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  1. Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML)

    MedlinePlus

    ... chemical exposure. Exposure to certain chemicals, such as benzene, is linked to greater risk of AML. Smoking. AML is linked to cigarette smoke, which contains benzene and other known cancer-causing chemicals. Other blood ...

  2. Emerging therapeutic drugs for AML

    PubMed Central

    Tallman, Martin S.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple new drugs are being developed to treat acute myeloid leukemia (AML), including novel formulations of traditional chemotherapy-antibody drug conjugates and agents that target specific mutant enzymes. Next-generation sequencing has allowed us to discover the genetic mutations that lead to the development and clinical progression of AML. Studies of clonal hierarchy suggest which mutations occur early and dominate. This has led to targeted therapy against mutant driver proteins as well as the development of drugs such as CPX-351 and SGN-CD33A whose mechanisms of action and efficacy may not be dependent on mutational complexity. In this brief review, we discuss drugs that may emerge as important for the treatment of AML in the next 10 years. PMID:26660428

  3. Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) KidsHealth > For Parents > Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) ... Treatment Coping en español Leucemia mieloide aguda About Leukemia Leukemia is a type of cancer that affects ...

  4. An Alternative Sugar Fuels AML.

    PubMed

    Cairns, Rob A; Mak, Tak W

    2016-11-14

    Although altered glucose metabolism is a well-studied feature of malignant cells, little is known about the direct metabolism of fructose. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Chen et al. report that AML cells consume fructose and use it to maintain viability, especially when glucose is scarce.

  5. MIT: Shaping the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Kenneth R., Ed.

    This book provides 16 essays by faculty and staff of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) concerning what MIT is like today and offering a guide to its possible future. Emphasis is placed on local, national, and global issues, providing a current sampling of the state of concerns and opinions around MIT. Topics include the question of…

  6. Prognostic stratification in the treatment of AML.

    PubMed

    Asou, Norio

    Current treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) still relies on intensive chemotherapy and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). AML is a heterogeneous neoplasm characterized by distinct chromosomal and genetic abnormalities. Recent comprehensive gene analyses have highlighted distinct genetic subgroups that are associated with different responses to chemotherapy. Therefore, the molecular landscape of AML is fundamental to the development of novel therapeutic approaches and provides opportunities for individualization of therapy. In addition, the age-related incidence of clonal hematopoiesis is high, affecting nearly 10% of healthy people more than 65 years of age. Clonal hematopoiesis is confirmed by the presence of mutations related to AML including genes involved in DNA methylation, chromatin modification and RNA splicing. In the analysis of gene mutation profiles in secondary AML (s-AML) from myelodysplastic syndromes and myeloproliferative neoplasms, secondary-type gene mutations were identified with >95% specificity in s-AML as compared with de novo AML, including RNA splicing, chromatin modification and cohesion complex genes, and were highly associated with poor responses to chemotherapy as well as TP53 mutation. It is important to identify genetic subgroups at relatively high-risk of relapses who should receive allogeneic HSCT during the first remission. In this review, prognostic stratification for individualized treatment of AML is discussed.

  7. The applicability of the WHO classification in paediatric AML. A NOPHO-AML study.

    PubMed

    Sandahl, Julie D; Kjeldsen, Eigil; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Ha, Shau-Yin; Heldrup, Jesper; Jahnukainen, Kirsi; Jónsson, Ólafur G; Lausen, Birgitte; Palle, Josefine; Zeller, Bernward; Forestier, Erik; Hasle, Henrik

    2015-06-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) classification of myeloid leukaemia was revised in 2008. It incorporates newly recognized entities and emphasizes the pivotal role of cytogenetic abnormalities. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usability of the WHO classification when applied to a large population-based paediatric acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cohort. We included children diagnosed with de novo AML, 0-18 years of age from the Nordic countries and Hong Kong from 1993 to 2012. Data were retrieved from the Nordic Society for Paediatric Haematology and Oncology AML database and patients classified according to the WHO 2008 classification. A successful karyotype was available in 97% of the cases. AML with recurrent genetic abnormalities were present in 262 (41%) and 94 (15%) were classified as AML with myelodysplasia-related changes (AML-MDS). WHO classifies patients with monosomy 7 and del(7q) into one group. We found that -7 (n = 14) had significantly poorer outcome than del(7q) (n = 11); 5-year event-free survival 26% vs. 67%, (P = 0·02), and 5-year overall survival 51% vs. 90%, (P = 0·04). The largest group was the highly heterogeneous AML not otherwise specified (NOS) (n = 280) (44%). In conclusion, the WHO classification allocated 15% to AML-MDS, 44% to NOS and grouped together entities with clearly different outcome, therefore limiting the applicability of the current WHO classification in children with AML.

  8. De novo AML exhibits greater microenvironment dysregulation compared to AML with myelodysplasia-related changes.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Matheus Rodrigues; Pereira, João Kleber Novais; de Melo Campos, Paula; Machado-Neto, João Agostinho; Traina, Fabiola; Saad, Sara T Olalla; Favaro, Patricia

    2017-01-13

    The interaction between the bone marrow microenvironment and malignant hematopoietic cells can result in the protection of leukemia cells from chemotherapy in both myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We, herein, characterized the changes in cytokine expression and the function of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) in patients with MDS, AML with myelodysplasia-related changes (MRC), a well-recognized clinical subtype of secondary AML, and de novo AML. We observed a significant inhibitory effect of MDS-MSC on T lymphocyte proliferation and no significant differences in any of the cytokines tested. AML-MSC inhibited T-cell proliferation only at a very low MSC/T cell ratio. When compared to the control, AML-MRCderived MSC presented a significant increase in IL6 expression, whereas de novo AML MSC presented a significant increase in the expression levels of VEGFA, CXCL12, RPGE2, IDO, IL1β, IL6 and IL32, followed by a decrease in IL10 expression. Furthermore, data indicate that IL-32 regulates stromal cell proliferation, has a chemotactic potential and participates in stromal cell crosstalk with leukemia cells, which could result in chemoresistance. Our results suggest that the differences between AML-MRC and de novo AML also extend into the leukemic stem cell niche and that IL-32 can participate in the regulation of the bone marrow cytokine milieu.

  9. De novo AML exhibits greater microenvironment dysregulation compared to AML with myelodysplasia-related changes

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Matheus Rodrigues; Pereira, João Kleber Novais; de Melo Campos, Paula; Machado-Neto, João Agostinho; Traina, Fabiola; Saad, Sara T. Olalla; Favaro, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    The interaction between the bone marrow microenvironment and malignant hematopoietic cells can result in the protection of leukemia cells from chemotherapy in both myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We, herein, characterized the changes in cytokine expression and the function of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) in patients with MDS, AML with myelodysplasia-related changes (MRC), a well-recognized clinical subtype of secondary AML, and de novo AML. We observed a significant inhibitory effect of MDS-MSC on T lymphocyte proliferation and no significant differences in any of the cytokines tested. AML-MSC inhibited T-cell proliferation only at a very low MSC/T cell ratio. When compared to the control, AML-MRCderived MSC presented a significant increase in IL6 expression, whereas de novo AML MSC presented a significant increase in the expression levels of VEGFA, CXCL12, RPGE2, IDO, IL1β, IL6 and IL32, followed by a decrease in IL10 expression. Furthermore, data indicate that IL-32 regulates stromal cell proliferation, has a chemotactic potential and participates in stromal cell crosstalk with leukemia cells, which could result in chemoresistance. Our results suggest that the differences between AML-MRC and de novo AML also extend into the leukemic stem cell niche and that IL-32 can participate in the regulation of the bone marrow cytokine milieu. PMID:28084439

  10. Pediatric AML: From Biology to Clinical Management.

    PubMed

    de Rooij, Jasmijn D E; Zwaan, C Michel; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry

    2015-01-09

    Pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) represents 15%-20% of all pediatric acute leukemias. Survival rates have increased over the past few decades to ~70%, due to improved supportive care, optimized risk stratification and intensified chemotherapy. In most children, AML presents as a de novo entity, but in a minority, it is a secondary malignancy. The diagnostic classification of pediatric AML includes a combination of morphology, cytochemistry, immunophenotyping and molecular genetics. Outcome is mainly dependent on the initial response to treatment and molecular and cytogenetic aberrations. Treatment consists of a combination of intensive anthracycline- and cytarabine-containing chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation in selected genetic high-risk cases or slow responders. In general, ~30% of all pediatric AML patients will suffer from relapse, whereas 5%-10% of the patients will die due to disease complications or the side-effects of the treatment. Targeted therapy may enhance anti-leukemic efficacy and minimize treatment-related morbidity and mortality, but requires detailed knowledge of the genetic abnormalities and aberrant pathways involved in leukemogenesis. These efforts towards future personalized therapy in a rare disease, such as pediatric AML, require intensive international collaboration in order to enhance the survival rates of pediatric AML, while aiming to reduce long-term toxicity.

  11. Kommunikation mit Mitarbeitern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spychala, Anne; Fleischmann, Jürgen

    Kommunikation ist der Austausch von Nachrichten und Informationen zwischen Mitarbeitern eines Unternehmens (O'Hair et al. 1997). Dieser Austausch kann persönlich, aber z.B. auch per Telefon, E-Mail oder durch Computersysteme erfolgen. In diesem Kapitel betrachten wir die persönliche Kommunikation zwischen Vorgesetzten und Mitarbeitern. Zur persönlichen Kommunikation mit Mitarbeitern zählen sowohl formelle Gespräche mit Mitarbeitern als auch eher informelle Gespräche zwischen Tür und Angel. Die Gespräche können dabei mit einzelnen Mitarbeitern (z.B. jährliches Mitarbeitergespräch) oder mit Gruppen von Mitarbeitern (z.B. regelmäßige Projekt- oder Teambesprechungen) stattfinden.

  12. CBFβ is critical for AML1-ETO and TEL-AML1 activity

    PubMed Central

    Roudaia, Liya; Cheney, Matthew D.; Manuylova, Ekaterina; Chen, Wei; Morrow, Michelle; Park, Sangho; Lee, Chung-Tsai; Kaur, Prabhjot; Williams, Owen

    2009-01-01

    AML1-ETO and TEL-AML1 are chimeric proteins resulting from the t(8;21)(q22;q22) in acute myeloid leukemia, and the t(12;21)(p13;q22) in pre-B-cell leukemia, respectively. The Runt domain of AML1 in both proteins mediates DNA binding and heterodimerization with the core binding factor β (CBFβ) subunit. To determine whether CBFβ is required for AML1-ETO and TEL-AML1 activity, we introduced amino acid substitutions into the Runt domain that disrupt heterodimerization with CBFβ but not DNA binding. We show that CBFβ contributes to AML1-ETO's inhibition of granulocyte differentiation, is essential for its ability to enhance the clonogenic potential of primary mouse bone marrow cells, and is indispensable for its cooperativity with the activated receptor tyrosine kinase TEL-PDGFβR in generating acute myeloid leukemia in mice. Similarly, CBFβ is essential for TEL-AML1's ability to promote self-renewal of B cell precursors in vitro. These studies validate the Runt domain/CBFβ interaction as a therapeutic target in core binding factor leukemias. PMID:19179469

  13. AML in 2016: Where we are now?

    PubMed

    Rowe, Jacob M

    2016-12-01

    A high relapse rate for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is still a major barrier to the long-term survival of these patients. Nevertheless, considerable progress has been made both in the biology and therapy of the disease. Specifically, progress has been made in the areas of integrated genomic analysis for prognosis, the widening application of minimal residual disease (MRD) monitoring in clinical practice, the development of new agents, and the increasing use of drugs, such as IDH and FLT3 inhibitors, as a bridge to transplant. Continued progress and inquiry into these and other areas are essential to improve the survival outcome for adult patients with AML.

  14. Prognostic Factors in Childhood Leukemia (ALL or AML)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diagnosis, and Types Prognostic Factors in Childhood Leukemia (ALL or AML) Certain factors that can affect a ... myelogenous leukemia (AML). Prognostic factors for children with ALL Children with ALL are often divided into risk ...

  15. The role of the proteasome in AML

    PubMed Central

    Csizmar, C M; Kim, D-H; Sachs, Z

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is deadly hematologic malignancy. Despite a well-characterized genetic and molecular landscape, targeted therapies for AML have failed to significantly improve clinical outcomes. Over the past decade, proteasome inhibition has been demonstrated to be an effective therapeutic strategy in several hematologic malignancies. Proteasome inhibitors, such as bortezomib and carfilzomib, have become mainstays of treatment for multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma. In light of this success, there has been a surge of literature exploring both the role of the proteasome and the effects of proteasome inhibition in AML. Pre-clinical studies have demonstrated that proteasome inhibition disrupts proliferative cell signaling pathways, exhibits cytotoxic synergism with other chemotherapeutics and induces autophagy of cancer-related proteins. Meanwhile, clinical trials incorporating bortezomib into combination chemotherapy regimens have reported a range of responses in AML patients, with complete remission rates >80% in some cases. Taken together, this preclinical and clinical evidence suggests that inhibition of the proteasome may be efficacious in this disease. In an effort to focus further investigation into this area, these recent studies and their findings are reviewed here. PMID:27911437

  16. Abdichtungen mit Bitumenbahnen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahn, Axel C.; Unger, Wolfram

    Das Werk Bauwerksabdichtung von Karl Lufsky, im allgemeinen Sprachgebrauch auch Der Lufsky genannt, war immer das Standardwerk für Flächenabdichtungen mit Bitumenwerkstoffen. Karl Lufsky war erst Mitarbeiter des Geschäftsführers Otto Latendorf der 1924 in Berlin gegründeten Firma ARIDO Abdichtungs-GmbH und später ihr Geschäftsführer [8.1]. Eine Baustelle war seit 1950 der Keller der neuen Sowjetischen Botschaft Unter den Linden. Eines Tages sprach dort einer der russischen Ingenieur-Offiziere Otto Latendorf an und fragte ihn, ob er wohl eine schriftliche Zusammenfassung aller technischen Probleme der bituminösen Bauwerksabdichtung für ihn verfassen könnte. Mit dieser Schrift würde er sich dann zu seinem Abschlussexamen in Moskau melden. Vergüten wollte er den Arbeitsaufwand mit Lebensmittellieferungen. Otto Latendorf willigte ein und machte sich gemeinsam mit Karl Lufsky an die Arbeit. Dies war offensichtlich der Impuls für Karl Lufsky, einige Zeit später im Leipziger Teubner Verlag die erste Auflage des Buchs "Bauwerksabdichtungen“ herauszugeben, womit der Grundstein gelegt wurde, aus einer "Moskauer Examensarbeit“ in den letzten 50 Jahren ein bedeutendes Fachbuch zu machen.

  17. Treatment of older patients with AML.

    PubMed

    Büchner, Thomas; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Wörmann, Bernhard; Schoch, Claudia; Haferlach, Torsten; Schnittger, Susanne; Kern, Wolfgang; Aul, Carlo; Lengfelder, Eva; Schumacher, Andrea; Reichle, Albrecht; Staib, Peter; Balleisen, Leopold; Eimermacher, Hartmut; Grüneisen, Andreas; Rasche, Herbert; Sauerland, Maria Cristina; Heinecke, Achim; Mesters, Rolf M; Serve, Hubert L; Kienast, Joachim; Hiddemann, Wolfgang

    2005-11-01

    Undertreatment of the older patients with AML can explain, in part, their inferior outcome when compared with that in younger patients. In analogy to the benefit of patients under the age of 60 years from high-dose AraC there are dosage related therapeutic effects in the patients over 60 years in particular for daunorubicin in the induction treatment, and for maintenance versus no maintenance in the post-remission treatment. Utilizing these effects can partly overcome the mostly unfavorable disease biology in older age AML, whereas the role of risk factors involved is not completely understood and the concept of dose-response needs to be requestioned. We recommend an adequate dosage of 60 mg/(m2day) daunorubicin for 3 days in a combination with standard dose AraC and 6-thioguanine given for induction and consolidation and followed by a prolonged monthly maintenance chemotherapy. Further improvements in supportive care may help delivering additional anti-leukemic cytotoxicity. As a novel approach, reduced toxicity preparative regimens may open up allogeneic transplantation for older patients with AML. Other new options like MDR modulators, antibody targeted therapies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors are under clinical investigation. A questionnaire study in patients with AML showed that according to patients' self-assessment intensive and prolonged treatment did not result in decreasing quality of life. This finding did not vary by age under or above 60 years. Given the actual median age in this disease being more than 60 years the adequate management of older age AML remains as the major challenge.

  18. Update on rational targeted therapy in AML

    PubMed Central

    Shafer, Danielle; Grant, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains a challenge to both patients and clinicians. Despite improvements in our understanding of the disease, treatment has changed minimally and outcomes remain poor for the majority of patients. Within the last decade, there have been an increasing number of potential targets and pathways identified for development in AML. The classes of agents described in this review include but are not limited to epigenetic modifiers such as IDH inhibitors, BET inhibitors, and HDAC inhibitors as well as cell cycle and signaling inhibitors such as Aurora kinase inhibitors and CDK inhibitors. While the developments are encouraging, it is unlikely that targeting a single pathway will result in long-term disease control. Accordingly, we will also highlight potential rational partners for the novel agents described herein. PMID:26972558

  19. Update on rational targeted therapy in AML.

    PubMed

    Shafer, Danielle; Grant, Steven

    2016-07-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains a challenge to both patients and clinicians. Despite improvements in our understanding of the disease, treatment has changed minimally and outcomes remain poor for the majority of patients. Within the last decade, there have been an increasing number of potential targets and pathways identified for development in AML. The classes of agents described in this review include but are not limited to epigenetic modifiers such as IDH inhibitors, BET inhibitors, and HDAC inhibitors as well as cell cycle and signaling inhibitors such as Aurora kinase inhibitors and CDK inhibitors. While the developments are encouraging, it is unlikely that targeting a single pathway will result in long-term disease control. Accordingly, we will also highlight potential rational partners for the novel agents described herein.

  20. Enhanced sensitivity to glucocorticoids in cytarabine-resistant AML.

    PubMed

    Malani, D; Murumägi, A; Yadav, B; Kontro, M; Eldfors, S; Kumar, A; Karjalainen, R; Majumder, M M; Ojamies, P; Pemovska, T; Wennerberg, K; Heckman, C; Porkka, K; Wolf, M; Aittokallio, T; Kallioniemi, O

    2016-12-02

    We sought to identify drugs that could counteract cytarabine resistance in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) by generating eight resistant variants from MOLM-13 and SHI-1 AML cell lines by long-term drug treatment. These cells were compared with 66 ex vivo chemorefractory samples from cytarabine-treated AML patients. The models and patient cells were subjected to genomic and transcriptomic profiling and high-throughput testing with 250 emerging and clinical oncology compounds. Genomic profiling uncovered deletion of the deoxycytidine kinase (DCK) gene in both MOLM-13- and SHI-1-derived cytarabine-resistant variants and in an AML patient sample. Cytarabine-resistant SHI-1 variants and a subset of chemorefractory AML patient samples showed increased sensitivity to glucocorticoids that are often used in treatment of lymphoid leukemia but not AML. Paired samples taken from AML patients before treatment and at relapse also showed acquisition of glucocorticoid sensitivity. Enhanced glucocorticoid sensitivity was only seen in AML patient samples that were negative for the FLT3 mutation (P=0.0006). Our study shows that development of cytarabine resistance is associated with increased sensitivity to glucocorticoids in a subset of AML, suggesting a new therapeutic strategy that should be explored in a clinical trial of chemorefractory AML patients carrying wild-type FLT3.Leukemia advance online publication, 2 December 2016; doi:10.1038/leu.2016.314.

  1. Chemosensitizing AML cells by targeting bone marrow endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bosse, Raphael C; Wasserstrom, Briana; Meacham, Amy; Wise, Elizabeth; Drusbosky, Leylah; Walter, Glenn A; Chaplin, David J; Siemann, Dietmar W; Purich, Daniel L; Cogle, Christopher R

    2016-05-01

    Refractory disease is the greatest challenge in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Blood vessels may serve as sanctuary sites for AML. When AML cells were co-cultured with bone marrow endothelial cells (BMECs), a greater proportion of leukemia cells were in G0/G1. This led us to a strategy of targeting BMECs with tubulin-binding combretastatins, causing BMECs to lose their flat phenotype, degrade their cytoskeleton, cease growth, and impair migration despite unchanged BMEC viability and metabolism. Combretastatins also caused downregulation of BMEC adhesion molecules known to tether AML cells, including vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 and vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin. When AML-BMEC co-cultures were treated with combretastatins, a significantly greater proportion of AML cells dislodged from BMECs and entered the G2/M cell cycle, suggesting enhanced susceptibility to cell cycle agents. Indeed, the combination of combretastatins and cytotoxic chemotherapy enhanced additive AML cell death. In vivo mice xenograft studies confirmed this finding by revealing complete AML regression after treatment with combretastatins and cytotoxic chemotherapy. Beyond highlighting the pathologic role of BMECs in the leukemia microenvironment as a protective reservoir of disease, these results support a new strategy for using vascular-targeting combretastatins in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy to treat AML.

  2. New study reveals relatively few mutations in AML genomes - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators for The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network have detailed and broadly classified the genomic alterations that frequently underlie the development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

  3. Osteoblasts Protect AML Cells from SDF-1-Induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Kremer, Kimberly N.; Dudakovic, Amel; McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E.; Philips, Rachael L.; Hess, Allan D.; Smith, B. Douglas; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Karp, Judith E.; Kaufmann, Scott H.; Westendorf, Jennifer J.; Hedin, Karen E.

    2014-01-01

    The bone marrow provides a protective environment for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells that often allows leukemic stem cells to survive standard chemotherapeutic regimens. Targeting these leukemic stem cells within the bone marrow is critical for preventing relapse. We recently demonstrated that SDF-1, a chemokine abundant in the bone marrow, induces apoptosis in AML cell lines and in patient samples expressing high levels of its receptor, CXCR4. Here we show that a subset of osteoblast lineage cells within the bone marrow can protect AML cells from undergoing apoptosis in response to the SDF-1 naturally present in that location. In co-culture systems, osteoblasts at various stages of differentiation protected AML cell lines and patient isolates from SDF-1-induced apoptosis. The differentiation of the osteoblast cell lines, MC3T3 and W-20-17, mediated this protection via a cell contact-independent mechanism. In contrast, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal cells, the precursors of osteoblasts, induced apoptosis in AML cells via a CXCR4-dependent mechanism and failed to protect AML cells from exogenously added SDF-1. These results indicate that osteoblasts in the process of differentiation potently inhibit the SDF-1-driven apoptotic pathway of CXCR4-expressing AML cells residing in the bone marrow. Drugs targeting this protective mechanism could potentially provide a new approach to treating AML by enhancing the SDF-1-induced apoptosis of AML cells residing within the bone marrow microenvironment. PMID:24851270

  4. Blastic leukaemias (AML): a biologist's view.

    PubMed

    Cáceres-Cortés, Julio Roberto

    2013-05-01

    Acute myeloblastic leukaemia is characterised by the extreme clonal proliferation of haematopoietic precursor cells with abnormal or arrested differentiation. Chemotherapy of acute leukaemia is channelled towards the reduction and eradication of leukaemic cells. However, relapse is generally assumed to occur in residual host cells, which are refractory to or elude therapy. The cancer stem cell hypothesis has gained considerable importance in recent years and could interpret this behaviour. This persuasive theory states that cells within a tumour are organised in a hierarchy similar to that of normal tissues and are maintained by a small subset of cells responsible for tumour dormancy. These cells, defined as 'tumour initiating cells' (TICs), possess several properties of normal tissue stem cells. Recently, the TICs associated with AML have been shown to comprise distinct, hierarchically arranged classes similar to those observed for haematopoietic stem cells. We know now that the growth and survival of blasts in AML are driven by the same growth factors that stimulate normal cells. Furthermore, direct evidence of the role of membrane stem cell factor and its receptor c-Kit in cell-cell interactions and cell survival in primary AML blasts have been provided, defining the importance of juxtacrine stimulation. Inhibition of c-Kit signalling induces combinations of cell death: autophagy (compensatory mechanism towards survival) and apoptosis. While recent work confirmed that c-Kit inhibitors reduce cancer cell proliferation, it also demonstrated that future inappropriate prescriptions could cause normal tissue deterioration. The purpose of this paper was to review some of the salient features of leukaemic blasts in support of the proposal that research into neoplasia be increased. Rather than presenting the details of various studies, I have attempted to indicate general areas in which work has been done or is in progress. It is hoped that this survey of the subject

  5. The t(8;21) fusion protein interferes with AML-1B-dependent transcriptional activation.

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, S; Lenny, N; Hiebert, S W

    1995-01-01

    The AML-1/CBF beta transcription factor complex is targeted by both the t(8;21) and the inv(16) chromosomal alterations, which are frequently observed in acute myelogenous leukemia. AML-1 is a site-specific DNA-binding protein that recognizes the enhancer core motif TGTGGT. The t(8;21) translocation fuses the first 177 amino acids of AML-1 to MTG8 (also known as ETO), generating a chimeric protein that retains the DNA-binding domain of AML-1. Analysis of endogenous AML-1 DNA-binding complexes suggested the presence of at least two AML-1 isoforms. Accordingly, we screened a human B-cell cDNA library and isolated a larger, potentially alternatively spliced, form of AML1, termed AML1B. AML-1B is a protein of 53 kDa that binds to a consensus AML-1-binding site and complexes with CBF beta. Subcellular fractionation experiments demonstrated that both AML-1 and AML-1/ETO are efficiently extracted from the nucleus under ionic conditions but that AML-1B is localized to a salt-resistant nuclear compartment. Analysis of the transcriptional activities of AML-1, AML-1B, and AML-1/ETO demonstrated that only AML-1B activates transcription from the T-cell receptor beta enhancer. Mixing experiments indicated that AML-1/ETO can efficiently block AML-1B-dependent transcriptional activation, suggesting that the t(8;21) translocation creates a dominant interfering protein. PMID:7891692

  6. Advanced Manned Launch System (AMLS) study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehrlich, Carl F., Jr.; Potts, Jack; Brown, Jerry; Schell, Ken; Manley, Mary; Chen, Irving; Earhart, Richard; Urrutia, Chuck; Randolph, Ray; Morris, Jim

    1992-01-01

    To assure national leadership in space operations and exploration in the future, NASA must be able to provide cost effective and operationally efficient space transportation. Several NASA studies and the joint NASA/DoD Space Transportation Architecture Studies (STAS) have shown the need for a multi-vehicle space transportation system with designs driven by enhanced operations and low costs. NASA is currently studying an advanced manned launch system (AMLS) approach to transport crew and cargo to the Space Station Freedom. Several single and multiple stage systems from air-breathing to all-rocket concepts are being examined in a series of studies potential replacements for the Space Shuttle launch system in the 2000-2010 time frame. Rockwell International Corporation, under contract to the NASA Langley Research Center, has analyzed a two-stage all-rocket concept to determine whether this class of vehicles is appropriate for the AMLS function. The results of the pre-phase A study are discussed.

  7. [AML treatment strategy based on cytogenetic abnormalities and somatic mutations].

    PubMed

    Imai, Yoichi

    2015-10-01

    In addition to morphological and histocytochemical analyses of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), data on cytogenetic abnormalities and somatic mutations are used for classification of AML. The risk stratification based on these examinations facilitates determining the treatment strategy for AML. Cytogenetic risk category definitions by the Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG), Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB), and The Medical Research Council (MRC) classify AML patients into favorable, intermediate, and adverse groups. Approximately 80% of patients in the intermediate group have a normal karyotype and the importance of molecular genetic analyses in these patients is increasing. Somatic mutations of NPM1, CEBPA, and FLT3 are known to be related to the prognosis of AML patients. The European LeukemiaNet (ELN) introduced risk stratification for AML patients based on cytogenetic abnormalities and NPM1, CEBPA, and FLT3 mutations. This risk stratification can be used to select only chemotherapy or chemotherapy with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation as consolidation therapy for individual AML patients. Development of molecular targeted therapies against FLT3 or IDH mutations is in progress and these novel therapies are expected to contribute to improving the prognosis of AML patients.

  8. Nassi-Schneiderman Diagram in HTML Based on AML

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menyhárt, László

    2013-01-01

    In an earlier work I defined an extension of XML called Algorithm Markup Language (AML) for easy and understandable coding in an IDE which supports XML editing (e.g. NetBeans). The AML extension contains annotations and native language (English or Hungarian) tag names used when coding our algorithm. This paper presents a drawing tool with which…

  9. How I treat FLT3-mutated AML

    PubMed Central

    Pratz, Keith W.

    2017-01-01

    FLT3-mutated acute myeloid leukemia (AML), despite not being recognized as a distinct entity in the World Health Organization (WHO) classification system, is readily recognized as a particular challenge by clinical specialists who treat acute leukemia. This is especially true with regards to the patients harboring the most common type of FLT3 mutation, the internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD) mutation. Here we present 4 patient cases from our institution and discuss how our management reflects what we have learned about this subtype of the disease. We also reflect on how we anticipate the management might change in the near future, with the emergence of clinically useful tyrosine kinase inhibitors. PMID:27872057

  10. MIT-CSR XIS Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This report outlines the proposers' progress toward MIT's contribution to the X-Ray Imaging Spectrometer (XIS) experiment on the Japanese ASTRO-E mission. The report discusses electrical system design, mechanical system design, and ground support equipment.

  11. MIT research in telerobotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheridan, T. B.

    1987-01-01

    Ongoing MIT research in telerobotics (vehicles capable of some autonomous sensing and manipulating, having some remote supervisory control by people) and teleoperation (vehicles for sensing and manipulating which are fully controlled remotely by people) is discussed. The current efforts mix human and artificial intelligence/control. The idea of adjustable impedance at either end of pure master-slave teleoperation, and simultaneous coordinated control of teleoperator/telerobotic systems which have more than six degrees of freedom (e.g., a combined vehicle and arm, each with five or six DOF) are discussed. A new cable-controlled parallel link arm which offers many advantages over conventional arms for space is briefly described. Predictor displays to compensate for time delay in teleoperator loops, the use of state estimation to help human control decisions in space, and ongoing research in supervisory command language are covered. Finally, efforts to build a human flyable real-time dynamic computer-graphic telerobot simulator are described. These projects represent most, but not all, of the telerobotics research in our laboratory, supported by JPL, NASA Ames and NOAA.

  12. Microenvironmental hypoxia regulates FLT3 expression and biology in AML.

    PubMed

    Sironi, Silvia; Wagner, Michaela; Kuett, Alexander; Drolle, Heidrun; Polzer, Harald; Spiekermann, Karsten; Rieger, Christina; Fiegl, Michael

    2015-11-30

    Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) is a receptor tyrosine kinase constitutively expressed by acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) blasts. In addition, 25% of AML patients harbour a FLT3-ITD mutation, associated with inferior outcome due to increased relapse rate. Relapse might be propagated by interactions between AML blasts and the bone marrow microenvironment. Besides cellular elements of the microenvironment (e.g. mesenchymal stromal cells), bone marrow hypoxia has emerged as an additional crucial component. Hence, effects of hypoxia on FLT3 expression and biology could provide novel insight into AML biology. Here we show that 25% of AML patients down-regulate FLT3 expression on blasts in response to in vitro hypoxia (1% O2), which was independent of its mutational state. While virtually no AML cell lines regulate FLT3 in response to hypoxia, the down-regulation could be observed in Ba/F3 cells stably transfected with different FLT3 mutants. Hypoxia-mediated down-regulation was specific for FLT3, reversible and proteasome-dependent; with FLT3 half-life being significantly shorter at hypoxia. Also, PI-3K inhibition could partially abrogate down-regulation of FLT3. Hypoxia-mediated down-regulation of FLT3 conferred resistance against cytarabine in vitro. In conclusion, FLT3 expression in AML is dependent on the oxygen partial pressure, but response to hypoxia differs.

  13. Mitochondrial DNA damage by bleomycin induces AML cell death.

    PubMed

    Yeung, ManTek; Hurren, Rose; Nemr, Carine; Wang, Xiaoming; Hershenfeld, Samantha; Gronda, Marcela; Liyanage, Sanduni; Wu, Yan; Augustine, Jeevan; Lee, Eric A; Spagnuolo, Paul A; Southall, Noel; Chen, Catherine; Zheng, Wei; Jeyaraju, Danny V; Minden, Mark D; Laposa, Rebecca; Schimmer, Aaron D

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondria contain multiple copies of their own 16.6 kb circular genome. To explore the impact of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage on mitochondrial (mt) function and viability of AML cells, we screened a panel of DNA damaging chemotherapeutic agents to identify drugs that could damage mtDNA. We identified bleomycin as an agent that damaged mtDNA in AML cells at concentrations that induced cell death. Bleomycin also induced mtDNA damage in primary AML samples. Consistent with the observed mtDNA damage, bleomycin reduced mt mass and basal oxygen consumption in AML cells. We also demonstrated that the observed mtDNA damage was functionally important for bleomycin-induced cell death. Finally, bleomycin delayed tumor growth in xenograft mouse models of AML and anti-leukemic concentrations of the drug induced mtDNA damage in AML cells preferentially over normal lung tissue. Taken together, mtDNA-targeted therapy may be an effective strategy to target AML cells and bleomycin could be useful in the treatment of this disease.

  14. When it comes to MRD, AML ≠ ALL.

    PubMed

    Paietta, Elisabeth

    2012-08-23

    Only the most specific main institutional affiliation is listed for Inside Blood authors, without indications of subdivisions, departments, parent institutions, or postal/geographic information. Please confirm or correct affiliation. Minimal residual disease (MRD) detection is standard of care in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL),(1) but not acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In this issue of Blood, an AML trial by Loken and colleagues from the Children's Oncology Group (COG) retrospectively demonstrates clinical significance of MRD.(2) These data reaffirm that AML-MRD is unlike ALL-MRD.

  15. MIT's interferometer CST testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyde, Tupper; Kim, ED; Anderson, Eric; Blackwood, Gary; Lublin, Leonard

    1990-01-01

    The MIT Space Engineering Research Center (SERC) has developed a controlled structures technology (CST) testbed based on one design for a space-based optical interferometer. The role of the testbed is to provide a versatile platform for experimental investigation and discovery of CST approaches. In particular, it will serve as the focus for experimental verification of CSI methodologies and control strategies at SERC. The testbed program has an emphasis on experimental CST--incorporating a broad suite of actuators and sensors, active struts, system identification, passive damping, active mirror mounts, and precision component characterization. The SERC testbed represents a one-tenth scaled version of an optical interferometer concept based on an inherently rigid tetrahedral configuration with collecting apertures on one face. The testbed consists of six 3.5 meter long truss legs joined at four vertices and is suspended with attachment points at three vertices. Each aluminum leg has a 0.2 m by 0.2 m by 0.25 m triangular cross-section. The structure has a first flexible mode at 31 Hz and has over 50 global modes below 200 Hz. The stiff tetrahedral design differs from similar testbeds (such as the JPL Phase B) in that the structural topology is closed. The tetrahedral design minimizes structural deflections at the vertices (site of optical components for maximum baseline) resulting in reduced stroke requirements for isolation and pointing of optics. Typical total light path length stability goals are on the order of lambda/20, with a wavelength of light, lambda, of roughly 500 nanometers. It is expected that active structural control will be necessary to achieve this goal in the presence of disturbances.

  16. Standard anatomical medullary locking (AML) versus tricalcium phosphate-coated AML femoral prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, D.W.C. (Bill); Davies, Donna M.; Beaupré, Lauren A.; Lavoie, Guy

    2001-01-01

    Objectives To compare the preliminary rate and amount of bony ingrowth and calcar resorption between patients receiving either a standard anatomical medullary locking (AML) or a tricalcium phosphate (TCP)-coated AML femoral prosthesis and to compare preliminary clinical results. Design A prospective, randomized, double-blind clinical trial. Setting An acute care tertiary institution. Patients Between January 1993 and March 1995, 92 patients underwent primary total hip arthroplasty (THA). They were randomized to 2 groups of 46 — a control group or a treatment group. Of the 46 subjects enrolled in each group, no significant differences were seen preoperatively with respect to age, sex, diagnosis, clinical and radiographic assessment. Seventy-one patients were followed up for 24 months. Interventions Insertion of either a standard AML femoral implant (control group) or a TCP-coated AML femoral implant (treatment group). Outcome measures The degree of hypertrophy, calcar atrophy and the number of spot welds on standard postoperative radiographs at 6, 12 and 24 months. Clinically, assessment according to the Société internationale de chirurgie orthopédique et de traumatologie (SICOT) scale and a 100-point visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain. Results There were no prosthetic stem revisions in either group at the 24-month follow-up. Radiographically, bony ingrowth was not significantly different in the TCP-coated stem, by χ2 analysis of the degree of hypertrophy and number of spot welds present. Also by χ2 analysis, the degree of calcar atrophy was not significantly different between groups. The mean VAS score for pain at 24 months was 12.5 for the control and 12.1 for the treatment group. No significant differences were seen in any of the clinical categories of the SICOT Scale over the 24-month interval. Conclusion The objective of TCP-coating — to increase the rate and amount of bony ingrowth while reducing the rate of calcar resorption in non-cemented THA

  17. Mouse models of human AML accurately predict chemotherapy response

    PubMed Central

    Zuber, Johannes; Radtke, Ina; Pardee, Timothy S.; Zhao, Zhen; Rappaport, Amy R.; Luo, Weijun; McCurrach, Mila E.; Yang, Miao-Miao; Dolan, M. Eileen; Kogan, Scott C.; Downing, James R.; Lowe, Scott W.

    2009-01-01

    The genetic heterogeneity of cancer influences the trajectory of tumor progression and may underlie clinical variation in therapy response. To model such heterogeneity, we produced genetically and pathologically accurate mouse models of common forms of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and developed methods to mimic standard induction chemotherapy and efficiently monitor therapy response. We see that murine AMLs harboring two common human AML genotypes show remarkably diverse responses to conventional therapy that mirror clinical experience. Specifically, murine leukemias expressing the AML1/ETO fusion oncoprotein, associated with a favorable prognosis in patients, show a dramatic response to induction chemotherapy owing to robust activation of the p53 tumor suppressor network. Conversely, murine leukemias expressing MLL fusion proteins, associated with a dismal prognosis in patients, are drug-resistant due to an attenuated p53 response. Our studies highlight the importance of genetic information in guiding the treatment of human AML, functionally establish the p53 network as a central determinant of chemotherapy response in AML, and demonstrate that genetically engineered mouse models of human cancer can accurately predict therapy response in patients. PMID:19339691

  18. Mouse models of human AML accurately predict chemotherapy response.

    PubMed

    Zuber, Johannes; Radtke, Ina; Pardee, Timothy S; Zhao, Zhen; Rappaport, Amy R; Luo, Weijun; McCurrach, Mila E; Yang, Miao-Miao; Dolan, M Eileen; Kogan, Scott C; Downing, James R; Lowe, Scott W

    2009-04-01

    The genetic heterogeneity of cancer influences the trajectory of tumor progression and may underlie clinical variation in therapy response. To model such heterogeneity, we produced genetically and pathologically accurate mouse models of common forms of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and developed methods to mimic standard induction chemotherapy and efficiently monitor therapy response. We see that murine AMLs harboring two common human AML genotypes show remarkably diverse responses to conventional therapy that mirror clinical experience. Specifically, murine leukemias expressing the AML1/ETO fusion oncoprotein, associated with a favorable prognosis in patients, show a dramatic response to induction chemotherapy owing to robust activation of the p53 tumor suppressor network. Conversely, murine leukemias expressing MLL fusion proteins, associated with a dismal prognosis in patients, are drug-resistant due to an attenuated p53 response. Our studies highlight the importance of genetic information in guiding the treatment of human AML, functionally establish the p53 network as a central determinant of chemotherapy response in AML, and demonstrate that genetically engineered mouse models of human cancer can accurately predict therapy response in patients.

  19. MIT Space Engineering Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawley, Edward F.; Miller, David W.

    1990-01-01

    The Space Engineering Research Center (SERC) at MIT, started in Jul. 1988, has completed two years of research. The Center is approaching the operational phase of its first testbed, is midway through the construction of a second testbed, and is in the design phase of a third. We presently have seven participating faculty, four participating staff members, ten graduate students, and numerous undergraduates. This report reviews the testbed programs, individual graduate research, other SERC activities not funded by the Center, interaction with non-MIT organizations, and SERC milestones. Published papers made possible by SERC funding are included at the end of the report.

  20. PU.1 downregulation in murine radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemia (AML): from molecular mechanism to human AML

    PubMed Central

    Verbiest, Tom; Bouffler, Simon; Nutt, Stephen L.; Badie, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor PU.1, encoded by the murine Sfpi1 gene (SPI1 in humans), is a member of the Ets transcription factor family and plays a vital role in commitment and maturation of the myeloid and lymphoid lineages. Murine studies directly link primary acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and decreased PU.1 expression in specifically modified strains. Similarly, a radiation-induced chromosome 2 deletion and subsequent Sfpi1 point mutation in the remaining allele lead to murine radiation-induced AML. Consistent with murine data, heterozygous deletion of the SPI1 locus and mutation of the −14kb SPI1 upstream regulatory element were described previously in human primary AML, although they are rare events. Other mechanisms linked to PU.1 downregulation in human AML include TP53 deletion, FLT3-ITD mutation and the recurrent AML1-ETO [t(8;21)] and PML-RARA [t(15;17)] translocations. This review provides an up-to-date overview on our current understanding of the involvement of PU.1 in the initiation and development of radiation-induced AML, together with recommendations for future murine and human studies. PMID:25750172

  1. RUNX1/AML1 DNA-binding domain and ETO/MTG8 NHR2-dimerization domain are critical to AML1-ETO9a leukemogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ming; Ahn, Eun-Young; Hiebert, Scott W.

    2009-01-01

    The 8;21 translocation, which involves the gene encoding the RUNX family DNA-binding transcription factor AML1 (RUNX1) on chromosome 21 and the ETO (MTG8) gene on chromosome 8, generates AML1-ETO fusion proteins. Previous analyses have demonstrated that full-length AML1-ETO blocks AML1 function and requires additional mutagenic events to promote leukemia. More recently, we have identified an alternatively spliced form of AML1-ETO, AML1-ETO9a, from t(8;21) acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patient samples. AML1-ETO9a lacks the C-terminal NHR3 and NHR4 domains of AML1-ETO and is highly leukemogenic in the mouse model. Here, we report that the AML1 DNA-binding domain and the ETO NHR2-dimerization domain, but not the ETO NHR1 domain, are critical for the induction of AML by AML1-ETO9a. A region between NHR1 and NHR2 affects latency of leukemogenesis. These results provide valuable insight into further analysis of the molecular mechanism of t(8;21) in leukemogenesis. PMID:19036704

  2. MIT January Operational Internship Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosanac, Natasha; DeVivero, Charlie; James, Jillian; Perez-Martinez, Carla; Pino, Wendy; Wang, Andrew; Willett, Ezekiel; Williams, Kwami

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the MIT January Operational Internship Experience (JOIE) program. The topics include: 1) Landing and Recovery; 2) Transportation; 3) Shuttle Processing; 4) Constellation Processing; 5) External Tank; 6) Launch Pad; 7) Ground Operations; 8) Hypergolic Propellants; 9) Environmental; 10) Logistics; 11) Six Sigma; 12) Systems Engineering; and 13) Human Factors.

  3. [Research advances of IDH gene mutation and AML].

    PubMed

    Sun, Ming-Dong; Zheng, Yong-Qin

    2014-10-01

    The isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) gene mutation has been recently found, which may be involved in the occurrence of leukemia. The incidence of IDH gene mutation in the patients with adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is high, especially in the AML patients with normal karyotype. Different subtype and molecular biology of IDH display a different effect on the AML prognosis. This gene mutation is related with treatment response, residual, recurrence of leukemia, and it could be a sign of test and a monitoring tool of minimal residual disease (MRD). The IDH gene mutation may be an index for predicting prognosis and guiding therapy. In this article, the research progress of IDH gene mutation and its correlation with acute myeloid leukemia, especially with the clinical characteristics,are reviewed.

  4. Controversies in treatment of AML: case-based discussion.

    PubMed

    Stock, Wendy

    2006-01-01

    Treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in older adults remains a tremendous challenge. Standard approaches to treatment have resulted in progression-free survival in only a small minority of patients with AML over the age of 60. Elucidation of the molecular genetic events that contribute to the pathogenesis of AML in older patients are providing insights into mechanisms of resistance. This knowledge is also providing new opportunities to begin to refine and direct novel therapies for these heterogeneous diseases. In this case-based review, prognostic factors for treatment outcome in older adults will be covered along with discussion of a risk-based approach to potential therapeutic options, ranging from palliative care to novel therapies and reduced-intensity allogenic transplant.

  5. Ten uncommon and unusual variants of renal angiomyolipoma (AML): radiologic-pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Schieda, N; Kielar, A Z; Al Dandan, O; McInnes, M D F; Flood, T A

    2015-02-01

    Classic (triphasic) renal angiomyolipoma (AML) is currently classified as a neoplasm of perivascular epithelioid cells. For diagnosis of AML, the use of thin-section non-contrast enhanced CT (NECT) improves diagnostic accuracy; however, identifying gross fat within a very small AML is challenging and often better performed with chemical-shift MRI. Although the presence of gross intra-tumoural fat is essentially diagnostic of AML; co-existing intra-tumoural fat and calcification may represent renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Differentiating AML from retroperitoneal sarcoma can be difficult when AML is large; the feeding vessel and claw signs are suggestive imaging findings. AML can haemorrhage, with intra-tumoural aneurysm size >5 mm a more specific predictor of future haemorrhage than tumor size >4 cm. Diagnosis of AML in the setting of acute haemorrhage is complex; comparison studies or follow-up imaging may be required. Not all AML contain gross fat and imaging features of AML without visible fat overlap with RCC; however, homogeneity, hyperdensity at NECT, low T2-weighted signal intensity and, microscopic fat are suggestive features. Patients with tuberous sclerosis often demonstrate a combination of classic and minimal fat AML, but are also at a slightly increased risk for RCC and should be imaged cautiously. Several rare pathological variants of AML exist including AML with epithelial cysts and epithelioid AML, which have distinct imaging characteristics. Classic AML, although benign, can be locally invasive and the rare epithelioid AML can be frankly malignant. The purpose of this review is to highlight the imaging manifestations of 10 uncommon and unusual variants of AML using pathological correlation.

  6. Wetland development as a portion of AML reclamation

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, W.L.

    1990-12-31

    The goal of Abandoned Mine Land (AML) reclamation is the development a multi-user land use that enhances the sites positive characteristics and eliminates negative ones. The AML program in the State of Kansas developed and reclaimed a large coal slurry disposal area by the use of wetlands. The main objective was to eliminate the acid mine drainage from the coal slurry and coarse fuel refuse areas but at the same time retain the wildlife habitat that had naturally developed on site. Selective flooding of various areas by the use of a series of small dams was the selected reclamation option. The project is now completed and is working as planned.

  7. Educational Outreach at MIT PSFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivenberg, P.; Thomas, P.; Censabella, V.

    2001-10-01

    At the MIT PSFC student and staff volunteers work together to increase the public's knowledge of fusion and plasma-related experiments. Seeking to generate excitement about science and engineering, the PSFC hosts a number of outreach activities throughout the year, including Middle and High School Outreach Days. Key to the success of these tours is the interactive ``C-Mod, Jr.," which helps students understand magnetic confinement in MIT's Alcator C-Mod tokamak. The PSFC also has an in-school science demonstration program on the theme of magnetism. As ``Mr. Magnet" Technical Supervisor Paul Thomas brings a truck-load of hands-on demonstrations to K-12 schools, challenging students to help him with experiments. While teaching fundamentals of magnetism and electricity he shows that science is fun for all, and that any student can have a career in science. This year he reached 77 schools -- 30,000 teachers and students. We have also collaborated with the MIT Museum to create an interactive plasma demonstration device which students and the general public can use to create plasmas from different gasses. Pinch and deflection magnets are moveable along the axis of the display, allowing investigation of the magnetic behavior of plasmas.

  8. MLN0128, a novel mTOR kinase inhibitor, disrupts survival signaling and triggers apoptosis in AML and AML stem/ progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhihong; Wang, Rui-Yu; Qiu, Yi Hua; Mak, Duncan H; Coombes, Kevin; Yoo, Suk Young; Zhang, Qi; Jessen, Katti; Liu, Yi; Rommel, Christian; Fruman, David A; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Kornblau, Steven M; Andreeff, Michael; Konopleva, Marina

    2016-08-23

    mTOR activation leads to enhanced survival signaling in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. The active-site mTOR inhibitors (asTORi) represent a promising new approach to targeting mTOR in AKT/mTOR signaling. MLN0128 is an orally-administered, second-generation asTORi, currently in clinical development. We examined the anti-leukemic effects and the mechanisms of action of MLN0128 in AML cell lines and primary samples, with a particular focus on its effect in AML stem/progenitor cells. MLN0128 inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in AML by attenuating the activity of mTOR complex 1 and 2. Using time-of-flight mass cytometry, we demonstrated that MLN0128 selectively targeted and functionally inhibited AML stem/progenitor cells with high AKT/mTOR signaling activity. Using the reverse-phase protein array technique, we measured expression and phosphorylation changes in response to MLN0128 in 151 proteins from 24 primary AML samples and identified several pro-survival pathways that antagonize MLN0128-induced cellular stress. A combined blockade of AKT/mTOR signaling and these pro-survival pathways facilitated AML cell killing. Our findings provide a rationale for the clinical use of MLN0128 to target AML and AML stem/progenitor cells, and support the use of combinatorial multi-targeted approaches in AML therapy.

  9. MLN0128, a novel mTOR kinase inhibitor, disrupts survival signaling and triggers apoptosis in AML and AML stem/ progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Zhihong; Wang, Rui-Yu; Qiu, Yi Hua; Mak, Duncan H.; Coombes, Kevin; Yoo, Suk Young; Zhang, Qi; Jessen, Katti; Liu, Yi; Rommel, Christian; Fruman, David A.; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Kornblau, Steven M.; Andreeff, Michael; Konopleva, Marina

    2016-01-01

    mTOR activation leads to enhanced survival signaling in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. The active-site mTOR inhibitors (asTORi) represent a promising new approach to targeting mTOR in AKT/mTOR signaling. MLN0128 is an orally-administered, second-generation asTORi, currently in clinical development. We examined the anti-leukemic effects and the mechanisms of action of MLN0128 in AML cell lines and primary samples, with a particular focus on its effect in AML stem/progenitor cells. MLN0128 inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in AML by attenuating the activity of mTOR complex 1 and 2. Using time-of-flight mass cytometry, we demonstrated that MLN0128 selectively targeted and functionally inhibited AML stem/progenitor cells with high AKT/mTOR signaling activity. Using the reverse-phase protein array technique, we measured expression and phosphorylation changes in response to MLN0128 in 151 proteins from 24 primary AML samples and identified several pro-survival pathways that antagonize MLN0128-induced cellular stress. A combined blockade of AKT/mTOR signaling and these pro-survival pathways facilitated AML cell killing. Our findings provide a rationale for the clinical use of MLN0128 to target AML and AML stem/progenitor cells, and support the use of combinatorial multi-targeted approaches in AML therapy. PMID:27391151

  10. An introduction to MIT mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Wang, C.; Xu, J.

    2012-12-01

    MIT is a Chinese mission proposed to lunch following Double Star and KuaFu project. The mission targets at the material coupling of the earth's magnetosphere, ionosphere and thermosphere. Implementing the mission will further our understanding of the sun-earth system, characterize the impact of solar activity on Earth's space environment, improve the security for man-made spacecraft. The mission's science objectives include the mechanism and the origin of outflow oxygen ions and other related outstanding scientific questions. The mission plans four satellites: two of them have polar circular orbit at the lower attitude of 500km*1000km; the other two have other two have elliptical orbit of 6400km*43000km with angle 75°. These altitudes are the key regions for the acceleration of the outflow oxygen ions. The proposed payloads are particles detectors, field detectors, aurora and neutral imaging system. These payloads will measure the plasma compositions and the electromagnetic waves, therefore determine the key factors for the oxygen ions to gain energy and flow upward. In this paper, we report the detailed orbit, payload and the current status for the MIT mission.

  11. On the trail of mutations at MIT

    SciTech Connect

    Nadis, S.

    1996-02-01

    This segment, which falls under NIEHS News, describes MIT`s Center for Environmental Health Sciences (CEHS), which is separated into four areas: air quality, water quality, analytical chemistry, and genetics and toxicology. The lab offers a unique consortium between scientists and engineers to examine the current problem of environmental chemical exposure and its relation to mutations and disease. 4 figs.

  12. Mutation position within evolutionary subclonal architecture in AML.

    PubMed

    Welch, John S

    2014-10-01

    Cytogenetic data suggest that acute myeloid leukemia (AML) develops through a process of branching evolution, especially during relapse and progression. Recent genomic data from AML cases using digital sequencing, temporal comparisons, xenograft cloning, and single-cell analysis indicate that most, if not all, AML cases emerge through branching evolution. According to a review of the current literature, the balanced translocations (t[15;17], t[8;21], and inv[16]) and nucleotide variants in DNMT3A and TET2 most commonly occur in the founding clone at diagnosis. These mutations are rarely gained or lost at relapse, and the latter 2 mutations are observed in elderly subjects with mosaic hematopoiesis antedating overt leukemia. In contrast, +8, +13, +22, -X, -Y, and nucleotide variants in FLT3, NRAS/KRAS, WT1, and KIT frequently occur in subclones and are observed either to emerge or to be lost at relapse. Because drugs that target mutations within a subclone are unlikely to eliminate all leukemic cells, it will be essential to understand not only which mutations a patient has but also how they organize within the leukemic subclonal architecture.

  13. Carnitine transporter CT2 (SLC22A16) is over-expressed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and target knockdown reduces growth and viability of AML cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan; Hurren, Rose; MacLean, Neil; Gronda, Marcela; Jitkova, Yulia; Sukhai, Mahadeo A; Minden, Mark D; Schimmer, Aaron D

    2015-08-01

    AML (acute myeloid leukemia) cells have a unique reliance on mitochondrial metabolism and fatty acid oxidation (FAO). Thus, blocking FAO is a potential therapeutic strategy to target these malignant cells. In the current study, we assessed plasma membrane carnitine transporters as novel therapeutic targets for AML. We examined the expression of the known plasma membrane carnitine transporters, OCTN1, OCTN2, and CT2 in AML cell lines and primary AML samples and compared expression to normal hematopoietic cells. Of the three carnitine transporters, CT2 demonstrated the greatest differential expression between AML and normal cells. Using shRNA, we knocked down CT2 and demonstrated that target knockdown impaired the function of the transporter. In addition, knockdown of CT2 reduced the growth and viability of AML cells with high expression of CT2 (OCI-AML2 and HL60), but not low expression. CT2 knockdown reduced basal oxygen consumption without a concomitant increase in glycolysis. Thus, CT2 may be a novel target for a subset of AML.

  14. Whole genome and transcriptome analysis of a novel AML cell line with a normal karyotype.

    PubMed

    Gosse, Géraldine; Celton, Magalie; Lamontagne, Vikie; Forest, Audrey; Wilhelm, Brian T

    2015-07-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) occurs when hematopoietic progenitor cells acquire genetic defects blocking the regulation of normal growth and differentiation. Although recurrent translocations have been identified in AML, almost half of adult AML patients present with a normal karyotype (NK-AML). While cell line models exist to study AML, they frequently have abnormal/unstable karyotypes, while primary cells from NK-AML patients are difficult to maintain in vitro. Here we provide a thorough molecular characterization of a recently established cell line, CG-SH, which has normal cytogenetics, representing a useful new model for NK-AML. Using high-throughput DNA sequencing, we first defined the genetic background of this cell line. In addition to identifying potentially deleterious SNVs in genes relevant to AML, we also found insertions in both GATA2 and EZH2, two genes previously linked to AML. We further characterized the growth of this model system in vitro with a cytokine mix that promotes faster cell growth. We assessed gene expression changes after the addition of cytokines to the culture media and found differential expression in genes implicated in proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation. Our results provide a detailed molecular characterization of genetic defects in this cell line derived from an NK-AML patient.

  15. CD56 and RUNX1 isoforms in AML prognosis and their therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Syed Z A; Motabi, Ibraheem H; Al-Shanqeeti, Ali

    2016-09-01

    Neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM/CD56) expression in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has been associated with extramedullary leukemia, multidrug resistance, shorter remission and survival. Recently, Bloomfield et al. published a succinct review of issues surrounding the AML prognostication and current therapeutics. However, we want to reiterate the prognostic value and therapeutic potential of CD56 that is frequently expressed in AML as was also reported by their own group earlier. In addition, novel RUNX1 isoforms contribute in controlling CD56 expression in AML cells. Anti-CD56 antibody therapy deserves exploration as an arsenal against AML patients expressing CD56. Relevantly, targeting RNA splicing machinery or RUNX1 isoform-specific siRNA may also become part of future therapeutic strategies for AML with CD56 overexpression.

  16. Spontaneous Remission in an Older Patient with Relapsed FLT3 ITD Mutant AML

    PubMed Central

    Mendler, Jason H.; Evans, Andrew; Deeb, George; Starostik, Petr; Wallace, Paul K.; Wang, Eunice S.

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous remission (SR) of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a very rare phenomenon. AML characterized by FLT3 internal tandem duplication (FLT3 ITD) is typically associated with an aggressive clinical course with rapid progression, relapse, and short overall survival in the absence of transplantation. We report here the first case of SR of FLT3 ITD mutant AML in the literature. Our patient was an elderly woman with relapsed NPM1 and FLT3 ITD mutant AML whose disease underwent SR for a brief duration without precipitating cause. We review the potential immune mechanisms underlying SR in AML and discuss the implications for novel immunotherapeutic approaches for FLT3 mutant AML. PMID:28127477

  17. Oncogenic pathways of AML1-ETO in acute myeloid leukemia: multifaceted manipulation of marrow maturation

    PubMed Central

    Elagib, Kamaleldin E.; Goldfarb, Adam N.

    2007-01-01

    The leukemic fusion protein AML1-ETO occurs frequently in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and has received much attention over the past decade. An initial model for its pathogenetic effects emphasized the conversion of a hematopoietic transcriptional activator, RUNX1 (or AML1), into a leukemogenic repressor which blocked myeloid differentiation at the level of target gene regulation. This view has been absorbed into a larger picture of AML1-ETO pathogenesis, encompassing dysregulation of hematopoietic stem cell homeostasis at several mechanistic levels. Recent reports have highlighted a multifaceted capacity of AML1-ETO directly to inhibit key hematopoietic transcription factors that function as tumor suppressors at several nodal points during hematopoietic differentiation. A new model is presented in which AML1-ETO coordinates expansion of the stem cell compartment with diminished lineage commitment and with genome instability. PMID:17125917

  18. DNMT3A mutation is a poor prognosis biomarker in AML: results of a meta-analysis of 4500 AML patients.

    PubMed

    Shivarov, Velizar; Gueorguieva, Ralitza; Stoimenov, Angel; Tiu, Ramon

    2013-11-01

    Somatic DNA methyl transferase 3A (DNMT3A) mutations have been recognized recently as recurrent molecular aberrations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The precise role of these mutations in leukemogenesis remains elusive but a number of studies have already been conducted to study their potential prognostic value in AML patients with variable results. We performed a meta-analysis on published data from over 4500 AML patients to provide robust evidence supporting DNMT3A mutation testing in clinical setting for AML patients. Our meta-analysis showed that DNMT3A mutations were associated with M4 and M5 AML subtypes. Those mutations conferred significantly worse prognosis with both shorter OS (p=0.0004) and shorter RFS (p=0.002). Notably, DNMT3A mutations appeared to be an independent adverse prognostic factor also in younger patients with normal cytogenetics AML (OS (p=0.01) and RFS (p=0.0005)) and also in the subgroup of patients with high risk genotypes defined according to the criteria of the European Leukemia Net (ELN) (OS (p=0.002)). Therefore, DNMT3A mutational status can improve the risk stratification of AML patients in the setting of integrated mutational profiling.

  19. Molecular pathway activation features of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblast leukemia (ALL) cells.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Ivan; Suntsova, Maria; Mutorova, Olga; Sorokin, Maxim; Garazha, Andrew; Ilnitskaya, Elena; Spirin, Pavel; Larin, Sergey; Kovalchuk, Olga; Prassolov, Vladimir; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Roumiantsev, Alexander; Buzdin, Anton

    2016-11-19

    Acute lymphoblast leukemia (ALL) is characterized by overproduction of immature white blood cells in the bone marrow. ALL is most common in the childhood and has high (>80%) cure rate. In contrast, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has far greater mortality rate than the ALL and is most commonly affecting older adults. However, AML is a leading cause of childhood cancer mortality. In this study, we compare gene expression and molecular pathway activation patterns in three normal blood, seven pediatric ALL and seven pediatric AML bone marrow samples. We identified 172/94 and 148/31 characteristic gene expression/pathway activation signatures, clearly distinguishing pediatric ALL and AML cells, respectively, from the normal blood. The pediatric AML and ALL cells differed by 139/34 gene expression/pathway activation biomarkers. For the adult 30 AML and 17 normal blood samples, we found 132/33 gene expression/pathway AML-specific features, of which only 7/2 were common for the adult and pediatric AML and, therefore, age-independent. At the pathway level, we found more differences than similarities between the adult and pediatric forms. These findings suggest that the adult and pediatric AMLs may require different treatment strategies.

  20. MPL expression on AML blasts predicts peripheral blood neutropenia and thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Philipp J; Ellegast, Jana M; Widmer, Corinne C; Fritsch, Kristin; Goede, Jeroen S; Valk, Peter J M; Löwenberg, Bob; Takizawa, Hitoshi; Manz, Markus G

    2016-11-03

    Although the molecular pathways that cause acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are increasingly well understood, the pathogenesis of peripheral blood cytopenia, a major cause of AML mortality, remains obscure. A prevailing assumption states that AML spatially displaces nonleukemic hematopoiesis from the bone marrow. However, examining an initial cohort of 223 AML patients, we found no correlation between bone marrow blast content and cytopenia, questioning the displacement theory. Measuring serum concentration of thrombopoietin (TPO), a key regulator of hematopoietic stem cells and megakaryocytes, revealed loss of physiologic negative correlation with platelet count in AML cases with blasts expressing MPL, the thrombopoietin (scavenging) receptor. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that MPL(hi) blasts could indeed clear TPO, likely therefore leading to insufficient cytokine levels for nonleukemic hematopoiesis. Microarray analysis in an independent multicenter study cohort of 437 AML cases validated MPL expression as a central predictor of thrombocytopenia and neutropenia in AML. Moreover, t(8;21) AML cases demonstrated the highest average MPL expression and lowest average platelet and absolute neutrophil counts among subgroups. Our work thus explains the pathophysiology of peripheral blood cytopenia in a relevant number of AML cases.

  1. The molecular signature of AML mesenchymal stromal cells reveals candidate genes related to the leukemogenic process.

    PubMed

    Binato, Renata; de Almeida Oliveira, Nathalia Correa; Du Rocher, Barbara; Abdelhay, Eliana

    2015-12-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease characterized by myeloid precursor proliferation in the bone marrow, apoptosis reduction and differentiation arrest. Although there are several studies in this field, events related to disease initiation and progression remain unknown. The malignant transformation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) is thought to generate leukemic stem cells, and this transformation could be related to changes in mesenchymal stromal cell (hMSC) signaling. Thus, the aim of this work was to analyze the gene expression profile of hMSC from AML patients (hMSC-AML) compared to healthy donors hMSCs (hMSC-HD). The results showed a common molecular signature for all hMSC-AML. Other assays were performed with a large number of patients and the results confirmed a molecular signature that is capable of distinguishing hMSC-AML from hMSC-HD. Moreover, CCL2 and BMP4 genes encode secreted proteins that could affect HSCs. To verify whether these proteins are differentially expressed in AML patients, ELISA was performed with plasma samples. CCL2 and BMP4 proteins are differentially expressed in AML patients, indicating changes in hMSC-AML signaling. Altogether, hMSCs-AML signaling alterations could be an important factor in the leukemic transformation process.

  2. SCLLTargeting FGFR1 to suppress leukemogenesis in syndromic and de novo AML in murine models.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qing; Bhole, Aaron; Qin, Haiyan; Karp, Judith; Malek, Sami; Cowell, John K; Ren, Mingqiang

    2016-08-02

    Although over expression of chimeric FGFR1 kinase consistently leads to the development of AML in the rare Stem Cell Leukemia and Lymphoma syndrome, we now show that overexpression of FGFR1 is also seen in up to 20% of non-syndromic, de novo AML. To determine whether targeting FGFR1 in both of these AML subtypes can suppress leukemogenesis, we evaluated the effects of different FGFR1 inhibitors in a side-by-side comparison for their ability to affect in vitro proliferation in FGFR1 overexpressing murine and human cells lines. Three newly developed pan-FGFR inhibitors, AZD4547, BGJ398 and JNJ42756493, show a significantly improved efficacy over the more established FGFR inhibitors, PD173074 and TKI258. To examine whether targeting FGFR1 suppresses leukemogenesis in de novo AML in vivo, we created xenografts in immunocompromized mice from primary, de novo AML that showed > 3-fold increased expression of FGFR1. Using BGJ398, the most potent inhibitor identified in the in vitro studies, AML progression in these mice was significantly suppressed compared with vehicle treated animals and overall survival improved. Importantly, no difference in disease course or survival was seen in AML xenografts that did not show overexpression of FGFR1. These observations support the idea that FGFR1 is a driver oncogene in de novo, FGFR1-overexpressing AML and that molecularly targeted therapies using FGFR1 inhibitors may provide a valuable therapeutic regimen for all FGFR1-overexpressing AML.

  3. Targeting FGFR1 to suppress leukemogenesis in syndromic and de novo AML in murine models

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qing; Bhole, Aaron; Qin, Haiyan; Karp, Judith; Malek, Sami; Cowell, John K; Ren, Mingqiang

    2016-01-01

    Although over expression of chimeric FGFR1 kinase consistently leads to the development of AML in the rare Stem Cell Leukemia and Lymphoma syndrome, we now show that overexpression of FGFR1 is also seen in up to 20% of non-syndromic, de novo AML. To determine whether targeting FGFR1 in both of these AML subtypes can suppress leukemogenesis, we evaluated the effects of different FGFR1 inhibitors in a side-by-side comparison for their ability to affect in vitro proliferation in FGFR1 overexpressing murine and human cells lines. Three newly developed pan-FGFR inhibitors, AZD4547, BGJ398 and JNJ42756493, show a significantly improved efficacy over the more established FGFR inhibitors, PD173074 and TKI258. To examine whether targeting FGFR1 suppresses leukemogenesis in de novo AML in vivo, we created xenografts in immunocompromized mice from primary, de novo AML that showed > 3-fold increased expression of FGFR1. Using BGJ398, the most potent inhibitor identified in the in vitro studies, AML progression in these mice was significantly suppressed compared with vehicle treated animals and overall survival improved. Importantly, no difference in disease course or survival was seen in AML xenografts that did not show overexpression of FGFR1. These observations support the idea that FGFR1 is a driver oncogene in de novo, FGFR1-overexpressing AML and that molecularly targeted therapies using FGFR1 inhibitors may provide a valuable therapeutic regimen for all FGFR1-overexpressing AML. PMID:27391347

  4. Molecular pathway activation features of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblast leukemia (ALL) cells

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Ivan; Suntsova, Maria; Mutorova, Olga; Sorokin, Maxim; Garazha, Andrew; Ilnitskaya, Elena; Spirin, Pavel; Larin, Sergey; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Kovalchuk, Olga; Prassolov, Vladimir; Roumiantsev, Alexander; Buzdin, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblast leukemia (ALL) is characterized by overproduction of immature white blood cells in the bone marrow. ALL is most common in the childhood and has high (>80%) cure rate. In contrast, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has far greater mortality rate than the ALL and is most commonly affecting older adults. However, AML is a leading cause of childhood cancer mortality. In this study, we compare gene expression and molecular pathway activation patterns in three normal blood, seven pediatric ALL and seven pediatric AML bone marrow samples. We identified 172/94 and 148/31 characteristic gene expression/pathway activation signatures, clearly distinguishing pediatric ALL and AML cells, respectively, from the normal blood. The pediatric AML and ALL cells differed by 139/34 gene expression/pathway activation biomarkers. For the adult 30 AML and 17 normal blood samples, we found 132/33 gene expression/pathway AML-specific features, of which only 7/2 were common for the adult and pediatric AML and, therefore, age-independent. At the pathway level, we found more differences than similarities between the adult and pediatric forms. These findings suggest that the adult and pediatric AMLs may require different treatment strategies. PMID:27870639

  5. Cell Type Dependent Regulation of Multidrug Resistance-1 Gene Expression by AML1-ETO

    PubMed Central

    Hines, Robert; Boyapati, Anita; Zhang, Dong-Er

    2007-01-01

    The AML1-ETO fusion protein is generated from the 8;21 chromosome translocation that is commonly identified in acute myeloid leukemia. AML1-ETO is a DNA binding transcription factor and has been demonstrated to play a critical role in promoting leukemogenesis. Therefore, it is important to define the molecular mechanism of AML1-ETO in the regulation of gene expression. Here, we report that the effect of AML1-ETO on the promoter of multidrug resistance-1 (MDR1) gene, a known AML1-ETO target, is highly cell type specific. Besides observing repression of the MDR1 promoter in C33A and CV-1 cells as reported previously, AML1-ETO strongly activated the promoter in K562 and B210 cells. More importantly, this activation required both the AML1 and ETO portions of the fusion protein, but did not depend on the AML1 binding site in MDR1 promoter. Furthermore, results from promoter deletion analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays suggested that this activation effect was likely through the influence of the general transcription machinery rather than promoter-specific factors. Based on these data, we propose that AML1-ETO may have opposing effects on gene expression depending on the various conditions of the cellular environment. PMID:17590361

  6. Isoform-Specific Potentiation of Stem and Progenitor Cell Engraftment by AML1/RUNX1

    PubMed Central

    Tsuzuki, Shinobu; Hong, Dengli; Gupta, Rajeev; Matsuo, Keitaro; Seto, Masao; Enver, Tariq

    2007-01-01

    Background AML1/RUNX1 is the most frequently mutated gene in leukaemia and is central to the normal biology of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. However, the role of different AML1 isoforms within these primitive compartments is unclear. Here we investigate whether altering relative expression of AML1 isoforms impacts the balance between cell self-renewal and differentiation in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Findings The human AML1a isoform encodes a truncated molecule with DNA-binding but no transactivation capacity. We used a retrovirus-based approach to transduce AML1a into primitive haematopoietic cells isolated from the mouse. We observed that enforced AML1a expression increased the competitive engraftment potential of murine long-term reconstituting stem cells with the proportion of AML1a-expressing cells increasing over time in both primary and secondary recipients. Furthermore, AML1a expression dramatically increased primitive and committed progenitor activity in engrafted animals as assessed by long-term culture, cobblestone formation, and colony assays. In contrast, expression of the full-length isoform AML1b abrogated engraftment potential. In vitro, AML1b promoted differentiation while AML1a promoted proliferation of progenitors capable of short-term lymphomyeloid engraftment. Consistent with these findings, the relative abundance of AML1a was highest in the primitive stem/progenitor compartment of human cord blood, and forced expression of AML1a in these cells enhanced maintenance of primitive potential both in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions These data demonstrate that the “a” isoform of AML1 has the capacity to potentiate stem and progenitor cell engraftment, both of which are required for successful clinical transplantation. This activity is consistent with its expression pattern in both normal and leukaemic cells. Manipulating the balance of AML1 isoform expression may offer novel therapeutic strategies, exploitable in the contexts of

  7. Fatty acid-binding protein FABP4 mechanistically links obesity with aggressive AML by enhancing aberrant DNA methylation in AML cells.

    PubMed

    Yan, F; Shen, N; Pang, J X; Zhang, Y W; Rao, E Y; Bode, A M; Al-Kali, A; Zhang, D E; Litzow, M R; Li, B; Liu, S J

    2016-12-02

    Obesity is becoming more prevalent worldwide and is a major risk factor for cancer development. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the most common acute leukemia in adults, remains a frequently fatal disease. Here we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which obesity favors AML growth and uncovered the fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4) and DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) regulatory axis that mediates aggressive AML in obesity. We showed that leukemia burden was much higher in high-fat diet-induced obese mice, which had higher levels of FABP4 and interleukin (IL)-6 in the sera. Upregulation of environmental and cellular FABP4 accelerated AML cell growth in both a cell-autonomous and cell-non-autonomous manner. Genetic disruption of FABP4 in AML cells or in mice blocked cell proliferation in vitro and induced leukemia regression in vivo. Mechanistic investigations showed that FABP4 upregulation increased IL-6 expression and signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 3 phosphorylation leading to DNMT1 overexpression and further silencing of the p15(INK4B) tumor-suppressor gene in AML cells. Conversely, FABP4 ablation reduced DNMT1-dependent DNA methylation and restored p15(INK4B) expression, thus conferring substantial protection against AML growth. Our findings reveal the FABP4/DNMT1 axis in the control of AML cell fate in obesity and suggest that interference with the FABP4/DNMT1 axis might be a new strategy to treat leukemia.Leukemia advance online publication, 2 December 2016; doi:10.1038/leu.2016.349.

  8. Epigenetic therapy as a novel approach for GFI136N-associated murine/human AML.

    PubMed

    Botezatu, Lacramioara; Michel, Lars C; Helness, Anne; Vadnais, Charles; Makishima, Hideki; Hönes, Judith M; Robert, François; Vassen, Lothar; Thivakaran, Aniththa; Al-Matary, Yahya; Lams, Robert F; Schütte, Judith; Giebel, Bernd; Görgens, André; Heuser, Michael; Medyouf, Hind; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw; Dührsen, Ulrich; Möröy, Tarik; Khandanpour, Cyrus

    2016-08-01

    Epigenetic changes can contribute to development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a malignant disease of the bone marrow. A single-nucleotide polymorphism of transcription factor growth factor independence 1 (GFI1) generates a protein with an asparagine at position 36 (GFI1(36N)) instead of a serine at position 36 (GFI1(36S)), which is associated with de novo AML in humans. However, how GFI1(36N) predisposes to AML is poorly understood. To explore the mechanism, we used knock-in mouse strains expressing GFI1(36N) or GFI1(36S). Presence of GFI1(36N) shortened the latency and increased the incidence of AML in different murine models of myelodysplastic syndrome/AML. On a molecular level, GFI1(36N) induced genomewide epigenetic changes, leading to expression of AML-associated genes. On a therapeutic level, use of histone acetyltransferase inhibitors specifically impeded growth of GFI1(36N)-expressing human and murine AML cells in vitro and in vivo. These results establish, as a proof of principle, how epigenetic changes in GFI1(36N)-induced AML can be targeted.

  9. Generating Peripheral Blood Derived Lymphocytes Reacting Against Autologous Primary AML Blasts.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Rohtesh S; Chen, Xiaohua; Antony, Jeyaraj; Boyiadzis, Michael; Szabolcs, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Expanding on our prior studies with cord blood T cells, we hypothesized that primary acute myeloid leukemia (AML)-reactive autologous T cells could be generated ex vivo under immunomodulatory conditions. We purified AML and T cells from 8 newly diagnosed high-risk patients. After 2 weeks expansion, T cells were stimulated with interferon-γ-treated autologous AML weekly × 3, interleukin-15, and agonistic anti-CD28 antibody. Cytotoxic T cells and ELISpot assays tested functionality; reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction tested AML and T-cell gene expression profiles. On the basis of combined positive ELIspot and cytotoxic T cells assays, T cells reactive against AML were generated in 5 of 8 patients. Treg proportion declined after cocultures in reactive T-cell samples. AML-reactive T cells displayed an activated gene expression profile. "Resistant" AML blasts displayed genes associated with immunosuppressive myeloid-derived suppressor cells. We discuss our approach to creating primary AML-reactive autologous T cell and limitations that require further work. Our study provides a platform for future research targeting on generating autologous leukemia-reactive T cells.

  10. GFI1 as a novel prognostic and therapeutic factor for AML/MDS.

    PubMed

    Hönes, J M; Botezatu, L; Helness, A; Vadnais, C; Vassen, L; Robert, F; Hergenhan, S M; Thivakaran, A; Schütte, J; Al-Matary, Y S; Lams, R F; Fraszscak, J; Makishima, H; Radivoyevitch, T; Przychodzen, B; da Conceição Castro, S V; Görgens, A; Giebel, B; Klein-Hitpass, L; Lennartz, K; Heuser, M; Thiede, C; Ehninger, G; Dührsen, U; Maciejewski, J P; Möröy, T; Khandanpour, C

    2016-06-01

    Genetic and epigenetic aberrations contribute to the initiation and progression of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). GFI1, a zinc-finger transcriptional repressor, exerts its function by recruiting histone deacetylases to target genes. We present data that low expression of GFI1 is associated with an inferior prognosis of AML patients. To elucidate the mechanism behind this, we generated a humanized mouse strain with reduced GFI1 expression (GFI1-KD). Here we show that AML development induced by onco-fusion proteins such as MLL-AF9 or NUP98-HOXD13 is accelerated in mice with low human GFI1 expression. Leukemic cells from animals that express low levels of GFI1 show increased H3K9 acetylation compared to leukemic cells from mice with normal human GFI1 expression, resulting in the upregulation of genes involved in leukemogenesis. We investigated a new epigenetic therapy approach for this subgroup of AML patients. We could show that AML blasts from GFI1-KD mice and from AML patients with low GFI1 levels were more sensitive to treatment with histone acetyltransferase inhibitors than cells with normal GFI1 expression levels. We suggest therefore that GFI1 has a dose-dependent role in AML progression and development. GFI1 levels are involved in epigenetic regulation, which could open new therapeutic approaches for AML patients.

  11. MCM7 polymorphisms associated with the AML relapse and overall survival.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Sol; Cheong, Hyun Sub; Koh, Youngil; Ahn, Kwang-Sung; Shin, Hyoung Doo; Yoon, Sung-Soo

    2017-01-01

    The minichromosome maintenance complex component 7 (MCM7) encodes a member of MCM complex, which plays a critical role in the initiation of gene replication. Due to the importance of MCM complex, MCM7 gene has been regarded as a candidate gene for cancer development. In the present study, seven MCM7 polymorphisms were genotyped in 344 subjects composed of 103 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients and 241 normal controls to examine the possible associations between MCM7 polymorphisms and the risk of AML. MCM7 polymorphisms were not associated with the risk of AML (P > 0.05). However, MCM7 polymorphisms were significantly related to the relapse of AML and overall survival. The rs2070215 (N144S) showed a protective effect to the risk of AML relapse (OR = 0.37; P (corr) = 0.02). In haplotype analyses, the ht1 and ht2 showed significant associations with the risk of AML relapse (P (corr) = 0.02-0.03). In addition, rs1534309 showed an association with the overall survival of AML patients. Patients with major homozygote genotype (CC) of rs1534309 showed a higher survival rate than the patients with other genotypes (CG and GG). The results of the present study indicate that MCM7 polymorphisms may be able to predict the prognosis of AML patients.

  12. Transcriptomic and proteomic analysis of mouse radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemia (AML)

    PubMed Central

    Badie, Christophe; Blachowicz, Agnieszka; Barjaktarovic, Zarko; Finnon, Rosemary; Michaux, Arlette; Sarioglu, Hakan; Brown, Natalie; Manning, Grainne; Benotmane, M. Abderrafi; Tapio, Soile; Polanska, Joanna; Bouffler, Simon D.

    2016-01-01

    A combined transcriptome and proteome analysis of mouse radiation-induced AMLs using two primary AMLs, cell lines from these primaries, another cell line and its in vivo passage is reported. Compared to haematopoietic progenitor and stem cells (HPSC), over 5000 transcriptome alterations were identified, 2600 present in all materials. 55 and 3 alterations were detected in the proteomes of the cell lines and primary/in vivo passage material respectively, with one common to all materials. In cell lines, approximately 50% of the transcriptome changes are related to adaptation to cell culture, and in the proteome this proportion was higher. An AML ‘signature’ of 17 genes/proteins commonly deregulated in primary AMLs and cell lines compared to HPSCs was identified and validated using human AML transcriptome data. This also distinguishes primary AMLs from cell lines and includes proteins such as Coronin 1, pontin/RUVBL1 and Myeloperoxidase commonly implicated in human AML. C-Myc was identified as having a key role in radiation leukaemogenesis. These data identify novel candidates relevant to mouse radiation AML pathogenesis, and confirm that pathways of leukaemogenesis in the mouse and human share substantial commonality. PMID:27250028

  13. IL8-CXCR2 pathway inhibition as a therapeutic strategy against MDS and AML stem cells.

    PubMed

    Schinke, Carolina; Giricz, Orsolya; Li, Weijuan; Shastri, Aditi; Gordon, Shanisha; Barreyro, Laura; Barreryo, Laura; Bhagat, Tushar; Bhattacharyya, Sanchari; Ramachandra, Nandini; Bartenstein, Matthias; Pellagatti, Andrea; Boultwood, Jacqueline; Wickrema, Amittha; Yu, Yiting; Will, Britta; Wei, Sheng; Steidl, Ulrich; Verma, Amit

    2015-05-14

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are associated with disease-initiating stem cells that are not eliminated by conventional therapies. Novel therapeutic targets against preleukemic stem cells need to be identified for potentially curative strategies. We conducted parallel transcriptional analysis of highly fractionated stem and progenitor populations in MDS, AML, and control samples and found interleukin 8 (IL8) to be consistently overexpressed in patient samples. The receptor for IL8, CXCR2, was also significantly increased in MDS CD34(+) cells from a large clinical cohort and was predictive of increased transfusion dependence. High CXCR2 expression was also an adverse prognostic factor in The Cancer Genome Atlas AML cohort, further pointing to the critical role of the IL8-CXCR2 axis in AML/MDS. Functionally, CXCR2 inhibition by knockdown and pharmacologic approaches led to a significant reduction in proliferation in several leukemic cell lines and primary MDS/AML samples via induction of G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. Importantly, inhibition of CXCR2 selectively inhibited immature hematopoietic stem cells from MDS/AML samples without an effect on healthy controls. CXCR2 knockdown also impaired leukemic growth in vivo. Together, these studies demonstrate that the IL8 receptor CXCR2 is an adverse prognostic factor in MDS/AML and is a potential therapeutic target against immature leukemic stem cell-enriched cell fractions in MDS and AML.

  14. Generating Peripheral Blood Derived Lymphocytes Reacting Against Autologous Primary AML Blasts

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Rohtesh S.; Chen, Xiaohua; Antony, Jeyaraj; Boyiadzis, Michael; Szabolcs, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Expanding on our prior studies with cord blood T-cells, we hypothesized that primary AML-reactive autologous T-cells could be generated ex vivo under immunomodulatory conditions. We purified AML and T-cells from 8 newly diagnosed high-risk patients. After 2 weeks expansion, T-cells were stimulated with IFN-γ treated autologous AML weekly X 3, IL-15 and agonistic anti-CD28 antibody. CTL and ELISpot assays tested functionality; RT-qPCR tested AML and T-cell gene expression profiles. Based on combined positive ELIspot and CTL assays, T-cells reactive against AML were generated in 5/8 patients. Treg proportion declined post-co-cultures in reactive T-cell samples. AML-reactive T-cells displayed an activated gene expression profile. “Resistant” AML blasts displayed genes associated with immunosuppressive MDSC. We discuss our approach to creating primary AML-reactive autologous T-cell and limitations that require further work. Our study provides a platform for future research targeting on generating autologous leukemia reactive T-cells. PMID:26849076

  15. Peripheral blood T cells in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients at diagnosis have abnormal phenotype and genotype and form defective immune synapses with AML blasts.

    PubMed

    Le Dieu, Rifca; Taussig, David C; Ramsay, Alan G; Mitter, Richard; Miraki-Moud, Faridah; Fatah, Rewas; Lee, Abigail M; Lister, T Andrew; Gribben, John G

    2009-10-29

    Understanding how the immune system in patients with cancer interacts with malignant cells is critical for the development of successful immunotherapeutic strategies. We studied peripheral blood from newly diagnosed patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) to assess the impact of this disease on the patients' T cells. The absolute number of peripheral blood T cells is increased in AML compared with healthy controls. An increase in the absolute number of CD3+56+ cells was also noted. Gene expression profiling on T cells from AML patients compared with healthy donors demonstrated global differences in transcription suggesting aberrant T-cell activation patterns. These gene expression changes differ from those observed in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), indicating the heterogeneous means by which different tumors evade the host immune response. However, in common with CLL, differentially regulated genes involved in actin cytoskeletal formation were identified, and therefore the ability of T cells from AML patients to form immunologic synapses was assessed. Although AML T cells could form conjugates with autologous blasts, their ability to form immune synapses and recruit phosphotyrosine signaling molecules to the synapse was significantly impaired. These findings identify T-cell dysfunction in AML that may contribute to the failure of a host immune response against leukemic blasts.

  16. AML1-ETO inhibits maturation of multiple lymphohematopoietic lineages and induces myeloblast transformation in synergy with ICSBP deficiency.

    PubMed

    Schwieger, Maike; Löhler, Jürgen; Friel, Jutta; Scheller, Marina; Horak, Ivan; Stocking, Carol

    2002-11-04

    The translocation (8;21), generating the AML1-ETO fusion protein, is one of the most frequent chromosomal abnormalities associated with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). To elucidate its role in oncogenesis, bone marrow (BM) cells were infected with a retroviral vector carrying AML1-ETO and transplanted into mice. In contrast to previous transgenic mouse models, we show that AML1-ETO directly stimulates granulopoiesis, suppresses erythropoiesis, and impairs the maturation of myeloid, B, and T lymphoid cells in vivo. To determine the significance of earlier findings that expression of the tumor suppressor ICSBP is often downregulated in AML myeloblasts, AML1-ETO was introduced into BM cells derived from mice lacking the interferon regulatory factor ICSBP. Our findings demonstrate that AML1-ETO synergizes with an ICSBP deficiency to induce myeloblastic transformation in the BM, reminiscent of AML.

  17. AML1-ETO Inhibits Maturation of Multiple Lymphohematopoietic Lineages and Induces Myeloblast Transformation in Synergy with ICSBP Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Schwieger, Maike; Löhler, Jürgen; Friel, Jutta; Scheller, Marina; Horak, Ivan; Stocking, Carol

    2002-01-01

    The translocation (8;21), generating the AML1-ETO fusion protein, is one of the most frequent chromosomal abnormalities associated with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). To elucidate its role in oncogenesis, bone marrow (BM) cells were infected with a retroviral vector carrying AML1-ETO and transplanted into mice. In contrast to previous transgenic mouse models, we show that AML1-ETO directly stimulates granulopoiesis, suppresses erythropoiesis, and impairs the maturation of myeloid, B, and T lymphoid cells in vivo. To determine the significance of earlier findings that expression of the tumor suppressor ICSBP is often downregulated in AML myeloblasts, AML1-ETO was introduced into BM cells derived from mice lacking the interferon regulatory factor ICSBP. Our findings demonstrate that AML1-ETO synergizes with an ICSBP deficiency to induce myeloblastic transformation in the BM, reminiscent of AML. PMID:12417632

  18. Cytidine deaminase polymorphisms and worse treatment response in normal karyotype AML.

    PubMed

    Hyo Kim, Lyoung; Sub Cheong, Hyun; Koh, Youngil; Ahn, Kwang-Sung; Lee, Chansu; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Doo Shin, Hyoung; Yoon, Sung-Soo

    2015-12-01

    The cytidine deaminase (CDA) catalyzes the irreversible hydrolytic deamination of the cytarabine (AraC) into a 1-β-D-arabinofuranosyluracil (AraU), an inactive metabolite that plays a crucial role in lowering the amount of AraC, a key chemotherapeutic drug, in the treatment of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In this study, we hypothesized that CDA polymorphisms were associated with the AraC metabolism for AML treatment and/or related clinical phenotypes. We analyzed 16 polymorphisms of CDA among 50 normal karyotype AML (NK-AML) patients, 45 abnormal karyotype AML (AK-AML) patients and 241 normal controls (NC). Several polymorphisms and haplotypes, rs532545, rs2072671, rs471760, rs4655226, rs818194 and CDA-ht3, were found to have a strong correlation with NK-AML compared with NC and these polymorphisms also revealed strong linkage disequilibrium with each other. Among them, rs2072671 (79A>C), which is located in a coding region and the resultant amino acid change K27Q, showed significant associations with NK-AML compared with NC (P=0.009 and odds ratio=2.44 in the dominant model). The AC and CC genotypes of rs2072671 (79A>C) were significantly correlated with shorter overall survival rates (P=0.03, hazard ratio=1.84) and first complete remission duration (P=0.007, hazard ratio=3.24) compared with the AA genotype in the NK-AML patients. Our results indicate that rs2072671 in CDA may be an important prognostic marker in NK-AML patients.

  19. 30 CFR 874.17 - AML agency procedures for reclamation projects receiving less than 50 percent government funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false AML agency procedures for reclamation projects... RECLAMATION REQUIREMENTS § 874.17 AML agency procedures for reclamation projects receiving less than 50 percent government funding. This section tells you, the AML agency, what to do when considering...

  20. 30 CFR 874.17 - AML agency procedures for reclamation projects receiving less than 50 percent government funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false AML agency procedures for reclamation projects... RECLAMATION REQUIREMENTS § 874.17 AML agency procedures for reclamation projects receiving less than 50 percent government funding. This section tells you, the AML agency, what to do when considering...

  1. STAT activation status differentiates leukemogenic from non-leukemogenic stem cells in AML and is suppressed by arsenic in t(6;9)-positive AML.

    PubMed

    Oancea, Claudia; Rüster, Brigitte; Brill, Boris; Roos, Jessica; Heinssmann, Maria; Bug, Gesine; Mian, Afsar Ali; Guillen, Nathalie Andrea; Kornblau, Steven M; Henschler, Reinhard; Ruthardt, Martin

    2014-11-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is characterized by an aberrant self-renewal of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and a block in differentiation. The major therapeutic challenge is the characterization of the leukemic stem cell as a target for the eradication of the disease. Until now the biology of AML-associated fusion proteins (AAFPs), such as the t(15;17)-PML/RARα, t(8;21)-RUNX1/RUNX1T1 and t(6;9)-DEK/NUP214, all able to induce AML in mice, was investigated in different models and genetic backgrounds, not directly comparable to each other. To avoid the bias of different techniques and models we expressed these three AML-inducing oncogenes in an identical genetic background and compared their influence on the HSC compartment in vitro and in vivo. These AAFPs exerted differential effects on HSCs and PML/RARα, similar to DEK/NUP214, induced a leukemic phenotype from a small subpopulation of HSCs with a surface marker pattern of long-term HSC and characterized by activated STAT3 and 5. In contrast the established AML occurred from mature populations in the bone marrow. The activation of STAT5 by PML/RARα and DEK/NUP214 was confirmed in t(15;17)(PML/RARα) and t(6;9)(DEK/NUP214)-positive patients as compared to normal CD34+ cells. The activation of STAT5 was reduced upon the exposure to Arsenic which was accompanied by apoptosis in both PML/RARα- and DEK/NUP214-positive leukemic cells. These findings indicate that in AML the activation of STATs plays a decisive role in the biology of the leukemic stem cell. Furthermore we establish exposure to arsenic as a novel concept for the treatment of this high risk t(6;9)-positive AML.

  2. Epigenetic landscape of the TERT promoter: a potential biomarker for high risk AML/MDS.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Tian, Xin; Kajigaya, Sachiko; Cantilena, Caroline R; Strickland, Stephen; Savani, Bipin N; Mohan, Sanjay; Feng, Xingmin; Keyvanfar, Keyvan; Dunavin, Neil; Townsley, Danielle M; Dumitriu, Bogdan; Battiwalla, Minoo; Rezvani, Katayoun; Young, Neal S; Barrett, A John; Ito, Sawa

    2016-11-01

    Although recent observations implicate the importance of telomerase activity in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), the roles of epigenetic regulations of the TERT gene in leukaemogenesis, drug resistance and clinical prognosis in AML are not fully understood. We developed a quantitative pyrosequencing-based methylation assay covering the TERT proximal promoter and a partial exon 1 (TERTpro/Ex1) region and tested both cell lines and primary leukaemia cells derived from AML and AML with preceding myelodysplastic syndrome (AML/MDS) patients (n = 43). Prognostic impact of methylation status of the upstream TERT promoter region was assessed by the Kaplan-Meier method. The activity of the telomerase inhibitor, imetelstat, was measured using leukaemia cell lines. The TERTpro/Ex1 region was highly methylated in all cell lines and primary leukaemia cells showed diverse methylation profiles. Most cases showed hypermethylated regions at the upstream TERTpro/Ex1 region, which were associated with inferior patient survival. TERTpro/Ex1 methylation status was correlated with the cytotoxicity to imetelstat and its combination with hypomethylating agent enhanced the cytotoxicity of imetelstat. AML cell lines and primary blasts harbour distinct TERTpro/Ex1 methylation profiles that could serve as a prognostic biomarker of AML. However, validation in a large cohort of patients is necessary to confirm our findings.

  3. Targeting PDK1 with dichloroacetophenone to inhibit acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell growth.

    PubMed

    Qin, Lijun; Tian, Yun; Yu, Zhenlong; Shi, Dingbo; Wang, Jingshu; Zhang, Changlin; Peng, Ruoyu; Chen, Xuezhen; Liu, Congcong; Chen, Yiming; Huang, Wenlin; Deng, Wuguo

    2016-01-12

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-1 (PDK1), a key metabolic enzyme involved in aerobic glycolysis, is highly expressed in many solid tumors. Small molecule compound DAP (2,2-dichloroacetophenone) is a potent inhibitor of PDK1. Whether targeting PDK1 with DAP can inhibit acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and how it works remains unknown. In this study, we evaluated the effect of inhibition of PDK1 with DAP on cell growth, apoptosis and survival in AML cells and identified the underlying mechanisms. We found that treatment with DAP significantly inhibited cell proliferation, increased apoptosis induction and suppressed autophagy in AML cells in vitro, and inhibited tumor growth in an AML mouse model in vivo. We also showed that inhibition of PDK1 with DAP increased the cleavage of pro-apoptotic proteins (PARP and Caspase 3) and decreased the expression of the anti-apoptotic proteins (BCL-xL and BCL-2) and autophagy regulators (ULK1, Beclin-1 and Atg). In addition, we found that DAP inhibited the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Furthermore, we demonstrated that PDK1 interacted with ULK1, BCL-xL and E3 ligase CBL-b in AML cells, and DPA treatment could inhibit the interactions. Collectively, our results indicated that targeting PDK1 with DAP inhibited AML cell growth via multiple signaling pathways and suggest that targeting PDK1 may be a promising therapeutic strategy for AMLs.

  4. Inhibiting glutaminase in acute myeloid leukemia: metabolic dependency of selected AML subtypes.

    PubMed

    Matre, Polina; Velez, Juliana; Jacamo, Rodrigo; Qi, Yuan; Su, Xiaoping; Cai, Tianyu; Chan, Steven M; Lodi, Alessia; Sweeney, Shannon R; Ma, Helen; Davis, Richard Eric; Baran, Natalia; Haferlach, Torsten; Su, Xiaohua; Flores, Elsa Renee; Gonzalez, Doriann; Konoplev, Sergej; Samudio, Ismael; DiNardo, Courtney; Majeti, Ravi; Schimmer, Aaron D; Li, Weiqun; Wang, Taotao; Tiziani, Stefano; Konopleva, Marina

    2016-11-29

    Metabolic reprogramming has been described as a hallmark of transformed cancer cells. In this study, we examined the role of the glutamine (Gln) utilization pathway in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines and primary AML samples. Our results indicate that a subset of AML cell lines is sensitive to Gln deprivation. Glutaminase (GLS) is a mitochondrial enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of Gln to glutamate. One of the two GLS isoenzymes, GLS1 is highly expressed in cancer and encodes two different isoforms: kidney (KGA) and glutaminase C (GAC). We analyzed mRNA expression of GLS1 splicing variants, GAC and KGA, in several large AML datasets and identified increased levels of expression in AML patients with complex cytogenetics and within specific molecular subsets. Inhibition of glutaminase by allosteric GLS inhibitor bis-2-(5-phenylacetamido-1, 2, 4-thiadiazol-2-yl) ethyl sulfide or by novel, potent, orally bioavailable GLS inhibitor CB-839 reduced intracellular glutamate levels and inhibited growth of AML cells. In cell lines and patient samples harboring IDH1/IDH2 (Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2) mutations, CB-839 reduced production of oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate, inducing differentiation. These findings indicate potential utility of glutaminase inhibitors in AML therapy, which can inhibit cell growth, induce apoptosis and/or differentiation in specific leukemia subtypes.

  5. Repression of GSK3 restores NK cell cytotoxicity in AML patients.

    PubMed

    Parameswaran, Reshmi; Ramakrishnan, Parameswaran; Moreton, Stephen A; Xia, Zhiqiang; Hou, Yongchun; Lee, Dean A; Gupta, Kalpana; deLima, Marcos; Beck, Rose C; Wald, David N

    2016-04-04

    Natural killer cells from acute myeloid leukaemia patients (AML-NK) show a dramatic impairment in cytotoxic activity. The exact reasons for this dysfunction are not fully understood. Here we show that the glycogen synthase kinase beta (GSK3β) expression is elevated in AML-NK cells. Interestingly, GSK3 overexpression in normal NK cells impairs their ability to kill AML cells, while genetic or pharmacological GSK3 inactivation enhances their cytotoxic activity. Mechanistic studies reveal that the increased cytotoxic activity correlates with an increase in AML-NK cell conjugates. GSK3 inhibition promotes the conjugate formation by upregulating LFA expression on NK cells and by inducing ICAM-1 expression on AML cells. The latter is mediated by increased NF-κB activation in response to TNF-α production by NK cells. Finally, GSK3-inhibited NK cells show significant efficacy in human AML mouse models. Overall, our work provides mechanistic insights into the AML-NK dysfunction and a potential NK cell therapy strategy.

  6. Rapid expansion of preexisting nonleukemic hematopoietic clones frequently follows induction therapy for de novo AML

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Terrence N.; Miller, Christopher A.; Klco, Jeffery M.; Petti, Allegra; Demeter, Ryan; Helton, Nichole M.; Li, Tiandao; Fulton, Robert S.; Heath, Sharon E.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Westervelt, Peter; DiPersio, John F.; Walter, Matthew J.; Welch, John S.; Graubert, Timothy A.; Wilson, Richard K.; Ley, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    There is interest in using leukemia-gene panels and next-generation sequencing to assess acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) response to induction chemotherapy. Studies have shown that patients with AML in morphologic remission may continue to have clonal hematopoiesis with populations closely related to the founding AML clone and that this confers an increased risk of relapse. However, it remains unknown how induction chemotherapy influences the clonal evolution of a patient’s nonleukemic hematopoietic population. Here, we report that 5 of 15 patients with genetic clearance of their founding AML clone after induction chemotherapy had a concomitant expansion of a hematopoietic population unrelated to the initial AML. These populations frequently harbored somatic mutations in genes recurrently mutated in AML or myelodysplastic syndromes and were detectable at very low frequencies at the time of AML diagnosis. These results suggest that nonleukemic hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, harboring specific aging-acquired mutations, may have a competitive fitness advantage after induction chemotherapy, expand, and persist long after the completion of chemotherapy. Although the clinical importance of these “rising” clones remains to be determined, it will be important to distinguish them from leukemia-related populations when assessing for molecular responses to induction chemotherapy. PMID:26631115

  7. Rapid expansion of preexisting nonleukemic hematopoietic clones frequently follows induction therapy for de novo AML.

    PubMed

    Wong, Terrence N; Miller, Christopher A; Klco, Jeffery M; Petti, Allegra; Demeter, Ryan; Helton, Nichole M; Li, Tiandao; Fulton, Robert S; Heath, Sharon E; Mardis, Elaine R; Westervelt, Peter; DiPersio, John F; Walter, Matthew J; Welch, John S; Graubert, Timothy A; Wilson, Richard K; Ley, Timothy J; Link, Daniel C

    2016-02-18

    There is interest in using leukemia-gene panels and next-generation sequencing to assess acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) response to induction chemotherapy. Studies have shown that patients with AML in morphologic remission may continue to have clonal hematopoiesis with populations closely related to the founding AML clone and that this confers an increased risk of relapse. However, it remains unknown how induction chemotherapy influences the clonal evolution of a patient's nonleukemic hematopoietic population. Here, we report that 5 of 15 patients with genetic clearance of their founding AML clone after induction chemotherapy had a concomitant expansion of a hematopoietic population unrelated to the initial AML. These populations frequently harbored somatic mutations in genes recurrently mutated in AML or myelodysplastic syndromes and were detectable at very low frequencies at the time of AML diagnosis. These results suggest that nonleukemic hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, harboring specific aging-acquired mutations, may have a competitive fitness advantage after induction chemotherapy, expand, and persist long after the completion of chemotherapy. Although the clinical importance of these "rising" clones remains to be determined, it will be important to distinguish them from leukemia-related populations when assessing for molecular responses to induction chemotherapy.

  8. Inhibiting glutaminase in acute myeloid leukemia: metabolic dependency of selected AML subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Jacamo, Rodrigo; Qi, Yuan; Su, Xiaoping; Cai, Tianyu; Chan, Steven M.; Lodi, Alessia; Sweeney, Shannon R.; Ma, Helen; Davis, Richard Eric; Baran, Natalia; Haferlach, Torsten; Su, Xiaohua; Flores, Elsa Renee; Gonzalez, Doriann; Konoplev, Sergej; Samudio, Ismael; DiNardo, Courtney; Majeti, Ravi; Schimmer, Aaron D.; Li, Weiqun; Wang, Taotao; Tiziani, Stefano; Konopleva, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic reprogramming has been described as a hallmark of transformed cancer cells. In this study, we examined the role of the glutamine (Gln) utilization pathway in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines and primary AML samples. Our results indicate that a subset of AML cell lines is sensitive to Gln deprivation. Glutaminase (GLS) is a mitochondrial enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of Gln to glutamate. One of the two GLS isoenzymes, GLS1 is highly expressed in cancer and encodes two different isoforms: kidney (KGA) and glutaminase C (GAC). We analyzed mRNA expression of GLS1 splicing variants, GAC and KGA, in several large AML datasets and identified increased levels of expression in AML patients with complex cytogenetics and within specific molecular subsets. Inhibition of glutaminase by allosteric GLS inhibitor bis-2-(5-phenylacetamido-1, 2, 4-thiadiazol-2-yl) ethyl sulfide or by novel, potent, orally bioavailable GLS inhibitor CB-839 reduced intracellular glutamate levels and inhibited growth of AML cells. In cell lines and patient samples harboring IDH1/IDH2 (Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2) mutations, CB-839 reduced production of oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate, inducing differentiation. These findings indicate potential utility of glutaminase inhibitors in AML therapy, which can inhibit cell growth, induce apoptosis and/or differentiation in specific leukemia subtypes. PMID:27806325

  9. Sorafenib inhibition of Mcl-1 accelerates ATRA induced apoptosis in differentiation responsive AML cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Xia, Lijuan; Gabrilove, Janice; Waxman, Samuel; Jing, Yongkui

    2015-01-01

    Purpose All trans retinoic acid (ATRA) is successful in treating acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) by inducing terminal differentiation-mediated cell death, but it has limited activity in non-APL acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We aim to improve ATRA therapy of AML by enhancing apoptosis through repression of the anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Mcl-1. Experimental Design APL and AML cell lines, as well as primary AML samples, were used to explore the mechanisms regulating differentiation and apoptosis during ATRA treatment. Stable transfection and gene silencing with siRNA were used to identify the key factors that inhibit apoptosis during induction of differentiation and drugs that accelerate apoptosis. Results In differentiation responsive AML cells, ATRA treatment induces long-lasting repression of Bcl-2 while first up-modulating and then reducing the Mcl-1 level. The Mcl-1 level appears to serve as a gatekeeper between differentiation and apoptosis. During differentiation induction, activation of MEK/ERK and PI3K/Akt pathways by ATRA leads to activation of p90RSK and inactivation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), which increase Mcl-1 levels by increasing its translation and stability. Sorafenib blocks ATRA-induced Mcl-1 increase by reversing p90RSK activation and GSK3β inactivation, maintains the repressed Bcl-2 level, and enhances ATRA induced apoptosis in non-APL AML cell lines and in primary AML cells. Conclusion Inhibition of Mcl-1 is required for apoptosis induction in ATRA differentiation responsive AML cells. ATRA and Sorafenib can be developed as a novel drug combination therapy for AML patients because this drug combination augments apoptosis by inhibiting Bcl-2 and Mcl-1. PMID:26459180

  10. MIT Lincoln Laboratory Annual Report 2013

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    monitor 500,000 stars for temporary drops in brightness caused by planetary transits. This first-ever space-borne all-sky transit survey will identify...military, including new designs for protective gear . Fellows pursuing graduate degrees, usually at MIT, work on sponsored programs that complement

  11. Incentives in IT Yield Success at MIT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Mary

    2001-01-01

    Describes the role of information technology (IT) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, explaining that attention to the unique characteristics of an MIT education and incentives for sustainable change are central to its IT efforts. Discusses various IT initiatives, such as Project Athena, provision on campus, international efforts, and…

  12. The leukemogenic t(8;21) fusion protein AML1-ETO controls ribosomal RNA genes and associates with nucleolar organizing regions at mitotic chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Bakshi, Rachit; Zaidi, Sayyed K.; Pande, Sandhya; Hassan, Mohammad Q.; Young, Daniel W.; Lian, Jane B.; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Stein, Janet L.; Stein, Gary S.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY RUNX1/AML1 is required for definitive hematopoiesis and is frequently targeted by chromosomal translocation in acute myeloid leukemias (AML). The t(8;21) related AML1-ETO fusion protein blocks differentiation of myeloid progenitors. Here, we show by immunofluorescence microscopy that during interphase, endogenous AML1-ETO localizes to nuclear microenvironments distinct from those containing native RUNX1/AML1 protein. At mitosis, we clearly detect binding of AML1-ETO to nucleolar organizing regions (NORs) in AML derived Kasumi-1 cells and binding of RUNX1/AML1 to NORs in Jurkat cells. Both RUNX1/AML1 and AML1-ETO occupy ribosomal DNA repeats during interphase, as well as interact with the endogenous RNA Pol I transcription factor UBF-1. Promoter cytosine methylation analysis indicates that RUNX1/AML1 binds to rDNA repeats that are more highly CpG methylated than those bound by AML1-ETO. Down-regulation by RNA interference reveals that RUNX1/AML1 negatively regulates rDNA transcription, while AML1-ETO is a positive regulator in Kasumi-1 cells. Taken together, our findings identify a novel role for the leukemia-related AML1-ETO protein in epigenetic control of cell growth through upregulation of RNA Pol I-mediated ribosomal gene transcription, consistent with the hyper-proliferative phenotype of myeloid cells in AML patients. PMID:19001502

  13. MicroRNA-mRNA Pairs Associated with Outcome in AML: From In Vitro Cell-Based Studies to AML Patients.

    PubMed

    Bhise, Neha S; Chauhan, Lata; Shin, Miyoung; Cao, Xueyuan; Pounds, Stanley; Lamba, Vishal; Lamba, Jatinder K

    2015-01-01

    Cytarabine is the primary chemotherapeutic agent used for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Disease relapse after initial remission remains one of the most pressing therapeutic challenges in the treatment of AML. Relapsed disease is often resistant to cytarabine and subsequent salvage therapy is ineffective. Recent studies have shown that some microRNAs (miRNAs) are associated with prognosis, but have not yet explored the role of miRNAs in cellular response to cytarabine. We identified 20 miRNAs that associate with the in vitro cytarabine chemo-sensitivity or apoptotic response of eight AML cell lines. Out of the 20 miRNAs, data on 18 miRNAs was available in AML patients from The Cancer Genome Atlas database. Our stepwise-integrated analyses (step 1 - miRNA-target mRNA that were significantly correlated in AML patients; step 2 - mRNAs from step 1 with significant association with overall survival (OS)) identified 23 unique miRNA-mRNA pairs predictive of OS in AML patients. As expected HOX genes (HOXA9, HOXB7, and HOXA10) were identified to be regulated by miRs as well as predictive of worse OS. Additionally, miR107-Myb, miR-378-granzyme B involved in granzyme signaling and miR10a-MAP4K4 were identified to be predictive of outcome through integrated analysis. Although additional functional validations to establish clinical/pharmacologic importance of miRNA-mRNA pairs are needed, our results from RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assay confirmed binding of miR-10a, miR-378, and miR-107 with their target genes GALNT1, GZMB, and MYB, respectively. Integration of pathogenic and pharmacologically significant miRNAs and miRNA-mRNA relationships identified in our study opens up opportunities for development of targeted/miRNA-directed therapies.

  14. Tailored strategy for AML patients receiving allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Sang Kyun; Kim, Jong Gwang; Kim, Dong Hwan

    2006-10-01

    Considering the heterogeneity of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), along with the pros and cons of allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT), a tailored strategy is needed to minimize the transplant-related mortality and maximize the transplant outcomes in AML patients exhibiting certain factors that have an impact on the post-transplant quality of life and outcomes. The factors that need to be considered when tailoring a strategy in an allogeneic PBSCT setting include the recipient's performance status and co-morbid disease include AML risk stratification, disease status, expected severity of graft-versus-host disease, and the necessity of a graft-versus-leukemia effect. Accordingly, this review article describes a possible tailoring strategy for AML patients receiving allogeneic PBSCT based on certain factors influencing the transplant outcome.

  15. What If the Leukemia Doesn't Respond or Comes Back After Treatment? (AML)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treating Acute Myeloid Leukemia What If Acute Myeloid Leukemia Doesn’t Respond or Comes Back After Treatment? For most types of acute myeloid leukemia If acute myeloid leukemia (AML) doesn’t go ...

  16. Timothy Ley, M.D., Advocates for Personalized Medicine in AML - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    Oncologist Dr. Timothy Ley talks about how repurposing of existing drugs based on better understanding of the genetic basis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) can help patients receive personalized care.

  17. SAB--a promising new treatment to improve remission rates in AML in the elderly?

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Keith

    2002-08-01

    This short report presents the results of a comparison of complete remission rates and reasons for failure, between two series of patients aged 60 years or over with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), and discusses their interpretation.

  18. Profiling of microRNAs in AML cells following overexpression or silencing of the VEGF gene.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Zhu, Lixia; Wang, Yungui; Zhou, De; Zhu, Jingjing; Xie, Wanzhuo; Ye, Xiujin

    2017-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a disease of the hematopoietic progenitor cells associated with heterogeneous clonal proliferation. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptors play important roles in the regulation of angiogenesis during physiological and pathological processes. It is thought that AML cells have an autocrine VEGF pathway that contributes to the development and progression of AML. In addition, growing evidence has suggested that numerous microRNAs are involved in AML. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between VEGF dysregulation and microRNA profiles in AML cells and patients. VEGF-overexpressing and VEGF-knockdown leukemia cells were constructed and changes in the patterns of microRNA expression were analyzed using a microRNA array. Subsequently, mononuclear cells from the blood of patients with AML showing high or low expression levels of VEGF were obtained and were used to assess the patterns of microRNA expression by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The results of the present study suggested that downregulation of VEGF markedly altered the profile of microRNAs in AML cells, while upregulation of VEGF did not. Examination of clinical samples from patients with AML showed that several microRNAs were closely associated with the expression level of VEGF, including miR-20a, miR-93, miR-16-5p, miR-17-5p, miR-124-5p and miR-17-3p. These results suggested that VEGF may be a pivotal protein that can both receive and initiate signals in leukemia cells.

  19. Profiling of microRNAs in AML cells following overexpression or silencing of the VEGF gene

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Zhu, Lixia; Wang, Yungui; Zhou, De; Zhu, Jingjing; Xie, Wanzhuo; Ye, Xiujin

    2017-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a disease of the hematopoietic progenitor cells associated with heterogeneous clonal proliferation. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptors play important roles in the regulation of angiogenesis during physiological and pathological processes. It is thought that AML cells have an autocrine VEGF pathway that contributes to the development and progression of AML. In addition, growing evidence has suggested that numerous microRNAs are involved in AML. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between VEGF dysregulation and microRNA profiles in AML cells and patients. VEGF-overexpressing and VEGF-knockdown leukemia cells were constructed and changes in the patterns of microRNA expression were analyzed using a microRNA array. Subsequently, mononuclear cells from the blood of patients with AML showing high or low expression levels of VEGF were obtained and were used to assess the patterns of microRNA expression by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The results of the present study suggested that downregulation of VEGF markedly altered the profile of microRNAs in AML cells, while upregulation of VEGF did not. Examination of clinical samples from patients with AML showed that several microRNAs were closely associated with the expression level of VEGF, including miR-20a, miR-93, miR-16-5p, miR-17-5p, miR-124-5p and miR-17-3p. These results suggested that VEGF may be a pivotal protein that can both receive and initiate signals in leukemia cells. PMID:28123529

  20. TEL/AML-1 fusion gene. its frequency and prognostic significance in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jamil, A; Theil, K S; Kahwash, S; Ruymann, F B; Klopfenstein, K J

    2000-10-15

    TEL gene rearrangement due to the 12;21 chromosome translocation is believed to be the most common molecular genetic abnormality in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). A study was conducted to investigate the frequency and prognostic significance of TEL/AML-1 fusion gene resulting from a cryptic t(12;21)(p13;q22). Bone marrow samples from 86 patients diagnosed over the past 5 years at Columbus Children's Hospital were analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique for TEL/AML-1 fusion gene, using LSI((R)) DNA probes. The positive cases were analyzed for clinical outcome. Patients in this study received treatment according to Children's Cancer Group (CCG) protocols. Fifteen of the 86 cases (17%) were positive for the fusion gene. All were B-cell lineage and except for one, all were CD10 positive. TEL/AML-1 was not found in any T-cell ALL. The mean overall survival (OS) following diagnosis for the TEL/AML-1-positive group was significantly longer than for the TEL/AML-1-negative group by log-rank = 7.84, P = 0.005. Similarly, the event-free survival (EFS) after remission for the positive group (median 94.5 months) was longer than the negative group (median 57 months) by log-rank = 7.19, P = 0.007. This study confirms that the TEL/AML-1 fusion gene may be the most common genetic event in childhood ALL, occurring in 17% of the patients. It appears restricted to the B-cell lineage. In this study, the presence of a TEL/AML-1 fusion gene was statistically significant in predicting both OS and EFS, indicating a favorable clinical outcome for these patients. Screening for TEL/AML-1 should become routine at diagnosis and a useful biological variable for risk stratification in future clinical trials.

  1. Focal Adhesion Kinase as a Potential Target in AML and MDS.

    PubMed

    Carter, Bing Z; Mak, Po Yee; Wang, Xiangmeng; Yang, Hui; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Mak, Duncan; Mu, Hong; Ruvolo, Vivian; Qiu, Yihua; Coombes, Kevin; Zhang, Nianxiang; Ragon, Brittany; Weaver, David T; Pachter, Jonathan A; Kornblau, Steven; Andreeff, Michael

    2017-03-07

    Although overexpression/activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is widely known in solid tumors to control cell growth, survival, invasion, metastasis, gene expression, and stem cell self-renewal, its expression and function in myeloid leukemia are not well investigated. Using reverse-phase protein arrays in large cohorts of newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myeloid dysplastic syndrome (MDS) samples, we found that high FAK expression was associated with unfavorable cytogenetics (P = 2 x 10-4) and relapse (P = 0.02) in AML. FAK expression was significantly lower in patients with FLT3-ITD (P = 0.0024) or RAS (P = 0.05) mutations and strongly correlated with p-SRC and integrinβ3 levels. FAK protein levels were significantly higher in CD34+ (P = 5.42 x 10-20) and CD34+ CD38- MDS (P = 7.62 x 10-9) cells compared to normal CD34+ cells. MDS patients with higher FAK in CD34+ cells tended to have better OS (P = 0.05). FAK expression was significantly higher in MDS patients who later transformed to compared with not transformed to AML and in AML patients who transformed from MDS compared with those with de novo AML. Co-culture with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) increased FAK expression in AML cells. Inhibition of FAK decreased MSC-mediated adhesion/migration and viability of AML cells and prolonged survival in an AML xenograft murine model. Our results suggest that FAK regulates leukemia-stromal interactions and supports leukemia cell survival; hence FAK is a potential therapeutic target in myeloid leukemia.

  2. Evaluation of DNMT3A genetic polymorphisms as outcome predictors in AML patients

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xiao-Qing; Zhang, Dao-Yu; Yan, Han; Yang, Yong-Long; Zhu, Ke-Wei; Chen, Yan-Hong; Li, Xi; Yin, Ji-Ye; Li, Xiao-Lin; Zeng, Hui; Chen, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    DNMT3A mutation is known as a recurrent event in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) patients. However, association between DNMT3A genetic polymorphisms and AML patients' outcomes is unknown. DNMT3A 11 SNPs (rs11695471, rs2289195, rs734693, rs2276598, rs1465825, rs7590760, rs13401241, rs7581217, rs749131, rs41284843 and rs7560488) were genotyped in 344 diagnostic non-FAB-M3 AML patients from southern China. Patients underwent combined chemotherapy with cytarabine and anthracyclines. DNMT3A mRNA expression was analyzed in PBMCs from randomly selected AML patients. Multivariate analysis and combined genotype analysis showed that rs2276598 was associated with increased while rs11695471 and rs734693 were associated with decreased chemosensitivity (P<0.05), while rs11695471 (worse for OS), rs2289195 (favorable for OS and DFS) and rs2276598 (favorable for DFS) were significantly associated with disease prognosis (P<0.05). In conclusion, DNMT3A polymorphisms may be potential predictive markers for AML patients' outcomes, which might improve prognostic stratification of AML. PMID:27528035

  3. Evaluation of DNMT3A genetic polymorphisms as outcome predictors in AML patients.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiao-Qing; Zhang, Dao-Yu; Yan, Han; Yang, Yong-Long; Zhu, Ke-Wei; Chen, Yan-Hong; Li, Xi; Yin, Ji-Ye; Li, Xiao-Lin; Zeng, Hui; Chen, Xiao-Ping

    2016-09-13

    DNMT3A mutation is known as a recurrent event in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) patients. However, association between DNMT3A genetic polymorphisms and AML patients' outcomes is unknown. DNMT3A 11 SNPs (rs11695471, rs2289195, rs734693, rs2276598, rs1465825, rs7590760, rs13401241, rs7581217, rs749131, rs41284843 and rs7560488) were genotyped in 344 diagnostic non-FAB-M3 AML patients from southern China. Patients underwent combined chemotherapy with cytarabine and anthracyclines. DNMT3A mRNA expression was analyzed in PBMCs from randomly selected AML patients. Multivariate analysis and combined genotype analysis showed that rs2276598 was associated with increased while rs11695471 and rs734693 were associated with decreased chemosensitivity (P<0.05), while rs11695471 (worse for OS), rs2289195 (favorable for OS and DFS) and rs2276598 (favorable for DFS) were significantly associated with disease prognosis (P<0.05). In conclusion, DNMT3A polymorphisms may be potential predictive markers for AML patients' outcomes, which might improve prognostic stratification of AML.

  4. Human AML-iPSCs Reacquire Leukemic Properties after Differentiation and Model Clonal Variation of Disease.

    PubMed

    Chao, Mark P; Gentles, Andrew J; Chatterjee, Susmita; Lan, Feng; Reinisch, Andreas; Corces, M Ryan; Xavy, Seethu; Shen, Jinfeng; Haag, Daniel; Chanda, Soham; Sinha, Rahul; Morganti, Rachel M; Nishimura, Toshinobu; Ameen, Mohamed; Wu, Haodi; Wernig, Marius; Wu, Joseph C; Majeti, Ravindra

    2017-03-02

    Understanding the relative contributions of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) should assist integrated design of targeted therapies. In this study, we generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from AML patient samples harboring MLL rearrangements and found that they retained leukemic mutations but reset leukemic DNA methylation/gene expression patterns. AML-iPSCs lacked leukemic potential, but when differentiated into hematopoietic cells, they reacquired the ability to give rise to leukemia in vivo and reestablished leukemic DNA methylation/gene expression patterns, including an aberrant MLL signature. Epigenetic reprogramming was therefore not sufficient to eliminate leukemic behavior. This approach also allowed us to study the properties of distinct AML subclones, including differential drug susceptibilities of KRAS mutant and wild-type cells, and predict relapse based on increased cytarabine resistance of a KRAS wild-type subclone. Overall, our findings illustrate the value of AML-iPSCs for investigating the mechanistic basis and clonal properties of human AML.

  5. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in patients with AML not achieving remission: potentially curative therapy.

    PubMed

    Gyurkocza, B; Lazarus, H M; Giralt, S

    2017-02-27

    Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who fail to achieve complete remission (CR) have a dismal prognosis. Although data suggest that durable remissions can be achieved in approximately 30% of patients with refractory or relapsed AML after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), only a small fraction of those patients are offered this therapeutic option. Importantly, patients with primary refractory AML have distinctly better outcomes following allogeneic HCT than those with refractory relapse. Access to suitable donors could be one of the main barriers in these situations. However, with recent developments in the field of allogeneic HCT, such as alternative donor sources, high-resolution HLA-typing, reduced intensity conditioning regimens and improvements in supportive care, this approach has the potential to offer long-term survival for patients with refractory and relapsed AML and should be considered as early after diagnosis as possible. Incorporating novel agents into the conditioning regimen or as post-transplant maintenance therapy could further improve outcomes and render older or medically infirm patients with refractory or relapsed AML eligible for allogeneic HCT. In this review, we summarize existing data on allogeneic HCT in patients with refractory or relapsed AML and explore novel approaches with the potential to improve outcomes in this patient population.Bone Marrow Transplantation advance online publication, 27 February 2017; doi:10.1038/bmt.2017.8.

  6. The efficacy of the ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor Didox in preclinical models of AML.

    PubMed

    Cook, Guerry J; Caudell, David L; Elford, Howard L; Pardee, Timothy S

    2014-01-01

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy which leads to marrow failure, and ultimately death. There is a desperate need for new therapeutics for these patients. Ribonucleotide reductase (RR) is the rate limiting enzyme in DNA synthesis. Didox (3,4-Dihydroxybenzohydroxamic acid) is a novel RR inhibitor noted to be more potent than hydroxyurea. In this report we detail the activity and toxicity of Didox in preclinical models of AML. RR was present in all AML cell lines and primary patient samples tested. Didox was active against all human and murine AML lines tested with IC50 values in the low micromolar range (mean IC50 37 µM [range 25.89-52.70 µM]). It was active against primary patient samples at concentrations that did not affect normal hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Didox exposure resulted in DNA damage and p53 induction culminating in apoptosis. In syngeneic, therapy-resistant AML models, single agent Didox treatment resulted in a significant reduction in leukemia burden and a survival benefit. Didox was well tolerated, as marrow from treated animals was morphologically indistinguishable from controls. Didox exposure at levels that impaired leukemia growth did not inhibit normal HSC engraftment. In summary, Didox was well tolerated and effective against preclinical models of AML.

  7. The Efficacy of the Ribonucleotide Reductase Inhibitor Didox in Preclinical Models of AML

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Guerry J.; Caudell, David L.; Elford, Howard L.; Pardee, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy which leads to marrow failure, and ultimately death. There is a desperate need for new therapeutics for these patients. Ribonucleotide reductase (RR) is the rate limiting enzyme in DNA synthesis. Didox (3,4-Dihydroxybenzohydroxamic acid) is a novel RR inhibitor noted to be more potent than hydroxyurea. In this report we detail the activity and toxicity of Didox in preclinical models of AML. RR was present in all AML cell lines and primary patient samples tested. Didox was active against all human and murine AML lines tested with IC50 values in the low micromolar range (mean IC50 37 µM [range 25.89–52.70 µM]). It was active against primary patient samples at concentrations that did not affect normal hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Didox exposure resulted in DNA damage and p53 induction culminating in apoptosis. In syngeneic, therapy-resistant AML models, single agent Didox treatment resulted in a significant reduction in leukemia burden and a survival benefit. Didox was well tolerated, as marrow from treated animals was morphologically indistinguishable from controls. Didox exposure at levels that impaired leukemia growth did not inhibit normal HSC engraftment. In summary, Didox was well tolerated and effective against preclinical models of AML. PMID:25402485

  8. Expression Profiling of Ribosome Biogenesis Factors Reveals Nucleolin as a Novel Potential Marker to Predict Outcome in AML Patients.

    PubMed

    Marcel, Virginie; Catez, Frédéric; Berger, Caroline M; Perrial, Emeline; Plesa, Adriana; Thomas, Xavier; Mattei, Eve; Hayette, Sandrine; Saintigny, Pierre; Bouvet, Philippe; Diaz, Jean-Jacques; Dumontet, Charles

    2017-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease. Prognosis is mainly influenced by patient age at diagnosis and cytogenetic alterations, two of the main factors currently used in AML patient risk stratification. However, additional criteria are required to improve the current risk classification and better adapt patient care. In neoplastic cells, ribosome biogenesis is increased to sustain the high proliferation rate and ribosome composition is altered to modulate specific gene expression driving tumorigenesis. Here, we investigated the usage of ribosome biogenesis factors as clinical markers in adult patients with AML. We showed that nucleoli, the nucleus compartments where ribosome production takes place, are modified in AML by analyzing a panel of AML and healthy donor cells using immunofluorescence staining. Using four AML series, including the TCGA dataset, altogether representing a total of about 270 samples, we showed that not all factors involved in ribosome biogenesis have clinical values although ribosome biogenesis is increased in AML. Interestingly, we identified the regulator of ribosome production nucleolin (NCL) as over-expressed in AML blasts. Moreover, we found in two series that high NCL mRNA expression level was associated with a poor overall survival, particular in elderly patients. Multivariate analyses taking into account age and cytogenetic risk indicated that NCL expression in blast cells is an independent marker of reduced survival. Our study identifies NCL as a potential novel prognostic factor in AML. Altogether, our results suggest that the ribosome biogenesis pathway may be of interest as clinical markers in AML.

  9. AML1/Runx1 as a versatile regulator of hematopoiesis: regulation of its function and a role in adult hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Mineo

    2006-08-01

    AML1/Runx1, originally identified as a gene located at the breakpoint of the t(8;21) translocation, encodes a transcription factor that is widely expressed in multiple hematopoietic lineages and that regulates the expression of a variety of hematopoietic genes. Numerous studies have shown that AML1 is a critical regulator of hematopoietic development. In addition, AML1 is a frequent target for chromosomal translocation in human leukemia. The activity of AML1 can be modulated by various types of posttranslational modification, including phosphorylation and acetylation. Phosphorylation by extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) is one of the mechanisms that dictate whether AML1 acts as either a transcriptional repressor or an activator of gene expression. Recently, a physiological role for AML1 in adult hematopoiesis was revealed by conditional gene targeting in mice. Remarkably, adult hematopoietic progenitors are maintained even in the absence of AML1, in stark contrast to the total disruption of definitive hematopoiesis during embryogenesis. AML1 is, however, critical for megakaryopoiesis and plays an important role in T-cell and B-cell development in adult mice. Recent analyses engineered to recreate hematopoiesis in vitro revealed that the transcriptional activity of AML1 is closely related with the potential of AML1 to generate hematopoietic cells and support thymocyte development.

  10. Expression Profiling of Ribosome Biogenesis Factors Reveals Nucleolin as a Novel Potential Marker to Predict Outcome in AML Patients

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Caroline M.; Perrial, Emeline; Plesa, Adriana; Thomas, Xavier; Mattei, Eve; Hayette, Sandrine; Saintigny, Pierre; Bouvet, Philippe; Diaz, Jean-Jacques; Dumontet, Charles

    2017-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease. Prognosis is mainly influenced by patient age at diagnosis and cytogenetic alterations, two of the main factors currently used in AML patient risk stratification. However, additional criteria are required to improve the current risk classification and better adapt patient care. In neoplastic cells, ribosome biogenesis is increased to sustain the high proliferation rate and ribosome composition is altered to modulate specific gene expression driving tumorigenesis. Here, we investigated the usage of ribosome biogenesis factors as clinical markers in adult patients with AML. We showed that nucleoli, the nucleus compartments where ribosome production takes place, are modified in AML by analyzing a panel of AML and healthy donor cells using immunofluorescence staining. Using four AML series, including the TCGA dataset, altogether representing a total of about 270 samples, we showed that not all factors involved in ribosome biogenesis have clinical values although ribosome biogenesis is increased in AML. Interestingly, we identified the regulator of ribosome production nucleolin (NCL) as over-expressed in AML blasts. Moreover, we found in two series that high NCL mRNA expression level was associated with a poor overall survival, particular in elderly patients. Multivariate analyses taking into account age and cytogenetic risk indicated that NCL expression in blast cells is an independent marker of reduced survival. Our study identifies NCL as a potential novel prognostic factor in AML. Altogether, our results suggest that the ribosome biogenesis pathway may be of interest as clinical markers in AML. PMID:28103300

  11. Sex disparity in childhood and young adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) survival: Evidence from US population data.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Jobayer; Xie, Li

    2015-12-01

    Sex variation has been persistently investigated in studies concerning acute myeloid leukemia (AML) survival outcomes but has not been fully explored among pediatric and young adult AML patients. We detected sex difference in the survival of AML patients diagnosed at ages 0-24 years and explored distinct effects of sex across subgroups of age at diagnosis, race-ethnicity and AML subtypes utilizing the United States Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) population based dataset of 4865 patients diagnosed with AML between 1973 and 2012. Kaplan-Meier survival function, propensity scores and stratified Cox proportional hazards regression were used for data analyses. After controlling for other prognostic factors, females showed a significant survival advantage over their male counterparts, adjusted hazard ratio (aHR, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.09, 1.00-1.18). Compared to females, male patients had substantially increased risk of mortality in the following subgroups of: ages 20-24 years at diagnosis (aHR1.30), Caucasian (1.14), acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) (1.35), acute erythroid leukemia (AEL) (1.39), AML with inv(16)(p13.1q22) (2.57), AML with minimum differentiation (1.47); and had substantially decreased aHR in AML t(9;11)(p22;q23) (0.57) and AML with maturation (0.82). Overall, females demonstrated increased survival over males and this disparity was considerably large in patients ages 20-24 years at diagnosis, Caucasians, and in AML subtypes of AML inv(16), APL and AEL. In contrast, males with AML t(9;11)(p22;q23), AML with maturation and age at diagnosis of 10-14 years showed survival benefit. Further investigations are needed to detect the biological processes influencing the mechanisms of these interactions.

  12. Grundlegende Steuerungsverfahren im heterogenen Logistiknetz mit Kanban

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickmann, Eva; Dickmann, Philipp; Lödding, Hermann; Möller, Niklas; Rücker, Thomas; Schneider, Herfried M.; Zäh, Michael F.

    In vielen Unternehmen werden heterogene (verschiedene) Steuerungen in einem abgestimmten Konzept kombiniert. Je nach Anwendungsfall und Rahmenbedingungen werden Kombinationen allgemein bekannter Steuerungen oder Steuerungsvarianten gemischt eingesetzt, um eine optimale Steuerung für unterschiedliche Fälle zu erreichen. Hierbei stehen neben den bekannten und weit verbreiteten Methoden, wie Material Requirements Planning (MRP) oder Kanban, auch weniger bekannte oder neue Methoden zur Auswahl, wie die Produktionssteuerung mit dezentraler, bestandsorientierter Fertigungsregelung (DBF). Kanban ist ein simples und effizientes Steuerungskonzept, das in der klassischen Form für spezifische einfache Anwendungsfälle umsetzbar ist. Hochentwickelte Steuerungsalgorithmen können helfen, komplexe Abläufe optimal abzubilden. Mit einer grundlegenden Vereinfachung der Abläufe kann allerdings in vielen Fällen ein wesentlich stärkerer und umfassender Verbesserungseffekt erzielt werden. Die wesentliche Fragestellung sollte folglich lauten: Warum ist der Ablauf nicht mit einer einfachen Steuerung wie Kanban abzubilden? Um die Vorteile des Konzepts auch in untypischen Bereichen anwenden zu können, sind jedoch verschiedene Varianten oder Kanban-ähnliche Steuerungsmethoden entstanden. Darüber hinaus sind in der Praxis hybride Steuerungen im Einsatz, welche so kombiniert werden, dass die Zusammensetzung anspruchsvolle Eigenschaftsbilder noch exakt abbildet. In der Praxis basieren die Steuerungsentscheidungen nur zu einem kleinen Teil auf den eigentlichen Steuerungsalgorithmen, wie sie uns das MRP-System zur Verfügung stellt. Moderne Steuerungswelten" schließen alle relevanten Informationsquellen in eine heterogene Entscheidungsmatrix mit ein. Letztlich zählt nicht, ob die Entscheidung auf den Informationen aus dem MRP-System oder auf Softfacts basierend getroffen wurde, sondern nur, ob die Entscheidung erfolgreich war.

  13. Mishap Investigation Team (MIT) - Barksdale AFB, Louisiana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepaniak, Philip

    2005-01-01

    The Shuttle Program is organized to support a Shuttle mishap using the resources of the MIT. The afternoon of Feb. 1, 2003, the MIT deployed to Barksdale AFB. This location became the investigative center and interim storage location for crewmembers received from the Lufkin Disaster Field Office (DFO). Working under the leadership of the MIT Lead, the medical team executed a short-term plan that included search, recovery, and identification including coordination with the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology Temporary operations was set up at Barksdale Air Force Base for two weeks. During this time, coordination with the DFO field recovery teams, AFIP personnel, and the crew surgeons was on going. In addition, the crewmember families and NASA management were updated daily. The medical team also dealt with public reports and questions concerning biological and chemical hazards, which were coordinated with SPACEHAB, Inc., Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Medical Operations and the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Space Medicine office. After operations at Barksdale were concluded the medical team transitioned back to Houston and a long-term search, recovery and identification plan was developed.

  14. CD14 mediated endogenous TNF-alpha release in HL60 AML cells: a potential model for CD14 mediated endogenous cytokine release in the treatment of AML.

    PubMed

    Treon, S P; Anand, B; Ulevitch, R; Broitman, S A

    1994-01-01

    In previous studies, HL60 AML cells treated with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF), interferon-gamma (IFN), and lipopolysaccharides (LPS) displayed decreased growth and viability, enhanced monocytic pathway differentiation and endogenous TNF release. Endogenous TNF release by LPS/TNF/IFN treated HL60 cells was postulated to play a role with the above findings. In these studies, HL60 cells expressed CD14 when treated with TNF, IFN, and LPS. CD14 mediates TNF release in monocytes/macrophages in response to binding of LPS with LPS binding protein (LBP). CD14 was not expressed in either untreated or LPS only treated HL60 cells. CD14 expression was present and greater with HL60 cells cultured with LPS/TNF/IFN vs TNF/IFN (47.47% vs 9.07% positive, respectively) suggesting synergism for LPS in CD14 induction. CD14 expression was associated with endogenous TNF release, and with significantly higher levels by HL60 cells treated with LPS/TNF/IFN vs TNF/IFN (p < 0.001). Addition of anti-CD14 antibody significantly reduced release of TNF in TNF/IFN (p < 0.001) and LPS/TNF/IFN (p = 0.0013) treated cells. KG1 and U937 AML cells treated with LPS, TNF, and IFN did not express CD14, nor release TNF. A model for inducing release of endogenous growth inhibitory cytokines by CD14 bearing AML cells is proposed as an approach to AML therapy.

  15. Molecular Changes During Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) Evolution and Identification of Novel Treatment Strategies Through Molecular Stratification.

    PubMed

    Karjalainen, E; Repasky, G A

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a hematopoietic malignancy characterized by impaired differentiation and uncontrollable proliferation of myeloid progenitor cells. Due to high relapse rates, overall survival for this rapidly progressing disease is poor. The significant challenge in AML treatment is disease heterogeneity stemming from variability in maturation state of leukemic cells of origin, genetic aberrations among patients, and existence of multiple disease clones within a single patient. Disease heterogeneity and the lack of biomarkers for drug sensitivity lie at the root of treatment failure as well as selective efficacy of AML chemotherapies and the emergence of drug resistance. Furthermore, standard-of-care treatment is aggressive, presenting significant tolerability concerns to the commonly advanced-age AML patient. In this review, we examine the concept and potential of molecular stratification, particularly with biologically relevant drug responses, in identifying low-toxicity precision therapeutic combinations and clinically relevant biomarkers for AML patient care as a way to overcome these challenges in AML treatment.

  16. Trisomy 8 in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia: A NOPHO-AML study.

    PubMed

    Laursen, Anne Cathrine Lund; Sandahl, Julie Damgaard; Kjeldsen, Eigil; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Asdahl, Peter; Ha, Shau-Yin; Heldrup, Jesper; Jahnukainen, Kirsi; Jónsson, Ólafur G; Lausen, Birgitte; Palle, Josefine; Zeller, Bernward; Forestier, Erik; Hasle, Henrik

    2016-09-01

    Trisomy 8 (+8) is a common cytogenetic aberration in acute myeloid leukemia (AML); however, the impact of +8 in pediatric AML is largely unknown. We retrospectively investigated 609 patients from the NOPHO-AML database to determine the clinical and cytogenetic characteristics of +8 in pediatric AML and to investigate its prognostic impact. Complete cytogenetic data were available in 596 patients (98%) aged 0-18 years, diagnosed from 1993 to 2012, and treated according to the NOPHO-AML 1993 and 2004 protocols in the Nordic countries and Hong Kong. We identified 86 patients (14%) with +8. Trisomy 8 was combined with other cytogenetic aberrations in 68 patients (11%) (+8 other) and in 18 patients (3%), it was the sole abnormality (+8 alone). Trisomy 8 was associated with FAB M5 (36%) but otherwise clinically comparable with non-trisomy 8 patients. Trisomy 8 was favorable in patients of young age and with t(9;11). Trisomy 8 alone was associated with older age (median age 10.1 years), FAB M2 (33%), and FLT3-ITD mutations (58%). The 5-year event-free survival for patients with +8 alone was 50% and 5-year overall survival was 75%. In conclusion, +8 is one of the most common cytogenetic aberrations in pediatric AML. Trisomy 8 positive AML is a heterogeneous group and the majority of cases have additional cytogenetic aberrations. Patients with +8 alone differed from patients with +8 other and were associated with older age, FAB M2, and FLT3-ITD aberrations. There were no differences in survival despite the more frequent occurrence of FLT3-ITD in +8 alone. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. A stable transcription factor complex nucleated by oligomeric AML1–ETO controls leukaemogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xiao-Jian; Wang, Zhanxin; Wang, Lan; Jiang, Yanwen; Kost, Nils; Soong, T. David; Chen, Wei-Yi; Tang, Zhanyun; Nakadai, Tomoyoshi; Elemento, Olivier; Fischle, Wolfgang; Melnick, Ari; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Nimer, Stephen D.; Roeder, Robert G.

    2013-06-30

    Transcription factors are frequently altered in leukaemia through chromosomal translocation, mutation or aberrant expression. AML1–ETO, a fusion protein generated by the t(8;21) translocation in acute myeloid leukaemia, is a transcription factor implicated in both gene repression and activation. AML1–ETO oligomerization, mediated by the NHR2 domain, is critical for leukaemogenesis, making it important to identify co-regulatory factors that ‘read’ the NHR2 oligomerization and contribute to leukaemogenesis. Here we show that, in human leukaemic cells, AML1–ETO resides in and functions through a stable AML1–ETO-containing transcription factor complex (AETFC) that contains several haematopoietic transcription (co)factors. These AETFC components stabilize the complex through multivalent interactions, provide multiple DNA-binding domains for diverse target genes, co-localize genome wide, cooperatively regulate gene expression, and contribute to leukaemogenesis. Within the AETFC complex, AML1–ETO oligomerization is required for a specific interaction between the oligomerized NHR2 domain and a novel NHR2-binding (N2B) motif in E proteins. Crystallographic analysis of the NHR2–N2B complex reveals a unique interaction pattern in which an N2B peptide makes direct contact with side chains of two NHR2 domains as a dimer, providing a novel model of how dimeric/oligomeric transcription factors create a new protein-binding interface through dimerization/oligomerization. Intriguingly, disruption of this interaction by point mutations abrogates AML1–ETO-induced haematopoietic stem/progenitor cell self-renewal and leukaemogenesis. These results reveal new mechanisms of action of AML1–ETO, and provide a potential therapeutic target in t(8;21)-positive acute myeloid leukaemia.

  18. TET2 exon 2 skipping is an independent favorable prognostic factor for cytogenetically normal acute myelogenous leukemia (AML): TET2 exon 2 skipping in AML.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Aminetou Mint; Balsat, Marie; Koering, Catherine; Maucort-Boulch, Delphine; Boissel, Nicolas; Payen-Gay, Lea; Cheok, Meyling; Mortada, Hussein; Auboeuf, Didier; Pinatel, Christiane; El-Hamri, Mohamed; Tigaud, Isabelle; Hayette, Sandrine; Dumontet, Charles; Cros, Emeline; Flandrin-Gresta, Pascale; Nibourel, Olivier; Preudhomme, Claude; Thomas, Xavier; Nicolini, Franck-Emmanuel; Solly, Françoise; Guyotat, Denis; Campos, Lydia; Michallet, Mauricette; Ceraulo, Antony; Mortreux, Franck; Wattel, Eric

    2017-01-16

    In AML, approximately one-third of expressed genes are abnormally spliced, including aberrant TET2 exon 2 expression. In a discovery cohort (n=99), TET2 exon 2 skipping (TET2E2S) was found positively associated with a significant reduction in the cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR). Age, cytogenetics, and TET2E2S were independent prognostic factors for disease-free survival (DFS), and favorable effects on outcomes predominated in cytogenetic normal (CN)-AML and younger patients. Using the same cutoff in a validation cohort of 86 CN-AML patients, TET2E2S(high) patients were found to be younger than TET2(low) patients without a difference in the rate of complete remission. However, TET2E2S(high) patients exhibited a significantly lower CIR (p<10(-4)). TET2E2S and FLT3-ITD, but not age or NPM1 mutation status were independent prognostic factors for DFS and event-free survival (EFS), while TET2E2S was the sole prognostic factor that we identified for overall survival (OS). In both the intermediate-1 and favorable ELN genetic categories, TET2E2S remained significantly associated with prolonged survival. There was no correlation between TET2E2S status and outcomes in 34 additional AML patients who were unfit for IC. Therefore our results suggest that assessments of TET2 exon 2 splicing status might improve risk stratification in CN-AML patients treated with IC.

  19. Outcome of children with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) experiencing primary induction failure in the AIEOP AML 2002/01 clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Quarello, Paola; Fagioli, Franca; Basso, Giuseppe; Putti, Maria C; Berger, Massimo; Luciani, Matteo; Rizzari, Carmelo; Menna, Giuseppe; Masetti, Riccardo; Locatelli, Franco

    2015-11-01

    Paediatric patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) who fail induction due to primary resistance to chemotherapy account for a significant proportion of cases and have a particularly dismal prognosis. We report the clinical and biological data, and final outcome of 48 paediatric patients with primary-resistant AML enrolled in the Associazione Italiana di Ematologia e Oncologia Pediatrica AML 2002/01 clinical trial. These patients had a significantly higher white blood cell count at diagnosis compared to other AML patients. Cytogenetic and molecular features did not differ between patients with primary induction failure and patients allocated to the high-risk group. For the whole patient population, the probability of overall survival, event-free survival (EFS) and disease-free survival (DFS) was 21·8% ± 6·2, 20·4% ± 5·9, and 49·5% ± 11·3, respectively. Twenty-eight (58%) patients received haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT); 3 were autologous and 25 were allogeneic. Patients who underwent HSCT had improved EFS (31·2% vs. 5%, P < 0·0001). Only one of the 20 patients who did not receive HSCT is alive and disease free. The 19 patients in complete remission at time of HSCT showed significantly better DFS than the 9 with active disease (46% vs. 0%, P = 0·02). This study represents one of the largest series with long-term follow up of paediatric AML patients with primary refractory disease. Children who underwent transplantation had an encouraging long-term outcome. Disease recurrence remains the major cause of treatment failure; a better understanding of the disease biology is desirable to develop more effective treatment strategies.

  20. Cellular Reprogramming Allows Generation of Autologous Hematopoietic Progenitors From AML Patients That Are Devoid of Patient-Specific Genomic Aberrations.

    PubMed

    Salci, Kyle R; Lee, Jong-Hee; Laronde, Sarah; Dingwall, Steve; Kushwah, Rahul; Fiebig-Comyn, Aline; Leber, Brian; Foley, Ronan; Dal Cin, Arianna; Bhatia, Mickie

    2015-06-01

    Current treatments that use hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) transplantation in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients substantially reduce the risk of relapse, but are limited by the availability of immune compatible healthy HPCs. Although cellular reprogramming has the potential to provide a novel autologous source of HPCs for transplantation, the applicability of this technology toward the derivation of healthy autologous hematopoietic cells devoid of patient-specific leukemic aberrations from AML patients must first be evaluated. Here, we report the generation of human AML patient-specific hematopoietic progenitors that are capable of normal in vitro differentiation to myeloid lineages and are devoid of leukemia-associated aberration found in matched patient bone marrow. Skin fibroblasts were obtained from AML patients whose leukemic cells possessed a distinct, leukemia-associated aberration, and used to create AML patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Through hematopoietic differentiation of AML patient iPSCs, coupled with cytogenetic interrogation, we reveal that AML patient-specific HPCs possess normal progenitor capacity and are devoid of leukemia-associated mutations. Importantly, in rare patient skin samples that give rise to mosaic fibroblast cultures that continue to carry leukemia-associated mutations; healthy hematopoietic progenitors can also be generated via reprogramming selection. Our findings provide the proof of principle that cellular reprogramming can be applied on a personalized basis to generate healthy HPCs from AML patients, and should further motivate advances toward creating transplantable hematopoietic stem cells for autologous AML therapy.

  1. Consolidation with autologous stem cell transplantation in first remission is safe and effective in AML patients above 65 years.

    PubMed

    Heini, Alexander D; Berger, Martin D; Seipel, Katja; Taleghani, Behrouz Mansouri; Baerlocher, Gabriela M; Leibundgut, Kurt; Banz, Yara; Novak, Urban; Pabst, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    The outcome of AML patients ≥65 years remains disappointing. Current post-induction strategies for elderly AML patients fit for intensive treatment involve additional cycles of chemotherapy or allogeneic transplantation. Consolidation with autologous transplantation (ASCT) is poorly studied in these patients. In this single-center retrospective analysis, we determined survival rates of AML patients ≥65 years undergoing busulfan/cyclophosphamide conditioning before ASCT in first remission between 2007 and 2015. We found elderly AML patients with ASCT to have longer progression-free survival (PFS; 16.3 vs. 5.1 months, P=0.0166) and overall survival (OS; n.r. vs. 8.2 months; P=0.0255) than elderly AML patients without ASCT consolidation. In addition, elderly AML patients undergoing ASCT had comparable PFS (P=0.9462) and OS (P=0.7867) as AML patients below 65 years receiving ASCT consolidation in CR1. Our data suggest that ASCT is an option in elderly fit AML patients who appear to benefit from autologous consolidation similarly to younger AML patients.

  2. Highly effective combination of LSD1 (KDM1A) antagonist and pan-histone deacetylase inhibitor against human AML cells.

    PubMed

    Fiskus, W; Sharma, S; Shah, B; Portier, B P; Devaraj, S G T; Liu, K; Iyer, S P; Bearss, D; Bhalla, K N

    2014-11-01

    The histone demethylase LSD1 (KDM1A) demethylates mono- and di-methylated (Me2) lysine (K) 4 on histone H3. High LSD1 expression blocks differentiation and confers a poor prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Here, treatment with the novel LSD1 antagonist SP2509 attenuated the binding of LSD1 with the corepressor CoREST, increased the permissive H3K4Me3 mark on the target gene promoters, and increased the levels of p21, p27 and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α in cultured AML cells. In addition, SP2509 treatment or LSD1 shRNA inhibited the colony growth of AML cells. SP2509 also induced morphological features of differentiation in the cultured and primary AML blasts. SP2509 induced more apoptosis of AML cells expressing mutant NPM1 than mixed-lineage leukemia fusion oncoproteins. Treatment with SP2509 alone significantly improved the survival of immune-depleted mice following tail-vein infusion and engraftment of cultured or primary human AML cells. Co-treatment with pan-HDAC inhibitor (HDI) panobinostat (PS) and SP2509 was synergistically lethal against cultured and primary AML blasts. Compared with each agent alone, co-treatment with SP2509 and PS significantly improved the survival of the mice engrafted with the human AML cells, without exhibiting any toxicity. Collectively, these findings show that the combination of LSD1 antagonist and pan-HDI is a promising therapy warranting further testing against AML.

  3. CHK1 as a therapeutic target to bypass chemoresistance in AML.

    PubMed

    David, Laure; Fernandez-Vidal, Anne; Bertoli, Sarah; Grgurevic, Srdana; Lepage, Benoît; Deshaies, Dominique; Prade, Naïs; Cartel, Maëlle; Larrue, Clément; Sarry, Jean-Emmanuel; Delabesse, Eric; Cazaux, Christophe; Didier, Christine; Récher, Christian; Manenti, Stéphane; Hoffmann, Jean-Sébastien

    2016-09-13

    The nucleoside analog cytarabine, an inhibitor of DNA replication fork progression that results in DNA damage, is currently used in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We explored the prognostic value of the expression of 72 genes involved in various aspects of DNA replication in a set of 198 AML patients treated by cytarabine-based chemotherapy. We unveiled that high expression of the DNA replication checkpoint gene CHEK1 is a prognostic marker associated with shorter overall, event-free, and relapse-free survivals and determined that the expression of CHEK1 can predict more frequent and earlier postremission relapse. CHEK1 encodes checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1), which is activated by the kinase ATR when DNA replication is impaired by DNA damage. High abundance of CHK1 in AML patient cells correlated with higher clonogenic ability and more efficient DNA replication fork progression upon cytarabine treatment. Exposing the patient cells with the high abundance of CHK1 to SCH900776, an inhibitor of the kinase activity of CHK1, reduced clonogenic ability and progression of DNA replication in the presence of cytarabine. These results indicated that some AML cells rely on an efficient CHK1-mediated replication stress response for viability and that therapeutic strategies that inhibit CHK1 could extend current cytarabine-based treatments and overcome drug resistance. Furthermore, monitoring CHEK1 expression could be used both as a predictor of outcome and as a marker to select AML patients for CHK1 inhibitor treatments.

  4. Age-related epigenetic drift in the pathogenesis of MDS and AML.

    PubMed

    Maegawa, Shinji; Gough, Sheryl M; Watanabe-Okochi, Naoko; Lu, Yue; Zhang, Nianxiang; Castoro, Ryan J; Estecio, Marcos R H; Jelinek, Jaroslav; Liang, Shoudan; Kitamura, Toshio; Aplan, Peter D; Issa, Jean-Pierre J

    2014-04-01

    The myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a clonal hematologic disorder that frequently evolves to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Its pathogenesis remains unclear, but mutations in epigenetic modifiers are common and the disease often responds to DNA methylation inhibitors. We analyzed DNA methylation in the bone marrow and spleen in two mouse models of MDS/AML, the NUP98-HOXD13 (NHD13) mouse and the RUNX1 mutant mouse model. Methylation array analysis showed an average of 512/3445 (14.9%) genes hypermethylated in NHD13 MDS, and 331 (9.6%) genes hypermethylated in RUNX1 MDS. Thirty-two percent of genes in common between the two models (2/3 NHD13 mice and 2/3 RUNX1 mice) were also hypermethylated in at least two of 19 human MDS samples. Detailed analysis of 41 genes in mice showed progressive drift in DNA methylation from young to old normal bone marrow and spleen; to MDS, where we detected accelerated age-related methylation; and finally to AML, which markedly extends DNA methylation abnormalities. Most of these genes showed similar patterns in human MDS and AML. Repeat element hypomethylation was rare in MDS but marked the transition to AML in some cases. Our data show consistency in patterns of aberrant DNA methylation in human and mouse MDS and suggest that epigenetically, MDS displays an accelerated aging phenotype.

  5. Coordinate regulation of residual bone marrow function by paracrine trafficking of AML exosomes.

    PubMed

    Huan, J; Hornick, N I; Goloviznina, N A; Kamimae-Lanning, A N; David, L L; Wilmarth, P A; Mori, T; Chevillet, J R; Narla, A; Roberts, C T; Loriaux, M M; Chang, B H; Kurre, P

    2015-12-01

    We recently demonstrated that acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines and patient-derived blasts release exosomes that carry RNA and protein; following an in vitro transfer, AML exosomes produce proangiogenic changes in bystander cells. We reasoned that paracrine exosome trafficking may have a broader role in shaping the leukemic niche. In a series of in vitro studies and murine xenografts, we demonstrate that AML exosomes downregulate critical retention factors (Scf, Cxcl12) in stromal cells, leading to hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) mobilization from the bone marrow. Exosome trafficking also regulates HSPC directly, and we demonstrate declining clonogenicity, loss of CXCR4 and c-Kit expression, and the consistent repression of several hematopoietic transcription factors, including c-Myb, Cebp-β and Hoxa-9. Additional experiments using a model of extramedullary AML or direct intrafemoral injection of purified exosomes reveal that the erosion of HSPC function can occur independent of direct cell-cell contact with leukemia cells. Finally, using a novel multiplex proteomics technique, we identified candidate pathways involved in the direct exosome-mediated modulation of HSPC function. In aggregate, this work suggests that AML exosomes participate in the suppression of residual hematopoietic function that precedes widespread leukemic invasion of the bone marrow directly and indirectly via stromal components.

  6. MIT - Mighty Steps toward Energy Sustainability

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Alastair; Regnier, Cindy; Settlemyre, Kevin; Bosnic, Zorana

    2012-07-01

    Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and implement solutions to retrofit existing buildings to reduce energy consumption by at least 30% as part of DOE’s Commercial Building Partnerships (CBP) Program.1 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) provided technical expertise in support of this DOE program. MIT is one of the U.S.’s foremost higher education institutions, occupying a campus that is nearly 100 years old, with a building floor area totaling more than 12 million square feet. The CBP project focused on improving the energy performance of two campus buildings, the Ray and Maria Stata Center (RMSC) and the Building W91 (BW91) data center. A key goal of the project was to identify energy saving measures that could be applied to other buildings both within MIT’s portfolio and at other higher education institutions. The CBP retrofits at MIT are projected to reduce energy consumption by approximately 48%, including a reduction of around 72% in RMSC lighting energy and a reduction of approximately 55% in RMSC server room HVAC energy. The energy efficiency measure (EEM) package proposed for the BW91 data center is expected to reduce heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) energy use by 30% to 50%, depending on the final air intake temperature that is established for the server racks. The RMSC, an iconic building designed by Frank Gehry, houses the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, the Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems, and the Department of Linguistics and Philosophy.

  7. MIT Space Engineering Research Center testbed programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawley, Edward F.; Miller, David W.

    1991-01-01

    The Space Engineering Research Center (SERC) at M.I.T., started in July 1988, has completed two and one-half years of research. This Semi-Annual Report presents annotated viewgraph material presented at the January 1991 Steering Committee and Technical Representative Review. The objective of the Space Engineering Research Center is to develop and disseminate a unified technology of controlled structures. There has been continued evolution of the concept of intelligent structures (including in this past year the first successful embedding of a microelectronic component into a structural element).

  8. The MIT Program, Competition, and Ethics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradt, Hale V.

    2013-01-01

    The MIT program in x-ray astronomy was, and still is, diverse and productive. Bruno Rossi and later George Clark, as the nominal leaders of the “x-ray astronomy group” created a “hands-off” culture wherein individual researchers could develop their own independent programs. Walter Lewin, Claude Canizares, and I as well as those in the next academic generations, e.g., Saul Rappaport and George Ricker, were able to thrive in this environment. MIT researchers were principal investigators or providers of x-ray instruments on sounding rockets and balloons in the 1960s and then in later years on nine satellite missions, OSO-7, SAS-3, HEAO-1, Einstein, ASCA, RXTE, Chandra, HETE-2, and Suzaku. Such a diverse program involved collaborations with other institutions and of course striving for primacy in discovery and competition for NASA resources. Looking back, I see a high degree of ethical behavior among the observational x-ray community during those years. In competition, we remembered that we might well be collaborating the following year and behaved accordingly. Many of us in the x-ray community had been friends since graduate school days and did not want to lose those relationships. Am I viewing the past through rose colored glasses? I think not. A vignette on this topic: In 1967, I was debating vigorously with Herb Gursky of AS&E about which institution, MIT or AS&E, should be the lead on the fourth paper (Oda et al. 1967, ApJ 148, L5) based on data from the 1966 AS&E rocket flight which had led to Allan Sandage’s (and Japanese) identification of Sco X-1 (Sandage, et al. 1966, ApJ. 146, 316). I and my Italian colleague, Gianfranco Spada, and our Japanese colleague, Minoru Oda, both then visiting MIT, had actively supported that flight. After one rather heated discussion with Herb about this, - I was the heated one; he always remained calm - he left my office saying: “Hale, however this comes out, let’s remain friends.” I treasured that comment and

  9. Prognostic factors of childhood and adolescent acute myeloid leukemia (AML) survival: evidence from four decades of US population data.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Jobayer; Xie, Li; Caywood, Emi H

    2015-10-01

    Growing insight into prognosis of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) survival has led to improved outcome over time and could be further enhanced through investigation using a large number of patients. To characterize the extent of the association of pediatric AML survival with its identified prognostic factors, we analyzed the United States population-based Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) large dataset of 3442 pediatric AML patients diagnosed and followed between 1973 and 2011 using a Cox proportional hazards model stratified by year of diagnosis. Patients diagnosed between 10 and 19 years of age were at a higher risk of death compared to those diagnosed before age 10 (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR): 1.30, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.17-1.44). African Americans (1.27, 1.09-1.48) and Hispanics (1.15, 1.00-1.32) had an elevated risk of mortality than Caucasians. Compared to the subtype acute promyelocytic leukemia, AML with minimal differentiation (2.44, 1.78-3.35); acute erythroid leukemia (2.34, 1.60-3.40); AML without maturation (1.87, 1.35-2.59); and most other AML subtypes had a higher risk of mortality, whereas AML with inv(16) had a substantially lower risk. Age at diagnosis, race-ethnicity, AML subtype, county level poverty and geographic region appeared as significant prognostic factors of pediatric AML survival in the US. Contrary to previous findings, the subtypes of AML with t(9;11)(p22;q23)MLLT3-MLL, AML without maturation and acute myelomonocytic leukemia emerged to be indicative of poor outcome.

  10. Targeting PI3Kδ and PI3Kγ signalling disrupts human AML survival and bone marrow stromal cell mediated protection.

    PubMed

    Pillinger, Genevra; Loughran, Niamh V; Piddock, Rachel E; Shafat, Manar S; Zaitseva, Lyubov; Abdul-Aziz, Amina; Lawes, Matthew J; Bowles, Kristian M; Rushworth, Stuart A

    2016-06-28

    Phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) is an enzyme group, known to regulate key survival pathways in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). It generates phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-triphosphate, which provides a membrane docking site for protein kinaseB activation. PI3K catalytic p110 subunits are divided into 4 isoforms; α,β,δ and γ. The PI3Kδ isoform is always expressed in AML cells, whereas the frequency of PI3Kγ expression is highly variable. The functions of these individual catalytic enzymes have not been fully resolved in AML, therefore using the PI3K p110δ and p110γ-targeted inhibitor IPI-145 (duvelisib) and specific p110δ and p110γ shRNA, we analysed the role of these two p110 subunits in human AML blast survival. The results show that PI3Kδ and PI3Kγ inhibition with IPI-145 has anti-proliferative activity in primary AML cells by inhibiting the activity of AKT and MAPK. Pre-treatment of AML cells with IPI-145 inhibits both adhesion and migration of AML blasts to bone marrow stromal cells. Using shRNA targeted to the individual isoforms we demonstrated that p110δ-knockdown had a more significant anti-proliferative effect on AML cells, whereas targeting p110γ-knockdown significantly inhibited AML migration. The results demonstrate that targeting both PI3Kδ and PI3Kγ to inhibit AML-BMSC interactions provides a biologic rationale for the pre-clinical evaluation of IPI-145 in AML.

  11. Clinical significance of in vivo cytarabine-induced gene expression signature in AML.

    PubMed

    Lamba, Jatinder K; Pounds, Stanley; Cao, Xueyuan; Crews, Kristine R; Cogle, Christopher R; Bhise, Neha; Raimondi, Susana C; Downing, James R; Baker, Sharyn D; Ribeiro, Raul C; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E

    2016-01-01

    Despite initial remission, ∼60-70% of adult and 30% of pediatric patients experience relapse or refractory AML. Studies so far have identified base line gene expression profiles of pathogenic and prognostic significance in AML; however, the extent of change in gene expression post-initiation of treatment has not been investigated. Exposure of leukemic cells to chemotherapeutic agents such as cytarabine, a mainstay of AML chemotherapy, can trigger adaptive response by influencing leukemic cell transcriptome and, hence, development of resistance or refractory disease. It is, however, challenging to perform such a study due to lack of availability of specimens post-drug treatment. The primary objective of this study was to identify in vivo cytarabine-induced changes in leukemia cell transcriptome and to evaluate their impact on clinical outcome. The results highlight genes relevant to cytarabine resistance and support the concept of targeting cytarabine-induced genes as a means of improving response.

  12. Donor lymphocyte infusions in AML and MDS: Enhancing the graft-versus-leukemia effect.

    PubMed

    Orti, Guillermo; Barba, Pere; Fox, Laura; Salamero, Olga; Bosch, Francesc; Valcarcel, David

    2017-04-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) represents the only curative therapy for many haematological malignancies. Its curative potential is mostly attributed to the graft-versus-leukemia effect (GvL), which is mainly driven by donor T-cells. Donor lymphocyte infusions (DLI), likewise a second allo-HCT, have become a standard approach to treat AML and MDS relapses post allo-HCT. Although DLI have been used in this setting for decades, its effectivity and toxicity are still unpredictable in many patients. Over these recent years, new DLI strategies and therapies have been developed for AML and MDS. In this review, we will overview the recent use of DLI for AML and MDS, with up to date information from novel studies and research lines.

  13. Characteristics, clinical outcome, and prognostic significance of IDH mutations in AML.

    PubMed

    DiNardo, Courtney D; Ravandi, Farhad; Agresta, Sam; Konopleva, Marina; Takahashi, Koichi; Kadia, Tapan; Routbort, Mark; Patel, Keyur P; Mark Brandt; Pierce, Sherry; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Cortes, Jorge; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2015-08-01

    The pathophysiology of IDH mutations in tumorigenesis is increasingly described, yet the prognostic significance of IDH1 and IDH2 mutations in AML remains controversial. The primary objective of this study was to define the natural history and prognosis of patients with AML and IDH1 or IDH2 mutations and provide historical survival expectations. A total of 826 patients treated from 2010 to 2014 at a single institution were evaluated, including 167 patients (20%) with AML and IDH1 or IDH2 mutations. Median age was 62 years (range 18-92). There were 59 IDH1-R132, 83 IDH2-R140, and 23 IDH2-R172 mutations. Clinicopathologic characteristics associated with IDH-mutations included older age, less frequent therapy-related status, and increased incidence of intermediate-risk cytogenetics, FLT3-ITD mutations, and NPM1 mutations. Remission rates (CR/CRi) by AML treatment status were: induction, 68%; Salvage-1 (S1), 42%; and Salvage-2 and beyond (S2+), 27%. No difference in response was identified by IDH mutation status. Similarly, overall survival (OS) was not dependent on IDH status within any cohort. The median OS was 15.4 months in induction, 8.7 months in S1, and 4.8 months in S2+. This analysis defines the clinical outcome associated with IDH-mutations in both the front-line and salvage AML treatment settings, and confirms that response rate and OS for both IDH-mutated and IDH wild-type AML patients is comparable. This provides contemporary data to be used for comparison with results of novel investigational (e.g., selective IDH inhibitor) strategies.

  14. Targeting FLT3-ITD signaling mediates ceramide-dependent mitophagy and attenuates drug resistance in AML.

    PubMed

    Dany, Mohammed; Gencer, Salih; Nganga, Rose; Thomas, Raquela J; Oleinik, Natalia; Baron, Kyla D; Szulc, Zdzislaw M; Ruvolo, Peter; Kornblau, Steven; Andreeff, Michael; Ogretmen, Besim

    2016-10-13

    Signaling pathways regulated by mutant Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3)-internal tandem duplication (ITD), which mediate resistance to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell death, are poorly understood. Here, we reveal that pro-cell death lipid ceramide generation is suppressed by FLT3-ITD signaling. Molecular or pharmacologic inhibition of FLT3-ITD reactivated ceramide synthesis, selectively inducing mitophagy and AML cell death. Mechanistically, FLT3-ITD targeting induced ceramide accumulation on the outer mitochondrial membrane, which then directly bound autophagy-inducing light chain 3 (LC3), involving its I35 and F52 residues, to recruit autophagosomes for execution of lethal mitophagy. Short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown of LC3 prevented AML cell death in response to FLT3-ITD inhibition by crenolanib, which was restored by wild-type (WT)-LC3, but not mutants of LC3 with altered ceramide binding (I35A-LC3 or F52A-LC3). Mitochondrial ceramide accumulation and lethal mitophagy induction in response to FLT3-ITD targeting was mediated by dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) activation via inhibition of protein kinase A-regulated S637 phosphorylation, resulting in mitochondrial fission. Inhibition of Drp1 prevented ceramide-dependent lethal mitophagy, and reconstitution of WT-Drp1 or phospho-null S637A-Drp1 but not its inactive phospho-mimic mutant (S637D-Drp1), restored mitochondrial fission and mitophagy in response to crenolanib in FLT3-ITD(+) AML cells expressing stable shRNA against endogenous Drp1. Moreover, activating FLT3-ITD signaling in crenolanib-resistant AML cells suppressed ceramide-dependent mitophagy and prevented cell death. FLT3-ITD(+) AML drug resistance is attenuated by LCL-461, a mitochondria-targeted ceramide analog drug, in vivo, which also induced lethal mitophagy in human AML blasts with clinically relevant FLT3 mutations. Thus, these data reveal a novel mechanism which regulates AML cell death by ceramide-dependent mitophagy in response

  15. Improved outcome of pediatric patients with acute megakaryoblastic leukemia in the AML-BFM 04 trial.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Jana; Zimmermann, Martin; Rasche, Mareike; von Neuhoff, Christine; Creutzig, Ursula; Dworzak, Michael; Reinhardt, Dirk; Klusmann, Jan-Henning

    2015-08-01

    Despite recent advances in the treatment of children with acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL) using intensified treatment protocols, clear prognostic indicators, and treatment recommendations for this acute myeloid leukemia (AML) subgroup are yet to be defined. Here, we report the outcome of 97 pediatric patients with de novo AMKL (excluding Down syndrome [DS]) enrolled in the prospective multicenter studies AML-BFM 98 and AML-BFM 04 (1998-2014). AMKL occurred in 7.4 % of pediatric AML cases, at younger age (median 1.44 years) and with lower white blood cell count (mean 16.5 × 10(9)/L) as compared to other AML subgroups. With 60 ± 5 %, children with AMKL had a lower 5-year overall survival (5-year OS; vs. 68 ± 1 %, P log rank = 0.038). Yet, we achieved an improved 5-year OS in AML-BFM 04 compared to AML-BFM 98 (70 ± 6 % vs. 45 ± 8 %, P log rank = 0.041). Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in first remission did not provide a significant survival benefit (5-year OS 70 ± 11 % vs. 63 ± 6 %; P Mantel-Byar = 0.85). Cytogenetic data were available for n = 78 patients. AMKL patients with gain of chromosome 21 had a superior 5-year OS (80 ± 9 %, P log rank = 0.034), whereas translocation t(1;22)(p13;q13) was associated with an inferior 5-year event-free survival (38 ± 17 %, P log rank = 0.04). However, multivariate analysis showed that treatment response (bone marrow morphology on day 15 and 28) was the only independent prognostic marker (RR = 4.39; 95 % CI, 1.97-9.78). Interestingly, GATA1-mutations were detected in six patients (11 %) without previously known trisomy 21. Thus, AMKL (excluding DS) remains an AML subgroup with inferior outcome. Nevertheless, with intensive therapy regimens, a steep increase in the survival rates was achieved.

  16. The promoter of miR-663 is hypermethylated in Chinese pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is growing evidence supporting a role for microRNAs (miRNA) as targets in aberrant mechanisms of DNA hypermethylation. Epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor miRNAs, including miR-663, which has recently been reported to be inactivated by hypermethylation in several cancers, may play important roles in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, expression of miR-663 and its promoter methylation remain status unclear in childhood leukemia. Methods Promoter methylation status of miR-663 was investigated by methylation specific PCR (MSP) and bisulfate genomic sequencing (BGS). Transcriptional expression of miR-663 was evaluated by semi-quantitative and real-time PCR, and the relationship between expression of miR-663 and promoter methylation was confirmed using 5-aza-2’-deoxycytidine (5-Aza) demethylation reagent. Results MiR-663 was aberrantly methylated in 45.5% (5/11) leukemia cell lines; BGS showed that the promoter was significantly methylated in three AML cell lines; methylation of miR-663 was significantly higher in Chinese pediatric AML patients [41.4% (29/70)] compared to normal bone marrow (NBM) control samples [10.0% (3/30)]. These results were confirmed by both BGS and 5-Aza demethylation analysis. In addition, miR-663 transcript expression was significantly lower in AML patients, both with and without miR-663 methylation, compared to controls; however, there were no significant differences in clinical features or French-American-British (FAB) classification between patients with and without miR-663 methylation. Conclusions Expression of miR-663 was significantly lower in pediatric AML cells compared to NBM controls; furthermore, a high frequency of miR-663 promoter hypermethylation was observed in both AML cell lines and pediatric AML samples. Inactivation of miR-663 by promoter hypermethylation could be affected by 5-Aza demethylation. These findings suggest that hypermethylation of the miR-663 promoter may be an early event in

  17. An Implementation and Evaluation of the AMLS Method for SparseEigenvalue Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Weiguo; Li, Xiaoye S.; Yang, Chao; Bai, Zhaojun

    2006-02-14

    We describe an efficient implementation and present aperformance study of an algebraic multilevel sub-structuring (AMLS)method for sparse eigenvalue problems. We assess the time and memoryrequirements associated with the key steps of the algorithm, and compareitwith the shift-and-invert Lanczos algorithm in computational cost. Oureigenvalue problems come from two very different application areas: theaccelerator cavity design and the normal mode vibrational analysis of thepolyethylene particles. We show that the AMLS method, when implementedcarefully, is very competitive with the traditional method in broadapplication areas, especially when large numbers of eigenvalues aresought.

  18. ELMO1 Is Upregulated in AML CD34+ Stem/Progenitor Cells, Mediates Chemotaxis and Predicts Poor Prognosis in Normal Karyotype AML

    PubMed Central

    Capala, Marta E.; Vellenga, Edo; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Both normal as well leukemic hematopoietic stem cells critically depend on their microenvironment in the bone marrow for processes such as self-renewal, survival and differentiation, although the exact pathways that are involved remain poorly understood. We performed transcriptome analysis on primitive CD34+ acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells (n = 46), their more differentiated CD34− leukemic progeny, and normal CD34+ bone marrow cells (n = 31) and focused on differentially expressed genes involved in adhesion and migration. Thus, Engulfment and Motility protein 1 (ELMO1) was identified amongst the top 50 most differentially expressed genes. ELMO1 is a crucial link in the signaling cascade that leads to activation of RAC GTPases and cytoskeleton rearrangements. We confirmed increased ELMO1 expression at the mRNA and protein level in a panel of AML samples and showed that high ELMO1 expression is an independent negative prognostic factor in normal karyotype (NK) AML in three large independent patient cohorts. Downmodulation of ELMO1 in human CB CD34+ cells did not significantly alter expansion, progenitor frequency or differentiation in stromal co-cultures, but did result in a decreased frequency of stem cells in LTC-IC assays. In BCR-ABL-transduced human CB CD34+ cells depletion of ELMO1 resulted in a mild decrease in proliferation, but replating capacity of progenitors was severely impaired. Downregulation of ELMO1 in a panel of primary CD34+ AML cells also resulted in reduced long-term growth in stromal co-cultures in two out of three cases. Pharmacological inhibition of the ELMO1 downstream target RAC resulted in a severely impaired proliferation and survival of leukemic cells. Finally, ELMO1 depletion caused a marked decrease in SDF1-induced chemotaxis of leukemic cells. Taken together, these data show that inhibiting the ELMO1-RAC axis might be an alternative way to target leukemic cells. PMID:25360637

  19. Targeting the kinase activities of ATR and ATM exhibits antitumoral activity in mouse models of MLL-rearranged AML.

    PubMed

    Morgado-Palacin, Isabel; Day, Amanda; Murga, Matilde; Lafarga, Vanesa; Anton, Marta Elena; Tubbs, Anthony; Chen, Hua-Tang; Ergan, Aysegul; Anderson, Rhonda; Bhandoola, Avinash; Pike, Kurt G; Barlaam, Bernard; Cadogan, Elaine; Wang, Xi; Pierce, Andrew J; Hubbard, Chad; Armstrong, Scott A; Nussenzweig, André; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar

    2016-09-13

    Among the various subtypes of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), those with chromosomal rearrangements of the MLL oncogene (AML-MLL) have a poor prognosis. AML-MLL tumor cells are resistant to current genotoxic therapies because of an attenuated response by p53, a protein that induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in response to DNA damage. In addition to chemicals that damage DNA, efforts have focused on targeting DNA repair enzymes as a general chemotherapeutic approach to cancer treatment. Here, we found that inhibition of the kinase ATR, which is the primary sensor of DNA replication stress, induced chromosomal breakage and death of mouse AML(MLL) cells (with an MLL-ENL fusion and a constitutively active N-RAS independently of p53. Moreover, ATR inhibition as a single agent exhibited antitumoral activity, both reducing tumor burden after establishment and preventing tumors from growing, in an immunocompetent allograft mouse model of AML(MLL) and in xenografts of a human AML-MLL cell line. We also found that inhibition of ATM, a kinase that senses DNA double-strand breaks, also promoted the survival of the AML(MLL) mice. Collectively, these data indicated that ATR or ATM inhibition represent potential therapeutic strategies for the treatment of AML, especially MLL-driven leukemias.

  20. 30 CFR 872.20 - What will OSM do with unappropriated AML funds currently allocated to the Rural Abandoned Mine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What will OSM do with unappropriated AML funds... MONEYS AVAILABLE TO ELIGIBLE STATES AND INDIAN TRIBES § 872.20 What will OSM do with unappropriated AML... will make available any moneys that remain allocated to RAMP and that were not appropriated or moved...

  1. The AML1-ETO fusion gene and the FLT3 length mutation collaborate in inducing acute leukemia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Schessl, Christina; Rawat, Vijay P.S.; Cusan, Monica; Deshpande, Aniruddha; Kohl, Tobias M.; Rosten, Patricia M.; Spiekermann, Karsten; Humphries, R. Keith; Schnittger, Susanne; Kern, Wolfgang; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Bohlander, Stefan K.; Feuring-Buske, Michaela; Buske, Christian

    2005-01-01

    The molecular characterization of leukemia has demonstrated that genetic alterations in the leukemic clone frequently fall into 2 classes, those affecting transcription factors (e.g., AML1-ETO) and mutations affecting genes involved in signal transduction (e.g., activating mutations of FLT3 and KIT). This finding has favored a model of leukemogenesis in which the collaboration of these 2 classes of genetic alterations is necessary for the malignant transformation of hematopoietic progenitor cells. The model is supported by experimental data indicating that AML1-ETO and FLT3 length mutation (FLT3-LM), 2 of the most frequent genetic alterations in AML, are both insufficient on their own to cause leukemia in animal models. Here we report that AML1-ETO collaborates with FLT3-LM in inducing acute leukemia in a murine BM transplantation model. Moreover, in a series of 135 patients with AML1-ETO–positive AML, the most frequently identified class of additional mutations affected genes involved in signal transduction pathways including FLT3-LM or mutations of KIT and NRAS. These data support the concept of oncogenic cooperation between AML1-ETO and a class of activating mutations, recurrently found in patients with t(8;21), and provide a rationale for therapies targeting signal transduction pathways in AML1-ETO–positive leukemias. PMID:16025155

  2. Phase I Trial of the Selective Inhibitor of Nuclear Export, KPT-330, in Relapsed Childhood ALL and AML

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-17

    Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL); Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL); Relapsed Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML); Refractory Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML); Relapsed Mixed Lineage Leukemia; Refractory Mixed Lineage Leukemia; Relapsed Biphenotypic Leukemia; Refractory Biphenotypic Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) in Blast Crisis

  3. MMPI and MIT Discriminators of Biogenic and Psychogenic Impotence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beutler, Larry E.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Male patients complaining of impotence (N=32) were administered the Male Impotence Test (MIT) and the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI). The results suggested that the MIT is without value for differentiating between psychogenic and biogenic impotence, whereas two rules from the MMPI appropriately classified 90 percent of the…

  4. Physik gestern und heute: Visualisierung mit der Schlierenmethode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heering, Peter

    2006-07-01

    Der Name des österreichischen Forschers Ernst Mach ist heute noch mit der Schallgeschwindigkeit verbunden. Diese Auszeichnung resultiert aus Machs Untersuchungen, wie sich Projektile mit Überschallgeschwindigkeit durch die Luft bewegen. Gerade in jüngster Zeit hat die Anwendung derartiger Methoden durch technische Modifikationen wieder einen Aufschwung erfahren.

  5. Identification of ins(8;21) with AML1/ETO fusion in acute myelogenous leukemia M2 by molecular cytogenetics.

    PubMed

    Urioste, M; Martínez-Ramírez, A; Cigudosa, J C; Mateo, M S; Martínez, P; Contra, T; Benítez, J

    2002-02-01

    A high percentage of cases of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) of the M2 subtype show a rearrangement between the AML1 and ETO genes. The detection of the AML1/ETO fusion has clinical relevance because patients with this subtype have a good prognosis. We present the results of conventional and molecular cytogenetic studies in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia French-American-British M2 classification, who had a complex karyotype involving chromosomes 8 and 21. Dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using the AML1/ETO probe demonstrated a recombination of both genes on an add(8) chromosome. The use of other FISH probes (CEP8, c-myc and TEL21) and spectral karyotyping indicated that AML1/ETO fusion occurred as a consequence of a previously undescribed ins(8;21)(q22;q22.1q22.3).

  6. Implementation of Microfiche Image Transmission System (MITS): A multifaceted assessment of demonstration installation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheposh, J. P.; Hulton, V. N.

    1983-06-01

    A multifaceted approach was employed to evaluate the introduction and implementation of a technological system--the microfiche image transmission system (MITS). Four different aspects of the demonstration installation were investigated: (1) operators' perception of MITS, (2) the requesters' acceptance of the services provided, (3) image quality, and (4) management's evaluation of the MITS implementation. The results revealed that the operators' perceptions of MITS were positive, the requesters regarded MITS as highly satisfactory, the image quality of the facsimile input fiche was judged superior to the MITS output, and the managers and developers regarded the MITS implementation as a success. Issues concerning widespread application of MITS were seen as premature at this time.

  7. Decitabine enhances anti-CD33 monoclonal antibody BI 836858-mediated natural killer ADCC against AML blasts.

    PubMed

    Vasu, Sumithira; He, Shun; Cheney, Carolyn; Gopalakrishnan, Bhavani; Mani, Rajeswaran; Lozanski, Gerard; Mo, Xiaokui; Groh, Veronica; Whitman, Susan P; Konopitzky, Renate; Kössl, Christian; Bucci, Donna; Lucas, David M; Yu, Jianhua; Caligiuri, Michael A; Blum, William; Adam, Paul J; Borges, Eric; Rueter, Bjoern; Heider, Karl-Heinz; Marcucci, Guido; Muthusamy, Natarajan

    2016-06-09

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common type of acute leukemia, affecting older individuals at a median age of 67 years. Resistance to intensive induction chemotherapy is the major cause of death in elderly AML; hence, novel treatment strategies are warranted. CD33-directed antibody-drug conjugates (gemtuzumab ozogamicin) have been shown to improve overall survival, validating CD33 as a target for antibody-based therapy of AML. Here, we report the in vitro efficacy of BI 836858, a fully human, Fc-engineered, anti-CD33 antibody using AML cell lines and primary AML blasts as targets. BI 836858-opsonized AML cells significantly induced both autologous and allogeneic natural killer (NK)-cell degranulation and NK-cell-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). In vitro treatment of AML blasts with decitabine (DAC) or 5-azacytidine, 2 hypomethylating agents that show efficacy in older patients, did not compromise BI 836858-induced NK-cell-mediated ADCC. Evaluation of BI 836858-mediated ADCC in serial marrow AML aspirates in patients who received a 10-day course of DAC (pre-DAC, days 4, 11, and 28 post-DAC) revealed significantly higher ADCC in samples at day 28 post-DAC when compared with pre-DAC treatment. Analysis of ligands to activating receptors (NKG2D) showed significantly increased NKG2D ligand [NKG2DL] expression in day 28 post-DAC samples compared with pre-DAC samples; when NKG2DL receptor was blocked using antibodies, BI 836858-mediated ADCC was significantly decreased, suggesting that DAC enhances AML blast susceptibility to BI 836858 by upregulating NKG2DL. These data provide a rationale for combination therapy of Fc-engineered antibodies such as BI 836858 with azanucleosides in elderly patients with AML.

  8. Decitabine enhances anti-CD33 monoclonal antibody BI 836858–mediated natural killer ADCC against AML blasts

    PubMed Central

    Vasu, Sumithira; He, Shun; Cheney, Carolyn; Gopalakrishnan, Bhavani; Mani, Rajeswaran; Lozanski, Gerard; Mo, Xiaokui; Groh, Veronica; Whitman, Susan P.; Konopitzky, Renate; Kössl, Christian; Bucci, Donna; Lucas, David M.; Yu, Jianhua; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Blum, William; Adam, Paul J.; Borges, Eric; Rueter, Bjoern; Heider, Karl-Heinz; Marcucci, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common type of acute leukemia, affecting older individuals at a median age of 67 years. Resistance to intensive induction chemotherapy is the major cause of death in elderly AML; hence, novel treatment strategies are warranted. CD33-directed antibody-drug conjugates (gemtuzumab ozogamicin) have been shown to improve overall survival, validating CD33 as a target for antibody-based therapy of AML. Here, we report the in vitro efficacy of BI 836858, a fully human, Fc-engineered, anti-CD33 antibody using AML cell lines and primary AML blasts as targets. BI 836858–opsonized AML cells significantly induced both autologous and allogeneic natural killer (NK)-cell degranulation and NK-cell–mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). In vitro treatment of AML blasts with decitabine (DAC) or 5-azacytidine, 2 hypomethylating agents that show efficacy in older patients, did not compromise BI 836858–induced NK-cell–mediated ADCC. Evaluation of BI 836858–mediated ADCC in serial marrow AML aspirates in patients who received a 10-day course of DAC (pre-DAC, days 4, 11, and 28 post-DAC) revealed significantly higher ADCC in samples at day 28 post-DAC when compared with pre-DAC treatment. Analysis of ligands to activating receptors (NKG2D) showed significantly increased NKG2D ligand [NKG2DL] expression in day 28 post-DAC samples compared with pre-DAC samples; when NKG2DL receptor was blocked using antibodies, BI 836858–mediated ADCC was significantly decreased, suggesting that DAC enhances AML blast susceptibility to BI 836858 by upregulating NKG2DL. These data provide a rationale for combination therapy of Fc-engineered antibodies such as BI 836858 with azanucleosides in elderly patients with AML. PMID:27013443

  9. Unfälle mit Kleintransportern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschirschwitz, Christian

    Auf einer außerörtlichen Bundesstraße geriet ein mit vier Personen besetzter Pkw Toyota Corolla aus letztlich nicht vollständig geklärten Gründen ins Schleudern. Nachdem sich das Fahrzeug beträchtlich entgegen dem Uhrzeigersinn ausgedreht hatte, prallte ein entgegenkommender Kleintransporter VW T4 frontal an die rechte Flanke des Toyota. Der Transporter wurde gedreht, ausgehoben und durch einen Pkw Ford Escort unterfahren. Alle Fahrzeuge kamen in Kollisionsortnähe zum Endstand. Die vier Toyota-Insassen wurden getötet. Aus den anderen Fahrzeugen wurden sechs Personen überwiegend schwer verletzt. Unbeteiligte Zeugen waren nicht vorhanden.

  10. MIT microwiggler for free electron laser applications

    SciTech Connect

    Catravas, P.; Stoner, R.; Blastos, J.; Sisson, D.; Mastovsky, I.; Bekefi, G.; Wang, X.J.; Fisher, A.

    1995-07-01

    A microwiggler-based FEL permits operation at shorter wavelengths with a reduction in the size and cost of the device. The MIT microwiggler is a pulsed ferromagnetic-core electromagnet with 70 periods of 8.8 mm each which generates an on-axis peak magnetic field of 4.2 kG. The pulse repetition rate is 0.5 Hz with FWHM 0.5 msec. The microwiggler is characterized by extensive tunability. We employed a novel tuning regimen through which the rms spread in peak amplitudes was reduced to 0.08 % the lowest ever achieved in a sub-cm period magnetic field. The microwiggler is a serviceable scientific apparatus: spontaneous emission has been observed for wavelengths of 700--800 nm using a 40 MeV beam from the Accerator Test Facility LINAC at BNL.

  11. Budget impact analysis of CYP2C19-guided voriconazole prophylaxis in AML

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Neil T.; Bell, Gillian C.; Quilitz, Rod E.; Greene, John N.; McLeod, Howard L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to determine the economic impact of proactive, CYP2C19 genotype-guided voriconazole prophylaxis in AML. Methods An Excel-based model was created to project the cost of treating a simulated cohort of severely neutropenic AML patients undergoing antifungal prophylaxis. The model compares (i) standard prophylactic dosing with voriconazole and (ii) CYP2C19 genotyping of all AML patients to guide voriconazole dosing and prescribing. Results Based on the model, genotype-guided dosing of voriconazole conservatively spares 2.3 patients per year from invasive fungal infections. Implementing proactive genotyping of all AML patients in a simulated 100 patient cohort is expected to save a total of $41467 or $415 per patient. Conclusions The model, based on the robust literature of clinical and economic data, predicts that proactive genotype-guided voriconazole prophylaxis is likely to yield modest cost savings while improving patient outcomes. The primary driver of savings is the avoidance of expensive antifungal treatment and extended hospital stays, costing $30 952 per patient, in patients succumbing to fungal infection. PMID:26233624

  12. A pyrrolo-pyrimidine derivative targets human primary AML stem cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoriko; Yuki, Hitomi; Kuratani, Mitsuo; Hashizume, Yoshinobu; Takagi, Shinsuke; Honma, Teruki; Tanaka, Akiko; Shirouzu, Mikako; Mikuni, Junko; Handa, Noriko; Ogahara, Ikuko; Sone, Akiko; Najima, Yuho; Tomabechi, Yuri; Wakiyama, Motoaki; Uchida, Naoyuki; Tomizawa-Murasawa, Mariko; Kaneko, Akiko; Tanaka, Satoshi; Suzuki, Nahoko; Kajita, Hiroshi; Aoki, Yuki; Ohara, Osamu; Shultz, Leonard D; Fukami, Takehiro; Goto, Toshio; Taniguchi, Shuichi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Ishikawa, Fumihiko

    2013-04-17

    Leukemia stem cells (LSCs) that survive conventional chemotherapy are thought to contribute to disease relapse, leading to poor long-term outcomes for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We previously identified a Src-family kinase (SFK) member, hematopoietic cell kinase (HCK), as a molecular target that is highly differentially expressed in human primary LSCs compared with human normal hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). We performed a large-scale chemical library screen that integrated a high-throughput enzyme inhibition assay, in silico binding prediction, and crystal structure determination and found a candidate HCK inhibitor, RK-20449, a pyrrolo-pyrimidine derivative with an enzymatic IC50 (half maximal inhibitory concentration) in the subnanomolar range. A crystal structure revealed that RK-20449 bound the activation pocket of HCK. In vivo administration of RK-20449 to nonobese diabetic (NOD)/severe combined immunodeficient (SCID)/IL2rg(null) mice engrafted with highly aggressive therapy-resistant AML significantly reduced human LSC and non-stem AML burden. By eliminating chemotherapy-resistant LSCs, RK-20449 may help to prevent relapse and lead to improved patient outcomes in AML.

  13. Negative immunomagnetic selection of T cells from peripheral blood of presentation AML specimens.

    PubMed

    Le Dieu, Rifca; Taussig, David; Lister, T Andrew; Gribben, John G

    2009-08-31

    To date, studies on T cells in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have been limited to flow cytometric analysis of whole peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) specimens or functional work looking at the impact of AML myeloblasts on normal or remission T cells. This lack of information on T cells at the time of presentation with disease is due in part to the difficulty in isolating sufficiently pure T cells from these specimens for further study. Negative immunomagnetic selection has been the method of choice for isolating immune cells for functional studies due to concerns that binding antibodies to the cell surface may induce cellular activation, block ligand-receptor interactions or result in immune clearance. In order specifically to study T cells in presentation AML specimens, we set out to develop a method of isolating highly pure CD4 and CD8 T cells by negative selection from the peripheral blood (PB) of newly diagnosed AML patients. This technique, unlike T cell selection from PB from normal individuals or from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, was extremely problematic due to properties of the leukaemic myeloblasts. A successful method was eventually optimized requiring the use of a custom antibody cocktail consisting of CD33, CD34, CD123, CD11c and CD36, to deplete myeloblasts.

  14. Improved FLT3/ITD PCR assay predicts outcome following allogeneic transplant for AML

    PubMed Central

    Grunwald, Michael R.; Tseng, Li-Hui; Lin, Ming-Tseh; Pratz, Keith W.; Eshleman, James R.; Levis, Mark J.; Gocke, Christopher D.

    2014-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients harboring internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutations of the FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) gene carry a poor prognosis. While allogeneic transplantation may improve outcomes, relapse occurs frequently. The FLT3/ITD mutation has been deemed an unsuitable minimal residual disease (MRD) marker because it is unstable and because the standard assay for the mutation is relatively insensitive. The FLT3 mutation is undetectable by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) at pre- or post-transplant time points in many FLT3/ITD AML patients who subsequently relapse following transplant. We report the application of a new technique, tandem duplication PCR (TD-PCR), for detecting MRD in FLT3/ITD AML patients. Between October 2004 and January 2012, 54 FLT3/ITD AML patients in remission underwent transplantation at our institution. Of 37 patients with available Day 60 marrow samples, 28 (76%) were evaluable for MRD detection. In seven (25%) of the 28 patients, the FLT3/ITD mutation was detectable by TD-PCR, but not by standard PCR, on day 60. Six out of the seven patients (86%) with MRD by TD-PCR have relapsed to date compared with only 2 of 21 (10%) patients who were negative for MRD (p = 0.0003). The ability to detect MRD by this sensitive technique may provide an opportunity for early clinical intervention. PMID:25240816

  15. Histological and immunohistochemical features of gingival enlargement in a patient with AML.

    PubMed

    Sonoi, Norihiro; Soga, Yoshihiko; Maeda, Hiroshi; Ichimura, Koichi; Yoshino, Tadashi; Aoyama, Kazutoshi; Fujii, Nobuharu; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Logan, Richard; Raber-Durlacher, Judith; Takashiba, Shogo

    2012-07-01

    Here, we discuss the pathophysiology of leukemia-associated gingival enlargement based on a case of acute myelomonocytic leukemia (AML-M4) with typical gingival enlargement. Uniquely, this patient was well enough to allow full periodontal examination and incisional gingival biopsy to be performed both before and after chemotherapy. The patient was a 39-year-old Japanese woman with AML-M4 showing gingival enlargement. Histological and immunohistochemical features of gingiva and bacterial counts in the periodontal pockets were examined before and after chemotherapy. The results were as follows: (1) infiltration of myelomonocytic blasts in enlarged gingiva; (2) resolution of gingival enlargement with complete remission of AML by anticancer chemotherapy; and (3) the numbers of bacteria in the periodontal pockets were not high and were not altered before or after chemotherapy. In patients with AML-M4, remarkable mucosal enlargement is not generally observed in the body except in the gingiva. We hypothesized that antigens derived from periodontal bacteria, even if they are not present in large numbers, could act as chemoattractants for myelomonocytic leukemic cells.

  16. A Crowdsourcing Approach to Developing and Assessing Prediction Algorithms for AML Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Noren, David P; Long, Byron L; Norel, Raquel; Rrhissorrakrai, Kahn; Hess, Kenneth; Hu, Chenyue Wendy; Bisberg, Alex J; Schultz, Andre; Engquist, Erik; Liu, Li; Lin, Xihui; Chen, Gregory M; Xie, Honglei; Hunter, Geoffrey A M; Boutros, Paul C; Stepanov, Oleg; Norman, Thea; Friend, Stephen H; Stolovitzky, Gustavo; Kornblau, Steven; Qutub, Amina A

    2016-06-01

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is a fatal hematological cancer. The genetic abnormalities underlying AML are extremely heterogeneous among patients, making prognosis and treatment selection very difficult. While clinical proteomics data has the potential to improve prognosis accuracy, thus far, the quantitative means to do so have yet to be developed. Here we report the results and insights gained from the DREAM 9 Acute Myeloid Prediction Outcome Prediction Challenge (AML-OPC), a crowdsourcing effort designed to promote the development of quantitative methods for AML prognosis prediction. We identify the most accurate and robust models in predicting patient response to therapy, remission duration, and overall survival. We further investigate patient response to therapy, a clinically actionable prediction, and find that patients that are classified as resistant to therapy are harder to predict than responsive patients across the 31 models submitted to the challenge. The top two performing models, which held a high sensitivity to these patients, substantially utilized the proteomics data to make predictions. Using these models, we also identify which signaling proteins were useful in predicting patient therapeutic response.

  17. Activity of 8F4, a T-cell receptor-like anti-PR1/HLA-A2 antibody, against primary human AML in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sergeeva, A; He, H; Ruisaard, K; St John, L; Alatrash, G; Clise-Dwyer, K; Li, D; Patenia, R; Hong, R; Sukhumalchandra, P; You, M J; Gagea, M; Ma, Q; Molldrem, J J

    2016-07-01

    The PR1 peptide, derived from the leukemia-associated antigens proteinase 3 and neutrophil elastase, is overexpressed on HLA-A2 in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We developed a high-affinity T-cell receptor-like murine monoclonal antibody, 8F4, that binds to the PR1/HLA-A2 complex, mediates lysis of AML and inhibits leukemia colony formation. Here, we explored whether 8F4 was active in vivo against chemotherapy-resistant AML, including secondary AML. In a screening model, coincubation of AML with 8F4 ex vivo prevented engraftment of all tested AML subtypes in immunodeficient NSG (NOD scid IL-2 receptor γ-chain knockout) mice. In a treatment model of established human AML, administration of 8F4 significantly reduced or eliminated AML xenografts and extended survival compared with isotype antibody-treated mice. Moreover, in secondary transfer experiments, mice inoculated with bone marrow from 8F4-treated mice showed no evidence of AML engraftment, supporting the possible activity of 8F4 against the subset of AML with self-renewing potential. Our data provide evidence that 8F4 antibody is highly active in AML, including chemotherapy-resistant disease, supporting its potential use as a therapeutic agent in patients with AML.

  18. Development of ZMYM2-FGFR1 driven AML in human CD34+ cells in immunocompromised mice.

    PubMed

    Ren, Mingqiang; Qin, Haiyan; Wu, Qing; Savage, Natasha M; George, Tracy I; Cowell, John K

    2016-08-15

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) has an overall poor survival rate and shows considerable molecular heterogeneity in its etiology. In the WHO classification there are >50 cytogenetic subgroups of AML, many showing highly specific chromosome translocations that lead to constitutive activation of individual kinases. In a rare stem cell leukemia/lymphoma syndrome, translocations involving 8p11 lead to constitutive activation of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) kinase. This disorder shows myeloproliferative disease with almost invariable progresses to AML and conventional therapeutic strategies are largely unsuccessful. Because of the rare nature of this syndrome, models that faithfully recapitulate the human disease are needed to evaluate therapeutic strategies. The t(8;13)(p11;q12) chromosome translocation is most common rearrangement seen in this syndrome and creates a ZMYM2-FGFR1 chimeric kinase. To understand more about the molecular etiology of AML induced by this particular rearrangement, we have created a model human CD34+ cells transplanted into immunocompromized mice which develop myeloproliferative disease that progresses to AML with a long (>12 months) latency period. As in humans, these mice show hepatospenomegaly, hypercellular bone marrow and a CD45 + CD34 + CD13+ immunophenotype. Molecular studies demonstrate upregulation of genes such as KLF4 and FLT3 that promote stemness, and overexpression of MYC, which is associated with suppression of myeloid cell differentiation. This murine model, therefore, provides an opportunity to develop therapeutic strategies against the most common subtype within these FGFR1 driven neoplasms and study the molecular etiology in more depth.

  19. Mediator Kinase Inhibition Further Activates Super-Enhancer Associated Genes in AML

    PubMed Central

    Nitulescu, Ioana I.; Tangpeerachaikul, Anupong; Poss, Zachary C.; Da Silva, Diogo H.; Caruso, Brittany T.; Arefolov, Alexander; Fadeyi, Olugbeminiyi; Christie, Amanda L.; Du, Karrie; Banka, Deepti; Schneider, Elisabeth V.; Jestel, Anja; Zou, Ge; Si, Chong; Ebmeier, Christopher C.; Bronson, Roderick T.; Krivtsov, Andrei V.; Myers, Andrew G.; Kohl, Nancy E.; Kung, Andrew L.; Armstrong, Scott A.; Lemieux, Madeleine E.; Taatjes, Dylan J.; Shair, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    Super-enhancers (SEs), which are composed of large clusters of enhancers densely loaded with the Mediator complex, transcription factors (TFs), and chromatin regulators, drive high expression of genes implicated in cell identity and disease, such as lineage-controlling TFs and oncogenes 1, 2. BRD4 and CDK7 are positive regulators of SE-mediated transcription3,4,5. In contrast, negative regulators of SE-associated genes have not been well described. Here we report that Mediator-associated kinases cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) and CDK19 restrain increased activation of key SE-associated genes in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cells. We determined that the natural product cortistatin A (CA) selectively inhibited Mediator kinases, had antileukaemic activity in vitro and in vivo, and disproportionately induced upregulation of SE-associated genes in CA-sensitive AML cell lines but not in CA-insensitive cell lines. In AML cells, CA upregulated SE-associated genes with tumour suppressor and lineage-controlling functions, including the TFs CEBPA, IRF8, IRF1 and ETV6 6, 7, 8. The BRD4 inhibitor I-BET151 downregulated these SE-associated genes, yet also has antileukaemic activity. Individually increasing or decreasing expression of these TFs suppressed AML cell growth, providing evidence that leukaemia cells are sensitive to dosage of SE-associated genes. Our results demonstrate that Mediator kinases can negatively regulate SE-associated gene expression in specific cell types and can be pharmacologically targeted as a therapeutic approach to AML. PMID:26416749

  20. Final Technical Report for the MIT Annular Fuel Research Project

    SciTech Connect

    Mujid S. Kazimi; Pavel Hejzlar

    2008-01-31

    MIT-NFC-PR-082 (January 2006) Abstract This summary provides an overview of the results of the U.S. DOE funded NERI (Nuclear Research ENergy Initiative) program on development of the internally and externally cooled annular fuel for high power density PWRs. This new fuel was proposed by MIT to allow a substantial increase in poer density (on the order of 30% or higher) while maintaining or improving safety margins. A comprehensive study was performed by a team consisting of MIT (lead organization), Westinghuse Electric Corporation, Gamma Engineering Corporation, Framatome ANP(formerly Duke Engineering) and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited.

  1. Childhood leukemia genetic bottleneck phenomenon related to TEL-AML1: the postulation by a mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Ivanovski, Petar; Ivanovski, Ivan; Nikolić, Dimitrije; Jovanović, Ivana

    2012-03-01

    Childhood leukemia bottleneck phenomenon is the most mysterious corollary of the prenatal origin discovery of leukemogenic chromosome translocations. The bottleneck is evidence that leukemia initiation, by in utero acquired chromosome translocations that generate functional fusion genes, is far more common than the incidence rate of corresponding leukemia. For childhood TEL-AML1(+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) this equates to approximately 100 times. Practically this means that among a hundred children born with TEL-AML1 fusion gene, only one child will later in its life develop ALL. The key data necessary for unraveling of this mystery were discovered in 2002. It was the level of TEL-AML1(+) cells’ frequency. The bottleneck is caused by the very low body TEL-AML1(+) cell count. Only one out of a thousand B cells carries TEL-AML1 fusion gene. TEL-AML1(+) body cell count is low because TEL-AML1 fusion is generated at cell level of 10(-3) to 10(-4) just during the late fetal lymphopoiesis i.e. after the 36th gestational week.

  2. Defining AML and MDS second cancer risk dynamics after diagnoses of first cancers treated or not with radiation.

    PubMed

    Radivoyevitch, T; Sachs, R K; Gale, R P; Molenaar, R J; Brenner, D J; Hill, B T; Kalaycio, M E; Carraway, H E; Mukherjee, S; Sekeres, M A; Maciejewski, J P

    2016-02-01

    Risks of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and/or myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are known to increase after cancer treatments. Their rise-and-fall dynamics and their associations with radiation have, however, not been fully characterized. To improve risk definition we developed SEERaBomb R software for Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results second cancer analyses. Resulting high-resolution relative risk (RR) time courses were compared, where possible, to results of A-bomb survivor analyses. We found: (1) persons with prostate cancer receiving radiation therapy have increased RR of AML and MDS that peak in 1.5-2.5 years; (2) persons with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), lung and breast first cancers have the highest RR for AML and MDS over the next 1-12 years. These increased RR are radiation specific for lung and breast cancer but not for NHL; (3) AML latencies were brief compared to those of A-bomb survivors; and (4) there was a marked excess risk of acute promyelocytic leukemia in persons receiving radiation therapy. Knowing the type of first cancer, if it was treated with radiation, the interval from first cancer diagnosis to developing AML or MDS, and the type of AML, can improve estimates of whether AML or MDS cases developing in this setting are due to background versus other processes.

  3. Outcome of myeloablative allogeneic peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for refractory/relapsed AML patients in NR status.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; Ning, Hong-Mei; Hu, Liang-Ding; Jiang, Min; Xu, Chen; Hu, Jiang-Wei; Wang, Jun; Li, Yu-Hang; Li, Bo-Tao; Lou, Xiao; Yang, Fan; Chen, Jian-Lin; Su, Yong-Feng; Li, Meng; Wang, Hong-Ye; Ren, Jing; Feng, Yue-Qian; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Dan-Hong; Chen, Hu

    2015-12-01

    To further find effective method to improve the long term survival of refractory or relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients, we retrospectively analyzed the outcomes of myeloablative hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) for 133 consecutive patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) therapy related AML(t-AML) in not remission status. The overall 3-year OS and DFS were 40.9% and 35.6% respectively. The variables associated with improved long term DFS were a bone marrow blast cell count less than 20% and an intensified conditioning regimen. In addition, the t-AML group had higher rates of relapse and III-IV acute GVHD than the primary AML group. The unrelated donor group had similar OS and DFS with sibling groups. Our study suggested that decreasing bone marrow blast cell counts before HSCT and strengthening the conditioning regimen may improve long-term DFS for refractory/relapsed AML patients, and unrelated donor group can get similar effect when compared to the sibling group.

  4. Transformation of human CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells with DEK-NUP214 induces AML in an immunocompromised mouse model.

    PubMed

    Qin, H; Malek, S; Cowell, J K; Ren, M

    2016-10-27

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease comprising a large number of subtypes defined by specific chromosome abnormalities. One such subtype carries the t(6;9)(p22;q34) chromosome rearrangement, which leads to expression of the DEK-NUP214 chimeric gene, and has a particularly poor outcome. To provide a better understanding of the molecular etiology of these relatively rare individual AML variants, it is necessary to generate in vivo models, which can also serve as a means to evaluate targeted therapies based on their specific genetic abnormalities. Here, we describe the development of a human cell AML, generated in CD34+ human hematopoietic progenitor cells xenografted into immunocompromised mice that express human myeloid cell growth factors. Within 6 months, these mice develop a human cell AML with phenotypic characteristics of the primary t(6;9) disease and a CD45+CD13+CD34+CD38+ immunophenotype. Gene expression studies show that members of the HOX family of genes (HOXA9, 10, B3, B4 and PBX3) are highly upregulated in the AML from this mouse model as well as from primary human t(6;9) AML. Gene expression analysis also identified several other significantly disregulated pathways involving KRAS, BRCA1 and ALK, for example. This is the first report of a humanized model of the DEK-NUP214 disease and provides a means to study the development and treatment of this particular subtype of AML.

  5. Classification of Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML M2 and AML M3) using Momentum Back Propagation from Watershed Distance Transform Segmented Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryani, Esti; Wiharto; Palgunadi, Sarngadi; Nurcahya Pradana, TP

    2017-01-01

    This study uses image processing to analyze white blood cell with leukemia indicated that includes the identification, analysis of shapes and sizes, as well as white blood cell count indicated the symptoms of leukemia. A case study in this research was blood cells, from the type of leukemia Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML), M2 and M3 in particular. Image processing operations used for segmentation by utilizing the color conversion from RGB (Red, Green dab Blue) to obtain white blood cell candidates. Furthermore, the white blood cells candidates are separated by other cells with active contour without edge. WBC (White Blood Cell) results still have intersected or overlap condition. Watershed distance transform method can separate overlap of WBC. Furthermore, the separation of the nucleus from the cytoplasm using the HSI (Hue Saturation Intensity). The further characteristic extraction process is done by calculating the area WBC, WBC edge, roundness, the ratio of the nucleus, the mean and standard deviation of pixel intensities. The feature extraction results are used for training and testing in determining the classification of AML: M2 and M3 by using the momentum backpropagation algorithm. The classification process is done by testing the numeric data input from the feature extraction results that have been entered in the database. K-Fold validation is used to divide the amount of training data and to test the classification of AML M2 and M3. The experiment results of eight images trials, the result, was 94.285% per cell accuracy and 75% per image accuracy

  6. Augmentation of autologous T cell reactivity with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) blasts by Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists.

    PubMed

    Zhong, RuiKun; Li, Hongying; Messer, Karen; Lane, Thomas A; Zhou, Jiehua; Ball, Edward D

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated whether TNF-α, Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 7/8 agonist resiquimod (R848), the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and their combinations can enhance autologous AML-reactive T cell generation in an in vitro culture. AML peripheral blood or bone marrow mononuclear cells were cultured in medium supplemented with GM-CSF/IL-4 to induce dendritic cell (DC) differentiation of AML blasts (AML-DC). The impact of TNF-α, LPS, R848 and their combinations on AML-DC cultures was analyzed. Significantly enhanced CD80, CD40, CD83, CD54, HLA-DR and CD86 expression of AML cells was observed by addition of TNF-α, LPS, R848 alone or combinations. Induced CD80 expression of AML cells was significantly higher through the combination of TNF-α, LPS and R848 (T + L + R) than that by T alone. CTL induced from T + L + R, T + R, T + L, L + R and R, but not T, L alone stimulated cultures showed significantly higher IFN-γ release than the medium control in response to autologous AML cells. IFN-γ release by T + L + R was significantly higher than T or L alone, and T + R was significantly higher than T alone. CTL generated from T + L + R, T + L, T + R, L + R and L alone exerted significantly higher AML cell killing than medium control. AML cell killing by T + L + R and T + R was significantly higher than T or R alone. These results indicate that the combination of T + L + R induces a significantly enhanced antigen presentation effect of AML-DC. We speculate that the complementary effects of reagent combinations may better address the heterogeneity of responses to any single agent in AML cells from different patients.

  7. Two splice-factor mutant leukemia subgroups uncovered at the boundaries of MDS and AML using combined gene expression and DNA-methylation profiling.

    PubMed

    Taskesen, Erdogan; Havermans, Marije; van Lom, Kirsten; Sanders, Mathijs A; van Norden, Yvette; Bindels, Eric; Hoogenboezem, Remco; Reinders, Marcel J T; Figueroa, Maria E; Valk, Peter J M; Löwenberg, Bob; Melnick, Ari; Delwel, Ruud

    2014-05-22

    Mutations in splice factor (SF) genes occur more frequently in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) than in acute myeloid leukemias (AML). We sequenced complementary DNA from bone marrow of 47 refractory anemia with excess blasts (RAEB) patients, 29 AML cases with low marrow blast cell count, and 325 other AML patients and determined the presence of SF-hotspot mutations in SF3B1, U2AF35, and SRSF2. SF mutations were found in 10 RAEB, 12 AML cases with low marrow blast cell count, and 25 other AML cases. Our study provides evidence that SF-mutant RAEB and SF-mutant AML are clinically, cytologically, and molecularly highly similar. An integrated analysis of genomewide messenger RNA (mRNA) expression profiling and DNA-methylation profiling data revealed 2 unique patient clusters highly enriched for SF-mutant RAEB/AML. The combined genomewide mRNA expression profiling/DNA-methylation profiling signatures revealed 1 SF-mutant patient cluster with an erythroid signature. The other SF-mutant patient cluster was enriched for NRAS/KRAS mutations and showed an inferior survival. We conclude that SF-mutant RAEB/AML constitutes a related disorder overriding the artificial separation between AML and MDS, and that SF-mutant RAEB/AML is composed of 2 molecularly and clinically distinct subgroups. We conclude that SF-mutant disorders should be considered as myeloid malignancies that transcend the boundaries of AML and MDS.

  8. Mapping of the gracile axonal dystrophy (gad) gene to a region between D5Mit197 and D5Mit113 on proximal mouse chromosome 5

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, J.G.; Yamanishi, T.; Matsui, K.

    1995-06-10

    The gracile axonal dystrophy (gad) mouse, which shows hereditary sensory ataxia and motor paresis, has been morphologically characterized by the dying back type of axonal degeneration in the nerve terminals of dorsal root ganglion cells and motor neurons. In the present study, using an intraspecific backcross between gad and C57BL/6J mice, the gracile axonal dystrophy (gad) gene was mapped to a region between D5Mit197 and D5Mit113. Estimated distances between gad and D5Mit197 and between gad and D5Mit113 are 0.4 {plus_minus} 0.3 and 5.0 {plus_minus} 1.0 cM, respectively. The gene order was defined: centromere-D5Mit81-D5Mit233-D5Mit184/D5Mit254-D5Mit256-D5Mit197-gad-D5Mit113-D5Mit7. The mouse map location of the gad locus appears to be in a region homologous to human 4p15-p16. Our present data suggest that the nearest flanking marker D5Mit197 provides a useful anchor for the isolation of the gad gene in a yeast artificial chromosome contig. 19 refs., 2 figs.

  9. MIT ASTROMAG 1.7 meter disk magnet design report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marston, P. G.; Hale, J. R.; Vieira, R.; Zhukovsky, A.; Titus, P. H.; Sullivan, J. D.; Dawson, A. M.

    1990-01-01

    MIT has proposed a magnet design for ASTROMAG, which has demonstrated substantial improvement in performance as compared with the present HEAO baseline design. Several advantages of the MIT disk design are listed along with design characteristics. Details of field contours and active field regions are shown along with comparisons with other designs. Three alternative design configurations for the ASTROMAG disk coils are summarized. The parameters of the conductors are listed and basic parameters for each of the complete systems are shown.

  10. MRD-directed risk stratification treatment may improve outcomes of t(8;21) AML in the first complete remission: results from the AML05 multicenter trial.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hong-Hu; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Qin, Ya-Zhen; Liu, Dai-Hong; Jiang, Hao; Chen, Huan; Jiang, Qian; Xu, Lan-Ping; Lu, Jin; Han, Wei; Bao, Li; Wang, Yu; Chen, Yu-Hong; Wang, Jing-Zhi; Wang, Feng-Rong; Lai, Yue-Yun; Chai, Jun-Yue; Wang, Li-Ru; Liu, Yan-Rong; Liu, Kai-Yan; Jiang, Bin; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2013-05-16

    We aimed to improve the outcome of t(8;21) acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in the first complete remission (CR1) by applying risk-directed therapy based on minimal residual disease (MRD) determined by RUNX1/RUNX1T1 transcript levels. Risk-directed therapy included recommending allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) for high-risk patients and chemotherapy/autologous-HSCT (auto-HSCT) for low-risk patients. Among 116 eligible patients, MRD status after the second consolidation rather than induction or first consolidation could discriminate high-risk relapse patients (P = .001). Allo-HSCT could reduce relapse and improve survival compared with chemotherapy for high-risk patients (cumulative incidence of relapse [CIR]: 22.1% vs 78.9%, P < .0001; disease-free survival [DFS]: 61.7% vs 19.6%, P = .001), whereas chemotherapy/auto-HSCT achieved a low relapse rate (5.3%) and high DFS (94.7%) for low-risk patients. Multivariate analysis revealed that MRD status and treatment choice were independent prognostic factors for relapse, DFS, and OS. We concluded that MRD status after the second consolidation may be the best timing for treatment choice. MRD-directed risk stratification treatment may improve the outcome of t(8;21) AML in CR1. This trial was registered at http://www.chictr.org as #ChiCTR-OCH-12002406.

  11. Diagnosis and management of AML in adults: 2017 ELN recommendations from an international expert panel

    PubMed Central

    Estey, Elihu; Grimwade, David; Amadori, Sergio; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Büchner, Thomas; Dombret, Hervé; Ebert, Benjamin L.; Fenaux, Pierre; Larson, Richard A.; Levine, Ross L.; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Naoe, Tomoki; Niederwieser, Dietger; Ossenkoppele, Gert J.; Sanz, Miguel; Sierra, Jorge; Tallman, Martin S.; Tien, Hwei-Fang; Wei, Andrew H.; Löwenberg, Bob; Bloomfield, Clara D.

    2017-01-01

    The first edition of the European LeukemiaNet (ELN) recommendations for diagnosis and management of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in adults, published in 2010, has found broad acceptance by physicians and investigators caring for patients with AML. Recent advances, for example, in the discovery of the genomic landscape of the disease, in the development of assays for genetic testing and for detecting minimal residual disease (MRD), as well as in the development of novel antileukemic agents, prompted an international panel to provide updated evidence- and expert opinion-based recommendations. The recommendations include a revised version of the ELN genetic categories, a proposal for a response category based on MRD status, and criteria for progressive disease. PMID:27895058

  12. Diagnosis and management of AML in adults: 2017 ELN recommendations from an international expert panel.

    PubMed

    Döhner, Hartmut; Estey, Elihu; Grimwade, David; Amadori, Sergio; Appelbaum, Frederick R; Büchner, Thomas; Dombret, Hervé; Ebert, Benjamin L; Fenaux, Pierre; Larson, Richard A; Levine, Ross L; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Naoe, Tomoki; Niederwieser, Dietger; Ossenkoppele, Gert J; Sanz, Miguel; Sierra, Jorge; Tallman, Martin S; Tien, Hwei-Fang; Wei, Andrew H; Löwenberg, Bob; Bloomfield, Clara D

    2017-01-26

    The first edition of the European LeukemiaNet (ELN) recommendations for diagnosis and management of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in adults, published in 2010, has found broad acceptance by physicians and investigators caring for patients with AML. Recent advances, for example, in the discovery of the genomic landscape of the disease, in the development of assays for genetic testing and for detecting minimal residual disease (MRD), as well as in the development of novel antileukemic agents, prompted an international panel to provide updated evidence- and expert opinion-based recommendations. The recommendations include a revised version of the ELN genetic categories, a proposal for a response category based on MRD status, and criteria for progressive disease.

  13. The prognostic importance of polypharmacy in older adults treated for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML).

    PubMed

    Elliot, Kathleen; Tooze, Janet A; Geller, Rachel; Powell, Bayard L; Pardee, Timothy S; Ritchie, Ellen; Kennedy, LeAnne; Callahan, Kathryn E; Klepin, Heidi D

    2014-10-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the prognostic significance of polypharmacy and inappropriate medication use among 150 patients >60 years of age receiving induction chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). After adjustment for age and comorbidity, increased number of medications at diagnosis (≥ 4 versus ≤ 1) was associated with increased 30-day mortality (OR=9.98, 95% CI=1.18-84.13), lower odds of complete remission status (OR=0.20, 95% CI=0.06-0.65), and higher overall mortality (HR=2.13, 95% CI=1.15-3.92). Inappropriate medication use (classified according to Beers criteria) was not significantly associated with clinical outcomes. Polypharmacy warrants further study as a modifiable marker of vulnerability among older adults with AML.

  14. The prognostic importance of polypharmacy in older adults treated for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML)

    PubMed Central

    Elliot, Kathleen; Tooze, Janet A.; Geller, Rachel; Powell, Bayard L.; Pardee, Timothy S.; Ritchie, Ellen; Kennedy, LeAnne; Callahan, Kathryn E.; Klepin, Heidi D.

    2014-01-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the prognostic significance of polypharmacy and inappropriate medication use among 150 patients >60 years of age receiving induction chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). After adjustment for age and comorbidity, increased number of medications at diagnosis (≥4 vs. ≤1) was associated with increased 30-day mortality (OR=9.98, 95% CI=1.18–84.13), lower odds of complete remission status (OR=0.20, 95% CI=0.06–0.65), and higher overall mortality (HR=2.13, 95% CI=1.15–3.92). Inappropriate medication use (classified according to Beers criteria) was not significantly associated with clinical outcomes. Polypharmacy warrants further study as a modifiable marker of vulnerability among older adults with AML. PMID:25127690

  15. Specific scoring systems to predict survival of patients with high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) after intensive antileukemic treatment based on results of the EORTC-GIMEMA AML-10 and intergroup CRIANT studies.

    PubMed

    Oosterveld, Margriet; Suciu, Stefan; Muus, Petra; Germing, Ulrich; Delforge, Michel; Belhabri, Amin; Aul, Carlo; Selleslag, Dominik; Ferrant, Augustin; Marie, Jean-Pierre; Amadori, Sergio; Jehn, Ulrich; Mandelli, Franco; Hess, Uwe; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva; Cakmak-Wollgast, Songuel; Vignetti, Marco; Labar, Boris; Willemze, Roel; de Witte, Theo

    2015-01-01

    High-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients have usually a less favorable outcome after intensive treatment compared with de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. This may reflect different disease-related and patient-related factors. The purpose of this analysis is to identify disease-specific prognostic factors and to develop prognostic scores for both patient groups. A total of 692 patients in the EORTC/GIMEMA AML-10 study and 289 patients in the CRIANT study received identical remission-induction and consolidation treatment. Estimated 5-year survival rate was 34 % in the AML-10 versus 27 % in the CRIANT study, and estimated disease-free survival was 40 % versus 28 %, respectively. In multivariate analysis, cytogenetic characteristics, white blood count, and age appeared prognostic for survival in both studies. French-American-British (FAB) subtype and performance status were prognostic in the AML-10 study only, whereas number of cytopenias and duration of antecedent hematologic disorder >6 months were prognostic in the CRIANT study only. The prognostic scores distinguish three groups with a 5-year survival rate of 54, 38, and 19 % in the AML-10 study versus 69, 37, and 5 % in the CRIANT study. The prognostic value of these scores has been validated on two external series. The new scoring systems form a practical tool to predict the outcome of individual MDS and AML patients treated with intensive antileukemic therapy.

  16. Differential diagnosis between AML infiltration, lymphoma and tuberculosis in a patient presenting with fever and mediastinal lymphadenopathy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, NA; YANG, JUN-JIE; ZHANG, GUANG-SEN

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of tuberculosis in immunocompromised hosts is often difficult as the hosts have atypical tuberculosis symptoms. The current study presents a case of scrofula and pulmonary tuberculosis with acute myelocytic leukemia (AML). As the disease became aggravated, the patient presented with fever, hemophagocytosis in the bone marrow, lymphadenopathy of the supraclavicular fossa, and mediastinal and nodular shadow in the chest by computed tomography. The symptoms presented successively or were coexistent, which made differentiation between tuberculosis, lymphoma, AML infiltration or other infections challenging. The diagnosis of tuberculosis was based on clinical and radiographic observations, morphological observation of the biopsies and the positive effect of antituberculosis drugs, while Ziehl-Neelsen stainings for acid fast bacilli were negative. The patient was treated with antituberculosis drugs, while receiving chemotherapy for AML. It is important to distinguish tuberculosis in adults with AML from other causes of fever, mediastinal masses in radiographic observations and hemophagocytosis in the bone marrow. PMID:24527075

  17. Detection of the AML translocation (8;21) by two-color fluorescent in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Sacchi, N.; Magnani, I.; Kearney, L.

    1994-09-01

    In the translocation (8;21)(q22;q22) associated with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), part of the long arm of chromosome 8 is reciprocally translocated onto chromosome 21. At the molecular level the translocation results in the fusion of the 5{prime} region of the AML1 gene on chromosome 21 and almost the entire CDR gene (also ETO or MTG8) on chromosome 8. To detection the translocation at the single cell level, we used two probes, a cosmid clone containing the first five exons of AML1 and a P1 clone containing the entire CDR gene. Hybridization of the two probes to the distal and proximal sides of the translocation breakpoint was expected to highlight the derivative 8q-chromosome in an interphase cell. To demonstrate the ability to identify the translocation in interphase cells using two-color FISH, these two probes were hybridized simultaneously to a cell line containing the 8;21 translocation, Kasumi-1. Each probe was detected with a different color so that their relationship in the sample could be determined within the same interphase cell. Simultaneous hybridization of the CDR and AML1 probes to interphase Kasumi-1 cells resulted in one orange and one green hybridization signal randomly located in the cell, from the hybridization to the normal 8 and 21 chromosomes, and one orange-green pair of signals from the close hybridization of the two probes to the fusion gene on the derivative 8q-chromosome, indicating the translocation. The translocation was identified by an abnormal pairing of the two differently colored signals in the same interphase cell. This technique allows for the detection of the translocation in all cells, not just those arrested in metaphase, and also permits the analysis of a small number of cells. Therefore, useful information can still be obtained from samples not suited for RT-PCR analysis and conventional cytogenetic techniques.

  18. MK-2206 induces apoptosis of AML cells and enhances the cytotoxicity of cytarabine.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jeng-Wei; Lin, Yu-Min; Lai, Yen-Ling; Chen, Chien-Yuan; Hu, Chung-Yi; Tien, Hwei-Fang; Ou, Da-Liang; Lin, Liang-In

    2015-07-01

    Genetic alterations in the PI3K/AKT cascade have been linked to various human cancers including acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and have emerged to be promising targets for treatment. In this study, we explored the molecular mechanism and clinical implication of a specific allosteric AKT inhibitor, MK-2206, in the treatment of AML. Four leukemia cell lines, MV-4-11, MOLM-13, OCI/AML3, and U937, were used. Apoptosis and cell cycle distribution were determined by flow cytometry analysis. Expression of anti-apoptotic protein family and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) signaling was determined by western blotting. Drug combination effects of MK-2206 with cytarabine were evaluated by cell proliferation assay, and the combination index values were calculated by CompuSyn software. MK-2206 had no effect on normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells, but induced G1-phase arrest and apoptosis in leukemia cells. Among anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members, only myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1) was significantly suppressed. Mcl-1 suppression by MK-2206 was closely associated with decreased GSK3β phosphorylation at Ser9, an event leads to GSK3β activation. Furthermore, the effect of MK-2206 on Mcl-1 downregulation was abolished by GSK3β inhibitor, lithium chloride and proteasome inhibitor, MG-132, suggesting that MK-2206 acted through a GSK3β-mediated, proteasome-dependent protein degradation. In addition, co-administration of MK-2206 with cytarabine could enhance the cytotoxic efficacy of cytarabine in leukemia cell lines. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that MK-2206 is an active agent in AML and its efficacy as in combination with cytarabine is implicated.

  19. Socioeconomic status (SES) and childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML) mortality risk: Analysis of SEER data.

    PubMed

    Knoble, Naomi B; Alderfer, Melissa A; Hossain, Md Jobayer

    2016-10-01

    Socioeconomic status (SES) is a complex construct of multiple indicators, known to impact cancer outcomes, but has not been adequately examined among pediatric AML patients. This study aimed to identify the patterns of co-occurrence of multiple community-level SES indicators and to explore associations between various patterns of these indicators and pediatric AML mortality risk. A nationally representative US sample of 3651 pediatric AML patients, aged 0-19 years at diagnosis was drawn from 17 Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database registries created between 1973 and 2012. Factor analysis, cluster analysis, stratified univariable and multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used. Four SES factors accounting for 87% of the variance in SES indicators were identified: F1) economic/educational disadvantage, less immigration; F2) immigration-related features (foreign-born, language-isolation, crowding), less mobility; F3) housing instability; and, F4) absence of moving. F1 and F3 showed elevated risk of mortality, adjusted hazards ratios (aHR) (95% CI): 1.07(1.02-1.12) and 1.05(1.00-1.10), respectively. Seven SES-defined cluster groups were identified. Cluster 1 (low economic/educational disadvantage, few immigration-related features, and residential-stability) showed the minimum risk of mortality. Compared to Cluster 1, Cluster 3 (high economic/educational disadvantage, high-mobility) and Cluster 6 (moderately-high economic/educational disadvantages, housing-instability and immigration-related features) exhibited substantially greater risk of mortality, aHR(95% CI)=1.19(1.0-1.4) and 1.23 (1.1-1.5), respectively. Factors of correlated SES-indicators and their pattern-based groups demonstrated differential risks in the pediatric AML mortality indicating the need of special public-health attention in areas with economic-educational disadvantages, housing-instability and immigration-related features.

  20. A Novel Tandem Duplication Assay to Detect Minimal Residual Disease in FLT3/ITD AML

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ming-Tseh; Tseng, Li-Hui; Dudley, Jonathan C.; Riel, Stacey; Tsai, Harrison; Zheng, Gang; Pratz, Keith W.; Levis, Mark J.; Gocke, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Internal tandem duplication (ITD) of the FLT3 gene is associated with poor prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients with a normal karyotype. The current standard PCR assay for FLT3/ITD detection is not sufficiently sensitive to monitor minimal residual disease (MRD). Clone-specific assays may have sufficient sensitivity but are not practical to implement, since each clone-specific primer/probe requires clinical validation. Objective To develop an assay for clinical molecular diagnostics laboratories to monitor MRD in FLT3/ITD AMLs. Methods We designed a simple novel assay, tandem duplication PCR (TD-PCR), and tested its sensitivity, specificity and clinical utility in FLT3/ITD AML patients. Results TD-PCR was capable of detecting a single ITD molecule and was applicable to 75% of ITD mutants tested. TD-PCR detected MRD in bone marrow prior to patient relapse. TD-PCR also identified low level ITD mutants not only in FLT3/ITD AMLs but also in initial diagnostic specimens reportedly negative by the standard assay in patients who progressed with the same ITDs detected by the TD-PCR assay. Conclusion Detection of MRD by TD-PCR may guide patient selection for early clinical intervention. In contrast to clone-specific approaches, TD-PCR assay can be more easily validated for MRD detection in clinical laboratories due to standardized primers and a universal positive control. In addition, our results on multi-clonality and low-level ITDs suggest that further studies are warranted to elucidate their clinical/biological significance. PMID:26446915

  1. Inhibition of Wild-Type p53-Expressing AML by the Novel Small Molecule HDM2 Inhibitor CGM097.

    PubMed

    Weisberg, Ellen; Halilovic, Ensar; Cooke, Vesselina G; Nonami, Atsushi; Ren, Tao; Sanda, Takaomi; Simkin, Irene; Yuan, Jing; Antonakos, Brandon; Barys, Louise; Ito, Moriko; Stone, Richard; Galinsky, Ilene; Cowens, Kristen; Nelson, Erik; Sattler, Martin; Jeay, Sebastien; Wuerthner, Jens U; McDonough, Sean M; Wiesmann, Marion; Griffin, James D

    2015-10-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is a key regulator of apoptosis and functions upstream in the apoptotic cascade by both indirectly and directly regulating Bcl-2 family proteins. In cells expressing wild-type (WT) p53, the HDM2 protein binds to p53 and blocks its activity. Inhibition of HDM2:p53 interaction activates p53 and causes apoptosis or cell-cycle arrest. Here, we investigated the ability of the novel HDM2 inhibitor CGM097 to potently and selectively kill WT p53-expressing AML cells. The antileukemic effects of CGM097 were studied using cell-based proliferation assays (human AML cell lines, primary AML patient cells, and normal bone marrow samples), apoptosis, and cell-cycle assays, ELISA, immunoblotting, and an AML patient-derived in vivo mouse model. CGM097 potently and selectively inhibited the proliferation of human AML cell lines and the majority of primary AML cells expressing WT p53, but not mutant p53, in a target-specific manner. Several patient samples that harbored mutant p53 were comparatively unresponsive to CGM097. Synergy was observed when CGM097 was combined with FLT3 inhibition against oncogenic FLT3-expressing cells cultured both in the absence as well as the presence of cytoprotective stromal-secreted cytokines, as well as when combined with MEK inhibition in cells with activated MAPK signaling. Finally, CGM097 was effective in reducing leukemia burden in vivo. These data suggest that CGM097 is a promising treatment for AML characterized as harboring WT p53 as a single agent, as well as in combination with other therapies targeting oncogene-activated pathways that drive AML.

  2. The NAE inhibitor pevonedistat interacts with the HDAC inhibitor belinostat to target AML cells by disrupting the DDR.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liang; Chen, Shuang; Zhang, Yu; Kmieciak, Maciej; Leng, Yun; Li, Lihong; Lin, Hui; Rizzo, Kathryn A; Dumur, Catherine I; Ferreira-Gonzalez, Andrea; Rahmani, Mohamed; Povirk, Lawrence; Chalasani, Sri; Berger, Allison J; Dai, Yun; Grant, Steven

    2016-05-05

    Two classes of novel agents, NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE) and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, have shown single-agent activity in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML)/myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Here we examined mechanisms underlying interactions between the NAE inhibitor pevonedistat (MLN4924) and the approved HDAC inhibitor belinostat in AML/MDS cells. MLN4924/belinostat coadministration synergistically induced AML cell apoptosis with or without p53 deficiency or FLT3-internal tandem duplication (ITD), whereas p53 short hairpin RNA (shRNA) knockdown or enforced FLT3-ITD expression significantly sensitized cells to the regimen. MLN4924 blocked belinostat-induced antiapoptotic gene expression through nuclear factor-κB inactivation. Each agent upregulated Bim, and Bim knockdown significantly attenuated apoptosis. Microarrays revealed distinct DNA damage response (DDR) genetic profiles between individual vs combined MLN4924/belinostat exposure. Whereas belinostat abrogated the MLN4924-activated intra-S checkpoint through Chk1 and Wee1 inhibition/downregulation, cotreatment downregulated multiple homologous recombination and nonhomologous end-joining repair proteins, triggering robust double-stranded breaks, chromatin pulverization, and apoptosis. Consistently, Chk1 or Wee1 shRNA knockdown significantly sensitized AML cells to MLN4924. MLN4924/belinostat displayed activity against primary AML or MDS cells, including those carrying next-generation sequencing-defined poor-prognostic cancer hotspot mutations, and CD34(+)/CD38(-)/CD123(+) populations, but not normal CD34(+) progenitors. Finally, combined treatment markedly reduced tumor burden and significantly prolonged animal survival (P < .0001) in AML xenograft models with negligible toxicity, accompanied by pharmacodynamic effects observed in vitro. Collectively, these findings argue that MLN4924 and belinostat interact synergistically by reciprocally disabling the DDR in AML/MDS cells. This strategy

  3. Problems getting from the laboratory to the field: Reclamation of an AML site

    SciTech Connect

    Dick, W.A.; Stehouwer, R.C.; Bigham, J.M.; Beeghly, J.H.

    1994-12-31

    Acid and toxic abandoned mineland sites provide an opportunity whereby flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-product can be beneficially used as a reclamation amendment material. Studies are needed to compare the effectiveness of FGD by-product, as compared with resoil, for reclamation purposes. Initial studies provided information about the chemical and physical properties of the FGD by-product and how to transport and blend the FGD by-product with yard waste compost. Greenhouse studies indicated that rates of 125 dry tons/acre of FGD and 50 dry tons/acre of yard waste compost would provide optimum results for reclamation of acid and toxic spoil contained at the Fleming abandoned mineland (AML) site. Their results showed that heavy metal loading rates were much lower using the FGD/compost mixture than using resoil material. Dioxin in the mixture was also less than the 5 ppt level considered as normal background. The technical problems of using FGD by-product for reclamation of an AML site were solved. However, considerable efforts to educate the public about the merits of reclaiming the Fleming AML site using this FGD/compost mixture were required before initiating field reclamation activities. Education efforts must continue if FGD by-products are to achieve general acceptance as a reclamation alternative to resoil in cases where resoil is of scarce supply.

  4. Supraphysiologic levels of the AML1-ETO isoform AE9a are essential for transformation

    PubMed Central

    Link, Kevin A.; Lin, Shan; Shrestha, Mahesh; Bowman, Melissa; Wunderlich, Mark; Bloomfield, Clara D.; Huang, Gang; Mulloy, James C.

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal translocation 8;21 is found in 40% of the FAB M2 subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The resultant in-frame fusion protein AML1-ETO (AE) acts as an initiating oncogene for leukemia development. AE immortalizes human CD34+ cord blood cells in long-term culture. We assessed the transforming properties of the alternatively spliced AE isoform AE9a (or alternative splicing at exon 9), which is fully transforming in a murine retroviral model, in human cord blood cells. Full activity was realized only upon increased fusion protein expression. This effect was recapitulated in the AE9a murine AML model. Cotransduction of AE and AE9a resulted in a strong selective pressure for AE-expressing cells. In the context of AE, AE9a did not show selection for increased expression, affirming observations of human t(8;21) patient samples where full-length AE is the dominant protein detected. Mechanistically, AE9a showed defective transcriptional regulation of AE target genes that was partially corrected at high expression. Together, these results bring an additional perspective to our understanding of AE function and highlight the contribution of oncogene expression level in t(8;21) experimental models. PMID:27457952

  5. The blind men and the AML elephant: can we feel the progress?

    PubMed Central

    Tauro, S

    2016-01-01

    The pharmacological therapy of non-promyelocytic acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has remained unchanged for over 40 years with an anthracycline–cytarabine combination forming the backbone of induction treatments. Nevertheless, the survival of younger patients has increased due to improved management of the toxicity of therapies including stem cell transplantation. Older patients and those with infirmity that precludes treatment-intensification have, however, not benefited from improvements in supportive care and continue to experience poor outcomes. An increased understanding of the genomic heterogeneity of AML raises the possibility of treatment-stratification to improve prognosis. Thus, efforts to identify agents with non-conventional anti-leukemic effects have paralleled those aiming to optimize leukemia cell-kill with conventional chemotherapy, resulting in a number of randomized controlled trials (RCT). In the last 18 months, RCTs investigating the effects of vosaroxin, azacitidine and gemtuzumab ozogamycin and daunorubicin dose have been reported with some studies indicating a statistically significant survival benefit with the investigational agent compared with standard therapy and potentially, a new era in AML therapeutics. Given the increasing costs of cancer care, a review of these studies, with particular attention to the magnitude of clinical benefit with the newer agents would be useful, especially for physicians treating patients in single-payer health systems. PMID:27176800

  6. MDS/AML del(11)(q14) Share Common Morphological Features Despite Different Chromosomal Breakpoints.

    PubMed

    Dambruoso, Irene; Invernizzi, Rosangela; Boni, Marina; Zappatore, Rita; Giardini, Ilaria; Cavigliano, Maria Paola; Rocca, Barbara; Calvello, Celeste; Bastia, Raffaella; Caresana, Marilena; Pasi, Francesca; Nano, Rosanna; Bernasconi, Paolo

    2017-02-01

    In myelodysplatic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia (MDS/AML) deletion of the 11q14 region is a rare chromosomal defect (incidence: 0.6-1.0%), included within the intermediate risk criteria by the International Prognostic Scoring System. No fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) study has yet been performed to identify a common breakpoint region (CBR). In our study through FISH with bacterial artificial chromosomes and commercial probes, we analyzed seven patients with MDS/AML harboring 11q14 deletion on conventional cytogenetic analysis. FISH revealed deletions in five patients and amplifications in two. Three patients with deletion carried a CBR, two had a deletion involving a more centromeric breakpoint. These five patients exhibited multilineage dysplasia, blast cells with large round nuclei, loose chromatin, small and abundant nucleoli, and vacuolated cytoplasm with very thin Auer bodies. In conclusion, the morphological features which occur independently of the extent of the deletion are of multilineage dysplasia in MDS and leukemic blasts strongly reactive to peroxidase in AML; despite the variable size of the deleted area, some patients harbor a CBR.

  7. Chimeric antigen receptor T cell therapy in AML: How close are we?

    PubMed

    Gill, Saar

    2016-12-01

    The majority of patients presenting with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) initially respond to chemotherapy but post-remission therapy is required to consolidate this response and achieve long-term disease-free survival. The most effective form of post-remission therapy relies on T cell immunotherapy in the form of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). However, patients with active disease cannot usually expect to be cured with HCT. This inherent dichotomy implies that traditional T cell-based immunotherapy in the form of allogeneic HCT stops being efficacious somewhere between the measurable residual disease (MRD) and the morphologically obvious range. This is in part because the full power of T cells must be restrained in order to avoid lethal graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and partly because only a sub-population of donor T cells are expected to be able to recognize AML cells via their T cell receptor. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy, most advanced in the treatment of patients with B-cell malignancies, may circumvent some of these limitations. However, major challenges remain to be overcome before CAR T cell therapy can be safely applied to AML.

  8. RNA Splicing Modulation Selectively Impairs Leukemia Stem Cell Maintenance in Secondary Human AML.

    PubMed

    Crews, Leslie A; Balaian, Larisa; Delos Santos, Nathaniel P; Leu, Heather S; Court, Angela C; Lazzari, Elisa; Sadarangani, Anil; Zipeto, Maria A; La Clair, James J; Villa, Reymundo; Kulidjian, Anna; Storb, Rainer; Morris, Sheldon R; Ball, Edward D; Burkart, Michael D; Jamieson, Catriona H M

    2016-11-03

    Age-related human hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) exhaustion and myeloid-lineage skewing promote oncogenic transformation of hematopoietic progenitor cells into therapy-resistant leukemia stem cells (LSCs) in secondary acute myeloid leukemia (AML). While acquisition of clonal DNA mutations has been linked to increased rates of secondary AML for individuals older than 60 years, the contribution of RNA processing alterations to human hematopoietic stem and progenitor aging and LSC generation remains unclear. Comprehensive RNA sequencing and splice-isoform-specific PCR uncovered characteristic RNA splice isoform expression patterns that distinguished normal young and aged human stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) from malignant myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and AML progenitors. In splicing reporter assays and pre-clinical patient-derived AML models, treatment with a pharmacologic splicing modulator, 17S-FD-895, reversed pro-survival splice isoform switching and significantly impaired LSC maintenance. Therapeutic splicing modulation, together with monitoring splice isoform biomarkers of healthy HSPC aging versus LSC generation, may be employed safely and effectively to prevent relapse, the leading cause of leukemia-related mortality.

  9. Hif-1α and Hif-2α synergize to suppress AML development but are dispensable for disease maintenance.

    PubMed

    Vukovic, Milica; Guitart, Amelie V; Sepulveda, Catarina; Villacreces, Arnaud; O'Duibhir, Eoghan; Panagopoulou, Theano I; Ivens, Alasdair; Menendez-Gonzalez, Juan; Iglesias, Juan Manuel; Allen, Lewis; Glykofrydis, Fokion; Subramani, Chithra; Armesilla-Diaz, Alejandro; Post, Annemarie E M; Schaak, Katrin; Gezer, Deniz; So, Chi Wai Eric; Holyoake, Tessa L; Wood, Andrew; O'Carroll, Dónal; Ratcliffe, Peter J; Kranc, Kamil R

    2015-12-14

    Leukemogenesis occurs under hypoxic conditions within the bone marrow (BM). Knockdown of key mediators of cellular responses to hypoxia with shRNA, namely hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) or HIF-2α, in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) samples results in their apoptosis and inability to engraft, implicating HIF-1α or HIF-2α as therapeutic targets. However, genetic deletion of Hif-1α has no effect on mouse AML maintenance and may accelerate disease development. Here, we report the impact of conditional genetic deletion of Hif-2α or both Hif-1α and Hif-2α at different stages of leukemogenesis in mice. Deletion of Hif-2α accelerates development of leukemic stem cells (LSCs) and shortens AML latency initiated by Mll-AF9 and its downstream effectors Meis1 and Hoxa9. Notably, the accelerated initiation of AML caused by Hif-2α deletion is further potentiated by Hif-1α codeletion. However, established LSCs lacking Hif-2α or both Hif-1α and Hif-2α propagate AML with the same latency as wild-type LSCs. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of the HIF pathway or HIF-2α knockout using the lentiviral CRISPR-Cas9 system in human established leukemic cells with MLL-AF9 translocation have no impact on their functions. We therefore conclude that although Hif-1α and Hif-2α synergize to suppress the development of AML, they are not required for LSC maintenance.

  10. Caspase-3 controls AML1-ETO-driven leukemogenesis via autophagy modulation in a ULK1 dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Man, Na; Tan, Yurong; Sun, Xiao-Jian; Liu, Fan; Cheng, Guoyan; Greenblatt, Sarah; Martinez, Camilo; Karl, Daniel L; Ando, Koji; Sun, Ming; Hou, Dan; Chen, Bingyi; Xu, Mingjiang; Yang, Feng-Chun; Chen, Zhu; Chen, Saijuan; Nimer, Stephen D; Wang, Lan

    2017-04-05

    AML1-ETO (AE), a fusion oncoprotein, generated by the t(8;21), can trigger acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in collaboration with mutations including c-Kit, ASXL1/2, FLT3, N-RAS, and K-RAS. Caspase-3, a key executor among its family, plays multiple roles in cellular processes, including hematopoietic development and leukemia progression. Caspase-3 was revealed to directly cleave AE in vitro, suggesting that AE may accumulate in a Caspase-3 compromised background and thereby accelerate leukemogenesis. Therefore, we developed a Caspase-3 knockout genetic mouse model of AML and found that loss of Caspase-3 actually delayed AML1-ETO9a (AE9a)-driven leukemogenesis, indicating that Caspase-3 may play distinct roles in the initiation and/or progression of AML. We report here that loss of Caspase-3 triggers a conserved, adaptive mechanism, namely autophagy (or macroautophagy), that acts to limit AE9a-driven leukemia. Furthermore, we identify ULK1 as a novel substrate of Caspase-3 and show that upregulation of ULK1 drives autophagy initiation in leukemia cells and that inhibition of ULK1 can rescue the phenotype induced by Caspase-3 deletion in vitro and in vivo Collectively, these data highlight Caspase-3 as an important regulator of autophagy in AML and demonstrate that the balance and selectivity between its substrates can dictate the pace of disease.

  11. Defining the oncogenic function of the TEL/AML1 (ETV6/RUNX1) fusion protein in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Meike; Schwieger, Maike; Horn, Stefan; Niebuhr, Birte; Ford, Anthony; Roscher, Susanne; Bergholz, Ulla; Greaves, Mel; Löhler, Jürgen; Stocking, Carol

    2005-11-17

    The t(12;21) translocation, generating the TEL/AML1 fusion protein, is the most common genetic lesion in childhood cancer. Using a bone marrow transplantation model, we demonstrate that TEL/AML1 expression impinges on normal hematopoietic differentiation, leading to the in vivo accumulation and persistence of an early progenitor compartment with a Sca1(+)/Kit(hi)/CD11b(+) phenotype and an increased self-renewal capacity, as documented by replating assays in vitro. Differentiation of these cells is not blocked, but the frequency of mature blood cells arising from TEL/AML1-transduced progenitors is low. Impaired differentiation is prominently observed in the pro-B-cell compartment, resulting in an proportional increase in early progenitors in vivo, consistent with the t(12;21) ALL phenotype. Despite the accumulation of both multipotent and B-cell progenitors in vivo, no leukemia induction was observed during an observation period of over 1 year. These results are consistent with findings in twins with concordant ALL, showing that TEL/AML1 generates a preleukemic clone in utero that persists for several years in a clinically covert fashion. Furthermore, our studies showed that the pointed domain of TEL/AML1, which recruits transcriptional repressors and directs oligomerization with either TEL/AML1 or wild-type TEL, was essential for the observed differentiation impairment and could not be replaced with another oligomerization domain.

  12. A randomized assessment of adding the kinase inhibitor lestaurtinib to first-line chemotherapy for FLT3-mutated AML.

    PubMed

    Knapper, Steven; Russell, Nigel; Gilkes, Amanda; Hills, Robert K; Gale, Rosemary E; Cavenagh, James D; Jones, Gail; Kjeldsen, Lars; Grunwald, Michael R; Thomas, Ian; Konig, Heiko; Levis, Mark J; Burnett, Alan K

    2017-03-02

    The clinical benefit of adding FMS-like tyrosine kinase-3 (FLT3)-directed small molecule therapy to standard first-line treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has not yet been established. As part of the UK AML15 and AML17 trials, patients with previously untreated AML and confirmed FLT3-activating mutations, mostly younger than 60 years, were randomly assigned either to receive oral lestaurtinib (CEP701) or not after each of 4 cycles of induction and consolidation chemotherapy. Lestaurtinib was commenced 2 days after completing chemotherapy and administered in cycles of up to 28 days. The trials ran consecutively. Primary endpoints were overall survival in AML15 and relapse-free survival in AML17; outcome data were meta-analyzed. Five hundred patients were randomly assigned between lestaurtinib and control: 74% had FLT3-internal tandem duplication mutations, 23% FLT3-tyrosine kinase domain point mutations, and 2% both types. No significant differences were seen in either 5-year overall survival (lestaurtinib 46% vs control 45%; hazard ratio, 0.90; 95% CI 0.70-1.15; P = .3) or 5-year relapse-free survival (40% vs 36%; hazard ratio, 0.88; 95% CI 0.69-1.12; P = .3). Exploratory subgroup analysis suggested survival benefit with lestaurtinib in patients receiving concomitant azole antifungal prophylaxis and gemtuzumab ozogamicin with the first course of chemotherapy. Correlative studies included analysis of in vivo FLT3 inhibition by plasma inhibitory activity assay and indicated improved overall survival and significantly reduced rates of relapse in lestaurtinib-treated patients who achieved sustained greater than 85% FLT3 inhibition. In conclusion, combining lestaurtinib with intensive chemotherapy proved feasible in younger patients with newly diagnosed FLT3-mutated AML, but yielded no overall clinical benefit. The improved clinical outcomes seen in patients achieving sustained FLT3 inhibition encourage continued evaluation of FLT3-directed therapy alongside

  13. The predictive value of hierarchical cytogenetic classification in older adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML): analysis of 1065 patients entered into the United Kingdom Medical Research Council AML11 trial.

    PubMed

    Grimwade, D; Walker, H; Harrison, G; Oliver, F; Chatters, S; Harrison, C J; Wheatley, K; Burnett, A K; Goldstone, A H

    2001-09-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in older adults carries a poor prognosis, and the optimum treatment remains to be determined. In younger patients, treatment stratification is frequently based upon diagnostic karyotype, which was the most important prognostic factor in the UK Medical Research Council (MRC) AML10 trial. Considered here is whether karyotype is also predictive in older adults; this is done by studying 1065 cases from MRC AML11 (median age, 66 years). Three prognostic groups were distinguished on the basis of response to induction therapy and overall survival (OS). Those with t(15;17), t(8;21), or inv(16) composed the favorable risk group. Overall, these abnormalities predicted a superior complete remission (CR) rate (72%), reflecting relatively low levels of resistant disease (RD) (8%), and lower relapse risk (RR) (56%) associated with superior OS (34% at 5 years). Normal karyotype (CR, 63%; RD, 17%; RR, 78%; OS, 15%) and other noncomplex abnormalities (CR, 53%; RD, 32%; RR, 85%; OS, 10%) composed the intermediate group; while complex karyotype predicted an extremely poor prognosis (CR, 26%; RD, 56%; RR, 91%; OS, 2%). Combining MRC AML10 and AML11 (n = 2677) revealed that the most favorable changes were rarer in older patients (younger than 55 years, 24%; 55 years or older, 7%), while complex abnormalities were more common (6% vs 13%). This study suggests that hierarchical cytogenetic classification identifies biologically distinct subsets of AML that are represented in all age groups. Furthermore, it highlights the importance of karyotype as a critical independent determinant of outcome in older patients with AML, providing a potential framework for stratified treatment approaches.

  14. Design of the randomized, Phase III, QUAZAR AML Maintenance trial of CC-486 (oral azacitidine) maintenance therapy in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Roboz, Gail J; Montesinos, Pau; Selleslag, Dominik; Wei, Andrew; Jang, Jun-Ho; Falantes, Jose; Voso, Maria T; Sayar, Hamid; Porkka, Kimmo; Marlton, Paula; Almeida, Antonio; Mohan, Sanjay; Ravandi, Farhad; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Skikne, Barry; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2016-02-01

    Older patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have worse rates of complete remission and shorter overall survival than younger patients. The epigenetic modifier CC-486 is an oral formulation of azacitidine with promising clinical activity in patients with AML in Phase I studies. The Phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled QUAZAR AML Maintenance trial (CC-486-AML-001) examines CC-486 maintenance therapy (300 mg/day for 14 days of 28-day treatment cycles) for patients aged ≥55 years with AML in first complete remission. The primary end point is overall survival. Secondary end points include relapse-free survival, safety, health-related quality of life and healthcare resource utilization. This trial will investigate whether CC-486 maintenance can prolong remission and improve survival for older patients with AML.

  15. Inositol polyphosphate 4-phosphatase II (INPP4B) is associated with chemoresistance and poor outcome in AML.

    PubMed

    Rijal, Sewa; Fleming, Shaun; Cummings, Nik; Rynkiewicz, Natalie K; Ooms, Lisa M; Nguyen, Nhu-Y N; Teh, Tse-Chieh; Avery, Sharon; McManus, Julie F; Papenfuss, Anthony T; McLean, Catriona; Guthridge, Mark A; Mitchell, Christina A; Wei, Andrew H

    2015-04-30

    Phosphoinositide signaling regulates diverse cellular functions. Phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K) generates PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 and PtdIns(3,4)P2, leading to the activation of proliferative and anti-apoptotic signaling pathways. Termination of phosphoinositide signaling requires hydrolysis of inositol ring phosphate groups through the actions of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 3-phosphatase (PTEN), PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 5-phosphatases (eg, SHIP), and PtdIns(3,4)P2 4-phosphatases (eg, INPP4B). The biological relevance of most of these phosphoinositide phosphatases in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains poorly understood. Mass spectrometry-based gene expression profiling of 3-, 4- and 5-phosphatases in human AML revealed significant overexpression of INPP4B. Analysis of an expanded panel of 205 AML cases at diagnosis revealed INPP4B overexpression in association with reduced responses to chemotherapy, early relapse, and poor overall survival, independent of other risk factors. Ectopic overexpression of INPP4B conferred leukemic resistance to cytosine arabinoside (ara-C), daunorubicin, and etoposide. Expression of a phosphatase inert variant (INPP4B C842A) failed to abrogate resistance of AML cells to chemotherapy in vitro or in vivo. In contrast, targeted suppression of endogenously overexpressed INPP4B by RNA interference sensitized AML cell lines and primary AML to chemotherapy. These findings demonstrate a previously unsuspected and clinically relevant role for INPP4B gain of function as a mediator of chemoresistance and poor survival outcome in AML independent of its phosphoinositide phosphatase function.

  16. Acquired TET2 mutation in one patient with familial platelet disorder with predisposition to AML led to the development of pre-leukaemic clone resulting in T2-ALL and AML-M0.

    PubMed

    Manchev, Vladimir T; Bouzid, Hind; Antony-Debré, Iléana; Leite, Betty; Meurice, Guillaume; Droin, Nathalie; Prebet, Thomas; Costello, Régis T; Vainchenker, William; Plo, Isabelle; Diop, M'boyba; Macintyre, Elizabeth; Asnafi, Vahid; Favier, Rémi; Baccini, Véronique; Raslova, Hana

    2016-12-20

    Familial platelet disorder with predisposition to acute myeloid leukaemia (FPD/AML) is characterized by germline RUNX1 mutations, thrombocytopaenia, platelet dysfunction and a risk of developing acute myeloid and in rare cases lymphoid T leukaemia. Here, we focus on a case of a man with a familial history of RUNX1(R174Q) mutation who developed at the age of 42 years a T2-ALL and, 2 years after remission, an AML-M0. Both AML-M0 and T2-ALL blast populations demonstrated a loss of 1p36.32-23 and 17q11.2 regions as well as other small deletions, clonal rearrangements of both TCRγ and TCRδ and a presence of 18 variants at a frequency of more than 40%. Additional variants were identified only in T2-ALL or in AML-M0 evoking the existence of a common original clone, which gave rise to subclonal populations. Next generation sequencing (NGS) performed on peripheral blood-derived CD34(+) cells 5 years prior to T2-ALL development revealed only the missense TET2(P1962T) mutation at a frequency of 1%, which increases to more than 40% in fully transformed leukaemic T2-ALL and AML-M0 clones. This result suggests that TET2(P1962T) mutation in association with germline RUNX1(R174Q) mutation leads to amplification of a haematopoietic clone susceptible to acquire other transforming alterations.

  17. Hinderniserkennung und -verfolgung mit einer PMD-kamera im automobil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schamm, Thomas; Vacek, Stefan; Natroshvilli, Koba; Marius Zöllner, J.; Dillmann, Rüdiger

    Die Detektion von Hindernissen vor dem Automobil ist eine Hauptanforderung an moderne Fahrerassistenzsysteme (FAS). In dieser Arbeit wird ein System vorgestellt, das mit Hilfe einer PMDKamera (Photomischdetektor) Hindernisse auf der Fahrspur erkennt und deren relevante Parameter bestimmt. Durch die PMD-Kamera werden zunächst 3D-Tiefenbilder der Fahrzeugumwelt generiert. Nach einem initialen Filterprozess werden im Tiefenbild mit Hilfe eines Bereichswachstumsverfahrens Hindernisse gesucht. Zur Stabilisierung des Verfahrens und zur Parameterberechnung wird ein Kaiman Filter eingesetzt. Das Ergebnis ist eine Liste aller Hindernisse im Fahrbereich des Automobils.

  18. The US DOE/MIT Innovation Acceleration Competition

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2009-06-30

    The Competition asked student teams from several US Universities to propose business models, technological systems, and policy framework to accelerate the penetration of new vehicle and fuel technologies into the markets. In May 2009 the final selection of teams was announced and four of five finalist teams flew to Washington DC to present to the US Department of Energy. The five finalist teams were 1. Filter Sensing Technologies (FST) (MIT), 2. Flex Cathode Technology for Electric Vehicle Batteries, 3. Green Guidance (RPI), 4. Levant Power (MIT), and 5. Wind-Driven Paddlewheel Cylinder for Energy Storage in Freighter Trucks (Villanova). The five finalists entries are described.

  19. Esculetin Downregulates the Expression of AML1-ETO and C-Kit in Kasumi-1 Cell Line by Decreasing Half-Life of mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Sawney, Sharad; Arora, Rashi; Aggarwal, Kamal K.; Saluja, Daman

    2015-01-01

    One of the most frequent genetic aberrations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is chromosomal translocation between AML1/RUNX1 on chromosome 21 and ETO gene on chromosome 8 resulting in the expression of chimeric oncogene AML1-ETO. Although patients with t(8;21) translocation have good prognosis, 5-year survival is observed only in 50% of the cases. AML1-ETO translocation is usually accompanied by overexpression of mutant C-Kit, a tyrosine kinase, which contributes to uncontrolled proliferation of premature blood cells leading to relapse and poor prognosis. We illustrate the potential use of esculetin on leukemic cell line, Kasumi-1, bearing t(8;21) translocation and mutated C-Kit gene. Esculetin decreases the expression of AML1-ETO at both protein and transcript level within 24 hours of treatment. Half-life of AML1-ETO mRNA was reduced from 7 hours to 1.5 hours. Similarly half-life of C-Kit mRNA was reduced to 2 hours from 5 hours in esculetin treated cells. Esculetin also perturbed the expression of ectopically expressed AML1-ETO in U937 cells. The decreased expression of AML1-ETO chimeric gene was associated with increased expression of LAT1 and RUNX3 genes, targets of AML1. We envisage that discovery of a drug candidate which could target both these mutated genes would be a considerable breakthrough for future application. PMID:25861270

  20. Optimizing outcomes following allogeneic hematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation in AML: the role of hypomethylating agents.

    PubMed

    Martino, Massimo; Fedele, Roberta; Moscato, Tiziana; Ronco, Francesca

    2013-07-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation is a key pathological mechanism in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and provides rationale for the clinical development of hypomethylating agents (HMAs) for the treatment of these diseases. One HMA, azacitidine (Vidaza®, Celgene Corp.), has demonstrated improved survival versus conventional care regimens in patients with intermediate-2/high-risk MDS and AML (20-30% blasts) and has a favorable tolerability profile. Emerging evidence indicates that azacitidine can have an immunomodulatory effect by, for example, increasing functional regulatory T-cell (Treg) numbers and killer-cell-immunoglobulin-like receptor expression. Allogeneic hematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation (allo HPCT) is the only potentially curative treatment approach in patients with advanced MDS or AML. Unfortunately, allo HPCT in these settings is limited because most patients are ineligible due to age/comorbidities, or are at a high risk of treatment failure due to disease relapse. Recent studies have shown that azacitidine after allo HPCT increases Treg numbers while inducing a cytotoxic CD8+ T-cell response, suggesting a potential mechanism for augmenting the graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effect without increasing graft-versushost- disease (GVHD). In patients at a high risk of relapse following allo HPCT, pre-emptive azacitidine may help prevent/delay relapse. For patients who have relapsed following allo HPCT, azacitidine may be a salvage therapy option, either as monotherapy or in combination with donor lymphocyte infusions (DLI). In this mini-review, we discuss these emerging clinical data for HMAs in the post-allo HPCT regimens and highlight the possible future role of azacitidine in this setting.

  1. Cytarabine and clofarabine after high-dose cytarabine in relapsed or refractory AML patients.

    PubMed

    Scappini, Barbara; Gianfaldoni, Giacomo; Caracciolo, Francesco; Mannelli, Francesco; Biagiotti, Caterina; Romani, Claudio; Pogliani, Enrico M; Simonetti, Federico; Borin, Lorenza; Fanci, Rosa; Cutini, Ilaria; Longo, Giovanni; Susini, Maria Chiara; Angelucci, Emanuele; Bosi, Alberto

    2012-12-01

    Clofarabine has been shown to be effective in AML patients, either as single agent or, mainly, in association with intermediate dose cytarabine. Based on these reports, we conducted a preliminary study combining clofarabine and intermediate dose cytarabine in AML patients who relapsed or failed to respond to at least two induction therapies. We treated 47 patients affected by relapsed/refractory AML with a regimen including clofarabine at 22.5 mg/m(2) daily on days 1-5, followed after 3 hr by cytarabine at 1 g/m(2) daily on days 1-5. Ten patients received a further consolidation cycle with clofarabine at 22.5 mg/m(2) and cytarabine at 1 g/m(2) day 1-4. Among the 47 patients, 24/47 (51%) achieved a complete remission, 5/47 (10.5%) a partial response, 10/47 (21%) had a resistant disease, and 6/47 (13%) died of complications during the aplastic phase. The most frequent nonhematologic adverse events were vomiting, diarrhea, transient liver toxicity, febrile neutropenia, and infections microbiologically documented. Among the 24 patients who obtained a CR 13 underwent allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. In 14 patients, complete remission duration was shorter than 12 months, whereas 10 patients experienced longer complete remission duration. These very preliminary results suggest that clofarabine-cytarabine regimen is effective in this particularly poor prognosis category of patients, representing a potential "bridge" toward bone marrow transplant procedures. Safety data were consistent with previously reported salvage therapies. Further studies and a longer follow up are warranted.

  2. MRD in AML: does it already guide therapy decision-making?

    PubMed

    Ossenkoppele, Gert; Schuurhuis, Gerrit Jan

    2016-12-02

    Prognostic factors determined at diagnosis are predictive for outcome whereas achievement of morphological complete remission (CR) is still an important end point during treatment. Residual disease after therapy may reflect the sum of all diagnosis and postdiagnosis resistance mechanisms/factors; its measurement could hypothetically be very instrumental for guiding treatment. The possibility of defining residual disease (minimal residual disease [MRD]) far below the level of 5% blast cells is changing the landscape of risk classification. In this manuscript, the various methods, all different in sensitivity, specificity, and phase of development, to assess MRD are discussed. Currently, the 2 methods mostly used are flow cytometry-based immune MRD (multiparameter flow cytometry [MPFC]) and molecular MRD assessed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Both have advantages and disadvantages that are summarized in detail. Many studies in children as well as adults already demonstrated that MRD detection by MPFC or molecular MRD provides strong prognostic information in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) after both induction and consolidation. These studies are summarized in this review. The general conclusion of this review is that a better definition of disease burden than morphological CR is now emerging. MRD assessed by flow or molecular techniques should become standard in every clinical trial in AML. Harmonization of antibody panels, introduction of single-cell tube systems (for determination of residual leukemic stem cells), and standardized analytical programs will pave the way for individual risk assessment and become a surrogate end point for survival in studies investigating new drugs, hopefully resulting in faster drug approval in AML.

  3. Monitoring Response and Resistance to the Novel Arsenical Darinaparsin in an AML Patient

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Torsten H.; Johnson, Nathalie; Garnier, Nicolas; Kwan, Stanley; Yao, Lu; Cocolakis, Eftihia; Hébert, Josée; Morgan, Robert A.; Paquet, Éric; Callahan, Kevin P.; Jordan, Craig T.; Assouline, Sarit; Miller, Wilson H.; Mann, Koren K.

    2012-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with inversion of chromosome 3 is characterized by overexpression of EVI1 and carries a dismal prognosis. Arsenic-containing compounds have been described to be efficacious in malignancies overexpressing EVI1. Here, we describe a case of AML with inv(3)(q21q26.2) treated with the organic arsenical darinaparsin. Using a “personalized medicine approach,” two different arsenicals were screened for anti-leukemic effect against the patient’s cells ex vivo. The most promising compound, darinaparsin, was selected for in vivo treatment. Clinical effect was almost immediate, with a normalization of temperature, a stabilization of white blood cell (WBC) counts and an increased quality of life. Longitudinal monitoring of patient response and resistance incorporating significant correlative studies on patient-derived blood samples over the two cycles of darinaparsin given to this patient allowed us to evaluate potential mechanisms of response and resistance. The anti-leukemic effects of darinaparsin correlated with inhibition of the alternative NF-κB pathway and production of the inflammatory cytokine IL-8. Emergence of resistance was suspected during treatment cycle 2 and supported by xenograft studies in nude mice. Darinaparsin resistance correlated with an attenuation of the effect of treatment on the alternative NF-κB pathway. The results from this patient indicate that darinaparsin may be a good treatment option for inv(3) AML and that inhibition of the alternative NF-κB pathway may be predictive of response. Longitudinal monitoring of disease response as well as several correlative parameters allowed for the generation of novel correlations and predictors of response to experimental therapy in a heavily pretreated patient. PMID:23408639

  4. Comorbidity, age and mortality among adults treated intensively for acute myeloid leukemia (AML)

    PubMed Central

    Tawfik, Bernard; Pardee, Timothy; Isom, Scott; Sliesoraitis, Sarunas; Winter, Allison; Lawrence, Julia; Powell, Bayard L.; Klepin, Heidi D.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Our goal was to characterize comorbidities among adults receiving intensive therapy for AML, and investigate their association with outcomes. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 277 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed AML treated intensively at the Comprehensive Cancer Center of Wake Forest University from 2002–2009. Pretreatment comorbidities were identified by ICD-9 codes and chart review. Comorbidity burden (modified Charlson Comorbidity Index [CCI]) and specific conditions were analyzed individually. Outcomes were overall survival (OS), remission, and 30-day mortality. Covariates included age, gender, cytogenetic characteristics, hemoglobin, white cell count, lactate dehydrogenase, body mass index, and insurance type. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate OS; logistic regression was used for remission and 30-day mortality. Results In this series, 144 patients were ≥60 years old (median age 70 years, median survival 8.7 months) and 133 were <60 years (median age 47 years, median survival 23.1 months). Older patients had a higher comorbidity burden (CCI≥1 58% versus 26%, p<0.001). Prevalent comorbid conditions differed by age (diabetes 19.2% versus 7.5%; cardiovascular disease 12.5% versus 4.5%, for older versus younger patients, respectively). The CCI was not independently associated with OS or 30-day mortality in either age group. Among older patients, diabetes was associated with higher 30-day mortality (33.3% vs. 12.0% in diabetic vs. non diabetic patients, p =0.006). Controlling for age, cytogenetic characteristics and other comorbidities, the presence of diabetes increased the odds of 30-day mortality by 4.9 (CI 1.6–15.2) times. Discussion Diabetes is adversely associated with 30-day survival in older AML patients receiving intensive therapy. PMID:26527394

  5. DNMT3A R882 Mutations Predict a Poor Prognosis in AML: A Meta-Analysis From 4474 Patients.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiao-Qing; Peng, Li; Zeng, Wen-Jing; Jiang, Bin-Yuan; Li, Guan-Cheng; Chen, Xiao-Ping

    2016-05-01

    DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase 3 alpha (DNMT3A) mutations were widely believed to be independently associated with inferior prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. As dominant missense alterations in DNMT3A mutations, R882 mutations cause the focal hypomethylation phenotype. However, there remains debate on the influence of R882 mutations on AML prognosis. Thus, this meta-analysis aimed at further illustrating the prognostic power of DNMT3A R882 mutations in AML patients.Eligible studies were identified from 5 databases containing PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Clinical Trials, and the Cochrane Library (up to October 25, 2015). Effects (hazard ratios [HRs] with 95% confidence interval [CI]) of relapse-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) were pooled to estimate the prognostic power of mutant DNMT3A R882 in overall patients and subgroups of AML patients.Eight competent studies with 4474 AML patients including 694 with DNMT3A R882 mutations were included. AML patients with DNMT3A R882 mutations showed significant shorter RFS (HR = 1.40, 95% CI = 1.24-1.59, P < 0.001) and OS (HR = 1.47, 95% CI = 1.17-1.86, P = 0.001) in the overall population. DNMT3A R882 mutations predicted worse RFS and OS among the subgroups of patients under age 60 (RFS: HR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.25-1.66, P < 0.001; OS: HR = 1.48, 95% CI = 1.15-1.90, P = 0.002), over age 60 (RFS: HR = 2.03, 95% CI = 1.40-2.93, P < 0.001; OS: HR = 1.85, 95% CI = 1.36-2.53, P < 0.001), cytogenetically normal (CN)-AML (RFS: HR = 1.52, 95% CI = 1.26-1.83, P < 0.001; OS: HR = 1.67, 95% CI = 1.16-2.41, P = 0.006), and non-CN-AML (RFS: HR = 1.96, 95% CI = 1.20-3.21, P = 0.006; OS: HR = 2.51, 95% CI = 1.52-4.15, P = 0.0038).DNMT3A R882 mutations possessed significant unfavorable prognostic influence on RFS and OS in AML patients.

  6. Targeting the kinase activities of ATR and ATM exhibits therapeutic potential in a mouse model of MLL-rearranged AML

    PubMed Central

    Lafarga, Vanesa; Anton, Marta Elena; Tubbs, Anthony; Chen, Hua Tang; Ergan, Aysegul; Anderson, Rhonda; Bhandoola, Avinash; Pike, Kurt G.; Barlaam, Bernard; Cadogan, Elaine; Wang, Xi; Pierce, Andrew J.; Hubbard, Chad; Armstrong, Scott A.; Nussenzweig, André; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Among the various subtypes of Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML), those with chromosomal rearrangements of the MLL oncogene (AML-MLL) have a poor prognosis. AML-MLL tumor cells are resistant to current genotoxic therapies due to an attenuated response by p53, which induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in response to DNA damage. In addition to chemicals that damage DNA, efforts have focused on targeting DNA repair enzymes as a general chemotherapeutic approach to cancer treatment. Here, we found that inhibition of the kinase ATR, which is the primary sensor of DNA replication stress, induced chromosomal breakage and death of mouse AMLMLL cells (with an MLL-ENL fusion and a constitutively active N-RAS) independently of p53. Moreover, ATR inhibition as a single agent exhibited antitumoral activity, both reducing tumor burden after establishment and preventing tumors from growing, in an immunocompetent allograft mouse model of AMLMLL and in xenografts of a human AML-MLL cell line. We also found that inhibition of ATM, a kinase that senses DNA double-strand breaks, also promoted the survival of the AMLMLL mice. Collectively, these data indicated that ATR and ATM inhibition represent potential alternative therapeutic strategies for the treatment of AML, especially MLL-driven leukemias. PMID:27625305

  7. Pre-transplant MRD predicts outcome following reduced-intensity and myeloablative allogeneic hemopoietic SCT in AML.

    PubMed

    Anthias, C; Dignan, F L; Morilla, R; Morilla, A; Ethell, M E; Potter, M N; Shaw, B E

    2014-05-01

    The presence of minimal residual disease (MRD) by multiparametric flow cytometry (MFC) has been associated with adverse outcomes in AML patients treated with chemotherapy alone, but its impact in the setting of allogeneic hematopoietic SCT (HSCT) is less clear. We studied 88 patients who underwent myeloablative (MA) or reduced-intensity conditioned allogeneic HSCT for AML in first or subsequent remission at our center. MRD status was determined using three-color MFC on pre-HSCT BM aspirates, and patients were stratified by MRD status into MRD-negative, low-level MRD-positive (<1%) or high-level MRD-positive groups (1-4.9%). Two-year survival estimates in these groups were 66.8%, 51% and 30%, respectively (P=0.012), and 2-year estimates of relapse were 7.6, 37 and 70% (P<0.001). Pre-HSCT MRD was related to disease characteristics including secondary AML (P=0.002) and primary induction failure (P=0.005), but, despite these strong correlations, MRD remained independently associated with poorer survival in multivariate analysis (hazard ratio, 1.92; P=0.014). Pre-HSCT MRD is associated with adverse clinical outcomes in AML patients undergoing reduced-intensity or MA HSCT in first or subsequent remission and should be integrated into transplant strategies for patients with AML.

  8. Design and kinetic analysis of hammerhead ribozyme and DNAzyme that specifically cleave TEL-AML1 chimeric mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Woo-Hyung; Choi, Bo-Ra; Kim, Jae Hyun; Yeo, Woon-Seok; Oh, Sangtaek; Kim, Dong-Eun

    2008-09-12

    In order to develop the oligonucleotides to abolish an expression of TEL-AML1 chimeric RNA, which is a genetic aberration that causes the acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), hammerhead ribozymes and deoxyoligoribozymes that can specifically cleave TEL-AML1 fusion RNA were designed. Constructs of the deoxyribozyme with an asymmetric substrate binding arm (Dz26) and the hammerhead ribozyme with a 4 nt-bulged substrate binding arm in the stem III (buRz28) were able to cleave TEL-AML1 chimeric RNA specifically at sites close to the junction in vitro, without cleaving the normal TEL and AML1 RNA. Single-turnover kinetic analysis under enzyme-excess condition revealed that the buRz28 is superior to the Dz26 in terms of substrate binding and RNA-cleavage. In conjunction with current progress in a gene-delivery technology, the designed oligonucleotides that specifically cleave the TEL-AML1 chimeric mRNA are hoped to be applicable for the treatment of ALL in vivo.

  9. Federal Logistics Information System (FLIS). Volume 18. Automated Mailing Labels System (AMLS) FLIS Procedures Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-01

    1DbD 4100.39-M AD-A272 177 VOLUME 18 FEDERAL LOGISTICS INFORMATION SYSTEM Cf26 1993 AUTOMATED MAILING LABELS SYSTEM (AMLS) FLIS PROCEDURES MANUAL T I...JULY 1993\\ 93-25434 93 10~~- DoD 4100.39-M Volume 18 VOLUME TITLE 1 General and Administrative Information 2 Multiple Application Procedures 3...Statistics 15 Publications 16 Logistics On-Line Access (LOLA) End-User Manual 17 Federal Logistics Data on Compact Disc (FED LOG) 18 Automated Mailing Labels

  10. Pressurized grout remote backfilling at AML sites near Beulah and Zap, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    Weiner, E.J.; Dodd, W.E.

    1999-07-01

    The Abandoned Mine Lands (AML) Division of the North Dakota Public Service Commission (PSC) is charged with the reclamation of hazardous abandoned mine sites in North Dakota. Several underground lignite coalmines were operated near the cities of Beulah and Zap, North Dakota, from the early 1900's until about 1955. Coal seams in this area were relatively thick and the overburden generally shallow. As these mines have deteriorated with time, deep collapse features, or sinkholes, have surfaced in many areas. These features are very dangerous, especially when they occur at or near residential and commercial areas and public roads. In the past five years, sinkholes have surfaced beneath a commercial building (boat dealership, lounge, and gas station) and beneath a nearby occupied mobile home north of Beulah. sinkholes have also surfaced near KHOL Radio Station in Beulah and in the right of way of a public road south of Zap. The AML Division has conducted several emergency sinkhole-filling projects in these areas. In 1995--97, the AML Division conducted exploratory drilling which confirmed the presence of collapsing underground mines at these sites. The remediation of these sites around Beulah/Zap will take place over several years and involve three or more separate contracts due to budget considerations. In 1997, the AML Division began reclamation at these sties utilizing pressurized grout remote backfilling. In this technique, a cementitious grout is pumped through cased drill holes directly into the mine cavities to fill them and thereby stabilize the surface from collapse. The successful contractor for Phase One of the project was The Concrete Doctor, Inc. (TCDI). This paper will concentrate on Phase One of this work performed from June through September 1997. This project is especially interesting because grout was pumped through holes drilled inside the occupied commercial building. Grout was also pumped through angled holes that intercepted mined workings directly

  11. MRD in AML: it is time to change the definition of remission.

    PubMed

    Ossenkoppele, Gert J; Schuurhuis, Gerrit Jan

    2014-01-01

    The possibility of defining residual disease far below the morphological level of 5% blast cells is changing the landscape of risk classification in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The so-called minimal residual disease (MRD) approach at this time can establish the presence of leukemia cells down to levels of 1:1000-1:10(6) white blood cells, compared to 1:20 for morphology. Availability of the newer and more sensitive technology to quantify the level of leukemic burden raises the issue of whether MRD should emerge as a new definition of complete response. This paper explores some of the issues surrounding such a change in definition.

  12. Increased dosage of the RUNX1/AML1 gene: a third mode of RUNX leukemia?

    PubMed

    Osato, Motomi; Ito, Yoshiaki

    2005-01-01

    RUNX1/AML1, located on chromosome 21, is a key factor in the generation and maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells and the gene most frequently implicated in human leukemias. Chromosome translocations and point mutations are well-documented genetic alterations in RUNX leukemia (also known as CBF leukemia). In addition, overdosage or overexpression of RUNX1 is suspected to be a third mode of RUNX1 involvement in leukemogenesis. The possibility that this mode might underlie Down syndrome-related leukemias caused by trisomy of chromosome 21 is discussed.

  13. Funktionelle Elektrostimulation Paraplegischer Patienten

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Functional Electrical Stimulation on Paraplegic Patients. We report on clinical and physiological effects of 8 months Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) of quadriceps femoris muscle on 16 paraplegic patients. Each patient had muscle biopsies, CT-muscle diameter measurements, knee extension strength testing carried out before and after 8 months FES training. Skin perfusion was documented through infrared telethermography and xenon clearance, muscle perfusion was recorded through thallium scintigraphy. After 8 months FES training baseline skin perfusion showed 86 % increase, muscle perfusion was augmented by 87 %. Muscle fiber diameters showed an average increase of 59 % after 8 months FES training. Muscles in patients with spastic paresis as well as in patients with denervation showed an increase in aerob and anaerob muscle enzymes up to the normal range. Even without axonal neurotropic substances FES was able to demonstrate fiberhypertrophy, enzyme adaptation and intracellular structural benefits in denervated muscles. The increment in muscle area as visible on CT-scans of quadriceps femoris was 30 % in spastic paraplegia and 10 % in denervated patients respectively. FES induced changes were less in areas not directly underneath the surface electrodes. We strongly recommend the use of Kern’s current for FES in denervated muscles to induce tetanic muscle contractions as we formed a very critical opinion of conventional exponential current. In patients with conus-cauda-lesions FES must be integrated into modern rehabilitation to prevent extreme muscle degeneration and decubital ulcers. Using FES we are able to improve metabolism and induce positive trophic changes in our patients lower extremities. In spastic paraplegics the functions „rising and walking“ achieved through FES are much better training than FES ergometers. Larger muscle masses are activated and an increased heart rate is measured, therefore the impact on cardiovascular fitness and metabolism is much greater. This effectively addresses and prevents all problems which result from inactivity in paraplegic patients. PMID:26913132

  14. MIT Mints a Valuable New Form of Academic Currency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) has invented or improved many world-changing things--radar, information theory, and synthetic self-replicating molecules, to name a few. Last month the university announced, to mild fanfare, an invention that could be similarly transformative, this time for higher education itself. It is called MITx.…

  15. Numerische Berechnung von Wirbelstromproblemen mit der Cell-Methode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenner, K.; Rucker, W. M.

    2006-09-01

    In dieser Arbeit wird die Cell-Methode auf die quasistatischen Maxwellgleichungen angewendet. Dabei werden für die notwendige Transformation vom Primärgitter auf das duale Gitter reziproke Basisvektoren verwendet. Anhand der Felddiffusion der magnetischen Induktion in einen zylindrischen Leiter werden Ergebnisse der Cell-Methode mit einer analytischen Vergleichsrechnung präsentiert.

  16. MIT Research Program on Communications Policy; First Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge. Research Program on Communications Policy.

    The first year's activities of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Research Program on Communication Policy are described. Among the projects undertaken were studies of: (1) land mobile radio systems, (2) direct satellite broadcasting in foreign countries, (3) communications regulation policy, (4) international data communication, and…

  17. AML1/ETO promotes the maintenance of early hematopoietic progenitors in NOD/SCID mice but does not abrogate their lineage specific differentiation.

    PubMed

    Bäsecke, Jörg; Schwieger, Maike; Griesinger, Frank; Schiedlmeier, Bernd; Wulf, Gerald; Trümper, Lorenz; Stocking, Carol

    2005-02-01

    AML1-ETO is generated by the t(8;21) translocation found in approximately 12% of acute myelogenous leukemia. Studies to delineate the mechanism by which AML1-ETO induces leukemia have primarily relied on transformed human cell lines or murine model systems. The goal of this study was to determine the effect of AML1-ETO expression on primary human hematopoietic cells in vitro and in a xenograft model. We used a FMEV retroviral vector for the transfer of AML1/ETO into human CD34 + cells. The repopulation, self-renewal, and differentiation potential of infected cells were assessed in serum-free liquid culture, colony assays, and in transplanted NOD-SCID mice. High transcription levels were confirmed by real-time PCR. AML1-ETO expressing cells were expandable for up to 12 weeks and retained an immature morphology. The capacity for prolonged survival, however, did not abrogate maturation, as AML1-ETO cells gave rise to normal colonies in a CFU-assay. AML1/ETO-expressing cells also contributed to myeloid (CD15, CD33), B-lymphoid (CD20), NK-cell (CD56) and erythroid (GPA) lineages in xenografted NOD/SCID mice. Although able to engraft all major lineages, AML1/ETO transplanted cells were primarily found in less differentiated fractions as measured by cell surface markers CD34 and CD38. In spite of a good engraftment and prolonged observation period none of the NOD/SCID-mice developed an acute myelogenous leukemia. Our findings demonstrate that AML1/ETO promotes the maintenance of early human hematopoietic progenitors, but does not abrogate their physiologic differentiation. Furthermore, the leukemogenic potential of AML1/ETO expressed in human progenitors is low, despite transcription levels equivalent to those found in AMLs.

  18. Data-driven phenotypic dissection of AML reveals progenitor-like cells that correlate with prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Jacob H.; Simonds, Erin F.; Bendall, Sean C.; Davis, Kara L.; Amir, El-ad D.; Tadmor, Michelle; Litvin, Oren; Fienberg, Harris; Jager, Astraea; Zunder, Eli; Finck, Rachel; Gedman, Amanda L.; Radtke, Ina; Downing, James R.; Pe’er, Dana; Nolan, Garry P.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) manifests as phenotypically and functionally diverse cells, often within the same patient. Intratumor phenotypic and functional heterogeneity have been linked primarily by physical sorting experiments, which assume that functionally distinct subpopulations can be prospectively isolated by surface phenotypes. This assumption has proven problematic and we therefore developed a data-driven approach. Using mass cytometry, we profiled surface and intracellular signaling proteins simultaneously in millions of healthy and leukemic cells. We developed PhenoGraph, which algorithmically defines phenotypes in high-dimensional single-cell data. PhenoGraph revealed that the surface phenotypes of leukemic blasts do not necessarily reflect their intracellular state. Using hematopoietic progenitors, we defined a signaling-based measure of cellular phenotype, which led to isolation of a gene expression signature that was predictive of survival in independent cohorts. This study presents new methods for large-scale analysis of single-cell heterogeneity and demonstrates their utility, yielding insights into AML pathophysiology. PMID:26095251

  19. Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes and therapeutic outcomes of AML patients from SWOG clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Kuptsova, Nataliya; Kopecky, Kenneth J; Godwin, John; Anderson, Jeanne; Hoque, Ashraful; Willman, Cheryl L; Slovak, Marilyn L; Ambrosone, Christine B

    2007-05-01

    Repair of damage to DNA resulting from chemotherapy may influence drug toxicity and survival in response to treatment. We evaluated the role of polymorphisms in DNA repair genes APE1, XRCC1, ERCC1, XPD, and XRCC3 in predicting therapeutic outcomes of older adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) from 2 Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG) clinical trials. All patients received standard chemotherapy induction regimens. Using logistic and proportional hazards regression models, relationships between genotypes, haplotypes, and toxicities, response to induction therapy, and overall survival were evaluated. Patients with XPD Gln751C/Asp312G ('D') haplotype were more likely to have complete response (OR = 3.06; 95% CI, 1.44-6.70) and less likely to have resistant disease (OR = 0.32; 95%CI, 0.14-0.72) than patients with other haplotypes. ERCC1 polymorphisms were significantly associated with lung (P = .037) and metabolic (P = .041) toxicities, and patients with the XRCC3 241Met variant had reduced risk of liver toxicity (OR = 0.32; 95%CI, 0.11-0.95). Significant associations with other toxicities were also found for variant XPD genotypes/haplotypes. These data from clinical trials of older patients treated for AML indicate that variants in DNA repair pathways may have an impact on both outcomes of patients and toxicities associated with treatments. With validation of results in larger samples, these findings could lead to optimizing individual chemotherapy options.

  20. Treatment of older patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML): a Canadian consensus

    PubMed Central

    Brandwein, Joseph M; Geddes, Michelle; Kassis, Jeannine; Kew, Andrea K; Leber, Brian; Nevill, Thomas; Sabloff, Mitchell; Sandhu, Irwindeep; Schuh, Andre C; Storring, John M; Ashkenas, John

    2013-01-01

    Patients over age 60 comprise the majority of those diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but treatment approaches in this population are variable, with many uncertainties and controversies. Our group conducted a literature review to summarize the latest information and to develop a consensus document with practical treatment recommendations. We addressed five key questions: selection criteria for patients to receive intensive induction chemotherapy; optimal induction and post-remission regimens; allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT); treatment of patients not suitable for induction chemotherapy; and treatment of patients with prior hematological disorders or therapy-related AML. Relevant literature was identified through a PubMed search of publications from 1991 to 2012. Key findings included the recognition that cytogenetics and molecular markers are major biologic determinants of treatment outcomes in the older population, both during induction therapy and following HSCT. Although disease-specific and patient-specific risk factors for poor outcomes are more common in the older population, age is not in itself sufficient grounds for withholding established treatments, including induction and consolidation chemotherapy. The role of HSCT and use of hypomethylating agents are discussed. Finally, suggested treatment algorithms are outlined, based on these recommendations. PMID:23675565

  1. miR-133 regulates Evi1 expression in AML cells as a potential therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Haruna; Lu, Jun; Oba, Shigeyoshi; Kawamata, Toyotaka; Yoshimi, Akihide; Kurosaki, Natsumi; Yokoyama, Kazuaki; Matsushita, Hiromichi; Kurokawa, Mineo; Tojo, Arinobu; Ando, Kiyoshi; Morishita, Kazuhiro; Katagiri, Koko; Kotani, Ai

    2016-01-01

    The Ecotropic viral integration site 1 (Evi1) is a zinc finger transcription factor, which is located on chromosome 3q26, over-expression in some acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Elevated Evi1 expression in AML is associated with unfavorable prognosis. Therefore, Evi1 is one of the strong candidate in molecular target therapy for the leukemia. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs, vital to many cell functions that negatively regulate gene expression by translation or inducing sequence-specific degradation of target mRNAs. As a novel biologics, miRNAs is a promising therapeutic target due to its low toxicity and low cost. We screened miRNAs which down-regulate Evi1. miR-133 was identified to directly bind to Evi1 to regulate it. miR-133 increases drug sensitivity specifically in Evi1 expressing leukemic cells, but not in Evi1-non-expressing cells The results suggest that miR-133 can be promising therapeutic target for the Evi1 dysregulated poor prognostic leukemia. PMID:26754824

  2. Pediatric donor cell leukemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in AML patient from related donor.

    PubMed

    Bobadilla-Morales, Lucina; Pimentel-Gutiérrez, Helia J; Gallegos-Castorena, Sergio; Paniagua-Padilla, Jenny A; Ortega-de-la-Torre, Citlalli; Sánchez-Zubieta, Fernando; Silva-Cruz, Rocio; Corona-Rivera, Jorge R; Zepeda-Moreno, Abraham; González-Ramella, Oscar; Corona-Rivera, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a male patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) initially diagnosed as M5 and with karyotype 46,XY. After induction therapy, he underwent a HLA-matched allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and six years later he relapsed as AML M1 with an abnormal karyotype //47,XX,+10[2]/47,XX,+11[3]/48,XX,+10,+11[2]/46,XX[13]. Based on this, we tested the possibility of donor cell origin by FISH and molecular STR analysis. We found no evidence of Y chromosome presence by FISH and STR analysis consistent with the success of the allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from the female donor. FISH studies confirmed trisomies and no evidence of MLL translocation either p53 or ATM deletion. Additionally 28 fusion common leukemia transcripts were evaluated by multiplex reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assay and were not rearranged. STR analysis showed a complete donor chimerism. Thus, donor cell leukemia (DCL) was concluded, being essential the use of cytological and molecular approaches. Pediatric DCL is uncommon, our patient seems to be the sixth case and additionally it presented a late donor cell leukemia appearance. Different extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms have been considered to explain this uncommon finding as well as the implications to the patient.

  3. New insights into transcriptional and leukemogenic mechanisms of AML1-ETO and E2A fusion proteins

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian; Guo, Chun; Steinauer, Nickolas; Zhang, Jinsong

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Nearly 15% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cases are caused by aberrant expression of AML1-ETO, a fusion protein generated by the t(8;21) chromosomal translocation. Since its discovery, AML1-ETO has served as a prototype to understand how leukemia fusion proteins deregulate transcription to promote leukemogenesis. Another leukemia fusion protein, E2A-Pbx1, generated by the t(1;19) translocation, is involved in acute lymphoblastic leukemias (ALLs). While AML1-ETO and E2A-Pbx1 are structurally unrelated fusion proteins, we have recently shown that a common axis, the ETO/E-protein interaction, is involved in the regulation of both fusion proteins, underscoring the importance of studying protein–protein interactions in elucidating the mechanisms of leukemia fusion proteins. OBJECTIVE In this review, we aim to summarize these new developments while also providing a historic overview of the related early studies. METHODS A total of 218 publications were reviewed in this article, a majority of which were published after 2004.We also downloaded 3D structures of AML1-ETO domains from Protein Data Bank and provided a systematic summary of their structures. RESULTS By reviewing the literature, we summarized early and recent findings on AML1-ETO, including its protein–protein interactions, transcriptional and leukemogenic mechanisms, as well as the recently reported involvement of ETO family corepressors in regulating the function of E2A-Pbx1. CONCLUSION While the recent development in genomic and structural studies has clearly demonstrated that the fusion proteins function by directly regulating transcription, a further understanding of the underlying mechanisms, including crosstalk with other transcription factors and cofactors, and the protein–protein interactions in the context of native proteins, may be necessary for the development of highly targeted drugs for leukemia therapy. PMID:28261265

  4. Epigenomic analysis of the HOX gene loci reveals mechanisms that may control canonical expression patterns in AML and normal hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Spencer, D H; Young, M A; Lamprecht, T L; Helton, N M; Fulton, R; O'Laughlin, M; Fronick, C; Magrini, V; Demeter, R T; Miller, C A; Klco, J M; Wilson, R K; Ley, T J

    2015-06-01

    HOX genes are highly expressed in many acute myeloid leukemia (AML) samples, but the patterns of expression and associated regulatory mechanisms are not clearly understood. We analyzed RNA sequencing data from 179 primary AML samples and normal hematopoietic cells to understand the range of expression patterns in normal versus leukemic cells. HOX expression in AML was restricted to specific genes in the HOXA or HOXB loci, and was highly correlated with recurrent cytogenetic abnormalities. However, the majority of samples expressed a canonical set of HOXA and HOXB genes that was nearly identical to the expression signature of normal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Transcriptional profiles at the HOX loci were similar between normal cells and AML samples, and involved bidirectional transcription at the center of each gene cluster. Epigenetic analysis of a subset of AML samples also identified common regions of chromatin accessibility in AML samples and normal CD34(+) cells that displayed differences in methylation depending on HOX expression patterns. These data provide an integrated epigenetic view of the HOX gene loci in primary AML samples, and suggest that HOX expression in most AML samples represents a normal stem cell program that is controlled by epigenetic mechanisms at specific regulatory elements.

  5. Autophagy is dispensable for Kmt2a/Mll-Mllt3/Af9 AML maintenance and anti-leukemic effect of chloroquine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoyi; Clark, Jason; Wunderlich, Mark; Fan, Cuiqing; Davis, Ashley; Chen, Song; Guan, Jun-Lin; Mulloy, James C; Kumar, Ashish; Zheng, Yi

    2017-02-15

    Recently, macroautophagy/autophagy has emerged as a promising target in various types of solid tumor treatment. However, the impact of autophagy on acute myeloid leukemia (AML) maintenance and the validity of autophagy as a viable target in AML therapy remain unclear. Here we show that Kmt2a/Mll-Mllt3/Af9 AML (MA9-AML) cells have high autophagy flux compared with normal bone marrow cells, but autophagy-specific targeting, either through Rb1cc1-disruption to abolish autophagy initiation, or via Atg5-disruption to prevent phagophore (the autophagosome precursor) membrane elongation, does not affect the growth or survival of MA9-AML cells, either in vitro or in vivo. Mechanistically, neither Atg5 nor Rb1cc1 disruption impairs endolysosome formation or survival signaling pathways. The autophagy inhibitor chloroquine shows autophagy-independent anti-leukemic effects in vitro but has no efficacy in vivo likely due to limited achievable drug efficacy in blood. Further, vesicular exocytosis appears to mediate chloroquine resistance in AML cells, and exocytotic inhibition significantly enhances the anti-leukemic effect of chloroquine. Thus, chloroquine can induce leukemia cell death in vitro in an autophagy-independent manner but with inadequate efficacy in vivo, and vesicular exocytosis is a possible mechanism of chloroquine resistance in MA9-AML. This study also reveals that autophagy-specific targeting is unlikely to benefit MA9-AML therapy.

  6. Establishment of xenotransplantation model of human CN-AML with FLT3-ITD (mut) /NPM1 (-) in NOD/SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Shang, Zhen; Wang, Jue; Wang, Di; Xiao, Min; Li, Tong-juan; Wang, Na; Huang, Liang; Zhou, Jian-feng

    2013-06-01

    Patients with FLT3-ITD (mut) /NPM1 (-) cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML), as high-risk molecular group in CN-AML, are associated with a worse prognosis than other CN-AML patients. It is beneficial to generate xenotransplantation model of FLT3-ITD (mut) /NPM1 (-) CN-AML to better understand the pathogenesis and therapeutic strategies of such AML subtype. The purpose of present study was to establish the xenotransplantation model in NOD/SCID mice with FLT3-ITD (mut) /NPM1 (-) CN-AML primary cells. The FLT3-ITD (mut) /NPM1 (-) CN-AML primary cells from 3 of 7 cases were successfully transplanted into NOD/SCID mice, and human CD45 positive cells were detected in the peripheral blood, spleen and bone marrow of mice by using flow cytometry. Infiltration of human leukemia cells in various organs of mice was observed by using immunohistochemistry. Gene analysis confirmed sustained FLT3/ITD mutation without NPM1 mutation in mice. By performing serial transplantation, it was found that characteristics of the leukemia cells in secondary and tertiary generation models remained unchanged. Moreover, in vivo cytarabine administration could extend survival of NOD/SCID mice, which was consistent with clinical observation. In conclusion, we successfully established xenotransplantation model of human FLT3-ITD (mut) /NPM1 (-) CN-AML in NOD/SCID mice. The model was able to present primary disease and suitable to evaluate the curative effects of new drugs or therapy strategies.

  7. Apoptosis repressor with caspase recruitment domain is regulated by MAPK/PI3K and confers drug resistance and survival advantage to AML

    PubMed Central

    Mak, P. Y.; Mak, D. H.; Mu, H.; Shi, Y.; Ruvolo, P.; Ruvolo, V.; Jacamo, R.; Burks, J. K.; Wei, W.; Huang, X.; Kornblau, S. M.; Andreeff, M.; Carter, B. Z.

    2014-01-01

    The apoptosis repressor with caspase recruitment domain (ARC) protein is known to suppress both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis. We previously reported that ARC expression is a strong, independent adverse prognostic factor in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Here, we investigated the regulation and role of ARC in AML. ARC expression is upregulated in AML cells co-cultured with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) and suppressed by inhibition of MAPK and PI3K signaling. AML patient samples with RAS mutations (N = 64) expressed significantly higher levels of ARC than samples without RAS mutations (N = 371) (P = 0.016). ARC overexpression protected and ARC knockdown sensitized AML cells to cytarabine and to agents that selectively induce intrinsic (ABT-737) or extrinsic (TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand) apoptosis. NOD-SCID mice harboring ARC-overexpressing KG-1 cells had significantly shorter survival than mice injected with control cells (median 84 versus 111 days) and significantly fewer leukemia cells were present when NOD/SCID IL2R null mice were injected with ARC knockdown as compared to control Molm13 cells (P = 0.005 and 0.03 at 2 and 3 weeks, respectively). Together, these findings demonstrate that MSCs regulate ARC in AML through activation of MAPK and PI3K signaling pathways. ARC confers drug resistance and survival advantage to AML in vitro and in vivo, suggesting ARC as a novel target in AML therapy. PMID:24337870

  8. Changes in the MALT1-A20-NF-κB expression pattern may be related to T cell dysfunction in AML.

    PubMed

    Shi, Li; Chen, Shaohua; Lu, Yuhong; Wang, Xu; Xu, Ling; Zhang, Fan; Yang, Lijian; Wu, Xiuli; Li, Bo; Li, Yangqiu

    2013-04-30

    To elucidate the characteristics of T-cell receptor (TCR) signal transduction in T-cells from acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the mucosa-associated-lymphoid-tissue lymphoma-translocation gene 1 (MALT1), A20, NF-κB and MALT1-V1 gene expression levels in CD3+ T cells sorted from the peripheral blood of patients with AML were analyzed by real-time PCR. A significantly lower MALT1 and A20 expression level was found in T cells from patients with AML compared with healthy controls (p = 0.045, p < 0.0001); however, the expression level of MALT1-V1 (variant 1) was significantly higher in the AML group than in the healthy control group (p = 0.006), and the expression level of NF-κB was increased in the AML group. In conclusion, the characteristics of the expression pattern of MALT1-A20-NF-κB and the distribution of MALT1 variants in T cells from AML were first characterized. Overall, low TCR-CD3 signaling is related to low MALT1 expression, which may related to T cell immunodeficiency, while the up-regulation of MALT1-V1 may play a role in overcoming the T cell activity by downregulating A20 in patients with AML, which may be related to a specific response to AML-associated antigens.

  9. High expression of costimulatory molecules correlates with low relapse-free survival probability in acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

    PubMed

    Graf, M; Reif, S; Hecht, K; Pelka-Fleischer, R; Kroell, T; Pfister, K; Schmetzer, H

    2005-05-01

    Costimulatory molecules such as lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1 (CD11a), LFA-3 (CD58), intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 (CD54), neuronal cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) (CD56), B7-1 (CD80), or B7-2 (CD86) are important regulatory elements in healthy immunological cascades, but their role in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has only been rarely investigated. We studied their expression on mononuclear bone marrow (BM) cells from 105 patients with AML at initial diagnosis and evaluated their prognostic significance. Fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analyses were performed using antibodies directly conjugated with fluorescein. A BM sample was considered positive if more than 20% of the cells in the blast containing gate expressed the respective marker. The surface expression of CD11a (27 of 29 cases positive with an average of 71% positive blasts; 27(+)/29, 71%), CD54 (23(+)/33, 37%), CD56 (24(+)/93, 20%), CD58 (29(+)/29, 95%), CD80 (13(+)/28, 30%), and CD86 (19(+)/29, 39%) was measured. The expression of these markers in different French-American-British (FAB) classification types (M0-M5) was heterogeneous, except for CD56, which showed a higher proportion of positive cells in monocytic subtypes of AML. In addition, cases with a "poor risk" karyotype as well as patients succumbing to "early death" after double induction therapy according to the AML Cooperative Group (CG) protocol were characterized by a high expression of CD56. Relapse-free survival analyses demonstrated that patients with more than 8% CD56(+) cells in the BM relapsed significantly sooner. CD54 was preferentially expressed in AML M4(eo) and in addition in "favorable" cytogenetic risk groups and in cases that had responded to AML-CG therapy. Only very high proportions (>60%) of CD54(+) cells were associated with a lower probability for relapse-free survival. CD80 and CD86 expressions were similar in all FAB types. Patients who had responded to AML-CG therapy showed higher CD80

  10. Survival of AML patients relapsing after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation: a CIBMTR study

    PubMed Central

    Bejanyan, Nelli; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Logan, Brent R.; Wang, Hai-Lin; Devine, Steven M.; de Lima, Marcos; Bunjes, Donald W.; Zhang, Mei-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) remains a major therapeutic challenge. We studied outcomes of 1788 AML patients relapsing after alloHCT (1990–2010) during first or second complete remission (CR) to identify factors associated with longer post-relapse survival. Median time of post HCT relapse was 7 months (mo; range, 1–177). At relapse, 1231 patients (69%) received intensive therapy, including chemotherapy (CT) alone (n=660), donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI)±CT (n=202; %), or 2nd alloHCT±CT ±DLI (n=369), with subsequent CR rates of 29%. Median follow-up after relapse was 39 mo (range, <1–193). Survival for all patients was 23% at 1 year post-relapse; however, 3-yr overall survival correlated with time from HCT to relapse (4% for relapse during 1–6 mo period, 12% during 6 mo-2 yr, 26% during 2–3 yr, and 38% for ≥3 yr). In multivariable analysis, lower mortality was significantly associated with longer time from alloHCT to relapse (RR 0.55 for 6 mo-2 yr, RR 0.39 for 2–3 yr, and RR 0.28 for ≥3 yr; p<0.0001) and a 1st HCT using reduced-intensity conditioning (RR=0.77; 95% CI 0.66–0.88, p=0.0002). In contrast, inferior survival was associated with age >40 yr (RR=1.42, 95% CI 1.24–1.64; p<0.0001), active GVHD at relapse (RR=1.25, 95% CI 1.13–1.39; p<0.0001), adverse cytogenetics (RR=1.37, 95% CI 1.09–1.71; p=0.0062), mismatched URD (RR=1.61, 95% CI 1.22–2.13; p=0.0008), and use of cord blood for 1st HCT (RR=1.23, 95% CI 1.06–1.42; p=0.0078). AML relapse after alloHCT predicted poor survival; however, patients who relapsed ≥6 mo after their initial alloHCT had better survival and may benefit from intensive therapy such as 2nd alloHCT±DLI. PMID:25460355

  11. The rarity of ALDH(+) cells is the key to separation of normal versus leukemia stem cells by ALDH activity in AML patients.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Van T; Buss, Eike C; Wang, Wenwen; Hoffmann, Isabel; Raffel, Simon; Zepeda-Moreno, Abraham; Baran, Natalia; Wuchter, Patrick; Eckstein, Volker; Trumpp, Andreas; Jauch, Anna; Ho, Anthony D; Lutz, Christoph

    2015-08-01

    To understand the precise disease driving mechanisms in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), comparison of patient matched hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and leukemia stem cells (LSC) is essential. In this analysis, we have examined the value of aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity in combination with CD34 expression for the separation of HSC from LSC in 104 patients with de novo AML. The majority of AML patients (80 out of 104) had low percentages of cells with high ALDH activity (ALDH(+) cells; <1.9%; ALDH-rare AML), whereas 24 patients had relatively numerous ALDH(+) cells (≥1.9%; ALDH-numerous AML). In patients with ALDH-rare AML, normal HSC could be separated by their CD34(+) ALDH(+) phenotype, whereas LSC were exclusively detected among CD34(+) ALDH(-) cells. For patients with ALDH-numerous AML, the CD34(+) ALDH(+) subset consisted mainly of LSC and separation from HSC was not feasible. Functional analyses further showed that ALDH(+) cells from ALDH-numerous AML were quiescent, refractory to ARA-C treatment and capable of leukemic engraftment in a xenogenic mouse transplantation model. Clinically, resistance to chemotherapy and poor long-term outcome were also characteristic for patients with ALDH-numerous AML providing an additional risk-stratification tool. The difference in spectrum and relevance of ALDH activity in the putative LSC populations demonstrates, in addition to phenotypic and genetic, also functional heterogeneity of leukemic cells and suggests divergent roles for ALDH activity in normal HSC versus LSC. By acknowledging these differences our study provides a new and useful tool for prospective identification of AML cases in which separation of HSC from LSC is possible.

  12. MIT LMFBR blanket research project. Final summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Driscoll, M.J.

    1983-08-01

    This is a final summary report on an experimental and analytical program for the investigation of LMFBR blanket characteristics carried out at MIT in the period 1969 to 1983. During this span of time, work was carried out on a wide range of subtasks, ranging from neutronic and photonic measurements in mockups of blankets using the Blanket Test Facility at the MIT Research Reactor, to analytic/numerical investigations of blanket design and economics. The main function of this report is to serve as a resource document which will permit ready reference to the more detailed topical reports and theses issued over the years on the various aspects of project activities. In addition, one aspect of work completed during the final year of the project, on doubly-heterogeneous blanket configurations, is documented for the record.

  13. The Harvard-MIT PHD Program in Bioastronautics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Laurence R.; Natapoff, Alan

    2008-06-01

    The National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI)1 supports a PhD program in Space Life Sciences with a specialty in Bioastronautics at MIT. (A sibling program operates at TAMU.) It gives broad training in life sciences, emphasizes hands-on field experience, provides access to laboratories in the Harvard-MIT community for thesis research, and prepares students for many options in space biomedicine. The Program trains prospective leaders in the field able to manage the challenges of design for the life-hostile space environment. Beyond subject and thesis work, students participate in a summer internship and a clinical preceptorship at a NASA center--and an introduction to clinical medicine and medical engineering.

  14. 30 CFR 872.20 - What will OSM do with unappropriated AML funds currently allocated to the Rural Abandoned Mine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What will OSM do with unappropriated AML funds currently allocated to the Rural Abandoned Mine Program ? 872.20 Section 872.20 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF... MONEYS AVAILABLE TO ELIGIBLE STATES AND INDIAN TRIBES § 872.20 What will OSM do with unappropriated...

  15. 30 CFR 872.20 - What will OSM do with unappropriated AML funds currently allocated to the Rural Abandoned Mine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What will OSM do with unappropriated AML funds currently allocated to the Rural Abandoned Mine Program ? 872.20 Section 872.20 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF... MONEYS AVAILABLE TO ELIGIBLE STATES AND INDIAN TRIBES § 872.20 What will OSM do with unappropriated...

  16. 30 CFR 872.20 - What will OSM do with unappropriated AML funds currently allocated to the Rural Abandoned Mine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What will OSM do with unappropriated AML funds currently allocated to the Rural Abandoned Mine Program ? 872.20 Section 872.20 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF... MONEYS AVAILABLE TO ELIGIBLE STATES AND INDIAN TRIBES § 872.20 What will OSM do with unappropriated...

  17. 30 CFR 872.20 - What will OSM do with unappropriated AML funds currently allocated to the Rural Abandoned Mine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What will OSM do with unappropriated AML funds currently allocated to the Rural Abandoned Mine Program ? 872.20 Section 872.20 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF... MONEYS AVAILABLE TO ELIGIBLE STATES AND INDIAN TRIBES § 872.20 What will OSM do with unappropriated...

  18. Prevalence and Prognostic Value of IDH1 R132 Mutation in Newly Diagnosed AML Egyptian Patients with Normal Karyotype.

    PubMed

    Salem, Dalia; El-Aziz, Sherin Abd; El-Menshawy, Nadia; Abouzeid, Tarek; Ebrahim, Mohamed

    2017-03-01

    Mutation in IDH1 gene was suggested to be associated with bad prognosis in cytogenetically normal AML (CN-AML). However, there are conflicting data about its prognostic impact. Besides, its prevalence and prognostic significance in Egyptian patients still not fully stated. We aimed to assess the prevalence of IDH1(R132) mutation in Egyptian CN-AML patients, its correlation with FAB subtypes, and clinical outcome of those patients. Sequencing of amplified IDH1 gene exon four from 50 patients was performed to detect codon R132 point mutation. High prevalence of IDH1 mutation was detected in our patients (9/50, 18 %). Mutated IDH1(R132) was associated with older age and higher platelets count (p = 0.04 and 0.01 respectively). The most common FAB subtype associated with mutated IDH1(R132) was AML-M2 followed by M4. In multivariate analysis, IDH1(R132) mutation was found as independent prognostic variable. It was significantly associated with lower CR and shorter OS (p = 0.06 and 0.009 respectively).

  19. High-affinity FRβ-specific CAR T cells eradicate AML and normal myeloid lineage without HSC toxicity.

    PubMed

    Lynn, R C; Feng, Y; Schutsky, K; Poussin, M; Kalota, A; Dimitrov, D S; Powell, D J

    2016-06-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy, and development of new treatments to prolong remissions is warranted. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapies appear promising but on-target, off-tumor recognition of antigen in healthy tissues remains a concern. Here we isolated a high-affinity (HA) folate receptor beta (FRβ)-specific single-chain variable fragment (2.48 nm KD) for optimization of FRβ-redirected CAR T-cell therapy for AML. T cells stably expressing the HA-FRβ CAR exhibited greatly enhanced antitumor activity against FRβ(+) AML in vitro and in vivo compared with a low-affinity FRβ CAR (54.3 nm KD). Using the HA-FRβ immunoglobulin G, FRβ expression was detectable in myeloid-lineage hematopoietic cells; however, expression in CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) was nearly undetectable. Accordingly, HA-FRβ CAR T cells lysed mature CD14(+) monocytes, while HSC colony formation was unaffected. Because of the potential for elimination of mature myeloid lineage, mRNA CAR electroporation for transient CAR expression was evaluated. mRNA-electroporated HA-FRβ CAR T cells retained effective antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo. Together, our results highlight the importance of antibody affinity in target protein detection and CAR development and suggest that transient delivery of potent HA-FRβ CAR T cells is highly effective against AML and reduces the risk for long-term myeloid toxicity.

  20. LIN28B Activation by PRL-3 Promotes Leukemogenesis and a Stem Cell-like Transcriptional Program in AML.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianbiao; Chan, Zit-Liang; Bi, Chonglei; Lu, Xiao; Chong, Phyllis S Y; Chooi, Jing-Yuan; Cheong, Lip-Lee; Liu, Shaw-Cheng; Ching, Ying Qing; Zhou, Yafeng; Osato, Motomi; Tan, Tuan Zea; Ng, Chin Hin; Ng, Siok-Bian; Wang, Shi; Zeng, Qi; Chng, Wee-Joo

    2017-03-01

    PRL-3 (PTP4A3), a metastasis-associated phosphatase, is also upregulated in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and is associated with poor prognosis, but the underlying molecular mechanism is unknown. Here, constitutive expression of PRL-3 in human AML cells sustains leukemogenesis in vitro and in vivo Furthermore, PRL-3 phosphatase activity dependently upregulates LIN28B, a stem cell reprogramming factor, which in turn represses the let-7 mRNA family, inducing a stem cell-like transcriptional program. Notably, elevated levels of LIN28B protein independently associate with worse survival in AML patients. Thus, these results establish a novel signaling axis involving PRL-3/LIN28B/let-7, which confers stem cell-like properties to leukemia cells that is important for leukemogenesis.Implications: The current study offers a rationale for targeting PRL-3 as a therapeutic approach for a subset of AML patients with poor prognosis. Mol Cancer Res; 15(3); 294-303. ©2016 AACR.

  1. Calreticulin exposure by malignant blasts correlates with robust anticancer immunity and improved clinical outcome in AML patients

    PubMed Central

    Fucikova, Jitka; Truxova, Iva; Hensler, Michal; Becht, Etienne; Kasikova, Lenka; Moserova, Irena; Vosahlikova, Sarka; Klouckova, Jana; Church, Sarah E.; Cremer, Isabelle; Kepp, Oliver; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Salek, Cyril

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cell death can be perceived as immunogenic by the host only when malignant cells emit immunostimulatory signals (so-called “damage-associated molecular patterns,” DAMPs), as they die in the context of failing adaptive responses to stress. Accumulating preclinical and clinical evidence indicates that the capacity of immunogenic cell death to (re-)activate an anticancer immune response is key to the success of various chemo- and radiotherapeutic regimens. Malignant blasts from patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) exposed multiple DAMPs, including calreticulin (CRT), heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70), and HSP90 on their plasma membrane irrespective of treatment. In these patients, high levels of surface-exposed CRT correlated with an increased proportion of natural killer cells and effector memory CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the periphery. Moreover, CRT exposure on the plasma membrane of malignant blasts positively correlated with the frequency of circulating T cells specific for leukemia-associated antigens, indicating that ecto-CRT favors the initiation of anticancer immunity in patients with AML. Finally, although the levels of ecto-HSP70, ecto-HSP90, and ecto-CRT were all associated with improved relapse-free survival, only CRT exposure significantly correlated with superior overall survival. Thus, CRT exposure represents a novel powerful prognostic biomarker for patients with AML, reflecting the activation of a clinically relevant AML-specific immune response. PMID:27802968

  2. Overproduction of NOX-derived ROS in AML promotes proliferation and is associated with defective oxidative stress signaling.

    PubMed

    Hole, Paul S; Zabkiewicz, Joanna; Munje, Chinmay; Newton, Zarabeth; Pearn, Lorna; White, Paul; Marquez, Nuria; Hills, Robert K; Burnett, Alan K; Tonks, Alex; Darley, Richard L

    2013-11-07

    Excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is frequently observed in cancer and is known to strongly influence hematopoietic cell function. Here we report that extracellular ROS production is strongly elevated (mean >10-fold) in >60% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients and that this increase is attributable to constitutive activation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidases (NOX). In contrast, overproduction of mitochondrial ROS was rarely observed. Elevated ROS was found to be associated with lowered glutathione levels and depletion of antioxidant defense proteins. We also show for the first time that the levels of ROS generated were able to strongly promote the proliferation of AML cell lines, primary AML blasts, and, to a lesser extent, normal CD34(+) cells, and that the response to ROS is limited by the activation of the oxidative stress pathway mediated though p38(MAPK). Consistent with this, we observed that p38(MAPK) responses were attenuated in patients expressing high levels of ROS. These data show that overproduction of NOX-derived ROS can promote the proliferation of AML blasts and that they also develop mechanisms to suppress the stress signaling that would normally limit this response. Together these adaptations would be predicted to confer a competitive advantage to the leukemic clone.

  3. Impaired hematopoietic differentiation of RUNX1-mutated induced pluripotent stem cells derived from FPD/AML patients.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, M; Kunimoto, H; Watanabe, N; Fukuchi, Y; Yuasa, S; Yamazaki, S; Nishimura, T; Sadahira, K; Fukuda, K; Okano, H; Nakauchi, H; Morita, Y; Matsumura, I; Kudo, K; Ito, E; Ebihara, Y; Tsuji, K; Harada, Y; Harada, H; Okamoto, S; Nakajima, H

    2014-12-01

    Somatic mutation of RUNX1 is implicated in various hematological malignancies, including myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and previous studies using mouse models disclosed its critical roles in hematopoiesis. However, the role of RUNX1 in human hematopoiesis has never been tested in experimental settings. Familial platelet disorder (FPD)/AML is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by germline mutation of RUNX1, marked by thrombocytopenia and propensity to acute leukemia. To investigate the physiological function of RUNX1 in human hematopoiesis and pathophysiology of FPD/AML, we derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from three distinct FPD/AML pedigrees (FPD-iPSCs) and examined their defects in hematopoietic differentiation. By in vitro differentiation assays, FPD-iPSCs were clearly defective in the emergence of hematopoietic progenitors and differentiation of megakaryocytes, and overexpression of wild-type (WT)-RUNX1 reversed most of these phenotypes. We further demonstrated that overexpression of mutant-RUNX1 in WT-iPSCs did not recapitulate the phenotype of FPD-iPSCs, showing that the mutations were of loss-of-function type. Taken together, this study demonstrated that haploinsufficient RUNX1 allele imposed cell-intrinsic defects on hematopoietic differentiation in human experimental settings and revealed differential impacts of RUNX1 dosage on human and murine megakaryopoiesis. FPD-iPSCs will be a useful tool to investigate mutant RUNX1-mediated molecular processes in hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis.

  4. Astronomen bei der Arbeit - Live-Konferenz mit La Palma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Paul G.

    2012-02-01

    "Wie kann man sich die nächtliche Arbeit eines Astronomen am Teleskop vorstellen?" Diese Frage stellen sich viele wissenschaftlich interessierte Menschen, die noch kein professionelles Observatorium besuchen konnten. Das multimediale Experiment "Call a Scientist" verband Besucher einer österreichischen Amateursternwarte live mit dem Großobservatorium in La Palma und brachte damit einer interessierten Öffentlichkeit seltene Einblicke in die Arbeitsweise der modernen Astronomie nahe.

  5. G-CSF-Associated Bone Marrow Necrosis in AML after Induction Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Osuorji, Ikenna; Goldman, Lyle

    2012-01-01

    Bone marrow necrosis (BMN) is defined as necrosis of the myeloid tissues and stroma without involvement of the cortical bone. We report a case of 66-year-old male with AML-M4 (FAB classification) who was given induction chemotherapy with cytarabine and daunorubicin. Filgrastim at 480 micrograms was administered on days 15-19 to shorten the duration of neutropenia. Consequently patient developed severe pelvic bone pain, leukoerythroblastosis, and severe leukocytosis. Repeat bone marrow aspiration and biopsy on day 21 confirmed bone marrow necrosis. These manifestations responded quickly to discontinuation of filgrastim. Subsequently, he recovered full myelopoiesis. We suggest that there may be more cases of BMN associated with G-CSF that are undiagnosed.

  6. Donor-Derived Smoldering Multiple Myeloma following a Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for AML

    PubMed Central

    Fiala, Mark; Slade, Michael; Westervelt, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder (PTLD) is one of the most common malignancies complicating solid organ transplantation. In contrast, PTLD accounts for a minority of secondary cancers following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Here we report on a 61-year-old woman who received an ABO-mismatched, HLA-matched unrelated donor hematopoietic cell transplantation from a presumably healthy donor for a diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Eighteen months following her transplant, she developed a monoclonal gammopathy. Bone marrow studies revealed 10% plasma cells, but the patient lacked clinical defining features of multiple myeloma (MM); thus a diagnosis of smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) was established. Cytogenetic and molecular studies of the bone marrow confirmed the plasma cells were donor-derived. The donor lacks a diagnosis of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, SMM, or MM. PMID:28316846

  7. Clofarabine versus fludarabine-based reduced-intensity conditioning regimen prior to allogeneic transplantation in adults with AML/MDS.

    PubMed

    Chevallier, Patrice; Labopin, Myriam; de La Tour, Regis Peffault; Lioure, Bruno; Bulabois, Claude-Eric; Huynh, Anne; Blaise, Didier; Turlure, Pascal; Daguindau, Etienne; Maillard, Natacha; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Guillerm, Gaelle; Delage, Jeremy; Contentin, Nathalie; Bay, Jacques-Olivier; Beckerich, Florence; Bourhis, Jean-Henri; Detrait, Marie; Vigouroux, Stéphane; François, Sylvie; Legrand, Faezeh; Guillaume, Thierry; Mohty, Mohamad

    2016-11-01

    We have retrospectively compared survivals between acute myeloid leukemia (AML)/myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients who received either a clofarabine/busulfan (CloB2A2) or a fludarabine/busulfan (FB2A2) RIC regimen for allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Between 2009 and 2014, 355 allotransplanted cases were identified from the SFGM-TC registry as having received either the FB2A2 (n = 316, 56% males, median age: 59.2 years, AML 78.5%, first complete remission [CR1] 72%, median follow-up: 20 months) or the CloB2A2 (n = 39, 62% males, median age: 60.8 years, AML 62%, CR1 69%, median follow-up: 22.4 months) RIC regimen. In multivariate analysis, FB2A2 was associated with significant lower overall survival (OS, HR: 2.14; 95%CI: 1.05-4.35, P = 0.04) and higher relapse incidence (RI, HR: 2.17; 95%CI: 1.02-4.61, P = 0.04) and a trend for lower leukemia-free survival (LFS, HR: 1.75; 95%CI: 0.94-3.26, P = 0.08). These results were confirmed using a propensity score-matching strategy. However, when considering AML and MDS patients separately, the benefit of the CLOB2A2 regimen was restricted to AML patients (2-year OS FB2A2: 38% [14.5-61.6] vs. CloB2A2: 79.2% [62.9-95.4], P = 0.01; 2-year LFS FB2A2: 38% [16-59.9] vs. CloB2A2: 70.8% [52.6-89], P = 0.03). The better survivals were due to the lower risk of relapse in this CloB2A2 AML subgroup (2-year RI FB2A2: 41.2% [19-62.4] vs. CloB2A2: 16.7% [5-34.2], P = 0.05). This retrospective comparison suggests that the CloB2A2 RIC regimen can likely provide longer survival than that awarded by a FB2A2 RIC regimen and may become a new standard of care RIC regimen for allotransplanted AML patients. A prospective phase 3 randomized study is warranted.

  8. Treosulfan, Fludarabine and 2 Gy Total Body Irradiation Followed by Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Patients with MDS and AML

    PubMed Central

    Gyurkocza, Boglarka; Gutman, Jonathan; Nemecek, Eneida R.; Bar, Merav; Milano, Filippo; Ramakrishnan, Aravind; Scott, Bart; Fang, Min; Wood, Brent; Pagel, John M.; Baumgart, Joachim; Delaney, Colleen; Maziarz, Richard T.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Estey, Elihu H.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Storer, Barry E.; Deeg, H. Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) offers curative therapy for many patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, post-HCT relapse remains a major problem, particularly in patients with high-risk cytogenetics. In this prospective phase II trial we assessed the efficacy and toxicity of treosulfan, fludarabine and 2 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) as conditioning for allogeneic HCT in patients with MDS or AML. Ninety-six patients with MDS (n=36; 15 RMCD; 10 RAEB-1; 10 RAEB-2; 1 CMML-1) or AML (n=60; 35 CR1; 18 CR2; 3 advanced CR; 4 refractory relapse) were enrolled; median age was 51 (range: 1–60) years. Twelve patients had undergone a prior HCT with high intensity conditioning. Patients received intravenous (IV) treosulfan, 14 g/m2/day on days −6 to −4, IV fludarabine, 30 mg/m2/day on days −6 to −2, and 2 Gy TBI on day 0, followed by infusion of hematopoietic cells from related (n=27) or unrelated (n=69) donors. Graft-vs.-host disease prophylaxis consisted of tacrolimus and methotrexate. With a median follow-up of 30 months, the 2-year overall survival (OS), relapse incidence and non-relapse mortality were 73%, 27% and 8%, respectively. The incidences of grades II–IV (III–IV) acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease were 59% (10%) and 47%, respectively. Two-year OS was not significantly different between MDS patients with poor risk and good/intermediate risk cytogenetics (69% and 85%, respectively), or between AML patients with unfavorable and favorable/intermediate risk cytogenetics (64% and 76%, respectively). In AML patients, minimal residual disease (MRD; n=10) at the time of HCT predicted higher relapse incidence (70% vs. 18%) and lower OS (41% vs. 79%) at 2 years, when compared to patients without MRD. In conclusion, treosulfan, fludarabine and low-dose TBI provided effective conditioning for allogeneic HCT in patients with MDS or AML, and resulted in low relapse incidence, regardless

  9. WT1 vaccination in AML and MDS: A pilot trial with synthetic analog peptides.

    PubMed

    Brayer, Jason; Lancet, Jeffrey E; Powers, John; List, Alan; Balducci, Lodovico; Komrokji, Rami; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier

    2015-07-01

    Peptide vaccines are capable of eliciting immune responses targeting tumor-associated antigens such as the Wilms' Tumor 1 (WT1) antigen, often overexpressed in myeloid malignancies. Here, we assessed the safety, tolerability, and immunogenicity of a polyvalent WT1 peptide vaccine. Individuals with WT1-positive acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in first (CR1) or second (CR2) remission or with higher-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) following at least 1 prior line of therapy were vaccinated with a mixture of peptides derived from the WT1 protein, with sargramostim injections before vaccination to amplify immunogenicity. Six vaccinations were delivered biweekly, continuing then monthly until patients received 12 vaccinations or showed disease relapse or progression. Therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by progression-free and overall survival. Immune responses were evaluated by delayed-type hypersensitivity testing and T-cell IFNγ ELISPOT at specified intervals. In 16 patients who received at least one vaccination, 10 completed the planned course of six vaccinations and six continued for up to six additional monthly vaccinations. Vaccinations were well tolerated, with no patients discontinuing due to toxicity. One of two patients with high-risk MDS experienced a prolonged decrease in transfusion dependence. Two of 14 AML patients demonstrated relapse-free survival >1 year. Both patients were in CR2 at time of vaccination, with duration of their remission exceeding duration of their first remission, suggesting a potential benefit. Our WT1 vaccine was well-tolerated. The clinical benefit that we observed in several patients suggests engagement of a protective immune response, indicating a need for further trials.

  10. Attempts to improve treatment outcomes in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in older patients: the results of the United Kingdom Medical Research Council AML11 trial.

    PubMed

    Goldstone, A H; Burnett, A K; Wheatley, K; Smith, A G; Hutchinson, R M; Clark, R E

    2001-09-01

    In an attempt to improve induction chemotherapy for older patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML),1314 patients were randomized to 1 of 3 induction treatments for 2 courses of DAT (daunorubicin, cytarabine, and thioguanine) 3 + 10, ADE (daunorubicin, cytarabine, and etoposide) 10 + 3 + 5, or MAC (mitoxantrone-cytarabine). The remission rate in the DAT arm was significantly better than ADE (62% vs 50%; P =.002) or MAC (62% vs 55%; P =.04). This benefit was seen in patients younger and older than 70 years. There were no differences between the induction schedules with respect to overall survival at 5 years (12% vs 8% vs 10%). A total of 226 patients were randomized to receive granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) or placebo as supportive care from day 8 after the end of treatment course 1. The remission rate or survival were not improved by G-CSF, although the median number of days to recover neutrophils to 1.0 x 10(9)/L was reduced by 5 days. Patients who entered remission (n = 371) were randomized to stop after a third course (DAT 2 + 7) or after 6 courses, ie, a subsequent COAP (cyclophosphamide, vincristine, cytarabine, and prednisolone), DAT 2 + 5, and COAP. The relapse risk (81% vs 73%), disease-free survival (16% vs 23%), and overall survival at 5 years (23% vs 22%) did not differ between the 3-course or 6-course arms. In addition to a treatment duration randomization, 362 patients were randomized to receive 12-month maintenance treatment with low-dose interferon, but no benefit was seen with respect to relapse risk, disease-free survival, or overall survival.

  11. The Runt domain of AML1 (RUNX1) binds a sequence-conserved RNA motif that mimics a DNA element

    PubMed Central

    Fukunaga, Junichi; Nomura, Yusuke; Tanaka, Yoichiro; Amano, Ryo; Tanaka, Taku; Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Kawai, Gota; Sakamoto, Taiichi; Kozu, Tomoko

    2013-01-01

    AML1 (RUNX1) is a key transcription factor for hematopoiesis that binds to the Runt-binding double-stranded DNA element (RDE) of target genes through its N-terminal Runt domain. Aberrations in the AML1 gene are frequently found in human leukemia. To better understand AML1 and its potential utility for diagnosis and therapy, we obtained RNA aptamers that bind specifically to the AML1 Runt domain. Enzymatic probing and NMR analyses revealed that Apt1-S, which is a truncated variant of one of the aptamers, has a CACG tetraloop and two stem regions separated by an internal loop. All the isolated aptamers were found to contain the conserved sequence motif 5′-NNCCAC-3′ and 5′-GCGMGN′N′-3′ (M:A or C; N and N′ form Watson–Crick base pairs). The motif contains one AC mismatch and one base bulged out. Mutational analysis of Apt1-S showed that three guanines of the motif are important for Runt binding as are the three guanines of RDE, which are directly recognized by three arginine residues of the Runt domain. Mutational analyses of the Runt domain revealed that the amino acid residues used for Apt1-S binding were similar to those used for RDE binding. Furthermore, the aptamer competed with RDE for binding to the Runt domain in vitro. These results demonstrated that the Runt domain of the AML1 protein binds to the motif of the aptamer that mimics DNA. Our findings should provide new insights into RNA function and utility in both basic and applied sciences. PMID:23709277

  12. A new model to predict remission status in AML patients based on day 14 bone marrow biopsy.

    PubMed

    Norkin, Maxim; Chang, Myron; An, Qi; Leather, Helen; Katragadda, Lakshmikanth; Li, Ying; Moreb, Jan S; May, W Stratford; Brown, Randy A; Hsu, Jack W; Hiemenz, John W; Wingard, John R; Cogle, Christopher R

    2016-07-01

    Although bone marrow evaluation on day 14 after initiation of induction chemotherapy (D14 BM) is a widely accepted practice in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), it has suboptimal predictive value for predicting complete remission. We retrospectively analyzed pretreatment characteristics and post-induction response in a cohort of AML patients to determine if adding clinical and laboratory characteristics can improve the predictive value of the D14 BM evaluation. Among 297 patients treated for AML at the single institution 183 patients (61%) had leukemia-positive D14 BM. Of those, 94 were given reinduction chemotherapy and 89 were not. Of the 89 patients who did not receive reinduction, 32 (36%) subsequently achieved complete remission (CR) or complete remission with incomplete count recovery (CRi), and 57 (64%) had persistent disease. Persistent disease after positive D14 BM was more likely associated with higher percentage of D14 myeloblasts, a history of relapsed disease before induction, and higher risk disease compared to patients who subsequently achieved CR. Age, diagnostic white blood cell count, and the D14 BM cellularity did not influence the subsequent likelihood of achieving remission in patients with a positive D14 BM. A new mathematical equation was created and resulted in a positive predictive value of 83%, negative predictive value 90% and accuracy 88% for correctly identifying remission status after positive D14 BM in AML. The accuracy of predicting response using these additional parameters was significantly higher than without (0.88 vs. 0.80, P=0.002). Our new model provides better accuracy for predicting the likelihood of achieving remission and if validated in future studies may be useful for managing AML patients.

  13. Arsenic trioxide and all-trans-retinoic acid selectively exert synergistic cytotoxicity against FLT3-ITD AML cells via co-inhibition of FLT3 signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Na; Tang, Yan-Lai; Zhang, Yin-Chuan; Zhang, Zu-Han; Liu, Xiao-Jian; Ke, Zhi-Yong; Li, Yu; Tan, Hui-Zhen; Huang, Li-Bin; Luo, Xue-Qun

    2017-03-09

    FLT3-ITD mutations occur in approximately 30% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and are associated with a poor outcome. Currently available FLT3 inhibitors have in vitro but limited clinical activity in FLT3-ITD AML. Reports have shown that an arsenic trioxide (ATO)/all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) combination improves prognosis in acute promyelocytic leukemia, especially with FLT3-ITD, and ATO or ATRA alone enhances apoptosis in FLT3-ITD AML cells treated with FLT3 inhibitors, providing a rationale to investigate the role of ATO/ATRA in FLT3-ITD AML. Here, we demonstrate that an ATO/ATRA combination selectively exerts synergistic cytotoxicity against FLT3-ITD AML cell lines (MV4;11/MOLM-13). The signaling pathways affected by ATO/ATRA include FLT3/STAT5/MYC, FLT3/STAT5/E2F1, FLT3/ERK/ATF5 and FLT3/AKT/ATF5.ATF5 may function as an oncogene in FLT3-ITD AML. Our findings provide experimental evidence that supports further exploration of ATO/ATRA in FLT3-ITD AML in vivo and warrants a clinical evaluation of regimens comprising an ATO/ATRA combination.

  14. The p21Waf1 pathway is involved in blocking leukemogenesis by the t(8;21) fusion protein AML1-ETO

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Luke F.; Yan, Ming

    2007-01-01

    The 8;21 translocation is a major contributor to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) of the M2 classification occurring in approximately 40% of these cases. Multiple mouse models using this fusion protein demonstrate that AML1-ETO requires secondary mutagenic events to promote leukemogenesis. Here, we show that the negative cell cycle regulator p21WAF1 gene is up-regulated by AML1-ETO at the protein, RNA, and promoter levels. Retroviral transduction and hematopoietic cell transplantation experiments with p21WAF1-deficient cells show that AML1-ETO is able to promote leukemogenesis in the absence of p21WAF1. Thus, loss of p21WAF1 facilitates AML1-ETO–induced leukemogenesis, suggesting that mutagenic events in the p21WAF1 pathway to bypass the growth inhibitory effect from AML1-ETO–induced p21WAF1 expression can be a significant factor in AML1-ETO–associated acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:17284535

  15. Feasibility of the AML profiler (Skyline™ Array) for patient risk stratification in a multicentre trial: a preliminary comparison with the conventional approach.

    PubMed

    Nomdedéu, Josep F; Puigdecanet, Eulalia; Bussaglia, Elena; Hernández, Juan José; Carricondo, Maite; Estivill, Camino; Martí-Tutusaus, Josep Maria; Tormo, Mar; Zamora, Lurdes; Serrano, Elena; Perea, Granada; de Llano, Maria Paz Queipo; García, Antoni; Sánchez-Ortega, Isabel; Ribera, Josep Maria; Nonell, Lara; Aventin, Anna; Solé, Francesc; Brunet, Maria Salut; Sierra, Jorge

    2016-05-03

    Deoxyribonucleic acid microarrays allow researchers to measure mRNA levels of thousands of genes in a single experiment and could be useful for diagnostic purposes in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). We assessed the feasibility of the AML profiler (Skyline™ Array) in genetic stratification of patients with de novo AML and compared the results with those obtained using the standard cytogenetic and molecular approach. Diagnostic bone marrow from 31 consecutive de novo AML cases was used to test MLL-PTD, FLT3-ITD and TKD, NPM1 and CEBPAdm mutations. Purified RNA was used to assess RUNX1-RUNX1T1, PML-RARα and CBFβ-MYH11 rearrangements. RNA remnants underwent gene expression profiling analysis using the AML profiler, which detects chromosomal aberrations: t(8;21), t(15;17), inv(16), mutations (CEBPAdm, ABD-NPM1) and BAALC and EVI1 expression. Thirty cases were successfully analysed with both methods. Five cases had FLT3-ITD. In one case, a t(8;21) was correctly detected by both methods. Four cases had inv(16); in one, the RNA quality was unsatisfactory and it was not hybridized, and in the other three, the AML profiler detected the genetic lesion - this being a rare type I translocation in one case. Two cases with acute promyelocytic leukaemia were diagnosed by both methods. Results for NPM1 mutations were concordant in all but two cases (2/11, non-ABD mutations). Analysis of costs and turnaround times showed that the AML profiler was no more expensive than the conventional molecular approach. These results suggest that the AML profiler could be useful in multicentre trials to rapidly identify patients with AML with a good prognosis. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Polymorphisms and haplotypes of the CYP2B6 detoxification gene in the predisposition of Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) and induction of its cytogenetic abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Daraki, Aggeliki; Kakosaiou, Katerina; Zachaki, Sophia; Sambani, Constantina; Aleporou-Marinou, Vassiliki; Kollia, Panagoula; Manola, Kalliopi N

    2016-11-01

    CYP2B6 is a polymorphic detoxification gene which plays a vital role in the degradation of genotoxic compounds. In this study we hypothesized that inadequate detoxification due to CYP2B6 polymorphisms may contribute to AML. To evaluate the potential impact of CYP2B6 polymorphisms on AML development and induction of its specific chromosomal abnormalities we studied C(777)A and A(785)G polymorphisms for the first time in AML. Furthermore, we investigated the co-existence of the above polymorphisms with G(516)T polymorphism to determine the CYP2B6 high-risk haplotypes in AML susceptibility. Our study included 619 AML patients and 430 healthy donors. Concerning C(777)A CYP2B6 polymorphism, no significant difference was found between patients and controls. However, A(785)G CYP2B6 polymorphism showed a statistically higher frequency of the variant genotypes in patients (48.2%), mainly in secondary AML patients (49.1%) than in controls (26.1%). Moreover, an increased frequency of the variant genotypes was found in those with abnormal karyotypes, especially with -7/del(7q), -5/del(5q), +8, inv(16) and t(8;21). The combination of the three CYP2B6 polymorphisms (G(516)T, C(777)A & A(785)G) revealed seven haplotypes. Four out of six haplotypes with at least one mutant allele were significantly associated with an increased risk for AML. Interestingly, T516A777G785 haplotype, where the three mutant alleles co-existed, had ~3-fold increased risk to be found in patients than controls. The association between haplotypes and cytogenetic aberrations revealed a positive correlation between specific CYP2B6 haplotypes and AML cytogenetic abnormalities. Our data suggest that A(785)G CYP2B6 gene polymorphism and specific CYP2B6 haplotypes may contribute to AML and its specific chromosomal aberrations.

  17. Cannabidiol stimulates Aml-1a-dependent glial differentiation and inhibits glioma stem-like cells proliferation by inducing autophagy in a TRPV2-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Nabissi, Massimo; Morelli, Maria Beatrice; Amantini, Consuelo; Liberati, Sonia; Santoni, Matteo; Ricci-Vitiani, Lucia; Pallini, Roberto; Santoni, Giorgio

    2015-10-15

    Glioma stem-like cells (GSCs) correspond to a tumor cell subpopulation, involved in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumor initiation and acquired chemoresistance. Currently, drug-induced differentiation is considered as a promising approach to eradicate this tumor-driving cell population. Recently, the effect of cannabinoids (CBs) in promoting glial differentiation and inhibiting gliomagenesis has been evidenced. Herein, we demonstrated that cannabidiol (CBD) by activating transient receptor potential vanilloid-2 (TRPV2) triggers GSCs differentiation activating the autophagic process and inhibits GSCs proliferation and clonogenic capability. Above all, CBD and carmustine (BCNU) in combination overcome the high resistance of GSCs to BCNU treatment, by inducing apoptotic cell death. Acute myeloid leukemia (Aml-1) transcription factors play a pivotal role in GBM proliferation and differentiation and it is known that Aml-1 control the expression of several nociceptive receptors. So, we evaluated the expression levels of Aml-1 spliced variants (Aml-1a, b and c) in GSCs and during their differentiation. We found that Aml-1a is upregulated during GSCs differentiation, and its downregulation restores a stem cell phenotype in differentiated GSCs. Since it was demonstrated that CBD induces also TRPV2 expression and that TRPV2 is involved in GSCs differentiation, we evaluated if Aml-1a interacted directly with TRPV2 promoters. Herein, we found that Aml-1a binds TRPV2 promoters and that Aml-1a expression is upregulated by CBD treatment, in a TRPV2 and PI3K/AKT dependent manner. Altogether, these results support a novel mechanism by which CBD inducing TRPV2-dependent autophagic process stimulates Aml-1a-dependent GSCs differentiation, abrogating the BCNU chemoresistance in GSCs.

  18. Comments on the MIT Assessment of the Mars One Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry W.

    2015-01-01

    The MIT assessment of the Mars One mission plan reveals design assumptions that would cause significant difficulties. Growing crops in the crew chamber produces excessive oxygen levels. The assumed in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) equipment has too low a Technology Readiness Level (TRL). The required spare parts cause a large and increasing launch mass logistics burden. The assumed International Space Station (ISS) Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) technologies were developed for microgravity and therefore are not suitable for Mars gravity. Growing food requires more mass than sending food from Earth. The large number of spares is due to the relatively low reliability of ECLS and the low TRL of ISRU. The Mars One habitat design is similar to past concepts but does not incorporate current knowledge. The MIT architecture analysis tool for long-term settlements on the Martian surface includes an ECLS system simulation, an ISRU sizing model, and an analysis of required spares. The MIT tool showed the need for separate crop and crew chambers, the large spare parts logistics, that crops require more mass than Earth food, and that more spares are needed if reliability is lower. That ISRU has low TRL and ISS ECLS was designed for microgravity are well known. Interestingly, the results produced by the architecture analysis tool - separate crop chamber, large spares mass, large crop chamber mass, and low reliability requiring more spares - were also well known. A common approach to ECLS architecture analysis is to build a complex model that is intended to be all-inclusive and is hoped will help solve all design problems. Such models can struggle to replicate obvious and well-known results and are often unable to answer unanticipated new questions. A better approach would be to survey the literature for background knowledge and then directly analyze the important problems.

  19. Research in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy at MIT LABA

    SciTech Connect

    Yanch, J.C.; Shefer, R.E.; Klinkowstein, R.E.; Howard, W.B.; Song, H.; Blackburn, B.; Binello, E.

    1997-02-01

    A 4.1 MeV tandem electrostatic accelerator designed for research into Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) has recently been installed in the MIT Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications (LABA). This accelerator uses a very high current switch mode high voltage power supply in conjunction with a multi-cusp negative ion source to supply the multimilliampere current required for clinical BNCT applications. A number of individual research projects aimed at evaluating the potential of this accelerator design as a hospital-based neutron source for radiation therapy of both tumors and rheumatoid arthritis are described here. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Mit Mathematik zu Mehr Intelligenz in der Logistik

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möhring, Rolf H.; Schenk, Michael

    Die Lösung logistischer Probleme ist ein wichtiger Aspekt menschlichen Handelns seit Menschen gemeinsam zielgerichtet tätig wurden. Die Grundlagen dessen, was wir heute Logistik nennen, entstammen dem militärischen Bereich. So basierte z. B. das römische Imperium in starkem Maße auf militärisch-logistischen Glanzleistungen. Ob damals bereits mathematische Überlegungen eine Rolle spielten, wissen wir heute nicht. Jedoch versuchte z. B. Napoleon, der mit den bedeutendsten Mathematikern seiner Zeit befreundet war, den Transport seiner Truppen und die Verbreitung von Informationen zu optimieren und strategisch einzusetzen.1,2

  1. The MIT-Green Bank (MG) 5 GHz survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, C. L.; Lawrence, C. R.; Burke, B. F.; Hewitt, J. N.; Mahoney, J.

    1986-01-01

    The catalog yielded by the MIT-Green Bank 5-GHz survey contains 5974 sources with S/N ratio greater than 5; a supplemental catalog contains 3836 possible detections with S/N of less than 5. The reliability of the main list is measured to be about 96 percent, with a completeness of about 95 percent. Flux density errors are a function of flux density. A comparison is presently made of survey sources from the Douglas et al. (1980) 365-MHz Texas survey; spectral indices are computed for coincident sources, and the distribution of spectral indices is discussed.

  2. Characteristics of the MIT microwiggler for free electron laser applications

    SciTech Connect

    Catravas, P.; Stoner, R.; Bekefi, G.

    1995-12-31

    We report work on the development of microwiggler technology for free electron laser research. The MIT microwiggler is a pulsed electromagnet with 70 periods of 8.8 mm each which generates a peak on-axis field of 4.2 kG. The wiggler is characterized by extensive tunability. We developed a novel tuning regimen to control 140 degrees of freedom afforded by the individually tunable half periods and achieved an rms spread in the peak amplitudes of 0.08%. This is the lowest attained to date in any sub-cm period wiggler. The microwiggler design and comprehensive measurements of its characteristics will be described.

  3. MIT Laboratory for Computer Science Progress Report 27

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    Link Chip (DLC). These components were discussed in some detail in last year’s progress report. PaRC is a CMOS gate array designed by Chris Joerg that...burdening the network. Chris Joerg has finished the design of PaRC and the generation of a complete set of test vectors. PaRC has 33,000 used gates and is...N. Lynch, Y. Mansour, and J Spinelli . The Data Link Layer: The Impos- sibility of Implementation in Face of Crashes. Technical Memo MIT/LCS/TM-355.b

  4. Autophagy mediates proteolysis of NPM1 and HEXIM1 and sensitivity to BET inhibition in AML cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Min; Garcia, Jacqueline S.; Thomas, Daniel; Zhu, Li; Nguyen, Le Xuan Truong; Chan, Steven M.; Majeti, Ravindra; Medeiros, Bruno C.; Mitchell, Beverly S.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying activation of the BET pathway in AML cells remain poorly understood. We have discovered that autophagy is activated in acute leukemia cells expressing mutant nucleophosmin 1 (NPMc+) or MLL-fusion proteins. Autophagy activation results in the degradation of NPM1 and HEXIM1, two negative regulators of BET pathway activation. Inhibition of autophagy with pharmacologic inhibitors or through knocking down autophagy-related gene 5 (Atg5) expression increases the expression of both NPM1 and HEXIM1. The Brd4 inhibitors JQ1 and I-BET-151 also inhibit autophagy and increase NPM1 and HEXIM1 expression. We conclude that the degradation of NPM1 and HEXIM1 through autophagy in certain AML subsets contributes to the activation of the BET pathway in these cells. PMID:27732946

  5. Early mixed T-cell chimerism is predictive of pediatric AML or MDS relapse after hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

    PubMed

    Broglie, Larisa; Helenowski, Irene; Jennings, Lawrence J; Schafernak, Kristian; Duerst, Reggie; Schneiderman, Jennifer; Tse, William; Kletzel, Morris; Chaudhury, Sonali

    2017-03-07

    Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who relapse after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) have dismal outcomes. Our ability to predict those at risk for relapse is limited. We examined chimerism trends post-HCT in 63 children who underwent HCT for AML or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Mixed T-cell chimerism at engraftment and absence of chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD) were associated with relapse (P = 0.04 and P = 0.02, respectively). Mixed T-cell chimerism at engraftment was predictive in patients without cGVHD (P = 0.03). Patients with engraftment mixed T-cell chimerism may warrant closer disease monitoring and consideration for early intervention.

  6. Saponin-Based Nanoemulsification Improves the Antioxidant Properties of Vitamin A and E in AML-12 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Choudhry, Qaisra Naheed; Kim, Mi Jeong; Kim, Tae Gyun; Pan, Jeong Hoon; Kim, Jun Ho; Park, Sung Jin; Lee, Jin Hyup; Kim, Young Jun

    2016-01-01

    Our work aimed to investigate the protective effects of saponin-based nanoemulsions of vitamin A and E against oxidative stress-induced cellular damage in AML-12 cells. Saponin nanoemulsions of vitamin A (SAN) and vitamin E (SEN) were prepared by high-pressure homogenization and characterized in terms of size, zeta potential, and polydispersity index. SEN and SAN protect AML-12 cells against oxidative stress-induced cellular damage more efficiently via scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS), and reducing DNA damage, protein carbonylation, and lipid peroxidation. These results provide valuable information for the development of nanoemulsion-based delivery systems that would improve the antioxidant properties of vitamin A and E. PMID:27571071

  7. Structural basis for recognition of SMRT/N-CoR by the MYND domain and its contribution to AML1/ETO's activity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yizhou; Chen, Wei; Gaudet, Justin; Cheney, Matthew D.; Roudaia, Liya; Cierpicki, Tomasz; Klet, Rachel C.; Hartman, Kari; Laue, Thomas M.; Speck, Nancy A.; Bushweller, John H.

    2007-01-01

    Summary AML1/ETO results from the t(8;21) associated with 12-15% of acute myeloid leukemia. The AML1/ETO MYND domain mediates interactions with the co-repressors SMRT and N-CoR and contributes to AML1/ETO's ability to repress proliferation and differentiation of primary bone marrow cells as well as to enhance their self-renewal in vitro. We solved the solution structure of the MYND domain and show it to be structurally homologous to the PHD and RING finger families of proteins. We also determined the solution structure of an MYND-SMRT peptide complex. We demonstrated that a single amino acid substitution that disrupts the interaction between the MYND domain and the SMRT peptide attenuated AML1/ETO's effects on proliferation, differentiation, and gene expression. PMID:17560331

  8. Activity of a selective inhibitor of nuclear export, selinexor (KPT-330), against AML-initiating cells engrafted into immunosuppressed NSG mice

    PubMed Central

    Etchin, J; Montero, J; Berezovskaya, A; Le, BT; Kentsis, A; Christie, AL; Conway, AS; Chen, WC; Reed, C; Mansour, MR; Ng, CEL; Adamia, S; Rodig, SJ; Galinsky, IA; Stone, RM; Klebanov, B; Landesman, Y; Kauffman, M; Shacham, S; Kung, AL; Wang, JCY; Letai, A; Look, AT

    2016-01-01

    Currently available combination chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) often fails to result in long-term remissions, emphasizing the need for novel therapeutic strategies. We reasoned that targeted inhibition of a prominent nuclear exporter, XPO1/CRM1, could eradicate self-renewing leukemia-initiating cells (LICs) whose survival depends on timely XPO1-mediated transport of specific protein and RNA cargoes. Using an immunosuppressed mouse model bearing primary patient-derived AML cells, we demonstrate that selinexor (KPT-330), an oral antagonist of XPO1 that is currently in clinical trials, has strong activity against primary AML cells while sparing normal stem and progenitor cells. Importantly, limiting dilution transplantation assays showed that this cytotoxic activity is not limited to the rapidly proliferating bulk population of leukemic cells but extends to the LICs, whose inherent drug resistance and unrestricted self-renewal capacity has been implicated in the difficulty of curing AML patients with conventional chemotherapy alone. PMID:26202935

  9. Phase I Trial of Maintenance Sorafenib after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for FLT3-ITD AML

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Bin; Li, Shuli; Lane, Andrew A.; Connolly, Christine; Del Rio, Candice; Valles, Betsy; Curtis, Morgan; Ballen, Karen; Cutler, Corey; Dey, Bimalangshu R.; El-Jawahri, Areej; Fathi, Amir T.; Ho, Vincent T.; Joyce, Amy; McAfee, Steven; Rudek, Michelle; Rajkhowa, Trivikram; Verselis, Sigitas; Antin, Joseph H.; Spitzer, Thomas R.; Levis, Mark; Soiffer, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The FLT3-ITD mutation is associated with a high relapse rate for patients with AML even after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Sorafenib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor which inhibits the FLT3 tyrosine kinase and has shown encouraging activity in FLT3-ITD AML. We conducted a phase I trial of maintenance sorafenib after HSCT in patients with FLT3-ITD AML (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01398501). Patients received a variety of conditioning regimens and graft sources. A dose escalation 3+3 cohort design was used to define the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) with an additional 10 patients treated at the MTD. Sorafenib was initiated between days 45 and 120 after HSCT continued for twelve 28-day cycles. Twenty-two patients were enrolled (status at HSCT: CR1=16, CR2=3, refractory=3). The MTD was established at 400 mg BID with one DLT observed (pericardial effusion). Two patients died of transplant-related causes, both unrelated to sorafenib. Two patients stopped sorafenib after relapse and 5 stopped due to attributable toxicities after the DLT period. Median follow-up for surviving patients is 16.7 months after HSCT (range, 8.1–35.0). There was one case of grade II acute GVHD after starting sorafenib and the 12-month cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD was 38% (90% CI, 21%–56%). For all patients, one-year progression-free survival (PFS) is 85% (90% CI, 66%–94%) and one-year overall survival (OS) is 95% (90% CI, 79%–99%) after HSCT. For patients in CR1 / CR2 prior to HSCT (n=19), one-year PFS is 95% (90% CI, 76%–99%) and one-year OS is 100% with only one patient who has relapsed. Sorafenib is safe after HSCT for FLT3-ITD AML and merits further investigation for the prevention of relapse. PMID:25239228

  10. Graft Immune Cell Composition Associates with Clinical Outcome of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients with AML.

    PubMed

    Impola, Ulla; Larjo, Antti; Salmenniemi, Urpu; Putkonen, Mervi; Itälä-Remes, Maija; Partanen, Jukka

    2016-01-01

    Complications of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) have been attributed to immune cells transferred into the patient with the graft. However, a detailed immune cell composition of the graft is usually not evaluated. In the present study, we determined the level of variation in the composition of immune cells between clinical HSCT grafts and whether this variation is associated with clinical outcome. Sizes of major immune cell populations in 50 clinical grafts from a single HSCT Centre were analyzed using flow cytometry. A statistical comparison between cell levels and clinical outcomes of HSCT was performed. Overall survival, acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD), chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD), and relapse were used as the primary endpoints. Individual HSCT grafts showed considerable variation in their numbers of immune cell populations, including CD123(+) dendritic cells and CD34(+) cells, which may play a role in GVHD. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients who developed aGVHD were transplanted with higher levels of effector CD3(+) T, CD19(+) B, and CD123(+) dendritic cells than AML patients without aGVHD, whereas grafts with a high CD34(+) content protected against aGVHD. AML patients with cGVHD had received grafts with a lower level of monocytes and a higher level of CD34(+) cells than those without cGVHD. There is considerable variation in the levels of immune cell populations between HSCT grafts, and this variation is associated with outcomes of HSCT in AML patients. A detailed analysis of the immune cell content of the graft can be used in risk assessment of HSCT.

  11. Efficacy of the Hypomethylating Agents as Frontline, Salvage or Consolidation Therapy in Adults with Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)

    PubMed Central

    Tawfik, Bernard; Sliesoraitis, Sarunas; Lyerly, Susan; Klepin, Heidi D.; Lawrence, Julia; Isom, Scott; Ellis, Leslie R.; Manuel, Megan; Dralle, Sarah; Berenzon, Dmitriy; Powell, Bayard L.; Pardee, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Background The hypomethylating agents (HA), azacitidine and decitabine, have emerged as an alternative to initial and salvage therapy in patients with AML. Little is known about how AML responds to hypomethylating agents after standard therapy and the activity of these agents in a real world setting is not well studied. Methods We retrospectively examined data for 75 consecutive AML patients at Wake Forest from 2002–2011 treated with HAs either as 1st line (n=34), salvage (n=28) or consolidation (n=13). We collected data on age, gender, race, Charlson Comorbidity index (CCI), cytogenetics, type of treatment, Complete Remission (CR), Complete Remission with incomplete count recovery (CRi), and survival. Statistical analysis was performed using Kaplan-Meier estimates and cox proportional hazards models. Results Frontline response rate (CR+CRi) was 26.5%, median overall survival (OS) was 3.4 (95% CI 1.3–7.4) months, with 18% alive at one year. In the salvage cohort, the response rate was significantly lower compared to frontline (3.6% versus 26.5%, p=0.017). Despite the reduced response, OS from time of HA treatment was longer than frontline at 8.2 (CI 4.8–10.3) months. In the consolidation cohort OS was 13.8 (CI 8.0 – 21.6) months with one patient in remission more than 30 months from diagnosis. Conclusion These data suggest prior cytotoxic therapy decrease marrow response rates to HAs but not survival. Furthermore, use of hypomethylating agents for consolidation resulted in a median overall survival over one year in a cohort of older patients. This suggests that hypomethylating agents have activity in all phases of AML treatment. PMID:24149914

  12. Efficacy of the hypomethylating agents as frontline, salvage, or consolidation therapy in adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

    PubMed

    Tawfik, Bernard; Sliesoraitis, Sarunas; Lyerly, Susan; Klepin, Heidi D; Lawrence, Julia; Isom, Scott; Ellis, Leslie R; Manuel, Megan; Dralle, Sarah; Berenzon, Dmitriy; Powell, Bayard L; Pardee, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    The hypomethylating agents (HAs), azacitidine and decitabine, have emerged as an alternative to initial and salvage therapy in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Little is known about how AML responds to hypomethylating agents after standard therapy, and the activity of these agents in a real-world setting is not well studied. We retrospectively examined data for 75 consecutive AML patients at Wake Forest from 2002 to 2011 treated with HAs either as first-line (n = 34), salvage (n = 28), or consolidation (n = 13) therapy. We collected data on age, gender, race, Charlson comorbidity index (CCI), cytogenetics, type of treatment, complete remission (CR), complete remission with incomplete count recovery (CRi), and survival. Statistical analysis was performed using Kaplan-Meier estimates and Cox proportional hazards models. Frontline response rate (CR + CRi) was 26.5 %, and median overall survival (OS) was 3.4 months (95 % CI 1.3-7.4), with 18 % alive at 1 year. In the salvage cohort, the response rate was significantly lower compared to frontline (3.6 versus 26.5 %, p = 0.017). Despite the reduced response, OS from time of HA treatment was longer than frontline at 8.2 months (CI 4.8-10.3). In the consolidation cohort, OS was 13.8 months (CI 8.0-21.6) with one patient in remission more than 30 months from diagnosis. These data suggest that prior cytotoxic therapy decreases marrow response rates to HAs but not survival. Furthermore, use of hypomethylating agents for consolidation resulted in a median overall survival over 1 year in a cohort of older patients. This suggests that hypomethylating agents have activity in all phases of AML treatment.

  13. FLT3 mutational status is an independent risk factor for adverse outcomes after allogeneic transplantation in AML

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yumeng; Braun, Thomas; Chang, Lawrence; Bixby, Dale; Hanauer, David A.; Chughtai, Komal A.; Gatza, Erin; Couriel, Daniel; Goldstein, Steven; Pawarode, Attaphol; Reddy, Pavan; Riwes, Mary; Connelly, James; Harris, Andrew; Kitko, Carrie; Levine, John; Yanik, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic HCT has been increasingly used in the setting of FLT3 mutated AML. However, its role in conferring durable relapse-free intervals remains in question. Herein, we sought to investigate FLT3 mutational status on transplant outcomes. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 262 consecutive AML patients who underwent first-time allogeneic HCT (2008-2014), of whom 171 had undergone FLT3-ITD mutational testing. FLT3 mutated AML was associated with nearly twice the relapse risk (RR) compared with those without FLT3 mutation 3 years post-HCT (63% vs. 37%, P<0.001), and with a shorter median time to relapse (100 vs. 121 days). FLT3 mutational status remained significantly associated with this outcome after controlling for patient, disease, and transplant-related risk factors (P<0.05). Multivariate analysis showed a significant association of FLT3 mutation with increased 3-year RR (HR 3.63, 95% CI: 2.13, 6.19, P<0.001), and inferior disease-free survival (HR 2.05, 95% CI: 1.29, 3.27, P<0.01) and overall survival (HR 1.92, 95% CI: 1.14, 3.24, P<0.05). These data demonstrate high risk of early relapse after allogeneic HCT for FLT3 mutated AML that translates into adverse disease-free and overall survival outcomes. Additional targeted and coordinated interventions are needed to maintain durable remission after allogeneic HCT in this high-risk population. PMID:26191952

  14. Triptolide sensitizes AML cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis via decrease of XIAP and p53-mediated increase of DR5.

    PubMed

    Carter, Bing Z; Mak, Duncan H; Schober, Wendy D; Dietrich, Martin F; Pinilla, Clemencia; Vassilev, Lyubomir T; Reed, John C; Andreeff, Michael

    2008-04-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells are relatively resistant to tumor necrosis factor alpha-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). We previously reported that triptolide, a potent anticancer agent from a Chinese herb, decreases XIAP in leukemic cells. We evaluated the combination of triptolide and TRAIL and found synergistic promotion of apoptosis in AML cells. XIAP-overexpressing U937 cells (U937XIAP) were more resistant to TRAIL than U937neo cells, and inhibition of XIAP with the small-molecule inhibitor 1396-11 enhanced TRAIL-induced apoptosis, implying XIAP as a resistance factor in AML. Furthermore, triptolide increased DR5 levels in OCI-AML3, while the DR5 increase was blunted in p53-knockdown OCI-AML3 and p53-mutated U937 cells, confirming a role for p53 in the regulation of DR5. In support of this finding, disruption of MDM2-p53 binding with subsequent increase in p53 levels by nutlin3a increased DR5 levels and sensitized OCI-AML3 cells to TRAIL. The combination of 1396-11 plus nutlin3a plus TRAIL was more effective than either the 1396-11 and TRAIL or nutlin3a and TRAIL combinations in OCI-AML3 cells, further supporting the role of triptolide as a sensitizer to TRAIL-induced apoptosis in part by independent modulation of XIAP expression and p53 signaling. Thus, the combination of triptolide and TRAIL may provide a novel strategy for treating AML by overcoming critical mechanisms of apoptosis resistance.

  15. Pre-clinical efficacy of combined therapy with novel β-catenin antagonist BC2059 and histone deacetylase inhibitor against AML cells.

    PubMed

    Fiskus, W; Sharma, S; Saha, S; Shah, B; Devaraj, S G T; Sun, B; Horrigan, S; Leveque, C; Zu, Y; Iyer, S; Bhalla, K N

    2015-06-01

    The canonical wingless-type MMTV integration site (WNT)-β-catenin pathway is essential for self-renewal, growth and survival of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) stem/blast progenitor cells (BPCs). Deregulated WNT signaling inhibits degradation of β-catenin, causing increased nuclear translocation and co-factor activity of β-catenin with the transcriptional regulator T-cell factor (TCF) 4/lymphoid enhancer factor 1 in AML BPCs. Here, we determined the pre-clinical anti-AML activity of the anthraquinone oxime-analog BC2059 (BC), known to attenuate β-catenin levels. BC treatment disrupted the binding of β-catenin with the scaffold protein transducin β-like 1 and proteasomal degradation and decline in the nuclear levels of β-catenin. This was associated with reduced transcriptional activity of TCF4 and expression of its target genes, cyclin D1, c-MYC and survivin. BC treatment dose-dependently induced apoptosis of cultured and primary AML BPCs. Treatment with BC also significantly improved the median survival of immune-depleted mice engrafted with either cultured or primary AML BPCs, exhibiting nuclear expression of β-catenin. Co-treatment with the pan-histone deacetylase inhibitor panobinostat and BC synergistically induced apoptosis of cultured and primary AML BPCs, including those expressing FLT3-ITD, as well as further significantly improved the survival of immune-depleted mice engrafted with primary AML BPCs. These findings underscore the promising pre-clinical activity and warrant further testing of BC against human AML, especially those expressing FLT3-ITD.

  16. Subclones with the t(9;22)/BCR-ABL1 rearrangement occur in AML and seem to cooperate with distinct genetic alterations.

    PubMed

    Bacher, Ulrike; Haferlach, Torsten; Alpermann, Tamara; Zenger, Melanie; Hochhaus, Andreas; Beelen, Dietrich W; Uppenkamp, Michael; Rummel, Mathias; Kern, Wolfgang; Schnittger, Susanne; Haferlach, Claudia

    2011-03-01

    In AML, cooperation of mutations suppressing differentiation ('class-II-mutations') with 'class-I-mutations' increasing cell proliferation is frequent. In rare cases of myeloid malignancies, the BCR-ABL1 fusion was reported to cooperate as class-I-mutation with class-II-mutations, but most cases had to be classified as blast phase of chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML). We identified five cases of Philadelphia positive subclones in AML occurring in coincidence with other genetic lesions: 1:220 patients with inv(16)/CBFB-MYH11 (0·5%), 2:272 AML cases with t(8;21)/RUNX1-RUNX1T1 (0·7%), 1:1029 NPM1-mutated AML (0·1%), and one patient with s-AML following MDS with a 5q-deletion. Four patients had m-BCR (e1a2) BCR-ABL1 transcripts; one case only had an M-BCR (b3a2) breakpoint. These cases allow some interesting conclusions: The BCR-ABL1 rearrangement apparently can cooperate with the NPM1 mutation similar to other class-I-mutations. The identification of Philadelphia positive subclones in <1% of patients with CBF-leukaemias fits well with previous observations that most CBF-AML are accompanied by activating mutations in genes enhancing proliferation. Since we observed the occurrence of the Philadelphia positive subclones at diagnosis, at relapse, or throughout the disease, the time point of the emergence of Philadelphia subclones seems variable in AML. Clinical research should further concentrate on Philadelphia positive subclones in AML to assess the clinical impact.

  17. Low-dose salinomycin induces anti-leukemic responses in AML and MLL.

    PubMed

    Roulston, Gary D R; Burt, Charlotte L; Kettyle, Laura M J; Matchett, Kyle B; Keenan, Heather L; Mulgrew, Nuala M; Ramsey, Joanne M; Dougan, Caoifa; McKiernan, John; Grishagin, Ivan V; Mills, Ken I; Thompson, Alexander

    2016-11-08

    Development of anti-cancer drugs towards clinical application is costly and inefficient. Large screens of drugs, efficacious for non-cancer disease, are currently being used to identify candidates for repurposing based on their anti-cancer properties. Here, we show that low-dose salinomycin, a coccidiostat ionophore previously identified in a breast cancer screen, has anti-leukemic efficacy. AML and MLLr cell lines, primary cells and patient samples were sensitive to submicromolar salinomycin. Most strikingly, colony formation of normal hematopoietic cells was unaffected by salinomycin, demonstrating a lack of hemotoxicity at the effective concentrations. Furthermore, salinomycin treatment of primary cells resulted in loss of leukemia repopulation ability following transplantation, as demonstrated by extended recipient survival compared to controls. Bioinformatic analysis of a 17-gene signature identified and validated in primary MLLr cells, uncovered immunomodulatory pathways, hubs and protein interactions as potential transducers of low dose salinomycin treatment. Additionally, increased protein expression of p62/Sqstm1, encoded for by one of the 17 signature genes, demonstrates a role for salinomycin in aggresome/vesicle formation indicative of an autophagic response.Together, the data support the efficacy of salinomycin as an anti-leukemic at non-hemotoxic concentrations. Further investigation alone or in combination with other therapies is warranted for future clinical trial.

  18. Low-dose salinomycin induces anti-leukemic responses in AML and MLL

    PubMed Central

    Kettyle, Laura M.J.; Matchett, Kyle B.; Keenan, Heather L.; Mulgrew, Nuala M.; Ramsey, Joanne M.; Dougan, Caoifa; McKiernan, John; Grishagin, Ivan V.; Mills, Ken I.; Thompson, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Development of anti-cancer drugs towards clinical application is costly and inefficient. Large screens of drugs, efficacious for non-cancer disease, are currently being used to identify candidates for repurposing based on their anti-cancer properties. Here, we show that low-dose salinomycin, a coccidiostat ionophore previously identified in a breast cancer screen, has anti-leukemic efficacy. AML and MLLr cell lines, primary cells and patient samples were sensitive to submicromolar salinomycin. Most strikingly, colony formation of normal hematopoietic cells was unaffected by salinomycin, demonstrating a lack of hemotoxicity at the effective concentrations. Furthermore, salinomycin treatment of primary cells resulted in loss of leukemia repopulation ability following transplantation, as demonstrated by extended recipient survival compared to controls. Bioinformatic analysis of a 17-gene signature identified and validated in primary MLLr cells, uncovered immunomodulatory pathways, hubs and protein interactions as potential transducers of low dose salinomycin treatment. Additionally, increased protein expression of p62/Sqstm1, encoded for by one of the 17 signature genes, demonstrates a role for salinomycin in aggresome/vesicle formation indicative of an autophagic response. Together, the data support the efficacy of salinomycin as an anti-leukemic at non-hemotoxic concentrations. Further investigation alone or in combination with other therapies is warranted for future clinical trial. PMID:27612428

  19. PI-103, a dual inhibitor of Class IA phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase and mTOR, has antileukemic activity in AML.

    PubMed

    Park, S; Chapuis, N; Bardet, V; Tamburini, J; Gallay, N; Willems, L; Knight, Z A; Shokat, K M; Azar, N; Viguié, F; Ifrah, N; Dreyfus, F; Mayeux, P; Lacombe, C; Bouscary, D

    2008-09-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling pathways are frequently activated in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). mTORC1 inhibition with RAD001 induces PI3K/Akt activation and both pathways are activated independently, providing a rationale for dual inhibition of both pathways. PI-103 is a new potent PI3K/Akt and mTOR inhibitor. In human leukemic cell lines and in primary blast cells from AML patients, PI-103 inhibited constitutive and growth factor-induced PI3K/Akt and mTORC1 activation. PI-103 was essentially cytostatic for cell lines and induced cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase. In blast cells, PI-103 inhibited leukemic proliferation, the clonogenicity of leukemic progenitors and induced mitochondrial apoptosis, especially in the compartment containing leukemic stem cells. In contrast, apoptosis was not induced with RAD001 and IC87114 association, which specifically inhibits mTORC1 and p110delta activity, respectively. PI-103 had additive proapoptotic effects with etoposide in blast cells and in immature leukemic cells. Interestingly, PI-103 did not induce apoptosis in normal CD34(+) cells and had moderate effects on their clonogenic and proliferative properties. Here, we demonstrate that multitargeted therapy against PI3K/Akt and mTOR with PI-103 may be of therapeutic value in AML.

  20. The role of VDR and BIM in potentiation of cytarabine–induced cell death in human AML blasts

    PubMed Central

    Studzinski, George P.

    2016-01-01

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) has grave prognosis due to aggressive nature of the disease, the toxicity of standard treatment, and overall low cure rates. We recently showed that AML cells in established culture treated with cytarabine (AraC) and a differentiation agent combination show enhancement of AraC cytotoxicity. Here we elucidate molecular changes which underlie this observation with focus on AML blasts in primary culture. The cells were treated with AraC at concentrations achievable in clinical settings, and followed by the addition of Doxercalciferol, a vitamin D2 derivative (D2), together with Carnosic acid (CA), a plant-derived antioxidant. Importantly, although AraC is also toxic to normal bone marrow cell population, the enhanced cell kill by D2/CA was limited to malignant blasts. This enhancement of cell death was associated with activation of the monocytic differentiation program as shown by molecular markers, and the increased expression of vitamin D receptor (VDR). Apoptosis elicited by this treatment is caspase-dependent, and the optimal blast killing required the increased expression of the apoptosis regulator Bim. These data suggest that testing of this regimen in the clinic is warranted. PMID:27144333

  1. Segregation of the AML t(7;11)(p15;p15) translocation chromosomes in somatic cell hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Borrow, J.; Munroe, D.; Housman, D.E.

    1994-09-01

    The t(7;11)(p15;p15) translocation is a recurrent chromosomal abnormality associated predominately with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) FAB M2 and occasionally with other types of AML or CML blast crisis. High resolution banding techniques have previously localized the breakpoints to 7q15.1 and 11p15.5. We have fused t(7;11)(p15;p15) blast cells from an AML patient to CHTG (hamster) cells in order to segregate the translocated chromosomes from their normal counterparts in somatic cell hybrids. Fusion events containing the derivative chromosomes or the normal chromosome 11 were enriched by panning with the antibodies M1C1 and MER2. These antibodies recognize cell surface markers which are expressed from genes which map to opposite sides of the breakpoint on chromosome 11 (11p13 and 11p15.5, respectively). Individual hybrids were expanded and typed with a series of ordered STSs from chromosomes 7 and 11, and hybrids containing the der(7) and der(11) chromosomes were identified. The segregation of the STSs between the two derivatives is in full agreement with the consensus breakpoint positions as determined cytogenetically. These hybrids may prove useful in further delineation of the breakpoint regions on chromosomes 7 and 11.

  2. Theoretical and experimental study of DOA estimation using AML algorithm for an isotropic and non-isotropic 3D array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asgari, Shadnaz; Ali, Andreas M.; Collier, Travis C.; Yao, Yuan; Hudson, Ralph E.; Yao, Kung; Taylor, Charles E.

    2007-09-01

    The focus of most direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation problems has been based mainly on a two-dimensional (2D) scenario where we only need to estimate the azimuth angle. But in various practical situations we have to deal with a three-dimensional scenario. The importance of being able to estimate both azimuth and elevation angles with high accuracy and low complexity is of interest. We present the theoretical and the practical issues of DOA estimation using the Approximate-Maximum-Likelihood (AML) algorithm in a 3D scenario. We show that the performance of the proposed 3D AML algorithm converges to the Cramer-Rao Bound. We use the concept of an isotropic array to reduce the complexity of the proposed algorithm by advocating a decoupled 3D version. We also explore a modified version of the decoupled 3D AML algorithm which can be used for DOA estimation with non-isotropic arrays. Various numerical results are presented. We use two acoustic arrays each consisting of 8 microphones to do some field measurements. The processing of the measured data from the acoustic arrays for different azimuth and elevation angles confirms the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  3. AML1-ETO mediates hematopoietic self-renewal and leukemogenesis through a COX/β-catenin signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiyun; Wang, Jianfeng; Wheat, Justin; Chen, Xi; Jin, Shan; Sadrzadeh, Hossein; Fathi, Amir T.; Peterson, Randall T.; Kung, Andrew L.

    2013-01-01

    Developing novel therapies that suppress self-renewal of leukemia stem cells may reduce the likelihood of relapses and extend long-term survival of patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). AML1-ETO (AE) is an oncogene that plays an important role in inducing self-renewal of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs), leading to the development of leukemia stem cells. Previously, using a zebrafish model of AE and a whole-organism chemical suppressor screen, we have discovered that AE induces specific hematopoietic phenotypes in embryonic zebrafish through a cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and β-catenin–dependent pathway. Here, we show that AE also induces expression of the Cox-2 gene and activates β-catenin in mouse bone marrow cells. Inhibition of COX suppresses β-catenin activation and serial replating of AE+ mouse HSPCs. Genetic knockdown of β-catenin also abrogates the clonogenic growth of AE+ mouse HSPCs and human leukemia cells. In addition, treatment with nimesulide, a COX-2 selective inhibitor, dramatically suppresses xenograft tumor formation and inhibits in vivo progression of human leukemia cells. In summary, our data indicate an important role of a COX/β-catenin–dependent signaling pathway in tumor initiation, growth, and self-renewal, and in providing the rationale for testing potential benefits from common COX inhibitors as a part of AML treatments. PMID:23645839

  4. Induced mitogenic activity in AML-12 mouse hepatocytes exposed to low-dose ultra-wideband electromagnetic radiation.

    PubMed

    Dorsey, W C; Ford, B D; Roane, L; Haynie, D T; Tchounwou, P B

    2005-04-01

    Ultra-wideband (UWB) technology has increased with the use of various civilian and military applications. In the present study, we hypothesized that low-dose UWB electromagnetic radiation (UWBR) could elicit a mitogenic effect in AML-12 mouse hepatocytes, in vitro. To test this hypothesis, we exposed AML-12 mouse hepatocytes, to UWBR in a specially constructed gigahertz transverse electromagnetic mode (GTEM) cell. Cells were exposed to UWBR for 2 h at a temperature of 23 degrees C, a pulse width of 10 ns, a repetition rate of 1 kHz, and field strength of 5-20 kV/m. UWB pulses were triggered by an external pulse generator for UWBR exposure but were not triggered for the sham exposure. We performed an MTT Assay to assess cell viability for UWBR-treated and sham-exposed hepatocytes. Data from viability studies indicated a time-related increase in hepatocytes at time intervals from 8-24 h post exposure. UWBR exerted a statistically significant (p < 0.05) dose-dependent response in cell viability in both serum-treated and serum free medium (SFM) -treated hepatocytes. Western blot analysis of hepatocyte lysates demonstrated that cyclin A protein was induced in hepatocytes, suggesting that increased MTT activity after UWBR exposure was due to cell proliferation. This study indicates that UWBR has a mitogenic effect on AML-12 mouse hepatocytes and implicates a possible role for UWBR in hepatocarcinoma.

  5. [Clinical curative efficacy of inducing remission for the newly diagnosed aged AML patients by chemotherapy with IA and DA regimens].

    PubMed

    Tian, Dong-Hua; Gan, Si-Lin; Xing, Hai-Zhou; Liu, Yan-Fang; Xie, Xin-Sheng; Sun, Hui

    2014-10-01

    This study was aimed to explore the clinical efficacy and toxicity of idarubicin (IA regimen) and daunoru-bicin combined with cytarabine (DA regimen) for treating aged patients with AML as induction chemotherapy. The clinical data of 60 newly diagnosed AML aged patients treated with IA or DA regimen were analyzed retrospectively. IA regimen group included 22 patients (8 male and 14 females with median age of 66 yrs), while the DA regimen group included 38 patients (20 males and 18 females with median age of 64 yrs). The complete remission rate, total effective rate and adverse effects after one chemotherapy course were compared. The results showed that the CR rate in IA regimen group was 63.63%, which was significantly higer than that in DA regimen group (31.58%) (P < 0.05). The total effective rate was 63.63% and 36.84% respectively in IA and DA regimen groups, there was significant difference between the two groups (P < 0.05). Both the hematological and non-hematological adverse effects were observed and no difference was found in the two regimen groups, neither in myelosupression (P > 0.05), the major hematological adverse effects, nor in non-hematological adverse effects (P > 0.05). It is concluded that for aged AML patients, IA regimen can achieve a higher CR rate and higher total effective rate than that in DA regimen without increase of adverse effects after one induction chemotherapy course.

  6. RIC versus MAC UCBT in adults with AML: A report from Eurocord, the ALWP and the CTIWP of the EBMT

    PubMed Central

    Beohou, Eric; Labopin, Myriam; Sanz, Guillermo; Milpied, Noel; Michallet, Mauricette; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Blaise, Didier; Sierra, Jorge; Socié, Gérard; Cornelissen, Jan J.; Schmid, Christoph; Giebel, Sebastian; Gorin, Norbert-Claude; Esteve, Jordi; Ciceri, Fabio; Savani, Bipin N.; Mohty, Mohamad; Gluckman, Eliane; Nagler, Arnon

    2016-01-01

    Nonrelapse mortality (NRM) is the first cause of treatment failure after unrelated cord blood transplantation (UCBT) following myeloablative conditioning (MAC). In the last decade, reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens have been developed with the aim of reducing NRM and allowing older patients and those with medical comorbidities to benefit from UCBT. The aim of the current retrospective study was to compare transplantation outcomes of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients given UCBT after either RIC or MAC. Data from 894 adults with AML receiving a single or double UCBT as first allograft from 2004 to 2013 at EBMT centers were included in this study. 415 patients were given UCBT after RIC while 479 patients following a MAC. In comparison to MAC recipients, RIC recipients had a similar incidence of neutrophil engraftment and of acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). However, RIC recipients had a higher incidence of disease relapse and a lower NRM, translating to comparable leukemia-free (LFS), GVHD-free, relapse-free survival (GRFS) and overall survival (OS). These observations remained qualitatively similar after adjusting for differences between groups in multivariate analyses. In conclusion, these data suggest that LFS and OS are similar with RIC or with MAC in adults AML patients transplanted with UCBT. These observations could serve as basis for a future prospective randomized study. PMID:27250025

  7. AML1-ETO mediates hematopoietic self-renewal and leukemogenesis through a COX/β-catenin signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiyun; Wang, Jianfeng; Wheat, Justin; Chen, Xi; Jin, Shan; Sadrzadeh, Hossein; Fathi, Amir T; Peterson, Randall T; Kung, Andrew L; Sweetser, David A; Yeh, Jing-Ruey Joanna

    2013-06-13

    Developing novel therapies that suppress self-renewal of leukemia stem cells may reduce the likelihood of relapses and extend long-term survival of patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). AML1-ETO (AE) is an oncogene that plays an important role in inducing self-renewal of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs), leading to the development of leukemia stem cells. Previously, using a zebrafish model of AE and a whole-organism chemical suppressor screen, we have discovered that AE induces specific hematopoietic phenotypes in embryonic zebrafish through a cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and β-catenin-dependent pathway. Here, we show that AE also induces expression of the Cox-2 gene and activates β-catenin in mouse bone marrow cells. Inhibition of COX suppresses β-catenin activation and serial replating of AE(+) mouse HSPCs. Genetic knockdown of β-catenin also abrogates the clonogenic growth of AE(+) mouse HSPCs and human leukemia cells. In addition, treatment with nimesulide, a COX-2 selective inhibitor, dramatically suppresses xenograft tumor formation and inhibits in vivo progression of human leukemia cells. In summary, our data indicate an important role of a COX/β-catenin-dependent signaling pathway in tumor initiation, growth, and self-renewal, and in providing the rationale for testing potential benefits from common COX inhibitors as a part of AML treatments.

  8. Results of the AIEOP AML 2002/01 multicenter prospective trial for the treatment of children with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Pession, Andrea; Masetti, Riccardo; Rizzari, Carmelo; Putti, Maria Caterina; Casale, Fiorina; Fagioli, Franca; Luciani, Matteo; Lo Nigro, Luca; Menna, Giuseppe; Micalizzi, Concetta; Santoro, Nicola; Testi, Anna Maria; Zecca, Marco; Biondi, Andrea; Pigazzi, Martina; Rutella, Sergio; Rondelli, Roberto; Basso, Giuseppe; Locatelli, Franco

    2013-07-11

    We evaluated the outcome of 482 children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) enrolled in the Associazione Italiana di Ematologia e Oncologia Pediatrica AML 2002/01 trial. Treatment was stratified according to risk group; hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) was used in high-risk (HR) children. Patients with core binding factor leukemia achieving complete remission (CR) after the first induction course were considered standard risk (SR; 99 patients), whereas the others (n = 383) were assigned to the HR group. Allogeneic (ALLO) or autologous (AUTO) HSCT was employed, respectively, in 141 and 102 HR patients after consolidation therapy. CR, early death, and induction failure rates were 87%, 3%, and 10%, respectively. Relapse occurred in 24% of patients achieving CR. The 8-year overall survival (OS), event-free survival (EFS), and disease-free survival (DFS) were 68%, 55%, and 63%, respectively. OS, EFS, and DFS for SR and HR patients were 83%, 63%, and 66% and 64%, 53%, and 62%. DFS was 63% and 73% for HR patients given AUTO-HSCT and ALLO-HSCT, respectively. In multivariate analysis, risk group, white blood cell >100 × 10(9)/L at diagnosis, and monosomal karyotype predicted poorer EFS. Risk-oriented treatment and broad use of HSCT result in a long-term EFS comparing favorably with previously published studies on childhood AML.

  9. Quark orbital angular momentum in the MIT bag model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtoy, A.; Miramontes, A. S.

    2017-01-01

    We present the results for the generalized transverse momentum distribution related to quark orbital angular momentum, i.e., F14, in the MIT bag model. This model has been modified to include the Peierls-Yoccoz projection to restore translational invariance. Such a modification allows us to fulfil more satisfactorily basic sum rules that would otherwise be less elegantly carried out with the original version. Using the same model, we have calculated the twist-3 generalized parton distribution (GPD) that corresponds to orbital angular momentum à la Ji, through the Penttinen-Polyakov-Shuvaev-Strikman sum rule. Recently, a new relation between the two definitions of the quark orbital angular momentum at the density level has been proposed, which we illustrate here within the model. The sum rule is fulfilled. Still within the framework of the MIT bag model, we analyze the Wandzura-Wilczek expression for the GPD of interest. The genuine quark-gluon contribution is evaluated directly thanks to the equation of motion of the bag, which allows for a direct control of the kinematical contributions to the twist-3 GPD.

  10. Educational Outreach at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivenberg, Paul; Thomas, Paul

    2004-11-01

    At the MIT PSFC student and staff volunteers work together to increase the public's knowledge of fusion science and plasma technology. Seeking to generate excitement in young people about science and engineering, the PSFC hosts a number of educational outreach activities and tours throughout the year, including Middle and High School Outreach Days. The PSFC also has an in-school science demonstration program on the theme of magnetism. As ''Mr. Magnet'' Technical Supervisor Paul Thomas brings a truck-load of hands-on demonstrations to K-12 schools, challenging students to help him with experiments. While teaching fundamentals of magnetism and electricity he shows that science is fun for all, and that any student can have a career in science. This year he taught at 75 schools and other events, reaching 30,000 teachers and students. He has expanded his teaching to include an interactive demonstration of plasma, encouraging participants to investigate plasma properties with audiovisual, electromagnetic, and spectroscopic techniques. The PSFC's continuing involvement with the MIT Museum and the Boston Museum of Science also helps familiarize the public with the fourth state of matter.

  11. Detectable FLT3-ITD or RAS mutation at the time of transformation from MDS to AML predicts for very poor outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Badar, Talha; Patel, Keyur P; Thompson, Philip A; DiNardo, Courtney; Takahashi, Koichi; Cabrero, Monica; Borthakur, Gautam; Cortes, Jorge; Konopleva, Marina; Kadia, Tapan; Bohannan, Zach; Pierce, Sherry; Jabbour, Elias J; Ravandi, Farhad; Daver, Naval; Luthra, Raja; Kantarjian, Hagop; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Background The molecular events that drive the transformation from myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have yet to be fully characterized. We hypothesized that detection of these mutations at the time of transformation from MDS to AML may lead to poorer outcomes. Methods We analyzed 102 MDS patients who were admitted to our institution between 2004 and 2013, had wild-type (wt) FLT3-ITD and RAS at diagnosis, progressed to AML, and had serial mutation testing at both the MDS and AML stages. Results We detected FLT3-ITD and/or RAS mutations in twenty-seven (26%) patients at the time of transformation to AML. Twenty-two patients (81%) had RAS mutations and five (19%) had FLT3-ITD mutations. The median survival after leukemia transformation in patients who had detectable RAS and/or FLT3-ITD mutations was 2·4 months compared to 7·5 months in patients who retained wt RAS and FLT3-ITD (hazard ratio [HR]: 3·08, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1·9–5·0, p < 0·0001). In multivariate analysis, FLT3-ITD and RAS mutations had independent prognostic significance for poor outcome. Conclusions We conclude that 26% of patients had detectable FLT3-ITD or RAS mutation at transformation to AML, and these mutations were associated with very poor outcome. PMID:26547258

  12. Using combination therapy to override stromal-mediated chemoresistance in mutant FLT3-positive AML: Synergism between FLT3 inhibitors, dasatinib/multi-targeted inhibitors, and JAK inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Weisberg, Ellen; Liu, Qingsong; Nelson, Erik; Kung, Andrew L.; Christie, Amanda L.; Bronson, Rod; Sattler, Martin; Sanda, Takaomi; Zhao, Zheng; Hur, Wooyoung; Mitsiades, Constantine; Smith, Robert; Daley, John F.; Stone, Richard; Galinsky, Ilene; Griffin, James D.; Gray, Nathanael

    2014-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) progenitors are frequently characterized by activating mutations in the receptor tyrosine kinase FLT3. Protein tyrosine kinases are integral components of signaling cascades that play a role in both FLT3-mediated transformation as well as viability pathways that are advantageous to leukemic cell survival. The bone marrow microenvironment can diminish AML sensitivity to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). We hypothesized that inhibition of protein kinases in addition to FLT3 may be effective in overriding drug resistance in AML. We used a cell-based model mimicking stromal protection as part of an unbiased high-throughput chemical screen to identify kinase inhibitors with the potential to override microenvironment-mediated drug resistance in mutant FLT3-positive AML. Several related multi-targeted kinase inhibitors, including dasatinib, with the capability of reversing microenvironment-induced resistance to FLT3 inhibition were identified and validated. We validated synergy in vitro and demonstrated effective combination potential in vivo. In particular Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors were effective in overriding stromal protection and potentiating FLT3 inhibition in primary AML and cell lines. These results hint at a novel concept of using combination therapy to override drug resistance in mutant FLT3-positive AML in the bone marrow niche and suppress or eradicate residual disease. PMID:22469781

  13. SGN-CD33A: a novel CD33-targeting antibody-drug conjugate using a pyrrolobenzodiazepine dimer is active in models of drug-resistant AML.

    PubMed

    Kung Sutherland, May S; Walter, Roland B; Jeffrey, Scott C; Burke, Patrick J; Yu, Changpu; Kostner, Heather; Stone, Ivan; Ryan, Maureen C; Sussman, Django; Lyon, Robert P; Zeng, Weiping; Harrington, Kimberly H; Klussman, Kerry; Westendorf, Lori; Meyer, David; Bernstein, Irwin D; Senter, Peter D; Benjamin, Dennis R; Drachman, Jonathan G; McEarchern, Julie A

    2013-08-22

    Outcomes in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remain unsatisfactory, and novel treatments are urgently needed. One strategy explores antibodies and their drug conjugates, particularly those targeting CD33. Emerging data with gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) demonstrate target validity and activity in some patients with AML, but efficacy is limited by heterogeneous drug conjugation, linker instability, and a high incidence of multidrug resistance. We describe here the development of SGN-CD33A, a humanized anti-CD33 antibody with engineered cysteines conjugated to a highly potent, synthetic DNA cross-linking pyrrolobenzodiazepine dimer via a protease-cleavable linker. The use of engineered cysteine residues at the sites of drug linker attachment results in a drug loading of approximately 2 pyrrolobenzodiazepine dimers per antibody. In preclinical testing, SGN-CD33A is more potent than GO against a panel of AML cell lines and primary AML cells in vitro and in xenotransplantation studies in mice. Unlike GO, antileukemic activity is observed with SGN-CD33A in AML models with the multidrug-resistant phenotype. Mechanistic studies indicate that the cytotoxic effects of SGN-CD33A involve DNA damage with ensuing cell cycle arrest and apoptotic cell death. Together, these data suggest that SGN-CD33A has CD33-directed antitumor activity and support clinical testing of this novel therapeutic in patients with AML.

  14. Scratch that: MIT's Mitchel Resnick Says Kids Should Do It for Themselves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Traylor, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Mitchel Resnick is a researcher, inventor, and professor at MIT's Media Laboratory in Cambridge, MA, and the founder of the Lifelong Kindergarten Group at MIT. He is the lead innovator behind many cutting-edge learning technologies and projects for children, including the Computer Clubhouse, PicoCrickets, and the wildly successful consumer…

  15. Mobile-IT Education (MIT.EDU): M-Learning Applications for Classroom Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sung, M.; Gips, J.; Eagle, N.; Madan, A.; Caneel, R.; DeVaul, R.; Bonsen, J.; Pentland, A.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the Mobile-IT Education (MIT.EDU) system, which demonstrates the potential of using a distributed mobile device architecture for rapid prototyping of wireless mobile multi-user applications for use in classroom settings. MIT.EDU is a stable, accessible system that combines inexpensive, commodity hardware, a flexible…

  16. Assessing International Product Design and Development Graduate Courses: The MIT-Portugal Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dori, Yehudit Judy; Silva, Arlindo

    2010-01-01

    The Product Design and Development (PDD) course is part of the graduate curriculum in the Engineering Design and Advanced Manufacturing (EDAM) study in the MIT-Portugal Program. The research participants included about 110 students from MIT, EDAM, and two universities in Portugal, Instituto Superior Técnico-Universidade Técnica de Lisboa (IST) and…

  17. Single-cell mass cytometry reveals intracellular survival/proliferative signaling in FLT3-ITD-mutated AML stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Lina; Qiu, Peng; Zeng, Zhihong; Jorgensen, Jeffrey L; Mak, Duncan H; Burks, Jared K; Schober, Wendy; McQueen, Teresa J; Cortes, Jorge; Tanner, Scott D; Roboz, Gail J; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Kornblau, Steven M; Guzman, Monica L; Andreeff, Michael; Konopleva, Marina

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the unique phenotypes and complex signaling pathways of leukemia stem cells (LSCs) will provide insights and druggable targets that can be used to eradicate acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Current work on AML LSCs is limited by the number of parameters that conventional flow cytometry (FCM) can analyze because of cell autofluorescence and fluorescent dye spectral overlap. Single-cell mass cytometry (CyTOF) substitutes rare earth elements for fluorophores to label antibodies, which allows measurements of up to 120 parameters in single cells without correction for spectral overlap. The aim of this study was the evaluation of intracellular signaling in antigen-defined stem/progenitor cell subsets in primary AML. CyTOF and conventional FCM yielded comparable results on LSC phenotypes defined by CD45, CD34, CD38, CD123, and CD99. Intracellular phosphoprotein responses to ex vivo cell signaling inhibitors and cytokine stimulation were assessed in myeloid leukemia cell lines and one primary AML sample. CyTOF and conventional FCM results were confirmed by western blotting. In the primary AML sample, we investigated the cell responses to ex vivo stimulation with stem cell factor and BEZ235-induced inhibition of PI3K and identified activation patterns in multiple PI3K downstream signaling pathways including p-4EBP1, p-AKT, and p-S6, particularly in CD34(+) subsets. We evaluated multiple signaling pathways in antigen-defined subpopulations in primary AML cells with FLT3-ITD mutations. The data demonstrated the heterogeneity of cell phenotype distribution and distinct patterns of signaling activation across AML samples and between AML and normal samples. The mTOR targets p-4EBP1 and p-S6 were exclusively found in FLT3-ITD stem/progenitor cells, but not in their normal counterparts, suggesting both as novel targets in FLT3 mutated AML. Our data suggest that CyTOF can identify functional signaling pathways in antigen-defined subpopulations in primary AML, which may

  18. The third MIT-Green Bank 5 GHz survey

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, M.; Heflin, M.; Conner, S.; Lehar, J.; Langston, G. National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA )

    1990-09-01

    The third MIT-Green Bank survey, which covers 1.11 sr in the right ascension range from 16.5 h to 5 h between +17 deg and +39.15 deg declination, is presented. The survey is unique in that a sample was observed twice in a short period of time and the spectral indices between 5 and 1.4 GHz are available for most of the sources brighter than 90 mJy. This survey can be used as the starting point for a search for gravitational lenses. The source list can also be examined for clustering and used to estimate the surface density of sources as a function of limiting flux density. 10 refs.

  19. Technology and human vulnerability. A conversation with MIT's Sherry Turkle.

    PubMed

    Turkle, Sherry

    2003-09-01

    For most of the last 50 years, technology knew its place. Yes, we all spent a lot of time with it, but even five years ago, few people would seriously claim that technology had taken over their lives. It's very different today. Technology is not only ubiquitous but has become highly intrusive as well. On the Internet, people invent imaginary identities in virtual chat rooms, playing out the lives they wish they really lived. Children are growing up with interactive toy animals that respond to them like real pets. Indeed, some critics claim that technology has not just entered our private lives but started to define them. If we want to be sure we'll like who we've become in 50 years, we need to take a closer look at the psychological effects of current and future technologies. The smartest people in technology have already started. Universities like MIT and Caltech have been pouring millions of dollars into researching what happens when technology and humanity meet. To learn more about this research, HBR senior editor Diane L. Coutu spoke with one of the field's most distinguished scholars: Sherry Turkle, MIT's Abby Rockefeller Mauzé Professor in the Program in Science, Technology, and Society and the author of Life on the Screen, which explores how the internet is changing the way we define ourselves. In a conversation with Coutu, Turkle discusses the psychological dynamics that can develop between people and their high-tech toys, describes ways in which machines might substitute for managers, and explains how technology is redefining what it means to be human. She warns that relatively small differences in technology design can have disproportionate effects on how humans relate to technology, to one another, and to themselves.

  20. Impact of loss of BH3-only proteins on the development and treatment of MLL-fusion gene-driven AML in mice

    PubMed Central

    Bilardi, Rebecca A; Anstee, Natasha S; Glaser, Stefan P; Robati, Mikara; Vandenberg, Cassandra J; Cory, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of the apoptosis pathway controlled by opposing members of the Bcl-2 protein family plays a central role in cancer development and resistance to therapy. To investigate how pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 homology domain 3 (BH3)-only proteins impact on acute myeloid leukemia (AML), we generated mixed lineage leukemia (MLL)-AF9 and MLL-ENL AMLs from BH3-only gene knockout mice. Disease development was not accelerated by loss of Bim, Puma, Noxa, Bmf, or combinations thereof; hence these BH3-only proteins are apparently ineffectual as tumor suppressors in this model. We tested the sensitivity of MLL-AF9 AMLs of each genotype in vitro to standard chemotherapeutic drugs and to the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, with or without the BH3 mimetic ABT-737. Loss of Puma and/or Noxa increased resistance to cytarabine, daunorubicin and etoposide, while loss of Bim protected against cytarabine and loss of Bmf had no impact. ABT-737 increased sensitivity to the genotoxic drugs but was not dependent on any BH3-only protein tested. The AML lines were very sensitive to bortezomib and loss of Noxa conveyed significant resistance. In vivo, several MLL-AF9 AMLs responded well to daunorubicin and this response was highly dependent on Puma and Noxa but not Bim. Combination therapy with ABT-737 provided little added benefit at the daunorubicin dose trialed. Bortezomib also extended survival of AML-bearing mice, albeit less than daunorubicin. In summary, our genetic studies reveal the importance of Puma and Noxa for the action of genotoxics currently used to treat MLL-driven AML and suggest that, while addition of ABT-737-like BH3 mimetics might enhance their efficacy, new Noxa-like BH3 mimetics targeting Mcl-1 might have greater potential. PMID:27584789

  1. Evaluation of the MIT RMID 1000 system for the identification of Listeria species.

    PubMed

    Ricardi, John; Haavig, David; Cruz, Lasaunta; Paoli, George; Gehring, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    The Micro Imaging Technology (MIT) 1000 Rapid Microbial Identification (RMID) System is a device that uses the principles of light scattering coupled with proprietary algorithms to identify bacteria after being cultured and placed in a vial of filtered water. This specific method is for pure culture identification of Listeria spp. A total of 81 microorganisms (55 isolates) were tested by the MIT 1000 System, of which 25 were Listeria spp. and 30 a variety of other bacterial species. In addition, a total of 406 tests over seven different ruggedness parameters were tested by the MIT 1000 System to determine its flexibility to the specifications stated in the MIT 1000 System User Guide in areas where they might be deviated by a user to shorten the test cycle. Overall, MIT concluded that the MIT 1000 System had an accuracy performance that should certify this Performance Test Method for the identification of Listeria spp. This report discusses the tests performed, results achieved, and conclusions, along with several reference documents to enable a higher understanding of the technology used by the MIT 1000 System.

  2. Clofarabine, Idarubicin, and Cytarabine (CIA) as Frontline Therapy for Patients ≤60 Years with Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)

    PubMed Central

    Nazha, Aziz; Ravandi, Farhad; Kantarjian, Hagop; Huang, Xuelin; Choi, Sangbum; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Jabbour, Elias; Borthakur, Gautam; Kadia, Tapan; Konopleva, Marina; Cortes, Jorge; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Kornblau, Steve; Andreeff, Michael; Du, Min; Brandt, Mark; Faderl, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To explore the combination of clofarabine, cytarabine, and idarubicin (CIA) in patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) AML and adequate organ functions were candidates. Induction therapy consisted of clofarabine (C) 22.5 mg/m2 IV daily (days 1-5), idarubicin (I) 6 mg/m2 IV daily (days 1-3), and cytarabine (A) 0.75 g/m2 IV daily (days 1-5). Patients in remission received up to 6 consolidation cycles (C 22.5 mg/m2 × 3, I 6 mg/m2 × 2, and A 0.75 g/m2 × 3). Results Fifty-seven patients were evaluable. The overall response rate was 79%. With a median follow up of 10.9 months (range, 1.6 - 23.1), the median overall survival (OS) was not reached, the median event-free survival (EFS) was 13.5 months, and the median relapse free survival was not reached. Most toxicities were ≤ grade 2. Four week mortality was 2%. In subgroup analysis, patients ≤ 40 years had better OS (P = 0.04) and EFS (P = 0.04) compared to patients > 40 years. Compared to historical patients treated with IA combination, the OS and EFS were significantly higher (P = 0.005, 0.0001, respectively) for CIA treated patients. In multivariate analysis, CIA retained its superior impact on OS and EFS compared to IA. Conclusion CIA is an effective combination for patients AML. Patients ≤ 40 years had better OS and EFS. CIA achieved longer OS and EFS compared to IA alone. PMID:23877926

  3. Targeting the leukemia microenvironment by CXCR4 inhibition overcomes resistance to kinase inhibitors and chemotherapy in AML

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Zhihong; Xi Shi, Yue; Samudio, Ismael J.; Wang, Rui-Yu; Ling, Xiaoyang; Frolova, Olga; Levis, Mark; Rubin, Joshua B.; Negrin, Robert R.; Estey, Elihu H.; Konoplev, Sergej; Andreeff, Michael

    2009-01-01

    SDF-1α/CXCR4 signaling plays a key role in leukemia/bone marrow microenvironment interactions. We previously reported that bone marrow–derived stromal cells inhibit chemotherapy-induced apoptosis in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Here we demonstrate that the CXCR4 inhibitor AMD3465 antagonized stromal-derived factor 1α (SDF-1α)–induced and stroma-induced chemotaxis and inhibited SDF-1α–induced activation of prosurvival signaling pathways in leukemic cells. Further, CXCR4 inhibition partially abrogated the protective effects of stromal cells on chemotherapy-induced apoptosis in AML cells. Fetal liver tyrosine kinase-3 (FLT3) gene mutations activate CXCR4 signaling, and coculture with stromal cells significantly diminished antileukemia effects of FLT3 inhibitors in cells with mutated FLT3. Notably, CXCR4 inhibition increased the sensitivity of FLT3-mutated leukemic cells to the apoptogenic effects of the FLT3 inhibitor sorafenib. In vivo studies demonstrated that AMD3465, alone or in combination with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, induced mobilization of AML cells and progenitor cells into circulation and enhanced antileukemic effects of chemotherapy and sorafenib, resulting in markedly reduced leukemia burden and prolonged survival of the animals. These findings indicate that SDF-1α/CXCR4 interactions contribute to the resistance of leukemic cells to signal transduction inhibitor– and chemotherapy-induced apoptosis in systems mimicking the physiologic microenvironment. Disruption of these interactions with CXCR4 inhibitors represents a novel strategy of sensitizing leukemic cells by targeting their protective bone marrow microenvironment. PMID:18955566

  4. Dicentric chromosomes and 20q11.2 amplification in MDS/AML with apparent monosomy 20.

    PubMed

    Mackinnon, R N; Campbell, L J

    2007-01-01

    FISH analysis of 41 previously karyotyped cases of MDS and AML with apparent monosomy of chromosome 20 revealed a variety of dicentric abnormalities involving chromosome 20. These usually, but not always, involved a breakpoint in the long arm of chromosome 20 and loss of the common deleted region at 20q12. Not one case of true monosomy 20 was confirmed. We found evidence for dicentric chromosome formation in 21 of 24 unbalanced translocations containing chromosome 20 and that were studied in more detail. Subsequent loss of one of the centromeres had occurred in eight of these 24 cases, and was more frequent than centromere inactivation as a means of resolving the inherent instability of a dicentric chromosome. In the three cases with dicentric chromosomes from which proximal 20q had been excised along with the 20 centromere, the excised segment was retained, and in two of these it was amplified. Proximal 20q was clearly retained in all but three cases, and present in three or more copies in 17 of 41 cases. The retention and amplification of proximal 20q provides support for the hypothesis that there is an oncogene located in this region of 20q that is activated in cases of MDS/AML with del(20q). Apparent monosomy 20 in MDS/AML should be treated as evidence of unidentified chromosome 20 abnormalities, and familiarity with the typical G-banded morphology of these derivatives can help with their identification. The reported incidence of dicentric chromosomes is clearly an under-estimate but is increasing in myeloid disorders as more cases are studied with methods allowing their detection.

  5. International phase 3 study of azacitidine vs conventional care regimens in older patients with newly diagnosed AML with >30% blasts

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, John F.; Butrym, Aleksandra; Wierzbowska, Agnieszka; Selleslag, Dominik; Jang, Jun Ho; Kumar, Rajat; Cavenagh, James; Schuh, Andre C.; Candoni, Anna; Récher, Christian; Sandhu, Irwindeep; Bernal del Castillo, Teresa; Al-Ali, Haifa Kathrin; Martinelli, Giovanni; Falantes, Jose; Noppeney, Richard; Stone, Richard M.; Minden, Mark D.; McIntyre, Heidi; Songer, Steve; Lucy, Lela M.; Beach, C. L.; Döhner, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    This multicenter, randomized, open-label, phase 3 trial evaluated azacitidine efficacy and safety vs conventional care regimens (CCRs) in 488 patients age ≥65 years with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with >30% bone marrow blasts. Before randomization, a CCR (standard induction chemotherapy, low-dose ara-c, or supportive care only) was preselected for each patient. Patients then were assigned 1:1 to azacitidine (n = 241) or CCR (n = 247). Patients assigned to CCR received their preselected treatment. Median overall survival (OS) was increased with azacitidine vs CCR: 10.4 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 8.0-12.7 months) vs 6.5 months (95% CI, 5.0-8.6 months), respectively (hazard ratio [HR] was 0.85; 95% CI, 0.69-1.03; stratified log-rank P = .1009). One-year survival rates with azacitidine and CCR were 46.5% and 34.2%, respectively (difference, 12.3%; 95% CI, 3.5%-21.0%). A prespecified analysis censoring patients who received AML treatment after discontinuing study drug showed median OS with azacitidine vs CCR was 12.1 months (95% CI, 9.2-14.2 months) vs 6.9 months (95% CI, 5.1-9.6 months; HR, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.60-0.96; stratified log-rank P = .0190). Univariate analysis showed favorable trends for azacitidine compared with CCR across all subgroups defined by baseline demographic and disease features. Adverse events were consistent with the well-established safety profile of azacitidine. Azacitidine may be an important treatment option for this difficult-to-treat AML population. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01074047. PMID:25987659

  6. Characterization of children with FLT3-ITD acute myeloid leukemia: a report from the AIEOP AML-2002 study group.

    PubMed

    Manara, E; Basso, G; Zampini, M; Buldini, B; Tregnago, C; Rondelli, R; Masetti, R; Bisio, V; Frison, M; Polato, K; Cazzaniga, G; Menna, G; Fagioli, F; Merli, P; Biondi, A; Pession, A; Locatelli, F; Pigazzi, M

    2017-01-01

    Recurrent molecular markers have been routinely used in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) for risk assessment at diagnosis, whereas their post-induction monitoring still represents a debated issue. We evaluated the prognostic value and biological impact of minimal residual disease (MRD) and of the allelic ratio (AR) of FLT3-internal-tandem duplication (ITD) in childhood AML. We retrospectively screened 494 children with de novo AML for FLT3-ITD mutation, identifying 54 harboring the mutation; 51% of them presented high ITD-AR at diagnosis and had worse event-free survival (EFS, 19.2 versus 63.5% for low ITD-AR, <0.05). Forty-one percent of children with high levels of MRD after the 1st induction course, measured by a patient-specific real-time-PCR, had worse EFS (22.2 versus 59.4% in low-MRD patients, P<0.05). Next, we correlated these parameters with gene expression, showing that patients with high ITD-AR or persistent MRD had characteristic expression profiles with deregulated genes involved in methylation and acetylation. Moreover, patients with high CyclinA1 expression presented an unfavorable EFS (20.3 versus 51.2% in low CyclinA1 group, P<0.01). Our results suggest that ITD-AR levels and molecular MRD should be considered in planning clinical management of FLT3-ITD patients. Different transcriptional activation of epigenetic and oncogenic profiles may explain variability in outcome among these patients, for whom novel therapeutic approaches are desirable.

  7. Exosomes Secreted by Apoptosis-Resistant Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) Blasts Harbor Regulatory Network Proteins Potentially Involved in Antagonism of Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wojtuszkiewicz, Anna; Schuurhuis, Gerrit J; Kessler, Floortje L; Piersma, Sander R; Knol, Jaco C; Pham, Thang V; Jansen, Gerrit; Musters, René J P; van Meerloo, Johan; Assaraf, Yehuda G; Kaspers, Gertjan J L; Zweegman, Sonja; Cloos, Jacqueline; Jimenez, Connie R

    2016-04-01

    Expression of apoptosis-regulating proteins (B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 - BCL-2, Myeloid Cell Leukemia 1 - MCL-1, BCL-2 like 1 - BCL-X and BCL-2-associated X protein - BAX) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) blasts at diagnosis is associated with disease-free survival. We previously found that the initially high apoptosis-resistance of AML cells decreased after therapy, while regaining high levels at relapse. Herein, we further explored this aspect of dynamic apoptosis regulation in AML. First, we showed that the intraindividualex vivoapoptosis-related profiles of normal lymphocytes and AML blasts within the bone marrow of AML patients were highly correlated. The expression values of apoptosis-regulating proteins were far beyond healthy control lymphocytes, which implicates the influence of microenvironmental factors. Second, we demonstrated that apoptosis-resistant primary AML blasts, as opposed to apoptosis-sensitive cells, were able to up-regulate BCL-2 expression in sensitive AML blasts in contact cultures (p= 0.0067 andp= 1.0, respectively). Using secretome proteomics, we identified novel proteins possibly engaged in apoptosis regulation. Intriguingly, this analysis revealed that major functional protein clusters engaged in global gene regulation, including mRNA splicing, protein translation, and chromatin remodeling, were more abundant (p= 4.01E-06) in secretomes of apoptosis-resistant AML. These findings were confirmed by subsequent extracellular vesicle proteomics. Finally, confocal-microscopy-based colocalization studies show that splicing factors-containing vesicles secreted by high AAI cells are taken up by low AAI cells. The current results constitute the first comprehensive analysis of proteins released by apoptosis-resistant and sensitive primary AML cells. Together, the data point to vesicle-mediated release of global gene regulatory protein clusters as a plausible novel mechanism of induction of apoptosis resistance. Deciphering the modes of communication

  8. Exosomes Secreted by Apoptosis-Resistant Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) Blasts Harbor Regulatory Network Proteins Potentially Involved in Antagonism of Apoptosis*

    PubMed Central

    Wojtuszkiewicz, Anna; Schuurhuis, Gerrit J.; Kessler, Floortje L.; Piersma, Sander R.; Knol, Jaco C.; Pham, Thang V.; Jansen, Gerrit; Musters, René J. P.; van Meerloo, Johan; Assaraf, Yehuda G.; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.; Zweegman, Sonja; Cloos, Jacqueline; Jimenez, Connie R.

    2016-01-01

    Expression of apoptosis-regulating proteins (B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 - BCL-2, Myeloid Cell Leukemia 1 - MCL-1, BCL-2 like 1 - BCL-X and BCL-2-associated X protein - BAX) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) blasts at diagnosis is associated with disease-free survival. We previously found that the initially high apoptosis-resistance of AML cells decreased after therapy, while regaining high levels at relapse. Herein, we further explored this aspect of dynamic apoptosis regulation in AML. First, we showed that the intraindividual ex vivo apoptosis-related profiles of normal lymphocytes and AML blasts within the bone marrow of AML patients were highly correlated. The expression values of apoptosis-regulating proteins were far beyond healthy control lymphocytes, which implicates the influence of microenvironmental factors. Second, we demonstrated that apoptosis-resistant primary AML blasts, as opposed to apoptosis-sensitive cells, were able to up-regulate BCL-2 expression in sensitive AML blasts in contact cultures (p = 0.0067 and p = 1.0, respectively). Using secretome proteomics, we identified novel proteins possibly engaged in apoptosis regulation. Intriguingly, this analysis revealed that major functional protein clusters engaged in global gene regulation, including mRNA splicing, protein translation, and chromatin remodeling, were more abundant (p = 4.01E-06) in secretomes of apoptosis-resistant AML. These findings were confirmed by subsequent extracellular vesicle proteomics. Finally, confocal-microscopy-based colocalization studies show that splicing factors-containing vesicles secreted by high AAI cells are taken up by low AAI cells. The current results constitute the first comprehensive analysis of proteins released by apoptosis-resistant and sensitive primary AML cells. Together, the data point to vesicle-mediated release of global gene regulatory protein clusters as a plausible novel mechanism of induction of apoptosis resistance. Deciphering the modes of

  9. Panobinostat enhances cytarabine and daunorubicin sensitivities in AML cells through suppressing the expression of BRCA1, CHK1, and Rad51.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chengzhi; Drenberg, Christina; Edwards, Holly; Caldwell, J Timothy; Chen, Wei; Inaba, Hiroto; Xu, Xuelian; Buck, Steven A; Taub, Jeffrey W; Baker, Sharyn D; Ge, Yubin

    2013-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains a challenging disease to treat and urgently requires new therapies to improve its treatment outcome. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the cooperative antileukemic activities of panobinostat and cytarabine or daunorubicin (DNR) in AML cell lines and diagnostic blast samples in vitro and in vivo. Panobinostat suppressed expression of BRCA1, CHK1, and RAD51 in AML cells in a dose-dependent manner. Further, panobinostat significantly increased cytarabine- or DNR-induced DNA double-strand breaks and apoptosis, and abrogated S and/or G2/M cell cycle checkpoints. Analogous results were obtained by shRNA knockdown of BRCA1, CHK1, or RAD51. Cotreatment of NOD-SCID-IL2Rγ(null) mice bearing AML xenografts with panobinostat and cytarabine significantly increased survival compared to either cytarabine or panobinostat treatment alone. Additional studies revealed that panobinostat suppressed the expression of BRCA1, CHK1, and RAD51 through downregulation of E2F1 transcription factor. Our results establish a novel mechanism underlying the cooperative antileukemic activities of these drug combinations in which panobinostat suppresses expression of BRCA1, CHK1, and RAD51 to enhance cytarabine and daunorubicin sensitivities in AML cells.

  10. Fractionated gemtuzumab ozogamicin combined with intermediate-dose cytarabine and daunorubicin as salvage therapy in very high-risk AML patients: a bridge to reduced intensity conditioning transplant?

    PubMed

    Paubelle, Etienne; Ducastelle-Leprêtre, Sophie; Labussière-Wallet, Hélène; Nicolini, Franck Emmanuel; Barraco, Fiorenza; Plesa, Adriana; Salles, Gilles; Wattel, Eric; Thomas, Xavier

    2017-03-01

    Outcome of patients with primary refractory/relapsed (R/R) acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains dismal. Herein, we present a retrospective monocentric study of 24 very high-risk AML patients who received a combination of fractionated gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) with intermediate-dose cytarabine and daunorubicin as salvage therapy. Median age was 55.3 years. Diagnostic was secondary AML for 33% of them. Seven patients had favorable risk, 8 had intermediate-1 or intermediate-2, and 6 had unfavorable risk of AML according to the European LeukemiaNet prognostic index. Complete remission was achieved in 50% of cases (46% in refractory and 55% in relapsed AML) without excessive toxicity. Thirteen patients could be referred for transplant. Only allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation provided a benefit in this patient cohort with a 1-year overall survival of 50.7 versus 18.1% in the absence of transplantation. Patients treated with reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) showed a longer survival as compared to those undergoing myeloablative conditioning regimen mainly because of decreased toxicity.Our data suggest that salvage therapy with fractionated GO combined with intermediate-dose cytarabine and daunorubicin in very high-risk patients may serve as a potential bridge therapy to RIC transplant.

  11. Novel B55α-PP2A mutations in AML promote AKT T308 phosphorylation and sensitivity to AKT inhibitor-induced growth arrest

    PubMed Central

    Shouse, Geoffrey; de Necochea-Campion, Rosalia; Mirshahidi, Saied; Liu, Xuan; Chen, Chien-Shing

    2016-01-01

    Activation of the Protein Kinase B (PKB), or AKT pathway has been shown to correlate with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) prognosis. B55α-Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) has been shown to dephosphorylate AKT at Thr-308 rendering it inactive. In fact, low expression of the PP2A regulatory subunit B55α was associated with activated phospho-AKT and correlated with inferior outcomes in AML. Despite this fact, no studies have specifically demonstrated a mechanism whereby B55α expression is regulated in AML. In this study, we demonstrate novel loss of function mutations in the PPP2R2A gene identified in leukemic blasts from three AML patients. These mutations eliminate B55α protein expression thereby allowing constitutive AKT activation. In addition, leukemic blasts with PPP2R2A gene mutation were more sensitive to treatment with the AKT inhibitor MK2206, but less responsive to the PP2A activator FTY720. Using leukemia cell lines, we further demonstrate that B55α expression correlates with AKT Thr-308 phosphorylation and predicts responsiveness to AKT inhibition and PP2A activation. Together our data illustrate the importance of the B55α-PP2A-AKT pathway in leukemogenesis. Screening for disruptions in this pathway at initial AML diagnosis may predict response to targeted therapies against AKT and PP2A. PMID:27531894

  12. Distribution of mutations in DNMT3A gene and the suitability of mutations in R882 codon for MRD monitoring in patients with AML.

    PubMed

    Jeziskova, Ivana; Musilova, Milena; Culen, Martin; Foltankova, Veronika; Dvorakova, Dana; Mayer, Jiri; Racil, Zdenek

    2015-11-01

    The DNA methyl-transferase 3A gene (DNMT3A) is the third most frequently mutated gene in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML) patients (20-30 %), who belong to a group of patients with intermediate risk. About 60 % of mutations in this gene have been identified in the arginine codon R882. To date, there is no consensus on whether these mutations can be used as biomarkers for monitoring of minimal residual disease and management of preemptive AML therapy. We studied the occurrence of mutations in the DNMT3A gene in our cohort of patients and their persistence during AML treatment. Using next-generation sequencing, we identified four mutations in 11/25 of our analyzed patients--frequent R882C and R882H mutations, rare Y735S mutation, and a novel L347P mutation. Mutation R882C was detected in 5/11, R882H in 4/11 patients, and Y735S and L347P in one patient each. In 4/7 patients initially carrying mutations in the R882 codon, we found the persistence of mutations also during complete remission with, however, no correlation to AML kinetics. Our findings suggest that mutations in the DNMT3A gene can only be used as a biomarker for those AML patients in whom DNMT3A mutation is lost after therapy.

  13. CBL mutation in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia secondary to familial platelet disorder with propensity to develop acute myeloid leukemia (FPD/AML).

    PubMed

    Shiba, Norio; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Park, Myoung-ja; Murata, Chisato; Sato-Otsubo, Aiko; Ogawa, Chitose; Manabe, Atsushi; Arakawa, Hirokazu; Ogawa, Seishi; Hayashi, Yasuhide

    2012-03-15

    Familial platelet disorder with a propensity to develop acute myeloid leukemia (FPD/AML) is a rare autosomal dominant disease characterized by thrombocytopenia, abnormal platelet function, and a propensity to develop myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and AML. So far, > 20 affected families have been reported. Recently, a second RUNX1 alteration has been reported; however, no additional molecular abnormalities have been found so far. We identified an acquired CBL mutation and 11q-acquired uniparental disomy (11q-aUPD) in a patient with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) secondary to FPD with RUNX1 mutation but not in the same patient during refractory cytopenia. This finding suggests that alterations of the CBL gene and RUNX1 gene may cooperate in the pathogenesis of CMML in patients with FPD/AML. The presence of CBL mutations and 11q-aUPD was an important "second hit" that could be an indicator of leukemic transformation of MDS or AML in patients with FPD/AML.

  14. NUP98 is rearranged in 3.8% of pediatric AML forming a clinical and molecular homogenous group with a poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Struski, S; Lagarde, S; Bories, P; Puiseux, C; Prade, N; Cuccuini, W; Pages, M-P; Bidet, A; Gervais, C; Lafage-Pochitaloff, M; Roche-Lestienne, C; Barin, C; Penther, D; Nadal, N; Radford-Weiss, I; Collonge-Rame, M-A; Gaillard, B; Mugneret, F; Lefebvre, C; Bart-Delabesse, E; Petit, A; Leverger, G; Broccardo, C; Luquet, I; Pasquet, M; Delabesse, E

    2017-03-01

    Pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a rare disease whose prognosis is highly variable according to factors such as chromosomal abnormalities. Recurrent genomic rearrangements are detected in half of pediatric AML by karyotype. NUcleoPorin 98 (NUP98) gene is rearranged with 31 different fusion partner genes. These rearrangements are frequently undetected by conventional cytogenetics, as the NUP98 gene is located at the end of the chromosome 11 short arm (11p15). By screening a series of 574 pediatric AML, we detected a NUP98 rearrangement in 22 cases (3.8%), a frequency similar to CBFB-MYH11 fusion gene (4.0%). The most frequent NUP98 fusion gene partner is NSD1. These cases are homogeneous regarding their biological and clinical characteristics, and associated with bad prognosis only improved by bone marrow transplantation. We detailed the biological characteristics of these AML by exome sequencing which demonstrated few recurrent mutations (FLT3 ITD, WT1, CEBPA, NBPF14, BCR and ODF1). The analysis of the clonal structure in these cases suggests that the mutation order in the NUP98-rearranged pediatric AML begins with the NUP98 rearrangement leading to epigenetic dysregulations then followed by mutations of critical hematopoietic transcription factors and finally, activation of the FLT3 signaling pathway.

  15. Standardization of WT1 mRNA quantitation for minimal residual disease monitoring in childhood AML and implications of WT1 gene mutations: a European multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Willasch, A M; Gruhn, B; Coliva, T; Kalinova, M; Schneider, G; Kreyenberg, H; Steinbach, D; Weber, G; Hollink, I H I M; Zwaan, C M; Biondi, A; van der Velden, V H J; Reinhardt, D; Cazzaniga, G; Bader, P; Trka, J

    2009-08-01

    A standardized, sensitive and universal method for minimal residual disease (MRD) detection in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is still pending. Although hyperexpression of Wilms' tumor (WT1) gene transcript has been frequently proposed as an MRD marker in AML, wide comparability of the various methods used for evaluating WT1 expression has not been given. We established and standardized a multicenter approach for quantifying WT1 expression by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR), on the basis of a primer/probe set combination at exons 6 and 7. In a series of quality-control rounds, we analyzed 69 childhood AML samples and 47 normal bone marrow (BM) samples from 4 participating centers. Differences in the individual WT1 expressions levels ranged within <0.5 log of the mean in 82% of the cases. In AML samples, the median WT1/1E+04 Abelson (ABL) expression was 3.5E+03 compared with that of 2.3E+01 in healthy BM samples. As 11.5% of childhood AML samples in this cohort harbored WT1 mutations in exon 7, the effect of mutations on WT1 expression has been investigated, showing that mutated cases expressed significantly higher WT1 levels than wild-type cases. Hence, our approach showed high reproducibility and applicability, even in patients with WT1 mutations; therefore, it can be widely used for the quantitation of WT1 expression in future clinical trials.

  16. Core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia (CBF-AML) in México: a single institution experience.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Delgado, Guillermo J; Macías-Gallardo, Julio; Lutz-Presno, Julia; Garcés-Eisele, Javier; Hernández-Arizpe, Ana; Montes-Montiel, Maryel; Ruiz-Argüelles, Guillermo J

    2011-01-01

    Twenty one patients with CBF-AML presented prospectively in the Centro de Hematología y Medicina Interna de Puebla (Puebla, México) between February 1995 and March 2010, 14 with the t(8;21)(q22;q22) and 7 with the inv(16)(p13;q22)/t(16;16)(p13;q22); they represent 13% of all cases of AML. The median age of the patients was 24 years (range 1 to 61). Seven of 14 patients with t(8;21)(q22;q22) had an M2 morphology whereas 3/7 with the inv(16) had an M4 morphology; in addition to the myeloid markers identified by flow-cytometry (surface CD13, surface CD33, and cytoplasmic myeloperoxidase) lymphoid markers were identified in the blast cells of 8/14 cases of the t(8;21) patients, but in no patient with the inv(16). Nineteen patients were treated with combined chemotherapy and 16 (84%) achieved a complete molecular remission. Seven patients were auto or allografted. Relapses presented in 10/16 patients. The median probability of overall survival (OS) has not been reached being above 165 months, whereas the 165-month probability of OS and leukemia-free survival was 52%; despite a tendency for a better outcome of patients with the t(8;21), there were no significant differences in survival of patients with either the t(8;21) or the inv(16). In this single institution experience in México, we found that the CBF variants of AML have a similar prevalence as compared with Caucasian populations, that the co-expression of lymphoid markers in the blast cells was frequent in the t(8;21) and that these two AML subtypes were associated with a relatively good long-term prognosis. Further studies are needed to describe with more detail the precise biological features of these molecular subtypes of acute leukemia.

  17. Star in Deep Freeze Chills Theory, MIT Researchers Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-09-01

    CAMBRIDGE, Mass. -- Like a frozen turkey that just won't thaw, a strange star near the center of the Milky Way is surprising MIT experts and colleagues with its remarkably low temperature. The odd behavior is chilling current theories of stellar physics. A famously battered neutron star named KS 1731-260 appears no hotter than some of its tranquil brethren, despite enduring the heat of constant thermonuclear explosions with the force of billions of hydrogen bombs every second across a region only a few miles wide for the past 12 years. Dr. Rudi Wijnands, an astrophysicist at MIT's Center for Space Research, used the Chandra X-ray Observatory to measure the temperature of the neutron star at a very opportune moment, only months after the nuclear war apparently ended and the smoke cleared. He presented his team's findings September 5 in Washington, D.C. at a scientific conference entitled "Two Years of Science with Chandra." "Twelve years of constant thermonuclear explosions: One would think that would heat things up," said Wijnands. "This leaves us wondering whether some neutron stars are in the freezer for a much longer time than previously thought and consequently take a long time to heat up, or whether they cool down incredibly fast. Either explanation has profound implications for our field." Neutron stars are the dense, core remains of stars once many times more massive than our Sun. They are created in dazzling supernovas, in which the outer shell of the star explodes into space, and the core, containing about as much mass as the Sun, implodes and collapses into a sphere no wider than Cambridge, Massachusetts. Despite their tiny size, neutron stars are visible in several ways. One is through accretion. Neutron stars are a strong source of gravity. When they exist in binary star systems, such as KS 1731-260, they can attract the gas from what is often a "healthy" hydrogen-burning companion star (although the nature of KS 1731-260's companion is not clear.) Gas

  18. Utility of the M.I.T. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) Underwater Stud Welding Gun.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS 02139 UTILITY OF THE MIT U-A.RWATER STUD WELDING ; GUN ~{VRY ~iPR>UfIT, JR. JLieuLk2fillL U...zv ~ :(X.~ML)Course 1 3A N ’T unle 1984 .................... A.r " 1- My Ms 31cmmWffi.ZL UTILITY OF THE M.I.T. UNDERWATER STUD WELDING GUN by...A Accession For NTIS GRA&I e.. DTIC TAB UTILITY OF THE M.I.T. Dist" " UNDERWATER STUD WELDING GUN Dist I - "-by I !- Henry Lowe Pruitt, Jr

  19. Segmentierung des Femurs aus MRT-Daten mit Shape-Based Level-Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekomien, Claudia; Busch, Martin; Teske, Wolfram; Winter, Susanne

    Inhalt dieser Arbeit ist die Segmentierung des Femurs aus MRT-Datensätzen mit einem Shape-based Level-Set-Ansatz. Der Algorithmus besteht aus zwei Phasen, der Modellerstellung und der Segmentierungsphase. In der Segmentierungsphase wurde ein kantenbasiertes und ein auf Intensitäten basierendes Optimierungskriterium mit einander kombiniert. Für eine lokale Verbesserung des Ergebnisses wurde zusätzlich ein Laplacian Level-Set-Verfahren angewendet. Der Femur konnte mit diesem Ansatz in drei verschiedenen MRT-Sequenzen und einem Fusionsdatensatz gut segmentiert werden.

  20. Comprehensive genetic analysis of cytarabine sensitivity in a cell-based model identifies polymorphisms associated with outcome in AML patients.

    PubMed

    Gamazon, Eric R; Lamba, Jatinder K; Pounds, Stanley; Stark, Amy L; Wheeler, Heather E; Cao, Xueyuan; Im, Hae K; Mitra, Amit K; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E; Ribeiro, Raul C; Raimondi, Susana; Campana, Dario; Crews, Kristine R; Wong, Shan S; Welsh, Marleen; Hulur, Imge; Gorsic, Lidija; Hartford, Christine M; Zhang, Wei; Cox, Nancy J; Dolan, M Eileen

    2013-05-23

    A whole-genome approach was used to investigate the genetic determinants of cytarabine-induced cytotoxicity. We performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies involving 523 lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from individuals of European, African, Asian, and African American ancestry. Several of the highest-ranked single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were within the mutated in colorectal cancers (MCC) gene. MCC expression was induced by cytarabine treatment from 1.7- to 26.6-fold in LCLs. A total of 33 SNPs ranked at the top of the meta-analysis (P < 10(-5)) were successfully tested in a clinical trial of patients randomized to receive low-dose or high-dose cytarabine plus daunorubicin and etoposide; of these, 18 showed association (P < .05) with either cytarabine 50% inhibitory concentration in leukemia cells or clinical response parameters (minimal residual disease, overall survival (OS), and treatment-related mortality). This count (n = 18) was significantly greater than expected by chance (P = .016). For rs1203633, LCLs with AA genotype were more sensitive to cytarabine-induced cytotoxicity (P = 1.31 × 10(-6)) and AA (vs GA or GG) genotype was associated with poorer OS (P = .015), likely as a result of greater treatment-related mortality (P = .0037) in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). This multicenter AML02 study trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00136084.

  1. NK cell expression of natural cytotoxicity receptors may determine relapse risk in older AML patients undergoing immunotherapy for remission maintenance.

    PubMed

    Martner, Anna; Rydström, Anna; Riise, Rebecca E; Aurelius, Johan; Brune, Mats; Foà, Robin; Hellstrand, Kristoffer; Thorén, Fredrik B

    2015-12-15

    In a phase IV trial, eighty-four patients (age 18-79) with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR) received cycles of immunotherapy with histamine dihydrochloride (HDC) and low-dose human recombinant interleukin-2 (IL-2) to prevent relapse in the post-consolidation phase. Aspects of natural killer (NK) cell biology were analyzed before and during immunotherapy with focus on outcome in older patients. In younger (<60 years old, n = 37) and older patients (>60 years old, n = 47), treatment with HDC/IL-2 resulted in an expansion of CD56(bright) and CD16+ NK cells in blood along with an increased NK cell expression of the natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCR) NKp30 and NKp46. In older patients, a high expression of NKp30 or NKp46 on CD16+ NK cells before and during therapy predicted leukemia-free and overall survival. These results suggest that NK cell functions determine relapse risk and survival in older AML patients and point to biomarkers of efficacy in protocols for remission maintenance.

  2. Azacitidine for treatment of imminent relapse in MDS or AML patients after allogeneic HSCT: results of the RELAZA trial.

    PubMed

    Platzbecker, U; Wermke, M; Radke, J; Oelschlaegel, U; Seltmann, F; Kiani, A; Klut, I-M; Knoth, H; Röllig, C; Schetelig, J; Mohr, B; Graehlert, X; Ehninger, G; Bornhäuser, M; Thiede, C

    2012-03-01

    This study evaluated azacitidine as treatment of minimal residual disease (MRD) determined by a sensitive donor chimerism analysis of CD34(+) blood cells to pre-empt relapse in patients with CD34(+) myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). At a median of 169 days after HSCT, 20/59 prospectively screened patients experienced a decrease of CD34(+) donor chimerism to <80% and received four azacitidine cycles (75 mg/m(2)/day for 7 days) while in complete hematologic remission. A total of 16 patients (80%) responded with either increasing CD34(+) donor chimerism to ≥80% (n=10; 50%) or stabilization (n=6; 30%) in the absence of relapse. Stabilized patients and those with a later drop of CD34(+) donor chimerism to <80% after initial response were eligible for subsequent azacitidine cycles. A total of 11 patients (55%) received a median of 4 (range, 1-11) additional cycles. Eventually, hematologic relapse occurred in 13 patients (65%), but was delayed until a median of 231 days (range, 56-558) after initial decrease of CD34(+) donor chimerism to <80%. In conclusion, pre-emptive azacitidine treatment has an acceptable safety profile and can substantially prevent or delay hematologic relapse in patients with MDS or AML and MRD after allogeneic HSCT.

  3. Azacitidine for treatment of imminent relapse in MDS or AML patients after allogeneic HSCT: results of the RELAZA trial

    PubMed Central

    Platzbecker, U; Wermke, M; Radke, J; Oelschlaegel, U; Seltmann, F; Kiani, A; Klut, I-M; Knoth, H; Röllig, C; Schetelig, J; Mohr, B; Graehlert, X; Ehninger, G; Bornhäuser, M; Thiede, C

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated azacitidine as treatment of minimal residual disease (MRD) determined by a sensitive donor chimerism analysis of CD34+ blood cells to pre-empt relapse in patients with CD34+ myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). At a median of 169 days after HSCT, 20/59 prospectively screened patients experienced a decrease of CD34+ donor chimerism to <80% and received four azacitidine cycles (75 mg/m2/day for 7 days) while in complete hematologic remission. A total of 16 patients (80%) responded with either increasing CD34+ donor chimerism to ⩾80% (n=10; 50%) or stabilization (n=6; 30%) in the absence of relapse. Stabilized patients and those with a later drop of CD34+ donor chimerism to <80% after initial response were eligible for subsequent azacitidine cycles. A total of 11 patients (55%) received a median of 4 (range, 1–11) additional cycles. Eventually, hematologic relapse occurred in 13 patients (65%), but was delayed until a median of 231 days (range, 56–558) after initial decrease of CD34+ donor chimerism to <80%. In conclusion, pre-emptive azacitidine treatment has an acceptable safety profile and can substantially prevent or delay hematologic relapse in patients with MDS or AML and MRD after allogeneic HSCT. PMID:21886171

  4. T-replete haploidentical allogeneic transplantation using post-transplantation cyclophosphamide in advanced AML and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Devillier, R; Bramanti, S; Fürst, S; Sarina, B; El-Cheikh, J; Crocchiolo, R; Granata, A; Chabannon, C; Morabito, L; Harbi, S; Faucher, C; Santoro, A; Weiller, P-J; Vey, N; Carlo-Stella, C; Castagna, L; Blaise, D

    2016-02-01

    Unmanipulated haploidentical transplantation (Haplo-SCT) using post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (PT-Cy) represents an alternative for patients with high-risk diseases lacking HLA-identical donor. Although it provides low incidences of GVHD, the efficacy of Haplo-SCT is still questioned, especially for patients with myeloid malignancies. Thus, we analyzed 60 consecutive patients with refractory (n=30) or high-risk CR (n=30) AML or myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) who underwent PT-Cy Haplo-SCT. The median age was 57 years (22-73 years), hematopoietic cell transplantation comorbidity index was ⩾3 in 38 patients (63%) and Haplo-SCT was the second allogeneic transplantation for 10 patients (17%). Although most of patients received PBSC as graft source (n=48, 80%), we found low incidences of grade 3-4 acute (2%) and severe chronic GVHD (4%). Among patients with high-risk CR diseases, 1-year non-relapse mortality, cumulative incidence of relapse, progression-free and overall survivals were 20%, 32%, 47% and 62%, respectively. In patients with refractory disease, corresponding results were 34%, 35%, 32% and 37%, respectively. We conclude that PT-Cy Haplo-SCT could provide promising anti-leukemic effect even in the setting of very advanced diseases. Thus, it represents a viable alternative for high-risk AML/MDS patients without HLA-identical donor.

  5. Mutual activation of Ets-1 and AML1 DNA binding by direct interaction of their autoinhibitory domains.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, W Y; Sieweke, M; Ogawa, E; Wee, H J; Englmeier, U; Graf, T; Ito, Y

    1999-01-01

    The transcription factors Ets-1 and AML1 (the alphaBl subunit of PEBP2/CBF) play critical roles in hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis, and cooperate in the transactivation of the T cell receptor (TCR) beta chain enhancer. The DNA binding capacity of both factors is blocked intramolecularly but can be activated by the removal of negative regulatory domains. These include the exon VII domain for Ets-1 and the negative regulatory domain for DNA binding (NRDB) for alphaB1. Here we report that the direct interaction between the two factors leads to a reciprocal stimulation of their DNA binding activity and activation of their transactivation function. Detailed mapping revealed two independent contact points involving the exon VII and NRDB regions as well as the two DNA binding domains. Using deletion variants and dominant interfering mutants, we demonstrate that the interaction between exon VII and NRDB is necessary and sufficient for cooperative DNA binding. The exon VII and NRDB motifs are highly conserved in evolution yet deleted in natural variants, suggesting that the mechanism described is of biological relevance. The mutual activation of DNA binding of Ets and AML1 through the intermolecular interaction of autoinhibitory domains may represent a novel principle for the regulation of transcription factor function. PMID:10075931

  6. Exposure to armament wastes and leukemia: a case-control study within a cluster of AML and CML in Germany.

    PubMed

    Kilian, P H; Skrzypek, S; Becker, N; Havemann, K

    2001-10-01

    An unusually high incidence of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) concentrated in a specific locality of a region in Germany motivated a descriptive incidence study in that region which showed a near 10-fold increased risk of CML among males but not among females (Kolb G, Becker N, Scheller S, Zugmaier G, Pralle H, Wahrendorf J, Havemann K. Increased risk of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in a County of Hesse, Germany, Soc Prev Med 1993;38:190-195). Since a serious environmental contamination of areas in this locality with armament wastes containing toluene-derivatives has been known for a long time, the hypothesis arose that TNT production and the related severe contamination of soil and water might be responsible for the observed higher risk. We carried out a case-control study within the cluster to test this hypothesis. Overall, the results do not confirm the hypothesis. There is an indication of a relationship of an increased odds ratio with the exposure for a small group of persons who lived at a particular site in one of the two communities involved during the peak phase of TNT production during the 1940s. However, this finding is spurious and cannot explain the large majority of cases which occurred in that area in the 1980s. At the moment, no other explanation can be given for the increased risk of leukemias in that area.

  7. Recovery of ovarian function and pregnancy in a patient with AML after myeloablative busulphan-based conditioning regimen.

    PubMed

    Balashov, Dmitry N; Papusha, Ludmila I; Nazarenko, Tatiana A; Trakhtman, Pavel E; Revishvili, Nino A; Maschan, Alexei A; Persiantseva, Marina I; Andriutsa, Anna V; Skorobogatova, Elena V; Skvortsova, Yulia V; Rumiantsev, Alexander G

    2011-05-01

    We report a rare case of ovarian function recovery and pregnancy after hormone-replacement therapy (HRT) in the acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) patient in third complete remission received hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) with busulphan-based conditioning regimen. Successful engraftment of the donor cells and full donor's chimerism was achieved without the signs of leukemia. One year after HSCT the patient received a course of HRT as a treatment of hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. After 12 months of HRT the recovery of ovarian function was confirmed. Eight years after the HSCT spontaneous pregnancy occurred; heartbeat of the fetus was registered on week 7. Three weeks later a nonsevere vaginal bleeding occurred and the ultrasound examination showed a nondeveloping pregnancy. Genetic examination of the abortion material showed a full triploid genotype (69 XXX). To our knowledge this is a first case of ovarian function restoration and spontaneous pregnancy in a AML patient after multiple courses of high-dose chemotherapy and busulphan-based myeloablative conditioning for HSCT.

  8. Comprehensive genetic analysis of cytarabine sensitivity in a cell-based model identifies polymorphisms associated with outcome in AML patients

    PubMed Central

    Gamazon, Eric R.; Lamba, Jatinder K.; Pounds, Stanley; Stark, Amy L.; Wheeler, Heather E.; Cao, Xueyuan; Im, Hae K.; Mitra, Amit K.; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Raimondi, Susana; Campana, Dario; Crews, Kristine R.; Wong, Shan S.; Welsh, Marleen; Hulur, Imge; Gorsic, Lidija; Hartford, Christine M.; Zhang, Wei; Cox, Nancy J.; Dolan, M. Eileen

    2013-01-01

    A whole-genome approach was used to investigate the genetic determinants of cytarabine-induced cytotoxicity. We performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies involving 523 lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from individuals of European, African, Asian, and African American ancestry. Several of the highest-ranked single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were within the mutated in colorectal cancers (MCC) gene. MCC expression was induced by cytarabine treatment from 1.7- to 26.6-fold in LCLs. A total of 33 SNPs ranked at the top of the meta-analysis (P < 10−5) were successfully tested in a clinical trial of patients randomized to receive low-dose or high-dose cytarabine plus daunorubicin and etoposide; of these, 18 showed association (P < .05) with either cytarabine 50% inhibitory concentration in leukemia cells or clinical response parameters (minimal residual disease, overall survival (OS), and treatment-related mortality). This count (n = 18) was significantly greater than expected by chance (P = .016). For rs1203633, LCLs with AA genotype were more sensitive to cytarabine-induced cytotoxicity (P = 1.31 × 10−6) and AA (vs GA or GG) genotype was associated with poorer OS (P = .015), likely as a result of greater treatment-related mortality (P = .0037) in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). This multicenter AML02 study trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00136084. PMID:23538338

  9. Educational Outreach at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivenberg, Paul; Thomas, Paul

    2006-10-01

    At the MIT PSFC, student and staff volunteers work together to increase the public's knowledge of fusion science and plasma technology. Seeking to generate excitement in young people about science and engineering, the PSFC hosts a number of educational outreach activities throughout the year, including Middle and High School Outreach Days. The PSFC also has an in-school science demonstration program on the theme of magnetism. The Mr. Magnet Program, headed by Mr. Paul Thomas, has been bringing lively demonstrations on magnetism into local elementary and middle schools for 15 years. This year Mr. Magnet presented the program to nearly 30,000 students at over 67 schools and other events, reaching kindergartners through college freshmen. In addition to his program on magnetism, he is offering an interactive lecture about plasma to high schools. The "Traveling Plasma Lab" encourages students to learn more about plasma science while having fun investigating plasma properties using actual laboratory techniques and equipment. Beyond the classroom, Paul Thomas has provided technical training for Boston Museum of Science staff in preparation for the opening of a Star Wars exhibit. His hands-on demos have also been filmed by the History Channel for a one-hour program about Magnetism, which aired in June 2006.

  10. Educational Outreach at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, P.; Rivenberg, P.; Censabella, V.

    2002-11-01

    At the MIT PSFC, student and staff volunteers work together to increase the public's knowledge of fusion science and plasma technology. Seeking to generate excitement in young people about science and engineering, the PSFC hosts a number of educational outreach activities throughout the year, including Middle and High School Outreach Days. The PSFC also has an in-school science-demonstration program on the theme of magnetism. As ``Mr. Magnet," Technical Supervisor Paul Thomas brings a truck-load of hands-on demonstrations to K-12 schools, challenging students to help him with experiments. While teaching fundamentals of magnetism and electricity he shows that science is fun for all, and that any student can have a career in science. This year he reached 82 schools -- 30,000 teachers and students. He has recently expanded his teaching to include an interactive demonstration of plasma, encouraging participants to investigate plasma properties with audiovisual, electromagnetic, and spectroscopic techniques. He has also developed a workshop for middle school on how to build an electromagnet.

  11. Elevated fetal haemoglobin is a predictor of better outcome in MDS/AML patients receiving 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (Decitabine).

    PubMed

    Lübbert, Michael; Ihorst, Gabriele; Sander, Philipp N; Bogatyreva, Ljudmila; Becker, Heiko; Wijermans, Pierre W; Suciu, Stefan; Bissé, Emmanuel; Claus, Rainer

    2017-02-01

    Although azanucleoside DNA-hypomethylating agents (HMAs) are routinely used for the treatment of myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukaemia (MDS/AML), very few outcome predictors have been established. Expression of the β-like globin gene locus is tightly regulated by DNA methylation, is HMA-sensitive in vitro, and fetal haemoglobin (HbF) expression is under study as a potential biomarker for response of MDS patients to azacitidine. We determined HbF expression in 16 MDS and 36 AML patients receiving decitabine (DAC). Pre-treatment HbF was already elevated (>1·0% of total haemoglobin) in 7/16 and 12/36 patients, and HbF was induced by DAC in 81%/54% of MDS/AML patients, respectively. Elevated pre-treatment HbF was associated with longer median overall survival (OS): 26·6 vs. 8·6 months for MDS (hazard ratio [HR] 8·56, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1·74-42·49, P = 0·008, with similarly longer progression-free and AML-free survival), and 10·0 vs. 2·9 months OS for AML (HR 3·01, 95% CI 1·26-7·22, P = 0·014). In a multivariate analysis, the prognostic value of HbF was retained. Time-dependent Cox models revealed that the prognostic value of treatment-induced HbF induction was inferior to that of pre-treatment HbF. In conclusion, we provide first evidence for in vivo HbF induction by DAC in MDS/AML, and demonstrate prognostic value of elevated pre-treatment HbF, warranting prospective, randomized studies.

  12. MIT Lincoln Laboratory Annual Report 2008: Technology in Support of National Security

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    at MIT Lincoln Laboratory MIT news Program spurs students to pursue scientific careers January 4, 2008 Dan Gabriner asks students to solve a...high-school students to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering, and math, Lincoln Laboratory hires local teachers every summer to work...prevents airplanes from crashing into one another while landing.” The long-term goals of LIFT2 are to entice students to pursue a technical career and

  13. Health-related Quality of Life (HR-QOL) and Chronic Health Conditions in Survivors of Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) with Down Syndrome (DS): A Report From the Children's Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Kris Ann P; Chen, Lu; Kunin-Batson, Alicia; Chen, Zhengjia; Woods, William G; Gamis, Alan; Kawashima, Toana; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Nicholson, H Stacy; Neglia, Joseph P

    2017-01-01

    Survival rates for children with Down syndrome (DS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are high; however, little is known regarding the health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) of these survivors. Individuals who survived ≥5 years following diagnosis of childhood AML were invited to complete parent or patient-report surveys measuring HR-QOL and chronic health conditions. In total, 26 individuals with DS had a median age at diagnosis of 1.8 years (range, 0.77 to 10.9 y) and median age at interview of 15 years (range, 8.3 to 27.6 y). Participants with DS and AML were compared with AML survivors without DS whose caregiver completed a HR-QOL survey (CHQ-PF50). In total, 77% of survivors with DS reported ≥1 chronic health condition compared with 50% of AML survivors without DS (P=0.07). Mean physical and psychosocial QOL scores for children with DS and AML were statistically lower than the population mean, though not discrepant from AML survivors without DS. Although the overall prevalence of chronic health conditions in survivors with DS is higher than in survivors without DS, prior studies of children with DS have reported similarly high rates of chronic health conditions, suggesting that AML therapy may not substantially increase this risk.

  14. Outcome in 146 patients with paediatric acute myeloid leukaemia treated according to the AML99 protocol in the period 2003-06 from the Japan Association of Childhood Leukaemia Study.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Toshihiko; Iwamoto, Shotaro; Kanai, Rie; Shimada, Akira; Terui, Kiminori; Osugi, Yuko; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Tawa, Akio; Kosaka, Yoshiyuki; Kato, Koji; Hori, Hiroki; Horibe, Keizo; Oda, Megumi; Adachi, Souichi

    2012-10-01

    The acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) 99 trial conducted previously in Japan for the treatment of de novo paediatric AML showed excellent results, with a 5-year overall survival (OS) and event-free survival (EFS) of 75·6% and 61·6%, respectively. To examine reproducibility of these results in another cohort, the outcome of 146 newly diagnosed AML paediatric patients prospectively registered in the Japan Association of Childhood Leukaemia Study (JACLS) from 2003 to 2006 was compared to that of 240 patients in the original AML 99 clinical trial. The 5-year EFS and OS achieved in the new cohort was 66·7 ± 4·0% and 77·7 ± 8·0% respectively, which were comparable to those obtained in the original AML 99 clinical trial, although less frequent core-binding factor (CBF) AML (29·5% vs. 37%) and an almost equal frequency of allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) during first complete remission (16·5% vs. 19%) were observed. The 5-year EFS in patients with a normal karyotype (NK) (n = 35, 54·9 ± 15·1%) was inferior in the present cohort when compared to the original AML99 trial. This study confirmed the excellent outcome of the original AML99 protocol.

  15. Chromatin organization as a possible factor in the control of susceptibility to radiation-induced AML in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maranon, David G.

    The studies described in this dissertation involve the use and comparison of two mouse strains: one sensitive (CBA/CaJ) and another resistant (C57BL/6J) to radiation-induced acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The purpose of these studies was to identify factors that may account for the large difference in the susceptibility of these strains to radiation-induced AML. The present study was initiated to determine whether the distances between breakpoint clusters on chromosome 2 are in closer proximity in the bone marrow cells of the CBA/CaJ mouse strain than in the C57BL/6J strain. Bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) were selected as markers of the central portion of the proximal and distal deletion breakpoint clusters as well as mdr on chromosome 2, where the preponderance of breaks occurs. Distance measurements were made by three dimensional fluorescent in situ hybridization (3DFISH) image analysis of hundreds of cells using Metamorph and ImageJ for data collection and Autoquant software for deconvolution and reconstruction of the three dimensional cell nuclei. Comparing bone marrow cells of CBA/CaJ and C57BL/6J mice, no differences were found between the proximity of the two regions represented for the selected markers compared in both murine strains. For the markers chosen the distribution of the distances showed similarities between the same cell types from both mouse strains; namely, fibroblasts, whole bone marrow (WBM), and hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). However, there was not found a change in the distance distributions toward the closer distances expected between the clusters in HSC and WBM compared with fibroblasts in both mouse strains. There was; however, a tissue-dependent distance distribution between the markers Specifically, the average distances of the clusters in fibroblasts (2.55 um for CBA/CaJ and 3.09 um for C57BL/6) were larger than the distance in blood cells (1.74 um in BM and 1.53 um in HSC for CBA/CaJ; and 1.79 um in BM and 1.77 um in HSC for

  16. Benchmarking on Tsunami Currents with ComMIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharghi vand, N.; Kanoglu, U.

    2015-12-01

    There were no standards for the validation and verification of tsunami numerical models before 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. Even, number of numerical models has been used for inundation mapping effort, evaluation of critical structures, etc. without validation and verification. After 2004, NOAA Center for Tsunami Research (NCTR) established standards for the validation and verification of tsunami numerical models (Synolakis et al. 2008 Pure Appl. Geophys. 165, 2197-2228), which will be used evaluation of critical structures such as nuclear power plants against tsunami attack. NCTR presented analytical, experimental and field benchmark problems aimed to estimate maximum runup and accepted widely by the community. Recently, benchmark problems were suggested by the US National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program Mapping & Modeling Benchmarking Workshop: Tsunami Currents on February 9-10, 2015 at Portland, Oregon, USA (http://nws.weather.gov/nthmp/index.html). These benchmark problems concentrated toward validation and verification of tsunami numerical models on tsunami currents. Three of the benchmark problems were: current measurement of the Japan 2011 tsunami in Hilo Harbor, Hawaii, USA and in Tauranga Harbor, New Zealand, and single long-period wave propagating onto a small-scale experimental model of the town of Seaside, Oregon, USA. These benchmark problems were implemented in the Community Modeling Interface for Tsunamis (ComMIT) (Titov et al. 2011 Pure Appl. Geophys. 168, 2121-2131), which is a user-friendly interface to the validated and verified Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) (Titov and Synolakis 1995 J. Waterw. Port Coastal Ocean Eng. 121, 308-316) model and is developed by NCTR. The modeling results are compared with the required benchmark data, providing good agreements and results are discussed. Acknowledgment: The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant

  17. Knocking down mitochondrial iron transporter (MIT) reprograms primary and secondary metabolism in rice plants

    PubMed Central

    Vigani, Gianpiero; Bashir, Khurram; Ishimaru, Yasuhiro; Lehmann, Martin; Casiraghi, Fabio Marco; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Seki, Motoaki; Geigenberger, Peter; Zocchi, Graziano; Nishizawa, Naoko K.

    2016-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential micronutrient for plant growth and development, and its reduced bioavailability strongly impairs mitochondrial functionality. In this work, the metabolic adjustment in the rice (Oryza sativa) mitochondrial Fe transporter knockdown mutant (mit-2) was analysed. Biochemical characterization of purified mitochondria from rice roots showed alteration in the respiratory chain of mit-2 compared with wild-type (WT) plants. In particular, proteins belonging to the type II alternative NAD(P)H dehydrogenases accumulated strongly in mit-2 plants, indicating that alternative pathways were activated to keep the respiratory chain working. Additionally, large-scale changes in the transcriptome and metabolome were observed in mit-2 rice plants. In particular, a strong alteration (up-/down-regulation) in the expression of genes encoding enzymes of both primary and secondary metabolism was found in mutant plants. This was reflected by changes in the metabolic profiles in both roots and shoots of mit-2 plants. Significant alterations in the levels of amino acids belonging to the aspartic acid-related pathways (aspartic acid, lysine, and threonine in roots, and aspartic acid and ornithine in shoots) were found that are strictly connected to the Krebs cycle. Furthermore, some metabolites (e.g. pyruvic acid, fumaric acid, ornithine, and oligosaccharides of the raffinose family) accumulated only in the shoot of mit-2 plants, indicating possible hypoxic responses. These findings suggest that the induction of local Fe deficiency in the mitochondrial compartment of mit-2 plants differentially affects the transcript as well as the metabolic profiles in root and shoot tissues. PMID:26685186

  18. Non-intensive treatment with low-dose 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC) prior to allogeneic blood SCT of older MDS/AML patients.

    PubMed

    Lübbert, M; Bertz, H; Rüter, B; Marks, R; Claus, R; Wäsch, R; Finke, J

    2009-11-01

    Novel, non-intensive treatment options in older MDS/AML patients planned for allografting, with the goal of down-staging the underlying disease and bridging time to transplantation, are presently being developed. 5-azacytidine and decitabine (DAC) are of particular interest, as they can be given repetitively, with very limited non-hematologic toxicity and result in responses both in MDS and AML even at low doses. We describe 15 consecutive patients (median age 69 years, range 60-75 years) with MDS (n=10) or AML (n=5) who all received first-line treatment with DAC and subsequent allografting (from sibling donor in four patients, unrelated donor in 11) after reduced-intensity conditioning with the FBM regimen. Successful engraftment was attained in 14/15 patients, all of whom achieved a CR, with a median duration of 5 months (range 1+ to 51+). Six of these 14 patients are alive (4 with complete donor chimerism), 8 have died either from relapse (n=4) or treatment-related complications while in CR (n=4). We conclude that allografting after low-dose DAC and subsequent conditioning with FBM is feasible, with no unexpected toxicities and appears as a valid alternative to standard chemotherapy ('InDACtion instead of induction') in elderly patients with MDS/AML.

  19. PRL-3, a metastasis associated tyrosine phosphatase, is involved in FLT3-ITD signaling and implicated in anti-AML therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianbiao; Bi, Chonglei; Chng, Wee-Joo; Cheong, Lip-Lee; Liu, Shaw-Cheng; Mahara, Sylvia; Tay, Kian-Ghee; Zeng, Qi; Li, Jie; Guo, Ke; Tan, Cheng Peow Bobby; Yu, Hanry; Albert, Daniel H; Chen, Chien-Shing

    2011-05-12

    Combination with other small molecule drugs represents a promising strategy to improve therapeutic efficacy of FLT3 inhibitors in the clinic. We demonstrated that combining ABT-869, a FLT3 inhibitor, with SAHA, a HDAC inhibitor, led to synergistic killing of the AML cells with FLT3 mutations and suppression of colony formation. We identified a core gene signature that is uniquely induced by the combination treatment in 2 different leukemia cell lines. Among these, we showed that downregulation of PTP4A3 (PRL-3) played a role in this synergism. PRL-3 is downstream of FLT3 signaling and ectopic expression of PRL-3 conferred therapeutic resistance through upregulation of STAT (signal transducers and activators of transcription) pathway activity and anti-apoptotic Mcl-1 protein. PRL-3 interacts with HDAC4 and SAHA downregulates PRL-3 via a proteasome dependent pathway. In addition, PRL-3 protein was identified in 47% of AML cases, but was absent in myeloid cells in normal bone marrows. Our results suggest such combination therapies may significantly improve the therapeutic efficacy of FLT3 inhibitors. PRL-3 plays a potential pathological role in AML and it might be a useful therapeutic target in AML, and warrant clinical investigation.

  20. AML1/ETO accelerates cell migration and impairs cell-to-cell adhesion and homing of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Saia, Marco; Termanini, Alberto; Rizzi, Nicoletta; Mazza, Massimiliano; Barbieri, Elisa; Valli, Debora; Ciana, Paolo; Gruszka, Alicja M.; Alcalay, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    The AML1/ETO fusion protein found in acute myeloid leukemias functions as a transcriptional regulator by recruiting co-repressor complexes to its DNA binding site. In order to extend the understanding of its role in preleukemia, we expressed AML1/ETO in a murine immortalized pluripotent hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell line, EML C1, and found that genes involved in functions such as cell-to-cell adhesion and cell motility were among the most significantly regulated as determined by RNA sequencing. In functional assays, AML1/ETO-expressing cells showed a decrease in adhesion to stromal cells, an increase of cell migration rate in vitro, and displayed an impairment in homing and engraftment in vivo upon transplantation into recipient mice. Our results suggest that AML1/ETO expression determines a more mobile and less adherent phenotype in preleukemic cells, therefore altering the interaction with the hematopoietic niche, potentially leading to the migration across the bone marrow barrier and to disease progression. PMID:27713544

  1. Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia with del(7)(q22) in a patient with de novo AML.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yang Gyun; Cho, Sun Young; Park, Tae Sung; Oh, Seung Hwan; Yoon, Hwi-Joong

    2011-01-01

    A 55-year-old Korean woman was initially diagnosed with acute myelomonocytic leukemia (AML). After induction chemotherapy was performed using cytarabine, idarubicin, and G-CSF, complete remission (CR) was subsequently achieved following reinduction chemotherapy using the same chemotherapeutic agents. Thirty-six months after the initial CR, an increase in immature cells (up to 12.0%) was observed in the patient's bone marrow. Because chromosome analysis revealed a karyotype of 46,XX,del(7)(q22) in all of the analyzed cells, the patient was diagnosed with therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome (t-MDS). Although the patient subsequently received chemotherapy and G-CSF for neutropenia, t-MDS rapidly progressed after 3 months to therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia (t-AML). Although very rare, de novo AML can progress to a secondary MDS/AML with del(7q) after chemotherapy with cytarabine, idarubicin, and G-CSF. Further investigation into the role of genes located in 7q22 may provide more information about the mechanisms of leukemogenesis.

  2. Unique dual targeting of thymidylate synthase and topoisomerase1 by FdUMP[10] results in high efficacy against AML and low toxicity.

    PubMed

    Pardee, Timothy S; Gomes, Evan; Jennings-Gee, Jamie; Caudell, David; Gmeiner, William H

    2012-04-12

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy that leads to marrow failure and death. There is a desperate need for new therapies. The novel fluoropyrimidine, FdUMP[10], was highly active against both human AML cell lines, (IC(50) values, 3.4nM-21.5nM) and murine lines (IC(50) values, 123.8pM-131.4pM). In all cases, the IC(50) of FdUMP[10] was lower than for cytarabine and ∼ 1000 times lower than 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). FdUMP[10] remained effective against cells expressing the Flt3 internal tandem duplication, BCR-ABL, MN1, and an shRNA against p53. It had activity against patient samples at concentrations that did not affect normal hematopoietic cells. FdUMP[10] inhibited thymidylate synthase (TS) and trapped topoisomerase I cleavage complexes (Top1CCs), leading to DNA damage and apoptosis. All cell lines and nearly all primary AML samples examined expressed both TS and Top1. In vivo, FdUMP[10] was active against a syngeneic AML model with a survival advantage equivalent to doxorubicin plus cytarabine. 5-FU treatment was toxic and did not improve survival. FdUMP[10] was better tolerated than 5-FU or cytarabine plus doxorubicin and did not affect normal HSCs, while 5-FU dramatically impaired their ability to engraft. In summary, FdUMP[10] was highly efficacious and better tolerated than standard therapies.

  3. The impact of TP53 mutations and TP53 deletions on survival varies between AML, ALL, MDS and CLL: an analysis of 3307 cases.

    PubMed

    Stengel, A; Kern, W; Haferlach, T; Meggendorfer, M; Fasan, A; Haferlach, C

    2017-03-01

    Alterations in TP53 have been described in many cancer types including hematological neoplasms. We aimed at comparing TP53 mutations (mut) and deletions (del) in a large cohort of patients with hematological malignancies (n=3307), including AML (n=858), MDS (n=943), ALL (n=358), CLL (n=1148). Overall, alterations in TP53 were detected in 332/3307 cases (10%). The highest frequency was observed in ALL (total: 19%; mut+del: 6%; mut only: 8%; del only: 5%) and AML (total: 13%; mut+del: 5%; mut only: 7%; del only: 1%), whereas TP53 alterations occurred less frequently in CLL (total: 8%) and MDS (total: 7%). TP53 mutations were significantly more frequent in patients ⩾60 vs <60 years in AML (9% vs 2%, P<0.001) and ALL (12% vs 6%, P<0.001). TP53mut+del had a significant negative impact on overall survival in all entities, whereas differences were observed regarding TP53mut only or TP53del only: TP53mut only impacted survival in AML (36 vs 9 months, P<0.001) and MDS (65 vs 19 months, P<0.001), TP53del only in CLL (not reached vs 64 months, P=0.008) and MDS (65 vs 24 months, P=0.011). As substantial differences between the entities are observed regarding correlation to age and survival, we suggest evaluation of both TP53 deletion and mutation status.

  4. Dual inhibition of AKT/FLT3-ITD by A674563 overcomes FLT3 ligand-induced drug resistance in FLT3-ITD positive AML

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenchao; Yu, Kailin; Liu, Xiaochuan; Zou, Fengming; Zhao, Zheng; Wu, Jiaxin; Liu, Juan; Liu, Feiyang; Wang, Li; Stone, Richard M.; Galinksy, Ilene A.; Griffin, James D.; Zhang, Shanchun; Weisberg, Ellen L.; Liu, Jing; Liu, Qingsong

    2016-01-01

    The FLT3-ITD mutation is one of the most prevalent oncogenic mutations in AML. Several FLT3 kinase inhibitors have shown impressive activity in clinical evaluation, however clinical responses are usually transient and clinical effects are rapidly lost due to drug resistance. One of the resistance mechanisms in the AML refractory patients involves FLT3-ligand induced reactivation of AKT and/or ERK signaling via FLT3 wt kinase. Via a screen of numerous AKT kinase inhibitors, we identified the well-established orally available AKT inhibitor, A674563, as a dual suppressor of AKT and FLT3-ITD. A674563 suppressed FLT3-ITD positive AML both in vitro and in vivo. More importantly, compared to other FLT3 inhibitors, A674563 is able to overcome FLT3 ligand-induced drug resistance through simultaneous inhibition of FLT3-ITD- and AKT-mediated signaling. Our findings suggest that A674563 might be a potential drug candidate for overcoming FLT3 ligand-mediated drug resistance in FLT3-ITD positive AML. PMID:27074558

  5. 76 FR 31230 - Safety Zone; M.I.T.'s 150th Birthday Celebration Fireworks, Charles River, Boston, MA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-31

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; M.I.T.'s 150th Birthday Celebration...) Zone for the M.I.T.'s 150th Birthday Celebration Fireworks display. This safety zone is necessary to.... 165.T01-0375 to read as follows: Sec. 165.T01-0375 Safety Zone; M.I.T.'s 150th Birthday...

  6. Clinical effectiveness of itraconazole as antifungal prophylaxis in AML patients undergoing intensive chemotherapy in the modern era.

    PubMed

    Keighley, C L; Manii, P; Larsen, S R; van Hal, S

    2017-02-01

    Antifungal prophylaxis regimens vary between centres, informed by local epidemiology and antifungal stewardship practices. The advantages of itraconazole over posaconazole prophylaxis include maintaining the utility of azole therapy for suspected breakthrough invasive fungal infection (bIFI). We examined the effectiveness and tolerability of itraconazole as prophylaxis in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients. We sought to determine the rate of probable and proven bIFI in the context of itraconazole prophylaxis in a real-life setting. Eighty-four patients corresponded to 175 episodes of primary antifungal prophylaxis with itraconazole solution (200 mg twice daily) as prophylaxis supported by a dedicated clinical pharmacist during induction, re-induction and consolidation chemotherapy for AML between January 2010 and January 2014. Assessment of clinical course included blinded review of all radiology scans. Episodes of bIFI were categorised according to consensus criteria. A low rate of bIFI (6/175, 3.4 %) occurred with the use of itraconazole. Tolerance was excellent with adverse events consisting predominantly of deranged liver function tests reported in 7/175 (4 %). Therapeutic drug monitoring performed at clinicians' discretion demonstrated appropriate levels in 12/14 (86 %). Persisting fever and suspicion of invasive fungal infection (IFI) led to empiric antifungal therapy with voriconazole or caspofungin in 33/175 episodes (19 %), ceased after a median of 5 days following investigation in 16/175 (9 %). In this setting, itraconazole is effective and well-tolerated as prophylaxis. An additional benefit was seen in empiric therapy of suspected bIFI with amphotericin formulations kept in reserve. Local epidemiology is vital in guiding prophylaxis strategy.

  7. Mit1 Transcription Factor Mediates Methanol Signaling and Regulates the Alcohol Oxidase 1 (AOX1) Promoter in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolong; Wang, Qi; Wang, Jinjia; Bai, Peng; Shi, Lei; Shen, Wei; Zhou, Mian; Zhou, Xiangshan; Zhang, Yuanxing; Cai, Menghao

    2016-03-18

    The alcohol oxidase 1 (AOX1) promoter (P AOX1) of Pichia pastoris is the most powerful and commonly used promoter for driving protein expression. However, mechanisms regulating its transcriptional activity are unclear. Here, we identified a Zn(II)2Cys6-type methanol-induced transcription factor 1 (Mit1) and elucidated its roles in regulating PAOX1 activity in response to glycerol and methanol. Mit1 regulated the expression of many genes involved in methanol utilization pathway, including AOX1, but did not participate in peroxisome proliferation and transportation of peroxisomal proteins during methanol metabolism. Structural analysis of Mit1 by performing domain deletions confirmed its specific and critical role in the strict repression of P AOX1 in glycerol medium. Importantly, Mit1, Mxr1, and Prm1, which positively regulated P AOX1 in response to methanol, were bound to P AOX1 at different sites and did not interact with each other. However, these factors cooperatively activated P AOX1 through a cascade. Mxr1 mainly functioned during carbon derepression, whereas Mit1 and Prm1 functioned during methanol induction, with Prm1 transmitting methanol signal to Mit1 by binding to the MIT1 promoter (P MIT1), thus increasingly expressing Mit1 and subsequently activating P AOX1.

  8. Mitotic crossover promotes leukemogenesis in children born with TEL-AML1 via the generation of loss of heterozygosity at 12p.

    PubMed

    Ivanovski, Ivan; Garavelli, Livia; Djurić, Olivera; Ćirović, Aleksandar; Škorić, Dejan; Ivanovski, Petar I

    2015-06-30

    TEL-AML1 (ETV6-RUNX1) fusion gene which is formed prenatally in 1% of the newborns, is a common genetic abnormality in childhood Bcell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia. But only one child out of a hundred children born with this fusion gene develops leukemia (bottleneck phenomenon) later in its life, if contracts the second mutation. In other words, out of a hundred children born with TEL-AML1 only one child is at risk for leukemia development, which means that TEL-AML1 fusion gene is not sufficient for overt leukemia. There is a stringent requirement for a second genetic abnormality for leukemia development and this is the real or the ultimate cause of the leukemia bottleneck phenomenon. In most cases of TEL-AML1+ leukemia, the translocation t(12;21) is complemented with the loss of the normal TEL gene, not involved in the translocation, on the contralateral 12p. The loss of the normal TEL gene, i.e. loss of heterozygosity at 12p, occurs postnatally during the mitotic proliferation of TEL-AML1+ cell in the mitotic crossing over process. Mitotic crossing over is a very rare event with a frequency rate of 10-6 in a 10 kb region. The exploration and identification of the environmental exposure(s) that cause(s) proliferation of the TELAML1+ cell in which approximately 106 mitoses are generated to cause 12p loss of heterozygosity, i.e. TEL gene deletion, may contribute to the introduction of preventive measures for leukemia.

  9. Designs of LiMIT as a Limiter in the EAST Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szott, Matthew; Christenson, Michael; Kalathiparambil, Kishor; Ruzic, David

    2016-10-01

    Liquid metal plasma facing components (PFCs) provide a constantly refreshing, self-healing surface that can reduce erosion and thermal stress damage to prolong device lifetime, and additionally decrease edge recycling, reduce impurities, and enhance plasma performance. The Liquid Metal Infused Trench (LiMIT) system, developed at UIUC, has demonstrated thermoelectric magnetohydrodynamic (TEMHD) driven flow of liquid lithium through series of solid trenches. This TEMHD effect drives liquid lithium in fusion systems using the plasma heat flux and the toroidal magnetic field, and the surface tension of the liquid lithium maintains a fresh surface on top of the solid trenches. LiMIT has been successfully tested at UIUC as well as HT-7 and Magnum PSI at heat fluxes up to 3 MW/m2. The next step is demonstrating system viability in full-scale fusion-relevant conditions. In collaboration with a team in Hefei, design and testing has begun for a large scale LiMIT system that will act as a limiter in EAST. The designs improve upon previous versions of LiMIT tested at Illinois and incorporate lessons learned from earlier tests of liquid metal PFCs at EAST. Existing infrastructure is used to load and supply lithium to the system, and the LiMIT trenches will help maintain a smooth, fresh surface as well as aid in propelling the lithium out of direct plasma flux to improve heat transfer. Supported by DOE/ALPS DE-FG02-99ER54515.

  10. A New Tool for Inundation Modeling: Community Modeling Interface for Tsunamis (ComMIT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, V. V.; Moore, C. W.; Greenslade, D. J. M.; Pattiaratchi, C.; Badal, R.; Synolakis, C. E.; Kânoğlu, U.

    2011-11-01

    Almost 5 years after the 26 December 2004 Indian Ocean tragedy, the 10 August 2009 Andaman tsunami demonstrated that accurate forecasting is possible using the tsunami community modeling tool Community Model Interface for Tsunamis (ComMIT). ComMIT is designed for ease of use, and allows dissemination of results to the community while addressing concerns associated with proprietary issues of bathymetry and topography. It uses initial conditions from a precomputed propagation database, has an easy-to-interpret graphical interface, and requires only portable hardware. ComMIT was initially developed for Indian Ocean countries with support from the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). To date, more than 60 scientists from 17 countries in the Indian Ocean have been trained and are using it in operational inundation mapping.

  11. MITR-III: Upgrade and relicensing studies for the MIT Research Reactor. Second annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Trosman, H.G.; Lanning, D.D.; Harling, O.K.

    1994-08-01

    The current operating license of the MIT research reactor will expire on May 7, 1996 or possibly a few years later if the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission agrees that the license period can start with the date of initial reactor operation. Driven by the imminent expiration of the operating license, a team of nuclear engineering staff and students have begun a study of the future options for the MIT Research Reactor. These options have included the range from a major rebuilding of the reactor to its decommissioning. This document reports the results of a two year intensive activity which has been supported by a $148,000 grant from the USDOE contract Number DEFG0293ER75859, approximately $100,000 of internal MIT funds and Nuclear Engineering Department graduate student fellowships as well as assistance from international visiting scientists and engineers.

  12. MIT Clean Energy Prize: Final Technical Report May 12, 2010 - May 11, 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, Chris; Campbell, Georgina; Salony, Jason; Aulet, Bill

    2011-08-09

    The MIT Clean Energy Prize (MIT CEP) is a venture creation and innovation competition to encourage innovation in the energy space, specifically with regard to clean energy. The Competition invited student teams from any US university to submit student-led ventures that demonstrate a high potential of successfully making clean energy more affordable, with a positive impact on the environment. By focusing on student ventures, the MIT CEP aims to educate the next generation of clean energy entrepreneurs. Teams receive valuable mentoring and hard deadlines that complement the cash prize to accelerate development of ventures. The competition is a year-long educational process that culminates in the selection of five category finalists and a Grand Prize winner and the distribution of cash prizes to each of those teams. Each entry was submitted in one of five clean energy categories: Renewables, Clean Non-Renewables, Energy Efficiency, Transportation, and Deployment.

  13. Fusion Science Outreach at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Censabella, V.; Rivenberg, P.; Granville, J.; Nachtrieb, R.; Gangadhara, S.

    1997-11-01

    Educational Outreach at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center is organized and energized by volunteers working together to increase the public's knowledge of fusion and plasma-related experiments. The PSFC holds a number of outreach activities throughout the year, such as Middle and High School Outreach Days. Included in these days is a demonstration of how magnets affect plasma using the ``Plasma Demo," an educational tool which will be on display for the first time outside the MIT area. Also featured is ``C-Mod Jr.," a video game which helps students discover how computers manipulate magnetic pulses to keep a plasma confined in the C-Mod tokamak for as long as possible. The PSFC maintains a Home Page on the World Wide Web, which can be reached at HTTP://PFC.MIT.EDU.

  14. Education Outreach at M.I.T. Plasma Science and Fusion Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivenberg, P.; Censabella, V.

    2000-10-01

    At the MIT PSFC student and staff volunteers work together to increase the public's knowledge of fusion and plasma-related experiments. Seeking to generate excitement about science, engineering and mathematics, the PSFC holds a number of outreach activities throughout the year, including Middle and High School Outreach Days and the Mr. Magnet program. During the past year, in collaboration with the MIT Museum, the PSFC reprogrammed their C-Mod, Jr Video Game to be operated via the keyboard instead of joysticks. The game will eventually be available on the web and on disc. The PSFC maintains a Home Page on the World Wide Web, which can be reached at http://www.psfc.mit.edu.

  15. NRF2-driven miR-125B1 and miR-29B1 transcriptional regulation controls a novel anti-apoptotic miRNA regulatory network for AML survival.

    PubMed

    Shah, N M; Zaitseva, L; Bowles, K M; MacEwan, D J; Rushworth, S A

    2015-04-01

    Transcription factor NRF2 is an important regulator of oxidative stress. It is involved in cancer progression, and has abnormal constitutive expression in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Posttranscriptional regulation by microRNAs (miRNAs) can affect the malignant phenotype of AML cells. In this study, we identified and characterised NRF2-regulated miRNAs in AML. An miRNA array identified miRNA expression level changes in response to NRF2 knockdown in AML cells. Further analysis of miRNAs concomitantly regulated by knockdown of the NRF2 inhibitor KEAP1 revealed the major candidate NRF2-mediated miRNAs in AML. We identified miR-125B to be upregulated and miR-29B to be downregulated by NRF2 in AML. Subsequent bioinformatic analysis identified putative NRF2 binding sites upstream of the miR-125B1 coding region and downstream of the mir-29B1 coding region. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses showed that NRF2 binds to these antioxidant response elements (AREs) located in the 5' untranslated regions of miR-125B and miR-29B. Finally, primary AML samples transfected with anti-miR-125B antagomiR or miR-29B mimic showed increased cell death responsiveness either alone or co-treated with standard AML chemotherapy. In summary, we find that NRF2 regulation of miR-125B and miR-29B acts to promote leukaemic cell survival, and their manipulation enhances AML responsiveness towards cytotoxic chemotherapeutics.

  16. Center for Multiscale Plasma Dynamics: Report on Activities (UCLA/MIT), 2009-2010

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Carter

    2011-04-18

    The final 'phaseout' year of the CMPD ended July 2010; a no cost extension was requested until May 2011 in order to enable the MIT subcontract funds to be fully utilized. Research progress over this time included verification and validation activities for the BOUT and BOUT++ code, studies of spontaneous reconnection in the VTF facility at MIT, and studies of the interaction between Alfven waves and drift waves in LAPD. The CMPD also hosted the 6th plasma physics winter school in 2010 (jointly with the NSF frontier center the Center for Magnetic Self-Organization, significant funding came from NSF for this most recent iteration of the Winter School).

  17. Azacitidine for Front-Line Therapy of Patients with AML: Reproducible Efficacy Established by Direct Comparison of International Phase 3 Trial Data with Registry Data from the Austrian Azacitidine Registry of the AGMT Study Group

    PubMed Central

    Pleyer, Lisa; Döhner, Hartmut; Dombret, Hervé; Seymour, John F.; Schuh, Andre C.; Beach, CL; Swern, Arlene S.; Burgstaller, Sonja; Stauder, Reinhard; Girschikofsky, Michael; Sill, Heinz; Schlick, Konstantin; Thaler, Josef; Halter, Britta; Machherndl Spandl, Sigrid; Zebisch, Armin; Pichler, Angelika; Pfeilstöcker, Michael; Autzinger, Eva M.; Lang, Alois; Geissler, Klaus; Voskova, Daniela; Sperr, Wolfgang R.; Hojas, Sabine; Rogulj, Inga M.; Andel, Johannes; Greil, Richard

    2017-01-01

    We recently published a clinically-meaningful improvement in median overall survival (OS) for patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), >30% bone marrow (BM) blasts and white blood cell (WBC) count ≤15 G/L, treated with front-line azacitidine versus conventional care regimens within a phase 3 clinical trial (AZA-AML-001; NCT01074047; registered: February 2010). As results obtained in clinical trials are facing increased pressure to be confirmed by real-world data, we aimed to test whether data obtained in the AZA-AML-001 trial accurately represent observations made in routine clinical practice by analysing additional AML patients treated with azacitidine front-line within the Austrian Azacitidine Registry (AAR; NCT01595295; registered: May 2012) and directly comparing patient-level data of both cohorts. We assessed the efficacy of front-line azacitidine in a total of 407 patients with newly-diagnosed AML. Firstly, we compared data from AML patients with WBC ≤ 15 G/L and >30% BM blasts included within the AZA-AML-001 trial treated with azacitidine (“AML-001” cohort; n = 214) with AAR patients meeting the same inclusion criteria (“AAR (001-like)” cohort; n = 95). The current analysis thus represents a new sub-analysis of the AML-001 trial, which is directly compared with a new sub-analysis of the AAR. Baseline characteristics, azacitidine application, response rates and OS were comparable between all patient cohorts within the trial or registry setting. Median OS was 9.9 versus 10.8 months (p = 0.616) for “AML-001” versus “AAR (001-like)” cohorts, respectively. Secondly, we pooled data from both cohorts (n = 309) and assessed the outcome. Median OS of the pooled cohorts was 10.3 (95% confidence interval: 8.7, 12.6) months, and the one-year survival rate was 45.8%. Thirdly, we compared data from AAR patients meeting AZA-AML-001 trial inclusion criteria (n = 95) versus all AAR patients with World Health Organization (WHO)-defined AML (“AAR (WHO-AML

  18. Azacitidine for Front-Line Therapy of Patients with AML: Reproducible Efficacy Established by Direct Comparison of International Phase 3 Trial Data with Registry Data from the Austrian Azacitidine Registry of the AGMT Study Group.

    PubMed

    Pleyer, Lisa; Döhner, Hartmut; Dombret, Hervé; Seymour, John F; Schuh, Andre C; Beach, C L; Swern, Arlene S; Burgstaller, Sonja; Stauder, Reinhard; Girschikofsky, Michael; Sill, Heinz; Schlick, Konstantin; Thaler, Josef; Halter, Britta; Machherndl Spandl, Sigrid; Zebisch, Armin; Pichler, Angelika; Pfeilstöcker, Michael; Autzinger, Eva M; Lang, Alois; Geissler, Klaus; Voskova, Daniela; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Hojas, Sabine; Rogulj, Inga M; Andel, Johannes; Greil, Richard

    2017-02-15

    We recently published a clinically-meaningful improvement in median overall survival (OS) for patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), >30% bone marrow (BM) blasts and white blood cell (WBC) count ≤15 G/L, treated with front-line azacitidine versus conventional care regimens within a phase 3 clinical trial (AZA-AML-001; NCT01074047; registered: February 2010). As results obtained in clinical trials are facing increased pressure to be confirmed by real-world data, we aimed to test whether data obtained in the AZA-AML-001 trial accurately represent observations made in routine clinical practice by analysing additional AML patients treated with azacitidine front-line within the Austrian Azacitidine Registry (AAR; NCT01595295; registered: May 2012) and directly comparing patient-level data of both cohorts. We assessed the efficacy of front-line azacitidine in a total of 407 patients with newly-diagnosed AML. Firstly, we compared data from AML patients with WBC ≤ 15 G/L and >30% BM blasts included within the AZA-AML-001 trial treated with azacitidine ("AML-001" cohort; n = 214) with AAR patients meeting the same inclusion criteria ("AAR (001-like)" cohort; n = 95). The current analysis thus represents a new sub-analysis of the AML-001 trial, which is directly compared with a new sub-analysis of the AAR. Baseline characteristics, azacitidine application, response rates and OS were comparable between all patient cohorts within the trial or registry setting. Median OS was 9.9 versus 10.8 months (p = 0.616) for "AML-001" versus "AAR (001-like)" cohorts, respectively. Secondly, we pooled data from both cohorts (n = 309) and assessed the outcome. Median OS of the pooled cohorts was 10.3 (95% confidence interval: 8.7, 12.6) months, and the one-year survival rate was 45.8%. Thirdly, we compared data from AAR patients meeting AZA-AML-001 trial inclusion criteria (n = 95) versus all AAR patients with World Health Organization (WHO)-defined AML ("AAR (WHO-AML)" cohort; n

  19. Mit1 Transcription Factor Mediates Methanol Signaling and Regulates the Alcohol Oxidase 1 (AOX1) Promoter in Pichia pastoris*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaolong; Wang, Qi; Wang, Jinjia; Bai, Peng; Shi, Lei; Shen, Wei; Zhou, Mian; Zhou, Xiangshan; Zhang, Yuanxing; Cai, Menghao

    2016-01-01

    The alcohol oxidase 1 (AOX1) promoter (PAOX1) of Pichia pastoris is the most powerful and commonly used promoter for driving protein expression. However, mechanisms regulating its transcriptional activity are unclear. Here, we identified a Zn(II)2Cys6-type methanol-induced transcription factor 1 (Mit1) and elucidated its roles in regulating PAOX1 activity in response to glycerol and methanol. Mit1 regulated the expression of many genes involved in methanol utilization pathway, including AOX1, but did not participate in peroxisome proliferation and transportation of peroxisomal proteins during methanol metabolism. Structural analysis of Mit1 by performing domain deletions confirmed its specific and critical role in the strict repression of PAOX1 in glycerol medium. Importantly, Mit1, Mxr1, and Prm1, which positively regulated PAOX1 in response to methanol, were bound to PAOX1 at different sites and did not interact with each other. However, these factors cooperatively activated PAOX1 through a cascade. Mxr1 mainly functioned during carbon derepression, whereas Mit1 and Prm1 functioned during methanol induction, with Prm1 transmitting methanol signal to Mit1 by binding to the MIT1 promoter (PMIT1), thus increasingly expressing Mit1 and subsequently activating PAOX1. PMID:26828066

  20. OSI-211, a novel liposomal topoisomerase I inhibitor, is active in SCID mouse models of human AML and ALL.

    PubMed

    Tomkinson, Blake; Bendele, Ray; Giles, Francis J; Brown, Eric; Gray, Atherton; Hart, Karen; LeRay, Jeremy D; Meyer, Denny; Pelanne, Michelle; Emerson, David L

    2003-11-01

    OSI-211 (liposomal lurtotecan), was evaluated using several different dose schedules (1mg/kg, d1-5, 1.75 mg/kg d1, 3, 5 and 6 mg/kg d1, 8) in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse models of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) with early treatment (ET, days 6-8) or late treatment (LT, days 15-19), examining early and advanced disease, respectively. Due to the aggressive nature of the Molt-4 model, the ET and LT were accelerated to day 3 or 4 and day 8 post-implant, respectively. For each model, 2 x 10(7) (KBM-3B) or 1 x 10(7) (Molt-4, HL-60 and CEM) leukemia cells were injected intravenously into the tail vein. Each control and test group consisted of eight animals. All three schedules (1mg/kg qd1-5, 1.75 mg/kg d1, 3, 5 and 6 mg/kg d1, 8) increased the life span of OSI-211 treated animals in each model, with a tendency toward improved efficacy with the 6 mg/kg d1, 8 schedule. As a result, the activity of the 6 mg/kg d1, 8 schedule is detailed for each model. ET significantly (P<0.005) increased survival in the KBM-3B model with 86% long-term survivors (LTS). Using PRC analysis, human beta-globin gene sequences in one or several tissues were amplified in all but 3 LTS, suggesting minimal residual disease in 26 of the 29 LTS. LT also significantly (P<0.005) improved average life span in the KBM-3B model, with an average ILS=196+/-11% and one LTS. Treatment of HL-60 leukemia animals significantly (P<0.005) increased life span, with an ILS=213+/-9% and two LTS for ET, and with an ILS=219+/-4% and no LTS for LT. Treatment of Molt-4 animals, the most aggressive leukemia model tested, significantly (P<0.005) increased life span, with an average ILS=181+/-3% and no LTS for ET and an average ILS=172+/-1% with no LTS for LT. In the CEM model, ET resulted in a significantly (P<0.005) improved ILS=244+/-24% with one LTS. In comparison to OSI-211, treatment with DaunoXome, the liposomal formulation of daunorubicin, a drug with clinical

  1. RIP Input Tables From WAPDEG for LA Design Selection: Repository Horizon Elevation- 2- Leel AML 50% and Near Maximum

    SciTech Connect

    B.E. Bullard

    1999-08-09

    The purpose of this calculation is to document the WAPDEG version 3.09 (CRWMS M&O 1998b). Software Routine Report for WAPDEG (Version 3.09) simulations used to analyze waste package degradation and failure under the repository exposure conditions characterized by a two-tier thermal loading repository design. Also documented is the post-processing of these results into tables of waste-package-degradation-time histories suitable for use as input into the Integrated Probabilistic Simulator for Environmental Systems (RIP) version 5.19.01 (Golder Associates 1998) computer program. Specifically, the WAPDEG simulations discussed in this calculation correspond to waste package emplacement conditions (repository environment and design) as defined in the Total System Performance Assessment-Viability Assessment (CRWMS M&O 1998a). Total System Performance Assessment-Viability Assessment (TSPA-VA) Analyses Technical Basis Document--Chapter 5, Waste Package Degradation Modeling And Abstraction, pp. 5-27 to 5-29, with the exception that a two-tier thermal loading design feature as specified in the License Application Design Selection (LADS) study was analyzed. The particular design feature evaluated in this report is a modification of the repository horizon elevation and layout within the Topopah Springs Member of Yucca Mountain. Specifically, the modification consists of adding a second level, 50-m above the base case repository layout. Two options were considered, representing two variations in thermal loading. In Design Feature 25e (designated DF25e), each level has an Areal Mass Loading (AML) of 42.5 MTU/acre (i.e., half the VA base case). In Design Feature 25f (designated DF25), each level has an AML of 64MTU/acre. As a result of the change in waste package placement relative to the TSPA-VA base-case design, different temperature and relative humidity time histories at the waste package surface are calculated (input to the WAPDEG simulations), and consequently different

  2. Real-time quantification of TEL-AML1 fusion transcripts for MRD detection in relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Comparison with antigen receptor-based MRD quantification methods.

    PubMed

    Taube, Tillmann; Eckert, Cornelia; Körner, Gabriele; Henze, Günter; Seeger, Karlheinz

    2004-07-01

    Response to therapy of ALL assessed by molecular methods has been proved to be a predictor of outcome. Alternatively to established but very labour-intensive DNA-based PCR-techniques the TEL-AML1 fusion transcript can serve as a marker for MRD monitoring. MRD quantification using TEL-AML1 is of particular interest if the results are directly comparable to data obtained by established DNA-based assays. Investigation of the potential of MRD monitoring using LightCycler technology for TEL-AML1 real-time quantification and comparison to results from established DNA-based MRD assays revealed corresponding results. Accordingly, TEL-AML1 MRD quantification is a sensitive, specific and rapid method that can supplement clone-specific MRD detection.

  3. How Much Have They Retained? Making Unseen Concepts Seen in a Freshman Electromagnetism Course at MIT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dori, Yehudit Judy; Hult, Erin; Breslow, Lori; Belcher, John W.

    2007-01-01

    The introductory freshmen electromagnetism course at MIT has been taught since 2000 using a studio physics format entitled TEAL--Technology Enabled Active Learning. TEAL has created a collaborative, hands-on environment where students carry out desktop experiments, submit web-based assignments, and have access to a host of visualizations and…

  4. Status of High Intensity Polarized Electron Gun at Mit-Bates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsentalovich, E.; Bessuille, J.; Tiunov, M.

    2011-01-01

    MIT-Bates, in collaboration with BNL, has developed a high intensity polarized electron gun for the eRHIC project. The gun implements large area cathode, ring-shaped beam and active cathode cooling. The paper describes the current status of the project.

  5. 1D-Messungen physiologischer Bewegungen am Hals mit optischer Kohärenztomographie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dämgen, M.; Schwab, B.; Lenarz, Th.; Leinung, M.

    In der Chirurgie insbesondere bei onkologischen Fragestellungen kommt es zu Grenzsituationen, in denen es gilt, Gewebeverbände mit hoher Genauigkeit aufzutrennen, z.B. bei Infiltration von Gefäßwänden oder Nervenstrukturen durch Tumorausläufer. Oft könnte eine physiologisch funktioneil wichtige Struktur erhalten werden, wenn ein chirurgisches Instrument existierte, das mit einer überaus hohen Präszision arbeitet. Hierfür ist ein (ultra-)kurzgepulster Laser geeignet, der bei kleinem Focus und minimalen thermischen Wechselwirkungen lediglich vernachlässigbare Kollateralschäden im umgebenden Gewebe erzeugt. Allerdings ist ein solches System nicht mehr allein durch den Operateur kontrollierbar. Daher wurde die Idee entwickelt, ein automatisiertes Assistenzsystem zu designen, das mit einem in entsprechender Genauigkeit arbeitenden Sensor (optische Kohärenztumographie, OCT) und einem Femtosekunden(fs)-Laser als Aktor teilautonom kritische Schritte des operativen Eingriffs unter der Kontrolle des Operateurs vornimmt. Die Vorbedingung eines solchen Systemes jedoch ist die Anpassung an physiologische Bewegungen im OP-Gebiet. Zur Messpooletablierung müssen diese physiologischen Bewegungen aufgezeichnet werden mit der den Dimensionen erforderlichen Präzision.

  6. Rapid Confirmation of Listeria spp. with the MIT 1000 Microbial Identification System

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methods that can rapidly confirm the identification of foodborne pathogens are highly desired. The USDA has recently entered into a collaborative research agreement with Micro Imaging Technology to evaluate their MIT 1000 microbial identification system for its ability to identify Listeria species ...

  7. When Alcohol Kills, Who Is Responsible? MIT's Inaction Blamed for Contributing to Death of a Freshman.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reisberg, Leo

    1998-01-01

    The alcohol-related death of a Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) freshman has focused attention on problems in the institution's housing policies and fraternity system, including unclear policy about housing and long-ignored complaints about hazing and dangerous drinking in the Greek system. (MSE)

  8. Pleiotropic effects of spongean alkaloids on mechanisms of cell death, cell cycle progression and DNA damage response (DDR) of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells.

    PubMed

    Stuhldreier, Fabian; Kassel, Stefanie; Schumacher, Lena; Wesselborg, Sebastian; Proksch, Peter; Fritz, Gerhard

    2015-05-28

    We investigated cytotoxic mechanisms evoked by the spongean alkaloids aaptamine (Aa) and aeroplysinin-1 (Ap), applied alone and in combination with daunorubicin, employing acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. Aa and Ap reduced the viability of AML cells in a dose dependent manner with IC50 of 10-20 µM. Ap triggered apoptotic cell death more efficiently than Aa. Both alkaloids increased the protein level of S139-phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX), which however was independent of the induction of DNA damage. Expression of the senescence markers p21 and p16 was increased, while the phosphorylation level of p-Chk-2 was reduced following Aa treatment. As a function of dose, Aa and Ap protected or sensitized AML cells against daunorubicin. Protection by Aa was paralleled by reduced formation of ROS and lower level of DNA damage. Both Aa and Ap attenuated daunorubicin-stimulated activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) as reflected on the levels of γH2AX, p-Kap-1 and p-Chk-1. Specifically Ap restored the decrease in S10 phosphorylation of histone H3 resulting from daunorubicin treatment. The cytoprotective effects of Aa and Ap were independent of daunorubicin import/export. Both Aa and Ap abrogated daunorubicin-induced accumulation of cells in S-phase. Inhibition of DNA synthesis was specific for Ap. The data show that Aa and Ap have both congruent and agent-specific pleiotropic effects that are preferential for anticancer drugs. Since Ap showed a broader spectrum of anticancer activities, this compound is suggested as novel lead compound for forthcoming in vivo studies elucidating the usefulness of spongean alkaloids in AML therapy.

  9. Dendritic cells (DCs) can be successfully generated from leukemic blasts in individual patients with AML or MDS: an evaluation of different methods.

    PubMed

    Kremser, Andreas; Dressig, Julia; Grabrucker, Christine; Liepert, Anja; Kroell, Tanja; Scholl, Nina; Schmid, Christoph; Tischer, Johanna; Kufner, Stefanie; Salih, Helmut; Kolb, Hans Jochem; Schmetzer, Helga

    2010-01-01

    Myeloid-leukemic cells (AML, MDS, CML) can be differentiated to leukemia-derived dendritic cell [DC (DCleu)] potentially presenting the whole leukemic antigen repertoire without knowledge of distinct leukemia antigens and are regarded as promising candidates for a vaccination strategy. We studied the capability of 6 serum-free DC culture methods, chosen according to different mechanisms, to induce DC differentiation in 137 cases of AML and 52 cases of MDS. DC-stimulating substances were cytokines ("standard-medium", "MCM-Mimic", "cytokine-method"), bacterial lysates ("Picibanil"), double-stranded RNA ["Poly (I:C)"] or a cytokine bypass method ("Ca-ionophore"). The quality/quantity of DC generated was estimated by flow cytometry studying (co) expressions of "DC"antigens, costimulatory, maturation, and blast-antigens. Comparing these methods on average 15% to 32% DC, depending on methods used, could be obtained from blast-containing mononuclear cells (MNC) in AML/MDS cases with a DC viability of more than 60%. In all, 39% to 64% of these DC were mature; 31% to 52% of leukemic blasts could be converted to DCleu and DCleu-proportions in the suspension were 2% to 70% (13%). Average results of all culture methods tested were comparable, however not every given case of AML could be differentiated to DC with 1 selected method. However performing a pre-analysis with 3 DC-generating methods (MCM-Mimic, Picibanil, Ca-ionophore) we could generate DC in any given case. Functional analyses provided proof, that DC primed T cells to antileukemia-directed cytotoxic cells, although an anti-leukemic reaction was not achieved in every case. In summary our data show that a successful, quantitative DC/DCleu generation is possible with the best of 3 previously tested methods in any given case. Reasons for different functional behaviors of DC-primed T cells must be evaluated to design a practicable DC-based vaccination strategy.

  10. Phase 2 trial of CPX-351, a fixed 5:1 molar ratio of cytarabine/daunorubicin, vs cytarabine/daunorubicin in older adults with untreated AML.

    PubMed

    Lancet, Jeffrey E; Cortes, Jorge E; Hogge, Donna E; Tallman, Martin S; Kovacsovics, Tibor J; Damon, Lloyd E; Komrokji, Rami; Solomon, Scott R; Kolitz, Jonathan E; Cooper, Maureen; Yeager, Andrew M; Louie, Arthur C; Feldman, Eric J

    2014-05-22

    CPX-351 is a liposomal formulation of cytarabine:daunorubicin designed to deliver synergistic drug ratios to leukemia cells. In this phase 2 study, newly diagnosed older acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients were randomized 2:1 to first-line CPX-351 or 7+3 treatment. The goal was to determine efficacy and identify patient subgroups that may benefit from CPX-351 treatment. Response rate (complete remission + incomplete remission) was the primary end point, with event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) as secondary end points. The 126 patients entered were balanced for disease and patient-specific risk factors. Overall, CPX-351 produced higher response rates (66.7% vs 51.2%, P = .07), meeting predefined criteria for success (P < .1). Differences in EFS and OS were not statistically significant. A planned analysis of the secondary AML subgroup demonstrated an improved response rate (57.6% vs 31.6%, P = .06), and prolongation of EFS (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.59, P = .08) and OS (HR = 0.46, P = .01). Recovery from cytopenias was slower after CPX-351 (median days to absolute neutrophil count ≥1000: 36 vs 32; platelets >100 000: 37 vs 28) with more grade 3-4 infections but without increase in infection-related deaths (3.5% vs 7.3%) or 60-day mortality (4.7% vs 14.6%), indicating acceptable safety. These results suggest a clinical benefit with CPX-351, particularly among patients with secondary AML, and provide the rationale for a phase 3 trial currently underway in newly diagnosed secondary AML patients. This study is registered at Clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00788892.

  11. Decreased survival in normal karyotype AML with single-nucleotide polymorphisms in genes encoding the AraC metabolizing enzymes cytidine deaminase and 5'-nucleotidase.

    PubMed

    Falk, Ingrid Jakobsen; Fyrberg, Anna; Paul, Esbjörn; Nahi, Hareth; Hermanson, Monica; Rosenquist, Richard; Höglund, Martin; Palmqvist, Lars; Stockelberg, Dick; Wei, Yuan; Gréen, Henrik; Lotfi, Kourosh

    2013-12-01

    De novo acute myeloid leukemia with normal karyotype (NK-AML) comprises a large group of patients with no common cytogenetic alterations and with a large variation in treatment response. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes related to the metabolism of the nucleoside analogue AraC, the backbone in AML treatment, might affect drug sensitivity and treatment outcome. Therefore, SNPs may serve as prognostic biomarkers aiding clinicians in individualized treatment decisions, with the aim of improving patient outcomes. We analyzed polymorphisms in genes encoding cytidine deaminase (CDA 79A>C rs2072671 and -451C>T rs532545), 5'-nucleotidase (cN-II 7A>G rs10883841), and deoxycytidine kinase (DCK 3'UTR 948T>C rs4643786) in 205 de novo NK-AML patients. In FLT3-internal tandem duplication (ITD)-positive patients, the CDA 79C/C and -451T/T genotypes were associated with shorter overall survival compared to other genotypes (5 vs. 24 months, P < 0.001 and 5 vs. 23 months, P = 0.015, respectively), and this was most pronounced in FLT3-ITD-positive/NPM1-positive patients. We observed altered in vitro sensitivity to topoisomerase inhibitory drugs, but not to nucleoside analogues, and a decrease in global DNA methylation in cells carrying both CDA variant alleles. A shorter survival was also observed for the cN-II variant allele, but only in FLT3-ITD-negative patients (25 vs. 31 months, P = 0.075). Our results indicate that polymorphisms in genes related to nucleoside analog drug metabolism may serve as prognostic markers in de novo NK-AML.

  12. Unique dual targeting of thymidylate synthase and topoisomerase1 by FdUMP[10] results in high efficacy against AML and low toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Evan; Jennings-Gee, Jamie; Caudell, David; Gmeiner, William H.

    2012-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy that leads to marrow failure and death. There is a desperate need for new therapies. The novel fluoropyrimidine, FdUMP[10], was highly active against both human AML cell lines, (IC50 values, 3.4nM-21.5nM) and murine lines (IC50 values, 123.8pM-131.4pM). In all cases, the IC50 of FdUMP[10] was lower than for cytarabine and ∼ 1000 times lower than 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). FdUMP[10] remained effective against cells expressing the Flt3 internal tandem duplication, BCR-ABL, MN1, and an shRNA against p53. It had activity against patient samples at concentrations that did not affect normal hematopoietic cells. FdUMP[10] inhibited thymidylate synthase (TS) and trapped topoisomerase I cleavage complexes (Top1CCs), leading to DNA damage and apoptosis. All cell lines and nearly all primary AML samples examined expressed both TS and Top1. In vivo, FdUMP[10] was active against a syngeneic AML model with a survival advantage equivalent to doxorubicin plus cytarabine. 5-FU treatment was toxic and did not improve survival. FdUMP[10] was better tolerated than 5-FU or cytarabine plus doxorubicin and did not affect normal HSCs, while 5-FU dramatically impaired their ability to engraft. In summary, FdUMP[10] was highly efficacious and better tolerated than standard therapies. PMID:22362039

  13. Outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for cytogenetically normal AML and identification of high-risk subgroup using WT1 expression in association with NPM1 and FLT3-ITD mutations.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jae-Ho; Kim, Hee-Je; Jeon, Young-Woo; Lee, Sung-Eun; Cho, Byung-Sik; Eom, Ki-Seong; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Lee, Seok; Min, Chang-Ki; Cho, Seok-Goo; Kim, Dong-Wook; Lee, Jong-Wook; Min, Woo-Sung

    2015-06-06

    According to recent guidelines, cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN AML) is divided into four molecular subgroups based on nucleophosmin-1 (NPM1) and FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3-internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD) mutations. All subgroups except for isolated NPM1mut are associated with poor prognosis. We retrospectively analyzed 223 patients with CN AML, 156 of whom were treated with standard chemotherapy. For postremission therapy, patients with available donors underwent allogeneic (allo) hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and the rest were treated with autologous HSCT or chemotherapy alone. We first compared the 4 conventional molecular subgroups, and then created another 4 subgroups based on WT1 expression: isolated NPM1mut, NPM1wt/FLT3-ITD-neg with low WT1 or high WT1, and FLT3-ITD-pos CN AML. We finally evaluated 89 patients who were treated with allo HSCT and achieved complete remission after standard chemotherapy. FLT3-ITD CN AML showed the worst outcome irrespective of NPM1mut, and isolated NPM1mut CN AML showed no significant differences compared with NPM1wt/FLT3-ITD-neg CN AML. In contrast, two newly stratified low-risk subgroups (NPM1wt/FLT3-ITD-neg with low WT1 and isolated NPM1mut CN AML) showed higher remission rates with superior overall survival (OS) compared with the other two high-risk subgroups, which showed a higher relapse rate even after allo HSCT. Further analysis showed that higher pre-HSCT expression of WT1 resulted in a higher relapse rate and poorer OS after allo HSCT. For CN AML, a risk-adapted approach using allo HSCT with novel agents should be evaluated with stratification specified by WT1. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Fludarabine with pharmacokinetically guided IV busulfan is superior to fixed-dose delivery in pretransplant conditioning of AML/MDS patients.

    PubMed

    Andersson, B S; Thall, P F; Valdez, B C; Milton, D R; Al-Atrash, G; Chen, J; Gulbis, A; Chu, D; Martinez, C; Parmar, S; Popat, U; Nieto, Y; Kebriaei, P; Alousi, A; de Lima, M; Rondon, G; Meng, Q H; Myers, A; Kawedia, J; Worth, L L; Fernandez-Vina, M; Madden, T; Shpall, E J; Jones, R B; Champlin, R E

    2017-04-01

    We hypothesized that IV busulfan (Bu) dosing could be safely intensified through pharmacokinetic (PK-) dose guidance to minimize the inter-patient variability in systemic exposure (SE) associated with body-sized dosing, and that this should improve outcome of AML/MDS patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation. To test this hypothesis, we treated 218 patients (median age 50.7 years, male/female 50/50%) with fludarabine 40 mg/m(2) once daily x4, each dose followed by IV Bu, randomized to 130 mg/m(2) (N=107) or PK-guided to average daily SE, AUC of 6000 μM min (N=111), stratified for remission status and allo-grafting from HLA-matched donors. Toxicity and GvHD rates in the groups were similar; the risk of relapse or treatment-related mortality remained higher in the fixed-dose group throughout the 80-month observation period. Further, PK-guidance yielded safer disease control, leading to improved overall and PFS, most prominently in MDS patients and in AML patients not in remission at allogeneic stem cell transplantation. We conclude that AML/MDS patients receiving pretransplant conditioning treatment with our 4-day regimen may benefit significantly from PK-guided Bu dosing. This could be considered an alternative to fixed-dose delivery since it provides the benefit of precise dose delivery to a predetermined SE without increasing risk(s) of serious toxicity and/or GvHD.

  15. Clofarabine plus Low-Dose Cytarabine Followed by Clofarabine plus Low-Dose Cytarabine Alternating with Decitabine in AML Frontline Therapy of Older Patients

    PubMed Central

    Faderl, Stefan; Ravandi, Farhad; Huang, Xuelin; Wang, Xuemei; Jabbour, Elias; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Kadia, Tapan; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Konopleva, Marina; Borthakur, Gautam; Burger, Jan; Feliu, Jennie; Kantarjian, Hagop M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Standard therapy for older patients with AML has a poor outcome. We have designed a combination of clofarabine plus low-dose cytarabine followed by a prolonged consolidation alternating with decitabine. Methods Sixty patients with a median age of 70 years (range 60-81) with newly diagnosed AML were included. They received clofarabine 20mg/m2 intravenously daily × 5 days plus cytarabine 20mg subcutaneously twice daily × 10 days. Responding patients continued for up to 17 courses of consolidation therapy including decitabine. Results Forty of 59 evaluable patients responded (66%). Complete remission rate was 58%. Median relapse-free survival (RFS) was 14.1 (95% CI: 6.9-not estimable) and median overall survival (OS) 12.7 months (95% CI: 8.8-not estimable). Median OS of responding patients (CR/CRp) was 24.2 months (95% CI: 17-not estimable). Compared to a historical group of patients who received clofarabine plus low-dose cytarabine with a shorter consolidation, RFS was not statistically different. Induction mortality was low (7% at 8 weeks) and toxicities manageable. Conclusions Clofarabine plus low-dose cytarabine alternating with decitabine in consolidation is active in older patients with newly diagnosed AML. The benefits of a prolonged consolidation remain unproven. PMID:22282348

  16. Using genome-wide CRISPR library screening with library resistant DCK to find new sources of Ara-C drug resistance in AML

    PubMed Central

    Kurata, Morito; Rathe, Susan K.; Bailey, Natashay J.; Aumann, Natalie K.; Jones, Justine M.; Veldhuijzen, G. Willemijn; Moriarity, Branden S.; Largaespada, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) can display de novo or acquired resistance to cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C), a primary component of induction chemotherapy. To identify genes capable of independently imposing Ara-C resistance, we applied a genome-wide CRISPR library to human U937 cells and exposed to them to Ara-C. Interestingly, all drug resistant clones contained guide RNAs for DCK. To avoid DCK gene modification, gRNA resistant DCK cDNA was created by the introduction of silent mutations. The CRISPR screening was repeated using the gRNA resistant DCK, and loss of SLC29A was identified as also being capable of conveying Ara-C drug resistance. To determine if loss of Dck results in increased sensitivity to other drugs, we conducted a screen of 446 FDA approved drugs using two Dck-defective BXH-2 derived murine AML cell lines and their Ara-C sensitive parental lines. Both cell lines showed an increase in sensitivity to prednisolone. Guide RNA resistant cDNA rescue was a legitimate strategy and multiple DCK or SLC29A deficient human cell clones were established with one clone becoming prednisolone sensitive. Dck-defective leukemic cells may become prednisolone sensitive indicating prednisolone may be an effective adjuvant therapy in some cases of DCK-negative AML. PMID:27808171

  17. Cellular determinants for preclinical activity of a novel CD33/CD3 bispecific T-cell engager (BiTE) antibody, AMG 330, against human AML.

    PubMed

    Laszlo, George S; Gudgeon, Chelsea J; Harrington, Kimberly H; Dell'Aringa, Justine; Newhall, Kathryn J; Means, Gary D; Sinclair, Angus M; Kischel, Roman; Frankel, Stanley R; Walter, Roland B

    2014-01-23

    CD33 is a valid target for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) but has proven challenging for antibody-drug conjugates. Herein, we investigated the cellular determinants for the activity of the novel CD33/CD3-directed bispecific T-cell engager antibody, AMG 330. In the presence of T cells, AMG 330 was highly active against human AML cell lines and primary AML cells in a dose- and effector to target cell ratio-dependent manner. Using cell lines engineered to express wild-type CD33 at increased levels, we found a quantitative relationship between AMG 330 cytotoxicity and CD33 expression; in contrast, AMG 330 cytotoxicity was neither affected by common CD33 single nucleotide polymorphisms nor expression of the adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) transporter proteins, P-glycoprotein or breast cancer resistance protein. Unlike bivalent CD33 antibodies, AMG 330 did not reduce surface CD33 expression. The epigenetic modifier drugs, panobinostat and azacitidine, increased CD33 expression in some cell lines and augmented AMG 330-induced cytotoxicity. These findings demonstrate that AMG 330 has potent CD33-dependent cytolytic activity in vitro, which can be further enhanced with other clinically available therapeutics. As it neither modulates CD33 expression nor is affected by ABC transporter activity, AMG 330 is highly promising for clinical exploration as it may overcome some limitations of previous CD33-targeted agents.

  18. Duration of first remission, hematopoietic cell transplantation-specific comorbidity index and patient age predict survival of patients with AML transplanted in second CR.

    PubMed

    Michelis, F V; Atenafu, E G; Gupta, V; Kim, D D; Kuruvilla, J; Lambie, A; Lipton, J H; Loach, D; Messner, H A

    2013-11-01

    Allo-SCT is potentially curative for patients with AML. Patients transplanted in CR2 tend to experience inferior survival compared with those in CR1. We retrospectively investigated the impact of pretransplant variables on the outcome of patients transplanted with AML in CR2. Ninety-four patients with AML in CR2 received a transplant between 1999 and 2011 with myeloablative (MA, n=65) or reduced-intensity conditioning regimens (RIC, n=29). Variables investigated included cytogenetic risk at diagnosis (SWOG), hematopoietic cell transplantation-specific comorbidity index (HCT-CI), CMV status, duration of CR1 and age. Median age of all patients was 47 years (range 18-70). Multivariable analysis for OS identified three prognostically significant categories: a favorable risk group included patients with duration of CR1 ≥6 months, age <55 years and HCT-CI score 0-3, an intermediate risk group with duration of CR1 ≥6 months, age <55 years and HCT-CI score 4-5 and a high-risk group with duration of CR1 <6 months or age ≥55 years (P=0.0001) with 5-year survivals of 53%, 31% and 6%, respectively. Acute and chronic GVHD did not influence this risk stratification. The stated risk factors discriminate patients with different OS and may assist in decision making for allo-SCT.

  19. Instruction of haematopoietic lineage choices, evolution of transcriptional landscapes and cancer stem cell hierarchies derived from an AML1-ETO mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Cabezas-Wallscheid, Nina; Eichwald, Victoria; de Graaf, Jos; Löwer, Martin; Lehr, Hans-Anton; Kreft, Andreas; Eshkind, Leonid; Hildebrandt, Andreas; Abassi, Yasmin; Heck, Rosario; Dehof, Anna Katharina; Ohngemach, Svetlana; Sprengel, Rolf; Wörtge, Simone; Schmitt, Steffen; Lotz, Johannes; Meyer, Claudius; Kindler, Thomas; Zhang, Dong-Er; Kaina, Bernd; Castle, John C; Trumpp, Andreas; Sahin, Ugur; Bockamp, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    The t(8;21) chromosomal translocation activates aberrant expression of the AML1-ETO (AE) fusion protein and is commonly associated with core binding factor acute myeloid leukaemia (CBF AML). Combining a conditional mouse model that closely resembles the slow evolution and the mosaic AE expression pattern of human t(8;21) CBF AML with global transcriptome sequencing, we find that disease progression was characterized by two principal pathogenic mechanisms. Initially, AE expression modified the lineage potential of haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), resulting in the selective expansion of the myeloid compartment at the expense of normal erythro- and lymphopoiesis. This lineage skewing was followed by a second substantial rewiring of transcriptional networks occurring in the trajectory to manifest leukaemia. We also find that both HSC and lineage-restricted granulocyte macrophage progenitors (GMPs) acquired leukaemic stem cell (LSC) potential being capable of initiating and maintaining the disease. Finally, our data demonstrate that long-term expression of AE induces an indolent myeloproliferative disease (MPD)-like myeloid leukaemia phenotype with complete penetrance and that acute inactivation of AE function is a potential novel therapeutic option. PMID:24124051

  20. Fusion of the TEL gene on 12p13 to the AML1 gene on 21q22 in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, G.F.; Golub, T.R.; Gilliland, D.G.; Bohlander, S.K.; Rowley, J.D.; Heibert, S.W.; Raimondi, S.C.; Ward, D.C.; Bray-Ward, P.; Morgan, E.

    1995-05-23

    Chromosomal rearrangements involving band 12p13 are found in a wide variety of human leukemias but are particularly common in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The genes involved in these rearrangements, however, have not been identified. We now report the cloning of a t(12;21) translocation breakpoint involving 12p13 and 21q22 in two cases of childhood pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia, in which t(12;21) rearrangements were not initially apparent. The consequence of the translocation is fusion of the helix-loop-helix domain of TEL, an ETS-like putative transcription factor, to the DNA-binding and transactivation domains of the transcription factor AML1. These data show that TEL, previously shown to be fused to the platelet-derived growth factor receptor {beta} in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, can be implicated in the pathogenesis of leukemia through its fusion to either a receptor tyrosine kinase or a transcription factor. The TEL-AML1 fusion also indicates that translocations affecting the AML1 gene can be associated with lymphoid, as well as myeloid, malignancy. 23 refs., 5 figs.

  1. SKLB-677, an FLT3 and Wnt/β-catenin signaling inhibitor, displays potent activity in models of FLT3-driven AML

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Shuang; Yang, Ling-Ling; Niu, Ting; Cheng, Chuan; Zhong, Lei; Zheng, Ming-Wu; Xiong, Yu; Li, Lin-Li; Xiang, Rong; Chen, Li-Juan; Zhou, Qiao; Wei, Yu-Quan; Yang, Sheng-Yong

    2015-01-01

    FLT3 has been identified as a valid target for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and some FLT3 inhibitors have shown very good efficacy in treating AML in clinical trials. Nevertheless, recent studies indicated that relapse and drug resistance are still difficult to avoid, and leukemia stem cells (LSCs) are considered one of the most important contributors. Here, we report the characterization of SKLB-677, a new FLT3 inhibitor developed by us recently. SKLB-677 exhibits low nanomolar potency in biochemical and cellular assays. It is efficacious in animal models at doses as low as 1mg/kg when administrated orally once daily. In particular, SKLB-677 but not first-generation and second-generation FLT3 inhibitors in clinical trials has the ability to inhibit Wnt/β-catenin signaling; Wnt/β-catenin signaling is required for the development of LSCs, but not necessary for the development of adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). This compound indeed showed considerable suppression effects on leukemia stem-like cells in in vitro functional assays, but had no influence on normal HSCs. Collectively, SKLB-677 is an interesting lead compound for the treatment of AML, and deserves further investigations. PMID:26497577

  2. Role for c-jun N-terminal kinase in treatment-refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML): signaling to multidrug-efflux and hyperproliferation.

    PubMed

    Cripe, L D; Gelfanov, V M; Smith, E A; Spigel, D R; Phillips, C A; Gabig, T G; Jung, S-H; Fyffe, J; Hartman, A D; Kneebone, P; Mercola, D; Burgess, G S; Boswell, H S

    2002-05-01

    A relationship was proved between constitutive activity of leukemic cell c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) and treatment failure in AML. Specifically, early treatment failure was predicted by the presence of constitutive JNK activity. The mechanistic origins of this association was sought. A multidrug resistant leukemic cell line, HL-60/ADR, characterized by hyperexpression of c-jun and JNK activity, was transfected with a mutant c-jun vector, whose substrate N-terminal c-jun serines were mutated. Down-regulated expression occurred of c-jun/AP-1-dependent genes, catalase and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) pi, which participate in cellular homeostasis to oxidative stress and xenobiotic exposure. MRP-efflux was abrogated in HL-60/ADR cells with dominant-negative c-jun, perhaps because MRP1 protein expression was also lost. Heightened sensitivity to daunorubicin resulted in cells subjected to this change. Biochemical analysis in 67 primary adult AML samples established a statistical correlation between cellular expression of c-jun and JNK activity, JNK activity with hyperleukocytosis at presentation of disease, and with exuberant MRP efflux. These findings reflect the survival role for c-jun/AP-1 and its regulatory kinase previously demonstrated for yeast in homeostatic response to oxidative stress and in operation of ATP-binding cassette efflux pumps, and may support evolutionary conservation of such function. Thus, JNK and c-jun may be salient drug targets in multidrug resistant AML.

  3. Resistance Prediction in AML: Analysis of 4,601 Patients from MRC/NCRI, HOVON/SAKK, SWOG, and MD Anderson Cancer Center

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Roland B.; Othus, Megan; Burnett, Alan K.; Löwenberg, Bob; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Ossenkoppele, Gert J.; Hills, Robert K.; Ravandi, Farhad; Pabst, Thomas; Evans, Anna; Pierce, Sherry R.; Vekemans, Marie-Christiane; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Estey, Elihu H.

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic resistance remains the principal problem in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We used area under receiver operator characteristic curves (AUC) to quantify our ability to predict therapeutic resistance in individual patients where AUC=1.0 denotes perfect prediction and AUC=0.5 denotes a coin flip, using data from 4,601 patients with newly diagnosed AML given induction therapy with 3+7 or more intense standard regimens in MRC/NCRI, HOVON, SWOG, and MD Anderson Cancer Center studies. Age, performance status, white blood cell count, secondary disease, cytogenetic risk, and FLT3-ITD/NPM1 mutation status were each independently associated with failure to achieve complete remission despite no early death (“primary refractoriness”). However, the AUC of a bootstrap-corrected multivariable model predicting this outcome was only 0.78, indicating only fair predictive ability. Removal of FLT3-ITD and NPM1 information only slightly decreased the AUC (0.76). Prediction of resistance, defined as primary refractoriness or short relapse-free survival (RFS), was even more difficult. Our ability to forecast resistance based on routinely available pre-treatment covariates provides a rationale for continued randomization between standard and new therapies and supports further examination of genetic and post-treatment data to optimize resistance prediction in AML. PMID:25113226

  4. Resistance prediction in AML: analysis of 4601 patients from MRC/NCRI, HOVON/SAKK, SWOG and MD Anderson Cancer Center.

    PubMed

    Walter, R B; Othus, M; Burnett, A K; Löwenberg, B; Kantarjian, H M; Ossenkoppele, G J; Hills, R K; Ravandi, F; Pabst, T; Evans, A; Pierce, S R; Vekemans, M-C; Appelbaum, F R; Estey, E H

    2015-02-01

    Therapeutic resistance remains the principal problem in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We used area under receiver-operating characteristic curves (AUCs) to quantify our ability to predict therapeutic resistance in individual patients, where AUC=1.0 denotes perfect prediction and AUC=0.5 denotes a coin flip, using data from 4601 patients with newly diagnosed AML given induction therapy with 3+7 or more intense standard regimens in UK Medical Research Council/National Cancer Research Institute, Dutch-Belgian Cooperative Trial Group for Hematology/Oncology/Swiss Group for Clinical Cancer Research, US cooperative group SWOG and MD Anderson Cancer Center studies. Age, performance status, white blood cell count, secondary disease, cytogenetic risk and FLT3-ITD/NPM1 mutation status were each independently associated with failure to achieve complete remission despite no early death ('primary refractoriness'). However, the AUC of a bootstrap-corrected multivariable model predicting this outcome was only 0.78, indicating only fair predictive ability. Removal of FLT3-ITD and NPM1 information only slightly decreased the AUC (0.76). Prediction of resistance, defined as primary refractoriness or short relapse-free survival, was even more difficult. Our limited ability to forecast resistance based on routinely available pretreatment covariates provides a rationale for continued randomization between standard and new therapies and supports further examination of genetic and posttreatment data to optimize resistance prediction in AML.

  5. Outcome of children with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia given autologous or allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in the aieop AML-2002/01 study.

    PubMed

    Locatelli, F; Masetti, R; Rondelli, R; Zecca, M; Fagioli, F; Rovelli, A; Messina, C; Lanino, E; Bertaina, A; Favre, C; Giorgiani, G; Ripaldi, M; Ziino, O; Palumbo, G; Pillon, M; Pession, A; Rutella, S; Prete, A

    2015-02-01

    We analyzed the outcome of 243 children with high-risk (HR) AML in first CR1 enrolled in the AIEOP-2002/01 protocol, who were given either allogeneic (ALLO; n=141) or autologous (AUTO; n=102) hematopoietic SCT (HSCT), depending on the availability of a HLA-compatible sibling. Infants, patients with AML-M7, or complex karyotype or those with FLT3-ITD, were eligible to be transplanted also from alternative donors. All patients received a myeloablative regimen combining busulfan, cyclophosphamide and melphalan; [corrected] AUTO-HSCT patients received BM cells in most cases, while in children given ALLO-HSCT stem cell source was BM in 96, peripheral blood in 19 and cord blood in 26. With a median follow-up of 57 months (range 12-130), the probability of disease-free survival (DFS) was 73% and 63% in patients given either ALLO- or AUTO-HSCT, respectively (P=NS). Although the cumulative incidence (CI) of relapse was lower in ALLO- than in AUTO-HSCT recipients (17% vs 28%, respectively; P=0.043), the CI of TRM was 7% in both groups. Patients transplanted with unrelated donor cord blood had a remarkable 92.3% 8-year DFS probability. Altogether, these data confirm that HSCT is a suitable option for preventing leukemia recurrence in HR children with CR1 AML.

  6. Using genome-wide CRISPR library screening with library resistant DCK to find new sources of Ara-C drug resistance in AML.

    PubMed

    Kurata, Morito; Rathe, Susan K; Bailey, Natashay J; Aumann, Natalie K; Jones, Justine M; Veldhuijzen, G Willemijn; Moriarity, Branden S; Largaespada, David A

    2016-11-03

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) can display de novo or acquired resistance to cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C), a primary component of induction chemotherapy. To identify genes capable of independently imposing Ara-C resistance, we applied a genome-wide CRISPR library to human U937 cells and exposed to them to Ara-C. Interestingly, all drug resistant clones contained guide RNAs for DCK. To avoid DCK gene modification, gRNA resistant DCK cDNA was created by the introduction of silent mutations. The CRISPR screening was repeated using the gRNA resistant DCK, and loss of SLC29A was identified as also being capable of conveying Ara-C drug resistance. To determine if loss of Dck results in increased sensitivity to other drugs, we conducted a screen of 446 FDA approved drugs using two Dck-defective BXH-2 derived murine AML cell lines and their Ara-C sensitive parental lines. Both cell lines showed an increase in sensitivity to prednisolone. Guide RNA resistant cDNA rescue was a legitimate strategy and multiple DCK or SLC29A deficient human cell clones were established with one clone becoming prednisolone sensitive. Dck-defective leukemic cells may become prednisolone sensitive indicating prednisolone may be an effective adjuvant therapy in some cases of DCK-negative AML.

  7. ComMIT and Tweb Integration: Global Tsunami Modeling Done Locally

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamb, L.; Moore, C. W.; Burger, E. F.

    2014-12-01

    Tweb is a web-based tsunami modeling research tool that was developed to provide distributed and remote access to the modeling and forecasting infrastructure developed for operational use at NOAA's Center for Tsunami Research (NCTR). ComMIT is a desktop application providing a powerful and fully functional, yet easy-to use graphical user interface to the NCTR-developed MOST tsunami forecasting model. ComMIT is a self-contained downloadable application available from NCTR for use by qualified and novice modelers alike. We have recently added functionality that allows ComMIT to retrieve the prefered model solution for tsunami events from the Tweb Web Service. A ComMIT user with access to high resolution coastal bathymetry can generate detailed inundation models for real or synthetic events for their areas of interest. Then with the push of a button, the ComMIT user can upload their model results to Tweb where a community of tsunami modelers and forecasters can see these model results displayed in Tweb, along with other operational and contributed inundation forecast models. Besides the crowdsourcing aspect of tsunami modeling that will allow tsunami forecasters to get inundation model inputs from areas they normally would not consider, these contributed flooding models could provide forecasters with an early model solution verification capability by allowing model result comparisons with local tide gauge data in areas where operational models have not been developed. In addition, with the proper training this tool is very useful for education and as a vehicle for community tsunami hazard assessment. We will illustrate the model solution and results interchange capabilities now possible with these two applications.

  8. Differential methylation in CN-AML preferentially targets non-CGI regions and is dictated by DNMT3A mutational status and associated with predominant hypomethylation of HOX genes

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Ying; Lennartsson, Andreas; Gaidzik, Verena I; Deneberg, Stefan; Karimi, Mohsen; Bengtzén, Sofia; Höglund, Martin; Bullinger, Lars; Döhner, Konstanze; Lehmann, Sören

    2014-01-01

    The extent and role of aberrant DNA methylation in promoter CpG islands (CGIs) have been extensively studied in leukemia and other malignancies. Still, CGIs represent only a small fraction of the methylome. We aimed to characterize genome-wide differential methylation of cytogenetically normal AML (CN-AML) cells compared with normal CD34+ bone marrow cells using the Illumina® 450K methylation array. Differential methylation in CN-AML was most prominent in genomic areas far from CGIs, in so called open sea regions. Furthermore, differential methylation was specifically found in genes encoding transcription factors (TFs), with WT1 being the most differentially methylated TF. Among genetic mutations in AML, DNMT3A mutations showed the most prominent association with the DNA methylation pattern, characterized by hypomethylation of CGIs (as compared with DNMT3A wild type cases). The differential methylation in DNMT3A mutant cells vs. wild type cells was predominantly found in HOX genes, which were hypomethylated. These results were confirmed and validated in an independent CN-AML cohort. In conclusion, we show that, in CN-AML, the most pronounced changes in DNA methylation occur in non-CGI regions and that DNMT3A mutations confer a pattern of global hypomethylation that specifically targets HOX genes. PMID:24866170

  9. The 3; 21 translocation in myelodysplasia results in a fusion transcript between the AML1 gene and the gene for EAP, a highly conserved protein associated with the Epstein-Barr virus small RNA EBER 1

    SciTech Connect

    Nucifora, G.; Begy, C.R.; Rowley, J.D. ); Erickson, P.; Drabkin, H.A. )

    1993-08-15

    In the 8;21 translocation, the AML1 gene, located at chromosome band 21q22, is translocated to chromosome 8 (q22), where it is fused to the ETO gene and transcribed as a chimeric gene. AML1 is the human homolog of the recently cloned mouse gene pebp2[alpha]B, homologous to the DNA binding [alpha] subunit of the polyoma enhancer factor pebp2. AML1 is also involved in a translocation with chromosome 3 that is seen in patients with therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome and in chronic myelogenous leukemia in blast crisis. The authors have isolated a fusion cDNA clone from a t(3;21) library derived from a patient with therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome; this clone contains sequences from AML1 and from EAP, which have now been localized to ban 3q26. EAP has previously been characterized as a highly expressed small nuclear protein of 128 residues (EBER 1) associated with Epstein-Barr virus small RNA. The fusion clone contains the DNA binding 5[prime] part of AML1 that is fused to ETO in the t(8;21) and, in addition, at least one other exon. The translocation replaces the last nine codons of AML1 with the last 96 codons of EAP. The fusion does not maintain the correct reading frame of EAP and may not lead to a functional chimeric protein. 23 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Assessment of circulating biochemical markers and antioxidative status in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients.

    PubMed

    Rasool, Mahmood; Farooq, Shahzad; Malik, Arif; Shaukat, Aysha; Manan, Abdul; Asif, Muhammad; Sani, Suleman; Qazi, Mahmood Husain; Kamal, Mohammad Amjad; Iqbal, Zafar; Hussain, Abrar

    2015-01-01

    Various circulating biochemical markers are indicators of pathological state in leukemia and its subtypes. Increased oxidative stress and decreased antioxidant factors portray clear image associated with malignancies during subtypes of leukemia. In this research work we investigated the inter-relationship among the subtypes of leukemia with circulating biochemical markers and oxidative stress in the Pakistani population. This research work was conducted on a total number of 70 subjects in which 20 were control participants and 50 were suffering from leukemia and divided into two subtypes (ALL and AML). Various circulating biomarkers were investigated including hematological, hepatic and renal profiles as well as oxidative stress markers, electrolytes and vitamins C and E. Results show that vitamin E was found to be decreased in diseased sub-types (P < 0.05). Malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were very high in disease sub-types (ALL-B = 8.69 ± 1.59; ALL-T = 8.78 ± 0.97; AML = 8.50 ± 1.29) compared to controls (1.22 ± 0.10; P < 0.05) while the levels of antioxidants [superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), reduced glutathione (GSH), catalase (CAT)], platelets, as well as electrolytes (Ca and Mg) were reduced in patients suffering from leukemia (sub-types). Enhanced levels of oxidative stress (MDA) and decreased levels of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants reflect the pathological state and impaired cell control in patients suffering from leukemia (subtypes) and show a strong correlation with oxidative stress, indicating that patients' biological systems are under oxidative stress.

  11. Mapping of jog locus to the region between D6Mit104 and D6Mit336 on mouse chromosome 6.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao-yang; Chen, Zi-yan; Kanou, Yasuhiko; Takagishi, Yoshiko; Hayashi, Yoshitaka; Ohno, Tamio; Murata, Yoshiharu; Oda, Sen-ichi

    2007-10-01

    The joggle mouse is a recessive ataxic mutant carrying an unknown mutation in a C3H/He (C3H)-derived chromosomal segment. Taking advantage of the mouse genome database, we selected 127 DNA microsatellite markers showing heterozygosity between C3H and C57BL/6J (B6) and a first round of screening for the joggle mutation was performed on B6-jog/+ partial congenic mice (N4). We identified 4 chromosomal regions in which 13 microsatellite markers show heterozygosity between C3H and B6. Then, we analyzed the genotype of these 4 chromosomal regions in mice that showed the joggle phenotype and mapped the jog locus between markers D6Mit104 (111.4 Mb) and D6Mit336 (125.1 Mb) (an interval of 13.7 Mb) on chromosome 6. By using a partial congenic strain together with the mouse genome database, we successfully mapped the chromosomal localization of the jog locus much more efficiently than by conventional linkage analysis.

  12. The MIT Accelerator Laboratory for Diagnostic Development for OMEGA, Z and the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrasso, R.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Armstrong, E.; Orozco, D.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rojas Herrera, J.; Rosenberg, M.; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A.; Frenje, J.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Hahn, K.; Jones, B.; Ruiz, C. L.; Sangster, T. C.

    2014-10-01

    The MIT Linear Electrostatic Ion Accelerator generates D-D and D-3He fusion products, which are used for development of nuclear diagnostics for OMEGA, Z, and the NIF. Fusion reaction rates around 106 s-1 are routinely achieved with this accelerator, and fluence and energy of the fusion products are accurately characterized. Diagnostics developed and calibrated at this facility include CR-39 based charged-particle spectrometers, neutron detectors, and the particle Time-Of-Flight (pTOF) CVD-diamond-based bang time detector. The accelerator is also a vital tool in the education of graduate and undergraduate students at MIT. This work was supported in part by SNL, DOE, LLE and LLNL.

  13. Center for Multiscale Plasma Dynamics: Report on Activities (UCLA/MIT), 2009-2010

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, Troy Alan

    2014-10-03

    The final “phaseout” year of the CMPD ended July 2010; a no cost extension was requested until May 2011 in order to enable the MIT subcontract funds to be fully utilized. Research progress over this time included verification and validation activities for the BOUT and BOUT++ code, studies of spontaneous reconnection in the VTF facility at MIT, and studies of the interaction between Alfv´en waves and drift waves in LAPD. The CMPD also hosted the 6th plasma physics winter school in 2010 (jointly with the NSF frontier center the Center for Magnetic Self-Organization, significant funding came from NSF for this most recent iteration of theWinter School).

  14. Educational Outreach at the M.I.T. Plasma Fusion Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Censabella, V.

    1996-11-01

    Educational outreach at the MIT Plasma Fusion Center consists of volunteers working together to increase the public's knowledge of fusion and plasma-related experiments. Seeking to generate excitement about science, engineering and mathematics, the PFC holds a number of outreach activities throughout the year, such as Middle and High School Outreach Days. Outreach also includes the Mr. Magnet Program, which uses an interactive strategy to engage elementary school children. Included in this year's presentation will be a new and improved C-MOD Jr, a confinement video game which helps students to discover how computers manipulate magnetic pulses to keep a plasma confined for as long as possible. Also on display will be an educational toy created by the Cambridge Physics Outlet, a PFC spin-off company. The PFC maintains a Home Page on the World Wide Web, which can be reached at http://cmod2.pfc.mit.edu/.

  15. Increased frequency of dicentric chromosomes in therapy-related MDS and AML compared to de novo disease is significantly related to previous treatment with alkylating agents and suggests a specific susceptibility to chromosome breakage at the centromere.

    PubMed

    Andersen, M K; Pedersen-Bjergaard, J

    2000-01-01

    Dicentric chromosomes are observed in many malignant diseases including myelodysplasia (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and have often been observed in a subset of these diseases, namely therapy-related MDS (t-MDS) and AML (t-AML). Using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with centromere-specific probes, we investigated the frequency and type of dicentric chromosomes in 180 consecutive patients with t-MDS and t-AML and in 231 consecutive patients with de novo MDS and AML, whose karyotypes had been studied previously by conventional G-banding. Twenty-seven out of 180 patients with t-MDS or t-AML presented dicentric chromosomes compared to only seven out of 231 patients with de novo disease (P = 0.00003). A dic(1q;7p) was observed in 10 cases, a dic(5p;17q) was observed in six cases, whereas various isodicentric chromosomes were observed in six cases. Excluding these six cases with isodicentrics, all 25 patients with dicentric chromosomes had involvement of at least one of the chromosome arms 1q, 5p, or 7p resulting in monosomy for 5q or 7q, and/or trisomy for 1q. Patients with dicentric chromosomes presented significantly more often as t-MDS compared to patients without dicentrics (P = 0.046), and the presence of a dicentric chromosome was significantly related to previous therapy with alkylating agents (P = 0.026). Thus, only one out of 27 patients with a dicentric chromosome had not previously received an alkylating agent. A specific susceptibility to breakage at the centromere after exposure to alkylating agents is suggested and may explain the frequent loss of whole chromosomes, in particular chromosomes 5 and 7 in t-MDS and t-AML, if the breaks are not followed by rejoining. Leukemia (2000) 14, 105-111.

  16. Molecular genetic studies on 167 pediatric ALL patients from different areas of Pakistan confirm a low frequency of the favorable prognosis fusion oncogene TEL-AML1 (t 12; 21) in underdeveloped countries of the region.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Zafar

    2014-01-01

    TEL-AML1 fusion oncogene (t 12; 21) is the most common chromosomal abnormality in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). This translocation is associated with a good prognosis and rarely shows chemotherapeutic resistance to 3-drug based remission induction phase of treatment as well as overall treatment. Thus, the higher the frequency of this fusion oncogene, the easier to manage childhood ALL in a given region with less intensive chemotherapy. Although global frequency of TEL-AML1 has been reported to be 20-30%, a very low frequency has been found in some geographical regions, including one study from Lahore, Punjab, Pakistan and others from India. The objective of present study was to investigate if this low frequency of TEL- AML1 in pediatric ALL is only in Lahore region or similar situation exists at other representative oncology centers of Pakistan. A total of 167 pediatric ALL patients were recruited from major pediatric oncology centers situated in Lahore, Faisalabad, Peshawar and Islamabad. Patients were tested for TEL-AML1 using nested reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Only 17 out of 167 (10.2%) patients were found to be TEL-AML1 positive. TEL-AML1+ALL patients had favorable prognosis, most of them (82.4%, 14/17) showing early remission and good overall survival. Thus, our findings indicate an overall low frequency of TEL-AML1 in Pakistan pediatric ALL patients, in accordance with lower representation of this prognostically important genetic abnormality in other less developed countries, specifically in south Asia, thus associating it with poor living standards in these ethnic groups. It also indicates ethnic and geographical differences in the distribution of this prognostically important genetic abnormality among childhood ALL patients, which may have a significant bearing on ALL management strategies in different parts of the world.

  17. The MIT Laser-Driven Target of Nuclear Polarized Hydrogen Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clasie, B.; Crawford, C.; Dutta, D.; Gao, H.; Seely, J.; Xu, W.

    2007-04-01

    The laser-driven target at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) produced nuclear polarized hydrogen gas in a configuration similar to that used in scattering experiments. The best result achieved was 50.5% polarization with 58.2% degree of dissociation of the sample beam exiting the storage cell at a hydrogen flow rate of 1.1 × 1018 atoms/s.

  18. Teleoperation experiments with a Utah/MIT hand and a VPL DataGlove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, D.; Demmel, J.; Hong, J.; Lafferriere, Gerardo; Salkind, L.; Tan, X.

    1989-01-01

    A teleoperation system capable of controlling a Utah/MIT Dextrous Hand using a VPL DataGlove as a master is presented. Additionally the system is capable of running the dextrous hand in robotic (autonomous) mode as new programs are developed. The software and hardware architecture used is presented and the experiments performed are described. The communication and calibration issues involved are analyzed and applications to the analysis and development of automated dextrous manipulations are investigated.

  19. The neurosciences research program at MIT and the beginning of the modern field of neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Adelman, George

    2010-01-15

    The interdisciplinary field, "neuroscience," began at MIT in 1962 with the founding of the Neurosciences Research Program (NRP) by Francis O. Schmitt and a group of US and international scientists - physical, biological, medical, and behavioral - interested in understanding the brain basis of behavior and mind. They organized and held specialist meetings of basic topics in neuroscience, and the journal and book publications over the next 20 years, based on these meetings, helped establish the new field.

  20. Fußball mit Wissenschaftlichem Maß: Bananenflanken, Flatterbälle, Kopfballkämpfe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathelitsch, Leopold; Thaller, Sigrid

    2006-05-01

    Die physikalische Betrachtung des Fußballs liefert spannende Resultate. Wegen der geringen Torzahl spielt der Zufall bei Sieg oder Niederlage stärker mit als in anderen Sportarten. Fußball ist daher mit gewissen statistischen Eigenschaften radioaktiver Quellen vergleichbar. Gleich mehrere physikalische Effekte beeinflussen die Flugbahn des Balls. Der Magnus-Effekt zum Beispiel ermöglicht erst Bananenflanken. Pfeift ein Schiedsrichter falsch, dann wird er nicht selten von seiner Sehperspektive getäuscht.

  1. Gaussian frequency blending algorithm with matrix inversion tomosynthesis (MITS) and filtered back projection (FBP) for better digital breast tomosynthesis reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying; Lo, Joseph Y.; Baker, Jay A.; Dobbins, James T., III

    2006-03-01

    Breast cancer is a major problem and the most common cancer among women. The nature of conventional mammpgraphy makes it very difficult to distinguish a cancer from overlying breast tissues. Digital Tomosynthesis refers to a three-dimensional imaging technique that allows reconstruction of an arbitrary set of planes in the breast from limited-angle series of projection images as the x-ray source moves. Several tomosynthesis algorithms have been proposed, including Matrix Inversion Tomosynthesis (MITS) and Filtered Back Projection (FBP) that have been investigated in our lab. MITS shows better high frequency response in removing out-of-plane blur, while FBP shows better low frequency noise propertities. This paper presents an effort to combine MITS and FBP for better breast tomosynthesis reconstruction. A high-pass Gaussian filter was designed and applied to three-slice "slabbing" MITS reconstructions. A low-pass Gaussian filter was designed and applied to the FBP reconstructions. A frequency weighting parameter was studied to blend the high-passed MITS with low-passed FBP frequency components. Four different reconstruction methods were investigated and compared with human subject images: 1) MITS blended with Shift-And-Add (SAA), 2) FBP alone, 3) FBP with applied Hamming and Gaussian Filters, and 4) Gaussian Frequency Blending (GFB) of MITS and FBP. Results showed that, compared with FBP, Gaussian Frequency Blending (GFB) has better performance for high frequency content such as better reconstruction of micro-calcifications and removal of high frequency noise. Compared with MITS, GFB showed more low frequency breast tissue content.

  2. May 1, 1989- A Critical Turning Point in the Cold Fusion Saga: APS, MIT and the Real Story

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallove, Sc. D.; Eugene, F.; Chubb, Talbot

    2001-04-01

    As Chief Science Writer at the MIT News Office from 1987 through 1991, and as an engineer (MIT, S.B. 1969, S.M. 1970) familiar with heat measurements and the various other experiment claims, I was in a position to ascertain the true facts surrounding: the media and Press Conference events at MIT before and after May 1, 1989; the ill-fated calorimetric experiment performed by the MIT Plasma Fusion Center; and the MIT Administration's so-called investigation of this experiment. This activity led to wide-spread disparagement of the Fleischmann-Pons claims. A reconstruction of these events will be outlined, together with original supporting evidence that confirm that the "standard story" of how cold fusion was "debunked" at the May 1, 1989 APS meeting in Baltimore is not only wrong, but catastrophically so(Eugene Mallove, Fire from Ice: Searching for the Truth Behind the Cold Fusion Furor. (John Wiley & Sons, 1991))^,(Infinite Energy Magazine, Issue #24, March/April 1999, 10th Anniversary of Cold Fusion issue. (Includes time-lines and 55-page "MIT Special Report") ).

  3. BCL-2 inhibition with ABT-737 prolongs survival in an NRAS/BCL-2 mouse model of AML by targeting primitive LSK and progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Beurlet, Stephanie; Omidvar, Nader; Gorombei, Petra; Krief, Patricia; Le Pogam, Carole; Setterblad, Niclas; de la Grange, Pierre; Leboeuf, Christophe; Janin, Anne; Noguera, Maria-Elena; Hervatin, Florence; Sarda-Mantel, Laure; Konopleva, Marina; Andreeff, Michael; Tu, Andrea W.; Fan, Alice C.; Felsher, Dean W.; Whetton, Anthony; Pla, Marika; West, Robert; Fenaux, Pierre; Chomienne, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) transforms into an acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) with associated increased bone marrow (BM) blast infiltration. Using a transgenic mouse model, MRP8[NRASD12/hBCL-2], in which the NRAS:BCL-2 complex at the mitochondria induces MDS progressing to AML with dysplastic features, we studied the therapeutic potential of a BCL-2 homology domain 3 mimetic inhibitor, ABT-737. Treatment significantly extended lifespan, increased survival of lethally irradiated secondary recipients transplanted with cells from treated mice compared with cells from untreated mice, with a reduction of BM blasts, Lin-/Sca-1+/c-Kit+, and progenitor populations by increased apoptosis of infiltrating blasts of diseased mice assessed in vivo by technicium-labeled annexin V single photon emission computed tomography and ex vivo by annexin V/7-amino actinomycin D flow cytometry, terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling, caspase 3 cleavage, and re-localization of the NRAS:BCL-2 complex from mitochondria to plasma membrane. Phosphoprotein analysis showed restoration of wild-type (WT) AKT or protein kinase B, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and mitogen-activated protein kinase patterns in spleen cells after treatment, which showed reduced mitochondrial membrane potential. Exon specific gene expression profiling corroborates the reduction of leukemic cells, with an increase in expression of genes coding for stem cell development and maintenance, myeloid differentiation, and apoptosis. Myelodysplastic features persist underscoring targeting of BCL-2-mediated effects on MDS–AML transformation and survival of leukemic cells. PMID:23943652

  4. Silver nanoparticles exhibit size-dependent differential toxicity and induce expression of syncytin-1 in FA-AML1 and MOLT-4 leukaemia cell lines.

    PubMed

    Alqahtani, Sultan; Promtong, Pawika; Oliver, Anthony W; He, Xiaotong T; Walker, Thomas D; Povey, Andrew; Hampson, Lynne; Hampson, Ian N

    2016-11-01

    Human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) sequences make up ~8% of the human genome and increased expression of some HERV proteins has been observed in various pathologies including leukaemia and multiple sclerosis. However, little is known about the function of these HERV proteins or environmental factors which regulate their expression. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are used very extensively as antimicrobials and antivirals in numerous consumer products although their effect on the expression of HERV gene products is unknown. Cell proliferation and cell toxicity assays were carried out on human acute T lymphoblastic leukaemia (MOLT-4) and Fanconi anaemia associated acute myeloid leukaemia (FA-AML1) cells treated with two different sizes of AgNPs (7nm and 50nm diameter). Reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and western blotting were then used to the assess expression of HERV-W syncytin-1 mRNA and protein in these cells. FA-AML1 cells were more sensitive overall than MOLT-4 to treatment with the smaller 7nm sized AgNp's being the most toxic in these cells. MOLT-4 cell were more resistant and showed no evidence of differential toxicity to the different sized particles. Syncytin-1 mRNA and protein were induced by both 7 and 50nm AgNPs in both cell types yet with different kinetics. In summary, the observation that AgNPs induce expression of syncytin-1 in FA-AML1 and MOLT-4 cells at doses as little as 5 µg/ml is grounds for concern since this protein is up-regulated in both malignant and neurodegenerative diseases. Considering the widespread use of AgNPs in the environment it is clear that their ability to induce syncytin-1 should be investigated further in other cell types.

  5. Deletion of PdMit1, a homolog of yeast Csg1, affects growth and Ca(2+) sensitivity of the fungus Penicillium digitatum, but does not alter virulence.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Congyi; Wang, Weili; Wang, Mingshuang; Ruan, Ruoxin; Sun, Xuepeng; He, Meixian; Mao, Cungui; Li, Hongye

    2015-04-01

    GDP-mannose:inositol-phosphorylceramide (MIPC) and its derivatives are important for Ca(2+) sensitization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and for the virulence of Candida albicans, but its role in the virulence of plant fungal pathogens remains unclear. In this study, we report the identification and functional characterization of PdMit1, the gene encoding MIPC synthase in Penicillium digitatum, one of the most important pathogens of postharvest citrus fruits. To understand the function of PdMit1, a PdMit1 deletion mutant was generated. Compared to its wild-type control, the PdMit1 deletion mutant exhibited slow radial growth, decreased conidia production and delayed conidial germination, suggesting that PdMit1 is important for the growth of mycelium, sporulation and conidial germination. The PdMit1 deletion mutant also showed hypersensitivity to Ca(2+). Treatment with 250 mmol/l Ca(2+) induced vacuole fusion in the wild-type strain, but not in the PdMit1 deletion mutant. Treatment with 250mmol/lCaCl2 upregulated three Ca(2+)-ATPase genes in the wild-type strain, and this was significantly inhibited in the PdMit1 deletion mutant. These results suggest that PdMit1 may have a role in regulating vacuole fusion and expression of Ca(2+)-ATPase genes by controlling biosynthesis of MIPC, and thereby imparts P. digitatum Ca(2+) tolerance. However, we found that PdMit1 is dispensable for virulence of P. digitatum.

  6. Up-regulation of a HOXA-PBX3 homeobox-gene signature following down-regulation of miR-181 is associated with adverse prognosis in patients with cytogenetically abnormal AML.

    PubMed

    Li, Zejuan; Huang, Hao; Li, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Xi; Chen, Ping; Arnovitz, Stephen; Radmacher, Michael D; Maharry, Kati; Elkahloun, Abdel; Yang, Xinan; He, Chunjiang; He, Miao; Zhang, Zhiyu; Dohner, Konstanze; Neilly, Mary Beth; Price, Colles; Lussier, Yves A; Zhang, Yanming; Larson, Richard A; Le Beau, Michelle M; Caligiuri, Michael A; Bullinger, Lars; Valk, Peter J M; Delwel, Ruud; Lowenberg, Bob; Liu, Paul P; Marcucci, Guido; Bloomfield, Clara D; Rowley, Janet D; Chen, Jianjun

    2012-03-08

    Increased expression levels of miR-181 family members have been shown to be associated with favorable outcome in patients with cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia. Here we show that increased expression of miR-181a and miR-181b is also significantly (P < .05; Cox regression) associated with favorable overall survival in cytogenetically abnormal AML (CA-AML) patients. We further show that up-regulation of a gene signature composed of 4 potential miR-181 targets (including HOXA7, HOXA9, HOXA11, and PBX3), associated with down-regulation of miR-181 family members, is an independent predictor of adverse overall survival on multivariable testing in analysis of 183 CA-AML patients. The independent prognostic impact of this 4-homeobox-gene signature was confirmed in a validation set of 271 CA-AML patients. Furthermore, our in vitro and in vivo studies indicated that ectopic expression of miR-181b significantly promoted apoptosis and inhibited viability/proliferation of leukemic cells and delayed leukemogenesis; such effects could be reversed by forced expression of PBX3. Thus, the up-regulation of the 4 homeobox genes resulting from the down-regulation of miR-181 family members probably contribute to the poor prognosis of patients with nonfavorable CA-AML. Restoring expression of miR-181b and/or targeting the HOXA/PBX3 pathways may provide new strategies to improve survival substantially.

  7. [Early detection of MRD in peripheral blood after induction chemotherapy of newly diagnosed patients with AML and its correlation with curative effects].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xu-Shu; Lan, Fei; Cui, Xu; Jiang, Neng-Gang; Zhu, Huan-Ling; Jia, Yong-Qian

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to detect the minimal residual disease (MRD) in peripheral blood of newly diagnosed patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) on day 8 of induction chemotherapy and analyze the correlation between day 8 MRD (D8RD) and therapeutic effectiveness. 29 adult patients (13 males and 16 females, aged 16 - 75 years, median 41 years) with AML diagnosed and treated in West China Hospital from September 2009 to June 2010 were analyzed and followed up in the study. The leukemia-associated aberrant immunophenotype (LAIP) of all the patients were detected by multiparameter flow cytometry (FCM) before therapy. The level of MRD in the peripheral blood at day 8 of induction chemotherapy was detected by FCM based on the LAIP. The overall survival curve was drawn by calculation using Kaplan-Meier method using, and the comparison between different groups was carried out by Log-rank test. The results indicated that after first course therapy, the levels of peripheral D8RD in 7 out of 29 AML cases were lower than 0.01% (negative group), and that in another 22 cases were higher than 0.01% (0.08% - 55%, positive group). The sex, age, WBC, LDH, percentage of bone marrow blasts at diagnosis in these groups were not statistically different. 6 cases achieved CR (86%) in D8RD negative group, and also 6 cases achieved CR (27%) in D8RD positive group, CR rate in D8RD negative group was higher than in D8RD positive group (86% vs 27%, P < 0.05). The median follow-up of 29 cases lasted for 15 months; the 1-year overall survival rate of D8RD negative and D8RD positive groups was 100% and 39.4%, respectively (P < 0.01). It is concluded that MRD level in peripheral blood at day 8 of induction chemotherapy is an early index to predict clinical efficacy of induction therapy in AML.

  8. Chemosensitivity of nonleukemic clonogenic precursors in AML patients in complete remission: association with CD34(+) mobilization and with disease-free survival.

    PubMed

    Milone, Giuseppe; Avola, Giuseppe; Leotta, Salvatore; Strano, Aurora; Camuglia, Maria Grazia; Pinto, Valeria; Mercurio, Salvatore; Poidomani, Massimo; Coppoletta, Stefania; Di Marco, Anna Lia; Consoli, Carla; Triolo, Anna; Spadaro, Andrea; Privitera, Antonella; Ragusa, Angela; Tibullo, Daniele; Di Mercurio, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    A high number of CD34(+) cells in the peripheral blood during mobilization in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in complete remission (CR) is associated with a high relapse rate. The variability in chemoresistance of normal bone marrow precursors has been hypothesized as explanation for the variable CD34 mobilization in AML. In 37 patients with AML in CR, we determined the chemosensitivity of bone marrow clonogenic precursors to maphosphamide and etoposide, which was then correlated with the degree of CD34(+) mobilization. In an enlarged set of 49 patients, we also studied the importance of chemosensitivity of marrow precursors for disease-free survival and relapse incidence. Significant correlations were demonstrated between the peak number of CD34(+) cells and residual growth of colony-forming unit granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) after maphosphamide (R = 0.550; p = 0.0003) and after etoposide (R = 0.793; p = 0.0003). It was possible to identify three groups of AML patients based on chemosensitivity. The mean CD34(+) peak was 33 × 10(6)/L in the hyperchemosensitive group, 141 × 10(6)/L in the normochemosensitive (p = 0.03), and 379 × 10(6)/L in the chemoresistant group (p = 0.002). Failed CD34(+) mobilization was observed in 72% of the hyperchemosensitive group, 23% of the normochemosensitive group, and 0% of the chemoresistant group (p = 0.001). Hyperchemosensitivity of CFU-GM, together with a low platelet count, were independent factors important in the failure of CD34(+) cell mobilization. A disease-free survival significantly inferior to that of all other patients was associated with chemoresistance of CFU-GM (log rank, p = 0.030) and with chemoresistance of burst-forming unit erythroid (BFU-E) (log rank, p = 0.033). Chemoresistance of CFU-GM (p = 0.048) and BFU-E (p = 0.017) was also associated with increase relapse incidence. Nonleukemic nature of these precursors was demonstrated studying minimal residual disease from single colony cells

  9. The RNA binding proteins RBM38 and DND1 are repressed in AML and have a novel function in APL differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wampfler, Julian; Federzoni, Elena A; Torbett, Bruce E; Fey, Martin F; Tschan, Mario P

    2016-02-01

    The RNA binding proteins RBM binding motif protein 38 (RBM38) and DEAD END 1 (DND1) selectively stabilize mRNAs by attenuating RNAse activity or protecting them from micro(mi)RNA-mediated cleavage. Furthermore, both proteins can efficiently stabilize the mRNA of the cell cycle inhibitor p21(CIP1). Since acute myeloid leukemia (AML) differentiation requires cell cycle arrest and RBM38 as well as DND1 have antiproliferative functions, we hypothesized that decreased RBM38 and DND1 expression may contribute to the differentiation block seen in this disease. We first quantified RBM38 and DND1 mRNA expression in clinical AML patient samples and CD34(+) progenitor cells and mature granulocytes from healthy donors. We found significantly lower RBM38 and DND1 mRNA levels in AML blasts and CD34(+) progenitor cells as compared to mature neutrophils from healthy donors. Furthermore, the lowest expression of both RBM38 and DND1 mRNA correlated with t(8;21). In addition, neutrophil differentiation of CD34(+) cells in vitro with G-CSF (granulocyte colony stimulating factor) resulted in a significant increase of RBM38 and DND1 mRNA levels. Similarly, neutrophil differentiation of NB4 acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cells was associated with a significant induction of RBM38 and DND1 expression. To address the function of RBM38 and DND1 in neutrophil differentiation, we generated two independent NB4RBM38 as well as DND1 knockdown cell lines. Inhibition of both RBM38 and DND1 mRNA significantly attenuated NB4 differentiation and resulted in decreased p21(CIP1) mRNA expression. Our results clearly indicate that expression of the RNA binding proteins RBM38 and DND1 is repressed in primary AML patients, that neutrophil differentiation is dependent on increased expression of both proteins, and that these proteins have a critical role in regulating p21(CIP1) expression during APL differentiation.

  10. [Helpful and stressful factors in coping with COPD in patients and their partners - a qualitative study].

    PubMed

    Binder, Marielle; Mörgeli, Hanspeter; Meier, Caroline; Witzemann, Lucia; Drabe, Natalie; Jenewein, Josef

    2014-01-15

    Zielsetzung: Eine Analyse der hilfreichen und belastenden Faktoren im Umgang mit COPD (chronisch-obstruktive Lungenkrankheit) bei Patienten und deren Partner. Methode: Neun COPD-Patienten und deren Partner wurden in einem semistrukturierten Interview befragt. Mittels qualitativer Inhaltsanalyse wurden die transkribierten Antworten ausgewertet. Resultate: Die professionelle Unterstützung erleben Patienten und Partner als hilfreich. Die Unterstützung durch den Partner scheint für die Patienten besonders hilfreich. Als belastender Faktor wurden von Patienten und Partnern häufig psychische Probleme genannt. Bei den Patienten standen zudem körperliche Einschränkungen im Vordergrund. Partner erwähnten ausserdem Konflikte mit dem Patienten. Schlussfolgerung: Partner von COPD-Patienten scheinen bei der Bewältigung eine wichtige Rolle zu spielen, sind gleichzeitig aber auch selbst häufig psychisch belastet. Sie sollten deshalb vermehrt in die Behandlung miteinbezogen werden.

  11. Prospective pilot trial of PerMIT versus standard anticoagulation service management of patients initiating oral anticoagulation.

    PubMed

    Borgman, Mark P; Pendleton, Robert C; McMillin, Gwendolyn A; Reynolds, Kristen K; Vazquez, Sara; Freeman, Andrew; Wilson, Andrew; Valdes, Roland; Linder, Mark W

    2012-09-01

    We performed a randomised pilot trial of PerMIT, a novel decision support tool for genotype-based warfarin initiation and maintenance dosing, to assess its efficacy for improving warfarin management. We prospectively studied 26 subjects to compare PerMIT-guided management with routine anticoagulation service management. CYP2C9 and VKORC1 genotype results for 13 subjects randomly assigned to the PerMIT arm were recorded within 24 hours of enrolment. To aid in INR interpretation, PerMIT calculates estimated loading and maintenance doses based on a patient's genetic and clinical characteristics and displays calculated S-warfarin plasma concentrations based on planned or administered dosages. In comparison to control subjects, patients in the PerMIT study arm demonstrated a 3.6-day decrease in the time to reach a stabilised INR within the target therapeutic range (4.7 vs. 8.3 days, p = 0.015); a 12.8% increase in time spent within the therapeutic interval over the first 25 days of therapy (64.3% vs. 55.3%, p = 0.180); and a 32.9% decrease in the frequency of warfarin dose adjustments per INR measurement (38.3% vs. 57.1%, p = 0.007). Serial measurements of plasma S-warfarin concentrations were also obtained to prospectively evaluate the accuracy of the pharmacokinetic model during induction therapy. The PerMIT S-warfarin plasma concentration model estimated 62.8% of concentrations within 0.15 mg/l. These pilot data suggest that the PerMIT method and its incorporation of genotype/phenotype information may help practitioners increase the safety, efficacy, and efficiency of warfarin therapeutic management.

  12. AML with gain of chromosome 8 as the sole chromosomal abnormality (+8sole) is associated with a specific molecular mutation pattern including ASXL1 mutations in 46.8% of the patients.

    PubMed

    Alpermann, Tamara; Haferlach, Claudia; Eder, Christiane; Nadarajah, Niroshan; Meggendorfer, Manja; Kern, Wolfgang; Haferlach, Torsten; Schnittger, Susanne

    2015-03-01

    Trisomy 8 is the most frequent cytogenetically gained aberration in AML. We compared 79 adult de novo AML with trisomy 8 as the sole cytogenetic abnormality (+8sole) to 511 normal karyotype AML patients (NK). +8sole patients were older (p=0.013), presented lower WBC counts (p=0.010), harbored more often ASXL1 mutations (p<0.001) and RUNX1 mutations (p=0.009), but less frequent FLT3-ITD (p=0.038), NPM1 mutations (p<0.001) and double-mutated CEBPA (p=0.038) than NK patients. No prognostic difference was found between +8sole and NK. With respect to genetic stability we found +8sole was instable, and molecular markers were either stable or gained in number and diversity.

  13. Nucleosome Presence at AML-1 Binding Sites Inversely Correlates with Ly49 Expression: Revelations from an Informatics Analysis of Nucleosomes and Immune Cell Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Wight, Andrew; Yang, Doo; Ioshikhes, Ilya; Makrigiannis, Andrew P

    2016-04-01

    Beyond its role in genomic organization and compaction, the nucleosome is believed to participate in the regulation of gene transcription. Here, we report a computational method to evaluate the nucleosome sensitivity for a transcription factor over a given stretch of the genome. Sensitive factors are predicted to be those with binding sites preferentially contained within nucleosome boundaries and lacking 10 bp periodicity. Based on these criteria, the Acute Myeloid Leukemia-1a (AML-1a) transcription factor, a regulator of immune gene expression, was identified as potentially sensitive to nucleosomal regulation within the mouse Ly49 gene family. This result was confirmed in RMA, a cell line with natural expression of Ly49, using MNase-Seq to generate a nucleosome map of chromosome 6, where the Ly49 gene family is located. Analysis of this map revealed a specific depletion of nucleosomes at AML-1a binding sites in the expressed Ly49A when compared to the other, silent Ly49 genes. Our data suggest that nucleosome-based regulation contributes to the expression of Ly49 genes, and we propose that this method of predicting nucleosome sensitivity could aid in dissecting the regulatory role of nucleosomes in general.

  14. A PCR-based sex determination method for possible application in caprine gender selection by simultaneous amplification of the Sry and Aml-X genes.

    PubMed

    Phua, Alice Choon Yen; Abdullah, Ramli Bin; Mohamed, Zulqarnain

    2003-08-01

    Sex determination of livestock is performed to achieve the objectives of livestock breeding programmes. Techniques for sex determination have evolved from karyotyping to detecting Y-specific antigens and recently to the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), which appears to be the most sensitive, accurate, rapid and reliable method to date. In this study, a PCR-based sex determination method for potential application in goat breeding programmes was developed. Primers were designed to amplify a portion of the X amelogenin gene (Aml-X) on the X chromosome to give a 300 bp product and Sry gene on the Y chromosome to give a 116 bp product. PCR optimization was performed using DNA template extracted from a whole blood sample of Jermasia goats (German Fawn x Katjang) of both sexes. It was possible to identify the sex chromosomes by amplifying both male- and female-specific genes simultaneously in a duplex reaction with males yielding two bands and females yielding one band. The Aml-X primer set, which served as an internal control primer, did not interfere with amplification of the Y-specific sequence even when a low amount of DNA (1 ng) was used. The duplex reaction subjected to a blind test showed 100% (14/14) concordance, proving its accuracy and reliability. The primer sets used were found to be highly specific and were suitable for gender selection of goats.

  15. Kinetics of Cytotoxic Lymphocytes Reconstitution after Induction Chemotherapy in Elderly AML Patients Reveals Progressive Recovery of Normal Phenotypic and Functional Features in NK Cells.

    PubMed

    Rey, Jérôme; Fauriat, Cyril; Kochbati, Eloïse; Orlanducci, Florence; Charbonnier, Aude; D'Incan, Evelyne; Andre, Pascale; Romagne, François; Barbarat, Bernadette; Vey, Norbert; Olive, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    NK cells are defective in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) at diagnosis. Here, we studied the kinetic of expression of the major activating and inhibitory receptors of NK, CD8 T, and γδ T cells in patients undergoing chemotherapy (CT) for the treatment of AML (n = 29). We showed that NK cells are the main affected population at diagnosis and that expression of activating receptors is partially restored within a few weeks after CT. CD8 T cells and γδ T cells are only weakly affected at diagnosis. Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor expression by NK cells, but not NKG2A and CD85j, was downregulated. Interestingly, the development of NK cells appeared altered as the most immature CD56(bright) NK cells were seriously underrepresented. Finally, we showed that NK cell functions were only partially restored 6 weeks after CT as degranulation capabilities of NK cells recovered, whereas cytokine production remained low. Our data point out NK cells as antitumor effectors peculiarly hampered by leukemic cells. This study may indicate a timeline when NK-mediated therapies or other immunotherapies could be performed, particularly for patients excluded of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  16. Treatment cost of invasive fungal disease (Ifd) in patients with acute myelogenous leukaemia (Aml) or myelodysplastic syndrome (Mds) in German hospitals.

    PubMed

    Rieger, C T; Cornely, O A; Hoppe-Tichy, T; Kiehl, M; Knoth, H; Thalheimer, M; Schuler, U; Ullmann, A J; Ehlken, B; Ostermann, H

    2012-11-01

    Invasive fungal disease (IFD) causes increasing morbidity and mortality in haematological cancer patients. Reliable cost data for treating IFD in German hospitals is not available. Objective of the study was to determine the institutional cost of treating the IFD. Data were obtained by retrospective chart review in German hospitals. Patients had either newly diagnosed or relapsed acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Direct medical cost was calculated from hospital provider's perspective. A total of 108 patients were enrolled at 5 tertiary care hospitals, 36 IFD patients and 72 controls. The vast majority of IFD patients (74%) were diagnosed with invasive aspergillosis. On average, the hospital stay for IFD patients was 12 days longer than in control patients. All patients in the IFD group and 89% of patients in the control group received antifungal drugs. Mean direct costs per patient were €51,517 in the IFD group and €30,454 in the control group. Incremental costs of €21,063 were dominated by cost for antifungal drugs (36%), hospital stay (32%) and blood products (23%). From the perspective of hospitals in Germany the economic burden of IFD in patients with AML or MDS is substantial. Therefore, prevention of IFD is necessary with respect to both clinical and economic reasons.

  17. Kinetics of Cytotoxic Lymphocytes Reconstitution after Induction Chemotherapy in Elderly AML Patients Reveals Progressive Recovery of Normal Phenotypic and Functional Features in NK Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Jérôme; Fauriat, Cyril; Kochbati, Eloïse; Orlanducci, Florence; Charbonnier, Aude; D’Incan, Evelyne; Andre, Pascale; Romagne, François; Barbarat, Bernadette; Vey, Norbert; Olive, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    NK cells are defective in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) at diagnosis. Here, we studied the kinetic of expression of the major activating and inhibitory receptors of NK, CD8 T, and γδ T cells in patients undergoing chemotherapy (CT) for the treatment of AML (n = 29). We showed that NK cells are the main affected population at diagnosis and that expression of activating receptors is partially restored within a few weeks after CT. CD8 T cells and γδ T cells are only weakly affected at diagnosis. Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor expression by NK cells, but not NKG2A and CD85j, was downregulated. Interestingly, the development of NK cells appeared altered as the most immature CD56bright NK cells were seriously underrepresented. Finally, we showed that NK cell functions were only partially restored 6 weeks after CT as degranulation capabilities of NK cells recovered, whereas cytokine production remained low. Our data point out NK cells as antitumor effectors peculiarly hampered by leukemic cells. This study may indicate a timeline when NK-mediated therapies or other immunotherapies could be performed, particularly for patients excluded of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:28210257

  18. High dose cytarabine, mitoxantrone and L-asparaginase (HAMA) salvage for relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Tamjeed; Holwerda, Scott; Klepin, Heidi D.; Isom, Scott; Ellis, Leslie R.; Lyerly, Susan; Manuel, Megan; Dralle, Sarah; Berenzon, Dmitriy; Powell, Bayard L.; Pardee, Timothy S.

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy that affects older patients. The role of salvage therapy in the elderly is controversial and there is little data on efficacy. Outcomes for 94 relapsed or refractory AML patients who received salvage HAMA therapy were analyzed. Of the 94 patients 66 were ≥60, including 26 patients ≥70, and 28 were <60 years old. Early mortality (30-day) was 14% (4% <60, 18% ≥60 years old). Overall, 27% of patients died during hospitalization or were discharged to hospice (11% <60, 33% ≥60 years old). CR/CRi was achieved in 41% of patients (61% <60, 33% ≥60 years old). Median survival was 6.1 months (15.7 <60, 5.2 ≥60). Patients ≥60 who achieved a CR/CRi had a median survival of 11.7 months. At 12 months 56% of patients <60 were alive versus 24% of patients ≥60. At 24 months these numbers fell to 40% and 2% respectively. In those <60 years old, 50% went on to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) whereas 14% of patients in the ≥60 cohort did so. In conclusion, HAMA salvage therapy results in a 33% response rate in patients ≥60 years old with acceptable toxicity. PMID:26154683

  19. High dose cytarabine, mitoxantrone and l-asparaginase (HAMA) salvage for relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Tamjeed; Holwerda, Scott; Klepin, Heidi D; Isom, Scott; Ellis, Leslie R; Lyerly, Susan; Manuel, Megan; Dralle, Sarah; Berenzon, Dmitriy; Powell, Bayard L; Pardee, Timothy S

    2015-09-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy that affects older patients. The role of salvage therapy in the elderly is controversial and there is little data on efficacy. Outcomes for 94 relapsed or refractory AML patients who received salvage HAMA therapy were analyzed. Of the 94 patients 66 were ≥60, including 26 patients ≥70, and 28 were <60 years old. Early mortality (30-day) was 14% (4%<60, 18%≥60 years old). Overall, 27% of patients died during hospitalization or were discharged to hospice (11%<60, 33%≥60 years old). CR/CRi was achieved in 41% of patients (61%<60, 33%≥60 years old). Median survival was 6.1 months (15.7<60, 5.2≥60). Patients ≥60 who achieved a CR/CRi had a median survival of 11.7 months. At 12 months 56% of patients <60 were alive versus 24% of patients ≥60. At 24 months these numbers fell to 40% and 2% respectively. In those <60 years old, 50% went on to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) whereas 14% of patients in the ≥60 cohort did so. In conclusion, HAMA salvage therapy results in a 33% response rate in patients ≥60 years old with acceptable toxicity.

  20. The CXCR4 inhibitor BL-8040 induces the apoptosis of AML blasts by down-regulating ERK BCL-2, MCL-1 and cyclin-D1 via altered miR-15a/16-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Abraham, M; Klein, S; Bulvik, B; Wald, H; Weiss, I D; Olam, D; Weiss, L; Beider, K; Eizenberg, O; Wald, O; Galun, E; Avigdor, A; Benjamini, O; Nagler, A; Pereg, Y; Tavor, S; Peled, A

    2017-03-10

    CXCR4 is a key player in the retention and survival of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) blasts in the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment. We studied the effects of the CXCR4 antagonist BL-8040 on the survival of AML blasts and investigated the molecular mechanisms by which CXCR4 signaling inhibition leads to leukemic cell death. Treatment with BL-8040 induced the robust mobilization of AML blasts from the BM. In addition, AML cells exposed to BL-8040 underwent differentiation. Furthermore, BL-8040 induced the apoptosis of AML cells in vitro and in vivo. This apoptosis was mediated by the up-regulation of miR-15a/miR-16-1, resulting in down-regulation of the target genes BCL-2, MCL-1 and cyclin-D1. Overexpression of miR-15a/miR-16-1 directly induced leukemic cell death. BL-8040-induced apoptosis was also mediated by the inhibition of survival signals via the AKT/ERK pathways. Importantly, treatment with a BCL-2 inhibitor induced apoptosis and act together with BL-8040 to enhance cell death. BL-8040 also synergized with FLT3 inhibitors to induce AML cell death. Importantly, this combined treatment prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice and reduced minimal residual disease in vivo. Our results provide a rationale to test combination therapies employing BL-8040 and BCL2 or FLT3 inhibitors to achieve increased efficacy of these agents.Leukemia accepted article preview online, 10 March 2017. doi:10.1038/leu.2017.82.

  1. Sampling Technique for Robust Odorant Detection Based on MIT RealNose Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duong, Tuan A.

    2012-01-01

    This technique enhances the detection capability of the autonomous Real-Nose system from MIT to detect odorants and their concentrations in noisy and transient environments. The lowcost, portable system with low power consumption will operate at high speed and is suited for unmanned and remotely operated long-life applications. A deterministic mathematical model was developed to detect odorants and calculate their concentration in noisy environments. Real data from MIT's NanoNose was examined, from which a signal conditioning technique was proposed to enable robust odorant detection for the RealNose system. Its sensitivity can reach to sub-part-per-billion (sub-ppb). A Space Invariant Independent Component Analysis (SPICA) algorithm was developed to deal with non-linear mixing that is an over-complete case, and it is used as a preprocessing step to recover the original odorant sources for detection. This approach, combined with the Cascade Error Projection (CEP) Neural Network algorithm, was used to perform odorant identification. Signal conditioning is used to identify potential processing windows to enable robust detection for autonomous systems. So far, the software has been developed and evaluated with current data sets provided by the MIT team. However, continuous data streams are made available where even the occurrence of a new odorant is unannounced and needs to be noticed by the system autonomously before its unambiguous detection. The challenge for the software is to be able to separate the potential valid signal from the odorant and from the noisy transition region when the odorant is just introduced.

  2. Estimates of intakes and internal doses from ingestion of {sup 32}P at MIT and NIH

    SciTech Connect

    Stabin, M.G.; Toohey, R.E.

    1996-06-01

    A researcher at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) became internally contaminated with {sup 32}P, probably due to an intentional act. The incident occurred on or about 14 August 1995. Subsequent measurement of activity in urine and a single whole body count were used to estimate the individual`s intake, with the assumption of ingestion as the route of intake. Two separate Sets of urine data were analyzed-one supplied by MIT and one from independent analyses of urine samples conducted at Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE); the former data set contained 35 samples, the latter 49. In addition, the results of 35 whole body counts, provided by MIT from a chair-type counter calibrated for 32p, were used to obtain a separate estimate of intake. The kinetic model for 32P proposed in ICRP Publication 30 and implemented in NUREG/CR-4884 was used to interpret the data. The data were analyzed using both the weighted and unweighted least squares techniques. All of the intake estimates were in very good agreement with each other, ranging from 18-22 MBq. Based on the dose model in ICRP 30, this would indicate a committed effective dose equivalent of 38-46 mSv. The incident was helpful in assessing the value of the least squares techniques in determining estimates of intake and dose. The ICRP model tended to slightly overestimate the whole body retention data and underestimate the urinary excretion at later times. Further results obtained by visual best fit and development of an individual-specific kinetic and dose model will also be discussed. This incident was quite similar to another case of ingestion of 32p that occurred at the National Institute of Health (NIH) on 28 June 1995. Dose assessment for the NIH case will also be presented if the data are available for public release.

  3. Influence of BCL2-938C>A and BAX-248G>A promoter polymorphisms in the development of AML: case-control study from South India.

    PubMed

    Cingeetham, Anuradha; Vuree, Sugunakar; Dunna, Nageswara Rao; Gorre, Manjula; Nanchari, Santhoshi Rani; Edathara, Prajitha Mohandas; Meka, Phannibhushann; Annamaneni, Sandhya; Digumarthi, Raghunadharao; Sinha, Sudha; Satti, Vishnupriya

    2015-09-01

    B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2) and BCL2-associated X protein (BAX) proteins are anti-apoptotic and pro-apoptotic determinants of mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis, and their relative expression determines the cell fate. The promoter polymorphisms in these genes were shown to alter the protein function or expression and exert an impact on apoptosis regulation. Deregulation in the expression of any of these genes leads to disruption of cellular homeostasis and malignant transformation. The present study was aimed to determine the association of BCL2-938C>A and BAX-248G>A promoter polymorphisms with origin and progression of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We also have performed combined genotype analysis to evaluate the cumulative effect of risk genotypes in the AML development. These polymorphisms were genotyped by polymerase chain reaction- restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) in 221 AML patients and 305 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Our study revealed that BCL2-938CA (p = 0.018) and BAX-248GG (0.043) genotypes were significantly associated with increased risk for AML occurrence. BAX-248A allele had shown decreased risk for AML. The combined analysis had shown that BCL2-938CA+AA-BAX-248GG group had a 1.63-fold (95 % CI: 1.08-2.45, p = 0.02) increased risk for AML. None of the clinical variables had shown any significant association with both polymorphisms. With respect to complete remission (CR) rate, BAX-248GG genotype (p = 0.002) and G allele (p = 0.009) had conferred significant risk for complete remission failure. Although the log rank test was not significant, survival analysis had shown a trend where BCL2-938CA genotype, and BAX-248GG had reduced median disease-free survival (DFS) of 9 and 10 months, respectively. In conclusion, BCL2-938C>A and BAX-248G>A gene polymorphisms might contribute to the origin of AML. Moreover, influence of BAX-248GG genotype on CR and DFS rate suggests that the BAX-248G>A polymorphism can serve as

  4. MIT extraction method for measuring average subchannel axial velocities in reactor assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Hawley, J.T.; Chiu, C.; Todreas, N.E.

    1980-08-01

    The MIT extraction method for obtaining flow split data for individual subchannels is described in detail. An analysis of the method is presented which shows that isokinetic values of the subchannel flow rates are obtained directly even though the method is non-isokinetic. Time saving methods are discussed for obtaining the average value of the interior region flow split parameter. An analysis of the method at low bundle flow rates indicates that there is no inherent low flow rate limitation on the method and suggests a way to obtain laminar flow split data.

  5. Deconfinement in the presence of a strong magnetic background: An exercise within the MIT bag model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraga, Eduardo S.; Palhares, Letícia F.

    2012-07-01

    We study the effect of a very strong homogeneous magnetic field B on the thermal deconfinement transition within the simplest phenomenological approach: the MIT bag pressure for the quark-gluon plasma and a gas of pions for the hadronic sector. Even though the model is known to be crude in numerical precision and misses the correct nature of the (crossover) transition, it provides a simple setup for the discussion of some subtleties of vacuum and thermal contributions in each phase, and should provide a reasonable qualitative description of the critical temperature in the presence of B. We find that the critical temperature decreases, saturating for very large fields.

  6. 50 years of helium liquefaction at the MIT Cryogenic Engineering Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Joseph L.

    2002-05-01

    The evolution of the helium liquefaction facility of the MIT Cryogenic Engineering Laboratory and the history of its operation over the last 50 years are described. Professor Samuel C. Collins created the liquid-helium facility based on his earlier developments. The chronology of the laboratory helium liquefiers is given with a brief description of each one. The current facility based on the Model 2000 liquefier is described and operating experience is given. The reasons for the very high availability of the liquefaction system are developed.

  7. The MIT HEDP Accelerator Facility for Diagnostic Development for OMEGA, Z, and the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, C. E.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Birkel, A.; Kabadi, N. V.; Lahmann, B.; Milanese, L. M.; Simpson, R. A.; Sio, H.; Sutcliffe, G. D.; Wink, C.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Leeper, R.; Ruiz, C. L.; Sangster, T. C.

    2016-10-01

    The MIT HEDP Accelerator Facility utilizes a 135-keV linear electrostatic ion accelerator, DT and DD neutron sources, and two x-ray sources for development and characterization of nuclear diagnostics for OMEGA, Z, and the NIF. The accelerator generates DD and D3He fusion products through the acceleration of D+ ions onto a 3He-doped Erbium-Deuteride target. Accurately characterized fusion product rates of around 106 s-1 are routinely achieved. The DT and DD neutron sources generate up to 6x108, and 1x107 neutrons/s, respectively. One x-ray generator is a thick-target W source with a peak energy of 225 keV and a maximum dose rate of 12 Gy/min; the other uses Cu, Mo, or Ti elemental tubes to generate x-rays with a maximum energy of 40 keV. Diagnostics developed and calibrated at this facility include CR-39-based charged-particle spectrometers, neutron detectors, and the particle Time-Of-Flight (pTOF) and Magnetic PTOF CVD-diamond-based bang time detectors. The accelerator is also a valuable hands-on tool for graduate and undergraduate education at MIT. This work was supported in part by the U.S. DoE, SNL, LLE and LLNL.

  8. Optimierung von FSS-Bandpassfiltern mit Hilfe der Schwarmintelligenz (Particle Swarm Optimization)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, G.; Hansen, V.; Kreysa, E.; Gemünd, H.-P.

    2006-09-01

    In diesem Beitrag wird ein neues Verfahren zur Optimierung von Bandpassfiltern aus mehrlagigen frequenzselektiven Schirmen (FSS), die in ein Dielektrikum eingebettet sind, vorgestellt. Das Ziel ist es, die Parameter der gesamten Struktur so zu optimieren, dass ihre Transmissionseigenschaften hohe Filteranforderungen erfüllen. Als Optimierungsverfahren wird die Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) eingesetzt. PSO ist eine neue stochastische Optimierungsmethode, die in verschieden Gebieten, besonders aber bei der Optimierung nicht linearer Probleme mit mehreren Zielfunktionen erfolgreich eingesetzt wird. In dieser Arbeit wird die PSO in die Spektralbereichsanalyse zur Berechnung komplexer FSS-Strukturen integriert. Die numerische Berechnung basiert auf einer Integralgleichungsformulierung mit Hilfe der spektralen Greenschen Funktion für geschichtete Strukturen. This paper presents a novel procedure for the optimization of band-pass filters consisting of frequency selective surfaces (FSS) embedded in a dielectric. The aim is to optimize the parameters of the complete structure so that the transmission characteristics of the filters fulfill the demanding requirements. The Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) is used as the optimization procedure. PSO is a new stochastic optimization method that is successfully applied in different areas for the optimization of non-linear problems with several object-functions. In this work, PSO is integrated into the spectral domain analysis for the calculation of the complex FSS structures. The numerical computation is based on the formulation of an integral equation with the help of the spectral Green's function for layered media.

  9. Redistribution of H3K27me3 and acetylated histone H4 upon exposure to azacitidine and decitabine results in de-repression of the AML1/ETO target gene IL3.

    PubMed

    Buchi, Francesca; Masala, Erico; Rossi, Alessia; Valencia, Ana; Spinelli, Elena; Sanna, Alessandro; Gozzini, Antonella; Santini, Valeria

    2014-03-01

    Human acute myeloid leukemia is characterized by a block in maturation caused by genetic and epigenetic alterations. We studied the effects of low concentrations of the DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitors 5-azacitidine and decitabine on apoptosis and on chromatin remodeling in an AML1/ETO inducible model of human AML. While both DNMT inhibitors induced apoptosis, only azacitidine did so via caspase activation, possibly through its exclusive non-DNA depending effects. We evaluated histone marks for permissive chromatin, H3K4me3, and acetylated histone H4, and for non-permissive chromatin, H3K9me2, and H3K27me3, at the promoter of the IL3 gene, which is under the direct control of AML1/ETO and is critical for myeloid maturation. We observed that low concentrations of DNMT inhibitors induced a loss of H3K27me3 and gain of acetylated histone H4 at the IL3 promoter exclusively in AML1/ETO-positive cells, which was associated with transcriptional reactivation of the IL3 gene.

  10. Rare CBFB-MYH11 fusion transcripts in AML with inv(16)/t(16;16) are associated with therapy-related AML M4eo, atypical cytomorphology, atypical immunophenotype, atypical additional chromosomal rearrangements and low white blood cell count: a study on 162 patients.

    PubMed

    Schnittger, S; Bacher, U; Haferlach, C; Kern, W; Haferlach, T

    2007-04-01

    The spectrum of CBFB-MYH11 fusion transcripts in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) M4eo with inv(16)/t(16;16) is heterogeneous. Approximately 85% show type A CBFB-MYH11 fusion transcripts. In addition, more than 10 different fusion transcripts have been reported. The prognostic impact and biological background of rare fusion transcripts remain open. In this study, a molecular characterization of CBFB-MYH11 transcripts in 162 patients with CBFB-MYH11 positive AML at diagnosis was performed. In total, 128 patients (79.0%) showed the fusion transcript type A, whereas nine different rare CBFB-MYH11 fusion genes were detected in 34 cases (21.0%). Rare fusion transcripts were found more frequently in therapy-related AML (P=0.0106). Numerical gains of the chromosomes 8, 21 and 22 were more frequently associated with type A (28.3%) than with rare fusions (12.9%) (P=0.012). Median white blood cell (WBC) count was higher in type A (35.4 G/l; range=1.1-279 G/l) than in cases with rare types (7.8 G/l; range=0.8-148.0 G/l) (P<0.0001). Rare fusion transcripts were correlated with an atypical cytomorphology not primarily suggestive for the FAB subtype M4eo (P=0.0203). Immunophenotype revealed lower CD2, CD13, CD33 and CD90 levels than in type A fusion cases (P=0.036, 0.002, 0.029 and 0.045, respectively). However, the type of fusion was not an independent prognostic parameter.

  11. Treatment-related myelodysplastic syndrome (t-MDS)/acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in children with cancer: A single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Tragiannidis, Athanasios; Gombakis, Nikolaos; Papageorgiou, Maria; Hatzipantelis, Emmanuel; Papageorgiou, Theodotis; Hatzistilianou, Maria

    2016-12-01

    Treatment-related myelodysplastic syndrome (t-MDS)/acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a devastating early or late complication of treatment for childhood cancer related with a significant morbidity and mortality. We retrospectively studied survivors of childhood cancer. Overall, 287 patients were recorded in the databases and we identified three (1.04%) with t-MDS. The primary cancer diagnoses were Langerhans cell histiocytosis (one patient) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL; two patients). The mean age of patients was 12.1 years. All patients had received systemic antifungal treatment for invasive pulmonary aspergillosis successfully treated with voriconazole and liposomal amphotericin B before diagnosis of t-MDS. Two patients (66%) remain alive after a median follow-up period of 3.5 years.

  12. Residual disease detected by flow cytometry is an independent predictor of survival in childhood acute myeloid leukaemia; results of the NOPHO-AML 2004 study.

    PubMed

    Tierens, Anne; Bjørklund, Elizabeth; Siitonen, Sanna; Marquart, Hanne Vibeke; Wulff-Juergensen, Gitte; Pelliniemi, Tarja-Terttu; Forestier, Erik; Hasle, Henrik; Jahnukainen, Kirsi; Lausen, Birgitte; Jonsson, Olafur G; Palle, Josefine; Zeller, Bem; Fogelstrand, Linda; Abrahamsson, Jonas

    2016-08-01

    Early response after induction is a prognostic factor for disease outcome in childhood acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Residual disease (RD) detection by multiparameter flow cytometry (MFC) was performed at day 15 and before consolidation therapy in 101 patients enrolled in the Nordic Society of Paediatric Haemato-Oncology AML 2004 study. A multicentre laboratory approach to RD analysis was used. Event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) was significantly different in patients with and without RD at both time points, using a 0·1% RD cut-off level. RD-negative and -positive patients after first induction showed a 5-year EFS of 65 ± 7% and 22 ± 7%, respectively (P < 0·001) and an OS of 77 ± 6% (P = 0·025) and 51 ± 8%. RD-negative and -positive patients at start of consolidation therapy had a 5-year EFS of 57 ± 7% and 11 ± 7%, respectively (P < 0·001) and an OS of 78 ± 6% and 28 ± 11%) (P < 0·001). In multivariate analysis only RD was significantly correlated with survival. RD before consolidation therapy was the strongest independent prognostic factor for EFS [hazard ratio (HR):5·0; 95% confidence interval (CI):1·9-13·3] and OS (HR:7·0; 95%CI:2·0-24·5). In conclusion, RD before consolidation therapy identifies patients at high risk of relapse in need of intensified treatment. In addition, RD detection can be performed in a multicentre setting and can be implemented in future trials.

  13. Prognostic value of minimal residual disease (MRD) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with favorable cytogenetics [t(8;21) and inv(16)].

    PubMed

    Perea, G; Lasa, A; Aventín, A; Domingo, A; Villamor, N; Queipo de Llano, M Paz; Llorente, A; Juncà, J; Palacios, C; Fernández, C; Gallart, M; Font, L; Tormo, M; Florensa, L; Bargay, J; Martí, J M; Vivancos, P; Torres, P; Berlanga, J J; Badell, I; Brunet, S; Sierra, J; Nomdedéu, J F

    2006-01-01

    Most patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and t(8;21) or inv(16) have a good prognosis with current anthracycline- and cytarabine-based protocols. Tandem analysis with flow cytometry (FC) and real-time RT-PCR (RQ-PCR) was applied to 55 patients, 28 harboring a t(8;21) and 27 an inv(16), including one case with a novel CBFbeta/MYH11 transcript. A total of 31% (n=17) of CR patients relapsed: seven with t(8;21) and 10 with inv(16). The mean amount of minimal residual disease (MRD) detected by FC in relapsed and nonrelapsed patients was markedly different: 0.3 vs 0.08% (P=0.002) at the end of treatment. The mean number of fusion transcript copies/ ABL x 10(4) also differed between relapsed and non-relapsed patients: 2385 vs 122 (P=0.001) after induction, 56 vs 7.6 after intensification (P=0.0001) and 75 vs 3.3 (P=0.0001) at the end of chemotherapy. Relapses were more common in patients with FC MRD level >0.1% at the end of treatment than in patients with < or = 0.1%: cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR) was 67 and 21% (P=0.03), respectively. Likewise, using RQ-PCR, a cutoff level of >10 copies at the end of treatment correlated with a high risk of relapse: CIR was 75% for patients with RQ-PCR >10 compared to 21% for patients with RQ-PCR levels < or = 10 (P=0.04). Combined use of FC and RQ-PCR may improve MRD detection, and provide useful clinical information on relapse kinetics in AML patients.

  14. Fabrication of water-soluble polymer-encapsulated As4S4 to increase oral bioavailability and chemotherapeutic efficacy in AML mice

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qiang; Wang, Chuan; Li, Xiaojin; Guo, Hua; Meng, Jie; Liu, Jian; Xu, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    Realgar (As4S4) has been demonstrated to be effective for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML); it has the advantages of no drug resistance and oral administration. Nevertheless, its poor solubility has been an obstacle to its bioavailability, requiring high-dose administration over a long period. We investigated whether crushing realgar crystals to the nanoscale and encapsulating the particles in a water-soluble polymer in one step using hot-melt extrusion would increase the bioavailability of As4S4. Raw As4S4 (r-As4S4) and water-soluble polymer were processed via co-rotating twin screw extrusion. The resulting product (e-As4S4) was characterized by SEM, XRD, and DLS. The cytotoxicity and therapeutic effects of e-As4S4 were evaluated in vivo and in vitro. The results show that e-As4S4 dissolved rapidly in water, forming a stable colloid solution. The average size of e-As4S4 particles was 680 nm, which was reduced by more than 40-fold compared with that of r-As4S4. The bioavailability of e-As4S4 was up to 12.6-fold higher than that of r-As4S4, and it inhibited the proliferation of HL-60 cells much more effectively than did r-As4S4, inducing apoptosis and significantly reducing the infiltration of HL-60 cells into the bone marrow, spleen, and liver. This in turn prolonged the survival of AML mice. PMID:27383126

  15. Effectivity of a strategy in elderly AML patients to reach allogeneic stem cell transplantation using intensive chemotherapy: Long-term survival is dependent on complete remission after first induction therapy.

    PubMed

    von dem Borne, P A; de Wreede, L C; Halkes, C J M; Marijt, W A F; Falkenburg, J H F; Veelken, H

    2016-07-01

    Intensive chemotherapy followed by allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) can cure AML. Most studies on alloSCT in elderly AML report results of highly selected patient cohorts. Hardly any data exist on the effectiveness of prospective strategies intended to bring as many patients as possible to transplant. Between 2006 and 2011 we implemented a treatment algorithm for all newly diagnosed AML patients aged 61-75 years, consisting of intensive chemotherapy cycles to induce complete remission, followed by alloSCT. 44 of 60 (73%) newly diagnosed elderly AML patients started with chemotherapy. By meticulously following our algorithm in almost all patients, we could induce complete remission (CR) in 66% of patients starting with chemotherapy, and transplant 32% of these patients in continuous CR. Main reasons for failure were early relapse (16%), early death (14%), primary refractory disease (9%), and patient or physician decision to stop treatment (16%). Patients in continuous CR after first induction benefit most with 36% long-term survival. Patients not in CR after first induction benefit less; although additional chemotherapy induces CR in 45% of these patients, only 23% are transplanted and no long-term survival is observed, mainly due to relapse. Long-term survival in the group of 44 patients is 9% (median 4.5 years after alloSCT). Considering that 27% of patients do not start with chemotherapy and 64% of patients starting with chemotherapy do not reach alloSCT, the reasons for failure presented here should be used as a guide to develop new treatment algorithms to improve long-term survival in elderly AML patients.

  16. Blockade of the PD-1/PD-L1 axis augments lysis of AML cells by the CD33/CD3 BiTE antibody construct AMG 330: reversing a T-cell-induced immune escape mechanism.

    PubMed

    Krupka, C; Kufer, P; Kischel, R; Zugmaier, G; Lichtenegger, F S; Köhnke, T; Vick, B; Jeremias, I; Metzeler, K H; Altmann, T; Schneider, S; Fiegl, M; Spiekermann, K; Bauerle, P A; Hiddemann, W; Riethmüller, G; Subklewe, M

    2016-02-01

    Bispecific T-cell engagers (BiTEs) are very effective in recruiting and activating T cells. We tested the cytotoxicity of the CD33/CD3 BiTE antibody construct AMG 330 on primary acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells ex vivo and characterized parameters contributing to antileukemic cytolytic activity. The E:T ratio and the CD33 expression level significantly influenced lysis kinetics in long-term cultures of primary AML cells (n=38). AMG 330 induced T-cell-mediated proinflammatory conditions, favoring the upregulation of immune checkpoints on target and effector cells. Although not constitutively expressed at the time of primary diagnosis (n=123), PD-L1 was strongly upregulated on primary AML cells upon AMG 330 addition to ex vivo cultures (n=27, P<0.0001). This phenomenon was cytokine-driven as the sole addition of interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α also induced expression. Through blockade of the PD-1/PD-L1 interaction, AMG 330-mediated lysis (n=9, P=0.03), T-cell proliferation (n=9, P=0.01) and IFN-γ secretion (n=8, P=0.008) were significantly enhanced. The combinatorial approach was most beneficial in settings of protracted AML cell lysis. Taken together, we have characterized a critical resistance mechanism employed by primary AML cells under AMG 330-mediated proinflammatory conditions. Our results support the evaluation of checkpoint molecules in upcoming clinical trials with AMG 330 to enhance BiTE antibody construct-mediated cytotoxicity.

  17. Use of graphics in decision aids for telerobotic control: (Parts 5-8 of an 8-part MIT progress report)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheridan, Thomas B.; Roseborough, James B.; Das, Hari; Chin, Kan-Ping; Inoue, Seiichi

    1989-01-01

    Four separate projects recently completed or in progress at the MIT Man-Machine Systems Laboratory are summarized. They are: a decision aid for retrieving a tumbling satellite in space; kinematic control and graphic display of redundant teleoperators; real time terrain/object generation: a quad-tree approach; and two dimensional control for three dimensional obstacle avoidance.

  18. Trouble and Triumph: German Life-Turkish Tradition in Renan Demirkan's "Schwarzer Tee mit drei Stuck Zucker"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebert, Reika

    2004-01-01

    This paper explores Demirkan's narrative strategies in "Schwarzer Tee mit drei Stuck Zucker" to negotiate issues of a life between two cultures and traditions. Based on Bhabha's insights that mainstream culture needs intellectual and artistic infusion from the margins of a society in order to remain vital; and that cultural production…

  19. TAF-4 is required for the life extension of isp-1, clk-1 and tpk-1 Mit mutants.

    PubMed

    Khan, Maruf H; Ligon, Melissa; Hussey, Lauren R; Hufnal, Bryce; Farber, Robert; Munkácsy, Erin; Rodriguez, Amanda; Dillow, Andy; Kahlig, Erynn; Rea, Shane L

    2013-10-01

    While numerous life-extending manipulations have been discovered in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, one that remains most enigmatic is disruption of oxidative phosphorylation. In order to unravel how such an ostensibly deleterious manipulation can extend lifespan, we sought to identify the ensemble of nuclear transcription factors that are activated in response to defective mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) function. Using a feeding RNAi approach, we targeted over 400 transcription factors and identified 15 that, when reduced in function, reproducibly and differentially altered the development, stress response, and/or fecundity of isp-1(qm150) Mit mutants relative to wild-type animals. Seven of these transcription factors--AHA-1, CEH-18, HIF-1, JUN-1, NHR-27, NHR-49 and the CREB homolog-1 (CRH-1)-interacting protein TAF-4--were also essential for isp-1 life extension. When we tested the involvement of these seven transcription factors in the life extension of two other Mit mutants, namely clk-1(qm30) and tpk-1(qm162), TAF-4 and HIF-1 were consistently required. Our findings suggest that the Mit phenotype is under the control of multiple transcriptional responses, and that TAF-4 and HIF-1 may be part of a general signaling axis that specifies Mit mutant life extension.

  20. Understanding the Self-Directed Online Learning Preferences, Goals, Achievements, and Challenges of MIT OpenCourseWare Subscribers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonk, Curtis J.; Lee, Mimi Miyoung; Kou, Xiaojing; Xu, Shuya; Sheu, Feng-Ru

    2015-01-01

    This research targeted the learning preferences, goals and motivations, achievements, challenges, and possibilities for life change of self-directed online learners who subscribed to the monthly OpenCourseWare (OCW) e-newsletter from MIT. Data collection included a 25-item survey of 1,429 newsletter subscribers; 613 of whom also completed an…

  1. Kopplung eines auf der Momentenmethode basierenden Computerprogramms mit einem FEM-Algorithmus zur Berechnung von elektromagnetischen Streuproblemen im medizinischen Bereich

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schick, M.; Landstorfer, F. M.

    2004-05-01

    Am Beispiel der Verkopplung von medizinischen Geräten über den menschlichen Körper werden elektromagnetische Störphänomene im Klinikbereich betrachtet. Für die Berechnung dieser komplexen Szenarien wird zum einen die Momentenmethode (MoM) verwendet, die sich in besonderem Maße für die Berücksichtigung metallischer Strukturen und offener Streuprobleme eignet, und zum anderen die Methode der Finiten Elemente (FEM), mit der die Eigenschaften des menschlichen Körpers besser berücksichtigt werden können. Mit Hilfe des Äquivalenzprinzips lässt sich das Gesamtproblem in zwei Teile zerlegen, in ein inneres und in ein äußeres. Der Außenraum wird dabei mit der MoM behandelt und das Innere, d.h. der Körper mit der FEM. Die Kopplung der beiden Methoden erfolgt an der Körperoberfläche über äquivalente Oberflächenströme. Durch Lösen des resultierenden linearen Gleichungssystems für das gesamte Problem lassen sich dann die Oberflächenströme und die über die Kontinuitätsgleichung miteinander verknüpften elektromagnetischen Felder bestimmen.

  2. Evaluation of the MIT RMID 1000 system for the identification of Listeria species:AOAC performance tested method 090325

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The MIT 1000 RMID System is a rapid microbial identification device that uses the principles of light scattering coupled with proprietary algorithms to identify bacteria after being cultured and placed in a vial of filtered water. This specific method is for pure culture identification of Listeria ...

  3. Interactive Web-Based and Hands-On Engineering Education: A Freshman Aerospace Design Course at MIT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Dava J.

    "Introduction to Aerospace and Design" is a 3-hour per week freshman elective course at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) that culminates in a Lighter-Than-Air (LTA) vehicle design competition, exposing freshmen to the excitement of aerospace engineering design typically taught in the junior or senior years. In addition to the…

  4. Rapid identification of Listeria spp.: an AOAC performance test of the MIT 1000 rapid microbial identification system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methods that rapidly confirm the identification of foodborne pathogens are highly desired. The Micro Imaging Technology (MIT) 1000 Rapid Microbial Identification (RMID) System is a benchtop instrument that detects laser light scattered from individual bacterial cells in solution with an array of 35 ...

  5. Designing Materials for the Language Lab of the Future: An Overview of the MIT Athena Language Learning Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramsch, Claire; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Details the current status, the future plans and the reasoning behind a five-year, campus-wide educational experiment for the integration of computers into the foreign language curriculum at MIT. The project is to use artificial intelligence in natural processing and to include interactive video and interactive audio components. (Author/SED)

  6. Proceedings of the MIT Student Workshop on VLSI and Parallel Systems Held in Dedham, Massachusetts on 21 July 1992

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-01

    William E. Weihl Jacob K. White Contents 1. Micron-Scale Display Technology Phillip Alvelda 2. Optimization of Loops for Dynamic Dataflow Machines Boon...Brewer Scribe: David Chaiken Micron-Scale Display Technology Phillip Alveldal NE43-810 alvelda @ai.mit.edu I. Introduction The primary objective of

  7. The standoff aerosol active signature testbed (SAAST) at MIT Lincoln Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Jonathan M.; Aldridge, John C.

    2005-11-01

    Standoff LIDAR detection of BW agents depends on accurate knowledge of the infrared and ultraviolet optical elastic scatter (ES) and ultraviolet fluorescence (UVF) signatures of bio-agents and interferents. MIT Lincoln Laboratory has developed the Standoff Aerosol Active Signature Testbed (SAAST) for measuring ES cross sections from BW simulants and interferents at all angles including 180º (direct backscatter). Measurements of interest include the dependence of the ES and UVF signatures on several spore production parameters including growth medium, sporulation protocol, washing protocol, fluidizing additives, and degree of aggregation. Using SAAST, we have made measurements of the ES signature of Bacillus globigii (atropheaus, Bg) spores grown under different growth methods. We have also investigated one common interferent (Arizona Test Dust). Future samples will include pollen and diesel exhaust. This paper presents the details of the SAAST apparatus along with the results of recent measurements.

  8. Rapid Speech Transmission Index predictions and auralizations of unusual instructional spaces at MIT's new Stata Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conant, David A.

    2005-04-01

    The Stata Center for Computer, Information and Intelligence Sciences, recently opened at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, includes a variety of oddly-shaped seminar rooms in addition to lecture spaces of somewhat more conventional form. The architects design approach prohibited following conventional, well understood room-acoustical behavior yet MIT and the design team were keenly interested in ensuring that these spaces functioned exceptionally well, acoustically. CATT-Acoustic room modeling was employed to assess RASTI through multiple design iterations for all these spaces. Presented here are computational and descriptive results achieved for these rooms which are highly-regarded by faculty. They all sound peculiarly good, given their unusual form. In addition, binaural auralizations for selected spaces are provided.

  9. Results of the GSFC/MIT Medium Scale Anisotropy Measurement (MSAM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchalla, J.; Inman, C.; Meyer, S.; Cheng, E.; Cottingham, D.; Fixsen, D.; Gentieu, P.; Kowitt, M.; Silverberg, R.; Page, L.

    1993-05-01

    A four channel balloon-bourne radiometer has been successfully flown by Goddard Space Flight Center and MIT in June of 1992. The passband central frequencies range from 6 to 22 cm(-1) with a measured beam FWHM of 0.5 degrees. A nutating secondary provides a 1.4 degree peak to peak throw at 2 Hz. Flight observations include 14 twenty minute CMBR scans 8 degrees from the North Celestial Pole and two calibrations using Jupiter and Saturn. The 4.6 hours of scan data have been spectrally decomposed into a CMBR Planck component and a dust component. Comparison of the dust component to the IRAS 100 micron data convolved with our beam is excellent. Results and constraints implied by the Planckian component are presented. Work supported in part by NASA grant NGT 50908.

  10. MC21 analysis of the MIT PWR benchmark: Hot zero power results

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly Iii, D. J.; Aviles, B. N.; Herman, B. R.

    2013-07-01

    MC21 Monte Carlo results have been compared with hot zero power measurements from an operating pressurized water reactor (PWR), as specified in a new full core PWR performance benchmark from the MIT Computational Reactor Physics Group. Included in the comparisons are axially integrated full core detector measurements, axial detector profiles, control rod bank worths, and temperature coefficients. Power depressions from grid spacers are seen clearly in the MC21 results. Application of Coarse Mesh Finite Difference (CMFD) acceleration within MC21 has been accomplished, resulting in a significant reduction of inactive batches necessary to converge the fission source. CMFD acceleration has also been shown to work seamlessly with the Uniform Fission Site (UFS) variance reduction method. (authors)

  11. Modellierung des elektrischen Feldes für Anordnungen mit Singularitäten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mente, D.; Greiff, M.; Mathis, W.

    2007-06-01

    Mit Hilfe von weitverbreiteten numerischen Methoden wie BEM/FEM lassen sich Singularitäten im Feldverlauf nur bedingt berücksichtigen. Es sollen daher zwei alternative numerische Feldberechnungsmethoden vorgestellt werden, die sich insbesondere für Spitzengeometrien eigenen, wie sie bei Rasterkraftmikroskopen eingesetzt werden. Dabei soll ein weiteres Augenmerk auf die Eignung der Kopplung der vorgeschlagenen Methoden an andere Feldberechnungsmethoden gerichtet werden. Modern numerical methods for field calculations are having problems dealing with singularities correctly. This paper provides two alternative methods that are able to handle electric fields including singularities in tip-like configurations. These configurations occur in atomic force microscopes. Another focus will be the suitability of coupling the presented methods with usual numerical methods.

  12. Frequency-difference MIT imaging of cerebral haemorrhage with a hemispherical coil array: numerical modelling.

    PubMed

    Zolgharni, M; Griffiths, H; Ledger, P D

    2010-08-01

    The feasibility of detecting a cerebral haemorrhage with a hemispherical MIT coil array consisting of 56 exciter/sensor coils of 10 mm radius and operating at 1 and 10 MHz was investigated. A finite difference method combined with an anatomically realistic head model comprising 12 tissue types was used to simulate the strokes. Frequency-difference images were reconstructed from the modelled data with different levels of the added phase noise and two types of a priori boundary errors: a displacement of the head and a size scaling error. The results revealed that a noise level of 3 m degrees (standard deviation) was adequate for obtaining good visualization of a peripheral stroke (volume approximately 49 ml). The simulations further showed that the displacement error had to be within 3-4 mm and the scaling error within 3-4% so as not to cause unacceptably large artefacts on the images.

  13. MIT-NASA/KSC space life science experiments - A telescience testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oman, Charles M.; Lichtenberg, Byron K.; Fiser, Richard L.; Vordermark, Deborah S.

    1990-01-01

    Experiments performed at MIT to better define Space Station information system telescience requirements for effective remote coaching of astronauts by principal investigators (PI) on the ground are described. The experiments were conducted via satellite video, data, and voice links to surrogate crewmembers working in a laboratory at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. Teams of two PIs and two crewmembers performed two different space life sciences experiments. During 19 three-hour interactive sessions, a variety of test conditions were explored. Since bit rate limits are necessarily imposed on Space Station video experiments surveillance video was varied down to 50 Kb/s and the effectiveness of PI controlled frame rate, resolution, grey scale, and color decimation was investigated. It is concluded that remote coaching by voice works and that dedicated crew-PI voice loops would be of great value on the Space Station.

  14. Space applications of the MITS electron-photon Monte Carlo transport code system

    SciTech Connect

    Kensek, R.P.; Lorence, L.J.; Halbleib, J.A.; Morel, J.E.

    1996-07-01

    The MITS multigroup/continuous-energy electron-photon Monte Carlo transport code system has matured to the point that it is capable of addressing more realistic three-dimensional adjoint applications. It is first employed to efficiently predict point doses as a function of source energy for simple three-dimensional experimental geometries exposed to simulated uniform isotropic planar sources of monoenergetic electrons up to 4.0 MeV. Results are in very good agreement with experimental data. It is then used to efficiently simulate dose to a detector in a subsystem of a GPS satellite due to its natural electron environment, employing a relatively complex model of the satellite. The capability for survivability analysis of space systems is demonstrated, and results are obtained with and without variance reduction.

  15. Die Struktur von schlankem Materialfluss mit Lean Production Kanban und Innovationen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheid, Wolf-Michael

    In der Literatur wird Materialfluss überwiegend in Spezialdisziplinen betrachtet, etwa der Steuerungslogik, der Logistiktechnik oder dem Supply Chain Management. Ein charakterisierendes Merkmal des Materialflusses ist jedoch, dass er sich aus vielfältigen Einzelbausteinen zusammensetzt, die alle harmonisch abgestimmt sein müssen. Die maximal erreichbare Effizienz wird nicht durch Höchstleistungen in dem einen oder anderen Spezialthema bestimmt, sondern durch das schwächste Glied im gesamten komplexen Netzwerk. Den Schnittstellen zwischen den betroffenen Fachbereichen in einem Unternehmen kommt hier eine ganz besondere Bedeutung zu: Erst ein harmonischer Einklang ermöglicht hohe Effektivität. Dies setzt umfassendes Verständnis für interdisziplinäre Notwendigkeiten, ein hohes Maß an Abstimmung mit den operativen Prozessen und letztlich einen einvernehmlichen Umgang und den Respekt vor den Problemstellungen des Anderen voraus.

  16. VDI-Richtlinien - mit Technischen Regeln Wirtschaftlichkeit erhöhen und Standards setzen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandelartz, Johannes

    Der Verein Deutscher Ingenieure e.V. (VDI) ist ein gemeinnütziger, wirtschaftlich und politisch unabhängiger, technisch-wissenschaftlicher Verein von Ingenieuren und Naturwissenschaftlern. Mit über 137 000 persönlich zugeordneten Mitgliedern ist er eine der größten Ingenieur-Vereinigungen Europas und gilt in Deutschland als führender Sprecher der Technik und der Ingenieure. 1856 gegründet, hat er viele für die Technik wesentliche Entwicklungen in Gang gesetzt, so im Bereich der technischen Überwachung, der technischen Regelsetzung und Normung, der Arbeitsstudien, im gewerblichen Rechtsschutz und im Patentwesen. Seit seiner Gründung sieht es der VDI als seine Aufgabe, "das Zusammenwirken aller geistiger Kräfte der Technik im Bewusstsein ethischer Verantwortung zu fördern“ und die Lebensmöglichkeiten aller Menschen durch Entwicklung und sinnvoller Anwendung technischer Mittel zu verbessern.

  17. Entropy Generation/Availability Energy Loss Analysis Inside MIT Gas Spring and "Two Space" Test Rigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebiana, Asuquo B.; Savadekar, Rupesh T.; Patel, Kaushal V.

    2006-01-01

    The results of the entropy generation and availability energy loss analysis under conditions of oscillating pressure and oscillating helium gas flow in two Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) test rigs piston-cylinder and piston-cylinder-heat exchanger are presented. Two solution domains, the gas spring (single-space) in the piston-cylinder test rig and the gas spring + heat exchanger (two-space) in the piston-cylinder-heat exchanger test rig are of interest. Sage and CFD-ACE+ commercial numerical codes are used to obtain 1-D and 2-D computer models, respectively, of each of the two solution domains and to simulate the oscillating gas flow and heat transfer effects in these domains. Second law analysis is used to characterize the entropy generation and availability energy losses inside the two solution domains. Internal and external entropy generation and availability energy loss results predicted by Sage and CFD-ACE+ are compared. Thermodynamic loss analysis of simple systems such as the MIT test rigs are often useful to understand some important features of complex pattern forming processes in more complex systems like the Stirling engine. This study is aimed at improving numerical codes for the prediction of thermodynamic losses via the development of a loss post-processor. The incorporation of loss post-processors in Stirling engine numerical codes will facilitate Stirling engine performance optimization. Loss analysis using entropy-generation rates due to heat and fluid flow is a relatively new technique for assessing component performance. It offers a deep insight into the flow phenomena, allows a more exact calculation of losses than is possible with traditional means involving the application of loss correlations and provides an effective tool for improving component and overall system performance.

  18. Effects of tissue heterogeneity on single-coil, scanning MIT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldkamp, J. R.; Quirk, S.

    2016-03-01

    We recently reported on the use of a single induction coil to accomplish imaging of the electrical conductivity in human tissues via magnetic induction tomography (MIT). A key to the method was the development of a mapping equation that quantitatively relates an arbitrary electrical conductivity distribution to ohmic loss in a coil consisting of concentric circular loops in a plane. By making multiple coil loss measurements at a number of locations in the vicinity of the target (scan), this mapping equation can be used to build an algorithm for 3D image construction of electrical conductivity. Important assumptions behind the mathematical formula included uniform relative permittivity throughout all space and continuous variation in conductivity. In this paper, these two assumptions were tested in a series of experiments involving the use of human tissue phantoms created from agarose, doped with sufficient sodium chloride to yield physiological conductivities. Inclusions of doped agarose were scanned both while isolated and also while embedded in a matrix of agarose gel having lowered conductivity - to help evaluate the effects of abrupt permittivity change. The effects of discontinuous conductivity change were simulated by filling 5 cm diameter petri dishes with 1.4% aqueous KCl and placing them in a much larger, 14 cm diameter petri dish - gap distance varied from about 3 mm to 30 mm. In either case, we will show that these effects are minimal on resultant images, helping to further validate the mapping equation used to construct MIT images. Because of their simplicity, scans reported here did not include coil rotation. To acknowledge the importance of rotation, however, we have devoted a section of this work to illustrate the profound benefits of coil rotation during a scan - though virtual data are used, where coil rotation is more easily specified.

  19. Dose intensification in acute myeloid leukaemia: greater effectiveness at lower cost. Principal report of the Medical Research Council's AML9 study. MRC Leukaemia in Adults Working Party.

    PubMed

    Rees, J K; Gray, R G; Wheatley, K

    1996-07-01

    Between 1984 and 1990, 972 patients aged 1-79 years with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), from 85 British hospitals, were entered into the MRC's 9th AML trial. Patients were randomized between DAT 1 + 5 (daunorubicin for 1 d, with cytarabine and 6-thioguanine for 5 d) and DAT 3 + 10 (same dose drugs for 3 and 10 d respectively) as induction therapy. The 63% who achieved complete remission (CR) were randomized to receive two courses of DAT 2 + 7 alternating with two courses of either MAZE (m-AMSA, 5-azacytidine, etoposide) or COAP (cyclophosphamide, vincristine, cytarabine, prednisone). Finally, those still in CR were randomized to receive either 1 year of maintenance treatment with eight courses of cytarabine and thioguanine followed by four courses of COAP, or no further cytotoxic therapy. Resistance to induction therapy was less common with the DAT 3 + 10 regimen than with DAT 1 + 5 (13% v 23%; P = 0.0001) and hence, despite a 5% increase in the risk of induction death, the CR rate was higher (66% v 61%; P = 0.15). Moreover, CR was achieved more rapidly with DAT 3 + 10 (median 34 v 46 d; P < 0.0001) and thus patients required less time in hospital (mean 20 v 29 d) and less blood product support. 5-year relapse-free survival (28% v 23%; P = 0.05) and survival (23% v 18%; P < 0.05) were also better with DAT 3 + 10. Post-remission intensification of therapy with MAZE resulted in fewer relapses (66% v 74% at 5 years; P = 0.03) but patients allocated MAZE required considerably more supportive care and 14 (4.5%) died following 312 MAZE courses, whereas no deaths occurred following COAP. 5-year survival was not significantly higher with MAZE (37% v 31%). Finally, although 1 year of outpatient maintenance treatment appeared to delay, but not prevent, recurrence it did not improve 5-year survival which was non-significantly worse for those allocated maintenance treatment (41% v 44%). We conclude that the more intensive induction regimen, DAT 3 + 10, is not only more

  20. The role of matched sibling donor allogeneic stem cell transplantation in pediatric high-risk acute myeloid leukemia: results from the AML-BFM 98 study

    PubMed Central

    Klusmann, Jan-Henning; Reinhardt, Dirk; Zimmermann, Martin; Kremens, Bernhard; Vormoor, Josef; Dworzak, Michael; Creutzig, Ursula; Klingebiel, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Background The role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation in post-remission management of children with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia remains controversial. In the multi-center AML-BFM 98 study we prospectively evaluated the impact of allogeneic stem cell transplantation in children with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission. Design and Methods HLA-typed patients with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia, who achieved first complete remission (n=247), were included in this analysis. All patients received double induction and consolidation. Based on the availability of a matched-sibling donor, patients were allocated by genetic chance to allogeneic stem cell transplantation (n=61) or chemotherapy-only (i.e. intensification and maintenance therapy; n=186). The main analysis was done on an intention-to-treat basis according to this allocation. Results Intention-to-treat analysis did not show a significantly different 5-year disease-free survival (49±6% versus 45±4%, Plog rank=0.44) or overall survival (68±6% versus 57±4%, Plog rank=0.17) between the matched-sibling donor and no-matched-sibling donor groups, whereas late adverse effects occurred more frequently after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (72.5% versus 31.8%, PFischer<0.01). These results were confirmed by as-treated analysis corrected for the time until transplantation (5-year overall survival: 72±8% versus 60±4%, PMantel-Byar 0.21). Subgroup analysis demonstrated improved survival rates for patients with 11q23 aberrations allocated to allogeneic stem cell transplantation (5-year overall survival: 94±6% versus 52±7%, Plog-rank=0.01; n=18 versus 49) in contrast to patients without 11q23 aberrations (5-year overall survival: 58±8% versus 55±5%, Plog-rank=0.66). Conclusions Our analyses defined a genetic subgroup of children with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia who benefited from allogeneic stem cell transplantation in the prospective multi-center AML-BFM 98 study. For

  1. A new type of gradiometer for the receiving circuit of magnetic induction tomography (MIT).

    PubMed

    Scharfetter, Hermann; Merwa, Robert; Pilz, Karl

    2005-04-01

    Magnetic induction tomography (MIT) is a low-resolution imaging modality which aims at the three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the electrical conductivity in objects from alternating magnetic fields. In MIT systems the magnetic field perturbations to be detected are very small when compared to the excitation field (ppm range). The voltage which is induced by the excitation field in the receiver coils must be suppressed for providing sufficient dynamic range. In the past, two very efficient strategies were proposed: adjusted planar gradiometers (PGRAD) and the orientation of a receiver coil with respect to the excitation coil such that the net magnetic flow is zero (zero flow coil, ZFC). In contrast to the PGRAD no voltage is induced in the ZFC by the main field. This is advantageous because two comparatively high voltages in the two gradiometer coils can never be subtracted perfectly, thus leaving a residual voltage which is prone to drift. However, a disadvantage of the ZFC is the higher susceptibility to interferences from far RF sources. In contrast, in the gradiometer such interferences are cancelled to a high degree. We developed a new type of gradiometer (zero flow gradiometer, ZFGRAD) which combines the advantages of ZFC and PGRAD. All three systems were compared with respect to sensitivity and perturbation to signal ratio (PSR) defined as the ratio of the signal change due to a magnetic perturbation field at the carrier frequency and the signal change due to shifting a metallic sphere between two test points. The spatial sensitivity of the three systems was found to be very similar. The PSR of the ZFGRAD was more than 12 times lower than that of the ZFC. Finally, the feasibility of image reconstruction with two arrays of eight excitation coils and eight ZFGRAD, respectively, was shown with a single-step Gauss-Newton reconstructor and simulated measurement data generated for a cylindrical tank with a spherical perturbation. The resulting images show a

  2. The MIT Integrated Global System Model: A facility for Assessing and Communicating Climate Change Uncertainty (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prinn, R. G.

    2013-12-01

    The world is facing major challenges that create tensions between human development and environmental sustenance. In facing these challenges, computer models are invaluable tools for addressing the need for probabilistic approaches to forecasting. To illustrate this, I use the MIT Integrated Global System Model framework (IGSM; http://globalchange.mit.edu ). The IGSM consists of a set of coupled sub-models of global economic and technological development and resultant emissions, and physical, dynamical and chemical processes in the atmosphere, land, ocean and ecosystems (natural and managed). Some of the sub-models have both complex and simplified versions available, with the choice of which version to use being guided by the questions being addressed. Some sub-models (e.g.urban air pollution) are reduced forms of complex ones created by probabilistic collocation with polynomial chaos bases. Given the significant uncertainties in the model components, it is highly desirable that forecasts be probabilistic. We achieve this by running 400-member ensembles (Latin hypercube sampling) with different choices for key uncertain variables and processes within the human and natural system model components (pdfs of inputs estimated by model-observation comparisons, literature surveys, or expert elicitation). The IGSM has recently been used for probabilistic forecasts of climate, each using 400-member ensembles: one ensemble assumes no explicit climate mitigation policy and others assume increasingly stringent policies involving stabilization of greenhouse gases at various levels. These forecasts indicate clearly that the greatest effect of these policies is to lower the probability of extreme changes. The value of such probability analyses for policy decision-making lies in their ability to compare relative (not just absolute) risks of various policies, which are less affected by the earth system model uncertainties. Given the uncertainties in forecasts, it is also clear that

  3. Thymineless Death in F10-Treated AML Cells Occurs via Lipid Raft Depletion and Fas/FasL co-Localization in the Plasma Membrane with Activation of the Extrinsic Apoptotic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gmeiner, William H.; Jennings-Gee, Jamie; Stuart, Christopher H.; Pardee, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    The polymeric fluoropyrimidine F10 displays excellent anti-leukemia activity in pre-clinical models of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) through dual targeting of thymidylate synthase and DNA topoisomerase 1. Here we report that F10 activates the extrinsic apoptotic pathway in AML cells by enhancing localization of Fas and Fas ligand (FasL) at the plasma membrane and while reducing overall lipid raft levels promotes Fas/FasL co-localization in remaining lipid rafts. The HMG-CoA synthase inhibitor simvastatin was synergistic with F10 and induced cell death via similar apoptotic processes. Our results are consistent with diverse processes activating a common apoptotic pathway characterized by reduced overall levels of lipid rafts and Fas/FasL co-localization in the plasma membrane, including in remaining lipid rafts which may play a role in both cell-survival and cell death signaling. PMID:25510486

  4. Thymineless death in F10-treated AML cells occurs via lipid raft depletion and Fas/FasL co-localization in the plasma membrane with activation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway.

    PubMed

    Gmeiner, William H; Jennings-Gee, Jamie; Stuart, Christopher H; Pardee, Timothy S

    2015-02-01

    The polymeric fluoropyrimidine F10 displays excellent anti-leukemia activity in pre-clinical models of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) through dual targeting of thymidylate synthase and DNA topoisomerase 1. Here we report that F10 activates the extrinsic apoptotic pathway in AML cells by enhancing localization of Fas and Fas ligand (FasL) at the plasma membrane and while reducing overall lipid raft levels promotes Fas/FasL co-localization in remaining lipid rafts. The HMG-CoA synthase inhibitor simvastatin was synergistic with F10 and induced cell death via similar apoptotic processes. Our results are consistent with diverse processes activating a common apoptotic pathway characterized by reduced overall levels of lipid rafts and Fas/FasL co-localization in the plasma membrane, including in remaining lipid rafts which may play a role in both cell-survival and cell death signaling.

  5. Safety and pharmacokinetics of the antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) LY2181308 as a single-agent or in combination with idarubicin and cytarabine in patients with refractory or relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

    PubMed

    Erba, Harry P; Sayar, Hamid; Juckett, Mark; Lahn, Michael; Andre, Valerie; Callies, Sophie; Schmidt, Shelly; Kadam, Sunil; Brandt, John T; Van Bockstaele, Dirk; Andreeff, Michael

    2013-08-01

    Survivin is expressed in tumor cells, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML), regulates mitosis, and prevents tumor cell death. The antisense oligonucleotide sodium LY2181308 (LY2181308) inhibits survivin expression and may cause cell cycle arrest and restore apoptosis in AML. In this study, the safety, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics/efficacy of LY2181308 was examined in AML patients, first in a cohort with monotherapy (n = 8) and then post-amendment in a cohort with the combination of cytarabine and idarubicin treatment (n = 16). LY2181308 was administered with a loading dosage of three consecutive daily infusions of 750 mg followed by weekly intravenous (IV) maintenance doses of 750 mg. Cytarabine 1.5 g/m(2) was administered as a 4-hour IV infusion on Days 3, 4, and 5 of Cycle 1, and idarubicin 12 mg/m(2) was administered as a 30-minute IV infusion on Days 3, 4, and 5 of Cycle 1. Cytarabine and idarubicin were administered on Days 1, 2, and 3 of each subsequent 28-day cycle. Reduction of survivin was evaluated in peripheral blasts and bone marrow. Single-agent LY2181308 was well tolerated and survivin was reduced only in patients with a high survivin expression. In combination with chemotherapy, 4/16 patients had complete responses, 1/16 patients had incomplete responses, and 4/16 patients had cytoreduction. Nine patients died on study: 6 (monotherapy), 3 (combination). LY2181308 alone is well tolerated in patients with AML. In combination with cytarabine and idarubicin, LY2181308 does not appear to cause additional toxicity, and has shown some clinical benefit needing confirmation in future clinical trials.

  6. Prognostic significance of flow-cytometry evaluation of minimal residual disease in children with acute myeloid leukaemia treated according to the AIEOP-AML 2002/01 study protocol.

    PubMed

    Buldini, Barbara; Rizzati, Frida; Masetti, Riccardo; Fagioli, Franca; Menna, Giuseppe; Micalizzi, Concetta; Putti, Maria Caterina; Rizzari, Carmelo; Santoro, Nicola; Zecca, Marco; Disarò, Silvia; Rondelli, Roberto; Merli, Pietro; Pigazzi, Martina; Pession, Andrea; Locatelli, Franco; Basso, Giuseppe

    2017-04-01

    In children with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), assessment of initial treatment response is an essential prognostic factor; methods more sensitive than morphology are still under evaluation. We report on the measurement of minimal residual disease (MRD), by multicolour flow-cytometry in one centralized laboratory, in 142 children with newly diagnosed AML enrolled in the Associazione Italiana di EmatoOncologia Pediatrica-AML 2002/01 trial. At the end of the first induction course, MRD was <0·1% in 69, 0·1-1% in 16 and >1% in 51 patients. The 8-year disease-free survival (DFS) of 125 children in morphological complete remission and with MRD <0·1%, 0·1-1% and ≥1% was 73·1 ± 5·6%, 37·8 ± 12·1% and 34·1 ± 8·8%, respectively (P < 0·01). MRD was also available after the second induction course in 92/142 patients. MRD was ≥0·1% at the end of the first induction course in 36 patients; 13 reached an MRD <0·1% after the second one and their DFS was 45·4 ± 16·7% vs. 22·8 ± 8·9% in patients with persisting MRD ≥0·1% (P = 0·037). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that MRD ≥0·1% after first induction course was, together with a monosomal karyotype, an independent adverse prognostic factor for DFS. Our results show that MRD detected by flow-cytometry after induction therapy predicts outcome in patients with childhood AML and can help stratifying post-remission treatment.

  7. Design of a D-Strut and its application results in the JPL, MIT, and LaRC test beds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, L. P.; Workman, Brian J.; Chu, Cheng-Chih; Anderson, Eric H.

    1992-01-01

    High damping at very low magnitudes of vibration is provided by an 'Arched Flexure' D-Strut. Five of these devices have been incorporated in JPL's CSI truss structure, and five more in MIT's interferometer test bed. Two were also temporarily installed in the LaRC CSI test structure. Damping factors in the 50 percent category are being provided at vibration motions as small as 50 nm. The 'Arched Flexure' used in the D-Strut maximizes the volumetric stiffness parameter relative to its axial stiffness. In turn, this enables high damping factors, even in a very rigid truss structure. This paper includes a presentation and discussion of both element and system test data taken at JPL, LaRC, and MIT. Also provided is a detailed description of the D-Strut, the dynamic model, and several graphs showing design parameter variations that will make it possible to evaluate the D-Strut for other applications.

  8. Hyperhomocysteinaemia, low folate concentrations and MTHFR C677T mutation in abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hui; Hu, Xinhua; Zhang, Qiang; Li, Jun; Liu, Bing; Wang, Junpeng; Shao, Yang; Zhang, Zhishen; Liu, Chengwei; Hu, Haidi; Zhang, Jian; Xin, Shijie

    2014-05-01

    Hintergrund: Homocystein (Hcy) wurde mit dem Bauchaortenaneurysma (AAA) in Verbindung gebracht. Allerdings wurde der Zusammenhang von Hcy, Vitamin B12 und Folsäure bei Patienten mit AAA bislang nicht in unserer Population untersucht. Patienten und Methoden: 463 Patienten mit einem AAA wurden in die Studie eingeschlossen. 463 Probanden waren nach Alter und Geschlecht mit den Patienten abgestimmt. Wir untersuchten bei allen den Plasmaspiegel von Hcy, Vitamin B12, Folsäure und die Verteilung der C677T Methylentetrahydrofolat Reduktase (MTHFR) Gen-Mutation. Ergebnisse: Die mittlere Plasma- Hcy Konzentrationen waren bei Patienten mit AAA im Vergleich zur Kontrollgruppe signifikant höher (18,37 ± 6,97 vs 12,89 ± 4,08 umol/l, P < 0,001). Die Häufigkeit des homozygoten (TT) Genotyps der MTHFR C677T Mutation war bei Patienten mit AAA signifikant höher als in der Kontrollgruppe (19,4 % vs 11,9 %, P = 0,002). Nüchtern Hcy korrelierte negativ mit Folsäure (AAA: r = - 0,311, P < 0,01; Kontrolle: r = - 0,348, P < 0,01). Die Aneurysmen waren signifikant größer (p < 0,001) bei Patienten mit Hyperhomocysteinämie als bei Patienten mit normalen Hcy Plasmaspiegel. Die Größe des AAA korrelierte linear mit dem Plasma- Hcy Spiegel (r = 0,286, p < 0,001). Schlussfolgerungen: Serum Folsäuremangel und Hyperhomocysteinämie waren mit einem erhöhten Risiko von AAA assoziiert. Der homozygote (TT) Genotyp des MTHFR Genmutation kann ein entscheidender erblicher Risikofaktor für AAA sein.

  9. MRD assessed by WT1 and NPM1 transcript levels identifies distinct outcomes in AML patients and is influenced by gemtuzumab ozogamicin.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Juliette; Lambert, Jérôme; Nibourel, Olivier; Pautas, Cécile; Hayette, Sandrine; Cayuela, Jean-Michel; Terré, Christine; Rousselot, Philippe; Dombret, Hervé; Chevret, Sylvie; Preudhomme, Claude; Castaigne, Sylvie; Renneville, Aline

    2014-08-15

    We analysed the prognostic significance of minimal residual disease (MRD) level in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) treated in the randomized gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) ALFA-0701 trial. Levels of WT1 and NPM1 gene transcripts were assessed using cDNA-based real-time quantitative PCR in 183 patients with WT1 overexpression and in 77 patients with NMP1 mutation (NPM1mut) at diagnosis. Positive WT1 MRD (defined as > 0.5% in the peripheral blood) after induction and at the end of treatment were both significantly associated with a higher risk of relapse and a shorter overall survival (OS). Positive NPM1mut MRD (defined as > 0.1% in the bone marrow) after induction and at the end of treatment also predicted a higher risk of relapse, but did not influence OS. Interestingly, the achievement of a negative NPM1mut MRD was significantly more frequent in patients treated in the GO arm compared to those treated in control arm (39 % versus 7% (p=0.006) after induction and 91% versus 61% (p=0.028) at the end of treatment). However, GO did not influence WT1 MRD levels. Our study supports the prognostic significance of MRD assessed by WT1 and NPM1mut transcript levels and show that NPM1 MRD is decreased by GO treatment.

  10. Stage I of Phase II study assessing efficacy, safety and tolerability of barasertib (AZD1152) versus LDAC in elderly AML patients

    PubMed Central

    Kantarjian, Hagop M; Martinelli, Giovanni; Jabbour, Elias J; Quintás-Cardama, Alfonso; Ando, Kiyoshi; Bay, Jacques-Olivier; Wei, Andrew; Gröpper, Stefanie; Papayannidis, Cristina; Owen, Kate; Pike, Laura; Schmitt, Nicola; Stockman, Paul K; Giagounidis, Aristoteles

    2013-01-01

    Background This Phase II study evaluated the efficacy, safety and tolerability of the Aurora B kinase inhibitor barasertib, compared with low-dose cytosine arabinoside (LDAC), in patients aged ≥60 years with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Methods Patients were randomized 2:1 to open-label barasertib 1200 mg (7-day iv infusion) or LDAC 20 mg (sc twice-daily for 10 days) in 28-day cycles. The primary endpoint was objective complete response rate (OCRR: CR + CRi [Cheson criteria, additionally requiring CRi reconfirmation ≥21 days after first appearance and associated with partial recovery of platelets and neutrophils]). Secondary endpoints included overall survival (OS) and safety. Results 74 patients (barasertib, n=48; LDAC, n=26) completed ≥1 cycle. A significant improvement in OCRR was observed with barasertib (35.4% vs 11.5%; difference, 23.9% [95% CI, 2.7–39.9]; P<0.05). Although not formally sized to compare OS data, the median OS with barasertib was 8.2 months versus 4.5 months with LDAC. (HR=0.88, 95% CI, 0.49-1.58; P=0.663;). Stomatitis and febrile neutropenia were the most common adverse events with barasertib versus LDAC (71% vs 15%; 67% vs 19%, respectively). Conclusions Barasertib showed a significant improvement in OCRR versus LDAC, with a more toxic but manageable safety profile that was consistent with previous studies. Clinicaltrials.gov, NCT00952588. PMID:23605952

  11. The prognostic significance of early treatment response in pediatric relapsed acute myeloid leukemia: results of the international study Relapsed AML 2001/01

    PubMed Central

    Creutzig, Ursula; Zimmermann, Martin; Dworzak, Michael N.; Gibson, Brenda; Tamminga, Rienk; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Ha, Shau-Yin; Hasle, Henrik; Maschan, Alexey; Bertrand, Yves; Leverger, Guy; von Neuhoff, Christine; Razzouk, Bassem; Rizzari, Carmelo; Smisek, Petr; Smith, Owen P.; Stark, Batia; Reinhardt, Dirk; Kaspers, Gertjan L.

    2014-01-01

    The prognostic significance of early response to treatment has not been reported in relapsed pediatric acute myeloid leukemia. In order to identify an early and easily applicable prognostic factor allowing subsequent treatment modifications, we assessed leukemic blast counts in the bone marrow by morphology on days 15 and 28 after first reinduction in 338 patients of the international Relapsed-AML2001/01 trial. Both day 15 and day 28 status was classified as good (≤20% leukemic blasts) in 77% of patients. The correlation between day 15 and 28 blast percentages was significant, but not strong (Spearman correlation coefficient = 0.49, P<0.001). Survival probability decreased in a stepwise fashion along with rising blast counts at day 28. Patients with bone marrow blast counts at this time-point of ≤5%, 6–10%, 11–20% and >20% had 4-year probabilities of survival of 52%±3% versus 36%±10% versus 21%±9% versus 14%±4%, respectively, P<0.0001; this trend was not seen for day 15 results. Multivariate analysis showed that early treatment response at day 28 had the strongest prognostic significance, superseding even time to relapse (< or ≥12 months). In conclusion, an early response to treatment, measured on day 28, is a strong and independent prognostic factor potentially useful for treatment stratification in pediatric relapsed acute myeloid leukemia. This study was registered with ISRCTN code: 94206677. PMID:24763401

  12. Second line azacitidine for elderly or infirmed patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) not eligible for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation-a retrospective national multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Ram, Ron; Gatt, Moshe; Merkel, Drorit; Helman, Ilana; Inbar, Tsofia; Nagler, Arnon; Avivi, Irit; Ofran, Yishai

    2017-04-01

    Elderly and infirm patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with either induction refractory or relapse disease may benefit from treatment with azacitidine. We retrospectively reviewed the data from five tertiary centers in Israel, treated between 2009 and 2015. Thirty-four patients (median age 74 years) were identified. Sixty-two percent of the patients had relapsed disease and 38% had refractory disease. Median time of follow-up was 12.1 months. Out of a total of 327 courses, incidence of infectious episodes was 6%. Eighteen percent experienced major bleeding. Thirty-two percent of the patients achieved morphologic complete remission, and 26% had stabilization of disease during at least three courses. At 12 and 18 months after the first course of azacitidine, 33 and 10% of the patients were progression-free, respectively. Incidences of overall survival at 12 and 24 months were 54.5 and 16%, respectively. Age <75 years was associated with better overall survival. Normal leukocyte count at the first dose of azacitidine and standard doses of azacitidine were both associated with a better progression-free and overall survival. We conclude that azacitidine is feasible in patients who have failed induction chemotherapy and may be associated with prolongation of survival. A prospective trial to validate these results is warranted.

  13. A Natural Combination Extract of Viscum album L. Containing Both Triterpene Acids and Lectins Is Highly Effective against AML In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Delebinski, Catharina I.; Twardziok, Monika; Kleinsimon, Susann; Hoff, Florian; Mulsow, Katharina; Rolff, Jana; Jäger, Sebastian; Eggert, Angelika; Seifert, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Aqueous Viscum album L. extracts are widely used in complementary cancer medicine. Hydrophobic triterpene acids also possess anti-cancer properties, but due to their low solubility they do not occur in significant amounts in aqueous extracts. Using cyclodextrins we solubilised mistletoe triterpenes (mainly oleanolic acid) and investigated the effect of a mistletoe whole plant extract on human acute myeloid leukaemia cells in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo. Single Viscum album L. extracts containing only solubilised triterpene acids (TT) or lectins (viscum) inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner in vitro and ex vivo. The combination of viscum and TT extracts (viscumTT) enhanced the induction of apoptosis synergistically. The experiments demonstrated that all three extracts are able to induce apoptosis via caspase-8 and -9 dependent pathways with down-regulation of members of the inhibitor of apoptosis and Bcl-2 families of proteins. Finally, the acute myeloid leukaemia mouse model experiment confirmed the therapeutic effectiveness of viscumTT-treatment resulting in significant tumour weight reduction, comparable to the effect in cytarabine-treated mice. These results suggest that the combination viscumTT may have a potential therapeutic value for the treatment AML. PMID:26244918

  14. IS THE AMPLIFICATION OF c-MYC, MLL AND RUNX1 GENES IN AML AND MDS PATIENTS WITH TRISOMY 8, 11 AND 21 A FACTOR FOR A CLONAL EVOLUTION IN THEIR KARYOTYPE?

    PubMed

    Angelova, S; Spassov, B; Nikolova, V; Christov, I; Tzvetkov, N; Simeonova, M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was 1) to define if the amplification of c-MYC, MLL and RUNX1 genes is related to the progressive changes of the karyotype in patients with AML and MDS with trisomy 8, 11 and 21 (+8, +11 and +21) in bone marrow and 2) can that amplification be accepted as part of the clonal evolution (CE). Karyotype analysis was performed in 179 patients with AML or MDS with the different chromosomal aberrations (CA) aged 16-81. The findings were distributed as follow: initiating balanced CA (n = 60), aneuploidia (n = 55), unbalanced CA (n = 64). Amplification of c-MYC, MLL and RUNX1 genes by means of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was found in 35% (7 out of 20) of AML and MDS patients with +8, +11 u +21 as single CA in their karyotype; in 63.6% of pts (7 out of 11)--with additional numerical or structural CA and in 75% (9 out of 12)--with complex karyotype. We assume that the amplification of the respective chromosomal regions in patients with +8, +11 and +21 is related to CE. Considering the amplification as a factor of CE, we established 3 patterns of karyotype development depending on the type of the initiating CA in it. Significant statistical differences were found between the three patterns regarding the karyotype distribution in the different stages of progression (p < 0.001).

  15. Selective FLT3 inhibitor FI-700 neutralizes Mcl-1 and enhances p53-mediated apoptosis in AML cells with activating mutations of FLT3 through Mcl-1/Noxa axis.

    PubMed

    Kojima, K; Konopleva, M; Tsao, T; Andreeff, M; Ishida, H; Shiotsu, Y; Jin, L; Tabe, Y; Nakakuma, H

    2010-01-01

    Treatment using Fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 (FLT3) inhibitors is a promising approach to overcome the dismal prognosis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with activating FLT3 mutations. Current trials are combining FLT3 inhibitors with p53-activating conventional chemotherapy. The mechanisms of cytotoxicity of FLT3 inhibitors are poorly understood. We investigated the interaction of FLT3 and p53 pathways after their simultaneous blockade using the selective FLT3 inhibitor FI-700 and the MDM2 inhibitor Nutlin-3 in AML. We found that FI-700 immediately reduced antiapoptotic Mcl-1 levels and enhanced Nutlin-induced p53-mediated mitochondrial apoptosis in FLT3/internal tandem duplication cells through the Mcl-1/Noxa axis. FI-700 induced proteasome-mediated degradation of Mcl-1, resulting in the reduced ability of Mcl-1 to sequester proapoptotic Bim. Nutlin-3 induced Noxa, which displaced Bim from Mcl-1. The FI-700/Nutlin-3 combination profoundly activated Bax and induced apoptosis. Our findings suggest that FI-700 actively enhances p53 signaling toward mitochondrial apoptosis and that a combination strategy aimed at inhibiting FLT3 and activating p53 signaling could potentially be effective in AML.

  16. [Evaluation of the Musical Concentration Training with Pepe (MusiKo mit Pepe) for children with attention deficits].

    PubMed

    Rothmann, Kathrin; Hillmer, Jana-Mareike; Hosser, Daniela

    2014-09-01

    Fragestellung: Die vorliegende Studie überprüft die Wirksamkeit des Musikalischen Konzentrationstrainings mit Pepe (MusiKo mit Pepe) für fünf- bis zehnjährige Kinder mit Aufmerksamkeitsproblemen. Methodik: In einem Prä-Post-Kontrollgruppendesign (N = 108) wurden Veränderungen der Aufmerksamkeitsleistung mittels der Testbatterie zur Aufmerksamkeitsprüfung für Kinder (KiTAP) sowie Veränderungen der kindlichen Lebensqualität mittels des Fragebogens für Kinder (KINDL-R) erfasst. Zusätzlich wurden Fremdbeurteilungsbögen zur Aufmerksamkeitsdefizit-/Hyperaktivitätsstörung (FBB-ADHS) sowie zur Störung des Sozialverhaltens (FBB-SSV) des Diagnostik-Systems für psychische Störungen nach ICD-10 und DSM-IV für Kinder und Jugendliche II und der Eltern- und der Lehrerfragebogen über das Verhalten von Kindern und Jugendlichen (CBCL, TRF) eingesetzt. Ergebnisse: Es zeigen sich für die am Training teilnehmenden Kinder im Vergleich zu der Kontrollgruppe über die Zeit signifikante Verbesserungen der Aufmerksamkeitsleistung sowie der Lebensqualität. Darüber hinaus ergibt sich eine signifikante Reduktion der ADHS-Symptomatik im Eltern- und Lehrerurteil sowie eine Verminderung der Internalisierenden Probleme im Elternurteil. Die Behandlungseffektivität ist unabhängig von Alter, Geschlecht, Intelligenz und Migrationshintergrund der teilnehmenden Kinder. Schlussfolgerung: Das musikbasierte Trainingsprogramm MusiKo mit Pepe stellt eine wirkungsvolle Maßnahme zur Behandlung von Aufmerksamkeitsproblemen dar, sollten sich diese Effekte in Replikationsstudien bestätigen.

  17. Spin-Dependent Electron Scattering from Polarized Protons and Deuterons with the BLAST Experiment at MIT-Bates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasell, Douglas K.; Milner, Richard G.; Redwine, Robert P.; Alarcon, Ricardo; Gao, Haiyan; Kohl, Michael; Calarco, John R.

    2011-11-01

    The Bates Large Acceptance Spectrometer Toroid (BLAST) experiment was operated at the MIT-Bates Linear Accelerator Center from 2003 until 2005. The experiment was designed to exploit the power of a