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Sample records for patients expanding image

  1. Expanding Perspectives for Comprehending Visual Images in Multimodal Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serafini, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The texts that adolescents encounter today are often multimodal, meaning they incorporate a variety of modes, including visual images, hypertext, and graphic design elements along with written text. Expanding the perspectives readers use to make sense of the multimodal texts is an important aspect of comprehension instruction. Moving beyond the…

  2. Expanded beam non-imaging fiber optic connector

    DOEpatents

    Jannson, Tommasz; Jannson, Joanna; Yeung, Peter

    1990-01-01

    There is disclosed an expanded beam fiber to fiber connector, based on non-imaging optic principles for coupling light beams from one optical fiber to another. The system consists of two identical connector parts, referred to herein as a collimating part and a concentrating part, each having a preferred partially curved reflective boundary surface for minimizing power loss and surrounding either a hollow space or a space filled with a uniform transparent medium. In one embodiment the boundary is metallic while in a second embodiment the boundary is in the form of an interface allowing total internal reflection. In both the hollow and filled case a lens may be located at the expanded end of both the collimater part and the concentrator part forming the connector. The connector is preferably located in a housing in order to protect and preserve the mechanical stability of the coupler.

  3. Role of tissue expanders in patients with loss of abdominal domain awaiting intestinal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Watson, Melissa J; Kundu, Neilendu; Coppa, Christopher; Djohan, Risal; Hashimoto, Koji; Eghtesad, Bijan; Fujiki, Masato; Diago Uso, Teresa; Gandhi, Namita; Nassar, Ahmed; Abu-Elmagd, Kareem; Quintini, Cristiano

    2013-12-01

    Abdominal closure is a complex surgical problem in intestinal transplant recipients with loss of abdominal domain, as graft exposure results in profound morbidity. Although intraoperative coverage techniques have been described, this is the first report of preoperative abdominal wall augmentation using tissue expanders in patients awaiting intestinal transplantation. We report on five patients who received a total of twelve tissue expanders as a means to increase abdominal surface area. Each patient had a compromised abdominal wall (multiple prior operations, enterocutaneous fistulae, subcutaneous abscesses, stomas) with loss of domain and was identified as high risk for an open abdomen post-transplant. Cross-sectional imaging and dimensional analysis were performed to quantify the effect of the expanders on total abdominal and intraperitoneal cavity volumes. The overall mean increase in total abdominal volume was 958 cm(3) with a mean expander volume of 896.5 cc. Two expanders were removed in the first patient due to infection, but after protocol modification, there were no further infections. Three patients eventually underwent small bowel transplantation with complete graft coverage. In our preliminary experience, abdominal tissue expander placement is a safe, feasible, and well-tolerated method to increase subcutaneous domain and facilitate graft coverage in patients undergoing intestinal transplantation. PMID:24118196

  4. Expandable and rigid endorectal coils for prostate MRI: impact on prostate distortion and rigid image registration.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yongbok; Hsu, I-Chow J; Pouliot, Jean; Noworolski, Susan Moyher; Vigneron, Daniel B; Kurhanewicz, John

    2005-12-01

    Endorectal coils (ERCs) are used for acquiring high spatial resolution magnetic resonance (MR) images of the human prostate. The goal of this study is to determine the impact of an expandable versus a rigid ERC on changes in the location and deformation of the prostate gland and subsequently on registering prostate images acquired with and without an ERC. Sagittal and axial T2 weighted MR images were acquired from 25 patients receiving a combined MR imaging/MR spectroscopic imaging staging exam for prostate cancer. Within the same exam, images were acquired using an external pelvic phased array coil both alone and in combination with either an expandable ERC (MedRad, Pittsburgh, PA) or a rigid ERC (USA Instruments, Aurora, OH). Rotations, translations and deformations caused by the ERC were measured and compared. The ability to register images acquired with and without the ERC using a manual rigid-body registration was assessed using a similarity index (SI). Both ERCs caused the prostate to tilt anteriorly with an average tilt of 18.5 degrees (17.4 +/- 9.9 and 19.5 +/- 11.3 degrees, mean +/- standard deviation, for expandable and rigid ERC, respectively). However, the expandable coil caused a significantly larger distortion of the prostate as compared to the rigid coil; compressing the prostate in the anterior/posterior direction by 4.1 +/- 3.0 mm vs 1.2 +/- 2.2 mm (14.5% vs 4.8%) (p < 0.0001), and widening the prostate in the right/left direction by 3.8 +/- 3.7 mm vs 1.5 +/- 3.1 mm (8.3% vs 3.4%) (p = 0.004). Additionally, the ability to manually align prostate images acquired with and without ERC was significantly (p < 0.0001) better for the rigid coil (SI = 0.941 +/- 0.008 vs 0.899 +/- 0.033, for the rigid and expandable coils, respectively). In conclusion, the manual rigid-body alignment of prostate MR images acquired with and without the ERC can be improved through the use of a rigid ERC. PMID:16475755

  5. [Methodological aspects of expanded operations in patients with lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Lomidze, Z T; Gagua, R O; Kuchava, V O; Gzirishvili, L G

    2009-02-01

    In attempt to improve the results of treatment of locally advanced lung cancer different techniques are presented and described. In 1995-2008 in Thoracal Department of Georgian National Oncological Center lung resection was performed to 2460 patients, to 1368 (55,6%) of which expanded operations were performed. There were 1070 (78,2%) male and 298(21,8%) female. Expanded operations on the right side as well as on the left side were performed in cases when metastatic lesion of mediastinal lymphatic nodes was observed. Sometimes intrasurgical biopsy of lymphatic nodes with urgent histological examination was used to verify metastases of lymphatic nodes of mediastinum. One stage removal of lymphatic nodes with lung or parts of lungs was performed. Mobilization of cellular tissues and lymphatic nodes mediastinum is described. It was accompanied by careful electrocoagulation which provides at some degree the ablasticity of interference. Expanded pneumactomies on the right and on the left sides technically had several distinctions which were defined by the anatomical peculiarities of the right and left hemithorax. For the purpose of one stage removal of paratracheal and tracheobronchial lymphatic nodes, the azygos vien was ligated in all cases of the right side expanded pneumactomy. To get the better approach to tracheobronchial lymphatic nodes in left side expanded pneumactomies, arterial duct and bronchial arteries were ligated in several cases. The removal of paraaortal lymphatic nodes on posterolateral wall of aorta in several cases, due to their site, forced us to legate some intercostals arteries in all cases, when it was possible. We tried to preserve the integrity of large nerve trunks. PMID:19276465

  6. Echocardiographic Imaging of Procedural Complications During Balloon-Expandable Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Rebecca T.; Kodali, Susheel; Tuzcu, E. Murat; Leon, Martin B.; Kapadia, Samir; Gopal, Deepika; Lerakis, Stamatios; Lindman, Brian R.; Wang, Zuyue; Webb, John; Thourani, Vinod H.; Douglas, Pamela S.

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) using a balloon-expandable valve is an accepted alternative to surgical replacement for severe, symptomatic aortic stenosis in high risk or inoperable patients. Intraprocedural transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) offers real-time imaging guidance throughout the procedure and allows for rapid and accurate assessment of complications and procedural results. The value of intraprocedural TEE for TAVR will likely increase in the future as this procedure is performed in lower surgical risk patients, who also have lower risk for general anesthesia, but a greater expectation of optimal results with lower morbidity and mortality. This imaging compendium from the PARTNER (Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valves) trials is intended to be a comprehensive compilation of intraprocedural complications imaged by intraprocedural TEE and diagnostic tools to anticipate and/or prevent their occurrence. PMID:25772835

  7. Osteoma of long bone: an expanding spectrum of imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Hansford, Barry Glenn; Pytel, Peter; Moore, Drew D; Stacy, Gregory Scott

    2015-05-01

    Osteoma of long bone is an extremely rare, benign bone-forming surface lesion with the largest published case series consisting of only 14 patients. The most important and often most difficult lesion to differentiate from osteoma of long bone radiographically is parosteal osteosarcoma, which is a rare, low-grade surface osteosarcoma with the potential for dedifferentiation. Reports of imaging studies of osteoma of long bone depict a well-defined ossified mass arising from the surface of the diaphysis or metadiaphysis of a long bone. A characteristic feature is the homogeneity of the mass, with uniform density near or equal to that of cortical bone from the base of the lesion to its periphery. The 45-year-old female in this case presented with left hip fullness and was subsequently found to have a proximal femoral osteoma, which was unique in that it contained large fatty marrow spaces that corresponded to bands of relatively low density on plain radiography and computed tomography, giving it a heterogeneous appearance atypical of osteoma of long bone. Furthermore, the osteoma reported here was associated with a small but separate nodular focus of ossification in the adjacent soft tissue. These findings led to a presumptive diagnosis of parosteal osteosarcoma with a local soft tissue metastasis or satellite nodule resulting in radical resection of the tumor. Definitive diagnosis of osteoma was made on histology of both the parent lesion and ossified nodule as no neoplastic spindle cell proliferation was present to establish a diagnosis of low-grade osteosarcoma. This represents, to the best of our knowledge, the first such presentation of osteoma of long bone.

  8. The Expanding Toolbox of In Vivo Bioluminescent Imaging.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tingting; Close, Dan; Handagama, Winode; Marr, Enolia; Sayler, Gary; Ripp, Steven

    2016-01-01

    In vivo bioluminescent imaging (BLI) permits the visualization of engineered bioluminescence from living cells and tissues to provide a unique perspective toward the understanding of biological processes as they occur within the framework of an authentic in vivo environment. The toolbox of in vivo BLI includes an inventory of luciferase compounds capable of generating bioluminescent light signals along with sophisticated and powerful instrumentation designed to detect and quantify these light signals non-invasively as they emit from the living subject. The information acquired reveals the dynamics of a wide range of biological functions that play key roles in the physiological and pathological control of disease and its therapeutic management. This mini review provides an overview of the tools and applications central to the evolution of in vivo BLI as a core technology in the preclinical imaging disciplines. PMID:27446798

  9. The Expanding Toolbox of In Vivo Bioluminescent Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tingting; Close, Dan; Handagama, Winode; Marr, Enolia; Sayler, Gary; Ripp, Steven

    2016-01-01

    In vivo bioluminescent imaging (BLI) permits the visualization of engineered bioluminescence from living cells and tissues to provide a unique perspective toward the understanding of biological processes as they occur within the framework of an authentic in vivo environment. The toolbox of in vivo BLI includes an inventory of luciferase compounds capable of generating bioluminescent light signals along with sophisticated and powerful instrumentation designed to detect and quantify these light signals non-invasively as they emit from the living subject. The information acquired reveals the dynamics of a wide range of biological functions that play key roles in the physiological and pathological control of disease and its therapeutic management. This mini review provides an overview of the tools and applications central to the evolution of in vivo BLI as a core technology in the preclinical imaging disciplines. PMID:27446798

  10. Imaging the expanding shell of SN 2011dh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Witt, A.; Bietenholz, M. F.; Kamble, A.; Soderberg, A. M.; Brunthaler, A.; Zauderer, B.; Bartel, N.; Rupen, M. P.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the third epoch of very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations of the radio-bright supernova SN 2011dh, located in the nearby (7.8 Mpc) galaxy M51. The observations took place at t = 453 d after the explosion and at a frequency of 8.4 GHz. We obtained a fairly well-resolved image of the shell of SN 2011dh, making it one of only six recent supernovae for which resolved images of the ejecta are available. SN 2011dh has a relatively clear shell morphology, being almost circular in outline, although there may be some asymmetry in brightness around the ridge. By fitting a spherical shell model directly to the visibility measurements we determine the angular radius of SN 2011dh's radio emission to be 636 ± 29 μas. At a distance of 7.8 Mpc, this angular radius corresponds to a linear radius of (7.4 ± 0.3) × 1016 cm and an average expansion velocity since the explosion of 19 000^{+2800}_{-2400} km s-1. We combine our VLBI measurements of SN 2011dh's radius with values determined from the radio spectral energy distribution under the assumption of a synchrotron-self-absorbed spectrum, and find all the radii are consistent with a power-law evolution, with R ˜ t0.97±0.01, implying almost free expansion over the period t = 4 d to 453 d.

  11. Recommendations to Facilitate Expanded Access to Investigational Therapies for Seriously Ill Patients.

    PubMed

    Jerome, Rebecca N; Edwards, Terri L; Boswell, Haley C; Bernard, Gordon R; Harris, Paul A; Pulley, Jill M

    2016-03-01

    When clinical trial enrollment is not an option for seriously ill patients whose illnesses have not responded to approved treatment options, those patients and their physicians may consider gaining access to investigational therapies through a pathway established by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) called expanded access. However, recent events have highlighted the challenging dynamics involved in accessing investigational therapies through expanded access that include a complex interplay of factors involving the patient, physician, drug company, FDA, and, increasingly, social media. The authors offer several potential strategies to streamline what is otherwise an arduous process for all involved. (1) The drug company should prospectively determine whether it will establish an expanded access program for specific drugs. (2) A central clearinghouse for companies should support registration of expanded access drugs for suitable patients. (3) The determination of whether a patient fits criteria would be made by an independent review board of clinicians. (4) An independent coordinating center is needed; academic health centers are ideally suited for that role. (5) Adequate financing of the costs of therapy need to be in place to make expanded access a reality, given frequent lack of payer coverage for therapies. (6) Further enhancement of regulatory pathways, approaches, or rules would promote expanded access. (7) Patients should explicitly acknowledge the limited data available. (8) There should be a shared, secure, technical platform to facilitate expanded access. All the authors' strategies present important prospects for improving treatment options for the most seriously ill patients. PMID:26445080

  12. A method for classification training samples spatial-time expanding of remote sensing image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Guangbo; Zhang, Jie; Ma, Yi; Zheng, Rong-Er

    2009-12-01

    Because of the environment conditions of the ground targets have been changing when the remote sensing images are acquired, so it is known that labeled samples from one remote sensing image is almost imposable to be used in another image classification, because the spectral signatures are various. But once it can be done successfully it will lead to great resource preserving and high work efficiency. This article proposes a classification samples spatial-time domain expanding method to address this issue. In this method, we choose training samples from a reference image, then classify the images in space and time neighborhood of the reference image by the classifier which is trained with these labeled samples. Before classifying, the relative radio-correcting (or to say radiometric normalization) of the images to be classified need be done, and it is the key step. Three classification experiments, which were the reference image and the image need be classified have only different acquisition time, only different cover region, and both the different acquisition time and different cover region, are successfully carried out. The results prove that our method has done well in classification samples expanding application in time domain, in space domain and both in the two domains.

  13. Phase-preserving beam expander for biomedical X-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Martinson, Mercedes; Samadi, Nazanin; Bassey, Bassey; Gomez, Ariel; Chapman, Dean

    2015-05-01

    The BioMedical Imaging and Therapy beamlines at the Canadian Light Source are used by many researchers to capture phase-based imaging data. These experiments have so far been limited by the small vertical beam size, requiring vertical scanning of biological samples in order to image their full vertical extent. Previous work has been carried out to develop a bent Laue beam-expanding monochromator for use at these beamlines. However, the first attempts exhibited significant distortion in the diffraction plane, increasing the beam divergence and eliminating the usefulness of the monochromator for phase-related imaging techniques. Recent work has been carried out to more carefully match the polychromatic and geometric focal lengths in a so-called `magic condition' that preserves the divergence of the beam and enables full-field phase-based imaging techniques. The new experimental parameters, namely asymmetry and Bragg angles, were evaluated by analysing knife-edge and in-line phase images to determine the effect on beam divergence in both vertical and horizontal directions, using the flat Bragg double-crystal monochromator at the beamline as a baseline. The results show that by using the magic condition, the difference between the two monochromator types is less than 10% in the diffraction plane. Phase fringes visible in test images of a biological sample demonstrate that this difference is small enough to enable in-line phase imaging, despite operating at a sub-optimal energy for the wafer and asymmetry angle that was used.

  14. Phase-preserving beam expander for biomedical X-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Martinson, Mercedes; Samadi, Nazanin; Bassey, Bassey; Gomez, Ariel; Chapman, Dean

    2015-05-01

    The BioMedical Imaging and Therapy beamlines at the Canadian Light Source are used by many researchers to capture phase-based imaging data. These experiments have so far been limited by the small vertical beam size, requiring vertical scanning of biological samples in order to image their full vertical extent. Previous work has been carried out to develop a bent Laue beam-expanding monochromator for use at these beamlines. However, the first attempts exhibited significant distortion in the diffraction plane, increasing the beam divergence and eliminating the usefulness of the monochromator for phase-related imaging techniques. Recent work has been carried out to more carefully match the polychromatic and geometric focal lengths in a so-called `magic condition' that preserves the divergence of the beam and enables full-field phase-based imaging techniques. The new experimental parameters, namely asymmetry and Bragg angles, were evaluated by analysing knife-edge and in-line phase images to determine the effect on beam divergence in both vertical and horizontal directions, using the flat Bragg double-crystal monochromator at the beamline as a baseline. The results show that by using the magic condition, the difference between the two monochromator types is less than 10% in the diffraction plane. Phase fringes visible in test images of a biological sample demonstrate that this difference is small enough to enable in-line phase imaging, despite operating at a sub-optimal energy for the wafer and asymmetry angle that was used. PMID:25931100

  15. Imaging Pregnant and Lactating Patients.

    PubMed

    Tirada, Nikki; Dreizin, David; Khati, Nadia J; Akin, Esma A; Zeman, Robert K

    2015-10-01

    As use of imaging in the evaluation of pregnant and lactating patients continues to increase, misperceptions of radiation and safety risks have proliferated, which has led to often unwarranted concerns among patients and clinicians. When radiologic examinations are appropriately used, the benefits derived from the information gained usually outweigh the risks. This review describes appropriateness and safety issues, estimated doses for imaging examinations that use iodizing radiation (ie, radiography, computed tomography, nuclear scintigraphy, and fluoroscopically guided interventional radiology), radiation risks to the mother and conceptus during various stages of pregnancy, and use of iodinated or gadolinium-based contrast agents and radiotracers in pregnant and lactating women. Maternal radiation risk must be weighed with the potential consequences of missing a life-threatening diagnosis such as pulmonary embolus. Fetal risks (ie, spontaneous abortion, teratogenesis, or carcinogenesis) vary with gestational age and imaging modality and should be considered in the context of the potential benefit of medically necessary diagnostic imaging. When feasible and medically indicated, modalities that do not use ionizing radiation (eg, magnetic resonance imaging) are preferred in pregnant and lactating patients. Radiologists should strive to minimize risks of radiation to the mother and fetus, counsel patients effectively, and promote a realistic understanding of risks related to imaging during pregnancy and lactation. PMID:26466183

  16. Expanded image database of pistachio x-ray images and classification by conventional methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keagy, Pamela M.; Schatzki, Thomas F.; Le, Lan Chau; Casasent, David P.; Weber, David

    1996-12-01

    In order to develop sorting methods for insect damaged pistachio nuts, a large data set of pistachio x-ray images (6,759 nuts) was created. Both film and linescan sensor images were acquired, nuts dissected and internal conditions coded using the U.S. Grade standards and definitions for pistachios. A subset of 1199 good and 686 insect damaged nuts was used to calculate and test discriminant functions. Statistical parameters of image histograms were evaluated for inclusion by forward stepwise discrimination. Using three variables in the discriminant function, 89% of test set nuts were correctly identified. Comparable data for 6 human subjects ranged from 67 to 92%. If the loss of good nuts is held to 1% by requiring a high probability to discard a nut as insect damaged, approximately half of the insect damage present in clean pistachio nuts may be detected and removed by x-ray inspection.

  17. Photon beam dose distributions for patients with implanted temporary tissue expanders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asena, A.; Kairn, T.; Crowe, S. B.; Trapp, J. V.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the effects of temporary tissue expanders (TTEs) on the dose distributions of photon beams in breast cancer radiotherapy treatments. EBT2 radiochromic film and ion chamber measurements were taken to quantify the attenuation and backscatter effects of the inhomogeneity. Results illustrate that the internal magnetic port present in a tissue expander causes a dose reduction of approximately 25% in photon tangent fields immediately downstream of the implant. It was also shown that the silicone elastomer shell of the tissue expander reduced the dose to the target volume by as much as 8%. This work demonstrates the importance for an accurately modelled high-density implant in the treatment planning system for post-mastectomy breast cancer patients.

  18. Expanding Imaging Capabilities for Microfluidics: Applicability of Darkfield Internal Reflection Illumination (DIRI) to Observations in Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Kawano, Yoshihiro; Otsuka, Chino; Sanzo, James; Higgins, Christopher; Nirei, Tatsuo; Schilling, Tobias; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidics is used increasingly for engineering and biomedical applications due to recent advances in microfabrication technologies. Visualization of bubbles, tracer particles, and cells in a microfluidic device is important for designing a device and analyzing results. However, with conventional methods, it is difficult to observe the channel geometry and such particles simultaneously. To overcome this limitation, we developed a Darkfield Internal Reflection Illumination (DIRI) system that improved the drawbacks of a conventional darkfield illuminator. This study was performed to investigate its utility in the field of microfluidics. The results showed that the developed system could clearly visualize both microbubbles and the channel wall by utilizing brightfield and DIRI illumination simultaneously. The methodology is useful not only for static phenomena, such as clogging, but also for dynamic phenomena, such as the detection of bubbles flowing in a channel. The system was also applied to simultaneous fluorescence and DIRI imaging. Fluorescent tracer beads and channel walls were observed clearly, which may be an advantage for future microparticle image velocimetry (μPIV) analysis, especially near a wall. Two types of cell stained with different colors, and the channel wall, can be recognized using the combined confocal and DIRI system. Whole-slide imaging was also conducted successfully using this system. The tiling function significantly expands the observing area of microfluidics. The developed system will be useful for a wide variety of engineering and biomedical applications for the growing field of microfluidics. PMID:25748425

  19. Expanding imaging capabilities for microfluidics: applicability of darkfield internal reflection illumination (DIRI) to observations in microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Yoshihiro; Otsuka, Chino; Sanzo, James; Higgins, Christopher; Nirei, Tatsuo; Schilling, Tobias; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidics is used increasingly for engineering and biomedical applications due to recent advances in microfabrication technologies. Visualization of bubbles, tracer particles, and cells in a microfluidic device is important for designing a device and analyzing results. However, with conventional methods, it is difficult to observe the channel geometry and such particles simultaneously. To overcome this limitation, we developed a Darkfield Internal Reflection Illumination (DIRI) system that improved the drawbacks of a conventional darkfield illuminator. This study was performed to investigate its utility in the field of microfluidics. The results showed that the developed system could clearly visualize both microbubbles and the channel wall by utilizing brightfield and DIRI illumination simultaneously. The methodology is useful not only for static phenomena, such as clogging, but also for dynamic phenomena, such as the detection of bubbles flowing in a channel. The system was also applied to simultaneous fluorescence and DIRI imaging. Fluorescent tracer beads and channel walls were observed clearly, which may be an advantage for future microparticle image velocimetry (μPIV) analysis, especially near a wall. Two types of cell stained with different colors, and the channel wall, can be recognized using the combined confocal and DIRI system. Whole-slide imaging was also conducted successfully using this system. The tiling function significantly expands the observing area of microfluidics. The developed system will be useful for a wide variety of engineering and biomedical applications for the growing field of microfluidics.

  20. A seed expanding cluster algorithm for deriving upwelling areas on sea surface temperature images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascimento, Susana; Casca, Sérgio; Mirkin, Boris

    2015-12-01

    In this paper a novel clustering algorithm is proposed as a version of the seeded region growing (SRG) approach for the automatic recognition of coastal upwelling from sea surface temperature (SST) images. The new algorithm, one seed expanding cluster (SEC), takes advantage of the concept of approximate clustering due to Mirkin (1996, 2013) to derive a homogeneity criterion in the format of a product rather than the conventional difference between a pixel value and the mean of values over the region of interest. It involves a boundary-oriented pixel labeling so that the cluster growing is performed by expanding its boundary iteratively. The starting point is a cluster consisting of just one seed, the pixel with the coldest temperature. The baseline version of the SEC algorithm uses Otsu's thresholding method to fine-tune the homogeneity threshold. Unfortunately, this method does not always lead to a satisfactory solution. Therefore, we introduce a self-tuning version of the algorithm in which the homogeneity threshold is locally derived from the approximation criterion over a window around the pixel under consideration. The window serves as a boundary regularizer. These two unsupervised versions of the algorithm have been applied to a set of 28 SST images of the western coast of mainland Portugal, and compared against a supervised version fine-tuned by maximizing the F-measure with respect to manually labeled ground-truth maps. The areas built by the unsupervised versions of the SEC algorithm are significantly coincident over the ground-truth regions in the cases at which the upwelling areas consist of a single continuous fragment of the SST map.

  1. An Imaging Spectral Line Survey of IRC+10216 using the Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claussen, Mark J.; EVLA Scientific Commissioning Team

    2011-01-01

    The Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA) is currently undergoing scientific commissioning, with full scientific operations expected in 2013. During the commissioning, we have performed a rather coarse ( 25 km/s) and shallow imaging spectral survey of the circumstellar environment of the well-known and nearby carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star IRC+10°216 (CW Leo) in the frequency range 18 - 26.5 GHz, using the capability of the WIDAR correlator to simultaneously observe 2 GHz of bandwidth. In addition we have used the additional capability of WIDAR to observe widely spaced sub-bands to observe eight pairs of targeted lines with much better spectral resolution (1.0 - 2.0 km/s) in the 18 - 26.5 GHz receiver band (selected from the coarse survey) and the 26.5 - 40 GHz receiver band (selected from the single-dish survey of Kawaguchi et al. (1995, PASJ, 47, 853). In the coarse survey, we detected twenty-one transitions of eleven molecules including eight transitions of HC7N, ranging from 18.049 GHz to 25.946 GHz, the J = 1 - 0 maser transition of SiS at 18.156 GHz, and three transitions of HC5N. We will present further results of the survey and images of the emission from the targeted lines. The National Radio Astronomy is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  2. Calibrating the High Density Magnetic Port within Tissue Expanders to Achieve more Accurate Dose Calculations for Postmastectomy Patients with Immediate Breast Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Jasmine; Zhang, Rui; Heins, David; Castle, Katherine

    In postmastectomy radiotherapy, an increasing number of patients have tissue expanders inserted subpectorally when receiving immediate breast reconstruction. These tissue expanders are composed of silicone and are inflated with saline through an internal metallic port; this serves the purpose of stretching the muscle and skin tissue over time, in order to house a permanent implant. The issue with administering radiation therapy in the presence of a tissue expander is that the port's magnetic core can potentially perturb the dose delivered to the Planning Target Volume, causing significant artifacts in CT images. Several studies have explored this problem, and suggest that density corrections must be accounted for in treatment planning. However, very few studies accurately calibrated commercial TP systems for the high density material used in the port, and no studies employed fusion imaging to yield a more accurate contour of the port in treatment planning. We compared depth dose values in the water phantom between measurement and TPS calculations, and we were able to overcome some of the inhomogeneities presented by the image artifact by fusing the KVCT and MVCT images of the tissue expander together, resulting in a more precise comparison of dose calculations at discrete locations. We expect this method to be pivotal in the quantification of dose distribution in the PTV. Research funded by the LS-AMP Award.

  3. A comparative analysis of Patient-Reported Expanded Disability Status Scale tools

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Christian DE; Ivry, Ben; Bowen, James D; Cheng, Eric M; Dobson, Ruth; Goodin, Douglas S; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Kappos, Ludwig; Galea, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patient-Reported Expanded Disability Status Scale (PREDSS) tools are an attractive alternative to the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) during long term or geographically challenging studies, or in pressured clinical service environments. Objectives: Because the studies reporting these tools have used different metrics to compare the PREDSS and EDSS, we undertook an individual patient data level analysis of all available tools. Methods: Spearman’s rho and the Bland–Altman method were used to assess correlation and agreement respectively. Results: A systematic search for validated PREDSS tools covering the full EDSS range identified eight such tools. Individual patient data were available for five PREDSS tools. Excellent correlation was observed between EDSS and PREDSS with all tools. A higher level of agreement was observed with increasing levels of disability. In all tools, the 95% limits of agreement were greater than the minimum EDSS difference considered to be clinically significant. However, the intra-class coefficient was greater than that reported for EDSS raters of mixed seniority. The visual functional system was identified as the most significant predictor of the PREDSS–EDSS difference. Conclusion: This analysis will (1) enable researchers and service providers to make an informed choice of PREDSS tool, depending on their individual requirements, and (2) facilitate improvement of current PREDSS tools. PMID:26564998

  4. Ipilimumab retreatment in patients with pretreated advanced melanoma: the expanded access programme in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Chiarion-Sileni, V; Pigozzo, J; Ascierto, P A; Simeone, E; Maio, M; Calabrò, L; Marchetti, P; De Galitiis, F; Testori, A; Ferrucci, P F; Queirolo, P; Spagnolo, F; Quaglino, P; Carnevale Schianca, F; Mandalà, M; Di Guardo, L; Del Vecchio, M

    2014-01-01

    Background: Retreatment with ipilimumab has been shown to re-establish disease control in some patients with disease progression. Here, we report the efficacy and safety of retreatment with ipilimumab 3 mg kg−1 among patients participating in an expanded access programme in Italy. Methods: Patients who achieved disease control during induction therapy were retreated with ipilimumab upon progression (3 mg kg−1 every 3 weeks for up to four doses), providing they had not experienced toxicity that precluded further dosing. Tumour assessments were conducted after retreatment, and patients were monitored throughout for adverse events. Results: Of 855 patients treated with ipilimumab, 51 were retreated upon disease progression. Of these, 28 (55%) regained disease control upon retreatment and 42% were alive 2 years after the first induction dose of ipilimumab; median overall survival was 21 months. Eleven patients (22%) had a treatment-related adverse event of any grade during retreatment. These were generally mild-to-moderate and resolved within a median of 4 days. No new types of toxicity were reported. Conclusions: For patients who meet predefined criteria, retreatment with ipilimumab is generally well tolerated and can translate into clinical benefit. This strategy should be compared with other therapeutic options in randomised controlled trials. PMID:24619072

  5. Spectroscopic, imaging, and probe diagnostics of laser plasma plumes expanding between confining surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Yeates, P.; Kennedy, E. T.

    2010-11-15

    Laser plasma plumes were generated in aluminum rectangular cavities of fixed depth (6 mm) and varying height (2.0, 1.5, and 1.0 mm). Space and time resolved visible emission spectroscopy, gated intensified visible imaging, and Langmuir probe diagnostics were utilized to diagnose the evolution of the confined plasma plumes in comparison to freely expanding plasma plume generated from ablation of a planar target. The constrained plasma behavior displayed a multiphase history. Early stage interactions (t<100 ns) resulted in enhanced continuum and line emission, shockwave formation and plasma plume rebound. Later phase, long duration plasma-surface interactions (t>160 ns) resulted in sustained 'decay', i.e., a rapid termination of continuum emission, in concert with decreases in peak electron density (N{sub e}) and plasma temperature (T). This later phase originates from loss mechanisms which bleed the plasma plume of thermal energy and charged particles. These loss mechanisms increase in magnitude as the duration of the plasma-surface interaction increases. The transition from enhancement phase, originating from hydrodynamic containment, and plasma-surface collisions, to decay phase is described and occurs for each cavity at a different point in the space time history.

  6. Object images of eating disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Nishizono-Maher, A; Ikuta, N; Ogiso, Y; Moriya, N; Miyake, Y; Minakawa, K

    1993-09-01

    The authors investigated images held by eating disorder patients toward selected stimulus words using the semantic differential method. The concept "object image" was introduced here to designate the images which any person has about the mother, the father, etc. A comparison was made between 22 eating disorder patients with concurrent borderline personality disorder, 20 patients without borderline pathology, and 48 controls. The eating disorder patients were found to have a "weaker" image of "motherliness" and "womanliness" compared to the control group. Another characteristic of eating disorder patients was their unfavorable image of children. The authors also studied the images held by fathers and mothers. In the families with borderline patients, the discrepancies between what we term "object images" held by fathers, mothers, and daughters were conspicuous. The importance of a tripartite (daughter-mother-father) relationship in the psychopathology of eating disorder is discussed.

  7. Quantitative and qualitative characterization of expanded CD4+ T cell clones in rheumatoid arthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    Ishigaki, Kazuyoshi; Shoda, Hirofumi; Kochi, Yuta; Yasui, Tetsuro; Kadono, Yuho; Tanaka, Sakae; Fujio, Keishi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune destructive arthritis associated with CD4+ T cell-mediated immunity. Although expanded CD4+ T cell clones (ECs) has already been confirmed, the detailed characteristics of ECs have not been elucidated in RA. Using combination of a single-cell analysis and next-generation sequencing (NGS) in TCR repertoire analysis, we here revealed the detailed nature of ECs by examining peripheral blood (PB) from 5 RA patients and synovium from 1 RA patient. When we intensively investigated the single-cell transcriptome of the most expanded clones in memory CD4+ T cells (memory-mECs) in RA-PB, senescence-related transcripts were up-regulated, indicating circulating ECs were constantly stimulated. Tracking of the transcriptome shift within the same memory-mECs between PB and the synovium revealed the augmentations in senescence-related gene expression and the up-regulation of synovium-homing chemokine receptors in the synovium. Our in-depth characterization of ECs in RA successfully demonstrated the presence of the specific immunological selection pressure, which determines the phenotype of ECs. Moreover, transcriptome tracking added novel aspects to the underlying sequential immune processes. Our approach may provide new insights into the pathophysiology of RA. PMID:26245356

  8. Frequent occurrence of highly expanded but unrelated B-cell clones in patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Kriangkum, Jitra; Motz, Sarah N; Debes Marun, Carina S; Lafarge, Sandrine T; Gibson, Spencer B; Venner, Christopher P; Johnston, James B; Belch, Andrew R; Pilarski, Linda M

    2013-01-01

    Clonal diversity in multiple myeloma (MM) includes both MM-related and MM-unrelated clonal expansions which are subject to dominance exerted by the MM clone. Here we show evidence for the existence of minor but highly expanded unrelated B-cell clones in patients with MM defined by their complementary determining region 3 (CDR3) peak. We further characterize these clones over the disease and subsequent treatment. Second clones were identified by their specific IgH-VDJ sequences that are distinct from those of dominant MM clones. Clonal frequencies were determined through semi-quantitative PCR, quantitative PCR and single-cell polymerase chain reaction of the clone-specific sequence. In 13/74 MM patients, more than one dominant CDR3 peak was identified with 12 patients (16%) being truly biclonal. Second clones had different frequencies, were found in different locations and were found in different cell types from the dominant MM clone. Where analysis was possible, they were shown to have chromosomal characteristic distinct from those of the MM clone. The frequency of the second clone also changed over the course of the disease and often persisted despite treatment. Molecularly-defined second clones are infrequent in monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS, 1/43 individuals or 2%), suggesting that they may arise at relatively late stages of myelomagenesis. In further support of our findings, biclonal gammopathy and concomitant MM and CLL (chronic lymphocytic leukemia) were confirmed to originate from two unrelated clones. Our data supports the idea that the clone giving rise to symptomatic myeloma exerts clonal dominance to prevent expansion of other clones. MM and second clones may arise from an underlying niche permissive of clonal expansion. The clinical significance of these highly expanded but unrelated clones remains to be confirmed. Overall, our findings add new dimensions to evaluating related and unrelated clonal expansions in MM and the

  9. Imaging obese patients: problems and solutions.

    PubMed

    Carucci, Laura R

    2013-08-01

    Obesity is an epidemic in the United States and Western World with an associated increasing impact on radiology departments. The increased prevalence of obesity in conjunction with the growing use and success of bariatric surgery results in an influx of obese patients into the health system in need of hospital services and care. Imaging services in particular are in demand in this patient population. Obese patients place special needs upon facilities and imaging equipment and also create technical challenges. This manuscript will address problems and potential solutions for imaging obese patients, specifically with regards to the modalities of radiography, fluoroscopy, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging.

  10. Expanded metabolomics approach to profiling endogenous carbohydrates in the serum of ovarian cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu; Li, Li; Zhu, Bangjie; Liu, Feng; Wang, Yan; Gu, Xue; Yan, Chao

    2016-01-01

    We applied hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry to the quantitative analysis of serum from 58 women, including ovarian cancer patients, ovarian benign tumor patients, and healthy controls. All of these ovarian cancer and ovarian benign tumor patients have elevated cancer antigen 125, which makes them clinically difficult to differentiate the malignant from the benign. All of the 16 endogenous carbohydrates were quantitatively detected in the human sera, of which, eight endogenous carbohydrates were significantly different (P-value < 0.05) between the ovarian cancer and healthy control. According to the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, arabitol was the most potentially specific biomarker for discriminating ovarian cancer from healthy control, having an area under the curve of 0.911. A panel of metabolite markers composed of maltose, maltotriose, raffinose, and mannitol was selected, which was able to discriminate the ovarian cancer from the benign ovarian tumor counterparts, with an area under concentration-time curve value of 0.832. Endogenous carbohydrates in the expanded metabolomics approach after the global metabolic profiling are characterized and are potential biomarkers for the early diagnosis of ovarian cancer.

  11. Aneurysmal Lesions of Patients with Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Contain Clonally Expanded T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Song; White, John V.; Lin, Wan Lu; Zhang, Xiaoying; Solomides, Charalambos; Evans, Kyle; Ntaoula, Nectaria; Nwaneshiudu, Ifeyinwa; Gaughan, John; Monos, Dimitri S.; Oleszak, Emilia L.

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a common disease with often life-threatening consequences. This vascular disorder is responsible for 1–2% of all deaths in men aged 65 years or older. Autoimmunity may be responsible for the pathogenesis of AAA. Although it is well documented that infiltrating T cells are essentially always present in AAA lesions, little is known about their role in the initiation and/or progression of the disease. To determine whether T cells infiltrating AAA lesions contain clonally expanded populations of T cells, we amplified β-chain TCR transcripts by the nonpalindromic adaptor–PCR/Vβ-specific PCR and/or Vβ-specific PCR, followed by cloning and sequencing. We report in this article that aortic abdominal aneurysmal lesions from 8 of 10 patients with AAA contained oligoclonal populations of T cells. Multiple identical copies of β-chain TCR transcripts were identified in these patients. These clonal expansions are statistically significant. These results demonstrate that αβ TCR+ T lymphocytes infiltrating aneurysmal lesions of patients with AAA have undergone proliferation and clonal expansion in vivo at the site of the aneurysmal lesion, in response to unidentified self- or nonself Ags. This evidence supports the hypothesis that AAA is a specific Ag–driven T cell disease. PMID:24752442

  12. Oxidative stress in multiple sclerosis patients in clinical remission: association with the expanded disability status scale.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Sayonara Rangel; Kallaur, Ana Paula; Simão, Andréa Name Colado; Morimoto, Helena Kaminami; Lopes, Josiane; Panis, Carolina; Petenucci, Diego Lima; da Silva, Eloisa; Cecchini, Rubens; Kaimen-Maciel, Damácio Ramon; Reiche, Edna Maria Vissoci

    2012-10-15

    Increased levels of oxidative stress markers and/or decreased levels of antioxidant molecules have been described in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). This imbalance has been implicated in demyelination and axonal damage. The aims of this study were to evaluate oxidative stress in MS patients and to verify its correlation with disability as assessed by the expanded disability status scale (EDSS). This case-controlled study included 91 patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RR-MS) and 196 healthy individuals matched by age, gender, ethnicity, smoking status, and body mass index. Oxidative stress was evaluated by tert-butyl hydroperoxide-initiated chemiluminescence (CL-LOOH), carbonyl protein, nitric oxide metabolites (NOx), total radical-trapping antioxidant parameter (TRAP), sulfhydryl groups of proteins and serum uric acid levels. MS patients exhibited higher plasma levels of CL-LOOH (p<0.0001) and carbonyl protein (p=0.0081), and lower plasma levels of NOx (p<0.0001), TRAP (p=0.0088), and sulfhydryl groups (p=0.0003) compared to the control subjects. A multivariate analysis showed an association between oxidative markers and the presence of MS. Patients with an EDSS >3.5 showed higher CL-LOOH than control subjects (p=0.0093). A positive correlation was observed between CL-LOOH and EDSS (r=0.3244, p=0.0026) and between carbonyl protein and EDSS (r=0.3012, p=0.0041). These results demonstrate that oxidative stress plays an important role in the physiopathology of MS progression. PMID:22883481

  13. Thallium-201 stress imaging in hypertensive patients

    SciTech Connect

    Schulman, D.S.; Francis, C.K.; Black, H.R.; Wackers, F.J.

    1987-07-01

    To assess the potential effect of hypertension on the results of thallium-201 stress imaging in patients with chest pain, 272 thallium-201 stress tests performed in 133 hypertensive patients and 139 normotensive patients over a 1-year period were reviewed. Normotensive and hypertensive patients were similar in age, gender distribution, prevalence of cardiac risk factors (tobacco smoking, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes mellitus), medications, and clinical symptoms of coronary disease. Electrocardiographic criteria for left ventricular hypertrophy were present in 16 hypertensive patients. Stepwise probability analysis was used to determine the likelihood of coronary artery disease for each patient. In patients with mid to high likelihood of coronary disease (greater than 25% probability), abnormal thallium-201 stress images were present in 54 of 60 (90%) hypertensive patients compared with 51 of 64 (80%) normotensive patients. However, in 73 patients with a low likelihood of coronary disease (less than or equal to 25% probability), abnormal thallium-201 stress images were present in 21 patients (29%) of the hypertensive group compared with only 5 of 75 (7%) of the normotensive patients (p less than 0.001). These findings suggest that in patients with a mid to high likelihood of coronary artery disease, coexistent hypertension does not affect the results of thallium-201 exercise stress testing. However, in patients with a low likelihood of coronary artery disease, abnormal thallium-201 stress images are obtained more frequently in hypertensive patients than in normotensive patients.

  14. Palliative therapy using polyurethane-covered self-expandable metallic stents for malignant esophageal strictures: experiences in six patients.

    PubMed

    Kato, M; Saji, S; Kanematsu, M; Hoshi, H; Ishiguchi, T; Kunieda, K; Takao, H; Sugiyama, Y

    1996-12-01

    To evaluate the utility and limitations of palliative stenting with polyurethane-covered self-expandable metallic stents, 6 patients (3 males and 3 females ranging in age from 58-85 [mean 72.1] years) with malignant esophageal strictures were treated with these stents between April 1993 and October 1995. Three had esophageal carcinoma, two had gastric carcinoma and one had lung carcinoma. Song-type self-expandable metallic stents were inserted by intubation under local laryngeal anesthesia. A retriever was attached in 4 stents and an anti-reflux mechanism was attached in 2 stents placed over the esophagocardiac strictures. The stents were placed successfully in all patients, and no major complication related to intubation was encountered. All the stents fully expanded within 3 days after insertion. The grade of dysphagia was improved in 5 (83%) of the 6 patients. One stent was extracted using a retriever in one patient with no improvement. No reflux symptoms were observed in 2 patients whom received stents with an anti-reflux mechanism. No blockage of the stent due to food impaction or secondary stricture occurred in any patient during the observation period. One stent migrated into the stomach in one patient 27 days after insertion. Esophageal stenting with polyurethane-covered self-expandable metallic stents is a relatively safe and effective palliation for malignant esophageal strictures. PMID:9001352

  15. Management of patients with stroke: is it time to expand treatment options?

    PubMed

    Adams, Harold P; Nudo, Randolph J

    2013-07-01

    Approximately 700,000 people in the United States have an ischemic stroke annually. Substantial research has tested therapies for the very early treatment of ischemic stroke but, to date, only intravenous thrombolysis and intra-arterial measures to restore perfusion have shown success. Despite a 15-year effort to increase the use of these therapies, only approximately 5% of patients with stroke are currently being treated. Although most patients with stroke have some neurological recovery, more than half of stroke survivors have residual impairments that lead to disability or long-term institutionalized care. Laboratory research has demonstrated several mechanisms that help the brain to recover after a stroke. New pharmacological and cell-based approaches that are known to promote brain plasticity are emerging from laboratory studies and may soon expand the window for stroke treatment to restore function. It is time to build on this knowledge and to translate the understanding of recovery after stroke into the clinical setting. Measures that might augment recovery should become a major focus of clinical research in stroke in the 21st century.

  16. Self-expandable metallic stents for palliation of patients with malignant gastric outlet obstruction caused by stomach cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Oh; Kang, Dae Hwan; Kim, Gwang Ha; Heo, Jeong; Song, Geun Am; Cho, Mong; Kim, Dong Heon; Sim, Mun Sup

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To ascertain clinical outcome and complications of self-expandable metal stents for endoscopic palliation of patients with malignant obstruction of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. METHODS: A retrospective review was performed throughout August 2000 to June 2005 of 53 patients with gastric outlet obstruction caused by stomach cancer. All patients had symptomatic obstruction including nausea, vomiting, and decreased oral intake. All received self-expandable metallic stents. RESULTS: Stent implantation was successful in all 53 (100%) patients. Relief of obstructive symptoms was achieved in 43 (81.1%) patients. No immediate stent-related complications were noted. Seventeen patients had recurrent obstruction (tumor ingrowth in 14 patients, tumor overgrowth in 1 patient, and partial distal stent migration in 2 patients). The mean survival was 145 d. Median stent patency time was 187 d. CONCLUSION: Endoscopic placement of self-expandable metallic stents is a safe and effective treatment for the palliation of patients with inoperable malignant gastric outlet obstruction caused by stomach cancer. PMID:17352023

  17. (R)evolution: toward a new paradigm of policy and patient advocacy for expanded access to experimental treatments.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    In life-threatening conditions such as cancer and rare diseases, where there is no cure and no U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved therapy, patients sometimes seek access to an unapproved, experimental therapy through expanded access programs as their last, best hope for treatment to save their lives. Since the 1980s, the policies and the practice of expanded access have evolved, but a common challenge remains that there is no obligation, and often little incentive, for manufacturers to offer expanded access programs, especially for individual patients. In recent years, online campaigns seeking access to an experimental therapy have become more common, paralleling growth in and representing an intersection of social media, digital health, and patient advocacy.Mackey and Schoenfeld have examined the evolution of expanded access policy, practice, and trends, as well as case studies of online campaigns to access experimental therapies, to arrive at several recommendations for the future of expanded access. This commentary puts their paper in context, examines their recommendations, and suggests further reforms.Please see related article: https://bmcmedicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12916-016-0568-8. PMID:26926908

  18. Immunophenotypic and functional characterization of ex vivo expanded natural killer cells for clinical use in acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Peragine, Nadia; Torelli, Giovanni F; Mariglia, Paola; Pauselli, Simona; Vitale, Antonella; Guarini, Anna; Foà, Robin

    2015-02-01

    The management of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients has witnessed profound changes in recent years. Nonetheless, most patients tend to relapse, underlining the need for new therapeutic approaches. The anti-leukemic potential of natural killer (NK) cells has over the years raised considerable interest. In this study, we developed an efficient method for the expansion and activation of NK cells isolated from healthy donors and ALL patients for clinical use. NK cell products were derived from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 35 healthy donors and 4 B-lineage ALL by immunomagnetic CD3 T cell depletion followed by CD56 cell enrichment. Isolated NK cells were expanded and stimulated in serum-free medium supplemented with irradiated autologous feeder cells and autologous plasma in the presence of clinical grade interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-15 for 14 days. Healthy donor NK cells expanded on average 34.9 ± 10.4 fold and were represented, after expansion, by a highly pure population of CD3(-)CD56(+) cells showing a significant upregulation of natural cytotoxicity receptors, activating receptors and maturation markers. These expanded effectors showed cytolytic activity against K562 cells and, most importantly, against primary adult B-lineage ALL blasts. NK cells could be efficiently isolated and expanded-on average 39.5 ± 20.3 fold-also from primary B-lineage ALL samples of patients in complete remission. The expanded NK cells from these patients showed a significantly increased expression of the NKG2D- and DNAM1-activating receptors and were cytotoxic against K562 cells. These data provide the basis for developing new immunotherapeutic strategies for the management of ALL patients.

  19. Expanding applications, accuracy, and interpretation of laser speckle contrast imaging of cerebral blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Kazmi, S M Shams; Richards, Lisa M; Schrandt, Christian J; Davis, Mitchell A; Dunn, Andrew K

    2015-01-01

    Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) provides a rapid characterization of cortical flow dynamics for functional monitoring of the microcirculation. The technique stems from interactions of laser light with moving particles. These interactions encode the encountered Doppler phenomena within a random interference pattern imaged in widefield, known as laser speckle. Studies of neurovascular function and coupling with LSCI have benefited from the real-time characterization of functional dynamics in the laboratory setting through quantification of perfusion dynamics. While the technique has largely been relegated to acute small animal imaging, its scalability is being assessed and characterized for both chronic and clinical neurovascular imaging. PMID:25944593

  20. Sexual Abuse Images in Cyberspace: Expanding the Ecology of the Child

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Jennifer; Alaggia, Ramona

    2013-01-01

    Cyberspace has added a new dimension to the ecology of children made the subjects of sexual abuse images distributed online. These images cannot be permanently removed and can continue to circulate in cyberspace forever. A review of the current literature suggests that helping professionals are not consistently aware of or do not probe…

  1. Aortic Regurgitation in Patients Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement With the Self-Expanding CoreValve Versus the Balloon-Expandable SAPIEN XT Valve.

    PubMed

    Kiramijyan, Sarkis; Magalhaes, Marco A; Koifman, Edward; Didier, Romain; Escarcega, Ricardo O; Baker, Nevin C; Negi, Smita I; Minha, Sa'ar; Torguson, Rebecca; Jiaxiang, Gai; Asch, Federico M; Wang, Zuyue; Okubagzi, Petros; Gaglia, Michael A; Ben-Dor, Itsik; Satler, Lowell F; Pichard, Augusto D; Waksman, Ron

    2016-05-01

    The incidence of aortic regurgitation (AR) after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in a self-expanding and a balloon-expandable system is controversial. This study aimed to examine the incidence and severity of post-TAVR AR with the CoreValve (CV) versus the Edwards XT Valve (XT). Baseline, procedural, and postprocedural inhospital outcomes were compared. The primary end point was the incidence of post-TAVR AR of any severity, assessed with a transthoracic echocardiogram, in the CV versus XT groups. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was completed to evaluate for correlates of the primary end point. The secondary end points included the change in severity of AR at 30-day and 1-year follow-up. A total of 223 consecutive patients (53% men, mean age 82 years) who had transfemoral TAVR with either a CV (n = 119) or XT (n = 104) were evaluated. The rates of post-TAVR AR in the groups were similar, and there was no evidence of more-than-moderate AR in either group. There were significant differences in the rates of intraprocedural balloon postdilation with the CV (17.1%) versus XT valve (5.8%; p = 0.009) and in the rates of intraprocedural implantation of a second valve-in-valve prosthesis with the CV (9.9%) versus XT valve (2.2%; p = 0.036). There were no significant differences in inhospital safety outcomes between the 2 groups. In conclusion, the incidence of post-TAVR AR is similar between the CV and the XT valve when performed by experienced operators using optimal intraprocedural strategies, as deemed appropriate, to mitigate the severity of AR. PMID:26996768

  2. Isolation and characterization of ex vivo expanded mesenchymal stem cells obtained from a surgical patient

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, JIA; SHA, HUIFAN; WANG, GUAN; BAO, GUOLIANG; LU, SHUN; LUO, QINGQUAN; TAN, QIANG

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the morphological characteristics and pluripotent differentiation potential of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMMSCs) in vitro and in vivo. Bone marrow cells were isolated from a rib fragment of an adult surgical patient, hBMMSCs were isolated based on plastic adherence and expanded ex vivo and phenotyping was performed. Pluripotent differentiation assays for adipogenesis, myogenesis and osteogenesis were conducted. Hematopoietic reconstruction of sublethally irradiated nude mice was performed by infusion of hBMMSCs. The gene expression profiles of early and late hBMMSCs were examined. The rate of CD31-positive cells was 31.1% in passage (P)4 hBMMSCs and 18.6% in P10 hBMMSCs. CD105 and CD106 were expressed in 99 and 95% of P25 hBMMSCs, respectively. Lipid droplets appeared at day 18 post induction. For osteogenesis, palpable masses were grossly observed from day 35 post inoculation of hBMMSCs. Hematoxylin and eosin staining further revealed chondrocytes and bone tissues. For myogenesis, at day six post subcutaneous inoculation, hBMMSCs differentiated into myocytes and were positive for myoglobin and MyoD1. In irradiated nude mice reconstituted by hBMMSCs, the white blood cell count briefly decreased following irradiation; however, it gradually recovered. In the irradiated nude mice reconstituted with hBMMSCs, CD45- and CD34-positive cells were detected 72 h post induction. Gene microarray analysis of P7 and P57 hBMMSCs demonstrated that 20 genes were upregulated >2 fold and 40 genes were downregulated >2 fold in P57 hBMMSCs. In conclusion, the isolated HBMMSCs possessed pluripotent differentiation potential and it was feasible and safe to use hBMMSCs within 30 passages. PMID:25376882

  3. Patient handling arrangements for NMR imaging systems

    SciTech Connect

    Carper, R.L.; Keller, J.T.

    1988-02-23

    In a nuclear magnetic resonance imaging system, including a magnet having a bore in which a subject to be imaged is to be located, a patient handling system is described comprising: a patient table which may be located so as to oppose the magnet bore, the patient table including a bottom portion and a top portion; a patient pallet, movably located on the top portion and adapted to be moved between the top portion and the magnet bore; mechanically driven transport means for transporting the patient pallet into and out of the magnet bore, including latch means for connecting the transport means to the patient pallet; and release means, located on the pallet, for manually releasing the latch means from the pallet, whereby the pallet may be manually removed from the magnet bore.

  4. Mastodynia: is imaging necessary in young patients?

    PubMed Central

    Ölçücüoğlu, Engin; Yılmaz, Güliz

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Mastalgia is the most frequent symptom seen in patients who undergo breast imaging. There are various medical treatment methods in the literature. However, malignancy should be excluded before starting treatment. This is a prospective study, evaluating the necessity of imaging in patients who have applied for cyclic or non-cyclic breast pain, with normal physical examination, and without a family history. Material and Methods: Two hundred women, younger than 30 years of age, who applied to Iğdır State Hospital general surgery department with complaint of cyclic or non-cyclic breast pain, were prospectively studied. Patients with nipple discharge, complaint of lump in their breast, who were pregnant or lactating, who had breast cancer history in their family and those who were found to have lumps on examination were excluded from the study. All patients underwent ultrasound imaging and the same radiologist evaluated them. Results: The breast examination was normal in all patients. Ultrasound imaging results were completely normal in 98 (48%) patients. 47 (23.5%) patients were found to have fibroadenoma, with a mean diameter of 9.6 mm (5 mm–14 mm). 45 (22.5%) patients had simple cysts with a mean diameter of 7.8 mm (3 mm–11 mm). 6 (3%) patients were found to have intraductal papillomas and 4 (2%) to have lipomas. All patients were classified as either BI-RADS 1 or BI-RADS 2. Conclusion: It is recommended that malignancy should be eliminated before starting treatment in patients with breast pain. In this study, the necessity of imaging in patients younger than 30 years and who applied to the general surgery department for only breast pain, was investigated. None of the patients with a normal breast examination were found to have any lesions considered suspicious for malignancy. We believe that if breast examination is normal, the patient is equal to or younger than 30 years of age and there is no family history, imaging is not necessary and that

  5. Sexual abuse images in cyberspace: expanding the ecology of the child.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jennifer; Alaggia, Ramona

    2013-01-01

    Cyberspace has added a new dimension to the ecology of children made the subjects of sexual abuse images distributed online. These images cannot be permanently removed and can continue to circulate in cyberspace forever. A review of the current literature suggests that helping professionals are not consistently aware of or do not probe possibilities of online sexual victimization in the investigation, assessment, and treatment of child sexual abuse. Nor is this issue adequately addressed in their education and training. There are gaps in the literature regarding how to identify and provide treatment for these children. New assessment and treatment targets are needed to enhance existing practice approaches. A contemporary ecological model that incorporates an explicit consideration of the cybersystem is provided as a starting point for practitioners to be aware of the possibility that images of child sexual abuse were recorded and distributed online. PMID:23682766

  6. Ex Vivo Expanded Natural Killer Cells Demonstrate Robust Proliferation In Vivo In High-Risk Relapsed Multiple Myeloma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Szmania, Susann; Lapteva, Natalia; Garg, Tarun; Greenway, Amy; Lingo, Joshuah; Nair, Bijay; Stone, Katie; Woods, Emily; Khan, Junaid; Stivers, Justin; Panozzo, Susan; Campana, Dario; Bellamy, William T.; Robbins, Molly; Epstein, Joshua; Yaccoby, Shmuel; Waheed, Sarah; Gee, Adrian; Cottler-Fox, Michele; Rooney, Cliona; Barlogie, Bart; van Rhee, Frits

    2015-01-01

    Highly activated/expanded natural killer (NK) cells can be generated via stimulation with the HLA-deficient cell line K562 genetically modified to express 41BB-ligand and membrane-bound interleukin (IL)15. We tested the safety, persistence and activity of expanded NK cells generated from myeloma patients (auto-NK) or haplo-identical family donors (allo-NK) in heavily pretreated patients with high-risk relapsing myeloma. The preparative regimen comprised bortezomib only or bortezomib and immunosuppression with cyclophosphamide, dexamethasone and fludarabine. NK cells were shipped overnight either cryopreserved or fresh. In 8 patients, up to 1×108 NK cells/kg were infused on day 0 and followed by daily administrations of IL2. Significant in vivo expansion was observed only in the 5 patients receiving fresh products, peaking at or near day 7, with the highest NK cell counts in 2 subjects who received cells produced in a high concentration of IL2 (500 units/mL). Seven days after infusion, donor NK cells comprised > 90% of circulating leukocytes in fresh allo-NK cell recipients, and cytolytic activity against allogeneic myeloma targets was retained in vitro. Among the 7 evaluable patients, there were no serious adverse events that could be related to NK cell infusion. One patient had a partial response and in another the tempo of disease progression decreased; neither patient required further therapy for 6 months. In the 5 remaining patients, disease progression was not affected by NK cell infusion. In conclusion, infusion of large numbers of expanded NK cells was feasible and safe; infusing fresh cells was critical to their expansion in vivo. PMID:25415285

  7. Expanding the Diversity of Imaging-Based RNAi Screen Applications Using Cell Spot Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Rantala, Juha K.; Kwon, Sunjong; Korkola, James; Gray, Joe W.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, great strides have been made in identifying gene aberrations and deregulated pathways that are associated with specific disease states. These association studies guide experimental studies aimed at identifying the aberrant genes and networks that cause the disease states. This requires functional manipulation of these genes and networks in laboratory models of normal and diseased cells. One approach is to assess molecular and biological responses to high-throughput RNA interference (RNAi)-induced gene knockdown. These responses can be revealed by immunofluorescent staining for a molecular or cellular process of interest and quantified using fluorescence image analysis. These applications are typically performed in multiwell format, but are limited by high reagent costs and long plate processing times. These limitations can be mitigated by analyzing cells grown in cell spot microarray (CSMA) format. CSMAs are produced by growing cells on small (~200 μm diameter) spots with each spot carrying an siRNA with transfection reagent. The spacing between spots is only a few hundred micrometers, thus thousands of cell spots can be arranged on a single cell culture surface. These high-density cell cultures can be immunofluorescently stained with minimal reagent consumption and analyzed quickly using automated fluorescence microscopy platforms. This review covers basic aspects of imaging-based CSMA technology, describes a wide range of immunofluorescence assays that have already been implemented successfully for CSMA screening and suggests future directions for advanced RNAi screening experiments.

  8. Expanding patient engagement in quality improvement and health system redesign: Three Canadian case studies.

    PubMed

    Baker, G Ross; Fancott, Carol; Judd, Maria; O'Connor, Patricia

    2016-09-01

    Healthcare organizations face growing pressures to increase patient-centred care and to involve patients more in organizational decisions. Yet many providers worry that such involvement requires additional time and resources and do not see patients as capable of contributing meaningfully to decisions. This article discusses three efforts in four organizations to engage patients in quality improvement efforts. McGill University Health Centre, Saskatoon Health Region, and Vancouver Coastal and Fraser Health Regions all engaged patients in quality improvement and system redesign initiatives that were successful in improving care processes, outcomes, and patient experience measures. Patient involvement in redesigning care may provide a way to demonstrate the value of patients' experiences and inputs into problem-solving, building support for their involvement in other areas. Further study of these cases and a broader survey of organizational experiences with patient involvement may help elucidate the factors that support greater patient engagement. PMID:27576853

  9. Geodetic Imaging: Expanding the Boundaries of Geodesy in the 21st Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez Diaz, J. C.; Carter, W. E.; Shrestha, R. L.; Glennie, C. L.

    2013-12-01

    High resolution (sub-meter) geodetic images covering tens to thousands of square kilometers have extended the boundaries of geodesy into related areas of the earth sciences, such as geomorphology and geodynamics, during the past decade, to archaeological exploration and site mapping during the past few years, and are now poised to transform studies of flora and fauna in the more remote regions of the world. Geodetic images produced from airborne laser scanning (ALS), a.k.a. airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) have proven transformative to the modern practice of geomorphology where researchers have used decimeter resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) to determine the spatial frequencies of evenly spaced features in terrain, and developed models and mathematical equations to explain how the terrain evolved to its present state and how it is expected to change in the future (Perron et al., 2009). In geodynamics researchers have used ';before' and ';after' geodetic images of the terrain near earthquakes, such as the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah Earthquake, to quantify surface displacements and suggest models to explain the observed deformations (Oskin et. al., 2012). In archaeology, the ability of ALS to produce ';bare earth' DEMs of terrain covered with dense vegetation, including even tropical rain forests, has revolutionized the study of archaeology in highly forested areas, finding ancient structures and human modifications of landscapes not discovered by archaeologists working at sites for decades (Chase et al., 2011 & Evans et al., 2013), and finding previously unknown ruins in areas that ground exploration has not been able to penetrate since the arrival of the conquistadors in the new world in the 17th century (Carter et al., 2012). The improved spatial resolution and ability of the third generation ALS units to obtain high resolution bare earth DEMs and canopy models in areas covered in dense forests, brush, and even shallow water (steams, lakes, and

  10. Misbheaving Faults: The Expanding Role of Geodetic Imaging in Unraveling Unexpected Fault Slip Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnhart, W. D.; Briggs, R.

    2015-12-01

    Geodetic imaging techniques enable researchers to "see" details of fault rupture that cannot be captured by complementary tools such as seismology and field studies, thus providing increasingly detailed information about surface strain, slip kinematics, and how an earthquake may be transcribed into the geological record. For example, the recent Haiti, Sierra El Mayor, and Nepal earthquakes illustrate the fundamental role of geodetic observations in recording blind ruptures where purely geological and seismological studies provided incomplete views of rupture kinematics. Traditional earthquake hazard analyses typically rely on sparse paleoseismic observations and incomplete mapping, simple assumptions of slip kinematics from Andersonian faulting, and earthquake analogs to characterize the probabilities of forthcoming ruptures and the severity of ground accelerations. Spatially dense geodetic observations in turn help to identify where these prevailing assumptions regarding fault behavior break down and highlight new and unexpected kinematic slip behavior. Here, we focus on three key contributions of space geodetic observations to the analysis of co-seismic deformation: identifying near-surface co-seismic slip where no easily recognized fault rupture exists; discerning non-Andersonian faulting styles; and quantifying distributed, off-fault deformation. The 2013 Balochistan strike slip earthquake in Pakistan illuminates how space geodesy precisely images non-Andersonian behavior and off-fault deformation. Through analysis of high-resolution optical imagery and DEMs, evidence emerges that a single fault map slip as both a strike slip and dip slip fault across multiple seismic cycles. These observations likewise enable us to quantify on-fault deformation, which account for ~72% of the displacements in this earthquake. Nonetheless, the spatial distribution of on- and off-fault deformation in this event is highly spatially variable- a complicating factor for comparisons

  11. Megapixel imaging camera for expanded H{sup {minus}} beam measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, J.E.; Lillberg, J.W.; McKee, R.J.; Slice, R.W.; Torrez, J.H.; McCurnin, T.W.; Sanchez, P.G.

    1994-02-01

    A charge coupled device (CCD) imaging camera system has been developed as part of the Ground Test Accelerator project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to measure the properties of a large diameter, neutral particle beam. The camera is designed to operate in the accelerator vacuum system for extended periods of time. It would normally be cooled to reduce dark current. The CCD contains 1024 {times} 1024 pixels with pixel size of 19 {times} 19 {mu}m{sup 2} and with four phase parallel clocking and two phase serial clocking. The serial clock rate is 2.5{times}10{sup 5} pixels per second. Clock sequence and timing are controlled by an external logic-word generator. The DC bias voltages are likewise located externally. The camera contains circuitry to generate the analog clocks for the CCD and also contains the output video signal amplifier. Reset switching noise is removed by an external signal processor that employs delay elements to provide noise suppression by the method of double-correlated sampling. The video signal is digitized to 12 bits in an analog to digital converter (ADC) module controlled by a central processor module. Both modules are located in a VME-type computer crate that communicates via ethernet with a separate workstation where overall control is exercised and image processing occurs. Under cooled conditions the camera shows good linearity with dynamic range of 2000 and with dark noise fluctuations of about {plus_minus}1/2 ADC count. Full well capacity is about 5{times}10{sup 5} electron charges.

  12. Enhancing the Imaging Experience for Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Baron, Molly; Joslin, Shannon; Kim, Jane S; Shet, Narendra S; Pocta, Brigitte; Olivi, Penny

    2016-01-01

    The University of Maryland Medical Center's goal was to improve the safety and comfort of pediatric imaging by enhancing the experience for children. Two pediatric radiologists and two child life specialists worked together to create a training program to help guide radiology technologists on how to approach and interact with children undergoing medical imaging. The results of surveys administered to technologists and parents or caregivers helped refine the strategy for both creating training sessions for technologists and reading materials for children and their parents to optimally prepare for the procedures. Training sessions included information on language choices, developmental considerations, comfort techniques, patient- and family-centered care practices, procedural support techniques, and coping styles. Through the implementation of learning sessions and distraction resources for technologists, and the development of preparation books, the imaging experience for pediatric patients at UMMC has improved. PMID:27514108

  13. Specific lymphocyte subsets predict response to adoptive cell therapy using expanded autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in metastatic melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Radvanyi, Laszlo G.; Bernatchez, Chantale; Zhang, Minying; Fox, Patricia S.; Miller, Priscilla; Chacon, Jessica; Wu, Richard; Lizee, Gregory; Mahoney, Sandy; Alvarado, Gladys; Glass, Michelle; Johnson, Valen E.; McMannis, John D.; Shpall, Elizabeth; Prieto, Victor; Papadopoulos, Nicholas; Kim, Kevin; Homsi, Jade; Bedikian, Agop; Hwu, Wen-Jen; Patel, Sapna; Ross, Merrick I.; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E.; Lucci, Anthony; Royal, Richard; Cormier, Janice N.; Davies, Michael A.; Mansaray, Rahmatu; Fulbright, Orenthial J.; Toth, Christopher; Ramachandran, Renjith; Wardell, Seth; Gonzalez, Audrey; Hwu, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) using autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) is a promising treatment for metastatic melanoma unresponsive to conventional therapies. We report here on the results of an ongoing Phase II clinical trial testing the efficacy of ACT using TIL in metastatic melanoma patients and the association of specific patient clinical characteristics and the phenotypic attributes of the infused TIL with clinical response. Experimental Design Altogether, 31 transiently lymphodepleted patients were treated with their expanded TIL followed by two cycles of high-dose (HD) IL-2 therapy. The effects of patient clinical features and the phenotypes of the T-cells infused on clinical response were determined. Results Overall, 15/31 (48.4%) patients had an objective clinical response using immune-related response criteria (irRC), with two patients (6.5%) having a complete response. Progression-free survival of >12 months was observed for 9/15 (60%) of the responding patients. Factors significantly associated with objective tumor regression included a higher number of TIL infused, a higher proportion of CD8+ T-cells in the infusion product, a more differentiated effector phenotype of the CD8+ population and a higher frequency of CD8+ T-cells co-expressing the negative costimulation molecule “B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator” (BTLA). No significant difference in telomere lengths of TIL between responders and non-responders was identified. Conclusion These results indicate that immunotherapy with expanded autologous TIL is capable of achieving durable clinical responses in metastatic melanoma patients and that CD8+ T-cells in the infused TIL, particularly differentiated effectors cells and cells expressing BTLA, are associated with tumor regression. PMID:23032743

  14. Ordering Diagnostic Imaging: A Survey of Ontario Physiotherapists' Opinions on an Expanded Scope of Practice

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Jodie Ng Fuk; De Luca, Krista; Goldan, Sana; Imam, Abdullah; Li, Boris; Zabjek, Karl; Chu, Anna

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To explore Ontario physiotherapists' opinions on their ability to order diagnostic imaging (DI). Methods: An online questionnaire was sent to all registered members of the College of Physiotherapists of Ontario. Descriptive statistics were calculated using response frequencies. Practice characteristics were compared using χ2 tests and Wilcoxon rank–sum tests. Results: Of 1,574 respondents (21% response rate), 42% practised in orthopaedics and 53% in the public sector. Most physiotherapists were interested in ordering DI (72% MRI/diagnostic ultrasound, 78% X-rays/computed tomography scans). Respondents with an orthopaedic caseload of 50% or more (p<0.001) and those in the private sector (p<0.001) were more interested in ordering DI. Respondents preferred a DI course that combined face-to-face and Web-based components and one that was specific to their area of practice. Most respondents perceived minimal barriers to the uptake of ordering DI, and most agreed that support from other health care professionals would facilitate uptake. Conclusion: The majority of Ontario physiotherapists are interested in ordering DI. For successful implementation of a health care change, such as physiotherapists' ability to order DI, educational needs and barriers to and facilitators of the uptake of the authorized activity should be considered. PMID:25931666

  15. Treatment of forensic patients: an expanding role for public psychiatric hospitals.

    PubMed

    Linhorst, D M; Turner, M A

    1999-02-01

    This article explores the increased role of state-operated public psychiatric hospitals in treating forensic patients. Patients with a forensic legal status have a mental illness and are involved with the criminal justice system. Using data from Missouri's forensic system, the article compares the characteristics of voluntary hospital patients with those of the largest hospitalized group of forensic patients--those found not guilty by reason of insanity (NGRI). Overall, NGRI patients tended to be higher functioning, less likely to have committed assaultive acts, and more likely to have substance abuse and personality disorder diagnoses. The article explores the treatment needs of forensic patients who reside in public psychiatric hospitals and discusses the effect of the strong presence of forensic patients in public psychiatric hospitals on social work practice, including clinical work with forensic patients, social work administration, and social work advocacy.

  16. Expanding the role of the iPad and tablet devices to cosmetic patient consultations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Hsu, Jeffrey T S; Bhatia, Ashish C

    2012-09-01

    The iPad is a useful reference tool for patient education in cosmetic consultations. In this article, we plan to (1) discuss how the iPad can be implemented and used by patients and physicians in consultations, (2) compare the advantages and disadvantages of the iPad with other forms of technology, (3) discuss the optimal way of using the iPad for patient care, (4) see how this tool complies with privacy regulations, and (5) look at other uses of the iPad in the patient care setting. There has been positive feedback from both patients and physicians regarding the addition of the tablet computer during consultations. In addition to showing patients pictures of cosmetic procedures, the iPad also has various multimedia capabilities such as videos and drawing tools that are useful in optimizing patient satisfaction, increasing clinical efficacy, and improving the overall patient experience.

  17. Genetically-encoded yellow fluorescent cAMP indicator with an expanded dynamic range for dual-color imaging.

    PubMed

    Odaka, Haruki; Arai, Satoshi; Inoue, Takafumi; Kitaguchi, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic AMP is a ubiquitous second messenger, which mediates many cellular responses mainly initiated by activation of cell surface receptors. Various Förster resonance energy transfer-based ratiometric cAMP indicators have been created for monitoring the spatial and temporal dynamics of cAMP at the single-cell level. However, single fluorescent protein-based cAMP indicators have been poorly developed, with improvement required for dynamic range and brightness. Based on our previous yellow fluorescent protein-based cAMP indicator, Flamindo, we developed an improved yellow fluorescent cAMP indicator named Flamindo2. Flamindo2 has a 2-fold expanded dynamic range and 8-fold increased brightness compared with Flamindo by optimization of linker peptides in the vicinity of the chromophore. We found that fluorescence intensity of Flamindo2 was decreased to 25% in response to cAMP. Live-cell cAMP imaging of the cytosol and nucleus in COS7 cells using Flamindo2 and nlsFlamindo2, respectively, showed that forskolin elevated cAMP levels in each compartment with different kinetics. Furthermore, dual-color imaging of cAMP and Ca2+ with Flamindo2 and a red fluorescent Ca2+ indicator, R-GECO, showed that cAMP and Ca2+ elevation were induced by noradrenaline in single HeLa cells. Our study shows that Flamindo2, which is feasible for multi-color imaging with other intracellular signaling molecules, is useful and is an alternative tool for live-cell imaging of intracellular cAMP dynamics.

  18. Expanding nurse practice in COPD: is it key to providing high quality, effective and safe patient care?

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Monica J; Dahl, Birthe H

    2013-06-01

    The prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a common and preventable chronic disease, is on the increase, and so are the financial and social burdens associated with it. The management of COPD is particularly challenging, as patients have complex health and social needs requiring life-long monitoring and treatment. In order to address these issues and reduce the burden imposed by COPD, the development of innovative disease management models is vital. Nurses are in a key position to assume a leading role in the management of COPD since they frequently represent the first point of contact for patients and are involved in all stages of care. Although evidence is still limited, an increasing number of studies have suggested that nurse-led consultations and interventions for the management of COPD have the potential to impact positively on the health and quality of life of patients. The role of nurses in the management of COPD around the world could be significantly expanded and strengthened. Providing adequate educational opportunities and support to nurses, as well as addressing funding issues and system barriers and recognising the importance of the expanding roles of nurses, is vital to the well-being of patients with long-term medical conditions such as COPD and to society as a whole, in order to reduce the burden of this disease.

  19. HLA-haploidentical bone marrow transplantation with posttransplant cyclophosphamide expands the donor pool for patients with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Ephraim J.; Luznik, Leo; Lanzkron, Sophie M.; Gamper, Christopher J.; Jones, Richard J.; Brodsky, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Allogeneic marrow transplantation can cure sickle cell disease; however, HLA-matched donors are difficult to find, and the toxicities of myeloablative conditioning are prohibitive for most adults with this disease. We developed a nonmyeloablative bone marrow transplantation platform using related, including HLA-haploidentical, donors for patients with sickle cell disease. The regimen consisted of antithymocyte globulin, fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and total body irradiation, and graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis with posttransplantation high-dose cyclophosphamide, mycophenolate mofetil, and tacrolimus or sirolimus. After screening 19 patients, we transplanted 17, 14 from HLA-haploidentical and 3 from HLA-matched related donors. Eleven patients engrafted durably. With a median follow-up of 711 days (minimal follow up 224 days), 10 patients are asymptomatic, and 6 patients are off immunosupression. Only 1 patient developed skin-only acute graft-versus-host disease that resolved without any therapy; no mortality was seen. Nonmyeloablative conditioning with posttransplantation high-dose cyclophosphamide expands the donor pool, making marrow transplantation feasible for most patients with sickle cell disease, and is associated with a low risk of complications, even with haploidentical related donors. Graft failure, 43% in haploidentical pairs, remains a major obstacle but may be acceptable in a fraction of patients if the majority can be cured without serious toxicities. PMID:22955919

  20. Interaction of expanding abdominal aortic aneurysm with surrounding tissue: Retrospective CT image studies

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Sebastian T.; Burek, William; Dupay, Alexander C.; Farsad, Mehdi; Baek, Seungik; Park, Eun-Ah; Lee, Whal

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) that rupture have a high mortality rate. Rupture occurs when local mechanical stress exceeds the local mechanical strength of an AAA, so stress profiles such as those from finite element analysis (FEA) are useful. The role and effect of surrounding tissues, like the vertebral column, which have not been extensively studied, are examined in this paper. Methods Longitudinal CT scans from ten patients with AAAs were studied to see the effect of surrounding tissues on AAAs. Segmentation was performed to distinguish the AAA from other tissues and we studied how these surrounding tissues affected the shape and curvature of the AAA. Previously established methods by Veldenz et al. were used to split the AAA into 8 sections and examine the specific effects of surrounding tissues on these sections [1]. Three-dimensional models were created to better examine these effects over time. Registration was done in order to compare AAAs longitudinally. Results The vertebral column and osteophytes were observed to have been affecting the shape and the curvature of the AAA. Interaction with the spine caused focal flattening in certain areas of the AAA. In 16 of the 41 CT scans, the right posterior dorsal section (section 5), had the highest radius of curvature, which was by far the section that had the maximum radius for a specified CT scan. Evolution of the growing AAA showed increased flattening in this section when comparing the last CT scan to the first scan. Conclusion Surrounding tissues have a clear influence on the geometry of an AAA, which may in turn affect the stress profile of AAA. Incorporating these structures in FEA and G&R models will provide a better estimate of stress. Clinical Relevance Currently, size is the only variable considered when deciding whether to undergo elective surgery to repair AAA since it is an easy enough measure for clinicians to utilize. However, this may not be the best indicator of rupture risk

  1. Expanded criteria for liver transplantation in patients with cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Silva, Mauricio; Moya, Angel; Berenguer, Marina; Sanjuan, Fernando; López-Andujar, Rafael; Pareja, Eugenia; Torres-Quevedo, Rodrigo; Aguilera, Victoria; Montalva, Eva; De Juan, Manuel; Mattos, Angelo; Prieto, Martín; Mir, José

    2008-10-01

    Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) selection for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a matter of debate. The Milan criteria (MC) have been largely adopted by the international community. The main aim of this study was to evaluate the survival rates and recurrence probabilities of a new proposal for criteria (up to 3 tumors, each no larger than 5 cm, and a cumulative tumor burden Patients with cirrhosis and HCC included on the waiting list (WL) from 1991 to 2006 were retrospectively analyzed. Outcomes in patients who had tumors within and beyond the MC were compared. The survival analysis was done (1) with the intention-to-treat principle and (2) among transplanted patients. A total of 281 patients were included in WL. Twenty-four cases did not undergo OLT (a dropout rate of 8.5%); all but 1 case had tumors within the MC. Of the 257 transplanted patients, 26 had tumors beyond the MC in the pre-OLT evaluation. Based on the intention-to-treat analysis, the 5-year survival was 56% versus 66% in patients who had tumors within and beyond the MC, respectively (P = 0.487). Among transplanted patients, the 5-year survival was 62% versus 69%, respectively (P = 0.734). Through multivariate analysis, microvascular invasion was an independent prognostic factor of poor survival (P = 0.004). The recurrence probabilities at 1 and 5 years were 7% versus 12% and 14% versus 28% in patients with tumors within and beyond the MC, respectively (P = 0.063). The multivariate analysis demonstrated that both poorly differentiated tumors (P < 0.001) and microvascular invasion (P < 0.001) increased the risk of recurrence. The expansion to up to 3 nodules, each up to 5 cm, and a cumulative tumor burden patients who had tumors within the MC.

  2. Fertility preservation in the transgender patient: expanding oncofertility care beyond cancer.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Sumer Allensworth; Blough, Kiara L; Kondapalli, Laxmi A

    2014-01-01

    While the field of oncofertility raised awareness about fertility concerns in oncology patients, new applications for fertility preservation are emerging, such as transgender medicine. As transgender medicine evolves, the number of individuals seeking gender reassignment hormone therapy is drastically increasing, generating a population of patients with unmet fertility needs and unknown reproductive potential. We present the first case report of a female-to-male (FtM) transgender patient to undergo oocyte cryopreservation before initiating androgen therapy. Our patient is a 17-year-old FtM transgender person undergoing gender transition throughout adolescence with an endocrinologist. The patient wished to complete androgen therapy before starting his first year of college to avoid gender ambiguity. After extensive consultation and psychological assessment, the patient was considered an appropriate candidate and proceeded with oocyte cryopreservation. He underwent baseline fertility testing followed by successful ovarian stimulation and surgical retrieval. We recommend that a discussion of reproductive health concerns and fertility preservation options be incorporated into the comprehensive care of transgender patients.

  3. Somatic mosaicism of expanded CAG repeats in brains of patients with dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy: cellular population-dependent dynamics of mitotic instability.

    PubMed Central

    Takano, H.; Onodera, O.; Takahashi, H.; Igarashi, S.; Yamada, M.; Oyake, M.; Ikeuchi, T.; Koide, R.; Tanaka, H.; Iwabuchi, K.; Tsuji, S.

    1996-01-01

    Dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease caused by unstable expansion of a CAG repeat in the DRPLA gene. We performed detailed quantitative analysis of the size and the size distribution (range) of the expanded CAG repeats in various regions of the CNS of eight autopsied patients with DRPLA. Expanded alleles (AE) showed considerable variations in size, as well as in range, depending on the region of the CNS, whereas normal alleles did not show such variations, which indicates the occurrence of somatic mosaicism of AE in the CNS. The AE in the cerebellar cortex were consistently smaller by two to five repeat units than those in the cerebellar white matter. Moreover, the AE in the cerebral cortex were smaller by one to four repeat units than those in the cerebral white matter. These results suggest that the smaller AE in the cerebellar and cerebral cortices represent those of neuronal cells. The ranges of the AE in the cerebral cortex, cerebral white matter, and cerebellar white matter showed considerable variation ranging from 9 to 23 repeat units, whereas those in the cerebellar cortex showed little variance and were approximately 7 repeat units. The ranges of the AE in the cerebral cortex, cerebral white matter, and cerebellar white matter were much broader in patients with higher ages at death than they were in patients with lower ages at death, raising the possibility that the range of AE increases with time, as the result of mitotic instability of AE. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:8651298

  4. Balloon-Expandable Stent Placement in Patients with Immediate Reocclusion after Initial Successful Thrombolysis of Acute middle Cerebral Arterial Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, H.K.; Kwak, H.S.; Chung, G.H.; Hwang, S.B.

    2012-01-01

    Summary We present the results of our approach for treating 12 consecutive cases of acute middle cerebral artery (MCA) stroke by performing balloon-expandable stent (BES) placement after immediate reocclusion due to the underlying stenosis after intra-arterial thrombolysis (IAT). We retrospectively reviewed the clinical outcomes of 12 patients with acute MCA stroke who underwent recanalization by BES placement in an underlying stenosis after IAT. The time to treatment, urokinase dose, duration of the procedure, recanalization rates and symptomatic hemorrhage were analyzed. Clinical outcome measures were assessed on admission and at discharge (the National Institutes of Health stroke scores [NIHSS]) as well as three months after treatment (modified Rankin scales [mRS]). The median NIHSS score on admission was 8.6. Four patients received IV rtPA. The median time from symptom onset to IAT was 236 minutes and the median duration of IAT was 62 minutes. The median dose of urokinase was 140,000 units. Initial recanalization after stent deployment (thrombolysis in cerebral ischemia attack grade of II or III) was achieved in all patients. Two patients died in the hospital due to aspiration pneumonia during medical management. In two patients, in-stent reocclusion occurred within 48 hours after stent deployment. At discharge, the median NIHSS score in ten patients (including the patients with reobstruction) was 2.4. The three-month outcome was excellent (mRS, 0-1) in eight patients. In this study, BES deployment was safe and effective in patients with an immediately reoccluded MCA after successful IAT. PMID:22440605

  5. Fully covered self-expandable metal stent in the treatment of postsurgical colorectal diseases: outcome in 29 patients

    PubMed Central

    Cereatti, Fabrizio; Fiocca, Fausto; Dumont, Jean-Loup; Ceci, Vincenzo; Vergeau, Bertrand-Marie; Tuszynski, Thierry; Meduri, Bruno; Donatelli, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    Background: Self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) placement is a minimally invasive treatment for palliation of malignant colorectal strictures and as a bridge to surgery. However, the use of SEMS for benign colorectal diseases is controversial. The purpose of this retrospective study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of fully covered SEMS (FCSEMS) placement in postsurgical colorectal diseases. Methods: From 2008 to 2014, 29 patients with 32 FCSEMS deployment procedures were evaluated. The indications for stent placement were: 17 anastomotic strictures (3/17 presented complete closure of the anastomosis); four anastomotic leaks; seven strictures associated with anastomotic leak; and one rectum-vagina fistula. Results: Clinical success was achieved in 18 out of 29 patients (62.1%) being symptom-free at an average of 19 months. In the remaining 11 patients (37.9%), a different treatment was needed: four patients required multiple endoscopic dilations, 4 patients colostomy confection, one patient definitive ileostomy and three patients revisional surgery. The FCSEMS were kept in place for a mean period of 34 (range: 6–65) days. Major complications occurred in 12 out of 29 patients (41.4%) and consisted of stent migration. Minor complications included two cases of transient fever, eight cases of abdominal or rectal pain, and one case of tenesmus. Conclusion: FCSEMS are considered a possible therapeutic option for treatment of postsurgical strictures and leaks. However, their efficacy in guaranteeing long-term anastomotic patency and leak closure is moderate. A major complication is migration. The use of FCSEMS for colonic postsurgical pathologies should be carefully evaluated for each patient. PMID:26929780

  6. Designing the Expanded Programme on Immunisation (EPI) as a service: Prioritising patients over administrative logic.

    PubMed

    McKnight, Jacob; Holt, Douglas B

    2014-01-01

    Expanded Programme on Immunisation (EPI) vaccination rates remain well below herd immunity in regions of many countries despite huge international resources devoted to both financing and access. We draw upon service marketing theory, organisational sociology, development anthropology and cultural consumer research to conduct an ethnographic study of vaccination delivery in Jimma Zone, Ethiopia - one such region. We find that Western public health sector policies are dominated by an administrative logic. Critical failures in delivery are produced by a system that obfuscates the on-the-ground problems that mothers face in trying to vaccinate their children, while instead prioritising administrative processes. Our ethnographic analysis of 83 mothers who had not vaccinated their children reveals key barriers to vaccination from a 'customer' perspective. While mothers value vaccination, it is a 'low involvement' good compared to the acute daily needs of a subsistence life. The costs imposed by poor service - such as uncaring staff with class hostilities, unpredictable and missed schedules and long waits - are too much and so they forego the service. Our service design framework illuminates specific service problems from the mother's perspective and points towards simple service innovations that could improve vaccination rates in regions that have poor uptake. PMID:25363481

  7. Designing the Expanded Programme on Immunisation (EPI) as a service: Prioritising patients over administrative logic.

    PubMed

    McKnight, Jacob; Holt, Douglas B

    2014-01-01

    Expanded Programme on Immunisation (EPI) vaccination rates remain well below herd immunity in regions of many countries despite huge international resources devoted to both financing and access. We draw upon service marketing theory, organisational sociology, development anthropology and cultural consumer research to conduct an ethnographic study of vaccination delivery in Jimma Zone, Ethiopia - one such region. We find that Western public health sector policies are dominated by an administrative logic. Critical failures in delivery are produced by a system that obfuscates the on-the-ground problems that mothers face in trying to vaccinate their children, while instead prioritising administrative processes. Our ethnographic analysis of 83 mothers who had not vaccinated their children reveals key barriers to vaccination from a 'customer' perspective. While mothers value vaccination, it is a 'low involvement' good compared to the acute daily needs of a subsistence life. The costs imposed by poor service - such as uncaring staff with class hostilities, unpredictable and missed schedules and long waits - are too much and so they forego the service. Our service design framework illuminates specific service problems from the mother's perspective and points towards simple service innovations that could improve vaccination rates in regions that have poor uptake.

  8. Novel IFT122 mutations in three Argentinian patients with cranioectodermal dysplasia: Expanding the mutational spectrum.

    PubMed

    Moosa, Shahida; Obregon, Maria Gabriela; Altmüller, Janine; Thiele, Holger; Nürnberg, Peter; Fano, Virginia; Wollnik, Bernd

    2016-05-01

    Cranioectodermal dysplasia (CED), also known as Sensenbrenner syndrome, is an autosomal recessive ciliary chondrodysplasia characterized by a recognizable craniofacial gestalt, skeletal abnormalities, and ectodermal features. To date, four genes have been shown to underlie the syndrome, namely, IFT122 (WDR10), WDR35 (IFT121), IFT43 (C14orf179), and WDR19 (IFT144). Clinical characterization of a larger cohort of patients with CED has been undertaken previously. Nevertheless, there are too few molecularly confirmed patients reported in the literature to determine precise genotype-phenotype correlations. To date, biallelic IFT122 mutations have been described in only five families. We therefore studied three unrelated Argentinian patients with typical features of CED using a 4813 next-generation sequencing (NGS) gene panel, which we call the "Mendeliome." The three patients had different, novel, compound heterozygous mutations in IFT122. Consequently, we compared these three patients to those previously described with IFT122 mutations. Thus, our report serves to add 6 novel mutations to the IFT122 mutation spectrum and to contribute to the IFT122-related clinical characterization. PMID:26792575

  9. Interleukin-2 treatment of tumor patients can expand regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Marc

    2012-10-01

    Augmented numbers of regulatory T cells contribute to the overall immunosuppression in tumor patients. Interleukin-2 has been widely used in the clinics in anticancer therapy, yet evidence has accumulated that the major drawback, limiting clinical efficacy, is the expansion of regulatory T cells, which aggravates immunosuppression.

  10. Towards online patient imaging during helical radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yu, L; Poole, C M; Lancaster, C M; Sylvander, S R

    2015-03-01

    Exit-detector data from helical radiation therapy have been studied extensively for delivery verification and dose reconstruction. Since the same radiation source is used for both imaging and treatment, this work investigates the possibility of utilising exit-detector raw data for imaging purposes. This gives rise to potential clinical applications such as retrospective daily setup verification and inter-fractional setup error detection. The exit-detector raw data were acquired and independently analysed using Python programming language. The raw data were extracted from the treatment machine's onboard computer, and converted into 2D array files. The contours of objects (phantom or patient) were acquired by applying a logarithmic function to the ratio of two sinograms, one with the object in the beam and one without. The setup variation between any two treatment deliveries can be detected by applying the same function to their corresponding exit-detector sinograms. The contour of the object was well defined by the secondary radiation from the treatment beam and validated with the imaging beam, although no internal structures were discernible due to the interference from the primary radiation. The sensitivity of the setup variation detection was down to 2 mm, which was mainly limited by the resolution of the exit-detector itself. The exit-detector data from treatment procedures contain valuable photon exit fluence maps which can be utilised for contour definition and verification of patient alignment without reconstruction.

  11. Towards online patient imaging during helical radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yu, L; Poole, C M; Lancaster, C M; Sylvander, S R

    2015-03-01

    Exit-detector data from helical radiation therapy have been studied extensively for delivery verification and dose reconstruction. Since the same radiation source is used for both imaging and treatment, this work investigates the possibility of utilising exit-detector raw data for imaging purposes. This gives rise to potential clinical applications such as retrospective daily setup verification and inter-fractional setup error detection. The exit-detector raw data were acquired and independently analysed using Python programming language. The raw data were extracted from the treatment machine's onboard computer, and converted into 2D array files. The contours of objects (phantom or patient) were acquired by applying a logarithmic function to the ratio of two sinograms, one with the object in the beam and one without. The setup variation between any two treatment deliveries can be detected by applying the same function to their corresponding exit-detector sinograms. The contour of the object was well defined by the secondary radiation from the treatment beam and validated with the imaging beam, although no internal structures were discernible due to the interference from the primary radiation. The sensitivity of the setup variation detection was down to 2 mm, which was mainly limited by the resolution of the exit-detector itself. The exit-detector data from treatment procedures contain valuable photon exit fluence maps which can be utilised for contour definition and verification of patient alignment without reconstruction. PMID:25636244

  12. Nurse-led action research project for expanding nurses’ role in patient education in Iran: Process, structure, and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Khorasani, Parvaneh; Rassouli, Maryam; Parvizy, Soroor; Zagheri-Tafreshi, Mansoureh; Nasr-Esfahani, Mahmood

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patient education is among the lowest met need of patients in Iran; therefore, expansion of that role can result in greater professional accountability. This study aimed to explain the practical science of the process, structure, and outcomes of a nurse-led action research project to expand the nurses’ role in patient education in Iran. Materials and Methods: This study was part of a participatory action research. Daily communications and monthly joint meetings were held from January 2012 to February 2014 for planning and management. These were based on the research protocol, and the conceptual framework included the Mobilizing for Action through Planning and Partnerships process by means of Leadership for Change skills. Data were produced and gathered through participant observations. Administrative data included project records, official documents, artifacts, news, and reports, which were analyzed through qualitative content analysis. Results: A participatory project was established with three groups of participants organized from both academic and clinical fields. These consisted of a “core research support team,” “two steering committees,” and community representatives of clients and professionals as “feedback groups.” A seven-stage process, named the “Nurse Educators: Al-Zahra Role Expansion Action Research” (NEAREAR) process, resulted from the project, in which strategic issues were gradually developed and implemented through 32 action plans and quality improvement cycles of action research. Audits and supervision evaluations showed meaningful changes in capacity building components. Conclusions: A nurse-led ad hoc structure with academic–clinical partnerships and strategic management process was suggested as a possible practical model for expanding nurses’ educational role in similar contexts. Implications and practical science introduced in this action research could also be applicable for top managers and health system

  13. Imaging studies in patients with spinal pain

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate an a priori threshold for advanced imaging in patients with spinal pain. Design Patients with spinal pain in any region for 6 to 52 weeks were assessed to determine if radiologic studies beyond x-ray scans were indicated, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and radionuclide bone scans. An a priori threshold was set before MRI, CT, or bone scans would be considered. Those who did not have MRI, CT, or bone scans ordered were followed for at least 1 year to determine if any of them went on to be diagnosed with a more serious spinal disorder (eg, infection, fracture, spondylitis, tumour, neurologic compression). Setting Four large primary care clinics in Edmonton, Alta. Participants A total of 1003 consecutively presenting patients with symptoms suspected to be related to the spine (for a duration of generally 6 to 52 weeks) who had not already undergone advanced imaging and did not have a diagnosis of nonbenign back pain. Main outcome measures Number of cases of nonbenign spinal disorder in participants who underwent advanced imaging and participants who did not undergo advanced imaging (ie, did not have any red flags). Results There were 399 women (39.8%) and 604 men (60.2%). The mean (SD) age of the group was 47.2 (14.6) years. The mean (SD) duration of symptoms was 15.1 (8.6) weeks. Of the 1003 participants, 110 met an a priori threshold for undergoing at least 1 of MRI, CT, or bone scan. In these 110 participants, there were newly diagnosed cases of radiculopathy (n = 12), including a case of cauda equina syndrome; spondyloarthropathy (n = 6); occult fracture (n = 2); solitary metastasis (n = 1); epidural lipomatosis (n = 1); osteomyelitis (n = 1), and retroperitoneal hematoma (n = 1), each of which was considered likely to be the cause of the patient’s spinal symptoms. The remaining 893 participants were followed for at least 1 year and none showed evidence of a nonbenign cause of his or her

  14. Diagnostic imaging of the acutely injured patient

    SciTech Connect

    Berquist, T.H.

    1985-01-01

    This book provides an analysis of pathophysiologic concepts of trauma and reviews the effectiveness of the available imaging modalities in acute trauma of various organ system. Topics covered are chest injuries; abdominal trauma; fractures of long bones; the foot and ankle; the knee; hand and wrist; the elbow; the shoulder; the pelvis hips; the spine; the skull and facial trauma and the clinical assessment of multiple injuries patients. Comparative evaluation of diagnostic techniques of radiography is discussed. Normal anatomy and bone fractures along with soft-tissue injuries are described.

  15. Patient-adaptive reconstruction and acquisition in dynamic imaging with sensitivity encoding (PARADISE).

    PubMed

    Sharif, Behzad; Derbyshire, J Andrew; Faranesh, Anthony Z; Bresler, Yoram

    2010-08-01

    MRI of the human heart without explicit cardiac synchronization promises to extend the applicability of cardiac MR to a larger patient population and potentially expand its diagnostic capabilities. However, conventional nongated imaging techniques typically suffer from low image quality or inadequate spatio-temporal resolution and fidelity. Patient-Adaptive Reconstruction and Acquisition in Dynamic Imaging with Sensitivity Encoding (PARADISE) is a highly accelerated nongated dynamic imaging method that enables artifact-free imaging with high spatio-temporal resolutions by utilizing novel computational techniques to optimize the imaging process. In addition to using parallel imaging, the method gains acceleration from a physiologically driven spatio-temporal support model; hence, it is doubly accelerated. The support model is patient adaptive, i.e., its geometry depends on dynamics of the imaged slice, e.g., subject's heart rate and heart location within the slice. The proposed method is also doubly adaptive as it adapts both the acquisition and reconstruction schemes. Based on the theory of time-sequential sampling, the proposed framework explicitly accounts for speed limitations of gradient encoding and provides performance guarantees on achievable image quality. The presented in-vivo results demonstrate the effectiveness and feasibility of the PARADISE method for high-resolution nongated cardiac MRI during short breath-hold. PMID:20665794

  16. Expand Your Horizon: A programme that improves body image and reduces self-objectification by training women to focus on body functionality.

    PubMed

    Alleva, Jessica M; Martijn, Carolien; Van Breukelen, Gerard J P; Jansen, Anita; Karos, Kai

    2015-09-01

    This study tested Expand Your Horizon, a programme designed to improve body image by training women to focus on the functionality of their body using structured writing assignments. Eighty-one women (Mage=22.77) with a negative body image were randomised to the Expand Your Horizon programme or to an active control programme. Appearance satisfaction, functionality satisfaction, body appreciation, and self-objectification were measured at pretest, posttest, and one-week follow-up. Following the intervention, participants in the Expand Your Horizon programme experienced greater appearance satisfaction, functionality satisfaction, and body appreciation, and lower levels of self-objectification, compared to participants in the control programme. Partial eta-squared effect sizes were of small to medium magnitude. This study is the first to show that focusing on body functionality can improve body image and reduce self-objectification in women with a negative body image. These findings provide support for addressing body functionality in programmes designed to improve body image. PMID:26280376

  17. Expand Your Horizon: A programme that improves body image and reduces self-objectification by training women to focus on body functionality.

    PubMed

    Alleva, Jessica M; Martijn, Carolien; Van Breukelen, Gerard J P; Jansen, Anita; Karos, Kai

    2015-09-01

    This study tested Expand Your Horizon, a programme designed to improve body image by training women to focus on the functionality of their body using structured writing assignments. Eighty-one women (Mage=22.77) with a negative body image were randomised to the Expand Your Horizon programme or to an active control programme. Appearance satisfaction, functionality satisfaction, body appreciation, and self-objectification were measured at pretest, posttest, and one-week follow-up. Following the intervention, participants in the Expand Your Horizon programme experienced greater appearance satisfaction, functionality satisfaction, and body appreciation, and lower levels of self-objectification, compared to participants in the control programme. Partial eta-squared effect sizes were of small to medium magnitude. This study is the first to show that focusing on body functionality can improve body image and reduce self-objectification in women with a negative body image. These findings provide support for addressing body functionality in programmes designed to improve body image.

  18. Screening of ARHSP-TCC patients expands the spectrum of SPG11 mutations and includes a large scale gene deletion.

    PubMed

    Denora, Paola S; Schlesinger, David; Casali, Carlo; Kok, Fernando; Tessa, Alessandra; Boukhris, Amir; Azzedine, Hamid; Dotti, Maria Teresa; Bruno, Claudio; Truchetto, Jeremy; Biancheri, Roberta; Fedirko, Estelle; Di Rocco, Maja; Bueno, Clarissa; Malandrini, Alessandro; Battini, Roberta; Sickl, Elisabeth; de Leva, Maria Fulvia; Boespflug-Tanguy, Odile; Silvestri, Gabriella; Simonati, Alessandro; Said, Edith; Ferbert, Andreas; Criscuolo, Chiara; Heinimann, Karl; Modoni, Anna; Weber, Peter; Palmeri, Silvia; Plasilova, Martina; Pauri, Flavia; Cassandrini, Denise; Battisti, Carla; Pini, Antonella; Tosetti, Michela; Hauser, Erwin; Masciullo, Marcella; Di Fabio, Roberto; Piccolo, Francesca; Denis, Elodie; Cioni, Giovanni; Massa, Roberto; Della Giustina, Elvio; Calabrese, Olga; Melone, Marina A B; De Michele, Giuseppe; Federico, Antonio; Bertini, Enrico; Durr, Alexandra; Brockmann, Knut; van der Knaap, Marjo S; Zatz, Mayana; Filla, Alessandro; Brice, Alexis; Stevanin, Giovanni; Santorelli, Filippo M

    2009-03-01

    Autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia with thinning of corpus callosum (ARHSP-TCC) is a complex form of HSP initially described in Japan but subsequently reported to have a worldwide distribution with a particular high frequency in multiple families from the Mediterranean basin. We recently showed that ARHSP-TCC is commonly associated with mutations in SPG11/KIAA1840 on chromosome 15q. We have now screened a collection of new patients mainly originating from Italy and Brazil, in order to further ascertain the spectrum of mutations in SPG11, enlarge the ethnic origin of SPG11 patients, determine the relative frequency at the level of single Countries (i.e., Italy), and establish whether there is one or more common mutation. In 25 index cases we identified 32 mutations; 22 are novel, including 9 nonsense, 3 small deletions, 4 insertions, 1 in/del, 1 small duplication, 1 missense, 2 splice-site, and for the first time a large genomic rearrangement. This brings the total number of SPG11 mutated patients in the SPATAX collection to 111 cases in 44 families and in 17 isolated cases, from 16 Countries, all assessed using homogeneous clinical criteria. While expanding the spectrum of mutations in SPG11, this larger series also corroborated the notion that even within apparently homogeneous population a molecular diagnosis cannot be achieved without full gene sequencing.

  19. Going "social" to access experimental and potentially life-saving treatment: an assessment of the policy and online patient advocacy environment for expanded access.

    PubMed

    Mackey, Tim K; Schoenfeld, Virginia J

    2016-02-02

    Social media is fundamentally altering how we access health information and make decisions about medical treatment, including for terminally ill patients. This specifically includes the growing phenomenon of patients who use online petitions and social media campaigns in an attempt to gain access to experimental drugs through expanded access pathways. Importantly, controversy surrounding expanded access and "compassionate use" involves several disparate stakeholders, including patients, manufacturers, policymakers, and regulatory agencies-all with competing interests and priorities, leading to confusion, frustration, and ultimately advocacy. In order to explore this issue in detail, this correspondence article first conducts a literature review to describe how the expanded access policy and regulatory environment in the United States has evolved over time and how it currently impacts access to experimental drugs. We then conducted structured web searches to identify patient use of online petitions and social media campaigns aimed at compelling access to experimental drugs. This was carried out in order to characterize the types of communication strategies utilized, the diseases and drugs subject to expanded access petitions, and the prevalent themes associated with this form of "digital" patient advocacy. We find that patients and their families experience mixed results, but still gravitate towards the use of online campaigns out of desperation, lack of reliable information about treatment access options, and in direct response to limitations of the current fragmented structure of expanded access regulation and policy currently in place. In response, we discuss potential policy reforms to improve expanded access processes, including advocating greater transparency for expanded access programs, exploring use of targeted economic incentives for manufacturers, and developing systems to facilitate patient information about existing treatment options. This includes

  20. Going "social" to access experimental and potentially life-saving treatment: an assessment of the policy and online patient advocacy environment for expanded access.

    PubMed

    Mackey, Tim K; Schoenfeld, Virginia J

    2016-01-01

    Social media is fundamentally altering how we access health information and make decisions about medical treatment, including for terminally ill patients. This specifically includes the growing phenomenon of patients who use online petitions and social media campaigns in an attempt to gain access to experimental drugs through expanded access pathways. Importantly, controversy surrounding expanded access and "compassionate use" involves several disparate stakeholders, including patients, manufacturers, policymakers, and regulatory agencies-all with competing interests and priorities, leading to confusion, frustration, and ultimately advocacy. In order to explore this issue in detail, this correspondence article first conducts a literature review to describe how the expanded access policy and regulatory environment in the United States has evolved over time and how it currently impacts access to experimental drugs. We then conducted structured web searches to identify patient use of online petitions and social media campaigns aimed at compelling access to experimental drugs. This was carried out in order to characterize the types of communication strategies utilized, the diseases and drugs subject to expanded access petitions, and the prevalent themes associated with this form of "digital" patient advocacy. We find that patients and their families experience mixed results, but still gravitate towards the use of online campaigns out of desperation, lack of reliable information about treatment access options, and in direct response to limitations of the current fragmented structure of expanded access regulation and policy currently in place. In response, we discuss potential policy reforms to improve expanded access processes, including advocating greater transparency for expanded access programs, exploring use of targeted economic incentives for manufacturers, and developing systems to facilitate patient information about existing treatment options. This includes

  1. Medical Imaging Informatics: Towards a Personalized Computational Patient.

    PubMed

    Ayache, N

    2016-05-20

    Medical Imaging Informatics has become a fast evolving discipline at the crossing of Informatics, Computational Sciences, and Medicine that is profoundly changing medical practices, for the patients' benefit.

  2. Expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A universe that expands with time. Although the possibility had been raised earlier through theoretical work carried out by Willem de Sitter (1872-1934), Aleksandr Friedmann (1888-1925), and the Abbé Georges Lemaître (1894-1966), that our universe is expanding was first demonstrated observationally in 1929 by Edwin P Hubble (1889-1953), through his measurements of the redshifts in the spectra of ...

  3. Proposal of new expanded selection criteria using total tumor size and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose - positron emission tomography/computed tomography for living donor liver transplantation in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma: The National Cancer Center Korea criteria

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Duk; Lee, Bora; Kim, Seong Hoon; Joo, Jungnam; Kim, Seok-Ki; Kim, Young-Kyu; Park, Sang-Jae

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To expand the living donor liver transplantation (LT) pool of eligible patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using new morphological and biological criteria. METHODS: Patients with HCC who underwent living donor LT (LDLT) from March 2005 to May 2013 at the National Cancer Center Korea (NCCK) were enrolled. We performed the 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) before LDLT. Overall and disease-free survival analysis was done in patients to evaluate the usefulness of new NCCK criteria using PET/CT and total tumor size (10 cm). RESULTS: We enrolled a total of 280 patients who pathologically confirmed to have HCC and performed the PET/CT before transplantation. Among them, 164 (58.6%) patients fulfilled the NCCK criteria and 132 patients (47.1%) met the Milan criteria. Five-year overall and disease-free survival rates for patients who fulfilled the NCCK criteria showed 85.2% and 84.0%, respectively, and were significantly higher than those beyond the NCCK criteria (60.2% and 44.4%, respectively; P < 0.001). The correlation analysis between preoperative imaging tests and pathologic reports using Cohen’s Kappa demonstrated the better results in the NCCK criteria than those in the Milan criteria (0.850 vs 0.583). The comparison of disease-free analysis among the NCCK, Milan, and University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) criteria using the receiver operating characteristics curves revealed the similar area under the curve value criteria (NCCK vs Milan, P = 0.484; NCCK vs UCSF, P = 0.189 at 5-years). CONCLUSION: The NCCK criteria using hybrid concept of both morphological and biological parameters showed an excellent agreement between preoperative imaging and pathological results, and favorable survival outcomes. These new criteria might select the optimal patients with HCC waiting LDLT and expand the selection pool. PMID:27358787

  4. Exercise thallium imaging in patients with diabetes mellitus. Prognostic implications

    SciTech Connect

    Felsher, J.; Meissner, M.D.; Hakki, A.H.; Heo, J.; Kane-Marsch, S.; Iskandrian, A.S.

    1987-02-01

    We used exercise thallium 201 imaging in 123 patients with diabetes mellitus (77 men and 46 women, aged 56 +/- 8 years), 75% of whom had angina pectoris (typical or atypical). During exercise testing, 18 patients (15%) had angina pectoris, 28 (23%) had ischemic ST changes, and 69 (56%) had abnormal thallium images. During follow-up (up to 36 months), there were 12 cardiac events; four patients died of cardiac causes and eight had nonfatal acute myocardial infarction. Univariate and multivariate survival analysis identified two independent predictors of cardiac events: the event rate was significantly less in patients with normal images and exercise heart rate over 120 beats per minute than in patients with abnormal images and exercise heart rate of 120 beats per minute or less (0% vs 22%). The patients with abnormal images or exercise heart rate of 120 beats per minute or less had an intermediate event rate (11.5%). Furthermore, two of the 54 patients with normal images and ten of 69 patients with abnormal images had subsequent cardiac events. Thus, exercise thallium imaging is useful in risk stratification in patients with diabetes mellitus.

  5. Transcriptomic and Phospho-Proteomic Analyses of Erythroblasts Expanded in vitro From Normal Donors and From Patients with Polycythemia Vera

    PubMed Central

    Hricik, Todd; Federici, Giulia; Zeuner, Ann; Alimena, Giuliana; Tafuri, Agostino; Tirelli, Valentina; Varricchio, Lilian; Masiello, Francesca; Ciaffoni, Fiorella; Vaglio, Stefania; Petricoin, Emanuel F.; Girelli, Gabriella; Levine, Ross L.; Migliaccio, Anna Rita F.

    2013-01-01

    Erythropoiesis is a tightly regulated process which becomes decoupled from its normal differentiation program in patients with polycythemia vera (PV). Somatic mutations in JAK2 are commonly associated with this myeloid proliferative disorder. To gain insight into the molecular events that are required for abnormally developing erythroid cells to escape dependence on normal growth signals, we performed in vitro expansion of mature erythroblasts (ERY) from 7 normal healthy donors and from 7 polycythemic patients in the presence of IL3, EPO, SCF for 10, 11 or 13 days. Normal ERYs required exposure to the glucocorticoid dexamethasone (Dex) for expansion, while PV-derived ERYs expanded in the absence of dexamethasone. RNA expression profiling revealed enrichment of two known oncogenes, GPR56 and RAB4a, in PV-derived ERYs along with reduced expression levels of transcription factor TAL1 (ANOVA FDR < 0.05). While both normal and polycythemic-derived ERYs integrated signaling cascades for growth, they did so via different signaling pathways which are represented by their differential phospho-profiles. Our results show that normal ERYs displayed greater levels of phosphorylation of EGFR, PDGFRβ, TGFβ and cKit, while PV-derived ERYs were characterized by increased phosphorylation of cytoplasmic kinases in the JAK/STAT, PI3K and GATA1 pathways. Together these data suggest that PV erythroblast expansion and maturation may be maintained and enriched in the absence of dexamethasone through reduced TAL1 expression and by accessing additional signaling cascades. Members of this acquired repertoire may provide important insight into the pathogenesis of aberrant erythropoiesis in myeloproliferative neoplasms such as polycythemia vera. PMID:23720412

  6. Imaging Recommendations for Acute Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wintermark, Max; Sanelli, Pina C.; Albers, Gregory W.; Bello, Jacqueline A.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; Hetts, Steven W.; Johnson, Michele H.; Kidwell, Chelsea S.; Lev, Michael H.; Liebeskind, David S.; Rowley, Howard A.; Schaefer, Pamela W.; Sunshine, Jeffrey L.; Zaharchuk, Greg; Meltzer, Carolyn C.

    2014-01-01

    In the article entitled “Imaging Recommendations for Acute Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack Patients: A Joint Statement by the American Society of Neuroradiology, the American College of Radiology and the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery”, we are proposing a simple, pragmatic approach that will allow the reader to develop an optimal imaging algorithm for stroke patients at their institution. PMID:23948676

  7. Ultrasonographic imaging of inflammatory bowel disease in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Chiorean, Liliana; Schreiber-Dietrich, Dagmar; Braden, Barbara; Cui, Xin-Wu; Buchhorn, Reiner; Chang, Jian-Min; Dietrich, Christoph F

    2015-05-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is one of the most common chronic gastrointestinal diseases in pediatric patients. Choosing the optimal imaging modality for the assessment of gastrointestinal disease in pediatric patients can be challenging. The invasiveness and patient acceptance, the radiation exposure and the quality performance of the diagnostic test need to be considered. By reviewing the literature regarding imaging in inflammatory bowel disease the value of ultrasound in the clinical management of pediatric patients is highlighted. Transabdominal ultrasound is a useful, noninvasive method for the initial diagnosis of IBD in children; it also provides guidance for therapeutic decisions and helps to characterize and predict the course of the disease in individual patients. Ultrasound techniques including color Doppler imaging and contrast-enhanced ultrasound are promising imaging tools to determine disease activity and complications. Comparative studies between different imaging methods are needed. PMID:25954096

  8. Subcortical physiology deformed into a patient-specific brain atlas for image-guided stereotaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finnis, Kirk; Starreveld, Yves P.; Parrent, Andrew; Peters, Terence M.

    2002-05-01

    Stereotactic neurosurgery for movement disorders involves the accurate localization of functionally distinct subcortical anatomy that appears homogeneous on magnetic resonance or computed tomographic images. To aid localization of these surgical targets on patient images, we have developed a visualization oriented searchable and expandable database of functional organization representing bilaterally the sensorimotor thalamus, pallidum, internal capsule, and subthalamic nucleus. Data were obtained through microelectrode recording and stimulation mapping routinely performed during 123 functional stereotactic procedures. Electrophysiologic data were standardized using a multi-parameter coding system and annotated to their respective MRIs at the appropriate position in patient stereotactic space. To accommodate for normal anatomical variability, we have developed an intensity-based nonlinear registration algorithm that rapidly warps a patient's volumetric MRI to a high-resolution MRI average brain. The annotated functional data are subsequently transformed into the average brain coordinate system using the displacement grids generated by the algorithm. When the database is searched, clustering of like inter-patient physiologic responses within target anatomy and adjacent structures is revealed. These data may in turn be registered to a preoperative MRI using a desktop computer enabling prior to surgery interactive delineation of surgical targets. The database is expandable, fully searchable, and provides a visual 3D representation of subcortical functional organization.

  9. Expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrödinger, E.

    2011-02-01

    Preface; Part I. The de Sitter Universe: 1. Synthetic construction; 2. The reduced model: geodesics; 3. The elliptic interpretation; 4. The static frame; 5. The determination of parallaxes; 6. The Lemaître-Robertson frame; Part II. The Theory of Geodesics: 7. On null geodesics; i. Determination of the parameter for null lines in special cases; ii. Frequency shift; 8. Free particles and light rays in general expanding spaces, flat or hyperspherical; i. Flat spaces; ii. Spherical spaces; iii. The red shift for spherical spaces; Part III. Waves in General Riemannian Space-Time: 9. The nature of our approximation; 10. The Hamilton-Jacobi theory in a gravitational field; 11. Procuring approximate solutions of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation from wave theory; Part IV. Waves in an Expanding Universe: 12. General considerations; 13. Proper vibrations and wave parcels; Bibliography.

  10. Expanding Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aisenberg, Sol

    2005-04-01

    Newton's gravitational constant Gn and Laws of Gravity are based upon observations in our solar system. Mysteries appear when they are used far outside our solar system Apparently, Newton's gravitational constant can not be applied at large distances. Dark matter was needed to explain the observed flat rotational velocity curves of spiral galaxies (Rubin), and of groups of remote galaxies (Zwicky). Our expansion of Newton's gravitational constant Gn as a power series in distance r, is sufficient to explain these observations without using dark matter. This is different from the MOND theory of Milgrom involving acceleration. Also, our Expanded Gravitational Constant (EGC) can show the correct use of the red shift. In addition to the Doppler contribution, there are three other contributions and these depend only upon gravity. Thus, velocity observations only based on the red shift can not be used to support the concept of the expanding universe, the accelerating expansion, or dark energy. Our expanded gravity constant can predict and explain Olbers' paradox (dark sky), and the temperature of the CMB (cosmic microwave background). Thus, CMB may not support the big bang and inflation.

  11. Coma Patient Monitoring System Using Image Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankalp, Meenu

    2011-12-01

    COMA PATIENT MONITORING SYSTEM provides high quality healthcare services in the near future. To provide more convenient and comprehensive medical monitoring in big hospitals since it is tough job for medical personnel to monitor each patient for 24 hours.. The latest development in patient monitoring system can be used in Intensive Care Unit (ICU), Critical Care Unit (CCU), and Emergency Rooms of hospital. During treatment, the patient monitor is continuously monitoring the coma patient to transmit the important information. Also in the emergency cases, doctor are able to monitor patient condition efficiently to reduce time consumption, thus it provides more effective healthcare system. So due to importance of patient monitoring system, the continuous monitoring of the coma patient can be simplified. This paper investigates about the effects seen in the patient using "Coma Patient Monitoring System" which is a very advanced product related to physical changes in body movement of the patient and gives Warning in form of alarm and display on the LCD in less than one second time. It also passes a sms to a person sitting at the distant place if there exists any movement in any body part of the patient. The model for the system uses Keil software for the software implementation of the developed system.

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in patients with cardiac pacing devices.

    PubMed

    Buendía, Francisco; Sánchez-Gómez, Juan M; Sancho-Tello, María J; Olagüe, José; Osca, Joaquín; Cano, Oscar; Arnau, Miguel A; Igual, Begoña

    2010-06-01

    Currently, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging is contraindicated in patients with a pacemaker or implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. This study was carried out because the potential risks in this situation need to be clearly defined. This prospective study evaluated clinical and electrical parameters before and after magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 33 patients (five with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and 28 with pacemakers). In these patients, magnetic resonance imaging was considered clinically essential. There were no clinical complications. There was a temporary communication failure in two cases, sensing errors during imaging in two cases, and a safety signal was generated in one pacemaker at the maximum magnetic resonance frequency and output level. There were no technical restrictions on imaging nor were there any permanent changes in the performance of the cardiac pacing device. PMID:20515632

  13. Imaging features of Burkitt lymphoma in pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Derinkuyu, Betül Emine; Boyunağa, Öznur; Öztunalı, Çiğdem; Tekkeşin, Funda; Damar, Çağrı; Alımlı, Ayşe Gül; Okur, Arzu

    2016-01-01

    Burkitt lymphoma is an aggressive and rapidly growing tumor that is curable and highly sensitive to chemotherapy. It can affect almost every tissue in the body, producing various clinical presentations and imaging appearances, according to the predilection of the different subtypes for certain sites. Awareness of its diagnostically specific imaging appearances plays an important role in rapid detection and treatment. In this pictorial review, we aimed to identify the most common imaging features of Burkitt lymphoma in pediatric patients. PMID:26611257

  14. Application of acute stroke imaging: selecting patients for revascularization therapy.

    PubMed

    Shang, Tiesong; Yavagal, Dileep R

    2012-09-25

    Due to the dynamic and versatile characteristics of ischemic penumbra, selecting the right acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients for revascularization therapy (RT) based on initial available imaging can be challenging. The main patient selection criterion for RT is the size of the mismatch between the potentially salvageable tissue (penumbra) and the irreversibly damaged tissue (core). The goal of revascularization RT is to "freeze" the core and prevent it from extending to the penumbral tissue. Penumbral imaging selection of AIS patients for RT, using magnetic resonance or CT-based studies, may provide more clinical benefit to the appropriate patients, although direct evidence is pending. Not all penumbra-core mismatches beyond 3 hours are equal and need treatment, and defining which mismatches to target for RT is the current goal of ongoing clinical trials. In addition to "penumbral"-based imaging, large vessel occlusion and clot length estimation based on CT angiography and noncontrasted ultrathin CT scan has been used to identify patients who are refractory to systemic thrombolysis and may be eligible for endovascular therapy. The application of various imaging modalities in selecting and triaging AIS patients for RT is discussed in this review. Larger prospective randomized trials are needed to better understand the role of various imaging modalities in selecting AIS patients for RT and to understand its influence on clinical outcome.

  15. Healthcare provider and patient perspectives on diagnostic imaging investigations

    PubMed Central

    Bergh, Anne-Marie; Hoffmann, Willem A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Much has been written about the patient-centred approach in doctor–patient consultations. Little is known about interactions and communication processes regarding healthcare providers’ and patients’ perspectives on expectations and experiences of diagnostic imaging investigations within the medical encounter. Patients journey through the health system from the point of referral to the imaging investigation itself and then to the post-imaging consultation. Aim and setting: To explore healthcare provider and patient perspectives on interaction and communication processes during diagnostic imaging investigations as part of their clinical journey through a healthcare complex. Methods: A qualitative study was conducted, with two phases of data collection. Twenty-four patients were conveniently selected at a public district hospital complex and were followed throughout their journey in the hospital system, from admission to discharge. The second phase entailed focus group interviews conducted with providers in the district hospital and adjacent academic hospital (medical officers and family physicians, nurses, radiographers, radiology consultants and registrars). Results: Two main themes guided our analysis: (1) provider perspectives; and (2) patient dispositions and reactions. Golden threads that cut across these themes are interactions and communication processes in the context of expectations, experiences of the imaging investigations and the outcomes thereof. Conclusion: Insights from this study provide a better understanding of the complexity of the processes and interactions between providers and patients during the imaging investigations conducted as part of their clinical pathway. The interactions and communication processes are provider–patient centred when a referral for a diagnostic imaging investigation is included. PMID:26245604

  16. Body Image and the Female Adolescent Oncology Patient.

    PubMed

    Burg, Alison Joy

    2016-01-01

    Female adolescent oncology patients undergo many physical changes throughout treatment that have challenging psychological, emotional, and social implications. Body image for this population is a subject that tends to be overlooked in the midst of the cancer experience. This article will examine the complex concept of body image and discuss why female adolescent patients are at such high risk for negative body image. Assessment and care strategies are needed to foster a positive body image, resiliency, and overall well-being. Although survivorship studies may offer insightful information about the effects of the cancer journey on long-term body image, focus should be on prevention and holistic care as part of the treatment itself. The health care team, especially nursing professionals, should acknowledge, recognize, and address this vital issue as a critical part of oncology care.

  17. Body Image and the Female Adolescent Oncology Patient.

    PubMed

    Burg, Alison Joy

    2016-01-01

    Female adolescent oncology patients undergo many physical changes throughout treatment that have challenging psychological, emotional, and social implications. Body image for this population is a subject that tends to be overlooked in the midst of the cancer experience. This article will examine the complex concept of body image and discuss why female adolescent patients are at such high risk for negative body image. Assessment and care strategies are needed to foster a positive body image, resiliency, and overall well-being. Although survivorship studies may offer insightful information about the effects of the cancer journey on long-term body image, focus should be on prevention and holistic care as part of the treatment itself. The health care team, especially nursing professionals, should acknowledge, recognize, and address this vital issue as a critical part of oncology care. PMID:25643971

  18. Three-dimensional CT imaging and virtual endoscopy for the placement of self-expandable stents in oesophageal and tracheobronchial neoplastic stenoses.

    PubMed

    Di Simone, M P; Mattioli, S; D'Ovidio, F; Bassi, F

    2003-01-01

    We examined the value of multislice computed tomography (CT) with three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the images as a pre-treatment examination in order to plan endoluminal stenting in 14 patients with large tumours involving the oesophagus and/or the tracheobronchial tree. The measurement of the stenosis obtained during 3D reconstruction of the CT images corresponded to that obtained by endoscopy and to the prosthesis chosen in all cases, with the exception of one patient undergoing double stenting due to inadequate gaseous distension of the oesophageal lumen. 3D CT may add information with respect to axial imaging, and be helpful to better plan and perform stenting of the oesophagus and airways without burdening the preoperative work-up.

  19. Expanded Yegua

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, R.E.; Grayson, S.; Benes, J.

    1988-01-01

    The upper Eocene Yegua Formation expands dramatically across a regional flexure generally 12-15 km wide. During each of several postulated Yegua sea level drops, this flexure became a focal point for deltaic deposition of good to excellent reservoir-quality sands. From the western edge of the Houston salt dome basin to the San Marcos arch, this trend has yielded, since 1982, at least seven noteworthy discoveries: Toro Grande and Lost Bridge fields in Jackson County, and Black Owl, Shanghai, Shanghai East, El Campo, and Phase Four fields in Wharton County, Texas. El Campo field in Wharton County, Texas, was discovered in December 1985 by Ladd Petroleum Corporation with the drilling of the Ladd Petroleum 1 Popp well. Mud logs acquired while drilling indicated that a very sandy reservoir, with encouraging quantities of natural gas and condensate had been encountered. Subsequent open-hold logging generated more questions than answers about the prospective sand section. Additional open hole logs (EPT/ML,SHDT) were run to identify what turned out to be an extremely laminated sand-shale sequence over 400 ft thick. Subsequent development drilling and the acquisition of a 120 ft whole core provided valuable data in analyzing this prolific, geopressured natural gas and condensate Yegua reservoir. Whole-core data, open-hole logs, and computer logs were integrated to develop petro-physical evaluation procedures and to determine the environment of deposition. El Campo field is believed to represent an extremely thick, delta front slope to distal delta front facies.

  20. Knowledge of healthcare professionals about rights of patient's images.

    PubMed

    Caires, Bianca Rodrigues; Lopes, Maria Carolina Barbosa Teixeira; Okuno, Meiry Fernanda Pinto; Vancini-Campanharo, Cássia Regina; Batista, Ruth Ester Assayag

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess knowledge of healthcare professionals about capture and reproduction of images of patients in a hospital setting. Methods A cross-sectional and observational study among 360 healthcare professionals (nursing staff, physical therapists, and physicians), working at a teaching hospital in the city of São Paulo (SP). A questionnaire with sociodemographic information was distributed and data were correlated to capture and reproduction of images at hospitals. Results Of the 360 respondents, 142 had captured images of patients in the last year, and 312 reported seeing other professionals taking photographs of patients. Of the participants who captured images, 61 said they used them for studies and presentation of clinical cases, and 168 professionals reported not knowing of any legislation in the Brazilian Penal Code regarding collection and use of images. Conclusion There is a gap in the training of healthcare professionals regarding the use of patient´s images. It is necessary to include subjects that address this theme in the syllabus of undergraduate courses, and the healthcare organizations should regulate this issue. PMID:26267838

  1. Expanding the clinical spectrum of the 16p11.2 chromosomal rearrangements: three patients with syringomyelia.

    PubMed

    Schaaf, Christian P; Goin-Kochel, Robin P; Nowell, Kerri P; Hunter, Jill V; Aleck, Kirk A; Cox, Sarah; Patel, Ankita; Bacino, Carlos A; Shinawi, Marwan

    2011-02-01

    16p11.2 rearrangements are associated with developmental delay, cognitive impairment, autism spectrum disorder, behavioral problems (especially attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder), seizures, obesity, dysmorphic features, and abnormal head size. In addition, congenital anomalies and abnormal brain findings were frequently observed in patients with these rearrangements. We identified and performed a detailed microarray, phenotypic, and radiological characterization of three new patients with 16p11.2 rearrangements: two deletion patients and one patient with the reciprocal duplication. All patients have a heterozygous loss (deletion) or gain (duplication) corresponding to chromosomal coordinates (chr16: 29 528 190-30 107 184) with a minimal size of 579 kb. The deletion patients had language delay and learning disabilities and one met criteria for pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified. The duplication patient received a diagnosis of autism and had academic deficits and behavioral problems. The patients with deletion had long cervicothoracic syringomyelia and the duplication patient had long thoracolumbar syringomyelia. The syringomyelia in one patient with deletion was associated with Chiari malformation. Our findings highlight the broad spectrum of clinical and neurological manifestations in patients with 16p11.2 rearrangements. Our observation suggests that genes (or a single gene) within the implicated interval have significant roles in the pathogenesis of syringomyelia. A more comprehensive and systematic research is warranted to study the frequency and spectrum of malformations in the central nervous system in these patients. PMID:20959866

  2. Expanding the clinical spectrum of the 16p11.2 chromosomal rearrangements: three patients with syringomyelia.

    PubMed

    Schaaf, Christian P; Goin-Kochel, Robin P; Nowell, Kerri P; Hunter, Jill V; Aleck, Kirk A; Cox, Sarah; Patel, Ankita; Bacino, Carlos A; Shinawi, Marwan

    2011-02-01

    16p11.2 rearrangements are associated with developmental delay, cognitive impairment, autism spectrum disorder, behavioral problems (especially attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder), seizures, obesity, dysmorphic features, and abnormal head size. In addition, congenital anomalies and abnormal brain findings were frequently observed in patients with these rearrangements. We identified and performed a detailed microarray, phenotypic, and radiological characterization of three new patients with 16p11.2 rearrangements: two deletion patients and one patient with the reciprocal duplication. All patients have a heterozygous loss (deletion) or gain (duplication) corresponding to chromosomal coordinates (chr16: 29 528 190-30 107 184) with a minimal size of 579 kb. The deletion patients had language delay and learning disabilities and one met criteria for pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified. The duplication patient received a diagnosis of autism and had academic deficits and behavioral problems. The patients with deletion had long cervicothoracic syringomyelia and the duplication patient had long thoracolumbar syringomyelia. The syringomyelia in one patient with deletion was associated with Chiari malformation. Our findings highlight the broad spectrum of clinical and neurological manifestations in patients with 16p11.2 rearrangements. Our observation suggests that genes (or a single gene) within the implicated interval have significant roles in the pathogenesis of syringomyelia. A more comprehensive and systematic research is warranted to study the frequency and spectrum of malformations in the central nervous system in these patients.

  3. Expanding the clinical spectrum of the 16p11.2 chromosomal rearrangements: three patients with syringomyelia

    PubMed Central

    Schaaf, Christian P; Goin-Kochel, Robin P; Nowell, Kerri P; Hunter, Jill V; Aleck, Kirk A; Cox, Sarah; Patel, Ankita; Bacino, Carlos A; Shinawi, Marwan

    2011-01-01

    16p11.2 rearrangements are associated with developmental delay, cognitive impairment, autism spectrum disorder, behavioral problems (especially attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder), seizures, obesity, dysmorphic features, and abnormal head size. In addition, congenital anomalies and abnormal brain findings were frequently observed in patients with these rearrangements. We identified and performed a detailed microarray, phenotypic, and radiological characterization of three new patients with 16p11.2 rearrangements: two deletion patients and one patient with the reciprocal duplication. All patients have a heterozygous loss (deletion) or gain (duplication) corresponding to chromosomal coordinates (chr16: 29 528 190–30 107 184) with a minimal size of 579 kb. The deletion patients had language delay and learning disabilities and one met criteria for pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified. The duplication patient received a diagnosis of autism and had academic deficits and behavioral problems. The patients with deletion had long cervicothoracic syringomyelia and the duplication patient had long thoracolumbar syringomyelia. The syringomyelia in one patient with deletion was associated with Chiari malformation. Our findings highlight the broad spectrum of clinical and neurological manifestations in patients with 16p11.2 rearrangements. Our observation suggests that genes (or a single gene) within the implicated interval have significant roles in the pathogenesis of syringomyelia. A more comprehensive and systematic research is warranted to study the frequency and spectrum of malformations in the central nervous system in these patients. PMID:20959866

  4. Comparability of the expanded WMS-III standardization protocol to the published WMS-III among right and left temporal lobectomy patients.

    PubMed

    Doss, R C; Chelune, G J; Naugle, R I

    2000-11-01

    We examined whether differences between the expanded standardization protocol (SP) used to derive norms for the final published version (PB) of the Wechsler Memory Scale - Third Edition (WMS-III; Wechsler, 1997a) would result in differences on the Primary Indexes in a neurologic sample. Specifically, we examined the comparability of the performances of 63 patients with temporal lobectomy (TL) who were administered either the expanded SP protocol (n = 33: 22 left TL and 11 right TL) or the PB battery (n = 30: 11 left TL and 19 right TL). Patients who were administered the SP or PB were comparable in terms of age, sex, education, seizure duration, postsurgical seizure status, and Full Scale IQ. Postoperative intervals were significantly longer for the SP group, although correlational analyses demonstrated no significant relationship between postoperative follow-up interval and WMS-III performance. A series of t tests revealed no significant differences on any of the eight Primary Index scores between patients taking the two versions of the WMS-III for either left or right TL groups. Furthermore, repeated measures analyses of variance failed to show significant differences on modality-specific memory scores between the SP and PB for the left and right TL groups. The current study indicates that temporal lobectomy patients obtained comparable scores on the two versions of the WMS-III.

  5. Risk Factors Associated With Complication Rates of Becker-Type Expander Implants in Relation to Implant Survival: Review of 314 Implants in 237 Patients.

    PubMed

    Taboada-Suarez, Antonio; Brea-García, Beatriz; Magán-Muñoz, Fernando; Couto-González, Iván; González-Álvarez, Eduardo

    2015-12-01

    Although autologous tissue reconstruction is the best option for breast reconstruction, using implants is still a reliable and simple method, offering acceptable aesthetic results. Becker-type implants are permanent implants that offer a 1-stage reconstructive option. A retrospective study was carried out in our center reviewing the clinical reports of 237 patients, in whom a total of 314 Becker-type prostheses were implanted. Overall survival was calculated using a Kaplan-Meier estimate. Cox proportional hazard models were used to calculate adjusted hazard ratios. At the end of the study, 214 expanders (68.15%) presented no complications, 40 (12.47%) developed significant capsular contracture, in 27 (8.60%) infection occurred, 24 (7.64%) suffered minor complications, and 9 (2.87%) ruptured. The mean survival time of the expanders was 120.41 months (95% CI: 109.62, 131.19). Radiotherapy, chemotherapy, high Molecular Immunology Borstel, age, mastectomy performed previously to the implant, ductal carcinoma, advanced tumoral stage, experience of the surgeon, and Becker 35-type implants were significantly related to a high number of complications in relation to the survival of the implants. Cox regression analysis revealed that the main risk factors for the survival of expander implants included radiotherapy and surgeon experience. The complication hazard ratio or relative risk caused by these 2 factors was 1.976 and 1.680, respectively. One-stage reconstruction using Becker-type expanders is an appropriate, simple, and reliable option in delayed breast reconstruction in patients who have not received radiotherapy and as long as the procedure is carried out by surgeons skilled in the technique.

  6. Deep Brain Stimulation: Expanding Applications

    PubMed Central

    TEKRIWAL, Anand; BALTUCH, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    For over two decades, deep brain stimulation (DBS) has shown significant efficacy in treatment for refractory cases of dyskinesia, specifically in cases of Parkinson's disease and dystonia. DBS offers potential alleviation from symptoms through a well-tolerated procedure that allows personalized modulation of targeted neuroanatomical regions and related circuitries. For clinicians contending with how to provide patients with meaningful alleviation from often debilitating intractable disorders, DBSs titratability and reversibility make it an attractive treatment option for indications ranging from traumatic brain injury to progressive epileptic supra-synchrony. The expansion of our collective knowledge of pathologic brain circuitries, as well as advances in imaging capabilities, electrophysiology techniques, and material sciences have contributed to the expanding application of DBS. This review will examine the potential efficacy of DBS for neurologic and psychiatric disorders currently under clinical investigation and will summarize findings from recent animal models. PMID:26466888

  7. Metabolic imaging of patients with cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Geltman, E.M. )

    1991-09-01

    The cardiomyopathies comprise a diverse group of illnesses that can be characterized functionally by several techniques. However, the delineation of derangements of regional perfusion and metabolism have been accomplished only relatively recently with positron emission tomography (PET). Regional myocardial accumulation and clearance of 11C-palmitate, the primary myocardial substrate under most conditions, demonstrate marked spatial heterogeneity when studied under fasting conditions or with glucose loading. PET with 11C-palmitate permits the noninvasive differentiation of patients with nonischemic from ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy, since patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy demonstrate large zones of intensely depressed accumulation of 11C-palmitate, probably reflecting prior infarction. Patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and Duchenne's muscular dystrophy demonstrate relatively unique patterns of myocardial abnormalities of perfusion and metabolism. The availability of new tracers and techniques for the evaluation of myocardial metabolism (11C-acetate), perfusion (H2(15)O), and autonomic tone (11-C-hydroxyephedrine) should facilitate further understanding of the pathogenesis of the cardiomyopathies.

  8. Nuclear Medicine Imaging in the Pediatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Loveless, Vivian

    2006-01-01

    Pediatric nuclear medicine provides a wealth of information on a variety of disease states; however, precautions on dosing have to be taken into consideration. Also, expertise in conducting procedures and interpreting the results in pediatric patients is necessary. Emphasis is placed on diagnostic studies involving the central nervous system, musculoskeletal system, genitourinary system, gastrointestinal system, endocrine system, pulmonary system, and cardiovascular system along with a brief explanation of the mechanism of localization of the radiopharmaceuticals involved. Radiation safety issues are addressed when the expectant mother or nursing mother is administered radiopharmaceuticals. PMID:23115536

  9. Imaging patterns of fatty liver in pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Özcan, H. Nursun; Oğuz, Berna; Haliloğlu, Mithat; Orhan, Diclehan; Karçaaltıncaba, Muşturay

    2015-01-01

    Fatty liver can present as focal, diffuse, heterogeneous, and multinodular forms. Being familiar with various patterns of steatosis can enable correct diagnosis. In patients with equivocal findings on ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging can be used as a problem solving tool. New techniques are promising for diagnosis and follow-up. We review imaging patterns of steatosis and new quantitative methods such as proton density fat fraction and magnetic resonance elastography for diagnosis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in children. PMID:26027765

  10. Renal safety of intravenous gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in patients awaiting liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Katherine M; Parikh, Mehul R; Runge, Thomas M; Perez, Sebastian D; Sakaria, Sonali S; Subramanian, Ram M

    2015-11-01

    Renal dysfunction in cirrhosis carries a high morbidity and mortality. Given the potential risk of contrast-induced nephropathy associated with iodinated intravenous contrast used in computed tomography (CT), alternate contrast modalities for abdominal imaging in liver transplant candidates need to be examined. The purpose of this study was to examine the renal safety of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with gadolinium in patients awaiting liver transplantation. The study involved a retrospective analysis of 352 patients of abdominal MRI with low-dose gadobenate dimeglumine (MultiHance) (0.05 mmol/kg) in patients with cirrhosis and without renal replacement therapy at a single center during the period from 2007 to 2013. For each case, serum creatinine before and within a few days after the MRI were compared. In addition, the patients were analyzed for the development of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), a reported complication of gadolinium in chronic kidney disease. The pre-MRI serum creatinine values ranged from 0.36 to 4.86 mg/dL, with 70 patients (20%) having values ≥ 1.5 mg/dL. A comparison of the pre- and post-MRI serum creatinine values did not demonstrate a clinically significant difference (mean change = 0.017 mg/dL; P = 0.38), including those patients with a pre-MRI serum creatinine ≥ 1.5 mg/dL. In addition, no cases of NSF were noted. In conclusion, our findings suggest that MRI with low-dose gadobenate dimeglumine (MultiHance) is a nonnephrotoxic imaging modality in liver transplant candidates, and its use can be cautiously expanded to liver transplant candidates with concomitant renal insufficiency.

  11. Imaging of patients treated with bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lemanowicz, Adam; Serafin, Zbigniew

    2014-01-01

    Summary Over the past few years, obesity has become a major clinical and population concern in the majority of developed countries. Obesity leads to significant systemic disorders, such as hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia and insulin resistance, and also increases the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases (ischemic heart disease, ischemic stroke), metabolic diseases (type 2 diabetes), certain types of cancer, and degenerative bone disorders (osteoarthritis). Health hazards associated with epidemic of obesity and potential benefits of weight loss have spurred interest in new treatment methods. Bariatric surgical procedures constitute a recognized alternative in cases where conservative management of obesity fails. Several bariatric operations can be distinguished: restrictive procedures, such as adjustable gastric band (AGB) and vertical banded gastroplasty (VBG); predominantly malabsorptive procedures, such as biliopancreatic diversion (BPD), and a combination of both methods, such as Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. The adverse consequences of surgical treatment of obesity include i.a.: intestinal anastomotic leakage, impaired intestinal permeability and internal hernia, dilatation of the stomach, gastrointestinal anastomotic stenosis, marginal ulceration, incisional hernia. Basic knowledge of procedures in the surgical treatment of obesity is of vital importance for the radiologist during evaluation of upper gastrointestinal tract in the early and late postoperative period, allowing correct interpretation of acquired images as well as recognition of typical complications. PMID:24497896

  12. Patient dose and image quality from mega-voltage cone beam computed tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Gayou, Olivier; Parda, David S; Johnson, Mark; Miften, Moyed

    2007-02-01

    The evolution of ever more conformal radiation delivery techniques makes the subject of accurate localization of increasing importance in radiotherapy. Several systems can be utilized including kilo-voltage and mega-voltage cone-beam computed tomography (MV-CBCT), CT on rail or helical tomography. One of the attractive aspects of mega-voltage cone-beam CT is that it uses the therapy beam along with an electronic portal imaging device to image the patient prior to the delivery of treatment. However, the use of a photon beam energy in the mega-voltage range for volumetric imaging degrades the image quality and increases the patient radiation dose. To optimize image quality and patient dose in MV-CBCT imaging procedures, a series of dose measurements in cylindrical and anthropomorphic phantoms using an ionization chamber, radiographic films, and thermoluminescent dosimeters was performed. Furthermore, the dependence of the contrast to noise ratio and spatial resolution of the image upon the dose delivered for a 20-cm-diam cylindrical phantom was evaluated. Depending on the anatomical site and patient thickness, we found that the minimum dose deposited in the irradiated volume was 5-9 cGy and the maximum dose was between 9 and 17 cGy for our clinical MV-CBCT imaging protocols. Results also demonstrated that for high contrast areas such as bony anatomy, low doses are sufficient for image registration and visualization of the three-dimensional boundaries between soft tissue and bony structures. However, as the difference in tissue density decreased, the dose required to identify soft tissue boundaries increased. Finally, the dose delivered by MV-CBCT was simulated using a treatment planning system (TPS), thereby allowing the incorporation of MV-CBCT dose in the treatment planning process. The TPS-calculated doses agreed well with measurements for a wide range of imaging protocols.

  13. Successful Endovascular Repair of an Iatrogenic Perforation of the Superficial Femoral Artery Using Self-Expanding Nitinol Supera Stents in a Patient with Acute Thromboembolic Limb Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Eisele, Tom; Muenz, Benedikt M.

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of acute thromboembolic limb ischemia includes well-established surgical thrombectomy procedures and, in recent times, also percutaneous rotational thrombectomy using Straub Rotarex® system. This modality not only enables efficient treatment of such thrombotic occlusion but also in rare cases may imply the risk of perforation of the occluded artery. Herein, we report the case of a perforation of the superficial femoral artery (SFA) in an elderly female patient with thromboembolic limb ischemia. The perforation was successfully treated by implantation of self-expanding nitinol Supera stents and without the need for implantation of a stent graft. PMID:27213074

  14. Patient-Centered Imaging: Shared Decision Making for Cardiac Imaging Procedures with Exposure to Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Einstein, Andrew J.; Berman, Daniel S.; Min, James K.; Hendel, Robert C.; Gerber, Thomas C.; Carr, J. Jeffrey; Cerqueira, Manuel D.; Cullom, S. James; DeKemp, Robert; Dickert, Neal; Dorbala, Sharmila; Garcia, Ernest V.; Gibbons, Raymond J.; Halliburton, Sandra S.; Hausleiter, Jörg; Heller, Gary V.; Jerome, Scott; Lesser, John R.; Fazel, Reza; Raff, Gilbert L.; Tilkemeier, Peter; Williams, Kim A.; Shaw, Leslee J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify key components of a radiation accountability framework fostering patient-centered imaging and shared decision-making in cardiac imaging. Background An NIH-NHLBI/NCI-sponsored symposium was held in November 2012 to address these issues. Methods Symposium participants, working in three tracks, identified key components of a framework to target critical radiation safety issues for the patient, the laboratory, and the larger population of patients with known or suspected cardiovascular disease. Results Use of ionizing radiation during an imaging procedure should be disclosed to all patients by the ordering provider at the time of ordering, and reinforced by the performing provider team. An imaging protocol with effective dose ≤3mSv is considered very low risk, not warranting extensive discussion or written consent. However, a protocol effective dose <20mSv was proposed as a level requiring particular attention in terms of shared decision-making and either formal discussion or written informed consent. Laboratory reporting of radiation dosimetry is a critical component of creating a quality laboratory fostering a patient-centered environment with transparent procedural methodology. Efforts should be directed to avoiding testing involving radiation, in patients with inappropriate indications. Standardized reporting and diagnostic reference levels for computed tomography and nuclear cardiology are important for the goal of public reporting of laboratory radiation dose levels in conjunction with diagnostic performance. Conclusions The development of cardiac imaging technologies revolutionized cardiology practice by allowing routine, noninvasive assessment of myocardial perfusion and anatomy. It is now incumbent upon the imaging community to create an accountability framework to safely drive appropriate imaging utilization. PMID:24530677

  15. Septicemia in Neutropenic Patients Infected with Clostridium tertium Resistant to Cefepime and Other Expanded-Spectrum Cephalosporins

    PubMed Central

    Steyaert, Sophia; Peleman, Renaat; Vaneechoutte, Mario; De Baere, Thierry; Claeys, Geert; Verschraegen, Gerda

    1999-01-01

    Clostridium tertium was isolated from two immunocompromised patients with septicemia, fever, and gastrointestinal symptoms. The strains were resistant to ceftazidime, cefepime, and clindamycin; intermediately resistant to penicillin; and susceptible to metronidazole, quinolones, and vancomycin. PMID:10523601

  16. High frequency of the expanded C9ORF72 hexanucleotide repeat in familial and sporadic Greek ALS patients

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Kin Y.; Koutsis, Georgios; Schottlaender, Lucia V.; Polke, James; Panas, Marios; Houlden, Henry

    2012-01-01

    An intronic expansion of a hexanucleotide GGGGCC repeat in the C9ORF72 gene has recently been shown to be an important cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) in familial and sporadic cases. The frequency has only been defined in a small number of populations where the highest sporadic rate was identified in Finland (21.1%) and the lowest in mainland Italy (4.1%). We examined the C9ORF72 expansion in a series of 146 Greek ALS cases, 10.95% (n = 16) of cases carried the pathological expansion defined as greater than 30 repeats. In the 10 familial ALS probands, 50% (n = 5) of them carried a pathologically large expansion. In the remaining 136 sporadic ALS cases, 11 were carriers (8.2%). None of the 228 Greek controls carried an expanded repeat. The phenotype of our cases was spinal (13/16) or bulbar (3/16) ALS, the familial cases were all spinal ALS and none of our cases had behavioral frontotemporal dementia. Expansions in the C9ORF72 gene therefore represent a common cause of ALS in Greece and this test will be diagnostically very important to implement in the Greek population. The frequency is higher than other populations with the exception of Finland and this may be due to Greece being a relatively isolated population. PMID:22445326

  17. Expanding the Parameters for Excellence in Patient Assignments: Is Leveraging an Evidence-Data-Based Acuity Methodology Realistic?

    PubMed

    Gray, Joel; Kerfoot, Karlene

    2016-01-01

    Finding the balance of equitable assignments continues to be a challenge for health care organizations seeking to leverage evidence-based leadership practices. Ratios and subjective acuity strategies for nurse-patient staffing continue to be the dominant approach in health care organizations. In addition to ratio-based assignments and acuity-based assignment models driven by financial targets, more emphasis on using evidence-based leadership strategies to manage and create science for effective staffing is needed. In particular, nurse leaders are challenged to increase the sophistication of management of patient turnover (admissions, discharges, and transfers) and integrate tools from Lean methodologies and quality management strategies to determine the effectiveness of nurse-patient staffing. PMID:26636229

  18. Does a continuous local anaesthetic pain treatment after immediate tissue expander reconstruction in breast carcinoma patients more efficiently reduce acute postoperative pain - a prospective randomised study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Immediate breast reconstruction with an expander is a reasonable option for properly selected patients. After reconstruction, patients have severe postoperative pain, which responds poorly to opioids. Our aim was to evaluate if continuous wound infusion of a local anaesthetic into the surgical wound reduces postoperative pain, consumption of opioids and incidence of chronic pain compared to standard intravenous piritramide after primary breast reconstruction in breast carcinoma patients. Methods Altogether, 60 patients were enrolled in our study; one half in the group with wound infusion of a local anaesthetic, and the other half in the standard (piritramide) group. Parameters measured included: pain intensity (visual analogue scale), drug requirements, alertness, hospitalisation, side-effects and late complications. A p-value of < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results In the recovery room, the test group reported less acute pain at rest (P = 0.03) and at activity (P = 0.01), and on the day of the surgical procedure they reported less pain at activity (P = 0.003). Consumption of piritramide and metoclopramide was lower in this group (P < 0.0001), but their alertness after the surgical procedure was higher compared to the standard group (P < 0.001). After three months, the test group reported less chronic pain (P = 0.01). Conclusions After primary tissue expander breast reconstruction, wound infusion of a local anaesthetic significantly reduces acute pain and enables reduced opioid consumption, resulting in less postoperative sedation and reduced need for antiemetic drugs. Wound infusion of a local anaesthetic reduces chronic pain. PMID:24433317

  19. Indium-111 leukocyte imaging in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Uno, K.; Matsui, N.; Nohira, K.; Suguro, T.; Kitakata, Y.; Uchiyama, G.; Miyoshi, T.; Uematsu, S.; Inoue, S.; Arimizu, N.

    1986-03-01

    This study evaluates the usefulness of labeled leukocyte imaging in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. In 33 patients, the incidence of pain and swelling in 66 wrist joints and 66 knee joints was compared with the accumulation of (/sup 111/In)leukocytes. No accumulation of (/sup 111/In)leukocytes was seen in any of the patients' wrists (0/12) or knee joints (0/14) when both pain and swelling were absent. In contrast, 93% (25/27) of wrist joints and 80% (24/30) of knee joints with both pain and swelling were positive by (/sup 111/In)leukocyte scintigraphy. There was little correlation between the stage of the disease, as determined by radiography, and (/sup 111/In)leukocyte accumulation. This study suggests that (/sup 111/In)leukocyte imaging may be a reliable procedure for monitoring the activity of rheumatoid arthritis, especially for confirming the lack of an ongoing inflammatory response.

  20. Imaging of cardiovascular risk in patients with Turner's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Marin, A.; Weir-McCall, J.R.; Webb, D.J.; van Beek, E.J.R.; Mirsadraee, S.

    2015-01-01

    Turner's syndrome is a disorder defined by an absent or structurally abnormal second X chromosome and affects around 1 in 2000 newborn females. The standardised mortality ratio in Turner's syndrome is around three-times higher than in the general female population, mainly as a result of cardiovascular disorders. Most striking is the early age at which Turner's syndrome patients develop the life-threatening complications of cardiovascular disorders compared to the general population. The cardiovascular risk stratification in Turner's syndrome is challenging and imaging is not systematically used. The aim of this article is to review cardiovascular risks in this group of patients and discuss a systematic imaging approach for early identification of cardiovascular disorders in these patients. PMID:25917542

  1. Safety and efficacy of sunitinib in patients from Latin America: subanalysis of an expanded access trial in metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Barrios, Carlos H; Herchenhorn, Daniel; Chacón, Matías; Cabrera-Galeana, Paula; Sajben, Peter; Zhang, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Background Sunitinib is an approved treatment for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). The safety profile and efficacy of sunitinib were confirmed in a global expanded access trial (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00130897). This report presents a subanalysis of the final trial data from patients in Latin America. Methods Treatment-naïve or previously treated mRCC patients aged ≥18 years received oral sunitinib at a starting dose of 50 mg/day on a 4-weeks-on/2-weeks-off schedule. Treatment continued until disease progression, unacceptable toxicity, or withdrawal of consent. Safety was assessed regularly, and tumor measurements were scheduled per local practice (using Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors). Results In total, 348 patients from Latin America received sunitinib. Overall, 75% of patients had two or more sites of metastatic disease, 28% were aged ≥65 years, 14% had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status ≥2, 9% had brain metastases, 9% had no prior nephrectomy, and 5% had non-clear cell RCC. Median treatment duration was 8 months, and median follow-up was 15.1 months. In total, 326 patients (94%) discontinued treatment, primarily due to death (41%) or lack of efficacy (22%). Most treatment-related adverse events were of mild to moderate severity (grade 1/2). Mucosal inflammation (reported in 54% of patients), diarrhea (53%), and asthenia (41%) were the most common any-grade treatment-related adverse events. Asthenia (12%), neutropenia (10%), and fatigue and thrombocytopenia (both 9%) were the most common grade 3/4 treatment-related adverse events. In total, 311 patients were included for tumor response, of whom eight (3%) had a complete response and 46 (15%) a partial response, yielding an objective response rate of 17%. Median duration of response, progression-free survival, and overall survival were 26.7, 12.1, and 16.9 months, respectively. Conclusion The efficacy and safety profile of sunitinib in patients with m

  2. Cardiac imaging in evaluating patients prone to sudden death

    PubMed Central

    Tamene, Ashenafi; Tholakanahalli, Venkatakrishna N.; Chandrashekhar, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying subjects who are at risk for SCD and stratifying them correctly into low or high-risk groups is the holy grail of Cardiology. While imaging shows a lot of promise, it is plagued by the fact that most SCD occurs in relatively healthy subjects, a massive group who would not ordinarily be subjected to imaging. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) currently is our primary parameter for risk stratification for sudden cardiac death but is a poor marker with low sensitivity and specificity. Current data shows that sophisticated imaging with techniques, mainly Cardiac magnetic resonance Imaging (CMR), have the potential to identify novel high-risk markers underlying SCD, beyond ejection fraction. Imaging seems to further refine risk in patients with low LVEF as well as in those with normal EF; this is a major strength of advanced imaging. Clinical application has been slow and not fully prime time. It is important to remember that while promising, imaging techniques including CMR, have not been tested in rigorous prospective studies and thus have not as yet replaced EF as the gatekeeper to ICD implantation. PMID:24568832

  3. The expanding spectrum of COL2A1 gene variants IN 136 patients with a skeletal dysplasia phenotype.

    PubMed

    Barat-Houari, Mouna; Dumont, Bruno; Fabre, Aurélie; Them, Frédéric Tm; Alembik, Yves; Alessandri, Jean-Luc; Amiel, Jeanne; Audebert, Séverine; Baumann-Morel, Clarisse; Blanchet, Patricia; Bieth, Eric; Brechard, Marie; Busa, Tiffany; Calvas, Patrick; Capri, Yline; Cartault, François; Chassaing, Nicolas; Ciorca, Vidrica; Coubes, Christine; David, Albert; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Dupin-Deguine, Delphine; El Chehadeh, Salima; Faivre, Laurence; Giuliano, Fabienne; Goldenberg, Alice; Isidor, Bertrand; Jacquemont, Marie-Line; Julia, Sophie; Kaplan, Josseline; Lacombe, Didier; Lebrun, Marine; Marlin, Sandrine; Martin-Coignard, Dominique; Martinovic, Jelena; Masurel, Alice; Melki, Judith; Mozelle-Nivoix, Monique; Nguyen, Karine; Odent, Sylvie; Philip, Nicole; Pinson, Lucile; Plessis, Ghislaine; Quélin, Chloé; Shaeffer, Elise; Sigaudy, Sabine; Thauvin, Christel; Till, Marianne; Touraine, Renaud; Vigneron, Jacqueline; Baujat, Geneviève; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; Le Merrer, Martine; Geneviève, David; Touitou, Isabelle

    2016-07-01

    Heterozygous COL2A1 variants cause a wide spectrum of skeletal dysplasia termed type II collagenopathies. We assessed the impact of this gene in our French series. A decision tree was applied to select 136 probands (71 Stickler cases, 21 Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita cases, 11 Kniest dysplasia cases, and 34 other dysplasia cases) before molecular diagnosis by Sanger sequencing. We identified 66 different variants among the 71 positive patients. Among those patients, 18 belonged to multiplex families and 53 were sporadic. Most variants (38/44, 86%) were located in the triple helical domain of the collagen chain and glycine substitutions were mainly observed in severe phenotypes, whereas arginine to cysteine changes were more often encountered in moderate phenotypes. This series of skeletal dysplasia is one of the largest reported so far, adding 44 novel variants (15%) to published data. We have confirmed that about half of our Stickler patients (46%) carried a COL2A1 variant, and that the molecular spectrum was different across the phenotypes. To further address the question of genotype-phenotype correlation, we plan to screen our patients for other candidate genes using a targeted next-generation sequencing approach.

  4. Expanded lung T-bet+RORγT+ CD4+ T-cells in sarcoidosis patients with a favourable disease phenotype.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Ylva; Lepzien, Rico; Kullberg, Susanna; Eklund, Anders; Smed-Sörensen, Anna; Grunewald, Johan

    2016-08-01

    Disease phenotypes of pulmonary sarcoidosis are distinguished by clinical rather than immunological criteria. We aimed to characterise patterns of CD4(+) T-cell lineage plasticity underlying the differences in clinical presentation and disease course between the acute form, Löfgren's syndrome, and the heterogeneous, potentially progressive "non-Löfgren" form.33 pulmonary sarcoidosis patients and nine controls underwent bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage. CD4(+) T-cell transcription factor, chemokine receptor and T-cell receptor expression, proliferation and cytokine production were assessed in the lavage fluid and peripheral blood using flow cytometry and multicolour FluoroSpot.CD4(+) T-cells simultaneously expressing the T-helper cell (Th)1 and Th17 transcriptional regulators T-bet and RORγT (T-bet(+)RORγT(+)) were identified in the lavage, but not blood, of all subjects, and to a significantly higher degree in Löfgren's patients. T-bet(+)RORγT(+) cells proliferated actively, produced interferon (IFN)γ and interleukin (IL)-17A, co-expressed the chemokine receptors CXCR3 and CCR6, and correlated with nonchronic disease. T-cell receptor-restricted Vα2.3(+)Vβ22(+) T-cells strongly co-expressed T-bet/RORγT and CXCR3/CCR6. Cytokine production was more heterogeneous in Löfgren's patients, with significantly higher IL-17A, IL-10, IL-22 and IL-2, but lower IFNγ.Here we demonstrate the presence of lung T-bet(+)RORγT(+)CXCR3(+)CCR6(+) CD4(+) T-cells and Th17-associated cytokines especially in sarcoidosis patients with a favourable prognosis, suggesting a Th1/Th17-permissive environment in the lung with implications for disease resolution. PMID:27230441

  5. Expanding the horizons of histoplasmosis: disseminated histoplasmosis in a renal transplant patient after a trip to Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Rappo, U; Beitler, J R; Faulhaber, J R; Firoz, B; Henning, J S; Thomas, K M; Maslow, M; Goldfarb, D S; Horowitz, H W

    2010-04-01

    Histoplasmosis is recognized to occur in the Ohio and Mississippi River Valleys of the United States, but less widely appreciated is its worldwide distribution. We report a case of disseminated histoplasmosis with disease involving skin, lungs, and epiglottis in a renal transplant patient 6 months after a trip to Bangladesh, to highlight the potential risk of acquisition of this infection in the Indian subcontinent. PMID:19878490

  6. FDG PET of the brain in pediatric patients: imaging spectrum with MR imaging correlation.

    PubMed

    Stanescu, Luana; Ishak, Gisele E; Khanna, Paritosh C; Biyyam, Deepa R; Shaw, Dennis W; Parisi, Marguerite T

    2013-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) of the brain is an important problem-solving tool in pediatric neuroimaging, neurology, and neurosurgery. Fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET or dual-modality PET and computed tomographic (CT) imaging (PET/CT), with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging correlation, can be used to evaluate childhood epilepsy and pediatric brain tumors, areas in which PET adds value in patient management. FDG PET has been widely used in pediatric temporal lobe epilepsy, most commonly manifesting as mesial temporal sclerosis, which demonstrates hypometabolism at interictal PET and hypermetabolism during seizures. Recently, FDG PET has shown added value for patients with extratemporal epilepsy, in whom FDG PET can help identify cortical foci of interictal hypometabolism that are undetectable or difficult to detect with MR imaging. These findings can then guide additional investigations and surgery. FDG PET also enhances medical decision making in children with brain tumors, in whom FDG PET can be used to (a) improve the diagnostic yield of stereotactic biopsies by detecting metabolically active areas of tumor, (b) help guide the surgeon in achieving total tumor resection, and (c) increase detection of residual or recurrent tumor. Technologic advances in the past decade have allowed fusion of PET and MR images, combining the high resolution of MR imaging with the low-resolution functional capability of PET. As dual-modality integrated PET/MR imaging systems become available, CT coregistration for PET can be eliminated, thus reducing patient radiation exposure. Increasing familiarity with normal and abnormal appearances of FDG PET brain images correlated with MR images can enhance diagnostic yield and improve the care of children with epilepsy and brain tumors.

  7. Design, Manufacturing, and In Vitro Testing of a Patient-Specific Shape-Memory Expander for Nose Reconstruction With Forehead Flap Technique.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Alessandro; Rodgers, Will; Schievano, Silvia; Ponniah, Allan; O'Hara, Justine; Jeelani, Owase; Dunaway, David

    2016-01-01

    Forehead skin is widely acknowledged as a good donor site for total nasal reconstruction, thanks to its matching color, texture, and abundant vascularity. The forehead flap technique uses an axial pattern flap forehead skin to replace missing nasal tissue. To increase the amount of available tissue and reduce the size of the tissue defect after flap mobilization, tissue expanders may be used. Although this is a relatively established technique, limitations include reduced moldability of the forehead skin (which is thicker than the nasal skin), and the need for multiple sessions of expansion to achieve a sufficient yield to close the forehead.Shape-memory metals, such as nitinol, can be programmed to "remember" complex shapes. In this work, the methodology for producing a prototype of nitinol tissue expander able to mold the skin in a predetermined patient-specific skin shape is described. A realistic nose mold was manufactured using metal rapid prototyping; nitinol sheet and mesh were molded into nose-shape constructs, having hyperelastic as well as shape-memory capability. Computed tomography scanning was performed to assess the ability of the structure to regain its shape after phase transformation upon cooling within 2% of initial dimensions. The prototypes were implanted in a pig forehead to test its ability to impose a nose shape to the forehead skin.The shape-memory properties of nitinol offer the possibility of producing bespoke tissue expanders able to deliver complex, precisely designed skin envelopes. The hyperelastic properties of nitinol allow constant preprogrammed expansion forces to be generated throughout the expansion process. PMID:26674894

  8. Body Image Disturbance in Acromegaly Patients Compared to Nonfunctioning Pituitary Adenoma Patients and Controls

    PubMed Central

    Conaglen, Helen M.; de Jong, Dennis; Crawford, Veronica; Elston, Marianne S.; Conaglen, John V.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Excess growth hormone secretion in adults results in acromegaly, a condition in which multiple physical changes occur including bony and soft tissue overgrowth. Over time these changes can markedly alter a person's appearance. The aim of this study was to compare body image disturbance in patients with acromegaly to those with nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NFAs) and controls and assess the impact of obesity in these groups. Methods. A cross-sectional survey including quality of life, body image disturbance, anxiety and depression measures, growth hormone, and BMI measurement was carried out. Results. The groups did not differ with respect to body image disturbance. However separate analysis of obese participants demonstrated relationships between mood scales, body image disturbance, and pain issues, particularly for acromegaly patients. Conclusions. While the primary hypothesis that acromegaly might be associated with body image disturbance was not borne out, we have shown that obesity together with acromegaly and NFA can be associated with body image issues, suggesting that BMI rather than primary diagnosis might better indicate whether patients might experience body image disturbance problems. PMID:26078758

  9. Integrating patient digital photographs with medical imaging examinations.

    PubMed

    Ramamurthy, Senthil; Bhatti, Pamela; Arepalli, Chesnal D; Salama, Mohamed; Provenzale, James M; Tridandapani, Srini

    2013-10-01

    We introduce the concept, benefits, and general architecture for acquiring, storing, and displaying digital photographs along with medical imaging examinations. We also discuss a specific implementation built around an Android-based system for simultaneously acquiring digital photographs along with portable radiographs. By an innovative application of radiofrequency identification technology to radiographic cassettes, the system is able to maintain a tight relationship between these photographs and the radiographs within the picture archiving and communications system (PACS) environment. We provide a cost analysis demonstrating the economic feasibility of this technology. Since our architecture naturally integrates with patient identification methods, we also address patient privacy issues.

  10. The sociological image of medicine and the patient.

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, U

    1989-01-01

    Jack Elinson raises somewhat rhetorical questions about the value of medical care and medical sociology. Behind them is a serious concern with the type and scope of medicalisation in modern society as well as its sociological criticism. This raises the issue of whether the various theoretical images of medicine and the patient which sociology provides are able to account for the effect of the social environment upon morbidity and mortality as shown, for instance, by the Alameda County Study. Three theoretically distinct approaches are discussed in detail, structural functionalism, symbolic interactionism and conflict theory. These characterise medical sociology over the last 30 years. They elucidate more clearly Elinson's own image of medicine and the patient. But none seems to match his standpoint vis-a-vis the medicalisation of care which refrains from citing psychological forces but emphasises the availability of good medical services.

  11. Using a patient image archive to diagnose retinopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin Jr, Kenneth William; Abramoff, M.D.; Chaum, Edward; Giancardo, Luca; Govindaswamy, Priya; Karnowski, Thomas Paul; Tennant, M; Swainson, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Diabetes has become an epidemic that is expected to impact 365 million people worldwide by 2025. Consequently, diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of blindness in the industrialized world today. If detected early, treatments can preserve vision and significantly reduce debilitating blindness. Through this research we are developing and testing a method for automating the diagnosis of retinopathy in a screening environment using a patient archive and digital fundus imagery. We present an overview of our content-based image retrieval (CBIR) approach and provide performance results for a dataset of 98 images from a study in Canada when compared to an archive of 1,355 patients from a study in the Netherlands. An aggregate performance of 89% correct diagnosis is achieved, demonstrating the potential of automated, web-based diagnosis for a broad range of imagery collected under different conditions and with different cameras.

  12. Imaging of cardiovascular complications in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kai; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M.; Li, Debiao; Liu, Ying; Yang, Jie; Markl, Michael; Carr, James C.

    2015-01-01

    In the long-term survivals of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a leading cause of death. Recently, multi-modality cardiovascular imaging methods have been adopted for the evaluation of cardiovascular risk, which has shown to be associated with both traditional cardiovascular risk factors and SLE-specific conditions. Quantitative imaging biomarkers, which can describe both morphological and functional abnormalities in the heart, are expected to provide new insights to stratify cardiovascular risks and to guide SLE management by assessing the individual responses to therapies either protecting the cardiovascular system or suppressing the autoimmune reactions. In this review, we will discuss cutting-edge cardiovascular imaging techniques and discuss potential clinical applications and limitations of those techniques for the evaluation of major SLE related heart disorders. PMID:26038342

  13. Imaging of cardiovascular complications in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Lin, K; Lloyd-Jones, D M; Li, D; Liu, Y; Yang, J; Markl, M; Carr, J C

    2015-10-01

    In the long-term survival of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a leading cause of death. Recently, multimodality cardiovascular imaging methods have been adopted for the evaluation of cardiovascular risk, which has shown to be associated with both traditional cardiovascular risk factors and SLE-specific conditions. Quantitative imaging biomarkers, which can describe both morphological and functional abnormalities in the heart, are expected to provide new insights to stratify cardiovascular risks and to guide SLE management by assessing individual responses to therapies either protecting the cardiovascular system or suppressing the autoimmune reactions. In this review, we will discuss cutting-edge cardiovascular imaging techniques and potential clinical applications and limitations of those techniques for the evaluation of major SLE-related heart disorders. PMID:26038342

  14. Hybrid Imaging for Patient-Specific Dosimetry in Radionuclide Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ljungberg, Michael; Gleisner, Katarina Sjögreen

    2015-01-01

    Radionuclide therapy aims to treat malignant diseases by systemic administration of radiopharmaceuticals, often using carrier molecules such as peptides and antibodies. The radionuclides used emit electrons or alpha particles as a consequence of radioactive decay, thus leading to local energy deposition. Administration to individual patients can be tailored with regards to the risk of toxicity in normal organs by using absorbed dose planning. The scintillation camera, employed in planar imaging or single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), generates images of the spatially and temporally varying activity distribution. Recent commercially available combined SPECT and computed tomography (CT) systems have dramatically increased the possibility of performing accurate dose planning by using the CT information in several steps of the dose-planning calculation chain. This paper discusses the dosimetry chain used for individual absorbed-dose planning and highlights the areas where hybrid imaging makes significant contributions. PMID:26854156

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of patients wearing a surgical traction halo.

    PubMed

    Hua, J; Fox, R A

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic resonance images of patients wearing a surgical halo may have unacceptable artifacts if the halo has a conductive loop structure. This study shows that the observed artifacts are predominantly due to eddy currents generated in the halo by switching field gradients, and that these artifacts can be substantially reduced by adjusting the phase encoding direction in MRI sequences so that it is parallel to the axis of the halo. PMID:8851441

  16. IR imaging of blood circulation of patients with vascular disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hsin; Wade, Dwight R., Jr.; Kam, Jack

    2004-04-01

    We conducted a preliminary IR imaging study of blood circulation in patients with peripheral vascular diseases. Abnormal blood flow is common in older adults, especially those with elevated blood lipids, diabetes, hypertension, and a history of smoking. All of these conditions have a high prevalence in our population, often with more than one condition in the same individual. The differences in blood flow is revealed by temperature differences in areas of the extremities as well as other regions of the body. However, what is needed is an imaging technique that is relatively inexpensive and can reveal the blood flow in real time. The IR imaging can show detailed venous system and small tempearture changes associated with blood flow. Six patients with vascular diseases were tested in a clinic set up. Their legs and feet were imaged. We observed large temperature differences (cooling of more than 10° C) at the foot, especially toes. More valuable information were obtained from the temperature distribution maps. IR thermography is potentially a very valuable tool for medical application, especially for vascular diseases.

  17. Automatic segmentation of MR brain images in multiple sclerosis patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avula, Ramesh T. V.; Erickson, Bradley J.

    1996-04-01

    A totally automatic scheme for segmenting brain from extracranial tissues and to classify all intracranial voxels as CSF, gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), or abnormality such as multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions is presented in this paper. It is observed that in MR head images, if a tissue's intensity values are normalized, its relationship to the other tissues is essentially constant for a given type of image. Based on this approach, the subcutaneous fat surrounding the head is normalized to classify other tissues. Spatially registered 3 mm MR head image slices of T1 weighted, fast spin echo [dual echo T2 weighted and proton density (PD) weighted images] and fast fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences are used for segmentation. Subcutaneous fat surrounding the skull was identified based on intensity thresholding from T1 weighted images. A multiparametric space map was developed for CSF, GM and WM by normalizing each tissue with respect to the mean value of corresponding subcutaneous fat on each pulse sequence. To reduce the low frequency noise without blurring the fine morphological high frequency details an anisotropic diffusion filter was applied to all images before segmentation. An initial slice by slice classification was followed by morphological operations to delete any brides connecting extracranial segments. Finally 3-dimensional region growing of the segmented brain extracts GM, WM and pathology. The algorithm was tested on sequential scans of 10 patients with MS lesions. For well registered sequences, tissues and pathology have been accurately classified. This procedure does not require user input or image training data sets, and shows promise for automatic classification of brain and pathology.

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Patients With Chronic Lateral Epicondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Liang; Zhang, Yu-Dong; Yu, Rong-Bin; Shi, Hai-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study is to determine the inter-reliability and intra-observer reliability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for lateral epicondylitis and investigate whether there is a potential relationship between MRI abnormalities of the common extensor tendon (CET) and its clinical symptom. The study group comprised 96 consecutive patients (46 men and 50 women) with a clinical diagnosis of chronic lateral epicondylitis, which were examined on 3.0 T MR. An MRI scoring system was used to grade the degree of tendinopahty. Three independent musculoskeletal radiologists, who were blinded to the patients’ clinical information, scored images separately. Clinical symptoms were assessed using the Patient-Rated Tennis Elbow Evaluation (PRTEE). Of all the patients, total 96 elbows had MRI-assessed tendinopathy, including 38 (39.6%) with grade 1, 31 (32.3%) with grade 2, and 27 (28.1%) with grade 3. Inter-observer reliability and intra-observer agreement for MRI interpretation of the grades of tendinopathy was good, and a positive correlation between the grades of tendinopathy and PRTEE was determined. MRI is a reliable tool in determining radiological severity of chronical lateral epicondylitis. The severity of MR signal changes positively correlate with the patient's clinical symptom. PMID:26844506

  19. Spectral CT imaging in patients with Budd-Chiari syndrome: investigation of image quality.

    PubMed

    Su, Lei; Dong, Junqiang; Sun, Qiang; Liu, Jie; Lv, Peijie; Hu, Lili; Yan, Liangliang; Gao, Jianbo

    2014-11-01

    To assess the image quality of monochromatic imaging from spectral CT in patients with Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS), fifty patients with BCS underwent spectral CT to generate conventional 140 kVp polychromatic images (group A) and monochromatic images, with energy levels from 40 to 80, 40 + 70, and 50 + 70 keV fusion images (group B) during the portal venous phase (PVP) and the hepatic venous phase (HVP). Two-sample t tests compared vessel-to-liver contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for the portal vein (PV), hepatic vein (HV), inferior vena cava. Readers' subjective evaluations of the image quality were recorded. The highest SNR values in group B were distributed at 50 keV; the highest CNR values in group B were distributed at 40 keV. The higher CNR values and SNR values were obtained though PVP of PV (SNR 18.39 ± 6.13 vs. 10.56 ± 3.31, CNR 7.81 ± 3.40 vs. 3.58 ± 1.31) and HVP of HV (3.89 ± 2.08 vs. 1.27 ± 1.55) in the group B; the lower image noise for group B was at 70 keV and 50 + 70 keV (15.54 ± 8.39 vs. 18.40 ± 4.97, P = 0.0004 and 18.97 ± 7.61 vs. 18.40 ± 4.97, P = 0.0691); the results show that the 50 + 70 keV fusion image quality was better than that in group A. Monochromatic energy levels of 40-70, 40 + 70, and 50 + 70 keV fusion image can increase vascular contrast and that will be helpful for the diagnosis of BCS, we select the 50 + 70 keV fusion image to acquire the best BCS images.

  20. Body Image Dissatisfaction in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Sumona; Zhao, Ying-Qi; Shah, Samir A.; Esposti, Silvia Degli; Lidofsky, Sheldon; Shapiro, Jason; LeLeiko, Neil; Bright, Renee; Law, Meaghan; Moniz, Heather; Samad, Zahid; Merrick, Marjorie; Sands, Bruce E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the fact that the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and their treatments may affect physical appearance, the effect of IBD on body image is poorly understood. The aims of this study were to determine whether body image dissatisfaction (BID) changes over time in patients with IBD and to examine the demographic and disease-related variables associated with decreased body image. Methods Adults aged 18 and above in the Ocean State Crohn's and Colitis Area Registry with at least 2 years of follow-up were eligible for this study. All patients were enrolled within 6 months of IBD diagnosis and followed prospectively. BID was assessed using a modified version of the Adapted Satisfaction With Appearance (ASWAP) questionnaire. Total ASWAP scores and 2 sub-scores were calculated. To assess for changes over time, general linear models for correlated data were used for continuous outcomes and generalized estimating equations were used for discrete outcomes. Results Two hundred seventy-four patients were studied. BID was found to be stable over time among men and women with IBD despite overall improvements in disease activity. No differences were found in BID according to IBD subtype. Female gender, greater disease activity, higher symptom burden, longer duration of steroid use, dermatologic and musculoskeletal manifestations of IBD, and ileocolonic disease location among patients with Crohn's disease were associated with greater BID. Greater BID was associated with lower health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Conclusions BID remains stable in an incident cohort of IBD despite improved disease activity and is associated with lower HRQOL PMID:25569736

  1. Cerebella segmentation on MR images of pediatric patients with medulloblastoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Zu Y.; Ji, Qing; Glass, John; Gajjar, Amar; Reddick, Wilburn E.

    2005-04-01

    In this study, an automated method has been developed to identify the cerebellum from T1-weighted MR brain images of patients with medulloblastoma. A new objective function that is similar to Gibbs free energy in classic physics was defined; and the brain structure delineation was viewed as a process of minimizing Gibbs free energy. We used a rigid-body registration and an active contour (snake) method to minimize the Gibbs free energy in this study. The method was applied to 20 patient data sets to generate cerebellum images and volumetric results. The generated cerebellum images were compared with two manually drawn results. Strong correlations were found between the automatically and manually generated volumetric results, the correlation coefficients with each of manual results were 0.971 and 0.974, respectively. The average Jaccard similarities with each of two manual results were 0.89 and 0.88, respectively. The average Kappa indexes with each of two manual results were 0.94 and 0.93, respectively. These results showed this method was both robust and accurate for cerebellum segmentation. The method may be applied to various research and clinical investigation in which cerebellum segmentation and quantitative MR measurement of cerebellum are needed.

  2. A Case of Aorto-Bronchial Fistula After Insertion of Left Main Bronchial Self-Expanding Metallic Stent in a Patient with Recurrent Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Hiroshi Kuriyama, Kengo; Komiyama, Takafumi; Tanaka, Shiho; Marino, Kan; Tsukamoto, Tatsuaki; Araki, Tsutomu

    2004-09-15

    We report a case of aorto-bronchial fistula (ABF) caused by a self-expanding metallic stent (EMS) 51 days after insertion into the left main bronchus. The patient presented with left main bronchial stenosis caused by post-operative local recurrence of esophageal cancer. Post-operative radio therapy totaling 40 Gy and post-recurrence radiotherapy totaling 34 Gy were administered, with daily fractions of 2 Gy. Stenosis of the left main bronchus improved slightly, and was followed with insertion of EMS to prevent re-stenosis. The patient experienced massive hemoptysis for 3 days before sudden death. Autopsy revealed the EMS edge perforating the descending aortic lumen. Tumor infiltration and bacterial infection were observed on the wall of the left bronchus, and atherosclerosis was present on the aortic wall around the fistula. It should be noted that the left main bronchus was at considerable risk of ABF after insertion of EMS for malignant stenosis, and prophylactic stent insertion into the bronchus without imperative need must be avoided.

  3. FUNDUS AUTOFLUORESCENCE IMAGING IN A PATIENT WITH RAPIDLY DEVELOPING SCOTOMA

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Rony; Chen, Royce; Blonska, Anna; Barile, Gaetano; Sparrow, Janet R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the findings in a case of acute macular neuroretinopathy involving sudden development of scotomas accompanied by rapid focal increases in fundus autofluorescence. Methods The clinical presentation of the patient was documented by color fundus photographs, fundus autofluorescence, infrared imaging, and high-resolution spectral domain optical coherence tomography. The scotomas were assessed by Humphrey visual field 10-2 and MP-1 microperimetry. Results Visual field defects exhibited spatial correspondence with wedge-shaped lesions demonstrable in color fundus photographs and infrared imaging. It was notable that the lesions exhibited increased intensity on autofluorescence images obtained within 3 weeks of presentation. Optical coherence tomography revealed focal loss of photoreceptor inner segment/outer segment junctions in both eyes. Conclusion This case was distinguished by the relative rapidity with which the lesions became hyperautofluorescent in fundus autofluorescence images. Given that the bisretinoids that are the source of autofluorescence form in photoreceptor cells and are transferred to retinal pigment epithelium secondarily, the rapid increase in autofluorescence is unlikely to only reflect retinal pigment epithelium status and is more likely to be indicative of photoreceptor cell dysfunctioning and loss of structural integrity. PMID:23293707

  4. FDG PET/CT imaging in canine cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Anders E; McEvoy, Fintan; Engelholm, Svend A; Law, Ian; Kristensen, Annemarie T

    2011-01-01

    2-Deoxy-2-[¹⁸F]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) is becoming increasingly available as an imaging modality in veterinary medicine. The purpose of this study was to report semiquantitative standard uptake values (SUV) of malignant and nonmalignant tissues and organs in canine cancer patients. FDG PET/CT was performed in 14 dogs including, nine mesenchymal tumors, four carcinomas, and one incompletely excised mast cell tumor. A generally higher FDG uptake was observed in carcinomas relative to sarcomas. Maximum SUV of carcinomas ranged from 7.6 to 27.0, and for sarcomas from 2.0 to 10.6. The FDG SUV of several organs and tissues, including regional brain uptake is reported, to serve as a reference for future FDG PET studies in canine cancer patients. Several potential pitfalls have been recognized in interpretation of FDG PET images of human patients, a number of these were also observed in this study.

  5. Magnetization Transfer Imaging of Suicidal Patients with Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ziqi; Zhang, Huawei; Jia, Zhiyun; Zhong, Jingjie; Huang, Xiaoqi; Du, Mingying; Chen, Lizhou; Kuang, Weihong; Sweeney, John A.; Gong, Qiyong

    2015-01-01

    Magnetization transfer imaging (MTI) provides a quantitative measure of the macromolecular structural integrity of brain tissue, as represented by magnetization transfer ratio (MTR). In this study, we utilized MTI to identify biophysical alterations in MDD patients with a history of suicide attempts relative to MDD patients without such history. The participants were 36 medication-free MDD patients, with (N = 17) and without (N = 19) a history of a suicide attempt, and 28 healthy controls matched for age and gender. Whole brain voxel-based analysis was used to compare MTR across three groups and to analyze correlations with symptom severity and illness duration. We identified decreased MTR in left inferior parietal lobule and right superior parietal lobule in suicide attempters relative to both non-attempters and controls. Non-attempters also showed significantly reduced MTR in left inferior parietal lobule relative to controls, as well as an MTR reduction in left cerebellum. These abnormalities were not correlated with symptom severity or illness duration. Depressed patients with a history of suicide attempt showed bilateral abnormalities in parietal cortex compared to nonsuicidal depressed patients and healthy controls. Parietal lobe abnormalities might cause attentional dysfunction and impaired decision making to increase risk for suicidal behavior in MDD. PMID:25853872

  6. Noninvasive Electrocardiographic Imaging (ECGI): Comparison to intraoperative mapping in patients

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, Raja N.; Jia, Ping; Ramanathan, Charulatha; Ryu, Kyungmoo; Markowitz, Alan; Rudy, Yoram

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES/BACKGROUND Cardiac arrhythmias are a leading cause of death and disability. Electrocardiographic imaging (ECGI) is a noninvasive imaging modality that reconstructs potentials, electrograms, and isochrones on the epicardial surface from body surface measurements. We previously demonstrated in animal experiments through comparison with simultaneously measured epicardial data the high accuracy of ECGI in imaging cardiac electrical events. Here, images obtained by noninvasive ECGI are compared to invasive direct epicardial mapping in open heart surgery patients. METHODS Three patients were studied during sinus rhythm and right ventricular endocardial and epicardial pacing (total of five datasets). Body surface potentials were acquired preoperatively or postoperatively using a 224-electrode vest. Heart-torso geometry was determined preoperatively using computed tomography. Intraoperative mapping was performed with two 100-electrode epicardial patches. RESULTS Noninvasive potential maps captured epicardial breakthrough sites and reflected general activation and repolarization patterns, localized pacing sites to ∼1 cm and distinguished between epicardial and endocardial origin of activation. Noninvasively reconstructed electrogram morphologies correlated moderately with their invasive counterparts (cross correlation = 0.72 ± 0.25 [sinus rhythm], 0.67 ± 0.23 [endocardial pacing], 0.71 ± 0.21 [epicardial pacing]). Noninvasive isochrones captured the sites of earliest activation, areas of slow conduction, and the general excitation pattern. CONCLUSIONS Despite limitations due to nonsimultaneous acquisition of the surgical and noninvasive data under different conditions, the study demonstrates that ECGI can capture important features of cardiac electrical excitation in humans noninvasively during a single beat. It also shows that general excitation patterns and electrogram morphologies are largely preserved in open chest conditions. PMID:15851333

  7. MS-CANE: a computer-aided instrument for neurological evaluation of patients with multiple sclerosis: enhanced reliability of expanded disability status scale (EDSS) assessment.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Y C; Hassin-Baer, S; Olmer, L; Barishev, R; Goldhammer, Y; Freedman, L; Mozes, B

    2000-10-01

    Kurtzke's EDSS remains the most widely-used measure for clinical evaluation of MS patients. However, several studies have demonstrated the limited reliability of this tool. We introduce a computerized instrument, MS-CANE (Multiple Sclerosis Computer-Aided Neurological Examination), for clinical evaluation and follow up of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and to compare its reliability to that of conventional Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) assessment. We developed a computerized interactive instrument, based on the following principles: structured gathering of neurological findings, reduction of compound notions to their basic components, use of precise definitions, priority setting and automated calculations of EDSS and functional systems scores. An expert panel examined the consistency of MS-CANE with Kurtzke's specifications. To determine the effect of MS-CANE on the reliability of EDSS assessment, 56 MS patients underwent paired conventional EDSS and MS-CANE-based evaluations. The inter-observer agreement in both methods was determined and compared using the kappa statistic. The expert panel judged the tool to be compatible with the basic concepts of Kurtzke's EDSS. The use of MS-CANE increased the reliability of EDSS assessment: Kappa statistic was found to be 0.42 (i.e. moderate agreement) for conventional EDSS assessment versus 0.69 (i.e. substantial agreement) for MS-CANE (P=0.002). We conclude that the use of this tool may contribute towards a standardized and reliable assessment of EDSS. Within clinical trials, this could increase the power to detect effects, thus reducing trial duration and the cohort size required. Multiple Sclerosis (2000) 6 355 - 361

  8. Self-acquired patient images: the promises and the pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Damanpour, Shadi; Srivastava, Divya; Nijhawan, Rajiv I

    2016-03-01

    Self-acquired patient images, also known as selfies, are increasingly utilized in the practice of dermatology; however, research on their utility is somewhat limited. While the implementation of selfies has yet to be universally accepted, their role in triage appears to be especially useful. The potential for reducing office wait times, expediting referrals, and providing dermatologic services to patients with limited access to care is promising. In addition, as technology advances, the number of smartphone applications related to dermatology that are available to the general public has risen exponentially. With appropriate standardization, regulation, and confidentiality measures, these tools can be feasible adjuncts in clinical practice, dermatologic surgery, and teledermatology. Selfies likely will have a large role in dermatologic practice and delivery in the future. PMID:26963112

  9. Self-acquired patient images: the promises and the pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Damanpour, Shadi; Srivastava, Divya; Nijhawan, Rajiv I

    2016-03-01

    Self-acquired patient images, also known as selfies, are increasingly utilized in the practice of dermatology; however, research on their utility is somewhat limited. While the implementation of selfies has yet to be universally accepted, their role in triage appears to be especially useful. The potential for reducing office wait times, expediting referrals, and providing dermatologic services to patients with limited access to care is promising. In addition, as technology advances, the number of smartphone applications related to dermatology that are available to the general public has risen exponentially. With appropriate standardization, regulation, and confidentiality measures, these tools can be feasible adjuncts in clinical practice, dermatologic surgery, and teledermatology. Selfies likely will have a large role in dermatologic practice and delivery in the future.

  10. Patient-adaptive lesion metabolism analysis by dynamic PET images.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Liu, Huafeng; Shi, Pengcheng

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic PET imaging provides important spatial-temporal information for metabolism analysis of organs and tissues, and generates a great reference for clinical diagnosis and pharmacokinetic analysis. Due to poor statistical properties of the measurement data in low count dynamic PET acquisition and disturbances from surrounding tissues, identifying small lesions inside the human body is still a challenging issue. The uncertainties in estimating the arterial input function will also limit the accuracy and reliability of the metabolism analysis of lesions. Furthermore, the sizes of the patients and the motions during PET acquisition will yield mismatch against general purpose reconstruction system matrix, this will also affect the quantitative accuracy of metabolism analyses of lesions. In this paper, we present a dynamic PET metabolism analysis framework by defining a patient adaptive system matrix to improve the lesion metabolism analysis. Both patient size information and potential small lesions are incorporated by simulations of phantoms of different sizes and individual point source responses. The new framework improves the quantitative accuracy of lesion metabolism analysis, and makes the lesion identification more precisely. The requirement of accurate input functions is also reduced. Experiments are conducted on Monte Carlo simulated data set for quantitative analysis and validation, and on real patient scans for assessment of clinical potential. PMID:23286175

  11. Safety and efficacy of ruxolitinib in an open-label, multicenter, single-arm phase 3b expanded-access study in patients with myelofibrosis: a snapshot of 1144 patients in the JUMP trial.

    PubMed

    Al-Ali, Haifa Kathrin; Griesshammer, Martin; le Coutre, Philipp; Waller, Cornelius F; Liberati, Anna Marina; Schafhausen, Philippe; Tavares, Renato; Giraldo, Pilar; Foltz, Lynda; Raanani, Pia; Gupta, Vikas; Tannir, Bayane; Ronco, Julian Perez; Ghosh, Jagannath; Martino, Bruno; Vannucchi, Alessandro M

    2016-09-01

    JUMP is a phase 3b expanded-access trial for patients without access to ruxolitinib outside of a clinical study; it is the largest clinical trial to date in patients with myelofibrosis who have been treated with ruxolitinib. Here, we present safety and efficacy findings from an analysis of 1144 patients with intermediate- or high-risk myelofibrosis, as well as a separate analysis of 163 patients with intermediate-1-risk myelofibrosis - a population of patients not included in the phase 3 COMFORT studies. Consistent with ruxolitinib's mechanism of action, the most common hematologic adverse events were anemia and thrombocytopenia, but these led to treatment discontinuation in only a few cases. The most common non-hematologic adverse events were primarily grade 1/2 and included diarrhea, pyrexia, fatigue, and asthenia. The rates of infections were low and primarily grade 1/2, and no new or unexpected infections were observed. The majority of patients achieved a ≥50% reduction from baseline in palpable spleen length. Improvements in symptoms were rapid, with approximately half of all patients experiencing clinically significant improvements, as assessed by various quality-of-life questionnaires. The safety and efficacy profile in intermediate-1-risk patients was consistent with that in the overall JUMP population and with that previously reported in intermediate-2- and high-risk patients. Overall, ruxolitinib provided clinically meaningful reductions in spleen length and symptoms in patients with myelofibrosis, including those with intermediate-1-risk disease, with a safety and efficacy profile consistent with that observed in the phase 3 COMFORT studies. This trial was registered as NCT01493414 at ClinicalTrials.gov. PMID:27247324

  12. Safety and efficacy of ruxolitinib in an open-label, multicenter, single-arm phase 3b expanded-access study in patients with myelofibrosis: a snapshot of 1144 patients in the JUMP trial

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ali, Haifa Kathrin; Griesshammer, Martin; le Coutre, Philipp; Waller, Cornelius F.; Liberati, Anna Marina; Schafhausen, Philippe; Tavares, Renato; Giraldo, Pilar; Foltz, Lynda; Raanani, Pia; Gupta, Vikas; Tannir, Bayane; Ronco, Julian Perez; Ghosh, Jagannath; Martino, Bruno; Vannucchi, Alessandro M.

    2016-01-01

    JUMP is a phase 3b expanded-access trial for patients without access to ruxolitinib outside of a clinical study; it is the largest clinical trial to date in patients with myelofibrosis who have been treated with ruxolitinib. Here, we present safety and efficacy findings from an analysis of 1144 patients with intermediate- or high-risk myelofibrosis, as well as a separate analysis of 163 patients with intermediate-1-risk myelofibrosis – a population of patients not included in the phase 3 COMFORT studies. Consistent with ruxolitinib’s mechanism of action, the most common hematologic adverse events were anemia and thrombocytopenia, but these led to treatment discontinuation in only a few cases. The most common non-hematologic adverse events were primarily grade 1/2 and included diarrhea, pyrexia, fatigue, and asthenia. The rates of infections were low and primarily grade 1/2, and no new or unexpected infections were observed. The majority of patients achieved a ≥50% reduction from baseline in palpable spleen length. Improvements in symptoms were rapid, with approximately half of all patients experiencing clinically significant improvements, as assessed by various quality-of-life questionnaires. The safety and efficacy profile in intermediate-1-risk patients was consistent with that in the overall JUMP population and with that previously reported in intermediate-2- and high-risk patients. Overall, ruxolitinib provided clinically meaningful reductions in spleen length and symptoms in patients with myelofibrosis, including those with intermediate-1-risk disease, with a safety and efficacy profile consistent with that observed in the phase 3 COMFORT studies. This trial was registered as NCT01493414 at ClinicalTrials.gov. PMID:27247324

  13. Optimizing Patient-centered Communication and Multidisciplinary Care Coordination in Emergency Diagnostic Imaging: A Research Agenda.

    PubMed

    Sabbatini, Amber K; Merck, Lisa H; Froemming, Adam T; Vaughan, William; Brown, Michael D; Hess, Erik P; Applegate, Kimberly E; Comfere, Nneka I

    2015-12-01

    Patient-centered emergency diagnostic imaging relies on efficient communication and multispecialty care coordination to ensure optimal imaging utilization. The construct of the emergency diagnostic imaging care coordination cycle with three main phases (pretest, test, and posttest) provides a useful framework to evaluate care coordination in patient-centered emergency diagnostic imaging. This article summarizes findings reached during the patient-centered outcomes session of the 2015 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference "Diagnostic Imaging in the Emergency Department: A Research Agenda to Optimize Utilization." The primary objective was to develop a research agenda focused on 1) defining component parts of the emergency diagnostic imaging care coordination process, 2) identifying gaps in communication that affect emergency diagnostic imaging, and 3) defining optimal methods of communication and multidisciplinary care coordination that ensure patient-centered emergency diagnostic imaging. Prioritized research questions provided the framework to define a research agenda for multidisciplinary care coordination in emergency diagnostic imaging.

  14. Extra patient movement during mammographic imaging: an experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Brettle, D; Howard, D; Kelly, J; Millington, S; Hogg, P

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine if movement external to the patient occurring during mammography may be a source of image blur. Methods: Four mammography machines with eight flexible and eight fixed paddles were evaluated. In the first stage, movement at the paddle was measured mechanically using two calibrated linear potentiometers. A deformable breast phantom was used to mimic a female breast. For each paddle, the movement in millimetres and change in compression force in Newton was recorded at 0.5- and 1-s intervals, respectively, for 40 s with the phantom in an initially compressed state under a load of 80 N. In the second stage, clinical audit on 28 females was conducted on one mammography machine with the 18 × 24- and 24 × 29-cm flexible paddles. Results: Movement at the paddle followed an exponential decay with a settling period of approximately 40 s. The compression force readings for both fixed and flexible paddles decreased exponentially with time, while fixed paddles had a larger drop in compression force than did flexible paddles. There is a linear relationship between movement at the paddle and change in compression force. Conclusion: Movement measured at the paddle during an exposure can be represented by a second order system. The amount of extra patient movement during the actual exposure can be estimated using the linear relationship between movement at the paddle and the change in compression force. Advances in knowledge: This research provides a possible explanation to mammography image blurring caused by extra patient movement and proposes a theoretical model to analyse the movement. PMID:25348098

  15. Prospective Evaluation of Dual-Energy Imaging in Patients Undergoing Image Guided Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer: Initial Clinical Results

    SciTech Connect

    Sherertz, Tracy; Hoggarth, Mark; Luce, Jason; Block, Alec M.; Nagda, Suneel; Harkenrider, Matthew M.; Emami, Bahman; Roeske, John C.

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: A prospective feasibility study was conducted to investigate the utility of dual-energy (DE) imaging compared to conventional x-ray imaging for patients undergoing kV-based image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) for lung cancer. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved feasibility study enrolled patients with lung cancer undergoing IGRT and was initiated in September 2011. During daily setup, 2 sequential respiration-gated x-ray images were obtained using an on-board imager. Imaging was composed of 1 standard x-ray image at 120 kVp (1 mAs) and a second image obtained at 60 kVp (4 mAs). Weighted logarithmic subtraction of the 2 images was performed offline to create a soft tissue-selective DE image. Conventional and DE images were evaluated by measuring relative contrast and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) and also by comparing spatial localization, using both approaches. Imaging dose was assessed using a calibrated ion chamber. Results: To date, 10 patients with stage IA to IIIA lung cancer were enrolled and 57 DE images were analyzed. DE subtraction resulted in complete suppression of overlying bone in all 57 DE images, with an average improvement in relative contrast of 4.7 ± 3.3 over that of 120 kVp x-ray images (P<.0002). The improvement in relative contrast with DE imaging was seen for both smaller (gross tumor volume [GTV] ≤5 cc) and larger tumors (GTV >5 cc), with average relative contrast improvement ratios of 3.4 ± 4.1 and 5.4 ± 3.6, respectively. Moreover, the GTV was reliably localized in 95% of the DE images versus 74% of the single energy (SE images, (P=.004). Mean skin dose per DE image set was 0.44 ± 0.03 mGy versus 0.43 ± 0.03 mGy, using conventional kV imaging parameters. Conclusions: Initial results of this feasibility study suggest that DE thoracic imaging may enhance tumor localization in lung cancer patients receiving kV-based IGRT without increasing imaging dose.

  16. Rates of Reconstruction Failure in Patients Undergoing Immediate Reconstruction With Tissue Expanders and/or Implants and Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fowble, Barbara; Park, Catherine; Wang, Frederick; Peled, Anne; Alvarado, Michael; Ewing, Cheryl; Esserman, Laura; Foster, Robert; Sbitany, Hani; Hanlon, Alex

    2015-07-01

    Objectives: Mastectomy rates for breast cancer have increased, with a parallel increase in immediate reconstruction. For some women, tissue expander and implant (TE/I) reconstruction is the preferred or sole option. This retrospective study examined the rate of TE/I reconstruction failure (ie, removal of the TE or I with the inability to replace it resulting in no final reconstruction or autologous tissue reconstruction) in patients receiving postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT). Methods and Materials: Between 2004 and 2012, 99 women had skin-sparing mastectomies (SSM) or total nipple/areolar skin-sparing mastectomies (TSSM) with immediate TE/I reconstruction and PMRT for pathologic stage II to III breast cancer. Ninety-seven percent had chemotherapy (doxorubicin and taxane-based), 22% underwent targeted therapies, and 78% had endocrine therapy. Radiation consisted of 5000 cGy given in 180 to 200 cGy to the reconstructed breast with or without treatment to the supraclavicular nodes. Median follow-up was 3.8 years. Results: Total TE/I failure was 18% (12% without final reconstruction, 6% converted to autologous reconstruction). In univariate analysis, the strongest predictor of reconstruction failure (RF) was absence of total TE/I coverage (acellular dermal matrix and/or serratus muscle) at the time of radiation. RF occurred in 32.5% of patients without total coverage compared to 9% with coverage (P=.0069). For women with total coverage, the location of the mastectomy scar in the inframammary fold region was associated with higher RF (19% vs 0%, P=.0189). In multivariate analysis, weight was a significant factor for RF, with lower weight associated with a higher RF. Weight appeared to be a surrogate for the interaction of total coverage, thin skin flaps, interval to exchange, and location of the mastectomy scar. Conclusions: RFs in patients receiving PMRT were lowered with total TE/I coverage at the time of radiation by avoiding inframammary fold incisions and

  17. A Multidimensional Analysis of Body Image Concerns Among Newly Diagnosed Patients with Oral Cavity Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fingeret, Michelle Cororve; Vidrine, Damon J.; Reece, Gregory P.; Gillenwater, Ann M.; Gritz, Ellen R.

    2009-01-01

    Background Body image is a critical psychosocial issue for patients facing treatment for oral cancer yet there is limited research conducted in this area. This study utilizes a multidimensional approach to body image assessment and evaluates relationships between body image, demographic, health, and psychosocial variables. Methods Newly diagnosed patients with oral cancer completed self-report questionnaires and a structured clinical interview. Results Most participants identified current and/or future body image concerns primarily related to impending surgery. Adequate psychometric properties were demonstrated on a range of body image measures. Depression was the strongest and most consistent predictor of body image outcomes. Conclusions Preliminary evidence supports the importance of evaluating body image concerns in oral cancer patients prior to surgical intervention. Our findings have implications for developing validated body image tools and can be used to guide psychosocial interventions targeting body image disturbance. PMID:19626634

  18. SU-E-J-15: Automatically Detect Patient Treatment Position and Orientation in KV Portal Images

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, J; Yang, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In the course of radiation therapy, the complex information processing workflow will Result in potential errors, such as incorrect or inaccurate patient setups. With automatic image check and patient identification, such errors could be effectively reduced. For this purpose, we developed a simple and rapid image processing method, to automatically detect the patient position and orientation in 2D portal images, so to allow automatic check of positions and orientations for patient daily RT treatments. Methods: Based on the principle of portal image formation, a set of whole body DRR images were reconstructed from multiple whole body CT volume datasets, and fused together to be used as the matching template. To identify the patient setup position and orientation shown in a 2D portal image, the 2D portal image was preprocessed (contrast enhancement, down-sampling and couch table detection), then matched to the template image so to identify the laterality (left or right), position, orientation and treatment site. Results: Five day’s clinical qualified portal images were gathered randomly, then were processed by the automatic detection and matching method without any additional information. The detection results were visually checked by physicists. 182 images were correct detection in a total of 200kV portal images. The correct rate was 91%. Conclusion: The proposed method can detect patient setup and orientation quickly and automatically. It only requires the image intensity information in KV portal images. This method can be useful in the framework of Electronic Chart Check (ECCK) to reduce the potential errors in workflow of radiation therapy and so to improve patient safety. In addition, the auto-detection results, as the patient treatment site position and patient orientation, could be useful to guide the sequential image processing procedures, e.g. verification of patient daily setup accuracy. This work was partially supported by research grant from

  19. Preoperative and surveillance MR imaging of patients undergoing cytoreductive surgery and heated intraperitoneal chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    MR imaging provides considerable advantages for imaging patients with peritoneal tumor. Its inherently superior contrast resolution compared to CT allows MRI to more accurately depict small peritoneal tumors that are often missed on other imaging tests. Combining different contrast mechanisms including diffusion-weighted (DW) MRI and gadolinium-enhanced MRI provides a powerful tool for preoperative and surveillance imaging in patients being considered for cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and heated intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC). PMID:26941984

  20. The efficacy of image-guided stereotactic brain biopsy in neurologically symptomatic acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Levy, R M; Russell, E; Yungbluth, M; Hidvegi, D F; Brody, B A; Dal Canto, M C

    1992-02-01

    A prospective series of 50 neurologically symptomatic human immunodeficiency infected patients with intracranial lesions who underwent image-guided stereotactic brain biopsy is presented. Patients were diagnosed with primary central nervous system lymphoma (14 patients), progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (14 patients), toxoplasmosis (13 patients), human immunodeficiency virus encephalitis (3 patients), infarction (2 patients), and 1 patient each with metastatic adenocarcinoma, metastatic melanoma, cryptococcoma, and atypical mycobacterial infection. Two of the patients with toxoplasmosis had a second intracranial abnormality. Two biopsies resulted in either descriptive diagnosis only or were nondiagnostic; the definitive diagnostic efficacy of image-guided stereotactic biopsy was thus 96%. No deaths were incurred as a result of biopsy. Four intraoperative or postoperative hemorrhages occurred; in only 1 patient was there a residual neurological deficit related to the surgery. Image-guided stereotactic biopsy may thus be considered both safe and effective in this patient population.

  1. Magical NiTi expander

    PubMed Central

    Katti, Chandrika Girish; Katti, Girish; Kallur, Ravi; Ghali, Srinivas Rao

    2013-01-01

    A 24-year-old male patient was referred to our department for expansion of the constricted maxillary arch as a presurgical procedure for the correction of congenital facial disfigurement. On examination, the patient had a convex profile, increased interlabial gap, tongue thrust, limited mouth opening, posterior crossbite, asymmetric ‘V’-shaped maxillary arch with severe constriction, crowding of anterior teeth in the maxillary arch and a massive open bite. Radiographic investigations included orthopantomograph and occlusal radiographs. The patient photographs and models were analysed. On careful evaluation, the treatment for maxillary arch expansion was planned with a nickel titanium (NiTi) slow maxillary expander along with fixed mechanotherapy for alignment of teeth. An unexpectedly successful outcome was appreciated from the treatment. An emphasis should be laid on selecting and treating the case of constricted arches with a surgical or non-surgical approach, as expansion can be achieved orthodontically by using NiTi expanders. PMID:23867876

  2. What Expands in an Expanding Universe?

    PubMed

    Pacheco, José A De Freitas

    2015-01-01

    In the present investigation, the possible effects of the expansion of the Universe on systems bonded either by gravitational or electromagnetic forces, are reconsidered. It will be shown that the acceleration (positive or negative) of the expanding background, is the determinant factor affecting planetary orbits and atomic sizes. In the presently accepted cosmology (ΛCDM) all bonded systems are expanding at a decreasing rate that tends to be zero as the universe enters in a de Sitter phase. It is worth mentioning that the estimated expansion rates are rather small and they can be neglected for all practical purposes. PMID:26628035

  3. What Expands in an Expanding Universe?

    PubMed

    Pacheco, José A De Freitas

    2015-01-01

    In the present investigation, the possible effects of the expansion of the Universe on systems bonded either by gravitational or electromagnetic forces, are reconsidered. It will be shown that the acceleration (positive or negative) of the expanding background, is the determinant factor affecting planetary orbits and atomic sizes. In the presently accepted cosmology (ΛCDM) all bonded systems are expanding at a decreasing rate that tends to be zero as the universe enters in a de Sitter phase. It is worth mentioning that the estimated expansion rates are rather small and they can be neglected for all practical purposes.

  4. 3D printing of patient-specific anatomy: A tool to improve patient consent and enhance imaging interpretation by trainees.

    PubMed

    Liew, Yaoren; Beveridge, Erin; Demetriades, Andreas K; Hughes, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    We report the use of three-dimensional or 3D printed, patient-specific anatomy as a tool to improve informed patient consent and patient understanding in a case of posterior lumbar fixation. Next, we discuss its utility as an educational tool to enhance imaging interpretation by neurosurgery trainees. PMID:25822093

  5. 3D printing of patient-specific anatomy: A tool to improve patient consent and enhance imaging interpretation by trainees.

    PubMed

    Liew, Yaoren; Beveridge, Erin; Demetriades, Andreas K; Hughes, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    We report the use of three-dimensional or 3D printed, patient-specific anatomy as a tool to improve informed patient consent and patient understanding in a case of posterior lumbar fixation. Next, we discuss its utility as an educational tool to enhance imaging interpretation by neurosurgery trainees.

  6. Cost analysis of periprocedural imaging in patients undergoing catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Pokorney, Sean D; Hammill, Bradley G; Qualls, Laura G; Steinberg, Benjamin A; Curtis, Lesley H; Piccini, Jonathan P

    2014-07-15

    Cardiovascular imaging is an important part of procedural planning and safety for catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF). However, the costs of imaging surrounding catheter ablation of AF have not been described. Medicare fee-for-service data were used to evaluate Medicare expenditures before, during, and after catheter ablation for AF from July 2007 to December 2009. Among 11,525 patients who underwent catheter ablation for AF, the mean overall expenditure on the day of the procedure was $14,455 (SD $7,441). The mean imaging expenditure in the periprocedural period, which included the 30 days before the catheter ablation and the day of the ablation itself, was $884 (SD $455). Periprocedural imaging expenditures varied by the imaging strategy used, ranging from a mean of $557 (SD $269) for patients with electroanatomic mapping only to $1,234 (SD $461) for patients with electroanatomic mapping, transesophageal echocardiogram, and computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Mean patient-level imaging expenditures varied by provider (mean $872, SD $249). Periprocedural imaging expenditures also varied by patient risk, with mean expenditures of $862 (SD $444) for patients with a CHADS2 score of ≥2 compared with $907 (SD $466) for CHADS2 score<2 (p<0.001). In conclusion, periprocedural imaging accounts for approximately 6% of mean Medicare expenditures for catheter ablation of AF. The expenditures for periprocedural imaging vary both at the patient and at the provider level and they are inversely related to stroke risk by CHADS2 score. PMID:24952929

  7. Efficacy of technetium Tc 99m pyrophosphate imaging in patients with equivocal myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, T.A.; Tyler, J.L.; Kulkarni, M.V.

    1983-03-01

    We studied the efficacy of technetium Tc 99m pyrophosphate imaging in patients with equivocal evidence of acute myocardial infarction. Only patients with positive enzyme findings (regardless of ECG findings) had scans with greater than or equal to 2+ focal uptake. None of 26 patients with negative or equivocal enzyme findings (regardless of ECG findings) had greater than 2+ diffuse uptake. These results support the contention that infarct-avid imaging has little clinical utility in patients with equivocal evidence of myocardial infarction.

  8. 89Zr-huJ591 immuno-PET imaging in patients with advanced metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    O’Donoghue, Joseph A.; Beylergil, Volkan; Lyashchenko, Serge; Ruan, Shutian; Solomon, Stephen B.; Durack, Jeremy C.; Carrasquillo, Jorge A.; Lefkowitz, Robert A.; Gonen, Mithat; Lewis, Jason S.; Holland, Jason P.; Cheal, Sarah M.; Reuter, Victor E.; Osborne, Joseph R.; Loda, Massimo F.; Smith-Jones, Peter M.; Weber, Wolfgang A.; Bander, Neil H.; Scher, Howard I.; Morris, Michael J.; Larson, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    study, while the conventional imaging modality was negative. Conclusion 89Zr-huJ591 PET imaging of prostate-specific membrane antigen expression is safe and shows good localization of disease in prostate cancer patients. Liver is the critical organ for dosimetry, and 7 ± 1 days is the optimal imaging time. A larger study is underway to determine lesion detection in an expanded cohort of patients with metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:25143071

  9. Measurement of patient imaging dose for real-time kilovoltage x-ray intrafraction tumour position monitoring in prostate patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocker, James K.; Aun Ng, Jin; Keall, Paul J.; Booth, Jeremy T.

    2012-05-01

    The dose for image-based motion monitoring of prostate tumours during radiotherapy delivery has not been established. This study aimed to provide quantitative analysis and optimization of the fluoroscopic patient imaging dose during radiotherapy for IMRT and VMAT treatments using standard and hypofractionated treatment schedules. Twenty-two patients with type T1c N0/M0 prostate cancer and three implanted fiducial markers were considered. Minimum field sizes encompassing all fiducial markers plus a 7.5 mm motion margin were determined for each treatment beam, each patient and the complete cohort. Imaging doses were measured for different field sizes and depths in a phantom at 75 and 120 kV. Based on these measurements, the patient imaging doses were then estimated according to beam-on time for clinical settings. The population minimum field size was 5.3 × 6.1 cm2, yielding doses of 406 and 185 mGy over the course of an IMRT treatment for 75 kV (10 mAs) and 120 kV (1.04 mAs) imaging respectively, at 1 Hz. The imaging dose was reduced by an average of 28% and 32% by adopting patient-specific and treatment-beam-specific field sizes respectively. Standard fractionation VMAT imaging doses were 37% lower than IMRT doses over a complete treatment. Hypofractionated IMRT stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) and VMAT SBRT imaging doses were 58% and 76% lower than IMRT doses respectively. The patient dose for kilovoltage intrafraction monitoring of the prostate was quantified. Tailoring imaging field sizes to specific patients yielded a significant reduction in the imaging dose, as did adoption of faster treatment modalities such as VMAT.

  10. An Expanded Analysis of Pharmacogenetics Determinants of Efavirenz Response that Includes 3′-UTR Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms among Black South African HIV/AIDS Patients

    PubMed Central

    Swart, Marelize; Evans, Jonathan; Skelton, Michelle; Castel, Sandra; Wiesner, Lubbe; Smith, Peter J.; Dandara, Collet

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Efavirenz (EFV) is a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor prescribed as part of first-line highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in South Africa. Despite administration of fixed doses of EFV, inter-individual variability in plasma concentrations has been reported. Poor treatment outcomes such as development of adverse drug reactions or treatment failure have been linked to EFV plasma concentrations outside the therapeutic range (1–4 μg/mL) in some studies. The drug metabolizing enzyme (DME), CYP2B6, is primarily responsible for EFV metabolism with minor contributions by CYP1A2, CYP2A6, CYP3A4, CYP3A5, and UGT2B7. DME coding genes are also regulated by microRNAs through targeting the 3′-untranslated region. Expanded analysis of 30 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), including those in the 3′-UTR, was performed to identify pharmacogenetics determinants of EFV plasma concentrations in addition to CYP2B6 c.516G>T and c.983T>C SNPs. Methods: SNPs in CYP1A2, CYP2B6, UGT2B7, and NR1I2 (PXR) were selected for genotyping among 222 Bantu-speaking South African HIV-infected patients receiving EFV-containing HAART. This study is a continuation of earlier pharmacogenetics studies emphasizing the role of genetic variation in the 3′-UTR of genes which products are either pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic targets of EFV. Results: Despite evaluating thirty SNPs, CYP2B6 c.516G>T and c.983T>C SNPs remain the most prominent predictors of EFV plasma concentration. Conclusion: We have shown that CYP2B6 c.516G>T and c.983T>C SNPs are the most important predictors of EFV plasma concentration after taking into account all other SNPs, including genetic variation in the 3′-UTR, and variables affecting EFV metabolism. PMID:26779253

  11. Body-Image Disturbance: A Comparative Study among Haemodialysis and Kidney Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghian, Jaleh; Seyedfatemi, Naeimeh; Rafiei, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Introduction As a chronic disease, End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) changes the patients’ body and affects their body image negatively. Although the changes in body image are expected in all types of renal replacement therapies, different renal replacement therapy methods could represent different levels of impact on body image. Aim Present study was conducted to examine and compare the level of body-image disturbance between haemodialysis and kidney transplant patients. Materials and Methods This descriptive study was conducted in two teaching hospitals in Tehran, Iran. Using convenient sampling, 84 patients (42 patients under haemodialysis and 42 patients with transplant) were invited to participate in the study. A self-designed questionnaire was developed to examine the level of body-image disturbance. Results Out of 42 haemodialysis patients, 64.3%, 19% and 16.7% of patients reported low, moderate and high level of body-image disturbance respectively. The mean score of body-image disturbance was 21.1±18.3(rang=1–71) in haemodialysis patients. Of 42 transplant patients, 69%, 26.2% and 4.8% reported low, moderate and high level of body-image disturbance respectively. The mean score of body-image disturbance was 17.1±13.3 (rang=1–48). According to the results of independent t-test, difference between mean score of body-image disturbance in two groups was statistically significant (p < 0.05). Conclusion The findings of the present study showed that both haemodialysis and renal transplant patients experienced some levels of body-image disturbance. This problem was more prevalent among haemodialysis patients as compared to kidney transplant ones. We recommend more studies may be conducted in this regard. PMID:27437264

  12. Integrated multimedia electronic patient record and graph-based image information for cerebral tumors.

    PubMed

    Puentes, John; Batrancourt, Bénédicte; Atif, Jamal; Angelini, Elsa; Lecornu, Laurent; Zemirline, Abdelhamid; Bloch, Isabelle; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Roux, Christian

    2008-04-01

    Current electronic patient record (EPR) implementations do not incorporate medical images, nor structural information extracted from them, despite images increasing role for diagnosis. This paper presents an integration framework into EPRs of anatomical and pathological knowledge extracted from segmented magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), applying a graph of representation for anatomical and functional information for individual patients. Focusing on cerebral tumors examination and patient follow-up, multimedia EPRs were created and evaluated through a 3D navigation application, developed with open-source libraries and standards. Results suggest that the enhanced clinical information scheme could lead to original changes in the way medical experts utilize image-based information.

  13. Body image: a critical psychosocial issue for patients with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Fingeret, Michelle Cororve; Teo, Irene; Goettsch, Keelan

    2015-01-01

    Increasing attention is being given to evaluating and treating body image difficulties of patients undergoing cancer treatment. Head and neck cancer significantly alters physical appearance and bodily functioning and therefore directly impacts body image. Research involving body image in head and neck cancer patients is growing, and this review considers published findings from 2013 to 2014. Primary attention is given to discussing recent advancements in body image assessment, qualitative studies, descriptive research, and psychosocial intervention studies relevant to body image. Limitations and necessary advancements in this field are noted, and a commentary is provided on the state of the current literature. PMID:25416316

  14. Rapidity and Modality of Imaging for Acute Low Back Pain in Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Hoangmai H.; Landon, Bruce E.; Reschovsky, James D.; Wu, Beny; Schrag, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    Background Most quality metrics focus on underuse of services, leaving unclear the factors associated with potential overuse. Objective To assess associations between physician and patient characteristics, and the rapidity and modality of imaging for uncomplicated low back pain (LBP) Setting Fee-for-service Medicare Population 35,039 beneficiaries with acute LBP and treated by one of 4,567 primary care physicians (PCPs) responding to the 2000-2001 or 2004-2005 Community Tracking Study Physician Surveys. Methods We analyzed Medicare claims from 2000-2002 and 2004-2006. We modified a measure of inappropriate imaging developed by the National Committee on Quality Assurance. Without assessing appropriateness of imaging for specific cases, we characterized the rapidity (within 28 days, within 29-180 days, none within 180 days) and modality of imaging (CT/MRI, only radiograph, no imaging). We used ordered logit models to assess relationships between imaging and patient demographics, and physician/practice characteristics including exposure to financial incentives based on patient satisfaction, clinical quality, cost profiling, or productivity. Results 28.8% of 35,039 beneficiaries with LBP were imaged within 28 days, and an additional 4.6% between 28-180 days. Among imaged patients, 88.2% had a radiograph, while 11.8% had CT/MRI as their initial study. White patients received higher levels of imaging than black patients or those of other races [29.7%, 24.8%, 18.9% (p<0.001) for imaging within 28 days and 10.8%, 9.1%, 7.2% (p<0.05) for CT/MRI, respectively]. Medicaid patients received less rapid or advanced imaging than other patients. Patients had more rapid imaging and advanced imaging if their PCP worked in large practices. Compared to no incentives, clinical quality-based incentives were associated with less advanced imaging (10.5% vs. 1.4% for within 28 days, respectively, p<0.001), while incentive combinations including satisfaction measures were associated with

  15. Body image among eating disorder patients with disabilities: a review of published case studies.

    PubMed

    Cicmil, Nela; Eli, Karin

    2014-06-01

    While individual cases of eating disorder (ED) patients with disabilities have been reported, there has been little synthesis of their experiences of body image and thin idealization. This study reviews 19 published clinical reports of ED patients with sensory, mobility-related, or intellectual disabilities and evaluates the extent to which their experiences align with or challenge current conceptions of body image in ED. ED patients with visual impairment reported a profound disturbance of body image, perceived intersubjectively and through tactile sensations. Reducing dependence in mobility was an important motivation to control body size for ED patients with mobility-related disabilities. ED as a way of coping with and compensating for the psychosocial consequences of disability was a recurrent theme for patients across a range of disabilities. These experiential accounts of ED patients with disabilities broaden current understandings of body image to include touch and kinaesthetic awareness, intersubjective dynamics, and perceptions of normalcy.

  16. Utilization and likelihood of radiologic diagnostic imaging in patients with implantable cardiac defibrillators

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Matthew R.; Ryan, Michael P.; Wolff, Steven D.; Mollenkopf, Sarah A.; Turakhia, Mintu P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To examine imaging utilization in a matched cohort of patients with and without implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) and to project magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) utilization over a 10‐year period. Materials and Methods The Truven Health MarketScan Commercial claims and Medicare Supplemental health insurance claims data were used to identify patients with continuous health plan enrollment in 2009–2012. Patients with ICDs were identified using ICD‐9 and CPT codes, and matched to patients with the same demographic and comorbidity profile, but no record of device implantation. Diagnostic imaging utilization was compared across the matched cohorts, in total, by imaging categories, and in subpopulations of stroke, back pain, and joint pain. MRI use in the nonimplant group over the 4‐year period was extrapolated out to 10 years for ICD‐indicated patients. Results A cohort of 18,770 matched patients were identified; average age 65.5 ± 13.38 and 21.9% female. ICD patients had significantly less MRI imaging (0.23 0.70 SD vs. 0.00 0.08 SD, P < 0.0001) than nonimplant patients. Among patients with records of stroke/transient ischemic attack (TIA) (ICD 5%, nonimplant 4%) and accompanying diagnostic imaging, 44% of nonimplant patients underwent MRI vs. 1% of ICD patients (P < 0.0001). Forecast models estimated that 53% to 64% of ICD‐eligible patients may require an MRI within 10 years. Conclusion MRI utilization is lower in ICD patients compared to nonimplant patients, yet the burden of incident stroke/TIA, back, and joint pain suggests an unmet need for MR‐conditional devices. J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2016;43:115–127. PMID:26118943

  17. Advancing Patient-centered Outcomes in Emergency Diagnostic Imaging: A Research Agenda.

    PubMed

    Kanzaria, Hemal K; McCabe, Aileen M; Meisel, Zachary M; LeBlanc, Annie; Schaffer, Jason T; Bellolio, M Fernanda; Vaughan, William; Merck, Lisa H; Applegate, Kimberly E; Hollander, Judd E; Grudzen, Corita R; Mills, Angela M; Carpenter, Christopher R; Hess, Erik P

    2015-12-01

    Diagnostic imaging is integral to the evaluation of many emergency department (ED) patients. However, relatively little effort has been devoted to patient-centered outcomes research (PCOR) in emergency diagnostic imaging. This article provides background on this topic and the conclusions of the 2015 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference PCOR work group regarding "Diagnostic Imaging in the Emergency Department: A Research Agenda to Optimize Utilization." The goal was to determine a prioritized research agenda to establish which outcomes related to emergency diagnostic imaging are most important to patients, caregivers, and other key stakeholders and which methods will most optimally engage patients in the decision to undergo imaging. Case vignettes are used to emphasize these concepts as they relate to a patient's decision to seek care at an ED and the care received there. The authors discuss applicable research methods and approaches such as shared decision-making that could facilitate better integration of patient-centered outcomes and patient-reported outcomes into decisions regarding emergency diagnostic imaging. Finally, based on a modified Delphi process involving members of the PCOR work group, prioritized research questions are proposed to advance the science of patient-centered outcomes in ED diagnostic imaging. PMID:26574729

  18. Functionalized expanded porphyrins

    DOEpatents

    Sessler, Jonathan L; Pantos, Patricia J

    2013-11-12

    Disclosed are functionalized expanded porphyrins that can be used as spectrometric sensors for high-valent actinide cations. The disclosed functionalized expanded porphyrins have the advantage over unfunctionalized systems in that they can be immobilized via covalent attachment to a solid support comprising an inorganic or organic polymer or other common substrates. Substrates comprising the disclosed functionalized expanded porphyrins are also disclosed. Further, disclosed are methods of making the disclosed compounds (immobilized and free), methods of using them as sensors to detect high valent actinides, devices that comprise the disclosed compounds, and kits.

  19. Turkish hysterectomy and mastectomy patients - depression, body image, sexual problems and spouse relationships.

    PubMed

    Keskin, Gulseren; Gumus, Aysun Babacan

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare hysterectomy and mastectomy patients in terms of depression, body image, sexual problems and spouse relations. The study group comprised 94 patients being treated in Ege University Radiation Oncology Clinic, Tulay Aktas Oncology Hospital, Izmir Aegean Obstetrics and Gynecology Training and Research Hospital for breast and gynecological cancer (42 patients underwent mastectomy, 52 patient underwent hysterectomy). Five scales were used in the study: Sociodemographic Data Form, Beck Depression Scale, Body Image Scale, Dyadic Adjustment Scale, Golombok Rust Sexual Functions Scale. Mastectomy patients were more depressive than hysterectomy patients (t = 2.78, p < 0.01). Body image levels of the patients were bad but there was no significant difference between the two patient groups (p > 0.05). Hysterectomy patients had more problems in terms of vaginismus (t = 2.32, p < 0.05), avoidance of sexual intercourse (t = 2.31, p < 0.05), communication (t = 2.06, p < 0.05), and frequency of sexual intercourse than mastectomy patients (t = 2.10, p < 0.05). As compared with compliance levels between patients and spouses; hysterectomy patients had more problems related to expression of emotions than mastectomy patients (t = 2.12, p < 0.05). In conclusion, body image was negative, mastectomy was associated with more depression and hysterectomy with greater sexual problems and difficulties with spouse relationships. PMID:21545207

  20. Automated Movement Correction for Dynamic PET/CT Images: Evaluation with Phantom and Patient Data

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hu; Wong, Koon-Pong; Wardak, Mirwais; Dahlbom, Magnus; Kepe, Vladimir; Barrio, Jorge R.; Nelson, Linda D.; Small, Gary W.; Huang, Sung-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Head movement during a dynamic brain PET/CT imaging results in mismatch between CT and dynamic PET images. It can cause artifacts in CT-based attenuation corrected PET images, thus affecting both the qualitative and quantitative aspects of the dynamic PET images and the derived parametric images. In this study, we developed an automated retrospective image-based movement correction (MC) procedure. The MC method first registered the CT image to each dynamic PET frames, then re-reconstructed the PET frames with CT-based attenuation correction, and finally re-aligned all the PET frames to the same position. We evaluated the MC method's performance on the Hoffman phantom and dynamic FDDNP and FDG PET/CT images of patients with neurodegenerative disease or with poor compliance. Dynamic FDDNP PET/CT images (65 min) were obtained from 12 patients and dynamic FDG PET/CT images (60 min) were obtained from 6 patients. Logan analysis with cerebellum as the reference region was used to generate regional distribution volume ratio (DVR) for FDDNP scan before and after MC. For FDG studies, the image derived input function was used to generate parametric image of FDG uptake constant (Ki) before and after MC. Phantom study showed high accuracy of registration between PET and CT and improved PET images after MC. In patient study, head movement was observed in all subjects, especially in late PET frames with an average displacement of 6.92 mm. The z-direction translation (average maximum = 5.32 mm) and x-axis rotation (average maximum = 5.19 degrees) occurred most frequently. Image artifacts were significantly diminished after MC. There were significant differences (P<0.05) in the FDDNP DVR and FDG Ki values in the parietal and temporal regions after MC. In conclusion, MC applied to dynamic brain FDDNP and FDG PET/CT scans could improve the qualitative and quantitative aspects of images of both tracers. PMID:25111700

  1. Patient-specific Deformation Modelling via Elastography: Application to Image-guided Prostate Interventions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Ni, Dong; Qin, Jing; Xu, Ming; Xie, Xiaoyan; Heng, Pheng-Ann

    2016-01-01

    Image-guided prostate interventions often require the registration of preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) images to real-time transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images to provide high-quality guidance. One of the main challenges for registering MR images to TRUS images is how to estimate the TRUS-probe-induced prostate deformation that occurs during TRUS imaging. The combined statistical and biomechanical modeling approach shows promise for the adequate estimation of prostate deformation. However, the right setting of the biomechanical parameters is very crucial for realistic deformation modeling. We propose a patient-specific deformation model equipped with personalized biomechanical parameters obtained from shear wave elastography to reliably predict the prostate deformation during image-guided interventions. Using data acquired from a prostate phantom and twelve patients with suspected prostate cancer, we compared the prostate deformation model with and without patient-specific biomechanical parameters in terms of deformation estimation accuracy. The results show that the patient-specific deformation model possesses favorable model ability, and outperforms the model without patient-specific biomechanical parameters. The employment of the patient-specific biomechanical parameters obtained from elastography for deformation modeling shows promise for providing more precise deformation estimation in applications that use computer-assisted image-guided intervention systems. PMID:27272239

  2. Patient-specific Deformation Modelling via Elastography: Application to Image-guided Prostate Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Ni, Dong; Qin, Jing; Xu, Ming; Xie, Xiaoyan; Heng, Pheng-Ann

    2016-01-01

    Image-guided prostate interventions often require the registration of preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) images to real-time transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images to provide high-quality guidance. One of the main challenges for registering MR images to TRUS images is how to estimate the TRUS-probe-induced prostate deformation that occurs during TRUS imaging. The combined statistical and biomechanical modeling approach shows promise for the adequate estimation of prostate deformation. However, the right setting of the biomechanical parameters is very crucial for realistic deformation modeling. We propose a patient-specific deformation model equipped with personalized biomechanical parameters obtained from shear wave elastography to reliably predict the prostate deformation during image-guided interventions. Using data acquired from a prostate phantom and twelve patients with suspected prostate cancer, we compared the prostate deformation model with and without patient-specific biomechanical parameters in terms of deformation estimation accuracy. The results show that the patient-specific deformation model possesses favorable model ability, and outperforms the model without patient-specific biomechanical parameters. The employment of the patient-specific biomechanical parameters obtained from elastography for deformation modeling shows promise for providing more precise deformation estimation in applications that use computer-assisted image-guided intervention systems. PMID:27272239

  3. Theme: The Expanded Mission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finley, Eddy; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This theme issue covers the following topics: modernization of agricultural education, an expanded mission for the field, community development, a national presence for agricultural education, revising curriculum, and interesting students in new careers in agriculture. (SK)

  4. Optimization of expander plants

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W.B.

    1985-01-01

    A computer program that uses the Tomich technique to solve multistage, multi-feed distillation problems was modified. The MSEQ method was utilized to generate initial temperature and vapor rate profiles. The modified fractionator program coupled with the MSEQ method was used to generate required rigorous data for expander-plant demethanizer splits. Furthermore, a shortcut method was developed to facilitate expander process simulation. Calculated demethanizer results from a simulation were compared with a commercial program with good agreement. The results from the shortcut method were in good agreement with rigorous calculations. Computer simulations were made for four different natural gases ranging from lean to rich in liquefiable hydrocarbons for various turboexpander plant processes. These processes included self-refrigerated expander process with/without external refrigeration, and with/without demethanizer heat recovery. Only lean gases can be utilized in the self-refrigerated expander process with high ethane recovery. While the use of external refrigeration in conjunction with the expander process can reduce overall horsepower requirements, it may not be economical to do so. In general, the processing should be carried out at the highest practical processing pressure. The use of demethanizer heat recovery is an efficient method to reduce both refrigeration horsepower and recompression energy requirements. This work emphasizes high ethane recovery. Further study of expander processes emphasizing ethane rejection is advisable.

  5. Occupational and patient exposure as well as image quality for full spine examinations with the EOS imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Damet, J. Fournier, P.; Monnin, P.; Sans-Merce, M.; Verdun, F. R.; Baechler, S.; Ceroni, D.; Zand, T.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: EOS (EOS imaging S.A, Paris, France) is an x-ray imaging system that uses slot-scanning technology in order to optimize the trade-off between image quality and dose. The goal of this study was to characterize the EOS system in terms of occupational exposure, organ doses to patients as well as image quality for full spine examinations. Methods: Occupational exposure was determined by measuring the ambient dose equivalents in the radiological room during a standard full spine examination. The patient dosimetry was performed using anthropomorphic phantoms representing an adolescent and a five-year-old child. The organ doses were measured with thermoluminescent detectors and then used to calculate effective doses. Patient exposure with EOS was then compared to dose levels reported for conventional radiological systems. Image quality was assessed in terms of spatial resolution and different noise contributions to evaluate the detector's performances of the system. The spatial-frequency signal transfer efficiency of the imaging system was quantified by the detective quantum efficiency (DQE). Results: The use of a protective apron when the medical staff or parents have to stand near to the cubicle in the radiological room is recommended. The estimated effective dose to patients undergoing a full spine examination with the EOS system was 290μSv for an adult and 200 μSv for a child. MTF and NPS are nonisotropic, with higher values in the scanning direction; they are in addition energy-dependent, but scanning speed independent. The system was shown to be quantum-limited, with a maximum DQE of 13%. The relevance of the DQE for slot-scanning system has been addressed. Conclusions: As a summary, the estimated effective dose was 290μSv for an adult; the image quality remains comparable to conventional systems.

  6. Cost Analysis of Periprocedural Imaging in Patients Undergoing Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Pokorney, Sean D.; Hammill, Bradley G.; Qualls, Laura G.; Steinberg, Benjamin A.; Curtis, Lesley H.; Piccini, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular imaging is an important part of procedural planning and safety for catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF). However, the costs of imaging surrounding catheter ablation of AF have not been described. Medicare fee-for-service data were used to evaluate Medicare expenditures before, during, and after catheter ablation for AF from July 2007 to December 2009. Among 11,525 patients who underwent catheter ablation for AF, the mean overall expenditure on the day of the procedure was $14,455 (SD $7,441). The mean imaging expenditure in the periprocedural period, which included the 30 days before the catheter ablation and the day of the ablation itself, was $884 (SD $455). Periprocedural imaging expenditures varied by the imaging strategy used, ranging from a mean of $557 (SD $269) for patients with electroanatomic mapping only to $1,234 (SD $461) for patients with electroanatomic mapping, transesophageal echocardiogram, and computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Mean patient-level imaging expenditures varied by provider (mean $872, SD $249). Periprocedural imaging expenditures also varied by patient risk, with mean expenditures of $862 (SD $444) for patients with a CHADS2 score of ≥2 compared with $907 (SD $466) for CHADS2 score <2 (p <0.001). In conclusion, peri-procedural imaging accounts for approximately 6% of mean Medicare expenditures for catheter ablation of AF. The expenditures for periprocedural imaging vary both at the patient and at the provider level and they are inversely related to stroke risk by CHADS2 score. PMID:24952929

  7. Fundus autofluorescence and colour fundus imaging compared during telemedicine screening in patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kolomeyer, Anton M; Baumrind, Benjamin R; Szirth, Bernard C; Shahid, Khadija; Khouri, Albert S

    2013-06-01

    We investigated the use of fundus autofluorescence (FAF) imaging in screening the eyes of patients with diabetes. Images were obtained from 50 patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing telemedicine screening with colour fundus imaging. The colour and FAF images were obtained with a 15.1 megapixel non-mydriatic retinal camera. Colour and FAF images were compared for pathology seen in nonproliferative and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR and PDR, respectively). A qualitative assessment was made of the ease of detecting early retinopathy changes and the extent of existing retinopathy. The mean age of the patients was 47 years, most were male (82%) and most were African American (68%). Their mean visual acuity was 20/45 and their mean intraocular pressure was 14.3 mm Hg. Thirty-eight eyes (76%) did not show any diabetic retinopathy changes on colour or FAF imaging. Seven patients (14%) met the criteria for NPDR and five (10%) for severe NPDR or PDR. The most common findings were microaneurysms, hard exudates and intra-retinal haemorrhages (IRH) (n = 6 for each). IRH, microaneurysms and chorioretinal scars were more easily visible on FAF images. Hard exudates, pre-retinal haemorrhage and fibrosis, macular oedema and Hollenhorst plaque were easier to identify on colour photographs. The value of FAF imaging as a complementary technique to colour fundus imaging in detecting diabetic retinopathy during ocular screening warrants further investigation.

  8. Patient-blaming and representation of risk factors in breast cancer images.

    PubMed

    Andsager, J L; Hust, S J; Powers, A

    2000-01-01

    Media coverage of some cancers in the past often equated cancer with a death sentence. Breast cancer coverage in 1990s magazines, however, has become less fatalistic, more frequent, and discusses a broader range of issues than before. This study examined whether the visual images accompanying magazine articles about breast cancer have also evolved. We used Goffman's (1976) rituals of subordination to measure patient-blaming and subordinating, disempowering images. We also analyzed race/ethnicity, body type, and age of females in the images to gauge whether these demographic risk factors were represented in a random sample of images from nine magazines over a 30-year period. Magazines analyzed represented three genres-women's magazines, fashion/beauty, and general news. Findings suggest that patient-blaming images have decreased in some categories and women portrayed are slightly more representative of risk factors of age and race/ethnicity. Magazine images tended to reinforce stereotyped portrayals of femininity to the detriment of cancer patients. Fashion/beauty magazines, aimed at younger women, were most likely to portray breast cancer images in stereotyped, patient-blaming ways, with the least representative images of risk factors. The social construction of feminine beauty seems to overpower accuracy in creating these images.

  9. Need for routine delayed radionuclide hepatobiliary imaging in patients with intercurrent disease

    SciTech Connect

    Drane, W.E.; Nelp, W.B.; Rudd, T.G.

    1984-06-01

    A retrospective review was made of all radionuclide hepatobiliary studies performed in a major trauma center over a 27-month period and correlated with the patients' clinical course. In a population of 42 patients (27 of whom were on total parenteral nutrition (TPN)) who had severe intercurrent illness (primarily trauma), and an additional 18 patients who had hepatocellular dysfunction, hepatobiliary imaging confirmed a patent cystic duct in 43 of 60 patients (72%). Of 17 patients who had nonvisualization of the gallbladder, four had surgically proved acute cholecystitis. The presence of gallstones, wall thickening, or sludge on sonograms did not correlate with cystic duct patency, and was not specific for acute cholecystitis. Though gallbladder function is compromised in the population with severe intercurrent disease, radionuclide hepatobiliary imaging is still valuable; it can confirm a patent systic duct in at least 72% of patients if routine imaging is continued for up to 24 hours.

  10. Molecular Imaging and Radiotherapy: Theranostics for Personalized Patient Management

    PubMed Central

    Velikyan, Irina

    2012-01-01

    This theme issue presents current achievements in the development of radioactive agents, pre-clinical and clinical molecular imaging, and radiotherapy in the context of theranostics in the field of oncology. PMID:22768022

  11. Imaging techniques for infections in the surgical patient

    SciTech Connect

    Gerzof, S.G.; Oates, M.E.

    1988-02-01

    Gallium-67 citrate is easy to use and readily available, but the need to delay imaging for 2 to 4 days after injection hinders rapid diagnosis. Moreover, normal gastrointestinal activity limits its usefulness in evaluating the abdomen. Labeling leukocytes with Indium-111 oxine is a time-consuming, technically involved process, yet the images obtained at 24 hours will usually reveal sites of inflammation or infection. Although the techniques have similar sensitivities, the higher specificity of In-111 makes it the superior agent for many clinical situations. When there are localizing signs or symptoms or a reason to suspect a specific body region, CT or ultrasonography is the imaging modality of choice. Guided needle aspiration can then be performed and is usually diagnostic. Radionuclide imaging with either Ga-67 or In-111 is available as an adjunct if needle aspiration cannot be performed or is inconclusive. Since it provides total-body surveillance, radionuclide imaging is particularly useful for screening when there are no localizing signs and in cases of occult sepsis or fever of unknown origin. If positive, it can direct further imaging with CT or ultrasound. 46 references.

  12. Towards adapting a normal patient database for SPECT brain perfusion imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, N. D.; Holmes, R. B.; Soleimani, M.; Evans, M. J.; Cade, S. C.; Mitchell, C. N.

    2012-06-01

    Single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) is a tool which can be used to image perfusion in the brain. Clinicians can use such images to help diagnose dementias such as Alzheimer's disease. Due to the intrinsic stochasticity in the photon imaging system, some form of statistical comparison of an individual image with a 'normal' patient database gives a clinician additional confidence in interpreting the image. Due to the variations between SPECT camera systems, ideally a normal patient database is required for each individual system. However, cost or ethical considerations often prohibit the collection of such a database for each new camera system. Some method of adapting existing normal patient databases to new camera systems would be beneficial. This paper introduces a method which may be regarded as a 'first-pass' attempt based on 2-norm regularization and a codebook of discrete spatially stationary convolutional kernels. Some preliminary illustrative results are presented, together with discussion on limitations and possible improvements.

  13. Exercise motives and positive body image in physically active college women and men: Exploring an expanded acceptance model of intuitive eating.

    PubMed

    Tylka, Tracy L; Homan, Kristin J

    2015-09-01

    The acceptance model of intuitive eating posits that body acceptance by others facilitates body appreciation and internal body orientation, which contribute to intuitive eating. Two domains of exercise motives (functional and appearance) may also be linked to these variables, and thus were integrated into the model. The model fit the data well for 406 physically active U.S. college students, although some pathways were stronger for women. Body acceptance by others directly contributed to higher functional exercise motives and indirectly contributed to lower appearance exercise motives through higher internal body orientation. Functional exercise motives positively, and appearance exercise motives inversely, contributed to body appreciation. Whereas body appreciation positively, and appearance exercise motives inversely, contributed to intuitive eating for women, only the latter association was evident for men. To benefit positive body image and intuitive eating, efforts should encourage body acceptance by others and emphasize functional and de-emphasize appearance exercise motives. PMID:26281958

  14. [Magnetic resonance tomography as the basis for biomechanical analysis. The simulation of the birth process as an example of the expanded information potentials of segmental imaging procedures].

    PubMed

    Wischnik, A; Lehmann, K J; Nalepa, E; Wentz, K U; Georgi, M; Melchert, F

    1992-10-01

    A method is presented that enables the use of (static) informations from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for (dynamic) biomechanical analysis. Using a specially developed software MRI pixel matrices are colour-coded and--according to the principle of same density--line data are created. After sectional attribution of the resulting polygons a three-dimensional mesh of so-called finite elements is created which can then be used in deformation analysis. This method is exemplified by a project dealing with the simulation of birth mechanics, which is finally aimed at validating the results from radiologic pelvimetry. First analyses show that even under foetal head moulding conditions, being considered as normal, such sensitive structures as the cerebellum, brain stem as well as the ventricles with the plexus chorioidei are to be found within the maximum isobars within a range of 104-140 N(10.6-14.3 kp). PMID:1391834

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging in patients with unstable angina: comparison with acute myocardial infarction and normals

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, M.; Johnson, R.F. Jr.; Fawcett, H.D.; Schreiber, M.H.

    1988-09-01

    The role of magnetic resonance imaging in characterizing normal, ischemic and infarcted segments of myocardium was examined in 8 patients with unstable angina, 11 patients with acute myocardial infarction, and 7 patients with stable angina. Eleven normal volunteers were imaged for comparison. Myocardial segments in short axis magnetic resonance images were classified as normal or abnormal on the basis of perfusion changes observed in thallium-201 images in 22 patients and according to the electrocariographic localization of infarction in 4 patients. T2 relaxation time was measured in 57 myocardial segments with abnormal perfusion (24 with reversible and 33 with irreversible perfusion changes) and in 25 normally perfused segments. T2 measurements in normally perfused segments of patients with acute myocardial infarction, unstable angina and stable angina were within normal range derived from T2 measurements in 48 myocardial segments of 11 normal volunteers (42 +/- 10 ms). T2 in abnormal myocardial segments of patients with stable angina also was not significantly different from normal. T2 of abnormal segments in patients with unstable angina (64 +/- 14 in reversibly ischemic and 67 +/- 21 in the irreversibly ischemic segments) was prolonged when compared to normal (p less than 0.0001) and was not significantly different from T2 in abnormal segments of patients with acute myocardial infarction (62 +/- 18 for reversibly and 66 +/- 11 for irreversibly ischemic segments). The data indicate that T2 prolongation is not specific for acute myocardial infarction and may be observed in abnormally perfused segments of patients with unstable angina.

  16. Wernicke's Encephalopathy in a Patient with Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Law, Huong Ling; Tan, Suzet; Sedi, Rosleena

    2011-07-01

    We report a case of Wernicke's encephalopathy in a patient with nasopharyngeal carcinoma with a 3-month history of poor oral intake related to nausea and vomiting due to chemotherapy. The patient later developed deep coma while receiving in-patient therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed typical findings of Wernicke's encephalopathy. The patient was treated with thiamine injections, which resulted in subsequent partial recovery of neurological function. This paper stresses the importance of magnetic resonance imaging for prompt diagnosis of Wernicke's encephalopathy.

  17. Imaging Findings of a Patient with Incomplete Phenotypical Expression of the PHACES Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sarikaya, B.; Altugan, F.S.; Firat, M.; Lasjaunias, P.L.

    2008-01-01

    Summary We present imaging findings of a patient with an incomplete form of the PHACES syndrome with dolichosegmental intracranial arteries as the predominant component, and discuss the etiopathological and clinical significance of this finding. PMID:20557791

  18. The need for routine delayed radionuclide hepatobiliary imaging in patients with intercurrent disease

    SciTech Connect

    Drane, W.E.; Nelp, W.B.; Rudd, T.G.

    1984-06-01

    A retrospective review was made of all radionuclide hepatobiliary studies performed in a major trauma center over a 27-month period and correlated with the patients' clinical course. In a population of 42 patients (27 of whom were on total parenteral nutrition (TPN)) who had severe intercurrent illness (primarily trauma), and an additional 18 patients who had hepatocellular dysfunction, hepatobiliary imaging confirmed a patent cystic duct in 43 of 60 patients (72%). Fourteen of these 43 patients (33%) had gallbladder visualization at later than one hour after radiotracer administration, and seven of these 14 required imaging from four to 24 hours. Of 17 patients who had nonvisualization of the gallbladder, four had surgically proved acute cholecystitis. Images of nine of the remaining 13 patients with gallbladder nonvisualization were not obtained for 24 hours. The presence of gallstones, wall thickening, or sludge on sonograms did not correlate with cystic duct patency, and was not specific for acute cholecystitis. Though gallbladder function is compromised in the population with severe intercurrent disease, radionuclide hepatobiliary imaging is still valuable; it can confirm a patent cystic duct in at least 72% of patients if routine imaging is continued for up to 24 hours.

  19. Combining population and patient-specific characteristics for prostate segmentation on 3D CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ling; Guo, Rongrong; Tian, Zhiqiang; Venkataraman, Rajesh; Sarkar, Saradwata; Liu, Xiabi; Tade, Funmilayo; Schuster, David M.; Fei, Baowei

    2016-03-01

    Prostate segmentation on CT images is a challenging task. In this paper, we explore the population and patient-specific characteristics for the segmentation of the prostate on CT images. Because population learning does not consider the inter-patient variations and because patient-specific learning may not perform well for different patients, we are combining the population and patient-specific information to improve segmentation performance. Specifically, we train a population model based on the population data and train a patient-specific model based on the manual segmentation on three slice of the new patient. We compute the similarity between the two models to explore the influence of applicable population knowledge on the specific patient. By combining the patient-specific knowledge with the influence, we can capture the population and patient-specific characteristics to calculate the probability of a pixel belonging to the prostate. Finally, we smooth the prostate surface according to the prostate-density value of the pixels in the distance transform image. We conducted the leave-one-out validation experiments on a set of CT volumes from 15 patients. Manual segmentation results from a radiologist serve as the gold standard for the evaluation. Experimental results show that our method achieved an average DSC of 85.1% as compared to the manual segmentation gold standard. This method outperformed the population learning method and the patient-specific learning approach alone. The CT segmentation method can have various applications in prostate cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  20. Combining Population and Patient-Specific Characteristics for Prostate Segmentation on 3D CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ling; Guo, Rongrong; Tian, Zhiqiang; Venkataraman, Rajesh; Sarkar, Saradwata; Liu, Xiabi; Tade, Funmilayo; Schuster, David M.; Fei, Baowei

    2016-01-01

    Prostate segmentation on CT images is a challenging task. In this paper, we explore the population and patient-specific characteristics for the segmentation of the prostate on CT images. Because population learning does not consider the inter-patient variations and because patient-specific learning may not perform well for different patients, we are combining the population and patient-specific information to improve segmentation performance. Specifically, we train a population model based on the population data and train a patient-specific model based on the manual segmentation on three slice of the new patient. We compute the similarity between the two models to explore the influence of applicable population knowledge on the specific patient. By combining the patient-specific knowledge with the influence, we can capture the population and patient-specific characteristics to calculate the probability of a pixel belonging to the prostate. Finally, we smooth the prostate surface according to the prostate-density value of the pixels in the distance transform image. We conducted the leave-one-out validation experiments on a set of CT volumes from 15 patients. Manual segmentation results from a radiologist serve as the gold standard for the evaluation. Experimental results show that our method achieved an average DSC of 85.1% as compared to the manual segmentation gold standard. This method outperformed the population learning method and the patient-specific learning approach alone. The CT segmentation method can have various applications in prostate cancer diagnosis and therapy. PMID:27660382

  1. Exercise thallium-201 imaging for risk stratification of elderly patients with coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Iskandrian, A.S.; Heo, J.; Decoskey, D.; Askenase, A.; Segal, B.L.

    1988-02-01

    Although coronary artery disease (CAD) may be asymptomatic, it is the most common cause of death in elderly patients in the U.S. This study examined the prognosis of 449 patients with a mean age of 65 years using exercise thallium-201 imaging. At a follow-up of 25 months, 45 patients underwent coronary artery revascularization, 8 died of cardiac causes and 10 had nonfatal acute myocardial infarctions (AMIs). Thus, the total of patients with ''hard'' events was 18. The events included 12 of 276 patients with atypical or non-anginal symptoms versus 6 of 128 with typical angina (p = not significant); 7 of 51 patients (14%) with Q-wave AMI versus 11 of 353 (3%) without Q-wave AMI (p less than 0.001); 1 of 183 patients (1%) with normal versus 17 of 221 (8%) with abnormal exercise thallium-201 images (p less than 0.002); 10 of 76 patients (13%) with multi vessel thallium-201 abnormality vs 8 of 328 (2%) with no or 1-vessel thallium-201 abnormality (p less than 0.001) and 10 of 96 patients (10%) with greater than or equal to 3 abnormal segments by thallium-201 imaging (total segments = 9) versus 8 of 308 patients with no or less than 3 abnormal segments (p less than 0.001). The number of segments with thallium-201 defects was 1 +/- 2 patients without and 3 +/- 2 in patients with hard events (p less than 0.002).

  2. Patient positioning with X-ray detector self-calibration for image guided therapy.

    PubMed

    Selby, Boris Peter; Sakas, Georgios; Groch, Wolfgang-Dieter; Stilla, Uwe

    2011-09-01

    Automatic alignment estimation from projection images has a range of applications, but misaligned cameras induce inaccuracies. Calibration methods for optical cameras requiring calibration bodies or detectable features have been a matter of research for years. Not so for image guided therapy, although exact patient pose recovery is crucial. To image patient anatomy, X-ray instead of optical equipment is used. Feature detection is often infeasible. Furthermore, a method not requiring a calibration body, usable during treatment, would be desirable to improve accuracy of the patient alignment. We present a novel approach not relying on image features but combining intensity based calibration with 3D pose recovery. A stereoscopic X-ray camera model is proposed, and effects of erroneous parameters on the patient alignment are evaluated. The relevant camera parameters are automatically computed by comparison of X-ray to CT images and are incorporated in the patient alignment computation. The methods were tested with ground truth data of an anatomic phantom with artificially produced misalignments and available real-patient images from a particle therapy machine. We show that our approach can compensate patient alignment errors through mis-calibration of a camera from more than 5 mm to below 0.2 mm. Usage of images with artificial noise shows that the method is robust against image degradation of 2-5%. X-ray camera self-calibration improves accuracy when cameras are misaligned. We could show that rigid body alignment was computed more accurately and that self-calibration is possible, even if detection of corresponding image features is not.

  3. Silicon microfabricated beam expander

    SciTech Connect

    Othman, A. Ibrahim, M. N.; Hamzah, I. H.; Sulaiman, A. A.; Ain, M. F.

    2015-03-30

    The feasibility design and development methods of silicon microfabricated beam expander are described. Silicon bulk micromachining fabrication technology is used in producing features of the structure. A high-precision complex 3-D shape of the expander can be formed by exploiting the predictable anisotropic wet etching characteristics of single-crystal silicon in aqueous Potassium-Hydroxide (KOH) solution. The beam-expander consist of two elements, a micromachined silicon reflector chamber and micro-Fresnel zone plate. The micro-Fresnel element is patterned using lithographic methods. The reflector chamber element has a depth of 40 µm, a diameter of 15 mm and gold-coated surfaces. The impact on the depth, diameter of the chamber and absorption for improved performance are discussed.

  4. 3D fluoroscopic image estimation using patient-specific 4DCBCT-based motion models.

    PubMed

    Dhou, S; Hurwitz, M; Mishra, P; Cai, W; Rottmann, J; Li, R; Williams, C; Wagar, M; Berbeco, R; Ionascu, D; Lewis, J H

    2015-05-01

    3D fluoroscopic images represent volumetric patient anatomy during treatment with high spatial and temporal resolution. 3D fluoroscopic images estimated using motion models built using 4DCT images, taken days or weeks prior to treatment, do not reliably represent patient anatomy during treatment. In this study we developed and performed initial evaluation of techniques to develop patient-specific motion models from 4D cone-beam CT (4DCBCT) images, taken immediately before treatment, and used these models to estimate 3D fluoroscopic images based on 2D kV projections captured during treatment. We evaluate the accuracy of 3D fluoroscopic images by comparison to ground truth digital and physical phantom images. The performance of 4DCBCT-based and 4DCT-based motion models are compared in simulated clinical situations representing tumor baseline shift or initial patient positioning errors. The results of this study demonstrate the ability for 4DCBCT imaging to generate motion models that can account for changes that cannot be accounted for with 4DCT-based motion models. When simulating tumor baseline shift and patient positioning errors of up to 5 mm, the average tumor localization error and the 95th percentile error in six datasets were 1.20 and 2.2 mm, respectively, for 4DCBCT-based motion models. 4DCT-based motion models applied to the same six datasets resulted in average tumor localization error and the 95th percentile error of 4.18 and 5.4 mm, respectively. Analysis of voxel-wise intensity differences was also conducted for all experiments. In summary, this study demonstrates the feasibility of 4DCBCT-based 3D fluoroscopic image generation in digital and physical phantoms and shows the potential advantage of 4DCBCT-based 3D fluoroscopic image estimation when there are changes in anatomy between the time of 4DCT imaging and the time of treatment delivery.

  5. Expander plant design

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Expander plant design is iterative. In order to calculate an answer it is necessary to have an answer to start with. Consequently, the starting point for a final design is a function of the experience level of the designer and his personal preference. This paper assumes that the designer has no experience in expander plant design and concentrates on providing methods for assuming an answer that will be close enough to the final answer that the design can be done with a minimum number of iterations. For illustration, several typical process designs are presented.

  6. For richer or poorer? Imageability effects in semantic dementia patients' reading aloud.

    PubMed

    Woollams, Anna M

    2015-09-01

    The degree to which a word's meaning evokes a mental image exerts an influence on performance across a variety of conceptual and linguistic tasks. In normal healthy participants, this effect takes the form of an advantage for high over low imageability words. Consideration of the influence of imageability on performance of patients with semantic dementia can provide information concerning its cognitive and neural bases. Semantic dementia patients show deficits in conceptual processing tasks, and an associated enhancement of the advantage for high over low imageability words. Semantic dementia patients also show deficits in linguistic processing tasks, including reading aloud words with inconsistent spelling-sound correspondences. This study provides the first systematic exploration of the influence of imageability on semantic dementia patients' reading aloud performance. Over 10 cases, the imageability effect seen for inconsistent words was actually reversed in reaction times, with faster performance for low than high imageability items. The same reversal was observed for inconsistent words when the frequency of legitimate alternative reading of components errors was considered, and this reversed effect grew larger with increasing semantic impairment. This result is interpreted in terms of the development of stronger connections along the direct pathway between spelling and sound for low than high imageability items that are then revealed under diminished semantic activation. This interpretation emphasises the interaction between form and meaning that occurs throughout learning in connectionist models.

  7. [The efficacy of treatment using expanded programs of megavolt irradiation and polychemotherapy in patients with lymphogranulomatosis in stages I, II and IIIA].

    PubMed

    Mendeleev, I M; Oleĭnik, V A; Miasnikov, A A; Polezhaev, Iu N

    1990-01-01

    The authors relate the results of multimodality treatment of 90 patients with stages I-IIIA lymphogranulomatosis. The total survival amounted to 86.4 +/- 3.8% within the time exceeding 7 years. The efficacy of the treatment of patients with lymphogranulomatosis of different stages by using multi-beam and broad-beam radiation is under comparison. The data obtained indicate that total radiation of lymph nodes in patients with stage II lymphogranulomatosis is not advisable.

  8. Solitary fibrous tumors in the extremities: imaging findings for six patients.

    PubMed

    Hyodo, Ryota; Komada, Tomohiro; Takada, Akira; Kawai, Hisashi; Ito, Shinji; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Naganawa, Shinji

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) findings for solitary fibrous tumors (SFTs) in the extremities in correlation with histopathological findings. Between 2006 and 2013, 6 consecutive patients with SFT in an extremity were studied with MRI (6 patients) and CT (4 patients). Diffusion-weighted images were also performed in 3 patients and dynamic contrast-enhanced CT in 2 patients. All 6 tumors were diagnosed after surgical excision, and the pre-surgical imaging findings were correlated with the histopathological findings. As a result, all 6 patients were female, and each had a clearly palpable, well-circumscribed, round or oval mass adjacent to fascia in an extremity, of less than 10 cm maximum diameter in 5 patients. On MRI, the tumors were iso-intense with muscle on T1-weighted image, and appeared heterogeneous and high-intensity on T2-weighted image. After injection of a contrast agent, the tumors demonstrated strong enhancement. A vascular pedicle was detected in 4 patients with tumors having a maximum diameter more than 5 cm. Diffusion-weighted images demonstrated high signal intensities, and apparent diffusion coefficient values were iso to high compared to muscle (from 1.41-2.10×10(-3) mm(2)/s). All the tumors were benign histopathologically and clinically. In 1 patient, the imaging appearance revealed underlying histopathological components, including fibrous-rich, cellular-rich, and myxoid change areas. In conclusion, a SFT in an extremity comprises a well-circumscribed mass adjacent to fascia having a fibrous-dominant area, strong contrast enhancement, and a vascular pedicle.

  9. Solitary fibrous tumors in the extremities: imaging findings for six patients.

    PubMed

    Hyodo, Ryota; Komada, Tomohiro; Takada, Akira; Kawai, Hisashi; Ito, Shinji; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Naganawa, Shinji

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) findings for solitary fibrous tumors (SFTs) in the extremities in correlation with histopathological findings. Between 2006 and 2013, 6 consecutive patients with SFT in an extremity were studied with MRI (6 patients) and CT (4 patients). Diffusion-weighted images were also performed in 3 patients and dynamic contrast-enhanced CT in 2 patients. All 6 tumors were diagnosed after surgical excision, and the pre-surgical imaging findings were correlated with the histopathological findings. As a result, all 6 patients were female, and each had a clearly palpable, well-circumscribed, round or oval mass adjacent to fascia in an extremity, of less than 10 cm maximum diameter in 5 patients. On MRI, the tumors were iso-intense with muscle on T1-weighted image, and appeared heterogeneous and high-intensity on T2-weighted image. After injection of a contrast agent, the tumors demonstrated strong enhancement. A vascular pedicle was detected in 4 patients with tumors having a maximum diameter more than 5 cm. Diffusion-weighted images demonstrated high signal intensities, and apparent diffusion coefficient values were iso to high compared to muscle (from 1.41-2.10×10(-3) mm(2)/s). All the tumors were benign histopathologically and clinically. In 1 patient, the imaging appearance revealed underlying histopathological components, including fibrous-rich, cellular-rich, and myxoid change areas. In conclusion, a SFT in an extremity comprises a well-circumscribed mass adjacent to fascia having a fibrous-dominant area, strong contrast enhancement, and a vascular pedicle. PMID:25797981

  10. Elements of the patient-centered medical home associated with health outcomes among veterans: the role of primary care continuity, expanded access, and care coordination.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Karin; Sun, Haili; Dolan, Emily; Maynard, Charles; Beste, Laruen; Bryson, Christopher; Schectman, Gordon; Fihn, Stephan D

    2014-01-01

    Care continuity, access, and coordination are important features of the patient-centered medical home model and have been emphasized in the Veterans Health Administration patient-centered medical home implementation, called the Patient Aligned Care Team. Data from more than 4.3 million Veterans were used to assess the relationship between these attributes of Patient Aligned Care Team and Veterans Health Administration hospitalization and mortality. Controlling for demographics and comorbidity, we found that continuity with a primary care provider was associated with a lower likelihood of hospitalization and mortality among a large population of Veterans receiving VA primary care.

  11. Elements of the patient-centered medical home associated with health outcomes among veterans: the role of primary care continuity, expanded access, and care coordination.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Karin; Sun, Haili; Dolan, Emily; Maynard, Charles; Beste, Laruen; Bryson, Christopher; Schectman, Gordon; Fihn, Stephan D

    2014-01-01

    Care continuity, access, and coordination are important features of the patient-centered medical home model and have been emphasized in the Veterans Health Administration patient-centered medical home implementation, called the Patient Aligned Care Team. Data from more than 4.3 million Veterans were used to assess the relationship between these attributes of Patient Aligned Care Team and Veterans Health Administration hospitalization and mortality. Controlling for demographics and comorbidity, we found that continuity with a primary care provider was associated with a lower likelihood of hospitalization and mortality among a large population of Veterans receiving VA primary care. PMID:25180648

  12. CT imaging features of obturator prostheses in patients following palatectomy or maxillectomy.

    PubMed

    Kumar, V A; Hofstede, T M; Ginsberg, L E

    2011-01-01

    Palatal tumors are often treated with palatectomy or maxillectomy. The resulting surgical defect produces an oroantral communication. An obturator is a removable prosthesis used to close the palatal or maxillectomy defect. Fifteen patients who had undergone palatectomy or maxillectomy for carcinoma and subsequent obturator prosthesis placement were retrospectively studied. Obturators were characterized by Hounsfield units and were subdivided into 3 CT imaging groups: either hyperattenuated, hollow (air-containing), or heterogeneous (isoattenuated to hyperattenuated with internal foci of air). Eight patients had hyperattenuated obturators either representing acrylic resin or Trusoft. Four patients had hollow obturators also composed of acrylic resin or Trusoft. Three patients had heterogeneous obturators, which were composed of only Trusoft. The postoperative imaging of patients treated for palatal or maxillary tumors can be complicated by the presence of obturator prostheses. The intent of this article was to familiarize the reader with the CT imaging features of obturator prostheses. PMID:21799037

  13. Persistent Drug-Induced Parkinsonism in Patients with Normal Dopamine Transporter Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sunwoo, Mun Kyung; Oh, Jungsu S.; Kim, Jae Seung; Sohn, Young H.; Lee, Phil Hyu

    2016-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging for the dopamine transporter (DAT) is used to distinguish drug-induced parkinsonism (DIP) from subclinical Parkinson’s disease (PD). Although DIP patients who show a normal DAT image are expected to recover completely, some do not. We investigated whether these patients showed changes in striatal DAT activity using semi-quantitative analysis of 18F-FP-CIT PET data. DIP patients with visually normal DAT images were selected from medical records. The subjects were classified as patients who recovered partially (PR) or completely within 12 months (CR). The 18F-FP-CIT uptake in each striatal subregion was compared between the CR and the PR groups. In total, 41 and 9 patients of the CR and PR groups were assessed, respectively. The two patient groups were comparable in terms of clinical characteristics including age, sex, and severity of parkinsonism. From semi-quantitative analysis of the PET image, the PR patients showed a relatively lower ligand uptake in the ventral striatum, the anterior putamen and the posterior putamen compared with the CR patients. This result suggests that persistent DIP in patients with visually normal DAT imaging may be associated with subtle decrement of DAT activity. PMID:27294367

  14. Holography and the virtual patient: the holographic medical image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Kathryn; Erickson, Ronald R.; Webster, John M.

    1996-12-01

    Practical holographic systems utilizing the pulsed laser are finding potential applications in medicine. Exploiting both the hologram's true 3D image and holographic interferometry these techniques enhance the physician's vision beyond the 2D radiological imaging of even the best CT and MRI. The authors describe the use of pulsed laser holography as applied to the morphological specialties: anatomy, pathology, and surgery. The authors report on the Holographic Brain Anatomy Atlas for medical education; pathologic documentation with holography, and the use of holographic interferometry in surgical planning. The techniques are outlined and a discussion on the interpretation of holographic interferometry with living subjects is provided.

  15. Expanding Student Assessment Opportunities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartscher, Beth; Carter, Andrea; Lawlor, Anna; McKelvey, Barbara

    This paper describes an approach for expanding assessment opportunities for students to demonstrate their understanding of content. The targeted population consisted of elementary and junior high school students in two schools in a growing middle-class community in north central Illinois. The elementary school enrolled 467 students and the junior…

  16. Expanded Roles for HRD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on expanded roles for human resource development (HRD). "The Roles of Consultants in Gainsharing Firms: Empirical Results" (Eunsang Cho, Gary N. McLean) reports findings that consultants are moderately involved at the separation, preparation, evaluation, and design stages and have low…

  17. Method and system for the diagnosis of disease using retinal image content and an archive of diagnosed human patient data

    DOEpatents

    Tobin, Kenneth W; Karnowski, Thomas P; Chaum, Edward

    2013-08-06

    A method for diagnosing diseases having retinal manifestations including retinal pathologies includes the steps of providing a CBIR system including an archive of stored digital retinal photography images and diagnosed patient data corresponding to the retinal photography images, the stored images each indexed in a CBIR database using a plurality of feature vectors, the feature vectors corresponding to distinct descriptive characteristics of the stored images. A query image of the retina of a patient is obtained. Using image processing, regions or structures in the query image are identified. The regions or structures are then described using the plurality of feature vectors. At least one relevant stored image from the archive based on similarity to the regions or structures is retrieved, and an eye disease or a disease having retinal manifestations in the patient is diagnosed based on the diagnosed patient data associated with the relevant stored image(s).

  18. ExpandED Options: Learning beyond High School Walls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ExpandED Schools, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Through ExpandED Options by TASC, New York City high school students get academic credit for learning career-related skills that lead to paid summer jobs. Too many high school students--including those most likely to drop out--are bored or see classroom learning as irrelevant. ExpandED Options students live the connection between mastering new…

  19. Multimode C-arm fluoroscopy, tomosynthesis, and cone-beam CT for image-guided interventions: from proof of principle to patient protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siewerdsen, J. H.; Daly, M. J.; Bachar, G.; Moseley, D. J.; Bootsma, G.; Brock, K. K.; Ansell, S.; Wilson, G. A.; Chhabra, S.; Jaffray, D. A.; Irish, J. C.

    2007-03-01

    High-performance intraoperative imaging is essential to an ever-expanding scope of therapeutic procedures ranging from tumor surgery to interventional radiology. The need for precise visualization of bony and soft-tissue structures with minimal obstruction to the therapy setup presents challenges and opportunities in the development of novel imaging technologies specifically for image-guided procedures. Over the past ~5 years, a mobile C-arm has been modified in collaboration with Siemens Medical Solutions for 3D imaging. Based upon a Siemens PowerMobil, the device includes: a flat-panel detector (Varian PaxScan 4030CB); a motorized orbit; a system for geometric calibration; integration with real-time tracking and navigation (NDI Polaris); and a computer control system for multi-mode fluoroscopy, tomosynthesis, and cone-beam CT. Investigation of 3D imaging performance (noise-equivalent quanta), image quality (human observer studies), and image artifacts (scatter, truncation, and cone-beam artifacts) has driven the development of imaging techniques appropriate to a host of image-guided interventions. Multi-mode functionality presents a valuable spectrum of acquisition techniques: i.) fluoroscopy for real-time 2D guidance; ii.) limited-angle tomosynthesis for fast 3D imaging (e.g., ~10 sec acquisition of coronal slices containing the surgical target); and iii.) fully 3D cone-beam CT (e.g., ~30-60 sec acquisition providing bony and soft-tissue visualization across the field of view). Phantom and cadaver studies clearly indicate the potential for improved surgical performance - up to a factor of 2 increase in challenging surgical target excisions. The C-arm system is currently being deployed in patient protocols ranging from brachytherapy to chest, breast, spine, and head and neck surgery.

  20. Anterior segment spectral domain optical coherence tomography imaging of patients with anterior scleritis.

    PubMed

    Levison, Ashleigh L; Lowder, Careen Y; Baynes, Kimberly M; Kaiser, Peter K; Srivastava, Sunil K

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe the findings seen on anterior segment spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) in patients with anterior scleritis and determine the feasibility of using SD-OCT to image and grade the degree of scleral inflammation and monitor response to treatment. All patients underwent slit lamp examination by a uveitis specialist, and the degree of scleral inflammation was recorded. Spectral domain OCT imaging was then performed of the conjunctiva and scleral tissue using a standardized acquisition protocol. The scans were graded and compared to clinical findings. Twenty-eight patients with anterior scleritis and ten patients without ocular disease were included in the study. Seventeen of the scleritis patients were followed longitudinally. Common findings on SD-OCT in patients with active scleritis included changes in hyporeflectivity within the sclera, nodules, and visible vessels within the sclera. There was significant variation in findings on SD-OCT within each clinical grade of active scleritis. These changes on SD-OCT improved with treatment and clinical improvement. SD-OCT imaging provided various objective measures that could be used in the future to grade inflammatory activity in patients with anterior scleritis. Longitudinal imaging of patients with active scleritis demonstrated that SD-OCT may have great utility in monitoring response to treatment.

  1. Assessment of patient selection criteria for quantitative imaging with respiratory-gated positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Stephen R; Pierce, Larry A; Alessio, Adam M; Liu, Chi; Wollenweber, Scott D; Stearns, Charles W; Kinahan, Paul E

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this investigation was to propose techniques for determining which patients are likely to benefit from quantitative respiratory-gated imaging by correlating respiratory patterns to changes in positron emission tomography (PET) metrics. Twenty-six lung and liver cancer patients underwent PET/computed tomography exams with recorded chest/abdominal displacements. Static and adaptive amplitude-gated [[Formula: see text

  2. Overuse of imaging the male breast-findings in 557 patients.

    PubMed

    Lapid, Oren; Siebenga, Pieter; Zonderland, Harmien M

    2015-01-01

    Gynecomastia is the most common abnormality of the male breast. However, breast cancer may occur, albeit with a significantly lower incidence than in females. Imaging is often used as part of the diagnosis. The aim of this study was to assess the utilization and outcome of imaging with mammography or ultrasound of the male breast in a university hospital's department of radiology. A retrospective study assessing the imaging of the male breast in 557 patients over a 10-year period. Referral was done mainly by general surgeons and general practitioners. The most common indication was enlargement of the breast, described as gynecomastia or swelling in 74% of patients, followed by pain in 24% and "lumps" in 10%. The modalities used were mammography in 65%, ultrasound in 51% and both in 26%. Most examinations, 519, were BI-RADS 1 or 2, and 38 were BI-RADS 3 or higher. Altogether 160 patients had additional fine-needle aspiration or biopsy. Malignancies were diagnosed in five patients (0.89%). Imaging had a sensitivity of 80% and a specificity of 99%. The positive predictive value was 44% and the negative predictive value 99.8%. Malignancies are rare in the male breast. The probability of finding cancer when performing imaging of clinically benign findings in the male breast is negligible. Imaging is not warranted unless there are suspicious abnormalities. Routine imaging of gynecomastia should be discouraged.

  3. DRR and portal image registration for automatic patient positioning in radiotherapy treatment.

    PubMed

    Bastida-Jumilla, Ma Consuelo; Larrey-Ruiz, Jorge; Verdú-Monedero, Rafael; Morales-Sánchez, Juan; Sancho-Gómez, José-Luis

    2011-12-01

    Image processing turns out to be essential in the planning and verification of radiotherapy treatments. Before applying a radiotherapy treatment, a dosimetry planning must be performed. Usually, the planning is done by means of an X-ray volumetric analysis using computerized tomography, where the area to be radiated is marked out. During the treatment phase, it is necessary to place the patient under the particle accelerator exactly as considered in the dosimetry stage. Coarse alignment is achieved using fiduciary markers placed over the patient's skin as external references. Later, fine alignment is provided by comparing a digitally reconstructed radiography (DRR) from the planning stage and a portal image captured by the accelerator in the treatment stage. The preprocessing of DRR and portal images, as well as the minimization of the non-shared information between both kinds of images, is mandatory for the correct operation of the image registration algorithm. With this purpose, mathematical morphology and image processing techniques have been used. The present work describes a fully automatic method to calculate more accurately the necessary displacement of the couch to place the patient exactly at the planned position. The proposed method to achieve the correct positioning of the patient is based on advanced image registration techniques. Preliminary results show a perfect match with the displacement estimated by the physician.

  4. DRR and portal image registration for automatic patient positioning in radiotherapy treatment.

    PubMed

    Bastida-Jumilla, Ma Consuelo; Larrey-Ruiz, Jorge; Verdú-Monedero, Rafael; Morales-Sánchez, Juan; Sancho-Gómez, José-Luis

    2011-12-01

    Image processing turns out to be essential in the planning and verification of radiotherapy treatments. Before applying a radiotherapy treatment, a dosimetry planning must be performed. Usually, the planning is done by means of an X-ray volumetric analysis using computerized tomography, where the area to be radiated is marked out. During the treatment phase, it is necessary to place the patient under the particle accelerator exactly as considered in the dosimetry stage. Coarse alignment is achieved using fiduciary markers placed over the patient's skin as external references. Later, fine alignment is provided by comparing a digitally reconstructed radiography (DRR) from the planning stage and a portal image captured by the accelerator in the treatment stage. The preprocessing of DRR and portal images, as well as the minimization of the non-shared information between both kinds of images, is mandatory for the correct operation of the image registration algorithm. With this purpose, mathematical morphology and image processing techniques have been used. The present work describes a fully automatic method to calculate more accurately the necessary displacement of the couch to place the patient exactly at the planned position. The proposed method to achieve the correct positioning of the patient is based on advanced image registration techniques. Preliminary results show a perfect match with the displacement estimated by the physician. PMID:21455811

  5. Percutaneous Implantation of the self-expanding valve Prosthesis a patient with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia severe aortic stenosis and porcelain aorta.

    PubMed

    Sahiner, Levent; Asil, Serkan; Kaya, Ergün Baris; Ozer, Necla; Aytemir, Kudret

    2016-10-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has shown favorable outcomes in patients with severe symptomatic aortic valve stenosis who are at high surgical risk or inappropriate for open heart surgery. However, concerns exist over treating patients who have porcelain aorta and familial hypercholesterolemia, due to the potential complications of aortic root and aortic annulus. In this case report, we present a patient with familial hypercholesterolemia, symptomatic severe aortic stenosis, previous coronary artery bypass grafting and porcelain aorta, who was successfully treated with TAVI using a CoreValve. PMID:27393846

  6. Abnormal brain magnetic resonance imaging in two patients with Smith-Magenis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Maya, Idit; Vinkler, Chana; Konen, Osnat; Kornreich, Liora; Steinberg, Tamar; Yeshaya, Josepha; Latarowski, Victoria; Shohat, Mordechai; Lev, Dorit; Baris, Hagit N

    2014-08-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a clinically recognizable contiguous gene syndrome ascribed to an interstitial deletion in chromosome 17p11.2. Seventy percent of SMS patients have a common deletion interval spanning 3.5 megabases (Mb). Clinical features of SMS include characteristic mild dysmorphic features, ocular anomalies, short stature, brachydactyly, and hypotonia. SMS patients have a unique neurobehavioral phenotype that includes intellectual disability, self-injurious behavior and severe sleep disturbance. Little has been reported in the medical literature about anatomical brain anomalies in patients with SMS. Here we describe two patients with SMS caused by the common deletion in 17p11.2 diagnosed using chromosomal microarray (CMA). Both patients had a typical clinical presentation and abnormal brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. One patient had subependymal periventricular gray matter heterotopia, and the second had a thin corpus callosum, a thin brain stem and hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis. This report discusses the possible abnormal MRI images in SMS and reviews the literature on brain malformations in SMS. Finally, although structural brain malformations in SMS patients are not a common feature, we suggest baseline routine brain imaging in patients with SMS in particular, and in patients with chromosomal microdeletion/microduplication syndromes in general. Structural brain malformations in these patients may affect the decision-making process regarding their management.

  7. Imaging-based management of acute ischemic stroke patients: current neuroradiological perspectives.

    PubMed

    Na, Dong Gyu; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Kim, Eung Yeop

    2015-01-01

    Advances in imaging-based management of acute ischemic stroke now provide crucial information such as infarct core, ischemic penumbra/degree of collaterals, vessel occlusion, and thrombus that helps in the selection of the best candidates for reperfusion therapy. It also predicts thrombolytic efficacy and benefit or potential hazards from therapy. Thus, radiologists should be familiar with various imaging studies for patients with acute ischemic stroke and the applicability to clinical trials. This helps radiologists to obtain optimal rapid imaging as well as its accurate interpretation. This review is focused on imaging studies for acute ischemic stroke, including their roles in recent clinical trials and some guidelines to optimal interpretation.

  8. Vaccination of pediatric solid tumor patients with tumor lysate-pulsed dendritic cells can expand specific T cells and mediate tumor regression.

    PubMed

    Geiger, J D; Hutchinson, R J; Hohenkirk, L F; McKenna, E A; Yanik, G A; Levine, J E; Chang, A E; Braun, T M; Mulé, J J

    2001-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) have been shown to be a promising adjuvant for inducing immunity to cancer. We evaluated tumor lysate-pulsed DC in a Phase I trial of pediatric patients with solid tumors. Children with relapsed solid malignancies who had failed standard therapies were eligible. The vaccine used immature DC (CD14-, CD80+, CD86+, CD83-, and HLA-DR+) generated from peripheral blood monocytes in the presence of granulocyte/monocyte colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-4. These DC were then pulsed separately with tumor cell lysates and the immunogenic protein keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) for 24 h and then combined. A total of 1 x 10(6) to 1 x 10(7) DC are administered intradermally every 2 weeks for a total of three vaccinations. Fifteen patients (ages 3-17 years) were enrolled with 10 patients completing all vaccinations. Leukapheresis yields averaged 2.8 x 10(8) peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC)/kg, and DC yields averaged 10.9% of starting PBMC. Patients with neuroblastoma, sarcoma, and renal malignancies were treated without obvious toxicity. Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response was detected in 7 of 10 patients for KLH and 3 of 6 patients for tumor lysates. Priming of T cells to KLH was seen in 6 of 10 patients and to tumor in 3 of 7 patients as demonstrated by specific IFN-gamma-secreting T cells in unstimulated PBMCs. Significant regression of multiple metastatic sites was seen in 1 patient. Five patients showed stable disease, including 3 who had minimal disease at time of vaccine therapy and remain free of tumor with 16-30 months follow-up. Our results demonstrate that it is feasible to generate large numbers of functional DC from pediatric patients even in those highly pretreated and with a large tumor burden. The DC can be administered in an outpatient setting without any observable toxicity. Most importantly, we have demonstrated the ability of the tumor lysate/KLH-pulsed DC to generate specific T-cell responses and to elicit

  9. The risk of lymph node metastasis makes it unsafe to expand the conventional indications for endoscopic treatment of T1 colorectal cancer: A retrospective study of 428 patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bun; Kim, Eun Hye; Park, Soo Jung; Cheon, Jae Hee; Kim, Tae Il; Kim, Won Ho; Kim, Hoguen; Hong, Sung Pil

    2016-09-01

    Though endoscopic treatment is an option for T1 colorectal cancer (CRC), the optimal indications and long-term outcomes of this strategy need to be validated. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate long-term outcomes of endoscopy versus surgery and optimal indications for endoscopic treatment of T1 CRC.This retrospective study included 428 T1 CRC patients treated with initial endoscopy (n = 224) or surgery (n = 204) at Severance Hospital between 2005 and 2012. Patients were subdivided into 4 groups according to conventional indications (CIs) for endoscopic treatment: negative lateral/vertical margins; submucosal invasion depth within 1000 μm; no lymphovascular invasion (LVI); well or moderately differentiated. For prognosis evaluation, short-term outcomes (resection margin and complications) and long-term outcomes (recurrence and cancer-specific mortality) were evaluated.Endoscopic treatment achieved en bloc resection in 86.6% of 224 patients. Recurrence and mortality did not differ between the endoscopy and surgery groups with or without CIs. For patients with CIs, although 80 patients were treated endoscopically with 1 (1.3%) recurrence and 0 mortality, 75 patients were treated surgically with 2 (2.7%) recurrence and 1 (1.3%) mortality. Multivariate analysis revealed that LVI positivity and poorly differentiated histology were independently associated with lymph node metastasis (LNM; P < 0.001 and P = 0.001, respectively).To determine whether the depth of submucosal invasion among criteria of CIs could be extended for endoscopic treatment, LNM was analyzed by extending the depth of submucosal invasion. There was no LNM in 155 patients within conventional indication. When the depth of submucosal invasion was extended up to 1500 μm, LNM was occurred (1/197 patient [0.5%]). In addition, when the depth of submucosal invasion was extended up to 2000 μm, LNM was increased (4/271 patient [1.5%]).Endoscopic treatment is safe

  10. Selection of patients for preoperative coronary angiography: use of dipyridamole-stress--thallium myocardial imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Brewster, D.C.; Okada, R.D.; Strauss, H.W.; Abbott, W.M.; Darling, R.C.; Boucher, C.A.

    1985-05-01

    To identify patients likely to benefit from preoperative coronary angiography, a method utilizing pharmacologically induced coronary vasodilatation in conjunction with serial thallium 201 myocardial perfusion imaging was investigated. Fifty-four patients admitted for elective aortic or femoropopliteal procedures were studied. There were no cardiac ischemic complications in 32 patients with normal scans or persistent defects (scar). In contrast, 7 of 15 patients with thallium redistribution (ischemia) on pre-operative scanning had perioperative ischemic events, including one death and two acute infarcts. An additional seven patients with positive scans (redistribution) underwent coronary angiography prior to vascular surgery; surgically important two- or three-vessel disease was confirmed in all. Dipyridamole-thallium imaging facilitates selection of the subset of truly high-risk patients in whom preoperative coronary angiography may be warranted.

  11. Diagnoses in Pediatric Patients With Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Lesions Suspicious for Demyelination.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Michael L; Kukreja, Marcia; Horn, Paul S; Standridge, Shannon M

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of the brain in pediatric patients frequently show abnormal white matter lesions, which may be concerning for demyelinating disease. This study aimed to determine the proportion of pediatric patients who have MRI lesions concerning for demyelinating disease at presentation and ultimately are diagnosed with a primary central nervous system demyelinating disease. A retrospective chart review was performed on MRI reports of patients who underwent imaging evaluation at a single tertiary pediatric hospital. Of 299 patients identified, 192 presented with acute neurologic complaints. In this group, ≥ 5 discrete lesions, African American race, and having brain stem, thalamic, cerebellar, or optic nerve lesions was associated with the patient being diagnosed with a disease that required further treatment. The other 107 patients underwent MRI for other indications. Among these subjects, having lesions within the corpus callosum or cerebellum was associated with being diagnosed with a disease requiring further treatment.

  12. Multiplane transesophageal echocardiography: a basic oblique plane patient imaging sequence.

    PubMed

    Griffin, M; Rafferty, T

    1998-01-01

    We have previously reported a standardized 10-step sequence of monoplane (transverse plane) transesophageal two-dimensional echocardiographic views and a standardized 7-step vertical plane examination, both suitable for expeditious intraoperative use by the beginning practitioner. A multiplane transesophageal examination involves transverse plane views, vertical plane views and the remaining "in-between" oblique plane views. This report describes a sequence of specific oblique views to be used as a framework for the completion of a multiplane transesophageal examination. Each of these steps is illustrated with a two-dimensional echocardiographic image, a matching diagram and a schematic representation of the corresponding axis of interrogation. This description of oblique plane imaging, therefore, completes the components of a multiplane transesophageal examination.

  13. Wide-Field Megahertz OCT Imaging of Patients with Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Reznicek, Lukas; Kolb, Jan P.; Klein, Thomas; Mohler, Kathrin J.; Wieser, Wolfgang; Huber, Robert; Kernt, Marcus; Märtz, Josef; Neubauer, Aljoscha S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the feasibility of wide-field Megahertz (MHz) OCT imaging in patients with diabetic retinopathy. Methods. A consecutive series of 15 eyes of 15 patients with diagnosed diabetic retinopathy were included. All patients underwent Megahertz OCT imaging, a close clinical examination, slit lamp biomicroscopy, and funduscopic evaluation. To acquire densely sampled, wide-field volumetric datasets, an ophthalmic 1050 nm OCT prototype system based on a Fourier-domain mode-locked (FDML) laser source with 1.68 MHz A-scan rate was employed. Results. We were able to obtain OCT volume scans from all included 15 patients. Acquisition time was 1.8 seconds. Obtained volume datasets consisted of 2088 × 1044 A-scans of 60° of view. Thus, reconstructed en face images had a resolution of 34.8 pixels per degree in x-axis and 17.4 pixels per degree. Due to the densely sampled OCT volume dataset, postprocessed customized cross-sectional B-frames through pathologic changes such as an individual microaneurysm or a retinal neovascularization could be imaged. Conclusions. Wide-field Megahertz OCT is feasible to successfully image patients with diabetic retinopathy at high scanning rates and a wide angle of view, providing information in all three axes. The Megahertz OCT is a useful tool to screen diabetic patients for diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26273665

  14. Feasibility of patient dose reduction based on various noise suppression filters for cone-beam computed tomography in an image-guided patient positioning system.

    PubMed

    Kamezawa, Hidemi; Arimura, Hidetaka; Shirieda, Katsutoshi; Kameda, Noboru; Ohki, Masafumi

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the feasibility of patient dose reduction based on six noise suppression filters for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in an image-guided patient positioning (IGPP) system. A midpoint dose was employed as a patient dose index. First, a reference dose (RD) and low-dose (LD)-CBCT images were acquired with a reference dose and various low doses. Second, an automated rigid registration was performed for three axis translations to estimate patient setup errors between a planning CT image and the LD-CBCT images processed by six noise suppression filters (averaging filter, median filter, Gaussian filter, edge-preserving smoothing filter, bilateral filter, and adaptive partial median filter (AMF)). Third, residual errors representing the patient positioning accuracy were calculated as Euclidean distances between the setup error vectors estimated using the LD-CBCT and RD-CBCT images. Finally, the residual errors as a function of the patient dose index were estimated for LD-CBCT images processed by six noise suppression filters, and then the patient dose indices for the filtered LD-CBCT images were obtained at the same residual error as the RD-CBCT image. This approach was applied to an anthropomorphic phantom and four cancer patients. The patient dose for the LD-CBCT images was reduced to 19% of that for the RD-CBCT image for the phantom by using AMF, while keeping a same residual error of 0.47 mm as the RD-CBCT image by applying the noise suppression filters to the LD-CBCT images. The average patient dose was reduced to 31.1% for prostate cancer patients, and it was reduced to 82.5% for a lung cancer patient by applying the AMF. These preliminary results suggested that the proposed approach based on noise suppression filters could decrease the patient dose in IGPP systems.

  15. Feasibility of patient dose reduction based on various noise suppression filters for cone-beam computed tomography in an image-guided patient positioning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamezawa, Hidemi; Arimura, Hidetaka; Shirieda, Katsutoshi; Kameda, Noboru; Ohki, Masafumi

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the feasibility of patient dose reduction based on six noise suppression filters for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in an image-guided patient positioning (IGPP) system. A midpoint dose was employed as a patient dose index. First, a reference dose (RD) and low-dose (LD)-CBCT images were acquired with a reference dose and various low doses. Second, an automated rigid registration was performed for three axis translations to estimate patient setup errors between a planning CT image and the LD-CBCT images processed by six noise suppression filters (averaging filter, median filter, Gaussian filter, edge-preserving smoothing filter, bilateral filter, and adaptive partial median filter (AMF)). Third, residual errors representing the patient positioning accuracy were calculated as Euclidean distances between the setup error vectors estimated using the LD-CBCT and RD-CBCT images. Finally, the residual errors as a function of the patient dose index were estimated for LD-CBCT images processed by six noise suppression filters, and then the patient dose indices for the filtered LD-CBCT images were obtained at the same residual error as the RD-CBCT image. This approach was applied to an anthropomorphic phantom and four cancer patients. The patient dose for the LD-CBCT images was reduced to 19% of that for the RD-CBCT image for the phantom by using AMF, while keeping a same residual error of 0.47 mm as the RD-CBCT image by applying the noise suppression filters to the LD-CBCT images. The average patient dose was reduced to 31.1% for prostate cancer patients, and it was reduced to 82.5% for a lung cancer patient by applying the AMF. These preliminary results suggested that the proposed approach based on noise suppression filters could decrease the patient dose in IGPP systems.

  16. Body image concerns of psoriasis patients as reflected in human figure drawings.

    PubMed

    Leichtman, S R; Burnett, J W; Robinson, H M

    1981-10-01

    Human figure drawings of patients with severe (n = 85) and mild (n = 38) psoriasis were compared on dimensions of nudity, sexual overemphasis, and omissions of exposed body parts. For female patients significant differences were found for percentages of undressed figures and omissions. For male patients only omissions were significant. When compared to 30 patients with other mild dermatologic conditions, mildly affected psoriatic males drew significantly fewer omissions. Discussion of results focussed on body image concerns of dermatology patients as related to issues of nudity, sexuality, and exhibition of exposed body parts. PMID:7288544

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of the chest in the evaluation of cancer patients: state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Guimaraes, Marcos Duarte; Hochhegger, Bruno; Santos, Marcel Koenigkam; Santana, Pablo Rydz Pinheiro; Sousa, Arthur Soares; Souza, Luciana Soares; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has several advantages in the evaluation of cancer patients with thoracic lesions, including involvement of the chest wall, pleura, lungs, mediastinum, esophagus and heart. It is a quite useful tool in the diagnosis, staging, surgical planning, treatment response evaluation and follow-up of these patients. In the present review, the authors contextualize the relevance of MRI in the evaluation of thoracic lesions in cancer patients. Considering that MRI is a widely available method with high contrast and spatial resolution and without the risks associated with the use of ionizing radiation, its use combined with new techniques such as cine-MRI and functional methods such as perfusion- and diffusion-weighted imaging may be useful as an alternative tool with performance comparable or complementary to conventional radiological methods such as radiography, computed tomography and PET/CT imaging in the evaluation of patients with thoracic neoplasias. PMID:25798006

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of the chest in the evaluation of cancer patients: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Guimaraes, Marcos Duarte; Hochhegger, Bruno; Santos, Marcel Koenigkam; Santana, Pablo Rydz Pinheiro; Sousa, Arthur Soares; Souza, Luciana Soares; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has several advantages in the evaluation of cancer patients with thoracic lesions, including involvement of the chest wall, pleura, lungs, mediastinum, esophagus and heart. It is a quite useful tool in the diagnosis, staging, surgical planning, treatment response evaluation and follow-up of these patients. In the present review, the authors contextualize the relevance of MRI in the evaluation of thoracic lesions in cancer patients. Considering that MRI is a widely available method with high contrast and spatial resolution and without the risks associated with the use of ionizing radiation, its use combined with new techniques such as cine-MRI and functional methods such as perfusion- and diffusion-weighted imaging may be useful as an alternative tool with performance comparable or complementary to conventional radiological methods such as radiography, computed tomography and PET/CT imaging in the evaluation of patients with thoracic neoplasias.

  19. Recent advances in MRI technology: Implications for image quality and patient safety

    PubMed Central

    Sobol, Wlad T.

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in MRI technology are presented, with emphasis on how this new technology impacts clinical operations (better image quality, faster exam times, and improved throughput). In addition, implications for patient safety are discussed with emphasis on the risk of patient injury due to either high local specific absorption rate (SAR) or large cumulative energy doses delivered during long exam times. Patient comfort issues are examined as well. PMID:23961024

  20. Three-dimensional reconstruction of registered and fused Chinese Visible Human and patient MRI images.

    PubMed

    Li, L; Liu, Y X; Song, Z J

    2006-04-01

    Radiological images are commonly used as important tools in medical diagnoses and treatment. Different modalities of medical images provide uniquely different content. Hence, it is natural and desirable to combine different image modalities to obtain additional new information to enhance clinical assessment. However, given the current technology, radiological images are not always sufficiently informative to permit diagnosis and treatment. In order to address this problem, we fused selected portions of the Chinese Visible Human (CVH) dataset with MRI images from a patient. Specifically, we segmented the caudate nucleus, the lentiform nucleus, and the thalamus in the CVH dataset and then registered and fused this dataset with corresponding MRI images using both rigid and nonrigid registration techniques. After rigid and nonrigid registration, the CVH and MRI images largely coincided with each other. The shape, relationship, and position of focal areas and neural structures were clearly displayed. Using volume and surface rendering, these images were three-dimensionally reconstructed to display the neural structures of interest within the brain. These structures can be rotated at will and observed from different angles. Our research indicates that the fusion of CVH and patients' MRI images can enhance the amount of neural information available to physicians and lay a foundation for the clinical use of the CVH dataset. PMID:16506210

  1. High-Resolution Imaging of Patients with Bietti Crystalline Dystrophy with CYP4V2 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Gocho, Kiyoko; Kameya, Shuhei; Akeo, Keiichiro; Kikuchi, Sachiko; Usui, Ayumi; Yamaki, Kunihiko; Hayashi, Takaaki; Tsuneoka, Hiroshi; Mizota, Atsushi; Takahashi, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the retinal morphology of eyes with Bietti crystalline dystrophy (BCD) associated with a CYP4V2 mutation using high-resolution imaging techniques. Three subjects with BCD underwent detailed ophthalmic examinations. High-resolution fundus images were obtained with an adaptive optics (AO) fundus camera. A common homozygous mutation was detected in the three patients. Funduscopic examination of the three patients revealed the presence of crystalline deposits in the retina, and all of the crystalline deposits were also detected in the infrared (IR) images. The crystals observed in the IR images were seen as bright reflective plaques located on the RPE layer in the SD-OCT images. The clusters of hyperreflective signals in the AO images corresponded to the crystals in the IR images. High-magnification AO images revealed that the clusters of hyperreflective signals consisted of circular spots that are similar to the signals of cone photoreceptors. Most of these circular spots were detected in healthy areas in the FAF images. There is a possibility that circular spots observed by AO are residual cone photoreceptors located over the crystals. PMID:25276414

  2. Dose reduction and image quality optimizations in CT of pediatric and adult patients: phantom studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, P.-H.; Lee, C.-L.; Kim, D.-H.; Lee, Y.-J.; Jeon, S.-S.; Kim, H.-J.

    2014-03-01

    Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) can be used to easily and rapidly perform numerous acquisitions, possibly leading to a marked increase in the radiation dose to individual patients. Technical options dedicated to automatically adjusting the acquisition parameters according to the patient's size are of specific interest in pediatric radiology. A constant tube potential reduction can be achieved for adults and children, while maintaining a constant detector energy fluence. To evaluate radiation dose, the weighted CT dose index (CTDIw) was calculated based on the CT dose index (CTDI) measured using an ion chamber, and image noise and image contrast were measured from a scanned image to evaluate image quality. The dose-weighted contrast-to-noise ratio (CNRD) was calculated from the radiation dose, image noise, and image contrast measured from a scanned image. The noise derivative (ND) is a quality index for dose efficiency. X-ray spectra with tube voltages ranging from 80 to 140 kVp were used to compute the average photon energy. Image contrast and the corresponding contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were determined for lesions of soft tissue, muscle, bone, and iodine relative to a uniform water background, as the iodine contrast increases at lower energy (i.e., k-edge of iodine is 33 keV closer to the beam energy) using mixed water-iodine contrast normalization (water 0, iodine 25, 100, 200, and 1000 HU, respectively). The proposed values correspond to high quality images and can be reduced if only high-contrast organs are assessed. The potential benefit of lowering the tube voltage is an improved CNRD, resulting in a lower radiation dose and optimization of image quality. Adjusting the tube potential in abdominal CT would be useful in current pediatric radiography, where the choice of X-ray techniques generally takes into account the size of the patient as well as the need to balance the conflicting requirements of diagnostic image quality and radiation dose

  3. Expandable LED array interconnect

    DOEpatents

    Yuan, Thomas Cheng-Hsin; Keller, Bernd

    2011-03-01

    A light emitting device that can function as an array element in an expandable array of such devices. The light emitting device comprises a substrate that has a top surface and a plurality of edges. Input and output terminals are mounted to the top surface of the substrate. Both terminals comprise a plurality of contact pads disposed proximate to the edges of the substrate, allowing for easy access to both terminals from multiple edges of the substrate. A lighting element is mounted to the top surface of the substrate. The lighting element is connected between the input and output terminals. The contact pads provide multiple access points to the terminals which allow for greater flexibility in design when the devices are used as array elements in an expandable array.

  4. Grazing incidence beam expander

    SciTech Connect

    Akkapeddi, P.R.; Glenn, P.; Fuschetto, A.; Appert, Q.; Viswanathan, V.K.

    1985-01-01

    A Grazing Incidence Beam Expander (GIBE) telescope is being designed and fabricated to be used as an equivalent end mirror in a long laser resonator cavity. The design requirements for this GIBE flow down from a generic Free Electron Laser (FEL) resonator. The nature of the FEL gain volume (a thin, pencil-like, on-axis region) dictates that the output beam be very small. Such a thin beam with the high power levels characteristic of FELs would have to travel perhaps hundreds of meters or more before expanding enough to allow reflection from cooled mirrors. A GIBE, on the other hand, would allow placing these optics closer to the gain region and thus reduces the cavity lengths substantially. Results are presented relating to optical and mechanical design, alignment sensitivity analysis, radius of curvature analysis, laser cavity stability analysis of a linear stable concentric laser cavity with a GIBE. Fabrication details of the GIBE are also given.

  5. Discovering the Expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussbaumer, Harry; Bieri, Lydia; Sandage, Foreword by Allan

    2009-03-01

    Acknowledgments; Foreword; 1. Introduction; 2. Cosmological concepts at the end of the Middle Ages; 3. Nebulae as a new astronomical phenomenon; 4. On the construction of the Heavens; 5. Island universes turn into astronomical facts: a universe of galaxies; 6. The early cosmology of Einstein and de Sitter; 7. The dynamical universe of Friedmann; 8. Redshifts: how to reconcile Slipher and de Sitter?; 9. Lemaître discovers the expanding universe; 10. Hubble's contribution of 1929; 11. The breakthrough for the expanding universe; 12. Hubble's anger about de Sitter; 13. Robertson and Tolman join the game; 14. The Einstein-de Sitter universe; 15. Are Sun and Earth older than the universe?; 16. In search of alternative tracks; 17. The seed for the Big Bang; 18. Summary and Postscript; Appendix; References; Index.

  6. Imaging Features of Pulmonary CT in Type 2 Diabetic Patients with Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hongbo; Ren, Yanwei; Lu, Xiwei

    2016-01-01

    Background Until now, radiographic manifestations of multidrug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis (MDR- TB) in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) have not been reported. We conducted a study to investigate the imaging features of pulmonary computed tomography (CT) for type 2 diabetic (T2DM) patients with MDR-TB. Methods The clinical data and pulmonary CT findings of 39 type 2 diabetic patients with MDR-TB, 46 type 2 diabetic patients with drug-susceptible tuberculosis (DS-TB), and 72 pure drug-susceptible TB cases (without T2DM and MDR) treated at Dalian Tuberculosis Hospital from 2012 to 2015 were collected, and the clinical features and imaging differences of the three groups were compared. Results The clinical characteristics of the three groups of patients were not significantly different except with respect to age and previous treatment history. However, on imaging, the patients with MDR-TB showed consolidation in and above the pulmonary segments was significantly more extensive than that seen in the DS-TB group with or without T2DM. Conclusion Consolidation in or above multiple pulmonary segments with multiple mouth-eaten cavities and bronchial damage on pulmonary CT images in type 2 diabetic patients with tuberculosis suggests the possibility of multi-drug resistance. PMID:27022735

  7. Targeted positron emission tomography imaging of CXCR4 expression in patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Herhaus, Peter; Habringer, Stefan; Philipp-Abbrederis, Kathrin; Vag, Tibor; Gerngross, Carlos; Schottelius, Margret; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Steiger, Katja; Altmann, Torben; Weißer, Tanja; Steidle, Sabine; Schick, Markus; Jacobs, Laura; Slawska, Jolanta; Müller-Thomas, Catharina; Verbeek, Mareike; Subklewe, Marion; Peschel, Christian; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Schwaiger, Markus; Götze, Katharina; Keller, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia originates from leukemia-initiating cells that reside in the protective bone marrow niche. CXCR4/CXCL12 interaction is crucially involved in recruitment and retention of leukemia-initiating cells within this niche. Various drugs targeting this pathway have entered clinical trials. To evaluate CXCR4 imaging in acute myeloid leukemia, we first tested CXCR4 expression in patient-derived primary blasts. Flow cytometry revealed that high blast counts in patients with acute myeloid leukemia correlate with high CXCR4 expression. The wide range of CXCR4 surface expression in patients was reflected in cell lines of acute myeloid leukemia. Next, we evaluated the CXCR4-specific peptide Pentixafor by positron emission tomography imaging in mice harboring CXCR4 positive and CXCR4 negative leukemia xenografts, and in 10 patients with active disease. [68Ga]Pentixafor-positron emission tomography showed specific measurable disease in murine CXCR4 positive xenografts, but not when CXCR4 was knocked out with CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing. Five of 10 patients showed tracer uptake correlating well with leukemia infiltration assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. The mean maximal standard uptake value was significantly higher in visually CXCR4 positive patients compared to CXCR4 negative patients. In summary, in vivo molecular CXCR4 imaging by means of positron emission tomography is feasible in acute myeloid leukemia. These data provide a framework for future diagnostic and theranostic approaches targeting the CXCR4/CXCL12-defined leukemia-initiating cell niche. PMID:27175029

  8. Prevalence of microdeletion 22q11 in patients with hypernasal speech due to velopharyngeal insufficiency: Expanded phenotype and clinical comparison to nondeletion

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel-Bartelt, J.; Cytrynbaum, C.; Witzel, M.A.; Teshima, I.E.

    1994-09-01

    Microdeletion 22q11.2 has been reported as a frequent ethiology of both velocardiofacial (VCF) and DiGeorge syndromes. We have studied the prevalence of microdeletion 22q11 in a group of patients ascertained through a Speech and Language clinic presenting with (1) velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) and (2) difficultly in school. Growth parameters were measured, and facies were scored for features of VCF. Microdeletions were detected at locus D22S75 by FISH with probe N25 (Oncor), and at 22q11.2 with high resolution banding analysis (HRB). One child with typical VCF facies was considered to have a deletion at 22q11 with HRB, but is not deleted with N25, indicating that N25 may not detect all deletion patients. An additional 8/30 children tested to date were deleted with the N25 probe. Heart defects were present in only 2/8 deletion patients: VSD/ASD and PS/AS. One N25 deletion patient was atypica; he has a tall, lanky habitus (height = 90%), and facies not characteristic of CVF. As expected, there is a trend to lower head size, smaller ear size, and more typical facies in deletion patients; however, four of the nondeletion patients also had a clinical diagnosis of VCF. Medially displaced carotid arteries were present in both groups, which is therefore not a diagnostic feature of microdeletion 22q11. Our findings indicate that the microdeletion 22q11 is frequent (26% in this series) in a population with VPI, even when not selected for typical facies. We believe this series supports the view that microdeletion 22q11 has a broader clinical phenotype than previously recognized.

  9. SU-E-J-225: CEST Imaging in Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J; Hwang, K; Fuller, C; Mohamed, A; Ding, Y; Frank, S; Hazle, J; Zhou, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) imaging is an MRI technique enables the detection and imaging of metabolically active compounds in vivo. It has been used to differentiate tumor types and metabolic characteristics. Unlike PET/CT,CEST imaging does not use isotopes so it can be used on patient repeatedly. This study is to report the preliminary results of CEST imaging in Head and Neck cancer (HNC) patients. Methods: A CEST imaging sequence and the post-processing software was developed on a 3T clinical MRI scanner. Ten patients with Human papilloma virus positive oropharyngeal cancer were imaged in their immobilized treatment position. A 5 mm slice CEST image was acquired (128×128, FOV=20∼24cm) to encompass the maximum dimension of tumor. Twenty-nine off-set frequencies (from −7.8ppm to +7.8 ppm) were acquired to obtain the Z-spectrum. Asymmetry analysis was used to extract the CEST contrasts. ROI at the tumor, node and surrounding tissues were measured. Results: CEST images were successfully acquired and Zspectrum asymmetry analysis demonstrated clear CEST contrasts in tumor as well as the surrounding tissues. 3∼5% CEST contrast in the range of 1 to 4 ppm was noted in tumor as well as grossly involved nodes. Injection of glucose produced a marked increase of CEST contrast in tumor region (∼10%). Motion and pulsation artifacts tend to smear the CEST contrast, making the interpretation of the image contrast difficult. Field nonuniformity, pulsation in blood vesicle and susceptibility artifacts caused by air cavities were also problematic for CEST imaging. Conclusion: We have demonstrated successful CEST acquisition and Z-spectrum reconstruction on HNC patients with a clinical scanner. MRI acquisition in immobilized treatment position is critical for image quality as well as the success of CEST image acquisition. CEST images provide novel contrast of metabolites in HNC and present great potential in the pre- and post-treatment assessment

  10. Posturographic destabilization in eating disorders in female patients exposed to body image related phobic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Forghieri, M; Monzani, D; Mackinnon, A; Ferrari, S; Gherpelli, C; Galeazzi, G M

    2016-08-26

    Human postural control is dependent on the central integration of vestibular, visual and proprioceptive inputs. Psychological states can affect balance control: anxiety, in particular, has been shown to influence balance mediated by visual stimuli. We hypothesized that patients with eating disorders would show postural destabilization when exposed to their image in a mirror and to the image of a fashion model representing their body ideal in comparison to body neutral stimuli. Seventeen females patients attending a day centre for the treatment of eating disorders were administered psychometric measures of body dissatisfaction, anxiety, depression and underwent posturographic measures with their eyes closed, open, watching a neutral stimulus, while exposed to a full length mirror and to an image of a fashion model corresponding to their body image. Results were compared to those obtained by eighteen healthy subjects. Eating disordered patients showed higher levels of body dissatisfaction and higher postural destabilization than controls, but this was limited to the conditions in which they were exposed to their mirror image or a fashion model image. Postural destabilization under these conditions correlated with measures of body dissatisfaction. In eating disordered patients, body related stimuli seem to act as phobic stimuli in the posturographic paradigm used. If confirmed, this has the potential to be developed for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. PMID:27397012

  11. Benign liver tumors in pediatric patients - Review with emphasis on imaging features.

    PubMed

    Chiorean, Liliana; Cui, Xin-Wu; Tannapfel, Andrea; Franke, Doris; Stenzel, Martin; Kosiak, Wojciech; Schreiber-Dietrich, Dagmar; Jüngert, Jörg; Chang, Jian-Min; Dietrich, Christoph F

    2015-07-28

    Benign hepatic tumors are commonly observed in adults, but rarely reported in children. The reasons for this remain speculative and the exact data concerning the incidence of these lesions are lacking. Benign hepatic tumors represent a diverse group of epithelial and mesenchymal tumors. In pediatric patients, most benign focal liver lesions are inborn and may grow like the rest of the body. Knowledge of pediatric liver diseases and their imaging appearances is essential in order to make an appropriate differential diagnosis. Selection of the appropriate imaging test is challenging, since it depends on a number of age-related factors. This paper will discuss the most frequently encountered benign liver tumors in children (infantile hepatic hemangioendothelioma, mesenchymal hamartoma, focal nodular hyperplasia, nodular regenerative hyperplasia, and hepatocellular adenoma), as well as a comparison to the current knowledge regarding such tumors in adult patients. The current emphasis is on imaging features, which are helpful not only for the initial diagnosis, but also for pre- and post-treatment evaluation and follow-up. In addition, future perspectives of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in pediatric patients are highlighted, with descriptions of enhancement patterns for each lesion being discussed. The role of advanced imaging tests such as CEUS and magnetic resonance imaging, which allow for non-invasive assessment of liver tumors, is of utmost importance in pediatric patients, especially when repeated imaging tests are needed and radiation exposure should be avoided.

  12. Posturographic destabilization in eating disorders in female patients exposed to body image related phobic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Forghieri, M; Monzani, D; Mackinnon, A; Ferrari, S; Gherpelli, C; Galeazzi, G M

    2016-08-26

    Human postural control is dependent on the central integration of vestibular, visual and proprioceptive inputs. Psychological states can affect balance control: anxiety, in particular, has been shown to influence balance mediated by visual stimuli. We hypothesized that patients with eating disorders would show postural destabilization when exposed to their image in a mirror and to the image of a fashion model representing their body ideal in comparison to body neutral stimuli. Seventeen females patients attending a day centre for the treatment of eating disorders were administered psychometric measures of body dissatisfaction, anxiety, depression and underwent posturographic measures with their eyes closed, open, watching a neutral stimulus, while exposed to a full length mirror and to an image of a fashion model corresponding to their body image. Results were compared to those obtained by eighteen healthy subjects. Eating disordered patients showed higher levels of body dissatisfaction and higher postural destabilization than controls, but this was limited to the conditions in which they were exposed to their mirror image or a fashion model image. Postural destabilization under these conditions correlated with measures of body dissatisfaction. In eating disordered patients, body related stimuli seem to act as phobic stimuli in the posturographic paradigm used. If confirmed, this has the potential to be developed for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.

  13. Imaging of Cerebral Blood Flow in Patients with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in the Neurointensive Care

    PubMed Central

    Rostami, Elham; Engquist, Henrik; Enblad, Per

    2014-01-01

    Ischemia is a common and deleterious secondary injury following traumatic brain injury (TBI). A great challenge for the treatment of TBI patients in the neurointensive care unit (NICU) is to detect early signs of ischemia in order to prevent further advancement and deterioration of the brain tissue. Today, several imaging techniques are available to monitor cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the injured brain such as positron emission tomography (PET), single-photon emission computed tomography, xenon computed tomography (Xenon-CT), perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and CT perfusion scan. An ideal imaging technique would enable continuous non-invasive measurement of blood flow and metabolism across the whole brain. Unfortunately, no current imaging method meets all these criteria. These techniques offer snapshots of the CBF. MRI may also provide some information about the metabolic state of the brain. PET provides images with high resolution and quantitative measurements of CBF and metabolism; however, it is a complex and costly method limited to few TBI centers. All of these methods except mobile Xenon-CT require transfer of TBI patients to the radiological department. Mobile Xenon-CT emerges as a feasible technique to monitor CBF in the NICU, with lower risk of adverse effects. Promising results have been demonstrated with Xenon-CT in predicting outcome in TBI patients. This review covers available imaging methods used to monitor CBF in patients with severe TBI. PMID:25071702

  14. Benign liver tumors in pediatric patients - Review with emphasis on imaging features

    PubMed Central

    Chiorean, Liliana; Cui, Xin-Wu; Tannapfel, Andrea; Franke, Doris; Stenzel, Martin; Kosiak, Wojciech; Schreiber-Dietrich, Dagmar; Jüngert, Jörg; Chang, Jian-Min; Dietrich, Christoph F

    2015-01-01

    Benign hepatic tumors are commonly observed in adults, but rarely reported in children. The reasons for this remain speculative and the exact data concerning the incidence of these lesions are lacking. Benign hepatic tumors represent a diverse group of epithelial and mesenchymal tumors. In pediatric patients, most benign focal liver lesions are inborn and may grow like the rest of the body. Knowledge of pediatric liver diseases and their imaging appearances is essential in order to make an appropriate differential diagnosis. Selection of the appropriate imaging test is challenging, since it depends on a number of age-related factors. This paper will discuss the most frequently encountered benign liver tumors in children (infantile hepatic hemangioendothelioma, mesenchymal hamartoma, focal nodular hyperplasia, nodular regenerative hyperplasia, and hepatocellular adenoma), as well as a comparison to the current knowledge regarding such tumors in adult patients. The current emphasis is on imaging features, which are helpful not only for the initial diagnosis, but also for pre- and post-treatment evaluation and follow-up. In addition, future perspectives of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in pediatric patients are highlighted, with descriptions of enhancement patterns for each lesion being discussed. The role of advanced imaging tests such as CEUS and magnetic resonance imaging, which allow for non-invasive assessment of liver tumors, is of utmost importance in pediatric patients, especially when repeated imaging tests are needed and radiation exposure should be avoided. PMID:26229397

  15. Construction of Realistic Liver Phantoms from Patient Images using 3D Printer and Its Application in CT Image Quality Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Shuai; Yu, Lifeng; Vrieze, Thomas; Kuhlmann, Joel; Chen, Baiyu; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to use 3D printing techniques to construct a realistic liver phantom with heterogeneous background and anatomic structures from patient CT images, and to use the phantom to assess image quality with filtered backprojection and iterative reconstruction algorithms. Patient CT images were segmented into liver tissues, contrast-enhanced vessels, and liver lesions using commercial software, based on which stereolithography (STL) files were created and sent to a commercial 3D printer. A 3D liver phantom was printed after assigning different printing materials to each object to simulate appropriate attenuation of each segmented object. As high opacity materials are not available for the printer, we printed hollow vessels and filled them with iodine solutions of adjusted concentration to represent enhance levels in contrast-enhanced liver scans. The printed phantom was then placed in a 35×26 cm oblong-shaped water phantom and scanned repeatedly at 4 dose levels. Images were reconstructed using standard filtered backprojection and an iterative reconstruction algorithm with 3 different strength settings. Heterogeneous liver background were observed from the CT images and the difference in CT numbers between lesions and background were representative for low contrast lesions in liver CT studies. CT numbers in vessels filled with iodine solutions represented the enhancement of liver arteries and veins. Images were run through a Channelized Hotelling model observer with Garbor channels and ROC analysis was performed. The AUC values showed performance improvement using the iterative reconstruction algorithm and the amount of improvement increased with strength setting.

  16. Construction of realistic liver phantoms from patient images using 3D printer and its application in CT image quality assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Shuai; Yu, Lifeng; Vrieze, Thomas; Kuhlmann, Joel; Chen, Baiyu; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to use 3D printing techniques to construct a realistic liver phantom with heterogeneous background and anatomic structures from patient CT images, and to use the phantom to assess image quality with filtered back-projection and iterative reconstruction algorithms. Patient CT images were segmented into liver tissues, contrast-enhanced vessels, and liver lesions using commercial software, based on which stereolithography (STL) files were created and sent to a commercial 3D printer. A 3D liver phantom was printed after assigning different printing materials to each object to simulate appropriate attenuation of each segmented object. As high opacity materials are not available for the printer, we printed hollow vessels and filled them with iodine solutions of adjusted concentration to represent enhance levels in contrast-enhanced liver scans. The printed phantom was then placed in a 35×26 cm oblong-shaped water phantom and scanned repeatedly at 4 dose levels. Images were reconstructed using standard filtered back-projection and an iterative reconstruction algorithm with 3 different strength settings. Heterogeneous liver background were observed from the CT images and the difference in CT numbers between lesions and background were representative for low contrast lesions in liver CT studies. CT numbers in vessels filled with iodine solutions represented the enhancement of liver arteries and veins. Images were run through a Channelized Hotelling model observer with Garbor channels and ROC analysis was performed. The AUC values showed performance improvement using the iterative reconstruction algorithm and the amount of improvement increased with strength setting.

  17. Patient-specific biomechanical model as whole-body CT image registration tool.

    PubMed

    Li, Mao; Miller, Karol; Joldes, Grand Roman; Doyle, Barry; Garlapati, Revanth Reddy; Kikinis, Ron; Wittek, Adam

    2015-05-01

    Whole-body computed tomography (CT) image registration is important for cancer diagnosis, therapy planning and treatment. Such registration requires accounting for large differences between source and target images caused by deformations of soft organs/tissues and articulated motion of skeletal structures. The registration algorithms relying solely on image processing methods exhibit deficiencies in accounting for such deformations and motion. We propose to predict the deformations and movements of body organs/tissues and skeletal structures for whole-body CT image registration using patient-specific non-linear biomechanical modelling. Unlike the conventional biomechanical modelling, our approach for building the biomechanical models does not require time-consuming segmentation of CT scans to divide the whole body into non-overlapping constituents with different material properties. Instead, a Fuzzy C-Means (FCM) algorithm is used for tissue classification to assign the constitutive properties automatically at integration points of the computation grid. We use only very simple segmentation of the spine when determining vertebrae displacements to define loading for biomechanical models. We demonstrate the feasibility and accuracy of our approach on CT images of seven patients suffering from cancer and aortic disease. The results confirm that accurate whole-body CT image registration can be achieved using a patient-specific non-linear biomechanical model constructed without time-consuming segmentation of the whole-body images. PMID:25721296

  18. Longitudinal evaluation of patients with oral potentially malignant disorders using optical imaging and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Richard A.; Pierce, Mark C.; Mondrik, Sharon; Gao, Wen; Quinn, Mary K.; Bhattar, Vijayashree; Williams, Michelle D.; Vigneswaran, Nadarajah; Gillenwater, Ann M.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2012-02-01

    Dysplastic and cancerous alterations in oral tissue can be detected noninvasively in vivo using optical techniques including autofluorescence imaging, high-resolution imaging, and spectroscopy. Interim results are presented from a longitudinal study in which optical imaging and spectroscopy were used to evaluate the progression of lesions over time in patients at high risk for development of oral cancer. Over 100 patients with oral potentially malignant disorders have been enrolled in the study to date. Areas of concern in the oral cavity are measured using widefield autofluorescence imaging and depth-sensitive optical spectroscopy during successive clinical visits. Autofluorescence intensity patterns and autofluorescence spectra are tracked over time and correlated with clinical observations. Patients whose lesions progress and who undergo surgery are also measured in the operating room immediately prior to surgery using autofluorescence imaging and spectroscopy, with the addition of intraoperative high-resolution imaging to characterize nuclear size, nuclear crowding, and tissue architecture at selected sites. Optical measurements are compared to histopathology results from biopsies and surgical specimens collected from the measured sites. Autofluorescence imaging and spectroscopy measurements are continued during post-surgery followup visits. We examined correlations between clinical impression and optical classification over time with an average followup period of 4 months. The data collected to date suggest that multimodal optical techniques may aid in noninvasive monitoring of the progression of oral premalignant lesions, biopsy site selection, and accurate delineation of lesion extent during surgery.

  19. Initial Clinical Experience Performing Patient Treatment Verification With an Electronic Portal Imaging Device Transit Dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Sean L.; Polvorosa, Cynthia; Cheng, Simon; Deutsch, Israel; Chao, K. S. Clifford; Wuu, Cheng-Shie

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate a 2-dimensional transit dosimetry algorithm's performance on a patient population and to analyze the issues that would arise in a widespread clinical adoption of transit electronic portal imaging device (EPID) dosimetry. Methods and Materials: Eleven patients were enrolled on the protocol; 9 completed and were analyzed. Pretreatment intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) patient-specific quality assurance was performed using a stringent local 3%, 3-mm γ criterion to verify that the planned fluence had been appropriately transferred to and delivered by the linear accelerator. Transit dosimetric EPID images were then acquired during treatment and compared offline with predicted transit images using a global 5%, 3-mm γ criterion. Results: There were 288 transit images analyzed. The overall γ pass rate was 89.1% ± 9.8% (average ± 1 SD). For the subset of images for which the linear accelerator couch did not interfere with the measurement, the γ pass rate was 95.7% ± 2.4%. A case study is presented in which the transit dosimetry algorithm was able to identify that a lung patient's bilateral pleural effusion had resolved in the time between the planning CT scan and the treatment. Conclusions: The EPID transit dosimetry algorithm under consideration, previously described and verified in a phantom study, is feasible for use in treatment delivery verification for real patients. Two-dimensional EPID transit dosimetry can play an important role in indicating when a treatment delivery is inconsistent with the original plan.

  20. Diagnostic imaging of blunt abdominal trauma in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Miele, Vittorio; Piccolo, Claudia Lucia; Trinci, Margherita; Galluzzo, Michele; Ianniello, Stefania; Brunese, Luca

    2016-05-01

    Trauma is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in childhood, and blunt trauma accounts for 80-90 % of abdominal injuries. The mechanism of trauma is quite similar to that of the adults, but there are important physiologic differences between children and adults in this field, such as the smaller blood vessels and the high vasoconstrictive response, leading to the spreading of a non-operative management. The early imaging of children undergoing a low-energy trauma can be performed by CEUS, a valuable diagnostic tool to demonstrate solid organ injuries with almost the same sensitivity of CT scans; nevertheless, as for as urinary tract injuries, MDCT remains still the technique of choice, because of its high sensitivity and accuracy, helping to discriminate between an intra-peritoneal form a retroperitoneal urinary leakage, requiring two different managements. The liver is the most common organ injured in blunt abdominal trauma followed by the spleen. Renal, pancreatic, and bowel injuries are quite rare. In this review we present various imaging findings of blunt abdominal trauma in children.

  1. The role of public relations for image creating in health services: a sample patient satisfaction survey.

    PubMed

    Kirdar, YalçIn

    2007-01-01

    This study discusses the role of public relations for image creating in health services. Hospitals require public relations activities to distinguish them from competitors, provide bidirectional communication between the society and the hospital, and assist to create of a strong hospital image and culture. A satisfaction survey was conducted on 264 patients who have received health services at Maltepe University Hospital. The research focused on how the Hospital's examination, care, catering and physical services; doctor and nurse politeness towards patients and patient relatives, their attitudes and behaviors; examination, check-in, bedding and discharge operations; public relations activities in and out of the hospital were perceived. Another subject of the study was the degree of recommendation of patients who have been served by the hospital's health services to prospective patients seeking treatment.

  2. The role of public relations for image creating in health services: a sample patient satisfaction survey.

    PubMed

    Kirdar, YalçIn

    2007-01-01

    This study discusses the role of public relations for image creating in health services. Hospitals require public relations activities to distinguish them from competitors, provide bidirectional communication between the society and the hospital, and assist to create of a strong hospital image and culture. A satisfaction survey was conducted on 264 patients who have received health services at Maltepe University Hospital. The research focused on how the Hospital's examination, care, catering and physical services; doctor and nurse politeness towards patients and patient relatives, their attitudes and behaviors; examination, check-in, bedding and discharge operations; public relations activities in and out of the hospital were perceived. Another subject of the study was the degree of recommendation of patients who have been served by the hospital's health services to prospective patients seeking treatment. PMID:19042527

  3. Sensitive Patient Data Hiding using a ROI Reversible Steganography Scheme for DICOM Images.

    PubMed

    Mantos, Petros L K; Maglogiannis, Ilias

    2016-06-01

    The exchange of medical images over the Internet has evoked significant interest over the past few years due to the introduction of web and cloud based medical information systems. The protection of sensitive data has always been a key indicator in the performance of such systems. In this context, this work presents an algorithm developed for Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) medical images, which applies secret-sharing steganography methods for ensuring the integrity of sensitive patient data as well as the important parts of the image. In the proposed algorithm, images are divided into two parts: the region of interest (ROI) and the region of non interest (RONI). Patient data and integrity hashes are positioned inside the ROI while the information (map) needed to recover the ROI before insertion is positioned in the RONI. Security of the extraction process is assured through the use of cryptography. The experimental results prove that the original (cover) images and the stego images provide an excellent visual equality result in terms of PSNR. Furthermore, they prove that the proposed scheme can be efficiently used as a steganography scheme in DICOM images with limited smooth areas.

  4. Sensitive Patient Data Hiding using a ROI Reversible Steganography Scheme for DICOM Images.

    PubMed

    Mantos, Petros L K; Maglogiannis, Ilias

    2016-06-01

    The exchange of medical images over the Internet has evoked significant interest over the past few years due to the introduction of web and cloud based medical information systems. The protection of sensitive data has always been a key indicator in the performance of such systems. In this context, this work presents an algorithm developed for Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) medical images, which applies secret-sharing steganography methods for ensuring the integrity of sensitive patient data as well as the important parts of the image. In the proposed algorithm, images are divided into two parts: the region of interest (ROI) and the region of non interest (RONI). Patient data and integrity hashes are positioned inside the ROI while the information (map) needed to recover the ROI before insertion is positioned in the RONI. Security of the extraction process is assured through the use of cryptography. The experimental results prove that the original (cover) images and the stego images provide an excellent visual equality result in terms of PSNR. Furthermore, they prove that the proposed scheme can be efficiently used as a steganography scheme in DICOM images with limited smooth areas. PMID:27167526

  5. Investigation of eating disorders in cancer patients and its relevance with body image

    PubMed Central

    Hossein, Seyyed Abbas; Bahrami, Masoud; Mohamadirizi, Shahla; Paknaad, Zamzam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Eating disorder is one of the most common health problems with clinical and psychological consequences, which can affect body image in cancer patients. Similar studies in this area for checking the status of this disorder and its relevance with body image in patients with cancer are limited. Therefore, this study was designed with the aim of determination of eating disorders in patients with cancer and their relevance with body image. Materials and Methods: The research was a cross-correlation study. It was carried out in Sayed-Al-Shohada Hospital affiliated to the Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in 2013. Two hundred and ten patients with cancer were selected and were asked tocomplete the demographic and disease characteristics questionnaire, the Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire (MBSRQ), and eating disorders questionnaire. SPSS statistical software, version 14 was used for statistical analysis’-Test, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and Pearson correlation coefficient were used for analyzing the obtained data. Results: The mean values of age, body mass index (BMI), and duration of illness were 48.2 ± 13.20 years, 24.6 ± 4.6kg/m2, and 25.64 ± 21.24months, respectively. Most patients were married (87%), without university education (96%), unemployed (67%), and with incomes below their requirement (52%). Most patients were diagnosed with breast cancer (36.5%). They received chemotherapy as the main treatment (56.2%). In addition, mean ± SD of eating disorders and body image were 12.84 ± 4.7 and184.40 ± 43.68, respectively. Also, 49.7% of patients with cancer had an eating disorder. Among these, 29% had experiences of anorexia and 20.7% had bulimia. There was a significant negative correlation between the score of body image and eating disorders (r = −0.47, P = 0.01). Conclusions: Findings of this study showed that most patients with cancer had experienced symptoms of eating disorders. This may lead to a negative impact on

  6. IMAGE-GUIDED EVALUATION AND MONITORING OF TREATMENT RESPONSE IN PATIENTS WITH DRY EYE DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Hamrah, Pedram

    2014-01-01

    Dry eye disease (DED) is one of the most common ocular disorders worldwide. The pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the development of DED are not well understood and thus treating DED has been a significant challenge for ophthalmologists. Most of the currently available diagnostic tests demonstrate low correlation to patient symptoms and have low reproducibility. Recently, sophisticated in vivo imaging modalities have become available for patient care, namely, in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). These emerging modalities are powerful and non-invasive, allowing real-time visualization of cellular and anatomical structures of the cornea and ocular surface. Here we discuss how, by providing both qualitative and quantitative assessment, these techniques can be used to demonstrate early subclinical disease, grade layer-by-layer severity, and allow monitoring of disease severity by cellular alterations. Imaging-guided stratification of patients may also be possible in conjunction with clinical examination methods. Visualization of subclinical changes and stratification of patients in vivo, allows objective image-guided evaluation of tailored treatment response based on cellular morphological alterations specific to each patient. This image-guided approach to DED may ultimately improve patient outcomes and allow studying the efficacy of novel therapies in clinical trials. PMID:24696045

  7. Image-domain shading correction for cone-beam CT without prior patient information.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qiyong; Lu, Bo; Park, Justin C; Niu, Tianye; Li, Jonathan G; Liu, Chihray; Zhu, Lei

    2015-01-01

    In the era of high-precision radiotherapy, cone-beam CT (CBCT) is frequently utilized for on-board treatment guidance. However, CBCT images usually contain severe shading artifacts due to strong photon scatter from illumination of a large volume and non-optimized patient-specific data measurements, limiting the full clinical applications of CBCT. Many algorithms have been proposed to alleviate this problem by data correction on projections. Sophisticated methods have also been designed when prior patient information is available. Nevertheless, a standard, efficient, and effective approach with large applicability remains elusive for current clinical practice. In this work, we develop a novel algorithm for shading correction directly on CBCT images. Distinct from other image-domain correction methods, our approach does not rely on prior patient information or prior assumption of patient data. In CBCT, projection errors (mostly from scatter and non-ideal usage of bowtie filter) result in dominant low-frequency shading artifacts in image domain. In circular scan geometry, these artifacts often show global or local radial patterns. Hence, the raw CBCT images are first preprocessed into the polar coordinate system. Median filtering and polynomial fitting are applied on the transformed image to estimate the low-frequency shading artifacts (referred to as the bias field) angle-by-angle and slice-by-slice. The low-pass filtering process is done firstly along the angular direction and then the radial direction to preserve image contrast. The estimated bias field is then converted back to the Cartesian coordinate system, followed by 3D low-pass filtering to eliminate possible high-frequency components. The shading-corrected image is finally obtained as the uncorrected volume divided by the bias field. The proposed algorithm was evaluated on CBCT images of a pelvis patient and a head patient. Mean CT number values and spatial non-uniformity on the reconstructed images were

  8. A structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging dataset of brain tumour patients.

    PubMed

    Pernet, Cyril R; Gorgolewski, Krzysztof J; Job, Dominic; Rodriguez, David; Whittle, Ian; Wardlaw, Joanna

    2016-02-02

    We collected high resolution structural (T1, T2, DWI) and several functional (BOLD T2*) MRI data in 22 patients with different types of brain tumours. Functional imaging protocols included a motor task, a verb generation task, a word repetition task and resting state. Imaging data are complemented by demographics (age, sex, handedness, and pathology), behavioural results to motor and cognitive tests and direct cortical electrical stimulation data (pictures of stimulation sites with outcomes) performed during surgery. Altogether, these data are suited to test functional imaging methods for single subject analyses, in particular methods that focus on locating eloquent cortical areas, critical functional and/or structural network hubs, and predict patient status based on imaging data (presurgical mapping).

  9. A structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging dataset of brain tumour patients

    PubMed Central

    Pernet, Cyril R.; Gorgolewski, Krzysztof J.; Job, Dominic; Rodriguez, David; Whittle, Ian; Wardlaw, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    We collected high resolution structural (T1, T2, DWI) and several functional (BOLD T2*) MRI data in 22 patients with different types of brain tumours. Functional imaging protocols included a motor task, a verb generation task, a word repetition task and resting state. Imaging data are complemented by demographics (age, sex, handedness, and pathology), behavioural results to motor and cognitive tests and direct cortical electrical stimulation data (pictures of stimulation sites with outcomes) performed during surgery. Altogether, these data are suited to test functional imaging methods for single subject analyses, in particular methods that focus on locating eloquent cortical areas, critical functional and/or structural network hubs, and predict patient status based on imaging data (presurgical mapping). PMID:26836205

  10. Body image in obese patients before and after stable weight reduction following bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Adami, G F; Meneghelli, A; Bressani, A; Scopinaro, N

    1999-03-01

    The role of possessing an abnormal body weight in the body image alterations of obese patients was evaluated in bariatric surgery subjects prior to and at long term after operation, when body weight and shape had become steadily normalized. Body image was assessed by the body dissatisfaction scale of the Eating Disorders Inventory, the Body Shape Questionnaire, and the Body Attitude Questionnaire. When the individuals were obese, a sharply impaired body image was observed; following operation, weight loss corresponded to normalization of body dissatisfaction, feeling of fatness, and physical attractiveness, whereas body disparagement and salience of shape, although improved in comparison to preoperative data, remained significantly different from that of controls. In the obese patients, some aspects of body image alterations are substantially accounted for by overweight status; other aspects reflect inner feelings, which are partially independent of the actual body weight and shape. PMID:10193918

  11. CD20+ T cells have a predominantly Tc1 effector memory phenotype and are expanded in the ascites of patients with ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    de Bruyn, Marco; Wiersma, Valerie R; Wouters, Maartje C A; Samplonius, Douwe F; Klip, Harry G; Helfrich, Wijnand; Nijman, Hans W; Eggleton, Paul; Bremer, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a small subset of T cells that expresses the B cell marker CD20 has been identified in healthy volunteers and in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. The origin of these CD20-positive T cells as well as their relevance in human disease remains unclear. Here, we identified that after functional B cell/T cell interaction CD20 molecules are transferred to the cell surface of T cells by trogocytosis together with the established trogocytosis marker HLA-DR. Further, the presence of CD20 on isolated CD20+ T cells remained stable for up to 48h of ex vivo culture. These CD20+ T cells almost exclusively produced IFNγ (∼70% vs. ∼20% in the CD20− T cell population) and were predominantly (CD8+) effector memory T cells (∼60–70%). This IFNγ producing and effector memory phenotype was also determined for CD20+ T cells as detected in the peripheral blood and ascitic fluids of ovarian cancer (OC) patients. In the latter, the percentage of CD20+ T cells was further strongly increased (from ∼6% in peripheral blood to 23% in ascitic fluid). Taken together, the data presented here indicate that CD20 is transferred to T cells upon intimate T cell/B cell interaction. Further, CD20+ T cells are of memory and IFNγ producing phenotype and are present in increased amounts in ascitic fluid of OC patients. PMID:26137418

  12. Development of Fast and Highly Efficient Gas Ionization Chamber For Patient Imaging and Dosimetry in Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    R. Hinderler; H. Keller; T.R. Mackie; M.L. Corradini

    2003-09-08

    In radiation therapy of cancer, more accurate delivery techniques spur the need for improved patient imaging during treatment. To this purpose, the megavoltage radiation protocol that is used for treatment is also used for imaging.

  13. Clinical assessment and magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder of patients with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Alex Pereira; Terrabuio Junior, Alberto Antonio; Pimenta, Ciro Jabur; Medina, Giovanna Ignácio Subirá; Rimkus, Carolina de Medeiros; Cliquet Júnior, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the shoulder of this group of patients using magnetic resonance imaging to detect clinical and subclinical disorders and establish a rehabilitation program. Methods Nine patients with spinal cord injury followed in the Laboratory of Biomechanics and Rehabilitation of the Locomotive System at HC/UNICAMP were divided into two groups according to the presence of paraplegia and tetraplegia and were clinically assessed for correlation with the imaging exams. Results Normal results were found in 41% of the shoulders. Most common injuries were tendinopathy of the supraspinatus and acromioclavicular joint degeneration. Eighty percent of injured shoulders had combined lesions. Conclusion A great variety of causes of shoulder pain was identified in paraplegic and tetraplegic subjects. Routine clinical assessment and imaging studies of the shoulder may contribute to the evolution of rehabilitation and reduction of pain and musculoskeletal disorders. Level of Evidence II, Development of Diagnostic Criteria on Consecutive Patients, With Universally Applied Reference "Gold" Standard. PMID:24453620

  14. Expanded criteria donors.

    PubMed

    Feng, Sandy; Lai, Jennifer C

    2014-08-01

    The greatest challenge facing liver transplantation today is the shortage of donor livers. Demand far exceeds supply, and this deficit has driven expansion of what is considered an acceptable organ. The evolving standard has not come without costs, however, as each new frontier of expanded donor quality (i.e., advancing donor age, donation after cardiac death, and split liver) may have traded wait-list for post-transplant morbidity and mortality. This article delineates the nature and severity of risk associated with specific deceased donor liver characteristics and recommends strategies to maximally mitigate these risks. PMID:25017080

  15. Body image and depressive symptoms in patients with head and neck cancer: an important relationship

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Jie; Dietrich, Mary S.; Murphy, Barbara; Ridner, Sheila H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between body image and depressive symptoms in patients who have been treated for head and neck cancer. Methods This is a prospective, longitudinal analysis. Body image and depressive symptoms were measured in patients diagnosed with head and neck cancer at baseline, end of treatment, 6 weeks post-treatment, and 12 weeks post-treatment. Body image was measured using the Body Image Quality of Life Inventory, and depressive symptoms were measured using the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. Results Forty-three individuals diagnosed with head and neck cancer participated in this study. The majority of participants were male, Caucasian, and married or living with a partner. Participants ranged from age 32 to 78 years (M=57.8 years, SD=10.5 years). At 12 weeks post-treatment, body image scores were statistically significantly higher than they were at the end of treatment (p=0.016) and 6 weeks post-treatment (p=0.032). Statistically significant increases in levels of depressive symptoms were observed at the end of treatment (p<0.001) and 6 weeks post-treatment (p=0.036) with a return to baseline by the 12-week post-treatment assessment (p=0.115). Body image and depressive symptoms were statistically significantly associated at the end of treatment, 6 weeks post-treatment, and 12 weeks post-treatment (rs −0.32 to −0.56, p <0.05). Conclusions This study supports early assessment of body image in patients with head and neck cancer. Additionally, the association between poorer body image and increased depressive symptoms is key in understanding the symptom clusters that patients with head and neck cancer experience. PMID:24925049

  16. Deformable image registration for geometrical evaluation of DIBH radiotherapy treatment of lung cancer patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottosson, W.; Lykkegaard Andersen, J. A.; Borrisova, S.; Mellemgaard, A.; Behrens, C. F.

    2014-03-01

    Respiration and anatomical variation during radiotherapy (RT) of lung cancer yield dosimetric uncertainties of the delivered dose, possibly affecting the clinical outcome if not corrected for. Adaptive radiotherapy (ART), based on deformable image registration (DIR) and Deep-Inspiration-Breath-Hold (DIBH) gating can potentially improve the accuracy of RT. Purpose: The objective was to investigate the performance of contour propagation on repeated CT and Cone Beam CT (CBCT) images in DIBH compared to images acquired in free breathing (FB), using a recently released DIR software. Method: Three locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients were included, each with a planning-, midterm- and final CT (pCT, mCT, fCT) and 7 CBCTs acquired weekly and on the same day as the mCT and fCT. All imaging were performed in both FB and DIBH, using Varian RPM system for respiratory tracking. Delineations of anatomical structures were performed on each image set. The CT images were retrospective rigidly and deformable registered to all obtained images using the Varian Smart Adapt v. 11.0. The registered images were analysed for volume change and Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC). Result: Geometrical similarities were found between propagated and manually delineated structures, with a slightly favour of FB imaging. Special notice should be taken to registrations where image artefacts or low tissue contrast are present. Conclusion: This study does not support the hypothesis that DIBH images perform better image registration than FB images. However DIR is a feasible tool for ART of lung cancer.

  17. Construction of realistic phantoms from patient images and a commercial three-dimensional printer.

    PubMed

    Leng, Shuai; Chen, Baiyu; Vrieze, Thomas; Kuhlmann, Joel; Yu, Lifeng; Alexander, Amy; Matsumoto, Jane; Morris, Jonathan; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to use three-dimensional (3-D) printing techniques to construct liver and brain phantoms having realistic pathologies, anatomic structures, and heterogeneous backgrounds. Patient liver and head computed tomography (CT) images were segmented into tissue, vessels, liver lesion, white and gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Stereolithography files of each object were created and imported into a commercial 3-D printer. Printing materials were assigned to each object after test scans, which showed that the printing materials had CT numbers ranging from 70 to 121 HU at 120 kV. Printed phantoms were scanned on a CT scanner and images were evaluated. CT images of the liver phantom had measured CT numbers of 77.8 and 96.6 HU for the lesion and background, and 137.5 to 428.4 HU for the vessels channels, which were filled with iodine solutions. The difference in CT numbers between lesions and background (18.8 HU) was representative of the low-contrast values needed for optimization tasks. The liver phantom background was evaluated with Haralick features and showed similar texture between patient and phantom images. CT images of the brain phantom had CT numbers of 125, 134, and 108 HU for white matter, gray matter, and CSF, respectively. The CT number differences were similar to those in patient images. PMID:27429998

  18. Construction of realistic phantoms from patient images and a commercial three-dimensional printer.

    PubMed

    Leng, Shuai; Chen, Baiyu; Vrieze, Thomas; Kuhlmann, Joel; Yu, Lifeng; Alexander, Amy; Matsumoto, Jane; Morris, Jonathan; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to use three-dimensional (3-D) printing techniques to construct liver and brain phantoms having realistic pathologies, anatomic structures, and heterogeneous backgrounds. Patient liver and head computed tomography (CT) images were segmented into tissue, vessels, liver lesion, white and gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Stereolithography files of each object were created and imported into a commercial 3-D printer. Printing materials were assigned to each object after test scans, which showed that the printing materials had CT numbers ranging from 70 to 121 HU at 120 kV. Printed phantoms were scanned on a CT scanner and images were evaluated. CT images of the liver phantom had measured CT numbers of 77.8 and 96.6 HU for the lesion and background, and 137.5 to 428.4 HU for the vessels channels, which were filled with iodine solutions. The difference in CT numbers between lesions and background (18.8 HU) was representative of the low-contrast values needed for optimization tasks. The liver phantom background was evaluated with Haralick features and showed similar texture between patient and phantom images. CT images of the brain phantom had CT numbers of 125, 134, and 108 HU for white matter, gray matter, and CSF, respectively. The CT number differences were similar to those in patient images.

  19. Coronary Computed Tomography Versus Radionuclide Myocardial Perfusion Imaging in Chest Pain Patients Admitted to Telemetry: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Levsky, Jeffrey M.; Spevack, Daniel M.; Travin, Mark I.; Menegus, Mark A.; Huang, Paul W.; Clark, Elana T.; Kim, Choo-won; Hirschhorn, Esther; Freeman, Katherine D.; Tobin, Jonathan N.; Haramati, Linda B.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Coronary computed tomography angiography plays an expanding role managing symptomatic patients with suspected coronary artery disease. Prospective intermediate-term outcomes are lacking. OBJECTIVE To compare coronary CT angiography with conventional non-invasive testing. DESIGN Randomized, controlled comparative effectiveness trial. SETTING Telemetry-monitored wards of one inner-city medical center. PATIENTS 400 acute chest pain patients (mean age 57); 63% women; 54% Hispanic, 37% African-American; low socioeconomic status. INTERVENTION Coronary CT angiography (CT) or radionuclide stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). MEASUREMENTS The primary outcome was cardiac catheterization not leading to revascularization within one year. Secondary outcomes included length of stay, resource utilization and patient experience. Safety outcomes included death, major cardiovascular events and radiation exposure. RESULTS 30(15%) CT patients and 32(16%) MPI patients underwent cardiac catheterization within one year, of which 15(7.5%) and 20(10%), respectively, were not revascularized (-2.5% difference, 95%CI −8.6%–+3.5%; hazard ratio 0.77, 95%CI 0.40–1.49, p=0.44). Median length of stay was 28.9 hours for CT and 30.4 hours for MPI (p=0.057). Median follow-up was 40.4 months. For CT and MPI, the incidences of death (0.5% vs 3%, p=0.12), non-fatal cardiovascular events (4.5% vs 4.5%), re-hospitalization (43% vs 49%), emergency visit (63% vs 58%) and outpatient cardiology visit (23% vs 21%) were not different. Long-term, all-cause radiation was lower for CT (24 vs 29 milliSieverts, p<0.001). More CT patients graded their experience favorably (p=0.001) and would undergo the exam again (p=0.003). LIMITATIONS Single site study; primary outcome dependent on clinical management decisions. CONCLUSIONS There were no significant differences between CT and MPI in outcomes or resource utilization over 40 months. CT had lower associated radiation and was more positively

  20. Amygdala Volumetry in Patients with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy and Normal Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Paramdeep; Kaur, Rupinderjeet; Saggar, Kavita; Singh, Gagandeep; Aggarwal, Simmi

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background It has been suggested that the pathophysiology of temporal lobe epilepsy may relate to abnormalities in various brain structures, including the amygdala. Patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) without MRI abnormalities (MTLE-NMRI) represent a challenge for diagnosis of the underlying abnormality and for presurgical evaluation. To date, however, only few studies have used quantitative structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging-based techniques to examine amygdalar pathology in these patients. Material/Methods Based on clinical examination, 24-hour video EEG recordings and MRI findings, 50 patients with EEG lateralized TLE and normal structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging results were included in this study. Volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of the amygdalas and hippocampi were conducted in 50 non-epileptic controls (age 7–79 years) and 50 patients with MTLE with normal MRI on a 1.5-Tesla scanner. Visual assessment and amygdalar volumetry were performed on oblique coronal T2W and T1W MP-RAGE images respectively. The T2 relaxation times were measured using the 16-echo Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill sequence (TE, 22–352). Volumetric data were normalized for variation in head size between individuals. Results were assessed by SSPS statistic program. Results Individual manual volumetric analysis confirmed statistically significant amygdala enlargement (AE) in eight (16%) patients. Overall, among all patients with AE and a defined epileptic focus, 7 had predominant increased volume ipsilateral to the epileptic focus. The T2 relaxometry demonstrated no hyperintense signal of the amygdala in any patient with significant AE. Conclusions This paper presented AE in a few patients with TLE and normal MRI. These findings support the hypothesis that there might be a subgroup of patients with MTLE-NMRI in which the enlarged amygdala could be related to the epileptogenic process. PMID:27231493

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Radiomic Profiles Predict Patient Prognosis in Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Before Therapy

    PubMed Central

    McGarry, Sean D.; Hurrell, Sarah L.; Kaczmarowski, Amy L.; Cochran, Elizabeth J.; Connelly, Jennifer; Rand, Scott D.; Schmainda, Kathleen M.; LaViolette, Peter S.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used to diagnose and monitor brain tumors. Extracting additional information from medical imaging and relating it to a clinical variable of interest is broadly defined as radiomics. Here, multiparametric MRI radiomic profiles (RPs) of de novo glioblastoma (GBM) brain tumors is related with patient prognosis. Clinical imaging from 81 patients with GBM before surgery was analyzed. Four MRI contrasts were aligned, masked by margins defined by gadolinium contrast enhancement and T2/fluid attenuated inversion recovery hyperintensity, and contoured based on image intensity. These segmentations were combined for visualization and quantification by assigning a 4-digit numerical code to each voxel to indicate the segmented RP. Each RP volume was then compared with overall survival. A combined classifier was then generated on the basis of significant RPs and optimized volume thresholds. Five RPs were predictive of overall survival before therapy. Combining the RP classifiers into a single prognostic score predicted patient survival better than each alone (P < .005). Voxels coded with 1 RP associated with poor prognosis were pathologically confirmed to contain hypercellular tumor. This study applies radiomic profiling to de novo patients with GBM to determine imaging signatures associated with poor prognosis at tumor diagnosis. This tool may be useful for planning surgical resection or radiation treatment margins. PMID:27774518

  2. Whole exome sequencing of relapsed/refractory patients expands the repertoire of somatic mutations in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mareschal, Sylvain; Dubois, Sydney; Viailly, Pierre-Julien; Bertrand, Philippe; Bohers, Elodie; Maingonnat, Catherine; Jaïs, Jean-Philippe; Tesson, Bruno; Ruminy, Philippe; Peyrouze, Pauline; Copie-Bergman, Christiane; Fest, Thierry; Jo Molina, Thierry; Haioun, Corinne; Salles, Gilles; Tilly, Hervé; Lecroq, Thierry; Leroy, Karen; Jardin, Fabrice

    2016-03-01

    Despite the many efforts already spent to enumerate somatic mutations in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), previous whole-genome and whole-exome studies conducted on patients of mixed outcomes failed at characterizing the 30% of patients who will relapse or resist current immunochemotherapies. To address this issue, we performed whole-exome sequencing of normal/tumoral DNA pairs in 14 relapsed/refractory (R/R) patients subclassified by full-transcriptome arrays (six activated B-cell like, three germinal center B-cell like, and five primary mediastinal B-cell lymphomas), from the LNH-03 LYSA clinical trial program. Aside from well-known DLBCL features, gene and pathway level recurrence analyses proposed several interesting leads including TBL1XR1 and activating mutations in IRF4 or in the insulin regulation pathway. Sequencing-based copy number analysis defined 23 short recurrently altered regions involving genes such as REL, CDKN2A, HYAL2, and TP53. Moreover, it highlighted mutations in genes such as GNA13, CARD11, MFHAS1, and PCLO as associated with secondary variant allele amplification events. The five primary mediastinal B-cell lymphomas (PMBL), while unexpected in a R/R cohort, showed a significantly higher mutation rate (P = 0.003) and provided many insights on this classical Hodgkin lymphoma related subtype. Novel genes such as XPO1, MFHAS1, and ITPKB were found particularly mutated, along with various cytokine-based signaling pathways. Among these analyses, somatic events in the NF-κB pathway were found preponderant in the three DLBCL subtypes, confirming its major implication in DLBCL aggressiveness and pinpointing several new candidate genes. PMID:26608593

  3. Results of stereotactic radiosurgery for patients with imaging defined cavernous sinus meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, Bruce E. . E-mail: pollock.bruce@mayo.edu; Stafford, Scott L.

    2005-08-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of stereotactic radiosurgery as primary management for patients with imaging defined cavernous sinus meningiomas. Methods: Between 1992 and 2001, 49 patients had radiosurgery for dural-based masses of the cavernous sinus presumed to be meningiomas. The mean patient age was 55.5 years. The mean tumor volume was 10.2 mL; the mean tumor margin dose was 15.9 Gy. The mean follow-up was 58 months (range, 16-144 months). Results: No tumor enlarged after radiosurgery. Twelve of 38 patients (26%) with preexisting diplopia or facial numbness/pain had improvement in cranial nerve function. Five patients (10%) had new (n = 3) or worsened (n = 2) trigeminal dysfunction; 2 of these patients (4%) underwent surgery at 20 and 25 months after radiosurgery despite no evidence of tumor progression. Neither patient improved after partial tumor resection. One patient (2%) developed an oculomotor nerve injury. One patient (2%) had an ischemic stroke related to occlusion of the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery. Event-free survival was 98%, 85%, and 80% at 1, 3, and 7 years after radiosurgery, respectively. Univariate analysis of patient and dosimetric factors found no analyzed factor correlated with postradiosurgical morbidity. Conclusions: Radiosurgery was an effective primary management strategy for patients with an imaging defined cavernous sinus meningioma. Except in situations of symptomatic mass effect, unusual clinical presentation, or atypical imaging features, surgery to confirm the histologic diagnosis is unlikely to provide clinical benefit.

  4. The Body Image Dissatisfaction and Psychological Symptoms among Invasive and Minimally Invasive Aesthetic Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Y. Yazdandoost, Rokhsareh; Hayatbini, Niki; Asgharnejad Farid, Ali Asghar; Gharaee, Banafsheh; Latifi, Noor Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Elective aesthetic surgeries are increasing in the Iranian population with reasons linked to body image dissatisfaction and psychological symptoms. This study compared the body image dissatisfaction and psychological symptoms among invasive and minimally invasive aesthetic surgery patients and a control group. METHODS Data from 90 participants (invasive aesthetic surgery=30 Ss, minimally invasive aesthetic surgery=30 Ss, and control group=30 Ss) were included. Subjects were assessed on body image dissatisfaction and psychological symptoms to provide an evidence for a continuum of body image dissatisfaction, anxiety, depression and interpersonal sensitivity in invasive and minimally invasive aesthetic surgery clients. RESULTS Between the three groups of invasive, minimally invasive aesthetic surgeries and control on body image dissatisfaction and psychological symptoms (anxiety, depression and interpersonal sensitivity), there was a significant difference. CONCLUSION These findings have implications for pre-surgical assessment as well as psychological interventions rather than invasive medical interventions at first step. PMID:27579270

  5. BodyWise: evaluating a pilot body image group for patients with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Mountford, Victoria A; Brown, Amy; Bamford, Bryony; Saeidi, Saeideh; Morgan, John F; Lacey, Hubert

    2015-01-01

    Body image disturbance can be enduring and distressing to individuals with eating disorders and effective treatments remain limited. This pilot study evaluated a group-based treatment-BodyWise-developed for use in full and partial hospitalization with patients with anorexia nervosa at low weight. A partial crossover waitlist design was used. BodyWise (N = 50) versus treatment as usual (N = 40) were compared on standardized measures of body image disturbance. Results demonstrated significant improvement in the group compared to treatment as usual for the primary outcome measure (Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire Shape Concern subscale) and other manifestations of body image disturbance including body checking and body image quality of life. BodyWise appeared acceptable to participants, and was easy to deliver within the pragmatics of a busy eating disorder service. There is potential for its wider dissemination as a precursor to more active body image interventions.

  6. Kilovoltage Imaging Doses in the Radiotherapy of Pediatric Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Jun; Chen Zhe; Roberts, Kenneth B.; Nath, Ravinder

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate doses induced by kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kVCBCT) to pediatric cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy, as well as strategies for dose reduction. Methods and Materials: An EGS4 Monte Carlo code was used to calculate three-dimensional dose deposition due to kVCBCT on 4 pediatric cancer patients. Absorbed doses to various organs were analyzed for both half-fan and full-fan modes. Clinical conditions, such as distance from organ at risk (OAR) to CBCT field border, kV peak energy, and testicular shielding, were studied. Results: The mean doses induced by one CBCT scan operated at 125 kV in half-fan mode to testes, liver, kidneys, femoral heads, spinal cord, brain, eyes, lens, and optical nerves were 2.9, 4.7, 7.7, 10.5, 8.8, 7.6, 7.7, 7.8, and 7.2 cGy, respectively. Increasing the distances from OARs to CBCT field border greatly reduced the doses to OARs, ranging from 33% reduction for spinal cord to 2300% reduction for testes. As photon beam energy increased from 60 to 125 kV, the dose increase due to kVCBCT ranged from 170% for lens to 460% for brain and spinal cord. A testicular shielding made of 1-cm cerrobend could reduce CBCT doses down to 31%, 51%, 68%, and 82%, respectively, for 60, 80, 100, and 125 kV when the testes lay within the CBCT field. Conclusions: Generally speaking, kVCBCT deposits much larger doses to critical structures in children than in adults, usually by a factor of 2 to 3. Increasing the distances from OARs to CBCT field border greatly reduces doses to OARs. Depending on OARs, kVCBCT-induced doses increase linearly or exponentially with photon beam energy. Testicular shielding works more efficiently at lower kV energies. On the basis of our study, it is essential to choose an appropriate scanning protocol when kVCBCT is applied to pediatric cancer patients routinely.

  7. Management of Low-Flow Vascular Malformations: Clinical Presentation, Classification, Patient Selection, Imaging and Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    McCafferty, Ian

    2015-10-15

    This review article aims to give an overview of the current state of imaging, patient selection, agents and techniques used in the management of low-flow vascular malformations. The review includes the current classifications for low-flow vascular malformations including the 2014 updates. Clinical presentation and assessment is covered with a detailed section on the common sclerosant agents used to treat low-flow vascular malformations, including dosing and common complications. Imaging is described with a guide to a simple stratification of the use of imaging for diagnosis and interventional techniques.

  8. Pancreas imaging by computed tomography after endoscopic retrograde pancreatography. [Dogs; patients

    SciTech Connect

    Frick, M.P.; O'Leary, J.F.; Salomonowitz, E.; Stoltenberg, E.; Hutton, S.; Gedgaudas, E.

    1984-01-01

    A method using CT after endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (CT-ERP) is described for pancreatic imaging. When using an ERP technique in the canine model comparable to that used in humans, small amounts of contrast material in peripheral pancreatic radicles resulted in enhancement of the pancreas on CT scans. Nine patients were also studied by CT-ERP images. The main pancreatic duct was seen on delayed images. In cases of chronic pancreatitis (n = 2), pancreatic opacification was patchy and heterogeneous. There was no contrast-material enhancement in areas of pancreatic carcimomas (n = 2). CT-ERP showed the true extent of carcinoma better than ERP alone.

  9. Follow-up study using iodine-131 metaiodobenzylguanidine imaging in a patient with neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ikekubo, K.; Habuchi, Y.; Jeong, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Saiki, Y.; Ito, H.; Hino, M.; Higa, T.

    1986-11-01

    A new radiopharmaceutical, I-131 metaiodobenzylguanidine (I-131 MIBG) was used to determine the location and to follow-up tumors in a 13-month-old girl with neuroblastoma. I-131 MIBG imaging revealed both a primary abdominal tumor and a distant metastatic orbital tumor. Follow-up study with I-131 MIBG imaging demonstrated significant resolution of tumors after external radiotherapy and chemotherapy. I-131 MIBG imaging is a simple, safe, and specific method of determining the location of tumors and also is clinically useful in the evaluation and management of patients with neuroblastoma.

  10. The influence of patient centering on CT dose and image noise

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, Thomas; Ge Zhanyu; Daly, Michael P.

    2007-07-15

    Although x-ray intensity shaping filters (bowtie filters) have been used since the introduction of some of the earliest CT scanner models, the clinical implications on dose and noise are not well understood. To achieve the intended dose and noise advantage requires the patient to be centered in the scan field of view. In this study we explore the implications of patient centering in clinical practice. We scanned various size and shape phantoms on a GE LightSpeed VCT scanner using each available source filter with the phantom centers positioned at 0, 3, and 6 cm below the center of rotation (isocenter). Surface doses were measured along with image noise over a large image region. Regression models of surface dose and noise were generated as a function of phantom size and centering error. Methods were also developed to determine the amount of miscentering using a scout scan projection radiograph (SPR). These models were then used to retrospectively evaluate 273 adult body patients for clinical implications. When miscentered by 3 and 6 cm, the surface dose on a 32 cm CTDI phantom increased by 18% and 41% while image noise also increased by 6% and 22%. The retrospective analysis of adult body scout SPR scans shows that 46% of patients were miscentered in elevation by 20-60 mm with a mean position 23 mm below the center of rotation (isocenter). The analysis indicated a surface dose penalty of up to 140% with a mean dose penalty of 33% assuming that tube current is increased to compensate for the increased noise due to miscentering. Clinical image quality and dose efficiency can be improved on scanners with bowtie filters if care is exercised when positioning patients. Automatically providing patient specific centering and scan parameter selection information can help the technologist improve workflow, achieve more consistent image quality and reduce patient dose.

  11. The influence of patient centering on CT dose and image noise.

    PubMed

    Toth, Thomas; Ge, Zhanyu; Daly, Michael P

    2007-07-01

    Although x-ray intensity shaping filters (bowtie filters) have been used since the introduction of some of the earliest CT scanner models, the clinical implications on dose and noise are not well understood. To achieve the intended dose and noise advantage requires the patient to be centered in the scan field of view. In this study we explore the implications of patient centering in clinical practice. We scanned various size and shape phantoms on a GE LightSpeed VCT scanner using each available source filter with the phantom centers positioned at 0, 3, and 6 cm below the center of rotation (isocenter). Surface doses were measured along with image noise over a large image region. Regression models of surface dose and noise were generated as a function of phantom size and centering error. Methods were also developed to determine the amount of miscentering using a scout scan projection radiograph (SPR). These models were then used to retrospectively evaluate 273 adult body patients for clinical implications. When miscentered by 3 and 6 cm, the surface dose on a 32 cm CTDI phantom increased by 18% and 41% while image noise also increased by 6% and 22%. The retrospective analysis of adult body scout SPR scans shows that 46% of patients were miscentered in elevation by 20-60 mm with a mean position 23 mm below the center of rotation (isocenter). The analysis indicated a surface dose penalty of up to 140% with a mean dose penalty of 33% assuming that tube current is increased to compensate for the increased noise due to miscentering. Clinical image quality and dose efficiency can be improved on scanners with bowtie filters if care is exercised when positioning patients. Automatically providing patient specific centering and scan parameter selection information can help the technologist improve workflow, achieve more consistent image quality and reduce patient dose.

  12. Pattern of brain blood perfusion in tinnitus patients using technetium-99m SPECT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudian, Saeid; Farhadi, Mohammad; Gholami, Saeid; Saddadi, Fariba; Karimian, Ali Reza; Mirzaei, Mohammad; Ghoreyshi, Esmaeel; Ahmadizadeh, Majid; Lenarz, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Tinnitus is associated with an increased activity in central auditory system as demonstrated by neuroimaging studies. Brain perfusion scanning using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was done to understand the pattern of brain blood perfusion of tinnitus subjects and find the areas which are mostly abnormal in these patients. Materials and Methods: A number of 122 patients with tinnitus were enrolled to this cross-sectional study. They underwent SPECT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of brain, and the images were fused to find the regions with abnormal perfusion. Results: SPECT scan results were abnormal in 101 patients (83%). Most patients had bilateral abnormal perfusion (N = 65, 53.3%), and most subjects had abnormality in middle-temporal gyrus (N = 83, 68%) and temporoparietal cortex (N = 46, 37.7%). Patients with multifocal involvement had the least mean age than other 2 groups (patients with no abnormality and unifocal abnormality) (P value = 0.045). Conclusions: Brain blood perfusion pattern differs in patient with tinnitus than others. These patients have brain perfusion abnormality, mostly in auditory gyrus (middle temporal) and associative cortex (temporoparietal cortex). Multifocal abnormalities might be due to more cognitive and emotional brain centers involvement due to tinnitus or more stress and anxiety of tinnitus in the young patients. PMID:23267375

  13. Variable Activation of the DNA Damage Response Pathways in Patients Undergoing SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shijun; Liang, Grace; Ong, Sang-Ging; Han, Leng; Sanchez-Freire, Veronica; Lee, Andrew S.; Vasanawala, Minal; Segall, George; Wu, Joseph C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although single photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT MPI) has improved the diagnosis and risk stratification of patients with suspected coronary artery disease, it remains a primary source of low dose radiation exposure for cardiac patients. To determine the biological effects of low dose radiation from SPECT MPI, we measured the activation of the DNA damage response pathways using quantitative flow cytometry and single cell gene expression profiling. Methods and Results Blood samples were collected from patients before and after SPECT MPI (n=63). Overall, analysis of all recruited patients showed no marked differences in the phosphorylation of proteins (H2AX, p53, and ATM) following SPECT. The majority of patients also had either down-regulated or unchanged expression in DNA damage response genes at both 24 and 48 hours post-SPECT. Interestingly, a small subset of patients with increased phosphorylation also had significant up-regulation of genes associated with DNA damage, whereas those with no changes in phosphorylation had significant down-regulation or no difference, suggesting that some patients may potentially be more sensitive to low dose radiation exposure. Conclusions Our findings showed that SPECT MPI resulted in a variable activation of the DNA damage response pathways. Although only a small subset of patients had increased protein phosphorylation and elevated gene expression post-imaging, continued care should be taken to reduce radiation exposure to both patients and operators. PMID:25609688

  14. SU-E-J-204: Radiation Dose to Patients Resulting From Image Guidance Procedures and AAPM TG-180 Update

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, G; Alaei, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is the new paradigm for patient positioning and target localization in radiotherapy. Daily imaging procedures add additional dose to the patient's treatment volume and normal tissues and may expose the organs at risk to unaccounted doses. This presentation is to update the progress of AAPM TG-180 which aims to provide strategies to quantify and account the dose from both MV and kV imaging in patient treatment planning. Methods: Our current knowledge on image guidance dose is presented. A summary of doses from image guidance procedures delivered to patients in relationship with therapeutic doses is given. Different techniques in reducing the image guidance dose are summarized. Typical organ doses resulting from different image acquisition procedures used in IGRT are tabulated. Results: Many techniques to reduce the imaging doses are available in clinical applications. There are large variations between dose to bone and dose to soft tissues for x-rays at kilovoltage energy range. Methods for clinical implementation of accounting for the imaging dose from an imaging procedure are available. Beam data from imaging systems can be generated by combining Monte Carlo simulations and experimental measurements for commissioning imaging beams in the treatment planning. Conclusion: The current treatment planning systems are not yet equipped to perform patient specific dose calculations resulting from kV imaging procedures. The imaging dose from current kV image devices has been significantly reduced and is generally much less than that resulting from MV. Because the magnitude of kV imaging dose is significantly low and the variation between patients is modest, it is feasible to estimate dose based on imaging producers or protocols using tabulated values which provides an alternative to accomplish the task of accounting and reporting imaging doses.

  15. Contrast-enhanced CT imaging in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    von Stillfried, Saskia; Apitzsch, Jonas C; Ehling, Josef; Penzkofer, Tobias; Mahnken, Andreas H; Knüchel, Ruth; Floege, Jürgen; Boor, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Renal microvascular rarefaction characterizes chronic kidney disease (CKD). In murine models of CKD, micro-CT imaging reflected capillary rarefaction using quantification of renal relative blood volume (rBV). In addition, micro-CT imaging revealed morphological alterations of the intrarenal vasculature including reduced vascular branching and lumen diameter. Here, we retrospectively quantified rBV in contrast-enhanced CT angiography in patients and found that, compared to non-CKD patients, those with CKD and renal fibrosis had significantly reduced rBV in the renal cortex. rBV values closely mirrored capillary rarefaction in the corresponding nephrectomy specimens. In patients with follow-up CT angiography, reduction of renal function was paralleled by a decline in rBV. Using virtual autopsy, i.e., postmortem CT angiography, morphometry of intrarenal arteries in 3D-rendered CT images revealed significantly reduced arterial diameter and branching in CKD compared to non-CKD cases. In conclusion, in CKD patients, contrast-enhanced CT imaging with quantification of rBV correlates with functional renal vasculature, whereas virtual autopsy allows morphometric analyses of macrovascular changes. Importantly, the observed vascular alterations in CKD patients mirror those in animals with progressive CKD, suggesting a high relevance of animal models for studying vascular alterations in CKD and renal fibrosis. PMID:27582011

  16. Variation of patient imaging doses with scanning parameters for linac-integrated kilovoltage cone beam CT.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xiongfei; Wang, Yunlai; Lang, Jinyi; Wang, Pei; Li, Jie; Ge, Ruigang; Yang, Jack

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the Elekta kilovoltage CBCT doses and the associated technical protocols with patient dosimetry estimation. Image guidance technique with cone-beam CT (CBCT) in radiation oncology on a daily basis can deliver a significant dose to the patient. To evaluate the patient dose from LINAC-integrated kV cone beam CT imaging in image-guided radiotherapy. CT dose index (CTDI) were measured with PTW TM30009 CT ion chamber in air, in head phantom and body phantom, respectively; with different combinations of tube voltage, current, exposure time per frame, collimator and gantry rotation range. Dose length products (DLP) were subsequently calculated to account for volume integration effects. The CTDI and DLP were also compared to AcQSim™ simulator CT for routine clinical protocols. Both CTDIair and CTDIw depended quadratically on the voltage, while linearly on milliampere x seconds (mAs) settings. It was shown that CTDIw and DLP had very close relationship with the collimator settings and the gantry rotation ranges. Normalized CTDIw for Elekta XVI™ CBCT was lower than that of ACQSim simulator CT owing to its pulsed radiation output characteristics. CTDIw can be used to assess the patient dose in CBCT due to its simplicity for measurement and reproducibility. Regular measurement should be performed in QA & QC program. Optimal image parameters should be chosen to reduce patient dose during CBCT. PMID:26405932

  17. Decreasing pediatric patient anxiety about radiology imaging tests: prospective evaluation of an educational intervention.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Annette J; Steele, Jennifer; Russell, Gregory B; Moran, Rhonda; Fredericks, Kirsten P; Jennings, S Gregory

    2009-12-01

    This trial investigated anxiety levels and effect of an educational coloring book (CB) among pediatric patients about to undergo radiology imaging tests. Control group (N = 101) and intervention group (N = 175) children ages 3-10 years and their parents were surveyed to determine anxiety levels before the imaging test, with the intervention group being surveyed after patient and parental review of the CB. Anxiety was low for all subjects overall compared with findings from previously published literature, perhaps related to systemic measures to make children's hospitals more child friendly in recent years. Review of the CB was not associated with decreased anxiety among patients or parents. However, among a subgroup with higher baseline parental anxiety, there was a trend toward lower patient anxiety in the intervention group. Most parents indicated that the CB was informative and helped them and their child be less worried, and that they were pleased to have received the CB.

  18. Ultrasound Imaging for Tailored Treatment of Patients With Acute Shoulder Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ottenheijm, Ramon P. G.; Cals, Jochen W. L.; Weijers, René; Vanderdood, Kurt; de Bie, Rob A.; Dinant, Geert-Jan

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The objective of this study was to assess the frequencies of ultrasound findings in patients with acute rotator cuff disorders in family medicine. METHODS In a prospective observational study, 129 patients aged 18 to 65 years with acute shoulder pain in whom the family physician suspected rotator cuff disease underwent ultrasound imaging. RESULTS Rotator cuff disease was present in 81% of the patients, and 50% of them had multiple disorders. Calcific tendonitis was the most frequently diagnosed specific disorder. An age of 40 years or older was most strongly related to rotator cuff disease. CONCLUSIONS Ultrasound imaging enables family physicians to rationalize treatment in nearly all patients who are aged 40 years and older with acute shoulder pain. PMID:25583893

  19. Patient-reported complications from fiducial marker implantation for prostate image-guided radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gill, S; Li, J; Thomas, J; Bressel, M; Thursky, K; Styles, C; Tai, K H; Duchesne, G M; Foroudi, F

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To report on complications from transrectal ultrasound-guided insertion of fiducial markers for prostate image-guided radiotherapy. Methods 234 patients who underwent transrectal fiducial marker insertion for prostate cancer image-guided radiotherapy were assessed retrospectively by questionnaire with regard to the duration and severity of eight symptoms experienced following the procedure. Pain during the implantation procedure was assessed according to the Wong–Baker faces pain scale. Results Of 234 patients, 32% had at least one new symptom after the procedure. The commonest new symptom following the procedure was urinary frequency affecting 16% of patients who had not been troubled by frequency beforehand. Haematuria, rectal bleeding, dysuria and haematospermia affected 9–13% of patients, mostly at Grade 1 or 2. Pain, obstruction, and fever and shivers affected 3–4% of patients. Grade 3 rectal bleeding, haematuria, fever and shivers, and urinary frequency affected 0.5–1.5% of patients. Only one patient had a Grade 4 complication (i.e. fever and shivers). Overall, 9% of patients had symptoms lasting more than 2 weeks. The commonest symptoms that lasted more than 2 weeks were frequency, dysuria, obstructive symptoms and rectal bleeding. Mean pain score during the procedure was 1.1 (range 0–5). Conclusion Transrectal ultrasound-guided fiducial marker insertion for image-guided radiotherapy is well tolerated in the majority of prostate cancer patients. Most symptoms were Grade 1 or 2 in severity. Symptoms in the majority of patients last under 2 weeks. The most serious complication was sepsis in our study. PMID:22253345

  20. Imaging of the optic disk in caring for patients with glaucoma: ophthalmoscopy and photography remain the gold standard.

    PubMed

    Spaeth, George L; Reddy, Swathi C

    2014-01-01

    Optic disk imaging is integral to the diagnosis and treatment of patients with glaucoma. We discuss the various forms of imaging the optic nerve, including ophthalmoscopy, photography, and newer imaging modalities, including optical coherence tomography (OCT), confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (HRT), and scanning laser polarimetry (GDx), specifically highlighting their benefits and disadvantages. We argue that ophthalmoscopy and photography remain the gold standard of imaging due to portability, ease of interpretation, and the presence of a large database of images for comparison.

  1. Eye movements in patients with glaucoma when viewing images of everyday scenes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Nicholas D; Crabb, David P; Glen, Fiona C; Burton, Robyn; Garway-Heath, David F

    2012-01-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that patients with bilateral glaucoma exhibit different eye movements compared to normally-sighted people when viewing computer displayed photographs of everyday scenes. Thirty glaucomatous patients and 30 age-related controls with normal vision viewed images on a computer monitor whilst eye movements were simultaneously recorded using an eye tracking system. The patients demonstrated a significant reduction in the average number of saccades compared to controls (P = 0.02; mean reduction of 7% (95% confidence interval (CI): 3-11%)). There was no difference in average saccade amplitude between groups but there was between-person variability in patients. The average elliptical region scanned by the patients by a bivariate contour ellipse area (BCEA) analysis, was more restricted compared to controls (P = 0.004; mean reduction of 23% (95% (CI): 11-35%)). A novel analysis mapping areas of interest in the images indicated a weak association between severity of functional deficit and a tendency to not view regions typically viewed by the controls. In conclusion, some eye movements in some patients with bilateral glaucomatous defects differ from normal-sighted people of a similar age when viewing images of everyday scenes, providing evidence for a potential new window for looking into the functional consequences of the disease. PMID:23193606

  2. The Role of Imaging in the Treatment of Patients With Multiple Myeloma in 2016.

    PubMed

    Terpos, Evangelos; Dimopoulos, Meletios A; Moulopoulos, Lia A

    2016-01-01

    The novel criteria for the diagnosis of symptomatic multiple myeloma have revealed the value of modern imaging for the management of patients with myeloma. Whole-body low-dose CT (LDCT) has increased sensitivity over conventional radiography for the detection of osteolytic lesions, and several myeloma organizations and institutions have suggested that whole-body LDCT should replace conventional radiography for the work-up of patients with myeloma. MRI is the best imaging method for the depiction of marrow infiltration by myeloma cells. Whole-body MRI (or at least MRI of the spine and pelvis if whole-body MRI is not available) should be performed for all patients with smoldering multiple myeloma with no lytic lesions to look for occult disease, which may justify treatment. In addition, MRI accurately illustrates the presence of plasmacytomas, spinal cord, and/or nerve compression for surgical intervention or radiation therapy; it is also recommended for the work-up of solitary bone plasmacytoma, and it may distinguish malignant from benign fractures (which is very important in cases of patients in biochemical remission with no other signs of progression). Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) seems to improve MRI diagnosis in patients with myeloma. PET/CT is a functional imaging technique, more sensitive than conventional radiography for the detection of lytic lesions, which probably allows better definition of complete response and minimal residual disease compared with all other imaging methods. PET/CT has shown the best results in the follow-up of patients with myeloma and has an independent prognostic value both at diagnosis and following treatment. PET/CT can also be used for the work-up of solitary bone plasmacytoma and nonsecretory myeloma. PMID:27249748

  3. Evaluating Patient Usability of an Image-Based Mobile Health Platform for Postoperative Wound Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Wiseman, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Background Surgical patients are increasingly using mobile health (mHealth) platforms to monitor recovery and communicate with their providers in the postdischarge period. Despite widespread enthusiasm for mHealth, few studies evaluate the usability or user experience of these platforms. Objective Our objectives were to (1) develop a novel image-based smartphone app for postdischarge surgical wound monitoring, and (2) rigorously user test it with a representative population of vascular and general surgery patients. Methods A total of 9 vascular and general surgery inpatients undertook usability testing of an internally developed smartphone app that allows patients to take digital images of their wound and answer a survey about their recovery. We followed the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 9241-11 guidelines, focusing on effectiveness, efficiency, and user satisfaction. An accompanying training module was developed by applying tenets of adult learning. Sessions were audio-recorded, and the smartphone screen was mirrored onto a study computer. Digital image quality was evaluated by a physician panel to determine usefulness for clinical decision making. Results The mean length of time spent was 4.7 (2.1-12.8) minutes on the training session and 5.0 (1.4-16.6) minutes on app completion. 55.5% (5/9) of patients were able to complete the app independently with the most difficulty experienced in taking digital images of surgical wounds. Novice patients who were older, obese, or had groin wounds had the most difficulty. 81.8% of images were sufficient for diagnostic purposes. User satisfaction was high, with an average usability score of 83.3 out of 100. Conclusion Surgical patients can learn to use a smartphone app for postoperative wound monitoring with high user satisfaction. We identified design features and training approaches that can facilitate ease of use. This protocol illustrates an important, often overlooked, aspect of mHealth development

  4. Expandable pattern casting research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-09-01

    The Expandable Pattern Casting (EPC) Process is a developing foundry technology that allows designers the opportunity to consolidate parts, reduce machining, and minimize assembly operations. An air gauging system was developed for measuring foam patterns; exact shrinkage depended on type and density of the foam. Compaction studies showed that maximum sand densities in cavities and under overhangs are achieved with vibrational amplitudes 0.001-0.004 in., and that sand moved most freely within a few inches of the top free surface. Key to complete mold filling while minimizing casting defects lies in removing the foam decomposition products. The most precise iron castings were made by EPC in four commercial EPC foundries, with attention paid to molding and compaction. EP cast 60-45-12 ductile iron had yield strengths, ultimate strengths, and elastic modulus similar to conventionally cast ductile iron cast from the same ladle.

  5. Expanding hollow metal rings

    DOEpatents

    Peacock, Harold B.; Imrich, Kenneth J.

    2009-03-17

    A sealing device that may expand more planar dimensions due to internal thermal expansion of a filler material. The sealing material is of a composition such that when desired environment temperatures and internal actuating pressures are reached, the sealing materials undergoes a permanent deformation. For metallic compounds, this permanent deformation occurs when the material enters the plastic deformation phase. Polymers, and other materials, may be using a sealing mechanism depending on the temperatures and corrosivity of the use. Internal pressures are generated by either rapid thermal expansion or material phase change and may include either liquid or solid to gas phase change, or in the gaseous state with significant pressure generation in accordance with the gas laws. Sealing material thickness and material composition may be used to selectively control geometric expansion of the seal such that expansion is limited to a specific facing and or geometric plane.

  6. Mechanically expandable annular seal

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, Richard F.

    1983-01-01

    A mechanically expandable annular reusable seal assembly to form an annular hermetic barrier between two stationary, parallel, and planar containment surfaces. A rotatable ring, attached to the first surface, has ring wedges resembling the saw-tooth array of a hole saw. Matching seal wedges are slidably attached to the ring wedges and have their motion restricted to be perpendicular to the second surface. Each seal wedge has a face parallel to the second surface. An annular elastomer seal has a central annular region attached to the seal wedges' parallel faces and has its inner and outer circumferences attached to the first surface. A rotation of the ring extends the elastomer seal's central region perpendicularly towards the second surface to create the fluidtight barrier. A counterrotation removes the barrier.

  7. Mechanically expandable annular seal

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, R.F.

    1983-07-19

    A mechanically expandable annular reusable seal assembly to form an annular hermetic barrier between two stationary, parallel, and planar containment surfaces is described. A rotatable ring, attached to the first surface, has ring wedges resembling the saw-tooth array of a hole saw. Matching seal wedges are slidably attached to the ring wedges and have their motion restricted to be perpendicular to the second surface. Each seal wedge has a face parallel to the second surface. An annular elastomer seal has a central annular region attached to the seal wedges' parallel faces and has its inner and outer circumferences attached to the first surface. A rotation of the ring extends the elastomer seal's central region perpendicularly towards the second surface to create the fluid tight barrier. A counter rotation removes the barrier. 6 figs.

  8. The multifunctional therapy room of the future: image guidance, interdisciplinarity, integration and impact on patient pathways.

    PubMed

    Jacob, A L; Regazzoni, P; Steinbrich, W; Messmer, P

    2000-01-01

    With few exceptions the interventional rooms of the present are either imaging suites or sterile operating rooms. Their users are restricted to either percutaneous procedures or to two-staged image-guided surgery without intra-operative imaging control. Since interventional therapy of the future will be minimally invasive and since minimally invasive therapy is essentially image-guided therapy, a new physical place for these activities has to be devised: the multifunctional therapy room of the future integrates sophisticated imaging and image guidance modalities together with advanced surgical and life-support equipment in a sterile environment [1, 2, 3]. Even given a high degree of integration, this will be a complex and costly piece of medical technology. These two factors--complexity and cost-- require interdisciplinary technological and medical collaboration to bring it into existence, distribute its cost and maximize usage and medical benefit. Yet another dimension of multifunctionality will be introduced and a significant impact on the care of vitally threatened patients will be exerted by using this room not only for elective image-guided therapy but also for emergent one-stop diagnosis and treatment. Motivation, technology, implementation strategies and funding of this image-guided, integrated and interdisciplinary therapy room, as well as a comprehensive approach combining emergency care and elective computer-assisted therapy (CAT), are discussed in this paper.

  9. Brain magnetic resonance imaging screening is not useful for HIV-1-infected patients without neurological symptoms.

    PubMed

    Nishijima, Takeshi; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Teruya, Katsuji; Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Kikuchi, Yoshimi; Hasuo, Kanehiro; Oka, Shinichi

    2014-10-01

    We investigated the diagnostic usefulness of brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) screening in HIV-1-infected patients without neurological symptoms in detecting intracranial diseases at early stages. In this retrospective analysis, the study patients were HIV-1-infected patients who underwent brain MRI scan in clinical practice between 2001 and 2013. We excluded patients with MRI for (1) follow-up examination for prediagnosed intracranial diseases, (2) cancer staging, (3) screening mycobacterium/bacteria/fungi disease proliferation in the brain, and (4) evaluation for meningitis/encephalitis. The study patients (n=485) were classified into two groups: those who underwent brain MRI scan without any neurological symptoms/signs (asymptomatic patients, n=158) and those who underwent MRI due to such symptoms (symptomatic patients, n=327). Asymptomatic patients had lower CD4 counts than symptomatic patients (median 78 versus 241/μl). Intracranial diseases were detected in three (2%) of the asymptomatic patients [two toxoplasmosis and one progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML)] compared to 58 (19%) of the symptomatic patients (the χ(2) test, p<0.01). The latter included toxoplasmosis (n=10), PML (n=7), cytomegalovirus encephalitis (n=3), primary central nervous system lymphoma (n=3), cryptococcoma/meningitis (n=3), and HIV-associated dementia (n=17). Among symptomatic patients, intracranial diseases were common in those with slurred speech (3/6, 50%), seizure (4/10, 40%), eyesight/vision abnormality (5/16, 31%), altered mental status (8/31, 26%), and hemiplegia/numbness (13/50, 26%). For patients with CD4 count <200/μl, intracranial diseases were detected in only 3 (3%) of 144 asymptomatic patients, compared with 46 (32%) of 113 symptomatic patients (p<0.01). Brain MRI screening for HIV-1-infected patients without neurological symptoms is of little value.

  10. Female patient with autistic disorder, intellectual disability, and co-morbid anxiety disorder: Expanding the phenotype associated with the recurrent 3q13.2-q13.31 microdeletion.

    PubMed

    Quintela, Ines; Gomez-Guerrero, Lorena; Fernandez-Prieto, Montse; Resches, Mariela; Barros, Francisco; Carracedo, Angel

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, the advent of comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays and its use as a first genetic test for the diagnosis of patients with neurodevelopmental phenotypes has allowed the identification of novel submicroscopic chromosomal abnormalities (namely, copy number variants or CNVs), imperceptible by conventional cytogenetic techniques. The 3q13.31 microdeletion syndrome (OMIM #615433) has been defined as a genomic disorder mainly characterized by developmental delay, postnatal overgrowth, hypotonia, genital abnormalities in males, and characteristic craniofacial features. Although the 3q13.31 CNVs are variable in size, a 3.4 Mb recurrently altered region at 3q13.2-q13.31 has been recently described and non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR) mediated by flanking human endogenous retrovirus (HERV-H) elements has been suggested as the mechanism of deletion formation. We expand the phenotypic spectrum associated with this recurrent deletion performing the clinical description of a 9-year-old female patient with autistic disorder, total absence of language, intellectual disability, anxiety disorder and disruptive, and compulsive eating behaviors. The array-based molecular karyotyping allowed the identification of a de novo recurrent 3q13.2-q13.31 deletion encompassing 25 genes. In addition, we compare her clinical phenotype with previous reports of patients with neurodevelopmental and behavioral disorders and proximal 3q microdeletions. Finally, we also review the candidate genes proposed so far for these phenotypes.

  11. In a patient with biclonal Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia only one clone expands in three-dimensional culture and includes putative cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kirshner, Julia; Thulien, Kyle J; Kriangkum, Jitra; Motz, Sarah; Belch, Andrew R; Pilarski, Linda M

    2011-02-01

    A small percentage of cases of Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia (WM) present with biclonality, defined here as the rearrangement of two distinct VDJ gene segments. Here we investigated the expansion of two clones from a patient with WM expressing molecularly detectable clonotypic gene rearrangements, one V(H)3 and one V(H)4. Biclonality was determined in blood and bone marrow mononuclear cells using real-time quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR). V(H)4 expressing cells but not V(H)3 expressing cells underwent clonal expansion in 3-D culture of reconstructed WM bone marrow. After 3-D culture, secondary culture in a colony forming unit assay, and RQ-PCR, only the V(H)4 clone was shown to harbor a subpopulation with characteristics of cancer stem cells, including proliferative quiescence, self-regeneration, and the ability to generate clonotypic progeny, suggesting that the V(H)4, but not the V(H)3, clone is clinically significant. Enrichment of potential WM stem cells in 3-D cultures holds promise for monitoring their response to treatment and for testing new therapies.

  12. Tryptophan PET Imaging of the Kynurenine Pathway in Patient-Derived Xenograft Models of Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Guastella, Anthony R.; Michelhaugh, Sharon K.; Klinger, Neil V.; Kupsky, William J.; Polin, Lisa A.; Muzik, Otto; Juhász, Csaba; Mittal, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates the immunosuppressive kynurenine pathway’s (KP) role in the pathophysiology of human gliomas. To study the KP in vivo, we used the noninvasive molecular imaging tracer α-[11C]-methyl-l-tryptophan (AMT). The AMT-positron emission tomography (PET) has shown high uptake in high-grade gliomas and predicted survival in patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GBM). We generated patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models from dissociated cells, or tumor fragments, from 5 patients with GBM. Mice bearing subcutaneous tumors were imaged with AMT-PET, and tumors were analyzed to detect the KP enzymes indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) 1, IDO2, tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase, kynureninase, and kynurenine 3-monooxygenase. Overall, PET imaging showed robust tumoral AMT uptake in PDX mice with prolonged tracer accumulation over 60 minutes, consistent with AMT trapping seen in humans. Immunostained tumor tissues demonstrated positive detection of multiple KP enzymes. Furthermore, intracranial implantation of GBM cells was performed with imaging at both 9 and 14 days postimplant, with a marked increase in AMT uptake at 14 days and a corresponding high level of tissue immunostaining for KP enzymes. These results indicate that our PDX mouse models recapitulate human GBM, including aberrant tryptophan metabolism, and offer an in vivo system for development of targeted therapeutics for patients with GBM. PMID:27151136

  13. Tryptophan PET Imaging of the Kynurenine Pathway in Patient-Derived Xenograft Models of Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Guastella, Anthony R; Michelhaugh, Sharon K; Klinger, Neil V; Kupsky, William J; Polin, Lisa A; Muzik, Otto; Juhász, Csaba; Mittal, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates the immunosuppressive kynurenine pathway's (KP) role in the pathophysiology of human gliomas. To study the KP in vivo, we used the noninvasive molecular imaging tracer α-[(11)C]-methyl-l-tryptophan (AMT). The AMT-positron emission tomography (PET) has shown high uptake in high-grade gliomas and predicted survival in patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GBM). We generated patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models from dissociated cells, or tumor fragments, from 5 patients with GBM. Mice bearing subcutaneous tumors were imaged with AMT-PET, and tumors were analyzed to detect the KP enzymes indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) 1, IDO2, tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase, kynureninase, and kynurenine 3-monooxygenase. Overall, PET imaging showed robust tumoral AMT uptake in PDX mice with prolonged tracer accumulation over 60 minutes, consistent with AMT trapping seen in humans. Immunostained tumor tissues demonstrated positive detection of multiple KP enzymes. Furthermore, intracranial implantation of GBM cells was performed with imaging at both 9 and 14 days postimplant, with a marked increase in AMT uptake at 14 days and a corresponding high level of tissue immunostaining for KP enzymes. These results indicate that our PDX mouse models recapitulate human GBM, including aberrant tryptophan metabolism, and offer an in vivo system for development of targeted therapeutics for patients with GBM.

  14. Comparison of setup error using different reference images: a phantom and lung cancer patients study

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Bo; Dai Jianrong; Zhang Ye; Zhang Ke; Men Kuo; Zhou Zongmei; Liang Jun; Wang Lvhua

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare setup errors obtained with kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and 2 different kinds of reference images, free-breathing 3D localization CT images (FB-CT) and the average images of 4-D localization CT images (AVG-CT) for phantom and lung cancer patients. This study also explored the correlation between the difference of translational setup errors and the gross tumor volume (GTV) motion. A respiratory phantom and 14 patients were enrolled in this study. For phantom and each patient, 3D helical CT and 4D CT images were acquired, and AVG-CT images were generated from the 4D CT. The setup errors were determined based on the image registration between the CBCT and the 2 different reference images, respectively. The data for both translational and rotational setup errors were analyzed and compared. The GTV centroid movement as well as its correlation with the translational setup error differences was also evaluated. In the phantom study, the AVG-CT method was more accurate than the FB-CT method. For patients, the translational setup errors based on FB-CT were significantly larger than those from AVG-CT in the left-right (LR), superior-inferior (SI), and anterior-posterior (AP) directions (p < 0.05). Translational setup errors differed by >1 mm in 32.6% and >2 mm in 12.9% of CBCT scans. The rotational setup errors from FB-CT were significantly different from those from AVG-CT in the LR and AP directions (p < 0.05). The correlation coefficient of the translational setup error differences and the GTV centroid movement in the LR, SI, and AP directions was 0.515 (p = 0.060), 0.902 (p < 0.001), and 0.510 (p = 0.062), respectively. For lung cancer patients, respiration may affect the on-line target position location. AVG-CT provides different reference information than FB-CT. The difference in SI direction caused by the 2 methods increases with the GTV movement. Therefore, AVG-CT should be the prefered choice of reference

  15. Circulating CD56dim natural killer cells and CD56+ T cells that produce interferon-γ or interleukin-10 are expanded in asymptomatic, E antigen-negative patients with persistent hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Conroy, M J; Mac Nicholas, R; Grealy, R; Taylor, M; Otegbayo, J A; O'Dea, S; Mulcahy, F; Ryan, T; Norris, S; Doherty, D G

    2015-03-01

    Infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) can result in spontaneous resolution or chronic infection, which can remain asymptomatic or can progress to cirrhosis and/or hepatocellular carcinoma. The host immune response is thought to be a major determinant of the outcome of HBV infection and virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) can mediate immunity against the virus and cause liver pathology. Antigen-nonspecific innate lymphocytes may also contribute to HBV infection and liver disease, therefore, we examined the frequencies, phenotypes, cytolytic activities and cytokine profiles of circulating natural killer (NK) cells, CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells and CD56(+) T cells in 102 asymptomatic HBV-infected patients and compared them with those in 66 uninfected control subjects. NK cells expressing low levels of CD56 (CD56(dim)) and CD56(+) T cells were significantly expanded in the circulation of HBV-infected patients compared with control subjects. CD1d expression and iNKT cell frequencies were similar in both groups. Despite these expansions, we did not detect augmented natural or cytokine-induced cytotoxicity in the HBV-infected subjects. All lymphocyte populations studied produced interferon-γ (IFN-γ) significantly more frequently when taken from HBV-infected patients compared with when taken from healthy controls. Additionally, NK cells from the patients more frequently produced interleukin-10. As our HBV-infected cohort consisted of asymptomatic patients with low viral loads, we propose that CD56(dim) NK cells and CD56(+) T cells control HBV infection by noncytolytic mechanisms.

  16. Self-image and perception of mother and father in psychotic and borderline patients.

    PubMed

    Armelius, K; Granberg

    2000-02-01

    Psychotic and borderline patients rated their self-image and their perception of their mother and father using the Structural Analysis of Social Behavior model (SASB). The borderline patients had more negative images of themselves and their parents, especially their fathers, than did the psychotic patients and the normal subjects, while the psychotic patients' ratings did not differ much from those of the normal subjects. The self-image was related to the images of both parents for borderline patients and normal subjects, while for the psychotic patients only the image of the mother was important for the self-image. In addition, the psychotic patients did not differentiate between the poles of control and autonomy in the introjected self-image. It was concluded that borderline patients are characterized by negative attachment, while psychotic patients are characterized by poor separation from the mother and poor differentiation between autonomy and control. The paper also discusses how this may influence the patients' relations to others. Psychotische und Borderline Patienten beurteilten ihr Selbstbild und ihre Wahrnehmung von Mutter und Vater mit Hilfe der strukturalen Analyse sozialen Verhaltens (SASB). Die Borderline Patienten hattten negativere Selbstbilder und Elternbilder (speziell Vaterbilder) als die psychotischen Patienten und gesunde Personen. Die Beurteilungen der psychotischen Patienten unterschieden sich dagegen nicht besonders von jenen Gesunder. Das Selbstbild stand in Beziehung zu beiden Elternbildern bei den Borderline Patienten und den Gesunden, während bei den psychotischen Patienten nur das Mutterbild für das Selbstbild bedeutsam war. Außerdem konnte bei den psychotischen Patienten nicht zwischen den Polen der Kontrolle und Autonomie bzgl. der introjizierten Selbstbilder differenziert werden. Aus den Ergebnissen wird gefolgert, dass Borderline Patienten durch eine negative Bindung charackterisiert sind, psychotische Patienten dagegen durch

  17. Self-image and perception of mother and father in psychotic and borderline patients.

    PubMed

    Armelius, K; Granberg

    2000-02-01

    Psychotic and borderline patients rated their self-image and their perception of their mother and father using the Structural Analysis of Social Behavior model (SASB). The borderline patients had more negative images of themselves and their parents, especially their fathers, than did the psychotic patients and the normal subjects, while the psychotic patients' ratings did not differ much from those of the normal subjects. The self-image was related to the images of both parents for borderline patients and normal subjects, while for the psychotic patients only the image of the mother was important for the self-image. In addition, the psychotic patients did not differentiate between the poles of control and autonomy in the introjected self-image. It was concluded that borderline patients are characterized by negative attachment, while psychotic patients are characterized by poor separation from the mother and poor differentiation between autonomy and control. The paper also discusses how this may influence the patients' relations to others. Psychotische und Borderline Patienten beurteilten ihr Selbstbild und ihre Wahrnehmung von Mutter und Vater mit Hilfe der strukturalen Analyse sozialen Verhaltens (SASB). Die Borderline Patienten hattten negativere Selbstbilder und Elternbilder (speziell Vaterbilder) als die psychotischen Patienten und gesunde Personen. Die Beurteilungen der psychotischen Patienten unterschieden sich dagegen nicht besonders von jenen Gesunder. Das Selbstbild stand in Beziehung zu beiden Elternbildern bei den Borderline Patienten und den Gesunden, während bei den psychotischen Patienten nur das Mutterbild für das Selbstbild bedeutsam war. Außerdem konnte bei den psychotischen Patienten nicht zwischen den Polen der Kontrolle und Autonomie bzgl. der introjizierten Selbstbilder differenziert werden. Aus den Ergebnissen wird gefolgert, dass Borderline Patienten durch eine negative Bindung charackterisiert sind, psychotische Patienten dagegen durch

  18. Image-based electronic patient records for secured collaborative medical applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianguo; Sun, Jianyong; Yang, Yuanyuan; Liang, Chenwen; Yao, Yihong; Cai, Weihua; Jin, Jin; Zhang, Guozhen; Sun, Kun

    2005-01-01

    We developed a Web-based system to interactively display image-based electronic patient records (EPR) for secured intranet and Internet collaborative medical applications. The system consists of four major components: EPR DICOM gateway (EPR-GW), Image-based EPR repository server (EPR-Server), Web Server and EPR DICOM viewer (EPR-Viewer). In the EPR-GW and EPR-Viewer, the security modules of Digital Signature and Authentication are integrated to perform the security processing on the EPR data with integrity and authenticity. The privacy of EPR in data communication and exchanging is provided by SSL/TLS-based secure communication. This presentation gave a new approach to create and manage image-based EPR from actual patient records, and also presented a way to use Web technology and DICOM standard to build an open architecture for collaborative medical applications. PMID:17282930

  19. European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging/Cardiovascular Imaging Department of the Brazilian Society of Cardiology recommendations for the use of cardiac imaging to assess and follow patients after heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Badano, Luigi P; Miglioranza, Marcelo H; Edvardsen, Thor; Colafranceschi, Alexandre Siciliano; Muraru, Denisa; Bacal, Fernando; Nieman, Koen; Zoppellaro, Giacomo; Marcondes Braga, Fabiana G; Binder, Thomas; Habib, Gilbert; Lancellotti, Patrizio

    2015-09-01

    The cohort of long-term survivors of heart transplant is expanding, and the assessment of these patients requires specific knowledge of the surgical techniques employed to implant the donor heart, the physiology of the transplanted heart, complications of invasive tests routinely performed to detect graft rejection (GR), and the specific pathologies that may affect the transplanted heart. A joint EACVI/Brazilian cardiovascular imaging writing group committee has prepared these recommendations to provide a practical guide to echocardiographers involved in the follow-up of heart transplant patients and a framework for standardized and efficient use of cardiovascular imaging after heart transplant. Since the transplanted heart is smaller than the recipient's dilated heart, the former is usually located more medially in the mediastinum and tends to be rotated clockwise. Therefore, standard views with conventional two-dimensional (2D) echocardiography are often difficult to obtain generating a large variability from patient to patient. Therefore, in echocardiography laboratories equipped with three-dimensional echocardiography (3DE) scanners and specific expertise with the technique, 3DE may be a suitable alternative to conventional 2D echocardiography to assess the size and the function of cardiac chambers. 3DE measurement of left (LV) and right ventricular (RV) size and function are more accurate and reproducible than conventional 2D calculations. However, clinicians should be aware that cardiac chamber volumes obtained with 3DE cannot be compared with those obtained with 2D echocardiography. To assess cardiac chamber morphology and function during follow-up studies, it is recommended to obtain a comprehensive echocardiographic study at 6 months from the cardiac transplantation as a baseline and make a careful quantitation of cardiac chamber size, RV systolic function, both systolic and diastolic parameters of LV function, and pulmonary artery pressure. Subsequent

  20. European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging/Cardiovascular Imaging Department of the Brazilian Society of Cardiology recommendations for the use of cardiac imaging to assess and follow patients after heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Badano, Luigi P; Miglioranza, Marcelo H; Edvardsen, Thor; Colafranceschi, Alexandre Siciliano; Muraru, Denisa; Bacal, Fernando; Nieman, Koen; Zoppellaro, Giacomo; Marcondes Braga, Fabiana G; Binder, Thomas; Habib, Gilbert; Lancellotti, Patrizio

    2015-09-01

    The cohort of long-term survivors of heart transplant is expanding, and the assessment of these patients requires specific knowledge of the surgical techniques employed to implant the donor heart, the physiology of the transplanted heart, complications of invasive tests routinely performed to detect graft rejection (GR), and the specific pathologies that may affect the transplanted heart. A joint EACVI/Brazilian cardiovascular imaging writing group committee has prepared these recommendations to provide a practical guide to echocardiographers involved in the follow-up of heart transplant patients and a framework for standardized and efficient use of cardiovascular imaging after heart transplant. Since the transplanted heart is smaller than the recipient's dilated heart, the former is usually located more medially in the mediastinum and tends to be rotated clockwise. Therefore, standard views with conventional two-dimensional (2D) echocardiography are often difficult to obtain generating a large variability from patient to patient. Therefore, in echocardiography laboratories equipped with three-dimensional echocardiography (3DE) scanners and specific expertise with the technique, 3DE may be a suitable alternative to conventional 2D echocardiography to assess the size and the function of cardiac chambers. 3DE measurement of left (LV) and right ventricular (RV) size and function are more accurate and reproducible than conventional 2D calculations. However, clinicians should be aware that cardiac chamber volumes obtained with 3DE cannot be compared with those obtained with 2D echocardiography. To assess cardiac chamber morphology and function during follow-up studies, it is recommended to obtain a comprehensive echocardiographic study at 6 months from the cardiac transplantation as a baseline and make a careful quantitation of cardiac chamber size, RV systolic function, both systolic and diastolic parameters of LV function, and pulmonary artery pressure. Subsequent

  1. Comparison of hair from rectum cancer patients and from healthy persons by Raman microspectroscopy and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaoli; Wang, Xin; Fang, Yusheng; Huang, Qing

    2013-09-01

    In this work, Raman microspectroscopy and imaging was employed to analyze cancer patients' hair tissue. The comparison between the hair from rectum cancer patients and the hair from healthy people reveals some remarkable differences, such as for the rectum cancer patients, there are more lipids but less content of α-helix proteins in the hair medulla section. Though more statistic data are required to establish universary rules for practical and accurate diagnosis, this work based on case study demonstrates the possibility of applying Raman microspectroscopy to reveal abnormality in non-cancer tissues such as hair in order to predict and diagnose cancers.

  2. Shaped, lead-loaded acrylic filters for patient exposure reduction and image-quality improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, J.E.; Stears, J.G.; Frank, E.D.

    1983-03-01

    Shaped filters that are constructed of lead-loaded acrylic material for use in patient radiography are discussed. Use of the filters will result in improved overall image quality with significant exposure reduction to the patient (approximately a 2X reduction in breast exposure and a 3X reduction in thyroid gland exposure). Detailed drawings of the shaped filters for scoliosis radiography, cervical spine radiography, and for long film changers in special procedures are provided. The use of the scoliosis filters is detailed and includes phantom and patient radiographs and dose reduction information.

  3. Considerations when communicating with awake patients undergoing image-guided neuro-interventions

    PubMed Central

    Simonetti, Luigi; Di Paola, Francesco; Leonardi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The authors empirically evaluated the context of intra-procedural physician-patient communication during imaging-guided procedures in a radiology/neuroradiology interventional clinical framework. Different intra-procedural communicative scenarios are reported. They conclude that the quality of intra-procedural physician-patient communication should be considered an important element of individual and team ethical and professional behaviour, able to strongly influence the therapeutic alliance. As for the whole medical communication strategy, an approach which takes into account the psychological and cultural background of the individual patient is preferred. PMID:26261155

  4. The safe practice of CT coronary angiography in adult patients in UK imaging departments.

    PubMed

    Harden, S P; Bull, R K; Bury, R W; Castellano, E A; Clayton, B; Hamilton, M C K; Morgan-Hughes, G J; O'Regan, D; Padley, S P G; Roditi, G H; Roobottom, C A; Stirrup, J; Nicol, E D

    2016-08-01

    Computed tomography coronary angiography is increasingly used in imaging departments in the investigation of patients with chest pain and suspected coronary artery disease. Due to the routine use of heart rate controlling medication and the potential for very high radiation doses during these scans, there is a need for guidance on best practice for departments performing this examination, so the patient can be assured of a good quality scan and outcome in a safe environment. This article is a summary of the document on 'Standards of practice of computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) in adult patients' published by the Royal College of Radiologists (RCR) in December 2014.

  5. Neuroimaging of HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis: comparison of magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with and without immune reconstitution.

    PubMed

    Katchanov, Juri; Branding, Gordian; Jefferys, Laura; Arastéh, Keikawus; Stocker, Hartmut; Siebert, Eberhard

    2016-02-01

    To determine the frequency, imaging characteristics, neuroanatomical distribution and dynamics of magnetic resonance imaging findings in HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis in immunocompromised patients we compared patients without antiretroviral therapy with patients undergoing immune reconstitution. Neuroimaging and clinical data of 21 consecutive patients presenting to a German HIV centre in a 10-year period between 2005 and 2014 were reviewed. We identified eight patients with magnetic resonance imaging findings related to cryptococcal disease: five patients without antiretroviral therapy and three patients receiving effective antiretroviral therapy resulting in immune reconstitution. The pattern of magnetic resonance imaging manifestations was different in the two groups. In patients not on antiretroviral therapy, pseudocysts (n = 3) and lacunar ischaemic lesions (n = 2) were detected. Contrast-enhancing focal leptomeningeal and/or parenchymal lesions were found in all patients under immune reconstitution (n = 3). Magnetic resonance imaging lesions suggestive of leptomeningitis or meningoencephalitis were detected in all patients with a recurrence of cryptococcal meningitis under immune reconstitution, which differs from the classical magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients without antiretroviral therapy. In antiretroviral therapy-treated patients with past medical history of cryptococcal meningitis, detection of contrast-enhancing focal meningeal and/or parenchymal lesions should prompt further investigations for a recurrence of cryptococcal meningitis under immune reconstitution.

  6. Deep learning for tissue microarray image-based outcome prediction in patients with colorectal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychkov, Dmitrii; Turkki, Riku; Haglund, Caj; Linder, Nina; Lundin, Johan

    2016-03-01

    Recent advances in computer vision enable increasingly accurate automated pattern classification. In the current study we evaluate whether a convolutional neural network (CNN) can be trained to predict disease outcome in patients with colorectal cancer based on images of tumor tissue microarray samples. We compare the prognostic accuracy of CNN features extracted from the whole, unsegmented tissue microarray spot image, with that of CNN features extracted from the epithelial and non-epithelial compartments, respectively. The prognostic accuracy of visually assessed histologic grade is used as a reference. The image data set consists of digitized hematoxylin-eosin (H and E) stained tissue microarray samples obtained from 180 patients with colorectal cancer. The patient samples represent a variety of histological grades, have data available on a series of clinicopathological variables including long-term outcome and ground truth annotations performed by experts. The CNN features extracted from images of the epithelial tissue compartment significantly predicted outcome (hazard ratio (HR) 2.08; CI95% 1.04-4.16; area under the curve (AUC) 0.66) in a test set of 60 patients, as compared to the CNN features extracted from unsegmented images (HR 1.67; CI95% 0.84-3.31, AUC 0.57) and visually assessed histologic grade (HR 1.96; CI95% 0.99-3.88, AUC 0.61). As a conclusion, a deep-learning classifier can be trained to predict outcome of colorectal cancer based on images of H and E stained tissue microarray samples and the CNN features extracted from the epithelial compartment only resulted in a prognostic discrimination comparable to that of visually determined histologic grade.

  7. Early detection of spondyloarthropathy in patients with psoriasis by using the ultrasonography and magnetic resonance image

    PubMed Central

    Hamdy, Maha; Omar, Gihan; Elshereef, Rawhya R; Ellaban, Abdou S; Amin, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the validity of ultrasound (US) in the early detection of arthritis and enthesitis, with assessment of the validity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the early detection of sacroiliitis and spondylitis in patients with psoriasis and to compare the findings of clinical examination and conventional radiography. Material and Methods The study included 50 patients with psoriasis and 20 healthy controls. All patients and controls underwent US and power Doppler analyses for the joints of both hands and feet and the entheseal sites. MRI of the lumbosacral spine and sacroiliac joints was performed. Results Abnormal US findings of arthritis were present in 18% patients, whereas only 6% patients had X-ray abnormalities, the enthesopathy represent 74%, at a higher percentage than clinical and radiological assessment (46, 26% respectively). MRI and radiological study demonstrated evidence of inflammation in the spine in 44% and 16% patients, respectively, and evidence of sacroiliitis in 10% and 6% patients, respectively. Conclusion Use of newer imaging modalities allows early diagnosis and early initiation of therapy.

  8. Geriatric Trauma: A Radiologist's Guide to Imaging Trauma Patients Aged 65 Years and Older.

    PubMed

    Sadro, Claudia T; Sandstrom, Claire K; Verma, Nupur; Gunn, Martin L

    2015-01-01

    Radiologists play an important role in evaluation of geriatric trauma patients. Geriatric patients have injury patterns that differ markedly from those seen in younger adults and are susceptible to serious injury from minor trauma. The spectrum of trauma in geriatric patients includes head and spine injury, chest and rib trauma, blunt abdominal injury, pelvic fractures, and extremity fractures. Clinical evaluation of geriatric trauma patients is difficult because of overall frailty, comorbid illness, and medication effects. Specific attention should be focused on the effects of medications in this population, including anticoagulants, steroids, and bisphosphonates. Radiologists should use age-appropriate algorithms for radiography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging of geriatric trauma patients and follow guidelines for intravenous contrast agent administration in elderly patients with impaired renal function. Because there is less concern about risk for cancer with use of ionizing radiation in this age group, CT is the primary imaging modality used in the setting of geriatric trauma. Clinical examples are provided from the authors' experience at a trauma center where geriatric patients who have sustained major and minor injuries are treated daily. PMID:26065932

  9. Susceptibility-Weighted Imaging Manifestations in the Brain of Wilson’s Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Renmin; Yu, Xuen; Yu, Changliang; Qian, Yinfeng; Yu, Yongqiang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose It is well known that patients with Wilson’s disease (WD) suffer copper metabolism disorder. However, recent studies point to an additional iron metabolism disorder in WD patients. The purpose of our study was to examine susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) manifestations of WD in the brains of WD patients. Methods A total of 33 patients with WD and 18 normal controls underwent conventional MRI (Magnetic resonance imaging) and SWI. The phase values were measured on SWI-filtered phase images of the bilateral head of the caudate nuclei, globus pallidus, putamen, thalamus, substantia nigra, and red nucleus. Student’s t-tests were used to compare the phase values between WD groups and normal controls. Results The mean phase values for the bilateral head of the caudate nuclei, globus pallidus, putamen, thalamus, substantia nigra, and red nucleus were significantly lower than those in the control group (P < 0.001), and bilateral putamen was most strongly affected. Conclusions There is paramagnetic mineralization deposition in brain gray nuclei of WD patients and SWI is an effective method to evaluate these structures. PMID:25915414

  10. PET imaging in patients with coal workers pneumoconiosis and suspected malignancy

    SciTech Connect

    Reichert, M.; Bensadoun, E.S.

    2009-05-15

    Abstract: Positron Emission Tomography (PET) with F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose is commonly used in the evaluation of lung nodules; however, there is limited data on the PET appearance of coal worker's pneumoconiosis (CWP) and its utility for diagnosing lung malignancy in this setting. Six cases of CWP and suspected malignancy are reported. Each patient had at least one nodule >1 cm in diameter for a total of 19 nodules >1 cm. On PET imaging 18 of the 19 nodules were hypermetabolic and five of the six patients had at least one nodule that was PET positive. Based on pathologic data and clinical follow-up, none of the six patients had any evidence of malignancy. In this series, PET imaging was often positive in patients with CWP; however, all were false positives with standardized uptake value measurements in the range that are typically seen with malignant nodules. Due to its high rate of false positives, PET imaging seems to be of limited utility in diagnosing malignancy in patients with underlying coal worker's pneumoconiosis.

  11. Muscle imaging in patients with tubular aggregate myopathy caused by mutations in STIM1

    PubMed Central

    Tasca, Giorgio; D'Amico, Adele; Monforte, Mauro; Nadaj-Pakleza, Aleksandra; Vialle, Marc; Fattori, Fabiana; Vissing, John; Ricci, Enzo; Bertini, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Tubular aggregate myopathy is a genetically heterogeneous disease characterized by tubular aggregates as the hallmark on muscle biopsy. Mutations in STIM1 have recently been identified as one genetic cause in a number of tubular aggregate myopathy cases. To characterize the pattern of muscle involvement in this disease, upper and lower girdles and lower limbs were imaged in five patients with mutations in STIM1, and the scans were compared with two patients with tubular aggregate myopathy not caused by mutations in STIM1. A common pattern of involvement was found in STIM1-mutated patients, although with variable extent and severity of lesions. In the upper girdle, the subscapularis muscle was invariably affected. In the lower limbs, all the patients showed a consistent involvement of the flexor hallucis longus, which is very rarely affected in other muscle diseases, and a diffuse involvement of thigh and posterior leg with sparing of gracilis, tibialis anterior and, to a lesser extent, short head of biceps femoris. Mutations in STIM1 are associated with a homogeneous involvement on imaging despite variable clinical features. Muscle imaging can be useful in identifying STIM1-mutated patients especially among other forms of tubular aggregate myopathy. PMID:26255678

  12. Muscle imaging in patients with tubular aggregate myopathy caused by mutations in STIM1.

    PubMed

    Tasca, Giorgio; D'Amico, Adele; Monforte, Mauro; Nadaj-Pakleza, Aleksandra; Vialle, Marc; Fattori, Fabiana; Vissing, John; Ricci, Enzo; Bertini, Enrico

    2015-11-01

    Tubular aggregate myopathy is a genetically heterogeneous disease characterized by tubular aggregates as the hallmark on muscle biopsy. Mutations in STIM1 have recently been identified as one genetic cause in a number of tubular aggregate myopathy cases. To characterize the pattern of muscle involvement in this disease, upper and lower girdles and lower limbs were imaged in five patients with mutations in STIM1, and the scans were compared with two patients with tubular aggregate myopathy not caused by mutations in STIM1. A common pattern of involvement was found in STIM1-mutated patients, although with variable extent and severity of lesions. In the upper girdle, the subscapularis muscle was invariably affected. In the lower limbs, all the patients showed a consistent involvement of the flexor hallucis longus, which is very rarely affected in other muscle diseases, and a diffuse involvement of thigh and posterior leg with sparing of gracilis, tibialis anterior and, to a lesser extent, short head of biceps femoris. Mutations in STIM1 are associated with a homogeneous involvement on imaging despite variable clinical features. Muscle imaging can be useful in identifying STIM1-mutated patients especially among other forms of tubular aggregate myopathy. PMID:26255678

  13. Particularities of Crohn's disease in pediatric patients: current status and perspectives regarding imaging modalities.

    PubMed

    Schreiber-Dietrich, Dagmar; Chiorean, Liliana; Cui, Xin-Wu; Braden, Barbara; Kucharzik, Torsten; Jüngert, Jörg; Kosiak, Wojciech; Stenzel, Martin; Dietrich, Christoph F

    2015-01-01

    A consensus on the best imaging modality evaluating inflammatory bowel disease in the pediatric population is lacking and it is often unclear which modality to choose in specific clinical circumstances. Children with inflammatory bowel disease are exposed to ionizing radiation from multiple imaging studies performed at initial diagnosis, throughout treatment and during the follow-up period. This paper discusses the value of different imaging techniques in pediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease and gives a review of the literature. In addition, particular features of inflammatory bowel disease in children including the predilection of affected segments in the gastrointestinal tract are highlighted. Based on current literature knowledge, we encourage an integrative approach to the interpretation of clinical and imaging data for diagnosis and follow-up in daily clinical settings.

  14. A contextual based double watermarking of PET images by patient ID and ECG signal.

    PubMed

    Nambakhsh, Mohammad-Saleh; Ahmadian, Alireza; Zaidi, Habib

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents a novel digital watermarking framework using electrocardiograph (ECG) and demographic text data as double watermarks. It protects patient medical information and prevents mismatching diagnostic information. The watermarks are embedded in selected texture regions of a PET image using multi-resolution wavelet decomposition. Experimental results show that modifications in these locations are visually imperceptible. The robustness of the watermarks is verified through measurement of peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR), cross-correlation (CC%), structural similarity measure (SSIM) and universal image quality index (UIQI). Their robustness is also computed using pixel-based metrics and human visual system metrics. Additionally, beta factor (β) as an edge preservation measure is used for degradation evaluation of the image boundaries throughout the watermarked PET image. Assessment of the extracted watermarks shows watermarking robustness to common attacks such as embedded zero-tree wavelet (EZW) compression and median filtering.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging and prediction of outcome in patients with major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    MacQueen, Glenda M.

    2009-01-01

    Whether magnetic resonance imaging studies can provide useful information to clinicians who treat people with major depressive disorder remains to be established. There are, however, several recent findings that suggest that likelihood of response may be predicted by imaging findings. For example, morphometric studies have examined whether hippocampus volume is associated with clinically meaningful outcomes such as response to treatment. In general, patients who remit have larger pretreatment hippocampus volumes bilaterally compared with those who do not remit. There are similar preliminary findings for the anterior cingulate cortex. There are also a number of functional imaging studies that have identified different activity patterns in those who are likely to respond to treatment compared with those who are not. Using positron emission tomography, investigators have reported different patterns of response to treatment in those treated with medication compared with those treated with psychotherapy. Some of the potential barriers to the routine use of imaging in psychiatric practice are reviewed briefly. PMID:19721844

  16. Population of 100 realistic, patient-based computerized breast phantoms for multi-modality imaging research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segars, W. Paul; Veress, Alexander I.; Wells, Jered R.; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Kiarashi, Nooshin; Lo, Joseph Y.; Samei, Ehsan; Dobbins, James T.

    2014-03-01

    Breast imaging is an important area of research with many new techniques being investigated to further reduce the morbidity and mortality of breast cancer through early detection. Computerized phantoms can provide an essential tool to quantitatively compare new imaging systems and techniques. Current phantoms, however, lack sufficient realism in depicting the complex 3D anatomy of the breast. In this work, we created one-hundred realistic and detailed 3D computational breast phantoms based on high-resolution CT datasets from normal patients. We also developed a finiteelement application to simulate different compression states of the breast, making the phantoms applicable to multimodality imaging research. The breast phantoms and tools developed in this work were packaged into user-friendly software applications to distribute for breast imaging research.

  17. Clinical review: Lung imaging in acute respiratory distress syndrome patients - an update

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 30 years lung imaging has greatly contributed to the current understanding of the pathophysiology and the management of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In the past few years, in addition to chest X-ray and lung computed tomography, newer functional lung imaging techniques, such as lung ultrasound, positron emission tomography, electrical impedance tomography and magnetic resonance, have been gaining a role as diagnostic tools to optimize lung assessment and ventilator management in ARDS patients. Here we provide an updated clinical review of lung imaging in ARDS over the past few years to offer an overview of the literature on the available imaging techniques from a clinical perspective. PMID:24238477

  18. Abnormal Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Patients With Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Kyung-Hwa; Choi, Jin Woo; Shin, Jung Eun; Kim, Chang-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The etiology of sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) remains unclear in most cases. This study aimed to assess abnormal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in patients with SSNHL and evaluate the value of MRI in identifying the cause of SSNHL. A retrospective analysis of the charts and MRI findings of 291 patients with SSNHL was performed. In 291 patients, MRI abnormality, which was considered a cause of SSNHL, was detected in 13 patients. Vestibular schwannoma involving the internal auditory canal (IAC) and/or cerebellopontine angle was observed in 9 patients. All 9 patients had intrameatal tumors, and 6 of the 9 patients displayed extrameatal extension of their tumors. The tumor was small (<1 cm) or medium-sized (1.1–2.9 cm) in these 6 patients. Intralabyrinthine schwannoma, labyrinthine hemorrhage, IAC metastasis, and a ruptured dermoid cyst were each observed in 1 patient. The most commonly observed MRI abnormality in patients with SSNHL was vestibular schwannoma, and all of the lesions were small or medium-sized tumors involving the IAC. PMID:27124066

  19. Integrated multimedia timeline of medical images and data for thoracic oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Aberle, D R; Dionisio, J D; McNitt-Gray, M F; Taira, R K; Cárdenas, A F; Goldin, J G; Brown, K; Figlin, R A; Chu, W W

    1996-05-01

    A prototype multimedia medical database has been developed to provide image and textual data for thoracic oncology patients undergoing treatment of advanced malignancies. The database integrates image data from the hospital picture archiving and communication system with textual reports from the radiology information system, alphanumeric data contained in the hospital information system, and other electronic medical data. The database presents information in a timeline format and also contains visualization programs that permit the user to view and annotate radiographic measurements in tabular or graphic form. The database provides an efficient and intuitive display of the changing status of oncology patients. The ability to integrate, manage, and access relevant multimedia information may substantially enhance communication among distributed multidisciplinary health care providers and may ensure greater consistency and completeness of patient-related data.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging in patients with cardiac pacemakers: era of "MR Conditional" designs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Advances in cardiac device technology have led to the first generation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) conditional devices, providing more diagnostic imaging options for patients with these devices, but also new controversies. Prior studies of pacemakers in patients undergoing MRI procedures have provided groundwork for design improvements. Factors related to magnetic field interactions and transfer of electromagnetic energy led to specific design changes. Ferromagnetic content was minimized. Reed switches were modified. Leads were redesigned to reduce induced currents/heating. Circuitry filters and shielding were implemented to impede or limit the transfer of certain unwanted electromagnetic effects. Prospective multicenter clinical trials to assess the safety and efficacy of the first generation of MR conditional cardiac pacemakers demonstrated no significant alterations in pacing parameters compared to controls. There were no reported complications through the one month visit including no arrhythmias, electrical reset, inhibition of generator output, or adverse sensations. The safe implementation of these new technologies requires an understanding of the well-defined patient and MR system conditions. Although scanning a patient with an MR conditional device following the strictly defined patient and MR system conditions appears straightforward, issues related to patients with pre-existing devices remain complex. Until MR conditional devices are the routine platform for all of these devices, there will still be challenging decisions regarding imaging patients with pre-existing devices where MRI is required to diagnose and manage a potentially life threatening or serious scenario. A range of other devices including ICDs, biventricular devices, and implantable physiologic monitors as well as guidance of medical procedures using MRI technology will require further biomedical device design changes and testing. The development and implementation of cardiac MR

  1. A Systematic Analysis of the Reliability of Diffusion Tensor Imaging Tractography for Facial Nerve Imaging in Patients with Vestibular Schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Ung, Nolan; Mathur, Monica; Chung, Lawrance K; Cremer, Nicole; Pelargos, Panayiotis; Frew, Andrew; Thill, Kimberly; Mathur, Ishani; Voth, Brittany; Lim, Michael; Yang, Isaac

    2016-08-01

    Surgeons need to visualize the facial nerve reliably in relation to the vestibular schwannoma (VS) in surgical planning. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography has enabled unprecedented in vivo preoperative visualization. We collected data to measure the accuracy of DTI for an accurate location of the nerve in preoperative VS resection planning. A PubMed search for relevant studies was conducted. Inclusion criteria were gross total resection of VS, preoperative DTI identification of the facial nerve, and intraoperative cranial nerve localization by the surgeon. Exclusion criteria were tumors other than VS and unsuccessful preoperative location of the cranial nerve. Accuracy rate was calculated by comparing the intraoperative and preoperative locations detailed by DTI. The query identified 38 cases of VS that fit our inclusion criteria. Overall, 89% had surgical findings that agreed with the DTI location of the facial nerve. Of these cases, 32 patients had a postoperative House-Brackmann grade I or II. Our findings suggest that DTI is a reliable method for facial nerve imaging. Implementation of this technique may help decrease facial nerve injury during surgery. Limitations and further studies are needed to better understand what factors correlate with successful location of the facial nerve and DTI in patients with VS. PMID:27441156

  2. Thallium-201 versus technetium-99m pyrophosphate myocardial imaging in detection and evaluation of patients with acute myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Pitt, B.; Thrall, J.H.

    1980-12-18

    Thallium-201 myocardial imaging is of value in the early detection and evaluation of patients with suspected acute infarction. Thallium imaging may have a special value in characterizing patients with cardiogenic shock and in detecting patients at risk for subsequent infarction or death or death or both, before hospital discharge. Approximately 95 percent of pateints with transmural or nontransmural myocardial infarction can be detected with technetium-99m pyrophosphate myocardial imaging if the imaging is performed 24 to 72 hours after the onset of symptoms. Pyrophosphate imaging may have an important role in the evaluation of patients during the early follow-up period after hospital discharge from an episode of acute infarction. The finding of a persistently positive pyrophosphate image suggests a poor prognosis and is associated with a relatively large incidence of subsequent myocardial infarction and death.

  3. Imaging Plaques to Predict and Better Manage Patients with Acute Coronary Events

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Garcia, Hector M.; Jang, Ik-Kyung; Serruys, Patrick W.; Kovacic, Jason C.; Narula, Jagat; Fayad, Zahi A.

    2014-01-01

    Culprit lesions of patients who have had an acute coronary syndrome commonly are ruptured coronary plaques with superimposed thrombus. The precursor of such lesions is an inflamed thin-capped fibroatheroma. These plaques can be imaged by means of invasive techniques such as intravascular ultrasound (and derived techniques), optical coherence tomography and near-infrared spectroscopy. Very often these patients exhibit similar (multiple) plaques beyond the culprit lesion. These remote plaques can be assessed non invasively by computed tomography angiography and magnetic resonance imaging and also using invasive imaging. The detection of these remote plaques is not only feasible, but also in natural history studies have been associated with clinical coronary events. Different systemic pharmacological treatments have been studied (mostly statins) with modest success and therefore newer approaches are being tested. Local treatment for such lesions is in its infancy and larger, prospective and randomized trials are needed. This review will describe the pathological and imaging findings in culprit lesions of patients with acute coronary syndrome and as well as the assessment of remote plaques. In addition, the pharmacological and local treatment options will be reviewed. PMID:24902974

  4. Assessment of sites of marrow and extramedullary hematopoiesis by hybrid imaging in primary myelofibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Ojeda-Uribe, Mario; Morel, Olivier; Ungureanu, Constantin; Desterke, Christophe; Le Bousse-Kerdilès, Marie-Caroline; Boulahdour, Hatem

    2016-09-01

    We investigated noninvasive procedures by hybrid imaging to assess the sites of active or inactive hematopoiesis in patients with primary myelofibrosis (PMF). To this end, we used two radionuclides, technetium 99m ((99m) Tc) and indium 111-chloride ((111) In-Cl3 ), coupled with single-photon emission tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT). We studied five patients with PMF and one with secondary myelofibrosis (MF). The classical pattern of lower fixation of both tracers at the axial skeleton where the myelofibrotic process occurs and the reactivation of sites of active hematopoiesis at the distal skeleton were confirmed. Coupling both radionuclides to SPECT/CT imaging allowed for more precise visualization of the sites of extramedullary hematopoiesis as those observed in the spleen and liver. Splenic high uptake of (111) In-Cl3 coupled with SPECT/CT represents a pathognomonic feature of PMF. We conclude that, the hybrid imaging procedures that we studied might constitute an alternative noninvasive method for the screening of the whole-body marrow and, by this way, to assess the impact of targeted therapies in PMF patients in whom it is well known that the distribution of the hematopoietic active areas is disturbed. Hybrid imaging could also be useful for diagnostic purposes in cases of early PMF or in suspected cases of myelofibrosis secondary to polycythemia vera or essential thrombocythemia. PMID:27518041

  5. Measuring outcomes in plastic surgery: body image and quality of life in abdominoplasty patients.

    PubMed

    Bolton, Michael A; Pruzinsky, Thomas; Cash, Thomas F; Persing, John A

    2003-08-01

    Abdominoplasty is an increasingly common aesthetic surgery procedure that has yet to be evaluated using the most recently developed and psychometrically sophisticated measures of body image and quality-of-life outcomes. This study prospectively evaluated 30 consecutive female abdominoplasty patients, preoperatively and postoperatively, using measures of body image, psychological investment in appearance, and general psychosocial functioning. One-way repeated-measures (pretest versus posttest) analyses of variance revealed significant positive postsurgical changes on the Appearance Evaluation subscale of the Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire. Mean scores for the questionnaire's Body Areas Satisfaction Scale improved postoperatively (p < 0.001). Scores for the Body Exposure and Sexual Relations Questionnaire also improved significantly (p < 0.001) postoperatively. These findings indicate significant improvements in body image outcome, including positive changes in patients' evaluations of their overall appearance, their average body image dissatisfaction, and their experiences of self-consciousness and avoidance of body exposure during sexual activities. As predicted, no changes were seen on any measure of psychological investment in appearance or on patients' reports of general psychosocial functioning (self-esteem, satisfaction with life, or social anxiety). PMID:12900625

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Glucose Uptake and Metabolism in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jihong; Weygand, Joseph; Hwang, Ken-Pin; Mohamed, Abdallah S R; Ding, Yao; Fuller, Clifton D; Lai, Stephen Y; Frank, Steven J; Zhou, Jinyuan

    2016-01-01

    Imaging metabolic dysfunction, a hallmark of solid tumors, usually requires radioactive tracers. Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging can potentially detect and visualize glucose uptake and metabolism, without the need for radioisotopes. Here, we tested the feasibility of using glucose CEST (glucoCEST) to image unlabeled glucose uptake in head and neck cancer by using a clinical 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. The average CEST contrast between tumors and normal tissue in 17 patients was 7.58% (P = 0.006) in the 3-4 ppm offset frequency range and 5.06% (P = 0.02) in 1-5 ppm range. In a subgroup of eight patients, glucoCEST signal enhancement was higher in tumors than in normal muscle (4.98% vs. 1.28%, P < 0.021). We conclude that glucoCEST images of head and neck cancer can be obtained with a clinical 3T MRI scanner. PMID:27461165

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Glucose Uptake and Metabolism in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jihong; Weygand, Joseph; Hwang, Ken-Pin; Mohamed, Abdallah S. R.; Ding, Yao; Fuller, Clifton D.; Lai, Stephen Y.; Frank, Steven J.; Zhou, Jinyuan

    2016-01-01

    Imaging metabolic dysfunction, a hallmark of solid tumors, usually requires radioactive tracers. Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging can potentially detect and visualize glucose uptake and metabolism, without the need for radioisotopes. Here, we tested the feasibility of using glucose CEST (glucoCEST) to image unlabeled glucose uptake in head and neck cancer by using a clinical 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. The average CEST contrast between tumors and normal tissue in 17 patients was 7.58% (P = 0.006) in the 3–4 ppm offset frequency range and 5.06% (P = 0.02) in 1–5 ppm range. In a subgroup of eight patients, glucoCEST signal enhancement was higher in tumors than in normal muscle (4.98% vs. 1.28%, P < 0.021). We conclude that glucoCEST images of head and neck cancer can be obtained with a clinical 3T MRI scanner. PMID:27461165

  8. Imaging Parameters and Recurrent Cerebrovascular Events in Patients With Minor Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack

    PubMed Central

    Yaghi, Shadi; Rostanski, Sara K.; Boehme, Amelia K.; Martin-Schild, Sheryl; Samai, Alyana; Silver, Brian; Blum, Christina A.; Jayaraman, Mahesh V.; Siket, Matthew S.; Khan, Muhib; Furie, Karen L.; Elkind, Mitchell S. V.; Marshall, Randolph S.; Willey, Joshua Z.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Neurological worsening and recurrent stroke contribute substantially to morbidity associated with transient ischemic attacks and strokes (TIA-S). OBJECTIVE To determine predictors of early recurrent cerebrovascular events (RCVEs) among patients with TIA-S and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores of 0 to 3. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A retrospective cohort study was conducted at 2 tertiary care centers (Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York, and Tulane University Medical Center, New Orleans, Louisiana) between January 1, 2010, and December 31, 2014. All patients with neurologist-diagnosed TIA-S with a National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score of 0 to 3 who presented to the emergency department were included. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The primary outcome (adjudicated by 3 vascular neurologists) was RCVE: neurological deterioration in the absence of a medical explanation or recurrent TIA-S during hospitalization. RESULTS Of the 1258 total patients, 1187 had no RCVEs and 71 had RCVEs; of this group, 750 patients (63.2%) and 39 patients (54.9%), respectively, were aged 60 years or older. There were 505 patients with TIA-S at Columbia University; 31 (6.1%) had RCVEs (15 patients had neurological deterioration only, 11 had recurrent TIA-S only, and 5 had both). The validation cohort at Tulane University consisted of 753 patients; 40 (5.3%) had RCVEs (24 patients had neurological deterioration only and 16 had both). Predictors of RCVE in multivariate models in both cohorts were infarct on neuroimaging (computed tomographic scan or diffusion-weighted imaging sequences on magnetic resonance imaging) (Columbia University: not applicable and Tulane University: odds ratio, 1.75; 95% CI, 0.82–3.74; P = .15) and large-vessel disease etiology (Columbia University: odds ratio, 6.69; 95% CI, 3.10–14.50 and Tulane University: odds ratio, 8.13; 95% CI, 3.86–17.12; P < .001). There was an increase in the percentage of

  9. Quantitative ultrasound spectroscopic imaging for characterization of disease extent in prostate cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Sofroni, Ervis; Papanicolau, Naum; Falou, Omar; Sugar, Linda; Morton, Gerard; Yaffe, Martin J; Nam, Robert; Sadeghian, Alireza; Kolios, Michael C; Chung, Hans T; Czarnota, Gregory J

    2015-02-01

    Three-dimensional quantitative ultrasound spectroscopic imaging of prostate was investigated clinically for the noninvasive detection and extent characterization of disease in cancer patients and compared to whole-mount, whole-gland histopathology of radical prostatectomy specimens. Fifteen patients with prostate cancer underwent a volumetric transrectal ultrasound scan before radical prostatectomy. Conventional-frequency (~5MHz) ultrasound images and radiofrequency data were collected from patients. Normalized power spectra were used as the basis of quantitative ultrasound spectroscopy. Specifically, color-coded parametric maps of 0-MHz intercept, midband fit, and spectral slope were computed and used to characterize prostate tissue in ultrasound images. Areas of cancer were identified in whole-mount histopathology specimens, and disease extent was correlated to that estimated from quantitative ultrasound parametric images. Midband fit and 0-MHz intercept parameters were found to be best associated with the presence of disease as located on histopathology whole-mount sections. Obtained results indicated a correlation between disease extent estimated noninvasively based on midband fit parametric images and that identified histopathologically on prostatectomy specimens, with an r(2) value of 0.71 (P<.0001). The 0-MHz intercept parameter demonstrated a lower level of correlation with histopathology. Spectral slope parametric maps offered no discrimination of disease. Multiple regression analysis produced a hybrid disease characterization model (r(2)=0.764, P<.05), implying that the midband fit biomarker had the greatest correlation with the histopathologic extent of disease. This work demonstrates that quantitative ultrasound spectroscopic imaging can be used for detecting prostate cancer and characterizing disease extent noninvasively, with corresponding gross three-dimensional histopathologic correlation.

  10. Quantitative Ultrasound Spectroscopic Imaging for Characterization of Disease Extent in Prostate Cancer Patients1

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Sofroni, Ervis; Papanicolau, Naum; Falou, Omar; Sugar, Linda; Morton, Gerard; Yaffe, Martin J.; Nam, Robert; Sadeghian, Alireza; Kolios, Michael C.; Chung, Hans T.; Czarnota, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional quantitative ultrasound spectroscopic imaging of prostate was investigated clinically for the noninvasive detection and extent characterization of disease in cancer patients and compared to whole-mount, whole-gland histopathology of radical prostatectomy specimens. Fifteen patients with prostate cancer underwent a volumetric transrectal ultrasound scan before radical prostatectomy. Conventional-frequency (~ 5 MHz) ultrasound images and radiofrequency data were collected from patients. Normalized power spectra were used as the basis of quantitative ultrasound spectroscopy. Specifically, color-coded parametric maps of 0-MHz intercept, midband fit, and spectral slope were computed and used to characterize prostate tissue in ultrasound images. Areas of cancer were identified in whole-mount histopathology specimens, and disease extent was correlated to that estimated from quantitative ultrasound parametric images. Midband fit and 0-MHz intercept parameters were found to be best associated with the presence of disease as located on histopathology whole-mount sections. Obtained results indicated a correlation between disease extent estimated noninvasively based on midband fit parametric images and that identified histopathologically on prostatectomy specimens, with an r2 value of 0.71 (P < .0001). The 0-MHz intercept parameter demonstrated a lower level of correlation with histopathology. Spectral slope parametric maps offered no discrimination of disease. Multiple regression analysis produced a hybrid disease characterization model (r2 = 0.764, P < .05), implying that the midband fit biomarker had the greatest correlation with the histopathologic extent of disease. This work demonstrates that quantitative ultrasound spectroscopic imaging can be used for detecting prostate cancer and characterizing disease extent noninvasively, with corresponding gross three-dimensional histopathologic correlation. PMID:25749174

  11. Response of patients to the introduction of a private Magnetic Resonance Imaging service in Western Jamaica

    PubMed Central

    Anderson-Jackson, Lennox; McGrowder, Donovan A.; Bourne, Paul A.; Crawford, Tazhmoye; Whittaker, Wayne H. A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is one of today's fastest growing imaging modalities, spurred in part by rapid advances in technology and important new applications in patient care. It was introduced in Western Jamaica in March 2005 at a non-hospital-based facility called North Coast Imaging MRI Service. Aims: The study examined the socio-demographics, accessibility and affordability of the services to patients. Materials and Method: A random sample of 100 patients was used and the research instrument was a questionnaire. The study was conducted between August and November 2008. Results: The findings of the study showed that majority of the respondents lived in rural areas and were within the age group 30 - 59 years. One-half of the respondents resided in St. James, were employed; earned more than US$1,351.00 per month and could afford the cost of the MRI procedure. More than one half of the respondents indicated that it took 15 – 30 minutes to be examined after arrival at the Centre; most (81%) of the respondents indicated that the MRI procedure was adequately explained, and 99% indicated that questions about the procedure were satisfactorily answered. The MRI Scans performed at the North Coast Imaging MRI Service showed an increase of 157.49% in 2006 when compared with 2005, and 70.90% in 2007 when compared with 2006. Our findings suggest that the number of MRI scans done at the North Coast Imaging MRI Service is likely to increase. Conclusion: Although most of the respondents were able to afford the procedure there are concerns about persons in the lower socio-economic group who are unable to afford expensive diagnostic imaging tests such as MRI scans. There is an urgent need for government-owned hospital-based MRI Units in Jamaica to offer lower cost MRI scans to the public. PMID:22666707

  12. What Does PET Imaging Add to Conventional Staging of Head and Neck Cancer Patients?

    SciTech Connect

    Pohar, Surjeet . E-mail: poharss@evms.edu; Brown, Robert B.S.; Newman, Nancy; Koniarczyk, Michael; Hsu, Jack; Feiglin, David

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the value of PET scans in the staging of patients with head and neck carcinoma. Methods and Materials: The charts of 25 patients who underwent neck dissection, computed tomography (CT) scan, and F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging as part of their initial work-up for a head and neck squamous cell cancer between 2000-2003 were reviewed. All patients underwent clinical examination, triple endoscopy, and chest radiograph as part of their clinical staging, adhering to American Joint Commission for Cancer criteria. In addition to the clinical nodal (N) stage, PET findings were incorporated to determine a second type of N staging: clinical N + PET stage. The number of neck sides and nodal levels involved on CT or PET and on pathologic examination were recorded. Results: The sensitivity and specificity for detection of nodal disease were similar for CT and FDG-PET. Positive and negative likelihood ratios were similar for both diagnostic tests. None of our 25 patients had unsuspected distant disease detected by PET. Conclusion: The addition of PET imaging did not improve diagnostic accuracy in our patients compared with CT. PET scanning did not alter clinical management in any of the patients.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging in patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Pilewskie, Melissa; King, Tari A

    2014-07-15

    The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer remains controversial. Here we review the current use of breast MRI and the impact of MRI on short-term surgical outcomes and rates of local recurrence. In addition, we address the use of MRI in specific patient populations, such as those with ductal carcinoma in situ, invasive lobular carcinoma, and occult primary breast cancer, and discuss the potential role of MRI for assessing response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Although MRI has improved sensitivity compared with conventional imaging, this has not translated into improved short-term surgical outcomes or long-term patient benefit, such as improved local control or survival, in any patient population. MRI is an important diagnostic test in the evaluation of patients presenting with occult primary breast cancer and has shown promise in monitoring response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy; however, the data do not support the routine use of perioperative MRI in patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer. Cancer 2014;120:120:2080-2089. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  14. The use of positron emission tomography imaging in the management of patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Maddahi, J; Blitz, A; Phelps, M; Laks, H

    1996-01-01

    Rational management of patients with CAD and poor left ventricular function relies on proper identification of the subgroup at high risk and those who have the highest potential of benefiting from a particular type of treatment. It is now well recognized that patients with CAD and left ventricular dysfunction have a high but variable mortality rate while receiving medical therapy. Many of these patients who have intractable heart failure are considered candidates for cardiac transplantation. Despite favorable survival after cardiac transplantation, this procedure cannot be performed in 90% of the heart failure patients who are potentially eligible because of the shortage of donor hearts. Cardiac transplantation is also an expensive procedure. Perfusion-FDG metabolism PET imaging has become the gold-standard noninvasive imaging method to identify the presence and extent of hibernating myocardium. Positron emission tomography accurately predicts recovery of regional and global left ventricular dysfunction after revascularization. In patients with poor left ventricular function, the PET pattern of perfusion metabolism mismatch is also predictive of improvement in heart failure symptoms and survival benefit after myocardial revascularization. These data suggest that a rational approach may be developed for cost-effective management of patients with CAD and poor left ventricular function.

  15. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography imaging of T-lymphoblastic lymphoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Hoon; Pahk, Kisoo; Kim, Sungeun; Lim, Sang Moo; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Park, Yeon Hee; Lee, Seung-Sook; Choe, Jae Gol

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) findings in patients with T-lymphoblastic lymphoma (T-LBL). In total, 9 patients with histopathologically confirmed T-LBL were included in the study. Bone marrow (BM) involvement and leukemic transformation (LT) were evaluated through iliac crest marrow biopsy and peripheral blood blast count. FDG-PET scans were performed at the initial pre-treatment point. Two experienced nuclear medicine physicians evaluated the FDG-PET images by visual analysis and using the maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) of the malignant lesions. Overall, 8 out 9 patients presented with BM involvement; 7 showed LT, while 1 showed BM involvement without LT. All involved T-LBL lesions were FDG-avid with variable uptake. The mean SUVmax was 6.4±3.3. T-LBL patients with BM involvement showed diffuse or nodular marrow uptake. In addition, all the patients with LT showed diffuse marrow FDG activity. However, the patient with BM involvement but no LT showed nodular FDG uptake in the marrow. In conclusion, the present study indicates that it is possible to use FDG-PET for the evaluation of the disease extent of T-LBL. Furthermore, the imaging technique could provide a diagnostic clue for determining BM involvement or LT. PMID:27446482

  16. Molecular image-directed biopsies: improving clinical biopsy selection in patients with multiple tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Stephanie A.; Tuite, Michael J.; Jeraj, Robert

    2016-10-01

    Site selection for image-guided biopsies in patients with multiple lesions is typically based on clinical feasibility and physician preference. This study outlines the development of a selection algorithm that, in addition to clinical requirements, incorporates quantitative imaging data for automatic identification of candidate lesions for biopsy. The algorithm is designed to rank potential targets by maximizing a lesion-specific score, incorporating various criteria separated into two categories: (1) physician-feasibility category including physician-preferred lesion location and absolute volume scores, and (2) imaging-based category including various modality and application-specific metrics. This platform was benchmarked in two clinical scenarios, a pre-treatment setting and response-based setting using imaging from metastatic prostate cancer patients with high disease burden (multiple lesions) undergoing conventional treatment and receiving whole-body [18F]NaF PET/CT scans pre- and mid-treatment. Targeting of metastatic lesions was robust to different weighting ratios and candidacy for biopsy was physician confirmed. Lesion ranked as top targets for biopsy remained so for all patients in pre-treatment and post-treatment biopsy selection after sensitivity testing was completed for physician-biased or imaging-biased scenarios. After identifying candidates, biopsy feasibility was evaluated by a physician and confirmed for 90% (32/36) of high-ranking lesions, of which all top choices were confirmed. The remaining cases represented lesions with high anatomical difficulty for targeting, such as proximity to sciatic nerve. This newly developed selection method was successfully used to quantitatively identify candidate lesions for biopsies in patients with multiple lesions. In a prospective study, we were able to successfully plan, develop, and implement this technique for the selection of a pre-treatment biopsy location.

  17. Detection of Early Right Ventricular Dysfunction in Young Patients With Thalassemia Major Using Tissue Doppler Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bornaun, Helen; Dedeoglu, Reyhan; Oztarhan, Kazim; Dedeoglu, Savas; Erfidan, Erkan; Gundogdu, Muge; Aydogan, Gonul; Cengiz, Dicle

    2016-01-01

    Background Myocardial iron overload is the most common cause of mortality in patients with thalassemia major (TM), also known as beta-thalassemia. T2* cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the best way of monitoring cardiac iron, and new echocardiographic techniques can be used to assess cardiac function. Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the systolic and diastolic right ventricular (RV) function of patients with TM using tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) and to determine whether this echocardiographic technique is an adequate diagnostic tool for the screening and detection of subclinical cardiac dysfunction. Patients and Methods Eighty-four patients with TM were evaluated by conventional echocardiography and pulse-wave TDI. The data of the TM group (Group 1) were compared with that of 85 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (Group 2). Cardiovascular T2* MRI examinations were performed in 49 of the 85 patients. Results The patients with TM had significantly lower values for weight, height, body mass index, systolic arterial pressure, deceleration time, E’/A’, and ejection time (ET) than the controls. Group 1 also had significantly higher values for peak early diastolic velocity (E) over peak late diastolic velocity (A), peak early diastolic velocity of TDI (E’), peak late diastolic velocity of TDI (A’), E/E’, isovolumetric relaxation time, isovolumetric contraction time, and RV magnetic perfusion imaging (MPI) than Group 2. Conclusions RV diastolic dysfunction occurs before systolic deterioration in patients with TM and cannot be screened with conventional echocardiographic techniques. In routine practice, TDI measurements, MPI (for global function) and the E/E’ parameter (for diastolic function) can be used to screen and detect early RV dysfunction. PMID:27617076

  18. The Artful Universe Expanded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrow, John D.

    2005-07-01

    Our love of art, writes John Barrow, is the end product of millions of years of evolution. How we react to a beautiful painting or symphony draws upon instincts laid down long before humans existed. Now, in this enhanced edition of the highly popular The Artful Universe , Barrow further explores the close ties between our aesthetic appreciation and the basic nature of the Universe. Barrow argues that the laws of the Universe have imprinted themselves upon our thoughts and actions in subtle and unexpected ways. Why do we like certain types of art or music? What games and puzzles do we find challenging? Why do so many myths and legends have common elements? In this eclectic and entertaining survey, Barrow answers these questions and more as he explains how the landscape of the Universe has influenced the development of philosophy and mythology, and how millions of years of evolutionary history have fashioned our attraction to certain patterns of sound and color. Barrow casts the story of human creativity and thought in a fascinating light, considering such diverse topics as our instinct for language, the origins and uses of color in nature, why we divide time into intervals as we do, the sources of our appreciation of landscape painting, and whether computer-generated fractal art is really art. Drawing on a wide variety of examples, from the theological questions raised by St. Augustine and C.S. Lewis to the relationship between the pure math of Pythagoras and the music of the Beatles, The Artful Universe Expanded covers new ground and enters a wide-ranging debate about the meaning and significance of the links between art and science.

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Developmental Anomalies of the Uterus and the Vagina in Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Gould, Sharon W; Epelman, Monica

    2015-08-01

    Developmental anomalies of the uterus and the vagina are associated with infertility and miscarriage and are most commonly detected in the postpubertal age-group. These conditions may also present in younger patients as a mass or pain owing to obstruction of the uterus or the vagina. Associated urinary tract anomalies are common, as well. Accurate diagnosis and thorough description of these anomalies is essential for appropriate management; however, evaluation may be difficult in an immature reproductive tract. Magnetic resonance imaging technique pertinent to imaging of the pediatric female reproductive tract is presented and illustrated along with the findings associated with various anomalies.

  20. Using patient-specific phantoms to evaluate deformable image registration algorithms for adaptive radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Nick; Glide-Hurst, Carri; Kim, Jinkoo; Adams, Jeffrey; Li, Shunshan; Wen, Ning; Chetty, Indrin J; Zhong, Hualiang

    2013-11-04

    The quality of adaptive treatment planning depends on the accuracy of its underlying deformable image registration (DIR). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the performance of two DIR algorithms, B-spline-based deformable multipass (DMP) and deformable demons (Demons), implemented in a commercial software package. Evaluations were conducted using both computational and physical deformable phantoms. Based on a finite element method (FEM), a total of 11 computational models were developed from a set of CT images acquired from four lung and one prostate cancer patients. FEM generated displacement vector fields (DVF) were used to construct the lung and prostate image phantoms. Based on a fast-Fourier transform technique, image noise power spectrum was incorporated into the prostate image phantoms to create simulated CBCT images. The FEM-DVF served as a gold standard for verification of the two registration algorithms performed on these phantoms. The registration algorithms were also evaluated at the homologous points quantified in the CT images of a physical lung phantom. The results indicated that the mean errors of the DMP algorithm were in the range of 1.0 ~ 3.1 mm for the computational phantoms and 1.9 mm for the physical lung phantom. For the computational prostate phantoms, the corresponding mean error was 1.0-1.9 mm in the prostate, 1.9-2.4mm in the rectum, and 1.8-2.1 mm over the entire patient body. Sinusoidal errors induced by B-spline interpolations were observed in all the displacement profiles of the DMP registrations. Regions of large displacements were observed to have more registration errors. Patient-specific FEM models have been developed to evaluate the DIR algorithms implemented in the commercial software package. It has been found that the accuracy of these algorithms is patient dependent and related to various factors including tissue deformation magnitudes and image intensity gradients across the regions of interest. This may suggest that

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of femoral marrow predicts outcome in adult patients with acute myeloid leukaemia in complete remission.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Shojiro; Tanaka, Osamu

    2002-04-01

    Accurate assessment of residual disease is important for the prediction of outcome in patients with acute leukaemia in complete remission (CR). To investigate whether abnormalities on magnetic resonance (MR) images of femoral marrow in adult patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) in CR can predict outcome, 28 newly diagnosed patients with AML underwent MR imaging when bone marrow aspiration or biopsy was performed to verify the state of CR after induction therapy. MR abnormalities on short TI (inversion time) inversion recovery (STIR) techniques persisted in all four patients who did not achieve CR. In 13 CR patients abnormalities on STIR images resolved, to result in normal appearance at the time CR was achieved. All 13 patients remained in CR for 3-104 months (median, 73 months). In the other 11 CR patients, STIR abnormalities persisted at the time CR was achieved. Seven of them relapsed between 1 and 28 months (median, 3 months) after MR evaluation. Disease-free survival of patients with persistent abnormal STIR images was significantly shorter than that of patients with normal STIR images (P < 0.01). MR imaging of femoral marrow may predict outcome in adult patients with AML in CR. PMID:11918535

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of femoral marrow predicts outcome in adult patients with acute myeloid leukaemia in complete remission.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Shojiro; Tanaka, Osamu

    2002-04-01

    Accurate assessment of residual disease is important for the prediction of outcome in patients with acute leukaemia in complete remission (CR). To investigate whether abnormalities on magnetic resonance (MR) images of femoral marrow in adult patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) in CR can predict outcome, 28 newly diagnosed patients with AML underwent MR imaging when bone marrow aspiration or biopsy was performed to verify the state of CR after induction therapy. MR abnormalities on short TI (inversion time) inversion recovery (STIR) techniques persisted in all four patients who did not achieve CR. In 13 CR patients abnormalities on STIR images resolved, to result in normal appearance at the time CR was achieved. All 13 patients remained in CR for 3-104 months (median, 73 months). In the other 11 CR patients, STIR abnormalities persisted at the time CR was achieved. Seven of them relapsed between 1 and 28 months (median, 3 months) after MR evaluation. Disease-free survival of patients with persistent abnormal STIR images was significantly shorter than that of patients with normal STIR images (P < 0.01). MR imaging of femoral marrow may predict outcome in adult patients with AML in CR.

  3. Correlative Imaging in a Patient with Cystic Thymoma: CT, MR and PET/CT Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Romeo, Valeria; Esposito, Alfredo; Maurea, Simone; Camera, Luigi; Mainenti, Pier Paolo; Palmieri, Giovannella; Buonerba, Carlo; Salvatore, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Cystic thymoma is a rare variant of thymic neoplasm characterized by almost complete cystic degeneration with mixed internal structure. We describe a case of a 60 year-old woman with a cystic thymoma studied with advanced tomographic imaging stydies. CT, MRI and PET/CT with 18F-FDG were performed; volumetric CT and MRI images provided better anatomic evaluation for pre-operative assessment, while PET/CT was helpful for lesion characterization based on 18F-FDG uptake. Although imaging studies are mandatory for pre-operative evaluation of cystic thymoma, final diagnosis still remains surgical. Case Report A 60-year-old woman with recent chest pain and no history of previous disease was admitted to our departement to investigate the result of a previous chest X-ray that showed bilateral mediastinal enlargement; for this purpose, enhanced chest CT scan was performed using a 64-rows scanner (Toshiba, Aquilion 64, Japan) before and after intravenous bolus administration of iodinated non ionic contrast agent; CT images demonstrated the presence of a large mediastinal mass (11×8 cm) located in the anterior mediastinum who extended from the anonymous vein to the cardio-phrenic space, compressing the left atrium and causing medium lobe atelectasis; bilateral pleural effusion was also present. Conclusions In conclusion, correlative imaging plays a foundamental role for the diagnostic evaluation of patient with cystic thymoma. In particular, volumetric CT and MRI studies can provide better anatomic informations regarding internal structure and local tumor spread for pre-operative assessment. Conversely, metabolic imaging using 18F-FDG PET/CT is helpful for lesion characterization differentiating benign from malignant lesion on the basis of intense tracer uptake. The role of PET/MRI is still under investigation. However, final diagnosis still remains surgical even though imaging studies are mandatory for pre-operative patient management. PMID:25593635

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of osteoarthrosis and effusion in patients with unilateral temporomandibular joint pain.

    PubMed

    Emshoff, R; Brandimaier, I; Bertram, S; Rudisch, A

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the presence of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain and the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of osteoarthrosis (OA), and effusion. The study comprised 112 consecutive TMJ pain patients. Criteria for including a patient were report of unilateral pain near the TMJ, with the presence of unilateral TMJ pain during palpation, function, and/or unassisted or assisted mandibular opening. Bilateral sagittal and coronal MR images were obtained to establish the presence or absence of TMJ OA, and/or effusion. Comparison of the TMJ side-related data showed a significant relationship between the clinical finding of TMJ pain and the MR imaging diagnoses of TMJ OA (P=0.000), and TMJ effusion (P=0.000). Further, there was a significant relationship between the MR imaging diagnosis of TMJ OA and TMJ effusion (P=0.000). Use of the Kappa statistical test indicated poor diagnostic agreement between the presence of TMJ pain and the MR imaging diagnosis of TMJ OA (K=0.22), TMJ effusion (K=0.29), and TMJ 'OA and effusion' (K=0.30). The study's findings suggest that while clinical pain is correlated to TMJ-related MR imaging findings, clinical pain in and of itself, is not reliable for predicting the presence of TMJ OA and/or effusion. Validation of MR imaging diagnoses would involve the investigation of cross-sectional and longitudinal evidence to assess decisive differences in terms of prognosis and/or treatment outcome. PMID:12521314

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of osteoarthrosis and effusion in patients with unilateral temporomandibular joint pain.

    PubMed

    Emshoff, R; Brandimaier, I; Bertram, S; Rudisch, A

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the presence of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain and the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of osteoarthrosis (OA), and effusion. The study comprised 112 consecutive TMJ pain patients. Criteria for including a patient were report of unilateral pain near the TMJ, with the presence of unilateral TMJ pain during palpation, function, and/or unassisted or assisted mandibular opening. Bilateral sagittal and coronal MR images were obtained to establish the presence or absence of TMJ OA, and/or effusion. Comparison of the TMJ side-related data showed a significant relationship between the clinical finding of TMJ pain and the MR imaging diagnoses of TMJ OA (P=0.000), and TMJ effusion (P=0.000). Further, there was a significant relationship between the MR imaging diagnosis of TMJ OA and TMJ effusion (P=0.000). Use of the Kappa statistical test indicated poor diagnostic agreement between the presence of TMJ pain and the MR imaging diagnosis of TMJ OA (K=0.22), TMJ effusion (K=0.29), and TMJ 'OA and effusion' (K=0.30). The study's findings suggest that while clinical pain is correlated to TMJ-related MR imaging findings, clinical pain in and of itself, is not reliable for predicting the presence of TMJ OA and/or effusion. Validation of MR imaging diagnoses would involve the investigation of cross-sectional and longitudinal evidence to assess decisive differences in terms of prognosis and/or treatment outcome.

  6. Clinical Decision Making With Myocardial Perfusion Imaging in Patients With Known or Suspected Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cremer, Paul; Hachamovitch, Rory; Tamarappoo, Balaji

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) to diagnose coronary artery disease (CAD) is best performed in patients with intermediate pretest likelihood of disease; unfortunately, pretest likelihood is often overestimated, resulting in the inappropriate use of perfusion imaging. A good functional capacity often predicts low risk, and MPI for diagnosing CAD should be reserved for individuals with poor exercise capacity, abnormal resting electrocardiography, or an intermediate or high probability of CAD. With respect to anatomy-based testing, coronary CT angiography has a good negative predictive value, but stenosis severity correlates poorly with ischemia. Therefore decision making with respect to revascularization may be limited when a purely noninvasive anatomical test is used. Regarding perfusion imaging, the diagnostic accuracies of SPECT, PET, and cardiac magnetic resonance are similar, though fewer studies are available with cardiac magnetic resonance. PET coronary flow reserve may offer a negative predictive value sufficiently high to exclude severe CAD such that patients with mild to moderate reversible perfusion defects can forego invasive angiography. In addition, combined anatomical and perfusion-based imaging may eventually offer a definitive evaluation for diagnosing CAD, even in higher risk patients. Any remarkable findings on single-photon emission computed tomography and PET MPI studies are valuable for prognostication. Furthermore, assessment of myocardial blood flow with PET is particularly powerful for prognostication as it reflects the end result of many processes that lead to atherosclerosis. Decision making with respect to revascularization is limited for cardiac MRI and PET MPI. In contrast, retrospective radionuclide studies have identified an ischemic threshold, but randomized trials are needed. In patients with at least moderately reduced left ventricular systolic function, viable myocardium as assessed by PET or MRI, appears to identify patients

  7. Patient Registration Using Intraoperative Stereovision in Image-guided Open Spinal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xiaoyao; Paulsen, Keith D.; Roberts, David W.; Mirza, Sohail K.; Lollis, S. Scott

    2015-01-01

    Despite its widespread availability and success in open cranial neurosurgery, image-guidance technology remains more limited in use in open spinal procedures, in large part because of patient registration challenges. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of using intraoperative stereovision (iSV) for accurate, efficient and robust patient registration in open spinal fusion surgery. Geometrical surfaces of exposed vertebrae were first reconstructed from iSV. A classical multi-start registration was then executed between point clouds generated from iSV and preoperative CT (pCT) images of the spine. With two pairs of feature points manually identified to facilitate the registration, an average registration accuracy of 1.43 mm in terms of surface-to-surface distance error was achieved in 8 patient cases using a single iSV image pair sampling 2–3 vertebral segments. The iSV registration error was consistently smaller than the conventional landmark approach for every case (average of 2.02 mm with the same error metric). The large capture ranges (average of 23.8 mm in translation and 46.0 deg in rotation) found in the iSV patient registration suggest the technique may offer sufficient robustness for practical application in the operating room. Although some manual effort was still necessary, the manually-derived inputs for iSV registration only needed to be approximate as opposed to be precise and accurate for the manual efforts required in landmark registration. The total computational cost of the iSV registration was 1.5 min on average, significantly less than the typical ~30 min required for the landmark approach. These findings support the clinical feasibility of iSV to offer accurate, efficient and robust patient registration in open spinal surgery, and therefore, its potential to further increase the adoption of image-guidance in this surgical specialty. PMID:25826802

  8. Stakeholders' Perceptions Regarding the Use of Patient Photographs Integrated with Medical Imaging Studies.

    PubMed

    Sadigh, Gelareh; Applegate, Kimberly E; Ng, Timothy W; Hendrix, Kamilah A; Tridandapani, Srini

    2016-06-01

    Integrating digital facial photographs of pediatric patients as identifiers (ID) with medical imaging (integrated photographic IDs) may increase the detection of mislabeled studies. The purpose of this study was to determine how different stakeholders would receive this novel technology. Parents or guardians of patients in a children's hospital outpatient radiology department, radiology faculty and residents, and radiology technologists and nurses were asked to complete a survey. The perception about the anticipated use of integrated photographic ID in different clinical scenarios was investigated, and its predictors were determined using logistic regression analysis. Four hundred ninety-eight parents responded (response rate 83 %); 96 and 97 % supported the use of integrated photographic ID, if it improves the radiologist's imaging interpretation or decreases the rate of mislabeled errors, respectively. Thirty-eight percent were worried that photographic IDs would impact patients' privacy. Ninety-four percent believed that they should be asked for their consent prior to obtaining their child's photograph. Seventy-eight radiologists responded (response rate 39 %); 63 and 59 % believed that the use of integrated photographic ID would result in improvement in accurate interpretation of images and identification of mislabeled patient errors, respectively. Forty-nine percent of radiologists had concern that integrated photographic ID would increase interpretation time. Fifty technologists and nurses responded (response rate 59 %); 71 and 73 % supported the technology if it resulted in more acute interpretation of images and identification of mislabeled patients, respectively. A majority of stakeholders support integrated photographic ID in order to improve safety. A majority of parents believe that consent should be obtained.

  9. Patient Registration Using Intraoperative Stereovision in Image-guided Open Spinal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Ji, Songbai; Fan, Xiaoyao; Paulsen, Keith D; Roberts, David W; Mirza, Sohail K; Lollis, S Scott

    2015-09-01

    Despite its widespread availability and success in open cranial neurosurgery, image-guidance technology remains more limited in use in open spinal procedures, in large part, because of patient registration challenges. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of using intraoperative stereovision (iSV) for accurate, efficient, and robust patient registration in an open spinal fusion surgery. Geometrical surfaces of exposed vertebrae were first reconstructed from iSV. A classical multistart registration was then executed between point clouds generated from iSV and preoperative computed tomography images of the spine. With two pairs of feature points manually identified to facilitate the registration, an average registration accuracy of 1.43 mm in terms of surface-to-surface distance error was achieved in eight patient cases using a single iSV image pair sampling 2-3 vertebral segments. The iSV registration error was consistently smaller than the conventional landmark approach for every case (average of 2.02 mm with the same error metric). The large capture ranges (average of 23.8 mm in translation and 46.0° in rotation) found in the iSV patient registration suggest the technique may offer sufficient robustness for practical application in the operating room. Although some manual effort was still necessary, the manually-derived inputs for iSV registration only needed to be approximate as opposed to be precise and accurate for the manual efforts required in landmark registration. The total computational cost of the iSV registration was 1.5 min on average, significantly less than the typical ∼30 min required for the landmark approach. These findings support the clinical feasibility of iSV to offer accurate, efficient, and robust patient registration in open spinal surgery, and therefore, its potential to further increase the adoption of image guidance in this surgical specialty.

  10. Stakeholders' Perceptions Regarding the Use of Patient Photographs Integrated with Medical Imaging Studies.

    PubMed

    Sadigh, Gelareh; Applegate, Kimberly E; Ng, Timothy W; Hendrix, Kamilah A; Tridandapani, Srini

    2016-06-01

    Integrating digital facial photographs of pediatric patients as identifiers (ID) with medical imaging (integrated photographic IDs) may increase the detection of mislabeled studies. The purpose of this study was to determine how different stakeholders would receive this novel technology. Parents or guardians of patients in a children's hospital outpatient radiology department, radiology faculty and residents, and radiology technologists and nurses were asked to complete a survey. The perception about the anticipated use of integrated photographic ID in different clinical scenarios was investigated, and its predictors were determined using logistic regression analysis. Four hundred ninety-eight parents responded (response rate 83 %); 96 and 97 % supported the use of integrated photographic ID, if it improves the radiologist's imaging interpretation or decreases the rate of mislabeled errors, respectively. Thirty-eight percent were worried that photographic IDs would impact patients' privacy. Ninety-four percent believed that they should be asked for their consent prior to obtaining their child's photograph. Seventy-eight radiologists responded (response rate 39 %); 63 and 59 % believed that the use of integrated photographic ID would result in improvement in accurate interpretation of images and identification of mislabeled patient errors, respectively. Forty-nine percent of radiologists had concern that integrated photographic ID would increase interpretation time. Fifty technologists and nurses responded (response rate 59 %); 71 and 73 % supported the technology if it resulted in more acute interpretation of images and identification of mislabeled patients, respectively. A majority of stakeholders support integrated photographic ID in order to improve safety. A majority of parents believe that consent should be obtained. PMID:26620199

  11. Image analysis of oronasal fistulas in cleft palate patients acquired with an intraoral camera.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Tania C; Willmot, Derrick R

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the clinical technique of using an intraoral camera to monitor the size of residual oronasal fistulas in cleft lip-cleft palate patients, to assess its repeatability on study casts and patients, and to compare its use with other methods. Seventeen plaster study casts of cleft palate patients with oronasal fistulas obtained from a 5-year series of 160 patients were used. For the clinical study, 13 patients presenting in a clinic prospectively over a 1-year period were imaged twice by the camera. The area of each fistula on each study cast was measured in the laboratory first using a previously described graph paper and caliper technique and second with the intraoral camera. Images were imported into a computer and subjected to image enhancement and area measurement. The camera was calibrated by imaging a standard periodontal probe within the fistula area. The measurements were repeated using a double-blind technique on randomly renumbered casts to assess the repeatability of measurement of the methods. The clinical images were randomly and blindly numbered and subjected to image enhancement and processing in the same way as for the study casts. Area measurements were computed. Statistical analysis of repeatability of measurement using a paired sample t test showed no significant difference between measurements, indicating a lack of systematic error. An intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.97 for the graph paper and 0.84 for the camera method showed acceptable random error between the repeated records for each of the two methods. The graph paper method remained slightly more repeatable. The mean fistula area of the study casts between each method was not statistically different when compared with a paired samples t test (p = 0.08). The methods were compared using the limits of agreement technique, which showed clinically acceptable repeatability. The clinical study of repeated measures showed no systematic differences when

  12. Advanced expander test bed program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, A. I.; Mitchell, J. C.

    1991-01-01

    The Advanced Expander Test Bed (AETB) is a key element in NASA's Chemical Transfer Propulsion Program for development and demonstration of expander cycle oxygen/hydrogen engine technology component technology for the next space engine. The AETB will be used to validate the high-pressure expander cycle concept, investigate system interactions, and conduct investigations of advanced missions focused components and new health monitoring techniques. The split-expander cycle AETB will operate at combustion chamber pressures up to 1200 psia with propellant flow rates equivalent to 20,000 lbf vacuum thrust.

  13. Advanced expander test bed engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Expander Test Bed (AETB) is a key element in NASA's Space Chemical Engine Technology Program for development and demonstration of expander cycle oxygen/hydrogen engine and advanced component technologies applicable to space engines as well as launch vehicle upper stage engines. The AETB will be used to validate the high pressure expander cycle concept, study system interactions, and conduct studies of advanced mission focused components and new health monitoring techniques in an engine system environment. The split expander cycle AETB will operate at combustion chamber pressures up to 1200 psia with propellant flow rates equivalent to 20,000 lbf vacuum thrust.

  14. Tabbed Tissue Expanders Improve Breast Symmetry Scores in Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Khavanin, Nima; Gust, Madeleine J; Grant, David W; Nguyen, Khang T

    2014-01-01

    Background Achieving symmetry is a key goal in breast reconstruction. Anatomically shaped tabbed expanders are a new tool in the armamentarium of the breast reconstruction surgeon. Suture tabs allow for full control over the expander position and thus inframammary fold position, and, in theory, tabbed expanders mitigate many factors responsible for poor symmetry. The impact of a tabbed expander on breast symmetry, however, has not been formally reported. This study aims to evaluate breast symmetry following expander-implant reconstruction using tabbed and non-tabbed tissue expanders. Methods A chart review was performed of 188 consecutive expander-implant reconstructions that met the inclusion criteria of adequate follow-up data and postoperative photographs. Demographic, oncologic, postoperative complication, and photographic data was obtained for each patient. The photographic data was scored using a 4-point scale assessing breast symmetry by three blinded, independent reviewers. Results Of the 188 patients, 74 underwent reconstruction with tabbed expanders and 114 with non-tabbed expanders. The tabbed cohort had significantly higher symmetry scores than the non-tabbed cohort (2.82/4±0.86 vs. 2.55/4±0.92, P=0.034). Conclusions The use of tabbed tissue expanders improves breast symmetry in tissue expander-implant-based breast reconstruction. Fixation of the expander to the chest wall allows for more precise control over its location and counteracts the day-to-day translational forces that may influence the shape and location of the expander pocket, mitigating many factors responsible for breast asymmetry. PMID:24511496

  15. Cognitive Impairment and Brain Imaging Characteristics of Patients with Congenital Cataracts, Facial Dysmorphism, Neuropathy Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chamova, Teodora; Zlatareva, Dora; Raycheva, Margarita; Bichev, Stoyan; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Tournev, Ivailo

    2015-01-01

    Congenital cataracts, facial dysmorphism, neuropathy (CCFDN) syndrome is a complex autosomal recessive multisystem disorder. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the degree of cognitive impairment in a cohort of 22 CCFDN patients and its correlation with patients' age, motor disability, ataxia, and neuroimaging changes. Twenty-two patients with genetically confirmed diagnosis of CCFDN underwent a detailed neurological examination. Verbal and nonverbal intelligence, memory, executive functions, and verbal fluency wеre assessed in all the patients aged 4 to 47 years. Brain magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 20 affected patients. Eighteen affected were classified as having mild intellectual deficit, whereas 4 had borderline intelligence. In all psychometric tests, evaluating different cognitive domains, CCFDN patients had statistically significant lower scores when compared to the healthy control group. All cognitive domains seemed equally affected. The main abnormalities on brain MRI found in 19/20 patients included diffuse cerebral atrophy, enlargement of the lateral ventricles, and focal lesions in the subcortical white matter, different in number and size, consistent with demyelination more pronounced in the older CCFDN patients. The correlation analysis of the structural brain changes and the cognitive impairment found a statistically significant correlation only between the impairment of short-term verbal memory and the MRI changes.

  16. Cognitive Impairment and Brain Imaging Characteristics of Patients with Congenital Cataracts, Facial Dysmorphism, Neuropathy Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chamova, Teodora; Zlatareva, Dora; Raycheva, Margarita; Bichev, Stoyan; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Tournev, Ivailo

    2015-01-01

    Congenital cataracts, facial dysmorphism, neuropathy (CCFDN) syndrome is a complex autosomal recessive multisystem disorder. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the degree of cognitive impairment in a cohort of 22 CCFDN patients and its correlation with patients' age, motor disability, ataxia, and neuroimaging changes. Twenty-two patients with genetically confirmed diagnosis of CCFDN underwent a detailed neurological examination. Verbal and nonverbal intelligence, memory, executive functions, and verbal fluency wеre assessed in all the patients aged 4 to 47 years. Brain magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 20 affected patients. Eighteen affected were classified as having mild intellectual deficit, whereas 4 had borderline intelligence. In all psychometric tests, evaluating different cognitive domains, CCFDN patients had statistically significant lower scores when compared to the healthy control group. All cognitive domains seemed equally affected. The main abnormalities on brain MRI found in 19/20 patients included diffuse cerebral atrophy, enlargement of the lateral ventricles, and focal lesions in the subcortical white matter, different in number and size, consistent with demyelination more pronounced in the older CCFDN patients. The correlation analysis of the structural brain changes and the cognitive impairment found a statistically significant correlation only between the impairment of short-term verbal memory and the MRI changes. PMID:26060356

  17. Liver stiffness measurements by means of supersonic shear imaging in patients without known liver pathology.

    PubMed

    Sirli, Roxana; Bota, Simona; Sporea, Ioan; Jurchis, Ana; Popescu, Alina; Gradinaru-Tascău, Oana; Szilaski, Milana

    2013-08-01

    We used supersonic shear imaging to determine the liver stiffness (LS) values of 82 patients without known liver pathology and studied the factors that influence these measurements. Five LS measurements were made in each subject, and the median value, expressed in kilopascals, was calculated. Reliable LS measurements were obtained in 84.5% of patients. Higher body mass index and older age were associated with failure to obtain reliable measurements. The mean value of LS measurements determined by SSI in our cohort of patients without known liver pathology was 6 ± 1.4 kPa. The mean LS measurements determined by SSI for men were significantly higher than those for women; body mass index did not significantly influence SSI measurements. Thus, 6 kPa is the mean SSI value in patients without known liver pathology, with higher values being obtained in men.

  18. A technique for transferring a patient's smile line to a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image.

    PubMed

    Bidra, Avinash S

    2014-08-01

    Fixed implant-supported prosthodontic treatment for patients requiring a gingival prosthesis often demands that bone and implant levels be apical to the patient's maximum smile line. This is to avoid the display of the prosthesis-tissue junction (the junction between the gingival prosthesis and natural soft tissues) and prevent esthetic failures. Recording a patient's lip position during maximum smile is invaluable for the treatment planning process. This article presents a simple technique for clinically recording and transferring the patient's maximum smile line to cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images for analysis. The technique can help clinicians accurately determine the need for and amount of bone reduction required with respect to the maximum smile line and place implants in optimal positions.

  19. Myocardial perfusion defect on thallium-201 imaging in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    SciTech Connect

    Mehrotra, P.P.; Weaver, Y.J.; Higginbotham, E.A.

    1983-08-01

    Six patients with angina pectoris had reversible perfusion defects on stress and redistribution thallium imaging. Three patients had a positive electrocardiographic response to exercise. No significant coronary artery lesions were seen on coronary arteriography in any of the six patients. All had mild to moderate hypoxemia at rest and physiologic evidence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as defined by the decrease in the ratio of forced expiratory volume at 1 second to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC X 100) or decrease in the forced midexpiratory flow rate (FEF25-75), or both. None had clinical findings suggestive of any of the reported causes of positive thallium scans in patients with normal coronary arteriograms. Cellular dysfunction produced by hypoxemia affecting the uptake of thallium seems to be the most likely mechanism of this abnormality.

  20. Percutaneous Image-guided Radiofrequency Ablation of Tumors in Inoperable Patients - Immediate Complications and Overall Safety

    PubMed Central

    Sahay, Anubha; Sahay, Nishant; Kapoor, Ashok; Kapoor, Jyoti; Chatterjee, Abhishek

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Percutaneous destruction of cancer cells using a radiofrequency energy source has become an accepted part of the modern armamentarium for managing malignancies. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a relatively novel procedure for treating recurrent and metastatic tumors. It is used for debulking tumors and as adjuvant therapy for palliative care apart from its role as a pain management tool. Its use in the third world countries is limited by various factors such as cost and expertise. In the remotest parts of India, where economic development has been slow, abject poverty with poor health care facilities advanced malignancies present a challenge to health care providers. We undertook this study to assess the safety of the percutaneous RFA tumor ablation as a therapeutic or palliative measure in patients where surgery was not possible. We observed that RFA may be an effective, alternative therapeutic modality for some inoperable tumors where other therapeutic modalities cannot be considered. Context: Palliative and therapeutic image-guided RFAs of tumors may be the only treatment option in patients who are inoperable for a variety of reasons. To assess the safety and complications of RFA in such a patient population is important before embarking upon any interventions given their physically, mentally, and socially compromised status in a country such as India. Aims: To assess the safety of percutaneous image-guided radiofrequency tumor ablation and to note the various immediate and early complications of the intervention. Settings and Design: This was a prospective, observational study conducted in Tata Main Hospital, Jamshedpur, Jharkhand, India. Subjects and Methods: After approval by the Hospital Approval Committee all patients who consented for percutaneous RFA of their tumor admitted in the hospital were included after taking fully informed consent from patient/close relative keeping the following criteria in view. Inclusion Criteria: Patients who

  1. Measurement of patient imaging dose for real-time kilovoltage x-ray intra-fraction tumour position monitoring in prostate patients

    PubMed Central

    Crocker, James K; Ng, Jin Aun; Keall, Paul J; Booth, Jeremy T

    2012-01-01

    The dose for image-based motion monitoring of prostate tumours during radiotherapy delivery has not been established. This study aimed to provide quantitative analysis and optimisation of the fluoroscopic patient imaging dose during radiotherapy for IMRT and VMAT treatments using standard and hypofractionated treatment schedules. Twenty-two patients with type T1c N0/M0 prostate cancer and three implanted fiducial markers were considered. Minimum field sizes encompassing all fiducial markers plus a 7.5mm motion margin were determined for each treatment beam, each patient and the complete cohort. Imaging doses were measured for different field sizes and depths in a phantom at 75kV and 120kV. Based on these measurements, the patient imaging doses were then estimated according to beam-on time for clinical settings. The population minimum field size was 5.3 × 6.1cm2, yielding doses of 406mGy and 185mGy over the course of an IMRT treatment for 75kV (10 mAs) and 120kV (1.04 mAs) imaging, respectively at 1Hz. The imaging dose was reduced by an average of 28% and 32% by adopting patient specific and treatment-beam specific field sizes respectively. Standard fractionation VMAT imaging doses were 37% lower than IMRT doses over a complete treatment. Hypofractionated IMRT SBRT and VMAT SBRT imaging doses were 58% and 76% lower than IMRT doses respectively. The patient dose for kilovoltage intrafraction monitoring of the prostate was quantified. Tailoring imaging field sizes to specific patients yielded a significant reduction in the imaging dose, as did adoption of faster treatment modalities such as VMAT. PMID:22517054

  2. Creation of a Reference Image with Monte Carlo Simulations for Online EPID Verification of Daily Patient Setup

    SciTech Connect

    Descalle, M-A; Chuang, C; Pouliot, J

    2002-01-30

    Patient positioning accuracy remains an issue for external beam radiotherapy. Currently, kilovoltage verification images are used as reference by clinicians to compare the actual patient treatment position with the planned position. These images are qualitatively different from treatment-time megavoltage portal images. This study will investigate the feasibility of using PEREGRINE, a 3D Monte Carlo calculation engine, to create reference images for portal image comparisons. Portal images were acquired using an amorphous-silicon flat-panel EPID for (1) the head and pelvic sections of an anthropomorphic phantom with 7-8 mm displacements applied, and (2) a prostate patient on five treatment days. Planning CT scans were used to generate simulated reference images with PEREGRINE. A correlation algorithm quantified the setup deviations between simulated and portal images. Monte Carlo simulated images exhibit similar qualities to portal images, the phantom slabs appear clearly. Initial positioning differences and applied displacements were detected and quantified. We find that images simulated with Monte Carlo methods can be used as reference images to detect and quantify set-up errors during treatment.

  3. MO-G-17A-07: Improved Image Quality in Brain F-18 FDG PET Using Penalized-Likelihood Image Reconstruction Via a Generalized Preconditioned Alternating Projection Algorithm: The First Patient Results

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidtlein, CR; Beattie, B; Humm, J; Li, S; Wu, Z; Xu, Y; Zhang, J; Shen, L; Vogelsang, L; Feiglin, D; Krol, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the performance of a new penalized-likelihood PET image reconstruction algorithm using the 1{sub 1}-norm total-variation (TV) sum of the 1st through 4th-order gradients as the penalty. Simulated and brain patient data sets were analyzed. Methods: This work represents an extension of the preconditioned alternating projection algorithm (PAPA) for emission-computed tomography. In this new generalized algorithm (GPAPA), the penalty term is expanded to allow multiple components, in this case the sum of the 1st to 4th order gradients, to reduce artificial piece-wise constant regions (“staircase” artifacts typical for TV) seen in PAPA images penalized with only the 1st order gradient. Simulated data were used to test for “staircase” artifacts and to optimize the penalty hyper-parameter in the root-mean-squared error (RMSE) sense. Patient FDG brain scans were acquired on a GE D690 PET/CT (370 MBq at 1-hour post-injection for 10 minutes) in time-of-flight mode and in all cases were reconstructed using resolution recovery projectors. GPAPA images were compared PAPA and RMSE-optimally filtered OSEM (fully converged) in simulations and to clinical OSEM reconstructions (3 iterations, 32 subsets) with 2.6 mm XYGaussian and standard 3-point axial smoothing post-filters. Results: The results from the simulated data show a significant reduction in the 'staircase' artifact for GPAPA compared to PAPA and lower RMSE (up to 35%) compared to optimally filtered OSEM. A simple power-law relationship between the RMSE-optimal hyper-parameters and the noise equivalent counts (NEC) per voxel is revealed. Qualitatively, the patient images appear much sharper and with less noise than standard clinical images. The convergence rate is similar to OSEM. Conclusions: GPAPA reconstructions using the 1{sub 1}-norm total-variation sum of the 1st through 4th-order gradients as the penalty show great promise for the improvement of image quality over that currently achieved

  4. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging predicts clinical outcomes in patients with chronic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Pavlides, Michael; Banerjee, Rajarshi; Sellwood, Joanne; Kelly, Catherine J.; Robson, Matthew D.; Booth, Jonathan C.; Collier, Jane; Neubauer, Stefan; Barnes, Eleanor

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Multiparametric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been demonstrated to quantify hepatic fibrosis, iron, and steatosis. The aim of this study was to determine if MR can be used to predict negative clinical outcomes in liver disease patients. Methods Patients with chronic liver disease (n = 112) were recruited for MR imaging and data on the development of liver related clinical events were collected by medical records review. The median follow-up was 27 months. MR data were analysed blinded for the Liver Inflammation and Fibrosis score (LIF; <1, 1–1.99, 2–2.99, and ⩾3 representing normal, mild, moderate, and severe liver disease, respectively), T2∗ for liver iron content and proportion of liver fat. Baseline liver biopsy was performed in 102 patients. Results Liver disease aetiologies included non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (35%) and chronic viral hepatitis (30%). Histologically, fibrosis was mild in 54 (48%), moderate in 17 (15%), and severe in 31 (28%) patients. Overall mortality was 5%. Ten patients (11%) developed at least one liver related clinical event. The negative predictive value of LIF <2 was 100%. Two patients with LIF 2–2.99 and eight with LIF ⩾3 had a clinical event. Patients with LIF ⩾3 had a higher cumulative risk for developing clinical events, compared to those with LIF <1 (p = 0.02) and LIF 1–1.99 (p = 0.03). Cox regression analysis including all 3 variables (fat, iron, LIF) resulted in an enhanced LIF predictive value. Conclusions Non-invasive standardised multiparametric MR technology may be used to predict clinical outcomes in patients with chronic liver disease. PMID:26471505

  5. Screening Magnetic Resonance Imaging Recommendations and Outcomes in Patients at High Risk for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ehsani, Sima; Strigel, Roberta M; Pettke, Erica; Wilke, Lee; Tevaarwerk, Amye J; DeMartini, Wendy; Wisinski, Kari B

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine MRI screening recommendations and the subsequent outcomes in women with increased risk for breast cancer evaluated by oncology subspecialists at an academic center. Patients and Methods Patients evaluated between 1/1/2007– 3/1/2011 under diagnosis codes for family history of breast or ovarian cancer, genetic syndromes, lobular carcinoma in situ or atypical hyperplasia were included. Patients with a history of breast cancer were excluded. Retrospective review of prospectively acquired demographics, lifetime risk of breast cancer and screening recommendations were obtained from the medical record. Retrospective review of the results of prospectively interpreted breast imaging examinations and image-guided biopsies were analyzed. Results 282 women were included. The majority of patients were premenopausal with a median age of 43. Most (69%) were referred due to a family history of breast or ovarian cancers. MRI was recommended for 84% of patients based on a documented lifetime risk > 20%. Most women referred for MRI screening (88%) were compliant with this recommendation. A total of 299 breast MRI examinations were performed in 146 patients. Biopsy was performed for 32 (11%) exams and 10 cancers were detected for a PPV of 31% (based on biopsy performed) and an overall per exam cancer yield of 3.3%. Three cancers were detected in patients who did not undergo screening MRI. The 13 cancers were Stage 0-II; all patients were without evidence of disease with a median follow-up of 22 months. Conclusion In a cohort of women seen by breast subspecialty providers, screening breast MRI was recommended according to guidelines, and used primarily premenopausal women with a family history or genetic predisposition to breast cancer. Adherence to MRI screening recommendations was high and cancer yield from breast MRI was similar to that in clinical trials. PMID:25789917

  6. Quantitative Diffusion Tensor Imaging Tractography Metrics are Associated with Cognitive Performance Among HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Conley, Jared; Paul, Robert H.; Coop, Kathryn; Zhang, Song; Zhou, Wenjin; Laidlaw, David H.; Taylor, Lynn E.; Flanigan, Timothy; Navia, Bradford; Cohen, Ronald; Tashima, Karen

    2010-01-01

    There have been many studies examining HIV-infection-related alterations of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diffusion metrics. However, examining scalar diffusion metrics ignores the orientation aspect of diffusion imaging, which can be captured with tractography. We examined five different tractography metrics obtained from global tractography maps (global tractography FA, average tube length, normalized number of streamtubes, normalized weighted streamtube length, and normalized total number of tubes generated) for differences between HIV positive and negative patients and the association between the metrics and clinical variables of disease severity. We also examined the relationship between these metrics and cognitive performance across a wide range of cognitive domains for the HIV positive and negative patient groups separately. The results demonstrated a significant difference between the groups for global tractography FA (t=2.13, p= 0.04), but not for any of the other tractography metrics examined (p-value range=0.39 to 0.95). There were also several significant associations between the tractography metrics and cognitive performance (i.e., tapping rates, switching 1 and 2, verbal interference, mazes; r≥0.42) for HIV infected patients. In particular, associations were noted between tractography metrics, speed of processing, fine motor control/speed, and executive function for the HIV-infected patients. These findings suggest that tractography metrics capture clinically relevant information regarding cognitive performance among HIV infected patients and suggests the importance of subtle white matter changes in examining cognitive performance. PMID:20503115

  7. Delineating potential epileptogenic areas utilizing resting functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in epilepsy patients.

    PubMed

    Pizarro, Ricardo; Nair, Veena; Meier, Timothy; Holdsworth, Ryan; Tunnell, Evelyn; Rutecki, Paul; Sillay, Karl; Meyerand, Mary E; Prabhakaran, Vivek

    2016-08-01

    Seizure localization includes neuroimaging like electroencephalogram, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with limited ability to characterize the epileptogenic network. Temporal clustering analysis (TCA) characterizes epileptogenic network congruent with interictal epileptiform discharges by clustering together voxels with transient signals. We generated epileptogenic areas for 12 of 13 epilepsy patients with TCA, congruent with different areas of seizure onset. Resting functional MRI (fMRI) scans are noninvasive, and can be acquired quickly, in patients with different levels of severity and function. Analyzing resting fMRI data using TCA is quick and can complement clinical methods to characterize the epileptogenic network. PMID:27362339

  8. Sodium imaging as a marker of tissue injury in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Inglese, M; Oesingmann, N; Zaaraoui, W; Ranjeva, J P; Fleysher, L

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies have suggested that intra-axonal sodium accumulation contribute to axonal degeneration in patients with MS. Advances in MRI hardware and software allow acquisition of brain sodium signal in vivo. This review begins with a summary of the experimental evidence for impairment of sodium homeostasis in MS. Then, MRI methods for sodium acquisition are reviewed and the application of the techniques in patients with MS is discussed. Sodium imaging and ultra-high field MRI have the potential to provide tissue-specific markers of neurodegeneration in MS.

  9. Dosimetry and Image Quality in Control Studies in Computerised Tomography Realized to Paediatric Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, M. R.; Gamboa-deBuen, I.; Dies, P.; Rickards, J.; Ruiz, C.

    2008-08-11

    Computerised tomography (CT) is a favourite method of medical diagnosis. Its use has thus increased rapidly throughout the world, particularly in studies relating to children. However to avoid administering unnecessarily high doses of radiation to paediatric patients it is important to have correct dose reference levels to minimize risk. The research is being developed within the public health sector at the Hospital Infantil de Mexico 'Dr. Federico Gomez.' We measured the entrance surface air kerma (K{sub P}) in paediatric patients, during the radiological studies of control in CT (studies of head, thorax and abdomen). Phantom was used to evaluate image quality as the tomograph requires a high resolution image in order to operate at its optimum level.

  10. BMIPP imaging to assess functional outcome in patients with acute and chronic left ventricular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Franken, P R; Hambÿe, A S; De Geeter, F W

    1999-02-01

    Assessment of myocardial viability is an important clinical issue for patient management during the acute and chronic stages of myocardial infarction. BMIPP (15-(p-iodophenyl)-3-(R,S)-methyl pentadecanoic acid) is a free fatty acid analogue which is trapped in the myocardium, thus permitting for metabolic imaging with single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT). Less BMIPP than flow tracers that may be observed in the areas of infarction, may reflect the metabolic shift from fatty acid to glucose utilization in ischaemic myocardium. In this sense, the combined imaging of BMIPP and a flow tracer with SPECT may provide similar and important information as fluoro-18 deoxyglucose (FDG) and positron emission tomography (PET) regarding the assessment of myocardial viability. The purpose of this article is to review the clinical impact of BMIPP in patients with acute and with chronic left ventricular dysfunction for the identification of jeopardized but viable myocardium and the prediction of the functional outcome.

  11. Imaging in conjunction with physical therapy in management of a patient with history of thoracic tumour

    PubMed Central

    Rendeiro, Daniel G.; Deyle, Gail D.; Boissonnault, William G.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Physical therapy care for musculoskeletal conditions includes an ongoing process that systematically considers and prioritises diagnostic hypotheses. These diagnostic hypotheses include those that are typical for common musculoskeletal conditions, and must also include more rare conditions that would require care outside the scope of practice of the physical therapist. When additional screening is required, physical therapists collaborate with other providers or directly order the appropriate tests to rule out suspected pathology. Case Description: This article illustrates the use of musculoskeletal imaging ordered by a physical therapist to guide ongoing management of a patient with back pain and a history of cancer. Outcomes: The patient successfully returned to moderate-intensity sport activities after a course of physical therapy. Discussion: This case provides an example of how clinical diagnostic reasoning combined with clinical privileges to order musculoskeletal imaging can facilitate diagnostic accuracy in a timely and cost-efficient manner. PMID:26309382

  12. Three-dimensional left ventricular segmentation from magnetic resonance imaging for patient-specific modelling purposes

    PubMed Central

    Caiani, Enrico G.; Colombo, Andrea; Pepi, Mauro; Piazzese, Concetta; Maffessanti, Francesco; Lang, Roberto M.; Carminati, Maria Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Aims To propose a nearly automated left ventricular (LV) three-dimensional (3D) surface segmentation procedure, based on active shape modelling (ASM) and built on a database of 3D echocardiographic (3DE) LV surfaces, for cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) images, and to test its accuracy for LV volumes computation compared with ‘gold standard’ manual tracings and discs-summation method. Methods and results The ASM was created based on segmented LV surfaces (4D LV analysis, Tomtec) from 3DE datasets of 205 patients. Then, it was applied to the cardiac magnetic resonance imaging short-axis (SAX) images stack of 12 consecutive patients. After proper realignment using two- and four-chambers CMR long-axis views both as reference and for initializing LV apex and base (six points in total), the ASM was iteratively and automatically updated to match the information of all the SAX planes contemporaneously, resulting in an endocardial LV 3D mesh from which volume was directly derived. The same CMR images were analysed by an experienced cardiologist to derive end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes. Linear correlation and Bland–Altman analyses were applied vs. the manual ‘gold standard’. Active shape modelling results showed high correlations with manual values both for LV volumes (r2 > 0.98) and ejection fraction (EF) (r2 > 0.90), non-significant biases and narrow limits of agreement. Conclusion The proposed method resulted in accurate detection of 3D LV endocardial surfaces, which lead to fast and reliable measurements of LV volumes and EF when compared with manual tracing of CMR SAX images. The segmented 3D mesh, including a realistic LV apex and base, could constitute a novel starting point for more realistic patient-specific finite element modelling. PMID:25362176

  13. Screening for Body Image Dissatisfaction in Patients with Advanced Cancer: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Rhondali, Wadih; Chisholm, Gary B.; Filbet, Marilene; Kang, Duck-Hee; Hui, David; Cororve Fingeret, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Cancer and its treatment can significantly affect appearance and body integrity. A number of studies have explored the impact of cancer and its treatment on body image, primarily in head and neck and breast cancer. The aim of this pilot study was to examine the construct of body image dissatisfaction and its measurement using a single question in patients with advanced cancer. Methods Outpatients with advanced cancer were recruited (n=81). Assessments included Body Image Scale (BIS), Appearance Schema Inventory (ASI-R), Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS) with a total symptom distress score (TSDS) and two subscales scores (physical distress [PHS] and psychological distress [PSS]), Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS), and one question assessing the overall appearance satisfaction from the Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire (MBSRQ). We also asked patients to rate the body image changes importance compared with five symptoms (pain, fatigue, depression, insomnia, lack of appetite). Results Forty-seven (58%) patients had a BIS score >10 (body image dissatisfaction) with a median of 11 (first–third quartiles, Q1–Q3; 5–16) and a median ASI-R of 3.1 (Q1–Q3; 2.8–3.5). Sensitivity and specificity of ≤3 for body image dissatisfaction in the single overall appearance question using the BIS as a standard was 0.70 and 0.71, respectively. BIS score was significantly correlated with ASI-R (r=0.248; p=0.025), age (r=−0.225; p=0.043), HADS-A (r=0.522, p<0.001), HADS-D (r=0.422, p<0.001), PSS score (r=0.371, p=0.001), PHS score (r=0.356, p=0.001), TSDS score (r=0.416, p<0.001), and the overall appearance question (MBSRQ; r=−0.449, p<0.001). Conclusion Body image dissatisfaction was frequent and associated with symptom burden. A single item ≤3 has a sensitivity of 70% for body image satisfaction screening. PMID:25188590

  14. Segmenting CT prostate images using population and patient-specific statistics for radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Qianjin; Foskey, Mark; Chen Wufan; Shen Dinggang

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: In the segmentation of sequential treatment-time CT prostate images acquired in image-guided radiotherapy, accurately capturing the intrapatient variation of the patient under therapy is more important than capturing interpatient variation. However, using the traditional deformable-model-based segmentation methods, it is difficult to capture intrapatient variation when the number of samples from the same patient is limited. This article presents a new deformable model, designed specifically for segmenting sequential CT images of the prostate, which leverages both population and patient-specific statistics to accurately capture the intrapatient variation of the patient under therapy. Methods: The novelty of the proposed method is twofold: First, a weighted combination of gradient and probability distribution function (PDF) features is used to build the appearance model to guide model deformation. The strengths of each feature type are emphasized by dynamically adjusting the weight between the profile-based gradient features and the local-region-based PDF features during the optimization process. An additional novel aspect of the gradient-based features is that, to alleviate the effect of feature inconsistency in the regions of gas and bone adjacent to the prostate, the optimal profile length at each landmark is calculated by statistically investigating the intensity profile in the training set. The resulting gradient-PDF combined feature produces more accurate and robust segmentations than general gradient features. Second, an online learning mechanism is used to build shape and appearance statistics for accurately capturing intrapatient variation. Results: The performance of the proposed method was evaluated on 306 images of the 24 patients. Compared to traditional gradient features, the proposed gradient-PDF combination features brought 5.2% increment in the success ratio of segmentation (from 94.1% to 99.3%). To evaluate the effectiveness of online

  15. Optimization of image quality and patient dose in radiographs of paediatric extremities using direct digital radiography

    PubMed Central

    Ansell, C; Jerrom, C; Honey, I D

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of beam quality on the image quality (IQ) of ankle radiographs of paediatric patients in the age range of 0–1 year whilst maintaining constant effective dose (ED). Methods: Lateral ankle radiographs of an infant foot phantom were taken at a range of tube potentials (40.0–64.5 kVp) with and without 0.1-mm copper (Cu) filtration using a Trixell Pixium 4600 detector (Trixell, Morains, France). ED to the patient was computed for the default exposure parameters using PCXMC v. 2.0 and was fixed for other beam qualities by modulating the tube current-time product. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was measured between the tibia and adjacent soft tissue. The IQ of the phantom images was assessed by three radiologists and a reporting radiographer. Four IQ criteria were defined each with a scale of 1–3, giving a maximum score of 12. Finally, a service audit of clinical images at the default and optimum beam qualities was undertaken. Results: The measured CNR for the 40 kVp/no Cu image was 12.0 compared with 7.6 for the default mode (55  0.1 mm Cu). An improvement in the clinical IQ scores was also apparent at this lower beam quality. Conclusion: Lowering tube potential and removing filtration improved the clinical IQ of paediatric ankle radiographs in this age range. Advances in knowledge: There are currently no UK guidelines on exposure protocols for paediatric imaging using direct digital radiography. A lower beam quality will produce better IQ with no additional dose penalty for infant extremity imaging. PMID:25816115

  16. Robust spectral analysis of videocapsule images acquired from celiac disease patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Dominant frequency (DF) analysis of videocapsule endoscopy images is a new method to detect small intestinal periodicities that may result from mechanical rhythms such as peristalsis. Longer periodicity is related to greater image texture at areas of villous atrophy in celiac disease. However, extraneous features and spatiotemporal phase shift may mask DF rhythms. Method The robustness of Fourier and ensemble averaging spectral analysis to compute DF was tested. Videocapsule images from the distal duodenum of 11 celiac patients (frame rate 2/s and pixel resolution 576 × 576) were analyzed. For patients 1, 2, ... 11, respectively, a total of 10, 11, ..., 20 sequential images were extracted from a randomly selected time epoch. Each image sequence was artificially repeated to 200 frames, simulating periodicities of 0.2, 0.18, ..., 0.1Hz, respectively. Random white noise at four different levels, spatiotemporal phase shift, and frames with air bubbles were added. Power spectra were constructed pixel-wise over 200 frames, and an average spectrum was computed from the 576 × 576 individual spectra. The largest spectral peak in the average spectrum was the estimated DF. Error was defined as the absolute difference between actual DF and estimated DF. Results For Fourier analysis, the mean absolute error between estimated and actual DF was 0.032 ± 0.052Hz. Error increased with greater degree of random noise imposed. In contrast, all ensemble average estimates precisely predicted the simulated DF. Conclusions The ensemble average DF estimate of videocapsule images with simulated periodicity is robust to noise and spatiotemporal phase shift as compared with Fourier analysis. Accurate estimation of DF eliminates the need to impose complex masking, extraction, and/or corrective preprocessing measures. PMID:21906318

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging biomarkers in patients with progressive ataxia: current status and future direction.

    PubMed

    Currie, Stuart; Hadjivassiliou, Marios; Craven, Ian J; Wilkinson, Iain D; Griffiths, Paul D; Hoggard, Nigel

    2013-04-01

    A diagnostic challenge commonly encountered in neurology is that of an adult patient presenting with ataxia. The differential is vast and clinical assessment alone may not be sufficient due to considerable overlap between different causes of ataxia. Magnetic resonance (MR)-based biomarkers such as voxel-based morphometry, MR spectroscopy, diffusion-weighted and diffusion-tensor imaging and functional MR imaging are gaining great attention for their potential as indicators of disease. A number of studies have reported correlation with clinical severity and underlying pathophysiology, and in some cases, MR imaging has been shown to allow differentiation of conditions causing ataxia. However, despite recent advances, their sensitivity and specificity vary. In addition, questions remain over their validity and reproducibility, especially when applied in routine clinical practice. This article extensively reviews the current literature regarding MR-based biomarkers for the patient with predominantly adult-onset ataxia. Imaging features characteristic of a particular ataxia are provided and features differentiating ataxia groups and subgroups are discussed. Finally, discussion will turn to the feasibility of applying these biomarkers in routine clinical practice.

  18. Application of image analysis in the myocardial biopsies of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agapitos, Emanuel; Kavantzas, Nikolaos; Bakouris, M. G.; Kassis, Kyriakos A.; Nanas, J.; Margari, Z.; Davaris, P.

    1996-04-01

    The aim of our study is to investigate if myocardial fibrosis measured by image analysis may be considered as an important and accurate index of dilated cardiomyopathy and its prognosis. The study group consisted of 24 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy which was diagnosed by echocardiography, radionuclide ventriculography, cardiac catheterization and left ventricular endomyocardial biopsy. The patients' overall disability was conventionally expressed with the criteria for functional capacity. Using image analysis the percentage of fibrosis in a total of 35 myocardial biopsies was measured accurately. A comparison study between the percentage of myocardial fibrosis and the clinical parameters (left ventricular ejection fraction and overall functional capacity) showing the degree of each patient's heart failure followed. A correlation was found among fibrosis, left ventricular ejection fraction and overall functional capacity. The cases with small values of fibrosis (less than 10%) have big values of ejection fraction and belong in Class I of overall functional capacity. The cases with big values of fibrosis (greater than 10%) belong in Classes III and IV of overall functional capacity and have small values of ejection fraction. The results of the comparison study were presented graphically and were considered significant. Myocardial fibrosis measured by image analysis might be considered an important prognostic index of dilated cardiomyopathy.

  19. Imaging plaques to predict and better manage patients with acute coronary events.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Garcia, Hector M; Jang, Ik-Kyung; Serruys, Patrick W; Kovacic, Jason C; Narula, Jagat; Fayad, Zahi A

    2014-06-01

    Culprit lesions of patients, who have had an acute coronary syndrome commonly, are ruptured coronary plaques with superimposed thrombus. The precursor of such lesions is an inflamed thin-capped fibroatheroma. These plaques can be imaged by means of invasive techniques, such as intravascular ultrasound (and derived techniques), optical coherence tomography, and near-infrared spectroscopy. Often these patients exhibit similar (multiple) plaques beyond the culprit lesion. These remote plaques can be assessed noninvasively by computed tomographic angiography and MRI and also using invasive imaging. The detection of these remote plaques is not only feasible but also in natural history studies have been associated with clinical coronary events. Different systemic pharmacological treatments have been studied (mostly statins) with modest success and, therefore, newer approaches are being tested. Local treatment for such lesions is in its infancy and larger, prospective, and randomized trials are needed. This review will describe the pathological and imaging findings in culprit lesions of patients with acute coronary syndrome and the assessment of remote plaques. In addition, the pharmacological and local treatment options will be reviewed.

  20. Impaired visual processing preceding image recognition in Parkinson's disease patients with visual hallucinations.

    PubMed

    Meppelink, Anne Marthe; de Jong, Bauke M; Renken, Remco; Leenders, Klaus L; Cornelissen, Frans W; van Laar, Teus

    2009-11-01

    Impaired visual processing may play a role in the pathophysiology of visual hallucinations in Parkinson's disease. In order to study involved neuronal circuitry, we assessed cerebral activation patterns both before and during recognition of gradually revealed images in Parkinson's disease patients with visual hallucinations (PDwithVHs), Parkinson's disease patients without visual hallucinations (PDnonVHs) and healthy controls. We hypothesized that, before image recognition, PDwithVHs would show reduced bottom-up visual activation in occipital-temporal areas and increased (pre)frontal activation, reflecting increased top-down demand. Overshoot of the latter has been proposed to play a role in generating visual hallucinations. Nine non-demented PDwithVHs, 14 PDnonVHs and 13 healthy controls were scanned on a 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging scanner. Static images of animals and objects gradually appearing out of random visual noise were used in an event-related design paradigm. Analyses were time-locked on the moment of image recognition, indicated by the subjects' button-press. Subjects were asked to press an additional button on a colour-changing fixation dot, to keep attention and motor action constant and to assess reaction times. Data pre-processing and statistical analysis were performed with statistical parametric mapping-5 software. Bilateral activation of the fusiform and lingual gyri was seen during image recognition in all groups (P < 0.001). Several seconds before image recognition, PDwithVHs showed reduced activation of the lateral occipital cortex, compared with both PDnonVHs and healthy controls. In addition, reduced activation of extrastriate temporal visual cortices was seen just before image recognition in PDwithVHs. The association between increased vulnerability for visual hallucinations in Parkinson's disease and impaired visual object processing in occipital and temporal extrastriate visual cortices supported the hypothesis of impaired bottom

  1. Accuracy of an automatic patient-positioning system based on the correlation of two edge images in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Myonggeun; Cheong, Minho; Kim, Jinsung; Shin, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Yong; Lee, Se Byeong

    2011-04-01

    We have clinically evaluated the accuracy of an automatic patient-positioning system based on the image correlation of two edge images in radiotherapy. Ninety-six head & neck images from eight patients undergoing proton therapy were compared with a digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) of planning CT. Two edge images, a reference image and a test image, were extracted by applying a Canny edge detector algorithm to a DRR and a 2D X-ray image, respectively, of each patient before positioning. In a simulation using a humanoid phantom, performed to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, no registration errors were observed for given ranges of rotation, pitch, and translation in the x, y, and z directions. For real patients, however, there were discrepancies between the automatic positioning method and manual positioning by physicians or technicians. Using edged head coronal- and sagittal-view images, the average differences in registration between these two methods for the x, y, and z directions were 0.11 cm, 0.09 cm and 0.11 cm, respectively, whereas the maximum discrepancies were 0.34 cm, 0.38 cm, and 0.50 cm, respectively. For rotation and pitch, the average registration errors were 0.95° and 1.00°, respectively, and the maximum errors were 3.6° and 2.3°, respectively. The proposed automatic patient-positioning system based on edge image comparison was relatively accurate for head and neck patients. However, image deformation during treatment may render the automatic method less accurate, since the test image many differ significantly from the reference image.

  2. 89Zr-cetuximab PET imaging in patients with advanced colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huisman, Marc C.; Vugts, Danielle J.; Roth, Chantal; Luik, Anne Marije; Mulder, Emma R.; Schuit, Robert C.; Boellaard, Ronald; Hoekstra, Otto S.; van Dongen, Guus AMS; Verheul, Henk M.W.

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are used in the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer (mCRC). Approximately 50% of patients benefit despite patient selection for RAS wild type (wt) tumors. Based on the hypothesis that tumor targeting is required for clinical benefit of anti-EGFR treatment, biodistribution and tumor uptake of 89Zr-cetuximab by Positron Emission Tomography (PET), combining the sensitivity of PET with the specificity of cetuximab for EGFR was evaluated. Ten patients with wt K-RAS mCRC received 37 ± 1 MBq 89Zr-cetuximab directly (<2 h) after the first therapeutic dose of cetuximab. PET-scans were performed from 1 hour to 10 days post injection (p.i.). Biodistribution was determined for blood and organs. Uptake in tumor lesions was quantified by Standardized Uptake Value (SUV) and related to response. In 6 of 10 patients 89Zr-cetuximab uptake in tumor lesions was detected. Four of 6 patients with 89Zr-cetuximab uptake had clinical benefit, while progressive disease was observed in 3 of 4 patients without 89Zr-cetuximab uptake. Taken together, tumor uptake of 89Zr-cetuximab can be visualized by PET imaging. The strong relation between uptake and response warrants further clinical validation as an innovative selection method for cetuximab treatment in patients with wt RAS mCRC. PMID:26309164

  3. 89Zr-cetuximab PET imaging in patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Menke-van der Houven van Oordt, Catharina Willemien; Gootjes, Elske C; Huisman, Marc C; Vugts, Danielle J; Roth, Chantal; Luik, Anne Marije; Mulder, Emma R; Schuit, Robert C; Boellaard, Ronald; Hoekstra, Otto S; van Dongen, Guus Ams; Verheul, Henk M W

    2015-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are used in the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer (mCRC). Approximately 50% of patients benefit despite patient selection for RAS wild type (wt) tumors. Based on the hypothesis that tumor targeting is required for clinical benefit of anti-EGFR treatment, biodistribution and tumor uptake of (89)Zr-cetuximab by Positron Emission Tomography (PET), combining the sensitivity of PET with the specificity of cetuximab for EGFR was evaluated. Ten patients with wt K-RAS mCRC received 37 ± 1 MBq (89)Zr-cetuximab directly (<2 h) after the first therapeutic dose of cetuximab. PET-scans were performed from 1 hour to 10 days post injection (p.i.). Biodistribution was determined for blood and organs. Uptake in tumor lesions was quantified by Standardized Uptake Value (SUV) and related to response. In 6 of 10 patients (89)Zr-cetuximab uptake in tumor lesions was detected. Four of 6 patients with (89)Zr-cetuximab uptake had clinical benefit, while progressive disease was observed in 3 of 4 patients without (89)Zr-cetuximab uptake. Taken together, tumor uptake of 89Zr-cetuximab can be visualized by PET imaging. The strong relation between uptake and response warrants further clinical validation as an innovative selection method for cetuximab treatment in patients with wt RAS mCRC.

  4. Usefulness of diffusion tensor imaging in patients who showed sustained unexplainable clinical symptom of torticollis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Hyun; Jang, Sung Ho; Lee, Eunsil; Kim, Saeyoon; Cho, Yun Woo; Hong, Ji Heon; Son, Su Min

    2012-07-26

    To investigate corticospinal tract (CST) status using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in patients who had clinical symptom of torticollis but no definite cause of sustained symptom of torticollis. We evaluated 10 patients with sustained torticollis and 12 age-matched control subjects. All patients showed no specific fibromatosis coli findings on neck sonography. Even after intensive manual therapy, there was no improvement of clinical symptom of torticollis. DTI was performed using 1.5 T with a synergy-L Sensitivity Encoding (SENSE) head coil. Fractional anisotropy and apparent diffusion coefficient were measured using the region of interest method, and diffusion tensor tractography was conducted. We estimated the asymmetric anisotropic index (AA) and asymmetric mean diffusivity index (AD) to evaluate the asymmetry between right and left CSTs. All patients showed only torticollis symptom but no definite hemiplegic pattern on their extremities at initial evaluation. DTT, which was performed to reveal the reason of sustained asymmetric postural symptom showed hemiplegic pattern. The results of DTT corresponded to the delayed hemiplegic symptoms, which were found in the patients at second evaluation. AA and AD values between patients and control group were significantly different. Torticollis is usually caused by fibromatosis coli, but may be one of the symptoms of hemiplegia. DTI may be an additional technique for the early detection of hemiplegia in patients with sustained symptoms of unexplainable postural torticollis.

  5. Functional brain imaging in 14 patients with dissociative amnesia reveals right inferolateral prefrontal hypometabolism.

    PubMed

    Brand, Matthias; Eggers, Carsten; Reinhold, Nadine; Fujiwara, Esther; Kessler, Josef; Heiss, Wolf-Dieter; Markowitsch, Hans J

    2009-10-30

    Dissociative amnesia is a condition usually characterized by severely impaired retrograde memory functioning in the absence of structural brain damage. Recent case studies nevertheless found functional brain changes in patients suffering from autobiographical-episodic memory loss in the cause of dissociative amnesia. Functional changes were demonstrated in both resting state and memory retrieval conditions. In addition, some but not all cases also showed other neuropsychological impairments beyond retrograde memory deficits. However, there is no group study available that examined potential functional brain abnormalities and accompanying neuropsychological deteriorations in larger samples of patients with dissociative retrograde amnesia. We report functional imaging and neuropsychological data acquired in 14 patients with dissociative amnesia following stressful or traumatic events. All patients suffered from autobiographical memory loss. In addition, approximately half of the patients had deficits in anterograde memory and executive functioning. Accompanying functional brain changes were measured by [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). Regional glucose utilization of the patients was compared with that of 19 healthy subjects, matched for age and gender. We found significantly decreased glucose utilization in the right inferolateral prefrontal cortex in the patients. Hypometabolism in this brain region, known to be involved in retrieval of autobiographical memories and self-referential processing, may be a functional brain correlate of dissociative amnesia.

  6. TH-C-18A-06: Combined CT Image Quality and Radiation Dose Monitoring Program Based On Patient Data to Assess Consistency of Clinical Imaging Across Scanner Models

    SciTech Connect

    Christianson, O; Winslow, J; Samei, E

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: One of the principal challenges of clinical imaging is to achieve an ideal balance between image quality and radiation dose across multiple CT models. The number of scanners and protocols at large medical centers necessitates an automated quality assurance program to facilitate this objective. Therefore, the goal of this work was to implement an automated CT image quality and radiation dose monitoring program based on actual patient data and to use this program to assess consistency of protocols across CT scanner models. Methods: Patient CT scans are routed to a HIPPA compliant quality assurance server. CTDI, extracted using optical character recognition, and patient size, measured from the localizers, are used to calculate SSDE. A previously validated noise measurement algorithm determines the noise in uniform areas of the image across the scanned anatomy to generate a global noise level (GNL). Using this program, 2358 abdominopelvic scans acquired on three commercial CT scanners were analyzed. Median SSDE and GNL were compared across scanner models and trends in SSDE and GNL with patient size were used to determine the impact of differing automatic exposure control (AEC) algorithms. Results: There was a significant difference in both SSDE and GNL across scanner models (9–33% and 15–35% for SSDE and GNL, respectively). Adjusting all protocols to achieve the same image noise would reduce patient dose by 27–45% depending on scanner model. Additionally, differences in AEC methodologies across vendors resulted in disparate relationships of SSDE and GNL with patient size. Conclusion: The difference in noise across scanner models indicates that protocols are not optimally matched to achieve consistent image quality. Our results indicated substantial possibility for dose reduction while achieving more consistent image appearance. Finally, the difference in AEC methodologies suggests the need for size-specific CT protocols to minimize variability in image

  7. Cumulative radiation exposure from imaging procedures and associated lifetime cancer risk for patients with lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Fabritius, Grete; Brix, Gunnar; Nekolla, Elke; Klein, Stefan; Popp, Henning D.; Meyer, Mathias; Glatting, Gerhard; Hagelstein, Claudia; Hofmann, Wolf K.; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Henzler, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate the cumulative radiation exposure and the associated lifetime-cancer-risk from diagnostic imaging in patients with Hodgkin-lymphoma-(HL) or diffuse-large-B-cell-lymphoma (DLBCL). 99 consecutive patients (53-males) diagnosed with HL or DLBCL were included in the study and followed. Based on the imaging reports, organ and effective-doses-(ED) were calculated individually for each patient and the excess lifetime risks were estimated. The average ED in the first year after diagnosis was significantly different for men (59 ± 33 mSv) and women (744 ± 33 mSv)-(p < 0.05). The mean cumulative ED in each of the following 5 years was 16 ± 16 mSv without significant differences between men and women-(p > 0.05). Over all years, more than 90% of the ED resulted from CT. The average cumulative radiation risk estimated for the first year was significantly lower for men (0.76 ± 0.41%) as compared to women (1.28 ± 0.54%)-(p < 0.05). The same was found for each of the subsequent 5-years (men-0.18 ± 0.17%; women-0.28 ± 0.25%)-(p < 0.05). In conclusion, for HL and DLBCL patients investigated in this study, a cumulative radiation risk of about 1 excess cancer per 100 patients is estimated for diagnostic imaging procedures performed during both the first year after diagnosis and a follow-up period of 5 years. PMID:27748377

  8. Prior CT imaging history for patients who undergo PAN CT for acute traumatic injury

    PubMed Central

    Kenter, Jeremy; Blow, Osbert; Krall, Scott P.; Gest, Albert; Smith, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Objective. A single PAN scan may provide more radiation to a patient than is felt to be safe within a one-year period. Our objective was to determine how many patients admitted to the trauma service following a PAN scan had prior CT imaging within our six-hospital system. Methods. We performed a secondary analysis of a prospectively collected trauma registry. The study was based at a level-two trauma center and five affiliated hospitals, which comprise 70.6% of all Emergency Department visits within a twelve county region of southern Texas. Electronic medical records were reviewed dating from the point of trauma evaluation back to December 5, 2005 to determine evidence of prior CT imaging. Results. There were 867 patients were admitted to the trauma service between January 1, 2012 and December 31, 2012. 460 (53%) received a PAN scan and were included in the study group. The mean age of the study group was 37.7 ± 1.54 years old, 24.8% were female, and the mean ISS score was 13.4 ± 1.07. The most common mechanism of injury was motor vehicle collision (47%). 65 (14%; 95% CI [11–18]%) of the patients had at least one prior CT. The most common prior studies performed were: CT head (29%; 19–42%), CT Face (29%; 19–42%) and CT Abdomen and Pelvis (18%; 11–30%). Conclusion. Within our trauma registry, 14% of patients had prior CT imaging within our hospital system before their traumatic event and PAN scan. PMID:26056616

  9. Optimization of chest and lumbar spine radiography by Monte Carlo modeling of the patient and imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandborg, Michael P.; McVey, Graham; Dance, David R.; Carlsson, Gudrun A.; Verdun, Francis R.

    1999-05-01

    A novel approach to patient dose and image quality optimization was developed and implemented for chest and lumbar spine radiography. A Monte Carlo model of the imaging chain, including an anthropomorphic voxel-phantom to simulate the patient, was utilized. Detector noise and system unsharpness were modeled and their influence on image quality considered. Image quality was quantified by the contrast ((Delta) OD) and the ideal observer signal-to-noise (SNR) for a number of relevant image details at various positions in the anatomy and measures of dynamic range (DR). Among systems evaluated in a clinical trial, a reference system, acknowledged to yield acceptable image quality, was selected. A large variety of other imaging conditions were simulated and compared to the reference system. Some of the simulated systems were found to give as good imaging performance but at substantially reduced patient doses: 35% and 50% reduction in the lumbar spine AP and the chest PA view, respectively. The model was also used to define a single-valued 'figure-of- merit,' the physical image quality score, PIQS, with the aim to make possible ranking of the imaging systems. By comparing the ranking according to PIQS with radiologists' ranking it was possible to analyze the features in the images which are clinically important.

  10. Study and design of beam expander with wide aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ming; Jin, Guangyong; Cai, Jixing; Zhang, Wei; Wei, Zhi

    2014-12-01

    In order to improve the capacity of beam collimation for laser beam expander, it is necessary to design a more reasonable and feasible structure of beam expander system. Laser beam expander is used to compress the laser divergence angle, in order to reduce the energy losing in long distance scanning acquisition system. This paper introduces the working principle and design idea of the laser beam expander, the collimating multiplying power focal length and the collimated magnification formula of expander main, secondary mirror. According to the third-order aberration theory, Considering the spherical aberration, sine difference and divergence angle, the reasonable analysis of optical path, ZEMAX optical design software was used to design large-diameter laser beam expander and analysis and optimize, And given the actual design data and results. Display the maximum optical path difference is +/-0.01λ of the main light ray and each light ray. To combination the rear- group objective lens of Galileo and Kepler beam expander, a large-diameter(1.475m) laser beam expander was designed with 0.2m in the diameter, 1/2m in the relative caliber. In the objective lens System, a high-order aspherical was used to the aberration of extra-axial point. we can see that the image quality is close to the diffraction limit from the curves of wavefront. In addition to improve image quality effectively, the system has the characteristics of simple structure, less costly and less design difficulty to compare with the other beam expanding system. And make the output beam's divergence angle smaller, energy density higher, and the beam quality has been greatly improved. The results show that the beam expander is fully meet the design requirements, the use effect is good. Design and research of laser beam expanding system not only improves the quality of the laser beam in the laser system, but also enlarge the application field of laser technology in photoelectric system.

  11. Patient-centered Radiology.

    PubMed

    Itri, Jason N

    2015-10-01

    Patient-centered care (ie, care organized around the patient) is a model in which health care providers partner with patients and families to identify and satisfy patients' needs and preferences. In this model, providers respect patients' values and preferences, address their emotional and social needs, and involve them and their families in decision making. Radiologists have traditionally been characterized as "doctor-to-doctor" consultants who are distanced from patients and work within a culture that does not value patient centeredness. As medicine becomes more patient driven and the trajectory of health care is toward increasing patient self-reliance, radiologists must change the perception that they are merely consultants and become more active participants in patient care by embracing greater patient interaction. The traditional business model for radiology practices, which devalues interaction between patients and radiologists, must be transformed into a patient-centered model in which radiologists are reintegrated into direct patient care and imaging processes are reorganized around patients' needs and preferences. Expanding radiology's core assets to include direct patient care may be the most effective deterrent to the threat of commoditization. As the assault on the growth of Medicare spending continues, with medical imaging as a highly visible target, radiologists must adapt to the changing landscape by focusing on their most important consumer: the patient. This may yield substantial benefits in the form of improved quality and patient safety, reduced costs, higher-value care, improved patient outcomes, and greater patient and provider satisfaction. PMID:26466190

  12. Indium 111 platelet imaging for the detection of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in patients without symptoms after surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke-Pearson, D.L.; Coleman, R.E.; Siegel, R.; Synan, I.S.; Petry, N.

    1985-07-01

    Indium 111 platelet imaging for the detection of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary emboli was performed in 171 patients after abdominal and pelvic surgery. Fifteen patients were found to have inadequate circulating blood pools of indium 111 platelets, making the study nondiagnostic. Of 156 patients with technically satisfactory images, 46 (29.5%) had images consistent with deep venous thrombosis and/or pulmonary emboli. The incidence, time of occurrence, and location of thromboemboli was similar to those of other reports of postoperative patients groups studied by iodine 125 fibrinogen uptake testing. Eighty patients had normal indium 111 platelets and 30 patients had diffusely distributed indium 111 platelets found in the operative field, suggesting accumulation in a postoperative hematoma. None of these results was confused with a diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis. When compared with another accurate diagnostic test in 23 patients, indium 111 platelet imaging was found to have a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 90%. The technique of indium 111 platelet imaging is performed easily in patients after surgery with some limitations as to the use of donor platelets and the occasionally altered imaging of the operative site. This diagnostic technique enjoys the distinct advantage in that it allows surveillance of the legs, pelvis, abdomen, and chest by a single method, making it a near-ideal method of postoperative thromboembolism surveillance.

  13. Attitudinal and perceptual factors in body image distortion: an exploratory study in patients with anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Body image disturbance is a core feature of anorexia nervosa (AN). Attitudinal and cognitive biases as well as fundamental perceptual differences have been hypothesized to play a role in this disturbance. Method This study investigated body image dissatisfaction and distortion, haptic perception and perfectionism in 30 patients with AN and 31 age-matched healthy controls. Participants completed perceptual tasks and self-report measures. Results As predicted, participants with AN scored significantly higher on body dissatisfaction, perfectionism measures and had greater body distortion (as assessed by a body size estimation task). Cognitive–affective factors and perfectionism were highly correlated with body image distortion in AN. No significant differences were found between groups on the generic perception task. Conclusions Findings did not confirm the hypothesis of fundamental perceptual inefficiencies in body image disturbance in individuals with AN. Despite renewed interest in fundamental perceptual factors implicated in body image disturbance, these findings suggest that it continues to be important to focus treatment on cognitive affective biases versus fundamental perceptual inefficiencies. PMID:24999398

  14. Early detection of chemotherapy-refractory patients by monitoring textural alterations in diffuse optical spectroscopic images

    SciTech Connect

    Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Falou, Omar; Czarnota, Gregory J.; Vorauer, Eric; Chin, Lee; Tran, William T.; Wright, Frances C.; Gandhi, Sonal; Yaffe, Martin J.

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Changes in textural characteristics of diffuse optical spectroscopic (DOS) functional images, accompanied by alterations in their mean values, are demonstrated here for the first time as early surrogates of ultimate treatment response in locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). NAC, as a standard component of treatment for LABC patient, induces measurable heterogeneous changes in tumor metabolism which were evaluated using DOS-based metabolic maps. This study characterizes such inhomogeneous nature of response development, by determining alterations in textural properties of DOS images apparent at early stages of therapy, followed later by gross changes in mean values of these functional metabolic maps. Methods: Twelve LABC patients undergoing NAC were scanned before and at four times after treatment initiation, and tomographic DOS images were reconstructed at each time. Ultimate responses of patients were determined clinically and pathologically, based on a reduction in tumor size and assessment of residual tumor cellularity. The mean-value parameters and textural features were extracted from volumetric DOS images for several functional and metabolic parameters prior to the treatment initiation. Changes in these DOS-based biomarkers were also monitored over the course of treatment. The measured biomarkers were applied to differentiate patient responses noninvasively and compared to clinical and pathologic responses. Results: Responding and nonresponding patients demonstrated different changes in DOS-based textural and mean-value parameters during chemotherapy. Whereas none of the biomarkers measured prior the start of therapy demonstrated a significant difference between the two patient populations, statistically significant differences were observed at week one after treatment initiation using the relative change in contrast/homogeneity of seven functional maps (0.001 < p < 0.049), and mean value of water

  15. IMAGES, IMAGES, IMAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, A.

    1980-07-01

    The role of images of information (charts, diagrams, maps, and symbols) for effective presentation of facts and concepts is expanding dramatically because of advances in computer graphics technology, increasingly hetero-lingual, hetero-cultural world target populations of information providers, the urgent need to convey more efficiently vast amounts of information, the broadening population of (non-expert) computer users, the decrease of available time for reading texts and for decision making, and the general level of literacy. A coalition of visual performance experts, human engineering specialists, computer scientists, and graphic designers/artists is required to resolve human factors aspects of images of information. The need for, nature of, and benefits of interdisciplinary effort are discussed. The results of an interdisciplinary collaboration are demonstrated in a product for visualizing complex information about global energy interdependence. An invited panel will respond to the presentation.

  16. Prostate Cancer: Can Multiparametric MR Imaging Help Identify Patients Who Are Candidates for Active Surveillance?

    PubMed Central

    Turkbey, Baris; Mani, Haresh; Aras, Omer; Ho, Jennifer; Hoang, Anthony; Rastinehad, Ardeshir R.; Agarwal, Harsh; Shah, Vijay; Bernardo, Marcelino; Pang, Yuxi; Daar, Dagane; McKinney, Yolanda L.; Linehan, W. Marston; Kaushal, Aradhana; Merino, Maria J.; Wood, Bradford J.; Pinto, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether multiparametric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can help identify patients with prostate cancer who would most appropriately be candidates for active surveillance (AS) according to current guidelines and to compare the results with those of conventional clinical assessment scoring systems, including the D’Amico, Epstein, and Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment (CAPRA) systems, on the basis of findings at prostatectomy. Materials and Methods: This institutional review board–approved HIPAA-compliant retrospectively designed study included 133 patients (mean age, 59.3 years) with a mean prostate-specific antigen level of 6.73 ng/mL (median, 4.39 ng/mL) who underwent multiparametric MR imaging at 3.0 T before radical prostatectomy. Informed consent was obtained from all patients. Patients were then retrospectively classified as to whether they would have met AS eligibility criteria or were better served by surgery. AS eligibility criteria for prostatectomy specimens were a dominant tumor smaller than 0.5 mL without Gleason 4 or 5 patterns or extracapsular or seminal vesicle invasion. Conventional clinical assessment scores (the D’Amico, Epstein, and CAPRA scoring systems) were compared with multiparametric MR imaging findings for predicting AS candidates. The level of significance of difference between scoring systems was determined by using the χ2 test for categoric variables with the level of significance set at P < .05. Results: Among 133 patients, 14 were eligible for AS on the basis of prostatectomy results. The sensitivity, positive predictive value (PPV), and overall accuracy, respectively, were 93%, 25%, and 70% for the D’Amico system, 64%, 45%, and 88% for the Epstein criteria, and 93%, 20%, and 59% for the CAPRA scoring system for predicting AS candidates (P < .005 for all, χ2 test), while multiparametric MR imaging had a sensitivity of 93%, a PPV of 57%, and an overall accuracy of 92% (P < .005). Conclusion

  17. HIPAA, dermatology images, and the law.

    PubMed

    Scheinfeld, Noah; Rothstein, Brooke

    2013-12-01

    From smart phones to iPads, the world has grown increasingly reliant on new technology. In this ever-expanding digital age, medicine is at the forefront of these new technologies. In the field of dermatology and general medicine, digital images have become an important tool used in patient management. Today, one can even find physicians who use their cellular phone cameras to take patient images and transmit them to other physicians. However, as digital imaging technology has become more prevalent so too have concerns about the impact of this technology on the electronic medical record, quality of patient care, and medicolegal issues. This article will discuss the advent of digital imaging technology in dermatology and the legal ramifications digital images have on medical care, abiding by HIPAA, the use of digital images as evidence, and the possible abuses digital images can pose in a health care setting. PMID:24800426

  18. Clinical presentation and imaging results of patients with symptomatic gluteus medius tears

    PubMed Central

    Lindner, Dror; Shohat, Noam; Botser, Itamar; Agar, Gabriel; Domb, Benjamin G.

    2015-01-01

    Greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS) is a common complaint. Recently, it has become well recognized that tendinopathy and tears of the gluteus medius (GM) are a cause of recalcitrant GTPS. Nevertheless, the clinical syndrome associated with GM tears is not fully characterized. We characterize the clinical history, findings on physical examination, imaging and intraoperative findings associated with symptomatic GM tears. Forty-five patients (47 hips) who underwent GM repair for the diagnosis of tear were evaluated. Pain was estimated on the visual analog scale (VAS) and hip-specific scores were administered to assess functional status. The imaging modalities were reviewed and intra operative findings were recorded. The average patient age was 54 years (17–76), 93% were females. Symptom onset was commonly insidious (75%) and the average time to diagnosis was 28 months (2–240). The most common pain location was the lateral hip (75%). The average pre-surgery VAS and modified Harris Hip Score were 6.65 (0–10) and 55.5 (12–90), respectively. All patients had pathological findings on magnetic resonance angiogram (MRA) ranging from tendinosis to complete tears of the GM tendon. There was a discrepancy between MRA interpretation by a radiologist and findings during surgery. Hip abductor tears are an under-recognized cause of hip pain and hip symptomatology. In this study, we further characterize the clinical presentation of this entity. The data we present here may facilitate early diagnosis, early orthopedic care and avoid unnecessary prolonged patient sufferings. PMID:27011854

  19. Smaragdyrins: emeralds of expanded porphyrin family.

    PubMed

    Pareek, Yogita; Ravikanth, M; Chandrashekar, T K

    2012-10-16

    Porphyrins are tetrapyrrolic 18 π electron conjugated macrocycles with wide applications that range from materials to medicine. Expanded porphyrins, synthetic analogues of porphyrins that contain more than 18 π electrons in the conjugated pathway, have an increased number of pyrroles or other heterocyles or multiple meso-carbon bridges. The expanded porphyrins have attracted tremendous attention because of unique features such as anion binding or transport that are not present in porphyrins. Expanded porphyrins exhibit wide applications that include their use in the coordination of large metal ions, as contrasting agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as sensitizers for photodynamic therapy (PDT) and as materials for nonlinear optical (NLO) studies. Pentaphyrin 1, sapphyrin 2, and smaragdyrin 3 are expanded porphyrins that include five pyrroles or heterocyclic rings. They differ from each other in the number of bridging carbons and direct bonds that connect the five heterocyclic rings. Sapphyrins were the first stable expanded porphyrins reported in the literature and remain one of the most extensively studied macrocycles. The strategies used to synthesize sapphyrins are well established, and these macrocycles are versatile anion binding agents. They possess rich porphyrin-like coordination chemistry and have been used in diverse applications. This Account reviews developments in smaragdyrin chemistry. Although smaragdyrins were discovered at the same time as sapphyrins, the chemistry of smaragdyrins remained underdeveloped because of synthetic difficulties and their comparative instability. Earlier efforts resulted in the isolation of stable β-substituted smaragdyrins and meso-aryl isosmaragdyrins. Recently, researchers have synthesized stable meso-aryl smaragdyrins by [3 + 2] oxidative coupling reactions. These results have stimulated renewed research interest in the exploration of these compounds for anion and cation binding, energy transfer

  20. Smaragdyrins: emeralds of expanded porphyrin family.

    PubMed

    Pareek, Yogita; Ravikanth, M; Chandrashekar, T K

    2012-10-16

    Porphyrins are tetrapyrrolic 18 π electron conjugated macrocycles with wide applications that range from materials to medicine. Expanded porphyrins, synthetic analogues of porphyrins that contain more than 18 π electrons in the conjugated pathway, have an increased number of pyrroles or other heterocyles or multiple meso-carbon bridges. The expanded porphyrins have attracted tremendous attention because of unique features such as anion binding or transport that are not present in porphyrins. Expanded porphyrins exhibit wide applications that include their use in the coordination of large metal ions, as contrasting agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as sensitizers for photodynamic therapy (PDT) and as materials for nonlinear optical (NLO) studies. Pentaphyrin 1, sapphyrin 2, and smaragdyrin 3 are expanded porphyrins that include five pyrroles or heterocyclic rings. They differ from each other in the number of bridging carbons and direct bonds that connect the five heterocyclic rings. Sapphyrins were the first stable expanded porphyrins reported in the literature and remain one of the most extensively studied macrocycles. The strategies used to synthesize sapphyrins are well established, and these macrocycles are versatile anion binding agents. They possess rich porphyrin-like coordination chemistry and have been used in diverse applications. This Account reviews developments in smaragdyrin chemistry. Although smaragdyrins were discovered at the same time as sapphyrins, the chemistry of smaragdyrins remained underdeveloped because of synthetic difficulties and their comparative instability. Earlier efforts resulted in the isolation of stable β-substituted smaragdyrins and meso-aryl isosmaragdyrins. Recently, researchers have synthesized stable meso-aryl smaragdyrins by [3 + 2] oxidative coupling reactions. These results have stimulated renewed research interest in the exploration of these compounds for anion and cation binding, energy transfer

  1. Semiautomatic registration of 3D transabdominal ultrasound images for patient repositioning during postprostatectomy radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Presles, Benoît Rit, Simon; Sarrut, David; Fargier-Voiron, Marie; Liebgott, Hervé; Biston, Marie-Claude; Munoz, Alexandre; Pommier, Pascal; Lynch, Rod

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: The aim of the present work is to propose and evaluate registration algorithms of three-dimensional (3D) transabdominal (TA) ultrasound (US) images to setup postprostatectomy patients during radiation therapy. Methods: Three registration methods have been developed and evaluated to register a reference 3D-TA-US image acquired during the planning CT session and a 3D-TA-US image acquired before each treatment session. The first method (method A) uses only gray value information, whereas the second one (method B) uses only gradient information. The third one (method C) combines both sets of information. All methods restrict the comparison to a region of interest computed from the dilated reference positioning volume drawn on the reference image and use mutual information as a similarity measure. The considered geometric transformations are translations and have been optimized by using the adaptive stochastic gradient descent algorithm. Validation has been carried out using manual registration by three operators of the same set of image pairs as the algorithms. Sixty-two treatment US images of seven patients irradiated after a prostatectomy have been registered to their corresponding reference US image. The reference registration has been defined as the average of the manual registration values. Registration error has been calculated by subtracting the reference registration from the algorithm result. For each session, the method has been considered a failure if the registration error was above both the interoperator variability of the session and a global threshold of 3.0 mm. Results: All proposed registration algorithms have no systematic bias. Method B leads to the best results with mean errors of −0.6, 0.7, and −0.2 mm in left–right (LR), superior–inferior (SI), and anterior–posterior (AP) directions, respectively. With this method, the standard deviations of the mean error are of 1.7, 2.4, and 2.6 mm in LR, SI, and AP directions, respectively

  2. Diffusion tensor imaging studies on arcuate fasciculus in stroke patients: a review.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sung Ho

    2013-01-01

    Aphasia is one of the most common and devastating sequelae of stroke. The arcuate fasciculus (AF), an important neural tract for language function, connects Broca's and Wernicke's areas. In this review article, previous diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies on the AF in stroke patients were reviewed with regard to the usefulness for diagnosis (seven studies), prediction of prognosis (two studies), and recovery of aphasia (three studies). Although scant studies on this topic have been conducted in stroke patients, DTI for the AF appears to provide useful information on the presence or severity of injury of the AF, prognosis prediction of aphasia, and recovery mechanisms of aphasia in stroke patients. Therefore, further DTI studies on these topics should be encouraged, especially studies on prognosis prediction and recovery mechanisms of aphasia. In addition, research on other neural tracts known to be involved in aphasia as well as the AF in both hemispheres should be encouraged. PMID:24198780

  3. [New technique of magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate peripheral circulation in diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Eiji

    2006-11-01

    Waveform analysis at the popliteal artery using the new technique of gated two-dimensional cine-mode phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging is beneficial to assess peripheral circulation in both normal and diseased arteries. The normal subjects had a typically triphasic waveform, which could be clearly separated into systolic, and early and late diastolic phases of the cardiac cycle. Diabetic patients are reported to have two types of insufficient arterial blood flow to the lower limbs associated with the vessel wall properties. Firstly, patients with atherosclerotic occlusion in the lower-leg arteries distal to the aortic bifurcation, resulting in a low ankle-brachial index, show an abnormal monophasic waveform. Secondly, patients with stiffer arteries characteristically show abnormal flow reversal in late diastole, suggesting higher vascular resistance.

  4. Quality of life for our patients: how media images and messages: influence their perceptions.

    PubMed

    Carr, Ellen R

    2008-02-01

    Media messages and images shape patients' perceptions about quality of life (QOL) through various "old" media-literature, film, television, and music-and so-called "new" media-the Internet, e-mail, blogs, and cell phones. In this article, the author provides a brief overview of QOL from the academic perspectives of nursing, psychology, behavioral medicine, multicultural studies, and consumer marketing. Selected theories about mass communication are discussed, as well as new technologies and their impact on QOL in our society. Examples of media messages about QOL and the QOL experience reported by patients with cancer include an excerpt from the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation radio interview with author Carol Shields, the 60 Minutes television interview focusing on Elizabeth Edwards (wife of presidential candidate John Edwards), and an excerpt from the 1994 filmThe Shawshank Redemption. Nurses are challenged to think about how they and their patients develop their perceptions about QOL through the media. PMID:18258574

  5. Image-based estimation of ventricular fiber orientations for patient-specific simulations.

    PubMed

    Vadakkumpadan, Fijoy; Arevalo, Hermenegild; Ceritoglu, Can; Miller, Michael; Trayanova, Natalia

    2011-01-01

    Patient-specific simulation of heart (dys)function aimed at personalizing cardiac therapy are hampered by the absence of in vivo imaging technology for clinically acquiring myocardial fiber orientations. In this research, we develop a methodology to predict ventricular fiber orientations of a patient heart, given the geometry of the heart and an atlas. We test the methodology by comparing the estimated fiber orientations with measured ones, and by quantifying the effect of the estimation error on outcomes of electrophysiological simulations, in normal and failing canine hearts. The new insights obtained from the project will pave the way for the development of patient-specific models of the heart that can aid physicians in personalized diagnosis and decisions regarding electrophysiological interventions. PMID:22254646

  6. Classification of videocapsule endoscopy image patterns: comparative analysis between patients with celiac disease and normal individuals

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Quantitative disease markers were developed to assess videocapsule images acquired from celiac disease patients with villous atrophy, and from control patients. Method Capsule endoscopy videoclip images (576 × 576 pixels) were acquired at 2/second frame rate (11 celiacs, 10 controls) at regions: 1. bulb, 2. duodenum, 3. jejunum, 4. ileum and 5. distal ileum. Each of 200 images per videoclip (= 100s) were subdivided into 10 × 10 pixel subimages for which mean grayscale brightness level and its standard deviation (texture) were calculated. Pooled subimage values were grouped into low, intermediate, and high texture bands, and mean brightness, texture, and number of subimages in each band (nine features in all) were used for quantifying regions 1-5, and to determine the three best features for threshold and incremental learning classification. Classifiers were developed using 6 celiac and 5 control patients' data as exemplars, and tested on 5 celiacs and 5 controls. Results Pooled from all regions, the threshold classifier had 80% sensitivity and 96% specificity and the incremental classifier had 88% sensitivity and 80% specificity for predicting celiac versus control videoclips in the test set. Trends of increasing texture from regions 1 to 5 occurred in the low and high texture bands in celiacs, and the number of subimages in the low texture band diminished (r2 > 0.5). No trends occurred in controls. Conclusions Celiac videocapsule images have textural properties that vary linearly along the small intestine. Quantitative markers can assist in screening for celiac disease and localize extent and degree of pathology throughout the small intestine. PMID:20815911

  7. Differences in body image between anorexics and in-vitro-fertilization patients - a study with Body Grid

    PubMed Central

    Borkenhagen, Ada; Klapp, Burghard F.; Schoeneich, Frank; Brähler, Elmar

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of the investigation was to explore the body image disturbance of anorexics and in-vitro-fertilization patients (IvF-patients) with Body Grid and Body Identity Plot. Methods: The paper reports on an empirical study conducted with 32 anorexic patients and 30 IvF-patients. The structure of the body image was derived from the Body Grid, an idiographic approach following the Role Repertory Grid developed by George A. Kelly [17]. The representation of the body image and the degree of body-acceptance is represented graphically. Results: By the Body Grid and Body Identity Plot measures we were able to identify important differences in body image between anorexics and IvF-patients. Conclusion: The tendencies of dissociation in the body image of anorexics which we found must be seen in the sense of a specific body image disturbance which differs significantly from the body-experience profile of IvF-patients. With the grid approach it was possible to elicit the inner structure of body image and determine the acceptance of the body and integration of single body parts. PMID:19742059

  8. Interventional magnetic resonance imaging-guided subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease: Patient selection

    PubMed Central

    Azmi, Hooman; Gupta, Fiona; Vukic, Mario; Kreitner, Jason; Kera, Elizabeth; Nicola, Gregory; Pierce, Sean; Panush, David; Cohen, Randy

    2016-01-01

    Background: Interventional magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) guided deep brain stimulation (DBS) for Parkinson's disease (PD) has been shown to be effective. The costs of a dedicated intraoperative MRI may be prohibitive. The procedure can also be performed in a diagnostic scanner, however this presents challenges for utilization of time when the scanner is used both as a diagnostic and an interventional unit. This report outlines our novel methodology for patient selection for implantation in a diagnostic MR scanner, as an attempt to streamline the use of resources. A retrospective review of our outcomes is also presented. Methods: DBS candidacy evaluation included a PD questionnaire-39. Anxiety, age, difficulties in communication and body habitus were factors that were assessed in selecting patients for this technique. Eleven patients underwent iMRI-guided DBS implantation in the subthalamic nucleus. All patients were implanted bilaterally. Unified PD rating scale (UPDRS) part III and L-dopa dose were compared pre- and post-stimulation. A cohort of 11 DBS patients not selected for iMRI-guided DBS were also reported for comparison. Results: For the iMRI-guided patients, mean “Off” UPDRS III score was 47.6 (standard deviation [SD] 8.26). Postoperative “On” medication, “On” stimulation UPDRS III was 13.6 (SD 5.23). Mean preoperative L-dopa dose was 1060 mg (SD 474.3) and mean postoperative L-dopa dose was 320 (SD 298.3). Conclusion: iMRI-guided DBS is a newly emerging technique for surgical treatment of patients with PD. We present a novel scoring system for patient selection assessing anxiety, age, ability to communicate, and body habitus to identify patients who will be benefited most from this technique. PMID:27583183

  9. Occipital sulci patterns in patients with schizophrenia and migraine headache using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

    PubMed

    Sulejmanpašić, Gorana; Suljić, Enra; Šabanagić-Hajrić, Selma

    2016-08-01

    Aim To examine the presence of morphologic variations of occipital sulci patternsin patients with schizophrenia and migraine headacheregarding gender and laterality using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods This study included 80 patients and brain scans were performed to analyze interhemispheric symmetry and the sulcal patterns of the occipital region of both hemispheres. Average total volumes of both hemispheres of the healthy population were used for comparison. Results There was statistically significant difference between subjects considering gender (p=0.012)with no difference regarding age(p=0.1821). Parameters of parieto-occipital fissure (p=0.0314), body of the calcarine sulcus (p=0.0213), inferior sagittal sulcus (p=0.0443), and lateral occipital sulcus (p=0.0411) showed statistically significant difference only of left hemisphere in male patients with schizophrenia with shallowerdepth of the sulcus. Conclusion Representation of neuroanatomical structures suggests the existence of structural neuroanatomic disorders with focal brain changes. Comparative analysis of occipital lobe and their morphologic structures (cortical dysmorphology) in patients with schizophreniausing MRI, according to genderindicates a significant cortical reduction in the left hemisphere only in the group of male patients compared to female patients and the control group. PMID:27313112

  10. Elderly depression diagnostic of diabetic patients by brain tissue pulsatility imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachemi, Mélouka Elkateb; Remeniéras, Jean-pierre; Desmidt, Thomas; Camus, Vincent; Tranquart, François

    2010-01-01

    Pulsatile motion of brain parenchyma results from cardiac and breathing cycles and consists in a rapid displacement in systole, with slow diastolic recovery. Based on the vascular depression concept and recent studies where a correlation was found between cerebral haemodynamics and depression in the elderly, we emitted the hypothesis that tissue brain motion due to perfusion is correlated to elderly depression associated with cardiovascular risk factors. Tissue Pulsatlity Imaging (TPI) is a new ultrasound technique developed firstly at the University of Washington to assess the brain tissue motion. We used TPI technique to measure the brain displacement of two groups of elderly patients with diabetes as a vascular risk factor. The first group is composed of 11 depressed diabetic patients. The second group is composed of 12 diabetic patients without depressive symptoms. Transcranial acquisitions were performed with a 1.8 MHz ultrasound phased array probe through the right temporal bone window. The acquisition of six cardiac cycles was realized on each patient with a frame rate of 23 frames/s. Displacements estimation was performed by off-line analysis. A significant decrease in brain pulsatility was observed in the group of depressed patients compared to the group of non depressed patients. Mean displacement magnitude was about 44±7 μm in the first group and 68±13 μm in the second group.

  11. Schizophrenia patients differentiation based on MR vascular perfusion and volumetric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanier, A. B.; Joskowicz, L.; Moshel, S.; Israeli, D.

    2015-03-01

    Candecomp/Parafac Decomposition (CPD) has emerged as a framework for modeling N-way arrays (higher-order matrices). CPD is naturally well suited for the analysis of data sets comprised of observations of a function of multiple discrete indices. In this study we evaluate the prospects of using CPD for modeling MRI brain properties (i.e. brain volume and gray-level) for schizophrenia diagnosis. Taking into account that 3D imaging data consists of millions of pixels per patient, the diagnosis of a schizophrenia patient based on pixel analysis constitutes a methodological challenge (e.g. multiple comparison problem). We show that the CPD could potentially be used as a dimensionality redaction method and as a discriminator between schizophrenia patients and match control, using the gradient of pre- and post Gd-T1-weighted MRI data, which is strongly correlated with cerebral blood perfusion. Our approach was tested on 68 MRI scans: 40 first-episode schizophrenia patients and 28 matched controls. The CPD subject's scores exhibit statistically significant result (P < 0.001). In the context of diagnosing schizophrenia with MRI, the results suggest that the CPD could potentially be used to discriminate between schizophrenia patients and matched control. In addition, the CPD model suggests for brain regions that might exhibit abnormalities in schizophrenia patients for future research.

  12. Neural substrate of quality of life in patients with schizophrenia: a magnetisation transfer imaging study.

    PubMed

    Faget-Agius, Catherine; Catherine, Faget-Agius; Boyer, Laurent; Wirsich, Jonathan; Jonathan, Wirsich; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe; Jean-Philippe, Ranjeva; Richieri, Raphaelle; Raphaelle, Richieri; Soulier, Elisabeth; Elisabeth, Soulier; Confort-Gouny, Sylviane; Sylviane, Confort-Gouny; Auquier, Pascal; Pascal, Auquier; Guye, Maxime; Maxime, Guye; Lançon, Christophe; Christophe, Lançon

    2015-12-03

    The aim of this study was to investigate the neural substrate underlying quality of life (QoL) and to demonstrate the microstructural abnormalities associated with impaired QoL in a large sample of patients with schizophrenia, using magnetisation transfer imaging. A total of 81 right-handed men with a diagnosis of schizophrenia and 25 age- and sex-similar healthy controls were included and underwent a 3T MRI with magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) to detect microstructural abnormalities. Compared with healthy controls, patients with schizophrenia had grey matter (GM) decreased MTR values in the temporal lobe (BA21, BA37 and BA38), the bilateral insula, the occipital lobe (BA17, BA18 and BA19) and the cerebellum. Patients with impaired QoL had lower GM MTR values relative to patients with preserved QoL in the bilateral temporal pole (BA38), the bilateral insula, the secondary visual cortex (BA18), the vermis and the cerebellum. Significant correlations between MTR values and QoL scores (p < 0.005) were observed in the GM of patients in the right temporal pole (BA38), the bilateral insula, the vermis and the right cerebellum. Our study shows that QoL impairment in patients with schizophrenia is related to the microstructural changes in an extensive network, suggesting that QoL is a bio-psychosocial marker.

  13. Body Image Disturbances Have Impact on the Sexual Problems in Chinese Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Biyu; He, Yan; Chen, Haoyang; Zhao, Chunmei; Zhu, Li; Gao, Yingying; Ren, Yunli; Wang, Xueqing; Liu, Jingwei

    2015-01-01

    SLE might affect all aspects of life including sexual functioning; previous study found that body image disturbance (BID) was the most powerful predictors of impaired partner relationships and sexual function. The current study investigated the relationship among disease parameters, quality of life, the psychological status, BID, and sexual problems in Chinese patients with SLE. A self-report survey design was administered to 168 SLE patients and 210 healthy individuals. Our results showed that 86 (55.1%) SLE patients reported impaired relationships with a sexual partner or partners, and 100 (64.1%) patients reported impaired sexual function which were significantly higher than the control group (31.6%, 35.7%, rep.). Age, marital status, depression, and BIDQ were the most powerful predictors of impaired partner relationships, while BIDQ3 and education, disease activity, and depression were the most significant causes of impaired sexual function. The study for first time reported Chinese SLE patients had sexual problems and BID was associated with sexual problems. So, early detection and interventions might not only rehabilitate the patients and their loved ones, but also improve overall health outcomes and reduce the direct and indirect costs of their medical care. PMID:26090484

  14. Prognostic value of exercise thallium-201 imaging in patients presenting for evaluation of chest pain

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.A.; Boucher, C.A.; Okada, R.D.; Guiney, T.E.; Newell, J.B.; Strauss, H.W.; Pohost, G.M.

    1983-04-01

    Accurate prognostic information is important in determining optimal management of patients presenting for evaluation of chest pain. In this study, the ability of exercise thallium-201 myocardial imaging to predict future cardiac events (cardiovascular death or nonfatal myocardial infarction) was correlated with clinical, coronary and left ventricular angiographic and exercise electrocardiographic data in 139 consecutive, nonsurgically managed patients followed-up over a 3 to 5 year period (mean follow-up, 3.7 +/- 0.9), using a logistic regression analysis. Among patients without prior myocardial infarction (100 of 139), the number of myocardial segments with transient thallium-201 defects was the only statistically significant predictor of future cardiac events when all patient variables were evaluated. Among patients with myocardial infarction before evaluation (39 of 139), angiographic ejection fraction was the only significant predictor of future cardiac events when all variables were considered. This study suggests an approach to evaluate the risk of future cardiac events in patients with possible ischemic heart disease.

  15. Neural substrate of quality of life in patients with schizophrenia: a magnetisation transfer imaging study.

    PubMed

    Faget-Agius, Catherine; Catherine, Faget-Agius; Boyer, Laurent; Wirsich, Jonathan; Jonathan, Wirsich; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe; Jean-Philippe, Ranjeva; Richieri, Raphaelle; Raphaelle, Richieri; Soulier, Elisabeth; Elisabeth, Soulier; Confort-Gouny, Sylviane; Sylviane, Confort-Gouny; Auquier, Pascal; Pascal, Auquier; Guye, Maxime; Maxime, Guye; Lançon, Christophe; Christophe, Lançon

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the neural substrate underlying quality of life (QoL) and to demonstrate the microstructural abnormalities associated with impaired QoL in a large sample of patients with schizophrenia, using magnetisation transfer imaging. A total of 81 right-handed men with a diagnosis of schizophrenia and 25 age- and sex-similar healthy controls were included and underwent a 3T MRI with magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) to detect microstructural abnormalities. Compared with healthy controls, patients with schizophrenia had grey matter (GM) decreased MTR values in the temporal lobe (BA21, BA37 and BA38), the bilateral insula, the occipital lobe (BA17, BA18 and BA19) and the cerebellum. Patients with impaired QoL had lower GM MTR values relative to patients with preserved QoL in the bilateral temporal pole (BA38), the bilateral insula, the secondary visual cortex (BA18), the vermis and the cerebellum. Significant correlations between MTR values and QoL scores (p < 0.005) were observed in the GM of patients in the right temporal pole (BA38), the bilateral insula, the vermis and the right cerebellum. Our study shows that QoL impairment in patients with schizophrenia is related to the microstructural changes in an extensive network, suggesting that QoL is a bio-psychosocial marker. PMID:26632639

  16. Muscle Quantitative MR Imaging and Clustering Analysis in Patients with Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Lareau-Trudel, Emilie; Le Troter, Arnaud; Ghattas, Badih; Pouget, Jean; Attarian, Shahram; Bendahan, David; Salort-Campana, Emmanuelle

    2015-01-01

    Background Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy type 1 (FSHD1) is the third most common inherited muscular dystrophy. Considering the highly variable clinical expression and the slow disease progression, sensitive outcome measures would be of interest. Methods and Findings Using muscle MRI, we assessed muscular fatty infiltration in the lower limbs of 35 FSHD1 patients and 22 healthy volunteers by two methods: a quantitative imaging (qMRI) combined with a dedicated automated segmentation method performed on both thighs and a standard T1-weighted four-point visual scale (visual score) on thighs and legs. Each patient had a clinical evaluation including manual muscular testing, Clinical Severity Score (CSS) scale and MFM scale. The intramuscular fat fraction measured using qMRI in the thighs was significantly higher in patients (21.9 ± 20.4%) than in volunteers (3.6 ± 2.8%) (p<0.001). In patients, the intramuscular fat fraction was significantly correlated with the muscular fatty infiltration in the thighs evaluated by the mean visual score (p<0.001). However, we observed a ceiling effect of the visual score for patients with a severe fatty infiltration clearly indicating the larger accuracy of the qMRI approach. Mean intramuscular fat fraction was significantly correlated with CSS scale (p≤0.01) and was inversely correlated with MMT score, MFM subscore D1 (p≤0.01) further illustrating the sensitivity of the qMRI approach. Overall, a clustering analysis disclosed three different imaging patterns of muscle involvement for the thighs and the legs which could be related to different stages of the disease and put forth muscles which could be of interest for a subtle investigation of the disease progression and/or the efficiency of any therapeutic strategy. Conclusion The qMRI provides a sensitive measurement of fat fraction which should also be of high interest to assess disease progression and any therapeutic strategy in FSHD1 patients. PMID:26181385

  17. Influence of the characteristic curve on the clinical image quality and patient absorbed dose in lumbar spine radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tingberg, Anders; Herrmann, Clemens; Lanhede, Birgitta; Almen, Anja; Mattsson, Saron; Panzer, Werner; Besjakov, Jack; Mansson, Lars G.; Kheddache, Susanne; Zankl, Maria

    2001-06-01

    The 'European Guidelines on Quality Criteria for Diagnostic Radiographic Images' do not address the choice of film characteristic (H/D) curve, which is an important parameter for the description of a radiographic screen-film system. Since it is not possible to investigate this influence by taking repeated exposures of the same patients on films with systematically varied H/D curves, patient images of lumbar spine were digitised in the current study. The image contrast was altered by digital image processing techniques, simulating images with H/D curves varying from flat over standard latitude to a film type steeper than a mammography film. The manipulated images were printed on film for evaluation. Seven European radiologists evaluated the clinical image quality of in total 224 images by analysing the fulfilment of the European Image Criteria and by visual grading analysis of the images. The results show that the local quality can be significantly improved by the application of films with a steeper film H/D curve compared to the standard latitude film. For images with an average optical density of about 1.25, the application of the steeper film results in a reduction of patient absorbed dose by about 10-15% without a loss of diagnostically relevant image information. The results also show that the patient absorbed dose reduction obtained by altering the tube voltage from 70 kV to 90 kV coincides with a loss of image information that cannot be compensated for by simply changing the shape of the H/D curve.

  18. SU-E-T-387: Achieving Optimal Patient Setup Imaging and Treatment Workflow Configurations in Multi-Room Proton Centers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H; Prado, K; Langen, K; Yi, B; Mehta, M; Regine, W; D'Souza, W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To simulate patient flow in proton treatment center under uncertainty and to explore the feasibility of treatment preparation rooms to improve patient throughput and cyclotron utilization. Methods: Three center layout scenarios were modeled: (S1: In-Tx room imaging) patient setup and imaging (planar/volumetric) performed in treatment room, (S2: Patient setup in preparation room) each treatment room was assigned with preparation room(s) that was equipped with lasers only for patient setup and gross patient alignment, and (S3: Patient setup and imaging in preparation room) preparation room(s) was equipped with laser and volumetric imaging for patient setup, gross and fine patient alignment. A 'snap' imaging was performed in treatment room. For each scenario, the number of treatment rooms and the number of preparation rooms serving each treatment room were varied. We examined our results (average of 100 16-hour (two shifts) working days) by evaluating patient throughput and cyclotron utilization. Results: When the number of treatment rooms increased ([from, to]) [1, 5], daily patient throughput increased [32, 161], [29, 184] and [27, 184] and cyclotron utilization increased [13%, 85%], [12%, 98%], and [11%, 98%] for scenarios S1, S2 and S3 respectively. However, both measures plateaued after 4 rooms. With the preparation rooms, the throughput and the cyclotron utilization increased by 14% and 15%, respectively. Three preparation rooms were optimal to serve 1-3 treatment rooms and two preparation rooms were optimal to serve 4 or 5 treatment rooms. Conclusion: Patient preparation rooms for patient setup may increase throughput and decrease the need for additional treatment rooms (cost effective). Optimal number of preparation rooms serving each gantry room varies as a function of treatment rooms and patient setup scenarios. A 5th treatment room may not be justified by throughput or utilization.

  19. Monolithical aspherical beam expanding systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, U.; Matthias, Sabrina

    2014-10-01

    Beam expanding is a common task, where Galileo telescopes are preferred. However researches and customers have found limitations when using these systems. A new monolithical solution which is based on the usage of only one aspherical component will be presented. It will be shown how to combine up to five monolithical beam expanding systems and to keep the beam quality at diffraction limitation. Insights will be given how aspherical beam expanding systems will help using larger incoming beams and reducing the overall length of such a system. Additionally an add-on element for divergence and wavelength adaption will be presented.

  20. Automated measurement of CT noise in patient images with a novel structure coherence feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Minsoo; Choi, Young Hun; Hyo Kim, Jong

    2015-12-01

    While the assessment of CT noise constitutes an important task for the optimization of scan protocols in clinical routine, the majority of noise measurements in practice still rely on manual operation, hence limiting their efficiency and reliability. This study presents an algorithm for the automated measurement of CT noise in patient images with a novel structure coherence feature. The proposed algorithm consists of a four-step procedure including subcutaneous fat tissue selection, the calculation of structure coherence feature, the determination of homogeneous ROIs, and the estimation of the average noise level. In an evaluation with 94 CT scans (16 517 images) of pediatric and adult patients along with the participation of two radiologists, ROIs were placed on a homogeneous fat region at 99.46% accuracy, and the agreement of the automated noise measurements with the radiologists’ reference noise measurements (PCC  =  0.86) was substantially higher than the within and between-rater agreements of noise measurements (PCCwithin  =  0.75, PCCbetween  =  0.70). In addition, the absolute noise level measurements matched closely the theoretical noise levels generated by a reduced-dose simulation technique. Our proposed algorithm has the potential to be used for examining the appropriateness of radiation dose and the image quality of CT protocols for research purposes as well as clinical routine.

  1. Adaptive optics-assisted optical coherence tomography for imaging of patients with age related macular degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudo, Kenta; Cense, Barry

    2013-03-01

    We developed an optical coherence tomography (OCT) prototype with a sample arm that uses a 3.4 mm beam, which is considerably larger than the 1.2 to 1.5 mm beam that is used in commercialized OCT systems. The system is equipped with adaptive optics (AO), and to distinguish it from traditional AO-OCT systems with a larger 6 mm beam we have coined this concept AO-assisted OCT. Compared to commercialized OCT systems, the 3.4 mm aperture combined with AO improves light collection efficiency and imaging lateral resolution. In this paper, the performance of the AOa-OCT system was compared to a standard OCT system and demonstrated for imaging of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Measurements were performed on the retinas of three human volunteers with healthy eyes and on one eye of a patient diagnosed with AMD. The AO-assisted OCT system imaged retinal structures of healthy human eyes and a patient eye affected by AMD with higher lateral resolution and a 9° by 9° field of view. This combination of a large isoplanatic patch and high lateral resolution can be expected to fill a gap between standard OCT with a 1.2 mm beam and conventional AO-OCT with a 6 mm beam and a 1.5° by 1.5° isoplanatic patch.

  2. Brain imaging changes associated with risk factors for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease in asymptomatic patients.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Joseph I; Tang, Cheuk Y; de Haas, Hans J; Changchien, Lisa; Goliasch, Georg; Dabas, Puneet; Wang, Victoria; Fayad, Zahi A; Fuster, Valentin; Narula, Jagat

    2014-10-01

    Reviews of imaging studies assessing the brain effects of vascular risk factors typically include a substantial number of studies with subjects with a history of symptomatic cardiovascular or cerebrovascular disease and/or events, limiting our ability to disentangle the primary brain effects of vascular risk factors from those of resulting brain and cardiac damage. The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review of brain changes from imaging studies in patients with vascular risk factors but without clinically manifest cardiovascular or cerebrovascular disease or events. The 77 studies included in this review demonstrate that in persons without symptomatic cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, or peripheral vascular disease, the vascular risk factors of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, obesity, hyperlipidemia, and smoking are all independently associated with brain imaging changes before the clinical manifestation of cardiovascular or cerebrovascular disease. We conclude that the identification of brain changes associated with vascular risk factors, before the manifestation of clinically significant cerebrovascular damage, presents a window of opportunity wherein adequate treatment of these modifiable vascular risk factors may prevent the development of irreversible deleterious brain changes and potentially alter patients' clinical course.

  3. Automatic geometric rectification for patient registration in image-guided spinal surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yunliang; Olson, Jonathan D.; Fan, Xiaoyao; Evans, Linton T.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Roberts, David W.; Mirza, Sohail K.; Lollis, S. Scott; Ji, Songbai

    2016-03-01

    Accurate and efficient patient registration is crucial for the success of image-guidance in open spinal surgery. Recently, we have established the feasibility of using intraoperative stereovision (iSV) to perform patient registration with respect to preoperative CT (pCT) in human subjects undergoing spinal surgery. Although a desired accuracy was achieved, the method required manual segmentation and placement of feature points on reconstructed iSV and pCT surfaces. In this study, we present an improved registration pipeline to eliminate these manual operations. Specifically, automatic geometric rectification was performed on spines extracted from pCT and iSV into pose-invariant shapes using a nonlinear principal component analysis (NLPCA). Rectified spines were obtained by projecting the reconstructed 3D surfaces into an anatomically determined orientation. Two-dimensional projection images were then created with image intensity values encoding feature "height" in the dorsal-ventral direction. Registration between the 2D depth maps yielded an initial point-wise correspondence between the 3D surfaces. A refined registration was achieved using an iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm. The technique was successfully applied to two explanted and one live porcine spines. The computational cost of the registration pipeline was less than 1 min, with an average target registration error (TRE) less than 2.2 mm in the laminae area. These results suggest the potential for the pose-invariant, rectification-based registration technique for clinical application in human subjects in the future.

  4. Expanding transplant options to patients over 50 years. Improved outcome after reduced intensity conditioning mismatched-unrelated donor transplantation for patients with acute myeloid leukemia: a report from the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the EBMT

    PubMed Central

    Savani, Bipin N.; Labopin, Myriam; Kröger, Nicolaus; Finke, Jürgen; Ehninger, Gerhard; Niederwieser, Dietger; Schwerdtfeger, Rainer; Bunjes, Donald; Glass, Bertram; Socié, Gerard; Ljungman, Per; Craddock, Charles; Baron, Frédéric; Ciceri, Fabio; Gorin, Norbert Claude; Esteve, Jordi; Schmid, Christoph; Giebel, Sebastian; Mohty, Mohamad; Nagler, Arnon

    2016-01-01

    The outcome of patients undergoing HLA-matched unrelated donor allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation following reduced-intensity conditioning or myeloablative regimens is reported to be equivalent; however, it is not known if the intensity of the conditioning impacts outcomes after mismatched unrelated donor transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia. Eight hundred and eighty three patients receiving reduced-intensity conditioning were compared with 1041 myeloablative conditioning regimen recipients in the setting of mismatched unrelated donor transplantation. The donor graft was HLA-matched at 9/10 in 872 (83.8%) and at 8/10 in 169 (16.2%) myeloablative conditioning recipients, while in the reduced-intensity conditioning cohort, 754 (85.4%) and 129 (14.6%) were matched at 9/10 and 8/10 loci, respectively. Myeloablative conditioning regimen recipients were younger, 70% being <50 years of age compared to only 30% in the reduced-intensity conditioning group (P=0.0001). Significantly, more patients had secondary acute myeloid leukemia (P=0.04) and Karnofsky Performance Status score <90% (P=0.02) in the reduced-intensity conditioning group. Patients <50 and ≥50 years were analyzed separately. On multivariate analysis and after adjusting for differences between the two groups, reduced-intensity conditioning in patients age ≥50 years was associated with higher overall survival (HR 0.78; P=0.01), leukemia-free survival (HR 0.82; P=0.05), and decreased non-relapse mortality (HR 0.73; P=0.03). Relapse incidence (HR 0.91; P=0.51) and chronic graft-versus-host disease (HR 1.31; P=0.11) were, however, not significantly different. In patients <50 years old, there were no statistically significant differences in overall survival, leukemia-free survival, relapse incidence, non-relapse mortality, and chronic graft-versus-host-disease between the groups. Our study shows no significant outcome differences in patients younger than 50 years receiving reduced-intensity vs

  5. Iatrogenic hemobilia: imaging features and management with transcatheter arterial embolization in 30 patients

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Wen; Yue, Dong; ZaiMing, Lu; ZhaoYu, Liu; XiangXuan, Zhao; Wei, Li; QiYong, Guo

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate the imaging features of computed tomography (CT) and angiography and the efficacy of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) in patients with hemobilia of different iatrogenic causes. METHODS Thirty patients with hemobilia were divided into two groups according to their iatrogenic causes, i.e., group 1, 11 patients (36.7%) with transhepatic intervention and group 2, 19 patients (63.3%) with surgical procedures in the hilar area. Seventeen patients (56.7%) underwent abdominal contrast-enhanced CT before selective angiography. Polyvinyl alcohol particles, gelatin sponges, and coils were used for TAE. Data from the two groups were compared using Fisher’s exact test and the Mann-Whitney U test. RESULTS Contrast-enhanced CT showed a hematoma, extravasation of contrast material, and pseudoaneurysm. The bleeding source was determined by angiographic features in all patients, which were not significantly different between the two groups (P = 0.127), and pseudoaneurysm was the most common. The embolic material and number of coils used for TAE were significantly different between the two groups (P < 0.001), but the embolization was technically successful in all patients. The clinical success rate of the first embolization was 100% in group 1 vs. 84.2% in group 2. The overall clinical success rate of TAE was 100% in all patients. The complication rate was 63.6% in group 1 vs. 68.4% in group 2 (P = 1.000). CONCLUSION CT was useful in diagnosing hemobilia, and angiograms enabled determination of the bleeding source. Pseudoaneurysm was one of the most common angiographic features. TAE was successfully performed with different embolic materials on the basis of the iatrogenic cause and bleeding location. PMID:27328719

  6. The Nature and Extent of Body Image Concerns Among Surgically Treated Patients with Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fingeret, Michelle Cororve; Yuan, Ying; Urbauer, Diana; Weston, June; Nipomnick, Summer; Weber, Randal

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to describe body image concerns for surgically treated patients with head and neck cancer and evaluate the relationship between body image concerns and quality of life outcomes. Methods Data were obtained from 280 patients undergoing surgical treatment for head and neck cancer. We used a cross-sectional design and obtained data from individuals at different time points relative to initiation of surgical treatment. Participants completed the Body Image Scale, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy scale – Head and Neck version, and a survey designed for this study to evaluate disease-specific body image issues, satisfaction with care regarding body image issues, and interest in psychosocial intervention. Results Body image concerns were prevalent in the majority of participants with 75% acknowledging concerns or embarrassment about one or more types of bodily changes at some point during treatment. Significant associations were found between body image concerns and all major domains of quality of life. Age, gender, cancer type, time since surgery, and body image variables were significantly associated with psychosocial outcomes. A clear subset of participants expressed dissatisfaction with care received about body image issues and/or indicated they would have liked additional resources to help them cope with body image changes. Conclusions These data provide useful information to document wide-ranging body image difficulties for this population and provide important targets for the development of relevant psychosocial interventions. PMID:21706673

  7. Lubricin in human breast tissue expander capsules.

    PubMed

    Cheriyan, Thomas; Guo, Lifei; Orgill, Dennis P; Padera, Robert F; Schmid, Thomas M; Spector, Myron

    2012-10-01

    Capsular contraction is the most common complication of breast reconstruction surgery. While presence of the contractile protein alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) is considered among the causes of capsular contraction, the exact etiology and pathophysiology is not fully understood. The objective of this study was to investigate the possible role of lubricin in capsular formation and contraction by determining the presence and distribution of the lubricating protein lubricin in human breast tissue expander capsules. Related aims were to evaluate select histopathologic features of the capsules, and the percentage of cells expressing α-SMA, which reflects the myofibroblast phenotype. Capsules from tissue expanders were obtained from eight patients. Lubricin, at the tissue-implant interface, in the extracellular matrix, and in cells, and α-SMA-containing cells were evaluated immunohistochemically. The notable finding was that lubricin was identified in all tissue expander capsules: as a discrete layer at the tissue-implant interface, extracellular, and intracellular. There was a greater amount of lubricin in the extracellular matrix in the intimal-subintimal zone when compared with the tissue away from the implant. Varying degrees of synovial metaplasia were seen at the tissue-implant interface. α-SMA-containing cells were also seen in all but one patient. The findings might help us better understand factors involved in capsule formation.

  8. Multi-observation PET image analysis for patient follow-up quantitation and therapy assessment

    PubMed Central

    David, Simon; Visvikis, Dimitris; Roux, Christian; Hatt, Mathieu

    2011-01-01

    In Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging, an early therapeutic response is usually characterized by variations of semi-quantitative parameters restricted to maximum SUV measured in PET scans during the treatment. Such measurements do not reflect overall tumour volume and radiotracer uptake variations. The proposed approach is based on multi-observation image analysis for merging several PET acquisitions to assess tumour metabolic volume and uptake variations. The fusion algorithm is based on iterative estimation using stochastic expectation maximization (SEM) algorithm. The proposed method was applied to simulated and clinical follow-up PET images. We compared the multi-observation fusion performance to threshold-based methods, proposed for the assessment of the therapeutic response based on functional volumes. On simulated datasets, the adaptive threshold applied independently on both images led to higher errors than the ASEM fusion and on the clinical datasets, it failed to provide coherent measurements for four patients out of seven due to aberrant delineations. The ASEM method demonstrated improved and more robust estimation of the evaluation leading to more pertinent measurements. Future work will consist in extending the methodology and applying it to clinical multi-tracers datasets in order to evaluate its potential impact on the biological tumour volume definition for radiotherapy applications. PMID:21846937

  9. Advanced expander test bed program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riccardi, D. P.; Mitchell, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Expander Test Bed (AETB) is a key element in NASA's Space Chemical Engine Technology Program for development and demonstration of expander cycle oxygen/hydrogen engine and advanced component technologies applicable to space engines as well as launch vehicle upper stage engines. The AETB will be used to validate the high-pressure expander cycle concept, investigate system interactions, and conduct investigations of advanced mission focused components and new health monitoring techniques in an engine system environment. The split expander cycle AETB will operate at combustion chamber pressures up to 1200 psia with propellant flow rates equivalent to 20,000 lbf vacuum thrust. Contract work began 27 Apr. 1990. During 1992, a major milestone was achieved with the review of the final design of the oxidizer turbopump in Sep. 1992.

  10. Regional myocardial velocity imaged by magnetic resonance in patients with ischaemic heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Karwatowski, S P; Mohiaddin, R H; Yang, G Z; Firmin, D N; St John Sutton, M; Underwood, S R

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the pattern of global and regional left ventricular long axis motion during early diastole in patients with ischaemic heart disease with and without myocardial infarction using magnetic resonance velocity mapping. DESIGN--Prospective study of 26 patients with a history of myocardial infarction (age 29-78, mean 55 years) and 21 patients with coronary artery disease without infarction (age range 39-71, mean 58 years). Values were compared with a control group (19 controls, age 35-76, mean 52 years) with a low likelihood of cardiovascular disease. RESULTS--Regional long axis velocity varied with time and position around the ventricle. All measurements were taken at the time of maximum early diastolic long axis velocity. Patients with coronary artery disease without infarction had lower values for maximum (mean (SD)) (99 (30) v 125 (33) mm/s, P < 0.05) and mean peak early diastolic wall motion (63 (13) v 82 (22) mm/s, P < 0.05) than controls. The coefficient of variation showed greater inhomogeneity of relaxation in patients than in controls (38 (18)% v 27 (10)%). All values were lower in patients with previous infarction than in patients with coronary artery disease without infarction and normal subjects. In patients with previous myocardial infarction the maximum (mean (SD)) early diastolic velocity was 80 (22) mm/s (P < 0.01 compared with controls and P < 0.05 compared with patients without infarction) and the mean (SD) velocity was 47 (18) mm/s (P < 0.01 compared with controls). The coefficient of variation was greater (52 (33)%) than for controls (P < 0.05) and patients with coronary artery disease without infarction. 18 of 26 patients with previous myocardial infarction and 13 of 21 patients with coronary artery disease without infarction had regional abnormalities corresponding to areas of fixed or reversible ischaemia on exercise electrocardiography or thallium myocardial perfusion tomography. CONCLUSIONS--Magnetic resonance velocity

  11. Transit Dosimetry for Patient Treatment Verification with an Electronic Portal Imaging Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Sean L.

    The complex and individualized photon fluence patterns constructed during intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning must be verified before they are delivered to the patient. There is a compelling argument for additional verification throughout the course of treatment due to the possibility of data corruption, unintentional modification of the plan parameters, changes in patient anatomy, errors in patient alignment, and even mistakes in identifying the correct patient for treatment. Amorphous silicon (aSi) Electronic Portal Imaging Devices (EPIDs) can be utilized for IMRT verification. The goal of this thesis is to implement EPID transit dosimetry, measurement of the dose at a plane behind the patient during their treatment, within the clinical process. In order to achieve this goal, a number of the EPID's dosimetric shortcomings were studied and subsequently resolved. Portal dose images (PDIs) acquired with an aSi EPID suffer from artifacts related to radiation backscattered asymmetrically from the EPID support structure. This backscatter signal varies as a function of field size (FS) and location on the EPID. Its presence can affect pixel values in the measured PDI by up to 3.6%. Two methods to correct for this artifact are offered: discrete FS specific correction matrices and a single generalized equation. The dosimetric comparison between the measured and predicted through-air dose images for 49 IMRT treatment fields was significantly improved (p << .001) after the application of these FS specific backscatter corrections. The formulation of a transit dosimetry algorithm followed the establishment of the backscatter correction and a confirmation of the EPID's positional stability with linac gantry rotation. A detailed characterization of the attenuation, scatter, and EPID response behind an object in the beam's path is necessary to predict transit PDIs. In order to validate the algorithm's performance, 49 IMRT fields were delivered to a

  12. Chest imaging features of patients afflicted with Influenza A (H1N1) in a Malaysian tertiary referral centre

    PubMed Central

    Bux, SI; Mohd. Ramli, N; Ahmad Sarji, S; Kamarulzaman, A

    2010-01-01

    This is a retrospective descriptive study of the chest imaging findings of 118 patients with confirmed A(H1N1) in a tertiary referral centre. About 42% of the patients had positive initial chest radiographic (CXR) findings. The common findings were bi-basal air-space opacities and perihilar reticular and alveolar infiltrates. In select cases, high-resolution computed tomography (CT) imaging showed ground-glass change with some widespread reticular changes and atelectasis. PMID:21611071

  13. Functional brain abnormalities localized in 55 chronic tinnitus patients: fusion of SPECT coincidence imaging and MRI

    PubMed Central

    Farhadi, Mohammad; Mahmoudian, Saeid; Saddadi, Fariba; Karimian, Ali Reza; Mirzaee, Mohammad; Ahmadizadeh, Majid; Ghasemikian, Khosro; Gholami, Saeid; Ghoreyshi, Esmaeel; Beyty, Saeid; Shamshiri, Ahmadreza; Madani, Sedighe; Bakaev, Valery; Moradkhani, Seddighe; Raeisali, Gholamreza

    2010-01-01

    Tinnitus is often defined as the perception of sounds or noise in the absence of any external auditory stimuli. The pathophysiology of subjective idiopathic tinnitus remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the functional brain activities and possible involved cerebral areas in subjective idiopathic tinnitus patients by means of single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) coincidence imaging, which was fused with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this cross-sectional study, 56 patients (1 subject excluded) with subjective tinnitus and 8 healthy controls were enrolled. After intravenous injection of 5 mCi F18-FDG (fluorodeoxyglucose), all subjects underwent a brain SPECT coincidence scan, which was then superimposed on their MRIs. In the eight regions of interest (middle temporal, inferotemporal, medial temporal, lateral temporal, temporoparietal, frontal, frontoparietal, and parietal areas), the more pronounced values were represented in medial temporal, inferotemporal, and temporoparietal areas, which showed more important proportion of associative auditory cortices in functional attributions of tinnitus than primary auditory cortex. Brain coincidence SPECT scan, when fused on MRI is a valuable technique in the assessment of patients with tinnitus and could show the significant role of different regions of central nervous system in functional attributions of tinnitus. PMID:20068582

  14. Functional brain abnormalities localized in 55 chronic tinnitus patients: fusion of SPECT coincidence imaging and MRI.

    PubMed

    Farhadi, Mohammad; Mahmoudian, Saeid; Saddadi, Fariba; Karimian, Ali Reza; Mirzaee, Mohammad; Ahmadizadeh, Majid; Ghasemikian, Khosro; Gholami, Saeid; Ghoreyshi, Esmaeel; Beyty, Saeid; Shamshiri, Ahmadreza; Madani, Sedighe; Bakaev, Valery; Moradkhani, Seddighe; Raeisali, Gholamreza

    2010-04-01

    Tinnitus is often defined as the perception of sounds or noise in the absence of any external auditory stimuli. The pathophysiology of subjective idiopathic tinnitus remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the functional brain activities and possible involved cerebral areas in subjective idiopathic tinnitus patients by means of single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) coincidence imaging, which was fused with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this cross-sectional study, 56 patients (1 subject excluded) with subjective tinnitus and 8 healthy controls were enrolled. After intravenous injection of 5 mCi F18-FDG (fluorodeoxyglucose), all subjects underwent a brain SPECT coincidence scan, which was then superimposed on their MRIs. In the eight regions of interest (middle temporal, inferotemporal, medial temporal, lateral temporal, temporoparietal, frontal, frontoparietal, and parietal areas), the more pronounced values were represented in medial temporal, inferotemporal, and temporoparietal areas, which showed more important proportion of associative auditory cortices in functional attributions of tinnitus than primary auditory cortex. Brain coincidence SPECT scan, when fused on MRI is a valuable technique in the assessment of patients with tinnitus and could show the significant role of different regions of central nervous system in functional attributions of tinnitus.

  15. MR imaging analysis of posterior pituitary in patients with pituitary adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shousen; Lin, Kunzhe; Xiao, Deyong; Zhao, Lin; Qin, Yong; Wei, Liangfeng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study is to investigate posterior pituitary bright spot (PPBS) occurrence, distribution and its influencing factors by analyzing MRI-T1WI images in patients with pituitary adenoma (PA). Methods: A total of 123 cases of PA patients were enrolled in this study. PPBS occurrence, distribution and MR signal characteristics were studied. The relationship of PPBS with PA morphology, tumor size, tumor height and immunohistochemical types were explored. Results: Among the 123 case of PA patients enrolled in the study, 98 cases were PPBS (+) and 25 cases were PPBS (-). According to tumor morphology, PA was divided into hourglass type (43 cases), barrel type (63 cases) and wedge type (17 cases). Occurrence rate of PPBS (+) in barrel type was less than those in hourglass and wedge types (P < 0.05). Tumor volume and height in PPBS (+) group were less than these in PPBS (-) group (P < 0.05). PPBS signal size in wedge and barrel types were larger than that of hourglass type (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Sagittal MRI-T1WI images could well show posterior pituitary and PPBS (+) was related to tumor morphology, volume and height but had nothing to do with immunohistochemical types. PMID:26221310

  16. In vivo molecular imaging of chemokine receptor CXCR4 expression in patients with advanced multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Philipp-Abbrederis, Kathrin; Herrmann, Ken; Knop, Stefan; Schottelius, Margret; Eiber, Matthias; Lückerath, Katharina; Pietschmann, Elke; Habringer, Stefan; Gerngroß, Carlos; Franke, Katharina; Rudelius, Martina; Schirbel, Andreas; Lapa, Constantin; Schwamborn, Kristina; Steidle, Sabine; Hartmann, Elena; Rosenwald, Andreas; Kropf, Saskia; Beer, Ambros J; Peschel, Christian; Einsele, Hermann; Buck, Andreas K; Schwaiger, Markus; Götze, Katharina; Wester