Science.gov

Sample records for patient samples potential

  1. Patients' bath basins as potential sources of infection: a multicenter sampling study.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Debra; Lineweaver, Lauri; Maze, Lenora M

    2009-01-01

    Nosocomial infections are a marked burden on the US health care system and are linked to a high number of patient deaths. To identify and quantify bacteria in patients' bath basins and evaluate the basins as a possible reservoir for bacterial colonization and a risk factor for subsequent hospital-acquired infection. In a prospective study at 3 acute care hospitals, 92 bath basins, including basins from 3 intensive care units, were evaluated. Sterile culture sponges were used to obtain samples from the basins. The culture sponges were sent to an outside laboratory, and qualitative and quantitative microbial tests were conducted and the results reported. Some form of bacteria grew in 98% of the samples (90 sponges), either by plating or on enrichment (95% confidence interval, 92%-99.7%). The organisms with the highest positive rates of growth on enrichment were enterococci (54%), gram-negative organisms (32%), Staphylococcus aureus (23%), vancomycin-resistant enterococci (13%), methicillin-resistant S aureus (8%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (5%), Candida albicans (3%), and Escherichia coli (2%). Mean plate counts, in colony-forming units, were 10 187 for gram-negative organisms, 99 for E coli, 30 for P aeruginosa, 86 for S aureus, 207 for enterococci, and 31 for vancomycin-resistant enterococci. Bath basins are a reservoir for bacteria and may be a source of transmission of hospital-acquired infections. Increased awareness of bath basins as a possible source of transmission of hospital-acquired infections is needed, particularly for high-risk patients.

  2. Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay Targeting Eight Parasites Customized to the Korean Population: Potential Use for Detection in Diarrheal Stool Samples from Gastroenteritis Patients.

    PubMed

    Won, Eun Jeong; Kim, Soo Hyun; Kee, Seung Jung; Shin, Jong Hee; Suh, Soon Pal; Chai, Jong Yil; Ryang, Dong Wook; Shin, Myung Geun

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal parasitic diseases occur worldwide and can cause diarrhea or gastroenteritis; however, their diagnosis is quite difficult, especially in low-endemism countries. We developed a multiplex real-time PCR assay for detection of eight intestinal parasites and prospectively evaluated it for patients with gastroenteritis. The assay targeted Cryptosporidium parvum, Giardia lamblia, Entamoeba histolytica, Blastocystis hominis, Dientamoeba fragilis, Clonorchis sinensis, Metagonimus yokogawai, and Gymnophalloides seoi. Performance characteristics were evaluated based on recovery after DNA extraction, analytical sensitivity, specificity, reproducibility, cross-reactivity, and interference characteristics. Clinical performance was validated against microscopy on 123 diarrheal samples. The assay demonstrated strong correlations between DNA concentrations and Ct values (R2, 0.9924-0.9998), and had a high PCR efficiency (83.3%-109.5%). Polymerase chain reactions detected as few as 10-30 copies of genomic DNA, and coefficient of variance was 0-7%. There was no cross-reactivity to the other 54 microorganisms tested. Interference occurred only in presence of high concentrations of erythrocytes or leukocytes. This assay had a higher correct identification rate (100.0% vs. 90.2%) and lower incorrect ID rate (0.0% vs. 9.8%) when compared to microscopy. Overall, this assay showed a higher sensitivity (100.0%; 95% confidence interval [CI] of 80.5-100.0) than microscopy (29.4%; 95% CI 10.31-55.96), and the specificity levels were comparable for both methods (100.0%; 95% CI 96.58-100.0). This newly developed multiplex real-time PCR assay offers a potential use for detecting intestinal parasitic pathogens customized to the Korean population.

  3. Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay Targeting Eight Parasites Customized to the Korean Population: Potential Use for Detection in Diarrheal Stool Samples from Gastroenteritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Won, Eun Jeong; Kim, Soo Hyun; Kee, Seung Jung; Shin, Jong Hee; Suh, Soon Pal; Chai, Jong Yil; Ryang, Dong Wook; Shin, Myung Geun

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal parasitic diseases occur worldwide and can cause diarrhea or gastroenteritis; however, their diagnosis is quite difficult, especially in low-endemism countries. We developed a multiplex real-time PCR assay for detection of eight intestinal parasites and prospectively evaluated it for patients with gastroenteritis. The assay targeted Cryptosporidium parvum, Giardia lamblia, Entamoeba histolytica, Blastocystis hominis, Dientamoeba fragilis, Clonorchis sinensis, Metagonimus yokogawai, and Gymnophalloides seoi. Performance characteristics were evaluated based on recovery after DNA extraction, analytical sensitivity, specificity, reproducibility, cross-reactivity, and interference characteristics. Clinical performance was validated against microscopy on 123 diarrheal samples. The assay demonstrated strong correlations between DNA concentrations and Ct values (R2, 0.9924–0.9998), and had a high PCR efficiency (83.3%–109.5%). Polymerase chain reactions detected as few as 10–30 copies of genomic DNA, and coefficient of variance was 0–7%. There was no cross-reactivity to the other 54 microorganisms tested. Interference occurred only in presence of high concentrations of erythrocytes or leukocytes. This assay had a higher correct identification rate (100.0% vs. 90.2%) and lower incorrect ID rate (0.0% vs. 9.8%) when compared to microscopy. Overall, this assay showed a higher sensitivity (100.0%; 95% confidence interval [CI] of 80.5–100.0) than microscopy (29.4%; 95% CI 10.31–55.96), and the specificity levels were comparable for both methods (100.0%; 95% CI 96.58–100.0). This newly developed multiplex real-time PCR assay offers a potential use for detecting intestinal parasitic pathogens customized to the Korean population. PMID:27861635

  4. Processing Protocol for Soil Samples Potentially ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Method Operating Procedures This protocol describes the processing steps for 45 g and 9 g soil samples potentially contaminated with Bacillus anthracis spores. The protocol is designed to separate and concentrate the spores from bulk soil down to a pellet that can be used for further analysis. Soil extraction solution and mechanical shaking are used to disrupt soil particle aggregates and to aid in the separation of spores from soil particles. Soil samples are washed twice with soil extraction solution to maximize recovery. Differential centrifugation is used to separate spores from the majority of the soil material. The 45 g protocol has been demonstrated by two laboratories using both loamy and sandy soil types. There were no significant differences overall between the two laboratories for either soil type, suggesting that the processing protocol would be robust enough to use at multiple laboratories while achieving comparable recoveries. The 45 g protocol has demonstrated a matrix limit of detection at 14 spores/gram of soil for loamy and sandy soils.

  5. Processing Protocol for Soil Samples Potentially ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Method Operating Procedures This protocol describes the processing steps for 45 g and 9 g soil samples potentially contaminated with Bacillus anthracis spores. The protocol is designed to separate and concentrate the spores from bulk soil down to a pellet that can be used for further analysis. Soil extraction solution and mechanical shaking are used to disrupt soil particle aggregates and to aid in the separation of spores from soil particles. Soil samples are washed twice with soil extraction solution to maximize recovery. Differential centrifugation is used to separate spores from the majority of the soil material. The 45 g protocol has been demonstrated by two laboratories using both loamy and sandy soil types. There were no significant differences overall between the two laboratories for either soil type, suggesting that the processing protocol would be robust enough to use at multiple laboratories while achieving comparable recoveries. The 45 g protocol has demonstrated a matrix limit of detection at 14 spores/gram of soil for loamy and sandy soils.

  6. PTCH 1 staining of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (PNET) samples from patients with and without multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN-1) syndrome reveals a potential therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Gurung, Buddha; Hua, Xianxin; Runske, Melissa; Bennett, Bonita; LiVolsi, Virginia; Roses, Robert; Fraker, Douglas A; Metz, David C

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) are rare, indolent tumors that may occur sporadically or develop in association with well-recognized hereditary syndromes, particularly multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN-1). We previously demonstrated that the hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway was aberrantly up-regulated in a mouse model that phenocopies the human MEN-1 syndrome, Men1l/l;RipCre, and that inhibition of this pathway suppresses MEN-1 tumor cell proliferation. We hypothesized that the HH signaling pathway is similarly upregulated in human PNETs. We performed immunohistochemical (IHC) staining for PTCH1 in human fresh and archival PNET specimens to examine whether human sporadic and MEN-1-associated PNETs revealed similar abnormalities as in our mouse model and correlated the results with clinical and demographic factors of the study cohort. PTCH1 staining was positive in 12 of 22 PNET patients (55%). Four of 5 MEN-1 patients stained for PTCH1 (p = 0.32 as compared with sporadic disease patients). Nine of 16 patients with metastatic disease stained for PTCH1 as compared with zero of 3 with localized disease only (p = 0.21). No demographic or clinical features appeared to be predictive of PTCH 1 positivity and PTCH 1 positivity per se was not predictive of clinical outcome. PTCH1, a marker of HH pathway up regulation, is detectable in both primary and metastatic tumors in more than 50% of PNET patients. Although no clinical or demographic factors predict PTCH1 positivity and PTCH1 positivity does not predict clinical outcome, the frequency of expression alone indicates that perturbation of this pathway with agents such as Vismodegib, an inhibitor of Smoothened (SMO), should be examined in future clinical trials.

  7. Geology of Potential Landing Sites for Martian Sample Returns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald

    2003-01-01

    This project involved the analysis of potential landing sites on Mars. As originally proposed, the project focused on landing sites from which samples might be returned to Earth. However, as the project proceeded, the emphasis shifted to missions that would not include sample return, because the Mars Exploration Program had deferred sample returns to the next decade. Subsequently, this project focused on the study of potential landing sites for the Mars Exploration Rovers.

  8. Geology of Potential Landing Sites for Martian Sample Returns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald

    2003-01-01

    This project involved the analysis of potential landing sites on Mars. As originally proposed, the project focused on landing sites from which samples might be returned to Earth. However, as the project proceeded, the emphasis shifted to missions that would not include sample return, because the Mars Exploration Program had deferred sample returns to the next decade. Subsequently, this project focused on the study of potential landing sites for the Mars Exploration Rovers.

  9. Determination of estrogenic potential in waste water without sample extraction.

    PubMed

    Avberšek, Miha; Žegura, Bojana; Filipič, Metka; Uranjek-Ževart, Nataša; Heath, Ester

    2013-09-15

    This study describes the modification of the ER-Calux assay for testing water samples without sample extraction (NE-(ER-Calux) assay). The results are compared to those obtained with ER-Calux assay and a theoretical estrogenic potential obtained by GC-MSD. For spiked tap and waste water samples there was no statistical difference between estrogenic potentials obtained by the three methods. Application of NE-(ER-Calux) to "real" influent and effluents from municipal waste water treatment plants and receiving surface waters found that the NE-(ER-Calux) assay gave higher values compared to ER-Calux assay and GC-MSD. This is explained by the presence of water soluble endocrine agonists that are usually removed during extraction. Intraday dynamics of the estrogenic potential of a WWTP influent and effluent revealed an increase in the estrogenic potential of the influent from 12.9 ng(EEQ)/L in the morning to a peak value of 40.0 ng(EEQ)/L in the afternoon. The estrogenic potential of the effluent was potential was 92-98%. Daytime estrogenic potential values varied significantly. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Are rhinoplasty patients potentially mad?

    PubMed

    Slator, R; Harris, D L

    1992-01-01

    Rhinoplasty patients have long been considered to be psychologically unstable and therefore a "risky" group upon which to operate. Patients who had rhinoplastic operations more than 5 years ago were contacted by post and their psychological health assessed by the use of psychometric tests. The results show no evidence to support earlier suggestions that requests for rhinoplasty may be early symptoms of severe psychiatric disease. However, several points do emerge. Male patients show more symptoms of anxiety and depression than normal, and female patients who give no history of injury preceding their operation behave in a more extrovert and sociable manner than normal. Furthermore, patients of both sexes who give no history of injury before their operation, even though pleased with the operative results, are more self-conscious of their appearance than those who were injured prior to their rhinoplasty.

  11. Eccentricity Samples: Implications on the Potential and the Velocity Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubarsi, R.; Stojanović, M.; Ninković, S.

    2017-06-01

    Planar and vertical epicycle frequencies and local angular velocity are related to the derivatives up to the second order of the local potential and can be used to test the shape of the potential from stellar disc samples. These samples show a more complex velocity distribution than halo stars and should provide a more realistic test. We assume an axisymmetric potential allowing a mixture of independent ellipsoidal velocity distributions, of separable or Staeckel form in cylindrical or spherical coordinates. We prove that values of local constants are not consistent with a potential separable in addition in cylindrical coordinates and with a spherically symmetric potential. The simplest potential that fits the local constants is used to show that the harmonical and non-harmonical terms of the potential are equally important. The same analysis is used to estimate the local constants. Two families of nested subsamples selected for decreasing planar and vertical eccentricities are used to borne out the relation between the mean squared planar and vertical eccentricities and the velocity dispersions of the subsamples. According to the first-order epicycle model, the radial and vertical velocity components provide accurate information on the planar and vertical epicycle frequencies. However, it is impossible to account for the asymmetric drift which introduces a systematic bias in estimation of the third constant. Under a more general model, when the asymmetric drift is taken into account, the rotation velocity dispersions together with their asymmetric drift provide the correct fit for the local angular velocity. The consistency of the results shows that this new method based on the distribution of eccentricities is worth using for kinematic stellar samples.

  12. Cavernous sinus sampling in patients with Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, Till; Flitsch, Jörg; van Leyen, Philine; Sauer, Nina; Aberle, Jens; Grzyska, Ulrich; Lüdecke, Dieter K

    2015-02-01

    OBJECT Correct diagnosis and precise localization of adenomas in patients with Cushing's disease are essential for avoiding unsuccessful transsphenoidal pituitary exploration. In addition to the well-established inferior petrosal sinus sampling, preoperative cavernous sinus sampling (CSS) was introduced as a potentially improved way to predict adenoma lateralization. The authors present their results with CSS in a consecutive series of patients with Cushing's disease. METHODS During 1999-2014, transsphenoidal surgeries were consecutively performed in 510 patients with Cushing's disease. For most patients, suppression of cortisol in high-dose dexamethasone tests and stimulation of adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol after administration of corticotropin-releasing hormone were sufficient to prove the diagnosis of adrenocorticotropic hormone-dependent hypercortisolism. Of the 510 patients, 67 (13%) were referred to the department of neuroradiology for CSS according to the technique of Teramoto. The indications for CSS were unclear endocrine test results or negative MRI results. Data for all patients were retrospectively analyzed. RESULTS A central/peripheral gradient was found in 59 patients; lateralization to the left or right side was found in 51. For 8 patients with a central/peripheral gradient, no left/right gradient could be determined. For another 8 patients with equivocal test results, no central/peripheral gradient was found. No severe CSS-associated complications were encountered. Of the 51 patients who underwent transsphenoidal surgery, the predicted lateralization was proven correct for 42 (82%). CONCLUSIONS As MRI techniques have improved, the number of potential candidates for this invasive method has decreased in the past decade. However, because detecting minute adenomas remains problematic, CSS remains a useful diagnostic tool for patients with Cushing's disease.

  13. Optimizing analog-to-digital converters for sampling extracellular potentials.

    PubMed

    Artan, N Sertac; Xu, Xiaoxiang; Shi, Wei; Chao, H Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    In neural implants, an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) provides the delicate interface between the analog signals generated by neurological processes and the digital signal processor that is tasked to interpret these signals for instance for epileptic seizure detection or limb control. In this paper, we propose a low-power ADC architecture for neural implants that process extracellular potentials. The proposed architecture uses the spike detector that is readily available on most of these implants in a closed-loop with an ADC. The spike detector determines whether the current input signal is part of a spike or it is part of noise to adaptively determine the instantaneous sampling rate of the ADC. The proposed architecture can reduce the power consumption of a traditional ADC by 62% when sampling extracellular potentials without any significant impact on spike detection accuracy.

  14. Reported pica behavior in a sample of incident dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Ward, P; Kutner, N G

    1999-01-01

    In a prospective study, pica behavior was investigated during baseline interviews with a cohort of incident patients (n = 226) who began chronic dialysis therapy in metropolitan Atlanta, GA, during 1996 to 1997. Pica, defined as current pica behavior and/or reported history of pica behavior, was reported by 16% of the sample. Patients reporting pica were significantly more likely to be African American women and were significantly younger than the remainder of the sample. Approximately two thirds of patients who reported pica behaviors craved and excessively consumed ice; the remainder craved and consumed starch, dirt, flour, or aspirin. Among patients reporting pica, average serum albumin values were low and average phosphorus was increased. The average hematocrit of patients reporting ice pica was low. Over half of the hemodialysis patients reporting pica behavior had excessive usual interdialytic weight gain. Potential symptoms/problems affecting quality of life among patients practicing pica, eg, cramps, are shown in a case report. The data indicate the need for targeted education and support for dietitians' increased interaction with dialysis patients involved in pica behaviors.

  15. Pseudospectral Gaussian quantum dynamics: Efficient sampling of potential energy surfaces.

    PubMed

    Heaps, Charles W; Mazziotti, David A

    2016-04-28

    Trajectory-based Gaussian basis sets have been tremendously successful in describing high-dimensional quantum molecular dynamics. In this paper, we introduce a pseudospectral Gaussian-based method that achieves accurate quantum dynamics using efficient, real-space sampling of the time-dependent basis set. As in other Gaussian basis methods, we begin with a basis set expansion using time-dependent Gaussian basis functions guided by classical mechanics. Unlike other Gaussian methods but characteristic of the pseudospectral and collocation methods, the basis set is tested with N Dirac delta functions, where N is the number of basis functions, rather than using the basis function as test functions. As a result, the integration for matrix elements is reduced to function evaluation. Pseudospectral Gaussian dynamics only requires O(N) potential energy calculations, in contrast to O(N(2)) evaluations in a variational calculation. The classical trajectories allow small basis sets to sample high-dimensional potentials. Applications are made to diatomic oscillations in a Morse potential and a generalized version of the Henon-Heiles potential in two, four, and six dimensions. Comparisons are drawn to full analytical evaluation of potential energy integrals (variational) and the bra-ket averaged Taylor (BAT) expansion, an O(N) approximation used in Gaussian-based dynamics. In all cases, the pseudospectral Gaussian method is competitive with full variational calculations that require a global, analytical, and integrable potential energy surface. Additionally, the BAT breaks down when quantum mechanical coherence is particularly strong (i.e., barrier reflection in the Morse oscillator). The ability to obtain variational accuracy using only the potential energy at discrete points makes the pseudospectral Gaussian method a promising avenue for on-the-fly dynamics, where electronic structure calculations become computationally significant.

  16. Sample Selected Averaging Method for Analyzing the Event Related Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Akira; Ono, Youhei; Kimura, Tomoaki

    The event related potential (ERP) is often measured through the oddball task. On the oddball task, subjects are given “rare stimulus” and “frequent stimulus”. Measured ERPs were analyzed by the averaging technique. In the results, amplitude of the ERP P300 becomes large when the “rare stimulus” is given. However, measured ERPs are included samples without an original feature of ERP. Thus, it is necessary to reject unsuitable measured ERPs when using the averaging technique. In this paper, we propose the rejection method for unsuitable measured ERPs for the averaging technique. Moreover, we combine the proposed method and Woody's adaptive filter method.

  17. Optimal sampling efficiency in Monte Carlo sampling with an approximate potential

    SciTech Connect

    Coe, Joshua D; Shaw, M Sam; Sewell, Thomas D

    2009-01-01

    Building on the work of Iftimie et al., Boltzmann sampling of an approximate potential (the 'reference' system) is used to build a Markov chain in the isothermal-isobaric ensemble. At the endpoints of the chain, the energy is evaluated at a higher level of approximation (the 'full' system) and a composite move encompassing all of the intervening steps is accepted on the basis of a modified Metropolis criterion. For reference system chains of sufficient length, consecutive full energies are statistically decorrelated and thus far fewer are required to build ensemble averages with a given variance. Without modifying the original algorithm, however, the maximum reference chain length is too short to decorrelate full configurations without dramatically lowering the acceptance probability of the composite move. This difficulty stems from the fact that the reference and full potentials sample different statistical distributions. By manipulating the thermodynamic variables characterizing the reference system (pressure and temperature, in this case), we maximize the average acceptance probability of composite moves, lengthening significantly the random walk between consecutive full energy evaluations. In this manner, the number of full energy evaluations needed to precisely characterize equilibrium properties is dramatically reduced. The method is applied to a model fluid, but implications for sampling high-dimensional systems with ab initio or density functional theory (DFT) potentials are discussed.

  18. Methanogenic potential of tailings samples from oil sands extraction plants.

    PubMed

    Fedorak, Phillip M; Coy, Debora L; Salloum, Myrna J; Dudas, Marvin J

    2002-01-01

    Approximately 20% of Canada's oil supply now comes from the extraction of bitumen from the oil sands deposits in northeastern Alberta. The oil sands are strip-mined, and the bitumen is typically separated from sand and clays by an alkaline hot water extraction process. The rapidly expanding oil sands industry has millions of cubic metres of tailings for disposal and large areas of land to reclaim. There are estimates that the consolidation of the mature fine tails (MFT) in the settling ponds will take about 150 years. Some of the settling ponds are now evolving microbially produced methane, a greenhouse gas. To hasten consolidation, gypsum (CaSO4 x 2H2O) is added to MFT, yielding materials called consolidated or composite tailings (CT). Sulfate from the gypsum has the potential to stimulate sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) to out-compete methanogens, thereby stopping methanogenesis. This investigation examined three MFT and four CT samples from three oil sands extractions companies. Each was found to contain methanogens and SRB. Serum bottle microcosm studies showed sulfate in the CT samples stopped methane production. However, if the microcosms were amended with readily utilizable electron donors, the sulfate was consumed, and when it reached approximately 20 mg/L, methane production began. Some unamended microcosms were incubated for 372 days, with no methane production detected. This work showed that each MFT and CT sample has the potential to become methanogenic, but in the absence of exogenous electron donors, the added sulfate can inhibit methanogenesis for a long time.

  19. Cancer patient education: reality and potential.

    PubMed

    Rimer, B; Keintz, M K; Glassman, B

    1985-11-01

    Cancer now attacks one in three Americans, resulting in one in six deaths. Yet, until recently, few patient education programs were directed toward cancer patients. This review examines the status of cancer patient education and suggests future directions. We focus on several aspects of cancer patient education, including needs assessments and programs in treatment, rehabilitation, and continuing care and evaluation. The most comprehensive patient education programs are those directed toward patients in active treatment; one of its tasks is to help patients manage treatment side effects. A major component of rehabilitation programs is counseling patients to help them cope with the effects of cancer. Many patient education programs have performed evaluations; most reflect difficulties in one or more areas, such as selecting appropriate measures or accruing adequate sample sizes. We recommend several directions for the future, including the use of appropriate measurement tools, adequate sample sizes, multimodality programs with incorporation of psychological techniques such as relaxation training and guided imagery, and assessment of the impact of patient education programs on costs.

  20. Potential applications of environmental sampling and analysis for the IAEA

    SciTech Connect

    Raber, E.

    1993-03-01

    This objective of this paper is to address the usefulness of envirorunental sampling and analysis in support of the IAEA. In particular, whether state-of-the-art analytical methods may provide detection of undeclared nuclear activities. It is important to emphasize that envirorunental sampling offers the IAEA a method of improving the assurance that a particular facility has no ongoing undeclared nuclear activities. It is suggested as a supplement to the existing IAEA safeguards inspections and activities. Enviromental sampling with appropriate analytical techniques can detect unknown activity fairly well, but it is not very reliable for determining how much or when activity has actually occured. Additionally, it is important to point out that the cost of such an envirorunental sampling program needs to be balanced with the confidence provided to detect undeclared nuclear activities. Environmental sampling wig probably not allow the IAEA to reduce or eliminate some of its existing baseline activities. The addition of an environmental sampling and analysis program will entail a cost of its own, and adding such a program may not reduce IAEA total costs. The overall cost of such a program will depend on the level of confidence required, (e.g. number and type of samples and analyses), the Quality Assurance plan to be implemented and the number of sites to be inspected. A more detailed cost analysis is not within the scope of this paper.

  1. Antimicrobial potentials of different solvent extracted samples from Physalis ixocarpa.

    PubMed

    Khan, Wajid; Bakht, Jehan; Shafi, Mohammad

    2016-03-01

    The present study investigates the antimicrobial activities of different solvent extracted samples isolated from different parts of Physalis ixocarpa through disc diffusion assay using three different concentrations. Statistical analysis of the data revealed that different parts of the plant showed varying degree of inhibition against different bacteria at different concentrations. Different solvent extracted samples from the calyx showed inhibitory activity against most of the bacteria under study. Extracts from leaf and fruit samples showed activity against S. aureus and K. pneumoniae and extracts from the stem tissues were effective to control the growth of E. coli and K. pneumoniae. Crude methanolic extract from the stem and n-butanol extracted samples from fruit exhibited strong inhibitory activity against Klebsiella pneumoniae at highest concentrations. Antifungal activity was observed only in crude methanol extract from the leaf against Rhizopus stolinifer, Aspergillus niger and Penicillium chrysogenum.

  2. Beryllium Wipe Sampling (differing methods - differing exposure potentials)

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, Kent

    2005-03-09

    This research compared three wipe sampling techniques currently used to test for beryllium contamination on room and equipment surfaces in Department of Energy facilities. Efficiencies of removal of beryllium contamination from typical painted surfaces were tested by wipe sampling without a wetting agent, with water-moistened wipe materials, and by methanol-moistened wipes. Analysis indicated that methanol-moistened wipe sampling removed about twice as much beryllium/oil-film surface contamination as water-moistened wipes, which removed about twice as much residue as dry wipes. Criteria at 10 CFR 850.30 and .31 were established on unspecified wipe sampling method(s). The results of this study reveal a need to identify criteria-setting method and equivalency factors. As facilities change wipe sampling methods among the three compared in this study, these results may be useful for approximate correlations. Accurate decontamination decision-making depends on the selection of appropriate wetting agents for the types of residues and surfaces. Evidence for beryllium sensitization via skin exposure argues in favor of wipe sampling with wetting agents that provide enhanced removal efficiency such as methanol when surface contamination includes oil mist residue.

  3. Reactive Monte Carlo sampling with an ab initio potential

    DOE PAGES

    Leiding, Jeff; Coe, Joshua D.

    2016-05-04

    Here, we present the first application of reactive Monte Carlo in a first-principles context. The algorithm samples in a modified NVT ensemble in which the volume, temperature, and total number of atoms of a given type are held fixed, but molecular composition is allowed to evolve through stochastic variation of chemical connectivity. We also discuss general features of the method, as well as techniques needed to enhance the efficiency of Boltzmann sampling. Finally, we compare the results of simulation of NH3 to those of ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD). Furthermore, we find that there are regions of state space formore » which RxMC sampling is much more efficient than AIMD due to the “rare-event” character of chemical reactions.« less

  4. A pseudo-random patient sampling method evaluated.

    PubMed

    De La Mata, Nicole L; Ahn, Mi-Young; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Ly, Penh Sun; Ng, Oon Tek; Nguyen, Kinh Van; Merati, Tuti Parwati; Pham, Thuy Thanh; Lee, Man Po; Durier, Nicolas; Law, Matthew G

    2017-01-01

    To compare two human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) cohorts to determine whether a pseudo-random sample can represent the entire study population. HIV-positive patients receiving care at eight sites in seven Asian countries. The TREAT Asia HIV Observational database (TAHOD) pseudo-randomly selected a patient sample, while TREAT Asia HIV Observational database-Low Intensity Transfer (TAHOD-LITE) included all patients. We compared patient demographics, CD4 count, and HIV viral load testing for each cohort. Risk factors associated with CD4 count response, HIV viral load suppression (<400 copies/mL), and survival were determined for each cohort. There were 2,318 TAHOD patients and 14,714 TAHOD-LITE patients. Patient demographics, CD4 count, and HIV viral load testing rates were broadly similar between the cohorts. CD4 count response and all-cause mortality were consistent among the cohorts with similar risk factors. HIV viral load response appeared to be superior in TAHOD and many risk factors differed, possibly due to viral load being tested on a subset of patients. Our study gives the first empirical evidence that analysis of risk factors for completely ascertained end points from our pseudo-randomly selected patient sample may be generalized to our larger, complete population of HIV-positive patients. However, results can significantly vary when analyzing smaller or pseudo-random samples, particularly if some patient data are not completely missing at random, such as viral load results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Biobank-short message service for linking patients and samples.

    PubMed

    Tebbakha, Riad

    2013-09-01

    A biobank is a biorepository that stores biological samples (usually of human origin) for use in research. Since the late 1990s, biobanks have become a key resource, supporting contemporary research in many fields, including genomics and personalized medicine. The ethical requirement for anonymity currently results in irreversible severing of the link between patients and their biobank samples. However, the maintenance of an anonymous link would increase patients' control over their samples and the efficacy of sample management. We propose a system for anonymous, real-time communication between the biobank and the patients providing samples based on the short message service (SMS) of mobile telephones. The patient and the biobank communicate via a cryptographic protocol, using a trusted third-party server. The biobank-SMS (BioK-SMS) communication system provides answers to certain persistent ethical questions relating to biobanking. BioK-SMS makes it easier to obtain renewed consent when required, gives patients more control over their samples, and protects their privacy.

  6. Adrenal venous sampling in a patient with adrenal Cushing syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Villa-Franco, Carlos Andrés; Román-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Velez-Hoyos, Alejandro; Echeverri-Isaza, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    The primary bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia or the independent adrenocorticotropic hormone bilateral nodular adrenal hyperplasia is a rare cause hypercortisolism, its diagnosis is challenging and there is no clear way to decide the best therapeutic approach. Adrenal venous sampling is commonly used to distinguish the source of hormonal production in patients with primary hyperaldosteronism. It could be a useful tool in this context because it might provide information to guide the treatment. We report the case of a patient with ACTH independent Cushing syndrome in whom the use of adrenal venous sampling with some modifications radically modified the treatment and allowed the diagnosis of a macronodular adrenal hyperplasia. PMID:26309345

  7. Adrenal venous sampling in a patient with adrenal Cushing syndrome.

    PubMed

    Builes-Montaño, Carlos Esteban; Villa-Franco, Carlos Andrés; Román-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Velez-Hoyos, Alejandro; Echeverri-Isaza, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    The primary bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia or the independent adrenocorticotropic hormone bilateral nodular adrenal hyperplasia is a rare cause hypercortisolism, its diagnosis is challenging and there is no clear way to decide the best therapeutic approach. Adrenal venous sampling is commonly used to distinguish the source of hormonal production in patients with primary hyperaldosteronism. It could be a useful tool in this context because it might provide information to guide the treatment. We report the case of a patient with ACTH independent Cushing syndrome in whom the use of adrenal venous sampling with some modifications radically modified the treatment and allowed the diagnosis of a macronodular adrenal hyperplasia.

  8. Evaluating the Impact of Sample Medication on Subsequent Patient Adherence.

    PubMed

    Pringle, Janice L; Aldridge, Arnie; Kearney, Shannon M; Grasso, Kim; Radack, John; Hogue, Susan; Manolis, Chronis

    2016-11-01

    Medication nonadherence is problematic throughout health care practice. Patient nonadherence is a result of several factors, such as financial issues, confusion about the medication, or concerns about possible side effects. Efforts to improve adherence have been implemented, but new strategies are needed to ensure that patients fill their medication prescriptions and adhere to their prescribed use. To investigate whether providing patients with a free 30-day supply of medication at the point of care via a dispensing kiosk-a secure, computerized cabinet placed in the prescriber's office-that provides sample medication and educational materials had a measurable impact on adherence and health care cost. The study sample consisted of patients drawn from the electronic health records of a large health care provider who were prescribed medications to treat diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. The comparison groups included a treatment group of patients who each received a 30-day generic sample of medication and a control group of patients who did not receive a sample. The study outcome was primary medication non-adherence (PMN), defined as whether a patient filled a prescription within 90, 180, or 365 days of prescribing. Only patients receiving a prescription for the first time were considered; patients on a medication before receipt of the sample were dropped. Postprescription medication adherence (PPMA), measured as proportion of days covered (PDC) and proportion of days covered ≥ 80% (PDC80), was also examined. Propensity score methods and multivariate regression models were used to examine the outcomes and group differences. Costs to the patient before and after the prescription were also analyzed. Key informant interviews were conducted with physicians, and qualitative analyses were performed. Patients who received a 30-day generic medication sample had a higher probability of filling a first prescription within 90 days (72.2% for treatment patients vs. 37

  9. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Heydari, Nahid; Hajiabolhassani, Fahimeh; Fatahi, Jamileh; Movaseghi, Shafieh; Jalaie, Shohreh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune systemic disease. Most common autoimmune diseases are multisystem disorders that may also present with otological manifestations, and autoimmune inner ear disease accompanied by vestibular dysfunction. This study aimed to compare the vestibular function between RA patients and normal subjects using cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMPs). Methods: In this cross- sectional study, 25patients with RA (19 female and 6 male: mean (±SD) age, 40.00 (±7.92) years) and 20 healthy subjects (15 female and 5 male: mean (±SD) age, 35.35 (±10.48) years) underwent cVEMPs, using 500 Hz-tone bursts at 95 dB nHL intensity level. Data were analyzed using independent sample t-test through SPSS software v. 16. Results: The mean peak latency of p13 was significantly higher in RA patients (p<0.001). The mean peak latency of n23 was significantly higher in patients in the left ear (p=0.03). Vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) responses were present in all (100%) of the participants. There were no significant differences in mean peak to peak amplitude and amplitude ratio between the two groups. Conclusion: According to the prolonged latency of VEMP responses in RA patients, lesions in the retrolabyrinthine, especially in the vestibulospinal tract are suspected. PMID:26478874

  10. Patients' perspectives on providing a stool sample to their GP: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Lecky, Donna M; Hawking, Meredith K D; McNulty, Cliodna A M

    2014-11-01

    Stool specimen collection is challenging and informal feedback has indicated that participants find the process difficult. Increasing stool specimen returns would improve the investigation of outbreaks of diarrhoeal and food-borne disease. To explore the barriers to stool sample collection and specimen return to ascertain which factors may help to improve the process. Qualitative patient interview study in Gloucester, UK. A two-stage purposive sampling process was used to identify patients who had either previous experience or no experience of collecting a stool sample. The interview schedule, based on the theory of planned behaviour, was used to facilitate interviews with 26 patients. Interview transcripts were analysed using a modified framework analysis. Barriers to collection included embarrassment, fear of results, concerns around hygiene and contamination, discretion and privacy, and lack of information. Personal gain was identified as the main incentive to collecting and returning a stool sample. The need for an information leaflet on stool collection was emphasised by most patients. GPs could make a number of small changes that could make a big difference for patients and potentially increase stool sample return. If they, rather than receptionists, distributed collection kits it may be easier for patients to ask any questions they had regarding collection. In addition, the provision of a stool-collection information leaflet could increase patients' confidence regarding collecting the sample, and providing drop-off boxes for specimens could help prevent patients' embarrassment regarding handing their stool over to a receptionist. © British Journal of General Practice 2014.

  11. Metabolic Perturbation and Potential Markers in Patients with Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kun; Liu, Gaoshuang; Wang, Yuqing; Xu, Jin; Liu, Linsheng; Li, Mengjie; Shi, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Clinical diagnosis of esophageal cancer (EC) at early stage is rather difficult. This study aimed to profile the molecules in serum and tissue and identify potential biomarkers in patients with EC. A total of 64 volunteers were recruited, and 83 samples (24 EC serum samples, 21 serum controls, 19 paired EC tissues, and corresponding tumor-adjacent tissues) were analyzed. The gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/TOF-MS) was employed, and principal component analysis was used to reveal the discriminatory metabolites and identify the candidate markers of EC. A total of 41 in serum and 36 identified compounds in tissues were relevant to the malignant prognosis. A marked metabolic reprogramming of EC was observed, including enhanced anaerobic glycolysis and glutaminolysis, inhibited tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and altered lipid metabolism and amino acid turnover. Based on the potential markers of glucose, glutamic acid, lactic acid, and cholesterol, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves indicated good diagnosis and prognosis of EC. EC patients showed distinct reprogrammed metabolism involved in glycolysis, TCA cycle, glutaminolysis, and fatty acid metabolism. The pivotal molecules in the metabolic pathways were suggested as the potential markers to facilitate the early diagnosis of human EC. PMID:28512469

  12. Test evaluation of potential heatshield contamination of an outer planet probe's gas sampling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of retaining the heat shield for outer planet probes was investigated as a potential source of atmospheric sample contamination by outgassing. The onboard instruments which are affected by the concept are the pressure sensor, temperature sensor, IR detector, nephelometer, and gas sampling instruments. It was found that: (1) The retention of the charred heatshield and the baseline atmospheric sampling concepts are compatible with obtaining noncontaminated atmospheric samples. (2) Increasing the sampling tube length so that it extends beyond the viscous boundary layer eliminates contamination of the atmospheric sample. (3) The potential for contamination increases with angle of attack.

  13. Microbial analysis of subgingival plaque samples compared to that of whole saliva in patients with periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Haririan, Hady; Andrukhov, Oleh; Bertl, Kristina; Lettner, Stefan; Kierstein, Sonja; Moritz, Andreas; Rausch-Fan, Xiaohui

    2014-06-01

    The detection of special bacterial species in patients with periodontitis is considered to be useful for clinical diagnosis and treatment. The collection of subgingival plaque samples is the common way for the determination of periodontopathic bacteria. However, recently, salivary analysis has been discussed as an advantageous future diagnostic method for periodontitis because it offers simple quantitative sampling and the possibility to assess various bacteria. The aim of this cross-sectional study is to investigate whether there is a correlation between the results of different bacterial species in saliva and subgingival plaque samples from individuals with aggressive periodontitis (AgP) and chronic periodontitis (CP). Whole saliva and subgingival plaque samples from the deepest pocket of each quadrant were collected from 43 patients with CP and 33 patients with AgP. Twenty different bacterial species from both samplings were determined by the 16S ribosomal RNA-based polymerase chain reaction with microarray technique. All bacterial species were detected in salivary and subgingival plaque samples. For Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia, as well as Actinomyces viscosus, Campylobacter rectus/showae, Prevotella intermedia, Parvimonas micra, Eubacterium nodatum, and Campylobacter gracilis, a significant positive correlation between salivary and subgingival plaque samples was detected in patients with both types of periodontitis. There were no significant differences in bacteria in salivary and subgingival plaque samples between AgP and CP. Salivary analysis might be discussed as a potential alternative to subgingival plaque sampling for microbiologic analysis in both AgP and CP.

  14. Use of extreme patient samples for outcome prediction from gene expression data.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huiqing; Li, Jinyan; Wong, Limsoon

    2005-08-15

    Patient outcome prediction using microarray technologies is an important application in bioinformatics. Based on patients' genotypic microarray data, predictions are made to estimate patients' survival time and their risk of tumor metastasis or recurrence. So, accurate prediction can potentially help to provide better treatment for patients. We present a new computational method for patient outcome prediction. In the training phase of this method, we make use of two types of extreme patient samples: short-term survivors who got an unfavorable outcome within a short period and long-term survivors who were maintaining a favorable outcome after a long follow-up time. These extreme training samples yield a clear platform for us to identify relevant genes whose expression is closely related to the outcome. The selected extreme samples and the relevant genes are then integrated by a support vector machine to build a prediction model, by which each validation sample is assigned a risk score that falls into one of the special pre-defined risk groups. We apply this method to several public datasets. In most cases, patients in high and low risk groups stratified by our method have clearly distinguishable outcome status as seen in their Kaplan-Meier curves. We also show that the idea of selecting only extreme patient samples for training is effective for improving the prediction accuracy when different gene selection methods are used.

  15. 43 CFR 11.22 - Sampling of potentially injured natural resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Sampling of potentially injured natural resources. 11.22 Section 11.22 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Preassessment Phase § 11.22 Sampling of potentially injured natural resources...

  16. What Patient Characteristics Could Potentially Affect Patient Satisfaction Scores During Spine Clinic?

    PubMed

    Bible, Jesse E; Kay, Harrison F; Shau, David N; OʼNeill, Kevin R; Segebarth, P Bradley; Devin, Clinton J

    2015-07-01

    Prospective study. Assess which patient factors are associated with patient satisfaction scores in the outpatient spine clinic setting. Patient satisfaction has become an important component of quality assessments, and thereby pay-for-performance metrics, made by government, hospitals, and insurance providers. During a 7-month period, 200 patients were contacted via phone within 3 weeks of a new patient encounter with 1 of 11 spine providers. A standardized patient satisfaction phone survey consisting of 25 questions, answered using a 1-10 scale, was then administered. Patient demographics, medical/social history, and previous treatment were prospectively recorded. Potential associations between these patient factors and 3 outcomes of interest were investigated: (1) provider satisfaction, (2) overall clinic visit satisfaction, and (3) overall quality of care during clinic visit. Younger age, less formal education, and smoking were associated with diminished provider satisfaction, overall clinic visit satisfaction, and perceived overall quality of care (P ≤ 0.0001). Male patients were significantly less satisfied with their clinic visit compared with females (P = 0.029). Those treated under a worker's compensation claim were significantly less satisfied with their provider and overall quality of care (P ≤ 0.02). Marital status, working status, mental health history, travel distance, pain characteristics, previous treatments, and current narcotic use were not significant determinants of patient satisfaction (P > 0.05). This study found that those patients who were younger, with less formal education, and active smokers had lower patient satisfaction scores. Because patient satisfaction is increasingly being used in assessments of quality of care, it is essential that these factors be considered when evaluating a given provider's practice. This information is important to providers by helping guide individualized patient interactions while in clinic, as well as

  17. OBSERVATIONAL STUDIES OF PATIENTS IN THE EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT: A COMPARISON OF FOUR SAMPLING METHODS

    PubMed Central

    Valley, Morgan A.; Heard, Kennon J.; Ginde, Adit A.; Lezotte, Dennis C.; Lowenstein, Steven R.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives We evaluated the ability of four sampling methods to generate representative samples of the Emergency Department (ED) population. Methods We analyzed the electronic records of 21,662 consecutive patient visits at an urban, academic ED. From this population, we simulated different models of study recruitment in the ED by employing two sample sizes (n = 200, 400) and four sampling methods: 1) true random; 2) random 4-hour time blocks by exact sample size; 3) random 4-hour time blocks by a pre-determined number of blocks; and 4) convenience or “business hours.” For each method and sample size, we obtained 1,000 samples from the population. Using chi-square tests, we measured the number of statistically significant differences between the sample and the population for eight variables (age, gender, race/ethnicity, language, triage acuity, arrival mode, disposition and payer source). Then, for each variable, method and sample size, we compared the proportion of the 1,000 samples that differed from the overall ED population to the expected proportion (5%). Results Only the true random samples represented the population with respect to gender, race/ethnicity, triage acuity, mode of arrival, language and payer source in at least 95% of the samples. Patient samples obtained using random 4-hour time blocks and business hours sampling systematically differed from the overall ED patient population for several important demographic and clinical variables. However, the magnitude of these differences was not large. Conclusions Common sampling strategies selected for ED-based studies may affect parameter estimates for several representative population variables. However, the potential for bias for these variables appears small. PMID:22401950

  18. Observational studies of patients in the emergency department: a comparison of 4 sampling methods.

    PubMed

    Valley, Morgan A; Heard, Kennon J; Ginde, Adit A; Lezotte, Dennis C; Lowenstein, Steven R

    2012-08-01

    We evaluate the ability of 4 sampling methods to generate representative samples of the emergency department (ED) population. We analyzed the electronic records of 21,662 consecutive patient visits at an urban, academic ED. From this population, we simulated different models of study recruitment in the ED by using 2 sample sizes (n=200 and n=400) and 4 sampling methods: true random, random 4-hour time blocks by exact sample size, random 4-hour time blocks by a predetermined number of blocks, and convenience or "business hours." For each method and sample size, we obtained 1,000 samples from the population. Using χ(2) tests, we measured the number of statistically significant differences between the sample and the population for 8 variables (age, sex, race/ethnicity, language, triage acuity, arrival mode, disposition, and payer source). Then, for each variable, method, and sample size, we compared the proportion of the 1,000 samples that differed from the overall ED population to the expected proportion (5%). Only the true random samples represented the population with respect to sex, race/ethnicity, triage acuity, mode of arrival, language, and payer source in at least 95% of the samples. Patient samples obtained using random 4-hour time blocks and business hours sampling systematically differed from the overall ED patient population for several important demographic and clinical variables. However, the magnitude of these differences was not large. Common sampling strategies selected for ED-based studies may affect parameter estimates for several representative population variables. However, the potential for bias for these variables appears small. Copyright © 2012. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  19. Diagnostic potential of structural neuroimaging for depression from a multi-ethnic community sample.

    PubMed

    Sankar, Anjali; Zhang, Tianhao; Gaonkar, Bilwaj; Doshi, Jimit; Erus, Guray; Costafreda, Sergi G; Marangell, Lauren; Davatzikos, Christos; Fu, Cynthia H Y

    2016-07-01

    At present, we do not have any biological tests which can contribute towards a diagnosis of depression. Neuroimaging measures have shown some potential as biomarkers for diagnosis. However, participants have generally been from the same ethnic background while the applicability of a biomarker would require replication in individuals of diverse ethnicities. We sought to examine the diagnostic potential of the structural neuroanatomy of depression in a sample of a wide ethnic diversity. Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were obtained from 23 patients with major depressive disorder in an acute depressive episode (mean age: 39.8 years) and 20 matched healthy volunteers (mean age: 38.8 years). Participants were of Asian, African and Caucasian ethnicity recruited from the general community. Structural neuroanatomy combining white and grey matter distinguished patients from controls at the highest accuracy of 81% with the most stable pattern being at around 70%. A widespread network encompassing frontal, parietal, occipital and cerebellar regions contributed towards diagnostic classification. These findings provide an important step in the development of potential neuroimaging-based tools for diagnosis as they demonstrate that the identification of depression is feasible within a multi-ethnic group from the community. C.H.Y.F. has held recent research grants from Eli Lilly and Company and GlaxoSmithKline. L.M. is a former employee and stockholder of Eli Lilly and Company. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) licence.

  20. Potential Prognostic Value of Handgrip Strength in Older Hospitalized Patients.

    PubMed

    Savino, E; Sioulis, F; Guerra, G; Cavalieri, M; Zuliani, G; Guralnik, J M; Volpato, S

    2012-01-01

    Objective measures of physical function are useful prognostic tools also for hospitalized elders. Low handgrip strength is predictive of poor outcomes and it can be assessed also in a sitting position, representing a potential alternative measure in bedridden patients. We evaluated grip strength prognostic value in hospitalized older patients. Prospective cohort study. Geriatric, medical ward of an academic medical center in Ferrara, Italy. Patients aged 65 and older (N = 88) admitted to the hospital for an acute medical condition. Patients were evaluated for grip strength at hospital admission and were re-evaluated at discharge. After discharge, they were followed every 3 months for 1 year by telephone interviews to assess new hospitalizations and vital status. The mean age of the sample was 77.3 years, 47% were women. At admission, mean height standardized handgrip strength was 15.7±5 kg/m; men had greater strength (p<0.001). There was a direct relationship of admission grip strength with BMI (p<0.05), serum albumin (p=0.07), and Short Physical Performance Battery score (p<0.05), and an inverse relationship with age (gender-adjusted p value <0.01). In multiple regression analysis, after adjustment for possible confounders, patients in third tertile of grip strength had a shorter hospital stay compared to those in the first tertile (β -2.8; p<0.05). Patients with higher grip strength at discharge also had a lower risk of rehospitalization or death over the follow-up, although the result was not statistically significant (OR: 0.68; 95% CI: 0.30-1.52). In older hospitalized medical patients, grip strength assessment might provide useful prognostic information.

  1. Tooth transposition: a descriptive study in a 547-patient sample.

    PubMed

    Bourzgui, Farid; Sebbar, Mourad; Ait Ikiss, Jamila; Hamza, Mouna; Abidine, Zouhair; El Quars, Farid

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this investigation was to study the prevalence of tooth transposition in a population of orthodontic patients. A total of 547 patient records from our dentofacial orthopedics department were consulted. Each file included clinical observations, panoramic radiography, lateral cephalograms and dental casts. Patients with incomplete or poorly kept orthodontic records were excluded from the sample, as were those with unreadable panoramic radiographs. The classification of tooth transpositions used in the study was that first proposed by S. Peck and L. Peck in 1995. Computerized statistical analysis was performed using Epi-Info 6.0. The prevalence of tooth transposition was 2%, with the female population more heavily affected (64%). Tooth transposition occurred only in the maxillary arch. Of all the teeth, the canines were the most involved in this anomaly (100%). Transposition was associated with tooth agenesis in 18% of cases, peg lateral incisors in 27%, and persistent deciduous teeth in 18%. The prevalence of tooth transposition in this study population remained low, but was nonetheless higher than that found in most published investigations. Copyright © 2012 CEO. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of ischaemia on somatosensory evoked potentials in diabetic patients.

    PubMed Central

    López-Alburquerque, T; García Miguel, A; Ruiz Ezquerro, J J; de Portugal Alvarez, J

    1987-01-01

    The nerve action potential at the elbow and somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) at the scalp were recorded over 30 minutes of tourniquet-induced limb ischaemia in 10 diabetic patients and 10 controls. According to the SEP changes, an increased resistance to nerve ischaemia in diabetic patients was observed. The pathways involved in SEP conduction are discussed. PMID:3585354

  3. A Circuit Model for the Measurement of the Streaming Potential in a Rock Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, C.; Wang, J.; Qiu, A.; Liu, X.; Hu, H.

    2012-04-01

    Streaming potential is usually defined under the assumption that the rock sample under consideration is not connected electrically to any external circuit. In this study we investigate experimentally the effect of the external circuit on the measurement of the streaming potential. Cations usually dominate anions in the diffuse layer in the pore canals in a fluid-saturated porous sandstone sample. When a pressure difference is applied to the sample, fluid flows in the pores and causing a convective current due to the cation-dominate motion. With the separation of opposite ions at the two ends, a streaming potential occurs, and results in a conductive current. Those two current will be opposite and equal in value so that the streaming potential does not change. But in any experimental measurement of the streaming potential, the rock sample is not isolated in the circuit. An external circuit is necessary for the measurement of the potential difference at the ends of the sample. This external circuit will divert the flow of charges. This study investigates the effect of the external circuit on the convective current and conductive current in the pores by experiments, and gives an equivalent circuit model for the two currents. We connect an external resistance Rext to the ends of the fluid-saturated rock sample, and measure the potential difference at the ends of the sample . The impedance of the fluid-saturated rock sample Zrock is definite under a given salinity and can be separately measured. The circuit is governed by the following equations, Urock = ZrockIcond, (1) Urock = RextIext, (2) Iconv + Icond +Iext = 0, (3) where Iconv is the convective current, Icond is the conductive current, Iext is the external current and Urock is the potential difference at the ends of the rock sample. From the above three equations, we get - Urock(Zrock + Rext) Iconv = ---Z--R----- . rock ext (4) We repeated the measurement under different external resistance Rext. The computed

  4. Comparing microbiota profiles in induced and spontaneous sputum samples in COPD patients.

    PubMed

    Tangedal, Solveig; Aanerud, Marianne; Grønseth, Rune; Drengenes, Christine; Wiker, Harald G; Bakke, Per S; Eagan, Tomas M

    2017-08-29

    Induced and spontaneous sputum are used to evaluate the airways microbiota. Whether the sputum types can be used interchangeably in microbiota research is unknown. Our aim was to compare microbiota in induced and spontaneous sputum from COPD patients sampled during the same consultation. COPD patients from Bergen, Norway, were followed between 2006/2010, examined during the stable state and exacerbations. 30 patients delivered 36 sample pairs. DNA was extracted by enzymatic and mechanical lysis methods. The V3-V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene was PCR-amplified and prepared for paired-end sequencing. Illumina Miseq System was used for sequencing, and Quantitative Insights Into Microbial Ecology (QIIME) and Stata were used for bioinformatics and statistical analyses. Approximately 4 million sequences were sorted into 1004 different OTUs and further assigned to 106 different taxa. Pair-wise comparison of both taxonomic composition and beta-diversity revealed significant differences in one or both parameters in 1/3 of sample pairs. Alpha-diversity did not differ. Comparing abundances for each taxa identified, showed statistically significant differences between the mean abundances in induced versus spontaneous samples for 15 taxa when disease state was considered. This included potential pathogens like Haemophilus and Moraxella. When studying microbiota in sputum samples one should take into consideration how samples are collected and avoid the usage of both induced and spontaneous sputum in the same study.

  5. Mud Volcanoes in the Martian Lowlands: Potential Windows to Fluid-Rich Samples from Depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oehler, Dorothy Z.; Allen, Carlton C.

    2009-01-01

    The regional setting of the Chryse-Acidalia area augurs well for a fluid-rich subsurface, accumulation of diverse rock types reflecting the wide catchment area, astrobiological prospectivity, and mud volcanism. This latter provides a mechanism for transporting samples from relatively great depth to the surface. Since mud volcanoes are not associated with extreme heat or shock pressures, materials they transport to the surface are likely to be relatively unaltered; thus such materials could contain interpretable remnants of potential martian life (e.g., organic chemical biomarkers, mineral biosignatures, or structural remains) as well as unmetamorphosed rock samples. None of the previous landings on Mars was located in an area with features identified as potential mud volcanoes (Fig. 3), but some of these features may offer targets for future missions aimed at sampling deep fluid-rich strata with potential habitable zones.

  6. Quantum grow--A quantum dynamics sampling approach for growing potential energy surfaces and nonadiabatic couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Godsi, Oded; Peskin, Uri; Collins, Michael A.

    2010-03-28

    A quantum sampling algorithm for the interpolation of diabatic potential energy matrices by the Grow method is introduced. The new procedure benefits from penetration of the wave packet into classically forbidden regions, and the accurate quantum mechanical description of nonadiabatic transitions. The increased complexity associated with running quantum dynamics is reduced by using approximate low order expansions of the nuclear wave function within a Multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree scheme during the Grow process. The sampling algorithm is formulated and applied for three representative test cases, demonstrating the recovery of analytic potentials by the interpolated ones, and the convergence of a dynamic observable.

  7. Mitochondrial DNA levels in blood and tissue samples from breast cancer patients of different stages.

    PubMed

    Xia, Peng; Wang, Hui-Juan; Geng, Ting-Ting; Xun, Xiao-Jie; Zhou, Wen-Jing; Jin, Tian-Bo; Chen, Chao

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been implicated in carcinogenesis and tumor progression. We here evaluated the diagnostic and prognostic potential of mtDNA as a biomarker for breast cancer. Using multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction, nuclear DNA (nDNA) and mtDNA levels in serum, buffy coat, tumor, and tumor-adjacent tissue samples from 50 breast cancer patients were determined and assessed for associations with clinicopathological features. To evaluate mtDNA as a biomarker for distinguishing between the four sample types, we created receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. The mtDNA levels in buffy coat were significantly lower than in other sample types. Relative to tumor-adjacent tissue, reduced levels of mtDNA were identified in buffy coat and tumor tissue but not in serum. According to ROC curve analysis, mtDNA levels could be used to distinguish between buffy coat and tumor-adjacent tissue samples with good sensitivity (77%) and specificity (83%). Moreover, mtDNA levels in serum and tumor tissue were positively associated with cancer TMN stage. The mtDNA levels in blood samples may represent a promising, non-invasive biomarker in breast cancer patients. Additional, large-scale validation studies are required to establish the potential use of mtDNA levels in the early diagnosis and monitoring of breast cancer.

  8. Presence and potential of cell free DNA in different types of forensic samples.

    PubMed

    Vandewoestyne, Mado; Van Hoofstat, David; Franssen, Aimée; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Deforce, Dieter

    2013-02-01

    Extracellular or cell free DNA has been found to exist in many biological media such as blood and saliva. To check whether cell free DNA is present in the supernatant which is normally discarded during several DNA extraction processes, such as Chelex(®) extraction, DNA profiles of cell pellet and concentrated supernatant from 30 artificial case like samples and from 100 real forensic samples were compared. Presence of cell free DNA was shown in all investigated sample types. Moreover, in some samples additional alleles, not detected during analysis of the cell pellet, were detected, offering valuable information which would normally have been discarded together with the supernatant. The results presented here indicate that cell free DNA deserves further consideration since it has the potential to increase the DNA yield in forensic casework samples in general and in contact traces in particular.

  9. A two-stage method to determine optimal product sampling considering dynamic potential market.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhineng; Lu, Wei; Han, Bing

    2015-01-01

    This paper develops an optimization model for the diffusion effects of free samples under dynamic changes in potential market based on the characteristics of independent product and presents a two-stage method to figure out the sampling level. The impact analysis of the key factors on the sampling level shows that the increase of the external coefficient or internal coefficient has a negative influence on the sampling level. And the changing rate of the potential market has no significant influence on the sampling level whereas the repeat purchase has a positive one. Using logistic analysis and regression analysis, the global sensitivity analysis gives a whole analysis of the interaction of all parameters, which provides a two-stage method to estimate the impact of the relevant parameters in the case of inaccuracy of the parameters and to be able to construct a 95% confidence interval for the predicted sampling level. Finally, the paper provides the operational steps to improve the accuracy of the parameter estimation and an innovational way to estimate the sampling level.

  10. Comparative evaluation of potential indicators and temporal sampling protocols for monitoring genetic erosion.

    PubMed

    Hoban, Sean; Arntzen, Jan A; Bruford, Michael W; Godoy, José A; Rus Hoelzel, A; Segelbacher, Gernot; Vilà, Carles; Bertorelle, Giorgio

    2014-11-01

    Genetic biodiversity contributes to individual fitness, species' evolutionary potential, and ecosystem stability. Temporal monitoring of the genetic status and trends of wild populations' genetic diversity can provide vital data to inform policy decisions and management actions. However, there is a lack of knowledge regarding which genetic metrics, temporal sampling protocols, and genetic markers are sufficiently sensitive and robust, on conservation-relevant timescales. Here, we tested six genetic metrics and various sampling protocols (number and arrangement of temporal samples) for monitoring genetic erosion following demographic decline. To do so, we utilized individual-based simulations featuring an array of different initial population sizes, types and severity of demographic decline, and DNA markers [single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and microsatellites] as well as decline followed by recovery. Number of alleles markedly outperformed other indicators across all situations. The type and severity of demographic decline strongly affected power, while the number and arrangement of temporal samples had small effect. Sampling 50 individuals at as few as two time points with 20 microsatellites performed well (good power), and could detect genetic erosion while 80-90% of diversity remained. This sampling and genotyping effort should often be affordable. Power increased substantially with more samples or markers, and we observe that power of 2500 SNPs was nearly equivalent to 250 microsatellites, a result of theoretical and practical interest. Our results suggest high potential for using historic collections in monitoring programs, and demonstrate the need to monitor genetic as well as other levels of biodiversity.

  11. A Two-Stage Method to Determine Optimal Product Sampling considering Dynamic Potential Market

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhineng; Lu, Wei; Han, Bing

    2015-01-01

    This paper develops an optimization model for the diffusion effects of free samples under dynamic changes in potential market based on the characteristics of independent product and presents a two-stage method to figure out the sampling level. The impact analysis of the key factors on the sampling level shows that the increase of the external coefficient or internal coefficient has a negative influence on the sampling level. And the changing rate of the potential market has no significant influence on the sampling level whereas the repeat purchase has a positive one. Using logistic analysis and regression analysis, the global sensitivity analysis gives a whole analysis of the interaction of all parameters, which provides a two-stage method to estimate the impact of the relevant parameters in the case of inaccuracy of the parameters and to be able to construct a 95% confidence interval for the predicted sampling level. Finally, the paper provides the operational steps to improve the accuracy of the parameter estimation and an innovational way to estimate the sampling level. PMID:25821847

  12. Sampling, extraction and measurement of bacteria, endotoxin, fungi and inflammatory potential of settling indoor dust.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Anne Mette; Matthiesen, Christoffer B; Frederiksen, Margit W; Frederiksen, Marie; Frankel, Mika; Spilak, Michal; Gunnarsen, Lars; Timm, Michael

    2012-12-01

    Selection of sampling device, sampling location and period are important first steps in the measurement of exposure to bioaerosols in indoor air. The steps following the sampling include treatment of samples and laboratory analysis. In this study, settling bacteria, endotoxin, fungi and serine protease have been measured in Danish homes using Electrostatic Dust Fall Collectors (EDCs). The effects of the presence of occupants, sampling on open surfaces versus in bookcases and treatment of samples have been studied. Concentrations of bacteria and endotoxin were significantly higher when occupants were at home than when they were absent. Across homes, higher concentrations of fungi were found in spring than in winter, as was the total inflammatory potential, while higher concentrations of protease were found in winter than in spring. The placement of the EDCs in bookcases versus on an open surface significantly affected the measured concentrations of bacteria and endotoxin. Direct extraction of EDC cloths caused a higher measured concentration of bacteria, fungi and serine protease than if EDC cloths were extracted post-storage at -20 °C. Extraction of EDC cloths caused an average of 51% and 58% extraction of bacteria and fungi respectively. In conclusion, EDCs should be placed on open surfaces during the sampling, how much occupants are present in their home during sampling and sampling season should be considered, EDC cloths should not be stored in a freezer before extraction of microorganisms, but extraction suspensions can be stored at -80 °C without affecting the number of microorganisms significantly.

  13. A Nationwide Random Sampling Survey of Potential Complicated Grief in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mizuno, Yasunao; Kishimoto, Junji; Asukai, Nozomu

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of significant loss, potential complicated grief (CG), and its contributing factors, we conducted a nationwide random sampling survey of Japanese adults aged 18 or older (N = 1,343) using a self-rating Japanese-language version of the Complicated Grief Brief Screen. Among them, 37.0% experienced their most significant…

  14. A Nationwide Random Sampling Survey of Potential Complicated Grief in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mizuno, Yasunao; Kishimoto, Junji; Asukai, Nozomu

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of significant loss, potential complicated grief (CG), and its contributing factors, we conducted a nationwide random sampling survey of Japanese adults aged 18 or older (N = 1,343) using a self-rating Japanese-language version of the Complicated Grief Brief Screen. Among them, 37.0% experienced their most significant…

  15. Race and Research Methods Anxiety in an Undergraduate Sample: The Potential Effects of Self-Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckberg, Deborah A.

    2015-01-01

    This study explores race as a potential predictor of research methods anxiety among a sample of undergraduates. While differences in academic achievement based on race and ethnicity have been well documented, few studies have examined racial differences in anxiety with regard to specific subject matter in undergraduate curricula. This exploratory…

  16. Race and Research Methods Anxiety in an Undergraduate Sample: The Potential Effects of Self-Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckberg, Deborah A.

    2015-01-01

    This study explores race as a potential predictor of research methods anxiety among a sample of undergraduates. While differences in academic achievement based on race and ethnicity have been well documented, few studies have examined racial differences in anxiety with regard to specific subject matter in undergraduate curricula. This exploratory…

  17. Social Cognition in a Clinical Sample of Personality Disorder Patients.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Tagle, Amparo; Costanzo, Elsa; De Achával, Delfina; Guinjoan, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    Social cognition was assessed in a clinical sample of personality disorder (PD) stable patients receiving ambulatory treatment (N = 17) and healthy matched controls (N = 17) using tests of recognition of emotions in faces and eyes, in a test of social faux pas and in theory of mind (ToM) stories. Results indicated that when compared with healthy controls, individuals with PD showed a clear tendency to obtain lower scoring in tasks assessing recognition of emotion in faces (T = -2.602, p = 0.014), eyes (T = -3.593, p = 0.001), ToM stories (T = -4.706, p = 0.000), and Faux pas (T = -2.227, p = 0.035). In the present pilot study, PD individuals with a normal cognitive efficiency showed an impaired performance at social cognition assessment including emotion recognition and ToM.

  18. Social Cognition in a Clinical Sample of Personality Disorder Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Tagle, Amparo; Costanzo, Elsa; De Achával, Delfina; Guinjoan, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    Social cognition was assessed in a clinical sample of personality disorder (PD) stable patients receiving ambulatory treatment (N = 17) and healthy matched controls (N = 17) using tests of recognition of emotions in faces and eyes, in a test of social faux pas and in theory of mind (ToM) stories. Results indicated that when compared with healthy controls, individuals with PD showed a clear tendency to obtain lower scoring in tasks assessing recognition of emotion in faces (T = −2.602, p = 0.014), eyes (T = −3.593, p = 0.001), ToM stories (T = −4.706, p = 0.000), and Faux pas (T = −2.227, p = 0.035). In the present pilot study, PD individuals with a normal cognitive efficiency showed an impaired performance at social cognition assessment including emotion recognition and ToM. PMID:26074824

  19. Identifying the potential of changes to blood sample logistics using simulation.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Pelle; Jacobsen, Peter; Poulsen, Jørgen Hjelm

    2013-01-01

    Using simulation as an approach to display and improve internal logistics at hospitals has great potential. This study shows how a simulation model displaying the morning blood-taking round at a Danish public hospital can be developed and utilized with the aim of improving the logistics. The focus of the simulation was to evaluate changes made to the transportation of blood samples between wards and the laboratory. The average- (AWT) and maximum waiting time (MWT) from a blood sample was drawn at the ward until it was received at the laboratory, and the distribution of arrivals of blood samples in the laboratory were used as the evaluation criteria. Four different scenarios were tested and compared with the current approach: (1) Using AGVs (mobile robots), (2) using a pneumatic tube system, (3) using porters that are called upon, or (4) using porters that come to the wards every 45 minutes. Furthermore, each of the scenarios was tested in terms of what amount of resources would give the optimal result. The simulations showed a big improvement potential in implementing a new technology/mean for transporting the blood samples. The pneumatic tube system showed the biggest potential lowering the AWT and MWT with approx. 36% and 18%, respectively. Additionally, all of the scenarios had a more even distribution of arrivals except for porters coming to the wards every 45 min. As a consequence of the results obtained in the study, the hospital decided to implement a pneumatic tube system.

  20. High velocity penetrators used a potential means for attaining core sample for airless solar system objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winglee, R. M.; Truitt, C.; Shibata, R.

    2017-08-01

    Sample return missions offer a greater science yield when compared to missions that only employ in situ or remote sensing observations. Such missions have high ΔV requirements, and the return yields to date have been typically only of a few grams for robotic missions. Planetary penetrators offer an alternative that significantly reduce a mission's ΔV, increase sample yields, and allow for the collection of subsurface materials. The following details the design, development, and testing of penetrator/sampler technology capable of surviving supersonic impact velocities that would enable the collection of a solid core of geologic materials, without the need for any drilling equipment,,thereby reducing the overall mass and propellant budget. It is shown through both modeling and field testing that penetrators at speeds between 300 and 600 m/s ( Mach 1-2) can penetrate into the ground to depths of 1-2 m with overall structural integrity maintained. The first flight tests demonstrated the potential for survivability at these speeds. The second flight series demonstrated core sample collection with partial ejection of the sample return canister. The 3rd flight series demonstrated self-ejection of the sample return system fully intact and with the core retaining the full stratigraphy of the rock bed. The recovered sample also shows the survivability of macro-organic structures. Possible mechanisms for the recovery of the ejected core sample are also discussed.

  1. Tampon sampling for diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis: a potentially useful way to detect genital infections?

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, D; Ndovela, N; Kharsany, A; Connolly, C; Sturm, A W

    1997-01-01

    Genital tract infections are important causes of ill health in developing countries, but diagnosis is difficult. Bacterial vaginosis (BV) was correctly diagnosed by using a vaginal specimen obtained by tampon sampling in 22 of 24 women (91.6%) for whom BV was diagnosed by Gram staining. The yield for other vaginal infections was higher (28% for Trichomonas vaginalis and 32.7% for Candida albicans) than it was for cervical infections (0% for Neisseria gonorrhoeae and 30% for Chlamydia trachomatis). Tampon sampling was acceptable to patients and may facilitate diagnosis of genital infections in developing countries. PMID:9276426

  2. Characteristics of patients receiving pharmaceutical samples and association between sample receipt and out-of-pocket prescription costs.

    PubMed

    Alexander, G Caleb; Zhang, James; Basu, Anirban

    2008-04-01

    Pharmaceutical samples are widely used for promotion and marketing, yet little is known about who receives samples or how their use is associated with patient's prescription costs. To examine the characteristics of those receiving samples and the relationship between sample receipt and out-of-pocket prescription costs. DESIGN, SUBJECTS, AND MEASURES: We divided the 2002-2003 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, a nationally representative, panel-design longitudinal study, into baseline and analysis periods. We conducted logistic and generalized linear regression analysis of 5709 individuals in the analysis period who did not receive samples during the baseline period. The primary outcome measures were sample receipt and prescription expenditures. Fourteen percent of individuals received at least 1 sample during the analysis period. On multivariate analyses sample receipt was greater among those who were younger and those not on Medicaid. In generalized linear regressions controlling for demographic characteristics and health care utilization, the predicted 180-day out-of-pocket prescription expenditures were $178 [standard error (SE), $3.9] for those never receiving samples. Among those receiving samples, the corresponding out-of-pocket expenditures were $166 (SE, $8.9) for periods before sample receipt (P = 0.16 for comparison with those not receiving samples), $244 (SE, $9.2) for periods during sample receipt (P < 0.001 for comparison with periods before sample receipt) and $212 (SE, $12.4) for periods following sample receipt (P = 0.008 for comparison with periods before sample receipt). Results were qualitatively similar when total prescription costs were examined. Individuals receiving samples have higher prescription expenditures than their counterparts. These findings suggest that sample recipients remain disproportionately burdened by prescription costs even after sample receipt.

  3. Ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in patients with acoustic neuroma.

    PubMed

    Piras, Gianluca; Brandolini, Cristina; Castellucci, Andrea; Modugno, Giovanni Carlo

    2013-02-01

    To assess the usefulness of vestibular testing in patients with acoustic neuroma, considering two main aspects: to compare diagnostic sensitivity of the current vestibular tests, especially considering ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (OVEMPs) and to identify pre-operative localization of the tumor (inferior vestibular nerve vs. superior vestibular nerve) only with the help of vestibular electrophysiological data. Twenty-six patients with unilateral acoustic neuroma (mainly intracanalicular type) were studied with a full audio-vestibular test battery (pure tone and speech audiometry, caloric bithermal test, vibration-induced nystagmus test (VIN), cervical and OVEMPs). 18 patients (69 %) showed abnormal caloric responses. 12 patients (46.2 %) showed a pattern of VIN test suggestive of vestibular asymmetry. 16 patients (61.5 %) showed abnormal OVEMPs (12 only to AC, 4 both to AC and BC). 10 patients (38.5 %) showed abnormal cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (5 both to AC and BC, 5 only to AC). In one case, results of vestibular evoked potentials and caloric test were confirmed by intra-operative and post-operative findings. Results of electrophysiological tests in AN patients could be helpful for planning the proper surgical approach, considering that sensitivity of every exam is quite low in intracanalicular lesion; clinical data allow a better interpretation of vestibular evoked myogenic potentials.

  4. Increased fear-potentiated startle in major depressive disorder patients with lifetime history of suicide attempt.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Elizabeth D; Ionescu, Dawn F; Vande Voort, Jennifer L; Slonena, Elizabeth E; Franco-Chaves, Jose A; Zarate, Carlos A; Grillon, Christian

    2014-06-01

    Suicide is a common reason for psychiatric emergency and morbidity, with few effective treatments. Anxiety symptoms have emerged as potential modifiable risk factors in the time before a suicide attempt, but few studies have been conducted using laboratory measures of fear and anxiety. We operationally defined fear and anxiety as increased startle reactivity during anticipation of predictable (fear-potentiated startle) and unpredictable (anxiety-potentiated startle) shock. We hypothesized that a lifetime history of suicide attempt (as compared to history of no suicide attempt) would be associated with increased fear-potentiated startle. A post-hoc analysis of fear- and anxiety-potentiated startle was conducted in 28 medication-free patients with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) divided according to suicide attempt history. The magnitude of fear-potentiated startle was increased in depressed patients with lifetime suicide attempts compared to those without a lifetime history of suicide attempt (F(1,26)=5.629, p=.025). There was no difference in anxiety-potentiated startle by suicide attempt history. This is a post-hoc analysis of previously analyzed patient data from a study of depressed inpatients. Further replication of the finding with a larger patient sample is indicated. Increased fear-potentiated startle in suicide attempters suggests the role of amygdala in depressed patients with a suicide attempt history. Findings highlight the importance of anxiety symptoms in the treatment of patients at increased suicide risk. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Increased Fear-Potentiated Startle in Major Depressive Disorder Patients with Lifetime History of Suicide Attempt

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Elizabeth D.; Ionescu, Dawn F.; Vande Voort, Jennifer L.; Slonena, Elizabeth E.; Franco-Chaves, Jose A.; Zarate, Carlos A.; Grillon, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Background Suicide is a common reason for psychiatric emergency and morbidity, with few effective treatments. Anxiety symptoms have emerged as potential modifiable risk factors in the time before a suicide attempt, but few studies have been conducted using laboratory measures of fear and anxiety. We operationally defined fear and anxiety as the increased in startle reactivity during anticipation of predictable (fear-potentiated startle) and unpredictable (anxiety-potentiated startle) shock. We hypothesized that a lifetime history of suicide attempt (as compared to history of no suicide attempt) would be associated with increased fear-potentiated startle. Methods A post-hoc analysis of fear- and anxiety-potentiated startle was conducted in 28 medication-free patients with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) divided according to suicide attempt history. Results The magnitude of fear-potentiated startle was increased in depressed patients with lifetime suicide attempts compared to those without a lifetime history of suicide attempt (F(1,26) = 5.629, p = .025). There was no difference in anxiety-potentiated startle by suicide attempt history. Limitations This is a post-hoc analysis of previously analyzed patient data from a study of depressed inpatients. Further replication of the finding with a larger patient sample is indicated. Conclusions Increased fear-potentiated startle in suicide attempters suggests the role of amygdala in depressed patients with a suicide attempt history. Findings highlight the importance of anxiety symptoms in the treatment of patients at increased suicide risk. PMID:24767002

  6. Development of an automatic laboratory computer flagging system to identify urine albumin samples potentially affected by antigen excess ('hooking').

    PubMed

    Pullan, N J; Hitch, T

    2012-05-01

    Immunoassays for urinary albumin are often subject to the problem of antigen excess (the 'hook' effect) at high albumin concentrations. We developed an automated protocol to identify such samples based on urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (uACR) and urinary total protein (uTP) results. An automated flagging system was designed and written into the laboratory computer system to alert technical staff to samples potentially affected by the 'hook effect'. This flag was activated when there was a combination of an uTP of ≥2400 mg/L and an uACR of <30 mg/mmol. The potential rate of false-negative uACR results was approximately 0.17% in samples from primary care and diabetic clinic sources. Samples with falsely low uACR results were identified, allowing the vast majority of results to be authorized without intervention. The protocol prevented the reporting of false-negative uACR results which might impact on the management of patients.

  7. A new method for evaluating stallion sperm viability and mitochondrial membrane potential in fixed semen samples.

    PubMed

    Peña, F J; Ball, B A; Squires, E L

    2016-12-29

    Multiparametric assessment of stallion sperm quality using flow cytometry can be a useful adjunct in semen evaluation; however, the availability of flow cytometers in veterinary practice is limited. The ability to preserve and transport sperm samples for later flow cytometric analysis using fixable probes would potentially facilitate this process. In the current study, we validated the combination of live/dead Zombie Green(®) (a fixable dye used to assess live and dead sperm) and MitoTracker Deep Red(®) (used to assess mitochondrial membrane potential). The assay was validated against classic, non-fixable, membrane assays (SYBR-14/PI). Our results demonstrated the feasibility of the assay. In conclusion, stained and fixed semen samples stored for 72 h obtained equivalent results to the exam on the same day; this new protocol shall facilitate the wider use of flow cytometry in stallion andrology in the future. © 2016 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  8. Selecting Sample Preparation Workflows for Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Patient Samples with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Valladares, Maria; Aasebø, Elise; Selheim, Frode; Berven, Frode S.; Bruserud, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    Global mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic and phosphoproteomic studies of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) biomarkers represent a powerful strategy to identify and confirm proteins and their phosphorylated modifications that could be applied in diagnosis and prognosis, as a support for individual treatment regimens and selection of patients for bone marrow transplant. MS-based studies require optimal and reproducible workflows that allow a satisfactory coverage of the proteome and its modifications. Preparation of samples for global MS analysis is a crucial step and it usually requires method testing, tuning and optimization. Different proteomic workflows that have been used to prepare AML patient samples for global MS analysis usually include a standard protein in-solution digestion procedure with a urea-based lysis buffer. The enrichment of phosphopeptides from AML patient samples has previously been carried out either with immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) or metal oxide affinity chromatography (MOAC). We have recently tested several methods of sample preparation for MS analysis of the AML proteome and phosphoproteome and introduced filter-aided sample preparation (FASP) as a superior methodology for the sensitive and reproducible generation of peptides from patient samples. FASP-prepared peptides can be further fractionated or IMAC-enriched for proteome or phosphoproteome analyses. Herein, we will review both in-solution and FASP-based sample preparation workflows and encourage the use of the latter for the highest protein and phosphorylation coverage and reproducibility. PMID:28248234

  9. Selecting Sample Preparation Workflows for Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Patient Samples with Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Valladares, Maria; Aasebø, Elise; Selheim, Frode; Berven, Frode S; Bruserud, Øystein

    2016-08-22

    Global mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic and phosphoproteomic studies of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) biomarkers represent a powerful strategy to identify and confirm proteins and their phosphorylated modifications that could be applied in diagnosis and prognosis, as a support for individual treatment regimens and selection of patients for bone marrow transplant. MS-based studies require optimal and reproducible workflows that allow a satisfactory coverage of the proteome and its modifications. Preparation of samples for global MS analysis is a crucial step and it usually requires method testing, tuning and optimization. Different proteomic workflows that have been used to prepare AML patient samples for global MS analysis usually include a standard protein in-solution digestion procedure with a urea-based lysis buffer. The enrichment of phosphopeptides from AML patient samples has previously been carried out either with immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) or metal oxide affinity chromatography (MOAC). We have recently tested several methods of sample preparation for MS analysis of the AML proteome and phosphoproteome and introduced filter-aided sample preparation (FASP) as a superior methodology for the sensitive and reproducible generation of peptides from patient samples. FASP-prepared peptides can be further fractionated or IMAC-enriched for proteome or phosphoproteome analyses. Herein, we will review both in-solution and FASP-based sample preparation workflows and encourage the use of the latter for the highest protein and phosphorylation coverage and reproducibility.

  10. Targeted or whole genome sequencing of formalin fixed tissue samples: potential applications in cancer genomics.

    PubMed

    Munchel, Sarah; Hoang, Yen; Zhao, Yue; Cottrell, Joseph; Klotzle, Brandy; Godwin, Andrew K; Koestler, Devin; Beyerlein, Peter; Fan, Jian-Bing; Bibikova, Marina; Chien, Jeremy

    2015-09-22

    Current genomic studies are limited by the poor availability of fresh-frozen tissue samples. Although formalin-fixed diagnostic samples are in abundance, they are seldom used in current genomic studies because of the concern of formalin-fixation artifacts. Better characterization of these artifacts will allow the use of archived clinical specimens in translational and clinical research studies. To provide a systematic analysis of formalin-fixation artifacts on Illumina sequencing, we generated 26 DNA sequencing data sets from 13 pairs of matched formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) and fresh-frozen (FF) tissue samples. The results indicate high rate of concordant calls between matched FF/FFPE pairs at reference and variant positions in three commonly used sequencing approaches (whole genome, whole exome, and targeted exon sequencing). Global mismatch rates and C · G > T · A substitutions were comparable between matched FF/FFPE samples, and discordant rates were low (<0.26%) in all samples. Finally, low-pass whole genome sequencing produces similar pattern of copy number alterations between FF/FFPE pairs. The results from our studies suggest the potential use of diagnostic FFPE samples for cancer genomic studies to characterize and catalog variations in cancer genomes.

  11. Allergic contact dermatitis from exotic woods: importance of patch-testing with patient-provided samples.

    PubMed

    Podjasek, Joshua O; Cook-Norris, Robert H; Richardson, Donna M; Drage, Lisa A; Davis, Mark D P

    2011-01-01

    Exotic woods from tropical and subtropical regions (eg, from South America, south Asia, and Africa) frequently are used occupationally and recreationally by woodworkers and hobbyists. These exotic woods more commonly provoke irritant contact dermatitis reactions, but they also can provoke allergic contact dermatitis reactions. We report three patients seen at Mayo Clinic (Rochester, MN) with allergic contact dermatitis reactions to exotic woods. Patch testing was performed and included patient-provided wood samples. Avoidance of identified allergens was recommended. For all patients, the dermatitis cleared or improved after avoidance of the identified allergens. Clinicians must be aware of the potential for allergic contact dermatitis reactions to compounds in exotic woods. Patch testing should be performed with suspected woods for diagnostic confirmation and allowance of subsequent avoidance of the allergens.

  12. Optimal sampling efficiency in Monte Carlo simulation with an approximate potential.

    PubMed

    Coe, Joshua D; Sewell, Thomas D; Shaw, M Sam

    2009-04-28

    Building on the work of Iftimie et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 113, 4852 (2000)] and Gelb [J. Chem. Phys. 118, 7747 (2003)], Boltzmann sampling of an approximate potential (the "reference" system) is used to build a Markov chain in the isothermal-isobaric ensemble. At the end points of the chain, the energy is evaluated at a more accurate level (the "full" system) and a composite move encompassing all of the intervening steps is accepted on the basis of a modified Metropolis criterion. For reference system chains of sufficient length, consecutive full energies are statistically decorrelated and thus far fewer are required to build ensemble averages with a given variance. Without modifying the original algorithm, however, the maximum reference chain length is too short to decorrelate full configurations without dramatically lowering the acceptance probability of the composite move. This difficulty stems from the fact that the reference and full potentials sample different statistical distributions. By manipulating the thermodynamic variables characterizing the reference system (pressure and temperature, in this case), we maximize the average acceptance probability of composite moves, lengthening significantly the random walk between consecutive full energy evaluations. In this manner, the number of full energy evaluations needed to precisely characterize equilibrium properties is dramatically reduced. The method is applied to a model fluid, but implications for sampling high-dimensional systems with ab initio or density functional theory potentials are discussed.

  13. An investigation of potential applications of OP-SAPS: Operational sampled analog processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, E. A.; Mcvey, E. S.

    1976-01-01

    The impact of charge-coupled device (CCD) processors on future instrumentation was investigated. The CCD devices studied process sampled analog data and are referred to as OP-SAPS - operational sampled analog processors. Preliminary studies into various architectural configurations for systems composed of OP-SAPS show that they have potential in such diverse applications as pattern recognition and automatic control. It appears probable that OP-SAPS may be used to construct computing structures which can serve as special peripherals to large-scale computer complexes used in real time flight simulation. The research was limited to the following benchmark programs: (1) face recognition, (2) voice command and control, (3) terrain classification, and (4) terrain identification. A small amount of effort was spent on examining a method by which OP-SAPS may be used to decrease the limiting ground sampling distance encountered in remote sensing from satellites.

  14. Family expectation, social adjustment and gender differences in a sample of schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    Shirakawa, I; Mari, J J; Chaves, A C; Hisatsugo, M

    1996-06-01

    A case series to study factors related to family expectation regarding schizophrenic patients was conducted in an out-patient setting in the city of S. Paulo, Brazil. Patients diagnosed as presenting schizophrenia by the ICD 9th Edition and having had the disease for more than four years were included in the study. Family Expectation was measured by the difference between the Katz Adjustment Scale (R2 and R3) scores based on the relative's expectation and the socially expected activities of the patient (Discrepancy Score), and social adjustment was given by the DSM-III-R Global Assessment Scale (GAS). Outcome assessments were made independently, and 44 patients comprised the sample (25 males and 19 females). The Discrepancy mean score was twice as high for males as for females (p < 0.02), and there was an inverse relationship between the discrepancy score and social adjustment (r = -0.46, p < 0.001). Moreover, sex and social adjustment exerted independent effects on the discrepancy score when age, age at onset and number of psychiatric admissions were controlled by means of a multiple regression technique. There was an interaction between sex and social adjustment, the inverse relationship between social adjustment and discrepancy score being more pronounced for males. These findings are discussed in the light of the potential association between the family environment, gender and social adjustment of schizophrenic patients, and the need for further research, i.e. ethnographic accounts of interactions between patient and relatives sharing households particularly in less developed countries.

  15. Panic disorder in a Spanish sample of 89 patients with pure alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Seguí, J; Márquez, M; Canet, J; Cascio, A; García, L; Ortiz, M

    2001-07-01

    High rates of anxiety disorders, including panic disorder (PD), have been found in patients suffering from alcohol dependence (AD). It has been suggested that alcoholic subjects with PD represent a more severe subgroup of patients. Eighty-nine patients with 'pure' AD (without abuse of other drugs) were examined and compared for the presence of PD. Several clinical scales were administered to assess symptomatology and severity. Twenty-three patients (25.8%) met the criteria for PD. The mean age at onset for alcohol use was 18.7 versus 28.5 years for PD onset. Our finding of an earlier onset for alcoholism than for PD in a sample of Spanish patients illustrates the potential importance of transcultural factors. These patients were more likely to be women and to have first-degree relatives with PD. Overall, alcoholic patients with comorbid PD showed greater clinical severity. They were found to have more comorbidity with axis I disorders (major depression and dysthymia), greater clinical severity, and a history of more suicide attempts.

  16. Potential use of oral fluid samples for serological diagnosis of African swine fever.

    PubMed

    Mur, Lina; Gallardo, Carmina; Soler, Alejandro; Zimmermman, Jeffrey; Pelayo, Virginia; Nieto, Raquel; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, José Manuel; Arias, Marisa

    2013-07-26

    African swine fever (ASF) is a complex, highly lethal, notifiable disease of swine. ASF is wide-spread in sub-Saharan Africa and East European countries and there is presently a great risk of spread to neighboring countries. Since there is no vaccine for ASF virus (ASFV), control is based on rapid and early detection of the disease via surveillance. This approach requires collecting blood samples from large number of animals. Laborious and expensive of itself, this process also presents an additional risk because ASFV is present at high concentrations in the blood. The objective of this study was to initiate studies into the potential use of oral fluid as an alternative to serum for ASF diagnosis, for latter studying its possible use in surveillance and control programs. To this end, oral fluid samples collected at different times post infection from eight pigs experimentally inoculated with an attenuated ASFV were assayed using modified protocols of the two validated serological techniques, the enzyme-immune-liked assay (ELISA) and immunoperoxidase technique (IPT). Antibodies against ASFV were detected in oral fluid samples of all animals from early post infection through the end of the experiment by ELISA and IPT. These results confirmed the presence of ASFV antibodies in swine oral fluids samples, the possibility of an oral fluid-based approach in ASF diagnosis and, potentially in ASF surveillance.

  17. Efferent and afferent evoked potentials in patients with adrenomyeloneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Hanajima, Ritsuko; Terao, Yasuo; Hamada, Masashi; Yugeta, Akihiro; Shirota, Yuichiro; Yuasa, Kaoru; Sato, Fumio; Matsukawa, Takashi; Takahashi, Yuji; Goto, Jun; Tsuji, Shoji; Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2010-02-01

    This paper investigates efferent and afferent conductions of the central nervous system by various evoked potentials in patients with adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN). Ten pure AMN patients without cerebral involvement were studied. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs), somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs), auditory brainstem response (ABR), and pattern reversal full-field visual evoked potentials (VEPs) were recorded. For MEP recording, single-pulse or double-pulse magnetic brainstem stimulation (BST) was also performed. Abnormal MEP was observed in all ten patients, abnormal SEP in all ten, abnormal ABR in nine, and abnormal VEP in only one. Brainstem latency was measured in three of the seven patients with central motor conduction time (CMCT) prolongation. The cortical-brainstem conduction time was severely prolonged along the normal or mildly delayed brainstem-cervical conduction time in those three patients. The pattern of normal VEP and abnormal MEP, SEP, ABR is a clinically useful electrophysiological feature for the diagnosis. BST techniques are helpful to detect, functionally, intracranial corticospinal tract involvement, probably demyelination, in pure AMN patients. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Bioassay for estimating the biogenic methane-generating potential of coal samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, E.J.P.; Voytek, M.A.; Warwick, P.D.; Corum, M.D.; Cohn, A.; Bunnell, J.E.; Clark, A.C.; Orem, W.H.

    2008-01-01

    Generation of secondary biogenic methane in coal beds is likely controlled by a combination of factors such as the bioavailability of coal carbon, the presence of a microbial community to convert coal carbon to methane, and an environment supporting microbial growth and methanogenesis. A set of treatments and controls was developed to bioassay the bioavailability of coal for conversion to methane under defined laboratory conditions. Treatments included adding a well-characterized consortium of bacteria and methanogens (enriched from modern wetland sediments) and providing conditions to support endemic microbial activity. The contribution of desorbed methane in the bioassays was determined in treatments with bromoethane sulfonic acid, an inhibitor of microbial methanogenesis. The bioassay compared 16 subbituminous coal samples collected from beds in Texas (TX), Wyoming (WY), and Alaska (AK), and two bituminous coal samples from Pennsylvania (PA). New biogenic methane was observed in several samples of subbituminous coal with the microbial consortium added, but endemic activity was less commonly observed. The highest methane generation [80????mol methane/g coal (56??scf/ton or 1.75??cm3/g)] was from a south TX coal sample that was collected from a non-gas-producing well. Subbituminous coals from the Powder River Basin, WY and North Slope Borough, AK contained more sorbed (original) methane than the TX coal sample and generated 0-23????mol/g (up to 16??scf/ton or 0.5??cm3/g) new biogenic methane in the bioassay. Standard indicators of thermal maturity such as burial depth, nitrogen content, and calorific value did not explain differences in biogenic methane among subbituminous coal samples. No original methane was observed in two bituminous samples from PA, nor was any new methane generated in bioassays of these samples. The bioassay offers a new tool for assessing the potential of coal for biogenic methane generation, and provides a platform for studying the

  19. Adenocarcinoma of the endometrium: survival comparisons of patients with and without pelvic node sampling.

    PubMed

    Kilgore, L C; Partridge, E E; Alvarez, R D; Austin, J M; Shingleton, H M; Noojin, F; Conner, W

    1995-01-01

    From 1969 to 1990, 649 patients with adenocarcinoma of the endometrium were surgically managed by gynecologic oncologists from the University of Alabama at Birmingham. All patients underwent TAH-BSO and washings. Two hundred twelve patients had multiple-site pelvic node sampling (mean number of nodes, 11), 205 patients had limited site pelvic node sampling (mean number of nodes, 4), and in 208 patients, nodes were not sampled. Historical prognostic features, including tumor grade, depth of invasion, adnexal metastasis, cervical involvement, and positive cytology, were equally distributed in the three groups. Mean follow-up was 3 years. Patients undergoing multiple-site pelvic node sampling had significantly better survival than patients without node sampling (P = 0.0002). When patients were categorized as low risk (disease confined to the corpus) or as high risk (disease in the cervix, adnexa, uterine serosa, or washings) multiple-site pelvic node sampling again provided a significant survival advantage compared to patients without node sampling (high risk, P = 0.0006; low risk, P = 0.026). In a comparison of patients receiving whole pelvic radiation for grade III lesions or deep myometrial invasion, patients with multiple-site pelvic node sampling had better survival than those in whom nodes were not sampled (P = 0.0027). The significant survival advantage for patients having multiple-site node sampling, overall and in high- and low-risk groups, strongly suggests a therapeutic benefit. Additionally, adjuvant therapy may be more appropriate directed in these patients.

  20. Iterative derivation of effective potentials to sample the conformational space of proteins at atomistic scale

    SciTech Connect

    Capelli, Riccardo; Paissoni, Cristina; Sormanni, Pietro; Tiana, Guido

    2014-05-21

    The current capacity of computers makes it possible to perform simulations of small systems with portable, explicit-solvent potentials achieving high degree of accuracy. However, simplified models must be employed to exploit the behavior of large systems or to perform systematic scans of smaller systems. While powerful algorithms are available to facilitate the sampling of the conformational space, successful applications of such models are hindered by the availability of simple enough potentials able to satisfactorily reproduce known properties of the system. We develop an interatomic potential to account for a number of properties of proteins in a computationally economic way. The potential is defined within an all-atom, implicit solvent model by contact functions between the different atom types. The associated numerical values can be optimized by an iterative Monte Carlo scheme on any available experimental data, provided that they are expressible as thermal averages of some conformational properties. We test this model on three different proteins, for which we also perform a scan of all possible point mutations with explicit conformational sampling. The resulting models, optimized solely on a subset of native distances, not only reproduce the native conformations within a few Angstroms from the experimental ones, but show the cooperative transition between native and denatured state and correctly predict the measured free-energy changes associated with point mutations. Moreover, differently from other structure-based models, our method leaves a residual degree of frustration, which is known to be present in protein molecules.

  1. Iterative derivation of effective potentials to sample the conformational space of proteins at atomistic scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelli, Riccardo; Paissoni, Cristina; Sormanni, Pietro; Tiana, Guido

    2014-05-01

    The current capacity of computers makes it possible to perform simulations of small systems with portable, explicit-solvent potentials achieving high degree of accuracy. However, simplified models must be employed to exploit the behavior of large systems or to perform systematic scans of smaller systems. While powerful algorithms are available to facilitate the sampling of the conformational space, successful applications of such models are hindered by the availability of simple enough potentials able to satisfactorily reproduce known properties of the system. We develop an interatomic potential to account for a number of properties of proteins in a computationally economic way. The potential is defined within an all-atom, implicit solvent model by contact functions between the different atom types. The associated numerical values can be optimized by an iterative Monte Carlo scheme on any available experimental data, provided that they are expressible as thermal averages of some conformational properties. We test this model on three different proteins, for which we also perform a scan of all possible point mutations with explicit conformational sampling. The resulting models, optimized solely on a subset of native distances, not only reproduce the native conformations within a few Angstroms from the experimental ones, but show the cooperative transition between native and denatured state and correctly predict the measured free-energy changes associated with point mutations. Moreover, differently from other structure-based models, our method leaves a residual degree of frustration, which is known to be present in protein molecules.

  2. Potential Biomarkers in Lewis Negative Patients With Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Luo, Guopei; Liu, Chen; Guo, Meng; Cheng, He; Lu, Yu; Jin, Kaizhou; Liu, Liang; Long, Jiang; Xu, Jin; Lu, Renquan; Ni, Quanxing; Yu, Xianjun

    2017-04-01

    To examine potential biomarkers in Lewis negative patients with pancreatic cancer. Carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) is currently the most important and widely used biomarker in pancreatic cancer. However, approximately 5 to 10% of the population are Lewis negative individuals, and they are documented to have scarce or no CA19-9 secretion. Therefore, it is necessary to explore potential biomarkers to compensate for this drawback. Lewis genotypes were determined in a large cohort of patients with pancreatic cancer (682 cases) and controls (525 cases) by sequencing the Fucosyltransferase 3 (FUT3) gene from genomic DNA. Potential biomarkers were examined in patients with Lewis negative genotypes and normal subjects. The impact of potential biomarkers on tumor burden and survival was analyzed. Forty-seven (6.9%) patients with pancreatic cancer had Lewis negative genotypes. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and CA125 had greater sensitivity than other biomarkers in Lewis negative patients with pancreatic cancer [CEA, 63.8%; CA125, 51.1%; CA72-4, 25.5%; CA15-3, 21.3%; CA19-9, 19.1%; CA50, 12.8%; CA242, 10.6%; and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), 0.0%]. In addition, both CEA (98.0%) and CA125 (93.8%) showed a high specificity. Compared with other biomarkers, CEA (60.9%) was sensitive for stage I, II diseases and CA125 (75.0%) was sensitive for stage III, IV diseases. CEA and CA125 were associated with tumor metastasis and therapeutic response. CEA and CA125 have the potential to be applied as biomarkers in Lewis negative patients with pancreatic cancer. CEA and CA125 should be routinely measured for all patients with pancreatic cancer.

  3. Experimental identification of potential falls in older adult hospital patients.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, Aimee; Yang, James; Pati, Debajyoti; Valipoor, Shabboo

    2016-05-03

    Patient falls within hospitals have been identified as serious but largely preventable incidents, particularly among older adult patients. Previous literature has explored intrinsic factors associated with patient falls, but literature identifying possible extrinsic or situational factors related to falls is lacking. This study seeks to identify patient motions and activities along with associated environmental design factors in a patient bathroom and clinician zone setting that may lead to falls. A motion capture experiment was conducted in a laboratory setting on 27 subjects over the age of seventy using scripted tasks and mockups of the bathroom and clinician zone of a patient room. Data were post-processed using Cortex and Visual3D software. A potential fall was characterized by a set of criteria based on the jerk of the upper body׳s center of mass (COM). Results suggest that only motion-related factors, particularly turning, pushing, pulling, and grabbing, contribute most significantly to potential falls in the patient bathroom, whereas only pushing and pulling contribute significantly in the clinician zone. Future work includes identifying and changing precise environmental design factors associated with these motions for an updated patient room and performing motion capture experiments using the new setup.

  4. Cyto- and genotoxic potential of water samples from polluted areas in Kosovo.

    PubMed

    Alija, Avdulla J; Bajraktari, Ismet D; Bresgen, Nikolaus; Bojaxhi, Ekramije; Krenn, Margit; Asllani, Fisnik; Eckl, Peter M

    2016-09-01

    Reports on the state of the environment in Kosovo have emphasized that river and ground water quality is affected by pollution from untreated urban water as well as the waste water from the industry. One of the main contributors to this pollution is located in Obiliq (coal power plants). Prishtina-the capital city of Kosovo-is heavily influenced too. Furthermore, the pollutants combined together with those from heavy traffic are dissolved in Prishtina runoff water, which is discharged into the creek entering the river Sitnica together with urban waste water. The available data show the complex pollution with excessive quantities of nitrites, suspended materials, organic compounds, detergents, heavy metals, polychlorinated biphenyls, etc. In this study, the cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of water samples taken at these sites was tested in primary rat hepatocytes. The results obtained indicate that water samples collected in Prishtina and Obiliq had a significant cytotoxic potential in primary rat hepatocyte cultures even when diluted to 1 %. The increased cytotoxicity, however, was not accompanied by an increased genotoxicity as measured by the percentage of micronucleated cells. Further investigations addressing the chemical composition of the samples and the identification of the toxicants responsible for the cytotoxic effects found will be carried out in a next step.

  5. An analysis of scientific potential of northern Oceanus Procellarum region for sample return

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Liu, J.; Li, C.

    2012-12-01

    We evaluate the science potential of northern Oceanus Procellarum as a candidate site for future Chang'e sample return mission. This region is characterized by relatively young basaltic lavas, estimated at approximately 2.5-3.75 Ga [e.g., 1], thus may potentially yield information on mare evolution and cratering rate not retrievable from Apollo and Lunar samples. Mons Rümker, a large (65 km diameter) volcanic edifice centered at 40.8°N 58.1°W, consists of multiple mare domes. Previous modeling suggests low effusion rates and varied lava eruption temperatures and varied degrees of crystallization for these domes [2]. Samples from Mons Rümker would provide information on its composition, eruption style, rheological properties, and evolution. In addition, Rima Sharp (46.7°N 50.5°W), a 107 km long, approximate 1 km wide rille, winds through this region. We present stratigraphical and compositional study of northern Oceanus Procellarum based on Kaguya and Chang'e 2 multispectral and image data. We will also present analysis on elevation, rock abundance and other engineering parameters of importance to landing safety. References: [1] Heisinger et al. J. Geophys. Res., 108, E7, 1-27, 2003. [2] Wöhler et al. Lunar Planet. Sci., XXXVIII, #1091, 2007.

  6. Continuous Time Level Crossing Sampling ADC for Bio-Potential Recording Systems.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wei; Osman, Ahmad; Kim, Dongsoo; Goldstein, Brian; Huang, Chenxi; Martini, Berin; Pieribone, Vincent A; Culurciello, Eugenio

    2013-06-01

    In this paper we present a fixed window level crossing sampling analog to digital convertor for bio-potential recording sensors. This is the first proposed and fully implemented fixed window level crossing ADC without local DACs and clocks. The circuit is designed to reduce data size, power, and silicon area in future wireless neurophysiological sensor systems. We built a testing system to measure bio-potential signals and used it to evaluate the performance of the circuit. The bio-potential amplifier offers a gain of 53 dB within a bandwidth of 200 Hz-20 kHz. The input-referred rms noise is 2.8 µV. In the asynchronous level crossing ADC, the minimum delta resolution is 4 mV. The input signal frequency of the ADC is up to 5 kHz. The system was fabricated using the AMI 0.5 µm CMOS process. The chip size is 1.5 mm by 1.5 mm. The power consumption of the 4-channel system from a 3.3 V supply is 118.8 µW in the static state and 501.6 µW with a 240 kS/s sampling rate. The conversion efficiency is 1.6 nJ/conversion.

  7. Continuous Time Level Crossing Sampling ADC for Bio-Potential Recording Systems

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wei; Osman, Ahmad; Kim, Dongsoo; Goldstein, Brian; Huang, Chenxi; Martini, Berin; Pieribone, Vincent A.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a fixed window level crossing sampling analog to digital convertor for bio-potential recording sensors. This is the first proposed and fully implemented fixed window level crossing ADC without local DACs and clocks. The circuit is designed to reduce data size, power, and silicon area in future wireless neurophysiological sensor systems. We built a testing system to measure bio-potential signals and used it to evaluate the performance of the circuit. The bio-potential amplifier offers a gain of 53 dB within a bandwidth of 200 Hz-20 kHz. The input-referred rms noise is 2.8 µV. In the asynchronous level crossing ADC, the minimum delta resolution is 4 mV. The input signal frequency of the ADC is up to 5 kHz. The system was fabricated using the AMI 0.5 µm CMOS process. The chip size is 1.5 mm by 1.5 mm. The power consumption of the 4-channel system from a 3.3 V supply is 118.8 µW in the static state and 501.6 µW with a 240 kS/s sampling rate. The conversion efficiency is 1.6 nJ/conversion. PMID:24163640

  8. A Limited Sampling Schedule to Estimate Individual Pharmacokinetic Parameters of Fludarabine in Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Salinger, David H.; Blough, David K.; Vicini, Paolo; Anasetti, Claudio; O’Donnell, Paul V.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; McCune, Jeannine S.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Fludarabine monophosphate (fludarabine) is frequently administered to patients receiving a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) in an ambulatory care setting. These patients experience significant interpatient variability in clinical outcomes, potentially due to pharmacokinetic variability in 2-fluoroadenine (F-ara-A) plasma concentrations. To test such hypotheses, patient compliance with the blood sampling should be optimized by the development of a minimally intrusive limited sampling schedule (LSS) to characterize F-ara-A pharmacokinetics. To this end, we sought to create the first F-ara-A population pharmacokinetic model and subsequently a LSS. Experimental Design A retrospective evaluation of F-ara-A pharmacokinetics was conducted after one or more doses of daily IV fludarabine in 42 adult HCT recipients. NONMEM software was used to estimate the population pharmacokinetic parameters and compute the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC). Results A two compartment model best fit the data. A LSS was constructed using a simulation approach, seeking to minimize the scaled mean square error (sMSE) for the AUC for each simulated individual. The LSS times chosen were: 0.583 hour (hr), 1.5 hr, 6.5 hr and 24 hr after the start of the 30 minute fludarabine infusion. Conclusion The pharmacokinetics of F-ara-A in an individual HCT patient can be accurately estimated by obtaining 4 blood samples (using the LSS) and maximum a posteriori (MAP) Bayesian estimation. Conclusions These are essential tools for prospective pharmacodynamic studies seeking to determine if clinical outcomes are related to F-ara-A pharmacokinetics in patients receiving IV fludarabine in the ambulatory clinic. PMID:19671874

  9. Evaluation of potentially nonlethal sampling methods for monitoring mercury concentrations in smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmitt, C.J.; Brumbaugh, W.G.

    2007-01-01

    We evaluated three potentially nonlethal alternatives to fillet sampling for the determination of mercury (Hg) concentrations in smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu). Fish (n = 62, 226-464 mm total length) from six sites in southern Missouri were captured by electrofishing. Blood samples (1 mL) from each fish were obtained by caudal veinipuncture with a heparinized needle and syringe. Biopsy needle (10 mm x 14 gauge; three cuts per fish; 10-20 mg total dry weight) and biopsy punch (7 mm x 5 mm in diameter, one plug per fish, 30-50 mg dry weight) samples were obtained from the area beneath the dorsal fin. Fillet samples were obtained from the opposite side of the fish. All samples were freeze-dried and analyzed for total Hg by combustion amalgamation atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Mean relative standard deviations (RSDs) of triplicate samples were similar for all four methods (2.2-2.4%), but the range of RSDs was greater for blood (0.4-5.5%) than for the muscle methods (1.8-4.0%). Total Hg concentrations in muscle were 0.0200-0.8809 ??g/g wet weight; concentrations in plug, needle, and fillet samples from each fish were nearly identical. Blood Hg concentrations were 0.0006-0.0812 ??g/mL and were highly correlated with muscle concentrations; linear regressions between log-transformed blood and fillet Hg concentrations were linear and statistically significant (p < 0.01), and explained 91-93% of the total variation. Correlations between fillet Hg concentrations and fish size and age were weak; together they explained ???37% of the total variation, and the relations differed among sites. Overall, any of the alternative methods could provide satisfactory estimates of fillet Hg in smallmouth bass; however, both blood and plug sampling with disposable instruments were easier to perform than needle sampling. The biopsy needle was the most difficult to use, especially on smaller fish, and its relative expense necessitates reuse and, consequently, thorough cleaning

  10. Evaluation of potentially nonlethal sampling methods for monitoring mercury concentrations in smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu).

    PubMed

    Schmitt, C J; Brumbaugh, W G

    2007-07-01

    We evaluated three potentially nonlethal alternatives to fillet sampling for the determination of mercury (Hg) concentrations in smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu). Fish (n = 62, 226-464 mm total length) from six sites in southern Missouri were captured by electrofishing. Blood samples (1 mL) from each fish were obtained by caudal veinipuncture with a heparinized needle and syringe. Biopsy needle (10 mm x 14 gauge; three cuts per fish; 10-20 mg total dry weight) and biopsy punch (7 mm x 5 mm in diameter, one plug per fish, 30-50 mg dry weight) samples were obtained from the area beneath the dorsal fin. Fillet samples were obtained from the opposite side of the fish. All samples were freeze-dried and analyzed for total Hg by combustion amalgamation atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Mean relative standard deviations (RSDs) of triplicate samples were similar for all four methods (2.2-2.4%), but the range of RSDs was greater for blood (0.4-5.5%) than for the muscle methods (1.8-4.0%). Total Hg concentrations in muscle were 0.0200-0.8809 microg/g wet weight; concentrations in plug, needle, and fillet samples from each fish were nearly identical. Blood Hg concentrations were 0.0006-0.0812 microg/mL and were highly correlated with muscle concentrations; linear regressions between log-transformed blood and fillet Hg concentrations were linear and statistically significant (p < 0.01), and explained 91-93% of the total variation. Correlations between fillet Hg concentrations and fish size and age were weak; together they explained sampling with disposable instruments were easier to perform than needle sampling. The biopsy needle was the most difficult to use, especially on smaller fish, and its relative expense necessitates reuse and, consequently, thorough

  11. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Versino, Maurizio; Colnaghi, Silvia; Callieco, Roberto; Bergamaschi, Roberto; Romani, Alfredo; Cosi, Vittorio

    2002-09-01

    Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) are saccular responses to loud acoustic stimuli and are recordable from the sterno-cleido-mastoid muscle ipsilaterally to the stimulated ear. This study aimed to investigate VEMPs in patients suffering from multiple sclerosis (MS), and to compare these findings with both clinical and instrumental data. We recorded VEMPs from 70 MS patients, whose clinical data were retrospectively evaluated for the possible occurrence of: past and current (with respect to VEMP recording) brainstem and/or cerebellar symptoms; current brainstem and/or cerebellar signs. Sixty-five patients underwent brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs) recording; 63 of the same patients underwent saccadic eye movement recording and subjective visual vertical (SVV) evaluation. VEMPs were abnormal in 31%, BAEPs in 38% and SVV in 21% of the patients. Saccadic eye movements showed a possible brainstem dysfunction in 44.4% of the patients. There was no correlation between the occurrence of abnormalities and the technical means of detection. The same held true for correlations with clinical data, with the exception of the BAEPs; these proved to be more frequently abnormal in patients presenting at neurological examination with brainstem and/or cerebellar signs that were possibly related to the complaint of dizziness. VEMPs should be considered a useful complementary neurophysiological tool for the evaluation of brainstem dysfunction.

  12. An assessment of sampling, preservation, and analytical procedures for arsenic speciation in potentially contaminated waters.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youn-Tae; Yoon, Hyeon; Yoon, Cheolho; Woo, Nam-Chil

    2007-08-01

    This study was undertaken to ascertain optimal methods of sampling, preserving, separating, and analyzing arsenic species in potentially contaminated waters. Arsenic species are readily transformed in nature by slight changes in conditions. Each species has a different toxicity and mobility. The conventional field sampling method using filters of 0.45 microm in size could overestimate the dissolved arsenic concentrations, as passing suspended particles that can act as a sink or source of arsenic depending on the site condition. For arsenic species in neutral pH and iron-poor waters, the precipitation can be stable for up to 3 days without any treatment, but for longer periods, a preservative, such as phosphoric acid, is required. Also, the analytical procedure must be selected carefully because the levels and hydride generation efficiencies of arsenic in different species can vary, even for the same amount of arsenic. For arsenic speciation in samples that also include organic species, a hybrid high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) column and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) gave the best resolution and lowest detection limits. However, the procedure using a solid phase extraction (SPE) cartridge can be used economically and conveniently for analyzing samples containing only inorganic arsenic species, such as groundwater, especially that related to mine activity.

  13. Cancer beliefs and patient activation in a diverse, multi-lingual primary care sample

    PubMed Central

    Hay, Jennifer L.; Zabor, Emily C.; Kumar, Julie; Brennessel, Debra; Kemeny, Margaret M.; Lubetkin, Erica I.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Greater patient activation, defined as having the knowledge, skills, and confidence to manage one’s health, is associated with cancer control behaviors. Cancer risk beliefs may be associated with patient activation, and delineating this relationship could inform cancer control interventions across diverse patient subgroups. This study examines associations between cancer risk beliefs, language preference, and patient activation within a multi-lingual urban primary care setting. Design Patients aged 18 and older within a New York City public hospital serving a large proportion of non-native born Americans were surveyed regarding their cancer risk beliefs and patient activation in Haitian Creole, Spanish, or English based on language preference during a health care visit. Results The sample (N=460) included 150 Haitian Creole speakers, 159 Spanish speakers, and 151 English speakers, and was primarily non-white (92%). Most participants (84%) had not been born in the United States. Cancer risk beliefs differed across language preference. Beliefs that cancer could be avoided by minimizing thoughts about cancer risk were significantly higher in Haitian Creole speakers compared to others; reported negative emotion when thinking about cancer risk was higher in Spanish and English versus Haitian Creole speakers. These cancer risk beliefs were positively related to patient activation, even when controlling for language preference. Conclusion Cancer risk beliefs differ across language preference, and are related to patient activation, making them potential important in cancer control. Consideration of language represents important demographic stratification for understanding the frequency and relevance of different beliefs about cancer and patient activation. PMID:27317127

  14. Potential contamination of forensic entomology samples collected in the mortuary: a case report.

    PubMed

    Archer, M S; Ranson, D L

    2005-01-01

    Carrion insects originating from infested bodies may establish small mortuary populations. Two Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine cases are presented to illustrate how these insects can potentially contaminate forensic entomology samples collected in the mortuary. The first case proves that bodies can be colonised in the mortuary: when a decomposed body in freezer storage was thawed for a procedure in the main mortuary, it was colonised within five minutes of exposure by the beetle Necrobia rufipes De Geer (Cleridae, Coleoptera). The second case illustrates that immobile juvenile insects can be transferred between bodies, and describes the transfer of an Eristalis sp. (Syrphidae, Diptera) pupa from a decomposed to a fresh body. While the contamination risk is slight, it can be further minimised by checking mortuary-collected samples against those taken from the body discovery site, by mortuary pest control, and by checking previous mortuary admittance records for possible contamination sources.

  15. Fly pupae and puparia as potential contaminants of forensic entomology samples from sites of body discovery.

    PubMed

    Archer, M S; Elgar, M A; Briggs, C A; Ranson, D L

    2006-11-01

    Fly pupae and puparia may contaminate forensic entomology samples at death scenes if they have originated not from human remains but from animal carcasses or other decomposing organic material. These contaminants may erroneously lengthen post-mortem interval estimates if no pupae or puparia are genuinely associated with the body. Three forensic entomology case studies are presented, in which contamination either occurred or was suspected. In the first case, blow fly puparia collected near the body were detected as contaminants because the species was inactive both when the body was found and when the deceased was last sighted reliably. The second case illustrates that contamination may be suspected at particularly squalid death scenes because of the likely presence of carcasses or organic material. The third case involves the presence at the body discovery site of numerous potentially contaminating animal carcasses. Soil samples were taken along transects to show that pupae and puparia were clustered around their probable sources.

  16. Potential, velocity, and density fields from sparse and noisy redshift-distance samples - Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dekel, Avishai; Bertschinger, Edmund; Faber, Sandra M.

    1990-01-01

    A method for recovering the three-dimensional potential, velocity, and density fields from large-scale redshift-distance samples is described. Galaxies are taken as tracers of the velocity field, not of the mass. The density field and the initial conditions are calculated using an iterative procedure that applies the no-vorticity assumption at an initial time and uses the Zel'dovich approximation to relate initial and final positions of particles on a grid. The method is tested using a cosmological N-body simulation 'observed' at the positions of real galaxies in a redshift-distance sample, taking into account their distance measurement errors. Malmquist bias and other systematic and statistical errors are extensively explored using both analytical techniques and Monte Carlo simulations.

  17. Communication: Newton homotopies for sampling stationary points of potential energy landscapes

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, Dhagash; Chen, Tianran; Hauenstein, Jonathan D.; Wales, David J.

    2014-09-28

    One of the most challenging and frequently arising problems in many areas of science is to find solutions of a system of multivariate nonlinear equations. There are several numerical methods that can find many (or all if the system is small enough) solutions but they all exhibit characteristic problems. Moreover, traditional methods can break down if the system contains singular solutions. Here, we propose an efficient implementation of Newton homotopies, which can sample a large number of the stationary points of complicated many-body potentials. We demonstrate how the procedure works by applying it to the nearest-neighbor ϕ{sup 4} model and atomic clusters.

  18. Predicting survival in potentially curable lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Win, Thida; Sharples, Linda; Groves, Ashley M; Ritchie, Andrew J; Wells, Francis C; Laroche, Clare M

    2008-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer death with unchanged mortality for 50 years. Only localized nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is curable. In these patients it is essential to accurately predict survival to help identify those that will benefit from treatment and those at risk of relapse. Despite needing this clinical information, prospective data are lacking. We therefore prospectively identified prognostic factors in patients with potentially curable lung cancer. Over 2 years, 110 consecutive patients with confirmed localized NSCLC (stages 1-3A) were recruited from a single tertiary center. Prognostic factors investigated included age, gender, body mass index (BMI), performance status, comorbidity, disease stage, quality of life, and respiratory physiology. Patients were followed up for 3-5 years and mortality recorded. The data were analyzed using survival analysis methods. Twenty-eight patients died within 1 year, 15 patients died within 2 years, and 11 patients died within 3 years postsurgery. Kaplan-Meier survival estimates show a survival rate of 51% at 3 years. Factors significantly (p < 0.05) associated with poor overall survival were age at assessment, diabetes, serum albumin, peak VO(2) max, shuttle walk distance, and predicted postoperative transfer factor. In multiple-variable survival models, the strongest predictors of survival overall were diabetes and shuttle walk distance. The results show that potentially curable lung cancer patients should not be discriminated against with respect to weight and smoking history. Careful attention is required when managing patients with diabetes. Respiratory physiologic measurements were of limited value in predicting long-term survival after lung cancer surgery.

  19. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Özgür, Abdulkadir; Serdaroğlu Beyazal, Münevver; Terzi, Suat; Coşkun, Zerrin Özergin; Dursun, Engin

    2016-10-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease with unknown etiology. Although sacroiliac joint involvement is the classic sign along with the formed immune mediators, it may result in immune-mediated inner ear disease and may cause damage to the audiovestibular system. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) is a clinical reflex test used in the diagnosis of vestibular diseases and is performed by recording and evaluating the muscle potentials resulting from the stimulation of the vestibular system with different stimuli. The aim of this study is to evaluate the cervical VEMP test results in AS patients without vestibular symptoms. Thirty-three patients with AS and a control group of 30 healthy volunteers with similar demographic characteristics were evaluated in the study. VEMP wave latency, P13-N23 wave amplitude, and VEMP asymmetry ratio (VAR) values were compared between the groups. The relationship between clinical and laboratory findings of the AS patients and VEMP data were also investigated. Compared with healthy people, this study shows the response rate of patients with ankylosing spondylitis was reduced in the VEMP test, and P13-N23 wave amplitude showed a decrease in AS patients who had VEMP response (p < 0.001). There was no correlation between the clinical and laboratory findings and VEMP findings in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. The data obtained from this study suggest that AS may lead to decreased sensitivity of the vestibular system.

  20. Invention and validation of an automated camera system that uses optical character recognition to identify patient name mislabeled samples.

    PubMed

    Hawker, Charles D; McCarthy, William; Cleveland, David; Messinger, Bonnie L

    2014-03-01

    Mislabeled samples are a serious problem in most clinical laboratories. Published error rates range from 0.39/1000 to as high as 1.12%. Standardization of bar codes and label formats has not yet achieved the needed improvement. The mislabel rate in our laboratory, although low compared with published rates, prompted us to seek a solution to achieve zero errors. To reduce or eliminate our mislabeled samples, we invented an automated device using 4 cameras to photograph the outside of a sample tube. The system uses optical character recognition (OCR) to look for discrepancies between the patient name in our laboratory information system (LIS) vs the patient name on the customer label. All discrepancies detected by the system's software then require human inspection. The system was installed on our automated track and validated with production samples. We obtained 1 009 830 images during the validation period, and every image was reviewed. OCR passed approximately 75% of the samples, and no mislabeled samples were passed. The 25% failed by the system included 121 samples actually mislabeled by patient name and 148 samples with spelling discrepancies between the patient name on the customer label and the patient name in our LIS. Only 71 of the 121 mislabeled samples detected by OCR were found through our normal quality assurance process. We have invented an automated camera system that uses OCR technology to identify potential mislabeled samples. We have validated this system using samples transported on our automated track. Full implementation of this technology offers the possibility of zero mislabeled samples in the preanalytic stage.

  1. Accelerating ab initio path integral molecular dynamics with multilevel sampling of potential surface

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Hua Y.

    2015-02-15

    A multilevel approach to sample the potential energy surface in a path integral formalism is proposed. The purpose is to reduce the required number of ab initio evaluations of energy and forces in ab initio path integral molecular dynamics (AI-PIMD) simulation, without compromising the overall accuracy. To validate the method, the internal energy and free energy of an Einstein crystal are calculated and compared with the analytical solutions. As a preliminary application, we assess the performance of the method in a realistic model—the FCC phase of dense atomic hydrogen, in which the calculated result shows that the acceleration rate is about 3 to 4-fold for a two-level implementation, and can be increased up to 10 times if extrapolation is used. With only 16 beads used for the ab initio potential sampling, this method gives a well converged internal energy. The residual error in pressure is just about 3 GPa, whereas it is about 20 GPa for a plain AI-PIMD calculation with the same number of beads. The vibrational free energy of the FCC phase of dense hydrogen at 300 K is also calculated with an AI-PIMD thermodynamic integration method, which gives a result of about 0.51 eV/proton at a density of r{sub s}=0.912.

  2. Accelerating ab initio path integral molecular dynamics with multilevel sampling of potential surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Hua Y.

    2015-02-01

    A multilevel approach to sample the potential energy surface in a path integral formalism is proposed. The purpose is to reduce the required number of ab initio evaluations of energy and forces in ab initio path integral molecular dynamics (AI-PIMD) simulation, without compromising the overall accuracy. To validate the method, the internal energy and free energy of an Einstein crystal are calculated and compared with the analytical solutions. As a preliminary application, we assess the performance of the method in a realistic model-the FCC phase of dense atomic hydrogen, in which the calculated result shows that the acceleration rate is about 3 to 4-fold for a two-level implementation, and can be increased up to 10 times if extrapolation is used. With only 16 beads used for the ab initio potential sampling, this method gives a well converged internal energy. The residual error in pressure is just about 3 GPa, whereas it is about 20 GPa for a plain AI-PIMD calculation with the same number of beads. The vibrational free energy of the FCC phase of dense hydrogen at 300 K is also calculated with an AI-PIMD thermodynamic integration method, which gives a result of about 0.51 eV/proton at a density of rs = 0.912.

  3. Visual evoked potentials in patients after methanol poisoning.

    PubMed

    Urban, Pavel; Zakharov, Sergey; Diblík, Pavel; Pelclová, Daniela; Ridzoň, Petr

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of the visual evoked potentials (VEP) examination in patients after severe poisoning by methanol. The group of 47 patients (38 males and 9 females) was assembled out of persons who survived an outbreak of poisoning by the methanol adulterated alcohol beverages, which happened in the Czech Republic in 2012-2013. The visual evoked potentials examination was performed using monocular checkerboard pattern-reversal stimulation. Two criteria of abnormality were chosen: missing evoked response, and wave P1 latency > 117 ms. Non-parametric statistical methods (median, range, and the median test) were used to analyze factors influencing the VEP abnormality. The visual evoked potential was abnormal in 20 patients (43%), 5 of them had normal visual acuity on the Snellen chart. The VEP abnormality did not correlate significantly with initial serum concentrations of methanol, formic acid or lactate; however, it showed statistically significant inverse relation to the initial serum pH: the subgroup with the abnormal VEP had significantly lower median pH in comparison with the subgroup with the normal VEP (7.16 vs. 7.34, p = 0.04). The abnormality was not related to chronic alcohol abuse. The visual evoked potentials examination appeared sensitive enough to detected even subclinical impairment of the optic system. Metabolic acidosis is likely to be the key factor related to the development of visual damage induced by methanol. The examination performed with a delay of 1-9 months after the poisoning documented the situation relatively early after the event. It is considered as a baseline for the planned long-term follow-up of the patients, which will make it possible to assess the dynamics of the observed changes, their reversibility, and the occurrence of potential late sequelae. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  4. A nationwide random sampling survey of potential complicated grief in Japan.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Yasunao; Kishimoto, Junji; Asukai, Nozomu

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of significant loss, potential complicated grief (CG), and its contributing factors, we conducted a nationwide random sampling survey of Japanese adults aged 18 or older (N = 1,343) using a self-rating Japanese-language version of the Complicated Grief Brief Screen. Among them, 37.0% experienced their most significant loss by expected non-violent death, 17.9% by unexpected non-violent death, and 5.5% by violent death. The mean length of time since the loss was 11.9 years (SD = 11.6). The percentage of individuals with potential CG (5 or higher score on the scale) was 2.5% among those who experienced significant loss. The individuals with potential CG showed lower mental health scores than those without. Through regression analysis, we found the significant effects of gender difference, time since the loss, and the interaction of the mode of death, gender of the bereaved, and the kinship relationship to the deceased on the CG score. Women who had lost a child by sudden or violent death showed significantly higher CG scores, but men did not. By comparison, those (particularly men) who had lost a partner by expected or sudden nonviolent death showed significantly higher CG scores. The implications of the findings are discussed.

  5. Potential Drug - Drug Interactions among Medications Prescribed to Hypertensive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Barna

    2014-01-01

    Context: Drug-drug interactions(DDIs) are significant but avoidable causes of iatrogenic morbidity and hospital admission. Aim: To detect potential drug-drug interactions among medications received by hypertensive patients. Materials and Methods: Patients of both sex and all adult age groups, who were attending medicine out -patient department (OPD) of a tertiary care teaching rural hospital since last six months and were being prescribed antihypertensive drug/s for essential hypertension, were selected for the study. Hypertensive patient with co-morbities diabetes mellitus, ischemic heart diseases, congestive heart failure, and chronic renal diseases were also included in the study. Potential drug drug interactions were checked with medscape drug interaction software. Results: With the help of medscape drug interaction software, 71.50% prescriptions were identified having atleast one drug-drug interaction. Total 918 DDIs were found in between 58 drug pairs. 55.23% DDIs were pharmacodynamic, 4.79% pharmacokinetic type of DDIs. 32.24% DDIs were found affecting serum potassium level. 95.42% DDIs were found significant type of DDIs. Drug drug interaction between atenolol & amlodipine was the most common DDI (136) followed by metoprolol and amlodine (88) in this study. Atenolol and amlodipine ( 25.92%) was the most common drugs to cause DDIs in our study. Conclusion: We detected a significant number of drug drug interaction in hypertensive patients. These interactions were between antihypertensive agents or between hypertensive and drug for co-morbid condition. PMID:25584241

  6. Threshold for endometrial sampling among postmenopausal patients without vaginal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Louie, Michelle; Canavan, Timothy P; Mansuria, Suketu

    2016-03-01

    To provide an optimum threshold for endometrial biopsy sampling among postmenopausal women without vaginal bleeding and an incidentally-found endometrial lining of above 4mm. A cohort of postmenopausal women (aged ≥50 years) who underwent pelvic ultrasonography at a tertiary US hospital for indications other than vaginal bleeding was retrospectively evaluated. Women were included if they had an endometrial lining of above 4mm. Logistic regression was performed to determine the probability of endometrial carcinoma and atypical hyperplasia at each increasing millimeter of endometrial thickness from 4 to 20mm. Among 462 women, carcinoma was identified in 9 (1.9%) and atypical hyperplasia in 7 (1.5%). An endometrial thickness of or above 14 mm was significantly associated with atypical hyperplasia (odds ratio 4.29; 95% confidence interval 1.30-14.20; P=0.02), with a negative predictive value of 98.3%. A thickness of or above 15 mm was associated with carcinoma (odds ratio 4.53; 95% confidence interval 1.20-17.20; P=0.03), with a negative predictive value of 98.5% and a 0.06% risk of cancer. Irrespective of conventional risk factors, an incidentally-found thickened endometrial lining of less than 15 mm might not warrant endometrial biopsy sampling among postmenopausal women without vaginal bleeding. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A Dual Color Immunohistochemistry Assay for Measurement of Cereblon in Multiple Myeloma Patient Samples.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yan; Wang, Maria; Couto, Suzana; Hansel, Donna E; Miller, Karen; Lopez-Girona, Antonia; Bjorklund, Chad C; Gandhi, Anita K; Thakurta, Anjan; Chopra, Rajesh; Breider, Michael

    Clinical interest in the measurement of Cereblon (CRBN), the primary target of the IMiDs immunomodulatory drugs lenalidomide and pomalidomide, has been fueled by its essential requirement for antitumor or immunomodulatory activity of both drugs in multiple myeloma (MM). However, limited analyses of clinical samples for CRBN gene expression or protein levels have utilized unvalidated reagents and assays, raising uncertainty about the interpretation of these results. We previously described a highly specific rabbit monoclonal antibody CRBN65 against 65-76 AA of human Cereblon. Here we describe a validated dual color bright-field Cereblon/CD138 immunohistochemical (IHC) assay utilizing CRBN65 and a commercial mouse monoclonal CD138 antibody. Sensitivity and specificity of the assay was determined and assay precision was shown for both cytoplasmic and nuclear Cereblon in MM bone marrow samples with coefficient of variation values of 5% and 2%, respectively. The dual IHC assay was effective for detecting a continuous range of Cereblon levels in 22 MM patient bone marrow core biopsies and aspirate clots, as shown by average cytoplasmic H-scores ranging from 63 to 267 and nuclear H-scores ranging from 17 to 250. Interpathologist comparison of MM sample H-scores by 3 pathologists demonstrated good concordance (R=0.73). This dual assay demonstrated superior Cereblon IHC measurement in MM samples compared with the single IHC assay using a published commercial rabbit polyclonal Cereblon antibody and could be used to explore the potential utility of Cereblon as a biomarker in the clinic.

  8. Visual evoked potentials in a patient with prosopagnosia.

    PubMed

    Small, M

    1988-01-01

    Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) were recorded from a 53-year-old man with prosopagnosia during presentation of slides of known and unknown faces and under two control conditions. ANOVA comparisons with a normal male group showed no differences in P100 amplitude, P300 amplitude or P300 latency. There were no significant evoked potential differences between the patient and controls specifically related to the face conditions. There was, however, a significant delay in the latency of P100 from both hemispheres during all types of stimuli. This prolonged latency was asymmetrical, showing a right sided emphasis with the control conditions: pattern reversal and slides of geometric designs. This finding, of a dissociation in the interhemispheric delay, provides physiological evidence of stimulus-specific organisation at an early, sensory level. The fact that the P100 component showed a marked delay, yet P300 fell within normal limits for amplitude and latency, suggests that this patient's problem lies at a perceptual level.

  9. [Adoption and behavioural disturbances in adolescence. A hospital patient sample].

    PubMed

    Fernández Rivas, A; Erkoreka, L; Vivanco González, E; Landa Aqueche, M; Sesma Pardo, E; Pérez Cabeza, L; Alonso, Z; Kerexeta, I; González Torres, M A

    2014-01-01

    The number of adoptions has increased in the Western world in recent decades. An over-representation in mental health services and an increased risk of displaying behavioural disorders has been reported among adopted adolescents. In this study, we aim to assess the proportions of adopted and non-adopted adolescents and the presence of externalizing disorders in an inpatient setting. Prospective data were collected over 56 months (n=431) from all adolescent admissions (12-17 years of age) to the Child and Adolescent's Inpatient Psychiatric Unit, which serves the Biscay province (Basque Country, Spain). The sample was divided into adopted (2.6%) and non-adopted adolescents (97.4%), and the following variables were compared: age, gender, cause of admission, prior admissions, main diagnosis, drug use and Overt Aggression Scale score at admission. Adopted adolescents were over-represented in our sample (2.84% vs. 0.6% in the general population of Biscay, P<.001). Compared to the non-adopted, age at admission was significantly lower (14.09 vs. 15.21 years old, P=.017) and they showed a statistical tendency to be admitted more frequently for behavioural disorders (63.6% vs. 38.1%, P=.086). The over-representation and the earlier age at admission suggest that the conditions of adopted adolescents are more serious and-or adoptive families are less able to manage them. The data also show that they tend to be admitted more for behavioural disorders, whilst no significant differences in the diagnosis on discharge were found, which suggests that they tend to externalise their symptoms more. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Motor evoked potentials of the respiratory muscles in tetraplegic patients.

    PubMed

    Lissens, M A; Vanderstraeten, G G

    1996-11-01

    We studied the respiratory muscles with magnetic transcranial stimulation (TCS) in four spinal cord injured (SCI) patients as compared to age-matched controls from a database of 40 healthy subjects. These SCI patients all had spinal cord lesions above C6 level with a clinically incomplete tetraplegia. One patient was artificially ventilated. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded from the diaphragm, the scalenes, the parasternal intercostals and the expiratory rectus abdominis during inspiration and expiration. In patients with incomplete tetraplegia MEP latency times were significantly prolonged in the scalenes and the parasternal intercostals, both during inspiration and expiration, and were nearly normal for the diaphragm, which was found to be more or less preserved. The mean MEP amplitudes in these patients for all inspiratory muscles studied were significantly decreased in tetraplegic patients, in part due to a decreased number of innervating axons and muscle hypotrophy. No MEPs could be obtained from the abdominal muscles, except in one C3 tetraplegic patient, in whom only a very small response was seen during expiration, with a very delayed latency time. The much lower location of their innervating nerve roots (T10) and the much longer distance of their spinal exit zone from the level of injury at the cervical spinal cord might at least partially explain this phenomenon. In the ventilator-dependent tetraplegic patient no MEPs could be obtained from any of the muscles studied. Thus, magnetic TCS is a painless and easily applicable technique to investigate the central motor conduction properties of the respiratory muscles, both in healthy humans and in tetraplegic patients.

  11. Visual evoked potentials in subgroups of migraine with aura patients.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Gianluca; Bracaglia, Martina; Di Lenola, Davide; Di Lorenzo, Cherubino; Serrao, Mariano; Parisi, Vincenzo; Di Renzo, Antonio; Martelli, Francesco; Fadda, Antonello; Schoenen, Jean; Pierelli, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Patients suffering from migraine with aura can have either pure visual auras or complex auras with sensory disturbances and dysphasia, or both. Few studies have searched for possible pathophysiological differences between these two subgroups of patients. Methods - Forty-seven migraine with aura patients were subdivided in a subgroup with exclusively visual auras (MA, N = 27) and another with complex neurological auras (MA+, N = 20). We recorded pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials (VEP: 15 min of arc cheques, 3.1 reversal per second, 600 sweeps) and measured amplitude and habituation (slope of the linear regression line of amplitude changes from the 1st to 6th block of 100 sweeps) for the N1-P1 and P1-N2 components in patients and, for comparison, in 30 healthy volunteers (HV) of similar age and gender distribution. VEP N1-P1 habituation, i.e. amplitude decrement between 1st and 6th block, which was obvious in most HV (mean slope -0.50), was deficient in both MA (slope +0.01, p = 0.0001) and MA+ (-0.0049, p = 0.001) patients. However, VEP N1-P1 amplitudes across blocks were normal in MA patients, while they were significantly greater in MA+ patients than in HVs. Our findings suggest that in migraine with aura patients different aura phenotypes may be underpinned by different pathophysiological mechanisms. Pre-activation cortical excitability could be higher in patients with complex neurological auras than in those having pure visual auras or in healthy volunteers.

  12. The importance of measuring and accounting for potential biases in respondent-driven samples.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Abby E; Fuller, Crystal M; Latkin, Carl

    2013-07-01

    Respondent-driven sampling (RDS) is often viewed as a superior method for recruiting hard-to-reach populations disproportionately burdened with poor health outcomes. As an analytic approach, it has been praised for its ability to generate unbiased population estimates via post-stratified weights which account for non-random recruitment. However, population estimates generated with RDSAT (RDS Analysis Tool) are sensitive to variations in degree weights. Several assumptions are implicit in the degree weight and are not routinely assessed. Failure to meet these assumptions could result in inaccurate degree measures and consequently result in biased population estimates. We highlight potential biases associated with violating the assumptions implicit in degree weights for the RDSAT estimator and propose strategies to measure and possibly correct for biases in the analysis.

  13. The importance of measuring and accounting for potential biases in respondent-driven samples

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, Abby E.; Fuller, Crystal M.; Latkin, Carl

    2013-01-01

    Respondent-driven sampling (RDS) is often viewed as a superior method for recruiting hard-to-reach populations disproportionately burdened with poor health outcomes. As an analytic approach, it has been praised for its ability to generate unbiased population estimates via post-stratified weights which account for non-random recruitment. However, population estimates generated with RDSAT (RDS Analysis Tool) are sensitive to variations in degree weights. Several assumptions are implicit in the degree weight and are not routinely assessed. Failure to meet these assumptions could result in inaccurate degree measures and consequently result in biased population estimates. We highlight potential biases associated with violating the assumptions implicit in degree weights for the RDSAT estimator and propose strategies to measure and possibly correct for biases in the analysis. PMID:23515641

  14. Neopterin: a potential biomarker for delirium in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Egberts, Angelique; Wijnbeld, Eline H A; Fekkes, Durk; van der Ploeg, Milly A; Ziere, Gijsbertus; Hooijkaas, Herbert; van der Cammen, Tischa J M; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U S

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of delirium is not supported by specific biomarkers. In a previous study, high neopterin levels were found in patients with a postoperative delirium. In the present study, we investigated levels of neopterin, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) in acutely ill admitted elderly patients with and without a delirium. Plasma/serum levels of neopterin, IL-6 and IGF-1 were determined in patients aged ≥65 years admitted to the wards of Internal Medicine and Geriatrics. Differences in biomarker levels between patients with and without a delirium were investigated by the analysis of variance in models adjusted for age, gender, comorbidities and eGFR (when appropriate). Eighty-six patients were included; 23 of them with a delirium. In adjusted models, higher mean levels of neopterin (70.5 vs. 45.9 nmol/l, p = 0.009) and IL-6 (43.1 vs. 18.5 pg/ml, p = 0.034) and lower mean levels of IGF-1 (6.3 vs. 9.3 nmol/l, p = 0.007) were found in patients with a delirium compared to those without. The findings of this study suggest that neopterin might be a potential biomarker for delirium which, through oxidative stress and activation of the immune system, may play a role in the pathophysiology of delirium. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Pattern Visual Evoked Potential Changes in Diabetic Patients without Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Sungur, Gulten; Yakin, Mehmet; Unlu, Nurten; Balta, Oyku Bezen; Ornek, Firdevs

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the different check sizes of pattern visual evoked potential (PVEP) in diabetic patients without retinopathy according to HbA1c levels and diabetes duration. Methods. Fifty-eight eligible patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 26 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were included in the study. Only the right eye of each patient was analyzed. All of the patients underwent a comprehensive ophthalmic examination, and the PVEPs were recorded. Results. There was a statistically significant difference in P100 latency in 1-degree check size and in N135 latency in 2-degree check size between controls and patient groups which have different HbA1c levels. There were statistically significant, positive, and weak correlations with diabetes duration and P100 latency in 7-minute and 15-minute check sizes and N135 latency in 15-minute check size. Conclusions. It was showed that there were prolongations in P100 latency only in 1-degree check size and in N135 only in 2-degree check size in diabetic patients without retinopathy. There was statistically significant correlation between diabetes duration and P100 and N135 latencies in different check sizes. PMID:28392940

  16. Sample-specific odontometric sex estimation: A method with potential application to burned remains.

    PubMed

    Gouveia, Marcia Filipa; Oliveira Santos, Inês; Santos, Ana Luísa; Gonçalves, David

    2017-07-01

    Metric features are often the only preserved sexually dimorphic features to allow sex estimation in burned human remains, but this is complicated by heat-induced dimensional changes. The potential of odontometry for sex estimation was investigated. A sample of permanent lower second pre-molars from 20 males and 20 females was experimentally burned at 900°C to assess heat-induced changes in the sexual dimorphism of seven dimensions of the cementum-enamel junction and the root. Four of them, cementum-enamel junction perimeter; mesiodistal, buccolingual and perimeter at the mid-root level, were investigated for the first time. Also, five measurements combining some of the isolated standard measurements were investigated. Additionally, 10 permanent upper central incisors and 10 permanent lower first molars were experimentally burned at 400°C and 700° C to document heat-induced dimensional changes and serve as comparison with the 900°C sample. Results showed that most of the standard measurements, although presenting significant sex differences, were not reliable enough to allow for correct sex classifications close to 100% both before and after the burning. Nonetheless, the perimeter at the cementum-enamel junction and the combined measurements of the mesiodistal and buccolingual diameters, at the same level, were quite promising in the post-burning analysis with correct sex classifications above 80%. At 900°C, females were slightly more affected by shrinkage in this measure than males thus artificially increasing sexual dimorphism after burning. Therefore, and although additional research is needed, this feature was not discarded as having potential for skeletal sex estimation. Copyright © 2017 The Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Potential drug interactions in patients given antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Wendel Mombaque; Secoli, Silvia Regina; Padoin, Stela Maris de Mello

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to investigate potential drug-drug interactions (PDDI) in patients with HIV infection on antiretroviral therapy. Methods: a cross-sectional study was conducted on 161 adults with HIV infection. Clinical, socio demographic, and antiretroviral treatment data were collected. To analyze the potential drug interactions, we used the software Micromedex(r). Statistical analysis was performed by binary logistic regression, with a p-value of ≤0.05 considered statistically significant. Results: of the participants, 52.2% were exposed to potential drug-drug interactions. In total, there were 218 potential drug-drug interactions, of which 79.8% occurred between drugs used for antiretroviral therapy. There was an association between the use of five or more medications and potential drug-drug interactions (p = 0.000) and between the time period of antiretroviral therapy being over six years and potential drug-drug interactions (p < 0.00). The clinical impact was prevalent sedation and cardiotoxicity. Conclusions: the PDDI identified in this study of moderate and higher severity are events that not only affect the therapeutic response leading to toxicity in the central nervous and cardiovascular systems, but also can interfere in tests used for detection of HIV resistance to antiretroviral drugs. PMID:27878224

  18. Evoked brain potentials and disability in brain-damaged patients.

    PubMed

    Rappaport, M; Hall, K; Hopkins, K; Belleza, T; Berrol, S; Reynolds, G

    1977-08-01

    Various measures of evoked brain potential abnormality (EPA) were correlated with disability ratings (DR) for 35 brain-damaged patients. EPA data consisted of judgements of abnormality of ipsilateral, contralateral and bilateral responses to auditory and visual stimuli reflecting activity in the brain stem, subcortex and cortex. DR data were obtained from a scale developed for this study to quantize and categorize patients with a wide range of disabilities from coma to normal functioning. EPA scores based on visual and auditory cortical responses showed significantly positive correlations with degree of disability. Visual response correlation was .49, auditory .38 and combined visual and auditory .51. It was concluded that EPA measures can reflect disability independently of clinical information. They are useful in assessing brain function in general and, specifically, in assessing impairment of sensory function. The evoked potential technique was particularly useful in patients who were not able to participate fully in their own examination. There were indications that the technique may also be valuable in monitoring progress and in predicting clinical outcome in brain-damaged patients.

  19. Communication of ALS Patients by Detecting Event-Related Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanou, Naoyuki; Sakuma, Kenji; Nakashima, Kenji

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis(ALS) patients are unable to successfully communicate their desires, although their mental capacity is the same as non-affected persons. Therefore, the authors put emphasis on Event-Related Potential(ERP) which elicits the highest outcome for the target visual and hearing stimuli. P300 is one component of ERP. It is positive potential that is elicited when the subject focuses attention on stimuli that appears infrequently. In this paper, the authors focused on P200 and N200 components, in addition to P300, for their great improvement in the rate of correct judgment in the target word-specific experiment. Hence the authors propose the algorithm that specifies target words by detecting these three components. Ten healthy subjects and ALS patient underwent the experiment in which a target word out of five words, was specified by this algorithm. The rates of correct judgment in nine of ten healthy subjects were more than 90.0%. The highest rate was 99.7%. The highest rate of ALS patient was 100.0%. Through these results, the authors found the possibility that ALS patients could communicate with surrounding persons by detecting ERP(P200, N200 and P300) as their desire.

  20. Initial and serial evoked potentials in cerebrovascular critical care patients.

    PubMed

    Haupt, Walter F; Pawlik, Gunter; Thiel, Alexander

    2006-10-01

    Results of somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) and brainstem auditory evoked potential (BAEP) examinations performed early in the clinical course of patients with acute cerebrovascular disease correlate statistically significantly with outcome regardless of type and localization of the primary lesion. The prognostic value of serial examinations of SEP and BAEP has not been studied yet. The authors examined a group of 215 patients suffering from acute stroke requiring neurocritical care composed of 75 supratentorial and 36 infratentorial ischemic strokes, 58 supratentorial and 18 infratentorial hemorrhages, and 28 aneurysmatic subarachnoid hemorrhages prospectively using spinal and cortical SEP and BAEP according to routine procedures on admission as well as after 1 and 2 weeks. The findings were correlated to outcome at 4 weeks. Statistical assessment was performed using standard methods of contingency analysis. In all groups, SEP findings were significantly correlated with outcome at initial and all subsequent examinations, similar correlations were also found for BAEP. However, after partialling out the prognostic information gained from the initial examination of SEP and BAEP, the follow-up examinations rendered only a marginal increase in prognostic information. Therefore, the initial examination of evoked potentials supplies valuable prognostic information, however, serial examinations of evoked potentials during the first weeks of disease improve the prognostic information only marginally.

  1. Chemical composition of core samples from Newark Basin, a potential carbon sequestration site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seltzer, A. M.; Yang, Q.; Goldberg, D.

    2012-12-01

    Injection of carbon dioxide into deep saline aquifers has been identified as a promising mitigation option of greenhouse gases, the successful management of which is considered to be one of the most urgent and important challenges. Given the high energy production in the New York metropolitan area, the Newark Basin region is considered to be a potential future sequestration site. However, the risk of an upward leak of sequestered CO2, especially to a shallow drinking water aquifer, is a key concern facing geological sequestration as a safe and viable mitigation option. In this study, we measured the chemical composition of 25 cores from various depths throughout Newark Basin as a precursor for an ex situ incubation experiment using these rock samples and aquifer water to simulate a leak event. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis of microwave-assisted digested rock powders and X-ray fluorescence analysis of the rock powders were conducted to obtain the concentrations of major and trace elements. Most of the major and trace elements show wide concentration ranges at one to two orders of magnitude. Understanding the chemical composition of these Newark Basin core samples is important not only for characterizing materials used for the later lab incubation, but also for gaining a broader understanding of the chemistry of the Newark Basin and profiling the region according to the varying risks associated with a leak of sequestered CO2 to a drinking water aquifer.

  2. Children's views on microneedle use as an alternative to blood sampling for patient monitoring.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Karen; McElnay, James C; Donnelly, Ryan F

    2014-10-01

    To explore children's views on microneedle use for this population, particularly as an alternative approach to blood sampling, in monitoring applications, and so, examine the acceptability of this approach to children. Focus groups were conducted with children (aged 10-14 years) in a range of schools across Northern Ireland. Convenience sampling was employed, i.e. children involved in a university-directed community-outreach project (Pharmacists in Schools) were recruited. A total of 86 children participated in 13 focus groups across seven schools in Northern Ireland. A widespread disapproval for blood sampling was evident, with pain, blood and traditional needle visualisation particularly unpopular aspects. In general, microneedles had greater visual acceptability and caused less fear. A patch-based design enabled minimal patient awareness of the monitoring procedure, with personalised designs, e.g. cartoon themes, favoured. Children's concerns included possible allergy and potential inaccuracies with this novel approach; however, many had confidence in the judgement of healthcare professionals if deeming this technique appropriate. They considered paediatric patient education critical for acceptance of this new approach and called for an alternative name, without any reference to 'needles'. The findings presented here support the development of blood-free, minimally invasive techniques and provide an initial indication of microneedle acceptability in children, particularly for monitoring purposes. A proactive response to these unique insights should enable microneedle array design to better meet the needs of this end-user group. Further work in this area is recommended to ascertain the perspectives of a purposive sample of children with chronic conditions who require regular monitoring. © 2013 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  3. Benefits, Challenges, and Potential Utility of a Gait Database for Diabetes Patients.

    PubMed

    Brown, Steven; Boulton, Andrew; Bowling, Frank; Reeves, Neil

    2016-09-01

    Gait analysis is a useful tool in understanding movement impairments, which impact on patient well-being. The use of gait analysis in patients with diabetes has led to improvements in health care including the treatment and prevention of ulceration and development of targeted exercise interventions. The current convention when analyzing gait is to address specific complications of diabetes, controlling for potential influencing conditions within a study sample to understand the effects of the few specific complications chosen for analysis. Databases allow for the storage of data in a structured format, allowing easy access to large quantities of data in a consistent, comparable manner. A database of gait analyses of patients with diabetes has the potential to include far greater sample sizes for statistical analyses, allowing multiple influencing factors to be assessed simultaneously, and relationships identified between multiple influencing factors. However, a database of this type would encounter ethical and methodological challenges in its implementation, which are discussed. This article introduces some of the potential benefits, challenges, and utility of a gait database for diabetes patients. We highlight that, whereas the creation of a database within this clinical population would be a complex process both ethically and practically, huge potential benefits could be gained, overcoming some of the limitations faced by traditional isolated gait analysis studies. © 2016 Diabetes Technology Society.

  4. Benefits, Challenges, and Potential Utility of a Gait Database for Diabetes Patients

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Steven; Boulton, Andrew; Bowling, Frank; Reeves, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Gait analysis is a useful tool in understanding movement impairments, which impact on patient well-being. The use of gait analysis in patients with diabetes has led to improvements in health care including the treatment and prevention of ulceration and development of targeted exercise interventions. The current convention when analyzing gait is to address specific complications of diabetes, controlling for potential influencing conditions within a study sample to understand the effects of the few specific complications chosen for analysis. Databases allow for the storage of data in a structured format, allowing easy access to large quantities of data in a consistent, comparable manner. A database of gait analyses of patients with diabetes has the potential to include far greater sample sizes for statistical analyses, allowing multiple influencing factors to be assessed simultaneously, and relationships identified between multiple influencing factors. However, a database of this type would encounter ethical and methodological challenges in its implementation, which are discussed. This article introduces some of the potential benefits, challenges, and utility of a gait database for diabetes patients. We highlight that, whereas the creation of a database within this clinical population would be a complex process both ethically and practically, huge potential benefits could be gained, overcoming some of the limitations faced by traditional isolated gait analysis studies. PMID:27022098

  5. Marijuana use and inpatient outcomes among hospitalized patients: analysis of the nationwide inpatient sample database.

    PubMed

    Vin-Raviv, Neomi; Akinyemiju, Tomi; Meng, Qingrui; Sakhuja, Swati; Hayward, Reid

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between marijuana use and health outcomes among hospitalized patients, including those hospitalized with a diagnosis of cancer. A total of 387,608 current marijuana users were identified based on ICD-9 codes for marijuana use among hospitalized patients in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database between 2007 and 2011. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the association between marijuana use and heart failure, cardiac disease, stroke, and in-hospital mortality. All models were adjusted for age, gender, race, residential income, insurance, residential region, pain, and number of comorbidities. Among hospitalized patients, marijuana use was associated with a 60% increased odds of stroke (OR: 1.60, 95% CI: 1.44-1.77) compared with non-users, but significantly reduced odds of heart failure (OR: 0.78, 95% CI: 0.75-0.82), cardiac disease (OR: 0.86, 95% CI: 0.82-0.91), or in-hospital mortality (OR: 0.41, 95% CI: 0.38-0.44). Among cancer patients, odds of in-hospital mortality was significantly reduced among marijuana users compared with non-users (OR: 0.44, 95% CI: 0.35-0.55). Hospitalized marijuana users were more likely to experience a stroke compared with non-users, but less likely to experience in-hospital mortality. Prospective studies will be needed to better characterize the health effects of marijuana use, especially among older, sicker, and/or hospitalized patients. In the meantime, conversations regarding marijuana use/misuse may be warranted in the clinical setting in order for patients and healthcare providers to adequately weigh the anticipated benefits of marijuana use with potentially significant health risks. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Collecting Tumor Samples From Patients With Gynecological Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Borderline Ovarian Clear Cell Tumor; Borderline Ovarian Serous Tumor; Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Childhood Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma; Childhood Malignant Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Endometrioid Stromal Sarcoma; Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Malignant Mesothelioma; Malignant Ovarian Epithelial Tumor; Melanoma; Neoplasm of Uncertain Malignant Potential; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Paget Disease of the Vulva; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Recurrent Vaginal Carcinoma; Recurrent Vulvar Carcinoma; Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage I Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage I Vaginal Cancer; Stage I Vulvar Cancer; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Borderline Ovarian Surface Epithelial-Stromal Tumor; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage III Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell

  7. Identification of Neopterin as a Potential Indicator of Infection in Burned Patients,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    iJTIC() ELECTE AD-A251 653 jUNS 71992L111111 li RE1 II 111 1 llliii C Identification of Neopterin as a Potential Indicator of Infection in Burned...liquid chromatography retention time and fluorescent m " characteristics Identical to those of neopterin . The identification of this component as... neopterin was verified by thormospray mass spectrometry. Serum neopterin concentra- - tions were then determined in supernatants of patient serum samples

  8. Potential Celiac Patients: A Model of Celiac Disease Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sperandeo, Maria Pia; Tosco, Antonella; Izzo, Valentina; Tucci, Francesca; Troncone, Riccardo; Auricchio, Renata; Romanos, Jihane; Trynka, Gosia; Auricchio, Salvatore; Jabri, Bana; Greco, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aim Potential celiacs have the ‘celiac type’ HLA, positive anti-transglutaminase antibodies but no damage at small intestinal mucosa. Only a minority of them develops mucosal lesion. More than 40 genes were associated to Celiac Disease (CD) but we still do not know how those pathways transform a genetically predisposed individual into an affected person. The aim of the study is to explore the genetic features of Potential CD individuals. Methods 127 ‘potential’ CD patients entered the study because of positive anti-tissue transglutaminase and no mucosal lesions; about 30% of those followed for four years become frankly celiac. They were genotyped for 13 polymorphisms of ‘candidate genes’ and compared to controls and celiacs. Moreover, 60 biopsy specimens were used for expression studies. Results Potential CD bear a lighter HLA-related risk, compared to celiac (χ2 = 48.42; p value = 1×10−8). They share most of the polymorphisms of the celiacs, but the frequency of c-REL* G allele was suggestive for a difference compared to celiac (χ2 = 5.42; p value = 0.02). One marker of the KIAA1109/IL-2/IL-21 candidate region differentiated potentials from celiac (rs4374642: χ2 = 7.17, p value = 0.01). The expression of IL-21 was completely suppressed in potentials compared to celiacs (p value = 0.02) and to controls (p value = 0.02), in contrast IL-2, KIAA1109 and c-REL expression were over-expressed. Conclusions Potential CD show genetic features slightly different from celiacs. Genetic and expression markers help to differentiate this condition. Potential CD is a precious biological model of the pathways leading to the small intestinal mucosal damage in genetically predisposed individuals. PMID:21760890

  9. [Identifying potential drug interactions in chronic kidney disease patients].

    PubMed

    Marquito, Alessandra Batista; Fernandes, Natália Maria da Silva; Colugnati, Fernando Antonio Basile; de Paula, Rogério Baumgratz

    2014-01-01

    Drug interactions (DIs) are common in clinical practice and are directly related to factors such as polypharmacy, aging, hepatic metabolism and decreased renal function. Individuals with chronic kidney disease (CKD) often require multiple classes of drugs being at important risk for the development of DIs. Identify potential interactions among drugs prescribed to patients with CKD on conservative treatment, and factors associated with their occurrence. Observational cross-sectional study, with analysis of 558 prescriptions. Potential DIs were identified by the database MICROMEDEX®, software that provides an internationally known pharmacopoeia. There was a predominance of males (54.7%), seniors (69.4%), stage 3 CKD (47.5%), overweight and obese patients (66.7%). The most prevalent comorbidities were hypertension (68.5%) and diabetes mellitus (31.9%). Potential DIs were detected in 74.9% of prescriptions. Among the 1364 DIs diagnosed, 5 (0.4%) were contraindicated and 229 (16.8%) of greater severity, which need immediate intervention. Interactions of moderate and low severity were identified in 1049 (76.9%) and 81 (5.9%) prescriptions, respectively. The probability of one DI increased by 2.5 times for each additional drug (CI = 2.18 to 3.03). Obesity, hypertension, diabetes as well as advanced stage of CKD were risk factors strongly associated with DI occurrence. Drug associations in individuals with CKD were related to high prevalence of serious DIs, especially in the later stages of the disease.

  10. Detection of JCPyV microRNA in blood and urine samples of multiple sclerosis patients under natalizumab therapy.

    PubMed

    Giovannelli, Irene; Martelli, Francesco; Repice, Anna; Massacesi, Luca; Azzi, Alberta; Giannecchini, Simone

    2015-12-01

    Polyomavirus JC (JCPyV) reactivation and development of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy is a health concern in multiple sclerosis patients under natalizumab therapy. Here, the JCPyV microRNA-J1-3p and microRNA-J1-5p expressions and genomic variability were investigated in blood and urine samples of multiple sclerosis patients before and under natalizumab therapy and in healthy controls. The two JCPyV microRNAs were detected in the JCPyV-DNA-positive peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples and in the exosomes derived from plasma and urine obtained from JCPyV-DNA-positive and JCPyV-DNA-negative patients. In particular, the increased JCPyV microRNA expression in samples of multiple sclerosis patients under natalizumab therapy was consistent with the high JCPyV-DNA positivity observed in these samples. Moreover, JCPyV microRNA genomic region showed few nucleotide differences in samples obtained from blood and urine of multiple sclerosis patients and healthy controls. Overall, these data suggest a potential role of the JCPyV microRNA expression in counteracting the viral reactivation to maintain JCPyV asymptomatic persistence in the host.

  11. Sampling for Patient Exit Interviews: Assessment of Methods Using Mathematical Derivation and Computer Simulations.

    PubMed

    Geldsetzer, Pascal; Fink, Günther; Vaikath, Maria; Bärnighausen, Till

    2016-11-24

    (1) To evaluate the operational efficiency of various sampling methods for patient exit interviews; (2) to discuss under what circumstances each method yields an unbiased sample; and (3) to propose a new, operationally efficient, and unbiased sampling method. Literature review, mathematical derivation, and Monte Carlo simulations. Our simulations show that in patient exit interviews it is most operationally efficient if the interviewer, after completing an interview, selects the next patient exiting the clinical consultation. We demonstrate mathematically that this method yields a biased sample: patients who spend a longer time with the clinician are overrepresented. This bias can be removed by selecting the next patient who enters, rather than exits, the consultation room. We show that this sampling method is operationally more efficient than alternative methods (systematic and simple random sampling) in most primary health care settings. Under the assumption that the order in which patients enter the consultation room is unrelated to the length of time spent with the clinician and the interviewer, selecting the next patient entering the consultation room tends to be the operationally most efficient unbiased sampling method for patient exit interviews. © 2016 The Authors. Health Services Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Health Research and Educational Trust.

  12. 43 CFR 11.22 - Sampling of potentially injured natural resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... of this part to proceed with an assessment, field sampling of natural resources should be limited to the conditions identified in this section. All sampling and field work shall be subject to the...) Early sampling and data collection. Field samples may be collected or site visits may be made before...

  13. 43 CFR 11.22 - Sampling of potentially injured natural resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... of this part to proceed with an assessment, field sampling of natural resources should be limited to the conditions identified in this section. All sampling and field work shall be subject to the...) Early sampling and data collection. Field samples may be collected or site visits may be made before...

  14. Potential food-drug interactions in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Masuko, Kayo; Tohma, Shigeto; Matsui, Toshihiro

    2013-04-01

    Various medications are used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Food-drug interactions may occur with concomitant ingestion of particular food. For example, methotrexate (MTX), the anchor drug in the therapeutic strategy against RA, is an antifolate agent. Excessive presence or absence of dietary folic acid may regulate MTX metabolism, possibly leading to unexpected adverse reactions. In this review, we focus on MTX, isoniazide and calcineurin inhibitors, and the implications of potential food-drug reactions in rheumatology, suggesting the important role of nutritional evaluations in RA patients.

  15. Potential bias of daily soil CO2 efflux estimates due to sampling time.

    PubMed

    Cueva, Alejandro; Bullock, Stephen H; López-Reyes, Eulogio; Vargas, Rodrigo

    2017-09-20

    Soil respiration (Rs) has been usually measured during daylight hours using manual chambers. This approach assumes that measurements made during a typical time interval (e.g., 9 to 11 am) represent the mean daily value; locally, this may not always be correct and could result in systematic bias of daily and annual Rs budgets. We propose a simple method, based on the temporal stability concept, to determine the most appropriate time of the day for manual measurements to capture a representative mean daily Rs value. We introduce a correction factor to adjust for biases due to non-optimally timed sampling. This approach was tested in a semiarid shrubland using 24 hr campaigns using two treatments: trenched plots and plots with shrubs. In general, we found optimum times were at night and potential biases ranged from -29 to + 40% in relation to the 24 hr mean of Rs, especially in trenched plots. The degree of bias varied between treatments and seasons, having a greater influence during the wet season when efflux was high than during the dry season when efflux was low. This study proposes a framework for improving local Rs estimates that informs how to decrease temporal uncertainties in upscaling to the annual total.

  16. Equilibrium sampling to determine the thermodynamic potential for bioaccumulation of persistent organic pollutants from sediment.

    PubMed

    Jahnke, Annika; MacLeod, Matthew; Wickström, Håkan; Mayer, Philipp

    2014-10-07

    Equilibrium partitioning (EqP) theory is currently the most widely used approach for linking sediment pollution by persistent hydrophobic organic chemicals to bioaccumulation. Most applications of the EqP approach assume (I) a generic relationship between organic carbon-normalized chemical concentrations in sediments and lipid-normalized concentrations in biota and (II) that bioaccumulation does not induce levels exceeding those expected from equilibrium partitioning. Here, we demonstrate that assumption I can be obviated by equilibrating a silicone sampler with chemicals in sediment, measuring chemical concentrations in the silicone, and applying lipid/silicone partition ratios to yield concentrations in lipid at thermodynamic equilibrium with the sediment (CLip⇌Sed). Furthermore, we evaluated the validity of assumption II by comparing CLip⇌Sed of selected persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic pollutants (polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and hexachlorobenzene (HCB)) to lipid-normalized concentrations for a range of biota from a Swedish background lake. PCBs in duck mussels, roach, eel, pikeperch, perch and pike were mostly below the equilibrium partitioning level relative to the sediment, i.e., lipid-normalized concentrations were ≤CLip⇌Sed, whereas HCB was near equilibrium between biota and sediment. Equilibrium sampling allows straightforward, sensitive and precise measurement of CLip⇌Sed. We propose CLip⇌Sed as a metric of the thermodynamic potential for bioaccumulation of persistent organic chemicals from sediment useful to prioritize management actions to remediate contaminated sites.

  17. Use of biosensors to screen urine samples for potentially toxic chemicals.

    PubMed

    Horswell, Jacqui; Dickson, Stuart

    2003-09-01

    Forensic toxicology laboratories are often required to implicate or exclude poisoning as a factor in a death or unexplained illness. An analytical tool which enables toxicologists to screen a wide variety of common poisons would be extremely useful. In this paper, we describe the use of a bacterial biosensor for detecting the presence of commonly encountered potentially toxic chemicals in urine. The biosensor responds to any chemical that causes metabolic stress to the bacterial cell and the response is in direct proportion to the concentration of the stressor. This allows a measure of the concentration of a toxicant in urine, without knowing exactly what the toxic compound(s) may be. This affords a distinct advantage over conventional analytical techniques, which require an extensive screening program before it is even known that a toxic compound is present. This preliminary investigation has shown that this biosensor can indicate the presence, in urine, of herbicides such as glyphosate, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid; the biocide pentachlorophenol; or inorganic poisons such as arsenic, mercury, and cyanide. The biosensor was also shown to be sensitive to a concentration range of these toxicants likely to be found in samples submitted for toxicological analysis.

  18. Measurement of radon potential from soil using a special method of sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosma, Constantin; Papp, Botond; Moldovan, Mircea; Cosma, Victor; Cindea, Ciprian; Suciu, Liviu; Apostu, Adelina

    2010-10-01

    Soil radon gas and/or its exhalation rate are used as indicators for some applications, such as uranium exploration, indoor radon concentration, seismic activity, location of subsurface faults, etc., and also in the studies where the main interest is the field verification of radon transport models. This work proposes a versatile method for the soil radon sampling using a special manner of pumping. The soil gas is passed through a column of charcoal by using passive pumping. A plastic bottle filled with water is coupled to an activated charcoal column and the flow of water through an adjustable hole made at the bottom of bottle assures a controlled gas flow from the soil. The results obtained for the activity of activated charcoal are in the range of 20-40 kBq/m3, for a depth of approximately 0.8 m. The results obtained by this method were confirmed by simultaneous measurements using LUK 3C device for soil radon measurements. Possible applications for the estimation of radon soil potential are discussed.

  19. Resolution of plasma sample mix-ups through comparison of patient antibody patterns to E. coli.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Beatrice N; Orlowski, Vanessa; Schüpbach, Jörg; Böni, Jürg; Rühe, Bettina; Huder, Jon B

    2015-12-01

    Accidental sample mix-ups and the need for their swift resolution is a challenge faced by every analytical laboratory. To this end, we developed a simple immunoblot-based method, making use of a patient's characteristic plasma antibody profile to Escherichia coli (E. coli) proteins. Nitrocellulose strips of size-separated proteins from E. coli whole-cell lysates were incubated with patient plasma and visualised with an enzyme-coupled secondary antibody and substrate. Plasma samples of 20 random patients as well as five longitudinal samples of three patients were analysed for antibody band patterns, to evaluate uniqueness and consistency over time, respectively. For sample mix-ups, antibody band patterns of questionable samples were compared with samples of known identity. Comparison of anti-E. coli antibody patterns of 20 random patients showed a unique antibody profile for each patient. Antibody profiles remained consistent over time, as shown for three patients over several years. Three example cases demonstrate the use of this methodology in mis-labelling or -pipetting incidences. Our simple method for resolving plasma sample mix-ups between non-related individuals can be performed with basic laboratory equipment and thus can easily be adopted by analytical laboratories. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Predicting Recovery Potential for Individual Stroke Patients Increases Rehabilitation Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Stinear, Cathy M; Byblow, Winston D; Ackerley, Suzanne J; Barber, P Alan; Smith, Marie-Claire

    2017-04-01

    Several clinical measures and biomarkers are associated with motor recovery after stroke, but none are used to guide rehabilitation for individual patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate the implementation of upper limb predictions in stroke rehabilitation, by combining clinical measures and biomarkers using the Predict Recovery Potential (PREP) algorithm. Predictions were provided for patients in the implementation group (n=110) and withheld from the comparison group (n=82). Predictions guided rehabilitation therapy focus for patients in the implementation group. The effects of predictive information on clinical practice (length of stay, therapist confidence, therapy content, and dose) were evaluated. Clinical outcomes (upper limb function, impairment and use, independence, and quality of life) were measured 3 and 6 months poststroke. The primary clinical practice outcome was inpatient length of stay. The primary clinical outcome was Action Research Arm Test score 3 months poststroke. Length of stay was 1 week shorter for the implementation group (11 days; 95% confidence interval, 9-13 days) than the comparison group (17 days; 95% confidence interval, 14-21 days; P=0.001), controlling for upper limb impairment, age, sex, and comorbidities. Therapists were more confident (P=0.004) and modified therapy content according to predictions for the implementation group (P<0.05). The algorithm correctly predicted the primary clinical outcome for 80% of patients in both groups. There were no adverse effects of algorithm implementation on patient outcomes at 3 or 6 months poststroke. PREP algorithm predictions modify therapy content and increase rehabilitation efficiency after stroke without compromising clinical outcome. URL: http://anzctr.org.au. Unique identifier: ACTRN12611000755932. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Visual evoked potentials in patients with pineal gland cyst.

    PubMed

    Bosnjak, Jelena; Mikula, Ivan; Miskov, Snjezana; Budisic, Mislav; Ivkic, Goran; Demarin, Vida

    2012-09-01

    The functional effect of the pineal gland cyst is difficult to evaluate with visual field examination. The aim of this study is to investigate the usefulness of visual evoked potentials (VEP) in patients with pineal gland cyst due to the possible compression on the visual pathway. Black-and-white pattern-reversal checkerboard VEP were recorded in 75 patients (50 females and 25 males, mean age 26.3 ± 15.7 and 25.6 ± 17.6 years, respectively) with pineal gland cyst detected on magnetic resonance of the brain (subject group) and 75 age and sex-matched control subjects (control group). Amplitudes and P100 latencies were collected and later grouped as: (1) normal finding; (2) prechiasmal; (3) prechiasmal and postchiasmal; and (4) postchiasmal dysfunction. P100 latencies differed significantly between subject (110.26 ± 13.23 ms) and control group (101.01 ± 5.36 ms) (p < 0.01). Findings of the VEP differed significantly (p < 0.01) between subject and control group, mainly due to the postchiasmal dysfunction frequency in subject group. Findings of the VEP differed significantly according to the pineal gland cyst volume (p = 0.006) with more frequent postchiasmal dysfunctions among subjects with larger cysts. Postchiasmal changes were significantly more frequent in patients with described compression of the cyst on surrounding brain structures (p = 0.016). Postchiasmal dysfunction on VEP can be seen in patients with pineal gland cyst, mostly with larger cysts and with compression of the cyst on surrounding brain structures. VEP serve as a useful method to determine functional impairment of the visual pathway in patients with pineal gland cyst.

  2. Potential Factors for Inadequate Voriconazole Plasma Concentrations in Intensive Care Unit Patients and Patients with Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Duettmann, Wiebke; Raggam, Reinhard B.; Seeber, Katharina; Troppan, Katharina; Fruhwald, Sonja; Prueller, Florian; Wagner, Jasmin; Valentin, Thomas; Zollner-Schwetz, Ines; Wölfler, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Voriconazole plasma concentrations (VPCs) vary widely, and concentrations outside the therapeutic range are associated with either worse outcome in invasive aspergillosis (IA) or increased toxicity. The primary goal of this cohort study conducted in a real-life setting was to identify potential factors associated with inadequate VPCs in ICU patients and patients with hematological malignancies. Within a period of 12 months, trough VPCs were obtained and analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography, and the adequate range was defined as 1.5 to 5.5 mg/liter. VPCs of <1.5 mg/liter were defined as low, whereas VPCs of >5.5 mg/liter were defined as potentially toxic. A total of 221 trough VPCs were obtained in 61 patients receiving voriconazole, and 124/221 VPCs (56%) were found to be low. Multivariate analysis revealed that low VPCs were significantly associated with clinical failure of voriconazole, prophylactic use, younger age, underlying hematological malignancy, concomitant proton pump inhibitor (PPI) (pantoprazole was used in 88% of the patients), and absence of side effects. Low VPCs remained an independent predictor of clinical failure of voriconazole. The defined adequate range was reached in 79/221 (36%) VPCs. In 18 samples (8%), potentially toxic levels were measured. Multivariate analysis revealed higher body mass index (BMI), absence of hematological malignancy, therapeutic application, and diarrhea as factors associated with potentially toxic VPCs. Neurotoxic adverse events occurred in six patients and were mostly associated with VPCs in the upper quartile of our defined adequate range. In conclusion, potential factors like younger age, prophylaxis, underlying hematological malignancy, BMI, and concomitant PPI should be considered within the algorithm of voriconazole treatment. PMID:23629724

  3. A Dual Color Immunohistochemistry Assay for Measurement of Cereblon in Multiple Myeloma Patient Samples

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yan; Couto, Suzana; Hansel, Donna E.; Miller, Karen; Lopez-Girona, Antonia; Bjorklund, Chad C.; Gandhi, Anita K.; Thakurta, Anjan; Chopra, Rajesh; Breider, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Clinical interest in the measurement of Cereblon (CRBN), the primary target of the IMiDs immunomodulatory drugs lenalidomide and pomalidomide, has been fueled by its essential requirement for antitumor or immunomodulatory activity of both drugs in multiple myeloma (MM). However, limited analyses of clinical samples for CRBN gene expression or protein levels have utilized unvalidated reagents and assays, raising uncertainty about the interpretation of these results. We previously described a highly specific rabbit monoclonal antibody CRBN65 against 65-76 AA of human Cereblon. Here we describe a validated dual color bright-field Cereblon/CD138 immunohistochemical (IHC) assay utilizing CRBN65 and a commercial mouse monoclonal CD138 antibody. Sensitivity and specificity of the assay was determined and assay precision was shown for both cytoplasmic and nuclear Cereblon in MM bone marrow samples with coefficient of variation values of 5% and 2%, respectively. The dual IHC assay was effective for detecting a continuous range of Cereblon levels in 22 MM patient bone marrow core biopsies and aspirate clots, as shown by average cytoplasmic H-scores ranging from 63 to 267 and nuclear H-scores ranging from 17 to 250. Interpathologist comparison of MM sample H-scores by 3 pathologists demonstrated good concordance (R2=0.73). This dual assay demonstrated superior Cereblon IHC measurement in MM samples compared with the single IHC assay using a published commercial rabbit polyclonal Cereblon antibody and could be used to explore the potential utility of Cereblon as a biomarker in the clinic. PMID:26186254

  4. Potential Mars Sample Return: The Next Really Big Challenge in Planetary Instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, C. C.; Beaty, D. W.

    2016-10-01

    We look ahead to the possible return to Earth of samples collected by the Mars 2020 mission, and address the measurements and types of instruments that could provide initial characterization and sample preparation required for planetary protection.

  5. Visual-evoked potentials in patients with brain circulatory problems.

    PubMed

    Pojda-Wilczek, Dorota

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to find out if local brain circulatory problems may influence visual-evoked potentials (VEP). Thirty-eight patients were divided into the following groups: (I) those with hemianopsia or quadrantanopsia and hemiparesis after brain stroke; (II) those with hemianopsia or quadrantanopsia without paresis after brain stroke; and (III) those with amaurosis fugax. The control group consisted of 38 patients. The VEP pattern (PVEP) and flash VEP (FVEP) were examined monocularly using two electrodes placed at O1 and O2. Latency and amplitude of the N75, P100 and N2, P2 waves were measured. The Newman-Keuls test was used for statistical analysis. In PVEP, no differences between the groups were observed. In FVEP, the mean P2 latency was significantly longer in group I than in group III, and the P2 amplitude was significantly lower in all examined groups when compared with the control group. PVEP and FVEP revealed differences in P latency over 3 ms between brain hemispheres and differences in P amplitude over 30% in all examined groups. In the control group, there were no differences in latency between brain hemispheres and only a small difference in amplitude. Local brain circulatory problems that may lead to brain ischemia cause differences in VEP amplitude and latency between brain hemispheres. Changes in VEPs observed in patients with amaurosis fugax may be considered the result of recurrent brain ischemia.

  6. Respiratory tract clinical sample selection for microbiota analysis in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Changes in respiratory tract microbiota have been associated with diseases such as tuberculosis, a global public health problem that affects millions of people each year. This pilot study was carried out using sputum, oropharynx, and nasal respiratory tract samples collected from patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and healthy control individuals, in order to compare sample types and their usefulness in assessing changes in bacterial and fungal communities. Findings Most V1-V2 16S rRNA gene sequences belonged to the phyla Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Fusobacteria, with differences in relative abundances and in specific taxa associated with each sample type. Most fungal ITS1 sequences were classified as Ascomycota and Basidiomycota, but abundances differed for the different samples. Bacterial and fungal community structures in oropharynx and sputum samples were similar to one another, as indicated by several beta diversity analyses, and both differed from nasal samples. The only difference between patient and control microbiota was found in oropharynx samples for both bacteria and fungi. Bacterial diversity was greater in sputum samples, while fungal diversity was greater in nasal samples. Conclusions Respiratory tract microbial communities were similar in terms of the major phyla identified, yet they varied in terms of relative abundances and diversity indexes. Oropharynx communities varied with respect to health status and resembled those in sputum samples, which are collected from tuberculosis patients only due to the difficulty in obtaining sputum from healthy individuals, suggesting that oropharynx samples can be used to analyze community structure alterations associated with tuberculosis. PMID:25225609

  7. Medication regimen complexity and prevalence of potentially inappropriate medicines in older patients after hospitalisation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wei Terk; Kowalski, Stefan R; Sorich, Wassana; Alderman, Christopher P

    2017-08-01

    Background There is a relative paucity of information to characterise potential changes in medication regimen complexity and prevalence of prescribing of potentially inappropriate medications after hospitalisation, both in Australia and elsewhere. Objective To evaluate medication regimen complexity and the prevalence of potentially inappropriate medications before and after admission to hospital. Setting General medical units of a tertiary care hospital in Australia. Methods Retrospective cohort study of patients aged 65 years and above. Medication complexity was measured by using the Medication Regimen Complexity Index (MRCI). Main outcome measure The primary outcome was the change in the Medication Regimen Complexity Index for all prescribed medications after hospitalization. Results A convenience sample of 100 patients was included in the study. There was a significant change in the mean medication complexity score (as measured using the MRCI), increasing from 29 at the time of admission to 32 at the time of discharge (p < 0.05). Factors such as baseline medication regimen complexity (pre-admission MRCI) and length of stay in the hospitals appear to influence the change in medication complexity. However, the proportion of patients prescribed at least one potentially inappropriate medicine (PIM) decreased significantly, from 52% pre-hospitalization to 42% at discharge (p = 0.04). Conclusions Relative to the time of admission, overall medication complexity increased and the proportion of patients who were prescribed PIMs decreased after hospitalisation.

  8. Using Technology to Better Characterize the Apollo Sample Suite: A Retroactive PET Analysis and Potential Model for Future Sample Return Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeigler, R. A.

    2015-01-01

    From 1969-1972 the Apollo missions collected 382 kg of lunar samples from six distinct locations on the Moon. Studies of the Apollo sample suite have shaped our understanding of the formation and early evolution of the Earth-Moon system, and have had important implications for studies of the other terrestrial planets (e.g., through the calibration of the crater counting record) and even the outer planets (e.g., the Nice model of the dynamical evolution of the Solar System). Despite nearly 50 years of detailed research on Apollo samples, scientists are still developing new theories about the origin and evolution of the Moon. Three areas of active research are: (1) the abundance of water (and other volatiles) in the lunar mantle, (2) the timing of the formation of the Moon and the duration of lunar magma ocean crystallization, (3) the formation of evolved lunar lithologies (e.g., granites) and implications for tertiary crustal processes on the Moon. In order to fully understand these (and many other) theories about the Moon, scientists need access to "new" lunar samples, particularly new plutonic samples. Over 100 lunar meteorites have been identified over the past 30 years, and the study of these samples has greatly aided in our understanding of the Moon. However, terrestrial alteration and the lack of geologic context limit what can be learned from the lunar meteorites. Although no "new" large plutonic samples (i.e., hand-samples) remain to be discovered in the Apollo sample collection, there are many large polymict breccias in the Apollo collection containing relatively large (approximately 1 cm or larger) previously identified plutonic clasts, as well as a large number of unclassified lithic clasts. In addition, new, previously unidentified plutonic clasts are potentially discoverable within these breccias. The question becomes how to non-destructively locate and identify new lithic clasts of interest while minimizing the contamination and physical degradation of

  9. Will a second biopsy sample affect treatment decisions in patients with chronic hepatitis B?

    PubMed

    Ekiz, Fuat; Yuksel, İlhami; Arikök, Ata Turker; Yilmaz, Baris; Altinbas, Akif; Aktas, Bora; Deveci, Murat; Basar, Omer; Coban, Sahin; Yuksel, Osman

    2016-07-01

    Liver biopsy is the gold standard for assessment of fibrosis in patients with hepatitis B. However, it has some disadvantages, including inter-observer and intra-observer variability in biopsy interpretation and specimen variation. A standard biopsy specimen represents only about 0.0002 % of the whole liver. It has been shown that two biopsy samples collected during a procedure have significant influence on the diagnostic performance of interpretation in patients with hepatitis C or non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Therefore, we aimed to assess the influence of collecting two liver biopsy samples during a single procedure for staging and grading chronic hepatitis B. 27 patients were included in the study. The median age of the patients was 43.51 ± 11.69. Fifteen patients were female, 12 patients were male. In the biopsy procedure, two samples of liver lobes were obtained. Grade and stage scores were compared between the two samples. Fibrosis staging and grading were assessed according to the Ishak scoring system. Numbers of portal tract and biopsy size were equal in the two samples. There was a significant difference between the samples in terms of histological activity index (p value = 0.04). However, the difference was not enough to distinguish the mild and moderate stages. On the other hand, no significant difference in fibrosis staging between the two samples was found. With this relatively small size of patients, in this study, we showed that a proper liver biopsy size is sufficient to predict treatment decisions in chronic hepatitis B patients. However, further studies are needed to show the association of sampling variability in patients with hepatitis B.

  10. Thermal property and density measurements of samples taken from drilling cores from potential geologic media

    SciTech Connect

    Lagedrost, J.F.; Capps, W.

    1983-12-01

    Density, steady-state conductivity, enthalpy, specific heat, heat capacity, thermal diffusivity and linear thermal expansion were measured on 59 materials from core drill samples of several geologic media, including rock salt, basalt, and other associated rocks from 7 potential sites for nuclear waste isolation. The measurements were conducted from or near to room temperature up to 500/sup 0/C, or to lower temperatures if limited by specimen cracking or fracturing. Ample documentation establishes the reliability of the property measurement methods and the accuracy of the results. Thermal expansions of salts reached 2.2 to 2.8 percent at 500/sup 0/C. Associated rocks were from 0.6 to 1.6 percent. Basalts were close to 0.3 percent at 500/sup 0/C. Specific heats of salts varied from 0.213 to 0.233 cal g/sup -1/C/sup -1/, and basalts averaged 0.239 cal g/sup -1/C/sup -1/. Thermal conductivities of salts at 50/sup 0/C were from 0.022 to 0.046 wcm/sup -1/C/sup -1/, and at 500/sup 0/C, from 0.012 to 0.027 wcm/sup -1/C/sup -1/. Basalts conductivities ranged from 0.020 to 0.022 wcm/sup -1/C/sup -1/ at 100/sup 0/C and 0.016 to 0.018 at 500/sup 0/C. There were no obvious conductivity trends relative to source location. Room temperature densities of salts were from 2.14 to 2.29 gcm/sup -3/, and basalts, from 2.83 to 2.90 gcm/sup -3/. The extreme friability of some materials made specimen fabrication difficult. 21 references, 17 figures, 28 tables.

  11. Safe Use of Acoustic Vestibular-Evoked Myogenic Potential Stimuli: Protocol and Patient-Specific Considerations.

    PubMed

    Portnuff, Cory D F; Kleindienst, Samantha; Bogle, Jamie M

    2017-09-01

    Vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) are commonly used clinical assessments for patients with complaints of dizziness. However, relatively high air-conducted stimuli are required to elicit the VEMP, and ultimately may compromise safe noise exposure limits. Recently, research has reported the potential for noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) from VEMP stimulus exposure through studies of reduced otoacoustic emission levels after VEMP testing, as well as a recent case study showing permanent sensorineural hearing loss associated with VEMP exposure. The purpose of this report is to review the potential for hazardous noise exposure from VEMP stimuli and to suggest clinical parameters for safe VEMP testing. Literature review with presentation of clinical guidelines and a clinical tool for estimating noise exposure. The literature surrounding VEMP stimulus-induced hearing loss is reviewed, including several cases of overexposure. The article then presents a clinical calculation tool for the estimation of a patient's safe noise exposure from VEMP stimuli, considering stimulus parameters, and includes a discussion of how varying stimulus parameters affect a patient's noise exposure. Finally, recommendations are provided for recognizing and managing specific patient populations who may be at higher risk for NIHL from VEMP stimulus exposure. A sample protocol is provided that allows for safe noise exposure. VEMP stimuli have the potential to cause NIHL due to high sound exposure levels. However, with proper safety protocols in place, clinicians may reduce or eliminate this risk to their patients. Use of the tools provided, including the noise exposure calculation tool and sample protocols, may help clinicians to understand and ensure safe use of VEMP stimuli.

  12. [Isolation of periodontal bacteria from blood samples and atheromas in patients with atherosclerosis and periodontitis].

    PubMed

    Padilla E, Carlos; Lobos G, Olga; Jure O, Gema; Matus F, Sergio; Descouvieres C, Claudia; Hasbún A, Sandra; Maragaño L, Patricio; Núñez F, Loreto

    2007-09-01

    Periodontitis is a common oral disease produced by bacterial species that reside in the subgingival plaque. These microorganisms have been associated to atherosclerosis and it is suggested that periodontitis is a cardiovascular risk factor. To isolate periodontal bacteria from blood and atheroma samples, from patients with atherosclerosis and periodontitis. Twelve patients with periodontitis and a clinical diagnosis of atherosclerosis and 12 patients with periodontitis but without atherosclerosis were studied. Blood samples were obtained immediately before and after scaling and root planing. The samples were incubated in aerobic and anaerobic conditions. One week after scaling, atheromatous plaques were obtained during endarterectomy in the 12 patients with atherosclerosis. These were homogenized and cultured for aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. Microorganisms were identified by means ofPCR. Five patients with and two without atherosclerosis, had bacteremia after scaling and root planing. Bacterial species isolated from blood samples were the same found in periodontic pockets. Four atheromatous plaques of patients with bacteremia yielded positive cultures. The isolated bacteria were the same found in blood samples and periodontal pockets. Bacteremia occurred in seven of 24 patients after scaling and root planing. In four patients, the same species found in periodontic pockets and blood cultures were detected in atherosclerotic plaques obtained one week after the dental procedure.

  13. RT-PCR for Detecting ALK Translocations in Cytology Samples from Lung Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Nakamichi, Shinji; Seike, Masahiro; Miyanaga, Akihiko; Chiba, Mika; Matsuda, Kuniko; Kobayashi, Kenichi; Takahashi, Akiko; Takeuchi, Susumu; Minegishi, Yuji; Kubota, Kaoru; Gemma, Akihiko

    2017-06-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for detecting anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) translocations using cytology samples from lung cancer patients. We analyzed ALK translocations by RT-PCR in cytology samples from lung cancer patients diagnosed at the Nippon Medical School Hospital between 2013 and 2015. Immunochemistry (IHC) and break-apart fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) were also performed on available tissue samples. A total of 155 cytology samples were analyzed in our study. We obtained 115 (68%) samples from bronchial lavage. We were able to determine 153 (99%) results by RT-PCR with 4 (3%) positive samples. The four samples positive by RT-PCR were also positive by IHC and FISH performed on the tissue samples collected simultaneously. RT-PCR is a suitable method for detecting ALK translocations using cytology samples from patients with primary lung cancer, especially when tissue samples are not available. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  14. Evoked Potentials and Neuropsychological Tests Validate Positron Emission Topography (PET) Brain Metabolism in Cognitively Impaired Patients

    PubMed Central

    Braverman, Eric R.; Blum, Kenneth; Damle, Uma J.; Kerner, Mallory; Dushaj, Kristina; Oscar-Berman, Marlene

    2013-01-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) Positron Emission Topography (PET) brain hypometabolism (HM) correlates with diminished cognitive capacity and risk of developing dementia. However, because clinical utility of PET is limited by cost, we sought to determine whether a less costly electrophysiological measure, the P300 evoked potential, in combination with neuropsychological test performance, would validate PET HM in neuropsychiatric patients. We found that patients with amnestic and non-amnestic cognitive impairment and HM (n = 43) evidenced significantly reduced P300 amplitudes, delayed latencies, and neuropsychological deficits, compared to patients with normal brain metabolism (NM; n = 187). Data from patients with missing cognitive test scores (n = 57) were removed from the final sample, and logistic regression modeling was performed on the modified sample (n = 173, p = .000004). The logistic regression modeling, based on P300 and neuropsychological measures, was used to validate membership in the HM vs. NM groups. It showed classification validation in 13/25 HM subjects (52.0%) and in 125/148 NM subjects (84.5%), correlating with total classification accuracy of 79.8%. In this paper, abnormal P300 evoked potentials coupled with cognitive test impairment validates brain metabolism and mild/moderate cognitive impairment (MCI). To this end, we cautiously propose incorporating electrophysiological and neuropsychological assessments as cost-effective brain metabolism and MCI indicators in primary care. Final interpretation of these results must await required additional studies confirming these interesting results. PMID:23526928

  15. An evaluation of potential sampling locations in a reservoir with emphasis on conserved spatial correlation structure.

    PubMed

    Yenilmez, Firdes; Düzgün, Sebnem; Aksoy, Aysegül

    2015-01-01

    In this study, kernel density estimation (KDE) was coupled with ordinary two-dimensional kriging (OK) to reduce the number of sampling locations in measurement and kriging of dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations in Porsuk Dam Reservoir (PDR). Conservation of the spatial correlation structure in the DO distribution was a target. KDE was used as a tool to aid in identification of the sampling locations that would be removed from the sampling network in order to decrease the total number of samples. Accordingly, several networks were generated in which sampling locations were reduced from 65 to 10 in increments of 4 or 5 points at a time based on kernel density maps. DO variograms were constructed, and DO values in PDR were kriged. Performance of the networks in DO estimations were evaluated through various error metrics, standard error maps (SEM), and whether the spatial correlation structure was conserved or not. Results indicated that smaller number of sampling points resulted in loss of information in regard to spatial correlation structure in DO. The minimum representative sampling points for PDR was 35. Efficacy of the sampling location selection method was tested against the networks generated by experts. It was shown that the evaluation approach proposed in this study provided a better sampling network design in which the spatial correlation structure of DO was sustained for kriging.

  16. Detection of hypermethylated spastic paraplegia-20 in stool samples of patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Song, Yong-Chun; Dang, Cheng-Xue

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of aberrant hypermethylation in stool DNA might provide a novel strategy for noninvasive detection of colorectal cancer. To explore the feasibility of detecting hypermethylation in Spastic paraplegia-20 promoter as a stool-based DNA marker for detection of colorectal cancer. We collected 96 tissue and stool samples from patients with colorectal cancer and 30 stool samples healthy individuals. Hypermethylated Spastic paraplegia-20 occurs in 85.4% (82/96) of patients with colorectal cancer in the tissue samples. In the stool samples, the results indicate 80.2% (77/96) sensitivity and 100% (30/30) specificity of the test for detecting colorectal cancer by using the stool samples as a noninvasive method. The study reveals that hypermethylation in Spastic paraplegia-20 promoter is a highly specific and sensitive biomarker for screening colorectal cancer in stool samples as a noninvasive method.

  17. Large-Scale Depletion of CD25+ Regulatory T Cells from Patient Leukapheresis Samples

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Daniel J.; Parker, Linda L.; Rosenberg, Steven A.

    2006-01-01

    Summary The ability to selectively enrich or deplete T lymphocytes of specific phenotype and function holds significant promise for application in adoptive immunotherapy protocols. Although CD4+ T cells can have an impact on CD8+ T-cell effector function, memory, and maintenance, a subset of CD4+ T cells, CD25+ regulatory T cells (Treg), can regulate peripheral self tolerance and possess the ability to suppress antitumor responses. The authors report the ability to selectively deplete CD25+ Treg cells from patient leukapheresis samples using a clinical-grade, large-scale immunomagnetic system. Using leukapheresis samples containing up to 1.3 × 1010 white blood cells, efficient depletion of Treg cells was measured by flow cytometric analysis of CD25 expression and FOXP3 expression on post-depletion products. Remnant CD25+ cells could not be detected in CD25-depleted products after short-term culture in IL-2 or enriched following secondary immunomagnetic selection for CD25+ cells, confirming that efficient depletion had occurred. In parallel to efficient enrichment of CD25− cells, immunomagnetic selection resulted in the recovery of Treg cells, since CD25+ lymphocytes removed during depletion were primarily composed of CD4+ T cells that expressed high levels of FOXP3 and possessed suppressive activity against autologous TCR-stimulated CD4+ CD25− T cells in vitro. These results show that selective separation of functional CD25+ Treg cells from large-scale samples can be performed in large scale under clinical-grade conditions with sufficient selection, recovery, viability, ability to expand, and function for potential use in adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:16000960

  18. Large-scale depletion of CD25+ regulatory T cells from patient leukapheresis samples.

    PubMed

    Powell, Daniel J; Parker, Linda L; Rosenberg, Steven A

    2005-01-01

    The ability to selectively enrich or deplete T lymphocytes of specific phenotype and function holds significant promise for application in adoptive immunotherapy protocols. Although CD4+ T cells can have an impact on CD8+ T-cell effector function, memory, and maintenance, a subset of CD4+ T cells, CD25+ regulatory T cells (Treg), can regulate peripheral self tolerance and possess the ability to suppress antitumor responses. The authors report the ability to selectively deplete CD25+ Treg cells from patient leukapheresis samples using a clinical-grade, large-scale immunomagnetic system. Using leukapheresis samples containing up to 1.3 x 10(10) white blood cells, efficient depletion of Treg cells was measured by flow cytometric analysis of CD25 expression and FOXP3 expression on post-depletion products. Remnant CD25+ cells could not be detected in CD25-depleted products after short-term culture in IL-2 or enriched following secondary immunomagnetic selection for CD25+ cells, confirming that efficient depletion had occurred. In parallel to efficient enrichment of CD25- cells, immunomagnetic selection resulted in the recovery of Treg cells, since CD25+ lymphocytes removed during depletion were primarily composed of CD4+ T cells that expressed high levels of FOXP3 and possessed suppressive activity against autologous TCR-stimulated CD4+ CD25- T cells in vitro. These results show that selective separation of functional CD25+ Treg cells from large-scale samples can be performed in large scale under clinical-grade conditions with sufficient selection, recovery, viability, ability to expand, and function for potential use in adoptive immunotherapy.

  19. Chest physiotherapy for collecting sputum samples from HIV-positive patients suspected of having tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Souza Pinto, V; Bammann, R H

    2007-12-01

    A public referral hospital in Sao Paulo, Brazil. To evaluate chest physiotherapy as a means of obtaining sputum samples from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive in-patients suspected of having pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). A prospective study. Five consecutive samples were collected from 132 patients using the 'spontaneous' technique (ST) on day 1, slow expiration with the glottis open in a lateral posture ('expiration lente totale glotte ouverte en infralatéral', ELTGOL) on day 2, ST on day 3, sputum induction with hypertonic saline (SIHS) on day 4 and ST on day 5. Samples were processed for acid-fast bacilli (AFB) smear and seeded onto Löwenstein-Jensen medium. Mycobacteria were recovered from 34 patients (25.8%). Nine (26.5%) of the strains were identified as mycobacteria other than Mycobacterium tuberculosis. AFB smear sensitivity was higher in ELTGOL samples than in ST or SIHS samples (52.9% vs. 32.4% and 29.4%), although the difference among the three was not significant (P = 0.098). In culture, the three ST samples proved significantly more sensitive (P = 0.05). Physiotherapy shows promise as a technique for obtaining sputum from HIV-positive patients, and AFB testing of a single sample presents high sensitivity. However, this does not preclude the routine collection of three samples, as TB cannot be ruled out before the culture results are known.

  20. Personality traits in recent-onset-of-psychosis patients compared to a control sample by gender.

    PubMed

    Sevilla-Llewellyn-Jones, Julia; Cano-Domínguez, Pablo; de-Luis-Matilla, Antonia; Espina-Eizaguirre, Alberto; Moreno-Küstner, Berta; Ochoa, Susana

    2017-08-31

    Personality traits in recent onset of psychosis (ROP) patients are an under-researched area. Our aim was to examine clinical and clinically significant personality traits in ROP patients compared with a healthy control sample by gender. Data were obtained from 94 ROP patients and a control sample matched in gender and age. The Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory and a sociodemographic scale were used. T for independent samples, U-Mann-Whitney and Fisher tests were applied to make comparisons. All personality traits were significantly higher in ROP than control participants in the general sample, except histrionic, narcissistic, and compulsive traits which were higher in controls. Clinically significant schizoid, avoidant, dependent and antisocial personality traits were more common in the ROP than the control participants. However, histrionic clinically significant trait was more common in the control sample. In relation to the males and female samples, more significant differences were found in the male sample in comparison to their control counterparts than in the female sample. These results highlight the importance of the study of clinical personality traits in patients with ROP and the importance of viewing these differences in relation to gender because of the possible therapeutic implications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Exploring Contextual Factors and Patient Activation: Evidence from a Nationally Representative Sample of Patients with Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Jie; Mortensen, Karoline; Bloodworth, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Patient activation has been considered as a "blockbuster drug of the century." Patients with mental disorders are less activated compared to patients with other chronic diseases. Low activation due to mental disorders can affect the efficiency of treatment of other comorbidities. Contextual factors are significantly associated with…

  2. Exploring Contextual Factors and Patient Activation: Evidence from a Nationally Representative Sample of Patients with Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Jie; Mortensen, Karoline; Bloodworth, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Patient activation has been considered as a "blockbuster drug of the century." Patients with mental disorders are less activated compared to patients with other chronic diseases. Low activation due to mental disorders can affect the efficiency of treatment of other comorbidities. Contextual factors are significantly associated with…

  3. Speciation of potential anti-diabetic vanadium complexes in real serum samples.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Daniele; Ugone, Valeria; Serra, Maria; Garribba, Eugenio

    2017-08-01

    In this work the speciation in real serum samples of five V(IV)O complexes with potential application in the therapy of diabetes was studied through EPR spectroscopy as a function of V concentration (45.4, 90.9 and 454.5μM) and time (0-180min). [VO(dhp)2], [VO(ma)2], [VO(acac)2], [VO(pic)2(H2O)], and [VO(mepic)2], where Hdhp indicates 1,2-dimethyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-pyridinone, Hma maltol, Hacac acetylacetone, Hpic picolinic acid, and Hmepic 6-methylpicolinic acid, were examined. The distribution of V(IV)O(2+) among the serum bioligands was calculated from the thermodynamic stability constants in the literature and compared with the experimental results. EPR results, which confirm the prediction, depend on the strength of the ligand L and geometry assumed by the bis-chelated species at physiological pH, cis-octahedral or square pyramidal. With dhp, the strongest chelator, the system is dominated by [VO(dhp)2] and/or cis-VO(dhp)2(Protein); with intermediate strength chelators, i.e. maltolate, acetylacetonate and picolinate, by cis-VO(ma)2(Protein), [VO(acac)2] or [VO(pic)(citrH-1)](3-)/[VO(pic)(lactH-1)](-) (citr=citrate and lact=lactate) when the V concentration overcomes 100-200μM and by (VO)(hTf)/(VO)2(hTf) when concentration is lower than 100μM; with the weakest chelator, 6-methylpicolinate, (VO)(hTf)/(VO)2(hTf), (VO)(HSA) (hTf = human serum transferrin and HSA = human serum albumin), and VO(mepic)(Protein)(OH) are the major species at concentration higher than 100-200μM, whereas hydrolytic processes are observed for lower concentrations. For [VO(dhp)2], [VO(ma)2], [VO(acac)2] and [VO(pic)2(H2O)], the EPR spectra remain unaltered with elapsing time, while for mepic they change significantly because the hydrolyzed V(IV)O species are complexed by the serum bioligands, in particular by lactate. The rate of oxidation in the serum is [VO(dhp)2]>[VO(ma)2]>[VO(acac)2] and reflects the order of E1/2 values. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Mapping neuroplastic potential in brain-damaged patients.

    PubMed

    Herbet, Guillaume; Maheu, Maxime; Costi, Emanuele; Lafargue, Gilles; Duffau, Hugues

    2016-03-01

    It is increasingly acknowledged that the brain is highly plastic. However, the anatomic factors governing the potential for neuroplasticity have hardly been investigated. To bridge this knowledge gap, we generated a probabilistic atlas of functional plasticity derived from both anatomic magnetic resonance imaging results and intraoperative mapping data on 231 patients having undergone surgery for diffuse, low-grade glioma. The atlas includes detailed level of confidence information and is supplemented with a series of comprehensive, connectivity-based cluster analyses. Our results show that cortical plasticity is generally high in the cortex (except in primary unimodal areas and in a small set of neural hubs) and rather low in connective tracts (especially associative and projection tracts). The atlas sheds new light on the topological organization of critical neural systems and may also be useful in predicting the likelihood of recovery (as a function of lesion topology) in various neuropathological conditions-a crucial factor in improving the care of brain-damaged patients.

  5. Schizophrenia relapse, patient considerations, and potential role of lurasidone

    PubMed Central

    Citrome, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    When treating persons with schizophrenia, delaying time to relapse is a main goal. Antipsychotic medication has been the primary treatment approach, and there are a variety of different choices available. Lurasidone is a second-generation (atypical) antipsychotic agent that is approved for the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar depression. Three long-term studies of lurasidone have examined time to relapse in persons with schizophrenia, including a classic placebo-controlled randomized withdrawal study and two 12-month active comparator studies (vs risperidone and vs quetiapine extended-release). Lurasidone 40–80 mg/d evidenced superiority over placebo (number needed to treat [NNT] vs placebo for relapse, 9). Lurasidone 40–160 mg/d was noninferior to quetiapine extended-release 200–800 mg/d on the outcome of relapse, and was superior on the outcome of avoidance of hospitalization (NNT 8) and the outcome of remission (NNT 7). Lurasidone demonstrated a lower risk for long-term weight gain than the active comparators. Demonstrated differences in tolerability profiles among the different choices of antipsychotics make it possible to attempt to match up an individual patient to the best choice for such patient based on past history of tolerability, comorbidities, and personal preferences, potentially improving adherence. PMID:27563237

  6. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in patients with BPPV

    PubMed Central

    Korres, Stavros; Gkoritsa, Eleni; Giannakakou-Razelou, Dimitra; Yiotakis, Ioannis; Riga, Maria; Nikolpoulos, Thomas P.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background The probable cause of Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV) is a degeneration of the oto lithic organs (utricle and saccule). The aim of the study is to find possible alterations in Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials (VEMP) recordings in BPPV patients, because the saccule is part of the VEMP pathway. Material/Methods 27 BPPV patients (24 unilateral and 3 bilateral) aged 20 to 70 years and 30 healthy age matched controls. BPPV was diagnosed by the upbeating geotropic nystagmus found in the supine position with the head overextended towards one side. The subjects were investigated with pure tone audiometry, bi-thermal caloric test with electronystagmographic (ENG) recording, and VEMP recording. Results P1 latency and N1 latency did not present any statistical difference between control ears and affected ears of the BPPV population. The percentage of abnormal VEMP in the BPPV population was statistically higher than in the control ears (p<0.005). No significant relationship could be shown between the occurrence of Canal Paresis and abnormal VEMP. No relationship was found between the side (right or left ear) where BPPV appeared clinically and the side where abnormal VEMP was registered. Conclusions BPPV is a clinical entity associated with increased occurrence of abnormal VEMP recordings, possibly due to degeneration of the saccular macula, which is part of the neural VEMP pathway. PMID:21169909

  7. Pleiotrophin as a potential biomarker in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jiequn; Kong, Ying; Nan, Haocheng; Qu, Shengyang; Fu, Xiao; Jiang, Lili; Wang, Wenjuan; Guo, Hui; Zhao, Shounian; He, Jianjun; Nan, Kejun

    2017-03-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN), a multifunctional growth factor, is up-regulated in many tumors. PTN is reported to play an important role in the regulation of several cellular processes. The objective of this study is to evaluate the clinical significance of PTN as a tumor marker in breast cancer (BC). Serum PTN levels were detected in 105 BC patients and 40 healthy volunteers using ELISA. In addition, PTN expression was examined in 80 BC tissues in a nested case-control study by immunohistochemistry. Serum PTN levels were elevated in BC patients compared to healthy controls. Area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.878 (95% CI: 0.824-0.932). The sensitivity of serum PTN was superior to CEA and CA15-3. High serum PTN levels were associated with TNM stage, histology grade, and distant metastasis. Moreover, serum PTN levels decreased significantly after surgical treatment. In BC tissues, PTN expression was significantly higher in BC tissues relative to paired paracancerous tissues. Tissue PTN expression proved to be a prognostic factor for breast cancer according to multivariable logistic regression analysis. PTN could be considered as a potential biomarker for the presence of breast cancer. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Ghrelin and its therapeutic potential for cachectic patients.

    PubMed

    Ashitani, Jun-ichi; Matsumoto, Nobuhiro; Nakazato, Masamitsu

    2009-10-01

    The discovery of ghrelin has resulted in the development of approaches to appetite, enabling a better understanding of the mechanisms regulating appetite through molecular analyses. Ghrelin is a 28-amino acid peptide that was isolated from the stomach only a decade ago, and has recently been investigated as a potential therapeutic endogenous agent. This peptide increases appetite, adjusts energy balance, suppresses inflammation, and enhances the release of growth hormone from the pituitary gland. Although many bioactive substances such as peptide YY, leptin, adiponectin and obestatin are involved in appetite control, ghrelin is the only known peptide to signal starvation information from a peripheral organ to the central nervous system, contributing to an increase in appetite. Clinical trials have revealed the effectiveness of ghrelin in increasing lean body mass and activity in cachectic patients. As shown in clinical research on humans and basic research using animal models, cachexia often occurs in response to excess release of proinflammatory cytokines and induces further appetite loss, which aggravates the physiological status of underlying diseases. Ghrelin functions as a protector against the vicious cycle of the cachectic paradigm through orexigenic, anabolic and anti-inflammatory effects, so administration of ghrelin may be able to improve quality of life in cachectic patients. We show here a significant role of ghrelin in the pathophysiology of cachectic diseases and the possibility of clinical applications.

  9. Optimal sampling designs for estimation of Plasmodium falciparum clearance rates in patients treated with artemisinin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Flegg, Jennifer A; Guérin, Philippe J; Nosten, Francois; Ashley, Elizabeth A; Phyo, Aung Pyae; Dondorp, Arjen M; Fairhurst, Rick M; Socheat, Duong; Borrmann, Steffen; Björkman, Anders; Mårtensson, Andreas; Mayxay, Mayfong; Newton, Paul N; Bethell, Delia; Se, Youry; Noedl, Harald; Diakite, Mahamadou; Djimde, Abdoulaye A; Hien, Tran T; White, Nicholas J; Stepniewska, Kasia

    2013-11-13

    The emergence of Plasmodium falciparum resistance to artemisinins in Southeast Asia threatens the control of malaria worldwide. The pharmacodynamic hallmark of artemisinin derivatives is rapid parasite clearance (a short parasite half-life), therefore, the in vivo phenotype of slow clearance defines the reduced susceptibility to the drug. Measurement of parasite counts every six hours during the first three days after treatment have been recommended to measure the parasite clearance half-life, but it remains unclear whether simpler sampling intervals and frequencies might also be sufficient to reliably estimate this parameter. A total of 2,746 parasite density-time profiles were selected from 13 clinical trials in Thailand, Cambodia, Mali, Vietnam, and Kenya. In these studies, parasite densities were measured every six hours until negative after treatment with an artemisinin derivative (alone or in combination with a partner drug). The WWARN Parasite Clearance Estimator (PCE) tool was used to estimate "reference" half-lives from these six-hourly measurements. The effect of four alternative sampling schedules on half-life estimation was investigated, and compared to the reference half-life (time zero, 6, 12, 24 (A1); zero, 6, 18, 24 (A2); zero, 12, 18, 24 (A3) or zero, 12, 24 (A4) hours and then every 12 hours). Statistical bootstrap methods were used to estimate the sampling distribution of half-lives for parasite populations with different geometric mean half-lives. A simulation study was performed to investigate a suite of 16 potential alternative schedules and half-life estimates generated by each of the schedules were compared to the "true" half-life. The candidate schedules in the simulation study included (among others) six-hourly sampling, schedule A1, schedule A4, and a convenience sampling schedule at six, seven, 24, 25, 48 and 49 hours. The median (range) parasite half-life for all clinical studies combined was 3.1 (0.7-12.9) hours. Schedule A1

  10. Optimal sampling designs for estimation of Plasmodium falciparum clearance rates in patients treated with artemisinin derivatives

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The emergence of Plasmodium falciparum resistance to artemisinins in Southeast Asia threatens the control of malaria worldwide. The pharmacodynamic hallmark of artemisinin derivatives is rapid parasite clearance (a short parasite half-life), therefore, the in vivo phenotype of slow clearance defines the reduced susceptibility to the drug. Measurement of parasite counts every six hours during the first three days after treatment have been recommended to measure the parasite clearance half-life, but it remains unclear whether simpler sampling intervals and frequencies might also be sufficient to reliably estimate this parameter. Methods A total of 2,746 parasite density-time profiles were selected from 13 clinical trials in Thailand, Cambodia, Mali, Vietnam, and Kenya. In these studies, parasite densities were measured every six hours until negative after treatment with an artemisinin derivative (alone or in combination with a partner drug). The WWARN Parasite Clearance Estimator (PCE) tool was used to estimate “reference” half-lives from these six-hourly measurements. The effect of four alternative sampling schedules on half-life estimation was investigated, and compared to the reference half-life (time zero, 6, 12, 24 (A1); zero, 6, 18, 24 (A2); zero, 12, 18, 24 (A3) or zero, 12, 24 (A4) hours and then every 12 hours). Statistical bootstrap methods were used to estimate the sampling distribution of half-lives for parasite populations with different geometric mean half-lives. A simulation study was performed to investigate a suite of 16 potential alternative schedules and half-life estimates generated by each of the schedules were compared to the “true” half-life. The candidate schedules in the simulation study included (among others) six-hourly sampling, schedule A1, schedule A4, and a convenience sampling schedule at six, seven, 24, 25, 48 and 49 hours. Results The median (range) parasite half-life for all clinical studies combined was 3.1 (0

  11. Identification of potential biases in the characterization sampling and analysis process

    SciTech Connect

    Winkelman, W.D.; Eberlein, S.J.

    1995-12-01

    The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Characterization Project is responsible for providing quality characterization data to TWRS. Documentation of sampling and analysis process errors and biases can be used to improve the process to provide that data. The sampling and analysis process consists of removing a sample from a specified waste tank, getting it to the laboratory and analyzing it to provide the data identified in the Tank Characterization Plan (TCP) and Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP). To understand the data fully, an understanding of errors or biases that can be generated during the process is necessary. Most measurement systems have the ability statistically to detect errors and biases by using standards and alternate measurement techniques. Only the laboratory analysis part of the tank sampling and analysis process at TWRS has this ability. Therefore, it is necessary to use other methods to identify and prioritize the biases involved in the process.

  12. Increased Levels of miRNA-146a in Serum and Histologic Samples of Patients with Uveal Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Russo, Andrea; Caltabiano, Rosario; Longo, Antonio; Avitabile, Teresio; Franco, Livio M; Bonfiglio, Vincenza; Puzzo, Lidia; Reibaldi, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze MiRs expression in serum of UM patients, respect to healthy donors, and to compare this data with MiRs expressed in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded UM samples. Methods: Expression profile of 754 miRNAs was performed in serum of patients with uveal melanoma who underwent primary enucleation. The level of miRNAs increased in serum was individually analyzed on FFPE UM samples and compared to choroidal melanocytes from unaffected eyes. Results: Fourteen patients with uveal melanoma were included in the study. We found 8 serum miRNAs differentially expressed compared to normal controls: 2 upregulated miRNAs (miRNA-146a, miR-523); 6 downregulated miRNAs (miR-19a, miR-30d, miR-127, miR-451, miR-518f, miR-1274B). When data on upregulated miRNAs were singularly validated only a significant overexpression of miRNA-146a was found. A statistically significant upregulation of miRNA-146a was also found on FFPE UM samples, compared to choroidal melanocytes from unaffected eyes. Conclusions: miRNA-146a is increased in serum of patients with UM and in FFPE tumor samples. Further studies will show if it could be considered a potential marker of UM in the blood.

  13. Increased Levels of miRNA-146a in Serum and Histologic Samples of Patients with Uveal Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Andrea; Caltabiano, Rosario; Longo, Antonio; Avitabile, Teresio; Franco, Livio M.; Bonfiglio, Vincenza; Puzzo, Lidia; Reibaldi, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze MiRs expression in serum of UM patients, respect to healthy donors, and to compare this data with MiRs expressed in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded UM samples. Methods: Expression profile of 754 miRNAs was performed in serum of patients with uveal melanoma who underwent primary enucleation. The level of miRNAs increased in serum was individually analyzed on FFPE UM samples and compared to choroidal melanocytes from unaffected eyes. Results: Fourteen patients with uveal melanoma were included in the study. We found 8 serum miRNAs differentially expressed compared to normal controls: 2 upregulated miRNAs (miRNA-146a, miR-523); 6 downregulated miRNAs (miR-19a, miR-30d, miR-127, miR-451, miR-518f, miR-1274B). When data on upregulated miRNAs were singularly validated only a significant overexpression of miRNA-146a was found. A statistically significant upregulation of miRNA-146a was also found on FFPE UM samples, compared to choroidal melanocytes from unaffected eyes. Conclusions: miRNA-146a is increased in serum of patients with UM and in FFPE tumor samples. Further studies will show if it could be considered a potential marker of UM in the blood. PMID:27895580

  14. Ultratrace Level Determination and Quantitative Analysis of Kidney Injury Biomarkers in Patient Samples Attained by Zinc Oxide Nanorods

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Manpreet; Alabanza, Anginelle; Gonzalez, Lorelis E.; Wang, Weiwei; Reeves, W. Brian; Hahm, Jong-in

    2016-01-01

    Determining ultratrace amounts of protein biomarkers in patient samples in a straightforward and quantitative manner is extremely important for early disease diagnosis and treatment. Here, we successfully demonstrate the novel use of zinc oxide nanorods (ZnO NRs) in the ultrasensitive and quantitative detection of two acute kidney injury (AKI)-related protein biomarkers, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-8, directly from patient samples. We first validate the ZnO NRs-based IL-8 results via comparison with those obtained from using a conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent method in samples from 38 individuals. We further assess the full detection capability of the ZnO NRs-based technique by quantifying TNF-α, whose levels in human urine are often below the detection limits of conventional methods. Using the ZnO NR platforms, we determine the TNF-α concentrations of all 46 patient samples tested, down to the fg/mL level. Subsequently, we screen for TNF-α levels in approximately 50 additional samples collected from different patient groups in order to demonstrate a potential use of the ZnO NRs-based assay in assessing cytokine levels useful for further clinical monitoring. Our research efforts demonstrate that ZnO NRs can be straightforwardly employed in the rapid, ultrasensitive, quantitative, and simultaneous detection of multiple AKI-related biomarkers directly in patient urine samples, providing an unparalleled detection capability beyond those of conventional analysis methods. Additional key advantages of the ZnO NRs-based approach include a fast detection speed, low-volume assay condition, multiplexing ability, and easy automation/integration capability to existing fluorescence instrumentation. Therefore, we anticipate that our ZnO NRs-based detection method will be highly beneficial for overcoming the frequent challenges in early biomarker development and treatment assessment, pertaining to the facile and ultrasensitive quantification of

  15. Alterations of the RANKL pathway in blood and bone marrow samples of prostate cancer patients without bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Todenhöfer, Tilman; Hennenlotter, Jörg; Schmiedel, Benjamin Joachim; Hohneder, Andrea; Grimm, Sabrina; Kühs, Ursula; Salih, Helmut Rainer; Bühring, Hans-Jörg; Fehm, Tanja; Gakis, Georgios; Blumenstock, Gunnar; Aufderklamm, Stefan; Schilling, David; Stenzl, Arnulf; Schwentner, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The receptor activator of the NF-kB ligand (RANKL) pathway is a key mediator of prostate cancer (PC)-induced bone disease. However, little is known about this pathway in patients with non-metastatic PC. We aimed to investigate whether changes of RANKL, its inhibitor osteoprotegerin (OPG) and bone marrow-mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) occur in PC patients without manifest bone metastases. We determined OPG and soluble RANKL (sRANKL) in serum and corresponding bone marrow (BM) samples of 140 patients before radical prostatectomy by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). As control serum samples of 50 patients with benign prostate hyperplasia were analyzed. BM mononuclear cells (BMNCs) of 16 PC patients were analyzed for expression of RANKL and CD271 (as marker for MSCs) by flow cytometry. PC patients had significantly lower serum levels of OPG compared to BPH patients (P = 0.007), whereas no differences were observed for serum sRANKL (P = 0.74). Both OPG and sRANKL concentrations of serum and corresponding BM samples correlated significantly (P < 0.0001 each). Interestingly, in PC patients, lower serum and BM OPG levels were associated with a higher proportion of BM-MSCs (P = 0.04 and 0.0016, respectively). No correlations were observed for sRANKL, OPG, BM-MSCs, and established risk parameters of PC. The results of the study indicate that localized PC is associated with early specific changes of the RANKL pathway in serum and bone marrow (BM). These changes might be part of the pre-metastatic niche of PC and implicate a potential benefit of RANKL inhibition in patients with localized PC. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Dipstick Test for Rapid Diagnosis of Shigella dysenteriae 1 in Bacterial Cultures and Its Potential Use on Stool Samples

    PubMed Central

    Taneja, Neelam; Nato, Faridabano; Dartevelle, Sylvie; Sire, Jean Marie; Garin, Benoit; Thi Phuong, Lan Nguyen; Diep, Tai The; Shako, Jean Christophe; Bimet, François; Filliol, Ingrid; Muyembe, Jean-Jacques; Ungeheuer, Marie Noëlle; Ottone, Catherine; Sansonetti, Philippe; Germani, Yves

    2011-01-01

    Background We describe a test for rapid detection of S. dysenteriae 1 in bacterial cultures and in stools, at the bedside of patients. Methodology/Principal Findings The test is based on the detection of S. dysenteriae 1 lipopolysaccharide (LPS) using serotype 1-specific monoclonal antibodies coupled to gold particles and displayed on a one-step immunochromatographic dipstick. A concentration as low as 15 ng/ml of LPS was detected in distilled water and in reconstituted stools in 10 minutes. In distilled water and in reconstituted stools, an unequivocal positive reaction was obtained with 1.6×106 CFU/ml and 4.9×106 CFU/ml of S. dysenteriae 1, respectively. Optimal conditions to read the test have been determined to limit the risk of ambiguous results due to appearance of a faint yellow test band in some negative samples. The specificity was 100% when tested with a battery of Shigella and unrelated strains in culture. When tested on 328 clinical samples in India, Vietnam, Senegal and France by laboratory technicians and in Democratic Republic of Congo by a field technician, the specificity (312/316) was 98.7% (95% CI:96.6–99.6%) and the sensitivity (11/12) was 91.7% (95% CI:59.8–99.6%). Stool cultures and the immunochromatographic test showed concordant results in 98.4 % of cases (323/328) in comparative studies. Positive and negative predictive values were 73.3% (95% CI:44.8–91.1%) and 99.7% (95% CI:98–100%). Conclusion The initial findings presented here for a simple dipstick-based test to diagnose S. dysenteriae 1 demonstrates its promising potential to become a powerful tool for case management and epidemiological surveys. PMID:21984895

  17. A study on determination of potentially hazardous plutonium isotopes in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Strumińska-Parulska, Dagmara I

    2013-01-01

    Due to the lack of stable plutonium isotopes, and the high mobility as well as long half-life, plutonium is considered one of the most important radioelement in safety assessment of environmental radioactivity and nuclear waste management. A number of analytical methods have been developed over the past decades for determination of plutonium in environmental samples. The article discusses different analytical techniques and presents the results of plutonium isotopes determination by alpha spectrometry and accelerator mass spectrometry in environmental samples. The concentrations of plutonium isotopes in analyzed samples indicates its measurement is of great importance for environmental and safety assessment, especially in contaminated areas.

  18. Association of environmental toxic elements in biological samples of myocardial infarction patients at different stages.

    PubMed

    Afridi, Hassan Imran; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Kazi, Naveed; Kandhro, Ghulam Abbas; Baig, Jameel Ahmed; Jamali, Mohammad Khan; Arain, Mohammad Balal; Shah, Abdul Qadir; Shah, Faheem; Khan, Sumaira; Kolachi, Nida Fatima

    2011-06-01

    The exposure of toxic elements may directly or indirectly associate with different pathogenesis of heart diseases. In the present study, the association of arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), lead (Pb), and nickel (Ni) in biological samples (whole blood and urine) and mortality from myocardial infarction (MI) patients at first, second, and third heart attacks was carried out. Both biological samples of 130 MI patients (77 male and 53 female), with ages ranging from 45 to 60 years, and 61 healthy persons (33 male and 28 female) of the same age group were collected. The elements in biological samples were assessed by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometer, prior to microwave-assisted acid digestion. The validity of methodology was checked by the biological certified reference materials. During this study, 78% of 32 patients aged above 50 years, registered after third MI attack, died. In these subjects, the levels of As, Cd, Co, Ni, and Pb in blood samples were higher in MI patients as compared with referents (p < 0.05), while increased by 11.7%, 12.2%, 5.55%, and 7.2%, respectively, in the blood samples of those patients who tolerated the third MI attack (p = 0.12). The high level of understudied toxic elements may play a role in the mortality of MI patients.

  19. Physician practices in requesting stool samples for patients with acute gastroenteritis, France, August 2013-July 2014.

    PubMed

    Van Cauteren, D; Turbelin, C; Fonteneau, L; Hanslik, T; De Valk, H; Blanchon, T

    2015-09-01

    A better understanding of physician practices in requesting stool samples for patients with acute gastroenteritis (AG) is needed to more accurately interpret laboratory-based surveillance data. A survey was conducted in General Practitioners (GPs) between August 2013 and July 2014 to estimate the proportion of stool samples requested for patients with AG and to identify factors associated with GP requests for a stool sample. National health insurance (NHI) data together with surveillance data from a French Sentinel GP network were also used to estimate the proportion of stool samples requested. This proportion was estimated at 4·3% in the GP survey and 9·1% (95% confidence interval 8·7-9·6) using NHI data. Multivariate analysis indicated that the ratio of stool samples requested was almost five times higher in patients with bloody diarrhoea and 10-20 times higher in patients with a long duration of illness before consultation. Laboratory-based surveillance data underestimates the actual burden of disease as fewer than one in 10 AG cases consulting their GP will be requested to submit a stool sample for laboratory testing. This underestimation varies by pathogen as stool samples are more frequently requested for severe illness.

  20. Big data and large sample size: a cautionary note on the potential for bias.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Robert M; Chambers, David A; Glasgow, Russell E

    2014-08-01

    A number of commentaries have suggested that large studies are more reliable than smaller studies and there is a growing interest in the analysis of "big data" that integrates information from many thousands of persons and/or different data sources. We consider a variety of biases that are likely in the era of big data, including sampling error, measurement error, multiple comparisons errors, aggregation error, and errors associated with the systematic exclusion of information. Using examples from epidemiology, health services research, studies on determinants of health, and clinical trials, we conclude that it is necessary to exercise greater caution to be sure that big sample size does not lead to big inferential errors. Despite the advantages of big studies, large sample size can magnify the bias associated with error resulting from sampling or study design.

  1. Potential Use of Passive Sampling for Environmental Monitoring of Petroleum E&P Operations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Traditional environmental monitoring relies on water or soil samples being taken at various time increments and sent to offsite laboratories for analysis. Reliance on grab samples generally captures limited “snapshots” of environmental contaminant concentrations, is time intensive, costly, and generates residual waste from excess sample and/or reagents used in the analysis procedures. As an alternative, we are evaluating swellable organosilica sorbents to create passive sampling systems for monitoring applications. Previous work has focused on absorption and detection of fuels, chlorinated solvents, endocrine disruptors, explosives, pesticides, fluorinated chemicals, and metals including Ba, Sr, Hg, Pb, Fe, Cu, and Zn. The advantages of swellable organosilica are that the material cancapture target compounds for an extended periods of time, does not absorb natural organic matter, and resists biofilm formation since the sorbent possesses an animated surface morphology.

  2. The male cosmetic surgery patient: a matched sample gender analysis of elective cosmetic surgery and cosmetic dentistry patients.

    PubMed

    Dowling, Nicki A; Honigman, Roberta J; Jackson, Alun C

    2010-06-01

    Plastic surgeons have traditionally perceived male patients as more psychologically disturbed than female patients. This study employed a matched sample design to explore the psychosocial experiences of 50 male and 50 female elective cosmetic surgery and cosmetic dentistry patients. It also aimed to compare male and female patients on preoperative psychosocial dysfunction on standardized measures (psychiatric disturbance, anxiety, depression, low self-esteem, dysmorphic concern, and low body image) and postoperative dissatisfaction. The findings revealed that there were many similarities between the self-reported appearance concerns, motivations for surgery, and expectations of surgery between male and female patients. Although male patients did not report higher levels of preoperative psychosocial dysfunction than their female counterparts, they were more likely to report postoperative dissatisfaction. Preoperative screening is recommended to identify the minority of male patients who will report an unsatisfactory outcome despite a technically good result.

  3. FGF2 as a potential prognostic biomarker for proneural glioma patients.

    PubMed

    Sooman, Linda; Freyhult, Eva; Jaiswal, Archita; Navani, Sanjay; Edqvist, Per-Henrik; Pontén, Fredrik; Tchougounova, Elena; Smits, Anja; Elsir, Tamador; Gullbo, Joachim; Lennartsson, Johan; Bergqvist, Michael; Ekman, Simon

    2015-03-01

    The survival of high-grade glioma patients is poor and the treatment of these patients can cause severe side effects. This fosters the necessity to identify prognostic biomarkers, in order to optimize treatment and diminish unnecessary suffering of patients. The aim of this study was to identify prognostic biomarkers for high-grade glioma patients. Eleven proteins were selected for analysis due to their suggested importance for survival of patients with other types of cancers and due to a high variation in protein levels between glioma patients (according to the Human Protein Atlas, www.proteinatlas.org). Protein expression patterns of these 11 proteins were analyzed by immunohistochemistry in tumor samples from 97 high-grade glioma patients. The prognostic values of the proteins were analyzed with univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses for the high-grade glioma patients, including subgroup analyses of histological subtypes and immunohistochemically defined molecular subtypes. The proteins with the most significant (univariate and multivariate p<0.05) correlations were analyzed further with cross-validated Kaplan-Meier analyses for the possibility of predicting survival based on the protein expression pattern of the corresponding candidate. Random Forest classification with variable subset selection was used to analyze if a protein signature consisting of any combination of the 11 proteins could predict survival for the high-grade glioma patients and the subgroup with glioblastoma patients. The proteins which correlated most significantly (univariate and multivariate p<0.05) to survival in the Cox regression analyses were Myc for all high-grade gliomas and FGF2, CA9 and CD44 for the subgroup of proneural gliomas, with FGF2 having a strong negative predictive value for survival. No prognostic signature of the proteins could be found. FGF2 is a potential prognostic biomarker for proneural glioma patients, and warrants further investigation.

  4. Isolation and identification of nontuberculous mycobacteria from hospitalized patients and drinking water samples--examination of their correlation by chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Dovriki, Eleni; Gerogianni, Irini; Petinaki, Efi; Hadjichristodoulou, Christos; Papaioannou, Agelos; Gourgoulianis, Kostas

    2016-04-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) have been found to be widely dispersed in the environment and are being considered potentially pathogenic for humans and animals, while reports of their human to human transmission are absent. Water and aerosols are potential transmission modes of NTM to humans. Hospitalized patients with NTM infections were studied together with drinking water samples from their respective residence areas during 2003-2013. Cluster analysis and factor analysis were used to analyze the data matrix. A total of 367 hospitalized patients living in 30 localities in the Prefecture of Larissa were tested positive for NTM. The most frequently isolated NTM species of the 383 NTM isolates from the clinical specimens were Mycobacterium fortuitum (n = 118, 30.8 %), M. gordonae (n = 87, 22.7 %), M. peregrinum (n = 46, 12.0 %), M. chelonae (n = 11, 2.9 %), M. avium (n = 8, 2.1 %), and M. intracellulare (n = 7, 1.8 %), while 88 (23.0 %) of these isolates were not identified. It is noted that in 8 patients, M. tuberculosis was isolated simultaneously with one NTM, in 15 patients, together with two types of NTM, while in 1 patient, it was found at the same time as three different NTM. In addition, 3360 drinking water samples were collected from 30 localities and analyzed during 2010 to 2013; they were found 11.2 % NTM positive. Cluster analysis and factor analysis results confirm that NTM strains are correlated to each other in both isolated samples from patients and drinking water, while the strength of their correlation varied from weak to moderate (e.g., factor loadings ranged from 0.69 to 0.74 when all data are considered). These results provide indications that drinking water could be linked with NTM cases in humans.

  5. Smartphone medication adherence apps: Potential benefits to patients and providers

    PubMed Central

    Dayer, Lindsey; Heldenbrand, Seth; Anderson, Paul; Gubbins, Paul O.; Martin, Bradley C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To provide an overview of medication adherence, discuss the potential for smartphone medication adherence applications (adherence apps) to improve medication nonadherence, evaluate features of adherence apps across operating systems (OSs), and identify future opportunities and barriers facing adherence apps. Practice description Medication nonadherence is a common, complex, and costly problem that contributes to poor treatment outcomes and consumes health care resources. Nonadherence is difficult to measure precisely, and interventions to mitigate it have been largely unsuccessful. Practice innovation Using smartphone adherence apps represents a novel approach to improving adherence. This readily available technology offers many features that can be designed to help patients and health care providers improve medication-taking behavior. Main outcome measures Currently available apps were identified from the three main smartphone OSs (Apple, Android, and Blackberry). In addition, desirable features for adherence apps were identified and ranked by perceived importance to user desirability using a three-point rating system: 1, modest; 2, moderate; or 3, high. The 10 highest-rated apps were installed and subjected to user testing to assess app attributes using a standard medication regimen. Results 160 adherence apps were identified and ranked. These apps were most prevalent for the Android OS. Adherence apps with advanced functionality were more prevalent on the Apple iPhone OS. Among all apps, MyMedSchedule, MyMeds, and RxmindMe rated the highest because of their basic medication reminder features coupled with their enhanced levels of functionality. Conclusion Despite being untested, medication apps represent a possible strategy that pharmacists can recommend to nonadherent patients and incorporate into their practice. PMID:23571625

  6. Smartphone medication adherence apps: potential benefits to patients and providers.

    PubMed

    Dayer, Lindsey; Heldenbrand, Seth; Anderson, Paul; Gubbins, Paul O; Martin, Bradley C

    2013-01-01

    To provide an overview of medication adherence, discuss the potential for smartphone medication adherence applications (adherence apps) to improve medication nonadherence, evaluate features of adherence apps across operating systems (OSs), and identify future opportunities and barriers facing adherence apps. Medication nonadherence is a common, complex, and costly problem that contributes to poor treatment outcomes and consumes health care resources. Nonadherence is difficult to measure precisely, and interventions to mitigate it have been largely unsuccessful. Using smartphone adherence apps represents a novel approach to improving adherence. This readily available technology offers many features that can be designed to help patients and health care providers improve medication-taking behavior. Currently available apps were identified from the three main smartphone OSs (Apple, Android, and Blackberry). In addition, desirable features for adherence apps were identified and ranked by perceived importance to user desirability using a three-point rating system: 1, modest; 2, moderate; or 3, high. The 10 highest-rated apps were installed and subjected to user testing to assess app attributes using a standard medication regimen. RESULTS 160 adherence apps were identified and ranked. These apps were most prevalent for the Android OS. Adherence apps with advanced functionality were more prevalent on the Apple iPhone OS. Among all apps, MyMedSchedule, MyMeds, and RxmindMe rated the highest because of their basic medication reminder features coupled with their enhanced levels of functionality. Despite being untested, medication apps represent a possible strategy that pharmacists can recommend to nonadherent patients and incorporate into their practice.

  7. Analysis of volatile organic compounds in compost samples: A potential tool to determine appropriate composting time.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fengxiang; Pan, Zaifa; Hong, Chunlai; Wang, Weiping; Chen, Xiaoyang; Xue, Zhiyong; Yao, Yanlai

    2016-12-01

    Changes in volatile organic compound contents in compost samples during pig manure composting were studied using a headspace, solid-phase micro-extraction method (HS-SPME) followed by gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection (GC/MS). Parameters affecting the SPME procedure were optimized as follows: the coating was carbon molecular sieve/polydimethylsiloxane (CAR/PDMS) fiber, the temperature was 60°C and the time was 30min. Under these conditions, 87 compounds were identified from 17 composting samples. Most of the volatile components could only be detected before day 22. However, benzenes, alkanes and alkenes increased and eventually stabilized after day 22. Phenol and acid substances, which are important factors for compost quality, were almost undetectable on day 39 in natural compost (NC) samples and on day 13 in maggot-treated compost (MC) samples. Our results indicate that the approach can be effectively used to determine the composting times by analysis of volatile substances in compost samples. An appropriate composting time not only ensures the quality of compost and reduces the loss of composting material but also reduces the generation of hazardous substances. The appropriate composting times for MC and NC were approximately 22days and 40days, respectively, during the summer in Zhejiang.

  8. Compositional analysis of excavated landfill samples and the determination of residual biogas potential of the organic fraction.

    PubMed

    García, J; Davies, S; Villa, R; Gomes, D M; Coulon, F; Wagland, S T

    2016-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the biogas potential of landfilled materials and to further validate the suitability of the enzymatic hydrolysis test EHT as a valuable alternative to substitute the standardised test currently in use (BMP). Both tests were applied to a range of landfill waste samples. The waste composition and volatile solids content (VS) profile together with the BMP test results showed that the biogas potential of the waste samples was directly related to their VS content, as expected. The positive correlation between the VS and the BMP test (r=0.67) suggests that the first could be used as a primary indicator of biogas potential of waste samples. Nevertheless, it should be validated against the BMP test because, occasionally, the VS content does not equate to the biogas production. This was mainly due to the paper content of the samples which also correlates positively (r=0.77) with the BMP biogas production. The EHT results showed a higher correlation with the BMP test (r=0.91) than in previous studies which used a wider mixture of enzymes containing cellulase, hemicellulase and carbohydrase. This finding positions the EHT as a quick assessing method for the biodegradability of waste samples in future sample regimes.

  9. A misleading false-negative result using Neisseria gonorrhoeae opa MGB multiplex PCR assay in patient's rectal sample due to partial mutations of the opa gene.

    PubMed

    Vahidnia, Ali; van Empel, Pieter Jan; Costa, Sandra; Oud, Rob T N; van der Straaten, Tahar; Bliekendaal, Harry; Spaargaren, Joke

    2015-07-01

    A 53-year-old homosexual man presented at his general practitioner (GP) practice with a suspicion of sexually transmitted infection. Initial NAAT screening was performed for Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The patient was positive for Neisseria gonorrhoeae both for his urine and rectal sample. The subsequent confirmation test for Neisseria gonorrhoeae by a second laboratory was only confirmed for the urine sample and the rectal sample was negative. We report a case of a potential false-negative diagnosis of Neisseria gonorrhoeae due to mutations of DNA sequence in the probe region of opa-MGB assay of the rectal sample. The patient did not suffer any discomfort as diagnosis of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in his urine sample had already led to treatment by prescribing the patient with Ceftriaxone 500 mg IV dissolved in 1 ml lidocaine 2% and 4 mL saline. The patient also received a prescription for Azithromycin (2x500 mg).

  10. Reactive Monte Carlo sampling with an ab initio potential

    SciTech Connect

    Leiding, Jeff; Coe, Joshua D.

    2016-05-04

    Here, we present the first application of reactive Monte Carlo in a first-principles context. The algorithm samples in a modified NVT ensemble in which the volume, temperature, and total number of atoms of a given type are held fixed, but molecular composition is allowed to evolve through stochastic variation of chemical connectivity. We also discuss general features of the method, as well as techniques needed to enhance the efficiency of Boltzmann sampling. Finally, we compare the results of simulation of NH3 to those of ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD). Furthermore, we find that there are regions of state space for which RxMC sampling is much more efficient than AIMD due to the “rare-event” character of chemical reactions.

  11. Reactive Monte Carlo sampling with an ab initio potential

    SciTech Connect

    Leiding, Jeff; Coe, Joshua D.

    2016-05-04

    Here, we present the first application of reactive Monte Carlo in a first-principles context. The algorithm samples in a modified NVT ensemble in which the volume, temperature, and total number of atoms of a given type are held fixed, but molecular composition is allowed to evolve through stochastic variation of chemical connectivity. We also discuss general features of the method, as well as techniques needed to enhance the efficiency of Boltzmann sampling. Finally, we compare the results of simulation of NH3 to those of ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD). Furthermore, we find that there are regions of state space for which RxMC sampling is much more efficient than AIMD due to the “rare-event” character of chemical reactions.

  12. Probing indiscretions: contamination of cardiac troponin reagent by very high patient samples causes false-positive results.

    PubMed

    Gould, Michael J; Wilgen, Urs; Pretorius, Carel J; Ungerer, Jacobus P J

    2012-07-01

    Cardiac troponin (cTn) has become the standard biomarker for the diagnosis of acute coronary syndromes. False-positive cTnI results have previously been reported on the Beckman Coulter analysers, which were shown to be random, not reproducible and occurred more commonly than expected. Our investigation ensued after a patient sample with an inordinately elevated cTnI was analysed, followed by a series of false-positive results being reported. The implications of falsely elevated cTnI results on patient care could be considerable. Multiple experiments with patient sample pools with concentrations below the 99th percentile to extremely high (0.025, 15, 175 and 884 μg/L) were conducted in varying sequences of high and low samples on the Beckman Coulter Access2, UniCel DxI600 and UniCel DxI800 analysers. Our results demonstrate a significant increase in cTnI concentrations in the negative pool after analysis of high pool samples in various sequences. This increase is sufficient to cause elevations above the 99th percentile cut-off and false-positive cTnI results. These findings were reproducible on all three analysers. Our study is highly suggestive of carryover and cTnI reagent pack contamination by the pipettors on the Access2, DxI600 and DxI800 analysers when patient samples with extremely high cTnI concentrations are analysed, leading to potential false-positive cTnI results on subsequent samples.

  13. Physico-chemical analysis and antimicrobial potential of Apis dorsata, Apis mellifera and Ziziphus jujube honey samples from Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Fahim, Hira; Dasti, Javid Iqbal; Ali, Ihsan; Ahmed, Safia; Nadeem, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate physico-chemical properties and antimicrobial potential of indigenous honey samples against different reference strains including Escherichia coli ATCC 8739, Enterobacter aerogenes ATCC 13048, Pseudomonas aeroginosa ATCC 9027, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Salmonella typhi ATCC 14028, Klebsiella pneumonia ATCC 13883, Aspergillus niger ATCC 16404, Rhizopus oligosporus PCSIR1, Candida albicans ATCC 14053 and Candida utilis ATCC 9950. Methods By using standard methods samples were evaluated for their antimicrobial properties including additive effect of starch and non-peroxidase activity, antioxidative properties (phenol contents, flavonoid contents, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity). Prior to this evaluation, complete physico-chemical properties including pH, color, ash contents, protein contents, moisture contents, hydroxymethyl furfural contents, total sugar contents, reducing sugar and non-reducing sugar contents were analyzed. Results Relatively higher ash contents were found in the Siddar honey i.e. (0.590 0±0.033 6)% and small honey showed relatively higher protein contents i.e. (777.598±9.880) mg/kg. The moisture contents of tested honey samples ranged between 13.8%-16.6%, total sugar contents from 61.672%-72.420% and non-reducing sugar contents from 1.95%-3.93%. Presences of phenolic contents indicate higher antioxidant potential of these honey samples. All bacteria showed clear inhibition zones in response to tested honey samples whereas fungi and yeast showed inhibition at higher concentrations of these honey samples. For Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Salmonella typhi, Pseudomonas aeroginosa and Aspergillus niger, overall the small honey showed the higher activity than other honey samples. Conclusion Physico-chemical analysis of honey samples confirmed good quality of honey according to the standards set by European Union Commission and Codex Alimentarius Commission

  14. Physico-chemical analysis and antimicrobial potential of Apis dorsata, Apis mellifera and Ziziphus jujube honey samples from Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Fahim, Hira; Dasti, Javid Iqbal; Ali, Ihsan; Ahmed, Safia; Nadeem, Muhammad

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate physico-chemical properties and antimicrobial potential of indigenous honey samples against different reference strains including Escherichia coli ATCC 8739, Enterobacter aerogenes ATCC 13048, Pseudomonas aeroginosa ATCC 9027, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Salmonella typhi ATCC 14028, Klebsiella pneumonia ATCC 13883, Aspergillus niger ATCC 16404, Rhizopus oligosporus PCSIR1, Candida albicans ATCC 14053 and Candida utilis ATCC 9950. By using standard methods samples were evaluated for their antimicrobial properties including additive effect of starch and non-peroxidase activity, antioxidative properties (phenol contents, flavonoid contents, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity). Prior to this evaluation, complete physico-chemical properties including pH, color, ash contents, protein contents, moisture contents, hydroxymethyl furfural contents, total sugar contents, reducing sugar and non-reducing sugar contents were analyzed. Relatively higher ash contents were found in the Siddar honey i.e. (0.590 0±0.033 6)% and small honey showed relatively higher protein contents i.e. (777.598±9.880) mg/kg. The moisture contents of tested honey samples ranged between 13.8%-16.6%, total sugar contents from 61.672%-72.420% and non-reducing sugar contents from 1.95%-3.93%. Presences of phenolic contents indicate higher antioxidant potential of these honey samples. All bacteria showed clear inhibition zones in response to tested honey samples whereas fungi and yeast showed inhibition at higher concentrations of these honey samples. For Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Salmonella typhi, Pseudomonas aeroginosa and Aspergillus niger, overall the small honey showed the higher activity than other honey samples. Physico-chemical analysis of honey samples confirmed good quality of honey according to the standards set by European Union Commission and Codex Alimentarius Commission. Evaluation of these honey samples

  15. A Clinical Evaluation of Routine Blood Sampling Practices in Patients With Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Pineau, Mitchel; Pynes, Mary Kate; Katz, Laurence B.; Ginsberg, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is a perception that patients with diabetes struggle to produce sufficient blood to fill glucose test strips, including strips with 1-µL fill requirements. The purpose of this study was to determine the volume of blood expressed when these patients perform routine fingersticks using their own lancing device and sampling technique and to evaluate the relationship between blood volume and pain. Methods: Sixty-four patients (type 1 or type 2 diabetes) performed 8 fingersticks using their own lancing device and preferred depth setting and lancing technique. Eight different commercially available lancing systems were used (8 patients/system). Blood volume and perceived pain were recorded after each fingerstick. Results: The mean blood volume across all patients was 3.1 µL (512 fingersticks), with 97% of patients expressing a mean of ≥1.0 µL of blood. There was no correlation between pain response and the volume of blood expressed. Nearly all patients agreed that they could easily and comfortably obtain a 1-µL blood sample, and most patients actually preferred a larger drop size to ease sampling and avoid wasting strips. Conclusion: These results provide evidence across 8 lancing systems that challenge the current perceptions that patients with diabetes struggle to produce sufficient blood samples to fill most test strips, including those with 1-µL fill requirements, and that obtaining larger volumes of blood is more painful. These results are consistent with the previous literature suggesting that patients derive no real benefits from very low strip volumes and generally prefer a blood drop size that enables them to confidently fill their test strip. PMID:24876439

  16. Psychopathy, Antisocial Personality Disorder, and Reconviction in an Australian Sample of Forensic Patients.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Stephane M; Campbell, Rachel E; Ogloff, James R P

    2016-06-09

    This study identified the presence of psychopathy (as measured by the PCL-R/PCL:SV instruments) and antisocial personality disorder (APD) and their relationship with future reconviction in an Australian forensic sample (N = 136) of patients with a mental disorder. Patients were tracked for over 4 years postrelease to determine associations between a diagnosis of APD/psychopathy and reoffense. Patients with higher psychopathy scores were found to have an increased likelihood of reincarceration, a higher rate of reconviction, and were reconvicted earlier compared with patients with lower psychopathy scores. Patients with APD were more likely to be reconvicted and reincarcerated during the follow-up period than patients without an APD diagnosis. Despite demonstrating associations with general reconviction, the PCL instruments did not exhibit statistically significant relationships with violence. Implications for the clinical identification of personality disordered patients in forensic settings are discussed.

  17. Potential artifacts associated with historical preparation of joint compound samples and reported airborne asbestos concentrations.

    PubMed

    Brorby, G P; Sheehan, P J; Berman, D W; Bogen, K T; Holm, S E

    2011-05-01

    Airborne samples collected in the 1970s for drywall workers using asbestos-containing joint compounds were likely prepared and analyzed according to National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health Method P&CAM 239, the historical precursor to current Method 7400. Experimentation with a re-created, chrysotile-containing, carbonate-based joint compound suggested that analysis following sample preparation by the historical vs. current method produces different fiber counts, likely because of an interaction between the different clearing and mounting chemicals used and the carbonate-based joint compound matrix. Differences were also observed during analysis using Method 7402, depending on whether acetic acid/dimethylformamide or acetone was used during preparation to collapse the filter. Specifically, air samples of sanded chrysotile-containing joint compound prepared by the historical method yielded fiber counts significantly greater (average of 1.7-fold, 95% confidence interval: 1.5- to 2.0-fold) than those obtained by the current method. In addition, air samples prepared by Method 7402 using acetic acid/dimethylformamide yielded fiber counts that were greater (2.8-fold, 95% confidence interval: 2.5- to 3.2-fold) than those prepared by this method using acetone. These results indicated (1) there is an interaction between Method P&CAM 239 preparation chemicals and the carbonate-based joint compound matrix that reveals fibers that were previously bound in the matrix, and (2) the same appeared to be true for Method 7402 preparation chemicals acetic acid/dimethylformamide. This difference in fiber counts is the opposite of what has been reported historically for samples of relatively pure chrysotile dusts prepared using the same chemicals. This preparation artifact should be considered when interpreting historical air samples for drywall workers prepared by Method P&CAM 239.

  18. A limited sampling strategy for the estimation of Neoral AUCs in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Meier-Kriesche, H U; Bonilla-Felix, M A; Ferris, M E; Swinford, R; Kahan, B D; Brannan, P; Portman, R J

    1999-11-01

    The improved pharmacokinetics of Neoral allows the development of an accurate estimate of the full area under the concentration time curve (AUC) from a limited sampling strategy. As no such strategy has been derived from pharmacokinetic data obtained from children on 12-hourly dosing, and as patient convenience demands shorter sampling times, we derived a limited sampling strategy from 45 AUCs obtained from 19 pediatric renal transplant patients by stepwise forward multiple regression, and prospectively tested them on a separate group of 49 AUCs obtained from 18 pediatric renal transplant patients. Full cyclosporine (CsA) AUCs were obtained from samples drawn pre dose (C0) and at 2, 4, 6, 8 and 12 h post dose (C2, C4, C6, C8, and C12). High-precision predictions of full AUC were obtained based on the formula: AUC = 444 + 3.69 x C0 + 1.77 x C2 + 4. 1 x C4 (mean prediction error +/- SD = 0.3 +/- 6.4%, 95% confidence interval=-1.7% to 1.9%.) In conclusion, CsA exposure in pediatric renal transplant patients on 12-hourly Neoral dosing can be reliably predicted by an early time point-based limited sampling strategy in children. This formula has the advantage of obtaining trough as well as AUC from one brief, convenient sampling period.

  19. Characteristics of a U.S. obstetric acupuncture clinic patient sample.

    PubMed

    Soliday, Elizabeth; Hapke, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    Most U.S.-based studies on acupuncture treatment for obstetric concerns published in mainstream health journals have been randomized controlled trials, widely considered the "gold standard" for clinical research. However, whether those studies adequately reflect the characteristics and treatment concerns of actual treatment users is as yet unknown. Provide a reference point for advancing U.S. obstetric acupuncture research by (1) describing background and relevant treatment characteristics of an obstetric acupuncture clinic sample and (2) reviewing those characteristics in relationship to existing U.S.-based studies. Descriptive follow-up involving a patient-completed internet survey; chief treatment concern and number of treatment sessions were validated against patient records. Of 265 former clinic patients, 137 (51.7%) completed the internet survey. Patient referral source and demographics; primary and secondary treatment concerns; number of treatment sessions; and planned birth attendant and setting. The clinic sample's demographics generally aligned with those in existing U.S. studies. However, the chief concern of most clinic patients was labor facilitation compared to two of the seven U.S.-based publications. Clinic patients learned about acupuncture through midwives and family/friends; 28% planned out-of-hospital birth. This first study on a U.S. obstetric acupuncture clinic sample suggests that an obstetric acupuncture research agenda relevant to current treatment users should increase focus on labor facilitation, involve samples from a wider range of maternal care settings, and continue outreach to ethnic minorities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Pretransplant HLA mistyping in diagnostic samples of acute myeloid leukemia patients due to acquired uniparental disomy.

    PubMed

    Dubois, V; Sloan-Béna, F; Cesbron, A; Hepkema, B G; Gagne, K; Gimelli, S; Heim, D; Tichelli, A; Delaunay, J; Drouet, M; Jendly, S; Villard, J; Tiercy, J-M

    2012-09-01

    Although acquired uniparental disomy (aUPD) has been reported in relapse acute myeloid leukemia (AML), pretransplant aUPD involving chromosome 6 is poorly documented. Such events could be of interest because loss of heterozygosity (LOH) resulting from aUPD in leukemic cells may lead to erroneous results if HLA typing for hematopoietic stem cell donor searches is performed on blood samples drawn during blastic crisis. We report here six AML patients whose HLA typing was performed on DNA extracted from peripheral blood obtained at diagnosis. We observed LOH involving the entire HLA region (three patients), HLA-A, B, C (two patients) and HLA-A only (one patient). An array-comparative genomic hybridization showed that copy number was neutral for all loci, thus revealing partial aUPD of chromosome 6p21. When HLA typing was performed on remission blood samples both haplotypes were detected. A 3-4% LOH incidence was estimated in AML patients with high blast counts. Based on DNA mixing experiments, we determined by PCR sequence-specific oligonucleotide hybridization on microbeads arrays a detection threshold for HLA-A, B, DRB1 heterozygosity in blood samples with <80% blasts. Because aUPD may be partial, any homozygous HLA result should be confirmed by a second typing performed on buccal swabs or on blood samples from the patient in remission.

  1. Frequency of fungi in respiratory samples from Turkish cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Güngör, Ozge; Tamay, Zeynep; Güler, Nermin; Erturan, Zayre

    2013-03-01

    An increased isolation of fungi from the respiratory tract of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) has been reported. The prevalence of different fungi in CF patients from Turkey is not known. Our aim was to determine the frequency of fungi in the respiratory tract of Turkish CF patients. We investigated a total of 184 samples from 48 patients. Samples were inoculated on Medium B+ and CHROMagar Candida. Candida albicans was the predominant yeast isolated [30 patients (62.5%)], followed by C. parapsilosis [6 (12.5%)] and C. dubliniensis 5 (10.4%). Aspergillus fumigatus was the most common filamentous fungus [5 (10.4%)] and non-fumigatus Aspergillus species were isolated from four (8.3%) patients. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequently detected bacterium in C. albicans positive samples (53.57%). A. fumigatus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa or S. aureus were detected together in 75% of A. fumigatus positive samples each. No statistically significant relationship was detected between growth of yeast and moulds and age, gender, the use of inhaled corticosteroids or tobramycin. No significant correlation was found between the isolation of C. albicans, A. fumigatus and P. aeruginosa, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia or S. aureus, and the isolation of C. albicans and Haemophilus influenzae. Other factors which may be responsible for the increased isolation of fungi in CF need to be investigated.

  2. Analysis of epinephrine, norepinephrine, and dopamine in urine samples of hospital patients by micellar liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    García Ferrer, Daniel; García García, Aurelio; Peris-Vicente, Juan; Gimeno-Adelantado, José Vicente; Esteve-Romero, Josep

    2015-12-01

    An analytical method based on micellar liquid chromatography was developed to determine the concentration of three catecholamines (epinephrine, norepinephrine, and dopamine) in urine. The detection of these compounds in urine can be useful to diagnose several diseases, related to stress and sympathoadrenal system dysfunction, using a non-invasive collection procedure. The sample pretreatment was a simple dilution in a micellar solution, filtration, and direct injection, thus avoiding time-consuming and tedious extraction steps. Therefore, there is no need to use an internal standard. The three catecholamines were eluted using a C18 column and a mobile phase of 0.055 M sodium dodecyl sulfate-1.5% methanol buffered at pH 3.8 running at 1.5 mL/min under isocratic mode in less than 25 min. The detection was performed by amperometry applying a constant potential of +0.5 V. The procedure was validated following the guidelines of the European Medicines Agency in terms of the following: calibration range (0.09-5 μg/mL), linearity (r(2) > 0.9995), limit of detection (0.02 μg/mL), within- and between-run accuracy (-6.5 to +8.4%) and precision (<10.2%), dilution integrity, matrix effect, robustness (<8.4), and stability. The obtained values were below those required by the guide. The method was rapid, easy-to-handle, eco-friendly, and safe and provides reliable quantitative data, and is thus useful for routine analysis. The procedure was applied to the analysis of epinephrine, norepinephrine, and dopamine in urine samples from patients of a local hospital.

  3. Patient education: a potential marketing tool for the private physician.

    PubMed

    Van Doren, D C; Blank, K M

    1992-03-01

    To keep pace with increasing competition, the private physician is encouraged to consider a patient education program as a marketing tool. Meeting the educational needs of patients is presented as an opportunity to create a trusting environment in the practice, enhance the doctor-patient relationship, and increase the active role of the patient in the health care process. A management model is proposed for successfully planning, organizing, staffing, leading, and controlling the patient education program.

  4. Experience-Sampling Research Methods and Their Potential for Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Sabrina; Garcia, Julie A.; Murphy, Mary C.

    2015-01-01

    Experience-sampling methods (ESM) enable us to learn about individuals' lives in context by measuring participants' feelings, thoughts, actions, context, and/or activities as they go about their daily lives. By capturing experience, affect, and action "in the moment" and with repeated measures, ESM approaches allow researchers…

  5. Experience-Sampling Research Methods and Their Potential for Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Sabrina; Garcia, Julie A.; Murphy, Mary C.

    2015-01-01

    Experience-sampling methods (ESM) enable us to learn about individuals' lives in context by measuring participants' feelings, thoughts, actions, context, and/or activities as they go about their daily lives. By capturing experience, affect, and action "in the moment" and with repeated measures, ESM approaches allow researchers…

  6. An investigation of potential applications of OP-SAPS: Operational Sampled Analog Processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, E. A.; Mcvey, E. S.

    1977-01-01

    The application of OP-SAP's (operational sampled analog processors) in pattern recognition system is summarized. Areas investigated include: (1) human face recognition; (2) a high-speed programmable transversal filter system; (3) discrete word (speech) recognition; and (4) a resolution enhancement system.

  7. Dehalococcoides as a Potential Biomarker Evidence for Uncharacterized Organohalides in Environmental Samples.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qihong; Yu, Ling; Liang, Zhiwei; Yan, Qingyun; He, Zhili; Luan, Tiangang; Liang, Dawei; Wang, Shanquan

    2017-01-01

    The massive production and improper disposal of organohalides resulted in worldwide contamination in soil and water. However, their environmental survey based on chromatographic methods was hindered by challenges in testing the extremely wide variety of organohalides. Dehalococcoides as obligate organohalide-respiring bacteria exclusively use organohalides as electron acceptors to support their growth, of which the presence could be coupled with organohalides and, therefore, could be employed as a biomarker of the organohalide pollution. In this study, Dehalococcoides was screened in various samples of bioreactors and subsurface environments, showing the wide distribution of Dehalococcoides in sludge and sediment. Further laboratory cultivation confirmed the dechlorination activities of those Dehalococcoides. Among those samples, Dehalococcoides accounting for 1.8% of the total microbial community was found in an anaerobic granular sludge sample collected from a full-scale bioreactor treating petroleum wastewater. Experimental evidence suggested that the influent wastewater in the bioreactor contained bromomethane which support the growth of Dehalococcoides. This study demonstrated that Dehalococcoides could be employed as a promising biomarker to test the present of organohalides in wastestreams or other environmental samples.

  8. Potential toxic effects of aircraft de-icers and wastewater samples containing these compounds.

    PubMed

    Mohiley, A; Franzaring, J; Calvo, O C; Fangmeier, A

    2015-09-01

    One of the major problems of airport operation is the impact of pollution caused by runoff waters. Runoff waters at an airport may contain high concentrations of different contaminants resulting from various activities of its operation. High quantities of aircraft de-icing/anti-icing fluids are used annually at airports worldwide. Aircraft de-icers and anti-icers may have negative environmental impacts, but their effects on aquatic organisms are virtually unknown. In order to address this issue, aircraft de-icers, pavement de-icers and wastewater samples were obtained from a regional airport. To evaluate the toxicity of wastewater samples and aircraft de-icing/anti-icing fluids (ADAFs), two bio-tests were performed: the Lemna growth inhibition test according to OECD guideline 221 and the luminescent bacteria test according to ISO guideline 11348-2. In the Lemna growth inhibition test, phytotoxicity was assessed using the endpoints frond number and frond area. The luminescent bacteria test involved the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri. The estimates of effective concentrations (EC50) values were determined using the free software R and the "drc" library. Aquatic plants and marine bacteria showed a higher sensitivity towards ADAFs than to wastewater samples. Experiments showed that aircraft de-icing/anti-icing fluids and wastewater samples were relatively more toxic towards Lemna gibba L. in comparison to V. fischeri.

  9. Childhood trauma associates with clinical features of bipolar disorder in a sample of Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Xian-Bin; Liu, Jin-Tong; Zhu, Xiong-Zhao; Zhang, Liang; Tang, Yi-Lang; Wang, Chuan-Yue

    2014-10-01

    Childhood trauma is a major public health problem which has a long-term consequence, a few studies have examined the relationship between childhood trauma and clinical features of bipolar disorder, most in western culture, with no such studies done in Chinese culture. The CTQ-SF was administered to 132 Chinese patients with DSM-IV bipolar disorder. Participants also completed the Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse Questionnaire (CECA.Q), the Impact of Events Scale-Revised (IES-R), and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). The CTQ-SF cut-off scores for exposure were used to calculate the prevalence of trauma. The relationship between childhood trauma and clinical features of bipolar disorder were examined. The internal consistency of CTQ-SF was good (Cronbach׳s α=0.826) and four week test-retest reliability was high (r=0.755). 61.4% of this sample reported physical neglect (PN) in childhood, followed by emotional neglect (EN, 49.6%), sexual abuse (SA, 40.5%), emotional abuse (EA, 26.0%) and physical abuse (PA,13.1%). Significant negative correlations existed between age of onset and EA and EN score (r=-0.178~-0.183, p<0.05). Significant positive correlations were observed between EA, CTQ-SF total score and intrusion and hyper-arousal scores of IES-R (r=0.223~0.309, p<0.05). Similarly, significant positive correlations were found between EN, PN, CTQ-SF total and STAI score (r=0.222~0.425, p<0.05). Data on childhood trauma were derived from a retrospective self-report questionnaire without independent corroboration. A number of potential patients (more severe or chronic patients) was excluded because they were either refused to participate or inappropriate to participate in research. Significant number of subjects in patients with BD reported experience of childhood abuse and neglect. Exposure to childhood trauma is associated with age of onset of illness, co morbid PTSD and anxiety symptoms. To study the pathogenesis of childhood trauma on bipolar disorder

  10. Free amino acids in the Arctic snow and ice core samples: Potential markers for paleoclimatic studies.

    PubMed

    Barbaro, Elena; Spolaor, Andrea; Karroca, Ornela; Park, Ki-Tae; Martma, Tõnu; Isaksson, Elisabeth; Kohler, Jack; Gallet, Jean Charles; Bjorkman, Mats P; Cappelletti, David; Spreen, Gunnar; Zangrando, Roberta; Barbante, Carlo; Gambaro, Andrea

    2017-12-31

    The role of oceanic primary production on climate variability has long been debated. Defining changes in past oceanic primary production can help understanding of the important role that marine algae have in climate variability. In ice core research methanesulfonic acid is the chemical marker commonly used for assessing changes in past primary production. However, other organic compounds such as amino acids, can be produced and emitted into the atmosphere during a phytoplankton bloom. These species can be transported and deposited onto the ice cap in polar regions. Here we investigate the correlation between the concentration of chlorophyll-a, marker of marine primary production, and amino acids present in an ice core. For the first time, free l- and d-amino acids in Arctic snow and firn samples were determined by a sensitive and selective analytical method based on liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. The new method for the determination of free amino acids concentrations was applied to firn core samples collected on April 2015 from the summit of the Holtedahlfonna glacier, Svalbard (N 79'08.424, E 13'23.639, 1120m a.s.l.). The main results of this work are summarized as follows: (1) glycine, alanine and proline, were detected and quantified in the firn core samples; (2) their concentration profiles, compared with that of the stable isotope δ(18)O ratio, show a seasonal cycling with the highest concentrations during the spring and summer time; (3) back-trajectories and Greenland Sea chlorophyll-a concentrations obtained by satellite measurements were compared with the amino acids profile obtained from ice core samples, this provided further insights into the present results. This study suggests that the amino acid concentrations in the ice samples collected from the Holtedahlfonna glaciers could reflect changes in oceanic phytoplankton abundance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Exploring the concurrent presence of hepatitis A virus genome in serum, stool, saliva, and urine samples of hepatitis A patients.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Madhuri S; Bhalla, Shilpa; Kalrao, Vijay R; Dhongade, Ramchandra K; Chitambar, Shobha D

    2014-04-01

    The use of saliva and urine as an alternative to serum samples for detection of anti-hepatitis A virus (HAV) IgM antibodies has been documented. However, these samples remain underreported or unexplored for shedding of HAV. To address this issue, paired serum, stool, saliva, and urine samples collected from hepatitis A patients were screened by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for detection of HAV RNA. HAV RNA was detected in 67.6% (44/65), 52.3% (34/65), 8.7% (5/57), and 12.3% (8/65) of the serum, stool, saliva, and urine samples, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of nucleotide sequences obtained for partial RNA polymerase region grouped HAV strains from all of the clinical samples of the study in subgenotype IIIA. Low frequency of HAV nucleic acid in saliva and urine samples indicates limited utility of these samples in genomic studies on HAV but suggests its potential for transmission and infection of hepatitis A. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinical features and prognosis of a sample of patients with trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome) from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Petry, Patrícia; Polli, Janaina B; Mattos, Vinícius F; Rosa, Rosana C M; Zen, Paulo R G; Graziadio, Carla; Paskulin, Giorgio A; Rosa, Rafael F M

    2013-06-01

    Trisomy 13 or Patau syndrome (PS) is a chromosomal disorder characterized by a well known presentation of multiple congenital anomalies. Our objective was to determine the clinical features and prognosis observed in a sample of patients with PS. The series was composed of patients with diagnosis of PS consecutively evaluated by a Clinical Genetics Service from a reference hospital of southern Brazil, in the period between 1975 and 2012. Statistical analysis was performed using PEPI program (version 4.0), with two-tailed Fisher's exact test for comparison of frequencies (P<0.05). The sample consisted of 30 patients, 60% male, median age at first evaluation of 9 days. Full trisomy of chromosome 13 was the main cytogenetic alteration (73%). The major clinical findings included: cryptorchidism (78%), abnormal auricles (77%), congenital heart defects (76%), polydactyly (63%), microphthalmia (60%) and micrognathia (50%). Four patients (13%) simultaneously had micro/anophthalmia, oral clefts and polydactyly. Some findings were only observed in our sample and included, among others, preauricular tags (10%), duplication of the hallux (3%) and spots following the lines of Blaschko (3%). Mosaicism (20% of cases) had a statistically significant association only with absence of cryptorchidism. The median of survival was 26 days. Patients with and without mosaicism had similar median of survival. Our findings, in agreement with the literature, show that the anomalies in patients with PS can be quite variable, sometimes even atypical. There is no pathognomonic finding, which may make the early identification of these patients challenging.

  13. Overnight transfusions in New Zealand hospitals: potential risk to patients.

    PubMed

    Donegan, Rachel; Wright, Angela; Bobbitt, Louise; Charlewood, Richard; Blacklock, Hilary

    2016-03-11

    This audit aimed to assess how frequently overnight transfusions were taking place and compare it to the previous 2004 audit. All red cell units transfused between 20:00 and 08:00 hours in low acuity areas over 4 weeks in 2010 in 8 of New Zealand's largest public hospitals were identified prospectively, followed by review of clinical notes and laboratory results by the hospital Transfusion Nurse Specialist (TNS). 535 red cell units were transfused overnight, or 9% of the total units administered over the study period. Indications for transfusion were symptomatic anaemia, active bleeding or haemolysis (66%), but 16% of patients were asymptomatic. Of the non-urgent overnight transfusions (OTs), 42% were assessed as non-essential during the night. 49% of post-transfusion haemoglobin (Hb) levels were >100 g/L indicating a liberal transfusion practice. Although frequently cited as a reason for OT, only 16% of patients were discharged the following day. The median interval from pre-transfusion haemoglobin testing and starting the OT was approximately 9 hours, far exceeding the time needed to obtain routine full blood results. Adherence to recommended best transfusion practice was poor at night, with 12% of transfusions exceeding the 4 hour recommendation. End of transfusion observations fell to less than 80%, with the lowest compliance rate (69%) occurring at 06:00 hours. In addition to the 4 adverse reactions reported to the Haemovigilance programme, another 9 unreported reactions were identified by the auditors from the clinical notes. This audit has shown an improvement from 22% to 9% in the rate of OT compared to the 2004 audit. Nevertheless, 42% of transfusions were not considered appropriate based on current guidelines, and there is therefore room for improvement. A mean delay of 9 hours from haemoglobin sampling to transfusion suggests that reasons for this delay could be explored to help optimise transfusion start time. Some aspects of OT were worse than

  14. Quality control lockout function on Medtronic ACT Plus coagulation timer system can be bypassed for same-patient samples.

    PubMed

    2011-06-01

    If Medtronic's ACT Plus automated coagulation timer system (an activated clotting time analyzer) is used on a single patient, its quality control (QC) lockout function may not activate--that is, the device may not lock the user out from performing sample analysis when QC has not been performed within the required time frame. The unit will indicate that QC is due by beeping three times and providing an onscreen message, but it will still analyze the sample and provide the user with results. These results may be inaccurate, and if they are used to make anticoagulation therapy decisions, they may lead to incorrect and potentially dangerous heparin therapy. Users should be made aware of this behavior (which is not described in the device's user manual) and should be instructed to verify that required QC checks have been performed before analyzing each sample.

  15. Chemistry Testing on Plasma Versus Serum Samples in Dialysis Patients: Clinical and Quality Improvement Implications

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Roger Neill; Johnson, Curtis; Pearce, Jim; Hui-Ng, Patricia; Lacson, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Plasma samples collected in tubes containing separator gels have replaced serum samples for most chemistry tests in many hospital and commercial laboratories. Use of plasma samples for blood tests in the dialysis population eliminates delays in sample processing while waiting for clotting to complete, laboratory technical issues associated with fibrin formation, repeat sample collection, and patient care issues caused by delay of results because of incompletely clotted specimens. Additionally, a larger volume of plasma is produced than serum for the same amount of blood collected. Plasma samples are also acceptable for most chemical tests involved in the care of patients with ESRD. This information becomes very important when United States regulatory requirements for ESRD inadvertently limit the type of sample that can be used for government reporting, quality assessment, and value–based payment initiatives. In this narrative, we summarize the renal community experience and how the subsequent resolution of the acceptability of phosphorus levels measured from serum and plasma samples may have significant implications in the country’s continued development of a value–based Medicare ESRD Quality Incentive Program. PMID:27185523

  16. Identification of Legionella from clinically diagnosed pneumonia patients and environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Jahan, R; Tarafder, S; Saleh, A A; Miah, M R A

    2015-04-01

    Legionnaires' disease is a multisystem disease with life-threatening acute and severe form of pneumonia which is responsible for 2-9% pneumonia with high mortality. Eighty six respiratory tract samples and urine were collected from clinically diagnosed pneumonia patients and 12 water samples were collected from different environment. Identification of Legionella was done by culture and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) of respiratory tract samples and environmental samples and Legionella Antigen (Ag) in urine was detected by Immunochromatographic test (ICT). Legionella was identified from 4 (4.65%) clinically diagnosed pneumonia patients of which 1(1.16%) case was culture positive, 1(1.16%) case was urine ICT positive and PCR was positive in all four cases. Of the 12 water samples tested, 4 (33.33%) samples were Legionella positive by PCR but culture results of these samples were negative. Identification of Legionella should be done by PCR in parallel with culture and urine ICT. Detection of Legionella in environmental samples is also needed to explore possible links between the water sources and disease transmission in population.

  17. A Genomic Sample Sequence of the Entomopathogenic Bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens W14: Potential Implications for Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Ffrench-Constant, Richard H.; Waterfield, Nicholas; Burland, Valerie; Perna, Nicole T.; Daborn, Phillip J.; Bowen, David; Blattner, Frederick R.

    2000-01-01

    Photorhabdus luminescens is a pathogenic bacterium that lives in the guts of insect-pathogenic nematodes. After invasion of an insect host by a nematode, bacteria are released from the nematode gut and help kill the insect, in which both the bacteria and the nematodes subsequently replicate. However, the bacterial virulence factors associated with this “symbiosis of pathogens” remain largely obscure. In order to identify genes encoding potential virulence factors, we performed ∼2,000 random sequencing reads from a P. luminescens W14 genomic library. We then compared the sequences obtained to sequences in existing gene databases and to the Escherichia coli K-12 genome sequence. Here we describe the different classes of potential virulence factors found. These factors include genes that putatively encode Tc insecticidal toxin complexes, Rtx-like toxins, proteases and lipases, colicin and pyocins, and various antibiotics. They also include a diverse array of secretion (e.g., type III), iron uptake, and lipopolysaccharide production systems. We speculate on the potential functions of each of these gene classes in insect infection and also examine the extent to which the invertebrate pathogen P. luminescens shares potential antivertebrate virulence factors. The implications for understanding both the biology of this insect pathogen and links between the evolution of vertebrate virulence factors and the evolution of invertebrate virulence factors are discussed. PMID:10919786

  18. Potential microbial contamination during sampling of permafrost soil assessed by tracers.

    PubMed

    Bang-Andreasen, Toke; Schostag, Morten; Priemé, Anders; Elberling, Bo; Jacobsen, Carsten S

    2017-02-23

    Drilling and handling of permanently frozen soil cores without microbial contamination is of concern because contamination e.g. from the active layer above may lead to incorrect interpretation of results in experiments investigating potential and actual microbial activity in these low microbial biomass environments. Here, we present an example of how microbial contamination from active layer soil affected analysis of the potentially active microbial community in permafrost soil. We also present the development and use of two tracers: (1) fluorescent plastic microspheres and (2) Pseudomonas putida genetically tagged with Green Fluorescent Protein production to mimic potential microbial contamination of two permafrost cores. A protocol with special emphasis on avoiding microbial contamination was developed and employed to examine how far microbial contamination can penetrate into permafrost cores. The quantity of tracer elements decreased with depth into the permafrost cores, but the tracers were detected as far as 17 mm from the surface of the cores. The results emphasize that caution should be taken to avoid microbial contamination of permafrost cores and that the application of tracers represents a useful tool to assess penetration of potential microbial contamination into permafrost cores.

  19. Potential microbial contamination during sampling of permafrost soil assessed by tracers

    PubMed Central

    Bang-Andreasen, Toke; Schostag, Morten; Priemé, Anders; Elberling, Bo; Jacobsen, Carsten S.

    2017-01-01

    Drilling and handling of permanently frozen soil cores without microbial contamination is of concern because contamination e.g. from the active layer above may lead to incorrect interpretation of results in experiments investigating potential and actual microbial activity in these low microbial biomass environments. Here, we present an example of how microbial contamination from active layer soil affected analysis of the potentially active microbial community in permafrost soil. We also present the development and use of two tracers: (1) fluorescent plastic microspheres and (2) Pseudomonas putida genetically tagged with Green Fluorescent Protein production to mimic potential microbial contamination of two permafrost cores. A protocol with special emphasis on avoiding microbial contamination was developed and employed to examine how far microbial contamination can penetrate into permafrost cores. The quantity of tracer elements decreased with depth into the permafrost cores, but the tracers were detected as far as 17 mm from the surface of the cores. The results emphasize that caution should be taken to avoid microbial contamination of permafrost cores and that the application of tracers represents a useful tool to assess penetration of potential microbial contamination into permafrost cores. PMID:28230151

  20. Potential microbial contamination during sampling of permafrost soil assessed by tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang-Andreasen, Toke; Schostag, Morten; Priemé, Anders; Elberling, Bo; Jacobsen, Carsten S.

    2017-02-01

    Drilling and handling of permanently frozen soil cores without microbial contamination is of concern because contamination e.g. from the active layer above may lead to incorrect interpretation of results in experiments investigating potential and actual microbial activity in these low microbial biomass environments. Here, we present an example of how microbial contamination from active layer soil affected analysis of the potentially active microbial community in permafrost soil. We also present the development and use of two tracers: (1) fluorescent plastic microspheres and (2) Pseudomonas putida genetically tagged with Green Fluorescent Protein production to mimic potential microbial contamination of two permafrost cores. A protocol with special emphasis on avoiding microbial contamination was developed and employed to examine how far microbial contamination can penetrate into permafrost cores. The quantity of tracer elements decreased with depth into the permafrost cores, but the tracers were detected as far as 17 mm from the surface of the cores. The results emphasize that caution should be taken to avoid microbial contamination of permafrost cores and that the application of tracers represents a useful tool to assess penetration of potential microbial contamination into permafrost cores.

  1. Potential and pitfalls in establishing the provenance of Earth-related samples in forensic investigations.

    PubMed

    Rawlins, Barry G; Kemp, Simon J; Hodgkinson, Emily H; Riding, James B; Vane, Christopher H; Poulton, Catherine; Freeborough, Katy

    2006-07-01

    Earth scientists are often asked to establish or constrain the likely provenance of very small quantities of earth-related material as part of a forensic investigation. We tested the independent and collective interpretations of four experts with differing analytical skills in the prediction of sample provenance for three samples from different environmental settings. The methods used were X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, the assessment of pollen assemblages, and structural characterization of organic matter at the molecular level. Independent interpretations were less accurate than those where multiple techniques were combined. Collective interpretation was very effective in the assessment of provenance for two of the three sites where the mineralogy and plant communities were distinctive. At the other site, although the mineralogical analysis correctly identified the Triassic mudstone soil parent material, Carboniferous spores from domestic coal were initially interpreted as deriving directly from bedrock. Such an interpretation could be a common pitfall owing to anthropogenic redistribution of material such as coal.

  2. Reliable determination of 237Np in environmental solid samples using 242Pu as a potential tracer.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Jixin; Hou, Xiaolin; Roos, Per; Miró, Manuel

    2011-04-15

    This paper reports an analytical method for rapid determination of neptunium ((237)Np) in environmental solid samples exploiting automated sequential injection (SI)-based anion exchange separation. Pivotal issues on analytical method performance were investigated including sorption behavior of (237)Np onto various AG 1-type anion exchangers; suitability of (242)Pu as a tracer for (237)Np determination in environmental solid samples; and long-term chemical stability of tetravalent Np. Experimental results revealed that the degree of resin cross-linking has a significant influence on the separation efficiency in terms of chemical yields of (237)Np and removal of interfering nuclides. Although ca. 30% of sorbed Np onto AG 1- × 4 was stripped out during HCl rinsing step for the removal of Th, chemical yield ratios of (237)Np to (242)Pu were proven steady with an average value of 0.67 ± 0.04 (n=15) under selected experimental conditions. Disulfite-8M HNO(3) was selected as a redox pair for valence adjustment to Np(IV) and the tetravalent Np in the sample solution was demonstrated to be stabilized for up to 5 days under 3°C. The analytical results for reference materials showed a good agreement with the expected values, thereby demonstrating the usefulness of (242)Pu as a non-isotopic tracer for (237)Np chemical yield monitoring. The on-column separation procedure fosters rapid analysis as required in emergency situations since each individual sample can be handled within 2.5h, and leads to a significant decrease in labor intensity compared to conventional batch-wise protocols.

  3. Estimation of toxic metals in scalp hair samples of chronic kidney patients.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Jalbani, Nusrat; Kazi, Naveed; Arain, Muhammad Balal; Jamali, Muhammad Khan; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Kandhro, Ghulam Abbas; Sarfraz, Raja Adil; Shah, Abdul Qadir; Ansari, Rehana

    2009-01-01

    The determination of toxic metals (TMs) in the biological samples of human beings is an important clinical screening procedure. The aim of this work is to determine total content of TMs, aluminum (Al), cadmium (Cd), nickel (Ni), and lead (Pb) in scalp hair samples of chronic kidney male patients (CKPs) on maintenance hemodialysis, during the period of 2005-2007. The study included 115 CKPs (all smokers) and 150 controls or referents [82 (nonsmokers) and 68 (smokers)]. Both controls and patients (males) were of the same age group (ranged 25-55 years), socioeconomic status, localities, and dietary habits. The scalp hair samples were analyzed by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometer, prior to microwave-induced acid digestion. The accuracy of the total Al, Cd, Ni, and Pb measurements was tested by simultaneously analyzing certified reference material (human hair NCS ZC81002). No significant differences were observed between the analytical results and the certified values (paired t test at p > 0.05). The levels of TMs in scalp hair samples of patients were found to be higher as compared to control nonsmoker and smokers. Moreover, the study shows that levels of Al, Cd, Ni, and Pb in scalp hair samples may be useful to evaluate the impact of cigarette smoking in kidney failure patients.

  4. Potentially inappropriate screening colonoscopy in Medicare patients: variation by physician and geographic region.

    PubMed

    Sheffield, Kristin M; Han, Yimei; Kuo, Yong-Fang; Riall, Taylor S; Goodwin, James S

    2013-04-08

    Inappropriate use of colonoscopy involves unnecessary risk for older patients and consumes resources that could be used more effectively. To determine the frequency of potentially inappropriate colonoscopy in Medicare beneficiaries in Texas and to examine variation among physicians and across geographic regions. This retrospective cohort study used 100% Medicare claims data for Texas and a 5% sample from the United States from 2000 through 2009. We identified Medicare beneficiaries aged 70 years or older who underwent a colonoscopy from October 1, 2008, through September 30, 2009. Colonoscopies were classified as screening in the absence of a diagnosis suggesting an indication for the procedure. Screening colonoscopy was considered potentially inappropriate on the basis of patient age or occurrence too soon after colonoscopy with negative findings. The percentage of patients undergoing potentially inappropriate screening colonoscopy was estimated for each colonoscopist and hospital service area. A large percentage of colonoscopies performed in older adults were potentially inappropriate: 23.4% for the overall Texas cohort and 9.9%, 38.8%, and 24.9%, respectively, in patients aged 70 to 75, 76 to 85, or 86 years or older. There was considerable variation across the 797 colonoscopists in the percentages of colonoscopies performed that were potentially inappropriate. In a multilevel model including patient sex, race or ethnicity, number of comorbid conditions, educational level, and urban or rural residence, 73 colonoscopists had percentages significantly above the mean (23.9%), ranging from 28.7% to 45.5%, and 119 had percentages significantly below the mean (23.9%), ranging from 6.7% to 18.6%. The colonoscopists with percentages significantly above the mean were more likely to be surgeons, graduates of US medical schools, medical school graduates before 1990, and higher-volume colonoscopists than those with percentages significantly below the mean. Colonoscopist

  5. Risk Factors for Hospitalization in a National Sample of Medicare Home Health Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fortinsky, Richard H.; Madigan, Elizabeth A.; Sheehan, T. Joseph; Tullai-McGuinness, Susan; Kleppinger, Alison

    2012-01-01

    Acute care hospitalization during or immediately following a Medicare home health care (HHC) episode is a major adverse outcome, but little has been published about HHC patient-level risk factors for hospitalization. We determined risk factors at HHC admission associated with subsequent acute care hospitalization in a nationally representative Medicare patient sample (n=374,123). Hospitalization was measured using Medicare claims data; risk factors were measured using Outcome Assessment and Information Set data. Seventeen percent of sample members were hospitalized. Multivariate logistic regression analysis found that the most influential risk factors (all p<.001) were: skin wound as primary HHC diagnosis; clinician-judged guarded rehabilitation prognosis; congestive heart failure as primary HHC diagnosis; presence of depressive symptoms; dyspnea severity; and Black, compared to White. HHC initiatives that minimize chronic condition exacerbations, and that actively treat depressive symptoms, might help reduce Medicare patient hospitalizations. Unmeasured reasons for higher hospitalization rates among Black HHC patients deserve further investigation. PMID:24781967

  6. [Hyperglycemia in critically ill patients. Sample of choice, controls and values: literature review].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Gangoso, L; Fuentes-Pumarola, C

    2014-01-01

    The hyperglycemia is one of the most common problems in the critically ill patient, hence the importance of a good control of it in the ICUs. To identify the sample of choice for glycemic control in the critically ill patient; To distinguish the necessary controls to ensure the correct levels of glucose in the critically ill patient; To determine the range of blood glucose values suitable for the critically ill patient. This review was made in different databases: MEDLINE with the assistance of specific search PubMed and ProQuest, CUIDEN-PLUS and ELSEVIER Publishing website. 24 articles were collected: descriptive, analytic and cohort studies, and also literature reviews. The golden sample for the glucose determination in this patient is the arterial one, and can be also used the venous one, excluding the capillary sample. The analysis should be carried out in a clinical laboratory. However, glucometers can be used to provide instantaneous measurements. Blood glucose controls in the critically ill patient are initially set each hour until their stabilization, and then, they are spaced to periods of two-three hours. The glycemic index is moderate, with values between 140-180 mg/dl. The arterial sample is the chosen one for glucose determination in this patient. Blood glucose controls should be initially set each hour, until their stabilization, and then they are spaced to periods of two-three hours. The glycemia in the critically ill patient should be included in a index of 140-180 mg/dl, which is considered a moderate control.

  7. Potential drug interactions in patients given antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Santos, Wendel Mombaque Dos; Secoli, Silvia Regina; Padoin, Stela Maris de Mello

    2016-11-21

    to investigate potential drug-drug interactions (PDDI) in patients with HIV infection on antiretroviral therapy. a cross-sectional study was conducted on 161 adults with HIV infection. Clinical, socio demographic, and antiretroviral treatment data were collected. To analyze the potential drug interactions, we used the software Micromedex(r). Statistical analysis was performed by binary logistic regression, with a p-value of ≤0.05 considered statistically significant. of the participants, 52.2% were exposed to potential drug-drug interactions. In total, there were 218 potential drug-drug interactions, of which 79.8% occurred between drugs used for antiretroviral therapy. There was an association between the use of five or more medications and potential drug-drug interactions (p = 0.000) and between the time period of antiretroviral therapy being over six years and potential drug-drug interactions (p < 0.00). The clinical impact was prevalent sedation and cardiotoxicity. the PDDI identified in this study of moderate and higher severity are events that not only affect the therapeutic response leading to toxicity in the central nervous and cardiovascular systems, but also can interfere in tests used for detection of HIV resistance to antiretroviral drugs. investigar potenciais interações droga-droga (PDDI) em pacientes infectados com HIV em terapia de antirretroviral. um estudo de corte transversal foi conduzido em 161 pessoas infectadas com o HIV. Dados de tratamentos clínicos, sociodemográficos e antirretrovirais foram coletados. Para analisar a possível interação medicamentosa, nós usamos o software Micromedex(r). A análise estatística foi feita por regressão logística binária, com um valor P de ≤0.05, considerado estatisticamente significativo. dos participantes, 52.2% foram expostos a potenciais interações droga-droga. No total, houve 218 interações droga-droga, das quais 79.8% ocorreram entre drogas usadas para a terapia antirretroviral

  8. Chromatic visual evoked potentials in young patients with demyelinating disease.

    PubMed

    Pompe, Manca Tekavčič; Brecelj, Jelka; Kranjc, Branka Stirn

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate color vision in young patients with demyelinating disease both clinically and electrophysiologically. Thirty young patients (8-28 years, mean age 19 years) with demyelinating disease with or without a history of optic neuritis (ON) were investigated. Color vision was evaluated clinically with the Ishihara test and the Farnsworth-Munsell 100 hue (FM 100 hue) test and electrophysiologically with chromatic visual evoked potentials (cVEPs). Color deficiency axis and error score (ES) obtained with the FM 100 hue test were analyzed. cVEPs to isoluminant red-green (R-G) and blue-yellow (B-Y) stimuli were recorded. The stimulus was a 7 deg circle composed of horizontal sinusoidal gratings with a spatial frequency of 2 cycles/deg and 90% chromatic contrast. Onset-offset mode of stimulation (ON:OFF=300∶700  ms) was used. Since the majority of the patients were adults (>18  years), the negative wave (N wave) of the cVEP respones is the prominent part and therefore was analyzed. Sixty eyes were studied-22 with at least one episode of ON (ON group) and 38 without any clinically evident episode of ON (nON group). The average ES in the ON group was 179.18±171.8, whereas in the nON group it was 87.60±65.34. The average N-wave latency in the ON group was 144±44  ms for the R-G stimulus and 146±56  ms for the B-Y stimulus, whereas in the nON group, it was 117±13  ms for the R-G stimulus and 121±22  ms for the B-Y one. The average N-wave amplitude in the ON group was 9.3±7.1  μV for the R-G stimulus and 5.1±3.9  μV for the B-Y one, whereas in the nON group, it was 10.8±8.3  μV for the R-G stimulus and 6.4±4.3  μV for the B-Y one. A significant difference between the ON and the nON group was found: in the ON group, ES was higher (p=0.01) and N-wave latency was longer (p=0.01) compared with those in the nON group. The study showed that color vision is expectedly more affected in the ON

  9. A model study of potential sampling errors due to data scatter around expendable bathythermograph transects in the tropical Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcphaden, Michael J.; Busalacchi, Antonio J.; Picaut, Joel; Raymond, Gary

    1988-01-01

    A linear multiple vertical-mode model described by McPhaden et al. (1988) is used to examine potential errors due to data scatter around expendable bathythermograph (XBT) transects in the tropical Pacific. Two methods of sampling are compared. In the first, the model was sampled along approximately straight lines of grid points corresponding to the mean positions of XBT tracks in the eastern, central, and western Pacific; in the second, the model was sampled again at the dates and locations of actual XTB casts for 1979-1983. The model indicates that the data scattered zonally around XBT transects in general can lead to about 2 dyn cm error in dynamic height in composite sections of XBT data. Errors larger than 2 dyn cm occurred in regions where XBT sample spacing in the zonal direction was insufficient to resolve Rossby wave variations in the model.

  10. Quantification and Potential Functions of Endogenous Agonists of Transient Receptor Potential Channels in Patients With Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cenac, Nicolas; Bautzova, Tereza; Le Faouder, Pauline; Veldhuis, Nicholas A; Poole, Daniel P; Rolland, Corinne; Bertrand, Jessica; Liedtke, Wolfgang; Dubourdeau, Marc; Bertrand-Michel, Justine; Zecchi, Lisa; Stanghellini, Vincenzo; Bunnett, Nigel W; Barbara, Giovanni; Vergnolle, Nathalie

    2015-08-01

    In mice, activation of the transient receptor potential cation channels (TRP) TRPV1, TRPV4, and TRPA1 causes visceral hypersensitivity. These receptors and their agonists might be involved in development of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We investigated whether polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) metabolites, which activate TRPs, are present in colon tissues from patients with IBS and act as endogenous agonists to induce hypersensitivity. We analyzed colon biopsy samples from 40 patients with IBS (IBS biopsies) and 11 healthy individuals undergoing colorectal cancer screening (controls), collected during colonoscopy at the University of Bologna, Italy. Levels of the PUFA metabolites that activate TRPV1 (12-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid, 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, and leukotriene B4), TRPV4 (5,6-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid [EET] and 8,9-EET), and TRPA1 (PGA1, 8-iso-prostaglandin A2, and 15-deoxy-Δ-prostaglandin J2) were measured in biopsies and their supernatants using liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry; we also measured levels of the PUFA metabolites prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and resolvins. C57Bl6 mice were given intrathecal injections of small interfering RNAs to reduce levels of TRPV4, or control small interfering RNAs, along with colonic injections of biopsy supernatants; visceral hypersensitivity was measured based on response to colorectal distension. Mouse sensory neurons were cultured and incubated with biopsy supernatants and lipids extracted from biopsies or colons of mice. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect TRPV4 in human dorsal root ganglia samples (from the National Disease Research Interchange). Levels of the TRPV4 agonist 5,6-EET, but not levels of TRPV1 or TRPA1 agonists, were increased in IBS biopsies compared with controls; increases correlated with pain and bloating scores. Supernatants from IBS biopsies, but not from controls, induced visceral hypersensitivity in mice. Small interfering RNA

  11. Concordance of ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated) immunohistochemistry between biopsy or metastatic tumor samples and primary tumors in gastric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Sung; Kim, Min A; Hodgson, Darren; Harbron, Christopher; Wellings, Robert; O'Connor, Mark J; Womack, Christopher; Yin, Xiaolu; Bang, Yung-Jue; Im, Seok-Ah; Lee, Byung Lan; Kim, Woo Ho

    2013-01-01

    ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated) is one of several DNA repair proteins that are suggested to sensitize tumor cells to the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor olaparib when deficient. The aim of this study was to assess the spatiotemporal concordance of ATM immunohistochemistry (IHC) in gastric cancer in order to determine if measurements made at the level of various sample types and times could be inferred as having the potential to be relevant to treatment decisions made at the patient level. Two independent cohorts composed of 591 gastric cancer patients divided into a gastrectomy cohort (n = 450) and a metastasis cohort (n = 141) were used in this study. A total of 2,705 ATM IHC samples were examined, including 450 whole tissue, 3 sets of 450 tissue microarray (TMA), 301 biopsy, 222 metastatic tumor and 2 additional whole tissue samples of 50 cases from the gastrectomy cohort, and 141 pairs of primary and metastatic tumors from the metastasis cohort. The prevalence of ATM negativity was 13.1% in biopsies, 13.9, 15.1, and 16.0% in TMAs and 15.9% in whole tissue samples of the gastrectomy cohort, and 21.4% in primary tumor and 21.5% in metastatic tumor samples of the metastasis cohort. coefficients were 0.341 for biopsy, 0.572 as the average of 3 TMAs and 0.415 for the largely synchronous metastatic tumors of the gastrectomy cohort, and 0.153 for the largely asynchronous metastatic tumors of the metastasis cohort. Using whole tissue sections from tumor resections or primary tumor, respectively, as the reference standards, specificity and sensitivity were 91.6 and 41.0% for biopsy, 93.9 and 61.9% as the average of 3 TMAs, and 86.6 and 58.8% for metastatic tumors of the gastrectomy cohort and 81.7 and 33.3% for metastatic tumors of the metastasis cohort, respectively. Although we have demonstrated that the IHC assay for ATM was robust and reproducible in gastric tumor samples, we have also found that measurements were subject to significant discordance across

  12. Potential and Challenges in Collecting Social and Behavioral Data on Adolescent Alcohol Norms: Comparing Respondent-Driven Sampling and Web-Based Respondent-Driven Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrand, Janina; Burns, Sharyn; Zhao, Yun; Lobo, Roanna; Howat, Peter; Allsop, Steve

    2015-01-01

    RDS resulted in partially different sample characteristics to traditional RDS. This potential effect should be considered when selecting the most appropriate data collection method. PMID:26704736

  13. Telephone screening to identify potential dementia cases in a population-based sample of older adults.

    PubMed

    Gatz, Margaret; Reynolds, Chandra A; John, Richard; Johansson, Boo; Mortimer, James A; Pedersen, Nancy L

    2002-09-01

    This study examined the utility of the TELE, a telephone assessment for dementia, in a sample of 269 individuals that was not selected on the basis of previous dementia diagnosis. Thus, the conditions of the study reflect the actual situation in which a screening instrument might be employed. Scores on TELE were compared to dementia diagnoses. Using the best cutoff score, sensitivity was .86 and specificity was .90. Longitudinal follow-up established that false positives primarily included those who subsequently developed dementia. Telephone screening for dementia has both clinical and research applications. One recommendation based on our experience is that longitudinal studies should include a telephone interview component for anyone who drops out of the study, to enable characterizing the cognitive status of dropouts.

  14. Sampling the oxidative weathering products and the potentially acidic permafrost on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Roger G.

    1988-01-01

    Large areas of Mars' surface are covered by oxidative weathering products containing ferric and sulfate ions having analogies to terrestrial gossans derived from sulfide mineralization associated with iron-rich basalts. Chemical weathering of such massive and disseminated pyrrhotite-pentlandite assemblages and host basaltic rocks in the Martian environment could have produced metastable gossaniferous phases (limonite containing poorly crystalline hydrated ferric sulfates and oxyhydroxides, clay silicates and opal). Underlying groundwater, now permafrost on Mars, may still be acidic due to incomplete buffering reactions by wall-rock alteration of unfractured host rock. Such acidic solutions stabilize temperature-sensitive complex ions and sols which flocculate to colloidal precipitates at elevated temperatures. Sampling procedures of Martian regolith will need to be designed bearing in mind that the frozen permafrost may be corrosive and be stabilizing unique complex ions and sols of Fe, Al, Mg, Ni and other minor elements.

  15. Erectile dysfunction in a sample of patients attending a psychiatric outpatient department.

    PubMed

    Mosaku, K S; Ukpong, D I

    2009-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of erectile dysfunction among a sample of patients attending a psychiatric clinic, we administered the International Index of Erectile Function on 108 male patients attending the clinic. We also obtained sociodemographic and clinical variables from the patients. The mean age of the patients studied was 39.6 (s.d.=11.6), with a mean duration of illness of 10.24 (s.d.=8.2) years. There were 46.8% schizophrenics; other diagnoses include bipolar affective disorder, recurrent depressive disorder and substance use disorder. The prevalence of erectile dysfunction was 83%. Age, marital status, current medications and the presence of comorbid medical conditions were significantly associated with erectile dysfunction; however, only age and marital status significantly predicted erectile dysfunction. We concluded that erectile dysfunction is highly prevalent among patients attending the psychiatric clinic, as such inquiries about sexual function should be routinely carried out by clinicians.

  16. A holistic passive integrative sampling approach for assessing the presence and potential impacts of waterborne environmental contaminants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petty, J.D.; Huckins, J.N.; Alvarez, D.A.; Brumbaugh, W. G.; Cranor, W.L.; Gale, R.W.; Rastall, A.C.; Jones-Lepp, T. L.; Leiker, T.J.; Rostad, C. E.; Furlong, E.T.

    2004-01-01

    As an integral part of our continuing research in environmental quality assessment approaches, we have developed a variety of passive integrative sampling devices widely applicable for use in defining the presence and potential impacts of a broad array of contaminants. The semipermeable membrane device has gained widespread use for sampling hydrophobic chemicals from water and air, the polar organic chemical integrative sampler is applicable for sequestering waterborne hydrophilic organic chemicals, the stabilized liquid membrane device is used to integratively sample waterborne ionic metals, and the passive integrative mercury sampler is applicable for sampling vapor phase or dissolved neutral mercury species. This suite of integrative samplers forms the basis for a new passive sampling approach for assessing the presence and potential toxicological significance of a broad spectrum of environmental contaminants. In a proof-of-concept study, three of our four passive integrative samplers were used to assess the presence of a wide variety of contaminants in the waters of a constructed wetland, and to determine the effectiveness of the constructed wetland in removing contaminants. The wetland is used for final polishing of secondary-treatment municipal wastewater and the effluent is used as a source of water for a state wildlife area. Numerous contaminants, including organochlorine pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, organophosphate pesticides, and pharmaceutical chemicals (e.g., ibuprofen, oxindole, etc.) were detected in the wastewater. Herein we summarize the results of the analysis of the field-deployed samplers and demonstrate the utility of this holistic approach.

  17. In vitro assessment of potential intestinal absorption of some phenolic families and carboxylic acids from commercial instant coffee samples.

    PubMed

    López-Froilán, R; Ramírez-Moreno, E; Podio, N S; Pérez-Rodríguez, M L; Cámara, M; Baroni, M V; Wunderlin, D A; Sánchez-Mata, M C

    2016-06-15

    Coffee is one of the most consumed beverages in the world, being a source of bioactive compounds as well as flavors. Hydroxycinnamic acids, flavonols, and carboxylic acids have been studied in the samples of instant coffee commercialized in Spain. The studies about contents of food components should be complemented with either in vitro or in vivo bioaccessibility studies to know the amount of food components effectively available for functions in the human body. In this sense, a widely used in vitro model has been applied to assess the potential intestinal absorption of phenolic compounds and organic acids. The contents of hydroxycinnamic acids and flavonols were higher in instant regular coffee samples than in the decaffeinated ones. Bioaccessible phenolic compounds in most analyzed samples account for 20-25% of hydroxycinnamic acids and 17-26% of flavonols. This could mean that a great part of them can remain in the gut, acting as potential in situ antioxidants. Quinic, acetic, pyroglutamic, citric and fumaric acids were identified in commercial instant coffee samples. Succinic acid was found in the coffee blend containing chicory. All carboxylic acids showed a very high bioaccessibility. Particularly, acetic acid and quinic acid were found in higher contents in the samples treated with the in vitro simulation of gastrointestinal processes, compared to the original ones, which can be explained by their cleavage from chlorogenic acid during digestion. This is considered as a positive effect, since quinic acid is considered as an antioxidant inducer.

  18. Systematic comparison of nutraceuticals and antioxidant potential of cultivated, in vitro cultured and commercial Melissa officinalis samples.

    PubMed

    Dias, Maria Inês; Barros, Lillian; Sousa, Maria João; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2012-06-01

    Melissa officinalis (lemon balm) infusions are used worldwide for digestive, analgesic and other pharmaceutical applications. Herein, the nutraceuticals production and antioxidant potential in garden cultivated, in vitro cultured and two commercial samples (bags and granulated) of lemon balm was compared. The profile of in vitro cultured lemon balm is closer of garden cultivated sample than of both commercial samples (bag or granulate). It presented the highest levels of proteins and ash, and the lowest energetic value. The most favorable n6/n3 ration, as also the highest PUFA (mostly α-linolenic acid), tocopherols (including α-, γ- and δ-isoforms) and ascorbic acid contents were also observed in this sample. Nevertheless, it was the commercial bag lemon balm that gave the highest antioxidant activity and the highest levels of phenolics and flavonoids. As far as we kwon, this is the first comparison of nutraceuticals and antioxidant potential of cultivated, in vitro cultured and commercial lemon balm samples. Moreover, it proved that in vitro culture might be used to stimulate vitamins production.

  19. Genome Analysis of Osteosarcoma Progression Samples Identifies FGFR1 Overexpression as a Potential Treatment Target and CHM as a Candidate Tumor Suppressor Gene

    PubMed Central

    Barøy, Tale; Chilamakuri, Chandra S. R.; Lorenz, Susanne; Sun, Jinchang; Bruland, Øyvind S.; Myklebost, Ola; Meza-Zepeda, Leonardo A.

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary malignant tumor of bone, showing complex chromosomal rearrangements but with few known consistent changes. Deeper biological understanding is crucial to find new therapies to improve patient survival. We have sequenced the whole exome of two primary tumors (before and after chemotherapy), one metastatic tumor and a matched normal sample from two OS patients, to identify mutations involved in cancer biology. The metastatic samples were also RNA sequenced. By RNA sequencing we identified dysregulated expression levels of drug resistance- and apoptosis-related genes. Two fusion transcripts were identified in one patient (OS111); the first resulted in p53 inactivation by fusing the first exon of TP53 to the fifth exon of FAM45A. The second fusion joined the two first exons of FGFR1 to the second exon of ZNF343. Furthermore, FGFR1 was amplified and highly expressed, representing a potential treatment target in this patient. Whole exome sequencing revealed large intertumor heterogeneity, with surprisingly few shared mutations. Careful evaluation and validation of the data sets revealed a number of artefacts, but one recurrent mutation was validated, a nonsense mutation in CHM (patient OS106), which also was the mutation with the highest expression frequency (53%). The second patient (OS111) had wild-type CHM, but a downregulated expression level. In a panel of 71 clinical samples, we confirmed significant low expression of CHM compared to the controls (p = 0.003). Furthermore, by analyzing public datasets, we identified a significant association between low expression and poor survival in two other cancer types. Together, these results suggest CHM as a candidate tumor suppressor gene that warrants further investigation. PMID:27685995

  20. Mass Spectrometric N-Glycan Analysis of Haptoglobin from Patient Serum Samples Using a 96-Well Plate Format.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jianhui; Wu, Jing; Yin, Haidi; Marrero, Jorge; Lubman, David M

    2015-11-06

    Alterations in glycosylation of serum glycoproteins can provide unique and highly specific fingerprints of malignancy. Our previous mass spectrometric study revealed that the bifucosylation level of serum haptoglobin was distinctly increased in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients versus liver cirrhosis of all three major etiologies. We have thus developed a method for the analysis of large numbers of serum samples based on a 96-well plate platform for the evaluation of fucosylation changes of serum haptoglobin between HCC versus cirrhosis. Haptoglobin was isolated from the serum of individual patient samples based on an HPLC column immobilized with antihaptoglobin antibody via hydrazide immobilization chemistry. Only 10 μL of serum was required for glycan extraction and processing for MALDI-QIT mass spectrometry analysis using the 96-well plate format. The bifucosylation degrees of haptoglobin in individuals were calculated using a quantitative glycomics method. The MS data confirmed that the bifucosylated tetra-anntenary glycan was upregulated in HCC samples of all etiologies. This study provides a parallel method for processing glycan content for haptoglobin and evaluating detailed changes in glycan structures for a potentially large cohort of clinical serum samples.

  1. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Tear Samples of Patients with Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Rentka, Anikó; Hársfalvi, Jolán; Berta, András; Köröskényi, Krisztina; Szekanecz, Zoltán; Szücs, Gabriella; Szodoray, Peter; Kemény-Beke, Ádám

    2015-01-01

    Background. Systemic sclerosis is an autoimmune disease, characterized by widespread small vessel vasculopathy, immune dysregulation with production of autoantibodies, and progressive fibrosis. Changes in levels of proangiogenic cytokines had already been determined largely in serum. Our aim was to assess the levels of VEGF in human tears of patients with SSC. Patients and methods. Forty-three patients (40 female and 3 men, mean (SD) age 61 (48–74) years) with SSc and 27 healthy controls were enrolled in this study. Basal tear sample collection and tear velocity investigations were carried out followed by an ophthalmological examination. Total protein concentrations and VEGF levels were determined in tear samples. Results. The average collected tear fluid volume developed 10.4 μL (1.6–31.2) in patients and 15.63 μL (3.68–34.5) in control subjects. The average total protein level was 6.9 μg/μL (1.8–12.3) in tears of patients and control tears contained an average of 4.132 μg/μL (0.1–14.1) protein. In patients with SSc the average concentration of VEGF was 4.9 pg/μL (3.5–8.1) and 6.15 pg/μL (3.84–12.3) in healthy samples. Conclusions. Total protein production was increased because of the smaller tear volume. Decreased VEGF in tear of SSc patients can be explained also by the decreased tear secretion of patients. PMID:26339137

  2. [Study of a sample of alcoholic patients two years post-treatment].

    PubMed

    Avila Escribano, J J; Pérez Madruga, A; Rodríguez Treceño, M

    1994-01-01

    This survey analyzes the evolution of one sample of alcoholic patients two years after finishing treatment. Its target is to determine the percentage of patients that remain abstinent, their rate of retention, and what factors can have an influence on abstinence. In 1990, 72 alcoholic patients were treated in the Alcoholism Unit, who make up our study sample. The average age was 37.9 +/- 11.47 years old; 77.8% were diagnosed as being Alcohol-dependents and 22.2% as Alcohol-abusers; 19.4% dropped out the treatment early. In 1992 our sample of study was 53 patients (2 died and 17 refused to participate), of whom 77.7% were abstinent and 28.3% continued ingesting alcohol; the average abstinence was 22.92 +/- 8.73 months. An important finding of this study was that the diagnosis, sex, and treatment with aversives had not an influence on abstinence; however the percentage of abstinent patients in those who had attended Therapeutic Discussion Groups was significantly higher than in those who had not.

  3. The prevalence and distribution of hypodontia in a sample of Qatari patients

    PubMed Central

    Hashim, Hayder Abdalla; Al-Said, Sozan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of hypodontia in the permanent dentition in a sample of Qatari patients attending a dental center and to compare the results with the reported findings of other populations. Materials and Methods: Orthodontic files including orthopantomographs of 1000 patients (655 females and 345 males, 11–36-year-old) were examined and inspected for evidence of hypodontia. Results: The prevalence of hypodontia in the present Qatari sample was 7.8%; 6.9% was in males and 8.2% in females. Hypodontia was found more frequently in the maxilla than in the mandible. The distribution of missing teeth was noticed in the left side more than the right side. The most frequently missing teeth were the maxillary lateral incisors followed by the mandibular second premolars, maxillary second premolars, and mandibular left lateral incisor. The majority of patients with hypodontia had one or two teeth missing, but rarely more than four teeth were missing in the same patient. Bilateral missing teeth in the current study was commonly seen in the maxillary lateral incisor (14.1%) followed by mandibular second premolar (12.8%) and maxillary second premolar (6.4%). Conclusions: The prevalence of hypodontia in a sample of Qatari individuals was within the range reported in the literature for other populations. The incidence of hypodontia in the anterior segment requires multidisciplinary team approach (orthodontic and prosthodontic) to restore the esthetic and function and improve patient self-esteem. PMID:26998470

  4. Using adaptive sampling and triangular meshes for the processing and inversion of potential field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foks, Nathan Leon

    The interpretation of geophysical data plays an important role in the analysis of potential field data in resource exploration industries. Two categories of interpretation techniques are discussed in this thesis; boundary detection and geophysical inversion. Fault or boundary detection is a method to interpret the locations of subsurface boundaries from measured data, while inversion is a computationally intensive method that provides 3D information about subsurface structure. My research focuses on these two aspects of interpretation techniques. First, I develop a method to aid in the interpretation of faults and boundaries from magnetic data. These processes are traditionally carried out using raster grid and image processing techniques. Instead, I use unstructured meshes of triangular facets that can extract inferred boundaries using mesh edges. Next, to address the computational issues of geophysical inversion, I develop an approach to reduce the number of data in a data set. The approach selects the data points according to a user specified proxy for its signal content. The approach is performed in the data domain and requires no modification to existing inversion codes. This technique adds to the existing suite of compressive inversion algorithms. Finally, I develop an algorithm to invert gravity data for an interfacing surface using an unstructured mesh of triangular facets. A pertinent property of unstructured meshes is their flexibility at representing oblique, or arbitrarily oriented structures. This flexibility makes unstructured meshes an ideal candidate for geometry based interface inversions. The approaches I have developed provide a suite of algorithms geared towards large-scale interpretation of potential field data, by using an unstructured representation of both the data and model parameters.

  5. Adherence to treatment and influencing factors in a sample of Chinese epilepsy patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianming; Liu, Zhiliang; Ding, Hu; Yang, Xiaohong

    2013-09-01

    To assess adherence to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and factors associated with non-adherence in a sample of Chinese patients with epilepsy. A cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out on patients who had no change in treatment regimen over the last six months. Data on adherence to medication and related factors for each patient were gathered using a questionnaire. Of a total of 368 patients studied, 48.1% of patients were non-adherent with regards to AEDs. There were no demographic differences (based on gender, age, seizure type, and rural or urban location) between adherent and non-adherent patients. Adherence was positively and significantly correlated with duration of illness (p=0.007). The primary reason for non-adherence was forgetfulness or not having medication on hand (69.6%), followed by a negative attitude (12.8%), a bad patient-prescriber relationship (9.5%), side effects (5.4%), inability to buy drugs (1.9%), and other reasons (0.8%). The non-adherence of epilepsy patients is common in China. Targeted management programs and communication strategies are necessary to improve adherence to AED treatments in patients with epilepsy and avoid the clinical consequences of poor adherence.

  6. [Presence of Streptococcus bovis in urine samples from patients experiencing symptoms of urinary tract].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Camarasa, Cristina; Gutiérrez Soto, Blanca; Jiménez-Guerra, Gemma; Sorlózano Puerto, Antonio; Navarro-Marí, José María; Gutiérrez-Fernández, José

    Given the relevance of proper clinical validation of Streptococcus bovis, we here consider revising its presence in urine samples in order to determine its relative frequency and the pattern of antibiotic susceptibility. The susceptibility to antibiotics of 91 isolates of S. bovis from urine samples was retrospectively reviewed over a period of 4 years (2012-2015). The mean age of patients was 55 years, 81% of whom were women and 37.4% were hospitalized patients suffering from urological diseases (61%). Susceptibility to penicillin, vancomycin and teicoplanin was 97.8%. Due to the fact that S. bovis can be infrequent in urine isolates and given its presence in patients suffering from urological diseases, further pathogenic studies, showing the true ability of this group of bacteria to produce disease, are required. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. The Proposed Mars Astrobiology Explorer - Cacher [MAX-C] Rover: First Step in a Potential Sample Return Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carlton C.; Beaty, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Sample return from Mars has been advocated by numerous scientific advisory panels for over 30 years, most prominently beginning with the National Research Council s [1] strategy for the exploration of the inner solar system, and most recently by the Mars Exploration Program Analysis Group (MEPAG s) Next Decade Science Analysis Group [2]. Analysis of samples here on Earth would have enormous advantages over in situ analyses in producing the data quality needed to address many of the complex scientific questions the community has posed about Mars. Instead of a small, predetermined set of analytical techniques, state of the art preparative and instrumental resources of the entire scientific community could be applied to the samples. The analytical emphasis could shift as the meaning of each result becomes better appreciated. These arguments apply both to igneous rocks and to layered sedimentary materials, either of which could contain water and other volatile constituents. In 2009 MEPAG formed the Mid-Range Rover Science Analysis Group (MRR-SAG) to formulate a mission concept that would address two general objectives: (1) conduct high-priority in situ science and (2) make concrete steps towards the potential return of samples to Earth. This analysis resulted in a mission concept named the Mars Astrobiology Explorer-Cacher (MAX-C), which was envisioned for launch in the 2018 opportunity. After extensive discussion, this group concluded that by far the most definitive contribution to sample return by this mission would be to collect and cache, in an accessible location, a suite of compelling samples that could potentially be recovered and returned by a subsequent mission. This would have the effect of separating two of the essential functions of MSR, the acquisition of the sample collection and its delivery to martian orbit, into two missions.

  8. Within-patient longitudinal speech reception measures with continuous interleaved sampling processors for ineraid implanted subjects.

    PubMed

    Pelizzone, M; Cosendai, G; Tinembart, J

    1999-06-01

    To assess within-subject changes in speech reception over time in a group of Ineraid subjects fitted with continuous interleaved sampling (CIS) wearable processors fabricated in Geneva. To compare asymptotic performance between CIS and Ineraid processors for the same subjects. Twelve patients, all users of the 4-channel Ineraid cochlear implant system for several years and with no previous experience of CIS processors in daily life, were equipped with Geneva Wearable Processors programmed to implement a high-rate CIS sound processing strategy using four to six channels. Their speech reception performance with CIS processors was monitored over a period of 1 yr with consonant and vowel identification tests. For comparison, speech reception performance also was measured with Ineraid processors before switching to CIS and after 6 mo of non-use of Ineraid processors. At fitting, CIS processors produced significantly better consonant identification but no better vowel identification. Subsequently, consonant and vowel scores with CIS processors improved progressively to asymptote after 6 mo of daily use. At 6 mo and beyond, performance with CIS processors was significantly superior to that obtained with Ineraid processors on both consonant and vowel identification tests. Control tests made with Ineraid processors after 6 mo of non-use of the device yielded results that were indistinguishable from those obtained before the study. The full potential of the CIS strategy is not revealed at fitting. Accumulation of daily experience provides significant improvements, asymptotic performance being reached after about 4 to 6 mo of use. All Ineraid users might greatly benefit from CIS processors.

  9. RNA sequencing and transcriptome arrays analyses show opposing results for alternative splicing in patient derived samples.

    PubMed

    Nazarov, Petr V; Muller, Arnaud; Kaoma, Tony; Nicot, Nathalie; Maximo, Cristina; Birembaut, Philippe; Tran, Nhan L; Dittmar, Gunnar; Vallar, Laurent

    2017-06-06

    RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) and microarrays are two transcriptomics techniques aimed at the quantification of transcribed genes and their isoforms. Here we compare the latest Affymetrix HTA 2.0 microarray with Illumina 2000 RNA-seq for the analysis of patient samples - normal lung epithelium tissue and squamous cell carcinoma lung tumours. Protein coding mRNAs and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) were included in the study. Both platforms performed equally well for protein-coding RNAs, however the stochastic variability was higher for the sequencing data than for microarrays. This reduced the number of differentially expressed genes and genes with predictive potential for RNA-seq compared to microarray data. Analysis of this variability revealed a lack of reads for short and low abundant genes; lncRNAs, being shorter and less abundant RNAs, were found especially susceptible to this issue. A major difference between the two platforms was uncovered by analysis of alternatively spliced genes. Investigation of differential exon abundance showed insufficient reads for many exons and exon junctions in RNA-seq while the detection on the array platform was more stable. Nevertheless, we identified 207 genes which undergo alternative splicing and were consistently detected by both techniques. Despite the fact that the results of gene expression analysis were highly consistent between Human Transcriptome Arrays and RNA-seq platforms, the analysis of alternative splicing produced discordant results. We concluded that modern microarrays can still outperform sequencing for standard analysis of gene expression in terms of reproducibility and cost.

  10. Helium-3 inventory of lunar samples: A potential future energy resource for mankind?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murali, A. V.; Jordan, J. L.

    1993-01-01

    Recent public concern over the safety, cost, and environmental impact of the worldwide fission reactors has focused the attention of scientists and engineers towards perfecting fusion technology because it promises a much more environmentally acceptable 'clean' energy supply. The fusion reaction D-2 + He-3 yields p(14.7 MeV) + He-4(3.6 MeV) has long been recognized as an ideal candidate for producing commercially 'safer and cleaner' fusion power. Naturally occurring He-3 is scarce on earth; however, lunar regolith is a potential ore for He-3 because the high He-3 in solar wind has been implanted in the lunar regolith for more than 4 x 10(exp 9) years, along with other volatile species. The helium abundance in lunar soils is dependent not only on the maturity of soils (I(sub S)/FeO) but also on their mineralogy. The titanium-rich (ilmenite) lunar soils are important repositories for volatiles, which may be released by heating these soils up to approximately 700 C.

  11. Antibodies reacting with Simian Virus 40 mimotopes in serum samples from patients with thalassaemia major

    PubMed Central

    Borgna-Pignatti, Caterina; Mazzoni, Elisa; Felletti, Marcella; Turlà, Giuliana; Malaventura, Cristina; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Cianciulli, Paolo; Forni, Gian Luca; Corallini, Alfredo; Martini, Fernanda; Tognon, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Background Simian virus 40 (SV40) is a small DNA tumour virus. Footprints of the virus have been detected in different humam lymphoproliferative disorders and in blood specimens of blood from healthy blood donors. This study was carried out to verify whether SV40 antibodies can be detected in serum samples from multiply transfused patients with thalassaemia major. Materials and methods An indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was employed, using SV40 specific synthetic peptides mimicking the antigens of the viral capsid proteins 1-2-3, to test for the presence of antibodies to SV40 in serum samples taken from patients affected by transfusion-dependent thalassaemia major (n=190) and healthy blood donors (n=251). Results The prevalence of antibodies against SV40 was higher in patients than in controls (24% vs 17%). The prevalence increased and was significantly higher in the older age group of patients affected by thalassemia major than in controls (38% vs 20%, p<0.04). Discussion The higher prevalence of serum antibodies against simian virus 40 in older, multiply transfused patients with thalassamia major than in controls suggests that this virus, or a closely related yet unknown human polyomavirus, could have been transmitted in the past by transfusion with whole blood. At the same time, our data indicate no significant differences in prevalence of SV40 antibodies in patients and controls of younger age thus suggesting that current transfusion methods with leucodepletion and filtered red cells are safe. PMID:24887224

  12. Antibodies reacting with Simian virus 40 mimotopes in serum samples from patients with thalassaemia major.

    PubMed

    Borgna-Pignatti, Caterina; Mazzoni, Elisa; Felletti, Marcella; Turlà, Giuliana; Malaventura, Cristina; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Cianciulli, Paolo; Forni, Gian Luca; Corallini, Alfredo; Martini, Fernanda; Tognon, Mauro

    2014-10-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) is a small DNA tumour virus. Footprints of the virus have been detected in different humam lymphoproliferative disorders and in blood specimens of blood from healthy blood donors. This study was carried out to verify whether SV40 antibodies can be detected in serum samples from multiply transfused patients with thalassaemia major. An indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was employed, using SV40 specific synthetic peptides mimicking the antigens of the viral capsid proteins 1-2-3, to test for the presence of antibodies to SV40 in serum samples taken from patients affected by transfusion-dependent thalassaemia major (n=190) and healthy blood donors (n=251). The prevalence of antibodies against SV40 was higher in patients than in controls (24% vs 17%). The prevalence increased and was significantly higher in the older age group of patients affected by thalassemia major than in controls (38% vs 20%, p<0.04). The higher prevalence of serum antibodies against simian virus 40 in older, multiply transfused patients with thalassamia major than in controls suggests that this virus, or a closely related yet unknown human polyomavirus, could have been transmitted in the past by transfusion with whole blood. At the same time, our data indicate no significant differences in prevalence of SV40 antibodies in patients and controls of younger age thus suggesting that current transfusion methods with leucodepletion and filtered red cells are safe.

  13. ASSOCIATION OF PLASMA HOMOCYSTEINE AND WHITE MATTER HYPODENSITIES IN A SAMPLE OF STROKE PATIENTS.

    PubMed

    Naveed, Ghazala; Bokhari, Faraz Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Studies of homocysteine in vascular disorders have yielded conflicting data. There are also differences based on various ethnicities and cultures. In this study, we have examined the homocysteine patterns in local stroke patients, so as to ascertain the homocysteine status in a sample of local population. Homocysteine-white matter hypodensities relationship in stroke is emerging, as an important aspect in stroke pathophysiology and is thought to have prognostic and therapeutic values. We included 150 stroke patients who were diagnosed as having clinical stroke on the basis of history; physical examination and CT (Computerized Tomography) scan of brain. These patients were recruited from neurology and emergency wards of two public sector hospitals of Lahore. The presence or absence of white matter hypodensities were diagnosed after consultation with a radiologist. Blood samples were collected from the same stroke patients. We found a strong association between white matter hypodensities and total homocysteine in plasma of stroke patients p < 0.001. Homocysteine is a risk factor for white matter hypodensities in stroke patients in our study.

  14. Piezoresistive Membrane Surface Stress Sensors for Characterization of Breath Samples of Head and Neck Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Lang, Hans Peter; Loizeau, Frédéric; Hiou-Feige, Agnès; Rivals, Jean-Paul; Romero, Pedro; Akiyama, Terunobu; Gerber, Christoph; Meyer, Ernst

    2016-07-22

    For many diseases, where a particular organ is affected, chemical by-products can be found in the patient's exhaled breath. Breath analysis is often done using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry, but interpretation of results is difficult and time-consuming. We performed characterization of patients' exhaled breath samples by an electronic nose technique based on an array of nanomechanical membrane sensors. Each membrane is coated with a different thin polymer layer. By pumping the exhaled breath into a measurement chamber, volatile organic compounds present in patients' breath diffuse into the polymer layers and deform the membranes by changes in surface stress. The bending of the membranes is measured piezoresistively and the signals are converted into voltages. The sensor deflection pattern allows one to characterize the condition of the patient. In a clinical pilot study, we investigated breath samples from head and neck cancer patients and healthy control persons. Evaluation using principal component analysis (PCA) allowed a clear distinction between the two groups. As head and neck cancer can be completely removed by surgery, the breath of cured patients was investigated after surgery again and the results were similar to those of the healthy control group, indicating that surgery was successful.

  15. Investigation of Helicobacter pylori antigen in stool samples of patients with upper gastrointestinal complaints

    PubMed Central

    Calik, Zeki; Karamese, Murat; Acar, Osman; Aksak Karamese, Selina; Dicle, Yalcin; Albayrak, Fatih; Can, Serpil; Guvendi, Bulent; Turgut, Alpgiray; Cicek, Mustafa; Yazgi, Halil

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is usually acquired in early childhood and it can persist throughout life without antibiotic treatment. This study aimed to compare the accuracy of the noninvasive H. pylori Stool Antigen Test-applied on the stool samples with the invasive gold standart Rapid Urease Test-applied on the gastric biopy samples of patients with upper gastrointestinal complaints. After endoscopy, biopsy and stool specimens were taken in 122 patients. The infection was detected with rapid urease test which is accepted as gold standart test. Rapid, one-step H. pylori card test was applied to all patients stool specimens. In this study 106 of the 122 patients (86.8%) were positive for H. pylori infection, while 16 of the 122 patients (13.2%) were negative. H. pylori card test was negative in 13 of the 16 patients and was positive in 98 of the 106. The sensitivity, specifity, positive and negative predictive values were 92.45%, 81.25%, 97.02%, and 61.90%, respectively. H. pylori card test is rapid, easy, noninvasive and inexpensive methods for detection H. pylori infection. This test showed high sensitivity and specificity. Additionally, it may be a good alternative to invasive tests for the detection of H. pylori infections especially in children. PMID:26887240

  16. Brain potentials predict substance abuse treatment completion in a prison sample.

    PubMed

    Fink, Brandi C; Steele, Vaughn R; Maurer, Michael J; Fede, Samantha J; Calhoun, Vince D; Kiehl, Kent A

    2016-08-01

    National estimates suggest that up to 80% of prison inmates meet diagnostic criteria for a substance use disorder. Because more substance abuse treatment while incarcerated is associated with better post-release outcomes, including a reduced risk of accidental overdose death, the stakes are high in developing novel predictors of substance abuse treatment completion in inmate populations. Using electroencephalography (EEG), this study investigated stimulus-locked ERP components elicited by distractor stimuli in three tasks (VO-Distinct, VO-Repeated, Go/NoGo) as a predictor of treatment discontinuation in a sample of male and female prison inmates. We predicted that those who discontinued treatment early would exhibit a less positive P3a amplitude elicited by distractor stimuli. Our predictions regarding ERP components were partially supported. Those who discontinued treatment early exhibited a less positive P3a amplitude and a less positive PC4 in the VO-D task. In the VO-R task, however, those who discontinued treatment early exhibited a more negative N200 amplitude rather than the hypothesized less positive P3a amplitude. The discontinuation group also displayed less positive PC4 amplitude. Surprisingly, there were no time-domain or principle component differences among the groups in the Go/NoGo task. Support Vector Machine (SVM) models of the three tasks accurately classified individuals who discontinued treatment with the best model accurately classifying 75% of inmates. PCA techniques were more sensitive in differentiating groups than the classic time-domain windowed approach. Our pattern of findings are consistent with the context-updating theory of P300 and may help identify subtypes of ultrahigh-risk substance abusers who need specialized treatment programs.

  17. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Tear Samples of Patients with Systemic Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rentka, Anikó; Hársfalvi, Jolán; Berta, András; Köröskényi, Krisztina; Szekanecz, Zoltán; Szücs, Gabriella; Szodoray, Peter; Kemény-Beke, Ádám

    2015-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is an autoimmune disease, characterized by widespread small vessel vasculopathy, immune dysregulation with production of autoantibodies, and progressive fibrosis. Changes in levels of proangiogenic cytokines had already been determined largely in serum. Our aim was to assess the levels of VEGF in human tears of patients with SSC. Forty-three patients (40 female and 3 men, mean (SD) age 61 (48-74) years) with SSc and 27 healthy controls were enrolled in this study. Basal tear sample collection and tear velocity investigations were carried out followed by an ophthalmological examination. Total protein concentrations and VEGF levels were determined in tear samples. The average collected tear fluid volume developed 10.4 μL (1.6-31.2) in patients and 15.63 μL (3.68-34.5) in control subjects. The average total protein level was 6.9 μg/μL (1.8-12.3) in tears of patients and control tears contained an average of 4.132 μg/μL (0.1-14.1) protein. In patients with SSc the average concentration of VEGF was 4.9 pg/μL (3.5-8.1) and 6.15 pg/μL (3.84-12.3) in healthy samples. Total protein production was increased because of the smaller tear volume. Decreased VEGF in tear of SSc patients can be explained also by the decreased tear secretion of patients.

  18. Molecular analysis of faecal samples from birds to identify potential crop pests and useful biocontrol agents in natural areas.

    PubMed

    King, R A; Symondson, W O C; Thomas, R J

    2015-06-01

    Wild habitats adjoining farmland are potentially valuable sources of natural enemies, but also of pests. Here we tested the utility of birds as 'sampling devices', to identify the diversity of prey available to predators and particularly to screen for pests and natural enemies using natural ecosystems as refugia. Here we used PCR to amplify prey DNA from three sympatric songbirds foraging on small invertebrates in Phragmites reedbed ecosystems, namely the Reed Warbler (Acrocephalus scirpaceus), Sedge Warbler (Acrocephalus schoenobaenus) and Cetti's Warbler (Cettia cetti). A recently described general invertebrate primer pair was used for the first time to analyse diets. Amplicons were cloned and sequenced, then identified by reference to the Barcoding of Life Database and to our own sequences obtained from fresh invertebrates. Forty-five distinct prey DNA sequences were obtained from 11 faecal samples, of which 39 could be identified to species or genus. Targeting three warbler species ensured that species-specific differences in prey choice broadened the range of prey taken. Amongst the prey found in reedbeds were major pests (including the tomato moth Lacanobia oleracea) as well as many potentially valuable natural enemies including aphidophagous hoverflies and braconid wasps. Given the mobility of birds, this approach provides a practical way of sampling a whole habitat at once, providing growers with information on possible invasion by locally resident pests and the colonization potential of natural enemies from local natural habitats.

  19. Effects of gamma irradiation on chemical composition and antioxidant potential of processed samples of the wild mushroom Macrolepiota procera.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Ângela; Barreira, João C M; Antonio, Amilcar L; Oliveira, M Beatriz P P; Martins, Anabela; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2014-04-15

    It was previously demonstrated that gamma irradiation was the processing technology with the highest capacity to maintain the chemical profile of fresh Macrolepiota procera wild mushroom, when compared to freeze-dried or oven-dried samples. Herein, it was aimed to evaluate gamma irradiation effects on processed samples. Chemical composition and antioxidant potential of irradiated (0.5 and 1 kGy) fresh, frozen and dried samples were determined by chromatographic techniques and in vitro assays, respectively. M. procera irradiation attenuated the effects caused by oven-drying or freezing; combining freeze treatment with 0.5 kGy dose preserved total tocopherols. Rather than a conservation methodology, gamma irradiation might act as a useful adjuvant to other conservation techniques (e.g., freezing or oven-drying).

  20. [Refractory cardiac arrest patients in prehospital care, potential organ donors].

    PubMed

    Le Jan, Arnaud; Dupin, Aurélie; Garrigue, Bruno; Sapir, David

    2016-09-01

    Under the authority of the French Biomedicine Agency, a new care pathway integrates refractory cardiac arrest patients into a process of organ donation. It is a medical, logistical and ethical challenge for the staff of the mobile emergency services.

  1. Nested Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling of a density functional theory potential: equilibrium thermodynamics of dense fluid nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Coe, Joshua D; Sewell, Thomas D; Shaw, M Sam

    2009-08-21

    An optimized variant of the nested Markov chain Monte Carlo [n(MC)(2)] method [J. Chem. Phys. 130, 164104 (2009)] is applied to fluid N(2). In this implementation of n(MC)(2), isothermal-isobaric (NPT) ensemble sampling on the basis of a pair potential (the "reference" system) is used to enhance the efficiency of sampling based on Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof density functional theory with a 6-31G(*) basis set (PBE6-31G(*), the "full" system). A long sequence of Monte Carlo steps taken in the reference system is converted into a trial step taken in the full system; for a good choice of reference potential, these trial steps have a high probability of acceptance. Using decorrelated samples drawn from the reference distribution, the pressure and temperature of the full system are varied such that its distribution overlaps maximally with that of the reference system. Optimized pressures and temperatures then serve as input parameters for n(MC)(2) sampling of dense fluid N(2) over a wide range of thermodynamic conditions. The simulation results are combined to construct the Hugoniot of nitrogen fluid, yielding predictions in excellent agreement with experiment.

  2. Time and temperature affect glycolysis in blood samples regardless of fluoride-based preservatives: a potential underestimation of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, Mary; Daly, Niamh; O'Kelly, Ruth; Turner, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    Background The inhibition of glycolysis prior to glucose measurement is an important consideration when interpreting glucose tolerance tests. This is particularly important in gestational diabetes mellitus where prompt diagnosis and treatment is essential. A study was planned to investigate the effect of preservatives and temperature on glycolysis. Methods Blood samples for glucose were obtained from consented females. Lithium heparin and fluoride-EDTA samples transported rapidly in ice slurry to the laboratory were analysed for glucose concentration and then held either in ice slurry or at room temperature for varying time intervals. Paired fluoride-citrate samples were received at room temperature and held at room temperature, with analysis at similar time intervals. Results No significant difference was noted between mean glucose concentrations when comparing different sample types received in ice slurry. The mean glucose concentrations decreased significantly for both sets of samples when held at room temperature (0.4 mmol/L) and in ice slurry (0.2 mmol/L). A review of patient glucose tolerance tests reported in our hospital indicated that 17.8% exceeded the recommended diagnostic criteria for gestational diabetes mellitus. It was predicted that if the results of fasting samples were revised to reflect the effect of glycolysis at room temperature, the adjusted diagnostic rate could increase to 35.3%. Conclusion Preanalytical handling of blood samples for glucose analysis is vital. Fluoride-EDTA is an imperfect antiglycolytic, even when the samples are transported and analysed rapidly provides such optimal conditions. The use of fluoride-citrate tubes may offer a viable alternative in the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus.

  3. Drug Discovery Testing Compounds in Patient Samples by Automated Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Pilar; Gorrochategui, Julián; Primo, Daniel; Robles, Alicia; Rojas, José Luis; Espinosa, Ana Belén; Gómez, Cristina; Martínez-López, Joaquín; Bennett, Teresa A; Ballesteros, Joan

    2017-06-01

    Functional ex vivo assays that predict a patient's clinical response to anticancer drugs for guiding cancer treatment have long been a goal, but few have yet proved to be reliable. To address this, we have developed an automated flow cytometry platform for drug screening that evaluates multiple endpoints with a robust data analysis system that can capture the complex mechanisms of action across different compounds. This system, called PharmaFlow, is used to test peripheral blood or bone marrow samples from patients diagnosed with hematological malignancies. Functional assays that use the whole sample, retaining all the microenvironmental components contained in the sample, offer an approach to ex vivo testing that may give results that are clinically relevant. This new approach can help to predict the patients' response to existing treatments or to drugs under development, for hematological malignancies or other tumors. In addition, relevant biomarkers can be identified that determine the patient's sensitivity, resistance, or toxicity to a given treatment. We propose that this approach, which better recapitulates the human microenvironment, constitutes a more predictive assay for personalized medicine and preclinical drug discovery.

  4. Factorial structure of the 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale in a large sample of somatoform patients.

    PubMed

    Koch, Anne Sarah; Kleiman, Alexandra; Wegener, Ingo; Zur, Berndt; Imbierowicz, Katrin; Geiser, Franziska; Conrad, Rupert

    2015-02-28

    Although a strong association between alexithymia and somatization has been postulated in numerous studies, no systematic study has investigated the psychometric properties of the 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20) in a sample of patients with somatoform disorder yet. The purpose of this study was to ensure a valid assessment by the German version of the TAS-20 in somatoform samples. We investigated whether the original three-factor model proposed by Bagby et al. (1994a), which is widely used in clinical research and practice, is replicable in a large sample of somatoform patients (n=806). Using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) the goodness-of-fit of the originally proposed factor structure was compared to three factor models generated with exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and other factorial solutions derived from the literature. Our results demonstrate that the original three-factor model is not replicable in somatoform patients. Instead, the four-factor model by Franz et al. (2001b) described the data best. However, none of the models met all criteria of confirmatory factor analysis. Our results indicate that the three-factor model is not robust in the German version of the TAS-20. At this state of research we recommend to use the TAS-20 sum-score as a measure of alexithymia in somatoform patients in clinical practice.

  5. A Degradome-Based Polymerase Chain Reaction to Resolve the Potential of Environmental Samples for 2,4-Dichlorophenol Biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Eslam S; Kashef, Mona T; Essam, Tamer M; Ramadan, Mohammed A

    2017-08-12

    A clean way to overcome environmental pollution is biodegradation. In this perspective, at the intersection of biodegradation and metagenomics, the degradome is defined as the totality of genes related to the biodegradation of a certain compound. It includes the genetic elements from both culturable and uncultured microorganisms. The possibility of assessing the biodegradation potential of an environmental samples, using a degradome-based polymerase chain reaction, was explored. 2,4-Dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) was chosen as a model and the use of tfdB gene as a biodegradation marker was confirmed by bioinformatics study of TfdB protein. Five primer pairs were designed for the detection of different tfdB gene families. A total of 16 environmental samples were collected from Egyptian agricultural soils and wastewaters and tested for the presence of 2,4-DCP. The biodegradation capacity of 2,4-DCP was determined, for all isolated consortia, to reach up to 350 mg/l. Metagenomic DNA was extracted directly from the soil samples while successive 2,4-DCP-degrading microbial communities were enriched, with increasing concentrations of 2,4-DCP, then their DNA was extracted. The extracted DNA was tested for the distribution of the tfdB gene using a degradome-based polymerase chain reaction. tfdB-1 and tfdB-2 were detected in 5 and 9 samples, respectively. However, the co-existence of both genes was detected only in five samples. All tfdB positive samples were capable of 2,4-DCP degradation. The developed approach of assessing the potential of different environments for degrading 2,4-DCP was successfully measured in terms of accuracy (81.25%) and specificity (100%).

  6. Frequency of Bacterial Samples from Patients with Chronic Acquired Nasolacrimal Duct Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Shahraki, Kourosh; Makateb, Ali; Shirzadi, Keyvan; Khosravifard, Keivan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Dacryocystitis is an infection of lacremical sac due to obstruction of nasolacrimal duct which has primary or secondary causes. Idiopathic inflammatory obstruction is the primary cause. Trauma, infection, inflammation, neoplasia, and mechanical obstruction are secondary one. Aim: The objective of this study is determination of bacterial samples from patients with chronic acquired nasolacrimal duct obstruction. Methods: This cross-sectional study was contained 90 patients with dacryocystitis from 2010 to 2011, in Besat hospital. Convenience sampling in sterile condition sampling was performed by sterile swab from the pus out of the lacrimal sac. Blood agar, EMB, chocolate agar, and thioglycolate broth were used for bacterial cultivation. Various antibiotics were used for antibiotic resistance study. Finally, statistical analysis was done by SPSS ver. 15. Results: In this study, the mean age of participants was 49.36 ± 12.18 years. Number of male and female patients was equal and Sampling was performed in 53.3% of patients from the right eye. The most frequent bacteria were Staphylococcus, E. coli, and Enterobacteriaceae, respectively. Also, our results show most of bacteria obtained from patients eye pus are sensitive to chloramphenicol and the most antibiotic resistance was for co-trimoxazole. Conclusion: Our results illustrated gram-positive bacteria have an important role in dacryocystitis which is confirm previous studies. Although our results indicated chloramphenicol is the best choice for treatment process, but it is notable due to the variety of bacteria which can cause this disease, identification of bacterial contamination can be a great help to choose the best treatment process. PMID:28210015

  7. Potential role for retinoic acid in patients with Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Pecori Giraldi, Francesca; Ambrogio, Alberto Giacinto; Andrioli, Massimiliano; Sanguin, Francesca; Karamouzis, Ioannis; Karamouzis, Iannis; Corsello, Salvatore Maria; Scaroni, Carla; Arvat, Emanuela; Pontecorvi, Alfredo; Pontercorvi, Alfredo; Cavagnini, Francesco

    2012-10-01

    Cushing's disease, i.e. cortisol excess due to an ACTH-secreting pituitary adenoma, is a rare disorder with considerable morbidity and mortality but no satisfactory medical treatment as yet. Experimental data have recently shown that retinoic acid restrains ACTH secretion by tumoral corticotropes. Our objective was to evaluate the efficacy and safety profile of retinoic acid treatment in patients with Cushing's disease. This is a prospective, multicenter study. Seven patients with Cushing's disease (three men, four postmenopausal women) were started on 10 mg retinoic acid daily and dosage increased up to 80 mg daily for 6-12 months. ACTH, urinary free cortisol (UFC), and serum cortisol as well as clinical features of hypercortisolism and possible side effects of retinoic acid were evaluated at baseline, during retinoic acid administration, and after drug withdrawal. A marked decrease in UFC levels was observed in five patients; mean UFC levels on retinoic acid were 22-73% of baseline values and normalization in UFC was achieved in three patients. Plasma ACTH decreased in the first month of treatment and then returned to pretreatment levels in responsive patients whereas no clear-cut pattern could be detected for serum cortisol. Blood pressure, glycemia, and signs of hypercortisolism, e.g. body weight and facial plethora, were ameliorated to a variable extent on treatment. Patients reported only mild adverse effects, e.g. xerophthalmia and arthralgias. Long-term treatment with retinoic acid proved beneficial and well tolerated in five of seven patients with Cushing's disease. This represents a novel, promising approach to medical treatment in Cushing's disease.

  8. Isolation and characterization of cardiogenic, stem-like cardiac precursors from heart samples of patients with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Ghazizadeh, Zaniar; Vahdat, Sadaf; Fattahi, Faranak; Fonoudi, Hananeh; Omrani, Gholamreza; Gholampour, Maziar; Aghdami, Nasser

    2015-09-15

    Regenerative therapies based on resident human cardiac progenitor cells (hCPCs) are a promising alternative to medical treatments for patients with myocardial infarction. However, hCPCs are rare in human heart and finding efficient source and proper surface marker for isolation of these cells would make them a good candidate for therapy. We have isolated 5.34∗10(6)±2.04∗10(5)/g viable cells from 35 heart tissue samples of 23 patients with congenital heart disease obtained during their heart surgery along with 6 samples from 3 normal subjects during cardiac biopsy. According to FACS analysis, younger ages, atrial specimen and disease with increased pulmonary vascular resistance were associated with higher percentage of c-kit(+) (CD117) hCPCs. Analysis for other stemness markers revealed increased CD133(+) cells in the hearts of patients with congenital heart disease. By using both immune-labeling and PCR, we demonstrated that these cells express key cardiac lineage and endothelial transcription factors and structural proteins during in vitro differentiation and do express stemness transcription factors in undifferentiated state. Another novel datum of potentially relevant interest is their ability in promoting greater myocardial regeneration and better survival in rat model of myocardial infarction following transplantation. Our results could provide evidence for conditions associated with enriched hCPCs in patients with congenital heart disease. Moreover, we showed presence of a significant number of CD133 expressing cardiogenic stem-like cardiac precursors in the heart of patients with congenital heart disease, which could be isolated and stored for future regenerative therapies in these patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Usefulness of real time PCR to quantify parasite load in serum samples from chronic Chagas disease patients.

    PubMed

    Melo, Myllena F; Moreira, Otacilio C; Tenório, Priscila; Lorena, Virginia; Lorena-Rezende, Izaura; Júnior, Wilson Oliveira; Gomes, Yara; Britto, Constança

    2015-03-12

    for both samples. Taken together, our data indicate the potential of using serum samples for molecular diagnosis and parasite load quantification by qPCR, suggesting its use in reference laboratories for the diagnosis of Chagas disease patients.

  10. Colonization potential to reconstitute a microbe community in patients detected early after fecal microbe transplant for recurrent C. difficile.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ranjit; Maynard, Craig L; Eipers, Peter; Goldsmith, Kelly T; Ptacek, Travis; Grubbs, J Aaron; Dixon, Paula; Howard, Donna; Crossman, David K; Crowley, Michael R; Benjamin, William H; Lefkowitz, Elliot J; Weaver, Casey T; Rodriguez, J Martin; Morrow, Casey D

    2016-01-13

    Fecal microbiota transplants (FMT) are an effective treatment for patients with gut microbe dysbiosis suffering from recurrent C. difficile infections. To further understand how FMT reconstitutes the patient's gut commensal microbiota, we have analyzed the colonization potential of the donor, recipient and recipient post transplant fecal samples using transplantation in gnotobiotic mice. A total of nine samples from three human donors, recipient's pre and post FMT were transplanted into gnotobiotic mice. Microbiome analysis of three donor fecal samples revealed the presence of a high relative abundance of commensal microbes from the family Bacteriodaceae and Lachnospiraceae that were almost absent in the three recipient pre FMT fecal samples (<0.01%). The microbe composition in gnotobiotic mice transplanted with the donor fecal samples was similar to the human samples. The recipient samples contained Enterobacteriaceae, Lactobacillaceae, Enterococcaceae in relative abundance of 43, 11, 8%, respectively. However, gnotobiotic mice transplanted with the recipient fecal samples had an average relative abundance of unclassified Clostridiales of 55%, approximately 7000 times the abundance in the recipient fecal samples prior to transplant. Microbiome analysis of fecal samples from the three patients early (2-4 weeks) after FMT revealed a microbe composition with the relative abundance of both Bacteriodaceae and Lachnospiraceae that was approximately 7% of that of the donor. In contrast, gnotobioitc mice transplanted with the fecal samples obtained from the three at early times post FMT revealed increases in the relative abundance of Bacteriodaceae and Lachnospiraceae microbe compositions to levels similar to the donor fecal samples. Furthermore, the unclassified Clostridiales in the recipient samples post FMT was reduced to an average of 10%. We have used transplantation into gnotobiotic mice to evaluate the colonization potential of microbiota in FMT patients early

  11. Target weight achievement and ultrafiltration rate thresholds: potential patient implications.

    PubMed

    Flythe, Jennifer E; Assimon, Magdalene M; Overman, Robert A

    2017-06-02

    Higher ultrafiltration (UF) rates and extracellular hypo- and hypervolemia are associated with adverse outcomes among maintenance hemodialysis patients. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services recently considered UF rate and target weight achievement measures for ESRD Quality Incentive Program inclusion. The dual measures were intended to promote balance between too aggressive and too conservative fluid removal. The National Quality Forum endorsed the UF rate measure but not the target weight measure. We examined the proposed target weight measure and quantified weight gains if UF rate thresholds were applied without treatment time (TT) extension or interdialytic weight gain (IDWG) reduction. Data were taken from the 2012 database of a large dialysis organization. Analyses considered 152,196 United States hemodialysis patients. We described monthly patient and dialysis facility target weight achievement patterns and examined differences in patient characteristics across target weight achievement status and differences in facilities across target weight measure scores. We computed the cumulative, theoretical 1-month fluid-related weight gain that would occur if UF rates were capped at 13 mL/h/kg without concurrent TT extension or IDWG reduction. Target weight achievement patterns were stable over the year. Patients who did not achieve target weight (post-dialysis weight ≥ 1 kg above or below target weight) tended to be younger, black and dialyze via catheter, and had shorter dialysis vintage, greater body weight, higher UF rate and more missed treatments compared with patients who achieved target weight. Facilities had, on average, 27.1 ± 9.7% of patients with average post-dialysis weight ≥ 1 kg above or below the prescribed target weight. In adjusted analyses, facilities located in the midwest and south and facilities with higher proportions of black and Hispanic patients and higher proportions of patients with shorter TTs were more likely to

  12. Urine sampling techniques in symptomatic primary-care patients: a diagnostic accuracy review.

    PubMed

    Holm, Anne; Aabenhus, Rune

    2016-06-08

    Choice of urine sampling technique in urinary tract infection may impact diagnostic accuracy and thus lead to possible over- or undertreatment. Currently no evidencebased consensus exists regarding correct sampling technique of urine from women with symptoms of urinary tract infection in primary care. The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of urine culture from different sampling-techniques in symptomatic non-pregnant women in primary care. A systematic review was conducted by searching Medline and Embase for clinical studies conducted in primary care using a randomized or paired design to compare the result of urine culture obtained with two or more collection techniques in adult, female, non-pregnant patients with symptoms of urinary tract infection. We evaluated quality of the studies and compared accuracy based on dichotomized outcomes. We included seven studies investigating urine sampling technique in 1062 symptomatic patients in primary care. Mid-stream-clean-catch had a positive predictive value of 0.79 to 0.95 and a negative predictive value close to 1 compared to sterile techniques. Two randomized controlled trials found no difference in infection rate between mid-stream-clean-catch, mid-stream-urine and random samples. At present, no evidence suggests that sampling technique affects the accuracy of the microbiological diagnosis in non-pregnant women with symptoms of urinary tract infection in primary care. However, the evidence presented is in-direct and the difference between mid-stream-clean-catch, mid-stream-urine and random samples remains to be investigated in a paired design to verify the present findings.

  13. Antibiotic activity and concentrations in clinical samples from patients with chronic bacterial prostatitis.

    PubMed

    Heras-Cañas, V; Gutiérrez-Soto, B; Almonte-Fernández, H; Lara-Oya, A; Navarro-Marí, J M; Garrido-Frenich, A; Vázquez-Alonso, F; Gutiérrez-Fernández, J

    2017-06-19

    Chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP) is the most common urological disease in patients younger than 50 years, whose long-standing symptoms could be related to an inappropriate therapeutic regimen. The objective was to analyse the sensitivity of microorganisms isolated from patients with CBP and measure the weekly antibiotic concentrations in serum, semen and urine. For the antibiotic sensitivity study, 60 clinical isolates were included between January 2013 and December 2014 from semen samples from patients with microbiologically confirmed CBP. Broth microdilution was performed on the samples. For the antibiotic concentration study from January to May 2014, urine, blood and semen samples were collected weekly, over 4 weeks of treatment from 8 patients with positive cultures for CBP. The concentrations were measured using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). The antibiotics fosfomycin and nitrofurantoin had the highest activity (95.2% in both cases). The mean antibiotic concentrations in semen during the 4 weeks studied were as follows: 1.68mg/L, 8.30mg/L, 2.61mg/L, 0.33mg/L and 2.90mg/L, respectively, for patients 1 to 5, who were treated with levofloxacin; 1.625mg/L for patient 6, who was treated with ciprofloxacin; 2.67mg/L for patient 7, who was treated with ampicillin; and 1.05mg/L for patient 8, who was treated with doxycycline. Higher concentrations were obtained in the urine samples than in serum and semen, the latter 2 of which were comparable. Fosfomycin is proposed as the primary alternative to the empiric treatment of CBP due to its high in vitro activity. The antibiotic concentration in semen was higher than the minimal inhibitory concentration against the aetiological agent, although microbiological negativisation was not always correlated with a favourable clinical outcome. Copyright © 2017 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Norovirus GII.4 Detection in Environmental Samples from Patient Rooms during Nosocomial Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Hannoun, Charles; Svensson, Lennart; Torén, Kjell; Andersson, Lars-Magnus; Westin, Johan; Bergström, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Norovirus (NoV) is an important cause of nosocomial gastroenteric outbreaks. This 5-month study was designed to characterize NoV contamination and airborne dispersal in patient rooms during hospital outbreaks. Air vents, overbed tables, washbasins, dust, and virus traps designed to collect charged particles from the air were swabbed to investigate the possibility of NoV contamination in patient rooms during outbreaks in seven wards and in an outbreak-free ward. Symptomatic inpatients were also sampled. Nucleic acid extracts of the samples were examined for NoV RNA using genogroup I (GI) and GII real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). The NoV strains were characterized by RT-PCR, sequencing, and phylogenetic analysis of the RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase-N/S capsid-coding region (1,040 nucleotides [nt]). Patient strains from two outbreaks in one ward were sequenced across the RNA-dependent-RNA-polymerase major capsid-coding region (2.5 kb), including the hypervariable P2 domain. In the outbreak wards, NoV GII was detected in 48 of 101 (47%) environmental swabs and 63 of 108 patients (58%); NoV genotype II.4 was sequenced from 18 environmental samples, dust (n = 8), virus traps (n = 4), surfaces (n = 6), and 56 patients. In contrast, NoV GII was detected in 2 (GII.4) of 28 (7%) environmental samples and in 2 (GII.6 and GII.4) of 17 patients in the outbreak-free ward. Sequence analyses revealed a high degree of similarity (>99.5%, 1,040 nt) between NoV GII.4 environmental and patient strains from a given ward at a given time. The strains clustered on 11 subbranches of the phylogenetic tree, with strong correlations to time and place. The high nucleotide similarity between the NoV GII.4 strains from patients and their hospital room environment provided molecular evidence of GII.4 dispersal in the air and dust; therefore, interventional cleaning studies are justified. PMID:24759712

  15. Norovirus GII.4 detection in environmental samples from patient rooms during nosocomial outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Nenonen, Nancy P; Hannoun, Charles; Svensson, Lennart; Torén, Kjell; Andersson, Lars-Magnus; Westin, Johan; Bergström, Tomas

    2014-07-01

    Norovirus (NoV) is an important cause of nosocomial gastroenteric outbreaks. This 5-month study was designed to characterize NoV contamination and airborne dispersal in patient rooms during hospital outbreaks. Air vents, overbed tables, washbasins, dust, and virus traps designed to collect charged particles from the air were swabbed to investigate the possibility of NoV contamination in patient rooms during outbreaks in seven wards and in an outbreak-free ward. Symptomatic inpatients were also sampled. Nucleic acid extracts of the samples were examined for NoV RNA using genogroup I (GI) and GII real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). The NoV strains were characterized by RT-PCR, sequencing, and phylogenetic analysis of the RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase-N/S capsid-coding region (1,040 nucleotides [nt]). Patient strains from two outbreaks in one ward were sequenced across the RNA-dependent-RNA-polymerase major capsid-coding region (2.5 kb), including the hypervariable P2 domain. In the outbreak wards, NoV GII was detected in 48 of 101 (47%) environmental swabs and 63 of 108 patients (58%); NoV genotype II.4 was sequenced from 18 environmental samples, dust (n = 8), virus traps (n = 4), surfaces (n = 6), and 56 patients. In contrast, NoV GII was detected in 2 (GII.4) of 28 (7%) environmental samples and in 2 (GII.6 and GII.4) of 17 patients in the outbreak-free ward. Sequence analyses revealed a high degree of similarity (>99.5%, 1,040 nt) between NoV GII.4 environmental and patient strains from a given ward at a given time. The strains clustered on 11 subbranches of the phylogenetic tree, with strong correlations to time and place. The high nucleotide similarity between the NoV GII.4 strains from patients and their hospital room environment provided molecular evidence of GII.4 dispersal in the air and dust; therefore, interventional cleaning studies are justified. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Potential pitfall of DMSA scintigraphy in patients with ureteral duplication

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, F.; Snow, B.; Taylor, A. Jr.

    1986-07-01

    A 5-wk-old male presented with radiographic findings of a duplicated collecting system. A (/sup 99m/Tc)DMSA scan was requested to evaluate cortical function. Images obtained immediately. postinjection showed activity restricted to the upper poles; in contrast, delayed images at 4 hr showed activity in the bladder and throughout both kidneys. Catheterizing the patient drained the activity from the bladder but had little effect on the refluxed renal activity. The early (/sup 99m/Tc)DMSA images were critical in making the proper interpretation. Technetium-99m DMSA is excreted into the urine and this fact needs to be considered when interpreting scans of patients with possible reflux or obstruction. When DMSA scans are obtained in pediatric patients with possible reflux, catheterization prior to the study and early images prior to the appearance of DMSA in the collecting system are recommended.

  17. Metabolic profiling of serum samples by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a potential diagnostic approach for septic shock.

    PubMed

    Mickiewicz, Beata; Duggan, Gavin E; Winston, Brent W; Doig, Christopher; Kubes, Paul; Vogel, Hans J

    2014-05-01

    To determine whether a nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics approach can be useful for the early diagnosis and prognosis of septic shock in ICUs. Laboratory-based study. University research laboratory. Serum samples from septic shock patients and ICU controls (ICU patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome but not suspected of having an infection) were collected within 24 hours of admittance to the ICU. None. H nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of septic shock and ICU control samples were analyzed and quantified using a targeted profiling approach. By applying multivariate statistical analysis (e.g., orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis), we were able to distinguish the patient groups and detect specific metabolic patterns. Some of the metabolites were found to have a significant impact on the separation between septic shock and control samples. These metabolites could be interpreted in terms of a biological human response to septic shock and they might serve as a biomarker pattern for septic shock in ICUs. Additionally, nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics was evaluated in order to detect metabolic variation between septic shock survivors and nonsurvivors and to predict patient outcome. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve indicated an excellent predictive ability for the constructed orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis models (septic shock vs ICU controls: area under the receiver operating characteristic curve = 0.98; nonsurvivors vs survivors: area under the receiver operating characteristic curve = 1). Our results indicate that nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolic profiling could be used for diagnosis and mortality prediction of septic shock in the ICU.

  18. [Patient identification errors and biological samples in the analytical process: Is it possible to improve patient safety?].

    PubMed

    Cuadrado-Cenzual, M A; García Briñón, M; de Gracia Hills, Y; González Estecha, M; Collado Yurrita, L; de Pedro Moro, J A; Fernández Pérez, C; Arroyo Fernández, M

    2015-01-01

    Patient identification errors and biological samples are one of the problems with the highest risk factor in causing an adverse event in the patient. To detect and analyse the causes of patient identification errors in analytical requests (PIEAR) from emergency departments, and to develop improvement strategies. A process and protocol was designed, to be followed by all professionals involved in the requesting and performing of laboratory tests. Evaluation and monitoring indicators of PIEAR were determined, before and after the implementation of these improvement measures (years 2010-2014). A total of 316 PIEAR were detected in a total of 483,254 emergency service requests during the study period, representing a mean of 6.80/10,000 requests. Patient identification failure was the most frequent in all the 6-monthly periods assessed, with a significant difference (P<.0001). The improvement strategies applied showed to be effective in detecting PIEAR, as well as the prevention of such errors. However, we must continue working with this strategy, promoting a culture of safety for all the professionals involved, and trying to achieve the goal that 100% of the analytical and samples are properly identified. Copyright © 2015 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Use and need for psychosocial support in cancer patients: a population-based sample of patients with minor children.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Johanna Christine; Beierlein, Volker; Romer, Georg; Möller, Birgit; Koch, Uwe; Bergelt, Corinna

    2013-06-15

    Cancer patients and their minor children have been shown to experience psychological distress. The objectives of the current study were to 1) describe the need for and use of psychosocial support and 2) determine predictors of family-centered support use in patients with minor children. A population-based sample of 1809 patients was recruited via 2 cancer registries. The eligibility criteria were age 25 years to 55 years, an initial diagnosis received no longer than 6 years before this survey, and having at least 1 minor child. Medical characteristics and self-report measures were used. Overall, approximately 38% cases were identified as being borderline or probable anxiety cases and 16% were identified as being borderline or probable depression cases. Since diagnosis, 44% of the patients had used psychosocial support and 9% had received family-focused and child-focused support. These patients perceived a lower quality of life and poorer family functioning. Approximately 73% of patients with children wanted information concerning or psychosocial services to support their children or parenting. Use of family-centered support was not found to be predicted by disease-related factors (eg, cancer staging) but rather by subjective needs (eg, mental health and having a distressed child in the family). The results of the current study emphasize the importance of child and parenting concerns in psychosocial care in oncology. Screenings for children and appropriate training programs for health care may increase awareness of this issue. Copyright © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  20. Intestinal pseudo-obstruction in patients with systemic sclerosis: an analysis of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Antonia; Li, Shufeng; Becker, Laren; Fernandez-Becker, Nielsen; Khanna, Dinesh; Nguyen, Linda; Chung, Lorinda

    2016-04-01

    Intestinal pseudo-obstruction is a rare gastrointestinal complication in patients with SSc without large studies examining its prevalence or outcomes. We aimed to compare outcomes in SSc patients with intestinal pseudo-obstruction to patients with intestinal pseudo-obstruction secondary to other causes, and SSc patients without intestinal pseudo-obstruction. This is a case-control study using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Nationwide Inpatient Sample for the period 2002-2011. We included patients with the previously validated International Classification of Diseases-Clinical Modification-9 code 710.1 for SSc in combination with codes for intestinal pseudo-obstruction, and determined length of hospitalization and the risks for surgical procedures, use of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and in-hospital mortality. A total of 193 610 SSc hospitalizations occurred in the USA between 2002 and 2011, of which 5.4% (n = 10 386) were associated with a concurrent intestinal pseudo-obstruction diagnosis (cases). In-hospital mortality was 7.3%. In multivariate analyses, cases were more likely to die during the inpatient stay and to receive TPN than patients with idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (control group 1), patients with intestinal pseudo-obstruction and diabetes (control group 2), and SSc patients without intestinal pseudo-obstruction (control group 3). Cases had longer in-hospital stay than control groups 2 and 3, and were less likely to undergo surgical procedures than control groups 1 and 2. Intestinal pseudo-obstruction is a rare cause of hospitalization in patients with SSc, but is associated with high in-hospital mortality in comparison with other SSc patients and those with intestinal pseudo-obstruction secondary to other causes. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology 2015. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  1. Disease management programs for CKD patients: the potential and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Rocco, Michael V

    2009-03-01

    Disease management describes the use of a number of approaches to identify and treat patients with chronic health conditions, especially those that are expensive to treat. Disease management programs have grown rapidly in the United States in the past several years. These programs have been established for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), but some have been discontinued because of the high cost of the program. Disease management programs for CKD face unique challenges. Identification of patients with CKD is hampered by incomplete use of the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes for CKD by physicians and the less than universal use of estimated glomerular filtration rate from serum creatinine measurements to identify patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2). CKD affects multiple organ systems. Thus, a comprehensive disease management program will need to manage each of these aspects of CKD. These multiple interventions likely will make a CKD disease management program more costly than similar disease management programs designed for patients with diabetes mellitus, congestive heart failure, or other chronic diseases. The lack of data that can be used to develop effective disease management programs in CKD makes it difficult to determine goals for the management of each organ system affected by CKD. Finally, long periods of observation will be needed to determine whether a particular disease management program is effective in not only improving patient outcomes, but also decreasing both resource use and health care dollars. This long-term observation period is contrary to how most disease management contracts are written, which usually are based on meeting goals during a 1- to 3-year period. Until these challenges are resolved, it likely will be difficult to maintain effective disease management programs for CKD.

  2. Fast patient-specific Monte Carlo brachytherapy dose calculations via the correlated sampling variance reduction technique

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, Andrew; Le, Yi; Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate potential of correlated sampling Monte Carlo (CMC) simulation to improve the calculation efficiency for permanent seed brachytherapy (PSB) implants without loss of accuracy. Methods: CMC was implemented within an in-house MC code family (PTRAN) and used to compute 3D dose distributions for two patient cases: a clinical PSB postimplant prostate CT imaging study and a simulated post lumpectomy breast PSB implant planned on a screening dedicated breast cone-beam CT patient exam. CMC tallies the dose difference, ΔD, between highly correlated histories in homogeneous and heterogeneous geometries. The heterogeneous geometry histories were derived from photon collisions sampled in a geometrically identical but purely homogeneous medium geometry, by altering their particle weights to correct for bias. The prostate case consisted of 78 Model-6711 125I seeds. The breast case consisted of 87 Model-200 103Pd seeds embedded around a simulated lumpectomy cavity. Systematic and random errors in CMC were unfolded using low-uncertainty uncorrelated MC (UMC) as the benchmark. CMC efficiency gains, relative to UMC, were computed for all voxels, and the mean was classified in regions that received minimum doses greater than 20%, 50%, and 90% of D90, as well as for various anatomical regions. Results: Systematic errors in CMC relative to UMC were less than 0.6% for 99% of the voxels and 0.04% for 100% of the voxels for the prostate and breast cases, respectively. For a 1 × 1 × 1 mm3 dose grid, efficiency gains were realized in all structures with 38.1- and 59.8-fold average gains within the prostate and breast clinical target volumes (CTVs), respectively. Greater than 99% of the voxels within the prostate and breast CTVs experienced an efficiency gain. Additionally, it was shown that efficiency losses were confined to low dose regions while the largest gains were located where little difference exists between the homogeneous and heterogeneous doses

  3. Impaired PLP-dependent metabolism in brain samples from Huntington disease patients and transgenic R6/1 mice.

    PubMed

    Sorolla, M Alba; Rodríguez-Colman, María José; Vall-Llaura, Núria; Vived, Celia; Fernández-Nogales, Marta; Lucas, José J; Ferrer, Isidre; Cabiscol, Elisa

    2016-06-01

    Oxidative stress has been described as important to Huntington disease (HD) progression. In a previous HD study, we identified several carbonylated proteins, including pyridoxal kinase and antiquitin, both of which are involved in the metabolism of pyridoxal 5´-phosphate (PLP), the active form of vitamin B6. In the present study, pyridoxal kinase levels were quantified and showed to be decreased both in HD patients and a R6/1 mouse model, compared to control samples. A metabolomic analysis was used to analyze metabolites in brain samples of HD patients and R6/1 mice, compared to control samples using mass spectrometry. This technique allowed detection of increased concentrations of pyridoxal, the substrate of pyridoxal kinase. In addition, PLP, the product of the reaction, was decreased in striatum from R6/1 mice. Furthermore, glutamate and cystathionine, both substrates of PLP-dependent enzymes were increased in HD. This reinforces the hypothesis that PLP synthesis is impaired, and could explain some alterations observed in the disease. Together, these results identify PLP as a potential therapeutic agent.

  4. Spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK) is a potential target for the treatment of cutaneous lupus erythematosus patients.

    PubMed

    Braegelmann, Christine; Hölzel, Michael; Ludbrook, Valerie; Dickson, Marion; Turan, Nil; Ferring-Schmitt, Sandra; Sternberg, Sonja; Bieber, Thomas; Kuhn, Annegret; Wenzel, Joerg

    2016-05-01

    Spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK) is a protein kinase involved in cell proliferation and the regulation of inflammatory pathways. Due to the increasing evidence that kinase inhibitors have potential as specific anti-inflammatory drugs, we have investigated the potential for SYK inhibition as a therapeutic target in autoimmune diseases, particularly cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE). Skin samples of patients with different CLE subtypes and appropriate controls were analysed for the expression of SYK and SYK-associated pro-inflammatory mediators via gene expression analysis and immunohistochemistry. The functional role of SYK in keratinocytes was investigated in vitro, using LE-typical pro-inflammatory stimuli and a selective inhibitor of SYK. SYK-associated genes are strongly upregulated in CLE skin lesions. Importantly, phosphorylated SYK (pSYK) is strongly expressed by several immune cell types and also keratinocytes in CLE skin. In vitro, immunostimulatory nucleic acids are capable of inducing SYK phosphorylation in keratinocytes leading to the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines, while small-molecule SYK inhibition decreases the expression of these proteins. The results demonstrate that pSYK is expressed by immune cells and keratinocytes in skin lesions of CLE patients. LE-typical stimuli induce the expression of pSYK in vitro. Small-molecule SYK inhibition leads to a reduction of pSYK expression and downregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines in keratinocytes. We therefore believe that pSYK provides a potential future drug target for the treatment of patients who suffer from CLE and related skin disorders. Specifically, our study reveals evidence supporting the use of topical SYK inhibitors in treating lupus.

  5. Interaction potentials of anisotropic nanocrystals from the trajectory sampling of particle motion using in situ liquid phase transmission electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Qian; Cho, Hoduk; Manthiram, Karthish; ...

    2015-03-23

    We demonstrate a generalizable strategy to use the relative trajectories of pairs and groups of nanocrystals, and potentially other nanoscale objects, moving in solution which can now be obtained by in situ liquid phase transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to determine the interaction potentials between nanocrystals. Such nanoscale interactions are crucial for collective behaviors and applications of synthetic nanocrystals and natural biomolecules, but have been very challenging to measure in situ at nanometer or sub-nanometer resolution. Here we use liquid phase TEM to extract the mathematical form of interaction potential between nanocrystals from their sampled trajectories. We show the power ofmore » this approach to reveal unanticipated features of nanocrystal–nanocrystal interactions by examining the anisotropic interaction potential between charged rod-shaped Au nanocrystals (Au nanorods); these Au nanorods assemble, in a tip-to-tip fashion in the liquid phase, in contrast to the well-known side-by-side arrangements commonly observed for drying-mediated assembly. These observations can be explained by a long-range and highly anisotropic electrostatic repulsion that leads to the tip-selective attachment. As a result, Au nanorods stay unassembled at a lower ionic strength, as the electrostatic repulsion is even longer-ranged. Our study not only provides a mechanistic understanding of the process by which metallic nanocrystals assemble but also demonstrates a method that can potentially quantify and elucidate a broad range of nanoscale interactions relevant to nanotechnology and biophysics.« less

  6. Interaction Potentials of Anisotropic Nanocrystals from the Trajectory Sampling of Particle Motion using in Situ Liquid Phase Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a generalizable strategy to use the relative trajectories of pairs and groups of nanocrystals, and potentially other nanoscale objects, moving in solution which can now be obtained by in situ liquid phase transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to determine the interaction potentials between nanocrystals. Such nanoscale interactions are crucial for collective behaviors and applications of synthetic nanocrystals and natural biomolecules, but have been very challenging to measure in situ at nanometer or sub-nanometer resolution. Here we use liquid phase TEM to extract the mathematical form of interaction potential between nanocrystals from their sampled trajectories. We show the power of this approach to reveal unanticipated features of nanocrystal–nanocrystal interactions by examining the anisotropic interaction potential between charged rod-shaped Au nanocrystals (Au nanorods); these Au nanorods assemble, in a tip-to-tip fashion in the liquid phase, in contrast to the well-known side-by-side arrangements commonly observed for drying-mediated assembly. These observations can be explained by a long-range and highly anisotropic electrostatic repulsion that leads to the tip-selective attachment. As a result, Au nanorods stay unassembled at a lower ionic strength, as the electrostatic repulsion is even longer-ranged. Our study not only provides a mechanistic understanding of the process by which metallic nanocrystals assemble but also demonstrates a method that can potentially quantify and elucidate a broad range of nanoscale interactions relevant to nanotechnology and biophysics. PMID:27162944

  7. Informatics-guided procurement of patient samples for biomarker discovery projects in cancer research.

    PubMed

    Suh, K Stephen; Remache, Yvonne K; Patel, Jalpa S; Chen, Steve H; Haystrand, Russell; Ford, Peggy; Shaikh, Anadil M; Wang, Jian; Goy, Andre H

    2009-02-01

    Modern cancer research for biomarker discovery program requires solving several tasks that are directly involved with patient sample procurement. One requirement is to construct a highly efficient workflow on the clinical side for the procurement to generate a consistent supply of high quality samples for research. This undertaking needs a network of interdepartmental collaborations and participations at various levels, including physical human interactions, information technology implementations and a bioinformatics tool that is highly effective and user-friendly to busy clinicians and researchers associated with the sample procurement. Collegial participation that is sequential but continual from one department to another demands dedicated bioinformatics software coordinating between the institutional clinic and the tissue repository facility. Participants in the process include admissions, consenting process, phlebotomy, surgery center and pathology. During this multiple step procedures, clinical data are collected for detailed analytical endpoints to supplement logistics of defining and validating the discovery of biomarkers.

  8. Viability of lymph node samples obtained by echobronchoscopy in the study of epigenetic alterations in patients with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Leiro-Fernández, Virginia; De Chiara, Loretta; Botana-Rial, Maribel; González-Piñeiro, Ana; Tardio-Baiges, Antoni; Núñez-Delgado, Manuel; Valverde Pérez, Diana; Fernández-Villar, Alberto

    2014-06-01

    The diagnosis of microscopic lymph node metastasis in lung cancer is challenging despite the constant advances in tumor staging. The analysis of the methylation status of certain genes in lymph node samples could improve the diagnostic capability of conventional cyto-histological methods. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of methylation studies using cytological lymph node samples. Prospective study including 88 patients with a diagnosis or strong suspicion of non-small cell lung cancer, in which an echobronchoscopy was performed on mediastinal or hilar lymph nodes for diagnostic and/or staging. DNA was extracted from cytological lymph node samples and sodium bisulfite modification was performed. Methylation studies for p16/INK4a and SHOX2 were accomplished by MS-qPCR and pyrosequencing. The methodology used in our study yielded optimal/good DNA quality in 90% of the cases. No differences in DNA concentration were observed with respect to the lymph node biopsied and final diagnosis. Methylation analyses using MS-qPCR and pyrosequencing were not possible in a small number of samples mainly due to low DNA concentration, inadequate purity, fragmentation and/or degradation as a consequence of bisulfite conversion. Methylation quantification using MS-qPCR and pyrosequencing of cytological lymph node samples obtained using echobronchoscopy is feasible if an appropriate DNA concentration is obtained, notably contributing to the identification of epigenetic biomarkers capable of improving decision-making for the benefit of potentially curable lung cancer patients. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Automated Device for Asynchronous Extraction of RNA, DNA, or Protein Biomarkers from Surrogate Patient Samples.

    PubMed

    Bitting, Anna L; Bordelon, Hali; Baglia, Mark L; Davis, Keersten M; Creecy, Amy E; Short, Philip A; Albert, Laura E; Karhade, Aditya V; Wright, David W; Haselton, Frederick R; Adams, Nicholas M

    2016-12-01

    Many biomarker-based diagnostic methods are inhibited by nontarget molecules in patient samples, necessitating biomarker extraction before detection. We have developed a simple device that purifies RNA, DNA, or protein biomarkers from complex biological samples without robotics or fluid pumping. The device design is based on functionalized magnetic beads, which capture biomarkers and remove background biomolecules by magnetically transferring the beads through processing solutions arrayed within small-diameter tubing. The process was automated by wrapping the tubing around a disc-like cassette and rotating it past a magnet using a programmable motor. This device recovered biomarkers at ~80% of the operator-dependent extraction method published previously. The device was validated by extracting biomarkers from a panel of surrogate patient samples containing clinically relevant concentrations of (1) influenza A RNA in nasal swabs, (2) Escherichia coli DNA in urine, (3) Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA in sputum, and (4) Plasmodium falciparum protein and DNA in blood. The device successfully extracted each biomarker type from samples representing low levels of clinically relevant infectivity (i.e., 7.3 copies/µL of influenza A RNA, 405 copies/µL of E. coli DNA, 0.22 copies/µL of TB DNA, 167 copies/µL of malaria parasite DNA, and 2.7 pM of malaria parasite protein). © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  10. Profiling the clinical presentation of diagnostic characteristics of a sample of symptomatic TMD patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients might present a number of concurrent clinical diagnoses that may be clustered according to their similarity. Profiling patients’ clinical presentations can be useful for better understanding the behavior of TMD and for providing appropriate treatment planning. The aim of this study was to simultaneously classify symptomatic patients diagnosed with a variety of subtypes of TMD into homogenous groups based on their clinical presentation and occurrence of comorbidities. Methods Clinical records of 357 consecutive TMD patients seeking treatment in a private specialized clinic were included in the study sample. Patients presenting multiple subtypes of TMD diagnosed simultaneously were categorized according to the AAOP criteria. Descriptive statistics and two-step cluster analysis were used to characterize the clinical presentation of these patients based on the primary and secondary clinical diagnoses. Results The most common diagnoses were localized masticatory muscle pain (n = 125) and disc displacement without reduction (n = 104). Comorbidity was identified in 288 patients. The automatic selection of an optimal number of clusters included 100% of cases, generating an initial 6-cluster solution and a final 4-cluster solution. The interpretation of within-group ranking of the importance of variables in the clustering solutions resulted in the following characterization of clusters: chronic facial pain (n = 36), acute muscle pain (n = 125), acute articular pain (n = 75) and chronic articular impairment (n = 121). Conclusion Subgroups of acute and chronic TMD patients seeking treatment can be identified using clustering methods to provide a better understanding of the clinical presentation of TMD when multiple diagnosis are present. Classifying patients into identifiable symptomatic profiles would help clinicians to estimate how common a disorder is within a population of TMD patients and

  11. Palliative Care for Hospitalized Patients With Stroke: Results From the 2010 to 2012 National Inpatient Sample.

    PubMed

    Singh, Tarvinder; Peters, Steven R; Tirschwell, David L; Creutzfeldt, Claire J

    2017-09-01

    Substantial variability exists in the use of life-prolonging treatments for patients with stroke, especially near the end of life. This study explores patterns of palliative care utilization and death in hospitalized patients with stroke across the United States. Using the 2010 to 2012 nationwide inpatient sample databases, we included all patients discharged with stroke identified by International Classification of Diseases-Ninth Revision codes. Strokes were subclassified as ischemic, intracerebral, and subarachnoid hemorrhage. We compared demographics, comorbidities, procedures, and outcomes between patients with and without a palliative care encounter (PCE) as defined by the International Classification of Diseases-Ninth Revision code V66.7. Pearson χ(2) test was used for categorical variables. Multivariate logistic regression was used to account for hospital, regional, payer, and medical severity factors to predict PCE use and death. Among 395 411 patients with stroke, PCE was used in 6.2% with an increasing trend over time (P<0.05). We found a wide range in PCE use with higher rates in patients with older age, hemorrhagic stroke types, women, and white race (all P<0.001). Smaller and for-profit hospitals saw lower rates. Overall, 9.2% of hospitalized patients with stroke died, and PCE was significantly associated with death. Length of stay in decedents was shorter for patients who received PCE. Palliative care use is increasing nationally for patients with stroke, especially in larger hospitals. Persistent disparities in PCE use and mortality exist in regards to age, sex, race, region, and hospital characteristics. Given the variations in PCE use, especially at the end of life, the use of mortality rates as a hospital quality measure is questioned. © 2017 The Authors.

  12. Virtual worlds to support patient group communication? A questionnaire study investigating potential for virtual world focus group use by respiratory patients.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Michael J; Taylor, Dave; Vlaev, Ivo; Elkin, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in communication technologies enable potential provision of remote education for patients using computer-generated environments known as virtual worlds. Previous research has revealed highly variable levels of patient receptiveness to using information technologies for healthcare-related purposes. This preliminary study involved implementing a questionnaire investigating attitudes and access to computer technologies of respiratory outpatients, in order to assess potential for use of virtual worlds to facilitate health-related education for this sample. Ninety-four patients with a chronic respiratory condition completed surveys, which were distributed at a Chest Clinic. In accordance with our prediction, younger participants were more likely to be able to use, and have access to a computer and some patients were keen to explore use virtual worlds for healthcare-related purposes: Of those with access to computer facilities, 14.50% expressed a willingness to attend a virtual world focus group. Results indicate future virtual world health education facilities should be designed to cater for younger patients, because this group are most likely to accept and use such facilities. Within the study sample, this is likely to comprise of people diagnosed with asthma. Future work could investigate the potential of creating a virtual world asthma education facility.

  13. Virtual worlds to support patient group communication? A questionnaire study investigating potential for virtual world focus group use by respiratory patients

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Michael J.; Taylor, Dave; Vlaev, Ivo; Elkin, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in communication technologies enable potential provision of remote education for patients using computer-generated environments known as virtual worlds. Previous research has revealed highly variable levels of patient receptiveness to using information technologies for healthcare-related purposes. This preliminary study involved implementing a questionnaire investigating attitudes and access to computer technologies of respiratory outpatients, in order to assess potential for use of virtual worlds to facilitate health-related education for this sample. Ninety-four patients with a chronic respiratory condition completed surveys, which were distributed at a Chest Clinic. In accordance with our prediction, younger participants were more likely to be able to use, and have access to a computer and some patients were keen to explore use virtual worlds for healthcare-related purposes: Of those with access to computer facilities, 14.50% expressed a willingness to attend a virtual world focus group. Results indicate future virtual world health education facilities should be designed to cater for younger patients, because this group are most likely to accept and use such facilities. Within the study sample, this is likely to comprise of people diagnosed with asthma. Future work could investigate the potential of creating a virtual world asthma education facility. PMID:28239187

  14. Pilot randomized-control trial to assess the effect product sampling has on adherence using adapalene/benzoyl peroxide gel in acne patients.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Laura F; Semble, Ashley; Gustafson, Cheryl J; Huang, Karen E; Levender, Michelle M; Feldman, Steven R

    2014-02-01

    The treatment of acne can be difficult, with suboptimal adherence resulting in poor treatment outcomes. To determine whether demonstrating to patients how to properly apply a topical acne medication through the use of a sample product will improve adherence. Subjects with mild to moderate acne were instructed to use adapalene/benzoyl peroxide gel once daily for six weeks. Subjects were randomized into sample or no sample group. Sample group received a demonstration on how to apply the medication using a product sample. The primary outcome was median adherence, recorded using electronic monitoring, and secondary outcomes were efficacy measures including the Acne Global Assessment (AGA) and lesion counts and the Perceived Medical Condition Self-Management Scale (PMCSMS). Data from 17 patients was collected and analyzed. Median adherence rates were 50% in the sample group and 35% in the no sample group (p=0.67). The median percent improvement in non-inflammatory lesions were 46% for the sample group and 33% for the no-sample group (p=0.10). The small size of this pilot study limited the extent of subgroup analyses. Objective electronic monitoring expanded our previous observations of poor adherence in the treatment of acne. There is a considerable potential effect size on adherence for the use of samples, supporting the need for future, well powered studies to assess the value of using samples in the treatment of acne and other dermatologic skin diseases.

  15. Statistical Analysis of Human Blood Cytometries: Potential Donors and Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal-Alvarado, J.; Segovia-Olvera, P.; Mancilla-Escobar, B. E.; Palomares, P.

    2004-09-01

    The histograms of the cell volume from human blood present valuable information for clinical evaluation. Measurements can be performed with automatic equipment and a graphical presentation of the data is available, nevertheless, an statistical and mathematical analysis of the cell volume distribution could be useful for medical interpretation too, as much as the numerical parameters characterizing the histograms might be correlated with healthy people and patient populations. In this work, a statistical exercise was performed in order to find the most suitable model fitting the cell volume histograms. Several trial functions were tested and their parameters were tabulated. Healthy people exhibited an average of the cell volume of 85 femto liters while patients had 95 femto liters. White blood cell presented a small variation and platelets preserved their average for both populations.

  16. Ultratrace level determination and quantitative analysis of kidney injury biomarkers in patient samples attained by zinc oxide nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Manpreet; Alabanza, Anginelle; Gonzalez, Lorelis E.; Wang, Weiwei; Reeves, W. Brian; Hahm, Jong-In

    2016-02-01

    Determining ultratrace amounts of protein biomarkers in patient samples in a straightforward and quantitative manner is extremely important for early disease diagnosis and treatment. Here, we successfully demonstrate the novel use of zinc oxide nanorods (ZnO NRs) in the ultrasensitive and quantitative detection of two acute kidney injury (AKI)-related protein biomarkers, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-8, directly from patient samples. We first validate the ZnO NRs-based IL-8 results via comparison with those obtained from using a conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent method in samples from 38 individuals. We further assess the full detection capability of the ZnO NRs-based technique by quantifying TNF-α, whose levels in human urine are often below the detection limits of conventional methods. Using the ZnO NR platforms, we determine the TNF-α concentrations of all 46 patient samples tested, down to the fg per mL level. Subsequently, we screen for TNF-α levels in approximately 50 additional samples collected from different patient groups in order to demonstrate a potential use of the ZnO NRs-based assay in assessing cytokine levels useful for further clinical monitoring. Our research efforts demonstrate that ZnO NRs can be straightforwardly employed in the rapid, ultrasensitive, quantitative, and simultaneous detection of multiple AKI-related biomarkers directly in patient urine samples, providing an unparalleled detection capability beyond those of conventional analysis methods. Additional key advantages of the ZnO NRs-based approach include a fast detection speed, low-volume assay condition, multiplexing ability, and easy automation/integration capability to existing fluorescence instrumentation. Therefore, we anticipate that our ZnO NRs-based detection method will be highly beneficial for overcoming the frequent challenges in early biomarker development and treatment assessment, pertaining to the facile and ultrasensitive quantification

  17. A cell transportation solution that preserves live circulating tumor cells in patient blood samples.

    PubMed

    Stefansson, Steingrimur; Adams, Daniel L; Ershler, William B; Le, Huyen; Ho, David H

    2016-05-06

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are typically collected into CellSave fixative tubes, which kills the cells, but preserves their morphology. Currently, the clinical utility of CTCs is mostly limited to their enumeration. More detailed investigation of CTC biology can be performed on live cells, but obtaining live CTCs is technically challenging, requiring blood collection into biocompatible solutions and rapid isolation which limits transportation options. To overcome the instability of CTCs, we formulated a sugar based cell transportation solution (SBTS) that stabilizes cell viability at ambient temperature. In this study we examined the long term viability of human cancer cell lines, primary cells and CTCs in human blood samples in the SBTS for transportation purposes. Four cell lines, 5 primary human cells and purified human PBMCs were tested to determine the viability of cells stored in the transportation solution at ambient temperature for up to 7 days. We then demonstrated viability of MCF-7 cells spiked into normal blood with SBTS and stored for up to 7 days. A pilot study was then run on blood samples from 3 patients with metastatic malignancies stored with or without SBTS for 6 days. CTCs were then purified by Ficoll separation/microfilter isolation and identified using CTC markers. Cell viability was assessed using trypan blue or CellTracker™ live cell stain. Our results suggest that primary/immortalized cell lines stored in SBTS remain ~90% viable for > 72 h. Further, MCF-7 cells spiked into whole blood remain viable when stored with SBTS for up to 7 days. Finally, live CTCs were isolated from cancer patient blood samples kept in SBTS at ambient temperature for 6 days. No CTCs were isolated from blood samples stored without SBTS. In this proof of principle pilot study we show that viability of cell lines is preserved for days using SBTS. Further, this solution can be used to store patient derived blood samples for eventual isolation of viable CTCs after

  18. [Potentially inappropriate prescribing in hospitalized patients with comparative study between prescription by internist and geriatricians].

    PubMed

    Pardo-Cabello, A J; Bermudo-Conde, S; Manzano-Gamero, V

    2014-01-01

    To analyze potentially inappropriate prescribing in hospitalized patients and compare the prescription by internists and geriatricians. Cross-sectional study in hospitalized patients older than 65 years. We recorded prevalence of potentially inappropriate prescriptions according to the criteria of "Screening Tool of Older Person's Prescriptions". We included 95 hospitalized patients over 65 years with a median age of 79 years (interquartile range: 73-82 years) and 50.5% female. One hundred eighty-three potentially inappropriate prescriptions were detected in 81 patients (85.2% of patients). The most frequent potentially inappropriate prescription were the prolonged use of inhibitors of proton pump high dose (32.6% of patients), the use of benzodiazepines in patients prone to falling (23.2% of patients), the prolonged use of long-acting benzodiazepines (21.1% of patients) and prolonged use of neuroleptic as hypnotics (21.1% of patients). In comparative study between medical specialties, significant differences were found in mean number of drugs (P = 0.0001) and in prolonged use of neuroleptics as hypnotics (P = 0.015). A high percentage of hospitalized patients older than 65 years receive potentially inappropriate prescribing. Prolonged use of inhibitors of the proton pump at high doses was the most frequent potentially inappropriate prescribing criterion.

  19. [Investigation of Bartonella henselae antibodies in serum and plasma samples of kidney transplant patients].

    PubMed

    Kiriş Satılmış, Ozgün; Akkaya, Yüksel; Ergin, Cağrı; Kaleli, Ilknur; Dursun, Belda; Aydın, Cağatay

    2012-10-01

    Solid organ transplantation is an important therapeutic choice to improve the life quality of patients with end-stage renal disease. Renal transplant recipients have to take immunosuppressive therapy to prevent transplant rejection. However, this treatment increases susceptibility to infection. Bartonella henselae causes systemic, disseminated and silent manifestations in healthy individuals, while the mortality rate is high in immunosuppressive patients in the case of untreated bartonellosis. The diagnosis of B.henselae infections is usually based on serological methods since they are practical, simple and rapid. Recent reports indicated that bartonellosis seen after liver or kidney transplantation have been increased. The aim of this study was to present the antibody seropositivity of B.henselae detected in the serum and plasma samples of renal transplant recipients. This study was aimed to evaluate the antibody seroprevalence in renal transplant recipients and also to compare the antibody results obtained from serum and plasma samples. A total of 59 renal transplant recipients (32 male, 27 female; age range: 20-65 years) followed by Transplantation Unit of Health, Research and Training Center of Pamukkale University, were included in the study. After suspension of lyophilised B.henselae ATCC 49882 (Houston-1); B.henselae co-cultivation to Vero cell culture was performed by the method recommended by Zbinden et al. [Clin Diagn Lab Immunol 1995; 2(6): 693-5]. The cells were taken to co-cultivation in flasks after development of monolayers. In house immunofluorescence antibody (IFA) method was performed with the use of infected cell-coated slides. B.henselae antibodies were studied at 1/64 screening dilution both in serum and plasma samples. In our study B.henselae antibody positivity rates found in serum and plasma samples of the patients were 16.9% (10/59) and 6.8% (4/59), respectively (Cohen κ= 0.37). This detected kappa value indicated that the results of serum

  20. Language Barrier as a Risk Factor for Injuries From Patient Violence Among Direct Care Workers in Home Settings: Findings From a U.S. National Sample.

    PubMed

    Byon, Ha Do; Zhu, Shijun; Unick, George; Storr, Carla; Lipscomb, Jane

    2017-08-15

    This study explored potential risk factors for injuries from patient violence among direct care workers in U.S. homes (DCWHs). A national probability sample of 3,377 DCWHs including home health and personal care aides was analyzed using complex sample analysis and generalized estimating equation. Injury from violence was defined as a workrelated injury sustained by aggression, violence, or abuse that was reported to the agency, required medical attention or resulted in absenteeism from work. An association between suffering an injury from patient violence and having a language barrier with patients was noted (OR = 4.44; 95% CI = 1.57, 12.56; p = .005). Findings illuminate the importance of homecare providers to match language between DCWHs and patients to reduce patient violence and improve quality of care in the home setting.

  1. (Sample) size matters! An examination of sample size from the SPRINT trial study to prospectively evaluate reamed intramedullary nails in patients with tibial fractures.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Mohit; Tornetta, Paul; Rampersad, Shelly-Ann; Sprague, Sheila; Heels-Ansdell, Diane; Sanders, David W; Schemitsch, Emil H; Swiontkowski, Marc; Walter, Stephen

    2013-04-01

    Inadequate sample size and power in randomized trials can result in misleading findings. This study demonstrates the effect of sample size in a large clinical trial by evaluating the results of the Study to Prospectively evaluate Reamed Intramedullary Nails in Patients with Tibial fractures (SPRINT) trial as it progressed. The SPRINT trial evaluated reamed versus unreamed nailing of the tibia in 1226 patients, and in open and closed fracture subgroups (N = 400 and N = 826, respectively). We analyzed the reoperation rates and relative risk comparing treatment groups at 50, 100, and then increments of 100 patients up to the final sample size. Results at various enrollments were compared with the final SPRINT findings. In the final analysis, there was a statistically significant decreased risk of reoperation with reamed nails for closed fractures (relative risk reduction 35%). Results for the first 35 patients enrolled suggested that reamed nails increased the risk of reoperation in closed fractures by 165%. Only after 543 patients with closed fractures were enrolled did the results reflect the final advantage for reamed nails in this subgroup. Similarly, the trend toward an increased risk of reoperation for open fractures (23%) was not seen until 62 patients with open fractures were enrolled. Our findings highlight the risk of conducting a trial with insufficient sample size and power. Such studies are not only at risk of missing true effects but also of giving misleading results.

  2. Use of complementary and alternative medicine by a sample of Turkish primary headache patients.

    PubMed

    Karakurum Göksel, Başak; Coşkun, Özlem; Ucler, Serap; Karatas, Mehmet; Ozge, Aynur; Ozkan, Secil

    2014-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasingly being used as adjunctive treatment in primary headache syndromes in many countries. In the Turkish population, no epidemiologic data have been reported about awareness and usage of these treatments in patients with headache. One hundred and ten primary headache patients attending three headache clinics completed a questionnaire regarding their headaches, the known modalities and the use and effect of CAM procedures for their headaches. The mean age of the patients was 34.7±9.6 years (32.8-36.5). Almost two-thirds of patients had completed high school and university, and one-third of patients were housewives. Migraine without aura (45.5%) was the most frequently diagnosed type of headache followed by migraine with aura (19.1%) and tension-type headache (18.2%). In 43.6% of the patients, headache frequency was 5-10 per month. The most frequently known CAM modalities were massage (74.5%), acupuncture (44.5%), yoga (31.8%), exercise (28.2%), psychotherapy (25.5%), and rosemary (23.6%). The most frequently used CAM treatments were massage (51%) and exercise (11%). Only massage was reported to be beneficial in one-third of the primary headache patients; the other modalities were not. Our findings suggest that the subgroup of primary headache patients in Turkey seek and use alternative treatments, frequently in combination with standard treatments. Neurologists should become more knowledgeable regarding CAM therapies; further randomized and controlled clinical researches with large sample sizes are needed.

  3. Pharmacokinetic Modeling and Optimal Sampling Strategies for Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of Rifampin in Patients with Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sturkenboom, Marieke G. G.; Mulder, Leonie W.; de Jager, Arthur; van Altena, Richard; Aarnoutse, Rob E.; de Lange, Wiel C. M.; Proost, Johannes H.; Kosterink, Jos G. W.; van der Werf, Tjip S.

    2015-01-01

    Rifampin, together with isoniazid, has been the backbone of the current first-line treatment of tuberculosis (TB). The ratio of the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC0–24) to the MIC is the best predictive pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic parameter for determinations of efficacy. The objective of this study was to develop an optimal sampling procedure based on population pharmacokinetics to predict AUC0–24 values. Patients received rifampin orally once daily as part of their anti-TB treatment. A one-compartmental pharmacokinetic population model with first-order absorption and lag time was developed using observed rifampin plasma concentrations from 55 patients. The population pharmacokinetic model was developed using an iterative two-stage Bayesian procedure and was cross-validated. Optimal sampling strategies were calculated using Monte Carlo simulation (n = 1,000). The geometric mean AUC0–24 value was 41.5 (range, 13.5 to 117) mg · h/liter. The median time to maximum concentration of drug in serum (Tmax) was 2.2 h, ranging from 0.4 to 5.7 h. This wide range indicates that obtaining a concentration level at 2 h (C2) would not capture the peak concentration in a large proportion of the population. Optimal sampling using concentrations at 1, 3, and 8 h postdosing was considered clinically suitable with an r2 value of 0.96, a root mean squared error value of 13.2%, and a prediction bias value of −0.4%. This study showed that the rifampin AUC0–24 in TB patients can be predicted with acceptable accuracy and precision using the developed population pharmacokinetic model with optimal sampling at time points 1, 3, and 8 h. PMID:26055359

  4. From laboratory to clinical practice: Dabigatran effects on thrombin generation and coagulation in patient samples.

    PubMed

    Helin, Tuukka A; Lemponen, Marja; Hjemdahl, Paul; Rönquist-Nii, Yuko; Lassila, Riitta; Joutsi-Korhonen, Lotta

    2015-07-01

    Dabigatran (Dabi) is not routinely monitored. However, in emergency cases quantitative assessment is required and laboratories must provide suitable tests at all hours. Little is known about Dabi effects on thrombin generation. Patient samples (n=241) were analyzed for functional Dabi concentrations (Dabi-TT) using a combination of the Hemoclot Thrombin Inhibitors assay (HTI®) and, for samples with low levels, undiluted thrombin time (TT). Results were compared to prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). In 49 samples Dabi effects were further investigated with Calibrated Automated Thrombogram (CAT®) for thrombin generation and with Russell's viper venom time (RVVT), prothrombinase-induced clotting time (PiCT®), chromogenic Anti-IIa® and ecarin clotting assay (ECA®). Fibrinogen and D dimer were assessed to reflect the coagulation status of the patient. A subset of these samples (n=21) were also analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Dabi-TT correlated with RVVT (R(2)=0.49), PiCT® (R(2)=0.73), ECA® (R(2)=0.89), Anti-IIa® (R(2)=0.90) and LC-MS/MS (R(2)=0.81). APTT correlated curvi-linearly with Dabi-TT (R(2)=0.71), but was normal in many cases (18/70) despite Dabi-TT>40ng/mL. There was no association between Dabi-TT and fibrinogen or D dimer levels. Increasing Dabi concentrations prolonged lag time (R(2)=0.54) and, surprisingly, elevated the ETP and Peak of CAT® (p<0.001). Thrombin-specific tests measure Dabi accurately, whereas coagulation time based assays depend more on other factors. The enhanced thrombin generation in Dabi-treated patients may predict clinically relevant hypercoagulability and warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Attitudes towards epilepsy among a sample of Turkish patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Yeni, Kubra; Tulek, Zeliha; Bebek, Nerses; Dede, Ozlem; Gurses, Candan; Baykan, Betul; Gokyigit, Aysen

    2016-09-01

    The attitude of patients with epilepsy towards their disease is an important factor in disease management and quality of life. The aim of this study was to define the attitudes of patients with epilepsy towards their disease and the factors that affect their attitudes. This descriptive study was performed on patients admitted to an epilepsy outpatient clinic of a university hospital between May and September 2015. The sample consisted of 70 patients over 18years of age with a diagnosis of epilepsy and no health problem other than epilepsy. Patients with no seizure in the last two years were excluded. The Epilepsy Attitude Scale was used to evaluate attitudes of the patients towards epilepsy; the Epilepsy Knowledge Scale, Rotter's Locus of Control Scale, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and the Quality of Life in Epilepsy-10 (QOLIE-10) were used to investigate the attitude-related factors. Among the 70 participants, 43 were female, and the mean age was 31.4years. The educational level of the patients was lower (primary school) in 38.6% of the sample, and 18.6% were unemployed. Time since diagnosis was 15.1years, 75.7% of the participants had generalized type of seizures, and more than half had seizures more frequently than once a month. The mean score of the attitude scale was 59.7±6.62 (range: 14-70). The attitudes of the patients towards epilepsy were found to be related to their educational status, living alone, and the attitudes of their families. The attitude scores were also related to the level of knowledge on epilepsy, stigma, and depression. Furthermore, the attitude was found to be correlated with quality of life. Patients with epilepsy had moderate-to-good attitude towards their disease. It was observed that the attitude was related to the knowledge, stigma, and depression rather than to demographic factors and the seizures, and furthermore, the attitude was found to be correlated with quality of life. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All

  6. Focally perfused succinate potentiates brain metabolism in head injury patients.

    PubMed

    Jalloh, Ibrahim; Helmy, Adel; Howe, Duncan J; Shannon, Richard J; Grice, Peter; Mason, Andrew; Gallagher, Clare N; Stovell, Matthew G; van der Heide, Susan; Murphy, Michael P; Pickard, John D; Menon, David K; Carpenter, T Adrian; Hutchinson, Peter J; Carpenter, Keri Lh

    2016-01-01

    Following traumatic brain injury, complex cerebral energy perturbations occur. Correlating with unfavourable outcome, high brain extracellular lactate/pyruvate ratio suggests hypoxic metabolism and/or mitochondrial dysfunction. We investigated whether focal administration of succinate, a tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate interacting directly with the mitochondrial electron transport chain, could improve cerebral metabolism. Microdialysis perfused disodium 2,3-(13)C2 succinate (12 mmol/L) for 24 h into nine sedated traumatic brain injury patients' brains, with simultaneous microdialysate collection for ISCUS analysis of energy metabolism biomarkers (nine patients) and nuclear magnetic resonance of (13)C-labelled metabolites (six patients). Metabolites 2,3-(13)C2 malate and 2,3-(13)C2 glutamine indicated tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolism, and 2,3-(13)C2 lactate suggested tricarboxylic acid cycle spinout of pyruvate (by malic enzyme or phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and pyruvate kinase), then lactate dehydrogenase-mediated conversion to lactate. Versus baseline, succinate perfusion significantly decreased lactate/pyruvate ratio (p = 0.015), mean difference -12%, due to increased pyruvate concentration (+17%); lactate changed little (-3%); concentrations decreased for glutamate (-43%) (p = 0.018) and glucose (-15%) (p = 0.038). Lower lactate/pyruvate ratio suggests better redox status: cytosolic NADH recycled to NAD(+) by mitochondrial shuttles (malate-aspartate and/or glycerol 3-phosphate), diminishing lactate dehydrogenase-mediated pyruvate-to-lactate conversion, and lowering glutamate. Glucose decrease suggests improved utilisation. Direct tricarboxylic acid cycle supplementation with 2,3-(13)C2 succinate improved human traumatic brain injury brain chemistry, indicated by biomarkers and (13)C-labelling patterns in metabolites.

  7. Copper, chromium, manganese, iron, nickel, and zinc levels in biological samples of diabetes mellitus patients.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Kazi, Naveed; Jamali, Mohammad Khan; Arain, Mohammad Bilal; Jalbani, Nussarat; Kandhro, Ghulam Abbas

    2008-04-01

    There is accumulating evidence that the metabolism of several trace elements is altered in diabetes mellitus and that these nutrients might have specific roles in the pathogenesis and progress of this disease. The aim of present study was to compare the level of essential trace elements, chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), and zinc (Zn) in biological samples (whole blood, urine, and scalp hair) of patients who have diabetes mellitus type 2 (n = 257), with those of nondiabetic control subjects (n = 166), age ranged (45-75) of both genders. The element concentrations were measured by means of an atomic absorption spectrophotometer after microwave-induced acid digestion. The validity and accuracy was checked by conventional wet-acid-digestion method and using certified reference materials. The overall recoveries of all elements were found in the range of (97.60-99.49%) of certified values. The results of this study showed that the mean values of Zn, Mn, and Cr were significantly reduced in blood and scalp-hair samples of diabetic patients as compared to control subjects of both genders (p < 0.001). The urinary levels of these elements were found to be higher in the diabetic patients than in the age-matched healthy controls. In contrast, high mean values of Cu and Fe were detected in scalp hair and blood from patients versus the nondiabetic subjects, but the differences found in blood samples was not significant (p < 0.05). These results are consistent with those obtained in other studies, confirming that deficiency and efficiency of some essential trace metals may play a role in the development of diabetes mellitus.

  8. Iterative and direct methods employing distributed approximating functionals for the reconstruction of a potential energy surface from its sampled values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szalay, Viktor

    1999-11-01

    The reconstruction of a function from knowing only its values on a finite set of grid points, that is the construction of an analytical approximation reproducing the function with good accuracy everywhere within the sampled volume, is an important problem in all branches of sciences. One such problem in chemical physics is the determination of an analytical representation of Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surfaces by ab initio calculations which give the value of the potential at a finite set of grid points in configuration space. This article describes the rudiments of iterative and direct methods of potential surface reconstruction. The major new results are the derivation, numerical demonstration, and interpretation of a reconstruction formula. The reconstruction formula derived approximates the unknown function, say V, by linear combination of functions obtained by discretizing the continuous distributed approximating functional (DAF) approximation of V over the grid of sampling. The simplest of contracted and ordinary Hermite-DAFs are shown to be sufficient for reconstruction. The linear combination coefficients can be obtained either iteratively or directly by finding the minimal norm least-squares solution of a linear system of equations. Several numerical examples of reconstructing functions of one and two variables, and very different shape are given. The examples demonstrate the robustness, high accuracy, as well as the caveats of the proposed method. As to the mathematical foundation of the method, it is shown that the reconstruction formula can be interpreted as, and in fact is, frame expansion. By recognizing the relevance of frames in determining analytical approximation to potential energy surfaces, an extremely rich and beautiful toolbox of mathematics has come to our disposal. Thus, the simple reconstruction method derived in this paper can be refined, extended, and improved in numerous ways.

  9. Microwave-assisted tissue processing for same-day EM-diagnosis of potential bioterrorism and clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Josef A; Gelderblom, Hans R; Hauroeder, Baerbel; Schmetz, Christel; Milios, Jim; Hofstaedter, Ferdinand

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the turnaround times, section and image quality of a number of more "difficult" specimens destined for rapid diagnostic electron microscopy (EM) after microwave-assisted processing. The results were assessed and compared with those of conventionally processed samples. A variety of infectious agents, some with a potential for bioterrorism, and liver biopsies serving as an example for routine histopathology samples were studied. The samples represented virus-producing cell cultures (such as SARS-coronavirus, West Nile virus, Orthopox virus), bacteria suspensions (cultures of Escherichia coli and genetically knockout apathogenic Bacillus anthracis), suspensions of parasites (malaria Plasmodium falciparum, Leishmania major, Microsporidia cuniculi, Caenorhabditis elegans), and whole Drosophila melanogaster flies infected with microsporidia. Fresh liver samples and infected flies were fixed in Karnovsky-fixative by microwaving (20 min), all other samples were fixed in buffered glutaraldehyde or Karnovsky-fixative overnight or longer. Subsequently, all samples were divided to evaluate alternative processing protocols: one part of the sample was OsO4-postfixed, ethanol-dehydrated, Epon-infiltrated (overnight) in an automated tissue processor (LYNX, Leica), and polymerized at 60 degrees C for 48 h; in parallel the other part was microwave-assisted processed in the bench microwave device (REM, Milestone), including post-osmication and the resin block polymerization. The microwave-assisted processing protocol required at minimum 3 h 20 min: the respective epon resin blocks were uniformly polymerized allowing an easy sectioning of semi- and ultrathin sections. Sections collected on non-coated 200 mesh grids were stable in the electron beam and showed an excellent preservation of the ultrastructure and high contrast, thus allowing an easy, unequivocal and rapid assessment of specimens. Compared with conventional routine methods

  10. The potential of volatile organic compounds for the detection of active disease in patients with ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Smolinska, A; Bodelier, A G L; Dallinga, J W; Masclee, A A M; Jonkers, D M; van Schooten, F-J; Pierik, M J

    2017-05-01

    To optimise treatment of ulcerative colitis (UC), patients need repeated assessment of mucosal inflammation. Current non-invasive biomarkers and clinical activity indices do not accurately reflect disease activity in all patients and cannot discriminate UC from non-UC colitis. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled air could be predictive of active disease or remission in Crohn's disease. To investigate whether VOCs are able to differentiate between active UC, UC in remission and non-UC colitis. UC patients participated in a 1-year study. Clinical activity index, blood, faecal and breath samples were collected at each out-patient visit. Patients with clear defined active faecal calprotectin >250 μg/g and inactive disease (Simple Clinical Colitis Activity Index <3, C-reactive protein <5 mg/L and faecal calprotectin <100 μg/g) were included for cross-sectional analysis. Non-UC colitis was confirmed by stool culture or radiological evaluation. Breath samples were analysed by gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry and kernel-based method to identify discriminating VOCs. In total, 72 UC (132 breath samples; 62 active; 70 remission) and 22 non-UC-colitis patients (22 samples) were included. Eleven VOCs predicted active vs. inactive UC in an independent internal validation set with 92% sensitivity and 77% specificity (AUC 0.94). Non-UC colitis patients could be clearly separated from active and inactive UC patients with principal component analysis. Volatile organic compounds can accurately distinguish active disease from remission in UC and profiles in UC are clearly different from profiles in non-UC colitis patients. VOCs have demonstrated potential as new non-invasive biomarker to monitor inflammation in UC. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Hypercalciuria, hyperoxaluria, and hypocitraturia screening from random urine samples in patients with calcium lithiasis.

    PubMed

    Arrabal-Polo, Miguel Angel; Arias-Santiago, Salvador; Girón-Prieto, María Sierra; Abad-Menor, Felix; López-Carmona Pintado, Fernando; Zuluaga-Gomez, Armando; Arrabal-Martin, Miguel

    2012-10-01

    Calcium lithiasis is the most frequently diagnosed renal lithiasis and is associated with a high percentage of patients with metabolic disorders, such as hypercalciuria, hypocitraturia, and hyperoxaluria. The present study included 50 patients with recurrent calcium lithiasis. We conducted a random urine test during nocturnal fasting and a 24-h urine test, and examined calcium, oxalate, and citrate. A study of the linear correlation between the metabolites was performed, and the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves were analyzed in the random urine samples to determine the cutoff values for hypercalciuria (excretion greater than 200 mg), hyperoxaluria (excretion greater than 40 mg), and hypocitraturia (excretion less than 320 mg) in the 24-h urine. Linear relationships were observed between the calcium levels in the random and 24-h urine samples (R = 0.717, p = 0.0001), the oxalate levels in the random and 24-h urine samples (R = 0.838, p = 0.0001), and the citrate levels in the random and 24-h urine samples (R = 0.799, p = 0.0001). After obtaining the ROC curves, we observed that more than 10.15 mg/dl of random calcium and more than 16.45 mg/l of random oxalate were indicative of hypercalciuria and hyperoxaluria, respectively, in the 24-h urine. In addition, we found that the presence of less than 183 mg/l of random citrate was indicative of the presence of hypocitraturia in the 24-h urine. Using the proposed values, screening for hypercalciuria, hyperoxaluria, and hypocitraturia can be performed with a random urine sample during fasting with an overall sensitivity greater than 86%.

  12. Mars Rover proposed for 2018 to seek signs of life and to cache samples for potential return to Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, Lisa; Beaty, David; Westall, Frances; Parnell, John; Poulet, François

    2010-05-01

    Mars Rover proposed for 2018 to seek signs of life and to cache samples for potential return to Earth Lisa Pratt, David Beatty, Frances Westall, John Parnell, François Poulet, and the MRR-SAG team The search for preserved evidence of life is the keystone concept for a new generation of Mars rover capable of exploring, sampling, and caching diverse suites of rocks from outcrops. The proposed mission is conceived to address two general objectives: conduct high-priority in situ science and make concrete steps towards the possible future return of samples to Earth. We propose the name Mars Astrobiology Explorer-Cacher (MAX-C) to best reflect the dual purpose of the proposed mission. The scientific objective of the proposed MAX-C would require rover access to a site with high preservation potential for physical and chemical biosignatures in order to evaluate paleo-environmental conditions, characterize the potential for preservation of biosignatures, and access multiple sequences of geological units in a search for evidence of past life and/or prebiotic chemistry. Samples addressing a variety of high-priority scientific objectives should be collected, documented, and packaged in a manner suitable for possible return to Earth by a future mission. Relevant experience from study of ancient terrestrial strata, martian meteorites, and from the Mars exploration Rovers indicates that the proposed MAX-C's interpretive capability should include: meter to submillimeter texture (optical imaging), mineral identification, major element content, and organic molecular composition. Analytical data should be obtained by direct investigation of outcrops and should not entail acquisition of rock chips or powders. We propose, therefore, a set of arm-mounted instruments that would be capable of interrogating a relatively smooth, abraded surface by creating co-registered 2-D maps of visual texture, mineralogy and geochemical properties. This approach is judged to have particularly high

  13. Mental health and itch in burns patients: Potential associations.

    PubMed

    McGarry, Sarah; Burrows, Sally; Ashoorian, Tanya; Pallathil, Trisha; Ong, Katherine; Edgar, Dale W; Wood, Fiona

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between mental health and self-reported itch in patients with burns across a 6 month time period and to test the hypothesis that poorer mental health outcomes are associated with increased severity of itch. A quantitative study with three time points for data collection was conducted. Participants (232) completed assessments at 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months after burn injury. The Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS) was used to report itch and the Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) provided an assessment of mental health across time. Only data from the itch and mental health subscales were used in the analysis. To analyze the data a quantile regression model was used. Mental health is significantly associated with itch after adjusting for variation in itch over time (p=0.001). The regression coefficient indicates that as mental health increases by one unit, itch decreases by 0.03. Of importance, the relationship remained significant after adjusting for total burn surface area (p<0.001). These findings suggest there is a relationship between mental health and itch. Given the powerful impact itch can have on an individual's wellbeing health professionals can begin to further investigate itch from a bio-psychosocial perspective. Further research to investigate causal relationships between mental health and itch is important. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  14. Magnesium hydrogen breath test using end expiratory sampling to assess achlorhydria in pernicious anaemia patients.

    PubMed Central

    Humbert, P; López de Soria, P; Fernández-Bañares, F; Juncá, J; Boix, J; Planas, R; Quer, J C; Domenech, E; Gassull, M A

    1994-01-01

    A modified magnesium hydrogen breath test, using end expiratory breath sampling, is described to investigate achlorhydria. The efficacy of this test in the diagnostic investigation of pernicious anaemia was compared with that of serum pepsinogen I. Twenty one patients with pernicious anaemia--that is, patients with achlorhydria--and 22 with healed duodenal ulcer and normal chlorhydria were studied. Magnesium hydrogen breath test, serum pepsinogen I, serum gastrin, and standard gastric acid secretory tests were performed in all subjects. The mean (SEM) hydrogen peak value was lower in patients with pernicious anaemia than in the duodenal ulcer group (21.7 (1.9) v 71.3 (5.2) ppm; p = 0.00005). The hydrogen peak value had a 95.2% sensitivity and a 100% specificity to detect pentagastrin resistant achlorhydria. Mean serum pepsinogen I concentrations were also significantly lower in patients with pernicious anaemia than in the duodenal ulcer group (10.7 (2.7) v 123.6 (11.8) micrograms/l p = 0.00005). Sensitivity and specificity to detect pernicious anaemia were both 100% for pepsinogen I. It is concluded that this modified magnesium hydrogen breath test is a simple, noninvasive, cost effective, and accurate method to assess achlorhydria and may be useful in the diagnostic investigation of patients with suspected pernicious anaemia. PMID:7959224

  15. Urinary microbiome of kidney transplant patients reveals dysbiosis with potential for antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Rani, Asha; Ranjan, Ravi; McGee, Halvor S; Andropolis, Kalista E; Panchal, Dipti V; Hajjiri, Zahraa; Brennan, Daniel C; Finn, Patricia W; Perkins, David L

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies have established that a complex community of microbes colonize the human urinary tract; however, their role in kidney transplant patients treated with prophylactic antibiotics remains poorly investigated. Our aim was to investigate the urinary microbiome of kidney transplant recipients. Urine samples from 21 patients after kidney transplantation and 8 healthy controls were collected. All patients received prophylactic treatment with the antibiotic combination trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Metagenomic DNA was isolated from urine samples, sequenced using shotgun sequencing approach on Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform, and analyzed for microbial taxonomic and functional annotations. Our results demonstrate that the urine microbiome of kidney transplants was markedly different at all taxonomic levels from phyla to species, had decreased microbial diversity, and increased abundance of potentially pathogenic species compared with healthy controls. Specifically, at the phylum level, we detected a significant decrease in Actinobacteria and increase in Firmicutes due to increases in Enterococcus faecalis. In addition, there was an increase in the Proteobacteria due to increases in Escherichia coli. Analysis of predicted functions of the urinary metagenome revealed increased abundance of enzymes in the folate pathway including dihydrofolate synthase that are not inhibited by trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, but can augment folate metabolism. This report characterizes the urinary microbiome of kidney transplants using shotgun metagenomics approach. Our results indicate that the urinary microbiota may be modified in the context of prophylactic antibiotics, indicating that a therapeutic intervention may shift the urinary microbiota to select bacterial species with increased resistance to antibiotics. The evaluation and development of optimal prophylactic regimens that do not promote antibiotic resistance is an important future goal.

  16. Exhaled breath and oral cavity VOCs as potential biomarkers in oral cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Bouza, M; Gonzalez-Soto, J; Pereiro, R; de Vicente, J C; Sanz-Medel, A

    2017-03-01

    Corporal mechanisms attributed to cancer, such as oxidative stress or the action of cytochrome P450 enzymes, seem to be responsible for the generation of a variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that could be used as non-invasive diagnosis biomarkers. The present work presents an attempt to use VOCs from exhaled breath and oral cavity air as biomarkers for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients. A total of 52 breath samples were collected (in 3 L Tedlar bags) from 26 OSCC patients and 26 cancer-free controls. The samples were analyzed using solid-phase microextraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry detection. Different statistical strategies (e.g., Icoshift, SIMCA, LDA, etc) were used to classify the analytical data. Results revealed that compounds such as undecane, dodecane, decanal, benzaldehyde, 3,7-dimethyl undecane, 4,5-dimethyl nonane, 1-octene, and hexadecane had relevance as possible biomarkers for OSCC. LDA classification with these compounds showed well-defined clusters for patients and controls (non-smokers and smokers). In addition to breath analysis, preliminary studies were carried out to evaluate the possibility of lesion-surrounded air (analyzed OSCC tumors are in the oral cavity) as a source of biomarkers. The oral cavity location of the squamous cell carcinoma tumors constitutes an opportunity to non-invasively collect the air surrounding the lesion. Small quantities (20 ml) of air collected in the oral cavity were analyzed using the above methodology. Results showed that aldehydes present in the oral cavity might constitute potential OSCC biomarkers.

  17. Structure-based sampling and self-correcting machine learning for accurate calculations of potential energy surfaces and vibrational levels.

    PubMed

    Dral, Pavlo O; Owens, Alec; Yurchenko, Sergei N; Thiel, Walter

    2017-06-28

    We present an efficient approach for generating highly accurate molecular potential energy surfaces (PESs) using self-correcting, kernel ridge regression (KRR) based machine learning (ML). We introduce structure-based sampling to automatically assign nuclear configurations from a pre-defined grid to the training and prediction sets, respectively. Accurate high-level ab initio energies are required only for the points in the training set, while the energies for the remaining points are provided by the ML model with negligible computational cost. The proposed sampling procedure is shown to be superior to random sampling and also eliminates the need for training several ML models. Self-correcting machine learning has been implemented such that each additional layer corrects errors from the previous layer. The performance of our approach is demonstrated in a case study on a published high-level ab initio PES of methyl chloride with 44 819 points. The ML model is trained on sets of different sizes and then used to predict the energies for tens of thousands of nuclear configurations within seconds. The resulting datasets are utilized in variational calculations of the vibrational energy levels of CH3Cl. By using both structure-based sampling and self-correction, the size of the training set can be kept small (e.g., 10% of the points) without any significant loss of accuracy. In ab initio rovibrational spectroscopy, it is thus possible to reduce the number of computationally costly electronic structure calculations through structure-based sampling and self-correcting KRR-based machine learning by up to 90%.

  18. Structure-based sampling and self-correcting machine learning for accurate calculations of potential energy surfaces and vibrational levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dral, Pavlo O.; Owens, Alec; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Thiel, Walter

    2017-06-01

    We present an efficient approach for generating highly accurate molecular potential energy surfaces (PESs) using self-correcting, kernel ridge regression (KRR) based machine learning (ML). We introduce structure-based sampling to automatically assign nuclear configurations from a pre-defined grid to the training and prediction sets, respectively. Accurate high-level ab initio energies are required only for the points in the training set, while the energies for the remaining points are provided by the ML model with negligible computational cost. The proposed sampling procedure is shown to be superior to random sampling and also eliminates the need for training several ML models. Self-correcting machine learning has been implemented such that each additional layer corrects errors from the previous layer. The performance of our approach is demonstrated in a case study on a published high-level ab initio PES of methyl chloride with 44 819 points. The ML model is trained on sets of different sizes and then used to predict the energies for tens of thousands of nuclear configurations within seconds. The resulting datasets are utilized in variational calculations of the vibrational energy levels of CH3Cl. By using both structure-based sampling and self-correction, the size of the training set can be kept small (e.g., 10% of the points) without any significant loss of accuracy. In ab initio rovibrational spectroscopy, it is thus possible to reduce the number of computationally costly electronic structure calculations through structure-based sampling and self-correcting KRR-based machine learning by up to 90%.

  19. Auditory-evoked potentials during coma: do they improve our prediction of awakening in comatose patients?

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Rosendo A; Bussière, Miguel; Froeschl, Michael; Nathan, Howard J

    2014-02-01

    The mismatch negativity (MMN), an auditory event-related potential, has been identified as a good indicator of recovery of consciousness during coma. We explored the predictive value of the MMN and other auditory-evoked potentials including brainstem and middle-latency potentials for predicting awakening in comatose patients after cardiac arrest or cardiogenic shock. Auditory brainstem, middle-latency (Pa wave), and event-related potentials (N100 and MMN waves) were recorded in 17 comatose patients and 9 surgical patients matched by age and coronary artery disease. Comatose patients were followed up daily to determine recovery of consciousness and classified as awakened and nonawakened. Among the auditory-evoked potentials, the presence or absence of MMN best discriminated between patients who awakened or those who did not. Mismatch negativity was present during coma in all patients who awakened (7/7) and in 2 of those (2/10) who did not awaken. In patients who awakened and in whom MMN was detected, 3 of those awakened between 2 and 3 days and 4 between 9 and 21 days after evoked potential examination. All awakened patients had intact N100 waves and identifiable brainstem and middle-latency waves. In nonawakened patients, N100 and Pa waves were detected in 5 cases (50%) and brainstem waves in 9 (90%). The MMN is a good predictor of awakening in comatose patients after cardiac arrest and cardiogenic shock and can be measured days before awakening encouraging ongoing life support. © 2013.

  20. Effectiveness of lipid-lowering therapy among a sample of patients in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Machado-Alba, Jorge Enrique; Murillo-Muñoz, Maria Monica; Machado-Duque, Manuel Enrique

    2013-06-01

    To determine the effectiveness of lipid-lowering therapy in a sample of patients affiliated with the Sistema General de Seguridad Social en Salud (the Colombian health system). A cross-sectional study was conducted from 1 January 2010-30 June 2011. From a total of 8 316 patients in 10 cities, a random sample of 600 was stratified according to dyslipidemia. Information on sociodemographic and anthropometric characteristics, risk factors, and pharmacological and laboratory variables were obtained from medical records. Subjects were predominantly female (56.2%), with a mean age of 65.1 ± 11.5 years; 93.2% had hypertension; 29.0%, diabetes mellitus; and 10.2%, a history of myocardial infarction. The patients were being treated with lovastatin (84.1%) or gemfibrozil (12.3%)-both at doses below what is recommended-or atorvastatin (1.8%). In patients with high cardiovascular risk, 38.6% achieved goals for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels (<100 mg/dL). Among those at moderate risk, 49.4% reached the target level (< 130 mg/dL). On average, there was a 4.9% reduction in LDL-C. Sex, age, history of cardiovascular disease and/or diabetes mellitus, use of hydrochlorothiazide, and poor therapy adherence were statistically associated with a lack of dyslipidemia control. Because a lack LDL-C control occurred in patients with two or more of the following variables: male, more than 55 years of age, diabetes and/or a history of cardiovascular disease, received lower doses of lovastatin, or non-adherent to treatment, it is recommended that medication be increased based on clearly-defined therapeutic goals and that comorbidities be assessed and effectively treated.

  1. Paucicellular Fibrointimal Proliferation Characterizes Pediatric Pulmonary Vein Stenosis: Clinicopathologic Analysis of 213 Samples From 97 Patients.

    PubMed

    Kovach, Alexandra E; Magcalas, Philip M; Ireland, Christina; McEnany, Kerry; Oliveira, Andre M; Kieran, Mark W; Baird, Christopher W; Jenkins, Kathy; Vargas, Sara O

    2017-09-01

    Pulmonary vein stenosis (PVS) is a luminal narrowing of extrapulmonary pulmonary veins. In pediatric patients, it arises following repair of congenital heart disease, particularly anomalous pulmonary venous return; in lung disease, especially prematurity; and rarely in isolation. The etiology is unknown and the course often fatal without lung transplantation. We hypothesized that systematic clinicopathologic review of pediatric PVS could provide further pathogenic insight. We included patients who underwent first resection of pulmonary venous tissue for symptomatic PVS at our pediatric referral center from 1995 to 2014. Clinical records and hematoxylin and eosin slides were reviewed. Subsets were immunostained for smooth muscle actin, Ki-67, β-catenin, estrogen receptor, and other markers and analyzed for USP6 gene rearrangement. A total of 97 patients (57% male; median age: 6 mo) were identified. Overall, 59 (61%) had prior congenital heart disease repair, 35 involving pulmonary vein manipulation. Samples included 213 separate anatomic sites (median: 2/patient). Histologically, all showed sparsely cellular intimal expansion composed of haphazardly arranged fibroblasts with slender nuclei in myxoid matrix. This tissue merged with underlying collagen. Most samples had a variably continuous sheath of cardiomyocytes. Ancillary tests supported a reactive fibroblastic proliferation; in particular, fibroblasts showed cytoplasmic β-catenin localization, no estrogen receptor expression, and no USP6 rearrangement. At last follow-up (mean: 2.3 y), 46% of patients had died of disease. Pediatric PVS uniformly consists of a paucicellular fibrointimal proliferation, irrespective of clinical scenario. It may be best conceived of as a form of reactive hyperplasia. As with other forms of vascular remodeling, trauma (iatrogenic or occult) is likely an inciting factor. A comprehensive understanding of the surgical pathology of PVS may further inform therapeutic strategies in this

  2. Non-stimulated adrenal venous sampling using Dyna computed tomography in patients with primary aldosteronism

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chin-Chen; Lee, Bo-Ching; Liu, Kao-Lang; Chang, Yeun-Chung; Wu, Vin-Cent; Huang, Kuo-How

    2016-01-01

    In this retrospective study, we aimed to examine the effect of applying Dyna computed tomography (CT) on the success rate of adrenal venous sampling (AVS) without adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation. A total of 100 consecutive patients with primary aldosteronism who underwent AVS between May 2012 and July 2015 were enrolled. In all the cases, Dyna CT was used in AVS to validate catheter position in the right adrenal vein. A selectivity index (cortisoladrenal vein /cortisolinferior vena cava) of ≥2.0 of both adrenal veins were required for successful AVS. Dyna CT indicated misplaced catheters in 16 patients; of these patients, 75% (12/16) eventually had successful right AVS after catheter repositioning. The success rate of initial sampling at the right adrenal vein was 76% (76/100), which increased to 88% (88/100) after Dyna CT was applied (p < 0.001). The most common inadvertently catheterised vessels detected using Dyna CT were the accessory hepatic veins (56.3%, 9/16), followed by the renal capsular veins (37.5%, 6/16). The overall success rate of non-stimulated AVS using Dyna CT was 87% (87/100). Thus, the application of Dyna CT further increased the success rate of non-stimulated AVS. PMID:27876824

  3. Clinical, radiological and molecular diagnosis correlation in serum samples from patients with osteoarticular tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    García-Elorriaga, Guadalupe; Martínez-Elizondo, Olga; del Rey-Pineda, Guillermo; González-Bonilla, César

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the role of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in serum samples, in the diagnosis of osteoarticular tuberculosis (OTB) in a setting where only clinical and imaging diagnoses determine the treatment. Methods A total of 44 consecutive serum specimens were collected from clinically suspected OTB patients, based on clinical and radiological [X-ray or magnetic resonance imaging/computed tomography] features. They were screened by in-house nested PCR. In addition, a few specimens were examined by Gram stain, acid-fast bacilli stain, histopathology and routine bacterial culture. A total of 39 specimens were collected from patients suffering from other bone diseases of nontuberculous origin and included as negative controls. Results Of the 44 clinically suspected OTB patients, in-house nested PCR was positive in 40 (91%) cases; PCR was negative in 38 (97%) negative controls. Sensitivity and specificity of our in-house nested PCR was 90.9% and 97.4%, respectively. The PCR report was available within 48 h. It was possible to standardize serum PCR technique and in positive cases, a good correlation was observed in terms of an adequate treatment response. Conclusions Nested PCR in serum samples is a rapid, highly sensitive and specific modality for OTB detection. PCR should be performed in addition to clinical evaluation, imaging studies, acid-fast bacilli staining, culture and histopathology diagnosis, if possible. PMID:25183281

  4. Psychological Resilience, Affective Mechanisms, and Symptom Burden in a Tertiary Care Sample of Patients with Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Samantha J; Vincent, Ann; Hassett, Afton L; Whipple, Mary O; Oh, Terry H; Benzo, Roberto P; Toussaint, Loren L

    2014-01-01

    Research demonstrates that patients with fibromyalgia who have higher positive and lower negative affect have lower symptom burden. Affect has been shown to be associated with resilience. This study examined the relationship between affect, resilience, and fibromyalgia symptom burden in a clinical sample of patients with fibromyalgia. We hypothesized that (a) positive and negative affect would be associated with fibromyalgia symptom burden; (b) resilience would be associated with positive and negative affect; (c) resilience would be associated with fibromyalgia symptom burden; and (d) the connection between resilience and fibromyalgia symptom burden would be mediated by both positive and negative affect. A sample of 858 patients with fibromyalgia completed questionnaires. Mediation modeling revealed statistically significant direct effects of resilience on fibromyalgia symptom burden (β =−.10, P < .001) and statistically significant indirect effects of resilience on fibromyalgia symptom burden through affect (β =−.36, P < .001), suggesting that both resilience and affect influence fibromyalgia symptom burden. Our results suggest that improving affect through resiliency training could be studied as a modality for improving fibromyalgia symptom burden. PMID:24376184

  5. Piezoresistive Membrane Surface Stress Sensors for Characterization of Breath Samples of Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Hans Peter; Loizeau, Frédéric; Hiou-Feige, Agnès; Rivals, Jean-Paul; Romero, Pedro; Akiyama, Terunobu; Gerber, Christoph; Meyer, Ernst

    2016-01-01

    For many diseases, where a particular organ is affected, chemical by-products can be found in the patient’s exhaled breath. Breath analysis is often done using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry, but interpretation of results is difficult and time-consuming. We performed characterization of patients’ exhaled breath samples by an electronic nose technique based on an array of nanomechanical membrane sensors. Each membrane is coated with a different thin polymer layer. By pumping the exhaled breath into a measurement chamber, volatile organic compounds present in patients’ breath diffuse into the polymer layers and deform the membranes by changes in surface stress. The bending of the membranes is measured piezoresistively and the signals are converted into voltages. The sensor deflection pattern allows one to characterize the condition of the patient. In a clinical pilot study, we investigated breath samples from head and neck cancer patients and healthy control persons. Evaluation using principal component analysis (PCA) allowed a clear distinction between the two groups. As head and neck cancer can be completely removed by surgery, the breath of cured patients was investigated after surgery again and the results were similar to those of the healthy control group, indicating that surgery was successful. PMID:27455276

  6. Coping strategies in a sample of anxiety patients: factorial analysis and associations with psychopathology

    PubMed Central

    Pozzi, Gino; Frustaci, Alessandra; Tedeschi, Daniela; Solaroli, Silvia; Grandinetti, Paolo; Di Nicola, Marco; Janiri, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Background The relationship between coping styles and mental disorders has received considerable attention and instruments have been developed to assess coping strategies. The measurement by means of category systems has been criticized and a functional hierarchy of action types linked to the adaptive processes is preferred. We aimed to determine which factors may exist within the Brief-COPE (Brief Coping Orientation to Problems Experienced – COPE – Inventory) in an Italian sample of patients with anxiety disorders; and if these factors correlate with the severity of psychopathology or with other characteristics. Methods A total sample of 148 patients was recruited. The Brief-COPE inventory, the Symptom Check List 90-Revised, the Penn State Worry Questionnaire, the Zung Anxiety Status Inventory and the Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale were administered. Results Factor analysis of the Brief-COPE yielded nine factors accounting for 65.48% of the variance. Patients scored higher on Searching Support, followed by Acceptance, Changing Perspective, and Problem Solving. Associations between measures of psychopathology and factors of coping strategies, mostly Searching support and Avoidance, were found. Conclusions Data of the present study support a nine-factor structure of the Brief-COPE that includes five broad dimensions of coping. Psychopathology was mostly related to Searching support and Avoidance factors, showing that these strategies may reflect ineffective ways of coping; Problem solving and Changing perspective could be a valid approach to moderate anxiety/depression symptoms and psychopathology in general. PMID:26356192

  7. [Bacterial isolates from respiratory samples of pediatric patients with cystic fibrosis and their distribution by ages].

    PubMed

    Busquets, Natalia P; Baroni, María R; Ochoteco, María C; Zurbriggen, María L; Virgolini, Stella; Meneghetti, Fernando G

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial isolates from respiratory samples of 50 pediatric patients with cystic fibrosis, their distribution by ages and antimicrobial resistance pattern as well as the intermittence of isolations and coinfections, were investigated. Staphylococcus aureus was isolated in 72 % of patients, followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (58 %), Haemophilus. influenzae (56 %), and the Burkholderia cepacia complex (12 %). The frequency of resistance of P. aeruginosa isolates to β-lactam antibiotics was low (13.8 %). Fifty percent of S. aureus isolates was methicillin-resistant, and 57.1 % of H. influenza was ampicillin resistant due to β-lactamase production. In children under 4 years-old, S. aureus was predominant, followed by P. aeruginosa and H. influenzae. This order of predominance was observed in all the groups studied, except in that of children between 10 and 14 years-old. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Achromobacter xylosoxidans isolates were intermittent and accompanied by other microorganisms. Finally, we observed a great variety of bacterial species, which imposes stringent performance requirements for microbiological studies in all respiratory samples of these patients.

  8. Automated high-throughput in vitro screening of the acetylcholine esterase inhibiting potential of environmental samples, mixtures and single compounds.

    PubMed

    Froment, Jean; Thomas, Kevin V; Tollefsen, Knut Erik

    2016-08-01

    A high-throughput and automated assay for testing the presence of acetylcholine esterase (AChE) inhibiting compounds was developed, validated and applied to screen different types of environmental samples. Automation involved using the assay in 96-well plates and adapting it for the use with an automated workstation. Validation was performed by comparing the results of the automated assay with that of a previously validated and standardised assay for two known AChE inhibitors (paraoxon and dichlorvos). The results show that the assay provides similar concentration-response curves (CRCs) when run according to the manual and automated protocol. Automation of the assay resulted in a reduction in assay run time as well as in intra- and inter-assay variations. High-quality CRCs were obtained for both of the model AChE inhibitors (dichlorvos IC50=120µM and paraoxon IC50=0.56µM) when tested alone. The effect of co-exposure of an equipotent binary mixture of the two chemicals were consistent with predictions of additivity and best described by the concentration addition model for combined toxicity. Extracts of different environmental samples (landfill leachate, wastewater treatment plant effluent, and road tunnel construction run-off) were then screened for AChE inhibiting activity using the automated bioassay, with only landfill leachate shown to contain potential AChE inhibitors. Potential uses and limitations of the assay were discussed based on the present results.

  9. Evoked potentials in the management of patients with cochlear implants: research and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Kileny, Paul R

    2007-04-01

    Evoked potential measures are integral to the treatment of patients with cochlear implants. In particular, these techniques are useful in the management of the pediatric patient. This brief report describes three categories of evoked potentials including clinical and research examples: electrically evoked auditory brain stem responses with transtympanic stimulation, middle-latency responses with cochlear implant stimulation, and cognitive evoked potentials elicited by speech stimuli.

  10. Presence of potentially pathogenic free-living amoebae strains from well water samples in Guinea-Bissau

    PubMed Central

    Baquero, Rocío A; Reyes-Batlle, María; Nicola, Graciela G; Martín-Navarro, Carmen M; López-Arencibia, Atteneri; Guillermo Esteban, J; Valladares, Basilio; Martínez-Carretero, Enrique; Piñero, José E; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Free-living amoebae (FLA) include opportunistic pathogens such as Naegleria fowleri, Balamuthia mandrillaris, and the genera Sappinia and Acanthamoeba. In this study, a survey was conducted in order to evaluate the presence of potentially pathogenic amoebic strains in water samples collected from wells located in the western part of Guinea-Bissau. The samples were left to precipitate for 48 hours and then the sediments were seeded on non-nutrient agar plates containing Escherichia coli spread and cultures were checked daily for the presence of FLA. Identification of FLA strains was based on the morphological and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using the 18S rDNA or 16S mitochondrial rDNA genes in the case of Naegleria and Balamuthia genera, respectively. In the case of positive samples of Acanthamoeba, strains were further classified at the genotype level by sequencing the diagnostic fragment 3 (DF3) region located in the 18S rDNA gene as previously described. Sappinia sp. was not isolated during the study and thus, no molecular analysis was performed for this genus. The obtained results revealed the presence of Acanthamoeba (genotypes T3 and T4), Naegleria fowleri, and Balamuthia mandrillaris. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating the presence of FLA in water bodies from Guinea-Bissau and the first report on the isolation of Balamuthia mandrillaris from environmental sources in Africa. PMID:24934796

  11. Personalised proteome analysis by means of protein microarrays made from individual patient samples

    PubMed Central

    Syafrizayanti; Lueong, Smiths S.; Di, Cuixia; Schaefer, Jonas V.; Plückthun, Andreas; Hoheisel, Jörg D.

    2017-01-01

    DNA sequencing has advanced to a state that permits studying the genomes of individual patients as nearly a matter of routine. Towards analysing a tissue’s protein content in a similar manner, we established a method for the production of microarrays that represent full-length proteins as they are encoded in individual specimens, exhibiting the particular variations, such as mutations or splice variations, present in these samples. From total RNA isolates, each transcript is copied to a specific location on the array by an on-chip polymerase elongation reaction, followed by in situ cell-free transcription and translation. These microarrays permit parallel analyses of variations in protein structure and interaction that are specific to particular samples. PMID:28045055

  12. Multielemental analysis of samples from patients with dermatological pathologies using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, J. C. A. C. R.; Canellas, C. G. L.; Anjos, M. J.; Lopes, R. T.

    2014-02-01

    Using synchrotron radiation total X-ray fluorescence (SRTXRF) technique, the concentrations of trace elements were measured in four skin lesions: seborrheic keratosis, fibroepithelial polyp, cherry angioma and dermatosis papulosa nigra. The concentrations of P, S, K, Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn and Rb were evaluated in 62 pairs of lesions and healthy samples, each one having been collected from the same patient. The results revealed significant differences of P, Ca, K, Fe and Cu levels as well as a common trend in their variations between lesion and control samples among the skin diseases. This study revealed a powerful tool that can be useful for skin disorders research. The measurements were conducted at Brazilian National Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS).

  13. Adolescents with personality disorders suffer from severe psychiatric stigma: evidence from a sample of 131 patients

    PubMed Central

    Catthoor, Kirsten; Feenstra, Dine J; Hutsebaut, Joost; Schrijvers, Didier; Sabbe, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the study is to assess the severity of psychiatric stigma in a sample of personality disordered adolescents in order to evaluate whether differences in stigma can be found in adolescents with different types and severity of personality disorders (PDs). Not only adults but children and adolescents with mental health problems suffer from psychiatric stigma. In contrast to the abundance of research in adult psychiatric samples, stigma in children and adolescents has hardly been investigated. Personality disordered adolescents with fragile identities and self-esteem might be especially prone to feeling stigmatized, an experience which might further shape their identity throughout this critical developmental phase. Materials and methods One hundred thirty-one adolescent patients underwent a standard assessment with Axis I and Axis II diagnostic interviews and two stigma instruments, Stigma Consciousness Questionnaire (SCQ) and Perceived Devaluation–Discrimination Questionnaire (PDDQ). Independent sample t-tests were used to investigate differences in the mean SCQ and PDDQ total scores for patients with and without a PD. Multiple regression main effect analyses were conducted to explore the impact of the different PDs on level of stigma, as well as comorbid Axis I disorders. Age and sex were also entered in the regression models. Results and conclusions Adolescents with severe mental health problems experience a burden of stigma. Personality disordered patients experience more stigma than adolescents with other severe psychiatric Axis I disorders. Borderline PD is the strongest predictor of experiences of stigma. More severely personality disordered adolescents tend to experience the highest level of stigma. PMID:25999774

  14. [The clinical significance of Aspergillus isolation from airway samples in critically ill patients].

    PubMed

    Shi, Yan; Liu, Hong-zhong; Wang, Xiao-ting; Liu, Ye; Rui, Xi; Tang, Bo; Chai, Wen-zhao; Zhao, Hua

    2009-06-01

    To analyze the risk factors and clinical significance of Aspergillus isolation from airway samples of critically ill patients. The study was conducted in an ICU between January 2007 and December 2007. The data of patients receiving mechanical ventilation with suspected invasive pulmonary fungal infection were analyzed. Tracheal aspirates were collected and cultured 3 times weekly. The cases were classified into groups of Aspergillus spp, Candida spp, and non-fungus spp according to the microbiological results. Isolation of Aspergillus spp. was subgrouped to proved-IPA (invasive pulmonary aspergillosis), probable-IPA or colonization. The risk factors for airway isolation of Aspergillus and infection were assessed. Statistical analysis was performed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) for Windows (version 12.0) and quantitative variables were expressed as mean +/- standard deviation. The Student' s t-test or the Mann-Whitney U-test was used for the comparison of categorical and normally distributed and non normally distributed variables, respectively. The chi2 test or the Fisher's exact test was used in the comparison of categorical variables. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to evaluate risk factors for the isolation of Aspergillus spp. The study population included 160 patients (82 men) with a mean age of (64.5 +/- 17.2) years. Aspergillus spp was isolated in 45, Candida spp in 63, and non-fungus spp in 52. The ICU mortality in the 3 groups was 48.9% (22/45 cases), 23.8% (15/63 cases), 7.7% (4/52 cases), respectively. The ICU mortality in patients with Aspergillus spp. isolation was higher than those with Candida spp and non-fungus spp. In 28 patients isolation of Aspergillus spp. was interpreted as invasive aspergillosis (2 patients were proven, 26 patients were probable). The predictive value of isolating Aspergillus from airway samples was 62% (28/45 cases). On multivariate analysis, the following factors were independently

  15. Micronutrients, their potential effect on patients with systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Wan, Ya-Nan; Yan, Jun-Wei; Peng, Wen-Jia; Zhang, Jun-Qing; Xiao, Chang-Chun; Wang, Bing-Xiang; Wang, Jing

    2014-09-01

    Over the past years, several evidences have supported an important role of specific micronutrients, including vitamin A, vitamin D and vitamin E in immune dysfunction, vascular involvement and fibrotic changes involved in systemic sclerosis (SSc) development. In PubMed, eight clinical trials about the therapy of micronutrients on SSc patients were searched out using medical subject headings terms (SSc: "scleroderma, localized", "scleroderma, systemic", "scleroderma, diffuse" and "scleroderma, limited"; vitamins "vitamin A", "thiamin", "riboflavin", "niacin", "pantothenic acid", "vitamin B 6", "biotin", "folic acid", "vitamin B 12", "inositol", "choline", "ascorbic acid", "vitamin D", "vitamin E", "tocopherols", "vitamin K" and "vitamin P"; and minerals: "calcium", "magnesium", "potassium", "sodium", "phosphorus", "sulfur", "chlorine", "iron", "copper", "iodine", "zinc", "selenium", "manganese", "molybdenum", "cobalt", "chromium", "tin", "vanadium", "silicon", "nickel" and "fluorine"). This brief review will summarize current understanding on that for the further prospect of future studies. Though the clinical trials for the treatment of SSc with micronutrients are still in their infancy, more researches are needed to substantiate the current results and accelerate the knowledge in this field.

  16. The prevalence of self-harm behaviors in a consecutive sample of cardiac stress test patients.

    PubMed

    Sansone, Randy A; Dittoe, Nathaniel; Hahn, Harvey S; Wiederman, Michael W

    2011-01-01

    While self-harm behavior has been studied in various psychiatric populations, particularly the behaviors of suicide attempts and completions, little empirical data exists on the lifetime prevalence of various self-harm behaviors in non-psychiatric populations. In the present study, using a cross-sectional approach and a self-report survey methodology, we examined the lifetime prevalence of 22 self-harm behaviors in a consecutive sample of 250 patients undergoing cardiac stress testing. Results indicated that abuse alcohol was most common (17.2%) followed by promiscuity (10.4%); 6% reported a previous suicide atatempt. Findings indicate areas of clinician inquiry for self-harm behaviors in non-psychiatric patients.

  17. MicroRNA Profiling of Pericardial Fluid Samples from Patients with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kuosmanen, Suvi M.; Hartikainen, Juha; Hippeläinen, Mikko; Kokki, Hannu

    2015-01-01

    Aims Multicellular organisms maintain vital functions through intercellular communication. Release of extracellular vesicles that carry signals to even distant target organs is one way of accomplishing this communication. MicroRNAs can also be secreted from the cells in exosomes and act as paracrine signalling molecules. In addition, microRNAs have been implicated in the pathogenesis of a large number of diseases, including cardiovascular diseases, and are considered as promising candidate biomarkers due to their relative stability and easy quantification from clinical samples. Pericardial fluid contains hormones secreted by the heart and is known to reflect the cardiac function. In this study, we sought to investigate whether pericardial fluid contains microRNAs and if so, whether they could be used to distinguish between different cardiovascular pathologies and disease stages. Methods and Results Pericardial fluid was collected from heart failure patients during open-heart surgery. MicroRNA profiles of altogether 51 patients were measured by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) using Exiqon human panels I and II. On the average, 256 microRNAs were detected per sample, and 70 microRNAs out of 742 profiled microRNAs were detected in every sample. The five most abundant microRNAs in pericardial fluid were miR-21-5p, miR-451a, miR-125b-5p, let-7b-5p and miR-16-5p. No specific signatures for cardiovascular pathologies or clinically assessed heart failure stages could be detected from the profiles and, overall, microRNA profiles of the samples were found to be very similar despite the heterogeneity in the study population. Conclusion Measured microRNA profiles did not separate the samples according to the clinical features of the patients. However, several previously identified heart failure marker microRNAs were detected. The pericardial fluid microRNA profile appeared to be a result of an active and selective secretory process indicating that microRNAs may act as

  18. MicroRNA profiling of pericardial fluid samples from patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kuosmanen, Suvi M; Hartikainen, Juha; Hippeläinen, Mikko; Kokki, Hannu; Levonen, Anna-Liisa; Tavi, Pasi

    2015-01-01

    Multicellular organisms maintain vital functions through intercellular communication. Release of extracellular vesicles that carry signals to even distant target organs is one way of accomplishing this communication. MicroRNAs can also be secreted from the cells in exosomes and act as paracrine signalling molecules. In addition, microRNAs have been implicated in the pathogenesis of a large number of diseases, including cardiovascular diseases, and are considered as promising candidate biomarkers due to their relative stability and easy quantification from clinical samples. Pericardial fluid contains hormones secreted by the heart and is known to reflect the cardiac function. In this study, we sought to investigate whether pericardial fluid contains microRNAs and if so, whether they could be used to distinguish between different cardiovascular pathologies and disease stages. Pericardial fluid was collected from heart failure patients during open-heart surgery. MicroRNA profiles of altogether 51 patients were measured by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) using Exiqon human panels I and II. On the average, 256 microRNAs were detected per sample, and 70 microRNAs out of 742 profiled microRNAs were detected in every sample. The five most abundant microRNAs in pericardial fluid were miR-21-5p, miR-451a, miR-125b-5p, let-7b-5p and miR-16-5p. No specific signatures for cardiovascular pathologies or clinically assessed heart failure stages could be detected from the profiles and, overall, microRNA profiles of the samples were found to be very similar despite the heterogeneity in the study population. Measured microRNA profiles did not separate the samples according to the clinical features of the patients. However, several previously identified heart failure marker microRNAs were detected. The pericardial fluid microRNA profile appeared to be a result of an active and selective secretory process indicating that microRNAs may act as paracrine signalling factors by mediating

  19. Human Endogenous Retrovirus Expression Profiles in Samples from Brains of Patients with Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Oliver; Giehl, Michelle; Zheng, Chun; Hehlmann, Rüdiger; Leib-Mösch, Christine; Seifarth, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    The detection and identification of retroviral transcripts in brain samples, cerebrospinal fluid, and plasma of individuals with recent-onset schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorders suggest that activation or upregulation of distinct human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) may play a role in the etiopathogenesis of neuropsychiatric diseases. To test this hypothesis, we performed a comprehensive microarray-based analysis of HERV transcriptional activity in human brains. We investigated 50 representative members of 20 HERV families in a total of 215 brain samples derived from individuals with schizophrenia or bipolar disorders and matched controls. A characteristic brain-specific retroviral activity profile was found that consists of members of the class I families HERV-E, HERV-F, and ERV9 and members of HERV-K taxa. In addition to these constitutively expressed HERVs, a number of differentially active HERV elements were identified in all brain samples independent of the disease pattern that may reflect differences in the genetic background of the tested individuals. Only a subgroup of the HML-2 family (HERV-K10) was significantly overrepresented in both bipolar-disorder- and schizophrenia-associated samples compared to healthy brains, suggesting a potential association with disease. Real-time PCR analysis of HERV env transcripts with coding capacity potentially involved in neuroinflammatory conditions revealed that env expression of HERV-W, HERV-FRD, and HML-2 remains unaffected regardless of the clinical picture. Our data suggest that HERV transcription in brains is weakly correlated with schizophrenia and related diseases but may be influenced by the individual genetic background, brain-infiltrating immune cells, or medical treatment. PMID:16103141

  20. Stratifying patients with peripheral neuropathic pain based on sensory profiles: algorithm and sample size recommendations.

    PubMed

    Vollert, Jan; Maier, Christoph; Attal, Nadine; Bennett, David L H; Bouhassira, Didier; Enax-Krumova, Elena K; Finnerup, Nanna B; Freynhagen, Rainer; Gierthmühlen, Janne; Haanpää, Maija; Hansson, Per; Hüllemann, Philipp; Jensen, Troels S; Magerl, Walter; Ramirez, Juan D; Rice, Andrew S C; Schuh-Hofer, Sigrid; Segerdahl, Märta; Serra, Jordi; Shillo, Pallai R; Sindrup, Soeren; Tesfaye, Solomon; Themistocleous, Andreas C; Tölle, Thomas R; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Baron, Ralf

    2017-08-01

    In a recent cluster analysis, it has been shown that patients with peripheral neuropathic pain can be grouped into 3 sensory phenotypes based on quantitative sensory testing profiles, which are mainly characterized by either sensory loss, intact sensory function and mild thermal hyperalgesia and/or allodynia, or loss of thermal detection and mild mechanical hyperalgesia and/or allodynia. Here, we present an algorithm for allocation of individual patients to these subgroups. The algorithm is nondeterministic-ie, a patient can be sorted to more than one phenotype-and can separate patients with neuropathic pain from healthy subjects (sensitivity: 78%, specificity: 94%). We evaluated the frequency of each phenotype in a population of patients with painful diabetic polyneuropathy (n = 151), painful peripheral nerve injury (n = 335), and postherpetic neuralgia (n = 97) and propose sample sizes of study populations that need to be screened to reach a subpopulation large enough to conduct a phenotype-stratified study. The most common phenotype in diabetic polyneuropathy was sensory loss (83%), followed by mechanical hyperalgesia (75%) and thermal hyperalgesia (34%, note that percentages are overlapping and not additive). In peripheral nerve injury, frequencies were 37%, 59%, and 50%, and in postherpetic neuralgia, frequencies were 31%, 63%, and 46%. For parallel study design, either the estimated effect size of the treatment needs to be high (>0.7) or only phenotypes that are frequent in the clinical entity under study can realistically be performed. For crossover design, populations under 200 patients screened are sufficient for all phenotypes and clinical entities with a minimum estimated treatment effect size of 0.5.

  1. [Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms in a Sample of Patients with Chronic Schizophrenia Under Clozapine Treatment].

    PubMed

    Schreiter, S; Hasan, A; Majic, T; Wullschleger, A; Schouler-Ocak, M; Bermpohl, F; Gutwinski, S

    2016-11-01

    Background: There is a high prevalence of obsessive-compulsive symptoms (OCS) in patients with schizophrenia. Antipsychotic treatment, especially duration and type of substance, is suspected to increase or even cause OCS. Methods: We examined in a naturalistic cross-sectional study the severity of OCS (Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory - Revised) and the incidence of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) according to ICD-10 criteria in 70 patients with schizophrenia. 26 patients were treated with clozapine and 44 patients were treated with another second-generation antipsychotic (SGA). After group matching, the two groups did not differ significantly in age, gender, duration of illness, treatment duration with the current antipsychotic substance and chlorpromazine-equivalent dosage. Results: Patients treated with Clozapine showed a significantly higher rate of OCD (χ(2) = 7.304, p = 0.007) and a significantly higher severity of OCS (t = 2.216, p = 0.037) compared to patients treated with another SGA. For the whole sample, duration of treatment with the current antipsychotic medication correlated significantly (p = 0.033, r = 0.323) with the severity of OCS, controlled for duration of illness. However, there was no significant correlation between severity of OCS and duration of illness, controlled for duration of treatment with the current antipsychotic substance. Discussion: Our data suggest an interrelation between the development of OCS or OCD and antipsychotic treatment, especially clozapine. Thereby, duration of treatment is correlated with the severity of OCS, irrespective of the duration of illness.

  2. Metabolomics profiling in plasma samples from glioma patients correlates with tumor phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hua; Heimberger, Amy B.; Lu, Zhimin; Wu, Xifeng; Hodges, Tiffany R.; Song, Renduo; Shen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Background Tumor-based molecular biomarkers have redefined in the classification gliomas. However, the association of systemic metabolomics with glioma phenotype has not been explored yet. Methods In this study, we conducted two-step (discovery and validation) metabolomic profiling in plasma samples from 87 glioma patients. The metabolomics data were tested for correlation with glioma grade (high vs low), glioblastoma (GBM) versus malignant gliomas, and IDH mutation status. Results Five metabolites, namely uracil, arginine, lactate, cystamine, and ornithine, significantly differed between high- and low-grade glioma patients in both the discovery and validation cohorts. When the discovery and validation cohorts were combined, we identified 29 significant metabolites with 18 remaining significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Those 18 significant metabolites separated high- from low-grade glioma patients with 91.1% accuracy. In the pathway analysis, a total of 18 significantly metabolic pathways were identified. Similarly, we identified 2 and 6 metabolites that significantly differed between GBM and non-GBM, and IDH mutation positive and negative patients after multiple comparison adjusting. Those 6 significant metabolites separated IDH1 mutation positive from negative glioma patients with 94.4% accuracy. Three pathways were identified to be associated with IDH mutation status. Within arginine and proline metabolism, levels of intermediate metabolites in creatine pathway were all significantly lower in IDH mutation positive than in negative patients, suggesting an increased activity of creatine pathway in IDH mutation positive tumors. Conclusion Our findings identified metabolites and metabolic pathways that differentiated tumor phenotypes. These may be useful as host biomarker candidates to further help glioma molecular classification. PMID:26967252

  3. Stratifying patients with peripheral neuropathic pain based on sensory profiles: algorithm and sample size recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Vollert, Jan; Maier, Christoph; Attal, Nadine; Bennett, David L.H.; Bouhassira, Didier; Enax-Krumova, Elena K.; Finnerup, Nanna B.; Freynhagen, Rainer; Gierthmühlen, Janne; Haanpää, Maija; Hansson, Per; Hüllemann, Philipp; Jensen, Troels S.; Magerl, Walter; Ramirez, Juan D.; Rice, Andrew S.C.; Schuh-Hofer, Sigrid; Segerdahl, Märta; Serra, Jordi; Shillo, Pallai R.; Sindrup, Soeren; Tesfaye, Solomon; Themistocleous, Andreas C.; Tölle, Thomas R.; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Baron, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    Abstract In a recent cluster analysis, it has been shown that patients with peripheral neuropathic pain can be grouped into 3 sensory phenotypes based on quantitative sensory testing profiles, which are mainly characterized by either sensory loss, intact sensory function and mild thermal hyperalgesia and/or allodynia, or loss of thermal detection and mild mechanical hyperalgesia and/or allodynia. Here, we present an algorithm for allocation of individual patients to these subgroups. The algorithm is nondeterministic—ie, a patient can be sorted to more than one phenotype—and can separate patients with neuropathic pain from healthy subjects (sensitivity: 78%, specificity: 94%). We evaluated the frequency of each phenotype in a population of patients with painful diabetic polyneuropathy (n = 151), painful peripheral nerve injury (n = 335), and postherpetic neuralgia (n = 97) and propose sample sizes of study populations that need to be screened to reach a subpopulation large enough to conduct a phenotype-stratified study. The most common phenotype in diabetic polyneuropathy was sensory loss (83%), followed by mechanical hyperalgesia (75%) and thermal hyperalgesia (34%, note that percentages are overlapping and not additive). In peripheral nerve injury, frequencies were 37%, 59%, and 50%, and in postherpetic neuralgia, frequencies were 31%, 63%, and 46%. For parallel study design, either the estimated effect size of the treatment needs to be high (>0.7) or only phenotypes that are frequent in the clinical entity under study can realistically be performed. For crossover design, populations under 200 patients screened are sufficient for all phenotypes and clinical entities with a minimum estimated treatment effect size of 0.5. PMID:28595241

  4. Temporomandibular joint osseous morphology in a consecutive sample of ankylosing spondylitis patients

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Remus, C.; Major, P.; Gomez-Vargas, A.; Petrikowski, G.; Hernandez-Chavez, A.; Gonzalez-Marin, E.; Russell, A.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To evaluate temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osseous morphology in a consecutive sample of Mexican patients with ankylosing spondylitis.
METHODS—Consecutive patients with a diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis who attended two secondary care outpatient rheumatology clinics were included in the study. Patients had a rheumatological assessment using a structured questionnaire and examination. Recorded variables included demographic data, disease characteristics, TMJ symptoms, and axial mobility measurements. Hypocycloidal tomography of the TMJ was obtained on all subjects. Radiographic variables included condyle position, superior joint space, range of movement, condylar osseous changes, and temporal osseous changes. Patients also underwent standard cervical spine radiography. A control group of normal people without either TMJ symptoms or systemic rheumatic disease was obtained.
RESULTS—65 subjects were studied (65 right sided and 63 left sided tomograms). The control group consisted of 22 individuals. Both groups were similar in age [33 (SD 11) v 34 (9) years, P = 0.8]. Patients with ankylosing spondylitis had more variability in TMJ mobility than controls (P < 0.05) and showed increased frequency of condylar erosions (P < 0.01), flattening (P < 0.01), sclerosis (P < 0.01), and temporal flattening (P < 0.01). Condylar erosions were associated with longer duration of ankylosing spondylitis (P < 0.05), neck complaints (P < 0.05), and atlantoaxial subluxation (P < 0.05).
CONCLUSIONS—TMJ involvement is frequent in this population of patients with ankylosing spondylitis and is associated with variables that suggest more severe disease.

 PMID:9068282

  5. The suicidality continuum in a large sample of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) patients.

    PubMed

    Velloso, P; Piccinato, C; Ferrão, Y; Aliende Perin, E; Cesar, R; Fontenelle, L; Hounie, A G; do Rosário, M C

    2016-10-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has a chronic course leading to huge impact in the patient's functioning. Suicidal thoughts and attempts are much more frequent in OCD subjects than once thought before. To empirically investigate whether the suicidal phenomena could be analyzed as a suicidality severity continuum and its association with obsessive-compulsive (OC) symptom dimensions and quality of life (QoL), in a large OCD sample. Cross-sectional study with 548 patients diagnosed with OCD according to the DSM-IV criteria, interviewed in the Brazilian OCD Consortium (C-TOC) sites. Patients were evaluated by OCD experts using standardized instruments including: Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (YBOCS); Dimensional Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (DYBOCS); Beck Depression and Anxiety Inventories; Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID); and the SF-36 QoL Health Survey. There were extremely high correlations between all the suicidal phenomena. OCD patients with suicidality had significantly lower QoL, higher severity in the "sexual/religious", "aggression" and "symmetry/ordering" OC symptom dimensions, higher BDI and BA scores and a higher frequency of suicide attempts in a family member. In the regression analysis, the factors that most impacted suicidality were the sexual dimension severity, the SF-36 QoL Mental Health domain, the severity of depressive symptoms and a relative with an attempted suicide history. Suicidality could be analyzed as a severity continuum and patients should be carefully monitored since they present with suicidal ideation. Lower QoL scores, higher scores on the sexual dimension and a family history of suicide attempts should be considered as risk factors for suicidality among OCD patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Prevalence and Measurement of Anxiety in Samples of Patients With Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Easton, Katherine; Coventry, Peter; Lovell, Karina; Carter, Lesley-Anne; Deaton, Christi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Rates of anxiety in patients with heart failure (HF) vary widely, and not all assessment instruments used in this patient population are appropriate. It is timely to consolidate the evidence base and establish the prevalence and variance of anxiety in HF samples. Methods: A systematic review, meta-analysis, and meta-regression were conducted to identify the prevalence, variance, and measurement of anxiety in patients with HF. Results: A total of 14,367 citations were identified, with 73 studies meeting inclusion criteria. A random effects pooled prevalence of 13.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 9.25%–16.86%) for anxiety disorders, 28.79% (95% CI, 23.30%–34.29) for probable clinically significant anxiety, and 55.5% (95% CI, 48.08%–62.83%) for elevated symptoms of anxiety was identified. Rates of anxiety were highest when measured using the Brief Symptom Scale-Anxiety scale (72.3%) and lowest when measured using the Generalised Anxiety Disorder-7 (6.3%). Conclusion: Many patients with HF would benefit if screened for anxiety and treated. The conceptualization and measurement of anxiety accounted for most variance in prevalence rates. The Generalised Anxiety Disorder-7 or the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale appear to be the most appropriate instruments for this clinical population, with evidence to suggest they can discriminate between depression and anxiety, omit somatic items that may contaminate identification of anxiety in a population with physical comorbidities, and provide thresholds with which to differentiate patients and target treatments. Although there are limitations with the collation of diverse measurement methods, the current review provides researchers and clinicians with a more granular knowledge of prevalence estimates of anxiety in a population of HF patients. PMID:25930162

  7. Tablet splitting of psychotropic drugs for patients with dementia: a pharmacoepidemiologic study in a Brazilian sample.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas Starling, Flávio; Medeiros-Souza, Patrícia; Francisco de Camargos, Einstein; Ferreira, Felipe; Rodrigues Silva, Alessandra; Homem-de-Mello, Maurício

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the frequency of tablet splitting of psychotropic drugs in a population of older adults with a diagnosis of dementia. This retrospective, cross-sectional study examined a sample of geriatric outpatients seen at a public center specializing in the care of elderly patients, a referral center for management of dementias in general, especially Alzheimer dementia to identify the frequency of tablet splitting of psychotropic drugs and the factors that may be involved in this practice. Comparison of the presence or absence of tablet splitting in relation to several parameters was assessed by means of P values; between-group differences with an α < 5% (P < 0.05) were deemed significant. The presence of dementia was significantly associated with prescriptions implying to split tablets, which was found in 88 patients with dementia (34.9%) versus 90 patients without dementia (23.7%) (P = 0.002). Among the 88 patients with dementia who split tablets, 64 (72.7%) split tablets of psychotropic drugs. These results indicate the importance of identifying the practice of tablet splitting, particularly when it involves psychotropic drugs, because it entails several factors that can reduce the efficacy of the drug therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Determinants of receiving intravenous sedation in a sample of dentally-fearful patients in the USA

    PubMed Central

    Coolidge, Trilby; Irwin, Scott P.; Leyster, Kimberly A.; Milgrom, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Dental fear may be the most common reason for referral for intravenous sedation. Intravenous sedation offers many patients an opportunity to obtain needed dental care. However, intravenous sedation also has costs and may not help patients overcome their fear. Given a sample of 518 dentally-fearful patients in the USA presenting for dental care, this study examined the variables which predicted receiving intravenous sedation or not. About one-fifth of the patients received intravenous sedation, while the others received only cognitive behavioural therapy. Having more carious teeth, higher dental fear, more negative beliefs about dentists, lifetime diagnoses of panic disorder and/or generalized anxiety disorder, fewer existing coping skills, and a lower desire to cope with the dental situation were each predictive of having intravenous sedation. When the variables were considered simultaneously, only lower desire to cope contributed uniquely to the prediction. In a setting where psychological treatment for dental fear is available, patients’ desire to cope with their fear was the most important factor in determining whether they received intravenous sedation or not. PMID:23264704

  9. Generating Virtual Patients by Multivariate and Discrete Re-Sampling Techniques.

    PubMed

    Teutonico, D; Musuamba, F; Maas, H J; Facius, A; Yang, S; Danhof, M; Della Pasqua, O

    2015-10-01

    Clinical Trial Simulations (CTS) are a valuable tool for decision-making during drug development. However, to obtain realistic simulation scenarios, the patients included in the CTS must be representative of the target population. This is particularly important when covariate effects exist that may affect the outcome of a trial. The objective of our investigation was to evaluate and compare CTS results using re-sampling from a population pool and multivariate distributions to simulate patient covariates. COPD was selected as paradigm disease for the purposes of our analysis, FEV1 was used as response measure and the effects of a hypothetical intervention were evaluated in different populations in order to assess the predictive performance of the two methods. Our results show that the multivariate distribution method produces realistic covariate correlations, comparable to the real population. Moreover, it allows simulation of patient characteristics beyond the limits of inclusion and exclusion criteria in historical protocols. Both methods, discrete resampling and multivariate distribution generate realistic pools of virtual patients. However the use of a multivariate distribution enable more flexible simulation scenarios since it is not necessarily bound to the existing covariate combinations in the available clinical data sets.

  10. Association of potentially inappropriate medication use with patient and prescriber characteristics in Medicare Part D.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Holly M; Luo, Ruili; Kuo, Yong-Fang; Baillargeon, Jacques; Goodwin, James S

    2013-07-01

    The use of potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) in older people is associated with increased risk of adverse drug events and hospitalization. This study aimed to determine the contribution of primary prescribers to variation in PIM use. This was a retrospective cohort study using 2008 Medicare Part D event files and claims data for a 100% sample of Texas beneficiaries. PIM use was defined as receiving any of 48 medications on the Beers 2003 list of PIMs. Patient characteristics associated with PIM use were determined using a multivariable model. A multilevel model for the odds of PIM use was constructed to evaluate the amount of variation in PIM use at the level of primary care prescriber, controlling for patient characteristics. Of 677,580 patients receiving prescriptions through Part D in 2008, 31.9% received a PIM. Sex, ethnicity, low-income subsidy eligibility, and hospitalization in 2007 were associated with PIM use. The strongest associations with higher PIM use were increasing number of prescribers and increasing number of medications. The odds ratio for PIM use was 1.50 (95%CI 1.47-1.53) for ≥4 prescribers versus only 1 prescriber. In the multilevel model, the adjusted average percent of patients prescribed a PIM ranged from 17.5% for the lowest decile to 28.9% for the highest decile of prescribers. PIM use was prevalent in Part D beneficiaries and varied among individual primary care prescribers. The association of PIM use with increasing numbers of prescribers suggests the need to reduce fragmentation of care to reduce inappropriate prescribing. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. [Are patients in the postpartum period potential egg donors?].

    PubMed

    Cabry-Goubet, R; Lombart, M; Scheffler-Garhieni, F; Lourdel, E; Carette, F; Devaux, A; Copin, H; Benkhalifa, M; Merviel, P

    2014-12-01

    In France, oocyte donation program is still underdeveloped because of lack of donors and this situation entails an important wave of cross border medical tourism to different European countries mainly Spain and Greece. In 2011, the General inspection of social affairs report recommended to the biomedicine agency to promote spontaneous oocyte donation via different channels of information to develop this national program. The main objective of this study is to assess the knowledge of women after baby delivery about oocyte donation. The second objective is the identification of ways to assure better information and to promote oocyte donation. We conducted a prospective study with anonymous questionnaire distribution to women after delivery at obstetrics/gynecology department of the Regional University Hospital and Maternity-Children Unit "Victor-Pauchet" of Amiens, from December 2012 to January 2013. Two hundred and fifty-five questionnaires were distributed and 242 of them were analyzed (94.9%). About oocyte donation knowledge: 28% did not know it was possible, 45% did not know it was legal in France, 54% did not know who was concerned and 36% know that a treatment is necessary, 9% think that oocyte donation is paid and 10% it is non-anonymous. If 67% seems to be favorable to this initiative, only 35% could accept to realize it. About information efficiency, 88% think not to receive enough information, 64% would like to have more information. The health care professional wanted to give this information is an obstetrician (51%), a midwife (37%) and a nurse (12%). Oocyte donation program is misoriented due to a lack of information. Obstetricians and midwives have an important educational and informative role to support oocyte donation. Specific strategy of communication and valuable targeted information are needed to motivate potential donor and achieve the objectives of the program. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Post-sampling mortality and non-response patterns in the English Cancer Patient Experience Survey: Implications for epidemiological studies based on surveys of cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Abel, Gary A; Saunders, Catherine L; Lyratzopoulos, Georgios

    2016-04-01

    Surveys of the experience of cancer patients are increasingly being introduced in different countries and used in cancer epidemiology research. Sampling processes, post-sampling mortality and survey non-response can influence the representativeness of cancer patient surveys. We examined predictors of post-sampling mortality and non-response among patients initially included in the sampling frame of the English Cancer Patient Experience Survey. We also compared the respondents' diagnostic case-mix to other relevant populations of cancer patients, including incident and prevalent cases. Of 109,477 initially sampled cancer patients, 6273 (5.7%) died between sampling and survey mail-out. Older age and diagnosis of brain, lung and pancreatic cancer were associated with higher risk of post-sampling mortality. The overall response rate was 67% (67,713 respondents), being >70% for the most affluent patients and those diagnosed with colon or breast cancer and <50% for Asian or Black patients, those under 35 and those diagnosed with brain cancer. The diagnostic case-mix of respondents varied substantially from incident or prevalent cancer cases. Respondents to the English Cancer Patient Experience Survey represent a population of recently treated cancer survivors. Although patient survey data can provide unique insights for improving cancer care quality, features of survey populations need to be acknowledged when analysing and interpreting findings from studies using such data. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Tri-State Synfuels Project Coal Sampling and Testing Program: Volume 1. Sampling and results. [Proposed Henderson, Kentucky coal to gasoline plant; sampling and testing other potential coal reserves for Lurgi gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-06-01

    This report focuses on the sampling and testing program of run-of-mine Illinois Basin coals which was conducted for the supply and design program of the Tri-State Synfuels Project. The basic objective was to identify coals suitable for Lurgi gasification which would supplement the Camp 1 coal used as the design coal for the Tri-State Synfuels Project. The Camp 1 coal had been selected for the commercial scale gasification test at Sasolburg on the basis of its proximity to the Towhead Island Reserves, plant site and similarity of coal quality. The information developed was used as technical guidance for: assessing reserves potentially available for the project during supply negotiations; establishing a sensitivity range for the Lurgi design which used the Camp 1 coal for heat and material balances (the maximum heat rates and flow rates were used to specify requirements for major equipment); and establishing environmental design criteria in the areas of wastewater treatment and solids disposal. These results are covered in the project review reports for development, engineering and environmental aspects. The sampling and testing program consisted of selecting, collecting, preparing and analyzing samples from ten mines in Kentucky, Indiana and Illinois. The mines were operated by Peabody, Island Creek, Amax and Old Ben coal companies and represented a mix of underground - both continuous and conventional mining - and strip mining. The two predominant seams in each of the three states were sampled. The resulting technical data were judged to be representative of the coal available from reserves of the various operators. Paul Weir Company was responsible for conducting the program.

  14. Mars Rover Proposed for 2018 to Seek Signs of Life and to Cache Samples for Potential Return to Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, L. M.

    2009-12-01

    The search for preserved evidence of life is the keystone concept for a new generation of Mars rover capable of exploring, sampling, and caching diverse suites of rocks from outcrops. The proposed mission is conceived to address two general objectives: conduct high-priority in situ science and make concrete steps towards the possible future return of samples to Earth. We propose the name Mars Astrobiology Explorer-Cacher (MAX-C) to best reflect the dual purpose of the proposed mission. The scientific objective of the proposed MAX-C would require rover access to a site with high preservation potential for physical and chemical biosignatures in order to evaluate paleo-environmental conditions, characterize the potential for preservation of biosignatures, and access multiple sequences of geological units in a search for evidence of past life and/or prebiotic chemistry. Samples addressing a variety of high-priority scientific objectives should be collected, documented, and packaged in a manner suitable for possible return to Earth by a future mission. Relevant experience from study of ancient terrestrial strata, martian meteorites, and from the Mars Exploration Rovers indicates that the proposed MAX-C’s interpretive capability should include: meter to submillimeter texture (optical imaging), mineral identification, major element content, and organic molecular composition. Analytical data should be obtained by direct investigation of outcrops and should not entail acquisition of rock chips or powders. We propose, therefore, a set of arm-mounted instruments that would be capable of interrogating a relatively smooth, abraded surface by creating co-registered 2-D maps of visual texture, mineralogy and geochemical properties. This approach is judged to have particularly high value for evaluating potential signs of ancient microbial life likely to be manifested at relatively small scale. Scientists could use the 2-D micro-mapping data to select an outstanding set of

  15. Development of a modified sampling and calculation method for isotope plasma clearance assessment of the glomerular filtration rate in patients with cirrhosis and ascites.

    PubMed

    Wickham, Fred; Burniston, Maria T; Xirouchakis, Elias; Theocharidou, Eleni; Wesolowski, Carl A; Hilson, Andrew J W; Burroughs, Andrew K

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to identify a practical sampling regimen and calculation method that could be used to measure the glomerular filtration rate in patients with ascites using plasma sampling. Thirteen potential liver transplant patients with cirrhosis and ascites were injected with Cr-51 ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, and plasma samples were obtained at up to 16 time points for each patient. Reference clearance values were calculated using the area under the plasma clearance curve, which was calculated using all the available data points. Clearance calculations were then performed using three and four data points from each patient and three different calculation methods to identify a sampling regimen and calculation method that yielded good agreement with the reference values. The reference clearances ranged from 6 to 80 ml/min. Sampling at 2, 4, 8 and 24 h and calculation of the area under the plasma clearance curve using a log-linear trapezoidal rule with extrapolation to zero and infinity yielded a relative root mean square difference from the reference of less than 7%. This method for measuring glomerular filtration rate in patients with cirrhosis and ascites was found to be more accurate than the slope-intercept technique and is a practical alternative to urine collection.

  16. Soluble Megalin is Reduced in Cerebrospinal Fluid Samples of Alzheimer’s Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Spuch, Carlos; Antequera, Desireé; Pascual, Consuelo; Abilleira, Soledad; Blanco, María; Moreno-Carretero, María José; Romero-López, Jesús; Ishida, Tetsuya; Molina, Jose Antonio; Villarejo, Alberto; Bermejo-Pareja, Felix; Carro, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Megalin or low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-2 is a member of the low-density lipoprotein receptor family, which has been linked to Alzheimer’s disease (AD) by clearing brain amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) across the blood–cerebrospinal fluid barrier at the choroid plexus. Here, we found a soluble form of megalin secreted from choroid plexus epithelial cells. Soluble megalin levels were also localized in the human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), being reduced in AD patients. We have also shown that soluble megalin binding to Aβ is decreased in the CSF of AD patients, suggesting that decreased sequestration of Aβ in the CSF could be associated with defective clearance of Aβ and an increase of brain Aβ levels. Thus, therapies, which increase megalin expression, at the choroid plexus and/or enhance circulating soluble megalin hold potential to control brain Aβ-related pathologies in AD. PMID:25926771

  17. A retrospective cross-sectional quantitative molecular approach in biological samples from patients with syphilis.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Miguel; Antelo, Minia; Ferreira, Rita; Azevedo, Jacinta; Santo, Irene; Borrego, Maria José; Gomes, João Paulo

    2017-03-01

    Syphilis is the sexually transmitted disease caused by Treponema pallidum, a pathogen highly adapted to the human host. As a multistage disease, syphilis presents distinct clinical manifestations that pose different implications for diagnosis. Nevertheless, the inherent factors leading to diverse disease progressions are still unknown. We aimed to assess the association between treponemal loads and dissimilar disease outcomes, to better understand syphilis. We retrospectively analyzed 309 DNA samples distinct anatomic sites associated with particular syphilis manifestations. All samples had previously tested positive by a PCR-based diagnostic kit. An absolute quantitative real-time PCR procedure was used to precisely quantify the number of treponemal and human cells to determine T. pallidum loads in each sample. In general, lesion exudates presented the highest T. pallidum loads in contrast with blood-derived samples. Within the latter, a higher dispersion of T. pallidum quantities was observed for secondary syphilis. T. pallidum was detected in substantial amounts in 37 samples of seronegative individuals and in 13 cases considered as syphilis-treated. No association was found between treponemal loads and serological results or HIV status. This study suggests a scenario where syphilis may be characterized by: i) heterogeneous and high treponemal loads in primary syphilis, regardless of the anatomic site, reflecting dissimilar duration of chancres development and resolution; ii) high dispersion of bacterial concentrations in secondary syphilis, potentially suggesting replication capability of T. pallidum while in the bloodstream; and iii) bacterial evasiveness, either to the host immune system or antibiotic treatment, while remaining hidden in privileged niches. This work highlights the importance of using molecular approaches to study uncultivable human pathogens, such as T. pallidum, in the infection process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  18. Frequency and correlates of maladaptive responses to paranoid thoughts in patients with psychosis compared to a population sample.

    PubMed

    Lincoln, Tania M; Möbius, Carolin; Huber, Martin T; Nagel, Matthias; Moritz, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to identify whether responses to paranoid thoughts distinguish patients with psychotic disorders from people in the population who have paranoid thoughts occasionally and to identify factors that are associated with and might explain the different ways of responding. Paranoid thoughts were assessed in patients diagnosed with a psychotic disorder (n = 32) and a population control sample (n = 34) with the Paranoia Checklist. Responses to paranoid thoughts were assessed with the Reactions to Paranoid Thoughts Scale (RePT) and social support, self-efficacy and cognitive insight were assessed as potential correlates of the responses to paranoid thoughts. The patients showed significantly more depressed, physical and devaluating responses to paranoid thoughts and employed less normalising responses than the controls. The differences in normalising responses were explained by perceived social integration, whereas the differences in depressive responses were explained by the overall levels of depression and partly explained by externality and social integration. Maladaptive responses to paranoid thoughts could be relevant to the pathogenesis and maintenance of persecutory delusions. Interventions aimed at reducing paranoia could benefit from targeting dysfunctional responses to paranoid thoughts and by placing a stronger emphasis on treating depression and improving social integration.

  19. Can Thromboelastography performed on kaolin-activated citrated samples from critically ill patients provide stable and consistent parameters?

    PubMed

    White, H; Zollinger, C; Jones, M; Bird, R

    2010-04-01

    Thromboelastography (TEG) is a potentially useful tool but analysis within 4-6 min of collection imposes limitations on its use and access. The use of citrate blood tubes potentially increases the time frame for processing specimens. There is, however, limited research on the stability of citrate specimens, timing of processing and the accuracy of TEG results. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of early and delayed processing on TEG parameters using kaolin-activated citrated blood samples in the intensive care population. TEG analysis was performed on 61 patients. Blood was collected into two 3.2% sodium citrate (0.105 m) tubes. Kaolin-activated samples were analysed at 15, 30 and 120 min postcollection. TEG parameters analysed included reaction time (R), clot formation time (K), alpha angle (alpha), maximum amplitude, LY30, the coagulation index, time to maximum rate of thrombus generation, maximum rate of thrombus generation and total thrombus generation. Sixty-one critically ill patients were included. The results of the anova showed that time from collection was significantly associated with the TEG((R)) results (P < 0.05). On comparison of individual outcome variables, this difference in most cases was due to changes over time from 30 to 120 min. Furthermore, progressive changes in TEG parameters such as decreasing R were suggestive of a trend toward hypercoagulability of the specimens. Processing of kaolin-activated citrate TEG specimens can begin as early as 15 min postvenipuncture. However, delaying processing by more than 30 min leads to a significant change in results.

  20. Bleach treatment of sputum samples aids pulmonary tuberculosis screening among HIV-infected patients in Laos.

    PubMed

    Thammavong, C; Paboriboune, P; Bouchard, B; Harimanana, A; Babin, F-X; Phimmasone, P; Berland, J-L; Buisson, Y

    2011-10-01

    Laos has a high prevalence of tuberculosis (TB) and a slowly increasing prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunedeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS). Sputum smear microscopy is the only method currently available for routine screening of pulmonary TB, although it only detects one in three cases among persons living with HIV (PLWH). Bleach treatment of sputum samples (bleach method) has been shown to significantly improve the sensitivity of the test; however, its effectiveness in PLWH remains to be determined in Laos. To determine the performance of the bleach method as a diagnostic tool for pulmonary TB in PLWH and to assess its cost-effectiveness in Laos. Of 174 sputum samples collected from 92 patients, 29 were culture-positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis in 17 patients. The sensitivity of the direct method and the bleach method was respectively 59% and 93%, and specificity was 100% for both methods. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for screening an additional case was US$17.40. The bleach method is simple, cheap, easy to perform and cost-effective in PLWH. Its implementation in laboratories involved in routine screening of pulmonary TB among PLWH would allow practitioners to start the treatment of this life-threatening co-infection earlier.

  1. Quality of life after videoscopic left cardiac sympathetic denervation in patients with potentially life-threatening cardiac channelopathies/cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Antiel, Ryan M; Bos, J Martijn; Joyce, Daniel D; Owen, Heidi J; Roskos, Penny L; Moir, Christopher; Ackerman, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Left cardiac sympathetic denervation (LCSD) provides an additive or potentially alternative treatment option for patients with life-threatening cardiac channelopathies/cardiomyopathies. We sought to examine the effects of LCSD on quality of life (QOL). From November 2005 to May 2013, 109 patients who underwent LCSD were subsequently sent postoperative QOL surveys. Of 109 patients, 8 (7%) could not be contacted. Of the remaining 101 patients, 62 returned surveys (response rate 61%). There were an average of 4.1 ± 1.8 self-reported side effects immediately after LCSD. The most common anticipated side effects included unilateral hand dryness, color or temperature variance between sides of the face, and abnormal sweating. Although parent-reported pediatric physical QOL scores were lower than national norms, there were no differences in psychosocial QOL or disability scores (P = .09 and .33, respectively). QOL scores for adult patients were not significantly different from a US normative sample. Adult LCSD patients reported less disability than a US normative sample (P < .01). There was no correlation between QOL scores and the presence of anticipated side effects. However, among the subset of pediatric patients who continued to receive ventricular fibrillation-terminating implantable cardioverter-defibrillator shocks after LCSD, there was a correlation between their disability scores and the number of reported shocks (Spearman correlation = 0.56). The majority of patients/parents reported that they were very or somewhat satisfied with their surgery (or their child's surgery) and would definitely or probably recommend LCSD to another patient. Despite the anticipated side effects associated with LCSD, patients are satisfied with their surgery and indicate that they would recommend the surgery to another patient. Copyright © 2016 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Do emergency department patients receive a pathological diagnosis? A nationally-representative sample.

    PubMed

    Wen, Leana S; Espinola, Janice A; Kosowsky, Joshua M; Camargo, Carlos A

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the cause of patients' symptoms often requires identifying a pathological diagnosis. A single-center study found that many patients discharged from the emergency department (ED) do not receive a pathological diagnosis. We analyzed 17 years of data from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) to identify the proportion of patients who received a pathological diagnosis at ED discharge. We hypothesized that many patients do not receive a pathological diagnosis, and that the proportion of pathological diagnoses increased between 1993 and 2009. Using the NHAMCS data from 1993-2009, we analyzed visits of patients age ≥18 years, discharged from the ED, who had presented with the three most common chief complaints: chest pain, abdominal pain, and headache. Discharge diagnoses were coded as symptomatic versus pathological based on a pre-defined coding system. We compared weighted annual proportions of pathological discharge diagnoses with 95% CIs and used logistic regression to test for trend. Among 299,919 sampled visits, 44,742 met inclusion criteria, allowing us to estimate that there were 164 million adult ED visits presenting with the three chief complaints and then discharged home. Among these visits, the proportions with pathological discharge diagnosis were 55%, 71%, and 70% for chest pain, abdominal pain, and headache, respectively. The total proportion of those with a pathological discharge diagnosis decreased between 1993 and 2009, from 72% (95% CI, 69-75%) to 63% (95% CI, 59-66%). In the multivariable logistic regression model, those more likely to receive pathological diagnoses were females, African-American as compared to Caucasian, and self-pay patients. Those more likely to receive a symptomatic diagnosis were patients aged 30-79 years, with visits to EDs in the South or West regions, and seen by a physician in the ED. In this analysis of a nationally-representative database of ED visits, many patients were discharged

  3. Impulsivity and risk for prescription opioid misuse in a chronic pain patient sample.

    PubMed

    Vest, Noel; Reynolds, Caleb J; Tragesser, Sarah L

    2016-09-01

    Misuse of, and addiction to, prescription opioid pain relievers is a growing concern, in both non-clinical samples and chronic pain patients receiving opioid analgesic therapy. Research is needed to identify which patients may be more prone to misuse or dependence on opioids in a chronic pain treatment setting. Based on literature showing the role of impulsivity in substance use disorders generally, we predicted that impulsivity may also be important to understanding which individuals may be at risk for opioid misuse when opioids are prescribed for pain. The present study examined associations between impulsivity facets and measures of prescription opioid misuse and symptoms. Four facets of impulsivity were examined: urgency, sensation seeking, lack of premeditation, and lack of perseverance. 143 patients receiving treatment for chronic pain at a regional pain clinic completed a series of questionnaires including the UPPS and measures of opioid risk and misuse. Consistent with predictions, urgency was associated with risk for future misuse (β=0.246, p<0.05), current misuse (β=0.253, p<0.01), and symptoms of current opioid use disorder (OUD; β=0.206, p<0.05). Sensation seeking was also associated with current misuse (β=0.279, p<0.01). These results suggest that identifying facets of impulsivity is important to understanding and assessing for risk of prescription opioid misuse in the context of chronic pain treatment. These data indicate that patients who react impulsively to negative mood states and cravings may be especially prone to developing aberrant use patterns when taking prescription opioids. This is the first known study to identify the role of urgency in predicting risk for OUDs in chronic pain patients.

  4. Clinical Impact of Sample Interference on Intensive Insulin Therapy in Severely Burned Patients: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Nam K.; Godwin, Zachary R.; Bockhold, Jennifer C.; Passerini, Anthony G.; Cheng, Julian; Ingemason, Morgan

    2013-01-01

    Objective Severely burned patients benefit from intensive insulin therapy (IIT) for tight glycemic control (TGC). We evaluated the clinical impact of automatic correction of hematocrit and ascorbic acid interference for bedside glucose monitoring performance in critically ill burn patients. Methods The performance of two point-of-care glucose monitoring systems (GMS): (a) GMS1, an autocorrecting device, and (b) GMS2, a non-correcting device were compared. Sixty remnant arterial blood samples were collected in a prospective observational study to evaluate hematocrit and ascorbic acid effects on GMS1 vs. GMS2 accuracy paired against a plasma glucose reference. Next we enrolled 12 patients in a pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT). Patients were randomized 1:1 to receive IIT targeting a TGC interval of 111–151 mg/dL and guided by either GMS1 or GMS2. GMS bias, mean insulin rate, and glycemic variability were calculated. Results In the prospective study, GMS1 results were similar to plasma glucose results (mean bias: −0.75[4.0] mg/dL, n=60, P=0.214). GMS2 results significantly differed from paired plasma glucose results (mean bias: −5.66[18.7] mg/dL, n=60, P=0.048). Ascorbic acid therapy elicited significant GMS2 performance bias (29.2[27.2], P<0.001). RCT results reported lower mean bias (P<0.001), glycemic variability (P<0.05), mean insulin rate (P<0.001), and frequency of hypoglycemia (P<0.001) in the GMS1 group than the GMS2 group. Conclusions Anemia and high dose ascorbic acid therapy negatively impact GMS accuracy and TGC in burn patients. Automatic correction of confounding factors improves glycemic control. Further studies are warranted to determine outcomes associated with accurate glucose monitoring during IIT. PMID:23884048

  5. Tongue Inspection in TCM: Observations in a Study Sample of Patients Living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Anastasi, Joyce K; Chang, Michelle; Quinn, Jessica; Capili, Bernadette

    2014-02-01

    Background: One of the principal diagnostic methods in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is the inspection of the tongue. This method involves examination of the shape, size, color, and texture of the tongue body and coat and helps reveal the state of organ functions and progression of conditions. Literature on tongue observations for patients who have human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is minimal. Objective: The goal of this study was to provide a clinical "snapshot" of initial tongue assessments of 159 patients living with HIV, who participated in an acupuncture clinical trial for chronic nausea. The aim was to explore the similarities and differences observed in tongue assessments. Design: This study was part of a prospective, randomized, controlled, double-blinded (subjects and evaluators), parallel-groups, acupuncture clinical trial for treating chronic nausea. Setting: The study was conducted at a large urban New York City academic health center. Patients: The patients in this study were 159 individuals who had HIV infections and who had histories of chronic nausea for ≥3 months. Main Outcome Measures: Initial tongue assessments were recorded for seven basic characteristics: (1) tongue color; (2) tongue shape; (3) tongue body quality; (4) coat color; (5) coat weight; (6) coat surface; and (7) tongue action. Results: The overall tongue picture seen in these patients was that the tongue was swollen and toothmarked, had a pink body with cracks, and had a thick, dry white coat. Conclusions: The HIV disease itself and the use of long term medications affect the Blood, Qi, Yin, and Yang. The observation of the tongue provides a window into the process of the disease and, ultimately, insight for clinical care. This sample population snapshot illustrates the complex processes seen in long-term chronic conditions managed by pharmacologic medications.

  6. Investigating CD11c expression as a potential genomic biomarker of response to TNF inhibitor biologics in whole blood rheumatoid arthritis samples.

    PubMed

    Smith, Samantha Louise; Eyre, Stephen; Yarwood, Annie; Hyrich, Kimme; Morgan, Ann W; Wilson, A G; Isaacs, John; Plant, Darren; Barton, Anne

    2015-12-14

    Gene expression profiling is rapidly becoming a useful and informative tool in a much needed area of research. Identifying patients as to whether they will respond or not to a given treatment before prescription is not only essential to optimise treatment outcome but also to lessen the economic burden that such drugs can have on healthcare resources. In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there is of yet no genetic/genomic biomarker which can accurately predict response to TNF inhibitor biologics prior to treatment, despite much interest in this area. Multiple studies have reported findings on potential candidate genes; however, due to relatively small sample sizes or lack of sufficient validation, results have been disappointingly inconsistent. The aim of this research was to further explore the predictive value of a previously reported association between CD11c expression and response to the TNF inhibitor biologics, adalimumab and etanercept. Real-time qPCR was performed using whole blood RNA samples obtained from seventy-five rheumatoid arthritis patients about to commence treatment with a TNF inhibitor biologic drug, whose response status was determined at 3-month follow-up using the EULAR classification criteria. Relative quantification of CD11c using the comparative CT method outputted differential expression between good-responders and non-responders as a fold-change. Relative expression of CD11c in patients receiving TNF inhibitor biologics yielded a decrease of 1.025 fold in good-responders as compared to non-responders (p-value = 0.36). Upon stratification of patients dependent upon the specific drug administered, adalimumab or etanercept, similar findings to the full cohort were observed, decreases of 1.015 (p-value = 0.33) and 1.032 fold (p-value = 0.13) in good-responders compared to non-responders, respectively. The results from this study reveal that CD11c expression does not correlate with response to TNF inhibitor biologics when tested for within pre

  7. Potential of Solid Sampling Electrothermal Vaporization for solving spectral interference in Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asfaw, Alemayehu; Wibetoe, Grethe

    2009-05-01

    Spectral interference is one of the main causes of erroneous results in Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES). This paper describes some cases of spectral interferences with conventional nebulization ICP-OES and the potential of solving them utilizing electrothermal vaporization for volatility-based separation. The cases studied were, the well-known spectral overlap between the As and Cd lines at 228.8 nm that are only 10 pm apart, and the interference of Fe on the main emission lines of As, Cd and Pb. The spectral interferences were studied by monitoring the typical signals of solutions that contain the analytes and the potential interferent, by studying the spectra and calculating Background Equivalent Concentration (BEC)-values. A three step temperature program was developed to be used for direct analysis of solid soil samples by Electrothermal Vaporization (ETV)-ICP-OES: step 1 (760 °C, 40 s), step 2 (1620 °C, 20 s) and a cleaning step (2250 °C, 10 s) where Cd vaporizes in step 1, As, Pb and part of Fe in step 2 and the major part of Fe in the cleaning step. Because As and Cd were time-separated using this program, their prominent lines at 228.8 nm, could be used for determination of each element by ETV-ICP-OES, in spite of the serious wavelength overlap. Selective vaporization was also shown to reduce or eliminate the Fe background emission on As, Cd and Pb lines. To confirm the applicability of the method, a solid soil certified reference materials was analyzed directly without any sample treatment. Good or reasonable accuracy was obtained for the three elements.

  8. Multisite Direct Determination of the Potential for Environmental Contamination of Urine Samples Used for Diagnosis of Sexually Transmitted Infections

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Patiyan; Tong, Steven Y. C.; Lilliebridge, Rachael A.; Brenner, Nicole C.; Martin, Louise M.; Spencer, Emma; Delima, Jennifer; Singh, Gurmeet; McCann, Frances; Hudson, Carolyn; Johns, Tracy; Giffard, Philip M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The detection of a sexually transmitted infection (STI) agent in a urine specimen from a young child is regarded as an indicator of sexual contact. False positives may conceivably arise from the transfer of environmental contaminants in clinic toilet or bathroom facilities into urine specimens. Methods The potential for contamination of urine specimens with environmental STI nucleic acid was tested empirically in the male and female toilets or bathrooms at 10 Northern Territory (Australia) clinics, on 7 separate occasions at each. At each of the 140 experiments, environmental contamination with Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Trichomonas vaginalis nucleic acid contamination was determined by swabbing 10 locations, and urine collection was simulated 5 times, using a (1) synthetic urine surrogate and (2) a standardized finger contamination procedure. Results The most contaminated toilets and bathrooms were in remote Indigenous communities. No contamination was found in the Northern Territory Government Sexual Assault Referral Centre clinics, and intermediate levels of contamination were found in sexual health clinics and in clinics in regional urban centres. The frequency of surrogate urine sample contamination was low but non-zero. For example, 4 of 558 of the urine surrogate specimens from remote clinics were STI positive. Conclusions This is by far the largest study addressing the potential environmental contamination of urine samples with STI agents. Positive STI tests arising from environmental contamination of urine specimens cannot be ruled out. The results emphasize that urine specimens from young children taken for STI testing should be obtained by trained staff in clean environments, and duplicate specimens should be obtained if possible. PMID:25349693

  9. Multisite Direct Determination of the Potential for Environmental Contamination of Urine Samples Used for Diagnosis of Sexually Transmitted Infections.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Patiyan; Tong, Steven Y C; Lilliebridge, Rachael A; Brenner, Nicole C; Martin, Louise M; Spencer, Emma; Delima, Jennifer; Singh, Gurmeet; McCann, Frances; Hudson, Carolyn; Johns, Tracy; Giffard, Philip M

    2014-09-01

    The detection of a sexually transmitted infection (STI) agent in a urine specimen from a young child is regarded as an indicator of sexual contact. False positives may conceivably arise from the transfer of environmental contaminants in clinic toilet or bathroom facilities into urine specimens. The potential for contamination of urine specimens with environmental STI nucleic acid was tested empirically in the male and female toilets or bathrooms at 10 Northern Territory (Australia) clinics, on 7 separate occasions at each. At each of the 140 experiments, environmental contamination with Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Trichomonas vaginalis nucleic acid contamination was determined by swabbing 10 locations, and urine collection was simulated 5 times, using a (1) synthetic urine surrogate and (2) a standardized finger contamination procedure. The most contaminated toilets and bathrooms were in remote Indigenous communities. No contamination was found in the Northern Territory Government Sexual Assault Referral Centre clinics, and intermediate levels of contamination were found in sexual health clinics and in clinics in regional urban centres. The frequency of surrogate urine sample contamination was low but non-zero. For example, 4 of 558 of the urine surrogate specimens from remote clinics were STI positive. This is by far the largest study addressing the potential environmental contamination of urine samples with STI agents. Positive STI tests arising from environmental contamination of urine specimens cannot be ruled out. The results emphasize that urine specimens from young children taken for STI testing should be obtained by trained staff in clean environments, and duplicate specimens should be obtained if possible. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society.

  10. [Forensic application of brainstem auditory evoked potential in patients with brain concussion].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xing-Bin; Li, Sheng-Yan; Huang, Si-Xing; Ma, Ke-Xin

    2008-12-01

    To investigate changes of brainstem auditory evoked potential (BAEP) in patients with brain concussion. Nineteen patients with brain concussion were studied with BAEP examination. The data was compared to the healthy persons reported in literatures. The abnormal rate of BAEP for patients with brain concussion was 89.5%. There was a statistically significant difference between the abnormal rate of patients and that of healthy persons (P<0.05). The abnormal rate of BAEP in the brainstem pathway for patients with brain concussion was 73.7%, indicating dysfunction of the brainstem in those patients. BAEP might be helpful in forensic diagnosis of brain concussion.

  11. APPLICATION OF STIR BAR SORPTIVE EXTRACTION TO ANALYSIS OF VOLATILE AND SEMIVOLATILE ORGANIC CHEMICALS OF POTENTIAL CONCERN IN SOLIDS AND AQUEOUS SAMPLES FROM THE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect

    FRYE JM; KUNKEL JM

    2009-03-05

    Stir bar sorptive extraction was applied to aqueous and solid samples for the extraction and analysis of organic compounds from the Hanford chemicals of potential concern list, as identified in the vapor data quality objectives. The 222-S Laboratory analyzed these compounds from vapor samples on thermal desorption tubes as part of the Hanford Site industrial hygiene vapor sampling effort.

  12. Finding Alternatives to the Dogma of Power Based Sample Size Calculation: Is a Fixed Sample Size Prospective Meta-Experiment a Potential Alternative?

    PubMed Central

    Tavernier, Elsa; Trinquart, Ludovic; Giraudeau, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Sample sizes for randomized controlled trials are typically based on power calculations. They require us to specify values for parameters such as the treatment effect, which is often difficult because we lack sufficient prior information. The objective of this paper is to provide an alternative design which circumvents the need for sample size calculation. In a simulation study, we compared a meta-experiment approach to the classical approach to assess treatment efficacy. The meta-experiment approach involves use of meta-analyzed results from 3 randomized trials of fixed sample size, 100 subjects. The classical approach involves a single randomized trial with the sample size calculated on the basis of an a priori-formulated hypothesis. For the sample size calculation in the classical approach, we used observed articles to characterize errors made on the formulated hypothesis. A prospective meta-analysis of data from trials of fixed sample size provided the same precision, power and type I error rate, on average, as the classical approach. The meta-experiment approach may provide an alternative design which does not require a sample size calculation and addresses the essential need for study replication; results may have greater external validity. PMID:27362939

  13. Clinical significance of national patients sample analysis: factors affecting mortality and length of stay of organophosphate and carbamate poisoned patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung-Ho; Kwon, In Ho; Lee, Jun Yeob; Yeo, Woon Hyung; Park, Ha Young; Park, Kyung Hye; Cho, Junho; Kim, Hyunjong; Kim, Gun Bea; Park, Deuk Hyun; Yoon, Yoo Sang; Kim, Yang Weon

    2013-12-01

    This study considered whether there could be a change of mortality and length of stay as a result of inter-hospital transfer, clinical department, and size of hospital for patients with organophosphates and carbamates poisoning via National Patients Sample data of the year 2009, which was obtained from Health Insurance Review and Assessment Services (HIRA). The utility and representativeness of the HIRA data as the source of prognosis analysis in poisoned patients were also evaluated. Organophosphate and carbamate poisoned patients' mortality and length of stay were analyzed in relation to the initial and final treating hospitals and departments, as well as the presence of inter-hospital transfers. Among a total of 146 cases, there were 17 mortality cases, and the mean age was 56.8 ± 19.2 years. The median length of stay was 6 days. There was no inter-hospital or inter-departmental difference in length of stay. However, it significantly increased when inter-hospital transfer occurred (transferred 11 days vs. non-transferred 6 days; p = 0.037). Overall mortality rate was 11.6%. The mortality rate significantly increased when inter-hospital transfer occurred (transferred 23.5% vs. non-transferred 7.0%; p = 0.047), but there was no statistical difference in mortality on inter-hospital and inter-department comparison at the initial treating facility. However, at the final treating facility, there was a significant difference between tertiary and general hospitals (5.1% for tertiary hospitals and 17.3% for general hospitals; p = 0.024), although there was no significant inter-departmental difference. We demonstrated that hospital, clinical department, length of stay, and mortality could be analyzed using insurance claim data of a specific disease group. Our results also indicated that length of stay and mortality according to inter-hospital transfer could be analyzed, which was previously unknown.

  14. Insulin resistance is associated with specific gut microbiota in appendix samples from morbidly obese patients

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Indias, Isabel; Sánchez-Alcoholado, Lidia; García-Fuentes, Eduardo; Cardona, Fernando; Queipo-Ortuño, Maria Isabel; Tinahones, Francisco J

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in intestinal microbiota composition could promote a proinflammatory state in adipose tissue that is associated with obesity and insulin resistance. Our aim was to identify the gut microbiota associated with insulin resistance in appendix samples from morbidly obese patients classified in 2 groups, high (IR-MO) and low insulin-resistant (NIR-MO), and to determine the possible association between these gut microbiota and variables associated with insulin resistance and the expression of genes related to inflammation and macrophage infiltration in adipose tissue. Appendix samples were obtained during gastric bypass surgery and the microbiome composition was determined by 16S rRNA pyrosequencing and bioinformatics analysis by QIIME. The Chao and Shannon indices for each study group suggested similar bacterial richness and diversity in the appendix samples between both study groups. 16S rRNA pyrosequencing showed that the IR-MO group had a significant increase in the abundance of Firmicutes, Fusobacteria, Pseudomonaceae, Prevotellaceae, Fusobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas, Catenibacterium, Prevotella, Veillonella and Fusobacterium compared to the NIR-MO group. Moreover, in the IR-MO group we found a significant positive correlation between the abundance of Prevotella, Succinovibrio, Firmicutes and Veillonella and the visceral adipose tissue expression level of IL6, TNF alpha, ILB1 and CD11b respectively, and significant negative correlations between the abundance of Butyricimonas and Bifidobacterium, and plasma glucose and insulin levels, respectively. In conclusion, an appendix dysbiosis occurs in IR-MO patients, with a loss of butyrate-producing bacteria, essential to maintenance of gut integrity, together with an increase in mucin-degrading bacteria and opportunistic pathogens. The microbiota present in the IR-MO group were related to low grade inflammation in adipose tissue and could be useful for developing strategies to control the development of insulin

  15. Clozapine and norclozapine concentrations in serum and plasma samples from schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    Hermida, Jesús; Paz, Eduardo; Tutor, J Carlos

    2008-02-01

    At present, the determination of steady-state trough serum/plasma concentrations of clozapine is considered a useful tool for the clinical management of schizophrenic patients treated with this drug. In a previously published study, it was indicated that only plasma should be used to avoid a significant underestimation of clozapine and norclozapine concentrations; however, a formal evaluation of this topic has still not been made, and a consensus on the use of plasma or serum for therapeutic clozapine monitoring may be desirable. Paired samples of serum and plasma (K3EDTA solution contained in Vacutainer tubes) were obtained from 40 schizophrenic patients, and clozapine and norclozapine concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. For the parent drug and its metabolite, serum concentrations were higher than in plasma (approximately 7%), although the correction of plasma concentrations in function of hematocrit values reduced this difference to 3%. High correlation coefficients were found between the serum and uncorrected or corrected plasma clozapine concentrations (r = 0.996, P < 0.001), with clinically acceptable differences between the means and standard error of the estimate and consequently with transferability of the results. The clozapine and norclozapine concentrations in five lithium heparin-containing plasma samples (371.9 +/- 226.7 ng/mL and 217.9 +/- 113.1 ng/mL) were analogous to the corresponding hematocrit-corrected EDTA-containing plasma values (374.4 +/- 225.4 ng/mL and 223.5 +/- 115.2 ng/mL), with correlation coefficients of r > or = 0.998 (P < 0.001). Serum or plasma samples may be used for the therapeutic monitoring of clozapine, and no practical advantages have been found with regard to the stability of the drug or imprecision obtained by using either type of biological matrix.

  16. Array CGH Analysis of Paired Blood and Tumor Samples from Patients with Sporadic Wilms Tumor

    PubMed Central

    del Carmen Crespo, María; Vallespín, Elena; Palomares-Bralo, María; Martin-Arenas, Rubén; Rueda-Arenas, Inmaculada; Silvestre de Faria, Paulo Antonio; García-Miguel, Purificación; Lapunzina, Pablo; Regla Vargas, Fernando; Seuanez, Hector N.; Martínez-Glez, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    Wilms tumor (WT), the most common cancer of the kidney in infants and children, has a complex etiology that is still poorly understood. Identification of genomic copy number variants (CNV) in tumor genomes provides a better understanding of cancer development which may be useful for diagnosis and therapeutic targets. In paired blood and tumor DNA samples from 14 patients with sporadic WT, analyzed by aCGH, 22% of chromosome abnormalities were novel. All constitutional alterations identified in blood were segmental (in 28.6% of patients) and were also present in the paired tumor samples. Two segmental gains (2p21 and 20q13.3) and one loss (19q13.31) present in blood had not been previously described in WT. We also describe, for the first time, a small, constitutive partial gain of 3p22.1 comprising 2 exons of CTNNB1, a gene associated to WT. Among somatic alterations, novel structural chromosomal abnormalities were found, like gain of 19p13.3 and 20p12.3, and losses of 2p16.1-p15, 4q32.5-q35.1, 4q35.2-q28.1 and 19p13.3. Candidate genes included in these regions might be constitutively (SIX3, SALL4) or somatically (NEK1, PIAS4, BMP2) operational in the development and progression of WT. To our knowledge this is the first report of CNV in paired blood and tumor samples in sporadic WT. PMID:26317783

  17. Drug Discovery Testing Compounds in Patient Samples by Automated Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Pilar; Gorrochategui, Julián; Primo, Daniel; Robles, Alicia; Rojas, José Luis; Espinosa, Ana Belén; Gómez, Cristina; Martínez-López, Joaquín; Bennett, Teresa A.; Ballesteros, Joan

    2017-01-01

    Functional ex vivo assays that predict a patient’s clinical response to anticancer drugs for guiding cancer treatment have long been a goal, but few have yet proved to be reliable. To address this, we have developed an automated flow cytometry platform for drug screening that evaluates multiple endpoints with a robust data analysis system that can capture the complex mechanisms of action across different compounds. This system, called PharmaFlow, is used to test peripheral blood or bone marrow samples from patients diagnosed with hematological malignancies. Functional assays that use the whole sample, retaining all the microenvironmental components contained in the sample, offer an approach to ex vivo testing that may give results that are clinically relevant. This new approach can help to predict the patients’ response to existing treatments or to drugs under development, for hematological malignancies or other tumors. In addition, relevant biomarkers can be identified that determine the patient’s sensitivity, resistance, or toxicity to a given treatment. We propose that this approach, which better recapitulates the human microenvironment, constitutes a more predictive assay for personalized medicine and preclinical drug discovery. PMID:28340541

  18. Investigating Treatment Outcomes Across OCD Symptom Dimensions in a Clinical Sample of OCD Patients.

    PubMed

    Chase, Tannah; Wetterneck, Chad T; Bartsch, Robert A; Leonard, Rachel C; Riemann, Bradley C

    2015-01-01

    Despite the heterogeneous nature of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), many self-report assessments do not adequately capture the clinical picture presenting within each symptom dimension, particularly unacceptable thoughts (UTs). In addition, obsessions and ordering/arranging compulsions are often underrepresented in samples of treatment outcome studies for OCD. Such methodological discrepancies may obscure research findings comparing treatment outcomes across OCD symptom dimensions. This study aimed to improve upon previous research by investigating treatment outcomes across OCD symptom dimensions using the Dimensional Obsessive-Compulsive Scale, which offers a more comprehensive assessment of UTs. The study included a primarily residential sample of 134 OCD patients. Results indicated that there were no significant differences in treatment outcomes across symptom dimensions. However, the severity of UTs remained significantly greater than other symptom dimensions at both admission and discharge. Thus, it is possible that UTs may exhibit uniquely impairing features, compared with other symptom dimensions. It is also possible that these findings may reflect the characteristics of the residential OCD samples. These speculations as well as implications for OCD treatment and future research are discussed.

  19. Low Prevalence of Aeromonas hydrophilain Infectious Diarrhea Samples of Pediatric Patients in Arak, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Elnaz, Abbasi; Behzad, Khansari-nejad; Hamid, Abtahi; Majid, Akbari; Ehsanollah, Ghaznavi-rad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Aeromonashydrophila (A. hydrophila) is an aquatic bacterium that can cause a spectrum of infectious diseases, including both gastrointestinal and extraintestinal infections. Due to the high rate of diarrheal infections in pediatric patients in central Iran, this study was designed to determine the frequency of A. hydrophila in diarrhea samples from children in this region. Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, diarrheal stool specimens were collected from 200 children admitted between February and October of 2015 to educational and medical centers affiliated with the Arak University of Medical Sciences. The samples were analyzed both phenotypically by culture and genotypically by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: A. hydrophila was isolated from two of the 200 samples tested (1%). The presence of bacterial genetic markers further confirmed the diagnosis. Conclusion: Based on this study, A. hydrophilais not highly prevalent in children with diarrhea in Arak; however clinical diagnostic laboratory personnel should be aware of the possible presence of A.hydrophila in children with diarrhea as it can cause dangerous health problems in both them and young adolescents. PMID:28070529

  20. Gavage of Fecal Samples From Patients with Colorectal Cancer Promotes Intestinal Carcinogenesis in Germ-free and Conventional Mice.

    PubMed

    Wong, Sunny H; Zhao, Liuyang; Zhang, Xiang; Nakatsu, Geicho; Han, Juqiang; Xu, Weiqi; Xiao, Xue; Kwong, Thomas Ny; Tsoi, Ho; Wu, William Kk; Benhua, Zeng; Chan, Francis Kl; Sung, Joseph Jy; Wei, Hong; Yu, Jun

    2017-08-17

    Altered gut microbiota is implicated in development of colorectal cancer (CRC). Some intestinal bacteria have been reported to potentiate intestinal carcinogenesis by producing genotoxins, altering the immune response and intestinal micro-environment, and activating oncogenic signaling pathways. We investigated whether stool from patients with CRC could directly induce colorectal carcinogenesis in mice. We obtained stored stool samples from participants in a metagenome study performed in Hong Kong. Conventional (male C57BL/6) mice were given azoxymethane to induce colon neoplasia after receiving a course of antibiotics in drinking water. Mice were gavaged twice weekly with stool from 5 patients with CRC or 5 healthy individuals (controls) for 5 weeks. Germ-free C57BL/6 mice were gavaged once with stool from 5 patients with CRC or 5 controls. We collected intestinal tissues from mice and performed histology, immunohistochemistry, expression microarray, quantitative PCR, immunoblot, and flow cytometry analyses. We performed 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis of feces from mice. Significantly higher proportions of conventional mice fed with stool from individuals with CRC than control stool developed high-grade dysplasia (P<.05) and macroscopic polyps (P<.01). We observed a higher proportion of proliferating (Ki-67-positive) cells in colons of germ-free mice fed with stool from patients with CRC vs those fed with stool from controls (P<.05). Feces from germ-free and conventional mice fed with stool from patients with CRC vs controls contained different microbial compositions, with lower richness in mice fed with stool from patients with CRC. Intestines collected from conventional and germ-free mice fed with stool from patients with CRC had increased expression of cytokines that modulate inflammation, including C-X-C motif chemokine receptor 1 (CXCR1), CXCR2, interleukin 17A (IL17A), IL22, and IL23A. Intestines from conventional and germ-free mice fed with stool from

  1. Oral white patches in a national sample of medical HIV patients in the era of HAART.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Marvin; Maida, Carl A; Freed, James R; Younai, Fariba; Coulter, Ian D; Der-Martirosian, Claudia; Liu, Honghu; Freed, Benjamin; Guzmán-Becerra, Norma; Shapiro, Martin

    2005-04-01

    Several types of HIV-related oral mucosal conditions have been reported to occur during the course of HIV disease progression. Of these, few may be manifested as 'white' lesions and many are noticeable to the patient. This paper examines the relationships between social, behavioral and medical aspects of HIV infection and reporting an occurrence of oral white patches (OWP) by HIV-infected patients. The subjects are participants in all three interviews in the HIV Cost and Services Utilization Study (HCSUS). The subjects were selected using a three-stage probability sampling design. The multivariate analysis is based on 2109 subjects with nonmissing binary outcome variable for all three waves representing a national sample of 214 000 individuals. The multivariate model was fitted using generalized estimating equations (GEE) by implementing the XTGEE command in STATA. We estimate that 75 000 persons (35%) reported at least one incident of OWP, of these 14 000 reported having OWP during all three interviews, and that the rate of reporting declined over the three HCSUS waves. The multivariate analysis showed seven variables that were significant predictors of at least one report of OWP. Compared with persons on HAART therapy, patients on other regimens or taking no antiviral medications were 23-46% more likely to report an incident of OWP. Compared with whites, African Americans were 32% less likely to report OWP, while current smokers were 62% more likely than nonsmokers. Being diagnosed with AIDS and having CD4 counts less than 500 significantly increased the likelihood of reporting OWP.

  2. Processing protocol for soil samples potentially contaminated with Bacillus anthracis spores [HS7.52.02 - 514

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Silvestri, Erin E.; Griffin, Dale W.

    2017-01-01

    This protocol describes the processing steps for 45 g and 9 g soil samples potentially contaminated with Bacillus anthracis spores. The protocol is designed to separate and concentrate the spores from bulk soil down to a pellet that can be used for further analysis. Soil extraction solution and mechanical shaking are used to disrupt soil particle aggregates and to aid in the separation of spores from soil particles. Soil samples are washed twice with soil extraction solution to maximize recovery. Differential centrifugation is used to separate spores from the majority of the soil material. The 45 g protocol has been demonstrated by two laboratories using both loamy and sandy soil types. There were no significant differences overall between the two laboratories for either soil type, suggesting that the processing protocol would be robust enough to use at multiple laboratories while achieving comparable recoveries. The 45 g protocol has demonstrated a matrix limit of detection at 14 spores/gram of soil for loamy and sandy soils.

  3. A procedure for estimating Bacillus cereus spores in soil and stream-sediment samples - A potential exploration technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watterson, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    The presence of bacterial spores of the Bacillus cereus group in soils and stream sediments appears to be a sensitive indicator of several types of concealed mineral deposits, including vein-type gold deposits. The B. cereus assay is rapid, inexpensive, and inherently reproducible. The test, currently under investigation for its potential in mineral exploration, is recommended for use on a research basis. Among the aerobic spore-forming bacilli, only B. cereus and closely related strains produce an opaque zone in egg-yolk emulsion agar. This characteristic, also known as the Nagler of lecitho-vitellin reaction, has long been used to rapidly indentify and estimate presumptive B. cereus. The test is here adapted to permit rapid estimation of B. cereus spores in soil and stream-sediment samples. Relative standard deviation was 10.3% on counts obtained from two 40-replicate pour-plate determinations. As many as 40 samples per day can be processed. Enough procedural detail is included to permit investigation of the test in conventional geochemical laboratories using standard microbiological safety precautions. ?? 1985.

  4. Outcome on quality of life in a Canadian national sample of patients with schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders.

    PubMed

    Malla, A; Williams, R; Kopala, L; Smith, G; Talling, D; Balshaw, R

    2006-01-01

    To examine changes in subjective and objective dimensions of quality of life (QoL) in a large Canadian sample of patients with diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder treated in academic and non-academic settings over a 2-year period. Patients recruited in the study across the country were assessed for QoL and functioning using the Client and Provider versions of the Wisconsin Quality of Life Questionnaire (WQoL) and the Short Form-36 (SF-36) at baseline (n = 448), 1 year (n = 308-353) and 2 years (188-297). Data were analyzed to examine change across time using multivariate analyses controlling for potential influence of variables such as age, regional variation, gender, duration of illness, type of treatment taken and baseline measures of symptoms and QoL. The weighted quality of life index (W-QoL-I) showed a significant change on both the client and the provider versions of the WQoL while the physical and mental composites of the SF-36 showed change only at 2 years. These changes were influenced significantly by baseline scores on W-QoL-I and in the case of provider version of the WQoL by baseline Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) scores. Regional variation or type of medication had no impact on improvement in QoL. Within a naturalistic sample of schizophrenia patients treated and followed in routine care the overall QoL showed an improvement over time but this improvement was not influenced by the type of medication prescribed.

  5. Postoperative Outcomes in Graves' Disease Patients: Results from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample Database.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Gustavo A; Koru-Sengul, Tulay; Vaghaiwalla, Tanaz M; Parikh, Punam P; Farra, Josefina C; Lew, John I

    2017-06-01

    Current surgical indications for Graves' disease include intractability to medical and/or radioablative therapy, compressive symptoms, and worsening ophthalmopathy. Total thyroidectomy for Graves' disease may be technically challenging and lead to untoward perioperative outcomes. This study examines outcomes in patients with Graves' disease who underwent total thyroidectomy and assesses its safety for this patient population. A retrospective cross-sectional analysis was performed using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database from 2006 to 2011. Total thyroidectomy performed in patients with Graves' disease, benign multinodular goiter (MNG), and thyroid cancer was identified. Demographic factors, comorbidities, and postoperative complications were evaluated. Chi-square, one-way analysis of variance, and risk-adjusted multivariable logistic regression were performed. Of 215,068 patients who underwent total thyroidectomy during the study period, 11,205 (5.2%) had Graves' disease, 110,124 (51.2%) MNG, and 93,739 (43.6%) thyroid malignancy. Patients with Graves' disease were younger than MNG and thyroid cancer patients (Mage = 42.8 years vs. 55.5 and 51.0 years; p < 0.01). The Graves' disease group included a higher proportion of women (p < 0.01) and nonwhites (p < 0.01). Postoperatively, Graves' patients had significantly higher rates of hypocalcemia (12.4% vs. 7.3% and 10.3%; p < 0.01), hematomas requiring reoperation (0.7% vs. 0.4% and 0.4%; p < 0.01), and longer mean hospital stay (2.7 days vs. 2.4 and 2.2 days; p < 0.01) compared to MNG and thyroid cancer patients, respectively. On risk-adjusted multivariate logistic regression, Graves' disease was independently associated with a higher risk of vocal-cord paralysis (odds ratio [OR] = 1.36 [confidence interval (CI) 1.08-1.69]), tracheostomy (OR = 1.35 [CI 1.1-1.67]), postoperative hypocalcemia (OR = 1.65 [CI 1.54-1.77]), and hematoma requiring reoperation (OR = 2.79 [CI 2

  6. Blubber Cortisol: A Potential Tool for Assessing Stress Response in Free-Ranging Dolphins without Effects due to Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Kellar, Nicholas M.; Catelani, Krista N.; Robbins, Michelle N.; Trego, Marisa L.; Allen, Camryn D.; Danil, Kerri; Chivers, Susan J.

    2015-01-01

    When paired with dart biopsying, quantifying cortisol in blubber tissue may provide an index of relative stress levels (i.e., activation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis) in free-ranging cetacean populations while minimizing the effects of the act of sampling. To validate this approach, cortisol was extracted from blubber samples collected from beach-stranded and bycaught short-beaked common dolphins using a modified blubber steroid isolation technique and measured via commercially available enzyme immunoassays. The measurements exhibited appropriate quality characteristics when analyzed via a bootstraped stepwise parallelism analysis (observed/expected = 1.03, 95%CI: 99.6 – 1.08) and showed no evidence of matrix interference with increasing sample size across typical biopsy tissue masses (75–150mg; r2 = 0.012, p = 0.78, slope = 0.022ngcortisol deviation/ultissue extract added). The relationships between blubber cortisol and eight potential cofactors namely, 1) fatality type (e.g., stranded or bycaught), 2) specimen condition (state of decomposition), 3) total body length, 4) sex, 5) sexual maturity state, 6) pregnancy status, 7) lactation state, and 8) adrenal mass, were assessed using a Bayesian generalized linear model averaging technique. Fatality type was the only factor correlated with blubber cortisol, and the magnitude of the effect size was substantial: beach-stranded individuals had on average 6.1-fold higher cortisol levels than those of bycaught individuals. Because of the difference in conditions surrounding these two fatality types, we interpret this relationship as evidence that blubber cortisol is indicative of stress response. We found no evidence of seasonal variation or a relationship between cortisol and the remaining cofactors. PMID:25643144

  7. Blubber cortisol: a potential tool for assessing stress response in free-ranging dolphins without effects due to sampling.

    PubMed

    Kellar, Nicholas M; Catelani, Krista N; Robbins, Michelle N; Trego, Marisa L; Allen, Camryn D; Danil, Kerri; Chivers, Susan J

    2015-01-01

    When paired with dart biopsying, quantifying cortisol in blubber tissue may provide an index of relative stress levels (i.e., activation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis) in free-ranging cetacean populations while minimizing the effects of the act of sampling. To validate this approach, cortisol was extracted from blubber samples collected from beach-stranded and bycaught short-beaked common dolphins using a modified blubber steroid isolation technique and measured via commercially available enzyme immunoassays. The measurements exhibited appropriate quality characteristics when analyzed via a bootstraped stepwise parallelism analysis (observed/expected = 1.03, 95%CI: 99.6 - 1.08) and showed no evidence of matrix interference with increasing sample size across typical biopsy tissue masses (75-150 mg; r(2) = 0.012, p = 0.78, slope = 0.022 ng(cortisol deviation)/ul(tissue extract added)). The relationships between blubber cortisol and eight potential cofactors namely, 1) fatality type (e.g., stranded or bycaught), 2) specimen condition (state of decomposition), 3) total body length, 4) sex, 5) sexual maturity state, 6) pregnancy status, 7) lactation state, and 8) adrenal mass, were assessed using a Bayesian generalized linear model averaging technique. Fatality type was the only factor correlated with blubber cortisol, and the magnitude of the effect size was substantial: beach-stranded individuals had on average 6.1-fold higher cortisol levels than those of bycaught individuals. Because of the difference in conditions surrounding these two fatality types, we interpret this relationship as evidence that blubber cortisol is indicative of stress response. We found no evidence of seasonal variation or a relationship between cortisol and the remaining cofactors.

  8. Prevalence, Virulence Potential, and Antibiotic Susceptibility Profile of Listeria monocytogenes Isolated From Bovine Raw Milk Samples Obtained From Rajasthan, India.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sanjita; Sharma, Vishnu; Dahiya, Dinesh Kumar; Khan, Aarif; Mathur, Manisha; Sharma, Amit

    2017-03-01

    Listeriosis is a serious foodborne disease of a global concern, and can effectively be controlled by a continuous surveillance of the virulent and multidrug-resistant strains of Listeria monocytogenes. This study was planned to investigate prevalence of L. monocytogenes in bovine raw milk samples. A total of 457 raw milk samples collected from 15 major cities in Rajasthan, India, were analyzed for the presence of L. monocytogenes by using standard microbiological and molecular methods. Five of the 457 samples screen tested positive for L. monocytogenes. Multiplex serotyping showed that 3/5 strains belonged to serotype 4b followed by one strain each to 1/2a and to 1/2c. Further virulence potential assessment indicated that all strains possessed inlA and inlC internalins, and, in addition, two strains also possessed the gene for inlB. All strains were positive for Listeriolysin O (LLO) and showed phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) activity on an in vitro agar medium with variations in production levels among the strains. A good correlation between the in vitro pathogenicity test and the chick embryo test was observed, as the strains showing higher LLO and PI-PLC activity were found to be lethal to fertilized chick embryos. All strains were resistant to the majority of antibiotics and were designated as multidrug-resistant strains. However, these strains were susceptible to 9 of the 22 tested antibiotics. The maximum zone of inhibition (mm) and acceptable minimum inhibitory concentration were observed with azithromycin, and thus it could be the first choice of a treatment. Overall, the presence of multidrug-resistant L. monocytogenes strains in the raw milk of Rajasthan region is an indicator of public health hazard and highlighting the need of consumer awareness in place and implementation of stricter food safety regulations at all levels of milk production.

  9. Among a German Sample of Forensic Patients, Previous Animal Abuse Mediates Between Psychopathy and Sadistic Actions.

    PubMed

    Stupperich, Alexandra; Strack, Micha

    2016-05-01

    In an attempt to explain the relationship between psychopathy and severe violent behavior, this study associates previous animal abuse, psychopathy, and sadistic acting in forensic patients. Two topics are addressed: (i) whether previous animal abuse can be identified by a patient's Psychopathy Checklist profile and (ii) whether animal abuse statistically mediates between psychopathy and sadistic acting. In a German forensic hospital, 60 patients were investigated. Animal abuse was assessed using face-to-face interviews and the Psychopathy Checklist: Screening Version (PCL:SV), and sadistic acting was identified by file records.Discriminant analysis separated previous animal abuse (10/60) by high adolescent antisocial behavior, superficiality, lack of remorse, lack of empathy, and grandiosity. The mediation from psychopathy to sadistic acting (6/60) through animal abuse was found to be complete.The results, although sample size is limited and base rate of animal abuse and sadistic acting are low, fit with a model suggestive of animal abuse as a causal step toward sadistic crimes. Animal abuse correlates with callous, unemotional traits, and a development of sadistic crimes.

  10. Management of arterial lines and blood sampling in intensive care: a threat to patient safety.

    PubMed

    Leslie, R A; Gouldson, S; Habib, N; Harris, N; Murray, H; Wells, V; Cook, T M

    2013-11-01

    In 2008, the UK National Patient Safety Agency (NPSA) made recommendations for safe arterial line management. Following a patient safety incident in our intensive care unit (ICU), we surveyed current practice in arterial line management and determined whether these recommendations had been adopted. We contacted all 241 adult ICUs in the UK; 228 (94.6%) completed the survey. Some NPSA recommendations have been widely implemented - use of sodium chloride 0.9% as flush fluid, two-person checking of fluids before use - and their practice was consistent. Others have been incompletely implemented and many areas of practice (prescription of fluids, two-person checking at shift changes, use of opaque pressure bags, arterial sampling technique) were highly variable. More importantly, the use of the wrong fluid as an arterial flush was reported by 30% of respondents for ICU practice, and a further 30% for practice elsewhere in the hospital. Our survey provides evidence of continuing risk to patients. © 2013 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  11. Sampling membrane potential, membrane resistance and electrode resistance with a glass electrode impaled into a single cell.

    PubMed

    Schiebe, M; Jaeger, U

    1980-04-01

    A method is demonstrated to measure membrane resistances and membrane potentials of single cells during impalement by a single glass microelectrode. The intention was to develop a procedure which would provide data almost continuously. Therefore, a frequency-dependent voltage divider network has been chosen to represent the basic electrical properties of the electrode and cell membrane, and used to explore its voltage response to a current stimulus, consisting of two rectangular pulses of different widths. It can be shown that the resolution of the method can be improved by inverting this stimulus so that each polarization becomes a relaxation and vice versa. In order to generate, analyze and display this signal continuously, a device has been designed which has been called 'Electrophysiological Monitor, (E1M2)'. E1M2 provides a current stimulus as input into a standard bridge network and can analyze the summed response of the electrode and cell by a set of sample-hold amplifiers. It then decodes and displays the data continuously, as membrane potential (Em), input resistance of the cell (Rinp) and the electrode resistance (Re) respectively. From Rinp the membrane resistance (Rm) can be deduced. The validity of the method has been examined by measuring these parameters in frog muscle cells. Technical design considerations, the accuracy and possible pitfalls with the suggested procedure are discussed.

  12. Distribution and Correlates of Serum 25 Hydroxyvitamin D Levels in a Sample of Hip Fracture Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pieper, Carl F.; Colon-Emeric, Cathleen; Caminis, John; Betchyk, Kathleen; Zhang, Jie; Janning, Cheri; Shostak, John; LeBoff, Meryl S.; Heaney, Robert; Lyles, Kenneth W.

    2008-01-01

    Background Vitamin D is important for gastrointestinal absorption of calcium and phosphorus, for bone mineralization, and is one useful therapeutic component in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures. Low levels of 25 hydroxyvitamin D have been implicated as a risk factor for falls, for all fractures in general and for hip fractures in particular. At present there is a gap in the diagnosis and treatment of vitamin D deficiency in older adults with hip fractures. Purpose To explore the distribution of and correlates to levels of vitamin D in a population of patients with a recent hip fracture. Sample 25 hydroxyvitamin D levels were measured in 526 screened subjects and 385 ultimately randomized patients who were part of the HORIZON RFT multinational trial, a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial testing the efficacy of a yearly intravenous bisphosphonate, zoledronic acid, in the prevention of new clinical fractures in patients with recent hip fracture repair. Results In screened patients, levels of 25 hydroxyvitamin D were low (median=14.7 ng/mL, IQR=7.80,22.5,), and 51% were at or below the clinically meaningful threshold of 15 ng/mL. In randomized patients, in bivariate analyses, level of 25 hydroxyvitamin D was significantly (p<0.05) related to male gender (r=0.12), calcium (r=0.16), and bone mineral density at the femoral neck (r=0.22). Low serum 25 hydroxyvitamin D (<15ng/mL) was related only to low calcium (odds=0.15 95%CI= 0.03, 0.63) in multivariate logistic models controlling for gender, age, race, BMI, living at home, alkaline phosphatase, and creatinine clearance. However, low serum calcium is an insensitive and poorly specific means of identifying patients with vitamin D deficiency, with an area under the ROC of 0.6. Conclusions We conclude that vitamin D insufficiency is a common problem in this population of subjects who have recently suffered a hip fracture. This insufficiency is related only to calcium in

  13. Potential of Drug Interactions among Hospitalized Cancer Patients in a Developing Country

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli-Ardakani, Maria; Kazemian, Kaveh; Salamzadeh, Jamshid; Mehdizadeh, Mahshid

    2013-01-01

    Cancer patients are more susceptible to adverse drug-drug interactions (DDIs) due to receiving multiple medications especially chemotherapy medications, hormonal agents and supportive care drugs. The aim of this study is to describe the prevalence of potential DDIs and to identify risk factors for these potential interactions in hospitalized cancer patients in a developing country. A cross-sectional study conducted by reviewing charts of 224 consecutive in hospitalized patients in hematology-oncology ward of a teaching hospital in Tehran, during a 12 month period from July 2009 to July 2010. “Drug Interaction Facts 2008, 2009: The Authority on Drug Interactions” was used for screening the potential drug-drug interactions. Potential interactions were classified by levels of severity and documentation. The median age of patients was 50 years, the length of hospital stay for patient was 5 days and the number of drugs per patient was 8 drugs. Two hundred and twenty-eight potential interactions were detected. Nearly 14% of the interactions were major and 60% were moderate. Approximately 9% and 10% potential interactions were graded as established and probable. In multivariate analysis, being older than 61 years old, suffering from hematologic cancer, source of cancer in different specific organs (esophagus, testis and cervices more than other sources), and number of ordered drugs for patients were independent predictors of having at least one potential DDI in hospital order. Suffering from hematologic cancer, source of cancer in different organs, length of hospital stay and number of ordered drugs for patients were independent predictors for number of interactions per patients. Having a DDI seems to be more likely to occur in patients older than 61 years old. Hematologic cancers, having more medications in physician’s order, longer length of hospital stay, esophageal cancer, testicular cancer and cervical cancer have related to having a DDI and also having more

  14. Neovascularization Potential of Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cells From Patients With Stable Ischemic Heart Failure Is Preserved.

    PubMed

    Dauwe, Dieter; Pelacho, Beatriz; Wibowo, Arief; Walravens, Ann-Sophie; Verdonck, Kristoff; Gillijns, Hilde; Caluwe, Ellen; Pokreisz, Peter; van Gastel, Nick; Carmeliet, Geert; Depypere, Maarten; Maes, Frederik; Vanden Driessche, Nina; Droogne, Walter; Van Cleemput, Johan; Vanhaecke, Johan; Prosper, Felipe; Verfaillie, Catherine; Luttun, Aernout; Janssens, Stefan

    2016-04-18

    Blood outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs) mediate therapeutic neovascularization in experimental models, but outgrowth characteristics and functionality of BOECs from patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICMP) are unknown. We compared outgrowth efficiency and in vitro and in vivo functionality of BOECs derived from ICMP with BOECs from age-matched (ACON) and healthy young (CON) controls. We isolated 3.6±0.6 BOEC colonies/100×10(6) mononuclear cells (MNCs) from 60-mL blood samples of ICMP patients (n=45; age: 66±1 years; LVEF: 31±2%) versus 3.5±0.9 colonies/100×10(6) MNCs in ACON (n=32; age: 60±1 years) and 2.6±0.4 colonies/100×10(6) MNCs in CON (n=55; age: 34±1 years), P=0.29. Endothelial lineage (VEGFR2(+)/CD31(+)/CD146(+)) and progenitor (CD34(+)/CD133(-)) marker expression was comparable in ICMP and CON. Growth kinetics were similar between groups (P=0.38) and not affected by left ventricular systolic dysfunction, maladaptive remodeling, or presence of cardiovascular risk factors in ICMP patients. In vitro neovascularization potential, assessed by network remodeling on Matrigel and three-dimensional spheroid sprouting, did not differ in ICMP from (A)CON. Secretome analysis showed a marked proangiogenic profile, with highest release of angiopoietin-2 (1.4±0.3×10(5) pg/10(6) ICMP-BOECs) and placental growth factor (5.8±1.5×10(3) pg/10(6) ICMP BOECs), independent of age or ischemic disease. Senescence-associated β-galactosidase staining showed comparable senescence in BOECs from ICMP (5.8±2.1%; n=17), ACON (3.9±1.1%; n=7), and CON (9.0±2.8%; n=13), P=0.19. High-resolution microcomputed tomography analysis in the ischemic hindlimb of nude mice confirmed increased arteriogenesis in the thigh region after intramuscular injections of BOECs from ICMP (P=0.025; n=8) and CON (P=0.048; n=5) over vehicle control (n=8), both to a similar extent (P=0.831). BOECs can be successfully culture-expanded from patients with ICMP. In contrast to impaired

  15. Clearance after vasectomy with a single semen sample containing < than 100 000 immotile sperm/mL: analysis of 1073 patients.

    PubMed

    Korthorst, Ruben A; Consten, Dimitri; van Roijen, J Herman

    2010-06-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of a new semen analysis protocol after vasectomy, where clearance is given to patients who provide a single semen sample with <100 000 immotile sperm/mL at > or = 3 months after vasectomy. Between 1 July 2005 and 31 March 2008, 1073 men provided a first semen sample at > or = 3 months after vasectomy. Semen was first evaluated on a wet-slide preparation. Those samples with no ('azoospermia') or sporadic immotile spermatozoa could be cleared without further analysis. Samples with motile sperm were immediately labelled as potentially fertile, while those with a significant number of immotile sperm were re-analysed using a Neubauer haemocytometer. All samples with <100 000 immotile sperm/mL were cleared. Of men providing semen at 3 months after vasectomy, 96% could be cleared. No sperm were seen ('azoospermia') in 51.3% of samples, and 44.7% of samples contained <100 000 immotile sperm. No paternity has been reported in the cleared group after a follow-up of at least 1 year. A protocol stipulating that patients can be cleared after a single semen sample containing <100 000 immotile sperm/mL at > or = 3 months after vasectomy is safe and dramatically reduces the number of men who cannot be cleared at 3 months after vasectomy.

  16. Transferring patients home to die: what is the potential population in UK critical care units?

    PubMed

    Coombs, Maureen A; Darlington, Anne-Sophie E; Long-Sutehall, Tracy; Pattison, Natalie; Richardson, Alison

    2017-03-01

    Most people when asked, express a preference to die at home, but little is known about whether this is an option for critically ill patients. A retrospective cohort study was undertaken to describe the size and characteristics of the critical care population who could potentially be transferred home to die if they expressed such a wish. Medical notes of all patients who died in, or within 5 days of discharge from seven critical care units across two hospital sites over a 12-month period were reviewed. Inclusion/exclusion criteria were developed and applied to identify the number of patients who had potential to be transferred home to die and demographic and clinical data (eg, conscious state, respiratory and cardiac support therapies) collected. 7844 patients were admitted over a 12-month period. 422 (5.4%) patients died. Using the criteria developed 100 (23.7%) patients could have potentially been transferred home to die. Of these 41 (41%) patients were diagnosed with respiratory disease. 53 (53%) patients were conscious, 47 (47%) patients were self-ventilating breathing room air/oxygen via a mask. 20 (20%) patients were ventilated via an endotracheal tube. 76 (76%) patients were not requiring inotropes/vasopressors. Mean time between discussion about treatment withdrawal and time of death was 36.4 h (SD=46.48). No patients in this cohort were transferred home. A little over 20% of patients dying in critical care demonstrate potential to be transferred home to die. Staff should actively consider the practice of transferring home as an option for care at end of life for these patients. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  17. Transferring patients home to die: what is the potential population in UK critical care units?

    PubMed Central

    Coombs, Maureen A; Darlington, Anne-Sophie E; Long-Sutehall, Tracy; Pattison, Natalie; Richardson, Alison

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Most people when asked, express a preference to die at home, but little is known about whether this is an option for critically ill patients. A retrospective cohort study was undertaken to describe the size and characteristics of the critical care population who could potentially be transferred home to die if they expressed such a wish. Methods Medical notes of all patients who died in, or within 5 days of discharge from seven critical care units across two hospital sites over a 12-month period were reviewed. Inclusion/exclusion criteria were developed and applied to identify the number of patients who had potential to be transferred home to die and demographic and clinical data (eg, conscious state, respiratory and cardiac support therapies) collected. Results 7844 patients were admitted over a 12-month period. 422 (5.4%) patients died. Using the criteria developed 100 (23.7%) patients could have potentially been transferred home to die. Of these 41 (41%) patients were diagnosed with respiratory disease. 53 (53%) patients were conscious, 47 (47%) patients were self-ventilating breathing room air/oxygen via a mask. 20 (20%) patients were ventilated via an endotracheal tube. 76 (76%) patients were not requiring inotropes/vasopressors. Mean time between discussion about treatment withdrawal and time of death was 36.4 h (SD=46.48). No patients in this cohort were transferred home. Conclusions A little over 20% of patients dying in critical care demonstrate potential to be transferred home to die. Staff should actively consider the practice of transferring home as an option for care at end of life for these patients. PMID:26628534

  18. The Clinical Utility of Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials in Patients of Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

    PubMed Central

    Sreenivasan, Anuprasad; Parida, Pradiptata Kumar; Alexander, Arun; Saxena, Sunil Kumar; Suria, Gopalakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    Context Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials (VEMP) is an emerging tool to diagnose Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV). The clinical utility of VEMP has been reported only in small accord in Indian literature. Aim To study the latency and amplitude of VEMP in patients with BPPV and compare it with that of normal subjects. Settings and Design The study included two groups. Group one (control group) were 18 normal subjects. Group two (test group) were 15 subjects with unilateral BPPV. Materials and Methods Those subjects who fulfilled the selection criteria based on case history and audiological assessment were taken for the VEMP recording. The VEMP response consist of positive and negative successive waves (pI-nI), with latency values in adults about 13 and 23 milliseconds respectively. Statistical Analysis Data was analysed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 12 (Chicago, IL, USA). Unpaired t-test was employed to measure the statistical difference between control group and test group. Results The difference in n23 and the peak to peak amplitude between the ipsilateral and contralateral ears of the test group were statistically significant, whereas such a difference in the p13 latency turned out to be statistically insignificant. It should be noted that, out of 15 patients in the test group, five patients showed only artifact tracer recordings in both the ears which is considered as no response. The heterogeneity of the results extended from absence of VEMP to prolongation of both p13, n23; prolongation of p13 alone; and even side to side variations. Conclusion Absent response from the ipsilateral ear, prolonged latency of n23 and decreased peak to peak amplitude (p13, n23), indicates the disease pathology. However, large sample size is required to draw further conclusions and to consolidate the usage of VEMP in the diagnosis of BPPV. PMID:26266140

  19. Increased serum G72 protein levels in patients with schizophrenia: a potential candidate biomarker.

    PubMed

    Akyol, Esra Soydaş; Albayrak, Yakup; Aksoy, Nurkan; Şahin, Başak; Beyazyüz, Murat; Kuloğlu, Murat; Hashimoto, Kenji

    2017-04-01

    The product of the G72 gene is an activator of d-amino acid oxidase and has been suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Increased G72 protein levels may be associated with disturbed glutamatergic transmission and increased reactive oxygen species. Only one pilot study by Lin et al. has investigated the potential role of serum G72 protein levels as a biomarker for schizophrenia. In this study, we aimed to compare serum G72 protein levels between patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls, and to retest the results of the previous pilot study. Materials and methods In total, 107 patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria and 60 age-sex-matched healthy controls were included in the study. The groups were compared regarding serum G72 protein levels. The mean serum G72 protein values were 495.90±152.03 pg/ml in the schizophrenia group and 346.10±102.08 pg/ml in the healthy control group. The mean serum G72 protein level was significantly increased in the schizophrenia group compared with the healthy control group (t=-3.89, p<0.001). A receiver operating characteristics analysis was performed to compare the schizophrenia and healthy control groups. It was determined that the cut-off value was 141.51 pg/ml with a sensitivity of 0.991 and a specificity of 0.821. We suggest that serum G72 protein levels may represent a candidate biomarker for schizophrenia and have confirmed the results of the previous preliminary study. Additional studies with larger sample sizes and the inclusion of first episode schizophrenia patients are required to clarify the reliability and validity of serum G72 protein levels as a biomarker for schizophrenia.

  20. Visually Evoked Potential Markers of Concussion History in Patients with Convergence Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Poltavski, Dmitri; Lederer, Paul; Cox, Laurie Kopko

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose We investigated whether differences in the pattern visual evoked potentials exist between patients with convergence insufficiency and those with convergence insufficiency and a history of concussion using stimuli designed to differentiate between magnocellular (transient) and parvocellular (sustained) neural pathways. Methods Sustained stimuli included 2-rev/s, 85% contrast checkerboard patterns of 1- and 2-degree check sizes, whereas transient stimuli comprised 4-rev/s, 10% contrast vertical sinusoidal gratings with column width of 0.25 and 0.50 cycles/degree. We tested two models: an a priori clinical model based on an assumption of at least a minimal (beyond instrumentation’s margin of error) 2-millisecond lag of transient response latencies behind sustained response latencies in concussed patients and a statistical model derived from the sample data. Results Both models discriminated between concussed and nonconcussed groups significantly above chance (with 76% and 86% accuracy, respectively). In the statistical model, patients with mean vertical sinusoidal grating response latencies greater than 119 milliseconds to 0.25-cycle/degree stimuli (or mean vertical sinusoidal latencies >113 milliseconds to 0.50-cycle/degree stimuli) and mean vertical sinusoidal grating amplitudes of less than 14.75 mV to 0.50-cycle/degree stimuli were classified as having had a history of concussion. The resultant receiver operating characteristic curve for this model had excellent discrimination between the concussed and nonconcussed (area under the curve = 0.857; P < .01) groups with sensitivity of 0.92 and specificity of 0.80. Conclusions The results suggest a promising electrophysiological approach to identifying individuals with convergence insufficiency and a history of concussion. PMID:28609417

  1. Visually Evoked Potential Markers of Concussion History in Patients with Convergence Insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Poltavski, Dmitri; Lederer, Paul; Cox, Laurie Kopko

    2017-07-01

    We investigated whether differences in the pattern visual evoked potentials exist between patients with convergence insufficiency and those with convergence insufficiency and a history of concussion using stimuli designed to differentiate between magnocellular (transient) and parvocellular (sustained) neural pathways. Sustained stimuli included 2-rev/s, 85% contrast checkerboard patterns of 1- and 2-degree check sizes, whereas transient stimuli comprised 4-rev/s, 10% contrast vertical sinusoidal gratings with column width of 0.25 and 0.50 cycles/degree. We tested two models: an a priori clinical model based on an assumption of at least a minimal (beyond instrumentation's margin of error) 2-millisecond lag of transient response latencies behind sustained response latencies in concussed patients and a statistical model derived from the sample data. Both models discriminated between concussed and nonconcussed groups significantly above chance (with 76% and 86% accuracy, respectively). In the statistical model, patients with mean vertical sinusoidal grating response latencies greater than 119 milliseconds to 0.25-cycle/degree stimuli (or mean vertical sinusoidal latencies >113 milliseconds to 0.50-cycle/degree stimuli) and mean vertical sinusoidal grating amplitudes of less than 14.75 mV to 0.50-cycle/degree stimuli were classified as having had a history of concussion. The resultant receiver operating characteristic curve for this model had excellent discrimination between the concussed and nonconcussed (area under the curve = 0.857; P < .01) groups with sensitivity of 0.92 and specificity of 0.80. The results suggest a promising electrophysiological approach to identifying individuals with convergence insufficiency and a history of concussion.

  2. Is there a potential role for echocardiography in adult patients with CAP?

    PubMed

    Yıldırım, Birdal; Biteker, Funda Sungur; Başaran, Özcan; Alataş, Ömer Doğan; Acar, Ethem; Sözen, Hamdi; Doğan, Volkan; Beydilli, Halil; Çaylak, Selmin Dirgen

    2015-11-01

    The role of echocardiography in adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) has not been tested in a clinical trial. The aim of the study was to assess the cardiac changes secondary to CAP by echocardiography and to find out the correlation between echocardiographic findings and the severity of CAP. A total of 111 unselected consecutive adult patients hospitalized with CAP were enrolled. The control group consisted of 100 consecutive sex- and age-matched patients. The severity of CAP was evaluated with the pneumonia severity index and the CURB-65 (confusion, urea, respiratory rate, arterial blood pressure and age) score. Blood samples were taken and echocardiography was performed within the first 48 hours. White blood count, N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide, and red blood cell distribution width were significantly higher in the CAP group compared with the control group. The 2 groups did not differ in terms of left and right ventricle ejection fraction, left atrial diameter, pulmonary artery systolic pressure, and left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic diameter. However, tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (21.1 ± 4.3 vs 22.3 ± 4.1 mm; P = .04), aortic distensibility (2.5 ± 0.9 vs 3.5 ± 0.9 cm(2):dyne:10, P < .001), and aortic strain (5.8% ± 2% vs 6.5% ± 1.9%, P = .009) were significantly reduced in CAP group than in controls. The plasma concentration of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide correlated with aortic strain, aortic distensibility, tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion, pneumonia severity index score, and CURB-65 score. Tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion and elastic properties of aorta may play a role in the diagnosis and clinical assessment of CAP severity, which could potentially guide the development of new prognostic models. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Diagnostic Accuracy of Combined Multimodality Somatosensory Evoked Potential and Transcranial Motor Evoked Potential Intraoperative Monitoring in Patients With Idiopathic Scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Thirumala, Parthasarathy D; Huang, Jessie; Thiagarajan, Karthy; Cheng, Hannah; Balzer, Jeffrey; Crammond, Donald J

    2016-10-01

    Systematic review. The aim of the study was to determine the predictive value of combined multimodality somatosensory evoked potential (SSEP) and transcranial motor evoked potential (TcMEP) monitoring in detecting impending neurological injury during surgery for idiopathic scoliosis. The diagnostic of motor evoked potential monitoring and SSEP monitoring have been established. However, the predictive value of combined multimodality SSEP and TcMEP monitoring in detecting impending neurological injury during surgery for idiopathic scoliosis has not been evaluated. A systematic literature search was performed using PubMed/MEDLINE, Web of Science, and EMBASE from 1974 to January 2015. All titles and abstracts were independently reviewed by the authors. We included all studies that were (1) randomized controlled trials, prospective or retrospective cohort studies; (2) included patients with idiopathic scoliosis undergoing scoliosis correction surgery; (3) included multimodality SSEP and TcMEP monitoring during spinal surgery; (4) included immediate postoperative neurological assessment; (5) idiopathic scoliosis patient population n ≥25; and (6) published in English. Seven studies comprising a total of 2052 patients with idiopathic scoliosis were included in our meta-analysis. The incidence of neurological deficit in this cohort was 0.93%. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, and Diagnostic Odds Ratio were 82.6% (95% CI 56.7%-94.5%), 94.4% (95% CI 85.1%-98.0%), and 106.16 (95% CI 24.952-451.667), respectively. The area under the curve was 0.928, indicating excellent discriminatory ability. Idiopathic scoliosis corrective surgery patients who experience a new neurological deficit are 106.16 times more likely to have had an SSEP and/or TcMEP change during corrective procedures. The results of this meta-analysis demonstrate that combined multimodality SSEP and TcMEP monitoring possess some advantage over use of each alone, and that intraoperative neurophysiological

  4. Utilization of professional psychological care in a large German sample of cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Faller, Hermann; Weis, Joachim; Koch, Uwe; Brähler, Elmar; Härter, Martin; Keller, Monika; Schulz, Holger; Wegscheider, Karl; Boehncke, Anna; Hund, Bianca; Reuter, Katrin; Richard, Matthias; Sehner, Susanne; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Mehnert, Anja

    2017-04-01

    Although one-third of cancer patients are perceived to have a need for psychological support based on the percentage of mental disorders, little is known about the actual utilization of psychological care in cancer. We aimed to assess cancer patients' reported use of psychological care and its correlates in a large, representative sample. In a multicenter, cross-sectional study in Germany, 4020 cancer patients (mean age 58 years, 51% women) were evaluated. We obtained self-reports of use of psychotherapy and psychological counseling. We measured distress with the Distress Thermometer, symptoms of depression with the Patient Health Questionnaire, anxiety with the Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale, and social support with the Illness-specific Social Support Scale. In a subsample of 2141, we evaluated the presence of a mental disorder using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. In total, 28.9% (95% confidence interval 27.4%-30.4%) reported having used psychotherapy or psychological counseling or both because of distress due to cancer. Independent correlates of utilization included age (odds ratio [OR] = 0.97 per year], sex (male, OR = 0.55), social support (OR = 0.96), symptoms of depression (OR = 1.04) and anxiety (OR = 1.08), the diagnosis of a mental disorder (OR = 1.68), and a positive attitude toward psychosocial support (OR = 1.27). Less than half of those currently diagnosed with a mental disorder reported having taken up psychological support offers. Special efforts should be made to reach populations that report low utilization of psychological care in spite of having a need for support. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Utility of Brainstem Trigeminal Evoked Potentials in Patients With Primary Trigeminal Neuralgia Treated by Microvascular Decompression.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jin; Zhang, Xin; Zhao, Hua; Tang, Yin-Da; Ying, Ting-Ting; Li, Shi-Ting

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the characteristics of brainstem trigeminal evoked potentials (BTEP) waveform in patients with and without trigeminal neuralgia (TN), and to discuss the utility of BTEP in patients with primary TN treated by microvascular decompression (MVD). A retrospective review of 43 patients who underwent BTEP between January 2016 and June 2016, including 33 patients with TN who underwent MVD and 10 patients without TN. Brainstem trigeminal evoked potentials characteristics of TN and non-TN were summarized, in particular to compare the BTEP changes between pre- and post-MVD, and to discover the relationship between BTEP changes and surgical outcome. Brainstem trigeminal evoked potentials can be recorded in patients without trigeminal neuralgia. Abnormal BTEP could be recorded when different branches were stimulated. After decompression, the original W2, W3 disappeared and then replaced by a large wave in most patients, or original wave poorly differentiated improved in some patients, showed as shorter latency and (or) amplitude increased. Brainstem trigeminal evoked potentials waveform of healthy side in patients with trigeminal neuralgia was similar to the waveform of patients without TN. In 3 patients, after decompression the W2, W3 peaks increased, and the latency, duration, IPLD did not change significantly. Until discharge, 87.9% (29/33) of the patients presented complete absence of pain without medication (BNI I) and 93.9% (31/33) had good pain control without medication (BNI I-II). Brainstem trigeminal evoked potentials can reflect the conduction function of the trigeminal nerve to evaluate the functional level of the trigeminal nerve conduction pathway. The improvement and restoration of BTEP waveforms are closely related to the postoperative curative effect.

  6. Evaluation of Potential Oxidative Stress in Egyptian Patients with Acute Zinc Phosphide Poisoning and the Role of Vitamin C

    PubMed Central

    Sagah, Ghada A.; Oreby, Merfat M.; El-Gharbawy, Rehab M.; Ahmed Fathy, Amal S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate potential oxidative stress in patients with acute phosphide poisoning and the effect of vitamin C. Methods Participants were females and divided into three groups; group I: healthy volunteers group II: healthy volunteers received vitamin C, group III: patients with acute phosphide poisoning received the supportive and symptomatic treatment and group IV: patients with acute phosphide poisoning received the supportive and symptomatic treatment in addition to vitamin C. All the participants were subjected to thorough history, clinical examination, ECG and laboratory investigations were carried on collected blood and gastric lavage samples on admission. Blood samples were divided into two parts, one for measurement of routine investigations and the second part was used for evaluation of malondialdehyde and total thiol levels before and after receiving the treatment regimen. Results Most of the cases in this study were among the age group of 15–25 years, females, single, secondary school education, from rural areas and suicidal. All vital signs were within normal range and the most common complaint was vomiting and abdominal pain. All cases in this study showed normal routine investigations. The mean MDA levels after receiving treatment decreased significantly in groups II and IV. The mean total thiol levels increased significantly after receiving treatment in groups II and IV. Conclusion It can be concluded that vitamin C has a potential benefit due to its antioxidant property on zinc phosphide induced-oxidative stress in acute zinc phosphide poisoned patients. PMID:26715917

  7. The perceived impact of extraction and nonextraction treatments on matched samples of African American patients.

    PubMed

    Scott, S H; Johnston, L E

    1999-09-01

    Orthodontic patients of African descent often seek some measure of reduction in profile protrusion. Lip retraction, however, seems to imply a need for premolar extraction. But in a nonextraction era, what does orthodontics have to offer the bimaxillary protrusion patient? To a considerable extent, it depends on what the patient wants and what treatment can provide. The present study was designed to address these questions by comparing the esthetic impact of extraction and nonextraction therapy on two morphologically similar samples of African American patients with Class I and II malocclusions. In addition to the patients, four panels of judges (black and white orthodontists and black and white laypersons) were asked to compare the pretreatment and posttreatment profile tracings and to quantify their perceptions of the esthetic impact of the change that occurred during treatment. Although there was a strong correlation among the various groups' ratings, there were a number of statistically significant differences. Premolar extraction led to a modest reduction in dental and soft tissue protrusion; nonextraction, by way of contrast, produced an increase. Presumably in response to these changes, all panels, independent of race or education, tended to prefer the posttreatment profiles, especially the posttreatment extraction profiles. There was, however, a significant interaction between race and treatment. The perceived effects of nonextraction treatment were modest and largely unrelated to the pretreatment profile, whereas the impact of premolar extraction was a highly significant function of initial protrusion: convex profiles were improved, but relatively straight profiles were made worse. The various panels, however, differed in their estimate of the point at which a profile might benefit from extraction (ie, profile reduction). For our white panelists, that point was reached when the lower lip was about 2 mm in front of Ricketts' E-plane. For our black panelists

  8. Are patients open to elective re-sampling of their glioblastoma? A new way of assessing treatment innovations.

    PubMed

    Mir, Taskia; Dirks, Peter; Mason, Warren P; Bernstein, Mark

    2014-10-01

    This is a qualitative study designed to examine patient acceptability of re-sampling surgery for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) electively post-therapy or at asymptomatic relapse. Thirty patients were selected using the convenience sampling method and interviewed. Patients were presented with hypothetical scenarios including a scenario in which the surgery was offered to them routinely and a scenario in which the surgery was in a clinical trial. The results of the study suggest that about two thirds of the patients offered the surgery on a routine basis would be interested, and half of the patients would agree to the surgery as part of a clinical trial. Several overarching themes emerged, some of which include: patients expressed ethical concerns about offering financial incentives or compensation to the patients or surgeons involved in the study; patients were concerned about appropriate communication and full disclosure about the procedures involved, the legalities of tumor ownership and the use of the tumor post-surgery; patients may feel alone or vulnerable when they are approached about the surgery; patients and their families expressed immense trust in their surgeon and indicated that this trust is a major determinant of their agreeing to surgery. The overall positive response to re-sampling surgery suggests that this procedure, if designed with all the ethical concerns attended to, would be welcomed by most patients. This approach of asking patients beforehand if a treatment innovation is acceptable would appear to be more practical and ethically desirable than previous practice.

  9. Elemental bio-imaging of calcium phosphate crystal deposits in knee samples from arthritic patients

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Christine; Hare, Dominic; Rozelle, Andrew L.; Robinson, William H.; Grimm, Rudolf

    2012-01-01

    Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA ICP-MS) was employed to image deposits of calcium phosphate based crystals in knee cartilage and synovial fluid from arthritic patients. A reaction/collision cell containing hydrogen minimised plasma interferences on calcium and also improved the image quality without significant sensitivity reduction. Areas of high calcium and phosphorus intensities consistent with crystal deposits were observed for both the cartilage and synovial fluid samples. These areas were also characterised by high magnesium and strontium intensities. Distribution patterns of other elements such as copper and sulfur did not correlate with the crystal deposits. Filtered and non-filtered solutions of calcium phosphate crystals grown in synthetic synovial fluid were also imaged as further evidence of crystal deposits. The crystal deposits were detected in the unfiltered solution, and were absent from the filtered solutions. PMID:21305107

  10. Reduced evoked motor and sensory potential amplitudes in obstructive sleep apnea patients.

    PubMed

    Mihalj, Mario; Lušić, Linda; Đogaš, Zoran

    2016-06-01

    It is unknown to what extent chronic intermittent hypoxaemia in obstructive sleep apnea causes damage to the motor and sensory peripheral nerves. It was hypothesized that patients with obstructive sleep apnea would have bilaterally significantly impaired amplitudes of both motor and sensory peripheral nerve-evoked potentials of both lower and upper limbs. An observational study was conducted on 43 patients with obstructive sleep apnea confirmed by the whole-night polysomnography, and 40 controls to assess the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea and peripheral neuropathy. All obstructive sleep apnea subjects underwent standardized electroneurographic testing, with full assessment of amplitudes of evoked compound muscle action potentials, sensory neural action potentials, motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities, and distal motor and sensory latencies of the median, ulnar, peroneal and sural nerves, bilaterally. All nerve measurements were compared with reference values, as well as between the untreated patients with obstructive sleep apnea and control subjects. Averaged compound muscle action potential and sensory nerve action potential amplitudes were significantly reduced in the nerves of both upper and lower limbs in patients with obstructive sleep apnea compared with controls (P < 0.001). These results confirmed that patients with obstructive sleep apnea had significantly lower amplitudes of evoked action potentials of both motor and sensory peripheral nerves. Clinical/subclinical axonal damage exists in patients with obstructive sleep apnea to a greater extent than previously thought.

  11. [Changes in movement-related cortical potentials in Parkinson's patients before and after treatment with levodopa].

    PubMed

    Feve, A P; Bathien, N; Rondot, P

    1991-05-01

    Cortical potentials associated with voluntary, self-paced wrist flexion (MRPs) were recorded from 3 scalp locations (Cz and psi contralateral hand motor area) in patients with Parkinson's disease (9 de novo patients and 30 L-Dopa treated patients). The analysis concerned 3 components of the MRPs: the 2 slow negative shifts (NS1 and N1) before the movement onset and the motor potential (MP). The NSI amplitude was measured at Cz, the peak negativity N1 and MP from contralateral hand motor area location. The potential distribution was also studied. The amplitude of the MRPs components was the same as in the normals. But in de novo patients, the potential distribution of the NS1 component was different; a Cz preponderance of the NS1 amplitude was not found. In patients treated with L-Dopa, there is a negative correlation between the changes in amplitude and the changes in clinical rating for NS1, N1 and MP components. The decrease in the MRPs components was significant from stage III and IV of the Hoehn and Yahr scales. After L-Dopa therapy, the NS1 component from de novo patients was increased in amplitude. The amplitude of the MRPs components from patients with L-Dopa induced clinical fluctuations was reduced during "off" period in comparison to "on" period. The findings suggest that the NS1 potential and the N1 and MP components share 2 distinct systems for the control of voluntary movement. Their mechanism in Parkinson's disease is discussed.

  12. Prospective risk factors for suicide attempts in a treated sample of patients with borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Links, Paul S; Kolla, Nathan J; Guimond, Tim; McMain, Shelley

    2013-02-01

    People with borderline personality disorder (BPD) are at high risk for attempting suicide. There are some data to suggest that risk factors for suicide attempts change over time. We conducted a prospective cohort study to examine risk factors for suicide attempts in a treated sample of patients with BPD. One hundred eighty participants with BPD were followed over a year-long course of dialectical behaviour therapy or general psychiatric management and then for 2 more years in naturalistic follow-up. Participants were assessed for suicidal and self-injurious behaviours at baseline, every 4 months over the 1-year treatment phase, and every 6 months over a 2-year follow-up period. Participants were classified as suicide or non-suicide attempters based on their behaviour at the end of the 1-year treatment phase and after the 2-year follow-up period. Groups were then compared on baseline clinical and demographic variables. Nearly 26% of participants made a suicide attempt during the 1-year treatment phase, while 16.7% reported a suicide attempt over the 2-year follow-up period. Baseline number of suicide attempts during the 4 months prior to study and severity of childhood sexual abuse predicted suicide attempts during the treatment year. Similarly, baseline suicide attempts, severity of childhood sexual abuse, and number of hospitalizations in the 4 months prior to study entry predicted suicide attempts during the 2-year follow-up. Risk factors for suicide attempts in this treated sample of patients with BPD were fairly stable, largely non-modifiable, and unrelated to psychopathology or psychosocial functioning at baseline.

  13. Comorbidity "depression" in heart failure - Potential target of patient education and self-management.

    PubMed

    De Vecchis, Renato; Manginas, Athanassios; Noutsias, Ewa; Tschöpe, Carsten; Noutsias, Michel

    2017-02-15

    The progress of the pharmacological and device treatment of heart failure (HF) has led to a substantial improvement of mortality and rehospitalization. Further potential for improvement may be heralded in the post-discharge management of HF patients, including patient education for self-management of HF. The study by Musekamp et al. is among the first publications providing evidence that improvements in self-management skills may improve outcomes of HF patients. It is concluded that multimodal approaches addressing comorbidities in HF patients with novel concepts, and by optimal and specific HF management, including patient education, may ultimately contribute to substantial improvement of HF prognosis.

  14. [Increased summation potentials in patients with Menière's disease].

    PubMed

    Hesse, G; Mausolf, A

    1988-03-01

    There have been many publications about enlarged summation potentials with Meniere patients. The phenomenon was interpreted as being due to endolymphatic hydrops. 50 patients were examined electrocochleographically who were suffering from the symptoms low-frequency hearing loss, vertigo, tinnitus and pressure in the ear. As in other previous studies a significantly enlarged negative summating potential was found in 70% of the patients. With 10 patients electrocochleography was performed before and three hours after glycerol ingestion. In 8 patients the SP became smaller, although the subjective hearing threshold improved in only 4 cases. The study shows that enlarged SP is a common finding in Meniere patients; it underlines the diagnostic value of electrocochleography in this disease.

  15. Electrochemical detection of Pseudomonas in wound exudate samples from patients with chronic wounds

    PubMed Central

    Sismaet, Hunter J.; Banerjee, Anirban; McNish, Sean; Choi, Yongwook; Torralba, Manolito; Lucas, Sarah; Chan, Agnes; Shanmugam, Victoria K.; Goluch, Edgar D.

    2016-01-01

    In clinical practice, point-of-care diagnostic testing has progressed rapidly in the last decade. For the field of wound care, there is a compelling need to develop rapid alternatives for bacterial identification in the clinical setting, where it generally takes over 24 hours to receive a positive identification. Even new molecular and biochemical identification methods require an initial incubation period of several hours to obtain a sufficient number of cells prior to performing the analysis. Here we report the use of an inexpensive, disposable electrochemical sensor to detect pyocyanin, a unique, redox-active quorum sensing molecule released by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, in wound fluid from patients with chronic wounds enrolled in the WE-HEAL Study. By measuring the metabolite excreted by the cells, this electrochemical detection strategy eliminates sample preparation, takes less than a minute to complete, and requires only 7.5 microliters of sample to complete the analysis. The electrochemical results were compared against 16S rRNA profiling using 454 pyrosequencing. Blind identification yielded 9 correct matches, 2 false negatives, and 3 false positives giving a sensitivity of 71% and specificity of 57% for detection of Pseudomonas. Ongoing enhancement and development of this approach with a view to develop a rapid point-of-care diagnostic tool is planned. PMID:26815644

  16. HPV strain distribution in patients with genital warts in a female population sample

    PubMed Central

    Boda, Daniel; Neagu, Monica; Constantin, Carolina; Voinescu, Razvan Nicolae; Caruntu, Constantin; Zurac, Sabina; Spandidos, Demetrios A.; Drakoulis, Nikolaos; Tsoukalas, Dimitrios; Tsatsakis, Aristides M.

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV) in the human cancer domain is still a subject of intensive study. In this study, we examined cervical swab samples from 713 females with genital warts, and tested the samples for high- and low-risk genital HPV. HPV genotyping was assessed using a Genotyping test that detects HPV by the amplification of target DNA using polymerase chain reaction and nucleic acid hybridization. In total, we detected 37 anogenital HPV DNA genotypes [6, 11, 16, 18, 26, 31, 33, 35, 39, 40, 42, 45, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 58, 59, 61, 62, 64, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73 (MM9), 81, 82 (MM4), 83 (MM7), 84 (MM8), IS39 and CP6108] and investigated the incidence of these genotypes in the patients with genital warts. We found differences in the distribution of high-/low-risk strains and the incidence of high-risk strains was found to occur mainly in females under 35 years of age. The data from our study suggest that a detailed oral, rectal and genital identification of high-risk strains should be performed to visualize the entire pattern of possible triggers of carcinogenesis. PMID:27602111

  17. Comparison of Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Campylobacter Strains Isolated from Food Samples and Patients with Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Bakhshi, Bita; Naseri, Amin; Alebouyeh, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Background: Campylobacter infections may lead to serious conditions, including septicemia or other invasive forms of the disease, which require rapid and accurate laboratory diagnosis and subsequently appropriate antimicrobial therapy. The aim of this study was to compare the species distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of Campylobacter spp. strains isolated from patients and food samples. Methods: Biochemical identification was performed on 15 clinical and 30 food isolates of Campylobacter recovered onto Brucella agar containing 5% sheep blood. PCR was carried out to confirm the identity of Campylobacter spp. using primers for cadF, hipO, and asp genes of Campylobacter. To determine antibiotic sensitivity of isolates, Kirby-Bauer assay was carried out using 16 different antibiotic discs. Results: PCR assay and biochemical tests confirmed all 45 isolates as Campylobacter: 20 (44.44%) as C. jujeni, 10 (22.22%) as C. coli, and 15 (33.34%) as other Campylobacter strains. The maximum resistance was observed to cefotaxime and imipenem (each 86.49%) and the maximum sensitivity to erythromycin (48.65%). Conclusion: C. jujeni is dominant among isolates from clinical and food samples. In addition, tetracycline remains the first-line therapeutic agent against Campylobacter infections in Iran. PMID:26783018

  18. [Characteristics of potentially inappropriate prescribing of drugs in elderly polypathological patients].

    PubMed

    Rivas-Cobas, Paula Carlota; Ramírez-Duque, Nieves; Gómez Hernández, Mercedes; García, Juana; Agustí, Antonia; Vidal, Xavier; Formiga, Francesc; López-Soto, Alfonso; Torres, Olga H; San-José, Antonio

    To analyse potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP) in elderly polypathological patients (PP). Multicentre observational, prospective study of 672 patients aged 75 years and older hospitalised in Internal Medicine between April 2011 and March 2012. The Beers, STOPP-START and ACOVE criteria were used to detect potentially inappropriate prescribing and the results of PP and non-PP patients were compared. Of the 672 patients included, 419 (62%) were polypathological, of which 89.3% met PIP criteria versus 79.4% of non-polypathological patients (p <0.01). 40.3% of polypathological patients met at least one Beers criteria, 62.8% at least one STOPP criteria, 62.3% at least one START criteria and 65.6% at least one ACOVE criteria. The rate of potentially inappropriate prescribing was higher in polypathological patients regardless of the tool used. Given the high rate of potentially inappropriate prescribing in polypathological patients, strategies to improve prescribing adequacy must be developed. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. TEMPERATURE HISTORY AND DYNAMICAL EVOLUTION OF (101955) 1999 RQ 36: A POTENTIAL TARGET FOR SAMPLE RETURN FROM A PRIMITIVE ASTEROID

    SciTech Connect

    Delbo, Marco; Michel, Patrick

    2011-02-20

    It has been recently shown that near-Earth objects (NEOs) have a temperature history-due to the radiative heating by the Sun-non-trivially correlated to their present orbits. This is because the perihelion distance of NEOs varies as a consequence of dynamical mechanisms, such as resonances and close encounters with planets. Thus, it is worth investigating the temperature history of NEOs that are potential targets of space missions devoted to return samples of prebiotic organic compounds. Some of these compounds, expected to be found on NEOs of primitive composition, break up at moderate temperatures, e.g., 300-670 K. Using a model of the orbital evolution of NEOs and thermal models, we studied the temperature history of (101955) 1999 RQ{sub 36} (the primary target of the mission OSIRIS-REx, proposed in the program New Frontiers of NASA). Assuming that the same material always lies on the surface (i.e., there is no regolith turnover), our results suggest that the temperatures reached during its past evolution affected the stability of some organic compounds at the surface (e.g., there is 50% probability that the surface of 1999 RQ{sub 36} was heated at temperatures {>=}500 K). However, the temperature drops rapidly with depth: the regolith at a depth of 3-5 cm, which is not considered difficult to reach with the current designs of sampling devices, has experienced temperatures about 100 K below those at the surface. This is sufficient to protect some subsurface organics from thermal breakup.

  20. Comparative Study of Suicide Potential among Pakistani and American Psychiatric Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farooqi, Yasmin Nilofer

    2004-01-01

    This study compared suicide potential and suicide attempts in 50 Pakistani and 50 American psychiatric patients all of whom reported a positive history of suicide attempts during the past 1-5 years. It further explored the role of nationality, gender, diagnosis, and marital status in respondents' potential for suicide and suicide attempts. The…

  1. Limited Sampling Strategy and Target Attainment Analysis for Levofloxacin in Patients with Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Alsultan, Abdullah; An, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    There is an urgent need to improve and shorten the treatment of tuberculosis (TB) and multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Levofloxacin, a newer fluoroquinolone, has potent activity against TB both in vitro and in vivo. Levofloxacin dosing can be optimized to improve the treatment of both TB and MDR-TB. Levofloxacin efficacy is linked primarily to the ratio of the area under the concentration-time curve for the free fraction of drug (fAUC) to the MIC. Since obtaining a full-time concentration profile is not feasible in the clinic, we developed a limited sampling strategy (LSS) to estimate the AUC. We also utilized Monte Carlo simulations to evaluate the dosing of levofloxacin. Pharmacokinetic data were obtained from 10 Brazilian TB patients. The pharmacokinetic data were fitted with a one-compartment model. LSSs were developed using two methods: linear regression and Bayesian approaches. Several LSSs predicted levofloxacin AUC with good accuracy and precision. The most accurate were the method using two samples collected at 4 and 6 h (R2 = 0.91 using linear regression and 0.97 using Bayesian approaches) and that using samples collected at 2 and 6 h (R2 = 0.90 using linear regression and 0.96 using Bayesian approaches). The 2-and-6-h approach also provides a good estimate of the maximum concentration of the drug in serum (Cmax). Our target attainment analysis showed that higher doses (17 to 20 mg/kg of body weight) of levofloxacin might be needed to improve its activity. Doses in the range of 17 to 20 mg/kg showed good target attainment for MICs from 0.25 to 0.50. At an MIC of 2, poor target attainment was observed across all doses. This LSS for levofloxacin can be used for therapeutic drug monitoring and for future pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic studies. PMID:25870068

  2. Limited sampling strategy and target attainment analysis for levofloxacin in patients with tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Alsultan, Abdullah; An, Guohua; Peloquin, Charles A

    2015-07-01

    There is an urgent need to improve and shorten the treatment of tuberculosis (TB) and multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Levofloxacin, a newer fluoroquinolone, has potent activity against TB both in vitro and in vivo. Levofloxacin dosing can be optimized to improve the treatment of both TB and MDR-TB. Levofloxacin efficacy is linked primarily to the ratio of the area under the concentration-time curve for the free fraction of drug (fAUC) to the MIC. Since obtaining a full-time concentration profile is not feasible in the clinic, we developed a limited sampling strategy (LSS) to estimate the AUC. We also utilized Monte Carlo simulations to evaluate the dosing of levofloxacin. Pharmacokinetic data were obtained from 10 Brazilian TB patients. The pharmacokinetic data were fitted with a one-compartment model. LSSs were developed using two methods: linear regression and Bayesian approaches. Several LSSs predicted levofloxacin AUC with good accuracy and precision. The most accurate were the method using two samples collected at 4 and 6 h (R(2) = 0.91 using linear regression and 0.97 using Bayesian approaches) and that using samples collected at 2 and 6 h (R(2) = 0.90 using linear regression and 0.96 using Bayesian approaches). The 2-and-6-h approach also provides a good estimate of the maximum concentration of the drug in serum (Cmax). Our target attainment analysis showed that higher doses (17 to 20 mg/kg of body weight) of levofloxacin might be needed to improve its activity. Doses in the range of 17 to 20 mg/kg showed good target attainment for MICs from 0.25 to 0.50. At an MIC of 2, poor target attainment was observed across all doses. This LSS for levofloxacin can be used for therapeutic drug monitoring and for future pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic studies.

  3. Assessing the potential for racial bias in hair analysis for cocaine: examining the relative risk of positive outcomes when comparing urine samples to hair samples.

    PubMed

    Mieczkowski, Tom

    2011-03-20

    This article examines the conjecture that hair analysis, performed to detect cocaine use or exposure, is biased against African Americans. It does so by comparing the outcomes of 33,928 hair and 105,792 urine samples collected from both African American and white subjects. In making this comparison the analysis seeks to determine if there is a departure in rates of positive and negative outcomes when comparing the results of hair analysis for cocaine to the results from urinalysis for cocaine by racial group. It treats urine as an unbiased test. It compares both the relative ratios of positive outcomes when comparing the two groups and it calculates the relative risk of outcomes for each group for having positive or negative outcomes. The findings show that the ratios of each racial group are effectively same for hair and urine assays, and they also show that the relative risk and risk estimates for positive and negative outcomes are the same for both racial groups. Considering all samples, the cocaine positive risk estimate for the hair samples comparing the two racial groups is 3.28 and for urinalysis the risk estimate is 3.10 (Breslow-Day χ(2) .250, 1 df, p = 0.617) a non-significant difference in risk. For pre-employment samples, the cocaine positive risk estimate for the hair samples comparing the two racial groups is 3.10 and for urinalysis the risk estimate is 2.90 (Breslow-Day χ(2) .281, df = 1, p = 0.595), also a non-significant difference in risk. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Associations between attachment and psychopathology dimensions in a large sample of patients with psychosis.

    PubMed

    Korver-Nieberg, Nikie; Berry, Katherine; Meijer, Carin; de Haan, Lieuwe; Ponizovsky, Alexander M

    2015-07-30

    Attachment theory is a powerful theoretical framework that complements and extents current models psychosis. We tested the hypothesis that attachment anxiety and avoidance are differentially associated with the severity of positive, negative and general psychopathology symptoms in patients with a diagnosis of psychosis. Five hundred patients with DSM-IV or ICD-10 diagnoses of psychotic disorders (schizophrenia, schizoaffective or non-affective psychosis) from independent samples from Netherlands, United Kingdom and Israel completed the Relationship Questionnaire. Psychopathology was assessed with the Positive and Negative Syndromes Scale. We used both categorical and dimensional approach to attachment data, which were analyzed using ANOVA with post-hoc tests, Pearson's correlations and multiple regression analysis. The conservative level of statistical significance was established (p < 0.001) to control for multiple testing. After adjustment for possible confounders, attachment anxiety predicted severity of positive symptoms as well as affective symptoms. Both attachment anxiety and avoidance were associated with severity of hallucinations and persecution Contrary to predictions, attachment avoidance was not associated with overall scores for negative symptoms, although there was some evidence of relatively weaker association between avoidance and social and emotional withdrawal.

  5. Fear conditioned potentiation of the acoustic blink reflex in patients with cerebellar lesions

    PubMed Central

    Maschke, M.; Drepper, J.; Kindsvater, K.; Kolb, F.; Diener, H.; Timmann, D.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To investigate whether the human cerebellum takes part in fear conditioned potentiation of the acoustic blink reflex.
METHODS—A group of 10 cerebellar patients (eight patients with lesions involving the medial cerebellum, two patients with