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Sample records for patient-specific aneurysm phantoms

  1. Patient specific 3D printed phantom for IMRT quality assurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehler, Eric D.; Barney, Brett M.; Higgins, Patrick D.; Dusenbery, Kathryn E.

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of a patient specific phantom for patient specific dosimetric verification. Using the head and neck region of an anthropomorphic phantom as a substitute for an actual patient, a soft-tissue equivalent model was constructed with the use of a 3D printer. Calculated and measured dose in the anthropomorphic phantom and the 3D printed phantom was compared for a parallel-opposed head and neck field geometry to establish tissue equivalence. A nine-field IMRT plan was constructed and dose verification measurements were performed for the 3D printed phantom as well as traditional standard phantoms. The maximum difference in calculated dose was 1.8% for the parallel-opposed configuration. Passing rates of various dosimetric parameters were compared for the IMRT plan measurements; the 3D printed phantom results showed greater disagreement at superficial depths than other methods. A custom phantom was created using a 3D printer. It was determined that the use of patient specific phantoms to perform dosimetric verification and estimate the dose in the patient is feasible. In addition, end-to-end testing on a per-patient basis was possible with the 3D printed phantom. Further refinement of the phantom construction process is needed for routine use.

  2. Patient specific 3D printed phantom for IMRT quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Ehler, Eric D; Barney, Brett M; Higgins, Patrick D; Dusenbery, Kathryn E

    2014-10-07

    The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of a patient specific phantom for patient specific dosimetric verification.Using the head and neck region of an anthropomorphic phantom as a substitute for an actual patient, a soft-tissue equivalent model was constructed with the use of a 3D printer. Calculated and measured dose in the anthropomorphic phantom and the 3D printed phantom was compared for a parallel-opposed head and neck field geometry to establish tissue equivalence. A nine-field IMRT plan was constructed and dose verification measurements were performed for the 3D printed phantom as well as traditional standard phantoms.The maximum difference in calculated dose was 1.8% for the parallel-opposed configuration. Passing rates of various dosimetric parameters were compared for the IMRT plan measurements; the 3D printed phantom results showed greater disagreement at superficial depths than other methods.A custom phantom was created using a 3D printer. It was determined that the use of patient specific phantoms to perform dosimetric verification and estimate the dose in the patient is feasible. In addition, end-to-end testing on a per-patient basis was possible with the 3D printed phantom. Further refinement of the phantom construction process is needed for routine use.

  3. Volumetric PIV in Patient-Specific Cerebral Aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brindise, Melissa; Dickerhoff, Ben; Saloner, David; Rayz, Vitaliy; Vlachos, Pavlos

    2016-11-01

    Cerebral aneurysms impose a unique challenge in which neurosurgeons must assess and decide between the risk of rupture and risk of treatment for each patient. Risk of rupture is often difficult to determine and most commonly assessed using geometric data including the size and shape of the aneurysm and parent vessel. Hemodynamics is thought to play a major role in the growth and rupture of a cerebral aneurysm, but its specific influence is largely unknown due to the inability of in vivo modalities to characterize detailed flow fields and limited in vitro studies. In this work, we use a patient-specific basilar tip aneurysm model and volumetric particle image velocimetry (PIV). In vivo, 4-D PC-MRI measurements were obtained for this aneurysm and the extracted pulsatile waveform was used for the in vitro study. Clinically relevant metrics including wall shear stress (WSS), oscillatory shear index (OSI), relative residence time (RRT), 3-D pressure contours, and pressure wave speed were subsequently computed. This is the first study to investigate in vitro 3-D pressure fields within a cerebral aneurysm. The results of this study demonstrate how these metrics influence the biomechanics of the aneurysm and ultimately their affect on the risk of rupture.

  4. Patient-specific modeling of intracranial aneurysmal stenting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appanaboyina, Sunil; Mut, Fernando; Löhner, Rainald; Putman, Christopher M.; Cebral, Juan R.

    2007-03-01

    Simulating blood flow around stents in intracranial aneurysms is important for designing better stents and to personalize and optimize endovascular stenting procedures in the treatment of these aneurysms. However, the main difficulty lies in the generation of acceptable computational grids inside the blood vessels and around the stents. In this paper, a hybrid method that combines body-fitted grid for the vessel walls and adaptive embedded grids for the stent is presented. Also an algorithm to map a particular stent to the parent vessel is described. These approaches tremendously simplify the simulation of blood flow past these devices. The methodology is evaluated with an idealized stented aneurysm under steady flow conditions and demonstrated in various patient-specific cases under physiologic pulsatile flow conditions. These examples show that the methodology can be used with ease in modeling any patient-specific anatomy and using different stent designs. This paves the way for using these techniques during the planning phase of endovascular stenting interventions, particularly for aneurysms that are difficult to treat with coils or by surgical clipping.

  5. In Vitro Validation of Patient-Specific Hemodynamic Simulations in Coronary Aneurysms Caused by Kawasaki Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Ethan; Kahn, Andrew M.; Burns, Jane C.; Marsden, Alison

    2014-01-01

    To perform experimental validation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) applied to patient specific coronary aneurysm anatomy of Kawasaki disease. We quantified hemodynamics in a patient-specific coronary artery aneurysm physical phantom under physiologic rest and exercise flow conditions. Using phase contrast MRI (PCMRI), we acquired 3-component flow velocity at two slice locations in the aneurysms. We then performed numerical simulations with the same geometry and inflow conditions, and performed qualitative and quantitative comparisons of velocities between experimental measurements and simulation results. We observed excellent qualitative agreement in flow pattern features. The quantitative spatially and temporally varying differences in velocity between PCMRI and CFD were proportional to the flow velocity. As a result, the percent discrepancy between simulation and experiment was relatively constant regardless of flow velocity variations. Through 1D and 2D quantitative comparisons, we found a 5–17% difference between measured and simulated velocities. Additional analysis assessed wall shear stress differences between deformable and rigid wall simulations. This study demonstrated that CFD produced good qualitative and quantitative predictions of velocities in a realistic coronary aneurysm anatomy under physiological flow conditions. The results provide insights on factors that may influence the level of agreement, and a set of in vitro experimental data that can be used by others to compare against CFD simulation results. The findings of this study increase confidence in the use of CFD for investigating hemodynamics in the specialized anatomy of coronary aneurysms. This provides a basis for future hemodynamics studies in patient-specific models of Kawasaki disease. PMID:25050140

  6. Patient-specific finite element analysis of ascending aorta aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Caitlin; Elefteriades, John

    2015-01-01

    Catastrophic ascending aorta aneurysm (AsAA) dissection and rupture can be prevented by elective surgical repair, but identifying individuals at risk remains a challenge. Typically the decision to operate is based primarily on the overall aneurysm size, which may not be a reliable indicator of risk. In this study, AsAA inflation and rupture was simulated in 27 patient-specific finite element models constructed from clinical CT imaging data and tissue mechanical testing data from matching patients. These patients included n = 8 with concomitant bicuspid aortic valve (BAV), n = 10 with bovine aortic arch (BAA), and n = 10 with neither BAV nor BAA. AsAA rupture risk was found to increase with elevated systolic wall stress and tissue stiffness. The aortic size index was sufficient for identifying the patients with the lowest risk of rupture, but unsuitable for delineating between patients at moderate and high risk. There was no correlation between BAV or BAA and AsAA rupture risk; however, the AsAA morphology was different among these patients. These results support the use of mechanical parameters such as vessel wall stress and tissue stiffness for AsAA presurgical evaluation. PMID:25770248

  7. Wall-Less Flow Phantoms with Tortuous Vascular Geometries: Design Principles and a Patient-Specific Model Fabrication Example.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chung Kit; Chee, Adrian J Y; Yiu, Billy Y S; Tsang, Anderson C O; Chow, Kwok Wing; Yu, Alfred C H

    2016-12-06

    Flow phantoms with anatomically realistic geometry and high acoustic compatibility are valuable investigative tools in vascular ultrasound studies. Here, we present a new framework to fabricate ultrasound-compatible flow phantoms to replicate human vasculature that is tortuous, non-planar and branching in nature. This framework is based upon the integration of rapid prototyping and investment casting principles. A pedagogical walkthrough of our engineering protocol is presented in this paper using a patient-specific cerebral aneurysm model as an exemplar demonstration. The procedure for constructing the flow circuit component of the phantoms is also presented, including the design of a programmable flow pump system, the fabrication of blood mimicking fluid, and flow rate calibration. Using polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) cryogel as the tissue mimicking material, phantoms developed with the presented protocol exhibited physiologically relevant acoustic properties (attenuation coefficient: 0.229±0.032 dB/(cm∙MHz); acoustic speed: 1535±2.4 m/s), and their pulsatile flow dynamics closely resembled the flow profile input. As a first application of our developed phantoms, the flow pattern of the patient-specific aneurysm model was visualized by performing high-frame-rate color-encoded speckle imaging (CESI) over multiple time-synchronized scan planes. Persistent recirculation was observed, and the vortex center was found to shift in position over a cardiac cycle, indicating the 3-D nature of flow recirculation inside an aneurysm. These findings suggest that phantoms produced from our reported protocol can serve well as acoustically-compatible test-beds for vascular ultrasound studies, including 3-D flow imaging.

  8. Wall-Less Flow Phantoms With Tortuous Vascular Geometries: Design Principles and a Patient-Specific Model Fabrication Example.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chung Kit; Chee, Adrian J Y; Yiu, Billy Y S; Tsang, Anderson C O; Chow, Kwok Wing; Yu, Alfred C H

    2017-01-01

    Flow phantoms with anatomically realistic geometry and high acoustic compatibility are valuable investigative tools in vascular ultrasound studies. Here, we present a new framework to fabricate ultrasound-compatible flow phantoms to replicate human vasculature that is tortuous, nonplanar, and branching in nature. This framework is based upon the integration of rapid prototyping and investment casting principles. A pedagogical walkthrough of our engineering protocol is presented in this paper using a patient-specific cerebral aneurysm model as an exemplar demonstration. The procedure for constructing the flow circuit component of the phantoms is also presented, including the design of a programmable flow pump system, the fabrication of blood mimicking fluid, and flow rate calibration. Using polyvinyl alcohol cryogel as the tissue mimicking material, phantoms developed with the presented protocol exhibited physiologically relevant acoustic properties [attenuation coefficient: 0.229±0.032 dB/( [Formula: see text]) and acoustic speed: 1535±2.4 m/s], and their pulsatile flow dynamics closely resembled the flow profile input. As a first application of our developed phantoms, the flow pattern of the patient-specific aneurysm model was visualized by performing high-frame-rate color-encoded speckle imaging over multiple time-synchronized scan planes. Persistent recirculation was observed, and the vortex center was found to shift in position over a cardiac cycle, indicating the 3-D nature of flow recirculation inside an aneurysm. These findings suggest that phantoms produced from our reported protocol can serve well as acoustically compatible test beds for vascular ultrasound studies, including 3-D flow imaging.

  9. The effect of inlet waveforms on computational hemodynamics of patient-specific intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Xiang, J; Siddiqui, A H; Meng, H

    2014-12-18

    Due to the lack of patient-specific inlet flow waveform measurements, most computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of intracranial aneurysms usually employ waveforms that are not patient-specific as inlet boundary conditions for the computational model. The current study examined how this assumption affects the predicted hemodynamics in patient-specific aneurysm geometries. We examined wall shear stress (WSS) and oscillatory shear index (OSI), the two most widely studied hemodynamic quantities that have been shown to predict aneurysm rupture, as well as maximal WSS (MWSS), energy loss (EL) and pressure loss coefficient (PLc). Sixteen pulsatile CFD simulations were carried out on four typical saccular aneurysms using 4 different waveforms and an identical inflow rate as inlet boundary conditions. Our results demonstrated that under the same mean inflow rate, different waveforms produced almost identical WSS distributions and WSS magnitudes, similar OSI distributions but drastically different OSI magnitudes. The OSI magnitude is correlated with the pulsatility index of the waveform. Furthermore, there is a linear relationship between aneurysm-averaged OSI values calculated from one waveform and those calculated from another waveform. In addition, different waveforms produced similar MWSS, EL and PLc in each aneurysm. In conclusion, inlet waveform has minimal effects on WSS, OSI distribution, MWSS, EL and PLc and a strong effect on OSI magnitude, but aneurysm-averaged OSI from different waveforms has a strong linear correlation with each other across different aneurysms, indicating that for the same aneurysm cohort, different waveforms can consistently stratify (rank) OSI of aneurysms.

  10. Evaluation of an asymmetric stent patch design for a patient specific intracranial aneurysm using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) calculations in the computed tomography (CT) derived lumen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minsuok; Ionita, Ciprian; Tranquebar, Rekha; Hoffmann, Kenneth R.; Taulbee, Dale B.; Meng, Hui; Rudin, Stephen

    2006-03-01

    Stenting may provide a new, less invasive therapeutic option for cerebral aneurysms. However, a conventional porous stent may be insufficient in modifying the blood flow for clinical aneurysms. We designed an asymmetric stent consisting of a low porosity patch welded onto a porous stent for an anterior cerebral artery aneurysm of a specific patient geometry to block the strong inflow jet. To evaluate the effect of the patch on aneurysmal flow dynamics, we "virtually" implanted it into the patient's aneurysm geometry and performed Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis. The patch was computationally deformed to fit into the vessel lumen segmented from the patient CT reconstructions. After the flow calculations, a patch with the same design was fabricated using laser cutting techniques and welded onto a commercial porous stent, creating a patient-specific asymmetric stent. This stent was implanted into a phantom, which was imaged with X-ray angiography. The hemodynamics of untreated and stented aneurysms were compared both computationally and experimentally. It was found from CFD of the patient aneurysm that the asymmetric stent effectively blocked the strong inflow jet into the aneurysm and eliminated the flow impingement on the aneurysm wall at the dome. The impact zone with elevated wall shear stress was eliminated, the aneurysmal flow activity was substantially reduced, and the flow was considerably reduced. Experimental observations corresponded well qualitatively with the CFD results. The demonstrated asymmetric stent could lead to a new minimally invasive image guided intervention to reduce aneurysm growth and rupture.

  11. Using vortex corelines to analyze the hemodynamics of patient specific cerebral aneurysm models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Greg; Mut, Fernando; Cebral, Juan

    2012-02-01

    We construct one-dimensional sets known as vortex corelines for computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations of blood flow in patient specific cerebral aneurysm models. These sets identify centers of swirling blood flow that may play an important role in the biological mechanisms causing aneurysm growth, rupture, and thrombosis. We highlight three specific applications in which vortex corelines are used to assess flow complexity and stability in cerebral aneurysms, validate numerical models against PIV-based experimental data, and analyze the effects of flow diverting devices used to treat intracranial aneurysms.

  12. Characterization of the transport topology in patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysm models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzani, Amirhossein; Shadden, Shawn C.

    2012-08-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is characterized by disturbed blood flow patterns that are hypothesized to contribute to disease progression. The transport topology in six patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysms was studied. Velocity data were obtained by image-based computational fluid dynamics modeling, with magnetic resonance imaging providing the necessary simulation parameters. Finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) fields were computed from the velocity data, and used to identify Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS). The combination of FTLE fields and LCS was used to characterize topological flow features such as separation zones, vortex transport, mixing regions, and flow impingement. These measures offer a novel perspective into AAA flow. It was observed that all aneurysms exhibited coherent vortex formation at the proximal segment of the aneurysm. The evolution of the systolic vortex strongly influences the flow topology in the aneurysm. It was difficult to predict the vortex dynamics from the aneurysm morphology, motivating the application of image-based flow modeling.

  13. Treatment Planning for Image-Guided Neuro-Vascular Interventions Using Patient-Specific 3D Printed Phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Russ, M.; O’Hara, R.; Setlur Nagesh, S.V.; Mokin, M.; Jimenez, C.; Siddiqui, A.; Bednarek, D.; Rudin, S.; Ionita, C.

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGIs) are the preferred procedures for treatment of a wide range of vascular disorders. Despite benefits including reduced trauma and recovery time, EIGIs have their own challenges. Remote catheter actuation and challenging anatomical morphology may lead to erroneous endovascular device selections, delays or even complications such as vessel injury. EIGI planning using 3D phantoms would allow interventionists to become familiarized with the patient vessel anatomy by first performing the planned treatment on a phantom under standard operating protocols. In this study the optimal workflow to obtain such phantoms from 3D data for interventionist to practice on prior to an actual procedure was investigated. Patient-specific phantoms and phantoms presenting a wide range of challenging geometries were created. Computed Tomographic Angiography (CTA) data was uploaded into a Vitrea 3D station which allows segmentation and resulting stereo-lithographic files to be exported. The files were uploaded using processing software where preloaded vessel structures were included to create a closed-flow vasculature having structural support. The final file was printed, cleaned, connected to a flow loop and placed in an angiographic room for EIGI practice. Various Circle of Willis and cardiac arterial geometries were used. The phantoms were tested for ischemic stroke treatment, distal catheter navigation, aneurysm stenting and cardiac imaging under angiographic guidance. This method should allow for adjustments to treatment plans to be made before the patient is actually in the procedure room and enabling reduced risk of peri-operative complications or delays. PMID:26778878

  14. Predictive Models with Patient Specific Material Properties for the Biomechanical Behavior of Ascending Thoracic Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, Olfa; Duprey, Ambroise; Favre, Jean-Pierre; Avril, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the patient-specific material properties of ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms (ATAA) using preoperative dynamic gated computed tomography (CT) scans. The identification is based on the simultaneous minimization of two cost functions, which define the difference between model predictions and gated CT measurements of the aneurysm volume at respectively systole and cardiac mid-cycle. The method is applied on five patients who underwent surgical repair of their ATAA at the University Hospital Center of St. Etienne. For these patients, the aneurysms were collected and tested mechanically using an in vitro bench. For the sake of validation, the mechanical properties found using the in vivo approach and the in vitro bench were compared. We eventually performed finite-element stress analyses based on each set of material properties. Rupture risk indexes were estimated and compared, showing promising results of the patient-specific identification method based on gated CT.

  15. Accuracy of Computational Cerebral Aneurysm Hemodynamics Using Patient-Specific Endovascular Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGah, Patrick; Levitt, Michael; Barbour, Michael; Mourad, Pierre; Kim, Louis; Aliseda, Alberto

    2013-11-01

    We study the hemodynamic conditions in patients with cerebral aneurysms through endovascular measurements and computational fluid dynamics. Ten unruptured cerebral aneurysms were clinically assessed by three dimensional rotational angiography and an endovascular guidewire with dual Doppler ultrasound transducer and piezoresistive pressure sensor at multiple peri-aneurysmal locations. These measurements are used to define boundary conditions for flow simulations at and near the aneurysms. The additional in vivo measurements, which were not prescribed in the simulation, are used to assess the accuracy of the simulated flow velocity and pressure. We also performed simulations with stereotypical literature-derived boundary conditions. Simulated velocities using patient-specific boundary conditions showed good agreement with the guidewire measurements, with no systematic bias and a random scatter of about 25%. Simulated velocities using the literature-derived values showed a systematic over-prediction in velocity by 30% with a random scatter of about 40%. Computational hemodynamics using endovascularly-derived patient-specific boundary conditions have the potential to improve treatment predictions as they provide more accurate and precise results of the aneurysmal hemodynamics. Supported by an R03 grant from NIH/NINDS

  16. Experimental unsteady flow study in a patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysm model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamatopoulos, Ch.; Mathioulakis, D. S.; Papaharilaou, Y.; Katsamouris, A.

    2011-06-01

    The velocity field in a patient-specific abdominal aneurysm model including the aorto-iliac bifurcation was measured by 2D PIV. Phase-averaged velocities obtained in 14 planes reveal details of the flow evolution during a cycle. The aneurysm expanding asymmetrically toward the anterior side of the aorta causes the generation of a vortex at its entrance, covering the entire aneurysm bulge progressively before flow peak. The fluid entering the aneurysm impinges on the left side of its distal end, following the axis of the upstream aorta segment, causing an increased flow rate in the left (compared to the right) common iliac artery. High shear stresses appear at the aneurysm inlet and outlet as well as along the posterior wall, varying proportionally to the flow rate. At the same regions, elevated flow disturbances are observed, being intensified at flow peak and during the deceleration phase. Low shear stresses are present in the recirculation region, being two orders of magnitude smaller than the previous ones. At flow peak and during the deceleration phase, a clockwise swirling motion (viewed from the inlet) is present in the aneurysm due to the out of plane curvature of the aorta.

  17. In vitro investigation of contrast flow jet timing in patient-specific intracranial aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Virendra R.; Britz, Garvin W.

    2016-01-01

    Background The direction and magnitude of intra-aneurysmal flow jet are significant risk factors of subarachnoid hemorrhage, and the change of flow jet during an endovascular procedure has been used for prediction of aneurysm occlusion or whether an additional flow diverter (FD) is warranted. However, evaluation of flow jets is often unreliable due to a large variation of flow jet on the digital subtraction angiograms, and this flow pattern variation may result in incorrect clinical diagnosis Therefore, factors contributing to the variation in flow jet are examined at an in vitro setting, and the findings can help us to understand the nature of flow jet and devise a better plan to quantify the aneurysmal hemodynamics accurately. Methods Intra-aneurysmal flows in three patient-specific aneurysms between 11 and 25 mm were investigated in vitro, and a FD was deployed in each aneurysm model. X-ray imaging of these models were performed at injection rates between 0.2 and 2 mL/s. Pulsatile blood pump and aneurysm model were imaged together to determine the timing of flow jet. Results The contrast bolus arrives at the aneurysm early at high contrast injection rates. The flow patterns with slow injection rates exhibit strong inertia that is associated with the systole flow. Flow jets arrive at the aneurysms at the peak systole when the bolus is injected at 0.2 mL/s. The contrast-to-signal ratio is the highest at the injection rate of 0.5 mL/s. Effect of flow diversion can only be assessed at an injection rate greater than 0.5 mL/s. Conclusions Intra-aneurysmal flow jet is highly dependent on the injection rate of the contrast agent. For the internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysms, the systolic flows can be visualized at slow injection rates (<0.5 mL/s), while the diastolic flow jets are visible at higher injection rates (>1 mL/s). Dependence of flow jet on the contrast injection rate has serious clinical implications and needs to be considered during diagnostic procedures

  18. Challenges and limitations of patient-specific vascular phantom fabrication using 3D Polyjet printing

    PubMed Central

    Ionita, Ciprian N; Mokin, Maxim; Varble, Nicole; Bednarek, Daniel R; Xiang, Jianping; Snyder, Kenneth V; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Levy, Elad I; Meng, Hui; Rudin, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (3D printing) technology offers a great opportunity towards development of patient-specific vascular anatomic models, for medical device testing and physiological condition evaluation. However, the development process is not yet well established and there are various limitations depending on the printing materials, the technology and the printer resolution. Patient-specific neuro-vascular anatomy was acquired from computed tomography angiography and rotational digital subtraction angiography (DSA). The volumes were imported into a Vitrea 3D workstation (Vital Images Inc.) and the vascular lumen of various vessels and pathologies were segmented using a “marching cubes” algorithm. The results were exported as Stereo Lithographic (STL) files and were further processed by smoothing, trimming, and wall extrusion (to add a custom wall to the model). The models were printed using a Polyjet printer, Eden 260V (Objet-Stratasys). To verify the phantom geometry accuracy, the phantom was reimaged using rotational DSA, and the new data was compared with the initial patient data. The most challenging part of the phantom manufacturing was removal of support material. This aspect could be a serious hurdle in building very tortuous phantoms or small vessels. The accuracy of the printed models was very good: distance analysis showed average differences of 120 μm between the patient and the phantom reconstructed volume dimensions. Most errors were due to residual support material left in the lumen of the phantom. Despite the post-printing challenges experienced during the support cleaning, this technology could be a tremendous benefit to medical research such as in device development and testing. PMID:25300886

  19. Challenges and limitations of patient-specific vascular phantom fabrication using 3D Polyjet printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionita, Ciprian N.; Mokin, Maxim; Varble, Nicole; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Xiang, Jianping; Snyder, Kenneth V.; Siddiqui, Adnan H.; Levy, Elad I.; Meng, Hui; Rudin, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (3D printing) technology offers a great opportunity towards development of patient-specific vascular anatomic models, for medical device testing and physiological condition evaluation. However, the development process is not yet well established and there are various limitations depending on the printing materials, the technology and the printer resolution. Patient-specific neuro-vascular anatomy was acquired from computed tomography angiography and rotational digital subtraction angiography (DSA). The volumes were imported into a Vitrea 3D workstation (Vital Images Inc.) and the vascular lumen of various vessels and pathologies were segmented using a "marching cubes" algorithm. The results were exported as Stereo Lithographic (STL) files and were further processed by smoothing, trimming, and wall extrusion (to add a custom wall to the model). The models were printed using a Polyjet printer, Eden 260V (Objet-Stratasys). To verify the phantom geometry accuracy, the phantom was reimaged using rotational DSA, and the new data was compared with the initial patient data. The most challenging part of the phantom manufacturing was removal of support material. This aspect could be a serious hurdle in building very tortuous phantoms or small vessels. The accuracy of the printed models was very good: distance analysis showed average differences of 120 μm between the patient and the phantom reconstructed volume dimensions. Most errors were due to residual support material left in the lumen of the phantom. Despite the post-printing challenges experienced during the support cleaning, this technology could be a tremendous benefit to medical research such as in device development and testing.

  20. Challenges and limitations of patient-specific vascular phantom fabrication using 3D Polyjet printing.

    PubMed

    Ionita, Ciprian N; Mokin, Maxim; Varble, Nicole; Bednarek, Daniel R; Xiang, Jianping; Snyder, Kenneth V; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Levy, Elad I; Meng, Hui; Rudin, Stephen

    2014-03-13

    Additive manufacturing (3D printing) technology offers a great opportunity towards development of patient-specific vascular anatomic models, for medical device testing and physiological condition evaluation. However, the development process is not yet well established and there are various limitations depending on the printing materials, the technology and the printer resolution. Patient-specific neuro-vascular anatomy was acquired from computed tomography angiography and rotational digital subtraction angiography (DSA). The volumes were imported into a Vitrea 3D workstation (Vital Images Inc.) and the vascular lumen of various vessels and pathologies were segmented using a "marching cubes" algorithm. The results were exported as Stereo Lithographic (STL) files and were further processed by smoothing, trimming, and wall extrusion (to add a custom wall to the model). The models were printed using a Polyjet printer, Eden 260V (Objet-Stratasys). To verify the phantom geometry accuracy, the phantom was reimaged using rotational DSA, and the new data was compared with the initial patient data. The most challenging part of the phantom manufacturing was removal of support material. This aspect could be a serious hurdle in building very tortuous phantoms or small vessels. The accuracy of the printed models was very good: distance analysis showed average differences of 120 μm between the patient and the phantom reconstructed volume dimensions. Most errors were due to residual support material left in the lumen of the phantom. Despite the post-printing challenges experienced during the support cleaning, this technology could be a tremendous benefit to medical research such as in device development and testing.

  1. Angiographic analysis for phantom simulations of endovascular aneurysm treatments with a new fully retrievable asymmetric flow diverter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoganand, Aradhana; Wood, Rachel P.; Jimenez, Carlos; Siddiqui, Adnan; Snyder, Kenneth; Setlur Nagesh, S. V.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.; Baier, Robert; Ionita, Ciprian N.

    2015-03-01

    Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA) is the main diagnostic tool for intracranial aneurysms (IA) flow-diverter (FD) assisted treatment. Based on qualitative contrast flow evaluation, interventionists decide on subsequent steps. We developed a novel fully Retrievable Asymmetric Flow-Diverter (RAFD) which allows controlled deployment, repositioning and detachment achieve optimal flow diversion. The device has a small low porosity or solid region which is placed such that it would achieve maximum aneurysmal in-jet flow deflection with minimum impairment to adjacent vessels. We tested the new RAFD using a flow-loop with an idealized and a patient specific IA phantom in carotid-relevant physiological conditions. We positioned the deflection region at three locations: distally, center and proximally to the aneurysm orifice and analyzed aneurysm dome flow using DSA derived maps for mean transit time (MTT) and bolus arrival times (BAT). Comparison between treated and untreated (control) maps quantified the RAFD positioning effect. Average MTT, related to contrast presence in the aneurysm dome increased, indicating flow decoupling between the aneurysm and parent artery. Maximum effect was observed in the center and proximal position (~75%) of aneurysm models depending on their geometry. BAT maps, correlated well with inflow jet direction and magnitude. Reduction and jet dispersion as high as about 50% was observed for various treatments. We demonstrated the use of DSA data to guide the placement of the RAFD and showed that optimum flow diversion within the aneurysm dome is feasible. This could lead to more effective and a safer IA treatment using FDs.

  2. Fluid-Structure Simulations of a Ruptured Intracranial Aneurysm: Constant versus Patient-Specific Wall Thickness.

    PubMed

    Voß, S; Glaßer, S; Hoffmann, T; Beuing, O; Weigand, S; Jachau, K; Preim, B; Thévenin, D; Janiga, G; Berg, P

    2016-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics is intensively used to deepen the understanding of aneurysm growth and rupture in order to support physicians during therapy planning. However, numerous studies considering only the hemodynamics within the vessel lumen found no satisfactory criteria for rupture risk assessment. To improve available simulation models, the rigid vessel wall assumption has been discarded in this work and patient-specific wall thickness is considered within the simulation. For this purpose, a ruptured intracranial aneurysm was prepared ex vivo, followed by the acquisition of local wall thickness using μCT. The segmented inner and outer vessel surfaces served as solid domain for the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) simulation. To compare wall stress distributions within the aneurysm wall and at the rupture site, FSI computations are repeated in a virtual model using a constant wall thickness approach. Although the wall stresses obtained by the two approaches-when averaged over the complete aneurysm sac-are in very good agreement, strong differences occur in their distribution. Accounting for the real wall thickness distribution, the rupture site exhibits much higher stress values compared to the configuration with constant wall thickness. The study reveals the importance of geometry reconstruction and accurate description of wall thickness in FSI simulations.

  3. Effect of exercise on patient specific abdominal aortic aneurysm flow topology and mixing.

    PubMed

    Arzani, Amirhossein; Les, Andrea S; Dalman, Ronald L; Shadden, Shawn C

    2014-02-01

    Computational fluid dynamics modeling was used to investigate changes in blood transport topology between rest and exercise conditions in five patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysm models. MRI was used to provide the vascular anatomy and necessary boundary conditions for simulating blood velocity and pressure fields inside each model. Finite-time Lyapunov exponent fields and associated Lagrangian coherent structures were computed from blood velocity data and were used to compare features of the transport topology between rest and exercise both mechanistically and qualitatively. A mix-norm and mix-variance measure based on fresh blood distribution throughout the aneurysm over time were implemented to quantitatively compare mixing between rest and exercise. Exercise conditions resulted in higher and more uniform mixing and reduced the overall residence time in all aneurysms. Separated regions of recirculating flow were commonly observed in rest, and these regions were either reduced or removed by attached and unidirectional flow during exercise, or replaced with regional chaotic and transiently turbulent mixing, or persisted and even extended during exercise. The main factor that dictated the change in flow topology from rest to exercise was the behavior of the jet of blood penetrating into the aneurysm during systole.

  4. Fluid-Structure Simulations of a Ruptured Intracranial Aneurysm: Constant versus Patient-Specific Wall Thickness

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, T.; Beuing, O.; Jachau, K.; Thévenin, D.; Janiga, G.; Berg, P.

    2016-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics is intensively used to deepen the understanding of aneurysm growth and rupture in order to support physicians during therapy planning. However, numerous studies considering only the hemodynamics within the vessel lumen found no satisfactory criteria for rupture risk assessment. To improve available simulation models, the rigid vessel wall assumption has been discarded in this work and patient-specific wall thickness is considered within the simulation. For this purpose, a ruptured intracranial aneurysm was prepared ex vivo, followed by the acquisition of local wall thickness using μCT. The segmented inner and outer vessel surfaces served as solid domain for the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) simulation. To compare wall stress distributions within the aneurysm wall and at the rupture site, FSI computations are repeated in a virtual model using a constant wall thickness approach. Although the wall stresses obtained by the two approaches—when averaged over the complete aneurysm sac—are in very good agreement, strong differences occur in their distribution. Accounting for the real wall thickness distribution, the rupture site exhibits much higher stress values compared to the configuration with constant wall thickness. The study reveals the importance of geometry reconstruction and accurate description of wall thickness in FSI simulations. PMID:27721898

  5. Wall Shear Stress Distribution in a Patient-Specific Cerebral Aneurysm Model using Reduced Order Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Suyue; Chang, Gary Han; Schirmer, Clemens; Modarres-Sadeghi, Yahya

    2016-11-01

    We construct a reduced-order model (ROM) to study the Wall Shear Stress (WSS) distributions in image-based patient-specific aneurysms models. The magnitude of WSS has been shown to be a critical factor in growth and rupture of human aneurysms. We start the process by running a training case using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation with time-varying flow parameters, such that these parameters cover the range of parameters of interest. The method of snapshot Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) is utilized to construct the reduced-order bases using the training CFD simulation. The resulting ROM enables us to study the flow patterns and the WSS distributions over a range of system parameters computationally very efficiently with a relatively small number of modes. This enables comprehensive analysis of the model system across a range of physiological conditions without the need to re-compute the simulation for small changes in the system parameters.

  6. Patient-specific computer modeling of blood flow in cerebral arteries with aneurysm and stent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takizawa, Kenji; Schjodt, Kathleen; Puntel, Anthony; Kostov, Nikolay; Tezduyar, Tayfun E.

    2012-12-01

    We present the special arterial fluid mechanics techniques we have developed for patient-specific computer modeling of blood flow in cerebral arteries with aneurysm and stent. These techniques are used in conjunction with the core computational technique, which is the space-time version of the variational multiscale (VMS) method and is called "DST/SST-VMST." The special techniques include using NURBS for the spatial representation of the surface over which the stent mesh is built, mesh generation techniques for both the finite- and zero-thickness representations of the stent, techniques for generating refined layers of mesh near the arterial and stent surfaces, and models for representing double stent. We compute the unsteady flow patterns in the aneurysm and investigate how those patterns are influenced by the presence of single and double stents. We also compare the flow patterns obtained with the finite- and zero-thickness representations of the stent.

  7. Blood flow dynamic improvement with aneurysm repair detected by a patient-specific model of multiple aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Sughimoto, Koichi; Takahara, Yoshiharu; Mogi, Kenji; Yamazaki, Kenji; Tsubota, Ken'ichi; Liang, Fuyou; Liu, Hao

    2014-05-01

    Aortic aneurysms may cause the turbulence of blood flow and result in the energy loss of the blood flow, while grafting of the dilated aorta may ameliorate these hemodynamic disturbances, contributing to the alleviation of the energy efficiency of blood flow delivery. However, evaluating of the energy efficiency of blood flow in an aortic aneurysm has been technically difficult to estimate and not comprehensively understood yet. We devised a multiscale computational biomechanical model, introducing novel flow indices, to investigate a single male patient with multiple aortic aneurysms. Preoperative levels of wall shear stress and oscillatory shear index (OSI) were elevated but declined after staged grafting procedures: OSI decreased from 0.280 to 0.257 (first operation) and 0.221 (second operation). Graftings may strategically counter the loss of efficient blood delivery to improve hemodynamics of the aorta. The energy efficiency of blood flow also improved postoperatively. Novel indices of pulsatile pressure index (PPI) and pulsatile energy loss index (PELI) were evaluated to characterize and quantify energy loss of pulsatile blood flow. Mean PPI decreased from 0.445 to 0.423 (first operation) and 0.359 (second operation), respectively; while the preoperative PELI of 0.986 dropped to 0.820 and 0.831. Graftings contributed not only to ameliorate wall shear stress or oscillatory shear index but also to improve efficient blood flow. This patient-specific modeling will help in analyzing the mechanism of aortic aneurysm formation and may play an important role in quantifying the energy efficiency or loss in blood delivery.

  8. Development of an improved approach to radiation treatment therapy using high-definition patient-specific voxel phantoms

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, R.C.; Ryman, J.C.; Worley, B.A.; Stallings, D.C.

    1998-09-01

    Through an internally funded project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a high-resolution phantom was developed based on the National Library of Medicine`s Visible Human Data. Special software was written using the interactive data language (IDL) visualization language to automatically segment and classify some of the organs and the skeleton of the Visible Male. A high definition phantom consisting of nine hundred 512 x 512 slices was constructed of the entire torso. Computed tomography (CT) images of a patient`s tumor near the spine were scaled and morphed into the phantom model to create a patient-specific phantom. Calculations of dose to the tumor and surrounding tissue were then performed using the patient-specific phantom.

  9. SU-E-T-114: Analysis of MLC Errors On Gamma Pass Rates for Patient-Specific and Conventional Phantoms

    SciTech Connect

    Sterling, D; Ehler, E

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate whether a 3D patient-specific phantom is better able to detect known MLC errors in a clinically delivered treatment plan than conventional phantoms. 3D printing may make fabrication of such phantoms feasible. Methods: Two types of MLC errors were introduced into a clinically delivered, non-coplanar IMRT, partial brain treatment plan. First, uniformly distributed random errors of up to 3mm, 2mm, and 1mm were introduced into the MLC positions for each field. Second, systematic MLC-bank position errors of 5mm, 3.5mm, and 2mm due to simulated effects of gantry and MLC sag were introduced. The original plan was recalculated with these errors on the original CT dataset as well as cylindrical and planar IMRT QA phantoms. The original dataset was considered to be a perfect 3D patient-specific phantom. The phantoms were considered to be ideal 3D dosimetry systems with no resolution limitations. Results: Passing rates for Gamma Index (3%/3mm and no dose threshold) were calculated on the 3D phantom, cylindrical phantom, and both on a composite and field-by-field basis for the planar phantom. Pass rates for 5mm systematic and 3mm random error were 86.0%, 89.6%, 98% and 98.3% respectively. For 3.5mm systematic and 2mm random error the pass rates were 94.7%, 96.2%, 99.2% and 99.2% respectively. For 2mm systematic error with 1mm random error the pass rates were 99.9%, 100%, 100% and 100% respectively. Conclusion: A 3D phantom with the patient anatomy is able to discern errors, both severe and subtle, that are not seen using conventional phantoms. Therefore, 3D phantoms may be beneficial for commissioning new treatment machines and modalities, patient-specific QA and end-to-end testing.

  10. Patient Specific Dosimetry Phantoms Using Multichannel LDDMM of the Whole Body

    PubMed Central

    Tward, Daniel J.; Ceritoglu, Can; Kolasny, Anthony; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Segars, W. Paul; Miller, Michael I.; Ratnanather, J. Tilak

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes an automated procedure for creating detailed patient-specific pediatric dosimetry phantoms from a small set of segmented organs in a child's CT scan. The algorithm involves full body mappings from adult template to pediatric images using multichannel large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping (MC-LDDMM). The parallel implementation and performance of MC-LDDMM for this application is studied here for a sample of 4 pediatric patients, and from 1 to 24 processors. 93.84% of computation time is parallelized, and the efficiency of parallelization remains high until more than 8 processors are used. The performance of the algorithm was validated on a set of 24 male and 18 female pediatric patients. It was found to be accurate typically to within 1-2 voxels (2–4 mm) and robust across this large and variable data set. PMID:21960989

  11. SU-F-BRE-08: Feasibility of 3D Printed Patient Specific Phantoms for IMRT/IGRT QA

    SciTech Connect

    Ehler, E; Higgins, P; Dusenbery, K

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Test the feasibility of 3D printed, per-patient phantoms for IMRT QA to analyze the treatment delivery quality within the patient geometry. Methods: Using the head and neck region of an anthropomorphic phantom as a substitute for an actual patient, a soft-tissue equivalent model was constructed with the use of a 3D printer. A nine-field IMRT plan was constructed and dose verification measurements were performed for the 3D printed phantom. During the delivery of the IMRT QA on to the 3D printed phantom, the same patient positioning indexing system was used on the phantom and image guidance (cone beam CT) was used to localize the phantom, serving as a test of the IGRT system as well. The 3D printed phantom was designed to accommodate four radiochromic film planes (two axial, one coronal and one sagittal) and an ionization chamber measurement. As a frame of comparison, the IMRT QA was also performed on traditional phantoms. Dosimetric tolerance levels such as 3mm / 3% Gamma Index as well as 3% and 5% dose difference were considered. All detector systems were calibrated against a NIST traceable ionization chamber. Results: Comparison of results 3D printed patient phantom with the standard IMRT QA systems showed similar passing rates for the 3D printed phantom and the standard phantoms. However, the locations of the failing regions did not necessarily correlate. The 3D printed phantom was localized within 1 mm and 1° using on-board cone beam CT. Conclusion: A custom phantom was created using a 3D printer. It was determined that the use of patient specific phantoms to perform dosimetric verification and estimate the dose in the patient is feasible. In addition, end-to-end testing on a per-patient basis was possible with the 3D printed phantom. Further refinement of the phantom construction process is needed for routine clinical use.

  12. Angiographic analysis for phantom simulations of endovascular aneurysm treatments with a new fully retrievable asymmetric flow diverter

    PubMed Central

    Yoganand, Aradhana; Wood, Rachel P.; Jimenez, Carlos; Siddiqui, Adnan; Snyder, Kenneth; Nagesh, S.V. Setlur; Bednarek, D.R.; Rudin, S; Baier, Robert; Ionita, Ciprian N

    2015-01-01

    Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA) is the main diagnostic tool for intracranial aneurysms (IA) flow-diverter (FD) assisted treatment. Based on qualitative contrast flow evaluation, interventionists decide on subsequent steps. We developed a novel fully Retrievable Asymmetric Flow-Diverter (RAFD) which allows controlled deployment, repositioning and detachment achieve optimal flow diversion. The device has a small low porosity or solid region which is placed such that it would achieve maximum aneurysmal in-jet flow deflection with minimum impairment to adjacent vessels. We tested the new RAFD using a flow-loop with an idealized and a patient specific IA phantom in carotid-relevant physiological conditions. We positioned the deflection region at three locations: distally, center and proximally to the aneurysm orifice and analyzed aneurysm dome flow using DSA derived maps for mean transit time (MTT) and bolus arrival times (BAT). Comparison between treated and untreated (control) maps quantified the RAFD positioning effect. Average MTT, related to contrast presence in the aneurysm dome increased, indicating flow decoupling between the aneurysm and parent artery. Maximum effect was observed in the center and proximal position (~75%) of aneurysm models depending on their geometry. BAT maps, correlated well with inflow jet direction and magnitude. Reduction and jet dispersion as high as about 50% was observed for various treatments. We demonstrated the use of DSA data to guide the placement of the RAFD and showed that optimum flow diversion within the aneurysm dome is feasible. This could lead to more effective and a safer IA treatment using FDs. PMID:26869741

  13. Patient specific quality control for Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy (SABR): it takes more than one phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kron, T.; Ungureanu, E.; Antony, R.; Hardcastle, N.; Clements, N.; Ukath, J.; Fox, C.; Lonski, P.; Wanigaratne, D.; Haworth, A.

    2017-01-01

    Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy (SABR) is an extension of the concepts of Stereotactic Radiosurgery from intracranial procedures to extracranial targets. This brings with it new technological challenges for set-up of a SABR program and continuing quality assurance. Compared with intracranial procedures SABR requires consideration of motion and inhomogeneities and has to deal with a much larger variety of targets ranging from lung to liver, kidney and bone. To meet many of the challenges virtually all advances in modern radiotherapy, such as Intensity Modulated and Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IMRT and IGRT) are used. Considering the few fractions and high doses per fraction delivered to complex targets it is not surprising that patient specific quality control is considered essential for safe delivery. Given the variety of targets and clinical scenarios we employ different strategies for different patients to ensure that the most important aspects of the treatment are appropriately tested, be it steep dose gradients, inhomogeneities or the delivery of dose in the presence of motion. The current paper reviews the different approaches and phantoms utilised at Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre for SABR QA.

  14. The Numerical Study of the Hemodynamic Characteristics in the Patient-Specific Intracranial Aneurysms before and after Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Jun Soo; Choi, Sun-Young

    2016-01-01

    The patient-specific pre- and postsurgery cerebral arterial geometries in the study were reconstructed from computed tomography angiography (CTA). Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics models were used to investigate the hemodynamic phenomena in the cerebral arteries before and after surgery of the aneurysm under realistic conditions. CFD simulations for laminar flow of incompressible Newtonian fluid were conducted by using commercial software, ANSYS v15, with the rigid vascular wall assumption. The study found that the flow patterns with the complex vortical structures inside the aneurysm were similar. We also found that the inflow jet streams were coming strongly in aneurysm sac in the presurgery models, while the flow patterns in postsurgery models were quite different from those in presurgery models. The average wall shear stress after surgery for model 1 was approximately three times greater than that before surgery, while it was about twenty times greater for model 2. The area of low WSS in the daughter saccular aneurysm region in model 2 is associated with aneurysm rupture. Thus the distribution of WSS in aneurysm region provides useful prediction for the risk of aneurysm rupture. PMID:27274764

  15. The Numerical Study of the Hemodynamic Characteristics in the Patient-Specific Intracranial Aneurysms before and after Surgery.

    PubMed

    Byun, Jun Soo; Choi, Sun-Young; Seo, Taewon

    2016-01-01

    The patient-specific pre- and postsurgery cerebral arterial geometries in the study were reconstructed from computed tomography angiography (CTA). Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics models were used to investigate the hemodynamic phenomena in the cerebral arteries before and after surgery of the aneurysm under realistic conditions. CFD simulations for laminar flow of incompressible Newtonian fluid were conducted by using commercial software, ANSYS v15, with the rigid vascular wall assumption. The study found that the flow patterns with the complex vortical structures inside the aneurysm were similar. We also found that the inflow jet streams were coming strongly in aneurysm sac in the presurgery models, while the flow patterns in postsurgery models were quite different from those in presurgery models. The average wall shear stress after surgery for model 1 was approximately three times greater than that before surgery, while it was about twenty times greater for model 2. The area of low WSS in the daughter saccular aneurysm region in model 2 is associated with aneurysm rupture. Thus the distribution of WSS in aneurysm region provides useful prediction for the risk of aneurysm rupture.

  16. Treatment planning for image-guided neuro-vascular interventions using patient-specific 3D printed phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russ, M.; O'Hara, R.; Setlur Nagesh, S. V.; Mokin, M.; Jimenez, C.; Siddiqui, A.; Bednarek, D.; Rudin, S.; Ionita, C.

    2015-03-01

    Minimally invasive endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGIs) are the preferred procedures for treatment of a wide range of vascular disorders. Despite benefits including reduced trauma and recovery time, EIGIs have their own challenges. Remote catheter actuation and challenging anatomical morphology may lead to erroneous endovascular device selections, delays or even complications such as vessel injury. EIGI planning using 3D phantoms would allow interventionists to become familiarized with the patient vessel anatomy by first performing the planned treatment on a phantom under standard operating protocols. In this study the optimal workflow to obtain such phantoms from 3D data for interventionist to practice on prior to an actual procedure was investigated. Patientspecific phantoms and phantoms presenting a wide range of challenging geometries were created. Computed Tomographic Angiography (CTA) data was uploaded into a Vitrea 3D station which allows segmentation and resulting stereo-lithographic files to be exported. The files were uploaded using processing software where preloaded vessel structures were included to create a closed-flow vasculature having structural support. The final file was printed, cleaned, connected to a flow loop and placed in an angiographic room for EIGI practice. Various Circle of Willis and cardiac arterial geometries were used. The phantoms were tested for ischemic stroke treatment, distal catheter navigation, aneurysm stenting and cardiac imaging under angiographic guidance. This method should allow for adjustments to treatment plans to be made before the patient is actually in the procedure room and enabling reduced risk of peri-operative complications or delays.

  17. Preoperative simulations of endovascular treatment for a cerebral aneurysm using a patient-specific vascular silicone model.

    PubMed

    Kono, Kenichi; Shintani, Aki; Okada, Hideo; Terada, Tomoaki

    2013-01-01

    Silicone models of cerebral aneurysms are used for evaluation of devices, training, or hemodynamic studies. We report preoperative simulations of endovascular treatment for a case with an unruptured wide-neck aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery using a patient-specific silicone model. Using a rapid prototyping system, we created a silicone model based on the vascular image obtained by three-dimensional rotational angiogram. The aneurysm and vessels formed a cavity in the silicone block model. We performed endovascular simulations using several difference devices and attempted possible methods for coil embolization. We designed treatment strategies based on the simulations and performed balloon-assisted coil embolization of the aneurysm. The simulations were especially useful in navigation of a microcatheter by planning the shape of its tip beforehand. There was one significant difference between the silicone model simulations and actual treatment: the shape of the vessel in the silicone block model was not changed by insertion of a catheter or guidewire. This is the first study to describe preoperative endovascular simulations using a patient-specific silicone model. Our methods of creating a patient-specific model are relatively simple and easy. Although this is a single case, we demonstrate that the simulations are feasible and helpful for designing a treatment strategy and safe manipulation of endovascular devices by experiencing their behavior before actual treatment.

  18. Flow topology in patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysms during rest and exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzani, Amirhossein; Shadden, Shawn

    2012-11-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a permanent, localized widening of the abdominal aorta. Flow in AAA is dominated by recirculation, transitional turbulence and low wall shear stress. Image-based CFD has recently enabled high resolution flow data in patient-specific AAA. This study aims to characterize transport in different AAAs, and understand flow topology changes from rest to exercise, which has been a hypothesized therapy due to potential acute changes in flow. Velocity data in 6 patients with different AAA morphology were obtained using image-based CFD under rest and exercise conditions. Finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) fields were computed from integration of the velocity data to identify dominant Lagrangian coherent structures. The flow topology was compared between rest and exercise conditions. For all patients, the systolic inflow jet resulted in coherent vortex formation. The evolution of this vortex varied greatly between patients and was a major determinant of transport inside the AAA during diastole. During exercise, previously observed stagnant regions were either replaced with undisturbed flow, regions of uniform high mixing, or persisted relatively unchanged. A mix norm measure provided a quantitative assessment of mixing. This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health, grant number 5R21HL108272.

  19. Flow-induced wall mechanics of patient-specific aneurysmal cerebral arteries: Nonlinear isotropic versus anisotropic wall stress.

    PubMed

    Cornejo, Sergio; Guzmán, Amador; Valencia, Alvaro; Rodríguez, Jose; Finol, Ender

    2014-01-01

    Fluid-structure interaction simulations of three patient-specific models of cerebral aneurysms were carried out with the objective of quantifying the effects of non-Newtonian blood flow and the vessel mechanical behavior on the time-dependent fluid shear and normal stresses, and structural stress and stretch. The average wall shear stress at peak systole was found to be approximately one order of magnitude smaller than the shear stresses in the proximal communicating arteries, regardless of the shape or size of the aneurysms. Spatial distributions of oscillatory shear index were consistent with the reciprocal of wall shear stress distributions at peak systole for all aneurysm geometries, demonstrating that oscillatory shear index correlates inversely with wall shear at this time point in the cardiac cycle. An aneurysm wall modeled with an isotropic material resulted in an underestimation of both the maximum principal stress and stretch, compared to the anisotropic material model. For the three aneurysm geometries, anisotropic peak wall stresses were approximately 50% higher than for an isotropic material. Regardless of the constitutive material, the maximum stresses were consistently located at the aneurysm neck; stresses in the dome were 30% of those in the neck.

  20. WE-D-BRA-05: Pseudo In Vivo Patient Dosimetry Using a 3D-Printed Patient-Specific Phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Ger, R; Craft, DF; Burgett, EA; Price, RR; Kry, SF; Howell, RM

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To test the feasibility of using 3D-printed patient-specific phantoms for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA). Methods: We created a patient-specific whole-head phantom using a 3D printer. The printer data file was created from high-resolution DICOM computed tomography (CT) images of 3-year old child treated at our institution for medulloblastoma. A custom-modified extruder system was used to create tissue-equivalent materials. For the printing process, the Hounsfield Units from the CT images were converted to proportional volumetric densities. A 5-field IMRT plan was created from the patient CT and delivered to the 3D- phantom. Dose was measured by an ion chamber placed through the eye. The ion chamber was placed at the posterior edge of the planning target volume in a high dose gradient region. CT scans of the patient and 3D-phantom were fused by using commercial treatment planning software (TPS). The patient’s plan was calculated on the phantom CT images. The ion chamber’s active volume was delineated in the TPS; dose per field and total dose were obtained. Measured and calculated doses were compared. Results: The 3D-phantom dimensions and tissue densities were in good agreement with the patient. However, because of a printing error, there was a large discrepancy in the density in the frontal cortex. The calculated and measured treatment plan doses were 1.74 Gy and 1.72 Gy, respectively. For individual fields, the absolute dose difference between measured and calculated values was on average 3.50%. Conclusion: This study demonstrated the feasibility of using 3D-printed patient-specific phantoms for IMRT QA. Such phantoms would be particularly advantageous for complex IMRT treatment plans featuring high dose gradients and/or for anatomical sites with high variation in tissue densities. Our preliminary findings are promising. We anticipate that, once the printing process is further refined, the agreement between

  1. Patient-specific computational analysis of the influence of a stent on the unsteady flow in cerebral aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takizawa, Kenji; Schjodt, Kathleen; Puntel, Anthony; Kostov, Nikolay; Tezduyar, Tayfun E.

    2013-06-01

    We present a patient-specific computational analysis of the influence of a stent on the unsteady flow in cerebral aneurysms. The analysis is based on four different arterial models extracted form medical images, and the stent is placed across the neck of the aneurysm to reduce the flow circulation in the aneurysm. The core computational technique used in the analysis is the space-time (ST) version of the variational multiscale (VMS) method and is called "DSD/SST-VMST". The special techniques developed for this class of cardiovascular fluid mechanics computations are used in conjunction with the DSD/SST-VMST technique. The special techniques include NURBS representation of the surface over which the stent model and mesh are built, mesh generation with a reasonable resolution across the width of the stent wire and with refined layers of mesh near the arterial and stent surfaces, modeling the double-stent case, and quantitative assessment of the flow circulation in the aneurysm. We provide a brief overview of the special techniques, compute the unsteady flow patterns in the aneurysm for the four arterial models, and investigate in each case how those patterns are influenced by the presence of single and double stents.

  2. Development of a patient-specific two-compartment anthropomorphic breast phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prionas, Nicolas D.; Burkett, George W.; McKenney, Sarah E.; Chen, Lin; Stern, Robin L.; Boone, John M.

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a technique for the construction of a two-compartment anthropomorphic breast phantom specific to an individual patient's pendant breast anatomy. Three-dimensional breast images were acquired on a prototype dedicated breast computed tomography (bCT) scanner as part of an ongoing IRB-approved clinical trial of bCT. The images from the breast of a patient were segmented into adipose and glandular tissue regions and divided into 1.59 mm thick breast sections to correspond to the thickness of polyethylene stock. A computer-controlled water-jet cutting machine was used to cut the outer breast edge and the internal regions corresponding to glandular tissue from the polyethylene. The stack of polyethylene breast segments was encased in a thermoplastic ‘skin’ and filled with water. Water-filled spaces modeled glandular tissue structures and the surrounding polyethylene modeled the adipose tissue compartment. Utility of the phantom was demonstrated by inserting 200 µm microcalcifications as well as by measuring point dose deposition during bCT scanning. Affine registration of the original patient images with bCT images of the phantom showed similar tissue distribution. Linear profiles through the registered images demonstrated a mean coefficient of determination (r2) between grayscale profiles of 0.881. The exponent of the power law describing the anatomical noise power spectrum was identical in the coronal images of the patient's breast and the phantom. Microcalcifications were visualized in the phantom at bCT scanning. The real-time air kerma rate was measured during bCT scanning and fluctuated with breast anatomy. On average, point dose deposition was 7.1% greater than the mean glandular dose. A technique to generate a two-compartment anthropomorphic breast phantom from bCT images has been demonstrated. The phantom is the first, to our knowledge, to accurately model the uncompressed pendant breast and the glandular tissue

  3. Development of a patient-specific two-compartment anthropomorphic breast phantom.

    PubMed

    Prionas, Nicolas D; Burkett, George W; McKenney, Sarah E; Chen, Lin; Stern, Robin L; Boone, John M

    2012-07-07

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a technique for the construction of a two-compartment anthropomorphic breast phantom specific to an individual patient's pendant breast anatomy. Three-dimensional breast images were acquired on a prototype dedicated breast computed tomography (bCT) scanner as part of an ongoing IRB-approved clinical trial of bCT. The images from the breast of a patient were segmented into adipose and glandular tissue regions and divided into 1.59 mm thick breast sections to correspond to the thickness of polyethylene stock. A computer-controlled water-jet cutting machine was used to cut the outer breast edge and the internal regions corresponding to glandular tissue from the polyethylene. The stack of polyethylene breast segments was encased in a thermoplastic 'skin' and filled with water. Water-filled spaces modeled glandular tissue structures and the surrounding polyethylene modeled the adipose tissue compartment. Utility of the phantom was demonstrated by inserting 200 µm microcalcifications as well as by measuring point dose deposition during bCT scanning. Affine registration of the original patient images with bCT images of the phantom showed similar tissue distribution. Linear profiles through the registered images demonstrated a mean coefficient of determination (r(2)) between grayscale profiles of 0.881. The exponent of the power law describing the anatomical noise power spectrum was identical in the coronal images of the patient's breast and the phantom. Microcalcifications were visualized in the phantom at bCT scanning. The real-time air kerma rate was measured during bCT scanning and fluctuated with breast anatomy. On average, point dose deposition was 7.1% greater than the mean glandular dose. A technique to generate a two-compartment anthropomorphic breast phantom from bCT images has been demonstrated. The phantom is the first, to our knowledge, to accurately model the uncompressed pendant breast and the glandular tissue

  4. Effects of Intraluminal Thrombus on Patient-Specific Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Hemodynamics via Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocity and Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chia-Yuan; Antón, Raúl; Hung, Ming-yang; Menon, Prahlad; Finol, Ender A.; Pekkan, Kerem

    2014-01-01

    The pathology of the human abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and its relationship to the later complication of intraluminal thrombus (ILT) formation remains unclear. The hemodynamics in the diseased abdominal aorta are hypothesized to be a key contributor to the formation and growth of ILT. The objective of this investigation is to establish a reliable 3D flow visualization method with corresponding validation tests with high confidence in order to provide insight into the basic hemodynamic features for a better understanding of hemodynamics in AAA pathology and seek potential treatment for AAA diseases. A stereoscopic particle image velocity (PIV) experiment was conducted using transparent patient-specific experimental AAA models (with and without ILT) at three axial planes. Results show that before ILT formation, a 3D vortex was generated in the AAA phantom. This geometry-related vortex was not observed after the formation of ILT, indicating its possible role in the subsequent appearance of ILT in this patient. It may indicate that a longer residence time of recirculated blood flow in the aortic lumen due to this vortex caused sufficient shear-induced platelet activation to develop ILT and maintain uniform flow conditions. Additionally, two computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling codes (Fluent and an in-house cardiovascular CFD code) were compared with the two-dimensional, three-component velocity stereoscopic PIV data. Results showed that correlation coefficients of the out-of-plane velocity data between PIV and both CFD methods are greater than 0.85, demonstrating good quantitative agreement. The stereoscopic PIV study can be utilized as test case templates for ongoing efforts in cardiovascular CFD solver development. Likewise, it is envisaged that the patient-specific data may provide a benchmark for further studying hemodynamics of actual AAA, ILT, and their convolution effects under physiological conditions for clinical applications. PMID:24316984

  5. Patient-specific blood flow simulation to improve intracranial aneurysm diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenz, Wolfgang; Dirnberger, Johannes

    2011-03-01

    We present a novel simulation system of blood flow through intracranial aneurysms including the interaction between blood lumen and vessel tissue. It provides the means to estimate rupture risks by calculating the distribution of pressure and shear stresses in the aneurysm, in order to support the planning of clinical interventions. So far, this has only been possible with commercial simulation packages originally targeted at industrial applications, whereas our implementation focuses on the intuitive integration into clinical workflow. Due to the time-critical nature of the application, we exploit most efficient state-of-the-art numerical methods and technologies together with high performance computing infrastructures (Austrian Grid). Our system builds a three-dimensional virtual replica of the patient's cerebrovascular system from X-ray angiography, CT or MR images. The physician can then select a region of interest which is automatically transformed into a tetrahedral mesh. The differential equations for the blood flow and the wall elasticity are discretized via the finite element method (FEM), and the resulting linear equation systems are handled by an algebraic multigrid (AMG) solver. The wall displacement caused by the blood pressure is calculated using an iterative fluid-structure interaction (FSI) algorithm, and the fluid mesh is deformed accordingly. First simulation results on measured patient geometries show good medical relevance for diagnostic decision support.

  6. Real-time surgery simulation of intracranial aneurysm clipping with patient-specific geometries and haptic feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenz, Wolfgang; Dirnberger, Johannes

    2015-03-01

    Providing suitable training for aspiring neurosurgeons is becoming more and more problematic. The increasing popularity of the endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms leads to a lack of simple surgical situations for clipping operations, leaving mainly the complex cases, which present even experienced surgeons with a challenge. To alleviate this situation, we have developed a training simulator with haptic interaction allowing trainees to practice virtual clipping surgeries on real patient-specific vessel geometries. By using specialized finite element (FEM) algorithms (fast finite element method, matrix condensation) combined with GPU acceleration, we can achieve the necessary frame rate for smooth real-time interaction with the detailed models needed for a realistic simulation of the vessel wall deformation caused by the clamping with surgical clips. Vessel wall geometries for typical training scenarios were obtained from 3D-reconstructed medical image data, while for the instruments (clipping forceps, various types of clips, suction tubes) we use models provided by manufacturer Aesculap AG. Collisions between vessel and instruments have to be continuously detected and transformed into corresponding boundary conditions and feedback forces, calculated using a contact plane method. After a training, the achieved result can be assessed based on various criteria, including a simulation of the residual blood flow into the aneurysm. Rigid models of the surgical access and surrounding brain tissue, plus coupling a real forceps to the haptic input device further increase the realism of the simulation.

  7. Correlation of phantom-based and log file patient-specific QA with complexity scores for VMAT.

    PubMed

    Agnew, Christina E; Irvine, Denise M; McGarry, Conor K

    2014-11-08

    The motivation for this study was to reduce physics workload relating to patient- specific quality assurance (QA). VMAT plan delivery accuracy was determined from analysis of pre- and on-treatment trajectory log files and phantom-based ionization chamber array measurements. The correlation in this combination of measurements for patient-specific QA was investigated. The relationship between delivery errors and plan complexity was investigated as a potential method to further reduce patient-specific QA workload. Thirty VMAT plans from three treatment sites - prostate only, prostate and pelvic node (PPN), and head and neck (H&N) - were retrospectively analyzed in this work. The 2D fluence delivery reconstructed from pretreatment and on-treatment trajectory log files was compared with the planned fluence using gamma analysis. Pretreatment dose delivery verification was also car- ried out using gamma analysis of ionization chamber array measurements compared with calculated doses. Pearson correlations were used to explore any relationship between trajectory log file (pretreatment and on-treatment) and ionization chamber array gamma results (pretreatment). Plan complexity was assessed using the MU/ arc and the modulation complexity score (MCS), with Pearson correlations used to examine any relationships between complexity metrics and plan delivery accu- racy. Trajectory log files were also used to further explore the accuracy of MLC and gantry positions. Pretreatment 1%/1 mm gamma passing rates for trajectory log file analysis were 99.1% (98.7%-99.2%), 99.3% (99.1%-99.5%), and 98.4% (97.3%-98.8%) (median (IQR)) for prostate, PPN, and H&N, respectively, and were significantly correlated to on-treatment trajectory log file gamma results (R = 0.989, p < 0.001). Pretreatment ionization chamber array (2%/2 mm) gamma results were also significantly correlated with on-treatment trajectory log file gamma results (R = 0.623, p < 0.001). Furthermore, all gamma results displayed a

  8. Development of patient-specific phantoms for verification of stereotactic body radiation therapy planning in patients with metallic screw fixation

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Dongryul; Hong, Chae-Seon; Ju, Sang Gyu; Kim, Minkyu; Koo, Bum Yong; Choi, SungBack; Park, Hee Chul; Choi, Doo Ho; Pyo, Hongryull

    2017-01-01

    A new technique for manufacturing a patient-specific dosimetric phantom using three-dimensional printing (PSDP_3DP) was developed, and its geometrical and dosimetric accuracy was analyzed. External body contours and structures of the spine and metallic fixation screws (MFS) were delineated from CT images of a patient with MFS who underwent stereotactic body radiation therapy for spine metastasis. Contours were converted into a STereoLithography file format using in-house program. A hollow, four-section PSDP was designed and manufactured using three types of 3DP to allow filling with a muscle-equivalent liquid and insertion of dosimeters. To evaluate the geometrical accuracy of PSDP_3DP, CT images were obtained and compared with patient CT data for volume, mean density, and Dice similarity coefficient for contours. The dose distribution in the PSDP_3DP was calculated by applying the same beam parameters as for the patient, and the dosimetric characteristics of the PSDP_3DP were compared with the patient plan. The registered CT of the PSDP_3DP was well matched with that of the real patient CT in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes. The physical accuracy and dosimetric characteristics of PSDP_3DP were comparable to those of a real patient. The ability to manufacture a PSDP representing an extreme patient condition was demonstrated. PMID:28102349

  9. Development of patient-specific phantoms for verification of stereotactic body radiation therapy planning in patients with metallic screw fixation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Dongryul; Hong, Chae-Seon; Ju, Sang Gyu; Kim, Minkyu; Koo, Bum Yong; Choi, Sungback; Park, Hee Chul; Choi, Doo Ho; Pyo, Hongryull

    2017-01-01

    A new technique for manufacturing a patient-specific dosimetric phantom using three-dimensional printing (PSDP_3DP) was developed, and its geometrical and dosimetric accuracy was analyzed. External body contours and structures of the spine and metallic fixation screws (MFS) were delineated from CT images of a patient with MFS who underwent stereotactic body radiation therapy for spine metastasis. Contours were converted into a STereoLithography file format using in-house program. A hollow, four-section PSDP was designed and manufactured using three types of 3DP to allow filling with a muscle-equivalent liquid and insertion of dosimeters. To evaluate the geometrical accuracy of PSDP_3DP, CT images were obtained and compared with patient CT data for volume, mean density, and Dice similarity coefficient for contours. The dose distribution in the PSDP_3DP was calculated by applying the same beam parameters as for the patient, and the dosimetric characteristics of the PSDP_3DP were compared with the patient plan. The registered CT of the PSDP_3DP was well matched with that of the real patient CT in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes. The physical accuracy and dosimetric characteristics of PSDP_3DP were comparable to those of a real patient. The ability to manufacture a PSDP representing an extreme patient condition was demonstrated.

  10. SU-F-BRE-04: Construction of 3D Printed Patient Specific Phantoms for Dosimetric Verification Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ehler, E; Higgins, P; Dusenbery, K

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To validate a method to create per patient phantoms for dosimetric verification measurements. Methods: Using a RANDO phantom as a substitute for an actual patient, a model of the external features of the head and neck region of the phantom was created. A phantom was used instead of a human for two reasons: to allow for dosimetric measurements that would not be possible in-vivo and to avoid patient privacy issues. Using acrylonitrile butadiene styrene thermoplastic as the building material, a hollow replica was created using the 3D printer filled with a custom tissue equivalent mixture of paraffin wax, magnesium oxide, and calcium carbonate. A traditional parallel-opposed head and neck plan was constructed. Measurements were performed with thermoluminescent dosimeters in both the RANDO phantom and in the 3D printed phantom. Calculated and measured dose was compared at 17 points phantoms including regions in high and low dose regions and at the field edges. On-board cone beam CT was used to localize both phantoms within 1mm and 1° prior to radiation. Results: The maximum difference in calculated dose between phantoms was 1.8% of the planned dose (180 cGy). The mean difference between calculated and measured dose in the anthropomorphic phantom and the 3D printed phantom was 1.9% ± 2.8% and −0.1% ± 4.9%, respectively. The difference between measured and calculated dose was determined in the RANDO and 3D printed phantoms. The differences between measured and calculated dose in each respective phantom was within 2% for 12 of 17 points. The overlap of the RANDO and 3D printed phantom was 0.956 (Jaccard Index). Conclusion: A custom phantom was created using a 3D printer. Dosimetric calculations and measurements showed good agreement between the dose in the RANDO phantom (patient substitute) and the 3D printed phantom.

  11. Investigation of hemodynamics in the development of dissecting aneurysm within patient-specific dissecting aneurismal aortas using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations.

    PubMed

    Tse, Kwong Ming; Chiu, Peixuan; Lee, Heow Pueh; Ho, Pei

    2011-03-15

    Aortic dissecting aneurysm is one of the most catastrophic cardiovascular emergencies that carries high mortality. It was pointed out from clinical observations that the aneurysm development is likely to be related to the hemodynamics condition of the dissected aorta. In order to gain more insight on the formation and progression of dissecting aneurysm, hemodynamic parameters including flow pattern, velocity distribution, aortic wall pressure and shear stress, which are difficult to measure in vivo, are evaluated using numerical simulations. Pulsatile blood flow in patient-specific dissecting aneurismal aortas before and after the formation of lumenal aneurysm (pre-aneurysm and post-aneurysm) is investigated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. Realistic time-dependent boundary conditions are prescribed at various arteries of the complete aorta models. This study suggests the helical development of false lumen around true lumen may be related to the helical nature of hemodynamic flow in aorta. Narrowing of the aorta is responsible for the massive recirculation in the poststenosis region in the lumenal aneurysm development. High pressure difference of 0.21 kPa between true and false lumens in the pre-aneurismal aorta infers the possible lumenal aneurysm site in the descending aorta. It is also found that relatively high time-averaged wall shear stress (in the range of 4-8 kPa) may be associated with tear initiation and propagation. CFD modeling assists in medical planning by providing blood flow patterns, wall pressure and wall shear stress. This helps to understand various phenomena in the development of dissecting aneurysm.

  12. Verification of Accuracy of CyberKnife Tumor-tracking Radiation Therapy Using Patient-specific Lung Phantoms

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Jinhong; Song, Si Yeol; Yoon, Sang Min; Kwak, Jungwon; Yoon, KyoungJun; Choi, Wonsik; Jeong, Seong-Yun; Choi, Eun Kyung; Cho, Byungchul

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the accuracy of the CyberKnife Xsight Lung Tracking System (XLTS) compared with that of a fiducial-based target tracking system (FTTS) using patient-specific lung phantoms. Methods and Materials: Three-dimensional printing technology was used to make individualized lung phantoms that closely mimicked the lung anatomy of actual patients. Based on planning computed tomographic data from 6 lung cancer patients who underwent stereotactic ablative radiation therapy using the CyberKnife, the volume above a certain Hounsfield unit (HU) was assigned as the structure to be filled uniformly with polylactic acid material by a 3-dimensional printer (3D Edison, Lokit, Korea). We evaluated the discrepancies between the measured and modeled target positions, representing the total tracking error, using 3 log files that were generated during each treatment for both the FTTS and the XLTS. We also analyzed the γ index between the film dose measured under the FTTS and XLTS. Results: The overall mean values and standard deviations of total tracking errors for the FTTS were 0.36 ± 0.39 mm, 0.15 ± 0.64 mm, and 0.15 ± 0.62 mm for the craniocaudal (CC), left–right (LR), and anteroposterior (AP) components, respectively. Those for the XLTS were 0.38 ± 0.54 mm, 0.13 ± 0.18 mm, and 0.14 ± 0.37 mm for the CC, LR, and AP components, respectively. The average of γ passing rates was 100% for the criteria of 3%, 3 mm; 99.6% for the criteria of 2%, 2 mm; and 86.8% for the criteria of 1%, 1 mm. Conclusions: The XLTS has segmentation accuracy comparable with that of the FTTS and small total tracking errors.

  13. Patient-specific models of wall stress in abdominal aortic aneurysm: a comparison between MR and CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Putter, Sander; Breeuwer, Marcel; van de Vosse, Frans N.; Kose, Ursula; Gerritsen, Frans A.

    2006-03-01

    Finite element method based patient-specific wall stress in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) may provide a more accurate rupture risk predictor than the currently used maximum transverse diameter. In this study, we have investigated the sensitivity of the wall stress in AAA with respect to geometrical variations. We have acquired MR and CT images for four patients with AAA. Three individual users have delineated the AAA vessel wall contours on the image slices. These contours were used to generate synthetic feature images for a deformable model based segmentation method. We investigated the reproducibility and the influence of the user variability on the wall stress. For sufficiently smooth models of the AAA wall, the peak wall stress is reproducible for three out of the four AAA geometries. The 0.99 percentiles of the wall stress show excellent reproducibility for all four AAAs. The variations induced by user variability are larger than the errors caused by the segmentation variability. The influence of the user variability appears to be similar for MR and CT. We conclude that the peak wall stress in AAA is sensitive to small geometrical variations. To increase reproducibility it appears to be best not to allow too much geometrical detail in the simulations. This could be achieved either by using a sufficiently smooth geometry representation or by using a more robust statistical parameter derived from the wall stress distribution.

  14. Advanced 3D mesh manipulation in stereolithographic files and post-print processing for the manufacturing of patient-specific vascular flow phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hara, Ryan P.; Chand, Arpita; Vidiyala, Sowmya; Arechavala, Stacie M.; Mitsouras, Dimitrios; Rudin, Stephen; Ionita, Ciprian N.

    2016-03-01

    Complex vascular anatomies can cause the failure of image-guided endovascular procedures. 3D printed patient-specific vascular phantoms provide clinicians and medical device companies the ability to preemptively plan surgical treatments, test the likelihood of device success, and determine potential operative setbacks. This research aims to present advanced mesh manipulation techniques of stereolithographic (STL) files segmented from medical imaging and post-print surface optimization to match physiological vascular flow resistance. For phantom design, we developed three mesh manipulation techniques. The first method allows outlet 3D mesh manipulations to merge superfluous vessels into a single junction, decreasing the number of flow outlets and making it feasible to include smaller vessels. Next we introduced Boolean operations to eliminate the need to manually merge mesh layers and eliminate errors of mesh self-intersections that previously occurred. Finally we optimize support addition to preserve the patient anatomical geometry. For post-print surface optimization, we investigated various solutions and methods to remove support material and smooth the inner vessel surface. Solutions of chloroform, alcohol and sodium hydroxide were used to process various phantoms and hydraulic resistance was measured and compared with values reported in literature. The newly mesh manipulation methods decrease the phantom design time by 30 - 80% and allow for rapid development of accurate vascular models. We have created 3D printed vascular models with vessel diameters less than 0.5 mm. The methods presented in this work could lead to shorter design time for patient specific phantoms and better physiological simulations.

  15. Phantom-based experimental validation of computational fluid dynamics simulations on cerebral aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Qi; Groth, Alexandra; Bertram, Matthias; Waechter, Irina; Bruijns, Tom; Hermans, Roel; Aach, Til

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: Recently, image-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation has been applied to investigate the hemodynamics inside human cerebral aneurysms. The knowledge of the computed three-dimensional flow fields is used for clinical risk assessment and treatment decision making. However, the reliability of the application specific CFD results has not been thoroughly validated yet. Methods: In this work, by exploiting a phantom aneurysm model, the authors therefore aim to prove the reliability of the CFD results obtained from simulations with sufficiently accurate input boundary conditions. To confirm the correlation between the CFD results and the reality, virtual angiograms are generated by the simulation pipeline and are quantitatively compared to the experimentally acquired angiograms. In addition, a parametric study has been carried out to systematically investigate the influence of the input parameters associated with the current measuring techniques on the flow patterns. Results: Qualitative and quantitative evaluations demonstrate good agreement between the simulated and the real flow dynamics. Discrepancies of less than 15% are found for the relative root mean square errors of time intensity curve comparisons from each selected characteristic position. The investigated input parameters show different influences on the simulation results, indicating the desired accuracy in the measurements. Conclusions: This study provides a comprehensive validation method of CFD simulation for reproducing the real flow field in the cerebral aneurysm phantom under well controlled conditions. The reliability of the CFD is well confirmed. Through the parametric study, it is possible to assess the degree of validity of the associated CFD model based on the parameter values and their estimated accuracy range.

  16. A multimodality vascular imaging phantom of an abdominal aortic aneurysm with a visible thrombus

    SciTech Connect

    Allard, Louise; Chayer, Boris; Qin Zhao; Soulez, Gilles; Roy, David; Cloutier, Guy

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: With the continuous development of new stent grafts and implantation techniques, it has now become technically feasible to treat abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) with challenging anatomy using endovascular repair with standard, fenestrated, or branched stent-grafts. In vitro experimentations are very useful to improve stent-graft design and conformability or imaging guidance for stent-graft delivery or follow-up. Vascular replicas also help to better understand the limitation of endovascular approaches in challenging anatomy and possibly improve surgical planning or training by practicing high risk clinical procedures in the laboratory to improve outcomes in the operating room. Most AAA phantoms available have a very basic anatomy, which is not representative of the clinical reality. This paper presents a method of fabrication of a realistic AAA phantom with a visible thrombus, as well as some mechanical properties characterizing such phantom. Methods: A realistic AAA geometry replica of a real patient anatomy taken from a multidetector computed tomography (CT) scan was manufactured. To demonstrate the multimodality imaging capability of this new phantom with a thrombus visible in magnetic resonance (MR) angiography, CT angiography (CTA), digital subtraction angiography (DSA), and ultrasound, image acquisitions with all these modalities were performed by using standard clinical protocols. Potential use of this phantom for stent deployment was also tested. A rheometer allowed defining hyperelastic and viscoelastic properties of phantom materials. Results: MR imaging measurements of SNR and CNR values on T1 and T2-weighted sequences and MR angiography indicated reasonable agreement with published values of AAA thrombus and abdominal components in vivo. X-ray absorption also lay within normal ranges of AAA patients and was representative of findings observed on CTA, fluoroscopy, and DSA. Ultrasound propagation speeds for developed materials were also in

  17. SU-C-213-01: 3D Printed Patient Specific Phantom Composed of Bone and Soft Tissue Substitute Plastics for Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ehler, E; Sterling, D; Higgins, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: 3D printed phantoms constructed of multiple tissue approximating materials could be useful in both clinical and research aspects of radiotherapy. This work describes a 3D printed phantom constructed with tissue substitute plastics for both bone and soft tissue; air cavities were included as well. Methods: 3D models of an anonymized nasopharynx patient were generated for air cavities, soft tissues, and bone, which were segmented by Hounsfield Unit (HU) thresholds. HU thresholds were chosen to define air-to-soft tissue boundaries of 0.65 g/cc and soft tissue-to-bone boundaries of 1.18 g/cc based on clinical HU to density tables. After evaluation of several composite plastics, a bone tissue substitute was identified as an acceptable material for typical radiotherapy x-ray energies, composed of iron and PLA plastic. PET plastic was determined to be an acceptable soft tissue substitute. 3D printing was performed on a consumer grade dual extrusion fused deposition model 3D printer. Results: MVCT scans of the 3D printed heterogeneous phantom were acquired. Rigid image registration of the patient and the 3D printed phantom scans was performed. The average physical density of the soft tissue and bone regions was 1.02 ± 0.08 g/cc and 1.39 ± 0.14 g/cc, respectively, for the patient kVCT scan. In the 3D printed phantom MVCT scan, the average density of the soft tissue and bone was 1.01 ± 0.09 g/cc and 1.44 ± 0.12 g/cc, respectively. Conclusion: A patient specific phantom, constructed of heterogeneous tissue substitute materials was constructed by 3D printing. MVCT of the 3D printed phantom showed realistic tissue densities were recreated by the 3D printing materials. Funding provided by intra-department grant by University of Minnesota Department of Radiation Oncology.

  18. Fluid solid interaction simulation of flow and stress pattern in thoracoabdominal aneurysms: A patient-specific study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, A.; Wood, N. B.; Mohiaddin, R. H.; Xu, X. Y.

    2008-02-01

    Thoracoabdominal aneurysm (TA) is a pathology that involves the enlargement of the aortic diameter in the inferior descending thoracic aorta and has risk factors including aortic dissection, aortitis or connective tissue disorders. Abnormal flow patterns and haemodynamic stress on the diseased aortic wall are thought to play an important role in the development of this pathology and the internal wall stress has proved to be more reliable as a predictor of rupture than the maximum diameter for abdominal aortic aneurysms; but this assumption has not been validated yet for aneurysms involving the thoracic aorta. In the present study, three patients with TAs of different maximum diameters were scanned using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. Realistic models of the aneurysms were reconstructed from the in vivo MRI data acquired from the patients, and subject-specific flow conditions were applied as boundary conditions. The wall and thrombus were modelled as hyperelastic materials and their properties were derived from the literature. A normal descending aorta was also simulated to provide data for comparison. Fully coupled fluid solid interaction (FSI) simulations as well as solid static simulations were performed using ADINA 8.2. The results show that the wall stress distribution and its magnitude are strongly dependent on the 3-D shape of the aneurysm and the distribution of thrombus. Maximum wall stresses in all TA models are higher than in the normal aorta, and values of maximum wall stress are not directly related to the maximum aneurysm diameter. Comparisons between the FSI and solid static simulation results showed no significant difference in maximum wall stress, supporting those previous studies which found that FSI simulations were not necessary for wall stress prediction.

  19. SU-E-T-169: Evaluation of Oncentra TPS for Nasopharynx Brachy Using Patient Specific Voxel Phantom and EGSnrc

    SciTech Connect

    Hadad, K; Zoherhvand, M; Faghihi, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Nasopharnx carcinoma (NPC) treatment is being carried out using Ir-192 HDR seeds in Mehdieh Hospital in Hamadan, Iran. The Oncentra™ TPS is based on optimized TG-43 formalism which disregards heterogeneity in the treatment area. Due to abundant heterogeneity in head and neck, comparison of the Oncentra™ TPS dose evaluation and an accurate dose calculation method in NPC brachytherapy is the objective of this study. Methods: CT DICOMs of a patient with NPC obtained from Mehdieh Hospital used to create 3D voxel phantom with CTCREATE utility of EGSnrc code package. The voxel phantom together with Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy source were the input to DOSXYZnrc to calculate the 3D dose distribution. The sources were incorporate with type 6 source in DOSXYZnrc and their dwell times were taken into account in final dose calculations. Results: The direct comparison between isodoses as well as DVHs for the GTV, PTV and CTV obtained by Oncentra™ and EGSnrc Monte Carlo code are made. EGSnrc results are obtained using 5×10{sup 9} histories to reduce the statistical error below 1% in GTV and 5% in 5% dose areas. The standard ICRP700 cross section library is employed in DOSXYZnrc dose calculation. Conclusion: A direct relationship between increased dose differences and increased material density (hence heterogeneity) is observed when isodoses contours of the TPS and DOSXYZnrc are compared. Regarding the point dose calculations, the differences range from 1.2% in PTV to 5.6% for cavity region and 7.8% for bone regions. While Oncentra™ TPS overestimates the dose in cavities, it tends to underestimate dose depositions within bones.

  20. Imaging and dosimetric errors in 4D PET/CT-guided radiotherapy from patient-specific respiratory patterns: a dynamic motion phantom end-to-end study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, S. R.; Nyflot, M. J.; Herrmann, C.; Groh, C. M.; Meyer, J.; Wollenweber, S. D.; Stearns, C. W.; Kinahan, P. E.; Sandison, G. A.

    2015-05-01

    Effective positron emission tomography / computed tomography (PET/CT) guidance in radiotherapy of lung cancer requires estimation and mitigation of errors due to respiratory motion. An end-to-end workflow was developed to measure patient-specific motion-induced uncertainties in imaging, treatment planning, and radiation delivery with respiratory motion phantoms and dosimeters. A custom torso phantom with inserts mimicking normal lung tissue and lung lesion was filled with [18F]FDG. The lung lesion insert was driven by six different patient-specific respiratory patterns or kept stationary. PET/CT images were acquired under motionless ground truth, tidal breathing motion-averaged (3D), and respiratory phase-correlated (4D) conditions. Target volumes were estimated by standardized uptake value (SUV) thresholds that accurately defined the ground-truth lesion volume. Non-uniform dose-painting plans using volumetrically modulated arc therapy were optimized for fixed normal lung and spinal cord objectives and variable PET-based target objectives. Resulting plans were delivered to a cylindrical diode array at rest, in motion on a platform driven by the same respiratory patterns (3D), or motion-compensated by a robotic couch with an infrared camera tracking system (4D). Errors were estimated relative to the static ground truth condition for mean target-to-background (T/Bmean) ratios, target volumes, planned equivalent uniform target doses, and 2%-2 mm gamma delivery passing rates. Relative to motionless ground truth conditions, PET/CT imaging errors were on the order of 10-20%, treatment planning errors were 5-10%, and treatment delivery errors were 5-30% without motion compensation. Errors from residual motion following compensation methods were reduced to 5-10% in PET/CT imaging, <5% in treatment planning, and <2% in treatment delivery. We have demonstrated that estimation of respiratory motion uncertainty and its propagation from PET/CT imaging to RT planning, and RT

  1. Effect of injection technique on temporal parametric imaging derived from digital subtraction angiography in patient specific phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionita, Ciprian N.; Garcia, Victor L.; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Snyder, Kenneth V.; Siddiqui, Adnan H.; Levy, Elad I.; Rudin, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    Parametric imaging maps (PIM's) derived from digital subtraction angiography (DSA) for the cerebral arterial flow assessment in clinical settings have been proposed, but experiments have yet to determine the reliability of such studies. For this study, we have observed the effects of different injection techniques on PIM's. A flow circuit set to physiologic conditions was created using an internal carotid artery phantom. PIM's were derived for two catheter positions, two different contrast bolus injection volumes (5ml and 10 ml), and four injection rates (5, 10, 15 and 20 ml/s). Using a gamma variate fitting approach, we derived PIM's for mean-transit-time (MTT), time-to-peak (TTP) and bolus-arrivaltime (BAT). For the same injection rates, a larger bolus resulted in an increased MTT and TTP, while a faster injection rate resulted in a shorter MTT, TTP, and BAT. In addition, the position of the catheter tip within the vasculature directly affected the PIM. The experiment showed that the PIM is strongly correlated with the injection conditions, and, therefore, they have to be interpreted with caution. PIM images must be taken from the same patient to be able to be meaningfully compared. These comparisons can include pre- and post-treatment images taken immediately before and after an interventional procedure or simultaneous arterial flow comparisons through the left and right cerebral hemispheres. Due to the strong correlation between PIM and injection conditions, this study indicates that this assessment method should be used only to compare flow changes before and after treatment within the same patient using the same injection conditions.

  2. Effect of injection technique on temporal parametric imaging derived from digital subtraction angiography in patient specific phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Ionita, Ciprian N; Garcia, Victor L.; Bednarek, Daniel R; Snyder, Kenneth V; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Levy, Elad I; Rudin, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Parametric imaging maps (PIM’s) derived from digital subtraction angiography (DSA) for the cerebral arterial flow assessment in clinical settings have been proposed, but experiments have yet to determine the reliability of such studies. For this study, we have observed the effects of different injection techniques on PIM’s. A flow circuit set to physiologic conditions was created using an internal carotid artery phantom. PIM’s were derived for two catheter positions, two different contrast bolus injection volumes (5ml and 10 ml), and four injection rates (5, 10, 15 and 20 ml/s). Using a gamma variate fitting approach, we derived PIM’s for mean-transit-time (MTT), time-to-peak (TTP) and bolus-arrivaltime (BAT). For the same injection rates, a larger bolus resulted in an increased MTT and TTP, while a faster injection rate resulted in a shorter MTT, TTP, and BAT. In addition, the position of the catheter tip within the vasculature directly affected the PIM. The experiment showed that the PIM is strongly correlated with the injection conditions, and, therefore, they have to be interpreted with caution. PIM images must be taken from the same patient to be able to be meaningfully compared. These comparisons can include pre- and post-treatment images taken immediately before and after an interventional procedure or simultaneous arterial flow comparisons through the left and right cerebral hemispheres. Due to the strong correlation between PIM and injection conditions, this study indicates that this assessment method should be used only to compare flow changes before and after treatment within the same patient using the same injection conditions. PMID:25302010

  3. Effect of injection technique on temporal parametric imaging derived from digital subtraction angiography in patient specific phantoms.

    PubMed

    Ionita, Ciprian N; Garcia, Victor L; Bednarek, Daniel R; Snyder, Kenneth V; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Levy, Elad I; Rudin, Stephen

    2014-03-13

    Parametric imaging maps (PIM's) derived from digital subtraction angiography (DSA) for the cerebral arterial flow assessment in clinical settings have been proposed, but experiments have yet to determine the reliability of such studies. For this study, we have observed the effects of different injection techniques on PIM's. A flow circuit set to physiologic conditions was created using an internal carotid artery phantom. PIM's were derived for two catheter positions, two different contrast bolus injection volumes (5ml and 10 ml), and four injection rates (5, 10, 15 and 20 ml/s). Using a gamma variate fitting approach, we derived PIM's for mean-transit-time (MTT), time-to-peak (TTP) and bolus-arrivaltime (BAT). For the same injection rates, a larger bolus resulted in an increased MTT and TTP, while a faster injection rate resulted in a shorter MTT, TTP, and BAT. In addition, the position of the catheter tip within the vasculature directly affected the PIM. The experiment showed that the PIM is strongly correlated with the injection conditions, and, therefore, they have to be interpreted with caution. PIM images must be taken from the same patient to be able to be meaningfully compared. These comparisons can include pre- and post-treatment images taken immediately before and after an interventional procedure or simultaneous arterial flow comparisons through the left and right cerebral hemispheres. Due to the strong correlation between PIM and injection conditions, this study indicates that this assessment method should be used only to compare flow changes before and after treatment within the same patient using the same injection conditions.

  4. Perfusion computed tomography imaging of abdominal aortic aneurysms may be of value for patient specific rupture risk estimation.

    PubMed

    Kontopodis, Nikolaos; Galanakis, Nikolaos; Tsetis, Dimitrios; Ioannou, Christos V

    2017-04-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) continues to pose a significant cause of unexpected mortality in the developed countries with its incidence constantly rising. The indication of elective surgical repair is currently based on the maximum diameter and growth rate criteria which represent an oversimplification of the Law of Laplace stating that the stress exerted in a cylinder or sphere is proportional to its radius. These criteria fail to capture the complex pathophysiology of the aneurismal disease thus often leading to therapeutic inaccuracies (treating large AAAs with a very low actual rupture risk while observing smaller ones with a much greater risk). Aneurysmal disease is mainly a degenerative process leading to loss of structural integrity of the diseased aortic wall which cannot withhold the stresses due to systemic pressurization. Moreover aortic wall degeneration has been shown to be a localized phenomenon and rupture depends on the pointwise comparison of strength and stress rather than a global aortic wall weakening. Ex-vivo mechanical studies have related vessel wall hypoxia to loss of structural endurance and reduced wall strength. Therefore a module to capture in vivo variation of aortic wall blood supply and oxygenation would be of value for the evaluation of AAA rupture risk. Perfusion computed tomography (PCT) imaging represents a novel technique which has been already used to estimate tissue vascularity in several clinical conditions but not aneurismal disease. We hypothesize that PCT could be used as an adjunct tool during AAA diagnostics in order to evaluate aortic wall oxygenation in vivo, therefore providing a possible means to identify weak spots making the lesion amenable to rupture.

  5. SU-E-T-115: Analysis of Patient Specific QA for VMAT by Disease Site and Planning-Delivery System Using the ScandiDos Delta4 Phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Giaddui, T; Hardin, M; Keller, J; Kremmel, E; Peng, C; Doyle, L; Yu, Y; Xiao, Y; Harrison, A; Fu, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate patient specific quality assurance (PSQA) for the delivery of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) by disease site. To compare planning-delivery system (PDS) PSQA pass rates in a dual vendor institution. Methods: PSQA is performed for VMAT plans using a ScandiDos Delta4 phantom. Verification plans are calculated using Varian Eclipse and Elekta Monaco treatment planning systems (TPS) for patients treated using Varian Truebeam and Elekta linear accelerators respectively. Individual arcs are delivered to the Delta4 phantoms and assessed using the gamma index pass criterion(3% Dose Deviation(DD%), 3mm Distance to Agreement(DTA),10% dose threshold and 90% gamma index). Results: A total of 287 VMAT plans and 680 arcs were analyzed. The passing rates for VMAT QA plans were 95% and 98% for head/neck and pelvis/prostate plans respectively, and 100% for chest/abdomen, spine, lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) and Stereotactic Radiosurgery(SRS) plans. Average gamma indices were: (99 ± 2) % for pelvis/prostate, chest/abdomen and lung SBRT plans, (97 ± 4) % for head and neck plans and (98 ± 3) % for spine plans. The average DD% and DTA pass rates ranged from 82% to 90% and 98% to 99% respectively for plans in different disease sites. Paired t-test analysis (two tails) indicated no significant differences in the gamma indices between plans delivered using different PDS; the P values were: 0.08, 0.45, and 0.94 for lung SBRT, head/neck and pelvis/prostate plans respectively. The statistical power for comparing PDS in different disease sites with an alpha of 0.05 is 1. Conclusion: The Gamma indices based on 3% DD%, 3 mm DTA and 10% dose threshold for the VMAT QA plans in all disease sites were well above 90%, suggesting the possibility of using a more stringent PSQA criterion. No significant differences were observed in the QA of VMAT plans delivered using different PDS.

  6. Implantation of 3D-Printed Patient-Specific Aneurysm Models into Cadaveric Specimens: A New Training Paradigm to Allow for Improvements in Cerebrovascular Surgery and Research

    PubMed Central

    Benet, Arnau; Plata-Bello, Julio; Abla, Adib A.; Acevedo-Bolton, Gabriel; Saloner, David; Lawton, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the feasibility of implanting 3D-printed brain aneurysm model in human cadavers and to assess their utility in neurosurgical research, complex case management/planning, and operative training. Methods. Two 3D-printed aneurysm models, basilar apex and middle cerebral artery, were generated and implanted in four cadaveric specimens. The aneurysms were implanted at the same anatomical region as the modeled patient. Pterional and orbitozygomatic approaches were done on each specimen. The aneurysm implant, manipulation capabilities, and surgical clipping were evaluated. Results. The 3D aneurysm models were successfully implanted to the cadaveric specimens' arterial circulation in all cases. The features of the neck in terms of flexibility and its relationship with other arterial branches allowed for the practice of surgical maneuvering characteristic to aneurysm clipping. Furthermore, the relationship of the aneurysm dome with the surrounding structures allowed for better understanding of the aneurysmal local mass effect. Noticeably, all of these observations were done in a realistic environment provided by our customized embalming model for neurosurgical simulation. Conclusion. 3D aneurysms models implanted in cadaveric specimens may represent an untapped training method for replicating clip technique; for practicing certain approaches to aneurysms specific to a particular patient; and for improving neurosurgical research. PMID:26539542

  7. Evaluation of intracranial aneurysm coil embolization in phantoms and patients using a high resolution microangiographic fluoroscope (MAF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionita, Ciprian N.; Jain, Amit; Loughran, Brendan; Swetadri Vasan, S. N.; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Levy, Elad; Siddiqui, Adnan H.; Snyder, Kenneth V.; Hopkins, L. N.; Rudin, Stephen

    2012-03-01

    Intracranial aneurysm (IA) embolization using Gugliemi Detachable Coils (GDC) under x-ray fluoroscopic guidance is one of the most important neuro-vascular interventions. Coil deposition accuracy is key and could benefit substantially from higher resolution imagers such as the micro-angiographic fluoroscope (MAF). The effect of MAF guidance improvement over the use of standard Flat Panels (FP) is challenging to assess for such a complex procedure. We propose and investigate a new metric, inter-frame cross-correlation sensitivity (CCS), to compare detector performance for such procedures. Pixel (P) and histogram (H) CCS's were calculated as one minus the cross-correlation coefficients between pixel values and histograms for the region of interest at successive procedure steps. IA treatment using GDC's was simulated using an anthropomorphic head phantom which includes an aneurysm. GDC's were deposited in steps of 3 cm and the procedure was imaged with a FP and the MAF. To measure sensitivity to detect progress of the procedure by change in images of successive steps, an ROI was selected over the aneurysm location and pixel-value and histogram changes were calculated after each step. For the FP, after 4 steps, the H and P CCSs between successive steps were practically zero, indicating that there were no significant changes in the observed images. For the MAF, H and P CCSs were greater than zero even after 10 steps (30 cm GDC), indicating observable changes. Further, the proposed quantification method was applied for evaluation of seven patients imaged using the MAF, yielding similar results (H and P CCSs greater than zero after the last GDC deposition). The proposed metric indicates that the MAF can offer better guidance during such procedures.

  8. Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arterial aneurysms. In: Cronenwett JL, Johnston KW, eds. Rutherford's Vascular Surgery . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; ... general considerations. In: Cronenwett JL, Johnston KW, eds. Rutherford's Vascular Surgery . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; ...

  9. Aneurysms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Making Your Wishes Known Home & Community Home › Aging & Health A to Z › Aneurysms Font size A A A Print Share Glossary Basic Facts & Information Causes & Symptoms Diagnosis & Tests Care & Treatment Lifestyle & Management Other Resources Caregiving How ...

  10. Complex flow patterns in a real-size intracranial aneurysm phantom: phase contrast MRI compared with particle image velocimetry and computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    van Ooij, P; Guédon, A; Poelma, C; Schneiders, J; Rutten, M C M; Marquering, H A; Majoie, C B; VanBavel, E; Nederveen, A J

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to validate the flow patterns measured by high-resolution, time-resolved, three-dimensional phase contrast MRI in a real-size intracranial aneurysm phantom. Retrospectively gated three-dimensional phase contrast MRI was performed in an intracranial aneurysm phantom at a resolution of 0.2 × 0.2 × 0.3 mm(3) in a solenoid rat coil. Both steady and pulsatile flows were applied. The phase contrast MRI measurements were compared with particle image velocimetry measurements and computational fluid dynamics simulations. A quantitative comparison was performed by calculating the differences between the magnitude of the velocity vectors and angles between the velocity vectors in corresponding voxels. Qualitative analysis of the results was executed by visual inspection and comparison of the flow patterns. The root-mean-square errors of the velocity magnitude in the comparison between phase contrast MRI and computational fluid dynamics were 5% and 4% of the maximum phase contrast MRI velocity, and the medians of the angle distribution between corresponding velocity vectors were 16° and 14° for the steady and pulsatile measurements, respectively. In the phase contrast MRI and particle image velocimetry comparison, the root-mean-square errors were 12% and 10% of the maximum phase contrast MRI velocity, and the medians of the angle distribution between corresponding velocity vectors were 19° and 15° for the steady and pulsatile measurements, respectively. Good agreement was found in the qualitative comparison of flow patterns between the phase contrast MRI measurements and both particle image velocimetry measurements and computational fluid dynamics simulations. High-resolution, time-resolved, three-dimensional phase contrast MRI can accurately measure complex flow patterns in an intracranial aneurysm phantom.

  11. WE-G-207-06: 3D Fluoroscopic Image Generation From Patient-Specific 4DCBCT-Based Motion Models Derived From Physical Phantom and Clinical Patient Images

    SciTech Connect

    Dhou, S; Cai, W; Hurwitz, M; Rottmann, J; Myronakis, M; Cifter, F; Berbeco, R; Lewis, J; Williams, C; Mishra, P; Ionascu, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Respiratory-correlated cone-beam CT (4DCBCT) images acquired immediately prior to treatment have the potential to represent patient motion patterns and anatomy during treatment, including both intra- and inter-fractional changes. We develop a method to generate patient-specific motion models based on 4DCBCT images acquired with existing clinical equipment and used to generate time varying volumetric images (3D fluoroscopic images) representing motion during treatment delivery. Methods: Motion models are derived by deformably registering each 4DCBCT phase to a reference phase, and performing principal component analysis (PCA) on the resulting displacement vector fields. 3D fluoroscopic images are estimated by optimizing the resulting PCA coefficients iteratively through comparison of the cone-beam projections simulating kV treatment imaging and digitally reconstructed radiographs generated from the motion model. Patient and physical phantom datasets are used to evaluate the method in terms of tumor localization error compared to manually defined ground truth positions. Results: 4DCBCT-based motion models were derived and used to generate 3D fluoroscopic images at treatment time. For the patient datasets, the average tumor localization error and the 95th percentile were 1.57 and 3.13 respectively in subsets of four patient datasets. For the physical phantom datasets, the average tumor localization error and the 95th percentile were 1.14 and 2.78 respectively in two datasets. 4DCBCT motion models are shown to perform well in the context of generating 3D fluoroscopic images due to their ability to reproduce anatomical changes at treatment time. Conclusion: This study showed the feasibility of deriving 4DCBCT-based motion models and using them to generate 3D fluoroscopic images at treatment time in real clinical settings. 4DCBCT-based motion models were found to account for the 3D non-rigid motion of the patient anatomy during treatment and have the potential

  12. Partially Polyurethane-Covered Stent for Cerebral Aneurysm Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rangwala, Hussain S.; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Rudin, Stephen; Baier, Robert E.

    2009-01-01

    Partially polyurethane-covered stent (PPCS) is proposed for the treatment of cerebral aneurysms. The PPCSs were observed to substantially modify the flow entering the aneurysm in a patient-specific aneurysm phantom (PSAP). These stents can act as flow modulators and the polyurethane (PU) membrane can provide a smooth scaffold for restoring the structural integrity of the diseased vessel. Partial coating of the stent aids in sealing only the entrance to the aneurysm while keeping the perforators around the aneurysm open and patent. Biocompatibility of the PU membrane was monitored using contact angle measurements to show that critical surface tension (CST) values remained in the thromboresistant range of 20–30 mN/m. Stent flexibility, stiffness, and pressure–diameter relationship showed no significant change after asymmetric PU film application. No delamination of the PU membrane from the stent was observed within the working strains of the stent. The flow modulating capability of the PPCS was monitored by intentionally orienting the stent to cover either the proximal or the distal regions along the neck of the PSAP. Time density curves (TDCs) compared the relative metrics of input rate, washout rate, residence time, and influx in the aneurysm before and after the stent placement. PMID:18837459

  13. Subject-specific modeling of intracranial aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebral, Juan R.; Hernandez, Monica; Frangi, Alejandro; Putman, Christopher; Pergolizzi, Richard; Burgess, James

    2004-04-01

    Characterization of the blood flow patterns in cerebral aneurysms is important to explore possible correlations between the hemodynamics conditions and the morphology, location, type and risk of rupture of intracranial aneurysms. For this purpose, realistic patient-specific models are constructed from computed tomography angiography and 3D rotational angiography image data. Visualizations of the distribution of hemodynamics forces on the aneurysm walls as well as the intra-aneurysmal flow patterns are presented for a number of cerebral aneurysms of different sizes, types and locations. The numerical models indicate that there are different classes of intra-aneurysmal flow patterns, that may carry different risks of rupture.

  14. Cerebral Aneurysms

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatment prevents repeat aneurysm rupture by placing a metal clip at the base of the aneurysm. Individuals ... the aneurysm, where it is used to insert metal coils that induce clot formation within the aneurysm. × ...

  15. PIV-measured versus CFD-predicted flow dynamics in anatomically realistic cerebral aneurysm models.

    PubMed

    Ford, Matthew D; Nikolov, Hristo N; Milner, Jaques S; Lownie, Stephen P; Demont, Edwin M; Kalata, Wojciech; Loth, Francis; Holdsworth, David W; Steinman, David A

    2008-04-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of nominally patient-specific cerebral aneurysms is increasingly being used as a research tool to further understand the development, prognosis, and treatment of brain aneurysms. We have previously developed virtual angiography to indirectly validate CFD-predicted gross flow dynamics against the routinely acquired digital subtraction angiograms. Toward a more direct validation, here we compare detailed, CFD-predicted velocity fields against those measured using particle imaging velocimetry (PIV). Two anatomically realistic flow-through phantoms, one a giant internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysm and the other a basilar artery (BA) tip aneurysm, were constructed of a clear silicone elastomer. The phantoms were placed within a computer-controlled flow loop, programed with representative flow rate waveforms. PIV images were collected on several anterior-posterior (AP) and lateral (LAT) planes. CFD simulations were then carried out using a well-validated, in-house solver, based on micro-CT reconstructions of the geometries of the flow-through phantoms and inlet/outlet boundary conditions derived from flow rates measured during the PIV experiments. PIV and CFD results from the central AP plane of the ICA aneurysm showed a large stable vortex throughout the cardiac cycle. Complex vortex dynamics, captured by PIV and CFD, persisted throughout the cardiac cycle on the central LAT plane. Velocity vector fields showed good overall agreement. For the BA, aneurysm agreement was more compelling, with both PIV and CFD similarly resolving the dynamics of counter-rotating vortices on both AP and LAT planes. Despite the imposition of periodic flow boundary conditions for the CFD simulations, cycle-to-cycle fluctuations were evident in the BA aneurysm simulations, which agreed well, in terms of both amplitudes and spatial distributions, with cycle-to-cycle fluctuations measured by PIV in the same geometry. The overall good agreement

  16. A system for saccular intracranial aneurysm analysis and virtual stent planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baloch, Sajjad; Sudarsky, Sandra; Zhu, Ying; Mohamed, Ashraf; Geiger, Berhard; Dutta, Komal; Namburu, Durga; Nias, Puthenveettil; Martucci, Gary; Redel, Thomas

    2012-02-01

    Recent studies have found correlation between the risk of rupture of saccular aneurysms and their morphological characteristics, such as volume, surface area, neck length, among others. For reliably exploiting these parameters in endovascular treatment planning, it is crucial that they are accurately quantified. In this paper, we present a novel framework to assist physicians in accurately assessing saccular aneurysms and efficiently planning for endovascular intervention. The approach consists of automatically segmenting the pathological vessel, followed by the construction of its surface representation. The aneurysm is then separated from the vessel surface through a graph-cut based algorithm that is driven by local geometry as well as strong prior information. The corresponding healthy vessel is subsequently reconstructed and measurements representing the patient-specific geometric parameters of pathological vessel are computed. To better support clinical decisions on stenting and device type selection, the placement of virtual stent is eventually carried out in conformity with the shape of the diseased vessel using the patient-specific measurements. We have implemented the proposed methodology as a fully functional system, and extensively tested it with phantom and real datasets.

  17. Aneurysm in the brain

    MedlinePlus

    Aneurysm - cerebral; Cerebral aneurysm; Aneurysm - intracranial ... July 19, 2016. Szeder V, Tateshima S, Duckwiler GR. Intracranial aneurysms and subarachnoid hemorrhage. In: Daroff RB, Jankovic J, ...

  18. Brain Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... tests don't provide enough information. Screening for brain aneurysms The use of imaging tests to screen ... and occupational therapy to relearn skills. Treating unruptured brain aneurysms Surgical clipping or endovascular coiling can be ...

  19. Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... these occur in the part of the aorta running through the chest Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) - these occur in the part of the aorta running through the abdomen Most aneurysms are found during ...

  20. Patient-Specific Orthopaedic Implants.

    PubMed

    Haglin, Jack M; Eltorai, Adam E M; Gil, Joseph A; Marcaccio, Stephen E; Botero-Hincapie, Juliana; Daniels, Alan H

    2016-11-01

    Patient-specific orthopaedic implants are emerging as a clinically promising treatment option for a growing number of conditions to better match an individual's anatomy. Patient-specific implant (PSI) technology aims to reduce overall procedural costs, minimize surgical time, and maximize patient outcomes by achieving better biomechanical implant fit. With this commercially-available technology, computed tomography or magnetic resonance images can be used in conjunction with specialized computer programs to create preoperative patient-specific surgical plans and to develop custom cutting guides from 3-D reconstructed images of patient anatomy. Surgeons can then place these temporary guides or "jigs" during the procedure, allowing them to better recreate the exact resections of the computer-generated surgical plan. Over the past decade, patient-specific implants have seen increased use in orthopaedics and they have been widely indicated in total knee arthroplasty, total hip arthroplasty, and corrective osteotomies. Patient-specific implants have also been explored for use in total shoulder arthroplasty and spinal surgery. Despite their increasing popularity, significant support for PSI use in orthopaedics has been lacking in the literature and it is currently uncertain whether the theoretical biomechanical advantages of patient-specific orthopaedic implants carry true advantages in surgical outcomes when compared to standard procedures. The purpose of this review was to assess the current status of patient-specific orthopaedic implants, to explore their future direction, and to summarize any comparative published studies that measure definitive surgical characteristics of patient-specific orthopaedic implant use such as patient outcomes, biomechanical implant alignment, surgical cost, patient blood loss, or patient recovery.

  1. Brain Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    A brain aneurysm is an abnormal bulge or "ballooning" in the wall of an artery in the brain. They are sometimes called berry aneurysms because they ... often the size of a small berry. Most brain aneurysms produce no symptoms until they become large, ...

  2. Correlation Between Aneurysm Size and Hemodynamics in One Individual with Multiple Small Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Britz, Gavin

    2016-01-01

    Objective A large number of cases are needed in the patient-specific modeling of intracranial aneurysms to establish the statistical significance due to individual variation of risk factors that are difficult to account for. However, these risk factors are critical in hemorrhage risk as demonstrated in large clinical studies. Rupture risks for aneurysms in an individual are easier to compare because these aneurysms are under the same physiological environment, and their only differences are the local hemodynamic factors associated with their anatomic locations. Methods Eight small aneurysms (< 7 mm) from one individual were analyzed using patient-specific hemodynamic modeling. Four scenarios with different perfusion assumptions were performed to account for the flow rate at two smaller communicating arteries. Wall shear stresses (WSS) at these aneurysms were compared to determine their relationship with the aneurysm size. Results Each of the three largest aneurysms is either the most proximal or distal aneurysm in a given artery so that blood pressure does not have a direct influence on aneurysm size. No wall shear stress-derived hemodynamic variables are found to be related to aneurysm size. Discussion A study of multiple aneurysms from one individual offers a unique opportunity to examine various hemodynamic factors without selection biases. Aneurysms greater than 4 mm (Group 1) have a higher product of maximum WSS and area of low WSS; aneurysms smaller than 4 mm (Group 2) have a lower product of maximum WSS and area of low WSS. In addition, aneurysm size is linearly correlated with the flow rate at the parent artery in each group. PMID:27555981

  3. Correlation Between Aneurysm Size and Hemodynamics in One Individual with Multiple Small Intracranial Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Jou, Liangder; Britz, Gavin

    2016-07-12

    Objective A large number of cases are needed in the patient-specific modeling of intracranial aneurysms to establish the statistical significance due to individual variation of risk factors that are difficult to account for. However, these risk factors are critical in hemorrhage risk as demonstrated in large clinical studies. Rupture risks for aneurysms in an individual are easier to compare because these aneurysms are under the same physiological environment, and their only differences are the local hemodynamic factors associated with their anatomic locations. Methods Eight small aneurysms (< 7 mm) from one individual were analyzed using patient-specific hemodynamic modeling. Four scenarios with different perfusion assumptions were performed to account for the flow rate at two smaller communicating arteries. Wall shear stresses (WSS) at these aneurysms were compared to determine their relationship with the aneurysm size. Results Each of the three largest aneurysms is either the most proximal or distal aneurysm in a given artery so that blood pressure does not have a direct influence on aneurysm size. No wall shear stress-derived hemodynamic variables are found to be related to aneurysm size. Discussion A study of multiple aneurysms from one individual offers a unique opportunity to examine various hemodynamic factors without selection biases. Aneurysms greater than 4 mm (Group 1) have a higher product of maximum WSS and area of low WSS; aneurysms smaller than 4 mm (Group 2) have a lower product of maximum WSS and area of low WSS. In addition, aneurysm size is linearly correlated with the flow rate at the parent artery in each group.

  4. Hemodynamic Intervention of Cerebral Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Hui

    2005-11-01

    Cerebral aneurysm is a pathological vascular response to hemodynamic stimuli. Endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms essentially alters the blood flow to stop them from continued growth and eventual rupture. Compared to surgical clipping, endovascular methods are minimally invasive and hence rapidly gaining popularity. However, they are not always effective with risks of aneurysm regrowth and various complications. We aim at developing a Virtual Intervention (VI) platform that allows: patient-specific flow calculation and risk prediction as well as recommendation of tailored intervention based on quantitative analysis. This is a lofty goal requiring advancement in three areas of research: (1). Advancement of image-based CFD; (2) Understanding the biological/pathological responses of tissue to hemodynamic factors in the context of cerebral aneurysms; and (3) Capability of designing and testing patient-specific endovascular devices. We have established CFD methodologies based on anatomical geometry obtained from 3D angiographic or CT images. To study the effect of hemodynamics on aneurysm development, we have created a canine model of a vascular bifurcation anastomosis to provide the hemodynamic environment similar to those in CA. Vascular remodeling was studied using histology and compared against the flow fields obtained from CFD. It was found that an intimal pad, similar to those frequently seen clinically, developed at the flow impingement site, bordering with an area of `groove' characteristic of an early stage of aneurysm, where the micro environment exhibits an elevated wall shear stresses. To further address the molecular mechanisms of the flow-mediated aneurysm pathology, we are also developing in vitro cell culture systems to complement the in vivo study. Our current effort in endovascular device development focuses on novel stents that alters the aneurysmal flow to promote thrombotic occlusion as well as favorable remodeling. Realization of an

  5. Effect of saccular aneurysm and parent artery morphology on hemodynamics of cerebral bifurcation aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Farnoush, A; Qian, Y; Takao, H; Murayama, Y; Avolio, A

    2012-01-01

    Morphological descriptors of aneurysms have been used to assess aneurysm rupture. This study investigated the relation between the morphological parameters and the flow related parameter of energy loss (EL). Four size indices and one shape index were assessed in idealized middle cerebral artery models with various aneurysm morphologies. Four patient-specific aneurysms (2 ruptured, 2 unruptured) were virtually manipulated by removing the aneurysms from their parent arteries and merging them with the idealized bifurcation models. EL was calculated from the energy difference between inflow and outflow. The results indicate that among size indices, EL is mostly dependent on bottleneck factor and less dependent on the aspect ratio. Results also showed that there is a direct relationship between nonsphericity index (NSI) and EL in manipulated models. No specific correlation was found between EL and NSI in patient-specific models.

  6. Flow Instability and Wall Shear Stress Ocillation in Intracranial Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Hyoungsu; Jayamaran, Mahesh; Richardson, Peter; Karniadakis, George

    2009-11-01

    We investigate the flow dynamics and oscillatory behavior of wall shear stress (WSS) vectors in intracranial aneurysms using high-order spectral/hp simulations. We analyze four patient- specific internal carotid arteries laden with aneurysms of different characteristics : a wide-necked saccular aneurysm, a hemisphere-shaped aneurysm, a narrower-necked saccular aneurysm, and a case with two adjacent saccular aneurysms. Simulations show that the pulsatile flow in aneurysms may be subject to a hydrodynamic instability during the decelerating systolic phase resulting in a high-frequency oscillation in the range of 30-50 Hz. When the aneurysmal flow becomes unstable, both the magnitude and the directions of WSS vectors fluctuate. In particular, the WSS vectors around the flow impingement region exhibit significant spatial and temporal changes in direction as well as in magnitude.

  7. On the prospect of patient-specific biomechanics without patient-specific properties of tissues

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Karol; Lu, Jia

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents main theses of two keynote lectures delivered at Euromech Colloquium “Advanced experimental approaches and inverse problems in tissue biomechanics” held in Saint Etienne in June 2012. We are witnessing an advent of patient-specific biomechanics that will bring in the future personalized treatments to sufferers all over the world. It is the current task of biomechanists to devise methods for clinically-relevant patient-specific modeling. One of the obstacles standing before the biomechanics community is the difficulty in obtaining patient-specific properties of tissues to be used in biomechanical models. We postulate that focusing on reformulating computational mechanics problems in such a way that the results are weakly sensitive to the variation in mechanical properties of simulated continua is more likely to bear fruit in near future. We consider two types of problems: i) displacement-zero traction problems whose solutions in displacements are weakly sensitive to mechanical properties of the considered continuum; and ii) problems that are approximately statically determinate and therefore their solutions in stresses are also weakly sensitive to mechanical properties of constituents. We demonstrate that the kinematically loaded biomechanical models of the first type are applicable in the field of image-guided surgery where the current, intraoperative configuration of a soft organ is of critical importance. We show that sac-like membranes, which are prototypes of many thin-walled biological organs, are approximately statically determinate and therefore useful solutions for wall stress can be obtained without the knowledge of the wall's properties. We demonstrate the clinical applicability and effectiveness of the proposed methods using examples from modeling neurosurgery and intracranial aneurysms. PMID:23491073

  8. Evaluation of flow with dynamic x-ray imaging for aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohatcu, Andreea Cristina

    The main goal of this thesis is to evaluate blood flow inside cerebrovascular aneurysms using dynamic x-ray imaging. X-ray contrast substance (dye) was auto injected in elastomer aneurysm models placed in a flow loop (for in-vitro studies) to trace flow passing through aneurysms. More specifically, an improved Time-Density Curves (TDC) Roentgen-videodensitometric tracking technique, that included looking to designated regions (R) within an aneurysm rather than focusing on the entire aneurysm, was employed to get information about blood flow using cine-angiographic sequences. It is the first time R-TDC technique has been used. In complex real-time interventions on patients, 2D/3D angiographic analysis of contrast media flow is the only reliable and rapid source of information that we have in order to assess the seriousness of the disease, suggest the treatment, and verify the result of the treatment. The present study focused on finding a "correlation metric" to quantitatively describe the flow behavior within the aneurysms and examine the hemodynamic implications of several treatments using flow modulating devices applied to saccular and bifurcation geometries aneurysms. The main idea in treatment of an aneurysm is rapid reduction of the risk of rupture. This is usually done endovascularly now by totally occluding the aneurysm by packing it with mechanical or chemical agents. Our research, however, involves a new method of blocking the neck using various types of asymmetric vascular stents (AVS). We proposed and analyzed, using R-TDCs, the feasibility of a new modified endovascular method of treatment based on alteration of blood flow through the aneurysm by partial occlusion only. In-vitro studies using aneurysm phantoms with patient-specific aneurysm models were performed. Also, for the first time the new methods were used in in-vivo studies as well, on rabbit-model experimental data, in an attempt to correlate thrombogenic response of a living organism to flow

  9. Volumetric analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskin, Kevin M.; Kusnick, Catherine A.; Shamsolkottabi, Susanne; Lang, Elvira V.; Corson, J. D.; Stanford, William; Thompson, Brad H.; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a valid, reliable and accurate system of measurement of abdominal aortic aneurysms, using volumetric analysis of x-ray computed tomographic data. This study evaluates illustrative cases, and compares measurements of AAA phantoms, using standard 2D versus volumetric methods. To validate the volumetric analysis, four phantom aneurysms were constructed in a range of diameters (4.5 - 7.0 cm) which presents the greatest management challenge to the clinician. These phantoms were imaged using a Toshiba Xpress SX helical CT. Separate scans were obtained at conventional (10 mm X 10 mm) and thin slice (5 mm X 5 mm) collimations. The thin slices were reconstructed at 2 mm intervals. Data from each of the 96 scans were interpreted using a standard 2D approach, then analyzed using task-oriented volumetric software. We evaluate patient assessments, and compare greatest outer diameters of phantoms, by standard versus volumetric methods. Qualitative differences between solutions based on standard versus volumetric analysis of illustrative patient cases are substantial. Expert radiologists' standard measurements of phantom aneurysms are highly reliable (r2 equals 0.901 - 0.958; p < 0.001), but biased toward significant overestimation of aneurysm diameters in the range of clinical interest. For the same phantoms, volumetric analysis was both more reliable (r2 equals 0.986 - 0.996; p < 0.001), and more accurate, with no significant bias in the range of interest. Volumetric analysis promotes selection of more valid management strategies, by providing vital information not otherwise available, and allowing more reliable and accurate assessment of abdominal aortic aneurysms. It is particularly valuable in the presence of aortic tortuosity, vessel eccentricity, and uncertain involvement of critical vessels.

  10. Brain aneurysm repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... aneurysm repair; Dissecting aneurysm repair; Endovascular aneurysm repair - brain; Subarachnoid hemorrhage - aneurysm ... Your scalp, skull, and the coverings of the brain are opened. A metal clip is placed at ...

  11. Hemodynamic analysis of intracranial aneurysms using phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging and computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuemei; Li, Rui; Chen, Yu; Sia, Sheau Fung; Li, Donghai; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Aihua

    2017-03-01

    Additional hemodynamic parameters are highly desirable in the clinical management of intracranial aneurysm rupture as static medical images cannot demonstrate the blood flow within aneurysms. There are two ways of obtaining the hemodynamic information—by phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PCMRI) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). In this paper, we compared PCMRI and CFD in the analysis of a stable patient's specific aneurysm. The results showed that PCMRI and CFD are in good agreement with each other. An additional CFD study of two stable and two ruptured aneurysms revealed that ruptured aneurysms have a higher statistical average blood velocity, wall shear stress, and oscillatory shear index (OSI) within the aneurysm sac compared to those of stable aneurysms. Furthermore, for ruptured aneurysms, the OSI divides the positive and negative wall shear stress divergence at the aneurysm sac.

  12. Computational Hemodynamic Analysis for the Diagnosis of Atherosclerotic Changes in Intracranial Aneurysms: A Proof-of-Concept Study Using 3 Cases Harboring Atherosclerotic and Nonatherosclerotic Aneurysms Simultaneously

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Hidenori; Niizuma, Kuniyasu; Endo, Toshiki; Funamoto, Kenichi; Ohta, Makoto; Tominaga, Teiji

    2016-01-01

    This was a proof-of-concept computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study designed to identify atherosclerotic changes in intracranial aneurysms. We selected 3 patients with multiple unruptured aneurysms including at least one with atherosclerotic changes and investigated whether an image-based CFD study could provide useful information for discriminating the atherosclerotic aneurysms. Patient-specific geometries were constructed from three-dimensional data obtained using rotational angiography. Transient simulations were conducted under patient-specific inlet flow rates measured by phase-contrast magnetic resonance velocimetry. In the postanalyses, we calculated time-averaged wall shear stress (WSS), oscillatory shear index, and relative residence time (RRT). The volume of blood flow entering aneurysms through the neck and the mean velocity of blood flow inside aneurysms were examined. We applied the age-of-fluid method to quantitatively assess the residence of blood inside aneurysms. Atherosclerotic changes coincided with regions exposed to disturbed blood flow, as indicated by low WSS and long RRT. Blood entered aneurysms in phase with inlet flow rates. The mean velocities of blood inside atherosclerotic aneurysms were lower than those inside nonatherosclerotic aneurysms. Blood in atherosclerotic aneurysms was older than that in nonatherosclerotic aneurysms, especially near the wall. This proof-of-concept study demonstrated that CFD analysis provided detailed information on the exchange and residence of blood that is useful for the diagnosis of atherosclerotic changes in intracranial aneurysms. PMID:27703491

  13. High Fidelity Virtual Stenting (HiFiVS) for Intracranial Aneurysm Flow Diversion: In Vitro and In Silico

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ding; Dumont, Travis M.; Kosukegawa, Hiroyuki; Ohta, Makoto; Yang, Xinjian; Siddiqui, Adnan H.; Meng, Hui

    2013-01-01

    A flow diverter (FD) is a flexible, densely braided stent-mesh device placed endoluminally across an intracranial aneurysm to induce its thrombotic occlusion. FD treatment planning using computational virtual stenting and flow simulation requires accurate representation of the expanded FD geometry. We have recently developed a High Fidelity Virtual Stenting (HiFiVS) technique based on finite element analysis to simulate detailed FD deployment processes in patient-specific aneurysms (Ma et al. J. Biomech. 45: 2256–2263, 2012). This study tests if HiFiVS simulation can recapitulate real-life FD implantation. We deployed two identical FDs (Pipeline Embolization Device) into phantoms of a wide-necked segmental aneurysm using a clinical push-pull technique with different delivery wire advancements. We then simulated these deployment processes using HiFiVS and compared results against experimental recording. Stepwise comparison shows that the simulations precisely reproduced the FD deployment processes recorded in vitro. The local metal coverage rate and pore density quantifications demonstrated that simulations reproduced detailed FD mesh geometry. These results provide validation of the HiFiVS technique, highlighting its unique capability of accurately representing stent intervention in silico. PMID:23604850

  14. Virtual coiling of intracranial aneurysms based on dynamic path planning.

    PubMed

    Morales, Hernán G; Larrabide, Ignacio; Kim, Minsuok; Villa-Uriol, Maria-Cruz; Macho, Juan M; Blasco, Jordi; San Roman, Luis; Frangi, Alejandro F

    2011-01-01

    Coiling is possibly the most widespread endovascular treatment for intracranial aneurysms. It consists in the placement of metal wires inside the aneurysm to promote blood coagulation. This work presents a virtual coiling technique for pre-interventional planning and post-operative assessment of coil embolization procedure of aneurysms. The technique uses a dynamic path planning algorithm to mimic coil insertion inside a 3D aneurysm model, which allows to obtain a plausible distribution of coils within a patient-specific anatomy. The technique was tested on two idealized geometries: an sphere and a hexahedron. Subsequently, the proposed technique was applied in 10 realistic aneurysm geometries to show its reliability in anatomical models. The results of the technique was compared to digital substraction angiography images of two aneurysms.

  15. Treatment of Basilar Aneurysms with SMP Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, J. M.; Rodriguez, J. N.; Maitland, D. J.; Wilson, T. S.; Hartman, J.

    2006-11-01

    Researchers in the Medical Division at LLNL are currently developing a shape memory polymer (SMP) foam aneurysm treatment technique. This technique involves the catheter delivery of a compressed piece of SMP foam to an aneurysm. When the foam is heated by laser radiation from a diffusing fiber-optic element embedded within the catheter, the foam expands, filling the aneurysm volume. If proven successful, such a treatment alternative will provide clinicians the ability to not only isolate an aneurysm from the vascular system with one device, but also to customize the shape of the lumen beneath the aneurysm neck. Consequently, the flow patterns beneath the aneurysm neck could potentially be optimized to minimize the hemodynamic stresses on the lumen. In this computational study, multiple lumen shapes are simulated beneath the necks of several patient-specific basilar aneurysms. A comparison is made between the pre-treatment and post-treatment configurations, as well as with a conventional surgical clipping configuration. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-Eng-48. UCRL-ABS-222933.

  16. Aneurysm growth and de novo aneurysms during aneurysm surveillance.

    PubMed

    Serrone, Joseph C; Tackla, Ryan D; Gozal, Yair M; Hanseman, Dennis J; Gogela, Steven L; Vuong, Shawn M; Kosty, Jennifer A; Steiner, Calen A; Krueger, Bryan M; Grossman, Aaron W; Ringer, Andrew J

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Many low-risk unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs) are followed for growth with surveillance imaging. Growth of UIAs likely increases the risk of rupture. The incidence and risk factors of UIA growth or de novo aneurysm formation require further research. The authors retrospectively identify risk factors and annual risk for UIA growth or de novo aneurysm formation in an aneurysm surveillance protocol. METHODS Over an 11.5-year period, the authors recommended surveillance imaging to 192 patients with 234 UIAs. The incidence of UIA growth and de novo aneurysm formation was assessed. With logistic regression, risk factors for UIA growth or de novo aneurysm formation and patient compliance with the surveillance protocol was assessed. RESULTS During 621 patient-years of follow-up, the incidence of aneurysm growth or de novo aneurysm formation was 5.0%/patient-year. At the 6-month examination, 5.2% of patients had aneurysm growth and 4.3% of aneurysms had grown. Four de novo aneurysms formed (0.64%/patient-year). Over 793 aneurysm-years of follow-up, the annual risk of aneurysm growth was 3.7%. Only initial aneurysm size predicted aneurysm growth (UIA < 5 mm = 1.6% vs UIA ≥ 5 mm = 8.7%, p = 0.002). Patients with growing UIAs were more likely to also have de novo aneurysms (p = 0.01). Patient compliance with this protocol was 65%, with younger age predictive of better compliance (p = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS Observation of low-risk UIAs with surveillance imaging can be implemented safely with good adherence. Aneurysm size is the only predictor of future growth. More frequent (semiannual) surveillance imaging for newly diagnosed UIAs and UIAs ≥ 5 mm is warranted.

  17. Applications of patient-specific 3D printing in medicine.

    PubMed

    Heller, Martin; Bauer, Heide-Katharina; Goetze, Elisabeth; Gielisch, Matthias; Roth, Klaus E; Drees, Philipp; Maier, Gerrit S; Dorweiler, Bernhard; Ghazy, Ahmed; Neufurth, Meik; Müller, Werner E G; Schröder, Heinz C; Wang, Xiaohong; Vahl, Christian-Friedrich; Al-Nawas, Bilal

    Already three decades ago, the potential of medical 3D printing (3DP) or rapid prototyping for improved patient treatment began to be recognized. Since then, more and more medical indications in different surgical disciplines have been improved by using this new technique. Numerous examples have demonstrated the enormous benefit of 3DP in the medical care of patients by, for example, planning complex surgical interventions preoperatively, reducing implantation steps and anesthesia times, and helping with intraoperative orientation. At the beginning of every individual 3D model, patient-specific data on the basis of computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or ultrasound data is generated, which is then digitalized and processed using computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) software. Finally, the resulting data sets are used to generate 3D-printed models or even implants. There are a variety of different application areas in the various medical fields, eg, drill or positioning templates, or surgical guides in maxillofacial surgery, or patient-specific implants in orthopedics. Furthermore, in vascular surgery it is possible to visualize pathologies such as aortic aneurysms so as to improve the planning of surgical treatment. Although rapid prototyping of individual models and implants is already applied very successfully in regenerative medicine, most of the materials used for 3DP are not yet suitable for implantation in the body. Therefore, it will be necessary in future to develop novel therapy approaches and design new materials in order to completely reconstruct natural tissue.

  18. Brain aneurysm repair - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/pubmed/22556195 . Szeder V, Tateshima S, Duckwiler GR. Intracranial aneurysms and subarachnoid hemorrhage. In: Daroff RB, Jankovic J, ... chap 67. Read More Aneurysm in the brain Brain aneurysm repair Brain surgery Recovering after stroke Seizures Smoking - ...

  19. Thoracic aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... common cause of a thoracic aortic aneurysm is hardening of the arteries . This condition is more common ... aortic aneurysm repair - open Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular Hardening of the arteries High blood pressure Marfan syndrome ...

  20. Effects of Variations of Flow and Heart Rate on Intra-Aneurysmal Hemodynamics in a Ruptured Internal Carotid Artery Aneurysm During Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Sarrami-Foroushani, Ali; Nasr Esfahany, Mohsen; Saligheh Rad, Hamidreza; Firouznia, Kavous; Shakiba, Madjid; Ghanaati, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hemodynamics is thought to play an important role in the mechanisms responsible for initiation, growth, and rupture of intracranial aneurysms. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis is used to assess intra-aneurysmal hemodynamics. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the effects of variations in heart rate and internal carotid artery (ICA) flow rate on intra-aneurysmal hemodynamics, in an ICA aneurysm, by using computational fluid dynamics. Patients and Methods: Computed tomography angiography (CTA) was performed in a 55 years old female case, with a saccular ICA aneurysm, to create a patient-specific geometrical anatomic model of the aneurysm. The intra-aneurysmal hemodynamic environments for three states with different flow and heart rates were analyzed using patient-specific image-based CFD modeling. Results: Results showed significant changes for the three simulated states. For a proportion of the states examined, results were counterintuitive. Systolic and time-averaged wall shear stress and pressure on the aneurysm wall showed a proportional evolution with the mainstream flow rate. Conclusion: Results reinforced the pivotal role of vascular geometry, with respect to hemodynamics, together with the importance of performing patient-specific CFD analyses, through which the effect of different blood flow conditions on the aneurysm hemodynamics could be evaluated. PMID:27110332

  1. Patient specific tube current modulation for CT dose reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yannan; Yin, Zhye; Yao, Yangyang; Wang, Hui; Wu, Mingye; Kalra, Mannudeep; De Man, Bruno

    2015-03-01

    Radiation exposure during CT imaging has drawn growing concern from academia, industry as well as the general public. Sinusoidal tube current modulation has been available in most commercial products and used routinely in clinical practice. To further exploit the potential of tube current modulation, Sperl et al. proposed a Computer-Assisted Scan Protocol and Reconstruction (CASPAR) scheme [6] that modulates the tube current based on the clinical applications and patient specific information. The purpose of this study is to accelerate the CASPAR scheme to make it more practical for clinical use and investigate its dose benefit for different clinical applications. The Monte Carlo simulation in the original CASPAR scheme was substituted by the dose reconstruction to accelerate the optimization process. To demonstrate the dose benefit, we used the CATSIM package generate the projection data and perform standard FDK reconstruction. The NCAT phantom at thorax position was used in the simulation. We chose three clinical cases (routine chest scan, coronary CT angiography with and without breast avoidance) and compared the dose level with different mA modulation schemes (patient specific, sinusoidal and constant mA) with matched image quality. The simulation study of three clinical cases demonstrated that the patient specific mA modulation could significantly reduce the radiation dose compared to sinusoidal modulation. The dose benefits depend on the clinical application and object shape. With matched image quality, for chest scan the patient specific mA profile reduced the dose by about 15% compared to the sinusoid mA modulation; for the organ avoidance scan the dose reduction to the breast was over 50% compared to the constant mA baseline.

  2. Vortex Imprints at the Wall, But Not in the Bulk, Distinguish Ruptured from Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varble, Nicole; Meng, Hui

    2015-11-01

    Intracranial aneurysms affect 3% of the population. Risk stratification of aneurysms is important, as rupture often leads to death or permanent disability. Image-based CFD analyses of patient-specific aneurysms have identified low and oscillatory wall shear stress to predict rupture. These stresses are sensed biologically at the luminal wall, but the flow dynamics related to aneurysm rupture requires further understanding. We have conducted two studies: one examines vortex dynamics, and the other, high frequency flow fluctuations in patient-specific aneurysms. In the first study, based on Q-criterion vortex identification, we developed two measures to quantify regions within the aneurysm where rotational flow is dominate: the ratio of volume or surface area where Q >0 vs. the total aneurysmal volume or surface area, respectively termed volume vortex fraction (VVF) and surface vortex fraction (SVF). Statistical analysis of 204 aneurysms shows that SVF, but not VVF, distinguishes ruptured from unruptured aneurysms, suggesting that once again, the local flow patterns on the wall is directly relevant to rupture. In the second study, high-resolution CFD (high spatial and temporal resolutions and second-order discretization schemes) on 56 middle cerebral artery aneurysms shows the presence of temporal fluctuations in 8 aneurysms, but such flow instability bears no correlation with rupture. Support for this work was partially provided by NIH grant (R01 NS091075-01) and a grant from Toshiba Medical Systems Corp.

  3. The impact of anthropometric patient-phantom matching on organ dose: A hybrid phantom study for fluoroscopy guided interventions

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Perry B.; Geyer, Amy; Borrego, David; Ficarrotta, Kayla; Johnson, Kevin; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: To investigate the benefits and limitations of patient-phantom matching for determining organ dose during fluoroscopy guided interventions. Methods: In this study, 27 CT datasets representing patients of different sizes and genders were contoured and converted into patient-specific computational models. Each model was matched, based on height and weight, to computational phantoms selected from the UF hybrid patient-dependent series. In order to investigate the influence of phantom type on patient organ dose, Monte Carlo methods were used to simulate two cardiac projections (PA/left lateral) and two abdominal projections (RAO/LPO). Organ dose conversion coefficients were then calculated for each patient-specific and patient-dependent phantom and also for a reference stylized and reference hybrid phantom. The coefficients were subsequently analyzed for any correlation between patient-specificity and the accuracy of the dose estimate. Accuracy was quantified by calculating an absolute percent difference using the patient-specific dose conversion coefficients as the reference. Results: Patient-phantom matching was shown most beneficial for estimating the dose to heavy patients. In these cases, the improvement over using a reference stylized phantom ranged from approximately 50% to 120% for abdominal projections and for a reference hybrid phantom from 20% to 60% for all projections. For lighter individuals, patient-phantom matching was clearly superior to using a reference stylized phantom, but not significantly better than using a reference hybrid phantom for certain fields and projections. Conclusions: The results indicate two sources of error when patients are matched with phantoms: Anatomical error, which is inherent due to differences in organ size and location, and error attributed to differences in the total soft tissue attenuation. For small patients, differences in soft tissue attenuation are minimal and are exceeded by inherent anatomical differences

  4. A Framework for Patient-Specific Spinal Intervention Simulation: Application to Lumbar Spinal Durotomy Repair.

    PubMed

    Lau, Jonathan C; Denning, Lynn; Lownie, Stephen P; Peters, Terry M; Chen, Elvis C S

    2016-01-01

    We present a functional and patient-specific lumbar phantom for the training of spinal durotomy and dura closure under microscopic view, consisting of a lumbar model, pressurized dural surrogate, together immersed in a tissue-mimicking layer simulating fat, muscle and skin. The lumbar model was derived from a patient computed tomography scan, preserving the natural shape and curvature of the lumbar column. The inclusion of the simulated soft-tissue layer was critical for preserving the surgical ergonomics and presented a realistic view under the surgical microscope. As the success of dura repair is indicated by the watertight closure of the thecal sac, the dura surrogate was connected to a pressurized and closed-loop water system to provide functional cerebrospinal fluid leakage during durotomy. This functional phantom is inexpensive to construct, provides a realistic tactile and visual environment for spinal durotomy repair, and can be easily extended to simulate other patient-specific spinal interventions.

  5. [Popliteal aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Vaquero Morillo, F; Zorita Calvo, A; Fernández-Samos Gutiérrez, R; García Vázquez, J; Ortega Martín, J M; Fernández Morán, C

    1992-01-01

    We presented the review of 22 cases of popliteal aneurysms with a follow-time of three years. One case was a woman and 5 cases were bilaterals. The most part of cases begun as a latter acute ischemia. Sixteen cases were treated surgically, with a null rate of mortality, 2 amputations, 4 cases of residual intermittent claudication and 10 no-symptomatic patients, with present distal pulses. Etiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, technics and results are presented and a comparison with other authors is made. Our experience support an interventionist attitude in cases of elderly nonsymptomatic patients, performed by internal way and saphenous vein substitution.

  6. Patient-specific models of cardiac biomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, Adarsh; Villongco, Christopher T.; Chuang, Joyce; Frank, Lawrence R.; Nigam, Vishal; Belezzuoli, Ernest; Stark, Paul; Krummen, David E.; Narayan, Sanjiv; Omens, Jeffrey H.; McCulloch, Andrew D.; Kerckhoffs, Roy C. P.

    2013-07-01

    Patient-specific models of cardiac function have the potential to improve diagnosis and management of heart disease by integrating medical images with heterogeneous clinical measurements subject to constraints imposed by physical first principles and prior experimental knowledge. We describe new methods for creating three-dimensional patient-specific models of ventricular biomechanics in the failing heart. Three-dimensional bi-ventricular geometry is segmented from cardiac CT images at end-diastole from patients with heart failure. Human myofiber and sheet architecture is modeled using eigenvectors computed from diffusion tensor MR images from an isolated, fixed human organ-donor heart and transformed to the patient-specific geometric model using large deformation diffeomorphic mapping. Semi-automated methods were developed for optimizing the passive material properties while simultaneously computing the unloaded reference geometry of the ventricles for stress analysis. Material properties of active cardiac muscle contraction were optimized to match ventricular pressures measured by cardiac catheterization, and parameters of a lumped-parameter closed-loop model of the circulation were estimated with a circulatory adaptation algorithm making use of information derived from echocardiography. These components were then integrated to create a multi-scale model of the patient-specific heart. These methods were tested in five heart failure patients from the San Diego Veteran's Affairs Medical Center who gave informed consent. The simulation results showed good agreement with measured echocardiographic and global functional parameters such as ejection fraction and peak cavity pressures.

  7. Image-based analysis of blood flow modification in stented aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebral, Juan; Mut, Fernando; Appanaboyina, Sunil; Löhner, Rainald; Miranda, Carlos; Escrivano, Esteban; Lylyk, Pedro; Putman, Christopher

    2009-02-01

    Currently there is increased interest in the use of stents as flow diverters for the treatment of intracranial aneurysms, especially wide necked aneurysms that are difficult to treat by coil embolization or surgical clipping. This paper presents image-based patient-specific computational models of the hemodynamics in cerebral aneurysms before and after treatment with a stent alone, with the goal of better understanding the hemodynamic effects of these devices and their relation to the outcome of the procedures. Stenting of cerebral aneurysms is a feasible endovascular treatment option for aneurysms with wide necks that are difficult to treat with coils or by surgical clipping. However, this requires stents that are capable of substantially modifying the intra-aneurysmal flow pattern in order to cause thrombosis of the aneurysm. The results presented in this paper show that the studied stent was able to change significantly the hemodynamic characteristics of the aneurysm. In addition, it was shown that patient-specific computational models constructed from medical images are capable of realistically representing the in vivo hemodynamic characteristics observed during conventional angiography examinations before and after stenting. This indicates that these models can be used to better understand the effects of different stent designs and to predict the alteration in the hemodynamic pattern of a given aneurysm produced by a given flow diverter. This is important for improving current design of flow diverting devices and patient treatment plans.

  8. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when atherosclerosis or plaque buildup causes the ... weak and bulge outward like a balloon. An AAA develops slowly over time and has few noticeable ...

  9. Abdominal aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000162.htm Abdominal aortic aneurysm To use the sharing features on this page, ... blood to the abdomen, pelvis, and legs. An abdominal aortic aneurysm occurs when an area of the aorta becomes ...

  10. Cerebral aneurysm (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... loss of nerve function may indicate that an aneurysm may be causing pressure on adjacent brain tissue. ... changes or other neurological changes can indicate the aneurysm has ruptured and is bleeding into the brain. ...

  11. Hemodynamic Alterations after Stent Implantation in 15 Cases of Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Tian, Zhongbin; Liu, Jian; Jing, Linkai; Paliwal, Nikhil; Wang, Shengzhang; Zhang, Ying; Xiang, Jianping; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Meng, Hui; Yang, Xinjian

    2016-01-01

    Background Stent-assisted coiling technology has been widely used in the treatment of intracranial aneurysms. In current study, we investigated the intra-aneurysmal hemodynamic alterations after stent implantation and its association with aneurysm location. Methods We first retrospectively studied 15 aneurysm cases (8 internal carotid artery-ophthalmic artery (ICA-OphA) aneurysms and 7 posterior communicating artery (PcoA) aneurysms) treated with Enterprise stents and coils. Then based on patient-specific geometries before and after stenting, we built virtual stenting computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation models. Results Before and after stent deployment, the average Wall Shear Stress (WSS) on the aneurysmal sac at systolic peak changed from 7.04 Pa (4.14 Pa, 15.77 Pa) to 6.04 Pa (3.86 Pa, 11.13 Pa), P = 0.001; and the spatially averaged value of flow velocity in the perpendicular plane of aneurysm dropped from 0.5 m/s (0.28 m/s, 0.7 m/s) to 0.33 m/s (0.25 m/s, 0.49 m/s), P = 0.001, respectively. Post-stent implantation, WSS in ICA-OphA aneurysms and PcoA aneurysms decreased by 14.4% (P = 0.012) and 16.6% (P = 0.018) respectively, and flow velocity also reduced by 10.3% (P = 0.029) and 10.5% (P = 0.013), respectively. Changes in WSS, flow velocity, and pressure were not significantly different between ICA-OphA aneurysms and PcoA aneurysms (P > 0.05). Stent implantation did not significantly change the peak systolic pressure in both aneurysm types. Conclusion After stent implantation, intra-aneurysmal flow velocity and WSS decreased independent of aneurysm type (ICA-OphA and PcoA). Little change was observed on peak systolic pressure. PMID:26746828

  12. The impact of deformation of an aneurysm model under pulsatile flow on hemodynamic analysis.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, T; Takao, H; Ichikawa, C; Kamiya, K; Murayama, Y; Motosuke, M

    2016-08-01

    Hemodynamic analysis of cerebral aneurysms has been widely carried out to clarify the mechanisms of their growth and rupture. In several cases, patient-specific aneurysm models made of transparent polymers have been used. Even though periodic changes in aneurysms due to the pulsation of blood flow could be important, the deformation of the model geometry and its effect on hemodynamic evaluation has not been fully investigated. In addition, the fabrication accuracy of aneurysm models has not been evaluated even though it may affect the hemodynamic parameters to be analyzed. In this study, the fabrication accuracy of a silicone aneurysm model was investigated. Additionally, the deformation of the model under pulsatile flow as well as its correlation with flow behavior was evaluated. Consequently, a fabrication method for an aneurysm model with high accuracy was established and the importance of the wall thickness of the model was also specified.

  13. The effect of aneurismal-wall mechanical properties on patient-specific hemodynamic simulations: two clinical case reports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jialiang; Wang, Shengzhang; Ding, Guanghong; Yang, Xinjian; Li, Haiyun

    2009-10-01

    Hemodynamic factors such as the wall shear stress play an important role in the pathogenesis and treatment of cerebral aneurysms. In present study, we apply computational fluid-structure interaction analyses on cerebral aneurysms with two different constitutive relations for aneurismal wall in order to investigate the effect of the aneurismal wall mechanical properties on the simulation results. We carry out these analyses by using two patient-specific models of cerebral aneurysms of different sizes located in different branches of the circle of Willis. The models are constructed from 3D rotational angiography image data and blood flow dynamics is studied under physiologically representative waveform of inflow. From the patient models analyzed in this investigation, we find that the deformations of cerebral aneurysms are very small. But due to the nonlinear character of the Navier-Stokes equations, these small deformations could have significant influences on the flow characteristics. In addition, we find that the aneurismal-wall mechanical properties have great effects on the deformation distribution of the aneurysm, which also affects the wall shear stress distribution and flow patterns. Therefore, how to define a proper constitutive relation for aneurismal wall should be considered carefully in the hemodynamic simulation.

  14. Vortex dynamics in ruptured and unruptured intracranial aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trylesinski, Gabriel; Varble, Nicole; Xiang, Jianping; Meng, Hui

    2013-11-01

    Intracranial aneurysms (IAs) are potentially devastating pathological dilations of arterial walls that affect 2-5% of the population. In our previous CFD study of 119 IAs, we found that ruptured aneurysms were correlated with complex flow pattern and statistically predictable by low wall shear stress and high oscillatory shear index. To understand flow mechanisms that drive the pathophysiology of aneurysm wall leading to either stabilization or growth and rupture, we aim at exploring vortex dynamics of aneurysmal flow and provide insight into the correlation between the previous predictive morphological parameters and wall hemodynamic metrics. We adopt the Q-criterion definition of coherent structures (CS) and analyze the CS dynamics in aneurysmal flows for both ruptured and unruptured IA cases. For the first time, we draw relevant biological conclusions concerning aneurysm flow mechanisms and pathophysiological outcome. In pulsatile simulations, the coherent structures are analyzed in these 119 patient-specific geometries obtained using 3D angiograms. The images were reconstructed and CFD were performed. Upon conclusion of this work, better understanding of flow patterns of unstable aneurysms may lead to improved clinical outcome.

  15. Quantifying the Large-Scale Hemodynamics of Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, G.; Mut, F.; Cebral, J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Hemodynamics play an important role in the mechanisms that govern the initiation, growth, and possible rupture of intracranial aneurysms. The purpose of this study was to objectively characterize these dynamics, classify them, and connect them to aneurysm rupture. MATERIALS AND METHODS Image-based computational fluid dynamic simulations were used to re-create the hemodynamics of 210 patient-specific intracranial aneurysm geometries. The hemodynamics were then classified according to their spatial complexity and temporal stability by using quantities derived from vortex core lines and proper orthogonal decomposition. RESULTS The quantitative classification was compared with a previous qualitative classification performed by visual inspection. Receiver operating characteristic curves provided area-under-the-curve estimates for spatial complexity (0.905) and temporal stability (0.85) to show that the 2 classifications were in agreement. Statistically significant differences were observed in the quantities describing the hemodynamics of ruptured and unruptured intracranial aneurysms. Specifically, ruptured aneurysms had more complex and more unstable flow patterns than unruptured aneurysms. Spatial complexity was more strongly associated with rupture than temporal stability. CONCLUSIONS Complex-unstable blood flow dynamics characterized by longer core line length and higher entropy could induce biologic processes that predispose an aneurysm for rupture. PMID:23928142

  16. A study of the hemodynamics of anterior communicating artery aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebral, Juan R.; Castro, Marcelo A.; Putman, Christopher M.

    2006-03-01

    In this study, the effects of unequal physiologic flow conditions in the internal carotid arteries on the intra-aneurysmal hemodynamics of anterior communicating artery aneurysms were investigated. Patient-specific vascular computational fluid dynamics models of five cerebral aneurysms were constructed from bilateral 3D rotational angiography images. The aneurysmal hemodynamics was analyzed under a range of physiologic flow conditions including the effects of unequal mean flows and phase shifts between the flow waveforms of the left and right internal carotid arteries. A total of five simulations were performed for each patient, and unsteady wall shear stress (WSS) maps were created for each flow condition. Time dependent curves of average WSS magnitude over selected regions on the aneurysms were constructed and used to analyze the influence of the inflow conditions. It was found that mean flow imbalances in the feeding vessels tend to shift the regions of elevated WSS (flow impingement region) towards the dominating inflow jet and to change the magnitude of the WSS peaks. However, the overall qualitative appearance of the WSS distribution and velocity simulations is not substantially affected. In contrast, phase differences tend to increase the temporal complexity of the hemodynamic patterns and to destabilize the intra-aneurysmal flow pattern. However, these effects are less important when the A1 confluence is less symmetric, i.e. dominated by one of the A1 segments. Conditions affecting the flow characteristics in the parent arteries of cerebral aneurysms with more than one avenue of inflow should be incorporated into flow models.

  17. Flow instability and wall shear stress variation in intracranial aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Baek, H.; Jayaraman, M. V.; Richardson, P. D.; Karniadakis, G. E.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the flow dynamics and oscillatory behaviour of wall shear stress (WSS) vectors in intracranial aneurysms using high resolution numerical simulations. We analyse three representative patient-specific internal carotid arteries laden with aneurysms of different characteristics: (i) a wide-necked saccular aneurysm, (ii) a narrower-necked saccular aneurysm, and (iii) a case with two adjacent saccular aneurysms. Our simulations show that the pulsatile flow in aneurysms can be subject to a hydrodynamic instability during the decelerating systolic phase resulting in a high-frequency oscillation in the range of 20–50 Hz, even when the blood flow rate in the parent vessel is as low as 150 and 250 ml min−1 for cases (iii) and (i), respectively. The flow returns to its original laminar pulsatile state near the end of diastole. When the aneurysmal flow becomes unstable, both the magnitude and the directions of WSS vectors fluctuate at the aforementioned high frequencies. In particular, the WSS vectors around the flow impingement region exhibit significant spatio-temporal changes in direction as well as in magnitude. PMID:20022896

  18. Pediatric isolated bilateral iliac aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Chithra, R; Sundar, R Ajai; Velladuraichi, B; Sritharan, N; Amalorpavanathan, J; Vidyasagaran, T

    2013-07-01

    Aneurysms are rare in children. Isolated iliac artery aneurysms are very rare, especially bilateral aneurysms. Pediatric aneurysms are usually secondary to connective tissue disorders, arteritis, or mycotic causes. We present a case of a 3-year-old child with bilateral idiopathic common iliac aneurysms that were successfully repaired with autogenous vein grafts.

  19. Patient-specific Deformation Modelling via Elastography: Application to Image-guided Prostate Interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi; Ni, Dong; Qin, Jing; Xu, Ming; Xie, Xiaoyan; Heng, Pheng-Ann

    2016-06-01

    Image-guided prostate interventions often require the registration of preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) images to real-time transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images to provide high-quality guidance. One of the main challenges for registering MR images to TRUS images is how to estimate the TRUS-probe-induced prostate deformation that occurs during TRUS imaging. The combined statistical and biomechanical modeling approach shows promise for the adequate estimation of prostate deformation. However, the right setting of the biomechanical parameters is very crucial for realistic deformation modeling. We propose a patient-specific deformation model equipped with personalized biomechanical parameters obtained from shear wave elastography to reliably predict the prostate deformation during image-guided interventions. Using data acquired from a prostate phantom and twelve patients with suspected prostate cancer, we compared the prostate deformation model with and without patient-specific biomechanical parameters in terms of deformation estimation accuracy. The results show that the patient-specific deformation model possesses favorable model ability, and outperforms the model without patient-specific biomechanical parameters. The employment of the patient-specific biomechanical parameters obtained from elastography for deformation modeling shows promise for providing more precise deformation estimation in applications that use computer-assisted image-guided intervention systems.

  20. Patient-specific Deformation Modelling via Elastography: Application to Image-guided Prostate Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Ni, Dong; Qin, Jing; Xu, Ming; Xie, Xiaoyan; Heng, Pheng-Ann

    2016-01-01

    Image-guided prostate interventions often require the registration of preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) images to real-time transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images to provide high-quality guidance. One of the main challenges for registering MR images to TRUS images is how to estimate the TRUS-probe-induced prostate deformation that occurs during TRUS imaging. The combined statistical and biomechanical modeling approach shows promise for the adequate estimation of prostate deformation. However, the right setting of the biomechanical parameters is very crucial for realistic deformation modeling. We propose a patient-specific deformation model equipped with personalized biomechanical parameters obtained from shear wave elastography to reliably predict the prostate deformation during image-guided interventions. Using data acquired from a prostate phantom and twelve patients with suspected prostate cancer, we compared the prostate deformation model with and without patient-specific biomechanical parameters in terms of deformation estimation accuracy. The results show that the patient-specific deformation model possesses favorable model ability, and outperforms the model without patient-specific biomechanical parameters. The employment of the patient-specific biomechanical parameters obtained from elastography for deformation modeling shows promise for providing more precise deformation estimation in applications that use computer-assisted image-guided intervention systems. PMID:27272239

  1. Effect of Hemodynamics on Outcome of Subtotally Occluded Paraclinoid Aneurysms after Stent-Assisted Coil Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian; Jing, Linkai; Wang, Chao; Paliwal, Nikhil; Wang, Shengzhang; Zhang, Ying; Xiang, Jianping; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Meng, Hui; Yang, Xinjian

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND and OBJECTIVE Endovascular treatment of paraclinoid aneurysms is preferred in clinical practice. Flow alterations caused by stents and coils may affect treatment outcome. Our aim was to assess hemodynamic changes following stent-assisted coil embolization in subtotally embolized paraclinoid aneurysms with residual necks that were predisposed to recanalization. METHODS We studied 27 paraclinoid aneurysms (seven recanalized and 20 stable) treated with coils and Enterprise™ stents. Computational fluid dynamics simulations were performed on patient-specific aneurysm geometries using virtual stenting and porous media technology. RESULTS After stent placement in 27 cases, aneurysm flow velocity decreased significantly, gradually increasing from the neck plane (11.9%), to the residual neck (12.3%), to the aneurysm dome (16.3%). Subsequent coil embolization was performed after stent placement and the hemodynamic factors decreased further and significantly at all aneurysm regions except the neck plane. Compared between recanalized and stable cases, univariate analysis showed no significant differences in any parameter before treatment. After stent-assisted coiling, only the reduction in area-averaged velocity at the neck plane differed significantly between recanalized (8.1%) and stable cases (20.5%) (p=0.016). CONCLUSION Aneurysm flow velocity can be significantly decreased by stent placement and coil embolization. However, hemodynamics at the aneurysm neck plane was less sensitive to coils. Significant reduction in flow velocity at the neck plane may be an important factor in preventing recanalization of paraclinoid aneurysms after subtotal stent-assisted coil embolization. PMID:26610731

  2. Morphological and Hemodynamic Discriminators for Rupture Status in Posterior Communicating Artery Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Karmonik, Christof; Fang, Yibin; Xu, Jinyu; Yu, Ying; Cao, Wei; Liu, Jianmin; Huang, Qinghai

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose The conflicting findings of previous morphological and hemodynamic studies on intracranial aneurysm rupture may be caused by the relatively small sample sizes and the variation in location of the patient-specific aneurysm models. We aimed to determine the discriminators for aneurysm rupture status by focusing on only posterior communicating artery (PCoA) aneurysms. Materials and Methods In 129 PCoA aneurysms (85 ruptured, 44 unruptured), clinical, morphological and hemodynamic characteristics were compared between the ruptured and unruptured cases. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the discriminators for rupture status of PCoA aneurysms. Results While univariate analyses showed that the size of aneurysm dome, aspect ratio (AR), size ratio (SR), dome-to-neck ratio (DN), inflow angle (IA), normalized wall shear stress (NWSS) and percentage of low wall shear stress area (LSA) were significantly associated with PCoA aneurysm rupture status. With multivariate analyses, significance was only retained for higher IA (OR = 1.539, p < 0.001) and LSA (OR = 1.393, p = 0.041). Conclusions Hemodynamics and morphology were related to rupture status of intracranial aneurysms. Higher IA and LSA were identified as discriminators for rupture status of PCoA aneurysms. PMID:26910518

  3. Wall motion estimation in intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Oubel, E; Cebral, J R; De Craene, M; Blanc, R; Blasco, J; Macho, J; Putman, C M; Frangi, A F

    2010-09-01

    The quantification of wall motion in cerebral aneurysms is becoming important owing to its potential connection to rupture, and as a way to incorporate the effects of vascular compliance in computational fluid dynamics simulations. Most of papers report values obtained with experimental phantoms, simulated images or animal models, but the information for real patients is limited. In this paper, we have combined non-rigid registration with signal processing techniques to measure pulsation in real patients from high frame rate digital subtraction angiography. We have obtained physiological meaningful waveforms with amplitudes in the range 0 mm-0.3 mm for a population of 18 patients including ruptured and unruptured aneurysms. Statistically significant differences in pulsation were found according to the rupture status, in agreement with differences in biomechanical properties reported in the literature.

  4. Flow patterns and shear stress waveforms in intracranial aneurysms: The effect of pulsatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Le, Trung; Borazjani, Iman

    2009-11-01

    The wall shear stress on the dome of intracranial aneurysms has been hypothesized to be an important factor in aneurysm pathology and depends strongly on the hemodynamics inside the dome. The importance of patient-specific geometry on the hemodynamics of aneurysms has long been established but the significance of patient-specific inflow waveform is largely unexplored. In this work we seek to systematically investigate and quantify the effects of inflow waveform on aneurysm hemodynamics. We carry out high resolution numerical simulations for an anatomic intracranial aneurysm obtained from 3D rotational angiography (3DRA) data for various inflow waveforms. We show that both the vortex formation process and wall-shear stress dynamics on the aneurysm dome depend strongly on the characteristics of the inflow waveform. We also present preliminary evidence suggesting that a simple non-dimensional number (named the Aneurysm number), incorporating both geometry and inflow waveform effects, could be a good qualitative predictor of the general hemodynamic patterns that will arise in a given aneurysm geometry for a particular waveform.

  5. CFD-based Thrombotic Risk Assessment in Kawasaki Disease Patients with Coronary Artery Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Dibyendu; Kung, Ethan; Kahn, Andrew; Burns, Jane; Marsden, Alison

    2012-11-01

    Coronary aneurysms occur in 25% of untreated Kawasaki Disease (KD) patients and put patients at increased risk for myocardial infarction and sudden death. Clinical guidelines recommend using aneurysm diameter >8 mm as the arbitrary criterion for treating with anti-coagulation therapy. This study uses patient-specific modeling to non-invasively determine hemodynamic parameters and quantify thrombotic risk. Anatomic models were constructed from CT angiographic image data from 5 KD aneurysm patients and one normal control. CFD simulations were performed to obtain hemodynamic data including WSS and particle residence times (PRT). Thrombosis was clinically observed in 4/9 aneurysmal coronaries. Thrombosed vessels required twice as many cardiac cycles (mean 8.2 vs. 4.2) for particles to exit, and had lower mean WSS (1.3 compared to 2.8 dynes/cm2) compared to vessels with non-thrombosed aneurysms of similar max diameter. 1 KD patient in the cohort with acute thrombosis had diameter < 8 mm. Regions of low WSS and high PRT predicted by simulations correlated with regions of subsequent thrombus formation. Thrombotic risk stratification for KD aneurysms may be improved by incorporating both hemodynamic and geometric quantities. Current clinical guidelines to assess patient risk based only on aneurysm diameter may be misleading. Further prospective study is warranted to evaluate the utility of patient-specific modeling in risk stratifying KD patients with coronary aneurysms. NIH R21.

  6. Current progress in patient-specific modeling

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    We present a survey of recent advancements in the emerging field of patient-specific modeling (PSM). Researchers in this field are currently simulating a wide variety of tissue and organ dynamics to address challenges in various clinical domains. The majority of this research employs three-dimensional, image-based modeling techniques. Recent PSM publications mostly represent feasibility or preliminary validation studies on modeling technologies, and these systems will require further clinical validation and usability testing before they can become a standard of care. We anticipate that with further testing and research, PSM-derived technologies will eventually become valuable, versatile clinical tools. PMID:19955236

  7. Vortex dynamics in ruptured and unruptured intracranial aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trylesinski, Gabriel

    Intracranial aneurysms (IAs) are a potentially devastating pathological dilation of brain arteries that affect 1.5-5 % of the population. Causing around 500 000 deaths per year worldwide, their detection and treatment to prevent rupture is critical. Multiple recent studies have tried to find a hemodynamics predictor of aneurysm rupture, but concluded with distinct opposite trends using Wall Shear Stress (WSS) based parameters in different clinical datasets. Nevertheless, several research groups tend to converge for now on the fact that the flow patterns and flow dynamics of the ruptured aneurysms are complex and unstable. Following this idea, we investigated the vortex properties of both unruptured and ruptured cerebral aneurysms. A brief comparison of two Eulerian vortex visualization methods (Q-criterion and lambda 2 method) showed that these approaches gave similar results in our complex aneurysm geometries. We were then able to apply either one of them to a large dataset of 74 patient specific cases of intracranial aneurysms. Those real cases were obtained by 3D angiography, numerical reconstruction of the geometry, and then pulsatile CFD simulation before post-processing with the mentioned vortex visualization tools. First we tested the two Eulerian methods on a few cases to verify their implementation we made as well as compare them with each other. After that, the Q-criterion was selected as method of choice for its more obvious physical meaning (it shows the balance between two characteristics of the flow, its swirling and deformation). Using iso-surfaces of Q, we started by categorizing the patient-specific aneurysms based on the gross topology of the aneurysmal vortices. This approach being unfruitful, we found a new vortex-based characteristic property of ruptured aneurysms to stratify the rupture risk of IAs that we called the Wall-Kissing Vortices, or WKV. We observed that most ruptured aneurysms had a large amount of WKV, which appears to agree with

  8. Toward patient-specific articular contact mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Ateshian, Gerard A.; Henak, Corinne R.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanics of contacting cartilage layers is fundamentally important to understanding the development, homeostasis and pathology of diarthrodial joints. Because of the highly nonlinear nature of both the materials and the contact problem itself, numerical methods such as the finite element method are typically incorporated to obtain solutions. Over the course of five decades, we have moved from an initial qualitative understanding of articular cartilage material behavior to the ability to perform complex, three-dimensional contact analysis, including multiphasic material representations. This history includes the development of analytical and computational contact analysis methods that now provide the ability to perform highly nonlinear analyses. Numerical implementations of contact analysis based on the finite element method are rapidly advancing and will soon enable patient-specific analysis of joint contact mechanics using models based on medical image data. In addition to contact stress on the articular surfaces, these techniques can predict variations in strain and strain through the cartilage layers, providing the basis to predict damage and failure. This opens up exciting areas for future research and application to patient-specific diagnosis and treatment planning applied to a variety of pathologies that affect joint function and cartilage homeostasis. PMID:25698236

  9. Patient-specific simulation of tidal breathing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, M.; Wells, A. K.; Jones, I. P.; Hamill, I. S.; Veeckmans, B.; Vos, W.; Lefevre, C.; Fetitia, C.

    2016-03-01

    Patient-specific simulation of air flows in lungs is now straightforward using segmented airways trees from CT scans as the basis for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations. These models generally use static geometries, which do not account for the motion of the lungs and its influence on important clinical indicators, such as airway resistance. This paper is concerned with the simulation of tidal breathing, including the dynamic motion of the lungs, and the required analysis workflow. Geometries are based on CT scans obtained at the extremes of the breathing cycle, Total Lung Capacity (TLC) and Functional Residual Capacity (FRC). It describes how topologically consistent geometries are obtained at TLC and FRC, using a `skeleton' of the network of airway branches. From this a 3D computational mesh which morphs between TLC and FRC is generated. CFD results for a number of patient-specific cases, healthy and asthmatic, are presented. Finally their potential use in evaluation of the progress of the disease is discussed, focusing on an important clinical indicator, the airway resistance.

  10. Post-Treatment Hemodynamics of a Basilar Aneurysm and Bifurcation

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, J.; Hartman, J.; Rodriguez, J.; Maitland, D.

    2009-01-01

    To investigate whether or not a successful aneurysm treatment procedure can subject a parent artery to harmful hemodynamic stresses, computational fluid dynamics simulations are performed on a patient-specific basilar aneurysm and bifurcation before and after a virtual endovascular treatment. Prior to treatment, the aneurysm at systole is filled with a periodic train of vortex tubes, which form at the aneurysm neck and advect upwards into the dome. Following the treatment procedure however, the motion of the vortex train is inhibited by the aneurysm filling material, which confines the vortex tubes to the region beneath the aneurysm neck. Analysis of the post-treatment flow field indicates that the impingement of the basilar artery flow upon the treated aneurysm neck and the close proximity of a vortex tube to the parent artery wall increase the maximum wall shear stresses to values approximately equal to 50 Pa at systole. Calculation of the time-averaged wall shear stresses indicates that there is a 1.4 × 9 10−7 m2 area on the parent artery exposed to wall shear stresses greater than 37.9 Pa, a value shown by Fry [Circ. Res. 22(2):165–197, 1968] to cause severe damage to the endothelial cells that line the artery wall. The results of this study demonstrate that it is possible for a treatment procedure, which successfully isolates the aneurysm from the circulation and leaves no aneurysm neck remnant, to elevate the hemodynamic stresses to levels that are injurious to the artery wall. PMID:18629647

  11. Improving the efficiency of abdominal aortic aneurysm wall stress computations.

    PubMed

    Zelaya, Jaime E; Goenezen, Sevan; Dargon, Phong T; Azarbal, Amir-Farzin; Rugonyi, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    An abdominal aortic aneurysm is a pathological dilation of the abdominal aorta, which carries a high mortality rate if ruptured. The most commonly used surrogate marker of rupture risk is the maximal transverse diameter of the aneurysm. More recent studies suggest that wall stress from models of patient-specific aneurysm geometries extracted, for instance, from computed tomography images may be a more accurate predictor of rupture risk and an important factor in AAA size progression. However, quantification of wall stress is typically computationally intensive and time-consuming, mainly due to the nonlinear mechanical behavior of the abdominal aortic aneurysm walls. These difficulties have limited the potential of computational models in clinical practice. To facilitate computation of wall stresses, we propose to use a linear approach that ensures equilibrium of wall stresses in the aneurysms. This proposed linear model approach is easy to implement and eliminates the burden of nonlinear computations. To assess the accuracy of our proposed approach to compute wall stresses, results from idealized and patient-specific model simulations were compared to those obtained using conventional approaches and to those of a hypothetical, reference abdominal aortic aneurysm model. For the reference model, wall mechanical properties and the initial unloaded and unstressed configuration were assumed to be known, and the resulting wall stresses were used as reference for comparison. Our proposed linear approach accurately approximates wall stresses for varying model geometries and wall material properties. Our findings suggest that the proposed linear approach could be used as an effective, efficient, easy-to-use clinical tool to estimate patient-specific wall stresses.

  12. Phantom Torso model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Phantom Torso is a tissue-muscle plastic anatomical model of a torso and head. It contains over 350 radiation measuring devices to calculate the radiation that penetrates internal organs in space travel. The Phantom Torso is one of three radiation experiments in Expedition Two including the Borner Ball Neutron Detector and Dosimetric Mapping.

  13. Palmar artery aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Shutze, Ryan A.; Liechty, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Aneurysms of the hand are rarely encountered and more rarely reported. The least common locations of these aneurysms are the palmar and digital arteries. The etiologies of these entities are quite varied, although they usually present as a pulsatile mass. Following a thorough evaluation, including arterial anatomic imaging, they should be repaired. The reported results following repair have been good. Herein we report a girl with a spontaneous palmar artery aneurysm and its management. PMID:28127131

  14. Patient-specific dosimetry in radionuclide therapy.

    PubMed

    Lyra, Maria; Lagopati, Nefeli; Charalambatou, Paraskevi; Vamvakas, Ioannis

    2011-09-01

    This study presents an attempt to compare individualised palliative treatment absorbed doses, by planar images data and Monte Carlo simulation, in two in vivo treatment cases, one of bone metastases and the other of liver lesions. Medical Internal Radiation Dose schema was employed to estimate the absorbed doses. Radiopharmaceutical volume distributions and absorbed doses in the lesions as well as in critical organs were also calculated by Monte Carlo simulation. Individualised planar data calculations remain the method of choice in internal dosimetry in nuclear medicine, but with the disadvantage of attenuation and scatter corrections lack and organ overlay. The overall error is about 7 % for planar data calculations compared with that using Monte Carlo simulation. Patient-specific three-dimensional dosimetric calculations using single-photon emission computed tomography with a parallel computed tomography study is proposed as an accurate internal dosimetry with the additional use of dose-volume histograms, which express dose distributions in cases with obvious inhomogeneity.

  15. Patient-specific dose estimation for pediatric chest CT

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Frush, Donald P.

    2008-12-15

    Current methods for organ and effective dose estimations in pediatric CT are largely patient generic. Physical phantoms and computer models have only been developed for standard/limited patient sizes at discrete ages (e.g., 0, 1, 5, 10, 15 years old) and do not reflect the variability of patient anatomy and body habitus within the same size/age group. In this investigation, full-body computer models of seven pediatric patients in the same size/protocol group (weight: 11.9-18.2 kg) were created based on the patients' actual multi-detector array CT (MDCT) data. Organs and structures in the scan coverage were individually segmented. Other organs and structures were created by morphing existing adult models (developed from visible human data) to match the framework defined by the segmented organs, referencing the organ volume and anthropometry data in ICRP Publication 89. Organ and effective dose of these patients from a chest MDCT scan protocol (64 slice LightSpeed VCT scanner, 120 kVp, 70 or 75 mA, 0.4 s gantry rotation period, pitch of 1.375, 20 mm beam collimation, and small body scan field-of-view) was calculated using a Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated to simulate radiation transport in the same CT system. The seven patients had normalized effective dose of 3.7-5.3 mSv/100 mAs (coefficient of variation: 10.8%). Normalized lung dose and heart dose were 10.4-12.6 mGy/100 mAs and 11.2-13.3 mGy/100 mAs, respectively. Organ dose variations across the patients were generally small for large organs in the scan coverage (<7%), but large for small organs in the scan coverage (9%-18%) and for partially or indirectly exposed organs (11%-77%). Normalized effective dose correlated weakly with body weight (correlation coefficient: r=-0.80). Normalized lung dose and heart dose correlated strongly with mid-chest equivalent diameter (lung: r=-0.99, heart: r=-0.93); these strong correlation relationships can be used to estimate patient-specific organ dose for

  16. Vein of Galen Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Komiyama, M.; Nakajima, H.; Nishikawa, M.; Yamanaka, K.; Iwai, Y.; Yasui, T.; Morikawa, T.; Kitano, S.; Sakamoto, H.; Nishio, A.

    2001-01-01

    Summary Eleven patients with so-called “vein of Galen aneurysms ” are reported, six of whom presented with vein of Galen aneurysmal malformations (four with choroidal type and two with mural type malformations). The remaining five patients presented with vein of Galen aneurysmal dilatations secondarily due to an arteriovenous malformation in one patient, an arteriovenous fistula in another, dural arteriovenous fistulas in two patients, and a varix in another. Treatments for these patients were individualised with consideration given to the clinical manifestations and the angioarchitecture of their lesions. Endovascular intervention played a critical role in the treatment of these vein of Galen aneurysms. PMID:20663385

  17. 3D Rapid Prototyping for Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery: Applications in Image-Guidance, Surgical Simulation and Patient-Specific Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Harley H. L.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Vescan, Allan; Daly, Michael J.; Prisman, Eitan; Irish, Jonathan C.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the role of advanced fabrication technology across a broad spectrum of head and neck surgical procedures, including applications in endoscopic sinus surgery, skull base surgery, and maxillofacial reconstruction. The initial case studies demonstrated three applications of rapid prototyping technology are in head and neck surgery: i) a mono-material paranasal sinus phantom for endoscopy training ii) a multi-material skull base simulator and iii) 3D patient-specific mandible templates. Digital processing of these phantoms is based on real patient or cadaveric 3D images such as CT or MRI data. Three endoscopic sinus surgeons examined the realism of the endoscopist training phantom. One experienced endoscopic skull base surgeon conducted advanced sinus procedures on the high-fidelity multi-material skull base simulator. Ten patients participated in a prospective clinical study examining patient-specific modeling for mandibular reconstructive surgery. Qualitative feedback to assess the realism of the endoscopy training phantom and high-fidelity multi-material phantom was acquired. Conformance comparisons using assessments from the blinded reconstructive surgeons measured the geometric performance between intra-operative and pre-operative reconstruction mandible plates. Both the endoscopy training phantom and the high-fidelity multi-material phantom received positive feedback on the realistic structure of the phantom models. Results suggested further improvement on the soft tissue structure of the phantom models is necessary. In the patient-specific mandible template study, the pre-operative plates were judged by two blinded surgeons as providing optimal conformance in 7 out of 10 cases. No statistical differences were found in plate fabrication time and conformance, with pre-operative plating providing the advantage of reducing time spent in the operation room. The applicability of common model design and fabrication techniques

  18. 3D Rapid Prototyping for Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery: Applications in Image-Guidance, Surgical Simulation and Patient-Specific Modeling.

    PubMed

    Chan, Harley H L; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H; Vescan, Allan; Daly, Michael J; Prisman, Eitan; Irish, Jonathan C

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the role of advanced fabrication technology across a broad spectrum of head and neck surgical procedures, including applications in endoscopic sinus surgery, skull base surgery, and maxillofacial reconstruction. The initial case studies demonstrated three applications of rapid prototyping technology are in head and neck surgery: i) a mono-material paranasal sinus phantom for endoscopy training ii) a multi-material skull base simulator and iii) 3D patient-specific mandible templates. Digital processing of these phantoms is based on real patient or cadaveric 3D images such as CT or MRI data. Three endoscopic sinus surgeons examined the realism of the endoscopist training phantom. One experienced endoscopic skull base surgeon conducted advanced sinus procedures on the high-fidelity multi-material skull base simulator. Ten patients participated in a prospective clinical study examining patient-specific modeling for mandibular reconstructive surgery. Qualitative feedback to assess the realism of the endoscopy training phantom and high-fidelity multi-material phantom was acquired. Conformance comparisons using assessments from the blinded reconstructive surgeons measured the geometric performance between intra-operative and pre-operative reconstruction mandible plates. Both the endoscopy training phantom and the high-fidelity multi-material phantom received positive feedback on the realistic structure of the phantom models. Results suggested further improvement on the soft tissue structure of the phantom models is necessary. In the patient-specific mandible template study, the pre-operative plates were judged by two blinded surgeons as providing optimal conformance in 7 out of 10 cases. No statistical differences were found in plate fabrication time and conformance, with pre-operative plating providing the advantage of reducing time spent in the operation room. The applicability of common model design and fabrication techniques

  19. Bronchial Aneurysms Mimicking Aortic Aneurysms: Endovascular Treatment in Two Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Vernhet, Helene; Bousquet, Claudine; Jean, Betty; Lesnik, Alvian; Durand, Gerard; Giron, Jacques; Senac, Jean Paul

    1999-05-15

    Bronchial artery dilatation and aneurysm formation is a potential complication of local inflammation, especially in bronchiectasis. When the bronchial artery has an ectopic origin from the inferior segment of the aortic arch, aneurysms may mimick aortic aneurysms. Despite this particular location, endovascular treatment is possible. We report two such aneurysms that were successfully embolized with steel coils.

  20. Transluminal Attenuation Gradient for Thrombotic Risk Assessment in Kawasaki Disease Patients with Coronary Artery Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grande Gutierrez, Noelia; Kahn, Andrew; Burns, Jane; Marsden, Alison

    2014-11-01

    Kawasaki Disease (KD) can result in coronary aneurysms in up to 25% of patients if not treated early putting patients at risk of thrombus formation, myocardial infarction and sudden death. Clinical guidelines for administering anti-coagulation therapy currently rely on anatomy alone. Previous studies including patient specific modeling and computer simulations in KD patients have suggested that hemodynamic data can predict regions susceptible to thrombus formation. In particular, high Particle Residence Time gradient (PRTg) regions have shown to correlate with regions of thrombus formation. Transluminal Attenuation Gradient (TAG) is determined from the change in radiological attenuation per vessel length. TAG has been used for characterizing coronary artery stenoses, however this approach has not yet been used in aneurysmal vessels. The aim of this study is to analyze the correlation between TAG and PRTg in KD patients with aneurysms and evaluate the use of TAG as an index to quantify thrombotic risk. Patient specific anatomic models for fluids simulations were constructed from CT angiographic image data from 3 KD aneurysm patients and one normal control. TAG values for the aneurysm patients were markedly lower than for the non-aneurysmal patient (mean -18.38 vs. -2). In addition, TAG values were compared to PRTg obtained for each patient. Thrombotic risk stratification for KD aneurysms may be improved by incorporating TAG and should be evaluated in future prospective studies.

  1. Hemodynamic Changes in Treated Cerebral Aneurysms and Correlations with Long-Term Outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGah, Patrick; Barbour, Michael; Levitt, Michael; Kim, Louis; Aliseda, Alberto

    2014-11-01

    The hemodynamic conditions in patients with cerebral aneurysms undergoing treatment, e.g. flow diverting stents or coil embolization, are investigated via computational simulations. Patient-specific 3D models of the vasculature are derived from rotational angiography. Patient-specific flow and pressure boundary conditions are prescribed utilizing intravascular pressure and velocity measurements. Pre-treatment and immediate post-treatment hemodynamics are studied in eight cases so as to ascertain the effect of the treatment on the intra-aneurysmal flow and wall shear stress. We hypothesize that larger reductions in intra-aneurysmal inflow and wall shear stress after treatment are correlated with an increased likelihood of aneurysmal occlusion and treatment success. Results indicate reductions of the intra-aneurysmal inflow and wall shear stress in all cases. Preliminary clinical six-month follow-up data, assessing if the treatment has been successful, shows that the cases with a persistent aneurysm had a smaller reduction in inflow and wall shear stress magnitude in the immediate post-treatment conditions. This suggests that CFD can be used to quantify a treatment's probability of success by computing the change in pre-and-post-treatment hemodynamics in cerebral aneurysms. NIH-NINDS.

  2. Patient-specific internal radionuclide dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Tsougos, Ioannis; Loudos, George; Georgoulias, Panagiotis; Theodorou, Kiki; Kappas, Constantin

    2010-02-01

    The development of patient-specific treatment planning systems is of outmost importance in the development of radionuclide dosimetry, taking into account that quantitative three-dimensional nuclear medical imaging can be used in this regard. At present, the established method for dosimetry is based on the measurement of the biokinetics by serial gamma-camera scans, followed by calculations of the administered activity and the residence times, resulting in the radiation-absorbed doses of critical organs. However, the quantification of the activity in different organs from planar data is hampered by inaccurate attenuation and scatter correction as well as because of background and organ overlay. In contrast, dosimetry based on quantitative three-dimensional data can be more accurate and allows an individualized approach, provided that all effects that degrade the quantitative content of the images have been corrected for. In addition, inhomogeneous organ accumulation of the radionuclide can be detected and possibly taken into account. The aim of this work is to provide adequate information on internal emitter dosimetry and a state-of-the-art review of the current methodology and future trends.

  3. Phantom limb pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2015:chap 54. Nikolajsen L, Springer JS, Haroutiunian S. Phantom limb pain. In: Benzon HT, ... medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- ...

  4. Lung pair phantom

    DOEpatents

    Olsen, P.C.; Gordon, N.R.; Simmons, K.L.

    1993-11-30

    The present invention is a material and method of making the material that exhibits improved radiation attenuation simulation of real lungs, i.e., an ``authentic lung tissue`` or ALT phantom. Specifically, the ALT phantom is a two-part polyurethane medium density foam mixed with calcium carbonate, potassium carbonate if needed for K-40 background, lanthanum nitrate, acetone, and a nitrate or chloride form of a radionuclide. This formulation is found to closely match chemical composition and linear attenuation of real lungs. The ALT phantom material is made according to established procedures but without adding foaming agents or preparing thixotropic concentrate and with a modification for ensuring uniformity of density of the ALT phantom that is necessary for accurate simulation. The modification is that the polyurethane chemicals are mixed at a low temperature prior to pouring the polyurethane mixture into the mold.

  5. Lung pair phantom

    DOEpatents

    Olsen, Peter C.; Gordon, N. Ross; Simmons, Kevin L.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention is a material and method of making the material that exhibits improved radiation attenuation simulation of real lungs, i.e., an "authentic lung tissue" or ALT phantom. Specifically, the ALT phantom is a two-part polyurethane medium density foam mixed with calcium carbonate, potassium carbonate if needed for K-40 background, lanthanum nitrate, acetone, and a nitrate or chloride form of a radionuclide. This formulation is found to closely match chemical composition and linear attenuation of real lungs. The ALT phantom material is made according to established procedures but without adding foaming agents or preparing thixotropic concentrate and with a modification for ensuring uniformity of density of the ALT phantom that is necessary for accurate simulation. The modification is that the polyurethane chemicals are mixed at a low temperature prior to pouring the polyurethane mixture into the mold.

  6. Stability of phantom wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo, Francisco S.N.

    2005-06-15

    It has recently been shown that traversable wormholes may be supported by phantom energy. In this work phantom wormhole geometries are modeled by matching an interior traversable wormhole solution, governed by the equation of state p={omega}{rho} with {omega}<-1, to an exterior vacuum spacetime at a finite junction interface. The stability analysis of these phantom wormholes to linearized spherically symmetric perturbations about static equilibrium solutions is carried out. A master equation dictating the stability regions is deduced, and by separating the cases of a positive and a negative surface energy density, it is found that the respective stable equilibrium configurations may be increased by strategically varying the wormhole throat radius. The first model considered, in the absence of a thin shell, is that of an asymptotically flat phantom wormhole spacetime. The second model constructed is that of an isotropic pressure phantom wormhole, which is of particular interest, as the notion of phantom energy is that of a spatially homogeneous cosmic fluid, although it may be extended to inhomogeneous spherically symmetric spacetimes.

  7. Cerebral aneurysms: relations between geometry, hemodynamics and aneurysm location in the cerebral vasculature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passerini, Tiziano; Veneziani, Alessandro; Sangalli, Laura; Secchi, Piercesare; Vantini, Simone

    2010-11-01

    In cerebral blood circulation, the interplay of arterial geometrical features and flow dynamics is thought to play a significant role in the development of aneurysms. In the framework of the Aneurisk project, patient-specific morphology reconstructions were conducted with the open-source software VMTK (www.vmtk.org) on a set of computational angiography images provided by Ospedale Niguarda (Milano, Italy). Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were performed with a software based on the library LifeV (www.lifev.org). The joint statistical analysis of geometries and simulations highlights the possible association of certain spatial patterns of radius, curvature and shear load along the Internal Carotid Artery (ICA) with the presence, position and previous event of rupture of an aneurysm in the entire cerebral vasculature. Moreover, some possible landmarks are identified to be monitored for the assessment of a Potential Rupture Risk Index.

  8. Embolization of Brain Aneurysms and Fistulas

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Embolization of Brain Aneurysms and Arteriovenous Malformations/Fistulas Embolization of brain ... Brain Aneurysms and Fistulas? What is Embolization of Brain Aneurysms and Fistulas? Embolization of brain aneurysms and ...

  9. Phantom energy traversable wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo, Francisco S.N.

    2005-04-15

    It has been suggested that a possible candidate for the present accelerated expansion of the Universe is 'phantom energy'. The latter possesses an equation of state of the form {omega}{identical_to}p/{rho}<-1, consequently violating the null energy condition. As this is the fundamental ingredient to sustain traversable wormholes, this cosmic fluid presents us with a natural scenario for the existence of these exotic geometries. 'Note, however, that the notion of phantom energy is that of a homogeneously distributed fluid. Nevertheless, it can be extended to inhomogeneous spherically symmetric spacetimes, and it is shown that traversable wormholes may be supported by phantom energy. Because of the fact of the accelerating Universe, macroscopic wormholes could naturally be grown from the submicroscopic constructions that originally pervaded the quantum foam. One could also imagine an advanced civilization mining the cosmic fluid for phantom energy necessary to construct and sustain a traversable wormhole. In this context, we investigate the physical properties and characteristics of traversable wormholes constructed using the equation of state p={omega}{rho}, with {omega}<-1. We analyze specific wormhole geometries, considering asymptotically flat spacetimes and imposing an isotropic pressure. We also construct a thin shell around the interior wormhole solution, by imposing the phantom energy equation of state on the surface stresses. Using the 'volume integral quantifier' we verify that it is theoretically possible to construct these geometries with vanishing amounts of averaged null energy condition violating phantom energy. Specific wormhole dimensions and the traversal velocity and time are also deduced from the traversability conditions for a particular wormhole geometry. These phantom energy traversable wormholes have far-reaching physical and cosmological implications. For instance, an advanced civilization may use these geometries to induce closed timelike

  10. Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Savarese, R P; Rosenfeld, J C; DeLaurentis, D A

    1986-05-01

    Between January 1976 and December 1982, 181 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms were treated surgically, and in 13 patients the aneurysms were found to be inflammatory. Inflammatory aneurysms of the abdominal aorta (IAAA) share important characteristics with typical atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysms. Diagnosis and surgical management of IAAA are distinctive which suggests that IAAA should be considered separately, as a varient of typical abdominal aortic aneurysms. IAAA occur predominantly in males. The presenting symptoms are often idiosyncratic and include severe abdominal or back pain, or both, and ureteral obstruction; the diagnosis of IAAA should be considered when these symptoms are present. Although grossly and microscopically, the perianeurysmal fibrosis resembles idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis, the two conditions can be differentiated. At the present time, ultrasonography and computed tomography appear to offer reliable means for diagnosing IAAA. The presence of IAAA, whether established preoperatively or discovered unexpectedly at operation, necessitate certain modifications in the surgical approach, in order to avoid injuring the duodenum and the venous structures. Most patients can be successfully treated by resection and graft replacement. Rupture of the aneurysm in IAAA appears to be less frequent than in typical atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  11. Patient-specific independent 3D GammaPlan quality assurance for Gamma Knife Perfexion radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Mamalui-Hunter, Maria; Yaddanapudi, Sridhar; Zhao, Tianyu; Mutic, Sasa; Low, Daniel A; Drzymala, Robert E

    2013-01-07

    One of the most important aspects of quality assurance (QA) in radiation therapy is redundancy of patient treatment dose calculation. This work is focused on the patient-specific time and 3D dose treatment plan verification for stereotactic radiosurgery using Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion (LGK PFX). The virtual model of LGK PFX was developed in MATLAB, based on the physical dimensions provided by the manufacturer. The ring-specific linear attenuation coefficients (LAC) and output factors (OFs) reported by the manufacturer were replaced by the measurement-based collimator size-specific OFs and a single LAC = 0.0065 mm-1. Calculation depths for each LGK PFX shot were obtained by ray-tracing technique, and the dose calculation formalism was similar to the one used by GammaPlan treatment planning software versions 8 and 9. The architecture of the QA process was based on the in-house online database search of the LGK PFX database search for plan-specific information. A series of QA phantom plans was examined to verify geometric and dosimetric accuracy of the software. The accuracy of the QA process was further evaluated through evaluation of a series of patient plans. The shot time/focus point dose verification for each shot took less than 1 sec/shot with full 3D isodose verification taking about 30 sec/shot on a desktop PC. GammaPlan database access time took less than 0.05 sec. The geometric accuracy (location of the point of maximum dose) of the phantom and patient plan was dependent on the resolution of the original dose matrix and was of the order of 1 dose element. Dosimetric accuracy of the independently calculated phantom and patient point (focus) doses was within 3.5% from the GammaPlan, with the mean = 2.3% and SD= 1.1%. The process for independent pretreatment patient-specific Gamma Knife Perfexion time and dose verification was created and validated.

  12. Current status of computational fluid dynamics for cerebral aneurysms: the clinician's perspective.

    PubMed

    Wong, George K C; Poon, W S

    2011-10-01

    The ultimate management goal for unruptured intracranial aneurysms is to select the aneurysms at risk of rupture and treat them. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) utilizes mechanical engineering principles to explicate what occurs in tubes (vessels) and bulges (aneurysms). CFD parameters have been related to the biological processes that occur in the aneurysm wall, and models have been developed to predict the risk of aneurysm rupture. A PubMed search from 1 January 1970 to 30 November 2010 was carried out using the keywords "computational fluid dynamics" AND "cerebral aneurysm". References were also reviewed for relevant articles. All relevant articles were then reviewed by a vascular neurosurgeon, who found that the hemodynamic parameters of wall shear stress (WSS), WSS gradient, inflow jet, impingement zone, and aneurysm inflow-angle (IA) lack the predictive values required for clinical practice. CFD study can now be simulated and reproduced in a simple and fast analysis of steady, non-pulsatile flow with phase contrast magnetic resonance-derived volumetric inflow rate but the key question of whether a patient-specific CFD model can predict the rupture risk of unruptured intracranial aneurysms remains to be determined in future studies incorporating multivariate analysis. CFD models will become available for routine clinical practice as the computational power of computers further improves.

  13. Renal artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    González, J; Esteban, M; Andrés, G; Linares, E; Martínez-Salamanca, J I

    2014-01-01

    A renal artery aneurysm is defined as a dilated segment of renal artery that exceeds twice the diameter of a normal renal artery. Although rare, the diagnosis and incidence of this entity have been steadily increasing due to the routine use of cross-sectional imaging. In certain cases, renal artery aneurysms may be clinically important and potentially lethal. However, knowledge of their occurrence, their natural history, and their prognosis with or without treatment is still limited. This article aims to review the recent literature concerning renal artery aneurysms, with special consideration given to physiopathology, indications for treatment, different technical options, post-procedure complications and treatment outcomes.

  14. Pediatric cerebral aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Gemmete, Joseph J; Toma, Ahmed K; Davagnanam, Indran; Robertson, Fergus; Brew, Stefan

    2013-11-01

    Childhood intracranial aneurysms differ from those in the adult population in incidence and gender prevalence, cause, location, and clinical presentation. Endovascular treatment of pediatric aneurysms is the suggested approach because it offers both reconstructive and deconstructive techniques and a better clinical outcome compared with surgery; however, the long-term durability of endovascular treatment is still questionable, therefore long-term clinical and imaging follow-up is necessary. The clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of intracranial aneurysms in children are discussed, and data from endovascular treatments are presented.

  15. Parallel multiscale simulations of a brain aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinberg, Leopold; Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Karniadakis, George Em

    2013-07-01

    Cardiovascular pathologies, such as a brain aneurysm, are affected by the global blood circulation as well as by the local microrheology. Hence, developing computational models for such cases requires the coupling of disparate spatial and temporal scales often governed by diverse mathematical descriptions, e.g., by partial differential equations (continuum) and ordinary differential equations for discrete particles (atomistic). However, interfacing atomistic-based with continuum-based domain discretizations is a challenging problem that requires both mathematical and computational advances. We present here a hybrid methodology that enabled us to perform the first multiscale simulations of platelet depositions on the wall of a brain aneurysm. The large scale flow features in the intracranial network are accurately resolved by using the high-order spectral element Navier-Stokes solver NɛκTαr. The blood rheology inside the aneurysm is modeled using a coarse-grained stochastic molecular dynamics approach (the dissipative particle dynamics method) implemented in the parallel code LAMMPS. The continuum and atomistic domains overlap with interface conditions provided by effective forces computed adaptively to ensure continuity of states across the interface boundary. A two-way interaction is allowed with the time-evolving boundary of the (deposited) platelet clusters tracked by an immersed boundary method. The corresponding heterogeneous solvers (NɛκTαr and LAMMPS) are linked together by a computational multilevel message passing interface that facilitates modularity and high parallel efficiency. Results of multiscale simulations of clot formation inside the aneurysm in a patient-specific arterial tree are presented. We also discuss the computational challenges involved and present scalability results of our coupled solver on up to 300 K computer processors. Validation of such coupled atomistic-continuum models is a main open issue that has to be addressed in future

  16. Parallel multiscale simulations of a brain aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Grinberg, Leopold; Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Karniadakis, George Em

    2013-07-01

    Cardiovascular pathologies, such as a brain aneurysm, are affected by the global blood circulation as well as by the local microrheology. Hence, developing computational models for such cases requires the coupling of disparate spatial and temporal scales often governed by diverse mathematical descriptions, e.g., by partial differential equations (continuum) and ordinary differential equations for discrete particles (atomistic). However, interfacing atomistic-based with continuum-based domain discretizations is a challenging problem that requires both mathematical and computational advances. We present here a hybrid methodology that enabled us to perform the first multiscale simulations of platelet depositions on the wall of a brain aneurysm. The large scale flow features in the intracranial network are accurately resolved by using the high-order spectral element Navier–Stokes solver NεκTαr. The blood rheology inside the aneurysm is modeled using a coarse-grained stochastic molecular dynamics approach (the dissipative particle dynamics method) implemented in the parallel code LAMMPS. The continuum and atomistic domains overlap with interface conditions provided by effective forces computed adaptively to ensure continuity of states across the interface boundary. A two-way interaction is allowed with the time-evolving boundary of the (deposited) platelet clusters tracked by an immersed boundary method. The corresponding heterogeneous solvers (NεκTαr and LAMMPS) are linked together by a computational multilevel message passing interface that facilitates modularity and high parallel efficiency. Results of multiscale simulations of clot formation inside the aneurysm in a patient-specific arterial tree are presented. We also discuss the computational challenges involved and present scalability results of our coupled solver on up to 300 K computer processors. Validation of such coupled atomistic-continuum models is a main open issue that has to be addressed in

  17. Parallel multiscale simulations of a brain aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Grinberg, Leopold; Fedosov, Dmitry A; Karniadakis, George Em

    2013-07-01

    Cardiovascular pathologies, such as a brain aneurysm, are affected by the global blood circulation as well as by the local microrheology. Hence, developing computational models for such cases requires the coupling of disparate spatial and temporal scales often governed by diverse mathematical descriptions, e.g., by partial differential equations (continuum) and ordinary differential equations for discrete particles (atomistic). However, interfacing atomistic-based with continuum-based domain discretizations is a challenging problem that requires both mathematical and computational advances. We present here a hybrid methodology that enabled us to perform the first multi-scale simulations of platelet depositions on the wall of a brain aneurysm. The large scale flow features in the intracranial network are accurately resolved by using the high-order spectral element Navier-Stokes solver εκαr . The blood rheology inside the aneurysm is modeled using a coarse-grained stochastic molecular dynamics approach (the dissipative particle dynamics method) implemented in the parallel code LAMMPS. The continuum and atomistic domains overlap with interface conditions provided by effective forces computed adaptively to ensure continuity of states across the interface boundary. A two-way interaction is allowed with the time-evolving boundary of the (deposited) platelet clusters tracked by an immersed boundary method. The corresponding heterogeneous solvers ( εκαr and LAMMPS) are linked together by a computational multilevel message passing interface that facilitates modularity and high parallel efficiency. Results of multiscale simulations of clot formation inside the aneurysm in a patient-specific arterial tree are presented. We also discuss the computational challenges involved and present scalability results of our coupled solver on up to 300K computer processors. Validation of such coupled atomistic-continuum models is a main open issue that has to be addressed in future

  18. Ruptured jejunal artery aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Sílvia; Costa, Alexandre; Pereira, Tiago; Maciel, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Visceral artery aneurysms (VAAs), unlike aortic aneurysms, are very rare, but are also a potentially lethal vascular disease. Jejunal artery aneurysms only account for less than 3% of VAAs, but have a 30% risk of rupture, with 20% death rate, presenting with only few and vague symptoms. We report the case of a 76-year-old man presenting at the emergency department (ED) with a crampy epigastric pain and vomiting. An ultrasound performed diagnosed free abdominal fluid and immediate CT scan diagnosed jejunal artery aneurysm spontaneously rupturing, followed by hypovolaemic shock. Emergent surgery was undertaken, and aneurysmectomy, followed by partial enterectomy with primary anastomosis were performed, because of segmentary jejunal ischaemia. The patient's recovery was unremarkable. High level of suspicion, rapid diagnosis capability and prompt surgical or endovascular intervention, as well as an effective teamwork in the ED are critical to avoid the devastating consequences of ruptured VAAs. PMID:23771962

  19. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Mikami, Y; Kyogoku, M

    1994-08-01

    Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is a distinct clinicopathological entity, characterized by: (1) clinical presentation, such as back pain, weight loss, and increased ESR, (2) patchy and/or diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration, and (3) marked periaortic fibrosis resulting in thickening of the aneurysmal wall and occasional retroperitoneal fibrosis. Its pathogenesis is unknown, but some authors support the theory that IAAA is a subtype of atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm because of close relationship between IAAA and atherosclerotic change. In this article, we describe clinical and histological features of IAAA on the basis of the literature and our review of 6 cases of IAAA, emphasizing the similarity and difference between IAAA and atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm. Our review supports that marked lamellar fibrosis completely replacing the media and adventitia, patchy lymphocytic infiltration (mostly B cells) and endarteritis obliterans are characteristic features of IAAA.

  20. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... US) : Ultrasound is a highly accurate way to measure the size of an aneurysm. A physician may also use a special technique called Doppler ultrasound to examine blood flow through the aorta. Occasionally the aorta may not ...

  1. Aortic Aneurysm Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ... to Prevent and Control Chronic Diseases Million Hearts® Web Sites with More Information About Aortic Aneurysm For ...

  2. Cerebral Aneurysms Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... affects the risk of rupture. What are the dangers? Aneurysms may burst and bleed into the brain, ... Research Coordinating Committees CounterACT Rigor & Reproducibility Scientific Resources Animal Models Cell/Tissue/DNA Clinical and Translational Resources ...

  3. What Is an Aneurysm?

    MedlinePlus

    ... rupture causes dangerous bleeding inside the body. A dissection is a split in one or more layers ... layers of the artery wall. Both rupture and dissection often are fatal. Overview Most aneurysms occur in ...

  4. Feasibility study of patient-specific quality assurance system for high-dose-rate brachytherapy in patients with cervical cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Boram; Ahn, Sung Hwan; Kim, Hyeyoung; Han, Youngyih; Huh, Seung Jae; Kim, Jin Sung; Kim, Dong Wook; Sim, Jina; Yoon, Myonggeun

    2016-04-01

    This study was conducted for the purpose of establishing a quality-assurance (QA) system for brachytherapy that can ensure patient-specific QA by enhancing dosimetric accuracy for the patient's therapy plan. To measure the point-absorbed dose and the 2D dose distribution for the patient's therapy plan, we fabricated a solid phantom that allowed for the insertion of an applicator for patient-specific QA and used an ion chamber and a film as measuring devices. The patient treatment plan was exported to the QA dose-calculation software, which calculated the time weight of dwell position stored in the plan DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) file to obtain an overall beam quality correction factor, and that correction was applied to the dose calculations. Experiments were conducted after importing the patient's treatment planning source data for the fabricated phantom and inserting the applicator, ion chamber, and film into the phantom. On completion of dose delivery, the doses to the ion chamber and film were checked against the corresponding treatment plan to evaluate the dosimetric accuracy. For experimental purposes, five treatment plans were randomly selected. The beam quality correction factors for ovoid and tandem brachytherapy applicators were found to be 1.15 and 1.10 - 1.12, respectively. The beam quality correction factor in tandem fluctuated by approximately 2%, depending on the changes in the dwell position. The doses measured by using the ion chamber showed differences ranging from -2.4% to 0.6%, compared to the planned doses. As for the film, the passing rate was 90% or higher when assessed using a gamma value of the local dose difference of 3% and a distance to agreement of 3 mm. The results show that the self-fabricated phantom was suitable for QA in clinical settings. The proposed patient-specific QA for the treatment planning is expected to contribute to reduce dosimetric errors in brachytherapy and, thus, to enhancing treatment

  5. The feasibility of producing patient-specific acrylic cranioplasty implants with a low-cost 3D printer.

    PubMed

    Tan, Eddie T W; Ling, Ji Min; Dinesh, Shree Kumar

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT Commercially available, preformed patient-specific cranioplasty implants are anatomically accurate but costly. Acrylic bone cement is a commonly used alternative. However, the manual shaping of the bone cement is difficult and may not lead to a satisfactory implant in some cases. The object of this study was to determine the feasibility of fabricating molds using a commercial low-cost 3D printer for the purpose of producing patient-specific acrylic cranioplasty implants. METHODS Using data from a high-resolution brain CT scan of a patient with a calvarial defect posthemicraniectomy, a skull phantom and a mold were generated with computer software and fabricated with the 3D printer using the fused deposition modeling method. The mold was used as a template to shape the acrylic implant, which was formed via a polymerization reaction. The resulting implant was fitted to the skull phantom and the cranial index of symmetry was determined. RESULTS The skull phantom and mold were successfully fabricated with the 3D printer. The application of acrylic bone cement to the mold was simple and straightforward. The resulting implant did not require further adjustment or drilling prior to being fitted to the skull phantom. The cranial index of symmetry was 96.2% (the cranial index of symmetry is 100% for a perfectly symmetrical skull). CONCLUSIONS This study showed that it is feasible to produce patient-specific acrylic cranioplasty implants with a low-cost 3D printer. Further studies are required to determine applicability in the clinical setting. This promising technique has the potential to bring personalized medicine to more patients around the world.

  6. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Stanlies

    2015-07-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a worldwide health burden with high fatality and permanent disability rates. The overall prognosis depends on the volume of the initial bleed, rebleeding, and degree of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Cardiac manifestations and neurogenic pulmonary edema indicate the severity of SAH. The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT) reported a favorable neurological outcome with the endovascular coiling procedure compared with surgical clipping at the end of 1 year. The ISAT trial recruits were primarily neurologically good grade patients with smaller anterior circulation aneurysms, and therefore the results cannot be reliably extrapolated to larger aneurysms, posterior circulation aneurysms, patients presenting with complex aneurysm morphology, and poor neurological grades. The role of hypothermia is not proven to be neuroprotective according to a large randomized controlled trial, Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysms Surgery Trial (IHAST II), which recruited patients with good neurological grades. Patients in this trial were subjected to slow cooling and inadequate cooling time and were rewarmed rapidly. This methodology would have reduced the beneficial effects of hypothermia. Adenosine is found to be beneficial for transient induced hypotension in 2 retrospective analyses, without increasing the risk for cardiac and neurological morbidity. The neurological benefit of pharmacological neuroprotection and neuromonitoring is not proven in patients undergoing clipping of aneurysms. DCI is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following SAH, and the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial and not yet understood. At present, oral nimodipine has an established role in the management of DCI, along with maintenance of euvolemia and induced hypertension. Following SAH, hypernatremia, although less common than hyponatremia, is a predictor of poor neurological outcome.

  7. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a worldwide health burden with high fatality and permanent disability rates. The overall prognosis depends on the volume of the initial bleed, rebleeding, and degree of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Cardiac manifestations and neurogenic pulmonary edema indicate the severity of SAH. The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT) reported a favorable neurological outcome with the endovascular coiling procedure compared with surgical clipping at the end of 1 year. The ISAT trial recruits were primarily neurologically good grade patients with smaller anterior circulation aneurysms, and therefore the results cannot be reliably extrapolated to larger aneurysms, posterior circulation aneurysms, patients presenting with complex aneurysm morphology, and poor neurological grades. The role of hypothermia is not proven to be neuroprotective according to a large randomized controlled trial, Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysms Surgery Trial (IHAST II), which recruited patients with good neurological grades. Patients in this trial were subjected to slow cooling and inadequate cooling time and were rewarmed rapidly. This methodology would have reduced the beneficial effects of hypothermia. Adenosine is found to be beneficial for transient induced hypotension in 2 retrospective analyses, without increasing the risk for cardiac and neurological morbidity. The neurological benefit of pharmacological neuroprotection and neuromonitoring is not proven in patients undergoing clipping of aneurysms. DCI is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following SAH, and the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial and not yet understood. At present, oral nimodipine has an established role in the management of DCI, along with maintenance of euvolemia and induced hypertension. Following SAH, hypernatremia, although less common than hyponatremia, is a predictor of poor neurological outcome. PMID:25272066

  8. Splenic artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Tcbc-Rj, Rui Antônio Ferreira; Ferreira, Myriam Christina Lopes; Ferreira, Daniel Antônio Lopes; Ferreira, André Gustavo Lopes; Ramos, Flávia Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Splenic artery aneurysms - the most common visceral artery aneurysms - are found most often in multiparous women and in patients with portal hypertension. Indications for treatment of splenic artery aneurysm or pseudoaneurysm include specific symptoms, female gender and childbearing age, presence of portal hypertension, planned liver transplantation, a pseudoaneurysm of any size, and an aneurysm with a diameter of more than 2.5cm. Historically, the treatment of splenic artery aneurysm has been surgical ligation of the splenic artery, ligation of the aneurysm, or aneurysmectomy with or without splenectomy, depending on the aneurysm location. There are other percutaneous interventional techniques. The authors present a case of a splenic artery aneurysm in a 51-year-old woman, detected incidentally. RESUMO Aneurismas da artéria esplênica - os aneurismas arteriais viscerais mais comuns - são encontrados mais frequentemente em mulheres multíparas e em pacientes com hipertensão portal. As indicações para o seu tratamento incluem sintomas específicos, sexo feminino e idade fértil, presença de hipertensão portal, paciente em fila de transplante hepático, um pseudoaneurisma de qualquer tamanho, e um aneurisma com um diâmetro superior a 2,5cm. Historicamente, o tratamento do aneurisma da artéria esplênica tem sido a ligadura cirúrgica da artéria esplênica, a ligadura do aneurisma ou a aneurismectomia, com ou sem esplenectomia, dependendo do local do aneurisma. Existem outras técnicas intervencionistas percutâneas. Os autores apresentam o caso de um aneurisma de artéria esplênica em uma mulher de 51 anos de idade, diagnosticado incidentalmente.

  9. Patient-specific dosimetry using quantitative SPECT imaging and three-dimensional discrete fourier transform convolution

    SciTech Connect

    Akabani, G.; Hawkins, W.G.; Eckblade, M.B.; Leichner, P.K.

    1997-02-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a three-dimensional discrete Fourier transform (3D-DFT) convolution method to perform the dosimetry for {sup 131}I-labeled antibodies in soft tissues. Mathematical and physical phantoms were used to compare 3D-DFT with Monte Carlo transport (MCT) calculations based on the EGS4 code. The mathematical and physical phantoms consisted of a sphere and cylinder, respectively, containing uniform and nonuniform activity distributions. Quantitative SPECT reconstruction was carried out using the circular harmonic transform (CHT) algorithm. The radial dose profile obtained from MCT calculations and the 3D-DFT convolution method for the mathematical phantom were in close agreement. The root mean square error (RMSE) for the two methods was <0.1%, with a maximum difference <21%. Results obtained for the physical phantom gave a RMSE <0.1% and a maximum difference of <13%; isodose contours were in good agreement. SPECT data for two patients who had undergone {sup 131}I radioimmunotherapy (RIT) were used to compare absorbed-dose rates and isodose rate contours with the two methods of calculations. This yielded a RMSE <0.02% and a maximum difference of <13%. Our results showed that the 3D-DFT convolution method compared well with MCT calculations. The 3D-DFT approach is computationally much more efficient and, hence, the method of choice. This method is patient-specific and applicable to the dosimetry of soft-tissue tumors and normal organs. It can be implemented on personal computers. 22 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Numerical simulations of post-surgical flow and thrombosis in basilar artery aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshadhri, Santhosh; Lawton, Michael; Boussel, Loic; Saloner, David; Rayz, Vitaliy

    2015-11-01

    Surgical treatment of basilar artery aneurysms presents a major challenge since it is crucial to preserve the flow to the vital brainstem perforators branching of the basilar artery. In some cases, basilar aneurysms can be treated by clipping vessels in order to induce flow reduction and aneurysm thrombosis. Patient-specific CFD models can provide guidance to clinicians by simulating postoperative flows resulting from alternative surgeries. Several surgical options were evaluated for four basilar aneurysm patients. Patient-specific models were generated from preoperative MR angiography and MR velocimetry data and modified to simulate different procedures. The Navier-Stokes equations were solved with a finite-volume solver Fluent. Virtual contrast injections were simulated by solving the advection-diffusion equation in order to estimate the flow residence time and determine thrombus-prone regions. The results indicated on procedures that reduce intra-aneurysmal velocities and flow regions which are likely to become thrombosed. Thus CFD modeling can help improve the outcome of surgeries altering the flow in basilar aneurysms.

  11. Computational hemodynamics in cerebral aneurysms: the effects of modeled versus measured boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Marzo, Alberto; Singh, Pankaj; Larrabide, Ignacio; Radaelli, Alessandro; Coley, Stuart; Gwilliam, Matt; Wilkinson, Iain D; Lawford, Patricia; Reymond, Philippe; Patel, Umang; Frangi, Alejandro; Hose, D Rod

    2011-02-01

    Modeling of flow in intracranial aneurysms (IAs) requires flow information at the model boundaries. In absence of patient-specific measurements, typical or modeled boundary conditions (BCs) are often used. This study investigates the effects of modeled versus patient-specific BCs on modeled hemodynamics within IAs. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of five IAs were reconstructed from three-dimensional rotational angiography (3DRA). BCs were applied using in turn patient-specific phase-contrast-MR (pc-MR) measurements, a 1D-circulation model, and a physiologically coherent method based on local WSS at inlets. The Navier-Stokes equations were solved using the Ansys®-CFX™ software. Wall shear stress (WSS), oscillatory shear index (OSI), and other hemodynamic indices were computed. Differences in the values obtained with the three methods were analyzed using boxplot diagrams. Qualitative similarities were observed in the flow fields obtained with the three approaches. The quantitative comparison showed smaller discrepancies between pc-MR and 1D-model data, than those observed between pc-MR and WSS-scaled data. Discrepancies were reduced when indices were normalized to mean hemodynamic aneurysmal data. The strong similarities observed for the three BCs models suggest that vessel and aneurysm geometry have the strongest influence on aneurysmal hemodynamics. In absence of patient-specific BCs, a distributed circulation model may represent the best option when CFD is used for large cohort studies.

  12. Jamitons: Phantom Traffic Jams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowszun, Jorj

    2013-01-01

    Traffic on motorways can slow down for no apparent reason. Sudden changes in speed by one or two drivers can create a chain reaction that causes a traffic jam for the vehicles that are following. This kind of phantom traffic jam is called a "jamiton" and the article discusses some of the ways in which traffic engineers produce…

  13. The Phantom brane revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahni, Varun

    2016-07-01

    The Phantom brane is based on the normal branch of the DGP braneworld. It possesses a phantom-like equation of state at late times, but no big-rip future singularity. In this braneworld, the cosmological constant is dynamically screened at late times. Consequently it provides a good fit to SDSS DR11 measurements of H(z) at high redshifts. We obtain a closed system of equations for scalar perturbations on the brane. Perturbations of radiation, matter and the Weyl fluid are self-consistently evolved until the present epoch. We find that the late time growth of density perturbations on the brane proceeds at a faster rate than in ΛCDM. Additionally, the gravitational potentials φ, Ψ evolve differently on the brane than in ΛCDM, for which φ = Ψ. On the Brane, by contrast, the ratio φ/Ψ exceeds unity during the late matter dominated epoch (z ≤ 50). These features emerge as smoking gun tests of phantom brane cosmology and allow predictions of this scenario to be tested against observations of galaxy clustering and large scale structure. The phantom brane also displays a pole in its equation of state, which provides a key test of this dark energy model.

  14. Rasmussen's aneurysm: A forgotten scourge☆

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Kshitij; Colaco, Brendon; Colaco, Clinton; Hellman, Michael; Meena, Nikhil

    2015-01-01

    Rasmussen's aneurysm is an inflammatory pseudo-aneurysmal dilatation of a branch of pulmonary artery adjacent to a tuberculous cavity. Life threatening massive hemoptysis from the rupture of a Rasmussen's aneurysm is an uncommon yet life threatening complication of cavitary tuberculosis (TB). We present a case of a young woman who presented with low-grade fever and hemoptysis. Computed tomographic (CT) angiography showed biapical cavitary lesions and actively bleeding aneurysms involving pulmonary artery, which successfully underwent glue embolization. PMID:26744661

  15. Egg White Phantoms for HIFU

    SciTech Connect

    Divkovic, Gabriela; Jenne, Juergen W.

    2005-03-28

    We used fresh egg white and polyacrylamide to create a transparent tissue mimicking phantom. Heating of phantoms by HIFU leads to egg white protein denaturation and creation of visible white lesions. We measured the acoustical and thermal properties and investigated the possibility to use such phantoms to study the lesion formation during the HIFU therapy.

  16. Combined Visualization of Wall Thickness and Wall Shear Stress for the Evaluation of Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Glaßer, Sylvia; Lawonn, Kai; Hoffmann, Thomas; Skalej, Martin; Preim, Bernhard

    2014-12-01

    For an individual rupture risk assessment of aneurysms, the aneurysm's wall morphology and hemodynamics provide valuable information. Hemodynamic information is usually extracted via computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulation on a previously extracted 3D aneurysm surface mesh or directly measured with 4D phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging. In contrast, a noninvasive imaging technique that depicts the aneurysm wall in vivo is still not available. Our approach comprises an experiment, where intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is employed to probe a dissected saccular aneurysm phantom, which we modeled from a porcine kidney artery. Then, we extracted a 3D surface mesh to gain the vessel wall thickness and hemodynamic information from a CFD simulation. Building on this, we developed a framework that depicts the inner and outer aneurysm wall with dedicated information about local thickness via distance ribbons. For both walls, a shading is adapted such that the inner wall as well as its distance to the outer wall is always perceivable. The exploration of the wall is further improved by combining it with hemodynamic information from the CFD simulation. Hence, the visual analysis comprises a brushing and linking concept for individual highlighting of pathologic areas. Also, a surface clustering is integrated to provide an automatic division of different aneurysm parts combined with a risk score depending on wall thickness and hemodynamic information. In general, our approach can be employed for vessel visualization purposes where an inner and outer wall has to be adequately represented.

  17. The UF family of reference hybrid phantoms for computational radiation dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Choonsik; Lodwick, Daniel; Hurtado, Jorge; Pafundi, Deanna; Williams, Jonathan L; Bolch, Wesley E

    2010-01-21

    masses from ICRP Publication 89, (3) reference elemental compositions provided in ICRP 89 as well as ICRU Report 46, and (4) reference data on the alimentary tract organs given in ICRP Publications 89 and 100. Various adjustments and refinements to the organ systems of the previously described newborn, 15 year and adult phantoms are also presented. The UF series of hybrid phantoms retain the non-uniform scalability of stylized phantoms while maintaining the anatomical realism of patient-specific voxel phantoms with respect to organ shape, depth and inter-organ distance. While the final versions of these phantoms are in a voxelized format for radiation transport simulation, their primary format is given as NURBS and polygon mesh surfaces, thus permitting one to sculpt non-reference phantoms using the reference phantoms as an anatomic template.

  18. Mouse models of intracranial aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yutang; Emeto, Theophilus I; Lee, James; Marshman, Laurence; Moran, Corey; Seto, Sai-wang; Golledge, Jonathan

    2015-05-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to rupture of an intracranial aneurysm is a highly lethal medical condition. Current management strategies for unruptured intracranial aneurysms involve radiological surveillance and neurosurgical or endovascular interventions. There is no pharmacological treatment available to decrease the risk of aneurysm rupture and subsequent subarachnoid hemorrhage. There is growing interest in the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysm focused on the development of drug therapies to decrease the incidence of aneurysm rupture. The study of rodent models of intracranial aneurysms has the potential to improve our understanding of intracranial aneurysm development and progression. This review summarizes current mouse models of intact and ruptured intracranial aneurysms and discusses the relevance of these models to human intracranial aneurysms. The article also reviews the importance of these models in investigating the molecular mechanisms involved in the disease. Finally, potential pharmaceutical targets for intracranial aneurysm suggested by previous studies are discussed. Examples of potential drug targets include matrix metalloproteinases, stromal cell-derived factor-1, tumor necrosis factor-α, the renin-angiotensin system and the β-estrogen receptor. An agreed clear, precise and reproducible definition of what constitutes an aneurysm in the models would assist in their use to better understand the pathology of intracranial aneurysm and applying findings to patients.

  19. Improved radiographic outcomes with patient-specific total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ivie, Conrad B; Probst, Patrick J; Bal, Amrit K; Stannard, James T; Crist, Brett D; Sonny Bal, B

    2014-11-01

    Patient-specific guides can improve limb alignment and implant positioning in total knee arthroplasty, although not all studies have supported this benefit. We compared the radiographs of 100 consecutively-performed patient-specific total knees to a similar group that was implanted with conventional instruments instead. The patient-specific group showed more accurate reproduction of the theoretically ideal mechanical axis, with fewer outliers, but implant positioning was comparable between groups. Our odds ratio comparison showed that the patient-specific group was 1.8 times more likely to be within the desired +3° from the neutral mechanical axis when compared to the standard control group. Our data suggest that reliable reproduction of the limb mechanical axis may accrue from patient-specific guides in total knee arthroplasty when compared to standard, intramedullary instrumentation.

  20. Image-based modeling of hemodynamics in coronary artery aneurysms caused by Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Dibyendu; Kahn, Andrew M; Burns, Jane C; Sankaran, Sethuraman; Shadden, Shawn C; Marsden, Alison L

    2012-07-01

    Kawasaki Disease (KD) is the leading cause of acquired pediatric heart disease. A subset of KD patients develops aneurysms in the coronary arteries, leading to increased risk of thrombosis and myocardial infarction. Currently, there are limited clinical data to guide the management of these patients, and the hemodynamic effects of these aneurysms are unknown. We applied patient-specific modeling to systematically quantify hemodynamics and wall shear stress in coronary arteries with aneurysms caused by KD. We modeled the hemodynamics in the aneurysms using anatomic data obtained by multi-detector computed tomography (CT) in a 10-year-old male subject who suffered KD at age 3 years. The altered hemodynamics were compared to that of a reconstructed normal coronary anatomy using our subject as the model. Computer simulations using a robust finite element framework were used to quantify time-varying shear stresses and particle trajectories in the coronary arteries. We accounted for the cardiac contractility and the microcirculation using physiologic downstream boundary conditions. The presence of aneurysms in the proximal coronary artery leads to flow recirculation, reduced wall shear stress within the aneurysm, and high wall shear stress gradients at the neck of the aneurysm. The wall shear stress in the KD subject (2.95-3.81 dynes/sq cm) was an order of magnitude lower than the normal control model (17.10-27.15 dynes/sq cm). Particle residence times were significantly higher, taking 5 cardiac cycles to fully clear from the aneurysmal regions in the KD subject compared to only 1.3 cardiac cycles from the corresponding regions of the normal model. In this novel quantitative study of hemodynamics in coronary aneurysms caused by KD, we documented markedly abnormal flow patterns that are associated with increased risk of thrombosis. This methodology has the potential to provide further insights into the effects of aneurysms in KD and to help risk stratify patients for

  1. Regular phantom black holes.

    PubMed

    Bronnikov, K A; Fabris, J C

    2006-06-30

    We study self-gravitating, static, spherically symmetric phantom scalar fields with arbitrary potentials (favored by cosmological observations) and single out 16 classes of possible regular configurations with flat, de Sitter, and anti-de Sitter asymptotics. Among them are traversable wormholes, bouncing Kantowski-Sachs (KS) cosmologies, and asymptotically flat black holes (BHs). A regular BH has a Schwarzschild-like causal structure, but the singularity is replaced by a de Sitter infinity, giving a hypothetic BH explorer a chance to survive. It also looks possible that our Universe has originated in a phantom-dominated collapse in another universe, with KS expansion and isotropization after crossing the horizon. Explicit examples of regular solutions are built and discussed. Possible generalizations include k-essence type scalar fields (with a potential) and scalar-tensor gravity.

  2. Tissue-like phantoms

    DOEpatents

    Frangioni, John V.; De Grand, Alec M.

    2007-10-30

    The invention is based, in part, on the discovery that by combining certain components one can generate a tissue-like phantom that mimics any desired tissue, is simple and inexpensive to prepare, and is stable over many weeks or months. In addition, new multi-modal imaging objects (e.g., beads) can be inserted into the phantoms to mimic tissue pathologies, such as cancer, or merely to serve as calibration standards. These objects can be imaged using one, two, or more (e.g., four) different imaging modalities (e.g., x-ray computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence) simultaneously.

  3. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Siebenmann, R; Schneider, K; von Segesser, L; Turina, M

    1988-06-11

    348 cases of abdominal aortic aneurysm were reviewed for typical features of inflammatory aneurysm (IAAA) (marked thickening of aneurysm wall, retroperitoneal fibrosis and rigid adherence of adjacent structures). IAAA was present in 15 cases (14 male, 1 female). When compared with patients who had ordinary aneurysms, significantly more patients complained of back or abdominal pain (p less than 0.01). Erythrocyte sedimentation rate was highly elevated. Diagnosis was established in 7 of 10 computed tomographies. 2 patients underwent emergency repair for ruptured aneurysm. Unilateral ureteral obstruction was present in 4 cases and bilateral in 1. Repair of IAAA was performed by a modified technique. Histological examination revealed thickening of the aortic wall, mainly of the adventitial layer, infiltrated by plasma cells and lymphocytes. One 71-year-old patient operated on for rupture of IAAA died early, and another 78-year-old patient after 5 1/2 months. Control computed tomographies revealed spontaneous regression of inflammatory infiltration after repair. Equally, hydronephrosis due to ureteral obstruction could be shown to disappear or at least to decrease. IAAA can be diagnosed by computed tomography with high sensitivity. Repair involves low risk, but modification of technique is necessary. The etiology of IAAA remains unclear.

  4. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Ziaja, K; Sedlak, L; Urbanek, T; Kostyra, J; Ludyga, T

    2000-01-01

    The reported incidence of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is from 2% to 14% of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and the etiology of this disease is still discussed--according to the literature several pathogenic theories have been proposed. From 1992 to 1997 32 patients with IAAA were operated on. The patients were mostly symptomatic--abdominal pain was present in 68.75% cases, back pain in 31.25%, fever in 12.5% and weight loss in 6.25% of the operated patients. In all the patients ultrasound examination was performed, in 4 patients CT and in 3 cases urography. All the patients were operated on and characteristic signs of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm like: thickened aortic wall, perianeurysmal infiltration or retroperitoneal fibrosis with involvement of retroperitoneal structures were found. In all cases surgery was performed using transperitoneal approach; in three cases intraoperatively contiguous abdominal organs were injured, which was connected with their involvement into periaortic inflammation. In 4 cases clamping of the aorta was done at the level of the diaphragmatic hiatus. 3 patients (9.37%) died (one patient with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm). Authors present diagnostic procedures and the differences in the surgical tactic, emphasizing the necessity of the surgical therapy in patients with inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  5. Correlation between Hemodynamics and Treatment Outcome of Intracranial Aneurysms after Intervention with Flow Diverters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliwal, Nikhil; Damiano, Robert; Davies, Jason; Siddiqui, Adnan; Meng, Hui

    2015-11-01

    Endovascular intervention by Flow Diverter (FD) - a densely woven stent - occludes an aneurysm by inducing thrombosis in the aneurysm sac and reconstructing the vessel. Hemodynamics plays a vital role in the thrombotic occlusion of aneurysms and eventual treatment outcome. CFD analysis of pre- and post-treatment aneurysms not only provides insight of flow modifications by FD, but also allows investigation of interventional strategies and prediction of their outcome. In this study 80 patient-specific aneurysms treated with FDs were retrospectively studied to evaluate the effect of intervention. Out of these cases, 16 required retreatment and thus are considered as having unfavorable outcome. Clinical FD deployment in these cases was simulated using an efficient virtual stenting workflow. CFD analysis was carried out on both pre- and post-treatment cases, and changes in hemodynamic parameters were calculated. Support vector machine algorithm was used to correlate the hemodynamic changes with outcome. Results show that cases having higher flow reduction into the aneurysmal sac have a better likelihood of occlusion. This suggests that changes in hemodynamics can be potentially used to predict the outcome of different clinical intervention strategies in aneurysms. This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health (R01 NS091075).

  6. Computational fluid dynamics evaluation of flow reversal treatment of giant basilar tip aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Alnæs, Martin Sandve; Mardal, Kent-Andre; Bakke, Søren; Sorteberg, Angelika

    2015-10-01

    Therapeutic parent artery flow reversal is a treatment option for giant, partially thrombosed basilar tip aneurysms. The effectiveness of this treatment has been variable and not yet studied by applying computational fluid dynamics. Computed tomography images and blood flow velocities acquired with transcranial Doppler ultrasonography were obtained prior to and after bilateral endovascular vertebral artery occlusion for a giant basilar tip aneurysm. Patient-specific geometries and velocity waveforms were used in computational fluid dynamics simulations in order to determine the velocity and wall shear stress changes induced by treatment. Therapeutic parent artery flow reversal lead to a dramatic increase in aneurysm inflow and wall shear stress (30 to 170 Pa) resulting in an increase in intra-aneurysmal circulation. The enlargement of the circulated area within the aneurysm led to a re-normalization of the wall shear stress and the aneurysm remained stable for more than 8 years thereafter. Therapeutic parent artery flow reversal can lead to unintended, potentially harmful changes in aneurysm inflow which can be quantified and possibly predicted by applying computational fluid dynamics.

  7. The Phantom SPH code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Daniel; Wurster, James; Nixon, Chris

    2016-05-01

    I will present the capabilities of the Phantom SPH code for global simulations of dust and gas in protoplanetary discs. I will present our new algorithms for simulating both small and large grains in discs, as well as our progress towards simulating evolving grain populations and coupling with radiation. Finally, I will discuss our recent applications to HL Tau and the physics of dust gap opening.

  8. A fully-coupled fluid-structure interaction simulation of cerebral aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazilevs, Y.; Hsu, M.-C.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, W.; Liang, X.; Kvamsdal, T.; Brekken, R.; Isaksen, J. G.

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents a computational vascular fluid-structure interaction (FSI) methodology and its application to patient-specific aneurysm models of the middle cerebral artery bifurcation. A fully coupled fluid-structural simulation approach is reviewed, and main aspects of mesh generation in support of patient-specific vascular FSI analyses are presented. Quantities of hemodynamic interest such as wall shear stress and wall tension are studied to examine the relevance of FSI modeling as compared to the rigid arterial wall assumption. We demonstrate the importance of including the flexible wall modeling in vascular blood flow simulations by performing a comparison study that involves four patient-specific models of cerebral aneurysms varying in shape and size.

  9. Crossing the phantom divide

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, Martin; Sapone, Domenico

    2006-12-15

    We consider fluid perturbations close to the 'phantom divide' characterized by p=-{rho} and discuss the conditions under which divergencies in the perturbations can be avoided. We find that the behavior of the perturbations depends crucially on the prescription for the pressure perturbation {delta}p. The pressure perturbation is usually defined using the dark energy rest-frame, but we show that this frame becomes unphysical at the divide. If the pressure perturbation is kept finite in any other frame, then the phantom divide can be crossed. Our findings are important for generalized fluid dark energy used in data analysis (since current cosmological data sets indicate that the dark energy is characterized by p{approx_equal}-{rho} so that p<-{rho} cannot be excluded) as well as for any models crossing the phantom divide, like some modified gravity, coupled dark energy, and braneworld models. We also illustrate the results by an explicit calculation for the 'Quintom' case with two scalar fields.

  10. The UF family of reference hybrid phantoms for computational radiation dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Choonsik; Lodwick, Daniel; Hurtado, Jorge; Pafundi, Deanna; Williams, Jonathan L.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2010-01-01

    organ masses from ICRP Publication 89, (3) reference elemental compositions provided in ICRP 89 as well as ICRU Report 46, and (4) reference data on the alimentary tract organs given in ICRP Publications 89 and 100. Various adjustments and refinements to the organ systems of the previously described newborn, 15 year and adult phantoms are also presented. The UF series of hybrid phantoms retain the non-uniform scalability of stylized phantoms while maintaining the anatomical realism of patient-specific voxel phantoms with respect to organ shape, depth and inter-organ distance. While the final versions of these phantoms are in a voxelized format for radiation transport simulation, their primary format is given as NURBS and polygon mesh surfaces, thus permitting one to sculpt non-reference phantoms using the reference phantoms as an anatomic template.

  11. Development of a patient-specific dosimetry estimation system in nuclear medicine examination

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, H. H.; Dong, S. L.; Yang, H. J.; Chen, S.; Shih, C. T.; Chuang, K. S.; Lin, C. H.; Yao, W. J.; Jan, M. L.

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a patient-specific dosimetry estimation system in nuclear medicine examination using a SimSET-based Monte Carlo code. We added a dose deposition routine to store the deposited energy of the photons during their flights in SimSET and developed a user-friendly interface for reading PET and CT images. Dose calculated on ORNL phantom was used to validate the accuracy of this system. The S values for {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 18}F and {sup 131}I obtained by the system were compared to those from the MCNP4C code and OLINDA. The ratios of S values computed by this system to those obtained with OLINDA for various organs were ranged from 0.93 to 1.18, which are comparable to that obtained from MCNP4C code (0.94 to 1.20). The average ratios of S value were 0.99{+-}0.04, 1.03{+-}0.05, and 1.00{+-}0.07 for isotopes {sup 131}I, {sup 18}F, and {sup 99m}Tc, respectively. The simulation time of SimSET was two times faster than MCNP4C's for various isotopes. A 3D dose calculation was also performed on a patient data set with PET/CT examination using this system. Results from the patient data showed that the estimated S values using this system differed slightly from those of OLINDA for ORNL phantom. In conclusion, this system can generate patient-specific dose distribution and display the isodose curves on top of the anatomic structure through a friendly graphic user interface. It may also provide a useful tool to establish an appropriate dose-reduction strategy to patients in nuclear medicine environments. (authors)

  12. Numerical simulation of aneurysm hemodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacVicar, Stephen; Huynh, Sophia; Rossmann, Jenn

    2003-11-01

    Rupture of intracranial aneurysms is the leading cause of spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage, with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Numerical simulations of flow in a variety of two-dimensional and three-dimensional saccular aneurysm geometries were performed to evaluate possible sites and mechanisms for aneurysm growth and rupture. The governing equations were solved in their finite volume formulation for both steady and pulsatile flows. Recirculation zones and secondary flows were observed in aneurysms and arteries. Regions of elevated and oscillating shear stress were observed, often at the aneurysm's distal shoulder. The influence of several geometric factors, including vessel curvature, branching angle, and aneurysm shape, on flow patterns and fluid mechanical forces was studied, with the goal of assessing the risks posed by given aneurysm geometry.

  13. High resolution, MRI-based, segmented, computerized head phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Zubal, I.G.; Harrell, C.R.; Smith, E.O.; Smith, A.L.; Krischlunas, P.

    1999-01-01

    The authors have created a high-resolution software phantom of the human brain which is applicable to voxel-based radiation transport calculations yielding nuclear medicine simulated images and/or internal dose estimates. A software head phantom was created from 124 transverse MRI images of a healthy normal individual. The transverse T2 slices, recorded in a 256x256 matrix from a GE Signa 2 scanner, have isotropic voxel dimensions of 1.5 mm and were manually segmented by the clinical staff. Each voxel of the phantom contains one of 62 index numbers designating anatomical, neurological, and taxonomical structures. The result is stored as a 256x256x128 byte array. Internal volumes compare favorably to those described in the ICRP Reference Man. The computerized array represents a high resolution model of a typical human brain and serves as a voxel-based anthropomorphic head phantom suitable for computer-based modeling and simulation calculations. It offers an improved realism over previous mathematically described software brain phantoms, and creates a reference standard for comparing results of newly emerging voxel-based computations. Such voxel-based computations lead the way to developing diagnostic and dosimetry calculations which can utilize patient-specific diagnostic images. However, such individualized approaches lack fast, automatic segmentation schemes for routine use; therefore, the high resolution, typical head geometry gives the most realistic patient model currently available.

  14. Juxtaphyseal aneurysmal bone cysts.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, M; Dellaero, D T; Harrelson, J M; Scully, S P

    1999-07-01

    Aneurysmal bone cysts are benign primary or secondary lesions that commonly arise in long bones and often before skeletal maturity. Little has been written about aneurysmal bone cysts that abut the physeal plate. The records of 15 patients with juxtaphyseal aneurysmal bone cysts were reviewed. Fourteen of the patients were referred with abnormal radiographs after evaluation for pain in the affected limb. One patient presented with abnormal radiographs after fracture about the aneurysmal bone cyst. None of the patients had evidence of growth plate disruption. The children's ages ranged from 2 to 14 years, with a mean of 9.8 years. There were 10 boys and five girls. Lesion locations included: six in the proximal tibia, three in the distal fibula, two in the distal tibia, two in the proximal femur, one in the distal femur, and one in the distal radius. All of the lesions abutted the physeal plate and fell into one of the types in Campanacci's classification of juxtaphyseal aneurysmal bone cysts. Three lesions were classified as Type 1, eight were Type 2, and four were Type 3. This study included no cases of Type 4 or 5 lesions. Treatment of all lesions consisted of excision, curettage, and bone grafting with care taken to preserve the growth plate. Adjunctive cauterization was performed in two cases. There were no incidences of postoperative physeal plate arrest. Overgrowth of the fibula occurred in one patient. Three patients experienced recurrent lesions. One of the children underwent repeat curettage and bone grafting with no additional recurrence. In the other two children with recurrence, the lesion had grown away from the physeal plate while remaining static in size and asymptomatic. Based on this study, juxtaphyseal aneurysmal bone cysts may be treated satisfactorily with intralesional surgery and bone grafting with expectation of normal physeal growth.

  15. Pediatric intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, L N; Singh, S N

    2009-01-01

    The incidence of subarachnoid haemorrhage from intracranial aneurysms in the paediatric age group is extremely rare. Interestingly, occurrence of vasospasm has been reported to be less in comparison to the adults. Both coiling and clipping have been advocated in selected cases. Because of the thinness of the wall of the arteries, utmost care should be taken while handling these arteries during surgery. The overall results of surgery in children have been reported to be better than their adult counterparts. We present four such cases from our own experience. All these children were operated upon, where the solitary aneurysm in each case was clipped and all of them made a good recovery.

  16. Unsteady velocity measurements in a realistic intracranial aneurysm model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugron, Ádám; Farinas, Marie-Isabelle; Kiss, László; Paál, György

    2012-01-01

    The initiation, growth and rupture of intracranial aneurysms are intensively studied by computational fluid dynamics. To gain confidence in the results of numerical simulations, validation of the results is necessary. To this end the unsteady flow was measured in a silicone phantom of a realistic intracranial aneurysm. A flow circuit was built with a novel unsteady flow rate generating method, used to model the idealised shape of the heartbeat. This allowed the measurement of the complex three-dimensional velocity distribution by means of laser-optical methods such as laser doppler anemometry (LDA) and particle image velocimetry (PIV). The PIV measurements, available with high temporal and spatial distribution, were found to have good agreement with the control LDA measurements. Furthermore, excellent agreement was found with the numerical results.

  17. Improving in vivo calibration phantoms

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, T.P.; Olsen, P.C.

    1991-10-01

    Anthropomorphic phantoms have been the basis for quantification of radioactive material in the body using in vivo measurements. The types of phantoms used and the degree of anthropomorphic detail vary depending on the counting application, the radioactive material to be measured, phantom availability and cost. Consequently, measurement results for the same types of radioactive material from different facilities are not always comparable. At a February 1990 meeting at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) the need to develop the gold standards'' or primary reference standards for in vivo phantoms was discussed in detail. The consensus of the attendees at the meeting was that the state of the art in phantoms was adequate as a starting point and that there was no need to start phantom development from scratch. In particular, the torso phantom developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and its commercial progeny, the bottle manikin absorption (BOMAB) phantom and the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Standard N44.3 thyroid phantom, were identified as the starting points for the development of the primary reference standards. Working groups at the meeting subsequently recommended design improvements for the existing phantom designs. The implementation of these recommendations is the subject of this paper.

  18. Patient-specific finite element modeling of bones.

    PubMed

    Poelert, Sander; Valstar, Edward; Weinans, Harrie; Zadpoor, Amir A

    2013-04-01

    Finite element modeling is an engineering tool for structural analysis that has been used for many years to assess the relationship between load transfer and bone morphology and to optimize the design and fixation of orthopedic implants. Due to recent developments in finite element model generation, for example, improved computed tomography imaging quality, improved segmentation algorithms, and faster computers, the accuracy of finite element modeling has increased vastly and finite element models simulating the anatomy and properties of an individual patient can be constructed. Such so-called patient-specific finite element models are potentially valuable tools for orthopedic surgeons in fracture risk assessment or pre- and intraoperative planning of implant placement. The aim of this article is to provide a critical overview of current themes in patient-specific finite element modeling of bones. In addition, the state-of-the-art in patient-specific modeling of bones is compared with the requirements for a clinically applicable patient-specific finite element method, and judgment is passed on the feasibility of application of patient-specific finite element modeling as a part of clinical orthopedic routine. It is concluded that further development in certain aspects of patient-specific finite element modeling are needed before finite element modeling can be used as a routine clinical tool.

  19. On the prediction of monocyte deposition in abdominal aortic aneurysms using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hardman, David; Doyle, Barry J; Semple, Scott I K; Richards, Jennifer M J; Newby, David E; Easson, William J; Hoskins, Peter R

    2013-10-01

    In abdominal aortic aneurysm disease, the aortic wall is exposed to intense biological activity involving inflammation and matrix metalloproteinase-mediated degradation of the extracellular matrix. These processes are orchestrated by monocytes and rather than affecting the aorta uniformly, damage and weaken focal areas of the wall leaving it vulnerable to rupture. This study attempts to model numerically the deposition of monocytes using large eddy simulation, discrete phase modelling and near-wall particle residence time. The model was first applied to idealised aneurysms and then to three patient-specific lumen geometries using three-component inlet velocities derived from phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging. The use of a novel, variable wall shear stress-limiter based on previous experimental data significantly improved the results. Simulations identified a critical diameter (1.8 times the inlet diameter) beyond which significant monocyte deposition is expected to occur. Monocyte adhesion occurred proximally in smaller abdominal aortic aneurysms and distally as the sac expands. The near-wall particle residence time observed in each of the patient-specific models was markedly different. Discrete hotspots of monocyte residence time were detected, suggesting that the monocyte infiltration responsible for the breakdown of the abdominal aortic aneurysm wall occurs heterogeneously. Peak monocyte residence time was found to increase with aneurysm sac size. Further work addressing certain limitations is needed in a larger cohort to determine clinical significance.

  20. 3D visualization of strain in abdominal aortic aneurysms based on navigated ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brekken, Reidar; Kaspersen, Jon Harald; Tangen, Geir Arne; Dahl, Torbjørn; Hernes, Toril A. N.; Myhre, Hans Olav

    2007-03-01

    The criterion for recommending treatment of an abdominal aortic aneurysm is that the diameter exceeds 50-55 mm or shows a rapid increase. Our hypothesis is that a more accurate prediction of aneurysm rupture is obtained by estimating arterial wall strain from patient specific measurements. Measuring strain in specific parts of the aneurysm reveals differences in load or tissue properties. We have previously presented a method for in vivo estimation of circumferential strain by ultrasound. In the present work, a position sensor attached to the ultrasound probe was used for combining several 2D ultrasound sectors into a 3D model. The ultrasound was registered to a computed-tomography scan (CT), and the strain values were mapped onto a model segmented from these CT data. This gave an intuitive coupling between anatomy and strain, which may benefit both data acquisition and the interpretation of strain. In addition to potentially provide information relevant for assessing the rupture risk of the aneurysm in itself, this model could be used for validating simulations of fluid-structure interactions. Further, the measurements could be integrated with the simulations in order to increase the amount of patient specific information, thus producing a more reliable and accurate model of the biomechanics of the individual aneurysm. This approach makes it possible to extract several parameters potentially relevant for predicting rupture risk, and may therefore extend the basis for clinical decision making.

  1. The phantom illusion.

    PubMed

    Galmonte, Alessandra; Soranzo, Alessandro; Rudd, Michael E; Agostini, Tiziano

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that visible luminance gradients may generate contrast effects. In this work we present a new paradoxical illusion in which the luminance range of gradual transitions has been reduced to make them invisible. By adopting the phenomenological method proposed by Kanizsa, we have found that unnoticeable luminance gradients still generate contrast effects. But, most interestingly, we have found that when their width is narrowed, rather than generating contrast effects on the surrounded surfaces, they generate an assimilation effect. Both high- and low-level interpretations of this "phantom" illusion are critically evaluated.

  2. Pancreaticoduodenal arterial aneurysms.

    PubMed Central

    Verta, M J; Dean, R H; Yao, J S; Conn, J; Mehn, W H; Bergan, J J

    1977-01-01

    Experience with four aneurysms of the pancreaticoduodenal artery is reviewed and compared to the reported experience of 19 other cases. In view of the common presentation of such lesions as intra-abdominal hemorrhage preceded by non-specific abdominal pain and other digestive symptoms, it is suggested that angiography perfomed preoperatively or intraoperatively allows definitive diagnosis and leads to specific therapy. PMID:406863

  3. Qualitative comparison of intra-aneurysmal flow structures determined from conventional and virtual angiograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebral, Juan R.; Radaelli, Alessandro; Frangi, Alejandro; Putman, Christopher M.

    2007-03-01

    In this study we qualitatively compare the flow structures observed in cerebral aneurysms using conventional angiography and virtual angiograms produced from patient-specific computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models. For this purpose, high frame rate biplane angiograms were obtained during a rapid injection of contrast agent in three patients with intracranial aneurysms. Patient-specific CFD models were then constructed from 3D rotational angiography images of each aneurysm. Time dependent flow fields were obtained from the numerical solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations under pulsatile flow conditions derived from phase-contrast magnetic resonance measurements performed on normal subjects. These flow fields were subsequently used to simulate the transport of a contrast agent by solving the advection-diffusion equation. Both the fluid and transport equations were solved with an implicit finite element formulation on unstructured grids. Virtual angiograms were then constructed by volume rendering of the simulated dye concentration field. The flow structures observed in the conventional and virtual angiograms were then qualitatively compared. It was found that the finite element models showed distinct flow types for each aneurysm, ranging from simple to complex. The virtual angiograms showed good agreement with the images from the conventional angiograms for all three aneurysms. Analogous size and orientation of the inflow jet, regions of flow impaction, major intraaneurysmal vortices and regions of outflow were observed in both the conventional and virtual angiograms. In conclusion, patient-specific image-based computational models of intracranial aneurysms can realistically reproduce the major intraaneurysmal flow structures observed with conventional angiography.

  4. Development, validation, and implementation of a patient-specific Monte Carlo 3D internal dosimetry platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besemer, Abigail E.

    Targeted radionuclide therapy is emerging as an attractive treatment option for a broad spectrum of tumor types because it has the potential to simultaneously eradicate both the primary tumor site as well as the metastatic disease throughout the body. Patient-specific absorbed dose calculations for radionuclide therapies are important for reducing the risk of normal tissue complications and optimizing tumor response. However, the only FDA approved software for internal dosimetry calculates doses based on the MIRD methodology which estimates mean organ doses using activity-to-dose scaling factors tabulated from standard phantom geometries. Despite the improved dosimetric accuracy afforded by direct Monte Carlo dosimetry methods these methods are not widely used in routine clinical practice because of the complexity of implementation, lack of relevant standard protocols, and longer dose calculation times. The main goal of this work was to develop a Monte Carlo internal dosimetry platform in order to (1) calculate patient-specific voxelized dose distributions in a clinically feasible time frame, (2) examine and quantify the dosimetric impact of various parameters and methodologies used in 3D internal dosimetry methods, and (3) develop a multi-criteria treatment planning optimization framework for multi-radiopharmaceutical combination therapies. This platform utilizes serial PET/CT or SPECT/CT images to calculate voxelized 3D internal dose distributions with the Monte Carlo code Geant4. Dosimetry can be computed for any diagnostic or therapeutic radiopharmaceutical and for both pre-clinical and clinical applications. In this work, the platform's dosimetry calculations were successfully validated against previously published reference doses values calculated in standard phantoms for a variety of radionuclides, over a wide range of photon and electron energies, and for many different organs and tumor sizes. Retrospective dosimetry was also calculated for various pre

  5. Custom Fenestration Templates for Endovascular Repair of Juxtarenal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Leotta, Daniel F.; Starnes, Benjamin W.

    2015-01-01

    Physician-modified endovascular grafts, with fenestrations added to accommodate major branch vessels, provide a means for endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms that are adjacent to the renal arteries. Manual measurements of vessel origin locations from CT images, however, take time and can lead to errors in the positions of the fenestrations. To make the fenestration process faster and more accurate, we have developed a procedure to create custom templates that serve as patient-specific guides for graft fenestration. We use a 3D printer to create a clear rigid sleeve that replicates the patient’s aorta and includes holes placed precisely at the locations of the branch vessels. The sleeve is slipped over the graft, the locations of the openings are marked with a pen, and the fenestrations are created after removing the sleeve. Custom fenestration templates can potentially save procedural costs and make minimally-invasive aortic aneurysm repair available to more patients. PMID:25864045

  6. Custom fenestration templates for endovascular repair of juxtarenal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Leotta, Daniel F; Starnes, Benjamin W

    2015-06-01

    Physician-modified endovascular grafts, with fenestrations added to accommodate major branch vessels, provide a means for endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms that are adjacent to the renal arteries. Manual measurements of vessel origin locations from computed tomography images, however, take time and can lead to errors in the positions of the fenestrations. To make the fenestration process faster and more accurate, we have developed a procedure to create custom templates that serve as patient-specific guides for graft fenestration. We use a three-dimensional printer to create a clear rigid sleeve that replicates the patient's aorta and includes holes placed precisely at the locations of the branch vessels. The sleeve is slipped over the graft, the locations of the openings are marked with a pen, and the fenestrations are created after the sleeve is removed. Custom fenestration templates can potentially save procedural costs and make minimally invasive aortic aneurysm repair available to more patients.

  7. Mechanics, Mechanobiology, and Modeling of Human Abdominal Aorta and Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, J.D.; Holzapfel, G.A.

    2011-01-01

    Biomechanical factors play fundamental roles in the natural history of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) and their responses to treatment. Advances during the past two decades have increased our understanding of the mechanics and biology of the human abdominal aorta and AAAs, yet there remains a pressing need for considerable new data and resulting patient-specific computational models that can better describe the current status of a lesion and better predict the evolution of lesion geometry, composition, and material properties and thereby improve interventional planning. In this paper, we briefly review data on the structure and function of the human abdominal aorta and aneurysmal wall, past models of the mechanics, and recent growth and remodeling models. We conclude by identifying open problems that we hope will motivate studies to improve our computational modeling and thus general understanding of AAAs. PMID:22189249

  8. Multi-Modality Phantom Development

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, Jennifer S.; Peng, Qiyu; Moses, William W.

    2009-03-20

    Multi-modality imaging has an increasing role in the diagnosis and treatment of a large number of diseases, particularly if both functional and anatomical information are acquired and accurately co-registered. Hence, there is a resulting need for multi modality phantoms in order to validate image co-registration and calibrate the imaging systems. We present our PET-ultrasound phantom development, including PET and ultrasound images of a simple prostate phantom. We use agar and gelatin mixed with a radioactive solution. We also present our development of custom multi-modality phantoms that are compatible with PET, transrectal ultrasound (TRUS), MRI and CT imaging. We describe both our selection of tissue mimicking materials and phantom construction procedures. These custom PET-TRUS-CT-MRI prostate phantoms use agargelatin radioactive mixtures with additional contrast agents and preservatives. We show multi-modality images of these custom prostate phantoms, as well as discuss phantom construction alternatives. Although we are currently focused on prostate imaging, this phantom development is applicable to many multi-modality imaging applications.

  9. Analysis of saccular aneurysms in the Barrow Ruptured Aneurysm Trial.

    PubMed

    Spetzler, Robert F; Zabramski, Joseph M; McDougall, Cameron G; Albuquerque, Felipe C; Hills, Nancy K; Wallace, Robert C; Nakaji, Peter

    2017-02-24

    OBJECTIVE The Barrow Ruptured Aneurysm Trial (BRAT) is a prospective, randomized trial in which treatment with clipping was compared to treatment with coil embolization. Patients were randomized to treatment on presentation with any nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Because all other randomized trials comparing these 2 types of treatments have been limited to saccular aneurysms, the authors analyzed the current BRAT data for this subgroup of lesions. METHODS The primary BRAT analysis included all sources of SAH: nonaneurysmal lesions; saccular, blister, fusiform, and dissecting aneurysms; and SAHs from an aneurysm associated with either an arteriovenous malformation or a fistula. In this post hoc review, the outcomes for the subgroup of patients with saccular aneurysms were further analyzed by type of treatment. The extent of aneurysm obliteration was adjudicated by an independent neuroradiologist not involved in treatment. RESULTS Of the 471 patients enrolled in the BRAT, 362 (77%) had an SAH from a saccular aneurysm. Patients with saccular aneurysms were assigned equally to the clipping and the coiling cohorts (181 each). In each cohort, 3 patients died before treatment and 178 were treated. Of the 178 clip-assigned patients with saccular aneurysms, 1 (1%) was crossed over to coiling, and 64 (36%) of the 178 coil-assigned patients were crossed over to clipping. There was no statistically significant difference in poor outcome (modified Rankin Scale score > 2) between these 2 treatment arms at any recorded time point during 6 years of follow-up. After the initial hospitalization, 1 of 241 (0.4%) clipped saccular aneurysms and 21 of 115 (18%) coiled saccular aneurysms required retreatment (p < 0.001). At the 6-year follow-up, 95% (95/100) of the clipped aneurysms were completely obliterated, compared with 40% (16/40) of the coiled aneurysms (p < 0.001). There was no difference in morbidity between the 2 treatment groups (p = 0.10). CONCLUSIONS In the

  10. Combined Visualization of Vessel Deformation and Hemodynamics in Cerebral Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Meuschke, Monique; Voss, Samuel; Beuing, Oliver; Preim, Bernhard; Lawonn, Kai

    2017-01-01

    We present the first visualization tool that combines patient-specific hemodynamics with information about the vessel wall deformation and wall thickness in cerebral aneurysms. Such aneurysms bear the risk of rupture, whereas their treatment also carries considerable risks for the patient. For the patient-specific rupture risk evaluation and treatment analysis, both morphological and hemodynamic data have to be investigated. Medical researchers emphasize the importance of analyzing correlations between wall properties such as the wall deformation and thickness, and hemodynamic attributes like the Wall Shear Stress and near-wall flow. Our method uses a linked 2.5D and 3D depiction of the aneurysm together with blood flow information that enables the simultaneous exploration of wall characteristics and hemodynamic attributes during the cardiac cycle. We thus offer medical researchers an effective visual exploration tool for aneurysm treatment risk assessment. The 2.5D view serves as an overview that comprises a projection of the vessel surface to a 2D map, providing an occlusion-free surface visualization combined with a glyph-based depiction of the local wall thickness. The 3D view represents the focus upon which the data exploration takes place. To support the time-dependent parameter exploration and expert collaboration, a camera path is calculated automatically, where the user can place landmarks for further exploration of the properties. We developed a GPU-based implementation of our visualizations with a flexible interactive data exploration mechanism. We designed our techniques in collaboration with domain experts, and provide details about the evaluation.

  11. SU-E-T-13: A Feasibility Study of the Use of Hybrid Computational Phantoms for Improved Historical Dose Reconstruction in the Study of Late Radiation Effects for Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Petroccia, H; O'Reilly, S; Bolch, W; Mendenhall, N; Li, Z; Slopsema, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced cancer effects are well-documented following radiotherapy. Further investigation is needed to more accurately determine a dose-response relationship for late radiation effects. Recent dosimetry studies tend to use representative patients (Taylor 2009) or anthropomorphic phantoms (Wirth 2008) for estimating organ mean doses. In this study, we compare hybrid computational phantoms to patient-specific voxel phantoms to test the accuracy of University of Florida Hybrid Phantom Library (UFHP Library) for historical dose reconstructions. Methods: A cohort of 10 patients with CT images was used to reproduce the data that was collected historically for Hodgkin's lymphoma patients (i.e. caliper measurements and photographs). Four types of phantoms were generated to show a range of refinement from reference hybrid-computational phantom to patient-specific phantoms. Each patient is matched to a reference phantom from the UFHP Library based on height and weight. The reference phantom is refined in the anterior/posterior direction to create a ‘caliper-scaled phantom’. A photograph is simulated using a surface rendering from segmented CT images. Further refinement in the lateral direction is performed using ratios from a simulated-photograph to create a ‘photograph and caliper-scaled phantom’; breast size and position is visually adjusted. Patient-specific hybrid phantoms, with matched organ volumes, are generated and show the capabilities of the UF Hybrid Phantom Library. Reference, caliper-scaled, photograph and caliper-scaled, and patient-specific hybrid phantoms are compared with patient-specific voxel phantoms to determine the accuracy of the study. Results: Progression from reference phantom to patient specific hybrid shows good agreement with the patient specific voxel phantoms. Each stage of refinement shows an overall trend of improvement in dose accuracy within the study, which suggests that computational phantoms can show improved

  12. SU-E-T-159: Evaluation of a Patient Specific QA Tool Based On TG119

    SciTech Connect

    Ashmeg, S; Zhang, Y; O'Daniel, J; Yin, F; Ren, L

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of a 3D patient specific QA tool by analysis of the results produced from associated software in homogenous phantom and heterogonous patient CT. Methods: IMRT and VMAT plans of five test suites introduced by TG119 were created in ECLIPSE on a solid water phantom. The ten plans -of increasing complexity- were delivered to Delta4 to give a 3D measurement. The Delta4's “Anatomy” software uses the measured dose to back-calculate the energy fluence of the delivered beams, which is used for dose calculation in a patient CT using a pencilbeam algorithm. The effect of the modulated beams' complexity on the accuracy of the “Anatomy” calculation was evaluated. Both measured and Anatomy doses were compared to ECLIPSE calculation using 3% - 3mm gamma criteria.We also tested the effect of heterogeneity by analyzing the results of “Anatomy” calculation on a Brain VMAT and a 3D conformal lung cases. Results: In homogenous phantom, the gamma passing rates were found to be as low as 74.75% for a complex plan with high modulation. The mean passing rates were 91.47% ± 6.35% for “Anatomy” calculation and 99.46% ± 0.62% for Delta4 measurements.As for the heterogeneous cases, the rates were 96.54%±3.67% and 83.87%±9.42% for Brain VMAT and 3D lung respectively. This increased error in the lung case could be due to the use of the pencil beam algorithm as opposed to the AAA used by ECLIPSE.Also, gamma analysis showed high discrepancy along the beam edge in the “Anatomy” calculated results. This suggests a poor beam modeling in the penumbra region. Conclusion: The results show various sources of errors in “Anatomy” calculations. These include beam modeling in the penumbra region, complexity of a modulated beam (shown in homogenous phantom and brain cases) and dose calculation algorithms (3D conformal lung case)

  13. Ultrasonic Calibration Wire Test Phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, S K; Fisher, K A; Werve, M; Chambers, D H

    2004-09-24

    We designed and built a phantom consisting of vertical wires maintained under tension to be used as an ultrasonic test, calibration, and reconstruction object for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory annular array scanner. We provide a description of the phantom, present example data sets, preliminary reconstructions, example metadata, and MATLAB codes to read the data.

  14. Computational Study of Intracranial Aneurysms with Flow Diverting Stent: Correlation with Surgical Outcome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yik Sau; Chiu, Tin Lok; Tsang, Anderson Chun On; Leung, Gilberto Ka Kit; Chow, Kwok Wing

    2016-11-01

    Intracranial aneurysm, abnormal swelling of the cerebral artery, can cause massive internal bleeding in the subarachnoid space upon aneurysm rupture, leading to a high mortality rate. Deployment of a flow diverting stent through endovascular technique can obstruct the blood flow into the aneurysm, thus reducing the risk of rupture. Patient-specific models with both bifurcation and sidewall aneurysms have been investigated. Computational fluid dynamics analysis with physiological boundary conditions has been performed. Several hemodynamic parameters including volume flow rate into the aneurysm and the energy (sum of the fluid kinetic and potential energy) loss between the inlet and outlets were analyzed and compared with the surgical outcome. Based on the simulation results, we conjecture that a clinically successful case might imply less blood flow into the aneurysm after stenting, and thus a smaller amount of energy loss in driving the fluid flow in that portion of artery. This study might provide physicians with quantitative information for surgical decision making. (Partial financial support by the Innovation and Technology Support Program (ITS/011/13 & ITS/150/15) of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Government)

  15. Wall shear stress and pressure distribution on aneurysms and infundibulae in the posterior communicating artery bifurcation.

    PubMed

    Baek, Hyoungsu; Jayaraman, Mahesh V; Karniadakis, George Em

    2009-12-01

    A growing number of cases of rupture at an infundibulum, progression of infundibulum to a frank aneurysm, and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in the posterior communicating artery (PCoA) have been reported. Using patient-specific geometric models of the supraclinoid internal carotid artery (ICA) with PCoA infundibulum or aneurysm, high-resolution computational fluid dynamics simulations were performed by solving the Navier-Stokes equations with a spectral/hp element method. Simulation results show that the flow impinges at the distal wall of infundibulum near the outside of the ICA bend and creates a region of higher pressure (4-5 mmHg) surrounded by a band of a high wall shear stress (WSS) (20-30 N/m(2) on average). At the proximal end of the infundibulum, another stagnation area is formed characterized by low WSS (<1 N/m(2)) and high oscillating shear index. This impingement region seems to coincide with the locations of the rupture of infundibulae or progression to aneurysms. In addition, the pulsatile flow becomes unstable due to the presence of aneurysms or aneurysm-like infundibulae, and this leads to WSS temporal fluctuations inside the aneurysm, which may accelerate the degenerative processes in the vessel walls.

  16. Computational Fluid Dynamics Study of Bifurcation Aneurysms Treated with Pipeline Embolization Device: Side Branch Diameter Study.

    PubMed

    Tang, Abraham Yik-Sau; Chung, Wai-Choi; Liu, Eric Tian-Yang; Qu, Jie-Qiong; Tsang, Anderson Chun-On; Leung, Gilberto Ka-Kit; Leung, Kar-Ming; Yu, Alfred Cheuk-Hang; Chow, Kwok-Wing

    An intracranial aneurysm, abnormal swelling of the cerebral artery, may lead to undesirable rates of mortality and morbidity upon rupture. Endovascular treatment involves the deployment of a flow-diverting stent that covers the aneurysm orifice, thereby reducing the blood flow into the aneurysm and mitigating the risk of rupture. In this study, computational fluid dynamics analysis is performed on a bifurcation model to investigate the change in hemodynamics with various side branch diameters. The condition after the deployment of a pipeline embolization device is also simulated. Hemodynamic factors such as flow velocity, pressure, and wall shear stress are studied. Aneurysms with a larger side branch vessel might have greater risk after treatment in terms of hemodynamics. Although a stent could lead to flow reduction entering the aneurysm, it would drastically alter the flow rate inside the side branch vessel. This may result in side-branch hypoperfusion subsequent to stenting. In addition, two patient-specific bifurcation aneurysms are tested, and the results show good agreement with the idealized models. Furthermore, the peripheral resistance of downstream vessels is investigated by varying the outlet pressure conditions. This quantitative analysis can assist in treatment planning and therapeutic decision-making.

  17. Conjoint recognition and phantom recollection.

    PubMed

    Brainerd, C J; Wright, R; Reyna, V F; Mojardin, A H

    2001-03-01

    A new methodology for measuring illusory conscious experience of the "presentation" of unstudied material (phantom recollection) is evaluated that extracts measurements directly from recognition responses, rather than indirectly from introspective reports. Application of this methodology in the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm (Experiments 1 and 2) and in a more conventional paradigm (Experiment 3) showed that 2 processes (phantom recollection and familiarity) contribute to false recognition of semantically related distractors. Phantom recollection was the larger contributor to false recognition of critical distractors in the DRM paradigm, but surprisingly, it was also the larger contributor to false recognition of other types of distractors. Variability in false recognition was tied to variability in phantom recollection. Experimental control of phantom recollection was achieved with manipulations that were motivated by fuzzy-trace theory's hypothesis that the phenomenon is gist-based.

  18. Evaluating and improving patient-specific QA for IMRT delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Guanghua

    2009-12-01

    Modern radiation therapy techniques such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and newly-emerging volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) aim to deliver highly conformal radiation dose to the target volume while sparing nearby critical organs as much as possible with the complex motion of multi-leaf collimator (MLC) leaves. Pre-treatment patient specific quality assurance (QA) has become an essential part of IMRT in making sure the delivered dose distributions agree with the planned ones. This dissertation evaluates the performance of current patient-specific QA process and proposes solutions to improve its sensitivity, accuracy and efficiency. In step and shoot IMRT, the study on the sensitivity of patient-specific QA to minor MLC errors reveals tighter criterion such as 2%/2mm must be employed to detect systematic MLC positioning errors of 2 mm. However, such criterion results in low average passing rate which leads to excessive false alarms, mainly due to inadequate treatment planning system (TPS) beam modeling on beam penumbra. An analytical deconvolution approach is proposed to recover true photon beam profiles to obtain a true beam model which significantly improves agreement between calculated and measured dose distributions. Thus a tighter criterion could be employed to enhance the sensitivity of patient-specific QA to minor errors in the delivery system. Measurement based patient-specific IMRT QA is a time-consuming process. A fast and accurate independent planar dose calculation algorithm is proposed to replace measurement based QA. The algorithm analytically models photons coming out from the accelerator and computes dose distribution from first principles. Accuracy of the algorithm is validated against 2D diode array measurements. The algorithm is found to be fast and accurate enough to replace time consuming measurement based QA. Patient-specific QA for VMAT differs significantly from step and shoot IMRT due to the increased use of dynamic

  19. Computational modeling of flow-altering surgeries in basilar aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Rayz, V L; Abla, A; Boussel, L; Leach, J R; Acevedo-Bolton, G; Saloner, D; Lawton, M T

    2015-05-01

    In cases where surgeons consider different interventional options for flow alterations in the setting of pathological basilar artery hemodynamics, a virtual model demonstrating the flow fields resulting from each of these options can assist in making clinical decisions. In this study, image-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models were used to simulate the flow in four basilar artery aneurysms in order to evaluate postoperative hemodynamics that would result from flow-altering interventions. Patient-specific geometries were constructed using MR angiography and velocimetry data. CFD simulations carried out for the preoperative flow conditions were compared to in vivo phase-contrast MRI measurements (4D Flow MRI) acquired prior to the interventions. The models were then modified according to the procedures considered for each patient. Numerical simulations of the flow and virtual contrast transport were carried out in each case in order to assess postoperative flow fields and estimate the likelihood of intra-aneurysmal thrombus deposition following the procedures. Postoperative imaging data, when available, were used to validate computational predictions. In two cases, where the aneurysms involved vital pontine perforator arteries branching from the basilar artery, idealized geometries of these vessels were incorporated into the CFD models. The effect of interventions on the flow through the perforators was evaluated by simulating the transport of contrast in these vessels. The computational results were in close agreement with the MR imaging data. In some cases, CFD simulations could help determine which of the surgical options was likely to reduce the flow into the aneurysm while preserving the flow through the basilar trunk. The study demonstrated that image-based computational modeling can provide guidance to clinicians by indicating possible outcome complications and indicating expected success potential for ameliorating pathological aneurysmal flow

  20. Post-Treatment Hemodynamics of a Basilar Aneurysm and Bifurcation

    SciTech Connect

    Ortega, J; Hartman, J; Rodriguez, J; Maitland, D

    2008-01-16

    Aneurysm re-growth and rupture can sometimes unexpectedly occur following treatment procedures that were initially considered to be successful at the time of treatment and post-operative angiography. In some cases, this can be attributed to surgical clip slippage or endovascular coil compaction. However, there are other cases in which the treatment devices function properly. In these instances, the subsequent complications are due to other factors, perhaps one of which is the post-treatment hemodynamic stress. To investigate whether or not a treatment procedure can subject the parent artery to harmful hemodynamic stresses, computational fluid dynamics simulations are performed on a patient-specific basilar aneurysm and bifurcation before and after a virtual endovascular treatment. The simulations demonstrate that the treatment procedure produces a substantial increase in the wall shear stress. Analysis of the post-treatment flow field indicates that the increase in wall shear stress is due to the impingement of the basilar artery flow upon the aneurysm filling material and to the close proximity of a vortex tube to the artery wall. Calculation of the time-averaged wall shear stress shows that there is a region of the artery exposed to a level of wall shear stress that can cause severe damage to endothelial cells. The results of this study demonstrate that it is possible for a treatment procedure, which successfully excludes the aneurysm from the vascular system and leaves no aneurysm neck remnant, to elevate the hemodynamic stresses to levels that are injurious to the immediately adjacent vessel wall.

  1. Development of 5- and 10-year-old pediatric phantoms based on polygon mesh surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Melo Lima, V. J. de; Cassola, V. F.; Kramer, R.; Oliveira Lira, C. A. B. de; Khoury, H. J.; Vieira, J. W.

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is the development of reference pediatric phantoms for 5- and 10-year-old children to be used for the calculation of organ and tissue equivalent doses in radiation protection. Methods: The study proposes a method for developing anatomically highly sophisticated pediatric phantoms without using medical images. The 5- and 10-year-old male and female phantoms presented here were developed using 3D modeling software applied to anatomical information taken from atlases and textbooks. The method uses polygon mesh surfaces to model body contours, the shape of organs as well as their positions, and orientations in the human body. Organ and tissue masses comply with the corresponding data given by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for the 5- and 10-year-old reference children. Bones were segmented into cortical bone, spongiosa, medullary marrow, and cartilage to allow for the use of micro computer tomographic ({mu}CT) images of trabecular bone for skeletal dosimetry. Results: The four phantoms, a male and a female for each age, and their organs are presented in 3D images and their organ and tissue masses in tables which show the compliance of the ICRP reference values. Dosimetric data, calculated for the reference pediatric phantoms by Monte Carlo methods were compared with corresponding data from adult mesh phantoms and pediatric stylized phantoms. The comparisons show reasonable agreement if the anatomical differences between the phantoms are properly taken into account. Conclusions: Pediatric phantoms were developed without using medical images of patients or volunteers for the first time. The models are reference phantoms, suitable for regulatory dosimetry, however, the 3D modeling method can also be applied to medical images to develop patient-specific phantoms.

  2. Patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk estimation in CT: Part I. Development and validation of a Monte Carlo program

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Toncheva, Greta; Yoshizumi, Terry T.; Frush, Donald P.

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Radiation-dose awareness and optimization in CT can greatly benefit from a dose-reporting system that provides dose and risk estimates specific to each patient and each CT examination. As the first step toward patient-specific dose and risk estimation, this article aimed to develop a method for accurately assessing radiation dose from CT examinations. Methods: A Monte Carlo program was developed to model a CT system (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare). The geometry of the system, the energy spectra of the x-ray source, the three-dimensional geometry of the bowtie filters, and the trajectories of source motions during axial and helical scans were explicitly modeled. To validate the accuracy of the program, a cylindrical phantom was built to enable dose measurements at seven different radial distances from its central axis. Simulated radial dose distributions in the cylindrical phantom were validated against ion chamber measurements for single axial scans at all combinations of tube potential and bowtie filter settings. The accuracy of the program was further validated using two anthropomorphic phantoms (a pediatric one-year-old phantom and an adult female phantom). Computer models of the two phantoms were created based on their CT data and were voxelized for input into the Monte Carlo program. Simulated dose at various organ locations was compared against measurements made with thermoluminescent dosimetry chips for both single axial and helical scans. Results: For the cylindrical phantom, simulations differed from measurements by -4.8% to 2.2%. For the two anthropomorphic phantoms, the discrepancies between simulations and measurements ranged between (-8.1%, 8.1%) and (-17.2%, 13.0%) for the single axial scans and the helical scans, respectively. Conclusions: The authors developed an accurate Monte Carlo program for assessing radiation dose from CT examinations. When combined with computer models of actual patients, the program can provide accurate dose

  3. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Sachs, T; Schermerhorn, M

    2010-06-01

    Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) continues to be one of the most lethal vascular pathologies we encounter. Its management demands prompt and efficient evaluation and repair. Open repair has traditionally been the mainstay of treatment. However, the introduction of endovascular techniques has altered the treatment algorithm for ruptured AAA in most major medical centers. We present recent literature and techniques for ruptured AAA and its surgical management.

  4. Mycotic femoral aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Richard Scott; Bennett, Kenneth R

    2007-05-01

    After several weeks of fever and chills, a 31-year-old logger developed pain in his right thigh. Upon examination a tender, pulsating upper thigh mass was found with a long loud bruit arising from it. Severe aortic insufficiency was present; however, blood cultures were negative. An angiogram, captured blood with contrast spewing from the profunda femoral artery to fill a 5 x 10 cm sac. A false aneurysm was diagnosed and resected; numerous gram positive cocci were present in cut sections, but cultures from the cavity grew the gram negative bacteria Salmonella and Alcaligenes. After one month of intravenous ampicillin the aortic valve was replaced after being destroyed by endocarditis. Ampicillin was continued and recovery was uneventful. Mycotic aneurysms are commonly caused by Salmonella (10%), which was second only to Staphylococcus (30%). The femoral artery accounts for 38% of all mycotic aneurysms. They typically present with a pulsatile mass (52%), bruit (50%), and fever (48%). This diagnosis can be supported by leukocytosis (64-71%), positive blood cultures (50-85%), and a history of arterial trauma (51%) (injection drug use, intravascular procedure, or trauma) or endocarditis (10%).

  5. 21 CFR 882.5200 - Aneurysm clip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5200 Aneurysm clip. (a) Identification. An aneurysm clip is a device used to occlude an intracranial aneurysm (a balloonlike sac formed on a blood vessel... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aneurysm clip. 882.5200 Section 882.5200 Food...

  6. 21 CFR 882.5200 - Aneurysm clip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aneurysm clip. 882.5200 Section 882.5200 Food and... NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5200 Aneurysm clip. (a) Identification. An aneurysm clip is a device used to occlude an intracranial aneurysm (a balloonlike sac formed on a blood...

  7. 21 CFR 882.5200 - Aneurysm clip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aneurysm clip. 882.5200 Section 882.5200 Food and... NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5200 Aneurysm clip. (a) Identification. An aneurysm clip is a device used to occlude an intracranial aneurysm (a balloonlike sac formed on a blood...

  8. 21 CFR 882.5200 - Aneurysm clip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aneurysm clip. 882.5200 Section 882.5200 Food and... NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5200 Aneurysm clip. (a) Identification. An aneurysm clip is a device used to occlude an intracranial aneurysm (a balloonlike sac formed on a blood...

  9. 21 CFR 882.5200 - Aneurysm clip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aneurysm clip. 882.5200 Section 882.5200 Food and... NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5200 Aneurysm clip. (a) Identification. An aneurysm clip is a device used to occlude an intracranial aneurysm (a balloonlike sac formed on a blood...

  10. Patient-specific instruments for total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lachiewicz, Paul F; Henderson, Robert A

    2013-09-01

    The use of patient-specific instruments for total knee arthroplasty shifts computer navigation for bone landmark registration and implant positioning from the intraoperative to the preoperative setting. Each system requires preoperative MRI or CT, with specifications determined by the instrument manufacturer. The marketed advantages of patient-specific instruments include greater accuracy in coronal alignment with fewer outliers, no need for instrumentation of the intramedullary canal, reduced surgical time, lower hospital costs, and improved clinical outcomes. The few published results of these instruments suggest minimal gains obtained in hospital logistics variables and minimal evidence of improvement in either alignment or patient outcomes. Disadvantages of patient-specific instruments include increased costs for imaging and instrument fabrication as well as increased preoperative time required for surgical planning and reviewing the instrument plans, and the learning curve for the surgeon to work with the engineers and use these instruments intraoperatively. It is also necessary to have a set of standard instruments available in case the patient-specific instruments do not work properly. Additional data are required before deciding whether these instruments should be recommended.

  11. How Is an Aneurysm Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... genetic conditions related to thoracic aortic aneurysms. The data collected through the GenTAC registry will help doctors and researchers better understand how genes, thoracic aortic aneurysms, and heart disease are linked. To learn more about GenTAC, visit https://gentac. ...

  12. Genetic and Epigenetic Regulation of Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ha Won

    2017-01-01

    Aneurysms are characterized by structural deterioration of the vascular wall leading to progressive dilatation and, potentially, rupture of the aorta. While aortic aneurysms often remain clinically silent, the morbidity and mortality associated with aneurysm expansion and rupture are considerable. Over 13,000 deaths annually in the United States are attributable to aortic aneurysm rupture with less than 1 in 3 persons with aortic aneurysm rupture surviving to surgical intervention. Environmental and epidemiologic risk factors including smoking, male gender, hypertension, older age, dyslipidemia, atherosclerosis, and family history are highly associated with abdominal aortic aneurysms, while heritable genetic mutations are commonly associated with aneurysms of the thoracic aorta. Similar to other forms of cardiovascular disease, family history, genetic variation, and heritable mutations modify the risk of aortic aneurysm formation and provide mechanistic insight into the pathogenesis of human aortic aneurysms. This review will examine the relationship between heritable genetic and epigenetic influences on thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysm formation and rupture. PMID:28116311

  13. Preventing eternality in phantom inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Chaojun; Li Xinzhou; Saridakis, Emmanuel N.

    2010-07-15

    We have investigated the necessary conditions that prevent phantom inflation from being eternal. Allowing additionally for a nonminimal coupling between the phantom field and gravity, we present the slow-climb requirements, perform an analysis of the fluctuations, and finally we extract the overall conditions that are necessary in order to prevent eternality. Furthermore, we verify our results by solving explicitly the cosmological equations in a simple example of an exponential potential, formulating the classical motion plus the stochastic effect of the fluctuations through Langevin equations. Our analysis shows that phantom inflation can be finite without the need of additional exotic mechanisms.

  14. 3D fluoroscopic image estimation using patient-specific 4DCBCT-based motion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhou, S.; Hurwitz, M.; Mishra, P.; Cai, W.; Rottmann, J.; Li, R.; Williams, C.; Wagar, M.; Berbeco, R.; Ionascu, D.; Lewis, J. H.

    2015-05-01

    3D fluoroscopic images represent volumetric patient anatomy during treatment with high spatial and temporal resolution. 3D fluoroscopic images estimated using motion models built using 4DCT images, taken days or weeks prior to treatment, do not reliably represent patient anatomy during treatment. In this study we developed and performed initial evaluation of techniques to develop patient-specific motion models from 4D cone-beam CT (4DCBCT) images, taken immediately before treatment, and used these models to estimate 3D fluoroscopic images based on 2D kV projections captured during treatment. We evaluate the accuracy of 3D fluoroscopic images by comparison to ground truth digital and physical phantom images. The performance of 4DCBCT-based and 4DCT-based motion models are compared in simulated clinical situations representing tumor baseline shift or initial patient positioning errors. The results of this study demonstrate the ability for 4DCBCT imaging to generate motion models that can account for changes that cannot be accounted for with 4DCT-based motion models. When simulating tumor baseline shift and patient positioning errors of up to 5 mm, the average tumor localization error and the 95th percentile error in six datasets were 1.20 and 2.2 mm, respectively, for 4DCBCT-based motion models. 4DCT-based motion models applied to the same six datasets resulted in average tumor localization error and the 95th percentile error of 4.18 and 5.4 mm, respectively. Analysis of voxel-wise intensity differences was also conducted for all experiments. In summary, this study demonstrates the feasibility of 4DCBCT-based 3D fluoroscopic image generation in digital and physical phantoms and shows the potential advantage of 4DCBCT-based 3D fluoroscopic image estimation when there are changes in anatomy between the time of 4DCT imaging and the time of treatment delivery.

  15. 3D fluoroscopic image estimation using patient-specific 4DCBCT-based motion models

    PubMed Central

    Dhou, Salam; Hurwitz, Martina; Mishra, Pankaj; Cai, Weixing; Rottmann, Joerg; Li, Ruijiang; Williams, Christopher; Wagar, Matthew; Berbeco, Ross; Ionascu, Dan; Lewis, John H.

    2015-01-01

    3D fluoroscopic images represent volumetric patient anatomy during treatment with high spatial and temporal resolution. 3D fluoroscopic images estimated using motion models built using 4DCT images, taken days or weeks prior to treatment, do not reliably represent patient anatomy during treatment. In this study we develop and perform initial evaluation of techniques to develop patient-specific motion models from 4D cone-beam CT (4DCBCT) images, taken immediately before treatment, and use these models to estimate 3D fluoroscopic images based on 2D kV projections captured during treatment. We evaluate the accuracy of 3D fluoroscopic images by comparing to ground truth digital and physical phantom images. The performance of 4DCBCT- and 4DCT- based motion models are compared in simulated clinical situations representing tumor baseline shift or initial patient positioning errors. The results of this study demonstrate the ability for 4DCBCT imaging to generate motion models that can account for changes that cannot be accounted for with 4DCT-based motion models. When simulating tumor baseline shift and patient positioning errors of up to 5 mm, the average tumor localization error and the 95th percentile error in six datasets were 1.20 and 2.2 mm, respectively, for 4DCBCT-based motion models. 4DCT-based motion models applied to the same six datasets resulted in average tumor localization error and the 95th percentile error of 4.18 and 5.4 mm, respectively. Analysis of voxel-wise intensity differences was also conducted for all experiments. In summary, this study demonstrates the feasibility of 4DCBCT-based 3D fluoroscopic image generation in digital and physical phantoms, and shows the potential advantage of 4DCBCT-based 3D fluoroscopic image estimation when there are changes in anatomy between the time of 4DCT imaging and the time of treatment delivery. PMID:25905722

  16. TU-C-BRE-09: Performance Comparisons of Patient Specific IMRT QA Methodologies Using ROC Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie, E; Balter, P; Stingo, F; Followill, D; Kry, S; Jones, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the ability of a selection of patient-specific QA methods to accurately classify IMRT plans as acceptable or unacceptable based on a multiple ion chamber (MIC) phantom. Methods: Twenty-four IMRT plans were selected (20 previously failed the institutional QA), and were measured on a MIC phantom to assess their dosimetric acceptability. These same plans were then measured using film (Kodak EDR2) and ion chamber (Wellhofer cc04), ArcCheck (Sun Nuclear), and MapCheck (Sun Nuclear) (delivered AP field-by-field, AP composite, and with original gantry angles). All gamma analyses were performed at 2%/2mm, 3%/3mm, and 5%/3mm. By using the MIC results as a gold standard, the sensitivity and specificity were calculated across a range of cut-off thresholds (% pixels passing for gamma analysis, and % dose difference for ion chamber), and were used to form ROC curves. Area under the curve (AUC) was used as a metric to quantify the performance of the various QA methods. Results: Grouping device’s AUC’s revealed two statistically significant different groups: ion chamber (AUC of 0.94), AP composite MapCheck (AUC of 0.85), ArcCheck (AUC of 0.84), and film (AUC of 0.82) were in the better performing group, while original gantry angles and AP field-by-field MapCheck (AUC of 0.65 and 0.66, respectively) matched less well with the gold standard results. Optimal cut-offs were also assessed using the ROC curves. We found that while often 90% of pixels passing is used as a criteria, the differing sensitivities of QA methods can lead to device and methodology-based optimal cutoff thresholds. Conclusion: While many methods exist to perform the same task of patient-specific IMRT QA, they utilize different strategies. This work has shown that there are inconsistencies in these methodologies in terms of their sensitivity and specificity to dosimetric acceptability. This work was supported by Public Health Service grants CA010953, CA081647, and CA21661 awarded by the

  17. Population of anatomically variable 4D XCAT adult phantoms for imaging research and optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Segars, W. P.; Bond, Jason; Frush, Jack; Hon, Sylvia; Eckersley, Chris; Samei, E.; Williams, Cameron H.; Frush, D.; Feng Jianqiao; Tward, Daniel J.; Ratnanather, J. T.; Miller, M. I.

    2013-04-15

    as a jumping point from which to create an unlimited number of 3D and 4D variations for imaging research. Conclusions: A population of phantoms that includes a range of anatomical variations representative of the public at large is needed to more closely mimic a clinical study or trial. The series of anatomically variable phantoms developed in this work provide a valuable resource for investigating 3D and 4D imaging devices and the effects of anatomy and motion in imaging. Combined with Monte Carlo simulation programs, the phantoms also provide a valuable tool to investigate patient-specific dose and image quality, and optimization for adults undergoing imaging procedures.

  18. Vein graft aneurysms following popliteal aneurysm repair are more common than we think.

    PubMed

    Sharples, Alistair; Kay, Mark; Sykes, Timothy; Fox, Anthony; Houghton, Andrew

    2015-10-01

    True infrainguinal vein graft aneurysms are reported infrequently in the literature. We sought to identify the true incidence of these graft aneurysms after popliteal aneurysm repair and identify factors which may increase the risk of such aneurysms developing. Using a prospectively compiled database, we identified patients who underwent a popliteal aneurysm repair between January 1996 and January 2011 at a single district general hospital. Patients were routinely followed up in a graft surveillance programme. Out of 45 patients requiring repair of a popliteal aneurysm over a 15-year period, four (8.8%) patients developed aneurysmal graft disease. Of the patients who developed graft aneurysms, all had aneurysmal disease at other sites compared with 18 (45.0%) patients who did not develop graft aneurysms. Patients with graft aneurysms had a mean of 1.60 aneurysms elsewhere compared to 0.58 in patients with non-aneurysmal grafts (P = 0.005). True vein graft aneurysms occur in a significant number of patients following popliteal aneurysm repair. Our data would suggest this to be more likely in patients who have aneurysms elsewhere and therefore a predisposition to aneurysmal disease. It may be appropriate for patients with aneurysms at other sites to undergo more prolonged post-operative graft surveillance.

  19. A critical appraisal of endovascular stent-grafts in the management of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Schoretsanitis, Nikolaos; Georgakarakos, Efstratios; Argyriou, Christos; Ktenidis, Kiriakos; Georgiadis, George S

    2017-04-01

    Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms has widely replaced the open surgical repair due to its minimal invasive nature and the accompanying lower perioperative mortality and morbidity. During the past two decades, certain improvements and developments have provided a wide variety of endograft structural designs and geometric patterns, enabling the physician to approach a more patient-specific treatment of AAA. This review presents the currently available aortic endografts and describes the clinical, technical and mechanical characteristics of them.

  20. Fluid-structure Interaction Modeling of Aneurysmal Conditions with High and Normal Blood Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torii, Ryo; Oshima, Marie; Kobayashi, Toshio; Takagi, Kiyoshi; Tezduyar, Tayfun E.

    2006-09-01

    Hemodynamic factors like the wall shear stress play an important role in cardiovascular diseases. To investigate the influence of hemodynamic factors in blood vessels, the authors have developed a numerical fluid-structure interaction (FSI) analysis technique. The objective is to use numerical simulation as an effective tool to predict phenomena in a living human body. We applied the technique to a patient-specific arterial model, and with that we showed the effect of wall deformation on the WSS distribution. In this paper, we compute the interaction between the blood flow and the arterial wall for a patient-specific cerebral aneurysm with various hemodynamic conditions, such as hypertension. We particularly focus on the effects of hypertensive blood pressure on the interaction and the WSS, because hypertension is reported to be a risk factor in rupture of aneurysms. We also aim to show the possibility of FSI computations with hemodynamic conditions representing those risk factors in cardiovascular disease. The simulations show that the transient behavior of the interaction under hypertensive blood pressure is significantly different from the interaction under normal blood pressure. The transient behavior of the blood-flow velocity, and the resulting WSS and the mechanical stress in the aneurysmal wall, are significantly affected by hypertension. The results imply that hypertension affects the growth of an aneurysm and the damage in arterial tissues.

  1. Numerical modeling of the flow in intracranial aneurysms: prediction of regions prone to thrombus formation.

    PubMed

    Rayz, V L; Boussel, L; Lawton, M T; Acevedo-Bolton, G; Ge, L; Young, W L; Higashida, R T; Saloner, D

    2008-11-01

    The deposition of intralumenal thrombus in intracranial aneurysms adds a risk of thrombo-embolism over and above that posed by mass effect and rupture. In addition to biochemical factors, hemodynamic factors that are governed by lumenal geometry and blood flow rates likely play an important role in the thrombus formation and deposition process. In this study, patient-specific computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of blood flow were constructed from MRA data for three patients who had fusiform basilar aneurysms that were thrombus free and then proceeded to develop intralumenal thrombus. In order to determine whether features of the flow fields could suggest which regions had an elevated potential for thrombus deposition, the flow was modeled in the baseline, thrombus-free geometries. Pulsatile flow simulations were carried out using patient-specific inlet flow conditions measured with MR velocimetry. Newtonian and non-Newtonian blood behavior was considered. A strong similarity was found between the intra-aneurysmal regions with CFD-predicted slow, recirculating flows and the regions of thrombus deposition observed in vivo in the follow-up MR studies. In two cases with larger aneurysms, the agreement between the low velocity zones and clotted-off regions improved when non-Newtonian blood behavior was taken into account. A similarity was also found between the calculated low shear stress regions and the regions that were later observed to clot.

  2. Clinical evaluation of an anatomy-based patient specific quality assurance system.

    PubMed

    Hauri, Pascal; Verlaan, Sarah; Graydon, Shaun; Ahnen, Linda; Klöck, Stephan; Lang, Stephanie

    2014-03-06

    The Delta(4DVH) Anatomy 3D quality assurance (QA) system (ScandiDos), which converts the measured detector dose into the dose distribution in the patient geometry was evaluated. It allows a direct comparison of the calculated 3D dose with the measured back-projected dose. In total, 16 static and 16 volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) fields were planned using four different energies. Isocenter dose was measured with a pinpoint chamber in homogeneous phantoms to investigate the dose prediction by the Delta(4DVH) Anatomy algorithm for static fields. Dose distributions of VMAT fields were measured using GAFCHROMIC film. Gravitational gantry errors up to 10° were introduced into all VMAT plans to study the potential of detecting errors. Additionally, 20 clinical treatment plans were verified. For static fields, the Delta(4DVH) Anatomy predicted the isocenter dose accurately, with a deviation to the measured phantom dose of 1.1% ± 0.6%. For VMAT fields the predicted Delta(4DVH) Anatomy dose in the isocenter plane corresponded to the measured dose in the phantom, with an average gamma agreement index (GAI) (3 mm/3%) of 96.9± 0.4%. The Delta(4DVH) Anatomy detected the induced systematic gantry error of 10° with a relative GAI (3 mm/3%) change of 5.8% ± 1.6%. The conventional Delta(4PT) QA system detected a GAI change of 4.2%± 2.0%. The conventional Delta(4PT) GAI (3 mm/3%) was 99.8% ± 0.4% for the clinical treatment plans. The mean body and PTV-GAI (3 mm/5%) for the Delta(4DVH) Anatomy were 96.4% ± 2.0% and 97.7%± 1.8%; however, this dropped to 90.8%± 3.4% and 87.1% ± 4.1% for passing criteria of 3 mm/3%. The anatomy-based patient specific quality assurance system predicts the dose distribution correctly for a homogeneous case. The limiting factor for the error detection is the large variability in the error-free plans. The dose calculation algorithm is inferior to that used in the TPS (Eclipse).

  3. Convolutional Neural Networks for patient-specific ECG classification.

    PubMed

    Kiranyaz, Serkan; Ince, Turker; Hamila, Ridha; Gabbouj, Moncef

    2015-01-01

    We propose a fast and accurate patient-specific electrocardiogram (ECG) classification and monitoring system using an adaptive implementation of 1D Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs) that can fuse feature extraction and classification into a unified learner. In this way, a dedicated CNN will be trained for each patient by using relatively small common and patient-specific training data and thus it can also be used to classify long ECG records such as Holter registers in a fast and accurate manner. Alternatively, such a solution can conveniently be used for real-time ECG monitoring and early alert system on a light-weight wearable device. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed system achieves a superior classification performance for the detection of ventricular ectopic beats (VEB) and supraventricular ectopic beats (SVEB).

  4. Patient specific Parkinson's disease detection for adaptive deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Ameer; Zamani, Majid; Bayford, Richard; Demosthenous, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    Continuous deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease (PD) patients results in side effects and shortening of the pacemaker battery life. This can be remedied using adaptive stimulation. To achieve adaptive DBS, patient customized PD detection is required due to the inconsistency associated with biomarkers across patients and time. This paper proposes the use of patient specific feature extraction together with adaptive support vector machine (SVM) classifiers to create a patient customized detector for PD. The patient specific feature extraction is obtained using the extrema of the ratio between the PD and non-PD spectra bands of each patient as features, while the adaptive SVM classifier adjusts its decision boundary until a suitable model is obtained. This yields individualised features and classifier pairs for each patient. Datasets containing local field potentials of PD patients were used to validate the method. Six of the nine patient datasets tested achieved a classification accuracy greater than 98%. The adaptive detector is suitable for realization on chip.

  5. In vivo strain assessment of the abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Satriano, Alessandro; Rivolo, Simone; Martufi, Giampaolo; Finol, Ender A; Di Martino, Elena S

    2015-01-21

    The only criteria currently used to inform surgical decision for abdominal aortic aneurysms are maximum diameter (>5.5 cm) and rate of growth, even though several studies have identified the need for more specific indicators of risk. Patient-specific biomechanical variables likely to affect rupture risk would be a valuable addition to the science of understanding rupture risk and prove to be a life saving benefit for patients. Local deformability of the aorta is related to the local mechanical properties of the wall and may provide indication on the state of weakening of the wall tissue. We propose a 3D image-based approach to compute aortic wall strain maps in vivo. The method is applicable to a variety of imaging modalities that provide sequential images at different phases in the cardiac cycle. We applied the method to a series of abdominal aneurysms imaged using cine-MRI obtaining strain maps at different phases in the cardiac cycle. These maps could be used to evaluate the distensibility of an aneurysm at baseline and at different follow-up times and provide an additional index to clinicians to facilitate decisions on the best course of action for a specific patient.

  6. Hemodynamic simulations in coronary aneurysms of children with Kawasaki disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Dibyendu; Burns, Jane; Marsden, Alison

    2009-11-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a serious pediatric illness affecting the cardiovascular system. One of the most serious complications of KD, occurring in about 25% of untreated cases, is the formation of large aneurysms in the coronary arteries, which put patients at risk for myocardial infarction. In this project we performed patient specific computational simulations of blood flow in aneurysmal left and right coronary arteries of a KD patient to gain an understanding about their hemodynamics. Models were constructed from CT data using custom software. Typical pulsatile flow waveforms were applied at the model inlets, while resistance and RCR lumped models were applied and compared at the outlets. Simulated pressure waveforms compared well with typical physiologic data. High wall shear stress values are found in the narrow region at the base of the aneurysm and low shear values occur in regions of recirculation. A Lagrangian approach has been adopted to perform particle tracking and compute particle residence time in the recirculation. Our long-term goal will be to develop links between hemodynamics and the risk for thrombus formation in order to assist in clinical decision-making.

  7. Influence of Geometry and Mechanical Properties on the Accuracy of Patient-Specific Simulation of Women Pelvic Floor.

    PubMed

    Mayeur, Olivier; Witz, Jean-François; Lecomte, Pauline; Brieu, Mathias; Cosson, Michel; Miller, Karol

    2016-01-01

    The woman pelvic system involves multiple organs, muscles, ligaments, and fasciae where different pathologies may occur. Here we are most interested in abnormal mobility, often caused by complex and not fully understood mechanisms. Computer simulation and modeling using the finite element (FE) method are the tools helping to better understand the pathological mobility, but of course patient-specific models are required to make contribution to patient care. These models require a good representation of the pelvic system geometry, information on the material properties, boundary conditions and loading. In this contribution we focus on the relative influence of the inaccuracies in geometry description and of uncertainty of patient-specific material properties of soft connective tissues. We conducted a comparative study using several constitutive behavior laws and variations in geometry description resulting from the imprecision of clinical imaging and image analysis. We find that geometry seems to have the dominant effect on the pelvic organ mobility simulation results. Provided that proper finite deformation non-linear FE solution procedures are used, the influence of the functional form of the constitutive law might be for practical purposes negligible. These last findings confirm similar results from the fields of modeling neurosurgery and abdominal aortic aneurysms.

  8. Organosilicon phantom for photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Avigo, Cinzia; Di Lascio, Nicole; Armanetti, Paolo; Kusmic, Claudia; Cavigli, Lucia; Ratto, Fulvio; Meucci, Sandro; Masciullo, Cecilia; Cecchini, Marco; Pini, Roberto; Faita, Francesco; Menichetti, Luca

    2015-04-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is an emerging technique. Although commercially available photoacoustic imaging systems currently exist, the technology is still in its infancy. Therefore, the design of stable phantoms is essential to achieve semiquantitative evaluation of the performance of a photoacoustic system and can help optimize the properties of contrast agents. We designed and developed a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) phantom with exceptionally fine geometry; the phantom was tested using photoacoustic experiments loaded with the standard indocyanine green dye and compared to an agar phantom pattern through polyethylene glycol-gold nanorods. The linearity of the photoacoustic signal with the nanoparticle number was assessed. The signal-tonoiseratio and contrast were employed as image quality parameters, and enhancements of up to 50 and up to 300%, respectively, were measured with the PDMS phantom with respect to the agar one. A tissue-mimicking (TM)-PDMS was prepared by adding TiO2 and India ink; photoacoustic tests were performed in order to compare the signal generated by the TM-PDMS and the biological tissue. The PDMS phantom can become a particularly promising tool in the field of photoacoustics for the evaluation of the performance of a PA system and as a model of the structure of vascularized soft tissues.

  9. Phantom stars and topology change

    SciTech Connect

    DeBenedictis, Andrew; Garattini, Remo; Lobo, Francisco S. N.

    2008-11-15

    In this work, we consider time-dependent dark-energy star models, with an evolving parameter {omega} crossing the phantom divide {omega}=-1. Once in the phantom regime, the null energy condition is violated, which physically implies that the negative radial pressure exceeds the energy density. Therefore, an enormous negative pressure in the center may, in principle, imply a topology change, consequently opening up a tunnel and converting the dark-energy star into a wormhole. The criteria for this topology change are discussed and, in particular, we consider a Casimir energy approach involving quasilocal energy difference calculations that may reflect or measure the occurrence of a topology change. We denote these exotic geometries consisting of dark-energy stars (in the phantom regime) and phantom wormholes as phantom stars. The final product of this topological change, namely, phantom wormholes, have far-reaching physical and cosmological implications, as in addition to being used for interstellar shortcuts, an absurdly advanced civilization may manipulate these geometries to induce closed timelike curves, consequently violating causality.

  10. Numerical predictions of hemodynamics following surgeries in cerebral aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayz, Vitaliy; Lawton, Michael; Boussel, Loic; Leach, Joseph; Acevedo, Gabriel; Halbach, Van; Saloner, David

    2014-11-01

    Large cerebral aneurysms present a danger of rupture or brain compression. In some cases, clinicians may attempt to change the pathological hemodynamics in order to inhibit disease progression. This can be achieved by changing the vascular geometry with an open surgery or by deploying a stent-like flow diverter device. Patient-specific CFD models can help evaluate treatment options by predicting flow regions that are likely to become occupied by thrombus (clot) following the procedure. In this study, alternative flow scenarios were modeled for several patients who underwent surgical treatment. Patient-specific geometries and flow boundary conditions were obtained from magnetic resonance angiography and velocimetry data. The Navier-Stokes equations were solved with a finite volume solver Fluent. A porous media approach was used to model flow-diverter devices. The advection-diffusion equation was solved in order to simulate contrast agent transport and the results were used to evaluate flow residence time changes. Thrombus layering was predicted in regions characterized by reduced velocities and shear stresses as well as increased flow residence time. The simulations indicated surgical options that could result in occlusion of vital arteries with thrombus. Numerical results were compared to experimental and clinical MRI data. The results demonstrate that image-based CFD models may help improve the outcome of surgeries in cerebral aneurysms. acknowledge R01HL115267.

  11. Idiopathic pulmonary artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kotwica, Tomasz; Szumarska, Joanna; Staniszewska-Marszalek, Edyta; Mazurek, Walentyna; Kosmala, Wojciech

    2009-05-01

    Pulmonary artery aneurysm (PAA) is an uncommon lesion, which may be associated with different etiologies including congenital cardiovascular diseases, systemic vasculitis, connective tissue diseases, infections, and trauma. Idiopathic PAA is sporadically diagnosed by exclusion of concomitant major pathology. We report a case of a 56-year-old female with an idiopathic pulmonary artery dilatation identified fortuitously by echocardiography and confirmed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Neither significant pulmonary valve dysfunction nor pulmonary hypertension and other cardiac abnormalities which might contribute to the PAA development were found. Here, we describe echocardiographic and computed tomography findings and review the literature on PAA management.

  12. Right hepatic artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Astrid Del Pilar Ardila; Loures, Paulo; Calle, Juan Cristóbal Ospina; Cunha, Beatriz; Córdoba, Juan Camilo

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of an aneurysm of the right hepatic artery and its multidisciplinary management by general surgery, endoscopy and radiology services. Being a case of extremely low incidence, it is important to show its diagnostic and therapeutic approach. RESUMO Relatamos um caso de aneurisma da artéria hepática direita conduzido de forma multidisciplinar pelos Serviços de Cirurgia Geral, Endoscopia e Radiologia. Em se tratando de caso de incidência baixíssima, é importante mostrar o enfoque diagnóstico e terapêutico usado em seu manejo.

  13. Quantitative modeling of the accuracy in registering preoperative patient-specific anatomic models into left atrial cardiac ablation procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Rettmann, Maryam E. Holmes, David R.; Camp, Jon J.; Cameron, Bruce M.; Robb, Richard A.; Kwartowitz, David M.; Gunawan, Mia; Johnson, Susan B.; Packer, Douglas L.; Dalegrave, Charles; Kolasa, Mark W.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: In cardiac ablation therapy, accurate anatomic guidance is necessary to create effective tissue lesions for elimination of left atrial fibrillation. While fluoroscopy, ultrasound, and electroanatomic maps are important guidance tools, they lack information regarding detailed patient anatomy which can be obtained from high resolution imaging techniques. For this reason, there has been significant effort in incorporating detailed, patient-specific models generated from preoperative imaging datasets into the procedure. Both clinical and animal studies have investigated registration and targeting accuracy when using preoperative models; however, the effect of various error sources on registration accuracy has not been quantitatively evaluated. Methods: Data from phantom, canine, and patient studies are used to model and evaluate registration accuracy. In the phantom studies, data are collected using a magnetically tracked catheter on a static phantom model. Monte Carlo simulation studies were run to evaluate both baseline errors as well as the effect of different sources of error that would be present in a dynamicin vivo setting. Error is simulated by varying the variance parameters on the landmark fiducial, physical target, and surface point locations in the phantom simulation studies. In vivo validation studies were undertaken in six canines in which metal clips were placed in the left atrium to serve as ground truth points. A small clinical evaluation was completed in three patients. Landmark-based and combined landmark and surface-based registration algorithms were evaluated in all studies. In the phantom and canine studies, both target registration error and point-to-surface error are used to assess accuracy. In the patient studies, no ground truth is available and registration accuracy is quantified using point-to-surface error only. Results: The phantom simulation studies demonstrated that combined landmark and surface-based registration improved

  14. Spontaneous thrombosis in giant intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed Central

    Whittle, I R; Dorsch, N W; Besser, M

    1982-01-01

    Twelve patients in a series of 22 with giant intracranial aneurysms demonstrated neuroradiological features of partial or total spontaneous intra-aneurysmal thrombosis. The presence of this intra-aneurysmal clot significantly altered the computed tomographic appearance of the giant aneurysm. Massive intra-aneurysmal thrombosis did not protect against subarachnoid haemorrhage and the likelihood of rupture of a clot containing giant aneurysm was not significantly different from that of a non-thrombosed giant aneurysm. Although parent artery occlusion from a thrombosed giant aneurysm, and massive aneurysmal thrombosis leading to the formation of giant serpentine aneurysm were documented, these are rare epiphenomena. The risk of embolisation from a partially thrombosed giant aneurysm, which was documented in one case, would appear to be greater than that from a non-thrombosed giant aneurysm. The findings in this series, and a review of literature, suggest that the presence of intra-aneurysmal clot in giant intracranial aneurysms has little prognostic significance and does not alter the management or outcome after treatment. Images PMID:7175528

  15. Techniques in Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Phade, Sachin V.; Garcia-Toca, Manuel; Kibbe, Melina R.

    2011-01-01

    Endovascular repair of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms (EVARs) has revolutionized the treatment of aortic aneurysms, with over half of elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repairs performed endoluminally each year. Since the first endografts were placed two decades ago, many changes have been made in graft design, operative technique, and management of complications. This paper summarizes modern endovascular grafts, considerations in preoperative planning, and EVAR techniques. Specific areas that are addressed include endograft selection, arterial access, sheath delivery, aortic branch management, graft deployment, intravascular ultrasonography, pressure sensors, management of endoleaks and compressed limbs, and exit strategies. PMID:22121487

  16. Support of a patient-specific therapeutical acoustic stimulation in tinnitus by numerical modeling.

    PubMed

    Haab, L; Scheerer, M; Ruckert, J; Hannemann, R; Strauss, D J

    2012-01-01

    The pathogenesis of tinnitus involves multiple hierarchical levels of auditory processing and appraisal of sensory saliency. Early tinnitus onset is most likely attributed to homeostatic plasticity in the periphery, while the chronification and decompensation are tightly linked to brain areas for the allocation of attentional resources, such as e.g., the thalamocortical feedback loops and the limbic system. Increased spontaneous firing after sensory deafferentation might be sufficient to generate a phantom perception, yet the question why not every peripheral hearing loss automatically elicits a tinnitus sensation is still to be addressed. Utilizing quantitative modeling of multiple hierarchical levels in the auditory pathway, we demonstrate the effects of lateral inhibition on increased spontaneous firing and the resulting elevation of firing regularity and synchronization of neural activity. The presented therapeutical approach is based on the idea of disrupting the heightened regularity of the neural population response in the tinnitus frequency range. This neural activity regularity depends on lateral dispersion of common noise and thus is susceptible for edge effects and might be influenced by a change in neural activity in bordering frequency ranges by fitted acoustical stimulation. We propose the use of patient specifically adapted tailor-made notched acoustic stimulation, utilizing modeling results for the optimal adjustment of the stimulation frequencies to archive a therapeutical edge-effect.

  17. Commissioning and validation of COMPASS system for VMAT patient specific quality assurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimthong, J.; Kakanaporn, C.; Tuntipumiamorn, L.; Laojunun, P.; Iampongpaiboon, P.

    2016-03-01

    Pre-treatment patient specific quality assurance (QA) of advanced treatment techniques such as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is one of important QA in radiotherapy. The fast and reliable dosimetric device is required. The objective of this study is to commission and validate the performance of COMPASS system for dose verification of VMAT technique. The COMPASS system is composed of an array of ionization detectors (MatriXX) mounted to the gantry using a custom holder and software for the analysis and visualization of QA results. We validated the COMPASS software for basic and advanced clinical application. For the basic clinical study, the simple open field in various field sizes were validated in homogeneous phantom. And the advanced clinical application, the fifteen prostate and fifteen nasopharyngeal cancers VMAT plans were chosen to study. The treatment plans were measured by the MatriXX. The doses and dose-volume histograms (DVHs) reconstructed from the fluence measurements were compared to the TPS calculated plans. And also, the doses and DVHs computed using collapsed cone convolution (CCC) Algorithm were compared with Eclipse TPS calculated plans using Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm (AAA) that according to dose specified in ICRU 83 for PTV.

  18. Computational assessment of effective dose and patient specific doses for kilovoltage stereotactic radiosurgery of wet age-related macular degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanlon, Justin Mitchell

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of vision loss and a major health problem for people over the age of 50 in industrialized nations. The current standard of care, ranibizumab, is used to help slow and in some cases stabilize the process of AMD, but requires frequent invasive injections into the eye. Interest continues for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), an option that provides a non-invasive treatment for the wet form of AMD, through the development of the IRay(TM) (Oraya Therapeutics, Inc., Newark, CA). The goal of this modality is to destroy choroidal neovascularization beneath the pigment epithelium via delivery of three 100 kVp photon beams entering through the sclera and overlapping on the macula delivering up to 24 Gy of therapeutic dose over a span of approximately 5 minutes. The divergent x-ray beams targeting the fovea are robotically positioned and the eye is gently immobilized by a suction-enabled contact lens. Device development requires assessment of patient effective dose, reference patient mean absorbed doses to radiosensitive tissues, and patient specific doses to the lens and optic nerve. A series of head phantoms, including both reference and patient specific, was derived from CT data and employed in conjunction with the MCNPX 2.5.0 radiation transport code to simulate treatment and evaluate absorbed doses to potential tissues-at-risk. The reference phantoms were used to evaluate effective dose and mean absorbed doses to several radiosensitive tissues. The optic nerve was modeled with changeable positions based on individual patient variability seen in a review of head CT scans gathered. Patient specific phantoms were used to determine the effect of varying anatomy and gaze. The results showed that absorbed doses to the non-targeted tissues were below the threshold levels for serious complications; specifically the development of radiogenic cataracts and radiation induced optic neuropathy (RON). The effective dose

  19. Analysis of flow patterns in a patient-specific aortic dissection model.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Z; Tan, F P P; Riga, C V; Bicknell, C D; Hamady, M S; Gibbs, R G J; Wood, N B; Xu, X Y

    2010-05-01

    Aortic dissection is the most common acute catastrophic event affecting the thoracic aorta. The majority of patients presenting with an uncomplicated type B dissection are treated medically, but 25% of these patients develop subsequent aneurysmal dilatation of the thoracic aorta. This study aimed at gaining more detailed knowledge of the flow phenomena associated with this condition. Morphological features and flow patterns in a dissected aortic segment of a presurgery type B dissection patient were analyzed based on computed tomography images acquired from the patient. Computational simulations of blood flow in the patient-specific model were performed by employing a correlation-based transitional version of Menter's hybrid k-epsilon/k-omega shear stress transport turbulence model implemented in ANSYS CFX 11. Our results show that the dissected aorta is dominated by locally highly disturbed, and possibly turbulent, flow with strong recirculation. A significant proportion (about 80%) of the aortic flow enters the false lumen, which may further increase the dilatation of the aorta. High values of wall shear stress have been found around the tear on the true lumen wall, perhaps increasing the likelihood of expanding the tear. Turbulence intensity in the tear region reaches a maximum of 70% at midsystolic deceleration phase. Incorporating the non-Newtonian behavior of blood into the same transitional flow model has yielded a slightly lower peak wall shear stress and higher maximum turbulence intensity without causing discernible changes to the distribution patterns. Comparisons between the laminar and turbulent flow simulations show a qualitatively similar distribution of wall shear stress but a significantly higher magnitude with the transitional turbulence model.

  20. CFD and PIV analysis of hemodynamics in a growing intracranial aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Raschi, Marcelo; Mut, Fernando; Byrne, Greg; Putman, Christopher M; Tateshima, Satoshi; Viñuela, Fernando; Tanoue, Tetsuya; Tanishita, Kazuo; Cebral, Juan R

    2012-02-01

    Hemodynamics is thought to be a fundamental factor in the formation, progression, and rupture of cerebral aneurysms. Understanding these mechanisms is important to improve their rupture risk assessment and treatment. In this study, we analyze the blood flow field in a growing cerebral aneurysm using experimental particle image velocimetry (PIV) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques. Patient-specific models were constructed from longitudinal 3D computed tomography angiography images acquired at 1-y intervals. Physical silicone models were constructed from the computed tomography angiography images using rapid prototyping techniques, and pulsatile flow fields were measured with PIV. Corresponding CFD models were created and run under matching flow conditions. Both flow fields were aligned, interpolated, and compared qualitatively by inspection and quantitatively by defining similarity measures between the PIV and CFD vector fields. Results showed that both flow fields were in good agreement. Specifically, both techniques provided consistent representations of the main intra-aneurysmal flow structures and their change during the geometric evolution of the aneurysm. Despite differences observed mainly in the near wall region, and the inherent limitations of each technique, the information derived is consistent and can be used to study the role of hemodynamics in the natural history of intracranial aneurysms.

  1. The effect of hemodynamics on the failure of endovascular coiling in cerebral aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Kyung Se; Lieber, Baruch B.

    2005-11-01

    Today the treatment of intracranial aneurysms with endovascular coils is an established procedure which has several advantages compared to surgical clipping. However, coil compaction with recanalization remains a long term problem and is observed in approximately 50% of large and giant aneurysm cases over a 5-6 year follow-up period. Clinical data suggest that the coil packing density and the location and size of the aneurysm are important parameters in the long term outcome, suggesting that the repeated impulses exerted by the impingement of the pulsatile blood flow on the coil are mainly responsible for coil compaction. To test this hypothesis we will present: 1. patient specific simulations of two different clinical cases having high and low coil compaction risk respectively; 2. a systematic study on the effects of various geometrical parameters (bifurcation angle, ratio of aneurysm neck size to parent vessel diameter) on the magnitude of the total force on the coil, using idealized configurations. In all cases the three-dimensional laminar flow computations have been carried out using an unstructured, finite-element, Navier-Stokes solver. It will be shown that the ratio of aneurysm neck size to parent vessel diameter has the largest influence on the maximum force on the coil, which is less sensitive to the bifurcation angle.

  2. Predictive biomechanical analysis of ascending aortic aneurysm rupture potential

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Caitlin; Sun, Wei; Pham, Thuy; Elefteriades, John

    2013-01-01

    Aortic aneurysm is a leading cause of death in adults, often taking lives without any premonitory signs or symptoms. Adverse clinical outcomes of aortic aneurysm are preventable by elective surgical repair; however, identifying at-risk individuals is difficult. The objective of this study was to perform a predictive biomechanical analysis of ascending aortic aneurysm (AsAA) tissue to assess rupture risk on a patient-specific level. AsAA tissues, obtained intra-operatively from 50 patients, were subjected to biaxial mechanical and uniaxial failure tests to obtain their passive elastic mechanical properties. A novel analytical method was developed to predict the AsAA pressure-diameter response as well as the aortic wall yield and failure responses. Our results indicated that the mean predicted AsAA diameter at rupture was 5.6 ± 0.7 cm, and the associated blood pressure to induce rupture was 579.4 ± 214.8 mmHg. Statistical analysis showed significant positive correlation between aneurysm tissue compliance and predicted risk of rupture, where patients with a pressure-strain modulus ≥100 kPa may be nearly twice as likely to experience rupture than patients with more compliant aortic tissue. The mechanical analysis of pre-dissection patient tissue properties established in this study could predict the “future” onset of yielding and rupture in AsAA patients. The analysis results implicate decreased tissue compliance as a risk factor for AsAA rupture. The presented methods may serve as a basis for the development of a pre-operative planning tool for AsAA evaluation, a tool currently unavailable. PMID:23948500

  3. Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... signs or symptoms of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The final recommendation statement summarizes what the Task ... the potential benefits and harms of screening for AAA: (1) Men ages 65 to 75 who smoke ...

  4. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular- discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... MRI scan Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular Aortic angiography Hardening of ... Center-Shreveport, Shreveport, LA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla ...

  5. Patient specific ankle-foot orthoses using rapid prototyping

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Prefabricated orthotic devices are currently designed to fit a range of patients and therefore they do not provide individualized comfort and function. Custom-fit orthoses are superior to prefabricated orthotic devices from both of the above-mentioned standpoints. However, creating a custom-fit orthosis is a laborious and time-intensive manual process performed by skilled orthotists. Besides, adjustments made to both prefabricated and custom-fit orthoses are carried out in a qualitative manner. So both comfort and function can potentially suffer considerably. A computerized technique for fabricating patient-specific orthotic devices has the potential to provide excellent comfort and allow for changes in the standard design to meet the specific needs of each patient. Methods In this paper, 3D laser scanning is combined with rapid prototyping to create patient-specific orthoses. A novel process was engineered to utilize patient-specific surface data of the patient anatomy as a digital input, manipulate the surface data to an optimal form using Computer Aided Design (CAD) software, and then download the digital output from the CAD software to a rapid prototyping machine for fabrication. Results Two AFOs were rapidly prototyped to demonstrate the proposed process. Gait analysis data of a subject wearing the AFOs indicated that the rapid prototyped AFOs performed comparably to the prefabricated polypropylene design. Conclusions The rapidly prototyped orthoses fabricated in this study provided good fit of the subject's anatomy compared to a prefabricated AFO while delivering comparable function (i.e. mechanical effect on the biomechanics of gait). The rapid fabrication capability is of interest because it has potential for decreasing fabrication time and cost especially when a replacement of the orthosis is required. PMID:21226898

  6. Patient-specific modeling of human cardiovascular system elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossovich, Leonid Yu.; Kirillova, Irina V.; Golyadkina, Anastasiya A.; Polienko, Asel V.; Chelnokova, Natalia O.; Ivanov, Dmitriy V.; Murylev, Vladimir V.

    2016-03-01

    Object of study: The research is aimed at development of personalized medical treatment. Algorithm was developed for patient-specific surgical interventions of the cardiovascular system pathologies. Methods: Geometrical models of the biological objects and initial and boundary conditions were realized by medical diagnostic data of the specific patient. Mechanical and histomorphological parameters were obtained with the help mechanical experiments on universal testing machine. Computer modeling of the studied processes was conducted with the help of the finite element method. Results: Results of the numerical simulation allowed evaluating the physiological processes in the studied object in normal state, in presence of different pathologies and after different types of surgical procedures.

  7. Inflammatory aneurysms treated with EVAR.

    PubMed

    Stone, William M; Fankhauser, Grant T

    2012-12-01

    Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysms (IAAA) are being treated more frequently by endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Some authors caution against treating IAAA by EVAR because retroperitoneal inflammation may not subside post-operatively. A recent experience of 69 IAAA treated by open and endovascular methods is presented with results supporting the use of EVAR for IAAA. Several other studies evaluating EVAR in the treatment of IAAA are discussed.

  8. Low abundances of synthetics lipids in phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva-Luna, A. E.; Santiago-Alvarado, A.; Castro-Ramos, J.; Vazquez-Montiel, S.; Flores-Gil, A.; Aguilar-Soto, J.; Delgado-Atencio, J. A.

    2012-03-01

    Phantoms simulate optical characteristics of tissues. Phantoms use to mimic light distributions in living tissue. Several Phantoms compositions made of silicone, polyester, polyurethane, and epoxy resin have been described in the literature. These kinds of phantoms have the problem of long time preservation. In this work, we describe the fabrication and characterization of phantoms with low concentrations of synthetic lipid using Raman spectroscopy. We fabricate four phantoms made of Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). These phantoms have synthetic lipid content of cholesterol and triglycerides. The size of our phantoms is 1 x 1 cm and 5 mm of thickness.We used the point-to-point mapping technique. Finally, we compared advantages and performance of made PDMS and gelatin phantoms.

  9. Clinical presentation of cerebral aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Cianfoni, Alessandro; Pravatà, Emanuele; De Blasi, Roberto; Tschuor, Costa Silvia; Bonaldi, Giuseppe

    2013-10-01

    Presentation of a cerebral aneurysm can be incidental, discovered at imaging obtained for unrelated causes, can occur in the occasion of imaging obtained for symptoms possibly or likely related to the presence of an unruptured aneurysm, or can occur with signs and symptoms at the time of aneurismal rupture. Most unruptured intracranial aneurysms are thought to be asymptomatic, or present with vague or non-specific symptoms like headache or dizziness. Isolated oculomotor nerve palsies, however, may typically indicate the presence of a posterior circulation aneurysm. Ruptured intracranial aneurysms are by far the most common cause of non-traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage and represent a neurological emergency with potentially devastating consequences. Subarachnoid hemorrhage may be easily suspected in the presence of sudden and severe headache, vomiting, meningism signs, and/or altered mental status. However, failure to recognize milder and more ambiguous clinical pictures may result in a delayed or missed diagnosis. In this paper we will describe the clinical spectrum of unruptured and ruptured intracranial aneurysms by discussing both typical and uncommon clinical features emerging from the literature review. We will additionally provide the reader with descriptions of the underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms, and main diagnostic pitfalls.

  10. Left Main Coronary Artery Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Doustkami, Hossein; Maleki, Nasrollah; Tavosi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysms of the left main coronary artery are exceedingly rare clinical entities, encountered incidentally in approximately 0.1% of patients who undergo routine angiography. The most common cause of coronary artery aneurysms is atherosclerosis. Angiography is the gold standard for diagnosis and treatment. Depending on the severity of the coexisting coronary stenosis, patients with left main coronary artery aneurysms can be effectively managed either surgically or pharmacologically. We herein report a case of left main coronary artery aneurysm in a 72-year-old man with a prior history of hypertension presenting to our hospital because of unstable angina. The electrocardiogram showed ST-segment depression and T-wave inversion in the precordial leads. All the data of blood chemistry were normal. Echocardiography showed akinetic anterior wall, septum, and apex, mild mitral regurgitation and ejection fraction of 45%. Coronary angiography revealed a saccular aneurysm of the left main coronary artery with significant stenosis in the left anterior descending, left circumflex, and right coronary artery. The patient immediately underwent coronary artery bypass grafting and ligation of the aneurysm. At six months’ follow-up, he remained asymptomatic. PMID:27403190

  11. [False aneurysm of the left ventricle and coronary aneurysms in Behçet disease].

    PubMed

    Rolland, J M; Bical, O; Laradi, A; Robinault, J; Benzidia, R; Vanetti, A; Herreman, G

    1993-09-01

    A false left ventricular aneurysm and coronary artery aneurysm were discovered in a 29 year old patient with Behçet's syndrome. The operation under cardiopulmonary bypass consisted of closing the neck of the false aneurysm by an endo-aneurysmal approach with a Gore-Tex patch. The coronary artery aneurysms were respected. There were no postoperative complications. Cardiac involvement is rare in Behçet's syndrome (6%). The originality of this case is the association of two aneurysmal pathologies: the coronary and ventricular aneurysms due to the angiitis and the myocardial fragility induced by ischaemia.

  12. Factors for converting dose measured in polystyrene phantoms to dose reported in water phantoms for incident proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Moyers, M. F.; Vatnitsky, A. S.; Vatnitsky, S. M.

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: Previous dosimetry protocols allowed calibrations of proton beamline dose monitors to be performed in plastic phantoms. Nevertheless, dose determinations were referenced to absorbed dose-to-muscle or absorbed dose-to-water. The IAEA Code of Practice TRS 398 recommended that dose calibrations be performed with ionization chambers only in water phantoms because plastic-to-water dose conversion factors were not available with sufficient accuracy at the time of its writing. These factors are necessary, however, to evaluate the difference in doses delivered to patients if switching from calibration in plastic to a protocol that only allows calibration in water. Methods: This work measured polystyrene-to-water dose conversion factors for this purpose. Uncertainties in the results due to temperature, geometry, and chamber effects were minimized by using special experimental set-up procedures. The measurements were validated by Monte Carlo simulations. Results: At the peak of non-range-modulated beams, measured polystyrene-to-water factors ranged from 1.015 to 1.024 for beams with ranges from 36 to 315 mm. For beams with the same ranges and medium sized modulations, the factors ranged from 1.005 to 1.019. The measured results were used to generate tables of polystyrene-to-water dose conversion factors. Conclusions: The dose conversion factors can be used at clinical proton facilities to support beamline and patient specific dose per monitor unit calibrations performed in polystyrene phantoms.

  13. Eigenbreasts for statistical breast phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Tward, Daniel J.; Ketcha, M.; Ratnanather, J. T.; Miller, M. I.; Park, Subok; Segars, W. P.; Lo, Joseph Y.

    2016-03-01

    To facilitate rigorous virtual clinical trials using model observers for breast imaging optimization and evaluation, we demonstrated a method of defining statistical models, based on 177 sets of breast CT patient data, in order to generate tens of thousands of unique digital breast phantoms. In order to separate anatomical texture from variation in breast shape, each training set of breast phantoms were deformed to a consistent atlas compressed geometry. Principal component analysis (PCA) was then performed on the shape-matched breast CT volumes to capture the variation of patient breast textures. PCA decomposes the training set of N breast CT volumes into an N-1-dimensional space of eigenvectors, which we call eigenbreasts. By summing weighted combinations of eigenbreasts, a large ensemble of different breast phantoms can be newly created. Different training sets can be used in eigenbreast analysis for designing basis models to target sub-populations defined by breast characteristics, such as size or density. In this work, we plan to generate ensembles of 30,000 new phantoms based on glandularity for an upcoming virtual trial of lesion detectability in digital breast tomosynthesis. Our method extends our series of digital and physical breast phantoms based on human subject anatomy, providing the capability to generate new, unique ensembles consisting of tens of thousands or more virtual subjects. This work represents an important step towards conducting future virtual trials for tasks-based assessment of breast imaging, where it is vital to have a large ensemble of realistic phantoms for statistical power as well as clinical relevance.

  14. Patient-specific blood rheology in sickle-cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuejin; Du, E; Lei, Huan; Tang, Yu-Hang; Dao, Ming; Suresh, Subra; Karniadakis, George Em

    2016-02-06

    Sickle-cell anaemia (SCA) is an inherited blood disorder exhibiting heterogeneous cell morphology and abnormal rheology, especially under hypoxic conditions. By using a multiscale red blood cell (RBC) model with parameters derived from patient-specific data, we present a mesoscopic computational study of the haemodynamic and rheological characteristics of blood from SCA patients with hydroxyurea (HU) treatment (on-HU) and those without HU treatment (off-HU). We determine the shear viscosity of blood in health as well as in different states of disease. Our results suggest that treatment with HU improves or worsens the rheological characteristics of blood in SCA depending on the degree of hypoxia. However, on-HU groups always have higher levels of haematocrit-to-viscosity ratio (HVR) than off-HU groups, indicating that HU can indeed improve the oxygen transport potential of blood. Our patient-specific computational simulations suggest that the HVR level, rather than the shear viscosity of sickle RBC suspensions, may be a more reliable indicator in assessing the response to HU treatment.

  15. Patient-Specific Computational Modeling of Human Phonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Qian; Zheng, Xudong; University of Maine Team

    2013-11-01

    Phonation is a common biological process resulted from the complex nonlinear coupling between glottal aerodynamics and vocal fold vibrations. In the past, the simplified symmetric straight geometric models were commonly employed for experimental and computational studies. The shape of larynx lumen and vocal folds are highly three-dimensional indeed and the complex realistic geometry produces profound impacts on both glottal flow and vocal fold vibrations. To elucidate the effect of geometric complexity on voice production and improve the fundamental understanding of human phonation, a full flow-structure interaction simulation is carried out on a patient-specific larynx model. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first patient-specific flow-structure interaction study of human phonation. The simulation results are well compared to the established human data. The effects of realistic geometry on glottal flow and vocal fold dynamics are investigated. It is found that both glottal flow and vocal fold dynamics present a high level of difference from the previous simplified model. This study also paved the important step toward the development of computer model for voice disease diagnosis and surgical planning. The project described was supported by Grant Number ROlDC007125 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD).

  16. Patient-specific blood rheology in sickle-cell anaemia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuejin; Du, E.; Lei, Huan; Tang, Yu-Hang; Dao, Ming; Suresh, Subra; Karniadakis, George Em

    2016-01-01

    Sickle-cell anaemia (SCA) is an inherited blood disorder exhibiting heterogeneous cell morphology and abnormal rheology, especially under hypoxic conditions. By using a multiscale red blood cell (RBC) model with parameters derived from patient-specific data, we present a mesoscopic computational study of the haemodynamic and rheological characteristics of blood from SCA patients with hydroxyurea (HU) treatment (on-HU) and those without HU treatment (off-HU). We determine the shear viscosity of blood in health as well as in different states of disease. Our results suggest that treatment with HU improves or worsens the rheological characteristics of blood in SCA depending on the degree of hypoxia. However, on-HU groups always have higher levels of haematocrit-to-viscosity ratio (HVR) than off-HU groups, indicating that HU can indeed improve the oxygen transport potential of blood. Our patient-specific computational simulations suggest that the HVR level, rather than the shear viscosity of sickle RBC suspensions, may be a more reliable indicator in assessing the response to HU treatment. PMID:26855752

  17. Aneurysms - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Aneurysms URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/aneurysms.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  18. SU-E-T-04: 3D Printed Patient-Specific Surface Mould Applicators for Brachytherapy Treatment of Superficial Lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Cumming, I; Lasso, A; Rankin, A; Fichtinger, G; Joshi, C P; Falkson, C; Schreiner, L John

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the feasibility of constructing 3D-printed patient-specific surface mould applicators for HDR brachytherapy treatment of superficial lesions. Methods: We propose using computer-aided design software to create 3D printed surface mould applicators for brachytherapy. A mould generation module was developed in the open-source 3D Slicer ( http://www.slicer.org ) medical image analysis platform. The system extracts the skin surface from CT images, and generates smooth catheter paths over the region of interest based on user-defined start and end points at a specified stand-off distance from the skin surface. The catheter paths are radially extended to create catheter channels that are sufficiently wide to ensure smooth insertion of catheters for a safe source travel. An outer mould surface is generated to encompass the channels. The mould is also equipped with fiducial markers to ensure its reproducible placement. A surface mould applicator with eight parallel catheter channels of 4mm diameters was fabricated for the nose region of a head phantom; flexible plastic catheters of 2mm diameter were threaded through these channels maintaining 10mm catheter separations and a 5mm stand-off distance from the skin surface. The apparatus yielded 3mm thickness of mould material between channels and the skin. The mould design was exported as a stereolithography file to a Dimension SST1200es 3D printer and printed using ABS Plus plastic material. Results: The applicator closely matched its design and was found to be sufficiently rigid without deformation during repeated application on the head phantom. Catheters were easily threaded into channels carved along catheter paths. Further tests are required to evaluate feasibility of channel diameters smaller than 4mm. Conclusion: Construction of 3D-printed mould applicators show promise for use in patient specific brachytherapy of superficial lesions. Further evaluation of 3D printing techniques and materials is required

  19. Sci—Fri PM: Dosimetry—06: Commissioning of a 3D patient specific QA system for hypofractionated prostate treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Rivest, R; Venkataraman, S; McCurdy, B

    2014-08-15

    The objective of this work is to commission the 6MV-SRS beam model in COMPASS (v2.1, IBA-Dosimetry) and validate its use for patient specific QA of hypofractionated prostate treatments. The COMPASS system consists of a 2D ion chamber array (MatriXX{sup Evolution}), an independent gantry angle sensor and associated software. The system can either directly calculate or reconstruct (using measured detector responses) a 3D dose distribution on the patient CT dataset for plan verification. Beam models are developed and commissioned in the same manner as a beam model is commissioned in a standard treatment planning system. Model validation was initially performed by comparing both COMPASS calculations and reconstructions to measured open field beam data. Next, 10 hypofractionated prostate RapidArc plans were delivered to both the COMPASS system and a phantom with ion chamber and film inserted. COMPASS dose distributions calculated and reconstructed on the phantom CT dataset were compared to the chamber and film measurements. The mean (± standard deviation) difference between COMPASS reconstructed dose and ion chamber measurement was 1.4 ± 1.0%. The maximum discrepancy was 2.6%. Corresponding values for COMPASS calculation were 0.9 ± 0.9% and 2.6%, respectively. The average gamma agreement index (3%/3mm) for COMPAS reconstruction and film was 96.7% and 95.3% when using 70% and 20% dose thresholds, respectively. The corresponding values for COMPASS calculation were 97.1% and 97.1%, respectively. Based on our results, COMPASS can be used for the patient specific QA of hypofractionated prostate treatments delivered with the 6MV-SRS beam.

  20. Interactive patient-specific vascular modeling with sweep surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kretschmer, Jan; Godenschwager, Christian; Preim, Bernhard; Stamminger, Marc

    2013-12-01

    The precise modeling of vascular structures plays a key role in medical imaging applications, such as diagnosis, therapy planning and blood flow simulations. For the simulation of blood flow in particular, high-precision models are required to produce accurate results. It is thus common practice to perform extensive manual data polishing on vascular segmentations prior to simulation. This usually involves a complex tool chain which is highly impractical for clinical on-site application. To close this gap in current blood flow simulation pipelines, we present a novel technique for interactive vascular modeling which is based on implicit sweep surfaces. Our method is able to generate and correct smooth high-quality models based on geometric centerline descriptions on the fly. It supports complex vascular free-form contours and consequently allows for an accurate and fast modeling of pathological structures such as aneurysms or stenoses. We extend the concept of implicit sweep surfaces to achieve increased robustness and applicability as required in the medical field. We finally compare our method to existing techniques and provide case studies that confirm its contribution to current simulation pipelines.

  1. Endovascular Exclusion of Renal Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Poul Erik Rohr, Nils

    2005-06-15

    A patient who was operated for an abdominal aortic aneurysm 7 years earlier presented with recently discovered iliac and renal artery aneurysms. The renal artery had an angulation of 90{sup o}, but the aneurysm was successfully excluded using a covered vascular stent graft placed over an extrastiff guidewire. Even in cases of complex anatomy of a renal aneurysm, endovascular treatment should be considered. With development of more flexible and low-profile endoprosthesis with accurate deployment, these have become more usable.

  2. Fractional Modeling of Viscoelasticity in Brain Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yue; Karniadakis, George

    2014-11-01

    We develop fundamental new numerical methods for fractional order PDEs, and investigate corresponding models for arterial walls. Specifically, the arterial wall is a heterogeneous soft tissue with complex biomechanical properties, and its constitutive laws are typically derived using integer-order differential equations. However, recent simulations on 1D model have indicated that fractional order models may offer a more powerful alternative for describing arterial wall mechanics, because they are less sensitive to the parameter estimation compared with the integer-calculus-based models. We study the specific fractional PDEs that better model the properties of the 3D arterial walls, and for the first time employ them in simulating flow structure interactions for patient-specific brain aneurysms. A comparison study indicates that for the integer order models, the viscous behavior strongly depends on the relaxation parameters while the fractional order models are less sensitive. This finding is consistent with what is observed in the 1D models for arterial networks (Perdikaris & Karniadakis, 2014), except that when the fractional order is small, the 3D fractional-order models are more sensitive to the fractional order compared to the 1D models.

  3. Microsurgical treatment of ophthalmic segment aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Gross, Bradley A; Du, Rose

    2013-08-01

    Ophthalmic segment aneurysms refer to superior hypophyseal artery aneurysms, true ophthalmic artery aneurysms, and their dorsal variant. Indications for treatment of these aneurysms include concerning morphological features, large size, visual loss, or rupture. Although narrow-necked aneurysms are ideal endovascular targets, more complex and larger lesions necessitating adjunctive stent or flow-diversion techniques may be suitably treated with long-lasting, effective clip ligation instead. This is particularly relevant in the consideration of ruptured ophthalmic segment aneurysms. This article provides a depiction of microsurgical treatment of ophthalmic segment aneurysms with an accompanying video demonstration. Emphasis is placed on microsurgical anatomy, the intradural anterior clinoidectomy and clipping technique. The intradural anterior clinoidectomy, demonstrated in detail in our Supplementary video, provides significant added exposure of the ophthalmic segment of the internal carotid artery, allowing for improved aneurysm visualization. In the management of superior hypophyseal artery aneurysms, emphasis is placed on identifying and preserving superior hypophyseal artery perforators, using serial fenestrated straight clips rather than a single right-angled fenestrated clip to obliterate the aneurysm. Post-clipping indocyanine green dye angiography is a crucial tool to confirm aneurysm obliteration and the preservation of the parent vasculature and adjacent superior hypophyseal artery perforators. With careful attention to the nuances of microsurgical clipping of ophthalmic segment aneurysms, rewarding results can be obtained.

  4. Paraclinoid aneurysm concealed by sphenoid wing meningioma.

    PubMed

    Petrecca, Kevin; Sirhan, Denis

    2009-02-01

    The coexistence of brain tumours and aneurysms is rare. In all previously reported cases the aneurysm was detectable by angiography. We report here a case in which a paraclinoid internal carotid artery aneurysm was coexistent and concealed from angiographic detection by an adjacent parasellar meningioma.

  5. [Albert Einstein and his abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Cervantes Castro, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    The interesting case of Albert Einstein's abdominal aortic aneurysm is presented. He was operated on at age 69 and, finding that the large aneurysm could not be removed, the surgeon elected to wrap it with cellophane to prevent its growth. However, seven years later the aneurysm ruptured and caused the death of the famous scientist.

  6. Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair: current endovascular perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Nathan; Minion, David; Bobadilla, Joseph L

    2014-01-01

    Thoracoabdominal aneurysms account for roughly 3% of identified aneurysms annually in the United States. Advancements in endovascular techniques and devices have broadened their application to these complex surgical problems. This paper will focus on the current state of endovascular thoracoabdominal aneurysm repair, including specific considerations in patient selection, operative planning, and perioperative complications. Both total endovascular and hybrid options will be considered. PMID:25170271

  7. Transcatheter Coil Embolization of Splenic Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Satoshi Hirota, Shozo; Maeda, Hiroaki; Achiwa, Sachiko Arai, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Nakao, Norio

    2008-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical results and technical problems of transcatheter coil embolization for splenic artery aneurysm. Subjects were 16 patients (8 men, 8 women; age range, 40-80 years) who underwent transcatheter embolization for splenic artery aneurysm (14 true aneurysms, 2 false aneurysms) at one of our hospitals during the period January 1997 through July 2005. Two aneurysms (12.5%) were diagnosed at the time of rupture. Multiple splenic aneurysms were found in seven patients. Aneurysms were classified by site as proximal (or strictly ostial) (n = 3), middle (n = 3), or hilar (n = 10). The indication for transcatheter arterial embolization was a false or true aneurysm 20 mm in diameter. Embolic materials were fibered coils and interlocking detachable coils. Embolization was performed by the isolation technique, the packing technique, or both. Technically, all aneurysms were devascularized without severe complications. Embolized aneurysms were 6-40 mm in diameter (mean, 25 mm). Overall, the primary technical success rate was 88% (14 of 16 patients). In the remaining 2 patients (12.5%), partial recanalization occurred, and re-embolization was performed. The secondary technical success rate was 100%. Seven (44%) of the 16 study patients suffered partial splenic infarction. Intrasplenic branching originating from the aneurysm was observed in five patients. We conclude that transcatheter coil embolization should be the initial treatment of choice for splenic artery aneurysm.

  8. Coil Embolization for Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective To determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of coil embolization compared with surgical clipping to treat intracranial aneurysms. The Technology Endovascular coil embolization is a percutaneous approach to treat an intracranial aneurysm from within the blood vessel without the need of a craniotomy. In this procedure, a microcatheter is inserted into the femoral artery near the groin and navigated to the site of the aneurysm. Small helical platinum coils are deployed through the microcatheter to fill the aneurysm, and prevent it from further expansion and rupture. Health Canada has approved numerous types of coils and coil delivery systems to treat intracranial aneurysms. The most favoured are controlled detachable coils. Coil embolization may be used with other adjunct endovascular devices such as stents and balloons. Background Intracranial Aneurysms Intracranial aneurysms are the dilation or ballooning of part of a blood vessel in the brain. Intracranial aneurysms range in size from small (<12 mm in diameter) to large (12–25 mm), and to giant (>25 mm). There are 3 main types of aneurysms. Fusiform aneurysms involve the entire circumference of the artery; saccular aneurysms have outpouchings; and dissecting aneurysms have tears in the arterial wall. Berry aneurysms are saccular aneurysms with well-defined necks. Intracranial aneurysms may occur in any blood vessel of the brain; however, they are most commonly found at the branch points of large arteries that form the circle of Willis at the base of the brain. In 85% to 95% of patients, they are found in the anterior circulation. Aneurysms in the posterior circulation are less frequent, and are more difficult to treat surgically due to inaccessibility. Most intracranial aneurysms are small and asymptomatic. Large aneurysms may have a mass effect, causing compression on the brain and cranial nerves and neurological deficits. When an intracranial aneurysm ruptures and bleeds

  9. Patient-specific dose calculation methods for high-dose-rate iridium-192 brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Emily S.

    In high-dose-rate 192Ir brachytherapy, the radiation dose received by the patient is calculated according to the AAPM Task Group 43 (TG-43) formalism. This table-based dose superposition method uses dosimetry parameters derived with the radioactive 192Ir source centered in a water phantom. It neglects the dose perturbations caused by inhomogeneities, such as the patient anatomy, applicators, shielding, and radiographic contrast solution. In this work, we evaluated the dosimetric characteristics of a shielded rectal applicator with an endocavitary balloon injected with contrast solution. The dose distributions around this applicator were calculated by the GEANT4 Monte Carlo (MC) code and measured by ionization chamber and GAFCHROMIC EBT film. A patient-specific dose calculation study was then carried out for 40 rectal treatment plans. The PTRAN_CT MC code was used to calculate the dose based on computed tomography (CT) images. This study involved the development of BrachyGUI, an integrated treatment planning tool that can process DICOM-RT data and create PTRAN_CT input initialization files. BrachyGUI also comes with dose calculation and evaluation capabilities. We proposed a novel scatter correction method to account for the reduction in backscatter radiation near tissue-air interfaces. The first step requires calculating the doses contributed by primary and scattered photons separately, assuming a full scatter environment. The scatter dose in the patient is subsequently adjusted using a factor derived by MC calculations, which depends on the distances between the point of interest, the 192Ir source, and the body contour. The method was validated for multicatheter breast brachytherapy, in which the target and skin doses for 18 patient plans agreed with PTRAN_CT calculations better than 1%. Finally, we developed a CT-based analytical dose calculation method. It corrects for the photon attenuation and scatter based upon the radiological paths determined by ray tracing

  10. Patient-specific biodegradable implant in pediatric craniofacial surgery.

    PubMed

    Essig, H; Lindhorst, D; Gander, T; Schumann, P; Könü, D; Altermatt, S; Rücker, M

    2017-02-01

    Surgical correction of premature fusion of calvarial sutures involving the fronto-orbital region can be challenging due to the demanding three-dimensional (3D) anatomy. If fronto-orbital advancement (FOA) is necessary, surgery is typically performed using resorbable plates and screws that are bent manually intraoperatively. A new approach using individually manufactured resorbable implants (KLS Martin Group, Tuttlingen, Germany) is presented in the current paper. Preoperative CT scan data were processed in iPlan (ver. 3.0.5; Brainlab, Feldkirchen, Germany) to generate a 3D reconstruction. Virtual osteotomies and simulation of the ideal outer contour with reassembled bony segments were performed. Digital planning was transferred with a cutting guide, and an individually manufactured resorbable implant was used for rigid fixation. A resorbable patient-specific implant (Resorb X-PSI) allows precise surgery for FOA in craniosynostosis using a complete digital workflow and should be considered superior to manually bent resorbable plates.

  11. Towards the Design of a Patient-Specific Virtual Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Caraguel, Flavien; Lesart, Anne-Cécile; Estève, François; van der Sanden, Boudewijn

    2016-01-01

    The design of a patient-specific virtual tumour is an important step towards Personalized Medicine. However this requires to capture the description of many key events of tumour development, including angiogenesis, matrix remodelling, hypoxia, and cell state heterogeneity that will all influence the tumour growth kinetics and degree of tumour invasiveness. To that end, an integrated hybrid and multiscale approach has been developed based on data acquired on a preclinical mouse model as a proof of concept. Fluorescence imaging is exploited to build case-specific virtual tumours. Numerical simulations show that the virtual tumour matches the characteristics and spatiotemporal evolution of its real counterpart. We achieved this by combining image analysis and physiological modelling to accurately described the evolution of different tumour cases over a month. The development of such models is essential since a dedicated virtual tumour would be the perfect tool to identify the optimum therapeutic strategies that would make Personalized Medicine truly reachable and achievable. PMID:28096895

  12. A method to enhance 2D ion chamber array patient specific quality assurance for IMRT.

    PubMed

    Diaz Moreno, Rogelio Manuel; Venencia, Daniel; Garrigo, Edgardo; Pipman, Yakov

    2016-11-21

    Gamma index comparison has been established as a method for patient specific quality assurance in IMRT. Detector arrays can replace radiographic film systems to record 2D dose distributions and fulfill quality assurance requirements. These electronic devices present spatial resolution disadvantages with respect to films. This handicap can be partially overcome with a multiple acquisition sequence of adjacent 2D dose distributions. The detector spatial response influence can also be taken into account through the convolution of the calculated dose with the detector spatial response. A methodology that employs both approaches could allow for enhancements of the quality assurance procedure. 35 beams from different step and shoot IMRT plans were delivered on a phantom. 2D dose distributions were recorded with a PTW-729 ion chamber array for individual beams, following the multiple acquisition methodology. 2D dose distributions were also recorded on radiographic films. Measured dose distributions with films and with the PTW-729 array were processed with the software RITv5.2 for Gamma index comparison with calculated doses. Calculated dose was also convolved with the ion chamber 2D response and the Gamma index comparisons with the 2D dose distribution measured with the PTW-729 array was repeated. 3.7 ± 2.7% of points surpassed the accepted Gamma index when using radiographic films compared with calculated dose, with a minimum of 0.67 and a maximum of 13.27. With the PTW-729 multiple acquisition methodology compared with calculated dose, 4.1 ± 1.3% of points surpassed the accepted Gamma index, with a minimum of 1.44 and a maximum of 11.26. With the PTW- multiple acquisition methodology compared with convolved calculated dose, 2.7 ± 1.3% of points surpassed the accepted Gamma index, with a minimum of 0.42 and a maximum of 5.75. The results obtained in this work suggest that the comparison of merged adjacent dose distributions with convolved calculated dose

  13. Use of 3D printers to create a patient-specific 3D bolus for external beam therapy.

    PubMed

    Burleson, Sarah; Baker, Jamie; Hsia, An Ting; Xu, Zhigang

    2015-05-08

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that an inexpensive 3D printer can be used to manufacture patient-specific bolus for external beam therapy, and to show we can accurately model this printed bolus in our treatment planning system for accurate treatment delivery. Percent depth-dose measurements and tissue maximum ratios were used to determine the characteristics of the printing materials, acrylonitrile butadiene styrene and polylactic acid, as bolus material with physical density of 1.04 and 1.2 g/cm3, and electron density of 3.38 × 10²³ electrons/cm3 and 3.80 × 10²³ electrons/ cm3, respectively. Dose plane comparisons using Gafchromic EBT2 film and the RANDO phantom were used to verify accurate treatment planning. We accurately modeled a printing material in Eclipse treatment planning system, assigning it a Hounsfield unit of 260. We were also able to verify accurate treatment planning using gamma analysis for dose plane comparisons. With gamma criteria of 5% dose difference and 2 mm DTA, we were able to have 86.5% points passing, and with gamma criteria of 5% dose difference and 3 mm DTA, we were able to have 95% points passing. We were able to create a patient-specific bolus using an inexpensive 3D printer and model it in our treatment planning system for accurate treatment delivery.

  14. SU-E-T-601: Patient Specific QA Check for Radiotherapy with Carbon Beam at SAGA HIMAT

    SciTech Connect

    Himukai, T; Tsunashima, Y; Kanazawa, M; Mizota, M; Shioyama, Y; Endo, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To verify a patient specific QA for a prescribed dose per monitor unit (MU) and range check of carbon ion radiotherapy with a beam wobbling method at SAGA HIMAT. Methods: The dose distribution in a water phantom was recalculated with a treatment plan made by XiO-N (Mitsubishi Electric Corporation, Tokyo). The depth dose distributions at central axis were compared with measurements using pinpoint ionization chamber (PTW31014). Measured data were analyzed for dose and distance difference with criteria of 3% and 2mm. To check for the MU and range, analysis data were used at center and distal end of a spread out bragg peak (SOBP) depth, respectively. Results: Treatment plan of 1400 beams in 500 patients were used for analysis. The pass rate of the MU and range was about 98% and 74%, respectively. The rate of both was 73%. The plan data passed only the MU check were verified depth dose profile. The data passed only the range and failed of both were compared depth dose distributions at off axis. If it was failed, we discussed with physicians. Conclusion: Most of patient specific QA check for a prescribed MU and range check at SAGA HIMAT were passed.

  15. Framework for quantitative evaluation of 3D vessel segmentation approaches using vascular phantoms in conjunction with 3D landmark localization and registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wörz, Stefan; Hoegen, Philipp; Liao, Wei; Müller-Eschner, Matthias; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Rohr, Karl

    2016-03-01

    We introduce a framework for quantitative evaluation of 3D vessel segmentation approaches using vascular phantoms. Phantoms are designed using a CAD system and created with a 3D printer, and comprise realistic shapes including branches and pathologies such as abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). To transfer ground truth information to the 3D image coordinate system, we use a landmark-based registration scheme utilizing fiducial markers integrated in the phantom design. For accurate 3D localization of the markers we developed a novel 3D parametric intensity model that is directly fitted to the markers in the images. We also performed a quantitative evaluation of different vessel segmentation approaches for a phantom of an AAA.

  16. Phantom Recollection of Bridging and Elaborative Inferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Murray; Spear, Jackie

    2015-01-01

    The phantom recollection model is a multiprocess analysis according to which memory judgments are collaboratively supported by one's recollection of an item in its context, a vaguer sense of stimulus familiarity, and the phantom recollection of the substance and even perceptual details of unstudied but related lures. Phantom recollection has…

  17. Rupture of lenticulostriate artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Heck, Olivier; Anxionnat, René; Lacour, Jean-Christophe; Derelle, Anne-Laure; Ducrocq, Xavier; Richard, Sébastien; Bracard, Serge

    2014-02-01

    The authors report on 3 rare cases of ruptured lenticulostriate artery (LSA) aneurysms that were heralded by deep cerebral hematomas. The hematomas were unilateral in 2 cases and bilateral in 1; in the bilateral case, only a single LSA aneurysm could be identified on the right side of the brain. Because of their small size (≤ 2 mm), fusiform aspect, and deep location within the brain, all of the aneurysms were treated conservatively. There was no hemorrhage recurrence, and follow-up angiography demonstrated spontaneous thrombosis in 2 of the 3 cases. The clinical course was favorable in 2 of the 3 patients. The course in the patient with the bilateral hematoma was marked by an ischemic event after the initial episode, resulting in an aggravation of deficits. The cause of this second event was uncertain. Because our knowledge about the natural history of LSA aneurysms is incomplete, there is no consensus concerning a therapeutic strategy. The authors' experience in 3 reported cases leads them to think that a conservative approach involving close angiographic monitoring may be proposed as first-line treatment. If the monitored aneurysm then persists or grows in size, its occlusion should be considered. Nonetheless, other studies are needed to further strengthen the legitimacy of this strategy.

  18. Endocavity Ultrasound Hyperthermia for Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer: Patient-specific Modeling, Experimental Verification, and Combination with HDR Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wootton, Jeffery; Diederich, Chris; Chen Xin; Prakash, Punit; Juang, Titania

    2010-03-09

    The feasibility of targeted hyperthermia delivery by an intrauterine ultrasound applicator to patient-specific treatment volumes in conjunction with HDR brachytherapy was investigated using theory and experiment. 30 HDR brachytherapy treatment plans were inspected to define hyperthermia treatment volumes (HTVs) based on tumor and radiation target volumes. Several typical cases were imported into a patient-specific treatment planning platform that optimized acoustic output power from an endocavity multisectored tubular array to conform temperature and thermal dose to HTVs. Perfusion was within a clinical range of 0.5-3 kg m{sup -3} s{sup -1}. Applicators were constructed with 1-3 elements at 6.5-8 MHz with 90 deg. -360 deg. sectoring and 25-35 mm heating length housed in a water-cooled PET catheter. Acoustic output was compared to heating in ex vivo tissue assessed with implanted thermometry. Radiation attenuation through the device was measured in an ionization chamber. The HTV extends 2-4 cm in diameter and 2-4 cm in length. The bladder and rectum can be within 10-12 mm. HTV targets can be covered with temperature clouds >41 deg. and thermal dose t{sup 43}>5 min with 45 deg. C maximum temperature and rectal temperature <41.5 deg. C. Sectored applicators preferentially direct energy laterally into the parametrium to limit heating of rectum and bladder. Interstitial brachytherapy catheters within the HTV could be used for thermal feedback during HT treatment. Temperature distributions in phantom show preferential heating within sectors and align well with acoustic output. Heating control along the device length and in angle is evident. A 4-6% reduction in radiation transmission through the transducers was observed, which could likely be compensated for in planning. Patient-specific modeling and experimental heating demonstrated 3-D conformal heating capabilities of endocavity ultrasound applicators.

  19. Bilateral asymptomatic giant renal artery aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Özkan, G; Ulusoy, Ş; Dinç, H; Kaynar, K; Sönmez, B; Akagündüz, K

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of renal artery aneurysm is very low. Approximately in 20% of these patients hypertension is observed. The diameter of aneurysm increases with accompanying complication rates. The most feared complication is rupture. The risk of rupture also increases with the diameter of aneurysm. We report an aneurysm with the biggest diameter reported in the literature. The patient had a 12 cm-diameter of aneurysm in one kidney and did not show any symptoms including hypertension until she was seventy years old. PMID:22435028

  20. Idiopathic thoracic aortic aneurysm at pediatric age.

    PubMed

    Marín-Manzano, E; González-de-Olano, D; Haurie-Girelli, J; Herráiz-Sarachaga, J I; Bermúdez-Cañete, R; Tamariz-Martel, A; Cuesta-Gimeno, C; Pérez-de-León, J

    2009-03-01

    A 6-year-old-boy presented with epigastric pain and vomiting over 1 year. Chest X-ray and esophagogastric transit showed a mediastinal mass. A chest computerized tomography angiogram demonstrated a descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. Analytical determinations carried out were all negative. The aneurysm was surgically repaired using a Dacron patch. The anatomopathological study described atherosclerotic lesions with calcifications, compatible with an atherosclerotic aneurysm wall. Aneurysms are uncommon in the pediatric population. Usually, no pathogenesis can be determined, and thus, such cases are grouped as idiopathic. Direct repair with or without patch is a therapeutic alternative in pediatric aneurysms and can allow the growth of the aortic circumference.

  1. Results of patient specific quality assurance for patients undergoing stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for lung lesions.

    PubMed

    Hardcastle, Nicholas; Clements, Natalie; Chesson, Brent; Aarons, Yolanda; Cramb, Jim; Siva, Shankar; Wanigaratne, Derrick M; Ball, David; Kron, Tomas

    2014-03-01

    Hypofractionated image guided radiotherapy of extracranial targets has become increasingly popular as a treatment modality for inoperable patients with one or more small lesions, often referred to as stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR). This report details the results of the physical quality assurance (QA) program used for the first 33 lung cancer SABR radiotherapy 3D conformal treatment plans in our centre. SABR involves one or few fractions of high radiation dose delivered in many small fields or arcs with tight margins to mobile targets often delivered through heterogeneous media with non-coplanar beams. We have conducted patient-specific QA similar to the more common intensity modulated radiotherapy QA with particular reference to motion management. Individual patient QA was performed in a Perspex phantom using point dose verification with an ionisation chamber and radiochromic film for verification of the dose distribution both with static and moving detectors to verify motion management strategies. While individual beams could vary by up to 7%, the total dose in the target was found to be within ±2% of the prescribed dose for all 33 plans. Film measurements showed qualitative and quantitative agreement between planned and measured isodose line shapes and dimensions. The QA process highlighted the need to account for couch transmission and demonstrated that the ITV construction was appropriate for the treatment technique used. QA is essential for complex radiotherapy deliveries such as SABR. We found individual patient QA helpful in setting up the technique and understanding potential weaknesses in SABR workflow, thus providing confidence in SABR delivery.

  2. Vertebro-basilar junction aneurysms: a single centre experience and meta-analysis of endovascular treatments.

    PubMed

    Graziano, Francesca; Ganau, Mario; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo; Boccardi, Edoardo

    2014-12-01

    Vascular lesions of the vertebrobasilar junction (VBJ) are challenging in neurosurgical practice, and their gold-standard therapy is still under debate. We describe the operative strategies currently in use for the management of these complex vascular lesions and discuss their rationale in a literature meta-analysis and single centre blinded retrospective study. The single centre study included a review of initial presentation, angiographic features and clinical outcome (with modified Rankin Scale [mRS] scores) over a long-term follow-up. In our series, small aneurysms were effectively treated by endosaccular coil embolization, whereas a strategy including flow-diverter devices combined with endosaccular coil embolization was the option of choice in large and giant aneurysms, leading to satisfactory outcomes in most cases. Our Medline review showed that endovascular treatment was chosen in most VBJ cases, whereas the microsurgical option was assigned to only a few cases. Among the endovascular treatments, the most common techniques used for the treatment of VBJ aneurysms were: coiling, stent-assisted coiling and flow diversion. Our study highlights that aneurysm morphology, location and patient-specific angio-architecture are key factors to be considered in the management of VBJ aneurysms. Most case series, including our own, show that parent artery reconstruction using a flow-diverter device is a feasible and successful technique in some cases of giant and complex aneurysms (especially those involving the lower third of the basilar artery) while a "sit back, wait and see" approach may represent the safest and most reasonable option.

  3. Vertebro-Basilar Junction Aneurysms: A Single Centre Experience and Meta-Analysis of Endovascular Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Graziano, Francesca; Ganau, Mario; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo; Boccardi, Edoardo

    2014-01-01

    Summary Vascular lesions of the vertebrobasilar junction (VBJ) are challenging in neurosurgical practice, and their gold-standard therapy is still under debate. We describe the operative strategies currently in use for the management of these complex vascular lesions and discuss their rationale in a literature meta-analysis and single centre blinded retrospective study. The single centre study included a review of initial presentation, angiographic features and clinical outcome (with modified Rankin Scale [mRS] scores) over a long-term follow-up. In our series, small aneurysms were effectively treated by endosaccular coil embolization, whereas a strategy including flow-diverter devices combined with endosaccular coil embolization was the option of choice in large and giant aneurysms, leading to satisfactory outcomes in most cases. Our Medline review showed that endovascular treatment was chosen in most VBJ cases, whereas the microsurgical option was assigned to only a few cases. Among the endovascular treatments, the most common techniques used for the treatment of VBJ aneurysms were: coiling, stent-assisted coiling and flow diversion. Our study highlights that aneurysm morphology, location and patient-specific angio-architecture are key factors to be considered in the management of VBJ aneurysms. Most case series, including our own, show that parent artery reconstruction using a flow-diverter device is a feasible and successful technique in some cases of giant and complex aneurysms (especially those involving the lower third of the basilar artery) while a "sit back, wait and see" approach may represent the safest and most reasonable option. PMID:25489898

  4. Endoleak Assessment Using Computational Fluid Dynamics and Image Processing Methods in Stented Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Models

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yueh-Hsun; Mani, Karthick; Panigrahi, Bivas; Hsu, Wen-Tang

    2016-01-01

    Endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) is a predominant surgical procedure to reduce the risk of aneurysm rupture in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) patients. Endoleak formation, which eventually requires additional surgical reoperation, is a major EVAR complication. Understanding the etiology and evolution of endoleak from the hemodynamic perspective is crucial to advancing the current posttreatments for AAA patients who underwent EVAR. Therefore, a comprehensive flow assessment was performed to investigate the relationship between endoleak and its surrounding pathological flow fields through computational fluid dynamics and image processing. Six patient-specific models were reconstructed, and the associated hemodynamics in these models was quantified three-dimensionally to calculate wall stress. To provide a high degree of clinical relevance, the mechanical stress distribution calculated from the models was compared with the endoleak positions identified from the computed tomography images of patients through a series of imaging processing methods. An endoleak possibly forms in a location with high local wall stress. An improved stent graft (SG) structure is conceived accordingly by increasing the mechanical strength of the SG at peak wall stress locations. The presented analytical paradigm, as well as numerical analysis using patient-specific models, may be extended to other common human cardiovascular surgeries. PMID:27660648

  5. Spontaneous Regression of Aneurysm Remnant after Incomplete Surgical Clipping in a Patient with Ruptured Cerebral Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Hyo Sub; Ahn, JunHyong; Song, Joon Ho

    2016-01-01

    Cases of spontaneous regression of cerebral aneurysm remnant after incomplete surgical clipping have been rarely reported. This paper reports the regression of an aneurysm remnant after incomplete surgical clipping during postsurgical follow-up. A 50-year-old male presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage because of rupture of an anterior communicating artery aneurysm. An emergency clipping of the aneurysm was performed. A cerebral angiography, which was performed two weeks postoperatively, revealed an aneurysm remnant. The patient refused additional treatment and was discharged without apparent neurological deficit. One-year follow up cerebral angiography demonstrated a partially regressed aneurysm remnant. PMID:28184353

  6. Aneurysms of the thoracoabdominal aorta.

    PubMed

    Motta, R; Lò, G; Galli, G; Spaggiari, A; Sandonà, F; Vitello, V; Altomani, V

    1985-01-01

    Five cases of thoracoabdominal aneurysms are reviewed. These cases were observed during the last 10 years and their incidence was 4% of all aortic aneurysms admitted in the same period. In all the patients the Crawford's technique by graft inclusion with visceral vessel reattachment by direct suture, without by-pass, was adopted. Of the five patients, two underwent elective surgery and three emergency surgery. While the mortality rate in the patients operated on election was 0%, on emergency it was 66,6%.

  7. Experimental study of physiological flow in a cerebral saccular basilar tip aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, William; Savas, Omer; Ortega, Jason; Maitland, Duncan; Saloner, David

    2008-11-01

    The subject matter of the research is the flow within cerebral saccular basilar tip aneurysms and exploring correlations with their growth and rupture. The flow phantom consists of an inlet pipe branching out 90^o into two outlets, simulating the basilar artery bifurcation and a nearly spherical dome at the flow divider simulating the aneurysm. Input flow is a physiological waveform for the basilar artery. Flow outlet branching ratios are controlled at will. Experiments are done at Reynolds numbers 221-376 and Sexl-Wormersley number 4.46. Flow visualization and particle image velocimetry are used to study velocity, vorticity, and wall shear stress. All flows can be characterized by an off-center inlet jet and a circulation region, whose transient strength and behavior depends on the outflow ratios.

  8. A low invasiveness patient's specific template for spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Azimifar, Farhad; Hassani, Kamran; Saveh, Amir Hossein; Tabatabai Ghomshe, Farhad

    2017-02-01

    Free-hand pedicle screw placement is still conventional in surgery, although it has potentially high risks. The surgical procedures such as pedicle screw placement are usually designed based on medical imaging, but during surgery, the procedures are not normally followed due to the fact that some points are missed in two-dimensional images and seen only during surgery. In this regards, some highly accurate computer-assisted systems have been proposed and are currently used. Moreover, it is possible to reduce or completely avoid hand working by applying modern digital technology. Therefore, using these technologies has remarkable advantages. In this study, we have presented a new approach of pedicle screw placement in the lumbar and sacral regions using a specific drill guide template. The template was created by additive manufacturing technology and was verified in a clinical study as well. The main aim of this research includes the following: design, analyze, manufacture and evaluate the accuracy of a new patient-specific drill guide template, for lumbar pedicle screw placement, and compare the template to the free-hand technique under fluoroscopy supervision. Our results show that the incidence of cortex perforation is substantially reduced compared to existing methods. Finally, we believe that this approach remarkably lowers the incidence of cortex perforation and could be potentially used in clinical applications, particularly in certain selected cases.

  9. Multiscale prediction of patient-specific platelet function under flow.

    PubMed

    Flamm, Matthew H; Colace, Thomas V; Chatterjee, Manash S; Jing, Huiyan; Zhou, Songtao; Jaeger, Daniel; Brass, Lawrence F; Sinno, Talid; Diamond, Scott L

    2012-07-05

    During thrombotic or hemostatic episodes, platelets bind collagen and release ADP and thromboxane A(2), recruiting additional platelets to a growing deposit that distorts the flow field. Prediction of clotting function under hemodynamic conditions for a patient's platelet phenotype remains a challenge. A platelet signaling phenotype was obtained for 3 healthy donors using pairwise agonist scanning, in which calcium dye-loaded platelets were exposed to pairwise combinations of ADP, U46619, and convulxin to activate the P2Y(1)/P2Y(12), TP, and GPVI receptors, respectively, with and without the prostacyclin receptor agonist iloprost. A neural network model was trained on each donor's pairwise agonist scanning experiment and then embedded into a multiscale Monte Carlo simulation of donor-specific platelet deposition under flow. The simulations were compared directly with microfluidic experiments of whole blood flowing over collagen at 200 and 1000/s wall shear rate. The simulations predicted the ranked order of drug sensitivity for indomethacin, aspirin, MRS-2179 (a P2Y(1) inhibitor), and iloprost. Consistent with measurement and simulation, one donor displayed larger clots and another presented with indomethacin resistance (revealing a novel heterozygote TP-V241G mutation). In silico representations of a subject's platelet phenotype allowed prediction of blood function under flow, essential for identifying patient-specific risks, drug responses, and novel genotypes.

  10. Using an EPID for patient-specific VMAT quality assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Bakhtiari, M.; Kumaraswamy, L.; Bailey, D. W.; Boer, S. de; Malhotra, H. K.; Podgorsak, M. B.

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: A patient-specific quality assurance (QA) method was developed to verify gantry-specific individual multileaf collimator (MLC) apertures (control points) in volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Methods: VMAT treatment plans were generated in an Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS). DICOM images from a Varian EPID (aS1000) acquired in continuous acquisition mode were used for pretreatment QA. Each cine image file contains the grayscale image of the MLC aperture related to its specific control point and the corresponding gantry angle information. The TPS MLC file of this RapidArc plan contains the leaf positions for all 177 control points (gantry angles). In-house software was developed that interpolates the measured images based on the gantry angle and overlays them with the MLC pattern for all control points. The 38% isointensity line was used to define the edge of the MLC leaves on the portal images. The software generates graphs and tables that provide analysis for the number of mismatched leaf positions for a chosen distance to agreement at each control point and the frequency in which each particular leaf mismatches for the entire arc. Results: Seven patients plans were analyzed using this method. The leaves with the highest mismatched rate were found to be treatment plan dependent. Conclusions: This in-house software can be used to automatically verify the MLC leaf positions for all control points of VMAT plans using cine images acquired by an EPID.

  11. Additive manufacturing of patient-specific tubular continuum manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amanov, Ernar; Nguyen, Thien-Dang; Burgner-Kahrs, Jessica

    2015-03-01

    Tubular continuum robots, which are composed of multiple concentric, precurved, elastic tubes, provide more dexterity than traditional surgical instruments at the same diameter. The tubes can be precurved such that the resulting manipulator fulfills surgical task requirements. Up to now the only material used for the component tubes of those manipulators is NiTi, a super-elastic shape-memory alloy of nickel and titan. NiTi is a cost-intensive material and fabrication processes are complex, requiring (proprietary) technology, e.g. for shape setting. In this paper, we evaluate component tubes made of 3 different thermoplastic materials (PLA, PCL and nylon) using fused filament fabrication technology (3D printing). This enables quick and cost-effective production of custom, patient-specific continuum manipulators, produced on site on demand. Stress-strain and deformation characteristics are evaluated experimentally for 16 fabricated tubes of each thermoplastic with diameters and shapes equivalent to those of NiTi tubes. Tubes made of PCL and nylon exhibit properties comparable to those made of NiTi. We further demonstrate a tubular continuum manipulator composed of 3 nylon tubes in a transnasal, transsphenoidal skull base surgery scenario in vitro.

  12. Patient-specific modeling of the Assisted Bidirectional Glenn (ABG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Jessica; Esmaily-Moghadam, Mahdi; Figliola, Richard; Hsia, Tain-Yen; Marsden, Alison

    2016-11-01

    The Assisted Bidirectional Glenn (ABG) is proposed as an early-stage palliative procedure for single ventricle neonates. The ABG augments the pulmonary flow of the Bidirectional Glenn (BDG) with a secondary high-velocity flow through a nozzle-like shunt between the innominate artery and the superior vena cava (SVC). The ABG would provide a superior cavopulmonary connection than the systemic-pulmonary shunt that is typically employed as a stage-I procedure (e.g., a modified Blalock-Taussig shunt) and would address the low pulmonary flow associated with the BDG. Following simulations in vitro and in silico that show the ABG successfully increased pulmonary flows in idealized models, we implemented the ABG in several patient-specific models coupled to a lumped parameter network tuned to clinical values for each patient. The ABG performed similarly across different patients; compared to the BDG, the pulmonary flow increased 20% with a similar increase in the SVC pressure. The performance of the ABG was the most sensitive to nozzle outlet area, compared to nozzle inlet area and location of the shunt anastomosis. The study verified that the ABG benefits a range of patients and identified key parameters for further optimization of the ABG. Stanford Cardiovascular Institute NIH T32.

  13. Patient-specific mitral leaflet segmentation from 4D ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Robert J; Tenenholtz, Neil A; Perrin, Douglas P; Marx, Gerald R; del Nido, Pedro J; Howe, Robert D

    2011-01-01

    Segmenting the mitral valve during closure and throughout a cardiac cycle from four dimensional ultrasound (4DUS) is important for creation and validation of mechanical models and for improved visualization and understanding of mitral valve behavior. Current methods of segmenting the valve from 4DUS either require extensive user interaction and initialization, do not maintain the valve geometry across a cardiac cycle, or are incapable of producing a detailed coaptation line and surface. We present a method of segmenting the mitral valve annulus and leaflets from 4DUS such that a detailed, patient-specific annulus and leaflets are tracked throughout mitral valve closure, resulting in a detailed coaptation region. The method requires only the selection of two frames from a sequence indicating the start and end of valve closure and a single point near a closed valve. The annulus and leaflets are first found through direct segmentation in the appropriate frames and then by tracking the known geometry to the remaining frames. We compared the automatically segmented meshes to expert manual tracings for both a normal and diseased mitral valve, and found an average difference of 0.59 +/- 0.49 mm, which is on the order of the spatial resolution of the ultrasound volumes (0.5-1.0 mm/voxel).

  14. Patient-Specific Early Seizure Detection from Scalp EEG

    PubMed Central

    Minasyan, Georgiy R.; Chatten, John B.; Chatten, Martha Jane; Harner, Richard N.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Develop a method for automatic detection of seizures prior to or immediately after clinical onset using features derived from scalp EEG. Methods This detection method is patient-specific. It uses recurrent neural networks and a variety of input features. For each patient we trained and optimized the detection algorithm for two cases: 1) during the period immediately preceding seizure onset, and 2) during the period immediately following seizure onset. Continuous scalp EEG recordings (duration 15 – 62 h, median 25 h) from 25 patients, including a total of 86 seizures, were used in this study. Results Pre-onset detection was successful in 14 of the 25 patients. For these 14 patients, all of the testing seizures were detected prior to seizure onset with a median pre-onset time of 51 sec and false positive rate was 0.06/h. Post-onset detection had 100% sensitivity, 0.023/hr false positive rate and median delay of 4 sec after onset. Conclusions The unique results of this study relate to pre-onset detection. Significance Our results suggest that reliable pre-onset seizure detection may be achievable for a significant subset of epilepsy patients without use of invasive electrodes. PMID:20461014

  15. Imaging CDMAM phantom with tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Baorui; Smith, Andy; Ruth, Chris; Jing, Zhenxue

    2008-03-01

    We studied the use of the mammography contrast detail phantom (CDMAM) with tomosynthesis to evaluate the performance of our system as well as to explore the application of CDMAM in 3D breast imaging. The system was Hologic's 1st generation tomosynthesis machine. CDMAM phantom plus PMMA slabs were imaged at 3 cm, 5 cm, 7 cm, and 9 cm PMMA-equivalent thickness with 11 projections per scan and the scan angle selected from 0, 15 and 28 degrees. CDMAM images were reconstructed using the back projection method, and were scored with the CDCOM automatic analysis program. The threshold thickness of each disk size was obtained with psychometric curve fitting. We first studied errors and variability associated with the results when different numbers of images were used in contrast detail analysis, then studied factors that affected CDMAM results in tomosynthesis, including the x-ray dose, the scan angle, the in-plane reconstruction pixel size, the slice-to-slice step size, the location of the CDMAM inside the PMMA slabs, and the scatter effect. This paper will present results of CDMAM performance of our tomosynthesis system, as well as their dependence on the various factors, and the comparison with 2D mammography. Additionally we will discuss the novel processing and analysis methods developed during this study, and make proposals to modify the CDMAM phantom and the CDCOM analysis program to optimize the method for 3D tomosynthesis.

  16. Measurement of flow diverter hydraulic resistance to model flow modification in and around intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Ugron, Adám; Szikora, István; Paál, György

    2014-06-01

    Flow diverters (FDs) have been successfully applied in the recent decade to the treatment of intracranial aneurysms by impairing the communication between the flows in the parent artery and the aneurysm and, thus, the blood within the aneurysm sac. It would be desirable to have a simple and accurate computational method to follow the changes in the peri- and intraaneurysmal flow caused by the presence of FDs. The detailed flow simulation around the intricate wire structure of the FDs has three disadvantages: need for high amount of computational resources and highly skilled professionals to prepare the computational grid, and also the lack of validation that makes the invested effort questionable. In this paper, we propose a porous layer method to model the hydraulic resistance (HR) of one or several layers of the FDs. The basis of this proposal is twofold: first, from an application point of view, the only interesting parameter regarding the function of the FD is its HR; second, we have developed a method to measure the HR with a simple apparatus. We present the results of these measurements and demonstrate their utility in numerical simulations of patient-specific aneurysm simulations.

  17. Measurement of flow diverter hydraulic resistance to model flow modification in and around intracranial aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Szikora, István; Paál, György

    2014-01-01

    Flow diverters (FDs) have been successfully applied in the recent decade to the treatment of intracranial aneurysms by impairing the communication between the flows in the parent artery and the aneurysm and, thus, the blood within the aneurysm sac. It would be desirable to have a simple and accurate computational method to follow the changes in the peri- and intraaneurysmal flow caused by the presence of FDs. The detailed flow simulation around the intricate wire structure of the FDs has three disadvantages: need for high amount of computational resources and highly skilled professionals to prepare the computational grid, and also the lack of validation that makes the invested effort questionable. In this paper, we propose a porous layer method to model the hydraulic resistance (HR) of one or several layers of the FDs. The basis of this proposal is twofold: first, from an application point of view, the only interesting parameter regarding the function of the FD is its HR; second, we have developed a method to measure the HR with a simple apparatus. We present the results of these measurements and demonstrate their utility in numerical simulations of patient-specific aneurysm simulations. PMID:24936307

  18. Observation of cerebral aneurysm wall thickness using intraoperative microscopy: clinical and morphological analysis of translucent aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Song, Jihye; Park, Jung Eon; Kim, Hyoung Ryoul; Shin, Yong Sam

    2015-06-01

    Intracranial aneurysms suffer various interactions between hemodynamics and pathobiology, and rupture when this balance disrupted. Aneurysm wall morphology is a result of these interactions and reflects the quality of the maturation. However, it is a poorly documented in previous studies. The purpose of this study is to observe aneurysm wall thickness and describe the characteristics of translucent aneurysm by analyzing clinical and morphological parameters. 253 consecutive patients who underwent clipping surgery in a single institute were retrospectively analyzed. Only middle cerebral artery aneurysms (MCA) which exposed most part of the dome during surgery were included. Aneurysms were categorized based on intraoperative video findings. Aneurysms more than 90 % of super-thin dome and any aneurysms with entirely super-thin-walled daughter sac were defined as translucent aneurysm. A total of 110 consecutive patients with 116 unruptured MCA aneurysms were included. Ninety-two aneurysms (79.3 %) were assigned to the not-translucent group and 24 (20.7 %) to the translucent group. The relative proportion of translucent aneurysm in each age group was highest at ages 50-59 years and absent at ages 30-39 and 70-79 years. There was a trend that translucent aneurysms were smaller in size (p = 0.019). Multivariate logistic analysis showed that translucent aneurysm was strongly correlated with height <3 mm (p = 0.003). We demonstrated that the translucent aneurysms were smaller in size and the aneurysm height <3 mm was related. These results may provide information in determining treatment strategies in patients with small size aneurysm.

  19. Simultaneous rupture of two middle cerebral artery aneurysms presented with two aneurysm-associated intracerebral hemorrhages.

    PubMed

    Havakeshian, Sina; Bozinov, Oliver; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl

    2013-12-01

    Simultaneous rupture of more than one intracranial aneurysm is a rare event and difficult to diagnose. In this case report, we present the case of a patient with a simultaneous rupture of two middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysms with two separately localized aneurysm-associated intracerebral hemorrhages (ICH). Initially, the patient presented with headache and neck stiffness as well as progressive decrease of consciousness. Computed tomography (CT) revealed a subarachnoid hemorrhage with a frontal and temporal space-occupying ICH. CT angiography demonstrated two MCA aneurysms located in adjacency to the ICHs, one located at the M1 segment and the other in the bifurcation of the left MCA. Rupture of both aneurysms was confirmed during surgery, and both aneurysms were clipped microsurgically without complications. Although rupture of one aneurysm in patients with multiple aneurysms is the most common event, this case indicates that simultaneous rupture should be kept in mind in patients with multiple aneurysms. In patients with multiple aneurysms, the identification of the ruptured aneurysm(s) is necessary to avoid leaving a ruptured aneurysm untreated.

  20. Fast Virtual Stenting with Active Contour Models in Intracranical Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jingru; Long, Yunling; Yan, Huagang; Meng, Qianqian; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Ying; Yang, Xinjian; Li, Haiyun

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial stents are becoming increasingly a useful option in the treatment of intracranial aneurysms (IAs). Image simulation of the releasing stent configuration together with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation prior to intervention will help surgeons optimize intervention scheme. This paper proposed a fast virtual stenting of IAs based on active contour model (ACM) which was able to virtually release stents within any patient-specific shaped vessel and aneurysm models built on real medical image data. In this method, an initial stent mesh was generated along the centerline of the parent artery without the need for registration between the stent contour and the vessel. Additionally, the diameter of the initial stent volumetric mesh was set to the maximum inscribed sphere diameter of the parent artery to improve the stenting accuracy and save computational cost. At last, a novel criterion for terminating virtual stent expanding that was based on the collision detection of the axis aligned bounding boxes was applied, making the stent expansion free of edge effect. The experiment results of the virtual stenting and the corresponding CFD simulations exhibited the efficacy and accuracy of the ACM based method, which are valuable to intervention scheme selection and therapy plan confirmation. PMID:26876026

  1. Virtual Treatment of Basilar Aneurysms Using Shape Memory Polymer Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, J. M.; Hartman, J.; Rodriguez, J. N.; Maitland, D. J.

    2012-11-01

    Numerical simulations are performed on patient-specific basilar aneurysms that are treated with shape memory polymer (SMP) foam. In order to assess the post-treatment hemodynamics, two modeling approaches are employed. In the first, the foam geometry is obtained from a micro-CT scan and the pulsatile blood flow within the foam is simulated for both Newtonian and non-Newtonian viscosity models. In the second, the foam is represented as a porous media continuum, which has permeability properties that are determined by computing the pressure gradient through the foam geometry over a range of flow speeds comparable to those of in vivo conditions. Virtual angiography and additional post-processing demonstrate that the SMP foam significantly reduces the blood flow speed within the treated aneurysms, while eliminating the high-frequency velocity fluctuations that are present prior to treatment. A prediction of the initial locations of thrombus formation throughout the SMP foam is obtained by means of a low fidelity thrombosis model that is based upon the residence time and shear rate of blood. The two modeling approaches capture similar qualitative trends for the initial locations of thrombus within the SMP foam.

  2. Automated patient-specific classification of long-term Electroencephalography.

    PubMed

    Kiranyaz, Serkan; Ince, Turker; Zabihi, Morteza; Ince, Dilek

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents a novel systematic approach for patient-specific classification of long-term Electroencephalography (EEG). The goal is to extract the seizure sections with a high accuracy to ease the Neurologist's burden of inspecting such long-term EEG data. We aim to achieve this using the minimum feedback from the Neurologist. To accomplish this, we use the majority of the state-of-the-art features proposed in this domain for evolving a collective network of binary classifiers (CNBC) using multi-dimensional particle swarm optimization (MD PSO). Multiple CNBCs are then used to form a CNBC ensemble (CNBC-E), which aggregates epileptic seizure frames from the classification map of each CNBC in order to maximize the sensitivity rate. Finally, a morphological filter forms the final epileptic segments while filtering out the outliers in the form of classification noise. The proposed system is fully generic, which does not require any a priori information about the patient such as the list of relevant EEG channels. The results of the classification experiments, which are performed over the benchmark CHB-MIT scalp long-term EEG database show that the proposed system can achieve all the aforementioned objectives and exhibits a significantly superior performance compared to several other state-of-the-art methods. Using a limited training dataset that is formed by less than 2 min of seizure and 24 min of non-seizure data on the average taken from the early 25% section of the EEG record of each patient, the proposed system establishes an average sensitivity rate above 89% along with an average specificity rate above 93% over the test set.

  3. Patient-specific academic detailing for smoking cessation

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Margaret; Gagnon, Antony; Levine, Mitchell; Thabane, Lehana; Rodriguez, Christine; Dolovich, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To describe and to determine the feasibility of a patient-specific academic detailing (PAD) smoking cessation (SC) program in a primary care setting. Design Descriptive cohort feasibility study. Setting Hamilton, Ont. Participants Pharmacists, physicians, nurse practitioners, and their patients. Interventions Integrated pharmacists received basic academic detailing training and education on SC and then delivered PAD to prescribers using structured verbal education and written materials. Data were collected using structured forms. Main outcome measures Five main feasibility criteria were generated based on Canadian academic detailing programs: PAD coordinator time to train pharmacists less than 40 hours; median time of SC education per pharmacist less than 20 hours; median time per PAD session less than 60 minutes for initial visit; percentage of prescribers receiving PAD within 3 months greater than 50%; and number of new SC referrals to pharmacists at 6 months more than 10 patients per 1.0 full-time equivalent (FTE) pharmacist (total of approximately 30 patients). Results Eight pharmacists (5.8 FTE) received basic academic detailing training and education on SC PAD. Forty-eight physicians and 9 nurse practitioners consented to participate in the study. The mean PAD coordinator training time was 29.1 hours. The median time for SC education was 3.1 hours. The median times for PAD sessions were 15 and 25 minutes for an initial visit and follow-up visit, respectively. The numbers of prescribers who had received PAD at 3 and 6 months were 50 of 64 (78.1%) and 57 of 64 (89.1%), respectively. The numbers of new SC referrals at 3 and 6 months were 11 patients per FTE pharmacist (total of 66 patients) and 34 patients per FTE pharmacist (total of 200 patients), respectively. Conclusion This study met the predetermined feasibility criteria with respect to the management, resources, process, and scientific components. Further study is warranted to determine

  4. Intra-aneurysmal microcatheter looping technique for stent-assisted embolization of complex intracranial aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Wang, C-C; Lv, N; Feng, Z-Z; Li, Z-F; Zhao, R; Li, Q; Liu, J-M

    2015-01-01

    The endovascular treatment of wide-necked, large and giant aneurysms remains challenging. This retrospective study investigated the feasibility and safety of an intra-aneurysmal microcatheter looping technique for stent-assisted embolization of complicated intracranial aneurysms. This technique was used for 31 patients with complicated cerebral aneurysms from January 2007 to November 2013. The clinical and angiographic results were retrospectively evaluated. The target aneurysms were successfully treated in all cases (100%). A flow diverter was used in seven procedures. There were no aneurysmal perforations or ischemic complications, except for a microguidewire perforation of the distal vessel in one case. Among the 24 cases with conventional stent-assisted embolization, complete embolization or neck residual was obtained in 21 cases. Partial occlusion occurred in three cases. In conclusion, the intra-aneurysmal microcatheter looping technique is a safe and feasible alternative treatment of complicated intracranial aneurysms. This approach is a reasonable choice for patients and leads to successful outcomes. PMID:26179063

  5. Aneurysms of the thoracic aorta

    PubMed Central

    Le Roux, B. T.; Rogers, M. A.; Gotsman, M. S.

    1971-01-01

    Selected radiographs from 40 patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm serve to illustrate most of the radiographic features of this disease. Surgical techniques are outlined and were used to modify the natural course of the disease in 14 patients, with three postoperative deaths. The remaining 26 patients were either moribund on admission and died shortly afterwards or declined operations and died later. Images PMID:5144643

  6. Giant Serpentine Aneurysms: Multidisciplinary Management

    PubMed Central

    Anshun, W.; Feng, L.; Daming, W.

    2000-01-01

    Summary Sixty-five cases of intracranial giant serpentine aneurysms (GSΛs), including 61 cases reported in the literature and four additional cases presented in this study were reviewed. The clinical presentation, possible causes, natural history, and especially management of GSAs are discussed with emphasis on the need for aggressive intervention and multidisciplinary management. PMID:20667180

  7. A study of wall shear stress in 12 aneurysms with respect to different viscosity models and flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Evju, Øyvind; Valen-Sendstad, Kristian; Mardal, Kent-André

    2013-11-15

    Recent computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies relate abnormal blood flow to rupture of cerebral aneurysms. However, it is still debated how to model blood flow with sufficient accuracy. Common assumptions made include Newtonian behaviour of blood, traction free outlet boundary conditions and inlet boundary conditions based on available literature. These assumptions are often required since the available patient specific data is usually restricted to the geometry of the aneurysm and the surrounding vasculature. However, the consequences of these assumptions have so far been inadequately addressed. This study investigates the effects of 4 different viscosity models, 2 different inflow conditions and 2 different outflow conditions in 12 middle cerebral artery aneurysms. The differences are quantified in terms of 3 different wall shear stress (WSS) metrics, involving maximal WSS, average WSS, and proportion of aneurysm sac area with low WSS. The results were compared with common geometrical metrics such as volume, aspect ratio, size ratio and parent vessel diameter and classifications in terms of sex and aneurysm type. The results demonstrate strong correlations between the different viscosity models and boundary conditions. The correlation between the different WSS metrics range from weak to medium. No strong correlations were found between the different WSS metrics and the geometrical metrics or classifications.

  8. Finite element modeling of endovascular coiling and flow diversion enables hemodynamic prediction of complex treatment strategies for intracranial aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Damiano, Robert J; Ma, Ding; Xiang, Jianping; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Snyder, Kenneth V; Meng, Hui

    2015-09-18

    Endovascular interventions using coil embolization and flow diversion are becoming the mainstream treatment for intracranial aneurysms (IAs). To help assess the effect of intervention strategies on aneurysm hemodynamics and treatment outcome, we have developed a finite-element-method (FEM)-based technique for coil deployment along with our HiFiVS technique for flow diverter (FD) deployment in patient-specific IAs. We tested four clinical intervention strategies: coiling (1-8 coils), single FD, FD with adjunctive coils (1-8 coils), and overlapping FDs. By evaluating post-treatment hemodynamics using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), we compared the flow-modification performance of these strategies. Results show that a single FD provides more reduction in inflow rate than low packing density (PD) coiling, but less reduction in average velocity inside the aneurysm. Adjunctive coils add no additional reduction of inflow rate beyond a single FD until coil PD exceeds 11%. This suggests that the main role of FDs is to divert inflow, while that of coils is to create stasis in the aneurysm. Overlapping FDs decreases inflow rate, average velocity, and average wall shear stress (WSS) in the aneurysm sac, but adding a third FD produces minimal additional reduction. In conclusion, our FEM-based techniques for virtual coiling and flow diversion enable recapitulation of complex endovascular intervention strategies and detailed hemodynamics to identify hemodynamic factors that affect treatment outcome.

  9. Behçet's disease with ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm following ruptured thoracic aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Atsushi; Kawashima, Masatou; Matsushima, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    A 48-year-old Japanese woman with Behçet's disease suffered successive rupture of thoracic aortic and cerebral aneurysms within one year. The patient underwent successful surgical treatment for both aneurysms. Histological examination of the aneurysm walls revealed lymphocyte infiltration into the adventitia with smooth muscle cell hyperplasia in the thickened intima. This is an extremely unusual presentation of Behçet's disease associated with both cerebral and aortic aneurysms.

  10. Endovascular aneurysm repair for multiple aneurysms as a sequel of hypereosinophilic syndrome.

    PubMed

    McVeigh, T; Hynes, N; Tawfick, W; Sultan, S

    2014-04-01

    This case represents the first report of multiple arterial aneurysms including aortic, iliac, visceral, and coronary aneurysms associated with hypereosinophilic syndrome. It presents an interesting case of epinephrine abuse and the unfortunate sequelae. This case illustrates novel approaches in emergency repair of internal iliac artery aneurysm rupture and the management of visceral artery aneurysms and exemplifies how multiple endovascular technologies can be utilized even in the high-risk polymorbid patient.

  11. Time analysis of aneurysm wall shear stress for both Newtonian and Casson flows from image-based CFD models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Marcelo A.; Ahumada Olivares, María. C.; Putman, Christopher M.; Cebral, Juan R.

    2014-03-01

    The optimal management of unruptured aneurysms is controversial, and current decision making is mainly based on aneurysm size and location. Incidentally detected unruptured aneurysms less than 5mm in diameter should be treated conservatively. However, small unruptured aneurysms also bleed. Risk factors based on the hemodynamic forces exerted over the arterial wall have been investigated using image-based computational fluid dynamic (CFD) methodologies during the last decade. Accurate estimation of wall shear stress (WSS) is required to properly study associations between flow features and aneurysm processes. Previous works showed that Newtonian and non-Newtonian (Casson) models produce similar WSS distributions and characterization, with no significant differences. Other authors showed that the WSS distribution computed from time-averaged velocity fields is significantly higher for the Newtonian model where WSS is low. In this work we reconstructed ten patient-specific CFD models from angiography images to investigate the time evolution of WSS at selected locations such as aneurysm blebs (low WSS), and the parent artery close to the aneurysm neck (high WSS). When averaging all cases it is seen that the estimation of the time-averaged WSS, the peak WSS and the minimum WSS value before the systolic peak were all higher when the Casson rheology was considered. However, none of them showed statistically significant differences. At the afferent artery Casson rheology systematically predicted higher WSS values. On the other hand, at the selected blebs either Newtonian or Casson WSS estimations are higher in some phases of the cardiac cycle. Those observations differ among individual cases.

  12. Patient-Specific Variations in Biomarkers across Gingivitis and Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Radhakrishnan; Miller, Craig S; Dawson, Dolph; Al-Sabbagh, Mohanad; Ebersole, Jeffrey L

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the use of saliva, as an emerging diagnostic fluid in conjunction with classification techniques to discern biological heterogeneity in clinically labelled gingivitis and periodontitis subjects (80 subjects; 40/group) A battery of classification techniques were investigated as traditional single classifier systems as well as within a novel selective voting ensemble classification approach (SVA) framework. Unlike traditional single classifiers, SVA is shown to reveal patient-specific variations within disease groups, which may be important for identifying proclivity to disease progression or disease stability. Salivary expression profiles of IL-1ß, IL-6, MMP-8, and MIP-1α from 80 patients were analyzed using four classification algorithms (LDA: Linear Discriminant Analysis [LDA], Quadratic Discriminant Analysis [QDA], Naïve Bayes Classifier [NBC] and Support Vector Machines [SVM]) as traditional single classifiers and within the SVA framework (SVA-LDA, SVA-QDA, SVA-NB and SVA-SVM). Our findings demonstrate that performance measures (sensitivity, specificity and accuracy) of traditional classification as single classifier were comparable to that of the SVA counterparts using clinical labels of the samples as ground truth. However, unlike traditional single classifier approaches, the normalized ensemble vote-counts from SVA revealed varying proclivity of the subjects for each of the disease groups. More importantly, the SVA identified a subset of gingivitis and periodontitis samples that demonstrated a biological proclivity commensurate with the other clinical group. This subset was confirmed across SVA-LDA, SVA-QDA, SVA-NB and SVA-SVM. Heatmap visualization of their ensemble sets revealed lack of consensus between these subsets and the rest of the samples within the respective disease groups indicating the unique nature of the patients in these subsets. While the source of variation is not known, the results presented clearly elucidate the

  13. Ultrasound Phantoms to Protect Patients from Novices

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    With the growing use of ultrasound for pain management, we are interested in how to teach and practice ultrasound-guided procedures. Ethically, we should not insert a needle in a patient until after much practice on a phantom. Several types of phantoms have been introduced for ultrasound training, including water, agar/gelatin, elastomeric rubber, and meat phantoms and cadavers. The ideal phantom is similar to human tissue, is readily available and inexpensive, can be used repeatedly, provides tactile feedback, will hold a needle in place, does not generate needle tracks, and is not a health hazard. Several studies have shown the effectiveness of phantoms for improving the proficiency of novices. We hope that the application of phantoms in education leads to improved proficiency and increased patient safety. PMID:27103961

  14. The Roles of Endoscope in Aneurysmal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    YOSHIOKA, Hideyuki; KINOUCHI, Hiroyuki

    The neuroendoscope, with its higher magnification, better observation, and additional illumination, can provide us information that may not be available with the microscope in aneurysm surgery. Furthermore, recent advancement of the holding systems for the endoscope allows surgeons to perform microsurgical manipulation using both hands under the simultaneous endoscopic and microscopic monitoring. With this procedure, surgeons can inspect hidden structures, dissect perforators at the back of the aneurysm, identify important vessel segments without retraction of the aneurysm or arteries, and check for completion of clipping. In addition, we have recently applied endoscopic indocyanine green video angiography to aneurysm surgery. This newly developed technique can offer real-time assessment of the blood flow of vasculatures in the dead angles of the microscope, and will reduce operative morbidity related to vascular occlusion, improve the durability of aneurysm surgery by reducing incomplete clipping, and thus promote the outcome of aneurysm surgery. PMID:26041623

  15. Neutron dosimetry in solid water phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Benites-Rengifo, Jorge Luis; Vega-Carrillo, Hector Rene

    2014-11-07

    The neutron spectra, the Kerma and the absorbed dose due to neutrons were estimated along the incoming beam in a solid water phantom. Calculations were carried out with the MCNP5 code, where the bunker, the phantom and the model of the15 MV LINAC head were modeled. As the incoming beam goes into the phantom the neutron spectrum is modified and the dosimetric values are reduced.

  16. TH-C-BRD-05: Reducing Proton Beam Range Uncertainty with Patient-Specific CT HU to RSP Calibrations Based On Single-Detector Proton Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Doolan, P; Sharp, G; Testa, M; Lu, H-M; Bentefour, E; Royle, G

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Beam range uncertainty in proton treatment comes primarily from converting the patient's X-ray CT (xCT) dataset to relative stopping power (RSP). Current practices use a single curve for this conversion, produced by a stoichiometric calibration based on tissue composition data for average, healthy, adult humans, but not for the individual in question. Proton radiographs produce water-equivalent path length (WEPL) maps, dependent on the RSP of tissues within the specific patient. This work investigates the use of such WEPL maps to optimize patient-specific calibration curves for reducing beam range uncertainty. Methods: The optimization procedure works on the principle of minimizing the difference between the known WEPL map, obtained from a proton radiograph, and a digitally-reconstructed WEPL map (DRWM) through an RSP dataset, by altering the calibration curve that is used to convert the xCT into an RSP dataset. DRWMs were produced with Plastimatch, an in-house developed software, and an optimization procedure was implemented in Matlab. Tests were made on a range of systems including simulated datasets with computed WEPL maps and phantoms (anthropomorphic and real biological tissue) with WEPL maps measured by single detector proton radiography. Results: For the simulated datasets, the optimizer showed excellent results. It was able to either completely eradicate or significantly reduce the root-mean-square-error (RMSE) in the WEPL for the homogeneous phantoms (to zero for individual materials or from 1.5% to 0.2% for the simultaneous optimization of multiple materials). For the heterogeneous phantom the RMSE was reduced from 1.9% to 0.3%. Conclusion: An optimization procedure has been designed to produce patient-specific calibration curves. Test results on a range of systems with different complexities and sizes have been promising for accurate beam range control in patients. This project was funded equally by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research

  17. Splenic Artery Aneurysm of the Hepatosplenomesenteric Trunk

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We herein report the case of a splenic artery aneurysm with a hepatosplenomesenteric trunk that presented in a pregnant woman. Catheter embolization was not performed due to the wide neck of the aneurysm and its close location to the trunk indicates a high risk of mesenteric trunk thrombosis. We instead performed surgical resection of the aneurysm after successful delivery of the infant by Caesarian section. The splenic artery was reconstructed by side-to-end anastomosis with the common hepatic artery. PMID:24386023

  18. Virtual angiography for visualization and validation of computational fluid dynamics models of aneurysm hemodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Matthew D.; Stuhne, Gordan R.; Nikolov, Hristo N.; Lownie, Stephen P.; Holdsworth, David W.; Steinman, David A.

    2005-04-01

    It has recently become possible to simulate aneurysmal blood flow dynamics in a patient-specific manner via the coupling of 3D X-ray angiography and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Before such image-based CFD models can be used in a predictive capacity, however, it must be shown that they indeed reproduce the in vivo hemodynamic environment. Motivated by the fact that there is currently no technique for measuring complex blood velocity fields in vivo, in this paper we describe how cine X-ray angiograms may be simulated for the purpose of indirectly validating patient-specific CFD models. Mirroring the radiological procedure, a virtual angiogram is constructed by first simulating the time-varying injection of contrast agent into a previously computed patient-specific CFD model. A time-series of images is then constructed by simulating attenuation of X-rays through the simulated 3D contrast-agent flow dynamics. Virtual angiographic images and residence time maps, here derived from an image-based CFD model of a giant aneurysm, are shown to be in excellent agreement with the corresponding clinical images and maps, but only when the interaction between the quasi-steady contrast-agent injection and the pulsatile wash-out are properly accounted for. These virtual angiographic techniques therefore pave the way for validating image-based CFD models against routinely available clinical data, and also provide a means of visualizing complex, 3D blood flow dynamics in a clinically relevant manner. However, they also clearly show how the contrast-agent injection perturbs the normal blood flow dynamics, further highlighting the utility of CFD as a window into the true aneurysmal hemodynamics.

  19. Phantom perception: voluntary and involuntary nonretinal vision.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Joel; Westbrook, Fred

    2015-05-01

    Hallucinations, mental imagery, synesthesia, perceptual filling-in, and many illusions are conscious visual experiences without a corresponding retinal stimulus: what we call 'phantom perception'. Such percepts show that our experience of the world is not solely determined by direct sensory input. Some phantom percepts are voluntary, whereas others are involuntarily, occurring automatically. Here, by way of review, we compare and contrast these two types of phantom perception and their neural representations. We propose a dichotomous framework for phantom vision, analogous to the subtypes of attention: endogenous and exogenous. This framework unifies findings from different fields and species, providing a guide to study the constructive nature of conscious sensory perception.

  20. Elective Treatment of Middle Colic Artery Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Hamasaki, Takafumi; Ota, Rikako; Ohno, Takashi; Kodama, Wataru; Uchida, Naotaka; Hayashi, Eiichi; Fukino, Syunsuke

    2014-01-01

    Middle colic artery aneurysms are rare and most have been reported with rupture or symptom. We report the successful elective treatment of a middle colic artery aneurysm without symptom, which is very rare. It failed to perform transcatheter arterial embolization for anatomical reasons, and, thus, the patient, a 77-year-old man, underwent surgical resection in spite of a history of laparotomy. Although a common cause of middle colic artery aneurysms is segmental arterial mediolysis, the present pathological findings indicated that fragmented or degenerated elastic fibers may also play an important role like aortic aneurysms. PMID:25298839

  1. Elective treatment of middle colic artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Kengo; Hamasaki, Takafumi; Ota, Rikako; Ohno, Takashi; Kodama, Wataru; Uchida, Naotaka; Hayashi, Eiichi; Fukino, Syunsuke

    2014-01-01

    Middle colic artery aneurysms are rare and most have been reported with rupture or symptom. We report the successful elective treatment of a middle colic artery aneurysm without symptom, which is very rare. It failed to perform transcatheter arterial embolization for anatomical reasons, and, thus, the patient, a 77-year-old man, underwent surgical resection in spite of a history of laparotomy. Although a common cause of middle colic artery aneurysms is segmental arterial mediolysis, the present pathological findings indicated that fragmented or degenerated elastic fibers may also play an important role like aortic aneurysms.

  2. Right ventricular outflow tract aneurysm with thrombus

    PubMed Central

    Peer, Syed Murfad; Bhat, P.S. Seetharama; Furtado, Arul Dominic; Chikkatur, Raghavendra

    2012-01-01

    Right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) aneurysm is a known complication of tetralogy of Fallot repair when a ventriculotomy is done. It leads to RV dysfunction and may require re-operation. We describe a rare instance of a patient who developed an RVOT aneurysm after trans-ventricular repair of tetralogy of Fallot, which was complicated with the formation of a thrombus in the aneurysm sac. The patient underwent re-operation with thrombectomy, excision of the RVOT aneurysm and pulmonary valve replacement. To the best of our knowledge, the occurrence of this combination and its implications have not been reported. PMID:22232231

  3. Pathomechanisms and treatment of pediatric aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Krings, Timo; Geibprasert, Sasikhan; terBrugge, Karel G

    2010-10-01

    Pediatric aneurysms are rare diseases distinct from classical adult aneurysms and therefore require different treatment strategies. Apart from saccular aneurysms that are more commonly found in older children, three major pathomechanisms may be encountered: trauma, infection, and dissection. The posterior circulation and more distal locations are more commonly encountered in children compared to adults, and there is an overall male predominance. Clinical findings are not only confined to subarachnoid hemorrhage but may also comprise mass effects, headaches or neurological deficits. In traumatic aneurysms, the skull base and distal anterior communicating artery are commonly affected, and the hemorrhage occurs often delayed (2-4 weeks following the initial trauma). Infectious aneurysms are mostly bacterial in origin, and hemorrhage occurs early after a septic embolic shower. Dissecting aneurysms are the most often encountered aneurysm type in children and can lead to mass effect, hemorrhage, or ischemia depending on the fate of the intramural hematoma. Treatment strategies in pediatric aneurysms include endosaccular coil treatment only for the "classical berry-type" aneurysms; in the other instances, parent vessel occlusion, flow reversal, surgical options, or a combined treatment with bypass and parent vessel occlusion have to be contemplated.

  4. Natural history of true pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Takao, H; Doi, I; Watanabe, T; Yoshioka, N; Ohtomo, K

    2010-01-01

    Advances in non-invasive diagnostic techniques, such as CT and ultrasonography, have improved our ability to detect unruptured pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysms. No definitive study evaluating the natural history of these lesions or their preferred method of treatment has been published. In this report, we describe five patients with eight unruptured true pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysms followed without treatment. Of these patients, four had coeliac axis stenosis (n = 1) or occlusion (n = 3) and one had occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery. The mean diameter of the aneurysms was 12.0 mm (range 7–17 mm). The mean duration of follow-up was 29.4 months (range 6–57 months). There was no aneurysm rupture during a total of 147 patient-months (243 aneurysm-months) of follow-up. Of the eight aneurysms, three increased in size over the follow-up period. We conclude that the risk of rupture of true pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysms might be lower than expected from the data on ruptured aneurysms; however, careful follow-up of untreated aneurysms is necessary. PMID:20647516

  5. Development of a HIFU Phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Randy L.; Herman, Bruce A.; Maruvada, Subha; Wear, Keith A.; Harris, Gerald R.

    2007-05-01

    The field of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is developing rapidly. For basic research, quality control, and regulatory assessment a reusable phantom that has both thermal and acoustic properties close to that of soft tissue is critical. A hydrogel-based tissue mimicking material (TMM) has been developed that shows promise for such a phantom. The acoustic attenuation, speed of sound, B/A, thermal diffusivity and conductivity, as well as the cavitation threshold, were measured and found to mimic published values for soft tissue. The attenuation of 0.53f1.04 from 1 MHz to 8 MHz, as well as the sound speed of 1565 m/s and the tissue-like image quality, indicate the usefulness of the TMM for ultrasound imaging applications. These properties along with the thermal conductivity of 0.58 W/m- °C, diffusivity of 0.15 (mm2)/s, and the ability to withstand temperatures above 95 °C make this material appropriate for HIFU applications. The TMM also allows for the embedding of thermocouples and the formation of wall-less vessels that do not deteriorate as a result of continuous flow of blood mimicking fluids through the material. Tissue characteristics are strongly dependent on the fabrication technique, and care must be taken to achieve reproducible results. Note: This research was supported by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).

  6. The phantom limb in dreams.

    PubMed

    Brugger, Peter

    2008-12-01

    Mulder and colleagues [Mulder, T., Hochstenbach, J., Dijkstra, P. U., Geertzen, J. H. B. (2008). Born to adapt, but not in your dreams. Consciousness and Cognition, 17, 1266-1271.] report that a majority of amputees continue to experience a normally-limbed body during their night dreams. They interprete this observation as a failure of the body schema to adapt to the new body shape. The present note does not question this interpretation, but points to the already existing literature on the phenomenology of the phantom limb in dreams. A summary of published investigations is complemented by a note on phantom phenomena in the dreams of paraplegic patients and persons born without a limb. Integration of the available data allows the recommendation for prospective studies to consider dream content in more detail. For instance, "adaptation" to the loss of a limb can also manifest itself by seeing oneself surrounded by amputees. Such projective types of anosognosia ("transitivism") in nocturnal dreams should also be experimentally induced in normally-limbed individuals, and some relevant techniques are mentioned.

  7. 3D real-time visualization of blood flow in cerebral aneurysms by light field particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsohn, Matthias F.; Kemmling, André; Petersen, Arne; Wietzke, Lennart

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral aneurysms require endovascular treatment to eliminate potentially lethal hemorrhagic rupture by hemostasis of blood flow within the aneurysm. Devices (e.g. coils and flow diverters) promote homeostasis, however, measurement of blood flow within an aneurysm or cerebral vessel before and after device placement on a microscopic level has not been possible so far. This would allow better individualized treatment planning and improve manufacture design of devices. For experimental analysis, direct measurement of real-time microscopic cerebrovascular flow in micro-structures may be an alternative to computed flow simulations. An application of microscopic aneurysm flow measurement on a regular basis to empirically assess a high number of different anatomic shapes and the corresponding effect of different devices would require a fast and reliable method at low cost with high throughout assessment. Transparent three dimensional 3D models of brain vessels and aneurysms may be used for microscopic flow measurements by particle image velocimetry (PIV), however, up to now the size of structures has set the limits for conventional 3D-imaging camera set-ups. On line flow assessment requires additional computational power to cope with the processing large amounts of data generated by sequences of multi-view stereo images, e.g. generated by a light field camera capturing the 3D information by plenoptic imaging of complex flow processes. Recently, a fast and low cost workflow for producing patient specific three dimensional models of cerebral arteries has been established by stereo-lithographic (SLA) 3D printing. These 3D arterial models are transparent an exhibit a replication precision within a submillimeter range required for accurate flow measurements under physiological conditions. We therefore test the feasibility of microscopic flow measurements by PIV analysis using a plenoptic camera system capturing light field image sequences. Averaging across a sequence of

  8. A new production method of elastic silicone carotid phantom based on MRI acquisition using rapid prototyping technique.

    PubMed

    Cao, Peng; Duhamel, Yvan; Olympe, Guillaume; Ramond, Bruno; Langevin, Francois

    2013-01-01

    In vitro experimental simulations of blood fluid in carotid artery require ideal phantoms that are as precise as possible. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate a method for carotid phantom fabrication by rapid prototyping technique (RP). By using 3D reconstructed projection of the 3D time-of-flight (TOF) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) sequence, a 12.5 cm multi-dimensional spatial structure of a carotid artery has been set up. Y-shaped and patient specific models have been generated respectively using silicone elastomer, which has a high resilience and a good tensile strength. The final patient specific model has internal carotid artery (ICA) with a highly spiraling siphon and an external carotid artery (ECA). Elastic properties of carotid walls have also been evaluated by Young's elastic modulus test and dynamic behaviors in optical and echography simulation experiments.

  9. [Approach to juxtarenal inflammatory aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Scuro, A; Barzaghi, M E; Griso, A; Ferrari Ruffino, S; Kontothanassis, D; Mirandola, M; Leonardi, G; D'Agata, M

    2004-01-01

    The incidence of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) in a late review of the literature is estimated about 2-15% overall aortic aneurysms. In our data this type of aneurysm is 3.6 overall aortic aneurysms treated. In the majority of the cases, IAAA is juxtarenal or infrarenal. Ethiopathogenesis of IAAA till today is not certain. Recent hypothesis on IAAA attribute the same ethiopathogenesis in both atherosclerotic and inflammatory aneurysm. The interaction of genetic, environmental and infective factors should be able to determine an autoimmune inflammatory reaction of variable severity. 80% of the patients suffering from IAAA present abdominal or lumbar pain, loss of weight and increase of the RC sedimentation velocity. The IAAA's natural history goes to rupture. Entrapment of nearstanding organs totally involved in the fibrotic process is the most frequent complication. Usually there is a compression of the ureter and the duodenum with consequenced hydroureteronephrosis and bowel obstruction. Preoperative diagnosis is possible; CT scan and MRI guarantee and accuracy about 90%. Intraoperatively the external wall of IAAA appears whitish and translucent and always there are tenacious adhesion given by the avventital wounds inflammation. Confirm is given by the histological examination of the aneurysmatic wall and peravventitial tissues. Our experience and a late review of the literature concorde that surgical indication for the treatment of IAAA is the same for the atherosclerotic one. This conviction is supported by the fact that the diagnostic methodical evolution and the improvement in mininvasive surgical technique lowered perioperating morbility and mortaliy. We prefer, according with many authors, retroperitoneal approach to juxtarenal IAAA, instead of standardized transperitoneal access with xifo-pubical or transversal under costal incision. This approach offers some advantages as easier exposition of aorta, whose postero-lateral wall is hardly ever

  10. The biaxial biomechanical behavior of abdominal aortic aneurysm tissue.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Siobhan A; Healey, Donagh A; Kavanagh, Eamon G; Walsh, Michael T; McGloughlin, Tim M; Doyle, Barry J

    2014-12-01

    Rupture of the abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when the local wall stress exceeds the local wall strength. Knowledge of AAA wall mechanics plays a fundamental role in the development and advancement of AAA rupture risk assessment tools. Therefore, the aim of this study is to evaluate the biaxial mechanical properties of AAA tissue. Multiple biaxial test protocols were performed on AAA samples harvested from 28 patients undergoing open surgical repair. Both the Tangential Modulus (TM) and stretch ratio (λ) were recorded and compared in both the circumferential (ϴ) and longitudinal (L) directions at physiologically relevant stress levels, the influence of patient specific factors such as sex, age AAA diameter and status were examined. The biomechanical response was also fit to a hyperplastic material model. The AAA tissue was found to be anisotropic with a greater tendency to stiffen in the circumferential direction compared to the longitudinal direction. An anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model represented the data well and the properties were not influenced by the investigated patient specific factors however, a future study utilizing a larger cohort of patients is warranted to confirm these findings. This work provides further insights on the biomechanical behavior of AAA and may be useful in the development of more reliable rupture risk assessment tools.

  11. Uncertainty Quantification applied to flow simulations in thoracic aortic aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccadifuoco, Alessandro; Mariotti, Alessandro; Celi, Simona; Martini, Nicola; Salvetti, Maria Vittoria

    2015-11-01

    The thoracic aortic aneurysm is a progressive dilatation of the thoracic aorta causing a weakness in the aortic wall, which may eventually cause life-threatening events. Clinical decisions on treatment strategies are currently based on empiric criteria, like the aortic diameter value or its growth rate. Numerical simulations can give the quantification of important indexes which are impossible to be obtained through in-vivo measurements and can provide supplementary information. Hemodynamic simulations are carried out by using the open-source tool SimVascular and considering patient-specific geometries. One of the main issues in these simulations is the choice of suitable boundary conditions, modeling the organs and vessels not included in the computational domain. The current practice is to use outflow conditions based on resistance and capacitance, whose values are tuned to obtain a physiological behavior of the patient pressure. However it is not known a priori how this choice affects the results of the simulation. The impact of the uncertainties in these outflow parameters is investigated here by using the generalized Polynomial Chaos approach. This analysis also permits to calibrate the outflow-boundary parameters when patient-specific in-vivo data are available.

  12. Patterns of patient specific dosimetry in total body irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Akino, Yuichi; McMullen, Kevin P.; Das, Indra J.

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Total body irradiation (TBI) has been used for bone marrow transplant for hematologic and immune deficiency conditions. The goal of TBI is to deliver a homogeneous dose to the entire body, with a generally accepted range of dose uniformity being within {+-}10% of the prescribed dose. The moving table technique for TBI could make dose uniform in whole body by adjusting couch speed. However, it is difficult to accurately estimate the actual dose by calculation and hence in vivo dosimetry (IVD) is routinely performed. Here, the authors present patterns of patient-specific IVD in 161 TBI patients treated at our institution. Methods: Cobalt-60 teletherapy unit (Model C9 Cobalt-60 teletherapy unit, Picker X-ray Corporation) with customized moving bed (SITI Industrial Products, Inc., Fishers, IN) were used for TBI treatment. During treatment, OneDose{sup TM} (Sicel Technology, NC) Metal Oxide-silicon Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor detectors were placed at patient body surface; both entrance and exit side of the beam at patient head, neck, mediastinum, umbilicus, and knee to estimate midplane dose. When large differences (>10%) between the prescribed and measured dose were observed, dose delivery was corrected for subsequent fractions by the adjustment of couch speed and/or bolus placement. Under IRB exempt status, the authors retrospectively analyzed the treatment records of 161 patients who received TBI treatment between 2006 and 2011. Results: Across the entire cohort, the median {+-} SD (range) percent variance between calculated and measured dose for head, neck, mediastinum, umbilicus, and knee was -2.3 {+-} 10.2% (-66.2 to +35.3), 1.1 {+-} 11.5% (-62.2 to +40.3), -1.9 {+-} 9.5% (-66.4 to +46.6), -1.1 {+-} 7.2% (-35.2 to +42.9), and 3.4 {+-} 12.2% (-47.9 to +108.5), respectively. More than half of treatments were within {+-}10% of the prescribed dose for all anatomical regions. For 80% of treatments (10%-90%), dose at the umbilicus was within {+-}10

  13. [A case of successful treatment of concomitant ruptured intracranial aneurysm and visceral aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Diogo, Cláudia; Baltazar, José; Fernandes, Mário

    2012-01-01

    The association between intracranial and visceral aneurysms is very rare, with a bad prognosis. The rupture usually appears in the Emergency Room, and it implies an immediate treatment. We describe the case of a woman with rupture of an anterior communicant artery aneurysm and rupture of a pancreatic duodenal artery aneurysm. The actuation of all specialties allowed the direct surgical treatment of the visceral aneurysm, without the aggravation of the cerebral hemorrhage that the eventual Aorta Artery clamping could provoke. The maintenance of the hemodynamic stability was essential for the posterior treatment of the intracranial aneurysm.

  14. Endovascular Aneurysm Repair in HIV Patients with Ruptured Abdominal Aneurysm and Low CD4

    PubMed Central

    Orrapin, Saritphat; Arworn, Supapong; Reanpang, Termpong

    2016-01-01

    We report two HIV infected patients with ruptured abdominal aneurysm by using endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) technique. A 59-year-old Thai man had a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm and a 57-year-old man had a ruptured iliac artery aneurysm. Both patients had a CD4 level below 200 μ/L indicating a low immune status at admission. They were treated by EVAR. Neither patient had any complications in 3 months postoperatively. EVAR may have a role in HIV patients with ruptured abdominal aneurysm together with very low immunity. PMID:27703834

  15. Pulmonary artery aneurysm with patent arterial duct: resection of aneurysm and ductal division.

    PubMed

    Tefera, Endale; Teodori, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Congenital or acquired aneurysm of the pulmonary artery (PA) is rare. Although aneurysms are described following surgical treatment of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), occurrence of this lesion in association with PDA without previous surgery is extremely uncommon. An eight-year-old patient with PDA and aneurysm of the main PA is described in this report. Clinical diagnosis of PDA was made upon presentation. Diagnosis of PA aneurysm was suspected on chest x-ray and was confirmed on transthoracic echocardiography. Successful surgical resection of the aneurysm and division of the duct were performed under cardiopulmonary bypass. The patient did well on follow-up both from clinical and echocardiographic point of view.

  16. SU-E-T-345: Validation of a Patient-Specific Monte Carlo Targeted Radionuclide Therapy Dosimetry Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Besemer, A; Bednarz, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: There is a compelling need for personalized dosimetry in targeted radionuclide therapy given that conventional dose calculation methods fail to accurately predict dose response relationships. To address this need, we have developed a Geant4-based Monte Carlo patient-specific 3D dosimetry platform for TRT. This platform calculates patient-specific dose distributions based on serial CT/PET or CT/SPECT images acquired after injection of the TRT agent. In this work, S-values and specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) were calculated using this platform and benchmarked against reference values. Methods: S-values for 1, 10, 100, and 1000g spherical tumors with uniform activity distributions of I-124, I-125, I-131, F-18, and Ra-223 were calculated and compared to OLINDA/EXM reference values. SAFs for monoenergetic photons of 0.01, 0.1, and 1 MeV and S factors for monoenergetic electrons of 0.935 MeV were calculated for the liver, kidneys, lungs, pancreas, spleen, and adrenals in the Zubal Phantom and compared with previously published values. Sufficient particles were simulated to keep the voxel statistical uncertainty below 5%. Results: The calculated spherical S-values agreed within a few percent of reference data from OLINDA/EXM for each radionuclide and sphere size. The comparison of photon SAFs and electron S-values with previously published values showed good agreement with the previously published values. The S-values and SAFs of the source organs agreed within 1%. Conclusion: Our platform has been benchmarked against reference values for a variety of radionuclides and over a wide range of energies and tumor sizes. Therefore, this platform could be used to provide accurate patientspecific dosimetry for use in radiopharmaceutical clinical trials.

  17. Hemodynamic flow modeling through an abdominal aorta aneurysm using data mining tools.

    PubMed

    Filipovic, Nenad; Ivanovic, Milos; Krstajic, Damjan; Kojic, Milos

    2011-03-01

    Geometrical changes of blood vessels, called aneurysm, occur often in humans with possible catastrophic outcome. Then, the blood flow is enormously affected, as well as the blood hemodynamic interaction forces acting on the arterial wall. These forces are the cause of the wall rupture. A mechanical quantity characteristic for the blood-wall interaction is the wall shear stress, which also has direct physiological effects on the endothelial cell behavior. Therefore, it is very important to have an insight into the blood flow and shear stress distribution when an aneurysm is developed in order to help correlating the mechanical conditions with the pathogenesis of pathological changes on the blood vessels. This insight can further help in improving the prevention of cardiovascular diseases evolution. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been used in general as a tool to generate results for the mechanical conditions within blood vessels with and without aneurysms. However, aneurysms are very patient specific and reliable results from CFD analyses can be obtained by a cumbersome and time-consuming process of the computational model generation followed by huge computations. In order to make the CFD analyses efficient and suitable for future everyday clinical practice, we have here employed data mining (DM) techniques. The focus was to combine the CFD and DM methods for the estimation of the wall shear stresses in an abdominal aorta aneurysm (AAA) underprescribed geometrical changes. Additionally, computing on the grid infrastructure was performed to improve efficiency, since thousands of CFD runs were needed for creating machine learning data. We used several DM techniques and found that our DM models provide good prediction of the shear stress at the AAA in comparison with full CFD model results on real patient data.

  18. Synaesthesia in phantom limbs induced with mirrors.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, V S; Rogers-Ramachandran, D

    1996-04-22

    Although there is a vast clinical literature on phantom limbs, there have been no experimental studies on the effects of visual input on phantom sensations. We introduce an inexpensive new device--a 'virtual reality box'--to resurrect the phantom visually to study inter-sensory effects. A mirror is placed vertically on the table so that the mirror reflection of the patient's intact had is 'superimposed' on the felt position of the phantom. We used this procedure on ten patients and found the following results. 1. In six patients, when the normal hand was moved, so that the phantom was perceived to move in the mirror, it was also felt to move; i.e. kinesthetic sensations emerged in the phantom. In D.S. this effect occurred even though he had never experienced any movements in the phantom for ten years before we tested him. He found the return of sensations very enjoyable. 2. Repeated practice led to a permanent 'disappearance' of the phantom arm in patient D.S. and the hand became telescoped into the stump near the shoulder. 3. Using an optical trick, impossible postures--e.g. extreme hyperextension of the fingers--could be induced visually in the phantom. In one case this was felt as a transient 'painful tug' in the phantom. 4. Five patients experienced involuntary painful 'clenching spasms' in the phantom hand and in four of them the spasms were relieved when the mirror was used to facilitate 'opening' of the phantom hand; opening was not possible without the mirror. 5. In three patients, touching the normal hand evoked precisely localized touch sensations in the phantom. Interestingly, the referral was especially pronounced when the patients actually 'saw' their phantom being touched in the mirror. Indeed, in a fourth patient (R.L.) the referral occurred only if he saw his phantom being touched: a curious form of synaesthesia. These experiments lend themselves readily to imaging studies using PET and fMRI. Taken collectively, they suggest that there is a

  19. Extended use of endovascular aneurysm sealing for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Böckler, Dittmar; Holden, Andrew; Krievins, Dainis; de Vries, Jean-Paul P M; Peters, Andreas S; Geisbüsch, Philipp; Reijnen, Michel

    2016-09-01

    Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (EVAR) is now an established treatment modality for suitable patients presenting with aneurysm rupture. EVAR for ruptured aneurysms reduces transfusion, mechanical ventilation, intensive care. and hospital stay when compared with open surgery. In the emergency setting, however, EVAR is limited by low applicability due to adverse clinical or anatomical characteristics and increased need for reintervention. In addition, ongoing bleeding from aortic side branches post-EVAR can cause hemodynamic instability, larger hematomas, and abdominal compartment syndrome. Endovascular aneurysm sealing, based on polymer filling of the aneurysm, has the potential to overcome some of the limitations of EVAR for ruptured aneurysms and to improve outcomes. Recent literature suggests that endovascular aneurysm sealing can be performed with early mortality similar to that of EVAR for ruptured aortic aneurysms, but experience is limited to a few centers and a small number of patients. The addition of chimney grafts can increase the applicability of endovascular aneurysm sealing in order to treat short-neck and juxtarenal aneurysms as an alternative to fenestrated endografts. Further evaluation of the technique, with larger longitudinal studies, is necessary before advocating wider implementation of endovascular aneurysm sealing in the emergency setting.

  20. Pharmacokinetic digital phantoms for accuracy assessment of image-based dosimetry in (177)Lu-DOTATATE peptide receptor radionuclide therapy.

    PubMed

    Brolin, Gustav; Gustafsson, Johan; Ljungberg, Michael; Gleisner, Katarina Sjögreen

    2015-08-07

    Patient-specific image-based dosimetry is considered to be a useful tool to limit toxicity associated with peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). To facilitate the establishment and reliability of absorbed-dose response relationships, it is essential to assess the accuracy of dosimetry in clinically realistic scenarios. To this end, we developed pharmacokinetic digital phantoms corresponding to patients treated with (177)Lu-DOTATATE. Three individual voxel phantoms from the XCAT population were generated and assigned a dynamic activity distribution based on a compartment model for (177)Lu-DOTATATE, designed specifically for this purpose. The compartment model was fitted to time-activity data from 10 patients, primarily acquired using quantitative scintillation camera imaging. S values for all phantom source-target combinations were calculated based on Monte-Carlo simulations. Combining the S values and time-activity curves, reference values of the absorbed dose to the phantom kidneys, liver, spleen, tumours and whole-body were calculated. The phantoms were used in a virtual dosimetry study, using Monte-Carlo simulated gamma-camera images and conventional methods for absorbed-dose calculations. The characteristics of the SPECT and WB planar images were found to well represent those of real patient images, capturing the difficulties present in image-based dosimetry. The phantoms are expected to be useful for further studies and optimisation of clinical dosimetry in (177)Lu PRRT.

  1. The influence of patient size on dose conversion coefficients: a hybrid phantom study for adult cardiac catheterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Perry; Lee, Choonsik; Johnson, Kevin; Siragusa, Daniel; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2009-06-01

    In this study, the influence of patient size on organ and effective dose conversion coefficients (DCCs) was investigated for a representative interventional fluoroscopic procedure—cardiac catheterization. The study was performed using hybrid phantoms representing an underweight, average and overweight American adult male. Reference body sizes were determined using the NHANES III database and parameterized based on standing height and total body mass. Organ and effective dose conversion coefficients were calculated for anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, left anterior oblique and right anterior oblique projections using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX 2.5.0 with the metric dose area product being used as the normalization factor. Results show body size to have a clear influence on DCCs which increased noticeably when body size decreased. It was also shown that if patient size is neglected when choosing a DCC, the organ and effective dose will be underestimated to an underweight patient and will be overestimated to an underweight patient, with errors as large as 113% for certain projections. Results were further compared with those published for a KTMAN-2 Korean patient-specific tomographic phantom. The published DCCs aligned best with the hybrid phantom which most closely matched in overall body size. These results highlighted the need for and the advantages of phantom-patient matching, and it is recommended that hybrid phantoms be used to create a more diverse library of patient-dependent anthropomorphic phantoms for medical dose reconstruction.

  2. Pharmacokinetic digital phantoms for accuracy assessment of image-based dosimetry in 177Lu-DOTATATE peptide receptor radionuclide therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brolin, Gustav; Gustafsson, Johan; Ljungberg, Michael; Sjögreen Gleisner, Katarina

    2015-08-01

    Patient-specific image-based dosimetry is considered to be a useful tool to limit toxicity associated with peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). To facilitate the establishment and reliability of absorbed-dose response relationships, it is essential to assess the accuracy of dosimetry in clinically realistic scenarios. To this end, we developed pharmacokinetic digital phantoms corresponding to patients treated with 177Lu-DOTATATE. Three individual voxel phantoms from the XCAT population were generated and assigned a dynamic activity distribution based on a compartment model for 177Lu-DOTATATE, designed specifically for this purpose. The compartment model was fitted to time-activity data from 10 patients, primarily acquired using quantitative scintillation camera imaging. S values for all phantom source-target combinations were calculated based on Monte-Carlo simulations. Combining the S values and time-activity curves, reference values of the absorbed dose to the phantom kidneys, liver, spleen, tumours and whole-body were calculated. The phantoms were used in a virtual dosimetry study, using Monte-Carlo simulated gamma-camera images and conventional methods for absorbed-dose calculations. The characteristics of the SPECT and WB planar images were found to well represent those of real patient images, capturing the difficulties present in image-based dosimetry. The phantoms are expected to be useful for further studies and optimisation of clinical dosimetry in 177Lu PRRT.

  3. Spontaneous regression of intracranial aneurysm following remote ruptured aneurysm treatment with pipeline stent assisted coiling.

    PubMed

    Tsimpas, Asterios; Ashley, William W; Germanwala, Anand V

    2016-10-01

    Spontaneous aneurysm regression is a rare phenomenon. We present the interesting case of a 54-year-old woman who was admitted with a Hunt/Hess grade IV, Fisher grade III subarachnoid hemorrhage and multiple intracranial aneurysms. She was treated with coiling of the largest paraclinoid aneurysm and placement of a flow diverting pipeline embolization device that covered all internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysms. A follow-up angiogram at 6 months showed remodeling of the ICA with complete obliteration of all treated aneurysms. A distant, untreated, right frontal M2 aneurysm regressed spontaneously, after the flow was diverted away from it with the stent. The literature is reviewed, and potential pathophysiological mechanisms leading to aneurysm regression are discussed.

  4. Spontaneous regression of intracranial aneurysm following remote ruptured aneurysm treatment with pipeline stent assisted coiling.

    PubMed

    Tsimpas, Asterios; Ashley, William W; Germanwala, Anand V

    2015-08-13

    Spontaneous aneurysm regression is a rare phenomenon. We present the interesting case of a 54-year-old woman who was admitted with a Hunt/Hess grade IV, Fisher grade III subarachnoid hemorrhage and multiple intracranial aneurysms. She was treated with coiling of the largest paraclinoid aneurysm and placement of a flow diverting pipeline embolization device that covered all internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysms. A follow-up angiogram at 6 months showed remodeling of the ICA with complete obliteration of all treated aneurysms. A distant, untreated, right frontal M2 aneurysm regressed spontaneously, after the flow was diverted away from it with the stent. The literature is reviewed, and potential pathophysiological mechanisms leading to aneurysm regression are discussed.

  5. Aneurysmal wall imaging in a case of cortical superficial siderosis and multiple unruptured aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Yalo, Bertrand; Pop, Raoul; Zinchenko, Ielyzaveta; Diaconu, Mihaela; Chibbaro, Salvatore; Manisor, Monica; Wolff, Valerie; Beaujeux, Remy

    2016-11-09

    We report a case of interhemispheric and bifrontal cortical superficial siderosis in association with two intracranial aneurysms. The patient had no clinical history suggestive of aneurysm rupture, no feature of amyloid angiopathy or other apparent etiology for cortical siderosis. We performed high resolution brain MRI with dark blood T1 sequences before and after IV contrast injection. An anterior communicating aneurysm showed partial wall enhancement on the posterior wall whereas a left posterior communicating aneurysm did not. In the light of recent reports of the association of wall enhancement with unstable aneurysms, we considered wall enhancement to be a marker of inflammation and remodeling of the aneurysm wall, resulting in chronic hemorrhagic suffusion in the subarachnoid spaces. To our knowledge, this is the first report offering proof for a possible link between apparently unruptured aneurysms and cortical siderosis.

  6. Scintigraphy of aneurysmal bone cysts

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, T.M.

    1984-04-01

    Bone scintigrams with Tc-99m radiopharmaceuticals of 25 aneurysmal bone cysts showed abnormal activity in every case. In 22 cases, the activity was correlated with the true pathologic extent of the lesions; only three exhibited a false-positive extended pattern of uptake beyond the true tumor margins. Sixteen scintigrams (64%) revealed increased uptake, chiefly around the periphery of the lesions, with less activity in their centers. This feature could not be explained simply by the cystic nature of the lesions, since aneurysmal bone cysts may contain considerable fibrous tissue septa containing trabeculae of reactive new bone. However, there was no correlation between any specific anatomic or histologic pattern and the intensity and pattern of abnormal scintigraphic activity.

  7. Time evolution and hemodynamics of cerebral aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sforza, Daniel M.; Putman, Christopher; Tateshima, Satoshi; Viñuela, Fernando; Cebral, Juan

    2011-03-01

    Cerebral aneurysm rupture is a leading cause of hemorrhagic strokes. Because they are being more frequently diagnosed before rupture and the prognosis of subarachnoid hemorrhage is poor, clinicians are often required to judge which aneurysms are prone to progression and rupture. Unfortunately, the processes of aneurysm initiation, growth and rupture are not well understood. Multiple factors associated to these processes have been identified. Our goal is to investigate two of them, arterial hemodynamics (using computational fluid dynamics) and the peri-aneurysmal environment, by studying a group of growing cerebral aneurysms that are followed longitudinally in time. Six patients with unruptured untreated brain aneurysms which exhibited growth during the observation period were selected for the study. Vascular models of each aneurysm at each observation time were constructed from the corresponding computed tomography angiography (CTA) images. Subsequently, models were aligned, and geometrical differences quantified. Blood flow was modeled with the 3D unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equation for a Newtonian fluid, and wall shear stress distribution and flow patterns were calculated and visualized. Analysis of the simulations and changes in geometry revealed asymmetric growth patterns and suggests that areas subject to vigorous flows, i.e. relative high wall shear stress and concentrated streamlines patterns; correspond to regions of aneurysm growth. Furthermore, in some cases the geometrical evolution of aneurysms is clearly affected by contacts with bone structures and calcifications in the wall, and as a consequence the hemodynamics is greatly modified. Thus, in these cases the peri-aneurysmal environment must be considered when analyzing aneurysm evolution.

  8. Organ and effective doses in newborns and infants undergoing voiding cystourethrograms (VCUG): A comparison of stylized and tomographic phantoms

    SciTech Connect

    Pazik, Frank D.; Staton, Robert J.; Williams, Jonathon L.; Arreola, Manuel M.; Hintenlang, David E.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2007-01-15

    The time-sequence videotape-analysis methodology, developed [Sulieman et al., Radiology 178, 653-658 (1991)] for use in tissue dose estimations in adult fluoroscopy examinations and utilized [Bolch et al., Med. Phys. 30, 667-680 (2003)] for analog fluoroscopy in newborn patients, has been extended to the study of digital fluoroscopic examinations of the urinary bladder in newborn and infant female patients. Individual frames of the fluoroscopic and radiographic video were analyzed with respect to unique combinations of field size, field center, projection, tube potential, and tube current (mA), and integral tube current (mAs), respectively. The dosimetry study was conducted on five female patients of ages ranging from four-days to 66 days. For each patient, three different phantoms were utilized: a stylized computational phantom of the reference newborn (3.5 kg), a tomographic computational phantom of the reference newborn (3.5 kg), and (3) a tomographic computational phantom uniformly rescaled to match patient total-body mass. The latter phantom set circumvented the need for mass-dependent rescaling of recorded technique factors (kVp, mA, mAs, etc.), and thus represented the highest degree of patient specificity in the individual organ dose assessment. Effective dose values for the voiding cystourethrogram examination ranged from 0.6 to 3.2 mSv, with a mean and standard deviation of 1.8{+-}0.9 mSv. The ovary and colon equivalent doses contributed in total {approx}65%-80% of the effective dose in these fluoroscopy studies. Percent differences in the effective dose assessed using the two tomographic phantoms (one fixed at 3.5 kg with rescaled technique factors rescaled and one physically rescaled to individual patient masses with no adjustment of recorded technique factors) ranged for -49% to +15%. Percent differences in effective dose found using the 3.5 kg stylized phantom and the 3.5 kg tomographic phantom, both with patient-specific rescaling of technique

  9. Pathological findings of saccular cerebral aneurysms-impact of subintimal fibrin deposition on aneurysm rupture.

    PubMed

    Hokari, Masaaki; Nakayama, Naoki; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2015-07-01

    Although several studies have suggested that aneurysmal wall inflammation and laminar thrombus are associated with the rupture of saccular aneurysms, the mechanisms leading to the rupture remain obscure. We performed full exposure of aneurysms before clip application and attempted to keep the fibrin cap on the rupture point. Using these specimens in a nearly original state before surgery, we conducted a pathological analysis and studied the differences between ruptured and unruptured aneurysms to clarify the mechanism of aneurysmal wall degeneration. This study included ruptured (n = 28) and unruptured (n = 12) saccular aneurysms resected after clipping. All of the ruptured aneurysms were obtained within 24 h of onset. Immunostainings for markers of inflammatory cells (CD68) and classical histological staining techniques were performed. Clinical variables and pathological findings from ruptured and unruptured aneurysms were compared. Patients with ruptured or unruptured aneurysms did not differ by age, gender, size, location, and risk factors, such as hypertension, smoking, and hyperlipidemia. The absence or fragmentation of the internal elastica lamina, the myointimal hyperplasia, and the thinning of the aneurysmal wall were generally observed in both aneurysms. The existence of subintimal fibrin deposition, organized laminar thrombus, intramural hemorrhage, neovascularization, and monocyte infiltration are more frequently observed in ruptured aneurysms. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that ruptured aneurysm was associated with presence of subintimal fibrin deposition and monocyte infiltration. These findings suggest that subintimal fibrin deposition and chronic inflammation have a strong impact on degeneration of the aneurysmal wall leading to their rupture, and this finding may be caused by endothelial dysfunction.

  10. The neural basis of phantom limb pain.

    PubMed

    Flor, Herta; Diers, Martin; Andoh, Jamila

    2013-07-01

    A recent study suggests that brain changes in amputees may be pain-induced, questioning maladaptive plasticity as a neural basis of phantom pain. These findings add valuable information on cortical reorganization after amputation. We suggest further lines of research to clarify the mechanisms that underlie phantom pain.

  11. Preemptive Medicine for Cerebral Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    AOKI, Tomohiro; NOZAKI, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Most of cerebral aneurysms (CAs) are incidentally discovered without any neurological symptoms and the risk of rupture of CAs is relatively higher in Japanese population. The goal of treatments for patients with CAs is complete exclusion of the aneurysmal rupture risk for their lives. Since two currently available major treatments, microsurgical clipping and endovascular coiling, have inherent incompleteness to achieve cure of CAs with some considerable treatment risks, and there is no effective surgical or medical intervention to inhibit the formation of CAs in patients with ruptured and unruptured CAs, new treatment strategies with lower risk and higher efficacy should be developed to prevent the formation, growth, and rupture of CAs. Preemptive medicine for CAs should be designed to prevent or delay the onset of symptoms from CAs found in an asymptomatic state or inhibit the de novo formation of CAs, but we have no definite methods to distinguish rupture-prone aneurysms from rupture-resistant ones. Recent advancements in the research of CAs have provided us with some clues, and one of the new treatment strategies for CAs will be developed based on the findings that several inflammatory pathways may be involved in the formation, growth, and rupture of CAs. Preemptive medicine for CAs will be established with specific biomarkers and imaging modalities which can sensor the development of CAs. PMID:27053328

  12. Ruptured Intracranial Dermoid Cyst Associated with Rupture of Cerebral Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Hong

    2011-01-01

    Many tumors have been reported to coexist with cerebral aneurysm. However, intracranial dermoid cysts associated with cerebral aneurysm are very rare. We report a case in which rupture of a cerebral aneurysm resulted in a ruptured dermoid cyst. We present this interesting case and review current literature about the relationship between tumors and aneurysm formation. PMID:22259693

  13. LLNL Torso Phantom Assembly and Disassembly

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, D P

    2005-10-05

    This document from the LLNL In Vivo measurement Facility archives provides important historical as well as current methods for the proper handling of the LLNL Torso Phantom. This document was written circa 1980 and is intended for use by in vivo measurement facilities that perform calibrations using the LLNL Torso Phantom. Proper care and use of the LLNL Torso Phantom will greatly extend the useful lifetime of the phantom. The assembly, and disassembly of the Realistic Phantom are simple tasks and are, for the most part, self evident. However, there are some considerations that will make these tasks easier and assure long life of the parts. The assembly process is presented in Figures 1 through 9 while disassembly suggestions are illustrated in Figures 10 and 11.

  14. Wormholes supported by a phantom energy

    SciTech Connect

    Sushkov, Sergey

    2005-02-15

    We extend the notion of phantom energy, which is generally accepted for homogeneously distributed matter with w<-1 in the universe, on inhomogeneous spherically symmetric spacetime configurations. A spherically symmetric distribution of phantom energy is shown to be able to support the existence of static wormholes. We find an exact solution describing a static spherically symmetric wormhole with phantom energy and show that a spatial distribution of the phantom energy is mainly restricted by the vicinity of the wormhole's throat. The maximal size of the spherical region, surrounding the throat and containing the most part of the phantom energy, depends on the equation-of-state parameter w and cannot exceed some upper limit.

  15. Enceladus' 101 Geysers: Phantoms? Hardly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porco, C.; Nimmo, F.; DiNino, D.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery by the Cassini mission of present-day geysering activity capping the southern hemisphere of Saturn's moon Enceladus (eg, Porco, C. C. et al. Science 311, 1393, 2006) and sourced within a subsurface body of liquid water (eg, Postberg, F. et al. Nature 459, 1098, 2009; Porco, C.C. et al. AJ 148, 45, 2014, hereafter PEA], laced with organic compounds (eg, Waite, J.H. et al. Science 311, 1419, 2006), has been a significant one, with far-reaching astrobiological implications. In an extensive Cassini imaging survey of the moon's south polar terrain (SPT), PEA identified 101 distinct, narrow jets of small icy particles erupting, with varying strengths, from the four major fractures crossing the SPT. A sufficient spread in stereo angles of the 107 images used in that work allowed (in some cases, many) pair-wise triangulations to be computed; precise surface locations were derived for 98 jets. Recently, it has been claimed (Spitale, J.N. et al. Nature 521, 57, 2015) that the majority of the geysers are not true discrete jets, but are "phantoms" that appear in shallow-angle views of a dense continuous curtain of material with acute bends in it. These authors also concluded that the majority of the eruptive material is not in the form of jets but in the form of fissure-style 'curtain' eruptions. We argue below the contrary, that because almost all the moon's geysers were identified by PEA using multiple images with favorable viewing geometries, the vast majority of them, and likely all, are discrete jets. Specifically, out of 98 jets, no fewer than 90 to 95 were identified with viewing geometries that preclude the appearance of phantoms. How the erupting solids (i.e., icy particles) that are seen in Cassini images are partitioned between jets and inter-jet curtains is still an open question.

  16. Patient-specific IMRT verification using independent fluence-based dose calculation software: experimental benchmarking and initial clinical experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georg, Dietmar; Stock, Markus; Kroupa, Bernhard; Olofsson, Jörgen; Nyholm, Tufve; Ahnesjö, Anders; Karlsson, Mikael

    2007-08-01

    Experimental methods are commonly used for patient-specific intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) verification. The purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy and performance of independent dose calculation software (denoted as 'MUV' (monitor unit verification)) for patient-specific quality assurance (QA). 52 patients receiving step-and-shoot IMRT were considered. IMRT plans were recalculated by the treatment planning systems (TPS) in a dedicated QA phantom, in which an experimental 1D and 2D verification (0.3 cm3 ionization chamber; films) was performed. Additionally, an independent dose calculation was performed. The fluence-based algorithm of MUV accounts for collimator transmission, rounded leaf ends, tongue-and-groove effect, backscatter to the monitor chamber and scatter from the flattening filter. The dose calculation utilizes a pencil beam model based on a beam quality index. DICOM RT files from patient plans, exported from the TPS, were directly used as patient-specific input data in MUV. For composite IMRT plans, average deviations in the high dose region between ionization chamber measurements and point dose calculations performed with the TPS and MUV were 1.6 ± 1.2% and 0.5 ± 1.1% (1 S.D.). The dose deviations between MUV and TPS slightly depended on the distance from the isocentre position. For individual intensity-modulated beams (total 367), an average deviation of 1.1 ± 2.9% was determined between calculations performed with the TPS and with MUV, with maximum deviations up to 14%. However, absolute dose deviations were mostly less than 3 cGy. Based on the current results, we aim to apply a confidence limit of 3% (with respect to the prescribed dose) or 6 cGy for routine IMRT verification. For off-axis points at distances larger than 5 cm and for low dose regions, we consider 5% dose deviation or 10 cGy acceptable. The time needed for an independent calculation compares very favourably with the net time for an experimental approach

  17. Giant Serpentine Aneurysm of the Middle Cerebral Artery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Joo; Kwun, Byung Duk; Kim, Chang Jin

    2010-01-01

    Giant serpentine aneurysms are rare and have distinct angiographic findings. The rarity, large size, complex anatomy and hemodynamic characteristics of giant serpentine aneurysms make treatment difficult. We report a case of a giant serpentine aneurysm of the right middle cerebral artery (MCA) that presented as headache. Treatment involved a superficial temporal artery (STA)-MCA bypass followed by aneurysm resection. The patient was discharged without neurological deficits, and early and late follow-up angiography disclosed successful removal of the aneurysm and a patent bypass graft. We conclude that STA-MCA bypass and aneurysm excision is a successful treatment method for a giant serpentine aneurysm. PMID:20856671

  18. Aneurysms of medium-sized arteries in Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Awais, Mazen; Williams, David M; Deeb, G Michael; Shea, Michael J

    2013-11-01

    Marfan syndrome is a relatively common connective tissue disorder that causes skin, ocular, skeletal, and cardiovascular abnormalities. High morbidity and mortality occur with aortic aneurysm and dissection. Other large-artery aneurysms, including carotid, subclavian, and iliac artery aneurysms, have also been associated with Marfan syndrome. It is not clear whether small- to medium-sized artery aneurysms are associated with Marfan syndrome. This report describes 4 patients with Marfan syndrome who have associated small- to medium-sized artery aneurysms with several complications. Additional investigations are needed to determine whether Marfan syndrome can cause small- to medium-sized artery aneurysms and how patients with these aneurysms should be treated.

  19. The Helsinki Rat Microsurgical Sidewall Aneurysm Model

    PubMed Central

    Marbacher, Serge; Marjamaa, Johan; Abdelhameed, Essam; Hernesniemi, Juha; Niemelä, Mika; Frösen, Juhana

    2014-01-01

    Experimental saccular aneurysm models are necessary for testing novel surgical and endovascular treatment options and devices before they are introduced into clinical practice. Furthermore, experimental models are needed to elucidate the complex aneurysm biology leading to rupture of saccular aneurysms. Several different kinds of experimental models for saccular aneurysms have been established in different species. Many of them, however, require special skills, expensive equipment, or special environments, which limits their widespread use. A simple, robust, and inexpensive experimental model is needed as a standardized tool that can be used in a standardized manner in various institutions. The microsurgical rat abdominal aortic sidewall aneurysm model combines the possibility to study both novel endovascular treatment strategies and the molecular basis of aneurysm biology in a standardized and inexpensive manner. Standardized grafts by means of shape, size, and geometry are harvested from a donor rat's descending thoracic aorta and then transplanted to a syngenic recipient rat. The aneurysms are sutured end-to-side with continuous or interrupted 9-0 nylon sutures to the infrarenal abdominal aorta. We present step-by-step procedural instructions, information on necessary equipment, and discuss important anatomical and surgical details for successful microsurgical creation of an abdominal aortic sidewall aneurysm in the rat. PMID:25350840

  20. Two cases of giant serpentine aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kumabe, T; Kaneko, U; Ishibashi, T; Kaneko, K; Uchigasaki, S

    1990-06-01

    Giant serpentine aneurysm (GSA) is an entity defined on radiological and pathological grounds as a giant, partially thrombosed aneurysm containing tortuous vascular channels. We have had the opportunity to study two patients with GSAs, which has allowed for a complete comparative anatomical and radiological study. This report emphasizes the etiology of the GSAs. Twenty-two patients with GSAs have been reported in the literature, of which pathological studies were done in 10. In most of these, the aneurysm was found to be filled with an organized thrombus, but in our patients the aneurysm was filled with relatively new clot. The aneurysm enlarged and a change in the tortuous vascular channel was observed over a period of 1 year in the first patient, whereas a globoid aneurysm developed into a GSA in the brief period of just 2 weeks in the second patient. This rapid transformation of a globoid aneurysm into a GSA is of particular interest when the etiology of GSAs is considered. Our patients therefore shed some interesting light on the possible pathophysiology of GSAs. That is, the bloodstream may change dynamically in a giant aneurysm and may become a serpentine channel under conditions that lead to a "Coanda effect."

  1. Spontaneous Retroperitoneal Hemorrhage from Adrenal Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez Valverde, F.M. Balsalobre, M.; Torregrosa, N.; Molto, M.; Gomez Ramos, M.J.; Vazquez Rojas, J.L.

    2007-04-15

    Spontaneous adrenal hemorrhage is a very rare but serious disorder of the adrenal gland that can require emergent treatment. We report on a 42-year-old man who underwent selective angiography for diagnosis and treatment of retroperitoneal hemorrhage from small adrenal artery aneurysm. This case gives further details about the value of transluminal artery embolization in the management of visceral aneurysm rupture.

  2. [Gigantic aneurysm of the popliteal artery].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Samos, R; Zorita, A; Vázquez, J G; Morán, C; Vaquero, F

    1990-01-01

    A giant popliteal aneurysm case, whose first symptom was an acute ischemia on the limb, caused by thrombosis, which was successfully treated, is reported. Although popliteal aneurysm is not a rare event, the interest of this case is focused on its extraordinary size and unique location.

  3. Aneurysmal bone cyst and other nonneoplastic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlin, D.C.; McLeod, R.A.

    1982-08-01

    Aneurysmal bone cyst is a benign proliferative tumefaction of bone. Histologic similarities indicate a kinship among classic aneurysmal bone cysts, essentially 'solid' proliferative lesions in bones; giant cell reparative granulomas of the jaws, at the base of the skull, and in the small bones of the hands and feet; skeletal lesions of hyperparathyroidism; and even pseudosarcomatous myositis ossificans, proliferative myositis, and proliferative fasciitis.

  4. Congenital hepatic artery aneurysm simulating pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Gavin, P.M.; Matalon, T.A.S.; Petasnick, J.P.; Roseman, D.L.

    1984-09-01

    The authors report a case of a hepatic artery aneurysm that simulated a mass in the head of the pancreas. The correct diagnosis was made preoperatively based on several findings: curvilinear calcification within the mass on CT, a well-defined crystic collection on ultrasound, absence of biliary duct dilatation or jaundice, and a presence of other aneurysms.

  5. Pantopaque simulating thrombosed intracranial aneurysms on MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Lidov, M.W.; Silvers, A.R.; Mosesson, R.E.; Stollman, A.L.; Som, P.M.

    1996-03-01

    A patient is presented in whom iophendylate (Pantopaque) within the basal cisterns closely resembled the appearance on MRI of thrombosed aneurysms of the middle cerebral arteries. The sometimes subtle differences between the appearances on MRI of Pantopaque and aneurysmal clot are discussed to permit accurate diagnosis without resorting to more invasive diagnostic tests, such as cerebral angiography. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Compact and extended objects from self-interacting phantom fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhunushaliev, Vladimir; Folomeev, Vladimir; Makhmudov, Arislan; Urazalina, Ainur; Singleton, Douglas; Scott, John

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we investigate localized and extended objects for gravitating, self-interacting phantom fields. The phantom fields come from two scalar fields with a "wrong-sign" (negative) kinetic energy term in the Lagrangian. This study covers several solutions supported by these phantom fields: phantom balls, traversable wormholes, phantom cosmic strings, and "phantom" domain walls. These four systems are solved numerically, and we try to draw out general, interesting features in each case.

  7. In Vitro MRV-based Hemodynamic Study of Complex Helical Flow in a Patient-specific Jugular Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kefayati, Sarah; Acevedo-Bolton, Gabriel; Haraldsson, Henrik; Saloner, David

    2014-11-01

    Neurointerventional Radiologists are frequently requested to evaluate the venous side of the intracranial circulation for a variety of conditions including: Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency thought to play a role in the development of multiple sclerosis; sigmoid sinus diverticulum which has been linked to the presence of pulsatile tinnitus; and jugular vein distension which is related to cardiac dysfunction. Most approaches to evaluating these conditions rely on structural assessment or two dimensional flow analyses. This study was designed to investigate the highly complex jugular flow conditions using magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV). A jugular phantom was fabricated based on the geometry of the dominant jugular in a tinnitus patient. Volumetric three-component time-resolved velocity fields were obtained using 4D PC-MRI -with the protocol enabling turbulence acquisition- and the patient-specific pulsatile waveform. Flow was highly complex exhibiting regions of jet, high swirling strength, and strong helical pattern with the core originating from the focal point of the jugular bulb. Specifically, flow was analyzed for helicity and the level of turbulence kinetic energy elevated in the core of helix and distally, in the post-narrowing region.

  8. Comparison of the strain field of abdominal aortic aneurysm measured by magnetic resonance imaging and stereovision: a feasibility study for prediction of the risk of rupture of aortic abdominal aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yufei; Joannic, David; Delassus, Patrick; Lalande, Alain; Juillion, Patrick; Fontaine, Jean-François

    2015-04-13

    The prediction of the risk of rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a complex problem. Currently the criteria to predict rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms are aneurysm diameter and growth rates. It is generally believed that study of the wall strain distribution could be helpful to find a better decision criterion for surgery of aortic aneurysms before their rupture. The wall strain distribution depends on many biological and biomechanical factors such as elastic properties of the aorta, turbulent blood flow, anatomy of the aorta, presence of thrombus or not and so on. Recently, numerical simulations to estimate rupture-potential have received many attentions. However, none of the medical imaging tools for screening and monitoring of AAAs were studied in terms of mechanical behavior and experimentally to demonstrate their capability to measure relevant variables. The aim of this study was to develop a metrological approach for deployment testing of the ability of techniques for measuring local in-vitro deformations based on comparison of stereovision and MRI. In this paper, we present the implementation approach and results of the study based on cylindrical phantoms with or without AAA representing, respectively, healthy and unhealthy artery. Through this study, an experimental device was developed for the behavior study of AAA during a cardiac cycle. The results show that the stereovision techniques used in laboratory is well suited and is qualitatively and quantitatively equivalent with MRI measurements.

  9. A statistically defined anthropomorphic software breast phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Beverly A.; Reiser, Ingrid; Nishikawa, Robert M.; Bakic, Predrag R.

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: Digital anthropomorphic breast phantoms have emerged in the past decade because of recent advances in 3D breast x-ray imaging techniques. Computer phantoms in the literature have incorporated power-law noise to represent glandular tissue and branching structures to represent linear components such as ducts. When power-law noise is added to those phantoms in one piece, the simulated fibroglandular tissue is distributed randomly throughout the breast, resulting in dense tissue placement that may not be observed in a real breast. The authors describe a method for enhancing an existing digital anthropomorphic breast phantom by adding binarized power-law noise to a limited area of the breast. Methods: Phantoms with (0.5 mm){sup 3} voxel size were generated using software developed by Bakic et al. Between 0% and 40% of adipose compartments in each phantom were replaced with binarized power-law noise ({beta} = 3.0) ranging from 0.1 to 0.6 volumetric glandular fraction. The phantoms were compressed to 7.5 cm thickness, then blurred using a 3 Multiplication-Sign 3 boxcar kernel and up-sampled to (0.1 mm){sup 3} voxel size using trilinear interpolation. Following interpolation, the phantoms were adjusted for volumetric glandular fraction using global thresholding. Monoenergetic phantom projections were created, including quantum noise and simulated detector blur. Texture was quantified in the simulated projections using power-spectrum analysis to estimate the power-law exponent {beta} from 25.6 Multiplication-Sign 25.6 mm{sup 2} regions of interest. Results: Phantoms were generated with total volumetric glandular fraction ranging from 3% to 24%. Values for {beta} (averaged per projection view) were found to be between 2.67 and 3.73. Thus, the range of textures of the simulated breasts covers the textures observed in clinical images. Conclusions: Using these new techniques, digital anthropomorphic breast phantoms can be generated with a variety of glandular fractions

  10. A nonlinear biomathematical model for the study of intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Nieto, J J; Torres, A

    2000-08-01

    The formation and rupture of aneurysms is a significant medical problem, but is not clearly understood. Most intracranial aneurysm are located in the circle of Willis. We consider a nonlinear mathematical model that simulates the blood flow inside the aneurysm, one of the relevant factors in the evolution of an aneurysm. Different techniques from nonlinear analysis are used in order to obtain, from the model, several consequences that would help to understand some medical aspects of aneurysms of the circle of Willis.

  11. [Aneurysm of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery: case report].

    PubMed

    Adorno, Juan Oscar Alarcón; de Andrade, Guilherme Cabral

    2002-12-01

    The intracranial aneurysms of the posterior circulation have been reported between 5 and 10% of all cerebral aneurysms and the aneurysms of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) are considered rare, can cause cerebello pontine angle (CPA) syndrome with or without subarachnoid hemorrhage. Since 1948 few cases were described in the literature. We report on a 33 year-old female patient with subarachnoid hemorrhage due to sacular aneurysm of the left AICA. She was submitted to clipage of the aneurysm without complications.

  12. Clipping of bilateral MCA aneurysms and a coiled ACOM aneurysm through a modified lateral supraorbital craniotomy.

    PubMed

    Hage, Ziad A; Charbel, Fady T

    2015-01-01

    We showcase the microsurgical clipping of a left middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysm-(B) done through a modified right lateral supraorbital craniotomy, as well as clipping of a previously coiled anterior communicating (ACOM) artery aneurysm-(C) and a bilobed right MCA aneurysm-(A). Splitting of the right sylvian fissure is initially performed following which a subfrontal approach is used to expose and dissect the contralateral sylvian fissure. The left MCA aneurysm is identified and clipped. The ACOM aneurysm is then clipped following multiple clip repositioning based on flow measurements. The right MCA aneurysm is then identified and each lobe is clipped separately. The first picture showcased in this video is a side to side right and left ICA injection in AP projection. In this picture, (A) points to the bilobed right MCA aneurysm, (B) to the left middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysm, and (C) to the previously coiled anterior communicating (ACOM) artery aneurysm. The red dotted line shows that both MCA aneurysms lie within the same plane which makes it easier to clip both of them, through one small craniotomy. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/4cQC7nHsL5I .

  13. Multiple fusiform cerebral aneurysms – case report

    PubMed Central

    Jaworska, Katarzyna; Dołowy, Joanna; Kuśmierska, Małgorzata; Kuniej, Tomasz; Jaźwiec, Przemysław

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: A true aneurysym is a dilation of arterial lumen as a consequence of congenital or acquired abnormalities leading to a reduction of mechanical resistance of vascular wall, most commonly caused by its defected structure in the form of absence or weakening of the muscular and/or elastic layer. From the pathophysiological point of view, cerebral aneurysms can be classified as ‘saccular’ – most commonly occurring, and ‘other types’, including fusiform/dolichoectatic, dissecting, serpentine, posttraumatic, mycotic and giant aneurysms with or without intra-aneurysmal thrombosis. Case Report: We present a rare case of a patient with multiple fusiform dilations of cerebral vessels and giant fusiform aneurysm in supraclinoid segment of the internal carotid artery. The patient presented to hospital because of sudden, severe vertigo with nausea, impaired balance and disturbed vision. Vascular anomalies were detected on CT scanning without contrast. The diagnostic work-up was complemented by CT angiography, MRI and cerebral angiography. Conclusions: Aneurysm located within the intracranial arteries is one of the most common vascular defects of the brain. The number, size and location of aneurysms are highly variable. Aneurysms can have either supra- or infratentorial location, affecting a single or multiple arteries within one or both brain hemispheres. There is often a correlation between the location of the aneurysm and its etiology, as in case of so-called mirror-image aneurysms. Symmetrically located aneurysms may indicate a defect in vascular structure. Asymmetric location, as in the patient described above, is more likely due to acquired causes, mainly atherosclerosis, but also septic emboli or blood disorders. PMID:22802866

  14. Toward optimizing patient-specific IMRT QA techniques in the accurate detection of dosimetrically acceptable and unacceptable patient plans

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie, Elizabeth M.; Balter, Peter A.; Stingo, Francesco C.; Jones, Jimmy; Followill, David S.; Kry, Stephen F.

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: The authors investigated the performance of several patient-specific intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA) dosimeters in terms of their ability to correctly identify dosimetrically acceptable and unacceptable IMRT patient plans, as determined by an in-house-designed multiple ion chamber phantom used as the gold standard. A further goal was to examine optimal threshold criteria that were consistent and based on the same criteria among the various dosimeters. Methods: The authors used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves to determine the sensitivity and specificity of (1) a 2D diode array undergoing anterior irradiation with field-by-field evaluation, (2) a 2D diode array undergoing anterior irradiation with composite evaluation, (3) a 2D diode array using planned irradiation angles with composite evaluation, (4) a helical diode array, (5) radiographic film, and (6) an ion chamber. This was done with a variety of evaluation criteria for a set of 15 dosimetrically unacceptable and 9 acceptable clinical IMRT patient plans, where acceptability was defined on the basis of multiple ion chamber measurements using independent ion chambers and a phantom. The area under the curve (AUC) on the ROC curves was used to compare dosimeter performance across all thresholds. Optimal threshold values were obtained from the ROC curves while incorporating considerations for cost and prevalence of unacceptable plans. Results: Using common clinical acceptance thresholds, most devices performed very poorly in terms of identifying unacceptable plans. Grouping the detector performance based on AUC showed two significantly different groups. The ion chamber, radiographic film, helical diode array, and anterior-delivered composite 2D diode array were in the better-performing group, whereas the anterior-delivered field-by-field and planned gantry angle delivery using the 2D diode array performed less well. Additionally, based on the AUCs, there

  15. Unsteady wall shear stress analysis from image-based computational fluid dynamic aneurysm models under Newtonian and Casson rheological models.

    PubMed

    Castro, Marcelo A; Ahumada Olivares, María C; Putman, Christopher M; Cebral, Juan R

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this work was to determine whether or not Newtonian rheology assumption in image-based patient-specific computational fluid dynamics (CFD) cerebrovascular models harboring cerebral aneurysms may affect the hemodynamics characteristics, which have been previously associated with aneurysm progression and rupture. Ten patients with cerebral aneurysms with lobulations were considered. CFD models were reconstructed from 3DRA and 4DCTA images by means of region growing, deformable models, and an advancing front technique. Patient-specific FEM blood flow simulations were performed under Newtonian and Casson rheological models. Wall shear stress (WSS) maps were created and distributions were compared at the end diastole. Regions of lower WSS (lobulation) and higher WSS (neck) were identified. WSS changes in time were analyzed. Maximum, minimum and time-averaged values were calculated and statistically compared. WSS characterization remained unchanged. At high WSS regions, Casson rheology systematically produced higher WSS minimum, maximum and time-averaged values. However, those differences were not statistically significant. At low WSS regions, when averaging over all cases, the Casson model produced higher stresses, although in some cases the Newtonian model did. However, those differences were not significant either. There is no evidence that Newtonian model overestimates WSS. Differences are not statistically significant.

  16. Biomimetic phantom for cardiac diffusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Teh, Irvin; Zhou, Feng‐Lei; Hubbard Cristinacce, Penny L.; Parker, Geoffrey J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used to characterize cardiac tissue microstructure, necessitating the use of physiologically relevant phantoms for methods development. Existing phantoms are generally simplistic and mostly simulate diffusion in the brain. Thus, there is a need for phantoms mimicking diffusion in cardiac tissue. Materials and Methods A biomimetic phantom composed of hollow microfibers generated using co‐electrospinning was developed to mimic myocardial diffusion properties and fiber and sheet orientations. Diffusion tensor imaging was carried out at monthly intervals over 4 months at 9.4T. 3D fiber tracking was performed using the phantom and compared with fiber tracking in an ex vivo rat heart. Results The mean apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy of the phantom remained stable over the 4‐month period, with mean values of 7.53 ± 0.16 × 10‐4 mm2/s and 0.388 ± 0.007, respectively. Fiber tracking of the 1st and 3rd eigenvectors generated analogous results to the fiber and sheet‐normal direction respectively, found in the left ventricular myocardium. Conclusion A biomimetic phantom simulating diffusion in the heart was designed and built. This could aid development and validation of novel diffusion MRI methods for investigating cardiac microstructure, decrease the number of animals and patients needed for methods development, and improve quality control in longitudinal and multicenter cardiac diffusion MRI studies. J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2016;43:594–600. PMID:26213152

  17. Growth of giant intracranial aneurysms: An aneurysmal wall disorder?

    PubMed

    Ferracci, F-X; Gilard, V; Cebula, H; Magne, N; Lejeune, J-P; Langlois, O; Proust, F

    2017-03-01

    The enlargement of giant intracranial aneurysms (IA) can be observed in 30 % of cases resulting in a neurological deficit and epilepsy due to its mass effect. This growth process could be due to a morphological disorder of the IA wall. The authors report on 2 cases of giant IA growth responsible for intracranial hypertension. The treatment of these giant IA required a microsurgical excision combined with a series of cerebral revascularization procedures. The role of vasa vasorum on the inflammatory granuloma outside the vessel, which induced the enlargement, is discussed. These cases illustrate the abluminal vasculopathy as the main involvement of this unfavourable natural history.

  18. Patient-specific dosimetry based on quantitative SPECT imaging and 3D-DFT convolution

    SciTech Connect

    Akabani, G.; Hawkins, W.G.; Eckblade, M.B.; Leichner, P.K.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study was to validate the use of a 3-D discrete Fourier Transform (3D-DFT) convolution method to carry out the dosimetry for I-131 for soft tissues in radioimmunotherapy procedures. To validate this convolution method, mathematical and physical phantoms were used as a basis of comparison with Monte Carlo transport (MCT) calculations which were carried out using the EGS4 system code. The mathematical phantom consisted of a sphere containing uniform and nonuniform activity distributions. The physical phantom consisted of a cylinder containing uniform and nonuniform activity distributions. Quantitative SPECT reconstruction was carried out using the Circular Harmonic Transform (CHT) algorithm.

  19. New ANSI standard for thyroid phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Mallett, Michael W.; Bolch, Wesley E.; Fulmer, Philip C.; Jue, Tracy M.; McCurdy, David E.; Pillay, Mike; Xu, X. George

    2015-08-01

    Here, a new ANSI standard titled “Thyroid Phantom Used in Occupational Monitoring” (Health Physics Society 2014) has been published. The standard establishes the criteria for acceptable design, fabrication, or modeling of a phantom suitable for calibrating in vivo monitoring systems to measure photon-emitting radionuclides deposited in the thyroid. The current thyroid phantom standard was drafted in 1973 (ANSI N44.3-1973), last reviewed in 1984, and a revision of the standard to cover a more modern approach was deemed warranted.

  20. Comparable mid-term survival in patients undergoing elective fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repair and endovascular aneurysm repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Gottsäter, Anders; Acosta, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate mid-term survival in patients undergoing elective fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repair and standard endovascular aneurysm repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm. Methods: Consecutive patients treated from 2007 to 2011 with elective fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repair (n = 81) and endovascular aneurysm repair (n = 201) were evaluated concerning age, cardiovascular medication, comorbidities, and mid-term mortality. Results: Patients in the elective fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repair group were younger than the endovascular aneurysm repair group (p = 0.006). In comparison with the endovascular aneurysm repair group, a lower proportion of patients in the elective fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repair group had diabetes (p = 0.013) and anemia (p = 0.003), and a higher proportion had arterial hypertension (p = 0.009). When entering age, endovascular aneurysm repair or fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repair operation, diabetes, anemia, and hypertension in a Cox regression model, only age (hazard ratio: 1.07; 95% confidence interval: 1.03–1.11; p < 0.001) was a risk factor for mid-term mortality. Conclusion: Careful patient selection and medical optimization resulted in comparable mid-term survival in patients undergoing elective fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repair and endovascular aneurysm repair. PMID:26770700

  1. The Hemodynamic Effects of Blood Flow-Arterial Wall Interaction on Cerebral Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Marie

    2005-11-01

    Mechanical stresses such as wall shear induced by blood flow play an important role on cardiovascular diseases and cerebral disorders like arterioscleroses and cerebral aneurysm. In order to obtain a better understanding of mechanism of formation, growth, and rupture of cerebral aneurysm, this paper focuses on investigation of cerebral hemodynamics and its effects on aneurismal wall. The paper mainly consists of three parts. Since it is important to obtain the detailed information on the hemodynamic properties in the cerebral circulatory system, the first part discusses a large-scale hemodynamic simulation of the Cerebral Arterial Circle of Willis. The second part presents the simulation and in-vitro experiment of cerebral aneurysm with the consideration of blood flow-arterial wall interaction. Both simulations in the first and the second parts are conducted in a patient specific manner using medical images and also include modeling of boundary conditions to emulate realistic hemodynamic conditions. The present mathematical model, however, includes only macroscopic mechanical functions. Therefore, in the third part, the paper touches upon on future prospects in modeling of microscopic functions such as the effects of endothelial cells and multi physics functions such as physiological effects.

  2. Influence of Parent Artery Segmentation and Boundary Conditions on Hemodynamic Characteristics of Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Yufeng; Oh, Je Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to explore the influence of segmentation of the upstream and downstream parent artery and hemodynamic boundary conditions (BCs) on the evaluated hemodynamic factors for the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of intracranial aneurysms. Materials and Methods Three dimensional patient-specific aneurysm models were analyzed by applying various combinations of inlet and outlet BCs. Hemodynamic factors such as velocity pattern, streamline, wall shear stress, and oscillatory shear index at the systolic time were visualized and compared among the different cases. Results Hemodynamic factors were significantly affected by the inlet BCs while there was little influence of the outlet BCs. When the inlet length was relatively short, different inlet BCs showed different hemodynamic factors and the calculated hemodynamic factors were also dependent on the inlet length. However, when the inlet length (L) was long enough (L>20D, where D is the diameter of inlet section), the hemodynamic factors became similar regardless of the inlet BCs and lengths. The error due to different inlet BCs was negligible. The effect of the outlet length on the hemodynamic factors was similar to that of the inlet length. Conclusion Simulated hemodynamic factors are highly sensitive to inlet BCs and upstream parent artery segmentation. The results of this work can provide an insight into how to build models and to apply BCs for more accurate estimation of hemodynamic factors from CFD simulations of intracranial aneurysms. PMID:26256976

  3. Assessment Of Coronary Artery Aneurysms Using Transluminal Attenuation Gradient And Computational Modeling In Kawasaki Disease Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grande Gutierrez, Noelia; Kahn, Andrew; Shirinsky, Olga; Gagarina, Nina; Lyskina, Galina; Fukazawa, Ryuji; Owaga, Shunichi; Burns, Jane; Marsden, Alison

    2015-11-01

    Kawasaki Disease (KD) can result in coronary artery aneurysms (CAA) in up to 25% of patients, putting them at risk of thrombus formation, myocardial infarction and sudden death. Clinical guidelines recommend CAA diameter >8 mm as the arbitrary criterion for initiating systemic anticoagulation. KD patient specific modeling and flow simulations suggest that hemodynamic data can predict regions at increased risk of thrombosis. Transluminal Attenuation Gradient (TAG) is determined from the change in radiological attenuation per vessel length and has been proposed as a non-invasive method for characterizing coronary stenosis from CT Angiography. We hypothesized that CAA abnormal flow could be quantified using TAG. We computed hemodynamics for patient specific coronary models using a stabilized finite element method, coupled numerically to a lumped parameter network to model the heart and vascular boundary conditions. TAG was quantified in the major coronary arteries. We compared TAG for aneurysmal and normal arteries and we analyzed TAG correlation with hemodynamic and geometrical parameters. Our results suggest that TAG may provide hemodynamic data not available from anatomy alone. TAG represents a possible extension to standard CTA that could help to better evaluate the risk of thrombus formation in KD.

  4. Physiologically-relevant measurements of flow through coils and stents: towards improved modeling of endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbour, Michael; Levitt, Michael; Geindreau, Christian; Rolland Du Roscoat, Sabine; Johnson, Luke; Chivukula, Keshav; Aliseda, Alberto

    2016-11-01

    The hemodynamic environment in cerebral aneurysms undergoing flow-diverting stent (FDS) or coil embolization treatment plays a critical role in long-term outcomes. Standard modeling approaches to endovascular coils and FDS simplify the complex geometry into a homogenous porous volume or surface through the addition of a Darcy-Brinkman pressure loss term in the momentum equation. The inertial and viscous loss coefficients are typically derived from published in vitro studies of pressure loss across FDS and coils placed in a straight tube, where the only fluid path is across the treatment - an unrealistic representation of treatment apposition in vivo. The pressure drop across FDS and coils in side branch aneurysms located on curved parent vessels is measured. Using PIV, the velocity at the aneurysm neck plane is reconstructed and used to determine loss coefficients for better models of endovascular coils or FDS that account for physiological placement and vessel curvature. These improved models are incorporated into CFD simulations and validated against in vitro model PIV velocity, as well as compared to microCT-based coil/stent-resolving CFD simulations of patient-specific treated aneurysm flow.

  5. Quantification of hemodynamics in abdominal aortic aneurysms during rest and exercise using magnetic resonance imaging and computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Les, Andrea S; Shadden, Shawn C; Figueroa, C Alberto; Park, Jinha M; Tedesco, Maureen M; Herfkens, Robert J; Dalman, Ronald L; Taylor, Charles A

    2010-04-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) affect 5-7% of older Americans. We hypothesize that exercise may slow AAA growth by decreasing inflammatory burden, peripheral resistance, and adverse hemodynamic conditions such as low, oscillatory shear stress. In this study, we use magnetic resonance imaging and computational fluid dynamics to describe hemodynamics in eight AAAs during rest and exercise using patient-specific geometric models, flow waveforms, and pressures as well as appropriately resolved finite-element meshes. We report mean wall shear stress (MWSS) and oscillatory shear index (OSI) at four aortic locations (supraceliac, infrarenal, mid-aneurysm, and suprabifurcation) and turbulent kinetic energy over the entire computational domain on meshes containing more than an order of magnitude more elements than previously reported results (mean: 9.0-million elements; SD: 2.3 M; range: 5.7-12.0 M). MWSS was lowest in the aneurysm during rest 2.5 dyn/cm(2) (SD: 2.1; range: 0.9-6.5), and MWSS increased and OSI decreased at all four locations during exercise. Mild turbulence existed at rest, while moderate aneurysmal turbulence was present during exercise. During both rest and exercise, aortic turbulence was virtually zero superior to the AAA for seven out of eight patients. We postulate that the increased MWSS, decreased OSI, and moderate turbulence present during exercise may attenuate AAA growth.

  6. Intracranial aneurysm growth quantification in CTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firouzian, Azadeh; Manniesing, Rashindra; Metz, Coert T.; Klein, Stefan; Velthuis, Birgitta K.; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.; van der Lugt, Aad; Niessen, Wiro J.

    2012-02-01

    Next to aneurysm size, aneurysm growth over time is an important indicator for aneurysm rupture risk. Manual assessment of aneurysm growth is a cumbersome procedure, prone to inter-observer and intra-observer variability. In clinical practice, mainly qualitative assessment and/or diameter measurement are routinely performed. In this paper a semi-automated method for quantifying aneurysm volume growth over time in CTA data is presented. The method treats a series of longitudinal images as a 4D dataset. Using a 4D groupwise non-rigid registration method, deformations with respect to the baseline scan are determined. Combined with 3D aneurysm segmentation in the baseline scan, volume change is assessed using the deformation field at the aneurysm wall. For ten patients, the results of the method are compared with reports from expert clinicians, showing that the quantitative results of the method are in line with the assessment in the radiology reports. The method is also compared to an alternative method in which the volume is segmented in each 3D scan individually, showing that the 4D groupwise registration method agrees better with manual assessment.

  7. Complications of endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Orrù, Emanuele; Roccatagliata, Luca; Cester, Giacomo; Causin, Francesco; Castellan, Lucio

    2013-10-01

    The number of neuroendovascular treatments of both ruptured and unruptured aneurysms has increased substantially in the last two decades. Complications of endovascular treatments of cerebral aneurysms are rare but can potentially lead to acute worsening of the neurological status, to new neurological deficits or death. Some of the possible complications, such as vascular access site complications or systemic side effects associated with contrast medium (e.g. contrast medium allergy, contrast induced nephropathy) can also be encountered in diagnostic angiography. The most common complications of endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms are related to acute thromboembolic events and perforation of the aneurysm. Overall, the reported rate of thromboembolic complications ranges between 4.7% and 12.5% while the rate of intraprocedural rupture of cerebral aneurysms is about 0.7% in patients with unruptured aneurysms and about 4.1% in patients with previously ruptured aneurysms. Thromboembolic and hemorrhagic complications may occur during different phases of endovascular procedures and are related to different technical, clinical and anatomic reasons. A thorough knowledge of the different aspects of these complications can reduce the risk of their occurrence and minimize their clinical sequelae. A deep understanding of complications and of their management is thus part of the best standard of care.

  8. Insights on a Giant Aneurysm Treated Endovascularly.

    PubMed

    Graziano, Francesca; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo; Ulm, Arthur John

    2016-07-01

    Background Endovascular treatment with stent-assisted Guglielmi detachable coils is an accepted method for treating intracranial giant aneurysms that otherwise would require more invasive or destructive treatment or could not be treated at all. Nevertheless, there is a paucity of information concerning inner postcoiling aneurysmal changes in human subjects over the long term. We report a postmortem analysis of a patient with a giant aneurysm at the vertebrobasilar junction (VBJ) who was treated endovascularly and studied pathologically 24 months after treatment. Materials and Method The head was removed at autopsy and prefixed in a 10% neutral buffered formalin solution. The brain was gently removed from the skull base after cutting the intracranial nerves and vascular structures. The giant VBJ aneurysm and its relationship with the brainstem, cranial nerves, and vessels were captured photographically and analyzed. Afterward, under operating microscope guidance, the vertebrobasilar system with the aneurysm was gently and carefully detached from the brainstem and carefully analyzed. Results No complete fibrous obliteration of the aneurysm lumen could be detected in our case, and no endothelialization had taken place 24 months after treatment. Conclusions Our findings agree with those of previous similar reports. Coiling, in particular in large or giant aneurysms, may be burdened by the risk of coil compaction and recanalization, but it has the advantage of not affecting the flow in the perforating arteries.

  9. Cerebral aneurysms following radiotherapy for medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, P.J.; Sung, J.H.

    1989-04-01

    Three patients, two males and one female aged 21, 14, and 31 years, respectively, developed cerebral saccular aneurysms several years after undergoing radiotherapy for cerebellar medulloblastoma at 2, 5, and 14 years of age, respectively. Following surgery, all three received combined cobalt-60 irradiation and intrathecal colloidal radioactive gold (/sup 198/Au) therapy, and died from rupture of the aneurysm 19, 9, and 17 years after the radiotherapy, respectively. Autopsy examination revealed no recurrence of the medulloblastoma, but widespread radiation-induced vasculopathy was found at the base of the brain and in the spinal cord, and saccular aneurysms arose from the posterior cerebral arteries at the basal cistern or choroidal fissure. The aneurysms differed from the ordinary saccular aneurysms of congenital type in their location and histological features. Their locations corresponded to the areas where intrathecally administered colloidal /sup 198/Au is likely to pool, and they originated directly from a segment of the artery rather than from a branching site as in congenital saccular aneurysms. It is, therefore, concluded that the aneurysms in these three patients were most likely radiation-induced.

  10. Trigger factors for rupture of intracranial aneurysms in relation to patient and aneurysm characteristics.

    PubMed

    Vlak, Monique H M; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; Greebe, Paut; van der Bom, Johanna G; Algra, Ale

    2012-07-01

    Female gender, age above 60 years, and an aneurysm larger than 5 mm or location on the posterior circulation are associated with a higher rupture risk of intracranial aneurysms. We hypothesized that this association is explained by a higher susceptibility to (one of) the eight trigger factors that were recently identified. We included 250 patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. We calculated relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) of aneurysmal rupture for trigger factors according to sex, age, site, and size of the aneurysms by means of the case-crossover design. None of the triggers except for physical exercise differed according to patient and aneurysm characteristics. In the hour after exposure to physical exercise: (1) patients over the age of 60 have a six-times-higher risk of rupture (RR 13; 95% CI 6.3-26) than those of 60 years of age and under (RR 2.3; 1.3-4.1); (2) aneurysms at the internal carotid artery have a higher risk than those at other locations (RR 17; 7.8-37), but this was only statistically significant when compared to anterior communicating artery aneurysms (RR 3.2; 1.6-6.1); (3) aneurysms 5 mm or smaller had a higher risk of rupture (RR 9.5; 4.6-19) than larger aneurysms (RR 2.4; 1.3-4.3); and (4) women and men had similar risks. A higher susceptibility to exercise might explain part of the higher risk of rupture in older patients. Why women and patients with aneurysms larger than 5 mm or posterior circulation aneurysms have a higher risk of rupture remains to be settled.

  11. Aneurysm Characteristics Associated with the Rupture Risk of Intracranial Aneurysms: A Self-Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Kang, Huibin; Ji, Wenjun; Qian, Zenghui; Li, Youxiang; Jiang, Chuhan; Wu, Zhongxue; Wen, Xiaolong; Xu, Wenjuan; Liu, Aihua

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzed the rupture risk of intracranial aneurysms (IAs) according to aneurysm characteristics by comparing the differences between two aneurysms in different locations within the same patient. We utilized this self-controlled model to exclude potential interference from all demographic factors to study the risk factors related to IA rupture. A total of 103 patients were diagnosed with IAs between January 2011 and April 2015 and were enrolled in this study. All enrolled patients had two IAs. One IA (the case) was ruptured, and the other (the control) was unruptured. Aneurysm characteristics, including the presence of a daughter sac, the aneurysm neck, the parent artery diameter, the maximum aneurysm height, the maximum aneurysm width, the location, the aspect ratio (AR, maximum perpendicular height/average neck diameter), the size ratio (SR, maximum aneurysm height/average parent diameter) and the width/height ratio (WH ratio, maximum aneurysm width/maximum aneurysm height), were collected and analyzed to evaluate the rupture risks of the two IAs within each patient and to identify the independent risk factors associated with IA rupture. Multivariate, conditional, backward, stepwise logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the independent risk factors associated with IA rupture. The multivariate analysis identified the presence of a daughter sac (odds ratio [OR], 13.80; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.65-115.87), a maximum aneurysm height ≥7 mm (OR, 4.80; 95% CI, 1.21-18.98), location on the posterior communicating artery (PCOM) or anterior communicating artery (ACOM; OR, 3.09; 95% CI, 1.34-7.11) and SR (OR, 2.13; 95% CI, 1.16-3.91) as factors that were significantly associated with IA rupture. The presence of a daughter sac, the maximum aneurysm height, PCOM or ACOM locations and SR (>1.5±0.7) of unruptured IAs were significantly associated with IA rupture.

  12. [Aneurysm of the splenic artery].

    PubMed

    Botoi, G

    2005-01-01

    The work is presenting the case of a young patient with splenic aneurysm, a more and more frequent diagnosis in these last years. The peculiarity consist in the biphase and bi-directional evolution, first toward the gastric lumen, with hematemesis and consequently, after about a month, in the peritoneal cavity, with hemoperitoneum. The positive diagnosis and the final surgical solution was obtained after successive procedures, due to the lack of an appropriate technical equipment (angiographic exploration) due to the lack of the medical information at one time (inefficient anamnesis and the lack of the documentation) and finally, due to some elements that disturbed the surgical reasoning.

  13. Rasmussen's Aneurysm: A Forgotten Entity?

    SciTech Connect

    Keeling, A. N.; Costello, R.; Lee, M. J.

    2008-01-15

    We present the case of a rare entity which is a complication of a disease process that had almost disappeared from the Western World. With the recent resurgence in reported cases of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) in Western communities, it is important to recognize complications and sequelae. A young alcoholic male with confirmed active TB suffered a cardiac arrest following massive haemoptysis. Multidetector computed tomography angiography diagnosed a Rasmussen's aneurysm, confirmed by digital subtraction angiography and then successfully embolized with glue. We outline this rare case and the embolization technique and review previously documented reports.

  14. Custom molded thermal MRg-FUS phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eames, Matthew D. C.; Snell, John W.; Hananel, Arik; Kassell, Neal F.

    2012-11-01

    This article describes a method for creating custom-molded thermal phantoms for use with MR-guided focused ultrasound systems. The method is defined here for intracranial applications, though it may be modified for other anatomical targets.

  15. Combining Population and Patient-Specific Characteristics for Prostate Segmentation on 3D CT Images.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ling; Guo, Rongrong; Tian, Zhiqiang; Venkataraman, Rajesh; Sarkar, Saradwata; Liu, Xiabi; Tade, Funmilayo; Schuster, David M; Fei, Baowei

    2016-02-27

    Prostate segmentation on CT images is a challenging task. In this paper, we explore the population and patient-specific characteristics for the segmentation of the prostate on CT images. Because population learning does not consider the inter-patient variations and because patient-specific learning may not perform well for different patients, we are combining the population and patient-specific information to improve segmentation performance. Specifically, we train a population model based on the population data and train a patient-specific model based on the manual segmentation on three slice of the new patient. We compute the similarity between the two models to explore the influence of applicable population knowledge on the specific patient. By combining the patient-specific knowledge with the influence, we can capture the population and patient-specific characteristics to calculate the probability of a pixel belonging to the prostate. Finally, we smooth the prostate surface according to the prostate-density value of the pixels in the distance transform image. We conducted the leave-one-out validation experiments on a set of CT volumes from 15 patients. Manual segmentation results from a radiologist serve as the gold standard for the evaluation. Experimental results show that our method achieved an average DSC of 85.1% as compared to the manual segmentation gold standard. This method outperformed the population learning method and the patient-specific learning approach alone. The CT segmentation method can have various applications in prostate cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  16. Combining population and patient-specific characteristics for prostate segmentation on 3D CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ling; Guo, Rongrong; Tian, Zhiqiang; Venkataraman, Rajesh; Sarkar, Saradwata; Liu, Xiabi; Tade, Funmilayo; Schuster, David M.; Fei, Baowei

    2016-03-01

    Prostate segmentation on CT images is a challenging task. In this paper, we explore the population and patient-specific characteristics for the segmentation of the prostate on CT images. Because population learning does not consider the inter-patient variations and because patient-specific learning may not perform well for different patients, we are combining the population and patient-specific information to improve segmentation performance. Specifically, we train a population model based on the population data and train a patient-specific model based on the manual segmentation on three slice of the new patient. We compute the similarity between the two models to explore the influence of applicable population knowledge on the specific patient. By combining the patient-specific knowledge with the influence, we can capture the population and patient-specific characteristics to calculate the probability of a pixel belonging to the prostate. Finally, we smooth the prostate surface according to the prostate-density value of the pixels in the distance transform image. We conducted the leave-one-out validation experiments on a set of CT volumes from 15 patients. Manual segmentation results from a radiologist serve as the gold standard for the evaluation. Experimental results show that our method achieved an average DSC of 85.1% as compared to the manual segmentation gold standard. This method outperformed the population learning method and the patient-specific learning approach alone. The CT segmentation method can have various applications in prostate cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  17. Combining Population and Patient-Specific Characteristics for Prostate Segmentation on 3D CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ling; Guo, Rongrong; Tian, Zhiqiang; Venkataraman, Rajesh; Sarkar, Saradwata; Liu, Xiabi; Tade, Funmilayo; Schuster, David M.; Fei, Baowei

    2016-01-01

    Prostate segmentation on CT images is a challenging task. In this paper, we explore the population and patient-specific characteristics for the segmentation of the prostate on CT images. Because population learning does not consider the inter-patient variations and because patient-specific learning may not perform well for different patients, we are combining the population and patient-specific information to improve segmentation performance. Specifically, we train a population model based on the population data and train a patient-specific model based on the manual segmentation on three slice of the new patient. We compute the similarity between the two models to explore the influence of applicable population knowledge on the specific patient. By combining the patient-specific knowledge with the influence, we can capture the population and patient-specific characteristics to calculate the probability of a pixel belonging to the prostate. Finally, we smooth the prostate surface according to the prostate-density value of the pixels in the distance transform image. We conducted the leave-one-out validation experiments on a set of CT volumes from 15 patients. Manual segmentation results from a radiologist serve as the gold standard for the evaluation. Experimental results show that our method achieved an average DSC of 85.1% as compared to the manual segmentation gold standard. This method outperformed the population learning method and the patient-specific learning approach alone. The CT segmentation method can have various applications in prostate cancer diagnosis and therapy. PMID:27660382

  18. Treatment of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage and unruptured intracranial aneurysms by neurosurgeons in Colombia: A survey

    PubMed Central

    Alcalá-Cerra, Gabriel; Gutiérrez Paternina, Juan J.; Buendía de Ávila, María E.; Preciado Mesa, Edgar I.; Barrios, Rubén Sabogal; Niño-Hernández, Lucía M.; Jaramillo, Keith Suárez

    2011-01-01

    Background: Trends in management of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage and unruptured intracranial aneurysms among neurosurgeons is very variable and had not been previously described in any Latin American country. This study was conducted to determine the preferences of Colombian neurosurgeons in pharmacologic, surgical, and endovascular management of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage and unruptured intracranial aneurysms. Methods: A survey-based descriptive study was performed in a sample of members from the Colombian Association of Neurosurgery. Questions about pharmacologic, surgical, and endovascular management of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage and unruptured intracranial aneurysm were carried out. We calculated the mean and the standard deviation of the results obtained from the continuous variables. The results of the categorical variables are presented as percentages. Results: The preference of medication with poor clinical evidence, such as magnesium sulfate, aspirin, statins, and anti-fibrinolytics was lower than 10%. The use of intravenous nimodipine and systemic glucocorticoids was as high as 31%. The availability of endovascular therapy was 69%. The indication for treatment of patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms that required intervention was less than 13.8%. In patients with ruptured or unruptured intracranial aneurysms, coiling was the preferred method for exclusion. Conclusions: Reported compliance of evidence-based clinical guidelines was similar to that described in developed countries, and even better. However, there is little agreement in treating patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms. For other issues, the conducts reported by Colombian neurosurgeons are in accordance with the current guidelines. PMID:22059120

  19. Endovascular exclusion of patch aneurysms of intercostal arteries after thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Juthier, Francis; Rousse, Natacha; Banfi, Carlo; Beregi, Jean-Paul; Vincentelli, André; Prat, Alain; Bachet, Jean

    2013-02-01

    Reimplantation of the largest patent intercostal arteries is usually performed during thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair. This may lead to aneurysmal evolution of the intercostal arteries patch. We report the successful percutaneous endovascular repair in 4 Marfan patients of aneurysms of the intercostal arteries patch that developed after thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair (Crawford type II) during a mean delay of 70 months (range, 48 to 91 months). All patients had previously undergone one or several aortic surgical procedures and had patent subclavian and hypogastric arterial networks. No in-hospital deaths or spinal cord ischemic injuries occurred, which emphasizes the importance of the vascular collateral network.

  20. Rare Case of Multiple Aneurysms with Rupture of the Deep Femoral Artery Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Dulić, Grgur; Požgain, Zrinka; Pinotić, Krešimir; Šego, Krunoslav; Selthofer, Robert; Rončević, Ivica

    2015-11-01

    Profunda femoris artery aneurysms (PFAA) are very rare and easily overlooked. Currently, around 100 PFAA and 20 ruptured PFAA have been described in the literature. This is a report on a case of ruptured PFAA with thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm. A ligation of the profunda femoris artery (PFA) and a femoropopliteal supragenicular bypass with vascular prosthesis were performed in the surgical treatment, which showed good results on the further follow-ups. A month after the procedure the patient had a rupture of the thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm with fatal result. Therefore, it is recommended to perform a search for another aneurysm, especially on the aortoiliac segment, in every diagnosed PFAA case.

  1. [Endovascular treatment of giant intracranial aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Bracard, S; Derelle, A L; Tonnelet, R; Barbier, C; Proust, F; Anxionnat, R

    2016-02-01

    Giant aneurysms are defined as having a maximal diameter higher than 25mm. The dynamic aspect of giant aneurysms, in particular, is its growth, which was responsible for parenchyma sequellae either due to haemorrhagic complications or a compression of cranial nerves. The treatment of these giant aneurysms was challenging because of its size, the mass effect and the neck diameter. These morphologic conditions required complex endovascular procedures such as remodelling, stenting, using flow diverters. Subsequently, the complex procedures increased the risk of morbidity because of ischemic complications. Despite these procedures, the risk of recurrence was high.

  2. [Cirsoid aneurysm: apropos of a clinical case].

    PubMed

    Valesi, M G; De Giovanni, M; Coppolino, S; Tentarelli, M N

    1983-12-01

    The authors, after mentioning the anatomopathologic, physiopathologic and clinical features of cyrsoid aneurysms, presently classed in the chapter of the congenital artero-venous fistulas, show a case, angiographically discovered, of cyrsoid aneurysm with palmar location, elsewhere already subjected twice to unsuccessful operation, and successfully operated at the Institute of Surgical Pathology of the Pavia University. The Authors think the morphologic and topographic features of such lesion, its relative local malignancy and trend to relapsing, justify why the old denomination of cyrsoid aneurysm was kept, even in the frame of the more general chapter of artero-venous fistulas.

  3. Measurement with microscopic MRI and simulation of flow in different aneurysm models

    SciTech Connect

    Edelhoff, Daniel Frank, Frauke; Heil, Marvin; Suter, Dieter; Walczak, Lars; Weichert, Frank; Schmitz, Inge

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: The impact and the development of aneurysms depend to a significant degree on the exchange of liquid between the regular vessel and the pathological extension. A better understanding of this process will lead to improved prediction capabilities. The aim of the current study was to investigate fluid-exchange in aneurysm models of different complexities by combining microscopic magnetic resonance measurements with numerical simulations. In order to evaluate the accuracy and applicability of these methods, the fluid-exchange process between the unaltered vessel lumen and the aneurysm phantoms was analyzed quantitatively using high spatial resolution. Methods: Magnetic resonance flow imaging was used to visualize fluid-exchange in two different models produced with a 3D printer. One model of an aneurysm was based on histological findings. The flow distribution in the different models was measured on a microscopic scale using time of flight magnetic resonance imaging. The whole experiment was simulated using fast graphics processing unit-based numerical simulations. The obtained simulation results were compared qualitatively and quantitatively with the magnetic resonance imaging measurements, taking into account flow and spin–lattice relaxation. Results: The results of both presented methods compared well for the used aneurysm models and the chosen flow distributions. The results from the fluid-exchange analysis showed comparable characteristics concerning measurement and simulation. Similar symmetry behavior was observed. Based on these results, the amount of fluid-exchange was calculated. Depending on the geometry of the models, 7% to 45% of the liquid was exchanged per second. Conclusions: The result of the numerical simulations coincides well with the experimentally determined velocity field. The rate of fluid-exchange between vessel and aneurysm was well-predicted. Hence, the results obtained by simulation could be validated by the experiment. The

  4. VOXMAT: Hybrid Computational Phantom for Dose Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Akkurt, Hatice; Eckerman, Keith F

    2007-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) computational phantoms have been the standard for assessing the radiation dose due to internal and external exposure over the past three decades. In these phantoms, the body surface and each organ are approximated by mathematical equations; hence, some of the organs are not necessarily realistic in their shape. Over the past two decades, these phantoms have been revised and updated: some of the missing internal organs have been added and the locations of the existing organs have been revised (e.g., thyroid). In the original phantom, only three elemental compositions were used to describe all body tissues. Recently, the compositions of the organs have been updated based on ICRP-89 standards. During the past decade, phantoms based on CT scans were developed for use in dose assessment. Although their shapes are realistic, some computational challenges are noted; including increased computational times and increased memory requirements. For good spatial resolution, more than several million voxels are used to represent the human body. Moreover, when CT scans are obtained, the subject is in a supine position with arms at the side. In some occupational exposure cases, it is necessary to evaluate the dose with the arms and legs in different positions. It will be very difficult and inefficient to reposition the voxels defining the arms and legs to simulate these exposure geometries. In this paper, a new approach for computational phantom development is presented. This approach utilizes the combination of a mathematical phantom and a voxelized phantom for the representation of the anatomy.

  5. SU-D-213-04: Accounting for Volume Averaging and Material Composition Effects in An Ionization Chamber Array for Patient Specific QA

    SciTech Connect

    Fugal, M; McDonald, D; Jacqmin, D; Koch, N; Ellis, A; Peng, J; Ashenafi, M; Vanek, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This study explores novel methods to address two significant challenges affecting measurement of patient-specific quality assurance (QA) with IBA’s Matrixx Evolution™ ionization chamber array. First, dose calculation algorithms often struggle to accurately determine dose to the chamber array due to CT artifact and algorithm limitations. Second, finite chamber size and volume averaging effects cause additional deviation from the calculated dose. Methods: QA measurements were taken with the Matrixx positioned on the treatment table in a solid-water Multi-Cube™ phantom. To reduce the effect of CT artifact, the Matrixx CT image set was masked with appropriate materials and densities. Individual ionization chambers were masked as air, while the high-z electronic backplane and remaining solid-water material were masked as aluminum and water, respectively. Dose calculation was done using Varian’s Acuros XB™ (V11) algorithm, which is capable of predicting dose more accurately in non-biologic materials due to its consideration of each material’s atomic properties. Finally, the exported TPS dose was processed using an in-house algorithm (MATLAB) to assign the volume averaged TPS dose to each element of a corresponding 2-D matrix. This matrix was used for comparison with the measured dose. Square fields at regularly-spaced gantry angles, as well as selected patient plans were analyzed. Results: Analyzed plans showed improved agreement, with the average gamma passing rate increasing from 94 to 98%. Correction factors necessary for chamber angular dependence were reduced by 67% compared to factors measured previously, indicating that previously measured factors corrected for dose calculation errors in addition to true chamber angular dependence. Conclusion: By comparing volume averaged dose, calculated with a capable dose engine, on a phantom masked with correct materials and densities, QA results obtained with the Matrixx Evolution™ can be significantly

  6. Development of realistic physical breast phantoms matched to virtual breast phantoms based on human subject data

    SciTech Connect

    Kiarashi, Nooshin; Nolte, Adam C.; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Ghate, Sujata V.; Segars, William P.; Nolte, Loren W.; Samei, Ehsan; and others

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Physical phantoms are essential for the development, optimization, and evaluation of x-ray breast imaging systems. Recognizing the major effect of anatomy on image quality and clinical performance, such phantoms should ideally reflect the three-dimensional structure of the human breast. Currently, there is no commercially available three-dimensional physical breast phantom that is anthropomorphic. The authors present the development of a new suite of physical breast phantoms based on human data. Methods: The phantoms were designed to match the extended cardiac-torso virtual breast phantoms that were based on dedicated breast computed tomography images of human subjects. The phantoms were fabricated by high-resolution multimaterial additive manufacturing (3D printing) technology. The glandular equivalency of the photopolymer materials was measured relative to breast tissue-equivalent plastic materials. Based on the current state-of-the-art in the technology and available materials, two variations were fabricated. The first was a dual-material phantom, the Doublet. Fibroglandular tissue and skin were represented by the most radiographically dense material available; adipose tissue was represented by the least radiographically dense material. The second variation, the Singlet, was fabricated with a single material to represent fibroglandular tissue and skin. It was subsequently filled with adipose-equivalent materials including oil, beeswax, and permanent urethane-based polymer. Simulated microcalcification clusters were further included in the phantoms via crushed eggshells. The phantoms were imaged and characterized visually and quantitatively. Results: The mammographic projections and tomosynthesis reconstructed images of the fabricated phantoms yielded realistic breast background. The mammograms of the phantoms demonstrated close correlation with simulated mammographic projection images of the corresponding virtual phantoms. Furthermore, power

  7. The GSF family of voxel phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petoussi-Henss, Nina; Zankl, Maria; Fill, Ute; Regulla, Dieter

    2002-01-01

    Voxel phantoms are human models based on computed tomographic or magnetic resonance images obtained from high-resolution scans of a single individual. They consist of a huge number of volume elements (voxels) and are at the moment the most precise representation of the human anatomy. The purpose of this paper is to introduce the GSF voxel phantoms, with emphasis on the new ones and highlight their characteristics and limitations. The GSF voxel family includes at the moment two paediatric and five adult phantoms of both sexes, different ages and stature and several others are under construction. Two phantoms made of physical calibration phantoms are also available to be used for validation purposes. The GSF voxel phantoms tend to cover persons of individual anatomy and were developed to be used for numerical dosimetry of radiation transport but other applications are also possible. Examples of applications in patient dosimetry in diagnostic radiology and in nuclear medicine as well as for whole-body irradiations from idealized external exposures are given and discussed.

  8. ANTHROPOMORPHIC BREAST PHANTOMS FOR TESTING ELASTOGRAPHY SYSTEMS

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Ernest L.; Hobson, Maritza A.; Frank, Gary R.; Shi, Hairong; Jiang, Jingfeng; Hall, Timothy J.; Varghese, Tomy; Doyley, Marvin M.; Weaver, John B.

    2006-01-01

    Two equivalent anthropomorphic breast phantoms were constructed, one for use in ultrasound elastography and the other in magnetic resonance (MR) elastography. A complete description of the manufacturing methods is provided. The materials used were oil-in-gelatin dispersions, where the volume percent oil differentiates the materials, primarily according to Young’s moduli. Values of Young’s moduli are in agreement with in vitro ranges for the corresponding normal and abnormal breast tissues. Ultrasound and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) properties are reasonably well represented. Phantoms of the type described promise to aid researchers who are developing hardware and software for elastography. Examples of ultrasound and MR elastograms of the phantoms are included to demonstrate the utility of the phantoms. Also, the level of stability of elastic properties of the component materials is quantified over a 15-month period. Such phantoms can serve as performance-assessing intermediaries between simple phantoms (consisting, for example, of homogeneous cylindrical inclusions in a homogeneous background) and a full-scale clinical trial. Thus, premature clinical trials may be avoided. PMID:16785008

  9. Assessing patient dose in interventional fluoroscopy using patient-dependent hybrid phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Perry Barnett

    Interventional fluoroscopy uses ionizing radiation to guide small instruments through blood vessels or other body pathways to sites of clinical interest. The technique represents a tremendous advantage over invasive surgical procedures, as it requires only a small incision, thus reducing the risk of infection and providing for shorter recovery times. The growing use and increasing complexity of interventional procedures, however, has resulted in public health concerns regarding radiation exposures, particularly with respect to localized skin dose. Tracking and documenting patient-specific skin and internal organ dose has been specifically identified for interventional fluoroscopy where extended irradiation times, multiple projections, and repeat procedures can lead to some of the largest doses encountered in radiology. Furthermore, inprocedure knowledge of localized skin doses can be of significant clinical importance to managing patient risk and in training radiology residents. In this dissertation, a framework is presented for monitoring the radiation dose delivered to patients undergoing interventional procedures. The framework is built around two key points, developing better anthropomorphic models, and designing clinically relevant software systems for dose estimation. To begin, a library of 50 hybrid patient-dependent computational phantoms was developed based on the UF hybrid male and female reference phantoms. These phantoms represent a different type of anthropomorphic model whereby anthropometric parameters from an individual patient are used during phantom selection. The patient-dependent library was first validated and then used in two patient-phantom matching studies focused on cumulative organ and local skin dose. In terms of organ dose, patient-phantom matching was shown most beneficial for estimating the dose to large patients where error associated with soft tissue attenuation differences could be minimized. For small patients, inherent difference

  10. In vivo feasibility case study for evaluating abdominal aortic aneurysm tissue properties and rupture potential using acoustic radiation force impulse imaging.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Aine P; Callanan, Anthony; McGloughlin, Timothy M

    2011-04-01

    An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is defined as a permanent and irreversible localized dilatation of the abdominal aorta. A reliable, non-invasive method to assess the wall mechanics of an aneurysm may provide additional information regarding their susceptibility to rupture. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging is a phenomenon associated with the propagation of acoustic waves in attenuating media. This study was a preliminary evaluation to explore the feasibility of using ARFI imaging to examine an AAA in vivo. A previously diagnosed in vivo aneurysm case study was imaged to demonstrate the viability of excitation of the abdominal aorta using ARFI imaging. Ex vivo experiments were used to assess an artificially induced aneurysm to establish its development and whether ARFI was able to capture the mechanical changes during artificial aneurysm formation. A combination of in vivo and ex vivo results demonstrated a proposed hypothesis of estimation of the tissue's stiffness properties. The study details a method for non-invasive rupture potential prediction of AAAs using patient-specific moduli to generate a physiological stiffness rupture potential index (PSRPI) of the AAA. Clinical feasibility of ARFI imaging as an additional surgical tool to interrogate AAAs was verified and methods to utilize this data as a diagnostic tool was demonstrated with the PSRPI.

  11. [Inflammatory aneurysms of the thoracic aorta. Surgical aspects].

    PubMed

    Kieffer, E; Chiche, L; Bertal, A; Bahnini, A; Koskas, F

    1997-12-01

    In the Western world, inflammatory aneurysms account for only 1 to 5%, of all operated thoracic aorta aneurysms. Takayasu's disease is by far the commonest cause although all forms of aortitis may result in aneurysm formation. Usually observed in young patients, these aneurysms are suitable for often major surgery with results that are globally better than in degenerative or dissecting aneurysms. However, they pose, two specific problems: the progression of the inflammatory disease which may require pre- and/or post-operative steroid therapy and that of the risk, at least in theory, of a late pseudo-aneurysm, which justifies regular long-term follow-up after surgery.

  12. Infectious or Noninfectious? Ruptured, Thrombosed Inflammatory Aortic Aneurysm with Spondylolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanczyk, Ludomir; Elgalal, Marcin; Papiewski, Andrzej; Szubert, Wojciech; Szopinski, Piotr

    2013-06-15

    Osteolysis of vertebrae due to inflammatory aortic aneurysm is rarely observed. However, it is estimated that up to 10 % of infectious aneurysms coexist with bone tissue destruction, most commonly the vertebrae. Inflammatory aneurysms with no identified infection factor, along with infiltration of adjacent muscle and in particular extensive destruction of bone tissue have rarely been described in the literature. A case of inflammatory aneurysm with posterior wall rupture and inflammatory infiltration of the iliopsoas muscle and spine, together with extensive vertebral body destruction, is presented. The aneurysm was successfully treated with endovascular aneurysm repair EVAR.

  13. Low-dose preview for patient-specific, task-specific technique selection in cone-beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Adam S.; Stayman, J. Webster; Otake, Yoshito; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Vogt, Sebastian; Kleinszig, Gerhard; Khanna, A. Jay; Gallia, Gary L.

    2014-07-15

    resulted in strong underestimation of the true noise, which would lead to overly optimistic predictions of dose reduction. Conclusions : Correlated noise injection is essential to accurate simulation of CBCT image quality at reduced dose. With the proposed LDP method, the user can prospectively select patient-specific, minimum-dose protocols (viz., acquisition technique and reconstruction method) suitable to a particular imaging task and to the user's own observer preferences for CBCT scans following the first acquisition. The method could provide dose reduction in common clinical scenarios involving multiple CBCT scans, such as image-guided surgery and radiotherapy.

  14. SU-E-T-472: A Multi-Dimensional Measurements Comparison to Analyze a 3D Patient Specific QA Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Ashmeg, S; Jackson, J; Zhang, Y; Oldham, M; Yin, F; Ren, L

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively evaluate a 3D patient specific QA tool using 2D film and 3D Presage dosimetry. Methods: A brain IMRT case was delivered to Delta4, EBT2 film and Presage plastic dosimeter. The film was inserted in the solid water slabs at 7.5cm depth for measurement. The Presage dosimeter was inserted into a head phantom for 3D dose measurement. Delta4's Anatomy software was used to calculate the corresponding dose to the film in solid water slabs and to Presage in the head phantom. The results from Anatomy were compared to both calculated results from Eclipse and measured dose from film and Presage to evaluate its accuracy. Using RIT software, we compared the “Anatomy” dose to the EBT2 film measurement and the film measurement to ECLIPSE calculation. For 3D analysis, DICOM file of “Anatomy” was extracted and imported to CERR software, which was used to compare the Presage dose to both “Anatomy” calculation and ECLIPSE calculation. Gamma criteria of 3% - 3mm and 5% - 5mm was used for comparison. Results: Gamma passing rates of film vs “Anatomy”, “Anatomy” vs ECLIPSE and film vs ECLIPSE were 82.8%, 70.9% and 87.6% respectively when 3% - 3mm criteria is used. When the criteria is changed to 5% - 5mm, the passing rates became 87.8%, 76.3% and 90.8% respectively. For 3D analysis, Anatomy vs ECLIPSE showed gamma passing rate of 86.4% and 93.3% for 3% - 3mm and 5% - 5mm respectively. The rate is 77.0% for Presage vs ECLIPSE analysis. The Anatomy vs ECLIPSE were absolute dose comparison. However, film and Presage analysis were relative comparison Conclusion: The results show higher passing rate in 3D than 2D in “Anatomy” software. This could be due to the higher degrees of freedom in 3D than in 2D for gamma analysis.

  15. The development of a population of 4D pediatric XCAT phantoms for CT imaging research and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, Hannah; Zhang, Yakun; Frush, Jack; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Minhas, Anum; Tward, Daniel J.; Ratnanather, J. Tilak; Miller, M. I.; Frush, Donald; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul

    2014-03-01

    With the increased use of CT examinations, the associated radiation dose has become a large concern, especially for pediatrics. Much research has focused on reducing radiation dose through new scanning and reconstruction methods. Computational phantoms provide an effective and efficient means for evaluating image quality, patient-specific dose, and organ-specific dose in CT. We previously developed a set of highly-detailed 4D reference pediatric XCAT phantoms at ages of newborn, 1, 5, 10, and 15 years with organ and tissues masses matched to ICRP Publication 89 values. We now extend this reference set to a series of 64 pediatric phantoms of a variety of ages and height and weight percentiles, representative of the public at large. High resolution PET-CT data was reviewed by a practicing experienced radiologist for anatomic regularity and was then segmented with manual and semi-automatic methods to form a target model. A Multi-Channel Large Deformation Diffeomorphic Metric Mapping (MC-LDDMM) algorithm was used to calculate the transform from the best age matching pediatric reference phantom to the patient target. The transform was used to complete the target, filling in the non-segmented structures and defining models for the cardiac and respiratory motions. The complete phantoms, consisting of thousands of structures, were then manually inspected for anatomical accuracy. 3D CT data was simulated from the phantoms to demonstrate their ability to generate realistic, patient quality imaging data. The population of pediatric phantoms developed in this work provides a vital tool to investigate dose reduction techniques in 3D and 4D pediatric CT.

  16. Endovascular coil embolization of aneurysm neck for the treatment of ruptured intracranial aneurysm with bleb formation

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Jun; Gu, Weijin; Zhang, Xiaolong; Geng, Daoying; Lu, Gang; Huang, Lei; Zhang, Lei; Ge, Liang; Ji, Lihua

    2014-01-01

    Background Ruptured intracranial aneurysm (ICA) with bleb formation (RICABF) is a special type of ruptured ICA. However, the exact role and effectiveness of endovascular coil embolization (ECE) in RICABF is unknown. We aimed to investigate the effectiveness and safety of ECE of aneurysm neck for RICABF treatment. Material/Methods We retrospectively assessed consecutive patients who were hospitalized in our endovascular intervention center between October 2004 and May 2012. Overall, 86 patients underwent ECE of aneurysm neck for 86 RICABF. Treatments outcomes included secondary rupture/bleeding rate, aneurysm neck embolization rate, residual/recurrent aneurysm, intraoperative incidents, and post-embolization complications, as well as improvements in the Glasgow outcome scale (extended) (GOS-E). Results Complete occlusion was achieved in 72 aneurysms (72/86, 83.7%), while 12 aneurysms (12/86, 14.0%) had a residual neck, and 2 aneurysms (2/86, 2.3%) had a residual aneurysm. The postoperative GOS-E was 3 in 3 patients (3.5%), 4 in 10 patients (11.6%), and 5 in 73 patients (84.9%). Follow-up angiography was performed in all patients (mean 9.0 months, interquartile range of 9.0). Recurrence was found in 3 patients (3/86, 3.5%). No aneurysm rupture or bleeding was reported. Conclusions Our mid-term follow-up study showed that ECE of aneurysm neck was an effective and safe treatment modality for RICABF. The long-term effectiveness and safety of this interventional radiology technique need to be investigated in prospective and comparative studies. PMID:24986761

  17. Comparison of PIV with 4D-Flow in a physiological accurate flow phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansom, Kurt; Balu, Niranjan; Liu, Haining; Aliseda, Alberto; Yuan, Chun; Canton, Maria De Gador

    2016-11-01

    Validation of 4D MRI flow sequences with planar particle image velocimetry (PIV) is performed in a physiologically-accurate flow phantom. A patient-specific phantom of a carotid artery is connected to a pulsatile flow loop to simulate the 3D unsteady flow in the cardiovascular anatomy. Cardiac-cycle synchronized MRI provides time-resolved 3D blood velocity measurements in clinical tool that is promising but lacks a robust validation framework. PIV at three different Reynolds numbers (540, 680, and 815, chosen based on +/- 20 % of the average velocity from the patient-specific CCA waveform) and four different Womersley numbers (3.30, 3.68, 4.03, and 4.35, chosen to reflect a physiological range of heart rates) are compared to 4D-MRI measurements. An accuracy assessment of raw velocity measurements and a comparison of estimated and measureable flow parameters such as wall shear stress, fluctuating velocity rms, and Lagrangian particle residence time, will be presented, with justification for their biomechanics relevance to the pathophysiology of arterial disease: atherosclerosis and intimal hyperplasia. Lastly, the framework is applied to a new 4D-Flow MRI sequence and post processing techniques to provide a quantitative assessment with the benchmarked data. Department of Education GAANN Fellowship.

  18. Nurses' Perceptions of Implementing Fall Prevention Interventions to Mitigate Patient-Specific Fall Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Deleise S; Montie, Mary; Conlon, Paul; Reynolds, Margaret; Ripley, Robert; Titler, Marita G

    2016-08-01

    Evidence-based (EB) fall prevention interventions to mitigate patient-specific fall risk factors are readily available but not routinely used in practice. Few studies have examined nurses' perceptions about both the use of these EB interventions and implementation strategies designed to promote their adoption. This article reports qualitative findings of nurses' perceptions about use of EB fall prevention interventions to mitigate patient-specific fall risks, and implementation strategies to promote use of these interventions. The findings revealed five major themes: before-study fall prevention practices, use of EB fall prevention interventions tailored to patient-specific fall risk factors, beneficial implementation strategies, overall impact on approach to fall prevention, and challenges These findings are useful to guide nurses' engagement and use of EB fall prevention practices tailored to patient-specific fall risk factors.

  19. Coil occlusion of a subclavian mycotic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kische, Stephan; Ince, Hüseyin; Peuster, Matthias

    2010-06-01

    We report the first successful application of nonferromagnetic embolization coils for endovascular exclusion of a mycotic right subclavian artery aneurysm. A 58-year-old woman presented with acute cervical pain and a pulsatile mass in the right supraclavicular fossa under antibiotic medication for subacute infectious endocarditis. Diagnostic work-up including duplex sonography, digital subtraction angiography, and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a saccular aneurysm of the extrathoracic right subclavian artery. As an alternative to open surgery or stent-graft repair, this pathology was electively treated by transcatheter coil embolization. No neurological deficit or ischemic symptoms were noted during 9 months clinical follow-up. Multislice computed tomography scan revealed complete occlusion of the mycotic aneurysm 6 months after the interventional procedure. Transcatheter closure with Inconel embolization coils is a cost-effective and safe therapeutic option in patients with mycotic aneurysm originating from the subclavian artery.

  20. [Inflammatory aneurysms of the abdominal aorta].

    PubMed

    Tovar Martín, E; Acea Nebril, B

    1993-01-01

    Approximately 10 per cent of abdominal aneurysms have an excessively thick wall that sometimes involve duodenum, cava or colon by an inflammatory process. Between February 1986 and December 1992, 147 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) were treated surgically and in 13 (8.8%) the aneurysms were found to be inflammatory. Their mean age was 67.3 years (70.1 years in non inflammatory group) and all were symptomatics initially (abdominal pain in 53%, rupture in 23%, mass in 15%). The operative mortality for elective resection was 37% in patients with inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysms (IAAA) decreasing to 9% in the AAA group without inflammatory involvement. We conclude that surgery is indicated in these patients to prevent rupture and to hasten the subsidense of inflammatory process ever with postoperative morbi-mortality increased.

  1. Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair - open - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... aortic aneurysm repair - open Aortic angiography Chest MRI Hardening of the ... Center-Shreveport, Shreveport, LA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla ...

  2. Apical aneurysm of Chagas's heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, J S; Mello De Oliveira, J A; Frederigue, U; Lima Filho, E C

    1981-01-01

    A retrospective study of Chagas's heart disease was carried out by a review of necropsy reports with special reference to the lesion known as the apical aneurysm. It was concluded that this lesion was more frequent in men, was unrelated to age, and was unrelated to heart weight. Patients dying of the cardiac consequences of Chagas's cardiomyopathy were more likely to have an apical aneurysm than those whose death was unrelated to the disease but the mode of death (sudden, or with heart failure) was unconnected with its presence. Transillumination from within the ventricle at necropsy was not only useful in demonstrating the aneurysm but also showed areas of myocardial thinning elsewhere. Thrombosis within the lesion was frequent. The aetiology of the apical aneurysm is discussed and it is concluded that while ischaemia, inflammation, thrombosis, and mechanical factors may produce and localise this lesion, the underlying cause is the basic pathogenetic process-parasympathetic nerve cell destruction. Images PMID:7295439

  3. [Unruptured cerebral aneurysms: Controversies on population screening].

    PubMed

    Delgado Lopez, Pedro David; Castilla Díez, José Manuel; Martín Velasco, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    The idea of population screening of unruptured intracranial aneurysms is interesting because, despite recent advances in surgical and endovascular treatment, the mortality related to aneurismal subarachnoid haemorrhage reaches 30%. Screening is justified whenever the morbidity and mortality of the treatment (markedly lower for unruptured compared to ruptured aneurysms) overcomes the inherent risk of harbouring a brain aneurysm. Although, at present, this balance does not seem to favour population-based screening, it is justified in certain sub-populations with an increased risk of rupture. In this review, an analysis is made of the requirements for implementing a screening program, when would it be justified, what is to be expected from treatment (in terms of effectiveness, morbidity and costs), and what medical-legal issues are relevant and to determine the usefulness of the program. A study protocol is proposed aimed at examining the usefulness of population screening for brain aneurysms by magnetic resonance angiography.

  4. Familial aortic aneurysm in Leonberg dogs.

    PubMed

    Chetboul, Valérie; Tessier, Dominique; Borenstein, Nicolas; Delisle, Françoise; Zilberstein, Luca; Payen, Guillaume; Leglaive, Eric; Franc, Brigitte; Derumeaux, Geneviève; Pouchelon, Jean-Louis

    2003-10-15

    A thoracic aortic aneurysm was diagnosed in a 6-month-old male Leonberg dog by use of radiography, transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography, and magnetic resonance imaging. The aneurysm was associated with a twisted ascending aorta and dilatation of several other thoracic arteries (pulmonary trunk, brachiocephalic trunk, and left subclavian artery). Histologic examination of the aorta revealed cystic medial necrosis, with disruption of the elastic network, collagen fibers, and the muscle glycoprotein fibrillin-1. The dam and sire of the dog and 8 littermates were examined by use of transthoracic echocardiography. The sire and 1 male littermate also had an aneurysm of the ascending aorta. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of familial aortic aneurysm in dogs.

  5. Case Report: A Troublesome Ophthalmic Artery Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Meling, T. R.; Sorteberg, W.; Bakke, S. J.; Jacobsen, E. A.; Lane, P.; Vajkoczy, P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective and Importance When treating large unruptured ophthalmic artery (OA) aneurysms causing progressive blindness, surgical clipping is still the preferred method because aneurysm sac decompression may relieve optic nerve compression. However, endovascular treatment of OA aneurysms has made important progress with the introduction of stents. Although this development is welcomed, it also makes the choice of treatment strategy less straightforward than in the past, with the potential of missteps. Clinical Presentation A 56-year-old woman presented with a long history of progressive unilateral visual loss and magnetic resonance imaging showing a 20-mm left-sided OA aneurysm. Intervention Because of her long history of very poor visual acuity, we considered her left eye to be irredeemable and opted for endovascular therapy. The OA aneurysms was treated with stent and coils but continued to grow, threatening the contralateral eye. Because she failed internal carotid artery (ICA) balloon test occlusion, we performed a high-flow extracranial-intracranial bypass with proximal ICA occlusion in the neck. However, aneurysm growth continued due to persistent circulation through reversed blood flow in distal ICA down to the OA and the cavernous portion of the ICA. Due to progressive loss of her right eye vision, we surgically occluded the ICA proximal to the posterior communicating artery and excised the coiled, now giant, OA aneurysm. This improved her right eye vision, but her left eye was permanently blind. Conclusion This case report illustrates complications of the endovascular and surgical treatment of a large unruptured OA aneurysm. PMID:25485220

  6. Concurrent arterial aneurysms in brain arteriovenous malformations with haemorrhagic presentation

    PubMed Central

    Stapf, C; Mohr, J; Pile-Spellman, J; Sciacca, R; Hartmann, A; Schumacher, H; Mast, H

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effect of concurrent arterial aneurysms on the risk of incident haemorrhage from brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Methods: In a cross sectional study, 463 consecutive, prospectively enrolled patients from the Columbia AVM Databank were analysed. Concurrent arterial aneurysms on brain angiography were classified as feeding artery aneurysms, intranidal aneurysms, and aneurysms unrelated to blood flow to the AVM. Clinical presentation (diagnostic event) was categorised as intracranial haemorrhage proved by imaging or non-haemorrhagic presentation. Univariate and multivariate statistical models were applied to test the effect of age, sex, AVM size, venous drainage pattern, and the three types of aneurysms on the risk of AVM haemorrhage at initial presentation. Results: Arterial aneurysms were found in 117 (25%) patients with AVM (54 had feeding artery aneurysms, 21 had intranidal aneurysms, 18 had unrelated aneurysms, and 24 had more than one aneurysm type). Intracranial haemorrhage was the presenting symptom in 204 (44%) patients with AVM. In the univariate model, the relative risk for haemorrhagic AVM presentation was 2.28 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.12 to 4.64) for patients with intranidal aneurysms and 1.88 (95% CI 1.14 to 3.08) for those with feeding artery aneurysms. In the multivariate model an independent effect of feeding artery aneurysms (odds ratio 2.11, 95% CI 1.18 to 3.78) on haemorrhagic AVM presentation was found. No significant effect was seen for intranidal and unrelated aneurysms. The attributable risk of feeding artery aneurysms for incident haemorrhage in patients with AVM was 6% (95% CI 1% to 11%). Conclusions: The findings suggest that feeding artery aneurysms are an independent determinant for increased risk of incident AVM haemorrhage. PMID:12185161

  7. Design of Optimal Treatments for Neuromusculoskeletal Disorders using Patient-Specific Multibody Dynamic Models

    PubMed Central

    Fregly, Benjamin J.

    2011-01-01

    Disorders of the human neuromusculoskeletal system such as osteoarthritis, stroke, cerebral palsy, and paraplegia significantly affect mobility and result in a decreased quality of life. Surgical and rehabilitation treatment planning for these disorders is based primarily on static anatomic measurements and dynamic functional measurements filtered through clinical experience. While this subjective treatment planning approach works well in many cases, it does not predict accurate functional outcome in many others. This paper presents a vision for how patient-specific multibody dynamic models can serve as the foundation for an objective treatment planning approach that identifies optimal treatments and treatment parameters on an individual patient basis. First, a computational paradigm is presented for constructing patient-specific multibody dynamic models. This paradigm involves a combination of patient-specific skeletal models, muscle-tendon models, neural control models, and articular contact models, with the complexity of the complete model being dictated by the requirements of the clinical problem being addressed. Next, three clinical applications are presented to illustrate how such models could be used in the treatment design process. One application involves the design of patient-specific gait modification strategies for knee osteoarthritis rehabilitation, a second involves the selection of optimal patient-specific surgical parameters for a particular knee osteoarthritis surgery, and the third involves the design of patient-specific muscle stimulation patterns for stroke rehabilitation. The paper concludes by discussing important challenges that need to be overcome to turn this vision into reality. PMID:21785529

  8. Aortoiliac aneurysm with congenital right pelvic kidney.

    PubMed

    Date, Kazuma; Okada, Shuuichi; Ezure, Masahiko; Takihara, Hitomi; Okonogi, Shuuichi; Hasegawa, Yutaka; Sato, Yasushi; Kaneko, Tatsuo

    2015-05-01

    The association of congenital pelvic kidney with abdominal aortoiliac aneurysm is an extremely rare clinical finding. Previous reports have described various methods of aneurysm repair with successful preservation of the function of pelvic kidney. However, to our knowledge, reconstruction of more than two renal arteries has not been established. We report a case of abdominal aortic aneurysm complicated by congenital right pelvic kidney in a 72-year-old man. Computed tomography (CT) revealed an abdominal aortic aneurysm with a maximum diameter of 54 mm and a right common iliac aneurysm of 45 mm. In addition, he had a congenital right pelvic kidney and CT angiography identified three right pelvic renal arteries. The upper artery originated from the bifurcation of the terminal aorta and the lower two originated from the right common iliac artery. Three-dimensional CT was helpful for the accurate planning of the operation. Open surgical repair of the aortoiliac aneurysm with a Dacron bifurcated graft replacement was decided and reimplantation of all three right pelvic kidney arteries to the right limb of the graft was also performed. For renal preservation, the right pelvic kidney arteries were perfused with cold Ringer's lactate using a rapid infusion pump and coronary perfusion cannula. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful, and worsening of renal function was not observed. The perfusion of renal arteries with cold Ringer's solution was thought to be a simple and appropriate procedure for renal protection.

  9. Flow Studies in Basilar Tip Aneurysm Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Russell; Selby, Kathy; Saloner, David; Savas, Omer

    2001-11-01

    Particle image velocimetry and flow visualization are performed on two models of basilar tip bifurcation aneurysms. The models are intended to correspond to an aneurysm at two stages during its growth. The models are subject to steady flow conditions covering the physiological range of Reynold’s numbers while being subject to both symmetric and asymmetric outflow conditions. A brief investigation is also made using pulsatile input flow with a physiologically representative waveform. Experiment showed a general pattern of increasing unsteadiness in the aneurysm head with increasing Reynold’s number. Only for a case of a small-headed model and asymmetric outflow could a quasi-stable flow pattern be established. For the same model with symmetric outflow conditions, instability in the aneurysm head occurs at the low end of physiological Reynold’s numbers. A larger-headed aneurysm model displayed a similar onset of instability for both symmetric and asymmetric outflow conditions, with flow within the aneurysm head being less pronounced than the small-headed model.

  10. Medical management of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Norbert; Rodionov, Roman N; Mahlmann, Adrian

    2014-11-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are the most common arterial aneurysms. Endovascular or open surgical aneurysm repair is indicated in patients with large AAA ≥ 5.5 cm in diameter as this prevents aneurysm rupture. The presence even of small AAAs not in need of immediate repair is associated with a very high cardiovascular risk including myocardial infarction, stroke or cardiovascular death. This risk by far exceeds the risk of aneurysm rupture. These patients therefore should be considered as high-risk patients and receive optimal medical treatment and life-style modification of their cardiovascular risk factors to improve their prognosis. In addition, these patients should be followed-up for aneurysm growth and receive medical treatment to decrease aneurym progression and rupture rate. Treatment with statins has been shown to reduce cardiovascular mortality in these patients, and also slows the rate of AAA growth. Use of beta-blockers, ACE inhibitors and AT1-receptor antagonists does not affect AAA growth but may be indicated for comorbidities. Antibiotic therapy with roxithromycin has a small effect on AAA growth, but this effect must be critically weighed against the potential risk of wide-spread use of antibiotics.

  11. From bench to bedside: utility of the rabbit elastase aneurysm model in preclinical studies of intracranial aneurysm treatment.

    PubMed

    Brinjikji, Waleed; Ding, Yong H; Kallmes, David F; Kadirvel, Ramanathan

    2016-05-01

    Preclinical studies are important in helping practitioners and device developers improve techniques and tools for endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms. Thus an understanding of the major animal models used in such studies is important. The New Zealand rabbit elastase induced arterial aneurysm of the common carotid artery is one of the most commonly used models in testing the safety and efficacy of new endovascular devices. In this review we discuss: (1) the various techniques used to create the aneurysm, (2) complications of aneurysm creation, (3) natural history of the arterial aneurysm, (4) histopathologic and hemodynamic features of the aneurysm, (5) devices tested using this model, and (6) weaknesses of the model. We demonstrate how preclinical studies using this model are applied in the treatment of intracranial aneurysms in humans. The model has similar hemodynamic, morphological, and histologic characteristics to human aneurysms, and demonstrates similar healing responses to coiling as human aneurysms. Despite these strengths, however, the model does have many weaknesses, including the fact that the model does not emulate the complex inflammatory processes affecting growing and ruptured aneurysms. Furthermore, the extracranial location of the model affects its ability to be used in preclinical safety assessments of new devices. We conclude that the rabbit elastase model has characteristics that make it a simple and effective model for preclinical studies on the endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms, but further work is needed to develop aneurysm models that simulate the histopathologic and morphologic characteristics of growing and ruptured aneurysms.

  12. False-negative indocyanine green videoangiography among complex unruptured middle cerebral artery aneurysms: the importance of further aneurysm inspection.

    PubMed

    Kulwin, Charles; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2014-10-01

    Successful surgical treatment of cerebral aneurysms requires complete occlusion of the aneurysm lumen while maintaining patency of the adjacent branching and perforating arteries. Intraoperative flow assessment allows aneurysm clip repositioning in the event these requirements are not met, avoiding the risk of postoperative rehemorrhage or infarction. A number of modalities have been proposed for primarily intraoperative qualitative blood flow assessment, including microdoppler ultrasonography, intraoperative digital subtraction angiography (DSA), and more recently noninvasive fluorescent angiography including indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescent imaging. Puncture of the aneurysm dome to exclude aneurysm sac filling may also assess the efficacy of clip placement. Although a high concordance between ICG and DSA has been reported, there remains an important subset of aneurysms for which negative ICG study may erroneously suggest aneurysm occlusion. A high-risk situation for such a false-negative study is an atherosclerotic middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysm in which vessel wall plaque interferes with the ICG signal. Furthermore, a decreased flow within the aneurysm may not allow enough emission light for detection under the current technology. In this report, we describe our experience with cases of MCA aneurysms with false-negative ICG-VA studies requiring clip adjustment for optimal surgical treatment and discuss two illustrative cases of MCA aneurysms with intraoperative fluorescence studies that were falsely negative, requiring puncture of the aneurysm to correctly identify incomplete aneurysm occlusion.

  13. Patient specific quality assurance of RapidArc pre treatment plans using semiflex 0.125 cc ionization chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S. A. Syam; Vivekanandan, Nagarajan

    2017-01-01

    Patient specific pre-treatment quality assurance for RapidArc plans were analyzed for hundred patients for different sites. Verification plan was created for each treatment plan in Eclipse 8.6 treatment planning system with the semiflex ionization chamber and the octavius phantom. Absolute point dose were measured for head and neck, thorax and abdomen cases using semiflex (0.125 cc) ionization chamber. Positive absolute mean dose variation of 0.56% was observed with thorax cases with a standard deviation (SD) of ±1.13 between the plans with a range of -1.78% to 2.70%. Negative percentage dose errors were found with head and neck and abdomen cases, with a mean variation of -0.43% (SD±1.50), (range -3.25% to 2.85%) and -0.35% (SD±1.48), (range -3.10% to 2.65%) for head and neck and abdomen cases respectively. Evaluation has been done using PTW verisoft software by keeping the passing criteria as 3 mm DTA, 3% DD, for 95% of the evaluated dose points. The maximum percentage value failed in gamma analysis was found to be 4.95, 4.75, and 4.88 for head and neck, thorax, and abdomen cases respectively. In all the cases analyzed the percentage dose points failed the gamma criteria is less than 5%. On the basis of the studies performed it can be concluded that the semiflex ionization chamber having a volume of 0.125 cc can be used efficiently for measuring the pre-treatment quality assurance of RapidArc plans for all the sites.

  14. A Patient-Specific Polylactic Acid Bolus Made by a 3D Printer for Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Min; Chun, MinSoo; Han, Ji Hye; Kim, Jung-in

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and advantages of a patient-specific breast bolus made using a 3D printer technique. Methods We used the anthropomorphic female phantom with breast attachments, which volumes are 200, 300, 400, 500 and 650 cc. We simulated the treatment for a right breast patient using parallel opposed tangential fields. Treatment plans were used to investigate the effect of unwanted air gaps under bolus on the dose distribution of the whole breast. The commercial Super-Flex bolus and 3D-printed polylactic acid (PLA) bolus were applied to investigate the skin dose of the breast with the MOSFET measurement. Two boluses of 3 and 5 mm thicknesses were selected. Results There was a good agreement between the dose distribution for a virtual bolus generated by the TPS and PLA bolus. The difference in dose distribution between the virtual bolus and Super-Flex bolus was significant within the bolus and breast due to unwanted air gaps. The average differences between calculated and measured doses in a 200 and 300 cc with PLA bolus were not significant, which were -0.7% and -0.6% for 3mm, and -1.1% and -1.1% for 5 mm, respectively. With the Super-Flex bolus, however, significant dose differences were observed (-5.1% and -3.2% for 3mm, and -6.3% and -4.2% for 5 mm). Conclusion The 3D-printed solid bolus can reduce the uncertainty of the daily setup and help to overcome the dose discrepancy by unwanted air gaps in the breast cancer radiation therapy. PMID:27930717

  15. Verification of patient-specific dose distributions in proton therapy using a commercial two-dimensional ion chamber array

    SciTech Connect

    Arjomandy, Bijan; Sahoo, Narayan; Ciangaru, George; Zhu, Ronald; Song Xiaofei; Gillin, Michael

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine whether a two-dimensional (2D) ion chamber array detector quickly and accurately measures patient-specific dose distributions in treatment with passively scattered and spot scanning proton beams. Methods: The 2D ion chamber array detector MatriXX was used to measure the dose distributions in plastic water phantom from passively scattered and spot scanning proton beam fields planned for patient treatment. Planar dose distributions were measured using MatriXX, and the distributions were compared to those calculated using a treatment-planning system. The dose distributions generated by the treatment-planning system and a film dosimetry system were similarly compared. Results: For passively scattered proton beams, the gamma index for the dose-distribution comparison for treatment fields for three patients with prostate cancer and for one patient with lung cancer was less than 1.0 for 99% and 100% of pixels for a 3% dose tolerance and 3 mm distance-to-dose agreement, respectively. For spot scanning beams, the mean ({+-} standard deviation) percentages of pixels with gamma indices meeting the passing criteria were 97.1%{+-}1.4% and 98.8%{+-}1.4% for MatriXX and film dosimetry, respectively, for 20 fields used to treat patients with prostate cancer. Conclusions: Unlike film dosimetry, MatriXX provides not only 2D dose-distribution information but also absolute dosimetry in fractions of minutes with acceptable accuracy. The results of this study indicate that MatriXX can be used to verify patient-field specific dose distributions in proton therapy.

  16. Analysis and Comparison of 2-D Hemodynamic Numerical Simulation of Elastic Aneurysm and Rigid Aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J. W.; Ding, G. H.; Yin, W. Y.; Yang, X. J.; Shi, W. C.; Zhang, X. L.

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of hemodynamic parameters on the formation, growth and rupture of an aneurysm. Our simulation of the elastic and rigid aneurysm is based on a DSA or other clinic image. The simulatied results are that there are great differences in the distribution of velocity magnitude at some sections which are predicted by the two models. For the elastic wall model, the distribution of velocity magnitude of one outlet is obviously off-center, which influences the distribution of wall shear stress (WSS) and exchange of substance through the vessel wall. The currents of the distributions of WSS along the wall of aneurysm for the two models are similar. But there are obvious differences between the two models in the values especially at the neck of aneurysm. This study demonstrates obviously that the elastic wall model suits the simulation for growth and rupture of an aneurysm better.

  17. Acoustic images of gel dosimetry phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Silvio L.; Baggio, André; Kinnick, Randall R.; Fatemi, M.; Carneiro, Antonio Adilton O.

    2010-01-01

    This work presents Vibro-acoustography (VA) as a tool to visualize absorbed dose in a polymer gel dosimetry phantom. VA relies on the mechanical excitation introduced by the acoustic radiation force of focused modulated ultrasound in a small region of the object. A hydrophone or microphone is used to measure the sound emitted from the object in response to the excitation, and by using the amplitude or phase of this signal, an image of the object can be generated. To study the phenomena of dose distribution in a gel dosimetry phantom, continuous wave (CW), tone burst and multi-frequency VA were used to image this phantom. The phantom was designed using 'MAGIC' gel polymer with addition of glass microspheres at 2% w/w having an average diameter range between 40-75 μm. The gel was irradiated using conventional 10 MeV X-rays from a linear accelerator. The field size in the surface of the phantom was 1.0×1.0 cm2 and a source-surface distance (SSD) of 100 cm. The irradiated volume corresponds to an approximately 8.0 cm3, where a dose of 50 gray was delivered to the gel. Polymer gel dosimeters are sensitive to radiation-induced chemical changes that occur in the irradiated polymer. VA images of the gel dosimeter showed the irradiate area. It is concluded that VA imaging has potential to visualize dose distribution in a polymer gel dosimeter.

  18. Note on the Schwarzschild-phantom wormhole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukmanova, R.; Khaibullina, A.; Izmailov, R.; Yanbekov, A.; Karimov, R.; Potapov, A. A.

    2016-11-01

    Recently, it has been shown by Lobo, Parsaei and Riazi that phantom energy with ω =pr/ρ <-1 could support phantom wormholes. Several classes of such solutions have been derived by them. While the inner spacetime is represented by asymptotically flat phantom wormhole that has repulsive gravity, it is most likely to be unstable to perturbations. Hence, we consider a situation, where a phantom wormhole is somehow trapped inside a Schwarzschild sphere across a thin shell. Applying the method developed by Garcia, Lobo and Visser, we exemplify that the shell can possess zones of stability depending on certain constraints. It turns out that zones corresponding to "force" constraint are more restrictive than those from the "mass" constraint. We also enumerate the interior energy content by using the gravitational energy integral proposed by Lynden-Bell, Katz and Bi čák. It turns out that, even though the interior mass is positive, the integral implies repulsive energy. This is consistent with the phantom nature of interior matter.

  19. Adjustable fetal phantom for pulse oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubán, Norbert; Niwayama, Masatsugu

    2009-05-01

    As the measuring head of a fetal pulse oximeter must be attached to the head of the fetus inside the mother's uterus during labor, testing, and developing of fetal pulse oximeters in real environment have several difficulties. A fetal phantom could enable evaluation of pulse oximeters in a simulated environment without the restrictions and difficultness of medical experiments in the labor room. Based on anatomic data we developed an adjustable fetal head phantom with three different tissue layers and artificial arteries. The phantom consisted of two arteries with an inner diameter of 0.2 and 0.4 mm. An electronically controlled pump produced pulse waves in the arteries. With the phantom we investigated the sensitivity of a custom-designed wireless pulse oximeter at different pulsation intensity and artery diameters. The results showed that the oximeter was capable of identifying 4% and 2% changes in diameter between the diastolic and systolic point in arteries of over 0.2 and 0.4 mm inner diameter, respectively. As the structure of the phantom is based on reported anatomic values, the results predict that the investigated custom-designed wireless pulse oximeter has sufficient sensitivity to detect the pulse waves and to calculate the R rate on the fetal head.

  20. TU-F-BRF-02: MR-US Prostate Registration Using Patient-Specific Tissue Elasticity Property Prior for MR-Targeted, TRUS-Guided HDR Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X; Rossi, P; Ogunleye, T; Jani, A; Curran, W; Liu, T

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has become a popular treatment modality for prostate cancer. Conventional transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate HDR brachytherapy could benefit significantly from MR-targeted, TRUS-guided procedure where the tumor locations, acquired from the multiparametric MRI, are incorporated into the treatment planning. In order to enable this integration, we have developed a MR-TRUS registration with a patient-specific biomechanical elasticity prior. Methods: The proposed method used a biomechanical elasticity prior to guide the prostate volumetric B-spline deformation in the MRI and TRUS registration. The patient-specific biomechanical elasticity prior was generated using ultrasound elastography, where two 3D TRUS prostate images were acquired under different probe-induced pressures during the HDR procedure, which takes 2-4 minutes. These two 3D TRUS images were used to calculate the local displacement (elasticity map) of two prostate volumes. The B-spline transformation was calculated by minimizing the Euclidean distance between the normalized attribute vectors of the prostate surface landmarks on the MR and TRUS. This technique was evaluated through two studies: a prostate-phantom study and a pilot study with 5 patients undergoing prostate HDR treatment. The accuracy of our approach was assessed through the locations of several landmarks in the post-registration and TRUS images; our registration results were compared with the surface-based method. Results: For the phantom study, the mean landmark displacement of the proposed method was 1.29±0.11 mm. For the 5 patients, the mean landmark displacement of the surface-based method was 3.25±0.51 mm; our method, 1.71±0.25 mm. Therefore, our proposed method of prostate registration outperformed the surfaced-based registration significantly. Conclusion: We have developed a novel MR-TRUS prostate registration approach based on patient-specific biomechanical elasticity prior

  1. Use of the FLUKA Monte Carlo code for 3D patient-specific dosimetry on PET-CT and SPECT-CT images.

    PubMed

    Botta, F; Mairani, A; Hobbs, R F; Vergara Gil, A; Pacilio, M; Parodi, K; Cremonesi, M; Coca Pérez, M A; Di Dia, A; Ferrari, M; Guerriero, F; Battistoni, G; Pedroli, G; Paganelli, G; Torres Aroche, L A; Sgouros, G

    2013-11-21

    Patient-specific absorbed dose calculation for nuclear medicine therapy is a topic of increasing interest. 3D dosimetry at the voxel level is one of the major improvements for the development of more accurate calculation techniques, as compared to the standard dosimetry at the organ level. This study aims to use the FLUKA Monte Carlo code to perform patient-specific 3D dosimetry through direct Monte Carlo simulation on PET-CT and SPECT-CT images. To this aim, dedicated routines were developed in the FLUKA environment. Two sets of simulations were performed on model and phantom images. Firstly, the correct handling of PET and SPECT images was tested under the assumption of homogeneous water medium by comparing FLUKA results with those obtained with the voxel kernel convolution method and with other Monte Carlo-based tools developed to the same purpose (the EGS-based 3D-RD software and the MCNP5-based MCID). Afterwards, the correct integration of the PET/SPECT and CT information was tested, performing direct simulations on PET/CT images for both homogeneous (water) and non-homogeneous (water with air, lung and bone inserts) phantoms. Comparison was performed with the other Monte Carlo tools performing direct simulation as well. The absorbed dose maps were compared at the voxel level. In the case of homogeneous water, by simulating 10(8) primary particles a 2% average difference with respect to the kernel convolution method was achieved; such difference was lower than the statistical uncertainty affecting the FLUKA results. The agreement with the other tools was within 3–4%, partially ascribable to the differences among the simulation algorithms. Including the CT-based density map, the average difference was always within 4% irrespective of the medium (water, air, bone), except for a maximum 6% value when comparing FLUKA and 3D-RD in air. The results confirmed that the routines were properly developed, opening the way for the use of FLUKA for patient-specific, image

  2. Use of the FLUKA Monte Carlo code for 3D patient-specific dosimetry on PET-CT and SPECT-CT images*

    PubMed Central

    Botta, F; Mairani, A; Hobbs, R F; Vergara Gil, A; Pacilio, M; Parodi, K; Cremonesi, M; Coca Pérez, M A; Di Dia, A; Ferrari, M; Guerriero, F; Battistoni, G; Pedroli, G; Paganelli, G; Torres Aroche, L A; Sgouros, G

    2014-01-01

    Patient-specific absorbed dose calculation for nuclear medicine therapy is a topic of increasing interest. 3D dosimetry at the voxel level is one of the major improvements for the development of more accurate calculation techniques, as compared to the standard dosimetry at the organ level. This study aims to use the FLUKA Monte Carlo code to perform patient-specific 3D dosimetry through direct Monte Carlo simulation on PET-CT and SPECT-CT images. To this aim, dedicated routines were developed in the FLUKA environment. Two sets of simulations were performed on model and phantom images. Firstly, the correct handling of PET and SPECT images was tested under the assumption of homogeneous water medium by comparing FLUKA results with those obtained with the voxel kernel convolution method and with other Monte Carlo-based tools developed to the same purpose (the EGS-based 3D-RD software and the MCNP5-based MCID). Afterwards, the correct integration of the PET/SPECT and CT information was tested, performing direct simulations on PET/CT images for both homogeneous (water) and non-homogeneous (water with air, lung and bone inserts) phantoms. Comparison was performed with the other Monte Carlo tools performing direct simulation as well. The absorbed dose maps were compared at the voxel level. In the case of homogeneous water, by simulating 108 primary particles a 2% average difference with respect to the kernel convolution method was achieved; such difference was lower than the statistical uncertainty affecting the FLUKA results. The agreement with the other tools was within 3–4%, partially ascribable to the differences among the simulation algorithms. Including the CT-based density map, the average difference was always within 4% irrespective of the medium (water, air, bone), except for a maximum 6% value when comparing FLUKA and 3D-RD in air. The results confirmed that the routines were properly developed, opening the way for the use of FLUKA for patient-specific, image

  3. Use of the FLUKA Monte Carlo code for 3D patient-specific dosimetry on PET-CT and SPECT-CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botta, F.; Mairani, A.; Hobbs, R. F.; Vergara Gil, A.; Pacilio, M.; Parodi, K.; Cremonesi, M.; Coca Pérez, M. A.; Di Dia, A.; Ferrari, M.; Guerriero, F.; Battistoni, G.; Pedroli, G.; Paganelli, G.; Torres Aroche, L. A.; Sgouros, G.

    2013-11-01

    Patient-specific absorbed dose calculation for nuclear medicine therapy is a topic of increasing interest. 3D dosimetry at the voxel level is one of the major improvements for the development of more accurate calculation techniques, as compared to the standard dosimetry at the organ level. This study aims to use the FLUKA Monte Carlo code to perform patient-specific 3D dosimetry through direct Monte Carlo simulation on PET-CT and SPECT-CT images. To this aim, dedicated routines were developed in the FLUKA environment. Two sets of simulations were performed on model and phantom images. Firstly, the correct handling of PET and SPECT images was tested under the assumption of homogeneous water medium by comparing FLUKA results with those obtained with the voxel kernel convolution method and with other Monte Carlo-based tools developed to the same purpose (the EGS-based 3D-RD software and the MCNP5-based MCID). Afterwards, the correct integration of the PET/SPECT and CT information was tested, performing direct simulations on PET/CT images for both homogeneous (water) and non-homogeneous (water with air, lung and bone inserts) phantoms. Comparison was performed with the other Monte Carlo tools performing direct simulation as well. The absorbed dose maps were compared at the voxel level. In the case of homogeneous water, by simulating 108 primary particles a 2% average difference with respect to the kernel convolution method was achieved; such difference was lower than the statistical uncertainty affecting the FLUKA results. The agreement with the other tools was within 3-4%, partially ascribable to the differences among the simulation algorithms. Including the CT-based density map, the average difference was always within 4% irrespective of the medium (water, air, bone), except for a maximum 6% value when comparing FLUKA and 3D-RD in air. The results confirmed that the routines were properly developed, opening the way for the use of FLUKA for patient-specific, image

  4. [Unruptured brain aneurysms: when to screen and when to treat?].

    PubMed

    Fiehler, J

    2012-02-01

    The detection rate of intracranial aneurysms has increased with the improved availability of non-invasive imaging methods. Moreover, persons who have relatives with intracranial aneurysms increasingly demand imaging to rule out aneurysms. To deal with these problems, radiologists require basic knowledge regarding the detection and treatment of unruptured intracranial aneurysms. The prevalence of aneurysms in the normal population is 2 - 3 %. It increases to 4 - 10 % in persons with one relative with an aneurysm and to about 20 % in persons with two relatives with an aneurysm. The average natural rupture risk is estimated to be 5 % within 5 years of detection. In the individual case it depends on several variables that are discussed here. According to the literature, the risk of endovascular aneurysm treatment is about 5 %. On the basis of these data, the benefit of MRA screening needs to be discussed individually with the patient.

  5. A ruptured cerebral mycotic aneurysm caused by Abiotrophia defectiva endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya-Sung; Shang, Shih-Ta; Lin, Jung-Chung; Chiu, Chun-Hsiang; Chang, Feng-Yee

    2010-02-01

    We describe a case of ruptured cerebral mycotic aneurysm caused by Abiotrophia defectiva endocarditis in a previously healthy man. The patient underwent craniotomy with clipping of aneurysm and received antibiotic treatment for 6 weeks and survived.

  6. The experimental study on aneurysm with PIV system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yueshe, Wang; Xiaoqi, Ma; Di, Li

    2013-07-01

    Cerebral aneurysm, a local enlargement of an artery caused by weakness in the wall of a cerebral artery, has the high death rate and disability rate, and is a threat to public health. The forming mechanism of aneurysm is complex, which motivated many researchers to conduct studies in this field. The results indicated that increasing heart frequency can aggravate the oscillation of wall shear stress, and push The growth points of aneurysm along the aneurysm wall, thereby significantly affecting bthe growth and rupture mechanism of aneurysm. In addition, it is found that the curvature of the vessel is the key to induce the secondary vortex in the aneurysm; the secondary vortex increases the magnitude of WSS near the dome of aneurysm, which can cause the rupture of aneurysm dome. there is a linear relationship between the velocity of blood flow and the square root of hear frequency.

  7. Talk to Your Doctor about Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... español Talk to Your Doctor about Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Browse Sections The Basics Overview What is AAA? ... doctor about getting screened (tested) for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). If AAA isn't found and treated ...

  8. Aneurysms of the posterior cerebral artery in children.

    PubMed

    Romero, F J; Tàpies, C; Ibarra, B; Rovira, M

    1988-01-01

    Two cases of aneurysms of the posterior cerebral artery, diagnosed by CT and confirmed angiographically, are reported. In the first case, the aneurysm was discovered fortuitously. The second began with intracerebral haemorrhage. A review of the literature is reported.

  9. Phantom-based ground-truth generation for cerebral vessel segmentation and pulsatile deformation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schetelig, Daniel; Säring, Dennis; Illies, Till; Sedlacik, Jan; Kording, Fabian; Werner, René

    2016-03-01

    Hemodynamic and mechanical factors of the vascular system are assumed to play a major role in understanding, e.g., initiation, growth and rupture of cerebral aneurysms. Among those factors, cardiac cycle-related pulsatile motion and deformation of cerebral vessels currently attract much interest. However, imaging of those effects requires high spatial and temporal resolution and remains challenging { and similarly does the analysis of the acquired images: Flow velocity changes and contrast media inflow cause vessel intensity variations in related temporally resolved computed tomography and magnetic resonance angiography data over the cardiac cycle and impede application of intensity threshold-based segmentation and subsequent motion analysis. In this work, a flow phantom for generation of ground-truth images for evaluation of appropriate segmentation and motion analysis algorithms is developed. The acquired ground-truth data is used to illustrate the interplay between intensity fluctuations and (erroneous) motion quantification by standard threshold-based segmentation, and an adaptive threshold-based segmentation approach is proposed that alleviates respective issues. The results of the phantom study are further demonstrated to be transferable to patient data.

  10. Abdominal aortic aneurysms in women

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Ruby C.; Schermerhorn, Marc L.

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) has long been recognized as a condition predominantly afflicting males, with sex-associated differences described for almost every aspect of the disease from pathophysiology and epidemiology to morbidity and mortality. Women are generally spared from AAA formation by the immunomodulating effects of estrogen but once they develop, the natural history of AAAs in women appears to be more aggressive, with more rapid expansion, a higher tendency to rupture at smaller diameters, and higher mortality following rupture. However, simply repairing AAA at smaller diameters in women is a debatable solution, as even elective endovascular AAA repair (EVAR) is fraught with higher morbidity and mortality in women compared to men. The goal of this review is to summarize what is currently known about the effect of gender on AAA presentation, treatment, and outcomes. Additionally, we aim to review current controversies over screening recommendations and threshold for repair in women. PMID:26747679

  11. Management of Splenic Artery Aneurysms and False Aneurysms with Endovascular Treatment in 12 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Guillon, R.; Garcier, J.M.; Abergel, A.; Mofid, R.; Garcia, V.; Chahid, T.; Ravel, A.; Pezet, D.; Boyer, L.

    2003-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the endovascular treatment of splenic artery aneurysms and false aneurysms. Methods: Twelve patients (mean age 59 years, range 47-75 years) with splenic artery aneurysm (n = 10) or false aneurysm (n = 2) were treated. The lesion was asymptomatic in 11 patients; hemobilia was observed in one patient. The lesion was juxta-ostial in one case, located on the intermediate segment of the splenic artery in four, near the splenic hilus in six,and affected the whole length of the artery in one patient. In 10 cases, the maximum lesion diameter was greater than 2 cm; in one case 30% growth of an aneurysm 18 mm in diameter had occurred in 6 months;in the last case, two distal aneurysms were associated (17 and 18 mm in diameter). In one case, stent-grafting was attempted; one detachable balloon occlusion was performed; the 10 other patients were treated with coils. Results: Endovascular treatment was possible in 11 patients (92%) (one failure: stenting attempt). In four cases among 11, the initial treatment was not successful (residual perfusion of aneurysm); surgical treatment was carried out in one case, and a second embolization in two. Thus in nine cases (75%) endovascular treatment was successful: complete and persistent exclusion of the aneurysm but with spleen perfusion persisting at the end of follow-upon CT scans (mean 13 months). An early and transient elevation of pancreatic enzymes was observed in four cases. Conclusion: Ultrasound and CT have made the diagnosis of splenic artery aneurysm or false aneurysm more frequent. Endovascular treatment, the morbidity of which is low, is effective and spares the spleen.

  12. Thoracic aortic aneurysm: reading the enemy's playbook.

    PubMed

    Elefteriades, John A

    2008-05-01

    The vast database of the Yale Center for Thoracic Aortic Disease--which includes information on 3000 patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm or dissection, with 9000 catalogued images and 9000 patient-years of follow-up--has, over the last decade, permitted multiple glimpses into the "playbook" of this virulent disease. Understanding the precise behavioral features of thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection permits us more effectively to combat this disease. In this monograph, we will first review certain fundamentals--in terms of anatomy, nomenclature, imaging, diagnosis, medical, surgical, and stent treatment. After reviewing these fundamentals, we will proceed with a detailed exploration of lessons learned by peering into the operational playbook of thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection. Among the glimpses afforded in the behavioral playbook of this disease are the following: 1 Thoracic aortic aneurysm, while lethal, is indolent. Mortality usually does not occur until after years of growth. 2 The aneurysmal ascending thoracic aorta grows slowly: about 0.1 cm per year (the descending aorta grows somewhat faster). 3 Over a patient's lifetime, "hinge points" at which the likelihood of rupture or dissection skyrockets are seen at 5.5 cm for the ascending and 6.5 cm for the descending aorta. Intervening at 5 cm diameter for the ascending and 6 cm for the descending prevents most adverse events. 4 Symptomatic aneurysms require resection regardless of size. 5 The yearly rate of rupture, dissection, or death is 14.1% for a patient with a thoracic aorta of 6 cm diameter. 6 The mechanical properties of the aorta deteriorate markedly at 6 cm diameter (distensibility falls, and wall stress rises)--a finding that "dovetails" perfectly with observations of the clinical behavior of the thoracic aorta. 7 Thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection are largely inherited diseases, with a predominantly autosomal-dominant pattern. The specific genetics are being elucidated at the

  13. Single-scan patient-specific scatter correction in computed tomography using peripheral detection of scatter and compressed sensing scatter retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Bowen; Lee, Ho; Xing, Lei; Fahimian, Benjamin P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: X-ray scatter results in a significant degradation of image quality in computed tomography (CT), representing a major limitation in cone-beam CT (CBCT) and large field-of-view diagnostic scanners. In this work, a novel scatter estimation and correction technique is proposed that utilizes peripheral detection of scatter during the patient scan to simultaneously acquire image and patient-specific scatter information in a single scan, and in conjunction with a proposed compressed sensing scatter recovery technique to reconstruct and correct for the patient-specific scatter in the projection space. Methods: The method consists of the detection of patient scatter at the edges of the field of view (FOV) followed by measurement based compressed sensing recovery of the scatter through-out the projection space. In the prototype implementation, the kV x-ray source of the Varian TrueBeam OBI system was blocked at the edges of the projection FOV, and the image detector in the corresponding blocked region was used for scatter detection. The design enables image data acquisition of the projection data on the unblocked central region of and scatter data at the blocked boundary regions. For the initial scatter estimation on the central FOV, a prior consisting of a hybrid scatter model that combines the scatter interpolation method and scatter convolution model is estimated using the acquired scatter distribution on boundary region. With the hybrid scatter estimation model, compressed sensing optimization is performed to generate the scatter map by penalizing the L1 norm of the discrete cosine transform of scatter signal. The estimated scatter is subtracted from the projection data by soft-tuning, and the scatter-corrected CBCT volume is obtained by the conventional Feldkamp-Davis-Kress algorithm. Experimental studies using image quality and anthropomorphic phantoms on a Varian TrueBeam system were carried out to evaluate the performance of the proposed scheme. Results

  14. Cerebral Aneurysm Perforations during Treatment with Detachable Coils

    PubMed Central

    Layton, K.F.; Cloft, H.J.; Kallmes, D.F.

    2006-01-01

    Summary Perforation of intracranial aneurysms during endovascular treatment with platinum microcoils is a well-known and serious complication reported to occur in 2-4% of patients. Inflation of a remodelling balloon across the aneurysm neck or within the proximal parent vessel is an additional technique that theoretically might be useful to reduce flow within the aneurysm and achieve hemostasis. In the case reports that follow, we present our experience using this technique for managing intraprocedural aneurysm rupture. PMID:20569548

  15. Traumatic aneurysm and arteriovenous fistula of the splenic artery.

    PubMed

    Oğuzkurt, L; Balkanci, F; Ariyürek, M; Demirkazik, F B

    1996-01-01

    Aneurysmal arteriovenous fistulas are rare and mostly seen in adults. A 13-year-old girl developed a subcapsular hematoma of the spleen following blunt abdominal trauma. Follow-up ultrasonography 4 months after the trauma revealed an aneurysm at the splenic hilum. Selective splenic angiography demonstrated the lesion to be an aneurysmal arteriovenous fistula. Repeat ultrasonography enabled us to be certain of the traumatic origin of the aneurysm and arteriovenous fistula which are very unusual in the pediatric age group.

  16. Multiple unusual aneurysms and arteriovenous malformation in a single patient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nehls, D G; Carter, L P

    1985-07-01

    A patient with multiple unusual aneurysms and an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is presented. Aneurysms involving the meningohypophyseal trunk and the feeding vessel of the AVM were observed. Two additional aneurysms assumed a pantaloon appearance. The largest aneurysm was responsible for the patient's subarachnoid hemorrhage. This aneurysm and two adjacent aneurysms were clipped successfully, and the patient made an uneventful recovery. Subsequent angiography revealed a stable appearance of the remaining aneurysms and AVM.

  17. Characterizations and Correlations of Wall Shear Stress in Aneurysmal Flow

    PubMed Central

    Arzani, Amirhossein; Shadden, Shawn C.

    2016-01-01

    Wall shear stress (WSS) is one of the most studied hemodynamic parameters, used in correlating blood flow to various diseases. The pulsatile nature of blood flow, along with the complex geometries of diseased arteries, produces complicated temporal and spatial WSS patterns. Moreover, WSS is a vector, which further complicates its quantification and interpretation. The goal of this study is to investigate WSS magnitude, angle, and vector changes in space and time in complex blood flow. Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) was chosen as a setting to explore WSS quantification. Patient-specific computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were performed in six AAAs. New WSS parameters are introduced, and the pointwise correlation among these, and more traditional WSS parameters, was explored. WSS magnitude had positive correlation with spatial/temporal gradients of WSS magnitude. This motivated the definition of relative WSS gradients. WSS vectorial gradients were highly correlated with magnitude gradients. A mix WSS spatial gradient and a mix WSS temporal gradient are proposed to equally account for variations in the WSS angle and magnitude in single measures. The important role that WSS plays in regulating near wall transport, and the high correlation among some of the WSS parameters motivates further attention in revisiting the traditional approaches used in WSS characterizations. PMID:26592536

  18. Vortex Analysis of Intra-Aneurismal Flow in Cerebral Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Sunderland, Kevin; Haferman, Christopher; Chintalapani, Gouthami; Jiang, Jingfeng

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to develop an alternative vortex analysis method by measuring structure ofIntracranial aneurysm (IA) flow vortexes across the cardiac cycle, to quantify temporal stability of aneurismal flow. Hemodynamics were modeled in "patient-specific" geometries, using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. Modified versions of known λ2 and Q-criterion methods identified vortex regions; then regions were segmented out using the classical marching cube algorithm. Temporal stability was measured by the degree of vortex overlap (DVO) at each step of a cardiac cycle against a cycle-averaged vortex and by the change in number of cores over the cycle. No statistical differences exist in DVO or number of vortex cores between 5 terminal IAs and 5 sidewall IAs. No strong correlation exists between vortex core characteristics and geometric or hemodynamic characteristics of IAs. Statistical independence suggests this proposed method may provide novel IA information. However, threshold values used to determine the vortex core regions and resolution of velocity data influenced analysis outcomes and have to be addressed in future studies. In conclusions, preliminary results show that the proposed methodology may help give novel insight toward aneurismal flow characteristic and help in future risk assessment given more developments.

  19. Novel risk predictor for thrombus deposition in abdominal aortic aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestola, M. G. C.; Gizzi, A.; Cherubini, C.; Filippi, S.; Succi, S.

    2015-10-01

    The identification of the basic mechanisms responsible for cardiovascular diseases stands as one of the most challenging problems in modern medical research including various mechanisms which encompass a broad spectrum of space and time scales. Major implications for clinical practice and pre-emptive medicine rely on the onset and development of intraluminal thrombus in which effective clinical therapies require synthetic risk predictors/indicators capable of informing real-time decision-making protocols. In the present contribution, two novel hemodynamics synthetic indicators, based on a three-band decomposition (TBD) of the shear stress signal, are introduced. Extensive fluid-structure computer simulations of patient-specific scenarios confirm the enhanced risk-prediction capabilities of the TBD indicators. In particular, they permit a quantitative and accurate localization of the most likely thrombus deposition in realistic aortic geometries, where previous indicators would predict healthy operation. The proposed methodology is also shown to provide additional information and discrimination criteria on other factors of major clinical relevance, such as the size of the aneurysm.

  20. Thermal stability of intralipid optical phantoms.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Philip I; Künnemeyer, Rainer; McGlone, Andrew; Talele, Sadhana; Martinsen, Paul; Oliver, Richard

    2013-08-01

    We investigated the stability of light transmission through Intralipid-based optical phantoms in the wavelength range of 400-950 nm at temperatures between 35 and 70 °C. Optical phantoms are materials commonly used to simulate the light scattering and absorption properties of biological materials. These simulations require the phantom to be optically stable. We demonstrate that the scattering properties of Intralipid remain stable at higher temperatures, varying less than 0.5%. We also present results that show this is not the case for absorption below 700 nm at 35 and 70 °C, with greater instability at 70 °C. For example, at 500 nm, the light intensity transmitted through 15 mm of Intralipid dropped 39% over 12 h. We demonstrate that oxidation of fatty acids in Intralipid could account for this effect and show, by flushing the system continuously with nitrogen gas, the instability is reduced.

  1. Cosmological perturbations in transient phantom inflation scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richarte, Martín G.; Kremer, Gilberto M.

    2017-01-01

    We present a model of inflation where the inflaton is accommodated as a phantom field which exhibits an initial transient pole behavior and then decays into a quintessence field which is responsible for a radiation era. We must stress that the present unified model only deals with a single field and that the transition between the two eras is achieved in a smooth way, so the model does not suffer from the eternal inflation issue. We explore the conditions for the crossing of the phantom divide line within the inflationary era along with the structural stability of several critical points. We study the behavior of the phantom field within the slow-climb approximation along with the necessary conditions to have sufficient inflation. We also examine the model at the level of classical perturbations within the Newtonian gauge and determine the behavior of the gravitational potential, contrast density and perturbed field near the inflation stage and the subsequent radiation era.

  2. Study on fibrous materials for brain phantoms.

    PubMed

    Guise, Catarina; Fangueiro, Raul; Nóbrega, João Miguel; Schneider, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Generally, current clinical imaging methods do not provide highly detailed information about location of axonal injury, severity of injury or expected recovery of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). High-Definition Fiber Tractography (HDFT) is a novel imaging modality that allows visualizing and quantifying, directly, the degree of axons damage, predicting functional deficits due to traumatic axonal injury and loss of cortical projections. This imaging modality is based on diffusion technology. Being a novel modality, validation and quality control are essential. Thus this study aims at the development of a brain phantom to mimic the human brain in order to fill some gaps that currently exist in this area. This paper is focused on this novel imaging approach, the role of brain phantoms on its validation and the quality control, as well as, on the materials used in their construction. Furthermore, some important characteristics of fibrous materials for brain phantom are also discussed.

  3. Epidemiology and genetics of intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Caranci, F; Briganti, F; Cirillo, L; Leonardi, M; Muto, M

    2013-10-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are acquired lesions (5-10% of the population), a fraction of which rupture leading to subarachnoid hemorrhage with devastating consequences. Until now, the exact etiology of intracranial aneurysms formation remains unclear. The low incidence of subarachnoid hemorrhage in comparison with the prevalence of unruptured IAs suggests that the vast majority of intracranial aneurysms do not rupture and that identifying those at highest risk is important in defining the optimal management. The most important factors predicting rupture are aneurysm size and site. In addition to ambiental factors (smoking, excessive alcohol consumption and hypertension), epidemiological studies have demonstrated a familiar influence contributing to the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysms, with increased frequency in first- and second-degree relatives of people with subarachnoid hemorrhage. In comparison to sporadic aneurysms, familial aneurysms tend to be larger, more often located at the middle cerebral artery, and more likely to be multiple. Other than familiar occurrence, there are several heritable conditions associated with intracranial aneurysm formation, including autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, neurofibromatosis type I, Marfan syndrome, multiple endocrine neoplasia type I, pseudoxanthoma elasticum, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type II and IV. The familial occurrence and the association with heritable conditions indicate that genetic factors may play a role in the development of intracranial aneurysms. Genome-wide linkage studies in families and sib pairs with intracranial aneurysms have identified several loci on chromosomes showing suggestive evidence of linkage, particularly on chromosomes 1p34.3-p36.13, 7q11, 19q13.3, and Xp22. For the loci on 1p34.3-p36.13 and 7q11, a moderate positive association with positional candidate genes has been demonstrated (perlecan gene, elastin gene, collagen type 1 A2 gene

  4. Comparison of whole-body phantom designs to estimate organ equivalent neutron doses for secondary cancer risk assessment in proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Moteabbed, Maryam; Geyer, Amy; Drenkhahn, Robert; Bolch, Wesley E; Paganetti, Harald

    2012-01-21

    Secondary neutron fluence created during proton therapy can be a significant source of radiation exposure in organs distant from the treatment site, especially in pediatric patients. Various published studies have used computational phantoms to estimate neutron equivalent doses in proton therapy. In these simulations, whole-body patient representations were applied considering either generic whole-body phantoms or generic age- and gender-dependent phantoms. No studies to date have reported using patient-specific geometry information. The purpose of this study was to estimate the effects of patient–phantom matching when using computational pediatric phantoms. To achieve this goal, three sets of phantoms, including different ages and genders, were compared to the patients' whole-body CT. These sets consisted of pediatric age specific reference, age-adjusted reference and anatomically sculpted phantoms. The neutron equivalent dose for a subset of out-of-field organs was calculated using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo toolkit, where proton fields were used to irradiate the cranium and the spine of all phantoms and the CT-segmented patient models. The maximum neutron equivalent dose per treatment absorbed dose was calculated and found to be on the order of 0 to 5 mSv Gy(-1). The relative dose difference between each phantom and their respective CT-segmented patient model for most organs showed a dependence on how close the phantom and patient heights were matched. The weight matching was found to have much smaller impact on the dose accuracy except for very heavy patients. Analysis of relative dose difference with respect to height difference suggested that phantom sculpting has a positive effect in terms of dose accuracy as long as the patient is close to the 50th percentile height and weight. Otherwise, the benefit of sculpting was masked by inherent uncertainties, i.e. variations in organ shapes, sizes and locations.Other sources of uncertainty included errors associated

  5. Spontaneous gastroduodenal artery aneurysm rupture in acute surgery.

    PubMed

    Savage, Jessica; Hsee, Li

    2012-06-29

    Among the rarest of the visceral aneurysms, gastroduodenal artery (GDA) aneurysms often present with spontaneous rupture and are associated with a high mortality rate. Their aetiology is poorly understood. This report describes a case of haemorrhagic shock due to sudden GDA aneurysm rupture in a patient with a significant autoimmune history.

  6. 21 CFR 882.4175 - Aneurysm clip applier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4175 Aneurysm clip applier. (a) Identification. An aneurysm clip applier is a device used by the surgeon for holding and applying intracranial... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aneurysm clip applier. 882.4175 Section...

  7. 21 CFR 882.4175 - Aneurysm clip applier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aneurysm clip applier. 882.4175 Section 882.4175...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4175 Aneurysm clip applier. (a) Identification. An aneurysm clip applier is a device used by the surgeon for holding and applying...

  8. 21 CFR 882.4175 - Aneurysm clip applier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aneurysm clip applier. 882.4175 Section 882.4175...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4175 Aneurysm clip applier. (a) Identification. An aneurysm clip applier is a device used by the surgeon for holding and applying...

  9. 21 CFR 882.4175 - Aneurysm clip applier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aneurysm clip applier. 882.4175 Section 882.4175...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4175 Aneurysm clip applier. (a) Identification. An aneurysm clip applier is a device used by the surgeon for holding and applying...

  10. 21 CFR 882.4175 - Aneurysm clip applier.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aneurysm clip applier. 882.4175 Section 882.4175...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4175 Aneurysm clip applier. (a) Identification. An aneurysm clip applier is a device used by the surgeon for holding and applying...

  11. Standard operating procedure to prepare agar phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, R. M.; Santos, T. Q.; Oliveira, D. P.; Souza, R. M.; Alvarenga, A. V.; Costa-Felix, R. P. B.

    2016-07-01

    Agar phantoms are widely used as soft tissue mimics and some preparation techniques are described in the literature. There are also standards that describe the recipe of a soft tissue mimicking material (TMM). However some details of manufacture process are not clearly defined. The standardization of the phantom's preparation can produce a metrological impact on the results of the acoustic properties measured. In this direction, this paper presents a standard operating procedure (SOP) to prepare the agar TMM described on the IEC 60601-237.

  12. New polymer-based phantom for photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Iwazaki, Hideaki; Ida, Taiichiro; Nishi, Taiji; Tanikawa, Yukari; Nitta, Naotaka

    2014-03-01

    We will report newly developed polymer-based phantom for photoacoustic (PA) imaging systems. Phantoms are important for performance evaluation and calibration of new modalities; however, there is no established method for making phantoms with no long-term change. We have developed skin mimicking phantoms simulating both optical and acoustic properties (i.e. optical scattering and absorption coefficients, and sound velocity). Furthermore, the phantoms are able to give accurate simulation of blood vessels by Inkjet-printing. Newly developed phantoms are consisted of castor oil included acrylic block copolymer and we can fabricate 0.8mm or less thick sheets and pile them using their self-adhesiveness.

  13. Effects of Vessel Tortuosity on Coronary Hemodynamics: An Idealized and Patient-Specific Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Vorobtsova, Natalya; Chiastra, Claudio; Stremler, Mark A; Sane, David C; Migliavacca, Francesco; Vlachos, Pavlos

    2016-07-01

    Although coronary tortuosity can influence the hemodynamics of coronary arteries, the relationship between tortuosity and flow has not been thoroughly investigated partly due to the absence of a widely accepted definition of tortuosity and the lack of patient-specific studies that analyze complete coronary trees. Using a computational approach we investigated the effects of tortuosity on coronary flow parameters including pressure drop, wall shear stress, and helical flow strength as measured by helicity intensity. Our analysis considered idealized and patient-specific geometries. Overall results indicate that perfusion pressure decreases with increased tortuosity, but the patient-specific results show that more tortuous vessels have higher physiological wall shear stress values. Differences between the idealized and patient-specific results reveal that an accurate representation of coronary tortuosity must account for all relevant geometric aspects, including curvature imposed by the heart shape. The patient-specific results exhibit a strong correlation between tortuosity and helicity intensity, and the corresponding helical flow contributes directly to the observed increase in wall shear stress. Therefore, helicity intensity may prove helpful in developing a universal parameter to describe tortuosity and assess its impact on patient health. Our data suggest that increased tortuosity could have a deleterious impact via a reduction in coronary perfusion pressure, but the attendant increase in wall shear stress could afford protection against atherosclerosis.

  14. Mechanical evaluation by patient-specific finite element analyses demonstrates therapeutic effects for osteoporotic vertebrae.

    PubMed

    Tawara, Daisuke; Sakamoto, Jiro; Murakami, Hideki; Kawahara, Norio; Oda, Juhachi; Tomita, Katsuro

    2010-01-01

    Osteoporosis can lead to bone compressive fractures in the lower lumbar vertebrae. In order to assess the recovery of vertebral strength during drug treatment for osteoporosis, it is necessary not only to measure the bone mass but also to perform patient-specific mechanical analyses, since the strength of osteoporotic vertebrae is strongly dependent on patient-specific factors, such as bone shape and bone density distribution in cancellous bone, which are related to stress distribution in the vertebrae. In the present study, patient-specific general (not voxel) finite element analyses of osteoporotic vertebrae during drug treatment were performed over time. We compared changes in bone density and compressive principal strain distribution in a relative manner using models for the first lumbar vertebra based on computer tomography images of four patients at three time points (before therapy, and after 6 and 12 months of therapy). The patient-specific mechanical analyses indicated that increases in bone density and decreases in compressive principal strain were significant in some osteoporotic vertebrae. The data suggested that the vertebrae were strengthened structurally and the drug treatment was effective in preventing compression fractures. The effectiveness of patient-specific mechanical analyses for providing useful and important information for the prognosis of osteoporosis is demonstrated.

  15. Development of an integrated CAD-FEA system for patient-specific design of spinal cages.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingzheng; Pu, Fang; Xu, Liqiang; Zhang, Linlin; Liang, Hang; Li, Deyu; Wang, Yu; Fan, Yubo

    2017-03-01

    Spinal cages are used to create a suitable mechanical environment for interbody fusion in cases of degenerative spinal instability. Due to individual variations in bone structures and pathological conditions, patient-specific cages can provide optimal biomechanical conditions for fusion, strengthening patient recovery. Finite element analysis (FEA) is a valuable tool in the biomechanical evaluation of patient-specific cage designs, but the time- and labor-intensive process of modeling limits its clinical application. In an effort to facilitate the design and analysis of patient-specific spinal cages, an integrated CAD-FEA system (CASCaDeS, comprehensive analytical spinal cage design system) was developed. This system produces a biomechanical-based patient-specific design of spinal cages and is capable of rapid implementation of finite element modeling. By comparison with commercial software, this system was validated and proven to be both accurate and efficient. CASCaDeS can be used to design patient-specific cages with a superior biomechanical performance to commercial spinal cages.

  16. Treatment of Infected Aneurysms of the Abdominal Aorta and Iliac Artery with Endovascular Aneurysm Repair and Percutaneous Drainage.

    PubMed

    Chino, Shuji; Kato, Noriyuki; Noda, Yoshihiro; Oue, Kensuke; Tanaka, Satofumi; Hashimoto, Takashi; Higashigawa, Takatoshi; Miyake, Yoichiro; Okabe, Manabu

    2016-10-01

    Infected aneurysm remains one of the most challenging diseases for vascular surgeons. We describe the successful treatment of 2 cases of infected aneurysms with endovascular aneurysm repair and percutaneous computed tomography-guided drainage. This strategy may be an effective alternative to open surgical repair in selected patients.

  17. Endovascular occlusion of intracranial aneurysms with electrically detachable coils: Correlation of aneurysm neck size and treatment results

    SciTech Connect

    Zubillaga, A.F.; Guglielmi, G.; Vinuela, F.; Duckwiler, G.R.

    1994-05-01

    To devise a method to measure aneurysm neck size on angiographic films, and to correlate the sizes obtained with the extent of endovascular aneurysm occlusion, performed with electrically detachable coils. The angiograms of 79 intracranial aneurysms treated by endovascular occlusion using electrically detachable coils were retrospectively analyzed. A method using the average reported caliber of the major intracranial vessels was applied to determine the aneurysm neck sizes on the diagnostic angiograms. The cases were divided into two groups according to neck size, 4 mm being the discriminative value for small and wide necks. The posttreatment angiogram of each case was analyzed to evaluate the degree of occlusion achieved by the technique. Necks were successfully measured in 95% of the aneurysms. Complete aneurysm thrombosis was observed in 85% of the small-necked aneurysms and in 15% of the wide-necked aneurysms. Accurate angiographic measurements of neck diameter can be obtained in most aneurysms. The size of an aneurysm neck correlates well with the results of the endovascular treatment. Small-necked aneurysms can be satisfactorily occluded with this technique. In wide-necked aneurysms this technique should be reserved for lesions having a high surgical risk. 10 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  18. The DOE in-vivo phantom library program

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, P.C.

    1993-12-31

    The use of improved in vivo bioassay calibration phantoms in recent years has led to significant advances in the detection capabilities of in vivo counting laboratories, and increased ability to cross-calibrate various systems and laboratories for standardization purposes in DOE programs. The cost of these phantoms are significant, though, and this inhibits successful intercomparisons for improving calibrations. A recent CIRRPC Workshop on Internal Dosimetry in April 1992 recommended establishing intercomparison programs for in vivo measurements and improved phantom designs. Improved phantoms, developed at PNL with NIST-traceable source reference material loadings, proven solid tissue substitutes, and extensive documentation on construction, activity, and physical and chemical composition are available through a newly operational library. These phantoms use original LLNL molds and existing BOMAB phantom shells, but with improved tissue substitutes. All phantom materials have been extensively tested for their chemical, physical, and radiation transmission properties, and are tailored for identical transmission characteristics at the photon energies of concern. PNL has been pursuing approval from NIST for {open_quotes}certification{close_quotes} of these phantoms. The DOE Phantom Library loans organ, whole-body, and through cooperation with USTR, an Am-241 skeletal phantom to DOE contractor laboratories without cost. Only the price of shipping the phantom is requested. This paper will discuss the operation of the library, the current and planned holdings, the quality of phantom construction, and planning for NIST cooperation in certifying these phantoms.

  19. Development of a patient specific artificial tracheal prosthesis: design, mechanical behavior analysis and manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Chua C H, Matthew; Chui, Chee Kong; Rai, Bina; Lau D P, David

    2013-01-01

    There is a need to create patient specific organ replacements as there are differences in the anatomical dimensions among individuals. High failure rates in tracheal prosthesis are attributed to the lack of mechanical strength and flexibility, slow rate of growth of ciliated epithelium and leakage of interstitial fluid into the lumen. This paper proposes a methodology of design, simulations and fabrication of a patient specific artificial tracheal prosthesis for implantation to closely mimic the biomechanical properties of the natural trachea, and describes the prototype device and its materials. Results show that the patient-specific trachea prosthesis has mechanical properties approximate that of normal tracheal rings. The user centric tracheal prosthesis is demonstrated to be a promising candidate for tracheal replacement.

  20. Patient-Specific Computational Models of Coronary Arteries Using Monoplane X-Ray Angiograms

    PubMed Central

    Zifan, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common type of heart disease in western countries. Early detection and diagnosis of CAD is quintessential to preventing mortality and subsequent complications. We believe hemodynamic data derived from patient-specific computational models could facilitate more accurate prediction of the risk of atherosclerosis. We introduce a semiautomated method to build 3D patient-specific coronary vessel models from 2D monoplane angiogram images. The main contribution of the method is a robust segmentation approach using dynamic programming combined with iterative 3D reconstruction to build 3D mesh models of the coronary vessels. Results indicate the accuracy and robustness of the proposed pipeline. In conclusion, patient-specific modelling of coronary vessels is of vital importance for developing accurate computational flow models and studying the hemodynamic effects of the presence of plaques on the arterial walls, resulting in lumen stenoses, as well as variations in the angulations of the coronary arteries. PMID:27403203