrants to the ehealth market are now emerging such as Google and Microsoft who are competing to 'own' the 'healthcare consumer'. Open source solutions for EPR/EHRs are now emerging that will challenge the

  19. Intensive Care Information System Impacts

    PubMed Central

    Ehteshami, Asghar; Sadoughi, Farahnaz; Ahmadi, Maryam; Kashefi, Parviz

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Today, intensive care needs to be increased with a prospect of an aging population and socioeconomic factors influencing health intervention, but there are some problems in the intensive care environments, it is essential to resolve. The intensive Care information system has the potential to solve many of ICU problems. The objective of the review was to establish the impact of intensive care information systems on the practitioners practice, patient outcomes and ICU performance. Methods: Scientific databases and electronic journal citations was searched to identify articles that discussed the impacts of intensive care information system on the practices, patient outcomes and ICU performance. A total of 22 articles discussing ICIS outcomes was included in this study from 609 articles initially obtained from the searches. Results: Pooling data across studies, we found that the median impact of ICIS on information management was 48.7%. The median impact of ICIS on user’ outcomes was 36.4%, impact on saving tips by 24%, clinical decision support by a mean of 22.7%, clinical outcomes improved by a mean of 18.6%, and researches improved by 18%. Conclusion: The functionalities of ICIS are growing day by day and new functionalities are available with every major release. Better adoption of ICIS by the intensive care environments emphasizes the opportunity of better intensive care services through patient oriented intensive care clinical information systems. There is an immense need for developing guidelines for standardizing ICIS to to maximize the power of ICISs and to integrate with HISs. This will enable intensivists to use the systems in a more meaningful way for better patient care. This study provides a better understanding and greater insight into the effectiveness of ICIS in improving patient care and reducing health care expenses. PMID:24167389

  20. [Analysis of clinical medication rules in 48 398 patients with limb fractures based on hospital information system].

    PubMed

    Jia, Cheng-Hui; Zhang, Yin; Xie, Yan-Ming; Wei, Xu; Yin, He; Feng, Bo; Zhuang, Yan

    2016-07-01

    To explore the clinical medication rules in the patients with limb fractures, and provide guidance for clinical practice. Data of 48 398 patients with limb fractures from 2001 to 2011 was extracted from the hospital information system(HIS) established by the institute of basic research in clinical medicine, China academy of Chinese medical sciences. The gender and age distribution of patients and clinical medication characteristics were described. Apriori algorithm was adopted to analyze the common drug combinations of Chinese medicine(CM) and western medicine(WM). The study results showed that the ratio of included males and females was 1.83∶1. There was a high peak of incidence for the patients from 18 to 44 years. Apriori algorithm showed that the usage of WM was more frequent than that of CM. The most commonly used CM was Lugua polypeptide and sodium aescinate injection. Blood-activating and stasis-resolving medicines, as well as tendons and bones-strengthening medicines were the commonly used CM types. In addition, WM antibiotics plus blood-activating and stasis-resolving CM, or antibiotics plus tendons and bones-strengthening CM was the most commonly used drug combination. Based on the analysis of available data, the prevalence of limb fracture was higher in men than in women; more in young and middle-aged patients; the common drug combination was antibiotics plus blood-activating and stasis-resolving CM, or antibiotics plus tendons and bones-strengthening CM. More prospective and high-quality clinical trials are necessary to evaluate the effect of CM or integrative medicine treatment for limb fracture in the future research. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  1. Development and Implementation of Team-Based Panel Management Tools: Filling the Gap between Patient and Population Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Watts, Brook; Lawrence, Renée H; Drawz, Paul; Carter, Cameron; Shumaker, Amy Hirsch; Kern, Elizabeth F

    2016-08-01

    Effective team-based models of care, such as the Patient-Centered Medical Home, require electronic tools to support proactive population management strategies that emphasize care coordination and quality improvement. Despite the spread of electronic health records (EHRs) and vendors marketing population health tools, clinical practices still may lack the ability to have: (1) local control over types of data collected/reports generated, (2) timely data (eg, up-to-date data, not several months old), and accordingly (3) the ability to efficiently monitor and improve patient outcomes. This article describes a quality improvement project at the hospital system level to develop and implement a flexible panel management (PM) tool to improve care of subpopulations of patients (eg, panels of patients with diabetes) by clinical teams. An in-depth case analysis approach is used to explore barriers and facilitators in building a PM registry tool for team-based management needs using standard data elements (eg, laboratory values, pharmacy records) found in EHRs. Also described are factors that may contribute to sustainability; to date the tool has been adapted to 6 disease-focused subpopulations encompassing more than 200,000 patients. Two key lessons emerged from this initiative: (1) though challenging, team-based clinical end users and information technology needed to work together consistently to refine the product, and (2) locally developed population management tools can provide efficient data tracking for frontline clinical teams and leadership. The preliminary work identified critical gaps that were successfully addressed by building local PM registry tools from EHR-derived data and offers lessons learned for others engaged in similar work. (Population Health Management 2016;19:232-239).

  2. 'It's more scary not to know': a qualitative study exploring the information needs of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus at the time of diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Waldron, Nicola; Brown, Sue; Hewlett, Sarah; Elliott, Barbara; McHugh, Neil; McCabe, Candy

    2011-12-01

    To identify the information needs of patients newly diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus (lupus), to inform the design of a future education package. Focus groups were conducted in seven rheumatology centres in the UK with 43 purposively selected participants. Data were subjected to thematic inductive analysis. The first major theme, 'Impact of early information', describes how for many individuals information was scant and, as most had little prior knowledge of lupus, the information was difficult to absorb, leaving them with feelings of fear and confusion. 'Information received versus information sought' (theme 2) describes how few participants felt they had received clear, consistent information. For most, information was felt to be insufficient, forcing them to seek it elsewhere, which, if unsuitable, resulted in further distress. 'Early education needs' (theme 3) reflects that patients would rather be informed of potential problems than remain naïve. Patients felt that receiving a comprehensive information pack as an adjunct to verbal information from their clinician would be helpful, along with rapid access to knowledgeable professionals when they were ready to ask questions about their lupus. Participants stated information and support currently provided at diagnosis is inadequate for their needs. They would like detailed information, provided through a variety of formats. Crucially this should be supported by professionals and available at whatever point in the patient's journey they want to access such discussions .The challenge is for health professionals to meet these needs in the most beneficial and cost effective way. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Nurses' perceptions of usefulness of nursing information system: module of electronic medical record for patient care in two university hospitals of iran.

    PubMed

    Kahouei, Mehdi; Baba Mohammadi, Hassan; Askari Majdabadi, Hesamedin; Solhi, Mahnaz; Parsania, Zeinab; Said Roghani, Panoe; Firozeh, Mehri

    2014-02-01

    For almost fifteen years, the application of computer in hospitals increasingly has become popular. Nurses' beliefs and attitudes towards computer is one of the most important indicators of the application of nursing information system. The purpose of this study was to investigate the perceptions of nurses on the usefulness of nursing information system for patient care. Here, a descriptive study was carried out. Sample was consisted of 316 nurses working in teaching hospitals in an urban area of Iran. This study was conducted during 2011 to 2012. A reliable and valid questionnaire was developed as a data collection tool. The collected data was analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. It was not believed that nursing information system was useful for patient care. However, it was mentioned that nursing information system is useful in some aspects of patient care such as expediting care, making early diagnosis and formulating diet plan. A significant association was found between the demographic background of sample and their perceptions of the usefulness of nursing information system (P<0.05). Totally, it can be concluded that nursing information system has a potential for improving patient care in hospital settings. Therefore, policy makers should consider implementing nursing information system in teaching hospitals.

  4. Nurses’ Perceptions of Usefulness of Nursing Information System: Module of Electronic Medical Record for Patient Care in Two University Hospitals of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Kahouei, Mehdi; Baba Mohammadi, Hassan; Askari Majdabadi, Hesamedin; Solhi, Mahnaz; Parsania, Zeinab; Said Roghani, Panoe; Firozeh, Mehri

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: For almost fifteen years, the application of computer in hospitals increasingly has become popular. Nurses’ beliefs and attitudes towards computer is one of the most important indicators of the application of nursing information system. The purpose of this study was to investigate the perceptions of nurses on the usefulness of nursing information system for patient care. Methods: Here, a descriptive study was carried out. Sample was consisted of 316 nurses working in teaching hospitals in an urban area of Iran. This study was conducted during 2011 to 2012. A reliable and valid questionnaire was developed as a data collection tool. The collected data was analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results: It was not believed that nursing information system was useful for patient care. However, it was mentioned that nursing information system is useful in some aspects of patient care such as expediting care, making early diagnosis and formulating diet plan. A significant association was found between the demographic background of sample and their perceptions of the usefulness of nursing information system (P<0.05). Conclusion: Totally, it can be concluded that nursing information system has a potential for improving patient care in hospital settings. Therefore, policy makers should consider implementing nursing information system in teaching hospitals. PMID:24757398

  5. Space Station information systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swingle, W. L.; Mckay, C. W.

    1983-01-01

    The space operations information system is defined and characterized in a wide perspective. Interactive subsets of the total system are defined and discussed. Particular attention is paid to the concept of end-to-end systems and their repetitive population within the total system. High level program goals are reviewed and related to more explicit system requirements and user needs. Emphasis is placed on the utility and cost effectiveness of data system services from a user standpoint. Productivity, as a quantitative goal, in both development and operational phases is also addressed. Critical aspects of the approach to successful development of the data management system are discussed along with recommendations important to advanced development activities. Current and planned activity in both technology and advanced development areas are reviewed with emphasis on their importance to program success.

  6. The risks and benefits of disclosing psychotherapy records to the legal system: What psychologists and patients need to know for informed consent.

    PubMed

    Borkosky, Bruce; Smith, Deirdre M

    2015-01-01

    When psychologists release patient records to the legal system, the typical practice is to obtain the patient's signature on a consent form, but rarely is a formal informed-consent obtained from the patient. Although psychologists are legally and ethically required to obtain informed consent for all services (including disclosure of records), there are a number of barriers to obtaining truly informed consent. Furthermore, compared to disclosures to nonlegal third parties, there are significantly greater risks when records are disclosed to the legal system. For these reasons, true informed consent should be obtained from the patient when records are disclosed to the legal system. A model for informed consent is proposed. This procedure should include a description of risks and benefits of disclosing or refusing to disclose by the psychotherapist, an opportunity to ask questions, and indication by the patient of a freely made choice. Both psychotherapist and patient share decision making responsibilities in our suggested model. The patient should be informed about potential harm to the therapeutic relationship, if applicable. Several recommendations for practice are described, including appropriate communications with attorneys and the legal system. A sample form, for use by psychotherapists, is included.

  7. Danish translation of a physical function item bank from the Patient-Reported Outcome Measurement Information System (PROMIS).

    PubMed

    Schnohr, Christina W; Rasmussen, Charlotte L; Langberg, Henning; Bjørner, Jakob B

    2017-01-01

    The Patient-Reported Outcome Measurement Information System (PROMIS) is an assessment system that aims to provide more valid, reliable, responsive, and precise patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures than has been previously available. This paper documents the translation of the Physical Function item bank into Danish. We followed the PROMIS standard procedure, including: 1) two independent translations, 2) back translation, 3) independent reviews of translation quality, and 4) cognitive interviews with a representative sample of the adult population from the municipality of Copenhagen. After each phase, the new information was reviewed and the Danish version of the PROMIS Physical Function items was revised, if warranted. Relatively few problems were related to translation in itself and such problems could be fixed by changes in item wordings to fit the Danish context. Cognitive testing revealed problem of a general issue: annoyance in case of mismatch between respondents' functional level and question difficulty, problems imagining performance on activities that the respondents did not usually do, and uncertainty whether mobility aids (e.g., canes and walkers) should be considered when performing an activity. Solutions to the more general issues would require revisions to the original items. The standard translation methodology was successful in eliminating problems in translation, and pointed to problems of a general issue in some of the original questions, producing translated Danish versions of the PROMIS Physical Functioning items. Translation and validation studies provide a valuable source when revising and improving PROs in a clinical setting or for research. The present paper exemplifies this with experiences from Denmark. The study describes how the use of PROs when measuring physical functioning in a Danish context can be improved-hence improving the items used for research, future trials and in clinical settings.

  8. Patient Navigation for Comprehensive Cancer Screening in High-Risk Patients Using a Population-Based Health Information Technology System: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Percac-Lima, Sanja; Ashburner, Jeffrey M; Zai, Adrian H; Chang, Yuchiao; Oo, Sarah A; Guimaraes, Erica; Atlas, Steven J

    2016-07-01

    Patient navigation (PN) to improve cancer screening in low-income and racial/ethnic minority populations usually focuses on navigating for single cancers in community health center settings. We evaluated PN for breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screening using a population-based information technology (IT) system within a primary care network. Randomized clinical trial conducted from April 2014 to December 2014 in 18 practices in an academic primary care network. All patients eligible and overdue for cancer screening were identified and managed using a population-based IT system. Those at high risk for nonadherence with completing screening were identified using an electronic algorithm (language spoken, number of overdue tests, no-show visit history), and randomized to a PN intervention (n = 792) or usual care (n = 820). Navigators used the IT system to track patients, contact them, and provide intense outreach to help them complete cancer screening. Mean cancer screening test completion rate over 8-month trial for each eligible patient, with all overdue cancer screening tests combined using linear regression models. Secondary outcomes included the proportion of patients completing any and each overdue cancer screening test. Among 1612 patients (673 men and 975 women; median age, 57 years), baseline patient characteristics were similar among randomized groups. Of 792 intervention patients, patient navigators were unable to reach 151 (19%), deferred 246 (38%) (eg, patient declined, competing comorbidity), and navigated 202 (32%). The mean proportion of patients who were up to date with screening among all overdue screening examinations was higher in the intervention vs the control group for all cancers combined (10.2% vs 6.8%; 95% CI [for the difference], 1.5%-5.2%; P < .001), and for breast (14.7% vs 11.0%; 95% CI, 0.2%-7.3%; P = .04), cervical (11.1% vs 5.7%; 95% CI, 0.8%-5.2%; P = .002), and colon (7.6% vs 4.6%; 95% CI, 0.8%-5.2%; P

  9. Insect barcode information system.

    PubMed

    Pratheepa, Maria; Jalali, Sushil Kumar; Arokiaraj, Robinson Silvester; Venkatesan, Thiruvengadam; Nagesh, Mandadi; Panda, Madhusmita; Pattar, Sharath

    2014-01-01

    Insect Barcode Information System called as Insect Barcode Informática (IBIn) is an online database resource developed by the National Bureau of Agriculturally Important Insects, Bangalore. This database provides acquisition, storage, analysis and publication of DNA barcode records of agriculturally important insects, for researchers specifically in India and other countries. It bridges a gap in bioinformatics by integrating molecular, morphological and distribution details of agriculturally important insects. IBIn was developed using PHP/My SQL by using relational database management concept. This database is based on the client- server architecture, where many clients can access data simultaneously. IBIn is freely available on-line and is user-friendly. IBIn allows the registered users to input new information, search and view information related to DNA barcode of agriculturally important insects.This paper provides a current status of insect barcode in India and brief introduction about the database IBIn. http://www.nabg-nbaii.res.in/barcode.

  10. Pharmacology Information System Ready

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the development and future of Prophet,'' a specialized information handling system for pharmacology research. It is designed to facilitate the acquisition and dissemination of knowledge about mechanisms of drug action, and it is hoped that it will aid in converting pharmacology research from an empirical to a predictive science. (JR)

  11. Management Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finlayson, Jean, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    This collection of papers addresses key questions facing college managers and others choosing, introducing, and living with big, complex computer-based systems. "What Use the User Requirement?" (Tony Coles) stresses the importance of an information strategy driven by corporate objectives, not technology. "Process of Selecting a…

  12. Pharmacology Information System Ready

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the development and future of Prophet,'' a specialized information handling system for pharmacology research. It is designed to facilitate the acquisition and dissemination of knowledge about mechanisms of drug action, and it is hoped that it will aid in converting pharmacology research from an empirical to a predictive science. (JR)

  13. Communication and Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Peter

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the Microelectronics Education Programme's work in the communication and information systems domain, suggesting that teachers understanding the new technologies and incorporate them into regular classroom instruction. Focuses on computers in the classroom, economy of time, keyboard skills, life skills, and vocational training. (Author/JN)

  14. Statistical Information Retrieval System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiFondi, Nicholas M.

    An information retrieval system was developed using technical word occurrences as a basis for classification. A set of words, designated a vocabulary, was selected from the middle range of frequency listing of words occurring in an experimental sample of 94 documents. The selection produced 115 non-function words with technical definition that did…

  15. Geographic information systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1992-01-01

    Geographic information systems (GIS) technology can be used for scientific investigations, resource management, and developmental planning. For example, a GIS might allow emergency planners to easily calculate emergency response times in the event of a natural disaster, or a GIS might be used to find wetlands that need protection form pollution.

  16. Medical librarians supporting information systems project lifecycles toward improved patient safety. Medical librarians possess expertise to navigate various search resources and can investigate inquiries during IS project lifecycles.

    PubMed

    Saimbert, Marie K; Zhang, Yingting; Pierce, Jenny; Moncrief, Erica S; O'Hagan, Keydi Boss; Cole, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Health information systems (HIS) have progressed from being used to manage billing to impacting patient safety and health professionals' job satisfaction. Many decisions are made during project management and the information system lifecycle of a HIS. Medical librarians are underutilized in HIS lifecycles; it may not be clear to stakeholders what they can provide and where their services fit. Medical librarians possess expertise to navigate various search resources and can investigate inquiries during information systems project lifecycles. Librarians can market specific skills to project lifecycle teams such as those involved in computerized provider order entry (CPOE), electronic medication administration record (eMAR) and root cause analysis (RCA). HIS project personnel, including patient safety team members, should make use of medical librarians in phases of health information systems project management. This will help them meet institutional and global objectives for evidence-based use of technology towards improved patient safety.

  17. The Fluvial Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugdale, S. J.; Carbonneau, P.; Clough, S.

    2009-12-01

    River ecologists have long been aware that our understanding of lotic ecology is limited by our lack of methods applicable to catchment scale processes. Furthermore, the EU’s Water Framework Directive states that surface waters must be managed at catchment scales. This has created a need for a new approach to high-resolution catchment scale data collection in fluvial environments. In response to this, remote sensing has been the focus of increasing interest in river science, and it is now possible to map parameters such as water depth, grain size and habitat type with sub-metric resolutions over large areas. These techniques are capable of yielding unprecedented amounts of information about river systems, and with such levels of information, crucial questions about catchment scale ecology can now be addressed. However, this intensive approach produces vast amounts of raster data leading to significant issues in terms of data management, and extracting spatially explicit information from large image databases poses a significant challenge which must be resolved if fluvial remote sensing methods are to deliver their potential. GIS has already been successfully applied to manage remotely sensed data. Unfortunately, when applied to fluvial remote sensing raster data, traditional GIS appears limited and unsuited to the specific tasks required by river scientists and managers, and experience with GIS packages has shown that they become overwhelmed when faced with datasets comprising thousands of rasters. Another fundamental issue with traditional GIS packages is the use of established Cartesian map projection systems. Given that rivers are curvilinear entities, the use of Cartesian grid map projections is mismatched and curvilinear coordinate systems unique to each river will be required. This paper introduces the Fluvial Information System (FIS), a raster based GIS-type system designed to manage fluvial remote sensing data and automatically extract meaningful

  18. Toward intelligent information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Fumio; Hinatsu, Ken'ichi

    This article describes the indexing aid system and project at JICST, API, NLM and BIOSIS. They are dealing with the very broad domain of science, medicine and technological literatures and indexing is done by use of controlled terms, the indexing is routinely performed by highly skilled indexers. Because of the high cost of controlled indexing of bibliographic information they have designed automated indexing system and/or expert-like system to take advantage of many years of experienced indexing using knowledge bases and /on thesauri.

  19. MIMS - MEDICAL INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankowski, J. W.

    1994-01-01

    MIMS, Medical Information Management System is an interactive, general purpose information storage and retrieval system. It was first designed to be used in medical data management, and can be used to handle all aspects of data related to patient care. Other areas of application for MIMS include: managing occupational safety data in the public and private sectors; handling judicial information where speed and accuracy are high priorities; systemizing purchasing and procurement systems; and analyzing organizational cost structures. Because of its free format design, MIMS can offer immediate assistance where manipulation of large data bases is required. File structures, data categories, field lengths and formats, including alphabetic and/or numeric, are all user defined. The user can quickly and efficiently extract, display, and analyze the data. Three means of extracting data are provided: certain short items of information, such as social security numbers, can be used to uniquely identify each record for quick access; records can be selected which match conditions defined by the user; and specific categories of data can be selected. Data may be displayed and analyzed in several ways which include: generating tabular information assembled from comparison of all the records on the system; generating statistical information on numeric data such as means, standard deviations and standard errors; and displaying formatted listings of output data. The MIMS program is written in Microsoft FORTRAN-77. It was designed to operate on IBM Personal Computers and compatibles running under PC or MS DOS 2.00 or higher. MIMS was developed in 1987.

  20. MIMS - MEDICAL INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankowski, J. W.

    1994-01-01

    MIMS, Medical Information Management System is an interactive, general purpose information storage and retrieval system. It was first designed to be used in medical data management, and can be used to handle all aspects of data related to patient care. Other areas of application for MIMS include: managing occupational safety data in the public and private sectors; handling judicial information where speed and accuracy are high priorities; systemizing purchasing and procurement systems; and analyzing organizational cost structures. Because of its free format design, MIMS can offer immediate assistance where manipulation of large data bases is required. File structures, data categories, field lengths and formats, including alphabetic and/or numeric, are all user defined. The user can quickly and efficiently extract, display, and analyze the data. Three means of extracting data are provided: certain short items of information, such as social security numbers, can be used to uniquely identify each record for quick access; records can be selected which match conditions defined by the user; and specific categories of data can be selected. Data may be displayed and analyzed in several ways which include: generating tabular information assembled from comparison of all the records on the system; generating statistical information on numeric data such as means, standard deviations and standard errors; and displaying formatted listings of output data. The MIMS program is written in Microsoft FORTRAN-77. It was designed to operate on IBM Personal Computers and compatibles running under PC or MS DOS 2.00 or higher. MIMS was developed in 1987.

  1. Laboratory Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Henricks, Walter H

    2015-06-01

    Laboratory information systems (LISs) supply mission-critical capabilities for the vast array of information-processing needs of modern laboratories. LIS architectures include mainframe, client-server, and thin client configurations. The LIS database software manages a laboratory's data. LIS dictionaries are database tables that a laboratory uses to tailor an LIS to the unique needs of that laboratory. Anatomic pathology LIS (APLIS) functions play key roles throughout the pathology workflow, and laboratories rely on LIS management reports to monitor operations. This article describes the structure and functions of APLISs, with emphasis on their roles in laboratory operations and their relevance to pathologists.

  2. Nuclear criticality information system

    SciTech Connect

    Koponen, B.L.; Hampel, V.E.

    1981-11-30

    The nuclear criticality safety program at LLNL began in the 1950's with a critical measurements program which produced benchmark data until the late 1960's. This same time period saw the rapid development of computer technology useful for both computer modeling of fissile systems and for computer-aided management and display of the computational benchmark data. Database management grew in importance as the amount of information increased and as experimental programs were terminated. Within the criticality safety program at LLNL we began at that time to develop a computer library of benchmark data for validation of computer codes and cross sections. As part of this effort, we prepared a computer-based bibliography of criticality measurements on relatively simple systems. However, it is only now that some of these computer-based resources can be made available to the nuclear criticality safety community at large. This technology transfer is being accomplished by the DOE Technology Information System (TIS), a dedicated, advanced information system. The NCIS database is described.

  3. Urban-Rural Dichotomy of Burn Patients in Georgia and South Carolina: A Geographic Information System Study.

    PubMed

    Mian, Mohammad Anwarul Huq; Haque, Akhlaque; Mullins, Robert Fred; Fiebiger, Barbara; Hassan, Zaheed

    2015-01-01

    This study uses a 4-year (2006-2009) cross-section of epidemiological burn injury data from Georgia and South Carolina. The results from the study show that the burn patients from rural areas differ from their urban counterparts in terms of relative burn injury incidence. Younger population groups that live in lower socioeconomic status communities especially in the urban areas are at a higher risk than other population groups. The differences in the types of burns in the urban-rural communities can give us further insights to the patients' association with injury sites. The presence of fewer burn injury treatment and care facilities in rural areas and the high incidence of burn in low-income communities in the urban areas should carry important policy implications for health planners. This study will enable researchers to understand the epidemiology of burn injuries at the local and national levels in the United States. It also carries important implications for using Geographic Information Systems for studying spatial distribution of burn injuries for disaster planning and mitigation of burn injuries.

  4. Cognitive Interviewing in the Evaluation of Fatigue Items: Results from the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS)

    PubMed Central

    Christodoulou, Christopher; Junghaenel, Doerte U.; DeWalt, Darren A.; Rothrock, Nan; Stone, Arthur A.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Cognitive Interviewing (CI) is a technique increasingly used to obtain respondent feedback on potential items during questionnaire development. No standard guidelines exist by which to incorporate CI feedback in deciding to retain, revise, or eliminate potential items. We used CI in developing fatigue items for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Roadmap initiative. Our aims were to describe the CI process, formally evaluate the utility of decisions made on the basis of CI, and offer suggestions for future research. Methods Participants were 22 patients with a diverse range of chronic health conditions. During CI, each participant provided feedback on a series of items. We then reviewed the CI data and decided whether to retain, revise, or eliminate each potential item. Following this, we developed or adopted three quantitative methods to compare retained versus eliminated items. Results Retained items raised fewer serious concerns, were less likely to be viewed as non-applicable, and were less likely to display problems with clarity or to make incorrect assumptions about respondents. Conclusions CI was useful in developing the PROMIS fatigue items and the methods used to judge CI for the present item set may be useful for future investigations. PMID:18850327

  5. Cognitive interviewing methodology in the development of a pediatric item bank: a patient reported outcomes measurement information system (PROMIS) study

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Debra E; Varni, James W; Yeatts, Karin; DeWalt, Darren A

    2009-01-01

    Background The evaluation of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in health care has seen greater use in recent years, and methods to improve the reliability and validity of PRO instruments are advancing. This paper discusses the cognitive interviewing procedures employed by the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) pediatrics group for the purpose of developing a dynamic, electronic item bank for field testing with children and adolescents using novel computer technology. The primary objective of this study was to conduct cognitive interviews with children and adolescents to gain feedback on items measuring physical functioning, emotional health, social health, fatigue, pain, and asthma-specific symptoms. Methods A total of 88 cognitive interviews were conducted with 77 children and adolescents across two sites on 318 items. From this initial item bank, 25 items were deleted and 35 were revised and underwent a second round of cognitive interviews. A total of 293 items were retained for field testing. Results Children as young as 8 years of age were able to comprehend the majority of items, response options, directions, recall period, and identify problems with language that was difficult for them to understand. Cognitive interviews indicated issues with item comprehension on several items which led to alternative wording for these items. Conclusion Children ages 8–17 years were able to comprehend most item stems and response options in the present study. Field testing with the resulting items and response options is presently being conducted as part of the PROMIS Pediatric Item Bank development process. PMID:19166601

  6. Cognitive interviewing methodology in the development of a pediatric item bank: a patient reported outcomes measurement information system (PROMIS) study.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Debra E; Varni, James W; Yeatts, Karin; DeWalt, Darren A

    2009-01-23

    The evaluation of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in health care has seen greater use in recent years, and methods to improve the reliability and validity of PRO instruments are advancing. This paper discusses the cognitive interviewing procedures employed by the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) pediatrics group for the purpose of developing a dynamic, electronic item bank for field testing with children and adolescents using novel computer technology. The primary objective of this study was to conduct cognitive interviews with children and adolescents to gain feedback on items measuring physical functioning, emotional health, social health, fatigue, pain, and asthma-specific symptoms. A total of 88 cognitive interviews were conducted with 77 children and adolescents across two sites on 318 items. From this initial item bank, 25 items were deleted and 35 were revised and underwent a second round of cognitive interviews. A total of 293 items were retained for field testing. Children as young as 8 years of age were able to comprehend the majority of items, response options, directions, recall period, and identify problems with language that was difficult for them to understand. Cognitive interviews indicated issues with item comprehension on several items which led to alternative wording for these items. Children ages 8-17 years were able to comprehend most item stems and response options in the present study. Field testing with the resulting items and response options is presently being conducted as part of the PROMIS Pediatric Item Bank development process.

  7. Minimally important differences for Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System pain interference for individuals with back pain.

    PubMed

    Amtmann, Dagmar; Kim, Jiseon; Chung, Hyewon; Askew, Robert L; Park, Ryoungsun; Cook, Karon F

    2016-01-01

    The minimally important difference (MID) refers to the smallest change that is sufficiently meaningful to carry implications for patients' care. MIDs are necessary to guide the interpretation of scores. This study estimated MID for the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) pain interference (PI). Study instruments were administered to 414 people who participated in two studies that included treatment with low back pain (LBP; n=218) or depression (n=196). Participants with LBP received epidural steroid injections and participants with depression received antidepressants, psychotherapy, or both. MIDs were estimated for the changes in LBP. MIDs were included only if a priori criteria were met (ie, sample size ≥10, Spearman correlation ≥0.3 between anchor measures and PROMIS-PI scores, and effect size range =0.2-0.8). The interquartile range (IQR) of MID estimates was calculated. The IQR ranged from 3.5 to 5.5 points. The lower bound estimate of the IQR (3.5) was greater than mean of standard error of measurement (SEM) both at time 1 (SEM =2.3) and at time 2 (SEM =2.5), indicating that the estimate of MID exceeded measurement error. Based on our results, researchers and clinicians using PROMIS-PI can assume that change of 3.5 to 5.5 points in comparisons of mean PROMIS-PI scores of people with LBP can be considered meaningful.

  8. Du Pont Information Flow System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Warren S.

    1972-01-01

    The Information Flow System is a large-scale information retrieval system developed for processing of Du Pont information files. As currently implemented, the system stores and retrieves information on company technical reports. Extensions of the system for handling chemical structure information and on-line processing are also discussed. (3…

  9. Information sciences experiment system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katzberg, Stephen J.; Murray, Nicholas D.; Benz, Harry F.; Bowker, David E.; Hendricks, Herbert D.

    1990-01-01

    The rapid expansion of remote sensing capability over the last two decades will take another major leap forward with the advent of the Earth Observing System (Eos). An approach is presented that will permit experiments and demonstrations in onboard information extraction. The approach is a non-intrusive, eavesdropping mode in which a small amount of spacecraft real estate is allocated to an onboard computation resource. How such an approach allows the evaluation of advanced technology in the space environment, advanced techniques in information extraction for both Earth science and information science studies, direct to user data products, and real-time response to events, all without affecting other on-board instrumentation is discussed.

  10. The ideal laboratory information system.

    PubMed

    Sepulveda, Jorge L; Young, Donald S

    2013-08-01

    Laboratory information systems (LIS) are critical components of the operation of clinical laboratories. However, the functionalities of LIS have lagged significantly behind the capacities of current hardware and software technologies, while the complexity of the information produced by clinical laboratories has been increasing over time and will soon undergo rapid expansion with the use of new, high-throughput and high-dimensionality laboratory tests. In the broadest sense, LIS are essential to manage the flow of information between health care providers, patients, and laboratories and should be designed to optimize not only laboratory operations but also personalized clinical care. To list suggestions for designing LIS with the goal of optimizing the operation of clinical laboratories while improving clinical care by intelligent management of laboratory information. Literature review, interviews with laboratory users, and personal experience and opinion. Laboratory information systems can improve laboratory operations and improve patient care. Specific suggestions for improving the function of LIS are listed under the following sections: (1) Information Security, (2) Test Ordering, (3) Specimen Collection, Accessioning, and Processing, (4) Analytic Phase, (5) Result Entry and Validation, (6) Result Reporting, (7) Notification Management, (8) Data Mining and Cross-sectional Reports, (9) Method Validation, (10) Quality Management, (11) Administrative and Financial Issues, and (12) Other Operational Issues.

  11. CUAHSI Hydrologic Information Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maidment, D.; Zaslavsky, I.; Tarboton, D.; Piasecki, M.; Goodall, J.

    2006-12-01

    The Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science, Inc (CUAHSI) has a Hydrologic Information System (HIS) project, which is supported by NSF to develop infrastructure and services to support the advance of hydrologic science in the United States. This paper provides an overview of the HIS project. A set of web services called WaterOneFlow is being developed to provide better access to water observations data (point measurements of streamflow, water quality, climate and groundwater levels) from government agencies and individual investigator projects. Successful partnerships have been created with the USGS National Water Information System, EPA Storet and the NCDC Climate Data Online. Observations catalogs have been created for stations in the measurement networks of each of these data systems so that they can be queried in a uniform manner through CUAHSI HIS, and data delivered from them directly to the user via web services. A CUAHSI Observations Data Model has been designed for storing individual investigator data and an equivalent set of web services created for that so that individual investigators can publish their data onto the internet in the same format CUAHSI is providing for the federal agency data. These data will be accessed through HIS Servers hosted at the national level by CUAHSI and also by research centers and academic departments for regional application of HIS. An individual user application called HIS Analyst will enable individual hydrologic scientists to access the information from the network of HIS Servers. The present focus is on water observations data but later development of this system will include weather and climate grid information, GIS data, remote sensing data and linkages between data and hydrologic simulation models.

  12. Engineering Review Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grems, III, Edward G. (Inventor); Henze, James E. (Inventor); Bixby, Jonathan A. (Inventor); Roberts, Mark (Inventor); Mann, Thomas (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A disciplinal engineering review computer information system and method by defining a database of disciplinal engineering review process entities for an enterprise engineering program, opening a computer supported engineering item based upon the defined disciplinal engineering review process entities, managing a review of the opened engineering item according to the defined disciplinal engineering review process entities, and closing the opened engineering item according to the opened engineering item review.

  13. Responsiveness to Change and Minimally Important Differences of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Gastrointestinal Symptoms Scales.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Dinesh; Hays, Ron D; Shreiner, Andrew B; Melmed, Gil Y; Chang, Lin; Khanna, Puja P; Bolus, Roger; Whitman, Cynthia; Paz, Sylvia H; Hays, Tonya; Reise, Steven P; Spiegel, Brennan

    2017-05-01

    The NIH-sponsored Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Gastrointestinal (GI) Symptoms scales were developed to assess patients' GI symptoms in clinical settings. To assess responsiveness to change and provide minimally important difference (MID) estimates for the PROMIS GI Symptoms scales. A sample of 256 GI outpatients self-administered the eight PROMIS GI Symptoms scales (gastroesophageal reflux, disrupted swallowing, diarrhea, bowel incontinence/soilage, nausea and vomiting, constipation, belly pain, and gas/bloating/flatulence) at two visits. Patient self-reported and physician-reported assessments of the subjects' overall GI condition were employed as change anchors. In addition, we prospectively assessed change at both visits using a GI-symptom anchor, the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS). Responsiveness to change was assessed using F-statistics. The minimally changed group was those somewhat better or somewhat worse on the retrospective anchors and changing by one category on the modified GSRS (e.g., from slight to mild discomfort to moderate to moderately severe discomfort). Responsiveness to change was statistically significant for 6 of 8 PROMIS scales using the self-report GI anchor, 3 of 8 scales using the physician-reported anchor, and 5 of 5 scales using the corresponding GSRS scales as anchors. The MID estimates for scales for improvement and worsening were about 0.5-0.6 SD using the GSRS anchor and generally larger in magnitude than the change for the "about the same" group. The responsiveness and MID estimates provided here for the PROMIS GI Symptoms scales can aid in scale score interpretation in clinical trials and observational studies.

  14. Decline in mortality with the Belize Integrated Patient-Centred Country Wide Health Information System (BHIS) with embedded program management.

    PubMed

    Graven, Michael; Allen, Peter; Smith, Ian; MacDonald, Noni E

    2013-10-01

    Belize deployed a country-wide fully integrated patient centred health information system with eight embedded disease management algorithms and simple analytics in 2007 for $4 (Cad)/citizen. This study evaluated BHIS uptake by health care workers, and pre and post BHIS deployment mortality in selected areas and public health care expenditures. BHIS encounter data were compared to encounter data from required Ministry of Health reports from licensed health care entities. De-identified vital statistics death data for the eight BHIS protocol disease domains and three non-protocol domains were compared from 2005 to 2011. Belize population data came from the Statistical Institute of Belize (2005-2009) and from Belize census (2010) and estimate (2011). Public health system expenditures were compared by fiscal years (2000-2012). BHIS captured over 90% healthcare encounters by year one, 95% by year two. Mortality rates decreased in the eight BHIS protocol domains (each 2005 vs. 2011, all p<0.02) vs. an increase or little change in the three domains without protocols. Hypertension related deaths dropped from 1st cause of death in 2003 to 9th by 2010. Public expenditures on healthcare steadily rose until 2009 but then declined slightly for the next 3 years. For modest investment, BHIS was well accepted nationwide and following deployment, mortality in the eight BHIS disease management algorithm domains declined significantly and expenditures on public healthcare stabilized. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Symposium on Geographic Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felleman, John, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Six papers on geographic information systems cover the future of geographic information systems, land information systems modernization in Wisconsin, the Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Referencing (TIGER) System of the U.S. Bureau of the Census, satellite remote sensing, geographic information systems and sustainable development,…

  16. Respiratory care management information systems.

    PubMed

    Ford, Richard M

    2004-04-01

    Hospital-wide computerized information systems evolved from the need to capture patient information and perform billing and other financial functions. These systems, however, have fallen short of meeting the needs of respiratory care departments regarding work load assessment, productivity management, and the level of outcome reporting required to support programs such as patient-driven protocols. The respiratory care management information systems (RCMIS) of today offer many advantages over paper-based systems and hospital-wide computer systems. RCMIS are designed to facilitate functions specific to respiratory care, including assessing work demand, assigning and tracking resources, charting, billing, and reporting results. RCMIS incorporate mobile, point-of-care charting and are highly configurable to meet the specific needs of individual respiratory care departments. Important and substantial benefits can be realized with an RCMIS and mobile, wireless charting devices. The initial and ongoing costs of an RCMIS are justified by increased charge capture and reduced costs, by way of improved productivity and efficiency. It is not unusual to recover the total cost of an RCMIS within the first year of its operation. In addition, such systems can facilitate and monitor patient-care protocols and help to efficiently manage the vast amounts of information encountered during the practitioner's workday. Respiratory care departments that invest in RCMIS have an advantage in the provision of quality care and in reducing expenses. A centralized respiratory therapy department with an RCMIS is the most efficient and cost-effective way to monitor work demand and manage the hospital-wide allocation of respiratory care services.

  17. Informational Needs of Postmastectomy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yeşilyurt, Duygu Soydaş; Fındık, Ümmü Yıldız

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine informational needs of postmastectomy patients. Materials and Methods This descriptive study was conducted in the general surgery clinics of a university health center for medical research and practice with 72 voluntary patients. For data collection, a patient identification form was used, which was prepared by the researchers in accordance with the literature. Results The mean age of the patients was 52.66±13.39 years, 87% were married, 58% had primary school education, 76% had moderate economic status, and 53% had undergone simple mastectomy. It was determined that 83% of the patients wanted to be informed about hospital and home care interventions, 82% about symptoms and prevention of post-surgical problems, 76% regarding breast cancer and treatment options, and in the range of 54–68%, patients wanted information on the effects of surgery on the body, shoulder and arm exercises, breast self-examination, the effects of breast cancer on family and work life, lymphedema and prevention interventions. Conclusion We recommend that patients with mastectomy should be informed about topics including care interventions, breast cancer and treatment options, effects of surgery, and reducing these effects.

  18. The determination of relevant goals and criteria used to select an automated patient care information system: a Delphi approach.

    PubMed

    Chocholik, J K; Bouchard, S E; Tan, J K; Ostrow, D N

    1999-01-01

    To determine the relevant weighted goals and criteria for use in the selection of an automated patient care information system (PCIS) using a modified Delphi technique to achieve consensus. A three-phase, six-round modified Delphi process was implemented by a ten-member PCIS selection task force. The first phase consisted of an exploratory round. It was followed by the second phase, of two rounds, to determine the selection goals and finally the third phase, of three rounds, to finalize the selection criteria. Consensus on the goals and criteria for selecting a PCIS was measured during the Delphi process by reviewing the mean and standard deviation of the previous round's responses. After the study was completed, the results were analyzed using a limits-of-agreement indicator that showed strong agreement of each individual's responses between each of the goal determination rounds. Further analysis for variability in the group's response showed a significant movement to consensus after the first goal-determination iteration, with consensus reached on all goals by the end of the second iteration. The results indicated that the relevant weighted goals and criteria used to make the final decision for an automated PCIS were developed as a result of strong agreement among members of the PCIS selection task force. It is therefore recognized that the use of the Delphi process was beneficial in achieving consensus among clinical and nonclinical members in a relatively short time while avoiding a decision based on political biases and the "groupthink" of traditional committee meetings. The results suggest that improvements could be made in lessening the number of rounds by having information available through side conversations, by having other statistical indicators besides the mean and standard deviation available between rounds, and by having a content expert address questions between rounds.

  19. MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEM,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Management Information System being developed for the Institute of Cybernetics of the Academy of Sciences of the Ukrainian SSR. The work is being done at the suggestion of Academician V. M. Glushkov under the leadership of Candidate of Physico-Mathematical Sciences A. A. Stognii. Projects reports prepared in various departments of the Institute of Cybernetics in 1963-64 were used in writing this paper. Among them, the works of V. N. Afanas’ev, V. G Bodnarchuk, E. F. Skorokhod’ko, and V. I. Shurikhin should be mentioned. A great deal of factural

  20. Interstellar reddening information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnashev, V. I.; Grigorieva, E. A.; Malkov, O. Yu.

    2013-10-01

    We describe an electronic bibliographic information system, based on a card catalog, containing some 2500 references (publications of 1930-2009) on interstellar extinction. We have classified the articles according to their content. We present here a list of articles devoted to two categories: maps of total extinction and variation of interstellar extinction with the distance to the object. The catalog is tested using published data on open clusters, and conclusions on the applicability of different maps of interstellar extinctions for various distances are made.

  1. An experience with the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System: pros and cons and unanswered questions.

    PubMed

    Badger, Terry A; Heitkemper, Margaret; Lee, Kathryn A; Bruner, Deborah Watkins

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) is to create efficient, reliable, and valid assessments of adult and child health. The nursing science literature in which PROMIS measures are used is rapidly expanding. Investigators have been encouraged to consider the integration of PROMIS measures into both descriptive studies and clinical trials. Doing this has created opportunities and challenges for investigators. This article highlights three projects to show the perspectives of nurse scientists who incorporated PROMIS measures into their research. The first project describes advantages of PROMIS to allow for comparisons of a study population with a national sample and to compliment legacy measures. The second project examines issues in the translation of tools for region-specific Hispanic populations. The third project provides a perspective on the use of PROMIS measures to capture cancer-related fatigue and to develop new components of a sexual function scale. As indicated by these three examples, nurse scientists can contribute an important role in moving the PROMIS initiative forward. Results from these types of projects also move symptom science forward within a more interdisciplinary approach to common measures of interest.

  2. Minimally important differences for Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System pain interference for individuals with back pain

    PubMed Central

    Amtmann, Dagmar; Kim, Jiseon; Chung, Hyewon; Askew, Robert L; Park, Ryoungsun; Cook, Karon F

    2016-01-01

    Background The minimally important difference (MID) refers to the smallest change that is sufficiently meaningful to carry implications for patients’ care. MIDs are necessary to guide the interpretation of scores. This study estimated MID for the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) pain interference (PI). Methods Study instruments were administered to 414 people who participated in two studies that included treatment with low back pain (LBP; n=218) or depression (n=196). Participants with LBP received epidural steroid injections and participants with depression received antidepressants, psychotherapy, or both. MIDs were estimated for the changes in LBP. MIDs were included only if a priori criteria were met (ie, sample size ≥10, Spearman correlation ≥0.3 between anchor measures and PROMIS-PI scores, and effect size range =0.2–0.8). The interquartile range (IQR) of MID estimates was calculated. Results The IQR ranged from 3.5 to 5.5 points. The lower bound estimate of the IQR (3.5) was greater than mean of standard error of measurement (SEM) both at time 1 (SEM =2.3) and at time 2 (SEM =2.5), indicating that the estimate of MID exceeded measurement error. Conclusion Based on our results, researchers and clinicians using PROMIS-PI can assume that change of 3.5 to 5.5 points in comparisons of mean PROMIS-PI scores of people with LBP can be considered meaningful. PMID:27175093

  3. Advanced information processing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lala, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    Design and performance details of the advanced information processing system (AIPS) for fault and damage tolerant data processing on aircraft and spacecraft are presented. AIPS comprises several computers distributed throughout the vehicle and linked by a damage tolerant data bus. Most I/O functions are available to all the computers, which run in a TDMA mode. Each computer performs separate specific tasks in normal operation and assumes other tasks in degraded modes. Redundant software assures that all fault monitoring, logging and reporting are automated, together with control functions. Redundant duplex links and damage-spread limitation provide the fault tolerance. Details of an advanced design of a laboratory-scale proof-of-concept system are described, including functional operations.

  4. The AMMA information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, Laurence; Brissebrat, Guillaume; Boichard, Jean-Luc; Cloché, Sophie; Eymard, Laurence; Mastrorillo, Laurence; Moulaye, Oumarou; Ramage, Karim; Favot, Florence; Roussot, Odile

    2014-05-01

    In the framework of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (AMMA) programme, several tools have been developed in order to facilitate and speed up data and information exchange between researchers from different disciplines. The AMMA information system includes (i) a multidisciplinary user-friendly data management and dissemination system, (ii) report and chart archives associated with display websites and (iii) a scientific paper exchange system. The AMMA information system is enriched by several previous (IMPETUS...) and following projects (FENNEC, ESCAPE, QweCI, DACCIWA…) and is becoming a reference information system about West Africa monsoon. (i) The AMMA project includes airborne, ground-based and ocean measurements, satellite data use, modelling studies and value-added product development. Therefore, the AMMA database user interface enables to access a great amount and a large variety of data: - 250 local observation datasets, that cover many geophysical components (atmosphere, ocean, soil, vegetation) and human activities (agronomy, health). They have been collected by operational networks from 1850 to present, long term monitoring research networks (CATCH, IDAF, PIRATA...) or scientific campaigns; - 1350 outputs of a socio-economics questionnaire; - 60 operational satellite products and several research products; - 10 output sets of meteorological and ocean operational models and 15 of research simulations. All the data are documented in compliance with metadata international standards, and delivered into standard formats. The data request user interface takes full advantage of the data and metadata base relational structure and enables users to elaborate easily multicriteria data requests (period, area, property, property value…). The AMMA data portal counts around 800 registered users and process about 50 data requests every month. The AMMA databases and data portal have been developed and are operated jointly by SEDOO and ESPRI in France

  5. The AMMA information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, Laurence; Brissebrat, Guillaume; Boichard, Jean-Luc; Cloché, Sophie; Mière, Arnaud; Moulaye, Oumarou; Ramage, Karim; Favot, Florence; Boulanger, Damien

    2015-04-01

    In the framework of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (AMMA) programme, several tools have been developed in order to boost the data and information exchange between researchers from different disciplines. The AMMA information system includes (i) a user-friendly data management and dissemination system, (ii) quasi real-time display websites and (iii) a scientific paper exchange collaborative tool. The AMMA information system is enriched by past and ongoing projects (IMPETUS, FENNEC, ESCAPE, QweCI, ACASIS, DACCIWA...) addressing meteorology, atmospheric chemistry, extreme events, health, adaptation of human societies... It is becoming a reference information system on environmental issues in West Africa. (i) The projects include airborne, ground-based and ocean measurements, social science surveys, satellite data use, modelling studies and value-added product development. Therefore, the AMMA data portal enables to access a great amount and a large variety of data: - 250 local observation datasets, that cover many geophysical components (atmosphere, ocean, soil, vegetation) and human activities (agronomy, health). They have been collected by operational networks since 1850, long term monitoring research networks (CATCH, IDAF, PIRATA...) and intensive scientific campaigns; - 1350 outputs of a socio-economics questionnaire; - 60 operational satellite products and several research products; - 10 output sets of meteorological and ocean operational models and 15 of research simulations. Data documentation complies with metadata international standards, and data are delivered into standard formats. The data request interface takes full advantage of the database relational structure and enables users to elaborate multicriteria requests (period, area, property, property value…). The AMMA data portal counts about 900 registered users, and 50 data requests every month. The AMMA databases and data portal have been developed and are operated jointly by SEDOO and

  6. Randomised trial of personalised computer based information for cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Ray; Pearson, Janne; McGregor, Sandra; Cawsey, Alison J; Barrett, Ann; Craig, Neil; Atkinson, Jacqueline M; Gilmour, W Harper; McEwen, Jim

    1999-01-01

    Objective To compare the use and effect of a computer based information system for cancer patients that is personalised using each patient's medical record with a system providing only general information and with information provided in booklets. Design Randomised trial with three groups. Data collected at start of radiotherapy, one week later (when information provided), three weeks later, and three months later. Participants 525 patients started radical radiotherapy; 438 completed follow up. Interventions Two groups were offered information via computer (personalised or general information, or both) with open access to computer thereafter; the third group was offered a selection of information booklets. Outcomes Patients' views and preferences, use of computer and information, and psychological status; doctors' perceptions; cost of interventions. Results More patients offered the personalised information said that they had learnt something new, thought the information was relevant, used the computer again, and showed their computer printouts to others. There were no major differences in doctors' perceptions of patients. More of the general computer group were anxious at three months. With an electronic patient record system, in the long run the personalised information system would cost no more than the general system. Full access to booklets cost twice as much as the general system. Conclusions Patients preferred computer systems that provided information from their medical records to systems that just provided general information. This has implications for the design and implementation of electronic patient record systems and reliance on general sources of patient information. PMID:10550090

  7. Nanophotonics for information systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nezhad, M.; Abashin, M.; Ikeda, K.; Pang, L.; Kim, H. C.; Levy, U.; Tetz, K.; Rokitski, R.; Fainman, Y.

    2007-02-01

    Optical technology plays an increasingly important role in numerous applications areas, including communications, information processing, and data storage. However, as optical technology develops, it is evident that there is a growing need to develop reliable photonic integration technologies. This will include the development of passive as well as active optical components that can be integrated into functional optical circuits and systems, including filters, switching fabrics that can be controlled either electrically or optically, optical sources, detectors, amplifiers, etc. We explore the unique capabilities and advantages of nanotechnology in developing next generation integrated photonic chips. Our long-range goal is to develop a range of photonic nanostructures including artificially birefringent and resonant devices, photonic crystals, and photonic crystals with defects to tailor spectral filters, and nanostructures for spatial field localization to enhance optical nonlinearities, to facilitate on-chip system integration through compatible materials and fabrication processes. The design of artificial nanostructured materials, PCs and integrated photonic systems is one of the most challenging tasks as it not only involves the accurate solution of electromagnetic optics equations, but also the need to incorporate the material and quantum physics equations. Near-field interactions in artificial nanostructured materials provide a variety of functionalities useful for optical systems integration. Recently, the inclusion of surface plasmon photonics in this area has opened up a host of new possibilities Finally and most importantly, nanophotonics may enable easier integration with other nanotechnologies: electronics, magnetics, mechanics, chemistry, and biology. We will address some of these areas in this paper.

  8. Layers of Information: Geographic Information Systems (GIS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucking, Robert A.; Christmann, Edwin P.

    2003-01-01

    Describes the Geographic Information System (GIS) which is capable of storing, manipulating, and displaying data allowing students to explore complex relationships through scientific inquiry. Explains applications of GIS in middle school classrooms and includes assessment strategies. (YDS)

  9. Layers of Information: Geographic Information Systems (GIS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucking, Robert A.; Christmann, Edwin P.

    2003-01-01

    Describes the Geographic Information System (GIS) which is capable of storing, manipulating, and displaying data allowing students to explore complex relationships through scientific inquiry. Explains applications of GIS in middle school classrooms and includes assessment strategies. (YDS)

  10. Geographic Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, William F; Delmerico, Alan M

    2009-01-01

    This chapter presents an overview of the development, capabilities, and utilization of geographic information systems (GIS). There are nearly an unlimited number of applications that are relevant to GIS because virtually all human interactions, natural and man-made features, resources, and populations have a geographic component. Everything happens somewhere and the location often has a role that affects what occurs. This role is often called spatial dependence or spatial autocorrelation, which exists when a phenomenon is not randomly geographically distributed. GIS has a number of key capabilities that are needed to conduct a spatial analysis to assess this spatial dependence. This chapter presents these capabilities (e.g., georeferencing, adjacency/distance measures, overlays) and provides a case study to illustrate how GIS can be used for both research and planning. Although GIS has developed into a relatively mature application for basic functions, development is needed to more seamlessly integrate spatial statistics and models.The issue of location, especially the geography of human activities, interactions between humanity and nature, and the distribution and location of natural resources and features, is one of the most basic elements of scientific inquiry. Conceptualizations and physical maps of geographic space have existed since the beginning of time because all human activity takes place in a geographic context. Representing objects in space, basically where things are located, is a critical aspect of the natural, social, and applied sciences. Throughout history there have been many methods of characterizing geographic space, especially maps created by artists, mariners, and others eventually leading to the development of the field of cartography. It is no surprise that the digital age has launched a major effort to utilize geographic data, but not just as maps. A geographic information system (GIS) facilitates the collection, analysis, and reporting of

  11. Geographic Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wieczorek, William F.; Delmerico, Alan M.

    2009-01-01

    This chapter presents an overview of the development, capabilities, and utilization of geographic information systems (GIS). There are nearly an unlimited number of applications that are relevant to GIS because virtually all human interactions, natural and man-made features, resources, and populations have a geographic component. Everything happens somewhere and the location often has a role that affects what occurs. This role is often called spatial dependence or spatial autocorrelation, which exists when a phenomenon is not randomly geographically distributed. GIS has a number of key capabilities that are needed to conduct a spatial analysis to assess this spatial dependence. This chapter presents these capabilities (e.g., georeferencing, adjacency/distance measures, overlays) and provides a case study to illustrate how GIS can be used for both research and planning. Although GIS has developed into a relatively mature application for basic functions, development is needed to more seamlessly integrate spatial statistics and models. The issue of location, especially the geography of human activities, interactions between humanity and nature, and the distribution and location of natural resources and features, is one of the most basic elements of scientific inquiry. Conceptualizations and physical maps of geographic space have existed since the beginning of time because all human activity takes place in a geographic context. Representing objects in space, basically where things are located, is a critical aspect of the natural, social, and applied sciences. Throughout history there have been many methods of characterizing geographic space, especially maps created by artists, mariners, and others eventually leading to the development of the field of cartography. It is no surprise that the digital age has launched a major effort to utilize geographic data, but not just as maps. A geographic information system (GIS) facilitates the collection, analysis, and reporting of

  12. Minimally important differences were estimated for six Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System-Cancer scales in advanced-stage cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Yost, Kathleen J; Eton, David T; Garcia, Sofia F; Cella, David

    2011-05-01

    We combined anchor- and distribution-based methods to establish minimally important differences (MIDs) for six Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS)-Cancer scales in advanced-stage cancer patients. Participants completed 6 PROMIS-Cancer scales and 23 anchor measures at an initial (n=101) assessment and a follow-up (n=88) assessment 6-12 weeks later. Three a priori criteria were used to identify usable cross-sectional and longitudinal anchor-based MID estimates. The mean standard error of measurement was also computed for each scale. The focus of the analysis was on item response theory-based MIDs estimated on a T-score scale. Raw score MIDs were estimated for comparison purposes. Many cross-sectional (64%) and longitudinal (73%) T-score anchor-based MID estimates were excluded because they did not meet a priori criteria. The following are the recommended T-score MID ranges: 17-item Fatigue (2.5-4.5), 7-item Fatigue (3.0-5.0), 10-item Pain Interference (4.0-6.0), 10-item Physical Functioning (4.0-6.0), 9-item Emotional Distress-Anxiety (3.0-4.5), and 10-item Emotional Distress-Depression (3.0-4.5). Effect sizes corresponding to these MIDs averaged between 0.40 and 0.63. This study is the first to address MIDs for PROMIS measures. Studies are currently being conducted to confirm these MIDs in other patient populations and to determine whether these MIDs vary by patients' level of functioning. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Iowa Flood Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, I.; Krajewski, W. F.; Goska, R.; Mantilla, R.; Weber, L. J.; Young, N.

    2011-12-01

    The Iowa Flood Information System (IFIS) is a web-based platform developed by the Iowa Flood Center (IFC) to provide access to flood inundation maps, real-time flood conditions, flood forecasts both short-term and seasonal, flood-related data, information and interactive visualizations for communities in Iowa. The key element of the system's architecture is the notion of community. Locations of the communities, those near streams and rivers, define basin boundaries. The IFIS provides community-centric watershed and river characteristics, weather (rainfall) conditions, and streamflow data and visualization tools. Interactive interfaces allow access to inundation maps for different stage and return period values, and flooding scenarios with contributions from multiple rivers. Real-time and historical data of water levels, gauge heights, and rainfall conditions are available in the IFIS by streaming data from automated IFC bridge sensors, USGS stream gauges, NEXRAD radars, and NWS forecasts. Simple 2D and 3D interactive visualizations in the IFIS make the data more understandable to general public. Users are able to filter data sources for their communities and selected rivers. The data and information on IFIS is also accessible through web services and mobile applications. The IFIS is optimized for various browsers and screen sizes to provide access through multiple platforms including tablets and mobile devices. The IFIS includes a rainfall-runoff forecast model to provide a five-day flood risk estimate for around 500 communities in Iowa. Multiple view modes in the IFIS accommodate different user types from general public to researchers and decision makers by providing different level of tools and details. River view mode allows users to visualize data from multiple IFC bridge sensors and USGS stream gauges to follow flooding condition along a river. The IFIS will help communities make better-informed decisions on the occurrence of floods, and will alert communities

  14. [Methods of data selection from the French medical information system program for trauma patient's analysis: Burns and traumatic brain injuries].

    PubMed

    Paget, L-M; Dupont, A; Pédrono, G; Lasbeur, L; Thélot, B

    2017-10-01

    Data from the French medical information system program in medicine, surgery, obstetrics and dentistry can be adapted in some cases and under certain conditions, to account for hospitalizations for injuries. Two areas have been explored: burn and traumatic brain injury victims. An algorithm selecting data from the Medical information system program was established and implemented for several years for the study of burn victims. The methods of selection of stays for traumatic brain injuries, which are the subject of a more recent exploration, are described. Production of results in routine on the hospitalization for burns. Expected production of results on the hospitalization for traumatic brain injuries. In both cases, the knowledge obtained from these utilizations of the Medical information system program contributes to epidemiological surveillance and prevention and are useful for health care organization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Correlation of the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System with legacy outcomes measures in assessment of response to lumbar transforaminal epidural steroid injections.

    PubMed

    Shahgholi, L; Yost, K J; Carter, R E; Geske, J R; Hagen, C E; Amrami, K K; Diehn, F E; Kaufmann, T J; Morris, J M; Murthy, N S; Wald, J T; Thielen, K R; Kallmes, D F; Maus, T P

    2015-03-01

    The Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System is a newly developed outcomes measure promulgated by the National Institutes of Health. This study compares changes in pain and physical function-related measures of this system with changes on the Numeric Rating Pain Scale, Roland Morris Disability Index, and the European Quality of Life scale 5D questionnaire in patients undergoing transformational epidural steroid injections for radicular pain. One hundred ninety-nine patients undergoing transforaminal epidural steroid injections for radicular pain were enrolled in the study. Before the procedure, they rated the intensity of their pain by using the 0-10 Numeric Rating Pain Scale, Roland Morris Disability Index, and European Quality of Life scale 5D questionnaire. Patients completed the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Physical Function, Pain Behavior, and Pain Interference short forms before transforaminal epidural steroid injections and at 3 and 6 months. Seventy and 43 subjects replied at 3- and 6-month follow-up. Spearman rank correlations were used to assess the correlation between the instruments. The minimally important differences were calculated for each measurement tool as an indicator of meaningful change. All instruments were responsive in detecting changes at 3- and 6-month follow-up (P < .0001). There was significant correlation between changes in Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System scores and legacy questionnaires from baseline to 3 months (P < .05). There were, however, no significant correlations in changes from 3 to 6 months with any of the instruments. The studied Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System domains offered responsive and correlative psychometric properties compared with legacy instruments in a population of patients undergoing transforaminal epidural steroid injections for radicular pain. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  16. TLC-Asthma: An Integrated Information System for Patient-centered Monitoring, Case Management, and Point-of-Care Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    Adams, William G.; Fuhlbrigge, Anne L.; Miller, Charles W.; Panek, Celeste G.; Gi, Yangsoon; Loane, Kathleen C.; Madden, Nancy E.; Plunkett, Anne M.; Friedman, Robert H.

    2003-01-01

    A great deal of successful work has been done in the area of EMR development, implementation, and evaluation. Less work has been done in the area of automated systems for patients. Efforts to link data at multiple levels – the patient, the case manager, and the clinician have been rudimentary to-date. In this paper we present a model information system that integrates patient health information across multiple domains to support the monitoring and care of children with persistent asthma. The system has been developed for use in a multi-specialty group practice and includes three primary components: 1) a patient-centered telephone-linked communication system; 2) a web-based alert reporting and nurse case-management system; and 3) EMR-based provider communication to support clinical decision making at the point-of-care. The system offers a model for a new level of connectivity for health information that supports customized monitoring, IT-enabled nurse case-managers, and the delivery of longitudinal data to clinicians to support the care of children with persistent asthma. Systems like the one described are well -suited, perhaps essential, technologies for the care of children and adults with chronic conditions such as asthma. PMID:14728122

  17. [Geographic information systems].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Vásquez, Akram; Azañedo, Diego; Bendezú-Quispe, Guido; Pacheco-Mendoza, Josmel; Chaparro, R Martín

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to geospatially explore the occurrence rates of car accidents involving pedestrians in Cercado de Lima (Lima District), Peru. Car accidents involving pedestrians recorded in the 2015 National Police Station Census of the National Statistics and Information Institute were described and georeferenced. Subsequently, a Kernel Density analysis was carried out to locate areas with high, medium, and low density events. Records of 171 car accidents involving pedestrians were studied: the types of vehicles involved were automobiles (56.7%) and smaller vehicles (22.8%). The highest percentage of car accidents involving pedestrians (38.6%) took place between 12:00 p.m. and 5:00 p.m. There were two densely populated areas and two areas with intermediate density for car accidents involving pedestrians, locations that were previously reported as critical due to their deficiencies and high probability of traffic accidents. The use of geographic information systems offers a quick overview of the occurrence rates of car accidents involving pedestrians to make comparisons and enable the local implementation of strategies.

  18. Characteristics and information searched for by French patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: A web-community data-driven online survey.

    PubMed

    Meunier, B; Jourde-Chiche, N; Mancini, J; Chekroun, M; Retornaz, F; Chiche, L

    2016-04-01

    To provide information about the needs of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) using Carenity, the first European online platform for patients with chronic diseases. At one year after its creation, all posts from the Carenity SLE community were collected and analysed. A focused cross-sectional online survey was performed. The SLE community included 521 people (93% females; mean age: 39.8 years). Among a total of 6702 posts, 2232 were classified according to disease-related topics. The 10 most common topics were 'lupus and …' either 'treatment', 'fatigue', 'entourage', 'sun exposure', 'diagnosis', 'autoimmune diseases', 'pregnancy', 'contraception', 'symptoms' or 'sexuality'. 112 SLE patients participated in the online survey. At the time of diagnosis, only 17 (15%) patients had heard of SLE and 84 (75%) expressed a need for more information on outcomes (27%), treatments (27%), daily life (14%), patients' associations (11%), symptoms (8%), the disease (8%) and psychosocial aspects (7%). When treatment was initiated, 48 patients (43%) would have liked more information about side effects (46%), long-term effects (21%), treatment duration/cessation (12.5%) and type (10%) and mechanism of action (8%) of treatments. All participants except one had used the internet to find information about SLE. Sources of information included healthcare providers (51%/61%/67%), journals/magazines (7%/12%/6%), lupus Websites (51%/77%/40%), web forums/blogs (34%/53%/19%), patients' associations (11%/23%/9%) accessed at 'just before diagnosis', 'just after diagnosis' and 'before treatment initiation'. Online patient communities provide original unbiased information that can help improve provision of information to SLE patients. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. An integrated framework for safety, quality and risk management: an information and incident management system based on a universal patient safety classification

    PubMed Central

    Runciman, W B; Williamson, J A H; Deakin, A; Benveniste, K A; Bannon, K; Hibbert, P D

    2006-01-01

    More needs to be done to improve safety and quality and to manage risks in health care. Existing processes are fragmented and there is no single comprehensive source of information about what goes wrong. An integrated framework for the management of safety, quality and risk is needed, with an information and incident management system based on a universal patient safety classification. The World Alliance for Patient Safety provides a platform for the development of a coherent approach; 43 desirable attributes for such an approach are discussed. An example of an incident management and information system serving a patient safety classification is presented, with a brief account of how and where it is currently used. Any such system is valueless unless it improves safety and quality. Quadruple‐loop learning (personal, local, national and international) is proposed with examples of how an exemplar system has been successfully used at the various levels. There is currently an opportunity to “get it right” by international cooperation via the World Health Organization to develop an integrated framework incorporating systems that can accommodate information from all sources, manage and monitor things that go wrong, and allow the worldwide sharing of information and the dissemination of tools for the implementation of strategies which have been shown to work. PMID:17142615

  20. Tuberculosis-Diagnostic Expert System: an architecture for translating patients information from the web for use in tuberculosis diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Osamor, Victor C; Azeta, Ambrose A; Ajulo, Oluseyi O

    2014-12-01

    Over 1.5-2 million tuberculosis deaths occur annually. Medical professionals are faced with a lot of challenges in delivering good health-care with unassisted automation in hospitals where there are several patients who need the doctor's attention. To automate the pre-laboratory screening process against tuberculosis infection to aid diagnosis and make it fast and accessible to the public via the Internet. The expert system we have built is designed to also take care of people who do not have access to medical experts, but would want to check their medical status. A rule-based approach has been used, and unified modeling language and the client-server architecture technique were applied to model the system and to develop it as a web-based expert system for tuberculosis diagnosis. Algorithmic rules in the Tuberculosis-Diagnosis Expert System necessitate decision coverage where tuberculosis is either suspected or not suspected. The architecture consists of a rule base, knowledge base, and patient database. These units interact with the inference engine, which receives patient' data through the Internet via a user interface. We present the architecture of the Tuberculosis-Diagnosis Expert System and its implementation. We evaluated it for usability to determine the level of effectiveness, efficiency and user satisfaction. The result of the usability evaluation reveals that the system has a usability of 4.08 out of a scale of 5. This is an indication of a more-than-average system performance. Several existing expert systems have been developed for the purpose of supporting different medical diagnoses, but none is designed to translate tuberculosis patients' symptomatic data for online pre-laboratory screening. Our Tuberculosis-Diagnosis Expert System is an effective solution for the implementation of the needed web-based expert system diagnosis. © The Author(s) 2013.

  1. Evaluation of Gastrointestinal Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (GI-PROMIS) Symptom Scales in Subjects With Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

    PubMed

    Kochar, Bharati; Martin, Christopher F; Kappelman, Michael D; Spiegel, Brennan M; Chen, Wenli; Sandler, Robert S; Long, Millie D

    2017-08-29

    Patient reported outcomes (PROs) are important treatment endpoints in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). We evaluated the gastrointestinal (GI) PRO Measurement Information System (PROMIS) in IBD subjects. Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America's Partners is an Internet-based cohort of IBD subjects. Participants complete surveys, including demographics, disease characteristics, PROMIS domains, disease activity (short Crohn's disease activity index or simple clinical colitis activity index) and quality of life (QoL) indices. In a nested cross-sectional study, we used univariate and bivariate analyses to assess associations between 8 GI-PROMIS domains (reflux, swallowing, diarrhea, nausea, belly pain, gas, incontinence, and constipation) and QoL and disease activity indices. The study included 2,378 Crohn's Disease (CD) and 1,455 ulcerative colitis (UC) respondents with a median age of 41 years. Median disease duration was 11 years for CD subjects and 8 years for UC subjects; 57% of CD subjects and 42% of UC subjects were in remission. Among symptomatic CD subjects, those with active CD reported significantly worse symptoms on all 8 domains than those in remission. The same was observed for UC subjects with the exception of disrupted swallowing. IBD subjects with worse QoL reported significantly worse symptoms on all 8 domains compared to those with better QoL. In IBD subjects experiencing GI symptoms, GI-PROMIS domains were strongly associated with disease activity and QoL indices. GI-PROMIS holds potential as PRO measures in IBD and correlates with other validated indices in this population.Am J Gastroenterol advance online publication, 29 August 2017; doi:10.1038/ajg.2017.240.

  2. Satisfaction Levels and Factors Influencing Satisfaction With Use of a Social App for Neonatal and Pediatric Patient Transfer Information Systems: A Questionnaire Study Among Doctors.

    PubMed

    Choi, Iee; Kim, Jin Kyu; Kim, Sun Jun; Cho, Soo Chul; Kim, Il Nyeo

    2016-08-04

    The treatment of neonatal and pediatric patients is limited to certain medical institutions depending on treatment difficulty. Effective patient transfers are necessary in situations where there are limited medical resources. In South Korea, the government has made a considerable effort to establish patient transfer systems using various means, such as websites, telephone, and so forth. However, in reality, the effort has not yet been effective. In this study, we ran a patient transfer information system using a social app for effective patient transfer. We analyzed the results, satisfaction levels, and the factors influencing satisfaction. Naver Band is a social app and mobile community application which in Korea is more popular than Facebook. It facilitates group communication. Using Naver Band, two systems were created: one by the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and the other by the Department of Pediatrics at Chonbuk National University Children's Hospital, South Korea. The information necessary for patient transfers was provided to participating obstetricians (n=51) and pediatricians (n=90). We conducted a survey to evaluate the systems and reviewed the results retrospectively. The number of patients transferred was reported to increase by 65% (26/40) obstetricians and 40% (23/57) pediatricians. The time taken for transfers was reported to decrease by 72% (29/40) obstetricians and 59% (34/57) pediatricians. Satisfaction was indicated by 83% (33/40) obstetricians and 89% (51/57) pediatricians. Regarding factors influencing satisfaction, the obstetricians reported communication with doctors in charge (P=.03) and time reduction during transfers (P=.02), whereas the pediatricians indicated review of the diagnosis and treatment of transferred patients (P=.01) and the time reduction during transfers (P=.007). The users were highly satisfied and different users indicated different factors of satisfaction. This finding implies that users' requirements should be

  3. Satisfaction Levels and Factors Influencing Satisfaction With Use of a Social App for Neonatal and Pediatric Patient Transfer Information Systems: A Questionnaire Study Among Doctors

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Iee; Kim, Sun Jun; Cho, Soo Chul; Kim, Il Nyeo

    2016-01-01

    Background The treatment of neonatal and pediatric patients is limited to certain medical institutions depending on treatment difficulty. Effective patient transfers are necessary in situations where there are limited medical resources. In South Korea, the government has made a considerable effort to establish patient transfer systems using various means, such as websites, telephone, and so forth. However, in reality, the effort has not yet been effective. Objective In this study, we ran a patient transfer information system using a social app for effective patient transfer. We analyzed the results, satisfaction levels, and the factors influencing satisfaction. Methods Naver Band is a social app and mobile community application which in Korea is more popular than Facebook. It facilitates group communication. Using Naver Band, two systems were created: one by the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and the other by the Department of Pediatrics at Chonbuk National University Children's Hospital, South Korea. The information necessary for patient transfers was provided to participating obstetricians (n=51) and pediatricians (n=90). We conducted a survey to evaluate the systems and reviewed the results retrospectively. Results The number of patients transferred was reported to increase by 65% (26/40) obstetricians and 40% (23/57) pediatricians. The time taken for transfers was reported to decrease by 72% (29/40) obstetricians and 59% (34/57) pediatricians. Satisfaction was indicated by 83% (33/40) obstetricians and 89% (51/57) pediatricians. Regarding factors influencing satisfaction, the obstetricians reported communication with doctors in charge (P=.03) and time reduction during transfers (P=.02), whereas the pediatricians indicated review of the diagnosis and treatment of transferred patients (P=.01) and the time reduction during transfers (P=.007). Conclusions The users were highly satisfied and different users indicated different factors of satisfaction. This finding

  4. Gaining the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Perspective in Chronic Kidney Disease: a Midwest Pediatric Nephrology Consortium study

    PubMed Central

    Selewski, David T.; Massengill, Susan F.; Troost, Jonathan P.; Wickman, Larysa; Messer, Kassandra L.; Herreshoff, Emily; Bowers, Corinna; Ferris, Maria E.; Mahan, John D.; Greenbaum, Larry A.; MacHardy, Jackie; Kapur, Gaurav; Chand, Deepa H.; Goebel, Jens; Barletta, Gina Marie; Geary, Denis; Kershaw, David B.; Pan, Cynthia G.; Gbadegesin, Rasheed; Hidalgo, Guillermo; Lane, Jerome C.; Leiser, Jeffrey D.; Song, Peter X.; Thissen, David; Liu, Yang; Gross, Heather E.; DeWalt, Darren A.; Gipson, Debbie S.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives Chronic kidney disease is a persistent chronic health condition commonly seen in pediatric nephrology programs. Our study aims to evaluate the sensitivity of the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) pediatric instrument to indicators of disease severity and activity in pediatric chronic kidney disease. Methods This cross sectional study included 233 children 8–17 years old with chronic kidney disease from 16 participating institutions in North America. Disease activity indicators, including hospitalization in the previous 6 months, edema, and number of medications consumed daily, as well as disease severity indicators of kidney function and coexisting medical conditions were captured. PROMIS domains, including depression, anxiety, social-peer relationships, pain interference, fatigue, mobility, and upper extremity function, were administered via web-based questionnaires. Absolute effect sizes (AES) were generated to demonstrate the impact of disease on domain scores. Four children were excluded because of missing GFR estimations. Results 221 of the 229 children included in the final analysis completed the entire PROMIS questionnaire. Unadjusted PROMIS domains were responsive to chronic kidney disease activity indicators and number of coexisting conditions. PROMIS domain scores were worse in the presence of recent hospitalizations (depression AES 0.33, anxiety AES 0.42, pain interference AES 0.46, fatigue AES 0.50, mobility AES 0.49), edema (depression AES 0.50, anxiety AES 0.60, pain interference AES 0.77, mobility AES 0.54) and coexisting medical conditions (social peer-relationships AES 0.66, fatigue AES 0.83, mobility AES 0.60, upper extremity function AES 0.48). Conclusions The PROMIS pediatric domains of depression, anxiety, social-peer relationships, pain interference, and mobility were sensitive to the clinical status of children with chronic kidney disease in this multi-center cross sectional study

  5. Defense Energy Information System. Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Carnes, J.

    1990-02-01

    The Manual provides clear, reliable, timely, accurate, and objective energy information; prescribes instructions for the preparation and submission of energy data to support the Defense Energy Information System (DEIS); and furnishes information regarding the use of the DEIS.

  6. Item Banks for Measuring Emotional Distress from the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS[R]): Depression, Anxiety, and Anger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilkonis, Paul A.; Choi, Seung W.; Reise, Steven P.; Stover, Angela M.; Riley, William T.; Cella, David

    2011-01-01

    The authors report on the development and calibration of item banks for depression, anxiety, and anger as part of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS[R]). Comprehensive literature searches yielded an initial bank of 1,404 items from 305 instruments. After qualitative item analysis (including focus groups and…

  7. Item Banks for Measuring Emotional Distress from the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS[R]): Depression, Anxiety, and Anger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilkonis, Paul A.; Choi, Seung W.; Reise, Steven P.; Stover, Angela M.; Riley, William T.; Cella, David

    2011-01-01

    The authors report on the development and calibration of item banks for depression, anxiety, and anger as part of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS[R]). Comprehensive literature searches yielded an initial bank of 1,404 items from 305 instruments. After qualitative item analysis (including focus groups and…

  8. Federal Energy Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyne, Joseph G.; Moneyhun, Dora H.

    1979-01-01

    Describes the Energy Information Administration (EIA) and the Technical Information Center (TIC), and lists databases accessible online to the Department of Energy and its contractors through DOE/RECON. (RAA)

  9. The Phobos information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karachevtseva, I. P.; Oberst, J.; Zubarev, A. E.; Nadezhdina, I. E.; Kokhanov, A. A.; Garov, A. S.; Uchaev, D. V.; Uchaev, Dm. V.; Malinnikov, V. A.; Klimkin, N. D.

    2014-11-01

    We have developed a Geo-information system (GIS) for Phobos, based on data from the Mars Express and Viking Orbiter missions, which includes orthoimages, global maps, terrain- and gravity field models, all referenced to the Phobos coordinate system. The data are conveniently stored in the ArcGIS software system, which provides an environment for mapping and which allows us to carry out joint data analysis and miscellaneous data cross-comparisons. We have compiled catalogs of Phobos craters using manual and automated techniques, which includes about 5500 and 6400 craters correspondingly. While crater numbers are biased by available image data resolution and illumination, we estimate that our catalog of manually detected craters contains all Phobos craters with diameters D>250 m which is a total of 1072 and catalog of automated detected craters are complete for craters D>400 m (360 craters). Statistical analysis of these large craters reveals a surplus of craters on the anti-Mars hemisphere, whereas differences in crater abundance between leading and trailing hemisphere cannot be confirmed. This in contrast to previous papers, where no such asymmetry was found (Schmedemann et al., 2014). But we cannot rule out remaining biases due to resolution, viewing angles or illumination effects. Using digital terrain model (DTM) derived from photogrammetry image processing we estimate depths of 25 craters larger than 2 km using geometric and dynamic heights (for discussion of Phobos crater morphometry see Kokhanov et al., 2014). We also have compiled catalogs of lineaments, and boulders. In particular, we mapped 546 individual grooves or crater chains, which extend in length from 0.3 km to 16.2 km. We identified and determined the sizes and locations of 1379 boulders near crater Stickney. Cross-comparisons of gravity field models against distribution patterns of grooves and boulders are currently under way and may shed light on their possible origins. Finally, we have developed

  10. Logistics or patient care: which features do independent Finnish pharmacy owners prioritize in a strategic plan for future information technology systems?

    PubMed

    Westerling, Anna M; Haikala, Veikko E; Bell, J Simon; Airaksinen, Marja S

    2010-01-01

    To determine Finnish community pharmacy owners' requirements for the next generation of software systems. Descriptive, nonexperimental, cross-sectional study. Finland during December 2006. 308 independent pharmacy owners. Survey listing 126 features that could potentially be included in the new information technology (IT) system. The list was grouped into five categories: (1) drug information and patient counseling, (2) medication safety, (3) interprofessional collaboration, (4) pharmacy services, and (5) pharmacy internal processes. Perceived value of potential features for a new IT system. The survey was mailed to all independent pharmacy owners in Finland (n = 580; response rate 53% [n = 308]). Respondents gave priority to logistical functions and functions related to drug information and patient care. The highest rated individual features were tracking product expiry (rated as very or quite important by 100% of respondents), computerized drug-drug interaction screening (99%), an electronic version of the national pharmaceutical reference book (97%), and a checklist-type drug information database to assist patient counseling (95%). In addition to the high ranking for logistical features, Finnish pharmacy owners put a priority on support for cognitive pharmaceutical services in the next IT system. Although the importance of logistical functions is understandable, the owners demonstrated a commitment to strategic health policy goals when planning their business IT system.

  11. ECONOMIC COMPARABILITY OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    not only on the probability distributions of channel in and outputs (events and messages) characterizing the information systems . This remains true when... information systems are interpreted as statistical experiments used to test hypotheses. Some pairs of information systems are, however, comparable...in the sense that one is preferable to another irrespective of the payoff function. There exists thus a partial ordering of information systems according

  12. Manufacturing information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, D. K.; Smith, P. R.; Smart, M. J.

    1983-12-01

    The size and cost of manufacturing equipment has made it extremely difficult to perform realistic modeling and simulation of the manufacturing process in university research laboratories. Likewise the size and cost factors, coupled with many uncontrolled variables of the production situation has even made it difficult to perform adequate manufacturing research in the industrial setting. Only the largest companies can afford manufacturing research laboratories; research results are often held proprietary and seldom find their way into the university classroom to aid in education and training of new manufacturing engineers. It is the purpose for this research to continue the development of miniature prototype equipment suitable for use in an integrated CAD/CAM Laboratory. The equipment being developed is capable of actually performing production operations (e.g. drilling, milling, turning, punching, etc.) on metallic and non-metallic workpieces. The integrated CAD/CAM Mini-Lab is integrating high resolution, computer graphics, parametric design, parametric N/C parts programmings, CNC machine control, automated storage and retrieval, with robotics materials handling. The availability of miniature CAD/CAM laboratory equipment will provide the basis for intensive laboratory research on manufacturing information systems.

  13. [Information system in the cardio polyclinic].

    PubMed

    Mihajlović, Marina; Zivković, Marija

    2014-03-01

    The cardiologic polyclinic information system ensures effective management of business processes in the polyclinic. Medical nurse provides health care to a patient with the support of the information system, which enables recording the patient's identity, admission, participation fee charges, billing for the services provided, patients' orders for noninvasive diagnostic methods, and implementation of diagnostic methods. The nurse enters patient's personal information at every work station, updates the existing records, and has an opportunity to add notes and insights to the results of patient's diagnostic tests and doctors' opinions for patients in the polyclinic. Additionally, the nurse records the services and supplies provided, and these entries are used for billing and service charges. This information is accessible at every work station to authorized persons exclusively. The implementation of the information system enables medical nurses working at the reception desk and in nurses' consulting room to record administrative data and data related to diagnostic analysis at the moment and at the place they happen. A personal password is required to access these data. In this way, the patient admission recording is facilitated, and in case the patient needs to be contacted, communication with him/her is improved, and finally, writing reports and data analysis are simplified. Apart from the advantages, there also are problems such as inadequate staff education and insufficient reliability of the information infrastructure, which if overloaded, can slow down the system, and this is time consuming for both health workers and patients.

  14. Applied Information Systems. Course Five. Information Systems Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, Sharon Lund; Everett, Donna R.

    This course is the fifth of seven in the Information Systems curriculum. The purpose of the course is to build on skills acquired in the earlier courses. It reviews the importance of information to management and the organization and information systems concepts within an office. These components are provided for each task area: behavioral…

  15. A Personalized Health Information Retrieval System

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunli; Liu, Zhenkai

    2005-01-01

    Consumers face barriers when seeking health information on the Internet. A Personalized Health Information Retrieval System (PHIRS) is proposed to recommend health information for consumers. The system consists of four modules: (1) User modeling module captures user’s preference and health interests; (2) Automatic quality filtering module identifies high quality health information; (3) Automatic text difficulty rating module classifies health information into professional or patient educational materials; and (4) User profile matching module tailors health information for individuals. The initial results show that PHIRS could assist consumers with simple search strategies. PMID:16779435

  16. [Realistic possibilities of using data sources in quality assessment of care of patients with diabetes in the Czech Republic: National Diabetes Information System].

    PubMed

    Kvapil, Milan

    2015-11-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a serious health and economic problem of our time. Therapy is primarily perceived as prevention of the late complications of diabetes. Most pharmacoeconomic analyses state that the cost associated with the therapy of diabetes mellitus is largely spent on the therapy of its complications. The project of the National Diabetes Information System is based on the essential principle of automated collection of data which is available in digital form in the Czech Republic and which describes the quality and quantity of the care provided for patients with diabetes mellitus and its results. Benefits of the posited National Diabetes Information System embrace minimizing of selective loss of data, a comprehensive view of epidemiology, therapy and its results, possibility of following trends, inclusion of costs related to hospitalization and social benefits. Risks involve correct interpretation and a possible system error. If we succeeded in implementing such system in the Czech Republic, it would be the first fully automatic information system on such a comprehensive scale worldwide. The data describing the incidence and prevalence of diabetes mellitus, therapy structure, direct healthcare costs and induced costs of social payments is in the largest part available in digital form. This creates a basis for the foundation of the National Diabetes Information System which will allow for continuous quality assessment of care for patients with diabetes mellitus, including the related pharmacoeconomic and social impacts.

  17. The IAGOS Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulanger, D.; Thouret, V.

    2016-12-01

    IAGOS (In-service Aircraft for a Global Observing System) is a European Research Infrastructure which aims at the provision of long-term, regular and spatially resolved in situ observations of the atmospheric composition. IAGOS observation systems are deployed on a fleet of commercial aircraft and do measurements of aerosols, cloud particles, greenhouse gases, ozone, water vapor and nitrogen oxides from the surface to the lower stratosphere. The IAGOS database is an essential part of the global atmospheric monitoring network. It contains IAGOS-core and IAGOS-CARIBIC data. The IAGOS Data Portal (http://www.iagos.fr) is part of the French atmospheric chemistry data center AERIS (http://www.aeris-data.fr). In 2016 the new IAGOS Data Portal has been released. In addition to the data download the portal provides improved and new services such as download in NetCDF or NASA Ames formats and plotting tools (maps, time series, vertical profiles). New added value products are available through the portal: back trajectories, origin of air masses, co-location with satellite data. Web services allow to download IAGOS metadata such as flights and airports information. Administration tools have been implemented for users management and instruments monitoring. A major improvement is the interoperability with international portals and other databases in order to improve IAGOS data discovery. In the frame of the IGAS project (IAGOS for the Copernicus Atmospheric Service), a data network has been setup. It is composed of three data centers: the IAGOS database in Toulouse, the HALO research aircraft database at DLR (https://halo-db.pa.op.dlr.de) and the CAMS (Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service) data center in Jülich (http://join.iek.fz-juelich.de). The link with the CAMS data center, through the JOIN interface, allows to combine model outputs with IAGOS data for inter-comparison. The CAMS project is a prominent user of the IGAS data network. Duting the next year IAGOS will

  18. The IAGOS Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulanger, Damien; Thouret, Valérie; Brissebrat, Guillaume

    2017-04-01

    IAGOS (In-service Aircraft for a Global Observing System) is a European Research Infrastructure which aims at the provision of long-term, regular and spatially resolved in situ observations of the atmospheric composition. IAGOS observation systems are deployed on a fleet of commercial aircraft and do measurements of aerosols, cloud particles, greenhouse gases, ozone, water vapor and nitrogen oxides from the surface to the lower stratosphere. The IAGOS database is an essential part of the global atmospheric monitoring network. It contains IAGOS-core data and IAGOS-CARIBIC (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the Atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container) data. The IAGOS Data Portal http://www.iagos.org, damien.boulanger@obs-mip.fr) is part of the French atmospheric chemistry data center AERIS (http://www.aeris-data.fr). In 2016 the new IAGOS Data Portal has been released. In addition to the data download the portal provides improved and new services such as download in NetCDF or NASA Ames formats and plotting tools (maps, time series, vertical profiles, etc.). New added value products are or will be soon available through the portal: back trajectories, origin of air masses, co-location with satellite data, etc. Web services allow to download IAGOS metadata such as flights and airports information. Administration tools have been implemented for users management and instruments monitoring. A major improvement is the interoperability with international portals or other databases in order to improve IAGOS data discovery. In the frame of the IGAS project (IAGOS for the Copernicus Atmospheric Service), a data network has been setup. It is composed of three data centers: the IAGOS database in Toulouse, the HALO research aircraft database at DLR (https://halo-db.pa.op.dlr.de) and the CAMS (Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service) data center in Jülich (http://join.iek.fz-juelich.de). The link with the CAMS data center, through the JOIN interface, allows to

  19. Design and Analysis of an Enhanced Patient-Server Mutual Authentication Protocol for Telecare Medical Information System.

    PubMed

    Amin, Ruhul; Islam, S K Hafizul; Biswas, G P; Khan, Muhammad Khurram; Obaidat, Mohammad S

    2015-11-01

    In order to access remote medical server, generally the patients utilize smart card to login to the server. It has been observed that most of the user (patient) authentication protocols suffer from smart card stolen attack that means the attacker can mount several common attacks after extracting smart card information. Recently, Lu et al.'s proposes a session key agreement protocol between the patient and remote medical server and claims that the same protocol is secure against relevant security attacks. However, this paper presents several security attacks on Lu et al.'s protocol such as identity trace attack, new smart card issue attack, patient impersonation attack and medical server impersonation attack. In order to fix the mentioned security pitfalls including smart card stolen attack, this paper proposes an efficient remote mutual authentication protocol using smart card. We have then simulated the proposed protocol using widely-accepted AVISPA simulation tool whose results make certain that the same protocol is secure against active and passive attacks including replay and man-in-the-middle attacks. Moreover, the rigorous security analysis proves that the proposed protocol provides strong security protection on the relevant security attacks including smart card stolen attack. We compare the proposed scheme with several related schemes in terms of computation cost and communication cost as well as security functionalities. It has been observed that the proposed scheme is comparatively better than related existing schemes.

  20. System status display information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, L. G.; Erickson, J. B.

    1984-01-01

    The system Status Display is an electronic display system which provides the flight crew with enhanced capabilities for monitoring and managing aircraft systems. Guidelines for the design of the electronic system displays were established. The technical approach involved the application of a system engineering approach to the design of candidate displays and the evaluation of a Hernative concepts by part-task simulation. The system engineering and selection of candidate displays are covered.

  1. 42 CFR 493.1231 - Standard: Confidentiality of patient information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standard: Confidentiality of patient information... Nonwaived Testing General Laboratory Systems § 493.1231 Standard: Confidentiality of patient information. The laboratory must ensure confidentiality of patient information throughout all phases of the...

  2. 42 CFR 493.1231 - Standard: Confidentiality of patient information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard: Confidentiality of patient information... Nonwaived Testing General Laboratory Systems § 493.1231 Standard: Confidentiality of patient information. The laboratory must ensure confidentiality of patient information throughout all phases of the...

  3. Strategic Planning and Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shuman, Jack N.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the functions of business planning systems and analyzes the underlying assumptions of the information systems that support strategic planning efforts within organizations. Development of a system framework, obstacles to the successful creation of strategic planning information systems, and resource allocation in organizations are…

  4. Electronic medical records in humanitarian emergencies – the development of an Ebola clinical information and patient management system

    PubMed Central

    Jobanputra, Kiran; Greig, Jane; Shankar, Ganesh; Perakslis, Eric; Kremer, Ronald; Achar, Jay; Gayton, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    By November 2015, the West Africa Ebola epidemic had caused 28598 infections and 11299 deaths in the three countries most affected. The outbreak required rapid innovation and adaptation. Médecins sans Frontières (MSF) scaled up its usual 20-30 bed Ebola management centres (EMCs) to 100-300 beds with over 300 workers in some settings. This brought challenges in patient and clinical data management resulting from the difficulties of working safely with high numbers of Ebola patients. We describe a project MSF established with software developers and the Google Social Impact Team to develop context-adapted tools to address the challenges of recording Ebola clinical information. We share the outcomes and key lessons learned in innovating rapidly under pressure in difficult environmental conditions. Information on adoption, maintenance, and data quality was gathered through review of project documentation, discussions with field staff and key project stakeholders, and analysis of tablet data. In March 2015, a full prototype was deployed in Magburaka EMC, Sierra Leone. Inpatient data were captured on 204 clinical interactions with 34 patients from 5 March until 10 April 2015. Data continued to also be recorded on paper charts, creating theoretically identical record “pairs” on paper and tablet. 83 record pairs for 33 patients with 22 data items (temperature and symptoms) per pair were analysed. The overall Kappa coefficient for agreement between sources was 0.62, but reduced to 0.59 when rare bleeding symptoms were excluded, indicating moderate to good agreement. The time taken to deliver the product was more than that anticipated by MSF (7 months versus 6 weeks). Deployment of the tablet coincided with a dramatic drop in patient numbers and thus had little impact on patient care. We have identified lessons specific to humanitarian-technology collaborative projects and propose a framework for emergency humanitarian innovation. Time and effort is required to bridge

  5. Electronic medical records in humanitarian emergencies - the development of an Ebola clinical information and patient management system.

    PubMed

    Jobanputra, Kiran; Greig, Jane; Shankar, Ganesh; Perakslis, Eric; Kremer, Ronald; Achar, Jay; Gayton, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    By November 2015, the West Africa Ebola epidemic had caused 28598 infections and 11299 deaths in the three countries most affected. The outbreak required rapid innovation and adaptation. Médecins sans Frontières (MSF) scaled up its usual 20-30 bed Ebola management centres (EMCs) to 100-300 beds with over 300 workers in some settings. This brought challenges in patient and clinical data management resulting from the difficulties of working safely with high numbers of Ebola patients. We describe a project MSF established with software developers and the Google Social Impact Team to develop context-adapted tools to address the challenges of recording Ebola clinical information. We share the outcomes and key lessons learned in innovating rapidly under pressure in difficult environmental conditions. Information on adoption, maintenance, and data quality was gathered through review of project documentation, discussions with field staff and key project stakeholders, and analysis of tablet data. In March 2015, a full prototype was deployed in Magburaka EMC, Sierra Leone. Inpatient data were captured on 204 clinical interactions with 34 patients from 5 March until 10 April 2015. Data continued to also be recorded on paper charts, creating theoretically identical record "pairs" on paper and tablet. 83 record pairs for 33 patients with 22 data items (temperature and symptoms) per pair were analysed. The overall Kappa coefficient for agreement between sources was 0.62, but reduced to 0.59 when rare bleeding symptoms were excluded, indicating moderate to good agreement. The time taken to deliver the product was more than that anticipated by MSF (7 months versus 6 weeks). Deployment of the tablet coincided with a dramatic drop in patient numbers and thus had little impact on patient care. We have identified lessons specific to humanitarian-technology collaborative projects and propose a framework for emergency humanitarian innovation. Time and effort is required to bridge

  6. Integrating child health information systems.

    PubMed

    Hinman, Alan R; Eichwald, John; Linzer, Deborah; Saarlas, Kristin N

    2005-11-01

    The Health Resources and Services Administration and All Kids Count (a national technical assistance center fostering development of integrated child health information systems) have been working together to foster development of integrated child health information systems. Activities have included: identification of key elements for successful integration of systems; development of principles and core functions for the systems; a survey of state and local integration efforts; and a conference to develop a common vision for child health information systems to meet medical care and public health needs. We provide 1 state (Utah) as an example that is well on the way to development of integrated child health information systems.

  7. Integrating Child Health Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    Hinman, Alan R.; Eichwald, John; Linzer, Deborah; Saarlas, Kristin N.

    2005-01-01

    The Health Resources and Services Administration and All Kids Count (a national technical assistance center fostering development of integrated child health information systems) have been working together to foster development of integrated child health information systems. Activities have included: identification of key elements for successful integration of systems; development of principles and core functions for the systems; a survey of state and local integration efforts; and a conference to develop a common vision for child health information systems to meet medical care and public health needs. We provide 1 state (Utah) as an example that is well on the way to development of integrated child health information systems. PMID:16195524

  8. Validation of Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Computerized Adaptive Tests Against the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score for 6 Common Foot and Ankle Pathologies.

    PubMed

    Koltsov, Jayme C B; Greenfield, Stephen T; Soukup, Dylan; Do, Huong T; Ellis, Scott J

    2017-08-01

    The field of foot and ankle surgery lacks a widely accepted gold-standard patient-reported outcome instrument. With the changing infrastructure of the medical profession, more efficient patient-reported outcome tools are needed to reduce respondent burden and increase participation while providing consistent and reliable measurement across multiple pathologies and disciplines. The primary purpose of the present study was to validate 3 Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System computer adaptive tests (CATs) most relevant to the foot and ankle discipline against the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS) and the Short Form 12 general health status survey in patients with 6 common foot and ankle pathologies. Patients (n = 240) indicated for operative treatment for 1 of 6 common foot and ankle pathologies completed the CATs, FAOS, and Short Form 12 at their preoperative surgical visits, 1 week subsequently (before surgery), and at 6 months postoperatively. The psychometric properties of the instruments were assessed and compared. The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System CATs each took less than 1 minute to complete, whereas the FAOS took 6.5 minutes, and the Short Form 12 took 3 minutes. CAT scores were more normally distributed and had fewer floor and ceiling effects than those on the FAOS, which reached as high as 24%. The CATs were more precise than the FAOS and had similar responsiveness and test-retest reliability. The physical function and mobility CATs correlated strongly with the activities subscale of the FAOS, and the pain interference CAT correlated strongly with the pain subscale of the FAOS. The CATs and FAOS were responsive to changes with operative treatment for 6 common foot and ankle pathologies. The CATs performed as well as or better than the FAOS in all aspects of psychometric validity. The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System CATs show tremendous potential for improving the study of patient

  9. The Johns Hopkins Oncology Clinical Information System

    PubMed Central

    Lenhard, Raymond E.; Blum, Bruce I.; Sunderland, Jeffery M.; Braine, Hayden G.; Saral, Rein

    1982-01-01

    The Johns Hopkins Oncology Center has developed and maintains a clinical information system to support patient care, education, research and administrative functions. It operates on a dedicated mini-computer (PDP-11) programmed in MUMPS. Clinical information collelcted includes patient medical status and laboratory values. Data are used daily in patient care and also in support of retrospective and prospective research. The use of the system to manage a large blood product pheresis program and to study and treat infectious disease is described. Administrative functions include patient and personnel scheduling, program evaluation and projects directed toward control of costs.

  10. Information Systems Plan.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-01

    calculation FREQUENCY THAT DATA SET IS USED: Variable - several times, several purposes CURRENT METHOD OF INFORMATION MANAGIMENT : Harris 500, stored on paper...INFORMATION MANAGIMENT : 0.2 FTE’s $9,400 A-85 29 CONDUCT PUBLIC AFFAIRS PROGRAM Conduct public affairs program by advising DE and staff on potential... Compensation Program) VINTAGE REQUIREMENT OF DATA SET: Variable DECISIONS OR PRODUCTS DATA SET SUPPORTS: FREQUENCY THAT DATA SET IS USED: Variable CURRENT

  11. Electronic access to care system: improving patient's access to clinical information through an Interactive Voice Response (IVR) system and Web portal.

    PubMed

    Do, Nhan; Marinkovich, Andre; Koisch, John; Wheeler, Gary

    2003-01-01

    Our clinical providers spend an estimated four hours weekly answering phone messages from patients. Our nurses spend five to ten hours weekly on returning phone calls. Most of this time is spent conveying recent clinical results, reviewing with patients the discharge instructions such as consults or studies ordered during the office visits, and handling patients' requests for medication renewals. Over time this will lead to greater patients' dissatisfaction because of lengthy waiting time and lack of timely access to their medical information. This would also lead to greater nursing and providers' dissatisfaction because of unreasonable work load.

  12. Cockpit weather information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tu, Jeffrey Chen-Yu (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Weather information, periodically collected from throughout a global region, is periodically assimilated and compiled at a central source and sent via a high speed data link to a satellite communication service, such as COMSAT. That communication service converts the compiled weather information to GSDB format, and transmits the GSDB encoded information to an orbiting broadcast satellite, INMARSAT, transmitting the information at a data rate of no less than 10.5 kilobits per second. The INMARSAT satellite receives that data over its P-channel and rebroadcasts the GDSB encoded weather information, in the microwave L-band, throughout the global region at a rate of no less than 10.5 KB/S. The transmission is received aboard an aircraft by means of an onboard SATCOM receiver and the output is furnished to a weather information processor. A touch sensitive liquid crystal panel display allows the pilot to select the weather function by touching a predefined icon overlain on the display's surface and in response a color graphic display of the weather is displayed for the pilot.

  13. Clinical Information Systems - From Yesterday to Tomorrow.

    PubMed

    Gardner, R M

    2016-06-30

    To review the history of clinical information systems over the past twenty-five years and project anticipated changes to those systems over the next twenty-five years. Over 250 Medline references about clinical information systems, quality of patient care, and patient safety were reviewed. Books, Web resources, and the author's personal experience with developing the HELP system were also used. There have been dramatic improvements in the use and acceptance of clinical computing systems and Electronic Health Records (EHRs), especially in the United States. Although there are still challenges with the implementation of such systems, the rate of progress has been remarkable. Over the next twenty-five years, there will remain many important opportunities and challenges. These opportunities include understanding complex clinical computing issues that must be studied, understood and optimized. Dramatic improvements in quality of care and patient safety must be anticipated as a result of the use of clinical information systems. These improvements will result from a closer involvement of clinical informaticians in the optimization of patient care processes. Clinical information systems and computerized clinical decision support have made contributions to medicine in the past. Therefore, by using better medical knowledge, optimized clinical information systems, and computerized clinical decision, we will enable dramatic improvements in both the quality and safety of patient care in the next twenty-five years.

  14. Performance of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System 29-Item Profile in Rheumatoid Arthritis, Osteoarthritis, Fibromyalgia, and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Katz, Patricia; Pedro, Sofia; Michaud, Kaleb

    2017-09-01

    The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) was developed to improve measurement of patient-reported outcomes. We examined performance of the 29-item PROMIS Profile (PROMIS-29) in persons with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), osteoarthritis (OA), fibromyalgia (FM), and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Participants in the National Data Bank for Rheumatic Diseases completed the PROMIS-29, which includes 4-item forms for 7 PROMIS domains. Scales were scored and converted to T scores. Distributions of scale scores were examined, convergent and known-groups validity was tested, and differences in scores from online versus paper questionnaires were examined. Sample sizes were 4,346 for RA, 727 for OA, 241 for FM, and 240 for SLE. Participants were predominantly female, with a mean disease duration ≥20 years, and were ages ∼60 years. Large ceiling effects occurred for some PROMIS-29 scales. Correlations of PROMIS-29 scores with scales measuring similar constructs ranged from high to moderate for RA, OA, and SLE; correlations for FM were markedly lower for some scales. Consistent patterns of worsening PROMIS-29 scores with increasing disease severity or declining health status were observed. Differences in scores obtained by online versus paper questionnaires ranged from 0.3 to 2.2 points. Results provide guarded support for using the PROMIS-29 in these conditions. The PROMIS-29 4-item static forms appear to identify differences among levels of health and to measure constructs similar to those measured by legacy questionnaires. However, large ceiling effects suggest that measurement may be more precise at the "bad" ends of the scales, which may limit responsiveness, and differences by mode of administration appear to exist. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  15. Patients' positive identification systems.

    PubMed

    Pagliaro, Pasqualepaolo; Turdo, Rosalia; Capuzzo, Enrico

    2009-10-01

    Blood safety must be maintained throughout the whole transfusion chain to prevent the transfusion of incorrect blood components. The estimated risk of an incorrect transfusion is in the order of 1 per 10,000 units of blood. Although several kinds of errors contribute to "wrong blood" events, 70% of errors occur in clinical areas with the most common being due to failure of the pre-transfusion bedside checking procedure. Several methods are available to reduce such errors. The I-TRAC Plus system by Immucor consists of an identification bracelet which is a bar-coded wristband and a handheld portable computer that identifies patients and blood bags by a scanner and prints the information through a portable printer. The labels attached on the blood order forms and on the sample tubes are read and recorded in the blood bank's informatics system (EmoNet INSIEL). Labels showing the bar-code of the assigned number, which includes the ID number of the patient, the ID number of the unit and a code identifying the kind of product and use (allogeneic or autologous), are generated and applied to the blood components. The transfusions are administered after checking the unit and the patient's wristband using the scanner of a portable PC. In 5 years a total of 71,400 units of blood components were transfused to 15,430 patients using the I-TRAC Plus system. The system prevented 12 cases of mis-identification of patients (5 in 2003, 0 in 2004, 1 in 2005, 1 in 2006 and 5 in 2007). In 2003 we introduced the use of a bar-code matching system between a patient's wristband and the blood bag to avoid mistakes at the bedside. In 5 years the system provided benefits by avoiding errors in the identification of patients, thus preventing "wrong blood" transfusions.

  16. Toward intelligent information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Sanzo

    NASA/RECON, the predecessor of DIALOG System, was originally designed as a user friendly system for astronauts, so that they should not miss-operate the machine in spite of tension in the outer space. Since then, DIALOG has endeavoured to develop a series of user friendly systems, such as knowledge index, inbound gateway, as well as Version II. In this so-called end user searching era, DIALOG has released a series of front end systems successively; DIALOG Business Connection, DIALOG Medical Connection and OneSearch in 1986, early and late 1987 respectively. They are all called expert systems. In this paper, the features of each system are described in some detail and the remaining critical issues are also discussed.

  17. Information Survivability Control Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-01-01

    interfaces with higher-level (e.g., Federal Reserve ) and lower-level (e.g., branch) control systems. A hierarchical structure is natural to support...level hierarchical banking system with branch banks at the leaves, money-center banks in the middle, and the Federal Reserve system at the root...center in question, then the check deposit request is routed there. If not, then the check must be routed through the Federal Reserve . Checks for small

  18. The visual information system

    Treesearch

    Merlyn J. Paulson

    1979-01-01

    This paper outlines a project level process (V.I.S.) which utilizes very accurate and flexible computer algorithms in combination with contemporary site analysis and design techniques for visual evaluation, design and management. The process provides logical direction and connecting bridges through problem identification, information collection and verification, visual...

  19. Condition Assessment Information System

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, Kenneth; McDermitt, Dennis

    2002-09-16

    CAIS2000 records, tracks and cost maintenance deficiencies associated with condition assessments of real property assets. Cost information is available for 39,000 items in the currenht RS Means, Facilities Construction Manual. These costs can, in turn, be rolled by by asset to produce the summary condition of an asset or site.

  20. Home Information Systems: A Primer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Robert C.

    The evolution of online home information systems, the nature and function of such systems, and their potential for wide-scale use are discussed in detail. Different types of home information systems, including one- and two-way interactive television, are described, and the unique technological features of the teletext, viewdata, and videotext…

  1. Newborn Screening Information System (NBSIS)

    PubMed Central

    Dayhoff, R. E.; Ledley, R. S.; Rotolo, L. S.

    1984-01-01

    A Newborn Screening Information System (NBSIS) has been developed to handle the information processing needs of State Newborn Screening Laboratories. Systems have been customized for use by the States of Maryland and Florida. These systems track clients (babies) from their first contact with the Screening Center through their last follow-up test, producing worksheets, result reports, letters, and summaries for archival storage.

  2. Forest Resource Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mrocznyski, R. P.

    1983-01-01

    Twenty-three processing functions aid in utilizing LANDSAT data for forest resource management. Designed to work primarily with digital data obtained from measurements recorded by multispectral remote sensors mounted on aerospace platforms. communication between processing functions, simplicity of control, and commonality of data files in LARSFRIS enhance usefulness of system as tool for research and development of remote sensing systems.

  3. Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Physical Function Item Bank, Version 1.0: Physical Function Assessment for Athletic Patient Populations.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Leif P; Evans, Todd A; Snyder, Kelli R; Docherty, Carrie L

    2016-09-01

    The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) item banks have been validated for general populations, but their application to high-functioning patient populations remains speculative. To examine the measurement properties of the PROMIS physical function item bank, version 1.0, when applied to individuals representing high levels of physical ability. Cross-sectional study. National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I and III collegiate athletic training rooms and intramural events. A heterogeneous sample of 215 adults from Division I or Division III collegiate or recreational sports volunteered for this study. Participants were divided into 4 groups depending on sport activity and injury status: healthy collegiate (HC; 33 men, 37 women; age = 19.7 ± 1.1 years), injured and currently active in sport (IP; 21 men, 29 women; age = 19.9 ± 1.2 years), injured and currently not active in sport (INP; 12 men, 18 women; age = 19.7 ± 1.3 years), and healthy recreational (HR; 47 men, 18 women; age = 20.1 ± 1.4 years). Participants completed 2 assessments: (1) an injury-history questionnaire and (2) the PROMIS physical function item bank, version 1.0, in computer-adaptive form. Mean PROMIS physical function scores were determined for each group. The PROMIS physical function score for the HC group (61.7 ± 6.0) was higher than for the IP (54.9 ± 7.5) and INP (44.1 ± 8.2) groups (P < .001). The IP group had a higher score than the INP group (P < .001). Mean PROMIS scores were not different between the HC and HR participants (mean difference = 1.9, P = .10). The computer-adaptive PROMIS physical function item bank, version 1.0, accurately distinguished injury status in elite-level athletes on a physical function latent trait continuum. Although it was unable to distinguish HC athletes from HR athletes, exposing a possible ceiling effect, it offers potential for use as an outcome instrument for athletic trainers and other sports medicine

  4. Global Land Information System (GLIS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1992-01-01

    The Global Land Information System (GLIS) is an interactive computer system developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for scientists seeking sources of information about the Earth's land surfaces. GLIS contains "metadata," that is, descriptive information about data sets. Through GLIS, scientists can evaluate data sets, determine their availability, and place online requests for products. GLIS is more, however, than a mere list of products. It offers online samples of earth science data that may be ordered through the system.

  5. Personal medical information system using laser card

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Seong H.; Kim, Keun Ho; Choi, Hyung-Sik; Park, Hyun Wook

    1996-04-01

    The well-known hospital information system (HIS) and the picture archiving and communication system (PACS) are typical applications of multimedia to medical area. This paper proposes a personal medical information save-and-carry system using a laser card. This laser card is very useful, especially in emergency situations, because the medical information in the laser card can be read at anytime and anywhere if there exists a laser card reader/writer. The contents of the laser card include the clinical histories of a patient such as clinical chart, exam result, diagnostic reports, images, and so on. The purpose of this system is not a primary diagnosis, but emergency reference of clinical history of the patient. This personal medical information system consists of a personal computer integrated with laser card reader/writer, color frame grabber, color CCD camera and a high resolution image scanner optionally. Window-based graphical user interface was designed for easy use. The laser card has relatively sufficient capacity to store the personal medical information, and has fast access speed to restore and load the data with a portable size as compact as a credit card. Database items of laser card provide the doctors with medical data such as laser card information, patient information, clinical information, and diagnostic result information.

  6. An Evaluation of the Rates of Repeat Notifiable Disease Reporting and Patient Crossover Using a Health Information Exchange-based Automated Electronic Laboratory Reporting System

    PubMed Central

    Gichoya, Judy; Gamache, Roland E.; Vreeman, Daniel J.; Dixon, Brian E.; Finnell, John T.; Grannis, Shaun

    2012-01-01

    Patients move across healthcare organizations and utilize services with great frequency and variety. This fact impacts both health information technology policy and patient care. To understand the challenges faced when developing strategies for effective health information exchange, it is important to understand patterns of patient movement and utilization for many healthcare contexts, including managing public-health notifiable conditions. We studied over 10 years of public-health notifiable diseases using the nation’s most comprehensive operational automatic electronic laboratory reporting system to characterize patient utilization patterns. Our cohort included 412,699 patients and 833,710 reportable cases. 11.3% of patients had multiple notifiable case reports, and 19.5% had notifiable disease data distributed across 2 or more institutions. This evidence adds to the growing body of evidence that patient data resides in many organizations and suggests that to fully realize the value of HIT in public health, cross-organizational data sharing must be meaningfully incentivized. PMID:23304400

  7. Sensory Information Systems Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-06

    Measurement Scientific Challenge: How does binaural hearing disclose the locus of sound in real 3D environments? • Eliminates inter-aural...Auditory Representations. 22-23 August. Hosted by U. Washington. Informational Masking & Binaural Hearing. 17-19 Nov. Hosted by Boston U. Brain...representation and filtering. • E. Bleszynski (Monopole Research): Math model of bone- & tissue-conducted sound • M. Elhilali (Johns Hopkins U

  8. Science information systems: Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, Ray J.

    1991-01-01

    Future programs in earth science, planetary science, and astrophysics will involve complex instruments that produce data at unprecedented rates and volumes. Current methods for data display, exploration, and discovery are inadequate. Visualization technology offers a means for the user to comprehend, explore, and examine complex data sets. The goal of this program is to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of scientists in extracting scientific information from large volumes of instrument data.

  9. Information Systems Administration. Course Seven. Information Systems Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, Sharon Lund; Everett, Donna R.

    This course is the seventh of seven in the Information Systems curriculum. The purpose of this capstone course is to build on skills acquired in the earlier courses. Emphasis is placed on realistic situations and challenges that exist in the automated office and for which information systems technology and skills are pertinent. These components…

  10. Implementing Student Information Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Laurie; Porter, Rebecca

    2006-01-01

    Implementing an enterprise resource planning system is a complex undertaking. Careful planning, management, communication, and staffing can make the difference between a successful and unsuccessful implementation. (Contains 3 tables.)

  11. Forest resource information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mroczynski, R. P. (Principal Investigator)

    1978-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A benchmark classification evaluation framework was implemented. The FRIS preprocessing activities were refined. Potential geo-based referencing systems were identified as components of FRIS.

  12. Implementing Student Information Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Laurie; Porter, Rebecca

    2006-01-01

    Implementing an enterprise resource planning system is a complex undertaking. Careful planning, management, communication, and staffing can make the difference between a successful and unsuccessful implementation. (Contains 3 tables.)

  13. Determination of components of the plasma proteolytic enzyme systems gives information of prognostic value in patients with multiple trauma.

    PubMed

    Aasen, A O; Kierulf, P; Vaage, J; Godal, H C; Aune, S

    1983-01-01

    Components of the plasma proteolytic enzyme systems were studied in 15 multiple trauma patients. There were 9 survivors and 6 fatal cases. All fatal cases had sepsis and/or post traumatic adult respiratory distress syndrome. Within the first day after trauma significantly reduced values were found for plasma prekallikrein (PKK), Hageman factor (HF) and Antithrombin III (AT III). In the survivors these parameters were normalized within the first five days after the injury. In the fatal cases, however, the same parameters remained reduced or declined during the observation period. The fatal cases also revealed a high frequency of positive ethanol gelation tests (EGT), elevated serum fibrin - fibrinogen degradation products (FDP) values and persisting low platelet counts. Analyses of plasma samples from both survivors and fatal cases, fractions by Sephadex G-150 gel filtration, demonstrated alpha 2-macroglobulin - plasma kallikrein complexes. These findings demonstrate activation of the kallikrein-kinin system as a part of pathological plasma proteolysis in multiple trauma patients. Persistent reductions of PKK, HF and AT III combined with positive EGT, elevated FDP values and reduced platelet counts indicate a poor prognosis.

  14. Medical Information Management System (MIMS): A generalized interactive information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterescu, S.; Friedman, C. A.; Hipkins, K. R.

    1975-01-01

    An interactive information system is described. It is a general purpose, free format system which offers immediate assistance where manipulation of large data bases is required. The medical area is a prime area of application. Examples of the system's operation, commentary on the examples, and a complete listing of the system program are included.

  15. Geographic names information system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1987-01-01

    of the data in each of the data elements of the four data bases of GNIS. The GNIS program, which includes the automated names system and the National Gazetteer program, is a coordinated effort under the direction of Donald J. Orth, Chief of the Branch of Geographic Names. The automated system was initially developed by Sam Stulberg and Roger L. Payne. System enhancement and software development is coordinated by Judy J. Stella, head programmer for GNIS, and special projects coordinator is Louis A. Yost IV. Coordination of the research and compilation of certain gazetteers is directed by Robin D. Worcester with research assistance and support from Jon Campbell, Linda S. Davis, and Nancy Engel.

  16. The Fire Effects Information System

    Treesearch

    William C. Fischer

    1987-01-01

    Lack of information regarding fire effects is perceived by many fire and resource managers as a barrier to the effective application of prescribed fire. This lack of information, in many instances, is the result of poor diffusion of existing knowledge rather than lack of knowledge. A computerized Fire Effects Information System can make existing fire effects knowledge...

  17. Do Patients Understand Written Health Information?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Elizabeth; Park, Rosemarie

    1990-01-01

    Long sentences, medical terms, and small print make hospital information brochures and consent forms difficult for many patients to understand. Nurses can help patients by simplifying language, highlighting important information, and using lists. (JOW)

  18. [Scientific drug safety information for patients' consent].

    PubMed

    Suzuki-Nishimura, Tamiko

    2011-01-01

    One of the important roles of pharmacists is to continue their contributions to new drug discovery and development. However, it seems to be very difficult to obtain patient satisfaction with new drugs. Because new medicines have both benefit and risk, there should be many systems to maximize the safety and efficacy of the drugs. In clinical trials, the rights, safety and welfare of human subjects under the investigator's care must be protected. Good Clinical Practice is a harmonized ICH-guideline, and the safety information of an investigational product is explained to patients who voluntarily enter the clinical trials. Since safety information about investigational products is still limited, subjects are informed about the results of animal experiments and those of finished clinical trials. The sponsor of clinical trials should be responsible for the on-going safety evaluation of the investigational products. When additional safety information is collected in the clinical trials, the written informed consent form should be appropriately revised. During the review process, quality, safety and efficacy of new drugs are evaluated and judged based on the scientific risk-benefit balance. The safety information collected in clinical trials is reflected in the decision-making process written in the review reports. All-case investigation should be also performed until data from a certain number of patients has been accumulated in order to collect early safety and efficacy data. Important messages written in review reports for drug safety and patient consent are explained. Risk communication will improve the application of patients' consent for new drugs.

  19. Information technology equipment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Mark D.

    2014-06-10

    According to one embodiment, a system for removing heat from a rack of information technology equipment may include a sidecar indoor air to liquid heat exchanger that cools warm air generated by the rack of information technology equipment. The system may also include a liquid to liquid heat exchanger and an outdoor heat exchanger. The system may further include configurable pathways to connect and control fluid flow through the sidecar heat exchanger, the liquid to liquid heat exchanger, the rack of information technology equipment, and the outdoor heat exchanger based upon ambient temperature and/or ambient humidity to remove heat from the rack of information technology equipment.

  20. Hospital information system survey in qatar.

    PubMed

    Al-Ali, Rashid; Reti, Shane; Feldman, Henry; Safran, Charles; Niaz, Rashid; Erskine, Alistair; Elmagarmid, Ahmed; Al-Musleh, Abdulwahab

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare can be enhanced by the effective use of information technology to improve the quality and safety of care and many healthcare providers are adopting advanced health information technology to improve their healthcare delivery process. Qatar is a relatively young Middle Eastern country with an ambitious and progressive national strategy to develop its healthcare system, including an advanced e-health infrastructure delivering the right medical information at the right time to clinicians and patients. To assess the effectiveness of such programs, it is important to have a pre-intervention baseline from which comparisons, performance against target measures and forward thinking strategic planning can be grounded. This study presents the first published campus wide survey of Hospital Information Systems in large public and private hospitals in Qatar. To qualitatively assess and describe the current state of Hospital Information Systems in large hospitals in Qatar, and to establish a baseline or reference point for Qatar's readiness for, and adoption of Hospital Information Systems.

  1. On Selecting Commercial Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    Möhr, J.R.; Sawinski, R.; Kluge, A.; Alle, W.

    1984-01-01

    As more commercial information systems become available, the methodology for their selection gains importance. An instances where the method employed for the selection of laboratory information systems was multilevel assessment. The method is described and the experience gained in the project is summarized and discussed. Evidence is provided that the employed method is comprehensive, reproducible, valid and economic.

  2. Tropical Cyclone Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, P. Peggy; Knosp, Brian W.; Vu, Quoc A.; Yi, Chao; Hristova-Veleva, Svetla M.

    2009-01-01

    The JPL Tropical Cyclone Infor ma tion System (TCIS) is a Web portal (http://tropicalcyclone.jpl.nasa.gov) that provides researchers with an extensive set of observed hurricane parameters together with large-scale and convection resolving model outputs. It provides a comprehensive set of high-resolution satellite (see figure), airborne, and in-situ observations in both image and data formats. Large-scale datasets depict the surrounding environmental parameters such as SST (Sea Surface Temperature) and aerosol loading. Model outputs and analysis tools are provided to evaluate model performance and compare observations from different platforms. The system pertains to the thermodynamic and microphysical structure of the storm, the air-sea interaction processes, and the larger-scale environment as depicted by ocean heat content and the aerosol loading of the environment. Currently, the TCIS is populated with satellite observations of all tropical cyclones observed globally during 2005. There is a plan to extend the database both forward in time till present as well as backward to 1998. The portal is powered by a MySQL database and an Apache/Tomcat Web server on a Linux system. The interactive graphic user interface is provided by Google Map.

  3. Patient information extraction in digitized radiography.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsien-Huang P

    2002-03-01

    Digital imagery is gradually replacing the traditional radiograph with the development of digital radiography and film scanner. This report presents a new method to extract the patient information number (PIN) field automatically from the film-scanned image using image analysis technique. To evaluate the PIN field extraction algorithm, 2 formats of label acquired from 2 different hospitals are tested. Given the available films with no constraints on the way the labels are written and positioned, the correct extraction rates are 73% and 84%, respectively. This extracted PIN information can link with Radiology Information System (RIS) or Hospital Information System (HIS), and the image scanned from the film then can be filed into the database automatically. The efficiency this method offers can simplify greatly the image filing process and improve the user friendliness of the overall image digitization system. Moreover, compared with the bar code reader, it solves the automatic information input problem in a very economical way. The authors believe the success of this technique will benefit the development of the PACS (Picture Archiving and Communication System) and teleradiology.

  4. [Development of software for the verification of patient flow through a daily clinical environment by use of the radiology information system (RIS)].

    PubMed

    Nose, Hideo; Shiraishi, Junji

    2012-01-01

    In order to manage relationship between patients' movements and operating efficiency, we developed a special software which can make patient flow visible on a display monitor by use of actual data obtained from the radiology information system (RIS). In this software, a simple floor map of the radiology department in our hospital was drawn on the monitor and each patient was indicated with a small figure. This software was developed with commercialized computer software [Excel 2007 visual basic applications (VBA) Microsoft]. Movements of the patient figures were simulated by use of actual time data such as registration of radiology department, and start and ending time of examinations. The patient figures were moved along with predetermined flow lines every second. The movements of the patient figures were controlled by several buttons (i.e., play and stop) and setting switches for determining reproduction date and time. In conclusion, by use of this software, the patient flows could be analyzed systematically by checking efficient operation such as average waiting time of the patients and/or standby time of radiological technologists.

  5. The IAGOS information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulanger, Damien; Gautron, Benoit; Schultz, Martin; Brötz, Björn; Rauthe-Schöch, Armin; Thouret, Valérie

    2015-04-01

    IAGOS (In-service Aircraft for a Global Observing System) aims at the provision of long-term, frequent, regular, accurate, and spatially resolved in situ observations of the atmospheric composition. IAGOS observation systems are deployed on a fleet of commercial aircraft. The IAGOS database is an essential part of the global atmospheric monitoring network. Data access is handled by open access policy based on the submission of research requests which are reviewed by the PIs. The IAGOS database (http://www.iagos.fr, damien.boulanger@obs-mip.fr) is part of the French atmospheric chemistry data centre Ether (CNES and CNRS). In the framework of the IGAS project (IAGOS for Copernicus Atmospheric Service) interoperability with international portals or other databases is implemented in order to improve IAGOS data discovery. The IGAS data network is composed of three data centres: the IAGOS database in Toulouse including IAGOS-core data and IAGOS-CARIBIC (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the Atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container) data since January 2015; the HALO research aircraft database at DLR (https://halo-db.pa.op.dlr.de); and the MACC data centre in Jülich (http://join.iek.fz-juelich.de). The MACC (Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate) project is a prominent user of the IGAS data network. In June 2015 a new version of the IAGOS database will be released providing improved services such as download in NetCDF or NASA Ames formats; graphical tools (maps, scatter plots, etc.); standardized metadata (ISO 19115) and a better users management. The link with the MACC data centre, through JOIN (Jülich OWS Interface), will allow to combine model outputs with IAGOS data for intercomparison. The interoperability within the IGAS data network, implemented thanks to many web services, will improve the functionalities of the web interfaces of each data centre.

  6. NASA space information systems overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Dana L.

    1987-01-01

    A major objective of NASA space missions is the gathering of information that when analyzed, compared, and interpreted furthers man's knowledge of his planet and surrounding universe. A space information system is the combination of data gathering, data processing, and data transport capabilities that interact to provide the underlying services that enable that advancement in understanding. Past space projects have been characterized by rather disjoint data systems that often did not satisfy user requirements. NASA has learned from those experiences, however, and now is conceptualizing a new generation of sophisticated, integrated space information systems suitable to the wide range of near future space endeavors. This paper examines the characteristics of recent data systems and, based upon that characterization, outlines the scope and attributes of future systems. A description if offered of the information system for the Space Station Program as one real example of such advanced capabilities.

  7. Pharmacogenetic information for patients on drug labels

    PubMed Central

    Haga, Susanne B; Mills, Rachel; Moaddeb, Jivan

    2014-01-01

    Advances in pharmacogenetic research have improved our understanding of adverse drug responses and have led to the development of pharmacogenetic tests and targeted drugs. However, the extent of the communication process and provision of information to patients about pharmacogenetics is unclear. Pharmacogenetic information may be included in sections of a drug’s package insert intended for patients, which is provided directly to patients or communicated via the health provider. To determine what pharmacogenetic information, if any, is included in patient-targeted sections of the drug label, we reviewed the labels listed in the US Food and Drug Administration’s Table of Pharmacogenomic Biomarkers in Drug Labels. To date, 140 drugs include pharmacogenetic-related information in the approved label. Our analysis revealed that pharmacogenetic information is included in patient-targeted sections for a minority (n=29; 21%) of drug labels, with no obvious pattern associated with the inclusion of pharmacogenetic information. Therefore, patients are unlikely to learn about pharmacogenetics through written materials dispensed with the drug. Given that there are also inconsistencies with regard to inclusion of pharmacogenetic information in the patient counseling information section, it is also unlikely that patients are receiving adequate pharmacogenetic information from their provider. The inconsistent presence of pharmacogenetic information in patient-targeted sections of drug labels suggests a need to review the criteria for inclusion of information in patient-targeted sections in order to increase consistency and patient knowledge of pharmacogenetic information. PMID:25342916

  8. Integrated risk information system (IRIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Tuxen, L.

    1990-12-31

    The Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) is an electronic information system developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) containing information related to health risk assessment. IRIS is the Agency`s primary vehicle for communication of chronic health hazard information that represents Agency consensus following comprehensive review by intra-Agency work groups. The original purpose for developing IRIS was to provide guidance to EPA personnel in making risk management decisions. This original purpose for developing IRIS was to guidance to EPA personnel in making risk management decisions. This role has expanded and evolved with wider access and use of the system. IRIS contains chemical-specific information in summary format for approximately 500 chemicals. IRIS is available to the general public on the National Library of Medicine`s Toxicology Data Network (TOXNET) and on diskettes through the National Technical Information Service (NTIS).

  9. Reaping the Benefits of Medical Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, E. Tin; Abendroth, Tomas W.

    1996-01-01

    This paper proposes that physicians' use of computerized medical information systems in the practice of medicine can assist delivery of cost-effective, high-quality patient care and help expand clinical research. However, benefits can be realized only if clinicians participate in system development and implementation and if senior institutional…

  10. Multipurpose interactive NASA information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, J. M.; Keefer, R. L.; Sanders, D. R.; Seitz, R. N.

    1979-01-01

    Multipurpose Interactive NASA Information System (MINIS) is data management system capable of retrieving descriptive data from LANDSAT photos. General enough to be used with other user-defined data bases, interactive data management and information retrieval system was especially developed for small and medium-sized computers. It uses free-form data base that allows one to create entirely new and different data bases and to control format of output products.

  11. Information Systems for Patient Follow-Up and Chronic Management of HIV and Tuberculosis: A Life-Saving Technology in Resource-Poor Areas

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Christian; Bailey, Christopher; Douglas, Gerry; Shin, Sonya; Blaya, Joaquin

    2007-01-01

    Background The scale-up of treatment for HIV and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in developing countries requires a long-term relationship with the patient, accurate and accessible records of each patient’s history, and methods to track his/her progress. Recent studies have shown up to 24% loss to follow-up of HIV patients in Africa during treatment and many patients not being started on treatment at all. Some programs for prevention of maternal–child transmission have more than 80% loss to follow-up of babies born to HIV-positive mothers. These patients are at great risk of dying or developing drug resistance if their antiretroviral therapy is interrupted. Similar problems have been found in the scale-up of MDR-TB treatment. Objectives The aim of the study was to assess the role of medical information systems in tracking patients with HIV or MDR-TB, ensuring they are promptly started on high quality care, and reducing loss to follow-up. Methods A literature search was conducted starting from a previous review and using Medline and Google Scholar. Due to the nature of this work and the relative lack of published articles to date, the authors also relied on personal knowledge and experience of systems in use and their own assessments of systems. Results Functionality for tracking patients and detecting those lost to follow-up is described in six HIV and MDR-TB treatment projects in Africa and Latin America. Preliminary data show benefits in tracking patients who have not been prescribed appropriate drugs, those who fail to return for follow-up, and those who do not have medications picked up for them by health care workers. There were also benefits seen in providing access to key laboratory data and in using this data to improve the timeliness and quality of care. Follow-up was typically achieved by a combination of reports from information systems along with teams of community health care workers. New technologies such as low-cost satellite Internet

  12. Computer Information System For Nuclear Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, P. T.; Knowles, R. J.....; Tsen, O.

    1983-12-01

    To meet the complex needs of a nuclear medicine division serving a 1100-bed hospital, a computer information system has been developed in sequential phases. This database management system is based on a time-shared minicomputer linked to a broadband communications network. The database contains information on patient histories, billing, types of procedures, doses of radiopharmaceuticals, times of study, scanning equipment used, and technician performing the procedure. These patient records are cycled through three levels of storage: (a) an active file of 100 studies for those patients currently scheduled, (b) a temporary storage level of 1000 studies, and (c) an archival level of 10,000 studies containing selected information. Merging of this information with reports and various statistical analyses are possible. This first phase has been in operation for well over a year. The second phase is an upgrade of the size of the various storage levels by a factor of ten.

  13. A Technical Evaluation of Wireless Connectivity from Patient Monitors to an Anesthesia Information Management System During Intensive Care Unit Surgery.

    PubMed

    Simpao, Allan F; Galvez, Jorge A; England, W Randall; Wartman, Elicia C; Scott, James H; Hamid, Michael M; Rehman, Mohamed A; Epstein, Richard H

    2016-02-01

    Surgical procedures performed at the bedside in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia were documented using paper anesthesia records in contrast to the operating rooms, where an anesthesia information management system (AIMS) was used for all cases. This was largely because of logistical problems related to connecting cables between the bedside monitors and our portable AIMS workstations. We implemented an AIMS for documentation in the NICU using wireless adapters to transmit data from bedside monitoring equipment to a portable AIMS workstation. Testing of the wireless AIMS during simulation in the presence of an electrosurgical generator showed no evidence of interference with data transmission. Thirty NICU surgical procedures were documented via the wireless AIMS. Two wireless cases exhibited brief periods of data loss; one case had an extended data gap because of adapter power failure. In comparison, in a control group of 30 surgical cases in which wired connections were used, there were no data gaps. The wireless AIMS provided a simple, unobtrusive, portable alternative to paper records for documenting anesthesia records during NICU bedside procedures.

  14. Patients’ views on electronic patient information leaflets

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background: Information in society and in health care is currently undergoing a transition from paper to digital formats, and the main source of information will probably be electronic in the future. Objective: To explore patients’ use and perceptions of the patient information leaflet included in the medication package, and their attitude towards a transition to an electronic version. Methods: The data was collected during October to November 2014 among individuals in South-Eastern Sweden, using a questionnaire (n=406, response rate 78%) and interviews (n=15). Results: The questionnaire showed that the majority of the respondents (52%) occasionally read the patient information leaflet, 37% always read it, and 11% never read it. Almost half of the patients (41%) were positive towards reading the patient information leaflet electronically while 32% were hesitant and 26% neutral. A majority of the patients would request to get the patient information leaflet printed at the pharmacy if it was not included in the package. There were differences in attitude related to age and gender. The interviews showed that patients had mixed views on a transition to an electronic patient information leaflet. The patients perceived several positive aspects with an electronic patient information leaflet but were concerned about elderly patients. Conclusion: Although many were positive towards reading the patient information leaflet electronically, the majority prefer the patient information leaflet in paper form. Providing appropriate and useful eHealth services for patients to access the patient information leaflet electronically, along with education, could prepare patients for a transition to electronic patient information leaflet. PMID:27382423

  15. Developing Information Systems for Competitive Intelligence Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohhof, Bonnie

    1994-01-01

    Discusses issues connected with developing information systems for competitive intelligence support; defines the elements of an effective competitive information system; and summarizes issues affecting system design and implementation. Highlights include intelligence information; information needs; information sources; decision making; and…

  16. Patient Matching within a Health Information Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Godlove, Tim; Ball, Adrian W.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the patient matching problems resulting from the Nationwide Health Information Network's automated patient discovery specification and propose a more effective and secure approach for patient matching between health information organizations participating in a health information exchange. This proposed approach would allow the patient to match his or her identity between a health information organization's electronic health records (EHRs) at the same time the patient identifies which EHR data he or she consents to share between organizations. The patient's EHR username/password combination would be the credential used to establish and maintain health information exchange identity and consent data. The software developed to support this approach (e.g., an EHR health information exchange module) could also allow a patient to see what health information was shared when and with whom. PMID:26755901

  17. Patient Matching within a Health Information Exchange.

    PubMed

    Godlove, Tim; Ball, Adrian W

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the patient matching problems resulting from the Nationwide Health Information Network's automated patient discovery specification and propose a more effective and secure approach for patient matching between health information organizations participating in a health information exchange. This proposed approach would allow the patient to match his or her identity between a health information organization's electronic health records (EHRs) at the same time the patient identifies which EHR data he or she consents to share between organizations. The patient's EHR username/password combination would be the credential used to establish and maintain health information exchange identity and consent data. The software developed to support this approach (e.g., an EHR health information exchange module) could also allow a patient to see what health information was shared when and with whom.

  18. Earth Science Information System (ESIS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1982-01-01

    The Earth Science Information System (ESIS) was developed in 1981 by the U.S. Geological Survey's Office of the Data Administrator. ESIS serves as a comprehensive data management facility designed to support the coordination, integration, and standardization of scientific, technical, and bibliographic data of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). ESIS provides, through an online interactive computer system, referral to information about USGS data bases, data elements which are fields in the records of data bases, and systems. The data bases contain information about many subjects from several scientific disciplines such as: geology, geophysics, geochemistry, hydrology, cartography, oceanography, geography, minerals exploration and conservation, and satellite data sensing.

  19. The use of an anesthesia information system to identify and trend gender disparities in outpatient medical management of patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Vigoda, Michael M; Rodríguez, Luis I; Wu, Eric; Perry, Kevin; Duncan, Robert; Birnbach, David J; Lubarsky, David A

    2008-07-01

    Previous anesthesia information management systems-based studies have focused on intraoperative data analysis. Reviewing preoperative data could provide insight into the outpatient treatment of patients presenting for surgical procedures. As gender-based disparities have been demonstrated in the treatment of patients with cardiac disease, we hypothesized that there would be gender disparities in the outpatient pharmacologic management of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) scheduled for elective noncardiac surgery. We analyzed electronic medical records of ambulatory patients with CAD (prior myocardial infarction [MI], coronary artery bypass surgery, and angioplasty with or without stenting, angina) presenting for elective noncardiac surgery between 1/2004 and 6/2006 (30 mo) at an inner city hospital. Of 21,039 ambulatory patients seen in the preanesthesia clinic, 6.4% (1346) had CAD. Patients with CAD: Men were more likely to be taking beta-blockers (P < 0.002), statins (P < 0.0001), aspirin (P < 0.0001), and antiplatelet medications (P < 0.04), although there was a trend of increased use of aspirin (P < 0.01) by women over the course of the study. Patients with history of prior MI: Men with a prior MI were more likely to be taking beta-blockers (P < 0.0001) and statins (P < 0.02), although there was a trend of increased use of beta-blockers (P < 0.0005) and aspirin (P < 0.03) by women over the course of the study. Quarterly prevalence rates for outpatient medication use were greatest for beta-blockers and least for aspirin. Patients were more likely to be taking a statin, aspirin, or oral antiplatelet medication if they were receiving chronic beta-blocker therapy (P < 0.0001 for each medication). Aggregating anesthesia management information systems data provides an epidemiological perspective of community care of patients presenting for surgery. We found that gender disparities in outpatient medical treatment of patients with CAD, which previously

  20. Experience with Nuclear Medicine Information System

    PubMed Central

    Volkan-Salanci, Bilge; Şahin, Figen; Babekoğlu, Vahide; Uğur, Ömer

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Radiology information system (RIS) is basically evolved for the need of radiologists and ignores the vital steps needed for a proper work flow of Nuclear Medicine Department. Moreover, CT/MRI oriented classical PACS systems are far from satisfying Nuclear Physicians like storing dynamic data for reprocessing and quantitative analysis of colored images. Our purpose was to develop a workflow based Nuclear Medicine Information System (NMIS) that fulfills the needs of Nuclear Medicine Department and its integration to hospital PACS system. Material and Methods: Workflow in NMIS uses HL7 (health level seven) and steps include, patient scheduling and retrieving information from HIS (hospital information system), radiopharmacy, acquisition, digital reporting and approval of the reports using Nuclear Medicine specific diagnostic codes. Images and dynamic data from cameras of are sent to and retrieved from PACS system (Corttex©) for reprocessing and quantitative analysis. Results: NMIS has additional functions to the RIS such as radiopharmaceutical management program which includes stock recording of both radioactive and non-radioactive substances, calculation of the radiopharmaceutical dose for individual patient according to body weight and maximum permissible activity, and calculation of radioactivity left per unit volume for each radionuclide according their half lives. Patient scheduling and gamma camera patient work list settings were arranged according to specific Nuclear Medicine procedures. Nuclear Medicine images and reports can be retrieved and viewed from HIS. Conclusion: NMIS provides functionality to standard RIS and PACS system according to the needs of Nuclear Medicine. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:23487446

  1. Experience with nuclear medicine information system.

    PubMed

    Volkan-Salanci, Bilge; Sahin, Figen; Babekoğlu, Vahide; Uğur, Omer

    2012-12-01

    Radiology information system (RIS) is basically evolved for the need of radiologists and ignores the vital steps needed for a proper work flow of Nuclear Medicine Department. Moreover, CT/MRI oriented classical PACS systems are far from satisfying Nuclear Physicians like storing dynamic data for reprocessing and quantitative analysis of colored images. Our purpose was to develop a workflow based Nuclear Medicine Information System (NMIS) that fulfills the needs of Nuclear Medicine Department and its integration to hospital PACS system. Workflow in NMIS uses HL7 (health level seven) and steps include, patient scheduling and retrieving information from HIS (hospital information system), radiopharmacy, acquisition, digital reporting and approval of the reports using Nuclear Medicine specific diagnostic codes. Images and dynamic data from cameras of are sent to and retrieved from PACS system (Corttex©) for reprocessing and quantitative analysis. NMIS has additional functions to the RIS such as radiopharmaceutical management program which includes stock recording of both radioactive and non-radioactive substances, calculation of the radiopharmaceutical dose for individual patient according to body weight and maximum permissible activity, and calculation of radioactivity left per unit volume for each radionuclide according their half lives. Patient scheduling and gamma camera patient work list settings were arranged according to specific Nuclear Medicine procedures. Nuclear Medicine images and reports can be retrieved and viewed from HIS. NMIS provides functionality to standard RIS and PACS system according to the needs of Nuclear Medicine. None declared.

  2. Information Requirements for a Procurement Management Information System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-08-01

    Management Information System is...described and some justification for this type of procurement management information system is presented. A literature search was made to determine...information systems. If information requirements are correctly identified and satisfied by a procurement management information system , contract administration and procurement management can be

  3. Patients' need for information about cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Skalla, Karen A; Bakitas, Marie; Furstenberg, Charlotte T; Ahles, Tim; Henderson, Joseph V

    2004-01-01

    To obtain detailed information about the preferences of patients with cancer and their need for information about side effects of cancer treatment to design an interactive multimedia educational program. Qualitative. Regional rural academic medical center. 51 patients and 14 spouses of patients who either currently were undergoing or recently had completed chemotherapy or radiation therapy for cancer. Focus groups. Information needs and common and distressing symptoms. Patients wanted information about the process of getting treatment, specific side effects that might occur, and the impact of treatment on their lives. Patients sought information from a variety of sources, but many found that other patients were the most helpful source. Although most patients wanted as much information as possible so they would be prepared for whatever happened, some patients preferred to avoid information about possible side effects. Several obstacles related to information were reported, including access to providers, communication difficulties with providers, informational overload, and problems with retention. Several aspects regarding information needs confirmed previous findings, and new aspects were illuminated. This led to a conclusion that multimedia technology offered many advantages to meet these informational needs. New approaches to patient education that will meet the needs of patients as well as clinicians and educators need to be developed.

  4. Computerized international geothermal information systems

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, S.L.; Lawrence, J.D.; Lepman, S.R.

    1980-03-01

    The computerized international geothermal energy information system is reviewed. The review covers establishment of the Italy - United States linked data centers by the NATO Committee on Challenges of Modern Society, through a bilateral agreement, and up to the present time. The result of the information exchange project is given as the bibliographic and numerical data available from the data centers. Recommendations for the exchange of computerized geothermal information at the international level are discussed.

  5. Medical Information Management System (MIMS): A Generalized Interactive Information System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alterescu,Sidney; And Others

    This report describes an interactive information system. It is a general purpose, free format system which can offer immediate assistance where manipulation of large data bases is required. The medical area is a prime area of application. The report is designed to serve as a manual for potential users--nontechnical personnel who will use the…

  6. Competencies for Information Systems Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everett, Donna R.; O'Neil, Sharon Lund

    1990-01-01

    Through survey research using the DACUM approach and the Delphi technique, 8 broad skill categories and 278 competencies were determined to have some degree of importance for information systems workers. (Author)

  7. System Wide Information Management (SWIM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hritz, Mike; McGowan, Shirley; Ramos, Cal

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation lists questions regarding the implementation of System Wide Information Management (SWIM). Some of the questions concern policy issues and strategies, technology issues and strategies, or transition issues and strategies.

  8. Integrated Compliance Information System (ICIS)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The purpose of ICIS is to meet evolving Enforcement and Compliance business needs for EPA and State users by integrating information into a single integrated data system that supports both management and programmatic requirements of the Enforcement and Compliance programs.

  9. Maryland Automated Geographic Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, E. L.

    1978-01-01

    A computer based system designed for storing geographic data in a consistent and coordinated manner is described. The data are stored, retrieved, and analyzed using a 400 km sq/acre cell. Stored information can be displayed on computer maps in a manner similar to standard map graphics. The data bank contains various information for performing land use analysis in a variety of areas.

  10. Maryland Automated Geographic Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, E. L.

    1978-01-01

    A computer based system designed for storing geographic data in a consistent and coordinated manner is described. The data are stored, retrieved, and analyzed using a 400 km sq/acre cell. Stored information can be displayed on computer maps in a manner similar to standard map graphics. The data bank contains various information for performing land use analysis in a variety of areas.

  11. Pesticide Product Information System (PPIS)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Pesticide Product Information System contains information concerning all pesticide products registered in the United States. It includes registrant name and address, chemical ingredients, toxicity category, product names, distributor brand names, site/pest uses, pesticidal type, formulation code, and registration status.

  12. RIMS: Resource Information Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Symes, J.

    1983-01-01

    An overview is given of the capabilities and functions of the resource management system (RIMS). It is a simple interactive DMS tool which allows users to build, modify, and maintain data management applications. The RIMS minimizes programmer support required to develop/maintain small data base applications. The RIMS also assists in bringing the United Information Services (UIS) budget system work inhouse. Information is also given on the relationship between the RIMS and the user community.

  13. Geographic Information System Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, Chad; Casad, Christopher; Floriano, Luis G.; Hill, Tracie; Johnson, Rashida K.; Locklear, J. Mark; Penn, Stephen; Rhoulac, Tori; Shay, Adam H.; Taylor, Antone; hide

    1995-01-01

    Data was collected in order to further NASA Langley Research Center's Geographic Information System(GIS). Information on LaRC's communication, electrical, and facility configurations was collected. Existing data was corrected through verification, resulting in more accurate databases. In addition, Global Positioning System(GPS) points were used in order to accurately impose buildings on digitized images. Overall, this project will help the Imaging and CADD Technology Team (ICTT) prove GIS to be a valuable resource for LaRC.

  14. RIMS: Resource Information Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Symes, J.

    1983-01-01

    An overview is given of the capabilities and functions of the resource management system (RIMS). It is a simple interactive DMS tool which allows users to build, modify, and maintain data management applications. The RIMS minimizes programmer support required to develop/maintain small data base applications. The RIMS also assists in bringing the United Information Services (UIS) budget system work inhouse. Information is also given on the relationship between the RIMS and the user community.

  15. ROMANSE Public Transport Information Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Steven

    ROMANSE is multi-million pound pilot project based in Southampton. It aims to use Advanced Transport Telematics (ATT) to develop the city as a model for transport management systems across Europe. ROMANSE achieves this by providing realtime traffic and travel information to influence travel behaviour, increase the use of public transport, maximize the efficiency of the transport system and provide high-quality information for use in strategic policy decisions.

  16. A web-based laboratory information system to improve quality of care of tuberculosis patients in Peru: functional requirements, implementation and usage statistics

    PubMed Central

    Blaya, Joaquin A; Shin, Sonya S; Yagui, Martin JA; Yale, Gloria; Suarez, Carmen Z; Asencios, Luis L; Cegielski, J Peter; Fraser, Hamish SF

    2007-01-01

    Background Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis patients in resource-poor settings experience large delays in starting appropriate treatment and may not be monitored appropriately due to an overburdened laboratory system, delays in communication of results, and missing or error-prone laboratory data. The objective of this paper is to describe an electronic laboratory information system implemented to alleviate these problems and its expanding use by the Peruvian public sector, as well as examine the broader issues of implementing such systems in resource-poor settings. Methods A web-based laboratory information system "e-Chasqui" has been designed and implemented in Peru to improve the timeliness and quality of laboratory data. It was deployed in the national TB laboratory, two regional laboratories and twelve pilot health centres. Using needs assessment and workflow analysis tools, e-Chasqui was designed to provide for improved patient care, increased quality control, and more efficient laboratory monitoring and reporting. Results Since its full implementation in March 2006, 29,944 smear microscopy, 31,797 culture and 7,675 drug susceptibility test results have been entered. Over 99% of these results have been viewed online by the health centres. High user satisfaction and heavy use have led to the expansion of e-Chasqui to additional institutions. In total, e-Chasqui will serve a network of institutions providing medical care for over 3.1 million people. The cost to maintain this system is approximately US$0.53 per sample or 1% of the National Peruvian TB program's 2006 budget. Conclusion Electronic laboratory information systems have a large potential to improve patient care and public health monitoring in resource-poor settings. Some of the challenges faced in these settings, such as lack of trained personnel, limited transportation, and large coverage areas, are obstacles that a well-designed system can overcome. e-Chasqui has the potential to provide a national

  17. A web-based laboratory information system to improve quality of care of tuberculosis patients in Peru: functional requirements, implementation and usage statistics.

    PubMed

    Blaya, Joaquin A; Shin, Sonya S; Yagui, Martin J A; Yale, Gloria; Suarez, Carmen Z; Asencios, Luis L; Cegielski, J Peter; Fraser, Hamish S F

    2007-10-28

    Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis patients in resource-poor settings experience large delays in starting appropriate treatment and may not be monitored appropriately due to an overburdened laboratory system, delays in communication of results, and missing or error-prone laboratory data. The objective of this paper is to describe an electronic laboratory information system implemented to alleviate these problems and its expanding use by the Peruvian public sector, as well as examine the broader issues of implementing such systems in resource-poor settings. A web-based laboratory information system "e-Chasqui" has been designed and implemented in Peru to improve the timeliness and quality of laboratory data. It was deployed in the national TB laboratory, two regional laboratories and twelve pilot health centres. Using needs assessment and workflow analysis tools, e-Chasqui was designed to provide for improved patient care, increased quality control, and more efficient laboratory monitoring and reporting. Since its full implementation in March 2006, 29,944 smear microscopy, 31,797 culture and 7,675 drug susceptibility test results have been entered. Over 99% of these results have been viewed online by the health centres. High user satisfaction and heavy use have led to the expansion of e-Chasqui to additional institutions. In total, e-Chasqui will serve a network of institutions providing medical care for over 3.1 million people. The cost to maintain this system is approximately US$0.53 per sample or 1% of the National Peruvian TB program's 2006 budget. Electronic laboratory information systems have a large potential to improve patient care and public health monitoring in resource-poor settings. Some of the challenges faced in these settings, such as lack of trained personnel, limited transportation, and large coverage areas, are obstacles that a well-designed system can overcome. e-Chasqui has the potential to provide a national TB laboratory network in Peru

  18. Designing and evaluating an electronic patient falls reporting system: perspectives for the implementation of health information technology in long-term residential care facilities.

    PubMed

    Mei, Yi You; Marquard, Jenna; Jacelon, Cynthia; DeFeo, Audrey L

    2013-11-01

    Patient falls are the leading cause of unintentional injury and death among older adults. In 2000, falls resulted in over 10,300 elderly deaths, costing the United States approximately $179 million in incidence and medical costs. Furthermore, non-fatal injuries caused by falls cost the United States $19 billion annually. Health information technology (IT) applications, specifically electronic falls reporting systems, can aid quality improvement efforts to prevent patient falls. Yet, long-term residential care facilities (LTRCFs) often do not have the financial resources to implement health IT, and workers in these settings are often not ready to adopt such systems. Additionally, most health IT evaluations are conducted in large acute-care settings, so LTRCF administrators currently lack evidence to support the value of health IT. In this paper, we detail the development of a novel, easy-to-use system to facilitate electronic patient falls reporting within a LTRCF using off-the-shelf technology that can be inexpensively implemented in a wide variety of settings. We report the results of four complimentary system evaluation measures that take into consideration varied organizational stakeholders' perspectives: (1) System-level benefits and costs, (2) system usability, via scenario-based use cases, (3) a holistic assessment of users' physical, cognitive, and marcoergonomic (work system) challenges in using the system, and (4) user technology acceptance. We report the viability of collecting and analyzing data specific to each evaluation measure and detail the relative merits of each measure in judging whether the system is acceptable to each stakeholder. The electronic falls reporting system was successfully implemented, with 100% reporting at 3-months post-implementation. The system-level benefits and costs approach showed that the electronic system required no initial investment costs aside from personnel costs and significant benefits accrued from user time savings

  19. Implementation of an anonymisation tool for clinical trials using a clinical trial processor integrated with an existing trial patient data information system.

    PubMed

    Aryanto, Kadek Y E; Broekema, André; Oudkerk, Matthijs; van Ooijen, Peter M A

    2012-01-01

    To present an adapted Clinical Trial Processor (CTP) test set-up for receiving, anonymising and saving Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) data using external input from the original database of an existing clinical study information system to guide the anonymisation process. Two methods are presented for an adapted CTP test set-up. In the first method, images are pushed from the Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) using the DICOM protocol through a local network. In the second method, images are transferred through the internet using the HTTPS protocol. In total 25,000 images from 50 patients were moved from the PACS, anonymised and stored within roughly 2 h using the first method. In the second method, an average of 10 images per minute were transferred and processed over a residential connection. In both methods, no duplicated images were stored when previous images were retransferred. The anonymised images are stored in appropriate directories. The CTP can transfer and process DICOM images correctly in a very easy set-up providing a fast, secure and stable environment. The adapted CTP allows easy integration into an environment in which patient data are already included in an existing information system.

  20. Validation of the National Institutes of Health Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Survey as a Quality-of-Life Instrument for Patients with Malignant Brain Tumors and Their Caregivers.

    PubMed

    Romero, Melissa M; Flood, Lisa Sue; Gasiewicz, Nanci K; Rovin, Richard; Conklin, Samantha

    2015-12-01

    At present there is a lack of well-validated surveys used to measure quality of life in patients with malignant brain tumors and their caregivers. The main objective of this pilot study was to validate the National Institutes of Health Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (NIH PROMIS) survey for use as a quality-of-life measure in this population. This article presents the rationale for using the NIH PROMIS instrument as a quality-of-life measure for patients with malignant brain tumors and their caregivers.

  1. Information Processing in Living Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkačik, Gašper; Bialek, William

    2016-03-01

    Life depends as much on the flow of information as on the flow of energy. Here we review the many efforts to make this intuition precise. Starting with the building blocks of information theory, we explore examples where it has been possible to measure, directly, the flow of information in biological networks, or more generally where information-theoretic ideas have been used to guide the analysis of experiments. Systems of interest range from single molecules (the sequence diversity in families of proteins) to groups of organisms (the distribution of velocities in flocks of birds), and all scales in between. Many of these analyses are motivated by the idea that biological systems may have evolved to optimize the gathering and representation of information, and we review the experimental evidence for this optimization, again across a wide range of scales.

  2. Safeguards Information Management Systems (SIMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Sorenson, R.J.; Sheely, K.B.; Brown, J.B.; Horton, R.D.; Strittmatter, R.; Manatt, D.R.

    1994-04-01

    The requirements for the management of information at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and its Department of Safeguards are rapidly changing. Historically, the Department of Safeguards has had the requirement to process large volumes of conventional safeguards information. An information management system is currently in place that adequately handles the IAEA`s conventional safeguards data needs. In the post-Iraq environment, however, there is a growing need to expand the IAEA information management capability to include unconventional forms of information. These data include environmental sampling results, photographs, video film, lists of machine tools, and open-source materials such as unclassified publications. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has responded to this information management need by implementing the Safeguards Information Management Systems (SIMS) initiative. SIMS was created by the DOE to anticipate and respond to IAEA information management needs through a multilaboratory initiative that will utilize an integrated approach to develop and deploy technology in a timely and cost-effective manner. The DOE will use the SIMS initiative to coordinate US information management activities that support the IAEA Department of Safeguards.

  3. Clinical information process units (CIPUs) - a system ergonomic approach to medical information systems.

    PubMed

    Friesdorf, W; Groß-Alltag, F; Konichezky, S; Arndt, K

    1994-01-01

    This article constitutes an introduction to the basic tools necessary to understand Systems Ergonomics applied to the development of clinical systems. A basic description of clinical patient care in the system ergonomics language is provided, and the current situation found in hospital information management is criticized from an ergonomic point of view. We have laid out a model of the information flow in the clinical environment, which breaks the complex process of patient care in clearly defined elements: the Clinical Information Process Units. Presented here as an example of the application of Systems Ergonomics to the clinical working processes, the Clinical Information Process Units constitute the central element in the system ergonomic model of the information flow in the clinical environment.

  4. National Information Systems Security (INFOSEC) Glossary

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-09-01

    Systems Security Engineering ISSM Information Systems Security Manager ISSO Information Systems Security Officer IT Information Technology ITAR ...Digital Net Radio Interface Unit SDNS Secure Data Network System SDR System Design Review SFA Security Fault Analysis SHA Secure Hash Algorithm

  5. Ecological Monitoring Information System (EMIS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiene, Richard John; And Others

    A system for evaluating and monitoring child development projects, with possible computerization capabilities, was developed for the State of Pennsylvania in connection with 26 child development projects funded by the Appalachian Regional Commission. The Ecological Monitoring Information System (EMIS), provides a series of ecological measurement…

  6. Simulating The SSF Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, Govind K.; Kleine, Henry; Younger, Joseph C.; Sanders, Felicia A.; Smith, Jeffrey L.; Aster, Robert W.; Olivieri, Jerry M.; Paul, Lori L.

    1993-01-01

    Freedom Operations Simulation Test (FROST) computer program simulates operation of SSF information system, tracking every packet of data from generation to destination, for both uplinks and downlinks. Collects various statistics concerning operation of system and provides reports of statistics at intervals specified by user. FROST also incorporates graphical-display capability to enhance interpretation of these statistics. Written in SIMSCRIPT 11.5.

  7. Simulating The SSF Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, Govind K.; Kleine, Henry; Younger, Joseph C.; Sanders, Felicia A.; Smith, Jeffrey L.; Aster, Robert W.; Olivieri, Jerry M.; Paul, Lori L.

    1993-01-01

    Freedom Operations Simulation Test (FROST) computer program simulates operation of SSF information system, tracking every packet of data from generation to destination, for both uplinks and downlinks. Collects various statistics concerning operation of system and provides reports of statistics at intervals specified by user. FROST also incorporates graphical-display capability to enhance interpretation of these statistics. Written in SIMSCRIPT 11.5.

  8. The Work Unit Information System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-01

    be discussing the current WUIS documentation, the various data input systems that currently exist, the current makeup of the database, and the various...corrections be submitted at least once a year for all active work units. 5 5. SIZE AND MAKEUP OF WUIS DATABASE The Work Unit Information System

  9. Reasonable Accommodation Information Tracking System

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Reasonable Accommodation Information Tracking System (RAITS) is a case management system that allows the National Reasonable Accommodation Coordinator (NRAC) and the Local Reasonable Accommodation Coordinators (LORAC) to manage information related to Reasonable Accommodation (RA) requests. It provides a data base system in compliance with Executive Order 13164 and required by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) Regulations and American Federation of Government Employees (AFGE) Bargaining Unit as described in the AFGE National Reasonable Accommodation Procedures. It is a tool that was internally developed in Lotus Notes to track requests for reasonable accommodation and was custom-configured to meet EPA's specific needs and infrastructure.

  10. An association between anti-platelet drug use and reduced cancer prevalence in diabetic patients: results from the Vermont Diabetes Information System Study.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Chris E; Ramos-Nino, Maria E; Littenberg, Benjamin

    2010-06-15

    Diabetes is associated with an increased risk of several malignancies. Both diabetic patients and patients with cancer have an increase in platelet reactivity and platelet activation has recently emerged as a potential mediator of cancer progression. Drug therapies, such as aspirin, that reduce platelet reactivity reduce both cardiovascular and cancer risk. We performed a cross-sectional analysis to assess the association between history of cancer and current anti-platelet drug use in a primary care population of adults with diabetes enrolled in the Vermont Diabetes Information System. Self-reported characteristics, medical history, and a complete medication list were recorded on 1007 diabetic adults. Fifty percent of diabetic patients used an anti-platelet drug. In unadjusted analysis, no association was seen between anti-platelet drug use and cancer history (OR = 0.93; P = .70). Platelet inhibitor use was associated with a decreased patient-reported history of malignancy in a multivariate logistic regression adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, comorbidity, and number of medications (OR = 0.66; CI 0.44-0.99; P = .045). Similar odds of association were seen in both males and females, and for aspirin and non-aspirin platelet inhibitor therapy. Our data suggest an association between anti-platelet drug use and reduced cancer prevalence in patients with diabetes. Given the potentially large implications of our observations in the diabetic population, further studies are required to determine if this association is causal.

  11. An association between anti-platelet drug use and reduced cancer prevalence in diabetic patients: results from the Vermont Diabetes Information System Study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Diabetes is associated with an increased risk of several malignancies. Both diabetic patients and patients with cancer have an increase in platelet reactivity and platelet activation has recently emerged as a potential mediator of cancer progression. Drug therapies, such as aspirin, that reduce platelet reactivity reduce both cardiovascular and cancer risk. Methods We performed a cross-sectional analysis to assess the association between history of cancer and current anti-platelet drug use in a primary care population of adults with diabetes enrolled in the Vermont Diabetes Information System. Results Self-reported characteristics, medical history, and a complete medication list were recorded on 1007 diabetic adults. Fifty percent of diabetic patients used an anti-platelet drug. In unadjusted analysis, no association was seen between anti-platelet drug use and cancer history (OR = 0.93; P = .70). Platelet inhibitor use was associated with a decreased patient-reported history of malignancy in a multivariate logistic regression adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, comorbidity, and number of medications (OR = 0.66; CI 0.44-0.99; P = .045). Similar odds of association were seen in both males and females, and for aspirin and non-aspirin platelet inhibitor therapy. Conclusions Our data suggest an association between anti-platelet drug use and reduced cancer prevalence in patients with diabetes. Given the potentially large implications of our observations in the diabetic population, further studies are required to determine if this association is causal. PMID:20546622

  12. [Portuguese-language cultural adaptation of the Items Banks of Anxiety and Depression of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS)].

    PubMed

    Castro, Natália Fontes Caputo de; Rezende, Carlos Henrique Alves de; Mendonça, Tânia Maria da Silva; Silva, Carlos Henrique Martins da; Pinto, Rogério de Melo Costa

    2014-04-01

    The Patient-Reported Outcome Measurement Information System (PROMIS), structured in Itens Banks, provides a new tool for evaluating results that apply to various chronic diseases through advanced statistical techniques (TRI) and computerized adaptive testing (CAT). The aim of this study was to culturally adapt the Items Banks of Anxiety and Depression of PROMIS to the Portuguese language. The process followed the recommendations of PROMIS through the advanced translation, reconciliation, back-translation, FACIT review, independent review, finalization, pre-test, and incorporation of the results from the pre-test. The translated version was pre-tested in ten patients, and items 3, 46, and 53 of the Bank of Anxiety and item 46 of the bank of Depression had to be changed. Changes affected equivalence of meaning, and the final version was consistent with the Brazilian population's linguistic and cultural skills. In conclusion, for the Brazilian population the translated version proved semantically and conceptually equivalent to the original.

  13. Standardizing and personalizing the treat to target (T2T) approach for rheumatoid arthritis using the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS): baseline findings on patient-centered treatment priorities.

    PubMed

    Bacalao, Emily J; Greene, George J; Beaumont, Jennifer L; Eisenstein, Amy; Muftic, Azra; Mandelin, Arthur M; Cella, David; Ruderman, Eric M

    2017-08-01

    A treat to target (T2T) approach to management has become the standard of care for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). While consensus T2T recommendations call for patient involvement in the treatment process, the targets commonly used to drive therapeutic decisions involve limited patient input. A pilot study was developed to explore whether the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) could add value to the T2T approach by providing a way to bring patient goals into the process. We report here the baseline data from this study. RA patients from an academic rheumatology practice were recruited to participate in this 1-year study. Patients were asked to complete PROMIS computer-assisted testing at quarterly visits during the year. At baseline, they were asked to identify the PROMIS domain (Pain Interference, Fatigue, Depression, Physical Function, and Social Function) that felt most important to their quality of life. They were then asked to select five representative items from this domain, to be followed through the year. Complete baseline data was available for 119 patients. Most selected Physical Function (39%) or Pain Interference (37%) as their highest priority PROMIS domain. Sixty percent ranked Depression as their lowest priority domain. Younger patients more frequently prioritized Social Function, while older patients more frequently prioritized Fatigue. The incorporation of PROMIS questionnaires into routine clinic visits is a feasible mechanism for incorporating patient preferences into a T2T approach to managing RA.

  14. Public and private maternal health service capacity and patient flows in Southern Tanzania: using a geographic information system to link hospital and national census data.

    PubMed

    Tabatabai, Patrik; Henke, Stefanie; Sušac, Katharina; Kisanga, Oberlin M E; Baumgarten, Inge; Kynast-Wolf, Gisela; Ramroth, Heribert; Marx, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Strategies to improve maternal health in low-income countries are increasingly embracing partnership approaches between public and private stakeholders in health. In Tanzania, such partnerships are a declared policy goal. However, implementation remains challenging as unfamiliarity between partners and insufficient recognition of private health providers prevail. This hinders cooperation and reflects the need to improve the evidence base of private sector contribution. To map and analyse the capacities of public and private hospitals to provide maternal health care in southern Tanzania and the population reached with these services. A hospital questionnaire was applied in all 16 hospitals (public n=10; private faith-based n=6) in 12 districts of southern Tanzania. Areas of inquiry included selected maternal health service indicators (human resources, maternity/delivery beds), provider-fees for obstetric services and patient turnover (antenatal care, births). Spatial information was linked to the 2002 Population Census dataset and a geographic information system to map patient flows and socio-geographic characteristics of service recipients. The contribution of faith-based organizations (FBOs) to hospital maternal health services is substantial. FBO hospitals are primarily located in rural areas and their patient composition places a higher emphasis on rural populations. Also, maternal health service capacity was more favourable in FBO hospitals. We approximated that 19.9% of deliveries in the study area were performed in hospitals and that the proportion of c-sections was 2.7%. Mapping of patient flows demonstrated that women often travelled far to seek hospital care and where catchment areas of public and FBO hospitals overlap. We conclude that the important contribution of FBOs to maternal health services and capacity as well as their emphasis on serving rural populations makes them promising partners in health programming. Inclusive partnerships could increase

  15. Public and private maternal health service capacity and patient flows in southern Tanzania: using a geographic information system to link hospital and national census data.

    PubMed

    Tabatabai, Patrik; Henke, Stefanie; Sušac, Katharina; Kisanga, Oberlin M E; Baumgarten, Inge; Kynast-Wolf, Gisela; Ramroth, Heribert; Marx, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Background Strategies to improve maternal health in low-income countries are increasingly embracing partnership approaches between public and private stakeholders in health. In Tanzania, such partnerships are a declared policy goal. However, implementation remains challenging as unfamiliarity between partners and insufficient recognition of private health providers prevail. This hinders cooperation and reflects the need to improve the evidence base of private sector contribution. Objective To map and analyse the capacities of public and private hospitals to provide maternal health care in southern Tanzania and the population reached with these services. Design A hospital questionnaire was applied in all 16 hospitals (public n=10; private faith-based n=6) in 12 districts of southern Tanzania. Areas of inquiry included selected maternal health service indicators (human resources, maternity/delivery beds), provider-fees for obstetric services and patient turnover (antenatal care, births). Spatial information was linked to the 2002 Population Census dataset and a geographic information system to map patient flows and socio-geographic characteristics of service recipients. Results The contribution of faith-based organizations (FBOs) to hospital maternal health services is substantial. FBO hospitals are primarily located in rural areas and their patient composition places a higher emphasis on rural populations. Also, maternal health service capacity was more favourable in FBO hospitals. We approximated that 19.9% of deliveries in the study area were performed in hospitals and that the proportion of c-sections was 2.7%. Mapping of patient flows demonstrated that women often travelled far to seek hospital care and where catchment areas of public and FBO hospitals overlap. Conclusions We conclude that the important contribution of FBOs to maternal health services and capacity as well as their emphasis on serving rural populations makes them promising partners in health

  16. Forest Resource Information System (FRIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The technological and economical feasibility of using multispectral digital image data as acquired from the LANDSAT satellites in an ongoing operational forest information system was evaluated. Computer compatible multispectral scanner data secured from the LANDSAT satellites were demonstrated to be a significant contributor to ongoing information systems by providing the added dimensions of synoptic and repeat coverage of the Earth's surface. Major forest cover types of conifer, deciduous, mixed conifer-deciduous and non-forest, were classified well within the bounds of the statistical accuracy of the ground sample. Further, when overlayed with existing maps, the acreage of cover type retains a high level of positional integrity. Maps were digitized by a graphics design system, overlayed and registered onto LANDSAT imagery such that the map data with associated attributes were displayed on the image. Once classified, the analysis results were converted back to map form as a cover type of information. Existing tabular information as represented by inventory is registered geographically to the map base through a vendor provided data management system. The notion of a geographical reference base (map) providing the framework to which imagery and tabular data bases are registered and where each of the three functions of imagery, maps and inventory can be accessed singly or in combination is the very essence of the forest resource information system design.

  17. [Patients' information in percutaneous core breast biopsy].

    PubMed

    Barreau, Béatrice; Tastet, Sandrine; Lakdja, Fabrice; Henriquès, Corinne; Valentin, Fabienne; Labat, Marie-Joëlle; Dilhuydy, Marie-Hélène

    2005-03-01

    Information takes a large part of patient's perceptions of the procedure. If the information is adapted, patients tolerate the procedure well. We point out indications and explain the different types of procedure. For infraclinical masses, sonographically guided automated core needle biopsy removes samples. Sonographically guided vacuum-assisted large-core biopsy is only used for diagnosis generally on second purpose for masses. Stereotaxic vacuum-assisted large-core biopsy is used for microcalcifications (needle 8 or 11 gauge). Haematoma and bleeding are rare (< 4%), but care is necessary to avoid complications. Information is executed before the procedure and a booklet is giving to the women. This information has to be adapted because lot of informations could increase patient's anxiety if they don't want more informations and "not enough information" could also increase anxiety if they want more informations. The practitioner, by hearing, his formation and his experience, is able to adapt informations.

  18. Patient-Reported Safety Information: A Renaissance of Pharmacovigilance?

    PubMed

    Härmark, Linda; Raine, June; Leufkens, Hubert; Edwards, I Ralph; Moretti, Ugo; Sarinic, Viola Macolic; Kant, Agnes

    2016-10-01

    The role of patients as key contributors in pharmacovigilance was acknowledged in the new EU pharmacovigilance legislation. This contains several efforts to increase the involvement of the general public, including making patient adverse drug reaction (ADR) reporting systems mandatory. Three years have passed since the legislation was introduced and the key question is: does pharmacovigilance yet make optimal use of patient-reported safety information? Independent research has shown beyond doubt that patients make an important contribution to pharmacovigilance signal detection. Patient reports provide first-hand information about the suspected ADR and the circumstances under which it occurred, including medication errors, quality failures, and 'near misses'. Patient-reported safety information leads to a better understanding of the patient's experiences of the ADR. Patients are better at explaining the nature, personal significance and consequences of ADRs than healthcare professionals' reports on similar associations and they give more detailed information regarding quality of life including psychological effects and effects on everyday tasks. Current methods used in pharmacovigilance need to optimise use of the information reported from patients. To make the most of information from patients, the systems we use for collecting, coding and recording patient-reported information and the methodologies applied for signal detection and assessment need to be further developed, such as a patient-specific form, development of a severity grading and evolution of the database structure and the signal detection methods applied. It is time for a renaissance of pharmacovigilance.

  19. Evolution of toxicology information systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wassom, J.S.; Lu, P.Y.

    1990-12-31

    Society today is faced with new health risk situations that have been brought about by recent scientific and technical advances. Federal and state governments are required to assess the many potential health risks to exposed populations from the products (chemicals) and by-products (pollutants) of these advances. Because a sound analysis of any potential health risk should be based on the use of relevant information, it behooves those individuals responsible for making the risk assessments to know where to obtain needed information. This paper reviews the origins of toxicology information systems and explores the specialized information center concept that was proposed in 1963 as a means of providing ready access to scientific and technical information. As a means of illustrating this concept, the operation of one specialized information center (the Environmental Mutagen Information Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory) will be discussed. Insights into how toxicological information resources came into being, their design and makeup, will be of value to those seeking to acquire information for risk assessment purposes. 7 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  20. Using Innovative Information Systems Techniques To Teach Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chimi, Carl J.; Gordon, Gene M.

    This paper discusses a number of innovative techniques that were used to teach courses in Information Systems to undergraduate and graduate students. While none of these techniques is individually innovative, the combination of techniques provides a true "hands-on" environment for students; because of the way that the components of the…

  1. Integrated Information Systems. Course Six. Information Systems Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, Sharon Lund; Everett, Donna R.

    This course is the sixth of seven in the Information Systems curriculum. The purpose of the course is to build on skills acquired in the earlier courses and to provide the student with skills that enable him/her to function as a resource person. Its focus is on concepts, applications, and skills as well as on equipment familiarity needed to…

  2. NICA project management information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashashin, M. V.; Kekelidze, D. V.; Kostromin, S. A.; Korenkov, V. V.; Kuniaev, S. V.; Morozov, V. V.; Potrebenikov, Yu. K.; Trubnikov, G. V.; Philippov, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    The science projects growth, changing of the efficiency criteria during the project implementation require not only increasing of the management specialization level but also pose the problem of selecting the effective planning methods, monitoring of deadlines and interaction of participants involved in research projects. This paper is devoted to choosing the project management information system for the new heavy-ion collider NICA (Nuclotron based Ion Collider fAcility). We formulate the requirements for the project management information system with taking into account the specifics of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR, Dubna, Russia) as an international intergovernmental research organization, which is developed on the basis of a flexible and effective information system for the NICA project management.

  3. BBIS: Beacon Bus Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasim, Shahreen; Hafit, Hanayanti; Pei Juin, Kong; Afizah Afif, Zehan; Hashim, Rathiah; Ruslai, Husni; Jahidin, Kamaruzzaman; Syafwan Arshad, Mohammad

    2016-11-01

    Lack of bus information for example bus timetable, status of the bus and messy advertisement on bulletin board at the bus stop will give negative impact to tourist. Therefore, a real-time update bus information bulletin board provides all information needed so that passengers can save their bus information searching time. Supported with Android or iOS, Beacon Bus Information System (BBIS) provides bus information between Batu Pahat and Kluang area. BBIS is a system that implements physical web technology and interaction on demand. It built on Backend-as-a-Service, a cloud solution and Firebase non relational database as data persistence backend and syncs between user client in the real-time. People walk through bus stop with smart device and do not require any application. Bluetooth Beacon is used to achieve smart device's best performance of data sharing. Intellij IDEA 15 is one of the tools that that used to develop the BBIS system. Multi-language included front end and backend supported Integration development environment (IDE) helped to speed up integration process.

  4. A Web Information Retrieval System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae-Hyun; Park, Dong-Chul; Huh, Woong; Kim, Hyen-Ug; Yoon, Chung-Hwa; Park, Chong-Dae; Woo, Dong-Min; Jeong, Taikyeong; Cho, Il-Hwan; Lee, Yunsik

    An approach for the retrieval of price information from internet sites is applied to real-world application problems in this paper. The Web Information Retrieval System (WIRS) utilizes Hidden Markov Model (HMM) for its powerful capability to process temporal information. HMM is an extremely flexible tool and has been successfully applied to a wide variety of stochastic modeling tasks. In order to compare the prices and features of products from various web sites, the WIRS extracts prices and descriptions of various products within web pages. The WIRS is evaluated with real-world problems and compared with a conventional method and the result is reported in this paper.

  5. Impact of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Management Information System (PROMIS) upon the Design and Operation of Multi-center Clinical Trials: a Qualitative Research Study

    PubMed Central

    Diener, Lawrence W.; Nahm, Meredith; Weinfurt, Kevin P.

    2013-01-01

    New technologies may be required to integrate the National Institutes of Health’s Patient Reported Outcome Management Information System (PROMIS) into multi-center clinical trials. To better understand this need, we identified likely PROMIS reporting formats, developed a multi-center clinical trial process model, and identified gaps between current capabilities and those necessary for PROMIS. These results were evaluated by key trial constituencies. Issues reported by principal investigators fell into two categories: acceptance by key regulators and the scientific community, and usability for researchers and clinicians. Issues reported by the coordinating center, participating sites, and study subjects were those faced when integrating new technologies into existing clinical trial systems. We then defined elements of a PROMIS Tool Kit required for integrating PROMIS into a multi-center clinical trial environment. The requirements identified in this study serve as a framework for future investigators in the design, development, implementation, and operation of PROMIS Tool Kit technologies. PMID:20703765

  6. Is informed consent effective in trauma patients?

    PubMed

    Bhangu, A; Hood, E; Datta, A; Mangaleshkar, S

    2008-11-01

    Informed consent in the modern era is a common and important topic both for the well-informed patient and to prevent unnecessary litigation. However, the effectiveness of informed consent in trauma patients is an under-researched area. This paper aims to assess the differences in patient recall of the consent process and desire for information by performing a comparative analysis between orthopaedic trauma and elective patients. Information from 41 consecutive elective operations and 40 consecutive trauma operations was collected on the first post-operative day. 100% of elective patients and 90% of trauma patients knew what operation they had received (p = 0.06). Overall recall of complications was poor, but was significantly lower in trauma patients compared with elective patients (62% vs 22%, p<0.001). 30% of trauma patients desired more information about their operation compared to 12% of elective patients (p = 0.049), although only 35% of trauma patients wanted written as well as verbal explanations, compared to 85% of elective patients p<0.001). Overall 100% of elective and 90% of trauma patients were happy with the consent process (p = 0.06). Subset analysis of neck of femur compared to other trauma patients showed that the above factors were not significantly different between the two groups. Recall of complications in the trauma patients is significantly lower than in elective patients, although both groups scored poorly overall. Repeated verbal explanations should be reinforced with the option of additional information leaflets for trauma operations. Further research into the usefulness of DVDs for commonly performed operations is warranted, although official internet resources may be more cost-effective.

  7. A web-based information system for management and analysis of patient data after refractive eye surgery.

    PubMed

    Zuberbuhler, Bruno; Galloway, Peter; Reddy, Aravind; Saldana, Manuel; Gale, Richard

    2007-12-01

    The aim was to develop a software tool for refractive surgeons using a standard user-friendly web-based interface, providing the user with a secure environment to protect large volumes of patient data. The software application was named "Internet-based refractive analysis" (IBRA), and was programmed with the computer languages PHP, HTML and JavaScript, attached to the opensource MySQL database. IBRA facilitated internationally accepted presentation methods including the stability chart, the predictability chart and the safety chart; it was able to perform vector analysis for the course of a single patient or for group data. With the integrated nomogram calculation, treatment could be customised to reduce the postoperative refractive error. Multicenter functions permitted quality-control comparisons between different surgeons and laser units.

  8. Processing information system for highly specialized information in corporate networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosyan, M. O.; Kovalev, I. V.; Zelenkov, P. V.; Brezitskaya, VV; Prohorovich, G. A.

    2016-11-01

    The new structure for formation system and management system for highly specialized information in corporate systems is offered. The main distinguishing feature of this structure is that it involves the processing of multilingual information in a single user request.

  9. An integrated hospital information system in Geneva.

    PubMed

    Scherrer, J R; Baud, R H; Hochstrasser, D; Ratib, O

    1990-01-01

    Since the initial design phase from 1971 to 1973, the DIOGENE hospital information system at the University Hospital of Geneva has been treated as a whole and has retained its architectural unity, despite the need for modification and extension over the years. In addition to having a centralized patient database with the mechanisms for data protection and recovery of a transaction-oriented system, the DIOGENE system has a centralized pool of operators who provide support and training to the users; a separate network of remote printers that provides a telex service between the hospital buildings, offices, medical departments, and wards; and a three-component structure that avoids barriers between administrative and medical applications. In 1973, after a 2-year design period, the project was approved and funded. The DIOGENE system has led to more efficient sharing of costly resources, more rapid performance of administrative tasks, and more comprehensive collection of information about the institution and its patients.

  10. Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, Felix L.

    1993-01-01

    Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS) is a computer systems philosophy, a set of validated hardware building blocks, and a set of validated services as embodied in system software. The goal of AIPS is to provide the knowledgebase which will allow achievement of validated fault-tolerant distributed computer system architectures, suitable for a broad range of applications, having failure probability requirements of 10E-9 at 10 hours. A background and description is given followed by program accomplishments, the current focus, applications, technology transfer, FY92 accomplishments, and funding.

  11. Health information system model for monitoring treatment and surveillance for leprosy patients in indonesia (case study in Pekalongan District, Central Java, Indonesia).

    PubMed

    Rachmani, Enny; Kurniadi, Arif; Hsu, Chien Yeh

    2013-01-01

    After India and Brazil, Indonesia has the third highest incidence/prevalence of leprosy in the world. Every year thousands of new cases and case with grade-2 disability are reported and, while the recovery rate lingers only 80-90 %. Therefore, more than 10 % of leprosy patients drop out of treatment and can be a source of new infections in the community. Our research was aimed at determining apparent difficulties in the leprosy control program as well as how a health information system (HIS) could assist the Indonesian leprosy control program. We used qualitative method with deep interview and observation of document. One of the difficulties which the Indonesian leprosy control program faces is discontinuity of patient's data due to rotating staff as well as the treatment monitoring and queries patients which should be monitored after treatment has ceased. Technology implementation is feasible through short message service (sms) reminders and web base applications. The leprosy control program urgently needs to implement continuous monitoring and recording of patients because of the particular characteristics of this contagious disease.

  12. Integrated information systems: tools for affiliation.

    PubMed

    Katz, P A

    1995-05-01

    The development of healthcare information systems as tools to facilitate business success traditionally has focused on a single profit center. The cataclysmic changes that are reshaping American healthcare have accelerated the affiliation of provider entities to form systems that have broader geographic coverage, deliver a larger portion of the provider continuum of care, and are more attractive partners for purchasers of healthcare services. Integrated and/or standardized information system technologies can provide great benefit in containing costs and optimizing quality among partners resulting from healthcare mergers and acquisitions as the new entity positions itself to increase market share and enhance its bottom line. Graduate Health System (GHS) in the Philadelphia area has demonstrated the efficacy of its investment to build a system-wide information network that delivers multiple standardized, integrated systems for both the financial and operational advantage of all component institutions. Building on its patient information system as the centerpiece of its information strategy, GHS has deployed a variety of tools across its network infrastructure that have brought new capabilities and savings to its member hospitals. In light of some of GHS's successes, other hospitals and healthcare systems may be able to re-create similar savings and efficiencies by applying like strategies in cooperation with their affiliated partners.

  13. Nursing information systems: applications in nursing curricula.

    PubMed

    Poirrier, G P; Wills, E M; Broussard, P C; Payne, R L

    1996-01-01

    America's healthcare system is being transformed to meet a new set of priorities: cost-effectiveness, quality, and access. To meet these priorities, health practitioners of the 21st century will rely heavily on computer information systems to provide complete, easily accessed patient data. Incorporation of this technology in nursing programs will enhance the quality of the graduates who will then strengthen the availability of a qualified work force to employers.

  14. Focus on: information technology. Online drug information for dermatology patients.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Amanda

    2005-01-01

    Information about medications appropriate for dermatologists and patients with skin diseases is readily available on the Internet. Authoritative educational material is supplied by academic dermatologic associations and institutions and distributed by independent websites, large health portals, and search directories. Although it is easy to find excellent dermatological drug information, the World Wide Web is dynamic and unmoderated, and patients can be misled or exploited by inaccurate or fraudulent websites. Health on the Net and other organizations have developed ethical principles to aid consumers and evaluate the quality of health-related information.

  15. Mass Storage Performance Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuermann, Peter

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this task is to develop a data warehouse to enable system administrators and their managers to gather information by querying the data logs of the MDSDS. Currently detailed logs capture the activity of the MDSDS internal to the different systems. The elements to be included in the data warehouse are requirements analysis, data cleansing, database design, database population, hardware/software acquisition, data transformation, query and report generation, and data mining.

  16. [Electronic poison information management system].

    PubMed

    Kabata, Piotr; Waldman, Wojciech; Kaletha, Krystian; Sein Anand, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    We describe deployment of electronic toxicological information database in poison control center of Pomeranian Center of Toxicology. System was based on Google Apps technology, by Google Inc., using electronic, web-based forms and data tables. During first 6 months from system deployment, we used it to archive 1471 poisoning cases, prepare monthly poisoning reports and facilitate statistical analysis of data. Electronic database usage made Poison Center work much easier.

  17. An information system for community nursing.

    PubMed

    Sustersic, Olga; Rajkovic, Vladislav; Leskovar, Robert; Bitenc, Iztok; Bernik, Mojca; Rajkovic, Uros

    2002-01-01

    In this article, an information system for community nursing is presented. It is critically evaluated on the basis of practical experiences. Its goal is not only to reduce the workload with modern information and communication technology but also to improve the quality of nurses' work. The quality improved because of the process method of work, which led toward a better client/patient orientation and more creative and research-oriented nurses' work based on nursing knowledge management support. It relies on an integrated and structured information picture, with special emphasis on transparency and interpretability.

  18. The impact of a Critical Care Information System (CCIS) on time spent charting and in direct patient care by staff in the ICU: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Mador, Rebecca L; Shaw, Nicola T

    2009-07-01

    The introduction of a Critical Care Information System (CCIS) into an intensive care unit (ICU) is purported to reduce the time health care providers (HCP) spend on documentation and increase the time available for direct patient care. However, there is a paucity of rigorous empirical research that has investigated these assertions. Moreover, those studies that have sought to elucidate the relationship between the introduction of a CCIS and the time spent by staff on in/direct patient care activities have published contradictory findings. The objective of this literature review is to establish the impact of a CCIS on time spent documenting and in direct patient care by staff in the ICU. Five electronic databases were searched including PubMed Central, EMBASE, CINAHL, IEEE Xplore, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Reference lists of all published papers were hand searched, and citations reviewed to identify extra papers. We included studies that were empirical articles, published in English, and provided original data on the impact of a CCIS on time spent documenting and in direct patient care by staff in the ICU. In total, 12 articles met the inclusion criteria. Workflow analysis (66%) and time-and-motion analysis (25%) were the most common forms of data collection. Three (25%) studies found an increase in time spent charting, five (42%) found no difference, and four (33%) studies reported a decrease. Results on the impact of a CCIS on direct patient care were similarly inconclusive. Due to the discrepant findings and several key methodological issues, the impact of a CCIS on time spent charting and in direct patient care remains unclear. This review highlights the need for an increase in rigorous empirical research in this area and provides recommendations for the design and implementation of future studies.

  19. Feasibility of Using the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System in Academic Health Centers: Case Series Design on Pain Reduction After Chiropractic Care

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Jeanmarie R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to test the utility of Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) as a resource for collecting data on patient-reported outcomes (PRO) within academic health centers at a chiropractic college; and, to describe changes in PRO following pragmatic chiropractic care incorporating instrument-assisted soft tissue mobilization (IASTM) on pain symptoms. Methods This was a pre-post intervention design without a control group (case series) involving 25 patients (14 females and 11 males; 40.5 ± 16.39 years, range 20-70 years) who completed their chiropractic care and their baseline and post-treatment pain assessments. The pragmatic chiropractic care intervention included both spinal manipulation and IASTM to treat pain symptoms. PRO’s were collected using PROMIS to measure pain behavior, pain interference and pain intensity. Results The average pre-post assessment interval was 33 ± 22.5 days (95% CI, 23-42 days). The durations of treatments ranged from one week to 10 weeks. The median number of IASTM treatments was six. Pre-post decreases in T-scores for pain behavior and pain interference were 55.5 to 48.4 and 57.7 to 48.4, respectively (P < .05). Only 12 patients had a baseline T-score for pain intensity greater than 50. The pre-post decrease in pain intensity T-scores for these 12 patients was from 53.4 to 40.9. Conclusion Within the limitations of a case series design, these data provide initial evidence on the utility of PROMIS instruments for clinical and research outcomes in chiropractic patients. PMID:25225465

  20. [Informed consent of the surgical patient].

    PubMed

    Kovács, József

    2014-02-01

    The article analyses the consequences of the paradigm shift in the surgical practice in the last fifty years. The earlier, paternalistic physician-patient relationship has been replaced by an equal one, which is based on informing the patient and involving him or her in the treatment decisions. This shift did not happen uniformly in various medical subspecialties. In this respect, surgery is more conservative than general medicine. The article analyses the most frequent problems of informing patients, and examines the major elements of information, together with their technical conditions in surgery. It reflects on specifics of surgical information disclosure and conditions of refusing medical interventions.

  1. Understanding confidentiality and disclosure of patient information.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Richard

    2007-11-01

    The need to share information about patients is vital to effective care and protection, especially where it relates to children or vulnerable adults. District nurses in common with other health professionals are often reluctant to share information because of a misunderstanding over the extent of their duty of confidence to patients. This has resulted in the needs of patients being unmet and in some cases tragic deaths have occurred. In this article Richard Griffith outlines the extent of the district nurses duty of confidence and considers when sharing patient information is lawful.

  2. GEOGRAPHIC NAMES INFORMATION SYSTEM (GNIS) ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS), developed by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Board on Geographic Names (BGN), contains information about physical and cultural geographic features in the United States and associated areas, both current and historical, but not including roads and highways. The database also contains geographic names in Antarctica. The database holds the Federally recognized name of each feature and defines the location of the feature by state, county, USGS topographic map, and geographic coordinates. Other feature attributes include names or spellings other than the official name, feature designations, feature class, historical and descriptive information, and for some categories of features the geometric boundaries. The database assigns a unique feature identifier, a random number, that is a key for accessing, integrating, or reconciling GNIS data with other data sets. The GNIS is our Nation's official repository of domestic geographic feature names information.

  3. Policy Information System Computer Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamlin, Roger E.; And Others

    The concepts and methodologies outlined in "A Policy Information System for Vocational Education" are presented in a simple computer format in this booklet. It also contains a sample output representing 5-year projections of various planning needs for vocational education. Computerized figures in the eight areas corresponding to those in the…

  4. Learning Information Systems: Theoretical Foundations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Terrance D.

    This paper uses the conceptual framework of cybernetics to understand why learning information systems such as the "Accelerated Reader" work so successfully, and to examine how this simple yet incisive concept can be used to accelerate learning at every level and in all disciplines. The first section, "Basic Concepts,"…

  5. Information Systems: Fact or Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bearley, William

    Rising costs of programming and program maintenance have caused discussion concerning the need for generalized information systems. These would provide data base functions plus complete report writing and file maintenance capabilities. All administrative applications, including online registration, student records, and financial applications are…

  6. Policy Information System Computer Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamlin, Roger E.; And Others

    The concepts and methodologies outlined in "A Policy Information System for Vocational Education" are presented in a simple computer format in this booklet. It also contains a sample output representing 5-year projections of various planning needs for vocational education. Computerized figures in the eight areas corresponding to those in the…

  7. SRS Research Information System Thesaurus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Claire K., Ed.

    For information storage and retrieval, a thesaurus is used during indexing and searching processes to translate from natural language into a more restricted retrieval system language. The purpose of this thesaurus is to control the language used to index and retrieve documents of interest to Social and Rehabilitation Service (SRS) and the…

  8. Information Systems: Fact or Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bearley, William

    Rising costs of programming and program maintenance have caused discussion concerning the need for generalized information systems. These would provide data base functions plus complete report writing and file maintenance capabilities. All administrative applications, including online registration, student records, and financial applications are…

  9. Information Systems, Security, and Privacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ware, Willis H.

    1984-01-01

    Computer security and computer privacy issues are discussed. Among the areas addressed are technical and human security threats, security and privacy issues for information in electronic mail systems, the need for a national commission to examine these issues, and security/privacy issues relevant to colleges and universities. (JN)

  10. Patient Portal Preferences: Perspectives on Imaging Information.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Mary; Arnold, Corey; Sarma, Karthik; Aberle, Denise; Garon, Edward; Bui, Alex A T

    2015-08-01

    Patient portals have the potential to provide content that is specifically tailored to a patient's information needs based on diagnoses and other factors. In this work, we conducted a survey of 41 lung cancer patients at an outpatient lung cancer clinic at the medical center of the University of California Los Angeles, to gain insight into these perceived information needs and opinions on the design of a portal to fulfill them. We found that patients requested access to information related to diagnosis and imaging, with more than half of the patients reporting that they did not anticipate an increase in anxiety due to access to medical record information via a portal. We also found that patient educational background did not lead to a significant difference in desires for explanations of reports and definitions of terms.

  11. Increasing information accessibility for patients in obstetrics-gynecology domain.

    PubMed

    Crişan-Vida, Mihaela; Stoicu-Tivadar, Lăcrămioara

    2014-01-01

    It is important for the patient to have access to personal medical information in order to manage information for increased quality of medical care and life. The paper presents a module added to an Obstetrics-Gynaecology Department information system (OGD IS) supporting patient empowerment. The patient is accessing the system easily using laptops or mobile devices. The application accessed by the patient is web-based, implemented in Visual Studio. NET, using ASP.NET pages and C# language, and the application is published in the Windows Azure cloud. The solution is user friendly using familiar devices and is ubiquitous using the cloud solution. A module for translating medical terms in colloquial ones is integrated in the system. For certain situations the patient will get information related to life style influencing health status as how and what to eat or what type of exercise it is recommended.

  12. Sexual Functioning Along the Cancer Continuum: Focus Group Results from the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS™)

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Kathryn E.; Jeffery, Diana D.; Keefe, Francis J.; Porter, Laura S.; Shelby, Rebecca A.; Fawzy, Maria R.; Gosselin, Tracy K.; Reeve, Bryce B.; Weinfurt, Kevin P.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Cancer and treatments for cancer affect specific aspects of sexual functioning and intimacy; however, limited qualitative work has been done in diverse cancer populations. As part of an effort to improve measurement of self-reported sexual functioning, we explored the scope and importance of sexual functioning and intimacy to patients across cancer sites and along the continuum of care. Methods We conducted 16 diagnosis- and sex-specific focus groups with patients recruited from the Duke University tumor registry and oncology/hematology clinics (N=109). A trained note taker produced field notes summarizing the discussions. An independent auditor verified field notes against written transcripts. The content of the discussions was analyzed for major themes by two independent coders. Results Across all cancers, the most commonly discussed cancer- or treatment-related effects on sexual functioning and intimacy were fatigue, treatment-related hair loss, weight gain, and organ loss or scarring. Additional barriers were unique to particular diagnoses, such as shortness of breath in lung cancer, gastrointestinal problems in colorectal cancers, and incontinence in prostate cancer. Sexual functioning and intimacy were considered important to quality of life. While most effects of cancer were considered negative, many participants identified improvements to intimacy after cancer. Conclusion Overall evaluations of satisfaction with sex life did not always correspond to specific aspects of functioning (e.g. erectile dysfunction), presenting a challenge to researchers aiming to measure sexual functioning as an outcome. Health care providers should not assume that level of sexual impairment determines sexual satisfaction and should explore cancer patients’ sexual concerns directly. PMID:20878833

  13. [Hospital information system--project of implementation of SAP information system at Sveti Duh General Hospital].

    PubMed

    Pale, Ivica

    2005-01-01

    Nowadays, as medical and hospital institutions have been facing a growing need of a more efficient provision of healthcare services to patients, with simultaneous complete monitoring of the successfulness of business activities, integrated information systems appear as the logical choice for the support to hospital business processes. The integrated business information system implemented at Sveti Duh General Hospital is a comprehensive system that supports all hospital, clinical and administrative processes, while providing the basis for decision making regarding the patients and hospital management. The system also enables transfer of all data with specific medical business segments such as laboratory device management. The project for the implementation of the information system was realized in accordance with the requests from the Ministry of Health, applying the proven methodology for the execution of such complex projects. The project team consisted of a number of consultants from b4b Co. from Zagreb, as well as Hospital employees. The new information system is completely ready for going live; however, the necessary decisions have to be made first. The application of the system gives the medical staff more time for their professional work with patients, and through longterm collection and analysis of data on symptoms, illnesses and medical treatments, the information system becomes an important tool for the improvement of health and quality of healthcare system in general.

  14. Centralized Storm Information System (CSIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    A final progress report is presented on the Centralized Storm Information System (CSIS). The primary purpose of the CSIS is to demonstrate and evaluate real time interactive computerized data collection, interpretation and display techniques as applied to severe weather forecasting. CSIS objectives pertaining to improved severe storm forecasting and warning systems are outlined. The positive impact that CSIS has had on the National Severe Storms Forecast Center (NSSFC) is discussed. The benefits of interactive processing systems on the forecasting ability of the NSSFC are described.

  15. Information integrity and privacy for computerized medical patient records

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, J.; Hamilton, V.; Gaylor, T.; McCurley, K.; Meeks, T.

    1996-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories and Oceania, Inc. entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) in November 1993 to provide ``Information Integrity and Privacy for Computerized Medical Patient Records`` (CRADA No. SC93/01183). The main objective of the project was to develop information protection methods that are appropriate for databases of patient records in health information systems. This document describes the findings and alternative solutions that resulted from this CRADA.

  16. Marketing in Admissions: The Information System Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wofford, O. Douglas; Timmerman, Ed

    1982-01-01

    A marketing information system approach for college admissions is outlined that includes objectives, information needs and sources, a data collection format, and information evaluation. Coordination with other institutional information systems is recommended. (MSE)

  17. PROMIS (Procurement Management Information System)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The PROcurement Management Information System (PROMIS) provides both detailed and summary level information on all procurement actions performed within NASA's procurement offices at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). It provides not only on-line access, but also schedules procurement actions, monitors their progress, and updates Forecast Award Dates. Except for a few computational routines coded in FORTRAN, the majority of the systems is coded in a high level language called NATURAL. A relational Data Base Management System called ADABAS is utilized. Certain fields, called descriptors, are set up on each file to allow the selection of records based on a specified value or range of values. The use of like descriptors on different files serves as the link between the falls, thus producing a relational data base. Twenty related files are currently being maintained on PROMIS.

  18. Age-related Differential Item Functioning for the Patient-Reported Outcomes Information System (PROMIS®) Physical Functioning Items

    PubMed Central

    Paz, Sylvia H; Spritzer, Karen L; Morales, Leo S; Hays, Ron D

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the equivalence of the PROMIS® wave 1 physical functioning item bank, by age (50 years or older versus 18-49). Materials and methods A total of 114 physical functioning items with 5 response choices were administered to English- (n=1504) and Spanish-language (n=640) adults. Item frequencies, means and standard deviations, item-scale correlations, and internal consistency reliability were estimated. Differential Item Functioning (DIF) by age was evaluated. Results Thirty of the 114 items were fagged for DIF based on an R-squared of 0.02 or above criterion. The expected total score was higher for those respondents who were 18-49 than those who were 50 or older. Conclusions Those who were 50 years or older versus 18-49 years old with the same level of physical functioning responded differently to 30 of the 114 items in the PROMIS® physical functioning item bank. This study yields essential information about the equivalence of the physical functioning items in older versus younger individuals. PMID:24052925

  19. Fisher Information in Ecological Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frieden, B. Roy; Gatenby, Robert A.

    Fisher information is being increasingly used as a tool of research into ecological systems. For example the information was shown in Chapter 7 to provide a useful diagnostic of the health of an ecology. In other applications to ecology, extreme physical information (EPI) has been used to derive the population-rate (or Lotka-Volterra) equations of ecological systems, both directly [1] and indirectly (Chapter 5) via the quantum Schrodinger wave equation (SWE). We next build on these results, to derive (i) an uncertainty principle (8.3) of biology, (ii) a simple decision rule (8.18) for predicting whether a given ecology is susceptible to a sudden drop in population (Section 8.1), (iii) the probability law (8.57) or (8.59) on the worldwide occurrence of the masses of living creatures from mice to elephants and beyond (Section 8.2), and (iv) the famous quarter-power laws for the attributes of biological and other systems. The latter approach uses EPI to derive the simultaneous quarter-power behavior of all attributes obeyed by the law, such as metabolism rate, brain size, grazing range, etc. (Section 8.3). This maximal breadth of scope is allowed by its basis in information, which of course applies to all types of quantitative data (Section 1.4.3, Chapter 1).

  20. Somerset County Flood Information System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Summer, William M.

    1998-01-01

    IntroductionThe timely warning of a flood is crucial to the protection of lives and property. One has only to recall the flood of August 2, 1973, in Somerset County, New Jersey, in which six lives were lost and major property damage occurred, to realize how unexpected and costly, especially in terms of human life, a flood can be. Accurate forecasts and warnings cannot be made, however, without detailed information about precipitation and streamflow in the drainage basin.Recognizing the need for detailed hydrologic information for Somerset County, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Somerset County, installed the Somerset County Flood Information System (SCFIS) in 1990. The availability of data provided by this system will improve the flood forecasting ability of the National Weather Service (NWS), and has assisted Somerset County and municipal agencies in planning and execution of flood-preparation and emergency evacuation procedures in the county.This fact sheet describes the Somerset County Flood Information System and identifies its benefits.

  1. Information needs among Italian abortion patients.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson Agostino, M

    1997-01-01

    Controversy still surrounds abortion and abortion care in many countries. Information for women who seek abortion is not always as objective and complete as desired. In Italy abortion has been legal for the last decades. The overall purpose of this study was to investigate general information needs among patients in a hospital in Rome. A questionnaire concerning information needs, opinions on information to include in a booklet, and methods of information was distributed among 212 women in a public hospital in Rome. Women answered the questionnaire very differently, and general information needs were not shown to be as essential as expected; their present needs seemed especially underestimated. However, a booklet with information as objective and complete as possible is suggested as a way of giving information to abortion patients.

  2. NEIS (NASA Environmental Information System)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Beth

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Environmental Information System (NEIS) is a tool to support the functions of the NASA Operational Environment Team (NOET). The NEIS is designed to provide a central environmental technology resource drawing on all NASA centers' capabilities, and to support program managers who must ultimately deliver hardware compliant with performance specifications and environmental requirements. The NEIS also tracks environmental regulations, usages of materials and processes, and new technology developments. It has proven to be a useful instrument for channeling information throughout the aerospace community, NASA, other federal agencies, educational institutions, and contractors. The associated paper will discuss the dynamic databases within the NEIS, and the usefulness it provides for environmental compliance efforts.

  3. Engineering Design Information System (EDIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.S.; Short, R.D.; Schwarz, R.K.

    1990-11-01

    This manual is a guide to the use of the Engineering Design Information System (EDIS) Phase I. The system runs on the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., IBM 3081 unclassified computer. This is the first phase in the implementation of EDIS, which is an index, storage, and retrieval system for engineering documents produced at various plants and laboratories operated by Energy Systems for the Department of Energy. This manual presents on overview of EDIS, describing the system's purpose; the functions it performs; hardware, software, and security requirements; and help and error functions. This manual describes how to access EDIS and how to operate system functions using Database 2 (DB2), Time Sharing Option (TSO), Interactive System Productivity Facility (ISPF), and Soft Master viewing features employed by this system. Appendix A contains a description of the Soft Master viewing capabilities provided through the EDIS View function. Appendix B provides examples of the system error screens and help screens for valid codes used for screen entry. Appendix C contains a dictionary of data elements and descriptions.

  4. [Portuguese-language translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the Fatigue domain of Patient-Reported-Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS)].

    PubMed

    Alves, Flávio Sérgio Marques; Pinto, Rogério de Melo Costa; Mendonça, Tânia Maria Silva; Silva, Carlos Henrique Martins da

    2014-05-01

    The items bank of the Fatigue domain is part of an American system developed for evaluation of results reported by patients, called Patient-Reported-Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS). This study aimed to translate and cross-culturally adapt this item bank for the Brazilian population, as a promising new tool for evaluating health-related quality of life. The items in this bank were translated using rigorous translation and back-translation protocols. The translated version was pre-tested in twenty Brazilians with a brief cognitive and retrospective interview in order to test the items' conceptual, cultural, and semantic equivalences. In the translation and back-translation process, only three of the 82 items had to be reworded due to the culturally inadequate content. In the pretest, only four items needed to be reworded, but without conceptual and semantic alterations. The results showed that the translated version of this item bank is conceptually, culturally, and semantically equivalent to the original version.

  5. The risk assessment information system

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, S.B.; Bonczek, R.R.; McGinn, C.W.; Land, M.L.; Bloom, L.D.; Sample, B.E.; Dolislager, F.G.

    1998-06-01

    In an effort to provide service-oriented environmental risk assessment expertise, the Department of Energy (DOE) Center for Risk Excellence (CRE) and DOE Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) are sponsoring Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to develop a web-based system for disseminating risk tools and information to its users. This system, the Risk Assessment Information System (RAIS), was initially developed to support the site-specific needs of the DOE-ORO Environmental Restoration Risk Assessment Program. With support from the CRE, the system is currently being expanded to benefit all DOE risk information users and can be tailored to meet site-specific needs. Taking advantage of searchable and executable databases, menu-driven queries, and data downloads, using the latest World Wide Web technologies, the RAIS offers essential tools that are used in the risk assessment process or anywhere from project scoping to implementation. The RAIS tools can be located directly at http://risk.lsd.ornl.gov/homepage/rap{_}tool.htm or through the CRE`s homepage at http://www.doe.gov/riskcenter/home.html.

  6. [Brazilian-Portuguese translation and cultural adaptation of the sleep and wake disturbances domains of the Patient-Reported-Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS)].

    PubMed

    Silva E Costa, Zilma Maria Severino; Pinto, Rogério de Melo Costa; Mendonça, Tânia Maria da Silva; Silva, Carlos Henrique Martins da

    2014-07-01

    Altered sleep and wakefulness affect individuals' mood, memory, and psychomotor performance and thus directly impact their quality of life. Tools to analyze the quality of these factors should be available for clinical evaluation. This study aimed to translate into Brazilian Portuguese and culturally adapt the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS), specifically the sleep and wake disturbances domains. The translation and cultural adaptation processes followed the guidelines proposed by the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy (FACIT) organization. The methodology included translation, reconciliation, back-translation, review by PROMIS, review by independent reviewers, pretest, and incorporation of the results into the final version. The Portuguese version of the sleep and wake disturbances domains presents semantic, idiomatic, cultural, and conceptual equivalence with the items in the source language.

  7. Database Systems. Course Three. Information Systems Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, Sharon Lund; Everett, Donna R.

    This course is the third of seven in the Information Systems curriculum. The purpose of the course is to familiarize students with database management concepts and standard database management software. Databases and their roles, advantages, and limitations are explained. An overview of the course sets forth the condition and performance standard…

  8. Joint Operational Medicine Information Systems (JOMIS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    2016 Major Automated Information System Annual Report Joint Operational Medicine Information Systems (JOMIS) Defense Acquisition Management ...Automated Information System MAIS OE - MAIS Original Estimate MAR – MAIS Annual Report MDA - Milestone Decision Authority MDD - Materiel Development...August 24, 2015 Program Information Program Name Joint Operational Medicine Information Systems (JOMIS) DoD Component DoD The acquiring DoD

  9. [Patient autonomy and informed consent - ethical and legal issues].

    PubMed

    Wolf-Braun, Barbara; Wilke, Hans-Joachim

    2015-03-01

    Informing patients about the benefits and risks of and alternatives to proposed medical or surgical procedures is crucial to the patient-physician relationship. It is a legal and ethical precondition to a patient's informed consent to a course of action. Particularly in cases of serious illness and when there are far reaching implications for a patient's lifestyle, this process entails much more than just imparting information. Indeed, it is a dialogue through which the physician empowers the patient to reach a decision which reflects the patient's life situation and system of values. This process promotes patient autonomy. Studies have shown that this approach builds trust, increases patient satisfaction with health care and results in a higher degree of professional fulfilment for the physician.

  10. Information systems vulnerability: A systems analysis perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Wyss, G.D.; Daniel, S.L.; Schriner, H.K.; Gaylor, T.R.

    1996-07-01

    Vulnerability analyses for information systems are complicated because the systems are often geographically distributed. Sandia National Laboratories has assembled an interdisciplinary team to explore the applicability of probabilistic logic modeling (PLM) techniques (including vulnerability and vital area analysis) to examine the risks associated with networked information systems. The authors have found that the reliability and failure modes of many network technologies can be effectively assessed using fault trees and other PLM methods. The results of these models are compatible with an expanded set of vital area analysis techniques that can model both physical locations and virtual (logical) locations to identify both categories of vital areas simultaneously. These results can also be used with optimization techniques to direct the analyst toward the most cost-effective security solution.

  11. Automated Information System (AIS) Alarm System

    SciTech Connect

    Hunteman, W.

    1997-05-01

    The Automated Information Alarm System is a joint effort between Los Alamos National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratory to demonstrate and implement, on a small-to-medium sized local area network, an automated system that detects and automatically responds to attacks that use readily available tools and methodologies. The Alarm System will sense or detect, assess, and respond to suspicious activities that may be detrimental to information on the network or to continued operation of the network. The responses will allow stopping, isolating, or ejecting the suspicious activities. The number of sensors, the sensitivity of the sensors, the assessment criteria, and the desired responses may be set by the using organization to meet their local security policies.

  12. Multifunctional Information Distribution System (MIDS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-554 Multifunctional Information Distribution System (MIDS) As of FY 2017 President’s Budget...Program Office Estimate RDT&E - Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation SAR - Selected Acquisition Report SCP - Service Cost Position TBD - To Be... selectable levels Multiple selectable levels >=200 with IF for 1000 200 with IF Multiple selectable levels LVT(2) Multiple selectable levels Multiple

  13. Image and information management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Tina L. (Inventor); Raney, Michael C. (Inventor); Dougherty, Dennis M. (Inventor); Kent, Peter C. (Inventor); Brucker, Russell X. (Inventor); Lampert, Daryl A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A system and methods through which pictorial views of an object's configuration, arranged in a hierarchical fashion, are navigated by a person to establish a visual context within the configuration. The visual context is automatically translated by the system into a set of search parameters driving retrieval of structured data and content (images, documents, multimedia, etc.) associated with the specific context. The system places ''hot spots'', or actionable regions, on various portions of the pictorials representing the object. When a user interacts with an actionable region, a more detailed pictorial from the hierarchy is presented representing that portion of the object, along with real-time feedback in the form of a popup pane containing information about that region, and counts-by-type reflecting the number of items that are available within the system associated with the specific context and search filters established at that point in time.

  14. Image and information management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Tina L. (Inventor); Raney, Michael C. (Inventor); Dougherty, Dennis M. (Inventor); Kent, Peter C. (Inventor); Brucker, Russell X. (Inventor); Lampert, Daryl A. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A system and methods through which pictorial views of an object's configuration, arranged in a hierarchical fashion, are navigated by a person to establish a visual context within the configuration. The visual context is automatically translated by the system into a set of search parameters driving retrieval of structured data and content (images, documents, multimedia, etc.) associated with the specific context. The system places hot spots, or actionable regions, on various portions of the pictorials representing the object. When a user interacts with an actionable region, a more detailed pictorial from the hierarchy is presented representing that portion of the object, along with real-time feedback in the form of a popup pane containing information about that region, and counts-by-type reflecting the number of items that are available within the system associated with the specific context and search filters established at that point in time.

  15. Do the Patients Read the Informed Consent?

    PubMed Central

    Özhan, Mehmet Özgür; Süzer, Mehmet Anıl; Çomak, İlker; Çaparlar, Ceyda Özhan; Aydın, Gözde Bumin; Eşkin, Mehmet Burak; Atik, Bülent; Ergin, Atilla; Çekmen, Nedim; Kurt, Ercan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Informed consent is a process which consists of informing the patient about the medical interventions planned to be applied to the patient’s body and making the patient active in the decision making process. Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the patients read the informed consent document or not and if not, to determine why they did not read it. This was achieved via a questionnaire administered at the pre-anaesthetic visit to assess the perception of patients to the informed consent process. Study Design: Survey study. Methods: The patients were given a questionnaire after signing the informed consent document at the pre-anaesthetic visit. We studied whether the patients read the informed consent document or not and asked for their reasons if they did not. Results: A total of 522 patients were included during the two month study (mean age: 38.1 years; 63.8% male, 36.2% female). Overall, 54.8% of patients reported that they did not read the informed consent. Among them, 50.3% did not care about it because they thought they would have the operation anyway, 13.4% did not have enough time to read it, 11.9% found it difficult to understand, 5.9% could not read because they had no glasses with them, and 5.2% found it frightening and gave up reading. Inpatients, older patients and patients with co-morbidities were less likely to read the informed consent document than outpatients, and younger and healthy patients (p<0.05). Also, 57.9% of parents whose children would be operated on had read the document. Conclusion: This study shows that the majority of our patients did not understand the importance of the informed consent. It is therefore concluded that informed consent documents should be rearranged to be easily read and should be supported with visual elements such as illustrations or video presentations, as informed consent is a process rather than just simply signing a form. PMID:25207184

  16. Infrastructure support for Clinical Information Systems

    SciTech Connect

    McGovern, Greg, A.

    2007-06-15

    Executive Summary: For the past 5 years, Adventist Health has been implementing a clinical information system, titled Project IntelliCare, throughout its 19 hospitals. To successfully do this, a commitment was made to ensure continuous availability of vital patient health information to the local hospitals. This commitment required a centralized data center with sufficient capacity and a backup data center to be used in case of technical software or natural disaster where interruptions could occur. The DOE grant provided financial assistance to purchase equipment to increase the capacity of an existing data center, along with purchase of more sophisticated software for the data center thus providing a reduction in time that information is unavailable to the local hospitals when hardware or software problems occur. Relative to public good, this translates into increased safety and convenience for the patients we serve because their electronic medical records are current and available a higher percentage of the time.

  17. Validation of the depression item bank from the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) in a three-month observational study.

    PubMed

    Pilkonis, Paul A; Yu, Lan; Dodds, Nathan E; Johnston, Kelly L; Maihoefer, Catherine C; Lawrence, Suzanne M

    2014-09-01

    The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) is an NIH Roadmap initiative devoted to developing better measurement tools for assessing constructs relevant to the clinical investigation and treatment of all diseases-constructs such as pain, fatigue, emotional distress, sleep, physical functioning, and social participation. Following creation of item banks for these constructs, our priority has been to validate them, most often in short-term observational studies. We report here on a three-month prospective observational study with depressed outpatients in the early stages of a new treatment episode (with assessments at intake, one-month follow-up, and three-month follow-up). The protocol was designed to compare the psychometric properties of the PROMIS depression item bank (administered as a computerized adaptive test, CAT) with two legacy self-report instruments: the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale (CESD; Radloff, 1977) and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9; Spitzer et al., 1999). PROMIS depression demonstrated strong convergent validity with the CESD and the PHQ-9 (with correlations in a range from .72 to .84 across all time points), as well as responsiveness to change when characterizing symptom severity in a clinical outpatient sample. Identification of patients as "recovered" varied across the measures, with the PHQ-9 being the most conservative. The use of calibrations based on models from item response theory (IRT) provides advantages for PROMIS depression both psychometrically (creating the possibility of adaptive testing, providing a broader effective range of measurement, and generating greater precision) and practically (these psychometric advantages can be achieved with fewer items-a median of 4 items administered by CAT-resulting in less patient burden). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Large-Scale Information Systems

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. Nicol; H. R. Ammerlahn; M. E. Goldsby; M. M. Johnson; D. E. Rhodes; A. S. Yoshimura

    2000-12-01

    Large enterprises are ever more dependent on their Large-Scale Information Systems (LSLS), computer systems that are distinguished architecturally by distributed components--data sources, networks, computing engines, simulations, human-in-the-loop control and remote access stations. These systems provide such capabilities as workflow, data fusion and distributed database access. The Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC) contains many examples of LSIS components, a fact that motivates this research. However, most LSIS in use grew up from collections of separate subsystems that were not designed to be components of an integrated system. For this reason, they are often difficult to analyze and control. The problem is made more difficult by the size of a typical system, its diversity of information sources, and the institutional complexities associated with its geographic distribution across the enterprise. Moreover, there is no integrated approach for analyzing or managing such systems. Indeed, integrated development of LSIS is an active area of academic research. This work developed such an approach by simulating the various components of the LSIS and allowing the simulated components to interact with real LSIS subsystems. This research demonstrated two benefits. First, applying it to a particular LSIS provided a thorough understanding of the interfaces between the system's components. Second, it demonstrated how more rapid and detailed answers could be obtained to questions significant to the enterprise by interacting with the relevant LSIS subsystems through simulated components designed with those questions in mind. In a final, added phase of the project, investigations were made on extending this research to wireless communication networks in support of telemetry applications.

  19. Information Security and Integrity Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs from the Information Security and Integrity Systems seminar held at the University of Houston-Clear Lake on May 15-16, 1990 are presented. A tutorial on computer security is presented. The goals of this tutorial are the following: to review security requirements imposed by government and by common sense; to examine risk analysis methods to help keep sight of forest while in trees; to discuss the current hot topic of viruses (which will stay hot); to examine network security, now and in the next year to 30 years; to give a brief overview of encryption; to review protection methods in operating systems; to review database security problems; to review the Trusted Computer System Evaluation Criteria (Orange Book); to comment on formal verification methods; to consider new approaches (like intrusion detection and biometrics); to review the old, low tech, and still good solutions; and to give pointers to the literature and to where to get help. Other topics covered include security in software applications and development; risk management; trust: formal methods and associated techniques; secure distributed operating system and verification; trusted Ada; a conceptual model for supporting a B3+ dynamic multilevel security and integrity in the Ada runtime environment; and information intelligence sciences.

  20. Information Security and Integrity Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs from the Information Security and Integrity Systems seminar held at the University of Houston-Clear Lake on May 15-16, 1990 are presented. A tutorial on computer security is presented. The goals of this tutorial are the following: to review security requirements imposed by government and by common sense; to examine risk analysis methods to help keep sight of forest while in trees; to discuss the current hot topic of viruses (which will stay hot); to examine network security, now and in the next year to 30 years; to give a brief overview of encryption; to review protection methods in operating systems; to review database security problems; to review the Trusted Computer System Evaluation Criteria (Orange Book); to comment on formal verification methods; to consider new approaches (like intrusion detection and biometrics); to review the old, low tech, and still good solutions; and to give pointers to the literature and to where to get help. Other topics covered include security in software applications and development; risk management; trust: formal methods and associated techniques; secure distributed operating system and verification; trusted Ada; a conceptual model for supporting a B3+ dynamic multilevel security and integrity in the Ada runtime environment; and information intelligence sciences.

  1. The Global Land Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleson, Lyndon R.

    1993-08-01

    The Global Land Information System (GLIS) is an interactive computer system being developed by the U.S. Geological Survey for scientists seeking data pertaining to the Earth's land surface that can be used in global change studies. GLIS contains descriptive information on a variety of regional, continental, and global land data sets. The interactive query services of GLIS allow scientists to assess the potential utility of data sets, determine their availability, and place online requests for data products. In addition to the text-based query services, GLIS offers a number of graphical aids to users accessing the system through one of the supported graphical user interfaces, such as the PG-GLIS package developed for IBM-compatible personal computers. These services include interative specification of geographic search areas, geographic coverage plots, and online digital image browse capabilities. Access to GLIS is provided through either wide-area network or dial-up interfaces. A prototype of the system became operational in June 1991, and full operational status is expected by September 1992. In addition to continued data set expansion, 1992 development plans include the enhancement of data query and visualization services and the addition of a graphical user interface for UNIX workstations.

  2. Feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) item banks for routine surveillance of sleep and fatigue problems in ambulatory cancer care.

    PubMed

    Leung, Yvonne W; Brown, Catherine; Cosio, Andrea Perez; Dobriyal, Aditi; Malik, Noor; Pat, Vivien; Irwin, Margaret; Tomasini, Pascale; Liu, Geoffrey; Howell, Doris

    2016-09-15

    Routine screening for problematic symptoms is emerging as a best practice in cancer systems globally. The objective of this observational study was to assess the feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) computerized adaptive testing (CAT) for fatigue and sleep-disturbance items compared with legacy measures in routine ambulatory cancer care. Patients who attended outpatient clinics at the Princess Margaret Cancer Center completed PROMIS CAT item banks and legacy measures (the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy [FACIT]-Fatigue scale and the Insomnia Severity Index [ISI]) using tablet computers during clinic visits. The completion rates, patient acceptability, and diagnostic accuracy of PROMIS CAT were evaluated against legacy measures using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Participants consisted of 336 patients (mean age ± standard deviation, 57.4 ± 15.7 years; 55% females; 75% Caucasian). Over 98% of patients did not find symptom screening was burdensome, although only 65% were willing to complete the survey at every visit. PROMIS CAT scores were significantly correlated with both FACIT-Fatigue scores (r = -0.83) and ISI scores (r = -0.57; p < 0.0001 for all). Areas under the curve (AUC) by ROC analysis for fatigue were 0.946 using the FACIT-Fatigue cutoff ≤30, 0.910 for sleep disturbance, and 0.922 for sleep impairment using the ISI cutoff ≥15. The recommended T-score cut-off for PROMIS CAT Fatigue was 57, Sleep Disturbance was 57, and Sleep Impairment was 57. The current results support the feasibility and accuracy of PROMIS CAT and its potential for use in routine ambulatory cancer care. Future research will assess feedback of these data to clinicians and evaluate effects on earlier identification of and intervention for these problems. Cancer 2016. © 2016 American Cancer Society. Cancer 2016;122:2906-2917. © 2016 American Cancer

  3. Buying a healthcare information system.

    PubMed

    Clegg, T A

    1998-01-01

    Replacing an antiquated computer system with state of the art equipment and software is a lengthy, at times frustrating, and never an easy decision. At Wesley Woods Center on Aging, Atlanta, an integrated provider of healthcare for the elderly affiliated with Emory University, the process consumed more than two and a half years. This article takes the reader through the entire process, from the initial decision to replace an existing system, through the final purchase and installation. It looks candidly at the problems that were encountered, including turnover among key personnel, difficulties with involving all of the user groups, changes in the technology and coordination with the University. The lessons Wesley Woods learned in its experience can be of benefit to any healthcare facility contemplating an information system change.

  4. Evaluation of internet derived patient information.

    PubMed

    Ward, J B M; Leach, P

    2012-07-01

    The internet is a widely used, powerful resource for patients to research medical conditions. There is an extensive amount of information available on the internet. It is important for patient information to be accurate and in an easily accessible format. This article aims to assess the quality of patient information on hydrocephalus and compares the findings with recent evaluations in other surgical specialties. The term 'hydrocephalus' was searched for on the search engines http://www.google.com/, http://www.bing.com/ and http://www.yahoo.com/. The top 20 results of these searches were assessed using the University of Michigan consumer health website evaluation checklist. The quality of patient information websites on hydrocephalus is highly variable. Websites rarely provide sufficient authorship information, do not review their information regularly enough and only reference material occasionally. The background of the provider was found to influence the quality of the website, with academic and care providers creating the best websites. On comparing our findings with those of recent studies from other surgical specialties, it was found that there was often a conflict of interest between the background of the provider and the information supplied. It is recommended that clinicians personally research material for their patients to be able to guide them to suitable, accurate websites.

  5. BIRS - Bioterrorism Information Retrieval System.

    PubMed

    Tewari, Ashish Kumar; Rashi; Wadhwa, Gulshan; Sharma, Sanjeev Kumar; Jain, Chakresh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Bioterrorism is the intended use of pathogenic strains of microbes to widen terror in a population. There is a definite need to promote research for development of vaccines, therapeutics and diagnostic methods as a part of preparedness to any bioterror attack in the future. BIRS is an open-access database of collective information on the organisms related to bioterrorism. The architecture of database utilizes the current open-source technology viz PHP ver 5.3.19, MySQL and IIS server under windows platform for database designing. Database stores information on literature, generic- information and unique pathways of about 10 microorganisms involved in bioterrorism. This may serve as a collective repository to accelerate the drug discovery and vaccines designing process against such bioterrorist agents (microbes). The available data has been validated from various online resources and literature mining in order to provide the user with a comprehensive information system. The database is freely available at http://www.bioterrorism.biowaves.org.

  6. Advanced information processing system: Local system services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhardt, Laura; Alger, Linda; Whittredge, Roy; Stasiowski, Peter

    1989-01-01

    The Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS) is a multi-computer architecture composed of hardware and software building blocks that can be configured to meet a broad range of application requirements. The hardware building blocks are fault-tolerant, general-purpose computers, fault-and damage-tolerant networks (both computer and input/output), and interfaces between the networks and the computers. The software building blocks are the major software functions: local system services, input/output, system services, inter-computer system services, and the system manager. The foundation of the local system services is an operating system with the functions required for a traditional real-time multi-tasking computer, such as task scheduling, inter-task communication, memory management, interrupt handling, and time maintenance. Resting on this foundation are the redundancy management functions necessary in a redundant computer and the status reporting functions required for an operator interface. The functional requirements, functional design and detailed specifications for all the local system services are documented.

  7. Applied Information Systems Research Program Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bredekamp, Joe

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on Applied Information Systems Research Program Workshop are presented. Topics covered include: the Earth Observing System Data and Information System; the planetary data system; Astrophysics Data System project review; OAET Computer Science and Data Systems Programs; the Center of Excellence in Space Data and Information Sciences; and CASIS background.

  8. Telematics and satellites. Part 1: Information systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, W. R.

    1980-06-01

    Telematic systems are identified and described. The applications are examined emphasizing the role played by satellite links. The discussion includes file transfer, examples of distributed processor systems, terminal communication, information retrieval systems, office information systems, electronic preparation and publishing of information, electronic systems for transfer of funds, electronic mail systems, record file transfer characteristics, intra-enterprise networks, and inter-enterprise networks.

  9. Prenatal drugs: patient information and its source.

    PubMed

    Doering, P L; Brackbill, Y; McManus, K; Woodward, L; McClave, J T

    1982-01-01

    Pregnant women consume numerous medications, some of which are potentially harmful to the fetus. It is especially important that these women are provided with information about these drugs. This study was undertaken, in part, to document the amount of information pregnant women have about the drugs they consume and the sources of their information. Study participants were 304 women selected at random from the postpartum inpatients at a teaching hospital. Mothers were interviewed to obtain drug exposure data and to determine what, if any, information they had about the drugs. The source of information for each drug consumed was also determined. Results show that pregnant women have little information for each drugs they consume. Mothers most often cited primary medical personnel (physicians and nurses) as sources of information about specific drugs. In contrast, only six patients cited the pharmacist as a source of information about specific drugs. However, patients ranked the pharmacist high as a source of general drug information. This report emphasizes the need for more drug information for pregnant women and highlights the role of the pharmacist in providing such information.

  10. Centralized versus Decentralized Information Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugoson, Mats-Åke

    This paper brings into question whether information systems should be centralized or decentralized in order to provide greater support for different business processes. During the last century companies and organizations have used different approaches for centralization and decentralization; a simple answer to the question does not exist. This paper provides a survey of the evolution of centralized and decentralized approaches, mainly in a Nordic perspective. Based on critical reflections on the situation in the end of the century we can discuss what we can learn from history to achieve alignment between centralized and decentralized systems and the business structure. The conclusion is that theories, management and practice for decisions on centralization or decentralization of information systems must be improved. A conscious management and control of centralization /decentralization of IT support is a vital question in the company or the organization, and this is not a task that can be handled only by IT-specialists. There is a need for business oriented IT management of centralization/decentralization.

  11. 75 FR 23834 - Occupational Information System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-04

    ... ADMINISTRATION Occupational Information System AGENCY: Social Security Administration (SSA). ACTION: Request for... Recommendations for the Social Security Administration Occupational Information System, September 2009.'' The... to provide independent advice and recommendations on creating an occupational information...

  12. The Co-Creation of Information Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomillion, David

    2013-01-01

    In information systems development, end-users have shifted in their role: from consumers of information to informants for requirements to developers of systems. This shift in the role of users has also changed how information systems are developed. Instead of systems developers creating specifications for software or end-users creating small…

  13. Status of Statewide Career Information Delivery Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Wynonia L.

    Intended as a resource document as well as a status report on all the statewide career information delivery systems (CIDS) in operation, this report examines the status of 39 statewide information systems. (Career information delivery systems are computer-based systems that provide national, state, and local information to individuals who are in…

  14. The Co-Creation of Information Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomillion, David

    2013-01-01

    In information systems development, end-users have shifted in their role: from consumers of information to informants for requirements to developers of systems. This shift in the role of users has also changed how information systems are developed. Instead of systems developers creating specifications for software or end-users creating small…

  15. Experience With and Attitudes Toward Psychotherapy and Antidepressants Among Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders: An Online Patient Survey to Inform System Design.

    PubMed

    Mikocka-Walus, Antonina; Andrews, Jane M

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to explore and compare experiences with and attitudes toward psychotherapy and antidepressants of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGiDs). Patients from gastroenterology clinic databases were invited to an online survey. Student's t test, Mann-Whitney U test, chi-square test, and Fisher's test were used to compare patients with IBD and FGiD on demographics and variables of interest. Of 86 participants, 56 (65%) had IBD and 30 (35%) had FGiDs. Mean levels of anxiety, depressive, and stress symptoms were within the moderate to severe range. Psychological care and antidepressants were offered to significantly more FGiD than to IBD respondents (37% vs. 9%; p = .009). Although the symptoms were generally reduced after the prescription of antidepressants, only 30% of IBD respondents and 21% of FGiD respondents using antidepressants would recommend them to others. In contrast, 53% of IBD respondents and 69% of FGiD respondents who used psychotherapy would recommend it to others. Both these therapies were valued by recipients; however, neither was reported to improve gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. Given the high desire for and positive experiences of psychological care for these 2 common GI conditions, access to formal psychological support services within GI clinics would appear to be the most efficient model.

  16. CORBA security services for health information systems.

    PubMed

    Blobel, B; Holena, M

    1998-01-01

    The structure of healthcare systems in developed countries is changing to 'shared care', enforced by economic constraints and caused by a change in the basic conditions of care. That development results in co-operative health information systems across the boundaries of organisational, technological, and policy domains. Increasingly, these distributed and, as far as their domains are concerned, heterogeneous systems are based on middleware approaches, such as CORBA. Regarding the sensitivity of personal and medical data, such open, distributed, and heterogeneous health information systems require a high level of data protection and data security, both with respect to patient information and with respect to users. This paper, relying on experience gained through our activities in CORBAmed, describes the possibilities the CORBA middleware provides to achieve application and communication security. On the background of the overall CORBA architecture, it outlines the different security services previewed in the adopted CORBA specifications which are discussed in the context of the security requirements of healthcare information systems. Security services required in the healthcare domain but not available at the moment are mentioned. A solution is proposed, which on the one hand allows to make use of the available CORBA security services and additional ones, on the other hand remains open to other middleware approaches, such as DHE or HL7.

  17. Evaluating geographic information systems technology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guptill, Stephen C.

    1989-01-01

    Computerized geographic information systems (GISs) are emerging as the spatial data handling tools of choice for solving complex geographical problems. However, few guidelines exist for assisting potential users in identifying suitable hardware and software. A process to be followed in evaluating the merits of GIS technology is presented. Related standards and guidelines, software functions, hardware components, and benchmarking are discussed. By making users aware of all aspects of adopting GIS technology, they can decide if GIS is an appropriate tool for their application and, if so, which GIS should be used.

  18. Prospective Randomized Controlled Study on the Efficacy of Multimedia Informed Consent for Patients Scheduled to Undergo Green-Light High-Performance System Photoselective Vaporization of the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Ham, Dong Yeub; Choi, Woo Suk; Song, Sang Hoon; Ahn, Young-Joon; Park, Hyoung Keun; Kim, Hyeong Gon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a multimedia informed consent (IC) presentation on the understanding and satisfaction of patients who were scheduled to receive 120-W green-light high-performance system photoselective vaporization of the prostate (HPS-PVP). Materials and Methods A multimedia IC (M-IC) presentation for HPS-PVP was developed. Forty men with benign prostatic hyperplasia who were scheduled to undergo HPS-PVP were prospectively randomized to a conventional written IC group (W-IC group, n=20) or the M-IC group (n=20). The allocated IC was obtained by one certified urologist, followed by a 15-question test (maximum score, 15) to evaluate objective understanding, and questionnaires on subjective understanding (range, 0~10) and satisfaction (range, 0~10) using a visual analogue scale. Results Demographic characteristics, including age and the highest level of education, did not significantly differ between the two groups. No significant differences were found in scores reflecting the objective understanding of HPS-PVP (9.9±2.3 vs. 10.6±2.8, p=0.332) or in subjective understanding scores (7.5±2.1 vs. 8.6±1.7, p=0.122); however, the M-IC group showed higher satisfaction scores than the W-IC group (7.4±1.7 vs. 8.4±1.5, p=0.033). After adjusting for age and educational level, the M-IC group still had significantly higher satisfaction scores. Conclusions M-IC did not enhance the objective knowledge of patients regarding this surgical procedure. However, it improved the satisfaction of patients with the IC process itself. PMID:27169129

  19. Comparability of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Pediatric short form symptom measures across culture: examination between Chinese and American children with cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanyan; Yuan, Changrong; Wang, Jichuan; Brown, Jeanne Geiger; Zhou, Fen; Zhao, Xiufang; Shen, Min; Hinds, Pamela S

    2016-10-01

    Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Pediatric forms measure symptoms and function of pediatric patients experiencing chronic disease by using the same measures. Comparability is one of the most important purposes of the PROMIS initiative. This study aimed to test the factorial structures of four symptom measures (i.e., Anxiety, Depression, Fatigue, and Pain Interference) in the original English and the Chinese versions and examine the measurement invariance of the measures across two cultures. Four PROMIS Pediatric measures were used to assess symptoms, respectively, in Chinese (n = 232) and American (n = 200) children and adolescents (8-17 years old) in treatment for cancer or in survivorship. The categorical confirmatory factor analysis (CCFA) model was used to examine factorial structures, and multigroup CCFA was applied to test measurement invariance of these measures between the Chinese and American samples. The CCFA models of the four PROMIS Pediatric symptom measures fit the data well for both the Chinese and American children and adolescents. Minor partial measurement invariance was identified. Factor means and factor variances of the four PROMIS measures were not significantly different between the two populations. Our results provide evidence that the four PROMIS Pediatric symptom measures have valid factorial structures and a statistical property of measurement invariance across American and Chinese children and adolescents with cancer. This means that the items of these measures were interpreted in a conceptually similar manner by two groups. They could be readily used for meaningful cross-cultural comparisons involving pediatric oncology patients in these two countries.

  20. Dutch-Flemish translation of nine pediatric item banks from the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS)®.

    PubMed

    Haverman, Lotte; Grootenhuis, Martha A; Raat, Hein; van Rossum, Marion A J; van Dulmen-den Broeder, Eline; Hoppenbrouwers, Karel; Correia, Helena; Cella, David; Roorda, Leo D; Terwee, Caroline B

    2016-03-01

    The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS(®)) is a new, state-of-the-art assessment system for measuring patient-reported health and well-being of adults and children. It has the potential to be more valid, reliable, and responsive than existing PROMs. The items banks are designed to be self-reported and completed by children aged 8-18 years. The PROMIS items can be administered in short forms or through computerized adaptive testing. This paper describes the translation and cultural adaption of nine PROMIS item banks (151 items) for children in Dutch-Flemish. The translation was performed by FACITtrans using standardized PROMIS methodology and approved by the PROMIS Statistical Center. The translation included four forward translations, two back-translations, three independent reviews (at least two Dutch, one Flemish), and pretesting in 24 children from the Netherlands and Flanders. For some items, it was necessary to have separate translations for Dutch and Flemish: physical function-mobility (three items), anger (one item), pain interference (two items), and asthma impact (one item). Challenges faced in the translation process included scarcity or overabundance of possible translations, unclear item descriptions, constructs broader/smaller in the target language, difficulties in rank ordering items, differences in unit of measurement, irrelevant items, or differences in performance of activities. By addressing these challenges, acceptable translations were obtained for all items. The Dutch-Flemish PROMIS items are linguistically equivalent to the original USA version. Short forms are now available for use, and entire item banks are ready for cross-cultural validation in the Netherlands and Flanders.

  1. Cross-cultural adaptation to Portuguese of a measure of satisfaction with participation of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS(r)).

    PubMed

    Silva, Maria Cristina Lima E; Mendonça, Tânia Maria da Silva; da Silva, Carlos Henrique Martins; Pinto, Rogério de Melo Costa

    2015-01-01

    Mental disorders often impair functioning in several areas of life and lead to unhappiness and suffering that may affect health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Satisfaction with participation is an indicator of HRQoL, and its measurement by patients reflects the impact of disease on their social, emotional and professional life. The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS(r)) offers an item bank based on item response theory. This system provides efficient, reliable and valid self-report instruments of satisfaction with participation, a measure that is both scarce and useful in the assessment of mental disorder outcomes. To cross-culturally adapt the PROMIS(r) satisfaction with participation item bank to Portuguese. Cross-cultural adaptation followed the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy (FACIT) multilingual translation method and was achieved through steps of forward and backward translations, review by bilingual experts (one of them a native of Portugal) and pretesting in a group of 11 adult native Brazilians. Instrument adaptation followed a universal approach to translation, with harmonization across languages. Equivalence of meaning was achieved. As two of the 26 translated items, which asked about leisure and social activities, were not understood by less educated participants, an explanation in parentheses was added to each item, and the problem was solved. All items were appropriate and did not cause embarrassment to the participants. The satisfaction with participation item bank is culturally and linguistically suitable to be used in Brazil. After the pretest is applied in Portugal and in other Portuguese-speaking countries, the same instrument will be ready to be used in multinational studies.

  2. ALS patients request more information about cognitive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Wicks, P; Frost, J

    2008-05-01

    Once thought to impact only voluntary motor function, ALS/Motor neuron disease (MND) is now seen as a multi-system disorder in which a minority of patients experience mild cognitive dysfunction or frontotemporal dementia. Despite clinical guidelines advocating supplying complete information to patients, educational materials on ALS often state that the mind is unaffected. We sought to establish how much patients and caregivers understand about ALS, what they have been told to expect by their physician, and if they would have appreciated more complete information. A two-part survey was administered online. An 'ALS quiz' gauged participants' knowledge of physical and psychological aspects of ALS. A second questionnaire assessed which symptoms patients had discussed with their clinician and explored patients' desire to receive information on psychological effects. A total of 247 ALS patients and 87 caregivers participated. Participants knew less about psychological symptoms than physical ones (72% correct responses versus 82%; paired t((333)) = -5.04, P < 0.001). Patients commonly reported being told by their doctor about physical symptoms such as problems walking (85%) or stiffness/cramps (74%) but not psychological issues like emotional lability (46%) or cognitive change (11%). The majority of patients (62%) and carers (71%) indicated a desire to be informed that cognitive change or dementia might occur. ALS is a multi-system disorder. However, despite a desire for more information from patients and their carers, healthcare professionals continue to primarily address only the physical consequences of the disease.

  3. CAIS. Condition Assessment Information System

    SciTech Connect

    Oak, J.C.

    1996-09-30

    CAIS is used by Architects and Engineers to gather facility condition assessment data. This data consist of architectural, civil, structural, electrical, and mechanical systems and components that are a part of the inspected facility. Data is collected using a hand-held, pen-based computer system which is preprogrammed for detailed inventories of individual components. The program is deficiency based for collecting data for repair and replacement observations. Observations are recorded on checklists preformatted to individual site needs, allowing for comments on unusual conditions to be documented on site. Data is transferred to a central database, where it can be reviewed, costed, and reported on using different scenarios. Information can be transferred to the DOE operations offices as well as to the DOE FIMS database for each site.

  4. Dynamic information theory and information description of dynamic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Xiusan

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we develop dynamic statistical information theory established by the author. Starting from the ideas that the state variable evolution equations of stochastic dynamic systems, classical and quantum nonequilibrium statistical physical systems and special electromagnetic field systems can be regarded as their information symbol evolution equations and the definitions of dynamic information and dynamic entropy, we derive the evolution equations of dynamic information and dynamic entropy that describe the evolution laws of dynamic information. These four kinds of evolution equations are of the same mathematical type. They show in unison when information transmits in coordinate space outside the systems that the time rate of change of dynamic information densities originates from their drift, diffusion and dissipation in state variable space inside the systems and coordinate space in the transmission processes, and that the time rate of change of dynamic entropy densities is caused by their drift, diffusion and production in state variable space inside the systems and coordinate space in the transmission processes. When space noise can be neglected, an information wave will appear. If we only consider the information change inside the systems, dynamic information evolution equations reduce to information equations corresponding to the dynamic equations which describe evolution laws of the above dynamic systems. This reveals that the evolution laws of respective dynamic systems can be described by information equations in a unified fashion. Hence, the evolution processes of these dynamic systems can be abstracted as the evolution processes of information. Furthermore, we present the formulas for information flow, information dissipation rate, and entropy production rate. We prove that the information production probably emerges in a dynamic system with internal attractive interaction between the elements, and derive a formula for this information

  5. RBIS - An Environmental Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zander, F.; Kralisch, S.

    2012-04-01

    The River Basin Information System (RBIS) developed at the Department of Geoinformatics at the Friedrich Schiller University of Jena provides a modular structured and web-based platform for environmental data management and data sharing (http://www.rbis.uni-jena.de). The system is used in several multidisciplinary research projects and provides user-friendly functions for the management, analysis, visualization and presentation of different types of data. These types of data include time series data (e.g. hydrological, climatologically …), geodata, documents and more domain specific modules for example related to soil, vegetation, scenarios, simulation models or indicators. One main focus lies on the maintenance on meta-data to make sure information about data provenance and responsible parties are preserved. Furthermore the fine grained user and permission management of RBIS take care about the access and manipulation rights of all stored data. For an easy data exchange of time series data and other data types RBIS provides several interfaces. One example is a prototypical implementation using OGC standards (Sensor Observation Service (SOS) and WaterML2.0). Since RBIS is used for data in research regions located in different countries (e.g. Brazil, Vietnam, Angola, Chile, Germany) a Multilanguage support was added to address not only research project partners but also local stakeholder and public. We will present the structure, modules, main functions, permission management and interfaces for data exchange of RBIS together with selected examples of RBIS instances.

  6. Making the case for a clinical information system: the chief information officer view.

    PubMed

    Cotter, Carole M

    2007-03-01

    Adequate decision support for clinicians and other caregivers requires accessible and reliable patient information. Powerful societal and economic forces are moving us toward an integrated, patient-centered health care information system that will allow caregivers to exchange up-to-date patient health information quickly and easily. These forces include patient safety, potential health care cost savings, empowerment of consumers (and their subsequent demands for quality), new federal policies, and growing regional health care initiatives. Underspending on health care information technologies has gone on for many years; and the creation and implementation of a comprehensive clinical information system will entail many difficulties, particularly in regard to patients' privacy and control of their information, standardization of electronic health records, cost of adopting information technology, unbalanced financial incentives, and the varying levels of preparation across caregivers. There will also be potential effects on the physician-patient relationship. Ultimately, an integrated system will require a concerted transformation of the health care industry that is akin to what the banking industry has accomplished with electronic automation. Critical care units provide a good starting point for how information system technologies can be used and electronic patient information collected, although the robust systems designed for intensive care units are not always used to their potential.

  7. Somerset County Flood Information System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoppe, Heidi L.

    2007-01-01

    The timely warning of a flood is crucial to the protection of lives and property. One has only to recall the floods of August 2, 1973, September 16 and 17, 1999, and April 16, 2007, in Somerset County, New Jersey, in which lives were lost and major property damage occurred, to realize how costly, especially in terms of human life, an unexpected flood can be. Accurate forecasts and warnings cannot be made, however, without detailed information about precipitation and streamflow in the drainage basin. Since the mid 1960's, the National Weather Service (NWS) has been able to forecast flooding on larger streams in Somerset County, such as the Raritan and Millstone Rivers. Flooding on smaller streams in urban areas was more difficult to predict. In response to this problem the NWS, in cooperation with the Green Brook Flood Control Commission, installed a precipitation gage in North Plainfield, and two flash-flood alarms, one on Green Brook at Seeley Mills and one on Stony Brook at Watchung, in the early 1970's. In 1978, New Jersey's first countywide flood-warning system was installed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Somerset County. This system consisted of a network of eight stage and discharge gages equipped with precipitation gages linked by telephone telemetry and eight auxiliary precipitation gages. The gages were installed throughout the county to collect precipitation and runoff data that could be used to improve flood-monitoring capabilities and flood-frequency estimates. Recognizing the need for more detailed hydrologic information for Somerset County, the USGS, in cooperation with Somerset County, designed and installed the Somerset County Flood Information System (SCFIS) in 1990. This system is part of a statewide network of stream gages, precipitation gages, weather stations, and tide gages that collect data in real time. The data provided by the SCFIS improve the flood forecasting ability of the NWS and aid Somerset County and municipal agencies in

  8. An Intelligent Pictorial Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Edward T.; Chang, B.

    1987-05-01

    In examining the history of computer application, we discover that early computer systems were developed primarily for applications related to scientific computation, as in weather prediction, aerospace applications, and nuclear physics applications. At this stage, the computer system served as a big calculator to perform, in the main, manipulation of numbers. Then it was found that computer systems could also be used for business applications, information storage and retrieval, word processing, and report generation. The history of computer application is summarized in Table I. The complexity of pictures makes picture processing much more difficult than number and alphanumerical processing. Therefore, new techniques, new algorithms, and above all, new pictorial knowledge, [1] are needed to overcome the limitatins of existing computer systems. New frontiers in designing computer systems are the ways to handle the representation,[2,3] classification, manipulation, processing, storage, and retrieval of pictures. Especially, the ways to deal with similarity measures and the meaning of the word "approximate" and the phrase "approximate reasoning" are an important and an indispensable part of an intelligent pictorial information system. [4,5] The main objective of this paper is to investigate the mathematical foundation for the effective organization and efficient retrieval of pictures in similarity-directed pictorial databases, [6] based on similarity retrieval techniques [7] and fuzzy languages [8]. The main advantage of this approach is that similar pictures are stored logically close to each other by using quantitative similarity measures. Thus, for answering queries, the amount of picture data needed to be searched can be reduced and the retrieval time can be improved. In addition, in a pictorial database, very often it is desired to find pictures (or feature vectors, histograms, etc.) that are most similar to or most dissimilar [9] to a test picture (or feature

  9. Concept analysis of the patient reported outcomes measurement information system (PROMIS(®)) and the international classification of functioning, disability and health (ICF).

    PubMed

    Tucker, Carole A; Cieza, Alarcos; Riley, Anne W; Stucki, Gerold; Lai, Jin Shei; Bedirhan Ustun, T; Kostanjsek, Nenad; Riley, William; Cella, David; Forrest, Christopher B

    2014-08-01

    The Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS (®) ) is a US National Institutes of Health initiative that has produced self-report outcome measures, using a framework of physical, mental, and social health defined by the World Health Organization in 1948 (WHO, in Preamble to the Constitution of the World Health Organization as adopted by the International Health Conference, New York, 1948). The World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) is a comprehensive classification system of health and health-related domains that was put forward in 2001. The purpose of this report is to compare and contrast PROMIS and ICF conceptual frameworks to support mapping of PROMIS instruments to the ICF classification system . We assessed the objectives and the classification schema of the PROMIS and ICF frameworks, followed by content analysis to determine whether PROMIS domain and sub-domain level health concepts can be linked to the ICF classification. Both PROMIS and ICF are relevant to all individuals, irrespective of the presence of health conditions, person characteristics, or environmental factors in which persons live. PROMIS measures are intended to assess a person's experiences of his or her health, functional status, and well-being in multiple domains across physical, mental, and social dimensions. The ICF comprehensively describes human functioning from a biological, individual, and social perspective. The ICF supports classification of health and health-related states such as functioning, but is not a specific measure or assessment of health, per se. PROMIS domains and sub-domain concepts can be meaningfully mapped to ICF concepts. Theoretical and conceptual similarities support the use of PROMIS instruments to operationalize self-reported measurement for many body function, activity and participation ICF concepts, as well as several environmental factor concepts. Differences observed in

  10. CIMS: The Cartographic Information Management System,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    evmee side if neceaety mid identity by block number) Information Management Microcomputer Tii-eractive Cartography ’I A STACT (Cubs me mverse eggs...use. Large-scale information systems may cover large amounts of information such as the Land Identification and Information Management System (LIMS...small computer in managing the information holdings of a mapping institute. The result is the Cartographic Information Management System (CIMS), a

  11. The Intelligent Technologies of Electronic Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xianyu

    2017-08-01

    Based upon the synopsis of system intelligence and information services, this paper puts forward the attributes and the logic structure of information service, sets forth intelligent technology framework of electronic information system, and presents a series of measures, such as optimizing business information flow, advancing data decision capability, improving information fusion precision, strengthening deep learning application and enhancing prognostic and health management, and demonstrates system operation effectiveness. This will benefit the enhancement of system intelligence.

  12. A Commentary on the Biomedical Information System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokes, Joseph, III; Hayes, Robert M.

    1970-01-01

    The Biomedical Information System is described as one which includes closed intermediate and open data, mobilizing all biomedical information for physicians, teachers, students and administrators. (Editor/IE)

  13. Physical function metric over measure: An illustration with the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (FACT).

    PubMed

    Kaat, Aaron J; Schalet, Benjamin D; Rutsohn, Joshua; Jensen, Roxanne E; Cella, David

    2017-09-08

    Measuring patient-reported outcomes (PROs) is becoming an integral component of quality improvement initiatives, clinical care, and research studies in cancer, including comparative effectiveness research. However, the number of PROs limits comparability across studies. Herein, the authors attempted to link the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General Physical Well-Being (FACT-G PWB) subscale with the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Physical Function (PF) calibrated item bank. The also sought to augment a subset of the conceptually most similar FACT-G PWB items with PROMIS PF items to improve the linking. Baseline data from 5506 participants in the Measuring Your Health (MY-Health) study were used to identify the optimal items for linking FACT-G PWB with PROMIS PF. A mixed methods approach identified the optimal items for creating the 5-item FACT/PROMIS-PF5 scale. Both the linked and augmented relationships were cross-validated using the follow-up MY-Health data. A 5-item FACT-G PWB item subset was found to be optimal for linking with PROMIS PF. In addition, a 2-item subset, including only items that were conceptually very similar to the PROMIS item bank content, were augmented with 3 PROMIS PF items. This new FACT/PROMIS-PF5 provided superior score recovery. The PROMIS PF metric allows for the evaluation of the extent to which similar questionnaires can be linked and therefore expressed on the same metric. These results allow for the aggregation of existing data and provide an optimal measure for future studies wishing to use the FACT yet also report on the PROMIS PF metric. Cancer 2017. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  14. Translation and linguistic validation of the Pediatric Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System measures into simplified Chinese using cognitive interviewing methodology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanyan; Hinds, Pamela S; Wang, Jichuan; Correia, Helena; Du, Shizheng; Ding, Jian; Gao, Wen Jun; Yuan, Changrong

    2013-01-01

    The Pediatric Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) measures were developed using modern measurement theory and tested in a variety of settings to assess the quality of life, function, and symptoms of children and adolescents experiencing a chronic illness and its treatment. Developed in English, this set of measures had not been translated into Chinese. The objective of this study was to develop the Chinese version of the Pediatric PROMIS measures (C-Ped-PROMIS), specifically 8 short forms, and to pretest the translated measures in children and adolescents through cognitive interviewing methodology. The C-Ped-PROMIS was developed following the standard Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy Translation Methodology. Bilingual teams from the United States and China reviewed the translation to develop a provisional version, which was then pretested with cognitive interview by probing 10 native Chinese-speaking children aged 8 to 17 years in China. The translation was finalized by the bilingual teams. Most items, response options, and instructions were well understood by the children, and some revisions were made to address patient's comments during the cognitive interview. The results indicated that the C-Ped-PROMIS items were semantically and conceptually equivalent to the original. Children aged 8 to 17 years in China were able to comprehend these measures and express their experience and feelings about illness or their life. The C-Ped-PROMIS is available for psychometric validation. Future work will be directed at translating the rest of the item banks, calibrating them and creating a Chinese final version of the short forms.

  15. The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) developed and tested its first wave of adult self-reported health outcome item banks: 2005-2008.

    PubMed

    Cella, David; Riley, William; Stone, Arthur; Rothrock, Nan; Reeve, Bryce; Yount, Susan; Amtmann, Dagmar; Bode, Rita; Buysse, Daniel; Choi, Seung; Cook, Karon; Devellis, Robert; DeWalt, Darren; Fries, James F; Gershon, Richard; Hahn, Elizabeth A; Lai, Jin-Shei; Pilkonis, Paul; Revicki, Dennis; Rose, Matthias; Weinfurt, Kevin; Hays, Ron

    2010-11-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are essential when evaluating many new treatments in health care; yet, current measures have been limited by a lack of precision, standardization, and comparability of scores across studies and diseases. The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) provides item banks that offer the potential for efficient (minimizes item number without compromising reliability), flexible (enables optional use of interchangeable items), and precise (has minimal error in estimate) measurement of commonly studied PROs. We report results from the first large-scale testing of PROMIS items. Fourteen item pools were tested in the U.S. general population and clinical groups using an online panel and clinic recruitment. A scale-setting subsample was created reflecting demographics proportional to the 2000 U.S. census. Using item-response theory (graded response model), 11 item banks were calibrated on a sample of 21,133, measuring components of self-reported physical, mental, and social health, along with a 10-item Global Health Scale. Short forms from each bank were developed and compared with the overall bank and with other well-validated and widely accepted ("legacy") measures. All item banks demonstrated good reliability across most of the score distributions. Construct validity was supported by moderate to strong correlations with legacy measures. PROMIS item banks and their short forms provide evidence that they are reliable and precise measures of generic symptoms and functional reports comparable to legacy instruments. Further testing will continue to validate and test PROMIS items and banks in diverse clinical populations. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Initial Adult Health Item Banks and First Wave Testing of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS™) Network: 2005–2008

    PubMed Central

    Cella, David; Riley, William; Stone, Arthur; Rothrock, Nan; Reeve, Bryce; Yount, Susan; Amtmann, Dagmar; Bode, Rita; Buysse, Daniel; Choi, Seung; Cook, Karon; DeVellis, Robert; DeWalt, Darren; Fries, James F.; Gershon, Richard; Hahn, Elizabeth A.; Lai, Jin-Shei; Pilkonis, Paul; Revicki, Dennis; Rose, Matthias; Weinfurt, Kevin; Hays, Ron

    2010-01-01

    Objective Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are essential when evaluating many new treatments in health care, yet current measures have been limited by a lack of precision, standardization and comparability of scores across studies and diseases. The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS™) provides item banks that offer the potential for PRO measurement that is efficient (minimizes item number without compromising reliability) flexible (enables optional use of interchangeable items), and precise (has minimal error in estimate) measurement of commonly-studied PROs. We report results from the first large-scale testing of PROMIS items. Study Design and Setting Fourteen item pools were tested in the U.S. general population and clinical groups using an online panel and clinic recruitment. A scale-setting sub-sample was created reflecting demographics proportional to the 2000 U.S. census. Results Using item response theory (graded response model), 11 item banks were calibrated on a sample of 21,133, measuring components of self-reported physical, mental and social health, along with a 10-item global health scale. Short forms from each bank were developed and compared to the overall bank as well as with other well-validated and widely accepted (“legacy”) measures. All item banks demonstrated good reliability across the majority of the score distributions. Construct validity was supported by moderate to strong correlations with legacy measures. Conclusion PROMIS item banks and their short forms provide evidence they are reliable and precise measures of generic symptoms and functional reports comparable to legacy instruments. Further testing will continue to validate and test PROMIS items and banks in diverse clinical populations. PMID:20685078

  17. Health information systems - past, present, future.

    PubMed

    Haux, Reinhold

    2006-01-01

    In 1984, Peter Reichertz gave a lecture on the past, present and future of hospital information systems. In the meantime, there has been a tremendous progress in medicine as well as in informatics. One important benefit of this progress is that our life expectancy is nowadays significantly higher than it would have been even some few decades ago. This progress, leading to aging societies, is of influence to the organization of health care and to the future development of its information systems. Twenty years later, referring to Peter Reichertz' lecture, but now considering health information systems (HIS), two questions are discussed: which were lines of development in health information systems from the past until today? What are consequences for health information systems in the future? The following lines of development for HIS were considered as important: (1) the shift from paper-based to computer-based processing and storage, as well as the increase of data in health care settings; (2) the shift from institution-centered departmental and, later, hospital information systems towards regional and global HIS; (3) the inclusion of patients and health consumers as HIS users, besides health care professionals and administrators; (4) the use of HIS data not only for patient care and administrative purposes, but also for health care planning as well as clinical and epidemiological research; (5) the shift from focusing mainly on technical HIS problems to those of change management as well as of strategic information management; (6) the shift from mainly alpha-numeric data in HIS to images and now also to data on the molecular level; (7) the steady increase of new technologies to be included, now starting to include ubiquitous computing environments and sensor-based technologies for health monitoring. As consequences for HIS in the future, first the need for institutional and (inter-) national HIS-strategies is seen, second the need to explore new (transinstitutional

  18. [Development and clinical evaluation of an anesthesia information management system].

    PubMed

    Feng, Jing-yi; Chen, Hua; Zhu, Sheng-mei

    2010-09-21

    To study the design, implementation and clinical evaluation of an anesthesia information management system. To record, process and store peri-operative patient data automatically, all kinds of bedside monitoring equipments are connected into the system based on information integrating technology; after a statistical analysis of those patient data by data mining technology, patient status can be evaluated automatically based on risk prediction standard and decision support system, and then anesthetist could perform reasonable and safe clinical processes; with clinical processes electronically recorded, standard record tables could be generated, and clinical workflow is optimized, as well. With the system, kinds of patient data could be collected, stored, analyzed and archived, kinds of anesthesia documents could be generated, and patient status could be evaluated to support clinic decision. The anesthesia information management system is useful for improving anesthesia quality, decreasing risk of patient and clinician, and aiding to provide clinical proof.

  19. Ecological Validity and Clinical Utility of Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS®) instruments for detecting premenstrual symptoms of depression, anger, and fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Junghaenel, Doerte U.; Schneider, Stefan; Stone, Arthur A.; Christodoulou, Christopher; Broderick, Joan E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study examined the ecological validity and clinical utility of NIH Patient Reported-Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS®) instruments for anger, depression, and fatigue in women with premenstrual symptoms. Methods One-hundred women completed daily diaries and weekly PROMIS assessments over 4 weeks. Weekly assessments were administered through Computerized Adaptive Testing (CAT). Weekly CATs and corresponding daily scores were compared to evaluate ecological validity. To test clinical utility, we examined if CATs could detect changes in symptom levels, if these changes mirrored those obtained from daily scores, and if CATs could identify clinically meaningful premenstrual symptom change. Results PROMIS CAT scores were higher in the pre-menstrual than the baseline (ps < .0001) and post-menstrual (ps < .0001) weeks. The correlations between CATs and aggregated daily scores ranged from .73 to .88 supporting ecological validity. Mean CAT scores showed systematic changes in accordance with the menstrual cycle and the magnitudes of the changes were similar to those obtained from the daily scores. Finally, Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analyses demonstrated the ability of the CATs to discriminate between women with and without clinically meaningful premenstrual symptom change. Conclusions PROMIS CAT instruments for anger, depression, and fatigue demonstrated validity and utility in premenstrual symptom assessment. The results provide encouraging initial evidence of the utility of PROMIS instruments for the measurement of affective premenstrual symptoms. PMID:24630180

  20. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Adult Domain Framework Using Item Response Theory Scores

    PubMed Central

    Carle, Adam Christopher; Riley, William; Hays, Ron D.; Cella, David

    2016-01-01

    Background To guide measure development, National Institutes of Health (NIH)-supported Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS®) investigators developed a hierarchical domain framework. The framework specifies health domains at multiple levels. The initial PROMIS domain framework specified that physical function and symptoms such as pain and fatigue indicate Physical Health (PH); depression, anxiety, and anger indicate Mental Health (MH); and social role performance and social satisfaction indicate Social Health (SH). We used confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) to evaluate the fit of the hypothesized framework to data collected from a large sample. Methods We used data (n = 14,098) from PROMIS’s wave 1 field test and estimated domain scores using the PROMIS item response theory parameters. We then used CFA to test whether the domains corresponded to the PROMIS domain framework as expected. Results A model corresponding to the domain framework did not provide ideal fit (RMSEA=0.13; CFI=0.92; TLI=0.88; SRMR=0.09). Based on modification indices and EFA, we allowed Fatigue to load on both PH and MH. This model fit the data acceptably (RMSEA=0.08; CFI=0.97; TLI=0.96; SRMR=0.03). Discussion Our findings generally support the PROMIS domain framework. Allowing fatigue to load on both PH and MH improved fit considerably. PMID:26366521

  1. Using a geographic information system to enhance patient access to point-of-care diagnostics in a limited-resource setting.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, William J; Kemp, Karen; Kost, Gerald

    2016-03-01

    Rapid and accurate diagnosis drives evidence-based care in health. Point-of-care testing (POCT) aids diagnosis by bringing advanced technologies closer to patients. Health small-world networks are constrained by natural connectivity in the interactions between geography of resources and social forces. Using a geographic information system (GIS) we can understand how populations utilize their health networks, visualize their inefficiencies, and compare alternatives. This project focuses on cardiac care resource in rural Isaan, Thailand. A health care access analysis was created using ArcGIS Network Analyst 10.1 from data representing aggregated population, roads, health resource facilities, and diagnostic technologies. The analysis quantified cardiac health care access and identified ways to improve it using both widespread and resource-limited strategies. Results indicated that having diagnostic technologies closer to populations streamlines critical care paths. GIS allowed us to compare the effectiveness of the implementation strategies and put into perspective the benefits of adopting rapid POCT within health networks. Geospatial analyses derive high impact by improving alternative diagnostic placement strategies in limited-resource settings and by revealing deficiencies in health care access pathways. Additionally, the GIS provides a platform for comparing relative costs, assessing benefits, and improving outcomes. This approach can be implemented effectively by health ministries seeking to enhance cardiac care despite limited resources.

  2. Information Systems Coordinate Emergency Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    -changing planet. This information can be captured, analyzed, and visualized by geographic information systems (GIS) to produce maps, charts, and other tools that can reveal information essential to a wide variety of applications including emergency management. Knowing precise, real-time information about the size, location, environmental conditions, and resulting damage of an event like a flood or wildfire as well as the location and numbers of emergency responders and other resources contributes directly to the effectiveness of disaster mitigation. The need for such information is also evident when responding to homeland security threats, such as a terrorist attack. Recognizing the value of its geospatial information resources for this and other purposes, in 1998 Stennis and the state of Mississippi partnered to form what became the Enterprise for Innovative Geospatial Solutions (EIGS) industry cluster, supporting the growth of remote sensing and GIS-based research and business. As part of EIGS, several companies partnered with NASA through dual use and Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts. Among those was NVision.

  3. Informed consent and the psychiatric patient.

    PubMed Central

    Dyer, A R; Bloch, S

    1987-01-01

    Informed consent is reviewed as it applies to psychiatric patients. Although new legislation, such as the Mental Health Act 1983, provides a useful safeguard for the protection of the civil rights of patients, it could actually reduce their humane care unless applied with sensitivity for the nature of their unique difficulties. In order to guard against this possibility, we suggest that legal requirements should be considered in light of the ethical principles which underlie them. Three principles are considered: those of autonomy (freedom); beneficence (paternalism); and the fiduciary principle (partnership). Psychotherapy is offered as a model for informed consent, which might be generalised to other clinical situations. PMID:3572986

  4. Information systems use, benefits, and satisfaction among Ohio RNs.

    PubMed

    Abdrbo, Amany A; Hudak, Christine A; Anthony, Mary K; Douglas, Sara L

    2011-01-01

    Contemporary forces, including the growing nursing shortage, the aging population, and the emphasis on patient safety, are increasing the pressure on healthcare facilities to use information systems to achieve better outcomes. Use of information systems improves nurses' ability to make decisions in a timely manner; however, nurses are still reluctant about or avoiding using information systems in their daily work. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships among age, nursing education, computer experience, user involvement in implementation, nursing management support to use information systems, nurses' information system use, and information system outcomes (benefits and satisfaction). The study used an input-process-outcome framework, a descriptive correlational design, and a mailed survey with a random sample of staff nurses. Computer experience, user involvement, and nursing management support were found to significantly explain information system use. In addition, information system use was found to significantly explain nurses' perception of the benefits of using information systems and their satisfaction with using information systems. These results assist nursing administrators and leaders to change and/or restructure the appropriate work environment to enhance nurses' information system use and increase their satisfaction, thereby improving patient outcomes.

  5. Information Measures for Multisensor Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-11

    permuted to generate spectra that were non- physical but preserved the entropy of the source spectra. Another 1000 spectra were constructed to mimic co...Research Laboratory (NRL) has yielded probabilistic models for spectral data that enable the computation of information measures such as entropy and...22308 Chemical sensing Information theory Spectral data Information entropy Information divergence Mass spectrometry Infrared spectroscopy Multisensor

  6. [Informed consent in the patients' rights law].

    PubMed

    Figueroa G, Rodolfo

    2012-10-01

    The new regulation of patients' rights creates the right to informed consent, which allows accepting or refusing any medical treatment. Also, the patient has the right to be appropriately informed about a variety of aspects determined by the law. Patient's autonomy has limits. Artificial acceleration of death, euthanasia or assisted suicide are not permitted. The problem is that the law does not define those situations. The law provides the intervention of Ethics Committees when the doctor considers that the patient exposes himself to severe harm or the risk of death which would be avoided. This intervention impinges on patient's autonomy. Patients have the right to request discharge and medical facilities could discharge patients against their will if they do not accept medical recommendations. These limitations on autonomy should be explained because the law apparently makes the distinction between killing, letting die and the Double Effect Doctrine. There is plenty of literature questioning the validity of both. The law fails to regulate part of the medical practice, regarding life and death decisions. A lack of consensus could explain this omission. Doctors have a right to conscientious objection to some patient's requests.

  7. 28 CFR 25.3 - System information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false System information. 25.3 Section 25.3 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS The National Instant Criminal Background Check System § 25.3 System information. (a) There is established at the FBI...

  8. 28 CFR 25.3 - System information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false System information. 25.3 Section 25.3 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS The National Instant Criminal Background Check System § 25.3 System information. (a) There is established at the FBI...

  9. 28 CFR 25.3 - System information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false System information. 25.3 Section 25.3 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS The National Instant Criminal Background Check System § 25.3 System information. (a) There is established at the FBI...

  10. 28 CFR 25.3 - System information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false System information. 25.3 Section 25.3 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS The National Instant Criminal Background Check System § 25.3 System information. (a) There is established at the FBI...

  11. 28 CFR 25.3 - System information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false System information. 25.3 Section 25.3 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS The National Instant Criminal Background Check System § 25.3 System information. (a) There is established at the FBI...

  12. The economic motivations for clinical information systems.

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, P. D.; van Mulligen, E.

    1996-01-01

    For three decades (1960-1990) the primary use of computers in hospitals' in the U.S. was to ease the task of reimbursement for care rendered and to automate results reporting for high-volume, time-critical tests such as clinical laboratory procedures. Hospitals were regarded as independent organizations/revenue centers which could pass costs to third party payers. Beginning in the mid-eighties, U.S. hospitals were no longer reimbursed on a fee-for-service basis for many patients, but received a fixed payment regardless of the actual cost of treating a patient. The size of the payment depended upon the patients' type of illness (Diagnostically related group). This approach gave hospitals incentives to reduce costs, but did not foster a fully competitive environment. Now, in the mid-nineties, hospitals in the U.S. are seen as cost centers in an integrated health care delivery system. Within this environment, a longitudinal patient record is necessary to increase levels of communication between healthcare providers. While certain management functions remain hospital-centered, clinical information systems must now cover a spectrum of patient activities within the ambulatory and inpatient arena. Several of the leading healthcare providers use computer-based logic to alert care givers whenever standards of care are not being achieved. These institutions feel that such capability will be the real impetus to reduce cost and improve the quality of care. Based upon observations over four decades, it appears that economic considerations play the major role in determining which kinds of information systems are deployed in the healthcare arena. PMID:8947748

  13. Concept of JINR Corporate Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filozova, I. A.; Bashashin, M. V.; Korenkov, V. V.; Kuniaev, S. V.; Musulmanbekov, G.; Semenov, R. N.; Shestakova, G. V.; Strizh, T. A.; Ustenko, P. V.; Zaikina, T. N.

    2016-09-01

    The article presents the concept of JINR Corporate Information System (JINR CIS). Special attention is given to the information support of scientific researches - Current Research Information System as a part of the corporate information system. The objectives of such a system are focused on ensuring an effective implementation and research by using the modern information technology, computer technology and automation, creation, development and integration of digital resources on a common conceptual framework. The project assumes continuous system development, introduction the new information technologies to ensure the technological system relevance.

  14. Detecting Anomalous Insiders in Collaborative Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, You; Nyemba, Steve; Malin, Bradley

    2012-05-01

    Collaborative information systems (CISs) are deployed within a diverse array of environments that manage sensitive information. Current security mechanisms detect insider threats, but they are ill-suited to monitor systems in which users function in dynamic teams. In this paper, we introduce the community anomaly detection system (CADS), an unsupervised learning framework to detect insider threats based on the access logs of collaborative environments. The framework is based on the observation that typical CIS users tend to form community structures based on the subjects accessed (e.g., patients' records viewed by healthcare providers). CADS consists of two components: 1) relational pattern extraction, which derives community structures and 2) anomaly prediction, which leverages a statistical model to determine when users have sufficiently deviated from communities. We further extend CADS into MetaCADS to account for the semantics of subjects (e.g., patients' diagnoses). To empirically evaluate the framework, we perform an assessment with three months of access logs from a real electronic health record (EHR) system in a large medical center. The results illustrate our models exhibit significant performance gains over state-of-the-art competitors. When the number of illicit users is low, MetaCADS is the best model, but as the number grows, commonly accessed semantics lead to hiding in a crowd, such that CADS is more prudent.

  15. Data Economics in Army Information Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    A. These applications include: 2-26 " Matlin , 1979. Matlin assigned dollar measures of value to information systems, based on how closely the system...information systems (e.g., Matlin , 1978). Additional support for this kind of test and evaluation framework has been received from several commands...A-44 TITLE: What is the Value of Investment in Information Systems? ORGANIZATION: Information Systems, Land O’Lakes, Inc. AUTHOR: Matlin , Gerald L

  16. Interactive Development Environments for Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wasserman, Anthony I.

    1986-01-01

    Most medical information systems are interactive information systems, since they provide their users with conversational access to data. The design of an interactive information system requires attention to data design, process design, and user interface design so that the resulting system will be easy to use and reliable. This paper describes some automated tools aimed at assisting software designers and developers in creating interactive information systems, with emphasis on the Software through Pictures environment and the User Software Engineering (USE) methodology.

  17. An integration of Emergency Department Information and Ambulance Systems.

    PubMed

    Al-Harbi, Nada; El-Masri, Samir; Saddik, Basema

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we propose an Emergency Department Information System that will be integrated with the ambulance system to improve the communication, enhance the quality of provided emergency services and facilitate information sharing. The proposed system utilizes new advanced technologies such as mobile web services that overcome the problems of interoperability between different systems, HL7 and GPS. The system is unique in that it allows ambulance officers to locate the nearest specialized hospital and allows access to the patient's electronic health record as well as providing the hospital with required information to prepare for the incoming patient.

  18. Evaluation of drug information for cardiology patients.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, D; Roberts, D E; Newcombe, R G; Fox, K A

    1991-01-01

    1. Cardiologists and pharmacists at the University Hospital of Wales collaborated to write 20 individual leaflets incorporating guidelines for a range of drugs used in the treatment of cardiology patients. The Plain English Campaign advised on the intelligibility and presentation of the information. 2. One hundred and twenty-five patients from the Regional Cardiology Unit, University Hospital of Wales were randomly allocated to receive usual verbal counselling about their drug treatment with or without an individualised drug information wallet. Two weeks after discharge from hospital patients completed a postal questionnaire to determine their satisfaction with the information about their drug treatment and their understanding of it. Forty-nine questionnaires were returned from the leaflet group and 52 from the control group. 3. The provision of written guidelines resulted in significant improvements in patients' satisfaction with their drug treatment (chi 2 = 33.3, P less than 0.001) and their understanding of it (P less than 0.001, Mann-Whitney test). Overall, patients who received leaflets were more likely to be aware of the potential side effects of their drugs but less likely to be apprehensive about them. Succinct guidelines concerning drug therapy can be assimilated by cardiology patients and provide them with a permanent record for future reference. PMID:1888619

  19. Reservoir Model Information System: REMIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang Yun; Lee, Kwang-Wu; Rhee, Taehyun; Neumann, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    We describe a novel data visualization framework named Reservoir Model Information System (REMIS) for the display of complex and multi-dimensional data sets in oil reservoirs. It is aimed at facilitating visual exploration and analysis of data sets as well as user collaboration in an easier way. Our framework consists of two main modules: the data access point module and the data visualization module. For the data access point module, the Phrase-Driven Grammar System (PDGS) is adopted for helping users facilitate the visualization of data. It integrates data source applications and external visualization tools and allows users to formulate data query and visualization descriptions by selecting graphical icons in a menu or on a map with step-by-step visual guidance. For the data visualization module, we implemented our first prototype of an interactive volume viewer named REMVR to classify and to visualize geo-spatial specific data sets. By combining PDGS and REMVR, REMIS assists users better in describing visualizations and exploring data so that they can easily find desired data and explore interesting or meaningful relationships including trends and exceptions in oil reservoir model data.

  20. American Health Information Management Association. Position statement. Issue: patient cards.

    PubMed

    1993-11-01

    In its simplest form, a patient card is a credit card sized record made of paper or plastic that contains identification information. A card may contain additional information, such as insurance or limited health information. Of the many technologies available, chip cards and optical cards are best suited for use in healthcare. If their expense can be justified and nation-wide standards established, cards could help improve timely access to basic health information such as demographic, insurance, and basic medical information needed for emergency treatment. Technology may permit a patient's entire longitudinal (lifetime) health history to be maintained on a card, but this should not be the only source of the longitudinal record. To assure its accessibility to legitimate users throughout the healthcare system, the longitudinal health record must be a computer-based patient record maintained on a controlled access network.

  1. Wikipedia and osteosarcoma: a trustworthy patients' information?

    PubMed

    Leithner, Andreas; Maurer-Ertl, Werner; Glehr, Mathias; Friesenbichler, Joerg; Leithner, Katharina; Windhager, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    The English version of the online encyclopedia, Wikipedia, has been recently reported to be the prominent source of online health information. However, there is little information concerning the quality of information found in Wikipedia. Therefore, we created a questionnaire asking for scope, completeness, and accuracy of information found on osteosarcoma. Three independent observers tested the English version of Wikipedia, as well as the patient version and the health professional version of the US National Cancer Institute (NCI) website. Answers were verified with authoritative resources and international guidelines. The results of our study demonstrate that the quality of osteosarcoma-related information found in the English Wikipedia is good but inferior to the patient information provided by the NCI. Therefore, non-peer-reviewed commonly used websites offering health information, such as Wikipedia, should include links to more definitive sources, such as those maintained by the NCI and professional international organizations on healthcare treatments. Furthermore, frequent checks should make sure such external links are to the highest quality and to the best-maintained aggregate sites on a given healthcare topic.

  2. Development and testing of nurses information systems use instrument.

    PubMed

    Abdrbo, Amany A; Zauszniewski, Jaclene A; Hudak, Christine A

    2010-01-01

    Information systems provide nurses with a variety of resources to facilitate their work. Nurses' use of information systems changes the way they collect assessment data, and plan and implement patient care. However, a reliable and valid instrument for measuring nurse's use of information systems does not currently exist. This study examined the development and psychometric testing of a measure of nurses' information systems use, the Information Systems Use Instrument (ISUI). A random sample of 570 nurses working in hospitals, providing direct patient care and using at least one information system completed the study questionnaire. The internal consistency reliability was .82. Exploratory factor analysis, using principal components extraction and varimax rotation, revealed that all seven items loaded cleanly and strongly on a single factor. The ISUI showed sufficient evidence for its psychometric properties to encourage its use.

  3. Meeting information needs of families of critical care patients.

    PubMed

    Barbret, L C; Westphal, C G; Daly, G A

    1997-01-01

    Families of patients in critical care experience extreme anxiety and frustration while awaiting their loved ones' recovery or stabilization. To study the hypothesis that meeting families' informational needs can reduce their anxiety and help them cope with the initial crisis, a small task force at a Midwest acute care facility, using a CQI approach, studied possible solutions. Initial findings showed low satisfaction for families of critically ill patients with the present system of imparting information to them. After initiation of a storyboard to present information by the critical care team, families reported increased satisfaction and greater knowledge recall.

  4. The Information Support System: Management Information for Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mead, Nancy A.

    The Information Support System (ISS) is a management information system developed for the National Drug Education Program (NDEP). The major components of the ISS are: (1) the Project Growth Record which provides a tool for project self-evaluation and for communication between NDEP project officers and project directors; (2) the Quarterly Project…

  5. Managing information systems: an ethical framework and information needs matrix.

    PubMed

    Caputo, R K

    1991-01-01

    This paper urged administrators in human services to attend to values and ethics in the design and implementation of automated information systems. Toward this end, it presented an ethical framework reasserting the primacy of clients as citizens and encouraging the development of client-driven information systems. Finally, the paper presented the rationale for and two examples of an Information Needs Matrix to assist administrators in their deliberations about allocating discretionary resources among functional units within organizations.

  6. Colorado Career Information System. Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Univ., Boulder. Colorado Career Information Center.

    Covering the period from October 1, 1975, to September 30, 1976, this annual report contains information on the Colorado Career Information System's (COCIS) administration and organization, information development, delivery vehicle, and marketing and field services. (COCIS is an on-line computerized career information system that has been…

  7. 76 FR 56504 - Proposed Information Collection (Spinal Cord Injury Patient Care Survey) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-13

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Spinal Cord Injury Patient Care Survey) Activity: Comment Request... spinal cord patients' satisfaction with VA rehabilitation and health care system. Affected Public... of automated collection techniques or the use of other forms of information technology. Title:...

  8. 75 FR 52765 - Development and Distribution of Patient Medication Information for Prescription Drugs; Public...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-27

    ... the current system, patients may receive several different types of information, developed by... products is an important component of medical product safety. Currently, patients receive multiple types of... and comprehension. The types of written prescription drug information include: Consumer Medication...

  9. 'What do patients want?' Tailoring medicines information to meet patients' needs.

    PubMed

    Young, Amber; Tordoff, June; Smith, Alesha

    2016-10-26

    Medicines information leaflets can equip patients to be in control of their own healthcare and support the safe and effective use of medicines. The design and content of leaflets influences patients' willingness to read them, and poor examples can cause patient confusion and anxiety. Researchers examined the literature over the past 8 years to determine the content and design of medicine information leaflets that patients prefer in order to read, understand, and use them effectively. It was found that existing leaflets do not meet patients' needs and appear ineffective. Leaflets lack the information patients seek and may contain non-essential material, affecting patients' perception of, and willingness to read them. Additionally, the acceptable leaflet length varies between patients. Application of good design principles improves readability, comprehension, and ability to locate information. Medicine information leaflets must meet patients' needs and be well designed. Tailoring information leaflets to patient characteristics and requirements would enhance effectiveness. Passive provision of pre-printed leaflets is outdated, unvalued and ineffective. Using automated computer systems for leaflet tailoring with the ability to further adapt patients' information might be the best way forward.

  10. Information Systems: A Strategic Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Sue

    1997-01-01

    This paper, which is intended for individuals responsible for information management at British further education (FE) colleges, describes the attempts by a number of FE institutions to manage their information effectively and provides guidelines for FE institutions to follow when developing their own information management strategy. After a brief…

  11. Multilingual Access for Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Carol; Sheridan, Paraic

    With the rapid growth of the global information society, the concept of library has evolved to embrace all kinds of information collections, on all kinds of storage media, and using many different access methods. The users of today's information networks and digital libraries, no longer restricted by geographic or spatial boundaries, want to be…

  12. Patient Dependency Knowledge-Based Systems.

    PubMed

    Soliman, F

    1998-10-01

    The ability of Patient Dependency Systems to provide information for staffing decisions and budgetary development has been demonstrated. In addition, they have become powerful tools in modern hospital management. This growing interest in Patient Dependency Systems has renewed calls for their automation. As advances in Information Technology and in particular Knowledge-Based Engineering reach new heights, hospitals can no longer afford to ignore the potential benefits obtainable from developing and implementing Patient Dependency Knowledge-Based Systems. Experience has shown that the vast majority of decisions and rules used in the Patient Dependency method are too complex to capture in the form of a traditional programming language. Furthermore, the conventional Patient Dependency Information System automates the simple and rigid bookkeeping functions. On the other hand Knowledge-Based Systems automate complex decision making and judgmental processes and therefore are the appropriate technology for automating the Patient Dependency method. In this paper a new technique to automate Patient Dependency Systems using knowledge processing is presented. In this approach all Patient Dependency factors have been translated into a set of Decision Rules suitable for use in a Knowledge-Based System. The system is capable of providing the decision-maker with a number of scenarios and their possible outcomes. This paper also presents the development of Patient Dependency Knowledge-Based Systems, which can be used in allocating and evaluating resources and nursing staff in hospitals on the basis of patients' needs.

  13. Anatomy of an anesthesia information management system.

    PubMed

    Shah, Nirav J; Tremper, Kevin K; Kheterpal, Sachin

    2011-09-01

    Anesthesia information management systems (AIMS) have become more prevalent as more sophisticated hardware and software have increased usability and reliability. National mandates and incentives have driven adoption as well. AIMS can be developed in one of several software models (Web based, client/server, or incorporated into a medical device). Irrespective of the development model, the best AIMS have a feature set that allows for comprehensive management of workflow for an anesthesiologist. Key features include preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative documentation; quality assurance; billing; compliance and operational reporting; patient and operating room tracking; and integration with hospital electronic medical records. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Information systems and audit in antenatal care.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, K A; Kelly, M; Lilford, R J

    1990-03-01

    The obstetric record as initiated at the antenatal booking clinic essentially identifies the degree of risk engendered in that pregnancy so that consequent obstetric and paediatric management is tailored appropriately. Whether carried by the patient or based in the hospital with a summary carried by the patient (shared-care card), this record should be exhaustive, the emphasis being on quality, not quantity, of information recorded. To obviate human error in history-taking, patient management or record transcription, we believe on-line computerization of patient records with spin-off paperwork to be the only patient management system to fulfil the above criteria. User-friendly software can be designed with highly branching programmes which provide clinical action suggestions in high-risk cases. Various 'error traps' enhance the accuracy of information recorded. Such systems can be operated by medical and midwifery staff with minimal keyboard skills and are well accepted by patients and staff. Inexpensive and versatile microcomputer networks are excellent for such systems. The operational effects are discussed. Audit means different things to different people and one's view on the subject depends on which definition is selected. Obstetricians are quick to take credit for instituting audit in the form of local and national data collection exercises, such as statistics on perinatal mortality, birthweight, etc. While these exercises certainly constitute observational studies, they cannot be used to make conclusions about the quality of care. There is no sound inference that can be made from a review of information contained in amalgamated databases of hospital statistics. Audit, as properly defined, hinges on inference: the inference that the quality of care was or was not of a high standard. Descriptive statistics, therefore, can be used to generate hypotheses but should not be used as a form of audit, at least not in obstetrics. Auditing the quality of care involves

  15. Prostatectomy: information provision and education for patients.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Paula

    Following the diagnosis of prostate cancer, information should be imparted to ensure an informed decision regarding treatment can be made. The impact of a cancer diagnosis could lead men to opt for surgical intervention without fully understanding the consequences of treatment. Effective communication of evidence-based information can assist men to fully understand the consequences of treatment. Radical prostatectomy, whether robotically assisted laparoscopic or retropubic, will lead to quality-of-life issues with functional outcomes such as erectile dysfunction and urinary incontinence being at the forefront. Issues should be discussed and communicated in depth so that frustration and regret following treatment are avoided. A cautious approach to information provision should be considered so the patient does not feel in a position of information overload. Advanced communication skills are of utmost importance to ensure information is tailored to suit individual needs, as no one model of information giving suits all. This article is a rapid literature search relating to post-prostatectomy functional outcomes and how communication and information giving before treatment assists with acceptance of treatment outcomes.

  16. Integration of Surgery Management and Clinical Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Paul D.; Delaplaine, Kathy H.; Jensen, Ronald D.; Bird, Bruce; Evans, R. Scott; Cannon, Clawson Y.

    1987-01-01

    We describe a computer-based management system used in the Surgery deaprtment at LSD Hospital. In addition to the traditional management functions which are found in systems developed by others, our system was designed to collect and display clinical information about the surgical patient as part of a larger comprehensive clinical information system. The information derived from the surgery sub-system is integrated with information from other sources in the hospital for use in automated medical decision - making as well as departmental management.

  17. Expert Systems and Intelligent Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, H. M.

    1987-01-01

    Explores what an intelligent information retrieval system involves and why expert system techniques might interest system designers. Expert systems research is reviewed with emphasis on components, architecture, and computer interaction, and it is concluded that information retrieval is not an ideal problem domain for expert system application at…

  18. Gatekeeping versus direct-access when patient information matters.

    PubMed

    González, Paula

    2010-06-01

    We develop a principal-agent model in which the health authority acts as a principal for both a patient and a general practitioner (GP). The goal of the paper is to weigh the merits of gatekeeping versus non-gatekeeping approaches to health care when patient self-health information and patient pressure on GPs to provide referrals for specialized care are considered. We find that, when GPs incentives matter, a non-gatekeeping system is preferable only when (i) patient pressure to refer is sufficiently high and (ii) the quality of the patient's self-health information is neither highly inaccurate (in which case the patient's self-referral will be very inefficient) nor highly accurate (in which case the GP's agency problem will be very costly).

  19. An Expertise Based Energy Information System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, S.

    This paper describes an intelligent decision support system for information on petroleum resources and use currently being designed by the Information Methodology Research Project as the first step in the development of a comprehensive intelligent information system for dealing with energy resources in the United States. The system draws on…

  20. Management Information Systems for Colleges and Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroeder, Roger G.

    A management information system (MIS) is embedded in the management and operating system of the organization. An MIS exists to provide information for management and operating purposes. The MIS must meet the information needs of management and operating users. The MIS consists of two components--a processor and a data base. Packaged systems have…